Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
UF00028315:03462

Full Text

Night after heartbreak, Rays seek redemption /B1 ea
_______ CHECK
f^ I T B ii ,i 9P1 4 E I II U TI WIT CHAD


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 263


LOCAL NEWS:


Boat bash
Boaters celebrate
county's maritime
history./Page A3
COMMENTARY:
Achievers
Publisher
Gerry
Mulligan
writes ,
about the
county's
top
students.
/Page C1

BUSINESS:


PR pro
The Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center
public relations
coordinator wins an
award./Page Dl
HOMEFRONT:


Yard update
What's up with the
winner of Citrus
County's "ugliest
backyard" makeover
contest?/Page E9

USA WEEKEND:
USA WEEKEND






Bczuity -_
Anti-aging
"The Doctors" bust
eight common anti-
aging myths./Inside


Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................ D4
Crossword ............... A12
Editorial ................. ... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A12
Obituaries ................A6
Together................... A18
Veterans ........ A14


6 I!tB I Io200711


Ii ".- :1 '












SCAMP
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Commercial grouper fisherman Captain Kirby Klys prepares his boat, Scamp, for a recent trip into the Gulf of
Mexico to catch highly sought-after sport fish. Unpredictable weather and unpredictable fish are two stressors
that are impossible to control. His 37-foot boat will be his home for eight to 10 days while offshore.


Soldier encounters culture clash


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
BEVERLY HILLS Your body being
on alert even while you sleep.
Being far away from home, in a coun-
try with unfamiliar customs and lan-
guage, with temperatures higher (and
lower) than you're used to back home.
Knowing that your family misses you,
and you miss them; knowing that they
fear for your safety
Having to carry a gun, having to know
how to use it, being reminded that you
may have to use it one day
Although U.S. Army Specialist Bryan
Trefry, 20, is not a combat soldier, dur-
ing his recent tour in Afghanistan as a
cargo specialist, he still carried a
weapon, still experienced the stress that
comes with being a soldier in a war
zone.
"What was most stressful for me was
working in a totally different atmos-
phere and culture with a totally differ-
ent type of people," he said while home
on leave to see his family in Citrus
County recently
His job involved exporting cargo out
See Page A5


AC-

-.?(2
i ir L'yiy


^
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
U.S. Army Specialist Bryan Trefry, 20,
left, and his younger brother Joseph
Wickson walk the halls of Forest Ridge
Elementary School recently.


2014 TOP 10
MOST
STRESSFUL
JOBS
The following
are the top 10
most stressful
jobs in 2014,
according to the
CareerCast.com
Jobs Rated report:
* Enlisted military
personnel
- Military general
SFirefighter
* Airline pilot
^ Event coordinator
- Public relations
executive
* Corporate
executive (senior)
* Newspaper
reporter
* Police officer
*< Taxi driver


p










Commercial

fisherman

knows strain
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
6 yen before com-
mercial
grouper fisher-
man Kirby
Klys drops his
line into the Gulf waters
60 to 120 miles from
shore, he's loaded his
boat with 4,000 pounds of
ice.
He's packed the boat
with enough supplies for
the 10 days he'll be out in
open water He's chosen
- hopefully a compati-
ble crew person and he's
prayed for good weather
"The allure of commer-
cial fishing is being out
on the water, watching
the sunsets and dolphins
swim by," he says.
Even so, he says if he
knew when he started
what he knows now he'd
probably be a certified
nursing assistant in a
hospital instead.
At 60, Klys has been
doing this for the past
18 years.
April is National Stress
Awareness Month, and
the job of a commercial
fisherman can be counted
among the most stressful.
According to the Ameri-
can Institute of Stress, job
stress is the major source
of stress for Americans
today However, it's not
necessarily the job itself
that causes the most
stress, although some jobs
are more stressful than
others, but the "person-
environment fit."
Some people thrive in
a pressure cooker or in
the fast lane, multi-
tasking and making split-
second decisions. For
them, a quiet, routine,
slow-paced job would
send their stress level ris-
ing through the roof.
"The primary stress in
the Gulf of Mexico for
commercial fishermen is
as much psychological as
See Page A5


If'stressed is just desserts spelled backwards,' then pass the cupcakes


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


irst, a disclaimer: I
love my job.
Other than profes-
sional cupcake taster or
someone who gets paid to
sit on a beach somewhere,
I wouldn't want to do any-
thing else.
I love listening to peo-
ple's stories and then
retelling them in print. I
love crafting sentences,
slipping in a fun or sur-
prising word or phrase,


purposefully breaking the
rules of grammar
OK, disclaimer's over
Now let me tell you about
stress.
When I told Sharon
Skeele-Hogan, Inverness
special event director,
about this "stressful jobs"
project I was working on,
she asked, "Who's going to
write about you?"
So here goes. Here's my
take on the stress of being


a newspaper reporter
The newspaper comes
out every single day, which
is a good thing. But it
comes out Every Single.
Day That means we have
to have stories and photos
to fill the pages. Daily
I call it "feeding the
beast." The editor (who is
not at all beastly; he's actu-
ally a very nice guy) comes
around daily with his clip-
board and asks, "Whatcha


got for tomorrow's paper?"
Sometimes I'll look at
him and lament, "But I had
five stories in today's
paper!"
He'll smile and say, "I
know Whatcha got for
tomorrow?"
Once upon a time, we
had 10 or so reporters and
three photographers on
beast-feeding duty, but
See Page A8


. . ..B....




CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Two community band perform
SIw compos *i* n away from the strict classi- Beauty and Love" from his
o ws include w compostOn cal adherence to form. "Teutonic Tales," per-
Beginning with the formed by NCCB tuba
Special to the Chronicle Sunday, May 4, at the Cor- "Overture to Russian and soloist Dylan Jones.
nerstone Baptist Church, Ludmilla" (Mikhail Also, the NCCB will pre-
The Nature Coast Comn- 1100 W Highland Ave., Glinka), the program offers miere a new composition
munity Band, under the di- Inverness. selections by Stravinsky titled "Pictures" by NCCB
reaction of conductor Cindy Narrated by Doreen ("The Firebird"), Tchai- clarinetist and composer
Hazzard, will present two Morgan, the program high- kovsky ("Pezzo in Forma di Nancy Fiurman. "Pictures"
productions of"Romanza" lights music of the Roman- Sonatina"), Moussorgsky themes are taken from
on May 3 and 4. tic Era. The romantic ("Gopak" from "The Fair Modest Moussorgsky's
The first performance is composers succeeded in At Sorochinski"), Offen- "Pictures At An
scheduled at 2:30 p.m. Sat- expressing their feelings, bach ("Overture to Or- Exhibition."
urday, May 3, at the Citrus externalizing their pheus" in the The program also in-
Springs Community Cen- dreams, sharing their ec- "Underworld") and Liszt eludes "Krakowiak" by
ter, 1570 W Citrus Springs stasies and shouting their ("Friska from Hungarian Glinka and "Scenes From
Blvd., Citrus Springs, and triumphs. They moved Rhapsody No. 2"). Old Russia," with excerpts
the second performance is music into individualism A special treat will be from Tchaikovsky and
scheduled at 2:30 p.m. and self-expression and Smith's "Freya: Goddess of Moussorgsky pieces. The


KNEE PAIN? 7i..

MIR...Save

1 0,.- Energv&

Save Money



_old windows with
Attend a FREE Seminar: new vinyl framed

T s ,a 2 replacement windows.
Lecanto Installing PGT Energy Star rated
HolidayInn press windows is a great way to do so!
903 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. "317 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: r Blackshears
1-888-685-1594 (toll free) Bacsears
www.LargoMedical.com Aluminum Inc
^ -- :-,_," -' A um In


* Largo Medical Center
A Teaching Hospital
FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


1111 1 I] II il ; 112 III | I I l tJ[ 1
Hwy. 44, Crystal River
I 795-9722
Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 ToI Free)
www.blackshears.com 1-888-474-2269


dances slated
program offers a wide va- go to the website www
riety of expressive and naturecoastcommunity
dramatic music, band.com or call 352-601-
The 75 volunteer musi- 7394.
cians of the Nature Coast All NCCB concerts are
Community Band re- free of admission charge;
hearse weekly in the band is supported by
Inverness. donations from NCCB
For more information on Friends and sales of the
performing with this band, seven NCCB CDs.


.i '!'M. Introductorio Pry ds- .S
',euay, thru Sunday 6OO-11:O Om t:0
,-EARLY'BIRDS TUE., WED., THURS. 3:OO:OOUP.
,. Reservations AeJ
.our FULL menu 41 wwww.to
"63 north Citrus Ave., Crystal it.
S352-564-0



..* Faux Wood
y .... i Blinds

~T treatments
N- Drapery
# Shades
".... Shutters
Verticals





Q 72 HOUR
BLIND FACTORY
1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTI 0 -
www.72-hourblinds.com 5 0 0 -15" 2


a








SwetaySupemake' 0s*oig aa. u ub s her for0ou-reay o*6lve

th-otsanig. eric, uliyan0svng w* r 0on or W iv 0eyo t@cm
dicoerwh ormay oyleusoerloetshpee.Whpeoseyuson


0o *n te l0ss6 Pu'i 0vsi- 0lx-O /sor rscan this cd.-. 0


0 6 -I S S 64 [3


1x

0C
0 [3


ratfer.7


A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


LOCAL






Page A3 -SUNDAY, APRIL 27,2014 fl



TATE2&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


It


Around the

COUNTY

S.W. Democrats to
meet May 3
The Southwest Citrus
Democratic Club will meet
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
May 3, in the Sugarmill
Woods Country Club,
1 Douglas St., Homosassa.
DeeVon Quirolo, the re-
gional coordinator for the
coalition Sunshine State
Clean Energy Solutions, will
be the guest speaker.
Light refreshments will be
served. For meeting infor-
mation, email swcdems
@gmail.com or call 352-
382-0032.
For information about the
Sunshine State Clean En-
ergy Solutions coalition and
its efforts, go to www.
sunshinestatecleanenergy
coalition.org/
Meek to have town
hall meeting
County Commissioner
Joe Meek will have a town
hall meeting, sponsored by
the Citrus Springs Civic As-
sociation, at 7 p.m. Monday,
May 19, at the Citrus
Springs Community Center.
Meek and Assistant Pub-
lic Works Director Larry
Brock will be addressing is-
sues specific to the Citrus
Springs area, such as road
resurfacing, the installation
of the Sabal gas pipeline,
and future plans for the
Suncoast Parkway.
All citizens are welcome
to attend and refreshments
will be available.
For questions, please
contact Janet Herrmann of
the Citrus Springs Civic As-
sociation at 352-465-5920.
Want foster pets?
Get trained for free
Citrus County Animal
Services invites residents to
attend an information and
training session about be-
coming a foster home for
shelter animals.
The training will be from
10 a.m. to noon Wednes-
day, April 30, at the Citrus
County Canning Center,
3405 W. Southern St.,
Lecanto (off County Road
491 and State Road 44).
RSVP to Billie Lombardo,
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices volunteer coordinator,
at billie.lombardo@bocc.
citrus.fl.us or call 352-
746-8408.
Humanitarians grand
opening May 3
The Humanitarians of
Florida Inc. invites mem-
bers of the public to cele-
brate the grand opening of
its new Manchester House
Clinic from 1 to 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, May 3. The new
clinic is at 1031 Com-
merce Terrace, Lecanto,
formerly the Serenity Day
Spa.
Pet owners will have an
opportunity to have their
pets' portraits painted on
the clinic's exterior wall by
Lorraine of Lorraine's Pet
Portraits. The money raised
will benefit SnippetCitrus
and Suncoast Service
Dogs. Refreshments will be
available.

-From staff reports


City to consider manager's contract


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
City officials will be pre-
sented with a contract
agreement with the city's
public works director to
make him the city man-
ager this summer
The current city man-
ager, Andy Houston, an-
nounced his retirement
March 31 after eight years
at the helm.
Houston's last day is
July 18.
During the city coun-
cil's previous meeting on
April 14, council mem-
bers voted 5-0 to author-
ize Houston to enter into
employment negotiations


with Dave Burnell, the
current public works
director.
The draft agreement be-
tween Houston and Bur-
nell does not include
salary for the position.
According to officials,
the city council which
meets Monday evening -
will have to develop salary
parameters based on cur-
rent market value.
The rest of the deal
includes:
Health and life insur-
ance.
The city would con-
tinue to pay a dollar
amount into a 401(a) ac-
count.
Annual leave of 160
hours.


A monthly car al-
lowance of $250. Mileage
traveled outside a 50-mile
radius of the city will be
reimbursed at the stan-
dard IRS rate.
Burnell would be eli-
gible for 20 weeks of sev-
erance if terminated
without just cause; there
is also a provision where
Burnell would be eligible
for severance pay if he re-
signed at the request of a
majority of council mem-
bers in lieu of being
terminated.
The deal is for an in-
definite period.
Also as an alternative
to being required to live
within the city limits, Bur-
nell would have the option


of residing in the unincor-
porated area directly on
the shoreline of King's Bay
because Burnell has an ac-
tive bid outstanding on a
house outside of the city
limits, and limitations on
the houses that meet his
needs due to the size of his
boat. Burnell currently
lives on a boat in King's
Bay
U Burnell would be in-
demnified for legal actions
arising from his duties as
city manager, with certain
conditions.
Also Monday the council
will consider, among other
things: the Three Sisters
Springs Management Plan
quarterly report; a con-
tract award to Insituform


Technologies LLC for tele-
vising, cleaning and relin-
ing approximately 3,905
linear feet of sanitary
sewer pipe; and the ap-
pointment of a city
representative to the
Springs Coast Steering
Committee.
In its capacity as the
Community Redevelop-
ment Agency, the panel
will hear about proposed
incentives for Waterfront
District Development from
consultant Tom Kohler of
Real Estate Research
Consultants.
Contact Chronicle
reporter A.B. Sidibe at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


Boats bring history ashore

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER History is rich
throughout Citrus County; however, it must
be told and received.
Dressed in a straw hat and suspenders,
Bill Whalen, secretary of the Crystal River
Boat Builders, told colorful tales Saturday
at the fifth annual Crystal River Boat Bash
of how life was when small, wooden boats
were the main source of transportation for
goods and services.
At Crystal River Preserve State Park, he
spoke about how a mullet skiffwas used in
Crystal River's big fishing industry. Thee
fish houses had steam-engine boats; how-
ever, most of the fisherman owned mullet
skiffs.
"When they tried to get out to the fishing
grounds and back, they
would be destroyed,"
Whalen explained. "There-
fore, the fishing houses
"::: ~took their power boats and _. __
Stowed out a dozen of these '
For more mullet skiffs in the morn- au i
photos, click ing. They'd fish and come
on this story at
owww.cts ronicler in at the next tide and sell Pr ,
As he revealed history,
Whalen emphasized that every wooden
small craft was unique and useful to the
fishing industry of Citrus County.
That was also the message that boat-
building groups such as Crystal River Boat
Builders were displaying Saturday
"There are so many people here in the
county who don't understand the local his-
tory and how it adds value to life here,"
said Steve Kingery, Crystal River Boat
Builders president. 'As you know more
about the county and the history, you will
enjoy it more and take care of it better"
A feature of the Boat Bash was the com-
pleted Civil War-era sailing scow, "Spirit,"
and its tugboat "Kingfisher" The scow is a
replica of the USS Wartappo and has taken
two years to complete.
In conjunction with the Boat Bash, anOW
Earth Day Extravaganza presented by
the Friends of Crystal River State Parks -
included vendors, displays and boat rides.
"We wanted to raise awareness of the
marine heritage here on the west coast of L
Florida and how to protect it," said John
Roberts, president of Friends of Crystal
River State Parks. "Virtually everyone on
the west of Florida has something to do
with boats. I always joke that either you
own a boat, used to own a boat, married CRYSTAL
someone who owns a boat, killed someone
who owns a boat or you have been divorced
because of a boat. Boats were important
during the non-power age as roads were
nonexistent until railroads. We are trying STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
to get people to understand that and the The main attraction at this year's Boat Bash on Saturday at Crystal River Preserve State
roots of their boat mania. Buying a boat is Park was the replica of the Civil War-era scow "Spirit," which was completed and had its
wonderful, but it is better to understand maiden voyage in March after two and a half years of planning and construction. The
the history and safety of boating for both Crystal River Boat Builders recruited professional and amateur volunteers, who built the
humans and the marine life." sailing scow using mid-19th-century technology.


Fun at Summer Safety Expo


Colby
Reynolds,
5, takes a
turn behind
the wheel
of a fire
truck
Saturday
at the
Sheriff's
Summer
Safety
Expo at the
Citrus
County
Auditorium.
For more
photos
from the
event, go
to www.
chronicle
online.com.
LOGAN MOSBY
/Chronicle


Marine Science Station


to host summer camps


Chronicle

The Citrus County
School District's Ma-
rine Science Station
in Crystal River is
hosting weeklong
summer camps for
middle school and
high school students
in Citrus, Hernando
and Marion counties.
Camp Citrus is spon-
sored in part by the
Southwest Florida
Water Management
District.
Students will ex-
plore springs, rivers,
estuaries and the


Gulf of Mexico
aboard Marine Sci-
ence Station boats
with certified teach-
ers and boat cap-
tains. Students lodge
overnight and eat
meals at the Marine
Science Station dur-
ing the entire week of
Camp Citrus. Stu-
dents are supervised
24 hours per day by
certified teachers
and staff in a
safe and secure
environment.
The dates for Mid-
dle School Camp Cit-
rus are June 9


through 13 and June
23 through 27.
The dates for High
School Camp Citrus
are June 16
through 20.
The cost per stu-
dent is only $249 and
the deadline for ap-
plications is May 9.
Need-based partial
scholarships may be
available for students
who qualify
To apply, go to
www.citrus.kl2.fl.us/
mss or call the Ma-
rine Science Station
at 352-795-4393.


4




A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday This will be an engaging
year for you. Your finances will take an
upward swing.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Interac-
tion with people in authoritative or offi-
cial capacities will lead to problems.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Get in-
volved in an environmentally or socially
conscious group. While your input and
enthusiasm are valuable, you must let
others have their say as well.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Little
changes you make at home will prove
rewarding. Avoid meddling or picking
sides in an argument. Keep your com-
posure and your distance.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your inquisi-
tive nature will result in an interesting
travel opportunity. You will be able to
learn a great deal about other people
by researching different cultures.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep a
close eye on your cash. Charity begins
at home, so don't donate to a cause
you know little about. Generosity will
impress the wrong person.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Now is not
the time to bring up past disagreements.
You may not see eye-to-eye with some-
one, but you must at least consider the
changes that are suggested.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Collabo-
ration and joint ventures will benefit
you. Show how valuable you can be,
but be sure to give credit where credit
is due. Celebrate victory as a group.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Con-
tinue to improve your self-image.
Whether it is a fitness program, diet
plan or some other activity, take posi-
tive steps toward your chosen goal.
Your perseverance will pay off.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Pur-
sue some solitary activities today. Rel-
atives and friends will not be
sympathetic to your difficulties.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) It's time
for an excursion. Check out interesting
local attractions or go for a short, un-
planned adventure. Your wanderlust
will take you somewhere interesting.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If finan-
cial independence is what you are
looking for, you will need to start by in-
vesting wisely, setting a budget and re-
ducing spending.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You may
have a problem avoiding trouble. Burn
up all of your excess energy engaging
in creative, constructive endeavors.
Consider getting rid of stuff you no
longer need.


ENTERTAINMENT


Fans celebrate film
at Lebowski Fest
LOS ANGELES There
were bowling pins, bathrobes,
white Russians, and even The
Dude himself.
Jeff Bridges and his band
performed Friday at Lebowski
Fest, but Joel and Ethan
Coen's 1998 campy crime com-
edy "The Big Lebowski" was still
the night's biggest star.
Fans of the Raymond
Chandler-flavored film filled the
Wiltern Theater in midtown Los
Angeles to capacity for the an-
nual celebration of the cult clas-
sic, which has been staged
around the country since 2002.
The two-day festival continued
Saturday with a costumed bowl-
ing party.
The Wiltern Theater was dec-
orated with inflatable bowling
pins and the drink menu fea-
tured white Russians re-
named Wiltern Caucasians,
perhaps in political protest-
"made with Ralphs half-and-
half." The film opens with the
Dude writing a check for
69 cents to buy half-and-half
from a Ralphs supermarket to
make his favorite cocktail.
Diggers find 'E.T.'
games in landfill
ALAMOGORDO, N.M.--A
documentary film production
company has found buried in a
New Mexico landfill hundreds of
the Atari "E.T." game cartridges
that some call the worst video
game ever made.
Film director Zak Penn
showed one "ET." cartridge re-
trieved from the dumpsite and
says there are hundreds more
mixed in the mounds of trash
and dirt scooped by a backhoe.
Fuel Entertainment is produc-
ing a documentary about the
search.
The video game's commercial


Associated Press
Jeff Bridges performs onstage Friday with his band the Abiders
at the Lebowski Fest in Los Angeles.


failure was partially responsible
for the demise of Atari in the
early 1980s.
The contents of the "Atari
Grave" have become urban leg-
end, with blog posts speculating
about millions of cartridges and
other Atari projects buried there.
A spokeswoman for Atari said
the company changed hands
many times since 1983 and
does not know what is buried
there.
Hawaii thinks
twice on ukulele
HONOLULU Sorry, ukulele.
Hawaii won't spurn the steel gui-
tar to sound its love for you.
Bills in the state Legislature
that would've declared the
friendly little guitar the official in-
strument of Hawaii both died


near the end of the legislative
session.
The measures easily passed
the Senate and House earlier
this year, but with differences
that meant more debate. That's
when steel guitar players
stepped in, led by a music
teacher who happens to be the
son of a former U.S. senator.
They argued the instrument born
in Hawaii, showcased in Santo &
Johnny's "Sleepwalk," better rep-
resents the state.
It was enough to reverse the
ukulele's momentum.
Alan Akaka said the steel gui-
tar deserves consideration for
the honor in the future. He ar-
gues the distinctly Hawaiian in-
strument has influenced other
genres.
-From wire reports


CIOus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, April 27, the
117th day of 2014. There are 248
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 27, 1521, Portuguese
explorer Ferdinand Magellan was
killed by natives in the Philippines.
On this date:
In 1509, Pope Julius II placed the
Republic of Venice under an inter-
dict following its refusal to give up
lands claimed by the Papal States.
(The pope lifted the sanction in
February 1510.)
Ten years ago: A ruptured
pipeline began spilling some
100,000 gallons of diesel fuel into
Suisun Bay, east of San Francisco.
Five years ago: A 23-month-old
Mexico City toddler died at Texas
Children's Hospital in Houston, be-
coming the first swine-flu death on
U.S. soil.
One year ago: North Korea an-
nounced that Kenneth Bae, an
American missionary detained for
nearly six months, was being tried
in the Supreme Court on charges of
plotting to overthrow the govern-
ment (Bae was later sentenced to
15 years of hard labor).
Today's Birthdays: Actress
AnoukAimee is 82. Announcer
Casey Kasem is 82. Actress Judy
Came is 75. Rock musician Jim
Keltner is 72. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Cuba Gooding is 70. Singer
Ann Peebles is 67. Rock singer
Kate Pierson (The B-52's) is 66.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Herbie
Murrell (The Stylistics) is 65. Actor
Douglas Sheehan is 65. Rock musi-
cian Ace Frehley is 63. Pop singer
Sheena Easton is 55. Actor James
Le Gros is 52. Rock musician Rob
Squires (Big Head Todd and the
Monsters) is 49. Actor David
Lascher is 42. Rock singer-
musician Travis Meeks (Days of the
New) is 35. Actress Ari Graynor is
31. Rock singer-musician Patrick
Stump (Fall Out Boy) is 30.
Thought for Today: "For those
who do not think, it is best at least
to rearrange their prejudices once
in a while." Luther Burbank,
American horticulturist (1849-1926).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


Daytona Bch. 85
Fort Lauderdale 85
Fort Myers 90
Gainesville 89
Homestead 85
Jacksonville 88
Key West 83
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 85


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Today: Southeast then southwest
winds around 5 to 12 knots. Seas 2
feet or less. Bay and inland waters a
light chop. Tonight: Southwest winds
around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet or less,


18762 0.00- | HAM u.uu
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y

TW.AY &OTOMORyOW MORNING 1
High 861 Low; 6O1
SMostly sunny

I Wq MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
r High:86 Low:631
'" Mostly sunny

- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low. 64'
"-. 'Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 84/67
Record /50
Normal 83W65
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean 1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 000


Gulf water
temperature


78
Taken at Ariptka


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.92 28,99 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.48 38.50 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.69 39.71 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.31 40.33 42.20
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage lor t aks are based on 2_33-year flood.
m e mean-annLual Iii Vhih h ,a N 41 [pne.chmfT of 1 linq R .uajJJt1 o e,.:?ede.J in
any one year, -h5(iala.s Ib'a.r n i... a 5 .jr.T' fnicaaW.ie Madr r.a eni ULI5..-,
and is sutoact oa resion In no eve w the Dislnt or te Urlted S1ales Geoo al Survey
_? iwalye W.y av'T iwaq-. m I o.1 of m sf iof maata. If you have any questions you
snrT.EN. ,.T[,O re HN0,.li.;f;1l Dli .. -! 6 I77211

THE NATION


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m.
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 0.89" oak, hickory, grasses
Total for the year 10.79" Today's count: 4.7/12
Normal for the year 9.88" c 6.
*As o 7 ma riwr Monday's count: 6.3
UV INDEX. 13 Tuesday's count: 6.9
O-2minimal, 3-4 low 5-6mooerale. AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 25
Pollutant: Parttculate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES ..: b
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) AFTERNOON
04/27 SUNDAY 04:43 23:08 17:43 10:40
04/28 MONDAY 05:24 23:59 18:43 11:31
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S e m ............... ...a :02 p.m
lo f^( Th O ............ 6:50 a.m.
/ Y 1 1MO1NRIS TODAY 5 41 amrn
Apr29 May 6 May 14 May 21 M013M.TAY............ 6:41 I p.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MOO. There Is no bum ban.
For mote Infomiahon call Florida Dlveon of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
Informalion on drought colndiions, please vistt Ihae Ovsion of Foresty's Web te:
hltp:tflarnmefl-dl.-conmnire wealhef,4bc
WATERING RULES
Lawn watedring limited to two days per week. before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei on Wedrnesdaary.or Sahurday
Hand waterng with a shut-off nozzle or micro iigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegelable gadene, Iowers anid shrubs, can be done on any cday and at any
lime.
Citrus Countly Uilities' aistomers shoum CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Soupe re. pLantiy may quaidty lo ailddlon 11
walering allowances,
To report violations. please cal: Cli ol invemess0 @ 352-726-2321, Cty Co C rstai
River 3,52 795-421I ef e 313 urlnncororafe' Cilrns County 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chaahowltzka" 6;22am, 0.3 61Bpm. 0.611. 1:056a.m. 0.1 1ft 12:21 p.ro.2fl,
CrysalFllver" 4;43a,m, 8tlt, 4;2Bpm. 23. 1t0:498a.m 0.6fI. 11.33p.rr.l ft
Wilhlacoochee* 2:10a.m. 3.3 It, 1:46 p.i 3.ft :32.m. 0.8 832am 8I- 9:21 pm04 t.
Homosassa"' 5;58a.m. 0.9It. 5:24p.m. t.3ft. 12:49a.m.-0O.1 ft 12;08p.r.3Ht,


^. ,

"' ..." .
-%
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
A'lanliri Cil
Al-N..I &r,,I
Auslin
Baibmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Bosloni
Buffalo
Builngton, VT
Charleston. S.C.
Charleston, W.V.
Charotle
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concom. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
ODalrot
El Paso
Evansvllle, IN
Harisburg
Hartloni
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT
H L Pep. H
59 43 49 56
73 53 64
78 45 81
80 52 83
71 48 .36 65
86 68 92
76 49 63 66
63 49 06 54
82 53 80
45 37 55
47 43 .20 51
47 37 .43 56
48 42 .21 50
e61 58 84
79 41 02 77
79 44 84
57 45 56
80 48 73
59 42 55
77 52 .0277
74 46 .02 65
49 41 .12 52
84 61 88
78 46 52
75 53 68
58 41 56
84 66 75
79 49 79
73 46 .02 63
55 41 .75 57
82 88 86
78 50 71
69 51 76
83 50 81
67 50 06 69
81 49 82
83 52 80
45 40 46
56 37 49
83 64 82
86 57 82
83 45 83


SUN
L Fcst
38 sh
39 pr
56 pc
58 PC
se ts
40 pc
63 ts
45 pc
37 sh
65 ls
33 ts
43 sh
37 pc
36 sh
63 pc
53 pc
60 pc
46 sh
57 pc
41 pc
52 pc
34 sh
58t%
33 r
54 ts
43 pc
53 pc
64 ts
41 pc
39 pc
72 pc
57 tis
57 pc
65 IS
56 s
64 ts
69 ts
38 sh
42 ts
68 ts
65 is
63 ts


SAT SUN
City H L Pcp. H LFcst
New Orleans 82 69 83 70 pc
New YorkCity 67 46 .89 64 44 pc
Nodiolk 77 57 57 65 53 pc
Oklahoma City 90 61 84 51 Is
Omaha 83 45 72 51 ts
PalmSpfngs 75 55 .05 81 60 pc
PhiLadelpNia 71 48 .50 64 45 pe
Phoenix 76 59 80 58 pc
Pitlsbugh 70 42 15 63 44 pc
Portland, ME 48 41 .08 47 37 sh
Porland.OR 57 42 55 43 sh
Providence, AI 47 43 36 54 41 ts
Raleigh 78 49 26 81 56 pc
Rapid Cily 63 42 53 38 ts
Reno 54 39 57 34 pc
Rochesler NY 50 40 20 53 35 pc
Sactamenlo 80 68 67 47 sh
Sal Lake Cty 46 42 .68 52 39 fI
SanAntonio 90 68 96 65 ts
SanDiego 65 56 17 64 58 pc
San Francisco 62 50 59 49 sh
Savannah 82 59 85 64 pC
Seatle 57 42 54 41 sh
Spokane 54 38 50 32 sn
St. Louis 8060 81 66 is
St.S9 Mane 45 33 32 54 32 pc
Syracumse 52 42 .32 53 36 sh
Topeka 79 62 77 51 ts
Washington 78 50 .39 67 50 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
NIHo 100, Zapat, Texas
LOW 21 Mi. Wastiwiro N ,H
WORLD cmnS


SUN
CITY HI/SKY
Acaputco 89t77/s
Amsterdam 6448/pc
Athens 68/59h
Beijing 7151/pc
Berlin 71153/ts
Bermuda 73/6&s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c cloudy; dridzle- Cairo 84I5Ss
Wolain h.hmr, pc.partly cloudy;: rrain; Calgawy 3/24/sn
r.mhVmsnow mix; wumMy s owiMi Havana 8768/s
t=-smlow tsa-undermt w wlewfy Hong Kong 80/73/pc
WSi C014 Jerusalem 80/55/s


Lisbon 64/511pc
London 59/48W
MaOdrid 66142/pc
Mexico Clly77/55Wpc
Montreal 48&39/r
Moscow 5030/pc
Paris 57/44/r
Rio 75/66rs
Rome 71148ft
Sydney 6660,pc
Tokyo Sw5.pc
Toronto 46/33/pc
Warsaw 60/51/r


S LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices...................D8

Miscellaneous Notices........D8

Self Storage Notices............D8

Surplus Property.................D8


CITRULIS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


H L Pcast City


"'.,
''"*s








Event director: 'There's no time for stress'


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS -As special events di-
rector for the city of Inverness, Sharon
Skeele-Hogan describes her job as "herd-
ing cats, juggling continually moving
parts and trying to organize chaos."
For every city event, of which there are
more than 40 each year and growing, she
plans for the worst-case scenario and
hopes for the best.
And she always packs three pairs of
shoes and her iPad in her backpack that
she carries with her everywhere, plus
her phone with an extra battery pack in
her back pocket.
"You can't be stressed," she says.
"There's no time for stress. You can't let it
overtake you. You have to be calm in
order to be rational, in order to make
good choices. The way you do that, you
make sure you have a plan, and if it
means you take your laptop home with
you so you sleep better at night, that's
what you do."
She says most problems work them-
selves out and often no one notices. If
a band is late, there's back-up music.
If a parade entry doesn't show up, oh
well.
If she leaves Sunny Cooter's head at
home, her husband will bring it to her


LOGAN MOSBY/Chronicle
Sharon Skeele-Hogan, special events director for the city of Inverness, makes an
announcement during a Taste of Inverness in Liberty Park on April 12.


"If you're stressed, you'll stress out
everyone around you," she says. "You
have to look like you're having a party. I
was a flight attendant and I know how to


smile."
Skeele-Hogan says she is aware of
stress in her life and is diligent about eat-
ing well, working out at the gym and get-


MORE ABOUT
STRESS
*The job of a
paramedic. -
run into chaos.
Read about
more stressful
jobs./Online
Stress by the
numbers -
what a recent
survey says.
/Online

ting enough sleep. She relies on her hus-
band, who's retired, to take care of things
at home.
"The only thing that's my number one
issue with events is weather, and I can't
stress about it," she says. "You have to
have a positive outlook and a Weather
Bug app, which gives me radar When I'm
dressing for an event, I just plan on get-
ting wet. You just go out and embrace
whatever comes.
"Besides," she says, "our events are
free, so it's not like I have to deal with giv-
ing people their money back."
Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. com.


SOLDIER
Continued from Pag1Al

of Afghanistan and work-
ing side by side with
Afghan nationals.
When you're the for-
eigner, you have to learn



STRAIN
Continued from Page Al

physical," Klys says.
For him and other com-
mercial fishermen, the
stress comes from: long
hours, being away from
home for days at a time,
storms or disruptive
weather events, the repet-
itive nature of the work,
not getting good sleep, ir-
regular eating schedules
and the financial pressure
to catch enough fish to
make a living.
"There's a lot of expense
involved with that boat


the other country's cus-
toms, especially what is
taboo or considered
offensive.
"Trying to talk to them
was difficult," he said.
"They didn't understand
what we were saying and
we didn't understand what
they were saying. Some-


leaving the dock," he says.
"It costs me $1,200 just to
leave."
MEN
Klys' day on the water
begins before dawn.
He likes to begin with a
time of prayer and quiet
reflection and a cup of cof-
fee. He wakes his crew
member; they eat break-
fast, then it's time to find
an area with lots offish. As
they pull them into the
boat, they'll gut the fish
and put them in icy slush.
Hour after hour, day after
day
"What ends a trip is run-
ning out of ice, running out
of fuel or running out of


times we'd yell, but
that doesn't help. That's
just misunderstanding
louder"
He said he and his bud-
dies would relieve stress
by working out at night.
"Some of the guys had
TVs and we'd play video
games," he said. "Being in


bait, or a weather event,"
Klys says, adding that he
doesn't view bad weather
as a stressor He uses it as
down time to relax and
read a book.
"If you're doing this as a
job to pay your mortgage,
then you have to perform,"
he says. "You have to be
prepared to work in most
weather conditions, and if
there's a storm, it might
mean you add another day
or two to your trip out."
Then when the fisher-
man returns home, he has
a family and a house to
deal with, which have
stresses of a different
nature.


the military, you get used
to always having to be
early and then waiting, al-
ways making sure that
everything's perfect.
That's definitely stressful."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


"I would not have done
this when I had young kids
at home," Klys says.
"There's not a lot of re-
cruitment, not many
younger people coming
into this business, mostly
for financial reasons. It's
expensive up front, and a
highly regulated business.
The government tells you
how much you're allowed
to take out of the Gulf.
"It's long hours and low
pay and you don't sleep as
well at sea as you do in your
own bed," he says. "But
some things in life have a
natural attraction, and fish-
ing is one of them. And the
sunsets are beautiful."


r Experience
The Difference



i If you have been to
another dentist and
would like a second
S'1 opinion about your
' ~ treatment, bring your
"'" xrays and I will do a
; .- complete evaluation
I i, and develop a
S; treatment plan
,,, , ,,",. / with you that fits
-'i-',,.., you and your needs.
5ST/ HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE
\&EST/
P' "We Cater to Cowards!"

L Ledger Dentistry
E JeremyA. Ledger. D.M.D., PA.

Next to ACE in Homrnosassa
I b (352) 628-3443
Se Habla Espahol
Ledgerdentistry.com


Put American Workers Back to Work, Buy American.


Shutter & Blind


~IISA


Manufacturing Company


Shutters Verticals 9 Cellular Shades 9 Woven Woods
e Faux Wood & Wood Horizontal Blinds
Sunscreen Shades Privacy Shadings & More


S Measured & Installed9


Our blinds
are built with
La STEEL
HEADRAIL
Unlike the
S Flimsy Plastic
w Headrail
likA Ihe


MADE IN AMERICA jd I HomeCenters j [_ J
24" W x 36" H $84 Inst EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
36"Wx 50" H $175 lnst 36"W Wx 48" H $39 Inst.
48 "Wx485"H$224Inst. 52" W x 62"H $68 Inst 52"Wx48"H$49Inst.
48"Wx60"H$280Inst. 60" W x 62"H $75 Inst. 60 Wx48" H $69Inst.
72"Wx62"H$434Inst. 72"Wx 72"H $93 Inst 72" Wx 72" H $86 Inst.
Your Window Treatments Say Alot About You and
They Frame Your View of the World




.,3






MADE IN AMERICA
24" W x 36" H $96 Inst EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
36" Wx 50" H $199 Inst24" W x'H$49Ist. 26" Wx 46" H $79 Inst.
48" W x 48"H$269Inst. 36" W x 48"' H $62 Inst W x3,
48" Wx 60" H $319 Inst. 52" W x 48" H $93 Inst. 35" Wx36"H$89Inst.
72"Wx62"H$557Inst. 72" Wx 60" H $131 nst 48" W x 36" H $99 Inst.
,- trus, aioin, Siniler Countin
_32- 1 -301.r, ^..,



352-610-301

Fora RE i-hmeesimte


LX:S /SI 1t l lE
TAE SPRING POMOTIO


VERTICALS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 AS




A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014





William Barton
Sr., 100
LAKE COMO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr William
Howard Barton, Sr, age
100, of Lake Como,
Florida,
will be
held 1:00
pm, Fri-
day, May 2, _
2014 at
Florida
National
Cemetery,
Bushnell, William
FL. Cre- Barton Sr.
m a t i o n
will be under the direction
of Hooper Crematory, In-
verness, Florida. Online
condolences may be sent
to the family at www
HooperFuineralHome.com.
Mr Barton was born
February 9,1914 in Jersey
City, NJ, son of William
Fetzer and Isabel Barton.
He died March 28, 2014 in
Crescent City, FL. Mr Bar-
ton was a Coast Guard vet-
eran serving during World
War II. He worked as a
sales manager with Pru-
dential Insurance Com-
pany for 25 years and then
with Continental Assur-
ance for 25 years before
retiring in 1981 and mov-
ing to Florida from West
Hempstead, LI, NY in
1982. Mr Barton was a
member of the Sugarmill
Woods Men's Golf Club and
the Homosassa First
United Methodist Church,
where he was active with
the church council, new
member cultivation and
Treasurer of the Men's
Club. He was the former
President of Life Supervi-
sors Association of New
York and Life Underwrit-
ers Association.
Mr Barton was pre-
ceded in death by his wife
Constance Barton. Sur-
vivors include his son,
William H. Barton Jr of
Bronxville, NY, his daugh-
ter, Muriel B. Kuhn of
Lake Como, FL, 5 grand-
children, 2 great grand-
children.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"




Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland, LFD & Brian Ledsome, LFD
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


1Jaoereu

5%iv;~t
352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

^ Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com
















To Place Your
/"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197
I 'aoceteofhiiaucat
OOHM





I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mary
Cammarata
BEVERLY HILLS
Mary Cammarata, 86,
Beverly Hills, Fla., for-
merly of Staten Island,
N.Y.,
passed
away after A4
a brief ill-
n e s s -.
Thursday,
April 24, -
2014, at
Hospice -
House. Mary
She was Cammarata
b o r n
Feb. 7, 1928, in Detroit,
Mich., to Francesco Grillo
and Francesca Taormina.
After emigrating to Italy
with her father in the early
1920s, she returned to the
United States in 1956 with
her children and husband,
Giuseppe Cammarata.
They lived in the Elm Park
section of Staten Island.
Mary was a dressmaker
and seamstress, was a
member of the ILGWU
and worked for Roebil
Sportswear in Port Rich-
mond (Staten Island) until
her retirement. In 2006,
Mary and her husband
moved to the warmth and
sunshine of Beverly Hills.
She is survived by her
husband of 69 years,
Giuseppe; a sister, Lea-
narda Fedele; children,
Antonio (Laura) Cam-
marata of Staten Island,
N.Y, Vincenza (George)
Breniak, of Beverly Hills,
Francesco (Rita) Cam-
marata of Inverness, and
Salvatore (Antoinette)
Cammarata of Jack-
sonville; as well as eight
grandchildren; 11 great-
grandchildren; four step-
grandchildren; and several
step-great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by a daughter-in-law, An-
toinette Cammarata.
Funeral services and in-
ternment will be in Free-
hold, N.J.

Dolores
Bayer, 79
BEVERLY HILLS
Dolores Jean Gass
Bayer, 79, born Aug. 11,
1934, in Pittsburgh, Pa.,
passed away Wednesday,
April 23,2014, after a brief
illness at Brentwood nurs-
ing home in Beverly Hills,
Fla.


Obituaries


She was preceded by
death of her husband,
William J. Bayer Sr She
is survived by her chil-
dren, Vicky Ezzell, Bill
Bayer Jr, Patricia Ostman;
nine grandchildren; and
11 great-grandchildren.
Her memorial service
will be at her beloved
church, First Baptist
Church of Beverly Hills, at
3 p.m. Saturday, May 3,
2014. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to
First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills, 4950 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.




James
Dirschedl, 72
INVERNESS
James Dirschedl, 72,
passed away suddenly
April 14,2014.
He was the son ofJoseph
and Elizabeth Dirschedl;
beloved husband of Bar-
bara (Boyce) Dirschedl;
loving father of Daniel
Dirschedl and Jenny Ham-
monds; and adoring grand-
father of Ethany and
Nathan Hammonds. He is
also survived by many sib-
lings. nieces and nephews.

Marjorie
'Midge'
Dupree, 84
CRYSTAL RIVER
Marjorie H. "Midge"
Dupree, 84, of Crystal
River, Fla., went to be with
the Lord Wednesday,
April 23, 2014, at Citrus
Memorial Hospital in In-
verness. She was born
July 14,1929, in New York
City to Lillian C. and
Wayne A. Hatfield. She
spent her first 16 years in
Westwood, N.J. Her father
died when she was 13
years old, and three years
later her mother moved
them to St. Petersburg. She
attended her last two years
of high school there and
graduated from SPHS in
1947. Her senior year, she
was a cheerleader She at-
tended SPJC and the Uni-
versity of Alabama, where
she was the regimental


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!



LA


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. m 2
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhome.com


honorary colonel for the
ROTC. She married L.B.
"Jay" Dupree Jr on
Nov 26, 1949. In 1976, she
returned to college and be-
came a registered nurse.
The couple moved to Crys-
tal River from St. Peters-
burg in 1982. She worked
as an R.N. at Seven Rivers
Community Hospital, the
Citrus County Health De-
partment and ABC Home
Health. She was also in-
volved in the real estate
business. She was a mem-
ber of the Crystal River
United Methodist Church,
The Crystal River
Woman's Club and Seven
Rivers Golf and Country
Club.
She is survived by her
husband of 64 years, L.B.
"Jay" Dupree Jr; two sons,
John W Dupree and wife
Deborah of Tallahassee,
and Jeffrey M. Dupree and
companion Patricia Har-
pole of Port Richey; a
daughter, Cheryl K.
Dupree-Mesker and hus-
band Richard T Mesker of
Crystal River; a grandson,
Evan Michael Dupree of
Tallahassee; and a sister-
in-law, Peggy Spinner
The funeral service will
be conducted at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, April 30,2014,
at the Crystal River United
Methodist Church with in-
terment to follow at 2 p.m.
in the Florida National
Cemetery Friends will be


u. E. bral V
Funeral Home
With Crematory
SBurial Shipping
Cremation

Crenmadon'10!!-i^ fii

For Information and costs,_
call 726-8323


received in visitation from
9:30 a.m. until service time
at the church. In lieu of
flowers, the family re-
quests donations to a char-
ity of your choice.
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory of Crystal
River is in charge of
arrangements.

Jane
Eldridge, 89
HOMOSASSA
Jane Eldridge, age 89,
Homosassa, died April 25,
2014, under the loving care
of her family, Hospice of
Citrus County and the staff
of Crystal
River M '
Health
a n d
and ---
Rehab.
Jane was
b o r n .
Nov 22, .
1924, in
Belgium to Jane
the late Eldridge
Octave
and Yvonne (Demaret)
Pochez. During World War
II, her family helped hide
two Jewish girls who made
it through the war and
were able to keep in touch
with her She was a loving
wife, mother, grandmother
and great-grandmother
who was an excellent cook,
seamstress and taught her-
self to upholster furniture.
She was an avid golfer
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her husband of


68 years, William Eldridge;
daughters Patricia Abt,
New York, N.Y, Deanna
(Anthony) Sicuro, Port
Jervis, N.Y, Kathleen
(Harlan) Haskins, Bonita
Springs, Fla., and Anne-
Marie (Jon) Vandenende,
Riverview, Fla.; grandchil-
dren Tony, Angela, Connie,
Louis, Caroline, Shaye and
Frances; and seven great-
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by a
grandson, Matthew; and
son-in-law Lou Abt
A funeral tribute and
celebration of Jane's life
will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
April 29, 2014, at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory Burial will fol-
low at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell. The
family invites friends to
join them in a time of visi-
tation from 9 a.m. until the
hour of service. Please
consider donations to St.
Jude Children's Research
Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38105,
in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.
See DEATHS/Page A7

The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


phi I? iCp Ii^>i~iilr^




S OOSIRI




1657 W.GL O AEHY EAT
OOHXF ww72horlns^o52A01


W--4 VT Special People Helping Animals alp

Humanitarians of Florida, Inc., cordially invites you to the

GRAND OPENING

of our new Manchester House Clinic

Saturday, May 3, 2014

from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
1031 Commerce Ter., Lecanto (formerly the Serenity Day Spa)

Light refreshments will be served.

Pet Portraits by Lorraine to benefit SnippetCitrus and
Suncoast Service Dogs.


For information call 352-563-2370.


Help us welcome Dr. Anastasia Solovieva, board
certified in obstetrics/gynecology. In the Seven
Rivers Regional tradition of providing exceptional
care, she can help women with normal and high-risk
pregnancies as well as conditions that involve fertility,
abnormal bleeding, pelvic pain, ovarian cysts, urinary
incontinence and more. Dr. Solovieva offers
high-tech, in-office treatments as well as traditional
and minimally invasive surgical options.


Anastasia Solovieva, M.D.
OB/GYN

Ob/Gyn Care LLC
700 SE 5th Terrace, Suite 3
Crystal River
352.564.0697


She is now accepting new patients.
Call 352.564.0697 or visit CitrusOBGYN.com today.



Positively *SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

6201 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River Your Life. Our Story.


Independent member of the medical staff


ME i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Carolyn 'Carol'
Kiefer, 79
FLORAL CITY
On April 17, 2014, Floral
City lost one of its lights as
Carolyn "Carol" Kiefer, 79,
slipped away peacefully
from this
world to -
the next
s u r r
rounded
by her
family of -- f
friends.
Formerly A6
of West Carolyn
P a l m Kiefer
Beach,
Fla., she was born Aug. 17,
1934, in Cranbury, N.J., a
daughter of the late Earl
Frank Danser Sr and
Gladys "Happy" Danser
n6e Hand. As a young
woman, she lived on the
family farm where they
grew potatoes and grains.
She learned to ride and
care for horses, which be-
came her passion. A part
of the local equine com-
munity, she spent much of
her time with her two
loves, Franklin and
Danser. Carol, always
being in great shape and
active, was still riding past
her 79th birthday She en-
joyed each day and every-
thing around her. She
loved her family and
friends with a rare sincer-
ity
She will be dearly
missed by her immediate
family, her family of
friends, her PBSO family,
and especially by her furry
family Danser, Franklin,
Happy, Sage and Russell.
Prior to retirement in
1997, she was employed
for 20 years as a consolida-
tion specialist by the Palm
Beach County Sheriff's Of-
fice, and earlier in her ca-
reer, she worked in
classified and legal adver-
tising for the Palm Beach
Post
She is survived by her
son, Ryan Kiefer; her sis-
ter, Minerva Baldwin
(Earl); nieces and
nephews, Carol Simon
(Michael), Gail Dyer
(James), Terri Shanko,


Earl Danser, Frank
Danser, Kevin Danser and
Sally Kominsky; dear
cousin, Cindy Vanderbeck
(Frank); other family and
countless friends. She is
predeceased by her
brother, Earl F DanserJr
Carol was often heard
saying "love and light,"
which is how she chose to
live her life. If you knew
Carol your life was
brighter with her by your
side. The family would like
to thank everyone who
supported and loved Carol
as her cancer progressed.
A special thank-you to the
following for going above
and beyond: Arbor Trail
and Hospice of Citrus
County; cherished friends
Linda and Gil Gates, Gin-
ger Leis, Cathy Milano,
Debbie Rigg, Barbara
Robinson, Cathy Rotola
and Daren, Lisa and Peter
Sansone and Jennifer
Forsyth.
Relatives and friends
are invited to Carol's cele-
bration of life at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home Inc.
at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 3,
2014, at 3075 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness, FL 34450;
phone 352-726-8323.
Friends will be received in
visitation from noon until
the hour of service. In lieu
of flowers, contributions
may be made to Horse
Protection Association of
Florida Inc., 20690 N.W
130th Ave., Micanopy, FL
32667. Federal Tax Identi-
fication Number 65-
0191969.
Sign the guestbook at
ww.chronicleonline. comn.


Robert
Niver, 78
HERNANDO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Robert G.
Niver, age 78, of Hernando,
Florida, will be held 12:00
PM, Monday, April 28,
2014 at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Pastor
Stephen Lane officiating.
Interment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Florida.
The family will receive
friends from 10:00 AM until
the time of service, Mon-
day at the chapel. Online
condolences maybe sent to
the family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Niver was born No-
vember 13,1935 in Willard,
OH, son of Albert and
Olive (Walker) Niver He
died April 24, 2014 in
Gainesville, FL. Mr Niver
was an Army veteran and
worked as a printer. He
moved to Hernando,
Florida from Hollywood,
FL in 1999. His hobbies in-
cluded ocean fishing and
traveling. He had a great
sense of humor and loved
a good joke, as well as sur-
prising people with his
recitations of elementary
school memorizations. Mr
Niver was a member of
Faith Lutheran Church,
Lecanto.
Survivors include his
wife of 33 years, Sandra
Niver of Hernando, 2 sons,
Larry (Monica) Niver of
Broadway NC and Donald
Jarvis of Hollywood, FL,
daughter, Cynthia (Richard)


FIRST AMERICAN TRUST o al services and loates FDIC
insured banks, and other financial islttns i oflS0erng best yields nationwide Certain restno ions
and penalty for early withdrawals may apply *Annual Percentage Yeld (AR
COMPLETE DETAILS ARE IMPORTANT APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


Tripp of Zephyrhills, FL, 2
brothers, Charles (Ann)
Niver of Lebanon, TN and
John (Helen) Niver of Grove
City, OH, sister, Ruth (Jerry)
Earl of North Fairfield, OH
and 3 grandchildren, Justin
Niver, Jennifer Randolph
and James Tripp.
Memorials may be made
to the donor's choice.

