Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
UF00028315:03454

Full Text

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PAGE A4


APRIL 19, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


A7 1XJJLAJ


www.chronicleonline.com 'W
L Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500 VOL. 119 ISSUE 255


Child's murder 'inconceivable'

Sheriffs office: Man admits killing baby to play video games L I TIVWILl i


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS During a news conference
Friday at the Citrus County Sheriff's Office, Lt.
Brad Smith of the Major Crimes section called
the act of killing a child and then going back
to playing video games "inconceivable."
On Thursday, Cody Eugene Wygant, 24, of
Homosassa, was arrested and charged with
third-degree murder in the death of his
1-year-old son, Daymeon Wygant.
"How can you rationalize someone stopping
what they're doing, killing their child so they
could go back to playing video games?" Smith


asked. "It's inconceivable."
Reviewing the tragic events, Smith said the
child's mother, whose name is being withheld
pending further investigation, called 911
about 8:21 a.m. Thursday, saying her child
wasn't breathing.
A copy of the 911 call revealed that the
mother sounded distraught, saying that the
boy was purple.
Paramedics and sheriff's deputies arrived
on the scene a singlewide mobile home at MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Bell Villa Mobile Home Park- and the child Lt. Brad Smith of the Citrus County Sheriff's Office
was transported to Seven Rivers Regional discusses the circumstances surrounding the death of an
infant Thursday morning in Homosassa during a news
See Page A2 conference Friday in Inverness.


New trail, bridge connect counties


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle
Kayakers paddling the Withlacoochee River make their way under the new bridge that connects Citrus and Marion counties along
what's called the Dunnellon Trail. The bridge includes several observation areas complete with seats for visitors.


Project to close the gap


Rails to Trails worker Edward Gladu, left, and Rails to Trails
director Kerry Keith, volunteers with the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, take in the scenery from the new bridge that stretches
over the Withlacoochee River.


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

INVERNESS Trail rid-
ers, volunteers and support-
ers turned out by the dozens
at the most recent county
commission meeting to sup-
port the Withlacoochee State-
Dunnellon Trail Connector
Their attendance empha-
sized how important the con-
nector is to the trail, to the
economy and to linking the
Citrus and Marion counties
together, said CountyAdmin-
istrator Brad Thorpe at the


April 8 meeting of the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC).
"I want to commend Jeff
Rogers for coming up with a
creative way to try to do this
in a two-step process,"
Thorpe said. "We'd love to
build the whole thing at
once. But, as with anything,
money is tight and we'd like
to get FDOT (Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation) to
get on board with us and help
us fund this project. So (the)
idea is to take one step at a
See Page A7


Path wil

eventually

connect with

Withlacoochee

State Trail
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
It's being called "the pretti-
est three miles of trail in the
state."
And Grant Chance agrees.
"I believe it," he said. "It's
absolutely gorgeous."
Chance owns and operates
Blue Run Bicycles in Dunnel-
lon and hears quite a bit
about the new trail and
bridge over the Withla-
coochee River connecting
Citrus and Marion counties.
"It's great for the city and
Marion County," he said.
"People who ride are taken
by it"
Chance has seen bicycling
grow during the six years he's
had the business. It's a trend
he thinks will continue and
can only be helped by the new
trail and bridge.
He said bicycling appeals
to all ages because it doesn't
beat up the body And while
the six-mile round trip is ade-
quate for some riders,
Chance is looking forward to
seeing the two counties' trails
connected.
The new stretch, known as
the Dunnellon Trail, will
eventually be connected to
the northern end of the With-
lacoochee State Trail in Cit-
rus Springs.
"It's really going to be
something in a few years," he
said, noting bicycling people
will come some distance to
ride it
In Dunnellon, the new trail
follows an old railroad grade
and a well-used footpath. It is
See Page A7


Scott's office: Ask employees for records, not us


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The ad-
ministration of Gov Rick Scott
is making a unique legal argu-
ment when it comes to handing
over public records: Get it from
the employees, not us.
As part of a bitter ongoing


legal battle, attorneys who work
for the governor late last month
declared that both current and
former employees are the "cus-
todians" of any text messages or
emails done on personal ac-
counts even if they cover state
business.
The Scott administration and


state agencies generally re-
quire that employees turn over
emails and text messages from
personal accounts if they cov-
ered state business. Past re-
quests made by media
organizations, including The
Associated Press, as well as
open-records advocates have


shown various Scott adminis-
tration employees using per-
sonal accounts to conduct state
business.
Tallahassee attorney Steven
Andrews, a persistent critic of
Scott caught up in a land dis-
pute with the state, last fall filed
a series of public-records


lawsuits maintaining that Scott
and other state officials weren't
complying with the state's Sun-
shine Laws. Florida has some
of the broadest public-records
laws in the nation.
In a court filing made in late


PageA2


Classifieds ....... C10
Comics .......... C9
Community . .C6, C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial ......... A6
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ...........C9
Obituaries ........ A5
TV Listings ....... C8


Corporate sponsors:
Withlacoochee State Trail users could soon
see sponsorship signs at trailheads./A3


Ferry captain arrested:
Vice-principal of students on doomed ferry
commits suicide./A8


Easter is for laughing:
Christians should be serious about laughing,
says Nancy Kennedy./Cl


LOW
54


Cody
Wygant
charged with
third-degree
murder in the
death of his
child.


i


I I N S I D E I


JlAr


I 7L'




A2 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


MURDER
Continued from PageAl

Center where he was pro-
nounced dead.
"Deputies secured the
scene, and my unit was
dispatched to the area
and interviews were con-
ducted and an arrest was
made later that day,"
Smith said.
Wygant was transported
to the county jail without
incident, where he is
being held without bond.
According to the arrest
report, Wygant said he
suffocated the boy, who
was crying uncontrollably
so he could continue to
play video games.
"From his statement he
made, he was frustrated
by his son's crying," Smith
said. "His intentions were
to silence the child; he
didn't say he was trying to
kill the child, but if you



RECORDS
Continued from Page Al

March, Scott's assistant
general counsel argued
the administration had
turned over thousands of
relevant records, but then
added the office "does not
have control over employ-
ees' private accounts and
devices, and therefore, it
does not search those ac-
counts and devices for
public records."
The filing then stated
that both current and for-
mer employees are "the
records custodians of
public business contained
on private accounts and
devices."
That means that in order
to obtain certain records,
the press and public would
have to ask those employ-
ees directly and then po-
tentially sue those state
workers if they do not com-
ply with the request
Barbara Petersen with
the First Amendment
Foundation said that
while it is true that the
state does not control any
personal accounts, the
state does control the em-
ployees. She said this new
legal argument from the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


put your hand over a
baby's mouth to stop its
breathing and wrap bed-
ding over its head, you'd
have to know that will kill
the child."
Wygant had not been ar-
rested previously in Cit-
rus County but he has an
extensive criminal history
in California, with crimes
ranging from trespassing
to rape, according to the
sheriff's office.
Smith said there were
five adults living in the
home, along with two chil-
dren. The other child, a 3-
month-old infant, was
placed in Department of
Children and Families
care and taken to the hos-
pital with "abuse-type" in-
juries. He also said that it
appears the deceased
child had previous in-
juries consistent with
abuse, such as a previ-
ously fractured rib.
Smith said there were
other adults at home at


the time, including the
child's mother
"I'm not going to com-
ment too much about the
mom, because this is still
an open and active inves-
tigation," he said. "She's
been cooperative to this
point."
Smith said Wygant
tested positive for drugs,
but he was coherent and
did not appear to be
under the influence at the
time of arrest.
In talking with wit-
nesses, Smith said, there
had been an awareness of
abuse, but nothing had
been reported.
"It's very frustrating,"
Smith said. "We always
encourage people to call
when they suspect abuse
so we can take care of it
before something tragic
happens."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


This is, for all practical
purposes, an insurmountable
barrier to the constitutional right
of accessess.

Barbara Petersen
First Amendment Foundation.


Scott administration could
set up lengthy obstacles
for the press and public
trying to obtain records.
She also said this would
create a new legal liability
for state employees.
"This is, for all practical
purposes, an insurmount-
able barrier to the consti-
tutional right of access,"
Petersen said.
Andrews, in his own re-
cent legal filing, went fur-
ther In an April 10
response, he called it "Or-
wellian." Andrews said
the legal argument was
absurd and would result
in members of the public
and press having to go to
employee homes and ask-
ing them for the right to
inspect their computers
and phones. He also said
the public and press
would then be required to
report to law-enforcement
any employees if they de-
stroyed the records in vio-


lation of law
In response to the filing,
Andrews has now started
filing public record re-
quests with individual
employees.
When asked about An-
drews' assertions, a
spokesman for Scott
blasted Andrews.
"It's no secret that this
case, and its multiple
companions, is simplyAn-
drews seeking out re-
venge for his personal
grudge against the Cabi-
net and state govern-
ment," said Frank Collins.
Another spokesman for
Scott maintained that the
governor's office already
"discourages" the use of
text messages by state em-
ployees because the
records are hard to cata-
log. John Tupps also
maintained that personal
email accounts are "al-
ready not allowed" to be
used for state business.


ies fClub S E |
S, i i ld DOLLARS ;',14


(\J2LU~DOLLARSi


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Applebee's of Crystal River general manager Michael Williams, center, and area
director Bart Loring, right, present Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County board president
Chad Halleen with a $1,000 check Thursday during the store's grand reopening. The
restaurant was recently remodeled, and the old, decorative items were sold, with a
portion of the profit donated to the nonprofit organization.


Restaurant supports charity


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -Ap-
plebee's Neighborhood
Bar and Grill is sporting a
brand new look but the
apple of its eye is charity.
The local eatery re-
opened Thursday after re-
ceiving a remodeling
face-lift to rejuvenate the
restaurant's feel.
But before the first en-
tree was served, a $1,000
check was handed off to
Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County's board presi-
dent Chad Halleen.
"We are so grateful for
the community's generos-
ity," Halleen said. "Re-
cently, we have had some
great events over the last


-. n.


several months with Taste
of Inverness and Steak and
Steak. Donations from
events and businesses like
this are really what keep
the clubs going."
Boys & Girls Clubs is a
national organization with
local chapters that provide
before- and after-school
enrichment activities for
youths in the community
"All of the money goes
directly to the clubs,"
Halleen said. "There are
three in Citrus County The
check will go into opera-
tions for anything from
snacks to scholarships."
As part of the remodel-
ing, Applebee's removed
the pop-culture photos
and artifacts that shel-
tered the walls.


"Recently, the store re-
modeled in three days,"
said marketing manager
Karen Fincher. "Our
guests came in and pur-
chased the artifacts on
the walls. It was really
great to see the commu-
nity receive a memora-
bilia while giving back to
a local charity"
The walls are now cov-
ered in local murals and
photographs supplied
by the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
and local photographers -
which highlight the Citrus
County community
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


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THREE LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT CITRUS COUNTY
10489 N Florida Ave., Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, FL 34434 (352) 489-2486


3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR 44), Inverness, FL 34453
7991 S Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446


(352) 341-5520
(352) 382-8282


MOSQUITOES?






Contact:
Citrus County Mosquito Control District
www.citrusmosquito.org 352-527-7478


I


LOCAL






Page A3 SATURDAY, APRIL 19,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

N. Suncoast GOP
meeting canceled
Due to Easter weekend,
the North Suncoast Repub-
lican Club will not meet
today.
The regular meeting on
the third Saturday of each
month will resume May 17
at the Sugarmill Country
Club, Homosassa.
A forum for Citrus County
Commission candidates for
District 2 will be on the
program.
On Saturday, June 21,
there will be a forum for
candidates in the District 4
county commission race.
For information, go to
www.NSRC-gop.com or call
Dr. Bruce Bryn, president,
at 352-503-7375, or Chuck
Haffenden, director, at 352-
382-2939.
Resident pre-files for
Mosquito Control
Stephen Edward Pochis
of Beverly Hills has pre-filed
to run as a candidate for
Seat 1 of the Mosquito
Control District, according
to the Citrus County Super-
visor of Elections Office.
Save Waters Week
planners to meet
The Citrus 20/20 Inc.
Save Our Waters Week
Committee will meet at
10 a.m. Monday, April 21, in
Room 219 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600
W. Sovereign Path off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to plan and coordi-
nate activities for Citrus
County's 19 annual Save
Our Waters Week, Sept. 20
to 27. All interested organi-
zations and individuals are
welcome to attend and en-
couraged to participate.
Any organization or indi-
vidual desiring more infor-
mation should call Lace
Blue-McLean at 352-201-
0149.
Humanitarians open
new clinic
The Humanitarians of
Florida opened its new
clinic Monday at 1031 Com-
merce Terrace, Lecanto.
The new clinic, at the for-
mer Serenity Day Spa, is
two-tenths of a mile east of
its previous facility.
The nonprofit humane or-
ganization, dedicated to re-
lieving animal suffering, will
host a grand opening from
1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May
3. Refreshments will be
served.
Diaper drive to
benefit food pantry
The Kiwanis Club of Ho-
mosassa Springs is urging
Citrus County residents to
donate packages of dispos-
able diapers to benefit We
Care Food Pantry in
Homosassa.
From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
today, club members will be
accepting donations of dia-
pers of all sizes, including
adult, at the Homosassa
Walmart, 6885 S. Suncoast
Blvd, Homosassa.
"This is a desperate need
in Citrus County that people
aren't aware of," said Iris
Whittaker, Kiwanis of Ho-
mosassa Springs president.
'You think about buying
food to give, but you don't
think about buying diapers."
She added diapers can-
not be purchased with food
stamps.
Also, many low-income
parents don't have their
own washers and dryer to
launder cloth diapers, and
sometimes laundromats
prohibit cloth diapers from
being washed in their
machines.
-From staff reports


So you know
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Slight drop in unemployment rate


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
State job figures released Fri-
day show Citrus County's esti-
mated unemployment rate for
March was 7.8 percent
The figure is down 0.1 percent
from February and down 0.7 per-
cent from March 2013.
According to the Florida De-
partment of Economic Opportu-
nity (DEO), the March number
represents 4,230 residents out of
work with 50,240 holding jobs.
The county's estimated total
labor force for March was 54,470,
an increase of 3,439 over the pre-


vious month.
The unemployment rate in the
Citrus-Levy-Marion region was
7.5 percent in March, down
0.1 percentage point from Febru-
ary's adjusted rate and 1 percent
lower than the same time last
year Out of a labor force of
203,364, there were 15,282 unem-
ployed, a decrease of 35 over the
month and 1,974 fewer than
March 2013.
Over the year, the Citrus County
labor force contracted by 1,560,
the number of employed has
dropped by 1,045 and the number
of jobless also fell by 515.
Hernando County has a March


unemployment rate of 8.5 percent,
the same as February, down from
9.2 percent in March 2013.
Hernando County held the
fourth-highest unemployment
rate in the state; Citrus County
was ninth, Marion County was
13th and Levy County was 20th.
Florida's unemployment for
March was 6.3 percent, up .01 per-
cent from February and down 1.4
percent from March 2013.
Rebecca Rust, DEO's chief
economist, said that over the year
63 counties had drops in unem-
ployment rates, three increased
and one remained the same. Over
the month there was a "mixed


Brought to you by...


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Withlacoochee State Trail users could soon be seeing sponsorship signs at trailheads and
access points. The Florida Park Service has contracted with a private firm to seek
corporate sponsors on seven state trails, including the Withlacoochee State Trail.

Corporate sponsors to get mentioned on state trails


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The Florida Park
Service has con-
tracted with a pri-
vate firm to seek
corporate sponsors on
major state trails, includ-
ing the Withlacoochee
State Trail.
Combined, the seven
trails Blackwater River
Heritage Trail, Tallahas-
see-St Marks Historic
Railroad State Trail, Na-
ture Coast State Trail,
Withlacoochee State Trail,
the Florida Keys Overseas
Heritage State Trail, Gen-
eral James A. Van Fleet
State Trail and the
Palatka-Lake Butler State
Trail attracted 2.74 mil-
lion visitors in 2013.
Withlacoochee, with an
estimated 275,000 annual
users, was the second-
busiest trail on the list,
after the Florida Keys
Overseas Heritage Trail.
The trails are all part of
the state park system.
The contract announced
this month is the second re-
cent attempt to attract some
commercial funding. The
concept was abandoned
last year when it failed to
attract sufficient interest.
This time, the park serv-
ice, under the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion, has an agreement
with Bike Path Country
based in Fort Myers.
"We are pleased to part-
ner with Bike Path Coun-
try on this initiative,"
Donald Forgione, director
of the Florida Park Serv-
ice, said in a news release.
"This is an opportunity for
corporate sponsors to
reach active trail users."
Bike Path Country and
the eventual sponsors will
also provide cross-
promotional activities that


Naturally, we seek
family-friendly businesses whose
logos and messages are in
harmony with the mission of the
Florida Park Service, which is to
provide resource-based recreation
while preserving, interpreting
and restoring natural and
cultural resources.
Mara Burger
spokeswoman for the Department of Environmental Protection.


could include "quick re-
sponse" or "QR"-
codes, promotional web-
site and mobile applica-
tions and promote state
trails at trade shows and
special events.
The contract is for one
year and will provide the
state with 50 percent of
gross revenue obtained
from sponsorships with a
provision for renewals.
Eighty-five percent of the
proceeds received by DEP
will go into the state park
trust fund, the source of
funding for managing and
operating state greenways,
trails and properties.
The remaining 15 per-
cent will go to the state
transportation trust fund
for traffic and bicycle
safety education.
"Right now, Bike Path
Country is working on get-
ting sponsors," said Mara
Burger, a DEP spokes-
woman. "Sponsorship
signs can be placed only at
trailheads or access points
authorized in the agree-
ment and can be no larger
than 16 square feet at trail-
heads and 4 square feet at
access points."
"DEP must approve
each sponsor," she said.


"Naturally, we seek family-
friendly businesses whose
logos and messages are in
harmony with the mission
of the Florida Park Serv-
ice, which is to provide re-
source-based recreation
while preserving, inter-
preting and restoring natu-
ral and cultural resources.
"Companies that are par-
ties to current litigation
against the Department or
the state of Florida will not
be considered."
The 46-mile Withla-
coochee State Trail from
Citrus Springs to Dade
City has seven designated
trailheads and numerous
access points.
Sherry Bechtel, who
owns Inverness Bicycle
and Fitness, was not aware
of the new program but
thought it has potential if
there were signs providing
users with information,
such as listing nearby busi-
nesses not visible from the
trail.
"I would support that,"
she said. 'A lot of people
using the trail are not fa-
miliar with the area. It
makes sense. It would ben-
efit them," she said,
adding, "It depends on
pricing."


bag" she said, with unemployment
rates falling in 38 counties, rising
in nine and unchanged in 20.
Rust said Florida's job growth
rate was the best since December
2005 and the increase of 22,900
jobs statewide over the month was
the largest in the nation.
However, Florida's double-digit
underemployment rate -
14.3 percent for 2013 remains a
problem, according to the March
2014 report by the Institute for
Economic Competitiveness at the
University of Central Florida.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


Annual


golf classic


supports


education

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA Enduring a good-
natured golf competition only promises op-
portunities for Citrus County
students.
The Citrus County Education Founda-
tion and the Citrus County School District
invite golfers of all skill levels to join them
at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, April 26, at the 16th
annual Superintendent's Golf Classic at the
Sugarmill Woods Golf Club, 1 Douglas St.,
Homosassa.
"The annual Superintendent's Golf Clas-
sic is to raise money for the Citrus County
Education Foundation," said Bruce
Sheffield, coordinator of health, physical
education and special programs for Citrus
County public schools. "It is an opportunity
to support them, as they do a lot for our stu-
dents in the form of grants and scholar-
ships. They help the district fund programs
within the district and help keep programs
going."
The CCEF is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organi-
zation that provides resources for Citrus
County schools.
"The golf classic is an opportunity to get
out and play golf with friends and win
prizes while helping a local nonprofit or-
ganization and Citrus County students,"
Sheffield said.
Approximately 150 golfers are expected
to attend the annual event. Registration is
$55 per golfer and sponsorships are
available.
Food, door prizes, hole-in-one prizes and
a 50/50 drawing are planned.
For information, call Bruce Sheffield at
352-726-1931, ext. 2239; Phil McLeod at 352-
726-2241, ext. 4517; or Dave Hamilton at
352-726-1931, ext. 2459.

* WHAT: 16th annual Superintendent's
Golf Classic.
WHEN: 8:30 a.m. shotgun start,
Saturday, April 26.
WHERE: Sugarmill Woods Golf Club,
1 Douglas St., Homosassa.
ONLINE: Visit www.citruseducation.org
or facebook.com/citruseducation.




Guided tour set of

recycling facilities

in Citrus County

Special to the Chronicle

The public is invited to join in a guided
tour of the recycling facilities in Citrus
County on Earth Day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday, April 22.
The tour will depart at 9:45 a.m. from the
southeast comer parking lot of Walmart in
Inverness, on Gulf-to-Lake Highway (area
closest to Wendy's). Climb aboard a bus
and head first to the county landfill to see
the recycling opportunities provided by the
county. Tour the landfill to learn how differ-
ent types of materials are managed and how
non-recyclable items are disposed of
The tour will continue on to Technol-
ogy Conservation Group (TCG) to see how
electronics are recycled, materials are re-
covered, and learn the potential reuses of
the recovered materials.
The next stop will be Single Stream
Processors Inc. to view the sorting process
of single-stream recyclables and to view
post-consumer products.
Registration is required. Space is lim-
ited. Call 352-201-0149 to reserve a seat.
Be sure to wear closed-toe shoes and to
bring a hat.
Not able to make the tour, but want to
learn more on recycling? Registration is
also available for future tours planned
for June 20, Sept. 26 and Nov. 14.




A4 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Expect to face highs and
lows this year. Don't be too proud or
embarrassed to ask for help. You will
advance if you attack problems with in-
tensity and determination. Strong al-
liances will provide the support
necessary for you to reach your set
destination.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your
sense of humor will help you escape
an awkward situation. You will meet
with opposition if you try to force your
opinions on others.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Keep
your composure today. Tension and
anger will escalate if you are stubborn.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) A friend
is likely to develop stronger feelings to-
ward you. Make sure your intentions
are clear, or your relationship may
have a bitter ending.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Children
should be included in your plans. Be
cautious when it comes to affairs of the
heart.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Show how
much you care by including the ones
you love in enjoyable social activities.
Helping others out will make you feel
more secure in your own environment.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Do some-
thing to enhance your looks and your
self-esteem. Your emotions will take
over if you get involved in a dispute
with someone you care about.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Entertain-
ment doesn't have to be expensive.
Getting together with friends or relatives
for a night of games or dancing is a
good way to add some spark to your life.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -As much
as you would like to help others, it's not
practical to donate money that you can
ill afford to part with.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You
have a lot of energy to burn. Do some-
thing physical and reap the health
benefits.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
may be at a crossroads in your life. By
staying in the background, you will
have the ability to listen and learn from
people who can help alter your life.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
forget to take a little personal time
today. It's great to be considerate and
caring, but you could use a little pam-
pering as well.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Avoid
arguments to reduce your frustration
level. A partner may have set priorities
that conflict with yours.


ENTERTAINMENT


Bill Clinton jokes
with Kevin Spacey at
benefit concert
NEW YORK- During the
25th Annual Rain Forest concert
at Carnegie Hall, Chairwoman
Trudie Styler introduced a man
who recently found out he was
going to be a grandfather, and
out came former President Bill
Clinton.
Clinton praised the Rain For-
est Foundation and thanked
Sting, Styler, and others for their
efforts Thursday night. Then he
acknowledged actor Kevin
Spacey for making jokes about
him earlier in the night. Spacey
imitated Clinton praising his Net-
flix series, "House of Cards."
Clinton told Spacey he always
wanted to be in his line of work.
Then he quipped to hearty
laughs, "Now, damn it, you're in
mine."
The event run by Sting and
Styler included musical guests
Paul Simon, James Taylor,
Renee Fleming and Stephen
Stills. The concert benefits the
Rain Forest Fund.
Adam Levine designs
womenswear with
help from fiancee

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. Ma-
roon 5 frontman-turned designer
Adam Levine said his lack of
fashion training is not a problem.
"I don't know how to read
music, but I can still play. So I
don't really give a (expletive)
about formal training or going to
school," said Levine in an inter-
view Thursday at an event for
his latest Kmart collection. "You
don't have to be trained in every-
thing to be good at it."
"The Voice" coach said skepti-
cism of some celebrity designers
is warranted, but insisted his col-
lection is not "your average,


Associated Press
Former President Bill Clinton and actor Kevin Spacey converse
Thursday night during the 25th Anniversary Rainforest Fund
benefit concert at Carnegie Hall in New York.


celebrity-hawked fashion line.
"I didn't want it to just be
something that I phoned in,"
Levine said. "So I was really in-
volved in the process."
The collection, which retails
for $30 or less, includes colorful,
casual printed T-shirts, mini crop
tops, twill and jean shorts and
patterned maxi dresses.
Levine's menswear line for
Kmart launched last fall.
"I kind of know what I like for
both men and women. I think
that it's a little more difficult and
challenging when you're not, it's
not something you can concep-
tualize, or it's not something you
can conceive of wearing," he
said of designing for the oppo-
site sex. "So I needed to get a lit-
tle bit of help."
Levine's Victoria's Secret
model fiancee Behati Prinsloo
lent him a hand. He looked
through Prinsloo's closet for in-
spiration and the couple collabo-
rated on a few pieces.
The clothes are "ideally what
you want to see, I guess self-
ishly, on a lady," he said.


Prince reaches
agreement with
music label
NEW YORK- Prince now
owns the rights to the music he
recorded on Warner Bros.
Records after years of disputes
and battles with the record label.
Warner Bros. announced Fri-
day that it had reached an
agreement with the pop icon.
Prince was signed to the label
from 1978 to the mid-1990s, re-
leasing key projects like "Purple
Rain, "1999" and "Around the
World in a Day."
Financial terms weren't
disclosed.
Warner Bros. also said the
55-year-old singer would release
"previously unheard material" from
his tenure on the label. A 30th-
anniversary edition of "Purple Rain"
will be released this summer.
Prince said in a statement that
he's "pleased with the results of
the negotiations." He added that
he's working on new music apart
from Warner Bros.
-From wire reports


COTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, April 19, the
109th day of 2014. There are 256
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 19,1989,47 sailors
were killed when a gun turret ex-
ploded aboard the USS Iowa in the
Caribbean. (The Navy initially sus-
pected that a dead crew member,
Clayton Hartwig, had deliberately
sparked the blast, but later said
there was no proof of that.)
On this date:
In 1775, the American Revolu-
tionary War began with the battles
of Lexington and Concord.
In 1993, the 51-day siege at the
Branch Davidian compound near
Waco, Texas, ended as fire de-
stroyed the structure after federal
agents began smashing their way
in; dozens of people, including sect
leader David Koresh, were killed.
In 1995, a truck bomb destroyed
the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Build-
ing in Oklahoma City, killing
168 people.
Ten years ago: A Russian rocket
roared into space carrying an Amer-
ican, a Russian and a Dutchman to
the international space station on
the third manned mission since the
halt of the U.S. shuttle program.
Five years ago: Author J.G. Bal-
lard, a survivor of a Japanese
prison camp who reached a wide
audience with the autobiographical
"Empire Of The Sun," died in Lon-
don at age 78.
One year ago: Newspaper pub-
lisherAl Neuharth, 89, died in Coco
Beach, Fla.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Hugh
O'Brian is 89. Actress Elinor Don-
ahue is 77Actor Tim Curry is 68.
Pop singer Mark "Flo" Volman (The
Turtles; Flo and Eddie) is 67. Ac-
tress Kate Hudson is 35.
Thought for Today: "The charm,
one might say the genius of mem-
ory, is that it is choosy, chancy and
temperamental: it rejects the edify-
ing cathedral and indelibly photo-
graphs the small boy outside,
chewing a hunk of melon in the
dust." Elizabeth Bowen, Irish-
born author (1899-1973).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L Pcast City


H L Fecast


Daytona Bch. 71
Fort Lauderdale 86
Fort Myers 80
Gainesville 72
Homestead 83
Jacksonville 71
Key West 81
Lakeland 75
Melbourne 80


74/66 0.25" |DOa/6 u.4u
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y
TODAY & MO OW MORNING
JJ 7 High. 72* Low: 54'
"-*'. "Partly cloudy, breezy and cooler. A few light
...." =showers.

E SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
:"' High:81 Low:58
.ill_ _'' Partly cloudy. Warmer afternoon.

1. MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low. 58'
" |.; Mostly sunny.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 78/67
Record /47
Normal 81/63
Mean temp. 72
Departure from mean 0
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 045
Total for the month 0.80"
Total for the year 10.70'
Normal for the year 9.38"
'As ol 7 p-m a t lwrner s
UV INDEX: 9
O-2minimal,3-41ow 5-6moaerale.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.03


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 66.c
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 84%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, bayberry, grasses
Today's count: 7.2/12
Sunday's count: 9.1
Monday's count: 8.5
AIR QUALITY
Friday observed: 25
Pollutant: Ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES 2S
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) AFTERNOON.
04/19 SATURDAY 23:28 03:30 09:28 16
04/20 SUNDAY 2328 04:27 10:27 16:58
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S$ e!f T .I.............. 7:57 p.m.
(h~i>SamU."01111h110-6 p8m
u %@ ""#81111 ------------ SaaM im ......6:58 a&m.
4 0 c MMNRIN TODAY Jo Rise
Apr22 Apr29 May 6 May 14 MQ07IAY- ................1027 a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is LOW. There Is no110 bum ban.
For mote Infonamion call Flda Divreon of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
Informnalion on drought oondcions, please vistt lhe Ovision of Forestry's Web te:
http: flarne-tfl-dol.coroIire welthef4bcd
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei an Wedneszda ar.or rSahjrLy
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro itigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegeptable garere, Iowers anid shubs, can be done on any cday anrd at any
lime.
Citrus County Utilities' astomers shoum CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Soupe re-. pLanlt i'j may quality flo awddilon 11
walering allowances.
To report violations, please call-i: C ol Invemess @ 352-726-2321, Cty Co C vstal
River 3,52 795-421. ewt 313 'un-ncor orae1 Clirus County 0 352-527-7669.


