Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
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Full Text


Bat Game: Pirates, Panthers battle in annual contest


I[-A:TlU D AI


C ITRU


Patchy fog in the
morning. Partly
cloudy and warm.
PAGE A4


C 0 COUNTY


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


Couple gets prison for child abuse


Prosecutor said parents harmed infant and neglected to get medical care


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS -A young cou-
ple accused of hurting their
then-5-week-old baby and try-
ing to cover it up for days
changed their pleas Friday and
were both sent to prison.
Peggy Sue Wood, 21, whose


charges included aggravated
child abuse and neglect, was
sentenced to 15 years in prison
and 10 years of probation in a
plea deal; her boyfriend Gerald
Alonzo Williams, 23, was given
81/2 years with no probation for
aggravated child neglect, also in
a plea deal.
Circuit Judge Ric Howard ad-


monished each about life after
prison saying he would not
recommend fatherhood or
motherhood as options for
them.
Howard told them having
children is not and should not
be the benchmark for being a
woman or a man; what matters,
he said, is how well a person is


equipped to handle parent-
hood. The couple's two children
are being cared for by the chil-
dren's paternal grandmother
pending adoption.
Prosecutor Tim McCourt told
the court the now 10-month-old,
who reportedly suffered broken
See Page A9


Peggy Sue Gerald
Wood Williams


sentenced to
15 years in
prison.


sentenced to
8 1/2 years in
prison.


'If you can't play nice,


PLAY DE


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle
Ocala Cannibals jammer Dena Elkins (Patriotic Pixie), smashes her way through a wall of women during a recent roller derby
match in Ocala. The jammer, who scores points for her team, is indicated by the star on her helmet.

Skating not a dainty sportfor the timid; bruises badges ofhonor


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
OCALA They're tough and tena-
cious in black fishnet stockings, short-
shorts and AtTi.Tude.
They're bulldozers on eight wheels
with names like Grenade O'Connor,
Tank R. Bell, Bombshell Brawler and
Bonesaw Betty
They're the women of roller derby,
plowing their way around the Skate
Mania rink in neighboring Marion
County as the Ocala Cannibals.
Their motto: "If you can't play nice,
play derby"
Several women from Citrus County
also skate with the Cannibals as "fresh
meat," roller derby speak for novices
or newbies.
Amanda Naas became fresh meat


this past June after some health prob-
lems put her life in perspective.
"I realized that life isn't guaranteed,
that it's too short, and I wanted to do
something," she said.
During the Inverness Christmas pa-
rade, roller derby skaters zipped by
and Naas was mesmerized by Bone-
saw Betty of the Ocala Cannibals, with
half her face painted as a skull, carry-
ing a pink toy chainsaw.
"I want to do that," Naas told her sis-
ter, who told her she was crazy
Her sister had a point Naas had
never been on skates before, ever
"I told my husband that that's what I
wanted to do, and we went to Sports
Authority and bought skates and I
started skating on the Withlacoochee
trail."
She said what drew her to roller


derby was the sense of awe, of danger
and daring, that surrounds roller
derby queens and the sport itself.
It's rough and a little bit naughty
"But when you get to know these
girls, they're just normal," Naas said.
"We're a big family"

On an early Sunday evening, a
crowd gathers outside the rink, wait-
ing to see their team in action. Little
girls dress in derby gear like their
derby idols, even a baby with cro-
cheted "skate" booties, seniors and
families.
At this arena, it's B.YO. seats, with
rows of lawn chairs set up on the shiny
wooden skate floor Or you can stand


Page A9


CEO says

CMHS


transition


smooth
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Three weeks into his new posi-
tion, Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem interim CEO Ralph Aleman
reports positive
progress in the
transition to new
ownership.
Since taking the
position, Aleman
said he has met
with 57 people in
the community, Ralph
one-on-one. Ralph
"Everyone is Aleman
looking forward to CMHS
the new way of Cit- ntem CEO
rus Memorial," he said Friday, ad-
dressing the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce. "My job is
to focus on that They're tired of all
the negative stories."
He said Hospital Corporation of
America (HCA), which is set to
See .Page A2



Search for

plane moves

to Hemrnando

County
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Searchers looking for a missing
pilot and plane crossed into Her-
nando County on Friday, thus
handing the lead in the multi-
agency law enforcement and vol-
unteer effort to officials in that
county.
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
spokeswoman Heather Yates said
Friday that aircraft were still fly-
ing over the Citrus tract of the
Withlacoochee State Forest, but
that the bulk of the operation has
shifted southward.
See Page A9


Classifieds ........ C7
Comics .......... C6
5 Crossword ........ C5


Community .......C4
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ...........C6


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C5


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a


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APRIL 12, 2014


VOL. 119 ISSUE 248


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w




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal River bike path dedicated


^^^_&iJB


Special to the Chronicle
The city of Crystal River on Thursday dedicated the John Crider Memorial Bike Path,
formerly known as the Cutler Spur Multi-use Trail. Pictured at the dedication, from left,
are Mayor Jim Farley, city Director of Planning & Community Development Jackie
Gorman and City Councilman Mike Gudis.


CMHS
Continued from Page Al

lease Citrus Memorial, has
a lot of people here work-
ing on the transition.
He added they are work-
ing toward defining the
lease agreement and ex-
pect to have it signed
sometime this summer
"There's a lot of lawyers
involved, a lot of work to
be done," Aleman said.
"But no obstacles so far;
once the agreement is
signed there will be more
activity as HCA comes in."
Aleman explained once
HCA takes over, patients'
experiences at the hospi-
tal will not be that differ-
ent. There will be a lot



House passes bill
to extend carry
and conceal
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House has passed a
bill that would allow the public
to carry concealed firearms
while evacuating their home
during an emergency.
Sponsor Rep. Heather
Dawes Fitzenhagen, R-Fort
Myers, explained the bill ex-
tends carry-and-conceal privi-
leges to those fleeing during a
mandatory evacuation de-
clared by the governor or
local officials. Individuals, oth-
erwise, must be in compliance


more resources, he said,
citing HCAs investment of
$45 million.
He said the new CEO
and local advisory group
will determine how Citrus
Memorial operates, and
that the current boards will
not be involved with the op-
eration of the hospital.
Since arriving, he said he
has made an effort to com-
municate with the physi-
cians who are facing the
transition at the same time
they are changing to a new
electronic records system.
"In addition to everything
else, there are major



with all laws, including having
the right to be in possession
of a firearm.
The bill (HB 209) was
passed 80-36 on Friday. The
Senate version (SB 296) has
to clear one more committee
before being heard on the
floor.
House approves
expansion of
voucher program
TALLAHASSEE The
state's main voucher program
for low-income children could
expand under a bill approved
by the Florida House.
The House approved the


changes taking place," he
said. "It's a painful process;
it's almost a perfect storm."
Aleman used the oppor-
tunity to publicly thank the
hospital volunteers more
than 400 -who he said con-
tribute thousands of hours.
He said the community
has a lot to be proud of, as
the hospital has received
numerous accolades over
the years in a variety of
treatment areas.
"It has also been jam-
packed," he said, indicat-
ing people still want to go
there or have to go there
for treatment.


bill 7343 Friday along party
lines.
It's still not clear, however, if
the bill would be accepted by
the Senate. Senate President
Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, said
the House legislation (HB
7167) lacks a testing require-
ment that he says is needed
before the program grows.
Nearly 60,000 students
from low-income families at-
tend private schools as a re-
sult of the current voucher
program. State figures show
more than 80 percent of the
schools participating are
religious.
The bill passed by the House


ocalahealthsystem.com


DUI arrest
Eric Gauthier, 42, of
Kiska Ren Road, Weeki
Wachee, at 12:06 a.m.April 11
on a misdemeanor charge of
driving under the influence.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, Gauthier was stopped
for failing to maintain a single
lane of traffic. He was asked to
perform field sobriety tests and
did poorly. Gauthier reportedly
refused Breathalyzer testing to
measure his blood alcohol
level. Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
Evelyn Gandia, 39, of
South Pendant Point, Floral
City, at 10 a.m. April 10 on
misdemeanor charges of
knowingly driving with a sus-
pended license and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
According to her arrest affi-
davit, a deputy spotted Gandia
driving and knew that her li-
cense was suspended, but
was unable to pull her over be-
cause he was on his way to
another service call. The fol-
lowing day she was a passen-
ger in a vehicle pulled over
and was charged for driving
with a suspended license. She
had a silver pipe with mari-
juana residue in her posses-
sion at the time of the arrest.
Bond $1,000.
Jeffrey Huff II, 21, of
East Mobile Street, Inverness,
at 10:46 a.m. April 10 on an
active warrant for felony viola-
tion of probation stemming
from an original charge of lewd
and lascivious battery on a
child between the ages of 12
and 15. Huff reportedly turned
himself in to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
Veronica McDaniel An-
thony, 36, of South Tropical
Avenue, Lecanto, at 10:25 a.m.


also would expand a separate
program that aids disabled chil-
dren. The Senate is advandng a
similar bill to help parents of dis-
abled children to get additional
services.
House moves
abortion measure
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House has passed a
measure prohibiting abortions
after the viability of a fetus
has been determined, with
limited exceptions.
The bill (HB 1047) passed


April 10 on an active warrant
for felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of grand theft.
Christopher Manuli Jr.,
35, of South Arundel Terrace,
Homosassa, at 9:45 a.m.
April 10 on a felony charge of
aggravated battery, intention-
ally causing great bodily harm.
He was also charged with a
misdemeanor failure to appear
regarding an original charge of
driving with a suspended li-
cense. According to his arrest
affidavit, Manuli was trans-
ported to the Citrus County
Detention Facility from the
Pinellas County Jail.
Robert Paty, 26, of
Southeast 177th Avenue, Sil-
ver Springs, at 12:39 p.m.
April 10 on an active warrant
for felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of burglary. Paty was
transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility from
the Marion County Jail.
William Boyington, 21, of
Murphee Street, Seffner, at
1:22 p.m. April 10 on an active
warrant for felony violation of
probation stemming from an
original charge of grand theft.
Boyington was transported to
the Citrus County Detention Fa-
cility from the Pasco County Jail.
Samuel Taylor III, 21, of
U.S 41, Inverness, at 3:57 p.m.
April 10 on two active Pasco
County warrants. Taylor was
charged with felony violation of
probation stemming from an
original charge of possession
of a controlled substance, and
felony failure to appear.
Daniel Medlin Sr., 29, of
South OakviewAvenue, Floral
City, at 5 p.m. April 10 on an
active warrant for felony viola-
tion of probation stemming


Friday with a 7045 vote, after
a debate that touched on
legal and medical issues.
Much of the discussion fo-
cused on the viability of a
fetus, or the point at which life
can be sustained with stan-
dard medical care.
Several lawmakers referred to
legal precedents regarding via-
bility, saying that Florida is simply
creating a law that keeps up with
federal court rulings.
Current law prohibits abor-
tions in the third trimester of
pregnancy, with exceptions.


from an original charge of traf-
ficking in stolen property.
Medlin reportedly turned him-
self in to the Citrus County
Sherriff's Office.
Jamie Bacon, 31, of
North Pennsylvania Avenue,
Crystal River, at 7:04 p.m.
April 10 on an active Her-
nando County warrant for
felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of grand theft.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary
was reported at 7:14 a.m.
April 10, in the 4400 block
of N. Canyon Terrace,
Hemrnando.
A residential burglary
was reported at 10:27 a.m.
April 10 in the 300 block of S.
U.S. 41, Inverness.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 1:29 a.m.
April 11, in the 100 block of N.
Florida Ave., Inverness.
Thefts
A grand theft was re-
ported at 4:39 a.m. Thursday,
April 10, in the 4400 block of
N. Pine Drive, Hemrnando.
A petit theft was reported
at2:18 p.m. April 10 in the 900
block of W. Colbert Court,
Beverly Hills.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 3:53 p.m. April 10 in
the 3400 block of E. Odier St.,
Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 5:32 p.m. April 10 in
the 8000 block of E. Gator
Court, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 7:05 p.m. April 10 in the
5000 block of W. Glenbrook
St., Homosassa.


Legislature passes
student data
privacy bill
TALLAHASSEE School
districts will no longer be able
to collect student data such as
fingerprints under a bill passed
by the Florida Legislature.
The House voted 113-1 for
the bill on Friday. The meas-
ure (SB 188) now heads to
Gov. Rick Scott. Scott has al-
ready spoken out in favor of
the legislation.
-From wire reports


For the RECORD


The new CEO and local advisory
group will determine how Citrus
Memorial operates...


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A2 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


LOCAL/STATE


352-351-1883






Page A3 SATURDAY, APRIL 12,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

STATE

Citrus County
Central Citrus Dems
meeting today
The Central Citrus Demo-
cratic Club will meet today at
11 a.m. at the Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills, at the
comer of Forest Ridge
Boulevard.
There will be an open dis-
cussion of current issues of
importance to the community.
For questions, email
ragnvald.read@gmail.com.
Paint, hazardous
waste accepted
today at landfill
Citrus County Central
Landfill will have a house-
hold hazardous waste and
paint drop-off from 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m. today, in addi-
tion to its regular Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday drop-
off days.
Participants may bring up
to 60 pounds or 10 gallons
of materials free of charge.
Hazardous waste over the
60-pound limit will be
charged at 35 cents per
pound.
Additional program infor-
mation is posted on the
county website at:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
pubworks/swm. Questions
may be emailed to
hazwasteinfo@bocc.citrus.fl
.us or call Solid Waste Man-
agement at 352-527-7670.
VA community clinic
hosting open house
The Lecanto Veterans Af-
fairs (VA) Community Based
Outpatient Clinic (CBOC)
will host an enrollment open
house from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
today at the clinic, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Enrollment and eligibility
staff will be available to an-
swer questions and enroll
veterans for health care.
Patients are asked to
bring their DD Form 214 if
possible for verification of
military service.
For information, call David
Gilmer at 352-746-8000.

Orlando
No bail yet for man
in day care crash
A man who authorities say
drove an SUV that crashed
into another vehicle, sending
it spinning into a daycare
center where a girl was killed
and 14 people were injured,
was ordered Friday to stay in
jail until a judge can deter-
mine whether he is a flight
risk.
Robert Corchado, 28, will
be held in jail until at least
Monday, when a judge will
hear arguments on whether
he can be released on bail,
Circuit Judge Jerry Brewer
said during a first-
appearance hearing.
Bail was initially set for
$100,000, but a prosecutor
told the judge that Corchado
was a flight risk and that he
should be held without bond.
"I have a witness here, a
trooper, who can testify that
he is a flight risk," prosecutor
Austin Price said. "He has it
on good authority that this
defendant, is planning, once
he posts bond, to leave the
country."
Corchado's public de-
fender, Jon de Armas, asked
that the $100,000 bond re-
main in place.
The judge said that if Cor-
chado is released, he will be
prohibited from driving a car
as a condition.
Police say Corchado
crashed his Dodge Durango
into a convertible, which in
turn smashed into the
KinderCare building on
Wednesday. Corchado fled
the scene, authorities said.
A manhunt across Florida
ended Thursday with Cor-
chado's arrest. He was
charged with leaving the
scene of a deadly accident


almost precisely 24 hours
after the KinderCare facility in
Winter Park was torn open in
the wreck, killing 4-year-old
Lily Quintus, who was sitting
in a classroom awaiting her
afternoon snack. Fourteen
others were injured, most of
them children.
-From staff and wire reports


Crime spree against neighbors lands man in jail


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent


A Hernando man faces multiple
charges after al-
legedly commit-
ting crimes against
two of his
neighbors.
Jacob Mayeu, 28,
was arrested
Thursday morning
and charged with
burglary to an oc- Jacob
cupied residence, Mayeu
burglary with bat- facing several
tery, auto theft and charges.
misdemeanor
petit theft
According to reports from the


Citrus County Sheriff's Office,
Mayeu is accused of pushing a win-
dow air conditioner through a win-
dow and onto a man while the
victim was sleeping in his bed.
Mayeu then entered the home at
approximately 6:45 a.m. Thursday
and pulled the victim out of bed
and began hitting him in the face
multiple times. A roommate re-
portedly heard the fighting and was
able to break it up and chase
Mayeu from the home. When
deputies arrived, the victim's face
was swollen and bloody and Emer-
gency Medical Servies transported
him to Monroe Regional Hospital
for treatment for his injuries.
A second complaint was filed by
a neighbor who claimed she had


Mayeu and other friends over to
her home on Wednesday evening.
After her guests left at approxi-
mately 10:30 p.m., the victim stated
she went outside and locked her
Ford Explorer and put the keys on
the dresser in her bedroom. When
she awoke Thursday morning, she
discovered both tail lights were
broken and there were dents and
scratches on the vehicle. She also
stated that the center console was
open and approximately $80 was
missing. When the victim went back
inside, she located the keys on her
couch.
Deputies made contact with
Mayeu at his home on Brave Lane
in Hernando. Mayeu reportedly ad-
mitted to getting into a fight with


the male victim, but denied push-
ing the air conditioner unit on him
and claimed that the victim had hit
him with a pipe. During the inter-
view, deputies noted that Mayeu's
only injuries were swollen knuck-
les on his right hand and that he
had blood on his arms and clothing.
Mayeu also reportedly admitted
to driving the other victim's vehicle,
but claimed he had been given per-
mission to do so. When questioned
at the Citrus County Detention Fa-
cility following his arrest, deputies
reportedly informed Mayeu there
were witnesses to the crimes, to
which Mayeu allegedly replied that
it would have been hard for them to
see him because it was dark out-
side. His bond was set at $42,250.


Filing under the wire


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Retired Air Force air traffic controller Gene Niedzwiecki and his wife Carol receive assistance Thursday with their 2013 tax paperwork
from volunteer Young Han at the Coastal Region Library in Crystal River. According to Local Coordinator Bob Kegan, AARP Foundation
Tax-Aide has processed 3,805 returns this year for seniors who qualify.

AARP helps last-minute taxpayers as April 15 deadline approaches


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

Anyone who owes income taxes is
sliding toward the 11th hour for
payment.
Fortunately, help can be available
at a public library through AARP's
Tax-Aide program. Just call 211 for
an appointment at Homosassa Pub-
lic Library and Lakes Region Li-
brary in Inverness today, Citrus
Springs Memorial Library and Crys-
tal River Moose Lodge on Monday
and Floral City Public Library on
Tuesday
Procrastinators sweating it out at
zero hour on Tuesday, the federal in-
come tax filing deadline, should
head to Central Ridge Library in
Beverly Hills between noon and
4 p.m. where no appointment will be
needed for help with 2013 taxes.
"The people at that point, if they
need an extension or if they think
they owe money and they don't know
how to pay, we can help them wade
through the process," said Barry
Schwartz, site coordinator at
Homosassa Public Library, on
Wednesday
AARP Foundation Tax-Aide is
available free to taxpayers with low
and moderate income. Trained vol-
unteers have helped for more than
40 years across the nation. It was of-
fered since the end of January in
Citrus County, as has happened an-
nually for many years.
"Some days are busier than oth-
ers," said Karen Mondrall, spokes-
woman for the local program.
"Some tax returns are pretty
difficult."
Each site has kept busy this year
as usual doing the paperwork.
"We're going to do 900 returns that
translate into maybe 1,500 taxpayers
just at this site alone," Schwartz said
about Homosassa Public Library
About 20 volunteers were working
at Homosassa library, and Schwartz
said more volunteers would be
needed next year
"Next year, there'll be Oba-
macare, so there will be some
changes in the tax code because of


TAX EXTENSION
The Internal Revenue service
warns: "An extension of time to file
your return does not grant you any
extension of time to pay your tax
liability."
The extension applies only to pa-
perwork; an estimated amount must
be paid on April 15. Without filing an
extension and paying an estimated
amount, the taxpayer can incur late
payment and late filing penalties.
For more information, go to
http://1 .usa.gov/1ghiCRP.

that," Schwartz said.
AARP Tax Aide provides free
training each January First-year tax
counselors attend for five days, but
need only two and a half days of
training for subsequent years.
"The characteristics people need
to be a volunteer tax counselor is
somebody who is comfortable work-
ing with numbers and somebody
who is comfortable on a computer,"
Schwartz said. "You don't have to
have any previous tax experience."
Retired people's tax returns can
get complicated with different
sources of retirement incomes,
which volunteers are trained to han-
dle. But younger people still draw-
ing a paycheck are welcome to the
free service, too.
"We also want to serve the work-
ing people who don't earn a high in-
come," Schwartz said. "Young
people, especially service workers,
restaurant workers, people like that,
we want to help them. They are
more than welcome to use our
program."
Paying taxes on the last day re-
quires a person to have the correct
documents. Those heading to Cen-
tral Ridge Library on Tuesday need
their Social Security cards for
everyone on their return, a photo ID
and all tax documents. AARP Tax
Aide will supply all the needed
forms.
Contact Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicleonline.corn.


Businesses face


May 1 deadline


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

While the federal in-
come tax deadline hits
Tuesday, business owners
have another deadline
looming.
The Florida Department
of State requires all busi-
ness entities, including
nonprofits, to submit an-
nual reports by May 1.
An annual report must
be filed each year with the
Florida Department of
State. It is not a financial
statement, but a system to
keep a business's most cur-
rent data on file with the
Division of Corporations
(DOC). It must be filed
whether a business needs
to make changes or not
"Florida statutes require
all corporations, limited-
liability companies and
limited partnerships to file
an annual report to main-
tain 'active' status and
avoid administrative disso-
lution or revocation," ex-
plained Brittany Lesser,
spokeswoman for the De-
partment of State. "It is the
entity's responsibility to
ensure the annual report
and applicable fee are paid
in a timely manner"
The report must be filed
online at www.sunbiz.org.
For reports filed by the
deadline, the fees are: $150
for a for-profit corporation;
$61.25 for a nonprofit cor-
poration; $138.75 for a lim-
ited-liability company; and
$500 for a limited partner-
ship or limited-liability


limited partnership.
A $400 late fee will be
imposed on all for-profit
corporations, limited-
liability companies, lim-
ited partnerships and
limited-liability limited
partnerships, which fail to
file before May 1.
Lesser said as a courtesy,
the DOC sends an entity
four reminder notices be-
tween Jan. 1 and May 1. If a
business did not provide
DOC with an email ad-
dress, it will receive one
postcard.
Nonprofit corporations
are not subject to the late
fee. For other businesses,
there are no provisions to
waive the late fee, even if
the entity did not receive
its filing notices.
The department re-
minds nonprofits that the
Solicitation of Contribu-
tions Act requires charita-
ble organizations intending
to solicit contributions
from the public to register
annually with the Division
of Consumer Services.
In January Florida Sec-
retary of State Ken Det-
zner released a video that
went to YouTube encour-
aging businesses to file
early and emphasizing the
May 1 deadline to avoid
late fees.
DOC records show there
are currently more than
1.8 million business enti-
ties statewide.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. corn.


Today's Taste of Inverness to feature local fare


Special to the Chronicle
The eighth annual Taste of Inverness will
take place from 6 to 9 p.m. today at Liberty
Park on Lake Henderson. Enjoy food, art
and live entertainment with the Blue Stem
Prairie Band.
Participating restaurants include Beef'0'


Brady's, Chefs of Napoli, Coach's Halftime
Pub, Domino's Pizza, the Fox Den Winery,
Highland Place, the Ice Cream Dr., Lake-
side Bar & Grille, Lynn's Ice Cream,
McLeod House Bistro, Nicole's House of
Cakes, Papa John's Pizza, Pine Street Pub,
Publix Catering, Rustic Ranch,
Rutabaga's Etc., Sonny's BBQ in Inverness


and Stumpknocker's.
Tickets are $30 at the door Net proceeds
will benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County
For tickets and information, call the Boys
& Girls Clubs at 352-621-9225 or the city of
Inverness at 352-726-2611, ext. 1304, or go to
www.inverness.webconnex.com/TOI.




A4 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday If you mingle with imagi-
native and talented people, you'll come
across many promising chances to
move forward. Your career path may
take some unexpected turns, but you
will be able to overcome any difficulties
and exceed your expectations. Shoot
for the stars.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Improve-
ments to your diet and exercise rou-
tines will help you look and feel better.
Try different options, set some realistic
goals and build a program you can
stick with.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be sure
to include recreational or social events
in your plans. Free yourself from daily
drudgery and embark on a day of fun
and entertainment with youngsters or
close friends.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- You may
have bitten off more than you can
chew. Don't get discouraged. Don't let
criticism get you down.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Outline
your future travel plans. You may want
to explore somewhere new or revisit a
special location. Share your thoughts
and plans with someone important.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't feel
disheartened by circumstances. Take a
second look at your previous efforts,
and you will find a more advantageous
route to your personal goals.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Re-
evaluate your career goals. You could
capitalize on a novel idea that you'd
set aside. An unconventional opportu-
nity will come your way through a pre-
vious friend or colleague.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Divulging
too much personal information could
backfire on you. Don't say anything
that could be misinterpreted by others.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your un-
selfish actions will lead to a meaning-
ful, long-lasting relationship.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Be
truthful but sensitive in your dealings
with loved ones. Hurtful words aren't
easily forgotten.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It's
time to get active. A brief change of
pace will brighten your mood.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
shortchange your abilities. Believe in
your skills, and don't be limited by fear
of the unknown.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Love is
in the air. Make special plans or set
aside time for someone you think is
special.


ENTERTAINMENT


Nirvana, Kiss,
E Street Band join
rock hall of fame
NEW YORK- Kiss made up,
but its music went unheard. Nir-
vana used four women rockers
to sing Kurt Cobain's songs.
And Bruce Springsteen's E
Street Band predictably -
turned its honor into a marathon.
The three acts were ushered
into the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame on Thursday in a colorful
induction ceremony at Brook-
lyn's Barclays Center. They were
joined by the blue-eyed soul duo
Hall & Oates, British rocker
Peter Gabriel, 1970s folkie Cat
Stevens and the absent Linda
Ronstadt.
Nirvana was the emotional
centerpiece. The trio rooted in
the Seattle-area punk rock
scene was voted into the hall in
its first year of eligibility. "Smells
Like Teen Spirit" hit like a thun-
derclap upon its 1991 release,
but the band was done after
Cobain committed suicide 20
years ago this month.
"Nirvana fans walk up to me
every day and say thank you for
the music," said Krist
Novoselic, the band's bass
player, who was inducted with
drummer Dave Grohl. "When I
hear that, I think of Kurt Cobain."
A subdued Courtney Love,
Cobain's widow, was booed by
some in the audience. She said
Cobain would have appreciated
the honor.
"Nirvana tapped into a voice
that was yearning to be heard,"
said former R.E.M. singer
Michael Stipe, who described
how the band made a commu-
nity of the disaffected.
Joan Jett was chosen to sing
"Smells Like Teen Spirit." Kim
Gordon of Sonic Youth, St. Vin-
cent and Lorde each took turns
at the microphone, with Lorde's


Associated Press
Hall of Fame Inductee Peter Gabriel performs Thursday at the
2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in New
York.


version of "All Apologies" ending
the night.
Kiss was responsible for pre-
ceremony drama. The two origi-
nal members still active, Gene
Simmons and Paul Stanley,
thought the replacements for ex-
bandmates Ace Frehley and
Peter Criss should perform at
the ceremony instead of the
original four. The result was
Kiss's music went unheard.
'Divergent' film
finale to be released
in two parts
LOS ANGELES -Lions
Gate Entertainment Corp. said
the final book of its "Divergent"
trilogy will be made into two
parts, following the lucrative for-
mula it has used for "Twilight"
and is repeating for "The Hunger
Games."
The first film in the series
based on Veronica Roth's nov-
els has grossed $117 million in
its first three weeks of release.
Part I of the finale, called "Al-
legiant," will be released on
March 18, 2016, followed by
Part II on March 24, 2017.


"Insurgent," the second film in
the series, begins production
next month and is set for release
on March 20 next year.
Belafonte and MLK
estate settle lawsuit
NEW YORK- Lawyers said
Harry Belafonte will retain pos-
session of historical documents
he acquired during his friendship
with Martin Luther King Jr.
Belafonte and the King estate
said Friday they have settled a
lawsuit in Manhattan federal
court.
Belafonte sued the estate in
October to establish rights to the
documents.
They include an outline of a
Vietnam War speech by King
and notes for a speech he never
got to deliver in Memphis, Tenn.
There also is a condolence letter
from President Lyndon B. John-
son to King's wife after the civil
rights leader's 1968 assassination.
The lawsuit had alleged that
Belafonte was preparing to auc-
tion the items in 2008 when the
estate "astonishingly" blocked it.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, April 12, the
102nd day of 2014. There are 263
days left in the year.
Today's Highlights in History:
On April 12, 1954, the U.S.
Atomic Energy Commission
opened a hearing on whether Dr. J.
Robert Oppenheimer, scientific di-
rector of the Manhattan Project,
should have his security clearance
reinstated amid questions about his
loyalty (it wasn't). Bill Haley and His
Comets recorded "Rock Around the
Clock" in New York for Decca
Records.
On this date:
In 1861, the American Civil War
began as Confederate forces opened
fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina.
In 1955, the Salk vacdcine against
polio was declared safe and effective.
Ten years ago: A federal judge
allowed a nationwide ban on dietary
supplements containing ephedra to
take effect, turning aside a plea
from two manufacturers.
Five years ago: American cargo
ship captain Richard Phillips was
rescued from Somali pirates by
U.S. Navy snipers who shot and
killed three of the hostage-takers.
One year ago: Guan Tianlang, a
14-year-old from China, made his-
tory as the youngest player to make
the cut in a PGATour-sanctioned
event; despite being the first player
at Augusta National to get hit with a
one-shot penalty for slow play,
Guan made the cut under the
10-shot rule at the Masters.
Today's Birthdays: Jazz musi-
cian Herbie Hancock is 74. Rock
singer John Kay (Steppenwolf) is
70. Actor Ed O'Neill is 68. Talk
show host David Letterman is 67.
Author Scott Turow is 65. Singer
David Cassidy is 64. Singer Pat
Travers is 60.
Thought for Today: "All history is
only one long story to this effect: men
have struggled for power over their
fellow men in order that they might
win the joys of earth at the expense
of others, and might shift the burdens
of life from their own shoulders upon
those of others." -William Graham
Sumner (1840-1910).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y


City


182/5 0 0.00" In/a nla
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eliy
SEW "11 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING 1j
j-,' HIghu 83 Low: 58,
Patchy fog in the morning. Partly cloudy
. and warm.
. -,^ SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
)41W High:85 Low:63'
.ml *` Palchy fog Partly cloudy. An isolated
~ shower.
.-- l- ,MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
Ty 7" High: 85 Low: 65
.y Mostly cloudy. A few showers late in the
-^--, clay.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 81/61
Record /45
Normal 80/62
Mean temp. 68
Departure from mean -3
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00


Daytona Bch. 80 63 pc Miami 82 73 pc
Fort Lauderdale 81 74 pc Ocala 84 57 pc
Fort Myers 88 65 pc Orlando 84 64 pc
Gainesville 84 57 pc Pensacola 74 62 pc
Homestead 81 72 pc Sarasota 86 62 pc
Jacksonville 80 56 pc Tallahassee 82 56 f
Key West 82 74 pc Tampa 83 66 pc
Lakeland 86 61 pc Vero Beach 81 68 pc
Melbourne 79 69 pc W. Palm Bch. 82 72 pc

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: East winds around 10 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and inland temperature
waters a light chop. Tonight: East 0
winds 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 feet.
Bay and inland waters a moderate 7 3
chop.Taken at Ark

LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.16 29,22 35.52
Tsaa Apopka-Hernando 38.59 38.60 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.74 39.75 40.60
Tsata Apopka-RFloral Cty 40.42 40.44 42.20
L-.Ph eDwim-di.. 1el anoew sea i ei Flood sva~e ?rlami sc- we bawd 31' .ly.'.1i lUK
Ie n `n Ornjal flood vjCic h S d a 43 ccnI! 'nanc, e 01 being equalea 1 e.Ceem 1 Im
an1 "'.h year Tni e1.au is co ..ilner lIom Ine Soulhwp. Fo/,.da Wa .r Man.pmT, iiC DiITr. ,
ana is -ubj):lio re. ln Is n n. 'iver., .1 ii Di .r,,ci o0 i1h Ufred Slale-. Gecgicl Sun'-,
be liabte lo any damage s asinsmg out of the use of its data. you have any questions you
should ontmaci me Hydroogia Data Section at (352) 796-7211
THE NATION


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 53
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 72A
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 0.24" Oak, bayberry, hickory
Total for the year 10.14" Today's count: 10.1/12
Normal for the year 8.89" una' .
'Asof 7 p.m.atIirnrss Sunday's count: 10.0
UV INDEX: it Monday's count: 9.1
0-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday observed: 50
3023 Pollutant: Particutate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES Hun-,s,=
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
04/12 SATURDAY 04:21 10:46 16:42 22:21
04/13 SUNDAY 04:56 23:07 17:37 23:09
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUiNSETTIro1 Tl.................... 7:53 p.m,
0 -C-- ... SU..IS TOM OW 7........ 05 a.m.
C NIISE 1TODAY .-........... 5:41 p.m.
Apr15 Apr22 Apr29 May6 f M... 520a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For more Information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777, For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
httpft/ramefil-dot comrfire_.weatherA)dl
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. orafter4 p.m.. as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addrEsses may waler on Weone-sday andor Salur-ay
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigatbon of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
time.
Citrus County UILties' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for addlitonai
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Invemrness @ 352-726-2321. City of Crystal
River 0 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SATURDAY
City High Low
Chassaiowdlzka' 5:49a.m, O.4 t. 5:43p.m O.5f1 12:16a.m 0,1 Hf 12:34 pr.2 l,
Crystal River" 4:04 a.m, 1.9f. 4:11 p.m. 2.0 fL 10:37am. 0.51 10:59p.rO.2fL.
Withlacoochee' 1:29am, 31 It. 1:39p.m. 3.4ft 8:16a.m. 0,5ft. 8:47p.m0.1 (t.
Homosassa*' 5:40a.m. Oft. 5:24p.m. 1.2f1. 12:08a.m. 0.0 t. 12:02p.rd.2t.