Bryan
Howarth, 18
HOMOSASSA
Bryan A. Howarth, age
18, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away April 24,2014,
at Shands Hospital in
Gainesville, Fla. He was
born Feb. 10, 1996, in In-
verness, Fla., to JeffBeutel
and Lauri A. Howarth.
Bryan was a student at
CREST School and a life-
long resident of Citrus
County
In addition to his parents,
he is survived by his mater-
nal grandparents, Allan and
Jackie Howarth of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; two brothers,
J.J. Daugherty of the U.S.
Army and Travis Howarth
of Homosassa, Fla.; two sis-
ters, Arijanna Powers and
Justine Beutel, both of New
York; and many loving ex-
tended family
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. Family will
receive friends from 6 p.m.
until service time at 7 p.m.
Wednesday at the Brown
Funeral Home in Lecanto,
Fla.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Fla.
Sign the guestbook at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.


Harrison
Siegle, 95
Harrison Bernard
Siegle, DVM, died peace-
fully April 13, 2014, at age
95, in Spring Hill, Fla. A
resident of Westwood,
Mass., from 1947 to 2010, Dr
Siegle was -
born in
Boston in
1919 to
William -
and Mary
Siegle. Dr
Si egIle
founded
and oper- Harrison
ated the Siegle
Dedham
Hospital for Animals, Ded-
ham, Mass., from 1949 to
1997; he attended Brook-
line High School, and grad-
uated Michigan State
University as doctor of vet-
erinary medicine. He was a
lifelong member and past
president of both Dedham
Rotary Club and Massa-
chusetts Veterinary Associ-
ation, member of the Board
of Directors of Dedham
Trust Company and Han-
cock Bank and Trust Com-
pany, and a founding and
lifelong member of Temple
Beth David, Westwood. As
an avid golfer, skier, swim-
mer and tennis player, he
was a longtime member of
Blue Hills Country Club,
and the Waterville Valley
Silver Streakers.
Beloved by his family to
whom he was dedicated,
Dr Siegle was recently pre-
deceased by his devoted
wife, Helen, to whom he
was married for 70 years;
and his two older brothers,
Richard and Arnold. He is
survived by his children,
Dr Jerri Ann Gray (Hugh)
of Nashville, Tenn., Dr


OBITUARIES


*4








If you re a Type 1 diabetic you may qualify for a new
research study of an investigational medication.
Qualified participants will receive at no cost study-related:
* Evaluations, physical exams, routIne lab work
* Investigational medication
Compensation of up to $600 for time and travel may
be available to those who qualify. 1
No medical insurance is necessary.

Kelli--^ ^ K. MaMD P


Meridien*
Research


Kelli K. Maw, MD, MPH
Board Certified, Family Medicine

352-597-8839
16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601


I T EESUG- TMA-BOKVLE-BA DENTON AKLN


Call the Chronicle or your advertising
representative to reserve your space

563-5592

4r'%^ C I T R U 9 ^^ C 0 U N T Y EW

CwkRONICL.. u.
k www.chronieleonline.com


. .. .


(Xat


Dr. Lee received her Bachelors of
Science from the University of
Florida. She then received her
Doctor of Dental Medicine
Degree from the University of
Pittsburgh. Dr. Lee continued her
training and received her
Advanced Education in General
Dentistry from UF.


ONLY THE BEST FOR OUR PATIENTS


,( Sensitive to Your Fears & Concerns ( Digital Xrays


I Crowns, Bridges & Fillings
I Dentures & Partials


I Root Canals
I Invisalign


535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL
smilesoncitrus.com Call Us Today 795-1881


Graduation 2014


Tell the special graduate
in your life how much you care.
Print an inspiring message
in our annual keepsake tab.
Include photos of your
graduate at no extra charge.

Ad Deadline: April 29, 2014
Publication Date: May 14, 2014


-


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 A7

John Siegle (Janice) of Fal-
mouth, Maine, and Janet
Just (Paul) of Homosassa;
grandchildren, Jason and
Harrison Gray, David and
Laura Siegle, and Andrew
Saunders; and great-grand-
daughters, Zazou and Oc-
tavia Gray and Eliana
Siegle. The family is happy
to say that Harrison Siegle
never lost his sense of
humor, curiosity or zest for
life.
In lieu of flowers, his
family requests donations
be made to Make A Wish or
The American Heart Asso-
ciation. Service and inter-
ment of Harrison & Helen
Siegle will take place at
10:45 a.m. June 8, 2014, at
Sharon Memorial Park
Cemetery in Sharon, Mass.
To sign guestbook, please
visit: brewerfuneral.com.
Brewer & Sons, 352-596-
4991.

Walter
Witkowski, 88
HOMOSASSA
Walter Witkowski, 88, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Wednesday, April 23,2014.
Funeral services will be
at 6 p.m. Sunday, April 27,
2014, at the Fero Funeral
Home. The family will re-
ceive friends at 4 p.m.
Fero Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
See DEATHS/Page A8

Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


I


,o .T..


2x5" .............$89

2x3" .............$75

2x2" .............$49




AS SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


DEATHS
Continued from PageA7

Rosemary
Verity, 72
Rosemary Catherine
Verity, age 72, died
April 24,2014, surrounded
by her lov-
ing family
and under
the care of
Hospice of
Citrus
County.
Rosemary
was born
Feb. 26, Rosemary
1942, in Verity
East Rock-
away, N.Y, to the late
Nicholas and Helen
(Fitzgerald) Russo. She
was a loving wife, mother
and grandmother, an ex-
cellent homemaker who
loved to bake and working
crafts, who sewed many of
her children's clothing.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her husband of 52
years, James "Jimmy" Ver-
ity; her daughters Judith
(Michael Sr) Tansey, Lor-
raine Verity and Toni-
Marie (Gary Daggertt)
Verity, all of Inverness; her
brother Nicky (Terry)
Russo, N.Y, and sister
Helen (Bill) Wood, Ga.;
grandchildren Michael


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TanseyJr, Mitchell Kohler,
Tiffany Tansey, Paige Ver-
ity and James Verity; and
great-grandson, Emmitt
Smith.
A celebration and trib-
ute to Rosemary's life will
be at3 p.m. Sunday, May 4,
2014, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory The family will greet
friends in visitation from
2 p.m. until the hour of
service. Please consider a
donation to St. Jude Chil-
dren's Research Hospital,
501 St. Jude Place, Mem-
phis, TN 38105, in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


GRACE
Continued from PageAl

now we're down to six re-
porters and one full-time
photographer The beast
has also gotten smaller, but
it still needs to be fed.
Every Day
On any given day we
come in to work with our
day all planned, with a
general idea of what story
or stories we're working
on, who we need to call or
go see and what type of
photos we need.
But the plan rarely goes
as planned. The person
we need to talk to by noon
for a story due at 3 p.m. de-
cides to go out of town for
the day and shuts his or
her phone off. Or the out-
door event we're covering
for the next day's front
page gets rained out
As the beast roars to be
fed, we scramble for a
Plan B to feed it
Other stressors:
We are human and make
mistakes. We put the
wrong name with a photo,
like I did a few months ago
(sorry, Tom Chancey). We
offend people without
meaning to. People call
and yell at us because
their paper's wet.
If we write about widget


shops in Citrus County and
do our best to include all
seven that are listed in the
phone book, once the story
comes out, widget shop
number eight with an
unlisted number will
call and yell because we
didn't include them.
A lot of people think we
know everything that's
going on. A lot of people
think we don't know any-
thing. All people think we
should know everything.
People call to tattle on
their neighbors and want
us to write about it People
who are in serious pain,
emotional or physical or fi-
nancial, call, wanting us
somehow to make their
pain go away People call
trying to scam the commu-
nity, telling us their story,
which turns out to not be
true. So, we start disbe-
lieving everyone.
Some people don't un-
derstand the community
nature of who we are as a
paper, and make fun of us
because we focus on local
issues and events. They
think we're rinky dink am-
ateurs. They call our paper
the Citrus County Comical
and the Mullet Wrapper
More stressors:
I write a weekly religion
column, which is a topic
fraught with opportunity
to offend. Some people


Another stressor is not being able
to cover every event, especially
when there are several on the
same day at the same time.


don't understand hyper-
bole or humor and take of-
fense or misunderstand
me. Others want to debate
theology with me, and I
simply don't have the time
for extended debates. I
will answer a person three
times and no more; other-
wise, my head explodes.
Another stressor is not
being able to cover every
event, especially when
there are several on the
same day at the same
time. We sincerely hate to
disappoint people, but we
do. A lot.
I could go on and on, but
frankly, that would only
stress me out even more
and probably bore you.
So, what do we newspa-
per reporters do about our
stress? I can't speak for my
co-workers, but I try to
come to work as early as I
can. My day officially
starts at 8 a.m., but I like to
get to my desk as close to
7 a.m. as possible so I can
breathe, read the paper,
drink my decaf, all before
the craziness starts. I'm a
natural early bird, so that


fits me just fine.
Because I come in early,
I don't feel guilty about
leaving early, which gives
me time to hit the gym on
my way home. Plus, I get at
least eight hours of sleep
at night, and I sleep
soundly
About 23 years ago,
when we first moved to
Citrus County our kids
were older and my hus-
band told me it was time I
got a "real" job. (Prior to
that, I had done freelance
magazine writing.)
But I didn't want a "real"
job I wanted to write.
Although writing is a
real job, I don't consider
what I do a job. Despite all
its stresses, for me this is
still less of a job than a
calling. It's something I
feel I was born to do, and I
wouldn't want to do any-
thing else.
Except maybe sit on a
beach eating cupcakes.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


HOE"PAINTING


* *McKenzie

.Painting
... -" & Pressure Cleaning C
t .^^.. ..


Interior Exterior* Driveway StairMAJ
S ALL PHASES OF PAINTING 3
352-400-1404

pill q 11K^ I s* 1111


INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
li*' 341-0813 iT"i MONF-,805
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
&INSURED www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMEN
- Al -

For information on
how your business can
advertise on the
Chronicle Website call
563-5592


CW....... A ING




Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!

WINDV
ELOF GEN IE.~
New cstom r spcial We Cloan Windows and a Whole Lot More'
BONDED & INSURED
352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com


cal- -.
[11352-56-61


* Bodne
S


1 Able Locksmith
24 Hours 7 Days A Week
Commercial i
Automotive WSE
Residential
High Security Laser Automotive Keys
(352)560-3178
....V.. www. 1lAbleLockSmith.com


POOL SERVICE
A VIVO Company
Call NOW for your FREE
No Obligation Estimate
(352) 637-6161
Celebrating 30 Years Since 1984


Full Pool Drain,
Cleanse and Fill
Turning Green
Pools Blue Again
Starting at $225
FULL SERVICE
& REPAIR!


Fi\F:C~r( i ONf AnRV
fFIIMArF Lew Customers OnJ
PLIIIBMENG 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SERVICES 352-860-1973
State Certified Master PlumberCFC 1427798


ServiceMA 77 Our Services: Carpet Protector
/VzTiw leR Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24 7'365 RestOlm Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

ROOMS& $1 95, UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
,, CHAIR OR
1 HALLWAY I R FREE CHAINED
I I FREE (with purchase of a
I Expires 4/30/14 I I Expires 4/30/14 couch & loveseat)
352-794-0270 .
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com r


i


OUTDATED TILE?
Dust Free
Tile and Thinset Removal
(352) 476-7220


iRS LOORS H




For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
352-563-5592.



CHEpNRiRICL




IZBUDD EX(RVRTING I


* Tree Work
* Trim/Removal
* Clearing
Lamar Budd.
owner t" ,


Site Prep
Bush Hogging
Demolition
Debris Removal
Rock Driveways

352-400-1442


a I

IR~)9 :100OFN 25 OFF
Any NewWhole House RICI
IR )N 9 Wa i^ SERVICECALI'-St
ZAPPER L "IL 'J
o: It's Chemical Free Visitur
4:+ It removes rotten egg Showroom in
smell and discoloration rDown townmI.ernessO
'+ It removes Iron, "_I 102 W. Main St.
Hydrogen Sulfide l Downtown
and Mananpsep 1 .-7'2 '-3111 i nn Irnverncc


m' T I E1 R i'MOVA1


01I


1I


LOCAL


I 0OLEANENANCE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WImnn/Dixie


He's been stocking these shelves
for years. Now, he stocks them

with Dependable Deals.


Sweetbay is now Winn-Dixie.


Welcome to a whole new experience with new items and hundreds of new ways to
save at your neighborhood store. Sweetbay is now Winn-Dixie, with Dependable
Deals. All over the store, you'll find the items your family wants most, at low prices
that are locked in now through June 5th. And along with Dependable Deals, you'll
find other great ways to save on every aisle, every week. Because we're not just
changing the name. We're changing the way you shop, for the better.


, Your newest Winn-Dixie stores are located at 1202 West Main Street in
Inverness and 1651 SE Highway 19 in Crystal River.


Q
0
Ocala Q


Q



Orlando S
Spring Hill


DEPENDABLE
DEAL
Low Prices That Last.


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 A9


et
CS eetbaO
\^ SUPERMRE^ /










NATION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


&


WORLD


NationBRIEFS cnt So l m


CntionBI Sanctions looming


World BRIEFS

King's Day


Foreign military observers detained in Ukraine


Associated Press


Associated Press
Republican congressional
candidate Mia Love
speaks Saturday during
the Utah Republican
Party nominating conven-
tion in Sandy, Utah.
Republican delegates
gathered to pick the
party's candidates for
four congressional seats
and nine legislative races.

Firefighters hurt
when wall falls
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Offi-
cials said four Memphis fire-
fighters were rescued from
a burning building after a
wall collapsed on them.
Memphis Fire Depart-
ment spokesman Wayne
Cooke said crews were
called to a two-alarm blaze
at a commercial building
south of downtown Satur-
day afternoon. The fire sent
heavy plumes of smoke into
the air and created a strong
odor in the area, which con-
tains a mix of commercial
and residential buildings
near train tracks.
Cooke said firefighters
were inside the building
when an exterior wall col-
lapsed, trapping them. Four
were taken to hospitals with
injuries that Cooke said
were not life-threatening.
Baby safe after
crossing street
BRIGHAM CITY, Utah -
Police said a baby found
crawling across a busy four-
lane street in northern Utah
after his 7-year-old sister
took him out of his crib is
safely back home.
The driver who rescued
the 1-year-old boy about
5:45 p.m. Friday returned
him to his mother and
called police in Brigham
City, 60 miles north of Salt
Lake City.
The unidentified mother
told police she was resting
and had put the infant in a
crib to sleep.
Police said her 7-year-old
daughter took the baby out
to play and he somehow
got out of the backyard.
Confederates have
medal of honor
HANCOCK, Md. -The
Medal of Honor has a Con-
federate counterpart.
The Confederate Medal
of Honor has been posthu-
mously awarded 50 times
since 1977 by the Sons of
Confederate Veterans to
fighters for the South who
distinguished themselves in
battle.
Rebel heroes will be cel-
ebrated this spring at state
Confederate Memorial Day
observations across the
South, starting this week-
end in Georgia.
Stabbing suspect
was 'genial'
HARTFORD, Conn. -A
teacher at the Connecticut
high school where a stu-
dent was stabbed to death
said the suspect is a
teenager with a good sense
of humor who gave no indi-
cation of trouble.
Authorities have not re-
leased the name of the sus-
pect, but two people who
saw him taken into custody
said he is 16-year-old Chris
Plaskon.
Plaskon is charged with
murder as a juvenile of-
fender in Friday's slaying of
fellow student Maren
Sanchez at Jonathan Law
High School in Milford. An
attorney for Plaskon said
his client is under psychi-
atric evaluation.
-From wire reports


SLOVYANSK, Ukraine
- As Western govern-
ments vowed to impose
more sanctions against
Russia and its supporters
in eastern Ukraine, a
group of foreign military
observers remained in
captivity Saturday accused
of being NATO spies by a
pro-Russian insurgency
The German-led, eight-


member team was travel-
ing under the auspices of
the Organization of Secu-
rity and Cooperation in
Europe when they were
detained Friday
Vyacheslav Ponomarev,
the self-proclaimed "peo-
ple's mayor" of Slovyansk,
described the detained ob-
servers as "captives" and
said that they were officers
from NATO member states.
'As we found maps on


them containing informa-
tion about the location of
our checkpoints, we get
the impression that they
are officers carrying out a
certain spying mission,"
Ponomarev said, adding
they could be released in
exchange for jailed pro-
Russian activists.
Outside Slovyansk, a
city about 90 miles west of
Russia, Ukraine govern-
ment forces continued


operations to form a se-
curity cordon as it at-
tempts to quell unrest
threatening to derail the
planned May 25 presiden-
tial election.
The U.S. and other na-
tions in the Group of
Seven said in a joint state-
ment released Friday
night by the White House
that they plan to impose
additional economic sanc-
tions on Russia in re-
sponse to its actions in
Ukraine.


Associated Press
A man tries to salvage belongings from a overturned mobile home in Greenville, N.C., on Saturday after a
tornado touched down along Black Jack Simpson Road on Friday. Officials said multiple tornadoes damaged
more than 200 homes the previous day and sent more than a dozen people to the emergency room.



More than 200 homes



damaged in tornadoes


Associated Press
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C.-
Residents, meteorologists and
emergency officials in eastern
North Carolina surveyed the
damage Saturday from multiple
tornadoes that damaged more
than 200 homes the previous day
and sent more than a dozen peo-
ple to the emergency room.
Meteorologists said Saturday
that tornadoes with winds of more
than 111 mph touched down in
Pitt and Beaufort counties on Fri-
day, and they were continuing to
investigate storm damage.
Elsewhere, Texas, Oklahoma
and other states in the Plains and
Midwest were bracing for severe
storms expected to start Saturday
and continue overnight. There,
the main threat will be large hail


and damaging wind gusts.
In North Carolina, Beaufort
County Emergency Management
Director John Pack said 16 people
were taken to the emergency
room when the storms passed
through around 7:25 p.m. Friday
Pack said 200 homes were ei-
ther heavily damaged or de-
stroyed. Pictures on news
websites showed residents sal-
vaging items from crushed mobile
homes, along with snapped trees
and a mangled utility pole in east-
ern North Carolina.
"You can track the tornado by
the damage." Pack said. "It left a
lot damage behind in its approxi-
mately five to 10 minutes on the
ground."
Pack said the storm appeared
to be about 300 yards wide and
was on the ground for 10 miles.


Okla. braces for
severe weather; Ga.
storms predicted
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Fore-
casters have predicted severe
weather threats across a sec-
tion of the Midwest for Sunday.
The Storm Prediction Center in
Norman, Okla., said Sunday
could bring powerful storms
that could include tornadoes
and even larger hail.
Northwest Georgia is pre-
dicted to see severe thunder-
storms with heavy rain and the
potential for hail, damaging
winds or tornadoes starting
early next week.
-From wire reports


NATO troops killed in helicopter crash


Associated Press


KABUL, Afghanistan-A
British helicopter crashed
in southern Afghanistan on
Saturday, killing five NATO
troops in the single dead-
liest day this year for for-
eign forces as they prepare
to withdraw from the coun-
try, officials said.
The British defense
ministry confirmed that all
five of the dead were
British. Maj. Gen. Richard
Felton, commander of the
Joint Helicopter Com-
mand, said the crash ap-
peared to be "a tragic
accident."
In Kabul, an Afghan uni-
versity official identified
two Americans killed by a
local policeman at a hospi-


The cause of the crash was not
immediately known. A police
spokesman said the aircraft went
down in the Kandahar province's
Takhta Pul district, about
31 miles from the Pakistani border.


tal in the capital earlier
this week. The shooting
was the latest by a member
of Afghanistan's security
forces against those they
are supposed to protect.
The cause of the heli-
copter crash was not im-
mediately known.
Kandahar provincial po-
lice spokesman Zia Dur-
rani said the aircraft went


down in the province's
Takhta Pul district in the
southeast, about 31 miles
from the Pakistani border
The coalition said it was
investigating the circum-
stances of the crash but
said it had no reports of
enemy activity in the area.
Saturday's crash was
one of the deadliest air ac-
cidents involving Britain's


forces in Afghanistan. In
September 2006, a Nimrod
surveillance aircraft ex-
ploded in mid-air while
supporting NATO ground
operations near Kandahar,
killing all 14 servicemen
on board.
A Taliban spokesman
claimed in a text message
to journalists Saturday
that the insurgents shot
down the helicopter
"Today, the mujahedeen
hit the foreign forces' heli-
copter with a rocket, and
12 soldiers on board were
killed," spokesman Qari
Yousef Ahmadi said. The
insurgents frequently ex-
aggerate death tolls in
their attacks and falsely
have claimed responsibil-
ity for incidents before.


aLI
Associated Press
Netherlands' King Willem
Alexander waves to well
wishers Saturday during
festivities marking King's
Day in De Rijp,
Netherlands.

Obama calibrates
China message
KUALA LUMPUR,
Malaysia President
Barack Obama is hop-
scotching through China's
neighborhood with a care-
fully calibrated message for
Beijing, trying both to
counter and court.
During visits to U.S. al-
lies, Obama has signaled
that American military
power can blunt Chinese
aggression in the Asia-
Pacific region, even as he
urges Beijing to use its
growing clout to help re-
solve international disputes
with Russia and North
Korea.
The dual tracks under-
score Beijing's outsized im-
portance to Obama's
four-country swing through
Asia, even though China is
absent from his itinerary.
The president opened a
long-awaited visit to
Malaysia on Saturday, fol-
lowing stops in Japan and
South Korea, and ahead of
a visit to the Philippines.
Prosecutor: Ferry
crew held
SEOUL, South Korea -
A prosecutor investigating
the South Korean ferry
sinking that left 302 people
dead or missing said all 15
crew members involved in
the ship's navigation are
now in custody.
Prosecutor Yang Jung-jin
of the joint investigation
team said two helmsmen
and two members of the
steering crew were de-
tained Saturday. Eleven
other crew members, in-
cluding the captain, were
arrested previously.
They are accused of neg-
ligence and of failing to help
passengers in need as the
ferry Sewol sankApril 16.
Venezuelans
protest gov't
CARACAS, Venezuela
- Scores of opponents of
President Nicolas Maduro
marched Saturday in Cara-
cas, vowing to remain on
the streets in defiance of a
high court ruling limiting
protests.
Student organizers at the
last minute decided against
marching downtown to
avoid a confrontation with
security forces in the
government-controlled dis-
trict. Instead they concen-
trated in the wealthier,
eastern neighborhoods that
have been the hotbed of
unrest since February.
Demonstrators carried
signs on Saturday blasting
a Supreme Court ruling this
week that gives police the
right to disperse protests
that don't have a permit.
Opponents say the ruling
is the latest attempt by the
socialist government to
muzzle dissent amid wide-
spread discontent with run-
away inflation and record
shortages.
The government says
that more than 40 people
have been killed across
Venezuela in protest-re-
lated incidents.

-From wire reports










EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The image of Scotland's largest city as a hard and dirty industrial center is long gone. Instead, this former European Capital
of Culture is now widely regarded as one of Britain's most lively and stylish urban destinations. It boasts the best shopping
experience in the U.K. outside of London and is home to a variety of annual festivals celebrating everything from rock music
and comedy to literature and the arts.


PAUL KELBIE
Associated Press

GLASGOW, Scotland
nce regarded as "The Second City of the British
Empire," it remains a well-preserved example
of Victorian excess and enlightenment, offering
numerous museums and art galleries, of which more
than 20 are free to visit.
The city is easy to get around. Many of the attrac-
tions are within walking distance of each other or can
be reached by the city's unique subway system known
fondly as the Clockwork Orange. Opened in 1896, it is
the third oldest metro system in the world after Lon-
don and Budapest, and has only one circle line serv-
ing 15 stations with a train every four minutes at peak
times.
CITY CENTER
The streets of this 800-year-old city are paved with
history built upon the profits of shipbuilding,
Caribbean sugar and American tobacco and cotton.
Glasgow was designated U.K. City of Architecture
and Design in 1999 and even a brief walk through its
streets will reveal the legacy of renowned architects
and designers, such as Charles Rennie Mackintosh
and Alexander "Greek" Thomson among others.
There are numerous monuments and statues to
leading scientists, inventors, poets, politicians and
war heroes throughout the city. The most popular is
that of the Duke of Wellington outside the Gallery of
Modem Art but the statue is rarely seen without a traf-
fic cone on its head. What started as a joke by students


more than 40 years ago is now an almost permanent
symbol of Glaswegian humor When the city council
tried to raise the statue higher to stop the prank, there
was a public protest which attracted tens of thousands
of supporters calling for the cone to stay


RIVERSIDE MUSEUM


One of the most modern city attractions is the River-
side Museum, shown above, on the banks of the Clyde.
Designed by Zaha Hadid, this iconic building, which
was voted 2013 European Museum of the Year, has
more than 3,000 exhibits showcasing a variety of
"Clyde-built" trams, trains and cars built when the
waterfront was home to a major industrial center The
museum also includes three reconstructed streets
showing Glasgow as it would have been between 1895
and 1930.
Visitors are encouraged to climb aboard many of the
exhibits, including the U.K.'s only floating Clyde-built
sailing ship, which is permanently moored outside the
museum.
HUNTERIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY
The Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery at the Uni-
versity of Glasgow is the oldest museum in Scotland,
dating back more than 200 years.
Used extensively for academic research but also
open to the public, the collection features a wide
range of artifacts ranging from an entire section of the
wall built by Romans in Scotland in the 2nd century to
scientific instruments used by some of the world's
greatest scientists and objects from Captain Cook's
voyage across the Pacific Ocean.


The Art Gallery is home to one of the world's great-
est collections of work by Charles Rennie Mackintosh,
including the reassembled interior of his former Glas-
gow home. It also houses paintings by famous artists
such as George Stubbs and James McNeill Whistler


NECROPOLIS


If you don't mind something a little more macabre,
the Necropolis is well worth a wander
Regarded as one of the most significant cemeteries
in Europe, the immense Victorian monument garden
of 37 acres is overlooked by Glasgow Cathedral and
provides a stunning elevated view of the city As the
final resting place of more than 50,000 people, many of
them notable, it is full of amazing stories and gothic
monuments.
There are regular free walking tours from ex-
tremely well-informed volunteer guides but visitors
may also explore on their own.
BOTANIC GARDENS
Founded initially in 1817, the internationally
renowned Botanic Gardens in the heart of the West
End of Glasgow provide an oasis of calm and respite.
There are more than 50 acres of formal gardens,
woodland walks and architecturally impressive
glasshouses filled with an extensive array of temper-
ate and tropical plants from around the world to ex-
plore. Open from 7 a.m. to dusk every day, the gardens
are within a short walking distance of Byers Road, one
of the most vibrant and cosmopolitan areas of the city,
filled with a range of cafes, bars and some of Glas-
gow's most popular restaurants.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 27, 2014 C:Comcast, Citrus B:Bright House DOi Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
AC B FD/ I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 1 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
i ESH NBC 19 19 News News Dream Builders Dateline NBC'PG' Believe (N)'14' Crisis (N) '14'N News Access
SP NewsHour WEDU Pioneers of Television Call the Midwife (N) Masterpiece Classic The Bletchley Circle AreYou Keeping
0 PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus (N)'PG'" '14'm (N)'PG'. (N)'14'" Served? Up
S9 wu PBS 5 5 5 41 Gone Gone Nature (N)'PG' Call the Midwife'14' Masterpiece Classic he Bletchley Circle Austin City Limits
fK NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly American Dream Dateline NBC (N) (In Believe "Together" (N) Crisis "Homecoming" News Paid
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Builders (N)'PG' Stereo)'PG'" (In Stereo) 14' (N)'14'" Program
S AC 20 2 2 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Resurrection (N) (In Revenge Revolution" News Spo Night
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG' Stereo)'PG' (N)'PG' u on 9
CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife "Tying The Mentalist (N) (In 10 News Paid
S CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo)" 'PG"' the Knot" (N)'14' Stereo)'14'" 11pmr (N Program
, O 13 3 13 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's American The Family Guy Cosmos: A Spacetime FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
( _FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Burgers Dad 14' Simpsons '14' Odyssey'PG (In Stereo) NNotice'PG'
| WJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Resurrection (N) 'PG' Revenge (N)'PG' News Inside Ed.
SIN 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken Doug Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Youngren Child G' Kaufmann Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
ABC 11 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Resurrection (N) (In Revenge "Revolution" News Castle'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'm Stereo) 'PG' (N)'PG'e
O N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee "Dance With Glee Kurt and Rachel The Office The Office We There We There
D C IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Somebody"'14' have an audition.'14' 'PG' 'PG' Yet? Yet?
ED WIA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "The Perfect Score" (2004) 'PG-13' Seinfeld Seinfeld Raymond Commun Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM WA TBN 21 21 1 1 Dr. C.Stanle Rejoice in the Lord Connec Paid Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Ministries
Friends Friends Two and Two and CSI: Miami "Ambush" CSI: Miami "To KIll a Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
ED WTO CW 4 4 4 12 12 '14'1 4' 14' Half Men Half Men '14'" Predator"'14'm "Memoriam"'14'm "Masterpiece"'14'
__ 1Casita Big Rotary Spy Crime Your Citrus County Court ISpy'G' Eye for an The Comedy
SIWYKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Games Strike'14' Eye Shop
D WOBX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Ban Burgers American Simpsons IFam.Guy ICosmos-Space News TMZ (N) 'PG'
SWVEAUNI 15 15 15 15 14 Camino Noticiero Noche de Estrellas Premios TV y Novelas 2014 (N) (SS) ___ Comned. Noticiero
SWXPX ION 17 Leverage'PG' Leverage'PG' Leverage 'PG' Leverage'PG' Leverage'PG' Without a Trace'14'
Dc DDuck DDuck uck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck uck DDuck uck Duck
j 54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
S*** "The Green Mile" (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks. A guard thinks an TURN "Eternity How Mad Men Don takes a TURN "Eternity How
55 64 55 inmate has a supernatural power to heal. R' Long" (N) M trip. (N)'14'" Long" M
m 52 35 52 19 21 sTo Be Announced Rocky Mountain Bounty River Monsters (In River Monsters (In Rocky Mountain Bounty River Monsters (In
52 35 152 119 21 Hunters '14' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Hunters '14' Stereo) 'PG'
J 96' 19 96 "Thin Line-Love and **2 "Just Wright" (2010 Romance-Comedy) Queen Latifah. A physical "Being Mary Jane" (2013 Drama) Gabrielle
96 19 96 Hate" therapist falls in love with her patient. 'PG' M Union, Omari Hardwick. 'NR'
[AV 254 51 254 Housewives/AtI. Housewives/AtI. Housewives/AtI. Married to Medicine Housewives/AtI. Happens IFashion
"Harold & Gabriel Iglesias: I'm Gabriel Iglesias: Hot Gabriel Iglesias: Aloha Fluffy '14, Jim Gaffigan: Gabriel Iglesias: I'm
S 27 61 27 33 Kumar" NotFat... Fluffy and Fluffy'14'" LmObsessed (N)'14, L Not Fat... I'm Fluffy
S 9 5 8 2 37*** "Beverlyf Hills Cop" (1984) Eddie Murphy A Detroit **2 "Beverly Hills Cop I1" (1987) Eddie Murphy. A Detroit Cops Cops
98 45 98 28 37 cop goes west to avenge his friend's death.'R' cop tangles with a vicious gang in California.'R' Reloaded Reloaded
N 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On Shark Tank 'PG' Shark Tank 'PG' Shark Tank 'PG' Shark Tank 'PG'
CNH1 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Special (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Inside Man Anthony Bourd.
S 4 4 Liv & I Didn't Do Jessie Jessie (N) 2014 Radio Disney Music Awards Jessie Good- Jessie Austin & Dog With a
46 40 46 6 5 Maddie It'G' G'm 'G'" (N) (In Stereo)'G' G' Charlie G' AllyG' Blog'G'
S 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Countdown MLB Baseball: Angels at Yankees SportsCenter (N)
ESN 34 28 34 43 49 Football Sports. NHRA Drag Racing O'Reilly Auto Parts SpringNationals. N 30for30 30 for 30 ESPNFC
WT 95 70 95 48 Pope Papacy Holy Mass and Canonization of Blesseds Pope John XXIII and Pope John In the Footsteps of Patrons
*** "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: ** "Mirror Mirror" (2012, Fantasy) Julia **2 "Mirror Mirror" (2012, Fantasy) Julia
IANDM 29 52 29 20 28 Part 2"(2011) Daniel Radcliffe. Roberts, Lily Collins. Premiere. 'PG Roberts, Lily Collins. 'PG'Fnyu
** "White Fang" (1991 Adventure) Klaus *** "Sleepy Hollow" (1999, Horror) Johnny "Original Sin" (2001, Suspense) Antonio
(1 118170 Maria Brandauer. (In Stereo) PG Depp. (In Stereo) 'R' Banderas. (In Stereo) 'R'
E 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
FD 26 56 26 Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Chopped 'G' Food Court Wars'G' America's Best Cook Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Kitchen Casino'G'
fS 732 112 732 Motorcycle Racing Drive! Best ofWEC (N) I UFC World Poker The Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
[ L 35 39 35 Wm. Lacrosse Cutting Countdwn World Poker IThe Best of Pride (N) World Poker World Poker
S** 'The Hangover Part /"(2011, Comedy) **F "Step Brothers" (2008, Comedy) Will ** "Step Brothers" (2008, Comedy) Will
U 30 60 30 51 Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. 'R' Ferrell, John C. Reilly 'Ferrell, John C. Reilly
J 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) LPGA Tour Golf Swingirng Skirts Classic, Final Round. IPGA Tour Golf
R 5 ** 'The Lost Valentine" (2011, Drama) Signed, Sealed, *** "The Wish List" (2010, Romance) Golden Golden
59 68 59 45 54 Jennifer Love Hewitt, Betty White. NR' Delivered (N)'PG' Jennifer Esposito, David Sutcliffe. BNGirs Girs
Billy Crystal 700 Sundays (In ** "Bullet to the Head" (2012) Game of Thrones Silicon Veep (N) Last Week Game of
S302 201 302 2 2 Stereo)'MA'" Sylvester Stallone. 'R' "Oathkeeper"'MA' Valley (N) 'MA To. Thrones
_**_ "Snitch"(2013) Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones (In *** "Pacific Rim" (2013) Charlie Hunnam, "Dream House"
3031202 303 'PG-13' Maher'MA'" Stereo)'MA'" Idris Elba. (In Stereo)'PG-13' (2011) N
T 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntlIntl Hunters HuntIntl Carib Carib Beach Beach Alaska Alaska Hunters HuntIntl
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
IS 51 54 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' PG' PG' PG' PG' PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' PG' 'PG'
2 2 "Escape From "Starving in Suburbia" (2014, Drama) Laura Drop Dead Diva (N) Devious Maids (N) "Starving in Suburbia'
E 24 38 24 31 Polygamy"(2013)'NR'Wiggins, zabellaMiko.'NR' *PGI PG'" (2014)'NR'.
50 119 To Be Announced ** "Anna Nicole"(2013 Docudrama) Agnes Those Who Kill "A Safe Those Who Kill "A Safe
_50 119 Bruckner, Martin Landau. NR'N Place" (N)'14' Place" 14'
*1 "Getaway" (2013 Action) Ethan Hawke. (In Ooln i,'n : ience Fiction) Tom ** "There's Something About May" (1998)
~10 'e 320e221s20 3 3 hterAbetwayM(2013,199g)
S 320221 320 3 3 Stereo)'PG-13' .1. ,, :,-1-, i.: i 'm Cameron Diaz. (In Stereo)'R'N
Caught on Camera Caught on Camera "I'm Caught on Camera Sex Slaves: The Sex Slaves: The Johns Sex Slaves- Massage
ANjiJ42 41 42 Cgo a Alivera l" "Eyes Everywhere" Sunshine State (N) Parlors
109 65 109 44 53 ~ Kentucky Justice 'PG' Wicked Tuna "Bad Wicked Tuna "Battle Wicked Tuna "Brotherly Filthy Riches "Hungry Wicked Tuna "Brotherly
109 65 109 44 53 Latitude"'14' Royale" 14' Shove" (N)'14' for Money"'14' Shove"'14'
BiCK] 28 36 28 35 25 Haunted Thunder Sam& |Sam& **"The WildThornberrys Movie" Full H'se FullH'se Friends Friends
CW 103 62 103 lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life "Running From Crazy" (2012) 'NR' lyanla, Fix My Life
XY 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped PG Snaed N *PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' "
*** "Coach Carter" Years of Living Californication Nurse Nurse Californication Years of Living Nurse Calfornication
5DVWJ 340 241 340 4 (2005) Dangerously 'PG' Jackie Jackie (N) Dangerously (N)'PG' Jackie
i 37 43 37 27 3 Bar Rescue "A Bar Full Bar Rescue "Jon of the Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "I Smell a Contractor Contractor Bar Rescue "Brawlin'
37 43 37 27 36 of Bull"'PG' Dead" 'PG' 'PG' Rat" (N)'PG' {Babes"'PG'
7 21 3**** "Unforgiven" (1992, Western) Clint Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons *** "Elysium"(2013, Science Fiction) Matt
370 271 370 Eastwood. (InStereo)'R' (iTV) 'MA' (iTV) 'MA' m Damon. (In Stereo) 'R' N
Uj 3 Into the Saltwater Sport Ship Sportsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpone Reel NBA
36 31 36 Blue'G' Exp. Fishing Shape TV Flats FishingI Tournament Series Animals 'G' Basketball
S 31 9 1 26 2 "Machete" "Vikingdom" (2013, Adventure) Dominic Purcell. Eirick, a **2 "The Day After Tomorrow" (2004, Action) Dennis "Stardust'
31 59 31 26 29 'R' forgotten king, is tasked with killing Thor. NR' Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal, lan Holm.'PG-13'
(B 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Cowboys & Aliens"(2011)(DVS) ** "NationalTreasure: Book of Secrets" (2007) 'PG' "NationalTreasure: Book"
S5 1 3 3 *** "'Royal Wedding"(1951 Musical) Fred *** "Too Many Husbands" *** "My Favorite Wife" (1940) Irene Dunne. A presumed-
J 1 69 53 169 30 35 Astaire, Jane Powell. N (DVS) (1940) Jean Arthur. 'NR' dead wife returns to find her husband remarried.
SAlaska: The Last Naked and Afraid Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid:
53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14'" "Mayan Misery"'14' Stereo)'14'" Uncensored (N)'14' (In Stereo)'14'" Uncensored'14'
jL 50 46 50 29 30 My 600-Lb. Life'PG' My 600-Lb. Life'PG' Medium IMedium Medium IMedium My Five Wives 'PG' Medium IMedium
S 30 261 3 *** "The Illusionist" (2006, Mystery) Edward *** "The Master"(2012) Joaquin Phoenix. A drifter ** "Hollywoodland"(2006,
350 261 350 Norton. (In Stereo)'PG-13'" becomes a charismatic religious leader's disciple. Mystery) Adrien Brody.'R'N
S 48 3 8 31 3 "Dark NBA Tip- NBA Basketball Toronto Raptors at Brooklyn Nets. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers.
48 33 48 31 34 Knight" Off (N) (N) (Live) N
TOON 38 58 38 33 "Scooby-Doo 2" Clarence Tom/ Venture |Chicken Rick Burgers Burgers I Fam. Guy Fam.Guy Chicken
TRA 9 106 9 44 Xtreme Waterparks Trip Flip Trip Fli p Mysteries-Museum Secrets- Lege. Secrets- Lege. Mysteries-Museum
ruTV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... truTV Top Funniest truTV Top Funniest truTV Top Funniest truTV To Funniest
(TVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan's Island'G' Gilligan Gilligan Gligan Gilligan Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Cleveland
4a &7 7 7 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special
04) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14"
7 7 :117 i69 1 -, Grizzly CSI: Miami "Triple CSI: Miami "Bloodline" CSI: Miami "Rush" (In CSI: Miami "Just CSI: Miami Delko fights
S117 169 117 1 1,,,,,, Threat"'14' '14' mStereo)'14'm Murdered"'14'B for his life.'14'
I WRNAj 118 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Videos *** "300" (2007, Action) Gerard Butler. 'R' Salem (N) 'MA' Salem 'MA'


Different doctrines


causing problems


D ear Annie: My
boyfriend and I
have been to-
gether for three years,
although we've been
apart a great deal of that
time due to college and
work. Now that we are
able to relocate together,
my boyfriend expects me
to participate more with
his family, especially
over the Christmas holi-
days.
All of his
family mem-
bers are prac-
ticing
Christians. I
am a Pagan. I
don't mind
spending
time with
them, but I do
not pray be-
fore I eat, I '
don't attend
any type of ANN
church, nor MAIL
do I celebrate
these holi-
days in any way, includ-
ing buying or receiving
presents. All of this cele-
bration makes me un-
comfortable, so I stay
away
My boyfriend insists
that I'm being selfish
and should "deal with
it." But he disregards all
of the celebrations that
come with my spiritual-
ity I have offered to go to
his family's celebrations
as long as I don't need to
go to church or exchange
gifts. But he still gives
me a hard time about it.
I'm perfectly happy
staying home while he


I
.I


enjoys these special holi-
day times, but he says
I'm being difficult, and
the argument loops
around again.
How do I get him to ac-
cept that not everyone
sees life the way his fam-
ily does? Different
Gods
Dear Different: Your
compromise -to spend
holidays with his family
as long as you
don't need to
attend church
or exchange
gifts --is rea-
sonable. How-
ever, your
boyfriend
wants you to
conform to his
family's idea of
celebration, ei-
ther because
he doesn't re-
E'S aspect your be-
BOX liefs or, more
likely, because
he wants to
avoid his family's disap-
proval.
Please don't assume
these religious differ-
ences are only relevant
at Christmas. If you de-
cide to have children to-
gether, this problem will
get ugly quickly In any
relationship, religious
differences can be a
major stumbling block,
not to mention, your
boyfriend does not de-
fend you to his parents.
If these conflicts aren't
resolved in a mutually
agreeable way, the rela-
tionship is likely to
flounder


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Brick Mansions" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:05 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
2 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R)
4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Quiet Ones" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 1:45 p.m.,
7:25 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13)


1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 3:45 p.m. No passes.
"A Haunted House 2" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12 p.m., 1:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Smith and Sandier
6 Essential oil
11 Separated
16 Was in a rage
21 Airman
22 River in France
23 Greenish songbird
24 Smell
25 Wet
26 Crispy quality
28 Metal mass
29 Abbr. in business
30 Palo-, Calif.
31 Jogged
32 Plant fiber
34 Western Indian
35 Onion relative
37 In medias-
38 Freight
40 Little lump
41 Directed
42 Old Roman poet
44 Ridicule
46 Tug
49 Consecrated
52 Long-eared animal
53 Jewel
55 Sounded a horn
59 War vessel (Hyph.)
60 Bit of smoke
61 Molded
64 Theater employee
65 Poetic time of day
66 Costly fur
67 Zoo denizen
68 "Wynken, Blynken, and

70 Withered
71 Melody
72 Certain relative
73 Plantation
74 Whole range
76 Estuary
77 Purify
79 Calendar abbr.
80 Long story
82 Sounded a bell
84 Connect
85 Get along
86 Fable
87 Oversized
sandwich
88 Lunar landscape feature
90 Regular
91 Predatory bird
92 Of baked clay


95 Swat
96 Mercury model
98 Daybreak
100 Trick
101 Baseball stat.
102 Use a blue pencil
104 -Aviv
105 Stitched
106 By-and starts
107 Ragout
108 Where Greeks once
gathered
110 Rule
112 Easily managed
113 Play part
114 Occupant
116 Intelligence
117 Comic's offering
118 Anchored
119 Landing place
121 Illegal drug
124 Harangue
125 -soda
128 Take it on the-
130 Dapper
131 -canto
132 Diplomat's forte
136 Books pro (Abbr.)
137 Early rock icon
139 Destiny
140 Forfearthat
141 Cry of contempt
142 Swift
144 Dissipated
147 Violin maker
149 Frosting
150 Din
151 Kind of candle
152 Consumed
153 Troublesome
154 Goofed
155 Baking need
156 Office worker


DOWN
1 Time of year
2 Laneor Ladd
3 Wonderland girl
4 Sun. follower
5 Piggery
6 Walked leisurely
7 Bakery items
8 Threesome
9 Insect
10 Go over again
11 Get retribution for


12 Fastener
13 War god
14 Plant secretion
15 Matter of chance (Hyph.)
16 Flunk
17 Samovar
18 Business giant
19 Overact
20 Old-fashioned
27 Carefree
adventure
30 Dry
33 Touch on
36 Holy writings
of Islam
38 Co. type
39 Music maker
43 Animal doc
44 False face
45 For sure!
47 Rawls or Gehrig
48 Deprivation
49 Tanning material
50 Seething
51 Statistical
relationship
52 Clue
54 Danger
56 Sick-room item
57 Strange
58 Fear
60 and dine
61 Knight's title
62 Place of birth
63 Monk's title
66 Aquatic rodent
67 Purple shade
69 Noblewoman
72 Queen -lace
73 Links warning
74 Breathing organ
75 Here and -
78 Islet
79 Church part
81 Kind of broker
83 Nest-egg letters
85 Guy
88 Swindle
89 Raised line
92 Attractive
93 Goddess of peace
94 Cried like a crow
97 Panhandle
99 Plant bristle
100 "The-of the
Ancient Mariner"
103 Capture


- Hall University
Bogus
F. Fitzgerald
Black cuckoo
Damone or Morrow
Entertainment award
Child
Reveal
Visibly nervous
Grain for brewing


Gully
Soothed
On the summit of
Feel indignation
Money substitute
Swiftly
- lazuli
Asia-
Greek letters
Die down


Puzzle answer is on Page A15.

Th4E 67IS l1 1
2,. ^ i ^ ~ ^ ~^

25 2:I:I
TA --


Provide food for
Opine
Tense
Commotion
Dalai -
Writing fluid
Opposite of WNW
Fish eggs
Defunct nuclear agcy.
- de mer


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for FS


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


A12 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Smart Spending:


Get your groove on, on a budget


Associated Press
NEW YORK -As the air gets warmer and spring
blossoms, the season of music festivals is upon us.
From Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Tennessee in
June to Lollapalooza in Chicago in August, music
lovers across the country will soon begin to flocking to
festivals, which can draw hundreds of thousands of
fans.
It's easy to get caught up in the excitement and
spend a bundle, on everything from tickets to accom-
modations to bottles of water But with a little fore-
sight, it's easy to cut down on excess spending and
enjoy the music and excitement without breaking the
bank.
BEFORE YOU GO: Tickets are usually pricey, but If
you plan enough in advance, you can at least shave off
a little money and buy with early-bird discounts. For
cheaper rates, consider if you want to buy a day pass
or two instead of a full festival pass.
Camping is the cheapest lodging option of course.
But if that isn't an option, or if you prefer to stay at a
hotel, book your hotel first, before your airfare, recom-
mends Andrew Young, editorial director, North Amer-
ica of travel site Travelzoo. The cheapest hotel rooms


book up quickly, and flights can be more flexible.
Also make sure to check for a secondary airport in
the region of the festival that might have cheaper
fares. And if you have a day or two to spare for your
vacation, come a day early and leave a day late, when
airfare will likely be cheaper, Young says.
The more information you have, the more likely you
are to make smart spending choices. Download the
festival's own app as well as apps like Festival Ready,
which includes navigation and weather forecasts. Yelp
and travel apps like Travelzoo or Expedia can also
help you find your way around or get last-minute dis-
counts on spots around town.
Carpooling is one of the best ways to save, Young
says, and there are even some hidden benefits when
festivals seek to reward carpoolers. At Coachella ear-
lier this month, for example, carpoolers with four or
more people in the car could print out a sign for their
dashboard that said "Carpoolchella," and were en-
tered into a contest that could result in winning VIP
tickets to Coachella for life and other prizes. Check
with the festival you're attending to see if it does any-
thing similar
AT THE FESTIVAL: If you're committed to saving
cash, consider volunteering. That has the obvious ad-


vantage of getting you into the festival free, but make
sure you consider the drawbacks, Young says.
"Those lists often fill up quick, and depending on
what's involved, you may see the festival from a dis-
tance, but you may get a little bit of off time," he says.
"Whether you volunteer depends on what your will-
ingness is to work during the festival."
The biggest money drain can be things that you
could have brought if you'd just prepared in advance.
Water is a big one. It can cost several dollars a bottle,
and when you're out all day in the scorching heat, that
can add up. Bring your own water, or if the festival
does not allow that, bring a water bottle or CamelBak.
Most festivals are required to offer free drinkable
water, though it might be well water that doesn't taste
the greatest.
Bringing snacks if the festival allows that can save a
lot of dough, too. And make sure you have essentials
like sunscreen and a hat, so you don't have to buy
them at the festival at a markup. Young recommends
buddying up with fellow festivalgoers and dividing up
what to bring, so you don't end up with seven bottles of
sunscreen but no Band-Aids.


CON TEST GRAND

PRIZE
R~rulnch for 4 &


Submit Photos April 11th-27th
Vote April 28th May 9th
Winners announced May 11th

Thank You to Our Sponsors
DAOT -* Jim Green Jewelers
PLANTATION : Specialty Gems
1,_____ ,,,,- Gus's Gold


JI UIIVIIl~l NI lr%
112 day Pontoon
Rental from
Plantation on
Crystal River &
Jewelry from
^^ Jim Green
Jewelers



CITRUS COUNT
ChOnNIC`E
www.chronicleonline.com


B&"Ie 0 9
I' the puravit )f health+
FWH & Associates
(352) 476-5111
3871 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Frank Triolo
ftriolo34450@gmail.com
If you are currently appointed to sell individual products with Florida Blue, please disregard this advertisement.
Florida BlueisanTndependentUcenseeofthe BlueCrossand BlueShield Association. 76527.-0414Agt
Email: #76527 ooo0w6


Eye Center
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa
(352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123
Board :,- ;'n-, 1 ......1iir1 ,,, ,. .i,..,j 11,,1 ,;'i,.,r,,, ,,, ,.,,.
B oa rd ri;, ,- ,;,h -, r .;, .l ,, 1 ,, 1-" ,,,, .-.:1h,,, 1-,', 1-h v ;', : ;':, ': l 4 i .,,,,,,


rFree -
ctuotes

p pro,
our
or your
or ) Ll
r6ject
I


Kitchen & Bath


wcrnceonieSSm/m S


Hondcu Countertops
has just opened our exciting new showroom featuring
the latest in kitchen and bath cabinetry, countertops
and flooring. Come by or call for free quote.


P1. NNTATON Reservation Suggested
352-795-5797
..... r .,.r .g.. www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS
70.


Hors onay-Frda 0 am-0 -*Sauray 0 ..- p
A Aftrhrbapin
8075SWighwy00,
'(352) 653-70184? or7Tf (352) 4^77 6-8J^ 762^^


PHOTO


Becky's fr' vIStor
1,71Y 1 '1191,MCarnivalf
Day of Art VIKING
m & Leisure RIVER CRUISES CRUISE
&'0 Leisure Grand Cayman
.VisoWinl.r Park Getyour & Cozumel
b 5..Ihseum $200.00 Ship Jan. 5, 2015
S(FineArt) fromTampa
&MorseMuseum Board Credit Starting at .pP
Starting at 356.00 pp
(Tiffany Glass) For all new bookings Ship board aedit 25.00 plus
Cost $55.00 per person confirmedbyMay6, 2014 bottle ofChampaneper cabin
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (2 578
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352)527-8855
.wwbeckystravelsice.com 00011I


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 A13










'ERANS __
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


New officers


VETERANS NOTES

Florida Artists Gallery
& Caf6 honors veterans
The Florida Artists Gallery & Cafe will
celebrate the month of May with an exhi-
bition spotlighting military veteran artists
who live in Citrus and adjoining counties.
The exhibit will open at The Gallery
Cafe on May 3 and run through May 31. A
special Memorial Day open house will be
hosted on the afternoon of May 26.
The Florida Artists Gallery & Cafe is in
the historic Knight House at 8219 Orange
Ave. in Floral City The Gallery and Cafe
are open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven days a
week. Admission is free.
For more information, call 352-344-9300,
visit wwwflartistsgallerycom or visit on
Facebook.