TIDES
Sof rives **At King's Bay "At Ma
SATURDAY
High Low
10:59a.m, 0.2I 11 :0ep,m. 0.7tM, :36s.m. 0.0It
9;24am, 1,7, 905p.m. 23 tt, 330 a.m. -0,0ft
6:28 am, 28 it, 5:14 p.m. 3.5 ft, 1242 a.m -0.4 t,
10:00a.m. 0.6it. 9;14p.m. 1.6ft. 5:22a.m. 0,2h


son's Creek

3:00 p.o.2 It,
3;02 p,mO.8 If,
12l3p.rmf.3t,
3:10 pm0.2 i,


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: West winds 10 to 15 knots Gulf water
then. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters choppy. Tonight: Northwest 7 0
winds 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 3
feet. Bay and inland waters a p7 2
moderate chop.
1Takin at Arip.4a

LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.06 2911 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.55 38.56 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.76 39.76 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.40 40.41 42,20
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage lor t akes are based on 2_33-year flood.
the mean-annual tni P.',h ha. M 41 [A"niT ch C a of O ino RjfuajL1 o r e.:?ede.J in
any oIne year. -I.- .1ila ar i.,' ,,'..jrnF.l[. F' orfaI1 11 W. ae. Ma r,..=a g-.,eni OLI5 .,.
and is suhjacto re ision In no vetm wa the Disri or te Uritedl Stales Geoo al Survey
W Labe W y aii *ia'qL. avl OI qu l of us Io fiids oata. If you have any quesllons you
snr.T H A ,.Tn[,N. rme H.,I..l G3Ll Li .: yl.:,, t 6 I ,7211

THE NATION




I.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
'LIl ri,: Cil
Auslin
Baibmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Bosloni
Buffalo
Burlngton, VT
Charlston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charotle
Chicago
Cincinnati
Clevelaind
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concod. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
ODalrot
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harisburg
Hartloni
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FRI
H L Pcp. H
so50 27 57
78 46 69
53 38 57
58 51 21 58
49 39 67
78 59 .07 79
51 37 66
61 42 67
61 52 .19 72
51 47 .16 76
42 31 61
60 43 54
54 31 51
71 56 .11 69
72 47 74
57 45 57
51 40 64
70 40 68
66 46 53
70 38 75
71 44 64
47 19 58
76 55 06 78
79 42 65
66 34 76
65 47 55
83 54 75
73 43 73
53 33 64
49 26 62
79 58 80
7041 68
B1 68 85
75 54 .01 77
73 61 72
74 47 73
74 55 76
44 36 51
51 26 68
62 59 .85 76
64 57 17770
69 52 75


SAT
L Fcst
31 pc
47 ts
44
50 T
37 pc
60 cd
40 pc
41 pc
52 pc
4O pc
38 s
35 pc
28 sh
54 Is
42 pc
48 r
47 pc
47 pc
35 pc
53 pc
44 s
27 Pc
60 pc
44 pc
55 pc
37 pc
56 Is
47 s
38 pc
34 s
62 Pc
46 s
64 pc
55 pc
57 pc
47 s
56 S
42 pc
48 ts
53 pc
53 pc
51 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c Qcloudy;. drdizle-
f.failr; hhzy; pc.pltdly cloudy;: rrain;
r lhVmsnew mix; s'ummy; sh,,howeig
s,-snow, tsUundenr wtoilmfy.
WSi 2014


FRI SAT
City H L Pcp. H LFcst
NewOrfeans 73 61 78 59 Pc
New York City 49 35 68 42 pc
Nodiok 51 43 57 50 r
Oklahoma City 76 42 77 58 pc
Omaha 68 29 78 53 pc
Palm Spngs 83 65 89 66 pc
PhiladelpNia 55 39 869 42 pc
Phoenix 82 71 88 65 pc
Ptlsburgh 69 41 62 38 pc
Portland, ME 42 24 56 31 pc
Porland. OR 60 39 56 43 r
Providence, lI 50 30 63 38 $
Raleigh 63 38 53 47 r
Rapid Cily 74 31 68 39 pc
Reno 73 48 73 38 pc
Rochester, NY 64 42 50 31 pc
Sacramenlo 79 57 79 50 pc
Salt Lake C4y 64 61 71 49 ts
SanAntoio 80 61 .15 81 62 cd
San Diego 68 62 65 58 cd
San Francisco 61 53 62 50 pc
Savannah 63 57 .91 70 55 ts
Sealtle 55 42 58 45 r
Spokane 53 36 11 63 35 pc
St. Louis 72 45 75 SO s
St Ste Mane 37 31 44 34 cd
Syracuse 61 34 53 29 pc
Topeka 70 31 78 57 pc
Washington 57 38 66 47 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL H1GH & LOW
NIHM 87. Immo".lee,. Fla
LOW 6, Cran Lake, Minn
WORLD cmrIS
SAT Lisbon 6653/pc
CITY HUSKY London 55139/S
AcaputCO 87/M/s Madrid 8/531is
Amsterdam 51/41pc Mexico Cily 7757/s
Athens 62d50/s Montreal 51/35/cd
Beijing 71148/od Moscow 57137/pc
Berlin 53/37/r Paris 55/41/pc
Bermuda 73/691cd Rio 80/71/pc
Cairo 93/62/s Rome 68/46/s
Calgary 35/22/sn Sydney 68/53/pc
Havana 89/68c Tokyo 60&46/s
Hong Kong 80/73/pc Toronio 51/35/r
Jerusalem 84"9s Warsaw 64150/s


LEGAL NOTICES







Meeting Notices


C16




C I T R ULIS COUNT TYL



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City


From mouths
cit
Chassahowtzka"
Crystal Rive"
Wililacoochee*
Hormosassa"'




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE STATE/LOCAL SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 AS


Missing Panhandle dog shows up after 9 years


Associated Press

CRESTVIEW -A missing dog
is back with its family nine years
after breaking out of their back
yard in Crestview
April Hight received a call
from the Panhandle Animal Wel-
fare Society called to let her
know that animal control workers
had picked up her Lhasa Apso


named Maggie on Tuesday A mi-
crochip provided contact infor-
mation for Maggie's owners.
"It's just a gift to have her
back," Hight told the Northwest
Florida Daily News. "She'll be
able to live out the rest of her
years loved and cared for and
that'll make up for the hopefully
not all horrible years she had to
live through to get back home."


Hight and her daughter Abi-
gayle, who was 4 when Maggie
ran away, picked up the almost
11-year-old dog on Wednesday
Maggie's hair was matted, but a
checkup showed no other major
issues. But Hight says Maggie is
"skin and bones."
"You try to picture what her life
might have been like," Hight said.
"It's hard to fathom or imagine."


While Maggie was quiet at first,
she recognized Hight's husband
and immediately began wagging
her tail.
The Hights are foster parents
and they've enjoyed watching
children "blossom" under their
care. She said they look forward
to the same thing with Maggie.
"You can see that little spark in
her, that little light in her," she said.


SpaceX making Easter delivery of station supplies


MARCIA DUNN
AP aerospace writer

CAPE CANAVERAL A
SpaceX supply ship rocketed to-
ward the International Space
Station on Friday, setting the
stage for an Easter morning de-
livery and urgent spacewalking
repairs later in the week.
Following its midday launch
through cloudy skies, the Dragon
cargo carrier was shown drifting
away in the blackness of space,
against the blue backdrop of
Earth.
It's transporting 2 1/2 tons of
goods, including a new spacesuit,
spacesuit replacement parts,
much-needed food, legs for
NASAs humanoid, Robonaut, a
bevy of mating flies, and germs
gathered from sports arenas and
historic sites across the U.S.
The Dragon will reach the or-
biting lab on Sunday Easter
morning. That pushes urgent
spacewalking repairs to Wednes-
day; NASA wants a bad backup
computer replaced before some-
thing else breaks.
This was the second launch at-
tempt this week for SpaceX.
NASAs commercial supplier
was foiled by a leaky rocket valve
Monday The valve was replaced,
and the company aimed for a Fri-
day liftoff despite a dismal fore-
cast Storms cleared out of Cape
Canaveral just in time.
A critical backup computer
failed outside the space station
last Friday, and NASA considered
postponing the SpaceX flight.
The primary computer is working
fine, but numerous systems
would be seriously compromised
if it broke, too. A double failure
also would hinder visits by the
Dragon and other vessels.
"It's imperative that we main-
tain" backups for these external
command-routing computer
boxes, also called multiplexer-
demultiplexers, or MDMs, said
flight director Brian Smith said
Friday "Right now, we don't have
that"


"U


'*1


Associated Press
A rocket carrying the SpaceX Dragon ship lifts off Friday
from launch complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in
Cape Canaveral. The rocket will deliver research equipment, food and
other supplies to the International Space Station.


NASA decided late this week to
use the gasket-like material al-
ready on board the space station
for the repair, instead of waiting
for the Dragon and the new,
precision-cut material that NASA
rushed on board for the com-
puter swap. Astronauts trimmed
their own thermal material Fri-
day to fit the bottom of the re-
placement computer, and
inserted a fresh circuit card.
The space station's six-man
crew watched the launch via a
live TV hookup; the outpost was


soaring 260 miles above Turkey at
the time of ignition. Video
beamed down from Dragon
showed the solar wings unfurling.
The shipment is close to five
weeks late. Initially set for mid-
March, the launch was delayed by
extra prepping, then damage to
an Air Force radar and, finally on
Monday, the rocket leak.
Earlier, as the countdown en-
tered its final few hours, NASAs
space station program manager
Mike Suffredini said an investi-
gation continues into the reason


ON THE NET
NASA: www.nasa.gov/
missionpages/station/main
/index.html
SpaceX: www.spacex.com

for last summer's spacesuit fail-
ure. The helmet worn by an Ital-
ian astronaut filled with water
from the suit's cooling system,
and he nearly drowned during a
spacewalk.
Routine U.S. spacewalks are
on hold until engineers are cer-
tain what caused the water leak.
The upcoming spacewalk by the
two Americans on board is con-
sidered an exception because of
its urgent nature; it will include
no unnecessary tasks, just the
2 1/2-hour computer swap.
NASA is paying the California-
based SpaceX Space Explo-
ration Technologies Corp. and
Virginia's Orbital Sciences Corp.
to keep the orbiting lab well
stocked. It was SpaceX's fourth
trip to the space station. Russia,
Japan and Europe also make pe-
riodic deliveries.
Unlike the other cargo carriers,
the Dragon can bring items back
for analysis.
Among the science samples
going up on the Dragon and
slated to return with it in a
month: 200 fruit flies and their
expected progeny, and germs col-
lected from stadiums and sports
arenas, as well as such notables
as America's Liberty Bell and
Sue, the T rex fossil skeleton at
Chicago's Field Museum.
Scientists will study the hearts
of the returning flies as many
as 3,000 are expected for the trip
home. The germ samples, once
back on Earth, will be compared
with duplicate cultures on the
ground.
Staying up there for as long
as the space station lives will
be new legs for NASAs hu-
manoid, Robonaut. The indoor
robot has been in orbit for three
years, but only from the waist up.


NASA's moon-orbiting robot crashes down as planned


MARCIA DUNN
AP aerospace writer

CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASAs robotic moon ex-
plorer, LADEE, is no more.
Flight controllers con-
firmed that the orbiting
spacecraft crashed into
the back side of the moon
Friday as planned, avoid-
ing the precious historic
artifacts left behind by
moonwalkers.
LADEE's annihilation
occurred just three days
after it survived a full lunar
eclipse, something it was
never designed to do.
Researchers believe
LADEE likely vaporized
when it hit because of its
extreme orbiting speed of
3,600 mph, possibly smack-
ing into a mountain or side
of a crater No debris would
have been left behind.
"It's bound to make a
dent," project scientist
Rick Elphic predicted
Thursday
By Thursday evening, the
spacecraft had been skim-
ming the lunar surface at
an incredibly low altitude
of 300 feet Its orbit had
been lowered on purpose
last week to ensure a crash
by Monday following an ex-
traordinarily successful
science mission.
LADEE short for
Lunar Atmosphere and
Dust Environment Ex-
plorer was launched in
September from Virginia.
From the outset, NASA
planned to crash the space-







b2 I I -'




I I I I
FOS3.YAS WIT


precisely where the space-
craft ended up; the data
cutoff indicates it smashed
into the far side of the
moon, although just barely
LADEE did not have
enough fuel to remain in
lunar orbit much beyond
the end of its mission. It
joined dozens if not scores
of science satellites and
Apollo program spacecraft
parts that have slammed
into the moon's surface, on
purpose, over the decades,
officials said. Until
LADEE, the most recent
man-made impacts were
the LCROSS crater-observ-
ing satellite that went down
in 2009 and the twin Grail
spacecraft in 2012.
During its $280 million
mission, LADEE identified
various components of the
thin lunar atmosphere -
neon, magnesium and tita-
nium, among others and
studied the dusty veil sur-
rounding the moon, cre-
ated by all the surface
particles kicked up by im-
pacting micrometeorites.


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craft into the back side of
the moon, far from the
Apollo artifacts from the
moonwalking days of 1969
to 1972.
Scattered over the near
side of the moon: the land-
ing portions of six lunar
modules, flags, plaques,
rovers and more, not to
mention those memorable
first footprints by Neil Arm-
strong and Buzz Aldrin.
Apollo 12 had been pro-
jected to be closest by
several hundred miles.
The last thing the
LADEE team wanted was
"to plow into any of the his-
toric sites," said project
manager Butler Hine.
LADEE completed its


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primary 100-day science
mission last month and was
on overtime. The extension
had LADEE flying during
Tuesday morning's lunar
eclipse; its instruments
were not designed to en-
dure such prolonged dark-
ness and cold.
But the small spacecraft
survived it's about the
size of a vending machine
- with just a couple pres-
sure sensors acting up.
The mood in the control
center at NASAs Ames Re-
search Center in Mountain
View, Calif., was upbeat late
Thursday afternoon, ac-
cording to Hine.
"Having flown through
the eclipse and survived,


Crmaion.


Cete

S .,o fth
.4' aur c a
35 *N 0t veu


the team is actually feeling
very good," Hine told The
Associated Press in a
phone interview
But the uncertainty of
the timing of LADEE's de-
mise had the flight con-
trollers "on edge," he said.
As it turns out, LADEE
succumbed within several
hours of Hine's comments.
NASA announced its end
early Friday morning.
It will be at least a day or
two before NASA knows


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Obituaries

Richard
Bunce, 81
LECANTO
Richard A. Bunce, 81, of
Lecanto, Fla., died
April 18, 2014. Visitation
will be from 2 to 3 p.m.
Monday, April 21, 2014,
with Funeral Chapel Serv-
ice following at Fero Fu-
neral Home.

Norman
Byrum, 60
HOMOSASSA
Norman L. Byrum, 60, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Thursday, April 17,2014, at
Hospice of Citrus County
Private arrangements are
provided by Cremation
Center of The Nature
Coast, Crystal River

Jill Short, 58
HERNANDO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Jill Denise
Short, age 58, ofHernando,
Florida, will be held 2:00
PM, Sunday, April 20,2014
at the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
Cremation will be under
the direction of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida. The family will
receive friends from
1:00 PM until the time of
service, Sunday at the
chapel. The family re-
quests expressions of sym-
pathy take the form of
memorial donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Online
condolences may be sent
to the family at www.
HooperFuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Short was born Au-
gust 11, 1955 in Miami, FL,
daughter of John and
Velma (King) Osborne. She
died April 18, 2014 in In-
verness, FL. She was a
homemaker who loved
crafts and nature; she was
an avid bird watcher
Mrs. Short was preceded
in death by her parents
and brother, Lee Osborne.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Donald E. "Shorty"
Short of Hernando, 2 sons,
Eric Short of Statesboro,
GA and Jason Short of
Gainesville, brother, Doug
Osborne of TX, 2 sisters,
Terry Holder of Inverness,
Gina Osborne of GA


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Free obituaries, run
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Non-local funeral
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352-795-2678
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Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

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Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
License ed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhiome


Associated Press
In this artist's concept provided by NASA, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust
Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft orbits the moon. Flight controllers on
Friday confirmed that the orbiting spacecraft crashed into the back side of the moon
as planned, just three days after surviving a full lunar eclipse, something it was never
designed to do.






OPage A6 SATURDAY, APRIL 19,2014



PINION


"Of all forms of tyranny the least attractive and
the most vulgar is the tyranny of mere wealth,
the tyranny ofplutocracy."
John Pierpont "J.P." Morgan, 1837-1913


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


REASONABLE OUTCOME




Duke settlement


creates budget


stability


property Appraiser Les
Cook's decision to set-
tle the Duke property
tax case ends costly litigation
and creates
budget stability T
for the county THE IS
going forward. Duke r
While some settler
have asked if
this agreement OUR OPI
was a "negoti-
ated surren- Settlement
der" to the budget stal
nation's largest coun
power com-
pany, given the facts of the
case, Cook and the company
reached a reasonable negoti-
ated settlement in a case the
county had no realistic
chance of winning.
The battle began in 2012,
when Duke claimed its Citrus
County property was over-
valued and made a "good
faith" payment of the taxes it
claimed were due, and went
to court over the remainder
This court battle continued
after the 2013 appraisal,
which was higher than that of
2012.
The major issue of con-
tention was the value of
$1.4 billion in pollution-
control equipment that had
been installed at the two
newer coal plants on the site.
Citing a 1997 local court
ruling, former property ap-
praiser GeoffGreene took the
position that the investment
was taxable at full value,
while Duke argued that state
law requires pollution con-
trol equipment to be valued
at its salvage value.
Last fall, Circuit Court
Judge Michael Johnson ruled
that pollution-control equip-
ment should be valued at its
salvage value.
This effectively undercut
the key argument from the
property appraiser's office.


Dream job?
Of all the jobs that I wish I
could have, it would
be on the BOCC be-
cause all they need to a o
do is know how to
argue and hire con-
sultants. It was bad
enough when they
were spending
$50,000 to hire
them, but now they're
spending $92,000 of CA.
taxpayer money to 563
figure out what to do 5 -0
with the landfill. What
are they getting paid for?
Dangerous roads
If the county wants to in-
crease revenue, I would suggest
some more officers on (County
Road) 491 from Beverly Hills
down to Lecanto. In Beverly
Hills, the speeds of people in a
45 mph zone is out of control at
all times. People are riding your
butt when you're going at close
to 10 miles over the limit when
you don't even want to be going
that fast. And then in Lecanto
near the high school, people are
driving at 70 mph. It's just dan-
gerous and it's a really great
way for this county to increase
their revenue. Get some officers
out there and start pulling peo-
ple over.


I


Coupled with closing the nu-
clear unit at the site, this de-
cision effectively meant the
property appraiser had no re-
alistic hope of win-
SUE: ning the litigation,
UE even though over
ate $1.4 million of tax-
ent. payer money had
been spent in the
MInIN- battle.


I 1 1 %I~ ll ll
t creates
ability for
ty.


I
)


After Greene's
death, Cook en-
tered into negotia-
tions with Duke.
As part of the set-


tlement agreement, Duke and
the county agreed to a value
at the plant lower than the
property appraiser's office
had set, but higher than Duke
had used in making "good
faith" tax payments in 2012
and 2013.
Under the settlement
agreement, Duke will pay
about $7 million more in
taxes, legal fees will end, and
the county and school system
can anticipate stable funding
going forward.
While settling the case
gives the county and school
system funding stability, it
also had an ancillary benefit
that will yield long-term ben-
efits to the county: With the
battle over tax values now
settled, the company has
committed to building a
$1.3 billion gas-fired plant in
the county This will add sub-
stantially to the taxable value
of Duke property in Citrus
County and will provide con-
tinuing tax revenues over
many years.
On balance, the settlement
agreement is in the best in-
terest of all parties. It ends a
costly legal battle and sets the
stage for a more positive and
productive relationship be-
tween the company and the
county over the long term.


Gold star for local vet
I would just like to give a
gold star to a veteri-
ND narian, a new one
Here on (State Road)
) W 44, Dr. Shawn Harris.
w I had a problem
p with an overgrown,
old lab that my son
had and passed away
and I've been taking
care of.
S The dog can't hear,
579 can't eat, can't move,
overweight. Anyway, I
just went in to talk to
a vet and I went in his office and
after he got through with his pa-
tients, he entertained my prob-
lems. And he said, "Well, bring
the dog in and we'll check it."
And I said, "I can't get him in
the car and he can't move that
good."
Anyway, he came and made a
house call and checked the dog
out here in my home. And I went
back and he set up some pre-
scriptions low-cost, to match
my budget.
Anyway, I was just so im-
pressed with him and his
capacity for the animals that I
just wanted to say he does de-
serve a gold star, plus I hope he
takes Medicare because I really
think he's a good doctor.


Poor, self-pitying Plutocrats


"Should any political party
attempt to abolish Social Secu-
rity unemployment insurance,
and eliminate labor laws and
farm programs, you would not
hear of that party again in our
political history. There is a tiny
splinter group, of course, that
believes you can do these
things. Among them are H.L.
Hunt ... a few other
Texas oil million-
aires, and an occa-
sional politician or
business man from
other areas. Their *
number is negligible
and they are stupid."
President
Dwight D. Eisen-
hower, in a 1954 G
letter to his brother Gene
Edgar OTI
VOI
ity the poor -
plutocrats, victims of the
envious mob. You can
hardly open the Wall Street
Journal these days without
reading a self-
pitying screed by some billion-
aire hungry for love.
A while back it was venture
capitalist Tom Perkins, who
equated criticism of the
wealthy with the Holocaust
"I would call attention to the
parallels of fascist Nazi Ger-
many to its war on its 'one per-
cent,' namely its Jews, to the
progressive war on the Ameri-
can one percent, namely the
'rich,"' he opined in a letter to
the newspaper
Makes sense to me. One day
they're saying Wall Street
bankers should pay the same
tax rate as the guys who rotate
their tires; next day they're
flinging them into concentra-
tion camps. Soon billionaires
will be hiding in attic pent-
houses, quietly fondling stock
certificates. Their limos will be
disguised as UPS trucks, their
yachts as humble tugboats.
In a subsequent San Fran-
cisco speaking engagement,
Perkins suggested that the
United States formally adopt a
one-dollar one-vote electoral
system. Citizens, he said, should
be like shareholders in a corpo-
ration.
"You pay a million dollars in
taxes, you get a million votes.
How's that?"
The audience laughed, but


l
HI

C


Perkins claimed to be dead se-
rious. Kleiner Perkins Caufield
& Byers, the investment firm he
co-founded, called itself
shocked, and emphasized its
disagreement.
More recently, Charles Koch,
the elder of the infamous Koch
brothers of legend and song,
contributed an op-ed to the
Journal bitterly com-
S plaining that people
targeted by TV attack
ads he's paid for are
S actually allowed to
talk back.
The brothers, you
see, are pure ideal-
ists campaigning for
liberty So when their
Lyons tea party front
yons groups oppose a pub-
IER lice transport system
DES in Nashville, work to
---- forbid Georgia Power
from investing in solar technol-
ogy, or spend big on a county
referendum on open pit mining
in Wisconsin, it has nothing
whatsoever to do with Koch In-
dustries' oil, gas and mining
profits. It's all about freedom.
And when the same organiza-
tions spend millions on TV com-
mercials featuring actresses
reading prepared scripts, pre-
tending to have been injured by
the Affordable Care Act and at-
tacking Democratic U.S. sena-
tors in Arkansas, Louisiana and
Alaska, that too is all about lib-
erty
However, wicked "collec-
tivists" who "promise heaven
but deliver hell" hell evi-
dently being reliable health in-
surance not subject to
cancellation on an employer's
whim have called the Koch
brothers out. One such is Sen-
ate majority leader Harry Reid,
who went so far as to call their
secretive methods "un-Ameri-
can."
"Instead of encouraging free
and open debate," Charles
Koch whined, collectivistss
strive to discredit and intimi-
date opponents. They engage in
character assassination. (I
should know, as the almost
daily target of their attacks.)
This is the approach that... Saul
Alinsky famously advocated in
the 20th (century), and that so
many despots have infamously
practiced. Such tactics are the
antithesis of what is required


for a free society."
"Despots," mind you. Boo-
hoo-hoo. Far from being
abashed, Sen. Reid must have
been thrilled that his taunts
lured Koch out of hiding. These
boys normally prefer to hide
the hundreds of millions they
spend purchasing U.S. Senate
seats behind benign-sounding
outfits like 'Americans for Pros-
perity"
Because who's against pros-
perity, right?
That said, I do think it's
wrong to call anybody "un-
American." To the contrary the
Koch brothers are every bit as
American as John D. Rocke-
feller H.L. Hunt or Scrooge Mc-
Duck, dabbling in his private
bullion pool. The comic-heroic
figure of the tycoon furiously
stamping his little webbed feet
because people are free to dis-
agree with him has long been a
staple of national life.
Like Charles and David
Koch, who inherited hundreds
of millions from their oilman fa-
ther a founding member of
the John Birch Society, which
famously held that President
Eisenhower was a card-
carrying member of the inter-
national Communist conspiracy
- the legacy of these charac-
ters often includes crackpot
megalomania. Hence "collec-
tivists," a polite euphemism.
Koch's Syndrome, you might
call it: combining an obsessive-
compulsive need to accumulate
money these boys are worth
$100 billion, but they're never-
theless bitter about paying
taxes along with a deep-
seated fear of being found un-
worthy Surrounded by
obsequious underlings all their
lives, they've no idea if they've
ever really deserved it.
It may also be significant that
Tom Perkins is 82, and Charles
and David Koch are 78 and 73,
respectively
Time's winged chariot draws
near, and there's no baggage
compartment.

Arkansas Times columnist
Gene Lyons is a National Mag-
azine Award winner and co-au-
thor of "The Hunting of the
President" (St Martin's Press,
2000). You can email Lyons at
eugenelyons2@yahoo. com.



AM26Af^-10S


g00S


W N that'S a runnin% Shoe, 1'm still undecided..."'


LETTERS)


Koch doesn't get it
Re: April 3 edition of the
Wall Street Journal:
I was amazed to read the
opinion written by Charles
Koch and published in the
April 3 Wall Street Journal re-
garding the criticism he re-
ceives for spending billions of
dollars to influence our
democracy
Koch stated that he is fight-
ing to restore a free society in
America and said he believes
in a free and open debate. He
just doesn't get it
I guess he feels that there is
nothing more free and open
than clobbering your foes with
hundreds of millions of dol-
lars of propaganda propa-
ganda that has been,
repeatedly and consistently,
proven untrue.
I have one message for Mr
Koch: Get up on the stage and
debate Sen. Elizabeth Warren
or Sen. Barbara Boxer and
then we can say, "Yes, that was
free and open."
Until that happens, Mr Koch,


OPINIONS INVITE
The opinions expressed ii
Chronicle editorials are th
opinions of the newspaper
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in po
cartoons, columns or lett
not necessarily represent
opinion of the editorial b
We reserve the right to ed
letters for length, libel, fa
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer
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limited to four letters per
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SEND LETTERS TO: The
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letters@chronicleonline.

you will be considered a
guy trying to buy entire e
tions. It's not your speed
we care about it's the
lions you're spending tot
and buy what real democ
won't deliver
Kathleen
Horn


to the Editor


ED Please maintain trail
Dear Mr Frank DiGiovanni:
1 I wish to thank you for initiat-
he
era's ing the annual bike ride from
Inverness to Crystal River
political I participated and enjoyed it
ters do very much. This is a great way
the
board. to showcase what we have
available in Citrus County.
dit However one item needs atten-
tion. The county trail, along
Norvell Bryant Highway, did
than not leave a good impression. It
S contained quite a bit of litter
and there was broken glass
Editor present in several areas. The
yd., 'glass is hard to see and can be
Or, fax quite hazardous.
ail to
corn. The Withlacoochee Trail is
always well-maintained. The
Srich county trail seldom receives
elec- any attention and is an embar-
h that rassment
mil- It would be nice to have the
try county trail monitored on a reg-
cracy ular basis, but especially before
any scheduled public ride.
Betsko Gerald R. Reiter
iosassa Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reader's showcase


SAMANTHA TURNER/Special the Chronicle
This photo of the blood moon eclipse was shot by local
resident Samantha Turner at about 3 a.m. Tuesday,
April 15.


BRIDGE
Continued from Page Al

accessible from Blue Run
Park (tuber exit) with
parking on Marion
County Road 484 on the
Rainbow River
In Citrus County, trail
access is on County Road
39 (West Withlacoochee
Trail), east of U.S 41.
There is paved parking.
In just over a mile from
the highway to the river,
the new trail has sweep-
ing curves, new trees and
grass.
There are also plans to
connect the Dunnellon
Trail to the Marjorie Carr
Cross Florida Greenway,
which will eventually be
paved for 11 miles east
along State Road 200.
NEW BRIDGE
The centerpiece of the
$3.2 million trail project
is a bridge over the With-
lacoochee River It was
proposed about six years
ago and was completed
last month.
While bicyclists, walk-
ers and skaters have al-
ready been enjoying the
trail, the state is planning
an official opening. Dee
Ann Miller, a DEP spokes-
woman, said the ribbon
cutting is scheduled for
May 16.
The bridge crosses the
Withlacoochee River
close to where it's joined
by the Rainbow River
The 12-foot-wide,
280-foot-long bridge has
scenic river overlooks
and benches at each end.
The three-span bridge
has aluminum fence
guard-rails and stone-
work entry pillars.
Its unpainted rusty
metal framework is a nod


to the region's railroad
heritage, which influ-
enced the bridge design.
The railroad motif was
selected from several
possible architectural
themes at a public meet-
ing in 2008.
The pavement ramps
up approaching the
bridge, and is steep
enough, especially on the
north side, to give a speed
boost to inline skaters.
But the loose, rocky
shoulders make pedes-
trian river access diffi-
cult Posted signs prohibit
fishing, jumping or diving
from the structure. The
bridge did not use the old
railroad trestle supports,
which are no longer
visible.
With a 10-ton weight ca-
pacity, the structure was
designed to be wide
enough and strong
enough to support emer-
gency vehicles with
enough river clearance
for normal boat traffic.
"They say it is a beau-
tiful run," said Sherry
Bechtel, who owns and
operates Inverness Bicy-
cle and Fitness, just off
the trail in downtown In-
verness. "It's a very ex-
citing project. I'm all for
it."
Her customers have
voiced enthusiasm about
the new trail and bridge
and they note the full
value will come once the
trails are connected.
"The (Withlacoochee)
trail is 46 miles; this just
adds more. People are
looking for a longer place
to ride," she said. "This
brings us publicity and
gives them more options
of places ride."
Contact Chronicle
reporter Pat Faherty at
352-564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. corn.


PROJECT D
Continued from Page Al th
and
time: get the alignment con-
figured, the design work
done, then hand over the
shovel-ready project to Trail
FDOT and hopefully they'll constr
fund a great majority of it" mates
County Public Works Di- fore
rector Jeff Rogers said the summer
project was submitted for that tin
inclusion in the 2015 Capi- address
tal Improvement Plan for the ali
preliminary engineering wouldI
study (PD&E), design and contain
construction. count t
Rogers recommended balance
combining the PD&E and "Tod
design and to budget all talk ab
phases in the current fis- and th
cal year
By a unanimous vote,
commissioners agreed to
submit the connector proj-
ect to the Transportation
Planning Organization
board (TPO) for approval.
Commissioners also
agreed to pay $127,800 to
Kimley-Horn & Associates
Inc. for the alignment se- 9
election and design phase
of the Withlacoochee
State-Dunnellon Trail
Connector project.


Colorado deaths stoke



worries about pot edibles


Associated Press

DENVER A college
student eats more than the
recommended dose of a
marijuana-laced cookie
and jumps to his death
from a hotel balcony A
husband with no history of
violence is accused of
shooting his wife in the
head, possibly after eating
pot-infused candy
The two recent deaths
have stoked concerns
about Colorado's recre-
ational marijuana indus-
try and the effects of the
drug, especially because
cookies, candy and other
pot edibles can be expo-
nentially more potent than
a joint.
"We're seeing hallucina-
tions, they become sick to
their stomachs, they throw
up, they become dizzy and
very anxious," said Al
Bronstein, medical direc-
tor of the Rocky Mountain
Poison and Drug Center
Studies are mixed about
whether there is any link
between marijuana and vi-
olence. Still, pot legalization
opponents said the deaths
are a sign of future dangers.
Twenty-six people have
reported poisonings from
marijuana edibles this
year, when the center
started tracking such ex-
posures. Six were children
who swallowed innocent-
looking edibles, most of
which were in plain sight
Five of those kids were
sent to emergency rooms,
and two to hospitals for in-
tensive care, Bronstein
said. Children were nau-
seous and sleepy, and doc-
tors worried about their
respiratory systems shut-
ting down.
Supporters of the pot
law and some experts
counter that alcohol
causes far more problems
among users, and the is-
sues with pot can be
largely addressed through
better regulations.
The deaths occurred
as Colorado lawmakers
scramble to create safety
regulations for the largely
unmonitored marijuana
snacks. On Thursday, the


imato said a master trail map
at he has produced with staff
public comments would return
to the BOCC in early June.


d alignments and
action cost esti-
will be brought be-
the BOCC this
er for approval. At
me, the BOCC can
s the cost of
ignments. Funding
be drawn from a
agency reserve ac-
hat has an available
e of $393,339.
ay, we're going to
out closing the gap
at is from the Gulf


Junction Trail Head at Cit-
rus Springs to the recently
completed trail head at
County Road 39 just off of
(U.S.) 41," said Commis-
sioner Dennis Damato.
Damato, who showed
slide photographs of his
recent trip to that part of
the trail, described the
next moves as necessary to
connect the two trails.
"This project is in place
and our trail ends right
now up in Citrus Springs.


A'
* ..
~; ~


Associated Press
Edible marijuana products are on display Friday at a medical marijuana dispensary in
Denver. Many of the items are far more potent than a single marijuana joint. Two
recent deaths have raised concerns about Colorado's recreational marijuana industry
and the effects of the drug, especially because cookies, candy and other pot edibles
can be exponentially more potent than a smoked joint.


Legislature advanced a
package of bills that would
lower the amount of THC
that could be permitted in
a serving of food and re-
quire more extensive
warning labels.
"It really is time for reg-
ulators, and the industry,
to look at how do we move
forward more responsibly
with edible products," said
Brian Vicente, who helped
lead the state's legaliza-
tion campaign.
An autopsy report listed
marijuana intoxication as a
significant contributing fac-
tor in the death of 19-year-
old Levy Thamba Pongi.
Authorities said Pongi,
who traveled from
Wyoming to Denver with
friends to try marijuana, ate
six times more than the
amount recommended by a
seller In the moments be-
fore his death, he spoke er-
ratically and threw things
around his hotel room.
Toxicologists later found
that the cookie Pongi ate
contained as much THC -
marijuana's intoxicating
chemical as six high-
quality joints.
Less is known about
Richard Kirk, 47, who was
charged in Denver with
shooting his 44-year-old


That's what's called the
gap," Damato said. "The
whole idea behind this
was to close the gap be-
tween those two."
Damato said a master
trail map that he has pro-
duced with staff and pub-
lic comments would return
to the BOCC in early June.
He said he thought the
map would precede the
connector plan.
"I'm tickled to death be-
cause I didn't think we'd get
to today before we got the
trail map done," Damato


wife to death while she was
on the phone with a 911 dis-
patcher Police said his wife
reported that her husband
had consumed marijuana-
laced candy but no infor-
mation has been released
about potency
The public defender's
office has declined com-
ment on the allegations
against Kirk.
"Sadly, we're going to
start to understand over
time all of the damage and
all of the problems associ-
ated with marijuana," said
Thornton police Sgt. Jim
Gerhardt, speaking in his
capacity as a board mem-
ber of the Colorado Drug
Investigators Association.
"It's going to dispel the
myth that there's no down-
side, that there's no side
effect to this drug. It's sad
that people are going to
have to be convinced with
the blood of Coloradans."
State lawmakers last
year required edible pot to
be sold in "serving sizes"
of 10 milligrams of THC.
Lawmakers also charged
marijuana regulators with
setting potency-testing
guidelines to ensure con-
sumers know how much
pot they're eating. The
guidelines are slated to be


said. Three potential con-
nectors have been mapped.
Damato said he supported
Plan B, a route from Gulf
Junction Trailhead using
West Delmane Drive.
"The beauty part of Plan
B is that road lines up pretty
much with County Road
39," Damato said. "To me,
that was vitally important to
view that, because I just
wanted to report to you that
the state is going to have to
be mightily involved with
this because we're going to
have pedestrians crossing


unveiled next month.
For now, the industry is
trying to educate con-
sumers about the strength
of pot-infused foods and
warning them to wait up to
an hour to feel any effects
before eating more. Still,
complaints from visitors
and first-time users have
been rampant.
"One of the problems is
people become very impa-
tient," Bronstein said.
"They eat a brownie or a
chocolate chip cookie and
they get no effect, so then
they stack the doses, and
all the sudden, they get an
extreme effect that they
weren't expecting."
Last year, the poison cen-
ter run by Bronstein re-
ceived 126 calls concerning
adverse reactions to mari-
juana. So far this year -
after pot sales became legal
on Jan. 1 the center has
gotten 65 calls. Bronstein at-
tributed the spike to the
higher concentrations of
THC in marijuana that has
become available.
Although millions of
Americans have used pot
without becoming violent,
Bronstein said such behav-
ior is possible depending
on the type of hallucina-
tions a user experiences.


