Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Full Text

Cobb pitches gem as Rays look to sweep Reds


CITRUS


Mostly sunny to
partly cloudy.
PAGE A4


APRIL 13, 2014 Florida's Best Community


,COUNTY


TODAY
& next
morning


-r-


___www.chronicleonilne.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


ONICL


Two city managers, one county


6t-**,::*Jl ~-^ ?
Bad backyard
Anna Mosley's
determination to win a
backyard makeover for
her seven children pays
off./HomeFront
USE WEEKEND:
r.. ^



A-S


Hunger help
Hot country music duo
Florida Georgia Line
talks with USA
WEEKEND about the
issue of hunger in
America./Inside
COMMENTARY:


Yom HaShoah
Events for Holocaust
Remembrance Day
stand as memorial for
those who died, as well
as a tribute to
heroism./Page Cl
EXCURSIONS:








Magical place
Peter Graulich continues
his 107-day trip around
the world with stops in
Tahiti and Pitcairn.
/Page A13
BUSINESS:

WIL&'TS



BLACK S
BEANS


Fjrj


Organic food
Walmart is using its
massive size to drive
down the price of
o:f












organic food items
for its low-income
customers./Page D1


Annie's Mailbox ...... A14
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword .............. A14
Editorial ................ C2
Entertainment .......... A4
Horoscope.........A4
Lottery Numbers ...... B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies .................... A 14
Obituaries ........ A9, All
Together ..................A26
Veterans ......... A18


6 184118 200711o


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Two cities. Two city managers. One
strong, united county.
That's the message Inverness City
Manager Frank DiGiovanni and Crystal
River City Manager Andy Houston put on
display Saturday at the inaugural Lake
to Bay Bike Ride, as they cycled 40 miles
roundtrip from Inverness to Crystal
River and back.
"This is a partnership between two
cities that are connected," DiGiovanni
said. "This is a city-to-city ride to show
people that, no matter whether you start
in Inverness and ride to Crystal River or
vice versa, you are going to have a good


time no matter what."
Cyclists from throughout Citrus County
joined the two city managers as they
wended their way from Inverness' North
Apopka Trailhead into downtown Crys-
tal River
Once the riders hit County Road 486 in
Hernando, they traveled the bike paths
on County Road 486 until they reached
State Road 44 just east of Crystal River
See Page All
City managers Frank DiGiovanni, left, of
Inverness, and Andy Houston of Crystal
River discuss Saturday morning's Lake
to Bay Bike Ride at Liberty Park in
Inverness.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


Citrus Hills aims for 'boutique-community feel'


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CITRUS HILLS
As a development, the Villages of
Citrus Hills occupies the geo-
graphic heart of Citrus County
and serves as its economic pulse.
It's a large community, an attraction for
perspective residents and a major em-
ployer with a long-range plan.
Right now there are 35 homes under
construction and another 45 on the draw-
ing board.
Sales are running 100 percent ahead of
last year
"It's exciting," said Mike Casey, vice
president of sales and marketing. "Our
goal is to build 300 homes a year"
There are 2,500 homes planned for
Terra Vista and Brentwood, with visible
construction and earthmoving from
County Road 486. Overall, parts of Citrus
Hills run from State Road 44 to north of
C.R. 486, bounded by North Essex Avenue
on the east and Ottawa Avenue on the
west.
But land for future development goes
all the way to C.R. 491 in Lecanto.
Terra Vista takes up about 663 acres of
a 10,000-acre master plan. Overall, there
are about 5,600 homes.
'As we look forward, there are going to
be other neighborhoods like Terra Vista
being in development in another part of
the property," explained Doug Wornick,
director of marketing. "It is that boutique-
community feel; this is what we have
today, but the Tamposi and Nash family
have plans that go out decades.
"The beauty is we're totally debt free
and we have over a hundred million dol-
lars' worth of infrastructure. When we go
into a brand new area, it costs millions of
dollars. Everything is underground; we
don't skimp on anything.
"People can be assured the family is
going to be involved with the Villages and
with the county for years to come."
"It gives us the ability to offer choices,"
said Casey "By us building lakes, we can
have customers who can choose what
they look at out the back of their homes.


We look at
it as a family.
We're very
particular about
who we let into
our family.


Mike Casey
vice president of sales and marketing, about
Villages of Citrus Hills employees.
If they don't want a golf course, they may
want to look at a lake or they might just
want privacy with nothing but wooded
areas behind them.
"We love to give our customers op-
tions," he said. "We believe in some cases
this will be the last home they build -
shouldn't they have it the way they want
it?"
New homes can run from the mid-
$200,000 range to $1.5 million. However,
there is also a strong resale market -
with sales up over last year for homes
of various prices throughout Citrus Hills.
The two acknowledged it's a long way
from the slow times of the recession
when sales dropped to 20 homes a year
Now, Casey views his role as creating
jobs and helping Citrus County grow
while serving a special slice of the active
retiree market.
Each new home creates direct jobs and
has a multiplier effect on the economy
He said they are currently at 400 em-
ployees and growing, and building that
workforce is part of their success.
"We look at it as a family," he said.
"We're very particular about who we let
into our family
"For our company it's a part of how we
deliver superior service, by making sure
all the employees believe they are in
sales; it's care and servitude."
Casey said that pairs the company com-
mitment to always do the right thing.
See Page A2


County's assets

enhance Citrus Hills

community amenities
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CITRUS HILLS From the patio
dining at Skyview you get a taste of Cit-
rus County: rolling hills, golf courses,
water features, parks, trees, paths and,
of course, luxury homes.
The effect is intentional.
Citrus Hills has grown, evolved and
succeeded as a premier retirement
community by showcasing the county's
numerous assets, focusing on top
amenities and marketing personalized
homes.
Mike Casey, vice president of sales
and marketing, agrees it's a competitive
market but Citrus County weighs in as a
heavy advantage.
"There is virtually no traffic, crime or
congestion," he said. "Add to that our
climate and convenience, being close to
Tampa, Orlando and Gainesville."
Prospective buyers can get a county
tour that includes everything from trails
to health care.
There's also the matter of taxes. For
people coming out of some Northern
states, what they save on property taxes
here makes a noticeable difference in
monthly mortgage payments.
"We have a compelling story to tell,"
said Doug Wornick, director of market-
ing. "There's no better place than Citrus
County
"We offer a lifestyle. We are in the life-
changing business. People come here
and they can't believe it."
"We're for a more discernable buyer,"
said Casey "They're at a point in their
life where they deserve it."
Casey said the amenities have played
a big role and received special attention
when the economy was ailing and buy-
ers were few and choosy
The Skyview Clubhouse at Terra Vista
See Page A2


"-VOL. 119 ISSUE 249- "-
VOL. 119 ISSUE 249


HIGH
84
LOW
61


Selling Citrus County


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Construction on new homes in the Terra Vista community of the Villages of Citrus Hills continues to progress steadily. Colony Stone and
Plastering workers Scotty Wilson, left, and Phillip Hutchinson stucco the exterior of this home in the Bellamy Ridge neighborhood.


I INSI IDE]II




A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


SELLING
Continued from PageAl

"If something needs to
be made right, it's made
right," he said. "We always
take the high road.
"It's because it's a pri-
vately held company and
we do control the
construction."
He said the company
takes a similar approach
to civic and philanthropic
activities, doing it because
it is the right thing to do.
Wornick said that ap-
proach goes back to the
late Sam Tamposi.
Likewise, they've
worked to keep entrances
gateways low-key and
tasteful.
Unlike some planned
communities, Casey said,
homes can be personal-
ized so customers get what
they really want some-
thing unique a trend
they are seeing more of


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A large area of land has recently been cleared near the corner of north Ottawa Avenue
and County Road 486 within the Terra Vista community.


with retiring boomers. And
it's not a fast process, with
six to nine months fac-
tored in for construction,
though showcase homes
are available.
They also offer a two-
year-out buying plan for


people needing to time
sell their current homes.
"Having a strong, vi-
brant community helps us
and helps the county," said
Wornick. "We're not an is-
land; we're part of this
county and our residents


feel that way"
"We're looking at the big
picture," said Casey "We
want to grow the county."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


ASSETS
Continued from PageAl

has become known for its
fine dining and wine
selection.
Quality golf courses are
expected, and they've
even acquired an off-site
course, Ocala National.
It is for residents who
want an outside option or
have time to play while
their spouse is doing
something else in Ocala.
Casey said the new dog
park has been a big suc-
cess, with separated play
areas for large and small
dogs, walking paths,
water stations and other
features.
He is particularly
proud of the Bella Vita
Spa and Fitness Center,
which has evolved to
serve an active, health-
conscious clientele.
In addition to the


recreation centers, activ-
ity center with audito-
rium and various sport
courts, there are more
subtle amenities, such as
a children's playground,
landscaped common
areas and walking paths
- but the one feature
that's catching the most
attention is a new tiki
bar, which is nearing
completion.
It's a massive, hand-
crafted structure that will
be surrounded by
torches.
General manager An-
thony Lambert ex-
plained it mixes
traditional tropical
craftsmanship, such as
the thatched palm-frond
roof, wood floor and
bamboo, with the tech-
nology necessary for a
bar and restaurant enter-
tainment complex.
Contact Chronicle re-
porterPatFaherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


Patient-Centered


"Held My Hand"


"The nurses at Oak Hill held
my hand and helped me
feel better."


Madison Renfroe
Homosassa Springs



| Oak Hll
Hospital

30 Years New
1984 2014


At Oak Hill, we're committed to patient-centered care that respects each
patient's preferences, values and needs. With the area's only pediatric ER,
our commitment extends to those without a strong voice. That's because
patient-centered care means giving every patient-regardless of age-
the chance to be heard, and for some-a hand to hold.


Pediatric
Emergency
Care Center

Oak Hill Hospital


352.596.6632
(Hernando)


OakHillHospital.com


352.628.6441
(Citrus)


We are pleased to announce the affiliation of





LISA ESTEVES
Vice President, Investments
FinancialIAdvisor




with
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RAYMOND JAMES


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T 352.341.5831 // T 866.306.6274 // F 352.341.5519
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I


LOCAL


dw






Page A3-SUNDAY, APRIL 13,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Affordable-housing
meeting Tuesday
The Citrus County Afford-
able Housing Advisory
Committee will meet at
5 p.m. Tuesday, April 15, in
Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Building. The
agenda includes Hardest
Hit, SHIP, CDBG, NSP 1 &
3, Section 8, Shelter Plus
Care and the Emergency
Solutions Grant.
The committee is tasked
with improving the housing
situation in Citrus County by
studying and developing proj-
ects, coordinating with county
staff and by making recom-
mendations to the Board of
County Commissioners.
Call Citrus County
Housing Services at 352-
527-7520.
Church/state group
to host sex talk
Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State (Nature Coast Chap-
ter) will host a guest
speaker from "Citizens for
Informed Teens" who will
present information about
sex education 4 p.m. Tues-
day, April 15, at Lakes Re-
gion Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness. The pub-
lic is welcome.
Call 352-344-9211 or
email naturecoastau@
hotmail.com.
Chronicle looking for
this year's grads
The Chronicle wants to
include graduating home-
schooled seniors from Cit-
rus County in the upcoming
graduation tab for 2014.
Also welcome are graduat-
ing seniors from out-of-
county schools who reside
in Citrus County. Send the
graduate's name and a
photo to the Chronicle at
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or email
cconnolly@chronicle
online.com no later than Fri-
day, April 25, with the photo
as an attachment. Informa-
tion and photos can also be
dropped off at the Meadow-
crest office in Crystal River.
-From staff reports
Campaign TRAIL


The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, can-
didate appearances and the
like for this year's political
campaign. Send informa-
tion to mwright@chronicle
online.com.
Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 2, will meet the pub-
lic from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fri-
day, April 18, at Mr. B's Car
Wash on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. Information: Kitchen
at 352-302-3613.
Les Cook, Republican
for property appraiser, will
greet the public from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday, April 24, at
Natalia's Pizza and Pasta
on State Road 44 in Crystal
River, across from Tire
Kingdom; and from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday, May 15, at
the Deco Cafe in downtown
Inverness.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission
District 2, will meet the pub-
lic from 10a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 26, near the
old Sears store in the Crys-
tal River Mall. Information:
352-257-5381.
The Citrus County
Chronicle will have its pri-
mary forum at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in Inver-
ness. The Chronicle's gen-
eral election forum is at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at
the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will have a
forum for county commis-


sion candidates at 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 12, at the
College of Central Florida.
The Citrus Hills CivicAs-
sodiation will have a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.


City to search for new manager


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The Crystal River City
Council will begin initial
plans Monday to replace
City Manager Andy Hous-
ton, who recently an-
nounced his retirement.
The council will discuss
the best way to proceed in
filling the vacancy
Houston announced his
resignation March 31 after
eight years at the helm.
Before hiring Houston,
the council used an
executive recruitment
firm to develop candi-
date profiles, advertise
the position, screen can-


didates, assist with the
interview process and
negotiate an employment
agreement.
That firm charged the
city $10,838 and the entire
process took approxi-
mately 4.5 months.
Houston's official last
day is tentatively set for
July 18 and he has ex-
pressed his willingness
to be flexible with that
date if it would aid the
council.
Council members also
will:
see a presentation-
from Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office Westside
commander Capt. Danny
Linhart regarding issues


IF YOU GO
WHAT: Crystal River
City Council meeting
WHEN: Tuesday, CRA
meeting 6 p.m.; Coun-
cil meeting 7 p.m.
WHERE: Council
Chamber, City Hall.
CONTACT: Call 352-
795-4216 or visit
crystalriverfl.org.

surrounding the homeless
population in the city;
schedule a Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District and Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection workshop for
April 21 at 6:30 p.m. about


the Basin Management Ac-
tion Plan (BMAP) for
King's Bay;
consider a contract
award to Pave Rite for
paving of a portion of
Kings Bay Drive at a cost
of $90,000;
consider a contract
award to Daley & Zilch
(FL) Inc. for expansion of
Lift Station 19 at a cost of
$447,422 and approve Res-
olution No. 14-R-08,
budget amendment to ap-
propriate funding in the
amount of $87,027.10;
and get an updated re-
port on a potential site for
a new city hall at 16 N.E.
Fifth St.
The council in its capac-


ity as the Community Re-
development Agency
(CRA) board will also get
an update on the Com-
mercial Waterfront Dis-
trict Development Plan;
consider a contract award
to GAI Consultants for the
development of a concep-
tual storm water plan for
the Waterfront District at
a cost of $18,500; and hear
an update on information
regarding the possible
purchase of the soon-to-
be-vacant Chamber of
Commerce building and
property
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


EIGHTH ANNUAL TASTE OF INVERNESS


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
The eighth annual Taste of Inverness was a smashing success, according to Inverness Special Events Director Sharon Skeele-Hogan.
"The event sold out for the first time since its inception," said Skeele-Hogan. "We had to turn people away. Next year, we are going to
shoot for 600 to 700." Proceeds from the event benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. ABOVE: Jim Fielding from Floral City
gets some ribs for dinner at the eighth annual Taste of Inverness Saturday at Liberty Park. BELOW: Food tents are set up at the eighth
annual Taste of Inverness.


TASTE OF
INVERNESS
WINNERS
* Appetizer: Chefs of
Napoli
* Casual Dining Entree:
Rustic Ranch
* Fine Dining Entree:
Chefs of Napoli
* Vegan: McLeod House
Bistro
* Pizza: Papa John's
* Dessert: Nicole's
House of Cakes


Marine Science Station seeking students for camp
Special to the Chronicle Hernando and Marion Station boats with certi- certified teachers and The cost per student is
counties. Camp Citrus is fied teachers and boat staff in a safe and secure $249. The deadline for ap-
The Citrus County sponsored in part by the captains. Students lodge environment, plications is May 9. Need-
School District's Marine Southwest Florida Water overnight and eat meals at The middle school stu- based, partial scholarships
Science Station in Crystal Management District. the Marine Science Sta- dents' program runs from may be available for stu-
River is hosting weeklong Students will explore tion during the entire June 9 to 13 and June 23 dents who qualify
summer camps for middle springs, rivers, estuaries, week of Camp Citrus. Stu- to 27. The high school stu- To apply, go to www.
school and high school and the Gulf of Mexico dents are supervised dents' program runs from citrus.kl2.fl.us/mss or call
students in Citrus. aboard Marine Science 24 hours ner dav byv June 16 to 20. 352-795-4393.


- 1, -.y -.y


........ 7




CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Today's birthday -A precise plan of
attack will be necessary to your ad-
vancement this year. Let your experi-
ence and intelligence keep you on the
straight path to your dreams.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Spend
some time with an older family mem-
ber. They may prove to be a valuable
and an unexpected source of advice.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't let
your quest for success take a toll on your
health. Be observant at your workplace;
don't make the mistake if underestimat-
ing the aspirations of an associate.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Accept
invitations that you have been ignoring.
A new acquaintance could develop into
an important friendship.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You
won't be good company if you don't
cheer up. If you are feeling sullen and
moody, leave others to their own de-
vices and read a good book.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Make sure
all of your documents are up to date. A
casual meeting at a sporting or musical
event could introduce you to someone
who will have an impact on your future.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You may
have too many irons in the fire. Don't
make promises you can't keep. Opt for
quality over quantity
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't re-
strict yourself to the expectations and
demands of others. Make the changes
that will be best for you. Strive to reach
your goals doing it your way.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your
love life may be showing signs of
strain. Have a meaningful discussion
and clear the air. Ignoring what's going
on will lead to upset and uncertainty.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Par-
ticipate in causes that you care about.
Your sound arguments will be instru-
mental in making improvements to or-
ganizations you get involved with.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
leave your future to chance. Follow
your passion and dedicate your talents
and abilities to attain your desires.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
have the ability to turn your life in a
new direction. Your original and un-
orthodox ideas will find a new, quite
profitable outlet.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't
stray too far from home. Devote your
time to domestic activities. Re-organiz-
ing and cleaning up your surroundings
will improve your environment and
clear your mind.


ENTERTAINMENT


Obama attends 'A
Raisin in the Sun'
NEW YORK Tickets to
watch Denzel Washington on
Broadway in "A Raisin in the
Sun" are hard to come by, but
one man managed it Presi-
dent Barack Obama.
The president and first lady
caught the American master-
piece Friday night at the Ethel
Barrymore Theatre, where it first
opened more than 50 years ago.
They took their seats to huge
applause.
Lorraine Hansberry's play is
set in 1950s Chicago. It centers
on a struggling working-class
black family anxiously awaiting a
$10,000 insurance check and
the ensuing squabbles over how
to spend it.
The cast also includes La-
Tanya Richardson Jackson,
Sophie Okonedo, Anika Noni
Rose, Sean Patrick Thomas
and David Cromer. The director
is Kenny Leon.
O'Brien approves of
Colbert for 'Late Show'
LOS ANGELES Don't feel
bad for Conan O'Brien. Again.
The 50-year-old talk show
host said he was never a con-
tender to take over CBS' the
"Late Show" when David Let-
terman announced his retire-
ment last week. The funnyman,
who has hosted his talk show
"Conan" on TBS since 2010,
said he believes Stephen Col-
bert is the "right person" to
take over the show from
Letterman.
"I wasn't up for it," O'Brien
said backstage Friday during a
break from rehearsing for Sun-
day's MTV Movie Awards, which
he's hosting for the first time.
"I'm very happy where I am, but I
love Stephen. I think Stephen is
great. I'm a huge fan of his as a


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
BIings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charestlon, S.C.
Charleston, W.V
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Clevelarnd
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Molnes
Detroil
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
ULtie Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nastwille


comic and as a human being. I
think it's fantastic. I'm really glad
that he got the job. I look forward
to seeing his show."
O'Brien originally succeeded
Letterman on NBC's "Late Night"
in 1993 when Letterman moved
to CBS to headline the "Late
Show."
O'Brien infamously replaced
Jay Leno as host of NBC's "The
Tonight Show" for a mere seven
months beginning in 2009 before
Leno was reinstated as host in
2010.
Play puts British
monarchy onstage
LONDON -A new play about
Britain's future king is getting
rave reviews. Once it would
have been theatrical treason.
"King Charles III" imagines
current heir Prince Charles tak-


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80 51 81


ing the throne, with catastrophic
results.
Just a few decades ago, de-
pictions of living British mon-
archs were banned from the
country's stages. Even in 2014,
Mike Bartlett's drama has pro-
voked strong reactions.
Daily Mail critic Quentin
Letts said the play "seems
anxious to provoke a serious
row." The paper headlined its
review "So could King Charles
III be deposed by scheming
Kate?"
Yet most of Britain's newspa-
pers applauded the play on Fri-
day. The Times of London said it
was "bold, brilliant and unstop-
pably entertaining," while the Fi-
nancial Times called it
"scintillating and audacious."

-From wire reports


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L F'cast City


Daytona Bch. 81 66 pc Miami
Fort Lauderdale 84 75 pc Ocala
Fort Myers 89 69 f Orlando
Gainesville 85 60 f Pensac
Homestead 83 73 pc Sarasol
Jacksonville 82 62 f Tallaha
Key West 84 76 pc Tampa
Lakeland 87 66 f VeroBe
Melbourne 81 70 pc W. Pair


Today East win
2 feet. Bay andi
chop. Tonight: E
knots. Seas 2 fe
waters a light ch


185/60 0.00, 8 |o/3z u.uu
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excve daily
NEW '11 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING __
jI Hlgh: 840 Low: 61
l Mostly sunny to partly cloudy

. ",--. MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 84 Low:64'
,m1m1p' Partly cloudy, breezy

) Tm TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
u00 |,* High: 78 Low: 56
Mostly cloudy, scattered showers and
',"'' ", '" storms, rain chance 50%
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 85/67
Record /46
Normal 80/62
Mean temp. 71
Departure from mean 0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00
Total Ior I-he rrmonth 0.24"
Total for the year 10.14"
Normal for the year 8.97"
*As ol 7 p.m a Inverness
UV INDEX: 13
0-2minimai,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.15


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 62.1
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 84%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
oak, bayberry, hickory
Today's count: 9.5/12
Monday's count: 10.5
Tuesday's count: 8.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 41
Pollutant: Ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES Huns.m=p
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
04/13 SUNDAY 04:56 23:07 17:37 23:09
04/14 MONDAY 05:33 23:07 18:34 11:33
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUISETT011TIrUET ..................... 7:53 p.m,
0 C) I )== SUNISE =TOMhROW .,. 7.04 a.m.
S NINIO USE TODAY .-...........- 6:36 p.m.
Apr15 Apr22 Apr29 May6 0 NS..TB ..- 555a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more Informaltion call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777, For more
information On drought conditions. please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
httpJ://framefi-dot comfire_.weatherAdidl
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.. as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addre-.ses may waler on Weonesday andor SalurOay
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigaton of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
time.
Citrus County Uities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of I werness @ 352-726-231. City of Crystal
River 0 352-7954216 ext. 313, unincopomated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
*rom mouths of rivers "At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassaihowlzka' 6:33a.m. 0.41t. 6:26 p.m 0.5fl 105 a.m. 0.1 01 12:57 pr.2fl.,
Crystal River" 4:49amrn, 2,Oft. 4:48p.m. 2.2fL 11:16a.m 0.511. 11:43p.r0.0 ftl,
WrthlNacoochee' 2:06 a.m. 3.2 It. 2:03p.m. 35f1t 8:43a.m. 0.6 It. 920p.m-0.2ft
Homosassa" 6:16a.m. 1.0ft. 5:44p.m. 1.3ft. 1:01 a.m. -O. t. 12:23p.rt.2 f.


H L PFcast


1
ola
ta
ssee

each
nm Bch.


Fictitki


Bid Nc

RfInf.:-


SUN SAT SUN
I LFct City H L Pap. H L Fest
S57 pc NewOrleans 79 62 82 67 cd
S39 pc New York City 73 50 74 57 pc
S53 pc Norfolk 71 60 77 59 pc
S59 pc OklahomaCity 84 62 83 39 ts
S54 pc Omaha 83 58 55 29 ts
S50 ts Palm Springs 86 61 89 62 s
S57 I Philadelphia 73 54 78 58 pc
B 26 sn Phoenix 89 68 87 60 s
S61 f Pitnsburgh 73 35 80 59 pc
34 s Portland. ME 66 47 56 47 pc
S53 pc Portland, OR 64 48 77 44 s
S56 pc Providence. RI 70 47 65 56 1 pc
'6O ts Raleigh 81 54 8O 58 pc
S60 pc RapidCity 62 37 36 23 sn
S59 pc FReno 78 46 65 35 s
9 58 pc Rochester, NY 63 38 79 60 sh
34 ts Sacramento 70 48 82 50 pc
S49 pc Salt Lake City 68 51 56 36 sh
S45 cd San Antonio 88 65 86 54 Is
36 ts San Diego 68 61 60 57 cd
S52 pc San Francisco 66 52 66 51 pc
S52 pc Savannah 84 55 80 61 f
S45 IS Seattle 60 46 66 43 pc
S20 sn Spokane 59 32 56 36 s
S32 Is St. Louis 83 57 73 38 ts
S43 Is St. Ste. Marie 41 30 45 27 r
D 55 pc Syracuse 67 34 75 58 ts
145 cd Topeka 84 56 72 34 ts
S57 pc Washington 77 57 81 60 pc
S52 pc YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
S52 ts HIGH 97. Chress. Texas
S40 pC LOW 17 Cran Lake Mi.n
656 pc
S49 s WORLD CITIES
S49 c SUN Usbon 711tpc
S49 CITY HLcS W KY London 60/42/pc
49 cd
S35 Is Acapulco 89(73/pc Madrid 73l1nd pc
S27 pc Amsterdam 57144/pc Mexico City 82/57ts
D 61 1 Athens 62/53/s MontreaJ 55/411pc
S62 f Belling 71/46/pc Moscow 4W/33s
54 cd Berlin 62/46/pc Paris 62/42/s
1,.A1 amolTg- --


uermuaa 6iWpc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: ccbouy ij; Cairo 80/59/pc
Main h.hawy pc-pWtry cloudy; raimn; Calgary 37/221pc
rs=rakwnow mix; s-surmW sh-showers; Havana 86/61ts
I=Slw. tl-hnddrst -s wwkildy. Hong Kong 7871/s
WSICM14 Jenrusalem 75/51/pc


Rio 86/7Spc
Rome 69441pc
Sydney 69/59r
Tokyo 62/48/cd
Toronto 51/42/pc
Warsaw 57/37/s


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Palm Sunday, April 13,
the 103rd day of 2014. There are
262 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 13,1964, Sidney Poitier
became the first black performer in
a leading role to win an Academy
Award for his performance in "Lilies
of the Field."
On this date:
In 1613, Pocahontas, daughter of
Chief Powhatan, was captured by
English Capt. Samuel Argall in the
Virginia Colony and held in ex-
change for English prisoners and
stolen weapons.
Ten years ago: Swimmer
Michael Phelps won the 2003 Sulli-
van Award as the nation's top ama-
teur athlete.
Five years ago: The U.N. Secu-
rity Council condemned North
Korea's April 5 rocket launch.
One year ago: All 108 passen-
gers and crew survived after a new
Lion Air Boeing 737 crashed into
the ocean and snapped in two while
attempting to land on the Indone-
sian resort island of Bali.
Today's Birthdays: Movie direc-
tor Stanley Donen is 90. Former
Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, R-
Colo., is 81. Actor Lyle Waggoner is
79. Actor Edward Fox is 77. Actor
Paul Sorvino is 75. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Lester Chambers is
74. Movie-TV composer Bill Conti is
72. Rock musician Jack Casady is
70. Actor Tony Dow is 69. Singer Al
Green is 68. Actor Ron Perlman is
64. Actor William Sadler is 64.
Singer Peabo Bryson is 63. Sen.
Bob Casey Jr., D-Pa., is 54. Rock
musician Joey Mazzola (Sponge) is
53. Chess grandmaster Garry Kas-
parov is 51. Actor Ricky Schroder is
44. Rock singer Aaron Lewis
(Staind) is 42. Actor Bokeem Wood-
bine is 41. Singer Lou Bega is 39.
Actor-producer Glenn Howerton is
38. Actor Kyle Howard is 36. Ac-
tress Courtney Peldon is 33.
Thought for Today: "Go on fail-
ing. Go on. Only next time, try to fail
better." Samuel Beckett, Irish
playwright and author (born this
date in 1906, died in 1989).



LEGAL NOTICES




)us Name Notices......D7


tices............................D7

..-. KlI ,:., n


MARINE OUTLOOK IVIeeLIIny iULIcb...................IJuI
ds 6 12 knots. Seas Gulf water
inland waters a light temperature Miscellaneous Notices........D7
East winds 5 to 10 04
et. Bay and inland C I TRUSc U N T Y-
lop. I7 4/CITRUS COUNTYJr


I


Associated Press
Denzel Washington, center, is shown April 3 at the curtain call
for the opening night of "A Raisin In The Sun" in New York.
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama caught
the American masterpiece Friday night.


Taken at Artpka
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.10 29.16 35.52
Tsata Apopka-Hernando 38.58 38.59 39.52
Tsata Apopka-lnvemess 39.73 39.74 40.60
Tsata Apopka-Floral Cty 40.41 40.42 42.20
L-.ms e:imTd i. -.eI anl e s-e .ei Feoi d Tvaye 11am t sr webawm U, 2' 31' yiix-A
nIep n.n r.jAl fl ood vnr1h has a 43 ra ance 01r-bei benl equaleda e.Ceem1 Im
an' .e year Tn a lr, 1au is co .i.laner lior m e Sou5hlePi Fo,.daa WdW.r Mana.flpriti DiTr. 1
ana is ,ub)l.'[ [i r.elii] in n.r; r.' e, Ii iN Di.irci or r united Slale- G fcgical Su'",
be labtle lo any damages ansing out o# the use ot this data. you hae any questions you
should contmaci hme Hydrologica Data Section at (352) 796-7211
THE NATION
3-.'.'.[An.


*i ^^^^K ^ ....j^^^^AN)*


-\^1~.-...-^
..... ,F

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


LHKONICLL
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To start your subscription:

Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Main switchboard phone numbers:
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Who's in charge:
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Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564 -2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SA Message

from

ISheriff
SJeff DawSI
JEFFREY J. DAWSYa s



SOCIAL MEDIA MAKES IMPACT

IN LAW ENFORCEMENT
If you had told me thirty years ago when I first got into law
enforcement that we would be solving crimes by posting pictures
of suspects from a cell phone, I would have laughed at you. Back
then, we didn't have computers, much less the powerful reach of
the World Wide Web. But today, things are much different.
First responders all over the country utilize laptops, cell phones,
tablets and more for enhanced productivity and connectivity, ulti-
mately improving the service they provide to citizens.
The communication model has also changed dramatically as
this new technology has taken the world by storm. Although peo-
ple still call 911 to get help, anyone with a smart phone can cap-
ture and upload a video to the web as the event is unfolding, and
sometimes before an officer even arrives on scene. This infor-
mation is often seen by the public as factual, regardless of the
outcome.
The agency took the leap into the social media arena several
years ago by creating a Facebook page to keep up with the chang-
ing times and enhance communication with the public. Since that
time, we have opened accounts on Twitter, YouTube, Vine,
Pinterest and Instagram.
To date, our largest successes have come through Facebook.
With over 1 billion users, anything we post on Facebook can be
shared across the
world. With just :: ..
hav D C e xen ~a .. .. .. Wiam'.. ,. INBI x*S SW MyM P *WGta ony.
one post, we have .... ...... -ft
reached more than '-*-'.. .
80,000 people .... ......., _.
slightly more than
half the population
of our county, and
more than double
the circulation of
our local news- .-_ ^.=. r_ ... .'-,:
paper. ...... ,... hi
Most recently, I
personally wit-" ..
Dctit nll r r id t 9 30 AM (hi r iinu hu thi
nessed the power .... h....l. ...abk.............
of socia l m ed ia 1 .. ..h.. af.......... .... ,. . ,.. W .7 .
medS iter i-. a Log leu puli'i 4a-lUiiid rirhells ba.lt up^ L^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ E ^
On February 18 -..., o"oo,
of this year, we
responded to a
bank robbery at
9:30 AM at the .............
SunTrust Bank in
Beverly Hills.
Thanks to great video equipment at SunTrust and our highly
skilled staff, we posted very clear pictures of the suspect on
Facebook by 10:35 AM.
People began commenting on the photos immediately, which
quickly led to the identification of the suspect. The tips that we
received ultimately led to his capture later that day. The suspect,

See MESSAGE, page 2


NotToic





Q&A ithD p i ch l w l .......
The Iomm nde's C allnge.........
All Ha a d x o...................
Fire ~~MSUMvnFowr.........4


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 A5


;/
i


...r


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MESSAGE, from page 1
in fact, was shocked at how quickly he was caught, stating, "I
can't believe you got me this quickly. I thought I at least had four
days...." I'm not downplaying the great work of our detectives by
any means. They did a phenomenal job. Social media just gave us
an advantage. One that we'll take any day.
Social media posts have led us to runaway juveniles, missing
persons, grow houses, meth cooks and to wanted suspects with
open warrants. It has promoted events, helped find animals
homes, provided timely traffic information, and much more. It has
opened a dialog with people we may not have reached using con-
ventional methods.
In the future, our media relations staff will continue to explore
and expand our use of social media. Our goals are ever-changing,
but we plan to establish more of a presence on other common
platforms like Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Vine. We're also
looking into developing an agency application for use on smart
phones and tablets. The app would give citizens quick access to
crime reports, most wanted suspects, scams, fire prevention tips,
a way to submit anonymous tips and much more.
Although I've spent the majority of this article explaining the
benefits of utilizing social media tools, there are also many nega-
tives. Sexual predators, identity thieves, scam artists, slanderers
and much more are always looking for an easy target, so be safe
when engaging in any conversation on the web.
That being said, we'd love to hear from you. Give us your feed-
back on this issue of Behind the Badge at www.facebook.com/
sheriffcitrus.


Patrol Squad

Adopts-A-Highway


Sgt. Casola's squad, Bravo 1 West, saw a need and
adopted the two mile stretch of road on Pine Ridge Blvd.
from 491 to Elkam. The squad goes out during their days
off and picks up the trash. Make sure you check out the
sign the next time you drive through this area.


SHERIFF


as


CLASSIC ITS
CLASSIC HITs


KB


746-9696


746-0953



@sheriffcitrus


We encourage people to call in or leave questions
for the Sheriff on our Facebook page.


A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


WEDgNESDAYS
7:OOAM-8E:OOAM B


THURSDAY
4:OOPM-5:OOPM I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I' BI TH BADGE 31


THE COMMANDER'S

CHALLENGE
Early last year, Commander Buddy Grant, now
the Undersheriff for the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, kicked off the Commander's Challenge to
all sworn law enforcement employees. The
initiative challenged officers to beat the
Commander's time on the physical training
course. Since that time, the Commander's
Challenge has impacted the agency in a very
positive way, with deputies training harder than
ever before to be physically fit.
In keeping with this tradition, Commander
Grant will include an article in each issue of
Behind the Badge with a challenge to you the
residents of this community.

Will YOU Accept the Commander's Challenge?
As technology advances, so do the ways in which we provide information to the
community. Since October 2008, the agency has offered residents a way to view crime
activity in their neighborhoods via our website at www.sheriffcitrus.org.
Now, we've made this technology even better. CrimeReports is a browser-based
community policing application that empowers users to access crime data in their
neighborhoods both quickly and easily. And you can get there with just a couple clicks of
your mouse.
CrimeReports is designed to provide citizens with valuable insight into recent criminal
activity neighborhood by neighborhood. The software program utilizes an advanced
mapping engine to serve accurate and timely data in the form of maps and reports. The
actual crime data is routinely extracted from the agency's own records management
system, so the information being viewed through the web browser is always up to date.
You can focus on and produce detailed reports of criminal activity near a specific
address: by parks, schools and other landmarks and within neighborhoods and other


a


S
U U
.3


qg ~
S
7
'4


~R


U


A | A


KNOW What's Going on in

Your Neighborhood
boundaries. Technology like this can be of significant value to our community outreach
efforts, overall communications and staff productivity.
Users have a variety of options from which to choose, such as showing clusters of
criminal activity, analyzing patterns within a specific radius of any location, determining
the distance to any crime from their own address, using a satellite image that illustrates
topography, plus producing detailed reports. This is what intelligence-led policing, in
conjunction with a community-oriented policing philosophy, is all about.
So how do you use it? All you have to do is visit our official Sheriff's Office website at
www.sheriffcitrus.org and you will see the Citrus County Crime Reports button in the
middle of the page. When you click on a crime there is a link at the bottom of the synopsis
that will link directly to our anonymous Crime Stoppers reporting page.
For more information about this advanced crime-fighting tool, please call 352-726-4488
and ask for Crime Analysis.
Log on now. Complete the Commander's Challenge. Know your neighborhood.


I-,---- 1, 1.


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1' BI TH BADGE I


Fire MSBU



Moving



Forward

Two of Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue's fire stations just
experienced major renovations thanks to funds provided by
the fire Municipal Service Benefit Unit (MSBU). Fire Station
8 and Fire Station 14 were both built in 1980 and have not


Citrus Sheriff
Fire Rescue is
using the fire
MSBU to
standardize
the equipment
and the
stations
throughout
the county.


experienced major upgrades
since their initial construction
more than 30 years ago.
Fire Station 14 is located in
Citrus Springs and expe-
rienced renovations in the
dayroom, the kitchen and
offices. This station will
house career Firefighters
which will work 12-hour shifts
on a daily basis. The reno-
vations of the kitchen
included floor tile, kitchen
cabinets and closing off one


I


of the doors into the bay. The dayroom received interior
paint and new wiring associated with the new energy-
efficient appliances.
At Fire Station 8 in the Highlands, the renovations con-
sisted of gutting the dayroom, kitchen, bathroom, and stor-
age areas. The previous two small bathrooms were con-
verted into one large bathroom with a shower
addition. New tile was placed throughout the station along
with a washer and dryer hook up, a tank-less water heater,
new lighting and a fresh coat of paint.
Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue is using the fire MSBU to stan-
dardize the equipment and the stations throughout the
county. Making sure all the equipment is the same enables
each firefighter to move to stations and trucks without
adapting to new equipment each time. These renovations
will ensure energy bill savings for years to come.


TOP 10 SUMMER
SAFETY TIPS FROM
CCSO PERSONNEL

DROWNING IS ONE OF THE
LEADING CAUSES OF INJURY
related deaths among children between 1-4 years
old. Never leave your child unattended around
water. Babies can drown in as little as one inch of
water. Give your children 100% of your attention
when they are near or around water.
-CAPTAIN DAVE DECARLO, CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION
CHECK THE
PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT
before letting kids play on it. Surfaces that are too
hot can cause burns, and loose ropes can cause
accidental strangulation. The ground should be cov-
ered in a protective surface such as rubber mats,
wood or rubber mulch or wood chips.
-SHARON DONCOURT, VICTIM ADVOCATE
DON'T FORGET TO WEAR SUNSCREEN
and put some on the kids when heading out to
enjoy the sunny days.
SERGEANT RYAN GLAZE, WEST SIDE OPERATIONS

ALWAYS USE YOUR GRILL
AWAY FROM YOUR HOME
and check the propane tank before use.
LINDA FRITZ, ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES ASSISTANT
DID YOU KNOW THAT IF YOU'RE
FEELING THIRSTY, YOU'RE ALREADY
MILDLY DEHYDRATED?
Relying on thirst as a reminder to take a drink
leaves you at risk for dehydration. Help kids avoid
becoming dehydrated by reminding them to drink
often throughout the day. Water and sports drinks
(drinks that contain electrolytes) are the best
options for hydrating avoid sodas, juice and other
fruit drinks.
LINDSAY BLAIR, MEDIA RELATIONS SPECIALIST

NEVER GO KAYAKING ALONE
and always wear your life vest.
-JERRI EVANS, OPERATIONS RECEPTIONIST
USE INSECT REPELLENTS
when going outside, especially during dusk or dawn
hours, to avoid mosquito and other insect bites.
Remember to check yourself, your kids and your
pets for ticks and fleas.
RACHEL WARNER, MEDIA RELATIONS ASSISTANT & CIVIL
CLERK
IF YOU OPERATE A GENERATOR
during the summer months (whenever power is lost)
never use it in the garage or inside your home as it
can lead to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from
the toxic engine exhaust, electric shock or electro-
cution and fire.
SERGEANT TROY HESS, JUDICIAL SERVICES DIVISION

NEVER LEAVE CHILDREN, PETS OR
LIVING THINGS LOCKED IN A HOT CAR
Once the door to the car closes, the car becomes
like an oven and even on an overcast day, can reach
temperatures over 100 degrees in minutes.
DEPUTY MICHELE TEWELL

REDUCE, ELIMINATE, OR RESCHEDULE
strenuous activities such as running, biking and
lawn care work when it heats up. The best times
for such activities are during early morning and late
evening hours. Take cool baths or showers and use
cool, wet towels.
HEATHER YATES, MEDIA RELATIONS MANAGER


mmmmmll


AS SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Raymond
Tate Jr., 89
CRYSTAL RIVER
Mount Airy, Md. Ray-
mond Theodore Tate Jr.
passed on to glory in the
loving
arms of
Jesus on
April 10,
2014, this
home in
Mount
Airy. Born
in 1924 in
Ragland, Raymond
Ala., he Tate Jr.
spent the
majority of his life living
between Maryland and
Crystal River, Fla. He was
actively planning his 90th
birthday on April 28.
He was preceded in
death by his loving wife of
67 years, Helen Jackson
Tate; his parents, Ray-
mond T Tate Sr and Mar-
ian Curd Best; and his
brother Robert E. Tate. He
was a patriot, a loving and
devoted husband, brother
and father He is survived
by daughter Susan T Bur-
rowbridge (Don) of An-
napolis, Md.; son Stephen
E. Tate (Jacki) of Mount
Airy, Md.; son Andrew P
Tate of Yankeetown, Fla.;
and daughter Elizabeth T
Winters (fiance Wayne
Kitzmiller) of Mount Airy,
Md.; grandchildren Erin
Leonard (Chris), Stacy Bul-
lock, Kevin Burrowbridge
(Will), Alex Harden (Dan),
Dana Tate and Margaret
Winters; as well as seven
great-grandchildren.
He graduated high
school in Laurel, Miss., in
1943; attended the Univer-
sity of Florida; transferred
and received his B.S. de-
gree from the University of
Maryland in June 1956; and
M.S. degree from George
Washington University in
1967. He also graduated
from the Industrial College
of the Armed Forces and
he was a frequent guest
lecturer at Harvard Uni-
versity, Kennedy Graduate


School. Mr Tate spent his
life in service to his coun-
try As a teenager, he en-
listed in the Army Air
Corps and became a radio
operator on a B-24 crew
stationed in Bungay, Eng-
land. He flew over 35 com-
bat and electronic
countermeasure missions.
His awards included the
Distinguished Flying
Cross, the Air Medal with
three oak leaf clusters, the
Purple Heart and three
Battle Stars. As a naval re-
servist, and attending col-
lege in Gainesville, Fla.,
Mr Tate was recalled to ac-
tive duty during the Korean
War in 1951 as part of the
Naval Security Group. In
1954, Mr Tate joined NSA
as an electronics engineer
He held a variety of man-
agement engineering posi-
tions until 1963, when he
was appointed chief of the
new Crypto Production
Equipment Engineering
Division. He supervised
both electronic and me-
chanical design engineers
in building unique devices
for the production of a
wide variety of crypto ma-
terials and devices. Mr
Tate was appointed chief of
the newly formed COMSEC
Engineering Division to in-
vestigate TEMPEST vul-
nerabilities. This function
was to grow to the point
where it became the na-
tional authority in the
TEMPEST area. In 1972, he
received the Exceptional
Civilian Service Award
(NSAs highest award) for
executive achievements.
And in 1973, he was pro-
moted to deputy director of
NSA for Communications
Security In 1979, Mr Tate
retired from government
service as a deputy assis-
tant secretary of the Navy
(Command, Control, Com-
munication & Intelligence).
He then began a succession
of successful businesses
that included Ashton Tech-
nology Group and The Win-
dermere Group. Mr Tate
was also director of three
private, commercial com-
panies that serve the fed-
eral market He served as
chairman of the Advisory


Committee on Assessment
of Defense Space Technol-
ogy National Research
Council and the CIA Advi-
sory Panel. He was a board
of directors member for
many large, public compa-
nies throughout the years,
such as BTG, Booze Allen
Hamilton, Lockheed Mar-
tin, TRW and Gould. Mr
Tate was a master mason,
an active member of the
446th Bombardment
Group, the COMSOS Club,
Phoenix Society, Sandy
Spring Neighbors Club and
the Purple Heart, among
others.
Visitation is from 2 to
4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, April 16, at
Stauffer Funeral Home's,
PA., 8 E. Ridgeville Blvd.,
Mount Airy, Md. A Chris-
tian funeral service will be
celebrated at 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, April 17, at Stauffer
Funeral Home, immedi-
ately followed by a proces-
sional to Pine Grove
Cemetery, Mount Airy, Md.
All are welcome to fellow-
ship following the burial at
The American Legion,
Mount Airy, Md. In lieu of
flowers, the family re-
quests donations to a mili-
tary charity or
organization of your
choice. Online condo-
lences may be shared with
the family at www.stauffer
funeralhome.com.