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Ausltn
Baltimore
BIllings
Bimingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Bwurtngton, VT
Charleslon, S.C.
Charleston, W.V
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Clevelarnd
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Molnes
Datroil
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Ultie Rock
I n-. A .1^


FRI
H L Pop. H
66 50 02 67
77 50 77
73 39 74
73 49 79
75 52 67
85 61 81
80 51 70
72 36 48
76 55 78
52 39 64
69 48 64
60 37 .35 68
63 43 .06 64
81 54 81
73 58 20 79
77 47 79
70 37 76
74 59 75
62 48 .42 72
74 46 81
67 56 14 73
72 43 64
83 62 80
77 41 72
78 38 75
68 42 .01 72
87 50 87
72 58 76
66 53 17 68
67 48 -01 67
82 64 80
67 50 .28 75
91 66 87
79 59 79
7A RS As-


FRI SAT
Cty H L Pp. H L Fest
NewOrleans 77 57 80 65 1
New York Ciy 75 56 73 49 pc
Norfolk 80 55 72 54 pc
OklahomaCity 81 52 84 52 pc
Omaha 77 41 78 36 ts
Palm Springs 95 71 86 61 s
Philadelphia 79 53 72 49 pc
Phoenix 96 68 90 60 pc
Pittsburgh 67 54 .12 72 54 pc
Portland. ME 69 42 55 40 pc
Portland. OR 66 43 65 45 pc
Providence. RI 71 48 62 42 pc
Raleigh 78 52 79 55 pc
Rapid City 65 34 61 28 r
Reno 78 46 76 39 pc
Rochester, NY 58 46 09 67 52 pc
Sacramento 75 50 78 49 pc
Salt Lake City 75 48 69 42 pc
San Antonio 90 59 83 69 f
San Diego 77 60 61 57 cd
SanFrancisco 63 53 59 50 f
Savannah 80 53 81 57 pc
Seattle 61 42 62 42 pc
Spokane 65 36 57 34 sh
St. Louis 74 54 80 61 pc
St. Ste. Marie 52 28 42 36 r
Syracuse 59 46 .07 66 52 pc
Topeka 78 39 81 43 pc
Washington 81 60 71 50 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HI98GH 9 By, Cai.
LOW 17 Cram Lake. Mnn.
WORLD CITIES


Usbon 69/5Opc
London 60/42/pc
Madrid 78/50Vs
Mexico City 84/55/s
MontreaJ 53/371pc
Moscow 42/281s
Parts 4/42/pc
Rio 8473/pc
Rome 71/44/s
Sydney 68164r
Tokyo 64/46/pc
Toronto 53141/pc
Warsaw 55/3/s


Louisville 77 63 SAT78 58 p T KY
L~u78III68 K ClITY HJLIKY
Memphis 77 60 79 62 pc
Milwaukee 67 34 64 40 Is Acapulco 8775f1pc
Minneapolis 63 43 65 36 sh Amsterdam 5941/pc
Mobile 76 53 79 61 pc Athens 64/50s
Montgomery 77 49 79 57 Beijing 6942/cd
Berlin 59/42/pc
NasWhvle 77 61 79 58 pc Berli 59/42/pc
Bermuda 68&62/pc
KEY TO CONDImONS .c-cbou dr-dm e; Cairo 80/60/pc
Wfain h.hay pcutly cloudy; rralnm; Calgary 53124tr
rsMrasnow mix; ssun#Wm sh-showers; Havana 86t66/pc
I=sn-ow thuimdm ns; w-wkWdy. Hong Kong 75/69/pc
W31C2M14 Jerusalem 78/55/s


H L F'cast City


H L F'cast


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


YrfON BsOICL
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:

Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
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13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
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and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County-- 352-563-6363
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan .......................................................................... P publisher, 563 -3222
Trina Murphy .......................... .. .. . 4 t .. Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E d ito r, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946

Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
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News and feature stories .................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ..................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ............................. Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................................................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The ( '. i-. '. is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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SAT
L Feat
47 pc
48 pc
50 pc
54 pc
45 Pc
67 pc
48 Pc
28 sn
56 f
33pc
47 pc
55 t
45 pc
56 pc
56 pc
57 pc
58 ts
60 pc
58 pc
54 pc
58 pc
4O pc
65 cd
29 pc
43 ts
58 pc
62 pc
59 pc
49 pc
43 pc
68 pc
59 pc
61 Pc
62 pc




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dreams dashed in fatal bus crash


Associated Press
ORLAND, Calif. It
was a busload of opportu-
nity: young, low-income,
motivated students, des-
tined to become the first in
their families to go to col-
lege, journeying from the
concrete sprawl of Los An-
geles to a remote redwood
campus 650 miles north.
Those dreams were
shattered for some Thurs-
day in an explosive free-
way crash that left 10 dead
- students, chaperones
and both drivers and
dozens hospitalized.
Desperate families
awaited word from loved
ones Friday, while investi-
gators tried to figure out
why a southbound FedEx
big rig swerved across the
grassy divide of California's
key artery before sideswip-
ing a car and slamming into
the tour bus, which burst
into a furious blaze.
"We're trying to think
positively," said Miguel
Serrato, whose twin 17-
year-old sisters had set off
on the adventure Thurs-
day on separate buses.
Marisol made it to their
destination, Humboldt
State University, but there


I
Associated Press
A California Highway Patrol officer walks past the charred remains of a tour bus at a
CalTrans maintenance station Friday in Willows, Calif. At least 10 people were killed
and dozens injured in the fiery crash on Thursday between a truck and a bus
carrying high school students on a visit to a Northern California college.


was no word from Marisa,
who had been aboard the
now-gutted bus.
But when a sheriff's
deputy asked her father
Friday morning for
Marisa's dental records, a
grim call made to several


families Friday, Serrato
said his family was "get-
ting a little bit scared." His
mother was booking a
flight to head north.
The bus was among
three Humboldt had
chartered as part of its


two-day Preview Plus pro-
gram to bring prospective
students to tour the Arcata
campus, according to uni-
versity officials. Before
launching the event Fri-
day, university Vice Presi-
dent Peg Blake's voice


broke as she asked a
crowded theater for a mo-
ment of silence in honor of
everyone affected by the
accident.
Most survivors were in-
jured, some with critical
burns or broken limbs.
Those who made it out
said they scrambled
through a kicked-out win-
dow One man, apparently
an admissions counselor,
was in flames and later
died. Those who could
sprinted, others staggered,
in a desperate dash to the
opposite side of Interstate
5 before the vehicle ex-
ploded.
"We knew we were in
major trouble," said
Steven Clavijo, a high
school senior from Santa
Clarita, who was trying to
nap when he felt the bus
shake before a loud boom.
After he escaped, two
more explosions followed.
Clavijo and other sur-
vivors watched helplessly,
knowing their peers were
trapped in the inferno.
Explosions of orange
flames engulfed both vehi-
cles, and clouds of black
smoke billowed into the
sky until firefighters
doused the fire, leaving


behind scorched black
hulks of metal. Bodies
were draped in blankets
inside the burned-out bus.
"The victims were
teenage kids. A lot of them
were freaked out. They
were shocked. They still
couldn't grasp what hap-
pened," said Jason Wyman
of the Orland Volunteer
Fire Department.
Both drivers were
killed, along with three
adult chaperones and five
teenage students, accord-
ing to the California High-
way Patrol, which
reached the scene shortly
after the 5:30 p.m. acci-
dent about 100 miles
north of Sacramento. Res-
cuers said the bodies
were mostly at the front of
the bus, or outside on the
ground in front of it.
Humboldt admissions
counselor Arthur Arzola,
26, who worked out of Los
Angeles, was among the
dead. His passion for
bringing kids to the uni-
versity was evident on his
"Meet the Counselors"
webpage: Humboldt "pro-
vides all students on cam-
pus with incredible
opportunities that change
the world for the better"


Nation/World BRIEFS


Health questions
remain after spill
CHALMETTE, La.--A
government researcher who
hopes to track the long-term
health effects of the 2010 BP
oil spill said there are early in-
dications that cleanup work-
ers were 30 percent more
likely to suffer from depres-
sion than others living in
areas affected by the spill.
Dr. Dale Sandier of the Na-
tional Institutes of Environ-
mental Health Sciences said
Friday it's too early to know
whether exposure to oil or dis-
persants would account for
higher levels of depression.
Sandier heads up a study
in which nearly 33,000 people
- cleanup workers or those
who applied for cleanup work
- are being surveyed on
health matters.
Geologists link
quakes to cracking
COLUMBUS, Ohio Ge-
ologists in Ohio have for the
first time linked earthquakes
in a geologic formation deep
under the Appalachians to hy-


draulic fracturing, leading the
state to issue new permit con-
ditions Friday in certain areas
that are among the nation's
strictest.
A state investigation of five
small tremors last month in
the Youngstown area, in the
Appalachian foothills, found
the injection of sand and
water that accompanies hy-
draulic fracturing, or cracking,
in the Utica Shale may have
increased pressure on a
small, unknown fault, said
State Oil & Gas Chief Rick
Simmers. He called the link
"probable."
Woman gets life in
stiletto slaying
HOUSTON -A Houston
woman was sentenced to life
in prison Friday for fatally
stabbing her boyfriend with
the 5 1/2-inch stiletto heel of
her shoe, striking him at least
25 times in the face and head.
Ana Trujillo was convicted
of murder Tuesday by the
same jury for killing 59-year-
old AIf Stefan Andersson dur-
ing an argument last June at
his Houston condominium.


Defense attorneys argued
that Trujillo, 45, was defend-
ing herself from an attack by
Andersson, who was a Uni-
versity of Houston professor
and researcher.
Ukraine's Russian
gas bill growing
MOSCOW The amount
Russia says it is owed by
Ukraine's cash-strapped gov-
ernment for natural gas has
ballooned as if by magic -
from $1.7 billion at the begin-
ning of April to a staggering
$35.4 billion, according to a
letter sent by President
Vladimir Putin this week to 18
European leaders.
Ukraine will most likely
have to call Russia's bluff and
hope it will accept to be re-
paid little by little. Experts say
that considering Ukraine's
cash problem, Russia is likely
to be realistic about the issue
if it wants to get its money
back at all.
PM: sounds are
from Flight 370
PERTH, Australia With
the Malaysian jetliner mystery


now five weeks old, officials
have narrowed the search
zone for the missing plane
and are "very confident" the
underwater signals they have
heard are from its black box,
Australia's prime minister said
Friday.
At the same time, however,
those electronic signals are
fading, Tony Abbott added.
Search crews are racing
against time because the bat-
teries powering the


recorders' locator beacons
last only about a month -
and more than a month has
passed since the plane dis-
appeared. Finding the de-
vices after the batteries fail
will be extremely difficult be-
cause the water in the area is
15,000 feet deep.
Complicating matters is the
depth of the seabed in that
area. The signals are emanat-
ing from 15,000 feet below
the surface, which is the


deepest the Bluefin can dive.
The search coordination cen-
ter said it was considering op-
tions in case a deeper-
diving sub is needed.
The surface area to be
searched for floating debris
had been narrowed to 18,036
square miles of ocean extend-
ing from 1,400 miles north-
west of Perth. Up to 15 planes
and 13 ships were conducting
the visual search Friday.
From wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries-


Lurline
Brooks, 91
LECANTO
Lurline Brooks, 91,
Lecanto, Fla., died April 9,
2014. Graveside service will
be 11 a.m. Monday, April 14,
2014, at Port Myaca Ceme-
tery in Port Myaca.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.

June
Herchenroeder,
89
HOMSASSA
June R. Herchenroeder,
89, died at her home under
the loving care of Hospice
of Citrus County on April 8,
2014.
June was preceded in
death by her husband,
Louis. She is survived by
her daughter, Lynne Her-
rick, and son-in-law,
Stephen Herrick; her
grandson, Joseph T Mc-
Cormick, his wife, Frankie
Seifert, and their son,
James; and her grand-
daughter, Jessica Mc-
Cormick, and her
husband, Micheil McElvey
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

L. Peter
McGonnigal,
81
INVERNESS
L. Peter McGonnigal, 81,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away April 8, 2014, under
the care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus and the
Nature Coast in Inverness.
Peter was born April 15,
1932, in New York City and
raised in Weymouth,
Mass., by James and Mar-
garet McGonnigal.
Peter is survived by his
loving wife of 58 years, Bev-
erly (Norcross); his son,
Peter McGonnigal, his wife
Shari, and his daughter,
Lisa Conway, and her hus-
band, Bill, of Weymouth,
Mass. He was a loving
grandfather to Katherine,
William, Ryan and Justin.
Peter retired from
Quincy Court House,
Quincy, Mass., after a 25-
year career Peter was a
life member of the Wey-
mouth, Mass., Elks Lodge
No. 2232, a member of the
Crystal River Moose Lodge
No. 2013, the Fraternal
Order of Eagles No. 4272 of
Homosassa and an auxil-
iary member of the Bev-
erly Hills, VFW Post 10087.
A celebration of his life
will be at the VFW Post
10087,2170 W Vet Lane, Bev-
erly Hills, from 5 to 9 p.m.
Sunday, April 13,2014. Me-
morial contributions may
be made to Hospice of Cit-
rus and the Nature Coast,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. corn.

Katherine
Nussle, 98
DUNNELLON
Katherine L. Nussle, 98,
of Dunnellon, Fla., died
April 11, 2014. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Fero
Funeral Home.

M26a. 9.,Q t
Funeral Home With Crematory
DEBORAH SWEAT
Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
CHRISTOPHER CASTER
Service: Sun. 4/27 3:00 PM
JIMMY D. WORKMAN
Service: Tues. 12:00 PM
LURLINE BROOKS
Service: Mon. 11:00 AM
Port Myaca Cemetery
726-8323


Thomas
Murphy, 82
BEVERLY HILLS
Thomas E. Murphy, 82,
of Beverly Hills, Fla., died
April 9, 2014. Visitation
will be 10 to 11 a.m. Thurs-
day, April 17, 2014, at Fero
Funeral Home. Military
honors to follow at
12:30 p.m., at the Florida
National Cemetery





Jimmy
Workman, 69
INVERNESS
Jimmy Dale Workman,
69, of Inverness, Fla.,
passed away at his resi-
dence Wednesday, April 9,
2014, surrounded by his
-loving
family
He was
born Aug.
9, 1944, in
-^ i Burling-
ton, Iowa,
to the late
Dale and
Jimmy D o r i s
Workman (Diderik-
sen) Workman. Jimmy was
a U.S. Army veteran and
was a maintenance safety
inspector for CITGO Petro-
leum Corp. He arrived in
this area in 1999, coming
from Lockport, Ill. He was
a member of Gulf to Lake
Baptist Church, and loved
all sports including bowl-
ing, golfing and fishing. He
especially loved his dog
"Dewey" While in high
school, he was a track run-
ner and he later coached
little league baseball.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 45 years, Gail
Workman. Other survivors
include sons, Jimmy
(April) Workman Jr of St.
Petersburg, Jason (and
companion Regan Becker)
Workman of Seattle, Wash.,
and Joel (Shannon) Work-
man ofJoliet, Ill.; brothers,
Jeff Workman and John
Workman; and two grand-
children. He is preceded
in death by one brother,
Jerry Workman.
The family will be re-
ceiving friends at the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory 10 a.m. to
12 p.m. Tuesday, April 15,
2014, with a funeral serv-
ice at 12 p.m. Burial with
military honors will occur
at Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell following
the service. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family requests do-
nations to be made in
Jimmy's name to either the
ALS Association, Florida
Chapter, or Hospice of Cit-
rus County
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


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Contact:
Citrus County Mosquito Control District
www.citrusmosquito.org 352-527-7478


Clarita
Sagun, 77
HERNANDO
Clarita S. Sagun, 77, of
Hernando, Fla., died
April 9, 2014, at home
while in the care of her
loving family and Hospice
of Citrus County
A funeral Mass will be
11 a.m. Monday at Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness, FL 34450.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

Autumn
Smith, 52
CRYSTAL RIVER
Autumn J. Smith, 52,
Crystal River, Fla., died
April 11, 2014. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or soci-
ety in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obitu-
aries will be posted
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted
by funeral homes or
societies.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an ad
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chroni-
cle online.com or fax
352-563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's obitu-
aries and guest
books.


Former Hawks All-Star


Lou Hudson dies at 69


Associated Press

ATLANTA Do-
minique Wilkins hopes
young fans take the time
to learn about Lou
Hudson.
Wilkins says they'll dis-
cover "Sweet Lou" was
one of the best shooting
guards in NBA history
Hudson, a smooth-
shooting star for the
Hawks who averaged
more than 20 points dur-
ing 13 NBA seasons, died
Friday He was 69.
He died in Atlanta,
where he was hospital-
ized and listed in grave
condition last month after
a stroke, the Hawks said.
Hudson was a six-time
All-Star while with the
Hawks in St Louis and At-
lanta, often playing away
from the national
spotlight.
"Young people today
don't know how good Lou
Hudson really was,"
Wilkins, a Hall of Famer,
told The Associated Press.
"He was a hell of a player
The guy could score with
the best in history He was
a phenomenal basketball
player
"He should be a Hall of
Famer and it's amazing to
me he's not He was one of
the best (shooting) guards
and that's a fact. You go
back and look at his ca-


Associated Press
St. Louis Hawks rookie forward Lou Hudson (23) goes to
the basket Jan. 31, 1967, against Philadelphia's Bill
Melchionni, in St. Louis. Hudson died Friday in Atlanta,


the Atlanta Hawks said.
reer and look at the num-
bers and see what he did
and you understand."
Hudson was the first
face of the Hawks fran-
chise in Atlanta. He then
passed the torch to
Wilkins.
Hudson suffered his


first stroke in 2005 and
later campaigned for the
"Power to End Stroke"
organization.
He is survived by his
wife, Madeline (Mardi),
his daughter, Adrienne,
and his former wife,
Bernadette.


Sue Townsend, creator of


Adrian Mole, dies at 68


Associated Press

LONDON British
comic author Sue
Townsend, who created
angst-ridden teenage di-
arist Adrian Mole and
sent Queen Elizabeth II
into exile on a public
housing estate, has died
after suffering a stroke.
She was 68.
Her publisher, Penguin
Books, said Friday that
Townsend died in Leices-
ter, central England, a day
earlier
Townsend left school
at 15, married at 18, and
by 23 was a single mother
of three. She worked in a
factory, in shops and at
other jobs and wrote,
honing her style for years
before breaking through
into publication.
Her first novel, "The
Secret Diary of Adrian
Mole, Aged 13/4," was
published in 1982 and
was hailed as a comic
masterpiece.
Written in the voice of
a gauche but observant
teenager, it fused the
acute awkwardness of
adolescence with the
zeitgeist of Thatcher-era
Britain.
The book was a huge


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success, selling more than
20 million copies around
the world, and Townsend
followed Adrian Mole into
adulthood in a series of
books, several of which
were adapted for the
stage, radio or television.
The most recent, "Adrian
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Broadway, and four
children.


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OBITUARIES


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets


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S&P 500
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Change: -17.39 (-0.9%)


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Dow Jones industrials
Close: 16,026.75
Change:-143.47 (-0.9%)


1,900 ......... ............ ............. ............ ............. 6 80...................16 8 0............ .............. ............ ............ .............i [ ,
1,85o0......... ..... ... ...16.......... .......... .. .............. .
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1'750F "i+ ] .....16,800.. +............................ .....

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1,700 .............. .. ............. .. ..... 15,200 ......... ...... ........................................ .......
1,650 ...... ..... ............. ........... 14800.
... N 6D J F M A0 N


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,695
Pvs. Volume 3,659
Advanced 867
Declined 2217
New Highs 22
New Lows 52


NASD
2,223
2,370
537
2075
14
92


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16168.87
7447.40
537.44
10369.96
4067.22
1835.07
1335.29
19543.41
1128.96


LOW
16015.32
7355.49
533.43
10271.36
3991.64
1814.36
1316.03
19298.59
1107.93


CLOSE
16026.75
7362.39
534.32
10280.94
3999.73
1815.69
1318.50
19321.15
1111.44


CHG.
-143.47
-68.84
-0.48
-85.88
-54.38
-17.39
-17.01
-203.30
-16.22


%CHG.
-0.89%
-0.93%
-0.09%
-0.83%
-1.34%
-0.95%
-1.27%
-1.04%
-1.44%


YTD
-3.32%
-0.52%
+8.92%
-1.15%
-4.23%
-1.77%
-1.79%
-1.95%
-4.49%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 8.47 6.96 -.34 -4.7 V A V -15.1 +131.0 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 -- 39.00 35.20 +.08 +0.2 A A A +0.1 -3.2 11 1.84
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -- 62.05 50.32 +.62 +1.2 V V -4.5 +19.6 24 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 0 107.84 105.60 +.07 +0.1 V A A -0.8 +6.1 2.82e
Bank of America BAG 11.23 --- 18.03 15.77 -.35 -2.2 V 7 7 +1.3 +31.1 16 0.20f
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -- 14.71 13.50 -.11 -0.8 V 7 A +14.7 +11.8 39 0.08
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 38.40 33.35 -.08 -0.2 V A A +4.7 -3.7 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 42.54 --- 55.28 45.68 -.55 -1.2 7 7 -12.3 +2.7 10 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 19.55 -- 28.10 25.97 -.64 -2.4 V 7 7 +11.4 +20.3 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 57.76 -- 83.65 77.01 -.50 -0.6 7 7 7 +0.8 +30.4 21 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 --- 75.46 71.84 +.25 +0.3 A A A +4.1 +2.6 19 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.69 -0- 61.18 53.51 +.15 +0.3 V 7 A +8.8 +5.2 17 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 -- 101.74 96.72 -.06 -0.1 7 A 7 -4.4 +12.0 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.40 -0- 18.02 15.63 ... ... A A +1.3 +22.4 9 0.50
Gen Electric GE 21.11 --- 28.09 25.43 -.15 -0.6 7 A 7 -9.3 +12.0 19 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 35.20 -- 52.83 48.21 -1.00 -2.0 7 A 7 +1.0 +34.2 14
Home Depot HD 69.78 -0- 83.20 75.70 -1.08 -1.4 V 7 7 -8.1 +9.4 20 1.88f
Intel Corp INTO 20.80 --0- 27.12 26.18 -.25 -0.9 A A A +0.9 +22.8 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0- 213.09 195.19 -.49 -0.3 A A A +4.1 -5.9 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.28 -0- 34.32 27.42 +.28 +1.0 V A A -16.7 +27.7 27
Lowes Cos LOW 37.09 --- 52.08 46.31 -.48 -1.0 7 7 -6.5 +21.7 22 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 --- 103.70 99.29 -.14 -0.1 A A A +2.3 +1.1 18 3.24
Microsoft Corp MSFT 28.47 --0- 41.66 39.21 -.15 -0.4 7 A 7 +4.8 +33.4 15 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 -- 67.69 63.39 -.60 -0.9 V 7 7 -6.1 +0.8 15 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 0 97.31 95.15 -.62 -0.6 A A V +11.1 +23.3 22 2.90f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 -0-- 19.63 7.70 -.82 -9.6 7 7 7 -15.8 -39.5 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 -0-- 21.09 17.05 -.14 -0.8 A A V +3.2 -9.3 31 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 7.62 --- 11.54 10.17 -.12 -1.2 V 7 7 +2.8 +26.5 13 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 26.62 --- 54.69 32.62 -1.78 -5.2 V 7 7 -17.9 -19.6 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -0-- 114.72 94.33 -1.17 -1.2 V 7 7 -9.0 -1.3 17 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 33.56 -- 49.77 44.98 -.55 -1.2 7 A 7 +2.4 +30.6 26 1.20
Time Warner TWX 55.71 -0- 70.77 62.76 -.81 -1.3 V 7 7 -10.0 +8.7 16 1.27f
UniFirst Corp UNF 87.68 -0-- 117.91 93.47 -1.85 -1.9 V 7 7 -12.6 +4.9 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 -0-- 54.31 47.07 -.40 -0.8 7 A 7 -4.2 -0.6 12 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 27.49 -0- 42.14 35.40 -.69 -1.9 7 7 -11.5 +20.9..
WalMart Strs WMT 71.51 -0- 81.37 76.50 -.39 -0.5 V A A -2.8 +1.8 16 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 43.31 -- 69.84 64.26 +.86 +1.4 V 7 7 +11.9 +34.3 23 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a -Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd- Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates




Em
The yield on the
10-year
Treasury fell to
2.63 percent
Friday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
VEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YRAGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Crude oil
nudged upward
and reached its
highest
settlement price
in nearly five
weeks. The
price of natural
gas edged
lower, its first
drop of the
week. Gold and
silver fell.


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .06
6-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .09
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .12
2-year T-note .34 0.34 .. .23
5-year T-note 1.58 1.59 -0.01 .73
10-year T-note 2.63 2.65 -0.02 1.79
30-year T-bond 3.48 3.52 -0.04 3.00


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.28 3.31 -0.03 2.71
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.63 4.68 -0.05 4.09
Barclays USAggregate 2.29 2.34 -0.05 1.82
Barclays US High Yield 5.03 5.17 -0.14 5.53
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.24 4.26 -0.02 3.79


Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.79 1.82
Barclays US Corp 2.99 3.04


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 103.74
Ethanol (gal) 2.36
Heating Oil (gal) 2.93
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.62
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.01
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1318.70
Silver (oz) 19.93
Platinum (oz) 1461.60
Copper (Ib) 3.07
Palladium (oz) 807.05
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.45
Coffee (Ib) 2.01
Corn (bu) 4.99
Cotton (Ib) 0.89
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 328.30
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.65
Soybeans (bu) 14.63
Wheat (bu) 6.60


PVS.
103.40
2.40
2.94
4.66
3.01
PVS.
1320.10
20.08
1458.40
3.07
792.55
PVS.
1.44
2.06
5.01
0.89
333.20
1.64
14.82
6.62


-0.03 1.02
-0.05 2.70


%CHG
+0.33
-0.96
-0.20
-0.75
+0.22
%CHG
-0.11
-0.72
+0.22
-0.07
+1.83
%CHG
+0.59
-2.38
-0.55

-1.47
+0.70
-1.30
-0.30


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.17 -.15 -0.5 +11.8 +11.2 +15.0
CaplncBuA m 58.28 -.35 +1.1 +8.2 +8.6 +13.1
CpWIdGrIA m 44.94 -.40 -0.5 +14.5 +9.1 +15.4
EurPacGrA m 48.39 -.44 -1.4 +13.4 +5.1 +13.6
FnlnvA m 49.92 -.51 -2.8 +15.9 +11.2 +17.4
GrthAmA m 41.74 -.47 -2.9 +18.0 +12.3 +17.0
IncAmerA m 20.74 -.12 +1.2 +10.5 +10.2 +15.7
InvCoAmA m 36.39 -.34 -0.5 +18.3 +12.7 +16.7
NewPerspA m 36.51 -.41 -2.8 +14.1 +9.4 +16.7
WAMutlnvA m 38.90 -.30 -0.9 +17.0 +13.9 +18.1
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 43.80 -.37 +1.8 +20.7 +7.8 +17.5
Stock 166.01 -1.82 -1.0 +23.2 +15.3 +21.1
Fidelity Contra 91.32 -1.09 -4.0 +16.6 +12.6 +18.2
ContraK 91.28 -1.09 -4.0 +16.7 +12.8 +18.4
LowPriStk d 49.24 -.46 -0.4 +19.7 +14.0 +21.4
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 64.41 -.61 -1.2 +16.3 +13.5 +18.7
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.51 ... +4.0 +11.5 +8.9 +16.1
IncomeA m 2.48 -.01 +4.2 +11.3 +9.5 +16.6
Harbor Intllnstl 71.15 -.52 +0.2 +12.5 +5.7 +16.4
Oakmark Intl 1 26.22 -.22 -0.4 +18.1 +11.1 +20.6
T Rowe Price GrowStk 49.36 -.77 -6.1 +19.9 +13.8 +19.5
Vanguard 500Adml 167.54 -1.59 -1.2 +16.3 +13.5 +18.7
5001lnv 167.54 -1.59 -1.2 +16.2 +13.4 +18.6
500Sgnl 138.40 -1.31 -1.2 +16.3 +13.5 +18.7
MulntAdml 14.06 +.02 +3.4 +1.0 +5.6 +5.2
PrmcpAdml 96.40 -1.36 +0.7 +21.6 +15.1 +19.2
STGradeAd 10.76 ... +1.2 +1.7 +2.7 +5.1
Tgtet2025 15.78 -.10 +0.2 +10.4 +8.6 +14.3
TotBdAdml 10.76 +.01 +2.7 +0.1 +4.1 +4.9
Totlntl 16.62 -.11 -0.1 +10.1 +3.4 +13.3
TotStlAdm 45.86 -.47 -1.3 +17.1 +13.4 +19.4
TotStldx 45.84 -.48 -1.4 +16.9 +13.3 +19.3
Welltn 38.10 -.17 +1.1 +11.3 +10.6 +14.7
WelltnAdm 65.81 -.29 +1.1 +11.4 +10.7 +14.8
WndsllAdm 65.39 -.59 +0.2 +17.2 +13.7 +18.9
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks fell Friday, adding to
their sharp losses from the prior
day. It closed the worst weekly
performance for the Standard &
Poor's 500 since 2012, and it
once again is down for the year
to date. All 10 sectors that make
up the index fell on Friday.


JPMorgan Chase JPM
Close:$55.30V-2.10 or -3.7%
The nation's largest bank fell short of
profit and revenue expectations as
fee-based income took a hit across
multiple sectors.





52-week range
$46.05 $61.48
Vol.:47.0m (2.3x avg.) PE: 12.7
Mkt. Cap: $209.41 b Yield: 2.7%
The Gap GPS
Close:$38.40V-0.89 or -2.3%
Comparable-store sales took a beat-
ing in March and analysts with
Sterne Agee blamed a bland clothing
lineup, not bad weather.





52-week range
$36.13 3$46.56
Vol.:15.2m (2.7x avg.) PE: 13.7
Mkt. Cap:$17.16 b Yield: 2.3%
H&R Block HRB
Close:$27.64V-0.78 or -2.7%
The tax preparer found a buyer for
its banking business after a sale
agreement with Republic Bank and
Trust fell apart.




dj J F M A
52-week range
$25.98 $32.42
Vol.:17.8m (5.4x avg.) PE: 16.8
Mkt. Cap: $7.58 b Yield: 2.9%
Ford Motor F
Close:$15.63 unchanged or 0%
Deutsche Bank projected domestic
truck sales will hold up, as well as
bigger profits from China, and up-
graded the automaker to a "buy."
$1-

1'1
14 J F M A
52-week range
$12.65 $18.02
Vol.:39.1m (1.1x avg.) PE:8.9
Mkt. Cap: $60.67 b Yield: 3.2%

Coldwater Creek CWTR
Close: $SO.13 V-0.06 or -31.6%
The women's retailer filed for Chap-
ter 11 bankruptcy protection after
failing to find a buyer or money to
fund a turnaround.





52-week range
$0.12 $3.96
Vol.:5.5m (5.7x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $3.98 m Yield:...


S TOTAL PLAN t S
PE PAMRTF PANT 43


S
~[ ~
ACM ~AWA


lU OF P INXTmlVa
$725 $643 $580






"RANO-MO 5 Of UNeEw S


lTOAL PLAN COT B1

1.33% 1.30% 1.29% 1.29%


2010 2011 2012 2013

TOTAL PLAN COST
AS PERCENT OF ASSETS: 129%



lam1 PLAN no I I
A i A P TA PLA OSTh


1.29% TOTAL PLAN COST


0.56% 0.65%
WT Ivai
MNTS~m2.T GROvs


m miS iU


'.0 U12M 0.96%
WTfM.NAL LeAE TARGET FID STAaLE
EQUITY tUE* i'TY DATE IMEI ASSET


_01 kl Averages Book

The moat recognized resource book
for 4D1 [k) fee information,


www.401 ksource.com

RECORDKEEPING AND ADMINISTRATION: represents ay INVESTMENT COST; represents any asset based
hard dollar cges for recordeering, adminslration and charges applied to plan asMsL TNhis Includes investment
trustee ikes. fmwmnt Ion, fiund axphinse ratiol. 12b-1l fees. ub-
transler agilt ees, contract d charges, wrap and a or
NE T INVESTMENT is the prt of th -Invesitnmert Cos fe any other asset based charges.
retained by the t Investment manager.
TOTAL PLAN COSTS. Indutel all of t heIlnvetment,
REVENUE SWARING. I the orton of the Ivtmont tpdk rofl & ad nrintnitratio. and truMt costs paid by
Co received by other swvice roviders to the plan. These the con oriy r poticip nt. ide nl t Iudrk e Wilpamt
other service providers could Include but we not limited to MtdatranmsactiolnssuchasBloanswilthdrawals or oahu
recodke r. ad viso and latorm prfO victerm mof of dtributiotn.

Source: 40 ih Averages Book





Savers beware



Fees may be shrinkingyour 401(k)


Associated Press

WASHINGTON It's
the silent enemy in our re-
tirement accounts: High
fees.
And now a new study
finds that the typical 401(k)
fees adding up to a mod-
est-sounding 1 percent a
year-would erase $70,000
from an average worker's
account over a four-decade
career compared with
lower-cost options. To com-
pensate for the higher fees,
someone would have to
work an extra three years
before retiring.
The study comes from
the Center for American
Progress, a liberal think
tank. Its analysis, backed by
industry and government
data, suggests that U.S.
workers, already struggling
to save enough for retire-
ment, are being further
held back by fund costs.
"The corrosive effect of
high fees in many of these
retirement accounts forces
many Americans to work
years longer than neces-
sary or than planned," the
report, being released Fri-
day, concludes.
Most savers have only a
vague idea how much
they're paying in 401(k)
fees or what alternatives
exist, though the informa-
tion is provided in often
dense and complex fund
statements. High fees sel-
dom lead to high returns.
And critics say they hurt


ordinary investors -
much more so than, say,
Wall Street's high-speed
trading systems, which
benefit pros and have in-
creasingly drawn the eye
of regulators.
Consider what would
happen to a 25-year-old
worker, earning the U.S.
median income of $30,500,
who puts 5 percent of his
or her pay in a 401(k) ac-
count and whose employer
chips in another 5 percent:
If the plan charged
0.25 percent in annual
fees, a widely available
low-cost option, and the in-
vestment return averaged
6.8 percent a year, the ac-
count would equal
$476,745 when the worker
turned 67 (the age he or
she could retire with full
Social Security benefits).
If the plan charged the
typical 1 percent, the ac-
count would reach only
$405,454 a $71,000
shortfall.
If the plan charged
1.3 percent common for
401 (k) plans at small com-
panies the account
would reach $380,649, a
$96,000 shortfall. The
worker would have to work
four more years to make
up the gap. (The analysis
assumes the worker's pay
rises 3.6 percent a year)
The higher fees often ac-
company funds that try to
beat market indexes by ac-
tively buying and selling
securities. Index funds,


which track benchmarks
such as the Standard &
Poor's 500, don't require
active management and
typically charge lower fees.
With stocks having hit
record highs before being
clobbered in recent days,
many investors have been
on edge over the market's
ups and downs. But ex-
perts say timing the mar-
ket is nearly impossible.
By contrast, investors can
increase their returns by
limiting their funds' fees.
Most stock funds will
match the performance of
the entire market over time,
so those with the lowest
management costs will gen-
erate better returns, said
Russel Kinnel, director of
research for Morningstar
"Fees are a crucial de-
terminant of how well you
do," Kinnel said.
The difference in costs
can be dramatic.
Part of the blame goes to
employers that offer work-
ers high-fee plans.
"The good options are
out there," said Alicia
Munnell, director of the
Boston College's Center
for Retirement Research.
"But when you introduce
bad options into a plan,
you attract people to them.
There are a lot of people
who think they should buy
a little of everything, and
that's diversification.
"I want the world to know
that fees can really eat into
your retirement savings."


Associated Press

Where to find the fees
charged by your 401(k) re-
tirement funds?
"Sorry to say there isn't
an easy answer to where to
find all expenses on re-
tirement accounts, which
is definitely part of the
problem," says Jennifer
Erickson, co-author of a
new study of 401(k) fees by
the Center for American
Progress.
Your quarterly state-
ment may not show all the
fees and "can be even
more confusing," Erickson
says.
Most fees more than
80 percent of them are
covered by a plan's "ex-
pense ratio." The expense
ratio includes recurring
fees you're charged when
you invest in a fund. The
ratio is disclosed in a doc-
ument form 404(a)(5) -


sent annually to partici-
pants in 401(k) plans.
The expense ratio ap-
pears as a percentage of
assets. It's also shown as
an annual dollar amount
for every $1,000 you invest.
But the $1,000 figure can
be misleadingly low. It
doesn't illustrate how fees
pile up year after year as
you put more money into
the plan.
For example, a 1 percent
expense ratio comes out to
$10 per $1,000 invested.
Yet as you contribute more
money and your invest-
ment grows over several
decades, that 1 percent
will likely add up to tens of
thousands of dollars.
Among the fees some
funds collect that aren't in-
cluded in the expense
ratio: Sales charges. These
are also known as "loads"
or commissions. These fees
can vary from plan to plan


and can be hard to find in
the fund documents.
Erickson and co-author
David Madland suggest
asking your human re-
sources department to
help you compare fees
among different plan
options.
How else to minimize
what you pay in 401(k)
fees?
Greg McBride, chief fi-
nancial analyst at
Bankrate.com, suggests fa-
voring index funds that
track broad market meas-
ures, such as the Standard
& Poor's 500, rather than
costlier funds that actively
buy and sell investments.
And McBride has an-
other suggestion: Lobby
for lower-cost options from
your employer's human
resources department and
from the company that
sponsors your employer's
401(k) plan.