U.S. 41. In my opinion, the
best route would be Del-
mane. It would be the least
expensive, although there is
an economic component to
going north and going by the
Front Porch (restaurant). I
think it's much more dan-
gerous to make the crossing
on a tangent. There's an-
other way to reach those
businesses with a short jog
off the existing trail into the
back door of those proper-
ties. I'm just tickled to death
if this gap is happening so
fast"


--mWAW


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NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Introducing dad


Associated Press
Six-week old Ewan
Bingham looks at his
father, Lt. Chris Bingham,
of Cranford, N.J., after
Chris disembarked Friday
from the nuclear aircraft
carrier Harry S. Truman at
Naval Station Norfolk in
Norfolk, Va. There were
171 babies born to
sailors aboard the ship
during the nine-month
deployment, according to
the Navy.

Barack Obama
heading to Pacific
WASHINGTON -The
White House is focusing
President Barack Obama's
upcoming Asia-Pacific trip
on the economic benefits of
closer ties to the region, but
regional security concerns
are likely to be pushed
higher on the president's
agenda because of the
tense situation between
Russia and Ukraine.
Japan and South Korea,
two of the four countries
Obama will visit next week,
are eyeing the fluid devel-
opments in Eastern Europe
through the lens of their
own sea and air disputes
with China, and North Ko-
rean provocations.
Cleric identified


in terrorism case
NEW YORK -A Seattle
man told a jury Friday that
an Egyptian cleric on trial
on terrorism charges is the
"very angry" imam he met in
London years ago.
David Smith, the second
witness in a Manhattan trial
expected to last a month,
identified Mustafa Kamel
Mustafa as he testified for
the government about an
effort to open an al-Qaida
training camp in Oregon
and about his visit to Lon-
don's Finsbury Park
Mosque.
Mustafa, 55, is charged
with conspiring to support
al-Qaida before and after
the Sept. 11 attacks.
Mustafa has pleaded not
guilty and plans to testify.
Supporters rally for
would-be prisoner
ST. LOUIS -A Missouri
man who avoided prison
because of a clerical error
and led a law-abiding life for
13 years said he is over-
whelmed by the support
he's received since the
story of his incarceration
became public.
An online petition urging
his release has collected
nearly 30,000 signatures,
and one of Anderson's at-
torneys said Friday that the
office has been flooded with
calls from people who feel
he has been wronged.
Movement raises
alarm in slide area
CHEYENNE, Wyo.--A
slow-moving landslide in
the Wyoming resort town of
Jackson has suddenly sped
up, buckling a road and a
Walgreens parking lot and
threatening to destroy sev-
eral unoccupied homes and
businesses.
A geologist said Friday
it's unlikely the 100-foot-
high hillside will collapse all
at once but could start
falling in large pieces.
Jackson officials have
stopped trying to stabilize
the hill for safety reasons.
The movement has sped
up from an inch a day to a
foot a day. New movement
overnight bulged a road
and parking lot. Rocks and
dirt are crumbling off the hill
and the shifting earth has
pushed a small utilities
building 15 feet.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Avalanche sweeps Everest


At least 12 guides killed


Associated Press

KATMANDU, Nepal -
An avalanche swept down
a climbing route on Mount
Everest early Friday,
killing at least 12 Nepalese
guides and leaving four
missing in the deadliest
disaster on the world's
highest peak. Several
more were injured.
The Sherpa guides had
gone to fix ropes for other
climbers when the ava-
lanche struck an area
known as the "popcorn
field" for its bulging
chunks of ice at about
6:30 a.m., Nepal Tourism
Ministry official Krishna
Lamsal said from the base
camp, where he was moni-


touring rescue efforts.
An injured survivor told
his relatives the path up
the mountain was unstable
just before the avalanche
struck at an elevation just
below 21,000 feet
As soon as the avalanche
hit, rescuers, guides and
climbers rushed to help.
Rescue workers pulled
out 12 bodies from under
mounds of snow and ice
and were searching for the
four missing guides, Lam-
sal said. Officials had ear-
lier said three were
missing.
Four survivors were in-
jured badly enough to re-
quire airlifting to a
hospital in Katmandu. One
arrived during the day, and


three taken to the foothill
town of Lukia could be
evacuated Saturday Oth-
ers with less serious in-
juries were being treated
at base camp.
The avalanche struck
ahead of the peak climb-
ing season, when hun-
dreds of climbers, guides
and support crews were at
Everest's base camp
preparing to climb to the
summit when weather
conditions are at their
most favorable early next
month. They had been set-
ting up camps at higher al-
titudes, and guides were
fixing routes and ropes on
the slopes above.
The wall of snow and
ice hit just below Camp 2,
which sits at an elevation
of 21,000 feet on the
29,036-foot mountain,


said Ang Tshering of the
Nepal Mountaineering
Association.
One injured guide,
Dawa Tashi, lay in the in-
tensive care unit at
Grande Hospital in the
capital late Friday after
being evacuated from the
mountain. Doctors said
he suffered several bro-
ken ribs and would be in
the hospital for a few
days.
Tashi told his visiting
relatives that the Sherpa
guides woke up early and
were on their way to fix
ropes to the higher camps
but were delayed because
of the unsteady path. Sud-
denly the avalanche fell on
the group and buried
many of them, according to
Tashi's sister-in-law Dawa
Yanju.


Ferry captain arrested


Associated Press
South Korean navy personnel try to install buoys Friday to mark the sunken passenger ship Sewol in the
water off the southern coast near Jindo, South Korea. Rescuers scrambled to find hundreds of ferry
passengers still missing Friday and feared dead, as fresh questions emerged about whether quicker
action by the captain of the doomed ship could have saved lives.

Vice-principal ofstudents on doomed boat commits suicide


Associated Press

MOKPO, South Korea The
captain of a sunken South Ko-
rean ferry was arrested Saturday
on suspicion of negligence and
abandoning people in need, as
investigators looked into
whether his evacuation order
came too late to save lives. Two
crew members were also ar-
rested, a prosecutor said.
The disaster three days ago
left more than 270 people miss-
ing and at least 29 people dead.
As the last bit of the sunken
ferry's hull slipped Friday be-
neath the murky water off south-
ern South Korea, there was a new
victim: a vice principal of the
high school whose students were
among the passengers was found
hanged, an apparent suicide.
The Sewol had left the north-
western port of Incheon on Tues-
day on an overnight journey to
the holiday island of Jeju in the
south with 476 people aboard, in-
cluding 323 students from Dan-
won High School in Ansan. It
capsized within hours of the
crew making a distress call to the
shore a little before 9 a.m.
Wednesday
Rescuers set two giant beige
buoys to mark the area Friday
Navy divers attached underwater
air bags to the 6,852-ton ferry to
prevent it from sinking deeper,
the Defense Ministry said.
The coast guard said divers
began pumping air into the ship
to try to sustain any survivors.
Strong currents and rain made


Associated Press
South Korean Buddhists monks pray Friday for passengers of the
sunken ferry Sewol in Busan, south of Seoul, South Korea.


it difficult to get inside the ferry
Divers worked in shifts to try to
get into the vessel, where most of
the passengers were believed to
have been trapped when it sank,
coast guard spokesman Kim Jae-
in said.
Investigators said the accident
came at a point where the ship
had to make a turn, and prosecu-
tor Park Jae-eok said investiga-
tors were looking at whether the
third mate ordered a turn that
was so sharp that it caused the
vessel to list
The sharp turn came between
8:48 a.m. and 8:49 a.m., but it's not
known whether it was done vol-
untarily or because of some ex-
ternal factor, said Nam Jae-heon,
a spokesman for the Maritime


Ministry
Another angle being probed is
the role of the captain, 68-year-
old Lee Joon-seok.
Senior prosecutor Yang Jung-
jin said Lee was detained early
Saturday, along with the two crew
members. Lee faces five charges,
including negligence of duty and
violation of maritime law, accord-
ing to the Yonhap news agency
Yang said earlier that Lee was
not on the bridge when the ferry
was passing through an area with
many islands clustered closely
together, something he said is re-
quired by law so the captain can
help a mate make a turn. The
captain also abandoned people
in need of help and rescue, he
said.


Diplomacy doesn't move insurgents in Ukraine


Associated Press


DONETSK, Ukraine -
Pro-Russian insurgents
defiantly refused Friday to
surrender their weapons
or give up government
buildings in eastern
Ukraine, despite a diplo-
matic accord reached in
Geneva and overtures from
the government in Kiev
Denis Pushilin of the self-
appointed Donetsk Peo-
ple's Republic told
reporters the insurgents in
more than 10 cities do not
recognize Ukraine's interim


government as legitimate
and will not leave the build-
ings until the government
resigns. He demanded that
Ukrainian leaders abandon
their own public buildings.
Talks between Ukraine,
Russia, the United States
and the European Union
produced an agreement
Thursday in Geneva to
take tentative steps toward
calming tensions in
Ukraine. The country's
former leader fled to Rus-
sia in February and Russia
annexed Crimea in March.
The Geneva agreement


calls for disarming all
paramilitary groups and
immediately returning all
government buildings
seized across the country
Pushilin, speaking at the
insurgent-occupied re-
gional headquarters in the
eastern city of Donetsk,
said the agreement was
"reasonable" but insisted
"everyone should vacate
the buildings," including
Arseniy Yatsenyuk and
Oleksandr Turchynov, the
acting Ukrainian prime
minister and president.
Ukraine has scheduled


a presidential election for
May 25, but Pushilin reit-
erated a call to hold a ref-
erendum on self-
determination for the
Donetsk region by May 11.
The same kind of referen-
dum in Crimea led to its
annexation by Russia.
Ukraine has faced
months of turmoil, first in
Kiev by protesters angry
that former President Vik-
tor Yanukovych wanted
closer ties with Russia in-
stead of Europe, then in
eastern Ukraine by pro-
Russian supporters.


World BRIEFS

Keeping watch


Associated Press
A fuel-boom operator of a
U.S. KC 135 tank aircraft
looks out of his cabin
Friday as he refuels a
NATO E-3A Component
AWACS aircraft during
their patrol over Romania
and Poland. NATO per-
forms daily surveillance
flights over Poland and
Romania, part of efforts
to monitor airspace along
the border with Ukraine.

Quake shakes
Mexican capital
ACAPULCO, Mexico-
A powerful magnitude-7.2
earthquake shook central
and southern Mexico on
Friday, sending panicked
people into the streets.
Some walls cracked and
fell, but there were no re-
ports of major damage or
casualties.
The U.S. Geological Sur-
vey said the quake at about
9:30 a.m. was centered on a
long-dormant fault line north-
west of the Pacific resort of
Acapulco, where many Mex-
icans are vacationing for the
Easter holiday.
Abducted girls
escape extremists
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria-
A Nigerian education official
said 24 more schoolgirls
abducted by Islamic ex-
tremists have escaped.
That means 44 are free and
85 are still missing.
At least 129 female stu-
dents were kidnapped from
a high school in the ex-
treme northeast of Nigeria
before dawn Tuesday.
Those who managed to
escape their captors had
been found wandering in a
forest near their school.
UN: 58 killed in
S. Sudan attack
UNITED NATIONS--An
attack on a U.N. peace-
keeping base in South
Sudan where some 5,000
members of an ethnic mi-
nority had sought shelter
killed 58 people and injured
about 100 others, a U.N. of-
ficial said Friday.
An angry mob of youths
attacked the U.N. peace-
keeping mission's camp in
Bor in Jonglei state on
Thursday where ethnic
Nuers fled after fighting
broke out in the country in
mid-December.
The U.N. official, speak-
ing on condition of
anonymity ahead of a formal
announcement, said most of
the 58 people killed were
Nuer but there were also ca-
sualties on the other side.
Cairo explosion
kills officer
CAIRO -An explosion
rocked a busy square in
central Cairo late Friday,
killing one police officer and
causing panic, Egypt's Inte-
rior Ministry and security of-
ficials said.
The ministry said the
bomb detonated next to a
traffic post in Lebanon
Square in Cairo's Mohan-
dessin district, killing Maj.
Mohammed Gamal Eddin.
A security official said the
bomb was planted inside
the traffic post and it ex-
ploded around 10 p.m.
Cairo time. A second official,
however, said unidentified
assailants hurled the bomb
from a bridge over the traffic
post before fleeing. It was
not immediately possible to
reconcile the two accounts.
Three other people were
injured including a senior
police officer, the two offi-
cials said, speaking on con-
dition of anonymity because
they were not authorized to
speak to the press.
-From wire reports









SPORTS


* Crystal
River
claims
county
flag
football
title.
/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Golf/B2
0 NHL playoffs/B2
0 Tennis/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 NBA/B5
0 High school sports/B6


Loney has 4 RBIs, Rays beat Yankees 11-5


Tampa Baypours

it on late against

AL East rivals

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG- James Loney
drove in four runs and the Tampa Bay
Rays overcame a four-run deficit to beat
the New York Yankees 11-5 on Friday
night.
Pinch-hitter Desmond Jennings had
an RBI single before Loney's two-run
single off Adam Warren (0-1) in the sev-
enth inning that gave Tampa Bay a 6-5
lead.
Sean Rodriguez hit a two-run homer
during a five-run eighth that made it
11-5. Wil Myers, who finished with three


Friday's MLB action
See Page B4 for the rest of Friday night's re-
sults and standings in Major League Baseball.

RBIs, added a two-run single.
Yankees reliever Cesar Cabral was
thrown out of the game by plate umpire
Joe West after hitting his third batter,
Logan Forsythe, in the eighth after
Myers' hit. The left-hander earlier
plunked Evan Longoria and Loney
Longoria reached base in all five plate
appearances. He had three hits, a walk
and was hit near the left knee by Cabral's
pitch.
Tampa Bay's Ben Zobrist beats the
throw to New York third baseman Scott
Sizemore during the seventh inning
Friday in St. Petersburg.
Associated Press


'All about the game'


CR's Pattison

enjoys working

on his craft
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
As the team's leadoff hitter
and shortstop, Zac Pattison's
play is a good barometer for
gauging the prospects of the
Crystal River baseball team.
In the club's first three dis-
trict losses, Pattison's bat strug-
gled to find the gaps, going 0 for
8 without a run. In the three
district contests since, which
saw the Pirates pull them-
selves from the cellar to the
second seed, after a tiebreaker
with Lecanto, the sophomore is
6 for 11 with four runs scored.
In the recent memorial Bat
Game win over Lecanto, with
the teams tied 2-2 in the eighth
inning with nobody on and one
out, Pattison ran out an infield
grounder for a hit, before scor-
ing the go-ahead run on a Jor-
dan Humphreys single.
"It was an exciting eighth in-
ning a lot of pressure," said
Pattison, who had a double
earlier in the game, CRHS'
first Bat Game win in five
years. "We just could never
catch a break out there against
(Panthers pitcher) Levi
(O'Steen). We could never seem
to knock him off the mound."
Pattison is used to pressure,
as he had to overcome the but-
terflies associated with being a
freshman starter last season. It
was obvious he was an up-and-
comer in the county, but he
took next-level strides this sea-
son, finishing the season lead-
ing the Pirates in hits (28),
doubles (6) and batting average
(.406), while his .506 on-base
percentage is tied for a team-
high with senior catcher
Mason Pateracki, according to
the team's stats listed online at
MaxPreps.
Pattison says everything re-
ally began to click for him last
summer, while playing in the
Gatorball training program in
Gainesville.
"My hitting fell into place a
lot," said Pattison, who plays
alongside Humphreys in the


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River sophomore shortstop Zac Pattison waits for the throw on a stolen base attempt
during the annual Bat Game against Lecanto on April 11 at Lecanto High School.


travel ball program, as well as
Citrus players Austin and Cody
Bogart and Wesley Bradshaw
"I fixed my swing made a


few tweaks -and caught up to sive at the plate, rarely laying
varsity pitching." down bunts. He's at the field
Pattison carries a small,
speedy frame, but stays aggres- See Page B3


Citrus County
baseball stats
Offensive Leaders
Batting Average (mini-
mum 70 PA)
Adam Gage, SR, .590;
Cory Weiand, SR, .517;
Parker Pillsbury, SR, .460;
Jacob Schenck, Lee, .431;
Zach Pattison, CR, .406;
Jordan Humphreys, CR,
.403; Mason Pateracki,
CR,.391; Coy Phillips, SR,
.382; Cody Bogart, Cit,
.338; Ben Wright, Cit, .338;
Austin Bogart,Cit, .333;
Derrick Rogers, CR, .296.
On-base percentage
Gage.681; Weiand
.640; P. Pillsbury .605;
Phillips .562; A. Bogart
.551; Pateracki .506; Patti-
son .506; Humphreys
.493; Tyler Pillsbury, SR,
.471; Derrick Rogers, CR,
.457; C. Bogart .430;
Schenck .429; Chad Daw-
son, Cit, .426; Carson
Pillsbury, SR, .412; Caleb
Southey, Lee, .400.
Home runs
Gage 5; Humphreys 4;
P. Pillsbury 4; A. Bogart 2;
Cy Yates, Cit, 1; T. Pills-
bury 1.
Doubles
Gage 17; A. Bogart 9; P.
Pillsbury 9; C. Bogart 8; T.
Pillsbury 8; Levi O'Steen,
Lee, 6; Pattison 6; Weiand
6; Wright 6; Alex Del-
gado,Lec, 5; Humphreys
5; Caleb Southey, Lee, 4;
Tyler Voland, CR, 4; Daw-
son 3; Pateracki 3.
Steals
P. Pillsbury 26; A. Bog-
art 18; Southey 17;
Weiand 14; Gage 8; Atkin-
son 5; Garrett Griggs, SR,
5; Allen Rivers, SR, 5.
Pitching Leaders
ERA(minimum 15
innings)
A. Bogart 0.88 (16);
Atkinson 1.17 (42); P. Pills-
bury 1.29 (32.7); Gage
1.38 (25.3);Weiand 1.38
(30.3); Rogers 1.42 (24.7);
Phillips 1.81 (27);
Humphreys 2.60 (29.7);
Chad Dawson, Cit, 2.68
(34); Pateracki 3.00 (14);
Kameron Pennington, CR,
3.06 (34.1); Ben Wright
3.90 (32.3).
Strikeouts
Weiand65; P. Pillsbury
54; Gage 42; Atkinson 35;
Pennington 30; Phillips 29;
A. Bogart 28; Humphreys
27; Wright 25; Rogers 24;
Dawson 21; Pateracki 20;
Voland 13.
-Compiled by Sean Arnold


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Larrazabal jumps into water to escape hornets


RBC Heritage

suspended by

heavy rain

Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR,
Malaysia Pablo Larraz-
abal couldn't believe what
was coming his way He
was playing in the second
round of the Malaysian
Open on Friday when a
swarm of hornets "three
times the size of bees"
began an assault.
"They were huge and
like 30 or 40 of them
started to attack me big-
time," he said. "I didn't
know what to do. My cad-
die told me to run, so I
start running like a crazy
guy But the hornets were
still there, so the other
players told me to jump in
the lake."
Lee Westwood shot a
6-under 66 for a four-
stroke lead, but this day
was all about Larrazabal.
The 30-year-old
Spaniard has been playing
pro golf for 10 years. In
January, he defeated Phil
Mickelson and Rory McIl-
roy to capture the Abu
Dhabi Championship. He
knows of hazards on the
course. This, however, had
nothing to do with bunkers
or sand traps.
"I ran to the lake, threw
my scorecard down, took
off my shoes and jumped
in the water," he said. "It
was the scariest moment of
my career, for sure. I've
never been so scared."
The aerial attack came
on the 14th hole, the fifth
of his round. Larrazabal


Associated Press
Pablo Larrazabal, left, is pulled out of a lake Friday after being attacked by a swarm of hornets during the second
round of the Malaysian Open at Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.


ran for safety, tossing his
hat and shirt before being
pulled from the lake. He
was left with multiple
stings and needed med-
ical treatment, including
injections.
Remarkably, Larrazabal
birdied the 14th hole en
route to a 2-under 68 at
Kuala Lumpur Country
Club in the European and
Asian Tour event.
Larrazabal, who opened
with a 74, knows he'll have
to confront the 14th hole
again.


"Tomorrow it will be
very, very scary to play that
hole," Larrazabal said.
Westwood, once ranked
No. 1, was an afterthought
in the hornets' buzz as he
pursues his first title in
two years. He was at 131
with two rounds to go. The
Englishman had eight
birdies, his only error a
double bogey when he hit
into water guarding the
green at the par-3 llth
hole.
"I got a little unlucky at
11," said Westwood, who


was seventh at the Mas-
ters. "It was one of the best
shots I hit all day, and the
wind just gusted on me
and it came up short in the
water But I rallied after
that."
Antonio Lascuna of the
Philippines carded a 65 to
hold the lead at 9 under
before being overtaken by
Westwood. Lascuna has
won twice on the Asian
Tour, and he shares second
with Nicolas Colsaerts of
Belgium.
Defending champion Ki-


radech Aphibarnrat of
Thailand was tied with
Larrazabal after a pair of
71s.
K.J. Choi leads
rain-delayed
RBC Heritage
HILTON HEAD ISLAND,
S.C. The second round of
the RBC Heritage was cut
short because of rain, with
K.J. Choi shooting a 4-under
67 for a one-stroke lead over
Robert Allenby.
Allenby was among 65


players left on the course
when the storm hit Harbour
Town Golf Links. Officials de-
layed the round shortly before
3 p.m. and then suspended it
until this morning after waiting
through about 90 minutes of
steady, heavy rain.
Choi is at 5-under 137 after
two rounds.
Former world No. 1 Luke
Donald led a group of five at 3
under. Donald shot 69 and
joined Billy Hurley III (69) and
first-round tri-leader Scott
Langley (73) in the clubhouse
two shots behind Choi. Bo
Van Pelt and Ben Martin were
also at 3 under early in their
rounds.
Jimenez shoots 65
to lead Greater
Gwinnett field
DULUTH, Ga. Miguel
Angel Jimenez made a dra-
matic Champions Tour debut,
setting a tournament record
with a first-round 65 in the
soggy Greater Gwinnett
Championship.
Jimenez, coming off a
fourth-place finish in the Mas-
ters, overcame constant rain
and chilly temperatures at TPC
Sugarloaf. He shot a 6-under
30 on his first nine holes, in-
cluding an eagle on No. 18.
He reached 7 under with a
birdie on No. 2 and closed with
seven straight pars.
Defending champion Bern-
hard Langer, Steve Pate and
Kenny Perry each shot a 68.
Fred Couples shot a 69, in-
cluding a double bogey on
No. 9, his finishing hole. Jeff
Sluman also shot a 69.
Though light rain began
soon after the round began
and became more intense in
the afternoon, there was no
delay.


In a deep hole Nadal loses in
lI C_1 _


Canadiens beat

Lightning in Tampa

again for 2-0 lead

Associated Press

TAMPA Rene Bourque had two
goals and David Desharnais and
Brendan Gallagher also scored Fri-
day night, helping the Montreal
Canadiens beat the Tampa Bay Light-
ning 4-1 in Game 2 of their Eastern
Conference quarterfinal series.
Carey Price stopped 26 shots for
Montreal, redeeming himself follow-
ing a less than stellar performance
during a 5-4 overtime win in Game 1.
A second road victory in three
nights sends the Canadiens home
with a 2-0 lead in the best-of-seven se-
ries. Game 3 is Sunday
Bourque and Desharnais scored in
the second period after defensive
breakdowns left Tampa Bay goal-
tender Anders Lindback in tough sit-
uations. Gallagher made it 3-0 with an
unassisted goal in the third period.
Bourque added his second goal at
14:39 of the third, rebounding his own
shot before skating around the back
of the net to beat backup goalie Kris-
ters Gudlevskis.
Price lost his bid for a shutout
when Teddy Purcell scored for
Tampa Bay with less than two min-
utes remaining.
The Canadiens went 0 for 23 on the
power play over their last eight
games of the regular season and were
0 for 17 in five meetings with the
Lightning before finally breaking
through when Desharnais slipped
the puck past Lindback for his first
career playoffgoal and a 1-0 lead.
PK Subban assisted on the goal,
and then got another assist when
Bourque took a pass from Thomas
Vanek, split two defenders and
skated in alone on Lindback to make
it 2-0 at 10:35 of the second.
Lindback, filling in for the injured
Ben Bishop, was lifted after Gal-
lagher scored from the right circle at
11:46 of the third. Less than three
minutes later, Montreal eliminated
any prospect for a Lightning come-
back when Bourque got his fifth ca-
reer playoffgoal in 12 games.
The Canadiens outshot the Light-
ning 44-25 in Game 1 and recovered
after Price failed to protect a pair of
third-period leads, taking the opener
on Dale Weise's first career playoff
goal.
Red Wings 1, Bruins 0
BOSTON Pavel Datsyuk scored at
16:59 of the third period, moments after
Jimmy Howard's best save of the
game, and the Detroit Red Wings beat
the top-seeded Boston Bruins 1-0 in the
opener of their Eastern Conference
playoff series.
The Bruins won the Presidents' Tro-


Associated Press

PARIS Rafael Nadal's
mastery of the Monte Carlo
clay courts seems to be over
The top-ranked Spaniard
hopes his confidence isn't
gone, too.
Nadal lost to fellow
Spaniard David Ferrer 7-6
(1), 6-4 in the quarterfinals of
the Monte Carlo Masters on
Friday, his earliest exit since
2003 at a tournament that
helped build his reputation
as perhaps the greatest clay-
court player of all time.
Nadal won eight consecu-
tive titles here from 2005-12,
before losing to Novak
Djokovic in last year's final.
This was Nadal's first loss
on clay to Ferrer since 2004,
and the 13-time Grand Slam
champion said he is still try-
ing to find his best form after
a disappointing loss to
Stanislas Wawrinka in the
Australian Open final.
'After what happened in
Australia, (it) was little bit
harder for me to find again
the intensity, the confidence,
the inside power that always
I have," Nadal said. "Even if
I won Rio, I played the final
in Miami, you know, (this) re-
mains something in my


mind and in my game."
Djokovic looked like he
might follow him out, but the
Serb finally got the better of
the unseeded Guillermo
Garcia-Lopez of Spain 4-6,
6-3, 6-1 to set up a 34th ca-
reer meeting against 17-time
Grand Slam champion
Roger Federer
Federer leads Djokovic
17-16 in head-to-heads and
they are 1-1 this year, with
Federer beating him in the
Dubai Championship semi-
finals and Djokovic winning
their final at Indian Wells.
A day after becoming the
llth man in the Open era to
reach 300 wins on clay,
Nadal was broken four
times in the face of Ferrer's
relentless attack
The sixth-seeded Ferrer
next faces the third-seeded
Wawrinka, who reached his
first semifinal since the Aus-
tralian Open by beating
eighth-seeded Milos Raonic
of Canada 7-6 (5), 6-2. Fourth-
seeded Roger Federer also
reached the last four in an
error-strewn 2-6, 7-6 (6), 6-1
win against No. 9Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga of France, where he
was two points from defeat
at 0-30 serving at 6-5 down in
the second set


Associated Press
Tampa Bay defenseman Eric Brewer, right, checks Montreal left wing Max
Pacioretty into the boards Friday during the first period of Game 2 of a first-
round NHL playoff series in Tampa.


phy for the best record in the regular
season but were locked in a tight game
in which neither team had many solid
scoring opportunities.
The winning goal came when Dat-
syuk carried the puck from the right side
to the left in Boston's zone and put a
30-footer from near the left circle past
goalie Tuukka Rask's left glove.
Late Thursday

Blues 4,
Blackhawks 3,3 OT
ST. LOUIS -Alexander Steen
scored at 26 seconds of the third over-
time to give the St. Louis Blues a 4-3
victory over the defending Stanley Cup
champion Chicago Blackhawks.
Steen beat Corey Crawford off a pair
of short passes from Steve Ott and
David Backes to cap the longest over-
time game in franchise history.
Rangers 4, Flyers 1
NEW YORK Brad Richards and


Derek Stepan scored power-play goals
47 seconds apart in the third period, and
the New York Rangers beat Philadel-
phia 4-1 in the playoff opener to stretch
their home-winning streak over the rival
Flyers to nine games.
Avalanche 5, Wild 4, OT
DENVER Paul Stastny scored 7:27
into overtime after tying the game with
13.4 seconds remaining in regulation, lift-
ing the Colorado Avalanche to a 5-4 win
over the Minnesota Wild in the opener of
the Western Conference quarterfinals.
Sharks 6, Kings 3
SAN JOSE, Calif. -Tomas Hertl and
Raffi Torres both scored in their first
game together as teammates and the
San Jose Sharks jumped on top of
Jonathan Quick and the rival LosAnge-
les Kings with a 6-3 victory in their play-
off opener.
Joe Thornton, Patrick Marleau and
Marc-Edouard Vlasic also scored for the
Sharks. Antti Niemi made 31 saves.


ivionte uario



quarterfinals


David Ferrer returns the ball Friday to Rafael Nadal during
their quarterfinals match of the Monte Carlo Tennis
Masters tournament in Monaco. Ferrer won 7-6 6-4.


B2 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NBA Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(x-if necessary)
Today
Brooklyn atToronto, 12:30 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 20
Dallas at San Antonio, 1 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, April 21
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 22
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn atToronto, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 23
Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 24
Indiana atAtlanta, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, April 25
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Washington, 8 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m.



NHL Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Wednesday, April 16
Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT
Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3, Pittsburgh leads
series 1-0
Anaheim 4, Dallas 3, Anaheim leads series
1-0
Thursday, April 17
N.Y Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1, N.Y Rangers
lead series 1-0
St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 30T, St. Louis leads
series 1-0
Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT, Colorado leads
series 1-0
San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3, San Jose leads
series 1-0
Friday, April 18
Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1, Montreal leads
series 2-0
Detroit 1, Boston 0, Detroit leads series 1-0
Dallas at Anaheim, late
Today
Chicago at St. Louis, 3 p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 20
Philadelphia at N.Y Rangers, Noon
Detroit at Boston, 3 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Monday, April 21
Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.



Brewers 5, Pirates 3
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
CGomzcf 5 1 2 2 Martel If 4 1 1 0
Segurass 5 0 1 0 RMartnc 4 02 2
Braunrf 4 1 1 0 AMcCtcf 3 0 1 1
ArRmr3b 2 1 0 0 PAIvrz3b 5 00 0
KDavislf 3 00 0 NWalkr2b 4 00 0
WSmithp 0 00 0 GSnchzlb 4 00 0
Hndrsnp 0 00 0 Tabatarf 3 00 0
FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Pimntlp 0 0 0 0
MrRynllb 4 1 2 0 JHrrsn ph-ss 1 0 1 0
Gennett2b 4 1 1 2 Mercerss 1 1 1 0
Maldndc 3 03 1 Barmesss 2 1 0 0
Lohsep 2 00 0 Ishikawph 1 00 0
Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0
EHerrrl If 1 0 0 0 Morton p 1 0 0 0
Sniderrf 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 5105 Totals 343 6 3
Milwaukee 000 311 000 5
Pittsburgh 101 000 100 3
E-MarReynolds (1), Maldonado (1), C.Gomez
(1), Segura (2). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Mil-
waukee 7, Pittsburgh 11. 2B-Braun (3), Gen-
nett (3), A.McCutchen (5). HR-C.Gomez (5).
SB-Marte (6). CS-Segura (4). S-Lohse,


Morton.