Vendors sought for health
fair at Crystal River Mall
Organizers of the May 10 Health Fair at
the Crystal River Mall are looking for
vendors.
The event, sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter 158 and the Crystal
River Mall, will be in the Westend Market
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Spring into Healthy Living" is the
theme for the fair, which will feature edu-
cation, screening and healthy living
consultations.
Those interested in participating may
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104.

Meatloaf on menu May 2
for VFW Post 4864
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 invites
the public to a meatloaf dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 2, at 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
The cost is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4.
The bloodmobile will be at the post on
Friday, May 2, starting at 4 p.m. Anyone do-
nating blood will receive a free dinner
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Public welcome at
Kentucky Derby Party
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for a Kentucky Derby
Party beginning at 4 p.m. Saturday, May 3,
at the post home, 906 State Road 44 East,
Inverness.
Enjoy mint julep specials, participate in
the hat contest and be entertained with
Turner Camp Dave's Variety Show Fried
chicken dinner may be purchased for $7
from 5 to 7 p.m. and includes mashed pota-
toes, gravy, green beans, coleslaw and
dessert.
Call352-344-3495 or visit wwwvfw4337.
org, for information about all post events.

American Legion Post 77
invites all to jam May 2
Everyone is welcome at the American
Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam from
6 to 9 p.m. May 2 with Nashville artist John
Thomas and the Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Public welcome at Dunnellon
American Legion activities
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the American
Legion will have an outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m.
Saturday May 19.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausages, orange
juice and coffee for $5 per person.
Memorial Day services will be at 11 a.m.
Monday, May 26, at the post. A picnic lunch
will follow.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Veterans Coalition stages
monthly yard sales
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where
U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call Dan at 352-
400-8952.


k ,I


Special to the Chronicle
American Legion Riders 155 use motorcycles to help veterans, their families and the community. The group held their
annual Poker Run on Saturday, March 31, to benefit veterans served by Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast. Pictured,
at far right, is Poker Run Chairperson "Timber" as he instructs fellow riders and event volunteers prior to the start of the
annual fundraiser.


I:


\fA-


*I1 ~


Special to the Chronicle
Unit 776 Ladies Auxiliary Military Order of the Purple Heart (LAMOPH) recently installed 2014-15 officers. From left are:
Marie Williams, chaplain; Linda Schlaudraff, three-year trustee; Ann Fair, two-year trustee and historian; Pat Layman,
parliamentarian; Pat Michael, secretary; Peggy Stants, treasurer; Vikki Pietras, senior vice president and Tee Pasay,
president. Not pictured are: Mickey Hunt, sergeant-at-arms, and Mari-Elain Ebitz, publicity. The LAMOPH consists of
mothers, wives, sisters, widows, daughters, stepdaughters, granddaughters and legally adopted female lineal descendants
of Purple Heart recipients, even if that Purple Heart recipient is not a member of the MOPH. If you are interested and
eligible to become a member, visit www.citruspurpleheart.org and click on "Forms."


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding each
group. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meetings, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or
email the contact listed. Posts
and groups may email changes
or corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Call 352-795-
6526, email blantonthompson
Post155@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544,
or email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the
Beverly Plaza. Visit www.
Post237.org or call 352-746-
5018.
Allen-Rawls American


Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at
352-476-2134 or Auxiliary
president Alice Brumett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule. Meet-
ings are the first Monday at
7 p.m. at the Springs Lodge No.
378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial
Drive, Homosassa. To accom-
modate members who cannot
drive at night, breakfast meet-
ings are also held at Olive Tree
at 9 a.m. weekly. Call Com-
mander Robert Scott at 352-
860-2090 for days and other
information.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City.
Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.


Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. Call 352-
637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S.
19. Call 352-447-3495.
OTHER GROUPS
Military Order of the
Cootie and MOC Auxiliary
members meet at 1:01 p.m. the
first Sunday monthly at Leroy
Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in
Hernando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway/State Road 200),
where the helicopter is.


AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road 40,
Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M. Bailey
Post 89, Homosassa. The newly
formed post meets the first
Thursday of the month. Call
Roger Ingall Jr. at 352-697-1826
or Jerry Webb at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, at the intersec-
tion of Independence Highway
and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy Godfrey
at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more in-
formation, call Duane Godfrey at
352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834.

See Page A15


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Poker run instructions


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from PageA14

The Korean War
Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine
Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
National Seabee
Veterans of America Island
X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club, Hernando. Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
National Seabee
Veterans of America
Auxiliary ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver


Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at the
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim Echlin,
Capt. U.S. Air Force, retired,
at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-637-
6206.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at


352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill. The
next meeting is May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4 meets at West
Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call
Wilbur B. Scott at 352-628-
0639 or Robert Currie at 352-
799-5250.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. second Saturday at
Elks Lodge No. 2522, 3580


Lemon Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com,
call President Archie Gooding
at 352-464-0863 or email
GatorDad0527@tampabay.
rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, seeks to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence
at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, or
email charles.lawrence@
servicesource.org.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.


A D A M SeA T T A R A P A R TBF U M E D
P I L OTiM A R N E V I R EQ OARO M A
RAINY BR I TTLYEBESING0OT
L E EK R ES CA R GO N UB LE D
0VID M-CKERY PULL
S A C "R-E D H A-"R-E1 G'-E- M DT U-0"TwE D

MO0R N M I N K 1LION NO0D0SERE
A IR A U NT F A RM GA M UT 0R IA
C L EANSE NOV EPICOH I MED
Lm I TN-i .. F A-R- E T-A-L E HE -R-i
C R A T E -RE-V-E-N O--W L Ci RAIU I C

EDIT EL SE WN FITS STTEWR
D TGO VEIREN TAMIEN SCE
TA T JOK E MOORE
PIR COCAI NERANIT
SAL LAM NAT T BE TACT
C-P-A ELVIS LOT LIES BAH
R-A-P-ID INT-E-MPERATE A-M ATT
I C I N GiNOI S E RO M AN E A T EN
PESKIYiE RRED YEAST CLERK
4-27 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for FS


WELCOME BACK,

SNOWBIRDS!


Blue Cross Blue Shield

Federal Insurance pays total cost of

2 Miracle Ear Digital Hearing Aids.
Federal Government Insurance
code #104, #105, #111, or #112.


Empie Sate nsuancePla
pasfrtta oto

26Mrace 6Er 6

DgtlHaing A id


'FREE'
**HEARING TEST
S*BATTERY REPLACEMENT U
HEARING AID REPAIRS
I Must present coupon. Any make or I
m-dei n office only. One week only.


Ai







BATRTERIS
I PREMIUM AA,'
I ZINC
BATTERIES 99 I
Limit 1 Coupon Per Visit. Limit I
2 Packs Per Visit. Must present
Li coupon. One week only.j


Call
fora
FREE

demo


Mtoday!T


SAME AS CASH ;

O0%I
I FINANCING
I ONE WEEK ONLY.


BlueCross
BlucShield


SECURITY

ISN'T FAR AWAY...


Did you know you can put your
savings into a gift that helps you
and helps others at the same time?
Learn about charitable gift annuities -
how they can secure your future income,
reduce taxes and even make you money!

mSIM HfUt 941130 iUL
Reservations required by April 29, 2014
Key Training Center Foundation Office
5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
Call 795-5541, ext. 311
Continental breakfast All materials included

FEE TO THE PUBLIC


VETERANS


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 A15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Military dog that saved patrol retires with honors


Associated Press

Staff Sgt. Shannon Hutto
thought his bomb-sniffing dog
Eddie was just being lazy when
he wouldn't move from a cer-
tain spot one hot day in
Afghanistan in 2012.
But Hutto then saw what
Eddie smelled: a homemade
bomb, partially buried in the
dirt It was six inches from
Hutto's foot.
"It was a high-stress mo-
ment," Hutto said.
A short time later, Eddie
sniffed out another improvised
explosive placed on a bridge
the patrol unit was about to


cross.
Eddie saved Hutto's life, the
lives of a dozen patrol members
and countless people in the vil-
lage.
For his service, Eddie retired
recently with full military hon-
ors. The ceremony was held at
MacDill Air Force Base in
Tampa, and a few dozen sol-
diers turned out to cheer Eddie
on.
The Belgian Malinois dog
was assigned to MacDill's 6th
Security Forces Squadron and
has served for about five years.
He's also helped sweep govern-
ment buildings and helped the
Secret Service by checking


presidential and vice presiden-
tial visit venues.
In retirement, he will be re-
united with his first handler,
Andrew Grymes.
Hutto said he will be forever
grateful to Eddie for saving his
life.
During the brief retirement
ceremony, Eddie wasn't quite
sure what to make of all the
people clapping, talking and
saluting. He appeared non-
plussed when someone for-
mally handed Hutto a plaque.
But when Carol White, a pri-
vate Air Force contractor, gave
him a special cake made out of
peanut butter and bananas, he


dove right in.
As a working dog, Eddie was-
n't allowed such luxuries. Now
he's free to enjoy the pleasures
of retirement.
"He can go and be a pet,"
said Hutto. "100 percent, sitting
on the couch, playing with toys,
sleeping in the bed."

Security Forces Squadron flight
chief Matthew Weaver salutes
Staff Sgt. Shannon Hutto, a
military working dog trainer, and
Eddie, a Belgian Malinois, during
a ceremony at MacDill Air Force
Base in Tampa April 11.

Associated Press


VETERANS NOTES


40&8 to have
breakfast May 4
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 welcomes the public
to breakfast from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. May 4 at Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for
adults; special on kids' (8
and younger) meals. Spe-
cialty drinks available for
$1. The hall is smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit pro-
grams of the 40&8.

Cooties, auxiliary
to serve pasta
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent
76 will serve a pasta din-
ner with meat sauce,
salad, garlic bread,
dessert and coffee from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, May
30, at Leroy Rooks Jr
VFW Post 4252 in Her-
nando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway State Road
200, where the helicopter
is). The public is invited.
Tickets are $7 per per-
son and can be purchased
at Post 4252. Call 352-726-
3339 or Seam Squirrel
Paul Kimmerling at 352-
795-4142.

Male descendants
sought for group
The American Legion
Post 166 of Homosassa
Springs is seeking all
male descendants,
adopted sons and step-
sons of members of the
American Legion and
such male descendants of
veterans who died in the
service to their country
during times of war
Such men in the Chas-
sahowitzka, Homosassa,
Homosassa Springs and
the Sugarmill Woods area
who are interested in be-
coming members of the
Sons of the American Le-
gion are needed. There is
no form or class of mem-
bership, except as active
membership.
Those interested in be-
coming members may
contact Clay Scott, vice
commander of American
Legion Post 166. He may
be reached by writing to
American Legion Post
166, PO. Box 767, Ho-
mosassa Springs, FL
34447-0767, or at 928-848-
8359. His email address is
eaglerider@gmx. com.
Interested men may
stop by the post on the
regular meeting night, the
first Monday monthly, at
7 p.m. at the Spring Lodge
No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S.
Memorial Drive.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5.
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Public invited for
shrimp, wings
Everyone is welcome to
join Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
in Crystal River on
Wednesday for wings or
shrimp basket lunches in
the lounge from noon to
3p.m.
All proceeds benefit
veterans' programs.
For more information,
call 352-795-6526.


Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), often has
special events that are
open to the public.
On a regular basis,
bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday
in the smoke-free hall.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Come play
games with post
VFW Post 8189 in Ho-
mosassa invites the public
to have some fun.
Bingo is played at
2 p.m. Wednesday and
food is available. Jam ses-
sions are from 3 to 7 p.m.
Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa.

Post 4252 invites
all for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State
Road 200 in Hernando
(with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the pub-
lic at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch
every day and breakfast
on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include
bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show
Me the Hand at 2 p.m.
Thursday Dance music is
on tap every Friday and
bingo is played in the hall
Saturday
Friday features an all-
you-can-eat fish fry or
New England boiled
dinner
For more information
and menus, call the post
at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay
rrcom and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-


teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.


manager will be available
Wednesday, May 7, at the
Lakes Region Library For
questions, call Samuel
Dininno, county veterans
services officer, at 352-
527-5915.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library
8619 W Crystal St, Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.


'In Their Words' Office has help for
wants stories vets with PTSD


The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The regular monthly
schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Please note that no case


Visit
ALL WOOD CABINETRY Our
" Outdoor Kitchens Showroom!
* Entertainment Centers
* Custom Offices Baths
* Kitchen Laminate Floors
* Hardwood & Travertine Specialists

\ __ \ DMT
-"- ,, 486 CABINETS, INC.
Crystal Riv
44 U
Inverness
19 41t

S N


The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-


ment is looking for veter-
ans who have recently
transitioned from the mil-
itary (or returning re-
servist from tours of
active duty) to Citrus
County within the past
two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat.

Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
background check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
com, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice has
program for vets
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans


and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.

Prior enlisted
sought for service
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select ca-
reer fields.
Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other special-
ties. Enlisted career
openings that include the
opportunities to retrain
consist of special opera-
tions positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes
offered to vets
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated
with the national service
organization, Yoga For
Vets. She teaches free
classes to combat veter-
ans at several locations
and times.
Call 352-382-7397.

Chilton reunion
set in September
The next reunion for
the USS Chilton will be
Sept. 17 to 24 in
Louisville, Ky.
For information, call
Joe at 352-341-5959.


Another


Satisfied


Customer
"The technician was a true professional. He
was knowledgeable, cooperative and
congenial. The scheduling by phone was
handled patiently and pleasantly. The work
was done swiftly and I will spread the word
about your company."


We Specialize in:
SWhole House Re-pipes
SWater & Drain Lines for Kitchen & Bath Additions
SSlab Leak Repairs
SWater Heater Service & Replacement
STankless Water Heater Repair & Replacement
SDripping Faucet or Hose Bib Repair & Replacement


SAdditional Hose Bib Installations
SWater Softener Installation
SToilet Repair & Replacement
SSewer Line Repair & Replacement
SSewer Camera Services
Sand much more!


~7I

d

I *


"IF WATER RUNS THROUGH IT,.WE DO IT"




Over 25 Years of Plumbing Excellence.


www. m,-fll,,ing. com


, $10 OFF ANY SERVICE
Restrictions apply. Offer expires 5/31/2014.

668 E. Overdrive Circle, Hernando, FL 34442
24 Hour Emergency Service! Toll Free: 866-314-4443

Crystal River 352-563-9976 icesed C sured Inverness 352-344-0322


A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ready for safe boating


Learning Center

seeks public input


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the Ho-
mosassa Learning Cen-
ter committee invite
residents to a town hall
meeting and open house
at 6:30 p.m. Thursday,
May 1, at the new
learning center
Construction of the old
fire station is nearing
completion and has
transformed the building
to accommodate class-
rooms and learning
areas.
Committee members
are now ready for public
input on what they
would like to see at the
new learning center
"We want members of
the community to be-
come part of this learn-


Special to the Chronicle
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-01 of Crystal River prepared another group of local residents for a safe
boating experience. Plan to increase your boating knowledge by taking a U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary safe boating
class. For more information about upcoming classes, call Linda Jones at 352-503-6199. Attend the next flotilla
meeting to get an idea of what it does and how you can make a difference in your community. Meetings are the
first Monday of each month beginning at 6:30 p.m. at 148 N.E. Fifth St. in Crystal River.For membership
information, call 917-597-6961. Pictured, from left, are: Dave Hurt, Diane Larson, James Perry, David Weiser,
Harold Nicholson, Katherine Nicholson, instructor Linda Jones and instructor trainee Bill Burley.


NEWS NOTES


ing center to help it grow
and to help those who
want to learn," said Jim
Bitter, committee
co-chairman.
The learning center is
also in need of volun-
teers to help in various
areas, including tutors,
assistants, computer
techs and others.
Background checks
and fingerprinting
may be required for
volunteers.
The town hall meeting
will take place at the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club, be-
hind the learning center
at the corner of Yulee
Drive and Mason Creek
Road.
The Learning Center
is a division of the
Homosassa Civic Club.


Humane Society OF CITRUS CO.

Tia and Torry


Head Start plans Social club to host
open house EMS speaker


Crystal River Preschool
Head Start will hold an
Open House from 6 to
8 p.m. Tuesday
Open enrollment will
be held for the fall Head
Start/Early Head Start
program. Enrollment for
the summer and fall
VPRE-K is also available.
IJUMP will be providing a
jump house for the chil-
dren's entertainment.
Come stop by take a look
at all of the programs of-
fered from birth to age 12.
Summer scheduled activi-
ties are available for
school-age children, too.
Crystal River Preschool
Head Start is at 639 N.E.
First St., Crystal River, be-
hind Burger King.
For information, call
Cozette Pierce, director,
at 352-795-2266.


The British American
Social Club will host a
speaker from Nature
Coast EMS at 7 p.m. Mon-
day at the Crystal River
Woman's Club, 32 N.
Citrus Ave.
The club meets the
fourth Monday monthly,
offering speakers and ac-
tivities: trivia quiz, bingo,
discussions, river trips
and visits to the theater,
other towns and places of
interest.
The club welcomes all
who have an interest in or
connection to the United
Kingdom, the Common-
wealth, its history and
culture. Details of meet-
ings and activities are on
the club's website at
www.britamclub.com, or
call Dave Jones at 352-
382-3418.


Walk, roll, run
to help Aspire
Aspire Relationship
Center announces the
second annual Walk &
Roll-A-Thon from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday, May 3.
Starting at the Withla-
coochee Bay Trail and
Felburn Park, runners,
bikers, walkers and
rollerbladers of all ages
are welcome to come out
and support the school-
based program.
The RIVER Project,
taught in local middle and
high schools, reaches over
4,000 Citrus County teens
annually with the infor-
mation to establish
healthy sexuality and
support healthy relation-
ships.
Nick Nicholas Ford is
sponsoring the Drive 4
UR Community event
Come and test drive a


new Ford and Ford Motor
Co. will donate $20 to As-
pire Home of The
RIVER Project for every
test drive taken at the
event.
For more information,
visit www.theriver
project info/events.


Send yournews
notes to
community@
chronicleonline.com


Special to the Chronicle
These two beautiful puppies are part of a litter of
seven born to a sweet American Staffordshire terrier
that came into the rescue. Her babies were born
Feb. 19 and will soon be ready for loving forever
homes The two pictured are Tia and Torry. To adopt
one, the Humane Society does require an approved
application and adoption fee. To access an adoption
application or to view other available pets, visit
www.roomforonemore.net and for more information,
call Karron at 352-560-0051.


......... ...... .... ...............
Fully Licensed and In'sured*D I ...LowI.

We Service, Install & Provide

Warranty Services for Nearly

All Brands!


* Custom Duct Cleaning Heat Pump Specialists
* Mobile Home Specialists UV Light and Filter Systems
@ Maintenance Agreements

Ask about our financing offers!


0% Interest

For 48 months _


F .. . ,
,,. 7i


Community Grand Opening
i i ' ill I

Dedication of the Veteran's Walkway immediately followed by the ribbon cutting,
dove and butterfly release, tours and light refreshments.
No RSVPs required. Questions? Please call HPH Hospice at 527-4600.


hospice
2939 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. pw&N
a not-for-profit organization initially licensed in 1984
Lecanto, Florida 34461 www.HPH-Hospice.org


Airfr


AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING


0


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 A17


^


000112T




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


World's Greatest Baby Shower


Special to the Chronicle
The World's Greatest Baby Shower will be held at Cornerstone Church, 1100 W.
Highland Blvd., Inverness. If you are expecting a baby or are a parent of an infant
younger than 6 months old you are invited to attend on May I and learn about
taking care of yourself and your baby. There will be an early session from 3 to 5
p.m. and a second session from 6 to 8 p.m. Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast
Public Relations Manager Joe Foster is pictured presenting a donation for the
event to Citrus Memorial Health System Obstetrics Nurse (and expectant mom)
Tammi Robinson, R.N., on behalf of Herry's Kids, the Pediatric Services Program of
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast. The World's Greatest Baby Shower will
offer exhibits, games, a scavenger hunt, gifts for moms, dads and babies and lots
of door prizes. The event is presented through a partnership of numerous
community organizations, businesses and individuals.


GET TOGETHER


Spirited group dances
bi-monthly in Beverly Hills
Spirit of Citrus Dancers, USA Dance
chapter 6072, holds social ballroom
dances on the second and fourth
Saturday of the month at Kellner
Auditorium Jewish Center, 92 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with


complimentary dance lessons at 7 p.m.
and general dancing from 7:30 to
10 p.m. Admission is $6 for members
and $9 for nonmembers.
Ice, coffee and snacks are provided.
Sodas and bottled water may be
purchased.
For more information, call Barb or
Jack at 352 344-1383 or JoAnn at 352
746-4274. Visit www.socdancer.org for
more information or schedule changes.


Five generations


Special to the Chronicle
Don and Helen Sells and their descendants gathered together on Easter at their
daughter Deborah's house, with five generations present. Pictured, from left, are:
mother Taylor Hutcheson, grandmother Tiffany Mendez, great-great grandmother
Helen Sells and great-grandmother Donna Barnes, holding 6-week-old Madison Leigh
Hutcheson, great-great-granddaughter.


FOR THE RECORD


April 7-13, 2014
Divorces
Sheridan Ann Gjelset vs.
Jan I. Gjelset, Dunnellon
Tracy M. Hawk, Crystal
River vs. Clyde L. Hawk Jr.,
Crystal River
Amy Lee Holland Grady,
Dunnellon vs. Patrick Gerald
Grady, Dunnellon
Mary B. Korn, New Port
News, Va. vs. Robert A. Korn,
Beverly Hills
Tina L. Pleacher, Dunnellon
vs. Russell M. Pleacher,
Hernando
Michele Elizabeth Smith,
Beverly Hills vs. Gerald Dean
Smith, Dunnellon
Denise M. Velez-Sliney,
Inverness vs. Kevin E. Sliney,
Inverness
Marriages
Vern Michael Carpenter,
Homosassa/Jessica Dawn


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Meurer, Homosassa
Bobby Alexander Demaris,
Floral City/Ashley Bernice
Gallagher, Floral City
Raymond Dunbar Jr.,
Citrus Springs/Nancy Rene
Hammock, Citrus Springs
Michael Dean Hamilton,
Homosassa/Colette Marie
Vanpelt, Homosassa
Neil Keith Huyler,
Inverness/Donna Marie
Johnson, Inverness
Joshua Luke Linaje,
Beverly Hills/Jennifer Marie
Brown, Beverly Hills
Gordon Ellis Marsh II,


Homosassa/Karen Sue
Flannery, Homosassa
Jaime Richard Massingill,
Inverness/Shannon Leigh
Carlton, Inverness
Lee Mitchell Schultz, Floral
City/Maureen Denise Kelly,
Floral City
Matt Andrew Simons,
Oxford, Mich./Sherry Lea
Swink, Ortonville, Mich.
Caleb Rex Spiegel,
Portland, Ore./Sonjaly Erica
Nicoll, Portland, Ore.
Marvin Gene Sullivan,
Crystal River/Debra Kay
Murphy, Crystal River


WANT TO SHARE YOUR GOOD NEWS?
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engagement
announcements, anniversaries, birth announcements and first birthdays.
To have forms emailed, call 352-563-5660 or email community@
chronicleonline.com.


EXTENDED
own OFFER!

CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL 5/4/14




ROOMS $Q



HALLL


Cleaning Completed By 5/4/14


AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIAL


$


EXTENDED
OFFER!
S5/4/14 -


Cleaning Completed By 5/4/14


BEYOND


A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


TOGETHER









SPORTS


Bruins win
decisively in B sv
Game 5, t
bringing Red i -,
Wings' season -- -
to an end./B6 '

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'7.


0 Adult recreation/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 Golf/B5
0 Tennis/B5
0 Basketball/B6
0 Hockey/B5


---q,


Rays rebound from hard loss, blank Sox


Associated Press
Los Angeles Clippers owner
Donald Sterling, center, and
V. Stiviano watch the Clippers
play the Sacramento Kings
on Oct. 25, 2013, during the
first half in Los Angeles.
NBA probing tape
of Clippers owner's
alleged racist remarks
SAN FRANCISCO--Anger,
frustration and calls for action
echoed around the NBA on
Saturday after an audio record-
ing surfaced of a man identified
as Los Angeles Clippers owner
Donald Sterling telling his girl-
friend not to bring black people
to games.
Everybody except for the em-
battled Clippers owner, who has
a decades-long history of discrim-
ination and offensive behavior,
seemed to have a response.
The league said it was inves-
tigating the recording posted
on TMZ's website, calling the
comments "disturbing and of-
fensive." Lakers Hall of Famer
Magic Johnson, a target of
Sterling's remarks, said he
wouldn't attend Clippers'
games as long as Sterling was
the owner. Miami Heat star Le-
Bron James asked new NBA
Commissioner Adam Silver to
take aggressive measures,
saying "there is no room for
Donald Sterling in our league."
Clippers coach Doc Rivers
said players even discussed
boycotting Game 4 of their first-
round playoff series at Golden
State on Sunday during a 45-
minute team meeting but
quickly decided against it.
Clippers President Andy
Roeser said in a statement that
the team did not know if the
tape is legitimate.
In the recording posted on
TMZ, the man questions his
girlfriend's association with mi-
norities. The man asked Stiviano,
who is of black and Mexican
descent, not to broadcast her
association with black people
or bring black people to games.
Caps part ways
with Oates, McPhee
WASHINGTON General
manager George McPhee and
coach Adam Oates lost their
jobs with the Washington Capi-
tals on Saturday after the team
failed to make the playoffs for
the first time since 2007.
McPhee's contract was up
and the team announced it will
not give him a new one after
his 17 years as the GM, which
included drafting Alex Ovechkin
and Nicklas Backstrom in the
first round.
Oates was fired with one
season left on his three-year
contract. A former star player
for the Capitals, he was in his
first job as an NHL head coach.
-From wire reports


Tampa Bay 4,

Chicago 0
Associated Press
CHICAGO Cesar Ramos and two
relievers combined to five-hit the
Chicago White Sox in a 4-0 win by the
Tampa Bay Rays on Saturday night.
Ramos (1-1) gave up all five hits over
five innings in his first scoreless start
of the season. He started in place of
Matt Moore, who had Tommy John sur-
gery on Tuesday
James Loney had three hits for the
Rays, who snapped a three-game los-


ing streak. Ryan Hanigan hit a two-run
double to give the Rays a 2-0 lead in
the second after Loney singled and
Logan Forsythe walked.
Loney's single extended the Rays'
lead to 3-0 in the third. Wil Myers
scored after he doubled.
White Sox starter John Danks (2-1)
struggled with his command and a
high pitch count. He allowed four runs
and seven hits in 5 2-3 innings. He
struck out four, walked four and threw
a career-high 123 pitches.
The White Sox threatened in the
fifth, loading the bases with a walk, a
single and another walk. Jose Abreu Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays catcher Ryan Hanigan hits a double
See Page B3 Saturday during the fourth inning in Chicago.


Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade drives past Charlotte Bobcats Al Jefferson (25) and
Kemba Walker on Saturday during the first half of Game 3 in Charlotte, N.C.




Playing hot

Associated Press Heat in 2010. Miami has won 19
straight overall against Charlotte.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Al Jefferson had 20 points for the
L eBron James had 30 points Bobcats, who are still searching for
and 10 rebounds, and the the first postseason win in franchise
Miami Heat defeated the history
Charlotte Bobcats 98-85 After trailing most of the first half,
Saturday night to take a 3-0 the Heat took a 42-40 lead on a 3-
lead in the Eastern Conference first pointer by Mario Chalmers. Miami
round series, closed the half on a 16-4 run.
Dwyane Wade added 17 points for Norris Cole hit a 5-foot bank shot
the Heat, who can close out the best- and then buried a 3-pointer from the
of-seven Monday night left wing to put the Heat up by five and
James, who was an efficient 10 of 18 Miami was off to the races.


from the field, pushed his record to 18-0
against the Bobcats since joining the


See Page B3


Logano's


late move


steals the


winat


Richmond

Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. Joey
Logano took advantage of a
three-car duel by sneaking
below the trio to take the lead
Saturday night, outrunning for-
mer champions Matt Kenseth,
Jeff Gordon and Brad Ke-
selowski to win at Richmond
International Raceway
Logano's first career victory
on the 0.75-mile oval came
seemingly from nowhere after a
restart with nine laps to go. He
sat fourth and on the outside
with Kenseth leading, Dale
Earnhardt Jr alongside in sec-
ond and Gordon on the inside
in third, in prime position to
move underneath the leader
and grab the victory
Instead, when Gordon, Kenseth
and Keselowski raced in a tri-
angle jockeying for position,
Logano went underneath all three
with three laps to go and then
held off Gordon for his fifth ca-
reer NASCAR Sprint Cup victory
"That's the best drive I've
ever had here. What a crazy fin-
ish," Logano said.
He also joined Kevin Harvick
as the only drivers with more
than one victory this season.
Kyle Busch, never in con-
tention all night, rose to finish
third, followed by Keselowski
and Kenseth.
Kenseth and Keselowski had
words post-race, with the fum-
ing Keselowski saying Kenseth
ran him off the track.
"I had a shot at winning the
race and he ran me off the track,"
Keselowski said. "It was just a
mind-boggling move to me. ... I
thought it was uncalled for"
Gordon said Kenseth was
doing what he needed to do to
hang on.
"I think Matt did what he
thought he had to do to win,"
Gordon said. "He started mak-
ing his car real wide. He proba-
bly didn't make the guys behind
him real happy"
Kenseth had come from
nowhere after lurking in the
back of the top 10 all race long,
suddenly charging through the
field and passing Gordon to
grab the lead with 38 laps to go.
It was his first lead.


WiperBlades Alignment
I Installed $95! $95
sati IwMF 0 1 1 59 1
See storefordetals Mostmodels PlusTh&shopsupplies where I I&
vappible Mustpresen.0ouponathemeofservice.Onlyone u n m See store for details. Mostmrodels. Plsta&shop s whp
peristVaido tLove Hondar Love Cho. Expise s app cab e M stpresentup ona lue me fsericet. 0p coupon
h per sit.Va~idonlyat~ ~ondaor~ove~ olet, xplr4-30-14. J pervisid.ValidonlyatLoveHondaorLoveChevrolet.Expires4-3--14.
,6 A L S4,30 A .J


BUY 3 TIRES ,ube, Oil, & FIlter
I AND Off ONE I
'F __EE with FREE Multi- S1 NE55
I I point Inspection -
Seestorefor details.Mostmodels.PlustaxI&shopsupplies iere Se store for details. MostSUVsPlustx&shop s plieslwhere
iapp able Mustpresentalcouponalttie t imeolsa. l yo eo upo w plicable. Mustpresentcoupon atthetimeofiserice. Oy n ecoupon
S visit. Val don at LoveHondaor LoveChevroet.Expres430-14. pervisit.ValidonlyatLove HondaorLoveChevrolet. Expires4-3-14.
----------------- L----------- -- -- -- -----------


r ----------------------- *4






Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check TIre Pressureo an All 4 Tires
27-Paoint Inspection
0 Battery Test
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere!
L ---------------------------------- -- -- ----- -- -- - -------


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. o Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovehlonda.oom
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Morn.-FrtL; 9AM-6PM Sat; 11AM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Morn.-FrtL; 8AM-2PM Salt.


Er(
I RS M k


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453
352.341.0018
loveohxevysales.oom
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL; 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Morn-FrL:; 8AM-Noon Sat.


IIoiid~


. =


SPORTS
BRIEFS I


I LOJV ::1 'CEJ|C[ PO-LO-V ESERV1 ICEC U P OIN, ::!-: I i.. 111i1 ;i


mILOViE SERVClOPilN i L1 3VE SERIC Oi LNi ,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus players


make trip to


Daytona for


USTA sectionals
s much as tennis is supposed to be a fun social
activity, most of us still like to win. That is one
of many reasons why players participate in
USTA leagues to ultimately qualify to take that
journey across the state to the USTA Florida Tennis
Center in Daytona.
What nobody tells you is that you may have to get
up at 6 a.m., as we did, to get ready for your first
match. This can be a major issue in the 55+ division.
Everything takes time at that age, including just get-
ting out of bed and getting all your moving parts
going. At least this time I did not forget my shoes. The
last time I played an important tournament like this,
it had to be done on sandals; size 13 is not easy to
come by on short notice.
Some of us decided to make the drive over to Day-
tona early in the morning; others elected to spend the
night here. I had volunteered to go a day early to at-
tend the mandatory captain's
Meeting at the Holiday Inn on
Thursday This is where they
explain the do's and don't for
the next couple of days, in-
I- eluding some reminders on
I how to handle disputes on the
...-courts.
V Our 4.0 division, with 13
registered teams from all over
Florida, was divided in three
Eric van groups, with the winners of
den Hoogen each group, plus the second-
ON TENNIS place team with the best
record, going to the semifinals
on Sunday
The USTA tennis center is a beautiful 24-court clay
public facility located on LPGA Boulevard just west
of Interstate 95.
You can tell by the way the tournament flows that
they have these events here almost every week in one
form or another
We were told to be at the tournament desk 30 min-
utes prior to the match, and the matches were called
promptly some even early
One thing I had never noticed before that stood out
when all the teams gathered to be send out for their
first match was that the women's teams are all coor-
dinated and the men's outfits are hodgepodge. It took
us a while to get used to reacting as a team when the
"Marion" team was called. After all, we are from Cit-
rus County, playing out of Sugarmill Woods, but Re-
gion 2, District 4 South is considered "Marion" for the
USTA.
The matches throughout these days are all very
close as expected, half of the matches being decided
by a Coman tiebreak. This was the case in our first-
round match on Friday against a team from Clear-
water, representing Pinellas. These were "old pros"
attending the tournament for the sixth time. This
time it did not go in favor of Citrus County; the
tiebreaks resulted in a 3-0 loss.
In the second match, played against Brevard
County, the Citrus team did not depend on to all
tiebreak decisions, although it got close toward the
end of the second sets. They won 2-1. Mike
Brown/Eric van den Hoogen won 6-1, 7-5; Barney
Hess/Tim Channel won 6-2, 7-5; Jorge Privat/Andy
Belskie lost 4-6, 6-4, 1-0.
Time to take a well-deserved rest in a cool envi-
ronment, not just for the players but also for the sup-
porters, such as Roger Foore and John Shaw, who
came all the way to the Atlantic Coast to see their
team play
On Saturday, the match was not until 2 in the hot
afternoon. One advantage for us was that for the op-
ponent from Naples, Collier, it was their second
match of the day and we had only one. The winner of
this match had a pretty good shot at reaching the
semifinals. It was another close one, even though a
3-0 loss does not look like it. The players did not show
any disappointment; they all agreed that it was a very
enjoyable experience. It is a nice goal to set for an-
other season. We certainly can recommend making
this trip.

Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle tennis columnist,
can be reached athoera@juno.com.


Recreation BRIEFS


Horseshoe Club
announces results
April 12th results
Won all three games Dick Lenzen
High Series Ed Tauber 232, Bill
Walters 216, Dick Lenzen 213
High Game Ed Tauber 101, Bill
Walters 81
April 19th results
Won all three games No one this week
High Series Ed Tauber 233, Mike
Trudel 230
High Game Mike Trudel 89 & 88,
Ed Tauber 87 & 81, Carl Nixon 84
Scores are based on a handicap sys-
tem so all skill levels can compete.
The club provides the horseshoes.
Stop by on any Tuesday or Saturday
morning at 9 a.m. at the old Community
Center on Route 39 in Citrus Springs.
Call Joe Warburton at 352-489-7537 for
information about the club.
Floral Park hosting
women's disc golf
On May 10, women from all around
the world will play two rounds of disc
golf at their local participating Women's
Global Event.
Floral Park in Floral City will be host-
ing the central Florida's segment of this
event aptly named 2014 Wild Flower DGC.
Presently, there are 59 registered
tournaments scheduled, reaching
across 24 states and six countries (the
United States, Canada, Finland,
Australia, Japan and Germany).
Interested women wanting to play in
this event should go to www.PDGA.com/
women/global-event. Online registration
ends May 3. If you want to see some
outstanding women play world class
disc golf, come to Floral Park on May
10. Tee off begins at 9 a.m.
For more information, call tournament
director Kim Pruden at 321-412-2240.
Rotary hosting charity
golf event
The Rotary Club of Inverness will
hold its annual Charity Golf Tournament
at the Inverness Golf and Country Club
on Saturday, May 17 at 8:30 a.m.
The cost is $50 per player for the
unique "Stableford Scoring" tourna-
ment, where points are awarded for
birdies, pars, and bogeys. Each player
will receive lunch, goodie bag, and free
beverages on the course.
Prizes will be awarded in each flight
of golfers, as well as for the longest drive,
closest to the pin, and other giveaways.
All proceeds benefit the Rotary Club
of Inverness Charitable Foundation,
which provides over $10,000 in scholar-
ships to local high school students each
year, as well as contributing funds to
over 25 local organizations each year.
Contact Rob Tessmer, Jr at 352-302-
0469 or robtessmerjr@gmail.com for
information.


Walk, bike, hike, kayak
for fitness
The Nature Coast Ramblers Inc. is a
nonprofit social and recreational club of
friendly people of all ages who enjoy
self-paced hiking or walking, biking and
kayaking activities in Citrus County.
Walking or hiking, biking, or kayaking
with the club promotes fitness. Its goal is
to provide fun events that can challenge
people to keep active.
Outings are started in different loca-
tions to explore the many beautiful
trails, parks, forests and waterways in
the area. Bicycle outings are generally
the second Friday each month, hiking
or walking is generally the third Satur-
day of each month and kayaking is usu-
ally the last Tuesday of each month,
All events are free for members. Be-
come a member of Nature Coast Ram-
blers for $10 (or $15 for a family) per
calendar year. There is a $3 fee per
event for nonmembers.
Members are informed of upcoming
club activities by email and through
postings on the website and Facebook.
Contact Marie Nail at 352-382-2525 or
marie428@earthlink.net.
Father Willie Classic set
for May 17
The Knights of ColumbusAbbot Francids
Sadlier Council 6168 will have its 20th
annual Father Willie Golf Classic on
Saturday, May 17, at Seven Rivers Golf
and Country Club in Crystal River. Net
proceeds from the event will be donated
to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Local merchants and organizations
are invited to sponsor one or more
holes for $50 per hole. Sponsorship will
be acknowledged with a sign on the
greens and in various Knights' publica-
tions prior to the event.
Entry fee for the tournament, open to
men and women of all ages, is $60 per
person. This includes coffee and
doughnuts prior to the start, greens and
cart fees, prizes and lunch at the Coun-
try Club. Prizes will be awarded for all
par three holes and the person hitting a
hole in one on the seventh hole will re-
ceive a prize of $10,000.
The winning teams will receive $200
for first place, $150 for second place
and $100 for third place. There will door
prizes, 50/50 drawings and a separate
raffle for a round of golf for four at Black
Diamond.
Play will be a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. with four player teams. Partici-
pants can form their own team or or-
ganizers will do it. Entries must be
received no later than May 14 with
checks attached made out to the
Knights of Columbus.
Since the field must be limited to 120
players, make reservations quickly with
Jim Louque at 352-746-7563. He will
also be available to answer questions.


Fishing club angles
for members
If you like to fish with people who like
to fish, and maybe learn to fish better,
come see what the Citrus Fishing Club
is all about. Men and women alike meet
at 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at
American Legion Post No. 155 at 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
For more information, call 352-445-
6743 or visit citrusfishingclub.org.
Buccheri golf tournament
set for May 17
The second annual Joseph Buccheri
Foundation Charity Golf Tournament
will be held on Saturday, May 17 at Cit-
rus Hills Oaks in Hernando.
All proceeds go towards partial schol-
arships to Citrus County students and
the foundation has been established to
continue the memory of coach Buc-
cheri, who is remembered for his pas-
sion for teaching and coaching, but
most importantly, his compassion for
the students who loved him.
Preregister by May 10 at www.
JoeBuccheri.org. Registration begins at
7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament
with tee off at 8:30 a.m.
The four-man scramble format tourna-
ment costs $60 per person, which includes
18 holes of golf, cart, food, beverages
and chances to win great prizes.
For information, contact Citrus Hills
Golf Club at 352-746-4425 or the Joseph
Buccheri Foundation at JBuccheri@
joebuccheri.org or 972-897-9987.
Golf tourney supports
Operation Welcome Home
The Inverness Golf and Country Club
is hosting a golf tournament fundraiser
for Operation Welcome Home/
Honor Flight Saturday, May 24.
The tournament format is a four-per-
son scramble and begins with a 9 a.m.
shotgun start. Prizes for low gross, low
net and hole-in-one will be awarded.
Lunch is included.
Hole-in-one prizes include a 2014
GMC Sierra, donated by Eagle Buick
GMC, and $10,000, donated by Bar-
bara Mills Remax Realty One.
Hole sponsors are needed and cost
$100, or $300 to include a foursome.
Single entries will be accepted at $60
and will be assigned to teams.
For information or entry forms, call
Barbara at 352-422-6236.
Golf Demo Day
at Skyview
Citrus Hills is having a Golf Demo Day
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on May 10 at the
Skyview at Terra Vista driving range.
Come try out the new and exciting
golf clubs from Ping, TaylorMade, Ti-
tleist, Cobra, Callaway, Nike, Cleveland
and Adams. For information, call 352-
746-4425.


The Original
SUMMERTIME
On Sale Now

$2.00.


W_ ::::,:..................


Pay$2000.or.ourPlaca0
& Receive 20 OUNS O GL
As owAs OLY$2.0
A limte qanttyofca0s ncud 106bnu
rouns a no6dd00 oal6 ost
Purhae ourcad ow


Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club 352-746-4425 $23.00'
(Oaks or Meadows course)
Inverness Golf and Country Club 352-637-2526 $23.00'
Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club 352-522-0309 $32.00'
Ocala National Golf Club 352-629-7980 $24.00'
Royal Oaks Golf Club 352-861-1818 $24.00'
Skyview at Terra Vista 352-746-3664 $32.00"*
Southern Woods Country Club 352-382-5996 $30.00"
Sugarmill Woods Country Club 352-382-3838 ext. 14 $30.00"
*Plus tax.


Purchase Your Card At One Of These Fine Courses
Or Call For Further Details.
Play Available *May 1 October 31, 2014 -"May 1 -October 12, 2014
**Play available only after 11:00 a.m., credit cards only. May 1 September 30, 2014


B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


SPORTS


II




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Rays 4, White Sox 0
Tampa Bay Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Zobrist2b 3 1 0 0 Eatoncf 4 0 0 0
DJnngscf 5 0 1 1 Semien 3b 3 0 0 0
Myersrf 5 1 1 0 JAreulb 4 0 0 0
Longori 3b 5 00 0 Viciedorf 3 0 1 0
SRdrgzl If 2 0 0 0 Konerkdh 4 02 0
Joyce ph-lf 2 0 0 0 AIRmrzss 4 0 0 0
Loneylb 4 1 3 1 DeAzalf 3 00 0
Forsythdh 2 1 0 0 GBckh2b 3 0 2 0
DeJessph-dh 1 0 0 0 Nietoc 2 0 0
0
YEscorss 4 020
Hanignc 4 022
Totals 37 49 4 Totals 300 5 0
Tampa Bay 021 001 000 4
Chicago 000 000 000 0
E-Viciedo (2). DP Tampa Bay 1. LOB-
Tampa Bay 10, Chicago 7.2B-Myers (4), Hani-
gan 2 (4), G.Beckham (1). 3B-De.Jennings (1).
S-Nieto.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
C.RamosW,1-1 5 5 0 0 2 0
B.Gomes 3 0 0 0 0 1
Oviedo 1 0 0 0 1 1
Chicago
Joh.Danks L,2-1 52-37 4 4 4 4
Noesi 11-31 0 0 0 1
Downs 2 1 0 0 0 3
C.Ramos pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Oviedo, Joh.Danks.
T-3:11. A-22,412(40,615).

Brewers 5, Cubs 3
Chicago Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bonifaccf 4 00 0 CGomzcf 2 1 0 1
Valuen2b 4 1 1 1 Segurass 0 00 0
Rizzolb 4 0 0 0 Bianchi ph-ss4 0 2 2
SCastross 4 0 1 0 Braunrf 4 0 1 0
Schrhltrf 3 00 0 EHerrrrf 0 00 0
Olt3b 3 1 1 0 ArRmr3b 3 00 1
Sweenyl If 3 0 0 0 Lucroyc 4 00 0
Castilloc 3 1 1 2 KDavisl If 4 22 1
TWoodp 2 00 0 MrRynllb 4 1 2 0
Schlittrp 0 00 0 RWeks2b 3 1 1 0
Lakeph 1 0 0 0 Gennett2b 0 0 0 0
Stropp 0 0 0 0 Estradp 2 00 0
WSmithp 0 00 0
FrRdrgp 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 34 3 Totals 305 8 5
Chicago 000 100 020 3
Milwaukee 120 101 00x 5
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Chicago 1, Milwaukee
6. HR Valbuena (1), Castillo (4), K.Davis (3).


SF-Ar.Ramirez.


IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
TWoodL,1-3 52-37 5 5 3 3
Schlitter 11-31 0 0 0 0
Strop 1 0 0 0 0 2
Milwaukee
EstradaW,2-1 72-34 3 3 0 9
W.SmithH,7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Fr.RodriguezS,11-11 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-byT.Wood (R.Weeks).
T-2:51.A-40,008(41,900).


Toyota Owners 400
results
Saturday at Richmond International Race-
way, Richmond, Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (17) Joey Logano, Ford, 400 laps, 126.8 rat-
ing, 47 points.
2. (25) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 134.8, 44.
3. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 96.2, 41.
4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 128.5, 41.
5. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 102.7, 40.
6.(14)A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 400, 88, 38.
7. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400,
112.1, 38.
8.(18) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 99.1, 36.
9. (16) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 90.2, 35.
10. (22) MartinTruex Jr, Chevrolet, 400, 85.6, 34.
11. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 108.7, 34.
12. (6) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 400, 86.5, 32.
13.(7) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 400, 94.4, 31.
14. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 101.3, 30.
15. (26) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 81.5, 29.
16. (1) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 400, 66.1, 28.
17. (15) AricAlmirola, Ford, 400, 75.2, 27.
18. (11) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 71.6, 26.
19. (34) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 400, 70.2, 25.
20. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 400, 60.7, 24.
21. (31)Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 400, 68.2, 23.
22. (28) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 78.6, 22.
23. (21) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 68.4, 21.
24. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 63.5, 20.
25. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 399, 59.7, 19.
26. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 398,47.9,0.
27. (27) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 398, 54.9, 17.
28. (24) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 398, 51.6, 16.
29. (30) David Reutimann, Ford, 397, 50.1, 15.
30. (37) David Ragan, Ford, 396, 44, 14.
31. (8) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 396, 42.9, 13.
32. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet 396, 84.2,12.
33. (23) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 396,48.1, 11.
34. (35) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 395, 36.5,10.
35. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 395,37.5,9.
36. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 394, 33.4, 9.
37. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 391, 28.2, 0.
38. (29) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 390,40.7,6.
39. (39) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 390, 27.3, 5.
40. (42) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 380, 30.3, 0.
41. (40) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 367, 28.2, 3.
42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, electrical,
225, 35,2.
43. (3) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, suspension, 159,
67, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 93.369 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 12 minutes, 47 sec-
onds.
Margin of Victory: 0.946 seconds.
Caution Flags: 9 for 66 laps.
Lead Changes: 20 among 8 drivers.
Lap Leaders: B.Keselowski 1-31; K.Harvick
32-42; TKvapil 43; K.Harvick 44-55; B.Ke-
selowski 56-101; L.Cassill 102; J.Gordon 103-
165; B.Keselowski 166; J.Gordon 167-172;
B.Keselowski 173-208; J.Gordon 209-227;
J.Logano 228; J.Gordon 229-242; J.Logano
243-251; J.Gordon 252-298; D.Earnhardt Jr.
299-305; J.Logano 306-337; J.Gordon 338-361;
M.Kenseth 362-396; J.Logano 397-400.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): J.Gordon, 6 times for 173 laps; B.Ke-
selowski, 4 times for 114 laps; J.Logano, 4 times
for 46 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 35 laps;
K.Harvick, 2 times for 23 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr.,
1 time for 7 laps; L.Cassill, 1 time for 1 lap;
TKvapil, 1 time for 1 lap.
Wins: K.Harvick, 2; J.Logano, 2; Ku.Busch, 1;
Ky.Busch, 1; D.Earnhardt Jr, 1; C.Edwards, 1;
Bra.Keselowski, 1.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Gordon, 341; 2.
M.Kenseth, 336; 3. C.Edwards, 313; 4.
Ky.Busch, 310; 5. D.Earnhardt Jr., 309; 6.
J.Logano, 292; 7. Bra.Keselowski, 287; 8.
J.Johnson, 282; 9. R.Newman, 272; 10. B.Vick-
ers, 256; 11. G.Biffle, 256; 12. A.Dillon, 252.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in
a race.
The formula combines the following cate-
gories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Aver-
age Running Position While on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led
Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 B3


For the iricrd


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
OA^^ 5-8-0
9 CASH 3 (late)
0 0-8-4

IPLAY 4 (early)
2-7-1-7
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 1-9-2-1



Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 18 -21 -31 -42
Mega Ball: 18


4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5
3-of-4 MB 43
3-of-4 726
2-of-4MB 1,155
1-of-4 MB 9,811
2-of-4 23,445


$1,296.50
$330
$58
$25.50
$3
$2


Fantasy 5: 2- 4- 11 -18- 32


5-of-5
4-of-5
3-of-5


1 winner
336
10,242


$234,004.74
$112
$10


Mega Millions: 3-11 -18-20-66
Mega Ball: 9
5-of-5 MB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 MB 1 winner $5,000
4-of-5 24 $500
3-of-5 MB 97 $50
3-of-5 1,309 $5
2-of-5 MB 1,943 $5
1-of-5 MB 14,732 $2
0-of-5 MB 35,620 $1

Players should verify winning
numbers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES,


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Honda Grand Prix of Alabama
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Indy Lights Series, Race 2
(same-day tape)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing O'ReillyAuto Parts
SpringNationals (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Alabama at South Carolina
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Oregon at Oregon State
7:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Arizona State atArizona
10:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Hawaii at Cal State Fullerton
1:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Alabama at South Carolina (same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at New York Met
1:30 p.m. (MLB) Cincinnati Reds atAtlanta Braves or Kansas
City Royals at Baltimore Orioles
2 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Chicago
White Sox
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Angels at New York Yankees
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Angels at New York Yan-
kees (same-day tape)
NBA PLAYOFFS
1 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Washington Wizards. Eastern
Conference First Round, Game 4
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Clippers at Golden State War-
riors. Western Conference First Round, Game 4
7 p.m. (TNT) Toronto Raptors at Brooklyn Nets. Eastern Con-
ference First Round, Game 4
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers.
Western Conference First Round, Game 4
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Chicago Bulls at Washington Wizards
(same-day tape)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Clippers at Golden State War-
riors (same-day tape)
ARENA FOOTBALL
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Iowa Barnstormers at Philadelphia Soul
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Volvo China Open,
Final Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Zurich Classic of New Orleans,
Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour Zurich Classic of New Orleans,
Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour Swinging Skirts Classic,
Final Round
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
12 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Flyers at New York Rangers.
Eastern Conference Quarterfinal, Game 5
3 p.m. (NBC) St. Louis Blues at Chicago Blackhawks.
Western Conference Quarterfinal, Game 6
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Anaheim Ducks at Dallas Stars. Western
Conference Quarterfinal, Game 6
WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
1 p.m. (ESPNU) ACC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
5 p.m. (FSNFL) ACC Championship: Teams TBA (same-day
tape)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship: Grand
Prix of Argentina
1 p.m. (CBS) Monster EnergyAMA Supercross (taped)
2 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series: Albuquerque (taped)
4 p.m. (FS1) Monster EnergyAMA Supercross (same-day tape)
SOCCER
7 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Sunderland AFC
vs. Cardiff City FC
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Liverpool FC vs.
Chelsea FC
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Crystal Palace
FC vs. Manchester City FC
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: Deportivo
Toluca FC vs. Club America
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
11 a.m. (SUN) Missouri at Florida
TENNIS
1 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Porsche Grand Prix, Final (same-day tape)
3 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell, Final
(same-day tape)
5:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP BCR Open Romania, Final
(same-day tape)


WTA Tour Porsche
Grand Prix results
Saturday at Porsche-Arena, Stuttgart Germany
Purse: $710,000 (Premier), Surface: Clay-Indoor
Singles
Semifinals
Maria Sharapova (6), Russia, def. Sara Errani
8), Italy, 6-1, 6-2.
Ana Ivanovic (9), Serbia, def. Jelena Jankovic
(5), Serbia, 6-3, 7-5.
Doubles
Semifinals
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza (2),
India, def. Antonia Lottner and Anna Zaja, Ger-
many, 6-2, 2-6, 10-4.
Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (1), Italy, def. Je-
lena Jankovic, Serbia, and Alisa Kleybanova,
Russia, 6-3, 6-3.


