Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community


The art of bonsai is a passion
for many./HomeFront
VOL. 119 ISSUE 256


II


r


bust


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Duane and Janice Ready have only this shell of a home near Crystal River, even though they've paid Gold Crest Homes about half of
the $250,000 contract. Ready said Gold Crest stopped work on the house in January and owes him $40,000 in payments for work
not done.


Customers say Gold
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Sane Ready knew all about
SFlorida's Construction
f Robert Meisel knew
Nothing about it.
W Both Ready and Meisel
Shad one thing in common:
They trusted Michael and Kathy Gilbert,
owners of Gold Crest Homes Inc., to
build their dream retirement homes.
That trust cost both tens of thousands
of dollars.
"My wife and I are a basket of nerves
over this whole situation," Ready said.
"I was too free with the money and I un-
derstand it I guess I'm one of these old-
timers who trusts people with a
handshake."
By Ready's estimate, he's out $40,000
to the Gilberts money paid for sup-
plies and services on his $250,000 Crys-
tal River home that the Gilberts never


Crest Homes owes them


The laws in
Florida suck.
Judith Meisel
about Florida's Construction Lien Law.
delivered on.
Robert and Judith Meisel are in far
worse shape. The Cape Cod, Mass., cou-
ple estimate their losses at close to
$300,000, including paying subcontrac-
tors and suppliers nearly $80,000 to
avoid foreclosure on a $450,000 Pine
Ridge home that's 60 percent complete.
The Meisels are mad at the Gilberts -
and at the state of Florida for its lien law
that requires homeowners to pay twice if
payments to contractors are not passed
on to subcontractors and suppliers.
"The laws in Florida suck," Judi
Meisel said.
"It's certainly not a consumer-friendly
state, that's for sure," her husband


thousands of dollars
added.
Both the county and Department of
Business and Professional Regulation
(DBPR) are investigating Gold Crest
Homes in the Meisel case.
Gold Crest has apparently shuttered
the business. Its signs at the office on
Pine Ridge Boulevard were removed
last week, the company Web page was
taken down and the phone is
disconnected.
Michael Gilbert did not return phone
calls for comment
Kathy Gilbert, who opened a small
business in February, said Friday she
has no comment
MEN
Gold Crest Homes is a familiar name
in Citrus County.
The company has been around since
1992, and it built homes for years with-
out a problem.
When the Meisels met with Kathy
See BUILDER/Page A6


Veterans coalition offering help to veterans


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
Nobody understands a vet-
eran like another veteran.
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition, a nonprofit organi-
zation, exists as a group of vet-
erans who offer help to other
veterans, from providing as-
sistance ranging from a food
pantry to financial help for ed-
ucation, or "re-education."
"Our primary thing right
now is a food pantry" said Ray
Michael, CCVC chairman.
The pantry, located behind


Our primary thing right now is a
food pantry.
Ray Michael
chairman, Citrus County Veterans Coalition.


the DAV building on North
Paul Drive in Inverness, is
open to any veteran, veteran's
family or active-duty family
members.
The organization is funded
by donations and fundraisers,
such as the monthly yard sale
on the grounds at Our Lady of


Fatima Catholic Church on
U.S. 41 in Inverness on second
Saturday of the month, from
September to May
"That's our major source of
income," Michael said.
He said 30 percent of money
raised goes toward emergency
aid to veterans gas money to


get to a job, a bus ticket, rent,
the cost to put in a wheelchair
ramp or cover on a roof, etc.
"The Veterans Services Of-
fice used to call around to var-
ious veterans groups when
somebody needed help,"
Michael said. "The (veterans)
foundation organized about
the same time the coalition
did. We give the money to the
foundation and the service of-
ficer writes the checks."
About 35 percent goes to
stock the food pantry Michael


S/Page A7


School


backers


bask in


Easter


gift

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Could Lent possibly have had
more meaning than it did this
year for parents, teachers and
supporters of Pope John Paul II
Catholic School?
As Christians throughout the
world celebrate Easter today,
those associated with Citrus
County's only Catholic school
are thankful that their school
not only survived a threatened
shutdown but will thrive in
years to come.
"I feel like there was divine
intervention," said Steve
Marchigiano, one of a handful
of parents and supporters who
led the effort to convince
Bishop Robert Lynch and his
advisers that Pope John Paul II
School should continue serving
elementary and middle school
students in the county
"I really feel like God led us,"
See 1/Page A5



DEP


officials to


present

Kings


Bay plan

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) is bringing its plan to re-
store and manage the King's
Bay basin to the people.
In March, the agency an-
nounced it is working on setting
restoration goals or Total
Maximum Daily Loads
(TMDLs) for the Outstanding
Florida Water (OFW), which is
now considered impaired.
Beginning Monday, DEP offi-
cials will share information
about TDMLs and the more en-
compassing Basin Management
Action Plan (BMAP) with offi-
cials in Citrus County and so-
licit public input.
According to the DEP, the
basin management plan aims
to:
Document how the public
and other stakeholders are
See DEP/Page A5


S118411711 12 1


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword .......A16
Excursions .......A15


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers . B3


Lottery Payouts
Movies .......
Obituaries ....


I SUNDAY


.... B3
.A16
.... A8


TV Listings .
Together ...
Veterans ...


.A16
.... A20
.... A18







Two community band Robonaut finally getting legs


pertbormances slated


Special to the Chronicle
The Nature Coast Com-
munity Band, under the di-
rection of conductor Cindy
Hazzard, will present two
productions of"Romanza"
in May
The first performance is
at 2:30 p.m. Saturday,
May 3, at the Citrus
Springs Community Cen-
ter, 1570 W Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs; and
the second performance is
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 4,
at the Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W Highland
Ave., Inverness.
Narrated by Doreen
Morgan, the program high-
lights music of the Roman-
tic Era.


Also, the NCCB will pre-
miere a new composition
titled "Pictures" by NCCB
clarinetist and composer
Nancy Furman. "Pictures"
themes are taken from
Modest Moussorgsky's
"Pictures At An
Exhibition."
The 75 volunteer musi-
cians of the Nature Coast
Community Band re-
hearse weekly in Inver-
ness. For information on
performing with the band,
go to wwwnaturecoast
communityband.com or
call 352-601-7394.
All NCCB concerts are
free; the band is supported
by donations from NCCB
friends and sales of the
seven NCCB CDs.


Local & State BRIEFS

WRWSA grant applications available
The Withlacoochee Regional Water Supply Authority's
board of directors representing Citrus, Hernando, Marion
and Sumter counties will accept applications for its fiscal
year 2014-15 Local Government Grants Program, beginning
May 1.
Applications will be accepted no later than June 30, 2014,
and the program is intended to fund water conservation-re-
lated projects on a matching basis. Applications and instruc-
tions are found at www.wrwsa.org. Proposals will be con-
sidered by the board of directors at the July and August meet-
ings, and grants will be awarded at the September meeting.
The authority voted to set aside $130,000 for these grants
while voting to retain the current year per capital assessment
rate of $0.19.
The next Authority Board of Directors meeting will be at
3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 21, at the Lecanto Government
Building, Room 166, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Citrus 20/20 board to meet Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Board of Directors will meet at 4:30 p.m.,
Monday in Room 117 of the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Visit www.citrus2020.org or call 352-201-0149.
Woman killed when car crashed into home
SARASOTA- Police said a 62-year-old Sarasota woman
was killed early Saturday when another woman drove a car
into the side of her home.
Eleanor Ball was asleep when the car went through a side
wall of her home and into her bedroom.
Investigators said the car was driven by a 24-year-old
Tampa woman was driving away from police after they had
been dispatched to her ex-boyfriend's home for an alleged
break-in. Officials said Ball died at the scene.
The driver was taken to the hospital and was expected to be
booked into the Sarasota County Jail later Saturday. She faces
charges of vehicular homicide, burglary, battery, petit theft and
obstruction.
Michigan man drowns during triathlon
TAMPA-A 64-year-old Michigan man drown early Satur-
day while participating in a Pinellas County triathlon. Officials
said fellow swimmers pulled Donald Bautel from the water dur-
ing the Escape from Fort De Soto Triathlon.
Emergency responders said the man was taken to a local
hospital, where he later died. They said the drowning ap-
peared to be an accident and might have been health-related.
Fisherman report increase in big sharks
DESTIN Panhandle fisherman said they are seeing more
and more super-sized sharks in the northern Gulf this spring.
In Destin, Capt. Curt Gwin caught a 668-pound mako shark
on April 10. On April 2, two men from Milton caught an 11-foot,
805-pound short fin mako. That shark could set a world record.
Okaloosa County commissioner and boat captain Kelly
Windes told The Northwest Florida Daily News that this spring
has seen an unusual number of really big sharks.
Earlier this month, another man caught a 720-pound mako
shark off the waters of Destin.
Experts said part of the reason fisherman are seeing the big
sharks now is the eastward cobia migration. Most of the fisher-
man were targeting the cobia when they snagged the big sharks.
Farm allows families to rent chicks
CANAVERAL GROVES One Canaveral Groves farm is
allowing families to enjoy baby Easter chicks without commit-
ting to their long-term care.
For $25 Hise Farms will rent a pair of fluffy chicks along with
2 pounds of feed, a cardboard coop and the care instructions
for two weeks.
After two weeks, renters must return the birds to the farm.
Farm owner Mary Hise said the chicks grow a lot in two
weeks, and the rental program is a fun and educational way
for kids to experience nature. -From staff and wire reports

EdI I I NA II [
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Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL Robonaut,
the first out-of-this-world hu-
manoid, is finally getting its space
legs.
For three years, Robonaut has
had to manage from the waist up.
This new pair of legs means the ex-
perimental robot now stuck on a
pedestal is going mobile at the
International Space Station.
"Legs are going to really kind of
open up the robot's horizons," said
Robert Ambrose from NASAs John-
son Space Center in Houston.
It's the next big step in NASAs
quest to develop robotic helpers for
astronauts. With legs, the 8-foot
Robonaut will be able to climb
throughout the 260-mile-high out-
post, performing mundane cleaning
chores and fetching things for the
human crew
The robot's gangly, contortionist-
bending legs are packed aboard a
SpaceX supply ship that launched
Friday, more than a month late. It
was the private company's fourth
shipment to the space station for
NASA and is due to arrive Easter


Associated Press
The Robonaut has legs Nov. 13,
2013, at a lab in Houston. Each leg
- 4 feet, 8 inches long when
straight has seven joints. Instead
of feet, there are grippers. Each
gripper, or foot, has a light, camera
and sensor for building 3-D maps.
Sunday morning.
Robonaut 2 R2 for short has
been counting down the days.


"Legs are on the way!" read a mes-
sage Friday on its Twitter account,
@AstroRobonaut (OK, so it's actually
a Johnson Space Center spokesman
who's doing the tweeting.)
Space Exploration Technologies
Corp.'s unmanned capsule, Dragon,
holds about 2 tons of space station
supplies and experiments, Robo-
naut's legs included.
Until a battery backpack arrives
on another supply ship later this
year, the multimillion-dollar robot
will need a power extension cord to
stretch its legs, limiting its testing
area to the U.S. side of the space
station. Testing should start in a few
months.
Each leg 4 feet, 8 inches long -
has seven joints. Instead of feet, there
are grippers, each with a light, cam-
era and sensor for building 3-D maps.
"Imagine monkey feet with eyes
in the palm of each foot," Ambrose
said.
NASA engineers based the de-
sign on the tether attachments used
by spacewalking astronauts. The
legs cost $6 million to develop and
another $8 million to build and cer-
tify for flight.


WELCOME BACK,

SNOWBIRDS!


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A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


LOCAL/STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Page A3-SUNDAY, APRIL 20,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Fire destroys
Crystal River home
CRYSTAL RIVER--Afire
razed a Crystal River home
early Saturday, according to
the Citrus County Sheriffs
Office Fire Rescue Division.
Fire rescue units re-
sponded to the call at 1865
N. Ambrose Point at
4:28 a.m. and found a sin-
glewide mobile home on fire.
Reportedly, the occupant
arrived on scene and ad-
vised the home was not oc-
cupied except for six dogs.
No animals were found on
scene alive during fire
ground operations.
The occupant said she
had left for work at 8 p.m.
Friday and had left two
lights on in the home. She
also said her gas stove was
clicking on and off for the
last several days, according
to the incident report.
The cause of the fire re-
mains under investigation.
The structure and contents
were destroyed.
Light Shine program
to be on barge canal
Steven Noll and David
Tegeder will offer insight into
the long and convoluted his-
tory of the attempt to build the
Cross Florida Barge Canal
from the Atlantic to the Gulf of
Mexico at 4 p.m. Sunday April
27, at Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto.
Noll and Tegeder teach in
the history department at
the University of Florida and
are co-authors of "Ditch of
Dreams: The Cross Florida
Barge Canal and the Strug-
gle for Florida's Future."
The program is part of
the Light Shine humanities
program sponsored by
Shepherd of the Hills Epis-
copal Church, the Florida
Humanities Council and the
Citrus County Chronicle.
The church is at 2540 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto. Admission is free.
Open seating, but limited to
the first 200 people.

The Campaign
TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, can-
didate appearances and the
like for this year's political
campaign. Send informa-
tion to mwright@chronicle
online.com.
Les Cook, Republican
for property appraiser, will
greet the public from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday, April 24, at
Natalia's Pizza and Pasta
on State Road 44 in Crystal
River, across from Tire
Kingdom; and from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday, May 15, at
the Deco Cafe in downtown
Inverness.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission District 2,
will greet the public from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
April 26, near the old Sears
store in the Crystal River Mall.
Information: 352-257-5381.
Linda Powers, incum-
bent for school board Dis-
trict 5, will have a fundraiser
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
May 3, at Mama's Kuntry
Kafe on S.R. 44 across
from Whispering Pines Park
in Inverness. Information:
Judy, 352-726-3583 or
Mary-Ann, 352-726-0040.
The Citrus County
Chronicle will have its pri-
mary forum at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day. Aug. 14, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in Inver-
ness. The Chronicle's gen-
eral election forum is at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at
the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will have a
forum for county commis-
sion candidates at 6 p.m.


Thursday, June 12, at the
College of Central Florida.
The Citrus Hills CivicAs-
sodiation will have a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
-From staff reports


Marine Science Station hosting camps


ion counties. Camp Citrus is
sponsored in part by the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District
Students will explore
springs, rivers, estuaries
and the Gulf of Mexico
aboard Marine Science
Station boats with certified


Chronicle

The Citrus County School
District's Marine Science
Station in Crystal River is
hosting weeklong summer
camps for middle school
and high school students in
Citrus, Hernando and Mar-


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Pink. Purple. Green. Blue.
All sorts of decorated Easter eggs dyed
the Nature Coast rainbow colors Saturday
for thousands of children, despite light
sprinkles of rain.
Hundreds of children began their morn-


RIGHT: One-year-old Aubrey
Learn of Homosassa puts
another Easter egg in her
basket Saturday at the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park.

FAR RIGHT: Eleven-year-old
Amber Morton of Crystal River
heads back to the surface after
retrieving some Easter eggs
from the bottom of the Bicen-
tennial Park pool in Crystal
River.



Photos by
Stephen E. Lasko
For the Chronicle


teachers and boat captains.
Students lodge overnight
and eat meals at the Ma-
rine Science Station during
the entire week of Camp
Citrus. Students are super-
vised 24 hours per day by
certified teachers and staff
in a safe and secure


environment
The dates for middle
school Camp Citrus are
June 9 through 13 and
June 23 through 27.
The dates for high
school Camp Citrus are
June 16 through 20.
The cost per student is


$249. The deadline for ap-
plications is May 9. Need-
based, partial scholarships
may be available for stu-
dents who qualify
To apply, go to www.
citrus.kl2.fl.us/mss, or call
the Marine Science Sta-
tion at 352-795-4393.


Two hours later, children put on their
bathing suits for a splashing-good time at
the sixth annual Underwater Egg Hunt at
the Bicentennial Park pool in Crystal
River It included activities such as face
painting and visits with the Easter Bunny
Then the children found their way inside
the pool for an opportunity to collect the
most bobbing and floating Easter eggs.


ing at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park in Homosassa as the
Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park
hosted their annual Easter Egg Hunt and
Earth Day events. Thousands of eggs were
scattered throughout grass behind the park's
Visitors Center Children visited with the
Easter Bunny and other costumed charac-
ters prior to the hunt


Apply now for fire assessment hardship assistance County BRIEF


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County has created a Hard-
ship Assistance Program to assist
residential property owners, who
meet eligibility criteria, with the fi-
nancial burden created by the im-
position of the Municipal Services
Benefit Unit for the Fire Protection
Assessment that was approved on
July 23, 2013.
Applications will not be accepted
after the close of business on Thurs-
day, May 1. Applications can be sub-
mitted to Citrus County Housing
Services and a determination will
be based upon the provided infor-
mation. If deemed qualified for the
hardship assistance, the county
shall pay the Fire Protection As-
sessment imposed on the qualified
homesteaded property.
The following qualifications must
be met to be considered eligible for
hardship assistance:
Applicant must be the owner of
the residential property and be
granted homestead exemption.
The total household income of


INFORMATION
CALL: 352-527-7520

all lawful occupants of the property
shall be less than or equal to 30 per-
cent of the current income limits es-
tablished by the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development
(HUD), as adjusted for family size
(income limits are listed on
application).
The applicant shall have the
present intent to maintain the resi-
dential property as their permanent
residence through the remainder of
the fiscal year
Prior to May 1 each year, the ap-
plicant shall file with Citrus County
Housing Services an application
and all supporting documentation to
be considered for eligibility
Applications submitted without
complete and proper documenta-
tion will be disqualified and denied.
Applications and supporting doc-
umentation must be submitted in
person or by mail. No applications


submitted by email will be consid-
ered. Supporting documentation for
all occupants of the property from
all sources is required and exam-
ples of documentation are included
on the application. Copies of origi-
nals are encouraged and accepted.
No documents will be returned. The
property owner must be able to pro-
vide the Tax Parcel ID number
when completing the application
and signature is required.
The application form is available
at Citrus County Housing Services,
Lecanto Government Building, Cit-
rus County Courthouse Administra-
tion Office (second floor), the
Property Appraiser's Office, the Tax
Collector's Office and on the follow-
ing websites: www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
and www.sheriffcitrus.org.
Send completed application to-
gether with supporting documenta-
tion to: Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners; Attn: Hous-
ing Services; 2804 W Marc Knighton
Court 12; Lecanto, FL 34461.
For questions, call Citrus County
Housing Services at 352-527-7520.


CRHS schedules
performance, exhibit
Young musical theater
students are taking the
stage at 8 p.m. Thursday,
April 24, and 7 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, April 25 and
26, at Crystal River High
School's cafeteria, 3195
Crystal River High Drive,
Crystal River.
They are presenting
"Working," a musical that
celebrates everyday people
in the workforce. It is based
on the book by Pulitzer
Prize-winning author Studs
Terkel.
The school's art depart-
ment will also host an art
show.
Tickets are $8 in ad-
vance and $12 at the door.
For more information or
to purchase a ticket, call the
choral department at 352-
795-4641.
-From staff reports


THE HUNT BEGINS


~2- -
- -


It was one ... two ... three ... Go! as the sixth annual Underwater Easter Egg Hunt got under way Saturday at Bicentennial Park pool


It was one ... two ... three ... Go! as the sixth annual Underwater Easter Egg Hunt got under way Saturday at Bicentennial Park pool
in Crystal River.

Children scramble for eggs during annual Easter tradition




A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Stubbornness will be your
downfall. Keep an open mind and an
optimistic outlook as you face the year
ahead. Enthusiastically and graciously
accept any help that is offered. Being
open to new methods and ideas will
help you to move forward.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't let
personal problems override your pro-
fessional responsibilities. You have to
carry your share of the work. Relation-
ship complications will have to be dealt
with after hours.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- You will
face financial woes if you take a risk.
Don't be shy about your desire to ad-
vance professionally You are likely to
improve your job prospects by net-
working with peers.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) There
may be a lot of items on your most-
wanted list, but you must be sensible.
You can avoid a major argument with a
loved one by curbing your spending.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If your cur-
rent relationship is unsatisfying, you
should make a clean break and move
on. It's not fair to either party if there is
no commitment on your part.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Try your
best to get along with your co-workers.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't
spend money on others just to win ap-
proval. Focus on self-improvement
projects that boost your esteem, and
the people you are trying to impress
will respond to your relaxed and self-
confident attitude.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Anger is
self-destructive, so use up negative
energy by doing some work around the
house.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Look
before you leap into a new job or part-
nership. You may have been sold
something that doesn't really exist.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
are caring and helpful, but please re-
sist the urge to do too much for others.
They will come to expect it, and you
will burn yourself out.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Give
your friends and family some breathing
room. Make a point of getting out and
meeting new people.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you
do your job to the best of your ability,
you will be able to dispel any negative
rumors in the workplace.
Aries (March 21-April 19) In your
race to beat the opposition, you may be
letting your personal responsibilities slide.


ENTERTAINMENT


Chris Brown trial set
to start on Monday
WASHINGTON -Ajudge has
set Monday as the start date for the
assault trial of singer Chris Brown
in the nation's capital.
During a brief court appear-
ance Friday in which he wore a
suit and tie, Brown turned to
wave and salute supporters in
the courtroom including his
mother and the rapper Bow
Wow.
The case that begins Monday
is significant for the Grammy
winner not only because he
faces up to six months in jail, but
also because if convicted he
could face additional penalties,
including jail time, as a result of
an earlier case from California.
At the time he was arrested in
Washington, Brown was on pro-
bation in Los Angeles for an at-
tack on his then-girlfriend, the
singer Rihanna, in 2009.
Brown entered anger man-
agement rehab at a California
facility shortly after his Washing-
ton arrest, but he was dismissed
from it in mid-March for violating
its rules. He was then jailed and
has been in custody since.
Besides giving Brown a trial
date Friday, D.C. Superior Court
Judge Patricia Wynn had been
expected to rule in the assault
trial of Brown's bodyguard,
Christopher Hollosy. But Wynn
delayed giving her verdict, say-
ing she needed more time be-
fore ruling. That is expected
Monday, followed by the start of
Brown's trial.
Both Brown and Hollosy are
facing a misdemeanor assault
charge in the same October skir-
mish in which a Maryland man
accused them of punching him
outside a Washington hotel.
Hollosy told police he
punched 20-year-old Parker
Adams after the man tried to get


Associated Press
The assault trial for singer Chris Brown starts Monday in the
nation's capital.


on Brown's tour bus. Adams told
police a different story. He said
Brown and later Hollosy
punched him after he tried to get
in a photo the singer was taking
and the men exchanged words.
Brown has denied hitting Adams.
White House on
petition to deport
Bieber: No comment
WASHINGTON -The White
House has two words for those
who want President Barack
Obama to deport Justin Bieber:
No comment.
Nearly 275,000 people signed
an Internet petition calling the
Canadian-born teen idol reck-
less and asking Obama to re-
voke his green card. That's far
more than required to merit an
official response through the
White House's "We the People"
program.
The White House said it's sorry
to disappoint, but it won't be com-
menting. It's citing a caveat that lets
the White House decline to ad-
dress certain petitions.


Carriage horse
foes picket Liam
Neeson's NYC home
NEWYORK-Animal rights ac-
tivists protesting outside Liam Nee-
son's home said they don't agree
with him that New York's carriage
horses should keep working.
Neeson didn't appear Satur-
day as about 50 demonstrators
filled the sidewalk in front of his
Manhattan apartment building.
They held signs with such slo-
gans as: "Liam Neeson: Stop
Supporting Cruelty!"
The 61-year-old actor is a
vocal supporter of the city's car-
riage horse industry. His publicist
hasn't immediately responded to
a request for comment.
Mayor Bill de Blasio has
pledged to ban the horse-drawn car-
riages and replace them with electric
vintage-style cars, commissioned by
a group called NYCLASS.
Its members joined protesters
from People for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals on Saturday.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Easter Sunday, April 20,
the 110th day of 2014. There are
255 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 20, 1914, the Ludlow
Massacre took place when the Col-
orado National Guard opened fire
on a tent colony of striking miners;
about 20 (accounts vary) strikers,
women and children died in the
gunfire or were smothered by
smoke from the burning tents.
On this date:
In 1792, France declared war on
Austria, marking the start of the
French Revolutionary Wars.
In 1999, the Columbine High
School massacre took place in Col-
orado as two students, Eric Harris
and Dylan Klebold, shot and killed
12 classmates and one teacher be-
fore taking their own lives.
In 2010, an explosion on the
Deepwater Horizon oil platform,
leased by BP, killed 11 workers and
began spewing an estimated 200
million gallons of crude into the Gulf
of Mexico for nearly three months.
Ten years ago: A tornado tore
through north-central Illinois, killing
eight people.
Five years ago: Medical student
Philip Markoff was arrested in the
death of Julissa Brisman, a
masseuse he'd met through
Craigslist and whose body was
found in a Boston hotel. (Markoff,
who also was accused of robbing
two other women, took his own life
while in jail in August 2010 as he
awaited trial in Brisman's death.)
One year ago: A magnitude 7
earthquake struck the steep hills of
China's southwestern Sichuan
province, leaving nearly 200 people
dead.
Today's Birthdays: Retired
Supreme Court Justice John Paul
Stevens is 94. Actor George Takei
is 77. Rock musician Craig Frost
(Grand Funk; Bob Seger's Silver
Bullet Band) is 66. Actress Jessica
Lange is 65.
Thought for Today: "History is
the autobiography of a madman."
-Alexander Herzen, Russian au-
thor (1812-1870).


169162 trace 1 LU/fu 0 u.u-
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y
v-)%^ TODAY TOMOOW MORNING
J^;' High. 741 Low: 521
i; "Partly cloudy, less wind

I MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High:76 Low:55*
SMostly sunny
?-W. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
.. High: 80 Low-.58'

Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 71/65
Record /48
Normal 82/64
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean 1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday Trace
Total for the month 0.88"
Total for the year 10.78"
Normal for the year 9.44'
'As ol 7 pm a It wrne a
UV INDEX: 13
0-2minimal,3-41ow 5-6moaerale.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. %
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, bayberry, grasses
Today's count: 8.2/12
Monday's count: 8.0
Tuesday's count: 7.3
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 27
Pollutant: Ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES 2S
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) AFTERNOON.
04/20 SUNDAY 23:28 04:27 10:27 16:58
04/21 MONDAY 00:22 05:24 11:29 17:54
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SIUel JTWUB ............... 7:58 pDm.
Sam MMNT657aM
S% 8 1 ----------------.............. .6:57 &. m .
4 McO OCNRIS TODAY 1227 a rm
Apr22 Apr29 May 6 May 14 MQQM.liy- -............-..1:26a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire DmmnW Rating is LOW. There Is no110 bum ban.
For mote Informaion call Florda Divsaon of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
Information on drought oondlions, please vistt he Davsion o f Forestry's Web site:
http: flarnme-tfl- WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei on Wednes'da artor Sahray
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irigalion of rnon-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardere, Iowers anid shbs, can be done on any cday and at any
lime-
Citrus County Utilities' acstomers shoum CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Scpre re, pLantaiv;r may quaityr lor awil.in I1
walering allowances,
To report violations. please call: C ol Invemess @ 352-726-2321, .ty Co C vstal
River 3,52 795-421 ef = 3 13 unrncoorpre'r C lns CouInty 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
CHy High Low
Chassahowltzka" 158a.m, 0.2 It 7:39a.m. 0.1 f1 3.4B p.mO12 f,
CryslalRiver 10:20arm. 1.64t, 10-05pm, 22t. 4:31 a.m. 0.1 ft 4;06p,mO.9f,
Wilhlacoochee 7;35 am, 27T, 6:14p.m. 3.2ft, 1:41 a.m. -0,1tt 1l6p,..f,
Homosassa'* 11:14a.m, 0.S6It. 10:14p.m, 1-4ft. 43a.m. 0,2ft 4:09p.mO.3 It,


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Today: North winds around 7-14
knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and
inland waters a light chop. Tonight:
North winds 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters a
moderate chop.


Gulf water
temperature


71
Taken at Ariptka


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 2913 29.06 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.57 38.55 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.76 39.76 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.42 40.40 42.20
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage lor t akes are based on 2.33-year wIood.
the mean-annual iVi,1 ih.th ha,. N 41 "Tnr chs? of Lpfinq Nuajat1 dor e,.:eeded.J in
any one year. "I.sI,,la . ,*'a.rwl I'.7.n 11w5 o.j, .T T FcIdIJWa.,i M r,3.a Treni OLu,,1
and is sutact oa reston In no m vent w the Distr or fte Unrted Stals Geos a Survey
bE ialye NAy aT' iaqL. CHJI .1 of m sf iof m ata. If you have ay questions you
sne-v.,.n[,HE NATe 3LON D ivi it 0-xZ i6 7211

THE NATION


0 \


1r402


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanla
AlaNl,,: Civl
Auslin
Batibmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Bosloi
Buffalo
auflngton, VT
Charlston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charotle
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concod. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
ODalrot
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harisburg
Hartloni
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT
H L Pcp. H
81 34 62
6fl 48 74
55 46 .81 66
63 51 .60 69
68 34 58
78 54 78
68 39 62
65 35 67
77 52 01 75
55 43 ,01 65
63 37 48
52 33 68
51 42 .09 59
63 59 2-71 68
71 45 78
52 47 1.7267
66 37 73
70 47 74
52 38 68
77 48 77
67 47 74
58 27 59
79 55 77
67 47 69
78 49 76
56 35 69
76 53 .45 81
77 51 77
64 37 64
65 34 61
80 55 81
68 41 74
B2 64 90
77 51 80
72 57 77
75 49 81
79 51 80
52 34 67
67 42 70
79 52 .01 75
77 58 .10 75
78 48 77


SUN
L Fcst
37 pc
49 pc
41 pc
49 pc
36 pc
63 pc
39 pc
38 pc
52 pc
43 s
37 s
43 pc
4O pc
49 sh
48 S
44 pc
54 pc
52 pc
49 pc
57 pc
50 pc
29 pc
63 ts
43 pc
56ts
SO pc
59 pc
52 pc
34 pc
35 s
65 1
53 pc
67 pc
59 pc
58 f
54 pc
60 pc
50 pc
50 pc
54 pc
53 pc
54 pc


SAT SUN
City H L Pcp. H LFcst
NewOrfeans 77 55 80 60 pC
NewYorkCity 68 41 61 41 s
Nodiolk 51 48 10 60 45 pc
Oklahoma Citly 80 47 75 59 is
Omaha 80 53 76 54 ts
Palm Spngs 91 63 92 68 pc
PhiladelpNia 68 42 65 40 pc
Phoenix 89 63 93 68 s
Ptlsburgh 64 44 71 44 pc
Portland, ME 58 31 51 35 pc
Porrland. OR 57 42 .07 67 48 1
Providence, l 65 36 55 35 s
Releigh 52 46 74 64 42 pc
Rapid City 60 39 73 40 pc
Reno 75 46 74 40 pc
Rochesler. NY 50 34 68 43 pc
SactamenIo 75 50 85 50 pc
Salt Lake City 71 46 69 46 pc
SanAntonio 81 55 78 64 pc
SanDiego 70 62 66 59 pc
San Francisco 63 52 64 50 pc
Savannah 64 58 1,3970 50 sh
Seattle 52 42 .38 62 45 pc
Spokane 63 33 58 39 pc
St. Louis 76 48 78 56 pc
St Ste Mane 42 24 47 35 r
Syracuse 53 36 .02 67 38 pc
Topeka 79 48 78 59 Is
Washington 71 47 63 43 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
OHI 91 ,lerrma., Caml
LOW 16, Santey,. Idaho
WORLD cmEs


SUN
CITY HL/SKY
Acaputco 8978s
Amsterdam 60144/pc
Athens 66153/pc
Beijing 62/42/r
Berlin 69501S
Bermuda 73/69/cd


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c cloudy; drCizde- Cairo 82W601pc
Wolinr; hrlmz .pc.ptly Cloudy; r rin; Calgary 5135/l
rsmlrvmsnow mix; 'sumy dshshowewi Havana 87G66s
si-smow tsrusndemtolre w9wfft Hong Kong 80/75/s
WIS @S14 BJerusalem 91s/pc


Lisbon 64/5B/cd
London 55/4s
MaOrid 78/5OWc
Mexico Cliy7/6Owpc
Montreal 50/28is
Moscow 64/4 /s
Paris 57/44/pc
Rio 84*71Is
Rome 62.J46
Sydney 69/51'pc
Tokyo 5./53/pc
Toronio 4W35/s
Warsaw 69148/s


1,LEGAL NOTICES





Bid Notices....................D8


Meeting Notices............D8


Lien Notices..................D8



I CITRUS.- C COUNTY T Y



CHRpNICLE
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City


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L Pcast City


Daytona Bch. 75
Fort Lauderdale 80
Fort Myers 83
Gainesville 76
Homestead 80
Jacksonville 72
Key West 81
Lakeland 82
Melbourne 79




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCHOOL
Continued from Page Al

Marchigiano added. "This
is our Lenten commit-
ment. In my heart of hearts
I know God was with us."
It was only a few days
after Ash Wednesday
when the Diocese of St. Pe-
tersburg announced it
would close Pope John
Paul II Catholic School at
the end of this school year
because of low enrollment
and costly repairs.
Stunned parents, teach-
ers and students pleaded
with Bishop Lynch to save
the school.
At a community meeting
a few days later, the bishop
was blunt: "The school's
been on life support for a
long time, and I've been
administering the IV"
He provided an opening,
though: He gave the school
until April 15 to submit a
plan that would increase
enrollment, make neces-
sary repairs and establish
a long-term fundraising
strategy that would signifi-
cantly lower the annual
subsidy the diocese pro-
vides the school.
Marchigiano, whose wife
teaches at Pope John Paul,
joined together with Jen-
nifer Petrella, Bill Grant,



DEP
Continued from PageAl

encouraged to participate
or participated in develop-
ing the BMAP
Equitably allocate pol-
lutant reductions in the
basin.
Identify the mecha-
nisms by which potential
future increases in pollu-
tant loading will be
addressed.
Document manage-
ment actions/projects to
achieve the TMDLs.
Document the imple-
mentation schedule, fund-
ing, responsibilities and
milestones.
Identify monitoring,
evaluation and a reporting
strategy to evaluate reason-
able progress over time.
Agency officials are ex-
pected to make presenta-


Frank Colitz and others to
develop a plan to meet the
bishop's expectations.
"It was just a matter of
understanding what their
needs were," Marchigiano
said. "It's all about
communicating."
Colitz learned that the
repairs the diocese
thought were necessary -
roof, boiler and air condi-
tioning weren't that bad
after all. The bishop's
$300,000 estimate was
much higher than what
was actually needed.
Marchigiano, treasurer
with the Knights of Colum-
bus Council 14485, helped
raise funds from the
Knights and others who
wanted to support the
school.
The diocese committed
$1.5 million over the next
five years, or about $300,000
annually Two years ago, the
diocese subsidy was
$525,000; this year and next
year, it's $465,000, Marchi-
giano said, and it will con-
tinue to drop annually
School supporters hope
to offset that drop in subsidy
with a significant increase
in enrollment With a sud-
den push in marketing, the
school is close to meeting
the bishop's enrollment
goal of 180 students next
year, Petrella said.
Petrella and Marchi-

tions at 6:30 p.m. Monday
at Crystal River City Hall
at a workshop; on Tuesday
during the Board of
County Commissioners
meeting; and at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, again at Crys-
tal River City Hall, for
public input.
The public input session
will begin with a presenta-
tion about "King's Bay's
Status and Trends" by
Chris Anatasiou, the
springs restoration team
leader with the Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District. Then,
Kristina Bridger of DEP
will present a review of
TMDLs and a questions
session will follow Follow-
ing that questions session,
Terry Hansen, also of DEP,
will share the BMAP
process and another ques-
tions session will ensue.
King's Bay's spring sys-
tems was one of three re-


e-r -


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Nine-year-old Ali Joseph of Crystal River and a host of
protesting parishioners gather March 9 outside Pope John
Paul II Catholic Church before Mass to show their
concern about the closing of their school in Lecanto.


giano said programs are in
place to provide scholar-
ships to needy families so
their children can attend
Pope John Paul II school.
"We will make Catholic
education affordable to
any child who wants it,"
Marchigiano said.
School supporters such
as fourth-grade teacher
Mary Ann Camisa say the
initial crisis has turned

cent additions to a list of
impaired water bodies tar-
geted by DEP's proposed
water quality restoration
goals.
According to DEP, King's
Bay's restoration goals will
focus on total nitrogen and
total phosphorus levels,
while the targets for the
springs address nitrate
and phosphate.
The proposed restora-
tion goals for King's Bay,
along with those being
proposed for Weeki
Wachee and Volusia Blue,
will bring the total number
of springs within water
bodies that have an
adopted or proposed
restoration goal to 345, ac-
cording to DEP
Another 37 springs in
other bodies of water are
expected to be covered by
a restoration goal by the
end of 2014.
King's Bay water quality


into a golden opportunity
for the school.
"It didn't start out good,
but the publicity we re-
ceived from it, we have
loads of people looking at
our school right now," said
Camisa, who has taught
22 years at Pope John Paul
II school. "We are headed
in the right direction. I
cannot tell you how happy
I am."

levels are considered im-
paired based on pollutants
present.
According to DEP, "Water
bodies that do not meet
water quality standards are
identified as "impaired"
for the particular pollu-
tants of concern-nutri-
ents, bacteria, mercury etc.
- and TMDLs must be de-
veloped, adopted and im-
plemented for those
pollutants to reduce pollu-
tants and clean up the
water body"
According to 2012 data
from the water district, at
King's Bay's Hunter Springs
and Magnolia Springs ni-
trate readings were 0.62
and 0.59 mg/l, respectively
The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency nitrate thresh-
old is 0.35 mg/l.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


*onayAprl2121


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 AS




A6SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 LOCAL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Robert and Judi Meisel of Cape Cod, Mass., paid Gold Crest more than $400,000 on their house, which
has sat incomplete for nearly two years. The Meisels also paid about $79,000 in liens to avoid
foreclosure because Gold Crest did not pay subcontractors and suppliers.


BUILDER
Continued from Page Al

Gilbert, who then was Kathy
Foulkes, at the Gold Crest office
about six years ago, they were
impressed.
The Meisels, visiting relatives
in Largo, were preparing for
their eventual retirement and
move to Florida. Mrs. Meisel vis-
ited Gold Crest again in spring
2011 and promised to return in
the fall with her husband to sign
a construction contract.
What the Meisels didn't know,
however, was that Gold Crest
had changed hands between
their first and second visit.
State records show the
Gilberts purchased the company
in May 2010 from Greg Conard.
They started slow, building a
screen room for one customer
and a handicap ramp for another
The Meisels were the new
Gold Crest's first big customer, in
September 2011 a $450,000
contract on a 3,500-square-foot
house and garage in Pine Ridge.
Despite the contract's size, the
Meisels neither hired a lawyer
to review the contract nor went
through a bank to handle the


construction draws.
"We thought we'd be saving
money by not paying interest,"
Mrs. Meisel said.
That decision would cost them
dearly, they acknowledge.
The Meisels said they do not
recall reading anything about
the state's lien law, which holds
homeowners ultimately respon-
sible for paying subcontractors
and suppliers, even if they've al-
ready paid the contractor for
those services.
The state requires contractors
to include a lien law warning on
the first page of the contract,
which Gold Crest did. And the
county sends out lien law warn-
ings to customers with notices of
commencement.
Like most construction con-
tracts, the Meisels had a sched-
ule of payments to correspond
with activity on the project. The
down payment was $8,982, plus
$25,329 in "start" funds. After
that the draw schedule required
individual payments of $89,823
after completion of the roof, dry-
wall and cabinets, plus the clos-
ing costs.
A bank normally would re-
quire a contractor to show proof
of payments to subcontractors
and suppliers before releasing


scheduled draw payments. The
Meisels, paying from their own
pocket did not do that.
Robert Meisel said the
Gilberts sent them photos show-
ing progress in the construction.
The progress slowed and the
Meisels traveled to Florida to
find out why work was not being
done on the house despite their
payments.
Meisel said Michael and
Kathy Gilbert were frank.
"They told us straight out they
were in financial disorder and
were trying to catch up," he said.
"She admitted to us they made
big financial mistakes. 'We just
can't catch up,' is how she put it."
Meisel said the Gilberts prom-
ised to refund the money paid
for work that hadn't yet begun.
Then in spring 2012, the
Meisels started receiving lien no-
tices at home from subcontrac-
tors and suppliers demanding
payment. When the companies
began threatening to sue for fore-
closure to receive payment, the
Meisels hired an attorney and
paid off a dozen lien-holders -
about $78,000 total.
They traveled to Florida again
and confronted the Gilberts.
"We told them right out we'd
go to the DBPR," Meisel said.


CONSTRUCTION LIEN LAW IN FLORIDA
* Florida's Construction Lien Law (Chapter 713, Florida
Statutes) is confusing to anyone having a new home built.
Basically, it places the burden on property owners to ensure
payments are made to subcontractors and building suppliers,
even though the property owner has already paid the
contractor for those services. Here's how it could work:
1. Property owner hires contractor to build home. The contractor
then hires subcontractors to perform specific work, such as
pouring the foundation, installing cabinets and plumbing.
2. Contractor files a notice of commencement, which is recorded
with the clerk of court and posted at the job site.
3. Property owner pays contractor over a series of scheduled
draws, each draw coinciding with work progress on the home.
4. If contractor pays suppliers and subcontractors, all is well.
5. If contractor does not make those payments, the subs and
suppliers will send notices to property owners that they have
not been paid and put the property owner on notice that a lien
may follow if there is no payment.
6. If no payment, subcontractor or supplier may file a lien
against the property with the clerk of court for the amount
owed. The lien is valid for one year. The only way for a
subcontractor or supplier to force collection on the lien is to
file a foreclosure lawsuit on the property owner.
7. To avoid foreclosure, and if the contractor has ignored
numerous requests for payment, the property owner pays the
subcontractor or supplier. Because the property owner already
paid the contractor and the contractor did not pay the
supplier or subcontractor the property owner has now paid
twice for the same service.
* Here are some tips to avoid that nightmare:
* Have a lawyer look over the contract.
* Pay attention to the notices on the contract and notice of
commencement. They inform property owners of the lien law,
especially the vital part about their responsibility in paying
subcontractors and suppliers.
* Use a bank to make the draw payments. Banks usually require
builders to prove that subcontractors and suppliers are paid
before they release money to the builder. Even if you have the
cash available for a new home, go through a bank anyway for
added protection.
* If you don't want to use a bank, make sure you receive in
writing notices from the contractor that he has made the
necessary payments before you release the draw payment.
* If you receive a lien, make sure the company has followed the
lien law. Chapter 713 spells out exactly how and when a lien
should be filed.
Sources: Florida Statutes; Citrus County Code Compliance


"They said, 'do that and we'll file
for bankruptcy so you'll never
get anything out of us."'
The Meisels said they've paid
the Gilberts $404,000 every-
thing but closing costs on a
house they estimate is 60 per-
cent complete. The house hasn't
been touched in nearly two
years and the Meisels said they
can't afford to finish it.
They filed formal complaints
with the county's Code Compli-
ance Division and the state
DBPR. The county can revoke
Michael Gilbert's permit-pulling
privileges and the state can re-
voke his license and fine him.
"We don't want anyone to suf-
fer like we have," Meisel said.


MEN
The county is preparing a case
against Michael Gilbert and
Gold Crest Homes in the
Meisels' case. A draft complaint
suggests a hearing officer should
suspend or revoke his ability to
obtain a building permit.
"The respondent committed
mismanagement or misconduct
in the practice of contracting
and caused financial harm to a
customer," the complaint reads.
A similar complaint is being
investigated by the DBPR,
which has the authority to sus-
pend or revoke Gilbert's con-
tractor's license.
See Page A7


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MAnTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Gold Crest Homes office is vacated and its sign was removed last week. The
owners, Michael and Kathy Gilbert, would not comment on questions about owing
customers tens of thousands of dollars.


BUST
Continued from PageA6

Beyond that, though,
cases like the Meisels and
Readys are primarily a
civil, not criminal, matter
Kimberly Corbin, who
heads the county's Code
Compliance Division and
formerly investigated con-
tractor complaints for the
county, said contractors
get in financial trouble
when they begin taking
funds from one customer
to pay bills on another cus-
tomer's home.
She said customers
should have an attorney
read the contract and use
banks, because they will
usually make sure the con-
tractor has paid their bills
before releasing contract
payments.
Corbin said she under-
stands, however, how a
customer can suddenly
find himself out thousands
of dollars if builders go
back on their word.
"You trust your contrac-
tor," she said. "You trust
they will do what they say
on the dotted line."
MEN
Duane and Janice
Ready have lived in many
places. They retired to
Spring Hill, waiting for the
right time to build their


The laws are set up to protect
the contractor. I was too naive
and I'm paying for it. I hope
nobody else besides me ever
has to go through this.
Duane Ready
building home in Crystal River.


home in Crystal River on
property they bought in
2006.
They decided that time
was in October 2013 and,
on advice of their archi-
tect, hired Gold Crest to
build the $250,000 house.
There was a problem
with the site plan that re-
quired a county variance.
Plus, like with the Meisels,
the Gilberts said they had
money troubles and asked
for help.
The Readys agreed to
renegotiate the contract
and provided additional
funds. In return, Ready
said, the Gilberts agreed to
refund the Readys $17,900
when the project was
completed.
The Readys, who paid
cash installments for the
home and did not use a
bank, provided $22,000 for
windows and frames.
Ready said Gold Crest did
not pass those payments
on to the suppliers, and


the house has sat with just
a poured foundation and
block wall since mid-
January
Ready said the Gilberts
owe him $40,000. Plus, he
said, he paid some subcon-
tractors who threatened
the couple with liens be-
cause the Gilberts did not
pay them.
"There's no question I
was ahead of the draw," he
said. "I was trying to bend
over backwards to help
them and make them suc-
cessful, and it turned
around and bit me .."
Neither the Meisels nor
the Readys know where to
go from here.
"The laws are set up to
protect the contractor,"
Ready said. "I was too naive
and I'm paying for it. I hope
nobody else besides me
ever has to go through this."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn.


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County issues citations that carry with them a fine of $100 for first
offenders of local watering rules. Find watering rules on Page A4 daily.


VETERANS
Continued from Page Al

said they spend an average
of $500 to $600 every time
they purchase food, usu-
ally from Save-a-Lot They
also get food from the local
food bank and a yearly
school district food drive.
About 20 percent of the
money they receive goes
toward helping veterans
with education costs, such
as vocational classes at
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute.
The remaining 15 per-
cent is for utilities, rent,
etc.
Although the coalition,
like any charitable organ-


ization, always needs fi-
nancial donations, what
the coalition really needs
is more members.
"It's hard to find a
meeting time when every-
body will come," Michael
said. "The younger ones
can't come during the day
because they're working,
and the older ones can't
see well at night"
They meet at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday of the
month at the DAV build-
ing, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness.
"When I try to recruit
people, I say up front, if
you can make it to the
meeting, fine. We try to
keep them informed with
a mail-out newsletter
once a quarter," Michael


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INFORMATION
Citrus County
Veterans Coalition:
352-400-8952.
Ray Michael:
352-637-3265.

said. 'As you're well
aware of, this is a very
generous county when it
comes to veterans, and we
want to get the word out
that we're here."
For information about
the Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition, call 352-
400-8952 or Ray Michael
at 352-637-3265.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


-All"
DLP




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Margaret
Chechile, 98
HOMOSASSA
A memorial Mass of
Christian Burial for Mar-
garet Chechile, 98, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., will be at
11 a.m. Wednesday,
April 23, 2014, at the St.
Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church,
Homosassa.
She died Friday,
March 21, 2014, in Crystal
River Cremation arrange-
ments were under the di-
rection of the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Home & Crematory




Louis
Cosentino, 93
HOMOSASSA
Louis M. Cosentino, 93,
passed away on April 16,
2014. He was born in Long
Branch, N.J., and lived in
Monmouth Beach for over
50 years until his retire-
ment to Homosassa, Fla.
Mr Cosentino served in
the U.S. Coast Guard dur-
ing World War II and later
became a carpenter and
cabinet maker for Fort
Monmouth. After retire-
ment, he became a build-
ing inspector and code
enforcement officer for
Monmouth Beach. He was
a member of The Ameri-
can Legion, and a 50-year
member of the Monmouth
Beach Volunteer Fire De-
partment. He was a life-
time member of the
National Active and Re-
tired Federal Employees
Association (NARFE),
Chapter 776 District 6. He
was a devoted husband
and father whose interests
spanned everything from
gardening to golf to oil
painting to ballroom
dancing.
He is survived by his
four children, Joan, Bill,
Michael and Patrick; 12
grandchildren; and 12
great-grandchildren. He
was predeceased by his
wife of 57 years, Elizabeth
Mary Headley; his par-
ents, Nichola Cosentino
and Franchesca Ronga;
his 10 brothers and sisters;
and a grandson, Michael.
He will be greatly
missed by his family and
friends in New Jersey as
well as his friends in
Florida, especially Patri-
cia Stanley and her family
of Homosassa.
Visitation will be from
6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday,
April 23,2014, at Fiore Fu-
neral Home on Broadway
in West Long Branch, N.J.
A funeral Mass will be
held at 10 a.m. Thursday,
April 24, 2014, at Precious
Blood Church in Mon-
mouth Beach, N.J. In lieu
of flowers, donations may
be made to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, Fla., (www
hospiceofcitrus.org), or to
a charity of your choice.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.



CILc. . 2Zai~
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call 726-8323


Obituaries
Cecilia
Guido, 85
BEVERLY HILLS
Cecilia R. Guido, age 85,
was born Nov 22, 1928. Ce-
cilia was a longtime resi-
dent of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
who passed away peace-
fully surrounded by her
family Thursday, April 17,
2014.
Memorial services will
be at Our Lady of Grace
Church at Beverly Hills at
9 a.m. April 21, 2014. Ce-
cilia Guido is preceded in
death by her late husband,
Ignatius Guido; and her
longtime companion, John
Davis. She is survived by
her 11 children, 39 grand-
children, and 19 great-
grandchildren. Cecilia will
surely be missed by her
family and friends.
Cecilia's family would
like to extend their great
appreciation to Citrus
County Senior Services,
Hospice of Citrus County,
and Skill Bank of Beverly
Hills for taking such good
care of Cecilia.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Elizabeth
Huard, 85
INVERNESS
Elizabeth A. Huard, 85,
of Inverness, Fla., died Fri-
day, April 18, 2014. Eliza-
beth was born July 19,
1928, in Providence, RI.,
the daughter of Lawrence
and Hazel Kneen. She was
a public school teacher in
Winooski, Vt. She came to
Citrus County area in 2001
from Burlington, Vt Eliza-
beth was a member of Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, Fla.,
where she was in the choir
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Donald; and sons, Donald
G. Huard II and Lawrence
P Huard.
Elizabeth is survived by
son Robert M. Huard of
Crystal River, Fla.; daugh-
ter Mary Elizabeth La-
timer of Kenton, N.Y;
brothers John R. Kneen
and William B. Kneen; sis-
ters Ann Twohig and Terri
Sue Thibodeau; and two
grandchildren.
A funeral Mass will be
held at St. Marks Catholic
Church with interment to
follow at New Mt. Calvary
Cemetery, Burlington, Vt.
Arrangements are by
Heinz Funeral Home and
Cremation.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Richard
Lacoss, 86
INVERNESS
Richard P Lacoss, 86, In-
verness, Fla., died Satur-
day, April 19, 2014, at
Hospice of Citrus County
Private arrangements by
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

DEADLINES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Ann Nelson, 76
BEVERLY HILLS
Ann C. Nelson, 76, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Wednesday, April 16,2014.
A memorial service of re-
membrance will be at
2 p.m. Wednesday, April 23,
2014, at Faith Lutheran
Church, 935 S. Crystal
Glen Drive, Lecanto.