What you should know




about your 401(k) fees


i


BREAKDOWN O SMALL PLAN401(k) FE 1
'I CU pamicpants 5 liollion inisse1


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 A7


BUSINESS





OPage A8 SATURDAY, APRIL 12,2014



PINION


"Children are the living messages we
send to a time we will not see."
Neil Postman, "Introduction," The
Disappearance of Childhood, 1982


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
4 ^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

CHILDREN'S MONTH





Help stop




the cycle




of abuse


hat was once Week of 40th ar
the Young Child and Abuse
National Child Abuse ment
Prevention month has become that on
Children's Month in Citrus we set
County. form f(
Organizers of the month- We a
long effort to raise awareness the or
about child abuse have set a come
number of events to further make
their cause, from health and dren's
safety expos to arts
and crafts to fam- THE ISSUE:
ily fun days.
The Department April marks
of Children and Children's Montl
Families has long
struggled to pro- OUR OPINION
tect children in the R
state, but to be fair Raising
theirtask is a mon- awareness key t
mental one. stopping cycle
Therefore, it is in- of abuse.
cumbent upon the
community to be involved in 7:30 a.:
protecting its children. S. Pa
It starts with awareness. Lecani
Often, child abuse goes unde- school
tested for years, hidden be- Al
hind closed doors, nanza'
perpetrated by those charged Librar
with the care of the child. conjun
Children often do not speak brary
up, either because of igno- the Cit
ranee, fear or lack ofopportu- month
nity With better awareness, go to c
members of the community A,
can learn how to spot signs of Earth
abuse and take steps to report mosass
it or intervene. Park IR
Organizers deserve credit hunt 9
for not just stopping at creating Al
a proclamation, but develop- p.m.: I
ing a series of special events Bicent
that are interactive and leave River
a lasting impression on those AI
who attend. Sheriff
These events go a long way Expo/A
toward stopping the cycle of Citrus
abuse. Awareness gives those Invern
who may have been raised in For
an abusive home and opportu- on Chi
nity to see what normal behav- Comm
ior looks like. 341-70'
Additionally, 2014 marks the alliance


Thanks for Lots
returning card I wou
I would like to sincerely thank ture at
the person who turned
in my credit card case OUND
in the Lowe's parking
lot to the Lowe's service I m
desk and also the
Lowe's employees that
went above and beyond
to locate me. Thank
you.
Stop using CAL
deputy cars 563-0579
I see in the Chronicle
where they're trying to find alter- reaction
native measures for the use of the aqu
county fuel for cheaper prices, just for
Why hasn't anybody, anybody a teachi
commissioners, anybody- ence. I t
thought of the issue of the sher- have so
iff's department using cruisers for County.
personal use? I've seen it many, arts wit
many times. I've called about it ior high
We have
and it's never, ever brought up by area. W,
the county commissioners' office people
or anybody else. If you want to ent. So
save a lot of money not only for go out
fuel and maintenance, stop pay- River M
ing for the use of the deputies' happen
personal cars. then we


anniversary of the Child
Prevention and Treat-
Act, so it's only fitting
i this historic occasion
Sin motion a new plat-
)r fighting child abuse.
pplaud the efforts of all
organizations that have
together this month to
a difference in our chil-
lives.


h1.

N:

0


The following
events have been
planned in con-
junction with Chil-
dren's Month in
Citrus County:
Today:
"Schoolhouse
Hustle." Health
Expo and 5K and
10K Run. Regis-
tration begins at
6:30 a.m., race at


m. CREST School, 2600
inther Pride Drive,
to. For information, visit
househustle.com.
)ril 17: "Bookmark Bo-
' at Homosassa Public
y. All day/all ages, in
action with National Li-
Week. Lots of events at
rus County libraries all
. For more information
clib.org.
pril 19: Egg hunt and
Day activities. Ho-
sa Springs Wildlife State
Registration at 8 a.m. Egg
a.m.
april 19, 11 a.m. to 2:30
Underwater egg hunt at
.ennial Pool, Crystal
Games, arts and crafts.
)ril 26, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.:
f's Youth & Safety
YMCA Healthy Kids Day,
County Auditorium,
ess.
additional information
ildren's Month, call the
unity Alliance at 352-
75 or visit citrus
ce.org.


of mall goings on
Id like to share my adven-
:he Crystal River Mall. I
came out several times
and there's so many
great changes going on
at Crystal River Mall. The
West End Market I've
been to twice each
month. The second Sat-
urday, it's like a farmer's
market and then the
fourth Saturday, it's an
arts-and-crafts home-
made and handmade.
But it's been really nice
to see that the mall is
changing in a positive di-
with the new changes. With
arium coming, which is not
entertainment, but it's also
ing and learning experi-
:hink it's just wonderful. We
me great talent in Citrus
They hosted the student
h the primary schools, jun-
schools and high schools.
e some great talent in this
e really do. We have local
that I know they have tal-
maybe everybody should
and look at the Crystal
all for the changes that are
ing and support it and
e can start growing again.


The profound urgency of DCF reform


ith much chest- number ofvictims in its files who
thumping, Florida Gov died because of violence or neg-
Rick Scott last week ligence by parents and care-
signed a law clipping givers.
auto-tag fees by about In 2008, for example,
$25 per vehicle in the the state said the death
state. He used the op- toll was 79. Using
portunity to blast for- DCF's own records,
mer Gov Charlie Herald reporters
Crist for raising those found 103 fatal cases
fees five years ago. that year
What Scott cyni- Then, in 2009, the
cally failed to men- 1 state reported that 69
tion during the rlHiaasen children whose fami-
bill-signing charade Cr lies had prior contact
was that all the top OTHER with DCF had died.
Republicans stand- VOICES Reporters counted
ing at his side had 107.
also supported the auto-tag The uncounted die just as
hikes. It was the depth of the re- wretchedly and as unneces-
cession, and the state desper- sarily-as the counted.
ately needed revenue. One of the most awful, notori-
Scott himself is desperate to ous cases involved Nubia Bara-
appear gubernatorial because hona, a 10-year-old Miami girl
Crist, running as a Democrat, who'd been tortured and starved
will likely be his opponent in the by her adoptive parents. Soaked
November election. The auto-tag in poisonous chemicals, her de-
fee cut was the centerpiece of a composing body was found in-
tax-relief agenda being pushed side a black garbage bag on a
by the governor, who trails Crist pest-control truck
in the early polls. Three years after the murder,
Two of the GOP lawmakers the DCF still hasn't sent her case
who were crowing about this to the Florida Child Abuse Death
grand windfall for motor-vehicle Review Committee. Incredibly
owners have an infinitely more Nubia's death remains officially
important job in the days ahead, uncounted.
House Speaker Will Weatherford The child-welfare system has
and Senate President Don Gaetz been overwhelmed and broken
have a chance to do something for a long time, but that hasn't
truly crucial and good. stopped lawmakers from hack-
They can shape a law that ing millions in DCF funding. But
saves actual lives the lives of this year Florida has accumu-
endangered children, lated an extra $1.3 billion in rev-
Bills that would strengthen enues, so there's no excuse not to
Florida's child welfare laws are take action to stop the killings.
winding through both houses of Scott has proposed $40 million
the Legislature following publi- to hire more DCF investigators
cation of the Miami Herald's and improve their training.
shocking investigative series, That's a start, but drug-treatment
Innocents Lost and counseling programs are
The newspaper documented also needed for those who've
the deaths of at least 477 children been allowed to keep custody of
whose parents or caregivers had their children while under
a history with the state's Depart- supervision.
ment of Children and Families. The sad truth is that there
During the six-year period stud- aren't enough good foster homes
ied by reporters, DCF consis- to let the state move all the kids
tently under-reported the now living with reckless parents


0


LETTER

Vote against oP
stub out in SMW m All le
Out of all the regions in the inclu
homnE
country we choose Florida and sent
more specifically, Sugarmill homn
Woods in Citrus County. This is phor
our retirement, our "forever pubi
home." My wife and I are not
wealthy, don't even have pen- all dime
sions. We saved, sacrificed and trusion
planned to have our lifestyle in Kalka s]
a deed-restricted community, we knov
We did not want neighbors in- change.
trading with wash lines, boats, planned
campers, burn barrels and of life. T
goats. We chose a property own- constru
ers association of like-minded the acco
neighbors to protect our way of house ti
life. That way of life is the change
wooded view, well cared for Boulewv
landscaping, quiet streets with at loss o
even a school bus or two. Our structec
Northern visitors admired the trees, ai
location. Dog lovers walk their fic light
canines each morning past our live like
Daisy Street home. They are a sen Tan
community within a community CrystalI
of folks that trust the slow pass- ness. Mi
ing cars. Other folks walk for cess cho
exercise and weight loss. Some plans in
are just recovering from ill- from U.-
nesses. They walk slower Then Hernan
we have the runners with their him, noi
flashy outfits. Our n
All of this will change, and Oak Vil]
not for the better We have wel- come to
comed change throughout our Kalka's
life. We all live with change in You are


in high-risk situations. In recent
years the DCF has bent over
backwards to hold dysfunctional
families intact, too often with
lethal consequences.
In 83 cases found by the Her-
ald, a little boy or girl died after
one or more parents had signed
a so-called "safety plan" pledg-
ing to take better care of the
child. The Senate version of the
reform bill aims to make these
safety plans more than just a
piece of paper
The measure would also re-
quire prompt and complete re-
porting of certain child deaths,
and offer tuition-aid incentives
for social workers who
want to become child-abuse
investigators.
Still, the Senate bill provides
only $31 million in extra fund-
ing for child protection. The
House version calls for $44.5
million.
"It's tragic where Florida
finds itself," said House Speaker
Weatherford last week
He and Sen. President Gaetz
have the clout and a moral
obligation -to make other law-
makers understand the pro-
found urgency of DCF reform.
Children who are known to be
in danger are dying anyway and
the state can't even properly
count how many
With $1.3 billion in unantici-
pated revenue lying around, the
governor and Legislature can
afford to invest more than a
drop in the bucket to help
Florida's most helpless
children.
Lowering auto-tag fees by 25
bucks might be cause for giddy
back-slapping in Tallahassee,
but saving even one child from
a tortuous death would be a
more noble accomplishment
And one you can't put a price
on.
CarlHiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers may
write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza,
Miami, Fla., 33132.


% ?LEDE ALLE6'A1mcc
* \ To TIE PIRCE TAG
c \ T E cotO42RES
^ -^3 V O TUNIOTED
E I TATE OF









to the Editor





Sto the Editor


PINIONS INVITED
otters must be signed and
de a phone number and
town, including letters
via email. Names and
towns will be printed;
le numbers will not be
wished or given out.

tensions. The planned in-
of developer Nachum
lams in the face of all
v. This is more than
It is a purposeful
d destruction of our way
'his is personal. His
action trucks and then
)mpanied apartment
Traffic will forever
tree-lined Oak Village
ard. We will be looking
f front lawns, con-
d sidewalks, loss of
ind possibly even a traf-
or two. If we wanted to
This we could have cho-
npa, Ocala, parts of
River or even Inver-
r Kalka has other ac-
)ices in his construction
a Hernando County both
S. 19 and U.S. 98. Let
do County deal with
t Citrus County
neighbors, friends and
lage Association have
gether to inform you of
egregious intensions.
our elected representa-


tives. You cannot recuse your-
self from your responsibility
You cannot pass this one off to a
consultant. You cannot bury
this in ethics committees. You
are ultimately responsible to
represent us in this intrusion
and we have elected you to pro-
tect us against this intrusion.
We know you have influence
with the planning commission.
We are all watching for political
shenanigans. We are a force to
be reckoned with.
Mr Chairman, as an Oak Vil-
lage resident you yourself have
been vandalized and burglar-
ized a few times. An uncommon
event in Sugarmill Woods. This
will now become an every day
event for all of us. Along with
the potential for auto conges-
tion, accidents and thefts, we
will lose our peaceful morning
walks, front lawns, quiet coffee-
sipping mornings, local
wildlife, and our way of life.
Election time is here. Those
of you running for reelection
are facing the negativity of in-
creased taxes, increased gov-
ernment, scandals, and now
you want to add a very un-
friendly vote from Sugarmill
Woods. I don't think so. Do the
right thing and vote against Mr
Kalka's planned intrusion of
Oak Village.
Dr. Bruce Bryn
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tax refund fraud frustration for victims


Associated Press

TOLEDO, Ohio Laura
Hankins knew something
was wrong when she filed
her daughter's tax return
and it was rejected hours
later: An identity thief al-
ready had sent in a return
using the 19-year-old's per-
sonal information.
"This is the first time in
her life she has ever filed
income taxes, after earn-
ing all of $1,800 stocking
products on grocery store
shelves," Hankins said. "I
did her taxes for her on-
line, but immediately she
got the rejection."
Thieves have claimed bil-
lions of dollars in bogus tax
refunds from the IRS by
swiping the Social Security
numbers and identities of
schoolchildren in Florida,
prisoners in Pennsylvania,
teachers in Washington
state and soldiers deployed
in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Hackers and employees
with access to thousands of
names stored in company
databases have tapped into
reams of personal informa-
tion, allowing them to sub-
mit hundreds of fraudulent



SKATE
Continued from Page Al

outside the waist-high wall
that surrounds the floor
Music pumps from over-
head speakers, pop songs
from the radio.
An announcer named
Puck starts things off by
asking, "Are you ready for
some dirty action?"
This is not a dainty
sport It's not for the timid
or those who don't think of
bruises as badges of honor
As the women begin to
skate, there are lots of
knees and elbows, pushing
of opponents and banding
together with teammates.
There are hip checks,
shoulder nudges and out-
right punches to the back
(although that is techni-
cally not allowed and will
earn a player a penalty).
They spend as much
time on their knees and
backsides as they do up-
right and skating. The
whole point is to get in the
other team's way, not let
them through, stop them,
push them, keep them
from passing you.
As the bout (what they
call a roller derby game)
progresses, the skaters -
and the crowd get more
aggressive.
"Pushpushpush!" yells a
woman in the front row of
lawn chairs. "Come on,
giver her hell!"
Someone else calls out,
"Keep pushing you got
her!" and "Nice one-
legged tomahawk!"


They play flat-track
roller derby, unlike the
banked surfaces of roller
derby days gone by The
bout is divided into two 30
minute halves, with each
half broken down into
jams, which last no more
than two minutes.
Eight players four
from each team make a
pack. The pack's job is to
block the opposing team's
jammer, one jammer from
each team. You can recog-
nize her by the star on her
helmet.
The jam begins with
everyone skating around
the oval track and the jam-
mers trying to make their
way through the pack.
Once a jammer passes, she



ABUSE
Continued from Page Al

ribs and legs and retinal
hemorrhaging, could face
developmental issues in
the future. McCourt said
medical tests indicate the
baby's brain is shrinking.
He also described the


sequence of events leading
to the arrests of Wood and
Williams last July
McCourt said the couple
harmed the baby and neg-
lected to seek medical in-
tervention despite
extensive bruising and the
child "projectile vomit-
ing." Instead, he said, they
tried home remedies, in-
cluding putting the baby in
warm bathtub water
McCourt said this went


returns by computer and re-
ceive refunds within days.
Five people in Cincinnati
were sentenced to prison
late last year for using the
names of employees at
nursing homes and hospi-
tals to file tax returns.
It all adds up to a lot of
frustration for legitimate
taxpayers who face more
paperwork and months of
waiting for their tax refunds.
Hankins was told her
daughter Claire, a college
student from West Milwau-
kee, Wis., would get her re-
fund in about six months.
But Hankins first had to
spend about 20 hours filling
out forms, gathering infor-
mation and photocopying
documents because she
couldn't file electronically
after the tax identity theft
was discovered in
February
"Some kids get to go to
Florida for spring break,
but she got to go to the West
Milwaukee police station to
file a theft report," said
Hankins, who added that
her daughter is worried
about what will happen
next now that her personal
information is out there.


The IRS paid out nearly
$4 billion to people using
stolen identities in 2012,
according to a government
report Since identity theft
fraud exploded over the
past three years, the
agency has made stopping
it a priority, but thieves are
becoming more aggressive
and still finding ways to get
around increased scrutiny
"It's like that game of
Whac-A-Mole. When
you're attacking one
scheme, they come up with
another," said Wifredo
Ferrer, the U.S. attorney in
South Florida, a hot spot
for the schemes.
Fraudulent filers have
evaded detection lately by
getting refunds loaded
onto prepaid debit cards
instead of receiving them
by check. Others have
robbed postal workers to
get refunds and even re-
cruited mail carriers to
take part, Ferrer said.
A former records clerk in
Alabama's prisons depart-
ment was charged in Janu-
ary with selling inmates'
personal information to
claim over $1 million in re-
funds. Three others were


,
A'S J


t


Associated Press
Laura Hankins sits with the paperwork in West Milwaukee that she needed go through
to help her 19-year-old daughter with her federal returns after finding out someone
using her name had already filed for a refund.


sentenced to prison for tak-
ing part, including a mail
carrier who stole the re-
funds from the mail.
"They're getting very
creative by using people in
the inside," Ferrer said.
"They're creative and


Associated Press
Jessie Dern, know to the roller derby world as "Turbo," slows down the opposing team's
jammer.


can score one point
each time she passes a
player from the other
team, which isn't easy with
four determined opposing
players focused on not let-
ting her pass.
The jam ends when a
jammer puts her hands on
her hips or when two min-
utes are up.


"When you're out there
skating, you feel muscles
you never knew you had,"
said Patricia "Salt"
Gantzer That's salt as in
"salt shaker" or even
"a-salt" (assault).
A small woman with a
soft voice and sweet West
Virginia accent, Gantzer
grew up dreaming of
being a roller derby
queen.
"I used to watch them on
TV and when the roller
girls would come and
skate at a skate shop in
Huntington, I thought that


on for two days and while
Wood purportedly spent
hours on a Facebook page
called Citrus County Vir-
tual Yard Sale hawking
some of the stolen items
the couple had.
Wood's attorney Bruce
Carney conceded Mc-
Court's version of the in-
juries to child, but
quibbled with the timeline
of events. Carney said that
is why his client changed
her plea to no contest in-
stead of guilty
Carney called the prose-
cution's case circumstantial.
The baby, who was ini-
tially taken to Citrus Me-
morial hospital, had to be
moved to a children's hos-
pital in St. Petersburg.
At the time of Wood's ar-
rest, she reportedly told of-
ficials the child was calm


was pretty neat," she said.
Gantzer 31, is still fresh
meat, having joined the
Cannibals a few months
ago after moving to Inver-
ness in January
"I'm small, so I think I'd
be good as a jammer," she
said.
Fellow fresh meat
Chenoa McCutcheon
started skating with the
Cannibals a month ago.
At 32, the Ozello resi-
dent said she only has one
bruise so far, but it's the
same one she keeps
falling on the same side of
her rear end.
"That's why they tell you
that you have to have
health insurance," she
said. "But I'm tough."
McCutcheon said she
didn't grow up skating, but
one day she and her hus-
band went to the roller
rink.
"I didn't fall, so I told my
husband, just joking, 'Now
I'm ready for the roller


and a good sleeper, but au-
thorities later were told by
witnesses that she had
been frustrated by the
baby's incessant crying,
and that things got really
aggravating for Wood
when a friend of Williams
brought another child for
her to care for in addition
to the two already in the
home. Wood reportedly be-
came increasingly upset
that Williams also was not
at home to help take care
of the kids.
It was during an unan-
nounced visit by a witness
who had not been told
about the medical condi-
tion of the 5-week-old that
Wood was convinced to
take the baby to the hospi-
tal. She told investigators
the bruising was caused by
the older child hitting the


derby,"' she said.
That's when she discov-
ered there was a team
"close-ish" to her and de-
cided to check it out
Although she hasn't de-
cided what her costume
will be, her husband gave
her the name "Fire-
cracker" because of her
red hair
"It's funny because I'm
quiet and reserved, an
introvert. But this is a
way to do something out
of my comfort zone," she
said. "You can be some-
one else out there. You
can pick a different per-
sona and be whoever you
want."
For more information
about the Ocala Cannibals,
visit ocalacannibalderby.
webs.com or find them on
Facebook at Facebook.
com/Ocala/CannibalDerby
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


younger one with a toy She
later said a bassinet fell on
the baby Other witnesses
recall hearing yelling and
screaming coming from
Wood's house.
One witness recalled
knocking on Wood's door,
only to be drowned out by
loud music emanating
from the residence. The
witness reportedly per-
sisted and went around
and gained access to the
house, only to find Wood
and Williams in one room
and the 14-month-old bel-
lowing in another room, in
a crib with soiled diapers.
The music was reportedly
so loud the child's cries
weren't noticeable.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


brazen. They're using the
IRS like their own ATM."
The IRS said Thursday
that it has started more
than 200 investigations
into identity theft and re-
fund fraud schemes this
filing season and that en-


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
Senate on Friday moved
to try to address sliding
test scores for nursing
school graduates and a
glut of poorly performing
programs, passing a
measure that would re-
quire accreditation for all
new schools within five
years of accepting
students.
The bill would also
allow nurses currently
certified by one of the two
top accrediting agencies
in the U.S. to be exempt
from the current biennial
continuing education
requirement.
The measure is a re-
sponse to legislation
passed in 2009 and 2010
that loosened require-
ments to open nursing ed-



SEARCH
Continued from Page Al

Yates said Citrus offi-
cials will continue to as-
sist, but the staging area
was also expected to
move nearer to searchers.
Searchers from several
counties and law enforce-
ment agencies continued
to peer through the forest
the forest on horseback,
on foot, in the air and on
all-terrain vehicles
(ATVs) for Theodore
Weiss, a 74-year-old New
Yorker whose plane dis-
appeared from radar at
about 2 p.m. Saturday,
shortly after taking off
from the Dunnellon Air-
port. Weiss was heading
to his second home in
Zephyrhills.
For reasons yet to be
determined, Weiss re-
portedly veered off his
route to Zephyrhills by
about 5 miles. The origi-
nal flight path had him
skirting the east end of
the county line.
Weiss's experimental
plane went missing in
what authorities are call-
ing a "radar dead zone"
- sometime after his
transponder was de-
tected by Gainesville
radar and before the air-
craft's signal could be
picked up by Tampa
radar
Marion County officials


forcement efforts are tak-
ing place nationwide. It
said investigators are es-
pecially focused on the
misuse of specialized
identification numbers as-
signed to firms that elec-
tronically file tax returns.


ucation programs. Pro-
gram operators were al-
lowed to apply through a
formulaic application
process designed to
streamline the process
for licensure and
opening.
Many of the new
schools, though, churned
out graduates who could
not perform well enough
on the national test that is
required by the state.
Sen. Denise Grimsley,
R-Sebring, sponsored
both the old bills and the
new one.
"It has become clear
that we have nursing pro-
grams that are not per-
forming adequately,"
Grimsley said earlier in
the session. She said the
new bill would address "a
serious situation that is
beginning to develop."


began investigating a
missing persons report
filed with that agency on
Monday afternoon saying
Weiss never made it to his
destination. Tampa radar
also never picked up on
the fixed-wing, single-en-
gine Sonex experimental
plane. The Sonex line of
planes, which are built
from kits, are small sports
aircraft which cost about
$20,000 to purchase and
assemble.
More than 130 people,
including 30 ATVs
spread between the
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and Citrus,
Hernando, Lake,
Sumter, Levy and Mar-
ion County Sheriff's Of-
fices, have been
scouring the forest since
Tuesday morning.
Ground searchers in-
clude staff from Citrus
and Hernando, helicop-
ters from Citrus and
Hernando and a fixed-
wing aircraft from both
the Civil Air Patrol and
the Florida Forest Serv-
ice. Community Emer-
gency Response Team
members from Citrus
and Hernando also
joined the search. An
air search was begun
in earnest Monday
evening.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter AB. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


Senate approves bill on

ailing nursing schools


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Skaters with the Ocala Cannibals line up at the starting line preparing to block the opposing team's jammer.


Tough and tenacious


The women of roller derby are bulldozers on eight wheels


Jammer Vinessa Farlow is jammed as she attempts to pass a group of
opponents.


Courtney Hindsley, known to many as Bonesaw Betty, gets into
the spirit with an elaborate design painted on her face.


Many Ocala Cannibals fans
have window decals displaying
their colors.


Vinessa Farlow, "Poison Control"
to her derby fans, races toward
the line to score a point for the
Cannibals.


Skate Mania in Ocala is the
Ocala Cannibals' home rink for
derby bouts.


A10 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


LOCAL








S B O APRIL 12,TS2014
PORTS


The Miami Heat regain
the top spot in the Eastern
Conference after defeating
the reeling Indiana Pacers
on Friday night./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Boxing/B2
* Baseball/B2, B4
U Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Auto racing/B6


Panthers' Van Cleef heading to St. Andrews


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Ashlynne Van Cleef once
summed up the greatest attrib-
ute she thought she brought to
the Lecanto High School girls
soccer team in one word: heart.
Van Cleef will now be bringing
that "heart" to North Carolina,
and to the St. Andrews Univer-
sity Lady Knights soccer team,
as the Panther defender signed
her official letter of intent on
April 3 at Lecanto High School.
Van Cleef signed in the com-
pany of her family, coaching
staff and school officials. She
will be receiving a 50 percent
scholarship from the university
Ashlynne has had her eyes set
on St. Andrews for quite a while
now, since she's a native of
North Carolina, and the school


provided precisely what she
was looking for in a university
"I've known for about a
month (that it might happen),"
Van Cleef said of the school's in-
terest. "I'm still really excited.
They have exactly the major I'm
looking for"
Van Cleef will be pursuing a
degree in forensic science.
"They offer exactly what I
want and have a real good soc-
cer program," Van Cleef added.
St. Andrews competes in the
National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics (NAIA).
"I would like to (help the
Knights) go on to the champi-
onship," Van Cleef said of her col-
legiate goals on the soccer pitch.
The Knights compete in the Ap-
palachian Athletic Conference.
Lecanto head coach Roselle
Lattin is sad to see one of her


strongest players go. But after
coaching Van Cleef for all four
years of her prep career, Lattin
knows that Van Cleef will have
no trouble landing on her feet at A
St. Andrews and will become an
integral part of that team just as
she was for the Lady Panthers.
"I'm really excited for Ash-
lynne, she loves soccer and
she's played pretty much her
entire life," Lattin said. "I know
this (past) year she's really put
in a lot of hard work, trying to
get herself into the position that
she's in right now (She wanted
to) play at the next level."
After four years as a Panther,
Van Cleef has been an integral
part of two back-to-back District
4A-4 championship teams, and Special to the Chronicle
two deep postseason runs that Lecanto High School senior Ashlynne Van Cleef, bottom left, recently
ended just shy of a state berth. received a partial athletic scholarship to play girls soccer for
See I~N- L7EF/Page 133 St. Andrews University, an NAIA school in North Carolina.


CR snatches Bat


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River shortstop Zac Pattison tags out Lecanto's Caleb Southey on a stolen base attempt Friday night in Lecanto during the
annual Joe Rigney Memorial Bat Game between the two Citrus County schools. The Pirates won 3-2 in eight innings.

Pirates survive extra innings with Lecanto to take Joe Rigney Bat Game


Tampa


Bay nips


Cincy 2-1

Balfour strikes out

batter with bases

loaded to end it

Associated Press
CINCINNATI David Price
took a shutout into the ninth and
Matt Joyce homered, helping the
Tampa Bay Rays beat the slump-
ing Reds 2-1 on Friday night for
their first victory in Cincinnati.
The teams have a brief and lop-
sided interleague history The
Reds had won eight of their nine
previous games, with Tampa Bay's
only win coming at Tropicana
Field on June 28, 2011, on Evan
Longoria's game-ending homer
Longoria singled home a run in
the first inning on Friday, and
Joyce added his homer to deep
right field off Johnny Cueto (0-2) as
the Rays finally got a victory in
their second visit to Great Ameri-
can Ball Park. They also visited in
2005 and got swept while giving up
34 runs in three games.
Price (2-0) allowed four hits and
one walk, losing his shutout when
Joey Votto homered to the
See /Page B5


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO With one earned run al-
lowed in eight innings on the mound and a
go-ahead RBI single and winning run in
the top of the eighth, Jordan Humphreys
got the monkey off Crystal River's back.
Humphreys' hit in the final inning a
high roping blast down the left-field line
-was one of four base hits by the Pirates
during the two-run rally, helping secure
the school its first Joe D. Rigney Memorial
Bat Game win in five years with a 3-2 eight-
inning triumph at Lecanto on Friday
The Pirate victory leaves both teams at
3-3 and split in head-on-head
matchups in District 5A-6 play, forcing
a tiebreaker to decide home-field status
in the teams' upcoming No. 2- versus
No. 3-seed district tourney meeting. Crys-
tal River improves to 11-9 overall.


The Panthers (8-11) were reluctant to
relinquish the game's titular 5 1/2-foot bat
They jumped to an 1-0 lead in the second
on an RBI grounder to second by Ashton
Honeggar and played error-free in the
field behind a masterfully efficient
7 1/3 innings on the mound from senior
Levi O'Steen (eight hits, no walks al-
lowed), who faced just 21 batters through
his first six innings, despite going without
a strikeout for the game.
"Levi is tough," CRHS coach Bobby Stack
said. "He's got our number As well as we've
been swinging it the past two weeks, I was
impressed with his performance his
change of speeds and breaking ball."
After back-to-back hits by sophomore
Zac Pattison and Humphreys in the
eighth, sophomore catcher Alex Delgado
relieved O'Steen. Moments later, a two-
out single by Casey Purnell drove in
Humphreys, giving the Pirates a 3-1


advantage on what turned out to be a
much-needed insurance run.
In the bottom of the eighth, LHS junior
first baseman Zach Bonick boarded on an
outfield error before cutting the deficit to
3-2 off a Jacob Schenck single in the right-
center gap. Junior Caleb Southey (2 for 4,
double) then moved Schenck over to third
with a sac bunt but with two outs, Schenck
was later picked off by Humphreys at sec-
ond base to end the game.
Humphreys (2 for 4) evened the score at
1-1 in the fourth after singling to left and
scoring on a gapper by third baseman
Austin Wiles (2 for 4).With runners on first
and third with no outs, the Pirates looked
to do even more damage in the fourth, but
Pattison was tagged out at the plate by
Delgado on a bunt by Mason Pateracki,
and Wiles was caught trying to stretch his
See BAT/Page B3


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays batter Matt Joyce
rounds the bases after hitting a solo
home run off Cincinnati Reds
starting pitcher Johnny Cueto in the
third inning Friday in Cincinnati.


Watson builds 3-stroke cushion at Masters


Associated Press
Bubba Watson walks down the 14th fairway during the second round
of the Masters on Friday in Augusta, Ga.


Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. Bubba Wat-
son won the Masters two years
ago with his brand of "Bubba
golf," producing shots of raw
skill and wild imagination. His
strategy now is to keep it sim-
ple, and he is halfway to an-
other green jacket
Watson took over Augusta Na-
tional on Friday with 75 min-
utes of brilliance and power On
another demanding day of
crispy greens and swirling
wind, he ran off five straight
birdies on the back nine and
wound up with a 4-under 68 for
a three-shot lead over John
Senden.
There's nothing fancy about
his golf, except for his outra-


Masters stats
For today's tee times and
Friday's par scores, see
Page B2.

geous length. He has made only
two bogeys in 36 holes. He has
missed only eight greens.
"It's not science here," Watson
said. "It's try to hit the greens.
And if you're hitting the greens,
that means you're obviously hit-
ting your tee shots well. So that's
all I'm trying to do is just hit the
greens ... maybe throw in a
birdie here or there. That's what
I've done the last two days and
it's worked out so far"
Watson made bogey on the 18th
hole with a shot that bounced left
of the green and into the gallery


He finished at 7-under 137, giving
him the largest 36-hole lead at
the Masters since Chad Camp-
bell in 2006.
Senden qualified for the Mas-
ters a month ago with his win at
Innisbrook. After a rugged start,
he played the final 14 holes with
six birdies and no bogeys for a 68
that puts him in the last group at
a major on the weekend.
Adam Scott also made a late
recovery with three birdies on
the back nine to salvage a 72,
along with his hopes to join
Tiger Woods, Nick Faldo and
Jack Nicklaus as the only play-
ers to win back-to-back at Au-
gusta. Scott was four shots back
at 141, along with Thomas Bjorn
(68), Jonas Blixt (71) and Jordan
See B2R/Page B2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rays' Moore will try to throw again soon


Assc
Tampa Bay left-hander Matt Moore plans to play catch in a f
to see how his left elbow is feeling and decide whether he c
recover from his latest problem without surgery.


KO

Bradley,

Pacquiao set

up for rematch

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -Tim-
othy Bradley never imag-
ined he would have to
avenge a victory
When the welterweight
champion defeated
Manny Pacquiao two
years ago on two injured
feet, he thought for an in-
stant that he had reached
the pinnacle of boxing. He
hadn't even left the MGM
Grand Garden ring before
learning that practically
nobody agreed with the
two judges who gave him
that split decision.
After death threats, de-
pression and a remarkable
personal transformation,
Bradley (31-0, 12 KOs) re-
turns to that ring Saturday
night in Las Vegas for a re-
match with the Filipino
congressman. Bradley in-
tends to let out two years of
humiliation and frustra-
tion with a decisive win
over Pacquiao, finally
earning the credit that was
two years deferred.
"I always believed you
only get one chance, but
this is my second chance
here," Bradley said. "It's
my second chance to be a
part of greatness and de-
feat a guy like Manny Pac-
quiao, who is one of the
top fighters of all time.
This guy has fought every-
body To get a win over a
guy like this who's an icon,
it would be epic."
Yet the fight might be
even more important to
the career of the 35-year-
old Pacquiao (55-5-2, 38
KOs), whose ascendance
through the sport slowed
with two losses in 2012.
The eight-division cham-
pion is fighting both
Bradley and the wide-
spread perception that he
has lost his competitive
fire, becoming more inter-
ested in politics and com-
passion than the brutal
business of boxing.
Pacquiao and his trainer,
Freddie Roach, insist
HBO's pay-per-view buyers
will see the Pacman who
ate up every opponent in
front of him on a 15-fight


Associated Press

CINCINNATI Tampa Bay
left-hander Matt Moore plans to
play catch in a few days to see
how his left elbow is feeling and
decide whether he can try to re-
cover from his latest problem
without surgery
Moore went on the 15-day dis-
abled list Tuesday and had an
MRI. The Rays are waiting for a
team doctor to return from a trip
over the weekend and compare
the latest scans to earlier ones.
Moore also experienced elbow
r soreness last year while going
17-4 with a 3.29 ERA for the Rays.
ociated Press Moore said on Friday before the
few days opening game of a series against
an try to the Reds that the elbow felt bet-
ter than it did a year ago, when


nd


Associated Press
Manny Pacquiao, left, and Timothy Bradley pose for photos following a weigh-in for
their WBO welterweight championship boxing match Friday in Las Vegas.


win streak before Bradley's
debatable decision.
"This time around, I
think I have to finish the
business first before I be-
come friendly to him," Pac-
quiao said. "We have our
business to do in the ring. I
have to do all I can do."
There's little doubt both
fighters will be completely
prepared for this rematch
after two years of incessant
talk about what happened
in those 12 rounds. They're
also both in top shape:
Bradley weighed in at
145 1/2 pounds Friday,
while Pacquiao was hy-
drating even before weigh-
ing 145 pounds on the MGM
Grand Garden scales.


"The first time around, I
was injured from the sec-
ond round on, and I still
found a way," Bradley
said. "This time around,
I'm not injured. And I'm
wearing socks. I will be
wearing socks."
Indeed, Bradley infa-
mously slid around the
canvas in the first bout be-
cause he didn't wear
socks, inexplicably choos-
ing the biggest fight of his
life to emulate Mike
Tyson's sockless ring style.
Roach, who trained
Tyson, could have told
Bradley that Iron Mike ac-
tually wore low socks.
Roach once rejected the
idea of a rematch with


Bradley, saying the Palm
Springs-area fighter could-
n't sell a ticket to help Pac-
quiao. Along with the rest
of the boxing world, Roach
gained a new respect for
Bradley last year after his
sensational brawl with
Ruslan Provodnikov-
also trained by Roach -
and a crisp win over Juan
Manuel Marquez.
"Bradley is a better
fighter than some people
give him credit for, and we
know he has a lot of
heart," Roach said. "That
doesn't change the fact
that Manny has a plan that
will beat him again this
time for real."