ATP Barcelona Open
results
Saturday at Real Club de Tenis Barcelona,
Barcelona Spain
Purse: $2.94 million (W0500), Surface: Clay-
Outdoor
Singles
Semifinals
Kei Nishikori (4), Japan, def. Ernests Gulbis (9),
Latvia, 6-2, 6-4.
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Nicolas Alma-
gro (6), Spain, 7-5, 6-3.
Doubles
Semifinals
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic
(5), Serbia, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and
Marcelo Melo (3), Brazil, 6-4, 6-4.
Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, and
Stephane Robert, France, def. Fabio Fognini,
Italy, and Jurgen Melzer, Austria, 6-2, 6-0.


Zurich Classic
par scores
Saturday atTPC Louisiana, Avondale, La.
Purse: $6.8 million, Yardage: 7,425, Par: 72,
Third Round:


Seung-Yul Noh
Keegan Bradley
Robert Streb
Jeff Overton
Ben Martin
Andrew Svoboda
PaulCasey
Charley Hoffman
Tommy Gainey
TimWilkinson
Danny Lee
Bud Cauley
Retief Goosen
J.B. Holmes
Peter Hanson
Brooks Koepka
Daniel Summerhays
Kevin Kisner
Erik Compton
Joe Durant
Freddie Jacobson
Robert Allenby
Justin Rose
Mark Anderson
Fabian Gomez
David Duval
Will Wilcox
Kevin Chappell
Bronson La'Cassie
David Toms
Alex Prugh
Morgan Hoffmann
Graham DeLaet
CameronTringale
Martin Flores
John Senden
Troy Matteson
Stuart Appleby
Vijay Singh
Kyle Stanley
Brendan Steele
Briny Baird
Troy Merritt
Mark Calcavecchia
DA. Points
Rory Sabbatini
Charlie Wi
Bo Van Pelt
Robert Garrigus
Sean O'Hair
Sang-Moon Bae
Andres Romero
Charles Howell III
David Hearn
Lucas Glover
YE.Yang
Ricky Barnes
Kevin Tway
Boo Weekley
Wes Roach
Andrew Loupe
J.J. Henry
MichaelThompson
Tag Ridings
John Rollins
John Merrick
Shawn Stefani
Doug LaBelle II
Chad Collins
Derek Ernst
Jim Renner
Padraig Harrington
Greg Chalmers
Max Homa


65-68-65
69-66-65
67-66-68
67-68-67
62-67-73
64-68-70
71-68-64
68-67-68
71-66-67
70-70-65
71-69-65
71-68-66
72-65-68
71-65-69
65-69-71
71-68-67
72-66-68
69-68-69
66-68-72
69-71-67
72-69-66
71-68-68
71-67-69
72-65-70
72-69-66
68-69-70
68-68-71
72-67-69
70-69-69
73-68-67
70-68-70
70-68-70
69-68-71
73-69-66
72-68-69
70-70-69
72-68-69
67-72-70
70-71-68
71-67-71
73-67-70
71-69-70
71-69-70
71-70-69
73-68-69
69-72-69
70-71-69
74-63-73
73-69-68
71-69-71
68-72-71
70-71-70
68-73-70
71-71-69
71-71-69
72-70-69
70-72-69
70-72-69
71-70-71
74-67-71
71-70-71
68-69-75
66-71-75
71-70-72
74-66-73
69-72-72
69-72-72
68-73-72
66-71-76
71-71-71
75-67-71
70-72-71
71-71-71
71-71-71


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays relief pitcher Juan Carlos
Oviedo looks up before pitching against the
Chicago White Sox during the ninth inning in
Chicago.


RAYS
Continued from Page B1

grounded out against Ramos to end the inning.
Abreu hit a walk-off grand slam in the White
Sox's 9-6 victory over the Rays on Friday
Danks exited in the sixth after allowing a
two-out, RBI triple to Desmond Jennings that
made it 4-0. Danks has walked 17 and struck
out 18 in 31 innings this season.
Ramos departed after he allowed a leadoff
single in the sixth inning in his sixth career
start. He walked two but didn't record a strike-
out. Ramos has started three games this sea-
son after making four relief appearances. He
allowed one run in five innings against the
New York Yankees in his previous start.
Rays manager Joe Maddon was ejected in
the bottom of the eighth for his first ejection of
the season. Home plate umpire Tim Timmons
ejected Maddon after he appeared to protest
Timmons' check swing call on leadoff batter
Adam Eaton. Timmons called a ball after
Eaton checked his swing on a 2-2 count. Eaton
grounded out.
The White Sox were shutout for just the sec-
ond time this season. They were averaging 5.58
runs per game, second in the majors entering
Saturday
NOTES: Before the game, the White Sox
placed 3B Conor Gillaspie on the 15-day dis-
abled list due to a left hand contusion, retroac-
tive to Tuesday Gillaspie is batting .302 with 12
RBIs in 16 games. He said he has been battling
the injury for 2-3 weeks and hopes to swing a
bat within 5-6 days. Marcus Semien started at
third base. ... The White Sox added RHP Hec-
tor Noesi to the roster after they claimed him
off waivers from the Texas Rangers on Friday
He was 0-1 with a 14.21 ERA in 6 1-3 innings
with the Rangers and Seattle Mariners. He
threw 11-3 scoreless innings Saturday ... Rays
RHP Grant Balfour stressed he was frustrated
with himself and was not directing anger at
White Sox DH Paul Konerko when they ex-
changed words after Balfour walked Konerko
in the ninth inning Friday "It was competitive
stuff coming out," White Sox manager Robin
Ventura said. "I think Paul might have been
watching the Blackhawks game." ... RHP Scott
Carroll will make his major league debut for
the White Sox on Sunday He is 3-1 with a 1.57
ERA for Triple-A Charlotte. LHP David Price
(3-1, 4.04) will start for the Rays.




HEAT
Continued from Page B1

The Heat made 8 of their first 11 3-point at-
tempts.
The half, which had started with so much en-
ergy and promise for the Bobcats, ended with
a colossal mistake by guard Gerald Henderson.
With the clock winding down, he turned the
ball over in the backcourt with 2 seconds left
and then fouled James while the Miami for-
ward was attempting a 3-pointer James made
the Bobcats pay by sinking three free throws
with 0.2 left on the clock to give the Heat a 58-
46 advantage at the break.
The second half was all Miami.
James, who was booed loudly almost every
time he touched the ball, hit a key 3-pointer
and had a breakaway dunk in the third quar-
ter to help push the lead to 26 midway through
the third and the Bobcats never mounted a se-
ries challenge after that point.
James has never lost a first-round series with
his teams in Cleveland and Miami going a com-
bined 8-0.
There was some intrigue entering the game.
James was outspoken on Friday after taking
an elbow to the throat from Josh McRoberts in
Game 2, although no flagrant foul was called
on the floor
The two made contact early in the first quar-
ter when James drove baseline and McRoberts
attempted to take a charge, but officials called
a blocking foul. James made the shot but
missed the ensuing free throw McRoberts
walked away after the foul clapping his hands,
refusing to get upset by a call that could have
easily gone the other way
The Bobcats got a big boost early from Jef-
ferson, who scored 15 points on 7 of 9 shooting
to help build a 27-23 lead.
Jefferson, who has been hobbled by a
strained plantar fascia since the first quarter
of Game 1, seemed to have some of his mobil-
ity back Saturday night. At one point he scored
on a spin move in the low post, surprising Chris
Andersen.
Jefferson even got to the foul line for the first
time in the series.
By the middle of the second quarter, Bobcats
fans, wearing all white, began chanting "M-V-P
M-V-P" as Jefferson shot free throws. But Char-
lotte's enthusiasm was short-lived as James
and the Heat began flexing their muscles.


Made cut did not finish


70-71-73
68-71-75
73-68-73
73-69-72
69-73-72
70-71-74
74-68-73
71-71-73
69-73-75
72-70-78


Scott McCarron
D.H. Lee
Ken Duke
Josh Teater
NickWatney
Luke Guthrie
Scott Gardiner
Billy Hurley III
Brice Garnett
Geoff Ogilvy


Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Placed 3B Conor
Gillaspie on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April
22. Activated RHP Hector Noesi.
NEWYORKYANKEES -Signed RHP Chris
Leroux and selected him from Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre (IL). Optioned RHP Shane Greene to
ScrantonN/Wilkes-Barre. Released LHP NikTurley.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES Released 1 B Ernesto
Mejia.
CHICAGO CUBS Placed RHP JoseVeras
on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Brian Schlit-
ter from Iowa (PCL).
CINCINNATI REDS -Placed C Devin Meso-
raco on the 15-day DL. Recalled CTucker Barn-
hartfrom Louisville (IL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Placed RHP
Jason Grilli on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
April 21, and C Russell Martin on the 15-day
DL. Recalled C Tony Sanchez and RHP Jared
Hughes from Indianapolis (IL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Suspended Washington F-C Nene
one game for head-butting and grabbing
Chicago G-F Jimmy Butler around the neckwith
both hands and attempting to throw him down
during an April 25 game.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Fined Dallas F Ryan Garbutt
$1,474.36 for spearing Anaheim F Corey Perry
during and April 25 game.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS Fired coach
Adam Oates. Announced the contract of general
manager George McPhee will not be renewed.
COLLEGE
FLORIDA Junior men's basketball F Jon
Horford is transferring to the school Florida.




White Sox 9, Rays 6


Tampa Bay
ab r h bi
Zobrist 2b 5 0 2 1
DJnngscf 4 0 1 0
Joycel If 0 1 0 1
Longori 3b 5 2 2 2
Loneylb 4 0 1 0
Myersrf 4 0 1 0
DeJessdh 3 1 1 0
YEscorss 4 1 1 1
Hanignc 4 1 1 1




Totals 33 6106
Tampa Bay 040
Chicago 101


Chicago
ab rhbi
Eatoncf 5 2 1 1
Semien3b 4 10 0
JAreulb 5 23 6
A.Dunndh 4 01 0
JrDnks pr-dh 0 0 0 0
Viciedorf 4 1 1 0
AIRmrzss 4 1 2 0
DeAzal If 4 1 2 0
Flowrsc 3 02 2
LeGarc pr 0 1 0 0
GBckh2b 3 00 0
Konerkph 0 00 0
Nietopr 0 00 0
Totals 36 912 9
000 002 6
200 005 9


Two outs when winning run scored.
DP Tampa Bay 2, Chicago 3. LOB Tampa
Bay 11, Chicago 4.2B-Zobrist (3), De Aza
(2), Flowers (2). HR-Longoria (3), J.Abreu 2
(9). SB-Eaton (2). CS-Joyce (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Archer 6 9 4 4 0 4
McGee 1 0 0 0 0 1
Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 1
BalfourL,0-1BS,1-5 2-3 2 5 5 3 0
Chicago
Er.Johnson 12-34 4 4 4 1
Petricka 22-33 0 0 3 2
Putnam 22-32 0 0 2 1
Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 0
LindstromW,2-1 1 1 2 2 2 3
Archer pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Er.Johnson. PB-Flowers.
T-4:04.A-17,210 (40,615).


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NewYork
Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto




Atlanta
NewYork
Washington
Philadelphia
Miami


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Nationals 4, Padres 0
San Diego Washington
ab rhbi ab rhbi
ECarerss 4 00 0 Spancf 5 0 1 1
Denorfil If 4 0 1 0 Rendon3b 4 1 1 0
Venalerf 4 00 0 Werthrf 4 1 2 0
Gyorko2b 4 0 1 0 LaRochlb 3 1 1 1
Alonsolb 3 0 0 0 Dsmndss 4 03 1
Amarstcf 3 0 0 0 Espinos2b 3 0 0 1
Petersn3b 3 0 0 0 Frndsn If 3 1 1 0
Rivera c 2 0 1 0 Leon c 4 00 0
Grandlph-c 0 0 0 0 Roarkp 3 0 1 0
Cashnrp 1 000
Roach p 0 000
Nady ph 1 00 0
Thayerp 0 00 0
Totals 29 03 0 Totals 33410 4
San Diego 000 000 000 0
Washington 300 001 00x 4
E-E.Cabrera (3), Alonso (1), Gyorko (3),
LaRoche (2). DP Washington 1. LOB-San
Diego 4, Washington 9.2B-Desmond (4). SB-
Desmond (1). S-Cashner, Roark. SF-Es-
pinosa.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
CashnerL,2-3 6 9 4 4 1 5
Roach 1 1 0 0 0 1
Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1
Washington
RoarkW,2-0 9 3 0 0 1 8
HBP-by Thayer (Frandsen).
T-2:19.A-31,590 (41,408).

Pirates 6, Cardinals I


Pittsburgh St. Louis
ab r h bi


Marte If 3 1 0 0 MCrpnt 3b
JHrrsn3b 4 1 1 0 JhPerltss
AMcCtcf 4 1 1 1 Hollidylf
GSnchzlb 3 1 1 2 MAdmslb
Davisph-lb0 1 0 0 YMolinc
NWalkr2b 4 00 0 Craigrf
Tabata rf 4 1 3 1 Bourjos cf
Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis2b
TSnchz c 4 0 1 2 Lyonsp
Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Jayph
Pimntlp 1 0 0 0 Manessp
JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Fornatr p
Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Choate p
JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph
Watsonp 0 000
PAIvrzph 1 000
Melncnp 0 000
Totals 33 67 6 Totals
Pittsburgh 000 400 002
St. Louis 000 010 000
LOB-Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 9.2B-(
(3), Jh.Peralta (5), Holliday (7). SB-E
S-Mercer.
IP H RERB
Pittsburgh
Liriano 2 2 0 0
PimentelW,2-0 22-32 1 1
J.Hughes 11-30 0 0
Ju.WilsonH,1 1 1 0 0
WatsonH,5 1 0 0 0
Melancon 1 0 0 0
St. Louis
Lyons L,0-2 6 4 4 4
Maness 2 1 0 0
Fornataro 2-3 2 2 2
Choate 1-3 0 0 0


Liriano pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd.
PB-TSanchez.
T-3:02. A-46,254 (45,399).

Braves 4, Reds 1
Cincinnati Atlanta


BHmltn cf
Votto 1 b
Phillips 2b
Bruce rf
Ludwck If
B.Pena c
N.Soto 3b
Cozart ss
Leake p
Berndn ph
MParr p
Christn p
Totals
Cincinnat
Atlanta


ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 Heywrd rf
3 0 0 0 BUptoncf
4 1 1 0 Fremnlb
2 0 0 0 J.Upton If
3 0 1 1 Gattisc
3 00 0 Uggla2b
3 00 0 CJhnsn3b
3 00 0 Smmnsss
2 0 0 0 Hale p
1 00 0 Kimrelp
0000
0000
28 12 1 Totals
i 100 000 000
202 000 00x


DP-Cincinnati 1, Atlanta 1. LOB-C
Atlanta 4. 2B-Ludwick (3). HR-Fr
J.Upton (7), Gattis (6). SB-J.Upton
IP H R ER
Cincinnati
Leake L,2-2 7 8 4 4
M.Parra 2-3 0 0 0
Christiani 1-3 0 0 0
Atlanta
HaleW, 1-0 8 2 1 1
KimbrelS,8-9 1 0 0 0
T-2:17.A-33,702 (49,586).


Interleag

Giants 5, Indian


Cleveland


San Francisc


ab r h bi
Bourn cf 5 22 0 Pagan cf
Swisher lb 5 1 2 1 Pence rf
Kipnis2b 5 01 2 Beltlb
CSantn3b 3 00 0 Posey c
Brantly If 3 0 0 0 Morse If
ACarerss 3 0 0 0 J.PerezIlf
YGomsc 4 0 1 0 Sandovl3b
DvMrprf 4 02 0 Affeldt p
McAlst p 2 01 0 Romo p
Chsnhllph 1 0 0 0 BCrwfrss
C.Lee p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b
Outmn p 0 00 0 Linccm p
Shawp 0 00 0 JGutrrz p
Giambi ph 0 00 0 Blanco ph
Kluberpr 0 00 0 Machip
Arias 3b
Totals 35 39 3 Totals
Cleveland 101 010 000
San Francisco 000 041 00x
E-McAllister (2). DP-San Francisc
Cleveland 9, San Francisco 3. 2B-
Swisher 2 (6), Pagan (6). HR-Pose
Blanco (1). SF-Pagan.
IP H RER
Cleveland
McAllisterL,3-1 5 5 4 4
C.Lee 1-3 1 1 1
Outman 2-3 0 0 0
Shaw 2 0 0 0
San Francisco
Lincecum 42-39 3 2
J.GutierrezW,1l-1 1-3 0 0 0
Machi H,2 12-30 0 0
AffeldtH,2 11-30 0 0
RomoS,6-6 1 0 0 0
HBP-by Shaw (Posey), by Rome
PB-Posey.
T-2:47.A-42,088(41,915).


ab r h bi


Str Home Away
W-17-4 7-6
W-1 5-5 7-6
W-2 5-8 7-5
W-1 7-7 4-6
L-4 4-7 7-6



Str Home Away
W-3 8-3 8-4
W-3 7-7 6-3
W-2 9-7 5-4
L-1 4-5 7-7
L-2 9-4 1-9


Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
9 .571 6-4 L-1 9-5 3-4
11 .522 1 6-4 W-1 6-5 6-6
13 .480 2 1 4-6 L-1 7-5 5-8
12 .478 2 1 5-5 L-1 6-3 5-9
13 .458 21 11/ 4-6 L-2 7-6 4-7


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 18 6 .750 8-2 W-3 9-5 9-1
St. Louis 13 12 .520 5/2 1 4-6 L-1 5-3 8-9
Cincinnati 11 13 .458 7 2/2 6-4 L-2 4-5 7-8
Pittsburgh 10 15 .400 8/2 4 3-7 W-1 6-8 4-7
Chicago 7 16 .304 10/2 6 3-7 L-4 5-8 2-8


W
Oakland 15
Texas 14
LosAngeles 11
Seattle 9
Houston 8


San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .625 5-5
9 .609 /2 8-2
12 .478 3/2 1 5-5
13 .409 5 2/2 2-8
17 .320 7% 5 3-7


West Division
t GB WC


.,-~-:-
- ~
- ~*-*-,.~4~*~-


New York Yankees closer David Robertson throws the final pitch of the game Saturday, striking out
Angels second baseman Howie Kendrick at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Yankees won 4-3


ab rh b


4030010 Yankees bounce back, win 4-3
4 02 0


32 1 5 1
6
1
G.Sanchez
Bourjos (2).

3B SO


Associated Press

NEW YORK -John Ryan Mur-
phy hit his first big league homer
and drove in three runs, Dellin
Betances earned his first win in
the majors and the New York Yan-
kees bounced back to beat the Los
Angeles Angels 4-3 Saturday
David Robertson posted his
first save since coming off the dis-
abled list Mike Trout singled with
one out in a nervy ninth and stole
second, but Robertson retired Al-
bert Pujols on a flyball and struck
out Howie Kendrick to end it.
A day after the Angels homered
four times in a 13-1 romp, they
started strong when Trout hit a
solo shot on the seventh pitch of
the afternoon.
Murphy lined a two-out, two-run
single in the second that gave the
Yankees a 3-1 lead. The backup
catcher then homered on the first
pitch in the fifth, tagging Hector
Santiago (0-4) for a 4-3 lead.
Betances (1-0) took over in the
fifth for shaky starter Vidal Nuno
and pitched two scoreless innings.
Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 6


4 0 0 0 TORONTO -A.J. Pierzynski hit
4 1 1 0 his eighth career grand slam and Will
4 11 2 Middlebrooks added a solo homer,
3131
4 1 1 1 powering Boston to the road win.
3 0 0 0 Jose Bautista and Juan Francisco
3 0 1 0 hit solo home runs for the Blue Jays,
3010
3 0 0 0 who have lost a season-high four
0 0 0 o0 straight games.
Middlebrooks has five home runs
31 4 8 4 and 10 extra base hits in 13 career
1 games at Toronto's Rogers Centre. He
4 had a three-homer game against the
;incinnati 3, Blue Jays on April 7, 2013.
eeman (6),
(3). Clay Buchholz survived a shaky
BB so first inning to win for the first time in
five starts this season. Buchholz (1-2)
0 4 allowed three runs and six hits in
1 1
0 0 seven innings. Koji Uehara got four
outs for his fifth save.
2 4 Blue Jays right-hander Brandon
Morrow (1-2) issued a career-worst
eight walks in 2 2-3 innings, allowing
rue four runs without giving up a hit.
6 Twins 5, Tigers 3

IS 3 MINNEAPOLIS Phil Hughes
Co threw seven strong innings and Josmil
ab r h bi Pinto hit his fifth homer, leading Min-
3 0 1 1 nesota to the victory.

4 0 0 0 Hughes (2-1) had six strikeouts with
3 1 1 1 no walks. He retired 16 straight at one
3 1 1 0 point and has won two straight.
1 0 0 0 Jared Burton pitched a scoreless
3000
0 0 0 0 eighth and Glen Perkins worked the
0 0 0 0 ninth for his sixth save in seven chances.
3 1 1 0 Detroit led 2-0 before starter Anibal

1 0 0 0 Sanchez left in the third with a blister
0 0 0 0 on his middle finger on his throwing
1 1 1 1 hand, forcing newly recalled Jose Or-
1 0 0 0 tega (0-1) into action.

295 6 5 Orioles 3, Royals 2
-3
5 (10 innings)
-o 1. LOB-
-Bourn (1), BALTIMORE Nick Markakis sin-
y (5). SB- gled in the winning run in 10th inning
BB SO after two throwing errors by pitcher
Danny Duffy laid the groundwork for
1 6 the Baltimore Orioles' 3-2 victory over
0 1 the Kansas City Royals.
0 2 After Duffy (1-1) hit Jonathan
0 1
Schoop to begin the 10th, the left-han-
2 3 der threw wildly to second base after
0 1 fielding a bunt by David Lough. Jemile
1 1
0 0 Weeks followed with another bunt,
0 0 and on this one Duffy's throw went
S(Giambi). high and wide to first, loading the
bases.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Kansas City 5, Baltimore 0
L.A. Angels 13, N.Y.Yankees 1
Boston 8, Toronto 1
Detroit 10, Minnesota 6
Oakland 12, Houston 5
Chicago White Sox 9, Tampa Bay 6
Seattle 6, Texas 5
San Francisco 5, Cleveland 1
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 4, L.A. Angels 3
Boston 7, Toronto 6
Minnesota 5, Detroit 3
San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3
Baltimore 3, Kansas City 2, 10 innings
Houston 7, Oakland 6
Tampa Bay 4, Chicago White Sox 0
Texas at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Boston (Lester 2-3) at Toronto (Dickey 1-3), 1:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 2-2) at Baltimore (Gonzalez 1-1), 1:35 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 3-1) at Minnesota (Gibson 3-1), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 0-1) at Houston (McHugh 1-0), 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay(Price 3-1) at White Sox (Carroll 0-0), 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 0-3) at San Fran. (Vcgelsong 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (Harrison 0-0) at Seattle (Maurer 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Angels (Richards 2-0) at Yankees (Tanaka 3-0), 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Washington 11, San Diego 1
N.Y Mets 4, Miami 3
Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 4
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 2
St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 0
Arizona 5, Philadelphia 4
Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 11 innings
San Francisco 5, Cleveland 1
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, San Diego 0
San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 1
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 3
Atlanta 4, Cincinnati 1
Miami at N.Y Mets, late
Philadelphia at Arizona, late
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday's Games
Miami (Koehler 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 1-1), 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 2-2) at Atlanta (Teheran 2-1), 1:35 p.m.
San Diego(Kennedy 1-3) at Washington (Jordan 0-3), 1:35p.m.
Cubs (Hammel 3-1) at Milwaukee (Peralta 3-0), 2:10 p.m.
Pttsburgh (Volquez 1-1) at St. Louis (Wainwright 4-1), 2:15 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 0-3) at San Fran. (Vcgelsong 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (De La Rosa 1-3) at Dodgers (Ryu 3-1), 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Burnett 0-1) at Arizona (McCarthy 0-4), 4:10 p.m.


Astros 7, Athletics 6
HOUSTON Dexter Fowler hit a
tiebreaking RBI single in Houston's
four-run eighth inning, and the Astros
beat the Oakland Athletics 7-6.
Fowler also had a solo homer as
Houston snapped a three-game losing
streak. Chris Carter connected for a
two-run shot in the second.
The game was tied at 3 when
Fowler drove in Marwin Gonzalez with
a base hit against Sean Doolittle (0-2).
Jason Castro then singled in Jose Al-
tuve, and Fowler and Castro eventu-
ally came home on groundouts.
Brandon Moss hit a three-run homer
in the Oakland ninth against Jerome
Williams (1-1). Nick Punto then singled,
but Coco Crisp bounced into a fielder's
choice and Raul Valdes struck out John
Jaso and Jed Lowrie for his first save.

INTERLEAGUE

Giants 5, Indians 3
SAN FRANCISCO Hunter
Pence hit a two-run single in San
Francisco's four-run fifth inning, lead-
ing the Giants to a 5-3 victory over the
Cleveland Indians on Saturday.
Buster Posey added a solo homer
in the sixth as San Francisco earned
its third consecutive win. Posey, who
won the NL MVP award in 2012, went
1 for 3 and is batting .103 (4 for 39)
over his last 13 games.
Michael Bourn, Nick Swisher and
David Murphy had two hits apiece for
Cleveland, which blew a 3-0 lead.
Jason Kipnis drove in two runs.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Nationals 4, Padres 0
WASHINGTON -Tanner Roark
pitched a three-hitter for the first com-
plete game of his career as the Wash-
ington Nationals beat the San Diego
Padres 4-0.
Roark set down the first 16 batters
before San Diego catcher Rene
Rivera, an .074 batter entering the
game, hit a solid single to center field
with one out in the sixth inning.
Roark (2-0) walked one and struck
out eight, including Jedd Gyorko to
end the game on his 105th pitch. The
27-year-old right-hander extended his
run of consecutive scoreless innings
to 18, improved to 4-0 in his career at
Nationals Park. In 35 innings there he
has given up one earned run.
lan Desmond had three hits for
Washington, including a run-scoring
double.

Pirates 6, Cardinals 1
ST. LOUIS Gaby Sanchez had
two RBIs in a four-run fourth inning
and the Pittsburgh Pirates bullpen
worked seven strong innings after
starter Francisco Liriano left with flu-
like symptoms and dizziness in a 6-1
victory over the St. Louis Cardinals.
Matt Holliday had an RBI double for
the Cardinals, who have mustered five
runs in their last six games.
Yadier Molina was a bust on his jer-
sey giveaway day, striking out with the
bases loaded to end the third against
Stolmy Pimentel (2-0) and popping
out with runners on second and third
to end the fifth against Jared Hughes.
He entered batting .431 during a 15-
game hitting streak.
Tyler Lyons (0-2) took the loss.

Braves 4, Reds 1
ATLANTA- Rookie right-hander
David Hale allowed only two hits over
eight innings in a performance that
may not be enough to save his spot in
Atlanta's rotation and the Braves beat
the Cincinnati Reds 4-1.
Freddie Freeman, Justin Upton and
Evan Gattis each homered off Cincin-
nati's Mike Leake (2-2).
Hale gave up a walk and two hits,
including Ryan Ludwick's run-scoring
double, in the first inning. He didn't
allow another hit as he faced the mini-
mum 21 batters over the next seven
innings.
Hale (1-0) has a 2.31 ERA in four
starts but could lose his spot in the ro-
tation next week, when left-hander
Mike Minor is expected to come off
the disabled list.

Brewers 5, Cubs 3
MILWAUKEE Jeff Bianchi had a
two-run single, and Marco Estrada
threw 7 2/3 strong innings to lead the
Milwaukee Brewers past the Chicago
Cubs 5-3 on Saturday night.
Bianchi went 2 for 4, entering the
game as a pinch-hitter in the first for
Jean Segura, who was hit in the head
in the dugout by a bat.
A TV replay showed the All-Star
getting hit on the right side of the head
during a warmup swing by teammate
Ryan Braun, who was facing the field
on the top steps of the dugout while
Segura was coming up behind him.
Bianchi drove in two runs with a
bases-loaded single in the second off
Cubs starter Travis Wood (1-3).
Estrada (2-1) had nine strikeouts.


Str Home
L-1 6-6
L-1 9-4
L-1 3-6
W-2 4-5
W-1 4-9



Str Home
W-3 7-4
W-1 8-4
L-2 5-8
L-2 7-6
W-3 2-11


AL


Yankees 4, Angels 3


Los Angeles
ab
Cowgill rf 5
Trout cf 3
Pujols dh 5
HKndrc 2b 4
Aybarss 4
lannettc 4
Boesch pr-If 0
IStewrt lb 3
Freese 3b 4
Shuck If 3


NewYork
r h bi
0 1 0 Ellsurycf
1 2 1 Jeterss
1 2 0 Beltrandh
0 0 0 ASorin rf
1 0 0 ISuzuki rf
0 2 1 Teixeirib
0 0 0 Gardnr lf
0 1 0 BRorts2b
0 1 0 KJhnsn3b
0 0 0 JMrphyc


ab r h bi
4010
4010
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4000
4010
4 0 1 0
0000
3100
3120
3100
3000
3123
3 1 0 0
3 1 2 0
3 1 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 1 2 3


Ibanezph 1 000
Congerc 0 000
Totals 36 39 2 Totals 314 7 3
Los Angeles 100 200 000 3
NewYork 030 010 00x 4
E-B.Roberts (3). LOB-Los Angeles 10, New
York 6. 2B-lannetta (5). HR Trout (6), J.Mur-
phy (1). SB Trout (3), Gardner (6).
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
H.Santiago L,0-4 41-36 4 4 1 3
Jepsen 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Maronde 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Kohn 11-30 0 0 0 1
Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Nuno 41-35 3 3 2 4
BetancesW,l-0 2 1 0 0 1 3
KelleyH,3 11-32 0 0 1 1
Thornton H,7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Dav.RobertsonS,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Frieri (Gardner), by H.Santiago (Teix-
eira). Balk- H.Santiago, Betances.
T- 3:05. A-40,908 (49, 642).
Red Sox 7,
Blue Jays 6
Boston Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pedroia2b 4 0 1 0 Reyesss 3 10 0
Victornrf 4 1 0 0 MeCarrlIf 5 11 0
D.Ortizd h 1 1 0 0 Bautistdh 5 23 2
Carplib 3 2 1 0 Frncsclb-3b 4 1( 1 1
GSizmrlf 2 1 1 2 Navarrc 4 13 1
Przynsc 3 1 1 4 Rasmscf 5 01 0
Mdlrks3b 4 1 1 1 Lawrie3b-2b 5 02 0
JHerrrss 4 00 0 Sierrarf 3 00 0
BrdlyJr cf 4 0 0 0 EncrncGph-lb 2 0 1 1
Goins2b 3 01 0
Diaz ph-rf 1 00 0
.... Totals 29 75 7 Totals 40613 5
- Boston 006 010 000 7
Toronto 300 000 021 6
DP-Toronto 2. LOB-Boston 4, Toronto 11.
Associated Press 2B -Carp (3), G.Sizemore (3), Bautista (4).
Los Angeles HR-Pierzynski (2), Middlebrooks (2), Bautista
(7), Francisco (2). CS-Pedroia (2).
3. IP H RERBBSO


Boston
Buchholz W,1-2
Tazawa
Capuano H,3
Uehara S,5-5
Toronto
Morrow L, 1-2
Jenkins
Loup
Cecil
Delabar
Santos


7 6 3 3 3 3
1-3 4 2 2 0 0
1-30 0 0 1 1
11-33 1 1 0 2


WP-Buchholz. PB-Navarro.
T-3:23. A-40,322 (49,282).
Twins 5, Tigers 3
Detroit Minnesota


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Kinsler2b 4 0 0 0 Dozier2b 2 1 0 0
TrHntrrf 4 1 3 0 Mauerdh 2 00 1
MiCarrlb 4 1 1 1 Plouffe3b 2 01 2
VMrtnzdh 3 1 1 2 Flormnss 1 00 0
AJcksncf 4 02 0 Colaelllb 3 00 0
Cstllns3b 4 0 0 0 Kubell If 4 00 0
AnRmnss 3 0 0 0 Pinto c 3 1 1 1
JMrtnzph 1 0 0 0 Fuldrf 3 1 1 0
Holadyc 2 0 0 0 A.Hickscf 3 1 1 0
Avilaph-c 1 0 0 0 EEscorss-3b3 1 0 0
RDavisl If 3 0 1 0
Totals 33 38 3 Totals 26 5 4 4
Detroit 200 000 001 3
Minnesota 000 040 01x 5
E-Holaday (2), Fuld (1). DP-Detroit 1, Min-
nesota 1. LOB-Detroit 5, Minnesota 7. 2B-
Tor.Hunter (6), Mi.Cabrera (7), A.Jackson (6),
Fuld (4), A.Hicks (3). HR V.Martinez (4), Pinto
(5). SB-A.Jackson (2), Fuld (2). CS-Dozier(l).
S-E.Escobar. SF V.Martinez.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
A.Sanchez 22-30 0 0 2 2
OrtegaL,0-1 11-30 4 4 4 1
Coke 22-32 0 0 2 2
Alburquerque 11-32 1 1 0 4
Minnesota
RHughesW,2-1 7 4 2 1 0 6
BurtonH,4 1 2 0 0 1 0
PerkinsS,6-7 1 2 1 1 0 2
Ortega pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Ortega (Plouffe). WP-Coke.
T-3:13.A-28,122 (39,021).
Orioles 3, Royals 2
(10 innings)


Kansas City
ab
Aoki rf 5
Infante 2b 4
Hosmer lb 4
BButler dh 4
AGordn If 5
S.Perezc 5
Pareds pr 0
Hayes c 0
Valenci3b 3


Baltimore
r h bi
02 0 JWeeksdh
0 0 0 N.Cruz rf
01 1 Markkslb
0 1 0 A.Jones cf
1 1 0 Wietersc
0 3 0 Hardy ss
0 0 0 Flahrty3b
00 0 Schoop2b
0 1 0 Lough lf


ab r h bi
4120
4100
4 1 2 0
4 1 0 0
5022
4011
4 0 1 1
4000
4010
4010
3110
4000
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 1 1 0
4 0 0 0


Dyson ph-cfl1 0 0 0
Maxwllcf 3 0 1 1
Mostks ph-3b 1 0 0 0
AEscorss 4 1 1 0
Totals 39 2112 Totals 3638 3
Kansas CityOOl 001 000 0 2
Baltimore 200 000 000 1 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-Duffy 2 (2). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-
Kansas City 11, Baltimore 8.2B-Hosmer (7),
S.Perez (8), A.Escobar (7). 3B-J.Weeks (1).
S-Infante, Dyson, J.Weeks.


Kansas City
Guthrie
WDavis
Crow
Duffy L,1-1
Coleman
Baltimore
WChen
Meek
Matusz
O'Day
Tom.Hunter
Britton W,3-0


IP H RERBBSO
7 6 2 2 1 3
1 0 0 0 0 2
1 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0
1-3 1 0 0 0 1


Duffy pitched to 3 batters in the 10th.
HBP-by Duffy (Schoop).
T-3:09. A-34,941 (45,971).
Astros 7, Athletics 6


Oakland Houston
ab r h bi
Crisp dh 4 1 1 1 Altuve2b
DNorrsc 3 1 2 0 Fowler cf
Jaso ph-c 2 0 0 0 JCastro c
Lowrie ss 5 0 1 1 Springr rf
Dnldsn3b 4 0 1 0 Krausslb
Callasplb 3 0 0 0 Guzmn lb
Barton lb 0 0 0 0 Carter dh
Reddckrf 4 1 2 0 PresleyIlf
Gentry cf 2 20 0 MDmn3b
Moss If 4 1 2 3 MGnzlzss
Punto2b 4 020
Totals 35 6115 Totals
Oakland 200 000 103
Houston 120 000 04x


ab r h bi
4110
4 1 1 0
4222
4111
4011
3101
0000
3112
3010
3000
3110
4 1 1 18 7
4 0 1 1
3 1 0 1

3 1 1 2
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 1 1 0

31 7 8 7
6
7


DP-Oakland 1, Houston 2. LOB-Oakland 6,
Houston 2.2B-Crisp (2), D.Norris (3), Springer
(2). HR-Moss (4), Fowler (2), Carter (3). SB-
Crisp (7). SF-Crisp.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Straily 61-34 3 3 2 7
Cook 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Doolittle L,0-2 0 4 4 4 0 0
Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
Keuchel 61-36 3 3 2 6
WilliamsW,1-1 BS,1-12 5 3 3 1 1
ValdesS,1-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Doolittle pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
WP-Gregerson. PB-Jaso.
T-3:13.A-17,850 (42,060).


B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


BASEBALL


a




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Giraldo, Nishikori to meet in Barcelona final


Sharapova defeats Errani to advance to finals in Stuttgart


Associated Press


Associated Press
Sara Errani of Italy returns the ball to Russia's Maria
Sharapova during their semifinal match Saturday at the
Porsche tennis Grand Prix in Stuttgart, Germany. Shara-
pova won the match with 6-1 and 6-2.


BARCELONA, Spain Santiago
Giraldo of Colombia beat Nicolas Al-
magro 7-5, 6-3 to reach the Barcelona
Open final on Saturday, as his Span-
ish rival suffered a letdown after
ousting top-ranked Rafael Nadal.
Giraldo will face fourth-seeded
Kei Nishikori of Japan after he beat
Ernests Gulbis of Latvia 6-2, 6-4 in
the other semifinal on the red out-
door clay
Almagro slumped to his first loss
in six meetings with Giraldo, a day
after one of his biggest wins when he
upset eight-time winner Nadal at
the Real Club de Tenis.
"Yesterday's game doesn't serve


as an excuse,"Almagro said. "Giraldo
grazed perfection today, above all in
the first set, and I couldn't find the
answer"
The unseeded Giraldo will be
playing for his first career title on
Sunday after he saved six of seven
break points and finished the match
with an emphatic ace.
"I have always dreamed of reach-
ing the top spots of the ATP ranking
and tomorrow is a first step," Gi-
raldo said. "But I am staying calm. I
will keep to my routine and tomor-
row will be a day to enjoy and play
the best tennis I can."
Nishikori will be seeking his sec-
ond title of the season and fifth in
his career


Sharapova victorious
at Porsche Grand Prix
STUTTGART, Germany Two-time
defending champion Maria Sharapova
cruised past Sara Errani 6-1,6-2 on Sat-
urday to reach her third straight Porsche
Grand Prix final.
Sharapova dominated the 59-minute
semifinal and will play Ana Ivanovic in the
final. Ivanovic, looking for her third title of
the year, beat Jelena Jankovic 6-3, 7-5.
Errani hit a big cross-court return that
kissed the line to save the first match point.
But Sharapova then hit a superb backhand
winner down the line to close the match.
Sharapova is looking for her 30th
career title.


Associated Press


Seung-yul Noh tees off on the second hole Saturday during the third round of the PGA Zurich Classic at TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La.



No problems: Noh leads Zurich by two


Associated Press

AVONDALE, La. Seung-
Yul Noh became the first
player to complete 54 holes at
the TPC Louisiana without a
bogey and strung together
three birdies late in his
round Saturday to surge two
strokes ahead of Keegan
Bradley atop the Zurich Classic
leaderboard.
Noh shot a 7-under 65 to
reach 18-under 198.
Bradley, who began the day
tied for seventh at 9 under,
pulled into a tie with Noh for
first on No. 15 with his seventh
birdie of the day Then, Noh,
who was tied for third at 11
under after two rounds, made
birdie putts of 13 feet on 14 and
10 feet on 15 before hitting a
112-yard approach shot to a
foot for another birdie, bring-
ing him to 18 under


Bradley also shot 65.
Robert Streb was third, three
shots back after a 68.
Ben Martin, who had a three-
shot lead after two rounds, shot
a 73 to drop into a tie for fourth
with Jeff Overton and Andrew
Svoboda at 14 under Overton
shot 67, and Svoboda 70.
Noh, from South Korea, has
been playing with yellow and
blue ribbons affixed to his cap
to honor victims of the fatal
ferry accident in the waters off
of his home country
He said he hoped he could
play well Sunday to provide
Koreans with a dose of good
news.
This marks the first time that
Noh has led a PGA Tour event
through three rounds. This is
his third year on the tour, but
he finished outside the top 125
on the money list last season,
forcing him to play in Web.com


Tour Finals events to retain his
tour card.
He had never before been
higher on the leaderboard than
tied for second through three
rounds. That happened once at
the 2012 AT&T National, but he
shot a 2-over 73 in his final
round to finish tied fo fourth,
his best finish in 77 previous
career PGA Tour starts.
Martin had raced to the lead
with a course-record 10-under
62 in his first round, and his 36-
hole score of 129 also was a
course record. Teeing off with
the final group, his trouble
began on the par-5 second hole.
He pushed his second shot to
the right toward the crowd. His
ball hit a spectator and kicked
right into a cluster of long pom-
pass grass, out of which it was
virtually impossible to hit.
Martin took a drop and
wound up with a bogey


Levy maintains 3-shot
lead at China Open
SHENZHEN, China--Alexander
Levy of France overcame driving
rain and gusting winds to shoot a
2-under 70 at the China Open on
Saturday and maintain a three-
stroke lead over Alvaro Quiros of
Spain heading into the final round.
Levy, aiming for his first Euro-
pean Tour title, birdied three
straight holes on the back nine,
but opened the door for Quiros
with bogeys on No. 14 and 16.
The Spaniard couldn't close the
gap, however, making two bogeys
of his own down the stretch.
Levy has a 16-under total of 200.
Finland's Mikko Ilonen was four
strokes back in third place after a
67, while England's Tommy Fleet-
wood (67) and Spain's Adrian
Otaegui (71) were another
stroke behind in a tie for fourth.


A day after 15-year-old Chinese
amateur Guan Tianlang failed to
make the cut, another young
homegrown talent, 18-year-old
Li Haotong, shot a 67 to match
the low score of the day and
jump into joint eighth at 7 under.
Third-ranked Henrik Stenson,
however, didn't make up any
ground on the leaders, falling 12
shots behind after shooting a
71. The Swede needed a win
here to take over the top ranking
from Tiger Woods.
Levy wasn't nearly as accurate
as he was on Friday, when he
holed a 20-foot putt for eagle and
sunk eight birdies en route to
setting a new course record at
Genzon Golf Club. But he handled
the nasty weather at the start of
his round and maintained his
focus after his late bogeys,
managing to avoid a third with a
15-foot putt for par on the 18th.


Phelps taking different approach in comeback


Associated Press

MESA, Ariz. Michael
Phelps tied the fourth-
fastest time in the world
this year swimming the
100-meter butterfly in his
first competition in nearly
two years. His comeback
has gotten off to a strong
start albeit with a much
different approach than he
took in winning 22 medals
over three Olympics.
After a 20-month retire-
ment, Phelps resumed
training last September
with his longtime coach
Bob Bowman at the North
Baltimore Aquatic Center
in his hometown. But he
didn't pick up the grueling
regimen that had ruled his
life since he was a
teenager
Phelps has slowly
started back and now
trains just once a day in
the afternoon. No double
or triple sessions or plow-
ing through thousands of
meters a day


Call this comeback
Phelps 2.0.
While his workload will
go up eventually, for now
Phelps is doing half the
amount of training he did
during the height of his ca-
reer, when he won a record
eight gold medals at the
2008 Beijing Olympics.
"I'm sort of experiment-
ing with stuff that I didn't
have the guts to do before,
like not swim as far," Bow-
man said. "I'm very pleased
with how he's doing."
This relaxed approach
appears to suit both
Phelps and Bowman just
fine. Their decades-long
partnership rare in a
sport where swimmers fre-
quently change coaches -
survived fiery clashes as
Phelps grew up and re-
belled against Bowman's
hard-nosed ways.
"Our last several years
together, it really wasn't
much fun for everybody,"
the coach said.
Without committing to


specifics, Phelps seems in-
tent on swimming fewer
events and shorter races
this time around. He turns
29 in June, and as the most
decorated Olympian in
history, his place in the
record books is secure.
"I'm not putting any
pressure on myself," he
said. "I'm just enjoying my-
self right now"
At the Arena Grand Prix
meet in Mesa, he com-
peted in just two events -
the 100 fly (he finished sec-
ond to Ryan Lochte) and
the 50 freestyle, where he
instead used a butterfly
stroke and finished 42nd.
Phelps' time of 52.13 sec-
onds in the 100 tied for
fourth-quickest in the
world this year In his
other event, he swam 50
meters of fly in 24.06,
faster than his split time a
day earlier in the 100 fly
His biggest challenge
last fall was to lose the 30
pounds he had piled on
since retiring after the


Associated Press
Michael Phelps warms up Friday prior to a 50-meter
freestyle preliminary heat at the Arena Grand Prix swim
event in Mesa, Ariz. It is Phelps' second competitive
event after a nearly two-year retirement.


2012 Olympics. He's gone
from a high of 225 to 194 -
about seven more pounds
than he raced at in London.
"He's not fat. He's been
pretty strong in the weight
room," Bowman said.
"Where he's lacking is aer-
obic fitness. He's got a
good start on it."
Phelps figures to im-
prove that aspect during


upcoming high-altitude
training in Colorado.
Bowman's plan calls for
Phelps to work his way up
to recovering faster so he
can handle multiple indi-
vidual races a day and
swim anywhere from one
to three relays. But the
coach said his star pupil
will never go back to the
grind he put in to win all


those Olympic medals.
"He's much happier doing
the training," Bowman
said. 'As long as he's en-
joying it like he is, it's good
for everybody That's what
I am concerned about"
Phelps is entered in the
last two Grand Prix meets
of the season, in North
Carolina in May and Cali-
fornia in June. Those are
tuneups for the U.S. na-
tional championships in
August, where teams will
be chosen for the Pan Pa-
cific Championships later
that month and next year's
world meet
"I know if I really want
to compete at a high level,
I have to be ready by this
summer," he said.
Whether all this leads to
the 2016 Rio Olympics,
Phelps remains mum.
"I always have goals and
things that I want to
achieve," he said. "This has
been an amazing journey
that I've gone on so far, and
I just hope it continues."


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pacers win 91-88, even series with Hawks


Associated Press

ATLANTA The Indi-
ana Pacers knew what they
were up against. This was
a game they had to have.
Paul George and David
West made sure they got it.
George and West hit key
3-pointers down the closing
minutes, and top-seeded
Indiana held off the At-
lanta Hawks 91-88 to even
the opening-round series at
two wins apiece Saturday
Finally, the Pacers
showed some grit and re-
silience, regaining the
home-court edge that
slipped away when they
were stunned by the No. 8-
seeded Hawks in Game 1.
"We were just in desper-
ation mode," West said. "You
just can't go down two
games in a playoff series.
The odds are against you."
George put the Pacers
ahead 86-85 with a jumper
beyond the arc, and West
hit another trey with 1:33
remaining.
Atlanta had a chance
after Kyle Korver was fouled
in the corner and knocked
down three free throws,


taking advantage of a do-
over after the Pacers were
called for a lane violation.
But George gave the Pacers
two chances at the other
hand, scrambling for an of-
fensive rebound after Lance
Stephenson missed a 3.
George Hill took advantage
by scooping one in off a
drive with 56 seconds left.
That would be the final
points. The Hawks whiffed
on their last three posses-
sions; Pero Antic missed a
3-pointer at the buzzer to
force overtime after the
Pacers made sure Korver the
long-range specialist, did-
n't get his hands on the ball.
Game 5 is Monday in In-
dianapolis.
After questioning his
team's toughness, George
scored 24 points and added
10 rebounds for his fourth
straight double-double.
West added 18 points.
"My number was called,"
George said. "I had to deliver"
Unfortunately for the
Hawks, Paul Millsap
couldn't provide the
matching punch.
Even though he led the
Hawks with 29 points, the


All-Star forward turned it
over with a bad pass with
33 seconds to go. Then,
after Stephenson lost the
ball and the Hawks gained
possession off a jump,
Millsap missed a spinning
shot in the lane as Atlanta
passed on going for a tying
3-pointer
"We're still a confident
group," Millsap said. "We
let one slip away, but we
showed we can go out and
compete in the games up
there. That's where our
mindset is now. We've got
to let this one go and get
ready for Monday"
Indiana left the door
open by missing its final
four free throws, including
a pair by George with 7.5
seconds left when only one
would have been enough
to seal the victory But the
Pacers buckled down at
the defensive end, forcing
Antic to throw up a des-
peration shot that clanked
off the rim.
The Pacers decided
against benching Roy Hib-
bert to go with a smaller
lineup against the Hawks,
who have taken the 7-foot-


Associated Press
Atlanta Hawks guard Kyle Korver and Indiana Pacers
center Roy Hibbert battle for a rebound Saturday in the
first half of Game 4 in Atlanta.


2 center out of his comfort
zone by spreading the court
with their big men. Hib-
bert continued to struggle,
managing just six points
and three rebounds in a
little less than 25 minutes.
But he did have his first
two blocks of the series.
George and West took
care of the rest.


Cheered on by a raucous
crowd at Philips Arena,
where they even took down
a curtain that normally
covers part of the upper
deck, the Hawks looked as
though they were headed
for a commanding lead in the
series as they pushed out
to their biggest lead, 54-44,
early in the third quarter


Carter beats the buzzer


Mavericks take 2-1 series lead with 109-108 last-second victory

Associated Press II11'

DALLAS Vince Carter hit
a double-pump 3-pointer at the
buzzer to give the Dallas Mav-
ericks a 109-108 victory in
Game 3 and a first-round series
lead over the top-seeded San
Antonio Spurs on Saturday
Carter took an inbound pass
from Jose Calderon with 1.7
seconds left in the left corner
After a quick pump fake in
front of Manu Ginobili, Carter
released the ball just before
the buzzer The winning shot
was held up on review
Ginobili had given the Spurs
a 108-106 lead on a layup be-
fore Dallas called timeout to
set up the play for Carter
Monta Ellis kept the eight-
seeded Mavericks close in the
fourth quarter and finished
with 29 points.
Tim Duncan led the Spurs
with 22 points.
Ginobili, who scored 12 points,
dribbled out most of the last 24
seconds before going around
Duncan and scoring over Samuel
Dalembert. His go-ahead shot -
spun around the rim and al-
most came out before falling in.
The Mavericks kept the
home-court advantage they
earned by taking Game 2 in
San Antonio, even though the
Spurs held Dirk Nowitzki under
20 points in a third straight
playoff game for the first time
since they did it to him in his
first postseason in 2001. The
big German finished with 18.
Dallas still had a chance in
the closing seconds because of
Ellis, who had a playoff career
high that included 12 fourth-
quarter points. He tied the score
twice in the final 1:10, first with
a three-pointplayon afloaterafter
he was fouled by Boris Diaw.
After Diaw put the Spurs
back in front with a baseline
jumper, Ellis hit another high
floater in the lane with 24.9
seconds left, setting up Gino-
bili's dramatic shot.
Tony Parker had 19 points,
but just two after halftime for
the Spurs. Tiago Splitter had
14 points and 13 rebounds and
Kawhi Leonard awoke from a
series-long slumber with 17 Associated Press
points, including a big 3- Dallas Mavericks guard Vince Carter shoots the game-winning 3-point basket at the buzzer Saturday
pointer in the fourth quarter over San Antonio Spurs guard Cory Joseph at the end of Game 3 in Dallas.