Joseph
Brousseau, 90
BEVERLY HILLS
Joseph C. Brousseau, 90,
of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
passed away April 1, 2014.
Graveside service and mil-
itary honors will take
place at 11 a.m. Friday
April 25, 2014, at Florida
National Cemetery, Bush-
nell, Fla.
Fero Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


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800.771.0057
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To Place Your
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Darrell Watson 564-2197


Norman
Gallant, 68
FLORAL CITY
Norman Robert Gallant,
age 68, Floral City, died
April 11, 2014, surrounded
by his loving family and
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus County Norman
was born April 29, 1945, in
Fall River, Mass., to the
late Norman B. And
Loretta (Hunt) Gallant. He
served his country in the
U.S. Navy during the Viet-
nam era aboard ship as a
navigator of hurricane
planes. Norman was the
owner/operator of his own
auto body repair shop for
many years. He enjoyed
socializing with his
friends, surfing the Inter-
net for research in history
and science and was an In-
ternet poker champ.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 20 years,
Linda Gallant; his son
Jason (Crystal) Gallant,
Newport, N.C.; stepson
Jason (Gretchen) Gray,
Leesburg, Fla.; brothers
Rick Gallant, Safety Har-
bour, Fla., Dennis Gallant,
Largo, Fla., David (Candy)
Gallant, Inverness and
Donald (Mary) Gallant,
Edison, N.J.; sisters Janine
Gallant, West Keansburg,
N.J., and Michelle (Leon)
Fowler, Lorton, Va.; grand-
stepchildren Blake Robin-
son and Ansley and Andon
Gray; and several nieces,
nephews and extended
family He was preceded in
death by a sister, Diane
Stewart.
A tribute to Norman's life
will be at 1 p.m. Monday,


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Obituaries


For Information and costs,-
call 726-8323


April 14, 2014, at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, with military
honors. The family will
greet friends in visitation
from noon until the hour of
service. Burial will be later
at the Florida National
Cemetery Please consider
a memorial donation to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 to continue
their wonderful care of oth-
ers as they did for Norman,
in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guestbook at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

Clarita
Sagun, 77
HERNANDO
Clarita S. Sagun, 77, of
Hernando, Fla., passed
away April 9,2014, at home
while in the care of her
loving



Ih area in g lrt
family and
Hospice of
Citrus
County A
native of4f
the Philip-
pines, she
came to
the area in Clarita
1998 from Sagun
Chicago,
Ill., where she retired as a
radiation oncology nurse
from Mercy Hospital. She
was a loving wife and








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mother who devoted her
life to taking care of her
family Mrs. Sagun was an
active member of Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church.
She is survived by her
husband, Ruben "Ben"
Sagun Sr; two sons, Raul
Sagun of Waldorf, Md., and
Ruben Sagun Jr. of San An-
tonio, Texas; brother,
Rolando Sarmiento of
Tacoma, Wash.; two sisters,
Purification Sarmiento
and Leonila Sarmiento,
both of the Philippines;
and four grandchildren,
Nicholas, Alexandra,
Gabriela and Cecelia.
A funeral Mass will be at
11 a.m. Monday, at Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness, FL 34450. www.
ferofuneralhome.com

Suzanne
Lavelle, 54
Suzanne Lavelle, age 54,
died Friday, April 11,2014.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.
See DEATHS/Page All

Deadline is 3 p.m. for
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in the next day's
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA9

Michael 'Mike'
Nadeau, 40
INVERNESS
Michael "Mike" Nadeau,
40, of Inverness, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
April 7,2014.
He was
born in
Dunedin,
Fla., on
Monday,
June 25,
1973, to
Francis
and Susan
(Lyman) Michael
Nadeau. Nadeau
Mike was
the owner of a tree service
company in Citrus County
He was an avid outdoors-
man and enjoyed hunting
and fishing.
Mike was preceded in
death by his father, Francis
Nadeau; and his brother,
Paul Rich.
Survivors include his
wife, Jennie Nadeau; sons,
Ryan Nadeau of St. Peters-


MANAGERS
Continued from Page Al

They concluded the first
half of the ride at Little
Springs Park, behind City
Hall.
While they were in Crys-
tal River, they were given a
chance to refuel their nat-
ural motors at downtown
eateries before heading
back to Inverness for the
Taste of Inverness
celebration.
"You see a lot of serious
bicyclers here today,"
Houston said. "I'm here to
show that you don't have to
be an athlete. This is an
easy place to ride a bike
from town to town, as we
have great bike trails."
The non-competitive
ride confirmed that Crys-
tal River and Inverness
are committed to being
part of the best united
county in the United
States.
"It is a great day for the
two cities to get together
and do something on a
joint basis," said cycling
coordinator Charlie Wade.
"The west side of the
county has the manatees
and the east side has cy-
cling. We want this county
to be a cycle destination
nationwide."
This year's cycling affair
was an experimental
event. DiGiovanni said
next year it will draw hun-
dreds of participants and
hopefully encourage the
possibility of a multi-day
event the third year
"We have enough trails
in Citrus County where we
can do several different
rides over a two- or three-
day period," he said. "We
are going to show people
that it can be done safely"



I1 Jn


burg, Fla., Brandon
Nadeau of Sitka, Alaska,
Cadence Nadeau of Inver-
ness, Fla., and Joshua and
Seth Hamlet, both of In-
verness, Florida; daugh-
ters, Kenley Nadeau and
Kelsey Hamlet, both of In-
verness, Fla.; mother,
Susan Nadeau of Inver-
ness, Fla.; brothers, David
Rich of Tuscon, Ariz., and
James and Stephen
Nadeau, both of Inverness,
Fla.; and sister, Amy
Mathis of Seminole, Fla.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 6 p.m.
Monday, April 14, 2014. A
celebration of Mike's life
will take place at 6 p.m. at
Fero Funeral Home, with
a reception to follow. The
family requests that every-
one dress casual, like Mike
did.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to St.
Jude Children's Research
Hospital, 262 Danny
Thomas Place, Memphis,
TN 38105, or www.stjude.
org in memory of Mike.
To view Michael's web-
site and sign the online reg-
ister book, please visit
www.ferofuneralhome.com.


Norwood
Speary, 90
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Norwood
LeRoy Speary, age 90, of
Homosassa, Fla., will be at
10:30 a.m.
Thursday,
April 17,
2014, at
the Ho-
mosassa
Chapel of
Hooper
Funeral
Homes. In- Norwood
urnment Speary
will follow
at Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Fla. The
family requests expres-
sions of sympathy take the
form of memorial dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
He was born July 14,
1923, in Marcus Hook, Pa.,


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
An estimated 300 participants were expected to
participate in the Lake to Bay Bike Ride on Saturday. The
ride went from Liberty Park in Inverness to downtown
Crystal River and back.



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son of Roy and Selina
(Millington) Speary He
died April 11, 2014, under
the loving care of Hospice
of Citrus County and his
family Mr Speary was a
U.S. Navy veteran serving
during World War II in
both theaters of combat.
He retired as a fire inspec-
tor for the city of St. Pe-
tersburg and moved to
Homosassa in 1974. Mr
Speary was a member of
First United Methodist
Church, Homosassa.
He is survived by his
wife of 68 years, Clara Eve-
lyne Speary, Homosassa; a
son, Kirk Roy Speary,
Round Rock, Texas; two
daughters, Sherry Lee Gi-
anakas, Lake City, Fla., and
Dareen Lee McCall, Jack-
sonville, Fla.; nine grand-
children; 13 great-
grandchildren; and four
great-great-grandchildren.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory
SO YOU KNOW
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or call
352-563-5660.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


FREE OBITUARIES
* Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name
of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death;
place of death; date, time and place of visitation
and funeral services.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served
in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when
submitting a free obituary.)
* Additionally, all obituaries will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline.com.




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LOCAL


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 All










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationBeFs Unrest in Donetsk
Lad rest Unrestmin Donetsk


World BRIEFS

Protest


Uniformed men occupypolice

headquarters in Ukrainian city


Associated Press
The hearse bearing the
body of Sgt. Timothy
Wayne Owens, 37, of
Effingham, Ill., travels
Saturday along the
procession route on 10th
Street in Rolla, Mo.
Owens was a soldier killed
in shootings at Fort Hood,
Texas, earlier this month.

Bond set for teen
in mob attack
DETROIT--A 16-year-
old Detroit boy charged with
assault and ethnic intimida-
tion in the mob beating of a
suburban motorist has been
ordered held on a $400,000
cash bond.
Referee Raeigen Woods
told the teen at a juvenile
court hearing Saturday that
the seriousness of the
charges and severity of the
victim's injuries necessi-
tated a high bond. Defense
attorney Sterling Coleman
asked for a lower bond.
The teen is accused of
being part of a mob that
beat Steve Utash, who
stopped April 2 to help a
boy he struck with his
pickup truck.
Suspect's mental
state is key to case
MURRYSVILLE, Pa. -
Attorneys say the legal fate
of a 16-year-old boy ac-
cused of stabbing or slash-
ing 22 people at his
Pennsylvania high school
will probably pivot more on
his mental state than his
tender age.
They said the sheer num-
ber of victims won't pre-
clude Alex Hribal from being
treated as a juvenile. That's
something that would as-
sure his freedom by 21.
The boy's attorney is
seeking a psychiatric evalu-
ation and will seek to have
him transferred to juvenile
court.
Squirrel blamed
for $300K damage
FORT WAYNE, Ind. -
Officials said a wayward
squirrel caused about
$300,000 in damage to an
eastern Indiana community
center set to open in June.
Fort Wayne Parks De-
partment officials said the
squirrel got into the electri-
cal equipment of the build-
ing in McMillen Park last
week, causing a power
surge that damaged the
heating and air conditioning
systems and some parts of
the boiler system. The
squirrel didn't survive.
Feds end cattle
roundup in NV
Federal land managers
abruptly ended the roundup
of cattle on public land in
southern Nevada owned by
a rancher who has refused
to recognize their authority,
citing a "serious concern"
for the safety of employees
and the public.
Bureau of Land Manage-
ment chief Neil Kornze
made the announcement
Saturday morning.
The fight has widened
into a debate about states'
rights and federal land-use
policy. The agency re-
voked Cliven Bundy's
grazing rights after he
stopped paying grazing
fees and disregarded court
orders to remove his
animals.
The Las Vegas Review-
Journal reported the BLM
will also release 100 of the
seized cattle. The BLM did
not immediately return
calls to The Associated
Press.
-From wire reports


In a phone call with
Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov, U.S. Secre-
tary of State John Kerry
"expressed strong con-
cern" that the attacks
"were orchestrated and
synchronized, similar to
previous attacks in eastern
Ukraine and Crimea," ac-
cording the State Depart-
ment. Kerry "made clear
that if Russia did not take
steps to de-escalate in east-
ern Ukraine and move its
troops back from Ukraine's
border, there would be ad-
ditional consequences,"
the department said.
The Russian news
agency Itar-Tass, citing the
Russia's Foreign Ministry,
said Kerry "could not give
any concrete facts" to


Associated Press
DONETSK, Ukraine -
Men in the uniforms of
Ukraine's now-defunct riot
police on Saturday occu-
pied police headquarters
in Donetsk, the eastern
city that is one of the flash-
points of a wave of pro-
Russia protests, hours
after armed men seized
local police headquarters
and a local branch of the
Security Service in a
nearby city
Interior Minister Arsen
Avakov described the un-
rest as "Russian aggres-
sion" and said Ukraine's
security officials would be
gathering for an extraordi-
nary meeting late Satur-
day evening.


MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. -
When the weather warms and the
South Carolina humidity hangs
like a soggy blanket along the
coast, you can often find an entre-
preneur selling shrimp out of the
back of a pickup truck by the road
with a hand-scrawled sign pro-
moting it as both fresh and local.
There's a chance it's neither
And the fresh, local, red snap-
per you order as you watch the
sunset over the Gulf of Mexico
from the deck of a seafood place
in Florida may just turn out to be
none of the above.
In a nation where 92 percent of
seafood is imported and labeling
fraud is rife, both state and fed-
eral lawmakers are moving to
pass laws to help make sure cus-
tomers are getting the seafood
they are paying for
A seafood labeling law in the
South Carolina General Assembly
would mean that, among other
things, what is advertised as fresh
local shrimp is what it says not
imported and frozen. It would
make it a misdemeanor to inten-
tionally mislabel seafood.
A bill introduced this year by


Associated Press
A member of Ukraine's now-defunct riot police officers
stand in his uniforms Saturday while guarding the front of
the regional police building in Donetsk, Ukraine.
support his allegations. Ukrainian government "to
The news agency said take into account the legit-
Lavrov told Kerry that the imate needs and interests
crisis in Ukraine was due of the Russian and Russ-
to the failure of the ian-speaking population."


Associated Press
Pike Place Fish Market fishmonger Erik Espinoza shovels ice onto fresh
fish at the Pike Place Market in Seattle on Oct. 3, 2013.


Maryland state delegate Eric
Luedtke imposes penalties for in-
tentionally mislabeling seafood like
the Chesapeake Bay's iconic blue
crab. And the governor of Washing-
ton last year signed a bill requiring
all processed fish and shellfish to
be labeled by their common names
to avoid confusing consumers.


In Washington, the so-called
SAFE Act the Safety and Fraud
Enforcement for Seafood Act -
has been introduced in both
chambers of Congress. It would
require information, such as
where and when seafood was
caught, to follow seafood through
final sale.


Poison gas claims complicate war


Associated Press


BEIRUT Both sides
in Syria's bloody civil war
said Saturday that a rural
village fell victim to a poi-
son gas attack, an assault
that reportedly injured
scores of people amid an
ongoing international ef-
fort to rid the country of
chemical weapons.


What exactly happened
Friday in Kfar Zeita, a
rebel-held village in Hama
province some 125 miles
north of Damascus, re-
mains unclear and likely
won't be known for some
time. It took United Na-
tions weapons inspectors
months to say it was likely
some chemical weapons
attacks happened last year,


including an August attack
that killed hundreds and
nearly sparked Western
airstrikes against Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's
forces.
But online videos
posted by rebel activists
from Kfar Zeita echoed
earlier images that
sparked a world outcry,
showing pale-faced men,


women and children gasp-
ing for breath at a field
hospital.
They suggest an afflic-
tion by some kinpd of poi-
son and yet another
clouded incident where
both sides blame each
other in a conflict that ac-
tivists say has killed more
than 150,000 people with
no end in sight.


Associated Press
University students shout
against Venezuela's
President Nicolas Maduro
on Saturday during an
anti-government protest
in Caracas, Venezuela.

Judge dismisses
case against baby
ISLAMABAD -A Pak-
istani judge dismissed an
attempted murder charge
Saturday that police lodged
against a 9-month-old boy,
ending a bizarre case that
drew new criticism to the
country's troubled criminal
justice system.
The family of toddler Mo-
hammad Musa had kept
the boy in hiding after au-
thorities pressed charges
accusing him of trying to
kill police officers after a
neighborhood brawl in
Pakistan's eastern city of
Lahore. Judge RafaqatAli
Qamar dropped the case
against the boy during a
hearing in which police an-
nounced they would no
longer pursue the charges,
defense lawyer Irfan Tarar
said.
"The father of toddler
produced him before the
judge today," Tarar said.
"The boy was in the arms
of his father when police
submitted a report, stating
they have dropped the
charge against the boy."
Diocese: Late bishop
guilty of abuse
THE HAGUE, Nether-
lands -A former Dutch
Catholic bishop, who died
last year, was guilty of sex-
ual abuse decades ago
when he was a chaplain
and teacher in the southern
Netherlands, his diocese
has acknowledged, in the
latest abuse scandal to hit
the church.
An organization of vic-
tims of church abuse, Mea
Culpa, welcomed the state-
ment Saturday as vindicat-
ing a fight for justice by
victims, both boys at the
time of the abuse.
The Diocese of Roer-
mond said in a statement
issued late Friday that a
church complaints commis-
sion had ruled that the late
Bishop Jo Gijsen was found
to have committed the
abuse.
Tsunami warning
follows quake
HONIARA, Solomon Is-
lands -A tsunami warning
was issued for some Pacific
islands following a powerful
magnitude-7.6 earthquake
near the Solomon Islands.
The United States Geo-
logical Service said the
quake struck around
7:14 a.m. local time Sun-
day. Its epicenter was 200
miles southeast of Honiara,
the Solomons capital,
and its depth was
18.2 miles.
The Pacific Tsunami
Warning Center issued a
warning for the Solomon Is-
lands, Vanuatu and Papua
New Guinea. The center
says it's not known if the
quake generated a tsunami
but it was powerful enough
to trigger one.
There were no immedi-
ate reports of injuries or
damage from the temblor.
The Solomon Islands lies
on the "Ring of Fire" an
arc of earthquake and vol-
canic activity that stretches
around the Pacific Rim.
-From wire reports


Fishy business

Fishy business


~1~~




Al


Associated Press
Shrimp boats sit at dock in Mount Pleasant, S.C., on Aug. 18, 2013. Lawmakers in both state legislatures
and in Washington, D.C., have been considering bills that would help to ensure more accurate labeling of
seafood.

American lawmakers look to combat seafoodfraud
Associated Press 4 .








EI Travel & Leisure


EXCURSIONS


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PETER GRAULICH
For the Chronicle


ay 19 begins at 7 a.m. local
time, as we approached
Pitcairn Island. You may recall
from part 4 that the mutiny on the
HMS Bounty occurred on April 28,
1789. After setting the captain and crew
afloat, the mutineers settled on the is-
lands of Tahiti and Pitcairn.
Led by Fletcher Christian, the
mutineers established Adamstown on
Pitcairn, and today the town is
populated by his descendents.
Due to centuries of isolation, residents
have not developed immunity to pres-
ent-day diseases, and therefore we were
not permitted to disembark. A small
group of residents that were properly
immunized boarded our ship. There is
no commerce on Pitcairn Island, so we
were offered the opportunity to pur-
chase $40 T-shirts and $5 postcards.
World travelers that we are, we are al-
ways happy to help the locals.
The administrative offices for the island
of Pitcairn are located in Auckland, New
Zealand (3,300 miles away). Thomas Chris-
tian, the great-great-great-grandson of
Fletcher Christian and Elizabeth, his wife,
as senior members of the community,
make frequent trips to the administrative
offices. As a result, they have developed
disease immunity and have seen a large
portion of the world. We were able to
spend some time with them discussing the
island's history and its current operation.
Living on the island is not easy
Electricity is available for only 10
hours a day and is very expensive. A
kilowatt-hour costs approximately $.60
versus about $. 10 here in the United
States. The average electric bill is be-
tween $300 and $500 per month. Mail is
sporadic and teachers are imported on
short contracts to operate the school.
At the end of our visit, we continue our
westward journey to Tahiti, approxi-
mately 1,350 miles away
So far, we have traveled 6,075 miles
and I have taken 660 photographs.
Day 20 is an "at-sea" day Although one
of many, the sea days pass quickly due to
the long list of activities available.


I.-


PETER GRAULICH / For the Chronicle
Tahiti (top) and Pitcairn (above) were two ports of call during a cruise around the world.

Editor's note:
This is the fifth installment in a series highlighting Peter Graulich's 107-day trip around the world.


I attended another lecture from John Maxton
Graham titled "Liners to the Sun." Known for their
long-distance travel, the ships were prepared for
anything.
We spent some time at the pool reading, as the
weather in this part of the world is perfect every
day Of course, we interrupted our busy schedule
for the lunch buffet, afternoon tea and cookies, and
to sample some new pastries.
We have now traveled 6,502 miles from Fort
Lauderdale.
Day 20 began at 7 a.m. as we arrived at Bounty
Bay, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia.
This is the finest example of tropical paradise I
have ever seen. Our arrival followed the same path
as the Bounty, and it was easy for us to understand
the attraction of the crew
Papeete was a small village populated by local
natives until the 1940s. When the United States gov-


ernment decided to move nuclear testing to the
area, the village grew rapidly into the present-day
city.
Leslye and I walked into town for a quick tour on
foot. The Bounty is everywhere.
We then hired a taxi to take us on a tour of the is-
land.
The island is beautiful. Everywhere we saw lush
tropical foliage, waterfalls, white-sand beaches, co-
conut palms and wildlife. We return to the city with
time for more exploration and shopping (everything
is imported, therefore expensive) and returned to
the ship.
At the end of the day we have traveled 7,203
miles from Fort Lauderdale, and I have taken
814 photographs.
Next up: we continue our journey across the
mighty Pacific Ocean.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Hubby must


break pattern


D earAnnie: I've
been married for
20 years. My hus-
band had a great job that
allowed him to support
me while I completed my
education. Our financial
situation diminished, but
as long as we could share
responsibilities, it was OK
with me.
When I entered the job
force, there was a radical
shift I be-
came respon-
sible for every
single bill.
There were
periods when
my husband
didn't work
because no
job paid as
well as his old
one, but
mostly it was
because he ANN
couldn't make MAIL
the job last M_ lL
Twelve years
ago, we decided that a
real estate career would
suit his personality, but
we have yet to see even
modest returns.
I have been patient, but
when times get tough, I
expect my husband to
take a side job to help
make ends meet This en-
rages him. He'll get the
job, but he's extremely
unpleasant to me. He has
pushed our lifestyle be-
yond our means. When I
offer advice, he accuses
me of implying he's an
idiot and then claims it's
verbal abuse.
We are so heavily in


I
.I


debt, I see no way out un-
less he takes a steady job
and sticks to a budget But
he insists that real estate
is our best option and
blames me for allocating
money to pay bills instead
of reinvesting it in mar-
keting himself
I worry incessantly
Every dime goes toward
our debt or his real estate
fees. I buy nothing for my-
self. But worse
is how awful he
makes me feel. I
have lost
friends, and my
self-esteem is
gone. But I love
him, and I know
he loves and
needs me. What
can I do to re-
store balance in
our lives with-
E'S out making him
feel that I'm the
3OX aggressor?-
Wife
Dear Wife: There is
some subtle emotional
abuse and definite ma-
nipulation going on, but
not from you. And be-
cause you are convinced
that your husband can't
manage without you, you
keep bucking him up
even though he takes ad-
vantage and belittles
you. This is called
enabling.
Speak to a financial
adviser at your bank,
and then consider some
low-cost counseling and
figure out how to break
this dysfunctional
pattern.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7p.m.
No passes.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Divergent" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Draft Day" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
12:20 p.m., 3:25 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Oculus" (R) 12:35 p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12:15 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.


"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 12:45 p.m.,
3:20 p.m. No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 8 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 3:45 p.m. No passes.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Draft Day" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m.,
3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 11:45 a.m.,
2:25 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 12:45 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 7:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Far-reaching
6 Shining
11 Material for bows
16 Close
20 Glove size
21 Carpentry tool
22 Damage by
degrees
23 Spud
25 Inert gas
26 Buckets
27 -lily
28 Homed beast,
for short
29 Parrot of
New Zealand
30 Bank note
32 Come together
34 -Angeles
35 River in Ireland
37 Off-color
38 Blusher
39 Different folks
41 Beam
43 Carried
44 "Lost in-"
46 Dickinson, for one
49 Signified
50 Most deserving
54 Passionate
55 Aflower
56 Nimbus
57 Stare with open mouth
58 Tattered cloth
59 Write, in a way
60 Jeans brand
61 Rock or Farley
62 Abbr. in footnotes
64 Loco
65 Used a stopwatch
66 Present but
undeveloped
67 Antitoxins
68 Detest
69 Indivisible entity
70 Mother
71 Actress Susan
72 Whooping -
74 Monopoly buy
75 Half a sawbuck
77 Books pro
80 Make peevish
81 River in Africa
82 Yam
83 Defunct acronym


87 Carriage
89 Old Roman place of as-
sembly
90 and spice
91 Greek letter
92 Lingo
93 Caravan creature
94 Pilot's place
95 Make lace
96 Commotion
97 Prep school (Abbr.)
98 Reddyor Mirren
99 Wound
102 Looked at
105 Fragrant wood
106 Soaked
107 Put up
108 Like a zoo animal
109 Barrel part
110 Make more plump
113 Was bold
114 Combustible stuff
115 Ceremony
119 -ideal
120 Underworld flower
123 Tropical fruit
125 Demand payment from
126 Pointer
128 Get stuck
129 Jewish holy day
130 Colossus
132 Nerve networks
133 Enrage
134 Dunne or Ryan
135 Earthy pigment
136 Wriggling
137 Lacks
138 Ralph the consumer ad-
vocate
139 Hollow rock

DOWN
1 English poet
2 Harder to find
3 Harmonium
4 Past
5 Collision result
6 Urgent requests
7 Quick look
8 The non-clergy
9 Sole
10 Montgomery or Craven
11 Tell
12 Spectrum color
13 Unriddle
14 Doing nothing


Approach
Lengthen
Cry of triumph
Serviceable
Male vocalist
Perot or
Macdonald
Bracelet location
Dated
Farm animal
Punta del -
Cook
Elevation
Game pieces
Hill or Goodman
Cube or cone, e.g.
Paid players
Reduces
Speechify
-Allan Poe
Corn
Fluttered
Kind of seal
Thorn
Petulant
Talk on and on
Of blood
Practical joke
Garment part
Arrived
Fond du -
Amulet
Tribal emblem
Enthusiast
Business VIP
La Scala's city
Very funny guy
Engaged
Villain in "Oliver Twist"
Massage
Pursue
Shindig
Actress
Dickinson
Wanderer
Underground stem
Arrangement
Fixed gaze
Appraised
Sherbet relative
Aspect
Low-cal lunch
Math branch (Abbr.)
Yielded
German
philosopher


NATO nation
A state (Abbr.)
Scoff
Window well
Telescope part
Professions
Edible clam
Mooched
Lying face-up
Panic


Think as one
Rich cake
Circumvent
Got along
Pocatello's state
Adjusted
- nous
Blueprint
Sharpen
Aqua-


Puzzle answer is on Page A26.


124 Very excited
127 Lubricate
129 Bowling item
131 Frost


4-13 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for FS


A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Revisiting NYC's 1964 World's Fair, 50 years later


BETH J. HARPAZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK- You can
just barely see them
through the window of the
No. 7 subway as it rattles
into the elevated station
in Corona, Queens: a gi-
gantic steel sphere, two
rocket ships, and towers
that appear to be capped
by flying saucers.
These unusual land-
marks are among a num-
ber of attractions still
standing from the 1964
World's Fair, which
opened in Flushing
Meadows Corona Park 50
years ago, with marvels
ranging from microwave
ovens to Disney's "it's a
small world" ride to Bel-
gian waffles with straw-
berries and whipped
cream.
But visiting the area
today is as much about
21st century Queens as it
is a walk down memory
lane. Many of Queens'
contemporary cultural in-
stitutions like the
Queens Museum and the
New York Hall of Science
- grew out of fair attrac-
tions and incorporate
original fair exhibits.
Other relics are stupen-
dous in their own right,
like the Unisphere, a 12-
story steel globe so glori-
ous to behold, you almost
feel like you're seeing
Earth from outer space.
There's also a modern
zoo, an antique carousel
and outdoor sculptures.
Here's a guide to cele-
brating the 50th anniver-
sary of the 1964 World's
Fair on a visit to Queens.
THE NEIGHBORHOOD
On weekends, Flushing
Meadows Corona Park is
packed with people from
the dozens of ethnic
groups that populate
Queens, speaking many
languages, eating food
from around the world
and playing soccer with a
seriousness of purpose
often found among those
who grew up with the
sport That makes for "a
wonderful unique experi-
ence," said Janice Melnick,
Flushing Meadows Corona
Park administrator
And yet, as you walk out
of the 111th Street train
station, there's something
about Corona that also
brings to mind an older,
simpler New York. No
hipsters here; no luxury
condo skyscrapers. In-
stead, you'll find modest
brick apartment buildings
and single-family homes,
pizzerias and diners, bar-
ber shops and variety
stores. That throwback
sensibility adds a layer of
nostalgia to the experi-
ence of revisiting fair
sites, especially for
boomers who attended
the event as kids.


Associated Press
The Unisphere, right, is the best-known symbol still standing from the 1964 World's Fair, as well as the ring of
pillars that once housed the New York State Pavilion, in the Queens borough of New York. These, and a number
of other landmarks and sites can be visited by those looking to soak up a little nostalgia on the fair's
50th anniversary, in the Corona neighborhood of Queens.


"I think for many peo-
ple, the fair represents
this last moment of true
optimism," said Melnick.
"We were looking into the
future, and the future was
going to be bright. That
really struck a chord with
a lot of people."

THE UNISPHERE
The fair's best-known
symbol, an elegant steel
globe, has appeared in
movies like "Men in
Black" and "Iron Man 2."
Visitors enjoy setting up
photos so that they ap-
pear to be holding the
world in their hands. Lo-
cated in the park, outside
the Queens Museum of
Art.

NEW YORK STATE
PAVILION
You can't miss the tow-
ers topped by flying
saucers, surrounded by
100-foot-high concrete
pillars. This was the New
York State Pavilion,
where visitors rode eleva-
tors to an observation
deck above an enormous
suspended roof of translu-
cent colored tiles. Today
the structure is pad-
locked, rusted and
cracked, with preserva-
tionists and critics fight-
ing over its future.
QUEENS MUSEUM
The museum is housed
in a building that dates to
the 1939 World's Fair,
which marks its 75th an-
niversary this year It also
briefly housed the United
Nations General Assem-
bly after World War II. Ex-
hibits include posters
from both fairs and a
replica of Michelangelo's
"Pieta," which was shown


in the Vatican Pavilion
during the'64 fair
The museum's most fa-
mous display, the
"Panorama of the City of
New York," is a scale
model of the city that de-
buted at the'64 fair The
panorama includes mod-
els of each of the city's
895,000 buildings built be-
fore 1992, along with
every street, park and
bridge, on a scale of 1 to
1,200. The island of Man-
hattan is 70 feet long, the
Empire State building 15
inches tall.
Opening April 27 is an
exhibit of posters that pop
artist Andy Warhol did for
the '64 World's Fair, in-
spired by mug shots of the
city's 13 most-wanted
criminals from 1962. The
posters were too contro-
versial for the fair and
were never shown.
Located in the park,
near the Willets Point
stop on the No. 7 train.
Wednesday-Sunday, noon
to 6 p.m.; adults, $8, chil-
dren under 12, free.
ROCKETS AND
NEW YORK HALL OF
SCIENCE
Two NASA rockets
stand 100 feet high (30
meters) outside the New
York Hall of Science, a
museum that opened a
few years after the'64 fair,
replacing a temporary
pavilion. The rockets
were part of a space park
at the fair that captured
the excitement of the
era's quest to get a man
on the moon.
Towering over the Hall


of Sciences is an undulat-
ing concrete building
called the Great Hall, an


architectural marvel that
was an original fair site.
Undergoing renovation


now, it's due to reopen in
October, when visitors will
be able to experience the
other-worldly interior cov-
ered in blue stained glass.
The Hall of Science has
undergone a series of ren-
ovations over the years and
today houses exhibits ex-
ploring everything from
microbes to the science of
basketball. It also has a
small but worthwhile dis-
play in a second-floor hall-
way of brochures, tickets
and other memorabilia
from the fair, along with a
first-floor display of photos
of World's Fairs going back
to the 19th century
Located at 47-1111th St
Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-
5 p.m., weekends 10 a.m.-6
p.m.; adults, $11, children
2-17, $8.
CAROUSEL
The carousel dates to the
early 1900s and was
brought to Queens for
the'64 fair from Coney Is-
land, Brooklyn. Located
outside the zoo, near lllth
Street and 55th Avenue.
Open weekends and school
holidays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., $3.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 A15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at
a jam from 6 to 9 p.m. April 18 with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are wel-
come. Cost is $5 at the door; food and
soft drinks are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness. For more information, call
352-476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-
726-0444.

Bingo open to public
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.;
games start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Public can eat shrimp,
wings at post
Everyone is welcome to join Blanton-
Thompson American Legion Post 155 in
Crystal River on Wednesday for wings
or shrimp basket lunches in the lounge
from noon to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit veterans'
programs.
For more information, call 352-
795-6526.


Come play games with post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa invites
the public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m. Wednesday
and food is available. Jam sessions are
from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.

Post welcomes all for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170
Vet Lane (County Road 491 behind Ca-
dence Bank), offers several events that
are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in the
smoke-free hall. Card bingo and grill
night is at 5 p.m. Wednesday in the
Canteen. Darts are at 7 p.m. Monday
and Fridays in the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and
Thursday mornings.
For more information, call 352-
746-0440.

Post invites all for meals
VFW Post 4252, State Road 200 in
Hernando (with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the public at its meals
and activities.
Meals include lunch every day and
breakfast on Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Activities include bar bingo on
Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday Dance
music is on tap every Friday and bingo
is played in the hall Saturday


Friday features an all-you-can-eat fish
fry or New England boiled dinner
For more information and menus, call
the post at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabayrr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.

DAV gets vets to clinics
The DAV transportation network has
received great response for volunteer
drivers for the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from
Lecanto to The Villages.
The Gainesville van goes each week-
day and The Villages run is made when
there is a need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto at 352-527-
5915 to be placed on the van list. All ap-
pointments must be made before 1 p.m.

'In Their Words' stories
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a sin-
gular event or moment in your military
career that stands out to you. It can be
any type of event, from something from
the battlefield to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of service,
theater of war served, years served, out-
fit and veterans organization affilia-
tions.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak
at 352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com.


Case manager aids vets
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday Coastal
Regional Library, 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.

Office has help for PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department offers help for veterans
who have had their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied
within the past two years are asked to
contact the office to review the case and
discuss compensation/pension examina-
tion. All veterans who have been diag-
nosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health
center and have been denied are en-
couraged to contact the Citrus County
Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to dis-
cuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial letter and a
copy of your compensation examination
by Gainesville. For more information,
visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.


-I


C- C I T R U S.,- ..C OU N T Y
CHRON ICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


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A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Transitioning vets
can get assistance
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat For more informa-
tion about the Citrus
County Veterans Office,
log onto wwwbocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.


Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons.
Criminal background
check and membership
are required.
Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.

Hospice assists
veterans, families
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war
It also provides care-
giver education and a
recognition program to
honor veterans' services
and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits.
For more information
about Hospice programs,
call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.


Prior enlisted
sought for service
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select ca-
reer fields.
Some of the careers in-


clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other
specialties.
Enlisted career open-
ings that include the op-
portunities to retrain
consist of special opera-
tions positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.


MODERN


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Chilton reunion
to be in September
The next reunion for
the USS Chilton will be
Sept. 17 to 24 in
Louisville, Ky.
For information, call
Joe at 352-341-5959.


Free yoga classes
offered for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom teaches free classes
to combat veterans at sev-
eral locations and times.
For more information,
call 352-382-7397.


* Send your veterans and service news to
community@chronicleonline.com.


County -


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VETERANS


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 A17




Page A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 13,2014





VETERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Veteran artists sought
The Florida Artists Gallery is planning a
special exhibit honoring Citrus County
veterans who are artists, with a juried ex-
hibit that will run the full month of May
Painters, illustrators and fine art pho-
tographers are being sought, and the only
rule for eligibility is that the artist be a
veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces who re-
sides in Citrus County no less than six
months per year, and is willing to sell his
or her art.
There is no entry fee and awards will be
given in each category, in addition to a
best of show award. Both military and non-
military subject matter is appropriate. Ap-
plication deadline is Tuesday
Entry forms can be obtained at the
Florida Artists Gallery in Floral City, or by
mailing floridaartistsgallery@gmail.com.
A good-quality photograph preferably a
digital photograph should be submitted
for each work of art to be considered.
Work does not have to be framed, but it
must be fitted with a durable hanging
wire.
The Florida Artists Gallery and Caf6 is
in the historic Knight House at 8219 Or-
ange Ave. in Floral City For more informa-
tion, call 352-344-9300, or go to
wwwflartistsgallery com.

Members sought for group
The American Legion Post 166 of
Homosassa Springs is seeking all male de-
scendants, adopted sons and stepsons of
members of the American Legion and
such male descendants of veterans who
died in the service to their country during
times of war
Such men in the Chassahowitzka,
Homosassa, Homosassa Springs and the
Sugarmill Woods area who are interested
in becoming members of the Sons of the
American Legion are needed. There is no
form or class of membership, except as ac-
tive membership.
Those interested in becoming members
may contact Clay Scott, vice commander of
American Legion Post 166. He may be
reached by writing to American Legion
Post 166, PO. Box 767, Homosassa Springs,
FL 34447-0767, or at 928-848-8359. His
email address is eaglerider@gmx.com.
Interested men may stop by the post on
the regular meeting night, the first Mon-
day monthly, at 7 p.m. at the Springs Lodge
No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S. Memorial Drive.

Vendors sought for health fair
Organizers of the May 10 Health Fair at
the Crystal River Mall are looking for
vendors.
The event, sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter 158 and the Crystal
River Mall, will be in the Westend Market
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Spring into Healthy Living" is the
theme for the fair, which will feature edu-
cation, screening and healthy living con-
sultations.
Those interested in participating may
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104.

Post to serve lasagna
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for Lasagna by Cheryl
Saturday, April 19, at the post home, 906
State Road 44 East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7 from 5 to 7 p.m., with music
by Charlie De from 6 to 9 p.m.
Call 352-344-3495 or visit www.vfw
4337.org.

Cook-off competitors sought
Signups are being accepted for the April
26 BBQ Cook-Off sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter and the Crystal
River Mall.
Barbecue categories include chicken,
ribs, brisket and butt. Entry fee is $300.
The cook-off will be from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the mall.
Applications must be received by April
15. For information or to register, call
Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104.

Flea market, food on tap
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the American
Legion will have an outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Satur-
day, April 19.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausages, orange
juice and coffee for $5 per person.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
May 4 at American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.


Mutual appreciation


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Special to the Chronicle
The Veterans Committee partnered with the Nature Coast Carving Club to create 120 plaques to be presented to the
veterans residing in the various Citrus County assisted living/life care facilities, routinely visited by committee members.
Committee member Jack Mckowen conceived and organized the project, and Charles Mattingly, another committee
member, cut and prepared the wood bases for the Carving Club. The club had previously prepared some plaques for another
group and agreed to assist the Homosassa Elks. The Carving Club then took as a club project the painting of the plaques in
a patriotic manner, attached a carved eagles head and added an inscription "In appreciation of your outstanding and
devoted Service to the Armed Forces of THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA." In appreciation, the Veterans Committee
agreed to donate $50 to the Nature Coast Carving Club. Pictured, from left, are: Jack Mckowen; Jim Adams, president of
the Nature Coast Carving Club; and Charles Mattingly.


Partner In Care


Special to the Chronicle
Mickey's Bar & Billiards and Grill at 770 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River, sponsored the recent American Legion Riders Chapter
237 Poker Run to benefit veterans receiving hospice care, and was recognized as a Hospice of Citrus and the
Nature Coast Partner In Care. Pictured outside Mickey's are, from left: American Legion Riders Chapter 237 Director John
Roby, Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast Development Director Linda Baker and Mickey's owner George Nelson.


Thanks to Pine Ridge


Special to the Chronicle
State Commander Lou Calleja and members of the Marine Corps League Detachment 1139 attended the March Pine Ridge
Civic Association meeting to thank members for their support and donations of many years for the Wounded Warriors.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only basic information regarding each
group. For more information about scheduled activities, meet-
ings, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email
the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or
corrections to community@chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352-795-6526,
email blantonthompsonPost1l55@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit
www.Post237.org or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at 352-476-2134 or Auxiliary
president Alice Brumett at 352-476-7001.
American Legion Post 166 has a new schedule. Meet-
ings are the first Monday at 7 p.m. at the Springs Lodge No.
378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. To accom-
modate members who cannot drive at night, breakfast meet-
ings are also held at Olive Tree at 9 a.m. weekly. Call
Commander Robert Scott at 352-860-2090 for days and other
information.
Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087, County Road 491, directly
behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864,10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando.
Call 352-726-3339, email vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call
352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906
State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston
at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org.


Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post 447,405 E. State Road 40,
Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M. Bailey Post 89, Homosassa. The
newly formed post meets the first Thursday of the month. Call
Roger Ingall Jr. at 352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb at 352-220-
4807.
Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of
Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter No. 158, Crystal
River, meets at the Crystal River Mall. For more information,
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498
meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in Hernando. Call
Susan McQuiston at 352-666-0084, or Joan Cecil at 352-726-
0834.
The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler
at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
National Seabee Veterans of America Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
National Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary IS-
LAND X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at
American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River.
Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA) meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly at the Olive Garden. Call President Norm


Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army, retired, at 352-746-1768, or Sec-
retary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force, retired, at 352-746-
0806.
Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or Wallace
Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at
VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Ca-
dence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted Ar-
chambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the
DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, In-
verness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Denny's in Crystal
River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Ma-
rine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on certain
Saturday at Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill. Remaining
meetings in 2014 are: March 8, April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State
Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-
6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Homosassa Flotilla 15-4
meets at West Citrus Community Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive. Call Wilbur B. Scott at 352-628-0639 or email sea-
capt34447@yahoo.com or Robert Currie at 352-799-5250 or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at 10 a.m.
second Saturday at Elks Lodge No. 2522, 3580 Lemon Drive,
Inverness. Visit www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call President
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or email
GatorDad0527@tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. Members can renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless Coalition; call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by nonprofit agency Service-
Source, seeks to meet the needs of wounded veterans. 2071
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722, ext. 102.


IN SERVICE


Forrest H. Spearing
Air Force Airman 1st Class
Forrest H. Spearing graduated from
basic military training at Joint Base
San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an inten-
sive, eight-week program that in-
cluded training in military discipline


and studies, Air Force core values,
physical fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic train-
ing earn four credits toward an asso-
ciate in applied science degree
through the Community College of
the Air Force.
Spearing is the son of William and
Mary Spearing of Dunnellon. He is a


2012 graduate of Crystal River
High School.
Eric S. Miller
Navy Seaman Eric S. Miller, son
of Bradley S. and Rose A. Miller of
Inverness, recently completed U.S.
Navy basic training at Recruit Train-
ing Command, Great Lakes, Ill.
During the eight-week program,


Miller completed a variety of training,
which included classroom study and
practical instruction on naval cus-
toms, first aid, firefighting, water
safety and survival, and shipboard
and aircraft safety
An emphasis was also placed on
physical fitness The capstone event
of boot camp is Battle Stations, an
exercise to give recruits the skills


and confidence they need.
Battle Stations is designed to gal-
vanize the basic warrior attributes of
sacrifice, dedication, teamwork and
endurance in each recruit through
the practical application of basic
Navy skills and the core values of
honor, courage and commitment.
Miller is a 2012 graduate of Citrus
High School.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 A21




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No title, please


Civic association to meet
The Pine Ridge Civic Association
will meet at 7 p.m. Monday at the
community center
Speakers for the evening will be a
couple who train service dogs for the
blind in Citrus, Hernando and Pasco
counties. The second speaker will be
Marilyn Butler, chairperson of the ten-
nis committee, who will provide infor-
mation on tennis activities and the
working of her group.
Refreshments and a social gathering
will follow

Lions to serve breakfast
The Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72
Civic Circle Drive will serve its pan-
cake breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m.
Sunday
Adults eat for $4 and children
younger than 12 eat for $2. This in-
cludes all-you-can-eat pancakes,


choice of bacon or sausage or combo,
along with orange juice and coffee or
tea.
For more information, call 352-
897-4899.

Don bonnet for bingo night
Pine Ridge Civic Association will
have a "Wear your Easter Bonnet"
bingo night on Saturday Doors open at
6 p.m. at the community center
Hot dogs with all the trimmings, cof-
fee and dessert cost only $4. Bingo
starts after the meal with tickets for
five games at $5. Wear your finest
Easter bonnet.
Call Louise Mathis for reservations
at 352-527-7443.

* Send news and photos for the
Central Ridge page to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Special to the Chronicle
Jim Britain, right, receives a plaque designating him the Knights of Columbus Council
6168 March Knight of the Month from Grand Knight Dominic Bonanno.

Beverly Hills resident Knight of the Month


Special to the Chronicle
Jim Britain, who joined
the Knights of Columbus
56 years ago in Montpe-
lier, Vt, is the Council
6168 March Knight of the
Month.
He is a hospitality min-
ster at 4 p.m. Saturday
Masses at Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church, a
floor worker on a Knights
of Columbus Wednesday
bingo team and volunteer
fundraiser, collecting for
the Knights on behalf of
Citizens with Intellectual
Disabilities.
"What impresses me
most about Jim is that he
volunteers for Catholic
Charities Respite Care,"
Grand Knight Dominic
Bonanno said before pre-
senting the award. "He
stays with elderly people
so members of the family
can go out, do some shop-
ping and just get a little
break and this Knight
is only 81 years young."
Britain does Respite
Care duty on Wednesday


afternoons in the Parish
Life Center at Our Lady of
Grace Church in Beverly
Hills on alternate weeks
and sometimes more fre-
quently
He came to Citrus
County in 2004 from Mil-
waukee, where he spent
25 years as a real estate
agent. Britain and his
wife of 32 years, Judith,
live in Beverly Hills off
Forest Ridge Boulevard.
He has two daughters and
two sons.
Originally from Marble-
head, Mass., he spent
1953-56 in the Army as a
Morse code interceptor
He was assigned to the
then-United States Army
Security Agency, a subor-
dinate unit of the Na-
tional Security Agency
now in the news as a re-
sult of the Snowden affair
Can he still do code?
"I tried to type recently
and my fingers still
seemed to find their way,"
he said about the dots and
dashes drilled into his
memory long ago.


Not one to be on the
sidelines, Britain prefers
to keep things "uncompli-
cated." He enjoys the
Knights of Columbus as
"just one of the people."
"I'm a doer and don't
want a title," he said. "I
want to be there when
someone needs help."
He likes to attend Mass
often, daily during Lent
and otherwise when he
can. "The work of hospi-
tality minister can be dis-
tracting, leaving a person
kind of wanting after wor-
ship on weekends," Jim
said. "Attending Mass on
weekdays helps fill that
void."


C "',oNI j1E www.chronicleonline.com


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NEWS NOTES


ANNOUNCEMENT
Dr. Thomas W. Dawson & Dr. Linda Azwell
announce the closing of Crystal Eye Center and
Optical effective 3/31/2014.
For your convenience, we have chosen the offices
of Drs. Anne and Jay Newcomer to be the
custodians of our patient's records. They have
offices in Homosassa and Beverly Hills and would
be a good choice for your eye care practitioner.
For inquiries about prescription refills, eye
appointments, eyeglasses repair, or copies of
patient records call their offices at: 352-628-3029
in Homosassa or 352-746-0800 in Beverly Hills.
To reach Dr. Linda Azwell's call her office in
Dunnellon at 352-465-0024.
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CHRONICLE
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A22 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


COMMUNITY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Surprise birthday celebration


NEWS NOTES


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the Ladies Guild of the Community Church of Beverly Hills surprised longtime member Connie
Lockman to celebrate her 89th birthday recently. Lockman, a resident of The Life Care Center, is seated in the
center with, from left, Marilyn Whittaker, Sandra Conway, Barbara Hamor (who celebrated her 90th birthday),
Mary Lou Warhol, Jean Altomari, Jackie Dean, Pat Burden and Phyllis Savage. She enjoyed gifts, a decorated cake
and punch with her friends.