Donald
Weaver, 85
INVERNESS
Donald Robert Weaver,
85, of Inverness, Fla.,
passed away Friday,
April 18, 2014, at Arbor
Trail Rehab & Nursing in
Inverness. He was born on
Aug. 16, 1928, in Chelsea,
Iowa, to the late Stephen
and Anna (Benesh)
Weaver Donald was a U.S.
Army veteran, and a linen
and laundry director at the
Iowa Lutheran Hospital.
He was an active member
of VFW Post 9127 in Des
Moines, and the First
Lutheran Church of Inver-
ness. Donald loved gar-
dening and adored his
grandchildren, as they
adored him.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 58 years, Eva
Faye Weaver Other sur-
vivors include his chil-
dren, Steven Rinard of
Ankeny, Iowa, and Sue
Ann (John) Weaver of Fer-
nandina Beach, Fla.; sister
Irene Kupka; grandchil-
dren Aaron, Amy, Deana,
Stephenie, and Wendy;
seven great-grandchildren;
and four great-great-
grandchildren. Donald
was preceded in death by
three brothers and three
sisters.
Private cremation
arrangements are by Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

* Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.






352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

V Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com


Bill could slow Florida


craft beer industry growth


Associated Press

SANTA ROSA BEACH
The fight between craft
brewers and the distribu-
tors of Budweiser over the
legalization of half-gallon
beer containers has gotten
so bitter that it is even
being likened to extortion.
The issue seems simple
enough: Florida allows
breweries to fill quart and
gallon containers -
called growlers at their
tap rooms, but the half-
gallon size that's the in-
dustry standard in 47
other states remains ille-
gal. Brewers, their cus-
tomers and some
lawmakers think the state
should just get rid of the
restriction that many call
silly But the politically
powerful Anheuser-
Busch InBev distributors
have a powerful ally in
Senate President Don
Gaetz as they try to force
craft breweries to give up
some of their profit.
The latest idea is to
force breweries to buy
their own beer from dis-
tributors at a markup be-
fore they can sell cans and
bottles to brewery visitors
the beer, in most cases,
wouldn't even leave the
premises or be handled
by the distributors. Now,
the brewers don't have to
use a middleman.
"It's like paying protec-
tion money" to the mob,
said Sen. Jack Latvala, R-
Clearwater, who supports
allowing half-gallon
growlers with no strings
attached.
Gaetz has in recent
weeks been playing both
sides telling beer lovers
who have complained
about the proposed legisla-
tion that he helped a craft
brewery in his district get
started, but is still support-
ing the bill (SB 1714) that
takes profits from craft
brewers and hands them to
distributors. The bill will
likely be considered before
the session closes May 2.
"When he says that he
supports Grayton Beer
Company or he supports
small, independent brew-
eries he has never sup-
ported me in one thing,"
said Jamey Price, the
brewery owner Gaetz has
boasted about helping.
"He's either evil or he's
dumb."
Price's brewery opened
under a business plan that
included sales through
distributors to restaurants
and stores, a tasting room



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Associated Press
Grayton Beer Company owner Jamey Price discusses a
proposed bill that could affect Florida's craft brewing
industry April 12 in Santa Rosa Beach.


where brewery visitors can
buy draft beer and take-
home containers, and a
small production brew pub
that would be supple-
mented by beer made at
the main brewery
"We can crumple that
business plan up and
throw it out the window,"
said Price, standing at his
Santa Rosa Beach brew-
ery "If this was in effect in
2010, more than likely we
wouldn't have gotten into
this business."
Anheuser-Busch InBev
distributors, who handle
Budweiser, are trying to
protect the three-tier sys-
tem of alcohol distribution
the federal government
set up after Prohibition
ended in the 1930s. It basi-
cally ensures that alco-
holic beverages are
passed through a distribu-
tor to get to retailers. Ex-
ceptions have been made
for purchases where prod-
ucts are produced, like
buying wine at a winery or
rum at a distillery
Mitch Rubin, a lobbyist
representing Anheuser-
Busch InBev distributors,
said he's OK with draft
beer and growler sales at
breweries, but not bottles,
cans or kegs. He hasn't
supported bills that sim-
ply legalize half-gallon
growlers.
MillerCoors distributors
do support legalizing half-
gallon growlers with no
strings attached. Other
regulatory concerns
should be addressed sep-
arately, said Eric Criss,
their lobbyist.
Another change the bill
makes would force brew-


ers to sell their beer to
distributors and buy it
back at a markup if they
want to sell it at another
location. That means a
company like Cigar City
Brewing in Tampa would
no longer be able to di-
rectly transport beer from
its main brewery to a sep-
arate brew pub that has a
smaller brewing capacity
Cigar City Brewing,
which Joey Redner
started with two employ-
ees in 2009, has grown to
115 employees, including
the brew pub. Redner
said he wouldn't have suc-
ceeded without a tap
room, where customers
buy draft beer and take-
home containers.
Small startup brew-
eries can't make a profit
just based on sales
through distributors, said
Redner. For at least two
years Cigar City was
spending more to make
beer than distributors
were paying for it.
"Every time I sent a case
out the door, I lost money
It was offset by the fact
that I could sell that beer
in draft on premise and in
six-packs on premise at a
higher margin than to a
distributor," he said.
Craft brewing is one of
Florida's fastest growing
industries. There were six
craft breweries in 2007
and there will be nearly
80 by the end of this year
"We're supposed to be
about jobs and economic
development," Latvala
said, adding that distribu-
tors are making money off
the growth. "They're just
being greedy"


Elizabeth H, Beckett
NEWARK: A memory al service for i
Elizabeth H. Beckett 94, of Newark will
be held at 2 PM on Saturday, April 19,
2014 at Second Presbyterian Church 42
E. Church St., Newark, OH with Pastor
Charlie Smi th officiating.
Mrs. Beckett passed away on April 15,
2014 at SharonBrooke. She was born on
December 19, 1919 in Columbus, OH
to the late Glenn R. and Blanche ,
(Hoffman) Horner. ,A_
She is survived by her daughters, Amy C-
(Robert) Mader of Newark and Dr.
Barbara Beckett of Inverness, FL;
granddaughter, Jessica (Greg) Bertke of '
Columbus, OH; special friend and
caregiver, Delores Bonner; and her beloved feline "Paul".
In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by her husband, ,
Charles Beckett who passed away on October 6, 1998.
Bettee held numerous secretarial positions throughout her career.n
a member at Second Presbyterian Church in Newark for 26 years. *h
also a member of First Presbyterian Church in Inverness, FL and o ,
Chapel on the Boardwalk in Wrightsville Beach, NC. She was very a.
women's circles and Bible studies. At the age of 91, she was the I ,
participant in the NEW ARK Walk to Emmaus, Womens #43 Sh ,
50 year alumni of Chi Omega and member of Zeta Alpha. She
volunteer for American Red Cross in Clark County and the Salvatioi.
in Wilmington, NC. She enjoyed traveling and was a member ,
Freedom Years and Tally Ho travel group. Bettee was an avid read ....
enjoyed shows at the Weathervane Playhouse as well as special .....
programs in the community.
Memorial contributions can be made to Second Presbyterian Chw. ,
Salvation Army, American Arthritis Foundation or
Duke University Eye Clinic.
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ANNOUNCEMENT
Dr. Thomas W. Dawson & Dr. Linda Azwell
announce the closing of Crystal Eye Center and
Optical effective 3/31/2014.
For your convenience, we have chosen the offices
of Drs. Anne and Jay Newcomer to be the
custodians of our patient's records. They have
offices in Homosassa and Beverly Hills and would
be a good choice for your eye care practitioner.
For inquiries about prescription refills, eye
appointments, eyeglasses repair, or copies of
patient records call their offices at: 352-628-3029
in Homosassa or 352-746-0800 in Beverly Hills.
To reach Dr. Linda Azwell's call her office in
Dunnellon at 352-465-0024.
Dr. Dawson Has Retired.


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IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Wednesday, April 23 11:00am
Wednesday, May 7 11:00am


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A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


ME i ,ra




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Snowy owl
released into wild
SUPERIOR, Wis. -A rare
snowy owl that was appar-
ently hit by a bus in the na-
tion's capital flew back into
the wild on Saturday, after
weeks of rehab in Minnesota
and procedures to replace its
flight feathers.
Officials with the Raptor
Center at the University of
Minnesota released the owl at
about noon Saturday outside
Superior, Wis., near the Min-
nesota and Wisconsin state
border. That location was cho-
sen by a biologist because
snowy owls have been spot-
ted there in recent winters, in-
dicating there is good habitat
for hunting.
"The snowy flew off with
strong steady wing beats,
showing off the new flight
feathers," Julia Ponder, The
Raptor's Center director, said
in a statement. "He is in great
condition and will hopefully
head back north in the coming
days."
Snowy owls are native to
the Arctic but were seen all
along the East Coast this win-
ter, as far south as Florida.
Customers hit with
expensive bill
SANTA PAULA, Calif. -
What was supposed to be a
cheap bite at Del Taco turned
out to be small fortune for
some Southern California
customers.
About 150 people who or-
dered this week at the Mexi-
can-style fast food chain in
Santa Paula, 65 miles north-
west of Los Angeles, were
mistakenly charged thou-
sands of dollars for burritos,
tacos and soft drinks.
Customer Michael Cole
said he was surprised when
he was charged $4,050 for
one CrunchTada Pizza and
two beef tacos. He discovered
the error Friday when he tried
to withdraw $20 from an ATM
and was denied.
A spokesman said all
charges will be refunded.
Woman: Beau stole
dog, TV on 1st date
DOVER, N.J. No stolen
hearts on this first date. In-
stead, a New Jersey woman
said a man she met on a dat-
ing website stole her dog and
her flat-screen TV.
Dover police told the Daily
Record of Parsippany that the
pair went out for the first time
Thursday night.


Associated Press
A snowy owl is set to be
released Saturday just
outside of Superior, Wis.


After returning home, the
woman said she became oc-
cupied in another room, leav-
ing the man alone. When she
returned, he was gone and
so were her Yorkshire Terrier
named Violet and her TV val-
ued at $3,000. The woman
said her dog was worth
$4,000.
The woman said she knew
her date only as Joel and be-
lieves he lives in Elizabeth.
Sgt. Richard Gonzalez said
police are searching for the
man and dog and are check-
ing other locations the short-
lived couple visited.
Ohio couple dies
15 hours apart
NASHPORT, Ohio-A
couple who held hands at
breakfast every morning even
after 70 years of marriage
have died 15 hours apart.
Helen Felumlee, of Nash-
port, died at 92 on April 12.
Her husband, 91-year-old
Kenneth Felumlee, died the
next morning.
The couple's eight children
say the two had been insepa-
rable since meeting as
teenagers, once sharing the
bottom of a bunk bed on a
ferry rather than sleeping one
night apart, the Zanesville
Times Recorder reported.
They remained deeply in
love until the very end, even
eating breakfast together
while holding hands, said their
daughter, Linda Cody.
According to Cody, about
12 hours after Helen died,
Kenneth looked at his children
and said, "Mom's dead." He
quickly began to fade and
was surrounded by 24 of his
closest family members and
friends when he died the next
morning.
-From wire reports


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Hawaii is crop flash point


Associated Press

WAIALUA, Hawaii You can
trace the genetic makeup of most
corn grown in the U.S., and in many
other places around the world, to
Hawaii.
The tiny island state 2,500 miles
from the nearest continent is so
critical to the nation's modern corn-
growing business that the industry's
leading companies all have farms
here, growing new varieties geneti-
cally engineered for desirable traits
like insect and drought resistance.
But these same farms have be-
come a flash point in a spreading
debate over genetic engineering in
agriculture.
Kauai and Hawaii counties have
moved in the past several months to
regulate genetically modified or-
ganisms and the pesticides the
farms use. In Maui County, a group
is collecting signatures for a poten-
tial ballot measure that would im-
pose a temporary ban on the crops.
"People are very concerned, and
it's my job as a council member to
determine whether those concerns
are valid and take steps to protect
them," said Gary Hooser, a council-
man in Kauai.
Hooser and the council passed a
law last year, over the mayor's veto,
to require large farms to create
buffer zones around their crops and
to disclose what pesticides they use.
The law is set to take effect in
August.
Seed companies with Kauai op-
erations Syngenta, Pioneer,
BASF and Agrigentics have sued
the county to stop the law, saying
they are already regulated by state
and federal laws and there is no
need for additional county rules.
"We don't plant anything that isn't
permitted and approved through
the proper regulatory agencies, be
it the EPA, the FDA and UDSA,"
said Mark Phillipson, the head of
Hawaii corporate affairs for Syn-
genta, referring to the Environmen-
tal Protection Agency, the Food and
Drug Administration and the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
Hawaii's origins as a critical node
in corn production dates to the
1960s when James Brewbaker, a re-
cently arrived researcher at the
University of Hawaii, noticed he
could plant three crops a year in
Hawaii's warm climate instead of
one as in most places on the
mainland.
Around the same time, Pioneer
Hi-Bred was trying to squeeze more


Associated Press
A tassel of corn grows April 16 in a
field on Pioneer Hi-Bred International
land in Waialua, Hawaii. The nation's
leading corn seed companies
have farms in Hawaii, but their fields
have become a flash point in a
spreading debate over genetic
engineering in agriculture.

research into a year by using green-
houses and farms in Florida. Brew-
baker suggested researchers come
to Hawaii.
Seed farms grew as research ex-
panded and more land became
available as Hawaii's sugar and
pineapple plantations became less
competitive in the global market
and shut down.
As of 2012, the most recent data
available, seed crops in Hawaii
were worth $217 million, up from
$140 million in 2007. About 95 per-
cent of it is corn. In all, they exceed
the value of the state's next several
largest crops including sugar-
cane and macadamia nuts.
Developing a new seed variety
takes about 10 to 12 growth cycles,
said Phillipson. On the mainland,
this could take 10 to 12 years. Being
able to get three to four growth cy-
cles a year in Hawaii dramatically
shrinks the time it takes to bring a
new product to market.
"It's getting your newest and best
hybrids to market quickly," said
Richard McCormack, who leads
Hawaii operations for Pioneer Hi-
Bred International, which is part of
DuPont and has farms on Kauai
and Oahu.
New genes such as those mak-
ing corn resistant to drought or
floods are inserted in a lab on the
mainland.
Once federal authorities approve


new varieties for planting, they're
brought to Hawaii for two growth
cycles or crop seasons to see how
they perform in an actual field. The
best ones are sent elsewhere for
more growing.
Syngenta, for example, sends its
best to fields in Missouri, Manitoba,
Canada and Mexico to make sure
the corn is able to thrive in the soil,
wind conditions and temperatures
of these various places, Phillipson
said.
Today, about 90 percent of all
corn grown in the U.S. is genetically
engineered and has been devel-
oped partially in Hawaii in this way
The discontent, however, has
been simmering.
There has been little scientific
evidence to prove that foods grown
from engineered seeds are less safe
than their conventional counter-
parts, but consumer concerns and
fears persist not just in the is-
lands but around the country and
rest of the world.
In Hawaii, residents have also ex-
pressed concern about pesticides
used in the growing of seed crops.
Hooser said he introduced the
legislation to get good information
that would allow the county to de-
termine whether the seed compa-
nies' operations were having any
negative effect on the health
of Kauai's people and the
environment.
Hawaii County, which covers the
Big Island, later adopted a law ban-
ning the cultivation of genetically
modified crops.
The county created an exemp-
tion, however, for papayas already
grown on the Big Island that have
been genetically engineered to re-
sist a virus that nearly wiped out
the fruit in years past No seed com-
panies currently have farms on the
island, so they're not affected by the
law
In Maui County, a group called
Sustainable Hawaiian Agriculture
for the Keiki and the Aina Move-
ment is gathering signatures for a
ballot measure to impose the ban
until seed companies complete en-
vironmental and public health
studies find their practices to be
safe.
Monsanto and Dow Agro-
Sciences, a unit of Dow Chemical,
both have farms in Maui County
State Sen. Clarence Nishihara
predicted the wrangling over ge-
netically modified crops will con-
tinue, in Hawaii and around the
country


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Associated Press
A river is polluted by waste from informal mining Sept. 13, 2013, in Peru's Madre de
Dios region. The clock has run out for an estimated 40,000 illegal gold miners who had
until Saturday to legalize their status in a region of southeastern Peru where
fortune-seekers have ravaged rainforests and contaminated rivers.


Deadline lapses in Peru


for illegal gold miners


Associated Press
LIMA, Peru The clock has run out
for an estimated 40,000 illegal gold min-
ers who had until Saturday to legalize
their status in a region of southeastern
Peru where fortune-seekers have rav-
aged rainforests and contaminated
rivers. The government's vow to enforce a
ban on illegal mining is raising fears of
bloody confrontations.
The miners already have been clashing
with police while intermittently blocking
traffic on the commercially vital intero-
ceanic highway that links the Pacific
coast with Brazil, protesting government
attempts to squeeze them out by drasti-
cally restricting shipments of the gaso-
line they use for their machinery One
miner has been killed and more than 50
wounded.
But officials insist this time they're se-
rious about combatting the multi-billion-
dollar illegal mining trade that accounts
for about 20 percent of Peru's gold
exports.
"We're not backing down even one
inch," said Daniel Urresti, the former
army officer leading the task for Presi-
dent Ollanta Humala.
The unrest already has left the region's
cities short of food, inflating prices, and
local authorities who support the miners
have traveled to the capital to press for
more time. They were denied an audi-
ence with Urresti and other officials.
"I don't know what's going to happen


after the government deadline lapses. I
think the violence will begin," said Jorge
Aldazabal, the governor of the Madre de
Dios region who has spent more than a
week camped out on a mattress in front
of a 17th-century church to protest the
crackdown and demand a solution.
Peru criminalized unpermitted mining
in rivers and other protected natural
zones in 2012 but repeatedly delayed im-
plementing the law, which imposes up to
12 years in jail and fines of up to $54,000
on violators.
Now, with the government preparing to
host global climate talks in December
and the world's eyes upon it, authorities
insist they are determined to end the il-
legal mining, even if critics say that in-
vites mayhem because no economic
alternatives have been offered to the
miners, most of them dirt-poor migrants
from the Andean highlands.
Very few qualify to legalize their oper-
ations because any permission they may
have to use the land is questionable, at
best. Some have paid bearers of refor-
estation permits to mine on that land.
Others mine on indigenous reserves. The
government says most are squatters with
no claims at all.
Urresti told The Associated Press that
authorities will first go after a group of
about 20,000 miners centered near the in-
teroceanic highway in an area called
La Pampa.
They already have been clashing with
riot police sent from Lima.


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National energy boom blurs political battle lines


NICHOLAS RICCARDI
Associated Press

DENVER The U.S.
energy boom is blurring
the traditional political
battle lines across the
country
Democrats are split be-
tween environmentalists
and business and labor
groups, with the proposed
Canada-to-Texas oil
pipeline a major wedge.
Some deeply conserva-
tive areas are allying with
conservationists against
cracking, the drilling tech-
nique that's largely re-
sponsible for the boom.
The divide is most visi-
ble among Democrats in
the nation's capital, where
11 Democratic senators
wrote President Barack
Obama this month urging
him to approve the Key-
stone XL pipeline, which
is opposed by many envi-
ronmental groups and bil-
lionaire activist Tom
Steyer. The State Depart-
ment said Friday it was ex-
tending indefinitely the
amount of time that fed-
eral agencies have to re-
view the project, likely
delaying a pipeline deci-
sion until after the No-
vember elections.
Several senators from
energy-producing states
such as Louisiana and
Alaska have distanced
themselves from the
Obama administration,
while environmental
groups complain the pres-
ident has been too permis-
sive of cracking.
There is even more con-
fusion among Democrats
in the states as drilling rigs
multiply and approach
schools and parks.
California Gov Jerry
Brown was shouted down
at a recent state conven-
tion by party activists
angry about his support
for cracking. New York
Gov Andrew Cuomo has
kept cracking in his state in
limbo for three years while
his administration studies
health and safety issues. In
Colorado, Gov John Hick-
enlooper has drawn envi-
ronmentalists' ire for
defending the energy in-
dustry, and a ballot battle
to regulate cracking is put-
ting U.S. Sen. Mark Udall
in a tough situation.
But the issue cuts across
party lines.
Even in deeply Republi-
can Texas, some communi-
ties have restricted


Associated Press
A worker adjusts hoses March 25 during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. gas well, near Mead,
Colo. The energy boom is scrambling national politics. Democrats are split between environmentalists and business
and labor groups. Some deeply-conservative areas are allying with conservationists against cracking, the technique


largely responsible for the su
cracking. In December,
Dallas voted to effectively
ban cracking within city
limits.
"You're looking at a sim-
ilar boom as we had in
tech in 1996," said Joe
Brettell, a GOP strategist
in Washington who works
with energy companies.
"The technology has
caught up with the aspira-
tions, and that changes
the political dynamics
fundamentally"
Those technological ad-
vances have made it possi-
ble for energy companies
to tap deep and once-
untouchable deposits of
natural gas and oil. They
include refinements in hy-
draulic fracturing, or
cracking, which is the in-
jection of chemicals into
the ground to coax buried
fossil fuels to the surface.
The U.S. is now the
world's largest natural gas
producer and is expected
to surpass Saudi Arabia
soon as the world's great-
est oil producer, becoming
a net exporter of energy by
2025.
The boom has brought
drilling rigs into long-set-
tled neighborhoods, rais-
ing fears of water


contamination, unsafe
traffic and air pollution,
and outraging residents.
Pollster Steven Green-
berg said Cuomo provides
little notice before his
public appearances be-
cause anti-fracking pro-
testers will crash his
events. Republicans blame
the governor for stymieing
growth. New York voters
split evenly on cracking,
with Democrats only mod-
estly more likely to oppose
it than Republicans.
"No matter what he de-
cides, he's going to have
half the people upset with
him," Greenberg said.
"From a purely political
point of view, it's hard to
argue with his strategy-
punt"
In California, Brown has
a long record of backing
environmental causes, but
he's drawn the wrath of
some environmentalists
for supporting cracking.
One group cited the $2 mil-
lion that oil and gas com-
panies have given the


governor's causes and
campaigns since 2006. De-
mocrats in the Legislature
have proposed a freeze on
cracking, but are not opti-
mistic Brown will support
it.
The Democratic split is
sharpest in Colorado.
Hickenlooper, a former
oil geologist, has been a
staunch supporter of
cracking; at one point he
said he drank cracking
fluid, albeit a version with-
out most of the hazardous
chemicals. His administra-
tion has fought suburban
cities that have banned
cracking, insisting that
only the state can regulate
energy exploration.
In response, activists are
pushing 10 separate ballot
measures to curb cracking.
One measure would let
cities and counties ban it.
The effort has the support
of Colorado Rep. Jared
Polis, a wealthy Democrat.
At the state party's recent
convention, he gave a
rousing speech nominat-


ing Hickenlooper for a sec-
ond term, but acknowl-
edged "none of us ... are
going to agree on every
single issue."
Some Colorado Democ-
rats worry that the ballot
push is bringing energy
groups who generally sup-
port Republicans into the
state. One pro-fracking
group has spent $1 million
in TV ads.
Jon Haubert, a
spokesman for the group,
said leaders in both
parties think the meas-
ures are economically
dangerous.
"We look at that and say
this seems to be an ex-
treme opinion," he said,
referring to the initiatives.
The ballot measures
will force Democratic can-
didates to choose among
environmentalists, labor
groups and Colorado's
business community,
whose political and finan-
cial support is vital to De-
mocrats in the swing state.
Udall embodies this


dilemma. He's an environ-
mentalist in a tight re-
election campaign with
Republican Rep. Cory
Gardner, who represents
an oil- and gas-rich,
mostly rural congressional
district.
In an interview, Udall
declined to say if cities
should have the right to
ban cracking.
"I'm not a lawyer," he
said.
Hickenlooper has put in
place several landmark
regulations requiring
that drilling occur a set
distance from homes and
schools and limiting
methane emissions from
energy exploration. But
that has not assuaged ac-
tivists such as Laura
Fronckwiecz, a former fi-
nancial worker who got in-
volved in an effort to ban
cracking in her moderate
suburb of Broomfield
after a drilling well was
planned near her chil-
dren's elementary school.
A Democrat, she's
aghast at her party's reluc-
tance to embrace the
cause.
"Ten years ago, I'd say it
was a progressive cause
they'd get behind,"
Fronckwiecz, 41, said, "but
much has changed, and
the politics of oil and gas
are not what you'd
expect."
Fronckwiecz said she
has Republicans and Lib-
ertarians in her coalition,
as do activists pushing to
limit cracking in energy-
friendly Texas. While the
GOP-dominated Legisla-
ture in Texas has rejected
efforts to limit drilling, ac-
tivists have earned small
victories in towns and
cities that have limited
drilling, and one big win,
the Dallas vote.
Sharon Wilson, Texas
organizer for the environ-
mental group Earthworks,
said she gets a warm re-
ception from conserva-
tives and Libertarians.
"When they come into
your community and start
cracking," she said, "it
does not matter what your
political affiliation is."
Follow Nicholas Ric-
cardi on Twitter at
https://twitter corn/mNick
Riccardi.


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A12 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Woman a celebrity


Searchers recover

13th bohndv from


after certified miracle Everest avalanche


Associated Press
TRES RIOS, Costa Rica
- On a warm spring day,
Floribeth Mora was in her
bed waiting to die from a
seemingly inoperable
brain aneurysm when her
gaze fell upon a photo-
graph of Pope John Paul II
in a newspaper
"Stand up," Mora recalls
the image of the pope say-
ing to her "Don't be
afraid."
Mora, her doctors and
the Catholic Church said
her aneurysm disap-
peared that day in a mira-
cle that cleared the way
for the late pope to be de-
clared a saint on April 27
in a ceremony at the Vati-
can where Mora will be a
guest of honor
For Mora, the church-
certified miracle was only
the start of her metamor-
phosis from an ill and des-
perate woman into an
adored symbol of faith for
thousands of Costa Ricans
and Catholics around the
world.
Mora, 50, has been greet-
ing a stream of local and
international visitors in
her modest home in a
middle-class neighbor-
hood outside the Costa
Rican capital, and accepts
invitations to as many as
four Masses a day The
faithful have given her so
many letters to deliver to
current pontiff Pope Fran-
cis that she has had to buy
an extra suitcase.
Mora has suspended her
late-in-life law studies and
much of her work for her
family security business to
dedicate herself full-time
to her role as a symbol of
faith for many in Costa
Rica.
"With all of this going on
I appreciate having my
own business, because if I
had a boss, they would
have already fired me for
missing so much work,"


Associated Press
Floribeth Mora stands by her shrine to Pope John Paul II in July 2013 inside the
entrance to her home in La Union de Cartago, Costa Rica. Mora, her doctors and the
Catholic Church say her aneurysm disappeared in May of 2011 in a miracle that cleared
the way for the late pope to be declared a saint.


she joked.
She says she ignores
skeptics who doubt she
was really healed.
"Everyone can think
what they want," she told
The Associated Press dur-
ing a visit to her home.
"What I know is that I am
healthy"
Mora was diagnosed
with a brain aneurysm and
sent home to rest and take
pain medication in April
2011 after doctors said the
problem was inoperable.
Mora, who thought she was
simply returning home to
await death, looked at the
image of John Paul on
May 1, the day of John
Paul's beatification six
years after his death.
Then, she said, it spoke
to her
She surprised her fam-
ily by walking around, and,
after her doctors declared
her healed, word spread
quickly to the local church,
and from there to the
Vatican.


Today, Mora said speak-
ing about her experience
has become her calling.
"I've got so much to do
that I'm going to dedicate
myself above all to telling
the world the story of
God's greatness and what
it's done for me," she said.
She said people some-
times ask whether the ex-
perience was somehow
imagined, or the result of
mental illness.
"I have no reason to
doubt what I am. I am
healthy and that's the most
important thing," said
Mora, the daughter of a
shoemaker and a seam-
stress, born in a tough
neighborhood south of San
Jose.
Grandchildren run
through the narrow halls
of the home she shares
with her husband, a re-
tired police officer Images
of John Paul, the infant
Jesus and the Virgin Mary
look down from the walls
of virtually every room.


The back garden smells
of the oregano and rose-
mary she grows for cook-
ing, and is shared by a pair
of roosters, three rabbits
and some ducks. Her 15-
year-old son, the youngest
of three, tells her off occa-
sionally for attending so
many Masses.
"I have to be there," she
said.
Mora is often over-
whelmed by the petitions
for prayer the faithful ask
her to take to Francis.
"I have to buy a special
suitcase for those letters,
because some of them are
big packages," she said.
Mora said she is filled with
excitement for meeting the
pope, whom she admires
for his humility and the
changes he's made in the
church.
While she looks tired,
she said she feels great,
and none of the symptoms
that she felt brought her to
the brink of death three
years ago have returned.


Associated Press
KATMANDU, Nepal-
Search teams recovered a
13th body Saturday from
the snow and ice covering
a dangerous climbing
pass on Mount Everest,
where an avalanche a day
earlier swept over a
group of Sherpa guides in
the deadliest disaster on
the world's highest peak.
Another three guides re-
mained missing, and
searchers were working
quickly to find them in
case weather conditions
deteriorated, said Maddhu
Sunan Burlakoti, head of
the Nepalese govern-
ment's mountaineering
department But the
painstaking effort involved
testing the strength of
newly fallen snow and
using extra clamps, ropes
and aluminum ladders to
navigate the treacherous
Khumbu icefall, a maze of
immense ice chunks and
crevasses.
The avalanche slammed
into the guides at about
6:30 a.m. Friday near the
"popcorn field," a section
of the Khumbu known for
its bulging chunks of ice.
The group of about 25
Sherpa guides were
among the first people
making their way up the
mountain this climbing
season. They were haul-


ing gear to the higher
camps that their foreign
clients would use in at-
tempting to reach the
summit next month.
One of the survivors
told his relatives that the
path had been unstable
just before the snow slide
hit at an elevation near
19,000 feet. The area is
considered particularly
dangerous due to its steep
slope and deep crevasses
that cut through the snow
and ice covering the pass
year round.
As soon as the ava-
lanche occurred, res-
cuers, guides and
climbers rushed to help,
and all other climbing
was suspended.
Seven of the 12 bodies
pulled out and brought
down Friday were
handed over to their fam-
ilies in the Everest re-
gion, while the other five
were taken to Katmandu,
Nepal's capital.
Four survivors were
conscious and being
treated in the intensive
care units of several Kat-
mandu hospitals for bro-
ken ribs, fractured limbs,
punctured lungs and skin
abrasions, according to
Dr C.R. Pandey from
Grande Hospital. Others
were treated for less seri-
ous injuries at the Ever-
est base camp.


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WORLD


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 A13


OILIL . ".......










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Documents detail another delayed recall


Gov't claims GeneralMotors


waited years to act, despite thousands ofconsumer complaints


Associated Press
DETROIT General
Motors waited years to re-
call nearly 335,000 Saturn
Ions for power steering
failures despite getting
thousands of consumer
complaints and more than
30,000 warranty repair
claims, according to gov-
ernment documents re-
leased Saturday
The National Highway


Traffic Safety Administra-
tion, the government's
auto safety watchdog, also
didn't seek a recall of the
compact car from the 2004
through 2007 model years
even though it opened an
investigation more than
two years ago and found 12
crashes and two injuries
caused by the problem.
The documents, posted
on the agency's website,
show yet another delay by


GM in recalling unsafe ve-
hicles and point to another
example of government
safety regulators reacting
slowly to a safety problem
despite being alerted by
consumers and through
warranty data submitted
by the company
A recall can be initiated
by an automaker or de-
manded by the government
Both GM and NHTSA
have been criticized by


safety advocates and law-
makers for their slow re-
sponses to a deadly
ignition switch problem in
2.6 million GM small cars.
GM admitted knowing
about the problem for
more than a decade, yet
didn't start recalling the
cars until February The
company says it knows of
13 deaths in crashes linked
to the ignition switches,
but family members of


crash victims say the num-
ber is much higher
The Ion was one of a few
GM cars included in a
March 31 recall of 1.5 mil-
lion vehicles worldwide to
replace the power steering
motors; the recall also cov-
ered some older Saturn
Auras, Pontiac G6s and
Chevrolet Malibus. If cars
lose power steering, they
can still be steered, but
with much greater effort.


Drivers can be surprised
by the problem and lose
control of the cars and
crash.
In a statement issued
Saturday, GM admitted
that it didn't do enough to
take care of the power
steering problem.
NHTSA closed its investi-
gation into the Ion because
GM had decided to recall the
cars, according to the docu-
ments released Saturday


Hol9 FiRe illuminates shRine


Thousands

flock to event
Associated Press

JERUSALEM --The
dark hall inside Chris-
tianity's holiest shrine
was illuminated with the
flames from thousands of
candles on Saturday as
worshippers participated
in the holy fire ceremony,
a momentous spiritual
event in Orthodox Easter
rites.
Christians believe Jesus
was crucified, buried and
resurrected at the site
where the Church of the
Holy Sepulcher now stands
in the Old City of
Jerusalem. While the
source of the holy fire is a
closely guarded secret, be-
lievers say the flame ap-
pears spontaneously from
his tomb on the day before
Easter to show Jesus has
not forgotten his followers.
The ritual dates back at
least 1,200 years.
Thousands of Christians
Associated Press waited outside the church
Christian pilgrims hold candles Saturday at the church of the Holy Sepulcher, traditionally believed to be the burial site of Jesus for it to open Saturday
Christ, during the ceremony of the Holy Fire in Jerusalem's Old City. morning.




Pope seeks to bring faith Creeping landslide devouring


to 'ends of the Earth' part of Wyoming of town


Associated Press
VATICAN CITY Pope Francis bap-
tized 10 people Saturday and urged them
to bring their faith "to the ends of the
Earth" as he presided over an Easter
Vigil in St. Peter's Basilica.
The vigil is among the Vatican's most
solemn services. Francis entered the dark-
ened basilica with a lone candle, which he
then shared with others to slowly illumi-
nate the church. The symbolic service
commemorates the darkness of the faith-
ful over the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on
Good Friday and their joy and light at his
resurrection on Easter Sunday
Francis urged the priests, bishops, car-
dinals and ordinary Catholics gathered
for the late night service to remember
when they first found their faith. "Do I
remember it? Have I forgotten it? Look
for it. You'll find it. The Lord is waiting."
Trying to remember isn't an act of nos-
talgia but rather a way to bring the "fire"
of faith "to all people, to the very ends of


Associated Press
Pope Francis holds the Holy Gospel while
he celebrates the Easter vigil service
Saturday in St. Peter's Basilica, at the
Vatican.
the Earth," he said.
After his homily, Francis proceeded to
baptize each of the 10, starting with Ital-
ian brothers Giorgio and Jacopo Capez-
zuoli, aged 8 and 10. "Do you want to be
baptized?" he asked each one as he
smiled.


Associated Press
JACKSON, Wyo. No one can say pre-
cisely when the mountainside collapsing
into this Wyoming resort town will give
way But it appears increasingly likely
that when it does, it's going to take a
piece of Jackson with it.
Workers and residents have watched
helplessly in recent days as the slow-
motion landslide spanning hundreds of
yards split a house in two and inched
ever closer to a cluster of businesses
below
Standing at the edge of the slide zone,
its rocky slope rising sharply behind
him, Jackson Fire Chief Willy
Watsabaugh said the rate of movement
slowed Saturday giving crews a chance
to get back in and reassess the damage.
Yet the fate of the businesses, houses
and apartment buildings in the slide zone
remained in doubt Experts brought in to
assist the town said it was unknown when
the slide will come to a rest.


Associated Press
A worker inspects damage to a house
Saturday at the top of a landslide in
Jackson, Wyo.
Efforts taken to stop it including
the erection of large concrete walls at
the base of the slope have proved
futile.
Town officials first noticed significant
hill movement April 4. They evacuated
42 homes and apartment units April 9.
What triggered the geologic event re-
mains under investigation.


World BRIEFS


Nation BRIEFS


Mayor's menu filled up:
One day, 24 restaurants
JENKINTOWN, Pa. -The mayor of a
small town in the Philadelphia suburbs can
offer a guarantee to his constituents: He won't
be going to bed hungry.
Jenkintown Mayor Ed Foley, in a gut-
busting campaign to draw attention to the tiny
borough's varied restaurant scene, set out to
visit all 24 of them on Saturday, starting with a
pre-dawn visit to IHOP.
"With one pancake," Foley said in late af-
ternoon. "And IHOP does not want to sell you
one pancake."
The second-term Democrat said he's had
to battle "mom guilt" from restaurant staff as
he has eaten his way across Jenkintown, a
town so small that he only needed to build-in
15 minutes to walk from place to place.
He said several restaurants have opened in
Jenkintown in recent years and more are
poised to join them in the coming months but
he was surprised to count them and see 24
restaurants now populate a town of less than a
single square mile. About 20 years ago, he said,
Jenkintown had only one place to eat.


Health care site flagged
in Heartbleed review
WASHINGTON People with accounts
on the enrollment website for President
Barack Obama's signature health care law
are being told to change their passwords fol-
lowing an administration-wide review of the
government's vulnerability to the confounding
Heartbleed computer virus.
Senior administration officials said there is
no indication that the HealthCare.gov site has
been compromised and the action is being
taken out of an abundance of caution. The of-
ficials say the government's Heartbleed re-
view is ongoing and users of other websites
may also be told to change their passwords in
the coming days.
The Heartbleed computer bug has
caused major security concerns across the
Internet and affected a widely used encryp-
tion technology designed to protect online
accounts.
The officials insist on anonymity because
they are not authorized to discuss the security
review by name.
-From wire reports


Four French journalists
abducted in Syria freed, safe
PARIS Ten months after their capture in
Syria, four French journalists crossed the bor-
der into neighboring Turkey and reached free-
dom Saturday, though dozens more remain
held in the country's chaotic civil war.
Edouard Elias, Didier Francois, Nicolas
Henin and Pierre Torres all said to be in
good health were freed over the weekend
in unclear circumstances in what has become
the world's most dangerous, and deadliest,
conflict for journalists.
Elias, a freelance photographer, also was
working for Europe 1 radio. Henin and Torres
are freelance journalists.
A DHA report said soldiers on patrol found
the four blindfolded and handcuffed in
Turkey's southeast Sanliurfa province late Fri-
day. Turkish television aired images of the
four at a police station and a local hospital.
It wasn't clear whether a ransom had been
paid for their release, nor which group in
Syria's chaotic 3-year-old conflict held the
men. In his statement, Hollande thanked "all
those" who contributed to the journalists' re-


lease without elaborating. Longstanding
French practice is to name a specific country
that contributed to hostage releases. France
denies it pays ransom to free its hostages.
10 more bodies found
inside South Korean ferry
MOKPO, South Korea Divers have re-
covered 10 more bodies from inside the ferry
that sank off South Korea. The confirmed
death toll is now 46.
Officials said Sunday the bodies were recov-
ered following divers gaining access to the inside
of the ferry after three days of failed attempts due
to strong currents. Details of how they got inside
the ship weren't immediately dear.
More than 265 people, most of them high
school students on a holiday trip, are missing.
There are only 174 known survivors.
The captain of the ferry has been arrested
on suspicion of negligence and abandoning
people in need. Two other crew members
have also been taken into custody, including
a rookie third mate who a prosecutor said
was steering in challenging waters unfamiliar
to her when the accident occurred.
-From wire reports






EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


History


in


your


hand


The lesser-known hobby of vintage postcard collecting


MEL RUSTOM
Special to the Chronicle
People collect all sorts of
things. The wealthy
collect art, classic cars,
vintage wines and so
forth. But, for us regular
folks, there are stamps, coins,
baseball cards, dolls and so on.
A lesser-known collectible is old
postcards.


These vintage cards are a time
machine images, some decades
even a hundred years old, are
frozen in time. The variety is
astounding cities and towns,
counties, countries, hotels,
restaurants, advertising, flowers,
animals and more.
It's a fun, educational and
inexpensive hobby. If you're inter-
ested, check out the Sunshine Post
Card Club's annual spring show


coming up in Tampa. The show will
be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
April 26, at the Holiday Inn Ex-
press, 4750 Dale Mabry Highway
For more information, call Leah
Schnall at 941-753-8794 or email
leahcard@aol.com.
Mel Rustom does marketing and
sales for the Art Center of Citrus
County. He can be reached at
352-527-2535.


'I'
XI'


/


L~A


t eSteeple
Chase Swimming Pool. Coney Island:
swimming at Southampton. L.I.; Times
Square. New York City.


From the collection of Mel Rustom ...
% "_ diI I 't dziret-tor in Nei% o hk ,ih ',4p 11e1i-Ji L ieiiczes. I loved
the -1t Deco ,k',c rer, thWe I-ieCo,~ o1: ROke-elleI L eltel; AdA eitisirg
.ss hoLI-il ehe '40S Alk '50S, I IltHe tIoo\ le posters, eLt.
"Ile dLt'. I Attelkied ite ,1, [ehr'polziti.i Postca Ii4o1 %At he New
'oIke, HLtel A~ld I I %., hooked. I 0o1 ha1 e .11 e\tel-Il e I Ilte post-
tcAId olle 10o1l of \1 %i.ii.tt.11i, SLUtl.UpIII LIl.. A.Li the he-1 06 'ordl F F:
I h11 e e[ .tCA I.t d 01 hOf.101 -dSA-i.1 ItA-1 .1 oSII fthIt k' e I eILlL. -1.e. I e I I te eAl'. 1900s
Ald ithe Nei% I.k CL-, ,khlne froin the 1020S, to tle pie.elt.
No \ I collect FloriWt cardI >,IlCe Ietit to FlorLi V Ifroin Nei% 'ork. I'w lookM i Uor c1tr it oU .1111.toIr .S
01r.11W groi e s. L It hoiS10 I the IIISltr'VOL-I Ct'LL Iot-'.1tx.T p.i ILd _st. reterl l .
I'm a member of the Sunshine Post Card Club and at one of theirtshows, 1 found a postcard of the Miami Beach hotel where my wife and 1
had our honeymoon in 1962. Sadly, the hotel isgone, but the memories remain.
That's the beauty of vintage postcards memories thatyou can hold inyour hand, and smile.


-MtelRustom


Seplle Chase Swimmmi Pgool
Coney Island N Y.


- 7Isa


-^.:-




A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 20, 2014 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DO1: Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/IF IH 6:00 6:30 7:001 7:30 8:001 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
i ESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC'PG' Dream Builders Believe (N)'14' Crisis (N)'14' News Access
E B 3 NewsHour WEDU Pioneers of Television Call the Midwife (N) Masterpiece Classic The Bletchley Circle AreYou Keeping
O PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus 'PG'c '14'm (N)'PG' (N)'14'c Served? Up
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Sf NBC 8 8 8 8 8 o News Nightly Dateline NBC (N) (In American Dream Believe "Bang and Crisis "Here He Comes" News Paid
BFL C 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo)'PG'c Builders (N)'PG' Blame" (N)'14' (N)'14' Program
ABC 20 20 20 News World It's the Easter Beagle, Once Upon a Time (N) "In My Dreams"(2014 Romance) Katharine News Spo Night
20 20 20News Charlie Brown 'PG' c McPhee. Premiere. (In Stereo) N on 9
S 1 1 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race The Good Wife "All The Mentalist "Forest 10 News Cindy
B W CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo)[N "Donkeylicious"'PG' Tapped Out" (N)'14' Green" (N)'14' lpm (NJ Crawford
S O 1 1 3 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's American The Family Guy Cosmos: A Spacetime FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
( V FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) Nc Burgers Dad 14' Simpsons '14' Odyssey'PG (In Stereo) N Notice'PG'
t WJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC The Easter Beagle Once Upon a Time "In My Dreams"(2014 Katharine McPhee. News Inside Ed.
SND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken Doug Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Youngren Child G' Kaumann Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
ABC 11 1 News World It's the Easter Beagle, Once Upon a Time (N) "in My Dreams"(2014, Romance) Kathadrine News Castle'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Charlie Brown 'PG' cc McPhee. Premiere. (In Stereo) Nc
MO 1 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee "Big Brother" (In Glee Disco-inspired The Office The Office We There We There
m C IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Stereo) 14' dance numbers.'14' 'PG' 'PG' Yet? Yet?
SD WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "The Mod Squad" (1999) Claire Danes. Seinfeld 700 Club Raymond Commun Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM w TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanle IRejoice in the Lord Connec Paid Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Ministries
SFriends Friends Two and Two and CSI: Miami "Miami CSI: Miami Horatio's ex Criminal Minds Criminal Minds "The
M WTO CW 4 4 4 12 12 'PG' 'PG' Half Men Half Men Confidential"'14' resurfaces. '14' "Paradise"'14' c Instincts"'14' c
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n WVE UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero AquifyAhora (SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina(N)'14'(SS) Saly Pimienta'PG' Corned. Noticiero
M IWXPX] ION 17 Monk'PG' Monk Break-in.'PG' Monk Murder.'PG' Monk'PG' Monk'PG' Monk'PG'
SDuck Dynasty (In Duck IDuck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck
54 48 54 25 27 Stereo) 'PG' c Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
*i 6 *** "TheShawshank Redemption" (1994) Tim Robbins. An inno- TURN "Of Cabbage Mad Men (N)'14'0 TURN "Of Cabbage
55 64 55 cent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947.'R' and Kings" (N) M and Kings" M
(- 52 35 52 19 21 n To Be Announced Rocky Mountain Bounty River Monsters "Jungle River Monsters (N) (In Rocky Mountain Bounty River Monsters (In
) 52 35 52 19 21 Hunters 'PG' Terminator"'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Hunters 'PG' Stereo) 'PG'
f J 6 9 6* "Nutty Professor II: The ** "Johnson Family Vacation" (2004, Comedy) Cedric the Celebration of Gospel 2014 Gospel artists
U 96 19 96 Klumps"'(2000) Eddie Murphy Entertainer, Vanessa L. Williams. 'PG-13' Bcincluding Yolanda Adams.'PG' c
RAV 254 51 254 Housewives/AtI. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/AtIl. Married to Medicine Matchmaker Happens Fashion
"Role" Bill Cosby: Far From Finished Kevin Hart: I'm a Grown Kevin Hart: Laugh at Tracy Morgan: Bona Tosh.O Amy
S 27 61 27 33 Models" Comic Bill Cosby performs. 14' Little Man My Pain'MA, L Fide (N) cm'14'm Schumer
I 9 4 98 28 **7 The Parent ** "Footloose" (1984) Kevin Bacon. Hip teen moves to Nii- H Keg Stand Cops Cops Cops
98 45 98 28 37 Trap" (1998) 'PG' corn town where pastor taboos dancing.'PG' i' Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded
N 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On 60 Minutes on CNBC Billions Behind Bars American Greed Marijuana- Am.
NN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Special Report Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Inside Man Anthony Bourd.
f 46 40 46 6 5 Austin & Austin & I Didn't Do I Didn't Do *** "Monsters, Inc."(2001) Jessie Good- Jessie Dog With a Austin &
46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Ally'G' It'G' It'G' Voices of John Goodman. 'G', GCharlie 'G'N Blog'G' AllyN
rSP 33 27 33 21 17 Countdown MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N)
[PN 34 28 34 43 49 SportsCenter (N) E:60 30 for 30 Nc 30 for 30 30 for 30 (N)
WT 95 70 95 48 Urbi et Orbi Solemn Mass of Easter Sunday'G' I Flesh Rosary Theology Roundtable EWTN Live'G'
(lAN* 2 2 ** "Tangled" (2010, Musical Comedy) Voices ** "Hop"(2011, Comedy) Voices of James ** "Hop"(2011 Comnedy) Voices of James
M 29 52 29 20 28 of Mandy Moore, Zachary Levi. 'PG' Marsden. Premiere. PG 'Marsden, Russell Brand. 'PG'
S*** "Quiz Show" (1994, Docudrama) John *** "Ruthless People"(1986) ** "Big Business" (1988, ** "Deliver Us From
(iJiXI 118 170 Turturro. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc Danny DeVito. 'R' c 0Comedy) Bette Midler. 'PG' Eva" (2003) 'R'
ji 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) HuckabeeI FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
[FOD 26 56 26 Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Chopped 'G' Food Court Wars 'G' America's Best Cook Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Kitchen Casino 'G'
SI 732 112 732 The Ultimate Fighter UFC: Werdum vs. Browne (Taped) N World Poker UFC Countdown '14' FOX Sports Live (N)
SNFL 35 39 35 Dumbest Cutting World Poker IWorld Poker jThe Best of Pride (N) World Poker World Poker
FX 30 ***6 0 "Rise of the Planet of theApes" (2011) ** "Contraband" (2012) Mark Wahlberg. A former smug- ** "Contraband" (2012, Action)
19 30 60 30 51 James Franco, Freida Pinto.'PG-13' gler finds he has to get back in the game. R' Mark Wahlberg.'R'
OLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf RBC Hertage, Final Round. From Hilton Head, S.C. Central
w "The Good Witch's Destiny" (2013, Drama) Signed, Sealed, "A Lesson in Romance" (2014, Comedy- Golden Golden
59 68 59 45 54 Catherine Bell, Chris Potter., Delivered (N)'G' Drama) Kristy Swanson, Scott Grimes. N Girs Girs
s 3 2 3 **2 "Beautiful *** "The Way Way Back" (2013) Steve Game of Thrones (N) Silicon Veep Game of Thrones (In
302201 302 2 2 Creatures" (2013) Carell, Toni Collette. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' 'MA'm cValley (N) "Alicia"'MA'Stereo)'MA'c
BO2 30 20 30 The Out Abraham Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones (In ** "Man of Steel" (2013, Action) Henry Cavill, Amy "War of
303202 303 List 'MA' Lincoln Maher'MA' c Stereo)'MA' c Adams, Michael Shannon. (In Stereo) PG-13 A Worlds"
T 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntIntl Hunters HuntIntl Carib Carib Beach Beach Alaska |Alaska Hunters HuntIntl
i 51 51 2 4 The Bible (In Stereo) Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars No Man's Land No Man's Land "My
) 51 54 51 32 42 '14, V' PG' PG PG' *PG' PG' 'PG' "Sandmen" (N)'PG' Desert Gold"'PG'
E 24:38 24 / 31 Devious Maids 'PG' Devious Maids 'PG' Devious Maids 'PG' Devious Maids "Totally Devious Maids "An Devious Maids "An
24 38 24 31 Clean"'PG' Ideal Husband"'PG' Ideal Husband"'PG'
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J 42 41 42 C1aught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera (N) Sex Slaves- Massage Sex Slaves: The Sex Slaves- Branded
42 41 42 "Chaos in the Court" Extreme athletes. Parlors Sunshine State (N)
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109 65 109 44 53 Fight"'14' Fishin!" '14' Latitude" '14' Competition intensifies. Moon" '14' Competition intensifies.
WItRJ 28 36 28 35 25 Haunted Thunder Sam& Sam& FullH'se FullH'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
WN 103 62 103 Lindsay'PG' Lindsay'PG' Lindsay'14' Lindsay (N) '14' Lindsay (N) Lindsay'14'
XY 44 123 Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' m Snapped'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
S** "The Longest Years of Living Califomication Nurse Nurse Californication Years of Living Nurse Caliornication
340 241 340 4 **yard" (2005) N Dangerously 'PG' c Jackie Jackie (N) Dangerously (N)'PG' Jackie
r i 37 37 27 3 Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Hostile Bar Rescue "Taxed Out Bar Rescue (N) (In Contractor Contractor Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
37 43 37 27 36 ,PC' Takeover'PG' in Texas"'PG' Stereo)'PG' 'PGC'
S* "Hostage" (2005, Action) Bruce Willis, Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons ** "White House Down" (2013, Action)
370 271 370 Kevin Polla. (In Stereo) 'R' (iTV) 'MA' cc (iTV) 'MA' m Channing Tatum. (In Stereo) PG-13' c
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Y 31 59 3 26 ** "Stardust" ** "Paul" (2011, Comedy) Simon Pegg, Nick *** "Men in Black" (1997 Action) Tommy Lee *** "Sin City" (2005)
31 59 31 26 29 (2007) Claire Danes. Frost.'R'c Jones, Will Smith. PG-13 Jessica Alba.
IB 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" "Tyler Perry's Madea's Big Happy Family" "Tyler Perry's Madea's Big Happy Family"
9 5 1 3 n ***3 "The Greatest Story Ever Told" (1965) *** "Easter Parade" (1948, Musical *** "Annie Get Your Gun" (1950, Musical)
S169 53 169 30 35 Max von Sydow G'a Comedy) Judy Garland. 'NR' (DVS) Betty Hutton.'NR' cc
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E 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'PG' c Stereo)'G' cc Stereo) 'G' c Uncensored (N)'14' (In Stereo)'14' c Bolivia"'14'
T 50 46 50 29 30 The Little Couple'G' Couple |Couple Medium |Medium Medium |Medium My Five Wives 'PG' Medium Medium
i 3521 35 i "Daylight" (1996, Action) Sylvester *** "Lemony Snicket's A Series of ** "Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination
350 261 350 Stallone. (n Stereo)'PG-13' mc Unfortunate Events" (2004) Jim Carrey 'PG' London" (2004) Frankie Muniz. 'PG'
S**' "1, Robot" (2004) NBA Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N NBA Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N
LNTJ 48 33 48 31 34 Will Smith.
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32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan IGilligan Gilligan IGilligan's Island'G' iGilligan Raymond iRaymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Cleveland
S 4 o **"He's Just Not That Into You" (2009, Romance- *** "Bridesmaids"(2011) Kristen Wiig.A maid of honors Law & Order: Special
^ 47 32 47 7 18 Comedy) Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston. 'PG-13' m] life unravels as the big day approaches.R' Victims Unit'14"
t J 117 69 117 CSI: Miami "Come As CSI: Miami CSI: Miami "Internal CSI: Miami "Throwing CSI: Miami "No Man's CSI: Miami High
117 69 117 You Are"'14' "Backstabbers"'14'm Affairs"'14' c Heat"'14' Land"'14' Octane"'14' c
1W8N 818 18 18 18 20 *** "300" (2007) Gerard Butler. 'R' cc ** "Fast Five" (2011) Vin Diesel.N Salem'MA' c Salem'MA' c