But Millsap picked up
two fouls just 7 seconds
apart, giving him four in
the game and forcing him
to the bench for much of
the period. The Pacers
took advantage of the At-
lanta star's absence, whit-
tling the deficit down to
59-56 by the time he re-
turned.
"Getting him on his
heels, putting him in a
tough spot, obviously it
changes who they are,"
West said. "The game was
getting away from us. He
goes to the bench, we
closed the gap somewhat."
It was tight all the way in
the fourth, and things re-
ally got heated down the
stretch.
With about 5 1/2 minutes
remaining, Millsap stum-
bled trying to drive to the
basket and two Pacers
piled on him trying to
snatch the ball away
Tempers flared, Hill
gave Atlanta's Mike Scott a
little shove, and both play-
ers were assessed techni-
cal fouls. After sorting
things out, the officials
ruled it a jump ball.



Pens top


Jackets,


go up 3-2


in series

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Jussi
Jokinen scored the go-
ahead goal in the third pe-
riod and the Pittsburgh
Penguins topped the
Columbus Blue Jackets 3-1
on Saturday night to take a
3-2 lead in their Eastern
Conference playoff series.
Chris Kunitz and Kris
Letang also scored for
Pittsburgh, which has the
upstart Blue Jackets on
the verge of elimination
with an opportunity to
close out the series Mon-
day during Game 6 in
Columbus.
It hasn't been easy for
the Penguins, a team con-
sidered by many a Stanley
Cup contender Columbus,
which began the series
searching for its first
playoff win in franchise
history, twice rallied to
stun the heavily favored
Penguins.
Boone Jenner scored
the lone goal for Colum-
bus, which played its
first Game 5 in franchise
history
Penguins goaltender
Marc-Andre Fleury recov-
ered from a game-chang-
ing gaffe in Game 4 for the
victory on Saturday, mak-
ing 23 saves. Fleury is 4-1
in his last five games after
a playoff overtime loss.
Sergei Bobrovsky
stopped 49 shots for the
Blue Jackets, who were
outshot 51-24.
Penguins captain Sid-
ney Crosby and Evgeni
Malkin still haven't scored
through five playoff games.
Crosby who led the league
in scoring with 104 points,
hasn't scored in his last 10
playoff games overall,
while Malkin has gone
nine without a goal.
The teams were tied at 1
entering the third, but
Jokinen touched a back-
hand rebound past Bo-
brovsky along the far post
6:16 into the period.


Bruins retire Red Wings with 4-2 win at home


Associated Press

BOSTON Tuukka Rask
made 31 saves to help the
defending Eastern Confer-
ence champion Boston
Bruins beat the Red Wings
4-2 in Game 5 of their first-
round playoff series on
Saturday and eliminate De-
troit from the postseason.
The Bruins, who fin-
ished the regular season
with the best record in the
NHL, advanced to the con-
ference semifinals against
the Montreal Canadiens.
Loui Eriksson opened
the scoring for Boston, and
Zdeno Chara snapped a
second-period tie to give


the Bruins the lead for
good. Milan Lucic also
scored, and Jarome Iginla
added an empty-netter
Pavel Datsyuk and Hen-
rik Zetterberg scored and
Jonas Gustavsson stopped
29 shots for Detroit.
Chara made it 2-1 in the
second, then Lucic's goal
with 4:27 gone in the third
made it a two-goal game.
Detroit made it 3-2 with
3:52 left after Rask made
two acrobatic saves but
left the puck to the side of
the net for Zetterberg, the
Red Wings captain who
missed two months with
back surgery and did not
return until Game 4.


Less than a minute later
the Wings were called for too
many men on the ice, leav-
ing them a man down try-
ing to finish the comeback.
The Bruins scored a
power play goal 3:27 into
the first period when
Dougie Hamilton's pass
bounced off a defender's
skate to Eriksson in the
slot. Rask earned an assist
on the play
It stayed that way until
Datsyuk came in and
scooped up a rebound 12
seconds into a second-
period power play against
Lucic for high-sticking.
The Bruins went to a 4-
on-3 in the final minute of


the second when Johan
Franzen was sent off for
holding 22 seconds before
Brendan Smith was called
for cross-checking. On a
faceoffin the Detroit zone,
two of the three Red Wings
defenders chased the puck
and Patrice Bergeron
passed it across the ice to
Chara, who one-timed it
past Gustavsson with just 4
seconds left in the period.
The Bruins had a good
scoring chance with a 3-on-2,
but Gustavsson stopped David
Krejci. ButToreyKrughelped
keep the puck in the zone,
then passed it to Lucic on
the doorstep for the goal
that made it 3-1.


Associated Press
The Detroit Red Wings goalkeeper Jonas Gustavsson
watches a shot from behind a screen Saturday during the
first period in Boston.


B6 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


SPORTS









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



While we're complaining, they're busy achieving


ost of us in Citrus
County are over the
age of 50.
We are one of the oldest
counties in the state of
Florida, which is the oldest
state in the nation.
We are old.
But that doesn't mean we
don't have young people liv-
ing here.
This is the time of the
year when our high school
students go through the cer-


emony of graduating and
entering the world of higher
education or employment.
(Trust me on this one, con-
tinuing your education is
more fun than going to
work).
I had the pleasure of sit-
ting through an awards cer-
emony the other evening
where 31 of the top Citrus
graduates were recognized
for incredible individual
achievements.


These amazing students
are so good that they make
you embarrassed to look
back on your own under-
achieving years.
It is a common old per-
son's refrain these days that
the younger generation is
going to hell. Some of the
award winners from the
Golden Citrus Scholars pro-
gram might have gone to
hell, but it would have been
in a rocket ship they built


from recycled materials
and for the sole purpose of
taking core samples to find
new elements that might
cure cancer
These kids are good.
I know Rishi Gurnani the
best because the Lecanto
High graduate serves as a
volunteer member on our
YMCA board. Rishi won the
top honors for science at
the awards ceremony and
scored a perfect 800 on the


math portion of the SAT
exam.
Did I mention that he was
the No. 1 player on the
school's tennis team and
was a National Merit Com-
mendation Winner?
I had the honor of intro-
ducing Abigale Mattingly as
the Gold Citrus Scholars
Hall of Fame award for her
tremendous achievements.


WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/Special to the Chronicle
Gamal Abdel Nasser (third from left), pictured with his children Mona (first from left), Khaled (second from left) and Abdel Hamid (fourth from left) in 1956,
became a key player in post-World War II Middle East. Nasser was a hero to other Third World countries because he stood up to the United States.


THE






ARABIST






GAMBIT


"America's Great Game: the CIA's
Secret Arabists and the Shaping of
the Middle East," Hugh Wilford,
Basic Books, 342 pages, $30
MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
This book chronicles the actions of
the United States government's in-
telligence/CIA agents in the Middle
East from the end of World War II to
1960. Washington began quickly
moving to fill the power vacuum left by war-
ravaged France and England, who were unable
to manage their colonial empires. Washington
was strongly motivated by fears of Russia into
the expansion or influence in the Middle East.
The book's cast of characters is colorful -
many were products of the eastern establish-
ment and Ivy League colleges. The central fig-
ures are "Arabists" men who had traveled
and studied in the Middle East and were fasci-
nated by the culture and intrigue.
By 1946, Washington was rushing diplomats
and agents into the area to counter the threat of


CHRONICLE
BOOK REVIEW
Soviet influence and the need to protect oil in-
terests. U.S. agents cultivated relations with
politicians and military officers who they be-
lieved would rise into leadership roles in their
countries. The CIA could sometimes provide
them financial support. This had to be clan-
destine, because the Arab leaders did not want
to seem to be pawns for Washington -which, of
course, is what the CIA wanted them to be.
There were two other ongoing controversies
at the time. The first was over what the CIA
mission was to be, with various factions strug-
gling to dominate and set the goals. The second
issue was the emergence of the state of Israel.
Most of the Arabists saw the Zionist movement
as unfairly displacing Arabs in Palestine and
thereby threatening Middle Eastern stability
Franklin Roosevelt had tried to stay out of the
controversy, but when Harry Truman suc-
ceeded FDR, he gave diplomatic recognition to
the new state despite the fact that many in the
CIA felt Arab nationalism should be encour-
aged in the name of the anti-communism.


Gamel Abdul Nasser is the key Arab
figure in the postwar Middle East.
Egypt was loosely governed, with the
support of London, by the flamboyant
playboy King Farouk. Nasser had risen
within the ranks of the Army and was
part of a cabal of military leaders. The
CIA supported the group's coup with
money and advice. The king was top-
pled when he was vacationing on the
Italian Riviera. Nasser soon domi-
nated the military government, and the
CIA Arabists were optimistic for the
relationship. But some months after
the take-over, Washington's promises
of economic assistance for Egypt
started to seem less likely Then
Cairo's request of military training and
equipment was denied by Washington,
much to the consternation of the Ara-
bists. Nasser decided to "play the
Russian card" by procuring military
equipment from Moscow and then wel-
coming Russian military advisers. The
final blow to the Cairo/Washington
connection came months later when
U.S. Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles, angered both by the deal with
Moscow and Nasser's attempts to rally
the support of other Middle Eastern
countries to support third world neu-
trality, decided that it would not help
finance the construction of the Aswan
Dam. America's influence in Egypt-
the largest country in the area -
quickly disappeared. Several of the
CIA agents remained on friendly terms
with the Egyptian leader But others in
the CIA were trying to figure how to
"get rid" of Nasser His standing up to
Washington made Nasser a hero in
Third World capitals.
Then things got worse: Nasser's
forces took over the Suez Canal, which
had been owned and administered by
London. His excuses were that it was
in Egyptian territory and that he
needed more financing for the dam.
This action triggered one of the most
botched ventures of the 20th century
Israel, France and London hatched a
plan to retake the canal by force and


Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3





0Page C2 SUNDAY, APRIL 27,2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"It is the eye which makes the horizon."
Ralph Waldo Emerson,
"Essays: Second Series," 1844


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ALTERNATIVE FUNDING




Road MSBU




workshop




necessary


oads don't pave them-
selves. Financially
speaking, those who
purchase fuel in Citrus
County fund the paving of
local public roads via the gas
tax.
County government estimates
it would take $13 million a
year to pave all the county
roads every 20 years. How-
ever, the road-resurfacing
program came to a screech-
ing halt a couple years ago
years ago because
revenues realized T
from the gas tax THE I
were closer to $3 Volunta
million than $13 resurfacir
million. That re-
sulted from a OUR 01
combination of
factors including Makes go
fuel-efficient ve-


hidcles and people driving less
due to tight budgets.
Given that financial
dilemma, it'd take an esti-
mated 112 years to pave every
county road (to be distin-
guished from state roads and
U.S. highways).
At present, if residents are
fed up with pot holes, cracks
and crumpled shoulders of a
neighborhood road, they can
unify to enact a municipal
services benefit unit (MSBU),
through which they agree to a
fee that funds repaving.
As county government
grapples with sorely lagging
gas tax revenue and in-
evitably aging roads, there's a
clear need to create funding
options. One seemingly logi-
cal option would be to allow
MSBU's that can be subsidized,
in part, with gas tax dollars
and/or sales tax money


You'll need this
Well, this isn't one that you've
heard much about. I donated a
scooter and a ramp to carry it on
the back of your car, to the DAV,
who didn't want it or didn't pick
it up, so they gave it to the Citrus
County Coalition of Vet-
erans or something. C01
They came and picked
it up, but they left the
charger and the cords
and the battery here. I
called them and told
them. They said they'd
come and pick them up.
They were also supposed C
to give me a thing stating C
I had donated it to them. 563-
They've not done it.
Catch those culprits
I'm calling about the skateboard
park over in Beverly Hills. I walk
my dog every morning over there,
and I again this morning seen
what the children have done as
far as throwing garbage down the
hill, took apart the bench that's
in the small gazebo in the mid-
dle of the park. I'm wondering if
there isn't some way that you all
could put cameras down there.
I'm sure that it would cost as
much as it is to repair the de-
struction that they've done. We
taxpayers are paying for this de-
struction. Find the culprits or go
back to locking the gate at dusk.


S
ar
n

p
DC


c
IkA
h.


(


County commissioners
have set a public workshop
for 5:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 13,
to consider the options.
One of five commissioners
voted against having the
workshop, voicing objections
to "any additional MSBUs."
The catch is: The MSBU op-
tion is being proposed as a
voluntary way for property
owners to have their own res-
idential roads paved. If resi-
dents don't want to make use
of the option,
S, ~nothing happens.
SUE: One good thing
ry road about the gas tax
ig MSBU. albeit a modest
revenue-genera-
'INION: tor- is visitors
and those gassing
od sense. up while passing
through the
county contribute, as well as
local residents. What are the
options? Who knows, but if
someone has a brilliant alter-
native, let the county com-
mission know and that idea
could be floated along with
the subsidized MSBU option.
The county does use gas
tax and state revenues to
pave collector and major
roads that are used by all res-
idents. The MSBU option is
being considered for resi-
dential roads where citizens
want to take the initiative
and make something happen
with the road in front of their
home.
Ignoring inadequate funds
to keep roads in decent shape
won't make the problem go
away. Setting the May 13 pub-
lic workshop is a good first
step toward getting a funding
mechanism in gear.


Join the academy
To the person who called in the
Sound Off "In Sheriff Dawsy's
pocket:" I just want to suggest
that you join the sheriff's Citizens'
Academy and state your negativ-
ity. You'll find out a lot of things
about the sheriff's of-
JND fice. It's a wonderful
class, and you'd be sur-
OFF prised at what good
things the sheriff's de-
S apartment does do. And
j if you don't like some-
Sthing, you should state
it and let them know.
S They'll explain things
5 and maybe improve
)579 things. The Citizens
Academy, all you need
to do is call up the
sheriff's office. There's another
class starting on April 24 and
throughout the year.
Numbers plan
I'm calling in response to the
"Fishy lottery." They want to
know how you can have two
numbers the same way. Well,
you have 0-9 in the first column,
0-9 in the second column, 0-9 in
the third column and you pick
each time. That's how you get
two of the same numbers on the
same lottery. In addition, to "Cit-
rus Springs is not Dunnellon:"
Citrus Springs, parts of it is
considered Dunnellon.


Liberate campus speech


Editor's note: This is the first
in a series on bringing the living
Constitution onto more Ameri-
can college campuses.
n April 4, Virginia Gov.
Terry McAuliffe signed
into law a bill unani-
mously passed by the House of
Delegates and the Senate,
which turns outdoor areas on
the state's public college and
university campuses into what
the Foundation for
Individual Rights in
Education, or FIRE,
calls "public fo-
rums."
In other words,
student speech will
not be limited to the
tiny "free speech
zones" that, as
FIRE documents, Nat H
restrict student O
speech in "1 in 6 of OTI
America's 400 top VOHI
colleges" in this land
of the free and home of the brave.
This is America? In these
places of higher learning?
As Greg Lukianoff, president
of FIRE, keeps revealing, these
tightly squeezed campus speech
zones often result in "banishing
student protests, leafleting and
other basic expression (politi-
cal or otherwise) to tiny areas
far away from the students the
speech is intended to reach"
("Virginia Legislature to Cam-
puses: Down With Free Speech
(Zones)!" Greg Lukianoff,
huffingtonpostcom, April 7).
Of course, FIRE was deeply
involved in this historic un-
leashing of Virginia students'
First Amendment rights. But
what about the state's private
colleges and universities? The
pressure will now be on them,
too, to allow their students to be
fully American by speaking
freely on those campuses.
It's important to emphasize
that as FIRE does while it now
goes on to give the First Amend-
ment a home on other college
campuses, "restricting student
speech to tiny 'free speech zones'
diminishes the quality of de-
bate and discussion on campus
by preventing expression from
reaching its target audience"
("Virginia Bans Unconstitutional
Campus 'Free Speech Zones,"'
www.thefire.org, April 7).
"Often, institutions that
maintain these restrictive poli-
cies also employ burdensome
permitting schemes that re-
quire students to obtain admin-
istrative permission days or
even weeks before being al-
lowed to speak their minds.
"Even worse, many of these
policies grant campus adminis-
trators unfettered discretion to
deny applications based on the





4eWiSR


I
[
H
c


Can someone explain
this to me please?
My 83-year-old neighbor was
widowed a year ago, and what
with all the paperwork for
many matters, never gave the
car a thought. She realized the
other day that the tag had ex-
pired, so wanting to do the
right thing, she went to the tag
office to replace the plate, as
it was her husband's handicap
plate, and pay the renewal
fee. Her name was on the reg-


viewpoint or content of the
speakers' intended message."
Are students on those cam-
puses learning to be active,
knowledgeable participants in
this self-governing republic?
Virginia's law, which FIRE is
determined to extend to other
states' schools where it's needed,
"prohibits public institutions of
higher education from impos-
ing restrictions on the time, place
and manner of student speech
that occurs in the
outdoor areas of the
institution's campus
S and is protected by
the FirstAmendment
to the United States
Constitution..."
However, there
are restrictions.
Watch for these ex-
entoff ceptions, because
IE they're why FIRE
ER always stays on and
DES protects its victo-
ries: "the restric-
tions (i) are reasonable, (ii) are
justified without reference to
the content of the regulated
speech, (iii) are narrowly tai-
lored to serve a significant gov-
ernmental interest, and (iv)
leave open ample alternative
channels for communication of
the information" (from the State
Council of Higher Education
for Virginia, www.schevedu).
Meanwhile, FIRE will keep
an eye on administrators at the
University of Virginia, and so
will its student members there,
to make sure the law remains
whole.
In the history of this nation,
no other organization has come
close to FIRE in working to
safeguard the individual consti-
tutional liberties of college stu-
dents of all backgrounds and
beliefs. That's why, almost from
its inception, I've been on the
Advisory Council of FIRE.
Because I'm aware of all it
does, I know FIRE doesn't need
my advice, so what I do is
spread the word of its record of
liberty which would have made
James Madison joyous.
According to FIRE's website,
the organization is a "nonprofit
educational foundation
(whose) mission is to defend
and sustain individual rights at
America's colleges and univer-
sities. These rights include
freedom of speech, legal equal-
ity, due process, religious lib-
erty, and sanctity of conscience
- the essential qualities of in-
dividual liberty and dignity"
It should also be noted that
FIRE represents no political party
- just the American people.
In a pamphlet on college
speech codes, FIRE says it's
"been fighting for student and
faculty rights since 1999, and


we've been very successful in
doing so. Since our founding,
FIRE has won over 190 public
victories at more than 135 col-
leges and universities that have
a total enrollment of nearly
three million students.
"FIRE is directly responsible
for changing over 90 unconsti-
tutional or repressive policies
affecting more than 1.9 million
students" ("Challenging Your
College's Speech Code,"
www.thefire.org).
All along, I've been hoping
FIRE would also move the First
Amendment into high schools.
That is beginning to happen, as
I'll report on how this liberation
of students and faculties brings
the living Bill of Rights into
those schools.
And I yearn to live long
enough to also see FIRE reach
elementary-age students, teach-
ing them how to be authentic
Americans.
Next week, with the aid of
Joe Cohn, FIRE's Legislative
and Policy Director (who testi-
fied before both houses of Vir-
ginia's General Assembly in
support of the state's campus
free speech law), I will report
on the organization's involve-
ment in another historic U.S.
state decision: In 2013, "North
Carolina Governor Pat McCrory
signed a bill granting public
university students in the state
facing non-academic discipli-
nary charges the right to an at-
torney" ("North Carolina
Becomes First State to Guaran-
tee College Students' Right to
Attorney" wwwthefire.org, Aug.
23,2013).
Explained FIRE Senior Vice
President Robert Shibley: "Stu-
dents across America are regu-
larly tried in campus courts for
serious offenses like theft, ha-
rassment, and even rape. Being
labeled a felon and kicked out
by your college carries serious,
life-altering consequences.
"Because the stakes are so
high, students should have the
benefit of an attorney to ensure
the hearing is conducted fairly
and by the rules."
So we have two firsts in the
nation! Did you know about this
law in North Carolina? Did you
know the First Amendment is
now flying high across many of
Virginia's college and univer-
sity campuses? Where are the
media?

Nat Hen toff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
of Rights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


istration, so she figured no
problem.
Wrong! It cost her over $200
to obtain a new title and plate.
She is on Social Security and
this was an expense she did
not need. Since her name was
on the registration and she
could have just mailed it in for
a renewal, this does not seem
fair Why punish someone for
doing the right thing?
Karen Peterson
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


AfWANAWfC iONbLUAMT


Fie Rcfe WTUS RWiNW OUR COUNTRY


SLETTER to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429, or email
letters@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Compared to Fred Alton Brannen, I haven't shot from taw


As I hope it is evi-
dent, I usually try to
keep these columns
light and cheery
Even so, I feel com-
pelled to share my feelings
about a recent passing.
My cousin, the incompa-
rable Bishop Fred Alton
Brannen, a major force for
many years in the Church
of God World Missions De-
partment, has died.
How is it possible to feel
great sadness and un-
speakable joy at the same
time?
While it makes my heart
ache that he is no longer
here with his family, it
brings much comfort and


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

She graduated No. 1 in her
class at Citrus High and has
been recognized as the
county's only National Merit
Scholarship finalist. More
than 1.5 million students ap-
plied for the honor, and only
15,000 in the nation received
the recognition.
She earned a 4.685
weighted GPA during her
high school career and has
been a 4-H standout since the
fourth grade.
We have amazing young
people in this community, and
we older folks need to keep
that front and center While
there are certainly under-
achievers in the schools, the
opportunity for excellence is
always right there.
One of the award winners
at the Thursday event
achieved her honors even
though she struggled through
Florida's foster care system
while in high school.
While we have a terrific
school system, the reality is
that we have one of the high-
est percentages of students on
free and reduced lunches in
the state. The statistic tells us
that many families are
struggling.
And in many cases, stu-
dents are struggling without
the benefit of living in the tra-
ditional family setting.
When a family struggles
economically, there are extra
barriers placed in front of
children who are just trying
to get through the day
Our job as a community is
to continue to try to level the
playing field so that all Citrus
County students can achieve.
Another positive educa-
tion note from last week was
that the Catholic Bishop
Robert Lynch from St. Peters-
burg has granted a stay of ex-
ecution to the Pope John Paul
II Catholic School in Lecanto.
The small elementary
school was slated to be closed
because of shrinking student
population and a difficult fi-
nancial picture.
But parents came out in
force and asked Bishop Lynch
to reconsider the decision.
He did, and that doesn't al-
ways happen.
Parents have now been
given the time to build up en-
rollment and put a strategic
plan together to help grow the
school.
That's truly good news. A
balanced community needs
as many educational opportu-
nities as possible for resi-
dents. The Pope John Paul II
Catholic School plays a criti-
cal role in our community
And speaking of educa-
tion news, as the school year
comes to an end, school board
member Pat Deutschman will
finish her final year on the
county board. Ms.
Deutschman is voluntarily
stepping down after serving
16 years on the board. She has
been known as a tenacious
fighter for student achieve-
ment and has truly made a
mark on the public school
system.
It's easy to forget the effect
that a single individual can
have, but Ms. Deutschman
has had a steady hand fight-
ing for our schools for almost
two decades. She was fre-
quently urged to leave the
school board to run for the
Florida House or Senate, be-
cause she has very strong
feelings about how the Legis-
lature has frequently gotten
off track with things such as
standardized testing. But she
felt she could make a stronger
impact on the local level, and
all of our county schools are
better off for her leadership.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonlinea com.


joy to know he is no longer
suffering physically, and
that he is now in the arms
of the One he served so
faithfully for so many
years, our Lord and savior
Jesus Christ.
But the purpose of my
words today is not to share
grief, but to recognize one
of my heroes.
As some of you know, I
recently finished a novel
which goes to great length
to tell about some of my
adventures, but in compar-
ison to cousin Fred Alton,
as my grandmother used to
say I haven't shot from taw
Soon after they married,
Fred Alton and his wife


Frances went to South children grew up, and he
America as missionaries, and Frances asked once
and while still a very more to be allowed to go to
young man, he the mission
became the field. The re-
overseer of the r H quest was
Church of God granted, and at
Missions in the approxi-
Guyana. mate age of 50,
As time he was given
passed, their the assignment
children began as overseer of
to arrive and the country of
they wisely Fred Brannen Kenya. Some
chose to come A SLICE 20 years later,
back home, he retired as
back to the OF LIFE field director
United States, of Africa
where he became a well- Church of God World
respected pastor Missions.
Time moved on, their Fred Alton invested 53


Originally published in the Citrus
County Chronicle. Information for
Back in Time is supplied by the Citrus
County Historical Society.
In 1939...
F friends here of Dr Dexter
Davis, a graduate of Citrus
High school and son of Mr and
Mrs. S.H. Davis, will be inter-
ested in the following article
appearing this week in the
Roanoke, Va., Times: Dr Dexter
Davis, formerly of Inverness,
Fla., was today appointed by


J.H. Fallwell, director of the
Roanoke Department of Public
Welfare, to fill the post of city
physician, left vacant by the re-
cent resignation of Dr William
C. Matthews. Dr Davis will take
over his new duties on July 15,
the date upon which Dr Matthews'
resignation becomes effective.

Mr. and Mrs. FH. Bobbitt
and Mr and Mrs. Clarence
Thomas and daughter, Susanne,
all of Gainesville, were guests


of his 75 years in ministry,
and his experiences, both
in importance and excite-
ment, far exceeded mine.
The shared name?
While they were alive,
depending on which one
you asked, either my fa-
ther asked his brother,
Louis, to name his first-
born son after him, or
Louis asked his brother,
Fred, if he could. Makes no
difference now
Haven't shot from taw?
It is an expression re-
garding the game of mar-
bles which means you
have not yet begun, you've
not yet done anything that
matters.


Sunday of Mr and Mrs. Ben Jones.

In 1954...
Bobby Jones, the golfer, and
Mrs. Jones and a party of
friends were recent guests at
Paradise Point Villas during a
10 day vacation. As he was leav-
ing, Jones, now a banking exec-
utive in Atlanta, said: "Believe
me we will all be back and often.
This spot has everything we
have searched for all over
Florida. We caught fish, our


I feel honored to have
shared my name with this
great man of God, and I
fully recognize that con-
cerning what really mat-
ters, as compared to
Bishop Fred Alton Bran-
nen, this Fred hasn't shot
from taw


Fred Brannen, an Inver-
ness resident, has been a
Chronicle columnist since
1988 and is the author of
the recently published
novel, 'At the Bottom
ofBiscayne Bay." Fred
maybe contacted at
fbrannenjr@gmail.com or
via brannenbooksllc. com.


rest was undisturbed, and
everybody was very nice to us.
Ike is going to hear all about it."

n the recent March of Dimes
campaign in Citrus County
$2,255.55 was raised, it was an-
nounced in a final report this
week by Rev J.B. Kelly, county
chairman. This compares with
$1,584.14 raised in the county a
year ago. The Mother's March,
an innovation in Citrus County
this year, brought in $671.41.


Letters toTHE EDITOR


GOP destruction theSi
of voting rights ted th
in Jur
The right to vote is states
threatened today in a vious]
way that it has not been Sectic
seen since the Voting imple
Rights Act became law restri,
nearly five decades ago. The
Across the country, the ID to
GOP has led efforts to to res
pass laws making it tratioi
harder, not easier, for under
people to vote. ping
New voting restric- are fe
tions have taken effect there
in 19 states from 2011- that si
12. Nine states under comp]
GOP control have News:
adopted measures to cases
make it more difficult to impel
vote since 2013. Since curre(



GAMBIT
Continued from Page Cl

return it to British. President
Dwight Eisenhower, who had
not been consulted about the
military action, strongly ob-
jected. Led by Washington, the
United Nations forced the in-
vaders to return the canal to
Egyptians.
With Nasser now the major
figure in Middle Eastern poli-
tics, the ClA's attention turned
to fighting his influence in the
region. The core message of
Nasser was that the Middle East
should avoid both American and
Russian influence. Meanwhile
the CIA sought to overthrow
leaders that were pro-Nassar.
Washington argued that Nasser
and his supporters (the Third
World neutralist bloc) were soft
on communism. One of the CIA
"success" stories was its 1953
coup against the civilian gov-
ernment in Iran of Mohammed
Mosaddegh. Although an anti-
communist Mosaddegh was be-
lieved to be disturbingly
emotional and notable to stand
up to the Soviet Union, which
shared a border with Iran. This
CIA-driven coup ended up bring
back to power the Shah, who


ipreme Court gut-
e Voting Rights Act
te 2013, half of the
(eight in total) pre-
ly covered under
)n 5 have passed or
mented new voting
actions.
ese laws, from voter
cutting early voting
tricting voter regis-
n, have been passed
r the guise of stop-
voter fraud. These
ar-fed lies because
is scant evidence
uch fraud exists. A
rehensive study by
21 found only 10
of in-person voter
rsonation have oc-
d since 2000.


The real voter fraud is
being done by people
who want to deny our
rights by making bogus
arguments about voter
fraud. The real voter
fraud is the product of
GOP restrictions legis-
lated against voters.
It is horrible that the
GOP is almost unanimously
supporting the restriction
of voting rights rather
than the expansion of
the voting franchise.
Why?
Are they afraid of the
American voter?
Republicans are all
about holding up na-
tional pride in demo-
cratic principles. They


wave the flag and sing
Lee Greenwoods' "I'm
Proud to be an Ameri-
can." People died for the
right to vote in this coun-
try, yet this right is being
restricted.
"And I gladly stand up
next to you and defend
her still today," but the
GOP isn't doing that.
The GOP is attacking
American freedoms by
gutting the right to vote
by supporting decisions
of Republican-nominated
justices and laws that re-
strict voting, the core of
the American way
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness


WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/Special to the Chronicle
Dwight D. Eisenhower and John Foster Dulles meet Aug. 14, 1956,
at the White House. Dulles, angered by Nasser because of his deal
with the Russians for arms, refused to help finance the Aswan Dam.
Eisenhower also had his dealings with Egypt when he pushed the
United Nations into forcing England to give back control of the Suez
Canal to Nasser.


was strongly pro-Washington.
Unfortunately, the scars of the
coup against Mossaddeq helped
justify the fiercely anti-Ameri-
can government currently rul-
ing Iran and the
much-publicized holding of U.S.
diplomats and agents until
Jimmy Carter left office.


Kim Roosevelt, one of the
CIA Arabists, in 1957 helped
topple the neutralist Indone-
sian government of Sukarno
with the loss of 500,000 lives.
That coup is the setting for the
popular 1982 Sigourney Weaver
movie "The Year of Living
Dangerously"


Why use drugs?
Given the fact that mar-
ijuana is legal in several
states, it begs the question:
Why do individuals need
a high? Among most users,
are their lives that dreary
gloomy, uninspired and
even socially detached that
a high helps them to cope?
The gross irresponsi-
bility of the states in
question ignores perni-
cious outcomes as they
defer to fattening their
coffers with additional
tax revenues which are
likely to be spent in re-
habilitating the addicted.
Sam Raffa
Citrus Springs


The author of 'America's Great
Game" is a professor of history at
California State University Long
Beach. Besides the many mem-
oirs and books written on this
topic, he interviewed officials
who were involved. The archival
materials both in the Library of
Congress and those of the fami-
lies of American agents or offi-
cials of the time assisted his
research. There is a large cast of
characters in this story, but the
author helps with several pages of
the book that gives information
about each of them. This was help-
ful to have as I read the book.
No book review can do justice
to the scope of this book or the
many intriguing, often bizarre
decisions of the U.S. intelli-
gence community and the State
Department This is a must-read
for anyone interested in the
Middle East, U.S. foreign policy
or the CIA.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill
Woods resident who taught in-
ternational relations at the
University of Notre Dame
for 39 years. He also was the
chair of the political science
department and associate
provost in charge of the
university's study abroad
programs for a number ofyears.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 C3


j^MAIOWas
40: enMi~vvA




C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 COMMENTARY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Another Ryan rant
A few days ago Mr Joseph Ryan
wrote convincingly that the way
to run a public school system was
to hand out vouchers and let
parents shop private schools. The
latter would, of course, like food
markets, crop up on every street
corner It seemed pretty far-fetched
to me. I seem to recall that when
George W Bush's little brother
was governor, a great effort was
made to set up voucher schools.
A question came up about
whether or not they would have
to, as a minimum, meet the stan-
dards applied to public schools.
The answer seemed to be that
the state would see to it that they
got paid. But as long as the parents
were happy no other standards
need be applied. That ignores
the important fact that the state
as well as the parents have an
interest in educating the students.
Moreover, it turned out that some
of the private school receiving
state aid were only post office
boxes connected to bank accounts.
For Republicans, the main ob-
jective of this nonsense is to break
teachers unions and make sure
that significant public funds stick
to the hands of entrepreneurs
along the way


This time Mr Ryan shows
that he has done more research.
He points out that "History shows
that a growing economy with
low unemployment and consis-
tent job creation in the private
sector yields greater revenue in
taxes. Presidents Harding,
Coolidge, Kennedy and Reagan
dramatically lowered marginal
and capital gains rates and gve
Americans years of prosperity"
He is equally critical of "anti-
business regulation" (for exam-
ple prosecuting HCA for
Medicare Fraud.)
In short, as Obama accused
his opponents back in 2008 "We
have been told that if we lower
taxes on the rich and deregu-
late everything all will be OK."
But curiously, overall there is
very little correlation between
lower top marginal tax rates and
growth in GDP In fact, the reverse
is the case. Roosevelt inherited
the Great Depression of the last
century and ran the top marginal
tax rate way up-around 90 percent
at peak But at the same time GDP
(1999 constant dollars) which
had dropped from over $800
billion in 1929 to around $600
billion in 1933 went up to
roughly $860 billion in 1937. There
were cutbacks that year which


are variously attributed to the
Supreme Court (almost as nutty
as the current one) and restraint
on the part of the administration.
That dropped to slightly
below the 1929 height before
taking off through wartime
spending. In all of this time the
job killing top marginal tax
rates were at record levels.
So no matter what Mr Ryan
believes (or tells us) prosperity
was not caused by lowering
taxes on the rich and deregulat-
ing everything.
More recently, while Reagan
and Bush Jr reduced taxes on the
rich, they did not come anywhere
near cutting federal spending.
Reagan's stimulus program was
the Department of Defense, and
it produced military forces for
perhaps the first time in our his-
tory which were fully trained
before being sent into battle.
Bush Jr while cutting Federal
Revenue launched us into at
least one extra war
In the Citizens United docu-
mentary on Reagan, Newt Gin-
grich reported, surprisingly,
that the government was bigger
after Reagan than before.
Pat Condray
Ozello


Praying writer
finds God
L. M. Eastman seems to re-
ject the Christian faith (a
myth in his view) on the sim-
ple fact that the Bible states
that certain events occurred
(e.g. creation, original sin,
Noah's Ark and Jesus' atoning
death and resurrection, and
that bad things happen to
good people).
From my perspective, there
are only two reasons why any-
one would want the Humanist
view to be correct. First, if
there was no creator (God)
then there is no such thing as
sin (heaven or hell) or ulti-
mate accountability to God
(eat, drink and be merry). Sec-
ondly, without a permanent
standard of Judeo/Christian
morals and ethics we would
all be free to do what ever we
please (anarchy-we are
headed there!).
If Mr Eastman is "put off"
by the logistics of feeding and
caring for the animals on
Noah's Ark then he logically
should have an even greater
difficulty with the incredible
odds against (1) the universe


(70 sextillion stars and count-
ing) originating (absent intel-
ligent design-a creator) from
nothing "The Big Bang The-
ory," (2) the Milky Way and
earth's solar system all oper-
ating in sync, and (3) the
human body (particularly the
human eye and the fact that
blood clots).
The bible says that the
"heavens declare God's glory
and the skies proclaim the
work of his hands" and that
"the fool says in his heart
there is no God." Charles Dar-
win's said that if one can't
find all of the fine, graduated
evolutionary steps in the fos-
sil record to substantiate his
evolution claims (e.g. the
human eye or a peacocks tail),
then one can rightly reject his
theory
Yes, as the bible says "man
is without excuse." However,
the "Good News" is that God
is compassionate and does an-
swer prayers. I will be praying
that he opens the eyes of those
blinded by man's wisdom. I
suggest everyone go see the
movie "God's Not Dead."
Mike Sullivan
Hernando


avWkjsT 1-4 KeNk3,



V


v44OR
F\Qall-W
\Na"PQ3ss


SVr(Au


Handicapped vote, too
I see where a caller wants to
do away with absentee ballots.
Some people do not own a car.
And for the seriously handi-
capped, it is very difficult and
painful getting in and out of a
car. Also, not everyone can lift a
heavy wheelchair out of their
trunk (the person driving).
Please have a little considera-
tion for the handicapped.
Stop means stop
This is a response to the Sound
Off in today's paper, which is
Wednesday, April 16, about the
son getting the ticket on the bike
path for not stopping and the
dad was very upset and I agree
with the article that the father
should be lucky that the child
was not hurt. But I think there's
another big point that needs to
be looked at here also. I go down
Citrus Springs Boulevard by the
schools at Deltona and Citrus
Spring Boulevard just about every
day and parents who've got kids
in their cars just basically drive
right through the stop sign. They
come up and they slow and they
just keep on going. So here the
kids sit in a car and watch the
parents run these stop signs, so
they figure that's what they're
supposed to do. And I'm sure if
people just noticed. I mean I've
been almost hit numerous times
where people just don't bother
to stop at stop signs.
9 means 9
How to run a business: If your
business opens at 9 o'clock, please
do not open at 9:10 or 9:15. If
your business opens at 9 o'clock,
please be ready to start your
business day. Don't fuss around
turning on the TV, diddling here,
diddling there. It makes it very,
very difficult. If you don't want
to have business, then go down
to Key West where everything is
9-ish and it doesn't really matter.


Blue Waters red
If you want to know why
you're losing so many manatees
in Citrus County, go out on the
Blue Waters. There is no law en-
forcement program in place. I
have seen dive boats hit, strike
the manatees and tear off so
they can't be located. The abuses
there are rampant and nobody, I
mean nobody, wants to do any-
thing about it. The feds push it off
to the state. The state pushes
off to no response to anybody
who calls and tries to get law en-
forcement presence in any of
the springs. We need some law
enforcement and we need it like
yesterday. People need to get off
their butts and say something
and get something done.
Kudos, Elks
Thank you, Elks Lodge in Ho-
mosassa. I am not an Elk member.
However, I applaud you greatly
for the calculus math plans and
parties and competitions that you
had for students. It was such a
wonderful thing. Had not been
aware of that before. I would just
like to say that there are many,
many things that go on for the
schools by lodges, veterans or-
ganizations and many of the clubs
in our area. Much money is
raised and given to these schools
for education of these children to
make them better, better, better
members of the United States.
If we could only get the parents
to care as much as some of the
older people in our county care
about these children, we will
have a better America.
Short sentence
I think the judicial system in
Florida needs to be fixed. A man
hits a couple on a tandem bike.
Are you following this? He hits a
couple on a tandem bike, kills them
and gets 11 years. Are you serious?
Come on, Florida, wake up and
pull your head out of the sand.


Policy helps victims
I don't understand all these
people who keep writing in
about why the sheriff's deputies
are taking their cars home. Yes,
it does cost money, but if you
stop and think instead of just
getting on and making an
anonymous phone call because
nobody's going to know who
made this call, the deputies do
that. Let's take for instance this
very easy example: Your house
is on fire or somebody broke in
your house
Oi ND Iand they're
0UND threatening
Wtol dto kill you
tollI gand you call
911or
something
oor you call
c the sheriff's
office, "I
CA .need help."
563=0579 Well, just a
long d u minute, the
deputy has
to drive over to his county garage
to get his county car and drive
over to wherever you are and take
care of the situation. Tell me, how
long do you think that would
take vs. him getting in his car at
his house and being over there in
a very short time? I don't think
you people think. I think you just
are looking for ways and means
and I almost wish they would post
names on these anonymous
phone calls because they would
eliminates some of these most
idiotic calls I've ever heard.
Shave, you bums
About some of the men you see
in ads on TV for different products:
I don't know if it's a new look or
what, but a lot of them are stand-
ing there, whether they're wearing
T-shirts or suits and shirts and ties,
with about four or five or six days'
growth of beard. Like I said, it
may be a new look. But to me, in
my opinion, they look like bums.


Remember your wage
This is to all you people who are
working out there killing yourself
for minimum wage. Just remem-
ber when it's election time, it's the
Republicans that voted against it
and they will not hear anything
about it. Just don't forget that
when you go to the polls.
We don't volunteer
I am shocked to read in this
month's AARP bulletin that
Florida boomers born, what, in
'46 to '64 like, I'm a boomer
at 65 years old we have the
third lowest percentage of vol-
unteers in our age group in the
whole country. We have 22.2
percent of boomers volunteering
in Florida. Even New Jersey,
where I'm from, has 27 percent
of boomers volunteering and
they've got a higher standard of
living up there. You'd think they'd
have to work. I am shocked.
Secure your dogs
I've noticed quite a few people
transport their dogs in the bed
of their pickup trucks loose. I
don't see why you can't take the
time to secure these dogs be-
cause if one ever jumps out, I
do not want to be the person to
run them over, nor do I want to
see them get run over. And also,
people that use shock collars for
their dogs, that's nothing but
animal cruelty. Please take bet-
ter care of your animals. I think
we need classes before people
can get a pet, on how to main-
tain and take good care of an
animal.
Thanks, stranger
I would just like to thank the
person that found my identifica-
tion at the Bealls in Crystal River
and turned it in. It had my li-
cense and credit card and other
identification in it. Thank you so
much for being honest and turn-
ing my card in.


Educate everybody
I'm calling the Sound Off in
reference to irresponsible school
bus drivers. The other day I'm
coming down Elkcam Boulevard
where it's 45 mph. The school bus
driver, even though it was a teenager,
pulled on the side of the road,
put out its flashing lights, the
stop sign. The teenager gets out
of the bus, walks on the side. As
he walks on the side, the bus driver
shut his lights off and flashing
lights, proceeds forward. This kid
walked behind the bus to cross the
street. It's a good thing I didn't hit
this kid. Let's educate the drivers
a little better. Safety for the kids,
regardless if it's a teenager or
not. Still, the teenager needs to
be educated where to walk also.
Everyone wants money
I want to know why nobody
helps each other anymore. It's
all about money. And they say if
you want like a tree cut down,
you have to pay that person.
They don't do it for free. They
don't help you and that's a
shame that nobody wants to
help each other. Now I have a
tree down in my yard and no-
body wants to help cut it in
pieces and take it off. And I've
got health problems and I have
to cut my grass and yesterday I
cut my grass part of the way
until I could walk no more and
it's a shame. That includes
friends. Friends don't want to
help friends. They say, "Well, I
can't do this because I'm too
busy or I have to do so and so or
such and such," and that's
awful.
Learn to share springs
The Three Sisters Springs
issue is a no-brainer. You just
have swimmers and viewers and
snorkelers on Saturdays; you
have boaters and kayakers on
Sunday. That way everybody is
happy.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SoundOFF


Pine Ridge has
horrible roads
I'm calling about the
roads. Everybody seems to
think that their roads are
bad. Well, I don't see any-
body saying anything
about Pine Ridge roads.
All the roads in Pine Ridge
are horrible and ours is all
crumbled up and the grass
is growing up. You've got
to send a lawnmower over
here. And I've been here
10 years and they've never
done a thing to my road.
So I would think that they
ought to start working on
some of these side roads.
Move the pipeline
This is about the
pipeline. Move the
pipeline. It is a total dese-
cration to have them move
the graves. Leave the
graves alone and move the
pipeline around the
graves. We had a Canadian
pipeline go through where
I used to live in New York
State and they went
around all the little graves
that were on the farms
even where the pipeline
had to be run. So I think
it's a disgrace to have to
move the graves. The
pipeline could just go
around them.
Not Dunnellon
I have just finished read-
ing the Sound Off about
Citrus Springs not being
Dunnellon. ... Why do they
insist on printing all Citrus
Springs events and crimes
as being Dunnellon? No
sensible answer. But I do
have an idea. Why don't
we all take our property
taxes at tax time and put
them in an escrow account
in Marion County, which is
where Dunnellon is, and
then maybe somebody
would sit up, take notice
and straighten this mess
out. We are not Dunnellon.
We are not in Marion
County. We need our roads
paved. Those taxes might
help, but they'll be in Mar-
ion County at the time and
you'll have to fight for it.
How does that sound?
Spend money
on boat ramp
Hey, I've got a great
idea. I just read in the
paper we're spending ...
millions) on Meadow-
crest. So how about do
something for the recre-
ational boater, all the other
recreational boaters, and
take some impact off
Crystal River because on
the weekend it's unbear-
able. Even the locals can't
even go. But if they go up
to the barge canal and re-
vamp the ramp because it
is ridiculous. It's the worst
ramp I've ever been to in
like 30 years of fishing.
One boat in, one boat out
and you've got to back out
a blind drive and you can't
do anything else. It's crazy.
It's just pure ludicrous.
I'm surprised nobody's
ever complained about it.
Anyway, take some money,
put it into that and the fea-
sibility, whatever. Should
have took the $50,000
from the barge canal feasi-
bility study and put it into
that ramp. It would help
the relief of our rivers and
bring more people here
that can access the water-
ways.
Editor's note: The county
is planning a multi-laned
boat ramp at the barge
canal that is still in the per-
mitting stages.
Felons should
be allowed to vote
I see in Sound Off re-
cently that someone called
in about felons not being
able to vote. It's about
time someone became
aware of the fact that a
felon can never vote. Now
for example, suppose
someone at 18 years of
age was caught smoking
marijuana, OK? Fine, 18
years old. Fast track:
They're 40 now, went to


college, have a job, raised
a family, and still, because
they were a past felon, are
not allowed to vote. This is
really outrageous and this
law should be taken off
Florida's books. It doesn't
happen in all of the states,
but Florida has it and this
is absolutely wrong and
it's about time someone
has become aware of it.
Editor's note: For what
it's worth, possession of a
small amount of marijuana
is a misdemeanor, not a felony.


Fuel for thought
We're all still waiting in
the county to hear why the
county vehicles aren't fu-
eled by the county fueling
stations and are instead
being fueled by the more
expensive commercial gas
stations. It seems like an-
other waste of taxpayers'
money.
Not wild
about airboats
I also live on the Withla-
coochee River and in the
main path of Wild Bill's
Airboat Tours, which goes
by our house nine times a
day, which in return is 18
times because they have
to come back to their sta-
tion. When will we ever get
a break? They run from
early in the morning 'til
after 6 o'clock at night
and this past Sunday was
no different. All we ask for
is a little peace and quiet
one day a week. It's bad
enough during the week
day. I understand they
have to make a living, but
this is getting out of hand.
The boats are louder than
ever before.
Grab a rake
and pitch in
Today is April 14 and
I'm reading in the paper
where 26 tons of this nox-
ious weed has been re-
moved from King's Bay. I
was just wondering and
this is the third time I'm
asking this question -
how much has Mr. Rose
done to remove this? All he
ever does is move his
mouth and never one rake
full of noxious weed.


Enough already
Hey, here we go again.
At 4 o'clock in the after-
noon on April 14 gas ...
was $3.55. At 9 o'clock
it's $3.69. I'm not sure
why we have to go up 14
cents again. It just doesn't
make sense, does it? Come
on, guys. It's 14 cents, just
like the last time. Then you
drop your penny and you
drop another penny, then
you drop another penny
and, bam, 14 cents again.
Give us a break.
My thanks to Shed
I'm calling to say thank
you to the Garden Shed in
Homosassa for putting on
a great event for their April
Spring Fling. They had
great entertainment, great
food, all local vendors. I'm
so glad that they're in this
community supporting
local art and local talent
and they're really an asset
to the community. Thanks
again to the Garden Shed
and I hope you do that
event again real soon.
Thanks.
Spare the bears
I'd like to know why
they're killing all these
bears down south. Those
bears were here before the
people were here. They
shouldn't have put the de-
velopment right next to a
game preserve. I mean the
bears were here a lot
longer than the humans.
Leave them alone. The
Florida Fish and Game
people are just guessing
that these are the bears
that are hurting people
and they're killing them. I
don't think that's right.


Another day,
another Dollar
Reading this morning's
Chronicle, Sunday, April
13, somebody wrote in
about a new convenience
store on State Road 44. I
hate to break this to you,
but it looks like another
Dollar Store. That's what
I'm told, anyway.
Children
going hungry
When you see articles
asking for help for the
food banks, these are the
statistics: Among 49 mil-
lion Americans live in
households that are at risk
of hunger. Of those, 16
million are children. That's
1 in 6 people.
Mysterious calls
For those who have
Caller ID and receive unso-
licited calls, have you ever
tried to call that number
back if you didn't pick up?
It says, "This is not a work-
ing number." How can that
be?
Know your history
In Monday's paper (April
14), Mr. Cook, the prop-
erty appraiser, made a
comment about, "Some-
times it's better not to
head to the Little
Bighorn." And it really sur-
prised me that somebody
felt it was necessary to ex-
plain that he was talking
about Custer's Last Stand.
I think that most people
that would read this article
in the first place would al-
ready know that. That's
all. I just thought it was
amusing.


SCORE Thanks You!


Thank you sp

SPONSORS
WYKE Radio
Advanced Aluminum
Association Strategies
Beef O'Brady's
Boulerice Roofing & Supply Inc
Brice Insurance
Bright House
Business Risk Solutions, LLC
CattleDog Coffee Roasters
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus County
Economic Dev Council Ir
Ch .I -.. Raw Bar & Grill
College of Central Florida
Crystal Automotive Group
Crystal River Chamber of Comi
Crystal River Wings, DBA
Beef O'Bradys
David Powell
David Williams
Davis Financial Group
Eagle Buick GMC, Inc.
Eco-Floridian
Economic Development Counci
Edward Jones--Craig O'Dell
Evan & Rose Marie Coe
Events FMD
Everedy Fire & Supply
Gulf To Lake Sales, Inc.
Homosassa Eye Clinic
Homosassa Open MRI Inc.
Ike's Old Florida Kitchen
In Memory of Gerry Youell
Janice Warren
Jim's Quality Paint and Body
Key 1 Realty, Inc.
Law Office of Robert Christensi
Lepage Carpet and Tile
Love Honda/Chevrolet
Mac Rae's of Homosassa Inc.
McPherson
Archery & Outdoor Pro S
Mikes Plumbing
Neon Leon's Zydeco Steakhous
Nick Nicholas Ford
O'Connell's Landscaping
Pack N Post at Homosassa
Ralph & Della Russo
Richard Swanson D.M.D., P.A.
Robert Radcliffe
Sheriff's Department
Sunflower Springs, LLC


For your sponsorship and

participation in our

16th Golf Classic

The Freezer
The Hagar Group
West Coast Insurers
Whiting Agency North Inc.
Windmill Self Storage
Yannis Restaurant
GOLF COURSE DONATIONS
onsors Ocala National Country Club
Citrus Hills / Meadows Course
Skyview Golf Course
Southern Hills Plantation
Glenn Lakes Golf& Country Club
University Of Florida Gainsville
Twisted Oaks Golf Course
c. Pine Ridge Country Club
Sugarmill Woods
Black Diamond
Brooksville Country Club
World Woods
Lake Diamond Golf Club
The Links at Spruce Creek South
nc. Ocala Golf Club
The Preserve
SPECIAL DONATIONS
merce Homosassa Wildlife Park
Walmart
Gulf To Lake Sales
Pizza Hut
Moschello NY Style
Pizza & Italian Restaurant
StoreRight Self Storage
Outback Steakhouse


il










en



hop LLC
e Inc.


Go see 'God'
If you have not gone and
seen "God's Not Dead,"
you need to do it. It is an
awesome, awesome movie.
It appeals to all ages and all
walks of life. It's awesome.
"God's not Dead." Thank
you, Citrus County movie
theaters, for having some
good films coming in. Great
movie, "God's Not Dead."
Not a boondoggle
I just finished reading
this morning's Sound Off
(April 11) and someone
has called in about money
boondoggles in Citrus
County, listing, among oth-
ers, the port project,
which I think certainly is a
boondoggle. However, they
also go on to say the citi-
zens patrol and list that as
a boondoggle. I disagree
completely. We go away
for an extended period on
vacation every summer
and I am pleased to have
them. I call them before I
leave, they keep an eye on
my house, and I call them
when I get back. They have
been a wonderful service.