News from the Central Ridge area



COMMUNITY


Helping
youth orchestra
Dr. Jay Newcomer, left, of the Beverly
Hills Eye Clinic, 3636 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, presents a
check to Dr. Walter Wynn of the Citrus
Youth Educational Symphonic
Orchestra Inc. The Citrus Youth
Educational Symphonic Orchestra Inc.
a nonprofit corporation, was founded by
Harold Seckinger, president, in 2011 to
spread the love of classical music to
the young people of Citrus County. Its
program is dedicated to teaching
classical and symphonic music to
children ages 5 to 19 by providing
classroom instruction in music theory
and instrumental performance. CYESO
is a member of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce. Visit
www.cyeso.org and www.facebook.
com/cyeso. Contact Wynn at
yes2cyeso@gmail.com or at 352
-697-1645 for more information about
the CYESO.
Special to the Chronicle


Free Tax-Aide
AARP Tax-Aide will be
available Tuesday at
Central Ridge Library in
Beverly Hills to help tax-
payers file 2013 returns.
A few tax counselors
will be on hand to com-
plete returns.
No appointment is
needed. Show up be-
tween noon and 4 p.m.
and be helped on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Bring Social Security
cards for everyone on
the return, plus your
photo identification and
all tax documents
needed to complete the
return.
AARP Tax-Aide helps
taxpayers of all ages.

Civic Association
The Citrus Springs
Civic Association will
meet at 7 p.m. Thursday,
April 17, at Citrus
Springs Community Cen-
ter
Guest speaker will be
Bob SchweickertJr,


publisher of the Ground
Hog News and Research.
All residents are
welcome.

Military cards
Come join the fun at
the Citrus Hills Women's
Club's Military Card
Party fundraiser at
7 p.m. Thursday
The event will be held
at the Beverly Hills
Lions Club and is open
to the public. Coffee and
bottled water, along with
desserts, are included in
the price of $12.
Cash prizes will be
awarded to the top three
winners.
There will be a draw-
ing for door prizes, and a
donation to the Scholar-
ship/Charitable RiFnd
will get tickets to win
one of several baskets of
goodies.
For tickets, call An-
drea at 352-344-3391 or
Carol at 352-860-2818.
Tickets will not be sold
at the door the night of
the event.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spanish American Club to celebrate 27 years


Multicultural organization provides scholarships, stagesfundraisers to help local causes


MARIA ELENA COIMBRE
Special to the Chronicle
The Spanish American Club of Citrus
County will be celebrating its 27th an-
niversary on June 7, 2014.
Since its inception in 1987, SAC has
evolved into a viable organization in Cit-
rus County We have awarded multiple
scholarships to college-bound students.
In order to provide these scholarships,
we have an annual fundraiser in the
form of a talent show We find our talent
in our very own membership. This event
takes place in the month of September
for the next school year
All students may apply for the schol-
arships, providing they meet the aca-


GUEST COLUMN
demic and other criteria that are estab-
lished. All graduates are eligible to
apply regardless of their heritage.
We have also supported the American
Cancer Society, Key Training Center,
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast
and more.
Our members enjoy cruising; there-
fore, we arrange group cruises and, in
some cases, we designate them as an-
other source of fundraising. These
cruises are usually arranged by two of
our sponsors who are travel agents.
Our club is very diversified and con-
sists of multiple nationalities. The thing
we look for in our members is their will-


ingness to attend meetings (meetings
are held in English). We meet at 7 p.m.
the third Thursday monthly at the
Knights of Columbus, 2389 W Norvell
Bryant Highway, Lecanto.
It is a place where we meet and make
new friends and keep members updated
on future events. We hold four dances a
year a Sweethearts Dance, Spring
Dance (also our Installation Ceremony
for the new board), Halloween and New
Year's Eve dances. We also have an an-
nual picnic, an annual scholarship
fundraiser and other more informal
events.
SAC is the place to come if you enjoy
cultural events. The yearly dues are $25.
Members enjoy reduced rates for our


dances and any other activities, con-
sider joining SAC and know you are in
for lots of fun.
If you are a business owner, we are al-
ways seeking sponsors. The sponsorship
dues are $100 per year and your busi-
ness will be advertised in our monthly
newsletter, "Que Pasa". Sponsors also
enjoy reduced rates for our dances and
other activities.
To join and for more information, call
me at 352-341-0979, or Ben Cruz at 352-
746-3599. You can also find us on
Facebook.
Maria Elena Coimbre is president
of the Spanish American Club of Citrus
County


Support for sanctuary


FOR THE RECORD


March 24-30, 2014
Divorces
Soon Ja Leibelt, Palm
Harbor vs. Jeffery Robert
Collom, Homosassa
Cheryl L. Pratt vs.
Steven G. Pratt
Marriages
Bryan Scott Bocker,
Inverness/Latisha Shiree
Brady, Inverness
Mark Steven Gluts,
Inverness/Josephine Judith
Cunliffe, Inverness
Robert Bryan Conrad,
Inverness/Angela Rose
Capurso, Inverness
David Elias, Inverness/


Ashley Lynn Roderick,
Inverness
Alvin DerI Flagg Jr.,
Homosassa/Denise Marie
Elder, Homosassa
Nicholas Alan Johnston,
Inverness/Jessica Lynn
Montuori, Inverness
Cesar Leal Espinosa,
Hernando/Alexis Marie
Franco Guiles, Lecanto
Hery Joe Martinez, Citrus
Springs/Magaly Diaz,
Citrus Springs
Jonathan Wesley Logan
Spell, Homosassa/
Bridget Elizabeth Jasinski,
Floral City


Ride your bike,


support YMCA


Special to the Chronicle
Mellodie's Body Image Gym recently held a fundraiser to build an enclosure/run for rescued lions Apollo and
Venus at EARS, the Endangered Animal Rescue Sanctuary in Citra, outside of Ocala. Shown with sanctuary
manager Gail Bowen, left, is Mellodie Farfaglia, handing over $2,500 to complete the project. Farfaglia is a
weekend volunteer at the sanctuary and hoped to raise "some money" with a drawing that included donations of
goods and services totaling over $900. Longtime gym patron Gloria Dumas Bishop was the winner of the basket.
To find out more about EARS, call Farfaglia at 352-637-5400 or visit www.earsinc.net.


Special to the Chronicle
The Rotary Club of
Central Citrus and
YMCA of Citrus County
will host "Let's Ride for
the Y" on May 10, which
will kick off at Lake
Hernando Park.
Routes and distance
vary to suit the individ-
ual rider Staggered
starting times begin at
7:30 a.m.
Cost to enter is $35.


Riders receive T-shirts
and post ride meals. Sign
up at wwwrotarybik-
eridefortheycom.
Sponsorships for this
event, which will help
raise money for the
YMCA of Citrus County,
range from $100 to
$3,000. Sponsors will re-
ceive rider registrations
and a variety of promo-
tional amenities.
For more information,
call Eric at 863-670-0734.


Humane Society OF CITRUS CO.

Barnaby
Barnaby is sweet as they
come and, after seven
years in a home, he is J -
back at the shelter. Due
to a death in the family
and relocation of his
surviving owner, Barnaby
had nowhere else to go.
Barnaby appears to be a
Dachshund and Beagle
mix. He weighs 22
pounds and is 8 years
old. He has plenty of
energy and gets along
great with other dogs. An
approved adoption
application and adoption
fee are required. To
access an application or
view other adoptable
pets, visit www.room
foronemore.net. For more
information, call Karron -w
at 352-560-0051. ', ..


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A24 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


COMMUNITY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUPERMARKET


WinniDixie


days until

The Beef People.


Sweetbay is becoming Winn-Dixie.

That's right. The Beef People are bringing a new experience, new items, and
hundreds of new ways to save to your neighborhood store. Come visit on April 18th
for giveaways and more. We're not just changing the name. We're changing the
way you shop. For the better.

On April 18th, Winn-Dixie will present the first 150 customers
with a free cutting board at our two newest stores located at
1202 West Main Street in Inverness and 1651 SE Highway 19 in
Crystal River. While supplies last, limit one per customer.


Ocala Q


Q Q


Orlando 0
Spring Hill

These Sweetbay locations will become Winn-Dixie on April 18th.


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 A25




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


70th ANNIVERSARY

TheAndersons


Ted Anderson from
Scranton, Pa., and Jane
Clark Anderson from
Fleetville, Pa., were
married April 12, 1944, in
Fleetville.
Ted was in the Air
Force during World War
II, stationed in the
Philippine Islands and
Korea. Jane enjoyed
painting and is a great
cook and baker Ted
worked at Gleason Works
in Rochester, N.Y, and


they lived in Mendon,
N.Y, until 1987, when
they moved to Dunnellon.
Ted and Jane moved to
Highland Terrace in
October 2012. They have
four children, Dave (Sue)
in Bloomfield, N.Y; Jim
(Peg) in Blue Mounds,
Wis.; Don (Gail) in
Grasonville, Md.; and
Ellen (Bruce) Delmar,
N.Y They also have nine
grandchildren and nine
great-grandchildren.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Ritters


Harold and Betty
Ritter of Inverness
celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on
April 7,2014.


The couple exchanged
vows on April 7,1964.
Now retired, they are
longtime residents of
Citrus County


100th BIRTHDAY


Evelyn


Evelyn Hewitt, who
lives in Brentwood
Retirement
Community, will
celebrate her 100th
birthday on May 20,
2014.
Born in Grantsville,
Md., in 1914, she was a
charter member of the
Order of the Eastern
Star in Monroeville, Pa.,
was a Girl Scout leader


Hewitt


there and a member of
the Monroeville Garden
Club.
She has two daughters
and one son-in-law-
Ann Holland of Citrus
Hills and Susan and
husband Walter Hughes
of Sarasota
She also has a
grandson, Ryan and wife
Lisa Hughes, who live in
Fairbanks, Alaska.


NEW ARRIVAL

Owen Austin Cannella
George and Susan
Cannella of Inverness
announce the birth of
their grandson, Owen
Austin Cannella.
The baby was born
March 16, 2014, at 2:22
a.m. in Matthues
Memorial Hospital in
Charlotte, N.C., and
weighed 8 pounds,
4 ounces.
His parents are George -
and Jenica Cannella, was welcomed by big
formerly of Inverness. He sister Aubrey Rose, age 2.


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SNOWBIRDS!


A26 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


TOGETHER









SPORTS


0 Baseball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Basketball/B4
0 Hockey/B4
0 NASCAR/B4
0 Adult recreation/B5
0 College football/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gloves golden as Rays squeak by black-and-blue Reds


Ramos to enter rotation as Tampa Baypushes for sweep


Associated Press
CINCINNATI -The starter
throws seven shutout innings.
The defense makes a few big
plays. One swing of the bat
provides all the offense needed.
Not a very flashy way to win,
but it's working for the Tampa
Bay Rays.
Alex Cobb went seven in-
nings on Saturday, extending
Tampa Bay's run of solid start-


ing pitching, and James Loney
homered for a 1-0 victory over
the slumping Cincinnati Reds.
The Rays came into the in-
terleague series with a 1-8
mark against Cincinnati. They've
taken the first two games with
their simple formula.
"We hit some balls well, they
hit some balls well, their de-
fense played great also," Rays
manager Joe Maddon said. "So
just one of those days, man. We


hit a homer and we win."
Cobb (1-1) pitched seven
shutout inning against Texas
on Sunday but got a no-deci-
sion. He kept the scoreless
streak going Saturday, limiting
Cincinnati's struggling lineup
to four hits without walking a
batter He's now gone 15 1-3 in-
nings without allowing a run.
Grant Balfour, who fanned
See Page B3


Tampa Bay
Rays catcher
Ryan Hanigan
waits to tag
out Cincinnati
Reds first base-
man Joey Votto
at home plate
in the fourth
inning Saturday
in Cincinnati.
Votto was try-
ing to score on
a hit by Brandon
Phillips.
Associated Press


Associated Press
Jordan Spieth hits out of bunker on the eighth fairway Saturday during the third round of the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga.



Headed into Sunday,



it's master and student


Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga.
In a Masters longing for star
power, 20-year-old Jordan
Spieth put himself atop the
leaderboard and 18 holes away
from replacing Tiger Woods as
the youngest player with a green
jacket.


Spieth kept his poise
on a lightning-quick
Augusta National on
Saturday with a 2-
under 70 that gave him
a share of the lead with
error-prone Bubba
Watson going into a
final round loaded with
possibilities.
Watson started the
third round with a
three-shot lead. After a
chaotic day in which


five players had at least
a share of the lead at
some point, this Mas-
ters is as wide open as
when it started.
All eyes now turn to
Spieth, a 20-year-old
Texan who already has
shown he can deliver
big moments. He talked
to himself constantly
on the golf course, fell
to his knees when he
thought his tee shot


was in trouble on the
par-3 12th and lightly
pumped his fist when
even the short par putts
dropped in the cup.
"Today was moving
day," Spieth said. "And
tomorrow is about see-
ing how I can control
my game and emotions
out on the golf course
against guys that have


Page B3


Healthy


Driskel


unveils


Gators'


newO0
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Jeff
Driskel wore tan flip flops
and blue basketball shorts
following Florida's spring
game. His calm demeanor
contrasted with the frenzied
offense that the Gators un-
veiled on Saturday in Ben
Hill Griffin Stadium.
Driskel finished 18 of 32
for 167 yards with a 31-yard
touchdown to Demarcus
Robinson for his first game
action since suffering a bro-
ken leg against Tennessee
last season. He took every
snap from shotgun complet-
ing passes to eight different
receivers in the 23-23 tie be-
tween the orange and blue
teams. Florida hired offen-
sive coordinator Kurt Roper
in December to improve an
offense that finished its last
three seasons nationally
ranked in the triple digits.
The Gators had all four of
their touchdown drives last
less than four minutes, de-
parting from the ball-control
clock-eating offense that char-
acterized coach Will Muschamp's
first three seasons.
'As a quarterback, when
you're in a no-huddle type of
deal you can really get in a
rhythm," Driskel said.
"When you start getting com-
pletion after completion, it
builds your confidence and
See .Page B6


Winston, Garnet win Noles' spring showcase


Garnet running
back Freddie
Stevenson slips
the tackle of
the gold squad's
Nick Waisome,
left, and avoids
Terrance
Smith, right, on
Saturday as he
scores a touch-
down in Florida
State's spring
game in
Tallahassee.
Associated Press


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Jameis
Winston admitted he's been
tired at times this spring, and
that was before he had 56 pass
attempts in Florida State's
spring game.
The reigning Heisman tro-
phy winner has pulled double
duty between football practices
and his role as the closer/utility
outfielder for the Seminoles
baseball team. He played
against Georgia Tech on Friday,
flew back to campus at 11 a.m.


Saturday played in the 3 p.m.
spring game and left to fly back
to Atlanta after meeting with
the media. The baseball team
plays the final game of the
Georgia Tech series Sunday
Winston threw for 396 yards
and two touchdowns in the de-
fending national champions'
spring game and led the Gar-
net team to a 31-14 victory over
the Gold team.
The 56 pass attempts were
more than he threw in any game
during his dynamic freshman
season. He said he hasn't


thrown 56 pitches in a base-
ball game since high school.
"I was always mentally
there," Winston said of the
spring. "Physically, there were
some days I was drained, man.
I'm a busy man. I've got to
study and I'm a regular college
student. Football is not partic-
ularly my job yet, so I've got to
carry out my everyday life.
"I just can't sit around being
lazy all day I hate being bored.
... I'm always doing something,
See Page B6


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B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Tampa Bay
Toronto
NewYork
Boston
Baltimore




Washington
Atlanta
Miami
NewYork
Philadelphia


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Cardinals 10, Cubs 4
Chicago St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Lake If 4 1 1 1 MCrpnt3b 5 1 2 2
Valuen3b 3 1 1 0 Wong2b 4 1 1 1
Oltph-3b 0 00 0 Kozmaph-ss 1 00 0
Rizzo lb 4 1 1 0 Hollidylf 5 2 1 1
Schrhltrf 4 1 2 1 MAdmslb 5 1 1 1
Sweeny cf 4 0 1 1 YMolin c 3 1 2 1
SCastross 4 0 2 1 TCruz c 0 0 0 0
Barney2b 4 00 0 Craigrf 4 1 1 0
JoBakr c 4 00 0 Jay cf 4 0 1 2
Villanv p 1 0 0 0 Descals ss-2b4 2 2 1
Rusinp 2 00 0 Wnwrgp 2 1 1 1
Kalishph 1 00 0 Roinsnph 1 0 1 0
Choatep 0 00 0
Manessp 0 00 0
Totals 35 48 4 Totals 38101310
Chicago 100 102 000 4
St. Louis 040 501 00x 10
E-Sweeney (1). LOB-Chicago 5, St. Louis 6.
2B-Valbuena (1), Schierholtz 2 (3), Sweeney
(1), S.Castro (2), Holliday (4), YMolina (3),
Descalso (1). HR-Lake (2), Ma.Adams (1).
SB Wong (3), Holliday (1). S-Wainwright.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Villanueva L,1-3 3 10 9 9 0 2
Rusin 5 3 1 1 1 1
St. Louis
WainwrightW,2-1 7 7 4 4 0 8
Choate 1 0 0 0 1 2
Maness 1 1 0 0 0 1
Villanueva pitched to 5 batters in the 4th.
PB-Jo.Baker.
T-2:40. A-45,302 (45,399).

Rockies 1, Giants 0


Colorado
ab r h bi
Blckmncf 3 1 2 0
Barnesrf 3 0 1 0
CGnzlzl If 4 00 0
Tlwtzkss 3 0 0 1
Rosario c 4 00 0
Mornealb 4 0 0 0
Arenad3b 4 0 1 0
LeMahi2b 1 00 0
Andrsnp 2 00 0
Kahnlep 0 00 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Culersn ph 1 0 0 0
Ottavinp 0 000
Brothrsp 0 0 0 0


San Francisco
ab r h bi
Pagan cf 4 00 0
Pencerf 3 0 1 0
Sandovl3b 4 0 1 0
Posey 1 b 3 0 0 0
Morse If 4 00 0
HSnchzc 4 00 0
Arias2b 3 00 0
BCrwfrss 3 0 1 0
M.Cainp 1 00 0
Machi p 0 0 0 0
B.Hicks ph 0 0 0 0
Petit p 0 0 0 0


Hwknsp 0 000
Totals 29 141 Totals 2903 0
Colorado 001 000 000 1
San Francisco 000 000 000 0
E-M.Cain (1). DP-Colorado 1. LOB-Col-
orado 6, San Francisco 6. 2B-Blackmon (4),
Arenado (2), Sandoval (2), B.Crawford (5). SB-
Blackmon (3), Barnes (1). S-Barnes. SF Tu-
lowitzki.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Anderson 3 1 0 0 1 2
KahnleW,2-0 2 1 0 0 1 2
BelisleH,2 1 0 0 0 0 1
OttavinoH,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
BrothersH,3 1 1 0 0 2 1
HawkinsS,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
M.CainL,0-2 7 4 1 1 3 8
Machi 1 0 0 0 0 1
Petit 1 0 0 0 0 1
T-2:48.A-41,917 (41,915).

Brewers 3, Pirates 2


Pittsburgh
ab r h bi
Martel If 4 0 1 1
Sniderrf 4 0 2 1
Melncnp 0 00 0
AMcCtcf 4 02 0
PAIvrz3b 2 00 0
JHrrsnpr 0 00 0
RMartnc 4 0 1 0
NWalkr2b 4 00 0
Ishikawlb 2 1 1 0
GSnchz ph-lb 1 0 0
0


Milwaukee
ab r h bi
CGomzcf 4 1 1 1
Segurass 4 0 0 0
Braunrf 4 1 2 0
ArRmr3b 4 0 1 0
Lucroyc 4 02 1
KDavisl If 4 1 0 0
MrRynllb 3 0 0 0
Gennett2b 2 0 1 0
Gallardp 1 0 0 0
0 Duke p 0 0 0


Mercerss 3 1 1 0 Thrnrgp 0 0 0 0
Volquezp 1 0 0 0 Overayph 0 0 0 0
Watsonp 0 00 0 Weeksph 1 00 0
Tabata ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0
FrRdrgp 0 00 0
Totals 30 28 2 Totals 31 3 7 2
Pittsburgh 002 000 000 2
Milwaukee 110 000 01x 3
E-A.McCutchen (1), RAIvarez (2). DP-Pitts-
burgh 1, Milwaukee 4. LOB-Pittsburgh 4, Mil-
waukee 7. 2B-A.McCutchen (2), Ishikawa (1).
HR-C.Gomez (4). SB-A.McCutchen (3). S-
Volquez, Gennett.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Volquez 61-34 2 1 2 4
Watson 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Melancon L,0-1 1 3 1 1 0 1
Milwaukee
Gallardo 6 6 2 2 1 6
Duke 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Thornburg 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
HendersonW,1l-0 1 2 0 0 0 1
Fr.RodriguezS,4-4 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP Volquez.
T-2:53.A-42,828(41,900).


Rays schedule


April 13
April 14
April 15
April 16
April 17
April 18
April 19
April 20
April 22
April 23
April 24
April 25
April 26
April 27
April 28
April 29
April 30
May 1
May 2
May 3
May 4
May 6
May 7
May 8
May 9
May 10
May 11
May 12
May 13
May 14
May 15
May 16
May 17


at Cincinnati
at Baltimore
at Baltimore
at Baltimore
vs. NYYankees
vs. NYYankees
vs. NYYankees
vs. NYYankees
vs. Minnesota
vs. Minnesota
vs. Minnesota
at Chicago White Sox
at Chicago White Sox
at Chicago White Sox
at Chicago White Sox
at Boston
at Boston
at Boston
at NYYankees
at NYYankees
at NYYankees
vs. Baltimore
vs. Baltimore
vs. Baltimore
vs. Cleveland
vs. Cleveland
vs. Cleveland
at Seattle
at Seattle
at Seattle
at LA Angels
at LA Angels
at LA Angels


Str Home Away
W-24-3 3-2
W-1 3-3 3-2
W-13-3 3-3
L-1 2-4 3-3
L-1 1-3 3-3



Str Home Away
L-1 4-2 3-1
W-12-2 4-2
L-5 5-2 0-4
L-1 2-4 2-2
W-1 1-3 3-3


Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
Minnesota
Kansas City


Central Division
Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
.625 5-3 L-1 4-1 1-2
.500 1 /2 4-6 L-1 4-2 2-4
.500 1 /2 5-5 W-1 3-3 3-3
.455 1/2 1 5-5 W-2 2-3 3-3
.400 2 1% 4-6 L-2 4-2 0-4


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 9 2 .818 8-2 W-8 3-2 6-0
Pittsburgh 6 5 .545 3 1 5-5 L-2 4-2 2-3
St. Louis 6 5 .545 3 1 5-5 W-1 3-2 3-3
Chicago 4 7 .364 5 2/2 4-6 L-1 2-4 2-3
Cincinnati 3 8 .273 6 3/2 3-7 L-2 1-4 2-4


W
Seattle 6
Oakland 6
Los Angeles 5
Texas 5
Houston 4


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
t GB WC


West Division
Pct GB WC
.636 -
.583 /2 -
.500 1/2 1
.400 2/ 2
.308 4 3/2


Str Home
W-1 2-1
L-1 3-3
W-2 1-3
W-1 3-1
L-1 3-4



Str Home
W-1 2-3
L-1 2-3
W-1 4-2
W-2 2-2
L-1 1-6


S. . .* .. ... .. ... .. ....... *. .


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox pitcher Burke Badenhop tosses the ball Saturday as the New York Yankees' Kelly Johnson
runs the bases after hitting a home run during the eighth inning in New York. The Yankees won the game 7-4.



Lackey gets batted around in




Yankees 7-4 win over Red Sox


Associated Press

NEW YORK Brian McCann
was far from panic mode. He was
hitting the ball well, and figured
positive results would follow
Still, he enjoyed seeing his
drives wind up in the seats in-
stead of someone's glove.
McCann put an emphatic end to
his season-opening slump, hitting
his first two home runs for the
New York Yankees to help beat
John Lackey and the Boston Red
Sox 7-4 Saturday
"I was pleased about my at-bats
today," McCann said.
Carlos Beltran, Alfonso Soriano
and Kelly Johnson also connected
as the Yankees scored all their runs
on homers. Lackey was tagged for
a career-high four home runs in 5
2-3 innings.
New York has won two of three
in a series that wraps up Sunday
A.J. Pierzynski hit his first home
run for the Red Sox.
After striking out in the first in-
ning and dropping his batting av-
erage to .158, McCann quickly
reversed his fortunes. The seven-
time All-Star who left Atlanta to
sign an $85 million, five-year deal
with the Yankees led off the fourth
with a liner into the first row of
the second deck in right field.
McCann hurried around the
bases, and fans were still cheering
when Soriano followed with his
third home run of the week.
"He's hit the ball better than his
numbers indicated," Yankees
manager Joe Girardi said.
Girardi said he assumed the
short right-field fence and the jet
stream that carries the ball in that
direction would benefit the lefty-
hitting McCann.
"It showed up today," he said.
Also showing up: A missed call
on a replay challenge.
Dean Anna of the Yankees was
called safe on a double in the
eighth inning with New York ahead
7-4. A television replay showed his
right foot briefly came off the base
as he stood up with shortstop Xan-
der Bogaerts tagging him.
"I feel like I was on the whole
time," Anna said. "I couldn't feel
myself off the bag."
That's not how Farrell saw it.
"We probably had five angles
that confirmed his foot was off the
base," he said after the game. "It
certainly raises questions on if they
are getting the same feed we are,
the consistency of the system. So,
it makes you scratch your head a
little bit on why he was called safe."
Later, Major League Baseball
said the conclusive angle showing
Anna was out wasn't immediately
available inside the replay center
in New York.
Hiroki Kuroda (2-1) pitched into
the seventh, and reliever Matt
Thornton gave up Mike Carp's
two-run single that made it 6-4.
Shawn Kelley pitched a perfect
ninth for his second save.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Boston 4, N.Y Yankees 2
Toronto 2, Baltimore 0
Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1
Texas 1, Houston 0, 12 innings
Chicago White Sox 9, Cleveland 6
Minnesota 10, Kansas City 1
L.A. Angels 5, N.Y Mets 4, 11 innings
San Diego 6, Detroit 0
Seattle 6, Oakland 4
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 7, Boston 4
Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0
Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 6
Minnesota 7, Kansas City 1
Toronto at Baltimore, late
Houston at Texas, late
Detroit at San Diego, late
N.Y Mets at L.A. Angels, late
Oakland at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay(C.Ramos 0-0)at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-1), 1:10p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 2-0) at Baltimore (Jimenez 0-2), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 1-1) at White Sox (Quintana 1-0), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Vargas 1-0) at Minnesota (Ccrreia 0-1), 2:10 p.m.
Houston (Oberholtzer 0-2) at Texas (Perez 1-0), 3:05 p.m.
Mets (Colon 1-1) at Angels (C.Wilson 1-1), 3:35 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at San Diego (TRoss 0-2), 4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Kazmir 2-0) at Seattle (C.Young 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 1-1) at Yankees (Nova 1-1), 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 6, Miami 3
Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1
Atlanta 7, Washington 6, 10 innings
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 2
Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 3, 11 innings
L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 0
L.A. Angels 5, N.Y Mets 4, 11 innings
San Diego 6, Detroit 0
San Francisco 6, Colorado 5
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 4
Colorado 1, San Francisco 0
Miami at Philadelphia, late
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, late
Washington at Atlanta, late
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late
Detroit at San Diego, late
N.Y Mets at L.A. Angels, late
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay(C.Ramos 0-0)at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-1), 1:10p.m.
Miami (H.Avarez 0-2) at Philadelphia (KKendrick 0-1), 1:35p.m.
Washington (G.Gnzalez 2-0) at Alanta (Harang 1-1), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 0-0) at Milwaukee (Lohse 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Cubs (E.Jackson 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 1-0), 2:15 p.m.
Mets (Colon 1-1) at Angels (C.Wilson 1-1), 3:35 p.m.
Cdolorado (Chatwood 0-0) at San Fran. (Hudson 2-0), 4:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at San Diego (T.Ross 0-2), 4:10 p.m.
L.A Dodgers (Haren 1-0) at Arizona (Cahill 0-3), 4:10 p.m.


AMERICAN LEAGUE

Indians 12, White Sox 6
CHICAGO Ryan Raburn hit a
tiebreaking, two-run single with two
outs in the seventh inning to lead
Cleveland over Chicago.
Nick Swisher, Jason Kipnis and
David Murphy homered for Cleveland,
which snapped a three-game losing
streak. Murphy added a bases-loaded
triple in a four-run ninth against Don-
nie Veal.
The Indians improved to 18-4
against the White Sox since the be-
ginning of last season, overcoming
another shaky start by Justin Master-
son. Josh Outman (2-0), Bryan Shaw
and Cody Allen combined for 3 1-3 in-
nings of one-hit relief before closer
John Axford finished in a non-save
situation.
Adam Eaton hit his first homer for
the White Sox. Ronald Belisario (1-1)
took the loss.


Twins 7, Royals 1
MINNEAPOLIS Joe Mauer hit
his first home run of the season and
Ricky Nolasco earned his initial win
for Minnesota in a victory over
Kansas City.
A day after getting his first RBI of
the year, Mauer hit a three-run shot
against James Shields. Brian Dozier
connected for his fourth home run, a
leadoff drive for the Twins.
Nolasco (1-1) showed why
the Twins signed him to a $49
million, four-year contract to
steady their rotation. In his first
home start for Minnesota, the right-
hander went eight innings and
allowed five hits.
Shields (0-2) yielded seven runs
- one earned in 5 2-3 innings.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cardinals 10, Cubs 4
ST. LOUIS Matt Adams home-
red, Matt Carpenter drove in two
runs and Adam Wainwright saved a
tired bullpen by lasting seven innings
for the St. Louis Cardinals in their 10-
4 win over the Chicago Cubs on
Saturday.
It was hardly a vintage perform-
ance by Wainwright (2-1), who struck
out eight and helped his own cause
with an RBI single. He gave up Jun-
ior Lake's homer on his first pitch
and allowed six more hits after that.
The four runs were twice as many as
Wainwright yielded in his first two
starts.
St. Louis did most of its damage
off starter Carlos Villanueva (1-3),
who allowed nine runs and 10 hits in
three innings.

Rockies 1, Giants 0
SAN FRANCISCO Tommy
Kahnle and four relievers combined
for two-hit ball over six innings after
Brett Anderson was injured, leading
Colorado past Matt Cain and San
Francisco.
Troy Tulowitzki had a sacrifice fly
in the third, and Kahnle (2-0) allowed
one baserunner in two innings. Matt
Belisle, Adam Ottavino, Rex Brothers
and LaTroy Hawkins pitched an in-
ning apiece to complete the three-hit-
ter, with Hawkins earning his second
save.
Rockies relievers extended their
scoreless streak to 9 2-3 innings in
the series.
Anderson left with a bruised
left index finger after allowing a hit
in three innings. It was the
Rockies' third win in their last
17 games at San Francisco's
waterfront ballpark.
Cain (0-2) allowed four hits over
seven innings with eight strikeouts
and three walks. He is winless in his
last seven starts at home.


BASEBALL


Tampa Bay Cincinnati
ab r h bi
DeJessIf 4 0 0 0 BHmltncf
Zobrist2b 3 0 1 0 Vottolb
Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b
McGeep 0 00 0 Brucerf
Balfourp 0 0 0 0 Frazier3b
Longori3b 4 0 1 0 Ludwcklf
Loneylb 4 1 1 1 B.Penac
Kiermrcf-rf 4 0 0 0 Cozartss
YEscorss 3 0 1 0 Simon p
Hanign c 3 0 0 0 Heisey ph
Cobbp 2 00 0 MParrp
Forsyth ph 1 0 1 0


ab r h bi
4000
3010
4010
3000
3010
3000
3000
2010
1000
1000
0000
3 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


DJnngs cf 0 000
Totals 32 15 1 Totals 2704 0
Tampa Bay 010 000 000 1
Cincinnati 000 000 000 0
DP Tampa Bay 1. LOB Tampa Bay 5, Cincin-
nati 3.2B-YEscobar (2), Forsythe (2), Votto (3),
Cozart (1). HR-Loney (1). CS-Phillips (2). S-
Simon.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
CobbW,1-1 7 4 0 0 0 5
McGeeH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
BalfourS,4-4 1 0 0 0 1 0
Cincinnati
SimonL,1-1 8 5 1 1 1 4
M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Cobb (Cozart). WP-Cobb.
T-2:31. A-35,356 (42,319).



AL

Yankees 7, Red Sox 4


Boston

Pedroia 2b
Nava rf
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli lb
Carp If
Bogarts ss
Przyns c
JHerrr 3b
BrdlyJr cf

Totals
Boston
NewYork


NewYork


ab r h bi
b 5 0 1 0 Gardnrlf
4 1 1 0 BRorts2b
4 0 1 0 Ellsurycf
3 0 0 0 Beltrandh
4 0 1 2 McCnnc
S4 1 1 0 ASorinrf
4 1 2 2 ISuzukirf
3 0 0 0 KJhnsnlb
3 1 0 0 Solarte3b
Anna ss
34 47 4 Totals
020 000 200
200 202 01 x


ab r h bi
5010
5 0 1 0
4000
3120
3 1 2 0
4222
4223
4121
4 1 2 1
0000
4121
4 1 2 1
4020
4010
4 0 1 0
36714 7
4
7


E-A.Soriano (1). DP-Boston 1. LOB-Boston
7, New York 7. 2B-Pedroia (3), Beltran (4),
Anna (1). HR-Pierzynski (1), Beltran (2), Mc-
Cann 2 (2), A.Soriano (3), K.Johnson (3). SB-
Nava (1), Bradley Jr. (2), Ellsbury (6). CS-Carp
(1). S-B.Roberts.
IP H RERBBSO


Boston
Lackey L,2-1
Breslow
A.Miller
Badenhop
NewYork
Kuroda W,2-1
Thornton H,3
Betances H,2
Warren H,4
Kelley S,2-2


52-310 6
2-3 1 0
2-3 0 0
1 3 1


HBP-by Thornton (Napoli).WP-Breslow.
T-3:07. A-48,572 (49,642).

Indians 12,
White Sox 6


Cleveland


Chicago


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Morgan cf 5 1 1 0 Eaton cf 3 22 1
Swisherib 6 2 2 1 LGarci2b 5 1 0 0
Kipnis2b 4 22 1 Gillaspi3b 3 1 1 1
CSantnc 3 20 0 Abreulb 4 10 0
Brantlylf 3 1 1 2 A.Dunndh 4 01 2
ACarerss 4 1 1 1 AIRmrzss 4 1 1 0
Raburndh 4 1 1 2 DeAzal If 5 02 1
DvMrprf 5 2 2 4 Nietoc 4 00 0
Aviles3b 5 02 1 JrDnksrf 4 01 1
Totals 39121212 Totals 366 8 6
Cleveland 310 020 204 12
Chicago 410 010 000 6
E Aviles (1), Kipnis (1), L.Garcia (2). DP-
Cleveland 1, Chicago 1. LOB-Cleveland 8,
Chicago 10.2B-A.Cabrera (5), Eaton (3). 3B-
Dav.Murphy (1). HR-Swisher (2), Kipnis (2),
Dav.Murphy (2), Eaton (1). SB-Morgan (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Masterson 42-37 6 5 5 7
OutmanW,2-0 11-30 0 0 1 2
ShawH,2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Allen H,2 1 1 0 0 0 3
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Paulino 5 6 6 6 3 3
Belisario L,1-1 11-32 2 2 1 1
Downs 0 0 0 0 1 0
D.Webb 1 1 0 0 0 0
Veal 12-33 4 4 3 3
Downs pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Masterson (A.Dunn).WP-Masterson,
Belisario.
T-3:28. A-27,332 (40,615).

Twins 7, Royals I


Kansas City Minnesota
ab r h bi
Aokirf 4 0 0 0 Dozier2b
Infante2b 4 0 0 0 Mauerlb
Hosmerlb 4 0 0 0 Plouffe3b
BButler dh 4 0 0 0 Colaell rf
AGordnlIf 4 1 2 0 Mstrnn rf
S.Perezc 4 0 1 0 Kubel If
Mostks3b 3 0 0 0 Pintodh
L.Cain cf 3 0 1 1 KSuzukc
AEscorss 3 0 2 0 A.Hickscf
Flormn ss
Totals 33 16 1 Totals
Kansas City 000 010 000
Minnesota 160 000 00x


ab r h bi
4212
4123
3000
3000
1000
3110
4110
4100
3111
3000
4 2 1 26 6
4 1 2 3
-3 00 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
3 1 1 0
4 1 1 0
4 1 0 0
3 1 1 1
3 0 0 0
327 6 6
1
7


E-Shields (1), Moustakas (2). LOB-Kansas
City 6, Minnesota 4. 2B-A.Gordon 2 (4),
S.Perez (5), L.Cain (1), A.Escobar (2). HR-
Dozier (4), Mauer(1).
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Shields L,0-2 52-36 7 1 3 5
Duffy 21-30 0 0 0 3
Minnesota
NolascoW,1-1 8 5 1 1 1 4
Tonkin 1 1 0 0 0 1
T-2:35. A-23,963 (39,021).


Rays schedule (cont'd.)
May 18 at LA Angels
May 20 vs. Oakland
May 21 vs. Oakland
May 22 vs. Oakland
May 23 vs. Boston
May 24 vs. Boston
May 25 vs. Boston
May 26 atToronto
May 27 atToronto
May 28 atToronto
May 30 at Boston
May 31 at Boston
June 1 at Boston
June 2 at Miami
June 3 at Miami
June 4 vs. Miami
June 5 vs. Miami
June 6 vs. Seattle
June 7 vs. Seattle
June 8 vs. Seattle
June 9 vs. Seattle
June 10 vs. St. Louis
June 11 vs. St. Louis
June 13 at Houston
June 14 at Houston
June 15 at Houston
June 16 vs. Baltimore
June 17 vs. Baltimore
June 18 vs. Baltimore


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Interleague

Rays 1, Reds 0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Masters par scores F r 0 thei T Od


Saturday at Augusta National Golf Club,
Augusta, Ga.
Yardage: 7,435, Par: 72
Third Round, a-amateur:
Jordan Spieth 71-70-70- 211 -5
Bubba Watson 69-68-74- 211 -5
Jonas Blixt 70-71-71 -212 -4
MattKuchar 73-71-68-212 -4
Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76-66-213 -3
Rickie Fowler 71-75-67-213 -3
Thomas Bjorn 73-68-73-214 -2
Jim Furyk 74-68-72-214 -2
Lee Westwood 73-71-70-214 -2
Fred Couples 71-71-73-215 -1
Justin Rose 76-70-69-215 -1
John Senden 72-68-75-215 -1
Kevin Stadler 70-73-72-215 -1
lan Poulter 76-70-70 -216 E
Gary Woodland 70-77-69 -216 E
Adam Scott 69-72-76-217 +1
Kevin Streelman 72-71-74-217 +1
Jason Day 75-73-70-218 +2
G. Fernandez-Castano 75-69-74-218 +2
Russell Henley 73-70-75-218 +2
Chris Kirk 75-72-71 -218 +2
Steve Stricker 72-73-73-218 +2
Jimmy Walker 70-72-76-218 +2
Jamie Donaldson 73-70-76-219 +3
Bernhard Langer 72-74-73-219 +3
Rory Mcllroy 71-77-71 -219 +3
Louis Oosthuizen 69-75-75-219 +3
HenrikStenson 73-72-74-219 +3
Steven Bowditch 74-72-74 220 +4
Martin Kaymer 75-72-73 220 +4
Hunter Mahan 74-72-74-220 +4
Bill Haas 68-78-74 220 +4
Vijay Singh 75-71-74- 220 +4
StewartCink 73-72-76-221 +5
Lucas Glover 75-69-77 221 +5
Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74-73 221 +5
Darren Clarke 74-74-73 221 +5
Brendon de Jonge 74-72-76 222 +6
Billy Horschel 75-72-75 222 +6
Thongchai Jaidee 73-74-75 222 +6
Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72-76 222 +6
K.J. Choi 70-75-78 223 +7
a-OliverGoss 76-71-76-223 +7
Francesco Molinari 71-76-76 223 +7
NickWatney 72-75-76- 223 +7
Sandy Lyle 76-72-76 224 +8
Brandt Snedeker 70-74-80 224 +8
Mike Weir 73-72-79-224 +8
Stephen Gallacher 71-72-81 224 +8
Joost Luiten 75-73-77 225 +9
Larry Mize 74-72-79- 225 +9

Masters tee times
Sunday at Augusta National Golf Club, Au-
gusta, Ga.
All Times EDT
Final Round
a-amateur
10:10a.m.-Larry Mize
10:20 a.m.- Stephen Gallacher, Joost Luiten
10:30 a.m.- Mike Weir, Brandt Snedeker
10:40 a.m. K.J. Choi, Sandy Lyle
10:50 a.m.- Francesco Molinari, NickWatney
11:00 a.m.- Brendon de Jonge, a-Oliver Goss
11:10 a.m. Thongchai Jaidee, Thorbjorn Olesen
11:20 a.m.- Lucas Glover, Billy Horschel
11:30 a.m.- Darren Clarke, Stewart Cink
11:50 a.m.-Vijay Singh, Jose Maria Olazabal
12:00 p.m. Steven Bowditch, Hunter Mahan
12:10 p.m.- Martin Kaymer, Bill Haas
12:20 p.m.- Louis Oosthuizen, Jamie Donaldson
12:30 p.m.- Bernhard Langer, Henrik Stenson
12:40 p.m.- Jimmy Walker, Rory Mcllroy
12:50 p.m. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano,
Russell Henley
1:00 p.m. Chris Kirk, Steve Stricker
1:10 p.m.-Adam Scott, Jason Day
1:30 p.m.- lan Poulter, Kevin Streelman
1:40 p.m. John Senden, Gary Woodland
1:50 p.m. Kevin Stadler, Fred Couples
2:00 p.m.-Thomas Bjorn, Justin Rose
2:10 p.m.- Lee Westwood, Jim Furyk
2:20 p.m. Miguel Angel Jimenez, Rickie Fowler
2:30 p.m. Matt Kuchar, Jonas Blixt
2:40 p.m. Jordan Spieth, Bubba Watson


Bojangles' Southern
500 Results
Saturday at Darlington Raceway,
Darlington, S.C.
Lap length: 1.366 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 374 laps, 148.9
rating, 48 points.
2. (15) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 374,120,43.
3. (26) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 374,101.2,42.
4. (25) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 374, 114.2,41.
5.(19) Greg Biffle, Ford, 374, 90, 40.
6. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 374,104.9,38.
7. (9) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 374,120.2,38.
8. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 374, 81.7, 36.
9. (23) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 374, 74.8, 35.
10. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 374, 95.7, 34.
11. (20) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 374, 77.6, 33.
12. (16) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 374, 85.2, 32.
13. (21) Carl Edwards, Ford, 374, 69.2, 31.
14. (4) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 374, 71,30.
15. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 374, 72, 29.
16. (6) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 374, 82.4, 28.
17. (5) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 374, 100.6,28.
18. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 374, 63.1, 26.
19. (10) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 374, 92.4, 26.
20. (28) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 374, 56.4, 24.
21. (29) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 374, 56.3, 23.
22. (33) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 374, 54.5, 22.
23. (24) Justin Algaier, Chevrolet, 372, 61,21.
24.(3) Aric Almirola, Ford, 372, 67.9, 20.
25. (35) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 372, 46.2,0.
26. (14) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 371, 80.6, 19.
27. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 371, 70.9, 17.
28. (27) David Gilliland, Ford, 370, 43.9, 16.
29. (34) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 369, 39.6,15.
30. (38) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 369, 40.7,14.
31. (13) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 368, 75,13.
32. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 367, 44.5,13.
33. (41)Travis Kvapil, Ford, 367, 32.9, 11.
34. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 366, 29.8, 0.
35. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, front hub, 359, 84.5,10.
36. (37) David Stremme, Chevrolet, brakes, 326,
34.1, 8.
37. (22) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 323, 87, 8.
38. (42) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 301, 31.5, 6.
39. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, overheating,
289, 42.3, 5.
40. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 274, 25, 4.
41. (11) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 270,60.8,3.
42. (30) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, accident, 101,
44.6, 2.
43. (36) Dave Blaney, Ford, brakes, 65, 28,1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 131.211 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 53 minutes, 37 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.558 seconds.
Caution Flags: 11 for 50 laps.
Lead Changes: 22 among 12 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-37; J.Gordon 38-42;
D.Ragan 43; J.Gordon 44-45; K.Harvick 46-60;
D.Hamlin 61-63; M.Kenseth 64-75; K.Harvick
76-179; B.Keselowski 180-183; K.Kahne 184-
201; K.Harvick 202; K.Kahne 203-207; K.Har-
vick 208-223; B.Vickers 224-247; J.Gordon 248;
B.Vickers 249-254; K.Harvick 255-273; G.Biffle
274-278; K.Harvick 279-359; J.Johnson 360-
367; D.Earnhardt Jr. 368-372; K.Harvick 373-374.


Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 7timesfor238 laps; J.Logano,
1 time for 37 laps; B.Vickers, times for 30 laps;
K.Kahne, 2timesfor23 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time
for 12 laps; J.Johnson, 1 time for 8 laps; J.Gor-
don, 3 times for 8 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr, 1 time
for 5 laps; G.Biffle, 1 time for 5 laps; B.Ke-
selowski, 1 time for 4 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for
3 laps; D.Ragan, 1 time for 1 lap.
Wins: K.Harvick, 2; Ku.Busch, 1; Ky.Busch, 1;
D.Earnhardt Jr., 1; C.Edwards, 1; Bra.Ke-
selowski, 1; J.Logano, 1.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Gordon, 297; 2.
M.Kenseth, 296; 3. C.Edwards, 278; 4. D.Earn-
hardt Jr., 271; 5. J.Johnson, 270; 6. Ky.Busch,
269; 7. Bra.Keselowski, 246; 8. J.Logano, 245; 9.
R.Newman, 236; 10. A.Dillon, 235; 11. G.Biffle,
227; 12. TStewart, 224.