Weigh what you


want from beau


D ear Annie: I have
been dating
"Pete" for three
years and never get in-
vited to his place. He
lives in a mobile home.
At first, he said he was
embarrassed for me to
visit. I did see it once
and thought it wasn't bad
at all. He has since re-
modeled the place, so I
expected to be invited
over to see
the results.
Nope.
Pete's adult
children live
with him, in-
cluding his
daughter's
boyfriend.
They have
their friends'
(and their r
mother!) over 4
all the time, ANN
but not me. MA
Pete comes to MAIL
my house
every weekend, has din-
ner with my children
and me, and spends the
night. When I ask why I
can't come to his place,
he avoids answering.
I feel used. Every
weekend, Pete has a nice
place to stay and a hot
shower in the morning,
but he won't share his
life with me. He won't
take me on vacation,
even though I'd pay my
own way He says his
money is only for his
children. Meanwhile, his
daughter won't speak to
me because I told Pete to
stop giving her his
charge card to use for


I
.I


parties when his ex-wife
comes over to stay If I
can't come over, why
should she?
I love Pete, and he
says he loves me and
wants to spend the rest
of his life with me, but I
don't understand what's
going on, and I don't like
it Do you think it's worth
investing any more time
in this relationship, or
should I move
on without
him? --Un-
happy
Dear Un-
happy: We
think Pete is so
worried about
alienating his
children that
he allows them
to set the rules,
and they have
E'S decided that
their mother is
BOX welcome, but
you are not
Unless Pete is willing to
stand up to them, this
will not change. The
same goes for the alloca-
tion of his money His
kids want it, he wants to
give it to them, and you
don't get a say in the
matter As with any rela-
tionship, you should
weigh what you want
against what you are
likely to get, and then de-
cide how to handle it.
Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcastnet.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 4:05 p.m. No passes.
"Draft Day" (PG-13)
1:35 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R)
1:30 p.m., 5 p.m.,8 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:25 p.m.,4 p.m., 7p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Oculus" (R) 1:10 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13)


1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 3:30 p.m. No passes.
"Draft Day" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Steam
6 Poets of old
11 Lampoon
16 Baffle
21 Lacking sense
22 Each and -
23 Insect stage
24 Kind of eclipse
25 Wise lawgiver
26 Sleight of hand
28 Actress
MacDowell
29 Poem
30 "--Hear a Waltz?"
32 Cable
33 Wooden duck
35 Compass pt.
36 Get some sleep
38 Haven for
gamblers
41 Roadster
43 Color
44 Small bird
45 Well-being
48 The subway in Paris
50 Go team!
52 A kind of hat
55 Withered
57 "- Fledermaus"
58 Sleepy
62 Cakes and -
63 Go very slowly
65 Leg
67 TV network
69 Lady of Spain
70 passim
71 Old name for Tokyo
72 Luis Obispo
74 Greek portico
76 Bring in
77 Related
79 Table scrap
81 Stage setting
83 Horde
85 Favorite -
86 Laundry problem
88 Peace prize name
90 Certain party mem.
92 Nation
94 Foray
96 Gent
97 Move up and down
99 Jai -
100 Of little depth
103 That man's
105 Pipe down!
107 Nine (Prefix)
110 Cereal plant


111 Pitcher
113 -operandi
115 Twosome
117 Taj Mahal's city
118 Fly
120 School in England
122 -generis
123 Coach
125 Term in golf
126 Assertion
128 Command
130 Folklore creature
132 Detest
133 From--Z
134 Extend a
membership
135 Zero
137 Salver
139 Big gun
141 Snaky swimmer
143 Copenhagen
natives
145 Satisfy
147 Stony
150 Kind of trip
152 Baking chamber
154 Playing cards
155 Skillful
159 Expert airman
160 Light wood
162 Blore or Ambler
164 Common abbr.
166 Tommy Jones
167 Monarch
169 Avid self-starter
(2 wds.)
173 -bouffe
175 Fixed look
176 Standing wide open
177 Stick
178 "Three Musketeers" au-
thor
179 Cursed
180 Worth
181 Bottle for recycling
182 Nimble


DOWN
1 Cap part
2 Battery terminal
3 Grows wan
4 Yoko-
5 Tear
6 Conviction
7 Maria
8 Rule (abbr.)
9 Sketched
10 Where Damascus is


Rained icy rain
Grier or Dawber
Toward the mouth
City in Spain
Ornate
Do in
Cask
Hot the collar
Augusta's state
Primp
Metal container
Actor Bloom
Poet's preposition
A pair
Punning poet
Mine's output
Of the ear
Complain
A Great Lake
Work unit
Confederate
soldiers
Dined
Takes no food
George or T.S.
Statement
Stand for canvas
Kitchen item
(2 wds.)
Slip
Kaye or Glover
Kind of oil
Name for a stranger
Depot (abbr.)
Pacific island group
Likewise not
Tolkien baddie
Watch part
Male cat
Jeans material
Picture puzzle
Christmas
Long river
Cry of contempt
Luau fare
Novel by Zola
Wooden rod
Cot
Until now (2 wds.)
Reduce by fifty percent
Moist
Distress call letters
Bed cover
Brass instrument
A Muse
Hank of baseball
Steal from
Payable
Banished one


19 Wool cloth 143 Prescribed amount
21 Ship of 1492 144 Eastern European
24 Seven- 146 Pep
27 Solemn fear 147 Severe
29 Flintstones'pet 148 Sharp
31 Monk's title 149 Take it easy
32 Blatant promotion 151 Shine
36 Young hare 153 Female relative
38 Likely 156 Tropical resin
40 Beatty or Rorem 157 Wild
42 Pasture 158 Pester in fun
Puzzle answer is on Page A19.


4-20


Engendered
Culture medium
Tranquil
Concluding
musical passage
Before
Above (Prefix)
Big wheel (Abbr.)
Med. specialty
Dog breed


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for FS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Public can eat
shrimp, wings at post
Everyone is welcome to join
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155 in Crystal
River on Wednesday for wings
or shrimp basket lunches in the
lounge from noon to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit veter-
ans' programs. For more infor-
mation, call 352-795-6526.

Male descendants
sought for group
The American Legion Post
166 of Homosassa Springs is
seeking all male descendants,
adopted sons and stepsons of
members of the American
Legion and such male descen-
dants of veterans who died in
the service to their country dur-
ing times of war
Such men in the Chassahow-
itzka, Homosassa, Homosassa
Springs and the Sugarmill
Woods area who are interested
in becoming members of the
Sons of the American Legion
are needed. There is no form or
class of membership, except as
active membership.
Those interested in becoming
members may contact Clay
Scott, vice commander of Amer-
ican Legion Post 166. He may
be reached by writing to Ameri-
can Legion Post 166, PO. Box
767, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447-0767, or at 928-848-8359.
His email address is eaglerider
@gmx.com.
Interested men may stop by
the post on the regular meeting
night, the first Monday monthly,
at 7 p.m. at the Spring Lodge
No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S.
Memorial Drive.

Bingo open to public
on Thursday
The public is invited to play
bingo Thursdays at American
Legion Wall-Rives Post 58.
Doors open at 4 p.m.; games
start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Post welcomes public
to come for bingo
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County


BOCC recognizes 40&8


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed the week of April 20 to April 27 as "The Society of the 40&8 Week" in
Citrus County. The 40&8 is an independent honor organization founded in 1920 by veterans returning from France and was originally an
arm of the American Legion. It is committed to charitable and patriotic aims and its purpose is to uphold and defend the Constitution, to
promote the well-being of veterans and their widows and orphans and to actively participate in selected charitable endeavors, which in-
clude programs that promote child welfare and nurses training. The title and symbols of the 40&8 reflect its World War I origins. Ameri-
cans were transported to the battle front on French trains within boxcars stenciled with a "40/8," denoting its capacity to hold either 40
men or eight horses. The local group is the Voiture 1219 (Veterans known as Voyageurs) and Cabane 1219 (Auxiliary Women or Dames).
The Voiture and Cabane are recognized for honoring members of the Citrus County Sheriff's Office and Fire Rescue for their dedication
and acts of bravery annually and also the patriotic actions of Citrus County cities and towns, and will host the Southlands Dixie
Promenade on April 24 through 26 in Crystal River. Pictured are the Board of County Commissioners, joined by representatives of the
Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219.


Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), often has special events
that are open to the public.
On a regular basis, bingo is at
1 p.m. Sunday in the smoke-
free hall.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.

Post 4252 invites all
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road
200 in Hernando (with the heli-
copter out front), welcomes the
public at its meals and activi-
ties.
Meals include lunch every
day and breakfast on Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities
include bar bingo on Tuesday


from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday
Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in
the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-
can-eat fish fry or New England
boiled dinner
For more information and
menus, call the post at 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tampa
bayrr. com and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.

DAV helps veterans
get to clinics
The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the


Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a
need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office
in Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to be
placed on the van list All ap-
pointments must be made be-
fore 1 p.m.

'In Their Words'
wants vets' stories
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-


ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit
and veterans organization affil-
iations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set
up obtaining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with your
story
See Page A19


ALL IN-STOC PO UC S O O ALE


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AGRICON ANNEX


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Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:OOpm


* Largest Full Line Inventory Factory Trained Experts


* Rental Department
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* Delivery Department
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We offer In House or On-site/Mobile Service for a variety of
services including Minor Repairs, Major Overhauls, Preventative
Maintenance, Warranty Repairs, and Annual Service.


AGRICON


KUBOTA SUPERSTORE


Two Locations
Two kon


CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
MOWERS, TRACTORS
UTILITY VEHICLES
SPREADERS
K2 % HAY TOOLS


To Serve You Best
Lecanto
4016 W. Southern St.
1 352.527.2001


Ocala
5211 W. Highway 40
352.368.2400


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V:/


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VETERANS


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 A17










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Vendors sought for health fair
Organizers of the May 10 Health Fair at
the Crystal River Mall are looking for
vendors.
The event, sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter 158 and the Crystal
River Mall, will be in the Westend Market
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Spring into Healthy Living" is the
theme for the fair, which will feature edu-
cation, screening and healthy living
consultations.
Those interested in participating may
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104.

VFW plans pork chop meal
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a
baked pork chop dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, April 25. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
The public is welcome. For more
information, call 352-465-4864.

Come eat with Post 4337
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for a ham dinner at 2 p.m.
today at the post home, 906 State Road 44
East, Inverness.
Dinner is free to members and $5 for
guests. Karaoke with Deb 2 Differ will be
from 4 to 7 p.m.
The public is also welcome at the post
for a barbecued chicken dinner at 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 26. Cost is $7. Music will be
by Red Moon.
Call 352-344-3495 or visit
wwwvfw4337.org for information about all
post activities.

DAV 158 cook-off slated
The inaugural BBQ Cook-Off sponsored
by the Crystal River DAV Chapter 158 and
the Crystal River Mall will be from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 26, outside at the
mall.
Barbecue categories include chicken,
ribs, brisket and butt. There is no gate
charge.
For information, call Duane Godfrey at
352-228-0337.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. May 2 with Nashville artist
John Thomas and the Ramblin' Fever
Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

CCVC yard sale set May 10
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically
15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call Dan at 352-
400-8952.

All welcome at post activities
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the American
Legion will have an outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m.
Saturday, May 19.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausages, orange
juice and coffee for $5 per person.
Memorial Day services will be at 11 a.m.
Monday, May 26, at the post. A picnic lunch
will follow.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
April 6, at American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.

Come play games with post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa invites the
public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m. Wednesday
and food is available. Jam sessions are
from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans Drive.


Help Cootie Auxiliary make blankets

The Military Order of the
Cootie Auxiliary Pup Tent
76 is working with
members of the Holy Faith
Episcopal Church in
Dunnellon to make plastic
mats. The mats are
.....constructed from plastic
bags and are given to
homeless veterans and
veterans in hospitals. The
church has donated many
plastic bags to be recycled
into the mats. Anyone who
would like to help crochet
mats or donate plastic
bags may call Betty at
352-795-4142.

Special to the Chronicle


Ihatsa

cootie?

The Military Order of the
Cootie of the United
States is a nonprofit
veterans service
organization. It is known
as The Honor Degree of
the VFW and members are
comprised of the officers
and leadership of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars
of the United States.
Membership in the MOC is
recognition of
outstanding service to the
VFW and its programs.
Founded in New York City
Sept. 17, 1920, the MOC
is based on the
principals
of good
humor
-- -and fun. J


Essay contest winner


Special to the Chronicle
The final eighth-grade winner of the Fleet Reserve Association Essay Contest was Krystine DeSomma of Citrus Springs
Middle School. The theme this year was "The Bill of Rights and Me." Local winners are forwarded to regional competition
for additional judging. If essays win at that level, competitors advance to national competition, where a $10,000
scholarship is awarded. From left are: Eileen Jenkin, Curriculum TOSA; Krystine DeSomma; and Bob Huscher, FRA essay
chairman.


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding each
group. For more information
about scheduled activities, meet-
ings, meals and more for a spe-
cific post or group, call or email
the contact listed. Posts and
groups may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Call 352-795-
6526, email blantonthompson
Post155@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call


352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the
Beverly Plaza. Visit
www.Post237.org or call 352-
746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at
352-476-2134 orAuxiliary presi-
dent Alice Brumett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule. Meet-
ings are the first Monday at 7
p.m. at the Springs Lodge No.
378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial
Drive, Homosassa. To accom-
modate members who cannot
drive at night, breakfast meet-
ings are also held at Olive Tree
at 9 a.m. weekly. Call Com-
mander Robert Scott at 352-


860-2090 for days and other
information.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City.
Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans


Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. Call 352-
637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S.
19. Call 352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
Military Order of the
Cootie and MOC Auxiliary
members meet at 1:01 p.m. the
first Sunday monthly at Leroy
Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in

See Page A19


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from PageA18

Hernando (3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway/State Road 200), where
the helicopter is.
AMVETS William Crow Post
447,405 E. State Road 40, Inglis,
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M. Bailey
Post 89, Homosassa. The newly
formed post meets the first Thursday
of the month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb at 352-
220-4807.
Disabled American Veterans
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter No. 70,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at
the intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-
419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Com-
mander Lucy Godfrey at 352-
794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans
Chapter No. 158, Crystal River,
meets at the Crystal River Mall. For
more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 A19


Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498 meets at
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in
Hernando. Call Susan McQuiston at
352-666-0084, or Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155,6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
National Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23 meets at
10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Coun-
try Club, Hernando. Call John Lowe
at 352-344-4702.
National Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Coun-
try Club, Hernando. Call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De


Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citruspur-
pleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of
Military Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at
the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or Secre-
tary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252
in Hernando. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or
Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,


Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Saturdays at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.
The remaining meeting in 2014 are:
April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at
West Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or email sea-
capt34447@yahoo.com or Robert
Currie at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.


Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at Elks Lodge No. 2522,
3580 Lemon Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
President Archie Gooding at 352-
464-0863 or email GatorDad0527
@tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coali-
tion is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by call-
ing 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition; call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource,
seeks to meet the needs of
wounded veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@servicesource.
org.


NEWS NOTES


NEED A REPORTER?


Case manager aids vets
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday Coastal
Regional Library 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.

Office has help for PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department offers help for veterans
who have had their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied
within the past two years are asked to
contact the office to review the case and
discuss compensation/pension examina-
tion. All veterans who have been diag-
nosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health
center and have been denied are en-
couraged to contact the Citrus County
Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to dis-
cuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial letter and a
copy of your compensation examination
by Gainesville. You can get a copy of
your exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical records or from
the primary care window in Lecanto.
For more information about the Cit-
rus County Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Transitioning vets get help
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans who
have recently transitioned from the mil-
itary (or returning reservist from tours
of active duty) to Citrus County within
the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that veter-
ans and their spouses call to be placed
on a list for an upcoming seminar,
which will discuss what benefits or serv-
ices they need to help ease transition.


IN SERVICE


The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more
information about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Memorial honors vets
Purple Heart recipients are sought to
be honored with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.

Assist USCG Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired military per-
sonnel are needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and non-law
enforcement programs such as public
education, vessel safety checks, safety
patrols search and rescue, maritime se-
curity and environmental protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uniform with
pride and your military ribbons. Crimi-
nal background check and membership
are required. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice program for vets
HPH Hospice, as a partnering agency
with the Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is trained to
provide Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique to each
military era or war It also provides
caregiver education and a recognition
program to honor veterans' services and
sacrifices.
HPH Hospice programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call 352-527-4600.

Prior enlisted sought
The U.S. Air Force is looking for prior
enlisted men and women from all serv-
ices interested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously obtained career
fields or retraining into select fields.
Some of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other spe-
cialties. Call 352-476-4915.


* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a
reporter is assigned. Call Editor Charlie Brennan at 352-563-3225 for news, or
call Logan Mosby at 352-563-5660 for features.


C04'"LE


Easter Coloring Contest Winners



jadyn, Aqe 6


Dadison, Age 9







lailey, Age 11

All contestants did a wonderful job.


Courtney J. O'Brien
Air Force Airman Courtney
J. O'Brien graduated from
basic military training at Joint
Base San Antonio-Lackland,
San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness and basic warfare prin-


ciples and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force. O'Brien earned distinc-
tion as an honor graduate.
She is the daughter of
Gwendolyn Dehass of
Dunnellon and a 2013
graduate of Lecanto High
School.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


VAPOR BARDS SPOOF STUMP
INANE EVERY LARVA LUNAR
SOLON LEGERDEMAIN ANDIE




TOLDE ORT DECOR EARMY SON


OA LWR MODU 0DU AGRA
FLEID A ET PIRI~
ARLEN NS SE NN0ON
sicR D TJ DA E FT




RULER EAGERBEAVER OPERA
4 2 R AtB yUIv Al UMAI S
SHEXEL TIWEU T ENILEA
4-20 EJ .E R0M4D UFS it yUJnivralcickfrAF


M e rii 352-597-8839 Brooksville, FL 34601


Q search Kelli K. Maw, MD, MPH
I- 6s B 0 53 Board Certified, Family Medicine

- 33^*-aaB --B wv3 -n A A A ?H 33^B


VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recognizing the


I-signs of spring


oday I saw my first
crocus popping up
after the long win-
ter It was in a picture a
friend posted on Face-
book. Suddenly, it seemed
everyone was posting pic-
tures of buds on trees,
robins on the lawn, green
shoots coming up in the
garden. It was almost
enough to make me go
outside and take a look
for myself.
But not quite. I'm only
on level 156 of "Candy
Crush," and it may take
me most of the year to get
to the 560th level, where I
will find total and com-
plete understanding of
the universe. Or become a
vegetable.
Yes, spring is in the air,
but my pollen filter
catches most of it and
scrubs it before I have to
breathe it. I see other
people posting pictures of
themselves out of doors,
pretending to enjoy the
weather, and I wonder
why they take the risk of
going outside. Why risk
getting stung by a bee or
killed by a zombie or
being hit by a meteorite
when they could be inside
playing "FarmVille" or
growing a digital garden
from the safety and com-
fort of their own base-
ment?
My weather app says it
will be near 70 today, but
they never tell you what
the wind chill will be
when the temperature
goes above freezing. It
may be 70 degrees on the
thermometer, but it might
"feel" like it's 65. I don't
think that's warm enough
to go outside in my PJs.
Besides, if spring
means anything, it means
baseball. That's right, it
means the long wait for
Fantasy Baseball is finally
over "Take me in to the
ball game, don't make me
go to the park. Make me
some pizza and Hot Pock-
ets, 'cause I don't care if I
ever go out..." Why on
earth would I leave the
house to go to a real sta-
dium when I can sit at
home in my jammies and
manage my own team? I


Jim
Mullen

VILLAGE
IDIOT


never have a bad seat,
and I've got my own per-
sonal concession stand
only a few yards away
And the parking's a
breeze.
Spring, of course, is the
time for me to start spring
cleaning, or as Sue calls
it, spring re-hoarding. She
says I never actually
throw anything away, I
just put it in different
places which is not
true at all. Why, only yes-
terday, I threw out a con-
necting cable to a
computer I haven't had
for 15 years, a VCR, VHS
tapes of things you can get
anywhere on the Internet
for free, and a box of un-
used floppy disks. I was
happy to get rid of them;
they were becoming a
burden. Besides, I had to
make room for a bunch of
new stuff I bought on
Amazon.
Of course, like everyone
else, I have a case of
spring fever I've set the
ringtone on my smart
phone to chirp like baby
birds, my screensaver is a
picture of apple trees in
blossom and I watch a lot
of videos of half-naked,
drunk college kids on
spring break. Face it, who
needs to relax more than
a bunch of 20-year-old
kids who get up at noon
and can afford $50,000 a
year to go to college? I
mean, it's not like they
could possibly wait for the
summer to do this.
Spring also means the
first commercials for
weed killers, lawn fertiliz-
ers and riding lawn mow-
ers. I have to say that I
have never fertilized my
lawn, and it looks pretty
healthy at least the
part I can see from my se-
curity cam. I think the
neighbors' dogs keep it
pretty well fertilized. And
it's funny, I've never seen
an ad for that particular
kind of fertilizer
Well, I've got to go. The
weather's so nice, I think
I'll play some computer
golf.

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Special to the Chronicle

Take Stock in Children
of Citrus County, a pro-
gram sponsored by the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, offers deserving
youths in Citrus County
the opportunity to receive
a college scholarship, a
caring mentor and the
promise of hope for the
future.
Take Stock scholars
join the program in the
sixth, seventh or eighth
grades and are assigned a
mentor who meets with


their student once a week,
during regular school
hours, and helps the stu-
dent achieve the goal of
graduating from high
school and going to
college.
Take Stock in Children
currently monitors 41 ac-
tive students enrolled in
Citrus County's middle
and high schools.
Call Pat Lancaster, pro-
gram coordinator, at 352-
422-2348 or 352-344-0855
to learn more about the
program and to sign up
for mentor training.


ENGAGED


Lucas/Miljure


Rylee Nicole Lucas
and Isaac Joseph
Miljure of Crystal River
have announced their
engagement.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of John Lucas
and Stacy Henderson.
She is a 2012 graduate
of Lecanto High School
and is on the customer
service staff of Publix in
Crystal River
Her fiance is the son


of Don and Dawn
Miljure. He is a 2009
Crystal River High
School graduate and is
a stock clerk at Publix.
The couple met at
Publix in February
2012. They became
engaged Feb. 20,2014.
Nuptial vows will be
exchanged at 4 p.m.
Feb. 20,2016, at
Lakeside Ranch in
Inverness.


New ARRIVAL

Dean Kade Stewart


50th ANNIVERSARY

TheJakobs


Rainer and Sandy
Jakob of Inverness are
celebrating their 50th
wedding anniversary
today, April 20, 2014.
The couple, who have
lived in Citrus County for
36 years, were married


April 20, 1964, in Battle
Creek, Mich. They are the
parents of Michele,
Marina and Rainer,
and have seven
grandchildren.
The Jakobs plan a
cruise to celebrate.


NEWS OF RECORD


Tim and Tara Stewart
of Apache, Okla.,
announce the birth of a
son, Dean Kade
Stewart, born March 11,
2014, at 1229 a.m. at
Duncan Regional
Hospital.
The baby weighed
7 pounds, 5 ounces and
was 19 inches long.


Grandparents are
Don and Elma Stewart
of Inverness, and Kelly
and the late Dean
Torres of Apache, Okla.
Great-grandmother is
Mathilde McAllister of
Lawton, Okla.
Dean Kade was
welcomed by his big
brother, Gannon.


WORKING TOGETHER


Gift shop needs
volunteers
The Friends of the
Community Center Inc.
operates the nonprofit
Circle of Friends Gift
Shop in support of the
Meals on Wheels Pro-
gram. The shop sells
miscellaneous giftware
items, along with jew-
elry, watches and some
high-end gifts.
Do you like to get out
of the house and be
around others in a
pleasant atmosphere?
Volunteers are needed
to run the gift shop from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. week-
days. Volunteers are
able to participate in
the Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center's RSVP Pro-
gram, where hours are
logged, and are invited
to appreciation picnics
and banquets for recog-
nition of service to Cit-
rus County, in addition
to other benefits.
This volunteer oppor-
tunity is in a pleasant
atmosphere in a busy
building, where volun-
teers can enjoy visiting
with customers. The
shop is at the Citrus
County Resource Cen-
ter, 2804 W Marc
Knighton Court,
Lecanto. For more in-
formation, call 352-527-
5975.

Drivers needed
for meal delivery
Do you have a few
hours a week to volun-
teer your time?
If so, Citrus County
Support Services has a
"feel-good" volunteer


opportunity Become a
volunteer Meals On
Wheels driver today
Each meal route con-
sists of 10 to 20 meals,
taking one to two hours
to complete, and drivers
are paid mileage.
The program espe-
cially needs drivers for
the Inverness area.
For more information,
call Support Services at
352-527-5975.


March 31-April 6, 2014
Divorces
Francis J. Bartley IV,
Homosassa vs. Kelli Bartley,
Lecanto
DanielleA. Burns,
Inverness vs. Kenneth A.
Burns, Inverness
Ronnie Wayne Thornton,
unknown address vs. Melissa
Ann Thornton, Homosassa
Nancy L. Wentworth,
Crystal River vs. David J.
McDonald, Homosassa
Springs

Marriages
John Alvarado,
Lindenhurst, N.Y/Laraine
Mary Alvarado, Lindenhurst,
N.Y.
Howard Edwin Barth,
Crystal River/Bonny Faye
Easter, Crystal River
Thomas Edward Bustetter,
Lecanto/Dianne Elizabeth
Doane, Lecanto
Joseph Jerald Calderon,
LaSalle, Ill./Samantha Paige
Claeys, Bureau, III,


Jeffrey Michael Everson,
Floral City/Amanda Jolene
Soman, Floral City
Derek Bryce Fontenot,
Beverly Hills/Kelli Rene Hum,
Beverly Hills
Curtis Edwin McNall,
Homosassa/Linda Ellen
Lytton, Homosassa
Ernest August Meyer VI,
Floral City/Amanda Brandy
Nicole Simmons, Floral City
David Lee Scheibelhoffer,
Homosassa/Stephanie Renee
Bensette, Homosassa
Allen Leroy Strickland III,
Homosassa/Krystine Lynn
Foshay, Homosassa
Richard George Tangeman,
Crystal River/Loretta Estelle
Hamilton, Wayne, Pa.
Charles Michael Tomberlin,
Crystal River/Janice Elaine
Bell, Inglis
William Joseph Townsend,
Hernando/Monica Lynn
Fisher, Hernando
Charles Thomas Waas,
Floral City/Tiffani Breiz
Carroll, Floral City


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400.


Humane Society OF CITRUS CO.

Bentley
Four-year-old Bentley is a
loving little fox terrier in
need of a new home. He is
listed as a special needs
dog, because he has some
issues with his knees that
cause them to be bent.
However, he gets around
very well and even jumps iw
up on furniture with no
problem at all. They have
been this way ever since
his previous family
adopted him and has not
worsened in the past three
years. Bentley is great
with people, neutered, up
to date on vaccinations, Special to the Chronicle
microchipped and application or view other
housebroken. An approved adoptable pets, visit
adoption application and www.roomforonemore.net.
adoption fee are required For more information, call
to adopt. To access an Karron at 352-560-0051.


Mentors needed


for Take Stock


Attention Business Owner

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Summer Camp Summer Day Care
Vacation Bible School Youth Activities & More

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A20 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


TOGETHER




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE EXCURSIONS SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 A21


Associated Press
Rabbis carry the Torah scrolls in a solemn procession during the reopening after the renovation of Germany's biggest synagogue at the Rykestrasse in Berlin, Germany. The
epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the world's fastest growing Jewish community. But despite
this stigma of Nazism, Berlin's dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union that has
continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.



Tragic past, rebirth in Berlin's Jewish community


DENIS D. GRAY
Associated Press
The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where
Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews,
seems an unlikely candidate for the world's fastest
growing Jewish community
But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlin's dynamic,
prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jew-
ish past initially attracted an influx of Jews from the
former Soviet Union. The community has kept grow-
ing with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and
smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Aus-
tralia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
And this upsurge in the Jewish population be-
lieved to be more than 40,000 has also spurred
tourism to an array of monuments, synagogues, muse-
ums and workaday places related to Jewish history
and present life in Germany's capital.
In fact you can literally trip over this history while
walking the streets and looking down on some of the
2,800 shiny brass tiles embedded in sidewalks by artist
Gunter Demnig. These palm-sized "Stolpersteine," or
stumbling stones, bear the names of those murdered
by the Nazis, and are placed in front of their onetime
homes.
Like these stones, Berlin's most prominent Jewish
sites are connected to the tragic past, but a healthy an-
tidote and probably the best way to begin a tour is a
visit to the Jewish Museum, a multi-layered panorama
of 1,000 years of Jewish culture, lore and history in
Germany And it's housed in one of the city's most
striking contemporary buildings, a jagged structure
coated with silvery zinc plates and punctured by
slanted windows slits.
"What we didn't want to do is just present the death,
persecution, prejudice. There was a great deal of nor-
mal life, regular life too. Before you die, you live and
we want to stress the living," says Cilly Kugelmann,
the museum's vice director
Exhibits include vivid recreations of family life
from 1850-1933 through paintings, writings, everyday
artifacts and even a 16mm home movie, showing a
family skiing, swimming and playing with their dog be-
fore moving to California in the 1930s. Although past
suffering is starkly portrayed, there are also games
and cartoons for children and displays celebrating
prominent German Jews from poet Heinrich Heine to
jeans inventor Levi Strauss.
If you want a glimpse of what city life was like in
1929, before the diaspora from Berlin of some 80,000
Jews, stop by to watch "People on Sunday" a short
silent film of residents enjoying a sunny weekend
made by Billy Wilder, an Austrian-born Jew who was
to become one of Hollywood's great directors.
Perhaps the most gripping of Berlin's Jewish sites is
the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. Many


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY CIIJ\IC [.
Art Center Theatre


do a double-take when in the bustling heart of the city,
between the Potsdamer Platz and the Bradenburg
Gate, they are suddenly confronted with a vast cluster
of 2,711 coffin-like slabs of concrete.
The impact is most visceral when wandering
through the labyrinth formed by the greyish rectan-
gles. The sepulchral chill, abetted by a bleak winter
sun and a few bare trees, is only lifted by children
playing hide and seek within the maze.
Just north of this historic center is the Scheunen-
viertel, the Jewish Quarter, an area of sedate 19th cen-
tury apartment buildings, contemporary art galleries
and lively side-streets.
The centerpiece is the soaring New Synagogue.
With 3,200 seats, it was Germany's largest before it was
bombed in 1943. Partially reconstructed, it now serves
as a museum about the synagogue and the former sur-
rounding community Worship does take place at two
other synagogues and some 10 houses of prayer-
compared to the 33 synagogues in pre-war Berlin.
Close by, the former Jewish Girls School has been
converted to an art gallery, a museum to the Kennedy
family and a New York-style Jewish deli, Mogg and
Melzer (pastrami sandwiches and New York cheese-
cake are the hot items).
The boy's school, now co-ed, reopened in 1993as the
Gymnasium Moses Mendelsohn. Like at most Jewish
sites, there is substantial security, but outside the ele-
gant building, knots of students snack, check their mo-
bile phones and sprinkle their German with hip
English phrases.
Only a few tombstones remain in the neighboring
17th century Jewish Cemetery, burial site of some
12,000. It was destroyed by the Nazis in 1943. Down the
street, set in a small park, is the Deserted Room in-
stallation a table and two chairs, one knocked over
- that symbolizes the sudden eviction of Jews from
their homes.


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NORWEGIAN PEARL Rates Starting fit
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And within a narrow courtyard, in what is known as
the Haus Schwarzenberg, are three small museums,
probably the most moving dedicated to an Otto Weidt.
Nearly blind himself, the Christian owner of a work-
shop producing brooms and brushes hired blind and
deaf Jews and protected them from the Gestapo. The
museum includes a room hidden by a cabinet where
he secreted an entire family
Several agencies offer walking tours of this quarter,
but tourism here is low-keyed and free of the reconsti-
tuted 'Jewish villages" and cultural shows found in
some East European countries to attract visitors in
search of a vanished way of life.
Those wishing to delve deeper into real and current
Jewish life in Berlin can visit the functioning syna-
gogues, check on ongoing community activities, eat
kosher and hang out at restaurants like Shiloh, Zula
and Sababa favored by young Israeli residents.
Visitors who do will find a diverse and sometimes
divided population: ultra-Orthodox to various reform
branches to non-believers, immigrants from the for-
mer Soviet Union and those with roots in Germany
(fistfights have broken out between the two).
"As the city of Berlin is recreating itself, Berlin Ju-
daism is. There are so many fights, but also many op-
portunities, a lot of creative people, new ideas. At
least it is never boring," says Gabriele Noa Laron, gen-
eral manager of the well-established Honey and Milk
Tours.
Still, today's Jewish Berlin is still a far cry from the
pre-Nazi era with its population of some 160,000. Only
8,000 were left when the war ended.
"If people come to Berlin they don't see real Jewish
culture, but they see landmarks of the Jewish past,
landmarks of destruction of Jewish culture," says
Kugelmann. "When you visit you have to be a kind of
archaeologist to decipher the Jewish past here, like
reading the hieroglyphics of the Rosetta Stone."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A22 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


et
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SPORTS


Clippers, Warriors
keep it closer in
series opener./B3




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE --


Donald shoots 66, takes lead at RBC Heritage


Associated Press
HILTON HEAD ISLAND,
S.C. Luke Donald believes
he's got the right game on the
right course and is ready to
make up for so many near-
misses at the RBC Heritage.
Donald had an eagle and six
birdies to shoot 66 on Saturday
and take a two-stroke lead over
John Huh after three rounds at
Harbour Town Golf Links. The
Englishman has done just about
everything on Harbour Town
the past five times he's played
- except win.
He fell in a playoff to Brandt
Snedeker here in 2011, part of a
run of four top-3 finishes since
at the tricky, Pete Dye design.
Now, he'll carry the lead into
the final day and is ready to


make it stand up on Sunday
"If I can go out as relaxed and
confident as I was today tomor-
row," he said. "If I can control
the trajectory (of shots) as well
as I did today, then hopefully I'll
be sitting here as the winner"
It has been a long time since
Donald has been able to say that.
Once the world's top-ranked
golfer, Donald has changed
coaches and the transition back
to the top has not come as quickly
as planned. The last of his five
PGA Tour wins came in 2012,
his best showing this year was a
tie for fourth at the Valspar
Championship last month and
he was quickly bounced at the
Masters after shooting 79-70.
Donald acknowledged he has
grown anxious waiting to win
again.


"I was the former world No. 1
and was there for a long time
and obviously slipped down,"
said Donald, currently 29th.
"But I haven't felt my game had ,
gotten that much worse."
Certainly not at Harbour Town. ...........
Donald's round got started
with a 25-footer for eagle on the
par-5 second hold. He added
four more on the next six holes.
Donald then tied leader
Nicholas Thompson with a
birdie on the 14th before
stretching his lead with a final.....
one by rolling in a 15-foot putt
on the par-3 17th.
Donald nearly closed with a
flourish when his approach on
the closing, lighthouse hole Associated Press
nearly landed in the cup on the Kevin Stadler flips his ball Saturday while waiting for one of his playing
partners to putt on the fifth green during the third round of the RBC
See Page 133 Heritage golf tournament in Hilton Head Island, S.C.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Wil Myers is congratulated by teammates after a three-run home run his second of he game during the fifth inning
Saturday in St. Petersburg, Fla. Rays catcher Ryan Hanigan also hit two home runs, and third baseman Evan Longoria went deep once. The
trio accounted for 12 of the Rays' 16 runs.




SIXTEEN FIVES

ARCHER ALLOWS 1 RUN THROUGH SEVEN INNINGS,

LINEUP GOES DEEP AS RAYS CLOBBER YANKEES 16-1


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG
R yan Hanigan homered
twice and had six RBIs,
and Chris Archer con-
tinued his dominance over the
Yankees as the Tampa Bay Rays
routed New York 16-1 on Satur-
day night.
Hanigan drove in his final
two runs with a single off Yan-
kees infielder Dean Anna, who
gave up two runs and three hits
in the eighth inning.


Archer (2-1) allowed one run
and three hits in 6 2-3 innings.
Wil Myers, who also homered
twice, and Evan Longoria both
drove in four runs for the Rays.
Yankees starter Ivan Nova (2-2)
gave up a career-high four home
runs before leaving in the fifth
with right elbow soreness. The
right-hander allowed eight runs
and eight hits in four-plus innings.
Myers hit his second homer of
the game, a three-run shot offMatt
Daley during a four-run fifth as
the Rays took a 10-1 lead. The 2013


AL Rookie of the Year ended a
10-game RBI drought by driving
in three runs in Tampa Bay's 11-5
victory Friday night.
Longoria hit his 164th homer,
which broke a tie with Carlos Pena
for the most in Rays history
Myers put the Rays up 1-0 on
his first homer since Sept. 16 in
the second.
The Rays went ahead 4-0 in
the third when Hanigan had a
solo homer and Longoria added
a two-run shot off Nova. It was
the first time Nova had given up


multiple homers in a game
since Aug. 21, 2012 when the
Chicago White Sox hit a pair
Hanigan extended the lead to
6-0 on his a two-run shot during
the fourth.
Yankees right fielder Carlos
Beltran went 0 for 3 as the des-
ignated hitter after sitting out
Friday because of left shoulder
and right wrist soreness. He
flipped over the short wall
down the right-field line while
chasing Desmond Jennings'
foul ball Thursday


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B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NewYork
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
Boston




Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Miami
Philadelphia


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Cardinals 4,
Nationals 3
St. Louis Washington
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt3b 4 1 1 0 Spancf 5 02 0
Jaycf-rf 4 0 2 0 Harper If 3 0 0 0
Hollidyl If 4 0 1 1 Frndsnl If 2 00 1
CMrtnzp 0 00 0 Werth rf 5 01 0
Rosnthlp 0 0 0 0 LaRochIlb 3 1 1 0
MAdmslb 4 0 1 0 Rendon3b 4 02 1
Craig rf-lf 2 1 0 0 Dsmndss 3 0 1 0
JhPerltss 4 1 0 0 Espinos2b 4 1 1 1
Wong 2b 3 00 0 Leonc 2 00 0
Siegristp 0 00 0 McLothph 1 00 0
Bourjoscf 1 00 0 Zmrmnp 2 00 0
T.Cruzc 4 1 2 2 TMooreph 1 00 0
Lynnp 2 0 1 1 Detwilrp 0 00 0
M.Ellis2b 1 00 0 Waltersph 0 1 0 0
Totals 33 48 4 Totals 353 8 3
St. Louis 030 000 100 4
Washington 000 010 011 3
E-Rendon (1). DP-St. Louis 1, Washington 1.
LOB-St. Louis 5, Washington 9.2B-Lynn (1),
LaRoche (3), Rendon (6). HR-Espinosa (1).
CS T.Cruz (1).
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
LynnW,4-0 52-35 1 1 3 5
SiegristH,5 1 1 0 0 0 2
C.MartinezH,5 11-32 1 1 0 2
Rosenthal S,5-5 1 0 1 1 1 1
Washington
ZimmermannL,1-1 7 7 4 1 2 6
Detwiler 2 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Zimmermann (M.Ellis). Balk-Rosenthal.
T-2:44.A-41,084(41,408).

Cubs 8, Reds 4


Cincinnati Chicago
ab r h bi
BHmltncf 5 1 3 0 Bonifaccf
Vottolb 4 1 2 0 Lake If
Phillips 2b 5 0 0 0 Strop p
Brucerf 3 1 3 1 Rizzolb
Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 Valuen 3b
HeiseylIf 4 1 1 0 Ruggin rf
Mesorc c 4 0 2 1 SCastro ss
Cozartss 4 0 0 1 Olt3b-lb
Cingrn p 2 0 0 0 Castillo c
B.Penaph 1 0 0 0 Barney2b
Ondrskp 0 0 0 0 EJcksnp
Christnp 0 00 0 Wrghtp
Berndn ph 1 0 0 0 Kalish ph
Hooverp 0 00 0 HRndnp
Sweeny ph-
Totals 37 4113 Totals
Cincinnati 000 002 200
Chicago 111 003 20x
E-Mesoraco (1), Olt (2). DP-C
Chicago 1. LOB-Cincinnati 8, Chic
Mesoraco 2 (5). HR-Olt (3), Cas
ney (1). SB-B.Hamilton (6), B
CS-S.Castro (1).
IP H R EFR
Cincinnati
CingraniL,1-2 5 4 3
Ondrusek 2-3 4 3 3
Christiani 11-33 2
Hoover 1 0 0
Chicago
E.Jackson W,1-1 52-38 2
W.WrightH,1 1-3 0 0
H.Rondon 2 3 2
Strop 1 0 0
T-3:20.A-32,966(41,072).

Brewers 8, Pira
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab r h bi
CGomzcf 5 00 0 Marte lf
Segura ss 5 22 0 RMartn c
Braunrf 5 4 3 3 AMcCtcf
ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 1 PAIvrz 3b
Lucroy c 5 1 3 2 Tabata rf
KDavisIf 5 0 1 1 I.Davis lb
MrRynllb 3 1 1 1 NWalkr2b
Weeks 2b 2 0 0 0 Barmes ss
Genett ph-2b1 0 0 0 WRdrg p
Garza p 2 0 0 0 Sniderph
Bianchi ph 1 0 1 0 Morris p
Wooten p 0 00 0 Mercer ph
Duke p 0 00 0 Watson p
EHerrr ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p
Hndrsn p 0 00 0 GSnchz ph
FrRdrgp 0 00 0 Grillip
Totals 39 8128 Totals
Milwaukee 012 110 102
Pittsburgh 010 501 000
E Weeks (2). DP-Milwaukee 2,
LOB-Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 7.
(3), Lucroy 3 (9), A.McCutchen (6)
HR-Braun 2(5), Mar.Reynolds (4). S
IP H R EFR
Milwaukee
Garza 5 8 6
Wooten 11-32 1
Duke 2-3 0 0
HendersonW,2-0 1 1 0
Fr.RodriguezS,6-6 1 0 0
Pittsburgh
W.Rodriguez 4 6 4 4
Morris 2 2 11
Watson H,4 1 2 1
MelanconH,7 1 0 0
Grilli L,0-1 BS,2-6 1 2 2
HBP-by Fr.Rodriguez (RAIvare
(Ar.Ramirez). WP-Morris.
T-3:04. A-32,490 (38,362).


Interleag

Marlins 7, Maril
Seattle Miami
ab r h bi
Almontcf 4 0 0 0 Yelich lf
BMillerss 3 0 0 0 Ozunacf
Cano 2b 3 00 0 Stanton rf
Smoaklb 3 00 0 McGeh3b
MSndrs rf 3 0 0 0 Sltlmch c
Seager3b 3 0 0 0 JeBakrlb
Rodney p 0 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss
Ackley If 3 0 1 0 Solano 2b
Zuninoc 3 0 1 0 HAIvrz p
Elias p 2 0 0 0
Farqhrp 0 000
Frnkln3b 1 000
Totals 28 02 0 Totals
Seattle 000 000 000
Miami 001 104 01x
E-Almonte (1). DP-Seattle 1, MiM
Seattle 1, Miami 8. 2B-Zunino (3
Hechavarria (4). HR-Ozuna (3). S-
IP H R EFR
Seattle
Elias L,1-2 52-38 6
Farquhar 11-30 0
Rodney 1 2 1
Miami
H.AlvarezW,1-2 9 2 0
WP-Rodney. PB-Zunino. Balk-E
T-2:20. A-24,003 (37,442).


Str Home Away
L-2 6-3 4-5
W-2 3-3 7-5
W-2 6-4 3-5
L-1 4-4 4-4
W-13-5 5-5



Str Home Away
W-2 4-2 8-3
L-1 5-4 5-4
L-2 2-6 6-3
W-2 8-4 0-6
L-1 4-5 3-4


Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
6 .571 4
7 .563 6
9 .471 1% 1/2 5
9 .471 1/2 1/2 5
10 .412 21 221 3


10 Str Home Away
-6 W-1 6-3 2-3
-4 W-5 6-2 3-5
-5 L-3 6-4 2-5
-5 L-2 5-4 3-5
-7 L-3 3-5 4-5


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 13 5 .722 7-3 W-2 5-4 8-1
St. Louis 11 7 .611 2 6-4 W-1 4-2 7-5
Pittsburgh 8 10 .444 5 2/2 3-7 L-2 5-4 3-6
Cincinnati 7 10 .412 5/2 3 5-5 L-1 4-5 3-5
Chicago 5 11 .313 7 4/2 3-7 W-1 3-5 2-6


W
Oakland 12
Texas 10
Los Angeles 8
Seattle 7
Houston 5


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC L
5 .706 8
7 .588 2 7
9 .471 4 11/2
10 .412 5 2/2 :
13 .278 7/2 5 :


West Division
L Pct GB WC
7 .588 -
7 .588 -
9 .500 1/2 1/2
9 .471 2 2
14 .263 6 6


Str Home
W-2 5-3
W-4 8-3
L-1 3-6
L-5 2-3
L-6 3-7



Str Home
L-1 2-4
L-2 5-4
W-2 5-2
W-1 6-5
W-1 1-11


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz watches his home run in front of Baltimore Orioles catcher
Matt Wieters in the fourth inning Saturday in Boston.



Ortiz, Red Sox snap Orioles' streak


Associated Press


ab r h bi BOSTON Brock Holt hit a
5 2 3 0 tiebreaking triple in the seventh
401 1
0 0 0 0 inning and scored on Jonathan
2 0 0 0 Herrera's suicide squeeze, lifting
0 0 0 0 the Boston Red Sox over the Bal-
3121 timore Orioles 4-2 on Saturday
401 1
4 11 1 David Ortiz had a solo homer
4 2 2 2 and two hits for the World Series
4 1 1 2 champion Red Sox, who have won
2 0 0 0 three of four

0 1 0 0 Nelson Cruz had a pair of run-
0000 scoring singles for the Orioles,
if 1 0 0 0 who had a three-game winning
338118 streak halted.
-4
8 Junichi Tazawa (1-0) pitched 1
Cincinnati 2, 1/3 hitless innings of relief. Koji
cago 6.2B- Uehara struck out three after a
tillo (3), Bar- leadoff walk for his fourth save.
onifacio (8). The benches emptied briefly in

R BB SO the seventh after Bud Norris (0-2)
threw high and tight to David
3 4 3 Ross, who was trying to sacrifice.
21 1 Ross yelled something, but Ori-
0 0 1 oles catcher Matt Wieters stepped
in between and both sides re-
2 2 5 treated to the dugouts.

1 0 1 Blue Jays 5, Indians 0
0 0 1 CLEVELAND-- Mark Buehrle

S pitched shutout ball into the eighth in-
AieS 7 ning and remained unbeaten this sea-
son, leading the Toronto Blue Jays
ab r h bi over the Cleveland Indians 5-0.
5020
5 1 1 0 Jose Reyes hit an RBI single in his
4 1 1 1 first game since opening day, when he
4 1 0 0 strained his left hamstring in his first

3 2 2 0 at-bat of the season and went on the
3 0 1 1 disabled list.
4 1 1 2 Buehrle (4-0) lowered his ERA to
1 0 1 2 0.64 in four starts.
0 0 0 0 The left-hander who once pitched a
1 0 0 0 perfect game was pulled after giving
0 0 0 0 up a single and walk to start the

1 0 0 0 eighth. He allowed four hits overall,
0 0 0 0 struck out three and walked three.
37711 7 A gl
3- 1 Tigers 5, Angels 2
-7
Pittsburgh 1. DETROIT Max Scherzer struck
2B-Segura out nine in seven innings and the De-
), I.Davis (2). troit Tigers finally managed to beat the
B-Marte (7). Los Angeles Angels 5-2.
R BB SO Lo
Detroit had lost 10 straight to the
5 3 2 Angels and hadn't beaten them since
1 0 3 Aug. 26, 2012. The Tigers snapped
00 1
0 0 1 that skid behind a sharp outing by
0 0 0 Scherzer and home runs from Nick
Castellanos and Victor Martinez.
41 3
1 1 0 Albert Pujols hit his 498th homer,
1 0 1 connecting for a solo shot in the ninth.
0 0 2 Scherzer (1-1) allowed a run and
201
z), by Grilli three hits with two walks.
C.J. Wilson (2-2) gave up three
earned runs in five innings.