Masters LEADERBOARD


Masters
Friday
At Augusta National Golf Club,
Augusta, Ga.
Yardage: 7,435, Par: 72
Second Round
a-amateur
Bubba Watson 69-68-137
John Senden 72-68- 140 .
Thomas Bjorn 73-68- 141
Jonas Blixt 70-71 -141
Adam Scott 69-72-141
Jordan Spieth 71-70 -141
Fred Couples 71-71 -142
Jim Furyk 74-68- 142
Jimmy Walker 70-72-142
Jamie Donaldson 73-70-143 .
Stephen Gallacher 71-72 -143 .
Russell Henley 73-70- 143 .
Kevin Stadler 70-73- 143 .
Kevin Streelman 72-71 -143 .
G. Fernandez-Castano 75-69- 144
Lucas Glover 75-69- 144
MattKuchar 73-71 -144
Louis Oosthuizen 69-75- 144
Brandt Snedeker 70-74- 144
Lee Westwood 73-71 -144
K.J. Choi 70-75-145 +
Stewart Cink 73-72- 145 +
HenrikStenson 73-72- 145 +
Steve Stricker 72-73- 145 +
Mike Weir 73-72-145 +
Steven Bowditch 74-72-146
Brendon de Jonge 74-72- 146
Rickie Fowler 71-75-146
Bill Haas 68-78-146
Bernhard Langer 72-74- 146


Hunter Mahan 74-72-
Larry Mize 74-72-
Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72-
lan Poulter 76-70-
Justin Rose 76-70-
Vijay Singh 75-71 -
a-Oliver Goss 76-71 -
Billy Horschel 75-72-
Thongchai Jaidee 73-74-
Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76-
Martin Kaymer 75-72-
Chris Kirk 75-72-
Francesco Molinari 71-76-
NickWatney 72-75-
Gary Woodland 70-77-
Darren Clarke 74-74-
Jason Day 75-73-
Sandy Lyle 76-72-
Joost Luiten 75-73-
Rory Mcllroy 71-77-
Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74-
Failed to qualify
Sang-Moon Bae 72-77-
Luke Donald 79-70-
Victor Dubuisson 74-75-
Ernie Els 75-74-
a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 76-73-
Sergio Garcia 74-75-
Marc Leishman 70-79-
Phil Mickelson 76-73-
Ryan Moore 77-72-
Charl Schwartzel 73-76-
Webb Simpson 74-75-
Harris English 74-76-
Zach Johnson 78-72 -
Graeme McDowell 72-78-
D.A. Points 78-72 -
lan Woosnam 77-73-


Ken Duke 75-76-151 +7
John Huh 75-76- 151 +7
Dustin Johnson 77-74- 151 +7
Hideki Matsuyama 80-71 -151 +7
Angel Cabrera 78-74- 152 +8
Graham DeLaet 80-72-152 +8
Derek Ernst 76-76- 152 +8
Matt Jones 74-78-152 +8
David Lynn 78-74- 152 +8
Matteo Manassero 71-81 -152 +8
MarkO'Meara 75-77-152 +8
Patrick Reed 73-79- 152 +8
Keegan Bradley 75-78- 153 +9
Robert Castro 73-80- 153 +9
Branden Grace 84-69- 153 +9
Trevor Immelman 79-74-153 +9
a-Chang-woo Lee 80-73-153 +9
Jason Dufner 80-74- 154 +10
YE.Yang 77-77-154 +10
Matt Every 77-78-155 +11
a-Jordan Niebrugge 81-74- 155 +11
Scott Stallings 75-80- 155 +11
a-Garrick Porteous 76-80- 156 +12
BooWeekley 73-83-156 +12
Tim Clark 79-78-157 +13
Peter Hanson 78-81 -159 +15
Craig Stadler 82-77- 159 +15
TomWatson 78-81 -159 +15
a-Michael McCoy 78-83- 161 +17
Ben Crenshaw 83-85-168 +24
Masters Tee Times
At Augusta National Golf Club
Augusta, Ga.
Today
Third Round
a-amateur
10:15 a.m.- Rory Mcllroy


10:25 a.m.- Jason Day, Joost Luiten
10:35 a.m. Jose Maria Olazabal,
Darren Clarke
10:45 a.m. M- iguel Angel Jimenez,
Sandy Lyle
10:55 a.m. Billy Horschel, Gary
Woodland
11:05 a.m. -Chris Kirk, Martin Kaymer
11:15 a.m. a-Oliver Goss, Francesco
Molinari
11:25 a.m.- Nick Watney, Thongchai
Jaidee
11:35 a.m.- Bill Haas, Thorbjorn Olesen
11:55 a.m. -lan Poulter, Rickie Fowler
12:05 p.m.-Steven Bowditch, Brendon
de Jonge
12:15 p.m. Hunter Mahan, Justin
Rose
12:25 p.m. Vijay Singh, Bernhard
Langer
12:35 p.m.- Steve Stricker, Larry Mize
12:45 p.m.- Mike Weir, K.J. Choi
12:55 p.m. Henrik Stenson, Stewart
Cink
1:05 p.m. Lee Westwood, Brandt
Snedeker
1:15 p.m.-Louis Oosthuizen, Gonzalo
Fernandez-Castano


1:35 p.m.-
1:45 p.m.
Donaldson
1:55 p.m.
Henley
2:05 p.m.
2:15 p.m.
Walker
2:25 p.m.
2:35 p.m.
2:45 p.m.
Senden


- Lucas Glover, Matt Kuchar
- Kevin Stadler, Jamie
- Stephen Gallacher, Russell
SJim Furyk, Kevin Streelman
- Fred Couples, Jimmy
Adam Scott, Jordan Spieth
-Thomas Bjorn, Jonas Blixt
- Bubba Watson, John


he spent the month of August on
the disabled list.
"The way it feels compared to
last time, I feel a whole lot bet-
ter," he said. "I feel I'm in a lot
better place.
"I think in the next three to
five days, we should have a de-
cent idea which direction this is
going."
Left-hander Cesar Ramos,
who competed for the final spot
in the rotation during spring
training, will take Moore's place
on Sunday for the final game of
the series. Ramos has made four
relief appearances totaling four
innings.
"It's based on the spring train-
ing he had, a lot of the conversa-
tion we had with him and the
other pitchers as we broke


MASTERS
Continued from Page B1l

Spieth, the 20-year-old
from Texas who looked
solid on the mystifying
greens and shot a 70.
"Bubba is tearing it up,"
Spieth said. "So we've got
to go get him."
The chase includes the
ageless Fred Couples, who
won the Masters a year be-
fore Spieth was born. Cou-
ples, cool as ever at 54,
had another 71 and was
five back.
Woods, who missed the
Masters for the first time
in 20 years because of back
surgery, won't be the only
guy watching on television.
Phil Mickelson made an-
other triple bogey three
shots from the bunkers on
the par-3 12th hole for a
73 and missed the cut for
the first time since 1997.
So did Sergio Garcia,
Ernie Els, Luke Donald,
Webb Simpson, Dustin
Johnson and Jason Dufner
Rory Mcllroy nearly
joined them. He hit one tee
shot over the fourth green,
past the head of Adam Scott
on the fifth tee and into the
bushes for a double bogey
Another shot hit a sprinkler
head and landed in the
azaleas behind the 13th
green. He had to make a
6-foot par putt to make the
cut at 4-over 148.
Watson seems further
away from the field than
just three shots.
U.S. Open champion
Justin Rose was nine shots
behind, but not ready to
give up because the leader
often comes back to the
field although he admit-
ted that former champs
are less likely to collapse.
"But there's no give on
this golf course," Rose
said. "The hole can start


spring training," manager Joe
Maddon said. "We're trying to
stay true to our word.
"We thought it was the right
thing to do now, to give him that
opportunity"
Maddon estimated that
Ramos could throw as many as
75 pitches on Sunday
The Rays could make a move
to bolster their bullpen for Sun-
days' game, depending upon
whether they need to use their
relievers a lot in the first two
games of the series.
Before Friday's game, the
Rays recalled outfielder Kevin
Kiermaier from Triple-A
Durham. He took the roster spot
opened when the Rays optioned
left-hander Jeff Beliveau to
Durham on Wednesday


looking awfully small, and
those lakes can start to
look awfully big."
The only thing that
looked big to Watson was
the size of the cup.
His birdie streak started
and ended with a 9-iron to
short range on par 3s 3
feet on the 12th, 4 feet on
the 16th. He got up-and-
down for birdies on the
par 5s. And in the middle
of that great run was a putt
that defines the vexing
greens of Augusta.
Watson had a 40-foot
putt on the 14th hole that
probably traveled 50 feet
after it turned nearly 90
degrees to the left and
rolled into the cup. Just his
luck, Garcia had a chip
shot that rolled over the
spot where Watson had
marked his putt and
showed him the way
"Without Sergio's chip, I
probably would have three-
putted it," Watson said.
That's really the only
break he needed in the
second round. His golf is
amazingly simple for such
a complicated personality.
Watson, whose victory at
Riviera in February was
his first since the 2012
Masters, said he was
helped by not having all
the attention on him this
week. He didn't have to
host the Champions Din-
ner He didn't have to go
through the process of re-
turning the green jacket.
Even so, the Masters is
just getting started.
The 36-hole leader goes
on to win the Masters just
over one-third of the
time, and only two play-
ers Mike Weir in 2003
and Trevor Immelman in
2008 have done it since
2000. And while Watson is
a major champion, this
will be the first time he
sleeps on the lead at
a major


Associated Press
Jordan Spieth hits out of a bunker on the 16th hole
during the second round of the Masters on Friday in
Augusta, Ga.






SAVE THE DATE



CHRONICLE

STUDENT

( ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION


Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM


College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus


For moe information, call (352) 563-6363.
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.|


B2 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-JHamilton, Los Angeles, .444; AI-
Ramirez, Chicago, .421; Kubel, Minnesota,
.412; SPerez, Kansas City, .393; Plouffe, Min-
nesota, .375; Rios, Texas, .364; Longoria,
Tampa Bay, .359.
RUNS-Bautista, Toronto, 10; Dozier, Min-
nesota, 10; Eaton, Chicago, 9; Plouffe, Min-
nesota, 9; AIRamirez, Chicago, 8; 7 tied at 7.
RBI-Abreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Min-
nesota, 14; AGordon, Kansas City, 9; Moss,
Oakland, 9; AIRamirez, Chicago, 9; Smoak,
Seattle, 9; Napoli, Boston, 8; Ortiz, Boston, 8;
Plouffe, Minnesota, 8; KSuzuki, Minnesota, 8.
HITS-MeCabrera, Toronto, 16; AIRamirez,
Chicago, 16; Plouffe, Minnesota, 15; Ellsbury, New
York, 14; Kubel, Minnesota, 14; Longoria, Tampa
Bay, 14; Eaton, Chicago, 13; Napoli, Boston, 13.
DOUBLES-DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; So-
larte, New York, 6; Colabello, Minnesota, 5;
Carter, Houston, 4; Kubel, Minnesota, 4;
Navarro, Toronto, 4; SPerez, Kansas City 4;
Plouffe, Minnesota, 4; Pujols, Los Angeles, 4;
AIRamirez, Chicago, 4.
HOME RUNS-Abreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista,
Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; De Aza,
Chicago, 3; Dozier, Minnesota, 3; Hart, Seattle,
3;TorHunter, Detroit, 3.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, NewYork, 5; Al-
tuve, Houston, 3; RDavis, Detroit, 3; Dozier,
Minnesota, 3; Kipnis, Cleveland, 3;Villar, Hous-
ton, 3; 15 tied at 2.
PITCHING-13 tied at 2.
ERA- Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Feldman, Hous-
ton, 0.66; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Gray, Oak-
land, 0.75; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84; Scherzer,
Detroit, 1.20;Vargas, Kansas City, 1.20.
STRIKEOUTS-Price, Tampa Bay, 22;
Sabathia, NewYork, 21; Lester, Boston, 20; FH-
ernandez, Seattle, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18;
Tillman, Baltimore, 15; Scherzer, Detroit, 15;
CWilson, Los Angeles, 15.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Blackmon, Colorado, .471; Utley,
Philadelphia, .469; Bonifacio, Chicago, .452;
Pagan, San Francisco, .442; Cuddyer, Col-
orado, .415; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .407; Free-
man, Atlanta, .400; Morse, San Francisco, .400.
RUNS-Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; LaRoche,
Washington, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Bonifa-
cio, Chicago, 9; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 9; Prado, Arizona, 9; Ruiz,
Philadelphia, 9; Werth, Washington, 9.
RBI-Stanton, Miami, 13; Trumbo, Arizona,
13; CGonzalez, Colorado, 11; PAIvarez, Pitts-
burgh, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Cuddyer, Col-
orado, 10; McGehee, Miami, 10; Morse, San
Francisco, 10;ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 10.
HITS-Bonifacio, Chicago, 19; Pagan, San
Francisco, 19; Cuddyer, Colorado, 17; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17;
ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 17; Blackmon, Col-
orado, 16; Hechavarria, Miami, 16.
DOUBLES-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 6; Lucroy,
Milwaukee, 6; KDavis, Milwaukee, 5; Hill, Ari-
zona, 5; Uribe, Los Angeles, 5; 13 tied at 4.
HOME RUNS-PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt,
San Francisco, 5;Trumbo, Arizona, 5; 9tied at3.
STOLEN BASES-Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; Re-
vere, Philadelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5;
CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4; DGordon, Los An-
geles, 4; Amarista, San Diego, 3; Marte, Pitts-
burgh, 3; Owings, Arizona, 3; Segura,
Milwaukee, 3;Yelich, Miami, 3.
PITCHING-16 tied at 2.
ERA-Gallardo, Milwaukee, 0.00; Harang,
Atlanta, 0.71; Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; Haren,
Los Angeles, 0.75; GGonzalez, Washington,
0.75; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.15;Wainwright,
St. Louis, 1.29; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.29.
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 28;
Fernandez, Miami, 23; Cueto, Cincinnati, 23;
Liriano, Pittsburgh, 21; TWood, Chicago, 17;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 16; CILee, Philadelphia,
15; Mejia, NewYork, 15; Miley, Arizona, 15.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-Toronto 46 33 .582 -
x-Brooklyn 43 36 .544 3
NewYork 34 45 .430 12
Boston 24 55 .304 22
Philadelphia 17 62 .215 29
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 54 25 .684 -
x-Washington 41 38 .519 13
x-Charlotte 40 39 .506 14
Atlanta 36 43 .456 18
Orlando 23 56 .291 31
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-lndiana 54 26 .675 -
x-Chicago 47 32 .595 6/2
Cleveland 32 48 .400 22
Detroit 29 51 .363 25
Milwaukee 15 64 .190 38/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-San Antonio 62 18 .775 -
x-Houston 52 27 .658 9/2
Dallas 48 32 .600 14
Memphis 47 32 .595 14/2
New Orleans 32 47 .405 29/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-Oklahoma City 58 21 .734 -
x-Portland 51 28 .646 7
Minnesota 40 39 .506 18
Denver 35 44 .443 23
Utah 24 54 .308 33%
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Clippers 55 24 .696 -
Golden State 48 30 .615 6%
Phoenix 47 32 .595 8
Sacramento 27 52 .342 28
L.A. Lakers 25 53 .321 29%
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Washington 96, Orlando 86
NewYork 108, Toronto 100
Atlanta 93, Brooklyn 88
Boston 106, Charlotte 103
Miami 98, Indiana 86
Chicago 106, Detroit 98
Minnesota 112, Houston 110
Oklahoma City 116, New Orleans 94
Memphis 117, Philadelphia 95
Milwaukee 119, Cleveland 116
San Antonio 112, Phoenix 104
Portland at Utah, late
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.


Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Oklahoma City at Indiana, 1 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Chicago at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-Boston 80 5318 9 115255 173
x-TampaBay 81 4527 9 99239 215
x-Montreal 81 4528 8 98214 204
x-Detroit 81 3828 15 91219 230
Ottawa 80 3531 14 84232 263


SCOREBOARD


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CASH 3 (early)
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CASH 3 (late)
7-2-3
PLAY 4 (early)
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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
6 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Bojangles' Southern 500
6 p.m. (FS1) United SportsCar Series Long Beach
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach,
Qualifying
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Four-Wide Nationals,
Qualifying (same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FS1) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees
1 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Cincinnati
Reds
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Cleveland Indians at Chicago White Sox
4 p.m. (MLB) Colorado Rockies at San Francisco Giants
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies
8 p.m. (MLB) Los Angeles Dodgers atArizona Diamondbacks
or Houston Astros at Texas Rangers
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Arkansas at LSU
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at Georgia Tech
10:30 p.m. (ESPNU) UCLA at Arizona
BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (ESPN2) College Slam Dunk & 3-Point Championship
(taped)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Nike Hoop Summit
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat atAtlanta Hawks
8:30 p.m. (NBA) Phoenix Suns at Dallas Mavericks
COLLEGE BOWLING
8 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Women's Championship
EQUESTRIAN
4:30 p.m. (FS1) Jockey Club Racing Tour: Keeneland
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPNU) South Carolina Spring Game
12:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Notre Dame Blue/Gold Game
3 p.m. (ESPN) Florida State Spring Game
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Clemson Spring Game
5 p.m. (SUN) Florida Gators Orange & Blue Debut (same-day
tape)
4:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Florida State Spring Game (same-day tape)
GOLF
3 p.m. (CBS) 2014 Masters Tournament Third Round
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NBC) NHL: Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins
7 p.m. (NHL) NHL: Toronto Maple Leafs at Ottawa Senators
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) College NCAATournament: Minnesota vs.
Union (N.Y). Final
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) NHL: Chicago Blackhawks at Nashville
Predators
1:30 a.m. (ESPNU) College NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs.
Union (N.Y). Final (same-day tape)
COLLEGE LACROSSE
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Maryland at Johns Hopkins
6 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina at Syracuse
MOTORCYCLE RACING
10:30 p.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross: Seattle
RODEO
12:30 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR Stanley Performance In
Action Invitational (taped)
SOCCER
7 a.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League: FC Bayern Munich
vs Manchester United FC (taped)
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Fulham FC vs
Norwich City FC
5:55 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: CruzAzul
vs CF Pachuca
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
12 p.m. (FSNFL) North Texas at Marshall
5 p.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma at Baylor
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Washington at Stanford
TENNIS
2 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP World Tour 250: U.S. Men's Clay Court
Championship, Semifinal
7 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP World Tour 250: U.S. Men's Clay Court
Championship, Doubles Final
8:30 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA BNP Paribas Katowice Open, First
Semifinal (same-day tape)
10:30 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA BNP Paribas Katowice Open, Sec-
ond Semifinal (same-day tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Toronto 81 3835 8 84231 255
Florida 81 2944 8 66194 265
Buffalo 80 2150 9 51153 240
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Pittsburgh 80 51 24 5 107244 200
x-N.Y Rangers 81 4531 5 95218 192
x-Philadelphia 80 4130 9 91227 226
x-Columbus 81 4232 7 91228 214
Washington 81 3830 13 89235 239
NewJersey 81 3429 18 86194 206
Carolina 81 3535 11 81201 225
N.Y Islanders 81 3337 11 77221 264
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Colorado 80 5221 7 111247 212
x-St. Louis 81 5222 7 111248 188
x-Chicago 81 4620 15 107262 213
x-Minnesota 81 4326 12 98204 199
Dallas 81 4030 11 91234 226
Nashville 80 3632 12 84202 234
Winnipeg 81 3635 10 82222 234
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Anaheim 80 5220 8 112259 204
x-San Jose 80 4922 9 107241 197
x-LosAngeles 81 4628 7 99203 170
Phoenix 80 3629 15 87212 227
Vancouver 80 3534 11 81189 217
Calgary 80 3538 7 77205 231
Edmonton 81 2844 9 65198 268
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-


time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 3, New Jersey 2, SO
Washington 4, Chicago 0
Carolina 2, Detroit 1
Tampa Bay 3, Columbus 2
Dallas 3, St. Louis 0
Winnipeg at Calgary, late
Colorado at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Buffalo at Boston, 12:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Florida, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at St. Louis, 12:30 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 3 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Buffalo, 5 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m.


Hurricanes baseball blows
past Nature Coast 9-3
The Citrus baseball team got three
solid innings each from Austin Bogart and
Dalton Dawson during a 9-3 triumph over
Brooksville Nature Coast on Friday night.
Bogart and Dawson each gave up one
earned run and two hits; Bogart struck
out three while Dawson fanned two
Sharks.


Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C. Chase El-
liott missed his senior prom Friday,
but wasn't too disappointed.
"I had a good date tonight, the 'Lady
in Black,' can't forget about that," he
said, smiling.
The 18-year-old son of NASCAR
great Bill Elliott raced to his second
straight Nationwide Series victory,
moving from fifth to first on the final
two laps Friday night.
Elliott broke through for his first se-
ries win last week at Texas when he
passed Sprint Cup veteran Kevin Har-
vick. At Darlington, Elliot moved past
Sadler when the veteran got loose
coming off Turn 2 on a restart two laps
from the end.
Elliott drives for JR Motorsports,
owned in part by Dale Earnhardt Jr
Earnhardt saw Bill Elliott at the Victory
Lane celebration and asked how long it
would be until Chase graduates and
gets to come to the race shop fulltime.
"He ain't even focusing on racing,
he's in school," Earnhardt said. "Wait



VAN CLEEF
Continued from Page B1

Van Cleef's senior season ended
with two goals and five assists (tied for
sixth in the county), all while adjusting




BAT
Continued from Page B1

single into a two-bagger
"Our kids are finally showing a will
to win," said Stack, whose Pirates
reeled off three straight in the district
after beginning 0-3. "There was a
spark in the dugout all night long.
They want to win baseball games. Our
kids know we can beat every single
team in this district."
Humphreys surrendered seven hits
and one unintentional walk, while
fanning seven.
"I just kept going, kept going, kept
going, and felt stronger as the game
went by," Humphreys said. "But with-
out those hits (in the eighth), we prob-
ably wouldn't have won it.
"That was just the Bat Game," he
added. "We've got to come out ready
for them again in districts."
Three Panthers Delgado, Southey
and senior Nate Hines finished the
night with a pair of hits apiece, and
O'Steen reached on three walks-two
intentional, but base-running blun-
ders undermined their cause, as the
team squeezed just the two runs from
15 base runners on the night.
Pateracki, a senior catcher who
joined Pattison, Humphreys and Pur-


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 B3


Offensively for the Hurricanes, Ben
Crofchick went 2 for 3 with two runs
scored and a stolen base and Bogart had
two hits, a walk, a run and a stolen base.
AlexAtkinson added an RBI, run and
stolen base for Citrus, and teammates
Ben Wright and Cody Bogart (RBI) each
doubled.
The Hurricanes (12-10) play 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at home against Williston.
From staff report


until he gets graduated, he's going to
be really trouble for those other boys."
He's plenty trouble for Nationwide
competitors right now At 18 years, 4
months, 14 days, he became the
youngest in the series to win twice and
the youngest winner at Darlington.
"I don't know that we expected to
come and win races at least this fast,"
Elliott said.
Elliott will graduate next month on
May 17, when the Nationwide Series
is in Iowa. He plans to test in Iowa on
Friday, return to Georgia on Saturday
for his graduation ceremonies before
flying back to the track for night-time
qualifying. "I want to make mom
happy I know she's going to be excited
about that one," he said.
Sadler held on for second while Joe
Gibbs Racing teammates Matt
Kenseth and Kyle Busch were third
and fourth.
Busch led by 1.5 seconds and was
seemingly cruising to victory until
Tanner Berryhill's spin forced a final
restart and sent the field diving into
the pits for a final shootout.


to a shift from midfield to the back end,
where she dominated for the Panthers.
"St. Andrews seemed to fit every-
thing that she wanted with her degree,
and wanting to play out of state, so it
worked out great," Lattin said. "I'm
really excited for her and I know that
she's going to do well there."


nell in getting a hit in the decisive
final rally, gunned down three Pan-
thers attempting to steal second base
- one on a failed hit-and-run attempt.
"Mason's big behind the plate,"
Stack said. "We're going to miss him
next year"
"It feels awesome to get the bat back
for Crystal River," Pateracki said.
"I've never had it before."
Lecanto loaded the bases, to no
avail, in the sixth after O'Steen's sec-
ond intentional walk at the plate.
CRHS second baseman Ryan Holmes
tagged out Kyler Speagle on a run-
down in the fifth to stifle another po-
tential LHS rally, and a laser shot off
O'Steen's bat in the fourth ended in a
double play by Pattison, adding to the
Panthers' troubles on the base paths.
"Offensively, I think we did okay,"
LHS coach Dave Logue said. "But
base running was killer We made
some good plays in the field early, for
sure. We had opportunities to win the
game in regulation. In games where
we don't execute, we usually lose.
When it came time for Crystal River
to get it done, they executed a little
better than us."
Junior Derrick Rogers went 2 for 3
with a walk for Crystal River
Crystal River is at Hernando, while
Lecanto goes to Weeki Wachee on
Tuesday


I S O RT B R EF


Chase Elliott wins second



straight Nationwide race


II .,f iN.



mI l t


7Z t~fj


Associated Press
Chase Elliott raises the trophy in Victory lane after winning a NASCAR
Nationwide race Friday at Darlington Speedway in Darlington, S.C.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
NewYork
Baltimore




Washington
Atlanta
Miami
NewYork
Philadelphia


East Division
Pct GB WC
.545 -
.545 -
.455 1 1
.455 1 1
.400 1% 1%


East Division
GB WC


Str Home Away
W-14-3 2-2
W-1 3-3 3-2
W-12-4 3-2
L-1 2-3 3-3
L-1 1-3 3-3



Str Home Away
W-44-2 3-0
L-1 1-2 4-2
L-5 5-2 0-4
W-12-4 2-1
W-1 1-3 3-3


Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota


Central Division
Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
.714 5-2 W-1 4-1 1-1
.500 1 /2 /2 5-5 W-1 3-1 2-4
.500 1 /2 /2 5-5 L-2 3-3 2-2
.500 1 /2 /2 4-4 W-1 4-2 0-2
.333 3 2 3-6 L-3 0-3 3-3


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 8 2 .800 8-2 W-7 2-2 6-0
Pittsburgh 6 4 .600 2 6-4 L-1 4-2 2-2
St. Louis 5 4 .556 2 /2 5-4 L-1 2-1 3-3
Chicago 3 6 .333 4/ 2/2 3-6 L-1 2-4 1-2
Cincinnati 3 7 .300 5 3 3-7 L-1 1-3 2-4


W
Oakland 6
Seattle 5
Los Angeles 4
Texas 4
Houston 4


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
t GB WC


West Division
Pct GB WC
.600 -
.600 -
.500 1 1
.333 2/ 2/2
.333 3 3


Str Home
W-4 3-3
L-1 1-1
W-1 0-3
L-1 2-1
W-1 3-4



Str Home
L-1 2-3
L-2 1-2
W-1 4-2
W-1 1-2
W-2 1-5


NL

Phillies 6, Marlins 3


Miami

Yelich If
Ozuna cf
Stanton rf
GJones lb
McGeh 3b
Sltlmch c
Dietrch 2b
Slowey p
RJhnsn ph
Solano 2b
Hchvrr ss
Frnndz p
JeBakr 2b
Cishek p

Totals
Miami
Philadelphi
DP-Miami


r h bi


Philadelphia
ab r h bi


4 0 1 0 GwynJcf
5 0 1 0 Rollinsss
5 0 1 0 Utley2b
4 0 1 0 Howard lb
2 00 0 Byrd rf
3 2 0 0 DBrwn If
2 1 1 2 Ruizc
0 00 0 Asche3b
0 0 0 0 Hollndsp
0 0 0 0 Revere ph
3 0 2 0 Bastrd p
1 00 0 Papelnp
1 0 0 1 ABrnttp
0 0 0 0 Diekmn p
Galvis 3b
30 373 Totals
020 000 010
a 201 030 00x
1, Philadelphia 1. LOB-


3100
3120
4221
3 1 0 0
3 1 2 0
4 2 2 1
2 2 1 1
4 0 2 2
4 0 2 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
31 610 5
3
-6
-Miami 10,
221 1
4022
4021
4010
3000
0000
1000
0000
0000
2000
0000
1000
31 610 5
--3
--6
-Miami 10,


Philadelphia 9. 2B-Hechavarria (3), Byrd (1),
Ruiz (4). 3B-Rollins (1). HR-Dietrich (2). SB-
Dietrich (1), Rollins (2). S-Fernandez, Gwynn
Jr.. SF-Je.Baker.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Fernandez L,2-1 4 8 6 6 4 6
Slowey 3 2 0 0 2 0
Cishek 1 0 0 0 1 1
Philadelphia
A.Burnett 41/35 2 2 6 4
DiekmanW,1-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
Hollands 2 2 0 0 0 1
Bastardo 1 0 1 1 1 1
Papelbon S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1
Fernandez pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Bastardo (R.Johnson). WP-A.Bur-
nett.
Umpires-Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Lance
Barksdale; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Gary
Cederstrom.
T-3:15.A-22,283 (43,651).
Brewers 4, Pirates 2


Milwaukee


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Marte If-cf 4 0 0 0 CGomzcf 3 1 1 1
Sniderrf 4 0 1 0 Segurass 4 0 0 0
AMcCtcf 3 00 0 Braunrf 4 0 1 0
JHrrsnlf 0 0 0 0 ArRmr3b 4 1 2 2
PAIvrz 3b 4 00 0 Lucroyc 3 00 0
RMartnc 4 1 1 0 KDavisl If 3 00 0
NWalkr2b 4 1 2 2 MrRynllb 3 1 1 1
Ishikawlb 3 00 0 Weeks2b 3 1 1 0
Mercerss 2 00 0 Hndrsnp 0 00 0
Liriano p 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0
Tabataph 1 00 0 WPerltp 2 00 0
Morris p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph-2b1 0 0 0
Totals 30 242 Totals 304 6 4
Pittsburgh 000 000 200 2
Milwaukee 000 220 00x 4
E-Ar.Ramirez (2). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-
Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee 4.2B Weeks (1). HR-
N.Walker (2), Ar.Ramirez (1), Mar.Reynolds (3).
SB-A.McCutchen 2 (2). S-Liriano.
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
Liriano L,0-2
Morris
Milwaukee
W.Peralta W,1-0
Henderson H,1
Fr.Rodriguez S,3-3
WP-Liriano.


644427
220003
6 4 4 4 2 7
2 2 0 0 0 3


Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First, Bill Miller;
Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Adam Hamari.
T-2:41.A-27,469 (41,900).


This Date In
Baseball
April 11
1907 New York catcher Roger Bresnahan
appeared wearing shin guards for the firsttime in
a major league game.
1912 -Rube Marquard of the New York Gi-
ants began a 19-game winning streak with an
18-3 triumph overthe Brooklyn Dodgers.
1961 The Los Angeles Angels won their
first major league game with a 7-2 victory over
the Orioles at Baltimore. Ted Kluszewski had a
pair of homers for the Angels.
1962 -The New York Mets played their first
game and lost 11-4 to the Cardinals in St. Louis.
Stan Musial of the cardinals had three hits and
tied Mel Offtts National League career record with
his 1,859th run scored. The Mets would losttheir
first nine games on the way to a 40-120 record.
1969- The Seattle Pilots played their first
game, with Gary Bell shutting out the White Sox
7-0 at Sicks Stadium.
1985 Seattle's German Thomas hit three
homers and drove in six runs to lead the
Mariners to a 14-6 victory overthe Oakland A's.
1990 Mark Langston made his Angels
debut by combining with Mike Witt on a no-hitter
as California beat the Seattle Mariners 1-0.
1996- Greg Maddux's major league record
of road victories ended at 18 in a row with a 2-1
loss to the San Diego Padres. He had been 18-
0 with an 0.99 ERA in 20 regular-season road
starts since losing at Montreal on June 27, 1994.
2001 Atlanta's Greg Maddux was almost
flawless for seven innings, combining with a pair
of relievers to pitch a one-hitter in a 2-0 win over
the NewYork Mets.The Mets wound up with only
one runner against Maddux, Mike Remlinger and
John Rocker. Todd Zeile lined a single about a
foot beyond second baseman Quilvio Veras'
glove with one out in the second.
2007 Felix Hernandez pitched a one-hitter
and struck out six, helping Seattle beat Boston
3-0.
2008 Missouri's Jacob Priday set a Big 12
Conference record, hitting four home runs
against Texas in a 31-12 rout. The senior went
5-for-5, drove in nine runs and scored six times.
2011 Sam Fuld had four extra-base hits
and drove in three runs to help Tampa Bay bust
out of an early season slump with a 16-5 win
overthe Boston Red Sox. Fuld, needing a single
to complete the cycle, doubled into the left-field
corner in his last at-bat in the ninth. Fuld hit a
two-run homer in the second inning to give the
Rays a 6-0 lead. Fuld doubled in the fourth and
tripled in the sixth.
Today's birthdays: Pete Kozma 26; Charlie
Furbush 28; Alejandro De Aza 30; MarkTeixeira
34.


AL


Rays 2, Reds 1
Tampa Bay Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Zobrist2b 3 0 0 0 BHmltncf 4 00 0
DJnngscf 3 1 0 0 Phillips2b 4 02 0
Joycel If 3 1 2 1 Vottolb 3 1 1 1
Longori3b 4 0 1 1 Ludwckl If 4 00 0
Loneylb 3 0 0 0 Brucerf 3 00 0
Myersrf 4 0 1 0 Frazier3b 3 00 0
YEscorss 4 0 1 0 Mesorcc 3 0 1 0
JMolinc 4 0 1 0 Cozartss 3 00 0
Price p 4 0 0 0 B.Pena ph 1 00 0
Balfourp 0 0 0 0 Cuetop 1 00 0
LeCurep 0 00 0
Heisey ph 1 0 0 0
Broxtnp 0 00 0
Totals 32 262 Totals 30 1 4 1
Tampa Bay 101 000 000 2
Cincinnati 000 000 001 1
LOB-Tampa Bay 9, Cincinnati 7. 2B-YEsco-
bar (1), Phillips (2), Mesoraco (3). HR-Joyce
(2), Votto (1). SB-Zobrist (1). S-Cueto.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
PriceW,2-0 81/34 1 1 1 10
BalfourS,3-3 2/3 0 0 0 3 2
Cincinnati
CuetoL,0-2 7 5 2 2 4 6
LeCure 1 1 0 0 1 0
Broxton 1 0 0 0 1 2
WP-Balfour.
Umpires-Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Tim Welke;
Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Jim Reynolds.
T-3:22. A-30,502 (42,319).

Red Sox 4,
Yankees 2


Boston


NewYork


ab rhbi ab rhbi
JGomsrf 5 1 2 1 Jeterss 4 0 1 0
Pedroia2b 4 00 0 Ellsurycf 3 01 0
D.Ortizdh 2 1 1 0 Beltranrf 4 00 0
Napolilb 4 1 1 0 ASorindh 4 12 1
Sizemrl If 4 1 2 3 Cervellic 3 0 0 0
Bogartsss 3 00 0 McCnnph-c 1 00 0
RRorts3b 3 00 0 Solarte3b 4 00 0
Carpph 1 0 0 0 ISuzukil If 4 1 2 0
JHerrr 3b 0 00 0 BRorts2b 2 00 0
D.Rossc 4 0 1 0 Gardnrph 1 00 0
BrdlyJrcf 4 00 0 KJhnsnlb 3 01 1
Totals 34 47 4 Totals 33 2 7 2
Boston 000 004 000 4
NewYork 010 000 100 2
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Boston 6, New York 6.
2B-D.Ross (1). HR-J.Gomes (1), Sizemore
(2), A.Soriano (2). SB-Ellsbury (5).
IP H RERBBSO


Boston
Lester W, 1-2
Tazawa H,2
Mujica S,1-1
NewYork
Sabathia L,1-2
Cabral
Warren
Betances


62/36 2 2 2 6
11/31 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 1


s lead R ed So ov r Ys Cabral pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First, John
HRs lead Red Sox over Yanks Davidson.
T-3:01.A-44,121 (49,642).