Milwaukee
Lohse W,3-1
Thornburg H,2
W.Smith H,4
Henderson H,2
Fr.Rodriguez S,5-5
Pittsburgh
Morton L,0-2
Pimentel
Ju.Wilson


IP H RERBBSO


685523
210012
110001
6 8 5 5 2 3
2 1 0 0 1 2
1 1 0 0 0 1


HBP-by W.Smith (N.Walker), by Morton
(K.Davis, Ar.Ramirez).
T-3:07.A-31,564 (38,362).
Royals 5, Twins 0
Minnesota Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Mstrnnl If 4 0 0 0 Aokirf 4 1 1 0
Dozier2b 4 0 1 0 Infante2b 4 0 2 2
Mauerlb 4 0 1 0 Hosmerib 4 02 1
Colaellrf 4 0 1 0 S.Perezc 4 00 0
Plouffe3b 4 0 0 0 AGordnl If 4 0 1 0
Pintodh 3 02 0 BButlerdh 3 1 1 0
KSuzukc 4 0 1 0 Paredspr-dh 0 0 0 0
A.Hickscf 3 0 1 0 Mostks3b 4 1 1 2
Flormnss 2 0 1 0 Maxwllcf 4 00 0
Kubelph 1 0 0 0 AEscorss 3 2 3 0
EEscorss 0 000
Totals 33 080 Totals 34511 5
Minnesota 000 000 000 0
Kansas City 002 012 00x 5
DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-Minnesota 7,
Kansas City 6. 2B-A.Gordon (5), A.Escobar
(4). HR-Moustakas (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
NolascoL,1-2 52/311 5 5 0 3
Tonkin 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Burton 1 0 0 0 0 0
Duensing 1 0 0 0 1 1
Kansas City
VargasW,2-0 7 7 0 0 1 4
Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1
Coleman 1 1 0 0 0 0
T-2:39.A-21,192 (37,903).
Rangers 12,
White Sox 0
Chicago Texas
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Eatoncf 2 0 1 0 Chool If 4 1 1 0
JrDnkscf 1 00 0 Choice If 1 00 0
Semien3b 4 00 0 Andrusss 2 2 1 0
Abreulb 4 0 0 0 JoWilsnss 1 00 0
Viciedorf 4 0 0 0 Riosdh 5 33 2
Konerkdh 3 0 0 0 Fielder lb 2 1 2 1
AIRmrzss 3 0 1 0 Kzmnff3b 5 02 2
DeAzal If 3 0 0 0 Adducirf 5 23 1
Flowrsc 3 0 0 0 DMrph2b 5 0 0 0
LeGarc2b 3 0 1 0 LMartncf 5 23 4
Chirinsc 5 1 3 2
Totals 30 030 Totals 401218
12
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Texas 207 101 10x 12
DP-Chicago 2. LOB-Chicago 4, Texas 9.
2B-Le.Garcia (2), Choo (3), Rios (5), Fielder
(4), Adduci (2). 3B-L.Martin (2). HR-L.Martin
(1), Chirinos (2). SB-Andrus 2 (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
PaulinoL,0-2 32/31310 10 3 3
Putnam 21/33 1 1 0 0
Downs 2 2 1 1 1 2
Texas
M.PerezW,3-0 9 3 0 0 1 8
HBP-by Paulino (Fielder). WP-Paulino 2.
T-2:41. A-40,671 (48,114).


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 B3


For their record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:


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numbers and payouts:


Fantasy 5: 12 -14-
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4-of-5 301
3-of-5 9,802


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$10


CASH 3 (early)
1-4-9
CASH 3 (late)
3-0-6
PLAY 4 (early)
7-3-3-7
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TM
FANTASY 5
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MEGA MONEY
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MEGA BALL
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MEGA MILLIONS
18-25-38-45-63
MEGA BALL
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On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
3 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One UBS Chinese Grand Prix.
Fourth round of the World Championship
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FS1) Los Angeles Angels at Detroit Tigers
4 p.m. (MLB) Houston Astros at Oakland Athletics
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Seattle Mariners at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) New York Yankees at Tampa
Bay Rays
8 p.m. (FS1) Arizona Diamondbacks at Los Angeles Dodgers
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Texas Rangers
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) North Carolina at Virginia
2 p.m. (SUN) LSU at Mississippi
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Baylor at Kansas State
NBA PLAYOFFS
12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Brooklyn Nets at Toronto Raptors. First
Round, game 1
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Golden State Warriors at Los Angeles
Clippers. First Round, game 1
7 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Hawks at Indiana Pacers. First Round,
game 1
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City
Thunder. First round, game 1
3 a.m. (ESPN) Golden State Warriors at Los Angeles Clippers.
First Round, game 1 (same-day tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder.
First round, game 1 (same-day tape)
BOXING
11 p.m. (HBO) Pacquiao vs. Bradley 2 (taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Alabama Spring Game
3 p.m. (ESPN) Auburn Spring Game
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Maybank Malaysian
Open, Third Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour RBC Heritage, Third Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour RBC Heritage, Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Champions: Greater Gwinnett
Championship, Second Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour LOTTE Championship, Final Round
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
11 a.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Boston Bruins. Eastern
Conference Quarterfinal, game 1 (taped)
1 p.m. (NHL) Montreal Canadiens at Tampa Bay Lightning.
Eastern Conference Quarterfinal, game 2 (taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Blackhawks at St. Louis Blues.
Western Conference Quarterfinal, game 2
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Columbus Blue Jackets at Pittsburgh
Penguins. Eastern Conference Quarterfinal, game 2
9:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Minnesota Wild at Colorado Avalanche.
Western Conference Quarterfinal, game 2
COLLEGE LACROSSE
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Maryland at Notre Dame
SOCCER
7:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham
Hotspur FC vs Fulham FC
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Cardiff City FC
vs Stoke City FC
12:30 p.m. (NBC) English Premier League: Chelsea FC vs
Sunderland AFC
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS Soccer: New England Revolution at
Chicago Fire
5:55 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: Club
America vs Queretaro FC
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
4 p.m. (ESPNU) LSU at South Carolina
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Texas A&M
2 a.m. (FSNFL) Texas at Oklahoma (same-day tape)
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, First
Semifinal (same-day tape)
2:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, Second
Semifinal (same-day tape)
4:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Fed Cup, World Group Playoff: USAvs.
France Rubber 1
6:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Fed Cup, World Group Playoff: USAvs.
France Rubber 2
11 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup Semifinal: Germany vs.
Australia Rubber 3
1 a.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup Semifinal: Germany vs.
Australia Rubber 4
3 a.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup Semifinal: Germany vs.
Australia Rubber 5

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


PGA
RBC Heritage
Friday, At Harbour Town Golf Links, Hilton
Head, S.C., Purse: $5.8 million, Yardage:
7,101, Par 71 (36-35), Partial Second
Round, a-denotes amateur:
K.J. Choi 70-67-137 -5
Scott Langley 66-73- 139 -3
Luke Donald 70-69- 139 -3
Billy Hurley III 70-69- 139 -3
Nicholas Thompson 70-70-140 -2
Geoff Ogilvy 72-68-140 -2
Charl Schwartzel 70-70- 140 -2
Tim Herron 69-72- 141 -1
Brian Stuard 69-72- 141 -1
Kevin Streelman 69-72-141 -1
Harris English 68-73- 141 -1
William McGirt 66-76-142 E


Chris Stroud
Stewart Cink
Charles Howell III
a-Matthew Fitzpatrick
CamiloVillegas
John Mallinger
J.B. Holmes
Ken Duke
Jordan Spieth
Patrick Reed
Tim Clark
Pat Perez
Andrew Loupe
Briny Baird
Jonathan Byrd
Zach Johnson
Jason Kokrak
Robert Garrigus
Ryo Ishikawa
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano
Ricky Barnes
Erik Compton


Kevin Kisner 73-72- 145 +3
DavidToms 73-73-146 +4
BrendonTodd 75-71 -146 +4
James Hahn 72-74-146 +4
MarkAnderson 71-75- 146 +4
Charlie Beljan 73-74- 147 +5
JoshTeater 74-73- 147 +5
Mike Weir 73-74-147 +5
Brendon deJonge 72-75- 147 +5
Aaron Baddeley 71-76- 147 +5
Kevin Chappell 75-72-147 +5
a-Hunter Stewart 74-73- 147 +5
Danny Lee 72-76- 148 +6
Jim Renner 75-73- 148 +6
CharlieWi 73-75-148 +6
Lucas Glover 69-79- 148 +6
Marc Leishman 72-76- 148 +6
Kevin Na 72-76-148 +6
Tom Watson 75-73-148 +6
Chad Collins 73-75-148 +6
MarkWilson 74-75-149 +7
Hideki Matsuyama 71-79-150 +8
Davis Love III 70-80-150 +8
Kyle Stanley 77-73- 150 +8
Jason Bohn 74-76- 150 +8
Kevin Tway 70-80-150 +8
Bryce Molder 74-78- 152 +10
Martin Laird 72-81 -153 +11
James Driscoll 77-76- 153 +11
Russell Henley 76-78- 154 +12
Ben Curtis 79-76- 155 +13
Leaderboard at time of suspended play
SCORE THRU
1. KJ. Choi -5 F
2. Robert Allenby -4 5
3. Luke Donald -3 F
3. Billy Hurley III -3 F
3. Bo Van Pelt -3 5
3. Ben Martin -3 4
3. Scott Langley -3 F
8. Geoff Ogilvy -2 F
8. Graeme McDowell -2 6
8. Jim Furyk -2 7
8. Charl Schwartzel -2 F
8.Ted Potter, Jr. -2 7
8. Nicholas Thompson -2 F
8. Brian Harman -2 5
8. Matt Every -2 7
Champions Tour
Greater Gwinnett
Friday, AtTPC Sugarloaf, Duluth, Ga.,
Purse: $1.8 million, Yardage: 7,131, Par 72,
First Round:


Miguel A. Jimenez
Steve Pate
Bernhard Langer
Kenny Perry
Fred Couples
Jeff Sluman
Rod Spittle
Colin Montgomerie
P.H. Horgan III
Jeff LeMaster
Chien Soon Lu
Duffy Waldorf
Gary Hallberg
Peter Jacobsen
Bob Gilder
Roger Chapman
Jay Haas
Marco Dawson
Joey Sindelar
Bill Glasson
Mike Goodes
Peter Senior
Billy Andrade
Brian Henninger
Joel Edwards
KirkTriplett
Michael Allen
David Frost
Fred Funk
Mike Reid
Nick Price
Esteban Toledo
Mark McNulty
Anders Forsbrand
Larry Mize
Wes Short, Jr.
Rocco Mediate
Mark Calcavecchia
Bart Bryant
Hale Irwin
Russ Cochran
Olin Browne
BobTway
Scott Dunlap
Morris Hatalsky
Wayne Levi
Steve Elkington
Joe Durant
Corey Pavin
WillieWood
John Riegger
Tom Lehman
Tom Pernice Jr.
Loren Roberts
Gene Sauers
Tommy Armour III
Brad Faxon
Sandy Lyle
Jeff Hart
Jim Rutledge
Brad Bryant
Steve Lowery
Trevor Dodds
Tom Purtzer
Mark Brooks
Dan Forsman
Gil Morgan
Mark O'Meara
Andrew Magee
Larry Nelson
Kohki Idoki
Hal Sutton
Jose Coceres
Chip Beck
Bobby Clampett
Bobby Wadkins
Rick Fehr
John Cook
Ben Crenshaw
MarkWiebe
D.A.Weibring


35-30-65 -7
33-35- 68 -4
36-32- 68 -4
35-33- 68 -4
35-34- 69 -3
36-33- 69 -3
35-35- 70 -2
35-35- 70 -2
35-35- 70 -2
35-35- 70 -2
34-37- 71 -1
36-35- 71 -1
34-37- 71 -1
35-36- 71 -1
36-35- 71 -1
38-33- 71 -1
35-36- 71 -1
33-38- 71 -1
38-34 -72 E
38-34 -72 E
35-37 -72 E
38-34 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
34-38 -72 E
35-37 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
37-35 -72 E
36-36 -72 E
34-38 -72 E
38-35- 73 +1
35-38- 73 +1
36-37- 73 +1
37-36- 73 +1
37-36- 73 +1
38-35- 73 +1
35-38- 73 +1
35-38- 73 +1
35-38- 73 +1
37-36- 73 +1
38-35- 73 +1
36-38- 74 +2
36-38- 74 +2
38-36- 74 +2
35-39- 74 +2
38-36- 74 +2
36-38- 74 +2
36-38- 74 +2
38-36- 74 +2
36-38- 74 +2
38-36- 74 +2
37-38- 75 +3
38-37- 75 +3
40-35- 75 +3
37-38- 75 +3
39-36- 75 +3
39-36- 75 +3
39-37- 76 +4
38-38- 76 +4
36-40- 76 +4
39-37- 76 +4
36-40- 76 +4
39-37- 76 +4
36-40- 76 +4
39-38- 77 +5
37-41 -78 +6
37-41 -78 +6
41-37- 78 +6
37-42- 79 +7
40-39- 79 +7
41-39- 80 +8
43-37- 80 +8
43-38- 81 +9
41-41-82 +10
39-43-82 +10
48-44-92 +20
WD
WD


Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atWashington-125 St. Louis +115
Cincinnati -125 at Chicago +115
at Pittsburgh -105 Milwaukee -105
Atlanta -120 atNewYork +110
at Colorado -150 Philadelphia +140
at Los Angeles-190 Arizona +180
San Francisco-120 atSan Diego +110
American League
atCleveland -115 Toronto +105
at Detroit -150 Los Angeles +140
at Boston -130 Baltimore +120
at Kansas City-150 Minnesota +140
atOakland -210 Houston +190
atTampa Bay-155 NewYork +145
atTexas -110 Chicago +100
Interleague
atMiami -110 Seattle +100
NBA Playoffs
Today
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
atToronto 21 (194) Brooklyn
at Oklahoma City 7 (192/2) Memphis
at Indiana 71 (186) Atlanta
at L.A. Clippers 7 (211 1) Golden State
Tomorrow
at San Antonio 9 (206/2) Dallas
at Miami 9% (189/2) Charlotte
atChicago 4/2 (181)Washington
at Houston 5 (215) Portland
Odds to Win Series
Brooklyn -160 Toronto +140
Oklahoma City-410 Memphis +340
Indiana -600 Atlanta +450
L.A. Clippers -390 Golden State +320
San Antonio -800 Dallas +550
Miami -2000 Charlotte +1200
Chicago -200 Washington +170
Houston -200 Portland +170
NHL Playoffs
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atSt. Louis -115 Chicago -105
at Pittsburgh -200 Columbus +170
at Colorado -145 Minnesota +125


TNT's Sager to miss NBA
playoffs due to leukemia
ATLANTA-- TNT analyst Craig Sager will miss
the NBA playoffs as he undergoes treatment for
leukemia.
A sideline reporter famous for his brightly col-
ored suits, Sager's sense of humor was intact in a
statement released by Turner Sports on Friday.
Sager describes the postseason as "my favorite
time of year city to city, round by round, 40
games in 40 nights." He said that "a dramatic turn
has matched me with acute myeloid leukemia.
From the sidelines to being sidelined, 40 veins
and 40 electrolytes."
Sager jokes about the often-terse in-game inter-
views with San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg
Popovich: "Too bad, I had some probing questions
for Pop."

Miami Hurricanes forward
James Kelly to transfer
CORAL GABLES Miami Hurricanes forward
James Kelly plans to transfer to a school closer to
his home in Michigan.
Coach Jim Larranaga said Friday that Kelly was
granted his release by the Hurricanes. The 6-foot-7
Kelly is from Ann Arbor, Mich.
He averaged 6.0 points and 3.7 rebounds in 27
games as a junior last season.

Kentucky F Lee to return
for sophomore season
LEXINGTON, Ky. Kentucky has announced
that freshman forward Marcus Lee will return for his
sophomore season, joining sophomore center Willie
Cauley-Stein in bypassing the NBA draft for another
year with the Wildcats.
Forward Julius Randle, 7-footer Dakari Johnson
and twin guardsAndrew and Aaron Harrison will an-
nounce whether they will turn pro soon. Guard
James Young announced Thursday that he will enter
the NBAdraft.
The 6-foot-9 Lee was a key part of Kentucky's
Final Four run and came off the bench to contribute
10 points, eight rebounds and two blocks in the Wild-
cats' Midwest Regional final victory over Michigan. In
a release Friday, he said he was "looking forward to
continuing to develop as an all-around player."
Lee returns to a frontcourt featuring Cauley-Stein
and recruits Karl Towns and Trey Lyles.

Duke sophomore Rodney Hood
entering NBA draft
DURHAM, N.C. Duke sophomore Rodney
Hood is entering the NBAdraft.
Hood said in a statement Friday that playing for
Mike Krzyzewski "helped me grow and develop as
a player and a person" to prepare him for the
NBA.
Hood averaged 16.1 points, 3.9 rebounds and
2.1 assists after sitting out last year following his
transfer from Mississippi State. He was part of a
1-2 scoring punch with freshman Jabari Parker,
who declared for the draft Thursday as a strong
candidate for the No. 1 overall pick. Hood was a
second-team all-Atlantic Coast Conference pick.
While Parker and Hood are gone, Duke is bol-
stered by the nation's No. 1 recruiting class, led by
top overall recruit Jahlil Okafor along with top-10
prospects Tyus Jones and Justise Winslow.

Mets trade 1B Davis to Pirates
NEW YORK The New York Mets have traded
slumping first baseman Ike Davis to the Pittsburgh
Pirates for minor league pitcher Zack Thornton
and a player to be named.
The Mets announced the move just minutes be-
fore they played Atlanta on Friday night. Davis
was on the field during batting practice earlier in
the day.
The 27-year-old was hitting .208 with one home
run and five RBIs in 12 games for the Mets. He
was platooning with Lucas Duda and Josh Satin at
first base.
Davis hit 32 homers for the Mets in 2012 but fell
off sharply last year.
Four SEC teams advance
in NCAA gymnastics
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Four Southeastern Con-
ference teams advanced Friday night to the
Super Six of the NCAA women's gymnastics
championships.
Defending champion Florida and Alabama led
the way in the second semifinal session to join
Georgia and LSU.
Oklahoma, last year's runner-up, had the high
score in the first semifinal at 197.50. Ten-time
champion Georgia scored 197.30 and LSU fin-
ished with 197.10.
Nebraska also had a 197.10 to advance to Sat-
urday's competition for the first time since 2011.
-From wire reports




PATTISON
Continued from Page BI


working on his hitting with his father Dave Pat-
tison, an assistant coach for CRHS, at every
opportunity.
"I think he's putting the bat on it a little bit
better," Dave Pattison said. "And the guys be-
hind him are doing a great job."
Pattison's most looking to improve in the
field, where he made 16 errors this season.
"I'm trying to get better throwing it, getting a
stronger arm," he said. "When you're facing
speedy guys, you've got to get it there quick."
CRHS head coach Bobby Stack says the


sophomore's competitiveness and driven atti-
tude help separate him from most other
players.
"He hustles at everything," Stack said. "He's
what they look at for the next level. They look
for go-getters, and he's a go-getter He plays the
game hard, the way it should be played. He
doesn't give up on a play if he makes an error
He wants to win."
Being a sophomore doesn't stop Pattison from
getting on teammates, but Stack says he's still
working on his diplomatic skills.
"Sometimes he gets on kids around here
maybe a little harder than he should," Stack
said, "but he's being a leader It doesn't matter
if you're a freshman or senior if you want to
win, people can tell. He's all about the game, not
any of the other garbage going on."


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NewYork
Baltimore
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Boston




Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia
Miami


East Division
GB WC L10
8 6-4
3 1 7-3
9 1 6-4
1 2 1 4-6
2 3 2 4-6


East Division
GB WC


NL

Braves 6, Mets 0
Atlanta NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Smmnsss 5 0 1 0 EYongl If 2 00 0
BUptoncf 4 22 0 DnMrp2b 4 00 0
Fremnib 5 1 2 2 DWrght3b 3 0 1 0
J.Uptonl If 2 1 1 1 Grndrsrf 4 00 0
Gattisc 4 0 0 0 CYoungcf 4 0 0 0
Uggla2b 4 1 2 0 Dudalb 3 0 0 0
CJhnsn3b 4 1 3 1 dArnadc 3 00 0
Doumitrf 3 00 0 Tejadass 2 00 0
JSchafrrf 1 0 1 1 Niesep 0 00 0
Harangp 3 00 0 Niwnhsph 1 00 0
Pstrnckph 1 00 0 CTorrsp 0 00 0
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 ABrwn ph 1 0 0 0
JWaldnp 0 00 0 Germnp 0 00 0
Rice p 0 0 0 0
Familip 0 00 0
Totals 36 6125 Totals 27 0 1 0
Atlanta 010 000 041 6
NewYork 000 000 000 0
E-d'Arnaud (1). DP-New York 1. LOB-At-
lanta 8, NewYork 7.2B-Freeman (5), Uggla (3),
C.Johnson 2 (6), J.Schafer (1). HR-Freeman
(5). S-E.Young. SF-J.Upton.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
HarangW,3-1 7 0 0 0 6 5
Avilan 1 1 0 0 0 2
J.Walden 1 0 0 0 0 1
NewYork
NieseL,0-2 6 4 1 1 3 7
C.Torres 1 1 0 0 0 1
Germen 2/3 4 4 4 1 0
Rice 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
Familia 1 2 1 1 0 0
T-2:55.A-33,199 (41,922).
Reds 4, Cubs 1
Cincinnati Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
BHmltncf 4 0 1 1 Bonifac2b 3 0 1 0
Vottolb 3 00 0 Lake If 4 00 0
Phillips2b 2 0 1 0 Rizzolb 4 02 0
RSantg 2b 3 00 0 Schrhltrf 4 00 0
Brucerf 5 1 1 0 SCastross 4 1 1 0
Frazier3b 3 1 0 0 Sweenycf 4 00 0
Ludwcklf 3 1 2 0 Castilloc 4 0 1 0
Berndnl If 0 00 0 Valuen3b 2 0 1 1
Mesorcc 3 1 1 0 Smrdzjp 2 00 0
Cozartss 4 0 1 1 Kalishph 1 00 0
Simonp 3 00 0 Grimmp 0 00 0
LeCurep 0 0 0 0 Russellp 0 0 0 0
MParrp 0 0 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0
N.Sotoph 1 01 0
Broxtnp 0 000
Totals 34 482 Totals 331 6 1
Cincinnati 000 012 010 4
Chicago 000 000 100 1
E-Frazier(3), Bonifacio (2), Castillo (1). LOB-
Cincinnati 9, Chicago 8. 2B-B.Hamilton (2),
Bruce (2), Castillo (2). SB-B.Hamilton (5), Votto
(1), Frazier (2), Mesoraco (1), N.Soto (1). S-
B.Hamilton.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
SimonW,2-1 6 4 1 0 2 3
LeCureH,2 11/31 0 0 0 3
M.ParraH,2 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
BroxtonS,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 2
Chicago
Samardzija L,0-2 7 6 3 1 2 7
Grimm 1 1 1 1 1 1
Russell 1 1 0 0 1 2
Simon pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP-Samardzija, Grimm.
T-3:09.A-28,699(41,072).
Nationals 3,
Cardinals 1
St. Louis Washington
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt3b 3 00 0 Rendon3b 4 1 1 1
JhPerltss 3 0 0 0 Harper If 4 0 1 0
Rosnthlp 0 00 0 Werthrf 4 00 0
Hollidylf 4 00 0 LaRochIlb 3 0 1 0
Craig 1b 4 1 2 0 Dsmndss 3 1 1 0
YMolinc 4 0 1 0 Espinos2b 3 1 1 0
M.Ellis2b 3 0 1 1 McLothcf 3 00 0
Roinsnrf 4 00 0 Loatonc 3 00 0
Bourjoscf 3 00 0 GGnzlzp 2 00 0
Wachap 2 00 0 Waltersph 1 00 0
Jayph 1 0 1 0 Clipprdp 0 00 0
Descalsss 0 0 0 0 Storenp 0 0 0 0
RSorinp 0 00 0
Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 30 3 5 1
St. Louis 000 100 000 1
Washington 001 000 20x 3
E-Y.Molina (2), M.Carpenter 2 (3). DP-St.
Louis 1, Washington 1. LOB-St Louis 6, Wash-
ington 3. 2B-Craig (2), Jay (2). HR-Rendon
(3).
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
WachaL,2-1 7 5 3 1 0 7
Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 0 1
Washington
G.GonzalezW,3-1 7 4 1 1 1 7
ClippardH,5 1/3 1 0 0 1 0
StorenH,3 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Soriano S,4-4 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP Wacha.
T-2:32.A-31,237(41,408).
Interleague
Marlins 8, Mariners 4
Seattle Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Almontcf 5 22 0 Yelichl If 5 1 3 0
BMillerss 5 0 0 1 Ozunacf 4 2 1 1
Cano 2b 5 0 1 0 Stantonrf 3 23 5
Hartlb-rf 5 02 1 GJoneslb 4 0 1 0
MSndrsrf 3 1 1 0 McGeh3b 4 0 1 1
Furushp 0 00 0 Sltlmchc 3 1 2 1
Smoaklb 0 00 0 Dietrch2b 2 00 0
Seager 3b 4 0 2 0 JeBakr ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Ackleylf 4 1 1 0 Hchvrrss 3 0 0 0
Zuninoc 3 0 1 0 Eovaldip 2 1 1 0
CYoungp 1 00 0 Dobbsph 1 00 0
Frnklnph 1 00 0 MDunnp 0 00 0
Beimelp 0 00 0 ARamsp 0 00 0
Wlhlmsp 0 00 0 Cishekp 0 00 0
Romerph 1 00 0 RJhnsnph 1 1 1 0
J.Jonesrf 1 01 0
Medinap 0 000
Totals 38 4112 Totals 33813 8
Seattle 020 010 100 4
Miami 211 000 004 8
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Seager 2 (3), Stanton (2), Dietrich (4).
DP-Seattle 1, Miami 1. LOB-Seattle 9,
Miami 7.2B-Almonte (4), Seager (4), Zunino
(2), Yelich (3), Ozuna (4). 3B-Almonte (1).
HR-Stanton (6), Saltalamacchia (2). CS-
Hechavarria (2). SF-Ozuna.


Seattle
C.Young
Beimel
Wilhelmsen
Furbush
Medina L,0-1
Miami
Eovaldi
M.Dunn H,3
A.Ramos BS,1-1
CishekW,1-0


IP H RERBBSO


6 7 3
2/3 1 1
11/33 0
1 0 0


Medina pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Beimel (Dietrich). WP-C.Young.
T-3:09.A-21,388 (37,442).


Str Home Away
L-1 6-3 4-4
W34-4 4-3
W-13-3 6-5
W-1 5-4 3-5
L-1 2-5 5-5



Str Home Away
W-1 4-2 7-3
W-15-3 5-4
L-1 2-5 6-3
W-14-5 3-3
W-1 7-4 0-6


Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
6 .538 4-6 L-1 5-3 2-3
7 .533 6-4 W-4 5-2 3-5
8 .500 /2 /2 5-5 L-1 5-4 3-4
9 .471 1 1 5-5 L-3 6-4 2-5
9 .438 1% 1% 4-6 L-2 3-4 4-5


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 12 5 .706 7-3 W-1 5-4 7-1
St. Louis 10 7 .588 2 6-4 L-1 4-2 6-5
Pittsburgh 8 9 .471 4 2 3-7 L-1 5-3 3-6
Cincinnati 7 9 .438 41 2/2 5-5 W-3 4-5 3-4
Chicago 4 11 .267 7 5 3-7 L-5 2-5 2-6


W
Oakland 10
Texas 10
Los Angeles 8
Seattle 7
Houston 5


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC L
5 .667 8
7 .588 1 7
8 .500 2 /2 /2
9 .438 3/ 1/2
11 .313 5/2 3/2 :


West Division
L Pct GB WC
6 .625 -
6 .625 -
9 .471 2/ 2
9 .438 3 2/2
14 .222 7 6/2


Str Home
L-1 3-3
W-4 8-3
W-2 3-6
L-4 2-3
L-4 3-7



Str Home
W-1 2-3
L-1 5-4
W-1 4-2
L-1 5-5
L-6 1-11


Associated Press
Miami's Giancarlo Stanton hits a grand slam Friday in the ninth inning to defeat Seattle 8-4 in Miami.




Stanton slam lifts Marlins


Atlanta's Harang


tosses seven hitless


innings vs. Mets

Associated Press

MIAMI Giancarlo Stanton hit
a grand slam with none out in the
ninth inning, and the Miami Mar-
lins took advantage of an over-
turned call on a replay review to
beat the Seattle Mariners 8-4 Friday
night
Reed Johnson was called out on a
force play following a bunt, but the
umpires reviewed the ruling and
determined third baseman Kyle
Seager had juggled the ball. The
Mariners then deployed five in-
fielders, and Stanton cleared them
all with a towering homer to the left
of the home-run sculpture.
Stanton had five RBIs to increase
his total to 26, most in the majors.
The Mariners lost their fourth
game in a row, while the Marlins
won for only the second time in the
past 11 games.
American League
Orioles 8, Red Sox 4
BOSTON -Jonathan Schoop
went 4 for 5 with two doubles and two
RBIs, and the Baltimore Orioles
pounded Red Sox starter John Lackey
in an 8-4 victory over Boston.
Every Orioles starter had at least
one hit except for Chris Davis. The
Orioles collected 10 of those hits off
Lackey (2-2), who surrendered six
earned runs over 5 1/3 innings. It was
the second straight start in which
Lackey gave up six runs and failed to
make it out of the sixth inning.
The first four-hit game of Schoop's
career extended his hitting streak to
seven games.
Orioles starter Chris Tillman (2-1)
labored through five innings, throwing
122 pitches and giving up three
earned runs on seven hits and four
walks. He struck out five.

Blue Jays 3, Indians 2
CLEVELAND Melky Cabrera
had four hits and scored Toronto's go-
ahead run in the seventh inning on
Edwin Encarnacion's single, and the
Blue Jays held on for a 3-2 win over
the Cleveland Indians.
The Blue Jays trailed 2-1 in the sev-
enth before Munenori Kawasaki hit an
RBI single off reliever Marc Rzepczyn-
ski (0-1) and Encarnacion delivered
against Cody Allen.
Carlos Santana hit a two-run homer
for the Indians, who have dropped six
of eight.

Royals 5, Twins 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Jason Var-
gas pitched seven shutdown innings,
Mike Moustakas cracked a two-run
homer and the Kansas City Royals
romped to a 5-0 victory over the Min-
nesota Twins.
Ricky Nolasco (1-2) gave up five
runs on 11 hits in 5 2/3 innings for the
Twins.
Vargas (2-0), who signed a $32 mil-
lion, four-year deal in the offseason,
allowed seven hits while striking out
four in another dazzling start.

Angels 11, Tigers 6
DETROIT-Albert Pujols hit his


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Detroit 7, Cleveland 5
Minnesota 7, Toronto 0,1st game
Texas 8, Seattle 6
N.YYankees 10, Tampa Bay 2
Minnesota 9, Toronto 5, 2nd game
Boston 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Kansas City 5, Houston 1
Friday's Games
Toronto 3, Cleveland 2
L.A. Angels 11, Detroit 6
Baltimore 8, Boston 4
Tampa Bay 11, N.YYankees 5
Miami 8, Seattle 4
Texas 12, Chicago White Sox 0
Kansas City 5, Minnesota 0
Houston at Oakland, late
Today's Games
Toronto (Buehrle 3-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 1-1),
1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 2-1) at Detroit (Scherzer 0-1),
1:08 p.m.
Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1) at Boston (Doubront 1-2),
1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 0-1) at Kansas City (B.Chen
0-1), 2:10 p.m.
Houston (Oberholtzer 0-3) at Oakland (Kazmir 2-0),
4:05 p.m.
N.YYankees (Nova 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Archer 1-1),
7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Elias 1-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-0) at Texas (Lewis
0-1), 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 1, Atlanta 0
L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1
Colorado 3, San Diego 1
Pittsburgh 11, Milwaukee 2
St. Louis 8, Washington 0
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 1
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 3, St. Louis 1
Atlanta 6, N.Y Mets 0
Miami 8, Seattle 4
Philadelphia at Colorado, late
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Today's Games
St. Louis (Lynn 3-0) at Washington (Zimmermann
1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cingrani 1-1) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jack-
son 0-1), 2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee (Garza 0-2) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez
0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (E.Santana 1-0) at N.Y Mets (Colon 1-2), 7:10
p.m.
Seattle (Elias 1-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (Bolsinger 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 2-0),
8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-1) at Colorado (Lyles
2-0), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Hudson 2-0) at San Diego (Stults
0-2), 8:40 p.m.

497th home run and Howie Kendrick
added two of his own to lead the Los
Angeles Angels to an 11-6 win over
the Detroit Tigers.
The Angels chased Detroit starter
Drew Smyly (1-1) after three innings.
Kendrick hit two-run homers in the
third and fourth, and Pujols lined a
three-run shot to left field in the sixth
to give the Angels an 11-1 lead.
Jered Weaver (1-2) allowed a run
and three hits in six innings. He
walked three and struck out three.

Rangers 12, White Sox 0
ARLINGTON, Texas- Martin
Perez pitched a three-hitter for his first
career shutout, Leonys Martin drove in
four runs and the Texas Rangers
routed the Chicago White Sox 12-0.
Martin homered and was one of
four Texas batters with three hits
apiece. Robinson Chirinos also went
deep.
Perez (3-0) retired his last 12 bat-
ters and struck out eight in his second
complete game.
Martin had a two-run triple and
Chirinos hit a two-run homer on the
next pitch in seven-run third inning off
Felipe Paulino (0-2). Martin homered
for a 10-0 lead in the fourth.


National League
Braves 6, Mets 0
NEWYORK-Aaron Harang threw
no-hit ball for seven innings but was
pulled after 121 pitches, and reliever
Luis Avilan gave up David Wright's two-
out single in the eighth as the Atlanta
Braves beat the New York Mets 6-0.
As Harang's pitch count increased
on a chilly evening, it seemed doubtful
manager Fredi Gonzalez would let him
go the distance. Harang worked around
six walks, including two in the sixth in-
ning and another pair in the seventh.
Harang (3-1) left for a pinch hitter
during a long, four-run eighth. He was
never in the on-deck circle the deci-
sion had already been made that he
was done.
Jordan Walden completed the com-
bined one-hitter.