Fue Royals 5, Twins 4
S KANSAS CITY, Mo. Bruce Chen

Iers 0 labored through five innings before the
Kansas City Royals' bullpen took over,
ab r h bi shutting down the Minnesota Twins
3 2 1 0 the rest of the way in a 5-4 victory.
4 1 2 4 The Royals have won five straight

4 0 1 1 after getting swept last weekend in
3 0 0 0 Minnesota.
4 oo 0 0 Chen (1-1) allowed all four runs on

4 1 2 0 eight hits and four walks, but the dam-
2 1 1 1 age could have been worse. He twice
walked the bases loaded, and his only
clean inning was the first, when Brian
31710 6 Dozier hit a fly out that nearly left the park.
0 Still, a five-run fourth inning off
7 Kevin Correia (1-1) staked Chen to a
amni 1. LOB--
3), Yelich (4), lead, and his bullpen made it stand
-H.Alvarez 2. up.
R BB SO Danny Duffy tossed two scoreless
4 5 5 innings, and Wade Davis navigated a
S1 2 perfect eighth before turning the game
1 0 1 over to All-Star closer Greg Holland.
04 He set down the top of the Minnesota
Elias lineup in order for his sixth save in as
many chances.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Toronto 3, Cleveland 2
L.A. Angels 11, Detroit 6
Baltimore 8, Boston 4
Tampa Bay 11, N.YYankees 5
Miami 8, Seattle 4
Texas 12, Chicago White Sox 0
Kansas City 5, Minnesota 0
Oakland 11, Houston 3
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Cleveland 0
Detroit 5, L.A. Angels 2
Boston 4, Baltimore 2
Kansas City 5, Minnesota 4
Oakland 4, Houston 3
Tampa Bay 16, N.YYankees 1
Miami 7, Seattle 0
Chicago White Sox at Texas, late
Sunday's Games
Toronto (Morrow 1-1) at Cleveland (Carrasco 0-2), 1:05 p.m.
Angels (H.Santiago 0-2) at Detroit (Porcello 1-1), 1:08 p.m.
Seattle (Maurer 0-0) at Miami (Slowey 0-0), 1:10 p.m.
Yankees (Nuno 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Ramos 0-1), 1:40 p.m.
Minnesota (Hughes 0-1) at Kansas City (Ventura 1-0), 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Johnson 0-1) at Texas (Ross Jr. 1-0),
3:05 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 0-1) at Oakland (Chavez 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Jimenez 0-3) at Boston (Peavy 0-0), 7:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 1
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 3, St. Louis 1
Atlanta 6, N.Y Mets 0
Miami 8, Seattle 4
Colorado 12, Philadelphia 1
Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 2, 12 innings
San Diego 2, San Francisco 1
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 4, Washington 3
Chicago Cubs 8, Cincinnati 4
Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 7
Atlanta 7, N.Y Mets 5
Miami 7, Seattle 0
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late
Philadelphia at Colorado, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
Atlanta (Hale 0-0) at N.Y Mets (Wheeler 1-2), 1:10 p.m.
Seattle (Maurer 0-0) at Miami (Slowey 0-0), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Cole 2-1), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Miller 1-2) at Washington (Strasburg 1-2), 1:35 p.m.
Cindnnat (Bailey 0-1) at Chicago Cubs (VMllanueva 1-3), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (Cdlmenter 0-1) at Dodgers (Beckett 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hernandez 1-0) at Colorado (Nicasio 2-0),
4:10 p.m.
San Frandsco (Lincecum 0-1) at San Diego (Erlin 1-1), 4:10 p.m.


Athletics 4, Astros 3
OAKLAND, Calif. Josh Reddick
hit an RBI single that capped a three-
run rally in the ninth inning, lifting the
Oakland Athletics over the Houston
Astros 4-3 on Saturday.
The Astros lost their sixth in a row.
Jed Lowrie started the comeback
with a leadoff home run against Chad
Quails (0-1).
Josh Donaldson walked and Yoenis
Cespedes then singled. After Quails
struck out pinch-hitter John Jaso, Al-
berto Callaspo hit a tying single and
Reddick followed with a one-out liner
to right-center.
Dan Otero (3-0) pitched the ninth
for the win after starter Scott Kazmir
went eight strong innings.

INTERLEAGUE

Marlins 7, Mariners 0
MIAMI Henderson Alvarez won
for the first time since his no-hitter to
end the 2013 season, pitching a two-
hitter to help the Miami Marlins beat
the Seattle Mariners 7-0 Saturday.
Alvarez (1-2) retired the first 15 bat-
ters en route to the third complete
game of his career. He struck out four,
walked none and threw 90 pitches.
He also had a two-out RBI single in
the sixth to make it 3-0.
The Mariners lost their fifth game in
a row and were shut out for the fourth
time.
Marcell Ozuna had a three-run
homer, his third, and an RBI single to
hike his average to .343. Adeiny
Hechavarria contributed three hits,
scored twice and made two fine plays.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cardinals 4, Nationals 3
WASHINGTON Lance Lynn won
his fourth straight start and the St.
Louis Cardinals took advantage of an-
other shaky fielding performance by
Washington, scoring three unearned
runs to beat Jordan Zimmermann and
the Nationals 4-3.
Tony Cruz drove in two runs for the
Cardinals, who have won nine of the
last 10 games between the teams. St.
Louis took control with a three-run
second inning fueled by third base-
man Anthony Rendon's throwing error.
Lynn (4-0) gave up one run and five
hits over 5 2/3 innings in becoming the
NL's first four-game winner.

Cubs 8, Reds 4
CHICAGO Darwin Barney and
Welington Castillo hit two-run homers
and Mike Olt added a solo shot as the
Chicago Cubs broke out of a week-
long offensive funk and beat the
Cincinnati Reds 8-4.
Since scoring four times last Sun-
day in St. Louis, the Cubs had man-
aged just one run before beating the
Reds. Cincinnati had won 16 of the
last 17 at Wrigley Field.
Emilio Bonifacio had three hits and
scored a pair of runs for the Cubs.
Junior Lake, Starlin Castro and Justin
Ruggiano each drove in a run.
Edwin Jackson (1-1) allowed two
runs and eight hits in 5 2-3 innings.
Tony Cingrani (1-2) gave up three
runs in five innings.
Jay Bruce went 3 for 3 with a walk
for the Reds.

Brewers 8, Pirates 7
PITTSBURGH Ryan Braun hit
two homers, including a two-run shot
with two outs in the ninth inning that
sent the Milwaukee Brewers over the
Pittsburgh Pirates 8-7 Saturday night.
Braun has five home runs this sea-
son after being suspended for the final
65 games last year in the Biogenesis
drug scandal.
The go-ahead drive came off Pi-
rates closer Jason Grilli (0-1), his sec-
ond blown save in six opportunities.
Jean Segura's two-out single kept the
inning going for Braun, who had three
hits and three RBIs.
Jonathan Lucroy hit three doubles
and drove in two runs for the Brewers.
Mark Reynolds hit his fourth homer.
Ike Davis doubled, singled and
walked a day after the Pirates got him
in a trade with the Mets.

Braves 7, Mets 5
NEW YORK Jordan Walden got
the final out with the bases loaded
after Atlanta manager Fredi Gonzalez
pulled star closer Craig Kimbrel, and the
Braves held off the New York Mets 7-5.
Freddie Freeman had three hits and
hustled his way through a weird play
that brought the Braves two runs
when the Mets were unable to chal-
lenge a costly incorrect call.
Justin Upton hit a three-run homer
in the ninth to make it 7-3.
The Mets scored twice off Kimbrel, who
loaded the bases with a two-out walk
to Lucas Duda. That's when Gonzalez
went to the mound and lifted Kimbrel,
who didn't look happy about it. He
waited for an extra moment or two be-
fore reluctantly handing over the ball.
Walden retired Travis d'Arnaud on a
grounder to end it. Gold Glove short-
stop Andrelton Simmons was shading
toward the hole and made a strong
throw to get d'Arnaud.


BASEBALL


Baltimore


Boston


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Markks rf 3 1 2 0 GSizmr rf 4 00 0
DYongdh 4 00 0 Pedroia2b 3 12 0
A.Jonescf 3 1 1 0 D.Ortizdh 4 12 1
C.Davislb 3 0 0 0 Napolilb 4 0 1 1
N.Cruzl If 4 0 2 2 Carp If 2 1 0 0
Wietersc 3 00 0 JGomsl If 0 00 0
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 D.Rossc 3 00 0
Schoop3b 4 00 0 Holt3b 3 1 1 1
Lmrdzz2b 4 00 0 JHerrrss 2 00 1
BrdlyJrcf 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 25 2 Totals 284 6 4
Baltimore 100 001 000 2
Boston 100 100 20x 4
E-Schoop (3), Holt (1). DP-Baltimore 3,
Boston 1. LOB-Baltimore 7, Boston 3. 2B-
A.Jones (3), Pedroia (5). 3B-Holt (1). HR-
D.Ortiz (3). SB-Markakis (1), A.Jones (2).
SJ.Herrera.
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
B.Norris L,0-2
Meek
R.Webb
Boston
Doubront
Tazawa W, 1-0
Uehara S,4-4


61-35 4
2-3 0 0
1 1 0

62-35 2
11-30 0
1 0 0


HBP-by Doubront (C.Davis).
T-2:47. A-37,689 (37,071).
Blue Jays 5, Indians 0


Toronto Cleveland
ab r h bi
Reyesss 5 0 1 1 ACarerss
MeCarrlf 5 1 2 0 Swisherlb
Bautistrf 4 2 1 1 Kipnis2b
Encrnclb 5 1 1 0 CSantndh
Navarr c 4 0 2 3 Raburn If
Rasms cf 4 0 0 0 Brantly cf
Lawrie3b 2 1 0 0 YGomsc
Frncscdh 3 0 1 0 DvMrprf
Goins2b 4 0 1 0 Aviles3b
Totals 36 59 5 Totals
Toronto 210 000 200
Cleveland 000 000 000


ab r h bi
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
2000
4000
4 00 0
3000
4010
2010
2010
29 0 4 0
2 0 1 0
2 0 1 0
290 4 0
5
0


DP Toronto 2. LOB Toronto 8, Cleveland 7.
2B-Me.Cabrera (5), Encarnacion (5). 3B-
Me.Cabrera (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
BuehrleW,4-0 7 4 0 0 3 3
Rogers 2 0 0 0 1 4
Cleveland
KluberL,1-2 62-39 5 4 3 3
Rzepczynski 11-30 0 0 1 1
B.Wood 1 0 0 0 0 2
Buehrle pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Buehrle (Kipnis). WP-Buehrle. PB-
YGomes.
T-2:42.A-15,188 (42,487).
Tigers 5, Angels 2


Los Angeles Detroit
ab r h bi
Shuck If 4 1 1 1 RDavisIf
Troutcf 4 0 0 0 Kinsler2b
Pujolsdh 3 1 1 1 MiCarrlb
Ibanezlb 4 00 0 VMrtnzdh
HKndrc2b 3 0 1 0 TrHntrrf
IStewrt3b 3 0 0 0 AJcksncf
Aybarss 3 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b
Congerc 3 0 1 0 Holadyc
Boesch rf 3 00 0 AnRmnss
Totals 30 24 2 Totals


ab r h bi
3010
4001
4110
2121
4000
3121
4112
4120
3010
31 510 5
4 0 0 1
4 1 1 0
2 1 2 1
4 0 0 0
3 1 2 1
4 1 1 2
4 1 2 0
3 0 1 0
31 510 5


Los Angeles 100 000 001 2
Detroit 021 010 01x 5
E-Boesch (1). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Los Ange-
les 3, Detroit 10. 2B-Mi.Cabrera (5). HR-
Shuck(2), Pujols(6),V.Martinez(3), Castellanos
(2). SB-I.Stewart (1). CS-R.Davis (2). SF-
Kinsler, A.Jackson.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
C.Wilson L,2-2 5 7 4 3 3 4
YHerrera 2 2 0 0 1 2
Wall 1 1 1 1 2 0
Detroit
ScherzerW, l-1 7 3 1 1 2 9
Chamberlain H,2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Nathan 1 1 1 1 0 2
WP-C.Wilson.
T-3:13. A-36,659 (41,681).
Athletics 4, Astros 3


Houston

Altuve 2b
Fowler cf
Guzmn lb
Springr rf
Carter dh
MDmn3b
Hoes If
Corprn c
Villar ss



Totals
Houston
Oakland


32


Oakland
r h bi
0 1 0 Gentry cf
0 0 0 Crisp ph-cf
0 0 0 Lowrie ss
0 1 0 Dnldsn3b
1 1 0 Cespdslf
01 1 DNorrsc
0 1 0 Jaso ph
0 0 0 Callaspdh
2 2 1 Reddck rf
Punto 2b
Barton lb
Moss ph-lb
37 2 Totals
001 110 000
001 000 003


ab r h bi
3021
1000
5111
4110
4120
3000
1000
5011
5031
4030
3110
1000
39414 4
3 0 2 1
1 0 0 0
5 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
4 1 2 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
5 0 1 1
5 0 3 1
4 0 3 0
3 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
39414 4
3
4


One out when winning run scored.
E-Donaldson (4), D.Norris (1). DP-Oakland
3. LOB-Houston 4, Oakland 14.2B-Springer
(1), Carter (5), Hoes (1), Villar (3), Gentry (1),
Donaldson (5), Barton (1). HR-Villar (3),
Lowrie (2). SB-Altuve 2 (7), Villar (4), Gentry (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Oberholtzer 52-38 1 1 2 3
BassH,1 11-30 0 0 1 0
AlbersH,3 1 2 0 0 0 0
Qualls L,0-1 BS,1-2 1-3 4 3 3 1 1
Oakland
Kazmir 8 6 3 2 0 5
OteroW,3-0 1 1 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Kazmir (Carter).
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Seth Buckminster; Third, Mike
Muchlinski.
T-3:07. A-33,166 (35,067).


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 16, Yankees 1
NewYork Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Ellsury cf 3 0 1 0 DeJess cf-lf 6 0 0 0
SSizmr1b-3b1l0 0 0 Zobrist2b-ss 5 3 3 0
Gardnrl If-cf 4 0 0 0 Joycedh 4 2 2 0
Beltrandh 3 00 0 Longori3b 3 22 4
ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 Guyercf 1 00 0
McCnnc 2 0 0 0 Loneylb 4 32 1
JMrphyph-cl 00 0 Myers rf 4 43 4
ASorin rf-lf 3 1 1 0 SRdrgz lf-2b 5 0 0 0
Solarte 3b-ss3 0 0 0 YEscorss 3 0 1 0
KJnsn lb-lf-1b3 0 1 1 Forsyth 3b 1 0 0 0
BRorts2b 3 00 0 Hanignc 4 23 6
Annass-p 3 000
Totals 29 13 1 Totals 40161615
NewYork 000 010 000 1
TampaBay 013 244 02x 16
E-Solarte (1). LOB-NewYork 1, Tampa Bay 6.
2B-K.Johnson (3), Zobrist (2), Joyce (4), Loney
(6), Myers (3). HR-Longoria (2), Myers 2 (2),
Hanigan 2 (3). CS-Ellsbury (2). SF-Longoria.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
NovaL,2-2 4 8 8 8 1 4
Daley 11-35 6 4 2 0
Betances 12-30 0 0 2 3
Anna 1 3 2 2 0 0
Tampa Bay
Archer W,2-1 62-33 1 1 0 4
Riefenhauser 11-30 0 0 0 0
Lueke 1 0 0 0 0 2
Nova pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, Clint
Fagan; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West.
T-3:15. A-30,159 (31,042).

Red Sox 4, Orioles 2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




RBC Heritage
par scores
Saturday at HarbourTown Golf Links,
Hilton Head, S.C.
Purse: $5.8 millionYardage: 7,101, Par: 71,
Third Round, a-denotes amateur:
Luke Donald 70-69-66 205 -8
John Huh 71-68-68-207 -6
Charl Schwartzel 70-70-68 208 -5
Nicholas Thompson 70-70-68-208 -5
Jim Furyk 71-66-71 -208 -5
Ben Martin 69-68-71 208 -5
Russell Knox 69-72-68-209 -4
Brian Stuard 69-72-68 209 -4
Brian Harman 69-71-69-209 -4
Matt Kuchar 66-73-70 209 -4
Matt Every 69-70-70 209 -4
Jason Kokrak 71-73-66-210 -3
Richard H. Lee 70-69-71 -210 -3
Scott Brown 70-69-71 -210 -3
Ted Potter, Jr. 70-69-71 210 -3
a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 71-71-69-211 -2
Rory Sabbatini 69-72-70- 211 -2
Robert Allenby 69-72-70- 211 -2
Kevin Streelman 69-72-70- 211 -2
GeoffOgilvy 72-68-71 -211 -2
K.J. Choi 70-67-74- 211 -2
J.B. Holmes 72-71-69-212 -1
Ken Duke 72-71-69-212 -1
Charley Hoffman 73-71-68-212 -1
Graeme McDowell 71-69-72-212 -1
Martin Kaymer 73-67-72-212 -1
Ryo Ishikawa 77-68-67-212 -1
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 74-71-67-212 -1
Kevin Stadler 71-69-72-212 -1
Bo Van Pelt 69-70-73- 212 -1
Woody Austin 74-71-67-212 -1
Chesson Hadley 72-67-73-212 -1
Billy Hurley III 70-69-73- 212 -1
Jordan Spieth 69-74-70 -213 E
Patrick Reed 71-72-70 -213 E
William McGirt 66-76-71 -213 E
PaulCasey 74-67-72 -213 E
Tim Herron 69-72-72 -213 E
Kevin Kisner 73-72-68 -213 E
Justin Hicks 75-70-68 -213 E
Stuart Appleby 73-73-67 -213 E
Jerry Kelly 76-70-67 -213 E
Tim Clark 72-71-71 -214 +1
StewartCink 70-72-72-214 +1
Chris Kirk 71-72-71 -214 +1
Tim Wilkinson 70-71-73-214 +1
Shawn Stefani 74-69-71 -214 +1
Zach Johnson 71-73-70-214 +1
Scott Langley 66-73-75-214 +1
Andrew Loupe 70-73-72-215 +2
Billy Horschel 69-74-72-215 +2
James Hahn 72-74-69-215 +2
CamiloVillegas 72-71-73-216 +3
John Mallinger 69-74-73-216 +3
Charles Howell III 69-73-74 216 +3
Chris Stroud 71-71-74-216 +3
Harris English 68-73-75-216 +3
Steve Marino 72-72-72-216 +3
Brice Garnett 73-71-72-216 +3
Robert Garrigus 71-74-71 -216 +3
Spencer Levin 72-74-70-216 +3
Dudley Hart 73-69-75-217 +4
Pat Perez 74-69-74-217 +4
Jonathan Byrd 71-73-73-217 +4
Ricky Barnes 72-73-72-217 +4
BrendonTodd 75-71-71 -217 +4
TrevorlImmelman 74-69-75-218 +5
Briny Baird 72-72-74-218 +5
Brian Gay 70-74-74-218 +5
ErikCompton 70-75-73-218 +5
Ernie Els 72-73-73-218 +5
David Toms 73-73-72-218 +5
Jeff Maggert 70-76-72-218 +5
Brandt Snedeker 72-73-74- 219 +6
Brian Davis 71-75-73-219 +6
Boo Weekley 73-73-73- 219 +6
MarkAnderson 71-75-74- 220 +7
Tommy Gainey 72-74-75 221 +8
Maybank Malaysian
Open leading scores
Saturday at Kuala Lumpur Golf and Coun-
try Club, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Purse: $2.75 millionYardage: 6,967,
Par: 72, Third Round:


Lee Westwood, England
Andy Sullivan, England
Julien Quesne, France
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belguim
Danny Willett, England
Masahiro Kawamura, Japan
Eduardo de la Riva, Spain
Ricardo Santos, Portugal
Garth Mulroy, South Africa
Rikard Karlberg, Sweden
Scott Jamieson, Scotland
L. Oosthuizen, South Africa
Tom Lewis, England
Anirban Lahiri, India
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria
Matteo Manassero, Italy
Wade Ormsby, Australia
Also


65-66-71 -
70-67-66-
68-69-69-
66-69-72-
70-66-72-
68-70-70-
69-68-71 -
67-71-70-
71-68-69-
72-69-67-
68-71-70-
72-68-69-
70-71-68-
72-72-66-
69-71-70-
71-72-67-
70-71-69-


Jason Knutzon, United States 75-67-69 211
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 72-70-70- 212
Francesco Molinari, Italy 71-74-73 -218
Anthony Kang, United States 71-74-75- 220
Greater Gwinnett
Championship
par scores
Saturday atTPC Sugarloaf, Duluth, Ga.
Purse: $1.8 millionYardage: 7,131, Par: 72,


Second Round:
Miguel Angel Jimenez 65-70-
Bernhard Langer 68-68-
Fred Couples 69-68-
Jay Haas 71-68-
Chien Soon Lu 71-68-
Duffy Waldorf 71-68-
Kenny Perry 68-71 -
Steve Pate 68-71-
David Frost 72-68-
Marco Dawson 71-69-
Scott Dunlap 73-68-
Fred Funk 72-69-
Joey Sindelar 72-69-
Rod Spittle 70-71-
Wes Short, Jr. 73-69-
Michael Allen 72-70-
Bill Glasson 72-70-
Colin Montgomerie 70-72 -
Olin Browne 73-70-
Anders Forsbrand 73-70-
Mark Calcavecchia 73-71-
Bart Bryant 73-71-
Russ Cochran 73-71-
Larry Mize 73-71-
WillieWood 74-70-
Billy Andrade 72-72-
Jeff LeMaster 70-74-
PH. Horgan III 70-74-
Jeff Sluman 69-75-
Nick Price 72-73-
Esteban Toledo 72-73-
Mark McNulty 72-73-
Steve Elkington 74-71 -
John Riegger 74-71 -
Peter Senior 72-73-
Brian Henninger 72-73-
Gene Sauers 75-70-
Mike Goodes 72-73-
Roger Chapman 71-74-
Rocco Mediate 73-73-
BobTway 73-73-
Joel Edwards 72-74-
Tom Pernice Jr. 74-72-
Peter Jacobsen 71-75-
Dan Forsman 76-70-
Joe Durant 74-73-
Mike Reid 72-75-
Sandy Lyle 75-72-
Jeff Hart 75-72-
Trevor Dodds 76-71-
Hale Irwin 73-75-
KirkTriplett 72-76-
Jim Rutledge 75-73-


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 B3


For theft reord


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
A 5-5-1
CASH 3 (late)
0 3-8-0

IPLAY 4 (early)
9-9-2-2
PLAY 4 (late)
TM S - -




Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 23 27 39 43
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 4
3-of-4 MB 30
3-of-4 666
2-of-4 MB 957
1-of-4 MB 9,234
2-of-4 20,601

Fantasy 5:13 -22
5-of-5 2 winners
4-of-5 294
3-of-5 9,155


$1,480.50
$432.50
$58
$28
$2.50
$2

25 31 36
$118,516.72
$130
$11.50


Mega Millions: 18-25-38-45-63
Mega Ball: 9
5-of-5 MB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 MB No winner
4-of-5 18 $500
3-of-5 MB 66 $50
3-of-5 950 $5
2-of-5 MB 1,581 $5
1-of-5 MB 13,366 $2
O-of-5 MB 35,049 $1
Players should verify winning num-
bers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES,


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series (taped)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Georgia at Florida
1 p.m. (ESPN) Vanderbilt at Arkansas
2 p.m. (FS1) Kansas at Oklahoma State
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Vanderbilt at Arkansas (same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Seattle Mariners at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (MLB) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays or St.
Louis Cardinals at Washington Nationals
1:30 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) New York Yankees at
Tampa Bay Rays
7 p.m. (ESPN) Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox (same-
day tape)
NBA PLAYOFFS
6 a.m. (ESPN2) Atlanta Hawks at Indiana Pacers. Eastern
Conference First Round, Game 1 (taped)
1 p.m. (TNT) Dallas Mavericks at San Antonio Spurs. Western
Conference First Round, Game 1
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Charlotte Bobcats at Miami Heat. Eastern
Conference First Round, Game 1
7 p.m. (TNT) Washington Wizards at Chicago Bulls. Eastern
Conference First Round, Game 1
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Portland Trail Blazers at Houston Rockets.
Western Conference First Round, Game 1
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Brooklyn Nets at Toronto Raptors (taped)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Charlotte Bobcats at Miami Heat. Eastern
Conference First Round, Game 1 (same-day tape)
NBA D-LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
1:30 p.m. (NBA) Rio Grande Valley Vipers at Iowa Energy.
First round, Game 3 (taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 a.m. (ESPNU) Auburn Spring Game (taped)
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Maybank Malaysian
Open, Final Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour RBC Heritage, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour RBC Heritage, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Greater Gwinnett
Championship, Final Round
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
10 a.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at St. Louis Blues.
Western Conference Quarterfinal, Game 2 (taped)
12 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Flyers at New York Rangers.
Eastern Conference Quarterfinal, Game 2
3 p.m. (NBC) Detroit Red Wings at Boston Bruins. Eastern
Conference Quarterfinal, Game 2
7 p.m. (NBCSPT, SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Montreal
Canadiens. Eastern Conference Quarterfinal, Game 3
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) LosAngeles Kings at San Jose Sharks.
Western Conference Quarterfinal, Game 2
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series: Tulsa (taped)
SOCCER
7 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Norwich City FC
vs Liverpool FC
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Hull CityAFC vs
Arsenal FC
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Everton FC vs
Manchester United FC
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: Pumas
de la U.N.A.M. vs Chivas de Guadalajara
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Syracuse at Florida State
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, Final
(taped)
2 p.m. (TENNIS) Fed Cup, World Group Playoff: USAvs.
France, Rubber 3
4 p.m. (TENNIS) Fed Cup, World Group Playoff: USAvs.
France, Rubber 4
6 p.m. (TENNIS) Fed Cup, World Group Playoff: USAvs.
France, Rubber 5
8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, Final
(same-day tape)
10:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Fed Cup, World Group Playoff: USAvs.
France, Rubber 3 (same-day tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


-146 +2 Gary Hallberg
146 +2 Wayne Levi
146 +2 Tom Lehman
-146 +2 Brad Faxon
-146 +2 Steve Lowery
- 147 +3 Morris Hatalsky
-147 +3 Tommy Armour lllI
-147 +3 MarkO'Meara
-147 +3 Brad Bryant
-147 +3 Bob Gilder
-148 +4 Tom Purtzer
-148 +4 Bobby Clampett
-148 +4 John Cook


71-77-148 +4 GilMorgan
74-75-149 +5 Kohki Idoki
74-75- 149 +5 Corey Pavin
75-74- 149 +5 Loren Roberts
76-73- 149 +5 Mark Brooks
74-76- 150 +6 Larry Nelson
75-75-150 +6 Andrew Magee
77-73-150 +6 HalSutton
76-75- 151 +7 Jose Coceres
71-80-151 +7 Chip Beck
76-75-151 +7 RickFehr
80-71 -151 +7 BobbyWadkins
82-69-151 +7 BenCrenshaw


76-76-152 +8
78-74-152 +8
74-79-153 +9
74-79-153 +9
76-77-153 +9
78-75-153 +9
78-76-154 +10
79-75-154 +10
79-75-154 +10
80-75-155 +11
82-73-155 +11
81-78-159 +15
92-77-169 +25


NBA daily playoff
glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Saturday, April 19
Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87, Brooklyn leads series 1-0
Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105, Golden
State leads series 1-0
Atlanta 101, Indiana 93, Atlanta leads series 1-0
Memphis at Oklahoma City, late
Sunday, April 20
Dallas at San Antonio, 1 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, April 21
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 22
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn atToronto, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 23
Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 24
Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, April 25
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Washington, 8 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 26
Indiana at Atlanta, 2 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 27
Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m.
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, April 28
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
x-Atlanta at Indiana, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 29
x-Washington at Chicago, TBD
x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBD
x-Golden State at L.A. Clippers, TBD
Wednesday, April 30
x-Charlotte at Miami, TBD
x-Brooklyn at Toronto, TBD
x-Dallas at San Antonio, TBD
x-Portland at Houston, TBD
Thursday, May 1
x-lndiana at Atlanta, TBD
x-Chicago at Washington, TBD
x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBD
x-L.A. Clippers at Golden State, TBD
Friday, May 2
x-Miami at Charlotte, TBD
x-Toronto at Brooklyn, TBD
x-San Antonio at Dallas, TBD
x-Houston at Portland, TBD
Saturday, May 3
x-Atlanta at Indiana, TBD
x-Washington at Chicago, TBD
x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBD
x-Golden State at L.A. Clippers, TBD
Sunday, May 4
x-Charlotte at Miami, TBD
x-Brooklyn at Toronto, TBD
x-Dallas at San Antonio, TBD
x-Portland at Houston, TBD


Glantz-Culver Line for April 20
Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atNewYork -120 Atlanta +110
atWashington -145 St. Louis +135
atPittsburgh -120 Milwaukee +110
Cincinnati -135 at Chicago +125
atColorado -165 Philadelphia +155
at L. Angeles -160 Arizona +150
San Fran. -115 at San Diego +105
American League
Toronto -110 at Cleveland +100
atDetroit -150 LosAngeles +140
atTampa Bay-130 NewYork +120
atKan.City -210 Minnesota +190
atTexas -180 Chicago +170
at Oakland -220 Houston +200
at Boston -155 Baltimore +145
Interleague
at Miami -110 Seattle +100
NBA Playoffs
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
at San Antonio 9'/2 (206'/2) Dallas
at Miami 9/2 (188/2) Charlotte
at Chicago 4/2 (181) Washington
at Houston 5 (215) Portland
Odds to Win Series
San Antonio -900 Dallas +600
Miami -2000 Charlotte +1200
Chicago -200 Washington +170
Houston -200 Portland +170
NHL Playoffs
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Rangers -155 Philadelphia +135
at Boston -230 Detroit +190
at Montreal -160 Tampa Bay +140
atSan Jose -140 LosAngeles +120


Saturday's sports transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Sent OF Shane Vic-
torino to Pawtucket (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Placed RHP Fe-
lipe Paulino on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP
Andre Rienzo from Charlotte (IL). Assigned
LHP Donnie Veal outright to Charlotte.
MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned INF Ed-
uardo Nunez to Rochester (IL).
NEWYORKYANKEES- Designated LHP
Cesar Cabral for assignment. Selected the con-
tract of RHP Matt Daley from ScrantonNVilkes-
Barre (IL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS Optioned RHP Brad
Boxberger to Durham (IL). Recalled LHP C.J.
Riefenhauser from Durham.
TEXAS RANGERS Placed OF Jim Adduci
on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Luis Sardinas
from Frisco (TL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Transferred 2B
Maicer Izturis to the 60-day DL. Placed 1B
Adam Lind on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
Wednesday. Optioned INF Munenori Kawasaki
to Buffalo (IL). Reinstated SS Jose Reyes from
the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of 1 B Juan
Francisco from Buffalo.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS- Optioned RHP Curtis
Partch to Louisville (IL). Reinstated LHP Sean
Marshall from the 15-day DL.
NEWYORK METS Reinstated OF Chris
Young from the 15-day DL.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES -Optioned RHP
Jonathan Pettibone to Lehigh Valley (IL). Se-
lected the contract of RHP Shawn Camp from
Lehigh Valley.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES- Optioned C Tony


Sanchez from Indianapolis (IL). Reinstated C
Chris Stewart from the 15-day DL. Designated
1B Travis Ishikawa for assignment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Reinstated
OF Denard Span from the 7-day DL. Optioned
OF Steven Souza Jr. to Syracuse (IL).
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Fined Boston F Milan Lucic $5,000
for spearing Detroit D Danny DeKeyser during
Friday's game.
DALLAS STARS Signed G Philippe
Desrosiers to a three-year, entry-level contract.
FLORIDA PANTHERS Reassigned D
Josh McFadden from San Antonio (AHL) to
Cincinnati (ECHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Signed D Jake
Dotchin to an entry-level contract.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS Traded the
rights to D Jaynen Rissling to Nashville for a
2014 seventh-round draft pick.


Associated Press
Shalane Flanagan approaches the finish line
April 15, 2013, to finish fourth in the women's
division of the Boston Marathon in Boston.
Flanagan is more determined than ever to win
the race for her battered hometown. The Mar-
blehead, Mass., native would be the first Amer-
ican winner since 1985.


Hometown favorite


wants to win in


Boston, for Boston

Associated Press

BOSTON Shalane Flanagan grew up in
nearby Marblehead with a reverence for the
Boston Marathon and dreamed, like many lo-
cals and foreign runners alike, that she would
win the race someday
Her goal has changed now
But only a little.
"If I could have one wish, it would be to win
this specific race on this specific day," she said this
week. "It basically would be the highlight of my
career, for sure. If I could win this specific Boston:
It has the most power, the most meaning behind
it, of all the Boston Marathons that would be run."
A year after two bombs at the finish line
killed three and wounded 264 others, the 118th
edition of the Boston Marathon has become a
symbol of resilience for the running commu-
nity, the city and a nation shocked by an attack
on one of its beloved traditions. And Flanagan,
a three-time Olympian who finished fourth in her
Boston debut last year, is hoping an American
victory in her hometown race will help heal
the wounds caused by last year's bombings.
No American runner has won the Boston
Marathon since Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach took
the women's title in 1985. East Africans have
won the men's race at the Boston Marathon
every year since 1991, with Kenyans taking 14
straight titles and 20 of the last 23. On the
women's side, a pair of Russian wins is the only
thing that interrupts a 17-year streak of Kenyan
and Ethiopian dominance.
To break through to the top step on the
podium this year, the U.S. runners will have to
keep their emotions under control. Hundreds
of thousands of fans are expected to line the
26.2-mile course from Hopkinton to Boston, a
course that is littered with stories of runners
who outran their pace and faltered.
"It the emotion gets me too soon, it could ab-
solutely ruin the race for me," Flanagan said.
"I sure we can use it to our advantage."




HERITAGE
Continued from Page BI

fly before bouncing to the edge and settling
for par
Donald's not the longest hitter on tour and
said some layouts are dragons he can't slay
"But this one I feel like I can plot my way
around with low wedges," he said. "If you miss
greens, you need to be pretty good at the short
game. Certainly a course that favors my style of
play"
Huh shot a 68 and was at 6 under
Major champions Charl Schwartzel (68) and
Jim Furyk (71), Nicholas Thompson (68) and
Ben Martin (71) were tied for third at 5 under
Matt Kuchar, ranked sixth in the world, shot
70 as part of a group of five golfers another shot
back at 4 under
Donald's performance capped a long day at
soggy Harbour Town, where 65 golfers had to
finish the second round before the third could
begin with K.J. Choi, Furyk and Ben Martin
tied for the lead.
But by midafternoon, the moisture had soft-
ened things and competitors were treated to
slick greens easily accepting approach shots.
At times, it looked more like a local club
shootout than a PGA Tour stop.
Thompson, whose sister Lexi won her first
LPGA Tour major at the Kraft Nabisco Cham-
pionship earlier this month, got things going
with five birdies on the front nine to lead at 7
under But bogeys at the 16th and 18th holes
dropped him back into the group at 208.
Schwartzel, the 2011 Masters champion, was
among those with an early start and jumped
into the chase with a third-round 68 to move to
5 under. He said the course held up well de-
spite more than 2V2 inches of rain that fell here
Friday
Schwartzel has not won on the PGA Tour
since his surprising run to the green jacket,
when he birdied the final four holes.
"I think if I can continue the ball striking and
giving myself chances, I can make a few
(birdies) tomorrow and give it a shot," he said.
Furyk, the 2010 winner at Harbour Town,
made birdie on his second hole to take the lead
at 6 under He failed to build on that hot start,
but held on to stay in the hunt
The craziest day might have belonged to
Kuchar, the highest-ranked player competing
at Harbour Town after the season's first major.
He followed his fifth-place showing at the Mas-
ters last week with a strong bogey-free 66 on
Thursday to take the lead.
Things went the other way quickly Friday,
with Kuchar posting a pair of double bogeys
before the rains came and suspended play
Kuchar struggled some more with a bogey on
the eighth hole once he restarted Saturday
Then he made four birdies on his back nine to
climb back in it.
Kuchar has finished fifth or better in his past


three events and has a chance to do it again at
Harbour Town.
"To be playing some good golf and be in con-
tention is fun," he said. "I'm excited to have my
fourth shot at trying to take a title."


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Williams scores 24 as Nets beat Raptors 94-87


Associated Press

TORONTO The
Brooklyn Nets made a
case for the important of
playoff experience in their
opening victory over the
Toronto Raptors.
Deron Williams and Joe
Johnson each had 24 points,
Paul Pierce scored nine of
his 15 points in the final
quarter and the Nets beat
the Raptors 94-87 in Game 1
of their first-round series.
Playing in his 137th ca-
reer postseason game,
Pierce connected on four
of his five shot attempts in
the fourth as the Nets kept
the Raptors at bay
"You just get that feel-
ing, you've been in those
situations a number of
times," Pierce said. "I don't
get rattled in the fourth
quarter, down the stretch
or in playoff settings. I've
been in pretty much every
playoff setting that you can
imagine. I just try to stay


calm and bring my calm-
ness to the game."
Nets coach Jason Kidd
said Williams "set the
tone" by scoring 18 points
in the first half.
"He came out with high
energy," Kidd said. "I
thought he was looking to
be aggressive in scoring
the ball. He got the guys off
to a good start."
Shaun Livingston scored
10 points and Kevin Gar-
nett had five as the Nets
won despite making 4 of 24
3-pointers.
"We didn't shoot well
from 3 tonight, but we
made up for that by taking
care of the ball, good de-
fense down the stretch,
making plays offensively,"
Williams said. "That's why
we got the win."
The Nets turned the ball
over nine times, while the
Raptors had 19, leading to
17 Brooklyn points.
"That was the biggest
issue," Toronto coach


Dwane Casey said.
Kyle Lowry scored 22
points and Jonas Valanciu-
nas had 17 points and 18
rebounds for the Raptors.
Valanciunas is the sec-
ond Raptors player to have
a double-double in his
postseason debut. Tracy
McGrady had 25 points
and 10 rebounds against
New York in his first play-
off game in 2000.
"He grew up today and
that was huge for us,"
Casey said.
Valanciunas also set a
Raptors record for playoff
rebounds by surpassing
Keon Clark, who had 16
against Detroit in 2002.
Greivis Vasquez had 18
points for the Raptors and
DeMar DeRozan had 14 in
his playoff debut, making
three of 14 field goal attempts.
"DeMar didn't have the
best of games" Lowry said.
"He'll bounce back for sure."
The game was delayed
midway through the third


Associated Press
The Brooklyn Nets' Paul Pierce and Toronto Raptors'
Jonas Valanciunas dive for the ball during the first half of
Game I of their playoff series Saturday in Toronto.


quarter when the shot
clocks above each basket
malfunctioned. Play even-
tually resumed with both
clocks still dark, and the
stadium announcer mark-
ing the remaining time at
10 seconds, then counting
down from five before say-
ing 'Horn' as time expired.


The clocks remained inac-
tive for the rest of the game.
"It was definitely tough
because you're used to
looking up to see the time,"
DeRozan said. "We just
tried to help each other out
when the announcer called
down from 10 seconds."
In a written statement,


-






Associated Press
Golden State Warriors forward Andre Iguodala puts up a shot as Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, center, and forward Glen Davis
defend during the first half of Game I of their opening-round playoff series Saturday in Los Angeles.




Foul trouble trips Clippers




as Warriors win 109-105


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Klay
Thompson scored 22 points,
David Lee added 20 and the
Golden State Warriors got Blake
Griffin and Chris Paul in foul
trouble to beat the Los Angeles
Clippers 109-105 on Saturday in
their playoff opener
Stephen Curry added 14 points
for the Warriors, who trailed by
11 points to start the game before
rallying in the third when Griffin
and Paul were on the bench
together
Paul led the Clippers with 28
points, and J.J. Redick added 22
points in 30 minutes. Griffin fin-
ished with 16 points, fouling out
with 48 seconds left and the
game tied at 105. DeAndre
Jordan had 11 points and 14
rebounds.
Foul trouble plagued both
teams, but losing Griffin and
Paul for stretches cost the Clip-
pers at both ends. For the War-
riors, Andre Iguodala fouled out
with 3:04 left in the game and
Lee played with four fouls.


Paul returned early in the
fourth with the Clippers trailing
by 11. His fast-break layup
trimmed Golden State's lead to
98-92. Griffin came back at that
point, hitting a hook shot and
then feeding Paul for a 3-pointer
that cut their deficit to 100-97
with 3 1/2 minutes left.
Jordan then stepped to the
line, having made just 1 of 6 free
throws in the game. He hit both
and the Clippers got within one.
Paul tied it at 102 on a 3-pointer
Darren Collison made one of
two free throws, giving the Clip-
pers their first lead since early in
the third at 103-102. Harrison Barnes
hit a 3 for the Warriors before
Griffin made two free throws for
the 18th and final tie of the game,
105-all with 11/2 minutes left.
The Clippers' defense forced
the Warriors into turning the ball
over on a shot-clockviolation Griffin
fouled out and then Thompson
turned the ball over. Paul got it
and fed Collison, who lost it near
the baseline with 37 seconds left
and the referees awarded pos-
session to the Warriors, which


was confirmed by a video review
Collison got called for a loose-
ball foul and Draymond Green
made the go-ahead free throws
for a 107-105 lead. Paul was try-
ing to dribble around two de-
fenders and wanted a foul. The
referees initially ruled the ball
belonged to the Clippers, but it
was overturned on review, giving
Golden State possession with 18
seconds left.
Down 108-105, Paul got fouled
and missed both. His fifth foul
put Green on the line, and he
missed both. Collison got posses-
sion, but turned the ball over
when he stepped out of bounds,
one of 17 turnovers by the Clippers.
The first half was bogged down
by 29 fouls, including 15 on the
Warriors.
Griffin was limited to four min-
utes in the first half. He got his
first two fouls 36 seconds apart
early in the opening quarter and
his third at 11:21 of the second.
Already playing without in-
jured center Andrew Bogut,
Iguodala had four fouls and Lee
three in the first half.


A three-minute stretch of the
third produced a torrent of of-
fense, with each team answering
the other's baskets. Redick and
Thompson dueled from 3-point
range and then Redick and
Curry exchanged short jumpers
with neither team leading by
more than three.
The Warriors began pulling away
over the final five minutes, when
Paul got two fouls within a span of
1:10 and went to the bench with
four Griffin got two more in the
final 2:16 and sat down with five.
The Warriors took advantage of
their absences to go on a 14-6 run
that generated their largest lead
to that point, 87-79. Lee scored
eight points and O'Neal had four
The teams split their four
games in the regular season, a
series that included nine techni-
cal fouls, two ejections, one fla-
grant foul and a post-game
confrontation between Griffin
and O'Neal. But the pushing,
shoving and bodies hitting the
floor in Game 1 was the result of
hard, physical play and not any
bad blood.


Raptors ownership blamed
the outage on a "signal
path failure" that also af-
fected the backup clocks.
Trailing by five to start
the final quarter, Toronto
tied it at 67-67 with 9:50
left thanks to a 3 and a fast
break layup from Patrick
Patterson.
Brooklyn moved back in
front thanks to four points
from Livingston and a
banked jumper by Mirza
Teletovic, but the Raptors
tied it at 73-73 with 6:25 left
on Lowry's driving layup.
Toronto led 77-76 on a 3
by Vasquez at 5:15, but the
Nets replied with a jumper
by Johnson, a turnaround
jumper by Garnett and a 3
by Pierce to lead 82-76 with
2:58 remaining. Garnett's
basket was his first made
field goal in five tries.
Pierce added two more
baskets on either side of a
3 by Vasquez, and the Nets
sealed it with six free throws
in the final 22 seconds.



Hawks


roll past


Pacers


101-93

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -Jeff
Teague scored a playoff
career-high 28 points and
Paul Millsap added 25 as
eighth-seeded Atlanta
rolled past top-seeded In-
diana 101-93 on Saturday
night, taking a 1-0 lead in
the best-of-seven series.
The Hawks ended an
eight-game road losing streak
in the playoffs, which
dated to May 2011. Game 2
is Tuesday in Indianapolis.
Indiana, which spent the
whole season working to get
home-court advantage in
the playoffs, wasted no time
in giving it right back with
a dismal third quarter
Paul George finished with
24 points and 10 rebounds.
Atlanta opened the third
quarter on an 8-0 run,
breaking a 50-50 tie, then
pulled away when Teague
scored nine points in a 14-0
run that made it 74-58 with
4:08 left in the quarter In-
diana couldn'tgetcloserthan
eight the rest of the way
Itwas afittingtwistto open
the best-of-seven series.
Indiana played fast and
energetic in the first half,
playing more like the team
that was so good over the
first half of the season.
Then in the second half,
the Pacers reverted to
their recent script of being
unable to make shots and
get defensive stops when
they needed them most.
The Pacers were just 5-of-
19 from the field in the
third quarter and were 15-
of-41 in the second half.
Atlanta took advantage
of those struggles, becom-
ing the first team to beat
the Pacers on their home
court twice this season and
stealing the win they
needed. It was the first time
the Hawks won a postsea-
son road game since the
first game of the 2011 East-
ern Conference semifinals
at Chicago.
Teague was 9-of-19 from
the field with five assists
and three rebounds. Mill-
sap had eight rebounds.
With 30 3-point attempts,
the Hawks broke their
franchise playoff record for
3-point attempts, and the
11 3s they made tied the
second-highest playoff
total in franchise history


Blues beat Blackhawks 4-3 in OT, take 2-0 lead


Associated Press

ST LOUIS- Defenseman
Barret Jackman scored on
a drive through traffic, giv-
ing the St Louis Blues their
second straight 4-3 overtime
victory over the Chicago
Blackhawks for a 2-0 series
lead against the defending
Stanley Cup champions.
St. Louis rallied after
Chicago defenseman Brent
Seabrook received a five-
minute major and game
misconduct penalty for a vi-


cious elbow to the head on
Blues captain David Backes,
who had to be helped off
the ice, went straight to the
locker room and did not re-
turn for the extra period.
Vladimir Tarasenko forced
overtime with his second
goal of the series, beating
Corey Crawford with a wrist
shot that banged off the right
post and in with 6.4 seconds
to go. Kevin Shattenkirk
had a goal and two assists
for the Blues, who also got
a goal from Chris Porter


Duncan Keith, Seabrook
and Michael Rozsival scored
in a span of five shots to put
the Blackhawks up 3-2 early
in the third. But Seabrook's
penalty proved costly, and
he could be suspended for
Game 3 on Monday night.
The Blackhawks got no
help from a power play that
went 0 for 4 and is 0 for 9
since Seabrook scored on
their first chance in Game 1.
Keith's goal late in the sec-
ond ended a scoring drought
of 119 minutes and 27 seconds


for Chicago since a three-
goal first period in Game 1.
Before Chicago's rally, Miller
stopped 53 consecutive shots.
A Blues checking for-
ward started the scoring for
the second straight game.
Porter had one assist in 22
regular-season games.
St. Louis made playing to
the whistle pay off, capital-
izing on a late flurry when
Shattenkirk's slap shot from
inside the blue line beat an
out-of-position Crawford with
1.8 seconds left in the first.


Associated Press
The Blues' Jay Bouwmeester and Blackhawks' Marian Hossa
reach for a loose puck during the first period of Game 2
of their first-round playoff series Saturday in St. Louis.


B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Federer beats injured Djokovic to reach final


Associated Press

MONACO -Roger Fed-
erer ousted defending
Monte Carlo Masters
champion Novak Djokovic
7-5, 6-2 Saturday, and the
second-ranked Serb said
he plans to take a break to
let his injured wrist heal.
Federer will try to win
the event for the first time
in an all-Swiss final
against Stanislas
Wawrinka, who defeated
David Ferrer of Spain 6-1,
7-6 (3).
Djokovic described
soreness in his right wrist
at the start of the week The
heavily taped wrist seemed
to bother him more toward
the end of the first set, and
he served slower through-
out the second.
"I just rest now I cannot
play tennis for some time.
How long, I don't know,"
Djokovic said. "I'm going
to rest and see when it can


heal 100 percent, then I
will be back on the court."
Federer is aiming for his
first Monte Carolo win
after losing three consecu-
tive finals to eight-time
champion Rafael Nadal
from 2006-08.
The final Sunday will be
the first all-Swiss affair
since Marc Rosset beat
Federer in Marseille in
2000, and the first meeting
between Federer and
Wawrinka for a title.
Wawrinka, who trails Fed-
erer 13-1 overall, earned
his only win against him
here in 2009 in the third
round.
"I was basically on my
honeymoon. I married on
Saturday and I came over
here and played him like
on Thursday," Federer
said. "I know I have a good
head-to-head against him.
I don't read that much into
it. He's a different caliber
player now."


Federer's touch was in-
consistent in his quarterfi-
nal win against Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga, but he was sharp
against Djokovic. His ca-
sual drop shot surprised
the Serb and drew loud
cheers from the center-
court crowd soaking up the
Mediterranean sunshine.
"I feel like I have put in
the performance to be
there, gave myself the op-
portunity this week,"
Federer said. "Of course, I
did see that Novak was
struggling."
Federer broke for 6-5
when Djokovic netted a
weak forehand. At the
changeover, Djokovic
nursed his wrist as he sat
in his chair, looking stern-
faced and pensive.
"It's unfortunate that
when you're playing at this
level against Roger, big
tournament, that you are
not able to play your game
because something else is


0 M*ddEL-MM~k V AI '-7"""W I =
Associated Press
Roger Federer of Switzerland returns the ball to Novak
Djokovic of Serbia on Saturday during their semifinal
match at the Monte Carlo Tennis Masters tournament in
Monaco. Federer won 7-6, 6-2.


taking away all your en-
ergy and effort," Djokovic
said. "This injury has been
present for last 10 days,
and I tried not to think or
talk about it. I did every-
thing I could really, I was
on the medications every
day, I was doing different


therapies, injections."
Djokovic's first-serve
speed dropped to 100 mph
in the second set, and he
had difficulty flexing his
arm as he tried to return
one Federer shot in the
third game.
Federer secured succes-


Associated Press
Auburn wide receiver Trovon Reed cannot make the catch as Auburn defensive back Kamryn Melton defends Saturday in the first half of the
annual A Day spring intrasquad game in Auburn, Ala.