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
%Op 2-3-5
CASH 3 (late)
0 5-9-6

SPLAY 4 (early)
5-6-7-1
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 3-4-1-7




Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 14 -15 -23 -29
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 3 $1,974.50
3-of-4 MB 45 $288.50
3-of-4 917 $42
2-of-4 MB 1,452 $18.50
1-of-4 MB 10,744 $2.50
2-of-4 25,046 $2


Fantasy 5:10 -15
5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 373
3-of-5 10,508


21 -24- 35
$241,408.16
$104
$10


Mega Millions: 3-42-44-47-57
Mega Ball: 8
5-of-5 MB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 MB 1 winner $5,000
4-of-5 4 $500
3-of-5 MB 58 $50
3-of-5 814 $5
2-of-5 MB 1,584 $5
1-of-5 MB 12,976 $2
0-of-5 MB 33,731 $1

Players should verify winning num-
bers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES,


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Racing Indy Lights Series:
Streets of Long Beach.
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Radcing Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach.
5 p.m. (FS1) Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction From West
Palm Beach, Fla.
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Four-Wide Nationals.
From Concord, N.C. (same-day tape)
11 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series. (taped)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
6:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Arkansas at LSU. (same-day tape)
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Texas at Oklahoma.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay Rays at Cincinnati Reds or Wash-
ington Nationals at Atlanta Braves.
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Cincinnati Reds.
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies.
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals.
8 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees.
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees.
(same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma City Thunder at Indiana Pacers.
1 p.m. (NBA) NBA D-League Basketball (taped)
6 p.m. (FSNFL) (NBA) Orlando Magic at Brooklyn Nets.
9:30 p.m. (NBA) Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Lakers.
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma City Thunder at Indiana Pacers.
(same-day tape)
BOWLING
2 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Elias Cup Finals: L.A. X vs. Silver
Lake Atom Splitters. From North Brunswick, N.J. (taped)
4 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Women's Championship. From Wick-
liffe, Ohio. (taped)
GOLF
2 p.m. (CBS) 2014 Masters Tournament: Final Round. From
Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga.
AHL HOCKEY
4 p.m. (NHL) Oklahoma City Barons atAbbotsford Heat.
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Detroit Red Wings at St. Louis Blues.
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dallas Stars at Phoenix Coyotes.
10 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Washington Capitals.
(same-day tape)
SKATING
4 p.m. (NBC) Figure Skating World Championships. (taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Liverpool FC
vs Manchester City FC.
11 a.m. (FS1) FA Cup Soccer Semifinal: Hull City vs Sheffield
United FC. From Wembley Stadium in London, England.
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Swansea CityAFC
vs Chelsea FC. From Liberty Stadium in Swansea, Wales.
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Deportivo
Toluca FC vs Club Leon. Desde el Estadio Nemesio Diez en
Toluca, Estado de Mexico, Mexico.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Tennessee at Texas A&M.
6:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Coppin State at Delaware State.
TENNIS
3 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Tennis World Tour 250: U.S. Men's Clay
Court Championship, Final. From Houston, Texas.
5 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Tennis BNP Paribas Katowice Open,
Final. From Katowice, Poland. (same-day tape)
4:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Tennis Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters,
First Round. From Monaco.

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
y-Toronto 46 33 .582
x-Brooklyn 43 36 .544
NewYork 34 45 .430
Boston 25 55 .313
Philadelphia 17 63 .213
Southeast Division
W L Pct
y-Miami 54 26 .675
x-Washington 42 38 .525
x-Charlotte 41 39 .513
x-Atlanta 37 43 .463
Orlando 23 56 .291
Central Division
W L Pct
y-lndiana 54 26 .675
x-Chicago 47 32 .595
Cleveland 32 49 .395
Detroit 29 51 .363
Milwaukee 15 65 .188
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
z-San Antonio 62 18 .775
x-Houston 53 27 .663
Dallas 48 32 .600
Memphis 47 32 .595
New Orleans 32 48 .400


Northwest Division
W L Pct
y-Oklahoma City 58 21 .734
x-Portland 52 28 .650
Minnesota 40 39 .506
Denver 35 44 .443
Utah 24 55 .304
Pacific Division
W L Pct
y-L.A. Clippers 56 24 .700
x-Golden State 49 30 .620
Phoenix 47 32 .595
Sacramento 27 53 .338
L.A. Lakers 25 54 .316
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Washington 96, Orlando 86
NewYork 108, Toronto 100
Atlanta 93, Brooklyn 88
Boston 106, Charlotte 103
Miami 98, Indiana 86
Chicago 106, Detroit 98
Minnesota 112, Houston 110
Oklahoma City 116, New Orleans 94
Memphis 117, Philadelphia 95
Milwaukee 119, Cleveland 116
San Antonio 112, Phoenix 104
Portland 111, Utah 99
Golden State 112, L.A. Lakers 95


Saturday's Games
L.A. Clippers 117, Sacramento 101
Washington 104, Milwaukee 91
Charlotte 111, Philadelphia 105
Boston 111, Cleveland 99
Atlanta 98, Miami 85
Houston 111, New Orleans 104
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 9p.m.
Sunday's Games
Oklahoma City at Indiana, 1 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Chicago at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Washington, 7 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee atToronto, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 10p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-Boston 81 5418 9 117259 174
x-Montreal 82 4628 8 100215 204
x-TampaBay 81 4527 9 99239 215
x-Detroit 81 3828 15 91219 230
Ottawa 81 3631 14 86233 263
Toronto 82 3836 8 84231 256
Florida 82 2945 8 66196 268
Buffalo 81 2151 9 51154 244
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Pittsburgh 81 51 24 6 108247 204
x-N.Y Rangers 82 4531 6 96218 193
x-Philadelphia 81 4230 9 93231 229
x-Columbus 82 4332 7 93231 216
Washington 81 3830 13 89235 239
New Jersey 81 3429 18 86194 206
Carolina 81 3535 11 81201 225
N.Y Islanders 81 3337 11 77221 264
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Colorado 81 5222 7 111248 217
x-St. Louis 81 5222 7 111248 188
x-Chicago 82 4621 15 107267 220
x-Minnesota 81 4326 12 98204 199
x-Dallas 81 4030 11 91234 226
Nashville 81 3732 12 86209 239
Winnipeg 82 3735 10 84227 237
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Anaheim 80 5220 8 112259 204
x-San Jose 81 5022 9 109246 198
x-Los Angeles 81 4628 7 99203 170
Phoenix 80 3629 15 87212 227
Vancouver 80 3534 11 81189 217
Calgary 81 3539 7 77208 236
Edmonton 81 2844 9 65198 268
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 3, New Jersey 2, SO
Washington 4, Chicago 0
Carolina 2, Detroit 1
Tampa Bay 3, Columbus 2
Dallas 3, St. Louis 0
Winnipeg 5, Calgary 3
San Jose 5, Colorado 1
Saturday's Games
Boston 4, Buffalo 1
Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT
Montreal 1, N.Y Rangers 0, OT
Ottawa 1, Toronto 0
Columbus 3, Florida 2
Nashville 7, Chicago 5
San Jose at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at St. Louis, 12:30 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 3 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Buffalo, 5 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Sent DH Jason
Giambi to Akron (EL) for a rehab assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS Placed RHP Scott
Feldman on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP
Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City (PCL). Op-
tioned RHP Josh Zeid to Oklahoma City.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Recalled LHP
Danny Duffy from Omaha (PCL). Optioned 2B
Johnny Giavotella to Omaha.
MINNESOTATWINS Placed OF Josh Will-
ingham on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 7.
Recalled RHP Michael Tonkin from Rochester
(IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Designated OF
Sam Fuld for assignment. Reinstated OF Craig
Gentry from the 15-day DL.
SEATTLE MARINERS -Traded RHP Hector
Noesi to Texas for a player to be named or cash
considerations.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled OF Kevin
Kiermaier from Durham (IL).
TEXAS RANGERS --Transferred INF Ju-
rickson Profar to the 60-day DL.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES- Sent LHP Mike Minor
to Rome (SAL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO CUBS Optioned RHP Brian
Schlitter to Iowa (PCL). Recalled LHP Chris
Rusin from Iowa.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Sent RHP
Mike Adams to Lehigh Valley (IL) for a rehab as-
signment.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Signed general
manager John Mozeliak to a two-year contract
extension through the 2018 season.
SAN DIEGO PADRES Sent OF Cameron
Maybin to El Paso (PCL) for a rehab assign-
ment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS- Selected the
contract of RHP Blake Treinen from Syracuse
(IL). Optioned RHP Aaron Barrett to Syracuse.
Placed OF Denard Span on the 7-day DL. Re-
called OF Steven Souza Jr. from Syracuse. Re-
called INF/OF Jeff Kobernus from Syracuse and
placed him on the 60-day DL.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CAROLINA HURRICANES- Reassigned F
Zach Boychuk to Charlotte (AHL).
DALLAS STARS- Recalled F Chris Mueller


from Texas (AHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS- Rassigned G Scott
Clemmensen to San Antonio (AHL).
MONTREAL CANADIENS Signed G
Dustin Tokarski to a two-year contract exten-
sion.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned D Eric
Gelinas to Albany (AHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled F Tyler
Gaudet from Sault Ste. Marie (OHL). Signed F
Dan O'Donoghue to a two-year, entry-level con-
tract.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS Recalled C
Peter LeBlanc from Hershey (AHL). Signed C
Chandler Stephenson to a three-year, entry-
level contract.
American Hockey League
ABBOTSFORD HEAT Recalled F David
Eddy from Alaska (ECHL).
CHICAGO WOLVES Recalled FYannick
Veilleux from Kalamazoo (ECHL).


RAYS
Continued from Page B1

Brayan Pena with the bases loaded to end Friday
night's game, got three outs for his fourth save in
as many chances, finishing off the four-hitter
Cincinnati stranded a pair at third base and
had runners thrown out at third and home, ex-
tending its run of wasteful offense.
The Reds have lost all four of their series
this season, falling to 3-8 for the first time since
1995, when they won the NL Central. They had
a brief team meeting after the game.
Loney led off the second inning with his first
homer againstAlfredo Simon (1-1), who matched
his career high with eight innings and allowed
only five hits.
The Rays opened the series with a 2-1 win
Friday night, when David Price took a shutout
into the ninth before Joey Votto homered with
one out Rays starters have thrown at least seven
shutout innings four times in the last six games.
It was Tampa Bay's second shutout of the
season, and the second time the Reds have
been shut out. The Reds also were blanked 1-0
by the Cardinals on opening day
Both managers changed their lineups, look-
ing for some runs.
The Rays have scored only nine in their last
six games, but managed to win three of them
because of the impressive pitching. The Reds
have scored 28 runs all season, second-fewest
in the National League.
Maddon stocked his lineup with left-handers
against Simon. Price moved Votto from third to
second in the batting order, the first time he'd
batted second since 2008.
Neither move made much of a difference.
Nice defense by both teams also kept it close.
Votto led off the fourth with a ground-rule
double. Kevin Kiermaier threw out Votto at the
plate as he tried to score on Brandon Phillips'
single to center Phillips went to second on the
play and was thrown out trying to steal third.
"Kiermaier's throw today was the play of the
game, the play of the season so far," Maddon
said. "He's an exceptional outfielder He's
among the best major league outfielders today
and he's only played one game here in the reg-
ular season."
Kiermaier was optioned back to Triple-A
Durham after the game, as expected. His throw
home in the fourth was a good way to leave.
NOTES: LHP Erik Bedard was added to the
Rays' roster following the game.... LHP Cesar
Ramos moves from the bullpen to the rotation on
Sunday, taking the place of injured Matt Moore.
Ramos will make his fourth career start.




MASTERS
Continued from Page B1

even won here recently So they have been in
the position I haven't. Doesn't necessarily
mean I don't think that they have an ad-
vantage in any way I think that I'm very confi-
dent in the way things are going. And really
looking forward to tomorrow"
Woods was 21 when he won his first Masters
in 1997. Spieth would be the youngest major
champion since Tom Creavy, who was a few
months younger than Spieth when he won the
1931 PGA Championship.
But there's a lot of traffic on the road to a
green jacket. Nine players were separated by
three shots, and that includes Watson, who won
the Masters two years ago and might have the
advantage of getting his bad round out of the
way Saturday
After a 7-iron within 6 feet for an eagle on the
second hole gave him a five-shot lead, Watson
threw it in reverse. He left shots short and long,
and his putting became weak and tentative.
Despite some struggles on the front nine, Wat-
son still was in position to build a cushion until
blowing birdie chances on the rest of the par 5s.
From just over the back of the eighth green,
he couldn't get up-and-down. He three-putted
the par-5 13th for a par And after a massive
drive on the par-5 15th hole left him only a 9-
iron to the green, he went long and failed to
convert that birdie chance.
Watson's jaw tightened as opportunities slipped
away, and he was lucky to convert two pars at the
end for a 74 and a share of the lead at 5-under 211.
Matt Kuchar, who squandered chances to
win in each of the last two weeks, hit a pitch
from well behind the 15th green that had to be
perfect and was, setting up the best of his six
birdies in a round of 68. Kuchar, a favorite in
these parts from his days at Georgia Tech, was
one shot behind along with Masters rookie
Jonas Blixt, who fell out of the lead with a
bogey on the 17th and shot 71.
A Masters rookie has not won a green jacket
since Fuzzy Zoeller in 1979.
Miguel Angel Jimenez, who finished his
round about the time the leaders teed off, had
a tournament-best 66 and was two shots behind
with Rickie Fowler, who had a 67. Lee West-
wood (70), Jim Furyk (72) and Thomas Bjorn
(73) were at 2-under 214.
"Bubba at this point is keeping me in it," U.S.
Open champion Justin Rose said after his 69,
leaving him only four shots behind. "There's a
lot of players with a chance tomorrow. Anybody
under par going into tomorrow has a good shot"
That would not include defending champion
Adam Scott, who might have thrown away his
hopes with a 40 on the front nine that led to a
76. He was six shots behind.
Spieth fell in love with Augusta National the
first time he saw it last October, during a two-
day golfing trip that started at Pine Valley He
has leaned on two-time champion and fellow


Texas Longhorn Ben Crenshaw in practice rounds,
and he met with six-time champion Jack Nick-
laus on Wednesday to learn as much as he could.
The kid is a quick study
He didn't even have a PGA Tour card at this
time last year Since then, he won the John
Deere Classic, became the youngest American
to play in the Presidents Cup when Fred Cou-
ples made him a captain's pick, and had a
chance in the final hour to win the FedEx Cup
and its $10 million prize.
Phil Mickelson might have seen this coming.
He was paired with Spieth the last day of the
Deutsche Bank Championship in September,
when the kid shot 62. Mickelson called Couples
and said, "Dude, you've got to pick this guy"
Now, the young Texan has a good shot to join
them in the champions' locker room.


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 B3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bruins officially NHL's best after win over Sabres


Associated Press

BOSTON The Boston Bru-
ins clinched the NHEs best
record and home-ice advantage
throughout the playoffs with a 4-
1 win over the league-worst Buf-
falo Sabres on Saturday
It is the first time the Bruins
have claimed the Presidents'
Trophy since the 1989-90 season.
David Krejci scored two goals,
Patrice Bergeron netted his 30th
of the season, one fewer than his
career high set in 2005-06, and
Gregory Campbell got his eighth.
Cody Hodgson scored for Buf-
falo.
Sabres goalie Matt Hackett
was taken from the ice on a
stretcher after Boston defense-
man Torey Krug fell on his right
leg with 11:35 left. He was re-
placed by Connor Knapp, who
allowed Krejci's second goal one
minute later
It is the second time the Bru-
ins have won the Presidents'
Trophy, given to the NHL team
with the most regular-season
points, since the award was in-
stituted for the 1985-86 season.
Senators 1,
Maple Leafs 0
OTTAWA-- Jason Spezza
scored the game's only goal and
Craig Anderson stopped 27 shots for


Associated Press
Buffalo Sabres' Marcus Foligno falls on the ice Saturday in the third
period against the Boston Bruins in Boston. The Bruins won 4-1.


his fourth shutout of the season as
the Ottawa Senators beat the
Toronto Maple Leafs 1-0 Saturday
night.
Spezza scored on the power play
at 7:35 of the second period as Erik
Karlsson found him alone in the
faceoff circle and the Senators' cap-
tain caught the inside of the post for
his 23rd of the season. Spezza now
has 56 points in 56 career games
against the Leafs.
The Senators tied a season high
with their fourth straight win.
James Reimer had 36 saves,
making a number of big stops to


keep Toronto in the game. The Leafs
capped off their season with 12
losses in their last 15 games, leav-
ing them below the Senators in the
standings.
Flyers 4, Penguins 3 (OT)
PITTSBURGH Mark Streit beat
Marc-Andre Fleury 2:10 into over-
time to lift Philadelphia over Pitts-
burgh and set up a first-round
playoff matchup with the New York
Rangers.
Streit's backhand shot from the
right circle caromed between
Fleury's pads and into the net as the


Flyers clinched third place in the
Metropolitan Division.
Jakub Voracek scored twice for
the Flyers, and Claude Giroux
added his team-high 28th goal of the
season. Ray Emery made 12 saves
after replacing injured starter Steve
Mason to start the third period.
Jussi Jokinen, James Neal and
Kris Letang scored for the Penguins.
Fleury stopped 17 shots and hardly
looked sharp while giving up the
game-winner.
Letang scored in the final minute
of regulation to force overtime after
Giroux gave the Flyers a 3-2 lead
with 1:15 left.
Blue Jackets 3,
Panthers 2
SUNRISE Ryan Johansen
scored the tiebreaking goal in the
third period to and the Columbus
Blue Jackets beat the Florida Pan-
thers for the eighth straight time, 3-2
on Saturday night.
Mark Letestu and Cam Atkinson
also scored for Columbus and
Sergei Bobrovsky made 33 saves.
Jimmy Hayes and Vincent
Trocheck scored for the Panthers.
Roberto Luongo stopped 35 shots.
The Blue Jackets clinched the first
wild-card spot and will face Pitts-
burgh in the first round of the Stan-
ley Cup playoffs.


Philadelphia's 4-3 overtime win
over Pittsburgh earlier Saturday
clinched third place in the Metropoli-
tan Division for the Flyers and forced
Columbus to the wild-card spot.
Johansen's 33rd goal of the sea-
son, a one-timer from the left circle,
got past Luongo at 5:58 of the third
period to put Columbus ahead.
Canadiens 1,
Rangers 0 (OT)
MONTREAL-- Brian Gionta
scored on a penalty shot at 2:04 of
overtime to give the Montreal Cana-
diens a 1-0 victory over the New
York Rangers in the final NHL regu-
lar-season game for both teams Sat-
urday night.
Gionta was awarded the shot
after he poked the puck away from
Raphael Diaz and then was tripped
by the defenseman on a breakaway.
He deked to the backhand to beat
Cam Talbot on the shot.
Carey Price made 39 saves as
Montreal finished with 100 points
and moved past Tampa Bay for sec-
ond place in the Atlantic Division.
The Lightning can still claim home
ice advantage for their first round
playoff meeting versus Montreal with
a victory on their final game Sunday
against Washington.
The Rangers have home ice for
the first round.


Associated Press
The field takes the green flag Saturday to start the Sprint Cup auto race at Darlington Speedway in Darlington, S.C.


Harvick survives





shootout at Darlington


Associated Press
DARLINGTON, S.C. Kevin Har-
vick capped his biggest weekend at
Darlington Raceway with his first
Southern 500 victory Saturday night,
passing Dale Earnhardt Jr two laps
from the end of the longest race in the
track's 65-year NASCAR history
Harvick earned his first pole here
Friday night and had the most domi-
nant car But he had to make it through
a restart with 10 laps left and two tries
at a green-white-checkered finish -
NASCAR's version of extra innings.
"We were able to hang on there at
the end and I knew I had that high line
I hadn't showed it to them all night on
the restarts and I wanted to save it
until the very end," Harvick said.
Earnhardt finished second, his best
career showing at a track where his
late father won nine times. Jimmie
Johnson was third, last year's Southern
500 winner Matt Kenseth fourth and
Greg Biffle fifth.
Harvick led 239 of the 374 laps, seven
more than planned, and became the
first two-time winner in the first eight
races of the season. It also gave a bit of
relief to those winners under the new
16-team Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship that they wouldn't have
to jostle with 26 winners there are
26 races before the final 10 playoff
events to try and make it in.
Harvick had just three top-fives and
six top-10 finishes in 17 career Dar-
lington races before this. He hadn't fin-
ished better than fifth in his last 10
tries, but clearly had the strongest ma-
chine this time out.
He was cruising along with 10 laps
left when Joey Logano's car leaked flu-
ids on the track. Johnson and Earn-
hardt took just two tires in the pits and
snuck out ahead of Harvick, who had
taken four tires and restarted fifth.
Earnhardt quickly moved past John-
son for the lead until Denny Hamlin
hit the wall for the 10th caution to set
up the overtime finish.
Earnhardt was still out front on that
restart when Clint Bowyer got too close
to Kurt Busch and spun him out -
Busch made sure to walk up the track
and stare down Bowyer to force a
second green-white-checkered finish.
This time, Harvick and his fresher


Associated Press
Kevin Harvick gets a kiss from his wife, Delana Harvick, in Victory Lane on Satur-
day after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup series race at Darlington Raceway in
Darlington, S.C.


tires easily got past Earnhardt and
drove on to his second win since join-
ing Stewart-Haas Racing this offsea-
son, adding Darlington to his win in
Phoenix this year
Kyle Busch was sixth and points
leader Jeff Gordon seventh. Rookie
Kyle Larson was eighth with Tony
Stewart and Ryan Newman rounding
out the top 10.
But there were plenty of power-
house drivers who hadn't yet broken
through the three Hendrick stal-
warts in Gordon, Johnson and Kahne
among them and that made for a
frantic charge at the end on the quirky,
country track.
Harvick was passed at the start by
Joey Logano, who led the first 37 laps,
then moved back to the front and led
for 137 of the next 185 laps.


The worst looking of the seven cau-
tion periods was with Paul Menard,
who hit the wall yet stayed out, eventu-
ally sparking under the passenger side
and igniting a small fire in the pits. No
one was injured, although Menard's
car was towed to the garage for repairs.
"I guess I was just in denial, I guess
I didn't realize the right-front tire was
down," Menard said.
Menard brought out another caution
with 95 laps left, hitting the wall a sec-
ond time.
The race teams get a break next
week for the annual Easter holiday be-
fore resuming the season at Richmond
International Raceway on April 26.
Their next off weekend won't come
until July 20, a week before the Brick-
yard 400 at Indianapolis Motor
Speedway


w6rni
Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade makes a
jump shot over the defense of Atlanta Hawks
guard Kyle Korver on Saturday during the first
half in Atlanta.

Hawks clinch,

knock Knicks

out of playoffs

Associated Press

ATLANTA-Jeff Teague scored 25 points,
Lou Williams had 18 of his 23 points in the
fourth quarter and the Atlanta Hawks
earned the Eastern Conference's final play-
off spot with a 98-85 victory over the Miami
Heat on Saturday night.
Atlanta's third straight victory eliminated
the New York Knicks from playoff contention.
Williams scored the Hawks' last 12 points.
LeBron James finished with 27 points and
Dwyane Wade, in his first game since miss-
ing nine straight with a sore left hamstring,
scored 24 for Miami.
Celtics 111, Cavaliers 99
CLEVELAND Rookie Kelly Olynyk matched
a career high with 25 points and the short-handed
Boston Celtics defeated the Cleveland Cavaliers
111-99 on Saturday night.
Avery Bradley also scored 25 points for the Celtics,
who built a 33-point lead early in the fourth quarter
before Cleveland's reserves cut into the margin.
Boston snapped a 13-game road losing streak
and won for the first time away from home since
Feb. 10.
Wizards 104, Bucks 91
WASHINGTON Bradley Beal scored 26
points, and the Washington Wizards moved a
step closer to claiming the No. 6 seed in the East-
ern Conference on Saturday night with a 104-91
win over the Milwaukee Bucks, whose loss guar-
anteed they will finish with at least a tie for the
worst record in the NBA.
Washington leads the seventh-place Charlotte
Bobcats, who beat the Philadelphia 76ers on Sat-
urday, by one game with two to play.
Clippers 117, Kings 101
LOS ANGELES Blake Griffin scored 27
points, DeAndre Jordan added 21, and the Los
Angeles Clippers beat the Sacramento Kings 117-
101 on Saturday to earn their franchise record-
tying 56th victory of the regular season.
Chris Paul added 17 points and 10 assists, J.J.
Redick had 13 points, and Matt Barnes scored 12.
Bobcats 111, 76ers 105
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -Al Jefferson continued
his dominating play with 29 points and 12 re-
bounds, and the Charlotte Bobcats defeated the
Philadelphia 76ers 111-105 Saturday night for
their sixth win in seven games.
It marked the sixth straight game Jefferson had
at least 20 points and 10 rebounds in a game -
extending his own franchise record.


B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pirates' Pool signs with St. Petersburg College


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Breanna Myers, the softball
coach at St. Petersburg College,
was after talent Marissa Pool, a
senior shortstop at Crystal River
High School, had it and was
looking for a place to develop it.
On Thursday they decided to
help each other. Pool committed
to attend St Petersburg starting
next fall and play softball for
Myers' Titans.
"I'm a local person, I was born
and raised in Dunnellon, and I
saw her travel team play, the
Snakebite team out of Belle-
view," Myers said, adding she be-
came interested in recruiting
Pool at the beginning of last
summer "It's always nice to
have someone with raw, natural
talent I could tell she liked play-
ing the game, she liked winning,
she wanted to win every single
inning. That's hard to find
sometimes.
"I could tell she loved playing


the game and wasn't afraid of
getting dirty, she just loved being
out there."
Something else Pool brings to
the table is her versatility: Al-
though primarily a shortstop
during her last two varsity sea-
sons at Crystal River, Pool has
played multiple positions, ac-
cording to Pirates' coach Cas-
sidy Rash.
"Third base, catcher, pitcher, I
thought of putting her at second
base, and she could play the out-
field for us," Rash said. "I could
put her at any position and I'd
have a great player there."
That versatility gained Myers'
attention.
"I think her utility is good,"
the St. Petersburg College coach
said when asked to name Pool's
best attributes. But there's more
to it than that, she added: "If
someone is a good hitter, you can
always find a place for them.
And she can hit the ball."
There are many facets to
Pool's game that make her a


Special to me unronicie
Crystal River senior softball player Marissa Pool recently signed to
continue her career at St. Petersburg College. Pictured, front row,
from left: Rose Pool (grandmother), Jerry Pool (grandfather), Marissa
Pool, Chad Pool (father) and Sharon Pool (mother). Back row: Bre-
anna Myers (St. Peteersburg College coach), Cassidy Rash (CRHS
coach) and Lanna Wentworth (former coach).


valuable addition to any team.
"She's our team leader, she's
our vocal leader on the field,"
Rash pointed out. "Others lead
by example and Marissa does
that, but she's also the one who


gets up in the dugout and says
'We're going to win this ball-
game.'
"You can hear her on and off
the field, wherever you are, you
can hear Marissa Pool."


Pool's also been known to ar-
rive early for practice and leave
late to help a teammate.
"She does whatever it takes to
take us to that next level," Rash
said. "She's a hard worker, she's
a team player"
Pool is also smart enough to
realize nothing is going to be
handed to her One of the decid-
ing factors in her choosing St.
Petersburg College was Myers.
"She was really open and nice,
and sometimes you don't get that
from all coaches, they're pretty
much down to business all the
time," Pool said, adding Myers was
different. "We toured the school
and had fun. It was pretty much
like a bond, a friendship bond."
She knows she still has work
to do.
"I have to work on the mental
side," Pool said. "Softball is 90
percent mental. You've got to play
hard all the time. You've gotto work
for your position, now it's your job."
Seems Pool is ready to tackle
and join this work force.


CR's Clark and Byrne


vault to regional meet


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

BROOKSVILLE When
Crystal River High's An-
gela Byrne set a school
record with an 11-8 pole
vault Friday, she didn't
have to look far to find her
friend and main cheer-
leader, Hayley Clark.
Clark took second in the
event with a vault of 10 feet
even at the Class 2A-Dis-
trict 7 Track and Field Meet
at Central High School.
They helped lead the Pi-
rate girls to third place
with 90.5 points. Nature
Coast Tech's girls won with
156.5 points.
The Crystal River boys
were fifth with 86 points.
Nature Coast won with
128.5 points.
Teammate Huyen Vo was
third with an 8-6.
It seems cliche that two
competitive teammates
should cheer each other
on, but with Byrne and
Clark, that's the way it is.
"We both are kind of like
coaches for each other,"
said Byrne, a junior "We
get excited when the other
person gets a better height.
If you mix in the sisterly
coaching, it makes it really
helpful. We have a compet-
itive thing."
Byrne almost finished
her vaulting career last
year


She had a double pars
fracture on her lower back.
It was broken on both sides
of the spine. She had to go
through extensive therapy
She had to strengthen her
back to keep everything. She
said it does still hurt, but it
is not as bad as thought.
Byrne had to stop in the
middle of the season, but
Clark made it to state. She
was part of a six-way tie for
fifth place. She medalled.
Clark is hoping both girls
get to state and medal.
"I felt really happy for
her," said Clark of her
friend's record and win.
"We have been friends and
teammates for so long that
her happiness is my happi-
ness. I broke the school
record and she broke it
again. We are good friends
outside of school. I have
had my share of firsts, and
it's Angle's time to shine. I
want her to improve and
get the same kind of college
offers I did."
Clark is a senior and will
attend the University of
Dayton in Ohio next year
She is going to walk on to
the track team there. She
took home a fourth-place
medal last year at state.
"They both want the best
for each other," said Byrne.
"We were up in Gainesville
and they both had a tough
day They are good
friends."


The regional will be
Wednesday at First Acad-
emy of Orlando. The field
events will be at 8:30 a.m.
The top four in each event
will advance from district
competition to regional
competition.
Crystal River's Madison
Winship was second in the
high jump with a leap of 5-
2. Cassidy Wardlow was
fourth with a 4-10.
The Crystal River girls
were third in the 4x800
relay with an 11:03.28.
The Pirate boys won the
4x800 relay with an 8:42.19.
Abigail Epstein was
fourth in the triple jump
with a 31-5.
Ryan Spivey was second
in the pole vault with a 12-
6. Teammate Gabriel
Charles was third with a 12-
foot vault.
Byrne was second in the
300 meters with a 48.24.
Wyatt Struppler was
fourth in the boys 300 me-
ters with a 46.54.
Adam Bennet won the
800 meters with a 2:06.64.
Alexis Ulseth was fourth
in the 800 meters with a
2:26.98.
Brandon Harris won the
3200 meters in 10:06.
Crystal River's girls were
third in the 4x400 medley
relay with 4:30.59.
The Pirate boys were
second in the 4x400 meter
relays with 3:38.38.


Lightning's Malone charged


with possession of cocaine


Associated Press

TAMPA Tampa Bay
Lightning left wing Ryan
Malone was charged Sat-
urday with DUI and pos-
session of cocaine after a
traffic stop, police said.
An officer saw Mal-
one's SUV strike a curb
after making a left turn
from the center lane
early Saturday, said
Tampa Police Lt Paul
Lusczynski.
After being pulled over,
Malone got out of his ve-
hicle, and the officer
smelled alcohol on his
breath, Lusczynski said.
According to the police
report, the officer also
found 1.3 grams of co-
caine in one of Malone's
pockets.
Malone refused to take
field sobriety tests, but a
breath test given at the
jail recorded blood alco-
hol levels of 0.112 and
0.116 percent, Lusczynski
said. Florida law consid-
ers a driver impaired at
0.08.
Malone was released
from the Hillsborough
County jail on $2,500
bond. Jail records didn't
show whether he had an
attorney Police im-
pounded Malone's car
"We are aware of the
situation this morning in-
volving Tampa Bay Light-
ning forward Ryan


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning left wing Ryan Malone stretches
before a game against the Minnesota Wild on Feb. 4 in
St. Paul, Minn. Malone was charged Saturday with DUI
and possession of cocaine after a traffic stop, police
said. An officer saw Malone's SUV strike a curb after
making a left turn from the center lane early Saturday,
said Tampa Police Lt. Paul Lusczynski. After being
pulled over, Malone got out of his vehicle, and the of-
ficer smelled alcohol on his breath, Lusczynski said.
According to the police report, the officer also found
1.3 grams of cocaine in one of Malone's pockets. Mal-
one was released from the Hillsborough County jail on
$2,500 bond.


Malone," NHL Deputy
Commissioner Bill Daly
said in a statement.
"Under the terms of the
collectively bargained
joint NHL/NHLPA Sub-
stance Abuse and Behav-
ioral Health Program, Mr
Malone is subject to
mandatory evaluation
and, if deemed necessary
by the Program Doctors,
treatment pursuant to
the terms of that Pro-
gram.
"His future playing sta-


tus, both in the near term
and during the Playoffs,
will be determined in ac-
cordance the terms of our
SABH Program."
Lightning general
manager Steve Yzerman
said Malone wouldn't
travel with the team for
Tampa Bay's final regu-
lar-season game Sunday
against the Washington
Capitals.
The Lightning will
meet Montreal in the first
round of the playoffs.


Recreation B R I E FS


Underwater Egg Hunt
held April 19 at
Bicentennial Park pool
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation's 6th annual Underwater Egg
Hunt will be on April 19 at the Bi-
centennial Park Pool in Crystal
River. There will be two egg hunts
for different age groups: Children
ages 0 to 6 hunt from 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.; Children ages 7 to 12
hunt from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Make sure you bring your own
basket. Eggs are turned in after the
hunt in exchange for a gift bag filled
with toys and candy. There will be
food for sale and festivities around
the pool grounds such as egg
races, arts-n-craft station, pictures
with the bunny and much more. For
more information call 352-527-
7540.
Get registered for
Parks and Recreation
adult leagues
Join one of Citrus County Parks
and Recreations adult leagues
today. It's a great way to meet new
people and spark new friendships.
You'll find yourself in the company
of others with whom you'll have at
least one common interest talk
about an icebreaker. By playing
with them once or twice a week,
you are bound to develop some
good relationships. If you're new in
town or simply like to meet people,
sports leagues are a fun and out-of-
the-box way to expand your social
network.
It might not be easy for you to
jump right in a join a team or league
when you don't know anyone there,
but just remember that everyone
was "the new guy" at some point. If
you still feel intimidated, ask a
friend to join you. You'll ease your
nerves and catch up with someone
you care about at the same time.
Adult leagues really are a blast
for athletes of all levels. The only


way to get the full experience is to
try it yourself. Release your inner
athlete and get out there and play.
There is a $50.00 team commit-
ment fee due at registration and
league fees will be determined by
the number of teams that register.
Men's Softball, Coed Softball
and Coed Kickball Registration
closes April 28, 2014
Men's Flag Football and Men's
Basketball Registration Closes
May 5, 2014
Sign up at the Citrus County
Parks and Recreation Office located
at 2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit the website at www.citrus
countyparks.com or call 352-527-
7540
Summer Tennis Clinics
available for young
players of all levels
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, in partnership with tennis pro
Mehdi Tahiri, will be hosting two
Summer Tennis Clinics. The first
clinic will be geared towards begin-
ners and the second clinic will be for
those who have tennis experience.
Instruction will include condition-
ing, drills, footwork, match play,
doubles and single strategy.
The clinics will be held at Lecanto
Park (3505 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461) in the month of
June. Week 1 will run June 2 to 6,
2014, from 9 to 11 a.m. The cost for
week 1 will be $150 per participant
($40 off for additional siblings). This
clinic will be geared for beginners
ages 7 to 12.
Week 2 will run June 9 to 12,
2014, from 9:00 a.m. to noon. The
cost for week 2 will be $190 per
participant ($50 off for additional
siblings). Week 2 will be for ages 9
to 15 who have experience playing
tennis.
Registration will open on Mon-
day, April 21, 2014.
For more information contact Cit-


rus County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Local golfers play for
charity at Trump
National Doral in Miami
BGA (Bad Golfers Association)
members will travel from Citrus Hills
to Miami for the opportunity to play at
Trump National Doral on Wednesday,
April 23, to support Sunny Shores
Sea Camp, a nonprofit corporation
celebrating its 35th year of helping
families and mentoring children and
young adults with cystic fibrosis.
Sunny Shores Sea Camp is free to
all campers, their parents and sib-
lings. All physicians, respiratory thera-
pists, registered nurses, board
members and volunteers of Sunny
Shores Sea Camp donate their time.
To help with the annual fundraising
for Sunny Shores Sea Camp, register
to participate in the cause and play
golf at Trump National Doral in Miami.
Applications for the Sunny Shores
Sea Camp Golf Tournament can be
found on the website www.sun-
nyshoresseacamp.org, or call W. A.
Pace at 352-746-4238 or Jim Remler
at 352-527-3596.
Walk, bike, hike and
kayak for fitness
The Nature Coast Ramblers Inc. is
a nonprofit social and recreational
club of friendly people of all ages who
enjoy self-paced hiking or walking,
biking and kayaking activities in the
Citrus County area.
Walking or hiking, biking, or kayak-
ing with the club promotes fitness. Its
goal is to provide fun events that can
challenge people to keep active.
Outings are started in different lo-
cations to explore the many beautiful
trails, parks, forests and waterways in
the area. Bicycle outings are gener-
ally the second Friday each month,
hiking or walking is generally the third
Saturday of each month and kayak-
ing is usually the last Tuesday of


each month,
All events are free for members.
Become a member of Nature Coast
Ramblers for $10 (or $15 for a family)
per calendar year. There is a $3 fee
per event for nonmembers.
Members are informed of upcom-
ing club activities by email and
through postings on the website and
Facebook. Contact Marie Nail at 352-
382-2525 or marie428@earthlink.net.
Golf tournament
April 19 in Ocala to
benefit shelter
A golf tournament to benefit the
Citrus County Animal Shelter in Inver-
ness will be held at the Royal Oaks
Golf Club in Ocala on April 19.
The benefit is called Hope's
Legacy, in honor of a little stray dog
named Hope that was adopted by a
loving family. The fundraising event
strives to bring similar hope to many
other loveable shelter animals, will
help to make needed improvements
at the aging shelter and also will help
pay for the special medical needs
and surgeries for injured animals.
Opportunities for sponsorships
ranging from $100 to $400 are avail-
able for individuals, corporations or
businesses. They include printed
signs at tees advertising the business
name or donor. Entry fee is $40 and
includes green fees, cart fees, vari-
ous prizes and lunch. A cruise raffle
and a silent auction will be offered.
Information regarding sponsorship
and in-kind donations are available
from Friends of Citrus County Animal
Services at 352-201-8664.
For information regarding golf sign-
ups, call Marti Little at 786-367-2834.
Father Willie Classic
set for May 17
The Knights of Columbus Abbot
Francis Sadlier Council 6168 will
have its 20th annual Father Willie
Golf Classic on Saturday, May 17, at
Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club
in Crystal River. Net proceeds from


the event will be donated to the Boys
& Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Local merchants and organizations
are invited to sponsor one or more
holes for $50 per hole. Sponsorship
will be acknowledged with a sign on
the greens and in various Knights'
publications prior to the event.
Entry fee for the tournament, open
to men and women of all ages, is $60
per person. This includes coffee and
doughnuts prior to the start, greens
and cart fees, prizes and lunch at the
Country Club. Prizes will be awarded
for all par three holes and the person
hitting a hole in one on the seventh
hole will receive a prize of $10,000.
The winning teams will receive
$200 for first place, $150 for second
place and $100 for third place. There
will door prizes, 50/50 drawings and a
separate raffle for a round of golf for
four at Black Diamond.
Play will be a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. with four player teams. Partici-
pants can form their own team or or-
ganizers will do it. Entries must be
received no later than May 14 with
checks attached made out to the
Knights of Columbus.
Since the field must be limited to
120 players, make reservations
quickly with Jim Louque at 352-746-
7563. He will also be available to an-
swer questions.
Superintendent's Golf
Classic set for April 26
The 16th annual Superintendent's
Golf Classic is scheduled for an 8:30
a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, April
26 at Sugarmill Woods Golf Club.
The event is a four-person scram-
ble and the field is limited to 144
golfers.
The registration fee is $55 per
golfer, which includes greens fee,
lunch, door prizes and hole contests.
For more information, contact
Dave Hamilton or Bruce Sheffield at
726-1931, or Phil McLeod at 726-
2241.


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 B5


SPORTS




B6 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


GATORS
Continued from Page B1

gets you in a rhythm that
sometimes it's tough for
the defense to break you
of."
Florida played in front
of an announced crowd of
35,834 that saw the two of-
fenses rack up 36 points
and 414 yards in the first
half. Driskel completed 11
of his 18 passes after start-
ing the game missing four
of his first seven.
Besides Driskel, other
bright spots included
kicker Austin Hardin, who
went 4 of 12 in 2013,
drilling all four of his at-
tempts and Trenton
Brown, who played a pro-
ductive right guard in his
first game there since
shifting inside this
spring.


NOLES
Continued from Page B1

so I'm going to be tired
sometimes. But ifJimbo asks
me, 'Jameis, are you tired?'
I'm going to say 'No, coach."'
Winston didn't look tired
Saturday He completed 27
of 56 passes.
Winston was working with
an inexperienced group going
against one of the best group
of defensive backs in the
country
"The more they play to-
gether ... the more you're
going to know each other,"
coach Jimbo Fisher said.
"Early they didn't get open
as well, but that's kind of
expected. But as the game
went on they gradually made
more plays and did things
and we helped them get open
with some formations and
different things we did.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Football springs to life in preseason previews


Gray triumphs

at Ohio State
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Bri'onte Dunn and Warren
Ball ran for touchdowns to
lead the Gray past the
Scarlet 17-7 in Ohio State's
annual spring game be-
fore a crowd of 61,058 at
sunny Ohio Stadium.
Many of the Buckeyes'
big names didn't play
Quarterback Braxton
Miller, Ohio State's All-Big
Ten quarterback, sat out
spring workouts after sur-
gery on his (right) throw-
ing shoulder Wide receiver
Evan Spencer (ankle) and
safety Vonn Bell (knee)
also missed the game.
The Buckeyes lose four
starters on defense and
six on offense from a 12-2
team that won a school-
record 24 games in a row
before losing the Big Ten
championship game to
Michigan State 34-24 and
the Orange Bowl to Clem-
son 40-35.
Zaire serves notice of
QB race in South Bend
SOUTH BEND, Ind.-
Malik Zaire made a statement
that he plans to challenge
Everett Golson for the start-
ing quarterback job at Notre
Dame.
The sophomore left-hander
threw for 292 yards and two
touchdowns in the spring
scrimmage on Saturday.
Golson, the former starter
who is back from a yearlong
academic suspension, threw
for 154 yards on 13 of 24
passing and ran for a score.
The school also an-


Nebraska head coach Bo Pelini holds a cat Saturday as the team emerges from the tunnel prior to Nebraska's spring
game in Lincoln, Neb.


nounced Saturday that the
field at Notre Dame Stadium
would be converted to artifi-
cial turf before the fall.
Zaire put some zip on a 6-
yard fastball toAmir Carlisle
for a second-quarter touch-
down, but also displayed a
penchant for big plays with
five passes of 20 yards or
more. He led the offense to
touchdowns on his first three
drives, including a 39-yard
TD pass to C.J. Prosise for
the second score.
Golson rushed for a touch-
down, but struggled with his
accuracy and scrambled from
the pocket often.
Confident S.C. wraps
up quiet spring
COLUMBIA, S.C. South
Carolina coach Steve Spurrier
didn't get a lot of answers out
of spring practice, but for once
he came in without a lot of


questions.
Spurrier said after Satur-
day's game that he will wait
until fall practice to name a
backup quarterback.
Spurrier already knows
Dylan Thompson will be his
starting quarterback. Also,
second-team all-Southeast-
ern Conference tailback Mike
Davis will get most of the car-
ries and four starters return
on the offensive line from last
year's 11-2 team.
There are plenty of ques-
tions on defense because
Spurrier won't let them loose
on his offense in the spring.
The Gamecocks must re-
place star defensive end
Jadeveon Clowney and
nearly the entire secondary.
The Gamecocks need to
replace quarterback Connor
Shaw, defensive tackle Kelcy
Quarles and cornerback Vic-
tor Hampton.


Cross runs for 100
in Cornhuskers game
LINCOLN, Neb. Imani
Cross ran for 100 yards and
two touchdowns against the
No. 1 defense to highlight the
Nebraska spring game.
Instead of splitting the play-
ers into Red and White
teams, the scrimmage pitted
the offense against the de-
fense. The offense won
55-46 in a scoring system
that awarded points to the
defense for certain accom-
plishments.
The day was about more
than the traditional spring
scrimmage. Coach Bo Pelini
came out of the tunnel
cradling a cat yes, a cat -
and raised it to the crowd in a
nod to the avatar on the pop-
ular @FauxPelini Twitter ac-
count. He challenged
receiver Kenny Bell to a


throwing contest, and Jere-
miah Sirles proposed to his
girlfriend during a punt, pass
and kick competition among
former players.
Mason impresses
in Bulldogs' starter
ATHENS, Ga. Georgia's
offense clicked under fifth-
year senior Hutson Mason,
who led the Red team to a
27-24 win Saturday in the
spring football game.
Meanwhile, Georgia's new
defense managed a handful
of turnovers, but proved vul-
nerable to the pass.
Mason finished the day 18
of 27 passing for 241 yards,
with one touchdown pass. He
might have quarterbacked
another scoring drive but jun-
ior tailback Todd Gurley fum-
bled the ball through the end
zone to negate a 75-yard
drive to open the game.


Citrus County BarAssociation 0
Law Week Art Contest


' $100 Cash Prize in All Four Categories
Kindergarten-5th grade 9th-12th grade
6th-8th grade Adult


Draw your best representation of our All entries must be mailed or dropped off by April 15
theme "American Democracy And Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429
The Rule Of Law: Why Every Vote Matters" for more information please call 352-795-0404


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Photo by JULE ROUARD; scanned by LUC VIATOR
This April 16, 1945, photo was taken during the liberation of the Nazi camp in Buchenwald. Prisoners were kept in boxes or bunks stacked to the ceiling.