Miss the old days
Remember the olden
days when if our parents
told us to do something,
we just simply did it with-
out arguing? So why can't
parents today tell their
kids that they have to walk
all the way to the corner to
cross the road and not jay-
walk? They feel they have
to be buddy-buddy with
their kids instead of hav-
ing a parent/child relation-
ship. So instead of telling
their kids not to jaywalk, they
want extra cops to work
these areas to watch their
kids. OK, hire cops for these
areas but have them give out
tickets to the kids for jay-
walking and pay a big fine.
Maybe then they'll learn to
obey rules. But, no, pam-
per them and cater to
their every little whim. No
wonder they grow up with
no respect for anyone.
'Noah' thanks
I went to see the movie
"Noah." Couldn't figure
out whether they meant
this to be a drama, a com-
edy or just a bad joke.


"'" -~ ~- Musical
-'" Visual end
- _ Peftorming


Saturday, May 3
10 a.m. 2 p.m.
CF Citrus Campus
Learning and Conference
_3800 S. Lecanto Highway,


Call 352-746-6721, ext. 6131 _____
for more information! N I L ... .
Watch demonstrations, view displays and receive infomiation IIt "I
from Citrus County arts organizations, individuals, businesses, venues, and service providers.
Complimentary beverages and snacks will be provided.
Email wirtm@cf.edu






HELP JOE FIGHT CANCER
Sunday, April 27, 2014 Noon 4pm
Frog's Lounge
3171 S. Stonebrook Dr., Homosassa
(Just of Hwy. 19 across from Homosassa Marine)
Rain or shine, indoor and outdoor seating provided
$20
BBQ Dinner
Fundraiser

SLive Music Featuring "Remember This" Band I
Live Auction Items Silent Auction 50/50 Raffle
SOther Raffles Free Haircuts by New Concepts Hair Salon
(Asking for donations)
Local Citrus County Veteran
needs your help to fight cancer!
..K Call (352) 586-7757 for information


LAKE

HENDERSON

INVERNESS
SATURDAY

CHAMPIONSHIP MAY 3, 2014

GAE9:30 AM 3:00 PM
Come to Beautiful Wallace Brooks Park to watch teams from Miami, Gainesville,
Orlando, Longwood, Tampa, Jacksonville, and Inverness compete in the ONLY
Middle School Regatta in the South East United States!

\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \
ThankYou To Our Generous Sponsors: Regetta Dock Systms, Citrus County
Chronicle, VanA1len Insurance Agency, American Fire Technologies


IfJ P 00 tp AefIocA

rmeet CfAia/t CThUwdtc


'-(fidam ,dla 1 76, 2074 5-Somp

H Cruise in with your hot wheels or stroll in for this FREE fun-filled event! Make an
75 T evening of it and enjoy the shops, restaurants, and pubs in downtown inverness!


066' =.V so


The NYSE Guys perform your
favorites from the 50s & 60s!


Starring Billy Lindsey
Friday, May 9 4
Central Ridge Community Center
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
Members $5.00, Non-Members $8
Doors open at 6pm r Show starts at 7pm
Call 352-746-4882 or 352-465-7007 for info
BURGER PLATESAND DRINKS
WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE
> ( )\i(,IT,


Special
Acknowledgments

This is the 16th Annual
SCORE Golf Classic.

i 1. would like to give a special thanks to the
Citrus County I and thanks also to golf
pro Rick Kelso and the s II Country
f .'for ..'their donated time and to make
this year's tournament a success. jII would also
like to thank .' the volunteers who assisted with
organizing this event. Without their tireless
this event would not exist.

A very big thankyou to sponsors,
gift donors and golfers!
^\6IT*U*^^ ....N ^


Historc CourtmauMS Sura DoWnMn Imnvlntss
lnt*lt In crllWln'? Cmtacl Kn Mc Nlty 352.1341.1145 Or MIka SoftadonA at 3524t.101 9
oo WWIfVlVwflqSS 3 352.726.2611 i Fdorkd iunny Coot ocm Facebcik


1 i


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 CS




C6 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014



Golf for meals
a big success
Citrus County's Support
Services and the Friends of
the Nature Coast Volunteer
Center joined the Meals
on Wheels Association of
America and its local pro-
grams nationwide for the
annual March for Meals
campaign to help stop
senior hunger Our local
program is referred to as
the "Meals on Wheels
Program."
Each year during the
month of March, home-
delivered meal programs
nationwide work to raise
awareness of senior nutri-
tion issues, raise funds to
enable the provision of
their meal services, and
recruit volunteers to assist
in delivery of those services
to a growing population.
On Saturday, March 29,
Seven Rivers Golf &
Country Club hosted our
third annual Golf for Meals
tournament. We would
like to thank Seven Rivers
staff members Marian
Walker, general manager;
Troy Suarez, from the Pro
Shop; and the hospitality
staff for ensuring our golf
tourney was a success.
Unfortunately we had to
stop the tournament early
because of inclement
weather, so kudos goes to
each golfer for making
this a great fundraiser
Thank you Harley-
Davidson of Crystal River
and Warren Hill, general
manager, for providing
our hole-in-one prize, a
Harley-Davidson motorcy-
cle. As I said last year, bet-
ter luck next year for
getting a hole-in-one!
A special thank-you to
our Platinum sponsor
Emeritus at Barrington
Place; to our Gold spon-


Bob
Patterson
Singer/Storyteller
Thursday, May 15
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


sor the Ted Williams Mu-
seum and Hitters' Hall of
Fame; and to our Silver
sponsors, Beverly Hills
American Legion Post
237, Brice Insurance
Agency, Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, Deem
Cabinets, Duke Energy,
Harry E NesbittVFW
Post 10087, Men's Auxil-
iary of VFW Post 10087,
and Mr Pool (Crystal
River).
The Citrus County
Chronicle, Citrus 95.3/96.7
and WYKE-TV deserve
special recognition for
helping to make the event
a success by getting the
word out through media
to sponsors and golfers.
Special thanks to all the
individuals and businesses
sponsoring golf holes:
Brad and Donna
Thorpe, Crystal River
Health and Rehabilita-
tion, Ellen and Dennis
Sommer, Friends of the
Community Centers, Inc.,
Friends of the Nature
Coast Volunteer Center,
Investor's Choice Finan-
cial Group Inc., JJ and
Brenda Kenney, Ladies
Auxiliary VFW Post
10087, Main Street
Restaurant New England
Pastry Cafe and NHS
Management LLC.
A special thanks also
goes out to the individuals
and businesses who do-
nated prizes:
Black Diamond Ranch
Golf Club, Super Walmart
Inverness and Walmart
Lecanto, Great Bay Dis-
tributors Inc., Plantation
on Crystal River, the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, A
Crystal River Kayak Com-
pany Inc., LifeSouth,
Royal Oaks Golf Club, Se-
lect Physical Therapy, Cit-
rus Hills Golf& Country
Club, Larry and Kathy


CHRONICLE
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRUS CoUv HisTOmicL SOCIETY!


The Rotary Club of Central
Citrus and the Citrus County
YMCA Presents "Let's Ride
for the Y" This ride will have
staggered starting times
beginning at 7:30am 7for
06

ehisoe the)

PsRidMeas Sponsored by: Crystal Automotive
I ,Citrus County Chronicle,
Sign upon aCitrus 95.3, The Fox 967
wwwrtar oteycPWerner& Company PA,
SMike Scott Plumbing, Nature Coast EMS &
11ja1SS 1 '11 '1;p .., I t1; ;11. f;. d surgery PA
I 16JjI


Pearson, Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park,
Tony Sanchez, El Diablo
Golf, Capt Mike Lazy
River Tour, Holiday Inn
Express, Kayak of Crystal
River, Bentley's Restau-
rant, Saddlebrook Resort,
Nature Coast EMS, United
Way, Virgilio Insurance,
Pin High, Golf Club Outlet,
Red Tail, River Ventures
Manatee Tour, Home In-
stead, The Links of Spruce
Creek, Ocala Golf Club,
Publix Supermarket, Wood
Carvers Club, Crystal River
Health & Rehab, Joe
Owensby, Cracker's Bar &
Grill, George's Wholesale,
Bird's Underwater, Inver-
ness Golf& Country Club,
Citrus Hills Golf& Country
Club, Custom Built Golf
Clubs, Gourmet Gift Bas-
kets, McLeod House Bistro,
World Woods Golf Club,
Franklin Anderson Gallery
of Arts, Mary Slinkard, K-
Mart, Corrine's Hair &
Nails, Marine Corps
League 1139, Inverness
Golf & Country Club, and
Jewels by Jan Jeck.
We had such amazing
golfers, sponsors and sup-
port! The proceeds from
our Golf for Meals tourna-
ment will provide an ad-
ditional 1,242 meals to
seniors in Citrus County
who would otherwise have
gone on a waiting list.
Please mark your calen-
dars for March 28,2015,
our fourth annual Golf for
Meals tournament.
Pat Coles
director, Citrus County
Support Services


Taste of Inverness
a success
A tasty thank you, to all
who participated in the 2014
Taste of Inverness. This
signature event was a great
success with a crowd of
over 500, enjoying an evening
of delicious food, great
music, and an enchanting
ambience created by a new
venue this year at Liberty
Park on Lake Henderson.
Sixteen Inverness
restaurants and culinary
entries; Beef'0' Brady's,
Chefs ofNapoli II, Domino's
Pizza, Fox Den Winery,
Highland Place, Ice Cream
Dr, Lynn's Ice Cream,
McLeod House Bistro,
Nicole's House of Cakes,
Papa John's Pizza, Pine
Street Pub, Publix Catering,
Rustic Ranch, Rutabaga's,
Sonny's BBQ, and Stump-
knockers on the Square
brought out their finest
foods for all to sample. We
thank them for their partic-
ipation and commitment
to our community and urge
you to patronize their
awesome establishments.
We would like to con-
gratulate the 2014 Award
Winners: People's Choice
award: The McLeod House
Bistro, BestAppetizer: Chefs
of Napoli II, Best Entree
Fine Dining: Chefs of
Napoli II, Best Entree Ca-
sual Dining: Rustic Ranch,
Best Vegan: The McLeod
House Bistro, Best Dessert
Nicole's House of Cakes.
Event sponsors are an
important part of any event,
and the Taste of Inverness


CllKpNICL CL^~A L ^%^
O00HJM6


K1ni4hjts of Columblsf
Council 6168

Annual

Fr. "Willie"

Memorial Golf Classic >

May 17th- 8:30 a.m. Shotgun start
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
Entry fee $60
Fee includes coffee/donuts, green and
cart fees, lunch at the club and prizes.
Proceeds will be donated to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Entries must be received by May 14th.
For information ii ) iI
call 746-7563 "


6 7 8 9 101112
C I1,fi( ) \,I( AI ,-'


,' 1 2345


13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
-27 28 29 30
m l .


was fortunate enough to
have many community-
minded individuals and
companies involved. We
wish to thank West Cen-
tral Solutions, Sunflower
Springs, Superior Resi-
dences of Lecanto, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
Annette Bus Lines, and
Williams, McCranie,
Wardlow, & Cash, PA. Ed-
ucational Tours and Tally
Ho Vacations, David M.
Rom State Farm, and
AAA Roofing.
In-kind sponsors included:
Angelo's Carts, Advanced
Waste Solutions, Awareness
Marketing, Citrus Memorial
hospital, Great Bay Dis-
tributors, Lowe's, Party
Time Rental, Susan Gill,
Supervisor of Elections.
Thanks too, to our year-
long event partners: Great
Bay Distributors, The Fox
96.7, Citrus 95.3, Citrus
County Chronicle, Duke
Energy, Insight Credit
Union, Nick Nicholas
Ford and Lincoln, To-
bacco Free Florida, and
Waste Management
Thank you Bluestem
Prairie and vocalist Keith
Crisp for filling the
evening with music that
set the perfect tone for
this unique event.
Appreciation to this
year's participating artists


Jeannette Berndsen, Mar-
ian Fox, Connie Phillips,
Rebecca Pujals-Jones,
Kim Shields, Michelle
Wirt, and Susi LaForsch
who also coordinated the
exhibit. Your time and tal-
ents continue to add so
much to this event.
Thank you to the food
judges Logan Mosby, Cit-
rus County Chronicle fea-
tures editor; Aldo
Verderame, Citrus High
School culinary arts in-
structor; and Laura
Shirley, culinary arts in-
structor at Crystal River
High School.
And finally, thank you to
all who supported this
event and joined us for an
enjoyable evening. Your
support helped raise
funds for Boys & Girls
Clubs and allowed them
to provide a consistent
haven for children with
proven after school, be-
fore school, and summer
camp programs. The Boys
& Girls Clubs of Citrus
County has touched the
lives of thousands of chil-
dren over the past 20
years. With your support
we will continue to be the
place where great futures
start.
Sunny Cooter
city of Inverness


Citrus County's
2o01 + Worlds Greatest baby 5hower

I Join us on -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Sat Cornerstone Church in Inverness
(1100 West Highland Blvd)

i rst Session: 3:00pm 5:00pm OR
SSecond Session: 6:00pm 8.00pm /
SOOSEONE

CiiPibMCLE Staywell'
OOOHFXH Please contact (352) 228-9047 with questions.
............ ... ...

April 27 9:00 AM 4:00 PM
Dunnellon Chamber of Commerce
| Boomtown Days
Contact Phone: Call 352-489-2320

|April 27 Noon 4:00 PM
Help- Joe Fight Cancer
( Frog's Lounge
3171 S. Stonebrook Dr, Homosassa
$20 BBQ Dinner Fundraiser |
|Contact Phone: 586-7757

April 27 4:00 PM
S Light Shine 2014 Ditch of Dreams
Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church
SContact Phone: 527-0052

May 1 3:00 PM
S 2014 World's Greatest Baby Shower
Cornerstone Church, Inverness
Contact Phone: 352-228-9047

I May 3
We Care Food Pantry
S 4th Annual Scramble Golf Tournament
Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club
$60 per person or $200 foursome
|Contact Phone: 228-4921

May 3 9:30 AM
|ROCCS
SE Middle School Championship Regatta
Lake Henderson, Inverness
|Contact Phone: 352-601-6195

May 9
i Citrus County Parks & Rec
Music at the Museum:
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey
Central Ridge Community Center
Doors open at 6PM, Show starts at 7PM
S Entrance Fee: Members $5, Non-Members $8
Contact Phone: 352-465-7007

May10
rUnited Way of Citrus County
2014 Kids Triathlon *Whispering Pines Park
Entrance Fee: $25 before April 14, $30
Contact Phone: 637-2475

| May 10:
Rotary of Central Citrus
4 Let's Ride for the YMCA
I Lake Hernando Park
Entrance Fee: $35 entry fee
| Contact Phone: 860-906-8234

May 15:
| Citrus County Historical Society
I Music at the Museum:
Florida Singer/Storyteller Bob Patterson
Old Courthouse Museum Inverness
I Doors open at 6:15 PM
Music starts promptly at 7 PM
i Contact Phone: 341-6427
/I/ / ANEW /1 ,


Rotary Club of Inverness

ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT

Saturday, May 17, 2014
8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start
Inverness Golf & Country Club


For information call
302-0469

Download
Entry Form at:
www.invernessflrotary.org


ItruSOral&










ClTRUg COUNTY
KIDf TRIATHLON
May 10, 2014 Inverness, Florida
Whispering Pines Park


3
Exciting
Divisions

Junior
Age 5- 10

Senior
Age 11 15

Tri4Fun
All Ages


Entry Fees
Before April 14th: $25
After April 15th May 7th: $30


For info go to www.CitrusKidsTri.com or contact
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475 or email: info@drcsports.com

...p.E.._


COMMENTARY










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Public Relations Professional of the Year


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
The Nature Coast Chapter of the Florida Public Relations Association recognized member Amy Lou Kingery as it second Public
Relations Professional of the Year at its sixth annual Roast 'n Toast Event in April. Kingery is the public relations coordinator of
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center.


Re ates we


with others


Amy Lou Kingery, public relations coordinator of Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center, has been named Public Relations Professional of the Year
by the Nature Coast Chapter of the Florida Public Relations Association.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

In her own words, she is the storyteller
of the organization.
"I am able to work with leadership
and the staff in all the different programs
and things we have going on," she ex-
plained. "Then I take all that information
and I put it into words and actions that
make sense to the people who use our
services or have an interest in what it is
that we're doing."
Her job entails keeping up with local
and national news as it relates to health
care and writing press releases about in-
novations or individuals at the hospital.
She also follows social media to see
what's going on and uses it to post med-
ical center news and photos or health
tips.
Kingery acknowledges health care de-
livery is vast, an ever-changing complex
field. "What I like is that I don't have to
be the expert on everything," she said. "I
just have to be able to listen and take


what the experts know and put in into
words that people can understand." It's a
skill she describes as the complexity of
being simple.
It means boiling down medical terms
and processes to a clear, understandable
message.
"I do have to take in a lot of informa-
tion," she said. "But what comes back out
is only going to be a little tiny bit."
"It has to make sense every day," she
added. "When you get into the financial
side of health care beyond the actual
medical treatments and everything, but
are confusing, you really have to be able
to break it down.
"It's a part of our business," she said.
"You've got to know it; you've got to know
what to do with it.
She also manages the speakers' bureau
for Seven Rivers, a conduit of hospital in-
formation for area organizations and in-
house education that is open to the
community
A graduate of the University of South
Florida, Kingery has 10 years in the pro-
fession. She is also a graduate of Leader-


ship Citrus and an active member of the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.
Kingery has lent her leadership to the
Kings Bay 5K and Relay for Life and Fit-
ness in Citrus, which she said is her op-
portunity to give back to the community
She serves as accreditation chair for
the Nature Coast Chapter of the Florida
Public Relations Association and sits on
both the Roast 'n' Toast Committee and
the scholarship committee.
She cited the association as a wonder-
ful resource for education, networking
and professional development. "It has
helped me a lot," she said.
As for the award, "I was surprised," she
said, noting it had been a well-kept secret
As for her spare time, Kingery consid-
ers herself an amateur photographer, gar-
dener and an up-cycler She explained
"upcycling" is taking trash or waste mate-
rials and repurposing it as something
useful.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty
at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
online, corn.


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY




Negotiation

the best way

to approach

neighbor

EAR BRUCE: My
neighbor needs a ton of
repairs done to his prop-
erty Most of the repairs fall
right on our property lines.
What can I do to make him take
care of the repairs without
starting a war?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Tons of re-
pairs right on the property line
are pretty hard to imagine. But
you say you're concerned with
starting a war If this owner is a
reasonable listener, I would
start there.
For example, if it's a picket
fence that messes up the prop-
erty line, that's one set of con-
ditions. You may be able to
negotiate putting up half of the
pickets yourself and your
neighbor putting up the other
half
On the other hand, if his
house is right on the property
line and needs repairs, how
does one address that? Per-
haps the most reasonable way
to approach this would be to
hire an independent contractor
to determine what repairs
need to be made right on or ad-
jacent to the property line. If
this individual is amenable to
making these repairs, the like-
lihood is you'll have to engage
an attorney or perhaps propose
an independent mediator to
come up with a plan for how
the work should be done.
I wish I could give you a bet-
ter answer Try to sit down with
this individual and see if you
both can come to some kind of
agreement.
DEAR BRUCE: I read your
article regarding the woman
whose son wanted her to move
to Florida. In that article, you
mentioned that she could in-
vest the proceeds on the sale of
her house and get at least a 5
percent return rate, which is
easily available.
My husband and I have ap-
proximately $100,000 cash to
invest; this does not include
our 401(k)s and IRAs, etc. I
would be very interested in
learning more about invest-
ments that will return 5 per-
cent or more since we can't
See Page D2


Analysis:



A fading middle-class perk: lower mortgage rates


JOSH BOAK
Associated Press
WASHINGTON For three decades, the U.S. mid-
dle class enjoyed a rare financial advantage over the
wealthy: lower mortgage rates.
Now, even that perk is fading away
Most ordinary homebuyers are paying the same or
higher rates than the fortunate few who can afford
much more.
Rates for a conventional 30-year fixed mortgage are
averaging 4.48 percent according to Bankrate. For
"jumbo" mortgages those above $417,000 in much of
the country the average is 4.47 percent.
This trend reflects the widening wealth gap be-
tween the richest Americans and everyone else.
Bankers now view jumbo borrowers as safer and
shrewder bets even though conventional borrowers
put less capital at risk.
Even as the overall U.S. housing recovery has
slowed, sales of homes above $1 million have surged
in the past year Price gains have been so great in
some areas that middle-class buyers are straining to
afford even modest homes. They're also facing tighter
lending rules, larger down-payment requirements and
a shortage of houses for sale.
Used to be, rates for conventional mortgages would
be 0.2 to 0.3 of a point below rates on jumbo mort-
gages. A decade ago, a conventional rate averaged 5.68
percent, a jumbo 5.97 percent. The advantage for mid-
dle-class borrowers was possible in part because gov-
ernment-chartered firms guarantee that lenders will
be paid on a conventional mortgage even if a borrower


Jumbo, fixed mortgage rates on par
Most Americans have enjoyed 30-year fixed mortgages at
cheaper rates compared to jumbos until the end of last
year, when the difference between them became almost
non-existent.
8 p ercen t ... ..........................." ........................................................
7 .......................... .. ;, ........ 'V I ..^ ......... J u ~m b o ............................ .
J: .fl /kt- 30-year fixed
6 ..5.......... ................................ ............. ...............................

3..............
1......................................................

2 .......................... .................................................................................... ..
1 .......................... .................................................................................... ..
0 ,I'
'04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14
SOURCE: Bankrate AP
defaults. No such guarantee exists for jumbos.
Two factors have caused the spread between con-
ventional and jumbo rates to vanish:
The government in 2012 began raising the fees it
charges lenders for guaranteeing payments on con-
ventional mortgages. Lenders passed along that in-
crease to borrowers in the form of higher rates. The
fees are meant to stop home buyers from once again
borrowing more than they can afford a trend that
fueled the 2007 housing bust.
Bankers say they've begun using mortgage rates to


woo high-net-worth clients: Attractive rates on jumbos
have become a way to secure additional business from
those clients from managing their investments to
supplying a broad suite of financial services. What's
more, those borrowers tend to be clustered in neigh-
borhoods that lenders consider more stable.
'Jumbo borrowers represent the holy grail of what
financial institutions are pursuing: that much-desired,
mass affluent consumer," said Greg McBride, a senior
analyst at Bankrate.
In the first three months of 2014,37 percent of the
money Bank of America lent for mortgages went to jum-
bos, compared with 22 percent at the same point last
year
The lower rates are geared for affluent borrowers liv-
ing in "sweet spots" with strong employment and stable
home prices areas like metro New York City, Boston
and sections of California, said Matt Vernon, who leads
consumer mortgage lending at Bank of America.
"We're lending where we believe home ownership is
sustainable," Vernon said.
Wells Fargo offers jumbos starting at 4.25 percent,
about 0.25 point lower than for conventional mort-
gages. This month, Wells trumpeted the spillover ben-
efits of increased jumbo lending: A 14 percent
year-over-year increase in loans from its separate
"wealth, brokerage and retirement" division.
"Hopefully it'll continue to go up," Wells' CFO, Timo-
thy Sloan, said of prospects for continued jumbo lending.
Sales of homes exceeding $1 million leapt 7.8 percent
over the past 12 months. That contrasted with a 7.5 per-
cent drop in overall home-buying in that period, accord-
ing to the National Association of Realtors.




D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 BUSINESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


NANC


THE


NG


FUTURE


FAMILY FEATURES
hough much is made about millennials and their sense of responsibility (or lack
thereof), new research suggests that when it comes to managing their money,
this generation takes few risks.
According to the TD Bank Financial Education Survey, 47 percent of millennials
(adults ages 18 to 34) described their financial personality as being cautious when it
comes to overall personal finance habits. A desire for more information to guide their
money decisions was a common theme of the survey.






Not surprisingly, this group of tech-savvy individuals uses the tools of online and
mobile banking to their advantage. In fact, an overwhelming 88 percent of those
surveyed use online banking for executing day-to-day transactions. While technology
serves as a huge resource, over half of respondents still use local branches for their
banking needs.
"By arming themselves with information, this generation can take steps now to
begin developing a sound financial future," Bakhshi said. "Making responsible
decisions, learning about the options available to them and taking steps to safeguard
their private financial data in this technology age are important aspects of financial
responsibility that will pay dividends in the future."



The Many Benefits of Mobile
It's easy to see why mobile banking has created quite a following. With the
ability to manage money right from your fingertips, mobile apps are designed
to serve everyday banking needs with ease. Here are a few of the convenient
features these apps offer users anytime, anywhere:
Check Your Balance
View your account balance, pending transactions and history.
Transfer Money
Move money from one account to another without the need to visit a
branch facility.
Remote Deposit Capture
Depositing money is a snap. Simply take a picture of a check and then
directly deposit it into your account.
Person-to-Person Payments
This service allows you to electronically transfer funds from your account
into someone else's account, replacing the need for paper checks.


Beyond the Basics
While the majority of millennials feel know- Fi
ledgeable about basic day-to-day banking Yo
products such as checking accounts, there isas
room to learn about personal finance topics
including savings accounts, credit cards and
creating a budget. The experts at TD Bank offer
the following guidelines to get you started.
T
Savings account options vary from simple
accounts --1 1 ill ii i 1-iwer minimum
balance requirements, but also lower rates of
return) to more sophisticated accounts that
reward you with higher interest rates as your V
balance grows.
Understand minimum balance requirements Vi!
before opening an account, tip
Consider opening a savings account at the
same bank as your main checking account.
Many banks offer special benefits for hav-
ing multiple accounts such as lower balance
requirements or higher interest rates.
Look for accounts that offer low or no maintenance
fees or ones that waive the fee as long as you maintain
a low minimum balance.
Verify whether there are limitations on withdraws
(which can be a good way to help ensure that what
you earmark for savings stays put, but detrimental if
an unexpected situation arises).
If you're saving for a particular event or item, inquire
about special goal-oriented accounts that generally
allow lower balances and can help ensure you reach
your target.
Credit cards allow you to borrow money to pay for
products or services. The upside is that responsible credit
card management can boost your credit score, qualifying
you for lower interest rates in the future. However, it is
important to avoid getting overextended with debt.
Compare costs (the interest rate, as well as charges,
such as annual and balance transfer fees) versus
rewards. While free is always appealing, remember
that modest fees may be worth the expense in
exchange for robust mileage or cash-back programs.
Check into policies regarding lost cards or stolen
identity to understand your accountability if
unauthorized charges appear on your account.
Confirm payment details, including minimum payment
requirements, payment deadlines and the grace period.


BANKING IN THE

MILLENNIAL AGE


Financial Success Begins with You
ou may be surprised by how the decisions you make
a young adult affect your long-term financial security.

Live within your means and pay your bills on time.
Take the initiative to learn about banking basics such
as balancing a checkbook, paying off debt and creating
a budget.
Begin investing in a 401K as early as possible.
Visit your local bank branch and talk to an expert about
what products are right for you.
visit www.tdbank.com/financialeducation for additional
is to get you on the path toward financial success.



Commit to always paying on time to avoid late fees
and penalties to your credit score, and avoid paying
only the minimum to keep your debt low.
Keep track of your credit score and report issues
immediately.
Budgets may feel restrictive and even overwhelming,
but a monthly financial plan can help reduce stress while
learning how to better manage your money.
First, identify all sources of income and account for
all expenses for one month.
Avoid the mistake of only budgeting for major bills.
Make sure to include monthly expenses such as a
rent, groceries or gym memberships.
Remember to pay yourself and allocate money for
savings.
Subtract your total monthly expenses from your
monthly income. If you have a surplus, determine
how you'll use it (such as devoting more to
savings). If the balance is negative, make adjust-
ments to ensure you're living within your means.
Once your monthly budget is set, make it a habit of
tracking your spending and revisiting your budget
every few months to ensure you are staying on track.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

seem to find anything yielding
more than 1.5 percent.
-J.B., via email
DEAR J.B.: It's not too hard
to understand that, in today's
depressed investments, it
seems you can only find guar-
anteed returns of little more
than 1.5 percent, but once
again, a 5 percent return is not
at all unreasonable. I think 7 to
8 percent is more reasonable.
If you are considering a well-
rounded investment portfolio
of securities issued by firms
that have been in business for
a substantial period of time
and, upon examination, would
seem that they will be around
for a long time, the higher re-
turn is quite achievable. Per-
haps $25,000 invested in each


of four companies might be a
way to begin.
DEAR BRUCE: I am a re-
cent widow (61 years old), and I
decided to take my husband's
Social Security now I have
about $400,000 in money mar-
ket accounts and CDs. My
house is paid for (worth
$255,000), and I am thinking of
selling and downsizing to
something much smaller
My question is, what do you
suggest I do with the $400,000
plus the money I make from
the house? I'm afraid of the
stock market.
N.M., via email
DEAR N.M.: You didn't men-
tion why you decided to take
your husband's Social Security
now It would appear that with
your investments and your
house being paid for, you per-
haps don't need the Social Se-
curity money now The longer
you wait, the more you will be


receiving when your expenses
may be increasing and making
more demands upon your sav-
ings. It is something I would
consider
As to what you should do
with your $400,000, given that
you are afraid of the market,
you are condemned to almost
nonexistent returns unless you
would be comfortable with an
annuity In some cases, annu-
ities are desirable, but in most,
the penalties for early with-
drawal, etc., make them not the
best choice.
I think what you should do is
get some information on the
stock market. You didn't indi-
cate if you are working. If you
aren't, why not spend some
time going back to school or
taking a course. Find out what
the stock market offers. There
is no reason to be afraid. It is
the only solid choice. You are
talking about the difference


between making $6,000 to
$8,000 in a money market or
$24,000 to $30,000 in the mar-
ketplace per year Think hard
on it.
DEAR BRUCE: Where's a
good place to buy gold or silver
coins? Do you advise it?
Ed, via email
DEAR ED: There are many
good and reliable organiza-
tions that will buy and sell gold
and silver coins. You will have
to do your own homework. Ask
for references from companies
and individuals. It takes a little
bit of doing, but there is no
question that many competi-
tive enterprises deal in coins.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
of mail, personal replies can-
not be provided.


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via
email to newsdesk @
chronicleonline.com or fax
to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the
right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will
be considered for publica-
tion. Images taken with
most cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific
date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submissions about specific
prices of products or sales
events are considered adver-
tising and are not eligible
for Business Digest.


F






SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber. com/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
April 29 Ribbon-cutting and Pre-
view Reception for HPH Hospice, 2939
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto, 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Call Anne Black for
more information at 352-428-0708.
April 30 Ribbon-cutting at Karma
Resale Shoppe, 109 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.
May 2 Pillar Awards Dinner inspired
by the style of the Kentucky Derby, 6
p.m. to 10 p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Cocktail attire and
hats are recommended. Table sponsor-
ships $300 and individual reservations
$35 per person.
May 7 Ribbon-cutting for the League
of Women Voters, 4:30 p.m.,Chamber
Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
May 8 Fox Den Winery presents FOX
Idol singing competition, starts at 6 p.m.,
Fox Den Winery & Cellar at 109 W. Main
Street, Inverness. Pick up an application
form or call 352-341-0305 after 3 p.m.
May 9 -Chamber Luncheon sponsored
by HPH Hospice, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Old Courthouse, 1 Courthouse Square,
Inverness. Italian buffet provided by
Joe's Deli and Catering. Speaker TBD.
Tickets available online, $18 in ad-
vance for members. Reservations and
prepayment due by May 7.
May 13 Ribbon-cutting for Cayla's
Coats, 4:30 p.m., Chamber Office, 28
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
May 19 Ribbon-cutting for Morgan
Stanley Cindy Van Heyde, 4:30 p.m.,
Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.

Community
events
May 1 The 63rd National Day of
Prayer, 12 p.m., Inverness Government
Center Plaza. Pastor Ed Mitchell will
be overseeing the ceremony and this
year's theme will be "One Voice United
in Prayer."
May 2 The Florida Public Relations
Association (FPRA) Nature Coast Chapter,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Professional develop-
ment luncheon featur-
ing Dan Ward, APR,
Presenting "Communi-
..c. eating Your Opinion:
How to Effectively Tar-
'.. _4 get the Editor." Lunch-
eons are open to the
public to attend. For
DAN more information, email
WARD kmehl@citrusmh.org.
May 3 Inverness Farmer's Market, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., Inverness Government
Center. Fresh products with over 40
vendors to choose from, beautiful goat
soaps, local honey, personalized em-
broidery towels, handmade jewelry, es-
sential oils, custom signs, doggie
treats to people treats.
May 10 Westend Health Fair hosted
by the DAV of Crystal River, 10 a.m., free
events at the Crystal River Mall. Event to
feature education, screenings and healthy
living consultations. Interested vendors,
contact Duane Godfrey 352-228-0337.
May 10 The Rotary Club of Central
Citrus presents Lets Ride for the Y, Lake
Hernando Park. This 62-mile ride will have
times starting at 7:30 a.m. $35 entry
fee. For more information, call 352-637-
0132 or visit rotarybikerideforthey.com.


Nature Coast Ministries
1590 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 .352-563-186o o MYNCM.com/l/


/ W ,.*,,- .;
: Chamber Ambassadors Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; George Bendtsen,
Insurance by George; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Nicholle
Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Janet Mayo, associate member; Lillian
Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keep-
ers; and Chamber CEO and President Josh Wooten welcome Bonnie McMullen and volunteers
at the new location of Nature Coast Ministries Thrift Shop. The Thrift Shop is open 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. The Food Pantry is open Tuesday and Thursday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. If you are interested
in volunteering for this cause, please call 352-563-1860. There is need for volunteers to as-
sist with answering phones and assisting in the food pantry and thrift shop.


Chamber Amy Kingery named PR
welcomes
new board professional of the year
member


Capital City Bank's
Clayton Jeck is the
newest addition to the
Chamber's board of di-
rectors. Clayton can
be reached at 352-
795-6100 or at 101
S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River, FL 34429.


The Nature Coast Chapter
of the Florida Public Relations
Association recognized member
Amy Lou Kingery, APR, as its
second Public Relations Profes-
sional of the Year at its sixth
annual Roast 'n' Toast Event.
The award is given annually to
an FPRA Nature Coast member
for demonstrating excellence
in leadership, management and
communication skills. Contri-
butions made to the community
and charitable organizations
are taken into consideration.
Kingery is the public relations
coordinator of Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center and a
leader in the public-relations


Anne Black, Amy
Kingery, APR, and Katie Mehl, APR.
industry. She has lent her lead-
ership to numerous causes such
as the 2012 King's Bay 5K, Relay
for Life and Fitness in Citrus.
She serves as the accreditation
chair for the chapter and sits on
both the Roast 'n' Toast committee
and Scholarship committee.


Hagar Group's McNeal Fox Den Winery
named Top 15 producer hosting weekly


The Hagar Group congratulates Linda
McNeal, recognized as one of the top 15
producers by the Southern Financial and Allegis
Advisors Group, a national financial services
firm. This award recognizes the top 15 life,
annuity and securities producers for 2013.
"We are so pleased Linda was recognized for
this tremendous achievement," said Greg Hagar. "I
see how hard she works for our clients every day."
McNealjoined the firm in 2010 and specializes
in retirement planning and financial services.
For more information, visit hagargroup.com
or call 800-952-4953.


singing contest
Fox Den presents FOX Idol and is
looking for singers to participate in
this singing competition, which will be
judged by local experts. There will be a
monthly winner. Interested in participat-
ing? Visit the Fox Den Winery & Cellar at
109 W. Main Street, Inverness, and pick
up an application form, or call 352-341-
0305 after 3 p.m. FOX Idol starts in May,
and will occur weekly on Thursday at 6 p.m.


New year

brings new

members to

Chamber

Bill and Ginny
Campbell
ggnboom@gmail.com
Phone: 828-773-0347

Cayla's
Coats, Inc.
Jessica Barnes
caylas.coats@
hotmail.com
352-316-6409

Karma Resale
Shoppe
109 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness
Louise Clarke
frugalfrogdiva@
gmail.comrn
352-212-7122

Krista A
Cleaning Lady
Krista Bevil
bevilservices@
hotmail.com
352-563-2908

League of
Women Voters
of Citrus County
Marie Pettibone
lwrcc2013@gmail.com
352-601-6857

BS Publications
305 S. Salisbury Terrace
Lecanto, FL 34461
Kathy Sayadoff
kathy@citruscounty
life.com
CitrusCountyLife.com

Citrus County
Clerk of the
Circuit Court &
Comptroller
Angela Vick
110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness
352-341-6414
avick@clerk.citrus.fl.us
clerk.citrus.fl.us

Escape the
Ordinary Travel
Kate Leas-Clisson
escapetheordinary
travel@gmail.com
407-403-4338
escapetheordinary
travel.corn

Stephen
Nadeau
954-665-8893
avantecenters.com

Servpro of
Citrus County
Debra or Romondo
Taylor
2189 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Servpro9299@
gmail.com
servpro.com

Wholesome
Helpers
Donald Gerken
wholesomehelpers@
gmail.com
wholesomehelpers.org


jT Schnettler Construction earns

?r *ii 11 1 *1.1n r- i I.B Bif'".1 <"r i '1 *T ~ *A T A TS 1 e


Chamber Ribbon Cutting
and Preview Reception


UUVtULCU P lI L OCIt Vlt 1t. -WVVdlU


from reviewer angieslist.com


2939 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida 34461
Ribbon cutting at 4:30 p.m. Reception and tours
will immediately follow. Enjoy heavy hors d'oeuvres
libations and great company before this beautiful
new facility opens to patients.
No RSVPs required.
Questions? Please call
HPH Hospice at 527-4600.

h ospice
www.HPH-Hospice.org
HPHM ISSIlON STATEMENI
HPH is where exllene in (ompossionote (ore moximizes quality of life


S chnetfler Construction, LLC
has earned the service indus-
try's coveted Angie's List Super
Service Award, reflecting an ex-
emplary year of service provided
to members of the consumer re-
view service in 2013.
"We pride ourselves on the
quality of customer service we
provide," said Scott Schnettler.
"Standing out in a very competi-
tive market is imperative and we
are extremely proud to earn this
award. We are grateful to all of
our clients that provided a posi-


tive review of our work."
"Only about 5 percent of the
companies Schnettler Construc-
tion, LLC competes with in Citrus
County are able to earn our Super
Service Award," said Angie's List
Founder Angie Hicks. "It's a mark of
consistently great customer service."


Angie's List Super Service
Award 2013 winners have met
strict eligibility requirements,
which include an "A" rating in
overall grade, recent grade, and
review period grade. The com-
pany must be in good standing
with Angie's List, have a fully
complete profile, pass a back-
ground check and abide by
Angie's List operational guide-
lines.
To contact Schnettler Construc-
tion, call Scott Schnettler at 352-
637-4629.




D4 SUNDAY,APRIL 27, 2014


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tinme


Fax:(352)563-56650To0l0re()27Eic


I am looking for that
honest, fun loving
gentlemen in his late
70's-80's. I am also an
attractive, young at
heart widow. If you
think you have the
above requirements
please write me.
Citrus Cty Chronicle
Blind Box 1865
106W Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII







tOPENP
HOUSE

2956 E. MARCIA ST.
Inverness
MLS # 709657
Sunday 4/27
noon-4pm
Charming A-Frame
2/2, fireplace, fish
pond, Shed,
carport, pole barn,
new roof, a/c &
septic.$130,000-
Sandra Oiler
ERA Suncoast Realty
(352) 634-0712
21'Well Boat. Merc.
40hp 4strk. w/ 20hrs.
use. Galv. Tandem Axle
Trailer. $3700.
(352)795-1093
w-55+ Park, 2bd/1 ba
SW w/fireplace, new
carport and carpet-
ing, appliances incl.
as is $5,000.
352-563-0500
8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
reclinerottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634
Cannondale
Men's bike, never
used. New-$600
asking $300;
Self propelled lawn
mower, Honda
Husqvarna, Like New
$200 352-382-3545




Votu 0id fiff



Need a iih
41r ,a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!






CKC Deerhead
Chihuahua pup M
$150.2 Mini Dasch-
shund pups M $250.
& Chiweenies, $200.
w/h/c & puppy kits
Janet (352) 628-7852
HOLLOWBODY
GUITAR, IBANEZ
AGR73T white w/gold
hardware & AG 100C
hardshell case $495.
FENDER TELECASTER,
1986 '62 reissuecandy
apple red w/white
bindingsoft case
$575. 352-746-1644
ROGUE BASS GUITAR,
black $50.
BEHRINGER ULTRABASS
AMP, 1x12,
180 watts $195.
352-746-1644.
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Used Hoveround
$2,000. obo
(352) 503-2233


yuen ize
Waterbed Frame
pls call (772) 579-0517



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Complete Toilet
beige, good cond
(772) 579-0517
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch. U load and
haul away.
352-628-9624
Toshiba 36" TV
exc. cond. You
pick-up, pls call
(352) 249-7638
after 6pm.



Chihuahua
11 yrs old female tan
& white. Ans to Quita,
pronounced eyes.
Lost 04/21 S. Fireside
Dr in Homosassa
(352) 422-0539
Lost Cat
Dk Black/Light Brown
w/light Green Eyes,
2 yr old.female, 121bs,
spayed, answers to
-Tator tots", lost 4/11
E Johnson Place off
Savory in Inverness
please, please call
(352) 637-6254
Lost Cat Grey short
haired female, white
underchin, tan belly.
Answers to Nala.
Spayed 12 lbs. Lost
4/17 Circle M off 488
585-259-7857
Lost Chihuahua
Small, male, fawn
color, Responds to his
named Pepe. Lost
4/16 Beverly Hills Blvd
& N. Adams St.
$50 REWARD
(352) 513-4009



Found
female chihuahua
Floral Park Rd.
Floral City
(352) 201-5247
Small Brown Dog
West Inverness
Need Description to
claim
(352) 560-0051



Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cypress
Records.com


-gI.P


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Man or Women to
help with yard work
etc, as needed $10 hr.
(352) 503-7237




Kiz 'R' RUSS
Preschool Hiring
Teachers
40 Hrs. req.'d
352-344-4106


*GEM

OFFICE MGR

Small counseling
practice in Inver-
ness. Responsible for
general office work.
Position would be
great for a retired or
semi retired indiv.
with experience.

Hours: Tues-Thurs
9:30a-6p. Must be
reliable & willing to
work 4 days if nec.
Send Resume to:
Cyndie Ford Purdy
PO box 3356
Dunnellon, Fl 34430
or email:
Fordpurdv@
msn.com












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





F/T Front Office
Receptionist

Prior experience in
Eye Care or Medical
preferred.
Apply in person
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219

PA/ARNP/
Family
Practitioner

Expanding Trend
Setting Practice
Looking for full time
Physician Assistant,
Nurse Practitioner &
Family Practitioner
to join an exciting,
team oriented,
growing practice.
Send CV to:
resumek@
rocketmail.com











WE'RE HIRING!I

Families Come First,
a progressive,
growing nurse
registry is currently
seeking Full/Part
Time CNA's to work
in Citrus and
surrounding
counties.
Excellent starting
pay with increased
benefits after
probationary
period.

Become part of a
leading company
that treats Staff and
Clients like our
name: FAMILY.

To apply, please call
Human Resources at
352-419-6535
Between 10a -4p
Monday Friday
Only.


CNA's/H HA's
Experienced Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885




*.NET Developer
with C# experience,
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

ADMINISTRATOR
A warm and
home-like Assisted
Living community in
Homosassa (Citrus
County FL) offers an
excellent opportu-
nity for an experi-
enced, licensed
Assisted Living Ad-
ministrator or current
assist, administrator
to manage all as-
pects of community
operations including
marketing activities,
housekeeping,
food/beverage
services, mainte-
nance community
/resident relations.

The Administrator
will have oversight
and have responsi-
bilities including
budget prepara-
tion, managing fis-
cal responsibilities,
and Management
of the staff. The
Administrator must
demonstrate and
lead a team effort
with all supervisory
associates to ensure
high quality service
is delivered. Suc-
cessful candidate
must be well organ-
ized, self-motivated,
value teamwork,
maintain excellent
customer service,
and possess ex-
ceptional leader-
ship skills, along with
an ability to
multi-task in a fast
paced
environment.
Selected candidates
must successfully
clear all
pre-employment
screenings and a
level 2 background
check to be eligible
to work In an
assisted living facility
To be considered for
this position, please
submit a current
resume to Ioerez@
doshealthcare.com

Instruction
and Research
Librarian
Announcement
#14-47
Professional library
work responsible for
instruction, research
and customer
service in a public
library. Four year
degree from an
accredited college
or university is
required. Masters
degree in Library
Science or related
coursework pre-
ferred. REQUIRED
TO WORK SOME
EVENINGS AND
SATURDAYS AND AT
VARIOUS BRANCH
LOCATIONS WHEN
NEEDED. Starting
pay $14.26 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Citrus County Board
of County
Commissioners,
Human Resources
Department, 3600
West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 9, 2014
EOE/ADA


BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE V DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
HELP .-

WANTEDi


Homeownership
Advisor

needed to prepare
& guide first-time
and low-income
homebuyers
through the home
purchase process
including helping
them secure financ-
ing & close on their
home. Bachelor's in
related field & 3 yrs
exp in residential
lending or home
buyer counseling
req. For complete
info & to apply, visit
www.community
housingpartnes.org/jobs
EOE AA
M/F/Vet/Disability





Staff
Veterinarian
Announcement
#14-44

Perform managerial
duties regarding
the Citrus County
animal shelter oper-
ation, with regard
to animal care and
maintenance of the
facility and equip-
ment. Examine and
treat sick animals,
perform surgeries,
vaccinate for
rabies. Requires
Doctor of Veterinary
Medicine Degree
from an accredited
school, with at least
2 years of experi-
ence in veterinary
shelter medicine.
Requires a Florida
Veterinary License in
good standing with
the Florida Board of
Veterinary Medi-
cine, a Drug En-
forcement Agency
License and a valid
Florida Driver Li-
cense. Must provide
a copy of College
transcripts. Starting
pay DOQ. Pay
range $1,969.38
-$2,954.09 B/W
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local Cit-
rus County Libraries
or the Citrus County
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.

This job is open until
filled. EOE/ADA.


Property
Manager

Full Time. Experience
preferred. Must
have Real Estate Lic
Please Call:
352-634-0129

Real Estate
Salesperson

needed to list,
market, sell inven-
tory & represent
first-time and low
income home
buyers through the
purchase process,
as well as aid in
acquiring & devel-
oping properties for
sale. Bachelors in re-
lated field, 3 yrs exp
in real estate sales,
and current license
req. SALARIED
positionw/excellent
benefits.
For complete info &
to apply, visit
www.community
housingpartners.org/jobs
EOE AA
M/F/Vet/Disability




Servers &
Bartenders
for a huge Tiki Hut &
Restaurant. High
volume business.
Must be experi-
enced & energetic
with outgoing per-
sonality. Must have
great customer
service skills.
Apply in person at
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando, Mon-Fri
2:00pm-5:00pm"

Traes/^

***Royal Oaks***
Golf & Country Club
Is looking for...

Exp Golf Course
Mechanic-F/T
Qualified individuals
interested in working
at our beautiful Golf
and Country Club
may apply at:
Oak Run Personnel
Office located on
SR200 and 110th
Street, Ocala or Call
352-854-6557 X13
EEO/DFWP



, I l [ .illd IllSt.

El)Y D)y


CHipClsLE
Classifieds


Trades/


Averitt Express
New Pay increase for
Reginal Drivers! 40 to
46 CPM + Fuel Bonus!
Also, Post Training
Pay increase for
Students!
(Depending on
Domocile) Get Home
EVERY Week + Ex-
cellent Benefits
CDL-A Required
888-362-8608
Apply at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer -
Females, minorities,
protected veterans
and indivdiuals with
disabilities are
encouraged to
apply.



Carpet Cleaners

Full Time Positions
Stanley Steemer
Clean Fl MVR record
22 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
Paid training, 401k,
holiday pay.
Fax: 352-726-8895 or
Email: toni.gronert
@steemer.com



DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624


Exp. Grant Writer
For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full benefits,
achievable bonuses.
Call for details
1-888-978-3791 or
www.hevl.net

ROOFERS
Experienced Roofers.
Top Pay.
(352) 344-2442




CITRUS HILLS
GOLF COURSE
w F/T Sod Installer
class B CDL pref.
P/T Golf Course
Malntenence
ADDIv In person:
920 E Ray St,
Hernando
352-344-2400

Floor Technician
Announcement
#14-48

Full time skilled Floor
Technician position.
Must have at least
one year experi-
ence in stripping,
waxing, buffing and
cleaning floors.
Continuous moving
of office furniture.
Hours are 5:00pm
-1:30am with over-
time and weekends
required occasion-
ally. Graduation
from H.S or GED
certificate. $8.70
hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 2, 2014
EOE/ADA


CITRUS MAIDS
CLEANING PERSON
P/T leading to F/T
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925




Housekeeping
Person

Opening on house-
keeping staff at
Citrus Hills. Responsi-
ble for cleaning
hospitality villas,
including laundry,
as well as offices
and models as
needed. Flexible
part-time schedule
to include weekends.
Apply in person @
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL.




Literacy Services
Librarian
Announcement
#14-45

Professional library
work specializing
in adult literacy
services. Regularly
plans, teaches, and
facilitates public
events, seminars,
workshops, and
classes related to lit-
eracy initiatives and
educational goals
of the library system.
Four year degree
from an accredited
college or university
is required. Masters
in Library Science or
related coursework
preferred. ABILITY TO
WORK SOME EVE-
NINGS AND SATUR-
DAYS AND AT VARI-
OUS LOCATIONS
WHEN NEEDED AS
REQUIRED. Starting
pay $14.26 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Citrus County Board
of County
Commissioners,
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 9,2014
EOE/ADA


Home Finder


www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fi Your tmreizHow4


Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

783572


HELP WANTED
Family Service Phone Representative
Hourly pay and bonuses Telephone experience helpful,
but will train the right person to be successful
Call 352-628-2555
To Schedule Your Interview
FOUNTAINS MEMORIAL PARK
Homosassa, FL
Serving Families in Citrus County Since 1977


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* ** f I ^ S i ''
' r * I

y ^B B tf ^J i M y
w I I i T H F
*. y *-i ^ ^ f ^y /


iseect new 2014 Chevys!*
4WHATWE PAY! NOT A PENNY MORE!