Nationals 3, Cardinals 1
WASHINGTON Cardinals
catcher Yadier Molina's throwing error
combined with Michael Wacha's wild
pitch to allow two unearned runs in the
seventh inning, breaking a tie and
helping Gio Gonzalez and the Wash-
ington Nationals beat St. Louis 3-1.
Gonzalez (3-1) allowed one run and
four hits in seven innings, retiring the
last 11 batters he faced. He finished
with seven strikeouts and one walk as
Washington ended an eight-game los-
ing streak against St. Louis that dated
to Game 5 of the teams' 2012 NL divi-
sion series.
Wacha (2-1) gave up five hits and
one earned run. But a night after the
Nationals made three errors they
initially were charged with four, but
one was changed to a hit Friday it
was the Cardinals' turn to be sloppy.

Reds 4, Cubs 1
CHICAGO -Alfredo Simon low-
ered his ERA to 0.86, and the Cincin-
nati Reds beat the Chicago Cubs 4-1
for their 16th win in their last 17
games at Wrigley Field.
Making his third start, Simon (2-1)
allowed an unearned run in six-plus
innings and sent the Cubs to their fifth
straight loss. Simon is in the rotation
while Mat Latos recovers from elbow
and knee injuries.
Jonathan Broxton pitched a hitless
ninth for his second save in two tries,
completing a six-hitter for the Reds,
who stretched their winning streak to a
season-best three.
Jeff Samardzija (0-2) gave up three
runs one earned and six hits in
seven innings with seven strikeouts
and two walks.

Brewers 5, Pirates 3
PITTSBURGH Kyle Lohse
pitched effectively into the seventh in-
ning, Carlos Gomez homered and the
Milwaukee Brewers beat the Pitts-
burgh Pirates 5-3.
Lohse (3-1) improved to 11-2 in his
career against the Pirates, allowing
one earned run in a win against them
for the second time in six days.
Gomez homered deep to center to
lead off the fifth and added an RBI sin-
gle an inning later as the Brewers ral-
lied from two runs down.
Charlie Morton (0-2) allowed five
runs and eight hits in six innings while
losing to Lohse for the second time
this week. Russell Martin had two hits
and two RBIs for the Pirates, who
have lost six of eight.


AL


Rays 11, Yankees 5


NewYork

Gardnr If
Jeter ss
Ellsury cf
ASorin dh
McCnn c
Solarte 2b
KJhnsn lb
SSizmr3b


Tampa Bay
rhbi ab rhbi
00 1 DeJesscf 3 00 0
0 1 0 SRdrgz ph-lf 2 2 1 2
1 2 0 Zobrist2b 5 22 0
0 1 1 Joycel If 2 21 0
1 1 0 DJnngsph 1 01 1
1 1 0 Guyerpr-cf 1 21 1
1 0 0 Longori3b 3 23 0
1 1 3 Loneylb 4 02 4


BRorts ph-2b1 0 0 0 Myers rf 5 0 3 3
ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Forsythdh 3 00 0
YEscorss 5 0 1 0
Hanignc 4 1 1 0
Totals 36 585 Totals 38111611
NewYork 040 000 100 5
TampaBay 000 201 35x 11
E-Y.Escobar (2). DP-NewYork 2, Tampa Bay
1. LOB-NewYork 7, Tampa Bay 9.2B-S.Size-
more (2), Loney (5), Hanigan (2). HR-S.Ro-
driguez (3). SB-Ellsbury (8).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Kuroda 52/37 3 3 2 2
PhelpsH,4 2/3 1 1 1 0 0
ThorntonH,6 1/3 1 1 1 0 0
Warren L,0-1 BS,1-2 1 4 3 3 1 1
Cabral 0 3 3 3 0 0
Kelley 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Bedard 32/36 4 4 1 3
Boxberger 2 0 0 0 2 2
McGeeW,1-0 11/32 1 1 0 0
Jo.PeraltaH,2 1 0 0 0 0 1
B.Gomes 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cabral pitched to 6 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Cabral (Longoria, Loney, Forsythe).
WP-Cabral.
Umpires-Home, Joe West; First, Marty Foster;
Second, Clint Fagan; Third, Rob Drake.
T-3:56. A-26,079 (31,042).

Orioles 8, Red Sox 4
Baltimore Boston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Markksrf 5 22 1 GSizmrl If 5 01 0
DYonglf 4 1 1 0 Navarf 5 1 1 0
Loughl If 0 0 0 0 Pedroia2b 4 1 1 1
C.Davislb 4 1 0 0 Napolidh 5 1 1 0
A.Jonescf 5 02 1 Carplb 4 12 0
N.Cruzdh 4 1 1 2 Bogartsss 3 01 1
Wietersc 4 0 1 1 Przynsc 4 0 1 1
Hardyss 5 1 2 1 BrdlyJrcf 3 01 0
Lmrdzz2b 5 1 2 0 Holt3b 4 02 1
Schoop3b 5 1 4 2
Totals 41 8158 Totals 37411 4
Baltimore 103 020 101 8
Boston 000 120 100 4
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Baltimore 11, Boston 12.
2B-Markakis 2 (3), Schoop 2 (6), Nava (2),
Napoli (3), Carp (2). SB-A.Jones (1). CS-Wi-
eters (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
TillmanW,2-1 5 7 3 3 4 5
MatuszH,2 22/34 1 1 0 2
O'DayS,1-1 11/30 0 0 1 0
Boston
Lackey L,2-2 51/310 6 6 4 6
A.Miller 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Badenhop 2 3 1 1 1 1
Mujica 1 2 1 1 0 0
HBP-by Matusz (Pierzynski). WP-Lackey.
Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Mark
Carlson; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Will Little.
T-3:26. A-36,408 (37,499).

Blue Jays 3,
Indians 2


Toronto
ab
MeCarr If 5
Kawsk2b 3
Diaz ss 0
Bautist dh 3
Encrnclb 4
Navarr c 4
Rasms cf 4
Lawrie 3b 4
Sierra rf 4
Goins ss-2b3
Totals 34
Toronto
Cleveland
E-Y.Gomes


Cleveland
r h bi
1 4 0 Bourncf
0 1 1 Swisherlb
0 0 0 Kipnis2b
0 0 0 CSantn 3b
0 1 1 Brantly If
0 0 0 ACarerss
1 1 0 DvMrprf
0 1 1 YGomsc
0 0 0 Chsnhlldh
110
4 393 Totals
000 100 200
000 002 000
(5). DP-Cleveland


ab r h bi
5000
4020
4130
4112
5010
4010
3010
4000
4010

37 210 2
4 1 3 0
4 1 1 2
5 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 0

37210 2
3
2
1. LOB-


Toronto 9, Cleveland 12. 2B-Rasmus (5),
Chisenhall (5). 3B-A.Cabrera (1). HR-C.San-
tana (1). SB-Brantley (2). S-Kawasaki.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Hutchison 51/38 2 2 0 9
DelabarW,1-0 2/3 0 0 0 1 1
Cecil H,6 1 1 0 0 1 2
Wagner H,4 1 0 0 0 0 0
SantosS,5-6 1 1 0 0 2 2
Cleveland
Masterson 61/36 2 2 2 9
Rzepczynski L,0-1 0 2 1 1 0 0
Allen 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
Atchison 1 0 0 0 0 2
Outman 2/3 0 0 0 1 1
C.Lee 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP-Masterson.
Umpires-Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Dale Scott;
Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, CB Bucknor.
T-3:15.A-16,335 (42,487).

Angels 11, Tigers 6
Los Angeles Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Cowgillrf-cf 3 2 1 0 Kinsler2b 5 1 3 2
Troutcf 3 2 2 2 TrHntrrf 3 0 1 1
Ibanezlb 1 0 0 0 Cstllns ph-3b 2 1 1 1
Pujolslb 4 2 2 3 MiCarrIb 4 00 1
Boeschrf 1 00 0 VMrtnzdh 5 01 1
HKndrcdh 5 23 4 AJcksncf 3 01 0
lannettc 3 1 1 0 D.Kelly3b-rf 4 0 1 0
Aybarss 5 0 1 0 Avilac 4 1 1 0
Shuck If 5 1 0 1 AnRmnss 3 1 1 0
JMcDnl2b 4 0 0 0 RDavisl If 4 21 0
IStewrt3b 4 1 3 1
Totals 38111311 Totals 37611 6
Los Angeles 022 403 000 11
Detroit 001 000 500 6
DP-Los Angeles 1, Detroit 1. LOB-Los Ange-
les 5, Detroit 9.2B-Cowgill (2), Trout 2 (6), Pu-
jols (5), lannetta (4), I.Stewart (2), D.Kelly (1),
Avila (2). 3B-I.Stewart (2). HR-Pujols (5),
H.Kendrick 2 (2). SB Trout (2), R.Davis (6).
CS-H.Kendrick(1).


Los Angeles
WeaverW,1-2
Wall
Jepsen
Kohn
Frieri
Detroit
Smyly L,1-1
Putkonen
J.Miller
Coke
E.Reed


H RERBBSO
31133
45510
10010
10001
20001
3 1 1 3 3
4 5 5 1 0
1 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1
2 0 0 0 1


Putkonen pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
Wall pitched to 5 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Putkonen (Cowgill).
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Brian Knight; Third, Quinn Wolcott.
T-3:34. A-28,435 (41,681).


Rays schedule


April 19
April 20
April 22
April 23
April 24
April 25
April 26
April 27
April 28
April 29


vs. NYYankees
vs. NYYankees
vs. Minnesota
vs. Minnesota
vs. Minnesota
at Chicago White Sox
at Chicago White Sox
at Chicago White Sox
at Chicago White Sox
at Boston


B4 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


BASEBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


o can win
i0 can win


it all?


NBA playoffs looking more wide-open than expected as Heat don't seem like a lock anymore


Associated Press
MIAMI Before the season started, a
poll suggested that the Miami Heat were
the overwhelming favorite to win the
NBA title, collecting a whopping 76 per-
cent of ballots cast.
The voters weren't some know-
nothings, either
No, this was a polling of NBA general
managers.
Things seem quite a bit different now
The Heat don't seem like locks for a third
straight title anymore. San Antonio and
Indiana are top seeds. Brooklyn, Chicago,
the Los Angeles Clippers, Oklahoma City,
Golden State, Houston, Portland and the
Heat all figure to have a legitimate
chance at being the club to hoist the
Larry O'Brien Trophy in a couple of
months.
Usually, the NBA playoffs aren't so
wide open. Things might change over the
next couple of months.
"There are 16 teams that have a chance
to win it," said Oklahoma City coach Scott
Brooks, whose team is seeded No. 2 in
the West. "If you're in the playoffs, you
have a chance. There are some good
teams. Any team can beat each other The
West is deep. There are two teams that
are really good that didn't make it and
had great years. It's definitely open.
There's a lot of good basketball teams
that are fighting for the championship."
For as good as San Antonio and Indi-
ana were all year well, for most of the
year in Indiana's case, before the Pacers
faltered down the stretch it's never a
certainty that the No. 1 seeds reach the
NBA Finals. It's happened that way only
11 times in the last 35 years.
Then again, the last time that there
wasn't either a No. 1 or a No. 2 in the title
series was 1978. So while upsets can hap-
pen, it's not all that common to see
bracket craziness akin to a No. 7 and
No. 8 seeds Connecticut and Kentucky


J5liiS


MEmPHiS
"'lIzZ L101






LOS NGELES\










month happening in the same NBA
playoff season.
"It is going to be tremendous from a
fans' standpoint, watching," Golden State
coach Mark Jackson said. "It going to be
a lot of fun."
Brooklyn's Jason Kidd has plenty of
postseason experience as a player He
believes the NBA championship is up for
grabs, but also probably knows history
doesn't favor his sixth-seeded club.
Since 1979, only five teams seeded


)FFS


CHICAGO

BLL
w^^^^^^^


WIEZARDES


No. 4 or lower in their conference have
reached the finals. But Kidd sees reason
for hope.
"It's always wide open," said Kidd, the
first-year coach of the Nets a veteran-
laden team put together to win a title this
season. "You guys sometimes limit it to
just two teams but guys that are playing
on a daily basis in the Western Confer-
ence and the Eastern Conference feel
like they've got a chance."
This year, that doesn't just seem like
coach speak.


Take the East. On paper, the biggest
mismatch is No. 1 Indiana against No. 8
Atlanta, especially because the Hawks
are the only sub-.500 team in the playoffs.
And just a couple weeks ago, the Hawks
went to Indianapolis and absolutely em-
barrassed the Pacers, running out to a
32-point halftime lead in one of the more
stunning games of the entire NBA
season.
"There's some good teams out there,"
Pacers coach Frank Vogel said. "Every
team in the playoffs have given us some
problems. We've been able to win against
them as well. But it's certainly shaped out
to be a good conference."
No. 5 Washington won the season se-
ries over No. 4 Chicago. Out West, the
third-seeded Clippers and sixth-seeded
Golden State split four meetings. Mem-
phis ousted Oklahoma City a year ago
and those clubs meet in the first round.
And San Antonio's quest to avenge last
year's loss in the NBA Finals starts
against Dallas the last team to beat
Miami in a seven-game series, winning
the title in 2011.
So there are some good stories, and
there's intrigue with every first-round
series.
That doesn't mean everyone in the
league thinks it'll be a year laden with
surprises. Philadelphia coach Brett
Brown put it simply to him, the game
changes in the playoffs, period.
"The regular season and the playoffs
are like two different sports," Brown
said. "If you put me in a bubble and you
drag me out in May, I can say this is dif-
ferent than the game I'm seeing in No-
vember It's just entirely different."
That's why Brown, a former Spurs as-
sistant, thinks there's a very small num-
ber of teams capable of winning it all.
"To be the last man standing is so
ridiculously hard," Brown said. "People
have no idea what it's like to play in
June."


Motivated LeBron preps


for the NBA playoff grind


Associated Press
MIAMI LeBron James
was walking down the hall-
way that the Miami Heat
call "Championship Alley"
a few minutes after last sea-
sofn's NBA Finals, when he
decided the time was right
to send a message.
It wasn't for his fans.
It was for his detractors.
"Keep giving me motiva-
tion! I need it!" James
shouted in the crowded cor-
ridor, as the champagne for
a second straight NBA title
started spraying in the
nearby locker room. "Keep
doubting me! I need it!"
James still has his haters,
of course. But with the start
of this year's playoffs loom-
ing, the four-time NBA MVP
said Friday he doesn't nec-
essarily need to be fueled
by them anymore, not with
the Heat having a chance to
become just the fourth fran-
chise in league history to
capture three straight titles.
And if doubt exists to
be clear, it surely does after
Miami lost 14 of its last 25
games James said he's
not noticing.
"I sent out a few tweets
but I haven't been reading
anything," James said after
Miami ended practice Fri-
day "I'm kind ofjust gearing
toward locking in tomorrow
night and go from there. But
I don't need any motivation.
I don't need extra motiva-
tion. I'm motivated enough.
This is the best part of the
season, it's the best time of
the year and I'm happy to be
here once again."
Miami's path toward
what it hopes is a third
straight title and fourth
straight appearance in the
NBA Finals starts on Sun-
day against the Charlotte
Bobcats, a team the Heat
swept this season and are
15-0 against since James ar-
rived in South Florida. Still,
no one needs to tell him
how much more difficult
this postseason could be for
Miami, since history isn't
exactly on his team's side.
Only two franchises -
the Lakers and Celtics -
have won as many as four
straight conference titles.
James got a reminder of
that Thursday night when
he watched a documentary
about the "Bad Boys"-era
Detroit Pistons, a group that
won back-to-back NBA
championships and
reached the finals three
years in a row, just as the
Heat have now


Associated Press
Miami's LeBron James passes June 13, 2013, between
San Antonio's Boris Diaw, back, and Manu Ginobili (20)
during Game 4 of the NBA Finals in San Antonio.


"When they said they
went to three straight finals,
they won two in a row, now
they're looking to go to a
fourth straight final, I looked
at my wife and said, 'Who's
that sound like?"' James
said. "I know exactly what
they were going through."
Thing is, those Pistons
couldn't get it done.
Whether or not Miami
does largely hinges on
James.
He averaged 27.1 points,
6.9 rebounds and 6.4 assists
in the regular season, shoot-
ing nearly 57 percent the
seventh straight year in
which he's set a career best
in that department He had
a career-high 61-point night
against Charlotte last
month, climbed five more
spots to No. 27 on the
league's career scoring list,
and is likely to pick up his
eighth All-NBA first-team
selection.
And even if James doesn't
wind up getting his fifth
MVP award, with Kevin Du-
rant of Oklahoma City ap-
pearing to be the favorite
this year, the Bobcats know
the enormity of the chal-
lenge awaiting them.
"Obviously he is the best
player in the world," Char-
lotte guard Chris Douglas-
Roberts said. "He's the best
player on the planet and we


know he is going to make
shots that are contested and
will have nights he gets 30.
But I think we have a pretty
good defense. The game he
had 61, if he hits 8 3s on any-
one that is going to happen.
But we like our chances on
the defensive end."
Fairly or unfairly, every-
thing the Heat and James
have done to this point
in the season is now
irrelevant.
They'll all be judged by
what they do in the next two
months. James knows and
accepts that's the case, as do
his star teammates Chris
Bosh and Dwyane Wade.
"This is what makes elite
players elite players," Wade
said. "You don't get the elite
name unless you've done it
at this level."
Over the last two postsea-
sons, James has made the
elite look ordinary
The 45-point, season-
saving game at Boston in
2012. A triple-double in
Game 5 of that season's Fi-
nals against Oklahoma City
to wrap up his first champi-
onship. A layup at the
buzzer to beat Indiana in
Game 1 last year A 32-point
game in Game 6 of last
year's Finals against San
Antonio, followed by a
37-point outing in the sec-
ond straight title-clincher


Associated Press
A solid rookie season by Victor Oladipo is just one reason why Orlando Magic team
officials are confident heading into the offseason, despite seasons of 20 and 23
victories the past two years.



Magic enter offseason



with confidence
O l do pa i don't want to do is skip any steps. So I
Orando ho pair think we'll be methodical, we'll continue
Strp ae to be very strategic in how we add to the
lotteyPick head teamhow we improve the team."
"The draft is certainly one area to do
nto the that I also think that we'll continue to be
into te summer opportunistic in actively exploring what
options exist in free agency and trades. So
Associated Press we're not bound to just one basket We're
looking for ways to improve all the way
ORLANDO It's been two seasons around," he said.
since the Orlando Magic went through It's a mantra that has clearly trickled
near-wholesale changes that included a down to and is being fully embraced his
franchise player's exit and bringing in a head coach as well.
new general manager and coaching staff. "I think there are more steps than just
The two seasons since have produced the win and loss column. You can prepare
just 20 and 23 victories, respectively, fol- to win. There's also cultivating," Magic
lowing Wednesday night's season finale, coach Jacque Vaughn said. "It's similar to
While fans haven't seen a lot of positive a garden. You have to cultivate, you have
on-court results yet, the new regime is to feed it You got to weed out some things.
hoping that it can remain patient entering You got to fertilize it So there's steps to
what could the most pivotal offseason to making that garden grow
date of the current rebuilding project "And I think it's the same way in culti-
"I think if you look back on the year, I vating a winning culture," he said.
think we made some positive strides. Orlando's current roster features just
Strides in the right direction," Magic gen- four players over the age of 25.
eral manager Rob Hennigan said Point guard Jameer Nelson, who has
Thursday spent his entire 10-year career in Orlando,
"I think clearly the win-loss record was is the Magic's longest-tenured player at
not very good. We're all aware of that. We age 32. He embraced a mentorship role
all know that has to improve. But I think with Oladipo this year, which Oladipo said
there are some deeper layers to it, and I was beneficial in helping him navigate
think that if you look at the way our guys through the ups and downs of a rookie
competed consistently, I thought the spirit season.
of the team was pretty good," he said. Still, there is uncertainty about whether
That spirit, combined with solid sea- Nelson will be a part of the rebuild next
sons from No. 2 overall draft pick Victor season. He is due $8 million in the final
Oladipo and third-year center Nik Vuce- year of his contract in 2014-15, but the
vie, gives team officials even more confi- Magic would owe him only $2 million if he
dence as they head into a summer is waived byJuly 15.
highlighted by two lottery picks in June's Nelson acknowledged there have been
draft, and lots of roster flexibility to po- internal conversations with team officials
tentially bring in veteran pieces as well. about his future with the team, but he de-
As has been his style, Hennigan was clinked to elaborate.
short on specifics about what could hap- "I would be lying to you if I said I didn't
pen in the coming months. But he reiter- (have talks)," Nelson said. "I did, but I'm
ated that whatever happened, that it not going to disclose that with you guys. I'll
wouldn't be a deviation from the process keep that internal. As I've always done in
he had in mind when he took the job. the past Like I said before, it's the team's
"I think we'll continue to try to do our option. I would love to continue to play
work to identify the best ways to improve here and be here and see this thing turn
the team," Hennigan said. "And what we around. I'll just keep my fingers crossed."


NBA PLAYOFFS


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 B5


41W




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pirates capture county flag football title


CR knocks off

Citrus and

Lecanto for

championship
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
LECANTO Crystal
River turned its turn-
around season into a flag
football championship
with a 13-6 win over
Lecanto in the Citrus
County Championship on
Thursday
Jasmyne Eason caught
eight passes including
two touchdown receptions
- and the Pirates shut
down a potent Panthers of-
fense that could not get into
rhythm. The win capped a
season in which the Pirates
started 0-3 before winning
their final six games, in-
cluding the semifinal and
title games.
"We worked hard for this
championship. We wanted
it and we got it," Eason said
afterward. "We dominated
out here tonight on some-
body else's field, so no one
can say, 'it was their home
field, it was this, it was
that"'
Continuing its improved
play from earlier in the
season, Crystal River's de-
fense contained Stephanie
Bandstra, Heather Kemp
and the other Panther of-
fensive threats. It also had
two big interceptions, in-
cluding Amy Rairick's pick
near midfield late in the
third quarter
Battling strong wind


gusts that kept long passes
from being threats all af-
ternoon, Crystal River
quarterback Savanah
Miller threw several short
passes that capitalized on
the speed of Eason and
other receivers.
Eason caught a jump ball
near the end of the first
half between defenders
Dani Ronzo and Tiffany
Conklin, spinning away for
the touchdown and the 6-0
lead. Her 20-yard touch-
down grab near the end of
the third quarter appeared
to put the game away
However, Bandstra
picked off a Miller pass
with 2:08 left in the quarter
with the Pirates on the
Panthers 25-yard line, re-
turning it all the way for the
score to cut the lead to
seven. Though the Pirates
had to play the Citrus Hur-
ricanes in the semifinal
match before playing
Lecanto a game they
won 6-0 they showed no
fatigue as the game against
Lecanto stretched on, and
its defense held the lead.
The Panthers, which had
to throw into the wind for
the fourth quarter, could
not get a drive deep enough
to threaten the lead, and
the clock became their
enemy in the end.
Pirates running back
Shirley Kortendick said
her team's offense and de-
fense improved throughout
the season, and she was not
surprised by the final
outcome.
"I never really doubted
us. I knew we had the po-
tential to keep going and
get better and better," she
said. "We did really good
this season."


MAnT PFIFFNER/Chronicle file photo
Jasmyne Eason, right, and the Crystal River flag football team defeated Stephanie Bandstra, left, and Lecanto for
the Citrus County flag football championship Thursday night at Lecanto High School. This photo is from their
March 18 regular season meeting at Crystal River.


Panthers top Pirates




for 5A-6 district crown


tered in surrendering no
earned runs, no walks and
seven hits and just two
line drives in seven in-
nings on the mound for
LHS. CRHS loaded the
bases to no avail in the
first and fifth innings, be-
fore Pirates freshman
Beca Carrico put her team
on the board in the sev-
enth, scoring on a throw to
first base by sophomore
catcher Amber Hopkins,
off a dropped third strike.
"Danielle pitched a
great game," CRHS coach
Cassidy Rash said, "and
Lecanto played a great
game. We struggled at the
plate tonight, but each girl
went up there with a posi-
tive attitude, ready to hit
the ball. Our effort was
there, but sometimes it
doesn't go as planned."
The Panthers took a 1-0
lead into the sixth, when
Hopkins scored on a wild
pitch and senior Jordan


Martin drove in freshman
shortstop Rebecca Schuler
on a line-drive double to
right-center for a 3-0
advantage.
Richards went 8 for 8
with six RBIs and four
runs scored in the tourna-
ment, which included a
12-6 win by LHS over top
seed Citrus on Wednesday
Hopkins was 2 for 4 with
two runs, and had a diving
catch on a foul ball by Car-
rico in the opening frame.
"We were under the ball
at the beginning of the
year," Richards explained,
"but we really started
using the (pitching) ma-
chine before districts, so
we were pretty ready for
the tournament. Our
record doesn't really mean
anything once we hit
districts.
"It's been pretty excit-
ing," she added. "I'm so
proud of our team. We had
to stick together because
Citrus and Crystal River
are two good teams."
In the field, the Pan-
thers committed five er-
rors, but only one led to a
Pirate run.
"We bent but didn't
break on defense," Dupler
said. "We've been trying to
stop making the mistake
that kills us, and the last
four games we've been
successful at that. Hit-
ting's not an issue for us.
'Anybody in our district
could be holding this tro-
phy," he added, "we just
happen to be the ones that
pulled it out. Cassidy's
done a tremendous job
with that team. They're
young and they don't give
up. (CRHS senior short-
stop) Marissa Pool (seven
putouts) was extraordi-
nary defensively She
changed the tone several
times, where I thought we
were going to blow it open
and she'd make a play"
Tiffany Macdonald
(three runs, eight hits al-
lowed) tossed 5 2/3 innings
before handing the ball to
fellow Pirates senior
McCale Wilson.
Freshman Emily
Doughman and senior
Bridget Whitley each
went 2 for 3 for CRHS,
which beat Dunnellon 4-3
in Wednesday's semifi-
nals, and split with
Lecanto in the regular
season.


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Lecanto softball coach
Robert Dupler says he
feels like a broken record
when he claims that he
doesn't put stock in his
club's record in the regu-
lar season, where experi-
mentation and fine-tuning
for the postseason are his
program's real priorities.
The approach continues to
pay dividends: behind
bend-don't-break defense
and pitching and another
monster performance at
the plate from Paige
Richards, the fourth-
seeded Panthers picked
up their second-straight
district title on Thursday
with a 5-1 victory over
No. 3 seed Crystal River in



mm


the 5A-6 finals at Citrus
High School.
Richards, a senior left
fielder, knocked in senior
Breanna Martin (2 for 4)
for an early 1-0 lead in the
first, and later added two
insurance runs in the sev-
enth with her second
home run in as many
nights, this one easily
clearing the fence in left.
The Panthers (8-14), who
are 9-2 in districts over the
past four seasons, play
host to Belleview (22-5)
next Thursday in the re-
gional quarterfinals, while
CRHS (13-13) travels to
Ocala Lake Weir (14-13),
which shocked the Rat-
tlers with a 12-6 win in the
5A-5 championship.
Senior Danielle Yant
was sharp where it mat-
or ^ .*


Tennis season comes to a close
The 2014 tennis season ended for area players when the
Lecanto doubles team of Madison Gamble and Mahima
Tatam lost their first-round match at the Class 3A FHSAA
State Finals.
The Panther duo dropped a 6-3, 6-2 decision to the
Orange Park team of Rebecca Cannon and Emily Wood at
the state meet held this week at Sanlando Park in Alta-
monte Springs.
Earlier in the tournament, Citrus singles standout
Melanie Dodd dropped her opening-round match as well.
District baseball assignment
announced for area schools
The four Citrus County baseball teams now know when
they will open district play next week, but one squad still
doesn't know its opponent.
Seven Rivers Christian is the top seed in District 2A-3
and travels to St. John Lutheran in Ocala for a semifinal
game Tuesday, April 22. The Warriors' opponent will be de-
cided the night before when the No. 4 and 5 seeded teams
face off.
Things are a little more clear in the 5A-6 District Tourna-
ment, which starts Wednesday, April 23 at Dunnellon High
School with games scheduled for 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.
In the first semifinal contest, No. 2 seed Crystal River
meets No. 3 Lecanto. In the nightcap, No. 1 seed Citrus
battles host and No. 4 seed Dunnellon.
The winners of those two games quatomatically qualify
for regionals and meet at 7 p.m. Friday, April 25 back in
Dunnellon for the district championship.
CR Volleyball Camp slated for June
The Crystal River Volleyball Camp will be held the week
of June 2-6 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. at Lecanto High School.
The camp is open to girls ages 10 to 16. No experience
is required. Crystal River players and coaches will run the
camp. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals of passing,
setting, hitting, serving, defense and team play. Campers
will be placed in groups with players of similar skill levels.
The cost of the camp is $55 per player. Contact Coach
Ridley for details at 352-566-7789. Registration forms are
also available at CRHS, CRMS and CSMS.
-From staff reports





SAVE THE DATE



CHRONICLE

STUDENT

ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM


College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus



For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


Both teams advance to next

week's regional tournament


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Lecanto's Paige Richards take a healthy swing during Wednesday night's District
5A-6 semifinal win over Citrus. Richards went 8 for 8 with six RBIs in the tournament
for the champion Panthers, including a pair of home runs.


B6 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS










RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Easter is for laughing


hen I was a new
Christian, I discov-
ered a portrait of
Jesus called the "Laughing
Christ" at a Christian book
store.
At the time I was attending
a serious church, a church
where the thought of Jesus
laughing was most likely
frowned on. Maybe Jesus
smiled at babies and pup-
pies, but telling jokes with
his friends? God forbid.
Consequently because the
serious people at that seri-
ous church were so serious
about their Christian faith,
they presented Jesus as seri-
ous too. Serious equals
somber and sober, which
equals humorless and kinda
mean.
Not that Jesus was mean,
but some of his followers
were.
So, when I saw the
"Laughing Christ" portrait, I
found it appealing and com-
pelling, yet rather confusing.
That wasn't at all how I pic-
tured Jesus.
At that church, we sang,
"I've got the joy, joy joy, joy
down in my heart," but
frankly, that joy didn't seem
to generate much laughter
That joy was way, way way
way down in our hearts.
There were some nice
people at that church, but
not too many who were fun
to be around. Thankfully we
moved away after about a
year and found friendlier
churches.
Over the years, that image
of Jesus laughing has stayed
with me. I love the thought of
the son of God throwing back


SNancy
Kennedy

I' /S GRACE
NOTES


his head in utter delight.
I believe that Easter is the
reason Jesus laughed and
the reason Christians should
be serious about laughing,
too.
A few years ago, I found an
account of some 15th-cen-
tury Bavarian monks. As
they pondered the meaning
of the somber events of holy
week Maundy Thursday's
observance of Christ's Last
Supper and his agony in the
Garden of Gethsemane, his
arrest and trial and then
Good Friday's remembrance
of Christ's brutal death on
the Cross one of the
monks started laughing,
and not just an amused twit-
ter This was a big belly
laugh.
As the story goes, the
monk told the other monks,
"Don't you see? The Resur-
rection was a joke -the best
joke in all history When
Jesus died, the devil thought
he had won. But God had the
last laugh on Easter when he
raised Jesus from the dead."
The monks called it Risus
Paschalis, "the Easter
laugh."
I love that! Jesus laughing,
Bavarian monks laughing,
Christians laughing.
We've got the "joy, joy, joy,


joy down in our hearts," or at
least we should.
When I think of that seri-
ous church I had attended, I
think about why the people
may have seemed so grumpy
It's just my speculation, but I
think they took sin too
lightly
Well, they were very seri-
ous about the "world's" sin
and the sin of everyone else,
but not so much their own.
By that I mean they thought
they could manage their own
sin. They certainly had
enough rules.
Back then, I thought I
could manage my sin too,
until I realized I couldn't.
Years ago, I told a group of
Lutheran women at their
"Experience the Joy!" re-
treat: "Real joy is knowing
the depth of your sin and the
extent of your idolatry" Be-
cause unless you know that
even your smallest sin
caused the death of Christ
you'll never be able to fully
appreciate the greatness of
God's grace, demonstrated
in the Cross and then the
Resurrection. We can't do
anything about our sin -
and that's great news.


There's a hymn that goes,
"My sin, oh, the bliss of this
glorious thought! My sin, not
in part but the whole, is
nailed to the cross and I bear
it no more. Praise the Lord,
praise the Lord, 0 my soul!"
Do you hear the laughter
in that?
It's found in knowing
you're forgiven everything,
past, present and future.
That should make you laugh.
The message of Good Fri-
day is that Jesus suffered
and died for our sin. His
death was real and neces-
sary, a death that we de-
served to die. For that, we
grieve. For that, we are
grateful.
But the message of Easter
is that Jesus didn't stay dead.
He simply threw off the
grave clothes, got up and
walked out of the tomb, alive
and well.
Like the monk had said,
Christ's Resurrection was
the great joke of God.
It's as we sing: "No more
let sin and sorrow grow, nor
thorns infest the ground; He
comes to make His blessings
flow far as the curse is
found."
Joy to the world, friends.
It's time to laugh.
Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over,
Victoria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. corn.