Holocaust Remembrance Day events stand as memorial as well as tribute to heroism


KARL SEIDMAN
Special to the Chronicle
The Holocaust, the purposeful an-
nihilation by Nazi Germany of 6 mil-
lion innocent Jews and millions of
other citizens during World War II,
continues to resonate in events of
the 21st century and to carry lessons
for all mankind.
Each year, Congregation Beth
Sholom in Beverly Hills looks for in-
dividuals to tell about their Holo-
caust experiences, to remind us of
what did happen, of what could hap-
pen again if we are too complacent,
and of what has continued to hap-
pen to other innocent peoples of the
world.
It is difficult to imagine what life
was like in the Vilna ghetto in 1942,
when the majority of the large Jew-
ish population of this city in Lithua-
nia who had been herded into an
overcrowded section of the city, this
Nazi-created ghetto had already
been done away with, mostly by
shooting. A young widow whose hus-
band had only recently been killed
carries their child in her womb.
This year Congregation Beth
Sholom's Yom HaShoah program
will be at 2 p.m. Sunday April 27, at
Kellner Auditorium, behind the
Beth Sholom Sanctuary, at the Civic
Circle in Beverly Hills.
Memorial organizers look for-
ward to presenting a video created
right here in Citrus County of some-
one who was a hidden child of the
Holocaust. Nina Jacobs, a good
friend of a member of the congrega-
tion, will visit our area around


Viewing the atrocil


the world does not


MURRAY TOPOL
Special to the Chronicle
What follows is a small com-
pendium from various sources on
the catastrophe that was the Holo-
caust. Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Re-
membrance Day, is observed on the
27th day of the month of Nisan,
which marks the day when Allied
troops liberated the first Nazi con-
centration camp at Buchenwald,
Germany, in 1945.
The full name of the day is Yom
HaShoah Ve-Hagevurah, which
means the "Day of (remembrance
of) the Holocaust and the Heroism."
On the morning of April 12, 1945,
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower met
Gens. Omar Bradley and George S.
Patton at Ohrdruf Concentration
Camp. After viewing the unspeak-
able horrors of the camp, Eisen-
hower ordered every American
soldier in the area who was not on
the front lines to visit Ohrdruf and
Buchenwald. He wanted them to
see for themselves what they were
fighting against.
During the camp inspections with

Passover, but could not be here in
person for Yom Hashoah (Holocaust
Remembrance Day). A video of her


his top comma
said that the a
yond the Amerin
hend." He oi
citizen of the to
ally tour the cai
done so, the m
went home and
Later on Eis
wife, Mamie, "I
such cruelty bes
could really exi
cabled Gen. Ge(
gest that he con
see these camp
courage Mars
gressmen and ji
It would be r
the world woulc
of the Holocaus
fore they knew l
apparatus that
ered at Buche
of other death
lions of inno
slaughtered.
Eisenhower
many people \


story will be ma
- this is being
the help of the ]


of Citrus High School, headed by
SS faculty member Ed Kilpatrick. Two
students in this program will be be-
ti s s hind the cameras that will capture
for et this event.
Among the small number of Euro-
g end of the Holocaust, thousands had
anders Eisenhower survived because they were hidden.
atrocities were "be- With identities disguised, and often
can mind to compre- physically concealed from the out-
tdered that every side world, these youngsters faced
wn of Gotha person- constant fear dilemmas and danger
mp and, after having Congregation Beth Sholom will
nayor and his wife again also have the special display
hanged themselves. "GI's Remember" from the National
senhower wrote to Museum of American Jewish Mili-
never dreamed that tary History It includes individual
stiality, and savagery photographs and narratives of Jew-
st in this world." He ish GI's who witnessed the libera-
orge Marshall to sug- tion of Nazi concentration camps.
me to Germany and Copies of the catalogue of this ex-
s for himself He en- hibit will be available for sale.
shall to bring con- As is done each year, the program
journalists with him. will include several Holocaust sur-
nany months before vivors or relatives of survivors from
d know the full scope Citrus County and environs, who
t many months be- will light candles as a symbolic me-
hat the Nazi murder morial for the 6 million Jews slaugh-
was being discov- tered by the Nazis and the millions
*nwald and dozens of other civilians murdered.
camps where mil- Musical offerings to accompany
cent people were the program will be provided by Jim
Davis, a talented local cellist. Haz-
understood that zan Mordecai Kamlot will lead the
vould be unable to audience in appropriate songs and
prayers.
See Page C5 This promises to be a moving and
informative afternoon, which all res-
idents of Citrus County and environs
ide during her visit are encouraged to attend. If further
accomplished with information is needed, call Karl
New Media Academy Seidman at 352-344-1531.


Is there a seat in the house?
Is there a seat in the house?


Sbuy a lot of chairs.
And I almost
never sit down.
When I look around
our house, there are '^,
41 different places to
sit down.
I have sat in every
one of those 41
places, but not for
long. Gerry 1
I am just not good OUT
at sitting. W N IN
Yet every time we
go near a furniture
store, I end up in the chair de-
partment. I'm looking for a chair
that will keep me parked in it.
I'm starting to wonder if such a
chair exists.
We only have two people in
the house, so even if we are both
sitting down, there are 39 free


MI
ID


spots.
And that does not
include the bath-
room. We have three
bathrooms, and we
can only possibly
use two at any single
time.
So if you count the
bathrooms, there
mulligan are 44 places to sit
THE At times we both
W want to sit in the
same location. How
does that happen?
How can it be that we have 44
spots and we both want the
same seat?
It makes no sense, but we
have been married a long time.
To celebrate a recent work an-
niversary, the newspaper
awarded me a gift.


It is not a smart idea to sit down
and watch a seagull fly upside down
for a long distance, as your
stomach eventually wants to take


the same journey.
I chose a telescope.
You have to sit down to use a
telescope and I have already ad-
mitted I am not very good at
that. My journey toward self-
awareness is in the very early
stages.
It is a very nice telescope, but
it did not say in the gift catalog
that some assembly was re-
quired. In fact, a lot of assembly
was required and the assembly,
as you might guess, involved sit-


ting down.
I am somewhat ashamed to
admit that it took me more than
a month to put the telescope to-
gether And yes, I will admit,
there were several leftover
parts.
It was in January when I com-
pleted the project, and I took it
on the back porch to view the
moon and the stars.
I sat down, looked in the tele-
scope and pointed it toward the


full moon.
Nothing.
I twisted the dials, changed
the lens, took off the lens cap,
adjusted all that could be ad-
justed and I continued to see
the same thing.
Nothing.
Did I mention that it was
January and it was cold? Who
can sit outside in January? Sit-
ting down is hard enough with-
out being cold.
A month went by, and I tried
the telescope again during the
daylight hours. There is actually
a secondary spotter telescope
attached to the main telescope,
and I could see lots of stuff out
of that little one.
But it was all upside down.


PageC3





0Page C2 SUNDAY, APRIL 13,2014



PINION


"To be free is not necessarily to be wise.
Wisdom comes with counsel, with the
frank and free conference of untrammeled
men united in the common interest."
Woodrow Wilson, July 7, 1912


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
m M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

GOVERNMENT WASTE?




Commission



should have



self-hauled



waste study


ou have to give the self f
county commissioners charge
this: They thought as by
long and hard before decid- sessed
ing to dispense with nearly -so s
$100,000. would
After an hour and a half of valore
discussion and deliberation, Tuesdc
the board voted
Tuesday, 4-1, to
pay project man- THEISSUE:
agement firm County
Government commission
Services Group votes to pay
$92,825 to conduct consultancy firn
an analysis of $92,825 to
landfill opera- analyze landfill
tions and help the operations and
county develop a help develop
strategic plan for solid waste
solid waste management
management, strategic plan.
At issue, to sim-
plify, is what the OUR OPINION
county's going to
do with the next The plan is
generation's trash, necessary; the
At the current cost isn't.
rate of disposal,
the county's landfill has notion
about 16 years of life left. duct ii
After that, it's got to go some- that th
where, but it can't stay here. has, a(
That might mean regionaliza- to the
tion, franchising or some- staff" i
thing else altogether, but it legwoi
certainly means the county study.
needs to be prepared. County We d
Administrator Brad Thorpe mission
revealed in Tuesday's meet- goverr
ing that Marion and Her- 2005,
nando counties have told him sioner
they have similar problems the sti
looming, and that those talks, wealth
coupled with the city of In- dispose
verness' recent decision to buya 1
give its waste-disposal busi- commit
ness to Sumter County's that ti
Heart of Florida Environ- waste
mental, spurred county staff still nc
to bring the matter before the to har
commission and that, cou- perts,
pled with the glacial pace at found(
which any potential solutions that p
might have to proceed, makes during
the plan a good idea. ment,
Since our concerns are commit
with the cost rather than the county
concept, it's worth first stat- dispos
ing that the county Solid their s
Waste Management Division's zens'
enterprise fund, out of which might
the study will be financed, sult a
stands at about $11 million, with F
The fund also provides for fore x
landfill operations and is it- $100,0(


Save a flowerpot, all of L
save a landfill the way
line, the
When planting purchased pot- You go
ted plants outdoors, save those 41 tow;
plastic pots to donate
to groups running flea
markets and yard sales. OUND
Many people who store I1FF
houseplant cuttings are
on the lookout for
cheap, small, plastic
flowerpots. You will also
be saving landfill area.
In the name of CAL
convenience 563-0579
I see they're building
a convenience store on
(State Road) 44 East. It's about stores (
time. If you want to go shopping, wards \


unded by user fees
ed at the landfill as well
a $25 annual fee as-
I to all county residents
dressing that the study
not be funded by ad
m taxes, as Thorpe did
ay, is a bit of a rhetori-
cal sleight of
hand: It's still
your money, re-
gardless of which
pocket it comes
out of
n Those pockets
or rather, the
depth of them -
are the problem.
The county has
professional
planners, and
should be looking
to save its strug-
1: gling citizens'
cash however
possible. At the
commission
meeting, Thorpe
headed off the
a that the county con-
ts own study by saying
e county staff- which
admittedly, been pared
quick- is a "working
incapable of the kind of
.k required for such a

isagree. When the com-
n voted to study local
iment space needs in
it assigned Commis-
SDennis Damato to do
uidy The county has a
Sof waste experts at its
al, and $50,000 would
lot of man hours. While
issioners might argue
ihe scope of the solid
problem is larger, it's
)t too big for the county
idle. One of those ex-
FDS Disposal co-
er William Ray, made
oint before the board
Sa period of public com-
underlining the lack of
unication he feels the
Shas had with private
al firms in the area. For
sake and for their citi-
sake, commissioners
have done well to con-
little more earnestly
Ray and his cohort be-
voting to give nearly
)00 to a consultant.

is that live from town all
' to the Sumter County
ire's no stores to shop.
to town, you go to (U.S.)
yards Floral City, you've got
three convenience
stores, Dollar stores
everywhere to shop,
markets. You go (S.R.)
44 to Crystal River,
there's all these stores.
But if you go from the
center of town to
Sumter County, we have
nothing. There's a lot of
people out here. We
probably would like not
to go to town to shop.
We've got to have more
on (S.R.) 44 going to-
Vildwood. Think about it.


Former inmates learning to


avoid going back to their cells


Editor's note: This is the last
in a series on addressing injus-
tices in the U.S. prison system.
t last, more emphasis -
particularly from Attor-
ney General Eric Holder
is being placed on how to re-
duce the large numbers of in-
mates in our overflowing
prisons. Once released, these
people are often re-
arrested, and then
locked up as crimi-
nals again.
In a lead editorial
last month, The New
York Times revealed
what many of us did-
n't know, that "in
2013, about 30,000
federal prison in- N
mates were released Nat
to more than 200 OTI
halfway houses VOI
around the country
These facilities -
where an inmate can serve up
to the last year of his or her sen-
tence are meant to ease the
transition back into society by
way of employment and hous-
ing assistance, drug treatment
and other programs that make
it less likely an inmate will end
up reoffending and returning to
prison" ("Halfway Back to Soci-
ety," The New York Times,
March 30).
"Preventing recidivism," the
Times editorial argues, "should,
of course, be a central goal of
any correctional system."
The problem, though, is that
"too many halfway houses are
understaffed, poorly super-
vised and generally ill pre-
pared to do that job, and as a
result the men and women who
pass through them often leave
them no better off."
But the attorney general -
long dismissed by many critics,
including me, as a mere minion
of his dictatorial boss is ac-
tively involved in bringing, of all
things, human rights to our
prison system.
The Times editorial goes on:
"On March 24, Attorney General
Eric Holder Jr took a step in the
right direction by announcing
new requirements for federally
financed halfway houses the
most recent example of his ag-
gressive push for reform across
the criminal justice system."
Furthermore: "Starting in
early 2015, halfway houses must
provide more rigorous and stan-
dardized cognitive-behavioral
treatment for inmates with men-
tal health or substance abuse is-
sues, both of which are rampant
in prison populations."
How many congressional and
presidential candidates will


HE
I
14


support this in 2016?
In February, I wrote that "the
Brennan Center for Justice at
New York University School of
Law reported on Holder's
'great step forward on restoring
voting rights' ... the attorney
general 'urged states to restore
voting rights to people of past
criminal convictions'' once
they had '"com-
pleted probation, pa-
role and paid all
fines"' (my column,
"Obama's Attorney
General American-
ized (in Part),"
cato.org, Feb. 19).
And last week, I re-
ported on Holder's
S"Smart on Crime"
entoff initiative, which he
IER elaborated on during
CES his March testimony
_____ before the U.S. Sen-
tencing Commission,
insisting "that people convicted
of certain low-level, nonviolent
federal drug crimes will face
sentences appropriate to their
individual conduct rather
than stringent mandatory mini-
mums, which will now be ap-
plied only to the most serious
criminals" ("Attorney General
Holder Urges Changes in Fed-
eral Sentencing Guidelines to
Reserve Harshest Penalties for
Most Serious Drug Traffickers,"
justice.gov, March 13).
Happily, he acknowledged
that "this approach enjoys sig-
nificant bipartisan support on
Capitol Hill, where a number of
leaders, including Sens. Patrick
Leahy, Dick Durbin and Mike
Lee along with Reps. Bobby
Scott and Raul Labrador-
have introduced legislation that
would give judges more discre-
tion in determining appropri-
ate sentences for those
convicted of certain crimes.
"By reserving the most severe
penalties for dangerous and vio-
lent drug traffickers, we can bet-
ter promote public safety
deterrence and rehabilitation
while saving billions of dollars
and strengthening communities"
and cutting down on recidivism.
And now that Holder himself
sees the necessary humaneness
in preventing formerly incar-
cerated Americans from be-
coming permanent outcasts, he
is looking ahead: 'As my col-
leagues and I work with Con-
gress to refine and pass this
legislation, we are simultane-
ously moving forward with a
range of other reforms."
The no-longer-supine Holder
speaks of such programs as
"drug treatment initiatives and
veterans courts that can serve


as alternatives to incarceration
in some cases.
"We are working to reduce
unnecessary collateral conse-
quences for formerly incarcer-
ated individuals seeking to
rejoin their communities. And
we are building on innovative,
data-driven reinvestment
strategies that have in many
cases been pioneered at the
state level."
Gee, the Justice Department
is following Louis Brandeis' ad-
vice to pay attention to the indi-
vidual states for creative
innovations to actually bring
justice to our prison system.
Holder continued: "In recent
years, no fewer than 17 states -
supported by the department's
Justice Reinvestment Initiative,
and led by officials from both
parties have directed signifi-
cant funding away from prison
construction (Wow!) and toward
evidence-based programs and
services, like supervision and
drug treatment, that are proven
to reduce recidivism while im-
proving public safety"
And to draw the support of
taxpayers increasingly worried
about how well their health in-
surance and pensions will
cover them during retirement,
Holder cheerily reported that:
"Rather than increasing costs, a
new report funded by the Bu-
reau of Justice Assistance -
projects that these 17 states will
actually save $4.6 billion over a
10-year period."
That's for starters. I hope that
the media in all its forms will
learn as I have from Eric
Holder what ceaselessly in-
ventive jazz master Charlie
Parker once told me: "Kid, be
careful about first impressions
and previous impressions. Get
to know that person and
yourself- again, and deeper
You might have missed some-
thing important!"
Well, I never thought I'd write
two columns urging you to look
again at the previously me-
chanical head of the Justice De-
partment in the shadow of
the omnipotent president. But
this renewed Eric Holder has
shown that he can be his own
man up to this point. There
should be more changes from
him to come.

Nat Hen toff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


LETTERS to the Editor


Hit and run shameful
We were shopping at the
Winn-Dixie store in Ho-
mosassa and when we came
out in the afternoon after 3, a
lady approached us and men-
tioned someone hit the front of
our van and took off and she
witnessed it. She said the sher-
iff probably couldn't do much
because it was minimal dam-
age, but she was nice enough
to wait until we came out and
tell us and gave us her name.
To the person that hit our
van in the parking lot this
happened Thursday, April 3,
2014 -you should be ashamed


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.

of yourself, because they say
what comes around goes
around. You might know that
there are cameras in parking
lots and people carry cameras
also. Hope you had a nice day
Dorraine Baltzell
Lecanto


Wrong culprit
I read a letter the other day
from someone complaining
about the deer eating from the
discarded trash along State
Road 44.
They want the county to
clean up the side of the road so
that the deer does not get hurt.
I am glad they have feelings
about the wild animals but in-
stead of blaming the county for
not keeping the roadways
clean, why not go after those to
whom the rubbish belongs?
Donald Smith
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Back to Tallahassee for a heartwarming reunion


y family and Florida state bank-
I moved to .. ing department
Inverness The person re-
from Tallahassee sponsible for my
back in 1983. Since ,d coming to Tallahas-
that time, we have see to occupy such a
returned to the capi- position was then the
tal city only rarely, state comptroller
but one such occa- ; and banking commis-
sion was most re- sioner, Gerald Lewis.
cently for what was a Fred Brannen Prior to Lewis's elec-
special, heartwarm- A SLICE tion in 1974, I had
ing reunion. OF LIFE worked for the bank-
Our time living ___________ ing department
there was an adventure to say under his predecessor I wasn't
the least. In 1976, when we first at all certain I would be wel-
arrived, I was still a kid ... a 31- come to stay with the agency
year-old kid who was so slight of after the election. As the super-
stature that I bought my suits in vising bank examiner in Or-
the boy's sections of major de- lando, I was a state career
apartment stores because those service employee who could not
were the only places I could find be fired by an incoming elected
anything small enough to fit. official without due cause, but I
Nevertheless, despite my youth knew what it was like to work
and diminutive size, I was where I wasn't wanted. I had
the assistant director of the been there before and never


wanted to go through it again.
It didn't take long for me to re-
alize that not only did I respect
and admire the newly elected
comptroller, he saw in me a staff
member he not only wanted to
keep, but someone he wanted in
a capitol-level position.
For right now, I won't bore you
any further with the details of
how I became ensconced in an
office on the 13th floor of the
capitol, but that's where I found
myself as of Dec. 1,1976.
Years later, when I left the em-
ploy of the banking department, it
was of my own accord, and my ad-
miration and respect for Comp-
troller Lewis never wavered.
Back to our most recent trip:
During the past 30 plus years,
Tallahassee has changed much.
While we lived there, Capital
Circle (State Road 366) was
about two miles south of town,
but now it is right in the middle.


Cheryl and I stayed in a hotel on
Apalachee Parkway at Capital
Circle. Because of the city's
changes and ours, to avoid get-
ting lost, we took a taxi to and
from the site of the scheduled
event, the University Center
Club, which is built right into the
side of Doak Campbell Stadium.
The soiree was on the fifth
floor In order to be in place at
the proper time, we went up in
the elevator to the appointed din-
ing room at precisely 5:50 p.m.
After greeting some of the people
we knew on sight, we put on our
name tags. Then, as we began to
mingle and read names on other
folks' tags, we were surprised by
just how many of the attendees
we remembered.
At 6:10 p.m., the doors opened
and we all let out a loud
and cheerful, "Happy 80th
birthday!"
If he wasn't surprised, Gerald


did a good job of pretending and
there was absolutely no pre-
tense about how happy he was to
see each and every one of the
100 or so of us who had worked
for him during his five terms in
office.
Later in the evening, as Ger-
ald, Cheryl and I reminisced on
a personal level, I fully under-
stood that not only did the mu-
tual respect remain, a dollop of
old fashioned friendship, some-
thing which mellows with age,
had been added to the mixture.


FredBrannen, an Inverness
resident, has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and is the
author of the recently
published novel, 'At the
Bottom ofBiscayne Bay." Fred
maybe contacted at
fbrannenjr@gmail.com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


SLetters to the EDITOR


Good care at CMH
Since the two boards at Citrus Memo-
rial hospital have been at odds for quite
a while, there has been some specula-
tion that it has affected the quality of
care in the hospital, and especially dur-
ing this time of change of ownership.
I recently spent 10 days at Citrus Me-
morial hospital, and I'm happy to report
that I received excellent care starting in
the emergency room and continuing
throughout my stay at the hospital. The
nursing staff was there when I needed
them, as well as the support personnel,
although at times they seemed short-
handed, especially on the weekends,
they still performed their duties in a
cheerful and professional way
I experienced the same quality of care
from all the departments in the hospital
connected with my care (X-ray, etc.), in-
cluding the volunteers who transported
me to those departments, and the doctor
I was assigned was, in my opinion, top-
notch. They all worked to make me well
and I am grateful to them for that.
Based on my experience, I have confi-
dence that these health care workers
will continue to give top-notch service
during this transition time.
JoAn A. Schulz
Homosassa

10 reasons stub out road
should not be extended
This is regarding Oak Village Boule-
vard South in Oak Village of Sugarmill
Woods and our petition to vacate an ex-
tension of the road into Hernando County.
There are many reasons not to allow
Oak Village South to be extended into
Hernando County, here are 10.
We believe that extending our boule-
vard would cause negative changes to
our peaceful neighborhood.
1. There are hundreds of acres of un-
developed land in Hernando County
that would eventually be occupied by
thousands of new home owners and Golf
Course patrons who would travel into
Oak Village Blvd. and use it as a wind-
ing tree lined express lane out to
U.S. 98.
2. There are at least three other
means to gain access to the 40 acres in
question, two are from the developers
own property
3. The unimproved road from Seville
that was used to get land clearing equip-
ment into the 40 acres to illegally clear
the east side could be used for direct
access.
4. There is also a named sand road
from U.S. 19 extending most of the way
to the 40-acre site on the county line.
5. For years there has been an en-
trance from U.S. 98 with an improved
road bed that extends into the Golf
Course property owned by the developer
6. Oak Village was the final phase of
the Sugarmill Woods Development with
further development to the south being
abandoned nearly 30 years ago.
7. Sugarmill Woods is a conservation
area, Oak Village has 21 miles of perime-
ter trails and several hundreds of acres
of undeveloped, natural green space for
wildlife throughout the community
8. County officials have said it must
permit the extension without any vote
or consideration for the negative effects
it will have on 3,250 property owners in
Oak Village alone. That is just wrong for
many reasons.
9. During the commissioners' meeting
on March 11 when the subject of vacat-
ing the boulevard extension was men-



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

It is not a smart idea to sit down and
watch a seagull fly upside down for a long
distance, as your stomach eventually
wants to take the same journey
After three months of telescope failure,
I finally called my wife over for some
assistance.
My wife is extremely competent in all
things mechanical and has very little pa-
tience for my inability to read instructions,
put anything together or simply sit down.
I was attempting to explain the prob-
lem to her while looking in the upside
down smaller telescope when I turned
the big telescope and whacked her in the


tioned by Commissioner Scott Adams,
three of the other commissioners
promptly excused themselves for vari-
ous reasons and walked out They re-
turned after a short time, while the
citizens in attendance wondered why
they would be so unwilling to listen to
our reasoned and common-sense re-
quest. Realizing that three commission-
ers expressed conflicts with our request
to vacate the boulevard extension raises
questions and is reason for our concern.
10. We are, in fact, very concerned
that the request of one person is appar-
ently considered vital, while the con-
cerns of thousands of Oak Village
citizens are looked at as trivial and be-
yond their control. Does anyone really
believe that?
These are things to remember when
thousands of voters are considering the
people we elect to represent the citi-
zens of Citrus County
Ted Swope
Homosassa

Collegiate golfers visit
It was pleasant to read Gerry Mulligan's
comments on March 24: "Good things are
happening in Citrus County if you look for
them." He referenced the new settlement
and communication with Duke Power;
light on the horizon for Citrus Memorial,
and many positive improvements that are
underway in our community Also under
way on March 24. was another "good thing
happening": Jessica Welch, ofJack-
sonville University, was shooting a re-
markable 66 on Plantation Golf Course.
The occasion was the University of
Cincinnati's Spring Invitational, and it
brought 14 women's golf teams to Crystal
River for the three-day event
This tournament has been held at the
Plantation for 10 years, and is already
scheduled to return March 19 to 22, 2015.
The format is both individual and team
competition, with the individual compe-
tition won by Jessica Welch, scoring 75,
70, 66; and the team event won by Jack-
sonville University The course is some-
what modified for the event, with play
primarily from the silver tees for a
length of 6,057 yards. Eighty-eight colle-
giate women; their team coaches and
school representatives who accompa-
nied them had a wonderful opportunity
to enjoy Crystal River and the Nature
Coast, and to return good feedback to
their schools and families. We here in
Citrus County had the opportunity to see
and follow good collegiate golfers, and
encourage them with our support and
hospitality. There is no better free
tourism publicity available than word of
mouth, especially when you consider
where these reports would be circulated.
There were six Florida schools: Jack-
sonville University Lynn of Boca Raton,
Florida Southern, Florida Atlantic,
Seminole State and University of Tampa.
The host team responsible for organizing
the event is the University of Cincinnati,
Ohio. Other schools participating were
Seton Hall, South Orange, N.J.; Univer-
sity of Memphis, Tenn.; University of
Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg;
North Dakota State University, Fargo;
Bradley University, Peoria, Ill.; Univer-
sity of Alabama, Birmingham; and the
University of Texas, Pan American.
Next year, it would be wonderful if we
could show these visitors from all over
our country true warmth of welcome
and appreciation for their selection of
Crystal River as the site for their annual
tournament.
Pepita Park
Pine Ridge


side of the head with it.
"Sit down," she yelled at me.
I had 44 choices, and I selected the
chair the furthest away from her
In about five minutes, she had the tel-
escope working just fine.
Bruce Springsteen was Born to Run.
Some people were born to tinker
I was not born to patiently sit down or
to use a telescope.
The journey toward new hobbies and
the ability to relax will continue.
I will conduct that journey while stand-
ing up.
Unless of course chair No. 45 is perfect.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


Special to the Chronicle
after an absence of
12 years, a new
League of Women
Voters of Citrus County
(LWVCC) celebrated its
first year with a lunch-
eon, which will become
an annual event. Fifty
guests heard from
Florida League Presi-
dent Deirdre Macnab,
named one of Florida's
most outstanding citi-
zens for the work she
has done to promote the
League's mission.
As we reflect on the
past year, we congratu-
late our enthusiastic
and determined members
who collected almost
1,100 local petitions for a
Florida Land & Water
Legacy amendment to be
placed on this November
ballot. Overall, the
Florida League con-
tributed over 25, 000 peti-
tions to the required
amount.
The League of Women
Voters of Florida has en-
dorsed this proposed
amendment that would
protect hundreds of acres
of land needed to ensure
the state's clean water
supply and wildlife for
generations to come with-
out increasing taxes. If
passed, 1/3 of the funds
collected from the exist-
ing document stamp act
will be used to purchase,
restore or manage conser-
vation and recreational
land for 10 years through
the Florida Forever Pro-
gram. A copy of the text
for this ballot amendment
can be found on our Face-
book page.
Also a bill was intro-
duced in Tallahassee to
include many important
protections for 38 Out-
standing Florida Springs.
This was the culmination
of more than six months
of collaborative work by
the League of Women Vot-
ers of Florida, environ-
mental groups and other
stakeholders under the
guidance and leadership
of Sens. Dean, Simmons,
Simpson, Montford and


Guest COLUMN

The League of Women Voters

of Florida has endorsed this

proposed amendment that

would protect hundreds of

acres of land needed to

ensure the state's clean water

supply and wildlife for

generations to come without

increasing taxes.


Hays. This bill calls for es-
tablishing the minimum
flow and level for a
spring, creates protec-
tions and specifies pro-
hibited activities. Sen.
Dean's stand and work on
this issue is appreciated
by the LWVCC. (Currently
this bill is in the Florida
House of Representatives
for review and approval.)
The League is a non-
partisan organization that
encourages informed and
active participation in
government, works to in-
crease understanding of
major public policy is-
sues, and influences pub-
lic policy through
education and advocacy
We do not support or op-
pose any candidate or po-
litical party
The League does take a
stand on issues of concern
to its members, after in-
depth study and by con-
sensus of its members. We
support state legislation
for energy conservation
and greater use of renew-
able sources such as solar
energy. The League
agrees with public policy
that promotes conserva-
tion of fresh water
As residents of Citrus
County and concerned cit-
izens of Florida, we ex-
pect to continue to be
involved in the environ-
mental issues affecting us
all. In addition, we will
explore other topics of
local concern, selected by
our members. Attend our


meetings and let us know
what interests you. You do
not have to be a member
to attend.
We are open to all men
and women and meet reg-
ularly on the second Tues-
day each month at the
Central Ridge Library
in Beverly Hills. Our
meeting place changes
occasionally
For example, on May 14
the League will focus on
the Withlacoochee State
Trail, also called the Path-
way to Paradise, and will
meet at the red caboose
(Inverness Depot) on
Apopka Avenue, for an
optional walk or bike tour,
followed by a presenta-
tion in the pavilion in the
park.
Future articles will con-
tinue to focus on the is-
sues affecting us all as
citizens of this county, of
this state and of this coun-
try We will follow the bal-
lot initiatives and voter
issues in this especially
important election year
With your help, we can
protect our right to vote,
educate ourselves and
others, and provide for
facts to informed voters.
Contact us at
lwvcc2013@gmail.com or
call Kate at 352-382-0032
or like us on Facebook for
details.


Contributed by the
League of Women Voters
of Citrus County.


SoundOFF


That's a lot of dough
I'd like to know why the new CEO of
the hospital gets $20,000 a
month for salary. I mean, I'm a (
taxpayer. Where's this money
coming from? Who regulates his
salary? What are the board of
directors getting a month? I'd
like to know. Half of the doctors
around town, heart doctors,
don't make that much money.
I'd like to know where this guy's CAL
getting all this money, $20,000 563
a month, just to be a CEO of
the hospital. ...


Editor's note: While that salary amount
seems high, apparently it's at the low end
of the going rate for temporary hospital
CEOs. It's also much less than what former
CEO Ryan Beaty was making. As for the
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation board
directors, it's a volunteer position and they
are not paid a dime for it.
Bring the dogs in
This is for the inconsiderate and
thoughtless neighbors who leave their
dogs out all day when they leave for
work. Your dogs bark nonstop. We can-
not work in our yard or relax with a book
outside because of the barking. It is very
upsetting and annoying to listen to this


every day. We've talked to you about it in
the past, but you become defensive and
put the blame on us for your
JN dog's barking. So I guess we'll
ND have to report you and your dogs
LOW to Animal Control. Why can't you
S be a good neighbor?
V Follow the book


3-0579


In response to "... but boil it
first": It's OK to boil the water to
dissolve the sugar, but the com-
bination is 4 to 1 or 1/4 cup of
sugar to a cup of water. That's
what the book says.


Make South look South
Just a suggestion: I think it would be
so nice if we kind of just made the en-
trance to our south land since (U.S.) 19 is
quite a route to get down into Tampa and
so forth, to plant some palm trees maybe
in our median strip. ... And I just think it
would make it look beautiful for the peo-
ple that are coming South, which I, my-
self, like when I first came down here, I
thought, oh, how shabby. I mean it does-
n't even look like Florida. It looks like the
North. And I just think it would be a great
thing and I don't think it should cost all
that much because you could get palm
trees almost out of the woods. But I
think it would beautify everything.


LWV presses water,



environment issues


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thank-You LETTERS


Awesome day
in Inverness
On behalf of the city of
Inverness, I would like to
take this opportunity to
thank everyone who sup-
ported the fourth annual
City of Inverness St.
Patrick's Celebration on
Saturday, March 15,2014.
Whether you rode a
horse, wagon or car, strut-
ted, beat a drum, waved a
flag (or your hand), tossed
a baton, walked, blew a
horn, danced, floated
down the parade route or
cheered it on, please
know that your presence
and enthusiasm at the pa-
rade made it a home
town, off-the-charts suc-
cess. Everyone came
away with a smile and a
warm heart.
A "Sunny" thanks to
those who joined us at
Shamrock the Block Con-
cert, pub and restaurant
crawl, Celtic Market, and
leprechaun contest (BTW,
congrats to winner Lep-
rechaun Lilly, cutest jig-
ging Leprechaun you'll
ever see). Thanks to
Seven Nations for bring-
ing the great Celtic music
to Inverness. A huge
thanks to Ryan Downs
from Citrus 95.3 who
brought high energy, flaw-
less timing and Irish wit
to the both the stage and
parade as emcee.
A special thank-you to
Deputy Michele Tewell
and members of the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Of-
fice. Lots of love to our
elected officials, adminis-
trators and staff, who
adore St. Patrick's as
much as I do. A huge
shout-out to the Citrus
County Chronicle, videog-
rapher to the stars Larry
D. and Citrus 95.3 for
spreading the word and
giving our St Patrick cele-
bration an audience.
Sincere thanks to the
Fitzpatrick family for the
gracious opportunity to
once again share Miss Dot
to serve as our Grand
Marshall. The Fitzpatrick
name has been associated
with the Inverness com-
munity for more than 60
years and we are proud to
call Miss Dot family!
We want to acknowl-
edge over 50 volunteers
who dedicated them-
selves to this event.
Specifically, we want to
recognize the Young
Marines, Insight Credit
Union and Interact for
bringing groups of volun-
teers to this and every
major event we put to-
gether in Inverness. Hav-
ing said that, every
volunteer is critically im-
portant to the success of
this event.
Cooterific thanks to our
Inverness business com-
munity for accommodat-
ing the merry green
visitors who lined the
streets, did the crawl
and filled Inverness
establishments.
Lastly and most impor-
tantly, we want to thank
our event partners whose
continual support allows
us to conduct over 60
events in Inverness all
year long. Citrus 95.3, Cit-
rus County Chronicle, Cit-
rus County Speedway,
The Fox 96.7, Duke En-
ergy, Great Bay Distribu-
tors, Insight Credit
Union, Nick Nicholas
Ford and Lincoln, To-
bacco Free Florida and
Waste Management
'Twas an awesome day
in the city of Inverness! If
you missed it, not to
worry, we'll see you again
next year for the biggest
St Patrick's Celebration in
Citrus County Mean-
while, we'll look forward
to seeing your smiling
faces around the
neighborhood.
Sunny Cooter

Book sale nets


over $35,000
Once again the citizens
of Citrus County have
come out in support of
our Friends of Citrus
County Libraries Book
Sale. Thank you! Because
of you and your enthusi-
astic purchases, we added
$35,696 to our total, and
we have now passed the
$800,000 mark of money
raised for the Coastal Re-
gion, Lakes Region and


Central Ridge libraries
and the library system.
We have now provided
more than $825,500 for
the purchase of materials
and other projects! With
the budget constraints on
all services and the even
greater use of the li-
braries, these figures are
particularly significant.
This money has enabled
the libraries to provide
new books, e-books and
other materials requested
by patrons to add even
more to our libraries' im-
portance and satisfaction
in the community
Our sales are huge un-
dertakings that owe their
success to many commu-
nity organizations. We are
deeply grateful to the fol-
lowing individuals and
groups who helped make
the fall sale another
triumph: the Citrus
County Chronicle for co-
sponsorship of the semi-
annual event, with special
appreciation to Deb Kam-
lot, Mike Arnold, Sarah
Gatling and Matthew
Beck. The articles, photos
and eye-catching ads
were significant in mak-
ing readers aware of our
event. We also appreciate
the loan of the Chronicle
truck and driver to return
empty boxes and supplies
to our Book House work
area.
We also thank WYKE-
TV and Dennis Miller for
their continued support;
the staff of the Citrus
County Auditorium and
Parks and Recreation for
their friendliness and as-
sistance; the Citrus
County Fair Association
and Hal Porter for sched-
uling arrangements and
the loan of equipment;
the many energetic Rotar-
ians of Inverness for set-
ting up more than 100
tables; the Citrus High
School Air Force JROTC
students for distributing
850 jam-packed banana
boxes in setup; the Inver-
ness Walmart Super-
center and Publix at
Inverness, Forest Ridge
and Crystal River and In-
verness Winn-Dixie for
donating banana boxes;
and to the Crystal River
Publix for its donation of
bags.
Many thanks as well to
the entire library staff
and our always-pleasant
courier Lee Seagreaves
for their help in collec-
tion and delivery of do-
nated materials. Special
thanks also go to Tom and
Sue Smith of Maja Signs
and Designs for our up-
dated banners and to the
four energetic and enthu-
siastic men from The
Sanctuary in Homosassa
for their valuable help
with the boxes during and
following the sale. A very
special thank-you, also, to
Steve Sachewicz of Quest
Wealth Management for
his donation of the Kindle
Fire to be raffled and for
underwriting the refresh-
ments for the volunteers.
Many of you noticed at
the last sale that the Dolly


Parton donation jars were
missing. The jars are
back! This sale we began
a new project for provid-
ing books to young chil-
dren in the county The
"First Library: Building
Pathways to Literacy"
project is a new literacy
initiative by the Citrus
County Education Foun-
dation to provide a new
book to every child in
each of the 22 prekinder-
garten classes six times
during the school year
They will enjoy their book
in school then take it
home to share with family
and friends and to begin
building their own "First
Library" Your donations
of $240 helped to get this
project off to a good start.
The success of these
fundraisers also depends
on the hard work and de-
votion of the FOCCLS vol-
unteers. To the 160-plus
Friends who worked this
sale, many thanks for your
energy and enthusiasm.
Finally, and most impor-
tantly, we salute the peo-
ple of Citrus County who
make these events possi-
ble by their contributions
of quality books and by
their patronage of the
sales. We couldn't succeed
without you!
FOCCLS operates year-
round. Volunteers are
now at work sorting, pric-
ing and packing boxes for
our next sale, Oct. 10 to
14, 2014, at the Citrus
County Auditorium.
Please read-return-
recycle. Drop off your
gently used books, games,
puzzles, CDs and DVDs at
the checkout desks of
Central Ridge, Coastal or
Lakes Region libraries.
We look forward to seeing
you in the fall!
Sue Haderer
president
FOCCLS

Thanks for
support
Our third annual yard
sale, March 22 at Ho-
mosassa Animal & Bird
Hospital was a smashing
success, due in large part
to the generous donations
of our clients! We are so
grateful for their contin-
ued support. We raised
over $1,440 for Nature
World Wildlife Rescue.
These funds will assist
with rehab and feeding of
wildlife at their facility
Special thanks to
Robert and Dottie
Mitchell, Tony Principe
and Linda Weeder for the
high-dollar donation
items. Also to Brock's
Storage on Grover Cleve-
land Boulevard, for allow-
ing us to store yard sale
items at no charge at their
facility for the second
year in a row You all
rock! And of course, we
cannot forget to thank all
the shoppers who turned
out to open their pockets
as well as their hearts to
Nature World Wildlife
Rescue Mission.
Your support helps


Mary Opall and her group
more than you know
Betty Allender
Homosassa Animal &
Bird Hospital
Homosassa

Thanks for help
with event
The Citrus Mopars Car
Club would like to thank
all those who made our
fifth annual All-Mopar
show an overwhelming
success. We would like to
thank all of our members
who helped both in the
preparation for the show
and the show itself A spe-
cial thanks goes out to Na-
ture Coast Mustangs for
their help in judging.
We would also like to
thank Joe's Family
Restaurant, The Knights
of Columbus Council
14485, O'Reilly Auto
Parts-Inverness, Diamond
Nails and Spa, Taylor
Rental-Inverness, Rock
Auto Parts, The Hen
House Caf6, The Ice
Cream Dr, Gary's Auto-
motive Inc., Cody's Road-
house, A Bit of
Everything, Gurued Gear,
Hobson's Herbs and
More, Rick's Barber
Shop, O'Reilly Auto Parts-
Crystal River, Bkleen Car
Wash, Custom Auto Care,
Citrus Pest Management,
Integrity Ins Advisers,
Robert Wood Allstate,
UPS-Inverness, Parkview
Lanes and The Citrus
County Cruisers for sup-
porting our show All pro-
ceeds from this and our
other activities are used
to help support various
charities in Citrus County.
We would also like to
thank Steve and Jewel
Lamb for their continued
support of our club. With-
out them and the staff of
Crystal Chrysler-Dodge-
Jeep, we would not be
able to put on this show
Mike Bonadonna
Greg Warhol
Ken McNally
Gene Raby

Event raises
over $57,000
We want to thank you all
for your support of our
second annual Tee Off for
Tourette Celebrity Golf
Tournament and Auction.
This year's event was an
even bigger success than
last year, and that was due
to the people like you,
who believe in our cause.
This year, we partnered
with our local sheriff's of-
fice and scheduled
'"American Idol" contest-
ant Dave Pittman, who
also suffers from Tourette
syndrome, to appear at
seven of our local schools.
Dave performed for the
students, and told them
his story of how he was
bullied in school from
having TS. The lives he
touched with his story
was amazing. He helped
us bring about an even
greater awareness of
what TS is.
This year, our event


raised over $57,738. The
Tourette Association of
Florida will use this
money to help bring more
awareness of Tourette
syndrome and its effects
on adults and children. It
will help fund our
Tourette camp that is of-
fered every year for chil-
dren who suffer from TS.
Thank you again for
your support See you
next year
Gary D'Amico
tournament chairman
TSA of FL board member

Big thanks from
rescued animals
On behalf of Dobie
Ranch Rescue/AHSCF, we
would like to thank every-
one for coming out to
Manatee Lanes for our
annual fundraiser and
sharing a good time for a
great cause despite the
bad weather
As always, our friends
at Manatee Lanes made
all feel welcome, includ-
ing our four-legged
friends.
Dr Tammy Ferarra and
staff from Plantation Ani-
mal Clinic give so much
time and heart for this
cause every year, we
could not do this without
them.
To all the vendors,
sponsors and other pet-
rescue groups that were
there to share our day, a
big thank you, it was great
working together and of
course for all of you who
made donations to help
these wonderful animals
we applaud you as none
of this would be possible
without all of you.
Diane DeSantis
Dobie Ranch
Rescue/AHSCF

Great care
at hospital
I would like to give a
heartfelt thank you to the
following list of doctors,
nurses and techs at Citrus
Memorial Hospital Surgi-
cal Services during my
three-day stay from
Feb. 17 to 20, 2014, for a
total knee replacement.
They are: in OR, Sheryll,
Teresa, Brian, Mike, and
Trey; in Pre-Admit, Car-
olyn, Nurse Karen; in
Holding Room, Dr Adam-
son and Betty; and last
but not least, in PACU,
Marilyn and Randy
Weeks.
The experience and
care I received was supe-
rior to any hospital I was
ever admitted to. I found
a total relaxed and pro-
found attention to detail
to my comfort never en-
countered in any other
hospital in the country
My most sincere and
thoughtful appreciation
to all those mentioned
above and if I missed any-
one, please accept my
apologies. I totally recom-
mend anyone who is con-
sidering any surgical
experience to feel ab-


Easter M ovie in the Pines

Saturday, April 1i9th at 8pm


Bring your [awn chairs, yourfriends andfamily and come out to
Whispering Pines Park to watch the movie HOP! The Easter Bunny
and Sunny Cooterwill be there with something specialfor everyone!


* Kid's zone begins at 7:30pm Movie begins at sunset
Food vendors available


^K~ditfU^ Free fac{|kpainting and bungee trampoline ^ ^ ^BJ

tCHDUKEi^ fe UPB-.^^^^^j


^4-yrim


( 'f er Cbl

jd kw-M. r=Rtwkrtf up


,ad -NI SFte Guys perform youti
favorites from the 50's & 60's!