Phillies rough up


Fernandez in 6-3


win over Marlins

Associated Press

NEW YORK Grady Size-
more hit a three-run homer in
the sixth inning and the Boston
Red Sox finally gave Jon Lester
enough run support for his first
win of the year, 4-2 over the New
York Yankees on Friday night.
Jonny Gomes led off the sixth
with another long ball off CC
Sabathia, and the four-run in-
ning was more runs than Boston
had scored for Lester in his first
two starts combined. Despite a
2.51 ERA coming in, Lester was
at risk of falling to 0-3 for the first
time in his career.
The left-hander was lifted with
two outs in the seventh after
Kelly Johnson singled to pull the
Yankees within two runs, his first
hit in 15 career at-bats against
Lester (1-2). Junichi Tazawa re-
lieved with runners at the cor-
ners and retired Derek Jeter on
a flyout.
Jeter was the leadoff batter in
the Yankees' batting order for
first time since breaking his left
ankle in the 2012 AL champi-
onship series opener He beat out
an infield single in four at-bats.
Lester allowed Alfonso Sori-
ano's homer starting the second,
and six hits overall. He walked
two and struck out six in improv-
ing to 12-5 in 27 starts against
New York.
Tazawa pitched 11/3 innings of
one-hit relief, and Edward Mu-
jica was perfect in the ninth for
his first save with Boston. Closer
Koji Uehara was bothered by
shoulder stiffness before the
game and was held out as a
precaution.
Sabathia (1-2) pitched without
the controversy that surrounded
teammate Michael Pineda in a
series-opening 4-1 win Thursday
but also without the same suc-
cess. Pineda gave up one run and
four hits in six-plus innings but
was caught on camera with a
brown substance on his hand.
Joe Torre, Major League Base-
ball's executive vice president
for baseball operations, said in a
statement Friday that Pineda
will not be suspended.
Looking as if he was setting
aside talk of being an ace on the
decline, Sabathia was dominant
for five innings. He allowed just
David Ross' third-inning double
until Gomes led off the sixth with
his first homer of the year, on an
89 mph four-seam fastball.
Four batters later, Sizemore
crushed an 80 mph slider into
right field for a 4-1 lead.
Sabathia's fastball velocity has
declined from 94.1 mph in 2009,
his first season in New York, to
89.7 mph this year entering Fri-


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Friday's Games
Boston 4, N.Y Yankees 2
Toronto 2, Baltimore 0
Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1
Houston at Texas, late
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, late
Kansas City at Minnesota, late
N.Y Mets at L.A. Angels, late
Detroit at San Diego, late
Oakland at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Boston (Lackey 2-0) at N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 1-1),
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1) at Cincinnati (Simon 1-0),
1:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at Chicago White Sox
(Paulino 0-1), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 0-1) at Minnesota (Nolasco 0-1),
2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 1-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1),
7:05 p.m.
Houston (Cosart 1-1) atTexas (Scheppers 0-1), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 0-1) at San Diego (Kennedy 1-1),
8:40 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Niese 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2),
9:05 p.m.
Oakland (Gray 1-0)atSeattle (E.Ramirez 1-1), 9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia 6, Miami 3
Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 2
Washington at Atlanta, late
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, late
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late
N.Y Mets at L.A. Angels, late
Detroit at San Diego, late
Colorado at San Francisco, late
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
N.Y Mets at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Detroit at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Colorado atSan Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1) at Cincinnati (Simon 1-0),
1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 1-2) at St. Louis (Wain-
wright 1-1), 2:15 p.m.
Colorado (Anderson 0-2) at San Francisco (M.Cain
0-1), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 1-1) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 0-0),
7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Volquez 0-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-0),
7:10 p.m.
Washington (Jordan 0-0) at Atlanta (A.Wood 1-1),
7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 2-0) at Arizona (Miley 2-1),
8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 0-1) at San Diego (Kennedy 1-1),
8:40 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Niese 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2),
9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
N.Y Mets at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado atSan Diego, 10:10 p.m.

day Last year he gave up 45 of his
major league-leading 122 runs on
a career-high 28 homers allowed.
He's already yielded five this
season.
Sabathia allowed four runs
and six hits in seven innings,
striking out nine and walking


two. He's given up at least four
runs in each of his three starts
and has a 6.63 ERA.
New York staked Sabathia to a
1-0 lead on Soriano's drive to left
field, his 408th homer Thanks to
some nifty shifts by both teams,
the score stayed that way until
the sixth.
American League
Blue Jays 2, Orioles 0
BALTIMORE Dustin McGowan
allowed five hits over 6 1/3 innings to
earn his first win since 2008, and the
Toronto Blue Jays used two unearned
runs to beat Chris Tillman and the Bal-
timore Orioles 2-0.
Making his first start since Septem-
ber 2011, the oft-injured McGowan
(1-1) walked one, hit two batters and
struck out two. He had faced the Ori-
oles 13 times previously going 0-3
with a 6.99 ERA and allowing 50 hits
in 37 1/3 innings.
The right-hander spent time on the
disabled list in each of the last six sea-
sons. He had shoulder surgery in
2008 and 2010 and missed the entire
2012 season. In his debut this year,
McGowan didn't make it out of the
third inning in a loss to the New York
Yankees.

National League
Phillies 6, Marlins 3

PHILADELPHIA- Marion Byrd
drove in two runs and the Philadelphia
Phillies knocked around Jose Fernan-
dez in one of his worst major league
starts, beating the Miami Marlins 6-3
to snap a four-game skid.
Phillies starter A.J. Burnett left in the
fourth inning because of a sore groin,
but Philadelphia chased Fernandez
(2-1) with three runs in the fifth en route
to its first home win of the season.
Fernandez, last season's NL
Rookie of the Year, was tagged for
eight hits and a career-worst six
earned runs in four-plus innings. The
right-hander walked four, matching a
career high, and struck out six. He
gave up only one run over 18 innings
in three appearances against Philadel-
phia last season.

Brewers 4, Pirates 2
MILWAUKEE -Aramis Ramirez hit
a two-run homer that backed Wily Per-
alta, and the Milwaukee Brewers ex-
tended their winning streak to seven
with a 4-2 victory over the Pittsburgh
Pirates.
Francisco Liriano befuddled the
Brewers with his slider over the first
three innings before Ramirez sent a
1-2 fastball over the left-field wall for a
2-0 lead.
At 8-2 on the year, the Brewers are
off to their best start since opening
with 13 wins in 1987.
Peralta (1-0) allowed four hits in
seven innings, but gave up a two-run
homer to Neil Walker in the seventh.
Francisco Rodriguez struck out the
side in the ninth for his third save.
Liriano (0-2) struck out seven over
six innings. He also gave up a homer
in the fifth to Mark Reynolds.


Blue Jays 2,
Orioles 0
Toronto Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MeCarrl If 4 0 1 0 Markksrf 4 01 0
Izturis2b 4 00 0 DYongdh 4 01 0
Diazss 0 0 0 0 C.Davislb 4 01 0
Bautistrf 3 1 0 0 A.Jonescf 4 00 0
Encrncdh 4 1 1 0 Wietersc 3 00 0
Lindlb 4 0 0 0 N.Cruzl If 4 0 1 0
Navarrc 3 0 1 1 Lmrdzz2b 3 00 0
Rasmscf 3 00 0 Flahrtyss 3 00 0
Lawrie3b 3 00 0 Schoop3b 3 0 1 0
Goins ss-2b3 0 0 0
Totals 31 231 Totals 32 0 5 0
Toronto 000 200 000 2
Baltimore 000 000 000 0
E-Schoop 2 (2). LOB-Toronto 3, Baltimore 8.
2B-N.Cruz (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
McGowanW,1-1 61/35 0 0 1 2
Cecil H,3 12/30 0 0 0 3
SantosS,4-4 1 0 0 0 0 2
Baltimore
TillmanL,1-1 8 3 2 0 1 6
R.Webb 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Britton 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by McGowan (Lombardozzi, Flaherty).
Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, Paul
Emmel; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Jordan
Baker.
T-2:20. A-22,327 (45,971).


Rays schedule
April 12 at Cincinnati
April 13 at Cincinnati
April 14 at Baltimore
April 15 at Baltimore
April 16 at Baltimore
April 17 vs. NYYankees
April 18 vs. NYYankees
April 19 vs. NYYankees
April 20 vs. NYYankees
April 22 vs. Minnesota
April 23 vs. Minnesota
April 24 vs. Minnesota
April 25 at Chicago White Sox
April 26 at Chicago White Sox
April 27 at Chicago White Sox
April 28 at Chicago White Sox
April 29 at Boston
April 30 at Boston
May 1 at Boston
May 2 at NYYankees
May 3 at NYYankees
May 4 at NYYankees
May 6 vs. Baltimore
May 7 vs. Baltimore
May 8 vs. Baltimore
May 9 vs. Cleveland
May 10 vs. Cleveland
May 11 vs. Cleveland
May 12 at Seattle
May 13 at Seattle
May 14 at Seattle
May 15 at LA Angels
May 16 at LA Angels
May 17 at LA Angels
May 18 at LA Angels
May 20 vs. Oakland
May 21 vs. Oakland
May 22 vs. Oakland
May 23 vs. Boston
May 24 vs. Boston
May 25 vs. Boston
May 26 atToronto
May 27 atToronto
May 28 atToronto
May 30 at Boston
May 31 at Boston
June 1 at Boston
June 2 at Miami
June 3 at Miami
June 4 vs. Miami
June 5 vs. Miami
June 6 vs. Seattle
June 7 vs. Seattle
June 8 vs. Seattle
June 9 vs. Seattle
June 10 vs. St. Louis
June 11 vs. St. Louis
June 13 at Houston
June 14 at Houston
June 15 at Houston
June 16 vs. Baltimore
June 17 vs. Baltimore
June 18 vs. Baltimore
June 19 vs. Houston


Pittsburgh


Associated Press
Boston's Grady Sizemore hits a three-run home run Friday as New York Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli
looks on during the sixth inning at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Red Sox won 4-2.


B4 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


BASEBALL


ab




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gudlevskis wins debut as TB tops Columbus


Islanders beat

Brodeur in his

possible last

start in goal

Associated Press

TAMPA Kristers
Gudlevskis made 36 saves
to win his NHL debut, Eric
Brewer scored two goals,
and the Tampa Bay Light-
ning beat the Columbus
Blue Jackets 3-2 on Friday
night.
Ondrej Palat also scored
for the Lightning, who took
a one-point lead over Mon-
treal for second place in
the Atlantic Division. A
runner-up finish would
give Tampa Bay home-ice
advantage in its first-
round playoff series with
the Canadiens.
Boone Jenner and David
Savard had goals for
Columbus. The playoff-
bound Blue Jackets are
tied with Philadelphia -
which has one game at
hand for third place in
the Metropolitan Division.
Gudlevskis had played
in the ECHL and AHL, and


for Lativa in the Sochi
Olympics this season.
Islanders 3,
Devils 2, SO
NEWARK, N.J. Frans
Nielsen, Josh Bailey and
Ryan Strome scored in the
shootout, and the New York
Islanders beat the New Jer-
sey 3-2 in what might have
been Devils goalie Martin
Brodeur's final start.
Devils coach Pete DeBoer
hasn't said whether the soon-
to-be 42 year-old Brodeur will
start the season finale against
Boston at home on Sunday.
Brodeur, the NHL career
leader in wins (687) and
shutouts (124) in a 20-year
career with New Jersey, is in
the last season of his con-
tract. He won three Stanley
Cup titles with the Devils.
Cory Schneider is in line to
be the Devils' No. 1 goalie of
the future.
Ryan Carter and Patrik
Elias scored for the Devils,
and Anders Lee and Strome
had regulation goals for the
Islanders in a matchup of
teams that failed to make the
playoffs this season.
Hurricanes 2,
Red Wings 1
DETROIT Cam Ward


had 28 saves, and the Car-
olina Hurricanes ended a
quarter-century of regular-
season futility in Detroit, beat-
ing the Red Wings 2-1.
The Hurricanes hadn't won
a regular-season game at De-
troit since Nov. 14,1989,
when they were still the Hart-
ford Whalers. They did win
Game 1 of the 2002 Stanley
Cup finals at Detroit, but that
was their only victory of that
series.
Elias Lindholm and Jiri
Tlusty scored in the first pe-
riod Friday, and Carolina held
on to hand the Red Wings
their second regulation loss in
eight games.
Riley Sheahan scored for
the Red Wings in the third
period.
Detroit has already clinched
its 23rd straight postseason
berth, and the Hurricanes are
out of the running. The Red
Wings outshot Carolina 29-19
but ended up with what could
be a costly loss in the race for
playoff seeding.
Capitals 4,
Blackhawks 0
WASHINGTON -Alex
Ovechkin scored his NHL-
leading 51st goal to help lead
the Washington Capitals to a


f l i




S' *.",







'- l


.1 '
Jr _
.- '.- p -


" .z~ [i._* _T


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Kristers Gudlevskis makes a save Friday against the
Columbus Blue Jackets during the third period in Tampa. The Lightning won 3-2.


low-intensity 4-0 rout of the
coasting Chicago Black-
hawks in a game between
teams whose postseason
fates had already been
decided.
Jay Beagle had his first ca-
reer two-goal game, and
Nicklas Backstrom also
scored as the Capitals won


their fourth straight, a hollow
winning streak because they
won't be in the playoffs for
the first time since 2007.
Jaroslav Halak made 34
saves in his first shutout
since the trade deadline deal
that brought him to Washing-
ton from the St. Louis Blues.
It was also his first game


Heat back on top


Miami beats

Pacersfor East lead

Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James scored
36 points, and the Miami Heat
moved back atop the Eastern Con-
ference standings by running past
the Indiana Pacers 98-86 on Friday
night
The Heat scored the first 16
points of the second half and
weren't in trouble again. Miami
(54-25) leads the Pacers (54-26) by a
half-game in the East race.
Mario Chalmers scored 13, Udo-
nis Haslem added 11 and Chris
Bosh and RayAllen each scored 10
for the Heat
Paul George scored 22 for Indi-
ana, which got 18 from David West,
12 from Luis Scola and 11 from
Lance Stephenson. Pacers center
Roy Hibbert had only five points
and one rebound, grabbing it with
just over 2 minutes left in the game.
Miami has games against At-
lanta, Washington and Philadel-
phia left Win them all, and the
Heat would have home-court ad-
vantage through at least the East fi-
nals which went seven games
against Indiana last season.
Wizards 96, Magic 86
ORLANDO Nene scored 17
points and Bradley Beal added 16 as
the Washington Wizards overcame a
sluggish offense and beat the Or-
lando Magic 96-86.
John Wall had 10 points and 12 as-
sists for the Wizards, who ended a
two-game losing streak. Trevor
Booker finished with 14 points and
Marcin Gortat had 12.
Arron Afflalo led Orlando with 19
points, but the Magic shot just 4 for
15 in the fourth quarter and saw their
two-game winning streak end.
Jameer Nelson had 12 points, 11 as-
sists and seven rebounds for Orlando
and Kyle O'Quinn added 13 points
and nine rebounds.
Knicks 108, Raptors 100
TORONTO Carmelo Anthony
scored 30 points, Amare Stoudemore
had 24 points and 11 rebounds and
the New York Knicks kept their slim
playoff hopes alive by beating the
Toronto Raptors 108-100.
J.R. Smith had 15 points, Ray-
mond Felton 12 and Iman Shumpert
scored eight of his 11 in the fourth
quarter as the Knicks won for the first
time in three games.
DeMar DeRozan scored 26 points
and Kyle Lowry had 25 but the Rap-
tors failed to match the franchise
record for victories in a season (47)
and disappointed a sellout crowd that
had hoped to watch them clinch the
Atlantic Division title for the second
time in franchise history.
Hawks 93, Nets 88
NEW YORK- Paul Millsap had
27 points and 10 rebounds, and the
Atlanta Hawks moved to the verge of
a playoff spot with a 93-88 victory
over the Brooklyn Nets.
Jeff Teague added 22 points for the
Hawks, who won for just the fifth time
in 13 games and are only 36-43, but
that might be good enough in the
East. He frequently took advantage of
a matchup with little brother Marquis,
forced to play extended minutes while
the Nets rested some regulars.


Associated Press
Miami's LeBron James, left, goes up to shoot Friday as Indiana's Roy Hibbert defends during the second
half in Miami. The Heat defeated the Pacers 98-86.


Celtics 106, Bobcats 103
BOSTON -Avery Bradley scored
22 points, Phil Pressey had a career-
high 13 assists and the Boston Celtics
held off a late surge by the Charlotte
Bobcats for a 106-103 win that
snapped a nine-game losing streak.
Boston led 104-103 before Jared
Sullinger made two free throws with
2.5 seconds left. Charlotte called time-
out, then got the ball to Jannero Pargo,
who missed a straightaway 3-point
shot as time expired.
The Bobcats were led byAI Jeffer-
son with 32 points and 10 rebounds
and Gary Neal with 13 points.
Charlotte's season-best five-game
winning streak ended as it dropped
into the seventh and the next-to-last
playoff spot in the Eastern Conference.
Grizzlies 117, 76ers 95
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Marc Gasol
had 21 points and 10 rebounds, Mike
Miller added 19 points, and the Mem-
phis Grizzlies made a strong push in
the third quarter to beat the Philadel-
phia 76ers 117-95.
TonyAllen scored 15 points to help
the Grizzlies preserve their playoff
hopes. Memphis entered the night
trailing the Suns by a game for the
Western Conference's final postsea-
son spot.
Nick Calathes added 12 points for
Memphis, while Zach Randolph fin-
ished with 10 points and 11 rebounds.
Tony Wroten and Thaddeus Young
led the Sixers with 18 points apiece.
Bulls 106, Pistons 98
CHICAGO D.J. Augustin scored
24 points, Taj Gibson added 17, and
the Chicago Bulls rallied from 18


down to beat the Detroit Pistons
106-98 for their seventh straight win.
Carlos Boozer finished with 18
points. Mike Dunleavy Jr. scored all of
his 14 in the second half, and the
Bulls kept their longest win streak of
the season going.
They moved a game ahead of At-
lantic Division leader Toronto for third
in the Eastern Conference, with the
Raptors losing to the New York
Knicks. The Bulls also clinched
home-court advantage in the first
round of the playoffs with Brooklyn
falling to Atlanta.
Thunder 116, Pelicans 94
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Kevin Durant
scored 27 points, Russell Westbrook
added 24 and the Oklahoma City
Thunder beat the short-handed New
Orleans Pelicans 116-94 to clinch at
least the No. 2 seed in the Western
Conference playoffs.
Darius Miller scored a career-high 18
points and Austin Rivers had 18 points
and eight rebounds for the Pelicans.
Timberwolves 112,
Rockets 110
MINNEAPOLIS Corey Brewer
scored a career-high 51 points and
Gorgui Dieng hit a short jumper with
4.6 seconds to play to lift the short-
handed Minnesota Timberwolves to a
112-110 victory over the Houston
Rockets.
Brewer made 19 of 30 shots, easily
surpassing his previous career high
of 29 points.
James Harden hit a 3-pointer with
17 seconds to go that tied it at 110,
but the rookie Dieng calmly knocked
down the game-winner for the


Wolves, who were missing All-Star
Kevin Love with a hyperextended
right elbow.
Harden had 33 points, 10 assists
and eight rebounds for the Rockets.
Spurs 112, Suns 104
SAN ANTONIO Danny Green
had a career-high 33 points and the
San Antonio Spurs rallied from a 21-
point deficit to beat the Phoenix Suns
112-104 and clinch the league's best
record.
Kawhi Leonard scored 18 points
and Tony Parker added 18 points and
three assists in his return from a two-
game absence due to a back injury.
Eric Bledsoe had 30 points, 11 re-
bounds and nine assists to lead
Phoenix (47-32), which fell into a tie
with Memphis for the West's eighth
seed.
Bucks 119, Cavaliers 116
MILWAUKEE Brandon Knight
scored 24 points and Ramon Sessions
added 20 as Milwaukee held off the
Cleveland Cavaliers 119-116, preserv-
ing the Bucks slim hopes of avoiding
the NBA's worst record.
The victory moved the Bucks to
within two games of Philadelphia with
three games remaining for each team.
The 76ers lost at Memphis earlier in the
night.
Dion Waiters had 23 points for
Cleveland, while Jarrett Jack added 21
and Tristan Thompson 18.
Knight's jumper from the right wing
put the Bucks up for good at 107-106
with 4:09 remaining. Two free throws by
Kyrie Irving pulled the Cavaliers within
111-110, but a basket by Khris Middle-
ton and two free throws by Zaza Pachu-
lia made it 115-110 with 1:44 remaining.


since a dustup earlier this
week over whether he was
skittish about facing his for-
mer team.
The Blackhawks, shut out
for the fourth time this sea-
son, were already assured of
making the postseason as
the third-place team in the
Central Division.



RAYS
Continued from Page BI

opposite field with one out
in the ninth. Grant Balfour
walked the bases loaded
in-between getting the
final two outs, throwing a
called third strike by
pinch-hitter Brayan Pena
to secure his third save.
Despite the teams' lim-
ited history, they have one
close connection. First-
year Reds manager Bryan
Price pitched for Joe Mad-
don when the Rays man-
ager ran the Double-A
Midland Angels in the
1980s. Price joked before
the game that they got to
know each other during
Maddon's trips to the
mound in the third and
fourth innings to replace
him.
No early exits in this
one. Both starters hung in
there against struggling of-
fenses. Tampa Bay has
scored a total of eight runs
in its last five games. The
Reds have scored only 28
runs overall, the second-
fewest in the National
League.
Both were wasteful
again.
Cueto needed 26 pitches
to get through the first in-
ning, when he walked two
with only one out. Longo-
ria singled home a run, but
that's all the Rays could
manage. Joyce led off the
third inning with a homer
that landed way up in the
right-field seats for his
team-high second of the
season.
Tampa Bay had chances
for a lot more. The Rays
stranded four runners in
scoring position in the first
five innings against Cueto,
who gave up five hits and
walked four over seven in-
nings.
The Reds wasted leadoff
doubles by Devin Meso-
raco in the third and Bran-
don Phillips in the fourth.
Phillips had two of Cincin-
nati's hits off Price.
NOTES: RH Alex Cobb
makes his first career ap-
pearance against the Reds
on Saturday RH Alfredo
Simon makes his second
start for Cincinnati, filling
in while Mat Latos recov-
ers from knee surgery ...
The Rays recalled OF
Kevin Kiermaier from
Triple-A Durham....
Tampa Bay LH Cesar
Ramos will start Sunday in
place of LH Matt Moore,
on the DL with a sore
pitching elbow.... Maddon
invited 1978 NL MVP Dave
Parker to meet the Rays
before the game. Parker
grew up in Cincinnati and
coached with Maddon on
the Angels' staff.... Bryan
Price lost a replay chal-
lenge in the ninth, when
he thought Phillips' foot
had been hit by a pitch. He
lost the challenge: The ball
bounced and deflected off
the catcher's mitt before
hitting the foot


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 B5


SPORTS




B6 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


Back on the track


Bradley returns to

racingfollowing

three-year break

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Steven Bradley's return to rac-
ing this year was a touch-and-go
situation. After a nearly three-
year break, the former go-kart
champion from
Inverness had
the final bolt
tightened on his
black No. 7 sprint
car just hours be-
fore his first race
back.
His layoff and
the precarious- Steven
ness of his return Bradley
haven't stood in
his way, however Last Saturday,
Bradley followed up his third-
place finish in March with a fea-
ture win in the most recent
Non-winged Sprints Series event
at the Citrus County Speedway It
was his 29th birthday
"It was my birthday present,"
said Bradley, who earned $1,000
for the win, but joked about hav-
ing just enough money to buy a
hamburger on the way home
after tire and fuel costs.
Bradley's ride was assembled
by renowned Hurricane chassis
builder Jerry Stuckey, who now
operates out of Citrus County, ac-
cording to Bradley
"We jumped into this at the last
minute," Bradley said. "Before
the last race, I kid you not, we fin-
ished the last bolt on the car
about three hours before the
race. We were kind of expecting
the car to fall apart on us in the
first race. The car was a bare
chassis three days before."
Bradley grew up in a garage
watching his father Dan Bradley,
who founded the family's U-Kil-
l'em Pest Control business, build
stock cars for local drivers. The
son jumped into a go-kart at the
age of 7, and immediately discov-
ered a calling, winning his sec-
ond race ever From there,
Bradley was an elite contender
on the go-kart circuit, scoring a
pair of state titles, placing fourth
in nationals and even qualifying
for the world championships for
consecutive years. He estimates
he won at least three or four
championships at Citrus, back
when the track hosted a major go-
kart series.


- i


- ..... .. -. II ~


,- 10..-
BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Steven Bradley of Inverness returned to racing this season after nearly a three-year break and has already
claimed a Non-winged Sprints Series feature win at Citrus County Speedway.


"We jumped into it pretty
quick, and it wasn't too long be-
fore I fell in love with it," Bradley
said.
By the time he turned 18, it was
time to move up.
"Around that time," Bradley re-
called, "it just so happened a ride
came up for a sprint car, and it
was a real good deal. My dad
jumped all over it and asked me,
'Do you think you can handle
this?' I said, 'Yeah, absolutely"'
Bradley's go-kart skills trans-
lated well to the sprints, but it
was rough going at first.
"For one whole season," he
said, "it seemed like we were just
wrecking cars right and left, never
finishing any races it seemed.
"The main difference between
the sprint and a go-kart is the roll
speed. You're trying to keep the
momentum up with the go-karts
around the corners, because it
takes a lap or two to get up to
speed. But with a sprint, it doesn't
matter what you do, you've got the
power to drive out of it. All you've
got to do is touch the gas pedal
and it goes."
Bradley prefers the non-
winged sprints over the winged
variety because of the parity of
the former, which is even


stronger at a track like Citrus.
"To me (the non-winged
sprints) are more of a driver's
game. You can take a non-winged
car that's not the greatest car in
the world, but a good driver can
drive that thing to the front. It
doesn't necessarily matter who
has the most expensive equip-
ment. And that's a good thing
about Citrus too, it's a small track
so it doesn't matter who has the
most expensive motor
"Don't get me wrong," Bradley
added, "I'm really happy with our
motor Like a lot of guys out there,
we're sitting on around a $35,000
engine, and it's very stout. But at
the same time, a guy could come
out there with a $10,000 to $15,000
engine and still keep up, because
we're not even using half the
motor anyway on a small track
like that. The other night, the
most I was getting was a three-
quarter throttle."
Bradley, who hopes to get into
more series in the near future
once he lands additional spon-
sors, said Stuckey designed his
chassis about two inches longer
than normal on the wheel base.
"It's more like what they call a
USAC (United States Auto Club)
car, which run the one-mile


tracks," Bradley said. "Most of the
NASCAR guys come out of USAC
racing. The cars are set up for
longer tracks and less down force
on the car."
Bradley is passing down the
family racing tradition to his
7-year-old son Talyn Bradley who
is about to begin racing go-karts
this year, at the same age that his
father began. But Bradley is
weary of children racing the
sprints.
"Jumping straight out of go-
karts into sprint cars was a pretty
big leap for me, but nowadays it
doesn't seem that big a deal to
any of these kids. They're jump-
ing into the sprints at 15 years
old. Back 12 years ago, I thought I
was the big boy on campus I
thought I was pretty cool jumping
out of go-karts. But some are as
young as 14 years old.
"To me, honestly, the maturity
isn't there yet. You're jumping
into a $60,000 to $70,000 car and
running with guys who've been
racing for 20 to 30 years. I won't
do it to my own son."
The Non-winged Sprints Series
races the first Saturday of every
month at the Citrus County
Speedway


Harvick wins first



pole at Darlington


Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C. -Kevin Harvick
won his first career pole at Darlington
Raceway on Friday as he looks to chase
his first Southern 500.
Harvick came out on top in the first
knockout qualifying session at
NASCAR's oldest superspeedway since
the circuit made the change from single-
car laps. Joey Logano, the winner Mon-
day in Texas, was second, followed by
Aric Almirola.
Almirola's teammate, Marcos Am-
brose, was fourth, followed by Brad Ke-
selowski, Jamie McMurray, Ryan
Newman and Kyle Busch.
Points leader Jeff Gordon, a seven-
time Darlington winner, will start ninth,
with Denny Hamlin rounding out the
top 10.
Almirola finished first in the second
of three rounds of qualifying and set a
track record of 184.145 mph, shattering
Kurt Busch's mark of 181.918 set last
May when the Southern 500 was held on
Mother's Day weekend. It's the sixth
time in eight races this season the qual-
ifying record fell.
But Harvick used a higher line in the
final segment to lead the field.
"It all worked out. Knockout qualify-
ing paid off for us today because we
were able to save the best for last," Har-
vick said.
Harvick, in his first season with Stew-
art-Haas Racing, hasn't been a qualify-
ing demon during his successful
NASCAR career, winning just six of
them in his previous 473 career Sprint
Cup races. He said his triumph Friday
was simple he had the fastest car
"We just had faster cars to drive in
qualifying," he said. His No. 4 Chevrolet
team has improved in finding qualifying
speed the past few weeks. Harvick had-
n't started better than 13th in his first
four events. He's had a fourth, a third
and a first in qualifying in three of past
four events.
It didn't look like anyone would have
the speed to move past Almirola in the
second segment, whose fast lap was
more than 2 mph quicker than the old
mark.
"That track record lap I actually felt
like I was going faster in the third ses-


Associated Press
Kevin Harvick reacts Friday as he talks
to crew members during a NASCAR
Sprint Cup series practice at Darlington
Speedway in Darlington, S.C. Harvick
won his first career pole at the track.
sion than the second session," Almirola
said. "But the record was in the second
session. It was a great lap for us and I
am proud of everyone (at Richard Petty
Motorsports)."
In all, 25 drivers went faster than Kurt
Busch's old record in the first round of
qualifying. There were 14 who bettered
Busch's 2013 mark in the second ses-
sion. The top seven qualifiers ran faster
than the old record in the final run.
Among those not advancing to the sec-
ond round were six-time Sprint Cup
champion Jimmie Johnson and Matt
Kenseth. The two drivers combined for
13 victories last season, yet each is win-
less through the first seven events this
year
Some who didn't make it through to
the final 12 qualifiers were Kurt Busch,
Dale EarnhardtJr, Greg Biffle and Tony
Stewart
Logano is starting in the top 10 for the
seventh time in eight races. He'll try for
his second straight Sprint Cup win after
taking the rain-delayed Duck Com-
mander 500 at Texas Motor Speedway
"It's insane," Logano said. "This is the
place you go to where you have the most
sensation of speed. Here and Dover are
the two places you feel like you're really
hauling the mail."


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

The Joey Coulter Pro-
Truck Series and a 50-lap
Pure Stock event are joined
by the Sportsman, Mini
Stock and Pro Figure-eight
classes today at the Citrus
County Speedway
It's the first stop at Citrus
for the first-year Coulter
truck series, which was put
together by series director
Rick Bristol and Coulter, a
NASCAR Camping World
Truck Series driver who got
his start in trucks on
Florida's short tracks.
The series also runs
through Auburndale
Speedway in Winter Haven,
Three Palms Speedway in
Punta Gorda and Braden-
ton's Desoto Speedway
where it made its debut on
March 15. Chad ChastainJr
won the opener, with Port
Charlotte's Michael Burns
finishing second and Lake-
land's Cody McDuffie com-
ing up third. Brent Huber, of
Venice, Lakeland's Becca
Monopoli, a winner at Cit-
rus on Feb. 1, and Steve
Darvalics, also of Venice,
rounded out the top six.
In what he described as
preparation for today's 50-
lapper, Sport Wilson edged
out fellow Floral City driver
Karlin Ray (two heat wins)
late in last Saturday's Pure
Stocks feature, which
brought a pair of nail-biting
shootouts between Wilson
and Ray and third-place's
Happy Florian and points-
leader Larry Welter Sr
Beverly Hills' Jay Witfoth
has cruised to consecutive
feature wins in the Sports-


man class after Lakeland's
Aaron Williamson claimed
the opener in his only ap-
pearance at Citrus this sea-
son. Orlando's Andy
Nicholls trails Witfoth by
eight points in the standings
after coming in second two
races in a row
Bill Ryan, of Bushnell,
has tallied five overall wins
(three heats, two features)
in Citrus Mini Stocks this
season, for an early advan-
tage in his class. Belleview's
Jason Terry and Summer-
field's Shannon Kennedy a
sponsor of Ryan's, also have
a feature win this year in
Minis.
Pinellas Park's Charlie
Meyer and Floral City's
Eric Sharrone, who con-
vincingly prevailed in the
division's most recent out-
ing on March 8, each have a
win in the Pro Figure-8s
class.
Pro Trucks and Pure
Stocks began their qualify-
ing runs at 6 p.m., followed
by eight-lap heats for Mini
Stocks and Sportsman.
After heats, the Trucks and
Pure Stock drivers will
gather with their vehicles
on the front stretch for an
autograph session.
The Mini Stock, Sports-
man and Pro Figure-8 fea-
tures are scheduled to run
25 laps.
Grandstand gates open at
4 p.m. Adult admissions are
$13; students, seniors and
military personnel with ID
are $9; children age 11 and
under are $5 (children
shorter than 42 inches are
free). Family passes for two
adults and two students or
children are $30.