Judi
Siegal

JUDI'S
JOURNAL






What



are we



doing



here?


sometimes we learn life les-
sons in the strangest ways.
Living in Ocala, with its di-
verse population of minorities, has
opened my eyes to the religion and
culture of many of my neighbors.
Like most people, the old adage
"Birds of a feather flock together"
is true for most of my social situa-
tions, but the other day I received
a lesson from a most unlikely and
unexpected source.
Since I was all caught up on my
columns, I decided to spend a little
time pampering myself at the lin-
gerie boutique. For me, a cancer
survivor, this is a very important
aspect of coping with my diagnosis,
and so I was looking forward to
purchasing items to help me feel
"sexy" and feminine. The sales as-
sociate was only too willing to as-
sist me and was delighted to show
me all the latest items, including
their new French-inspired collec-
tion.
I was really enjoying myself, try-
ing on all sorts of bras, each one
more beautiful than the other,
when I suddenly sat down and
looked straight at the associate and
said: '"After all I have been
through, I am just so glad to be
alive."
This kind of feeling and emotion
is very typical of women who have
delt with breast cancer, but what
came next was most amazing. That
sales lady just gave me a big hug
and, in an accent as broad as her
hometown of Atlanta, she in-
structed me: "If de Lawd wants
you to be here, then you be here!"
I Just loved that line and it put a
lot into perspective for me.
Why exactly are we here? How
do we make the most of the time
we have? The Jewish tradition has
much to say on this topic, and
while most people would agree
that God has a plan for us all, Ju-
daism gives us some specific ideas
about this.
Traditionally, we are here to
make the world a better place.
Through something we call Tik
kun olam, repairing the world,
Jews strive to combat social injus-
tice and are in the forefront in en-
vironmental and ecological issues.
We are also involved with the
homeless, the disadvantaged and
disenfranchised. Too many times
when the world messes itself up,
some Jewish scientist comes to the
rescue and saves the day We strive
for world peace and devote our-
selves to humanitarian causes.
From a spiritual point of view,
we are commanded to give
tzedakah, loosely translated as
"charity" to help those less fortu-
nate than ourselves. The word
"tzedakah" comes from the He-
brew word for "righteousness" so
by helping our fellow neighbors,
we are following on a righteous
path. Tzedakah can take the form
of a check to a local charity or do-
nating goods or time to a worthy or-
ganization.
The Torah also acts as a specific
guide for moral and ethical behav-
ior The Ten Commandments, the
laws of keeping kosher, lighting
Shabbat candles and other rituals,
observing the Sabbath and other
holy days, all seek to create a sense
of holiness for the Jewish spirit
Add acts of loving-kindness to the
melange, and you have a recipe for
a Torah-centered life. All these
mitzvot, commandments, are im-
portant Jewish values, which seek
to make us more human and better
people. They are our raison d'etre,
our reason for being.


And so we go about our lives, in
my case, writing columns on Ju-
daism and giving service to my
See Page C5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION NOTES


Special events
Reflections Church will host its first
"Easter Egg Mud Run" from 9 to 10:30 a.m.
today with the traditional Easter egg hunt at 11
a.m. at Citrus Springs Middle School. Cost of
the "Mud Run" is $10 per participant or $40 for
a family of four or more. There is no cost for
the traditional egg hunt. To pre-register or pre-
pay for the race, go to reflectionschurch.net.
The church's Easter Sunday worship service
is at 10:17 a.m.
St. Paul's Lutheran School and Precious
Lambs Preschool, at 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way in Beverly Hills, invites all families in the
community with children up to age 10 to at-
tend its "Easter Eggstravaganza" from 10 a.m.
to noon today. Enjoy an Easter egg hunt,
crafts, music, games, prizes, food, fun and it's
all free. Families who pre-register at
www.stpauls.edu will be entered into a draw-
ing for a free gift certificate. For more informa-
tion, call 352-489-3027.
First Presbyterian Church of Inverness will
sponsor a "Rock-n-roll Easter event Where
the rock rolled away from the tomb," from 10
to 11:30 a.m. today for children up to and in-
cluding 5th grade. Everything about the event
points children to one thing: celebrating Jesus
Christ. It is an all-out family event with games,
music, crafts, snacks, and activities that center
on the resurrection. There is no charge for this
event and all are invited. Make reservations in
advance by going to www.rocknrolleasterf-
pcinv.eventbrite.com or mailing: sarahfpciny-
outh@gmail.com. For more information, call
352-637-0770.
Hernando United Methodist Church
Easter will have an egg hunt for the children
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. today. Free lunch is in-
cluded. Easter Sunday Sunrise service is at
6:30 a.m. and cantata service is at 10 a.m.
Rock Crusher Road First Church of God
will host a community Easter egg hunt from 3
to 5 p.m. today on the church property, 419 N.
Rock Crusher Road, Crystal River. There will
be food, games, face painting, community
booths, fire trucks, and, of course, lots of
eggs. Everyone is invited. For more informa-
tion, call the church office at 352-795-5553 or
visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
The third Saturday night supper will take
place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. today in the De-
wain Farris Fellowship Hall at Community
Congregational Christian Church, 9220 N.


Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu in-
cludes pork chops with mushroom gravy,
mashed potatoes, applesauce, seasoned
green beans, apple pie, coffee and tea. Tick-
ets are $10 for adults, $5 for children and can
be purchased at the door. Takeouts available.
For information, call the church at 352-489-
1260.
Faith Lutheran Church, in Crystal Glen
Subdivision off State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites the public to cel-
ebrate the Resurrection at 6 p.m. today and at
the sunrise service at 7 a.m. Sunday, followed
by a continental breakfast between services.
The service of the Resurrection is at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday. During breakfast time there will be an
egg hunt for children. The Living Cross will be
in the narthex of the church today and Sunday
to place live flowers on. For more information,
call 527-3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.
Saturday night Bible study is at 6 p.m. at
the Holy Grounds Cafe at Calvary Chapel in
Inverness, 960 S. U.S. 41. Enjoy free coffee
and dessert while studying the book of
Samuel. Call 352-726-1480.
Holy Faith Episcopal Church in Dunnellon
will have its Easter Vigil at 7 p.m. tonight.
Easter Sunday services are at 8 and 10 a.m.
Everyone is welcome.
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church will cele-
brate Holy Saturday with the Easter Vigil and
Holy Baptism at 7 p.m. today. Easter Sunday
will be celebrated with Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at
8 a.m. and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m.
Adult Sunday school starts at 9:30 and an
Easter egg hunt will take place at noon.
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church's
Easter Vigil begins at 7 p.m. tonight. Easter
Sunday sunrise worship is at 6:45 a.m. with
Festival Celebration of Holy Communion at
8:30 and 11 a.m. The church is on County
Road 486 opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard, in
Hernando. For more information, call 352-746-
7161.
Inverness First United Methodist Church's
Easter Sunday outdoor sunrise service at 6:30
a.m. features a live Christian praise band. A
pancake breakfast follows at 7:30 a.m. in the
fellowship hall until 10 a.m. with tickets avail-
able now for $6 or $7 at the door. The contem-
porary service begins at 9 a.m. in the
sanctuary and the traditional service is at
10:30 a.m. Touched Ministry, a contemporary
music ministry preformed by Kevin and Cherie
Daniels, will be in concert at 6 p.m. Sunday,


April 27, in the sanctuary. The concert is free.
A love offering will be accepted. The church is
at 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness.
For more information, call 352-726-2522 or
visit invernessfirstumc.org.
Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church in Cit-
rus Springs will celebrate Easter Sunday with
a sunrise service at 7 a.m. in the Memorial
Garden. Breakfast in Luther Hall will follow at
8 a.m. The Easter worship service is at 10
a.m. in the sanctuary. For more information,
call 352-489-5511. The community is invited to
all services.
Parsons Memorial Presbyterian Church,
at 5850 Riverside Drive in Yankeetown, invites
the public to the Easter Sunday sunrise serv-
ice at 7 a.m. followed by breakfast, then a
morning worship service at 11 a.m. For more
information, call 352-489-5274.
Floral City United Methodist Church will
join fellow Floral City churches for a commu-
nity Easter Sunday sunrise service at 7 a.m. in
Floral Park. A breakfast will follow in Hilton
Hall at 8478 E. Marvin St., across from the el-
ementary school. There will be an Easter wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m. in the main
sanctuary. There will be no service in the 1884
church. For more information, call 352-344
1771.
First Church of God of Crystal River is cel-
ebrating Easter Sunday with the community
with a sunrise service at 8:30 a.m., brunch at
9 a.m. and the worship celebration at 10 a.m.
Everyone is invited to be a part of the celebra-
tion. The church is at419 N. Rock Crusher
Road, Crystal River. For more information, call
the church office at 352-795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Inverness Church of God invites the com-
munity to attend "Celebrate the Light" at 10
a.m. Easter Sunday. This is a Resurrection
celebration including the children, youth and
adults in a day of family worship. The church
is at416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness. For more in-
formation, call the church office at 352-726-
4524.
First Christian Church of Inverness will
host a concert by "64 to Grayson" at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. There is no charge for tickets.
Everyone from the community is invited to at-
tend. The church is behind the RaceTrac gas
station on State Road 44 at 2018 Colonade
Street, Inverness. Call 352-344-1908. With a
unique sound that ranges from the classic har-
monies of Alabama and the young sounds of


Luke Bryan to the laidback feel of Kenny
Chesney and the meaningful messages of
Randy Travis, "64 to Grayson" is definitely not
tacked down to any particular country feel. "64
to Grayson" is geared toward an array of all
ages and backgrounds. The band's lead
singer is Zack Shelton, the son of gospel mu-
sician Thomas Shelton. Zack has played with
Josh Turner, Emerson Drive and the Gaither
Vocal Band. Zack is a recent graduate of Ken-
tucky Christian College.
Everyone is welcome to the April "Forgot-
ten Film Festival" at 3 p.m. Thursday at the
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. A $3 do-
nation is appreciated. For information, call
352-465-4225. Thursday's film, titled "Unfin-
ished Song," is about a group of British senior
citizens who enter a choral competition
singing rock and heavy metal songs. Starring
Terrence Stamp and Vanessa Redgrave.
A four-week class titled "Understanding
the Bible," will be presented by Jim Septer
from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday beginning April 24
at Unity of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto. The class is structured as fol-
lows: Week 1 We will explore the history of
religion from ancient times to see how we got
here from there. We will also discuss the
major religions and the development of their
belief systems. Week 2 We will take a closer
look at the New Testament by reviewing the
books of the New Testament in the chronologi-
cal order they were written. Week 3 We will
discuss the seven keys to understanding the
Bible as presented in the book "Let There Be
Light" by the Rev. Dr. Rocco Errico. Week 4 -
The class will conclude with metaphysically
understanding the Bible based on the Charles
Fillmore books Metaphysical Bible Dictionary
and The Revealing Word.
n Arbor Lake Chorus will present its spring
concert titled, 'Victory 1945 -A Musical Cele-
bration" at 7 p.m. Friday at Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. The program is directed
by Cory Stroup and written by Harry Hershey.
Admission is free. A love offering will be col-
lected.
The annual rummage sale at Peace
Lutheran Church will take place from
7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 26. There
will be no early sales. Shoppers will find many
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship



that offer love, peace,:



and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted.!!


Church
Of Hernand



Rechn anrsorn


Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenniy Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10OAM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siid., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplace to belong. Aplace to become."


SFloral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.comn


Shepherd'

s of the

T Hills

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offiiith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truthli
of Jesus Chirii.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday .\rIhI Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.,. to 3:15 PM Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
wwwourladyofgracefl
L. .catholicweb.com .:


\ [). l l I h I h
INVERNESS
CHURCH OF GOD
Sunday Services:
Worship Services..8:30 AM & 10:30 AM
Sunday School .....................9:30AM
Wednesday Night:
Classes For All Ages at 7:00 PM
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Dayeare
and Learning Center" & "Cornerstone
Christian Supply"



First United

Methodist

(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
Senior Pastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages
Sunday Worship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM- Vertical Kids
10:30 AM-Traditional
Wednesday Worship
6:00 PM-Vertical Youth
Foosteps Preschool
6:00 AM- 6:00 PM
Monday-Friday
352-344-4331 0
Lic. #C05C10056


First Church of
Christ, Scientist
Inverness
224 N. OsceolaAve.
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting
4:00 PM
352-726-4033


9 I 'off
Hwy. 44 E @
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Servicesm
Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
0 5th Sunday
0 of Any Month Combined 10am *
0 Sunday School for all ages 0
0 9:30 AM 0
0 Nursery Provided U
SFellowship & Youth Group
Sunday Evening
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgf
" Podcast: fpcinv.com
SChurch Office 637-0770*
Pastor James Capps


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA


Come





Worship


8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


C2 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

unusual items at amazing bargain prices. Hot-
dogs, chips and soft drinks will be available.
The church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
north of downtown Dunnellon. For more infor-
mation, call the church at 352-489-5881.
"VBS FunShop Training with a Twist"
will take place from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday,
April 26, at First Presbyterian Church, 1501
S.E. U.S. 19 (Suncoast Boulevard), Crystal
River. Churches planning to present Group
Publishing's Weird Animals theme this sum-
mer are invited to attend. This hands-on train-
ing will give practical pointers on all phases of
conducting VBS. Register online at
group.com/vbsfunshop. The fee is $20 per
person prior to one week before the event.
Registration after that and at the door is $28
per person. For more information, call the
church at 352-795-2259 or Lynn Dively at 352-
382-0435.
SA concert featuring brass and the new
pipe organ will be presented at 3 p.m. Sunday,
April 27, at First Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 W., Inverness. The program will in-
clude Michael Tranchida, trumpet, and
Jonathan Manchester, trumpet. Tranchida is a
graduate of the Juilliard School of Music and
performs throughout the Nature Coast. Man-
chester is a member of the Citrus High School
band and a student of Tranchida. The pro-
gram will include music for organ and brass


from several eras. The featured work is the Vi-
valdi concerto for two trumpets. The program
is free and open to the public. A freewill offer-
ing will be collected.
Beverly Hills Community Church Food
Pantry is participating in the 2014 Alan Shawn
Feinstein, 17th Annual $1 Million Giveaway to
Fight Hunger. The more donations made to
the food pantry through April 30, the more of
the Feinstein money the pantry will receive.
Donations can include cash, checks and food
items.
Holy Faith Episcopal Church is seeking
donations for its end-of-the-school-year
"Sneaker Project." Funds raised will provide
new sneakers for children at Dunnellon and
Romeo elementary schools. Donations are
needed by May 1. Mail contributions to:
"Sneaker Project" at Holy Faith Episcopal
Church, 19924 W. Blue Cove Road, Dunnel-
Ion, FL 34432, or stop by the church office
Monday, Wednesday or Thursday mornings.
For information, call 352-489-2685.
Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills will host its monthly outdoor flea
market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 3,
on the church property at 6 Roosevelt Boule-
vard in Beverly Hills off North Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491). Shoppers are
welcome. Up to 50 commercial and private
vendors from throughout Citrus County are
expected to display their wares. Commercial
vendors and private individuals are welcome
to bring and sell goods. Spaces are available
for $10 and should be reserved in advance.
Coffee, sodas doughnuts and hotdogs will be


available for breakfast and lunch. This church-
sponsored flea market takes place the first
Saturday monthly, September through May.
The next flea market is Sept. 6. For more in-
formation or to reserve a space, call Rose
Mary at 352-527-6459 or email
wjeselso@tampabay.rr.com.
The Knights of Columbus will sponsor a
Country Western Dinner Dance featuring an
"encore performance" by the Country Sun-
shine Band on Saturday, May 3, in the parish
hall of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church,
7525 U.S. 41 South in Dunnellon. The
evening includes a country-style dinner, cash
bar, 50/50, basket raffles and a door prize.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m., with dinner
served at 6:30. Tickets are $15 and are avail-
able at the church office, from the Knights or
by calling 352-489-6221 for tickets/table reser-
vations.
Southern Gospel solo artist Keith Plott will
appear at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 3, at Life-
point Family Church, 6430 S. Lewdinger
Drive, Homosassa, and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
May 4, at First Baptist Church of Homosassa,
10540 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa. Admission
is free. A love offering will be collected. Plott is
a Southern Gospel Music Dove Award winner
along with multiple-time winner of the South-
ern Gospel Fanfare Awards. He has per-
formed at the "Grand Ole Opry" and at the
National Quartet Convention, and with such
groups as "Brian Free and Assurance,"
"Danny Funderburk & Mercy's Way" and "Safe
Harbor."
First Church of God of Crystal River is cel-


ebrating kids (and the grownups who love
them) with a kid-friendly service at 10 a.m.
Sunday, May 4, followed by a picnic lunch
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the church property,
419 N. Rock Crusher Road. There will be car-
nival games, prizes, a bounce house, climbing
wall and other activities for people of all ages.
Everyone is invited to be a part of the celebra-
tion. For more information, call the church of-
fice at 352-795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
First Assembly of God of Dunnellon will
have a "Blessing of the Bikes" at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday, May 4. Pastor Tom Golden rides an
Ultra Classic HD. He gets you and wants to
bless you and your machine. All makes and
models are welcome. All colors welcome. The
church is at 2872 W. Dunnellon Road (County
Road 488), across from Nichols Lumber. Call
the church at 352-489-8455.
The Dunnellon Community Chorale will
present its spring concert titled "Down Mem-
ory Lane," at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 4, at First
United Methodist Church, 21501 W. State
Road 40, Dunnellon. The concert is free to the
public. A love offering will be accepted.
"Awakening Florida" is coordinating a
statewide prayer gathering from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, May 10, at ParkAvenue Bap-
tist Church, 2600 S. ParkAve., Titusville. This
will be a day of prayer and fasting, calling peo-
ple to cry out for God's purposes and seek the
destiny of the Lord for the state of Florida.
Everyone is invited to join this solemn

See NOTES/Page C5


Places of worship



that offer love, peaceW


and harmony to all.



Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted.!


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor -'
Marple Lewis III 73
Sunday Worship
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Children's Ministry
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Student Ministry
7:00 pm
Wednesday
UPLIFT Prayer & Praise 7 pm
Child Care Provided
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com


I irstBats
Cswrck
of Lake Roa seaaL
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email: k ... I. ,on F ,e ... b ,
Check us out on Facebook


9 Faith
Lutheran

Church M
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


(3 Crystal Diver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Uife Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided






CoPinservtive~ni^^


Sma~llL Jewish
,- v !_IIII l

kVJ 1 i'W M1 Swww
VEYNICE] 11





2 NYc [Srld'- Ayfe







2101 N, Florida Ave,

Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


SPRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


NORTH CITRUS

CHRISTIAN\

CHURCH
Phone: (352) 527-0021



Sunday Services: 10:30am
Bible Study:
Wednesday 6:30pm
Minister
George Plantz
Where your search for a
friendly Bible Church ends




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
0, CKINC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKyTNL J
RIVIEK w
,VNIT CD
N-.CTHODISTI
C H U KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:- A Stephen Ministry Provider .


1st UI NIT:EDm


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1 umc.org

k Homosassa Springs
A. SEVEN-DAYADVENTISfQ-URCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor William Bremmer
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 4:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Inverness
Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


B0 Crystal
0= River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm
795-4479


SWest I
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.





US Hwy. 19 (D


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30

Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
S David Curry


SFirst Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i I'til Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org

GM
the
2JoIf' I 11Timothy


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen

Come To E--
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor




unity
of Citrus County

A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING



WE ARE A JOYOUS COMMUNITY
WHICH INSPIRES, EMBRACES,
AND NURTURES ALL THOSE ON
THEIR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY
SERVICE OFFERINGS:
SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT
CLASSES, WEDDINGS,
CHRISTENINGS, MEMORIALS,
AND HOLY UNIONS
WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30
NURSERY/SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30
I 'Founidfa ,Bngfiter-('it"






KNOWING GOD, LOVING
GOD, SERVING GOD

2628 W WOODVIEW
LANE LECANTO, FL
I 34461
352-746-1270
WWW.UNITYOFCITRUS.ORG


RELIGION


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Michigan mud run adds


twist by carrying the cross


Associated Press
LAPEER, Mich. -A new Chris-
tian-themed mud run has added an
unusual twist to the barbed wire
and flames that have become com-
monplace at similar events.
The opportunity to carry an 8-
foot-tall cross to the top of a hill.
"The whole idea behind (Jesus)
dying on the cross was to forgive
our sins," race organizer Michael
O'Neill told The Flint Journal.
"I thought it would be cool if we
could experience carrying that
cross up the hill without the pain
and suffering, obviously"
The 5K Cross Course run set for
June 14 at the Michigan Christian
Youth Camp in Attica is to raise
money for Little Dresses for Africa,
a group that provides handmade
dresses individually crafted from
pillow cases in the U.S. for children
of Africa living in orphanages,
churches and schools.
The 3.11-mile obstacle course
will lead runners through trails
and pastures to encounter more
than 15 obstacles along the way, in-
cluding a mud crawl, wall climb,
rope swing, slip and slide, tires,
cargo climb, up and overs, mud
bomb forest, cross carry and the
pit.
The halfway point of the course
features a stop where runners have
the option of picking up crosses
ranging in size from 2 to 8 feet tall
and carrying them up a hill. At the
top of the hill, there will be a
chapel where participants can
drop their crosses and say a quick
prayer
"(People can) use it to take a mo-
ment to get rid of our own sins and
give them to Jesus," said O'Neill.
Participants are allowed to run,
walk or jog, and all of the obstacles
throughout the course are optional.


"You don't have to be in shape to
do this. Anyone that can walk can
do this," said O'Neill, who said he
felt a calling from above to put on
the event
"I created Cross Course Mud Run
to benefit a charity that is close to
my heart Little Dresses for
Africa," said O'Neill. "In 2008, my
mother founded this charity after
visiting Africa and recognizing the
children's need for simple clothing,
and more importantly, to show the
little girls that they are worthy and
to boost their self-esteem. She has
inspired so many to help and has
distributed over 2.5 million dresses
for deserving little girls in Africa,"
he said.
Several hundred people have al-
ready registered for the race, but
the O'Neills hope to have 1,000 par-
ticipants.
Megan Frump, 35, from South-
gate, will be driving to Lapeer for
the day to participate in the run
with her husband.
An amateur 5K runner, both
Frump and her husband placed in
a Biggest Loser competition at
their church, where members were
challenged to lose weight.
Frump was surprised to hear that
there would be crosses available to
carry, but said she will definitely
carry one. "I think that's pretty
awesome," she said.
Chris Frump, 37, said that he
likes the symbolism associated
with carrying the cross, "doing the
same thing that Jesus Christ did for
us," he said.
"It's something to challenge us. A
lot of other runs have a party-type
atmosphere. We're really looking
forward to this run more than oth-
ers because we'll be surrounded by
people that have the same walk of
faith as we do."
"I love the cause. I love his


mom's organization, Little Dresses
for Africa. Mike's passion behind
everything is really awesome. I love
the fact that it's mixing a good
cause, a healthy activity and God
all in one," said Megan Frump.
Rachel O'Neil said she hopes her
son will raise the $20,000 it will cost
to fill a 40-foot container with more
than half a million pillow-case
dresses and pants for boys, furni-
ture and medical supplies.
In addition, the container will
carry school supplies for the 450
children who attend a primary
school that Little Dresses for Africa
built in the country of Malawi, in-
cluding desks, paper, pens, globes,
maps, chalk and chalkboards, to
name a few
The 40-foot container will stay in
Africa to be used for food storage
after the supplies are emptied.
Rachel O'Neill will travel to Africa
to distribute the container's con-
tents once it is shipped.
"We've had a tremendous re-
sponse from all over the United
States, but until we get the clothes
on the backs of these children, our
job is not complete. Getting the
items shipped over there is our
biggest challenge. We're not just
sending dresses, we're sending
hope," she said.
It is Michael O'Neill's hope that
if the race succeeds, Cross Course
could be used as an avenue for
other ministries to raise money "It
doesn't have to be for Little
Dresses. We could pack it up
and bring Cross Course to any loca-
tion that wants to put it on, but it
will always be Christ-centered," he
said.
Cross Course will begin at 10 a.m.
at Michigan Christian Youth Camp
in Lapeer Participants have to
bring a signed waiver to compete,
according to the event's website.


Associated Press
Pope Francis kisses a child as he arrives
Thursday at the Don Gnocchi Foundation for
assistance to disabled and elderly to celebrate
the rite of the washing of the feet, in Rome. Pope
Francis has washed the feet of 12 elderly and
disabled people women and non-Catholics
among them in a pre-Easter ritual designed to
show his willingness to serve like a "slave."
Francis' decision in 2013 to perform the Holy
Thursday ritual on female and Muslim inmates at
a juvenile detention center just two weeks after
his election helped define his rule-breaking
papacy. It riled traditionalist Catholics, who
pointed to the Vatican's own regulations that the
ritual be performed only on men since Jesus' 12
apostles were men. The 2014 edition brought
Francis to a center for the elderly and disabled
Thursday. Francis kneeled down, washed, dried
and kissed the feet of a dozen people, some in
wheelchairs. He said the ritual is a gesture of "a
slave's service."


Places of worship



that offer love, peace :,



and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!


iD ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


THE 1
SALVATION LJ
ARMy CITRUS COUNTY
AR CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish
712S. cbol ve
Lec/nt
51-960..,


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
/!l /llt!ll/lll l/W /L I ,I. L I ,lI


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
fWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June- August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9-30-10-00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'
714S. Scarbor ...
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813



0_ 0 8

"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Comnmunity
with a
Heart
for the
Comlmunity"



2105 .GogaR.


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIANk
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS t
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00A.M. Sunday School
10:15A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study


^SsB^S

F 47 Yearsof
IRST Bringing Christ
LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
S9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


t St. Timothy t"
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor



^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


- Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


First Baptist
_Church
Sof Floral City
L Lifling Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I '- I I ,, it [ ,r ,-
ii'. ][,: l [ ] r HI I ,. I,,
-Im


HERNANDO

United
Methodist
Church

Opfw
Hear,

Miwis,

Voorws

S .. .. for Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1F/ miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107 I 1


C4 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Around the world, Christians came together in observance of Good Friday,
which they believe was the day Jesus was crucified.
In the Philippines, Asia's largest Roman Catholic nation commemorated the oc-
casion by re-enacting the crucifixion. Devotees have themselves nailed to wooden
crosses, rituals that church leaders do not condone but that draw huge crowds. Un-
deterred, some penitents participate in the practice year after year
Devotees undergo the re-enactment in the belief that extreme pain is a way to
atone for their sins, attain miracle cures for illnesses or give thanks to God.
In the Holy Land, Christians marked the day with prayers and processions, with
thousands of pilgrims crowding along the Via Dolorosa, or "Way of Suffering," car-
rying wooden crosses.
They end at the ancient Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem. Tradition
says the church was built on the site where Jesus was crucified, buried and resur-
rected.
Here are some photos from Good Friday commemorations around the world:


Associated Press
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: An Indian Christian devotee enacts the crucifixion of Jesus Christ to mark Good Friday at The Mount Carmel Church in Hyderabad, India. A
Christian devotee re-enacts the crucifixion of Jesus Christ to mark Good Friday in Jammu, India. Sri Lankan Christians carry a cross symbolizing the journey of the crucifixion
of Jesus Christ during a Good Friday procession in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Danish national Lasse Spang Olsen, a 48-year-old filmmaker, grimaces as he is nailed to a cross to
re-enact the crucifixion of Jesus Christ in San Pedro Cutud village, Pampanga province, northern Philippines.


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

assembly. Entrance fee is $10. Registration and information at:
awakeningflorida.com.
Grace Temple Church of the Living God will host its an-
nual Rev. Leroy Bellamy Scholarship Fund Memorial Service
at 4 p.m. Sunday, May 18. The community is invited to attend.
The church is at 7431 Old Floral City Road, Floral City. The
pastor is Larry McReynolds. For more information, call 352-
726-0501.
Mary Magee-Allen, LUT, will present a six-week health
and wholeness class from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday through May
20 at Unity of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. This course is based in the spiritual laws and univer-
sal principles that support the expression of health and whole-
ness in our minds, bodies and affairs. There are three major
topics in which the teachings are based: The Source of Heal-
ing; The Consciousness of Healing; The Practice of Healing.
There will be a concert by Annie & Tim's Bluegrass Gospel
Band at 7 p.m. Friday, May 23, at First Presbyterian Church,
1501 S.E. U.S. 19 (Suncoast Boulevard), Crystal River. Alove
offering will be collected at the performance to benefit the inter-
generational Vacation Bible School ecumenical program spon-
sored by First Presbyterian Church, St. Anne's Church and St.
Timothy Lutheran Church. Join us for an evening of fun, fellow-
ship, and root beer floats. Call 352-795-2259. Intergenera-
tional VBS will take place from 8:30 a.m. to noon June 16-20
at First Presbyterian Church.
Seven Rivers Christian School invites all girls ages 4 to
8th grade to Spirit Camp 2014 from 8:30 a.m. to noon Tuesday
through Friday, May 27-30, at the Seven Rivers Christian
School Gymnasium. Cost of $45 includes a snack each day
and a souvenir T shirt. Spirit Camp is coached by Julie Taylor,
the former coach of Camp Rah Rah at CRHS. Coach Taylor
brings 13 years of cheerleading and camp experience and has
established herself as a premier cheer coach in Citrus County.
Register early and save $5. Registrations need to be received
by May 19. You can also register the first day of camp. There
will be a pep rally and performance for family and friends at
noon Friday.
Helping Hands Thrift Store, a ministry of Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church, is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund the food
pantry. The store accepts donations of household items, cloth-
ing and small appliances. Call 352-726-1707.
The Genesis Project, an in-depth analysis and discussion
of the text of Genesis, is conducted from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday
at Etz Hayim Institute the Adult Education Program of Con-
gregation Beth Sholom, 102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A class
on American-Jewish History is also offered from 8:15 to 9:15
p.m. Monday through June 23. Both classes are taught by
Hazzan Mordecai Kamlot. For more information, call 352-643-
0995.


Cornerstone Christian Supply, a ministry of the Inverness
Church of God, has available for purchase the newly released
novel, "At the Bottom of Biscayne Bay," by Fred H. Brannen,
Jr. The novel is a quixotic courtroom drama, wrapped in a love
story, with a thread of the inspirational truth concerning God's
unfailing faithfulness interwoven within its lines. Cornerstone
Christian Supply is an excellent source for all your Christian
needs: Bibles, greeting cards, books, T-shirts, gifts, etc. Cor-
nerstone Christian Supply is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
For more information, call the store at 352-344-2470.
The ladies of Lecanto Church of Christ meet for Bible
study at 10 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly. Bible study is fol-
lowed by a luncheon. Studies have included such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All ladies are invited to attend and
enjoy Christian fellowship.
Community Christian Karate Club (CCKC) offers a Citrus
County group for learning karate skills, working on cardio, and
meeting new friends. Three different classes for three different
age groups are offered: the 4- to 7-year-old class, 8- to 12-
year-old class, and the teen/adult class. Classes take place
Tuesday evenings at New Hope Baptist Church, 8635 W.
Goodman Lane, Homosassa. Cost is $25 a month with dis-
counts for families. For more information, contact 5th degree
black belt instructor Greg Gunn at 352-428-6348 or email
ggunn14@gmail.com or visit www.topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist Catholic Church offers Bingo at 11:30
a.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday featuring regular,
double and special bingos, together with a jackpot and "pickle"
game. Doors open at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m. Wednes-
day. Kitchen features "homemade" soups and sandwiches.
The church is on U.S. 41, three miles north of Dunnellon.
SAll widows in the community are invited to join the Widows
Ministry Group from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
"God isn't finished with us yet!" For information, call Darla at
352-270-8115.
n A Christian Bible-based spiritual recovery group meets
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Living Water Ministry
Complex, 1 Beverly Hills Blvd., Beverly Hills. For more infor-
mation, call Meg at 352-527-2443.
"Get in Touch With Your Faith," a Christian information
class at Peace Lutheran Church," continues at 6 p.m. Thurs-
days. Pastor Terry McKee conducts the class for 1 hour
weekly. Everyone is welcome. There is no fee. To register, call
the church office at 352-489-5881 .The church is at 7201 S.
U.S. 41, five miles north of Dunnellon.
The Beverly Hills Community Church spaghetti suppers
take place from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday monthly in the Jack
Steele Hall at 86 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation of $8
per person or two tickets for $15 includes all-you-can-eat
salad, spaghetti with meat sauce, Italian bread, dessert and
coffee or tea. Come and enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door.
Ladies, come to "The Well" for refreshment and prophetic
prayer ministry at 7 p.m. the first Friday monthly at FresHope
Ministries, 2991 E. Thomas St., Inverness. If you are hurting,


need to hear a word from God, and/or spiritual growth and
strength, then this is the night just for you. Come comfortable
and come expecting to receive. You will not leave the same
way you came in. Call 352-341-4011 or visit www.freshopemi-
nistries.com.
The Men's Club of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church on
U.S. 41 in Dunnellon play horseshoes at 9 a.m. Saturday.
Horseshoes are provided to anyone needing them along with
instructions in pitching, scoring and court maintenance.
Women, children and persons who have never pitched horse-
shoes before are invited to attend and share in the fun and fel-
lowship. For more information, call 352-489-5954.
The Saturday night Gospel Jubilee takes place the last
Saturday night monthly at First Church of God 5510 Jasmine
Lane, Inverness. Everyone is invited to come to enjoy or come
and participate. Prepare a number, bring your instrument if you
have one and join in this full-filled evening. Great music, fun,
food, fellowship and never a charge. For more information, call
352-344-3700.
The public is welcome to Zen meditation sessions at 2:45
p.m. Sunday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto (off County Road 491). For more information, call
352-464-4955.