Historic Couidiaou Square Downtown rnigmess
Interest In cruBlln'? Cmontact Ken McNaIly at 3JS2.141.116S or Mike Bonadonnrs a 352.341.1019
wwwJIwvm*s*-ft.4v 3 52.726.2511 W Friend Sunny Cootr on foacebook


solutely free to choose
Citrus Memorial hospital.
If I ever need to use this
facility again, I will cer-
tainly return to this hospi-
tal over others, as a
resident in Inverness.
Louis F. Poulin
Inverness

Great meals
and service
This is not an advertise-
ment. Nor does the
restaurant I am mention-
ing have a single clue I
am writing this. But it is
overdue.
Most every Friday
night, four of us meet at
Heidi's in Inverness for
their delicious Italian
food. What do we get?
Usually, we get whatever
the latest coupon offers at
a very reasonable price.
The coupon is in Friday's
paper and several of
those coupon books float-
ing around in some stores.
Whether it be soup,
salad or an Italian home-
cooked meal, we have
never been disappointed.
The name doesn't have to
be Italian for the food to
taste good. It just is, and
we always get more than
we need to be satisfied.
What about the service?
They couldn't be nicer No
grouches working there.
Everyone is friendly and
makes us feel like old
friends.
Maybe we'll see you
some Friday night We'll
be in the corner, as always.
The Bizzosos
and Grahams
Inverness

Thank you to all
We would like to give a
big thanks to the follow-
ing for their generous do-
nations to our Tower of
Hope. For those who
made donations and for
those who bought raffle
tickets.
Thanks to Walmart, In-
verness Shell Service,
Stumpknockers, Connors
Gifts, The Cove, McLeod
House Bistro, Angelo's
Pizzeria, Chef Anthony's,
Ace Hardware. Inverness
Golf and Country Club,
Bobbie Dilocker, Delores
Kelly and Keitha Stoney
All proceeds go to
Relay for Life to give
hope to those who are
fighting for their life from
cancer
Other places our chap-
ter donates to are Camp
Good Hope, military
packages, Citrus County
Blessings, Feed the
Homeless, Heart Associa-
tion, Family Resource
Center, CASA, Jessie's
Place and CREST School.
Thanks again for all
who made a donation on
behalf of the members of
Xi Epsilon Chi Chapter of
Beta Sigma Phi Inverness.
Keitha Stoney
president
Flo Hayward
service chairman
Inverness


YJZ l lam, ^_
^qL^l ThImSt~yjdei,-z^^



jn Ciiti'ie I with your hot wheels or stroll in for this FREE
ftin filed event! Make an evening of it and enjoy the
shops, restatwants, and pubs in downtown Inverrness


r i.- Lsk 1


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


COMMENTARY


9a








Perspectives on the Holocaust


Special to the Chronicl
Holocaust Remembrance
will be observed in Ci
County at 2 p.m. Sur
April 27, at Kellner Auditor
102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hi
'As Holocaust Remembrz
Day (Yom HaShoah)
proaches, I spend time rea
and thinking about the F
caust. Each time I read ano
text or find something rele
on the Internet, I learn s(
thing new," said Karl Seidi
chairman of the Holocaust
morial Program Committe
Congregation Beth Sho
"These are some of the asr
of study of the Holocaust tha
terest me."
Delve into the lives of J
viduals who survived and
an appreciation of what it
like to live through this hor
dous event



VIEWING
Continued from Page Cl

comprehend the full scope
of this horror He also un-
derstood that any human
deeds that were so utterly
evil might eventually be
challenged or even denied
as being literally unbeliev-
able. For these reasons, he
ordered that all the civil-
ian news media and mili-
tary combat camera units
be required to visit the
camps and record their ob-
servations in print, pic-
tures and film. As he
explained to Marshall, "I
made the visit deliber-
ately in order to be in a po-
sition to give first-hand
evidence of these things if
ever, in the future, there
develops a tendency to
charge these allegations
merely to 'propaganda."'
His prediction proved
correct. When some
groups, even today, at-
tempt to deny that the
Holocaust ever happened,


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center Theatre


A Stan Getz Tribute
with Jeff Rupert
& The Johny
Carlsson Trio

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427
nnnFMiA


Ponder the enormity of the
Holocaust. The number
6,000,000 is difficult to appreci-
ate in the abstract without losing
the sense that this was the mur-
der of 6 million individual Jew-
ish souls. Here's one way to
visualize it: If you put 6 million
people in a line, allowing 2 feet
per person standing room
(which is very close), this line
would stretch along Interstate 95
from Cape Canaveral to New
York City and back
Study the history of how the
Holocaust evolved from the first
days of Hitler's rise to power in
Germany (1933) to the end of
World War II (1945). The defeat
of Germany in World War I cre-
ated conditions in Germany in
the 1920s and 1930s that abetted
the rise of Hitler to power The
Holocaust is very much inter-
twined with the conduct of
World War II and should be stud-


they must confront the
massive official record, in-
cluding both written evi-
dence and thousands of
pictures, that Eisenhower
ordered to be assembled
when he saw what the
Nazis had done.
Patton wrote the follow-
ing in his diary after he
toured the camp:
"It was the most ap-
palling sight imaginable. In
a shed ... was a pile of
about 40 completely naked
human bodies in the last
stages of emaciation.
These bodies were lightly
sprinkled with lime, not for
the purposes of destroying
them, but for the purpose
of removing the stench.
"When the shed was full
- I presume its capacity to
be about 200, the bodies
were taken to a pit a mile
from the camp where they
were buried. The inmates
claimed that 3,000 men,
who had been either shot
in the head or who had
died of starvation, had
been so buried since the
1st of January"


SPONSORS.-
Cl iii)NIl(E
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRUs COUTYHisTORCiAL SOCIETY


* WHAT: Congregation Beth
Sholom's Holocaust
Memorial Service.
WHEN: 2 p.m. Sunday,
April 27.
WHERE: Kellner
Auditorium, 102 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
OTHER: In addition to the
memorial service and
candle-lighting, there will
be a video presentation
about Holocaust survivor
Gerda Weissmann Klein.

ied with it
Learn about how Germany
applied the technology of mass
production to develop "mass de-
struction" and how the German
war machine benefitted from
the appropriation (theft) of Jew-
ish money, possessions and
property, and by using the slave
labor of Jews and other victims.


Gen. Bradley said of the
atrocities at Ohrdruf: "The
smell of death over-
whelmed us even before
we passed through the
stockade. More than 3,200
naked, emaciated bodies
had been flung into shal-
low graves. Others lay in
the streets where they had
fallen. Lice crawled over
the yellowed skin of their
sharp, bony frames."
May the memories of
those who suffered the
Shoah always be for a
blessing. And may we
never forget what evil men
can do when they are ap-
peased by the rest of the
world.
Murray Topol is chair-
man of the Congregation
Beth Sholom Ritual
Committee.


Visit one of the Holocaust
Museums in the country The
Florida Holocaust Museum is
nearby in St. Petersburg. The
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Mu-
seum is in Washington, D.C., and
is a must-see on any trip to the
D.C. area. There are many such
museums and memorials
around the United States, and it
is worth looking up the list on-
line to see if one is near where
you are traveling.
The Holocaust was unique
- it was state-sponsored a
perfect storm built on the pseu-
doscience of a racial hierarchy
of differences and Aryan superi-
ority, incorporating virulent anti-
Semitism (against the Jewish
"race"). On economic grounds, it
was claimed that Jews were re-
sponsible for Germany's finan-
cial woes. This thinking was then
used to indoctrinate (brainwash)
the German population, includ-


Law won't solve anything


Is the Crystal River Council
now the moral police? No open
containers on waterways? Let
me remind them that it's a
state waterway. They do not
control the waterways. It's
ridiculous what they're doing. A
Band-Aid, feel-good approach to
appease a few people, which
will accomplish nothing. The
overcrowding will continue.
Fishbowl at
Three Sisters


C50
563-(


I always read with interest with the
manatees and the park now that they're
trying to develop it. I'd just like to throw
something out. During the offseason
when the manatees aren't there, it
would be nice if they had something
similar to or, you know, compatible to
the fishbowl (underwater viewing area at
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park)


Citrus County's

Zo 201 + World's Greatest baby 5khower

Join us on -

Thursday, May 1, 2014
at Cornerstone Church in Inverness
(1100 West Highland Blvd)

rst Session: 3:00pm 5:00pmrOR
Second Session: 6:00pmr 8:00pm
CHOOSE ONE

Ciii 0 R-\jE StayweM
SOOOHFXH Please contact (352) 228-9047 with questions.




Little Springs Park
Behind City Hall
Join the
Crystal River Tree Board for the
3rd Annual

Arbor Day

Tree-Give-Away
Come get your Florida Friendly tree!
SApril 26th 9am-12pm

C l i( )NIC 3 Key Training Center
EJ '.a A.^>, ^/SA t.. t.zJ,'z,,. ^,.z,


16th Annual

Superintendent's Golf Classic
Saturday April 26, 2014 ,3 ": ar, Srlriu:il, .r
Sugarmill Woods 5 RegzIr.l,,:iF
Golf Club $1000 and $100He
Sponsorshi
Food Available
Door Prizes
Hole in One Prizes
50/50 Drawing






For more information 726-1931 or 724-1931 or 726-2241

ICnights of Columblls
Council 6168

Annual
Fr. "Wil.li"'
Memorial Golf Classic !1

May 17th-8:30 a.m. Shotgun startW
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
Entry fee $60
Fee includes coffee/donuts, green and
cart fees, lunch at the club and prizes.
Proceeds will be donated to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Entries must be received by May 14th.
For information Ci )N ICI i
call 746-7563 V il


ing teaching this in school. By
1939, Germans conscripted into
the military would have already
been thoroughly brainwashed
for six years.
The Holocaust "Final Solu-
tion" was carefully planned.
There were numerous collection
points, including the concentra-
tion of Jews into ghettoes in
many cities. The European net-
work of rail lines would be used
to bring the victims to the vast
array of extermination camps
and slave labor camps the Nazis
established. Because the Ger-
mans attained European domi-
nation in 1941-42 they were able
to implement their plan for total
annihilation of the Jews across
Europe. This killing machine
operated under a subterfuge -
claiming resettlement in labor
camps, when it was about exter-
mination and working slave
labor to death.


so that people could walk down and
even during the season and help offset

JNDjust a thought, you know, to
J D throw out there.
FF Appreciate the
hard work
S Talking about resilience: Hats
off to Rod Leek and his entire
crew at the El Diablo Golf
Course. Their clubhouse burned
)579 down on Monday and they were
opened for business on Tuesday
morning. We certainly appreci-
ate their efforts. Thank you.
Thanks to Logan
I want to thank Logan Mosby for her
"No place like home" article in the
March 21 paper. We've lived in Citrus
County here in Inverness for over 33
years and we feel the same way. The
only thing wrong with it is that too many
other people are discovering it.


Citrus Springs Community Center
Friday, April 25 8:30 am 5 pm
Saturday, April 26 8 am 2 pm
S Puzzles DVDs CDs -.
-' Paperbacks Hard Covers

We also will be accepting donations for:
ICASA, the Animal Shelter
and Local Area Food Banks
CIn4 iit.i<(l.


C.Ijl)jC.I.F


SWmue French, Inc
By Ron Clark & Sam Bobrick
Direced by Tim Stuart
OOOHWHZ


Rotary Club of Inverness
ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT

Saturday, May 17, 2014
8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start
Inverness Golf & Country Club


For information call
302-0469

Download
Entry Form at:
www.invernessflrotary.org


UUU-A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 CS


Ci Ii)XllJE ,CRY MTAL' #' g ;+'' ry-:; .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


Don't abuse
recycling bins
Don't leave your busted-
up furniture in front of the
recycle bins at WTI. Don't
abuse that privilege of get-
ting rid of recyclables.
Otherwise they will take
the recycle bins away.
Bigger fish to fry
I would like to say to Mr.
Charlie Dean: Quit worry-
ing about the road in Cit-
rus County and stop Duke
Energy from making the
taxpayers pay their ex-
penses, especially for the
Levy County (plant) that's
never going to even be
built and we're paying
their expenses. That's a
private business. Charlie
Dean, that's a no-no.
Pick up your trash
As I drive around Citrus
County, I see all these
"Adopt-a-Highway" signs.
If the slobs, litterbugs,
etc., kept their waste in-
side their vehicle they
bring it in, they wouldn't
need these signs. They
should have some pride in
keeping Citrus County
clean. I guess their par-
ents never taught them to
pick up after themselves.
Now someone else still
has to pick up after them.
Perkins please
Yes, you are right; we
need a Perkins. All of us
senior citizens love the
food they serve and veg-
etables. Please bring us a
Perkins.


CR 486 speed trap
Please, somebody get
the speed limit changed on
(County Road) 486. The 45
(miles per) hour is ridicu-
lous. All it is is a money
trap for the state troopers
and the sheriff's depart-
ment. Every day it's either
one of them or both of
them, two or three on each
side of the road. It's
ridiculous. It's a money
trap. ...
A license to kill
A 79-year-old woman in
Bradenton lost control of
her car, killing three
women at her church.
Watching her on television
shows that she can hardly
walk, even while using a
walker. Yet all they did to
her was fine her $1,000
and suspend her license
for one year. If she gets
her license back next year,
someone else will get
killed because she would
never be able to move her
foot fast enough to hit the
brakes in an emergency,
yet Florida will let her have
her license back even
though she's in no shape
to drive. Something's not
right.
Two to a seat
I have a question for the
Sounding Off hotline and
when I'm done with this,
I'm going on my computer
and sending a letter to the
editor. Tell me why stu-
dents are allowed to sit
three in a seat on the
school bus. Would some-


body in Citrus County
please tell me why stu-
dents are allowed to sit
three in a seat on a school
bus and stand up? Do the
citizens of Citrus County
know that this is happen-
ing? Do they know that this
is a safety issue?
Paws go outside
On April 4, someone
called in to the Sound Off
about the dogs being in
the stores where the food
is. I totally agree. I was in
(a store) this week. The
man's walking all through
the store with his dog up
in his arms and as he's
walking through there,
he's scratching the dog's
head, fluffing up his hair. I
love dogs. I had dogs for
years, but I never had to
take them when I went
shopping. The dogs need
to be left at home. They do
not need to be in the gro-
cery stores or in restau-
rants. People, please use
some common sense. And
stores, you have the right
to stop this do it.
Red means stop
Approximately 10:15,
April 3, a black SUV-type
car ran the red light at
(U.S.) 19 and Halls River
Road in Homosassa and
came within a foot of a
deadly accident. We had
the arrow to make the
turn. Wake up and obey
the laws before you end up
dead and possibly (killing)
innocent people. You were
driving too fast for us to
see if you were on a cell-


phone. But everybody else
stopped at the light but
you. We were shook up for
several hours after that.
Sidewalk
suggestion
I'm calling in about a
statement that was made
about last week on the
Sound Off about roads
and sidewalks. Well,
(County Road) 581 defi-
nitely needs sidewalks.
When people use your en-
tryway as a walkway, that's
a pretty bad problem.
Part-time
subsidies
If employers with 50 or
more employees are re-
quired to provide medical
health insurance to full-
time employees, and full
time is set at 40 hours,
then why can't those em-
ployees who work less
than 40 hours have half
their insurance subsidized
by the employer? Sounds
fair to me.


together and make it right.
Hoping karma
catches up to thief
To the person who stole
my son's John Deere bat-
tery-operated Gator off
the front porch: I hope you
feel guilty watching your
son or daughter ride this,
but at the same time I
hope they're having a lot
of fun with it. Hopefully,
sometime karma will
come back and maybe my
son will get his Gator back
when you get in trouble.
God bless.
Congratulating
hospice
I'd like to congratulate
HPH Hospice on their new
building in Lecanto. A cou-
ple of years ago, they took
care of my husband and
I've never, ever met such
gracious people. When I
needed that helping hand,
they were always there.
God bless each and every
one of them.


Aggressive pets You get what you
now fm>


Just want to send a no-
tice to all pet owners. If
you have a pet and you're
going to take it outside to
do its business, make sure
you've got a big club or a
stick or something with
you because another dog
could come on your prop-
erty and kill your pet and
as long as you don't get
bit, there's not a thing you
could do about it. We need
to make some differences
here, somebody. Let's get


IJa f I VI
I got a good laugh in the
Chronicle this morning.
This job, they need a secu-
rity guard. ... You have to
have good vision, be able
to stand for long periods


of time and you should
have at least military expe-
rience or law enforcement.
... But guess what? The
starting pay is $7.93 per
hour. I have never laughed
so hard in my life. Give me
a break.
Lay off junk food
I have a solution to obe-
sity, especially in children.
If these parents would not
take their kid to Burger
King and McDonald's and
all those places every day
of the week, they would
eat better and slim down.
That goes for adults also.
There are many people
who eat more than one
meal in a fast-food place.
If they'd give that up and
cook something at home,
they would lose weight
and we wouldn't have such
a big problem as we do.
So, ladies and men, get a
pot and pan and learn to
cook something good for
you.
Need more spring
cleaning
I was just wondering if
we could get the commis-
sioners to give us another
spring cleanup day. Some
of us like a clean county
and we don't mind helping
clean up a little bit if we


CRE FOOD P~j#
V t0fourthAnnuoal


SCRAMBLE GOLFTOURHAMENT


3
Exciting
Divisions

Junior
Age 5- 10

Senior
Age 11 15

Tri4Fun
All Ages


Entry Fees
Before April 14th: $25
After April 15th May 7th: $30


For info go to www.CitrusKidsTri.com or contact
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475 or email: info@drcsports.com

OOHQ T


axillofachaluntery PA
UM L =MM UA,,



^-,-1
m


CITRUS COUNTY
KIDI TRIATHLON
May 10, 2014 Inverness, Florida
Whispering Pines Park


CITRUS COUNTY RECYCLES
Celebrating Earth Day
T EIAP.22 I

FREE guided tour of three
recycling facilities in the county
Meet at 9:45am in the Inverness Walmart
parking lot (southeast corner closest to Wendy's)
Registration is required. Call 201-0149 .7
Hosted by (
Keep Citrus County Beautiful, Inc. (KCCB), /'-/ /
Citrus County Solid Waste Division, 'Z
FDS Disposal, Inc. &
Technology Conservation Group (TCG)
Suggested $10 donation
to cover transportation cost.
Ciii 'i

Dunnellon Area Chamber of Commerce
Presents

, town Days0
SApril 26th 8 27th
Pennsylvania Ave. & Cedar St.
Sat. 9am to 5pm Sun. 9am to 4pm
Arts and Crafts
Queen of the Rainbow &
Little Miss & Mr. Pageants
Antique Car Show Music & Kids Area
Boomtown Casino Friday
25th at Gruffs 6-10pm
For information contact the Chamber of Commerce
352-489-2320 or dunnellonchamber.com
OOOX4Riverland News


QHMUSIC ffST
OU A BENEFIT FOR THE
BOYS & GIRLS CLUB IN DUNNELLON
Saturday, April 25
Come Join Us For Live Music & BBQ
at Swampy's Grill on
The Rainbow River at Dunnellon
Featuring A Variety of Music Including
Blue Grass, Folk, Country & More


Wound Tight
Scott & Michelle Dalzie
Nathan Whitt
Jamie Davis
Backwater Bluegrass


12:00 1:00
1:25 2:15
2:30 3:30
3:45 4:45
5:00 6:00


BBQ Dining-In or Take-Out
B $8.00 a plate

Exciting Silent Auction Items
"FREE" ADMISSION
More Info: Carswell Ponder B&G Club 690-7440
Riverland News


Ciiik(2.(...i 1





6 7 8 9 101112
13141516171819
20 2122 23 24 25 26
27 2829 30


April 17
Citrus County Historical Society
Music at the Museum:
Johnny Carlsson Presents A Stan Getz Tribute
A Doors open at 6:15 PM
SEntrance: $20 includes appetizers and cash bar
Contact Phone: Call 341-6427


April 18-26
Art Center Theatre
Murder at the Howard Johnson's
Entrance Fee: $15 each
Contact Phone: 746-7606


April 18 8:00 PM
City of Inverness Whispering Pines Park
Easter Movie in the Pines FREE
Contact Phone: 352-726-2611, Ext 1304

April 19* 10:00 AM
Friends of Fort Cooper
Bluegrass Music Festival
Fort Cooper State Park
Contact Phone: (352)726-0315

April 22 9:00 AM
Keep Citrus County Beautiful
Citrus County Recycles
Tour of the recycling facilities in the county
Entrance Fee: $10 donation
Contact Phone: 352-201-0149


April 24 6:30 PM
Crystal River Heritage Council
Night at the Museum
$25 a person
Call 212-8390 or 795-1755


April 24
Citrus County Schools in conjunction with
the Citrus County Chamber & Chronicle
Golden Citrus Scholar Awards
CF Lecanto

April 25-26
Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
Citrus Springs Community Center
Fri. 8:30-5:00 PM; Sat. 8:00 AM-2:00 PM
Contact Phone: 489-2313

April 26 12:00 PM-6:00 PM
Boys & Girls Club of Dunnellon
Americana Music Fest
Swampy's Grill on the Rainbow River,
Dunnellon
Entrance Fee: $8/plate
Contact Phone: 690-7440

April 26 8:00 AM-Noon
Memory Enhancement Center of America
Dash for Dementia Lecanto HS Track
Entrance Fee: $15 Adults, $10 Children
Contact Phone: 726-3874

April 26 9:00 AM
City of Crystal River Tree Board
Arbor Day Celebration Tree Giveaway
Little Springs Park (Behind City Hall)
Contact Phone: 352-212-0437

April 26 9:00 AM-2:00 PM
Citrus County Sheriff's Dept.
Sheriff's Summer Safety &Youth Expo
Citrus County Auditorium Fairgrounds
Contact Phone: 341-7486 or 726-4488
- M 1 M


3rd Annual 3 46W 55O


/l4sic Cestioal
at Fort Cooper State Park
Sat., April 19th. 10am to 4pm RAIN OR SHINE
Hosted by the 3100 S.Old Floral City Rd Tickets
F... I :' .- ,*' ...... -'-726-0315s $10.00@ gate
Fc, ':::, 'T '' Jo Coolers Advance
V & f )r Alcohol Advance tickets
"available at the park
$7.00
B.R INC.A Children Under 12 Free
\ .~... LAN CAIR)


American Irish Club
Annual Invitational Golf Tournament

SATURDAY, APRIL 26,2014
SEVEN RIVERS COUNTRY CLUB
Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun Start at 12:30pm
Scramble Best Ball Format
|Prizes for men and women
for the longest drive (#4)
Pot-0-Gold (optional) on Hole #5
m I 'Cost $55 per person includes
golf, cart, prizes & lunch
Social hour with cash bar and appetizers
Si-- during awards ceremony 4:45-6pm
PROCEEDS TO BENEFITAIC LOCAL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
& CITRUS COUNTY CHARITIES
For information and sign-up contact:
Dave Horsman 897-1398 or Herb Duval 794-7565 e I I)N I( l.E


C6 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


COMMENTARY









BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY


Even in Florida, where
we are blessed with
normally sunny, mild
winters, spring is a welcome
relief from the dregs of
winter. Let's face it, once the
holiday season is packed
away for another year, and
we've managed to survive
March Madness and our
busted brackets, we long to
embrace the promise of
spring.
For many, that means rolling up
our sleeves and getting down to busi-
ness, dusting the cobwebs from the
dark recesses of closed-off rooms,
sorting through items that no longer
work for us, and throwing open our
windows to the fresh breeze of
change.
Spring cleaning. It couldn't happen
at a more propitious time of year
Similarly, this is the perfect time
for our annual Spring Job Fair, which
takes place May 14 from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. at the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
If you are one of the 4,278 unem-
ployed people in Citrus County who
have slogged through a long winter of
disappointment when it comes to
finding your next job, you are likely
more than ready to get down to the
business of finding one. And that may
take dusting the cobwebs off your


ii


old, outdated resume, sor
through job-search tactics
longer work for you and t
to a fresh approach.
This year, we're offering
proach with our Job Fair
shop on May 6, designed 1
you for meeting face-to-fa
ing managers the followii
Whether it's your first t
ing a job fair, or whether
participated in the past a
optimize your efforts, this
workshop is for you. The
focuses on how to make ti
impression by dressing fc
understanding the soft sk
ers seek and perfecting w
your personal infomercial
tor speech."
Why do we drill down t
three areas right out ofth
cause there may be hund
other job seekers at the sa
all vying to grab and main
tention of employers. You
a matter of seconds to ma
mark, so it's important th
a lasting, positive impress
Once you've garnered t


interest, you'll want to give them some-
thing to remember you by, and nothing
does the job like a well-organized,
Laura clean and professional-looking re-
sume. Consider this your calling card.
3vrnmes It helps break the ice, it gives you
something concrete to refer to after
all, you can't cram all your experience
CAREER and attributes into one 30- to 60-second
SOURCE elevator speech and it provides a
ready reference for the hiring manager
(I've seen many jot down notes on the
spot, which refresh their memory after
rting a long day of meeting job candidates).
s that no That's why the second part of Job
)eing open Fair 101 is so invaluable. When was
the last time you dusted off your re-
g a fresh ap- sume? Are you still using the old
101 Work- chronological format? How are you
to prepare filling the gaps in your employment
ace with hir- history? Forget about the one-size-
ng week. fits all approach; we'll help you de-
time attend- velop a targeted resume designed to
you have cut straight to the needs of the em-
nd want to players you're interested in meeting.
s two-part Both the workshop and job fair are
first session open to any job seeker at no charge.
he best first Registration for the workshop is re-
)r success, quired and you can do so online by
rills employ- visiting our Events Calendar at ca-
vhat's called reersourceclm.com and clicking on
il or "eleva- the date. For more information,
please call 352-249-3278, ext. 5200 or
o these 800-434-JOBS, ext. 5200.


ie gate? Be-
reds of
ame job fair,
itain the at-
['11 have just
ike your
at you leave
sion.
heir


Walmart and Wild Oats

unveil cheap organic line


Associated Press
NEW YORK Walmart is
using its massive size to
drive down the price of or-
ganic food items from
tomato paste to chicken
broth to make them more af-
fordable for its low-income
customers.
The world's largest re-
tailer and nation's largest
grocery seller said Thursday
that it has teamed up with
Wild Oats to sell a new line
of organic foods, starting this
month, that's at least 25 per-
cent cheaper than the na-


tional organic brands it
carries and in line with the
prices of its branded non-
organic alternatives. Wild
Oats helped pioneer the or-
ganic food trend in the late
1980s but has largely disap-
peared from store shelves
since 2007.
Wild Oats' 6-ounce can of
tomato paste, for example, is
priced at 58 cents, compared
with 98 cents for a national-
brand organic version. And a
32-ounce can of chicken
broth under Wild Oats is
See Page D2

Associated Press


Laura Byrnes, APR, is a Florida
Certified Workforce Professional and
communications manager at Career-
Source Citrus Levy Marion, formerly
Workforce Connection. Contact her at
(352) 291-9559 or (800) 434-5627, ext.
1234 or lbyrnes@careersourceclm.
com.


WILDOATS


BLACK


BEANS


Wal-Mart, he world's largest retailer, on Thursday said that it
has teamed up with Wild Oats to sell a new line of organic
foods, starting this month, that's at least 25 percent cheaper
than the national organic brands it carries and in line with the
prices of its branded non-organic alternatives.


There's no


debate: Just

deal with

probate

EAR BRUCE: My dad
passed away on Dec. 8,2013.
He had no assets and only
$900 in his checking account.
While he was alive, I was his
power of attorney and after his
death was designated by his will as
his executor Mom passed away in
2012, and there are two other adult
children listed as heirs.
I went to the office of the attor-
ney who wrote the will and he re-
tired some time ago. The attorney
who took over his cases suggested
that rather than probate the will,
which could cost money we don't
have, he would file an "affidavit
for filing will for preservation." I
got the forms, went to his office to
sign, had them notarized and sent
copies to all of the heirs.
I took my copies along with the
death certificate to the bank to
have the account closed and to
open a new account. I was told by
the bank that they didn't like the
wording in a couple of places.
They said it could be interpreted
as meaning more heirs would be
filing claims and that more money
may be coming into the estate,
which might require probating the
will.
I am expecting some refunds
from insurance companies and
possibly from the nursing home,
but certainly not enough to war-
rant probating the will. Also, the
will specifically states that if Mom
has passed, only the living children
are to receive the remainder of the
assets or monies. In other words, it
doesn't extend to spouses or chil-
dren of a deceased heir (one
brother passed away 14 years ago).
I realize this is long and de-
tailed, but do I have any recourse
with the bank? They won't let me
deposit the refund checks I have
received, nor can I pay the funeral
home or the cemetery I don't know
what the recourse will be if they go
unpaid for any length of time. I
don't know what to do next.
C.T, via email
DEAR C.T: You have your hands
full, but really, it shouldn't be that
difficult to straighten out. The ad-
vice that was given regarding not
filing for probate has a certain de-
gree of merit because there are
some relatively modest expenses,
but having to meet all these other
standards may be more trouble
than it's worth. You have checks
made out to your dad and you are
having a problem depositing them,
although I don't understand that.
Why not file a will through pro-
bate? You can be named the execu-
tor and proceed. This way you can
deposit the monies in the various
accounts and distribute any assets
according to the will. As I under-
stand it, there are a couple of re-
maining heirs.
Technically, you don't have to file
a will if there is no reason to, but
the reality here is you are being
hassled with regard to minor
amounts paid to the estate. I would
just file the will through probate
and get on with your life.
DEAR BRUCE: I am currently
facing some issues involving a sib-
ling with whom I jointly own sev-
eral pieces of property inherited
from our parents. Do you give per-
sonal responses that would not be
published in the paper?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I can appreci-
ate you wishing to keep your mat-
ters quiet, and I certainly respect
that, but I can't give personal re-
sponses. The purpose of this col-
umn is to allow as many people as
are interested to learn from the
various situations people get them-
selves into. If you decide to send
me a letter and it is published, I
will not identify you in any way
DEAR BRUCE: Can you explain
to me what IRA stands for and
what the difference is between a
See Page D2


Dust off your resumes for


upcoming job fair


WT 15O0Z5142g) Yi .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OATS
Continued from Page Dl

priced at $1.98, compared with the $3.47 for a na-
tional-brand alternative, according to the discounter's
survey of 26 nationally branded organic products
available at Walmart.com.
Walmart Stores Inc. is unveiling nearly 100 pantry
items under the Wild Oats label over the next several
months, adding to the 1,600 organic food items it al-
ready carries. It's taking a cautious approach, plan-
ning to have them in about half of its 4,000 domestic
namesake stores to make sure it can satisfy demand.
The Bentonville, Ark., company will be the exclusive
national retailer of Wild Oats.
"We are removing the premium associated with or-
ganic groceries," Jack Sinclair, Walmart's executive
vice president of grocery, told reporters during a con-
ference call Wednesday
Walmart and other mainstream stores are eagerly
trying to stake a bigger claim in the hot organic mar-
ket as they see shoppers from all different income lev-
els wanting to eat healthier
Analysts believe that Walmart's strategy could put
more pressure on companies like Whole Foods to
lower prices. Sinclair declined to comment on how big
Walmart's organic business is, but he says sales of or-
ganic food are growing more quickly than nearly every
category of non-organic food items. Still, high prices
have kept a lid on that growth.
Walmart says that 42 percent of its customers sur-
veyed in 2011 bought some organic or "natural" goods,
according to outside research. According to its own
survey, 91 percent of Walmart shoppers would con-
sider purchasing products from an affordable organic
brand at the store.
For Wild Oats, it's a big chance to revive its brand.
Founded in Boulder, Colo., in 1987, Wild Oats operated
110 stores in 24 states and in Canada at its peak in
early 2007. Whole Foods bought Wild Oats that year,
but after an extensive regulatory battle, Whole Foods
unloaded the chain in 2009, and the stores and its
products disappeared.
Private equity firm Yucaipa Cos., who was the
largest stakeholder of Wild Oats by the time the name
was sold to Whole Foods, now owns the brand. Yu-
caipa is run by billionaire Ron Burkle.
Wild Oats just started selling a line of fresh organic
food like eggs and milk at Fresh & Easy stores in the
U.S., a former division of Britain's Tesco. Most of the
Fresh & Easy U.S. stores were purchased by Yucaipa
last year
"We're invigorating our brand by bringing great tast-
ing Wild Oats products to more customers than ever
before," said Tom Casey, CEO of Wild Oats.
Whole Foods Market Inc. couldn't be immediately
reached for comment. But Marshal Cohen, chief in-
dustry analyst at market research firm NPD Group,
says that he expects Whole Foods and other retailers
to react with lower prices.
According to the Washington-based Organic Trade
Association, organic food and other products gener-
ated sales of $31.5 billion in the U.S. in 2012, the most
recent data available. The sales figure was up 10.3
percent from the year before and has more than
tripled since 2002 when sales were $8.4 billion.
"The pie is growing and more consumers are com-
ing on board," said the group's Barbara Haumann.
She noted that all types of stores are benefiting from
that growth.
In fact, earlier this week, Walmart rival Target Corp.
announced it was increasing its offerings
of natural, organic and sustainable offerings across
the grocery, beauty and household staples and beauty
aisle.
Sinclair told reporters that Walmart will be able to
reduce costs by making longer-term commitments
with producers like tomato growers so they can have
an incentive to grow more.
When asked about what its other organic brands
think of the move, Sinclair said that other labels don't
span across all the food categories.
But Sinclair added that to make organic food more
affordable, overall, "Prices are going to have to come
down."


Merkel, in Athens, praises


reform progress in Greece


Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece Greece
won praise Friday from German
Chancellor Angela Merkel the
lead advocate of eurozone auster-
ity for its painful economic
turnaround and successful return
to markets.
But Merkel added a polite re-
minder that the bailed-out coun-
try still wasn't out of the woods.
"Greece has honored its
pledges," Merkel said at a news
conference with Greek Prime Min-
ister Antonis Samaras in Athens. "I
hope that policy is continued."
Merkel's brief visit, her second
since Europe's debt crisis
erupted in Greece more than four
years ago, came amid Greek gov-
ernment euphoria over the coun-
try's successful re-entry to
international bond markets on
Thursday The landmark five-year
issue was Greece's first since
2010, when it was saved from
bankruptcy by a massive bailout
from its European partners and
the International Monetary Fund.
"Greece has made it," Samaras
said, before striking a more sober
tone.
"My pace and that of my govern-
ment will not change. What has
changed is the image, the psychol-
ogy ... markets have voted for
Greece and given it their confi-
dence."
Merkel remains a divisive fig-
ure in Greece because of her in-
sistence on economic pain.
During a visit in 2012, she was





MONEY
Continued from Pas Dl

Roth IRA and a conventional
IRA?
-Jack, via email
DEAR JACK: IRA stands for In-
dividual Retirement Account.
And the difference between a
Roth IRA and a conventional IRA
is considerable.
A Roth IRA is funded with post-
tax money Any money the Roth
IRA earns from that point for-
ward is totally tax-free. A regular
IRA is funded with pre-tax money
Its earnings are put aside and
taxes on those earnings are de-
ferred. When you finally take the
money out, you have to pay the
taxes.
Does that mean the Roth is a
better idea? For many people, it
surely is. The higher the tax
bracket for the individual, the
more the Roth is worth. In the
event that you pay little or no
taxes, then the Roth has less


Associated Press
Antonis Samaras, Greece's prime minister, left, greets Angela Merkel,
Germany's chancellor, on her arrival at the prime minister's office in
Athens, on Friday, April 11, 2014, for a brief visit, a day after the
crisis-hit country returned to international bond markets.


greeted by mass anti-austerity
protests that turned violent and
about 5,000 police officers were
deployed Friday to guard areas
on Merkel's itinerary and enforce
a ban across most of central
Athens on planned protests.
Security was tightened further
after a powerful car bomb ex-
ploded early Thursday outside
the Bank of Greece, causing dam-
age but no injuries. No group
claimed responsibility, but police
suspect domestic anarchist mili-
tants.
About 1,000 people held peace-
ful demonstrations outside the
prohibited area, but dispersed
under heavy rain.
The austerity measures that
have helped stabilize public fi-




value.
DEAR BRUCE: My husband
and I both had IRAs with
Broker A. Due to a falling-out
over fees, we moved the IRAs to
Broker B.
We each had an annuity in our
accounts. Broker B would not ac-
cept custodianship of an annuity
he didn't sell. We attempted to
open an account with a financial
adviser and he, too, would not ac-
cept the annuities. So we are now
stuck with Broker A and must pay
annual fees for IRAs that contain
only one security.
I have talked with the IRS and
asked if we can become our own
custodians. They said no because
an IRA custodian must be insured
and approved by the IRS. We do
not want to cash in the annuities
and take the loss that you fre-
quently warn people about. Is
there any other option?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: How do you
spell "stuck?" The other brokers
will not accept custodianship be-
cause they didn't sell the annu-


nances have exacted a horrifying
social toll. The economy has
shrunk by about a quarter during
the crisis and unemployment is
near 27 percent.
"I believe that after all these
necessary reforms have been car-
ried out with more remaining
- that Greece will have more op-
portunities than difficulties,"
Merkel said at the start of her
visit.
Her talks with Samaras, who is
facing opposition party demands
for early elections along with next
month's vote for the European
Parliament, included a German
initiative to support small Greek
businesses, as well as future ne-
gotiations on Greek national debt
relief.




ities, they earned no commission
and that is the end of that. The
IRS advised you that you cannot
be your own custodian. It has to
be a third party
You don't want to cash in the
annuities and take the loss; I un-
derstand that. You didn't mention
the size of the annuities. If they
are large, you should leave them
where they are and pay this guy
his fees until such time has
passed when there will be no sur-
charge. If you really want to cut
the relationship, cash them in,
take the hit and get on with your
life.
Unfortunately, this is another
reason you want to be very care-
ful before you buy an annuity
Recognizing the penalties is just
one of the reasons you should be
cautious.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions ofgeneral interest will be
answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume ofmail, per-
sonal replies cannot be provided.


Fo *or nfrato

on advrtiingcal
Ann Frro4a


325 4-231o
- IrllWtsna


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L.^iNOM AX DIRECirR


D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


BUSINESS






SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


ClCR5US COUNTY
CO& w C h br of Commurce
Chamber of Commem~e


Chamber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber

events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
April 14--Ribbon-cutting, Bedinotti
Photo at the Chamber of Commerce
Crystal River Office.
April 18 Chamber Offices closed for
Good Friday.
April 21 Ribbon-cutting, Nature
Coast Ministries, 1590 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River.
April 23 Ribbon-cutting, Reel Burns
Charters, 4:30 p.m. 5300 S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa.
April 24 Golden Citrus Scholars
Awards Ceremony, 6 p.m., College of
Central Florida, Lecanto.
April 29 Ribbon-cutting and Pre-
view Reception for HPH Hospice, 2939
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto, 5 to
7 p.m. Contact Anne Black for more in-
formation at 352-428-0708.
April 30- Ribbon-cutting at Karma Resale
Shoppe, 109 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness.
May 2 Pillar Awards Dinner, inspired
by the style of the Kentucky Derby,
6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Cocktail attire and
hats are recommended. Table sponsor-
ships $300 and individual reservations
$35 per person.

Community

events
April 17- Chili Cook-off and Redneck
Olympic Games, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.,
Citrus County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, $10
per person. Register at www.citrus
builders.com or by mailing
donnab@citrusbuilders.com.
April 17 Music at the Museum Con-
cert, 7 to 9 p.m., Inverness Historic
Courthouse. This month is all about
jazz with Stan Getz tribute with Jeff
Rupert and the Johny Carlsson Trio.
Call 352-341-6427 for more informa-
tion and tickets.
April 18- Alzheimer's Family Organi-
zation presents Caregiver Day at Seven
Rivers Medical Center, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
More information at 727-848-8888.
April 18 Doo Wop the Block meets
the Friday Night Thunder Cruise with
the NYSE Guys, 5 to 8 p.m., stop by
for a fun-filled evening at Courthouse
Square, Inverness.
April 19- Inverness Farmer's Market
features fresh produce, Italian pas-
tries, fresh coffee, seafood, doggie
treats and crafts, 9 to 1 p.m., Court-
house Square, Inverness.
April 19 Fort Cooper State Park
presents the third annual Bluegrass
Music Festival. Open jam tent; bring
your instruments. Food and crafts,
classic car show with performers:
Back Porch Pickers 10 a.m., Pasture
Prime 11:15 a.m., Wry Whiskey 12:30
p.m., Xtreme Grass 1:45 p.m. and
Arnold Messer and Lonesome Highway
3 p.m. No coolers and no alcohol.
Bring a chair. Tickets are $7 in ad-
vance or $10 at the door and may be
purchased at Fort Cooper State Park
or by call ing 352-726-0315.
April 19- Easter Movie in the Pines,
free event starts at 8 p.m. and will fea-
ture the movie "Hop."
April 26 Sheriff's Summer Safety
and Youth Expo, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Citrus County Auditorium to have
free bicycle helmets (while supplies
last), free string backpacks and spe-
cial YMCA Healthy Kids area. For more
information, call 352-726-4488.
April 26- Dash for Dementia, 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m., Lecanto High School Track.
Fundraiser to support Memory En-
hancement Center of America. No
tickets needed; admission is free,
though donations are accepted. There
will be a vendor section, food, games
and introductory speech about the
center by Dr. John Grace.
April 26 Westend Arts and Crafts
Fair, an indoor market with 40-plus
vendors that include crafts, foods and
artisan items, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Crys-
tal River Mall.
April 26-- BBQ Cookoff hosted by
DAV Crystal River Chapter with $2,500
in awards, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fun for
the whole family at the Crystal River
Mall. No entry fee.
May 2 The Florida Public Relations
Association (FPRA) Nature Coast Chapter
professional development luncheon,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., to feature Dan
Ward, APR, presenting "Communicat-
ing Your Opinion: How to Effectively
Target the Editor." Luncheons are open
to the public to attend. For more infor-
mation, email kmehl@citrusmh.org.


Suncoast Credit Union
2367E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness, FL 34453 8oo00-999-5887
suncoastcreditunion.com o Manager: Linda Rodgers


: Chamber Ambassadors Mary Pericht, Cadence Bank; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit
Union; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Lisa Nash,
FDS Disposal; Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Nancy
Hautop, Top Time Travel, welcome Suncoast Credit Union Manager Linda Rodgers to the Chamber.


Waverley Florist
302 N-. ThirdStreet, CrystalRiver, FL 34429 o 352-795-1424
waverleyflorist.com Owners: Mike and Cheryl Gaouette


: Chamber Ambassadors Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Jeanne Green, associate
member; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; Peter Retzko, Citrus County Chronicle; Janet Mayo,
associate member; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Janet Mayo, associate member; Dennis
Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal;
Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten welcome Mike
and Cheryl Gaouette to the Chamber.


BWA thanks HPH Hospice
for sponsoring luncheon


: Jennifer Duca, BWA chair; Pati Smith, HPH Hospice
gift planner; Connie Clifton, R.N., HPH clinical manager; Doris
Graska, HPH board member; Anne Black, HPH marketing
communications coordinator; Juli Davelli, R.N. and HPH marketing
representative; Donna Smith, BWA luncheon chair.


YMCA

offering

summer

camps
The Y is welcom-
ing summer with
open arms and tons
of fun. The Y will
offer camp at three
convenient locations:
Crystal River Middle,
Inverness Middle
and Lecanto Primary
schools. Youths ages
5 to 11 will enjoy and
take advantage of all
the games, sports,
crafts and summer
activities.
Camp EPIC (En-
couraging People to
Impact their Com-
munities), ages 12 to
14, will be at Lecanto
Primary School.
Teens will make an
impact by participat-
ing in community
service projects and
create new relation-
ships while experi-
encing fun field trips
and discovering new
talents.
Field trips are
planned to include:
MOSI, a Tampa Bay
Rays game, putt-putt
golf, swimming, the
Glazer Children's
Museum, Homosassa
Springs Ellie Schiller
Wildlife State Park,
Friday Wet Field
Days and much
more.
Summer camp con-
sists of 10 themed
weeks and will oper-
ate Monday through
Friday from 7 a.m. to
6 p.m. with free
breakfast and lunch
provided for most
weeks. The Y offers
financial assistance
to families who qual-
ify. Financial assis-
tance is based on a
sliding scale and con-
siders size of family,
household income
and extenuating cir-
cumstances. Act now
and save up to $149
this summer through
the Early Bird and
Play More, Pay Less
incentives.
For more informa-
tion, please call the
Y's administrative of-
fice at 352-637-0132.
Registrations can be
found at www.
ymcasuncoast.org/
locations/citrus-
county-branch and
can be dropped off at
the Y office at 3909
N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL
34465, by fax at 888-
206-1244 or scanned
and sent to drew@
suncoastymca.org.


Saturday service

coming to transit line
Citrus County transit will begin offering Satur-
day service starting May 3, as approved by the
Board of County Commissioners. Saturday service
will have the same hours of operation as Monday to
Friday buses, operating from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on the
same schedule. The fare for the Orange Line is $2
all day, $1 one way. Deviation requests for Satur-
days will need to be called in by 3 p.m. the Friday
before the request. Regular paratransit door-to-
door service will not operate on Saturdays. For
more information, please call Citrus County Transit
at 352-527-7630 or visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/trans/transportation.htm.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUDGET-FRIENDLY TRAVELTIPS


FailisPlnfo pringTrve
Wih ae arlyhal ihade fr aspingvaation


FAMILY FEATURES
ith a winter that never seems to end, families are aching to
enjoy some fun in the sun, turning their attention to a well-
deserved getaway.
According to a recent Bank of America survey, 46 percent of
Americans plan on hitting the road and organizing family-friendly
vacations this year. But nearly half of these survey respondents, 48 per-
cent, said the most difficult part of planning a trip is managing a budget.
Fun, Affordable Vacations
Travel Channel host Samantha Brown has trekked the globe and is an ace at
keeping costs low while maximizing adventure. She shares a few budget saving
tips for the millions of Americans looking to take a family vacation and ensure
lasting memories.
"When you start researching vacation destinations, it's important to keep in
mind that a good rewards card can help to offset travel costs," Brown said. "I find
that using credit cards like the BankAmericard Travel Rewards credit card gives
you great flexibility in how to use your points to cover travel expenses ... more
than just for flights. You can book your travel whenever, however you choose so
there are no restrictions or blackouts."
Using a rewards card and following these helpful travel tricks will guarantee an
unforgettable family vacation that won't break the budget.
Destination, Destination, Destination
The majority of survey respondents said they are headed towards easy to access,
family-friendly destinations like beaches, theme parks and zoos. They also said
they are careful to steer clear of popular college party destinations. Sixty three
percent of respondents said car trips are the preferred mode of travel because they
are easier on the budget and also ensure that the vacation will be an adventure.
Road trips are also ideal because travel schedules are more flexible; you can stay
an extra night in a location, or if the weather is nice, consider camping or visiting
public parks which are often more affordable. And don't forget travel journals for
each family member so they track the vacation and save memories.
Save on Lodging, Park Admission Fees
Families are increasingly looking for ways to stretch the dollar, so it doesn't come
as a surprise that 36 percent of men and 47 percent of women agreed that costs
are extremely important when planning a vacation. Half of the survey respondents
agreed that hotels and lodging generally eat up most of the budget. Search for
ways to save a bit of money in other places by being flexible with your dates or
traveling to locations that are off the beaten path. You can also use rewards points
you've already accumulated towards lodging or airfare expenses. Some travel
rewards credit cards let you use your points to "pay yourself back" for any type
of travel purchase such as flights, hotels, vacation packages, cruises, rental cars or
baggage fees through a statement credit. You can even use your points to pay for
theme park tickets and camp sites.
Plan Out Your Activities
One of the best parts about a family vacation is getting the whole family involved
in the travel planning process. Hold a family meeting about a month before your
trip and have each member choose and plan an activity so everyone is invested in
the family vacation. This will take all the responsibility off the parents' shoulders
and make travel easier. Challenge the family to plan activities that are unique to
the area those you wouldn't be able to do in your hometown like surfing,
mountain hiking or stargazing. These types of new and unique activities will
create lasting memories and strengthen the bonds of family which is what
family vacations are all about. It's also fun to choose activities that allow your
children to see you acting like a kid. For example, go-cart racing, trampoline
parks or eating ice cream sundaes for dinner are great ways for kids to see their
parents lighten up and have a great time.
Have a Backup Plan
Whenever you travel, you're likely to experience missed connections, wrong
turns, long lines or unexpected closings. One thing you can do to prepare for the
unexpected is to create a plan A and plan B for your entire trip. Start two weeks in
advance of your departure date by brainstorming with the whole family all of the
possible routes, attractions, restaurants and hotels that you'd like to incorporate
into your trip. Throughout the next two weeks, narrow down the list and create
two plans for going to your destination and heading back home. In the event you
run into any issues, you won't have to waste time figuring out another option.
Also, it's always important to remember that your children may copy the way you
react during a stressful situation. Travel is an ideal time to teach your kids coping
skills and how to make the best of it.
Pay with Your Card
Most families (77 percent) pay for purchases during vacations with credit cards.
This not only minimizes the amount of cash or travelers checks you should carry,
but it allows you to offset costs. Since most places accept credit cards, think about
using a rewards card for big ticket expenses like gas, theme park admission and
hotels. If you use a rewards credit card for those purchases, it frees up cash for
smaller expenses and also accumulates points that you can use on your next vaca-
tion. Look for a card like the BankAmericard Travel Rewards card where you can
earn 1.5 points for every dollar spent on purchases, every time. Then these points
can be used to get a statement credit to cover your flights, hotels, vacation pack-
ages, cruises, rental cars or baggage fees.
For more information, visit www.bankofamerica.com/creditcard.