33 Bill Ryan 182
73 Jason Terry 167
11 Jerry Daniels 167
24 Tim Scalise 127
22 Mark Patterson 108
Pro Figure-8s
Car# Name Points
32 Eric Sharrone 82
94 Charlie Meyer 77
01 Shannon Lengell 74
15 William Stansbury 73
85 Thomas Peet 72
PRO Hornet
Car# Name Points
98 Marvin Armstrong 202
73 Drew Jackson 177
99 Raymond Vann 150
97 Alan Harmon 126
6 Willie Lacey 116
Non-Wing Sprints
Car# Name Points
5 Mickey Kempgens 213
21 Jimmy Alvis 205
0 DudeTeate 199
19 Keith Butler 199
18 Shane Butler 193


Coulter truck




series makes




Citrus debut


AUTO RACING


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Citrus County
Speedway schedule
April
12 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
50, Pure Stock 50, Sportsman, Pro F-8, Mini-
Stock
19- Legends, Bandoleros, Modifieds, Street
Stock, Pure Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie, Pure/Street Stock F-8 Easter Egg
Hunt for the Kids, Fan Participation Racing
26 Sportsman 6 Pack Series 50, Super Late
Model 50, Street Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet
Pro, Hornet Rookie
May
3 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Non-Winged
Sprints Cars, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Hornet
Pro, Hornet Rookie, Pure/Street Stock F-8
10 Modified Mini Fab 4 Series 50, Street
Stock 50, Pro F-8, DAARA Antiques, Mini-
stock, Pure Stock
17 Mini-stock 50, Modifieds, Legends,
Bando's, Sportsman, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie, Fan Participation Racing
24 Super Late Model 50, Street Stock, Pure
Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie,
Pure/Street Stock F-8
31 Sportsman 6 Pack Series 50, Modifieds,
Street Stock, Mod Mini-stock, Pure Stock,
Mini-stock
June
7 Non Winged Sprint Cars, Sportsman,
Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock,
Pure/Street Stock F-8, Cars ofYesteryear
14- Super Late Model 100, Pro F-8, Champ
Karts, Mod Mini-stock, Street Stock, Pure
Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
21 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Sportsman,
Legends, Bando's, Street Stock, Mini-stock,
Pure Stock, POWDER PUFF, Fan Participa-
tion Racing
28 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
50, Street Stock, Mod Mini-stock, Mini-stock,
Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
July
5 Non Winged Sprint Cars, Pure stock 50,
Street Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie
12 Sportman 6 Pack Series 50, Pro F-8,
Modifieds, Mod Mini-stock, Mini-stock, Hor-
net Pro, Hornet Rookie
19 Super Late Model 50, Legends, Ban-
doleros, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock,
Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie, Fan Participation
Racing
26 Sportsman, Street Stock, Mod Mini-
stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock, Pure/Street
Stock F-8
August
2 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Non-winged
Sprint cars, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Hornet
Pro, Hornet Rookie, Pure/Street Stock F-8
9 Super Late Model 50, Pro F-8, DAARA
Antiques, Sportsman, Street Stock, Mod
Mini-stock, Mini-stock
16 Mini-stock 50, Modifieds, Legends,
Bando's, Pure Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie
23 Sportsman 6 Pack Series 50, Modifieds,
Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock, Pure/
Street Stock F-8, POWDER PUFF, Fan Par-
ticipation Racing
30 Super Late Model 50, Mod Mini Fab 4
Series 50, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-
stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
September
5 Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock,
POWDER PUFF, Flag Pole Race, Boat &
Trailer Race, Pure/Street Stock F-8, Suit
Case Race
6 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Non-Winged
Sprints, (Sportsman, Mod Mini-stock- Double
Points), (Hornet Pro Double Points), Hornet
Rookie
13 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
50, Street Stock, Pro F-8, Champ Karts, Pure
Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie, Fan Par-
ticipation Racing
20 Sportsman 6 Pack- Currys Roofing 100
Series, Modifieds, Legends, Bando's, Street
Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock
27 Super Late Model 50, Mod Mini Fab 4
Series 50, Pure Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet
Pro, Hornet Rookie
October
4 Modified 6 Pack Series, Non-Winged
Sprints, Street Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet Pro,
Hornet Rookie, Pure Stocks, Pure/Street
Stock F-8
11 Jack Smith Memorial Late Model 100
Race, Pro F-8, Sportsman, Mod Mini-stock,
Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
18 TBARA Frank Riddle Memorial Winged
Sprints, DAARA, Champ Karts, Legends,
Bando's, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Fan Par-
ticipation Racing
25 Street-stock 57 Lap Stromquist Memo-
rial, Pure Stock, (Modifieds, Pro F-8 FINAL
POINTS NIGHT), Mod Mini-stock.
November
1st (Non-Winged Sprint Cars, Sportsman
FINAL POINTS NIGHT), Street Stock, Pure
Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie,
POWDER PUFF
8 Mod Mini Fab 4 Series 100 Laps, Super
Late Model 50, Pro F-8, Street Stock, Mini-
stock, (Hornet Pro- FINAL POINTS NIGHT),
Hornet Rookie
14 Modified Mini-stock State Championship
50; Street Stock End of the Season Champi-
onship 25; Pure Stock End of the Season
Championship 25; Mini-stock end of the Sea-
son Championship 25; Intermingled Practices
forTrucks, Modifieds, Sportsman, Late Models.
15 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
75/ State Chanpionship; Modifieds State
Championship 50; Sportsman State Champi-
onship 50; Late Model State Championship
50; Champ Karts-Triple Crown Race 25 laps
Fan Participation Racing State Champi-
onship of the top nine race winners
December
12th & 13th -To Be Announced
Points standings
Open Wheel Mods
Car# Name Points
43 Gator Hise 86
982 L.J. Grimm 86
98 Robbie Cooper 76
90 Cody Johnson 75
19 Keith Brendel 70
Mod Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
01 Johnny Siner 133
44 Michael Lawhorn 124
24 Phil Edwards 118
47 Richard Kuhn 114
34 Kevin Harrod 82
Sportsman
Car# Name Points
4 Jay Witfoth 134
66 Andy Nicholls 126
11 Charlie Brown 81
00 Billy Smith 79
78 Robert Kuhn 77
Street Stocks
Car# Name Points
8 Tim Wilson 233
48 Dora Thorne 201
16 J.D.Goff 135
3 Curtis Flanagan 135
92 Ted Head 113
Pure Stocks
Car# Name Points
85 Larry Welter Sr. 204
32 Mike Autenrieth 197
75 Mike Gilkerson 183
72 Karlin Ray 182
65 Happy Florian 158
Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points











RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
An article published in the Harvard Theological Review on Thursday said new scientific tests suggest this fragment (above) is
more likely an ancient document than a forgery. Karen King, an expert in the history of Christianity, said the papyrus probably
dates to eighth-century Egypt based on carbon dating tests and tests on the ink's chemical composition.


rgng


n?


Harvard study suggests 'Jesus' wife' text not fake


PHILIP MARCELO ment," she said in a confer-
Associated Press ence call Thursday "It's not a
modern forgery"
BOSTON But, she stressed, the frag-
ment doesn't prove that the
N ew scientific tests historical Jesus was actually
suggest a fragment of married. Most reliable evi-
papyrus in which dence from early Christianity
Jesus speaks of "my wife" is is silent on Jesus' marital sta-
more likely an ancient docu- tus, King added.
ment than a forgery, accord- If anything, she says, the
ing to an article published papyrus provides insight into
Thursday by the Harvard early Christianity's debates
Theological Review over family life.
The text, which is written "Early Christians were ex-
in Coptic and is roughly the tremely interested in
size of a business card, whether or not they should
specifically contains the marry or be celibate or
phrase 'Jesus said to them, whether it was OK to have a
my wife." family or whether one
Karen King, a Harvard should remain virginal,"
professor of divinity, says the King said.
papyrus probably dates to King said the papyrus,
eighth century Egypt, based which contains about eight
on radiocarbon dating and partial lines of text, appears
tests on the ink's chemical to make the case that moth-
composition. ers and wives can be disci-
"If it was written in the ples. Jesus references his
eighth or even the ninth cen- mother, wife, and another
tury, it's still an ancient docu- female as his disciples


apparently discuss whether a
woman identified as
"Mary" can join their
ranks.
According to King's trans-
lation, the text then reads
"Jesus said to them, "My wife
..." That is followed in the
next line by "... she is able to
be my disciple..."
King originally revealed
existence of the papyrus in
2012. Calling it the "Gospel of
Jesus's Wife," her announce-
ment sparked debate among
religious and ancient schol-
ars. But publication of her
findings was delayed for the
tests. King maintains the
"gospel" moniker was appro-
priate.
While the papyrus is too
small to discern anything de-
finitive about who composed
it, King argued Thursday
that the text belongs to a
body of ancient texts that il-
luminate facets of Jesus' life.
"It contains a dialogue be-
tween Jesus and his disci-


ples," she said. "That would
normally put it in the cate-
gory of gospel."
King hopes the research
puts to rest questions about
the text's authenticity
But Brown University Pro-
fessor Leo Depuydt, in an
analysis also published
Thursday by the Harvard
Theological Review, was not
convinced. He said the text
contains grammatical errors
that a native Coptic speaker
would not make. King sug-
gested in a phone interview
that the text is written in an
informal style that is found
in other ancient Coptic texts.
Others have questioned
the mysterious provenance
of the papyrus.
King says she obtained the
text in 2011 from a donor that
wants to remain anonymous.
That owner had purchased
the text in 1999 from a collec-
tor who, in turn, had ac-
quired it in East Germany
around 1963.


RELIGION NOTES


Special events
Joining the fast-food market
in the breakfast wars, the
Serendipity Men's group invites
all to an all-you-can-eat breakfast
buffet from 8 to 10 a.m. today at
the United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa. For $6, feast on eggs,
bacon,sausage,pancakes,
hashbrown potatoes, biscuits,
fruit and beverages like coffee,
juice and milk. All proceeds help
support the hungry and home-
less in Citrus County through
Grace House and The Sanctuary.
For more information, call 352-
6284083 or 352-382-0336.
Saturday night Bible study is
at 6 p.m. at the Holy Grounds
Cafe at Calvary Chapel in Inver-
ness, 960 S. U.S. 41. Enjoy free
coffee and dessert while studying
the book of Samuel. Call 352-
726-1480.
Holy Faith Episcopal Church
in Dunnellon plans its Easter
week events. Services are as fol-
lows: Palm Sunday at 8 and
10 a.m.; Maundy Thursday at
4 p.m.; Good Friday at 4 p.m.;
April 19 Easter Vigil at 7 p.m.;
April 20 Easter Sunday at 8
and 10 a.m. Everyone is wel-
come.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Palm Sun-
day tomorrow with the Liturgy of
the Palms at 8 a.m. Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 and 10:30 a.m.
Holy Eucharist Rite 2. Walk the
Stations of the Cross at 11 a.m.
and 7 p.m. Friday with the Com-
munity Good Friday Service, fea-
turing the "Last Seven Words of
Christ on the Cross," from noon


to 3 p.m.
Palm Sunday begins Holy
Week at Joy Lutheran Church,
7045 S.W. 83rd Place (State
Road 200), Ocala. Pastor Ed-
ward Holloway, Jr. will preach on
the "Exalted/Reviled" at the 8:15
and 11 a.m. services tomorrow.
Maundy Thursday service is at
6:45 p.m. Good Friday service is
at 6:45 p.m. Easter egg hunt is at
10 a.m. Saturday, April 19, in
Hope Field. Easter Sunday out-
side service is at 6:30 a.m. April
20 in Memorial Gardens with
Easter day services in the sanc-
tuary at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. All
are welcome. For more informa-
tion call 352-854-4509, Ext. 221.
Faith Lutheran Church, in
Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County Road
490 in Lecanto, invites the public
to its special worship services
beginning with Palm Sunday at
9:30 a.m. with the distribution of
palms. Maundy Thursday Holy
Communion service is at 7 p.m.
and the Good Friday service is at
3 p.m. Celebrate the Resurrec-
tion at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 19,
and at the sunrise service at 7
a.m. Sunday, April 20, followed
by a continental breakfast be-
tween services. The service of
the Resurrection is at 9:30 a.m.
During breakfast time there will
be an egg hunt for children. The
Living Cross will be in the
narthex of the church Saturday
and Sunday to place live flowers
on. For more information, call
527-3325 or visit
faithlecanto.com.
Hernando United Methodist
Church has the following Easter
events scheduled: Palm Sunday


service 10 a.m. tomorrow.
Maundy Thursday service at 6
p.m. Walk the Stations of the
Cross at 8 a.m. with Good Friday
Service at noon. Easter egg hunt
for the children from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday, April 19, includes
free lunch. Sunrise service at
6:30 a.m. and cantata service at
10 a.m. Easter Sunday, April 20.
Hope Evangelical Lutheran
Church in Citrus Springs will
begin Holy Week on Palm Sun-
day, processing into the church
under upraised palms. A cantata
presented by the Sanctuary
Choir directed by Susan Collins
will replace the 10 a.m. service.
Holy Week service will include a
Seder dinner at 5 p.m. Maundy
Thursday with a foot-washing
play after dinner and worship
service at 7 p.m., including the
Sacrament of Holy Communion
and stripping of the altar. There
will be a Taize service at 7 p.m.
Good Friday. Easter Sunday will
begin with a sunrise service at
7 a.m. in the Memorial Garden.
Breakfast in Luther Hall will follow
at 8 a.m. The Easter worship
service is at 10 a.m. in the sanc-
tuary. For more information, call
352-489-5511. The community is
invited to all services.
Inverness Church of God will
host the "The Hunt" from noon to
2 p.m. Palm Sunday. Bring your
Easter basket and join us for
lunch and an afternoon of fun,
games, prizes, face painting, and
the egg hunt. The public is invited
and admission is free. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness. For more information,
call the church office at 352-726-
4524.


Everyone is welcome to the
April "Forgotten Film Festival" at
3 p.m. Thursday at the Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus
Springs. A $3 donation is appre-
ciated. For information, call 352-
465-4225. Films to be shown:
Thursday -"A Family Thing." An
Arkansas man learns he has an
African American half-brother in
Chicago. The two men struggle
through their long-held grudges
and prejudices and gain an un-
derstanding of each other and
themselves. Starring Robert Du-
vall and James Earl Jones. April
24 "Unfinished Song." A group
of British senior citizens enter a
choral competition singing rock
and heavy metal songs. Starring
Terrence Stamp and Vanessa
Redgrave.
Parsons Memorial Presbyte-
rian Church, at 5850 Riverside
Drive in Yankeetown, invites the
public to celebrate the Lenten
season. The first service at 5
p.m. Maundy Thursday in the fel-
lowship hall includes communion
followed by "stone" soup before
stripping the church. There will
be a Good Friday service at 4
p.m. in the church. Easter Sun-
day sunrise service at 7 a.m. will
be followed by breakfast, then a
morning worship service at 11
a.m. For more information, call
352-489-5274.
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church's Holy Week service
schedule: Maundy Thursday at 7
p.m.; Good Friday Tenebrae at
noon and 7 p.m.; Easter Vigil at 7
p.m. Saturday, April 19; Easter

See Page C3


|Nancy
Kennedy

GRACE
NOTES






Getting



Jesus



right

(Editor's note: Nancy Kennedy is
taking a break this week This is a
rewrite of a column from April 2006.)

Here's a great idea:
Let's stop fighting.

All of us who believe in
Jesus, let's all stop
nitpicking the peripherals
and incidentals of our faith.
After all, we are all one,
right?
I got this great idea even before
going to see a local Pentecostal
preacher for a story I was
working on about Pentecostalism.
Even though I had reams of history
and background information, I
wanted to talk to a real Pentecostal
- a Holy Ghost preacher
As we sat and talked about Pen-
tecostalism, the preacher's eyes
danced. He obviously loved his
faith; he loved God and loved
being filled with the Holy Ghost
and all the manifestations that
brings: speaking in tongues, being
slain in the Spirit, and believing in
and witnessing miracle healings.
He told me that at age 9 he at-
tended a tent meeting in Knoxville,
Tenn. He still remembered the
sawdust on the floor and lying on
the ground, tears streaming down
his face, sorry for the wrong he had
done, and then receiving the Spirit
of God.
"My daddy picked me up and
took me home, he told me. "I was
still speaking in tongues when my
mama put my pajamas on me and
put me to bed."
He also said that Pentecostalism
has been around a long, long time;
that it didn't begin in 1906 as most
people think, but in 33 A.D. on the
day of Pentecost when the Holy
Spirit blew into the room where
the disciples were gathered,
sounding like a violent wind.
Tongues of fire fell that day, and
the disciples were filled with the
Spirit.
When the power of God came,
the preacher said, they began
speaking in strange tongues. Pente-
costals believe that still happens
today
I asked him why Presbyterians
don't speak in tongues (although
some might, I suppose). He said
they could if they wanted to.
"The promise is for everyone
who asks for it," he said.
I didn't tell him that I asked for it
before, but I never got it
Years ago, a Pentecostal neigh-
bor decided that I needed to speak
in tongues and tried teaching me.
But as hard as she tried and I
tried, it didn't work. It's like alge-
bra I could never get that either.
Eventually I told my neighbor
that I was content to not speak in
tongues and that I hoped she could
be content with not trying anymore
to make me do it. After that, I think
she felt sorry for me, the poor, un-
tongued, heathen shlub. She
seemed to think Pentecostalism
was the only ticket in town. She
probably doubted my salvation.
Ha! Some people still doubt if
I'm truly saved.
Although I have nothing against
Pentecostalism, some people do.
Some argue vehemently that
speaking in tongues ceased when
the Bible was completed and that
being slain in the Spirit (falling on
the ground in a rapturous state) is
from the devil, not the Lord.
Not all, but some Pentecostals
think non-Pentecostals are not real
believers or maybe we're not as
complete. So we've got the "haves"
and the "have-nots" pitted against


each other, each thinking the other


PageC3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Places of worship


that offer love, peace ,


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His house, your spirits will be lifted!! !LM:


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH



"Rooted in Scrioture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9-30- 10"0)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor' i
714 S. Scarbor ...
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813



u C huc


"n aP e I
M tngBile Study
6:0 p.m. t.


Rev. Keit


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor




169 0 0 0 90 0 0 0 r



Hwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness
" Sunday Services .
" Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
m Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
5th Sunday
0 of Any Month Combined 10am *
0 Sunday School for all ages U
0 9:30 AM 0
0 Nursery Provided U
SFellowship & Youth Group
Sunday Evening
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgf
" Podcast: fpcinv.com
SChurch Office 637-0770
Pastor James Capps



as^V


\ I).Il~ll I luL.I- h. I
INVERNESS
CHURCH OF GOD
Sunday Services:
Worship Services..8:30 AM & 10:30 AM
Sunday School .....................9:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Classes For All Ages at 7:00 PM
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Dayeare
and Learning Center" & "Cornerstone
Christian Supply"


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June- August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670


First Baptist
Church
> of Floral City
'74Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available g
www.fbcfloralcity.org


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I I l , .i ,I ,r ,

--7
':., ] [,.:li l ,,. ]l t H , I , . ] ]





First UniteW

Methodist

(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
Senior Pastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages
Sunday Worship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM -Vertical Kids
10:30 AM- Traditional
Wednesday Worship
6:00 PM-Vertical Youth
Foosteps Preschool
6:00 AM- 6:00 PM
Monday-Friday
, 352-344-4331
Lic. #C05C10056


First Church of
Christ, Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting
4:00 PM
352-726-4033


_0 01

(4.
"The
Church
in the


















4950 N. Lecanto Hwy c^
Pastor /
HeartMarple Lewis III
of the









CSunday Worshity
with9:00 am & 10:45 a
Heart
for the
Community"













Children's Ministry
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwvy
Pastor J
Marple Lewis III '
Sunday Worship

9:00 am & 10:45 am
Children's Ministry
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Student Ministry
7:00 pm
Wednesday
UPLIFT Prayer & Praise 7 pm
Child Care Provided
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com


4f Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 Pm. to 3:15 Pm. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEI(DAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
L .catholicweb.com .j


First Pt
Ckhwck
of Lake, Roa;seaw,
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email: us ou or n, ., ,, c .b .oo
Check us out on Facebook


6 "First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN .
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS II
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
iL *. ..*




(j Crystal Diver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided

Floral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.coin


Shepherd

s of the

T Hills

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offiiith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truthli
of Jesus Chriti.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


) i
ConservtamXive






SMLLSRVC
VERYIC
No Dues ca-x?
KIDDISHm


F1 47 Years of
F I RST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
4 9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I AMissouri Synod
www.l1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GoD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday A ivi Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.



unity
of Citrus County

A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING



WE ARE A JOYOUS COMMUNITY
WHICH INSPIRES, EMBRACES,
AND NURTURES ALL THOSE ON
THEIR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY.
SERVICE OFFERINGS:
SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT
CLASSES, WEDDINGS,
CHRISTENINGS, MEMORIALS,
AND HOLY UNIONS
WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30
NURSERY/SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30
1 'ouud'a ,Brighter -"ibiff

I ForFoudant



KNOWING GOD, LOVING
GOD, SERVING GOD

2628 W WOODVIEW
LANE LECANTO, FL
S 34461
S 352-746-1270
WWW.UNITYOFCITRUS.ORG


NORTH CITRUS

CHRISTIAN

CHURCH
Phone: (352) 527-0021



Sunday Services: 10:30am
Bible Study:
Wednesday 6:30pm
Minister
George Plantz
Where your search for a
friendly Bible Church ends

Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
!i ,/kl'!iil/t'hiCij', !h .i P iii


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call

Theresa

Holland at

564-2940
For Advertising
Information
-_% ,________


0


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA

Come






Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-4676


C2 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KENNEDY
Continued from Page Cl

guy's wrong. That's not even
throwing the way different
groups baptize into the mix.
When sprinklers and dunkers
get going at each other, you've
got all-out combat.
I guess all I'm trying to say is
that not all believers in Jesus
worship in the same manner,
but we all worship the same
Jesus.
"There is one body and one
Spirit," wrote the apostle Paul
to the Ephesians, "just as (we)
were called to one hope .. .one


RELIGION


Lord, one faith, one baptism:
one God and Father of all, who
is over all and through all and
in all" (Ephesians 4:4-6).
One day God will gather all
of his people around him -
Pentecostals and Presbyteri-
ans, charismatic and Calvin-
ists, too. I think he'll tell us all
to sit still, and then he'll say
that we all got a whole lot of
things wrong and that we
fought over things not worth
fighting about, but because we
got Jesus right, that's all that
counts.
Maybe we'll all shout and
dance and the Baptists and
Presbyterians will speak in
tongues while the Pentecostals


sit on their hands and nod,
or maybe we'll all eat straw-
berry rhubarb pie or drink
martinis.
Either way, because we got
Jesus right, we will have
stopped our fighting and our
Father will be pleased.
But why wait until then?
Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria IKnow the Real
Secret," "Girl on a Swing,"
and her latest book, "Lip-
stick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927,
Monday through Thursday,
or via email at nkennedy
(@chronicleonline. corn.


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 C3


NOTES
Continued from Page CI

sunrise worship at 6:45 a.m. Sun-
day, April 20, with Festival Celebra-
tion of Holy Communion at 8:30 and
11 a.m. The church is on County
Road 486 opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard, in Hernando. For more
information, call 352-746-7161.
Reflections Church will host its
first "Easter Egg Mud Run" from 9
to 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 19,
with the traditional Easter egg hunt
at 11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Middle
School. Cost of the "Mud Run" is
$10 per participant or $40 for a


family of four or more. There is no
cost for the traditional egg hunt. To
pre-register or prepay for the race,
go to reflectionschurch.net. The
church's Easter Sunday worship
service is at 10:17 a.m.
St. Paul's Lutheran School and
Precious Lambs Preschool, at
6150 N. Lecanto Highway in Bev-
erly Hills, invites all families in the
community with children up to age
10 to attend its "Easter Eggstrava-
ganza" from 10 a.m. to noon Satur-
day, April 19. Enjoy an Easter egg
hunt, crafts, music, games, prizes,
food, fun and it's all free. Families
who pre-register at ww.stpauls.edu
will be entered into a drawing for a
See NOTES/Page C7


Places of worship


that offer love, peace'

and harmony to all. .


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! 'I


& Homosassa Springs
S'f-DA IMnSfHU'rCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor William Bremmer
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 4:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1 umc.org


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
A Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES--
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm
795-4479



e. of I Timothy
of 2:15

Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen

SPRIMERAIGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les 'speramos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
CKINC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYTNL J

VN ITCD
-ACETHODIST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
-. A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Bn Crystal
E3 River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship \ il, Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


.^^^Hemando
i SC urchof
ss^ TheNazarene
.4 Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


[ ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Ikm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.
p Woo



US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
L David Curry


R ev. olepnen Lane
Faith
Lutheran
Church LM
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
9;,- 066etw~ol..


THE ]
SALVATION FI
A D IUIV CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY = CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish
712S. cbol ve
Lec/nt
51-960..


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siind., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong. A place to become."



W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

l^ ?^ Pastor,
S4 Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
S(352 ) 746-9422


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


HWts, 6^ L

Miwk,
ODow
O , ,i , ,, ,|
Vom r1

2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1 V miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107 I






CPage C4. SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


LOOKING FOR NEWS
FROM THE CENTRAL RIDGE?
U The Community news page for Beverly Hills,
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and that area
will print in the Sunday, April 13, Chronicle.


NEWS NOTES

Homosassa church
to have Saturday sales
Nature Coast Community
Church, 4980 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S. 19), Homosassa, will con-
tinue its annual plant and yard
sale today 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The public is welcome.

Get free haircut, help
Legion post's efforts
Quick Stop Barber Shop owner
Donna Bowman and her staff of
hair care professionals will do-
nate their time and provide free
men's, women's and kids' haircuts
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday
It is only requested that a dona-
tion be made. The event will in-
clude music, food, raffles and a
silent auction. All proceeds will
be donated to the Beverly Hills
American Legion Post 237.
The Quick Stop Barber Shop is
at 3541 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills, in the Winn-Dixie
Plaza. Call 352-527-3030.

Joint agency meeting
to be held Monday
The Area 13 Family Care Coun-
cil will meet from 10 a.m. to noon
Monday for a combined meeting
with the START Citrus County In-
teragency Council. The meeting
will be at the Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, room 115,
1201 West Main St.
All persons interested in issues
of those with developmental dis-
abilities and their families are
welcome. The council is also
seeking new members. For more
information, call Karen Huscher
at 352-726-1445.
Area 13 covers Citrus, Her-
nando, Lake, Marion and Sumter
counties. Developmental disabili-
ties are defined as autism, cere-
bral palsy, Down syndrome,
Prader-Willi syndrome, spina bi-
fida and intellectual disabilities.

Al-Anon celebration
planned for Tuesday
Serenity Al-Anon Family Group
will hold a fourth anniversary cel-
ebration at 10 a.m. Tuesday at
Unity Church of Citrus, 2628 W
Woodview Lane, Lecanto. There
will be Al-Anon and AA speakers,
finger foods and beverages.
Al-Anon is an anonymous fel-
lowship of friends and family
members of alcoholics. Call 352-
697-0497 or visit nfldistrict5.com.
This Al-Anon group meets each
week at this time and location.
Call Joe at 727-580-0891.

Have photo taken
with Easter Bunny
The Easter Bunny will be on
hand today and Sunday from
noon to 5 p.m. at the Crystal River
Mall on U.S. 19 North.
Come have a photo made by
KNS Photography
For more information about
events at the mall, call 352-
795-2585.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Blue Bell


Helping to feed seniors


MEMO VflnC I,


Special to the Chronicle
On March 28, Friends of the Community Centers presented a check to Pat Coles, director of county Support Services, in the amount
of $4,010.89 for the Citrus County Meals On Wheels program. The check represents the proceeds from the Circle of Friends Gift
Shop, operated by the Friends at the Citrus County Resource Center Central Citrus Community Center. Since the gift shop has
been in operation, the Friends have donated $15, 890.47. Pictured, from left, are: Eileen Doman, president of the Friends; Mary
Laughlin, secretary of the Friends; Pat Coles, director of Support Services; Marie Jakobsen, gift shop volunteer; and Theresa Heyde,
gift shop volunteer. Not pictured are: Barbara Harmon, treasurer of the Friends, and Coreen Schempf, gift shop volunteer.


NEWS NOTES


Sew-Ciety series
ahead Monday
The Florida Sewing
Sew-Ciety will meet at 9 a.m.
Monday at the Citrus County
Canning Facility 3405 W
Southern St., Lecanto.
The group will choose be-
tween a purse or a pillow to
make on their sergers. All
sewing enthusiasts are wel-
come to attend.
For more information, call
Jan at 352-746-5380 or Dee at
352-527-8229.

Calling all dog lovers
for training meeting
The Citrus County Dog
Training Center invites fellow
dog lovers to its next monthly
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday


in the climate-controlled facil-
ity at Shamrock Industrial
Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave.
(County Road 495), Unit Q,
Crystal River
This all-volunteer group
welcomes input for future
training classes, informational
workshops and fun activities
with dogs. The meeting will in-
clude a demonstration of a fun
dog sport Rally
For more information, call
352-212-1697.

Women's political
group to convene
The Women's Political Net-
work of Citrus County will
meet at noon Tuesday at
Joe's Family Restaurant in
Inverness.
Guest speaker will be Inver-
ness attorney Denise Dymond


Lyn. She is a Citrus County
legal adviser and will speak
about legislative issues.
Meetings are open to men
and women. Enjoy luncheon
and a speaker and clip
coupons for the military the
club's ongoing outreach proj-
ect to help troops overseas.
Members also collect house-
hold and hygiene products for
the residents of CASA.
For more information, call
Rosalie Matt, 352-746-7143.

Church, state group
to meet Tuesday
Americans United for Sepa-
ration of Church and State
(Nature Coast Chapter) will
host a guest speaker from Citi-
zens for Informed Teens, who
will present information on
sex education.


The meeting will be at 4 p.m.
Tuesday at Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, In-
verness. All are welcome.
For information, call 352-
344-9211 or email nature
coastau@hotmail. com.

Literary group
welcomes public
The GFWC Crystal River
Woman's Club Literary Group
invites everyone to meet with
members to learn more about
bats, birds and nature at
1:30 p.m. Wednesday April 16,
at the clubhouse on Citrus Av-
enue in Crystal River
Speaker will be Betsy Frank,
world traveler and Audubon
Society and Woman's Club
member
The event is free and all are
welcome.


Ground rules keep clients, staff safe


recently, there was an article
printed about a homeless family a
young man who murdered his
mother To me, this is one of the most vio-
lent acts in human nature. Not only is it
murder, the person being killed is the
person who brought him into this world.
When I first started The Path shelter, I
had very few rules. After a year or so, I
realized I was on a course for burnout. In
other words, the fires of disruption every
day from people acting out or not know-
ing what boundaries or structure were,
were wearing me out physically and
emotionally
For the next year, I went to the opposite
extreme. I had so many rules that one
client told me he felt he was walking on
egg shells. Although I felt I needed time
to get more energy and was quite com-
fortable with their discomfort, I started to
rethink this also.
Where I and The Path landed was in
the middle and we have remained there
for many years. The rules seem to work
well for everyone involved. We have four


DuWayne
Sipper

THE PATH
HOME


"zeros" four things for which we will
expel people from the program, period.
This is how the staff and I keep our sanity
and the clients can remember these four
things: drinking alcohol, sex, illegal drugs
or medications that are not theirs and
breaking curfew
The rest of our clients' mistakes are on
a demerit system and they have to add up
points a lot of them before we ask
them to leave.
This has worked quite well for us. I still
talk to residents of Beverly Hills that
don't know we have a shelter in our town
and I heard from a sheriff's deputy that


he has never been dispatched to our
shelter
We have people who believe everyone
should be afforded housing. This is called
"housing first."
There is some truth to this argument
and, after all, isn't our shelter "housing
first"? The key for us is supervision. So,
in the future, when you see homeless
people who do not want to check into our
program and you have a strong suspicion
that it is because they do not want to give
up their alcohol or illegal drug use, you
may be right.
Please keep in mind, it is not that there
isn't someone out there that wanted to
help, it is that I do not want to offer very
valuable help and energy to someone that
refuses to believe that any mixture of al-
cohol and drugs endangers my staff, my
clients and the person himself or herself

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County a
faith-based homeless shelter Contact him
at 527-6500 orsipperd@bellsouth.net.


Special to the Chronicle
Blue Bell is a pretty and sweet,
blue-eyed Siamese mix with lynx
points and white feet. She was
recently a mom and with her litter
weaned, she is fixed and ready to
go home. There are many other
varieties of felines to choose from,
as well. Drop by and enjoy the
felines in their cage-free, home-
style environment from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 and 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Hardin Haven on
the corner of State Road 44 and
North Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of our felines on-line at
www.petfinder.com/shelters/
fl186.html.


SHARE Bridge Club
SHARE Bridge Club meets at
1 p.m. second and fourth Mondays
at Cornerstone Baptist Church,
1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
All levels of players are welcome.
For more information, call Julia
Grissom at 352-341-0554, or
Barbara Hackett at 352-341-0149.
Point 0' Woods
Are you a card player, need a
place to meet new friends and
enjoy a few hours of social mo-
ments? Point 0' Woods Country
Club, at 9228 E. Gospel Island
Road, welcomes residents in the
area to join us for lively afternoon


of cards and laughter.
Duplicate bridge is played at
noon Tuesday and Friday.
Call Barbara Pofahl at 352-341-
1756 or Elaine Spangenberg at
352-860-0358. Party bridge is
played Wednesday afternoon and
Saturday night. Call Mary Thomas
at 352-637-0045.
For more information, call
President Sandra Koonce at 352-
341-1747 or membership chairman
Marilyn Pruter at 352-287-2545.
Citrus Bridge Club
Learn to play bridge at the Citrus
Bridge Club at the Nature Coast
Bank on the corner of County Road


486 and Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando. Instructor Pat Peterson
has taught hundreds of people for
many years.
Participants will be able to play
with peers in a relaxed game.Citrus
Bridge Club conducts games at 1
p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Friday.
Peterson also gives a free lec-
ture for intermediate players at
12:15 p.m. Tuesday at the club.
Come and play anytime; partners
are guaranteed. Call Peterson at
352-746-7835 for more information.
Nature Coast Bridge Club
Nature Coast Bridge Club has


bridge games (open and points) at
12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
and at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at 3021
Commercial Way, south end of
Towne Square Mall, Spring Hill.
Games for all levels of players are
offered.
Beginners lessons are at 11 a.m.
Thursday; other classes are con-
ducted occasionally.
The games attract many Citrus
County players.
For details and a complete
schedule of games or lessons, call
Gary at 727-215-7651, or Mary
Ellen at 352-596-1524. Visit the
website at daily-recap.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


BRIDGE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


^^ ^aZfer
Experience Worship
in the "other" Catholic Church
Where all of Gods (i. i,/,,,,i Are Welcomed at the Lords Table!
Maundy Thursday.......................7:00pm
Good Friday.................12 Noon-3:00pm
Holy Saturday Easter Vigil........6:00 pm
Easter Sunday Holy Eucharist
8:00 am & 10:30 am
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church
S, 1a,,. 120 years in Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness FL 34450
726-3153 www.stmaggie.org
Fi ( iC ic P C pii 111 i- P I


t C I FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
"First For Christ"...John 1:41 INVERNESS


I Dr. Ray Kelley, Minister
344-1908
2018 C43143nade St. nens


FAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
, = 1 t +
A Pastor Chris Owens
6918 S. Spartan Ave. Homosassa
352-628-4793
www.comeandseefbc.org


Sunday, April 20
Outdoor Sunrise Service
Sunday School
Morning Worship


Easter
7:00 AM
9:00 AM
10:00 AM


1 -HOLY WEEK 2014
Holy Thursday, April 17, 2014
[i '^ AMaSS of the Lord's Supper 7:00 p.m.
Adoration until 10:00 p.m.
Good Friday, April 18, 2014
Celebration of the Lord's Passion 3:00 p.m.
Holy Saturday, April 19, 2014
The Vigil of Easter 8:00 p.m.
Easter Sunday, April 20, 2014
7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Mass
The Sacrament of Reconciliation is not available during Holy Week
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
1401 W. Country Club Blvd., Citrus Springs
352-489-4889


S960 S. US Hwy. 41, Inverness
726-1480 www.calvaryinv.com
Wednesday, April 16,
Dinner: 6 pm
Worship in Upper Room: 7 pm
Friday, April 18, 7 pm
Good Friday Service in Sanctuary
Easter Sunday, April 20, 9 am
Worship & Dance
Easter Service
Ressurection Celebration



Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church
6 R,:,:o- lt BIE\,I E-\B tlrl\ Hills
iI; i h ,,h i ['.,- .*i,,l i'- 1 'l :
746-2144
www.ourladyofgracefl.catIholicweb.com


HOLY THURSDAY
APRIL 17TH
Lord s-_lppe I"
7 00pll


GOOD FRIDAY W
APRIL 18TH
st ittl 1- oftl. (- of t o~'
Lord ~ PjISSIOI ", ";pll


HOLY SATURDAY
APRIL 19TH
EIL.l-i i.. E~il- F. .. ..l
l~ l :',,),.,|ln, |i,, ,l,, n ,
[yE'- i --i I'.i s ""Ni~i

EASTER SUNDAY
APRIL 20TH
I :1, *. :i p l !
I -.i I ,i ,': ,i i[i I


/! LXELCA LUTHERAN CHURCHES
, of Citrus County

invite you to celebrate

Easter with us!


A First Baptist Church
n CS of Crystal River
A Place to Belong!
700 North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-3367 www.firstbaptistcr.org


Good Shepherd
Hernando
6:45am, 8:30am,
and 11:00am
746-7161


Hope
Citrus Springs
7:00am Breakfast Following Sunrise
10:00am Worship
S489-5511



fbcinvemess.com (b

First Baptist Churchi i

of Inverness
550 Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness, FL 34452
726-1252




April 18, 6:00 pm
Good Friday Service

SApril 20, Easter Sunday
7:00 am Sunrise Service
9:001 aml SunCday School
](210:30 am Celebration Service


BEFORE EASTER
Spronltong


Saturday, April 19, 2014
9:00am- 12 noon
Families will enjoy a wonderful breakfast
followed by games, crafts, and other fun
activities. And, of course, there will be
an Easter Egg hunt!
This event is FREE
and open to eveyrone!