SUPERHEROES

WANTED










Crystal River/

Dunnellon

Relay for Life
Friday, April 25, 2014 6:00PM
Crystal River High School
Complimentary
Cancer Survivor/Caregiver Dinner
5:30PM
For more information, call Rory Wells at 352-201-9057
or email: rorywellsrelay@gmail.com
www.relayforlife.org/crystalriverfl


JUDI
Continued from Page Cl

synagogue. I give tzedakah
and do mitzvot when I can
while balancing my role as
wife, mother and grand-
mother I try to maximize
the time I have, however,
waiting in phone queues
for answers to credit card
or bank questions does
have a negative effect on
my busy day!
I hope the Lord wants
me around for a long
time. I have a lot more
columns to write.


Easter Movie n the Pines

Saturday, April 19th at 8pm

Bring your lawn chairs, yourjriends and family and come out to
Whispering Pines Park to watch the movie HOP! The Easter Bunny


and Sunny Cooter wit
A M Kid"


It be there with something specialfor everyone!
's zone begins at 7:30pm Movie begins at sunset
Food vendors available l
Free face painting and bungee trampoine .


K, ( ... IN S IG H T F "UHF-" W
L 4 4i -- --,- .. .^ ..., --L
LB ^Bg ;; 7-^'Nso^s~


RELIGION


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 CS





Page C6 -SATURDAY, APRIL 19,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Garden club to host
two-day flower show
The Garden Club of Crystal
River will host a standard flower
show from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday,
April 25, and from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, April 26, at the
Coastal Region Library, in
Crystal River
The theme of the show is "The
Magic of Nursery Rhymes." A
children's activity will be avail-
able with plants for the children
to take home.

Doll enthusiasts
to gather Wednesday
The Central Florida Sugar
Babes Doll Club will meet at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday in room 115
at the Central Citrus Community
Center off County Road 491 be-
hind Diamond Ridge Convales-
cent Center
Lunch will follow the meeting
at the Main Street Restaurant in
Beverly Hills. The program will
be "Friendship, Fun and the Fu-
ture."
Sugar Babes is a member of the
United Federation of Doll Clubs.
Visitors are always welcome. For
more information, call Barbara at
352-344-1423.

Enjoy 'Night at the
Museum' in CR
The Crystal River Heritage
Council is hosting a fundraiser:
'A Night At The Museum" from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday
The evening will include a per-
sonal nighttime tour of the
Coastal Heritage Museum and
beverages, light refreshments and
musical entertainment at the
Wine Shop II a few doors down.
Ticket cost is $25 per person.
Call 352-795-1755 or Sharon
Padgett at 352-212-8390.

Luau Dinner Dance
slated for social club
Citrus American Italian Social
Club will host its May Luau Din-
ner Dance at 5 p.m. on Saturday,
May 3, at the club, 4325 S. Little Al
Point, in Inverness.
Menu includes roast pork ten-
derloin, roasted potatoes, veg-
etable, salad and dessert. BYOB.
Cost is $15 for members and $17
for nonmembers.
For tickets call Angie at 352-
637-5203 or Marie at 352-419-6320
by Friday, April 25.

Free Zumba classes at
Unity of Citrus
Zumba classes for beginners
are offered at 11:30 a.m. Monday,
Thursday and Saturday at the
Unity Church, 2628 W Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Call 352-628-3253.


Humanitarians OF
FLORIDA

Champagne


Special to the Chronicle
Champagne is a pretty smoky-
black and white older kitten with
luxurious whiskers and white
socks. She was shy but is coming
out of her shell. She loves
attention and once she gets to
know you, she is your friend and
will purr up a storm. There are
many other varieties of felines to
choose from as well. Drop by and
enjoy the felines in their cage-free,
homestyle environment from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Hardin Haven on
the corner of State Road 44 and
North Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of our felines online at
www.petfinder.com/shelters
/fl186.html.


Go Florida-friendly


Workshop


willfocus on


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Florida-Friendly Land-
scaping is offering a free workshop to dis-
cuss designing a sustainable garden from
2 to 3 p.m. Tuesday
The workshop will cover the establish-
ment and maintenance of the lawn and
landscape. Lawn areas in Florida land-


best, most effectivepractices for landscaping


scapes require more time, chemicals and
supplemental irrigation than up north.
Best management practices will be dis-
cussed and identification of nutritional,
insect and turf diseases will be shared.
Planting lawns in the right places, se-
lection of the proper grass, establishment
and maintenance are all things to be con-
sidered when choosing to plant lawns.


Utilizing Florida-Friendly Landscaping
practices and sustainable alternatives re-
duces management costs and water con-
sumption by lawns and landscapes.
Classes are held at the Citrus County
Extension Service building, 3650 W Sov-
ereign Path in Lecanto.
Call Steven Davis at 352-527-5708 to
confirm participation.


Celebrating our valuable resources


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed April 6 through 12 as National Volunteer Week in Citrus County. The
proclamation urged all citizens to help recognize and renew the volunteer spirit of Citrus County by committing to address the needs
of the community through service. In 2013, 514 volunteers donated a total of 97,727 volunteer hours, which equals to $2,163,667.
The talents, generosity and energy of volunteers continue to be Citrus County's most valuable natural resources. Citrus County
communities would be deprived of numerous programs, services and activities without the support and involvement of volunteers.
To find out more about becoming a volunteer, call 352-249-1275 or visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.




Paddle to Shell Island for Earth Day


Special to the Chronicle
Join a Florida Coastal Office biologist
and the Florida Public Archaeology Net-
work archaeologists on a guided paddle
to Shell Island on Earth Day Guided tour
will take place from 10:30 a.m. Tuesday
and will depart from the boat ramp west
of Fort Island Gulf Beach Park.
Participants will explore a portion of
the St. Martin's Marsh Aquatic Preserve


during their adventure to Shell Island.
Ecological concepts and local archaeol-
ogy will be discussed on Shell Island dur-
ing a picnic lunch. Bring sunscreen,
lunch and water
Space is limited and some rental
kayaks are available, courtesy of A Crys-
tal River Kayak Company Cost is $15 per
person providing their own equipment
and $20 per person wishing to rent equip-
ment. Rental cost covers kayak, paddle,


personal floatation device and whistle.
Participants providing their own gear are
required to provide their own kayak, pad-
dle, personal floatation device and whis-
tle per U.S. Coast Guard regulations.
Departure is from Fort Island Beach boat
ramp.
Space is limited; spaces must be re-
served for this tour Call Jamie at 352-563-
0450 or Lisa at 352-795-0208 for details
and to reserve a space.


CF seeks vendors for arts, culture expo


Event setfor May 3 in Lecanto


Special to the Chronicle
The College of Central
Florida is seeking vendors for
an arts and culture expo it will
host Saturday, May 3, at its
Citrus Campus, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.


The expo will showcase vi-
sual, literary, performing and
musical arts opportunities
available in Citrus County
Arts organizations, galleries,
museums, studios, entertain-
ment venues, photographers,
decorators, writers, musicians


and actors are invited to par-
ticipate as vendors. They may
set up displays, distribute
print materials and samples
and offer demonstrations for
the public.
There is no fee to partici-
pate and a box lunch will be
provided for participating pre-
senters and vendors. Vendors
will also be provided with a


table and two chairs, within an
8-by-10-foot area in the Citrus
Learning and Conference Cen-
ter Electricity will not be pro-
vided. A prize will be awarded
for the best table.
To participate, contact CF
Associate Professor of Visual
Arts Michele Wirt at 352-746-
6721, ext 6131, orwirtm
@cf.edu.


NEWS NOTES


Help needed
to foster puppies
The Humane Society of
Citrus County shelter has a
number of puppies that
could use individualized so-
cialization and training.
Volunteers are needed to
help them go into their new
homes knowing some basics.
With such a small staff, there
are not enough hours in the
day to spend that much time
with each puppy
The Humane Society
seeks anyone interested in
volunteering to work with
the puppies. The shelter
could also use any volun-
teers who would be inter-
ested in helping with
fundraisers, laundry, general
help with cleaning, and to
assist in operating the thrift
store.
To volunteer, call the shel-


ter office at 352-341-2222 and
ask for Lisa. The Humane
Society of Citrus County is a
nonprofit organization and
operates the only no-kill
shelter in Citrus County

AARP slates driver
course next week
Florida is a mandated
state and any insurance com-
pany doing business in
Florida must give a discount
to those completing an
AARP Safe Driving Course,
open to everyone age 50 and
older Contact your agent for
discount amounts.
Course fee is $15 for AARP
members; $20 for all others.
Call the listed instructor to
register:
Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon,
First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W Bradshaw


Blvd., Homosassa. Call
Frank Tobin at 352-628-3229.
Tuesday and Wednesday,
April 29 and 30,10:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., Homosassa Public
Library Call Phillip Mulrain
at 352-628-7633.

Chassahowitzka
group to meet
A public meeting of the
Chassahowitzka Community
Association will be at 7 p.m.
Thursday at the community
center, 10300 S Riviera
Drive.
The association will up-
date the public on its
progress, outline future
plans, request input and ask
for volunteers and support.
Everyone is welcome. Com-
ments may also be made at
chassahowitzka@outlook.
com.
The association works to-


ward the betterment of the
community. Youth programs,
adult fitness, social events,
local history preservation
and support of local recre-
ational and environmental
issues are priorities.
To get on the email mail-
ing list of the Chassahow-
itzka Community
Association, email chassa
howitzka@outlook.com.

Learn social
ballroom dance
Social ballroom dance
classes are offered Wednes-
days at the Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Basics are taught at
1:30 p.m., Plus classes are at
2:45 p.m. Proceeds help sup-
port In-Home Senior
Services.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

AT THE LIBRARY
CENTRAL RIDGE LIBRARY
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465-4281
352-746-6622
www.citruslibraries.org

April 21
Scrabble Game, 10 a.m.
Adults Create: Spring
Flower Wreath, 10:30 a.m.
Bodacious Beading Babes, 1 p.m.
Nature Coast Dulcimer Club, 3 p.m.
Tobacco Cessation Class, 5 p.m.
April 22
Lakeside Village POA, 10 a.m.
Word: Templates, 10:15 a.m.
Preschool Stories, 11 a.m.
Fun and Games, 1 p.m.
Pre-GED Math Foundations,
4:30 p.m.
April 23
Tai Chi, 10 a.m.
Mother Goose, 11 a.m.
Afro-American Club
of Citrus County, 3:15 p.m.
April 24
AARP Safe Driving Course, 10 a.m.
Depression & Anxiety
Support Group, 10 a.m.
Web Browsing: Getting
Started, 10:15 a.m.
Emotions Anonymous, 12:30 p.m.
Pre-GED Social Studies, 3 p.m.
April 25
AARP Safe Driving Course, 10 a.m.
April 26
La Leche League Series
Meeting, 10:30 a.m.
Education Research Group
Meeting, 1 p.m.


NEWS NOTES

New Home Again store
opens at Beverly Plaza
A new branch of the Home
Again Resale Store opens Mon-
day at Beverly Plaza next to
Dollar General.
Since June 2012, the Home
Again Resale Store has featured
quality consignment furniture
and furniture accessories at 1980
N. Future Terrace, across from
the Chevron Station.
Consignments are on a 50/50
basis and one of the store's mottos
is "Too good to give away?
Consign with us."
Both stores are open from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday Both stores are non-
profit and exclusively benefit the
Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club.
For more information, call 352-
270-8861.

BH Post 237 accepting
officer nominations
The Beverly Hills American
Legion Post 237 will accept nomi-
nations for post officers for the
2014-15 term at its regular meet-
ing at 7 p.m. Tuesday
Members being nominated
must be present to accept the
nomination, according to Ray
Roby, Post 237 commander

Holocaust memorial
slated for April 27
A Holocaust Memorial Service
will take place at 2 p.m. Sunday,
April 27, at the Kellner Audito-
rium (Congregation Beth Sholom)
at 102 Civic Circle in
Beverly Hills.
For more information, call Karl
Seidman at 352-344-1531 or email
him at thekseid@gmail.com.
Coin Club to gather

in Beverly Hills
The Beverly Hills Coin Club
will meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday
April 28, at the Central Ridge
Library
There are no dues. The club's
purpose is to bring local coin col-
lectors together and numismatic
education.
For details, call Joe at 352-527-
2868.

Knights Ladies
to host Spring Fling
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Knights of Columbus No.6168 will
host its Spring Fling from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 29, at the
Knights of Columbus Hall, 2389 W
Norell Bryant Blvd., Lecanto.
Doors open at 10:30 a.m. The
event includes tricky tray baskets,


raffle, money trees and door
prizes.
Bring a monetary or baby gift
donation for the Pregnancy and
Family Life Center, and receive a
free door prize ticket.
Cost of the luncheon is $15,
which includes a buffet luncheon
cooked by John Mason Catering,
coffee, dessert and door prizes.
For tickets, call Fran Wagner at
352-527-0723 or Pearl Sheehan at
352-637-5395 before 5 p.m.
Net proceeds are donated to
local nonprofit organizations and
a scholarship fund for a Citrus
County high school student
graduate.
Tickets are limited to 160; there
will be no ticket sales at the door


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 C7


Help for Respite Care


Special to the Chronicle
The St. Scholastica Knights of Columbus Council 14485 donated $791.42 to the Citrus County Catholic Charities' Respite Care
Program. The program is designed to meet the growing needs of the elderly populations in Hernando and Citrus counties. Staff and
trained volunteers provide center-based respite to early stage Alzheimer's and other memory-loss clients and their caregivers.
Respite Care operates four hours every Wednesday at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills and also Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at the Catholic Charities Hernando Community Outreach Center in Spring Hill. The Respite Care Programs offer specially
planned days for people with early stage Alzheimer's disease or other memory-loss illnesses including stroke, Parkinson's disease or
senile dementia. They provide caregivers the opportunity to have some much-needed time for themselves while their loved ones
participate in activities and enjoy new friendships. The program provides a nurturing and positive environment, and the opportunity to
socialize with others who share in the same affliction. The program also provides caregiver support services, training and technical
assistance to groups seeking to develop caregiver programs. Pictured are: Council Advocate Roger Preble, Respite Program
Coordinator Gary Chapin and Council Grand Knight Dave Kononitz.


C news from the Central Ridge area

COMMUNITY


Diaper
donations
President Dick Morton of
the Kiwanis Club of
Central Ridge-Crystal River
is collecting diapers and
donating them to needy
parents. The local club has
donated 2,112 diapers to
assist with a Florida state
Kiwanis goal of 750,000.
Pictured: Dick Morton
donates diapers to Deborah
Odle of the Life Choice
Pregnancy Center. Kiwanis
is making diapers available
to any agency/needy
parents. To make a
donation or for more
information, call Morton
at 352-465-1000.

Special to the Chronicle


Horseshoe winners


Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club had its end-of-year league doubles
tournament on March 19. The winning team was Stan Champion and Sam
Gonzalez, and in close second were Ed Bradford and Ed Tauber. All
competitors had a good time throwing many ringers and many points. The
club is known for its camaraderie and competition. Summer league will
start in May. Women and men wanting to join may call or email President
Ron Fair at 352-746-3924 or rfair3@tampabay.rr.com. Pictured, front, are:
Ed Bradford and Stan Champion. In back are Ed Tauber and Sam Gonzalez.


NEWS NOTES


'Sneaker Project'
Holy Faith Episcopal
Church is seeking dona-
tions for its end of the
school year "Sneaker
Project."
Funds raised will pro-
vide new sneakers for
children at Dunnellon
and Romeo elementary
schools.
Donations are needed
by May 1.
Mail contributions to
"Sneaker Project" at
Holy Faith Episcopal
Church, 19924 W Blue
Cove Road, Dunnellon
FL 34432, or stop by the
church office Monday,
Wednesday or Thursday
mornings.
For information, call
352-489-2685.

Friends' sale
The Friends of the
Dunnellon Public Li-
brary, 20351 Robinson
Road, is preparing for its
two-day Boomtown Day
Spring Book Sale to be
held in the meeting
room of the library
The sale will run from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, April 25
and 26, with a special
"bag of books" for $4 or
all hardback books for $1


and all paperback books
for 50 cents. The all-
volunteer staff will be
there to help.
Categories such as
cooking, inspirational,
novels, history war, poli-
tics, children's books,
classics and more will be
available.
All proceeds from the
book store, membership
fees and other fundrais-
ers benefit the Dunnel-
lon Public
Library
For more information,
call 352-438-2520.

'Elvis'on stage
Billy Lindsey as Elvis
will be at the Central
Ridge Community Cen-
ter, 77 Civic Circle in
Beverly Hills, from 7 to
9 p.m. Friday, May 9.
Doors open at 6 p.m.
Volunteers from the
Nature Coast Volunteer
Center will be on hand
selling hamburgers and
hot dog plates.
Tickets are $5 for
members of the center
and $8 for nonmembers
and will available at
Parks & Recreation
Offices.
For more information,
call 352-465-7007, 352-
746-4882 or 352-527-7540.




C8 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING APRIL 19, 2014 C: Comcast, Citrus B:Bright House .. Comcast, Dunnellon&lnglis F:Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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West
*J 8 7 4 3 2

* 10 9 6 5
4.J 72


South
14
4 V


North 04-19
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W 863
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East
2 Q 9 6 5
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South
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9-14


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
West North East


Pass Pass


Pass


Opening lead: 4 2


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Samuel Johnson, an 18th-century English es-
sayist, said, "The two offices of memory are
collection and distribution."
One of the offices of success at the bridge
table is collection of information, which might
involve hand distribution as in this deal.
South is in four hearts after East opened one
club. West leads his lowest club. East wins with
his king, cashes his ace, and continues with a
third round to declarer's queen. How should
South continue?
South's leap to four hearts has two ways to
win: The contract might make, or he might talk
his opponents out of a higher-scoring contract.
South seems to have 11 tricks: two spades,
seven hearts, one diamond and one club. And
that will be true if hearts are 2-1. But when de-
clarer learns that clubs are 3-3, what must
East's hand distribution be?
There is only one answer: 4-3-3-3. (If he had
four diamonds, he would have opened one dia-
mond, not one club.) So South does not have a
trump entry to the board. And surely East has
the diamond king for his opening bid. What
can declarer do?
There is a clever solution. After winning the
third trick, South should cash two top trumps,
then sacrifice a heart trick by leading a low
heart East takes the trick with his jack, but
what can he do now?
Nothing! East has to lead a spade or a dia-
mond, which gives declarer access to the
dummy
Note that East cannot play his heart jack
earlier, because dummy's eight would become
an entry


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LIHEW I

@2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved
LIFTN



CUDNIT

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DREARH



A:

Yesterday's Jumbles:
Answer:


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

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have aty days.Imay
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S suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
RIGOR GEESE ACTIVE COBALT
The retriever's store was so successful
because he was a REAL GO-GETTER


39 Computer key Answer to Previous Puzzle
40 A few
41 Doctrine
43 Slumber party TH IAIR RUM U
attire MNIAT0 TEIE R E
45 Kapow! |YOlD|E|LEvRAND|A
48 Where
Nairobi is GASC L0 UlD
51 Truisms AIDI IR| I U
53 Pouched
animal AMs K\L EA P S E
56 Lunar U R L S I A M EE K S
phenomenon R TIES COOL P U P
5 7 N o t h im . .. .
58 Elevator guy T AS K A S T I S L Y
59 Plaid wearers IIN NEM AlL
60 Grassy field A I
61 Ondeck LJOJT0 TLSP SP
62Hungonto P LI A ST EIR IS L EIT


DOWN GIE
1 Mighty steed A. S|P H|
2 Metal fastener 7 Anderson
3 Prove Cooper's
innocent channel
4 Frenzied 8 Psyched up
5 Bad- 9 Crooner
mannered Martin
S Foreman foe 10 Debate side


11 Inventory wd.
17 Piece of luck
19 Bakery
purchase
22 Traffic cone
24 Worms and
minnows
S25 Stick around
27 Do batik
S28 JAMA readers
29 Cul-de- -
30 Mac rivals
- 31 Frat letter
32 Candied
goody
36 Diary keeper
38 X-rated
42 Rooting
material
44 He jilted
Medea
46 Spry
47 Award for
valor
48 Germany's
Helmut -
49 Thrust-and-
parry sword
50 Ms. Ephron
51 Helper, briefly
52 Cellphone
button
54 Versatile
vehicle
55 Stir


j 2014 LIsUF, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: I would
like to comment on
Gail Rae-Garwood's
letter about kidney disease.
I retired in 2010, and like a
lot of retirees, I was compla-
cent about my health. I had
been taking insulin
for my diabetes for
20 years and had
high cholesterol
and elevated blood
pressure. I finally
went in for my an-
nual checkup and
was shocked to
learn that I had
anemia and stage-
three kidney fail-
ure.
I had no symp-
toms for the kidney AN I
failure, with the MAI
exception of being
tired. I had always
attributed that to my diabetes
and my age (68). My doctor
told me to diet and exercise,
but it was up to me to take
ownership of my health and
be proactive. Nobody is going
to do it for you.
To make a long story short,
exercising and eating prop-
erly allowed me to lose 90
pounds. I reversed my choles-
terol in three months and am
off of medication. My dia-
betes went away in six
months. In eight months, I re-
versed my kidney failure and
am now completely normal.
My BMI is in the healthy
range. My wife has lost close
to 100 pounds and reversed
her thyroid sickness after
being on medication for six
years.
So please tell your readers
to see their doctors regularly
for blood and urine tests and
to ask for a copy of the re-
sults. Take ownership of your


L
L


health. Our successes have
astonished our doctors. I
thank God for waking us up.
Now we hopefully will be
around to see our grandchil-
dren grow up. I will celebrate
my 70th birthday this year
and look forward
to the new day To
our senior popula-
tion, it is never too
late to do some-
thing about your
health. Newbury
Park, Calif
Dear Newbury
Park: You and your
S wife are an inspira-
tion and proof that
so much of our over-
all health is tied to
HE'S our diet and exer-
.BOX cise programs.
Many things can be
improved if we
make the effort Thank you for
sharing your story You rock
DearAnnie: Please recon-
sider what constitutes
pornography In my opinion,
simply looking at nude bodies
in magazines or on the Inter-
net is not pornography If it
were, then some of the great-
est works of art should be
banned.
What I believe constitutes
true pornography is viewing
sexual acts or specific parts
of the body in a sexual way
Also, you might consider the
fact that many older men use
milder forms of so-called
porn (girlie magazines, for ex-
ample) to "charge" their bat-
teries, which can benefit
their partners. If this helps
them only at home, what is
the crime? Nude Bodies
Are OK
Dear Nude: There is a dif-
ference between nudity as art
and nudity for prurient pur-


poses. And girlie magazines
are fairly benign compared to
what's on the Internet these
days. Our problem is with the
photos that demean or ex-
ploit women or airbrush
them into such a state of per-
fection that men can no
longer appreciate real
women. And those are just
the photographs.
But our concern is not
about using pornography (of
any type) to augment what
goes on in the bedroom be-
tween consenting adults. It's
when viewing pornography
becomes addictive and inter-
feres with intimacy in the
marriage or leads to virtual
affairs.
DearAnnie: Is there any
chance that "Sick of Xeno-
phobes" was working at my
drive-thru window? I once
gave my order through the
speaker, and when the person
repeated it back to me, I
didn't understand a word of
what was said. I repeated the
order slowly and assumed it
was what was repeated back
to me, even though I couldn't
make it out. But when I got
home, there was nothing in
the bag that I had ordered.
Perhaps the person with
the thick accent had as much
trouble understanding me as
I did them. Sorry Someone
Was Rude to You

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more visit
www. creators. com.


ACROSS
1 St. Louis
landmark
5 Hurry
9 Reservoir
boundary
12 Miff
13 Humerus
neighbor
14 Conclusion
15 With, to
monsieur
16 Ninnies
18 Fab Four
member
20 AMuppet
21 Vocal group
22 Before, in
combos
23 Hack
26 Uses a
calculator
30 Force open
33 Flunk
34 Sedgwick of
the screen
35 Bloke
37 Goddess's
statue


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.coi


4-19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


sOUC CRNiO (^L
wo/ is eoy R
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Sally Forth

SI CAN'T TELL YOU 6L5S' I AND TO CELEBRATE,
HOW HAPPY I AM TO GET TH I. WROTE A NEW SON!.
BAND BACK TOGETHER -- -


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury Classic


Big Nate


NATE,YO'U TOJRNE
THAT MASCOT CONTEST
INTO A TONG6 WAP
BETWEEN tOU AND
ARTURI WHY DO YOU
ALWAYS COriPA.FE
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Arlo and Janis


/\. \ "If it's easier, you could just buy me
ANOTHER little ball to play with,"
"I PJPNYr TW ROW THE CARROTS AWAY, MOM.
I PUt T!CEM OUTS1PE FORT-IE EAST0R BUNNY."

Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
In 3D. 4:05 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Draft Day" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R) 1:30 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 1:25 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Oculus" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No


passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
In 3D. 3:30 p.m. No passes.
"Draft Day" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: .0 fnba


"SH IAWYN SPG PWOZY VO NXWDGX


SPG LGRVOOVOR HT WO JNXVYVOR


WRWVOYS SPG ZVYHXZGX HT SPG


UHXAZ."


- FWXA LWXSP


Previous Solution: "The Church has its problems, but the older I get, the more
comfort I find there." Bono
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-19


Peanuts


Pickles


YOU Ill,: U NEVER WERE ABLE !,
TO T ROW YOUR OLP
DRIVER THAT FAR!


EVERIBOD'Y COMPARES
THfEMSELVE.S TO SOME-
ON. ELSE' I M-EASURE
MSE.LF AGAiNST ARTuR.,
YOU MEASURE YOURSE.L-
AGAINST 6I1NA.-


^00 ^


VY


COMICS


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 C9


dftl', ww4m


\




CIO SATURDAY APRIL 19,2014



Chronicle


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fx(5 535 51 oFr :88823 1Ealcsie ch ncoieo Iw st pc oTe ln1


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




2 pc. Beige Loveseat
w/matching Sofa
very good cond. $400.
Chocolate Brown
Sofa, exc. cond. $250.
(518) 420-5373

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. Only 9a-2p
Fishing, Hunting
& Household
1331 NW 20th Ave

Entertainment
Center
Beautiful made in Italy
Over $2,200 New
Asking $350. obo
(352) 212-5844

NISSAN
2000 Xterra XE 140k
$1,750 352-6344286

Pet Safe Dog Kennel
5' wide x 20' long
*incl. 5' gate, incl. nice
cedar dog house
31" x45", $200.
(352)489-2011

RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566

SCORPION
Sale Boat
$200. obo
(352) 795-0125

Sealy Posturepedic
Firm Queen Mattress,
like new, exc.cond.
used only 3 mos.
asking $200.
(352) 503-9577





Yot rid S1i.


Need a ji)
40r ai
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHKOiCL


I ap oe5


Boat Tube, Black &
yellow on HWY 41
near Gobler on 4/13.
352-201-7725
Chihauhau
Smallmale, fawn
color, Responds to his
named Pepe. Lost
4/16 Beverly Hills Blvd
& N Adams St
(352) 513-4009
Chihuahua
Male, white & tan
5 Ibs. Brodie disap-
peared on 4/10
Mocassin Slough
Inverness, Windwood
Loop. 352-422-6320
REWARD


Fill in the squares so that each row.
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 tt


Magnet & Marine
Core Dog Tag & Cross
made of 3 nails
Inverness area
REWARD
(352) 746-5077
Lost Cat
Slender, female,
Tuxedo
Gospel Is Rd. Area
(352) 419-4681
(352) 201-8626 Cell
REWARD
Lost Cat, Silver Gray
Tabby, long
haired approx. 151bs.
lost near Croft and
Stevens St. in
Inverness.
Grandson's pet
misses very much!
small Reward
(352) 419-5135
Lost Male Cat,
Fat orange & white
has two collars
Near Adams Street
Beverly Hills,
(352) 527-1178
Lost Siamese Mix
2 yrs old, Male Cat,
escaped carrier
at Humanitarian of Fl.
on Commerce Terr.
off Hwy 44
(352) 563-2370
(352) 613-1629


Today's
New Ads
Sofa, Dinette Set
sofa, brown leather,
88" $350. Dinette Set,
wood table w/
wrought iron base, 4
matching chairs $300.
excellent condition!
SMW (352) 503-2416
Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
3BD., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Justa Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $110,000.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
(866) 351-1234




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

Look
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Free
4 Male Cats & 1 female
kitten, two 1 year old
cats, 1 male, 1 female
To good home,
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free Dog, Jack
Russell/Pomeranian
Mix. 12 mos. old
female
Free to good home
(352) 201-2510
Free to disabled
Brand New Walker w/
seat & hand brakes
and Pair of Aluminum
Crutches
Pick up Citrus
(352) 897-5469
Free to good home
17 moold male
Mali-Poo
up to date on shots
(352) 513-5308
HORSE MANURE
mixed with plenty of
dark rich top soil
Lecanto area near
landfill. Bring Shovel,
Truck load avail.. Help


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


column, and
through 9.


J~J 4~4~All of our
structures

Installations by Brian CBC 1253853 12OJh

-4' 4 '' 0352-621-7519


FREE OWT N
wPermit And htan
Engineering Fees' ^ tt ---* ||
SUp to $200 value It

Siding Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms Decks Windows Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Situations
HANDYMAN WANTED
(or) persons) to disas-
semble a 40 Ft. TV.
tower. Inverness area.
Call for more inform
tion. (352)201-2798


















ExpeiencdCare"'
PRE SCHOOL
STAFF NEEDED
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
40 hrs req'd, CDA Pre-
ferred (352) 341-1559










Tell that special
person
",Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




CNA's/HHA's
Experienced Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

COME WORK
FOR THE
BEST OF THE BEST
RN/LPN, FT, 11-7
MDS-PRN
All Nsg. PRN Shifts
Available
3-11 SUPERVISOR
RN Weekend
Supervisor
DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB
Linda Pursley, DON
352-746-9500 #725
don@diamondridge
healthandrehab
.com

FRONT DESK
P/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience
& experience with
Eaglesoft a must.
Fax or e-mail resume:
352-795-1637
lynn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.comn

PT Dietary Aide
Must be able to
AM & PM Shifts
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP EOE
No Phone Calls

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility, Seeking
F/T LPN's and
Certified CNA's
Must have excel-
lent organization
skills. Be a team
player. Have previ-
ous resident care
experience with
Alzheimer's and
Dementia popula-
tion is preferred.
Please Applv at:
SUSHINE GARDENS
Crystal River
311 NE 4th Ave.

Ultrahisound Tech
iPT /4hr/wk For OB
Dr Ofc, Fax Resume:
352-794-0877




-.NET Developer
with C#f experience.
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

OFFICE ASST.