Auburn, Alabama, Texas




spring into 2014 campaigns


Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Nick Marshall threw
four touchdowns in two quarters as Auburn's
first team routed its second team 58-3 on Sat-
urday in a spring football game.
Marshall, the Tigers' starter last season
who occasionally struggled through the air,
completed 13 of 22 passes for 236 yards.
Wearing an orange non-contact jersey, Mar-
shall kept only once on a zone-read play
"(Marshall) is playing great right now," wide
receiver Sammie Coates said. "He is throwing
the ball down the field and reading right."
"I think the big thing (in Marshall's im-
provement) is just being more comfortable,"
Tigers head coach Gus Malzahn said. "You
can see him in the pocket. you can tell he's
really improved."
Backup Jeremy Johnson had less success
with the second-team offense in the first half
before moving to the first-team offense in the
second. Combined, he was 9-of-21 for 130 yards
and a 38-yard touchdown pass to Tony Stevens.
Despite those struggles, Malzahn was still
pleased with the promising sophomore.
"Jeremy's had an excellent spring,"
Malzahn said. "(Offensive coordinator Rhett)
Lashlee's given him about 25 percent of the
snaps with our first group. We feel like he
could play for most teams in the country"
Auburn's receiving corps also was impres-
sive. Coates made a one-handed touchdown
catch, D'haquille Williams debuted with five
catches for 88 yards and a touchdown while
Quan Bray caughttwo TD passes. Stevens caught
two touchdown passes in the second half.
"We have some veteran guys (at wide re-
ceiver) that have some experience that un-
derstand our offense," Malzahn said. "I feel
like that group's improved and of course you
add (Williams) to it and some of those
younger guys we have some depth there."
"It's going to be a really scary sight to see,"
Marshall said, referring to the Tigers' play-
makers at wide receiver "We're throwing the
football down the field to take some pressure
off our running game, and we know we can
run the ball."
Corey Grant gained 128 yards on just five
carries, including a 54-yard touchdown run,
and Cameron Artis-Payne had 97 yards on 12
carries for the defending SEC Champions.
An announced crowd of 70,405 fans braved
an unseasonably chilly day to cram into Jordan-
Hare Stadium, which still bore the scars of
the wild celebration following the Tigers' Iron
Bowl victory over Alabama in November


Defense dominates in
Crimson Tide's spring game
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Blake Sims' bid to re-
place AJ McCarron as Alabama's starting quarter-
back hit a snag Saturday afternoon when the
Crimson Tide defense dominated the annual A-
Day game at Bryant-Denny Stadium.
Playing with the offensive starters on the Crim-
son Team, Sims completed 13 of 30 passes for
178 yards in a 17-14 loss to the White Team. Sims
had a late touchdown and two interceptions.
"Nobody ever has a bad spring game, let's start
with that," coach Nick Saban said.
"Everybody needs to understand that in games
like today we really limit what we do on offense, we
really limit what we do on defense, and we really don't
try to feature players. That may be a little bit of a
disadvantage to our players. Blake Sims did some
things at quarterback that we really don't feature."
Sims passed to sophomore wide receiver Chris
Black for a last-minute 55-yard touchdown, but he
also had an interception returned for a touchdown
by defensive lineman D.J. Pettway early in the
third quarter.
Sims' longest possession was just five plays,
while redshirt freshman Cooper Bateman led
drives of 14,10 and eight plays for the White
Team. Neither side was able to score in the first
half when both teams had 116 total yards.
Sims' uneven performance came with Jacob
Coker looking on. Coker is transferring to Alabama
after graduating from Florida State next month. He
backed up Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Win-
ston this past season.
Meanwhile, Alabama's defense had 19 tackles
for a loss, seven sacks and four interceptions in
front of a crowd of 73,506.
The Crimson Team's first offensive touchdown
was set up by a turnover. Defensive end Tim
Williams recovered Kenyan Drake's fumble, lead-
ing to T.J. Yeldon's 1-yard touchdown run.
Alabama's kicking woes continued as sopho-
more Adam Griffith missed a 30-yard field goal
and had a 47-yard attempt blocked by defensive
lineman Jonathan Allen.
With 95 yards on 11 carries, Yeldon became the
first player in Crimson Tide history to win the Dixie
Howell Memorial player as A-Day MVP for a third
time. Pettway and Allen shared the Dwight
Stephenson Lineman of the Game Award.
Although the announced attendance is the
largest in college football so far this spring, it was
Alabama's lowest since Saban arrived in 2007.
The previous low was 78,200 in 2008.


Longhorns begin Strong era
with shaky play at QB
AUSTIN, Texas The Charlie Strong era
began at Texas with a shaky performance at quar-
terback and few questions answered about just
how quickly the Longhorns can rebound in the
Big 12 under their new coach.
With next season's presumed starter David Ash
not playing because of a foot injury, Tyrone Swoopes
took all the snaps with the first-team offense in the
Longhorns' annual spring scrimmage. Swoopes
rallied from a poor start to finish with 229 yards and
three touchdowns against the second-team defense.
But he likely did little to establish himself as the
potential top-flight quarterback the Longhorns
have lacked for several seasons.
Ash missed most of last season with concus-
sion symptoms but had been cleared to return in
the spring. His injury left Swoopes as the only
scholarship quarterback available for the scrimmage.
Strong had planned to play the starters against
each other, but instead opted to pit the first-team
offense against the second-team defense to help
give Swoopes a confidence boost. But Swoopes
threw an interception on his first attempt and was
just 7 of 17 passing until a desperation heave at
the end of the first half turned into a touchdown
catch by Daje Johnson.
Swoopes was better in the second half, throw-
ing touchdowns to Malcolm Brown and Jaxon
Shipley. Strong said he liked that Swoopes re-
bounded from the poor start, but acknowledged
he hasn't gotten the play he wanted at quarter-
back this spring.
"We're going to have to get better there,
whether it's David or Swoopes or someone else,"
Strong said.
The Longhorns signed one quarterback in their
2014 recruiting class, Jerrod Heard, who will arrive
on campus in June. Texas is also courting USC
transfer Max Wittek, who has yet to announce his
destination.
Texas hasn't had consistent play there since
Colt McCoy was injured in the 2010 national
championship game against Alabama. Since then,
the Longhorns haven't won more than nine games
in a season or won the Big 12.
Strong was hired in January to replace Mack
Brown and turn around that trend of mediocrity.
After 15 days of spring practice, Strong said the
team still has a lot of work to do.
"I don't know how good we can be," Strong
said, adding: "I wish I had 15 more days of prac-
tice, but I don't."


sive breaks to take control.
The fourth-ranked Fed-
erer raised both hands in
the air after winning on
his first match point, and
Djokovic walked off look-
ing despondent.
The third-ranked
Wawrinka remains on
course for his third title of
the season, the fourth of
his career on clay and his
first in a Masters event
"I think it's incredible
that we are in the finals to-
gether, the same week
we've been playing so
well," said Federer, who
got a wild-card invitation.
"I know Spaniards have it,
French guys have it, Amer-
icans might have it. But for
us it's so rare. Last time
was 14 years ago."
Wawrinka has six career
titles, but lost his previous
two Masters finals on clay
- at Madrid last year and
in Rome six years ago to
Djokovic.



Westwood's

lead down

to 1 stroke

in Malaysia
Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR,
Malaysia Lee Westwood
saw his four-shot lead
trimmed to just one on Sat-
urday after a bogey at the
final hole of the third round
of the Malaysian Open.
Westwood shot a 1-under
71 for a three-round total
of 14-under 202 but is only
one shot ahead of English
compatriot Andy Sullivan,
who had a 66 as he chases
his first tour title. French-
man Julien Quesne is an-
other three shots back in
third place after a 69.
Westwood, who turns 41
next week, won the
Malaysian Open in 1997
and is looking for a repeat
to end a near two-year
winless drought. For a
third day in a row he
birdied the opening hole
of the Kuala Lumpur Golf
Club course before drop-
ping a shot with a three-
putt bogey at the second.
He added birdies at the
fifth also for a third day
in succession and at the
par-3 12th before two-
putting the final green for
bogey after having to play
his approach shot from the
slope of a fairway bunker
"It was tricky out there
and I didn't play as well as
I did the first two days and
there was some tough flags
out there," Westwood said.
"I gota couple ofbad breaks
out there today but I am
leading with a day to play, so
I am quite happy with that"
Italy's Matteo Manassero
celebrated his 21st birth-
day with his best round of
the tournament, a 67 to sit
in a tie for 14th at 6 under
Defending champion Ki-
radech Aphibarnrat was
forced to pull out ahead of
the third round because of
inflammation of his tonsils.
There was no sign of the
hornets that attacked
Pablo Larrazabal on the
14th hole during Friday's
second round, forcing the
Spaniard to jump into a
water hazard. Larrazabal
shot a 70 to sit tied for 23rd
at 4 under.
Jimenez leads
Langer by I shot in
Greater Gwinnett
DULUTH, Ga. Miguel
Angel Jimenez, extending his
impressive Champions Tour
debut, shot 2-under 70 on
Saturday to take a one-stroke
lead over defending cham-
pion Bernhard Langer into the
final round of the Greater
Gwinnett Championship.
Jimenez and Langer were
tied at 8 under entering the
final hole. Jimenez reclaimed
sole possession of the lead
with a birdie. Langer missed


putts for eagle and birdie be-
fore settling for par and his
second straight 68.
Fred Couples, who shot 68,
is in third place, two shots be-
hind Jimenez.
Jimenez began the day
with a three-stroke lead after
his tournament-record 65 on
Friday. He began his second
round with a birdie, but he
gave back three strokes on
the next three holes.


I ^^ .. am


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Police looking into Purifoy
Associated Press to act as an informant, very's seat of the car and
The motion to quash or was holding a marijuana
GAINESVILLE, Fla. cancel the warrant was joint, the warrant states.
The Gainesville Police filed by an attorney for Purifoy was searched
Department launched an Purifoy. The motion and two baggies that
internal investigation stated that Purifoy would were later tested to con-
late Friday into the be available to law en- tain a synthetic drug
quashing of an arrest forcement on request, known as bath salts were
warrant for a former Uni- that Purifoy has no sig- found in Purifoy's
versity of Florida foot- nificant prior criminal pocket.
ball star and current history and would waive "Based on probable
NFL draft prospect, his right to a speedy trial, cause developed by the
The Gainesville Sun In a letter requesting deputy, an arrest warrant
reported that University the investigation, was issued for Loucheiz
of Florida standout Alachua County Sheriff Purifoy for April 4, 2014,
Loucheiz Purifoy was Sadie Darnell said her after he failed to fulfill
caught by the Alachua deputies were not aware his end of the bargain
County Sheriff's Office that the warrant had made with GACDTF,"
in March with marijuana been invalidated and Darnell wrote to
and the synthetic drug that the move to quash Gainesville Police Chief
bath salts but was not ar- the warrant was "highly Tony Jones. "The action
rested because he had unusual." to quash the warrant is
agreed to cooperate with According to the war- highly unusual and, as a
the drug taskforce. An ar- rant affidavit, a deputy result, I have numerous
rest warrant was issued smelled marijuana corn- questions as to the pro-
late Tuesday after inves- ing from a parked car on priety of how this oc-
tigators said Purifoy did March 18. curred."
not fulfill his agreement Purifoy was in the dri- Ben Tobias,


warrant
spokesman for the police
department, said an in-
ternal investigation
would be conducted.
Purifoy announced in
November that he would
forgo his senior season
and enter the NFL draft.
Last season, Purifoy
started seven of 12 games
and made 24 tackles, in-
cluding two sacks, and an
interception. He has
been a key contributor to
the Gators since his
freshman season in 2011
out of Pensacola.
Purifoy was suspended
for the first game of last
season for an unspeci-
fied violation of team
rules. He was arrested
for misdemeanor posses-
sion of marijuana in Feb-
ruary 2013, but the
charge was dropped
weeks later by the State
Attorney's Office.


Ravens' Harbaugh

honored with statue


Associated Press

OXFORD, Ohio -
John Harbaugh likes the
pose on his bronze statue.
The Baltimore Ravens
coach was added to Miami
University's Cradle of
Coaches on Saturday He
unveiled a sculpture of
himself with right arm
raised in triumph on the
Baltimore sideline.
"I like the pose," he
said. "That looks like a
winning pose right there.
That's one we usually
take when we win. I feel
good about the pose. I'd
like to see that pose a few
more times this year."
So would his alma mater
Harbaugh's is the
ninth statue on the plaza,
joining the likenesses of
Earl "Red" Blaik, Paul


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens coach
John Harbaugh smiles next
to a statue of him that was
unveiled Saturday at Miami
(Ohio) University in Oxford,
Ohio.
Brown, Carm Cozza, Paul
Dietzel, Weeb Ewbank,
Ara Parseghian, John Pont
and Bo Schembechler.


Recreation BRIEFS


C.R. Sharks teeing Buccheri golf tourney
off next Saturday set for May 17


The Crystal River Sharks
Golf Tournament will take
place Saturday, April 26, at
the Pine Ridge Country Club,
5600 N. Elkcam Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills.
Registration is at 9 a.m.
First tee-off is at 10 a.m. The
tournament will be played in a
scramble format with four-
person teams.
First-, second- and third-
place cash prizes will be
awarded. There will be a raffle
for a Sharks liquor cooler filled
with goodies. A free catered
lunch will be served for all.
Entry fee of $50 includes
greens fees, cart and catered
lunch. Mail checks payable to
CYC to P.O. Box 1133, Crys-
tal River, FL 34423 or call
Delisa Dove at 352-257-0596
with a credit card.
Choice of sponsorship lev-
els include platinum at $500,
gold at $350 and silver at
$250. The event will benefit
Pop Warner youth football
and cheerleading.
Walk, bike, hike,
kayak for fitness
The Nature Coast Ram-
blers Inc. is a nonprofit social
and recreational club of
friendly people of all ages
who enjoy self-paced hiking
or walking, biking and kayak-
ing activities in the Citrus
County area.
Walking or hiking, biking or
kayaking with the club pro-
motes fitness. Its goal is to
provide fun events that can
challenge people to keep
active.
Outings are started in differ-
ent locations to explore the
many beautiful trails, parks,
forests and waterways in the
area. Bicycle outings are gen-
erally the second Friday each
month, hiking or walking is
generally the third Saturday of
each month and kayaking is
usually the last Tuesday of
each month.
All events are free for mem-
bers. Become a member of
Nature Coast Ramblers for
$10 (or $15 for a family) per
calendar year. There is a $3 fee
per event for nonmembers.
Members are informed of
upcoming club activities by
email and through postings on
the website and Facebook.
Contact Marie Nail at 352-
382-2525 or marie428@
earthlink.net.


The second annual Joseph
Buccheri Foundation Charity
Golf Tournament will be held
on Saturday, May 17 at Citrus
Hills Oaks in Hernando.
All proceeds go towards
partial scholarships to Citrus
County students, and the
foundation has been estab-
lished to continue the memory
of coach Buccheri, who is re-
membered for his passion for
teaching and coaching, but
most importantly, his compas-
sion for the students who
loved him.
Preregister online by May 10
at www.JoeBuccheri.org.
Registration begins at
7:30 a.m. the day of the tour-
nament with tee-off at 8:30 a.m.
The four-man scramble for-
mat tournament costs $60 per
person, which includes 18
holes of golf, cart, food, bev-
erages and chances to win
great prizes and raffles.
For more information, con-
tact Citrus Hills Golf Club at
352-746-4425 or the Joseph
Buccheri Foundation at
JBuccheri@joebuccheri.org
or 972-897-9987.
Support troops young
and old on the links
The Inverness Golf and
Country Club is hosting a golf
tournament fundraiser for Op-
eration Welcome Home/Honor
Flight Saturday, May 24.
The tournament format is a
four-person scramble and be-
gins with a 9 a.m. shotgun
start. Prizes for low gross, low
net and hole-in-one will be
awarded. Lunch is included.
Hole-in-one prizes include
a 2014 GMC Sierra, donated
by Eagle Buick GMC, and
$10,000, donated by Barbara
Mills Remax Realty One.
Hole sponsors are needed
and cost $100, or $300 to in-
clude a foursome. Single en-
tries will be accepted at $60
and will be assigned to teams.
For information or entry
forms, call Barbara at 352-
422-6236.
Tournament benefits
shelter, animals
A golf tournament to benefit
the Citrus County Animal
Shelter in Inverness will be
held at the Royal Oaks Golf
Club in Ocala on April 19.
The benefit is called Hope's
Legacy, in honor of a little
stray dog named Hope that


The Rotary Club of Central
Citrus and the Citrus County
YMCA Presents "Let's Ride
for the Y" This ride will have
staggered starting times
beginning at 7:30am


$ 00
Tee 6 Sthe

B Sponsored by: Crystal Automotive
SCitrus County Chronicle,
t i f 0^ Citrus 95.3, The Fox 967
wwrtary b ikrdeoteycmWerner& Company PA,
Mike Scott Plumbing, Nature Coast EMS &
;Ii ';;I ,q, surgeryy PA


was adopted by a loving fam-
ily. The fundraising event
strives to bring similar hope to
many other loveable shelter
animals, will help to make
needed improvements at the
aging shelter and also will
help pay for the special med-
ical needs and surgeries for
injured animals.
Opportunities for sponsor-
ships ranging from $100 to
$400 are available for individ-
uals, corporations or busi-
nesses. They include printed
signs at tees advertising the
business name or donor.
Entry fee is $40 and includes
green fees, cart fees, various
prizes and lunch. A cruise raf-
fle and a silent auction will be
offered.
Information regarding spon-
sorship and in-kind donations
are available from Friends of
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices at 352-201-8664.
For information regarding
golf sign-ups, call Marti Little
at 786-367-2834.
Super's Classic
slated for April 26
The 16th annual Superin-
tendent's Golf Classic is
scheduled for an 8:30 a.m.
shotgun start on Saturday,
April 26 at Sugarmill Woods
Golf Club.
The event is a four-person
scramble and the field is lim-
ited to 144 golfers.
The registration fee is $55
per golfer, which includes
greens fee, lunch, door prizes
and hole contests.
For more information, con-
tact Dave Hamilton or Bruce
Sheffield at 726-1931, or Phil
McLeod at 726-2241.
Father Willie Classic
set for May 17
The Knights of Columbus
Abbot Francis Sadlier Council
6168 will have its 20th annual
Father Willie Golf Classic on
Saturday, May 17, at Seven
Rivers Golf and Country Club
in Crystal River. Net proceeds
from the event will be donated
to the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County.
Local merchants and or-
ganizations are invited to
sponsor one or more holes for


$50 per hole. Sponsorship will
be acknowledged with a sign
on the greens and in various
Knights' publications prior to
the event.
Entry fee for the tournament,
open to men and women of
all ages, is $60 per person.
This includes coffee and
doughnuts prior to the start,
greens and cart fees, prizes
and lunch at the Country
Club. Prizes will be awarded
for all par-3 holes and the per-
son hitting a hole in one on
the seventh hole will receive a
prize of $10,000.
The winning teams will re-
ceive $200 for first place,
$150 for second place and
$100 for third place. There will
door prizes, 50/50 drawings
and a separate raffle for a
round of golf for four at Black
Diamond.
Play will be a shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m. with four player
teams. Participants can form
their own team or organizers
will do it. Entries must be re-
ceived no later than May 14
with checks attached made out
to the Knights of Columbus.
Since the field must be lim-
ited to 120 players, make
reservations quickly with Jim
Louque at 352-746-7563. He
will also be available to an-
swer questions.
BGA playing in
Miami for charity
BGA (Bad Golfers Associa-
tion) members will travel from
Citrus Hills to Miami for the
opportunity to play at Trump
National Doral on Wednes-
day, April 23, to support
Sunny Shores Sea Camp, a
nonprofit corporation celebrat-
ing its 35th year of helping
families and mentoring chil-
dren and young adults with
cystic fibrosis.
Sunny Shores Sea Camp is
free to all campers, their par-
ents and siblings. All physi-
cians, respiratory therapists,
registered nurses, board
members and volunteers of
Sunny Shores Sea Camp do-
nate their time.
To help with the annual
fundraising for Sunny Shores
Sea Camp, register to partici-
pate in the cause and play


Citrus County's
20 I + World's Greatest [ ab9 5hower

I Join us on .

Thursday, May 1, 2014
at Cornerstone Church in Inverness
(1100 West Highland Blvd)

First Session, 3:00pm 5:00pm OR
Q Second Session: 6:00pm 8.00pm /)
_.-__CHOOSE ONE J


(* i U/Yf t*fr1


UI zIL.I btayweii
I..HFXH Please contact (352) 228-9047 with questions.

E CARE FOOD lPAy

fourth AnnualJ

SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURHAMENY


golf at Trump National Doral
in Miami.
Applications for the Sunny
Shores Sea Camp Golf Tour-
nament can be found on the
website www.sunnyshores
seacamp.org, or call W. A.
Pace at 352-746-4238 or Jim
Remler at 352-527-3596.
CCBA fishing
tourney April 26, 27
The Citrus County Builders
Association (CCBA) 19th an-
nual Family Fishing Tourna-
ment and Coastal
Conservation Association
(CCA) Aaron Monier Memo-
rial Youth Tournament hosted
by Homosassa Riverside Re-
sort will be held from 6 a.m.,
Saturday, April 26 to 3 p.m.,
Sunday, April 27, come rain or
shine. Boat captain registra-
tion is 6 p.m., Friday, April 25
and weigh-in at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, April 27 at the Ho-
mosassa Riverside Resort,
Homosassa.
The CCBA tournament is
open to all anglers. A tourna-
ment fee of $150 per boat in-
cludes unlimited anglers, two
T-shirts, two free drink tickets,
one door prize ticket and one
"goodie" bucket. CCA/Aaron
Monier Memorial Youth tour-
nament fee, ages 3 to 15, is
$35 and includes T-shirt and a
1-year subscription CCA Ris-
ing Tide Newsletter.
An Earlybird Boat Entry/
Hotel Bundle offer for $274 in-
cludes two nights standard
lodging (double occupancy) at
the Homosassa Riverside Re-
sort plus two free cocktails at
the Riverside Crab House/
Monkey Bar. Offer ends
March 31. Entries received
after April 24 will be subject to
a late fee.
Join Exclusive Platinum
Sponsor FDS Disposal, Weigh
In Sponsor Florian Masonry
and Heart Sponsor Sodium
Fishing Gear with a sponsor-
ship of your own. Sponsorship
levels available are Silver
($750), Bronze ($500), Prize
& Goodie Bucket ($100),
Prize ($50) and Sign ($50).
Gold, Silver and Bronze spon-
sorships include one free boat
entry in addition to numerous
other benefits.


Based upon 125 paid boat
entries, CCBA tournament
cash prizes and door prizes
are estimated at more than
$12,500. A portion of the pro-
ceeds benefits the combat
wounded veterans of Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart.
Participants may register at
www.ccba.camp9.org. For in-
formation call 352-746-9028 or
email info@citrusbuilders.com.
Fishing club angles
for members
If you like to fish with people
who like to fish, and maybe learn
to fish better, come see what the
Citrus Fishing Club is all about.
Men and women alike meet at
7 p.m. the first Monday monthly
at American Legion Post No.
155 at 6585W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
For information, call Steve
Tresnak at 352-445-6743 or
visit citrusfishingclub.org.
Boating safety
program offered
The United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4 will conduct an
eight-session boating safety
program starting Monday.
Boating Skills and Seaman-
ship is a comprehensive boat-
ing education program. It
covers the subjects of boat
design, equipment, trailering,
boat handling and anchoring,
aids to navigation, navigation
rules, inland boating and han-
dling boating emergencies.
Boating Skills and Seaman-
ship also forms the basis for
the instruction of officer
trainees at the Coast Guard
Academy during the summer,
prior to attending the Officer
Candidate School. At the
completion of the program,
participants passing the final
exam will be eligible to receive
the Florida boater ID card.
Total cost is $35 for materials.
This program is presented
Monday and Thursdays, from
7 to 9 p.m., April 7 to May 1,
at the West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 Veterans Drive,
Homosassa. For information,
contact Ned Barry at 352-249-
1042 or nedbarry115@
gmail.com.


16th Annual

Superintendent's Golf Classic
Saturday April 26, 2014 .13 ; an, Sdriu,: .I
Sugarmill Woods Re g "i r.; "iii.i
Golf Club $1000 and $10Iol
Foo Sponsorshis
Food ailabnv er
Door Prizes Availabl
Hole in One Prizes
50/50 Drawing



A. on.Fond,atn



For more information 726-1931 or 724-1931 or 726-2241


Rotary Club of Inverness

ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT

Saturday, May 17, 2014
8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start
Inverness Golf & Country Club

For information call
302-0469

Download
Entry Form at:
www.invernessflrotary.org

Ci Ii4_WILE,.'Y-TAL
OOOHJM6


B6 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


SPORTS









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



It's spring, and that means it's time to get cleaning


spring is a time of
renewal.
Flowers are bloom-
ing, the bad weather is be-
hind us and spirits are high.
In Florida we are begin-
ning to recognize the im-
portance water plays in that
renewal process. We have
spent the past 150 years pol-
luting our water, and now
most folks are beginning to
realize we can't continue
this destructive behavior


Citrus County is a perfect
example of the complex is-
sues that surround the use
and abuse of water And there
are few places on Earth where
you can you find a better ex-
ample of the results of bad
behavior than in King's Bay
and Crystal River
Crystal River has become
the epitome of bad practices.
While my unscientific con-
clusion is that we have not
passed the tipping point, I


do believe we are very close.
That is why I have lost pa-
tience with the baloney
people keep spouting about
why we can't clean up the
mess we have created.
Earlier this week we had
Pat Rose from the Save the
Manatee Club speak to our
editorial board about the
dance that organization has
been doing with the Save
Crystal River group over
cleaning the Lyngbya off of


the bottom of King's Bay
Later that same morning
we had officials from
county government appear
before the editorial board
and tell us how difficult it
would be to pass and imple-
ment a law that restricts fer-
tilizer use in Citrus County
I get physically ill when I
think of a pontificating
Crystal River resident who
has spoken publicly about
the need to clean up the


river, but then threatened a
lawsuit when he was being
forced to pay a sewer con-
nection fee so his own pol-
luting septic tank could be
replaced.
Hypocrites are the heroes
of pollution.
Here are the facts ac-
cording to Mulligan:
If we continue to pol-
lute our drinking water,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Volunteers transplant hyacinth into a large pen in June 2013 on King's Bay in Crystal River. Hyacinth is a type of prolific aquatic vegetation
that filters the water.


ONE





AT A


Helen Spivey
GUEST
COLUMN


Special places that have
been degraded always re-
quire special and often
very expensive efforts to
restore. However, King's
Bay in Crystal River may have all
the right components to accomplish
a restoration just by using what na-
ture has already given it over 30
freshwater springs, the Gulf of Mex-
ico three miles as the crow flies and
Mother Nature's plant harvester, the
endangered West Indian Manatee TI
plus an organization named KBAM
(Kings Bay Adaptive Management)
that came to the realization that
King's Bay can be economically re-
stored by adapting what nature has
given the system.
KBAM group members were indi- h:
vidually thinking along the same
lines when they met a few years ago.
They began comparing notes and
theories for facilitating onsite restoration
of water clarity and control of planktonic
and benthic filamentous algae such as Lyn-
gbya by utilizing floating aquatic plants
such as water hyacinths and water lettuce.
Some KBAM folks had spent years studying


PLANT





TIME


methods and apply them to today's
problems in an effort to reverse
some of the damage and clear the
waters of microscopic phytoplank-
ton and filamentous algae like Lyn-
gbya that add so much ugliness to
King's Bay
How did things get this way?
King's Bay experienced numerous
manipulations over many years that
resulted in significant ecological im-
pairments, particularly increased
nutrient concentrations. These ex-
cess nutrients led to the waters of
King's Bay becoming overpopulated
with water hyacinths, water lettuce
and submerged vegetation such as
Hydrilla that prospered on the
abundant nutrients, yet the waters
still remained crystal clear How?
We knew those aquatic plants
were absorbing the nutrients that
were pouring into the Bay from
springs via an aquifer that was over-
whelmed. The aquifer gained nutri-
ents from a burgeoning population
with home landscaping, agriculture,
waters laden with waste from yards,
roads and highways, shopping cen-
ters and so on. Folks didn't realize
n. that these nutrients which they
didn't know existed and couldn't
even see should never have been
allowed to reach the Bay waters.
The aquatic plants of King's Bay
gn used these nutrients to expand from
a small original population to dense,
weedy overgrowth.
Water hyacinths and water lettuce
are used around the world to clean
up sewage treatment plant waste-
water and to clear emerald green, cloudy,
eutrophic ponds to crystal clear in a matter
of weeks. This made KBAM members think
back to the days when those same aquatic
See PageC3


e water hyacinth produces a vibrant purple bloo
he water hyacinth produces a vibrant purple bloor


To see a
video of the
project, visit
tinyurl.com/
yacinthproject


Editor's note: This column is
reprinted with permission from
Aquatics Magazine, a publication
of the Florida Aquatic Plant
Management Society.


the Bay waters; others had researched
King's Bay and its springs and the lessen-
ing of aquifer flows to them, and a few had
lived in the area for a number of years and
had witnessed the changes to the system.
We agreed to revisit some earlier control


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3





0Page C2 SUNDAY, APRIL 20,2014



PINION


"Customary use of artifice is the sign of a small mind,
and it almost always happens that he who uses it to
cover one spot uncovers himself in another."
Francois de La Rochefoucauld, "Maxims," 1665


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SV Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
SMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

IRRESPONSIBLE PARTY




Chicanery in



District 2 race



disenfranchises



54,000 voters


others don't appreciate
it when they get
scammed.
That is just what's happen-
ing in the District 2 Citrus
County Commission race.
An un-electable Republi-
can resident has announced
that he will qualify to run as a
"No Party" candidate, so that
the intent of Florida's open-
primary rules can be violated.
Incumbent commissioner
JJ Kenney is facing three
challengers in the August pri-
mary for the Republican
nomination. There are no
Democratic mem-
bers of the county THE 1
commission, and
no Democrat is Trying
running for this the v
seat.
Michael '"Joey" OUR 01
White, a peren-
nial losing GOP Politica
candidate, has an- subvert
nounced he will electric
qualify to run
against the winner of the Re-
publican primary as a non-
party candidate.
That decision by White
blocks 54,000 Citrus County
voters from having a say on
who will win the commission
seat Kenney or one of his
three opponents.
State law says that if only
candidates from one party
qualify for an election, all
registered voters get to par-
ticipate. There are about
95,000 voters in Citrus, of
which about 41,800 are Re-
publican. The remainder are
either Democrats, minor-party
voters or independent voters.
While White won't say so
publicly, it is our opinion that
he has been convinced to reg-
ister as a non-party candidate
to block approximately 54,000
Citrus residents from casting
a ballot.
No non-party candidate has
ever been elected in Citrus
County White has previously
run for office as a Republican


Pick it up or put it out
This is my last time calling
for a solution to highway trash,
fire department call-outs be-
cause of burning lots getting
out of control, leaving house-
hold garbage and recy-
cling containers,
dropping off household 1
garbage in private busi-
ness Dumpsters or at
Whispering Pines Park
Dumpsters. My reason-
ing, after watching this
for 27 years as a 4
county resident, is
mandatory garbage CAL
pick-up. The county Q
government commis- 563
sioners simply refuse to
enact this ordinance or law
for political reasons, I suppose.
So we go on and on, year
after year, watching the roads,
etc., overflowing with
household garbage. I pick up
cups and papers in front of
my house, but that's it,
nowhere else.


Is
C



F

ti
on


I

(


and has been unable to gar-
ner enough votes to make
him a contender And, in this
case, White doesn't even live
in the district he intends to
try to represent.
He suggested to a Chroni-
cle reporter that he wants to
run as a "no-party" candidate
because there has been too
much bickering between De-
mocrats and Republicans.
While we agree there has
been way too much bickering
in county government for the
past six months, all five mem-
bers of the county commission
are Republicans.
SdE ~There are no De-
SUE: mocrats on the
to fool board.
)ters. We currently
have Republicans
'INION: bickering with
Republicans.
games The intent of
ng state the Florida law-
ns law. passed by a Re-
publican Legisla-
ture is to open primary
voting so that all citizens can
participate in the process.
Some Republican insiders
who are opposed to Kenney
winning re-election are
afraid that the incumbent's
strong support from veterans
regardless of party affilia-
tion will ensure his re-
election. Before being
elected four years ago, Ken-
ney was the county's vet-
eran's services officer.
So while veterans are good
enough to take up arms and
fight for this nation overseas,
the political insiders of Cit-
rus County want to block
them from participating in
our county's election process.
This is an insult to veterans
and to all Floridians who be-
lieve in fair elections.
Regardless of which candi-
date you might support in the
District 2 commission race,
let's stop the political games-
manship and let voters make
the choice.


Way to go, USF
Kudos the University of South
Florida's health care navigators
for getting so many Floridians
enrolled in health care, and
shame on the Florida Legisla-
ture for banning the
|ND health care navigators
JND from county public
health departments.
Lack of hours
Lack of doctors in
Citrus County? I don't
think Citrus County has
a lack of doctors. What
Citrus County needs is
\579 doctors' offices that are
) open Monday through
Friday.
Confusing intersection
The caller was correct about
the dangerous traffic situation
at Independence and State Road
44. In the left lane on Independ-
ence facing Walgreens, you
should get not just a green light
but a green turn signal.


Do no harm to your finances


after being sued by the
Wall Street Journal, the
government finally re-
leased its Medicare reimburse-
ment data last week. It included
the less-than-stunning revela-
tion that 28 of the 100 doctors
who received the
largest payments in
2012 were from
Florida..
No other state came
close. And no physi- t I1
cian in the country
billed Medicare for
bigger bucks than
Dr Salomon E. Mel-
gen, a West Palm Carl H
Beach ophthalmolo-
gist who operates OTI
several clinics and VOI
is tight with a pow-
erful Democratic senator
Melgen got almost $21 million
from Medicare in 2012. (No, you
don't need your vision checked
-$20,827,341 is the actual num-
ber for one year)
Records show Melgen filed
claims for 894 patients and
92,000 procedures, meaning
Medicare paid him approxi-
mately $11,700 for every eyeball
that was eyeballed by him and
his staff.
Even in Florida, the mecca
for Medicare tricksters, Melgen's
billing habits drew notice. The
government had already forced
him to give back $8.9 million
from 2007 and 2008, alleging he
overbilled for injectable Lucen-
tis, an expensive medication that
combats macular degeneration.
The disorder is common in
the elderly, and nationwide the
treatment costs Medicare $1
billion a year In 2012, Melgen
reported administering more
than 37,000 doses of Lucentis in
South Florida.
Currently he's under investi-
gation for possible fraud, and
twice FBI agents have swarmed
his offices in search of evidence.
His attorney says he's done
nothing wrong, and has taken
action to recover the nearly $9
million that Melgen repaid the
agency in charge of Medicare
and Medicaid.


I


I



ti
Ci
C


The doctor has an important
ally in Sen. Robert Menendez,
the New Jersey Democrat who
has traveled on Melgen's pri-
vate jet and hung out at his posh
spread in the Dominican
Republic.
When Melgen first
got in trouble,
Menendez called the
U.S. Department of
Health and Human
Services to defend
his pal's prolific
billing. Another time
the senator argued
in favor of a com-
aasen pany owned by Mel-
gen in a dispute over
IER a seaport contract
DES in the Dominican
Republic.
For his part, the doctor do-
nated $700,000 to a Democratic
political action committee that
gave $582,000 to Menendez's re-
election efforts. So far, Melgen's
friendship with Menendez has
failed to deflect the FBI's
interest.
Second on the national score-
board of Medicare's top billers
is Dr Asad Qamar, an Ocala car-
diologist who was paid $18.2
million in 2012. He told the
New York Times that his
charges are fair, and that the
sum is so large partly because
he works in an outpatient facil-
ity for which the government
pays added fees.
Like Melgen, Qamar is an en-
thusiastic donor to Democrats,
including President Obama. He
gave more than $100,000 to the
Democratic National Commit-
tee, and distributed other con-
tributions to congressional
candidates in five states, in-
cluding Florida.
After federal auditors began
examining Qamar's bills, the
doctor hired lobbyists to contact
more than a dozen U.S. law-
makers, seeking relief from the
scrutiny
"The auditors put an astro-
nomical burden on us, in terms
of manpower," he told the Times.
An astronomic burden caused
by astronomical billing.


Any physician who rakes in
$18 million from Medicare in 12
months deserves special atten-
tion, because such a massive
volume of medical claims defi-
nitely isn't business as usual.
In fact, according to a Times
analysis, only about 2 percent of
doctors collected almost 25 per-
cent of the country's Medicare
payouts in 2012. Expanding that
graph, just 25 percent of doctors
accounted for 75 percent of
Medicare's total spending, which
reached $77 billion that year
It's hardly a shocker that
Florida leads the way No place
in the nation hosts more
Medicare fraud prosecutions, a
grim distinction.
The good news is that the
conviction rate is high; the bad
news is that we could quadru-
ple the number of prosecutors,
and they'd still be overworked.
Meanwhile, soaring
Medicare costs cut deeper and
deeper into federal tax rev-
enues. The program is so huge
that it practically defies effec-
tive auditing, but certainly a
much better job of that could be
done.
Publicizing the payment data
base is a start. Some medical
practices are more complex
than others, and the numbers
only tell part of the story for
each physician on the list
However, it's more than a sta-
tistical blip when two doctors
collect a total of $39 million,
more than hundreds of other
practitioners in those same spe-
cialties added together
California, which has twice
the population of Florida, had
only 10 doctors in the top 100
Medicare billers, compared to
our stellar 28.
It's not that Florida has more
sick and elderly people than
California, because we don't.
We just happen to attract more
opportunists.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132.


F Z4
"BUT WI905 WRoNG WiT- OUR cv m FiNLANfAI SYSTEM "


SLETTERS to the Editor


President
Newly released emails show
Lois Lerner former director of
the IRS Exempt Organizations
Division, violated federal law by
leaking confidential tax infor-
mation about tea party groups to
the Federal Election Commission.
The House Ways and Means
Committee has referred her
case to Attorney General Eric
Holder to start criminal pro-
ceedings against her
Political observers I trust be-
lieve nothing much will come
of that. President Obama has
never concealed his passion for
increasing the power of the ex-
ecutive branch, and Holder has
changed the role of the Justice
Department from federal pros-
ecutor to liberal defense attorney
To conjoin the chief executive's
powers to tax and police the elec-
tion process is a dangerous thing.
Liberals enjoying these proceed-
ings should keep in mind that any
broadening of executive power
will benefit future presidents.
John McFadden
Inverness


Brainwashing a nation
The word brainwashing
comes to mind as I ponder
the state of our nation. Web-
ster's Dictionary defines
brainwashing as follows: "a
forcible indoctrination to in-
duce someone to give up
basic political, social, or reli-
gious beliefs and attitudes
and to accept contrasting reg-
imented ideas."
Brainwashing also can be
defined as "to condition, grill,
persuade pressure, indoctri-
nate, and re-educate."
The brainwashing that is
taking place in our country by
those running our country is
slowly but surely destroying
everything good that our
Founding Fathers established
as the rules of our land. For-
tunately, what is in place to
destroy us can still be
changed, and will be changed.
Good can and will overcome
evil.
John J. Bressan
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And life is worth the living, just because He lives


"... and life is worth the living,
just because He lives..."
"Because He Lives,"
Bill and Gloria Gaither, c. 1974.
during the years I have
produced this column,
I've typically remembered
some holidays and passed on others,
but to the best of my recollection,
since the column's inception, there
has always been a Christmas
edition and an Easter edition.
Today, April 20, 2014, is
Easter It is the day on which we
Christians recognize the resur-
rection of our savior, Jesus Christ
My previous approach to an
Easter column has usually been
to select a scriptural text and ex-
pound on it regarding the death
and resurrection of our Lord -
a mini-sermon, if you will.
But today, while it is still im-
perative to recognize the true
reason for celebrating Easter,
my mind has also entertained
thoughts of Easter eggs, chocolate
bunny rabbits and marshmallow


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

there will be a day when each of us
will have to pay very high taxes to
find a new source of drinking
water.
E If we continue to pollute Crys-
tal River and King's Bay, tourists
will stop coming and the economy
will crash and burn.
E If we continue to pollute Crys-
tal River and King's Bay, manatees
will get sick and stop coming here.
And die.
E If we continue to pollute Crys-
tal River and King's Bay, no one
who owns a home, business or real
estate will be able to sell anything
because no one wants to live on a
polluted waterway
Unfortunately, there are no sim-
ple or single answers to correct the
mess we have made. We are all
stakeholders in finding answers.
There are solutions.
Art Jones and his "One Rake at
a Time" project have energized
the population. He has made pop-
ular the message that we each in-
dividually have to take
responsibility He is our American
Indian who shed that single tear
long ago when Americans thought
it was OK to toss litter on the high-
way
Art has made it popular to find
solutions and to work together.
Here are the top actions needed:
E All septic tanks on the west



PLANT
Continued from Page Cl

plants kept King's Bay crystal clear,
although the populations of these
plants were overabundant (and if
manatees had ventured to Crystal
River then in the numbers that
come now, the overabundance of
aquatic plants probably wouldn't
have happened.) There is abundant
scientific evidence that suggests
these aquatic plants can keep
clouded water columns clear in
other places; this led to our decision
to apply this phytoremediation tech-
nique here in Crystal River
The Howard T Odum Florida
Springs Institute, with experienced
and dedicated water-quality
restoration experts, helped get us
the permits required to legally pos-
sess water hyacinths and water let-
tuce. They also secured a permitted
area, adjacent to the east side of
Parker Island and across the lagoon
from the FWS Refuge headquarters,
for us to experiment. With the insti-
tute's leadership, along with dona-
tions of time, funds, pontoon boats
and volunteer labor, our hyacinth
corral was constructed and placed
adjacent to Parker Island. The cor-
ral is some 80 feet wide and 200 feet
long and composed of PVC pipe
booms to keep the floating plants in
place. The official scientific name of
the project is the "King's Bay Adap-
tive Management (KBAM) Phytore-
mediation Project."
Quarterly data have been gath-
ered and recorded by Springs Insti-
tute scientists and volunteers to
establish a baseline that can
demonstrate the effects of floating
plants on water clarity Our first goal
was to show that despite a 30 per-
cent increase in salinity in King's
Bay waters, the floating aquatic
plants water hyacinth and water let-
tuce could survive and grow in
those salty waters. Initial readings
were taken. Then, through many
trips and countless hours, volun-
teers transported the plants, using
pontoon boats, to the nearby corral.
Many plants survived the initial
placement despite a storm with high
winds and high tides later that week
that stranded a number of plants on
the shore. These plants died because
they were stuck in the mud and were
unable to float back into the corral.
We added more plants a month
later, but this time we collected
water hyacinths and water lettuce


Peeps. I've always absolutely I was 24 years old and already
loved those little yellow sugary- working for the state as a bank
sweet baby-chick Peeps! Cheryl examiner and with my 21-year-
or one of our offspring- a child old Cheryl, along with toddler
or a grandchild, someone-will Beth-Pooh, we were the epit-
see to it that I get my peep fix! ome of an extremely young fam-
Not only that, I ily To add a bit more
have mentally revis- excitement to the
ited the days of my mix, Cheryl was six
youth and how excit- months into her ex-
ing it was to select pectation of another
and wear a new out- arrival.
fit, new clothes, to I couldn't form a
church on Easter. precise mental pic-
Today, while it is ture of my own outfit
not totally a thing of for that Easter day
the past, Easter out- Fred Brannen in 1970, but my best
fits don't seem to be SC recollection is a
so much in vogue as A SLICE hazy view of me in a
they once were. OF LIFE cranberry-and-white
On a more specific pinstriped coat with
note about Easter finery I found matching cranberry trousers
myself thinking about a certain and tie all made from double-
picture that I remembered tak- knit polyester However, the vi-
ing during that period of time, a sion of my girls soon became
time when I was certainly no ultra clear: I found the photo-
longer a child, but to most, I'm graph.
sure I was not considered alto- In it, Cheryl is wearing a
gether grown up either white floppy hat and a very full


side of the county need to be re-
placed with public sewer systems.
All septic tanks throughout the
county need to be inspected on a
regular basis and those not meet-
ing minimum standards need to be
replaced.
Fast-release fertilizer needs to
be banned throughout Citrus
County
In waterfront areas, specific
fertilizing regulations need to be
developed and implemented.
Stormwater runoff from U.S.
19 and the shopping centers needs
to be diverted, retained and
cleaned before it is permitted to
enter King's Bay or Crystal River.
This is a public responsibility -
starting with the state government.
The state of Florida is the largest
creator of stormwater pollution by
directing the U.S. 19 runoff into
King's Bay
The Lyngbya needs to be
raked, sucked, dredged what-
ever you want to call it and
taken out of King's Bay
Natural grasses need to be re-
planted in controlled areas. Living
shoreline projects need to be de-
veloped throughout the bay
The pumping of water from
the aquifer needs much more
rigid controls. That means no
water-bottling businesses in Crys-
tal River. But it also means that in-
dustrial uses of water pumped
from the aquifer needs to be con-
trolled. The first source of indus-
trial water (power plants) should
be reclaimed water from sewer


from a stormwater project pond
across the street from the Crystal
River Post Office. As before, the tubs
were filled and driven to the refuge,
loaded onto boats and carried out to
the corral. Volunteers in kayaks
placed the plants in the corral and
chased down any escapees. This
time it wasn't a storm with high
tides and winds that shortened the
time the plants were observed and
data taken: Three happy manatees,
described by a kayaker as a mother
and a calf and a juvenile, discov-
ered the corral, and within a few
short days wiped out our experi-
ment. Luckily, the manatee's diges-
tive system is long and complex and
it has been scientifically proven that
manatees utilize most of the nutri-
ents in the foods they eat; therefore,
almost none of the nutrients that are
moved through their digestive tracts
end up back in the waters.
Back to the drawing board. Float-
ing manatee-exclusion water hy-
acinth cages, measuring 4 feet by 8
feet were designed. Supplies were
again purchased using donations
from the Florida Springs Institute,
Save the Manatee Club and others;
generous volunteers constructed
them and, on the next trip out, the
cages were transported to the cor-
ral. We later received reports of
manatees bopping these cages up
and down, but they were probably
just scratching their backs on the
plastic exclusion screening. KBAM
and volunteers again collected float-
ing plants from the stormwater pen
by the post office and filled the
cages, as well as the corral.
The cages worked as we had
hoped, and when videos were sent
of four commercial dive boats sur-
rounding the corral and the floating
plants' leaves rapidly disappearing,
leaving just a floating plant nub, we
knew the manatees had come back.
We continued to collect data and to
fill the corral. The floating plants in
the cages happily grew and flour-
ished, while the plants in the corral
disappeared. At this point, we met
some folks involved with mechani-
cal harvesters at a springs program.
They volunteered to help KBAM
and we quickly got an amazing les-
son on how creative these folks can
be. They brought a conveyor and a
tilt trailer to our next plant collec-
tion event; with volunteers in the
pond feeding aquatic plants onto
the conveyor, the trailer filled in no
time. As we were filling the tubs at
the boat launch site and putting the
tubs into boats, one of the harvester


maternity dress that is a brightly
colored floral print She is sport-
ing white sandals and holding
an oversized purse which is a
mixture of pastel and white weave.
Beth is in a sweet little dress
with a white top, a pink belt and
a flowered skirt, complimented
by a white hat and white shoes
with socks. Becky? At that time,
we didn't yet know that she was
Becky, but her presence is quite
visible beneath her mother's
ever-so-colorful outfit.
Life.
Nothing says life to me more
exquisitely than does that pic-
ture, and I truly know life is worth
the living because He lives.


Fred Brannen, an Inverness
resident, has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and is the
author of the recently published
novel 'At the Bottom ofBiscayne
Bay." Fred may be contacted at
fbrannenjr@gmail. com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


systems.
All golf courses in the county
should be required to use re-
claimed water from sewer systems.
Tax incentives should be cre-
ated for homes and businesses that
use Florida-Friendly Landscape
practices.
In coastal areas, private wells
for irrigation purposes should be
banned. And homeowners in
coastal areas should not be per-
mitted to dump used household
water in waterways.
There are plenty of other things
that need to be done, but these
would be a start. We don't need
more studies, we need more ac-
tion.
The next time some politician or
bureaucrat tells you they are doing
all they can to clean up the water,
tell them to get busy making the
difficult decisions or get out of the
way and let someone else try to get
the job done.
While well-intentioned people
argue over the details of how to get
the job done, Rome continues to
burn.
There are a lot of things we
can disagree about, but cleaning
up our most famous Outstanding
Florida Waterway and protecting
our underground drinking
water supply should not be one
of them.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


guys said he had a small harvester
and that if we dumped the plants
from the tilt trailer into the water,
he could scoop them up and trans-
port them out to the corral.
Now, as we head into our final
year, we will be attempting to com-
pletely exclude manatees from the
floating aquatic plants now that we
have proven that they see them as a
salad bar To accomplish this we will
have to increase the size of the float-
ing cages to something like 8 feet by
8 feet. This will be much more
costly, which has us actively solicit-
ing donations to allow us to get it
done. With that goal accomplished,
we can move forward and focus on
our basic concept: If we can reduce
the water turbidity (suspended
planktonic algal cells) from a frac-
tion of the water in the bay by shad-
ing the area under a corral filled
with water hyacinth and water let-
tuce, we can help dilute the cloudy
algae over a wider area, particularly
in a place where the water circulates
with four tides every day Once we've
proven that this system works, we can
expand it to all of King's Bay, with
pockets of floating aquatic plants
consuming excessive nutrients while
spreading over and shading out the
microscopic phytoplankton that
ruins the scenic views of King's Bay
Meanwhile, newspaper stories re-
port that some agencies are looking
at adopting new methods too, and
offering credits for complying. For
example, farmers in parts of east
Florida, where they have deep
ditches filled with waters from their
agricultural efforts, have been of-
fered credits by the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
to avoid the use of herbicides on the
water lettuce plants that are thriv-
ing on nutrient runoff and clogging
those ditches. Instead, the agency
wants farmers to mechanically har-
vest the aquatic plants and haul
them to an area away from the wa-
ters, where they can be turned into
a more useful compost.
Restoring special places may not
require a bundle of cash to succeed;
we just need to use the tools that
Mother Nature has given us to allow
these areas to flourish once again.


Helen Spivey is a member of
KBAM, co-chair of the board of di-
rectors of the Save the Manatee
Club, a former state representative
and general stirrer-up of necessary
things. She can be emailed at
mana tees2@gmail. com.


FRED BRANNEN/Special to the Chronicle
Easter 1970. Cheryl, Beth and Becky,
incognito.