UMITED TIME ONLY!


lIi0E
GHEVR~A =A


SRADO DOUBLE
CAB IWT
tC14970MSRP $32,240

, ...........GM SuppUer Discount
----,.- Rebate
oo, """PB
_________Pec
....C... sh orTrade Equity
--o -.USAA


2014 Chevy
)NIC LS
4248 & MSRP$16,840
- -DalsDcourt
___USAA
- sh orTradeEquity


New 2014 Chevy
CRUZELS
STK#C14047 MSRP $19,255
'sc-- Dealer MoDb
1$0O- Rebate
6Z-O Chr USAA
.T .-.-...-....... r.. c Trf Emd


New 2014 Chevy
MALIBU LS
STK#C14254 MSRP $23,735
s ==550- ---- Dealr DIScount
52.TOO_ Cash nTrads Eunv


New 2014 Chevy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14207 MSRP $28,520
750 --- DealerDisc
^SOO--------Rebate
PBC
... i AA


2!4MC1,505 .., ashor8ae Eu23,020
lft-$14l45m ftw.$17.685 Ywnv$23,020


New 2014 Chevy
AMARO1LS
STK#C14195 MSRP $25,495
... DeIWa Di t
0------Rebate
_USAA
Cash orTradeEquy
ft -21 9"'"r


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK.14146 MSRP $25,330
! ., --00 ---- Dealeri scont
$100 .. ..Rebute
7s,50 Cao'rdeeqUSAAty
12.500 --- Cash or TrWe Equity


New 2014 Chevw
TRAVERSE LT
STK #C14112 MSRP $35,395
%M000................Dealer Discount
.1 ..00----------Rebate
7So .. .... ..... USAA
2, ----- Cas, or r'ade Equity


New 2014 Chew
TAHOELS
STK#CT14041 MSRP $45,115
3O6"GMS e~b~w
Rebate
S750 Us"_____B
s25oo- --Cash orTradeEuIty
.. $^3793O


OVER 90
Used & Certified
Pre-Loved Vehicles


'I. q *I


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY7r


Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!
spr=Lf


04CHEVROLETSIO 07 CHEVROLETHHR LT
12412 CREW CAB 4Xt4 12434 LEATHER. SUNROOF
%4995 9%995


09 TOYOTAVENZA
12 ALEMTHi, ACKUP CAR
S62%"99


11TOYOTAHIGHLANDERSE
12374LEATHER
$n,995


6CHEVYOC1O PICKUP
STEPSIOE



10 FORD ESCAPE 4X4
P12A80,4CV., POWEWINDOWS, TILT



11 CHEVY SILVERADO LT
12437 CREW CAB
$24k99


10KIASOUL
12479, POWERWINDOWS & LOCKS
$0 59"


13 FORD F-150
SUPER CAB
$2%,M


10PONTIACG6
POWER WINDOWS



12CHEVYWSILVERADO
REGUIARCAB
SL995
RLUS MANY
MORETO
CHOOSE
FOMI


forYou!


8


Not available
shown.


Pay
ray...


_.$20,280 ,,_$29,6A5


2 YEARS 0
24,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealer for complete details.


Vehicles!


HEVYIMPALALT


i


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 D5


rJII


I I E El




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TENDED THRU SUNDAY NIGHT!


1i


S- a m


0
i0


I loa I


I


IT'S A SAVINGS FRENZY YOU'LL SAVE THOUSANDS!


44


1stm
PVowmen


U. "/o
for up to 60 MOS.
on select new Honda models
L. on approved credit 4A


N ITL..JIII
~IOi4


'7


'1lr


$500 MIUTARY APPMRECIATION OUPERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their spouses towards any new Honda
vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS.
OCVR 90 USND & CERTIFIED PR IOW D VNI I
AN Pro-owned VeNides Include a
6 MONTH//66 MILE
Umted Warranty1
PLUS A 5-DAY EXCHANGE PRG
See dealer for complete details.


*ft
" Go mnywhiere
in tme worm
first, but


i.v.a ~v~:


! -1 1 I


H


40
w~s ~


Down!


>1- f


D6 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


e" 0 1


I


e4


/I T




CITRUS COUNTY o(FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 D 7


Blg
POOL CLEANING
TECH PT/FT

Good driving record,
attention to detail
hard working. Exp.
a plus, but not nec.
Apply: 20359 E
Penn. Ave, Dunnellon

Senior Program
Assistant
Announcement
# 14-46

Bring community
members in various
fields together to
plan efforts/ initia-
tives to better the
community. Com-
puter experience
and working
knowledge of Word,
Excel, PowerPoint,
Internet and
Publisher Must
successfully pass a
level II background
check. Starting pay
$12.67 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
for more information
and you may also
visit one of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 2, 2014
EOE/ADA.


SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
**352-503-4930**


TOWER HAND
Starting at Si10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F


Ziegler Lawn
Hiring

Exp. pref. clean
valid Drivers Lic. a
must. 352-628-9848
or 352-634-0861


COMO RV Hiring
Housekeeper/
RV Detailer
Inauire within
1601 W. Main Street
Inverness 34450






RESIDENTIAL
CLEANER
Inv. Cleaning Co.
Looking for speed, ac-
curacy, customer serv.
orientated,experienced
only team player with
references (day work
only) 352-302-6418






AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547












NgtSchools
NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School

Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM
Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE
(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu


"- AVAILABLE
Pool Sunnlv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177

OWN YOUR own
Medical Alert
Company. Be the
1st and Only Distrib-
utor in your area!
Unlimited $ return.
Small investment
required. Call toll
free 1-844-225-1200.
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Op. Est. long
time Consignment
Shop MenWomens
Clothing & Acces.
Short window of op-
portunity Serious
inquires to: modine
ann@vahoo.com



AVAILABLE
Pool Sunpply Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177
Tuxedo Rental Sales
and Formal Ware
Owner Retiring. All Inv
& fixtures included. 15
yr est busn. Serious inq
accentsbvarace@vaho
o.com. Time sensitive



AVAILABLE
Pool Sunpply Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



Ice Cream Set
Table, marble top,
4 padded chairs
$175.
(352) 527-4301


#1e EmlometJOurci

CSIEIE1-()\1,InE -,mnClassfedsz


25.5 Cubic ft. Maytag
side by side
refrigerator/freezer.
Water & ice in door. Ex.
Cond.$275.
(352)726-1005
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Kenmore Elite
17 cu ft. Freezer
2/2 years old, with full
transferable warranty
through Sept. 2016
Excel. Cond. $350.
(352) 382-1166
KENMORE MICRO
WAVE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $75
352-613-0529
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398



DESK CHAIR High
back, adjustable, swivel.
Black. $30.00
(352)5644214



AV receiver/amp $10.
352419-4464
Panasonic
42 in, HD, Flat Screen
Great Picture
Must Sell $250 obo
Homosasa
315-729-2634
TV PANASONIC 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
TV PANASONIC 27"


COMPUTER DESKTOP
windows xp, monitor
and all accessories
$100. (352)628-4210
DOCKING STATION &
STAND for Dell
Latitude/Inspiron/Predsion lap-
tops $35 OBO
352-382-3650




8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
recliner, ottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




2 pc. Beige Loveseat
w/matching Sofa
very good cond. $400.
Chocolate Brown
Sofa, exc. cond. $250.
(518) 420-5373
ANTIQUE CANE SEAT
solid wood brown
chair Excellent condi-
tion Nice! Only $25.00.
352-621-0175
ANTIQUE TABLE
SMALL rectangle with
glass top over solid
wood Exc shape Deal
@ $75. 352-621-0175
BASSET SOFA BED
80in. flower pattern.
$95.neg. 352-344-8212
Black Recliner
Stand w/light
White chair
w/microwave stand
All for $180.
(352) 795-7254
BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top


CANE BOTTOM CHAIR
Antique Solid wood
black Excellent condi-
tion Very cute $25.
352-621-0175
DRESSER WITH MIR-
ROR 66inch triple draw
Mediterranean.$45.
352-344-8212
DRESSER WITH MIR-
ROR 66inch triple draw
Mediterranean.$45.
352-344-8212
Entertainment
Center
Beautiful made in Italy
Over $2,200 New
Asking $250. obo
(352) 212-5844
Full Size Bed, pine,
headboard & frame,
brand new mattress &
box spring $350 obo
Pine Din. Rm Table 4
matching chairs
excel cond. sturdy
construction $250
(352) 344-4178
GLASS TOP TABLES
SET OF 3, 1 COFFEE
TABLE & 2 END
TABLES $50
352-613-0529
Lift Chair Recliner
All features,
heat massage, tilt,
& more
$250. (352) 726-9049
LIGHTED ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER
HOLDS 32" TV WHITE
WASHED $50
352-613-0529
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Tan, like new.
No pets or smoking.
Exc. Cond! $210.
(352) 746-2329
Permobil Wheelchair,
does everything, incl.
tbl. Orig. cost $20,000,
BO. Stand up lift, $500
OBO. Orig. $2,000.
(352)726-5070
Power Lift Recliner, tan
microfiber. Ex. cond.
$275. Love Seat w/2


BASSET SOFA BED
80in. flower pattern.
$95.neg. 352-344-8212
Sealy Posturepedic
Firm Queen Mattress,
like new, exc.cond.
used only 3 mos.
asking $200.
(352) 503-9577
Sofa, Dinette Set
sofa, brown leather,
88" $350. Dinette Set,
wood table w/
wrought iron base, 4
matching chairs $300.
excellent condition!
SMW (352) 503-2416
THEATER CHAIR
Tan reclining theater
chair $85
(352) 249-9144
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500



2 Riding Lawn Mowers
Recondition, $350 ea.
Delivered in Citrus
County or Dunnellon.
(352) 507-1490
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
BOLENS MTD
38" Deck, 13.5 HP
4 yrs. old
Excellent Condition
$400.
(352) 270-4087
Craftsman
Zero Turn Riding
mower, 44" deck,
20 HP, Kolar engine.
$1500
(352) 746-7357
Lawn Sweeper
42" sweep
$75
(352) 341-0557
Poulan XT
Riding Mower
30" Like New, Little Use


STARTA CAREER --. WITH MANUAL & Mattress Set $150. recliners. Wheat print. Paid $900.
INA YEAR I Awww chronicleonlinec m REMOTE $40 Still in Original Plastic. Ex. cond. $175. Asking $650.
INA YEAR WWW.c roniceonine.com 352-613-0529 (352) 484-4772 (352)726-5070 (352) 628-5553





SNnaf


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Affordable Care + lite
housekping, cooking
errands, trans. Call
Lisa (352) 423-0298
PRivate Duty
Senices
In my home. For
live in
dek y Told
Care.
(352)
503-9523
Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793


Awn~mingsB

SHADY VIEW f
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lie/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019,201-5147


Your World

,94 49te 44/





CIIpN1CLE


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing. Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Electrical

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *kk
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lie/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lie.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


F ', -rI I -








POOL.AND PAVER LLC
352-400-3188









*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


"ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 5374144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


"Hasta La Bye Bye."
1 .-35 -56-61 I







Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/ins.
563-9824, 228-7320


FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C
and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202
Lic.#CAC057482


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lie/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861


WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lie., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570


A, C UT ABOVE t#^XfN
352-419-2779



0or 352-201-2201
WE WILL BEAT ANY
WRITTEN ESTIMATE
Mowing, Hedging, Trimming, Blowing
Tree Trimming, Brush Removal,
Seasonal Planting.




SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
M 352-364-4610
MR.
?ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
24n-r-nl-nsai -,a W -r--h
I24 Hours a DaY. 7 DaYS a Weeki


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767



VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
*lAll Home Repairs
K* Small Carpentry
"'" Fencing
S.:reening
S(lean Dryer Vents
/Affordable & Dependable
Eqp.i,'nce lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


DUST BUSTERS
CLEANING SERVICE


REI D EN IA,COMM ERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & NEW HOME CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
N P Workers Comp.
Pressure
SWashing Too

3 5 2 .9 4 2 .8 4 3 4


Coll Today for a
Clean Tomorrow



SERVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE RST,
CONSISTENT VOTED SRET OF THE RIST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
.,-- Sod Sales & Install



746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded


Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians|
ER0015377

35 1 4*


Wallpaper Removal



r352-597-2440 -352-293-5088
SToll Free: 877-89-39 |


0 OMW I'



ITRUS

HOmEWATICH
We care for your home while
you re away.





www.homewatchcitrus.com
352-422-0025
Licensed, Bonded, Insured


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


This Sat 6pm
Preview 5pm
Antiques, Coins, Art, Jewelry,
A Military and Estate Items
Red Barn Auctions
4535 S. FloridaAve., Inverness, FL
Terms 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash F1 Sales lTax
AB 3172 AU4416


A Consign Now
Rates as low as 2 o We Buy Estates




S All In One Home
,.'. Repair & Lawn Care
,-,* Landscaping
,'' ,'S ., *Mowing
SMulch &Weed
Carpentry Remove Debris
Concrete Trim Trees & Shrubs
SDrywall ,
SPaint
SPressure Washing k #
25 years experience, reliable and super cheap
SJim Maloney
352-246-2585




Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist

Spring Tune $S995
S P r7 IReo.
lpSpecial 4 $13995
Guaranteeing 10x Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Particle Scan to detennine
thile quality of the air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires Aprl 30,2014
1 [c#1 AC181589
13 I i Back To New s1997
Heating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz


INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins





YourLIrld first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHRE)NCLE
Cki- as


I I


I P EI N




D8 SUNDAY,APRIL 27, 2014


horsepower runs good
$50. 352-527-1193
Riding Lawn Mower
Simplicity Cornet, 34"
cut, 13 HP good cond
well maintained $275;
Black & Decker 18"
electric mower w/ grass
catcher $100
(352) 341-0557



ROSE OF SHARON
2 Year Old Seedlings
Mixed Colors 3 for
$12/$5 ea Inv. Off Croft
Rd 613-5818



HOMOSASSA
Moving Sale Sat/Sun
Furniture and more!!
1690 S Carriage Ter
LECANTO
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a-3p
5595 S Chestnut Ter
Leisure Acres



MENS KAKHI PANTS 3
SIZE 36X30 $15
352-613-0529
MENS SPORTS
JACKETS 3 BROWN,
BLACK & BLUE SIZE
40R $5 EACH
352-613-0529

H'l 1111111111411 J

CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/case, Con-
sumer Cellular/unlock or
911 $28 352-382-3650



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOAT TIRES AND
RIMS 2 14" GALVA-
NIZED $25. EACH
352-527-1193
CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with Case. Excellent
Condition $95.00
352-746-5421
Cannondale
Men's bike, never
used. New-$600
asking $300;
Self propelled lawn
mower, Honda
Husqvarna, Like New
$200 352-382-3545
Chest Freezer
Frigidaire, 8 cu ft.,
less than 1 yr. old,
excel, cond. $250.
Beautiful 3 pc. Bassett
Entertainment Center,
opening for 37" TV.
excel, cond. $250
(352) 419-7213
Deep Stainless Steel
Sink w/faucet, $50.
Countertop for Center
Island 64" x 36" $20.
(352) 419-8888
DISPLAY CASES 1/64
die cast car display
cases $40.00 each
352-746-6931
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$25 352-613-0529
H2 PRO WATER TANK
30 GALLON LIKE NEW
$35 352 527 1193
HALOGEN DESK
LAMP Black, Counter
Balance, Hi/Lo, 50W
$35 OBO can email pic
352-382-3650
HIGH END LICENSE
PLATE FRAMES for
BMW & Jaguar Chrome
$20 Each Call 726-0040
Kirby Vacuum
all attachements, 2001
Limited Ed, like new
cond $125
Treadmill, Tunturi 620,
good running $175
(352) 341-0557
KITCHEN AID Stainless
Steel Automatic 12 cup
Coffee Maker $25 Call
726-0040
PFALTZGRAFF CHINA.
27 pcs including plates,
bowls, cups/saucers.
Tea Rose pattern. $65.
527-1239
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529


Three sets of wooden
indoor/outdoor shutters.
Excellent condition
$100.00 352-746-5421
SPEAKERS 5 inch 2
way 70 Watt Optimus
Speakers. Very good
Condition $35.00
352-746-5421
TABLE 5' BROWN
FORMICA top Heavy
duty Legs fold. Yard
sales/banquet, etc.
$30. (352)270-3909
TABLE 5' BROWN
FORMICA top Heavy
duty Legs fold. Yard
sales/banquet, etc.
$30. (352)270-3909
Twin Box Spring &
Mattress, stand &
lamp$ 100; Elvis Gold
Record Volume 4
$100 (352) 795-7254
WINDOW TREATMENT
Custom fabric covered
cornice, Beige. Fits 5 ft.
window. $50.00 Call
352-621-7586
YAMAHA SURROUND
SOUND SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $70
352-613-0529
ZODIAC POOL VAC
WITH HOSE WORKS
GOOD $100
352-527-1193

Medical
Equipment
Used Hoveround
$2,000. obo
(352) 503-2233



"PACKAGE DEAL" 2
ELECTRIC GUITARS
SG STYLE&LAP STEEL
BOTH W/GIGBAGS
$100 352-601-6625
5 STRING BANJO
RESONATOR BACK,
30BRACKETS,PLAYS&SOU
NDSGREA'1$75
352-601-6625
BLACK&GOLD LES
PAUL COPY COM-
PARE TO "BLACK
BEAUTY"SETNECK
$100 352-601-6625
HOLLOWBODY
GUITAR, IBANEZ
AGR73T white w/gold
hardware & AG100C
hardshell case $495.
FENDER TELECASTER,
1986 '62 reissue ,candy
apple red w/white
bindingsoft case
$575. 352-746-1644
ROGUE BASS GUITAR,
black $50.
BEHRINGER ULTRABASS
AMP, 1x12,
180 watts -$195.
352-746-1644.



AQUARIUM
30gal. stand,
full top and filter.
$45.
352-344-8212
PIE MAKER ELECTRIC
Wolfgang Puck never
used includes great
cookbook $25./offer
352-621-0175
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529



2 yr. old 8 spd
The Rover by
Terra-Trike $900.
2 yr. old Pure 6 gear
w/over sz. seat $225.
(352) 419-6153
Elliptical
Slight Used $50.
(352) 419-4243
TREK BICYCLE 2012
Trek Bike. 7000 Series
Mint condition with
mirror and bottle holder.
700X28 tires. $275.00
firm. 352-586-0426

S orting

4 BASEBALL BATS
ALUMINUM EASTMAN
AND ASSORTED $25
EACH 352 527 1193
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


DAM QUICK REEL
AND ROD 50 YEARS
OLD GOOD
CONDITION $75
352-527-1193
For sale:
Direct Callaway
factory clone
X HOT irons. Used 1
time. Right hand, R
flex, PGA SENSICORE
inserts, WINN Dry Tack
pro grips. 3-9,"PW,
AWSW. $299.
(352) 746-4920
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
STREET HOCKEY
STICKS MADE IN
UKRAINE $15 EACH
352527 1193



2 nice flat bed trailers.
2 dual axle, 6 x10
& 6x12. Details:
(352) 860-0513
or 201-8120


Sell r Swa


x w




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111
TRADE FOR PON-
TOON Have 19'Deck
boat w/88 fresh rebuilt
motor.trade for like pon-
toon boat 352-560-7747



Queen size
Waterbed Frame
pls call (772) 579-0517
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



RV CORD ADAPTER
18 inch NEW 30 amp
Female to 50amp Male
w/Pwr Lt $10 SMW
352-382-3650





L",k


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci @ 352-212-8936


CKC Deerhead
Chihuahua pup M
$150.2 Mini Dasch-
shund pups M $250.
& Chiweenies, $200.
w/h/c & puppy kits
Janet (352) 628-7852


RAYNA
Rayna, a lovely
5-y.o. American
bulldog mix, sits for
treats & attention,
gives paw. Weight
50 Ibs, polite to
people & does not
jump. Likes some
dogs, not a fan of
cats. Housebrkn.
Fee of $60 covers
spay, chip, tests &
UTD on vacs.
Call Trish @
352-586-7547.


r\[_u IVlllIlI-I UI l~ur\_r-"
DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352-419-8233





Yot r 0rld first

Need a j,,h
iir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


cwIi- IC


CLASSIFIED




with cage. 25 yrs old.
Asking $650
352-642-2823
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827



Pet Safe Dog Kennel
5' wide x 20' long
*incl. 5' gate, incl. nice
cedar dog house
31" x 45", $200.
(352)489-2011



2003 JOHNSON 40
HP 4 STROKE
ELECT FUEL INJEC-
TION, 20 inch shaft,
all controls & ca-
bles, on pontoon
that just came from
MI, like new, $3,450
or BO (989) 324-7015
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510-
16 ft fiber glass
Tri-hull w/ 40HP John-
son w/ tilt. Too much
to list $1500 (352)
860-0513 or 201-1860
21'Well Boat.
Merc. 40hp 4strk. w/
20hrs. use. Galv.
Tandem Axle Trailer.


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barren
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
HURRICANE
My loss your gain. Due
to health issues must
sell almost new less
than 15hrs on mo-
tor,2013 Hurricane Sun
Deck 187 with lots of
options, inc. Yamaha
115 4 stroke motor with
customized trailer with
surgue breaks. Retais at
over 34K will let go for
$26,300. Pictures upon
request. Al 527-7732
PONTOON
20 ft. 25HP, Johnson,
w/ trailer,
$4,400
(352) 726-4289
PORTA-BOTE
2004 -12 ft. Porta-Bote
with transom for engine
mounting, all seats,
oars, oar locks, and
hardware to mount on
an RV. $800.00 Call
Art at 352-726-2750





const ent boats id~.'~g

an our l seilrv'icel





Sportscraft 88
27' Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STUMPNOCKER
14FT, 2008, 15HP,
4 stroke Merc. Eng.
elec. start, 551b trolling
mtr., galv. tfr. 2 new
batteries $3,600.
(352) 423-0289
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



HONDA
2011, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
WE BUY RV'S,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500 352-201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SUNDANCE
2010 5th wheel,
wooden deck with
stairs, incl., $13,000
obo 352-637-6679

Vehicles

Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Look
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
wANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440





Buy Here/Pay Here

'05 Chevy Cavalier
$895 Down
'01 Dodge
Dakota R/T
$995 Down
'00 Mitsubishi Galant
$650 Down
'03 Ford Focus
$3595 CASH
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl


Chronicle ': -. i ";'

Classifieds ,. }:;..,,,,

In Print :".


& Online .//






C pNiCLE I i),ci





(352) 563-5966 -- /


4


2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005 Venture 8 passen-
ger, runs great, 186K
miles, $3500 OBO
352-212-1203
CHRYSLER
2000 Town & Country
passenger, loaded,
good cond., asking
$1,975. 352-637-2588
CHRYSLER
2010 Town & Country
Cream Puff, 40k mi,
Auto start, back up
camera, frt pull down
shades, fuss buster
radar $17,500
352-503-6209
FORD
03 Taurus SE
Full power, Nice
dependable care
$1900
(352) 795-8986
FORD
2003, Mustang,
convertible, silver,
64k mi., good cond.
(352) 746-0687

JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
3/4, V10, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995
CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19& US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
1994 Maxima
low miles, runs great
Must sell $3000 obo
(352)564-1818

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440




FORD
Roadster Convertible
Rumble Seat
Original 1929
727- 422-4433
GMC Pick-up
1970 Shortbed
350 3 Speed
Needs restoring $1200
352-220-1214



S o [if, ill li lt1, "
) I. L 1 1 ][St.
LI II ,. Ild Ilrst


CH ,N Da


Classified


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018
GMC
'01, Sonoma,
ext. cab, 4 cyl.
5 speed. $4,500.
(352)697-2171

Larry's Auto Sales
1955S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333
BUY HERE, PAY HERE
**-*-**
2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down
2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down
'91 F150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down
'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van 5.7, V-8
Auto, $995 down

TOYOTA
'91,4x4S-R5, 22 RE/
5 Spd. Ext. Cab, rebuilt
mtr., pilgrim canopy
$4,200 obo, 341-0818




NISSAN
2000 Xterra XE 140k
$1,750 352-634-4286
TOYOTA
'10, Venza, 4 cyl.
loaded, 46k miles
1 owner, garage kept
$19,995 obo, 726-0686
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
2001 CARGO VAN
5.2 litre, Auto, A/C
Full Price $4495 + tax,
fees. (352) 564-8333

^SelfSoae^
Noticesji


Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055

Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068

HONDA
2002 VTX 1800
clean, priced to sell
$3995
(352) 564-8333

HONDA
2005 Goldwing Any Ed
ABS,13k mi, Exc. Cond,
Garage kept $13,500
(352) 637-0292

HONDA
2006 VTX1300C
7,400 miles
Cobra Pipes, Helmet
Windshields
$4,900
(352) 341-1187

HONDA
2008 Shadow Spirit
VT750C2
3,775 miles
Cobra Pipes Helmet
Saddle Bags
Windshield
$4,500
(352) 341-1187

HONDA REBEL
2009, super low miles
many accessories, like
new.$2695 OBO. Pine
Ridge (419) 307-8954

IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990
'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999

KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 1500
Classic: Custom Paint,
18" Baron Bars, Saddle
Bags, Kuryakyn High-
way Pegs/Passenger
Floor Boards
/Cable&Grips. 3200
Miles! Garage Kept,
Exc.Condition $5999.
phone or email




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April
25, 2014- May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014

^Self !Oag
Noticesl


384-0504 SUCRN
5-14 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SAT-
ISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY
ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
#141 Christina Stride
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2014.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434 352-489-6878
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, April 27 and May 4, 2014.


382-0427 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Dedication of the completion of Phase 1 Terra Ceia Ecosystem Restoration Project in
Manatee County. All activities will take place outside. A guided tour will be available
immediately following the dedication. One or more Governing Board members may
attend.
DATE/TIME: Monday, May 12, 2014; 10:30 a.m.
PLACE: 302 Terra Ceia Rd., Terra Ceia, FL 34221
Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinatoraswfwmd.state.fl.us
For more information, you may contact: tara.poulton @watermatters.orga;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x6530
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 30, 2014. #EXE0321

383-0427 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Joint Industrial and Public Supply Advisory Committee tour of Tampa Bay Water's De-
salination Plant. One or more Governing Board members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, May13, 2014; 1:30 p.m.
PLACE: Tampa Bay Water Desalination Plant, 13041 Wyandotte Rd., Gibsonton, FL
33534
Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinatoreswfwmd.state.fl.us
For more information, you may contact: cindv.tavlorawatermatters.ora;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x6530
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 30, 2014. #EXE0322


374-0427 SUCRN
5/10 MEETING NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
A First Time Homebuyer's class is being offered by Housing Services, a division under
the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners. Participants who attend the en-
tire session will receive a Certificate of Completion that is required for Neighborhood
Stabilization Program and other first time homebuyer assistance programs.
The class encompasses the entire home buying process including preparing your
credit and finances, shopping for a home, home inspection, fair housing, available
loan products, loan preapproval, and closing. A variety of industry professionals will
present to the class and answer questions throughout the session.
The class will be held 8:30am-4:30pm on Saturday, May 10th, 2014 at the Citrus
County Resource Center 2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct. Lecanto, FL 34461. Please call
Jen Pollard at (352)527-7522 or Pat Wilkerson at (352)527-7526 or you may email
Jennifer. Pollard bocc.citrus.fl.us to register.
This event is sponsored by Citrus County Housing Services and Community Housing
Partners.
There is no charge to attend these sessions, but you must reserve a seat. Lunch will
be provided by Community Housing Partners. Child care is not available.
Any persons who require a special accommodation (ADA) for accessibility must advise
us in advance and allow at least 72 hours to provide that accommodation. TrY
(352)527-5901
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: April 13 & 27, 2014


I Misc. Nti


Misc. Ntice


I Misc. Not


Metn


...........
............... ............... ................... ......... ..... ............. .................................. ........... .......... .....................
............... ............................................................... ................ ...............................................
............... ...............................................
............... .............................................................. ...............................................
............... .................
............... ......... .... .............................. ..............................
.............................
ft w t j .... ..................
... ... ... .... .... ... ...
... ... ... ... .... .... ... ....
... ... ... ... .... .... ... ....
... ... ... ... .... .... ... ... .... ...
... ... .... .. ... .... .
... ... ... .... .... Olow
k", io 0 ro.". tj
..... ........................ .... .................................. .......... .... ............... ............................ ....................... ............... ..................................... ................... .......... .................... ..................................


11


Metn


Metn


Yow,7Do

HrYou"B ^y ^B^





Youwr'Da),




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EVERY 2014 SILVERADO HAS THE PRICE CLEARLY MARKED


NEW 2014 SILVERADO
V62WDLT


2014 Chevy Spark


MSRP BEFORE DISCOUNTS .............$37,520
TRUCK MONTH PRICE .....................$34,328
TOTAL REBATES ................................$4,500
TRUCK MONTH PRICE YOU PAY ......$29,828"


2014 Chevy Equinox


-


2014 Chevy Cruze/ 2014 Chevy Traverse


2014 Chevy Malibu


2014 Chevy Tahoe


CRYSTAL
FIND NEWROADS C H E V R 0 L E T
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448


U


CRYSTALCH EVROLETONLI N E.COM
PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. INCLUDES $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL
QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +ON SELECT MODELS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 D9


1800-584-8755 EX




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IlUF


1i


SSA


III


r/B


I oI


'11..I!1


i'dlOlli


''1IRI'


'iIrnT WI


DLO SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014


7 "%-




tI lII iI




H Section E SUNDAY, APRIL 27,2014


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


This large Pottery Barn
conservatory bird cage
made of mahogany and wire.
is a statement piece
due to its scale, and
replicates similar designs of
the Victorian era. It would
look striking alone, or filled
with elements of a personal
collection, or even plants.
Those drawn to
19th-century style may be
happy to learn that
vintage garden decor is
a trend for spring and
summer.
- : :- ,:,;, 1 1 I: : J A


I. illll lIIi'i'r 1illlJ ill !?!L L~li


N


, ,I


H Sikorski's
SIV, Attc
----V M PAGE E4




E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






14W EIGWLLWCUT 1332 S. ROOl(FIEL.DDR. COMPLETELY UPDATED VILLA S^ AWGRASS COHDO UNIBUE WATERFRONT RETREAT^
S I NLECATO IN 55+ COMMUNITY NoFloodZone .256 Feet on Lake RousseauLINE
2rq~ -6 7.28




odC bSldSrfc RPu ok 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot 2 DR, 2BATH 1-Car Garage. Ow e Financing... .Hardwood &'file Floors Includes 3 Sub-dividable Lots
S ce ne a a Ne rl Great Mate Beattfll De oae /M t e GR ANIE Co unters S tan l s Aplia ncs G reat get aw ay w ith com m unity Detached 2-Car Garage Pontoon Boat and Motor Included
i Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows Enclosed Lanai Low Mainte nane Fee pool and dock. Attached 1-CarGarage Potential for Guest Cottage



ELLISUTTH35-288399 ffi PETER .ARVII(ORO l 7 LM F UCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 | SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 --^
EmnU ellslln, e>U'"'' eE(52) S527-7842 m KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 RHEmail: lucybarseseremax.nel Email: sherylpottseaol.com *
w d g (352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellsnorda.com Vial Tours: www.crystalilverfl.com iWebste: www.CrystalRlverilvng.comi
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-4 PM .





14 WEEPING WILLOW COURT 1332 N. ORCHIS TER. COMPLETELY UPDATED VILLA ASS CONDO UNIQUE WATERFRONT RETREATHILLS
N3/2/2 LUXURICUSI SHARP DECOR LECANTO IN 55+ COMMUNITY r No Flood Zone 256 Fee on Lake Rousseau





Wood Ca/Slid Surface 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF iving Living & Family Room Bu ilt 1995 w/2,674S Ft. Living Area
*Scree ned Lanai *Great Master Bat Hadwo 38 Tle20 Flur inlue 200 On-dvdal NiePivtoot2Bs BT arGrg




DI :US H 19, Cyress Blvd., left on Seagrape, left on e y 5002nd StoBonusRm. Decor4thBedr/Maintained GRANITE Counters Stanless l ances chen rea g eakfast Nook Acre CorrLo OonMado o oue
B e e chB irig ht o n Cee, Wlte l n g s N ew L g h tin g /C e ilin g F a n s D e n D et te d T u b H i s & B o at ank s




BEe r TON o Large Lana w Vny Windows Enclosed Lana Low Maintenance Fee pool and dock Modifiached Mitch Underwood Diplomal orGuest Model
(oc"\ 573 o-7842 C BARNES (352) 60i34-2103 [ SE POTTS (352) 7-5500b
ELLIE SUTTON 352-217-3997 PETER & MARIA KOROL LosKELLY GODDARD 352P-4718531 E-mail: lncybTesCremaxnE I:h GHa S









ww.F lot^-lnll ol | 422-3875 Email: lenpalmereremax.nel 3HI Email: kcunningham@remaxonel
g ali-i I. "inI 35 42 7 Email: kellygoddardsellsorid.com Visual T: www.crysalriverflcom Welsie: www.CryslaRiverLiving com
12 7-282.37637828
a... Ouse -5. Mter .. s
OPENHOUE TOAY -4 PM
21 DEER COURT 5989 N. ORCHIS TEN. i iV~ei PN--UKD. */ ol CTU IL




GRANITE DCAB *CW AERALL PN RIDGE D AM TV SUITiS It PIW E RIDGl-a on 1 Acre MOLB This is a well Garge
*HUGE LOT/Cul De-Sac *3BR/3Bath/Cff ce/FR PaINE RIDG --lManaie rB/B/C




LPaersDrivePool Area EXECUTIVE HOME w maintenance Ri Overhaven waterfront Li move-in g sought aer home located Livin Pinely Ridge Equestrian/Golf BUILT IN 2005Area
DIR US 19 Cypress Blvd, left on Seagrape l eft on Beeh 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath g. I e ity Home Fw/Breakfatures 4 Bedoo 2 master Open floor pla n with great r oom, formal diningCourse
right on Deer left on De Ct* Office or Den *oMany Extras ted withSuHtHEL Pool & Lanai Area Jetted Tub, His & Her's Sinks




ELLIEu S UTTON 352-28739 24/7 ru INF LI E Beautiful Landscaped F Scetting Modified M spitch Underwoomsd 10x51Dplomat Modelso




)pool area Concrete Shed Ut orty Building, Inside Laundry, lanai, inside laundry with wet sinkE 10x82' 4 20x20
I'UhI]AY ~A countersts batfl ietr-out, updated bathrooms, R 3 Bue itn oLarge 2-Car Garage, Freshly Painted, New Carpet, New attached carports and detached carport/boat
S 'ELLIE SUTTON 352-27-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL nLots ofn LatancpDroivieandg Spaod lose toe Golf e Look arking'E-I. AM;,, r,,..;1,,-j ;l
nimmi, OIIIOUIIOneH momusix.in i nID B 35242 3758 dI-LO LEN PALMER (352)212-20 (352) 0 370200
www. lotiudLislunglnlo.coin (352 422387 637.2828 Email: lenpaiimerremax.il n ti Email: kc 7-ngm 200emax net





HERERENTALS
-,Wy-.-24/7 Info Line <
637-2828.
I rv i 2 uyer entrs houseI I
LECAHTO!! VALLEYHILL number when AMAZING POOL HOME WITH 2 MASTER 31212 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS




S IN PINE RIDGE on 1 Acre MI Ths is a weCANTERBURY!
PARK YOUR BOAT! WATERFRONT DOCK Low maintenance Riverhaven waterfront is move-in prompto h after home located in Pine Ridge Equestrian/Goif BUILT IN 2005




9 W LE BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH, 2-oAR a e ta Communit Home Featurs 4 Bedrooms (2 master Open floor plan with great oom, SF living area
aeLAE O LOCATED ON 15TH FAIRWAY, INGROUND ustom built with lots of extras. Dormers, a 3 on lush, cul-de-sac PRESERVE loos Loadedin
5 FENCED ACRES, CLOSE TO FOREST, GREAT SCREEN POOL, FORMAL DINING AREA dream kitchen with natural cherry cabinets, open Fansw Screened/Covered Lanai in breakfast room, split bedrooms ring5 garden
ROOM, LARGE KITCHEN WITH DINING EA BREAKFAST NOOK, INSIDE UTILITY ROOM, floor plan, office/den, house generator, tankless Concrete Shed Utii Buidin Inside Laundry lanai, inside laundry with wetmbershipnk plus 82 & 202





CROWN MOLDING. PRC LOCATED ON CUL-DE-SAC. bho water heater plus a 2-oar garage. t ag e- i Canterbury Recreation Center. ---
ELLIE SUTTON 352-217-3997 r fain. rm. with fireplace views canal and dock ,sLndscapitng and Sod Ciose to Goif Coursel Loo~ oa1 parking. E ri ;I
JODY property Won'tLti[1
English Spanishio iiMI downii wrii g80rmoao




ANNEDMACROL (352) 212-9682 MANNEMACOL (352) 521n2-9682is DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-10 CHERYL NADAL (352) 30244-3558125
w mwwFlomt dul@Yiuiolinlno.omlo Email: rmfxgl22@yohoo.com orEmil. rhrimillsieirthlink.ne. Email: Re dalEs ateGeorgeSleeman.com el
Ism .M RENTAL
AVAILABLE
11111, "III11111",V isit
CANTOO! CIRS HILLS!! 2-STORY HOME on one acre (MOL) UU I.R~IIU UELUI D EST IN CANTERBURY!
3 BDROM 2BATH, 2-CAR GARAGE 3BDOM2BAH, 2-CAR GARAGE HOME, total of 4,461 sq. ft. under roof. 48R/2.5 BA. Pristine 3 BID -2.5 Bath w/1,850 SF living area
COUTRYSTYE HOME, LOCATED ON LCTDO 1THFAIRWAY, ANGROUND Custom buit with lots of extras. Dormers, a on lush, cul-de-sac PRESERVE lot. Loaded
5 FENCED ACRES, CLOSE TO FOREST, GREAT SCREEN POOL, FORMAL DINING AREA, dream kitchen with natural cherry cabinets, open with upgrades including wood flooring, garden
floor plan, office/den, house generator, tankless tubl,granite countertops & designer faucets.
ROOM, LARGE KITCHEN WITH DINING AREA, BREAKFAST NOOK, INSIDE UTILITY ROOM, an irsHlsC enesipu
CROWN MOLDING. LOCATED ON CUL-DE-SAC. water heater plus a 2-car garage. j Canterbury Recreation Center'
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-0082 DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-0082 BARBARA MILLS (352) 031-0200 inGEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-78127i
Email. dimfl~yahoo.wom oil.! Email. dim fl~yahoo.com a~ firh borbormills@oarrhfinlcnor L Email: RealEslate@GeorneSleeman.com B

*II *TT I M Mi MI IYi :ft II M l[NIM M I-11 1CI TT U M ITIR





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Stefanie Felicia
Young Satchell
Century 21 Century 21
Nature Coast. Nature Coast.

Century 21 welcomes
newest associates
Century 21 Nature Coast of Crys-
tal River is pleased to announce Ste-
fanie Young and Felicia Satchell
have joined its firm as sales associ-
ates. Both specialize in residential
property sales, and are long-time resi-
dents of the county.
Stefanie and Felicia have completed
extensive real estate training with Cen-
tury 21, and are actively helping cus-
tomers fulfill their real estate goals.
Reach them at 352-795-0021.


e
17r




David Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Linda Barnes
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX agents
continue to soar in 2014
Realtor David Ivory recently sur-
passed $2 million in sales volume,
which qualified him as a 2014 multi-mil-
lion dollar producer. He joins an elite
club of Realtors who have qualified for
this distinguished level this year.
David is a Realtor in the Crystal
River office of RE/MAX Realty One lo-
cated on U.S. 19.
Linda Barnes recently surpassed
the $1 million mark in sales volume for
2014. Linda has been a Realtor in the
area for more than 30 years and con-
tinues to be a leader in local sales.
The brokers and staff of RE/MAX
congratulate David and Linda on their
accomplishments.


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E3


Wants or needs?


Gypsy's Two Cents: I am the
world's greatest watchdog, so why do
they call me a doorbell? It must be
their attempt at humor, but I'm not
laughing, I'm convinced that one day
I'll save the day.
We opened our shop four
years ago, fully aware of the
risks of a new business, es-
pecially during a recession. I was
concerned that during economic
hard times, we could be in trouble in
that our shop
is filled with
all wants and
no needs. 4
I was wrong.
As it turns out,
dealers and
collectors
have a very
real need.
Dealers go Steve Barnes
to estate! TIME WILL
garage sales,
thrift stores, TELL
flea markets,
auctions etc., looking for that sell-
able item with a good margin. They
also do retail shops hoping for a mis-
mark, to exercise their negotiating
skill, or if they want someone else to
hunt, find, clean and price.
A collector's priority is posses-
sion, and they will go to the same
places to find what they're looking
for
On the other hand, "wants are
easy" Some customers come in on a
mission, perhaps having seen an
item the day before, and they make a
beeline to their prize. Others may
have discipline and wish to think
about it. Then there is the impulse
buyer, whom we like and encourage
... Oops, my bias is showing!
The distinction between wants
and needs also applies to buying for
the shop. Cindy and Cheryl do most
of the buying and wrestle with this
every day Cindy's experience makes
her ask "is it sellable?" Then
Cheryl's emotion kicks in with "got
to have it" Makes for a nice balance.
Whether it's wants or needs, we
can all justify our purchases. Hope-
fully, it's one we can enjoy until it
goes to another home.
This month's story by Sue Shaut:
"I remember starting as a small girl
and seeing my mother and grand-
mother using all the things I see in


antique stores. They reminded me of
home and simpler times. So I started
to collect all the things that I was so
used to seeing them use, such as the
old Pyrex mixing bowls and great
wooden rolling pins, the getchy
measuring spoons, etc.
"I still use the utensils and bowls
today, I love them, it's part of who I
am and they remind me of my mom
and grandma, whom I miss dearly I
think they would be happy to know
they left such an impression on me,
and that I can actually cook!"


Steve Barnes owns and, along with
his shop dog Gypsy, operates Olde
Inverness Antiques.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


| !Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney ,
|f Realtor.., A HOUSE Realtor
302.3179 SOLoNae! 287.90m
74k66700-l"l: THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
the olden air WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


3057 N. DELEON
Come enjoy this lovely Kingsley model 2/2/1. Relax on the large front
screened porch or enclosed lanai. Eat-in kitchen, partially fenced yard. I
I ___Call for private viewing. I


Spacious 3 bedroom 2 bath
split plan 1997 home with
4 Fireplace and wet bar. Huge
gourmet kitchen with
island, pass thru, extra
cabinets and two ovens.
Master bath with dual sinks,
garden tub, separate shower and large walk-in closet w/shelves.
708882 Directions: From US 19 N, East on SR 44, R on Rockcrusher, R on
Moss to home on left. Steve McClory, Realtor 352-422-3998


2/2 picturesque condo ir :,per
709556 $142,900 709659 $74,900
Sherri Orendorf573-9968 Yolanda Canchola 219-2196


_3/1
Cute as a
button!!
Fenced Yard
710050
$54,900
Sherri
Orendorf
573-9968






3/2/2 priced to sell 3/1 lovely back yard
707891 $139,900 709878 $44,000
Becky Paradiso 634-4581 John Maisel 302-5351


granite countertops. 708572 $137,900
Randy Morehouse 287-2934


End unit condo,2 bed 2 bath
708789 $77,500
Becky Paradiso 634-4581


1U^-* 352:"4-0888 l-3 -527111 352e44-4




E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci IIONICLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What to consider when


choosing a tree service

Doing homework will save countless headaches
any homeowners, at one time or poor tree work can result in damage to
another, hire a tree service to per- property and poor response from trees,
form tree pruning, maintenance, resulting in additional costs for future
or removals. They are hired because the corrective tree work, or even injury from
trees are too large, the work is falling limbs or trees.
beyond the scope or capability There are many tree service
of homeowners, or the home- companies to choose from. A
owners are elderly or physi- quick scan of the Citrus County
cally unable to do the work 1' ,, Yellow Pages reveals a total of
themselves. Tree work is dan- ., 28 tree service companies lo-
gerous, requires specialized cated in or doing business in
equipment and requires an y the county. How does a home-
understanding of tree biology, I owner know which one to call
local species, regulations, and or eventually select? I will try
other specialized knowledge. to provide some guidance to
Unfortunately, many home- assist in making an informed
owners select a tree service Eric Hoyer decision.
based solely on price. While ARBOR U First, be sure the company
being conscious of your budget CULTURE has proper insurance. This in-
is wise, the old expression, c___________ ludes liability, vehicle and
"penny wise, pound foolish" worker's compensation insur-
often prevails when choosing solely on a ance. What is to keep an employee who
low bid. Granted, hiring a tree service hurts himself while working on your
may not be as critical a decision as, say,
choosing a physician or buying a car, but See TREES/Page E7


Inside...


-rip




Victorian style
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E6
Sneaky squirrels
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sizing up a numbered print; fixing an antique music box
ear John: At a recent yard William Barr, 1867-1933, born in Scot-
sale put on by our West Citrus land. He ended up in California and
Ladies of the Elks, we discov- is generally listed as an American
ered this watercolor and California artist
held onto it because it was He is known as a land-
signed and dated. At- scape and genre painter I
tached are photos of the His oil-on-canvas paint- H .
watercolor and a close up 'H ings have sold from $250 to
of the signature and date, ~ $8,000. His paintings de- '
W Barr 1904, and the re- picting California land- R R. ,
verse side, which appears scapes sell for the highest W I "i
to be a pencil drawing of a prices. '
person holding a bird. I think your watercolor N ...
It is 6 inches by 11.75 depicting a European"| 9 t
inches. We looked up the John Sikorski scene would sell in the $50 TY 'l'
name on the Internet and SIKORSKI'S to $150 range.
found a William Barr who Dear Jomhn: Enclosed .-- -
was born in Scotland, ATTIC are copies made by me of . ?-
studied in Europe and a book I have. The copies -_- .,.:
came to California to paint, are of the front cover and the side .-, .
Can you tell us if this might be an panel of the book of John Milton's 'i,.,4,
early work, or what might be our next "Poetical Works." There is also an in- O VA--
step to determine if this work has scription to A.B. Russell by the Special to the Chronicle
any value? CM., Internet This watercolor is likely the work of William Barr, 1867-1933. Although his works have sold for
Dear C.M.: Yes, I agree the artist is See ATTIC/Page Ell as high as $8,000, this European scene might sell for $50 to $150.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keep pesky squirrels away from the bird feeder


Associated Press


They're vermin to some.
Cunning adversaries to oth-
ers. Squirrels have long been
a source of fascination and
frustration for gardeners and
bird enthusiasts engaged in a
near-constant battle to keep
them away from the nuts and
seeds put out for birds.
Greased poles. Loud music.
Motion-activated sprinklers.
Bill Adler Jr has heard all
the strategies. And tried many
of them.
The 57-year-old humor
writer has been collecting tips
to keep squirrels from avian
meals for three decades, and


recently updated his 1988
book, "Outwitting Squirrels:
101 Cunning Stratagems to
Reduce Dramatically the
Egregious Misappropriation
of Seed From Your Bird-
feeder by Squirrels" (Chicago
Review Press), for a third
edition.
The most important thing to
know? While technology has
changed, squirrels still have
little else to do all day but
strategize.
And they're good at it
"There's no one technique
that works for everyone,"
Adler says.
Try a few different strate-
gies, and be willing to change.


Most of all, Adler says, don't
sweat it too much.
"I have to admit, I care a lit-
tle less (these days). I care in a
different way," he says of his
squirrel strategy
Squirrels still eat more
from his birdfeeders than the
birds do, but "I don't mind
that I personally don't always
win.
"I enjoy outwitting them, I
do. But these days I win the
battles and not the war."
Here are some tips (some
serious, some not) from Adler
and others to bring a little
harmony to your backyard:

See SQUIRRELS/Page E12


^-^-^fT~i i^.n f T179 h^i r A i %- TT ^ -


U3 m 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Baltour Walt Engelken YvonneJenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE REALTOR H m A a yi


t 1 -0 L N 0


orMUSSNS


N50 ~ DELTONA
7 $129900


Wild Birds Unlimited/Associated Press
A squirrel attempting to eat bird seed on an Eliminator, a squirrel-proof bird
feeder. It protects bird seed from persistent squirrels by closing the seed
ports based on the weight of the intruder standing on the perch ring. The
sensitivity can be set by the owner.


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E5


COMO= BUDING + HOPE


PI558NE ELKCAM




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Plant propagation can enhance garden

M any wildflowers self-seed they are prolific, rampant or out-
in lawns and gardens. My grow their allotted place in a Pa r
lawn is supposed to be manicured landscape."...al s
Bahia turfgrass with winter rye- Many native wildflowers do
grass over-seeded for have a place in a,
five or six months of meadow or naturalistic
winter color ... garden. Last February,
The wildflowers are I dug up an 18-inch di-
pretty. I loathe crop- ameter clump of Blue-
ping them with the eyed Iris, Sisyrinchium
lawn mower Since I angustifolia, from the
have hundreds of front lawn. I separated -
empty pots recycled it into 15 clumps,
from my nursery days, I which were immedi-
can pot excess plants ately planted in pots,
that sprout by them- Jane Weber watered thoroughly to A
selves in unwanted JANE'S settle the soil around
places. GARDEN the roots then placed
paThe potting soil is GA DE in the nursery where
The ottig sol isthey would get irri-
half backyard sand and thie wu ld get ri-
half decaying, finely milled or- gated while I was off travelling for
ganic mulch from the Central a month. Without further atten-
Landfill on State Road 44. It is tion, these native evergreen iris
mixed with the 42 inch-wide tiller became established. On my re-
on the back of my tractor. Recy- turn, they were ready to trans-
cled pots are filled by hand and plant as border plants alongside a
stacked in the tractor's loading 6-foot-wide sandy path through
bucket for transport to any part of othe sandhill habitat. is -
the yard where there are too Florida Violets, Viola species,
many unneeded plants. were potted the same way I left a
manyapb rrc wagon load of pots full of soil for a JN WESc t t Crn
Some homeowners call any un- neighbor to take any plants she JANE WEBERISpeoiaIto the Chronicle
wanted plants "weeds." Such Blue Spiderwort spreads through self-seeding. They can be easily transplanted to another area of the
plants are not valued because See JANE/Page Ell garden. Plant propagation is natural and makes for inexpensive and easy gardening.




~,A -.CLASSIC ELEGANCE UNSPOILED NATURE
," French Country Estate on 6 acre MOL in desirable location close to Inverness Secluded 80+ acre farm close to Crystal River Rollinlg pastures, lush meadows,
4,078 sq ft of luxury I, J f shes you desire ponds, mature oak trees 2 spacious and luxuriously remodi rttnq i are
INCREDIBLE VISTAS gourmet kitchen, family .1' 11 .' 'u1'' : car garage, plus carefully positioned in a beautiful setting for maximum Ir, visit
HAMPTON LAKE sep 6 car gar, office & apartment PIs visit www MyCitrusCountyEstate com for www mycrystalriverfarm com for an interactive tour
This 3/2/1 situated n 12 acre elevated n iteractve tour $739,000 $800,000

HISTIE ESAE
lots of frult trees Recently


THE GLEN HIGHVIEW ESTATES
at e d The GlenI Beautiful 2004 Avanzini Mode, ncel
namH... e laundry, treed 1 ac lot High ceiling s, f Ie ...
carpert and paint, eat-in kitchen, large master w/,ete iTub
Residential & Commercial Buildings Bt AR.....TH condition' Just unpackathe &hugewalk-sho nice pnvanai
B A R T Hs an d rela Clos t1 o shop n, dining just tihe rightsize w/tons of upgrade
APPROVING ASSISTANCE WITH BUILDING DEPARTMENTS REALTOR@ anafa $65,00 $549,000 $469,000 $189,900
Country Architect Florida Registered Architect CV
_____________________ Cell: (352) 220.0466 E L- -
Jo n arenW h tegbarth@myflorida-house.com F~ g
John W arren VW hite g corn111111 SECONDS TO KINGS BAY FASCINATING RIVER VIEWS MOVERIGHTIN-BEAUTIFULCITRUSHILLS, DESIRABLE CYPRESS
P A no 1 2naster ....tes, apart 3/2 home built 2007 on 13 acres on Enjoy ths 3/3/2 pool ho 0e an a t I. VILLAGE LOCATION!
PTment low r level Upper level the banks of the Withlacoochee corner lot with mature oak trees and Elegant 3/2/2 pool home 0n quet
THE MOST EXPERIENCED ARCHITECT IN HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTY a.t bl via elevator Pool, hurricane .across from Half Moon Gum Slough 0ots of privacy' Very well maintaaned c ate- c Fa 0m 0 en w awoo ,ne
Investors Realty s y syst updated P.e. i HW floors, fireplace, cherry .at t w a
C e l 3 2 5 0 8 8 5 9 9 2k it ch e n & b at h r o o m s 1 9 0 I t a f , , ,, . .i . ,
of Citrus County, Inc. ..... aw a Just
jwhite198@tampabay.rr.com J Visitnrywebsite at:wnyryflorida-housencom wat g far .4Sf,000 $489,000 i, $169,000 . $169,000


E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TREES
Continued from Page E4

property from coming after you?
You can request copies of their
insurance certificates or names
of their insurance companies so
you can verify their coverage. If
they are reluctant to provide this
information, it is time to move on
to another tree service company
Second, be sure they are li-
censed with the local city or
county Licensing doesn't make
for a better company; it simply
means they have completed some
paperwork and submitted the
necessary licensing fees. How-
ever, it proves that they are al-
lowed to do business locally and
are not "flying under the radar"
They are more likely to have local
ties, and their business is on


Terma 'Ls


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E7


record, so they can be tracked
down if an issue occurs later
Third, ask whether they have
a certified arborist on staff and if
the work will be done under the
supervision of a certified arborist
This certification is offered
through the International Society
of Arboriculture and guarantees
at least a minimum level ofknowl-
edge of trees and tree work.
This certification has become
more common since its introduc-
tion in 1992, and many compa-
nies have owners and/or
employees who have this creden-
tial. Also, a homeowner can
check online via the Interna-
tional Society of Arboriculture's
website to see if someone is a
certified arborist. This search
can be done using a last name,
ZIP code, certification number,
or location by state and city How-
ever, please note that only an in-


dividual can be a certified ar-
borist, and not the tree service
company The ISAs website can
be found at www.isa-arbor.com.
Finally, ask for references for
similar type of work. If it is a
pruning job, ask for two or three
references of recent pruning
work in the area. A reputable
firm should be pleased to pro-
vide this information. If they can-
not or will not, that is a red flag
and the firm should not be hired
to work on your property
Companies who have proper
insurance, are licensed, have
trained staff, and can provide ref-
erences are probably not going to
offer the lowest bid for your
work. These things cost money
and represent an investment for
the tree service company owner
However, companies with these
qualifications prove that they are
serious about their work, have


S. U


SpecialzinginTerraVi

Brentwood Res ale

wwwTero~listoeltyCroup"coml^


made an investment in their em-
ployees, and plan to remain in
business for some time. They are
likely not a fly-by-night company,
here today and gone tomorrow
Let me offer one final note re-
garding fly-by-night businesses.
Beware of tree service compa-
nies who knock on your door un-
solicited and offer to "take down
that bad tree" or "prune that
dead limb." These companies are
combing the neighborhood fish-
ing for work They are often from
out of town or even out of state
and are often predatory after a
disaster such as a hurricane or
other major wind event Ask them
for their business card and tell
them you will get back to them.
Then check their credentials.
These simple guidelines are
common sense and should be
done for any contractor However,
many homeowners treat tree


work as a low-level or unprofes-
sional vocation that anyone with
a chainsaw and pickup truck can
do. Tree work entails a body of
knowledge which is gained and
honed over a period of years.
Trees are living things and don't
always "follow the book"
An experienced and profes-
sional tree worker will approach
the job safely to prevent injury to
himself and others, minimize any
chance of property damage, and
perform the proper practices to
support the health of the tree.