Experience needed
Apply at 4079 S Ohio
Ave. Homosassa

Property
Manager

Full Time. Experience
preferred. Must
have Real Estate Lic
Please Call:
352-634-0129




Waitress/Kitchen

Must be 18 yrs old,
have a car & be a
non smoker.
ApplY in Person:
Chef Anthony's Pizza
Cafe, 2780 N Florida
Ave, Unit 6,
Hernando Plaza


SEEKING
FULL TIME
AD SALES REP
The Williston Pioneer
Sun News
Salary Plus
Commission, Based
out of Williston, FL.
Service new and
existing advertising
customers. Meet &
exceed sales goals
Excellent customer
service skills. Strong
computer skills
Reliable transporta-
tion required to
make sales calls
Email Resume to
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
Drug screen
required for final
candidate, EOE




AC Service Tech
Apply at Air Care
Heating & Cooling Inc.
7745 W Homosassa
Trail Homosassa
Drug Free Work Place

ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Experienced Lead
man with drivers lic.
Competitive Pay
(352) 795-9722

Captain & Mate

Needed for Tour
Boat. Site seeing
only. Not a manatee
Dive Operation.
(352) 400-0133

EXPERIENCED
SERVICE
PLUMBERS
Min 5 yrs experience
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973

F/T Dock Hand
at
Port Hotel & Marina
352-795-7234

Granite Fabrica-
tors & Bridge
Saw Operator
Needed
Part time w/Full time
potential NO EXP.
NEC. Will train, Must
be detail oriented
and have good
hand eye coord.
drug free workplace
Apply in Person
DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
Crystal River

































Soffit Fascia
Installers

Must have own truck
& tools willing to
work serious inquiries
only.(352) 270-8836




CITRUS MAIDS
CLEANING PERSON
PrT leading to F/T
Generallr






Needed. Must have


flex, schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Front Desk
Receptionist
Housekeeping/
Locker Rm. Attend

Personal Trainer /
Fitness Desk Staff
Inside TERRA VISTA
One of the Nations
Largest & Upscale
Country Clubs
ADDlV In Person
2125W. Skyview
Crossing, Hernando


POOL CLEANING
TECHNICIAN
Exp required. Must
have good driving
rec. Veh provided
Call 352-270-8221

Telemarketing
Manager

Salary Plus Bonuses
Mon-Fri. 9a-4p
Exp only need apply
Gerry (352) 503-6811

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F





MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547










NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School
Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM
Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE

(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu
START A CAREER
INA YEAR





AVAILABLE
Pool Supplyv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177





AVAILABLE
Pool Supplyv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177




AVAILABLE
Pool Supply vStore
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
513.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
* A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
* All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
wwws metal
structureslic~com


ANTIQUE MAHOGANY
DINING CHAIRS (4)
have fabric seat. $25
each 352-621-0175



VVVVVVv
ANTIQUE/
COLLECTABLES
Berkey & Gay bedroom
set, French couch,
Luggage trunks, Gun
Cabinet, salt & pepper
shakers, other misc.
Items contact
352-221-2836
CANE BOTTOM
CHAIRS (2) 1 black 1
brown Cane in excellent
condition $25 ea
352-621-0175



COLLECTABLES 6
Franklin Mint McDon-
aids plates. $99. all
3524656619
COLLECTABLES Sa-
lem China 6 salad & 6
mugs Christmas eve
design. $99. for all
3524656619



APPLIANCES G.E.
convection toaster
oven. like new $30.00
3524656619
APPLIANCES Mr
Coffee expresso maker.
like new $15.00
3524656619
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE Profile
Built in Microwave
$100. Dishwasher, S/S
GE Profile,White $125.
Both good Cond.
352-249-4451
KENMORE WASHER
70 SERIES WHITE $20
352-613-0529
Kitchen Appliance Set
GE, Almond, S-by-S
Refrig w/ ice/water
Range glass top, and
Diswasher. May Divide
$1,000; 352-601-3728
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $75
352-613-0529
Refrigerator
with ice maker $150
Washer & Dryer $200
will sell separately
(678) 617-5560
SILAMPOS
SKILLET/OVEN
ROASTER WITH LID
$55 PORTUGAL 12
INCH STAINLESS
STEEL 419-5981
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Stove, GE,
white,
good condition
$125.
(678) 617-5560 Cell
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529



DESK CHAIR
Adjustable High
BackSwivel, Black.
$30 (352)564-4214



MANUAL & ELECTRIC
TOOLS, WRENCHES
AND MORE
(352) 628-3570


ROCKWELL
HANDHELD BELT
SANDER $80 HEAVY
DUTY METAL INVER-
NESS 352-419-5981
Sears Wood Lathe
Bench w/2 drawers on
Wheels, turning chisels
1/3 hpgrinder $150.
Delta 10" Bench Saw
$50. (352) 382-1814



KARAOKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
Television
Toshiba, 35 inch
With remote
$85
(352) 746-4779
Television w/Remote
26" Sanyo $30
352-726-3730 or
Cell 352-422-0201
Televisions
Mitsubishi 40 in., $60
Mitsubishi 60 in., $80.
Both have good pictures
No calls B4 10:00am
(352) 628-4766
TV PANOSONIC 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $40
352-613-0529



%2 inch plywood
used for window and
door coverings $30.
(352) 419-8888
BUILDING MATERIALS
300 count grip cap nails
$30.00 352 465 6619
STILTS FOR DOING
SHEETROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316



ACER 10.1" Computer.
Win 7 Premium. Aqua.
Wireless,3G,320 gb hd,
Perfect. Office Pro 10.
$100. 352-560-0046
COMPUTER MONITOR
DEL FLAT SCREEN
14in.Works good. $15
obo Linda 4234163
COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 16 in wide.
Works good $10 Linda
4234263
DOCKING STATION &
STAND w/power cord
for DELL laptop Latitude
D-series Mint Cond. $35
352-382-3650


SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf CartoSeatsoTops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



2 pc. Beige Loveseat
w/matching Sofa
very good cond. $400.
Chocolate Brown
Sofa, exc. cond. $250.
(518) 420-5373
3-piece sectional sofa,
Excel cond., octagonal
coffee table both for
$200.Crystal River
305-394-1000 Cell
42" round wrought iron
& wicker glass -top
table & 4 chairs
$250. obo. SMW
(352) 382-2939
Antique sewing
machine table, oak
parquet style top,
decorative/dinette,
etc. Exc. cond.
$150. (352) 419-8629
Chinese Black
Pearl Cabinet
$150. White 4
Drawer Dresser $50.
(352) 270-8096
Coffee Table
Ig oak (30x20) w/
bronze glass inserts. 2
matching end tables
$300; Patio PVC table,
glass top, 4 white
steel chairs $200
(352) 465-4505
Computer Desk w/chair
excellent condition
$50.
(518) 420-5373
Dining. Room Set
6 chairs, table,
real wood. $75
6 Pc. Bed. Rm. Set, Ital-
ian, nice shape $150
(352) 423-3513
Entertainment
Center
Beautiful made in Italy
Over $2,200 New
Asking $350. obo
(352) 212-5844
Full Size Bed, pine,
headboard & frame,
brand new mattress &
box spring $350 obo
Pine Din. Rm Table 4
matching chairs
excel cond. sturdy
construction $250
(352) 344-4178



FURNITURE Mint Cond.
2 Couches, 2 Din. Sets
Ethan Allen Cabinet
qn. wicker bed, dress-
ers Fireplace & MORE
Priced to Sell 428-0721


... %, .* *..' 4

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Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises
1 ASSISTANT STORE
MANAGER
High School diploma
) or equal with 2 yrs
Retail Mgmt experience.
Full-time position Excellent benefits
Apply in person Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 SE US HWY 19 Crystal River FL 34429
EOE/DFWP 000IOLK


OOOHQCH

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


98 1 3

8



2 6 5


8 3 9 46





54 2 9_ 3


7 2 9


5


6 4 18


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org
Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cvoypress
Records.com

B17pey




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ottoman, Excel. Cond
$200.
Billiard Light for Pool
Table $50. No pets
(352) 726-6487
Hide-a-bed Loveseat
w/matching storage
ottoman. Ex Cond
$200; Lg Blue area rug
9x12 $100
352-503-6017
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Tan, like new.
No pets or smoking.
Exc. Cond! $210.
(352) 746-2329
Oak Dining Room Set
Table, leaf, 6 chairs &
64" china cabinet
$400.
Call 352-564-0212
Power Lift Recliner,
by Merlot, Maroon
New 2013, very nice
Paid $1000.
Asking $750. obo
(352) 344-5308
Qn Sz. Bed
Boxspring &
Mattress, $75. obo
Desk Executive
30" x 60", $75. obo
(352) 726-5065
QUEEN BED King Koil,
like new 8mos old,
complete Frame & Box
Spring, Moving must sell
$500. Crystal River
305-394-1000
Round Glass Top
Dining Table w/4
padded chairs, $195.
obo (231) 775-4774
Sealy Posturepedic
Firm Queen Mattress,
like new, exc.cond.
used only 3 mos.
asking $200.
(352) 503-9577
SOFA BED full size in
like new condition
wood frame $100
352-257-5687
SOFA
Micro fiber, light tan,
7 ft dual reclining sofa,
$300 (352) 274-1940
Sofa, Dinette Set
sofa, brown leather,
88" $350. Dinette Set,
wood table w/
wrought iron base, 4
matching chairs $300.
excellent condition I
SMW (352) 503-2416
TABLE BANQUET
Type folding legs
brown 5'long formica
top Great condition
$30. 352-270-3909
Tan Leather Couch &
Loveseat $450.
Decorative Korean
Chest $300.
(352) 270-8096
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TRUNDLE BED
Wrought iron frame,
everything included
good condition
$100
(352) 795-7239
Vintage Oak
Mediterranean
Bedroom Set
Q/K Headboard &
Frame, Qn. boxspring
dresser w/mirror, chest
of drawers, cedar
lined hope chest, very
good cond. $500.
(352) 746-7310



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019,201-5147
BOLENS MTD
38" Deck, 13.5 HP
4 yrs. old
Excellent Condition
$400.
(352) 270-4087
Club Cadet 2000
Clean, Good Belt,
Blades, Trans Axle
Solid Motor $650.
Craftsman 42" Riding
Mower Clean &
Rebuilt Carb/Valves/
Rings $450. with out
Battery(352) 270-4087
Craftsman 18" hedge
trimmer, Weedeater
blower, Flo-Master &
Spray Doc sprayers,
both never used, $175
total. (352) 344-4374


ELEC.HEDGE CUTTER
BLACK&DECKER 24"
HEDGE HOG.EXC.
COND. $35
352-746-4160
POWER WASHER AT-
TACHMENTS 1/4 hose
20', gun, lance & bottle
$25. Dunnellon
465-8495
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Scotts, 17.5 hp, 42 in.
cut, Automatic w/
dump cart $650
352-601-3234



HIBISCUS 3 GAL POTS
Beauties, 3 Colors, 3 for
$36 Compare to 2 gal
for $20 @ stores Inv Off
Croft 613-5818
MEXICAN PETUNIAS
PINK AND PURPLE
in 4 inch pots
6 for $10 Off Croft Rd.
613-5818




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. Only 9a-2p
Fishing, Hunting
& Household
1331 NW 20th Ave
DUNNELLON
Fri & Sat 8a-2p
Rainbow Springs,
Former Manuf. Fish Eq
Selling priv. collection.
Rods, reels, nets, etc
Plus Sew Mach, vases,
books, candles, etc
9330 SW 208 Circle



6 pr. of never used
men's shoes, 10-1/2.
4 pr. beige Pro Walker,
1 brown & 1 black
dress loafers, Total
$150. (352) 344-4374
MENS KHAKI PANTS 1
SIZE 36X29 2 SIZE
36X30 $5 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS PANTS MENS
JEANS/NEW Roots / 36
x 30 & 5 pr dress pants
$10 each Linda
423-4163
MENS SPORTS JACK-
ETS 3 BLACK,
BROWN & BLUE SIZE
40R $8 EACH
352-613-0529
WEDDING DRESS Size
8 Oleg Cassini white
strapless gown. Worn
once. 352-201-2665

i 0.]i||nll|t|41.i

CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/CASE, Con-
sumer Cellular/unlock or
911 $28. 352-382-3650



..265/70 R17..
Nice tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
---~245\65 R17---
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND BAG
ONLY 70.00 464 0316
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS
HEARTS/ANIMALS $20
FUN TO PAINT IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
1HP above ground
pump & bladder tank,
$150
352-726-7485
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
China
86 piece Crown &
Ming Set $150
Unifloor quick style,
2 boxed $50
(352) 795-7254


washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Computer Desk,
Corner style
$175.
Noritake China
$75.
(352) 423-3513
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new.l own
$50 obo Linda
4234163
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$30 352-613-0529
FOLD-UP WALKER
w/seat & hand brakes
$100.
(352) 436-3302
GE Microwave $20.
Wood End Table $20.
19" TV $20. 13"TV $10.
Wood Dinette Chair $5.
352-637-1857
Halogen Desk Lamp
Black, Counter Balance,
Hi/Lo, 50W $35 can
email pic 352-382-3650
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY
$75 (352)464-0316
King Size Serta Perfect
Sleeper Mattress and
Box Spring. $200
(352) 382-0484
LARGE FIBERGLASS
DOG KENNEL OK
SHAPE ONLY 40.00
3524640316
MOVING SALE:
lamps, couch, wall
units, tables, DirectTV
receiver & dish, 43" TV,
sofa ,bar stools, coffee
& end tables & more
(352) 794-6686
NEW MEDICINE CABI-
NET $20 SHELVES
NEED TO BE SIZED IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
PFALTZGRAFF. 5
cups/saucers, 7 bowls,4
dinner,2 dessert plates,
2 oval platters, 2 pie
plates. $75. 527-1239
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY COOPER 2
BAND OF THIEVES $5
EACH 352-613-0529
PORTABLE GRILL
for boat or camper
O'Grill 3,000, never
used, $200.
(352) 344-4374
ROCKING DOLL CRA-
DLE SOLID OAK $55
E-MAIL PHOTOS IN-
VERNESS
352419-5981
SPEAKERS SHARP
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
Twin Box Spring &
Mattress, stand &
lamp$ 100; Elvis Gold
Record Volume 4
$100 (352) 795-7254
VINTAGE 70'S MEDI-
CINE CABINET MIR-
ROR $20 DECORA-
TIVE FRAME INVER-
NESS 419-5981
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 FOR SUR-
ROUND SOUND $60
352-613-0529




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Blue $395, 1 Wine
$295. Both Exc.Cond.
352-270-8475
4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
Bedside Commode
$20.00
Walker $5.00
Bedrails $40.00
(352) 382-5883
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316


WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 (352)464-0316
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316



ELECTRIC GUITAR SG
COPY BLACK&
CHROME
LOOKS,PLAYS,
SOUNDS NEW! $50
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR-
LEAD AMPLIFIER
35W,ONBOARD EF-
FECTS 12"SPEAKER
$100 352-601-6625
LES PAUL BLACK
BEAUTY COPY
LOOKS,PLAYS NEW
GOLD HARDWARE
$100 352-601-6625
LOWREY ORGAN
MX-2, With all the
bells and whistles.
Exc Cond, w/ bench
$1,000 obo
352-601-6664
NEWPORTER BY
FENDER TRAVEL/
STUDENT ACOUSTIC
GUITAR&GIGBAG
$100 352-601-6625
Piano
Console,
Kohler Cambell
Very Nice Shape $150.
(352) 423-3513



3 MATCHING BRASS &
GLASS CHANDELIERS
- 3 SIZES 8 lights, 3
lights & 2 lights $50
732-977-2616
BIRD CAGE LG BIRD
CAGE/STAND good
condition / $35 obo
Linda 4234163 Linda
4234163
HOUSEHOLD Ralph
Lauren navy/gray Q
sleeping bag. like new
$30.00 352 465 6619



A space saver
PRO-FORM
XP,CROSSWALK 580
treadmill exerciser, from
Sears. $100.00
352-857-6050
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
HEALTH ITEM
Automatic upper arm
Blood Pressure tester
$20.00 352 465 6619
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75.464-0316
Proform Resistance
Bike, Never used, pd
$350, asking $150.
Call Evenings
(352) 344-3131
WESLO 78 TREAD-
MILL. Time, Distance,
Calories, Speed, Incline.
Folds.$100
352-560-0046

S orting


12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS Set of
Left Handed Maxfli
Irons. 4 thru P.W. New
grips. $100.00 Call Art
352-726-2750
GOLF CLUBS Set of
Wilson left handed irons
5 thru RP.W. New grips.
$75.00 Call Art
352-726-2750


L Medical
Eiq'uipment
'mmilIDIMMAUNLI, I


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED TO BUY
18 FT. BOAT
Can Pay Cash
(678) 617-5560w

Campers,/

RV CORD ADAPTER
18 inch NEW 30amp
Female to 50amp Male
w/Pwr Lt $10 SMW
352-382-3650





LQolk
^s II,,* ES* II SI


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci @ 352-212-8936


CLASSIFIED



GOLF WEDGES 52*
Gap Oversize GX2 &
60* Dunlop Lob $15.
each, $25. pair.
Dunnellon 465-8495
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
Bnn^


Wood Utility Trailer
12x6, 11 inches Deep
3 brand new tires,
$450.
(352) 601-3174



ALL WOOD CRIB
espresso color/good
condition Sell for $100
Retail price $530
352-257-5687
COMBI TWIN
STROLLER excellent
shape/Side-by-Side/Sell
for $100 Retail $235
352-257-5687
EDDIE BAUER CAR
SEAT $50 deluxe high
back kids 22-40 pounds
& over lyr./excellent
352-257-5687


Sell r Swa


RED MINIATURE POO-
DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352-419-8233

Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day


SPEEDY
Speedy, bulldog
mix, found at the
speedway, along
w/his sister Farrah,
who is very close to
him. Pleasant, com-
fortable & confi-
dent, walks well on
leash, does well
w/cats. Will stay by
your side. Fee $60
covers neuter, chip,
tests & vaccinations.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


TINY
Tiny, Blackmouth
Cur/terrier, is sweet
& calm. Walks very
well on leash, obeys
well, eager to
please. Gives paw,
sits, lies down. Not a
fan of cats, best in
home without cats.
Fee $60 includes
spay, chip, tests
and UTD on
vaccinations.
Call Trish @
352-586-7547.


SATURDAY,APRIL 19, 2014 CIA


I I I


HERMAN"
4 19 Laughingstock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2014

"When we get back, I'm having you
charged with mutiny."


EASTER BUNNIES
FOR SALE All
Breeds/ English Lop
352-697-9187-
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827




Pet Safe Dog Kennel
5' wide x 20' long
*incl. 5' gate, incl. nice
cedar dog house
31" x 45", $200.
(352)489-2011




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
p.*


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

DUNNELLON/488
Clean 2/1 Particiall
fenced, shed, $475/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970
HERNANDO
1/1 & 2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1st last +dep
352-201-2428




2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell


Hurricane Codes!
2006 Entertainer.
MUST SEE -GREAT
SHAPE $46,907
delivered to you!
1-877-578-5729
Great Shape *
Singlewide 2Br/1Ba
Delivered to you!
$15k 727-967-4230
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on '12 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
Palm Harbor Homes
Plant City!! $5K Home
Replacement; Over
22 models to view -
Free Factory Tours!
new Velocity home
$67,903 includes
delivery, set and A/C
plantcitv.
palmharbor.com or
800-622-2832
Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$1 1,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




-FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
$5,000 down
with $425 monthly
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369


Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 352-795-1272
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on 1/2 acre." Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile.
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974
Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000.352-302-1383
No Owner Financing
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2BA, Fully fur-
nished, Great Location
Drastically Reduced
(352) 746-0524
INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352) 201-7081

INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home 1248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065


^B n a 4^HUM'^.^E /


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793





SHADY VIEW f
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst3525613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019,201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


"ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 5374144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447




Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


**Budd Excavating**
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/ins.
563-9824, 228-7320


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sorin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861












NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374


pily ClUdIan-Up, prIUss.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


INSTALLED!I
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



*Budd Excavatina**
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442









TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452





Yourvrid first

Need a joh
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CpNmclE


Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


AKC Male Husky
Black/White
In tact, UTD on Shots
3 yr. old, $400. obo
(352) 246-3000


mHa^
^^erymes^


DOLLY
Dolly, 6-8 y.o. Terrier
mix, Wt 54 Ibs, had
an unfortunate prior
life, not her fault.
The sweetest dog
ever, full of love for
people amazingly,
playful, very happy,
craves affection &
returns it, gets along
w/some dogs,
finally deserves a
home of her own.
Loves Kids
Call Karen @
218-780-1808,
Joanne @
352-697-2682.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ii


bJ~WdjTh~iA


!014 Ch!evys*


IAYWE PAY! NOT A PENNY MORE!
11TED TIME ONLY!


'IAk
low kj(E


jRADO DOUBLE
CAB 1WT
CT497*MSRP $32,240CAIW
_GM Supplier Discount
..............................Rebate
PBC
........ Cash orTrade Equity
-_ -- USAA


7014 Cheew
NIC LS
48 MSRP $16,840
DealerDcunt
---- USAA
- Cash or Trade Equity


310


New 2014 Chew
CRUZE LS
STK#C14047 MSRP $19,255
s500 Dealer Dismout
%00 -----Rebate
p75__0 . . . USAA
2.SO Cash TIde Emv


New 2014 Chewvy
MALIBU LS
STK#C14254 MSRP $23,735
55O- Deae Dbcouf
'^VSQ--------ebate
750---USAA
2500 Cash orTrade Equitv


New 2014 Chevy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14207 MSRP $28,520
750 DeUeSDit
-500- Rebate
S750-USA


s1 s23,5005Cash orTrade Equ
ff $14305 ._s!765 ._s23,020


New 2014 Chevy
AMARO ILS
STK#C14195 MSRP $25,495
1 -- DederDiscunt
)o---Rebate
1-----------------
__ USAA
0- Cash orTradeEquity

,1,Y9


OVER"
Used & Certified
Pre-Loved Vehicles


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK #C14146 o MSRP $25,330
S ........................ De. D is.. .t
o1,000--- ,,Rebate
75Thu USAA
2,0 -Cash rTadeEq uty


New 2014 ChewV
TRAVERSELT
STK#C14112 MSRP $35,395
%000- .Deaer Discbnt
1,500 .....Reba.t.
'750 ........ USAA
S2-5----Cash ,riTade Equilty


20,280 _2$29%645


q *1*
AU Pre-Loved certified


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTt


New 2014 Chew
TAHOELS
STK#CT14041 MSRP $45,115
$1,500 ---------- Rebate
Z:50_ ___ 0USAW
s2,0-0 -Cash arTradeEquity
Ys^wj .$3743006


2YEARSoR
24,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealerfor complete details.


Vehicles!


MHEVYIMPAALT


Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!
g'iIL-- -


08DODGE AVENGER 04CHEVROLETSIO
POWERWINDOWS & LOCKS, TILT 12412 CREW CAB 4X4
$""S %S99S


09TOYOTAVENZA
12404 LATHERBACKUP OMR
$2%9"5


07CHEVROLETHHRLT
12434 LEATHER. SUNROOF


13HYUNDAIACCMIT 09KIABORREGO
P12249 12400 LEATHER, CD, POWER SEAT


11TOYOTAHIGHLANDERSE 11 CHEVY SILVERADOLT
12374 LEATHER 12437 CREWCAB
s$22952


08 NISSAN PATHFNDERLE 64OVYC10 PICKUP
12271 LEATHER SUNROOF STEPSIDE
9%9s"s 9


13 FORDF-150
SUPER CAB
$2""49


-PUS MANY
MORE TO
COOSE
FROM!


You!


Pay %
ray .


C12 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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IT'S A SAVINGS FRENZY! YOU'LL SAVE THOUSANDS!


-1 =1 I


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Istwq
Payment!


iTJ


500 MIUTARY APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their spouses towards any new Honda
vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS.
OVER O USED & CEIIRTIPlID PRUWNED VEHIES
AN Pre-Owned Vehiles Include a
6 MONTH/6. MILE
Umited Poweraln Warranty&
PLUS A 5-4DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM
See dealer for complete details.


Ar4


"Check i
anywee In tIhe
world frst but


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u-rio
for up to 60 Mos.
on select new Honda models
hhh on approved crecrdit


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SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 C13


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CITRUS COUNTY (1L) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014 C 15


WORDY GURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Ran into Scarlett O'Hara's love (1) Every answer isa rhymin
pair of words (like FAT C.
and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Tartan-patterned tablet (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after
definition tells you how m
3. Moby Dick water wake (1) syllables in each word.
I I 1 1 1 1 @ 2014 UFS, Dist by Univ Ucick fI
4. Singer Cyrus demurely (2)


5. Make the Whos' elephant pal less tall (2)


6. Actor Costner's naturals in craps (2)


7. More charmingly old-fashioned oils artist (2)

------WE-*-------


4-19-14


Tsis To loft INITIHIWefre FULLY INKUED for '
l m Lihilit9I1EWorkers'Comp! _

M l WorkeWnn COMT rt


2br/2ba, 55+ in Thun-
derbird Park, Lot 45
carport, furn'd, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441
Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273

For Sale 1,Ia
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-
tivated seller will negoti-


Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
furn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105

For Sale%*,
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090




-AaIlON
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. j
352-795-7368
S900 & UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/ unique home/Avail. May 1
5339 S Elm Ave.
2/1 cute and cozy Avail. May 1
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959sqft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 sto/ townhome, canal side
S650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/1.5 in B.H. 992 Sft
1063 N Commerce Ter.
2/1 Apt in Lecanto, centrally located
1071 N Commerce Ter
2/1 Apt.in Lecanto, centrally located
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/addition on 1.25 aae
For More Listings GoTo
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.nom


Apartments-

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694





INVERNESS
2BR/1 BA, lake access,
no pets, $550/mo
(352) 341-0900
Business

FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514



BRENTWOOD
Townhome 3/2.5
w/Social Membership
(352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
"MOVE IN READY"
June 1, 2014, Lakeside
Golf Country Club,
Fully Furn. Villa ; 3/2/2
Scrnd. Solar heated
pool Clean and cozy.
Only for very serious
people $1250. mo.
1 yr or longer Call for
view: 352-726-8197



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
until cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813


FLORAL CITY
Furn Eff, Basic Cable,
Wifi, all util, $650/mo
$350 Sec 6/mo lease
352-341-1734
HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




At SM WOODS
3/2/2, Ht. Pool, FP,
Maint. Free, Sm. Pet
$ 1,000 mo, 422-1933|
Beverly Hills
106 S. Adams
2bd/l ba, $550. mo
1st, last + dep.
$1,600. moves you in.
(352) 422-6407
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 + Loft on Canal
$850. (352)795-0125
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$800 (908) 322-6529



CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk. call Bruce
**352-445-9136"*
CRYSTAL RIVER
Free Housing in ex-
change for Transpor-
tation, clean back-
ground, 352-697-0177


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb6avahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


OOHQCB



g
CAT
:), and

rthe
rany


or UFS


-I


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


Y'iur '.,i II lust.
Ei,.i Da)


CHkQN]CE
Classifieds


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WVVW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 "
352-584-9496/464-2514





Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
3BD., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Justa Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $110,000.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
(866) 351-1234





Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2/2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext.,Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202





For Sale %"1,





Laurel Ridge on
Twisted Oaks 1st
green. 2BR/2BA with
den & screened lanai
high ceilings and
open floor plan
$ 125k 352-746-4880
or 330-322-0329
553 W Player Path


Hoe






Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
BOUTIQUE
Real Estate Group
Buying or Selling?
We Tailor Our
Services.
Teri Paduano, Broker
352-341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
119E. DampierSt.,
Inverness
TheFLDream.comrn


RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY !!!


OEM

For Sale5
TURN KEY
4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE, 1,200 sq ft
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282
^S?= 11I^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.




Your World







C4LRpNCLE


"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
www.
citruscritters.com





ff




Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now Is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


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C16 SATURDAY, APRIL 19,2014


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatoneitampabav.rr.
corn

ERA American
Realty &
Investments


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.corn

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855













Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!









Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor

(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com

"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"

ERA
American Realty
& Investments




$100,000 + Closing
Cost wll get you this
2,100 sq. ft.,
3BR 3'/2 BA Fully turn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268




Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507




Country Home + 80
Acres Land, Near
App. St. Univ., Ideal
for Summer Home
In Cool. NC Mtns.
828-297-2669, details




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com








Fisherman's Paradise
in Inverness East Cove.
Furnished 2/2 plus
dock & seawall.
Deep water. $51,900
(352) 344-0101
Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty












NeMsaines ite
SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNau-reCoast
Properties, comn
"To view

my properties"




New stainless steel
self adj trim tabs for a
14 ff boat; Aux motor
brackets for a up to
15 HP engine.
$30 each. Call Art
(352) 726-2750
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510-


#1 Employment source is






)fI ilI




www.chronicleonline.com


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson, Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
HURRICANE
My loss your gain. Due
to health issues must
sell almost new less
than 15hrs on mo-
tor,2013 Hurricane Sun
Deck 187 with lots of
options, inc. Yamaha
115 4 stroke motor with
customized trailer with
surgue breaks. Retais at
over 34K will let go for
$26,300. Pictures upon
request. Al 527-7732
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792

must sell!
PONTOON '03
22 ft., w/ '04 Johnson
90HP mtr. & TrIr., like
New Lots of Extras
$8,500 352-860-3293
PONTOON
20 ft. 25HP, Johnson,
w/ trailer,
$4,400
(352) 726-4289
PORTA-BOTE
2004 -12 ft. Porta-Bote
with transom for engine
mounting, all seats,
oars, oar locks, and
hardware to mount on
an RV. $800.00 Call
Art at 352-726-2750
SCORPION
Sale Boat
$200. obo
(352) 795-0125



o 1 [I 1 I1 1114J



LllI [' II.11f kF:





Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



HONDA
2011, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
TOW DOLLY
lights, electric brakes
& new strap,
excel, cond. $750.
(352) 382-1627
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



CITATION
'01, 22 ft, new awning,
3 new tires, full bath
and outside shower,
refrig/furnace just
serviced $4000
(352) 628-0173
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500 352-201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Roof AC's for RV
2 13,500 BTU's
$400 each
(352) 628-0173
Tow Mirrors
CIPA, in the box $35
for the pair. Call Mike
(352) 382-1424



Four GM 16"
6 hole, steel wheels
$60.00
(352) 465-7506
Truck Rack
Heavy Duty Adrian
Steel. Fits 6' 6" bed,
hauls 24 ft material.
Like New $200 Call Art
(352) 726-2750



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WANTED
Silver Buick LaCross,


private owners only
pis call (352) 628-2437
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
w ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ


I Boats -1


WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440






Buy Here/Pay Here

'05 Chevy Cavalier
$895 Down
'01 Dodge
Dakota R/T
$995 Down

'00 Mitsubishi Galant
$650 Down
'03 Ford Focus
$3595 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018

CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018

JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
3/4, V10, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995
CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


03 Taurus SE
Full power, Nice
dependable care
$1900
(352) 795-8986
FORD
2003, Mustang,
convertible, silver,
64k mi., good cond.
(352) 746-0687
MUSTANG
Conyv,2000,6 CYL, 5 sp.
man, repainted 2013
+ graphics, very clean
71K mi, 352-746-7215

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440









I I I I I I I I

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
'91, 4 x4S-R5, 22 RE/
5 Spd. Ext. Cab, rebuilt
mtr., pilgrim canopy
$4,200 obo, 341-0818


FORD
2007 Eddie Bauer
Explorer, leather,87k
miles, Black on beige
$13,800 352-794-3930
GMC
2005 Envoy XL, Bose
with XM, Power Sun-
roof, Towing package,
171K miles, $5500
352-302-0173
NISSAN
2000 Xterra XE 140k
$1,750 352-634-4286
NISSAN
2003 Xterra v6, auto
4x4, cold ac. runs
great, 119k mi.
$2999.(352) 257-3894
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018



CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999


Your World






CII1pNWCLE





MeetB^in
NoticesH


Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055

Meeting^
Notice


272-0419 SACRN
CCHB Meetings
PUBLIC NOTICE
Regular meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Wednesday,
April 30, 2014 at 6:00pm; Thursday, May 08,2014 at 6:00pm and Wednesday, May 21,
2014 at 6:00pm in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memo-
rial Health System Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida, to
discuss
SApproval of Minutes.
SCitrus County Hospital Board Committees Report.
SCCHB/CMHF Legal.
STransaction.
SOther.
N O T I C E OF EXECUTIVE SESSION MEETING DURING MEETING
The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will hold an Executive Session meeting
during the April 30, 2014, May, 08, 2014, and May 21,2014 meeting underthe author-
ity of Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The Executive Session will be closed to the
public to allow the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees to meet with the board's
Attorney(s) to discuss the settlement negotiations or strategy related to litigation ex-
penditures in all pending litigations.
Present at the Executive Session will be Debbie Ressler (Trustee), Krista Joseph
(Trustee), Mark Fallows (Trustee), William Grant General Counsel, Bruce Blackwell,
Esquire, Clifford Shepard, Esq., Barry Richard, Esq., Taylor Ford, Esq., Glenn Burhans,
Esq., Bridget Smitha, Esq., Vincent Falcone, Esq., Andrew Hand, Esq., Ashby Burks,
Esq., Warren Bloom, Esq., Bruce Giles, Esq., and Court Reporter.
An Executive Session will be held on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 at 7:30pm in the
Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, Inverness, Florida.
An Executive Session will be held on Thursday, May 08, 2014 at 7:30pm in the Board
Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administra-
tion Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, Inverness, Florida.
An Executive Session will be held on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 7:30pm in the
Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, Inverness, Florida.
When the Executive Session commences the door will be closed. At the conclusion
of the Executive Session, the meeting of the Board will be reconvened and the pub-
lic is invited to rejoin.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board of-
fice at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this
Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, April 19, 2014.


Get the Facts: Florida Newspapers

Your local newspaper is a vital community asset. It provides local news
and advertising not available anywhere else. It is a community partner that
assists business' to communicate with customers and keeps residents well
informed. Florida newspapers, serving the communities of Florida yesterday,
today and tomorrow.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... VIBRANT AND VITAL...

GET THE FACTS.


C I TUS_ -CCOUNTY
For more information on how to reach F E
Citrus County readers call CrI 11\lo nC Ll
352-563-5592. www.chroicleonline.con
Scarborough 2010


0008XHJ


Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068

YAMAHA
2004, 1500CC, V Star
Classic, clean, 20k mi.
$5000 obo
(203) 982-2815


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLT.ASSITFITE.DS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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.. CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 ext 10
...Jeep.C"CrstlTuosco
j gA CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM CrystalAutoscom
2077 HIGHWAY 44 W. 14358 CORTEZ BLVD. 1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
INVERNESS, FL BROOKSVILLE, FL HOMOSASSA, FL
*Prices include all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. ^Lease payments are 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $2999 due at signing
and all rebates and incentive, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. 'Lease payments are 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes all rebates and incentive, not
everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. Wilh approved credit. +30 MPG with 2.4L engine with 6-speed automatic transmission. Actual mileage may vary AAOn select makes and models. With approved credit. All
financing must be done through Chyrsler Financial to qualify. Offers can not be combined. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.


C18 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2014


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