Letters to THE EDITOR

On a fact-finding mission
I am a proud member of the board of the Sugarmill
Woods Civic Association, and believe our mission to
promote our subdivision's involvement in our county
doesn't neglect or isolate our neighbors in Hernando
County The vacation request submitted by our Oak
Village residents is valid only if you believe the
gypsies fortune that predicts doomsday (Where are
the facts?). How do the people living on Cypress
Boulevard feel about their quality of life between
3:30 and 6 p.m. daily? No one avoids dwelling on
that two-lane drive, and hundreds of cars and
dozens of school busses transverse within this com-
munity daily Know what? I don't see signs in their
front yards, or the owners condemning commis-
sioners' behavior because of the traffic and pound-
ing their chests.
The objection I have is facts are not being exam-
ined yet conjecture prevails. This has yet to be dis-
played on either side of this issue. Scarier yet is the
Citrus County Land Development Council (or what-
ever they develop), didn't see this dispute coming
and decided this vacation should be approved. The
squeaky wheel is getting undeserved grease if the
Citrus County Commissioners approve the vacation
application without resolving the application from
the developer This issue involves facts not specula-
tion and this developer has yet to produce facts nor
has the county or Sugarmill Woods.
Harry B. Oates
Homosassa

Giving Event very successful
The Citrus County YMCA takes great pride in of-
fering quality programs to children, youths and
adults. The Y does not discriminate against those
who are unable to pay, but lends a hand. This is
possible through the Y's People Helping People.
These applications grant families financial assis-
tance with programming fees something that
could not be done if not for the generosity of the
community
Every year, the YMCA holds a Giving Event; this
event allows members in the community to open
their hearts and made a donation to support the
Citrus County YMCA. This year's annual Giving
Event was held on Saturday, March 22, at Black Di-
amond. This successful fundraising event raised
$220,000 that will support healthy Y programs and
the People Helping People Financial Assistance
Program. It was a very successful event and the
YMCA staff would like to thank the many volun-
teers, donors, and YMCA supporters.
Caitlin Drew
administrative assistant, Suncoast YMCA Citrus Branch


I ft CONSTRUCTIOfl


5712 S S Slvd .,2-2
Beau*tifu p i ierlmRW


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sweet talk
I was very upset to see in the newspa-
per Friday, March 21, about the hum-
mingbirds feeder mixture. You put in
there 1/2 cup of sugar to 1 cup of
water, but that's way too strong. You
need to have just 1 part of sugar to 4
parts of water. So I hope you could put
something in the paper for that.
Captured by aliens
I just heard the 23rd or 24th opinion
on what has happened to the aircraft,
the 777 Boeing out of Malaysia. And
the last one I heard now has changed its
mind three times. I'd like to send mine
in, for what it's worth. I think that an
alien aircraft has come down and cap-
tured that airplane and taken it out of
our atmosphere and that plane now is
somewhere on some other planet. I
know this may sound a little bit far out.
But hey, you know, this is opinion
No. 24 and nobody else has been right
yet. Who knows?
Address on license
For the first 20 years that I lived in
Florida, I was allowed to have my post
office box address on my driver's li-
cense. Now I have to have my street ad-
dress on it. Why? It was great when it
had my post office box
U number on it because
if I got mugged, I
FF didn't have to worry
about people getting
my street address
from it and going to
my home to rob that
C*Al also. These crooks can
A look in the phonebook,
563-0579UO but it wasn't listed in
that, either. Now with it
on my license, it's like saying, 'Here's
where I live, so go and rob that place
also." Elderly women have been taught
simple things they can do to help pro-
tect themselves and not revealing where
they live was one of them. So whose big
idea was it to now have to have the
street address on the driver's license?
Living in car with cats
There seems to be a homeless lady
living in her car with six cats. How can
she be helped when she will not part
with any of her pets? She tries to take
care of them, but is this animal cruelty
as well as inadvertent human cruelty?
That's ironic
I find it hugely ironic that state Sen.
Charlie Dean is receiving credit for rec-
ommending the elimination of the hos-
pital taxing district when, along with Bill
Grant, Charlie Dean was the lead agent
in this whole entire battle to begin with,
from beginning to end.
Great read
Just like to compliment you on this
morning's column titled "I am the har-
vester." I hope Mr. Rose reads this column
and understands that his opinion only
represents a small percentage of the cit-
izens of Citrus County and how they feel.
Thanks, Jerry
It's Sunday (March 30). What a good
column by Jerry Muetzel, I believe it is.
And he says, "I know what harms the
environment and what does not." He's
got years of experience. Give it to the good
guy that's out there doing something.
Lower limit on 19
I plead with you very much to help
and maybe put something in your paper
and help other people comment on the
fact that from Publix from (U.S.) 98 up
to at least the flea market should be 45
mph. That is so ridiculous that they fly
past here at 70 and 75 and sometimes
more than that and never get picked up.
More accidents are there than I have
ever heard of. I live there very close to
the highway and I know how many acci-
dents we have because of the speed.
We need a bark park
This call is in regards to the letter about
the dog park written in today's Chronicle
(March 30) from Bob Goethe. I have my
two sons' dogs from Orlando here with
me for an extended length of time and I
miss the dog park over there. I used to
be able to go when I was over there to the
dog park and let the dogs run for a good
hour and give them some good exercise.
They'd get to mingle and get to know the
other dogs. I took my own little poopie
bags. I took my own portable water dish
and my bottle of water. My dogs had a
great time over there. It is a shame that
there isn't one, a dog park, over here.
Enough plans, need action
I've been reading for years now in the
newspaper about the EDC and how they've
got all these plans, five-year plans, two-
year plans. What we need is some per-
formance. What we need is some action,
which we're not getting any of. We need
to get somebody there that can actually
achieve some good goals for jobs.
No hunting in springs
Regarding the Sound Off today, Monday,


March 31, in the Chronicle, the hunter
who says he's been fined for doing illegal
things to animals and deer in the forest:
I have been to Three Sisters Springs on
dozens of occasions. Have yet to see any-
body do anything in any way that would
harm the manatees. So I'm not quite
sure where this man goes hunting, but
obviously we can keep him out of Three
Sisters Springs because God knows
what he might do to the manatees.
Lecanto McDonald's
I just want to set the record straight
where the new McDonald's is. It's not in
Beverly Hills. It's four miles south of
that. It's in Lecanto in front of the
Lecanto Walmart.


dlf


Letters to THE EDITOR


Thanks for supporting
idea whose time has come
Thank you Chronicle and staff writer
Nancy Kennedy for the story on Citrus
County's Operation Welcome Home
proposal to the city of Inverness re-
garding a parade May 2,2015, honoring
Vietnam War veterans, former prison-
ers of war, our missing in action, and
their families. It was an honor to repre-
sent Operation Welcome Home and ap-
pear before the city's gracious and
professional group who unanimously
approved our request.
This will not be an easy project and
will require extensive effort by the city,
our Operation Welcome Home organi-
zation, local veterans organizations,
businesses, and private citizens to
make it successful. It is an endeavor
long overdue for those who served in
probably the most controversial war in
our nation's history while returning to
humiliation and suffering for having
done so.
As a Vietnam War veteran I person-
ally know few Americans said thank
you. Nobody said welcome home. In
many instances we were called baby
killers, psychos, drug addicts and war
mongers. Urine and garbage were
thrown at us. Some restaurants re-
fused to serve us. Businesses would
not hire us. We were spit on by our
own citizens. We were unprepared as
we walked off airplanes and ships
upon return.
We were humiliated by America's re-
sponse and took off our uniforms in
public. We refused to talk about what
happened to us in the war We put our
military decorations in dresser draw-
ers and no longer wore or displayed
them. Nobody would talk to us about
our experiences. We sat alone in a hell
of nightmares and humiliation while
over one million of us suffer from post
traumatic stress disorder and hun-
dreds of thousands from combat
wounds.
These actions caused Operation Wel-
come Home to step forward and initi-
ate this endeavor for a parade of honor
to finally tell these heroes, "Thank you
for serving."
I want to make a statement to those
of you who served World War II, the
Korean War, the Gulf War, Operation
Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Endur-
ing Freedom. You are heroes and I do
not want to detract from your service to
America because you, too, fully de-
serve our sincere respect and honor
Barbara Mills established our Opera-
tion Welcome Home program to honor
the most recent wars and it is a shame
no similar local special program ex-
isted for earlier wars where military
personnel and families sacrificed so
much in the name of freedom. There
are no words to describe my feelings
for your heroic service to America in
those past wars. However, I believe
each of you know how badly Vietnam
War veterans were treated upon return
and we began this project to honor
them, but with thought that a similar
action of honor should be taken over
the next few years for each of your re-
spective periods of war I hope you will
join together and implement a similar
program to honor veterans from your
eras of war
Meanwhile, we will work diligently
to honor our Vietnam War veterans
next year and I invite every Citrus
County veterans organization to coor-
dinate with your state of Florida
chapters to invite their local Vietnam
War veterans to join us in this parade
of honor Please encourage all other
war veterans to appear in the parade
and join in the celebration of thanks.
And, to those of you who did not
serve, please come and cheer our
heroes.
If you have any questions, or wish to
volunteer or have an organization be a
parade participant, go to www.
operationwelcomehomeveterans.org
and click on the link for the City of In-
verness Vietnam War parade.
John Stewart
Operation Welcome Home
Committee Chairperson


Give away Beverly Hills
recreation center
In today's, Hot Corner of the Chroni-
cle, several comments were made,
that favor the closing of the Beverly
Hills Community Center and Pool. I
concur! There are no prudent reasons,
I can take into account, for the contin-
uation of this absurd financial drain.
Wake up commissioners. Pouring
Citrus County's tax money down a
deep abyss is about as sensible as
beating a dead horse. Perhaps you
shouldn't take salaries (for a year) but
instead, the use of your personal dol-
lars might trigger your understanding
and make you aware of what residents
currently feel.
Why haven't you recognized the de-
mographic changes that have oc-
curred over the past few years? Gone
are those great old-timer retirees, who
were thrilled having a center and pool
as an enjoyment for their remaining
senior years.
For those folks who are still alive
and coping with various illnesses,
their only desire now is undisturbed
peace and tranquility The younger
families, who recently have moved in
and taken their places, have different
needs raising their young children.
Give the center and pool away for
free. There are organizations or indi-
viduals, who financially, can revitalize
and energize this once thriving re-
source, such as: the Boys and Girls
Club, the YMCA, or an individual in-
vestor who has already provided ac-
tive businesses to enhance the
county's growth and increased its tax
roll.
I am certain this complementary
gift by you will make far better sense
to those seasoned financial pros, who
at the same time, can easily remove
this senseless tax burden from the
County
Peter Monteleone
Pine Ridge

Your phone has an
off switch; find it
I have recently been asked why I do
not carry my cell phone with me when-
ever I leave the house. This is why: My
family and friends are very important
to me. I love them so much I want them
to be free to live their lives as they see
fit and not be at my beck and call every
minute of the day What possible rea-
son could I have to report to them my
every thought, word and deed through-
out the day? I can lace my shoes in the
morning by myself and I can untie
them when I go to bed at night without
seeking guidance from anyone.
I do not feel it is a hardship to be
alone. When I am alone I am not lonely
It is only when I am alone that I can
make plans for my future. We are who
we are largely because of our interac-
tion with others. We need time alone to
sort things out, but not while driving.
When you notice someone in the cen-
ter lane going 20 mph under the speed
limit, watch out! He is texting. Driving
alongside of him is like swimming with
sharks. Very, very dangerous!
A lot has been written about Abra-
ham Lincoln, but beyond his public
persona that part of himself that he
projected to the outside world we
know nothing. We go to a large hall to
listen to music, but unless each of us is
conscious of the stream of the melody,
the music amounts to little more than
wind rustling through the leaves of an
empty forest.
Cell phones and iPads are marvelous
devices that help us keep in touch with
the world about us, but we should not
forget they all come with an off button.
The tools of the trade available to
William Shakespeare were quill and
ink and paper, but he understood
human nature as well as anyone who
has ever lived. He wrote, "To thine own
self be true and it must follow as the
night the day, thou canst not be false to
any man."
Franklin G. Aretz
Beverly Hills


Watch for cyclists
on roadways
As a bicycle-only adult who has re-
cently moved to the area after about
2.5 years in the Floral City area, I
would like to share a few experiences I
have had commuting on U.S. 19.
Two weeks ago I was sideswiped by a
late-model Honda which continued on
down the road, as did the cars behind
the Honda. In this instance I suffered
no harm. My left mirror was struck,
which is about 6 inches from my hand
and shoulder It scared me, but I am
still alive. Twice in the seven weeks I
have been here I have had near-hits at
intersections.
In another instance I was overtaking
a much slower cyclist and rode into the
slow lane then returned to the shoul-
der In this instance I first looked into
my mirrors to observe traffic; there
was a small, dark Toyota SUV about 200
yards back in the slow lane, so I passed
the cyclist. When I did this, the driver of
the SUV sped up and moved closer to
the white line to blow their horn at me.
I obey all traffic laws; I wish drivers
would. I will not stop riding to and from
work. I can only hope that drivers here
will be more aware of cyclists in the area.
Thank you.
William Cline
Crystal River

Letter suggests Realtors
violate ethics
Re: "Two sides of the issue," Letters
to the Editor, Page C3, April 6.
I have no dog in this hunt (Oak Village
stub out), but need to shed some light on
the subject matter of this letter, as the
writer spreads untruths about brokers
in general and, in particular, brokers in
Clearwater
Florida law (chapter 475) and the
Realtors Code of Ethics (Articles 1, 2,
11 and 12) prohibit Realtors from
promising anything to their customers or
clients. Doing so opens the door to liti-
gation, prosecution under Florida law,
and ethics violations by a local Board of
Realtors.
I, too, was a Realtor in Clearwater,
for 40 years. I have never witnessed
such activity as the writer describes.
Realtors may assist customers/clients
in their due diligence efforts, but promising
an outcome is not part of the process.
It seems some want to blame the Re-
altor for any problem that (in most cases)
they have no part of, or control over
The very thing the writer faults Real-
tors for, she, herself indulges in the
second-to-last paragraph!
Buz Heuchan
Crystal River

U.S. not a democracy
Re: "Playing the recusal card,"
Letters to the Editor, Page C3, April 6.
In a recent letter to the editor titled
"Playing the recusal card" an individ-
ual from Sugarmill Woods, Eugene
White, voiced his opinion in regard to
certain members of the county commis-
sion recusingg" themselves in regard to
a developer extending a stub out in
order to gain right of way to a proposed
development. He has every right to
voice his opinion and I have no prob-
lem with that
However, in the seventh paragraph
of his letter he makes the following
comment: "in a democracy, the good of
the many usually outweighs the good of
the few (or the one)."
I'm not sure just what Mr White was
taught when he went to school, but when
I did so, I was taught that this country
was never intended to be a democracy
but was a constitutional republic where
individual rights were paramount.
Democracies inherently fail, mainly
due to the fact "the many" have a ten-
dency to vote themselves more and
more freebies. To quote Karl Marx,
"Democracy is the road to socialism."
Case in point, look where we are today
Ken Morgan
Pine Ridge


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


COMMENTARY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Impeach Obama
I am sure by now everyone
knows Obamacare has been a dis-
aster It is not going to get better
What everyone should have done
is not sign up then this whole fiasco
would have collapsed as it should.
This president needs to be impeached.
Why he is not I will never figure that
out. He has turned this country up-
side down and as a result we are all
paying the price. It seems that any-
thing and everything the government
gets its hands on is a train wreck.
Does anyone care? Who knows what
is coming next. Does he remind you
of someone who did something like
this for the good of the people?
We need a good strong leader to
run this country Not Clintons or
Bushes. I think we all have seen
enough of them. Not someone who
can care less. We are not the super
power anymore. Watch all these
countries rise up against us. This is
truly a sad time for all Americans
who remember the way it used to
be. We took no bull from anyone.
Boy! How times have changed. For
worse, not for better What has hap-
pened to our country?
Anna DeRose
Lecanto


Case of mistaken identity
A few weeks ago a woman was
being mistaken for the teenager
who wanted to sue her parents for
not paying for her education. This
woman's first and last names were
identical to this teenager's name. I
felt sorry for her because I go
through the same thing in Inver-
ness. The only difference is that
only my first name is the same and
the last names are not even close.
When I was leaving a building, a
woman called my name and I turned
around to see what she wanted. She
told me that she didn't agree with
something that I had said in my last
letter and went on to tell me what
that letter had been about that she
disagreed with. I had to tell her
that I was not that Joanie and that
my last name was nothing like hers.
It wouldn't have bothered me if
this woman had at least said to me,
'"Aren't you the Joanie that always
has letters in the Chronicle?" instead
of just telling me what she thought
about my last letter I had no idea
who this woman was, but she knew
me. At least she thought she did.
As I walked away I said a prayer
that people like this do not work in
a hospital where an identification


error could be fatal. As for the other
Joanie, I have nothing but admira-
tion for her to have the courage to
write what she does, but I just like
having my own identity.
So please, try to get a person's
identification correct before as-
suming that they're someone else. I
didn't choose my first name, but
please get our last names correct
and stop mistaking me for the one
who writes letters to the Chronicle
all the time. Thank you.
Joanie Knapp
Inverness

Rumble strips the answer
To reduce speeding through the
traffic light intersection in Floral City,
I suggest the use of rumble strips
on U.S. 41. They work. They re-
quire little if any maintenance. In-
stallation is relatively inexpensive,
a lot cheaper than a bypass. Signs
on the approaches could provide a
warning.
The ones on 180th Street between
State Road 40 and Marion County
Road 484 near the Dunnellon schools,
east of that city, are very effective.
Bob Best
Crystal River


Missing Marguerita
I'm calling about the Marguerita Grill. We always
used to come here and go down there to eat. What
happened? Did they quit building it? Are they going to
rebuild it yet? We would like to know. Please tell us.
Same price, better value
I am not in favor of buying the building in Meadow-
crest. It is older, old plumbing, old electrical, old roof,
old insulation. Look at the new Hospice building for
not much more. We can get a nice, new, modern, en-
ergy-efficient building that will last a long time and
would need less repairs. Nothing
UND fancy, just better. Also, we don't
AO-N need a medical corridor, just a nice
V ~FF four-lane road for (County Road) 491.
Here's your counsel
I read in the Chronicle this morn-
A q ing (March 27) about the attorney
CAL 0 right out of law school and we're of-
fering her $91,000 a year to repre-
6-UO 57 sent this little hillbilly town, plus
another $8,000 goes to attorneys in
Tallahassee. Who do some of these people think we
are? We're not New York City. We're not Philadelphia.
We're a small town in Inverness. We don't need a full-
time attorney. They should use a local attorney if they
have any problems the commissioners cannot handle.
I don't know. They're just trying to spend as much
money as they possibly can.
Truck muck
I'm calling in response to the "Don't litter, young'uns."
I am not a young'un; I am a senior citizen. I want to
know if this person has ever followed a garbage truck
going to the landfill with the garbage flying out and
they don't seem to care whether the garbage is covered
or not. A lot of the garbage on the highway is due to the
garbage people picking up and letting things just fly.
I should hope so
I wonder why people put "I love my children" on their
car for. You know, like little signs on their car, "I love my
children." Well, let's hope you do love your children.



++le lrlti~n

Crystal River Preserve State Park
April 26, 2014 10:00am 3:00pm
Critter touch tank, kid's games and activities, food, music,
boat tours, local exhibitors and more!!!
Celebrate Earth Day all week with guided tours.
Call ahead for reservations.
April 22- Kayak Trip at 10:30am
April 24 Guided Fire Walk at 9:00am
April 26- Kid's Marsh Exploration from 8:30 -10:30am
For more information, call 352-563-0450
3266 N. Sailboat Ave., Crystal River, FL 34428
The Friends of the Crystal River State Parks Inc.
a not-for-profit (501(c)(3) Citizen Support Organization.


3rd Art"fUa' Inglis Yankeetown Lions Club

NATURE COAST CHALLENGE

KAYAK FISHING

S TOURNAMENT
9Catch-Photo-Release
Saturday
VAPRIL 26, 2014
www.naturecoastchallenge.com
$200 Longest Redfish 352-505-7936
$200 Longest Sea Trout FISH THEWITHLACOOCHEE
$200 Grand Slam RIVER OR THE GULF of MEMCO
"Mixed Bag" Prize and More! WHRICE |
100% of Na- Proe A- Us.d To S.ppor Lbon. Chtbkl. Ac-MtiU.

(iusOral & Sue p
Jallofacgal .urdery. PA 3
-IVli t LoE ItMD.AD., Exciting
OO # Divisions

Junior
O Age 5 -10
I5 Senior
Age 11 -15

CITRUS COUNTY Tri4Fun
KIDI TRIATHLON All Ages
May 10, 2014 Inverness, Florida
Whispering Pines Park
Entry Fees
Before April 14th: $25
After April 15th May 7th: $30


HELP JOE fRGHT CANCER
Sunday, April 27, 2014 Noon 4pm
Frog's Lounge
3171 S. Stonebrook Dr., Homosassa
(Just of Hwy. 19 across from Homosassa Marine)
Rain or shine, indoor and outdoor seating provided
$20 p^^B BK* f
BBQ Dinner
Fundraiser I Bi Z

SLive Music Featuring "Remember This" Band
SLive Auction Items Silent Auction 1 50/50 Raffle
SOther Raffles Free Haircuts by New Concepts Hair Salon
(Asking for donations)
Local Citrus County Veteran
needs your help to fight cancer!
OZK9 Call (352) 586-7757 for information


SATURDAY, APRIL 26
CITRUS COUNTY AUDITORIUM
9AM-I PM
Giveaways for parents and more!
SPONSORED BY: CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUIK COUNTY CHOOI. BOARD YMCA
.U I:: [ llI. I I I I I II: III- I : l I "Iq

^ For more information ^ [
2 call 726-4488


I Citrus Springs Community Center 04
Friday, April 25 8:30 am 5 pm
SSaturday, April 26 8 am 2 pm
Puzzles DVDs CDs
Paperbacks Hard Covers

We also will be accepting donations for:
ICASA, the Animal Shelter
and Local Area Food Banks
Cl Iq)\ t(:I.E
_____~C i"i^'L_______ _



Liewr SHINE 2014
Pre..ilJ8., Shlphrrid ,. ft H. II I_, ,i-f Clii C im

Ditch of Dreams.
The (.rt, llorids Barge (Canal
and Ihe Strugk for Flionda Future



H I ,, I. . h" hu I..U 11 'II. 1, 1.1111l 1 I l ... ll l *I l .1 l. ..1.
ih14-uJ MII ,... I. HIJr S UNDAY APR J I 27 .
(J.,., 1A IN'N m I.

A ,' I is 1 1"en Se Ia t. I ng J bIIt, Im itdII t 20
r ., ,j ,- i 1,,1, i , n I .1 '1. , M


.. ... ", .I ., l .,. ..... .lr i>.. ... . 1. .. I R )N l(JjL

Shefri of rrHilk -EpixaJ CWdi 254W N ndlBW mat Higa) (CR 4 1 ALemio
... .. ForAMor Information. call 352-527-0052 8am to 1pm


fa F o fijtQ


MU OTC VV QT
U A BENEFIT FOR THE
BOYS & GIRLS CLUB IN DUNNELLON
Saturday, April 26
Come Join Us For Live Music & BBQ
at Swampy's Grill on
The Rainbow River at Dunnellon
Featuring A Variety of Music Including
Blue Grass, Folk, Country & More


* 12:00 1:OC
* 1:25-2:15
* 2:30-3:30
* 3:45 4:45
* 5:00 6:00

BBQ


Wound Tight
Scott & Michelle Dalzie
Nathan Whitt
Jamie Davis
Backwater Bluegrass
Dining-In or Take-Out
*80. a plate


Exciting Silent Auction Items
"FREE" ADMISSION
More Info: Carswell Ponder B&G Club 690-7440
Riverland News


Starring Billy Lindsey
Friday, May 9
Central Ridge Community Center
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
Members $5.00, Non-Members $8
Doors open at 6pm Show starts at 7pm
Call 352-746-4882 or 352-465-7007 for info
BURGER PLATESAND DRINKS
WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE


SUPERHEROES

WANTED










Crystal River/

Dunnellon

Relay for Life
Friday, April 25, 2014 6:00PM
Crystal River High School
Complimentary
Cancer Survivor/Caregiver Dinner
5:30PM
For more information, call Rory Wells at 352-201-9057
or email: rorywellsrelay@gmail.com
www.relayforlife.org/crystalriverfl


For info go to www.CitrusKidsTri.com or contact
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475 or email: info@drcsports.com
OOOCIHCLEQYT


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 CS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Rehab center provides
exceptional care
After my surgery at Citrus
Memorial hospital (Feb. 17 to
20), I did some research as to
the best rehab center to go to.
I chose Arbor Trail Nursing
and Rehab Center located on
Turner Camp Road in Inver-
ness. I can honestly say, with-
out reservation, that my
choice was most welcome be-
cause of the treatment I re-
ceived while a resident and an
outpatient for 37 days (Feb. 20
to March 28). Attention to de-
tail was the highest concern
that I personally witnessed
which made my recovery fast.
I was compelled to go the dis-
tance and did so willingly and
even attempted to go the extra
mile in order to be released to
return home. Listening to the
staff and doing what they tell
you was foremost the clue to
leave. The staff were the great-
est, most concerned person-
nel. They were extremely
caring and I wish to congratu-
late the following for the at-
tention to detail, their
enormous training program,
their facility and those who
are able to provide the pa-
tients with proper care and
concern for the safety of the
patients and myself.
As a resident: Thank you to
nurses Linda and Tracy and
the techs, Alice, Vic and Jim
for their care and concern for
my safety and for the relaxed
atmosphere while I was there.
It made me feel very important
and cared for beyond all ex-
pectations. Thanks also to my
personal trainer, Denyse, and
Dixie, Mike, Reggie, Dave,
Bob, Carol and Judy Without
their specified individual di-
rection to training programs, I
would never have achieved my
goal for complete fitness and
return to society as a healed
patient after receiving a major
surgical procedure. Again,
thank you everyone, and allow
me to apologize if I forgot
anyone.
Louis F. Poulin
Inverness


Candidate clarifies
campaign donation
Just to comment on the
April 3 Chronicle article,
"Candidate claims new home
as an in-kind contribution:"
To clarify, the public
should know that I did not
take campaign contributions
from my campaign bank ac-
count to pay the $13,095 for
my new home in District 2,
Homosassa that was listed
recently on the reporting for
the Supervisor of Elections
website as an in-kind contri-
bution. Instead, the $13,095
came from my personal
funds and I claimed this cost
as an in-kind expense, as it is
the state of Florida Statute
requirement that I live in
District 2 at the time of
election.
It was just logical, since
this house was an additional
expense than what I would
have paid had I not have
been a candidate. That it be
listed as campaign expense,


20144
Saturday, May 3
10 a.m. 2 p.m. i
CF Citrus Campus
Learning and Conference C.
3805 ecanto Highway,A



Call 352-746-6721, ext. 6131
for more information! II ...
Watch demonstrations, view displays and receive information
from Citrus Count, arts organizations, individuals, businesses, venues, and service providers.
Complimentary beverages and snacks will be provided.
Email wirtm@cf.edu




1/5411W Cete~vauo
SLittle Springs Park

\ Join the
Crystal River Tree Board for the
'3rd Annual

Arbor Day

Tree-Give-Away
Come get your Florida Friendly tree!

SApril 26th -9am-12pm

i E NI(C Key Training Center
EfW. ,/A .i1 I 11.ZA,


the suggested worn
Supervisor of Elec
"in-kind." So kind]
did not rob the pig
received no monet
fit I only backed
law of required re:
that next year is e;
the Florida Legish
have specific requ
to be enforceable.
Renee C



Benevolen
business as
Re: "On road tal
pass the rhetoric,'
Sunday, April 6.
I'll be the first t(
that my vision isn'
was seven or eight
Obviously the Cl
vision has also det
over that same per
time. Certainly the
cle saw Nachum K
what he was then,
breaker of rules. A


ding by the his contractor was attempt
tions was ing to clear-cut the infamo
ly believe I "40 acres" with no regard f
*gy bank, the environment or for ob-
tary bene- training a building permit.
I1 up the Like Claude Raines in
sidency, "Casablanca," Mr. Kalka w
expected by "shocked" that such behav
ature to ior was being carried out i
irements his name. Just another "mi
understanding," like the
$8 million lawsuit filed and
.hristopher- won by his partner and
VMcPheeters childhood "friend" in New
Homosassa York. Now, years later, the
Chronicle has come to this
.ce or poor man's defense with
usual? regard to the Floral City
bypass.
k, let's by- The Chronicle asks that
Page C2, ignore the rhetoric and ac-
cept Mr. Kalka's role in the
o admit process as one of a benevo
t what it lent citizen. The land he is
t years ago. donating is a windfall for t
chronicle's county So what if he make
teriorated a little money in the proce
riod of Isn't he entitled? Obviously
e Chroni- the Chronicle thinks he is.


Alka for
i.e. a
kt that time


Dunnellon Area Chamber of Commerce
Presents

^ town DaysO
0 April 26th 8 27th 9
Pennsylvania Ave. & Cedar St.
Sat. 9am to 5pm Sun. 9am to 4pm
Arts and Crafts
Queen of the Rainbow &
Little Miss & Mr. Pageants
Antique Car Show Music & Kids Area
Boomtown Casino Friday
25th at Gruffs 6-10pm
For information contact the Chamber of Commerce
352-489-2320 or dunnellonchamber.com
OOHX8Riverland News


American Irish Club
Annual Invitational Golf Tournament

SATURDAY, APRIL Z6, 2014
SEVEN RIVERS COUNTRY CLUB
Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun Start at 12:30pm
Scramble Best Ball Format
1Prizes for men and women
for the longest drive (#4)
Pot-0-Gold (optional) on Hole #5
Cost $55 per person includes
golf, cart, prizes & lunch
Social hour with cash bar and appetizers
1 during awards ceremony 4:45-6pm
PROCEEDS TO BENEFITAIC LOCAL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
& CITRUS COUNTY CHARITIES
For information and sign-up contact: .
Dave Horsman 897-1398 or Herb Duval 794-7565 tIi li.\ql$ |


Knigffhts of Colambus
Council 6168

Annual
Fr. "Willie"

Memorial Golf Classic (

May 17th- 8:30 a.m. Shotgun start
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
Entry fee $60
Fee includes coffee/donuts, green and
cart fees, lunch at the club and prizes.
Proceeds will be donated to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Entries must be received by May 14th.
For information C I i-) I i
call 746-7563 I3


Dave Groff
Homosassa


Columnist misses
mark on ACA
I see once again that Gene
Lyons is exercising his consti-
tutional rights by trumpeting
the glories of the Affordable
Care Act ("7 million reasons
not to repeal the ACA," Page
A8, April 8). He states that the
acts opponents' comments,
after Barack Obama an-
nounced that 7 million people
were enrolled in the program,
would be predictably negative.
I suppose that the ACAs sup-
porters, him included, would
be predictably positive, a point
he failed to note.
The 7 million enrollees pro-
jected by the CBO and HHS's
Kathleen Sebelius fails to sub-
tract the 6 million-plus people
who already had health insur-
ance and had this coverage
canceled. These people were
forced onto the "exchanges."
So does he really view this as a
net gain? Do the math, Gene.
The really big misleading data
about the 7 million is how
many of those have actually
paid their premium. No one in
us Washington can or is willing to
for tell us. How much have those
"temporary glitches" cost us,
the taxpayers, for ads and
computer consultants? We
as don't even know the cost of the
program itself. The ACA has
n been changed 30-plus times
is- since it was put into force, and
is not what the U.S. Congress
d passed in 2010. He seems to ig-
nore that fact and the effect it
S will have on the American
public and the large piece of
the U.S. economy that will be
impacted.
I understand that Mr Lyons
is a partisan supporter of this
we bill, but the facts speak for
themselves. He uses the word
e "estimates" three times in his
column when referring to
3 numbers and percentages. The
he people in this country cannot
s rely on estimates when so
ss. much of their lives are af-
y, fected by government bureau-
cracy and presidential fiat.


Terry Coats
Crystal River


April 20 26 7:30 PM
ACT Murder at the Howard Johnson's
Entrance Fee: $15 each
Contact Phone: 746-7606

|April 22 9:00 AM
Keep Citrus County Beautiful
Citrus County Recycles County Landfill
Entrance Fee: $10 donation
Contact Phone: 352-201-0149

|April 24 6:30 PM
Night at the Museum Coastal Heritage Museum
(Tickets are $25 a person
Contact Phone: 212-8390 or 795-1755


April 25-26
Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
Citrus Springs Community Center
Friday 8:30 5:00 PM; Sat 8:00 2:00 PM
Contact Phone: 489-2313


IApril 25 6:00 PM r
P American Cancer Society* Relay for Life Crystal River
Crystal River High School
Contact Email: mshapot@bellsouth.net

April 26 12:00 6:00 PM
Boys & Girls Club of Dunnellon Americana Music Fest
Swampy's Grill, Dunnellon
Entrance Fee: $8/plate Contact Phone: 690-7440

rApril 26 8:00 AM Noon
Memory Enhancement Center of America
Dash for Dementia Lecanto HSTrack
Entrance Fee: $15 Adults, $10 Children
SContact Phone: 726-3874

April 26 9:00 AM
|City of Crystal River Tree Board
Arbor Day Celebration Tree Giveaway
Little Springs Park Contact Phone: 352-212-0437

|April 26 10:00 AM 3:00 PM
Earth Day Celebration CR Preserve State Park
| Contact Phone: 563-0450

April 26
(InglisYankeetown Lions Club
3rd Annual Nature Coast Challenge Kayak Fishing Tourn.
Fish the Withlacoochee River or the Gulf of Mexico
|Contact Phone: 505-7936

April 26 9:00 AM 2:00 PM
Citrus County Sheriff's Summer Safety &Youth Expo
I Contact Phone: 341-7486

| April 26
P Senior Foundation Tampa Bay Downs
Entrance Fee: $48 pp
9:30AM pick up, 7PM return
Contact Phone: 527-5959

SD oApril 26-27:
Dunnellon Chamber of Commerce Boomtown Days
Saturday 9-5, Sunday 9-4
S Contact Phone: Call 352-489-2320


CITRUS COUNTY RECYCLES
Celebrating Earth Day

TE IAP.22 I

FREE guided tour of three
recycling facilities in the county
Meet at 9:45am in the Inverness Walmart
parking lot (southeast corner closest to Wendy's)
Registration is required. Call 201-0149 J
Hosted by
Keep Citrus County Beautiful, Inc. (KCCB), J
Citrus County Solid Waste Division, ", \
FDS Disposal, Inc. & '
Technology Conservation Group (TCG)
Suggested $10 donation I .
to cover transportation cost. L
CiiT<()\[u._!Li..


L! I I () UNI( ,I1


S 1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 101112
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 2122 23 24 25 26
2728 29 30
m / .


C6 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


COMMENTARY










BUSINESS
CITRUIS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY




Curbs and

sidewalks

the price

of expansion

D EAR BRUCE: I own a
E BU : property and lease half the
space. The current tenant
wants to expand to the lot next
door However, the township says
we need to install curbs and side-
Pbyeoo walks. This is ridiculous because it
is on a main highway However, I
w want to keep everyone happy and
have offered to help with the high
cost of installing what is needed.
Associated Press Is there any way I can avoid all
The this cost? Is there any way to fight
the township on this matter?
TW, via email
DEAR T.W: To answer your sec-
ond question first, "Is there any
way to fight the township on this
matter?" Possibly, but generally
speaking, it is a waste of time.
What has happened is that sub-
sequent to your current arrange-
ment, an ordinance has been
passed that says any extension of
areuse will require that you install
ar curbs and sidewalks. You may
think this is ridiculous because it's
on a main highway, but that's not
material, and keeping everyone
id the happy is not material either
The en- Is there any way to avoid this
cost? I doubt it very seriously, ex-
g the law cept by passing it on to the current
tenant who wants to expand his
use, which is perfectly appropri-
ate. If he wants the use, he will
have to pay
out, Democ- DEAR BRUCE: In 1990, my par-
age on the ents created a trust and placed the
ober, when family home in it. When my mother
' unusable, passed away in 2010, the trust was
Strategy dissolved and the family home was
d that placed in the name of my sister and
Secretary me with a right of survivorship.
ime the face The value of the home in 1990
pping was approximately $150,000, and
when my mother passed, it was ap-
ains unpop- proximately $215,000. Neither my
)ut Democ- sister nor I live in the house or
ing to plan to live in it since our elderly
are actively father lives there and we live out
away from 8 of state. At some point in the fu-
ture, we plan to sell the house.
provide The question is whether we owe
the ex- tax on the sale of the house and, if
e still we do, what is the basis? Is it when
the trust was established or when
Stall of the trust was dissolved? R.S., via
eviously email
ng health DEAR RS.: In 1990, when your
;o unclear parents created the trust, the
he deal by house had an established value.
emium to You said when your mother passed
away 20 years later the value of the
se uncer- house was approximately $215,000,
is hyping which is a difference of $65,000
damage the from 1990. At that point, the taxes
r premi- should have been paid on the
rks and $65,000.
to Senate If that wasn't the case, that obli-
nnell, R-Ky. gation is still buried into the value
hington De- passed on to you and your sister In
medy the the event that one of you passes
t means re- before the house is sold, the re-
ig it with maining heir will be responsible
Page D5 for taxes on the entire $65,000 that
is already accrued, plus any differ-
ence in appreciation.
DEAR BRUCE: I have been get-
ting conflicting opinions about
when and how to pay quarterly es-
timated tax. I receive Social Secu-
rity and a pension income. In
.g n-/3December, I take a required mini-
ges Lmum distribution (RMD) from my
IRA.
One bit of advice says at the first
Obama's of the year, I should calculate my
total expected taxable yearly in-
rance come (Social Security, pension,
dividends and RMD), estimate the
taxes that would be due, then di-
itute, which vide by four and make four equal
states' im- payments during the course of the
ie health year
t the top of The other advice seems to be
e likely to saying that I need not pay quar-
nge. Her list terly tax, but instead have the IRA
, Arkansas, custodian simply withhold the
rginia, New total yearly estimated tax in one
elaware, lump sum from the RMD.
luctance is I've asked a few friends what
cf those they do, and some do the former,
ovember some the latter. What's correct?
oess mb D.C., via email
re a state DEAR D.C.: As far as I can tell,


President Barack Obama speaks Thursday about health care in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. 1
president said 8 million people have signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.





President Obama:



8 million signed up for health c

ight million people have signed up for health care through new insurance exchanges ar
proportion of younger applicants has increased, President Barack Obama said Thursda
rollments exceeded expectations and offered new hope to Democrats who are defending


ahead of the midterm elections.


WASHINGTON

An impromptu appearance
in the White House briefing
room offered the president
an opportunity to trumpet
the new figures, which beat
initial projections by 1 mil-
lion. With an eye toward No-
vember, Obama castigated
Republicans for continuing
to seek out every opportu-
nity to thwart the Affordable
Care Act.

"This thing is working," Obama said of
his signature domestic achievement.
Touting modest progress on another
front, Obama said 35 percent of enrollees
are under 35 years old, suggesting that in
the final weeks of enrollment, the admin-
istration managed to sign up higher num-
bers of younger, healthier people who are
critical to the law's viability
The most coveted age group com-
prises those between 18 and 34 years
old. White House officials said that for
the 36 states where the federal govern-
ment is taking the lead, 28 percent are
in that age group a step in the right
direction from March, when the admin-
istration said just 25 percent were 18 to


Associated Press
In a sharp rebuke to his political op-
ponents, Obama called out states that
have refused to embrace an expansion
of Medicaid under "Obamacare," argu-
ing that their opposition was rooted in
nothing more than sheer ideology and
political spite.
"That's wrong. It should stop," he said.
"Those folks should be able to get health
insurance like everybody else."
Although the first year's open enroll-
ment season for the exchanges closed on
March 31, the administration is still tal-
lying the number of total enrollees.
States managing their own exchanges
have been slower to report data, and
some Americans who started applica-
tions before the deadline were given
extra time to complete their enrollment.
The demographic figures also give De-
mocrats an opportunity to blunt the pes-
simism of Republicans, some of whom
have accused the White House of "cook-
ing the books" by announcing large over-
all enrollment numbers that tell only
part of the story
"They still can't bring themselves to
admit that the Affordable Care Act is
working," Obama said. "The longer we
see the law benefiting millions of peo-
ple, the more we see accusations that
the law is hurting people being com-
pletely debunked."
Democrats have been hoping that bet-
ter-than-expected results could help
their candidates reclaim the political
high ground on "Obamacare" before


Election Day Seven months o
rats are seeking to turn the p
law's disastrous debut in Oct
HealthCare.gov was virtually
Obama seemed to affirm thai
last week when he announce
Health and Human Services
Kathleen Sebelius, who beca
of the rollout failure, was ste
down.
Polling shows the law rema
ular in much of the country, t
rats plan to argue that by tryi
repeal the law, Republicans
working to take health care a
million Americans.
Although the new figures p
some clarity about how well 1
changes performed, there ar
plenty of unknowns.
Officials haven't released a
how many enrollees were pr
uninsured and are thus gain
care thanks to the law. It's als
how many enrollees sealed ti
paying their first month's pre
the insurance companies.
Republicans seized on those
tainties to argue that Obama
figures that obscure the real
law is inflicting like higher
ums, smaller provider netwo
canceled policies, according
Minority Leader Mitch McCo
"It's long past time for Was
mocrats to work with us to re
mess they created and tha
pealing this law and replacir
See


Clock ticking for states to adopt health exchai

For the more than 30 states that defaulted to the federal government under President Barack(
health care law, time may be running out to decide whether to create their own state-run insu
exchanges.


Associated Press
CHICAGO -With the
chance to apply for hundreds
of millions of dollars in fed-
eral help set to expire in a
few months, even Obama's
home state of Illinois is ex-
pressing little interest in tak-
ing the next step. The law's
disastrous rollout and linger-
ing unpopularity have made
it risky to raise the issue in a
tense election year despite
Obama's announcement
Thursday that 8 million
Americans have signed up for
subsidized private insurance.


Health care advocates are
pushing the Democrats who
control the Illinois Legisla-
ture to pass a measure en-
abling a state exchange. They
note many states already run-
ning their own were able to
enroll customers at a faster
clip and will have more op-
portunity to scrutinize insur-
ance rate increases for their
residents.
But it has barely been men-
tioned in the state capital of
Springfield, with just weeks
left to take action before the
Legislature adjourns.
"The Democrats run this


state. President Obama's
from Illinois. It's up to them
to do it," said Jim Duffett of
the Campaign for Better
Health Care, a nonprofit
coalition that has been help-
ing Illinois residents sign up
for coverage. "Who's in power
makes a difference; you can't
hide from it anymore."
Many of the remaining
states that declined to adopt
their own exchanges are con-
trolled by Republicans, some
of whom want to eliminate
what they call "Obamacare."
But Sonya Schwartz of the
Georgetown University


Health Policy Inst
has been tracking
plementation of th
law, puts Illinois a
a list of states mor
approve an exchai
also includes Iowa
Michigan, West Vir
Hampshire and De
But the same rel
holding back many
states, despite a N
deadline to get ace
funds to help secu
exchange, with in
case could mean u
See


Illinois' you can proceed either way: MaKe
in to .is certain there is enough money


ESPage D5


Page D5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Understanding charitable solicitations in Florida


oliciting for charitable do-
nations by nonprofits has
come under greater
scrutiny Discovery of deceptive
practices, misleading solicita-
tion and outright fraud has led
to more regulatory control by a
majority of the states. Forty
states, including Florida, have
statutory requirements regard-
ing soliciting for donations.
Nonprofits classified as
501(c)3s must register with gov-
ernmental agencies for permis-
sion to solicit donations in their
respective states. Recognized
churches are exempt Many
states additionally require out-
of-state nonprofits to register
with them.
Permission to solicit has be-
come even more complicated,
as some states now require the
federal income tax exemption


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

NONPROFIT
a f t BRIEFS


from IRS called the determina-
tion letter to be in place.
Adding to this criterion, more
states are requiring nonprofits
to be incorporated in an appro-
priate IRS exemption category
Tighter regulations have grown
as discovery has shown monies
collected may not be being used
for the purpose stated by the
solicitors.


Registering for permission
Registration for permission
to solicit means providing the
state with enough detail about
the nonprofit, its programs,
mission, purpose and finances.
The detail required allows pro-
fessional staff to evaluate, ex-
amine factual disclosures and
uncover potential misuse of
fund donations. The applica-
tion processing form is very
specific, but not at the same
level of information when re-
questing a 501(c)3 nonprofit
federal tax exemption from the
IRS.
In today's world of rules and
regulations, most states now re-
quire annual re-registration.
Florida requires annual report-
ing. Once the nonprofit regis-
ters in Florida, an annual
reminder form is sent each


year thereafter
Noncompliance and fees
Noncompliance penalties
can be stiff. They can easily es-
calate to thousands of dollars.
Not registering is a big gamble
not worth the risk. Ignorance of
the law is not an accepted ex-
cuse. It will not bring relief
from compliance. States today
are cash-poor They're quickly
learning how to pursue and
fine organizations attempting to
avoid compliance.
Florida's fees to register for
solicitation permission start at
$10 for a nonprofit with dona-
tions of $25,000 or less in their
previous year For groups re-
ceiving $10 million, the fee is
$400. Late fees can be as much
as $25 for each month re-regis-
tration is missed. Organizations


can request 60-day extensions
to mitigate late penalties.
Compliance
recommendations
Review your state and fed-
eral nonprofit documents annu-
ally Comply and keep clearly
understood records. Pay the
fees required on time. Need
help? The Nonprofit Resource
Center works with Citrus
County nonprofits to stay in
compliance with state and fed-
eral agencies. Remember: Ex-
perience matters.
Dr Frederick JHerzog, PhD
is the Executive Director and
Founder of the NonProfit Re-
source Center of Citrus County
He can be reached at: Ther-
zog@tampabay.rrcom or call
847-899-9000.


Economist: 2018 minimum wage will be worth $9.25


NICK TABOR
Associated Press
ANNAPOLIS, Md. In a plan approved by the
Maryland legislature, full-time minimum-wage work-
ers in the state will ultimately make about $875 less
annually than they would have under the governor's
proposed timetable, an economic analyst said.
Legislators voted last week to have Maryland's mini-
mum wage reach $10.10 an hour by July 2018, whereas
Gov Martin O'Malley originally wanted it to reach that
amount by July 2016.
David Cooper, an analyst for the pro-minimum wage
group Economic Policy Institute, said that by mid-
2018, $10.10 will be worth about $9.25 in today's dol-
lars. Cooper based his numbers on the Congressional
Budget Office's inflation estimates.
He said $10.10 will likely be worth about $9.67 in
mid-2016.
"Just because inflation is always eating away at the
purchasing power of the dollar, the longer you push
out these increases, the less in spending power that
means for these low-wage workers," Cooper said.
Senate Minority Leader David Brinkley, R-Freder-
ick, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, said
he and his colleagues chose this timetable to alleviate
the burden on employers.
"Some of us would have extended it for 20 years,"
he said.
He said the wage hike will give incentive to busi-
nesses to rely more on machines, reducing the num-
ber of entry-level jobs.
For that reason, House Minority Leader Nic Kipke,
R-Anne Arundel, said the delayed timetable could
also mean a trade-off for low-wage workers. If a
higher minimum wage means fewer jobs, then raising
the amount more gradually could slow that attrition
process.
But regardless, he said the wage increase will still
put Maryland at a competitive disadvantage with its
neighbors for attracting investors.
"Maryland is basically all borders," he said. "This is
a bigger problem for Maryland than for many states."
O'Malley's plan also would have indexed the mini-
mum wage to inflation after it reached $10.10. The


With Your I

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A m Fai ho ..o e
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Associated Press
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada arrives for a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington to
criticize Republican opposition as the Democratic caucus urges approval for raising the minimum wage.


House stripped away this provision and changed the
timetable so the rate would reach $10.10 in 2017. The
Senate Finance Committee voted to extend the
timetable further, and both chambers ratified this
plan.
Lawmakers also amended the bill to let businesses
pay workers under 20 years old a "training wage," set
at 85 percent of the general minimum, for their first
six months on a job.
And they kept the base wage for tipped workers at
$3.63 an hour, rather than raising it in proportion to
the increase other workers will receive.
Mat Hanson, spokesman for the advocacy group
Raise Maryland, said he still sees the bill's passage as
a victory Last year, without O'Malley's involvement, a
similar measure died in legislative committees.
But the exemptions disappointed him.
"We should not have had to fight this hard or make
this kind of compromises in an overwhelmingly Dem-
ocratic state," he said.
O'Malley is expected to sign the bill next month.


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D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


BUSINESS





Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's Conneition


D3

SUNDAY
APRIL 20, 2014


Turn out for tournament


The 19th annual Family
Fishing Tournament, pre-
sented by Exclusive Plat-
inum Sponsor FDS
Disposal, has been sched-
uled for April 26 and 27,
2014, at the Homosassa
Riverside Resort in Ho-
mosassa.
The Captain's Meeting
will take place on Friday,
April 25, 2014 at the same
location beginning at
6p.m.
This year's tournament
will boast over $12,500 in
cash and prizes based on
125 paid boat entries.
CCBA expects a record
tournament to beat 2013
totals of 121 paid boats at
97 percent prize payout.
Current adult entry fee is
$150, which includes one
boat unlimited anglers,
two T-shirts, two drink
tickets and one goodie
bucket.
Adult registrations will
be accepted at the Cap-


tain's Meeting; however, a
"last minute" fee of $25
for adult registration can
be avoided with online
registration and payment
through midnight on
April 24. The Adult Cap-
tain's meeting and
CCA/Aaron Monier Me-
morial Youth Tournament
Captain's Meeting will be
at Homosassa Riverside
Resort.
Youth registrations are
$35 and will be accepted
until the Captain's Meet-
ing with no additional fee.
The CCBA presented
the Aaron A Weaver
Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) with a check in
the amount of $1,682.69
from the 2013 tournament
and hopes to beat that
number this year
The Fishing Tourna-
ment Committee is ex-
cited to partner with the
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter


Top golfers, again


Lecanto Veterinary Hospital took first place in the 2014 Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing for the second consecutive year.
The winning team members, from left, are: Dr. Jason De La Paz,
Steve Fabretti, Donovan Anderson and Dr. Wade Phillips. The Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing raised almost $4,000 for the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County at its Feb. 22 event. A
tentative date of Feb. 21, 2015, has been set for the next Golf
Outing. Contact the Citrus County Builders Association at 352-746-
9028 for more information.


BANQUET HALL AVAILABLE
The Citrus County Builders Association has a Banquet Hall
available to rent, for weddings, receptions, anniversary parties,
graduation celebrations, club meetings, etc. and it's open to
the public.
Come and look at the hall during regular business hours of
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Thursday.
The office is atl 196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461,
centrally located a short drive south of State Road 44. For
information, visit www.CitrusBuilders.com or call Donna Bid-
lack at 352-746-9028.


TOURNAMENT
Artwork concept by Melissa Olbek,
final design by Sew Be It Embroidery and Screen Printing


776 MOPH for the third
consecutive year and to
be able to again offer vet-
eran fishing opportuni-
ties, through the
generosity of some local
captains.


CCBA would like to
thank the following spon-
sors already committed to
the 2014 tournament:
Exclusive Platinum
Sponsor: FDS Disposal
Inc.,


Official Weigh In
Sponsor: Florian
Masonry,
Purple Heart Spon-
sor: Sodium Fishing Gear,
Youth Partner:
Coastal Conservation
Association Citrus
Chapter,
Gold Sponsors: Citrus
95.3, 96.7 The Fox and
True Oldies 106.3,
Silver Sponsors:
Bluewater Drafting, City
Electric Supply, Nick
Nicholas Ford Lincoln,
Sherwin Williams and Vil-
lage Criernewspaper and
Bronze Sponsors:
Gainesville Ice, Sheldon-
Palmes Insurance, The
Home Depot and Woods &
Water
Door prize and goodie
bucket donations are still
being accepted. Many
thanks for donations re-
ceived, to date, from:
Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military


Order of the Purple Heat,
Applebee's, Breakfast Sta-
tion, Chili's, City Electric
Supply, Craig Clark
Stump Grinding, Dan's
Clam Stand, Dunkin'
Donuts, High Octane Sa-
loon, Nick Nicholas Ford
Lincoln, Porter's Lock-
smithing, Ryan Lampa-
sona State Farm, SeaTow
and Woods N Water
Magazine.
Tournament informa-
tion as well as online reg-
istration and payment are
available at the events
page of www.Citrus-
Builders.com and in per-
son at the CCBA between
the hours of 9 a.m. and
3 p.m. Monday through
Thursday For more infor-
mation about participat-
ing in or donating to this
tournament and next
year's tournament dates,
please contact Executive
Officer Donna Bidlack at
352-746-9028.


Important
upcoming
CCBA events
Dates have been
chosen for some of
our favorite events,
but details are still in
the planning stages.
Save the Dates and
check back soon for
more information!
June 19 and 20, 2014
14 hours of CILB
Continuing Education
Classes to be held at
the Citrus County
Builders Association
headquarters. Cost
and registration
information will be
available, starting in
May, at www.Citrus
Builders.corn or by
calling 352-746-9028.
June 26, 2014-
CCBA General
Membership
Luncheon from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
July 24 to 26, 2014
Florida Home
Builders Association
Southeastern Building
Conference.
Nov. 8, 2014-CCBA
Annual Comn-
A unity
Show-
t1 Z B case.