Eric H. Hoyeris a certified ar-
borist, a certified forester, a
registered consulting arborist
and a qualified tree risk asses-
sor with Natural Resource
Planning Services Inc. He can
be contacted at erich@
nrpsforesters. corn.


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
rADI MAKIIIrrI 14.')9 f').Q7a7 I QIIIA^ Miill 1i C .IA9.' 11 /I'TInDIA PDAII IM 1 -').')7-1777


BRENTWOOD, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
his former builders showcase model offers comfortable, affordable giving in one of Florida's .. customized villa on one ofthe most scenic golf course lots in Terra Vista. Great open Situated on a beautiful lot in Terra Vista. Unique floor plan with access
remer lifestyle communities. Si tuated along the Brentwood Golf Course in an area of newer floor plan. Looks like new and is loaded with upgrades such as Conan countertops, to both guest bedrooms from large guest bath. Spacious third bedroom
homes this maintenance-free home offers an open great room, a casual dining nook, spacious DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS staggered cabinets, tiled backsplash, customized office space, expanded lanai, and expanded lanai. Large great room, dining room, eat-in kitchen, very
kitchen, owners suite, guest room plus den/3rd bedroom, covered lanai &2-car garage. Home Nicely maintained Maibu model with great open floor plan on golf course homesite. This oversized garage, pavers on entry and lanai upgraded lighting thru out and glass open floor plan. Experience living in a maintenance-free villa and spend
as been impeccably maintained both inside & out & shows like a model. Furnishings are home has 2 bedrooms plus a den, which can be used as a third bedroom. An outstanding block windows. Expanded master bath with garden tub, separate shower and dual your time taking advantage of the Bella Vita Spa/Fitness Center, tennis,
ecotiable making this a true TUR N KEY OPPORTUNITY. MLS 708241 .................... $199.900 home forvear round or a vacation oetawav. MLS 706854 ....................................... $214.900 sinks. Eniovthe amazina view ofthe Skwiew Golf course.MLS 708232.... $229.900 aolf, and numerous activities. MLS 710061................................. $259.000


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Professionally decorated Lantana maintenance-free home. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, plus den/office with "".. Wil SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2-CAR
French door entry. Open floor plan design with ambient lighting throughout the home. Kitchen has SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HUNT CLUB SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH Beautiful custom home located on Fenway Drive in the center of Terra Vista.
Merat cabinets with soft close feature & crown molding. Conan countertops & gourmet stainless steel Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage home with spacious kitchen, Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2.5 baths great Exclusively designed pool and spa home with 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths plus den,
kitchen sink. Butler's pantry, eat-in knthen & formal dining room. Greantroom has specialty built in with Conan countertops, breakfast nook, formal dining, family room, great room room floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades Situated on and oversized garage with attached 18 X45 RV garage. Upgrades throughout
custom arches & remote control fireplace. Minka rotating double-bladed ceiling fan & many more and lanai overlooking the fountain on Lake Pastor. This home offers a split Sky View Golf Course with breathe taking views. Over sized lanai home, including marble fireplace, summer kitchen, solid surface counter tops,
V bedroom plan with an open floor design. Light and bright. Make sure to with lush landscape. Located in the premiere community of Terra tile floors, window treatments and many more to mention. Amazing panoramic
269.OOO visit the backyard to enloythe view! MLS 708113........................$329,999 Vista. M LS 702685.......................................................................$334,900 viewfrom spacious lanai on over an acre of land.MLS708318............. $595,000
Terms 6 Mots or More
Terr Vit rn wo dR nas Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


'ILLR DAULIAHML VILLA, 2 bL: 2 tAIAM, 2-1K, bKLNIWUU VILLAS I | bKLNIWUUU IUWIINUMI.L, Z LU, i. bAIM, .1-UA I
2BD2Bath Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished I Cozy unfurnished inside unit Brentwood Townhome- 2 bedroom, 2.5
rviewfrom detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, and 2-car garage. Open floor plan Ibaths, and 1-car garage. Spacious kitchen w/ breakfast bar. Nicely
1,200 | with lots of space. Social membership is included. #2121.............$1,200 I maintained, move-in ready. Social Membership included. #6106....$1,000




E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


19TH-CENTURY STYLE MAKES A SPLASH


KIM COOK
Associated Press

Shose drawn to 19th cen-
tury style may be pleased
to learn that vintage gar-
den decor is a trend this
pring and summer
The look involves florals,
weathered wood, wire, period ty-
pography, bird motifs and acces-
sories, and other elements with a
Victorian vibe, says Tom Mirabile, a
trend watcher for Lifetime Brands.
The appeal lies largely in the era's
garden-as-haven aesthetic, he says.


"We look at the Victorian age as
an era when there was just a lot of
time," he said at an industry trends
seminar earlier this year at the NY
Now trade show
Conservatories, greenhouses and
aviaries were popular in stately
Victorian-era homes, but even mod-
est residences might have a little
birdcage. Fashionable too were
ferns, palms and terrariums.
Pottery Barn's got miniature
greenhouses this season made of
white-painted distressed pine and
See Page EO10
















jar.


Associated Press
ABOVE: This tall wire birdcage in a distressed green painted wire, available from Pottery Barn,
can be filled with a tall plant or just used as a decorative tabletop accessory. Victorians were
fond of birds in all iterations, from illustrations to textile motifs to aviaries large and small.
LEFT: Reproduction and original antique signage and labels are part of the vintage garden look.
This metal sign from Farmhouse Wares, printed on both sides, is wall art with graphic punch and
old fashioned charm.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Update on county's



'ugliest backyard'


Things take shape as work reaches halfwivay point


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Their backyard was so
ugly that even the snakes,
birds and squirrels
avoided an afternoon fes-
tivity, which was quite OK
with the Mosley family
Except they always
dreamed of hosting their
own family get-together in
the raw and unpalatable
site.
But they say what their
backyard may lack in aes-
thetics, it more than makes
up for in love. That family
love is all they need to
have a good time espe-
cially in their cramped
backyard.
"When you don't have
tons of money to buy the
best of everything, it's a sit-


uation where you do what
you can do," Ken Mosley
said. "We just love spend-
ing family time together
That is what is most im-
portant to us."
They have to fret no more.
Recently, the Mosleys
won a $10,000 makeover at
the Chronicle-sponsored
inaugural Home and Out-
door Living Show. The
event brought together
more than 50 community
and business partners for
home and outdoor enthu-
siasts, which featured an
"ugliest backyard" contest
Entries were posted at
chronicleonline.com and
readers cast their votes for
the top honor
Anna Mosley entered
the contest on the last day
for entries to be submitted,


WM .%W:- "w - .
BANK OWNED DUPEI.i Great investment opportunity that needs a little TLC.
Old FLa home w/knotty pine ceiling. Shared laundry & storage area.
$48,000. Call Sandy McDermott at 352-489-4949. 158D713/700592







DOWNTOWN DUNNELLON. Income producing rental property. Zoned specialty
business. $82,000. Call Capt. Lee Harris at 352-489-4949. 158D704/
qAA979


957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452
352-344-5535
-a.,. www.Cridland.com t


and was determined to 0
win the top prize pro- -'"""..
vided by Jason Aguilar's 'Ln el -
Landscaping, Crystal Ca- whAren
sual Inc., Mosaic Tile and R a r
Remodel and Color Coun- p a i
try Nursery i L
Titled "Backyard not
suitable for my children," MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Anna described her back- Jason Aguilar, left, of Jason Aguilar's Landscaping, explains how the Mosleys' back
yard online as, "Broken yard will appear when finished. Anna Mosley, right, and her family plan to spend ex-
swing set and no grass. tended, quality time outdoors in their newly-redesigned back yard when the work is
complete. Crystal Casual Inc., Mosaic Tile and Remodel and Color Country Nursery
See Page El0 also are participating in the redesign of the yard.


38 HIGHWOOD PATH 105C
SOn Golf Course Heated POOL! Comr
Large Lanai Summer Kitchen Lots of
D Oversized Garage Wood
Gorgeous Granite Kitchen NEW
D Granite, Wood Hard
Much More Fire.
D $250,000 MLS#707002
P Tiiemy VIM Tud^ r~rT


IAK VILLAbt IBLU
Nltl Updatd
Sin This Home
Cabinets Granite
Stainless Appl.
Wood & Tile
ice *POOL
7,000 MLS#70940(


S"^

225 C;
INC. c
,corn
ZD Cc
or 65
CO

CS
Q@





0 Cc


Y'*^S.COM


"Always There For You"
KEY1 GAIL COOPER
RE LTY r r lL inill,.:,, D,:, ll r RK ail,:,r
(352) 634-4346
-. ( Office: (352) 382-1700
,- -0, E-mail me: homes4u3.mmndspnng.com


vi




GOLF COURSE & 3 MASTER SUITES
* Custom 4/4 pool home on 8th green
* 3995 sq ft living- close to clubhouse
* Italian 20" tile in main/wet areas
* Dual pane Andersen windows
* 2AC/heat units new in 2010
* 40-year roof new in 1997
* Open oak stairway to 1 master suite
* Home warranty for buyers
#707826 $298,700


PAVERED DRIVE & WALKWAY!
S3+office/2.5/2 pool home
SCustom built by Buddy Woods
SWood burning fireplace in family room
SCentral vacuum and security system
SSolid surface Diana Pearl countertops
SAll windows/sliders are dual pane
SNew roof in 2013
S12'x34' expanded lanai for entertaining
#705795 $215,000


i American Realty For a Visual Tour and all MLS: ac a i
OUE & Investments bjdavis.comrn Jackie Davis
E { 117 S. Hwy. 41
I. .vereF jackie@bjdavis.com (352) 634-2371 Cell







So much luxurious space in this 3 bedroom, 3 bath home with an SPACE, SPACE AND MORE SPACE COUNTRY STYLE WITH A FLAIR
office, a fireplace in the great room, cherry cabinets, Conan
counters, pecan hardwood floors, a solar heated pool/spa and a 4BRs, 3.5 BAs, Office Appliances new in 2011 Built in 2006, 3 BRs,2.5 BAs Office, and bonus room
circular driveway. All bedrooms have walk-in closets, bedroom #3 is Just replaced all 3 C/H/A, roof Heated pool with spa -Wood floors, stonefireplace Hickory cabinets, Conrian counters
an ensuite with its own bath that also exits to the pool and the 34' Surround found sys, wired for generator
lanai. Solar tubes, skylights, central vac, more closets than you 14'x14 workshop, power/water Sec sys, intercom, 2 skylights Solar heated pool 32' lanai w/half bath shower
could wish for and a well for irrigation. Set on a wooded acre in the *Tip top condition on an acre OnanAcre CitrusHillsmembership
premier community of Fairview Estates, a village of Citrus Hills. a a a C H m br
MLS 710086 $279000 $335,000 MLS 707544 $259,000 MLS 709826


See .Virtual IIIurs..ilww.reIJ aIJ.I.I.Ie IIB.I..m


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E9


_I__




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YARD
Continued from Page E9

There is nowhere to put their bikes
and toys. The dogs need a good back-
yard as well. I am hoping and pray-
ing to win this for the kids to have an
awesome new backyard. I know my
seven kids would be so excited."
To her disbelief, she won.
The family of nine Ken, Anna,
Krystal, Shelby, Brittany, Danyelle,
Noah, Abigial and Elijah envision
a backyard where they can enjoy a
barbecue while the kids swim or
play in a sandbox during the day,



VINTAGE
Continued from Page E8

glass, perfect terrariums for small
plants. A replica of a vintage bird-
cage is made of wire painted hunter
green; it's tall enough to house an el-
egant orchid, but would also work as
a tabletop accent.
On a grander scale is the retailer's
Conservatory bird cage, a nearly 5-
foot-long mahogany and wire piece
that would fit on a console table or
atop a long shelf
While it's dramatic in and of itself,
a collection of objects would look
amazing inside it. (wwwpottery
barn.com)
Floral motifs and roses in par-
ticular were all the rage during
the Victorian era. Art and textiles
featured illustrated flora and fauna
from home and exotic parts of the
world.
Bradbury & Bradbury now offers
a couple of art wallpapers derived
from illustrations by period artists
William Morris and Walter Crane.
Fenway has an Art Nouveau-style
pattern with irises at its heart, while
Woodland showcases the artistry of
both Morris and Crane winsome
rabbits and long-legged deer cavort
across a leafy landscape. (www
bradburycom)
Designer Voytek Brylowski offers
prints of works by Victorian illustra-
tors Mary and Elizabeth Kirby Par-
rots, toucans, lilies and
hummingbirds are hand-colored, vi-
brant examples that can be mounted
in simple frames and placed near a
patio door or anywhere the gen-
tility and charm of the period might
be appreciated.


and where they can sit around a fire
pit in the evenings.
That's exactly what the Mosleys
are receiving, according to Jason
Aguilar, owner of Jason Aguilar's
Landscaping.
"We have the fire pit already set
up for them," Aguilar said. "And we
are installing a sandbox for the
younger children next week."
He explained that the family-
friendly oasis scheduled to be
completed by the end of the week -
will feature a sandbox, fire pit lawn
furniture, mulch and lots of colorful
plants for both colorful attraction
and framework.
"We want to keep everything low

"By digitally enhancing old im-
ages, I feel that I give them new life,
and preserve historically significant
illustrations and drawings by these
famous naturalists," says Brylowski,
who is based in Wroclaw, Poland.
(www.etsy. c o m/shop/Victorian
WallArt)
Jennifer Stuart, an artist in Tulsa,
Oklahoma, has designed a collection
of plates depicting damask and flo-
ral prints of the 19th century on
patio-friendly melamine. (www.
zazzle.com)
And Pier l's Floria collection has
a vintage damask pattern in garnet,
soft blue and grass-green in a col-
lection of indoor/outdoor rugs and
throw pillows. (wwwpierl.com)
Cast-iron and wicker furniture
and containers were used both in-
doors and out in the late 19th cen-
tury, just as today we use rattan
chairs in the family room and the
garden, or iron plant stands in the
kitchen, as well as the patio.
Restoration Hardware's Hampshire
and Bar Harbor all-weather wicker
collections include chairs and sofas
in restful shades of cream, gray and
mocha. (wwwrestorationhardware.
com)
Early visitors to resorts in New
York's Adirondack Mountains dis-
covered the eponymous big
wooden chair that's withstood hun-
dreds of years of style changes. A
good selection in both real wood
and Polywood, a recycled plastic
resembling wood, is at
www.hayneedle.com.
West Elm's collection of soft yet
sturdy braided baskets, woven of
bankuan grass, evoke French laun-
dry bins.
Use them as storage in any room;
the natural color makes them


maintenance for the family," Aguilar
said. "We made the fire pad big
enough where they can add their
furniture on either side to enjoy the
pit. But most of all it is all for the
kids and a little getaway for the fam-
ily from everyday life."
Anna Mosley said she couldn't be
happier and smores are ready to go
on the grill.
"We have barbeques every week-
end as a family," she said. "This is
surely a blessing and exactly what
we were hoping for"
Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext
1334, or eworthington@chronicle
online, corn.

versatile. (www.westelm.com)
Turquoise chicken-wire baskets
and cloches can be found at
www.farmhousewares.com, which
also has a vintage-style garden sup-
ply shop sign in the form of a hand.
Galvanized planter pots in sets of six
would make great receptacles for
herbs or miniature blooms.

0 CitrusCounty
Dr a0Team
i *flie~t


WEEKLY LINEUP
Medical professionals contribute their expertise to
columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays
Read up on all things school-related in the
Chronicle's Education section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the week from the tempting
recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays
Get a jump on the weekend with Scene./Fridays
See what local houses of worship plan to do for
the week in the Religion section./Saturdays
Read about area businesses in the Business
section./Sundays


^JONOANN MARTIN S !
(W~ Peferred ^
REAL ESTATE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net






f ej Y 228 Pleasant Grove Rd.
9330 E Kenosha Ct, Floral City Inverness
Beautiful Waterfront Home Fully Occupied. Great Investment
Gourmet kitchen, stainless steel appliances, Fulortunit Nire 4 family with 2
New roof and air 2011, gazebo, double pane opportunity. Nice 4 family with 2
windows, extra large lot. Fish from your own bedrooms in each unit. Close to
dock. Home available forviewing 3/17/14 Hospitals and shopping. Coin-op
Offered for $259,OOO. MLS# 709137 Laundry on site. Off street parking.
Directions: U.S.41 Fl Ave Southfrom Inverness, Left on Can be purchased with 224 Pleasant
Orange Ave. (Hwy 48) Left on Duval Island. Left on Grove. Priced at $149,900.
Grove. Left on Kenosha.


BELMONT HILLS GATED COMMUNITY .COUNTRY CHARMER
Citrus Hills Membership available Stunning GREAT LOCATION ON INVERNESS GOLF COURSE BRIGHT AND CHEERY CLOSE TO TOWN
4BR, 3BA Built 2006 with 3600 sq. ft. under WITHLACOOCHEE RIVERFRONT Splash into summer!! Custom 3 bedroom 2 bath Bring your airboat to this canal waterfront only minutes
roof* Formal living and dining Gracious Access to Rainbow River Dock for Fishing and Great room with volume ceilings inside laundry from the Withlacoochee River. Newer home with all the
master suite Island kitchen large screen Enjoying the View* Beautiful Oak Trees Garage Split bedrooms. CAGED IN-GROUND SWIMMING POOL cottage charm with open inviting space Built in 2005
lanai with pavers on deck and driveway Lush and Two Sheds Screened Porch 2 BR 2 Bath with Ride your golf cart right out your back yard to the this home shows like BRAND NEW!!! 2 bedrooms 2 baths
landscaping Tile roof Below replacement cost! Family Room, Den or Bedroom MLS #t708313 course! City water and sewer! Florida room spacious eat-in kitchen. Air boaters
MLS#705846 $298,900 $199,900 MLS 708670 $152,900 dream.MLS #708434 $86,900



LOCATION *LOCATION LOCATION BEST OF THE BEST!!!
City of Inverness 3 BR 2 BA 2 Car Garage CBS Sweet|ater home on 5 acres* Goeous hickory cabinets* n .- ,
home REDUCED** Builder/Owner Bright open 2300 living area 3 BR, 2.5 Baths plus den/library 3-car BuiERS FiNANiNG FAILED-BAC,, uNMARKET:n
GREAT ROOM *Wood burning fireplace Split garage *Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances* Custom quality Owner/builder BUILT 2011 ATTlENTION PRICE REDUCED IN FAIRVIEW ESTATES
bedrooms Sliders open to Florida Room Engineered maple flioring and ceramic tile Spacbus family TO DETAILS Wood ceilings Laminate floors Butterfly gardens out your back door! No
Convenient to churches shopping *bike trail m ith gilassindosoverlooking the Florida natural backyard Spectacular kitchen with WOOD CABINETS granite mandatory membership One-owner 3 BB 2 BA
onvenien o cures soppin e tra ,ith widife feeding at your doorstep. Owner's feeders bring the tops and top of the line appliances 2 bedrooms 2 3-car garage Spacious and spotless *
and Citrus Memorial Hospital. Ready for birds and wildlife in your backyard...truly amazing. 4508 Iy baths NO DEED RESTRICTIONS ON THIS 120 X 120 laminate floors open kitchen with large nook
Immediate occupancy!! storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and LOT. Bring your boat or motor home Close to the overlooking lanai Lush landscaping all on I
MLS 4707745 $104,900 trulybetterthannew.MLSg704043.$299,900. railstotrails! MLS 707599 $109,900 acre* MLS 707053 NOW$178,900


E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E6

wanted to rescue while I was away
Clumps of Blue Spiderwort, Trades-
cantia virginia, had self-seeded
wherever the wind blew I dug holes
in places where they could multiply
by themselves further away from the
house. I covered the hand wagon's
mesh deck with plastic, simply dug
up clumps of spiderwort, loaded
them on the plastic, pulled the
wagon to the pre-dug holes and
plopped the clumps in. Decayed
mulch was scattered over the plant-
ing hole and roots. The transplants
were well-watered and left to estab-
lish in their new homes.
Similarly I unearthed large clumps
of Stokes' Aster, Stokesia laevis, a
perennial evergreen plant with large
blue flowers in spring and summer
These were pulled apart and placed
in a 4-inch deep trough, 8 inches
apart and a foot back from the edge of
a raised foundation planting bed.



ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

teacher O.A. Dickey dated 1857.
I would like to know its value, if
any, and if there would be an inter-
est in the book. -BM.K, Leesburg
Dear B.M.K: Yes, there would be
some collector interest in your book
if it were in good condition. It is in
rather poor condition, leaving poten-
tial dollar value catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: Enclosed are pictures
of my grandmother's armoire lo-
cated in Ohio. I would appreciate
any information that you could give
me on the piece or where I could get
an idea of value. CT, Internet
Dear C.T: You have an American-
made wardrobe that reflects 18th
century style. It was made by the
Snelling Flirniture Company in Penn-
sylvania between World War I and II.
Potential dollar value is $100 to $200.
Dear John: I listen to your pro-
gram so very often on Saturdays and
read your column, and I have a
request.
We have an old violin that be-
longed to my father-in-law We esti-
mate that the violin was made
sometime in the early 1900s or late
1890s. He played this as a child and
was quite accomplished.


In front of the Stokesia I planted a
row of seedling Florida Violets
where both would get afternoon
shade and prosper Amid the violets
were planted small solid corms of
Rain Lilies, Zephyranthes treatiae.
A month later they were in flower to
welcome me home.
As the weather warms, sprouts of
Passion Vines, Passiflora, have
sprouted from roots 6 to 8 inches un-
derground. Three or four stems with
a few inches of white roots were
placed in pots half-full of potting
mix, topped up and deposited in the
irrigated nursery Now they are
ready to plant into gardens not
mine, because I already have more
than enough to support a host of but-
terfly caterpillars.
When I get time, the perennial but
deciduous Black-eyed Susans, Rud-
beckia fulguida, need dividing. The
perennial Tasmanian Flax lily, Di-
anella tasmanica, Lily-of-the-Nile, an
Agapanthus hybrid, and Fire Lilies,
Crocosmia species all have prolifer-
ated and should be separated.
Plant propagation is natural and


When he died in 1957, the violin
was stored in the attic and forgotten.
After 40 years in storage, my mother-
in-law recently rediscovered it and
has given it to my husband. This vio-
lin still has a nice sound, but is in
need of repair We took it to the An-
tiques Road Show when they were
in Tampa and they said it was not
extremely valuable but
repairable.
I do not know if our family would
ever use it, but if it is repairable,
maybe we would consider donating
it to some child who could make the
violin sing again. Any help you can
provide would be very much appre-
ciated. S.S., Brooksville
Dear S.S.: What a nice thought to
have the violin restored and then
donate it to a child.
I know a violin specialist who
could help with both issues. His
name is Jan van Rooyen. His web-
site is wwwgviolins.com, and his
phone number is 352-331-5355.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


makes for inexpensive and easy gar-
dening. The hobby can and should
be shared with friends and neigh-
bors. But it can become addictive.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-


dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of na-
tive plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County, gar-
den. For an appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


I 4 9 9AZAWALL 0J'w C71MUS COU


Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


I\'u WV LaKe valley I
-f)ISM MLS 709794 $338,000
REDUCED & ready to sell! 3/2/2 enhanced
with upgrades.
Dir: Rte 486 to Terra Vista entry, follow Terra Vista
Blvdto R atFenway(Circle), L on Lake Mane, Ron
Skyview Landing, L on Wisper, L on Lake Valley.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING


7 tjsI Iz4 Ni Muslal tri
MLS 709979 $299,000
3/3/3 +den w/pool and hot tub
Winward Model.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING






iso" 4 1915W Nicole Dr
ivMLS 1 luu4a $129,000
Casual Florida living in this 2/2 with den
maintenance free villa.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


i -".Lr.' ..-- -
SI 4161 N Longvalley Rd
t MLS 707428 $254,900
REDUCED $10,000. Well maintained 3/3/3
w/pool; gas fireplace in family room.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


/Zealto
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


o(Istil 7l^

/'-lU1 3842 W Norlhcres Cl
1r rh: .II4,I S165.000
3/2/2 home on cul-de-sac, spacious indoor
living. Many NEW items in & out of home.
Oir: East on 44 to Rt into Crystal Glen, Crystal
Glen Or to Rt on Northcrest.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
NEW LISTING


V)1,4"'- 870 W Sunset Strip Dr
MLS 709997 $99,500
Spotless 2/2/2 split plan with pool.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


JCi.- I 330o3 vv ruwiiee ur
r MLS 709097 $299,900
Large family pool home w/fabulous
finishes thru-out.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


FO'"- 3116 W uouglastir uLir
MLS 708957 $239,000
Custom pool home on a private corner lot.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK


4. LL3 1100 W Pearson St
SMLS 705976 $124,900
Meticulously maintained 2/2/2 with
fabulous upgraded features.
Dir: 486 Wto Lon Essex, Ron Keller, Lon
Fresno, Ron Pearson.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


/Uclfrw- 6589 W Cannondale Dr
MLS 709981 $79,000
Charming and maintenance free 2/2/2 in
Fox Hollow.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


I? it 3422 N Buckhorn Dr
MLS 355561 $299,000
Bring your horses! Beautifully designed
3/3/2 on 2.75 acres.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


C (w" 1644W Spring Meadow
MLS 706531 $119,900
Move-in-condition 3/2 corner townhome.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


PINE RIDGE i CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 (352) 746-0744
c 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC An independentlyowned and operated brokermemrnberofBRERAffiliates LLC Prudental,the Prudential

S S- Si, I I l .i, ..


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E11




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SQUIRRELS
Continued from Pags E5

The natural
approach
Resigned to the fact that squirrels
are going to call his Washington,
D.C., yard home, Adler puts out
some unsalted mixed nuts along his
steps.
"If you feed them, they will tend to
leave the bird-
feeder alone," he Also inclu
says.
Squirrels also book ar
love corn, so if you
don't want them in- ratings,
vading your feeder, attract
keep your bird- at c ce
seed corn-free, and 101
You also can try
filling your feeder stratagem
with safflower
seeds, which are squirrel
high in fat and Some are
protein. om are
"Many favorite Most are
backyard birds
favor safflower ludic
seeds, but squir-
rels typically do
not," says John Schaust, chief natu-
ralist for Wild Birds Unlimited.
The technical approach
These days, there are motion-acti-
vated outdoor cameras if you want to
monitor your feeder, and even mo-
tion-activated sprinklers to douse of-
fending squirrels.
"Squirrel-proof" birdfeeders
abound. The best according to Adler
and other experts, are those that sit
on a 5-foot pole and are covered with
a plastic dome or "baffle" that's hard
for squirrels to cling to.
If you want to get even more high-
tech, there are weight-activated
feeders that actually cover up the
feeding ports when a squirrel
latches on.
"Squirrels are foiled, but not
harmed in any way," Schaust says.
While some particularly wily
squirrels have been known to
scratch up the pole and baffle
enough to gain access, bird enthusi-
ast Barbara Bergin of Austin, Texas,
has a slippery solution: petroleum
jelly


(


k


She actually greases the pole her
feeder hangs from with Vasoline
every now and then, and says it
works like a charm.
'As a bonus, it's also fun to watch
the squirrels slip off the hanger," the
60-year-old orthopedic surgeon
quipped.
The crazy approach
Adler devotes a chapter of his
book to his own misadventures with
squirrels, dating back to his bache-
lor days, when he first moved to
Washington from
New York. Wanting
ded in the a pet in an apart-
e feeder ment building that
didn't allow them,
ways to Adler invested in a
birdfeeder.
retain birds "The next day I
6,,,,i., got a squirrel,
cunning which was not part
S' to keep of the instruc-
tions," he says.
at bay. He tried yelling,
coated the bricks
practical, of his building with
S Teflon, squirted
hilariously the squirrel with
rous. water, even rolled
out some stainless-
steel spikes.
Nothing worked.
After hearing similar stories from
other frustrated bird lovers, Adler
decided to pen the first edition of his
diatribe against the rodents. Also in-
cluded in the book are feeder ratings,
ways to attract certain birds and 101
"cunning stratagems" to keep squir-
rels at bay Some are practical. Most
are hilariously ludicrous.
Some of the more entertaining:
Dig a moat around your feeder
Fill it with piranha.
Trap squirrels and send them to
Antarctica.
Encourage your neighbors -
and what the heck, your local gov-
ernment- to use drones to monitor
and, ahem, deal with squirrels.
Buy a squirrel costume. Parade
around your yard wearing it. Squir-
rels can't figure out what in the
world is going on and it drives them
away
Buy some lasers and set up a
hologram show in your yard. Make
holograms of cats and hunters.
Cry Maybe the squirrel will feel
sorry for you and go away


A VIEW FOR ONLY A FEW!Iw
BOMBSHELL BANK-OWNED 1994 3/2/2 Pine living. Almost 1/2 acre with a view of green p 1 ...1
Ridge pool home w/1,824 living for $149,900!1 NEW NEW int./ext. paint, lights, flooring, den/office,
paint, flooring & appliances. 3784 Birds Nest. 708162. screened porch. $139,900 #709350 Kim 6141 W.
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Peter. 352-212-5752


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Invention, collaboration



at Italian furniture show


I.


Associated Press

MILAN Collaboration drove in-
vention during Milan's annual Inter-
national Furniture Show and
collateral design week events, yield-
ing the promise of homes without mo-
bile phone chargers, and with more
ergonomic seating, table settings fit
for Italy's most demanding chefs and
sculptures that double as furniture.
The sprawling show, which closed
last Sunday, is the largest in the
world, capitalizing on Italian excel-
lence in furniture design and crafts-
manship. The weeklong happening,
which spills out into Milan venues
with numerous side events, is also
increasingly the launching pad for
high-level collaborations among the
fashion, architecture, technological
and design worlds.
"The market is big and growing for
those who have a strong brand," said
the presiding chairman of the inter-
national furniture show, Kartell CEO
Claudio Luti, noting that visitors
from 160 countries were on hand to
see new products from some 2,400
furniture makers at the Rho conven-
tion center near Milan. "It is a great
opportunity and a great recognition
of the quality of innovation."
Top designers unite
For design aficionados, there is
nothing more galling than finding
out that a competitive neighbor also
bought that coveted Philippe Starck
chair Now, thanks to a concept
launched on the sidelines of the fur-
niture show, buyers can customize
their own designer furnishings.
Seven designers, including Starck,
Sebastian Bergne, Sam Hecht and
Kim Colin, have designed "naked"
furnishings chairs, tables, sofas -
for an inaugural collection of a new
brand concept dubbed Tog, short for
together Consumers can choose
from colors and combinations of-
fered by the designers. But Tog co-
ordinator and designer Nicola
Rapetti said the concept also estab-
lishes a network of so-called cus-
tomizers who offer additions of their
own. For example, one Dutch "cus-
tomizer" offers knit covers for


chairs, and the possibilities for col-
laborations within the Tog commu-
nity as it grows, is endless.
Eventually, Starck envisions that
3-D printing will expand the concept
even further
Starck called Tog "a philosophy, a
political idea" because it brings
mass production to design, which
will bring down prices.
"It's a high-tech miracle," Starck
said. "You have a guy somewhere
who will make a beautiful object,
just for you."
A temporary store was opened in
Milan this week and the first perma-
nent store will open in Sao Paolo,
with more to follow There is
also a website, wwwtogallcreators
together.com.
Architects scale down
Knoll continues its long tradition
of collaborating with architects dat-
ing from Mies Van Der Rohe's
Barcelona chair This year, it has
tapped London-based David Adjaye,
who said he was apprehensive until
"I understood that it would be an op-
portunity to express my position in
terms of materials, silhouettes and
forms."
Adjaye designed two chairs in-
tended as complementary forms, one
the skeleton and one the skin. Wash-
ington Skeleton is a solid sculpture,
a curved intersection of crisscrossing
lines, made of cast iron and either
painted or copper-plated. Washing-
ton Skin is made from nylon that
gives for a light backward bounce.
"My starting point was the idea of
a seated person, and the form of the
chair echoes this," Adjaye said. "The
pattern is then a drawing of the
forces required to brace this shape
and make it a chair It is like an
exoskeleton."
High tech, low tech
While technology remains a driv-
ing force in home furnishing inno-
vations, there were also many
simple, low-tech solutions on offer
A Dutch design team created pop-
up furniture for temporary restau-
rants or festivals a cushioned and
heated bench for two with a built-in
table that folds into a box for easy


transport. The pieces, made for side-
by-side dining or working, were
dubbed Soullmate.
Itinerant Italians often lament the
quality of espresso abroad. Bialetti,
maker of stove-top espresso ma-
chines, has one solution: a stainless
steel bottom on its traditional stove-
top espresso maker that better con-
ducts heat from electric or
ceramic-top heating elements com-
mon abroad, while retaining the alu-
minum reservoir, which best
preserves the espresso flavor
Bialetti's traditional espresso mak-
ers have been all-aluminum.


!Lou Miele Realtor
* ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU

Cell: (352) 697-1685


I Gorgeous waterfront pool home in the "Hunt
Club", 2006 built, 3/2/2 with 2,327 s.f. living
area. MLS 707324 $386,900


b tLUKUUM rUUL flUMt z.o acres!! uui
in the country, but close to everything!! I
MLS 704491 REDUCED $114,900


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
Biand New ClassA Office
E< :ecutive Office Suites
Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hwy ,Ciystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007 (727) 515-6571


a02 AMERICAN
EA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Y Office: 352-746-3600


CITRUS HILLS
Beautiful gated community of Belmont Hills.
Fabulous 3/2/2 pool home with spacious
Rooms and high ceilings. A must see!!
MLS 706313 $224,999
II ,W r.l


DUNNELLON 2006 BUILT
3BR, 2.5BA, two story country home with new
hardwood, kitchen cabinets, Corian and remodeled
baths. Beautiful. MLS 707164 $129,900


BLACK DIAMOND
RANCH
Beautiful Golf Course Lot
sitting above the road is
CITRUS SPRINGS This 4 BR home is sure to perfect for your dream home.
please. Over 2,200 sf living with loads of upgrades $89,900
like granite counters, stainless appliances,
beautiful flooring. MLS 708812 $159,900 (lot next door also available)
To. Se Viua Tor an vie AL irsCut itns ii o~ ie~


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E13


k .





E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014







Real Estate


Classifieds

ILn "-. 'J ., ,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $500 & 2/1 $550
cl 4 info 352-584-3348
DUNNELLON/488
Clean 2/1 Particiall
fenced, shed, $475/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970


lI roMfni. -


2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell

Palm Harbor Parade
of Homes!!
7 new models to view,
3 models that MUST,
must be liquidated.
Save over $26k, 4/2 in
the 70's. FREE factory
tours! plantcitv
palmharbor.com or
800-622-2832


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729
Ready to Show!
In Homosassa
2Br/1Ba 1982 Single
Wide. NO HIDDEN
FEES! 20K Includes
Delv/Set/New AC,
Heat, skirting, steps,
gutters & down spouts
1-727-967-4230
SAVE. SAVE. SAVE.
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.



**FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527



Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 352-795-1272
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on /2 acre." Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile.
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974
Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing


HOMOSASSA
2BR/2BA, Fully fur-
nished, Great Location
Drastically Reduced
(352) 746-0524

HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on /2 acre
5192 S Amanda PT
$15,000 212-2051

HOMOSASSA
Large 3BR/2BA Exc
cond, with laminate and
tile floors throughout
$650 per month or rent
to own w/ $3000 down
3394 Arundel Ter
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330

INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352) 201-7081

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807





W 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441

- 55+ Park, 2bd/lba
SW w/fireplace, new
carport and carpet-
ing, appliances incl.
as is $5,000.
352-563-0500


Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273


For Sale h,,,
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-
tivated seller will negoti-


Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
turn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105


ForSatem.
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858

Nice Older Singlewide
in Singing Forest Adult
Park, has addition
and partially furn.
Low Lot Rent
$18,300 obo
352-726-9369


WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090


-ACTION7
Fo Rent



RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
$900 & UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/ounique home/Avail. May 1
5339 S Elm Ave.
2/1 cute and cozy Avail. May 1
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959sqft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 story townhome, caal side

S650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/1.5 iB.H. 992Sqft
6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/additbn on 1.25 acre
For More Listings Go To
www.GtrusmountyHomeRentals.owm

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FLi

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you/


2/1.5/1 .........$700
2/1/1 ............$600
2/2/1 ............$900
CONDO
2/1 ................ $500
PARTS

2/2/1 ............$650


3/2/2 ...........$900
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggqqs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

Get
Results in
the

homefront
classified!











INVERNESS
2BR/1BA, lake access,
no pets, $550/mo
(352) 341-0900



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


Retil/Office'f





(S3n 637-311100




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Lovely, historic homes in
outstanding city location.
Each with lovely sprawling
porches, zoned commercial
and ready for your business!
Call today!
352-637-3800





INVERNESS
"MOVE IN READY"
June 1,2014, Lakeside
Golf Country Club,
Fully Furn. Villa ; 3/2/2
Scrnd. Solar heated
pool Clean and cozy.
Only for very serious
people $1250. mo.
1 yr or longer Call for
view: 352-726-8197


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813

HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225

INVERNESS
Waterfront Studio
$500 dep; $125/wk.
all utils. 352-364-7588


Brentwood
& Terra Vista
of Citrus Hills
Homes & Town-
homes. Furnished &
unfurnished.
Starting at $1000/
per month, social
membership
included
Six months minimum.
Terra Vista Realty
Group.Call 746-6121




BEVERLY HILLS
2 bed, 1 bath. W/D, FL
room, fresh paint, new
roof, garage, fenced
yard, no pets. $600 mo.
352-464-2845
BEVERLY HILLS
Remodeled Lrg. 2/2/2,
CH/A, FL Rm, fncd yrd,
W/D, No Pets
$750. mo 1st last, sec.,
352-726-2280
CRYSTAL MANOR
3/2/2, $850. mo.
(352) 257-8277
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 duplex, basic
water,sewer incl $495.
220-2447 or 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
2/2. House/dock on a
spring feed canal off
Halls River. Low profile
boats/kayaks only.
Fenced yard/pet ok with
first, last and security.
Available now.
$800/month. Drive by
first 8928 W. White
Dogwood then call
619-301-5442
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
Lake Front Home
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$800 (908) 322-6529


Old Homosassa
Lrg. 1/1 liv &fam rm,
scrn prch, lots of stor-
age, dock w/ access
to gulf. $750., no pets
/smoke 352-628-2261
















DEB
THOMPSON
w One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
, Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(ivahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


NEAR BOONE, NC
2+/-ac. tract 350ft of
rushing streams
3000ft elevation pri-
vate and secluded
underground utilities
and paved roads
from only $9900. Call
1-877-717-5273ext91



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.








Retire to Kentucky's
BlueGrass Country!
Enjoy maintenance
free living! BRAND
NEW LUXURY HOMES
Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA,
1,800 sf, from the
low $200's. Lowest
price per sq ft in the
area! Mild climate,
low taxes, minutes
to shopping, dining,
medical &
Keeneland Horse
Racing. Perfect for
retirement/2nd
home. Call now for
details:
877-333-2412, x 121
SugarTree
Homes.com



Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www,
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



Open House


2956 E. MARCIA ST.
Inverness
MLS # 709657
Sunday 4/27
noon-4pm
Charming A-Frame
2/2, fireplace, fish
pond,Shed,
carport, pole barn,
new roof, a/c &
septic. $130,000-
Sandra Oiler
ERA Suncoast Realty
(352) 634-0712






ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



LOANS FOR
LANDLORDS!
We Finance From
5-500 Units
As Low As 5.5 %.
1-4 Family,
Townhome,
Condos OK.
Contact B2R:
1-855-940-0227
www.B2R
Finance.com


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514




Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
3BD., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Justa Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $110,000.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
(866) 351-1234




2/2/2, w/ New roof, &
wtr. heater & tiled firs.
scr. lanai, new paint,
$78,500. 352-726-7543

For Sule,,I





Laurel Ridge on
Twisted Oaks 1st
green. 2BR/2BA with
den & screened lanai
high ceilings and
open floor plan
$125k 352-746-4880
or 330-322-0329
553 W Player Path




3/2/2 + Den On % acre,
Move in Condition!
Built in 2008
Selena Hills
$165,000.
352-341-0118





Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
BOUTIQUE
Real Estate Group
Buying or Selling?
We Tailor Our
Services.

Teri Paduano, Broker
352-341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
119 E. Dampier St.,
Inverness
TheFLDream.com

RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


OPE HOS SUDA


Nice 2BR 1BA+ side
room w/ pri. entrance
bungulow style brick
Very priv $42k Cash,
As is. (786) 301-3805


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY M







For Sale",,.*
TURN KEY
4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE, 1,200 sq ft
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


S= 11^S^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www. bettyh u nts
homes.com.


"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company+
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscritters.com










Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office














MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


OPE HOS SUDA
Ip Ip


PELICAN COVE 6060 W. CROYDEN CIRCLE, CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1. Single stand along condo unit with spectacular views! MEADOWCREST 3/2/2
It can be yours for only $170,000. (Park in guest parking) 3/2/2. Check out this steal. Home listed at $93,900
| Pl ida Re IC. Puiaoutiag Reag, IKC.
For more information, call Kristi Bortz (352) 228-9505 For more information, call Kristi Bortz (352) 228-9505


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




e


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone(tamoabav.rr.c
om
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855















Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments


14
Citrus County
Homes


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


Desperately my properties"
Need Rentals

Office Open Te3 4
7 Days a Week et

LISA I
VANDEBOE Flwh
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921


Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


Home Finder
www findeifcorn


Fiua Yi tr t)rw* Hocel
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chro nclehor 1 efnder.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014 E15


CirsCut


$100,000 + Closing
Cost wll get you this
2,100sq. ft.,
3BR 3'/2 BA Fully turn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268



Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle car towards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507



"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.,.-,,-- ...
INVERNESS HOME


.1 rrrr' Irr ml I-I ''1~ ''rr' .-r I I ,



l.' ii.ij $62000
Call Nilda Cano 352 2 70 .0202








*, I,,i :, I:1, i,,,1 : Tr ,,, i-r P i .
,'l. liiriii :l l :'1 2 b l.:.' :.iii :'2 t. ll.
*,, I :I ', :l ili llii"
S' y :J '.~ r r-- nirr lirrrrrrrui-rrl
* Lliir ,il Iii- ii viin A C

iJL .:.;::c, ASKING S49,500
Call Charles Kell\ 352 422 2387








LITTLE PRICE, BIG BARGAIN
I,, 2ir,, H ,,II,,r,: Trr'. r-l, r ii~r -









F, lrrh rh ,R, I 1l iro0 r, I nrllh ,
r i"' ii, i ,lh ir I" ri r .I,, i, r ,h, ,, Ii
rli [ I,: rr- r I, lr ,h rr- l, r- h l

1 L 7I: :::.A::6N $50,700
Ask Lor Marilyn Booth 637-4904


54 ACRE FARM WITH HUGE BARN!
IPrul,, rn I, u lur, : : l--. i,1, ., 11
L iri r-', r l i| lih r :- : itil-:


ONLY 429K
Call Quade 352-302-7699


GREAT LOT LOCATED IN PINE GROVE!
A [ -li., -, :1.ii i ,, r i, r l- n I : l Il I
Il.' : -w --I. l:I -, r-I. Hr lN- Pi, :m.. I'r.,vw -
Eirlinr.- rr I,: lI,,,,-l v r, : ,,:- I,,
: l'ii,,l| l | n .. l r, i:r~ r ni.. : ,H l': i r, :it

LISTED AT $14,900
Call Shanna Casey 352-270-1352

'r- iMEDITERRANEAN
STYLE HOME IN
TRADEWINDS
A Homosassa
River Front
Community,



.. ... I. Ii i~.
.l.l ..r :. i l:... il. H ..... : : F l. .h ,l ]l

S I I,,,[ ,,, ,
,- ,, I,,, 1 i ,, f , -, 1 ,, 1


OFFERED AT I' ,',',i r 1 : ,. i
fI,.' C iK., Oit ti 1 1J 7 jj3J5J


Ir h , ,r ,, I) , I r ll,),, ii ,,,, ), I ,,,,, I ,) ,
2 I" ,,1 .. .. .. ., ,1 , ,- :,, 1 : r ,

I .. I i p 1. 1 I II .4 N ,

ri :.i ASKING 0.i, .'.
P :le'lll|/.'.' L''.W "l A ~ "" AAAll .:I, l. I ). -.


WATERFRONT NEAR 3 SISTERS SPRINGS





S1L-7 i:i.:.Ji:'. ASKING S235000U
Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3






INVERNESS GOLF COURSE HOME
TI l: li : l., t, ISe .n .. IS uat ir. : : 2 12 1 [
roo. .ii t i,[ :' .- :'[I .. r :' :. ..,j ..1
lIr,:l~lv:',, L :'rqj I,,,: l p o , rl 1 _: [1..:
[1 I:i'. .r :', 1, [ ':[, i :'1 I. :. .11..1 :r :
.:l.:.:. [: .1L-:'. --/llll:'S139.900
Call Slelan Stuart at 352.212.0211


t 1 : I I hi Oit ,I 1,.,l

lL: ,:w.,JJ ASKING S86.900
Call Chailes Kell' 352.422.2387








IN TOWN 2,'2,1 WITH
FLA. ROOM & SCREENED PORCH

l: t, I"..: t h t I.,
:, , ,r ,,ii i ,.. , :i i i,

l L: =. h,,, ASKING S84 900
Pal Davis 3521212 7280
Vie, lisliq i, i, i c21galdaV'is coin


STONERIDGE PARK

, i. ir: *.1,1.- r ',1r 110 1


PRICED 5_ $24500
,IWlIFF Ill 1 FP IcI -el 35h'lI2 H- I'l ,II2 6 1
Willatd Picktel 352 726.6668


HEATHERWOOD
LI,',, r- : rl lh r- '1 ,r- F ,,rr-
LII li:.: i I ', c-I7 S Iw c :,,r : ,:,-
Tr rIr ro Ir: irIli r ,

,,r,,, r ,: T~i,,l,,i rl ,, ,,, P .:.r[l ,,, l
-, ll R I.Rrf,,1H rf,1,I, -,cr-i rll-r
r,1L' =-702471 $28,000
Call Jeanne Pickrel 352-212-3410


II I.,: [lir-:i 1r [I1r- [r-:r : Prop:r| r[, ir
r i7 : [rli: [i'7'1 i: 1:1 1illl 11 1111[, 1l1.1 1 1 1 : 1 ,1717 1,
I. r [i I l ,: rr, i ir,, :h [hl i, -. i ,rr [1,
t al: r S h an n a ,'a llll j ill -:[ [ll
=.1L'.'. /l:HJ.:ll $150,000
Call Shanna Casel 352 270 1352


TWO FABULOUS MOBILE HOMES IN
STONERIDGE MOBILE HOME PARK

' l.':.+ 1:| .r.ir.-r L irjr . i ir, i .. l.

I, ,[inr,: -d or I, rrh ,[ ,I I
BOTH IN 20S
Call Doris Miner 4 3527266668
or 3524224627


L.I:L,/IM I U nlUIVIl-
* ::R :'A
* Iivc-r 2000 :.. 1 r[ ,, livi i, irc- l
* Lir, v c-cr c- ikcm -r
,1L'C 7i6ti46 PRICED TO SELL S115 500
Call LaWanda Watt 352-212-1989


CITRUS HILLS *POOL HOME *GOLF COURSE
TII, -: ,:,.li I', :: I [ :1 j11 %ji I, r I,: In, il
[or c ,Ir pool r
,Ir-rl lirl[:r '"i "hr- O w l I,,i,,:,I
,*,V rl... ,,,, llll I I i | N i l Ij t i: .,llir' n:
!L, L=70' ::Nl.:: PRICED RIGHT ATS19I 900
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


1.1. :r I F>, :.l: r, : 1:1, [I ,, VV [II :'.: o1.o:1 I,,:,:
R.,..,:r E I i [i : [ I I Vi.. i, : E l|.:i I -o i ,[i ..J
or Whih..o,j [1, (I.. .tl., ., :'(r Iron, ,.mir
cq j..h I :, :'r,1i-.r, :' ,)lo lp 1[wiir[, Ili
I. il.rI r 1 :' :i ili. [II [
iJL'.. =-i,':.: ASKING S75.000
Call Jin Morton 3524222173


NEWLY RENOVATED HOME IN INVERNESS
Lim : ,i.1 :[r :'1( c1 [.i r, 1 ,11 : i ,: i
:.,, :. ih, ip.jr vi,t : -.hf [I,,i l.. ih,,:
t.,io~oh i .) l.ohh or 1.1 :'i. [..oIn : rc.).-.l
ri,:[ : l [ .: l l. i| r ,: ,: i[ :, L' u.- 1, .!',I

Call Terri SleIwart 352220 1008
or Doris Miner 3524224627


,,ir-ld orriir- hrii,, 1,r,:r rrndr I ,..
TI ,,: 'i 'l 1 :. r, | i r,:, l I, :' : (I. ,, I ,, :(




S74.900
Call me Rulh Frederick 1.352.563.6866


iI.11:11 1 ilI P illll h'llll.J 7 E: : [:'[.7 : ll'h. r
I :':Irr-lll :I ol h,:,l l r.i ,[ :' V, r, i ,h r,i,

,[J.Ih'i:'Ii::.il. 2. i:'r n :l'[7'1:.h '< I .: :'r
li rr r- l :, i r v I I [r- I I r-
,1L-.. =--,2:JC0 ASKING S264.900
Call Nancy Jenks 352.4008072


E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014