ON EASTER


Join us as our choir and drama teams lead in a
celebration of the risen Christ. Each service
will include an opportunity for Communion
and the Flowering of the Cross.
Service times: 8:30, 9:45 and 11:00 am.


irst Unfited Methodist

Church Homosassa


Easter Worship Services:
8:00 am, 9:30 am, 11:00 am
Kip Younger Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homrnosassa, FL 34448 352-628-4083
www.lumc.org Office Hours: 8:30 4:30 M-F
OOOHTC5


Join us for Worship

EASTER WEEK


SCHEDULE

April 13 to April 20


Easter 4/20/14
Suirise Serivcie
7:0()0 am
\\)rsliip
10:15 illm


St. Timothy's
Crystal River
8:00am and
10:30am
795-5325


No Evening
Services


=-0000019


I


.......... i


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 CS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Welcome to Services at
[FLORAL CITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
!; Rev. Mary Gestrich
THURSDAY Tenebrae Service
(Services of shadows) & communion 7:00 PM
FRIDAY Meditations of the Cross
Reflect and Pray in Santuary 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM
EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE Floral City Park, 7:00 AM
Breakfast to follow, Hilton Hall
EASTER CELEBRATION In Sanctuary 10:30 AM


Information 344-1771
'-,._ -'- East Marvin St. (across from Floral Cit
Website: floralcityumc.org


A


'YI,\V,-.U / I 1 ) l
712 S. School Ave.
(corner of Hwy. 44)
Lecanto, FL
352-513-4960


April 20, 2014
Easter Sunday
Son-Rise Service
i 7:30am
Easter Breakfast
a8:00am
Adult Sunday
School &
Children's Easter
Egg Hunt
9:00am
Worship
Service
10:00am


'Hernando United Methodist Church'
,, April 13th 10:00 a.m.
Palm Sunday Service
.. April 17th 6:00 p.m.
Maundy Thursday Service
I April 18th 8:00 a.m.
I Walk the Cross
April 18th 12:00 NOON Open
if *1 Good Friday Service Hearts,
-.c April 19th 11:00a.m. to 1:00p.m. open
Easter Egg Hunt Minds,
Open
April 20th 6:30 a.m. Door
jSunrise Service
April 20th 10:00 a.m.
Easter Cantata Service
Pastor Jerry Carris
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy (486)
(1 '/2 miles from Hwy 41)
For information call (352) 726-7245
;. www.hernandoumcfl.org A



CHRIST IS RISEN!
INDEED HE IS RISEN!
Please Come To Holy Week Services And Celebrate
Pascha With Fr. Nicholas Roth Of St. Vladimir Seminary
Sat., April 12 Lazarus Saturday
5 PM Great Vespers with Blessing of Palms
Sun., April 13 Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem
10 AM Divine Liturgy of St. Basil the Great
Mon., April 14 Holy and Great Monday
7 PM Bridegroom Matins
Tues., April 15 Holy and Great Tuesday
7 PM Bridegroom Matins
Wed., April 16 Holy and Great Wednesday
5 PM Service of Anointing
Thurs., April 17 Holy and Great Thursday
7 PM Holy Friday Matins with Office of the
12 Passion Gospels
Fri., April 18 Holy and Great Friday
3 PM Vespers with Rite of Entombment
7 PM Holy Saturday Matins with the Praises
Sat., April 19 Holy and Great Saturday
9:30 AM Vesperal Liturgy of St. Basil the Great with
15 Old Testament Readings
7 PM Nocturn and Matins of Holy Pascha
Sun., April 20 Great and Holy Sunday of Pascha
10 AM Paschal Divine Liturgy followed by Agape meal
12 Noon Paschal Vespers
St. Raphael Orthodox Church
1277 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL
Right off Hwy 41 across from Dollar General)
www.straphaelchurch.org




6(ommun*q/

lacvte, Jwumsqv feirice^


April 20 i
Floral City Park
7:00 a.m.
Music, Preaching
and breakfast to follow.


EVERYONE
IS INVITED.

Bring your lawn chair
or a blanket to sit on.
In case of bad weather, service will be held
at First Baptist Church Floral City
Sponsored by: First Baptist Church Floral City,
Floral City United Methodist Church, Mount Carmel Methodist Church,
Grace Temple Church of the Living God, Covenant Church of God


SSt.
Scholastic
Catholic Church
4301 W. Homosassa Trail,
Hwy. 490 in Lecanto
352-746-9422
*! M v\ J


April 12/13
Palm Sunday
of the
Lord's Passion
Mass Times:
Saturday
at 4:00pm & 6:00pm
Sunday
at 9:00am & 11:30am
Good Friday.
April 18
Confessions from
9:00-10:OOam
Stations of The Cross
at Noon
Rosary at 1:30pm
Choral Prelude
at 2:30pm
Liturgy of the Passion
at 3pm


Wednesday.
April 16
Confessions from
9:00-10:OOam
(Following the
8:30am
Daily Mass)
Holy Saturday.
April 19
Blessing of Easter
Foods & Baskets
11:30am
Easter Vigil
Mass
at 8:00pm


Holy Thursday.
April 17
Confessions from
9:00-10:OOam
Mass of the
Lord's Supper
at 7:00pm
Easter Sunday.
April 20
Easter Day
Masses at
7:30am, 9:30am
and 11:30am
(in church)
9:45am
(in parish hall)


I- For more information go to www.stscholastica.org i
TV~j or call 352-746-9422 J
-r | OOOHSJK_______________________________I 1 -




E Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Holy Monday, April 14
5:30pm Holy Eucharist
Holy Tuesday. April 15
5:30pm Holy Eucharist
Holy Wednesday. April 16
10:00am Healing Eucharist
5:30pm Holy Eucharist
Maundy Thursday. April 17
6:30pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing
and Stripping of the Altar
Good Friday. April 18
12:00 noon Good Friday Liturgy
5:30pm Stations of the Cross
Holy Saturday. April 19
9:00am Brief Morning Prayer
Easter Vigil. April 19
7:30pm Great Vigil of Easter
Easter Sunday. April 20
8:00am Holy Eucharist
10:30am Festive Holy Eucharist
2450 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. www.sothec.org
(CR486), Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491) 527-0052
1 L )^^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^


.....................


*


*


p = = = =


... 4/17 MAUNDY THURSDAY
Dinner 6 pm, Worship Service and Communion, 7 pm 0
U 4/18 GOOD FRIDAY
Shadows of the Cross, 8 pm0
0 4/19 SATURDAY
0 Rock & Roll Easter Event Easter Egg Hunt; crafts, 0
0 games, snacks, 10 am 11:30 am. A family event! U
0 focusing on the resurrection.0
0 4/20 EASTER SUNDAY
SSunrise Service & Continental Breakfast, 6:30 am0
0 Worship Service, 8:00 9:30 11:00 am 0
Easter Breakfast 9:00 to 10:45 am
I* U
S Hwy. 44 E. @ Church Office 637-0770 *
SWashington Ave., Inverness Rev. James Capps
.I.II.II.II.I..I..I I II II I


f-tel-a





CORNERS ONE
SBAPTIST/ CHURCH
1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452


Easter

Celebration

Services
Sunday, April 20
9:00 & 10:30 AM
Nursery and Children's Church
provided through 5th Grade for both services
352-726-7335 www.cbcinverness.com





F Redemption

Christian Church

Easter Sunrise

Service

Sunday, April 20

6:30 A.M.
Worship: 9:00 A.M.
(Easter Sunday Only)
Meeting at the East Citrus
Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Hwy

For more information....
Call Pastor Todd 352-422-6535
orvisit our website at:
www.redemptionchristian.net


Join us for Worship


EASTER WEEK I


SCHEDULE


April 13 to April 20


Victory Baptist Church


/|Easter Worship

^ 10:45 a.m. )
Special Music & Message

Pastor Gary Beehler
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
Highway 41 North, Inverness (turn at Sportsman Pt.)
726-9719
"A place to belong. A place to become."


EASTER
CELEBRATION SERVICES
Good Friday Communion Service
April 18, 7 pm
Easter Youth/Children Musical
Sunday, April 20 at 10:am
tst,,lic Clfs-tiii Dii T eiinach'
o61 l\. reivenii -Lores Sit.. Hoiiios7a 132-('2'-fo7c


You are invited to
worship with us on
Easter Sunday!
S Inverness
First United Methodist
Church
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(2ml. south of Applebee's)
v352-726-2522
www.invernessfirstumc.org

Sunrise Service (Outside) 6:30 A.M.
Contemporary Service 9:00 A.M.
Traditional Service 10:30 A.M.


==OR


C6 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


Li




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

free gift certificate. For more infor-
mation, call 352-489-3027.
First Presbyterian Church of In-
verness will sponsor a "Rock-n-roll
Easter event Where the rock rolled
away from the tomb," from 10 to
11:30 a.m. Saturday, April 19, for
children up to and including 5th
grade. Everything about the event
points children to one thing: cele-
brating Jesus Christ. It is an all-out
family event with games, music,
crafts, snacks, and activities that
center on the resurrection. There is
no charge for this event and all are
invited. Make reservations in ad-
vance by going to www.rocknrol-
leasterfpcinv.eventbrite.com or
mailing:
sarahfpcinyouth@gmail.com. For
more information, call 352-637-
0770.
Rock Crusher Road First
Church of God will host a commu-
nity Easter egg hunt from 3 to 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 19, on the church
property, 419 N. Rock Crusher
Road, Crystal River. There will be
food, games, face painting, commu-
nity booths, fire trucks, and, of
course, lots of eggs. Everyone is in-
vited. For more information, call the
church office at 352-795-5553 or
visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
The third Saturday night supper
will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
April 19 in the Dewain Farris Fellow-
ship Hall at Community Congrega-
tional Christian Church, 9220 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Menu includes pork chops with
mushroom gravy, mashed potatoes,
applesauce, seasoned green beans,
apple pie, coffee and tea. Tickets
are $10 for adults, $5 for children
and can be purchased at the door.
Takeouts available. For information,
call the church at 352-489-1260.
First Church of God of Crystal
River is celebrating Easter with the
community. On Sunday, April 20,
there will be a sunrise service at
8:30 a.m., brunch at 9 a.m. and the
worship celebration at 10 a.m.
Everyone is invited to be a part of
the celebration. The church is at 419
N. Rock Crusher Road, Crystal
River. For more information, call the


IY~2


RELIGION


church office at 352-795-5553 or
visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Inverness Church of God invites
the community to attend "Celebrate
the Light" at 10 a.m. Easter Sunday,
April 20. This is a Resurrection cele-
bration including the children, youth
and adults in a day of family wor-
ship. The church is at 416 U.S. 41
S., Inverness. For more information,
call the church office at 352-726-
4524.
Arbor Lake Chorus will present
its spring concert titled, "Victory
1945-A Musical Celebration" at 7
p.m. Friday, April 25, at Hernando
United Methodist Church, 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando.
The program is directed by Cory
Stroup and written by Harry Her-
shey. Admission is free. A love offer-
ing will be collected.
The annual rummage sale at
Peace Lutheran Church will take
place from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Satur-
day, April 26. There will be no early
sales. Shoppers will find many un-
usual items at amazing bargain
prices. Hotdogs, chips and soft
drinks will be available. The church
is at 7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
north of downtown Dunnellon. For
more information, call the church at
352-489-5881.
"VBS FunShop Training with a
Twist" will take place from 9 a.m. to
noon Saturday, April 26, at First
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19 (Suncoast Boulevard), Crys-
tal River. Churches planning to pres-
ent Group Publishing's Weird
Animals theme this summer are in-
vited to attend. This hands-on train-
ing will give practical pointers on all
phases of conducting VBS. Register
online at group.com/vbsfunshop.
The fee is $20 per person prior to
one week before the event. Regis-
tration after that and at the door is
$28 per person. For more informa-
tion, call the church at 352-795-2259
or Lynn Dively at 352-382-0435.
SAt 10 a.m. Sunday through
April 27, Rock Crusher Road First
Church of God will unpack what
"SoulShifts" are with practical, bibli-
cal suggestions for life. Join us in
worship each Sunday morning
through this series as we explore a
new "SoulShift" every week. Be a
part of one of the community groups
that meet Thursday, Friday and Sat-
urday. Each week, these groups


take the "SoulShift" message and
place emphasis on how to apply it to
our lives. The church is at 419 N.
Rock Crusher Road., Crystal River.
For more information, call the church
office at 352-795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Beverly Hills Community Church
Food Pantry is participating in the
2014 Alan Shawn Feinstein, 17th
Annual $1 Million Giveaway to Fight
Hunger. The more donations made
to the food pantry through April 30,
the more of the Feinstein money the
pantry will receive. Donations can in-
clude cash, checks and food items.
Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church in Beverly Hills will host its
monthly outdoor flea market from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 3, on
the church property at 6 Roosevelt
Boulevard in Beverly Hills off North
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491). Shoppers are welcome. Up to
50 commercial and private vendors
from throughout Citrus County are
expected to display their wares.
Commercial vendors and private in-
dividuals are welcome to bring and
sell goods.
Spaces are available for $10 and
should be reserved in advance. Cof-
fee, sodas doughnuts and hotdogs
will be available for breakfast and
lunch. This church-sponsored flea
market takes place the first Saturday
monthly, September through May.
The next flea market is Sept. 6. For
more information or to reserve a
space, call Rose Mary at 352-527-
6459 or email wjeselso
@tampabay.rr.com.
The Knights of Columbus will
sponsor a Country Western Dinner
Dance featuring an "encore perform-
ance" by the Country Sunshine
Band on Saturday, May 3, in the
parish hall of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, 7525 U.S. 41
South in Dunnellon. The evening in-
cludes a country-style dinner, cash
bar, 50/50, basket raffles and a door
prize. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.,
with dinner served at 6:30. Tickets
are $15 and are available at the
church office, from the Knights or by
calling 352-489-6221 for
tickets/table reservations.
Southern Gospel solo artist
Keith Plott will appear at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 3, at Lifepoint Family
Church, 6430 S. Lewdinger Drive,
Homosassa, and at 10:30 a.m. Sun-


Join us for Worship


EASTER WEEK


SCHEDULE


April 13 to April 20


First Baptist Church

Of Hernando
Maundy Thursday Service,
April 17, 6:30pm
Easter Sunday, April 20:
8:00 am Early Service
8:45 am Breakfast
9:30 am Sunday School
10:45 am Worship Service
3790 E. Parson's Point Rd., Hernando, FL 34442
(Across from Post Office)
352-726-6734
Visit us on the Web at www.fbchernando.com[



l( Crystal River United
SMethodist Church
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
S Crystal River, Fl 34428
352-795-3148
www.crumc.com
Opp


Sunday, April 13
Easter Cantata and Bell Choir 4:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 17
S "Christ in the Passover"
Seder Meal 6:30 p.m.
^ Tickets cost $12.00

Friday, April 18
Good Friday
SChapel will be open for prayer and
ommunion from 12 noon until 3 p.m.

Sunday, April 20
SCommunity Sunrise Service 6:45 a.m.
Breakfast at Tabernacle 7:45 a.m.
Traditional Service 9 a.m.
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. j


/


SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 C7


day, May 4, at First Baptist Church
of Homosassa, 10540 W. Yulee
Drive, Homosassa. Admission is
free. A love offering will be collected.
Plott is a Southern Gospel Music
Dove Award winner along with multi-
ple-time winner of the Southern
Gospel Fanfare Awards. He has per-
formed at the "Grand Ole Opry" and
at the National Quartet Convention,
and with such groups as "Brian Free
and Assurance," "Danny Funderburk
& Mercy's Way" and "Safe Harbor."
First Church of God of Crystal
River is celebrating kids (and the
grownups who love them) with a kid-
friendly service at 10 a.m. Sunday,
May 4, followed by a picnic lunch
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the church
property, 419 N. Rock Crusher
Road. There will be carnival games,
prizes, a bounce house, climbing
wall and other activities for people of
all ages. Everyone is invited to be a
part of the celebration. For more in-
formation, call the church office at
352-795-5553 or visit www.rock-
crusherchurch.com.
The Dunnellon Community
Chorale will present its spring con-
cert titled "Down Memory Lane," at 3
p.m. Sunday, May 4, at First United
Methodist Church, 21501 W. State
Road 40, Dunnellon. The concert is
free to the public. A love offering will
be accepted.
"Awakening Florida" is coordi-
nating a statewide prayer gathering
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
May 10, at Park Avenue Baptist
Church, 2600 S. ParkAve., Ti-
tusville. This will be a day of prayer
and fasting, calling people to cry out
for God's purposes and seek the
destiny of the Lord for the state of
Florida. Everyone is invited to join
this solemn assembly. Entrance fee
is $10. Registration and information
at: awakeningflorida.com.
There will be a concert by Annie
& Tim's Bluegrass Gospel Band at 7
p.m. Friday, May 23, at First Presby-
terian Church, 1501 S.E.U.S. 19
(Suncoast Boulevard), Crystal River.
A love offering will be collected at
the performance to benefit the inter-
generational Vacation Bible School
ecumenical program sponsored by
First Presbyterian Church, St.
Anne's Church and St. Timothy
Lutheran Church. Join us for an
evening of fun, fellowship, and root
beer floats. Call 352-795-2259. In-


tergenerational VBS will take place
from 8:30 a.m. to noon June 16-20
at First Presbyterian Church.
Seven Rivers Christian School
invites all girls ages 4 to 8th grade to
Spirit Camp 2014 from 8:30 a.m. to
noon Tuesday through Friday, May
27-30, at the Seven Rivers Christian
School Gymnasium. Cost of $45 in-
cludes a snack each day and a sou-
venir T shirt. Spirit Camp is coached
by Julie Taylor, the former coach of
Camp Rah Rah at CRHS. Coach
Taylor brings 13 years of cheerlead-
ing and camp experience and has
established herself as a premier
cheer coach in Citrus County. Regis-
ter early and save $5. Registrations
need to be received by May 19. You
can also register the first day of
camp. There will be a pep rally and
performance for family and friends at
noon Friday.
Helping Hands Thrift Store, a
ministry of Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, is open from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household items,
clothing and small appliances. Call
352-726-1707.
The Genesis Project, an in-
depth analysis and discussion of the
text of Genesis, is conducted from 7
to 8 p.m. Monday at Etz Hayim In-
stitute the Adult Education Pro-
gram of Congregation Beth Sholom,
102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A
class on American-Jewish History is
also offered from 8:15 to 9:15 p.m.
Monday through June 23. Both
classes are taught by Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot. For more informa-
tion, call 352-643-0995.
Cornerstone Christian Supply, a
ministry of the Inverness Church of
God, has available for purchase the
newly released novel, "At the Bottom
of Biscayne Bay," by Fred H. Bran-
nen, Jr. The novel is a quixotic court-
room drama, wrapped in a love
story, with a thread of the inspira-
tional truth concerning God's unfail-
ing faithfulness interwoven within its
lines. Cornerstone Christian Supply
is an excellent source for all your
Christian needs: Bibles, greeting
cards, books, T-shirts, gifts, etc. Cor-
nerstone Christian Supply is at 416
U.S. 41 South, Inverness. For more
information, call the store at 352-
344-2470.


The New Church


Without Walls

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.co,


Easter Sunday

Sunday School 9:30

Worship Service- 11:00



Hernando
Chrch of
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong
Easter Sunday April 20. 2014
Sunrise Service......................7:30 A.M.
Breakfast ............................8:45 A.M.
Sunday School....................9:45 A.M.
Cantata Service.............] ... 10:40 A.M.
Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
Nursery Provided
2101 N. Florida Ave. Hernando FL 726-6144
www.hernaz.org


Faith Lutheran Church
44 and 490
in Crystal Glen Subdivision. Lecanto

lm Sanday.................9:30 AM HC
Mawy Tkasda.......7:-OOPM HC
good Frid-ay.........................3:00PM
Hoy Satrd...ay...............6:00PM HC
Easter Santdy Sawtrse......7:OOAM
B' a reakcfast ..... 7:30-9:00 AM
P fEaster Saay...............9:30AM HC
HC Holy communion is celebrated
H-e 1 Reiren ...He f Riren Indeed!



Please call
527-33,25 or visit
our web-site,:
faithlecanto.com for
more information.
Rev. Stephen Lane,
Pastor
'A Hert-frtrnui od,---A /*Wt-firr others-


R T 47 Years of Bringing
FI R 1 I 1 Christ to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Maundy Thursday (Commandment) Service
w/Holy Communion April 17th, 5:30 PM
Good Friday Tenebrae Service
April 18th, 5:30 PM
fj^ Sunrise Service t
April 20th, 7:00 AM f
w Outside in the Prayer GardenJ
Easter Celebration
w/Holy Communion, 10:00' AM
Easter Breakfast 8:15- 9:30 AM
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness 726-1637
e e T B Missouri Synod
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson www.1 stlutheran.net


foin a4 in ee,^Uhtew

Easter Services:
Saturday, 4/19 10:00am
Easter Eggstravaganva' Easter Egg Hunt for children ages up to 11 years old

Easter Sunday:
Sunday, 4/20 Bridge Building
People Worship at 8:30 & 11:00am
No PM Service- Communion will be observed at both services.







Church of God Pastors Ronnie &
Sherry Reid
2180 NW 12th Avenue Crystal River
(352) 795-3079 www.crystalrivercog.com


OOOHVWY


&I




CS SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014


SATURDAY EVENING APRIL 12, 2014 C: .Comcast ,Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon &, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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North
4 Q52
V J 10 8 7
* KJ


West
* 83
V A KQ4
* Q 10 76
4 K 6 3


4 J 10l


04-12-14


97
East
* 764
S92
* 98543
4 A82


South
SA K J 10 9
V 653
A2
4Q 5 4
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 4 Dbl. 2 1 All pass

Opening lead: V A


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

In "The Electric Woman," Marabel Morgan,
an author of self-help books for married
women, wrote, "Persistence is the twin sister
of excellence. One is a matter of quality; the
other, a matter of time."
Why did she not make it excellence is the
twin sister of persistence? Or one is a matter of
time; the other, a matter of quality?
This is an excellent defensive deal because
it requires persistence on the part of the de-
fenders. They have to take six tricks to defeat
two spades. How can they do it after West
leads the heart ace?
When two spades came back to West, per-
haps he should have made a second takeout
double. Note that three diamonds is making,
East losing two spades and two diamonds.
East's club loser disappears on West's third
high heart.
West leads the heart ace, under which East
drops his nine, starting a high-low (echo) with
his doubleton. West cashes his heart king and
heart queen. What should East discard?
Since he would like a club shift, he should
pitch the club eight.
West then leads his club three, the low card
guaranteeing at least one honor in the suit.
East wins with his ace and, although South
drops a deceptive queen, returns the club two.
When West takes the trick with his king, he
should lead his last club, which East ruffs to
defeat the contract.
West should know that South has the last
club, because if East had started with four
clubs, he would have returned his higher-re-
maining club at trick five (high-low with a re-
maining doubleton), not the two.
Excellent!


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
| LIPTO {


2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rghts Reserved
SOZAKO



HURNKS' __



TALLEY __
-rT]-"


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I don't want you listening'
to that "Pelvis" Presle.
/ __ His music is too lou
and too fast.


Sho t0o3 h "?
Ia.d 'hat a a
got 'k
tj lips, ar* .
t', t.. L

,L ', -
iZ'

WHEN A YOUNG EL-VI5
TOPPEP THI7 MUSIC.
&CHARP-TS IN APRIL 1957,
5OME PARF-NTS WER ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: cc^^ ^^^^^
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: UNFIT MOUND INTENT ALKALI
Answer: His passion for high-calorie foods was -
INFATUATION


ACROSS
1 Ring out
5 Chimp or
chicken
10 Four-footed
Romeo
12 Gingham
cousin
13 Vail
conveyance
(2 wds.)
14 Loafers
15 Marquette's
title
16 MPG monitor
18 Expected any
time
19 Minor clergy
23 Unruly crowd
26 Go-aheads
27 Tallinn money
30 Alter genes
32 Without risk
34 up
(got ready)
35 No big thing
36 Lower jaw
37 Source of
metal


38 Posed for
an artist
39 Tern or
albatross
42 Quick punch
45 Kind of boots
46 Cornstarch
brand
50 Beethoven's
Third
53 Register
55 Pharaoh's
amulet
56 Sign on
the line
57 Let fly
58 Roller coaster
cry

DOWN
1 Nudge
2 Bahrain VIP
3 Took steps
4 Mekong
native
5 Naughty
6 Under the
weather


Answer to Previous Puzzle


0oR D I NiA V E|R T S
1 E VE'E._.ES E
AL| CE I LMFAB
D O U R AL. M]LL E
JJ T S UnGA 0- L S


I K S lT A MYP
N YIE HI AIT ES Y EW

N |IOiS E SEun 0 RIB E T
D D .


17 Some Diel
products
20 Time of the
mammals
21 Closer
22 Muslim
mystic
23 Flavor
enhancer
24 Fuel cartel
25 Dull and
boring
28 Umps
29 Earthenware
pot
31 Orchidlike
blossom
32 Like a zebra
33 So far
37 Kimono sash
40 Melville
captain
41 Vaderof
"Star Wars"
42 Wisecrack
43 St, Louis
landmark
44 Tusked animal
47 From memory
48 Jubilant
gaiety
49 Prehistoric
51 Fit of temper
52 Harsh cry
54 Right this
minute


0' 2P014 LIFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for Urs


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: I enjoy
reading your column
and agree with most of
your advice, including your
recommendations when it
comes to handling alcohol ad-
dictions and binge drinking.
I do not work in
this field, but I've
seen alternatives to
AA that may be
more palatable to
some who are seek-
ing assistance.
Would you print
this information,
too? -Albany N.Y
Dear Albany: We
actually have
printed alterna-
tives to AA in the
past and are happy AN I
to do so again. MAIL
Whatever helps.
We recognize that
some people are not comfort-
able with 12-step programs or
those mentioning a "higher
power," and others are
searching for something
more specifically tailored to
their needs. So here are a few
suggestions:
Moderation Management
(moderation.org); Hams
(Harm Reduction, Abstinence
and Moderation Support) at
hamsnetworkorg; Smart Re-
covery (Self-Management and
Recovery Training) at
smartrecoveryorg; Rational
Recovery (rational.org);
Sober Recovery (soberrecov-
erycom); SOS (Secular Or-
ganizations for Sobriety) at
sossobrietyorg; LifeRing (lif-
ering.org); Women for Sobri-
ety (womenforsobrietyorg).
We realize this list doesn't
include everything, so read-
ers can find more resources
through the Substance Abuse
and Mental Health Services


I
L


Administration (samhsa.gov)
at 1-800-662-HELP (1-800-662-
4357).
DearAnnie: We are friends
with "George and Helen," a
couple with whom my hus-
band went to college 40 years
ago. We used to see
them several times
a year, but we now
winter with them
in the same com-
plex and see them
almost daily We
love the husband,
and I have devel-
oped a close rela-
S tionship with his
wife.
However, his
wife seems to be a
HE'S rather insecure
.BOX person, as evi-
denced by her
comments regard-
ing her weight and the fact
that we purchased our condo
and they rent theirs. I believe
this is the reason she never
compliments us on anything
we buy unless she had a part
in picking it out
I ignore her comments
about the way things "should"
look (when clearly I did the
opposite) and her little re-
marks that could be con-
strued as digs. She never has
a positive comment unless
pushed.
I want to keep the relation-
ship on good terms, but her
attitude is wearing me down.
Is it wise to have an honest
conversation about this?
I am not very good with
confrontation or diplomacy,
and it would be devastating if
I damaged this friendship. -
Undernourished Friend
Dear Friend: Since you
know her criticisms are due
to insecurities, please be


kind. These comments (or
lack thereof) do not reflect on
you or your taste, and there is
no harm in continuing to ig-
nore them.
Friends don't have to like
the same things. However, if
you need more aesthetic sup-
port from her, try a light-
hearted approach. When she
insults your new dress, sim-
ply smile and say, "Hortense,
I know it kills you to give me
a compliment but I love you
anyway"
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Blue-Collar Grand-
parents," who are concerned
about their grandchildren's
trichotillomania. I am 62 and
have had trich my entire life.
It never goes away We just
learn how to hide it. It is not
something one can control
any more than we can control
how tall we are. You would
not berate your grandchild
for his height
Help them deal with the
trich with hats and conceal-
ing hairstyles. Please do not
ever in any way blame your
grandchildren or their par-
ents for this malady Accept
them the way they are. One
of Many

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


G PARITI-
+IE [RIA]


Want more puzzles?
Chock out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


4-12


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S C O PI IED





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

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SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 C9


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Blondie


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Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
In 3D. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
No passes.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Draft Day" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG) 12:20 p.m., 3:25 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Oculus" (R) 12:35 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:40 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 12:45 p.m., 3:20 p.m.,


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7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 10:20 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
In 3D. 3:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Draft Day" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
10:15p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:10p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 11:45 a.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 12:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 10:25 p.m.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public LOCal RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: slenba -


"X OBA'Z MAEKWJZBAE GFT VKNVRK


MJK WKRXUXNA ZN FMWZ KBOF NZFKW


GFKA ZFKWK'J BRWKBET JN LMOF


VBXA XA ZFK GNWRE." JZKVFKA


PXAU

Previous Solution: "I wonder how many people don't get the one they want, but
end up with the one they're supposed to be with." Fannie Flagg
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-12


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


The Born Loser


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C10 SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 RELIGION CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION NOTES


The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for Bible
study at 10 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly. Bible study is
followed by a luncheon. Studies
have included such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend and
enjoy Christian fellowship.
Community Christian Karate
Club (CCKC) offers a Citrus
County group for learning karate
skills, working on cardio, and
meeting new friends. Three dif-
ferent classes for three different
age groups are offered: the 4- to
7-year-old class, 8- to 12-year-
old class, and the teen/adult
class. Classes take place Tues-
day evenings at New Hope Bap-
tist Church, 8635 W. Goodman
Lane, Homosassa. Cost is $25 a
month with discounts for fami-
lies. For more information, con-
tact 5th degree black belt
instructor Greg Gunn at 352-
428-6348 or email
ggunn14@gmail.com or visit
www.topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church offers Bingo at 11:30
a.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday featuring regular,
double and special bingos, to-
gether with a jackpot and
"pickle" game. Doors open at 10
a.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m.
Wednesday. Kitchen features
"homemade" soups and sand-
wiches. The church is on U.S.
41, three miles north of Dunnel-
Ion.
SAll widows in the community
are invited to join the Widows


Ministry Group from 4 to 5:30
p.m. Wednesday at Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1100 W.
Highland Blvd., Inverness. "God
isn't finished with us yet!" For in-
formation, call Darla at 352-270-
8115.
m A Christian Bible-based spir-
itual recovery group meets from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
at Living Water Ministry Com-
plex, 1 Beverly Hills Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills. For more information,
call Meg at 352-527-2443.
"Get in Touch With Your
Faith," a Christian information
class at Peace Lutheran
Church," continues at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Pastor Terry McKee
conducts the class for 1 hour
weekly. Everyone is welcome.
There is no fee. To register, call
the church office at 352-489-
5881.The church is at 7201 S.
U.S. 41, five miles north of Dun-
nellon.
The Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church spaghetti suppers
take place from 4 to 6 p.m. the
third Friday monthly in the Jack
Steele Hall at 86 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. A donation of $8
per person or two tickets for $15
includes all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce, Ital-
ian bread, dessert and coffee or
tea. Come and enjoy a delicious
meal. Tickets are available at the
door.
Ladies, come to "The Well"
for refreshment and prophetic
prayer ministry at 7 p.m. the first
Friday monthly at FresHope
Ministries, 2991 E. Thomas St.,


Inverness. If you are hurting,
need to hear a word from God,
and/or spiritual growth and
strength, then this is the night
just for you. Come comfortable
and come expecting to receive.
You will not leave the same way
you came in. Call 352-341-4011
or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
n The Men's Club of St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church on
U.S. 41 in Dunnellon play horse-
shoes at 9 a.m. Saturday.
Horseshoes are provided to any-
one needing them along with in-
structions in pitching, scoring
and court maintenance. Women,
children and persons who have
never pitched horseshoes be-
fore are invited to attend and
share in the fun and fellowship.
For more information, call 352-
489-5954.
The Saturday night Gospel
Jubilee takes place the last Sat-
urday night monthly at First
Church of God 5510 Jasmine
Lane, Inverness. Everyone is in-
vited to come to enjoy or come
and participate. Prepare a num-
ber, bring your instrument if you
have one and join in this full-
filled evening. Great music, fun,
food, fellowship and never a
charge. For more information,
call 352-344-3700.
The public is welcome to
Zen meditation sessions at 2:45
p.m. Sunday at Unity Church,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto (off County Road 491).
For more information, call 352-
464-4955.


Pope assumes rap



for priest sex abuse


Associated Press

VATICAN CITY Pope Francis
said Friday he took personal re-
sponsibility for the "evil" of priests
who raped and molested children,
asking forgiveness from victims
and saying the church must be
even bolder in its efforts to protect
the young. It was the first time a
pope has taken personal responsi-
bility for the sex crimes of his
priests and begged forgiveness.
Francis' off-the-cuff remarks
were the latest sign that he has
become sensitized to the gravity
of the abuse scandal after coming
under criticism from victims' ad-
vocacy groups for a perceived
lack of attention to, and under-
standing of, the toll it has taken
on the church and its members.
The evolution began last month
when he named four women and
an abuse survivor to a sex abuse
advisory panel that the Vatican
has suggested will address the
critical issue of sanctioning bish-
ops who cover up for pedophiles.
Francis delivered the comments
to members of the International
Catholic Child Bureau, a French
Catholic network of organizations
that protects children's rights. Sit-
ting with them in his library Friday,
Francis spoke slowly deliberately
and softly in his native Spanish, de-
viating from his text
"I feel compelled to take per-
sonal responsibility for all the evil


that some priests, many many
in number, (although) not in com-
parison with the totality to as-
sume personal responsibility and
to ask forgiveness for the damage
caused by the sexual abuse of the
children," he said.
"The church is aware of this
damage," he continued. "We don't
want to take a step back in deal-
ing with this problem and the
sanctions that must be imposed.
On the contrary, I think we must
be even stronger! You don't play
around with the lives of children."
No pope has ever taken per-
sonal responsibility for the tens of
thousands of children who were
molested by priests over decades
as bishops moved them from
parish to parish rather than re-
porting them to police. Pope John
Paul II denounced priests who
abused children, saying there was
no place for them in the priest-
hood. Pope Benedict XVI ex-
pressed sorrow and regret to
victims, met with them and even
wept with them. But neither ever
took personal responsibility for
the crimes or begged forgiveness
as Francis did.
Last month, Francis named the
initial members of a commission
to advise him on best practices to
combat sexual abuse in the
church. Half of the eight members
are women and one, Marie
Collins, was assaulted by a priest
as a child.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Fa: 32)56-66 TllFee (8) 5-240*Em i: *asfi*scroile0ln cm I *ie:ww hrnclonie 0o


*-



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Y o lll lll' ll'ISt.



Classifieds


3 WHEEL BIKE
$100.
FOLD-UP WALKER
w/seat and hand brakes
$100.
(352) 436-3302
4-PC. QUEENSIZE BED-
ROOM SET, with mirror
headboard & side
cabinets, mattress,
$800,4 pc. wall cabi-
nets, dark wood, $600.
(352) 637-6310 Iv.msg
Air Conditioner
Coleman 3 ton
straight cool Mobile
Home unit w/ 10kw
electric heater $600
315-729-2634
Computer Desk,
Corner style
$175.
Noritake China
$75.
(352) 423-3513
CraftsmanRiding
Lawn Mower
42" cut, 20hp
$500. obo
(352) 382-4779
Dining. Room Set
6 chairs, table,
real wood. $75
6 Pc. Bed. Rm. Set, Ital-
ian, nice shape $150
(352) 423-3513


Brentwood
Sat 8-2pm
1954W Chelsea Ann
Way
Four GM 16"
steel wheels
$60.00
(352) 465-7506
GROOMER
Exp. Only apply
Linda's Grooming
352-628-3842
LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers
to service lights.
Electrical exp. pref,
will train. Travel req.
throughout South-
east. Cpy vehicle
and hotel provided.
Exc pay, per diem,
bonus and benefits.
Background check
and clean FL. Dr. Lic
required.
Apply in person at
Hilights Inc.
1515 White Lake Dr
Inverness
352-564-8830


OOOHQCH
SU JOkU ****** 4puz.com

6 3


4 1


9 843


5 4 8

7 2


_8 6 1___


217 8


5 7


1__1 6
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

All of our
structures
withstand
Installations by BrianCBC1253853 i1h

&wa" a 4 v- !P 352-628-7519
BMEE 1EST ;
Fl REE' 'Tli ,

SPermit And IS
I Engineering Fees Ifl
I Up to $200 value I .