Renewing Members


CCBA members are recognized for renewing their commitment to the building industry at every
regular General Membership Meeting. Pictured left to right are Dave Hutchins of Bay Area Air
Conditioning (34 years), CCBA 2nd Associate VP Ken Lindquist of Ken Lindquist Corporation,
Affiliate Dusty Porter of Porter's Locksmithing (3 years), Cyndi McRee of Duke Energy (25 years),
John Porter of Porter's Locksmithing (11 years), Pat Faherty of Citrus County Chronicle (30 years),
President Elect Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted Builders, Pat Spalding of Florida Public Utilities
(15 years) and Virginia Will of Will Construction Corp (22 years). Renewing members not pictured
were: Al & Sons Millwork (15 years), Bonded Builders Home Warranty (19 years), C & S Residential
Roofing Inc. (10 years), Cemex (2 years), Citrus County School District (16 years), Citrus Well
Drilling (32 years), Don Poss Roofing (6 years), Affiliate Marie Brotnitsky of Duke Energy (6 years),
Florida Pest Control (33 years), Gerrits-Citrus Inc. (11 years), Goodfella's Roll Off Waste Disposal
(11 years), J.A. Floyd Incorporated (16 years), Mark E. Schroder PE (5 years), Nature Coast Pools
Inc. (19 years) and SanderSon Bay Fine Homes LLC (12 years).


Bring Housing Home


N7



at'


The Citrus County and Hernando Builders Associations hosted a member's only meeting with Congressman Richard Nugent on
March 19, 2014, as part of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) "Bring Housing Home" Campaign. Members of
Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Sumter and Marion county builders associations were invited to visit with Rep. Nugent and discuss
housing issues and impediments that they are encountering. More than 225 meetings in 48 total states were held during this
national campaign. This is yet another example of the value of membership in your local home builders association.









D4


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber.com/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
April 21 Ribbon-cutting, Nature
Coast Ministries, 4:30 p.m., 1590 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River.
April 23 Ribbon-cutting Reel Burns
Charters, 4:30 p.m., 5300 S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa.
April 24 Golden Citrus Scholars
Awards Ceremony, 5 p.m. College of
Central Florida, Lecanto.
April 29 Ribbon-cutting and Pre-
view Reception for HPH Hospice, 2939
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto, 5 to
7 p.m. Contact Anne Black for more in-
formation at 352-428-0708.
April 30 Ribbon-cutting at Karma
Resale Shoppe, 109 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.
May 2 Pillar Awards Dinner inspired
by the style of the Kentucky Derby, 6
p.m. to 10 p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Cocktail attire and
hats are recommended. Table sponsor-
ships are $300 and individual reserva-
tions are $35 per person.

Community
events
April 26 Sheriff's Summer Safety
and Youth Expo, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Citrus County Auditorium to have
free bicycle helmets (while supplies
last), free string backpacks and spe-
cial YMCA Healthy Kids area. For more
information, call 352-726-4488.
April 26 Dash for Dementia, 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m., Lecanto High School Track.
Fundraiser to support Memory En-
hancement Center of America. A do-
nation gets you through the gate.
There will be vendors, food, games
and a speech by Dr. John Grace.
April 26-Westend Arts and Crafts Fair,
an indoor market with 40-plus vendors
that include crafts, foods and artisan items,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Crystal River Mall.
April 26 BBQ Cookoff hosted by
DAV Crystal River Chapter with $2,500
in awards, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fun for
the whole family at the Crystal River
Mall. No entry fee.
May 2 -The Florida Public Relations
Association (FPRA) Nature Coast Chap-
ter, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., professional
development luncheon to feature Dan
Ward, APR, presenting "Communicat-
ing Your Opinion: How to Effectively
Target the Editor." Luncheons are open
to the public to attend. For more infor-
mation, email kmehl@citrusmh.org.
May 10 Westend Health Fair hosted
by the DAV of Crystal River, 10 a.m.,
free events at the Crystal River Mall.
Event to feature education, screenings
and healthy living consultations. Inter-
ested vendors contact Duane Godfrey
at 352-228-0337.
May 10- The Rotary Club of Central
Cirus presents Lets Ride for the Y, Lake
Hernando Park. This 62-mile ride will have
times starting at 7:30 a.m., $35 entry
fee. For more information, call 352-637-
0132 or visit rotarybikerideforthey.com.
May 14- Florida Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater invites you to participate
in Operation SAFE., Be Scam Smart,
a free workshop for seniors, their family
and caregivers. Time 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
at the Master the Possibilities Center for
Lifelong Learning, 8415 S.W. 80 Street,
Ocala. Register at www.myfloridacfo.com/
SAFE/registration.asp.


Schnettler Construction earns esteemed


2013 Angie's
S chnettler Construction, LLC has
earned the service industry's cov-
eted Angie's List Super Service Award,
reflecting an exemplary year of service
provided to members of the consumer
review service in 2013.
"We pride ourselves on the quality of
customer service we provide," said Scott
Schnettler. "Standing out in a very com-
petitive market is imperative and we
are extremely proud to earn this award.
We are grateful to all of our clients that


List Super Service Award


provided a positive review of our work"
"Only about 5 percent of the compa-
nies Schnettler Construction, LLC
competes with in Citrus County are
able to earn our Super Service Award,"


said Angie's List Founder Angie Hicks.
"It's a mark of consistently great cus-
tomer service."
Angie's List Super Service Award
2013 winners have met strict eligibility
requirements, which include an "A"
rating in overall grade, recent grade,
and review period grade. The company
must be in good standing with Angie's
List, have a fully complete profile, pass
a background check and abide by
Angie's List operational guidelines.


Bedinotti Photography
352-621-5534 bedinottiphoto.com Owners: Lou and Lea Bedinotti


: Chamber Ambassadors Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Jim Ferrara,
Insight Credit Union; David Heinz, Heinz Funeral Home; Janet Mayo, associate member; and Lillian Smith, Mary Kay
Cosmetics welcome Lou and Lea Bedinotti.


Chamber rewards performers at monthly luncheon
T he Chamber's April Luncheon, sponsored by Nature Coast
Ministries, left, welcomed Citrus Memorial Health System
interim Chief Executive Officer Ralph Aleman as speaker. The April
New Image Award was presented to Citrus 95.3 and The Fox 96.7.
Laura Grady, general manager, and Steve Schurdell, managing
partner, accepted Citrus 95's New Image Award. Lisa Nash of FDS
Disposal was named the April Gold Star Winner for her work on the
Ambassador Committee.


Chamber Board Member Lillian Smith, Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten and Citrus Me-
morial Health System interim Chief Executive Officer Ralph Aleman. : Steve Schurdell, man-
aging partner; Laura Grady, general manager; Jennifer Duca, Chamber board member; Rebecca Bays, Chamber board
chair-elect; and Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten. Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten;
Rebecca Bays, Chamber board chair-elect; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; and Chamber Ambassador chair Lillian Smith.


WqV' Cou


FF ii .' i I- ". * *I,.* sr *"** ; '!


Chamber Ribbon Cutting
and Preview Reception


2939 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida 34461
Ribbon cutting at 4:30 p.m. Reception and tours
will immediately follow. Enjoy heavy hors d'oeuvres,
libations and great company before this beautiful
new facility opens to patients.
No RSVPs required.
Questions? Please call
HPH Hospice at 527-4600.

hospice
',.s.n...,.n. ...... The Citrus
www.HPH-Hospkice.org Julie Rose
HPHM MISSION STATEMENT Ten years
HPH i s where exllence in l(ompssionte ore maximizes quality of ife years: M ar


nty Commission honors employee service


s County Commission presented service awards to employees at its April 11 meeting. RFive years: Dr.
enberger, animal services director in the Department of Community Services Animal Services Division.
: Joanna Coutu, land development director in the Department of Planning and Development. Fifteen
rk Helsell, medium equipment operator in the Department of Public Works, Road Maintenance Division.


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

withheld to satisfy all the taxes,
or make the proper tax payment
quarterly and at the end when it's
time to file. Then make up any
deficiency prior to the file date
closing.
From what you are telling me,
it doesn't appear that you will
have a substantial tax payment,
but it must be made on time.
DEAR BRUCE: My question
has to do with possibly receiving
a refund from my bank with re-
gards to my current mortgage.
Years ago, I was able to receive
a refund on a previous mortgage
that had to do with mortgage in-
surance. I'm not positively sure
about it being specifically that. It
had to do with funds being held
in a "reserve" over the period of
years of my loan. Most of the pub-
lic did not realize the bank had
no claim to it, and it was money
that the bank was obligated to re-
fund if anyone inquired.
I contacted my bank back then
and, after getting resistance from




HEALTH
Continued from Page Dl

real reforms that actually lower
costs," McConnell said.
As Obama's health law begins
to look more viable, Democrats
have been seeking to change the
political debate from one about
repeal to one about fixing linger-
ing issues with the law
Obama said it's "absolutely pos-
sible" to make improvements, but
that it would require a change of
attitude from Republicans. But
election-year posturing and the
GOP's reluctance to be seen as em-
bracing "Obamacare" make than
an unlikely proposition.


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 D5


them, I did in fact get the refund.
Do you know what these funds
would be or how they are associ-
ated with my mortgage? Are they
still refundable? I'm looking to
close out my loan and would like to
retrieve that money if possible.
-S.D., via email
DEAR S.D.: The information you
gave me is a little vague, but I sus-
pect that the refund you got was
money left over in your escrow ac-
count, which was established to
pay taxes, insurance, etc.
Contact the bank and be very
specific. Ask if there are any
monies that have not been dis-
tributed such as for taxes, insur-
ance, etc., and how much that
will amount to upon closing. If
my guess is correct, then you are
clearly entitled to any funds that
were not distributed in conjunc-
tion with the mortgage. I don't
think there should be any prob-
lem getting a refund.
Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal replies
cannot be provided.



The president's upbeat assess-
ment came shortly after he and
top aides had separate meetings
with leading insurance execu-
tives and state insurance com-
missioners.
"I think that's a pretty good
number in terms of trying to
make sure we have a healthy
pool," Montana's insurance com-
missioner, Monica Lindeen, said
of the surge in younger enrollees.
In other positive news for
Obama's health care law, Califor-
nia's state-run insurance ex-
change reported Thursday that
nearly 1.4 million Californians
had enrolled by the end of open
enrollment, besting original
projections by almost 100,000
people.


STATES
Continued from Page Dl

million. In Michigan, Republican Gov Rick
Snyder prefers creating a state-run ex-
change, but has been rebuffed by the GOP-
controlled Legislature. In Iowa, where the
health care law is expected to be a big issue
in a U.S. Senate race, the Legislature is ex-
pected to adjourn soon without any action
on a state-run exchange.
In Illinois, Republicans are expected to
exploit the health law's problems in election
campaigns against incumbent Democrats in
Congress, including Dick Durbin, the No. 2
Democrat in the U.S. Senate.
The governor's race, between incumbent
Democrat Pat Quinn and his Republican op-
ponent, wealthy businessman Bruce Rauner,
is expected to be one of the most hotly con-
tested in the nation.
While state lawmakers have less connec-
tion to the federal law, the idea of any state
measure associated with the Affordable
Care Act remains unpopular with both par-
ties, said Pat Brady, a former Illinois GOP
chairman.
'A lot of people don't want to have their
names associated with it," Brady said.
The health care law was designed for each
state to run its own insurance marketplace,
but just 16 states and Washington, D.C.,
opted to do so. The federal government
ended up running exchanges for the other
states, plus Idaho and New Mexico, which
ran out of time to fully implement their own
exchanges.
Illinois and a handful of other states
formed partnerships with the federal gov-
ernment, a hybrid model that allowed the
states access to a first level of federal grants.
In Illinois, that totaled nearly $154 million,
roughly half of which has been spent or com-
mitted to outreach workers, advertising, a


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via
email to newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the


telephone help desk and analysis of health
insurance plans.
With a few notable exceptions, state-run
exchanges outpaced the ones run by the fed-
eral government. The Oregon exchange's
technology glitches forced people to sign up
using a time-consuming hybrid paper-online
process. Earlier this month, Maryland chose
to replace its glitch-filled exchange with
technology from Connecticut at an estimated
cost of $40 million to $50 million.
Time is now running out for the final round
of federal grant funding, which requires state
enabling legislation or a governor's executive
order The grants can't be awarded after Jan.
1,2015, and federal rules set Nov 14 as the
deadline for states to apply
"This is your last chance to pull this off,"
Schwartz said.
However, many state legislatures will soon
adjourn their spring sessions, leaving elec-
tion-minded lawmakers free to go home and
campaign until November
In Illinois, Duffett's group is trying to col-
lect pledges of support from lawmakers to
persuade Democratic leaders to introduce a
bill creating an exchange before lawmakers
adjourn on May 31. But a spokesman for
House Speaker Michael Madigan, who is
also the state Democratic Party chairman,
acknowledged a lack of "real interest" in
pursuing an exchange but wouldn't rule it
out "if a consensus would develop."
Christopher Mooney, director of the Uni-
versity of Illinois' Institute of Government
and Public Affairs, said the health law is
"probably" more popular in Obama's home
state than elsewhere, and that individual
state lawmakers know whether their smaller
districts either support or oppose it. But he
said legislators normally like to avoid "un-
pleasant stuff," especially in an election
year
"It's such a polarizing issue, I can easily
imagine them saying, 'Why bother?"'
Mooney said.


right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will
be considered for publica-
tion. Images taken with
most cellphone cameras
do not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific


date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
w Submissions about spe-
cific prices of
products or sales events
are considered advertising
and are not eligible for
Business Digest.


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WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
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To place an ad, call 563-5966


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Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


. .. 0 -- ...ITol ree (88 82-240 1 mal0 l*sii0s -,oiceol 0 cm 0bs -e 0 -,onilen -nec0


*


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
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includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
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IIIIIIII



1936 Grinnell Brothers
Baby Grand
Hand carvedFrench
Provincial legs,
matching bench
$2,500
obo 352-422-3829
w 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441
CRYSTAL RIVER
Free Housing in ex-
change for Transpor-
tation, clean back-
ground, 352-697-0177
Lawn Service Help

PIT EXP. ONLY, Must
have Clean Dr. Lic. &
own transportation
(352) 302-6034
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Op. Est. long
time Consignment
Shop MenWomens
Clothing & Acces.
Short window of op-
portunity .Serious
inquires to: modine
ann@vahoo.com
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178


I Hapy No


yellow on HWY 41
near Gobler on 4/13.
352-201-7725
Lost 2 Keys with
Magnet & Marine
Core Dog Tag & Cross
made of 3 nails
Inverness area
REWARD
(352) 746-5077
Lost Cat
Slender, female,
Tuxedo
Gospel Is Rd. Area
(352) 419-4681
(352) 201-8626 Cell
REWARD
Lost Cat, Silver Gray
Tabby, long
haired approx. 151bs.
lost near Croft and
Stevens St. in
Inverness.
Grandson's pet
misses very much!
small Reward
(352) 419-5135
Lost Male Cat,
Fat orange & white
has two collars
Near Adams Street
Beverly Hills,
(352) 527-1178
Lost Siamese Mix
2 yrs old, Male Cat,
escaped carrier
at Humanitarian of Fl.
on Commerce Terr
off Hwy 44
(352) 563-2370
(352) 613-1629




Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant

Hey Girls!
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TOWER HAND

Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F
Tuxedo Rental Sales
and Formal Ware
Owner Retiring. All Inv
& fixtures included. 15
yr est busn. Serious inq
accentsbvarace@vaho
o.com. Time sensitive



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

L.Q4l
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




Free
4 Male Cats & 1 female
kitten, two 1 year old
cats, 1 male, 1 female
To good home,
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free Dog, Jack
Russell/Pomeranian
Mix. 12 mos. old
female
Free to good home
(352) 201-2510
Free to disabled
Brand New Walker w/
seat & hand brakes
and Pair of Aluminum
Crutches
Pick up Citrus
(352) 897-5469
HORSE MANURE
mixed with plenty of
dark rich top soil
Lecanto area near
landfill. Bring Shovel,
Truck load avail., Help
Yourself. 352-697-5252



Chihauhau
Smallmale, fawn
color, Responds to his
named Pepe. Lost
4/16 Beverly Hills Blvd
& N Adams St
(352) 513-4009
Chihuahua
Male, white &tan
5 Ibs. Brodie disap-
peared on 4/10
Mocassin Slough
Inverness, Windwood
Loop. 352-422-6320
REWARD


-E


HANDYMAN WANTED
(or) persons) to disas-
semble a 40 Ft. TV.
tower. Inverness area.
Call for more informa-
tion. (352)201-2798






PRE SCHOOL
STAFF NEEDED
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

40 hrs req'd, CDA Pre-
ferred (352) 341-1559







Receptionist
Announcement
# 14-43

Responsible public
contact work
assisting the general
public either in per-
son or by telephone
at the Citrus County
Resource Center
Must pass a Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs
level II background
check. Starting pay
$9.50 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 25, 2014
EOE/ADA.














Tell that special
person
Hapy Birthday
witn a classi-
fled ad under
Hapy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


CNA'S
3P-1IP &11P-7A

RN/LPN
11P-3P &11P-7A
Weekend
7A-3P & 3P-1IP

APPLY IN PERSON
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100

CNA's/HHA's

Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

COME WORK
FOR THE
BEST OF THE BEST

RN/LPN, FT, 11-7
MDS-PRN
All Nsg. PRN Shifts
Available
S3-11 SUPERVISOR
RN Weekend
Supervisor

DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB
Linda Pursley, DON
352-746-9500 #725
don@diamondridge
healthandrehab
.com

FRONT DESK

P/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience
& experience with
Eaglesoft a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lynn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.com

NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219

PT Dietary Aide

Must be able to
AM & PM Shifts
Aoolv in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE
No Phone Calls

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility, Seeking

F/T LPN's and
Certified CNA's
Must have excel-
lent organization
skills. Be a team
player. Have previ-
ous resident care
experience with
Alzheimer's and
Dementia popula-
tion is preferred.
Please Applv at:
SUSHINE GARDENS
Crystal River
311 NE 4th Ave.

Ultrasound Tech

PT /4hr/wk, For OB
Dr Ofc, Fax Resume:
352-794-0877






CENTRAL
FLORIDA
an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida

First Year Success
Specialist
Bachelor's degree
required and one
year of work experi-
ence in the field.
Faculty -
Instrumental Music
Master's degree in
Instrumental Music
required and two
years of teaching
exp. preferred.

Open until filled
Faculty -
Health Information
Technology
Specialist Catering
Services

HOW TO APPLY:
Please go to
www.CF.edu. Click
on Quick Links then
Employment at CF.
Submit an elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and copy of
unofficial transcripts.
Transcripts may al-
ternatively be
mailed to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala, FL 34474.
CFis an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


IMedia


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


*.NET Developer
with C# experience,
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

OFFICE ASST.

Experience needed
Apply at 4079 S Ohio
Ave. Homosassa

Property
Manager

Full Time. Experience
preferred. Must
have Real Estate Lic
Please Call:
352-634-0129




Waitress/Kitchen

Must be 18yrs old,
have a car & be a
non smoker
Apply in Person:
Chef Anthony's Pizza
Cafe, 2780 N Florida
Ave, Unit 6,
Hernando Plaza




SEEKING
FULL TIME
AD SALES REP
The Williston Pioneer
Sun News

Salary Plus
Commission, Based
out of Williston, FL.
Service new and
existing advertising
customers. Meet &
exceed sales goals
Excellent customer
service skills. Strong
computer skills
Reliable transporta-
tion required to
make sales calls

Email Resume to
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
Drug screen
required for final
candidate, EOE




AC Service Tech

Apply at Air Care
Heating & Cooling Inc.
7745 W Homosassa
Trail Homosassa
Drug Free Work Place

ALUMINUM
INSTALLER

Experienced Lead
man with drivers lic.
Competitive Pay
(352) 795-9722

ATTN: Drivers!
Bring a Rider! $$$
Up to 50 cpm $$$
BCBS + 401k + Pet
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Hometime Orienta-
tion Sign On Bonus
CDL-A Req
877-258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com

Captain & Mate

Needed for Tour
Boat. Site seeing
only. Not a manatee
Dive Operation.
(352) 400-0133

EXPERIENCED
SERVICE
PLUMBERS

Min 5 yrs experience
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973


&


Trades/
BSkill
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
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week! Local CDL
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(1-877)214-3624

F/T Dock Hand
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352-795-7234

Granite Fabrica-
tors & Bridge
Saw Operator
Needed

Part time w/Full time
potential NO EXP.
NEC. Will train, Must
be detail oriented
and have good
hand eye coord.
drug free workplace
Applyv in Person
DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
Crystal River

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Installers
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only (352) 270-8836






CLEANING PERSON
PIT leading to FIT
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
ic/vehicable. Exp. ae











plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925
Blvdforydetaliver

























Front FDeska
Receptionist











Housekeeping!
car ri eriosia urie s

































Locker Rm. Atten
Personal Trainero











Fitness Desk Staff
Inside TERRA VISTA
One of the Nations








Largest & Upscale
Country Clubs
Creetonice


























Crossing, Hernando







Lawn Service Help
P/T EXR ONLY, Must
have Clean Dr. Lie. &
ainess$DekSignffO






























(352) 302-6034

POOL CLEANING
TECHNICIAN
oExp required. Must







have good driving
rec. Veh provided
Call 352-270-8221

Telemarketing
Manager
Salary Plus Bonuses
Mon-Fri. 9a-4pc








Exp only need apply
owGerry (352) 503-6811nt
ony(352)2302-88603



POLCLEANING PRO

Nx eedied. Must hv
flexschehdpovie,

Ti./ehlemarExp.ng
pls.Lavemsager

FalryoPustonuesk
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Apply n35Pe50-son


AVAILABLE
Pool Supplv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177


Baa

The City of
Crystal River
is seeking resumes
for the position of
MAINTENANCE II.

This is a semi-skilled
and manual posi-
tion including repair
and maintenance
of City property.
Must have a high
school diploma or
equivalent certifi-
cate; hold a valid
Florida Class B
Commercial Drivers
License; and have
two years exp.
A lob description
can be obtained
from the Finance Di-
rector or by calling
352-795-4216, ext.
309. Hourly wage is
$9.87 -$13.98 per hr,
and includes
insurance benefits.
Please Send Resume
to: David Burnell
Public Works
Director, City of
Crystal River, 123NW
Hwy 19, Crystal River
Florida 34428
BY APRIL 28, 2014

TOWER HAND

Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F





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SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE

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START A CAREER
INA YEAR





"- AVAILABLE
Pool Sunnlv Store
W/ Service and Re-
nair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177

Owner Retiring
Turn Key Op. Est. long
time Consignment
Shop MenWomens
Clothing & Acces.
Short window of op-
portunity Serious
inquires to: modine
ann@vahoo.com




t" AVAILABLE
Pool Sunnlv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177

Tuxedo Rental Sales
and Formal Ware
Owner Retiring. All Inv
& fixtures included. 15
yr est busn. Serious inq
accentsbvarace@vaho
o.com. Time sensitive


FRCTUCONYR SIDNT

Cal ro yurhoewwrkorcelthoe














I- M E




































I DYSA EE


Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises

^ ASSISTANT STORE
C MANAGER
High School diploma
or equal with 2 yrs
Retail Mgmt experience.
Full-time position Excellent benefits
Apply in person Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 SE US HWY 19 Crystal River FL 34429
EOE/DFWP 0001OLK


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








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Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




ANTIQUE MAHOGANY
DINING CHAIRS (4)
have fabric seat. $25
each 352-621-0175





ANTIQUE/
COLLECTABLES
Berkey & Gay bedroom
set, French couch,
Luggage trunks, Gun
Cabinet, salt & pepper
shakers, other misc.
Items contact
352-221-2836
CANE BOTTOM
CHAIRS (2) 1 black 1
brown Cane in excellent
condition $25 ea
352-621-0175




COLLECTABLES 6
Franklin Mint McDon-
aids plates. $99. all
3524656619
COLLECTABLES Sa-
lem China 6 salad & 6
mugs Chnristmas eve
design. $99. for all
3524656619




APPLIANCES G.E.
convection toaster
oven. like new $30.00
3524656619
APPLIANCES Mr
Coffee expresso maker.
like new $15.00
3524656619
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE Profile
Built in Microwave
$100. Dishwasher, SIS
GE Profile,White $125.
Both good Cond.
352-249-4451
Kitchen Aoppliance Set
GE, Almond, S-by-S
Refrig w/ ice/water
Range glass top, and
Diswasher. May Divide
$1,000; 352-601-3728
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $75
352-613-0529
Refrigerator
with ice maker $150
Washer & Dryer $200
will sell separately
(678) 617-5560
SILAMPOS
SKILLET/OVEN
ROASTER WITH LID
$55 PORTUGAL 12
INCH STAINLESS
STEEL 419-5981
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also JWanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Stove, GE,
white,
good condition
$125.
(678) 617-5560 Cell
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398




DESK CHAIR
Adjustable High
Back,Swivel, Black.
$30 (352)564-4214




MANUAL & ELECTRIC
TOOLS, WRENCHES
AND MORE...
(352) 628-3570


CIR us CoUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY APRIL 20,2014 D 7


ROCKWELL
HANDHELD BELT
SANDER $80 HEAVY
DUTY METAL INVER-
NESS 352-419-5981
Sears Wood Lathe
Bench w/2 drawers on
Wheels, turning chisels
1/3 hpgrinder $150.
Delta 10" Bench Saw
$50. (352) 382-1814




KARAOKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
Television
Toshiba, 35 inch
With remote
$85
(352) 746-4779
Television w/Remote
26" Sanyo $30
352-726-3730 or
Cell 352-422-0201
Televisions
Mitsubishi 40 in., $60
Mitsubishi 60 in., $80.
Both have good pictures
No calls B4 10:00am
(352) 6284766
TV PANOSONIC 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $40
352-613-0529



% inch plywood
used for window and
door coverings $30.
(352) 419-8888
BUILDING MATERIALS
300 count grip cap nails
$30.00 352 465 6619
STILTS FOR DOING
SHEETROCKWORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316




ACER 10.1" Computer.
Win 7 Premium. Aqua.
Wireless,3G,320 gb hd,
Perfect. Office Pro 10.
$100. 352-560-0046


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Affordable Care + lite
housekping, cooking
errands, trans. Call
Lisa (352) 423-0298

Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/ Ref. 352-875-9793





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873


I.oos


A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
# 39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *k*
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
**ABOVE ALL**
M&W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


P 3
This Sat 6pm

Preview 5pm
Antiques, Coins, Art, Jewelry,
a Military and Estate Items
Red Barn Auctions
4535 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
Terms 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash FL Sales Tax
AB3172 AU4416


Consign Now '

Rates as low as 2 % We Buy Estates







ACUT ABOCVE LAWN
352-419-2779
or 352-201-2,201



WE WILL BEAT ANY
WRITTEN ESTIMATE
Mowing, Hedging, Trimming, Blowing
Tree Trimming, Brush Removal,
Seasonal Planting.


ANDR jEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557

^Home^^
Sell^^^


**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
@ Srall Carpentry
e a o Fencing
9S,:reening

Thm as lean Dryer Vents
,4ffordoble & Dependable
Ent 'peaience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761




GENERAg C r

Stand Alone
Generator neiatoJ

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians<
ER0015377

352-621-124


STAND w/power cord
for DELL laptop Latitude
D-senes Mint Cond. $35
352-382-3650



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart*Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



2 pc. Beige Loveseat
w/matching Sofa
very good cond. $400.
Chocolate Brown
Sofa, exc. cond. $250.
(518) 420-5373
3-piece sectional sofa,
Excel cond. octagonal
coffee table both for
$200.Crystal River
305-394-1000 Cell
42" round wrought iron
& wicker glass -top
table & 4 chairs
$250. obo. SMW
(352) 382-2939
Antique sewing
machine table, oak
parquet style top,
decorative/dinette,
etc. Exc. cond.
$150. (352) 419-8629
Chinese Black
Pearl Cabinet
$150. White 4
Drawer Dresser $50.
(352) 270-8096
Coffee Table
Ig oak (30x20) w/
bronze glass inserts. 2
matching end tables
$300; Patio PVC table,
glass top, 4 white
steel chairs $200
(352) 465-4505
Computer Desk w/chair
excellent condition
$50.
(518) 420-5373
Dining. Room Set
6 chairs, table,
real wood. $75
6 Pc. Bed. Rm. Set, Ital-
ian, nice shape $150
(352) 423-3513
Full Size Bed, pine,
headboard & frame,
brand new mattress &
box spring $350 obo
Pine Din. Rm Table 4
matching chairs
excel cond. sturdy
construction $250
(352) 344-4178


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lie/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Spring a Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING, TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


S _tr
Entertainment
Center
Beautiful made in Italy
Over $2,200 New
Asking $350. obo
(352) 212-5844



FURNITURE Mint Cond.
2 Couches, 2 Din. Sets
Ethan Allen Cabinet
qn. wicker bed, dress-
ers Fireplace & MORE
Priced to Sell 428-0721
Hide-a-bed Loveseat
w/matching storage
ottoman. Ex Cond
$200; Lg Blue area rug
9x12 $100
352-503-6017
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Tan, like new.
No pets or smoking.
Exc. Cond! $210.
(352) 746-2329
Qn Sz. Bed
Boxspring &
Mattress, $75. obo
Desk Executive
30" x 60", $75. obo
(352) 726-5065
QUEEN BED King Koil,
like new 8mos old,
complete Frame & Box
Spring, Moving must sell
$500. Crystal River
305-394-1000
Sealy Posturepedic
Firm Queen Mattress,
like new, exc.cond.
used only 3 mos.
asking $200.
(352) 503-9577
SOFA BED full size in
like new condition
wood frame $100
352-257-5687
SOFA
Micro fiber, light tan,
7 ft dual reclining sofa,
$300 (352) 274-1940
Sofa, Dinette Set
sofa, brown leather,
88" $350. Dinette Set,
wood table w/
wrought iron base, 4
matching chairs $300.
excellent condition!
SMW (352) 503-2416
TABLE BANQUET
Type folding legs
brown 5'long formica
top Great condition
$30. 352-270-3909
Tan Leather Couch &
Loveseat $450.
Decorative Korean
Chest $300.
(352) 270-8096


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861


NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570




V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHEL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746


*Interior/Exterior Painting|












FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C

and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202 |
Lic.#CAC057482





Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist

Spring Tune $AQ95
Up Special --

Guaranteeing 10x Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusre L aser Parhcle Sco to determine
tie quality of the anr you breathe n your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires Apri l 30,2014
__ ... [hc#CAC]815891
OIQ'ir Back To New ni m
SHeating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz


Furniture
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TRUNDLE BED
Wrought iron frame,
everything included
good condition
$100
(352) 795-7239
Vintage Oak
Mediterranean
Bedroom Set
Q/K Headboard &
Frame, Qn. boxspring
dresser w/mirror, chest
of drawers, cedar
lined hope chest, very
good cond. $500.
(352) 746-7310




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
BOLENS MTD
38" Deck, 13.5 HP
4 yrs. old
Excellent Condition
$400.
(352) 270-4087
Club Cadet 2000
Clean, Good Belt,
Blades, Trans Axle
Solid Motor $650.
Craftsman 42" Riding
Mower Clean &
Rebuilt Carb/Valves/
Rings $450. with out
Battery(352) 270-4087
Craftsman 18" hedge
trimmer, Weedeater
blower, Flo-Master &
Spray Doc sprayers,
both never used, $175
total. (352) 344-4374
POWER WASHER AT-
TACHMENTS 1/4 hose
20', gun, lance & bottle
$25. Dunnellon
465-8495
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Scottffs, 17.5hp, 42 in.
cut, Automatic w/
dump cart $650
352-601-3234




HIBISCUS 3 GAL POTS
Beauties, 3 Colors, 3 for
$36 Compare to 2 gal
for $20 @ stores Inv Off
Croft 613-5818


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


Inslall0 Nleir Now's the
HPump .iIles. time for pool
Healers remodeling
a San Svslems
*Pool Refinishing
Construction
Pavers
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
Woods
Woods Serving All OfI cr s Coionr
PoolRSpa .,a ,
SMwPOOISomc m 382-4421






WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
*Driveways -
Parking Lots
Seal Coating
Maintenance
Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@grnail.comr
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


MEXICAN PETUNIAS
PINK AND PURPLE
in 4 inch pots
6 for $10 Off Croft Rd.
613-5818




CHERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
SAT., April 26th




6 pr. of never used
men's shoes, 10-1/2.
4 pr. beige Pro Walker,
1 brown & 1 black
dress loafers, Total
$150. (352) 344-4374
MENS KHAKI PANTS I
SIZE 36X29 2 SIZE
36X30 $5 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS SPORTS JACK-
ETS 3 BLACK,
BROWN & BLUE SIZE
40R $8 EACH
352-613-0529
WEDDING DRESS Size
8 Oleg Cassini white
strapless gown. Worn
once. 352-201-2665




CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/CASE, Con-
sumer Cellular/unlock or
911 $28. 352-382-3650




3 VISION & 1 PYREX
COOKWARE- Cran-
berry, sauce, casserole,
double boiler, cake pan,
$30. 628-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.

SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066






Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND BAG
ONLY 70.00 464 0316
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS
HEARTS/ANIMALS $20
FUN TO PAINT IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
1 HP above ground
pump & bladder tank,
$150
352-726-7485
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
China
86 piece Crown &
Ming Set $150
Unifloor quick style,
2 boxed $50
(352) 795-7254
Computer Desk,
Corner style
$175.
Noritake China
$75.
(352) 423-3513
Deep Stainless Steel
Sink w/faucet, $50.
Countertop for Center
Island 64" x 36" $20.
(352) 419-8888
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new.l own
$50 obo Linda
423-4163
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$30 352-613-0529
FOLD-UP WALKER
w/seat & hand brakes
$100.
(352) 436-3302
GE Microwave $20.
Wood End Table $20.
19" TV $20.13"TV$10.
Wood Dinette Chair $5.
352-637-1857
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY
$75 (352)464-0316


ALL TYPES OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)6284049

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838





.Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442










TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452








Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


Halogen Desk Lamp
Black, Counter Balance,
Hi/Lo, 50W $35 can
email pic 352-382-3650
LARGE FIBERGLASS
DOG KENNEL OK
SHAPE ONLY 40.00
3524640316
MOVING SALE:
lamps, couch, wall
units, tables, DirectTV
receiver & dish, 43" TV,
sofabar stools, coffee
& end tables & more
(352) 794-6686
NEW MEDICINE CABI-
NET $20 SHELVES
NEED TO BE SIZED IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY COOPER 2
BAND OF THIEVES $5
EACH 352-613-0529
PORTABLE GRILL
for boat or camper
O'Grill 3,000, never
used, $200.
(352) 344-4374
PRO-TECH
COMPOUND MITER
SAW- 10" diamond
blade, dust bag, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
ROCKING DOLL CRA
DLE SOLID OAK $55
E-MAIL PHOTOS IN-
VERNESS
352-419-5981
SPEAKERS SHARP
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
Twin Box Spring &
Mattress, stand &
lamp$100; Elvis Gold
Record Volume 4
$100 (352) 795-7254
VINTAGE 70'S MEDI-
CINE CABINET MIR-
ROR $20 DECORA-
TIVE FRAME INVER-
NESS 419-5981
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 FOR SUR-
ROUND SOUND $60
352-613-0529



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Blue $395, 1 Wine
$295. Both Exc.Cond.
352-270-8475


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178

Upholstery

SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


iPO.OL A.


DUST BUSTERS
CLEANING SERVICE

UST___
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS &NEW HOME CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too

352.942,8434
Call Today for a
S Clean Tomorrow




SERVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE REST
CONSISTENT VOTED BEST OF THIE BEST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
SSod Sales & Install
3 Time Winner
2011 -2012 -2013

746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 -Insured -Bonded




SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
MR 352-364-4610
(%MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated
Ll#EC13003381 insured & bonded
24Hoursa Day. 7 DaYsalWeek


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


a>
4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 (352)464-0316
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316



1936 Grinnell Brothers
Baby Grand
Hand carvedFrench
Provincial legs,
matching bench
$2,500
obo 352-422-3829
ELECTRIC GUITAR SG
COPY BLACK&
CHROME
LOOKS,PLAYS,
SOUNDS NEW! $50
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR-
LEAD AMPLIFIER
35W,ONBOARD EF-
FECTS 12"SPEAKER
$100 352-601-6625
LES PAUL BLACK
BEAUTY COPY
LOOKS,PLAYS NEW
GOLD HARDWARE
$100 352-601-6625
LOWREY ORGAN
MX-2, With all the
bells and whistles.
Exc Cond, w/ bench
$1,000 obo
352-601-6664
NEWPORTER BY
FENDER TRAVEL/
STUDENT ACOUSTIC
GUITAR&GIGBAG
$100 352-601-6625


Piano
Console,
Kohler Cambell
Very Nice Shape $150.
(352) 423-3513




3 MATCHING BRASS &
GLASS CHANDELIERS
- 3 SIZES 8 lights, 3
lights & 2 lights $50
732-977-2616
HOUSEHOLD Ralph
Lauren navy/gray Q
sleeping bag. like new
$30.003524656619




ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
HEALTH ITEM
Automatic upper arm
Blood Pressure tester
$20.00 352 465 6619
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
Proform Resistance
Bike, Never used, pd
$350, asking $150.
Call Evenings
(352) 344-3131




12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
GOLF CLUBS Set of
Left Handed Maxfli
Irons. 4 thru P.W. New
grips. $100.00 Call Art
352-726-2750
GOLF CLUBS Set of
Wilson left handed irons
5 thru P.W. New gnps.
$75.00 Call Art
352-726-2750
GOLF WEDGES 52*
Gap Oversize GX2 &
60* Dunlop Lob $15.
each, $25. pair.
Dunnellon 465-8495
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066


r ab z c 41b




D8 SUNDAY,APRIL 20, 2014



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course WANT TO BL
DAN'S GUN ROOM or MOBILE A
(352) 726-5238 Condition or


Wood Utility Trailer
12x6, 11 inches Deep
3 brand new tires,
$450.
(352) 601-3174



ALL WOOD CRIB
espresso color/good
condition Sell for $100
Retail price $530
352-257-5687
COMBI TWIN
STROLLER excellent
shape/Side-by-Side/Sell
for $100 Retail $235
352-257-5687
EDDIE BAUER CAR
SEAT $50 deluxe high
back kids 22-40 pounds
& over lyr./excellent
352-257-5687


Sell r Swa


-4




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


141X o


UY HOUSE
\ny Area,
r Situation


Fred, 352-726-9369


WANTED TO BUY
18 FT. BOAT
Can Pay Cash
(678) 617-5560w


Ca 3ers


RV CORD ADAPTER
18 inch NEW 30amp
Female to 50amp Male
w/Pwr Lt $10 SMW
352-382-3650







Leekl


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci @ 352-212-8936


AKC Male Husky
Black/White
In tact, UTD on Shots
3 yr. old, $400. obo
(352) 246-3000





;a .


DOLLY
Dolly, 6-8 y.o. Terrier
mix, Wt 54 Ibs, had
an unfortunate prior
life, not her fault.
The sweetest dog
ever, full of love for
people amazingly,
playful, very happy,
craves affection &
returns it, gets along
w/some dogs,
finally deserves a
home of her own.
Loves Kids
Call Karen @
218-780-1808,
Joanne @
352-697-2682.


RED MINIATURE POO-
DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352-419-8233


Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day













SPEEDY
Speedy, bulldog
mix, found at the
speedway, along
w/his sister Farrah,
who is very close to
him. Pleasant, com-
fortable & confi-
dent, walks well on
leash, does well
w/cats. Will stay by
your side. Fee $60
covers neuter, chip,
tests & vaccinations.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.










TINY
Tiny, Blackmouth
Cur/terrier, is sweet
& calm. Walks very
well on leash, obeys
well, eager to
please. Gives paw,
sits, lies down. Not a
fan of cats, best in
home without cats.
Fee $60 includes
spay, chip, tests
and UTD on
vaccinations.
Call Trish @
352-586-7547.


CLASSIFIED



SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827




Pet Safe Dog Kennel
5' wide x 20' long
*incl. 5' gate, incl. nice
cedar dog house *
31 "x 45", $200.
(352) 489-2011


Boat

New stainless steel
self adj trim tabs for a
14 ft boat; Aux motor
brackets for a up to
15 HP engine.
$30 each. Call Art
(352) 726-2750
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
352-563-5510"*


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173


CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Rrida averages 108 days of sunshine a year (Avg. Major Metros; Currnt Result; Research News
& Science Facts; http://w.currentremsuts.cmMWeathef/Rodda/annual-days-of-sunshine.php)


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HURRICANE
My loss your gain. Due
to health issues must
sell almost new less
than 15hrs on mo-
tor,2013 Hurricane Sun
Deck 187 with lots of
options, inc. Yamaha
1154 stroke motor with
customized trailer with
surgue breaks. Retais at
over 34K will let go for
$26,300. Pictures upon
request. Al 527-7732

LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792

must sell!
PONTOON '03
22 ft., w/ '04 Johnson
90HP mtr. & Trlr., like
New Lots of Extras
$8,500 352-860-3293
PONTOON
20 ft. 25HP, Johnson,
w/ trailer,
$4,400
(352) 726-4289
PORTA-BOTE
2004- 12 ft. Porta-Bote
with transom for engine
mounting, all seats,
oars, oar locks, and
hardware to mount on
an RV. $800.00 Call
Art at 352-726-2750

SCORPION
Sale Boat
$200. obo
(352) 795-0125








NO 440'2."I l
,'ons hlm il,' boats


Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
t(352)527-0555"
boatsupercenter.com



HONDA
2011, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
TOW DOLLY
lights, electric brakes
& new strap,
excel, cond. $750.
(352) 382-1627
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



CITATION
'01, 22 ft, new awning,
3 new tires, full bath
and outside shower,
refrig/furnace just
serviced $4000
(352) 628-0173
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500 352-201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, p arts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Roof AC's for RV
2 13,500 BTU's
$400 each
(352) 628-0173
Tow Mirrors
CIPA, in the box $35
for the pair Call Mike
(352) 382-1424



Four GM 16"
6 hole, steel wheels
$60.00
(352) 465-7506
Truck Rack
Heavy Duty Adrian
Steel. Fits 6' 6" bed,
hauls 24 ft material.
Like New $200 Call Art
(352) 726-2750

Vehicles

Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

L.QQk

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




380-0420 SUCRN
4/20/14 Lien Foreclosure
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
gives Notice of Foreclo-


4 3I I^
10 1^^


-7-
WANTED
Silver Buick LaCross,
private owners only
pls call (352) 628-2437
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Buy Here/Pay Here

'05 Chevy Cavalier
$895 Down

'01 Dodge
Dakota R/T
$995 Down

'00 Mitsubishi Galant
$650 Down

'03 Ford Focus
$3595 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
FORD
03 Taurus SE
Full power, Nice
dependable care
$1900
(352) 795-8986
FORD
2003, Mustang,
convertible, silver,
64k mi., good cond.
(352) 746-0687
JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
3A, V1i0, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995

CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MUSTANG
Conv,2000,6 CYL, 5 sp.
man, repainted 2013
+ graphics, very clean
71K mi, 352-746-7215
WE DO IT ALL
BUY- SELL -TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440









IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles on
5/1/2014 10:00:00 AM at
1635 NE 32nd Ave, Ocala,
FL 34470 pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Flor-


CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018

TOYOTA
'91,4x4S-R5, 22RE/
5 Spd. Ext. Cab, rebuilt
mtr. pilgrim canopy
$4,200 obo, 341-0818





FORD
2007 Eddie Bauer
Explorer, leather,87k
miles, Black on beige
$13,800 352-794-3930


GMC
2005 Envoy XL, Bose
with XM, Power Sun-
roof, Towing package,
171K miles, $5500
352-302-0173


NISSAN
2000 Xterra XE 140k
$1,750 352-634-4286

NISSAN
2003 Xterra v6, auto
4x4, cold ac. runs
great, 119k mi.
$2999.(352) 257-3894

TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018





CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306





Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055

Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr. SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068


IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200

'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999


YAMAHA
2004, 1500CC, V Star
Classic, clean, 20k mi.
$5000 obo
(203) 982-2815




ida Statutes. S M Duggan
Towing LLC. reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
3VWBB21C61M442848
2001 VOLK NEW BEETLE GL
April 20, 2014


379-0420 SUCRN
SWFWMD PERMIT APP
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the Southwest Florida Water Management District has re-
ceived an Environmental Resource permit application number 694763 from John W.
Rowda. Application received: 3/28/2014. Proposed activity: commercial develop-
ment. Project name: West Coast Eye Institute building addition. Project size: 0.76
acre. Location: Section 33 Township 18 East, Range 18 South, in Citrus County. Out-
standing Florida Water: no. Aquatic preserve: no. The application is available for
public inspection Monday through Friday at SWFWMD's Tampa District office, 7601
Highway 301 North, Tampa, Florida 33637. Interested persons may inspect a copy of
the application and submit written comments concerning the application. Com-
ments must include the permit application number and be received within 14 days
from the date of this notice. If you wish to be notified of intended agency action or
an opportunity to request an administrative hearing regarding the application, you
must send a written request referencing the permit application number to the South-
west Florida Water Management District, Regulation Performance Management De-
partment, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 or submit your request
through the District's website at www.watermatters.org. The District does not dis-
criminate based on disability. Anyone requiring accommodation under the ADA
should contact the Regulation Performance Management Department at
(352)796-7211 or 1(800)423-1476, TDD only 1(800)231-6103.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, April 20, 2014.


381-0420 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS TO KINGS BAY DRIVE PHASE I
BID #14-B-10
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for drainage improvements to a por-
tion of Kings Bay Drive from Cutler Spur Boulevard to the bridge. You are hereby in-
vited to submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is the City of
Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on May 6,2014, opened and read aloud at 10:05
AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally consists of creating swales and drainage
retention areas in portions of the City right-of-way, removing excess material, provid-
ing traffic control, and restoring the area with sod.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS TO KINGS BAY DRIVE PHASE I, BID #14-B-10", AND THE
NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora) or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised to
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Kim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, April 20, 2014.


k ..... ,........................



...........


si


I ^^BiNoieI


I Bi


I Bm




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'~^ J iv a '~-- -=-,t-,,L f i
r,=t =.,,.... ....







Hop on over for Egg-cellent


deals at Village Toyota


2014 TOYOTA
COROLLA L
Automatic, Air Conditioning, AM/FM/CD MP3/WMA Player, 4 Speakers, USB Port
with iPod, Hands-free via Bluetooth, Power Door Locks, Power Windows, Electric Power Steering


VI N#1 37106


MSRP
Village Savings


$18,260
$1,360


2014 TOYOTA
CAMRY L
6-speed ECT-I Transmission, Electric Power Steering, Air Conditioning,
6.1" Touch Screen/6 Speakers, Bluetooth, Cruise Control, Power Windows, Power Door Locks


I


d
A


VIN#790503


MSRP
Village Savings


$23,285
$4,290


2014 TOYOTA
TUNDRA 4X2
4.9L V6 DOHC 24V WT-1270 HP/278 LB-FT,
5-Speed Automatic Transmission w/Sequential Shift, Automatic Limited-Slip Differential


viNi#322'9i


MSRP
Village Savings


24,999 E


$27,810
$2,811


ALL OFFERS GOOD THRU APRIL 21, 2014 OR WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.


O ToyotaCare


Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm
Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm
Service: Mon-Fri: 7am-6pm
Sat: 8am-4pm


2431 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448
www.VILLAGETOYOTA.com 352-628-5100
-II I, Ii1 .-iII 1 1i111 ', ,,PI I"-1 ,'1-11 "


2014 TOYOTA
PRIUS
Hybrid Synergy Drive System, AT-PZEV, 1.8L DOHC 16VVVT-i 4-Cylinder Engine, Display Audio:
6.1" Touch Screen, Cruise Control, Tilt/Telescopic Steering Wheel w/Controls,
Driver Door Smart Key System, Push Button Start, Power Locks, Power Windows
^ ___ A4 M P G
0 HWY.
^teL^^^^^^ 51 MPG CITY
:E :::f:: ..... .....-


VIN#1778204
-OR
MSRP $25,060
Village Savings $3,160


TGVOTA
-


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 D9


i -6


Ffth---




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EVERY 2014 SILVERADO HAS THE PRICE CLEARLY MARKED


NEW 2014 SILVERADO
M V62WDLT


2014 Chevy S ark
^^A


2014 Chevy Cruze/


2014 Chevy Malibu


MSRP BEFORE DISCOUNTS .............$37,520
TRUCK MONTH PRICE .....................$34,328
TOTAL REBATES ................................$4,500
TRUCK MONTH PRICE YOU PAY ......$29,828*
TOTAL OPEN I ii~ HOUSE DISCOUNS ....:,69


2014 Chevy Equinox


2014 Chevy Traverse


2014 Chevy Tahoe


.CRYSTAL
FIND NEWROADS CH E V R 0 L E T
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448


CRYSTALCHEVROLETONLINE.COM
PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. INCLUDES $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL
QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +ON SELECT MODELS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


=E=9


: :::"^.^^^^B^ K^&^^ A 2.W y


omm.."s I


DL0 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014




INSIDE


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEI REAL ESTATE GUIIDE


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


A bonsai from the Broag
Botanic Garden. The very beist
bonsai stories are about passion :
and beauty and transformation.
"A dewdrop hanging for a
split-second, that is bonsai."
says Julian Velasco. curator of
the Brooklyn Botanic Garden's
bonsai collection, one
of the largest and oldest
outside Japan.
I- -- --I I, ,-C I- ,-. [ '- , 1 .-- - 1 ], 1, f.


ft-ft
.4
'A


'4


mj u Pi

-BwY


*


' .1 F '


ft
a
-* &.w~-'
i
J


'I




E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


SB ^ ^637282 _'4





14 WEEPING WILLOW COURT
NEXT TO NEW 'SHARP DECOR
SSS Appliances Wood Cab/Silestone
'3/2/2 Split Plan Screen Lanai
Nook Plus DR 'A MUST SEE!!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -
Emiauil elliesullon ieiunix neD
www.F lo idu islinginlo.comn


pr <637-282





1229 RABECK
* LUXURIOUS POOL! OVER 1 ACRE LOT
* Lovely Dining Room Split Plan 3/2.5/2-Car gar
* Fully Applianced Handy Kitchen/Nice Nook
MOVE-IN READY You Will Like This One!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 _
iEmnil elliesuIIon eilemnx neD
www.FIlo idaLi singinlo.comn


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5216 INFON 417INFOLINE I
_____ 37___282__ 52) 7-282
Enter En~#000ter house #4182


*,4BD/4BAI3CG Over 3,400 SF Under A/C
*3/4 Acres on El Diablo Golf Course
* Large Heated Pool and Spa
* Custom Built Home in 2003 Like a Model _
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ln
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
GREAT VALUE
* 4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
* New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM
* Beautifully Maintained Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ir
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


GACEFUL SUUTHEHN CHAUMER
This large country home on 2.5 rolling acres
features 3-LARGE bedrooms, vaulted great room
and breezy screen lanai. HUGE detached
GARAGE w/full electric AND room for 4-6 cars!
MOVE-IN READY! _
KIM DEVANE
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


' yULt VulU UvII Liill 0 LtUIUUIII, Z UdtiI
family home in popular Pine Ridge. Fenced
acreage on the trails along with horse stalls
and inground pool. Lovely home with huge
Florida room, fireplace, updated kitchen,
large dining room and 2-car garage.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 1 I
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net 1


Split plan 3/2/2 home has large fenced
backyard. Almost 1/2 acre. Seller has updated
roof and just had the drainfield replaced. Big
kitchen loaded with cabinets. Waterfront
community. 12x32 lanai.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: JenniferSloli@remax.net
www.CitrusCounidyHomes.com


r--- 1 n"-~
:1.' ,.,,, I ii-Rel
BEST IN CANTERBURY!
Pristine 3 BD 2.5 Bath w/1,850 SF living area
on lush, cul-de-sac PRESERVE lot. Loaded
with upgrades including wood flooring, garden
tub, granite countertops & designer faucets.
Includes Citrus Hills CC Membership, plus
Canterbury Recreation Center.
GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812 [-
Email: RealEslnate GeorgeSleeman.com r


IT ,
'%




REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

S2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

. 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


Nice 4 Bedroom 2 Bath Home On Quiet Cul-De-Sac In
Lecanto School District. Greatroom Open To Tiled Kitchen &
Dining, Cathedral Ceilings, Split Bedroom Plan, Lg Master
Bedroom Walk-In Closet, Tiled Master En Suite Bath Walk-In
Shower Neutral Colors, Plantation Blinds, 12x24 Screened
Lanai, Fenced Backyard For The Pets. See It Today!__
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 K9
Email: martha.salhereemax.nel It


Mat A"^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Karen 5tuKes
ERA Suncoast
Realty.