A&


63%

34%


146%


Majority of both
women (65%b) and
men t.59%i agree
family-friendliness
drives destination
choice


of families surveyed are likely to
take a family spring break this year.


The most difficult part of planning a spring vacation


)


48% say managing
budgets


36% say coordinating
schedules


9


13% say choosing
a destination


About half of women
and men say easy
access is close second
when choosing a
destination


* 0


I w ita y an


Tie!


r


Theme parks and beaches
get 2/3 of the votes for No.1 desired attraction

Other Favorites (in order of highest votes)-


dqu jri~rnt,


E
Lhnrdmarl.k5' national museums/ :onert-%
riJrnuinent s .i6rk cultural he3Ler


.ports
Fadcilii ies


sites


Cost Conscious


47% of women


*


36% of men


say vacation cost is "extremely important"


77%
of families will use credit cards for vacation
planning and shopping

62%

often redeem their credit card rewards
to help offset vacation costs


14,325 respondents urveyed between January and February 2014


02014 Bank o Amernca Cwpalon


Choices, Choices


Getting there


D4 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


BUSINESS


wwilltael by car ^^^^


---- --- I r ",




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclonlne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co
S @ 0 .. *@* 0 .0 0701


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
NISSAN
2003 Xterra v6, auto
4x4, cold ac. runs
great, 119k mi.
$2999.(352) 257-3894




OPEN
HOUSE

Open House at
3764 Black Diamond
Circle, Lecanto, Fl
April 13th
Noon 3pm
Estate Pool Home
3211 LSF 4/3 with
2nd master or bonus
room. MLS 707769
$529,000
Call for gate pass
Linda Thomas
Black Diamond
Realty
(352) 464-4881
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Your World

9mw 9 444ea4


CH""pNIdE


FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



6 mo old neuter
Siamese snowshoe.
All vaccines. Indoor
cat only. Free to good
home (352) 220-2712



CAT Male Black&
White short hair. Miss-
ing since 4/3. Gemini
off Grover Cleveland
(352) 621-3392
Cat-Grey & White
short haired Tabby
Lost Sugar Mill Woods
4/8. Microchiped
(352) 422-7278
Lost Cat on Mon 3-10,
10:30a. Blue Point
Himalayan. Goes by
"Blue". Has one eye,
underbite. Front paws
declawed. License &
rabies tags on. Cream
colored w/gray tips &
tail. Last seen 44 E.
westbound after VFW in
the woods on right.
Deb @ 352-201-4800.
Lost Dog-Bull Mastiff
Mix, male, brown,
black collar w/silver tag,
registered in Georgia
lost on Tuedsy night on
Cardinal St. and Elsie
Pt. in Lecanto
(352) 621-9810
Lost Maine Coon Male
Cat in the Highland area
close to Canton &
Apopka streets
Dark brown mix very
friendly he has left ear
tip off due to TNR Col-
ony but has become our
pet we miss him & want
him home last seen
Thurs April 3rd.
726-0562 or 302-6509
Lost
Small Pekingese, Black
Cardinal & Georgia Rd.
(352) 628-3829
Male Siamese Cat
mature, answers to
the name'Old Man"
lost in the vicinity of
Robert Blake Ave
in Inverness
(352) 419-7167

-i.e


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Realtor Needs
ASSISTANT

Exp. necessary
Send resume to:
reoffice.assistant3
@gmail.com


I a p o e3


Our enhanced starting pay rates are effective immediately.
There's never been a better time for RNs to embark on a career
with Central Florida Health Alliance.

Call 352-323-5360 to speak with one of our recruiters today.

To learn more about the facilities or to apply online, visit us at
http://www.cfhacareers.com.
EEO/AA/H/V. Drug-free Workplace/Tobacco-free Workplace.


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966






BRASHEAR'S
PHARMACY
NOW HIRING

LOOKING FOR
" PHARMACY TECH.
" MEDICAL BILLING
SPECIALIST
(352) 746-3420 Ask
for Rob or Dianne


C.N.A.s
11-7 Full Time

Join our team.
ask about Baylor
Prog. EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


Come Join Our
5 Star Facility
Team at Avante
at Inverness

Available Positions
RN
MDS Coordinator
Exp. Preferred
RN and LPN
all shifts
CNA3-11 & 11-7
Great Benefits
and 401K
Please AppIv Online
Avantecenters.com


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoii@
vahoo~com


FRONT DESK

P/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience
& experience with
Eaglesoft a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
Ivnn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.com


O100
Owia==.
(T~O P1h00.d


)Central Florida Health Alliance
Leesburg Regional Medical Center The Villages Regional Hospital
)OOHY33


HEALTH CARE
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
in Lecanto
MARKETING
DIRECTOR
Full-time position
available. Must
have a BS degree or
equivalent back-
ground in market-
ing, business, jour-
nalism or commu-
nications. Health
care experience
required. Must be
familiar with profes-
sional community.
Prior case manage-
ment or nursing
experience benefi-
cial. Admissions,
marketing or sales
experience in a
long-term care sett-
ing preferred. Can-
didate will perform
both facility-based
an external market-
ing and admissions
duties.

RN I LPN
Full-time position
available for
11 p.m.-7 a.m. shift.
PRN positions availa-
ble for 3 p.m.-11 pm
and 11 p.m.-7 a.m.
shift. Must be a Flor-
ida -licensed nurse.

CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT
Full-time position
available for 3 pm
-11 pm shift and PRN
positions available
for all shifts. Must
be able to work
weekends. Must be
a Florida -certified
nursing assistant.
LAUNDRY AIDE
PRN position availa-
ble. Laundry experi-
ence in a long-term
care facility pre-
ferred. High school
diploma or equiva-
lent required. Must
be able to work
weekends.

We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.

Admissions: Amy_
Derby@LCCA.com
Nursing: Hannah
Mand@LCCA.com
Laundry: Apply
in person to
Nina Davidson.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne In
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
47557




Cwmf







New 3BR/2BA Lake
Cottage on 2+
acres with lake
access only $99,900.
Ready for finishing
touches! City water/
sewer, gated, 2
private recreational
lakes. Convenient to
town. Prime South
Florida location. Call
now 1-866-352-2249.


NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219










IfJ"
i'm lovin' itf

McDonald's
in Beverly Hills..

is accepting
applications for
employment for
I All Part Time &
Full time Positions
I Opening & Closing
Managers needed
Please apply at the
McDonald's in
Crystal River, 625
N. U.S. Hwy. 19.

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant

Now Acceptina
Applications for
w LINE COOKS &
w" P/T DISHWASHERS
o P/T HOUSEKEEPERS
Please AlDDIv
in Person at
505 E Hartford St
Mon-Sat btn 2p-5p




SEEKING
FULL TIME
AD SALES REP
The Williston Pioneer
Sun News

Salary Plus
Commission, Based
out of Williston, FL.
Service new and
existing advertising
customers. Meet &
exceed sales goals
Excellent customer
service skills. Strong
computer skills
Reliable transporta-
tion required to
make sales calls
Email Resume to
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
Drug screen
required for final
candidate, EOE




AUTO TECHNICIAN

Full Time. Must have
valid Dvr Lic. Willing to
train right person with
mechanical exp.
hourly pav+ incentive.
Call (352) 563-1717
for interview apt.

Auto Technician

Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
AUTOMATION
Floral City
352-341-1881

Drive-away
across the USA
even if you don't
own a car.
22 Pickup
Locations. Call
866-764-1601 or
www.qualitvdrive-
awav.com

EXPERIENCED
SERVICE
PLUMBERS

Min 5 yrs experience
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973

License
Compliance
Officer
Announcement
#14-42

Enforce laws and
ordinances regard-
ing unlicensed
contracting and
illegal advertising
for Citrus County.
Requires at least
one year of related
experience. Former
law enforcement
experience may
supplement con-
struction experi-
ence. Starting pay
$13.46 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 18, 2014
EOE/ADA.


BfE^
Skills
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Wemrner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624

GROOMER

Exp. Only apply
Linda's Grooming
352-628-3842

LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.

Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers
to service lights.
Electrical exp. pref,
will train. Travel req.
throughout South-
east. Cpy vehicle
and hotel provided.
Exc pay, per diem,
bonus and benefits.
Background check
and clean FL. Dr. Lic
required.
Apply in person at
Hilights Inc.
1515 White Lake Dr
Inverness
352-564-8830

LOVE
CHEVROLET

Factory Trained
Technician
Experience Rea'd.
Detailer
Apply in Person:
Love Chevrolet
2209 Hwy 44 West
Inverness, FL
For more information
Ray Smerecki
352-341-0018
Drugfree Work
Place, EOE


































Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
Ldays out. Full benefits,













achievable bonuses.
Call for details
1-888-978-3791 o
www.hevi.neto

Roofers & Laborers
Commercial, Exp.








(352) 564-1242




CITRUS COUNTY
YMCA
Now Hiring:the











following positions.
Camp Leader
CaOTRmp Coordinator












Lifeguard
Swim Instructor
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10











days out. Fullne benefits,
achievable bonuses.
Call for details
1-888-978-3791 or










4/16:www.hevl.netmca
Rooers & Laborers









DFWP/EOE.
Commercial, Exp.









(352) 564-1242


CITRUS COUNTY







Announcement
YMCA















#14-39

Semi-skilled janitorial
duties maintaining
County buidings the
following facilositions:
Camp Leader








Graduation from H.S
or GED ertificate.rd








Some knowledge
of building mainte-
Swmnance and cusstructor
Apply onlfne by
suncoast.ori.
DFWP/EOE.
(352) 637-0132

CUSTODIAN
Announcement
# 14-39

Semi-skilled janitorial
duties maintaining
County buildings
and facilities.
Graduation from H.S
or GED certificate.
Some knowledge
of building mainte-
nance and custo-
dial requirements.
Knowledge of floor
care such as stripp-
ing, waxing and
buffing. Must have
janitorial experience
and/or experience
as a semi-skilled
handyman.
$8.02 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FI. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 18, 2014
EOE/ADA.


Administrative
Assistant P/T
(to start)
Microsoft Office
& Quick Books exp.
Email resume to:
offlce@wavecrest
masonry.com

Customer
Service
Specialist
Announcement
#14-40

Answer Utility phone
lines, assist employ-
ees and public.
Respond to general
customer billing
account inquiries.
Billing and customer
service experience
preferred. Starting
pay $11.09 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 18, 2014
EOE/ADA.

DELI CLERK

EXPERIENCED ONLY
Sat & Sun. a must.
No calls.
Apply in person:
Brooklyn Dockside
Deli, Crystal River

Exp. Sales/Office
Help

Full Time- call to
set up interview
352-563-2005

GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Announcement
#14-41
Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Heavy lifting,
pushing, bending,
climbing and reach-
ing required. Ability
to work outdoors in
hot/cold tempera-
tures under noisy
conditions. Current
valid Florida Driver
License required.
$8.02 hourly to start,
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, April 18,2014
EOE/ADA

MAINTENANCE
Position

Experience Preferred
No Phone Calls
Apply In Person
614 NW Hwy 19,
BEST WESTERN


Mock Jurors
$$ Earn $12
Per Hour $ $

Spend 6-10 hrs on
a given wkday
night, wkday or
wkend serving as a
juror in a mock trial
to evaluate settle-
ment of an actual
court case. If you
have a valid FL DL
or State I.D.,a U.S.
Citizen, and eligi-
ble to vote, enroll
with us on:
SIGNUPDIRECT.
COM (please fill
out on line form
completely for
consideration) or
only if you do not
have access to a
computer Call:
1-800-544-5798.
(On-line sign up
preferred).
Mock Trials
will be held in
Downtown Tampa


TOWER HAND

Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F





AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547









NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School

Barber
Night School

Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM

Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE

(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu

START A CAREER
INA YEAR




AVAILABLE
Pool Suppooly Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177




AVAILABLE
Pool Suppooly Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177




AVAILABLE
Pool Suoopply Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE GAS DRYER
Front Load, with ped-
estal, good cond.
white, $300.
(352) 419-5604
MICROWAVE
KENMORE 30" WIDE
MOUNTS ABOVE THE
STOVE WHITE $75
352-613-0529
Refrigerator
GE, bottom freezer, w/
icemaker, White $275
DishwasherGE Profile,
White $175. Both good
Cond. 352-249-4451
SAMSUNG FRONT
LOAD dryer, used very
little, good cond.,
$200 (352) 726-6461
352-201-5113
Side by Side
LG, Refrigerator
Stainless,
$300 as is
(352) 422-4492


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398



Antique sewing
machine table, oak
parquet style top,
decorative/dinette,
etc. Exc. cond.
$150. (352) 419-8629



AIR COMPRESSOR
Champbell Hausfeld
26 gallon, oil less, air
compressor, 150 PSI
Vertical on wheels 1.7
HP 120 volts. $175.00
Call Mike @
352-637-6754
Big Bench
Wood Vice
$40.
(352) 382-1814
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell 1/4"
Hose,gun,lance&bottle
$25.Dunnellon
465-8495
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell
Hausfeld hose gun
lance & bottle $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
Pressure Washer.
extra long hose, $125
(352) 527-4910
Sears Wood Lathe
Bench w/2 drawers on
Wheels, turning chisels
1/3 hpgrinder $150.
Delta 10" Bench Saw
$50. (352) 382-1814



SPEAKERS SHARP 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $40
352-613-0529
TV SYLVANIA 32"
WITH REMOTE $40
352-613-0529



SLIDING GLASS
DOORS 6 foot wide slid-
ing glass doors, excel-
lent condition $225
Homosassa area Tele-
phone 352 503 7114



WANTED: 3 PHASE
GENERATOR, 20,000
KW, at least 60 amps
with or without motor
(352) 637-2560



Patio Glass top table
w/4 chairs, good
cond. $75. obo
(231) 775-4774



2 Lazy Boys Recliners
Lg. Wine colored,
rocker $400.2nd
smallergreen $300.
like new (352)270-0269
4-PC. QUEENSIZE BED-
ROOM SET, with mirror
headboard & side
cabinets, mattress,
$800,4 pc. wall cabi-
nets, dark wood, $600.
(352) 637-6310 Iv.msg
42" sq. Blonde Wood
Table Setw/one leaf,
4 captains chairs &
Lighted China
Cabinet 44" wide,
very good cond. $225.
obo(248) 701-7353
COUCH Leather
good cond, $50;
Office Chair, leather
swivel rocker, good,
cond, maroon $25
(352) 228-4796
Dining Table
Glass top, 4 floral
upholstered caster
chairs. Orig $1800+
Very Comfortable Set
$600 OBO
(352) 527-2778
Dining. Room Set
6 chairs, table,
real wood. $75
6 Pc. Bed. Rm. Set, Ital-
ian, nice shape $150
(352) 423-3513
Flex Steel Couch and
Ottoman, Excel. Cond
$200.
Billiard Light for Pool
Table $50. No pets
(352) 726-6487
King Sealy Mattress
Set, w/frame & head-
board, exc. cond.
$250. 24" Sanyo TV.
$30. (352) 726-3730
or (352)422-0201
Leather Sectional
Natuzzi tan leather
good cond. 3
loveseats, 51" long ea.
1 sofa 72" long. $900.
(352) 489-7674
LEATHER SOFA
caramel color with re-
cliners on both sides,
$350. Call for details.
(352) 637-6310, Iv.msg
LIVING ROOM FURNI-
TURE 3-piece sectional
sofa, 2 Rocker Reclin-
ers, octagonal table and
end table. $300 OBO
305-394-1000


SUNDAY,APRIL 13,2014 D5




D6 SUNDAY,APRIL 13, 2014


Leather Recliner
dark burgundy
exc. cond. $175.00
(352) 382-5057
Oak 48" Round Table
2 leaves, 4 chairs,
2pc hutch/buffet,
$500. obo
(352) 249-7405
Oak Dining Room Set
Table, leaf, 6 chairs &
64" china cabinet
$400.
Call 352-564-0212
Oak Dining Table with
4 swivel chairs
Good cond. $50.
(352) 228-4796
Office Chair, dark
brown, perfect shape
$50. 5 x7 Area Rug
earthtone, $30.
(352) 423-4423
Power Lift Recliner,
by Merlot, Maroon
New 2013, very nice
Paid $1000.
Asking $750. obo
(352) 344-5308
Round Glass Top
Dining Table w/4
padded chairs, $195.
obo (231) 775-4774
SOFA
Micro fiber, light tan,
7 ft dual reclining sofa,
$300 (352) 274-1940
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
Trundle Bed
tubular black steel
frame, twin over
queen, built in ladders
safety rails, never used
\ $230. (352) 503-3446
WHITE DINING SET
Like new condition, 4
sturdy chairs & round
table. $100
(352) 795-0763



2 Rear Engine
Riding Mowers,
Snapper 33" cut
w/ Wisconsin Robin
Engine $400.
Honda 30" Cut 9HP
$350. (352) 507-1490
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Club Cadet 2000
Clean, Good Belt,
Blades, Trans Axle
Solid Motor $650.
Craftsman 42" Riding
Mower Clean &
Rebuilt Carb/Valves/
Rings $450. with out
Battery(352) 270-4087
CraftsmanRiding
Lawn Mower
42" cut, 20hp
$500. obo
(352) 382-4779


Grass Trimmer
Stihl, 50c, curved
shaft $75
(352) 795-4674
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Craftsman LTS 1500,
17/2 HP.42"cut,
mulching kit & blade,
seldom used,
exc cond $600
352-726-6238
TILLER
Red Ox
for small gardens
$150
(352) 527-4910
WANTED TO BUY
WOOD SPLITTER
GAS OR ELECTRIC
(352) 419-4733



AZALEAS 1 GAL POTS
3 for $12 Must sell!
Compare to $10 ea in
stores 613-5818
HIBISCUS 3 GAL
Beauties, 3 colors, 3
for $36 compare to 2
Gal for $20 @ stores
Inv. off Croft 613-5818




BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. & Sun. 8a-3p
LARGE 2 FAMILY
MOVING SALE
4233 N. Deckwood
Dr. Pine Ridge

Hernando
Sat & Sun 9 to 5
12'x 6.5' landscaping
trailer, tackle, power
& hand tools, gems
antiques, glass, HO
scale trains, jewelry,
collectibles, silver
& gold, Lake Park
off 200, 3842 Webb Pt

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Neededl
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
SAT., April 26th

INVERNESS
Sat. & Sun. 7am-until
6600 E. Haden Lane



INVERNESS
Sat & Sun 9a-5p
Quality Furniture and
complete household
8635 E Sandpiper Dr


Classifieds


cfII Ci 11)NICEt'"N~J


(352) 563-5966


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Affordable Care + lite
housekping, cooking
errands, trans. Call
Lisa (352) 423-0298
Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lie/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755



A- I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *k*
FENCE PRO, all types
repairs, gates, free
est. veteran owned
lie/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
fr All Home Repairs
^ V> Small Carpentry
9 Fencing
9 Screening
,411O 9 Clean Dryer Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
S1 Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761




Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist
SP ring Tune $ 995

Up'Special 4 9 139.95
Guaranteeing 1 Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusve Laser Particle Scan to determine
the quality of the air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires April 30, 2014
t .... Lic # 9ACI 1
.1-Q "- Back To New st 199
Heating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz


"ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352-476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080


SERVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE REST,
CONSISTEMT VOTED REST OF THE RIST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install
3 Time Winner
S2011 -2012-2013

746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded S


Residential/Comm.
Lic.. Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


**Budd Excavating**
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273


Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
_ ER0015377
352-621-1248


AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lie/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lie/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861


Misc Srvice


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lie., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570


WE WILL BEAT ANY >#
WRITTEN ESTIMATE
Mowing, Hedging, Trimming, Blowing
Tree Trimming, Brush Removal,
Seasonal Planting.


ALL TYPES
V ASAP PAINTING MAC'S MOBILE RV INSTA
CHRIS SATCHELL REPAIR & MAINT. Anthony
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. RVTC Certified Tech Anthony
Insured 352-464-1397 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. (352)62
COUNT
A-I Complete Repairs NATURE COAST RV DRY-WALL
Pres. Wash Painting RV service. Darts, sales lic.2875, all
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic Mobile Repair/Maint. needs! Ce
#39765, 352-513-5746 352-795-7820, Lie/Ins. Repairs.
CALL STELLAR BLUE Removal 3:
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR Attention Budd Ex
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs Attention Budd Ex
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. Consumers! & Tree Wo
(352) 726-9998 Please make sure you hauling, ro
-are using a licensed demo, bu
Joel's Handyman Serv. and insured service Lamar 35:
Pressure Washing, professional. Many
Painting, General Rpr. service advertisers
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919 are required by state .
^ ^k law to include their *
Presur state license
-Clenn number in all adver-
CALL STELLAR BLUE don't see a license
All Int./Ext. Painting number in the ad, you
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE should inquire about it
EST (352) 586-2996 and be suspicious TREE REF
that you may STUMP G
Joel's Handyman Serv. be contacting an un- Trim/Tree
Pressure Washing, licensed business. 55ft. Buc
Painting, General Rpr. The Citrus County 352-344-26
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919 Chronicle wants to ATREE
Lawncare N More ensure that our ads Lic. & In
Spring Clean-Up, press, meet the require- Rates I
wash, bushes, beds, ments of the law. (352)8(
mulch, mow, handyman Beware of any service 3
service 352-726-9570 advertiser that can not All Tractor
provide proof that Land Clear
Pressure Washing, they are licensed to 1 time Clec
Roof Coating, Drive do business, ways (352
ways & any Handyman For questions about Arbor Reds
Repair Lic# 39477 business licensing, 24 Hr. Eme,
(352) 464-3748 please call your city Lic/Ins. Fre
THE KLEEN TEAM or county All Major C
Residential/Comm. government offices. 352-583-31
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



______it t Now's the
Handicap Showers, remodeling
Safety Bars, Firs.I reStS stms
422-2019 Lic. #2713 I *Pool Refinishing
^^^Salt Systems n^E!" s" n g0
0 Construction

P*avers
The S 1 *Leak Detection 8
SSugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
Tile M n Wnoods ServingllAll0 Citrus Counni
Floors/walls. Tubs to Pol U'& SOt Free Consultation
shower conv. No job SM a .=382-4421
too big or small. Ph: -3 U 2
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441 S tL 1rl-k tP1 otodrL* 458326


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
,MR. 352-364-4610
SMR.
"(ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated.
S Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day 7 Days a Week


S OF TILE
CALLED!
y Stender
28-4049
rY WIDE
.25 yrs exp.
your drywall
iling & Wall
Pop Corn
52-302-6838



cavatinag
k, clearing
ock drives,
shhogging
2-400-1442


OVAL &
GRINDING
SRemoval,
ket Truck
696 Lie/ins.
SURGEON
s. Lowest
Free est.
360-1452
& Tree Work
ed, Hauling
anup, Drive-
2) 302-6955
s Tree Care
irgeny Serv.
e Estimates
Credit Cards
41/206-1153


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lie/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
" 7Driveways -
" Parking Lots

" Seal Coating
SMaintenance
SOverlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmail.com
Licensed and Insured Lic.#Sp13889








* Interior/Exterior Painting
" Drywall RepairsTextures
Wallpaper Removal



352-597-2440 352-293-5088
SToll Free: 877-893-3895 |






"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County
Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


GENERAC l .....
Stand Alone A CUT ,^BCVE LUVWN
Generator 1 352-419-2779
Thnmas Elertrir I I C or 352-201-2201


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I r e e ui e




CITRUS COUNTY (a1) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 D 7


3 WHEEL BIKE
$100.
FOLD-UP WALKER
w/seat & hand brakes
$100.
(352) 436-3302
10 Gal Fish Tank w/Lid,
light, water filter, air
pump/tubing/stone,
rocks, some decor.
$40.00 563-1241
1HP above ground
pump & bladder tank,
$150
352-726-7485
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
China
86 piece Crown &
Ming Set $150
Unifloor quick style,
2 boxed $50
(352) 795-7254
Computer Desk,
Corner style
$175.
Noritake China
$75.
(352) 423-3513
DOG KENNEL Petmate
Vari-kennel Ultra Fash
XLg New Never Used!
$75.00 352-445-2402
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$30 352-613-0529
King Size Serta Perfect
Sleeper Mattress and
Box Spring. $200
(352) 382-0484
LAWN MOWER &
EDGER Huskee 21"
push mower $50.
McLane lawn edger -
$40.716-860-6715
MOTORCYCLE FLOOR
JACK CRAFTSMAN
EUC...$75.00
352-249-7212
MOTORCYCLE FLOOR
JACK CRAFTSMAN
EUC...$75.00
352-249-7212
MOTOROLA WX416
Cel Iphone NEW
w/CASE, Consumer
Cellular/unlock or 911
$28 352-382-3650
One- Kohler 3 Bay
Enamel Sink Facets
included great cond
$100. Two- 3 x 6.8
alum. Patio Doors $50.
(352) 533-2223
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $6 EACH
352-613-0529
POTATO
CURLY CUTTER
$30.
(352) 436-3302
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
VACUUM CLEANER
ORECK. Just 1 yr old.
asking $50.00;
Corner Bookcase
12x12x72, Asking $20
(352) 628-2844
YAMAHASPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $60
352-613-0529




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Blue $395, 1 Wine
$295. Both Exc.Cond.
352-270-8475
WHEEL CHAIR
Rover manual wheel
chair -$50.00
phone 382 5883




CASIO PIANO
Keyboard WK-6500 with
stand. $175.00 Phone:
352-564-1668
Karaoke
Music Machine
$125. obo
(352) 533-2223
Piano
Console,
Kohler Cambell
Very Nice Shape $150.
(352) 423-3513




New Custom Double
Honeycomb blinds, for
triple kitch. window in
the Windward Model
Villa(Terra Vista)110 x
70, 4 mo oldpd $970,
ask $200;352-746-2656




Recumbant Bike
like new
$150.
(352) 563-0338




BICYCLE
3sp, 26 in
Sun Country Huffy $65
DJ 352-621-1221
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Four GM 16"
steel wheels
$60.00
(352) 465-7506
GOLF WEDGES 52*
Gap Oversize GX2 &
60* Dunlop Lob
$15.each, $25. pair
Dunnellon 465-8495
Ladies Bicycle
Pacific Regency,
26 inch, 15 speed, $75
(352) 795-4674
Two Compound
Hunting Bows
$150.
(352) 533-2223


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


-C-
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369





Leekc


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci @ 352-212-8936
AKC Male Husky
Black/White
In tact, UTD on Shots
3 yr. old, $400. obo
(352) 246-3000
MALTI-POO PUPPIES
Addorable, non shed,
9 wks., Health cert.
Crystal River $350.
(352) 795-5204
PUPPIES
Miniature Short Hair
Daschunds
2 male 1 female CKC
papers, register ,HC
$400 ea: 786-87g-0221


RED MINIATURE POO-
DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352-419-8233
Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827
Sweet Little Puppies
Chihuahua & Mini
Daschshund &
Chiweenies, ready
soon, ckc reg.
w/health certs.
& puppy kits
Janet (352) 628-7852



HORSE TRAILER Silver
Star Slant 4 with self
contained living quar-
ters. sleeps 4. Call after
6Pm 352-726-7117



14FT Sears
Gamefisher alum.
boat, Shoreland'r
trailer, 8HP Mariner
motor, $800
(352) 601-0180




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**3R2R-515 fl**


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
BayLiner 1990
27 ft Cabin Cruiser
Exc cond. Just replaced
engine & more. Will
e-mail pics. Reduced!
$6900 352-795-1863
Custom Made 18ft
Center console 2006
Mercury Optimax 115hp
jack plate, hyd steering.
Too many extras to list!
$8,000 323-819-5161
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792

































CKRpMICLE
W~e]'s el~l new, used,






andour W orvic


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




BUY OR SELL AN RV
ONLINE
Best Deals and
Selection
Visit RVT.com
Classifieds
Thousands of RVs for
Sale by Owner and
Dealer Listings
www.RVT.com
888-771-8430

HONDA
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
TOW DOLLY
lights, electric brakes
& new strap,
excel, cond. $750.
(352) 382-1627
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




Air Conditioner
Coleman 3 ton
straight cool Mobile
Home unit w/ lOkw
electric heater $600
315-729-2634
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500 352-201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Real Lite 1987
Travel Trailer, gas
stove, oven, AC, micro,
full Bath, twin bed, fold
out couch $2500
352-746-9435
SUNDANCE
2010 5th wheel, 28FT
w/large slider, 6'x4'
deck, asking $14,500
(352) 637-6679
Terry 5th Wheel
93, remodeled, 28',
w/slide, clean title
$3800. obo
(352) 697-0361




Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
w ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





Buy Here/Pay Here


'05 Chevy Cavalier
$895 Down

'01 Dodge
Dakota R/T
$995 Down

'00 Mitsubishi Galant
$650 Down

'03 Ford Focus
$3595 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CADILLAC
97 Deville Conc. 4drs
Runs great, good tires,
Northstar system.
$3,000 802-745-8718
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
HONDA
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
Details (352) 746-0524


JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
1/4, V10, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995

CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCEDES BENZ
1980, 450SL, 50k mi.
$8,000. obo
(352) 795-0125
MUSTANG
Conv,2000,6 CYL, 5 sp.
man, repainted 2013
+ graphics, very clean
71K mi, 352-746-7215


S






Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
2000 Silverado 1500
Extended Cab.144000
mishortbed w/topper
V8, 4.8 Liter. LS pkg.
A/C.Automatic, 2WD.
AM/FM/CD. Bed liner.
Towing pkg. Red. You
won't regret buying it.
$5,800 Call 527-6709
CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
'91, 4 x4FR5, 22 RE/
5 Spd. Ext. Cab, rebuilt
mtr., pilgrim canopy
$4,800 obo, 341-0818




FORD
2007 Eddie Bauer
Explorer, leather,87k
miles, Black on beige
$13,800 352-794-3930


Misc. Notice


GMC
2005 Envoy XL, Bose
with XM, Power Sun-
roof, Towing package,
171K miles, $5500
352-302-0173

NISSAN
2003 Xterra v6, auto
4x4, cold ac. runs
great, 119k mi.
$2999.(352) 257-3894
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
FORD
2000 Windstar
good cond, runs well
$2200. obo
352-601-5110




Harley Davidson
2001, Fat Boy
Garage kept,
23,659 miles, $9,700
352-601-7911
Harley Davidson
2010 Ultra Classic
loaded, garaged,
xtras, 13,900 mi.
$19500.(352) 419-4053
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068


IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200

'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568


375-0413 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
CHESWYND
located at 4001 W. Sta-
tion Ct. Dunnellon, Florida
34433 in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Dated at Dunnellon,
Florida, this 8 day of April,
2014.
By: /s/ Deborah Sue
Broussard,
Owner
Publish in Citrus County
Chronicle: April 13, 2014


377-0413 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID

City of Crystal River
STORAGE BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS
AT WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT-BID #14-B-09
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for improvements to an existing stor-
age building located at the City's wastewater treatment plant. You are hereby in-
vited to submit a bid on the above referenced project. The Owner is the City of
Crystal River
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on April 30, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work consists of enclosing a partially open storage build-
ing with an area of approximately 940 square, extending a second story, and add-
ing windows, overhead doors, and electrical. There are alternates to replace the
roof with either fiberglass composite shingles or Galvalume metal.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"STORAGE BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS AT WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT, BID
#14-B-09", AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY
CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crystalriverfl.org), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle: April 13, 2014


374-0427 SUCRN
5/10 MEETING NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE

A First Time Homebuyer's class is being offered by Housing Services, a division under
the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners. Participants who attend the en-
tire session will receive a Certificate of Completion that is required for Neighborhood
Stabilization Program and other first time homebuyer assistance programs.
The class encompasses the entire home buying process including preparing your
credit and finances, shopping for a home, home inspection, fair housing, available
loan products, loan preapproval, and closing. A variety of industry professionals will
present to the class and answer questions throughout the session.
The class will be held 8:30am-4:30pm on Saturday, May 10th, 2014 at the Citrus
County Resource Center 2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct. Lecanto, FL 34461. Please call
Jen Pollard at (352)527-7522 or Pat Wilkerson at (352)527-7526 or you may email
Jennifer.Pollard@bocc.citrus.fl.us to register.
This event is sponsored by Citrus County Housing Services and Community Housing
Partners.
There is no charge to attend these sessions, but you must reserve a seat. Lunch will
be provided by Community Housing Partners. Child care is not available.
Any persons who require a special accomodation (ADA) for accessibility must advise
us in advance and allow at least 72 hours to provide that accommodation. TrY
(352)527-5901
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: April 13 & 27, 2014


378-0413 SUCRN
Code Compliance 4/16 Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance Awill conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, April 16, 2014 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Adkins, Kenneth R.
8455 W Longfellow St, Homosassa, Fl 34448-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Old tarps, laddersmattresses, empty 5 gallon buckets,
interior furniture, tires, old empty coolers, old wood & lumber, and miscellaneous junk
and debris all around the yard.
Adrian, Melvin R.
9901 N Northcut Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Several bags of torn household garbage and plastic
debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris on vacant wooded lot.
DeMarchi, Thomas E. & Lucy
8335 E Turner Camp Rd, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Huge amounts of household items, furniture, and mis-
cellaneous junk.

Fletcher, Patricia A. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
150 S Otis Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Papers, plastics, multiple appliances, tarps, fires, and
other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Foreclosure Advisors LLC
4245 W Roadrunner Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34446-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for


no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Piles of wood and lumber, mattresses, box springs, inte-
rior furniture, interior cabinets, bathtubs, toilets, sinks, tires, blue crates, trash cans,
clothes, coolers, and miscellaneous junk and debris all around the yard.
Hauter, Randall **REPEAT VIOLATION-
19 W Lemon St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, tarps, garbage, plastics, metals, a spa, wood, tree
debris, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Jablonski EST, Sophie ATTN: Robert Lester Jordan **REPEAT VIOLATION-
7605 E Gospel Island Rd, Inverness, Fl 34450-
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

John & Evelyn Smith Trust
10722 N Rousseau Dr, Dunnellon, Fl 34433-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One untagged two door Nissan pickup truck.

King, Danielle
7529 W Turkeyneck Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31 (a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A couple empty coolersa crib and mattress, 55 gallon
drum full of trash, empty cardboard boxes, a ladder and ironing board against the
fence, fishing gear and canoe on and around the ground, and miscellaneous junk
and debris in and outside of the fenced in area.

King, Danielle
7529 W Turkeyneck Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One red Toyota Corolla and one charcola gray Dodge Dakota extended
cab.
Lumapas, Fabian C. & Gaythee A.
1221 W Buftonbush Dr, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465-
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Phase Five Properties LLC
5593 W Holiday St, Homosassa, Fl 34446-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A blue couch with cushions, a silver and black televi-
sion, plastic kids swimming pool, a pile of carpet, and a large pile of debris.

Rich, Carl & Newton, Betty L.
4156 E Lake Park Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442-
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18-8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: Shed, carport, and two
porches need ATF permits.
Roddenberry, William & Bamela
11242 W Yellow Oak Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34428-
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Roosen, James I. **RELEASE OF FOF**
68 Rose Ave, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465-
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18-62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: En-
closing an open carport.

Smith, Marshall K. & Joyce D.
275 S Rooks Ave, Inverness, Fl 34453-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tarps, plastics, paper, tires, buckets, and other miscella-
neous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Smith, Marshall K. & Joyce D.
275 S Rooks Ave, Inverness, Fl 34453-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The two open trailers, two trailers with boats on them, a white station wagon
backed in, and a Jeep with no tag parked on the property.
Tomer Inc.
7739 E Watson St, Inverness, Fl 34450-
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18-8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: Joined two single wide
mobile homes and converted them into a triplex without permits.
Waugh, Lillian
4134 W Norvell Bryant Hwy, Lecanto, Fl 34461-
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18-8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: An extension to the bill-
board.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352)341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)341-6580.

GREGG R. BRENNAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE

Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: April 13, 2014


376-0413 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE
ITB# 015-14
Janitorial Services Citrus County
Department of Community Services
&
Division of Library Services

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid To provide for the routine, daily janitorial services to maintain and clean various
locations for the Citrus County Department of Community Services, Support Services
Division and Division of Library Services. It covers such things as the established over-
all daily cleaning procedures; removal of wastebasket trash; sanitization and deo-
dorization of all restroom facilities; vacuuming of carpeted areas and upholstered
furniture; dusting of hardwood furniture, wooden and metal shelves; provision of pa-
per and cleaning supplies; semi-annual stripping and waxing of hard-surfaced floor-
ing; semi-annual carpet cleaning by deep extraction cleaning method; semi-annual
upholstered chair cleaning by an extraction cleaning method; and the routine gen-
eral janitorial maintenance schedules required for each facility.
Bidders must have a minimum of five (5) years experience performing commercial
janitorial services similar to the size and scope, of services specified in the bid docu-
ments.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before May 13, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for May 13, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352)527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352)527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: April 13, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COAST-TO-COAST


2014 FOCUS
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing $0 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


w w
2014 FUSION
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


v


2014 ESCAPE
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


See what everyone
is talking about.


2014 FIESTA
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing $0 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 EDGE
$329 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due at Signing SO st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 EXPLORER
$339 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due at Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


j FORD CREDIT


BLUE OVAL T


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00


GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
726-1231
www.nicknicholasford.com


Brad Hill
Salesperson of the Month


'2013 CY sales.**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will
qualify for Ford Credit financing. 0%APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 04/30/14.


SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT


DS SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014




INSIDE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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The Redal Estate Leaders


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INVERNESS 637-6200
I 1 1: 1 H -Il1 I


HOMOSASSA 628-7800
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BEVERLY HILLS 527-7842
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CRYSTAL RIVER 795-2441
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E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


New
milestones
for RE/MAX
agents
The associates and
staff of RE/MAX Re-
alty One are pleased
to announce that Tony
Viggiano and Debra
Pilny have each quali-
fied for the 2014 Mil-
lion Dollar Club.
Tony is an agent in
the Homosassa office
of RE/MAX and Debra
works out of the Inver-
ness office.
The brokers of
RE/MAX congratulate
these two on their
success.


Debra Pliny
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Tony
Viggiano
RE/MAX
Realty One.


ERA agents
hitting
new highs
in 2014
ERA American Re-
alty & Investments is
proud to announce Gary and
the latest production Karen
level achieved by two Baxley
of its agents year to ERAAmerican
date. Realty &
Gary and Karen Investments.
Baxley, Inverness of-
fice, have surpassed the $2 million mark
in closed sales volume thus far in 2014.
ERAAmerican Realty is proud to rec-
ognize the achievements of these fine
real estate professionals.
They can be reached at the Inverness
office of ERAAmerican Realty at 352-
726-5855.


Tips for spring cleaning


TALl ARBEL
AP business writer

NEW YORK With spring
emerging from a seemingly never-
ending winter, I wanted to clean my
New York City apartment But with-
out cleaning products.
I've been trying to eliminate unfa-
miliar chemicals and the consumer
products stuffed with them from my
life when feasible. So I got advice on
how to clean without them from
Cori Morenberg, the owner of the
Ms. Green-Clean cleaning service in
New York, and Mary Findley, author
of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to
Green Cleaning" and a seller of
green cleaning products.
They had a few key ingredients


for me: White vinegar, baking soda,
dish detergent, essential oils, rub-
bing alcohol and water
So can I clean without Clorox,
See SPRING/Page E5







oUR L.ST.N. SELL FAST
I Cive us a call to list
Jackie affney ason Gaffney
| Realtor-- A HOUS Realtor y2
3&j 02-3179 s~oLName, 287-9022 g-
l~hfl 746l-6700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!|
[ 'dcoenCilil EEKS REALTY, 5BEVRYHLL LD


L ^-OUR LISTINGS SELL FAST!
I \^\Give us a call to list
I ^^^ your home today!


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate agents and associates submitted for the Real
Estate Digest are kept on file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is
the responsibility of the individuals submitting news notes to ensure
headshots have been sent to the newsroom, and to advise staff of any
name changes.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well; submit the
digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff will color correct and otherwise
"work up" the image to Chronicle publication standards.


I PAAD OFHMS .. MV -I REDY


Move-in ready 3/2/2. 3/2/2. Great investment opportunity 2/2. Cute as a button country style 3/2
708705 $75,900 708572 $144,900 708448 $49,900 707451 $107,950
Yolanda Canchola 219-2196 RandyMorehouse 287-2934 Randy Morehouse 287-2934 Steve McClory422-3998
00HXXDS
h^M, J~;JH*lllH lt,^H ^ I^lglI~


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 E3




E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci i^NicjLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hate to weed?



Jane seconds that


Columnist shares tips to minimize chore
lbert Einstein kept a weedy garden Nature and I sprinkle seeds there. Wild-
at his lakeside allotment near flowers, saplings, shrubs and natural
Berlin, Germany Per- herbs eventually become a ma-
haps he did not like weeding, ture privacy screen.
He claimed, "insanity is doing The organic veggie garden
the same thing over and over and strawberry patch had few
again and expecting different unwanted weeds after being
results." abandoned for a month while I
Weeding is tiresome. I use was away birding. They were
granular Ronstar G, a selective weeded about Feb. 18 and then
pre-emergent herbicide, on dusted with an organic, corn
planting beds where I do not gluten-based pre-emergent
want seedlings to sprout. Ron- herbicide called Preen, made
star lasts for 8 to 12 weeks. It Jane Weber in Lebanon, Pa. It is all-natural
kills only sprouting seeds. JANE'S and made specifically for food
Apply mid-February before GARDEN gardens. I started using it a
new weed seedlings germinate, GAR EN year ago. While not as long-
then again in April and every lasting as stronger chemical
two to three months from spring to fall. pre-emergents, Preen is non-toxic and ac-
The wildflower beds and wildlife buffer tually does work for about a month.
zone around the perimeter of the prop- A handful of pepper seeds saved from a
erty do not get treated with fertilizer or
pre-emergents and have no irrigation. See JANE/Page E6


Inside...


Backyard makeover
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
Spring cleaning
PAGE E3
Beyond Lego
PAGE E13
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


More information on porcelain pieces; perils of translation


D earJohn: I noticed the
article in the Sunday
newspaper about old
dishes. Attached is
a picture of a dish,
bowl, and spoon
that are very old
and were hand- .
painted. Would you
give me your opin-
ion of their worth?
-AW, Internet
Dear A.W: The
word Nippon on
the underside of John S
your pretty porce- SIKOF
lain ladle, bowl AT
and plate was used _____
by the Japanese for
the country of origin export
mark from 1891 until 1921. In
1921, Japan replaced the
word Nippon.
Nippon porcelain products
were produced in large quan-


L

I


tities and have been a collect-
ing category for decades. Re-
productions have flooded the
marketplace, so
S new buyers be-
ware. Potential dol-
S lar value for your
three pieces would
,. be less than $50.
Dear John:
Thank you for try-
ing to identify the
plate I asked you
about in a previous
korski contact, to which
SKI'S you replied in the
IC Citrus County
_____ Chronicle Sunday
March 2. Unfortu-
nately, one of the pictures
must not have gotten up-
loaded, so I am sending it to
you now and hopefully you can
help me further identify it
Thank you again for the


leads for proper identifica-
tion at Replacements.com. I
want you to know that the
plate is hand-painted no
dots and that the antique
dealer I bought it from told
me that it was Dostoevsky,
circa 1860. If you can help me
further with this, I will surely
appreciate it. -A., Internet
DearA.: I am glad you sent
a photograph of the mark on
your pretty plate. The cobalt
blue mark was used by the
Royal Porcelain Manufactory
See ATTIC/Page Ell
These porcelain pieces
bear the word "Nippon,"
which indicates they were
produced in Japan sometime
between 1891 and 1921.
Collectors should be alert for
reproductions.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPRING
Continued from Page E3

Windex and Murphy Oil Soap?
(Yes.) Is it harder? (Kind of- it's
an extra step to mix cleaners to-
gether rather than just spraying
from a package.) Does it smell
better? (Yes.) Is it easier on my
skin? (Yes.) Cheaper? (A little.)
All-purpose cleaner
A one-size-fits-all soapy mix-
ture works for most surfaces,
both Morenberg and Findley say
Morenberg likes warm water,
dish soap she likes a brand
called Ecover- and a few drops
of an essential oil in a bucket.
Findley pushes warm water,
Biokleen dish soap and about a
quarter-cup of distilled white
vinegar, and she puts the whole


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 E5


mixture in a spray bottle.
Morenberg recommends dip-
ping microfiber and cotton terry
cloths, available at grocery
stores and hardware stores, in
the solution, wringing them out
and then attacking floors and
other surfaces.
Exceptions: Findley says the
vinegar mixture should not be
used on stone floors or counter-
tops because the acid in it can
dull the surface. So stick to hot
water and soap. On wood or lam-
inate floors, avoid soap. Clean
those with warm water and
vinegar
I filled a large plastic con-
tainer halfway with warm water,
poured in less than half a cup of
white vinegar, added a few drops
of some lavender essential oil
and a squirt of my dish soap. I
tried cleaning my window sills,
which got grimy over the winter,


with paper towels dipped in this
mix. That didn't work so well -
the windowsills are less dirty,
but aren't sparkling, either
Using paper towels with the so-
lution didn't work well for me on
really dirty surfaces.
Windows and mirrors
Findley's recipe: One-third cup
distilled white vinegar, one-quar-
ter cup rubbing alcohol and water
- she recommends distilled in
an unused spray bottle. Use old
cotton T-shirts to wipe dry
Bathroom
I soaked an old T-shirt in my
all-purpose mixture and
scrubbed my tiled bathroom
floor with it. It seemed clean
enough and smelled better than
Clorox, although I got a bit light-
headed from the vinegar fumes.
If you have windows in the bath-


room, open them.
Then I sprinkled baking soda
in the sink and bathtub and went
over them with a sponge that
had some of the dish detergent
on it. My metal fixtures looked
great and grime came out of the
sink and tub fine.
The walls above my bathtub
still had soap scum on them,
though. Findley recommended
wiping them down with a sponge
or non-scratching pad drenched
in boiling vinegar, but I was too
nervous about burning myself to
do so.
Some of the grout is moldy
The cleaner I mixed together
didn't make much difference on
the mold but neither had
Tilex or Clorox, the cleaners I
relied on before. Findley says
hot vinegar can take care of it,
and recommends squirting the
liquid from a veterinarian's sy-


ringe, similar to a turkey baster
I sprinkled baking soda inside
the toilet and on its surfaces,
then used a toilet wand to clean
the inside as I normally would. I
scrubbed the rim and outside
with the soapy sponge.
Kitchen
I also cleaned my kitchen floor
with the all-purpose cleaner,
which worked fine.
My countertops are marble,
which Findley recommends
wiping down with warm water
and a mild detergent. Same for
the inside of the refrigerator
I didn't clean the inside of my
oven yet, but Morenberg says
this should take less than half an
hour and does not require harsh
cleaners. She uses dish soap and
copper scouring pads that cost
$3 for a two-pack on
Amazon.com.


Specil^izBinginTerraVist
& Brentwoo Res5B
wwTrais tae tSou~o


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLA I festyle communities, Terra Vista of Citrus Hlls. Situated abutting open space n the rearths
3rightand Open describes this 3-2-2 Vila with a beautifully private landscaped backyard maintenance free" home offers an open great room plan with formal dining area, spacious
round a screenenclosed in ground pool. It also has many extras such as ceramic tile and kitchen with wood cabinets and solid surface counters, owner's suite, guest room PLUS a
olid surface counter tops, stanless steel app lances to name just few. Step outside fora den/3rd bedroom, enclosed lanai for year round use & 2-car garage. The home has been
resh orange off te tree. It is a Must-See maintenance free Villa, located in the bea utiful impecca bly maintained both inside & out and shows ike a model. Be sure to put it on your
:ommun i of Brentwood. MLS709730 ......................................................................$ 145,000 "M UST SEE"...You will not be disa pointed! MLS709734......................................$249,900


SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3-CAR, WOODSIDE
Spectacular Cordova model loaded with upgrades, including granite countertops in
HED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS your beautiful Gourmet kitchen with built in sky light, custom window treatments and
itenance-free living in this 2/2/2 w/office in Terra Vista's. Dual pane gorgeous lighting fixtures. Formal dining and living areas plus a large family room give
ss pocket doors lead out to a beautiful screened private inground pool great spaces for entertaining. Enloy a relaxing retreat on your extended screened
It's the perfect place to enjoy your morning coffee in the fresh Florida lanai with Shoji hot tub. All this plus a 3+car garage with a separate golf cart
58772............................................................................................. $210,000 entrance. PRICED TO SELL! This home is a must see. M LS353844 .......... $345,000


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Move ght into this mm n stare Joyng ieFlor ida Ifesyle. Open an sp acious,
Maintenance-free villa with an open floor plan design with great use of the space, there are 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, plus a den and a 2-car garage, large great room, dining area &
3 bedroom, 2 bath Villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, living room, family room, fully appianced kitchen. Home is light and bright and all rooms are spacious. Top it offwith an
formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2-car enclosed Florida room all nicely situated on a fully landscaped cul-de-sac homesite. Fantastic
oversized garage, all situated in beautiful Terra Vista. MLS 703250...... $179,00 gated communitywith greatamenities to enjoy. MLS 707146 ...................................... $148,900
_.Vft. I 1.00


Ui I.I.lU VILLA, Z DLU, Z JAI L-U.K, 1KLP.IiWUUU VILLA,
Immaculate Bristol model, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, split plan home in Brentwood of Citrus
Hills. Great room, dining room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy
nook, inside laundry room and a 2-car garage. Neutral tile throughout the home,
bedrooms are carpeted. Gated community, with access to the world class amenities
of Citrus Hills Country Club. Just minutes to golf courses, pools, sauna, hot tub, Bella
Vita Fitness Center and Brentwood recreation center. MLS 707514..........$249,000


Elegance, sirmpicity and breathtaking describes this 3/2.5/2 with den. This home has arguably one
of the best views in Terra Vista overlooking 8th green of prestigious Skyview golf course.
Professionally decorated throughout with completely upgraded kitchen featuring stately cabinets
and Coran counters. Stoneaccented frontwith bnck paverson drivewayand lanai set this home
apart from all others. Maintenance free iving at its best MLS 707623......................$349,000


Terms 6 Mots or More
Te rait Br nt oo R na ls Soca Mebrsi inlue wit a lRets


111111 with two baths as rwe as eda
BRENTWOOD 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS oft/office space Barely lived HUNT CLUB, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR BRENTWOOD, DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR
Come take a look at this fully furnished home in the Community of i n, close to all the amenities, Single family home unfurnished, nicely upgraded kitchen, tile floors Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate, unfurnished
Brentwood. 2 bedroom plus a bonus roon. Close to the community pool and and located in a quiet-cul-de and carpet in bedrooms. Extended lanai with pavers. All appliances, detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2-car garage. Open floor
exercise area. Perfect for seasonal or full time residence. All rental prices .. sac. Social Membership Citrus HillsSocial membership and lawn care included. Single plan with lots of space. Social membership is included. Single family
are based on one year rental. 6 months are negotiable. #1126 ........ $1,350 included. 1169 ........$1,150 family home (detached) #303317................................................ ...$1550 home(detached) Brentwood. 2121 .............................................$1,200


REALTY GROUP




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

A handful of pepper seeds saved
from a bag of mixed sweet peppers
from the grocery store were scat-
tered half way between the tomato
plants. No corn gluten was sprinkled
near the seeds. A month later there
were few weed seedlings in the bed,
but the pepper seeds had sprouted
and needed thinning. Now the bed
needs weeding and another applica-
tion of Preen. Would Einstein con-
sider me crazy?
My garden beds are richly
amended with finely milled mulch
trucked in from Central Landfill on
State Road 44 west of Inverness.
They load it for free at fixed times.
Over the past three years I spread
275 tons -11 dump trucks full on
my sandhill property Organic, de-
cayed humus with all the natural
soil organisms, fungus, and decom-
posers is the only thing needed to
turn sandy soil into fertile land.
Weed seeds dry, die, decompose
or are cooked by composting
temperatures.
I had planted a dozen evergreen,
perennial and self-seeding native
Blue Spiderworts, Tradescantia vir-
giniana. After three years, there are
literally thousands of clumps scat-
tered throughout the property The
welcome home was a delight, with
masses of vibrant blue flowers atop
stiff, fleshy stems. Long, strap-like
leaves, 10 to 18 inches high, are in a
clump from the base. These plants are
easily transplanted or put in pots for
other wildflower enthusiasts to adopt
Tradescantia has about 70 species
in the genus, all native to North or
South America in cold hardiness
zones 7 to 10. Naturally occurring
Blue Spiderwort has clusters of
three-petaled flowers with six
golden-yellow, pollen-tipped anthers
atop stamens. Their eight-month
flowering season lasts from March to
October
Spiderworts are abuzz with bees
and butterflies on sunny days. Hav-
ing so many pollinators attracted to
the garden ensures good pollination
of the strawberry, tomato and pep-
per flowers. Pollination is essential
for plants to produce seeds and fruit
for people to eat.
I control weeds in the edible gar-
den with Preen and keep some foun-
dation beds weed-free with Ronstar
and pine needle top mulch. Perhaps


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Blue Spiderworts is one of about 70
species in the genus, all native
to North or South America. Their
eight-month flowering season lasts
from March to October.
I am sane by Einstein's standard. I
have no inclination to repeatedly
pull weeds. Much of the garden is
left to nature. Enjoy the wildflowers
wherever they sprout


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.

ServingCitrus& Levy Counties Since 1970
|David G. Griffin
Real Estate
O i Licensed Real Estate Broker
lCell 352-228-1812
H i Office 352-795-0330


E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 E7


Average 30-year loan rate



drops to 4.34 percent


Market adjusting to uncertainty in spring buying season


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Average U.S.
rates on fixed mortgages declined
this week, edging closer to histori-
cally low levels as the spring home-
buying season begins.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday that the average rate for
the 30-year loan fell to 4.34 percent
from 4.41 percent last week. The av-
erage for the 15-year mortgage eased
to 3.38 percent from 3.47 percent.
Mortgage rates have risen about a
full percentage point since hitting
record lows about a year ago.
Going into the spring buying sea-
son, the housing market faces a
dilemma: Too few people are selling
homes. Yet too few buyers can afford
the homes that are for sale.
A double-digit jump in the aver-
age price of a home sold last year
hasn't managed to coax more home-
owners to sell. And combined with
higher mortgage rates, higher prices
have made homes costlier for first-
time buyers, as well as for all-cash
investors.
Refinancing's share of mortgage
applications fell from 53 percent to
51 percent in the week ended April 4
- the lowest level since July 2009,
the Mortgage Bankers Association
reported Wednesday


Average prices nationally are ex-
pected to rise by single digits this
year The gains could be strongest in
areas with solid job growth, such as
Seattle and Austin (Texas).
The increase in mortgage rates
over the year was driven by specula-
tion that the Federal Reserve would
reduce its $85 billion-a-month bond
purchases, which have helped keep
long-term interest rates low Indeed,
the Fed has announced three
$10 billion declines in its monthly
bond purchases since December
The latest plan is to cut its monthly
long-term bond purchases to $55 bil-
lion because it thinks the economy
is steadily healing.
The Fed also said after its two-day
policy meeting last month that even
after it raises short-term interest
rates, the job market strengthens
and inflation rises, the central bank
expects its benchmark short-term
rate to stay unusually low.
To calculate average mortgage
rates, Freddie Mac surveys lenders
across the country between Monday
and Wednesday each week. The av-
erage doesn't include extra fees,
known as points, which most bor-
rowers must pay to get the lowest
rates. One point equals 1 percent of
the loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-year


mortgage was unchanged at
0.7 point The fee for a 15-year loan
remained at 0.6 point.
The average rate on a one-year ad-
justable-rate mortgage fell to 2.41 per-
cent from 2.45 percent. The average
fee rose to 0.5 point from 0.4 point
The average rate on a five-year
adjustable mortgage declined to
3.09 percent from 3.12 percent. The
fee held steady at 0.5 point.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again, be pre-
pared to leave a detailed message.



.,. : ,, 47 LINDER DR.

-1 HOMOSASSA, FL
"!|^ ^ j SUGARMILL WOODS

Cabana style pool home.
Like new condition.
Exquisitely remodeled
throughout.
Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd., Left on 2nd Douglas St., Right on Linder, See house on right.
I 4I I |Alison Markham, GRI and Steve McClory, Realtor'
352-697-0761 or 352-422-3998
A & 1 nfognatu recoastliv! ng .co m


U' i 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Ballour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE REALTOR P Al yi


I w 84490W STABLE
3/3.5/3 709726 $289.900 J


LAUREL IDG


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to
columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for
Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./
Friday
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the
Religion section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses in the Business section./Sundays


PINE RIDGE-
m0wow- ,
0 om




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County's



UGLIEST


backyard...







Businesses to conduct H
full-fledgedmakeover
for winning entry '
ERYN WORTHINGTON BK '
Staff writer
he grass is not always greener on
the other side.
Sometimes it's dead, sandy, boring
and not very appealing.
It's a raw and unpalatable site that
Ken and Anna Mosley of Hernando can at-
test too. What their backyard may lack in
aesthetics, it more than makes up for in love.
The couple said that family love is all they
need to have a good time especially in
their cramped backyard.
"When you don't have tons of money to buy
the best of everything, it's a situation where s
you do what you can do," Ken Mosley said.
"We just love spending family time together.
That is what is most important to us."
Recently, the Mosleys won what they con-
sider the backyard lotto a $10,000 ,
makeover at the Chronicle-sponsored
See Page E10
Anna, left, and Ken Mosley, who won
the Chronicle's ugliest backyard contest,
push their son, Elijah, on the seesaw in
their backyard.
LOGAN MOSBY/Chronicle


E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHRONICLE'S nTPPT fl
HOM OTDOOR


&LifINII
931019


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 E9


YOU WON'T FORGET THIS ONE! Crystal River. ALL YOUR DREAMS WITHIN YOUR MEANS! 2006 3/2/2 pool home for $148,750! Custom
'06,4/2.5,2 story w/2,984 living, $144,500. NEW inground pool & pavers, covered BBQ area, fenced yard, shed w/electric & wired for generator, new paint,
int. paint, flooring, appliances, large deck, covered porch. kitchen w/Corian counters, S/S apple tile & bamboo flooring, tray & vaulted ceilings, plantation shutters, int.
709768. 8242 N. Verdino. Tomika Spires-Hanssen. laundry & Home Warranty! 708301. 4874 S. Hummingbird. Tomika Spires-Hanssen tel: 352-586-6598.


OPE HUS


Chronicle
The Citrus County Chronicle hosted its first Home
and Garden Outdoor show Saturday, April 6, where
a number of businesses showcased their products. At
the show, the Chronicle announced the winner of its
Backyard Makeover contest, Anna Mosley. See more
photos, page El12.


;.,- "-'" .. DOWNTOWN INVERNESS LOCATION,
'. ." .: '. "." -- can't be beat! Corner lot, completely remodeled
2/1 HOME w/quality long term tenant. 3/2 w/possible 4th/office. 300 Park Ave.
PRICED RIGHT AT $49,900. #703806. Owner says sell. $79,500. #703874.




El0 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014



BEFORE
Continued from Page E8

inaugural Home and Out-
door Living Show
The event brought to-
gether more than 50 com-
munity and business
partners for home and out-
door enthusiasts, which
featured an "ugliest back-
yard" contest. Entries
were posted at chronicle
online. corn and readers
cast their votes for the top
honor
Ken's wife, Anna, en-
tered the contest on the
last day for entries to be
submitted, and was deter-
mined to win the top prize
- provided by Jason
Aguilar's Landscaping,


Crystal Casual Inc., Mosaic
Tile and Remodel and
Color Country Nursery
To her disbelief, she
won.
"I have almost 3,000
Facebook friends and
1,400 Twitter followers,"
Anna said. "I posted it 10
times a day on my ac-
counts and asked people
to help vote. I did not lose
one friend. In fact I think I
gained 25 friends.
"I was on the computer
probably 12 to 15 hours a
day," she said. "When it
was finally announced, I
just screamed with happi-
ness and then we high-
fived all night."
Titled "Backyard not
suitable for my children,"
Anna described her back-
yard online as, "Broken


kids to have an awesome
new backyard. I know my
seven kids would be so
excited."
The family of nine
moved to the Hernando


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


swing set and no grass.
There is nowhere to put
their bikes and toys. The
dogs need a good backyard
as well. I am hoping and
praying to win this for the


IOOOHY2C ^ I

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CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 '
oCE: (352) 795-6633 Realt
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AG-ENT i *O 3 ID SEVNAYS A WE


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front porch, cathedral J1... eat in
kitchen, rear fenced (2012),
paved road 100% laminated floors A
must see #709742 $39,000




HOMOSASSA D/W M/H on 1 8 acres
on a corner in green acres 3 bedroom, 2
bath, dual pane windows, sheetrock
walls, open & bright formal living &
dining + family room partially inground
pool w/screened 1-.-i T --- -t--.ge
shed/game room t I'' i '/'lii


CRYSTAL RIVER Commercial
opportunity in nursery, wholesale;
fencing & landscaping sales also, 5 acres
totally fenced, plants, office, equipment,
I. & samples of fence work
;iJ' 3 $300,000





CRYSTAL RIVER totally renovated, 2
bdrm, 1 bath home with carport, fully
fenced, downtown Crystal Ri 1.
laundry room, currently rented o. ., 1.
to month basis make a nice investment,
#700696 $43,000


HERNANDO cute fixer upper in
Apache Shores, 2 bedrm, 1 bath w/utility
shed, screer- 1-.1I pool, all new
electrical, :*' i house gutted,
1 ..... ed Shed w/washer &
,, '.'' $15,000




DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
M/H '-t-;- -; cars/workshop on 2
acres .. i cabinets, china
cabinet, carpet through out except for
kitchen, baths and laundry room Large
family r... .--..t. l --1;-. gourmet
kitchen' i... i 4' $ 05,000






LECANTO Nice half acre with well,
septic and impact fees paid Mobile not
livable but, take it off and replace with
new Center of county, Lecanto School
dist #703990 $18,000




CITRUS SPRINGS large 3 bedroom, 2
bath, one car garage; screen porch w/
slider to kitchen, family rm & main
bedroom Ceiling fans 1. .tin
bedrooms new counters in i i. w/
newer appliances; fenced rear yard
#708524 Reduced To $83,000


Titled "Backyard not suitable for

my children," Anna described her

backyard online as, "Broken

swing set and no grass. There

is nowhere to put their bikes

and toys. The dogs need a good

backyard as well.


residence in 2004, and
Anna and Ken Mosley
tried to make the backyard
as kid-friendly as possible.
However, funds were tight.
Ken works for a pool com-
pany, while Anna takes
care of the children at
home.
"We can't afford to take
the kids on vacations,"
Anna said, "so they need
their own little place. In
the summer they are con-
stantly in the pool, but it is
on its last leg. And the
backyard is not a kid-
friendly area to work with.
Ken built a swing set, but
it's no longer safe. I really


Afl American Realty For a VisualTour and all MLS: J c i
HEM & Investments bjdavis.com Jackie Davis
ERA" 117 S. Hwy. 41
ERA .. 4 vere,F. jackie@bidavis.com (352) 634-2371 Celli
WHAT' E NAEW FLTEMREALOFAUIG.


IAt



Built in 2006, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with dormer windows WELCOME TO AWORLD OF EASY LIVING COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
bringing height and light where is counts. Black bamboo wood Here's a superiorvilla community offering exterior painting, roof An adorable building you can live and work in. Its zoning is
floors, hickory cabinets, Conan counters. A stone fireplace in the care lawn/shrub care, irrigation, cable, clubhouse/heated pool
living room, French doorstothe 32ft. lanai with outdoor shower, half RV/boat parking $163/month). This 2-story townhouse has mixed-use; has mostly been used as commercial. Space
bath. Office and a "bonus" room for crafts or even as a second 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, an office. The master suite is on the 1st for kitchen is plumbed and wired. Ample front parking for
office. The pool is solar heated, the home is wired for a generator floor. You'll find 2 bedrooms, a bath and a walk-in attic on the 2nd commercial enterprise. Septic drain field redone in 12/13.
and has a surround sound system. All on an acre. Citrus Hills floor. Sitting on our 46-mile Rails-To-Trails and close to historic, O er ncin erprise eptic drain field redone in 1.
membership stays with home. quaint, downtown Inverness. Owner financing offered to qualified candidates.
MLS 709826 $259,010 MLS 708363 $115,00 MLS 707273 $68,900


just want something nice
for the kids."
The Mosleys envision a
family backyard where
they can enjoy a barbecue
while the kids swim or
play in a sandbox during
the day, and where they
can sit around a fire pit in
the evenings.
"We just want a place
that we can just sit down
and be comfortable," Anna
said.
They will be meeting
with the companies soon
to assess their backyard
and begin planning what
renovations need to
occur.


COLD11118IL
BANKOR




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This plate was
likely made by the .
Royal Porcelain
Manufactory in
Berlin, Germany,
sometime in the
late 19th to early
20th century.
Special to the Chronicle


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

in Berlin, Germany, from the 18th cen-
tury and on through the 19th century
I think your piece was made in the
late 19th to early 20th century because
of the red lines that are over the cobalt
blue scepter mark Perhaps Replace-
ments Ltd. will have the complete
story Let us know the outcome.
Dear Jomhn: A lady inquired in ref-
erence to her manuscript printed on
vellum. I have a similar item, mine
is a Psalter leaf, printed on calfskin
and hand-lettered in the 17th cen-
tury by Spanish monks.
Some of these pages can be beau-
tifully illuminated, a work of art.
Mine is somewhat crude, valuable to
me for the history of it. Evidently,
monasteries were a popular desti-
nation for some, guaranteeing them
housing, food, education, etc. Unfor-
tunately, many of these monasteries
have now been closed and their an-
tiquities have become available for
sale on the open market.
I treasure mine, because where
the pages would be turned, there is
evidence of sweat-staining in the bot-
tom right corner, as long ago, those
large pages were often turned. Re-
garding translating same, good luck.
I had a neighbor who was a medical
doctor and the product of Catholic
schools, considering himself profi-
cient in Latin. He announced he
would translate this document and
return it to me. When considerable


time went by with no translation, he
admitted he was stymied at translat-
ing this document!
In one of those happy coincidences,
he had a relative visiting him who
said she would look at it. To my as-
tonishment, she quickly deciphered
it and gave me the translation. When
I asked how she was able to do this so
quickly, this relative, a nun teaching
at the college level, explained one of
her master's degrees was in translat-
ing ancient documents, and that the
document was written in epigraphy,
which I think she said is where we get
the phrase "Pig Latin."
My page was a musical version of
a response for a holy day The trans-
lation is firmly in place on the back-
side of the frame! Memories of how
it came to be translated just increase
my pleasure in this framed docu-
ment. Your faithful reader M.B.,
Inverness
Dear M.B.: Good story; thanks for
taking the time to write and share it
with our readers. The physical signs
of use and age are part of the overall
appreciation in the world of an-
tiques. It is good you pointed that out.
Coincidences are often part of the
searching and hunting for antiques.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski2aol. com.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place
and other details.
* News releases are subject to editing. Call 352-563-5660 for details.



-0 4 9 T Ai9


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820
NEW LISTING


_, I- 5 ..-". .. -
"7ji,$St 1048 W Lake Valley Ct
S MLS 709794 $338,000
Ready to sell! 3/2/2 beautifully enhanced,
on cul-de-sac.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


`)ift, 479W Mickey Mantle Path
MLS 703997 $385,000
Value, savings, elegance &the golf view
you've dreamed of in this 4/2.5 home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


/a- H- o N bennington ler
VJ MLS 706262 $234,900
Spacious pool home Hilltop views
abound beautiful, bright & airy
3/2.5/2 pool home.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774






'S'tflt'5 "115 N Carnevale Ter
.- rl: IiiIl S225.500uu
3/2 pool home offers peace & serenity on
private one acre.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086

Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Powe


QSr Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A Weeldk! Properties
NEW LISTING


Sa2273 N SI Lucie Pt
MLS 709802 $98,500
Fully furnished 2/2/1 split plan w/enclosed
Florida room.
John Lombard 352-422-6887


-. iiqwiiM AE W IB

3260 N Pinelake Village Pt
MLS 705870 $324,700
Tastefully decorated 3/2.5/2 pool home in
private, gated community.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


3001 N Sheriff Dr
S MLS 707786 $398,900
PERFECT FOR MULTI-GENERATIONAL
FAMILY! Unique pool homew/large
attached apartment.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


ffkai tvm?_ .111111
J..tLs 141 E Liberty St
MLS 707281 $294,900
3/2/3 pool home w/views of Oaks Golf
Course 18th fairway.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


,-ifjr1 zui vv uoerr rain fJll, 1 L c ,iWadu LI
S MLS 708247 $229,000 -.i : JX.,I $228.uu000
Relax & enjoy the private backyard and Pride of ownership thru-out this Oaks Golf
lanai of this 3/2/2 + den/bonus room. Course 3/2/2 + office + golf cart garage.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


TO i0a: 5371 N Red Ribbon Pit
/ i r.11.: ;.'. U S219.UU000
Gorgeous landscaping surrounds this
nice 3/2/3 pool home w/ lots of "extras".
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


-1 .L i S1149.445
I need some lovin'! I'm a strong,
spacious 3/2/2; I want to be
fabulous again.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


*Repeat Home Buyer
-First Time Home Buyer


and Associates' 2013 "ill kE&-- -First Time Home Seller
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl -^

1.hi II III 1 II ,I III I I eIs .
.. .. I1 ,, ,h II.... I.. 0, , h i I I.. .. i. .I I I ,, I .. Ih ,,- Sh ,I h- ,, I ,S, l l I . ii h .


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 Ell




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ui-A
: ( ..-. ""


CHRONICLE'S









serr


SUAl An4ni M AMERICAN
Alb I AnniIII Realtor E.RA REALTY &INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU' 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
BlI~flH ^B--- 9ffl' <... /C1\11A 1/n Beverly Hills FL 34465|
SCell: (352) 220-8143 Office: 352-746-3600
alantoni@era com ..

pl 4260 N. BRYNNER PASS TERR.
...po BEVERLY HILLS
Q/312 pool home mo2
es, formal dinning, one
1294900 #708713


Lo Realtor A REALTY & INVESTMENTS
i ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511N. LentoHwy1.
cBedell: (352697.1685 Fl 546
Ce1: (352) 697.1685 oficm352-746-3600


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Building with toy bricks: Beyond Lego


Companies offer new options for creative kids


KIM COOK
Associated Press

Building and construc-
tion toys have been a fix-
ture in playrooms since,
well, forever, and there are
several reasons for their
enduring appeal.
"Directions aren't nec-
essary, no rules or instruc-
tions are needed. Children
are just provided space to
grow," says Judith Ellis,
founder and chairwoman
of the Toy Design depart-
ment at New York's Fash-
ion Institute of Technology
"Construction toys em-
power children. They offer
a child a chance to be ad-
venturous to ask, 'what
if,' to think abstractly, de-
veloping creative intelli-
gence. Building develops
strategic thinking. It pro-
vides visionary perspec-
tive and it increases
attention spans," Ellis says.
While Lego and Mega
Blox are category stal-


warts Lego celebrates
its 82nd birthday this year
and has a hit movie in the-
aters there are other in-
teresting options to
consider
At the recent Toy Fair
2014 in New York, the
building category was ro-
bust, according to Adri-
enne Apell, trends
specialist for the Toy In-
dustry Association. "It's
been very hot, and that's
going to continue," she
says. "We love this trend
because it speaks to the
fact that classic play pat-
terns appeal to kids, gen-
eration after generation."
Parents enjoy building
stuff too, and bring their
own childhood memories
to the play table.
Magna-Tiles are colorful
geometric tiles with em-
bedded magnets along the
edges. There are also
translucent tile sets to
make see-through cre-
ations, including "stained


SO MANY OPTIONS. Gorgeous 5 ac parcel w/1/1 home,
carport, screened porch and 4 storage sheds. Cleared area for
your new home if you choose. $114,900 Call Melissa Cridland-
Bonnell or Dennis Bonnell at 352-344-5535.1583106/709024.



iM


TWO HOMES ON NICE PARCEL Great for families or
income producing. $45,000 Call Capt. Lee Harris at
352-489-4949. 158D743/708903/403882

l l 957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452
l352-344-5535
A =" www.Cridland.com


glass" windows. The plastic
is Pthalate- and Latex-free.
(www.magnatiles.com)
Tegu blocks are also
magnetized but are crafted
of wood, harvested by co-
operatives in Honduras
certified by the Forest
Stewardship Council. The
smooth-sided blocks, rec-
tangles and triangles come
in soft, natural colors in
both starter-set sizes (with
a felt travel pouch) and
larger sets of 40 to 480
pieces. There's a car-build-


ing set, too. (www.tegu.com)
Toddler builders might
like to start with
Edushape's sturdy foam
blocks and shapes. After
mastering simple tan-
grams, stacked castles and
rudimentary fitted bits,
kids can graduate to Kiddy
Connects a collection of
snap-and-lock plastic
pieces that include elbows
and other unusual shapes.
(wwwedushape.com)
K'nex has kits to make
simple machines like
windmills, sail carts, water
mills, elevators and levers,
allowing kids to tinker at


i "Always There For You"
KEY GAIL COOPER
REALTY Multimillion Dollar Realtor
% (352) 634-4346
1 Office: (352) 382-1700
[RV 9t E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com

-A -7=


] "


ARE YOU LOOKING TO DOWNSIZE?
* Custom 3/2/2 Hammocks villa
* Eat-in kitchen paneled cabinetry
* Dual paned windows 10' flat ceilings
* Glassed Florida room has dual pane too
* Complete lawn care with monthly fee
* All appliances to convey with the home
* Side entry garage gives extra storage
* Furnishings available separately
#706332 $137,900


SWEETWATERWESTWIND POOL HOME!
* 3+office/2 5/3 2,457 sq ft of living
* 12'x34' heated pool has outdoor shower
* Well for irrigation security system
* 1/2 bath off lanai for pool guests
* Large double closet in the laundry room
* Island kitchen wood cabinetry
* Separate office with built-ins
* Home warranty for the buyers
#708838 $249,700


M__ q I -11
3928 N. Passion Flower 4390 W Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills Pine Ridge
3 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage home Beautiful 4/4/3 with office. Caged in ground
with cage in-ground pool. Home offers salt water pool with spa 3981 sq. ft. of
1824 s of living area. Split floor pan, living area, stainless steel appliances Wet
roof 2009, heat & air 2003. Home bar, Tray ceilings, plantation shutters,
needs some TLC.
Prneeds some at L.114,900 Intercom, and summer kitchen. Come see
Prce at $114,900. a $5900
Dir: From 491 to left on Honeylocust i. t today^ Priced at $459,000., ,
Dr. to left onto Passion Flower to D. Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd. to
4.n.o home on left.


home with concepts they
may have been exposed to
in the classroom. (www.
knex.com)
And targeting science-
oriented young girls,
Goldie Blox kits offer the
chance to build things like
dunk tanks, spinning ma-
chines and belt drive ma-
chines. Developed by
Stanford engineering grad-
uate Debbie Sterling, the
kits feature intrepid young
inventor Goldie, her
friends and her dog Nacho
tackling various obstacles
using innovation and savvy
(www.goldieblox.com)


Finally, for the kids who
are always taking apart
broken appliances or
rewiring the stereo, con-
sider littleBits. It offers
what you need to make all
kinds of electronic circuits,
but without worrying about
wiring, programming or
soldering. The magnet-em-
bedded modules snap to-
gether, and you can add
buzzers, lights or other
components to create more
elaborate contraptions. An
online library offers free
plans, and you can share
your creations there as
well. (www.littlebits.cc)


I I


U


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
BiandrIIewv Class A Office
E Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake HwvyCiystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007-(727) 515-6571









DDEERWOOD-INVERNESS, FL REGENCY PARK (ONDO-INVERNESS, FL
1 acre with 2BR/2BA home. Close to Wal-Mart & Ground floor 2BR/2BA/1 Car gar. Convenient
Lowes. $61,999 MlS708261 locale $72,900 MlS706979



*:..WJ| ,.wNJ
REGENCY PARK-INVERNESS, FL OPEN LAKEFRONT HOME-HERNANDO, FL
1 st floor 2BR/2BA condo with replace Great 1/2 acre Updated 2BR/2BA, Fain Room
location. $51,900 MlS709755 Newer roof. $199,900 MlS709344
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ^
00HAfter Hours 13521302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allcitrusrealty cor


See.JVirtual .IIIrs@..i resalehomesI..I IIB.I.om


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 E13





E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 5635966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
r


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
*k 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

FLORAL CITY
111,sml house
$500/mo. studio apt.
$400/mo. utilities incl.
(352) 422-3670
HERNANDO
1/1 &2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1st last +dep
352-201-2428




Built after 2004
Hurricane Codes!
2006 Entertainer.
MUST SEE -GREAT
SHAPE $46,907
delivered to you!
1-877-578-5729
Cabin 12X32'
w/front prch & tin roof.
Full bath/kitchen. Bd/Liv.
w/10X12 unfnshd add.
You move. $7000 obo.
(352)746-9211
Great Shape *
Singlewide 2Br/IBa
Delivered to you!
$15k 727-967-4230

Palm Harbor Parade
of Homes!!
7 new models to view,
3 models that MUST,
must be liquidated.
Save over $26k, 4/2 in
the 70's. FREE factory
tours! plantcitv.
nalmharbor.com or
800-622-2832


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




"FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527

FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
$5,000 down
with $425 monthly
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369




Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on /2 acre. Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974

Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing


INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352)201-7081

INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home 1248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180


OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065





2br/2ba, 55+ in Thun-
derbird Park, Lot 45
carport, furn'd, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441

HANDICAP ACCESS
with Vertical Lift,
Stonebrook, 2/2 MH
1,400 sf., $25,000.,
Must See to Believe!
352-628-5311


ForSale t,,
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090




J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf


2/1.5/1 .........$700
2/1/1 .............$650
2/2/1 ............$700
LAWNCARE INCLUDED
2/2/1 ............$900
CONDO, COMMUNITY POOL
WI2'1!IIIJE
2/1.5/1.........$650
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010
24x36 Garage/Man
Cave, Cit.Spgs., $300
month 352-489-3750


Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


SACTIOWN
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
$900 & UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/ vnvue home/Avail. May I
5339 S Elm Ave.
2/1 cute and cozy Avail. May 1
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959sq ft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 st0 y townhome, canal side
$650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/1.5 in B.H. 992Sqft
1063 N Commerce Ter.
2/1 Apt in Lecanto, centrally locted
1071 N Commerce Ter
2/1 Apt.in Lecanto, centrally located
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/odditionon 1.25 acre
For More Listings Go To
www.CirusCouintyHonmeRentalsano





[E]E^ I 'i ,lJ'][ TelJ iE






-In








LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
iirTiknt%_?1Tn~i








N of nglis-6 miles.







800 SF w/ HD Direct
LAKEFRONT 1 Becirm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


N of lnglis-6 miles.
800 SF w/ HD Direct
TV, W/D. Hang your
clothes, get groceries,
Move-in ready. 12 min
to Power Plant & Hosp.
Tom 352-586-9598


FLORAL OAKS
APARTMENTS
NOW RENTING *
352-860-0829
62+ Elderly/Disabled
With or Without
Children.
Central AC Heat
Water & Sewer
Included
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Managemnt
1 & 2 BD. APTS
8092 S. Floral Oaks
CIR., Floral City,
Fl 34436, TDD #771




EOE/Provider

Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694






Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514


PINE RIDGE
3/2, $1000. F/L/S
r hm cn~ 9,0 -: 5310 Yuma Lane
C'enenW.l' (352) 302-6025
(Sn &iV-3800 RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISS ION .COM

CRYSTAL RIVER S I
2 Lovely, historic homes in
outstanding city location. HERNANDO
Each with lovely sprawling Watson's Fish Camp
porches, zoned commercial 55+ Rental Community
and ready for your business! (352) 726-2225
Call today! So m
352-637-3800 F e
CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
S0M$125/wk. call Bruce
**352-445-9136*
CITRUS HILLS o I
212, Furn. Long or Shrlt melEtt
Term 352-527-8002, e
or 352-476-4242



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Coft tages -


Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
E DEB
THOMPSON
E M r One call away for
At SM WOODS your buying and
3/2/2, Ht. Pool, FP, selling needs.
Maint. Free, Sm. Pet r Realtor that you can
$ 1,000 mo, 422-1933 refer to your
BEVERLYfamily and friends.
BEVERLY HILLS ,- Service with a smile
2BR, 2BA, $600. mo. seven days
(352) 465-5777 a week.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 + Loft on Canal Parsley Real Estate
$1,000. (352)795-0125 Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb)vahoo.com
and
debthomoson corn



INVERNESS Get R
clean, cute 2/1/ 1, T
family friendly area In The H
w/d hk-up,. avail. 5/1
$695mo. f/I & $500. Class
sec. (352) 789-4682


I -


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Results in
the
homefront
classified!

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






results

omefront

ifieds!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




BEVERLY HILLS. SUN
12-3. 104S FILLMORE.
2 bed, 2 FULL baths, 1
gar. 1558 sf heat/ac.
NEW: Kit, baths, appli-
ances, carpet, lights,
more. $62k. 527-1239




r OPENp
HOUSE

Open House at
3764 Black Diamond
Circle, Lecanto, Fl
April 13th
Noon 3pm
Estate Pool Home
3211 LSF 4/3 with
2nd master or bonus
room. MLS 707769
$529,000
Call or gate pass
Linda Thomas
Black Diamond
Real ty
(352) 464-4881




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickgbf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator. NLMS
#267854,FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


LOANS FOR
LANDLORDS!
We Finance From
5-500 Units
As Low As 5.5 %.
1-4 Family,
Townhome,
Condos OK.
Contact B2R:
1-855-940-0227
www.B2R
Finance.com



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514



Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2/2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext.,Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202
Pine Ridge, 3 bedroom.
3 bath. with salt water
pool, a 20x45 workshop
and carport with 15 ft
enclosed full solar
compliment, solar elec-
tric, pool pump, pool
heater,hot water and
solar assisted air condi-
tioning 352-746-9435



BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525 sf heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$62,000. 527-1239




YOU'LL v THIS!
6385 W Cannondale
Drive. Reduced Price
$84,900.2 bedroom. 2
bath. Cozy
1000SF(approx.)home,2
car attached garage, Irg
screened lanai,newly
updated. (352)794-6686



RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



Cinnamon Ridge
2/2/1 Rock Crusher
Sch district. New Appl,
Remodeled bath,
tile/wood floors, W/D,
ready to move in.
$65K 352-494-7203


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY M


Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!




SECLUDED 3BR/2BA.
1653 sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
3A acre buildable lot.
$79,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289

For Sale',
TURN KEY
4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE, 1,200 sqf
Turn key, Good location
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282

Sul 11^^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Haoas


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscritters.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETMY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company+
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatoneitamoabav.rr.c
om
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


A ,N 11,1
SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


Citrus Count
Homes I^


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!

2/2 Citrus Hills. Master
w/lg walk-in closet. Lg
utility rm/pantry. Scrn
porch. Walk to pool!
Tile floors, very clean,
lots of natural light!
$58,000. 586-260-2848





Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507





Country Home + 80
Acres Land, Near
App. St. Univ., Ideal
for Summer Home
In Cool. NC Mtns.
828-297-2669, details





Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
Chassahowitzka
$140,000. 2/2, Garage
TV Rm, Irg. covered
dock, canal to the
gulf, great fishing,
pics avail, by inter
(352) 382-0893 or
Cel 1352-220-2868








Fisherman's Paradise
in Inverness East Cove.
Furnished 2/2 plus
dock & seawall.
Deep water. $61,900
(352) 344-0101


Home Finder
www.chroniclehom efinder.comrn


FMt Your Drum Howe
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chro n iclehomefinder.com


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 E15


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureCbast
ProDerties.com
"To view
my properties"









GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $45,000. Call
Ray 352-322-6304
**: =*** =****





E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPACIOUS 3/2/2 POOL HOME
ON HALF-ACRE --HOMESITE
I .. ..II I-.-- I. ..... I.... N. ,- .. 1.6.I1.. I .. 1I .



i: -1F S128.900
pi'Oi', O's i 3 80
hl~fl ISdllniii ii,/liiii.}


P q


LOVELY 2 BEDHUOOM
1.5 BATH VILLA
l"ijil \in\\i \.hIiiii: yiiiil Ii.-ll /.i.,yt

Mi =/l/lIlIl ASKING $59,000
lai'anda Wall 352212 1989


'i.Ii Ih.lliIi-' ,'Jii 'ill,- .,ii..I.

ONLY $89,900
Call Ouade 352 302 7699








COUNTRY LIVING THAT IS
NOT FAR FROM TOWN

I i-,:.. 6 -lh... i h .ll i
Mi_ = I:'i.'c. ASKING $325,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173
to see the lovely laim


PEACE & CONTENTMENT -
COMFORTABLE LIVING


Ab.--
I... .-. ,]J .r. 0 ,j m I 10 .j I i -,.
.'. h.. .j JI"" I. i l jlJl ..' I I ,. m'..'.


Ml'-. = "it. .:i ASKING $104,900
Pat Davis f3S21212 7280
I/i, listing iizir' c2lsatdavis corn









BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
* rJ. I I.n... Ih'., ,:. \ I.M... ..i III. 1,1.:

M1 /I',h-,/ $103,000
Jeanne ot l.'illaid Pickiel 352212 3410
1111 CiliusCounli Sold coon








PINEWOOD CONDOS
OF SUGARMILLL WOODS



Cill Teel Sleu il 352 220 1008
lot pn ile t iell ing i0
fmnitl ltei.ini stle.i ilcenltin 21 com


:'_ ),hhI I, ] h,,, Ill. I, 1,".1)1. i ,,,) .. ..... n

..I. I I.. i ".lh i.
Sli. = -,:" ASKING $155,000
Cni NAnli J.ni- 352 4008072


UI= I=H IHAN NtIW
hi h ii i, ii. .,, i]IV l- I]iii ..iii .,] ..


-bll. . I. l,. I h 1. 1.iI l,... .. .,|l .j
ASKING $89,900
Call Multha. Sn; del ask lot tile = 710170648









A RARE OPPORTUNITY

lh .i iiiiiiii'i~ii 1' 11. |lnll .] I i'" 11111 li' u ll' iv.
ill i'' ,JHlU l 'lll l I hll : .1 1 llJ IJl I,,, il'll'l: i I N I

Mi'.-, ='i'i:.,.iI $59,900
Ask loI Matil n Bootlh 637 -4904


NATURE ABOUNDS!
1%. ..lljl'll .ilhl.l]l d'.] 11 ,]..:....I
I1 ..1 I ..ll h. I j. j S "ljl jll. ,1 I].ilul l r. BU I I
|.I .. I bui ld VVilil. Iiiinh d .jI,1 h',il Ih, il
.. I1 1 1 11111 ..* I ..I I.i . i j. I
L'- =1irii', $250,000
lotiamne 0 Regan 352 586 0075


CELINA HILLS

Il. :n 1-1.6 1 I ,. i n l h _,:j.il Ill I I|.:I.F I.
Tl i iii.I V. .l. ui.b i l..i. h ..i.
"; dl~il wl.:iI ..I1,:1 1 III I A.i
Mi: = i IwIh ASKING $160,000
Call Jim Motion 352 422 2173

r_.


i l le '' l .lh,1hi1 .]' I r.IH I,11,.
F*1111%ligI ni 6 .,l k*|^|,,,,i .ill.


* i 1111\ hlll.hi.l .i 1 A I
* I: ':^ .1. I ih I 1 ,l. hi......


MI ii :". .ASKING $49,500
Call Chatles Ke/l 352 422 2387


AMAZING NEW PRICE!
"Cilrus Hills 'Pool Home Goll Course
/1i. .. .-. I.,]. .ii ,]IP rj ,, I .ih.l'.n'


Ml _'., = i^l ?l, ?,
PRICED RIGHT AT $199,900
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


BEAUTIFUL HOME ON POND
';. ; _; VI,,I IjIJIll i"i 1 11/ l lh w i ii.1]'i


I Cal l .I IS / So H,]t b3.522 l I,]0 1

hlL:. = /i' .((i:. $215.000
Call Stelan Stuai1 352 212 0211


* ll ..i ;I.I ..,h PhI i.]- .i.lj H u .i.I
* W. K )....i , Kil. I 'll I |'rJ Hl. h l:- .hi.-.

* li i. P I'1 .,i. i ii ',] hV.,l V .,:].l
Mil1 = ii..ii,3. $229,000
Jea,we o, Ilialiiad PcAel 352 212 3410
zziiII Citl'OCoiou' Sold cosp


* I. .,,, '" H':.':.'" 0 ,,,,,,9 H,:.,:,,, -3 h-, ,1 I I h ,
* 'i .',, \.). h ii I I. lii l.:...
H III.M Hn .,..1I IF

Il1i =-i:i4I ASKING $89,900
Ci" Clil- /,l.ti 352 4222387


THE PERFECT PLACE TO CALL HOME

h',lh I ,m d .1. 1 .- .1 11 lI I' ,,',,I, ,,,,,' I ,,,, I I
: 1 111 J1 1. 111.1 111 'I

,...I... .... I
rjl i i h iiili rji, HII,
rII.': i:i" ASKING $148.900
Pt Dio ,352' 212 7280
le.6, li-Pi .11ii /2toidi,i-. imo


CANTERBURY LAKE EST.
I. .. I. I IH .' I. I Iii i I, ,
h II~iIg Il,- H,,I,- h- l.- ,I,- ,,- II .i,hl II-,,

1Il1 i IliI lll I i Ill11 i-illl Ii-I~l-I I lliIII Ii- U

rih.i =,) i:,'i ASKING $118,500
Call Nanc; Jenks at 352-400-8012


I., :, I,., H uIlH t.lN ,:l : .:,jid I IN, : U .:l I;'.:,Il.
I I k' ,1, ,,.. .V I.] lji) I l,.,lh Oi. l IV.. :4
1 `, I .]. ] ll..j N. h .11. I I',, ..I .'.


ML-A, = !,.ii..4 $65,000
Call Ruth fiedetick 352563 6866


k4^|~~~~OU HOME* 1!* : c ^



A01M S reMare
CITRUS MANAGEMENT Anal1sis
SCOUNTY ,. ., .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^A||l^|^


FO'Riii^fw K -l