Deanna Rodrick Greg Rodrick
ERA Suncoast ERA Suncoast
Realty. Realty.
ERA
Suncoast
agents rack
up numbers
ERA Suncoast -
Realty is proud to
announce the latest ..
production levels
achieved by some
of its agents for Steve Latiff
2014. ERA Suncoast
Steve Latiff has Realty.
surpassed the multi-million dollar mark in
closed sales volume in 2014.
The team of Harry Eck and Karen
Stukes has surpassed the $1 million


Average 30-year loan


rate falls to 4.27 percent


FOj
Harry Eck
ERA Suncoast
Realty.


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate agents and associates submitted for the Real
Estate Digest are kept on file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is
the responsibility of the individuals submitting news notes to ensure
headshots have been sent to the newsroom, and to advise staff of any
name changes. Photos need to be in sharp focus.

* Submitted photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.

* When identifying persons in group photos, do so from left to right.
Include your name, address and phone number on all photos.

* For more information, call 352-563-5660.


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Average
U.S. rates on fixed mortgages
fell this week for the second
straight week as the spring
home-buying season begins.
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday that the
average rate for the 30-year
loan fell to 4.27 percent from
4.34 percent last week. The
average for the 15-year mort-
gage eased to 3.33 percent
from 3.38 percent.
Mortgage rates have risen


about a full percentage point
since hitting record lows
about a year ago.
Many analysts have been
expecting an improving econ-
omy to lift the housing market,
which has been recovering
over the past two years. But
housing has struggled to
maintain momentum. Rising
home prices and higher mort-
gage rates have held back
some potential home buyers.
Others have had trouble qual-
ifying for mortgages.
The Commerce Depart-


Janice Ayers Bill Moore
ERA Suncoast ERA Suncoast
Realty. Realty.
mark in closed sales volume in 2014.
The team of Janice Ayers and Bill
Moore has surpassed the $2 million
mark in closed sales volume in 2014.
The Rodrick Team, Deanna and
Greg, has surpassed the $2 million mark
in closed sales volume in 2014.
ERA Suncoast Realty is proud to rec-
ognize the achievement of these fine
real estate professionals. Reach any of
these agents at the Crystal River office
at 352-795-6811.
EXIT gives
kudos to
agent
EXIT Realty *.-_ .- .
Leaders wishes to
congratulate Mike k
Stokley for closing "
more than $1 mil- ., /
lion so far in 2014.
Mike is a profes-
sional agent who Mike
brings a wealth of Stokley
knowledge to every EXIT Rearlty
transaction and is
always committed to providing excellent
service to his clients. Reach him at 352-
794-088, or on the Web at exitrealty
leaders.com.


3/1 lovely backyard
709878 $44,000
John Maisel 302-5351


3/2 fenced in backyard
709633 $69,900
Steve McClory 422-3998


3/2 fenced in pastures
709922 $52,000
Randy Morehouse 287-2934


John Maisel 302-5351


ment reported Wednesday
that U.S. home construction
rose moderately in March as
builders resumed work at the
end of a frigid winter But ap-
plications for building per-
mits slid, clouding the outlook
for future construction.
The increase in mortgage
rates over the year was
driven by speculation that
the Federal Reserve would
reduce its $85 billion-a-
month bond purchases,
which have helped keep
long-term interest rates low


.? Two stories

~an acre
4/3/2.
709634
$264,900
Pam Shemet
422-2939


2/2 Large open floor plan
706630 $69,900
Yolanda Canchola 219-2196


2/1.5 close to Rainbow RiverState 1
709547 $44,900
John Maisel 302-5351


::-A
3/2/1 spacious kitchen Pool 3/2 Lots of room
709080 $73,500 707391 $75,000
Steve McClory 422-3998 Randy Morehouse 287-2934


1 3LC IONS TO SERVE YOU !35-9088-322712 324449


Real Estate DIGEST


- 3/2/2
priced
to sell
707891
$139,900
Becky
Paradiso
634-4581


2/2
picturesque
condo
709556
$142,900
Sherri
Orendorf
573-9968


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 E3




E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Choose a bulb that won't be a feast for deer


Hoofed visitors can

make your garden a

salad bar ifyou're

not careful

LEE REICH
Associated Press

Chomping down on a rosette of
freshly emerging tulip leaves is just
the thing to drive away winter dol-
drums for deer Crocuses proba-
bly taste almost as good to them.
There's no need, though, for us
humans to forsake the blossoms of
spring bulbs; there are plenty that
don't appeal to deer
Daffodils, for example. Deer won't
eat them. So plant daffodils to your
heart's content without any worry
that their tops will be chomped off
before the flowers even unfold.
Hyacinths also don't particularly
appeal to deer. Although hyacinths
were among the most fashionable
flowers in the 18th century, they're
not among the most popular bulbs
now. Perhaps it's because they're a
little stiff and formal, so don't
blend well with currently popular
naturalistic landscapes. Still, if
you've got a place for them, go
ahead and plant them and don't
worry about deer upsetting your
design.
Equally deer-proof and, in this
case, easily integrated into natura-
listic plantings, are grape hy-
acinths, or muscari. These tiny
bulbs are impervious to cold, and
spread to eventually blanket the
ground with popsicle sticks packed
with pure white, violet, or deep
blue flowers.
Actually, once you segue over
into the world of small bulbs, you
open the door to a slew of flowers
that both naturalize and are passed
over by hungry deer. Some are also
the first harbingers of spring:
Snowdrop and glory of the snow
often bloom right through the snow,
the former with white blossoms,
the latter in white, pink or blue.
Each of winter aconite's yellow
blossoms, also appearing in very
early spring, is cradled in hand-


LEE REICH/Associated Press
A Star of Persia (Allium christophii) in
New Paltz, N.Y. Flowering onions -
alliums mostly appear as pastel
pompoms atop slender stalks. Plant
this ornamental onion for beauty and
not for eating by deer.

shaped leaves, decorative in their
own right well after the blossoms
dry up.
After this early show subsides,
striped squill, also known as
puschkinia, could share the stage
with muscari, both blooming fairly
early The loose, pale blue clusters
of striped squill won't do for the gar-
den what Darwin tulips do or
would do if the deer wouldn't eat
them but they are welcome
nonetheless.
Crown imperial is a deer-proof
bulb that could provide the elegance
of tulips. The stalks shoot skyward 2
to 3 feet and then are capped by a
tuft of leaves encircled below by a
"crown" of downward-pointing red


See BULBS/Page E13


77 ,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Control your garden pests the natural way


'Benign neglect' method is sometimes

the safest, most effective approach


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Gardeners worried about the
safety of synthetic pest-control prod-
ucts sometimes turn to botanically
derived compounds instead. But
many of those also contain toxic in-
gredients, such as nicotine,
rotenone and pyrethrins.
"Botanically derived pesticides
are not always safe and some are
more hazardous than synthetics,"
said Linda Chalker-Scott, an exten-
sion horticulturist at Washington
State University's Puyallup Re-
search Center. "Any improperly used
pesticide will contaminate nearby
terrestrial and aquatic systems."
And don't use home remedies, she
said, which could be "illegal and


possibly fatal to many good things in
your garden."
Instead, consider the benign-
neglect school of pest-control a
mix of prevention (such as maintain-
ing healthy soil) and natural controls
(such as insect-eating insects).
"I don't add fertilizers. I don't use
pesticides. I use a wood chip mulch,
which provides habitat for beneficial
insects like predacious ground bee-
tles that may eat slugs and slug eggs,"
Chalker-Scott said in an email.
Ninety-nine percent of the insects
in our yards are benign or even ben-
eficial, writes Jessica Walliser in her
new "Attracting Beneficial Bugs to
Your Garden: A Natural Approach
to Pest Control" (Timber Press).
See PESTS/Page E13


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A ladybug on a residential property in Langley, Wash. Many gardeners use pesticides -
organic or otherwise only as a last resort. They opt instead for such predatory insects as
ladybugs, which individually can consume up to 5,000 aphids during their lifetime, and can be
bought commercially and released from containers into the garden.



746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engelken Y onne Jenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE REALTOR



ST4490 W ABLE 2894W. BEAMWOOD 5049 W. PINTO LOOP 3197 N.SHERIFF DR.
| 200S.DIS$289,900 3/ 709771 $285,000 7 709646 $199,900 3/2/3 $23
3IF812709742'07"M3/2/3 239,500


200 S DAVIS 4496 N CANARYWOOD TOMAHAWK 551 N L
2/.5/2 709823 $62,500 322 09421 198 500 N432 0786$314,900 732,2 06$50
I CITRU SPRING


ATrENTION!!!!

HOMES WANTED!
Our inventory is low and we are looking for homes to sell!
THERE'S
QUITE A WHY Choose
DIFFERENCE Top
Between Performance
Listing & Realty
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your property!!!

16.9 MILLION closed in 2013
95% List Price to Sales price
Commitment to:
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CALL NOW for a FREE Market Analysis & Marketing Plan


352-746-9924 ffJMrAc


why trust your most important asset to just any Realtor
Z vwww.letstalkflrealestate.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 E5




E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci fioNkiciE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peaches, nectarines


and Carolina Jessamine

Carefil choices can make these beauties bloom


spring is the time to plant fruit trees.
Nursery outlets offer grafted
saplings grown in fast-draining bark
soil medium. Buyer beware.
Check online with IFAS at the
University of Florida for spe-
cific fruit trees that will get suf- '
ficient chill hours in your
garden climate zone and can
withstand the heat Zone 10 of
Central Florida. Certain vari-
eties of nectarine, peach, pear
and plums can be grown locally
Citrus trees are grafted on
hardier root stock that can with- Jane
stand some light frosts. Always JAN
snip off any sucker shoots below GAR
the graft. These will be of the
undesirable sour orange root
stock. The UF Extension office has a list of
cold-hardy citrus for north and central
Florida brochure FC36 is available
online.
Most central Florida gardens get 10 to
15 frosty morning and a freeze or two. Cit-
rus will need the protection of a nearby


body of warmer water or protection from
winter wind and cold by being planted
close to a building, preferably on the
south side.
Citrus normally flowers in
March and April. Be sure to
plant flowers that bloom at that
time to attract pollinators to
your garden. Coral Honey-
suckle, Lonicera semper-
virens, Florida Violets, Viola,
Rain lilies, Zephyranthes, Red
Salvia, Salvia coccinea, Asian
Bridal Wreath Spiraea, Spi-
Veber raea cantoniensis, and Blue
E'S Spiderwort, Tradescantia vir-
DEN ginia are easy to grow, require
D little maintenance and flower
when citrus trees are in bloom.
Beneficial insects will then find the cit-
rus flower blossoms and pollinate them.
Peaches, nectarines and rabbiteye
blueberries flower from February to
March locally I planted 'Tropic Snow,' a
See JANE/Page E7


I
II


Inside...


Bonsai
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
Controlling pests
PAGE E5
White wall paint
PAGE E14
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sizing up a numbered print; fixing an antique music box


ear John: In doing
some research re-
garding a print I own,
I came across your
column. I saw you
did an appraisal on
an A.E. Backus
litho. I also have
this same litho ti-
tled "Flamboyant,"
byA. E. Backus.
Here is some
more information
about it: It is a lim-
ited edition litho, John
No. 901 of 1,000, and SIKC
as my photos show,
it is double signed ____
by A.E. Backus.
There is one up for sale cur-
rently on eBay for $799, but
you can never tell how real-
istic those prices are there.
The A.E. Backus Mu-
seum's website also had one


I

II
1T


they sold recently, but there
was no price listed. I am not
looking to sell mine, be-
cause it goes
perfectly with
my room, but I
was just won-
S during what it
S, is worth. Ipur-
chased the
'print more than
- 20 years ago at
Flamingo Gar-
dens in Davie,
Sikorski Fla. H.K,
RSKI'S Internet
I-rc Dear H.K: I
______think it would
be a lucky day
to get a couple of hundred
dollars for your print. At
$799, it seems like someone
is fishing for a mackerel or
an autograph buyer
Generally speaking, col-


lectors of limited-edition
prints have a cutoff edition
number of 250.
Dear John: I have an an-
tique cylinder music box in
need of repair I had signifi-
cant repairs done to it years
ago by a man in Ohio and
would send it to him again,
but shipping is prohibitive
It appears to be a mecha-
nism issue, as it has begun
playing very slowly I have
searched the Internet, but
have not found any sources
See ATTIC/Page E15
This lithograph by
A.E. Backus is numbered
901 out of 1,000. Collec-
tors of prints normally
restrict themselves to
editions numbered 250
or lower.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E6

white-fleshed peach, and two nec-
tarines, 'Sun Raycer' and another
where the tag has disappeared. All
were recommended by UF and
knowledgeable Craig Collins of
Color Country on State Road 44. The
trees are 15 feet apart in a bed flank-
ing the fire-break lawn. The un-
tagged tree in the center has
attractive burgundy leaves. Several
green shoots sprouted at its base
from the rootstock. I snipped them
off.
A late February freeze could kill
tiny, developing peaches and nec-
tarines. This year there was no late
freeze only lots of rain. My trees
are loaded with developing fruit.
This year, the young trees have a
bumper crop.
To lure pollinators I planted two
native, evergreen Carolina Jes-
samine vines, Gelsemium semper-
virens, beside a pathway leading to
the unkempt back half of the lot.
They were named varieties in hang-
ing baskets, flowerless and needing
water on the clearance rack at a big
box store. The sickly plants soon re-
covered after planting in humus-
rich soil.
The vines were hand-watered
daily for a week, every other day the
next week, then three times a week,
and finally twice a week for their
first month in the ground. After es-
tablishment, they got only natural
rainfall, morning fog and dew They
are now clambering happily over a
rusting steel arbor and up nearby
Longleaf Pines and Turkey Oaks. By
their second year, the jessamine
erupted in a mass of yellow, trum-
pet-shaped flowers. The first flowers
appeared late in January and flow-
ering continued through March.
Named cultivars often have longer
flowering periods than wild natural
plants.
More flowers, more pollen and
nectar, more pollinators and conse-
quently more fruit on the peaches,
nectarines, blueberries, strawber-
ries, tomatoes and pepper plants.
Cross Bayou Farms in Holder has a
bumper crop of rabbiteye blueber-
ries ready to pick right now
An edible garden can look after it-
self, providing you amend the sandy
soil, select the right varieties and
give them a good start. Spring is a
good time to plant fruit trees so they


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
A nectarine blossom. Peaches,
nectarines and rabbiteye blueberries
flower from February to March locally.
Spring is a good time to plant fruit
trees so they can get established
before cool fall weather.
can get established before cool fall
weather


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.








HAPPY EASTER!
Cinco de Mayo Giveaway
$50 Applebee's Gift Certificate
Call for information to enter drawing

352-637-2777/www.CitrusSold.com


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


'4,4 /IT 4d F f 9 a TI T9WM


PINE RIDGE (A Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. W Fr S o c s
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 AWeek! Properties


1l'1I ',V 1o,1 ,, El-l _* U .. ibl l
MLS 706931 $1,238,000 3077 N Caves Valley Path
UNBELIEVABLE!! Executive, turnkey MLS 702034 $350,000
home-MUST be seen to appreciate! Pride of ownership! 3/3 pool home
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 w/views of #9 on The Ranch Course.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 JodieTrace Holder 352-302-2036


.. L .lI L L I .. : : ,. I I [
MLS 709814 $239,000
Large 3/2/2 w/Liv & Fain rooms & pool. A
must see!
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
t`:"ip "- ..


gj #" 6117 NWhispering OakLp
MLS 709873 $160,000
Large, bright 3/2.5/2 home
with family room.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


/nl-PW- 2325 N Hendry Pt
MLS 709904 $76,000
This Meadowview Villa is very well
maintained. 2/2/1 with hot tub.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


"sf ^ II ,,,_ : ,! I,,:, ,, :,
..h_ : : $' $174.500
3/2/2 with pool, nearly new,
fabulous home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


3 15 IJ bi II[.. d U i
MLS 705457 $115,000
3/2/2 home with a perfect floor plan for
the Florida lifestyle.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


/ W ~ 791 E Hartford St 29-2B
MLS 709858 $75,000
Beautifully furnished, remodeled 3/2.5/
carport condo.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


1i d _l* T;<. 1 1 H ,i,,1.1.:1-. 1,.1L,
' SOO _L: :1,'Ir.l: $245.900
Like new, one owner pool home
with 3/2/3.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


.tuV- IoU4 IN Ivia n U vvar ur
SMLS 709907 $169,000
3/2/2 pool home with newer
"big ticket" items.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


330W National St
MLS 709956 $109,900
Furnished Citrus Hills 2/2/2 with
enclosed lanai.
John Lombard 352-422-6887


I. IJ..,,^i"I ^^
,}f 1 ^ li /' | };Iii Ill. l,, li *,
SMLS 709527 $59,900
Maintenance-free upper 2/2 furnished
condo.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four .Repeat Home Buyer
Categories In J.D. Power *Flrst Time Home Buyi
and Associates 2013 *First Time Home Selli
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl
1-. 1 i h I I . ,, , I I , h I , W W1 W IS.U 1 , ,*1 , , I ,,l h I I I I , .


XaSE;: Show SSSoZer 3Sc


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 E7


ir
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CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A Malus slant-style bonsai at
=the Brooklyn Botanic Garden
in New York.
S ,,IP-. I ,-l-. P .


E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


- :,, ...




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I The C.V.
SStarr Bonsai Museum
in autumn at the
4 Brooklyn Botanic
SGarden in New York.
The garden's bonsai
collection is one of the
Largest and oldest
outside Japan.
c : An
Acer buergerianum
in root-over-rock
bonsai style.

This Quercus
dentata with fall
colors is almost
200 years old and was
imported in 1910,
in New York. It has
been part of the
Brooklyn Botanic
P _Garden collection
since 1925.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden/
Associated Press ;-,_ -
OOOHZP1 1

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_________ 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. I--
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
ocE: (352) 795-6633 1o,
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carpet, lots of parking #702921
$57,500_



DUNNELLON 1998 Nobility D/W
M/HI w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 25
acres Master bath garden tub w/dbl
vanity & shower Country kitchen,
vaulted ceilings, 16 x 20 workshop w/
electric, inside laundry #703976


1 bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean w/
circular driveway half way between
Crystal River and Homosassa 2 lots, 2
!1. 1 .1. 1... screenn porch Fully


HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H
w/3bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved
road, screen porch, .1 i shed,
ceiling fans, formal i.......... eat-in
kitchen w/breakfast bar Immaculate
inside, near by to shopping #706376
$44,000


LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of
3 mobile homes/buildings, center of
county, 1 well, 2 skeptics, appointment
only One rented for $450/mo
#703819 $106,000





CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bdrms, 1 bath,
carport, screen porch, inside laundry rm;
high on a hill, downtown Crystal River,
no flood insurance required #709076-
$47,500


INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage, w/inground vinyl lined caged
pool, privacy fence on 3 sides, cathedral
ceiling in great room, country kitchen w/
-i-ln 7;--.-.t- -.nter tops Tile
: ..... ... 'J t $93,800


^IlWMO A MluB TalJlv ll I
Continuous tlo\\ in sprin-tedJ ri \er running
thru property An lj uSt arJs tronim our door

PRICE REDUCED

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S I, 1 ,, ,.r F ., r m a n


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0 td ., ~~,








^ .. 'HOME #1
I l .i 'Il' , i, ..l. I ,

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SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 E9


--(




EIO SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


BONSAI
Continued from Page E8

place as much as the vi-
sual image," and bonsai is
about that emotion, he
said. It is the haiku of the
tree world.
Luckily for beginners,
who have not yet attained
a level of oneness with
their new bonsai, learning
to nurture a bonsai has
never been easier Expert
help, once found only in
Japan or China, is now
more readily available at
bonsai clubs and shops
around the world. The
American Bonsai Society
lists bonsai clubs across
the United States and
Canada, and Bonsai Clubs
International lists clubs
worldwide.
"Most U.S. states now
have at least a couple of
bonsai societies, and inter-
est seems to be growing,"
said David Bogan of
Evansville, Indiana, who is
on the board of the Ameri-
can Bonsai Society
"About 30 years ago a
friend brought a bonsai
for me from Hawaii, and
I've been hooked ever


since. Now my wife and I
have hundreds of bonsai,"
he said. "Bonsai are a
long-term commitment,
though, and most take at
least a decade to create.
Some can hardly go a day
without some kind of care.
It's almost like having a
pet."
Bonsai, Japanese for
"planted in a tray," origi-
nated in China in around
200 A.D., and the art
spread several hundred
years later to Japan. The
art of bonsai was intro-
duced to the U.S. in the
late 19th and early 20th
centuries, and at least one
of the Brooklyn Botanic
Garden bonsais is over 200
years old.
Although Velasco said
the ultimate goal is to
"open your heart to the
tree," he has a few more
practical tips for novices.
The first is to choose a
variety of tree suited to
your environment. Bonsai
are trees or shrubs, and
most varieties should be
grown outside, where they
require a period of dor-
mancy in winter
For most people, how-
ever, who want to grow
their bonsai indoors or


The next step along the
continuum of hardiness is
junipers, particularly Chi-
nese and procumbens va-
rieties. Small varieties of
azaleas, which are sturdy
with nice leaves and flow-
ers, are also popular
among bonsai enthusiasts,
Velasco said.
Outdoor bonsai are deli-
cate, however, and need to
be protected once temper-
atures reach 20 degrees
and colder
"Most people will bury
just the pot part of the bon-
sai in soil and mulch up


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


keep them outdoors only in
warmer months, tropical
varieties like the ficus or
Australian brush cherry,
with its interesting flower
and bark, are good choices.
Both are sturdy enough to
endure a few beginners'
mistakes, do well indoors
and can be kept outside so
long as temperatures are
above 60 degrees.
Another good option,
particularly for people with
access to an outdoor grow-
ing space, is Chinese elm,
which is adaptable and can
also be grown indoors.


Bonsai, Japanese for 'planted in a
tray,' originated in China in
around 200 A.D., and the art
spread several hundred years
later to Japan. The art of bonsai
was introduced to the U.S. in
the late 19th and early
20th centuries, and at least one
of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden
bonsais is over 200 years old.


ON THE NET
www.absbonsai.org.
www.bbg.org.
www.bonsai-bci.com.

against a house or fence to
protect it from drying
winds. Burying the pot
evens out the temperature
for the roots so there are
no sudden drops or super
hard freezes," Velasco
said.
Another strategy is bury-
ing just the pot part of the
bonsai under a bench in
the winter, and covering
the bench with some clear
plastic.
In addition to selecting
the right variety beginners
need to understand bonsai
stress and watering, Ve-
lasco said.
'A lot of times people
bring home a bonsai and it
drops its leaves and looks
unwell. It's just stressed
out. It needs time to adjust,
and a little patience," he
explained.
"Monitor the water very
carefully Without leaves it
won't need as much water
Hold off on water until the
soil dries out. And little by


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SECONDS TO KINGS BAY
no 1 2 master suites, apart-
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kit hen & bathrooms 190 ft of
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little, when you hold off on
water, buds will start to
appear And as that starts
to happen, the need for
water will start to
increase."
Many bonsai growers
keep the tip of a chopstick
deep in the soil toward the
back of the pot as a mois-
ture gauge.
"If the chopstick is moist
you don't need to water
But you never want the
roots in the pot to get com-
pletely dry Water it only
when it's almost dry," Ve-
lasco said.
Water from the top down
and make sure the water
drains out the bottom of
the pot.
As for pruning, allow the
tree to grow five to seven
leaves before pruning it
back by about two leaves of
the new growth, Velasco
said.
"Only prune what's ac-
tively growing. Trees need
to grow to be happy and
healthy" he said.
"If you're on top of your
game, the tree will repay
you by being healthy and
beautiful. Just try to ap-
preciate what the bonsai
is trying to express to
you."


--- .












No Job Too Small
Residential & Commercial Buildings
APPROVING ASSISTANCE WITH BUILDING DEPARTMENTS
Country Architect Florida Registered Architect


John Warren White
PA ARCHITECT
THE MOST EXPERIENCED ARCHITECT IN HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTY
Cell 352-540-8687 352-796-4972
jwhite198@tampabay.rr.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



I Choncl


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 Ell



To place an ad, call 5603"5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
ir 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
DUNNELLON/488
Clean 2/1 Particiall
fenced, shed, $475/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970
HERNANDO
1/1 & 2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1st last +dep
352-201-2428



2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell
Built after 2004
Hurricane Codes!
2006 Entertainer.
MUST SEE -GREAT
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delivered to you!
1-877-578-5729
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fenced yard, 1500sf
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New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
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($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183


Palm Harbor Homes
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Replacement; Over
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Free Factory Tours!
new Velocity home
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plantcitv.
palmharbor.com or
800-622-2832
Private Owner
Financing
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Serving the South
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1-877-578-5729

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




**FLORAL CITY 3/2-
1+ACRE treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
$5,000 down
with $425 monthly
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369




Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 352-795-1272
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on /2 acre. Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974

Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing


HOMOSASSA
2BR/2BA, Fully fur-
nished, Great Location
Drastically Reduced
(352) 746-0524
INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352) 201-7081
INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home 1248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


V THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




a,2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441
Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273


For Sale B
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-


Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
furn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105

For Sale ,4(I
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090








#1Employment






Fw chronicleonline corn


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FIL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for your


2/1.5/1 .........$700
2/1/1 ............$600
2/2/1 ............ $900
CONDO
2/1 ................ $500
PARTS

2/2/1 ............$650


3/2/2 ...........$900
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


-ACTION7
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
S900 & UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/unique homne/Avail. May 1
5339 S Elm Ave.
2/1 cute and cozy Avail. May 1
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959sqft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 story town home, canal side
$650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/1.5 inB.H. 992Sqft
1063 N Commerce Ter.
2/1 Apt in Lecanto, centrally lIated
1071 N Commerce Ter
2/1 Apt.in Lecanto, centrally lated
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/add ion on 1.25 acre
For More Listings Go To
www.CirnsCountyHomneRentals.wnm


--t.








INVERNESS
FOR RENT
Beautiful waterfront condo!
2 bedroom, 2 bath, w/gorgeous
porches Overlooking the water
Amenriesinc Boat dock and
swimming pool' $750!
Call today!
352-637-3800

























FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025








INVERNESS
2BR/1BA, lake access,
no pets, $550/mo
(352) 341-0900


Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694








FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514



BRENTWOOD
Townhome 3/2.5
w/Social Membership
(352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
"MOVE IN READY"
June 1,2014, Lakeside
Golf Country Club,
Fully Furn. Villa ; 3/2/2
Scrnd. Solar heated
pool Clean and cozy.
Only for very serious
people $1250. mo.
1 yr or longer Call for
view: 352-726-8197



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225


FLORAL CITY
Furn Eff, Basic Cable,
Wifi, all util, $650/mo
$350 Sec 6/mo lease
352-341-1734





At SM WOODS
3/2/2, Ht. Pool, FP,
Maint. Free, Sm. Pet
$1,000 mo, 422-1933


Beverly Hills
106 S. Adams
2bd/lba, $550. mo
1st, last + dep.
$1,600. moves you in.
(352) 422-6407

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 + Loft on Canal
$850. (352)795-0125

RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM





HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225

Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$800 (908) 322-6529





CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk. call Bruce
*352-445-9136"*

CRYSTAL RIVER
Free Housing in ex-
change for Transpor-
tation, clean back-
ground, 352-697-0177


RelEsa7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


"r i'," i..,i,,,


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
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"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
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A VIEW TO
LOVE"
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(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.









ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
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Call or email to get
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Ph: (813)470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
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FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514






Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
3BD., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Justa Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $110,000.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
(866) 351-1234


Home Finder
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Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2/2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext.,Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202





Por S ie%,,i



rj

Laurel Ridge on
Twisted Oaks 1st
green. 2BR/2BA with
den & screened lanai
high ceilings and
open floor plan
$125k 352-746-4880
or 330-322-0329
553 W Player Path









Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
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352-341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
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RENT TO OWN
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Homosassa^
Homes^jl


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Exit Realty Leaders
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NJ-4




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352 586-0139
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"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office













BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipoowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!







L
Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
CfatoneetamDabav.rr.c
om
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watti
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515









SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


ILM
Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!





I


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments



$100,000 + Closing
Cost wil get you this
2,100 sq. ft.,
3BR 3'/2 BA Fully turn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268



Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507


^fflj^^-q
Citrus count


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com







Fisherman's Paradise
in Inverness East Cove.
Furnished 2/2 plus
dock & seawall.
Deep water. $51,900
(352) 344-0101
Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNa-ure-Coast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"


Get Results


In The Homefront


Classifieds!


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014


Citrus Count
Homes^^-


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PESTS
Continued from Page E5

She recommends introducing
insects that eat other insects.
"A single ladybug proba-
bly the most illustrious bene-
ficial predatory insect can
consume up to 5,000 aphids
during its lifetime," Walliser
says, adding that there are
thousands of other insect
species capable of doing the
same thing.
To keep these predatory in-
sects around, however, you
have to offer a diverse and
pesticide-free garden with
plenty of plant-based foods.
"Just like people, most
species of beneficial insects
need a balance of carbohy-
drates (found in nectar) and


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 E13


protein (found in their prey)
in order to survive," Walliser
said.
Provide plants that produce
flowers with shallow, exposed
nectaries, she said. "Many
beneficial insects are very
small and don't have special-
ized mouthparts for accessing
nectar from tubular flowers.
Members of the carrot family
and the aster family are great
places to start."
Where to find beneficial in-
sects? Aside from luring wild
singles into your yard with
the necessary food, water
and shelter, you can simply
buy several hundred for re-
lease from containers at gar-
den centers or on the
Internet.
"Be sure you have every-
thing they need to survive,
then look at the types of pests


you have in the garden," Wal-
liser said. "If whiteflies are
problematic on your toma-
toes, then larval lacewings
may be your answer If aphids
are plaguing your lettuce
crop, ladybugs may be a better
choice."
Prevention, though, is
probably the best way to
keep problem insects away,
said Christy Wilhelmi, a gar-
den designer from Los Ange-
les and author of "Gardening
for Geeks" (Adams Media,
2013).
"If you have healthy soils,
you won't have as many pests
and you won't need to use pes-
ticides," she said. "Avoid
(plant) stresses. Have soil with
a lot of organic matter in it.
Check your garden every day
and you won't need pest
control."


BULBS
Continued from Page E4

or yellow flowers. Crown imper-
ial's relatives, Persian lily and
guinea hen flower, are also passed
over by deer and are beautiful in a
more relaxed rather than regal
manner
English bluebells and wood hy-
acinth, both botanically squills,
share midseason bloom with crown
imperial. These two squills are per-
fect for naturalizing and brighten-
ing the dappled shade of a
mid-spring woodland.
Even as spring rolls into summer,
there are colorful bulbs that can
make deer look elsewhere for a
meal. Flowering onions alliums
-fill this time slot, mostly appear-
ing as pastel pompoms atop slender
stalks.


If you're unfamiliar with the or-
namental, flowering onions, take a
look at chives when they come into
bloom. Now imagine those blos-
soms in deep blue, or in pink, even
yellow And rather than golf-ball
size clusters of flowers, imagine
flower heads the size of volleyballs,
or baseball-size clusters sending
out thin streamers of male flowers
like fireworks. These are some of
the variations on the basic allium
flower theme.
This sampling of bulbs should
be sufficient to convince you that
deer need not reduce your spring
landscape to a monochrome of
green. After once watching deer
munch the leaves off a friend's
garlic plants, I do hesitate to rec-
ommend any plant as completely
deer-proof Still, planting the
above-mentioned bulbs generally
sends out the signal: No food here,
deer


REALTY GROUP
REALTY GROUP


Speializin in Tes

- IB..ntwoodResal
www.err istmelt BrIpco


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787' SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133' VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777
1I1 --


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 4 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Come and enjoy ife atTerra Vsta in this ever popular Windward model. The home offers over Cordova Model. Situated on the 3rd fairway of the championship Skyview Golf Course. Be part of one of Florida's premier resort communities in the 2 bedroom, maintenance-free villa
100 sf of giving space,3 bedrooms PLUS den allowing ample space for family and feends.Abuts a Completely upgraded in 2008. Cabinets, granite counter tops, flooring, baseboards, located in the cozy Village of Brentwood. Located in close proximity to Brentwood fitness & pool
reen belt in the rear giving your outdoor pool and entertaining activities lots of privacy. Sitting on designer paint and window treatments just to name a few. Added a lovely solar heated facility & Brentwood Golf Course. Open floor plan allows you to live a casual Florida lifestyle. Florida
n oversized home site providing lots of space between home. Inside you'll find a casual great salt water pool complete with two waterfalls and a fountain in 2009. Picture sliders allow room for year-round comfort. Master suite offers large walk-in closet, spacious vanity & walk-in
( beautiful view of golf course If you are quality conscious w/sophisticated tastes, please shower in the bathroom. "Social Membership is required, providing access to an array ofworld class
S.... .- mi, i 111 i ........ ...... ,,, *r, S269.900 don't miss seeing this wonderful home w/neutral colors. MLS 709872 .............. 499,000 amenities.All thin is available in oneof Brentwood's GREATEST values. MLS 704580.......$99,900


aillr.uL r-m1ii DL 0.- D-M1, 0-Ln, ruAr InL I
Highly appointed Picasso mode situated along the 15th fairway of the Skyview G C in Foxfire of Terra
Vista. Abundant landscaping, including a babbling brook in the front yard. Incredible views ofthe golf
course This home is a complete package.Wellthought out interior offering views from all vantage points,
abundant space from casual to formal living. Expansive lanai with summer kitchen, heated pool with spill-
over-spa and pool bath for fantastic outdoor entertaining. Just too much to describe. THIS IS ONE THAT
MUST BE SEEN TO FULLYAPPRICIATE. DON'T MISS THISOPPORTUNITY. MLS709969 .$595,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 4 BED 3.5 BATH 2 CAR DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
leautful custom homelocated on FenwayDrveinthecenterofTerraVista.Exclusively designed This lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is the ideal place for any occasion, whether
ool and spa home wth 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths plus den, and oversized garage with attached 1e seasonal use, retirement or full time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking
145 RV garage. Upgrades throughout home, including marble fireplace, summer kitchen, solid the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what
surface counter tops, tile floors, window treatments and many more to mention. Amazing you've been looking for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoy the social
anoramic view from spaciouslanai on overan acre ofland. MLS708318 ...............$595,000 life that comes with the social membership! MLS 703807.........................$288,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HUNT CLUB SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage home with spacious kitchen, Conan Custom designed, beautiful residence in the premier community of Terra Vista. 4
countertops, breakfast nook, formal dining, family room, great room and lanai bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 3-car garage. Enhanced with the right upgrades such as tile floors,
overlooking the fountain on Lake Pastor. This home offers a split bedroom plan with maplewood cabinetry, fireplace, crown molding, double-pane windows, tile roof,
an open floor design. Light and bright. Make sure to visit the back yard to enjoythe expanded paver lanai and driveway, custom window treatments and many more.
view M LS708113 ...................................................................................................... $329,999 Expansive view on a premium Skyview GolfCourse Homesite. MLS707842...$439,000


STerms 6 MonthS oSr Mor
Terra Vista& Bent oodRena l Social Membership i d wh a l


I- stairs ha two bedrooms .
with two bath a w l as a II .. .. '' .. '" ", .-' .
BRENTWOOD, DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR loft/office space. Barely lived HUNT CLUB, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR BRENTWOOD 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate, unfurnished in, close to all the amenities, Single family home unfurnished, nicely upgraded kitchen, tile floors Come take a look at this fully furnished home in the Community of
detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2-car garage. Open floor and located in a quiet-cul-de- and carpet in bedrooms. Extended lanai with pavers. All appliances. Brentwood. 2 bedroom plus a bonus room. Close to the community pool and
plan with lots of space. Social membership is included. Single family sac. Social Membership Citrus Hills Social membership and lawn care included. Single exercise area. Perfect for seasonal or full time residence. All rental prices
home (detached) Brentwood. #2121....................................... ... $1200 ncluded.#1169 ........$ 1,150 family home (detached) #303317...................................................$1,550 are based on one year rental. 6 months are negotiable. #1126........ $1,350




E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



White walls: Easy color can sometimes be tricky


Associated Press

NEW YORK So you want to
paint a room white. Sounds easy
until you go to the hardware
store to buy paint and discover
there are dozens of whites to
choose from.
Many have familiar yet poetic
names that conjure up ever-so-
slightly different hues: cream,
pearl, vanilla, snow, chalk, ivory
jasmine, bone. But the closer
you look, the more confusing the
choices are. You want a plain,
basic white, but the purest white
on the color chart looks a little
harsh next to all those soft
shades with just a hint of some-
thing else beige, gray, peach,


rose, yellow or the palest-ever
blue or green.
Often people default to white
because they don't want strong
colors in their home. But as it
turns out, "it's harder to choose
white than any other color," said
Sharon Grech, a color design ex-
pert at Benjamin Moore Paints.
She says Benjamin Moore
alone offers more than 150
whites, and "when people are
choosing white, I see more peo-
ple unhappy or making a mis-
take or being shocked at the
color than when they choose
other colors."
And watch out if you go with a
pure white untinted by any other
hue. Leatrice Eiseman, executive


director of the Pantone Color In-
stitute, which maintains color
standards, says "the purity and
cleanliness" of the purest whites
"can also make them feel very
sterile and cold. And you can lit-
erally get eyestrain from too much
dazzling white. So you've got to be
cautious. Most people don't want
to live with hospital white."
More so than with other colors,
whites are also more influenced
by colors around them, so Grech
says it's crucial to try a sample to
see how it looks in the room. Buy
a pint and paint a 2-by-2-foot
board that you can move around
your home. "Sometimes the sun
hits it one way or another at dif-
ferent times of day or it looks dif-


ferent against the rug, or you re-
alize it's got a lot of pink in it or
green in it," she said. "It might
look totally different in the
morning than at night."
The paint sheen makes a dif-
ference too, whether matte a
flat paint or a shiny high-gloss.
One recommended mix is a
semi-gloss trim with matte on
the walls.
And don't forget the ceiling.
"More people are thinking of the
ceiling as a fifth wall," Grech said.
"Think about it in terms of all the
rooms that white is going to be
flowing through on the ceiling."
Most people want flat paint on
the ceiling, but if you want to
bring focus to the ceiling, a semi-


gloss or high gloss can look
"spectacular" in the right space,
she said.
James Martin is an architec-
tural color consultant whose
company, the Color People, de-
signs colors for buildings. He
says "if you're going to have
white, you want to use a warm
white yellow white, peachy
white, rosy white. Anything you
live with, you want it to be
warm." It's especially important
in an old house: "If you use a
warm white, you'll see all the
wonderful details in the sur-
rounding woodwork much bet-
ter," he said.

See WHITE/Page E15


I I


Il


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
Biand lNewv Class A Office
E Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hvwy. Ciystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007 (727) 515-6571


JUST LIKE NEW! JUST LISTED!
Completely rebuilt Meticulously updated
2 BR, 2-1/2BA, 2 story villa wi 2 car 3/2-1/2/2 golf course home on deep
garage +extra parking. Large screened estate lot. Family room wi stone fireplace.
porch. Everything new from roof to floors All new kitchen. Huge, screened lanai. New
inc. siding, plumbing, wiring, hardware, floors, paint, SS appliances, breakfast bar
A C. etc. & more!
#708977 $119,900 #709868 $179,500


LOOK NO FURTHER!
* Custom upgraded 4/3/3 heated pool/spa home
* Built in 2006 Sweetwater Westwind V
* Salt system pool pop up cleaning
*Over 2500 sq ft of living
* Gorgeous hardwood flooring gas fireplace
* Staggered maple cabinetry with quartz
* Stainless steel appliances
* Well for yard security system
#702152 $285,000


SECOND HOME POSSIBILITY!
* End unit single story condo
S2/2/1 views of #3 green on Cypress
* Updated kitchen with stainless steel
* Hardwoods in dining and Great Room
* All appliances to convey
* Extra parking spaces for guests
*Close to SMW Country Club
* Home warranty for the buyers
#707553 $66.000


I DEERWOOD-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-HOM1OSASSA, FL I
1 acre with 2BR/2BA home Close e to Wk-Mart & 4BR/3BA Over 3000 sq. ft living Sugarmill
Lowes. $61,999 MLS#708261 Woods $134,900 MLS#702836


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 I
After Hours o,, 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allcitrusrealty.comrn


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
'J Realtor' A HOUSE Realtor 'q
4 302-3179 soLD. Name! 287-9022
The 7fl66700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
golden irl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


OUR LISTINGS SELL FAST!
^yP\ Give us a call to list
your home today!

piln'afl^^^^^^^twumD^^^i4


CASUAL 2/2/2 home w/hliving & family rooms opening up to the expanded
screened porch featuring a hot tub. Home is landscaped w/sitting areas in
the private backyard. $92,600. Call Carol Hamilton at 352-344-5535.
1583126/708808.


WELL KEPT 2/2 DW w/large screen porch + 2 sheds in the very nice park of
Palm Terrace. This is located in the center of the county w/a lot rental of
$275 which includes water, septic & garbage. $18,500. Call Dennis
Bonnell at 352-344-5535 to see today.
957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452
352-344-5535
-, www.Cridland.com 2


4 "Always There For You"
KEY GAlL COOPER
REALTY Multimillion Dollar Realtor
ri- t (352) 634-4346
jr I Office: (352) 382-1700
O E R IL 4 E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


I See Virtual.TursI ww.i. es.eIhIIJ.I.I.IcIIBJI.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WHITE
Continued from Page E14

He adds that "white kills art.
When you put a piece of art against
a white wall, it isolates the painting
so it becomes like a postage stamp -
a thing in a box. If you put the same
painting against a colored wall, it
eliminates those boundaries, pulls
the colors out of the painting, and
brings the painting to life."
Martin doesn't like white walls,
though he'll use off-white in a ceiling.
He cautions that bright white trim
and a bright white ceiling will make
other colors look brighter than they
would if you were using an off-white.
What can work, he says, "if you really
like white," is to choose a warm white
for walls in a flat sheen, then high-
gloss trim the same color "It's a very
sexy, subtle thing to do," he said.
Don't pick colors online, advises
Martin, because they can be dis-
torted. But there is an art to study-
ing the paper fan deck of paint
colors in the store. Bring a white
piece of paper with a square cut out
so you can focus on the color you're
considering without being influ-
enced by the hues around it
And if you're color-challenged and
unsure whether the white you're
eyeing is more on the rosy side or
the orange side, follow it in the fan


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

in Florida or even the southeast
Do you know of anyone closer
than the northeast or California who
repairs antique music boxes? Could
a watchmaker take care of the prob-
lem? R.P, Internet
Dear RP: I wish you had included
a photograph of your cylinder music
box for our readers. It is possible
that the mechanism can simply be
removed from the box and shipped
separately First, you might contact
the person who repaired it and ask if
just the mechanism can be removed
and shipped separately
I do not know of anyone in Florida
to repair it. One of the nationally
well-known restorers is Al Meekins
of Meekins Music Box Restoration,
who could do the repair and per-
haps may know of someone in
Florida. His website is www
antiquemusicboxes. com.


If you're
color-challenged
and unsure whether
the white you're
eyeing is more on
the rosy side or the
orange side, follow it
in the fan deck from
its palest iteration to
its deepest, to see
its true undertone.

deck from its palest iteration to its
deepest, to see its true undertone.
Warm tints include red, orange, yel-
low, and offshoots like peach and
apricot, but if you want to cool a
room off, go for colors like blue and
purple. In between are the neutrals
- taupe, gray, beige.
And don't get overwrought about
the choices. "I think most people
have more judgment than they think
they do," Eiseman said. "You look at
something, you have a doubt about it
because your eye is telling you
something is off here. Or you look at
it and it pleases you. In the end, it's
your eye and your comfort level."

Dear John: I have the 1980 Christ-
mas edition Cabbage Patch dolls
dressed in red velvet clothes. They
are Noel and Nicholas special edi-
tions from Babyland General in
Cleveland, Ga. My registered num-
bers on the dolls are No. 0506 and No.
2345. Could you please advise me of
where I may sell them and what the
value is of each one? WC., Internet
Dear WCO.: The crest of the popu-
larity wave for Cabbage Patch dolls
has come and gone. The secondary
market is loaded with them for sale.
If you have noted a seller asking a
high price for the type you have,
contact them and see if they are will-
ing to buy your two.

John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, P.O Box2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorskij@aol. com.


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014 E15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ni 0,, Nrl, O:,- Gol~l Llir:,n
: ::BFR 2 I -l pool h.:..,.,-
" FI:rc-l, d ,: c j c ,,1 Iw. ,
.lhr 1d1.. I'.lnt h. rn c
* A 1,. I r,,, r I. I, I i'-i, -
rL', 7i161:9i7 S194,600
Jeanne or Willaid Picktel 352-212-3410
www.CilusCounlySold.comn






BANK APPROVED SHORTSALE
F .c.1drc .c.i i .: h.n- ,t : ,: : h.

: .:.i i TLL :...1 .i..1:[. : a :l .., i.r.:.c
:i q, 1r,. [. : :.,
r,: Mi l, ,*llr L ill [A :,
IJL'. 711::2b ASKING $44,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352.4008072


k4| H^ t =[---]Z :1 t]i: fc ','l

,SERVINGcT U n .Y ,'1 6 'Ila
E CITRUS 6 06.uf^^
COUNTY ,[.ll ... , :' :',:" l, ,
FOR'i HOM
OVERd 37 .EA .kF I pENC. WRH
YEARS 164 W. SUNDA StIvresL3 40Cl oa o


Pr,:ii T,l, r ,, Ihd rr ; 1 .| HIo 1 i',,r11
I iri|Hc 1 i ,ri h \ .Il\ I l :,r c- dr .lilc-
. : h I-II:,H|| tl..l r 1'NNl^ll 111 ,,,,lir,:,..,H ,,,Hir:
:lh:,nniH l.j,:,rii,:il lir,:,l,, r n,, ,. ,i'r,, t-i't '
ONLY S429K
Call Quade 352-302-7699


* r,,1 I,,,rn ,, ,,: IFrn, LIV,,,,J
*2 -" lr,,,,i,, [hBih I Cr 'it r ,ic-
- K lit.: lIV I I .,.,If .... B r,- I: i: ir
* T,hc III Ki lt, ,ih-, 6 l,: -.I Flr,
* i'Tr- ,, P..rI', j i- v-r A L
r,1L' 7( 1I:.I:.t6 ASKING S64,900
Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


THE PERFECT PLACE TO CALL HOME N, : '
h,,1,,, ...;1J;1 I I ,,1,,,,I,,. DRASTIC REDUCTION I :. 1
SI 1 I: :',,',, ,1,-II ,IC ',""EADUCTI HN r,1 SPARKING TWO-SOME! 10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!
I,,-1, ,I ,,1 ,1 ',, I 'J ,, -,1,1,1,' ,, ,,, ,l JE W K IT C H E i j F L n n I' rll, . 1 1 A, : h , , : r r, r r |I,,, ,: ,, ,t l I ,, , r i |, ,: ,l [,I
ii ,I r, i EW E T A EA ir 'l ..'1 ,,'d b,,, r ,,I,.i I, ,,L I ,, :,AI Cl r, ::in llliI rr,, :
h.I~ II 1CI+ i1 1 .: F:. i : .t , .. ......
, L':.=-/:"9 X.I'' A S K IN G S 14 8 ,9 0 0 l i,,o,, r ,,i,. Fnn,: ,l In.: ir l ,,:,',',,,,,.... I.-, l,1,,,. ,:,, '," '... ,',,h:,,r: 1i', ",, :,rn c-l v : r, ,,,,,rnv ,i
Pal Davis 13521212 7280 GREAT BUY AT S94.500 ".IL: :,:i S84,900 Br,,,i.i il ,,ri.r: S139.900
VieivLisilng: iviiv.c2lpaldavis.comin Call Doris Miner 4 352-344-1515 Ask lot Manlyn Booth 637.4904 Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699





PEACE & CONTENTMENT-COMFORTABLE
HANDYMAN SPECIAL LIVING 4. ............ ElII, .I.II i.
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I. .... ..... i, .. .. CITRUS SPRINGS! C .-,,, I Rvp P i
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r.IL"L z?,,17" : S79,500 ASKING S104,900 L rij ii- I,,i i,, iiiil ,,iri|, i i,,, ,L' .7ii: i,: .i:. S219.000
Call Ten, Sleui'an 220 1008 Pal Davis 13521212 7280 r,1L'" 7iC'i,' S139,000 Jeanne Ot Willatd Pickte1 352-212-3410
Email lelnann sleianl : cenlgrk21 corn View listing: Iviviv.c2lpaldavis.comn Lorraine O'Regaii 352-586-0075 www.CiltusCounilySold.comn


li,: -,I.ii NEW ASKING PRICE: $159 900
Call Nanc, Jenks 352 400 8072


CHOICE IN-TOWN NEIGHBORHOOD
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iJL'..7-:1:77 ASKING S78,800
Pal Davis 13521212.7280
View listings: iviwvv.c21paldavis.comin


BEAUTIFUL UPDATED HOME
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Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727
Ask lot lile #708627


2 MOBILES ON 4.8 ACRES
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I.lL: n.'41 S49,900
Call Slelan Sart al 352.2120211


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* All -.huh i,,, JEW Fi:ii:iF
* PLEA'AI JT i .O\iVE '. ,: I. I, :r,.
rL =70C.1)67 S103,000
Jeanne Or Willard Pickrel 212-3410
www.CilrusCouiinlySold.comin


WHISPERING PINES VILLA
* FULL, Fi.iFrJI H I E, l i.iiii
* F 1R 2 L ilI L ,rI.- ,.r.-- .-l L 1 1
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* :'.rl eR 1 11 .: : .. .,,ll, l U.. i "1h. 1 1 1"h LF
rL., 1L' :ii:7'iii S95.000
Jeanne Or Willard Pickrel 212-3410
www.CilrusCouiilySold.com


GOTTA SEE THIS ONE
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S375,900
C0II ,, Rw,, -, F-,il',,= 1 352563,-6S,


E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2014