* Siding *Soffit *Fascia *Skirting Roofvers *Carports *Screen Rooms Decks Windows *Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.corn


nLn^
- HerandoU-
Sat & Sun 9 to 5
12'x 6.5' landscaping
trailer, tackle, power
& hand tools, gems
antiques, glass, HO
scale trains, jewelry,
collectibles, silver
& gold, Lake Park
off 200, 3842 Webb Pt
INVERNESS
Sat. & Sun. 7am-until
6600 E. Haden Lane
LEATHER SOFA
caramel color with re-
cliners on both sides,
$350. Call for details.
(352) 637-6310, Iv.msg
Piano
$150.
(352) 423-3513
PINE RIDGE
Saturday Only 8a-12p
*MULTI FAMILY SALE*
3835 & 3858
W. Douglas Fir Cr.
Real Lite 1987
Travel Trailer, gas
stove, oven, AC, micro,
full Bath, twin bed, fold
out couch $2500
352-746-9435
Sears Wood Lathe
Bench w/2 drawers on
Wheels, turning chisels
1/3 hpgrinder $150.
Delta 10" Bench Saw
$50. (352) 382-1814
TOW DOLLY
lights, electric brakes
& new strap,
excel, cond. $750.
(352) 382-1627



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

Leek
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



6 mo old neuter
Siamese snowshoe.
All vaccines. Indoor
cat only. Free to good
home (352) 220-2712



CAT Male Black&
White short hair. Miss-
ing since 4/3. Gemini
off Grover Cleveland
(352) 621-3392
Lost Cat on Mon 3-10,
10:30a. Blue Point
Himalayan. Goes by
"Blue". Has one eye,
underbite. Front paws
declawed. License &
rabies tags on. Cream
colored w/ gray tips &
tail. Last seen 44 E.
westbound after VFW in
the woods on right.
Deb @352-201-4800.


short haired Tabby
Lost Sugar Mill Woods
4/8. Microchiped
(352) 422-7278
Lost Dog-Bull Mastiff
Mix, male, brown,
black collar w/silver tag,
registered in Georgia
lost on Tuedsy night on
Cardinal St. and Elsie
Pt. in Lecanto
(352) 621-9810
Lost Maine Coon Male
Cat in the Highland area
close to Canton &
Apopka streets
Dark brown mix very
friendly he has left ear
tip off due to TNR Col-
ony but has become our
pet we miss him & want
him home last seen
Thurs April 3rd.
726-0562 or 302-6509
Lost
Small Pekingese, Black
Cardinal & Georgia Rd.
(352) 628-3829
Male Siamese Cat
mature, answers to
the name'"Old Man"
lost in the vicinity of
Robert Blake Ave
in Inverness
(352) 419-7167


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org

Happy^^


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Realtor Needs
ASSISTANT
Exp. necessary
Send resume to:
reoffice.assistant3
@gmail.com











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





BRASHEAR'S
PHARMACY
NOW HIRING
LOOKING FOR
r PHARMACY TECH.
r MEDICAL BILLING
SPECIALIST
(352) 746-3420 Ask
for Rob or Dianne


C.N.A.s
11-7 Full Time
Join our team.
ask about Baylor
Prog. EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


Come Join Our
5 Star Facility
Team at Avante
at Inverness

Available Positions
RN
MDS Coordinator
Exp. Preferred
RN and LPN
all shifts
CNA3-11 & 11-7
Great Benefits
and 401K
Please Aoolv Online
Avantecenters.com


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo.com

FRONT DESK
P/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience
& experience with
Eaglesoft a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lynn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.com










i'm lovin' it
McDonald's
in Beverly Hills..
is accepting
applications for
employment for
0 All Part Time &
Full time Positions
Opening & Closing
Managers needed
Please apply at the
McDonald's in
Crystal River, 625
N. U.S. Hwy. 19.

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now Acceptina
ADpplications for
LINE COOKS &
e P/T DISHWASHERS
e P/T HOUSEKEEPERS
Please Apply
in Person at
505 E Hartford St
Mon-Sat btn 2p-5p



SEEKING
FULL TIME
AD SALES REP
The Williston Pioneer
Sun News
Salary Plus
Commission, Based
out of Williston, FL.
Service new and
existing advertising
customers. Meet &
exceed sales goals
Excellent customer
service skills. Strong
computer skills
Reliable transporta-
tion required to
make sales calls
Email Resume to
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
Drug screen
required for final
candidate, FOE


AUTO TECHNICIAN
Full Time. Must have
valid Dvr Lic. Willing to
train right person with
mechanical exp.
hourly pav+ incentive.
Call (352) 563-1717
for interview apt.

EXPERIENCED
SERVICE
PLUMBERS
Min 5 yrs experience
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973


LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers
to service lights.
Electrical exp. pref,
will train. Travel req.
throughout South-
east. Cpy vehicle
and hotel provided.
Exc pay, per diem,
bonus and benefits.
Background check
and clean FL. Dr. Lic
required.
Apply in person at
Hilights Inc.
1515 White Lake Dr
Inverness
352-564-8830


LOVE
CHEVROLET
Factory Trained
Technician
Experience Req'd.
* Detailer
Apply in Person:
Love Chevrolet
2209 Hwy 44 West
Inverness, FL
For more information
Ray Smerecki
352-341-0018
Drugfree Work
Place, EOE


Auto Technician
Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
AUTOMATION
Floral City
352-341-1881

GROOMER
Exp. Only apply
Linda's Grooming
352-628-3842






























Plasterers,
Apprentices, &
Laborers
Must have stucco
experience To apply
call Daniel Haag Inc
352-746-9807
Drugfree workplace.
Roofers & Laborers
Commercial, Exp.
(352) 564-1242



Administrative
Assistant P/T
(to start)
Microsoft Office
& Quick Books exp.
Email resume to:
offlce@wavecrest
masonry.com


6 5 8 214 3 179'
473519862
912678435
564921783
137865294
289437651
3321796548
846352917
795184326


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 C01L


DELI CLERK

EXPERIENCED ONLY
Sat & Sun. a must.
No calls.
Apply in person:
Brooklyn Dockside
Deli, Crystal River


Exp. Sales/Office
Help

Full Time- call to
set up interview
352-563-2005


MAINTENANCE
Position

Experience Preferred
No Phone Calls
AnlIv In Person
614 NW Hwy 19,
BEST WESTERN


TOWER HAND

Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F






MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547











NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School

Barber
Night School

Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM

Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE

(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu

START A CAREER
INA YEAR


I- AVAILABLE
Pool Sunnlv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!!
Pat (813) 230-7177





.- AVAILABLE
Pool Supplv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177





.- AVAILABLE
Pool Sulv Store
W/ Service and Re-
pair! Net Income of
nearly $125000!
Pat (813) 230-7177





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-10x10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




CAKE PLATE Milkglass
hobnail pattern w wavy
edge, pedestal base.12
1/2" diam x 5" tall.
$25.00 352422-1309

COOKIE JAR Milkglass
hobnail pattern with lid.
11 1/2" tall x 8" diam.
$35.00 352422-1309


OLD PHONOGRAPH
RECORDS
A variety(76) of
Stereo #33 $75.00;
27 Children's records
in 33 and 78. They are
instrumental, teach-
ing, instructional,
music and more.
$40.00; Stereo 45
Records (29) Free.
(352) 628-6948




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE GAS DRYER
Front Load, with ped-
estal good cond.
white, $300.
(352) 419-5604
MICROWAVE
KENMORE 30" WIDE
MOUNTS ABOVE THE
STOVE WHITE $75
352-613-0529
Refrigerator
GE, bottom freezer, w/
icemaker, White $275
Dishwasher,GE Profile,
White $175. Both good
Cond. 352-2494451
SAMSUNG FRONT
LOAD dryer, used very
little, good cond.,
$200 (352) 726-6461
352-201-5113
Side by Side
LG, Refrigerator
Stainless,
$300 as is
(352) 422-4492
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398




Antique sewing
machine table, oak
parquet style top,
decorative/dinette,
etc. Exc. cond.
$150. (352) 419-8629




AIR COMPRESSOR
Champbell Hausfeld
26 gallon, oil less, air
compressor, 150 PSI
Vertical on wheels 1.7
HP 120 volts. $175.00
Call Mike @
352-637-6754
Big Bench
Wood Vice
$40.
(352) 382-1814
CRAFTSMAN SHOP
Vacuum 16 gallon.$30,
Floor Jack..$20.00
352 382-5521
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell 1/4"
Hose,gun,lance&bottle
$25.Dunnellon
465-8495
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell
Hausfeld hose gun
lance & bottle $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495


Pressure Washer.
extra long hose, $125
(352) 5274910
Sears Wood Lathe
Bench w/2 drawers on
Wheels, turning chisels
1/3 hpgrinder $150.
Delta 10" Bench Saw
$50. (352) 382-1814



SPEAKERS SHARP 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $40
352-613-0529
TV SYLVANIA 32"
WITH REMOTE $40
352-613-0529



SLIDING GLASS
DOORS 6 foot wide slid-
ing glass doors, excel-
lent condition $225
Homosassa area Tele-
phone 352 503 7114
STILTS FOR DOING
SHEETROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316



WANTED: 3 PHASE
GENERATOR, 20,000
KW, at least 60 amps
with or without motor
(352) 637-2560



Patio Glass top table
w/4 chairs, good
cond. $75. obo
(231) 775-4774

Furniture

2 Lazy Boys Recliners
Lg. Wine colored,
rocker $400.2nd
smallergreen $300.
like new (352)270-0269
4-PC. QUEENSIZE BED-
ROOM SET, with mirror
headboard & side
cabinets, mattress,
$800,4 pc. wall cabi-
nets, dark wood, $600.
(352) 637-6310 Iv.msg
42" sq. Blonde Wood
Table Setw/one leaf,
4 captains chairs &
Lighted China
Cabinet 44" wide,
very good cond. $225.
obo(248) 701-7353
American-Drew Solid
Wood Bedroom Set,
two dressers,
1 Ig. mirror, qn. sz bed
w/headboard, 1 night
stand, $725. obo
Leave Message
(352) 746-3597
COUCH Leather
good cond, $50;
Office Chair, leather
swivel rocker, good,
cond, maroon $25
(352) 228-4796
Dining Table
Glass top, 4 floral
upholstered caster
chairs. Orig $1800+
Very Comfortable Set
$600 OBO
(352) 527-2778


CHEST OF DRAWERS
Small white 4 drawers
Ideal for baby/child/teen
room NICE $25.00
352-621-0175
Dining. Room Set
6 chairs, table,
real wood. $75
6 Pc. Bed. Rm. Set, Ital-
ian, nice shape $150
(352) 423-3513
Flex Steel Couch and
Ottoman, Excel. Cond
$200.
Billiard Light for Pool
Table $50. No pets
(352) 726-6487
King Sealy Mattress
Set, w/frame & head-
board, exc. cond.
$250. 24" Sanyo TV.
$30. (352) 726-3730
or (352)422-0201
Leather Recliner
dark burgundy
exc. cond. $175.00
(352) 382-5057
Leather Sectional
Natuzzi tan leather
good cond. 3
loveseats, 51" long ea.
1 sofa 72" long. $900.
(352) 489-7674
LEATHER SOFA
caramel color with re-
dcliners on both sides,
$350. Call for details.
(352) 637-6310, Iv.msg
LIVING ROOM FURNI-
TURE 3-piece sectional
sofa, 2 Rocker Reclin-
ers, octagonal table and
end table. $300 OBO
305-394-1000
Oak 48" Round Table
2 leaves, 4 chairs,
2pc hutch/buffet,
$500. obo
(352) 249-7405
Oak Dining Room Set
Table, leaf, 6 chairs &
64" china cabinet
$400.
Call 352-564-0212
Oak Dining Table with
4 swivel chairs
Good cond. $50.
(352) 228-4796
Office Chair, dark
brown, perfect shape
$50.5 x7 Area Rug
earthtone, $30.
(352) 423-4423
Power Lift Recliner,
by Merlot, Maroon
New 2013, very nice
Paid $1000.
Asking $750. obo
(352) 344-5308
Queen Size Bed
like new wicker &
black rodiron, matt
box spring$300.
Dresser French Prov.
Oak 9 drawer $100
(352) 503-6313
Round Glass Top
Dining Table w/4
padded chairs, $195.
obo (231) 775-4774
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50. **
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
Trundle Bed
tubular black steel
frame, twin over
queen, built in ladders
safety rails, never used
\ $230. (352) 503-3446
WHITE DINING SET
Like new condition, 4
sturdy chairs & round
table. $100
(352) 795-0763
WICKER ARMOIRE
Like new condition, very
nice addition to any
room. $100
(352)795-0763


WICKER CHAIR
Antique, painted white,
back & seat cushions
& pillow. $100
352-422-1309
WICKER ROCKER
Antique, painted white,
back & seat cushions
& pillow. $100
352-422-1309



2 Rear Engine
Riding Mowers,
Snapper 33" cut
w/ Wisconsin Robin
Engine $400.
Honda 30" Cut 9HP
$350. (352) 507-1490
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Club Cadet 2000
Clean, Good Belt,
Blades, Trans Axle
Solid Motor $650.
Craftsman 42" Riding
Mower Clean &
Rebuilt Carb/Valves/
Rings $450. with out
Battery(352) 270-4087
CraftsmanRiding
Lawn Mower
42" cut, 20hp
$500. obo
(352) 382-4779
Grass Trimmer
Stihl, 50c, curved
shaft $75
(352) 795-4674
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Craftsman LTS 1500,
17/2 HP, 42" cut,
mulching kit & blade,
seldom used,
exc cond $600
352-726-6238
Self Propelled 21"
Lawnmower
Troy Built w/B&S
engine, E-Z start recoil.
rear bagger &
mulcher, complete
owners manual, like
new, pd $280. asking
$140. (352) 513-4536
TILLER
Red Ox
for small gardens
$150
(352) 527-4910
WANTED TO BUY
WOOD SPLITTER
GAS OR ELECTRIC
(352) 419-4733



AZALEAS 1 GAL POTS
3 for $12 Must sell!
Compare to $10 ea in
stores 613-5818
HIBISCUS 3 GAL
Beauties, 3 colors, 3
for $36 compare to 2
Gal for $20 @ stores
Inv. off Croft 613-5818
HUGE Annual
Plant Sale
Debe's Garden
Fr. Apr.11th -Sat.12th
9am-5pm
3903 S. Lecanto Hwy
across from CFCC
352-586-6590




American Trading
Post Has been Hired
to Liquidate
Crystal River
Thu. Fri. Sat.8a to 3p
BIG SALE I! furn,
hshld, apple, etc...
392 NW 14th Place


BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. & Sun. 8a-3p
LARGE 2 FAMILY
MOVING SALE
4233 N. Deckwood
Dr. Pine Ridge

Brentwood
Sat 8-2pm
1954 W Chelsea Ann
Way

CITRUS SPRING
Fri & Sat 8am-3pm
Furn, records, jewelry
tools, and Misc items
6493 N. Glacier Terr

CITRUS
SPRINGS
Fri & Sat 8a-3p
10316 NAdler Place


NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE

Fairview

Estates
Sat, April 12, 8a -1P
34 FAMILIES
appls., furniture, golf,
fishing, decor, fitness,
yard, tools, Househld.
AND MORE!
get map/list on
N. Annapolis Ave @
Fairview Entrance


DUNNELLON
Sat & Sun 9a-2p
Rockers, grill, tables,
chairs, lamps, 2 twin
beds, TV & More! Free
vynl solar panels.
5311 W. Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642

FLORAL CITY
Fri. &Sat. 8a-12p
TOOLS & MISC. ITEMS
4497 E. Hero Lane
(352) 726-9101

FLORAL CITY
Thurs. Fri. & Saturday
8:30-3p, Tools, Bike,
Golf clubs & MISC.
6926 S. Lloyd Terr.

HERNANDO
Fri, Sat 9a to 3p?
4 FAMILY SALE
6771 N Florida Ave.

HERNANDO
Moving Sale *
Fri & Sat 8a-3p
2064 N McGee Dr

Hernando
Sat & Sun 9 to 5
12'x 6.5' landscaping
trailer, tackle, power
& hand tools, gems
antiques, glass, HO
scale trains, jewelry,
collectibles, silver
& gold, Lake Park
off 200, 3842 Webb Pt


Hernando
Sat. 8-4, Sun. 9-3
man cave-pwr &hand
tools, fishing, golf, pool
stix & more! '2 Retail
Ladies Lia Sophia
3951 E. Lake Park Dr.

HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
STORAGE UNIT
ITEMS FOR SALE
Vintage wedding
gowns, band saw, tbl.
saw, turn.., antiques,
hummels, Much More!
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S. Tex Point.,
Across from How-
ards Flea Market
Follow Pink Signs

HOMOSASSA
Nature Coast
Community Church

April 11th & 12th
9am to 3pm
*Annual Plant &
Rummage Sale*
4980 S Suncoast Blvd
(US HWY 19)

HUGE Annual
Plant Sale
Debe's Garden
Fr. Apr.11th -Sat.12th
9am-5pm
3903 S. Lecanto Hwy
across from CFCC
352-586-6590


Automatic, Power Windows

S R IF


1 2008R Ruick ILucerne tX 1


E E rI I


I 35 MPG, Spoiler, Tilt Wheel
^f^~I I'^


I ./L 'tMI va8 engine, Learner


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2007 Lincoln Towncar


I 4.6 V8 Engine, 25 MPG I
I I



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.SJL engine, Automatic

0 VAU 141


4.01 Engine, Automatic

.k II


Automatic, rower windows

I *^-


I PW/PL, Remote Start/Entry


12.4L Ecotech Engine, Automatic, PW


0HV I


I T rre-ownea prices are plus tax, tag, tite ana n ),9.3u dealer Tee.


HERMAN,
4-12 Laughingstock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCick for UFS, 2014

"Is that the only way you can have
a good time ... smashing up
|public property?"
Adiin Garages Kichens -"Bath


Keyless Entry, unatar

B I 'l


2010 Honda CR-V EX-L


28 MPG, PW/PL, XM Radio

u :1 I :


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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LoveHonda.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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!014 Chevys!
NOT A PENNY MORE!

ME ONLY!


rADO DOUBLE
D UFCAB 1WT
19 MSRP $32,240
......... GMSuppUlerDiscount
......... ...... Rebate
______PBC
._..... Cash orTrade Equity
.... ...-...-USAA


)14 Chew

*MSRP $16,840
_Dea Damr unt
^ ___ USdAA
-Cash or Trade Equity


New 2014 Chew
CRUZELS
STK#C14047 MSRP $19,255
9S...500- ...Dealer Dlscount
$100 . . . .ebate
s7500 ..Ch USAA
6*2,W -___ Cash or Trade Equity


New 2014 Chew
MALIBU LS
STK#C14254 MSRP $23,735
's550 Dealer Dscount
52.,M -_Rebate
'750 -USAA
s2,500. Cash or Trade Equity


v-$- 143505 -uf17.685


New 2014 Chewv
IMPALALS
STK#C14207 MSRP $28,520
'750 Dealer Dowswcount
500 -.... .Rebate
' "750 ... ... ... ... USAA
z500 _____ CashorTrade Equ
s_::$23,020


w 2014 Chevy
MARO 1LS
K#C14195 MSRP $25,495
----DealerDiscut
-----Rebate
PIr"
...... Cash oTrae Equity
S19t"Cfivw~


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX US
STK#C14146 o MSRP $25,330
^80 -----eler DiXcount
.000 .................Rebate
750- ....USMAA
200 Cash orTmradeEquity


New 2014 Chew
TRAVERSE IT
STK #C14112 MSRP $35,395
s2,500 --- Dealer Discwut
$1,500_______ebarte
$750 USAA
$2.W0 Cash or Trade Equity


mS20280 ,.$us29,645


New 2014 Chew
TAHOELS
STK#CT14041 MSRP $45,115
s33064A --GM SuppliOer Discount
$1,150 ..Rebate
$750 __ hr USAA
s2-00 CashorTradeEqulty
v-pt$37,30060


OVER 9
Used & Certified
Pre-Loved Vehicles


All Pre-Loved Certified


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTYT


2YEARS"m
24,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealer for complete details.


W Vehicles!


12 CHEVYMAUBULT
123$86 SPED J1TOALSTARPKG
.S4"99


Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


07 HUIEVTUPANUIDERL
12444 LEATHER. 7 PASSENGER
$"995


09 TYOA.9ENZA
124 4 LEATHER, AUPC"MER
:521,99


BU~IIU1UNTUKT
12371 CUSTOM
S6A95


03 KIA RKIO
12441 LOW MILES
Sk9K


59.9r93 $%9"


13 CHEVYSPARKLT 02GMCSERRACREWCAB
1242 MY LCOLRTOUCH RAIOOONST, 12415 DIESEL DAUiLLY



11T AHI1GHLANDiERSE 11CHEVYSILVERADO LT
12374LEAITHR 12437CREWCAB
$22.9 s"910


04 CHEVYSILVERADO O FORD E2 ECONOUNE
12440 REG CABV6 12438 CARGO-PASSENGER
S6.995 S7.95


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MOREMO
HOOSE
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SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014 C13


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2077 HIGHWAY 44 W. 14358 CORTEZ BLVD. 1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
INVERNESS, FL BROOKSVILLE, FL HOMOSASSA, FL
*Prices include all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. ^Lease payments are 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $2999 due at signing
and all rebates and incentive, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. 'Lease payments are 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes all rebates and incentive, not
everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. +30 MPG with 2.4L engine with 6-speed automatic transmission. Actual mileage may vary AAOn select makes and models. With approved credit. All
financing must be done through Chyrsler Financial to qualify. Offers can not be combined. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.


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WUJUAIIU U ABY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Roast pig meat con game (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Blue-green-hued calf meat (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Cattle meat rustler (1) syllables in each word.

I I1IIII12014UFS,Dist by UnivUclickforUFS
4. White pig meat dining utensil (1)


5. Sheep meat eater who can't get enough (2)


6. Lower-in-fat frankfurter (2)


7. Deer meat 4 la Victorian poet Alfred (3)


NOSANNSI NOSIN3A LHANIM HHaNVrI '9 NOL11 NOlINf T
t1Od otd *T da filMU *Te'lA TVXA Tt'I *VOS NVH I
4-12-14 SHHASTV


Homosassa
Sat, Sun 8a to 2p
furn, & much morel
6772 W Seer Ct.

INVERNESS
297 Stotler. BIG
WAREHOUSE SALE
9 am Fri & Sat,
April 11 and 12.

'W a u iout
aL -
DA ,,> V *4& 3i

INVERNESS
620 E Inverness Blvd
Fri & Sat 8-2, furniture,
tools, misc
INVERNESS
Moving Sale
Fri & Sat 8am -?
812 Hemlock St
INVERNESS
SAT ONLY 8a to 2p
Ridgewood Pt.
Foxwood Subdivision







INVERNESS
Sat Only April 12th
10Oam to 5pm
ENTIRE HOUSEHOLD!
506 Turner Camp Rd.
M/C & Visa accepted
INVERNESS
Sat. & Sun. 7am-until
6600 E. Haden Lane
INVERNESS
Saturday 12th,
9am-3pm
768 S.Rooks Ave.

INVERNESS
Saturday 8-1
Tools, Kitchen,
Clothes, general stuff
1105 N Mediterranean
Way

INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri. &Sat. 8-3p
Kayaks, bath tub
lift chair, books, lift
chair, walkers, ETC.
2359 Bubb Way

INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri. & Sat.
quality fishing items,
Procraft/55HP
Yamaha + extras,
'95 GMC/Stake body,
Jaguar, shopsmith &
access., misc. of all
sorts, collectibles.
Hwy 44 E. I Mi. to
Tranquil, right I bik.


INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help
feed veterans
LECANTO
2 Family Sale *
Fri 9-3, Sat 9-1
5606 & 5592 West
Dayflower Path
LECANTO
Fri. & Saturday 8 to 5
hshld, pwr. tools, fishing
utility trlr., MUCH MORE
1739 Squirrel Tree Av
PINE RIDGE
2 FAMILY SALE
Saturday 8am-5pm
Furn, luggage, dishes
lighting, misc hsehold,
exercise eq., collectibles
2471 W. Mustang Blvd
Pine Ridge
Fri, Sat & Sun 8a to 3p
lots of housewares
bookcases, file
cabinets, brand new
Craftsman Roto-tiller
porcelain doll
and misc. items
5325 N Red Ribbon Pt
NO EARLY BIRDS!
PINE RIDGE
Sat Only 8a to noon
Rooms of furniture,
2 desks, small app-
liances, collectibles
2778 W. Beamwood
Dr. view pictures @
www.plnerldaesale.
shutterflv.com/
PINE RIDGE
Saturday Only 8a-12p
* MULTI FAMILY SALE*
3835 & 3858
W. Douglas Fir Cr.




INVERNESS
Sat &Sun 9a-5p
Quality Furniture and
complete household
8635 E Sandpiper Dr



MENS KAHKI PANTS 2
SIZE 36X30 & 1 SIZE
36X29 $20
352-613-0529
MENS SPORTS JACK-
ETS 3 SIZE 40 BLACK,
GREY & BLUE $10
EACH 352-613-0529


Clothing
SKECHERS TENNIS
shape-ups, 6.5 blue
new 20. 352 476-8056
WOMAN BOOTS black
leather #7 3" heel new
$20. (352)476-8056



3 WHEEL BIKE
$100.
FOLD-UP WALKER
w/seat & hand brakes
$100.
(352) 436-3302
10 Gal Fish Tank w/Lid,
light, water filter, air
pump/tubing/stone,
rocks, some decor.
$40.00 563-1241
1HP above ground
pump & bladder tank,
$150
352-726-7485
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
China
86 piece Crown &
Ming Set $150
Unifloor quick style,
2 boxed $50
(352) 795-7254
Computer Desk,
Corner style
$175.
Noritake China
$75.
(352) 423-3513
DOG KENNEL Petmate
Vari-kennel Ultra Fash
XLg New Never Used!
$75.00 352-445-2402
Dryer Front load Whirl-
pool $75; Free Stand-
ing, heavy magnetic
6' by 20" advertising
stand with slots. (New
$500) want $75. 352-
503-6313 Homosassa
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$30 352-613-0529
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY
$75 (352)464-0316
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sleeper Mattress and
Box Spring. $200
(352) 382-0484
LAWN MOWER &
EDGER Huskee 21"
push mower -$50.
McLane lawn edger -
$40.716-860-6715
MOTORCYCLE FLOOR
JACK CRAFTSMAN
EUC...$75.00
352-249-7212
MOTORCYCLE FLOOR
JACK CRAFTSMAN
EUC...$75.00
352-249-7212
MOTOROLA WX416
Cel Iphone NEW
w/CASE, Consumer
Cellular/unlock or 911
$28 352-382-3650
One- Kohler 3 Bay
Enamel Sink Facets
included great cond
$100. Two- 3 x 6.8
alum. Patio Doors $50.
(352) 533-2223
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $6 EACH
352-613-0529
POTATO
CURLY CUTTER
$30.
(352) 436-3302
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
VACUUM CLEANER
ORECK. Just 1 yr old.
asking $50.00;
Corner Bookcase
12x12x72, Asking $20
(352) 628-2844
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $60
352-613-0529




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Blue $395, 1 Wine
$295. Both Exc.Cond.
352-270-8475
4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 (352)464-0316
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100.464-0316
WHEEL CHAIR
Rover manual wheel
chair -$50.00
phone 382 5883



CASIO PIANO
Keyboard WK-6500 with
stand. $175.00 Phone:
352-564-1668
Karaoke
Music Machine
$125. obo
(352) 533-2223
Piano
Console,
Kohler Cambell
Very Nice Shape $150.
(352) 423-3513


Household

New Custom Double
Honeycomb blinds, for
triple kitch. window in
the Windward Model
Villa(Terra Vista) 110 x
70, 4 mo oldpd $970,
ask $200;352-746-2656


Eeeal


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369





L ko


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci @ 352-212-8936


CLASSIFIED




ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
Recumbant Bike
like new
$150.
(352) 563-0338



2 Black Diamond
Golf Gift Certificates
Valued at $350. will
sell for $250. obo
(352) 795-2947
12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
BICYCLE
3sp, 26 in
Sun Country Huffy $65
DJ 352-621-1221
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Four GM 16"
steel wheels
$60.00
(352) 465-7506
GOLF WEDGES 52*
Gap Oversize GX2 &
60* Dunlop Lob
$15.each, $25. pair
Dunnellon 465-8495
Ladies Bicycle
Pacific Regency,
26 inch, 15 speed, $75
(352) 795-4674
Two Compound
Hunting Bows
$150.
(352) 533-2223


Sell r Swa


AKC Male Husky
Black/White
In tact, UTD on Shots
3 yr. old, $400. obo
(352) 246-3000
MALTI-POO PUPPIES
Addorable, non shed,
9 wks., Health cert.
Crystal River $350.
(352) 795-5204
PUPPIES
Miniature Short Hair
Daschunds
2 male 1 female CKC
papers, register ,HC


RDU MINIAI UEL UU-
DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352-419-8233
Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827
Sweet Little Puppies
Chihuahua & Mini
Daschshund &
Chiweenies, ready
soon, ckc reg.
w/health certs.
& puppy kits
Janet (352) 628-7852




HORSE TRAILER Silver
Star Slant 4 with self
contained living quar-
ters. sleeps 4. Call after
6Pm 352-726-7117




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

L.


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

FLORAL CITY
1/1,sml house
$500/mo. studio apt.
$400/mo. utilities incl.
(352) 422-3670
HERNANDO
1/1 &2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1st last +dep
352-201-2428




Built after 2004
Hurricane Codes!
2006 Entertainer.
MUST SEE -GREAT
SHAPE $46,907
delivered to youl
1-877-578-5729

MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on 'V AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183


Cabin 12X32'
w/front prch & tin roof.
Full bath/kitchen. Bd/Liv.
w/10X12 unfnshd add.
You move. $7000 obo.
(352)746-9211
Great Shape *
Singlewide 2Br/1Ba
Delivered to you!
$15k 727-967-4230
Palm Harbor Parade
of Homes!!
7 new models to view,
3 models that MUST,
must be liquidated.
Save over $26k, 4/2 in
the 70's. FREE factory
tours! plantcitv.
palmharbor.com or
800-622-2832
Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




-FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
$5,000 down
with $425 monthly
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369




Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on 1/2 acre." Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile.
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974
Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing
INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352) 201-7081
INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home/ 248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


*THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




2br/2ba, 55+ in Thun-
derbird Park, Lot 45
carport, furn'd, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441
HANDICAP ACCESS
with Vertical Lift,
Stonebrook, 2/2 MH
1,400 sf., $25,000.,
Must See to Believel
352-628-5311


For Sale B9,
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858
Singing Forrest 55+
Park, SW 2/1,LRoom
addition, new flooring &
Furnc/AC. Lanai, shed.
Lot rent $183/mo
$23,000; 352-860-1463
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090




24x36 Garage/Man
Cave, Cit.Spgs., $300
month 352-489-3750


7AMTION i
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
$900 & UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/unique home/ Avail. May 1
5339 S Elm Ave.
2/1 cute and cozy Avail. May 1
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959sqft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 story townhome, canal side

S650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/1.5 in B.H. 992 Sqft
1063 N Commerce Ter.
2/1 Apt in Lecanto, centrally located
1071 N Commerce Ter
2/1 Apt.in Lecanto, centrally located
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/addition on 1.25 aoe
For More Listings GoTo
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.rom




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
N of Inglis-6 miles.
800 SF w/ HD Direct
TV, W/D. Hang your
clothes, get groceries,
Move-in ready. 12 min
to Power Plant & Hosp.
Tom 352-586-9598




FLORAL OAKS
APARTMENTS
NOW RENTING *
352-860-0829
62+ Elderly/Disabled
With or Without
Children.
Central AC Heat
Water & Sewer
Included
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Managemnt
1 & 2 BD. APTS
8092 S. Floral Oaks
CIR., Floral City,
F 34436, TDD #771



OPPORTUNTY^" ^
EOE/Provider

Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813

HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225

a P=iTT
v-sI

At SM WOODS
3/2/2, Ht. Pool, FP,
Maint. Free, Sm. Pet
$1,000 mo, 422-1933

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 + Loft on Canal
$1,250. (352)795-0125
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210






INVERNESS
clean, cute 2/1/1,
family friendly area
w/d hk-up,. avail. 5/1
$695mo. f/I & $500.
sec. (352) 789-4682
PINE RIDGE
3/2, $1000. F/L/S
5310 Yuma Lane
(352) 302-6025
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk. call Bruce
**352-445-9136"*






tlt ll ,' 1ilI Il St.
L i, i) Lhl)


CimpNICLE


DEB
THOMPSON

One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.

Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebi(vahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com


D..w..... y41o


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793




SHADYVIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






YiOI% oirld first


Need a jil)

iir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHitpNiCE


JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873




A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Elecuical

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **k
FENCE PRO, all types
repairs, gates, free
est. veteran owned
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. *100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
PRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. *100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
or Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352) 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
* QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672


ETMII .iMI.
**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Et. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



S ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570

Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



.Budd Excavatina**
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442









TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lie. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Arbor Reds Tree Care
24 Hr. Emergeny Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
All Major Credit Cards
352-583-3141/206-1153


Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


SATURDAY,APRIL 12,2014 C15


Mobile Hom
In PaFk :1


Business
Location I




C16 SATURDAY,APRIL 12,2014


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITUNTY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WVWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



BEVERLY HILLS. SUN
12-3. 104 S FILLMORE.
2 bed, 2 FULL baths, 1
gar. 1558 sf heat/ac.
NEW: Kit, baths, appli-
ances, carpet, lights,
more. $62k. 527-1239





Yo %orid first

Need a jil)
iir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHQi--E


ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514



Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2 /2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext.,Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202
Pine Ridge, 3 bedroom.
3 bath. with salt water
pool, a 20x45 workshop
and carport with 15 ft
enclosed full solar
compliment, solar elec-
tric, pool pump, pool
heater, hot water and
solar assisted air condi-
tioning 352-746-9435




BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525 sf heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$62,000. 527-1239
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM





YOU'LL w THIS!
6385 W Cannondale
Drive. Reduced Price
$84,900.2 bedroom. 2
bath. Cozy
1000SF(approx.)home,2
car attached garage, Irg
screened lanai,newly
updated. (352)794-6686




RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




Cinnamon Ridge
2/2/1 Rock Crusher
Sch district. New Appl,
Remodeled bath,
tile/wood floors, W/D,
ready to move in.
$65K 352-494-7203


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY II!





ForMSaleI A
TURN KEY
4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE, 1,200 sqf
Turn key, Good location
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


SECLUDED 3BR/2BA,
1653 sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
3/4 acre buildable lot.
$79,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289

S=Wu^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.




"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscriffers.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now Is the time
to get listed.

Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880-Office












BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward/"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell
netscaDe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




M-


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone ptamoabav.rr.
corn
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattff
centurv21 .com

Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855




Your World

puw "Fl49ea44


CHipNiCLE


CLASSIFIED















Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.corn

"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"

ERA
American Realty
& Investments





2/2 Citrus Hills. Master
w/lg walk-in closet. Lg
utility rm/pantry. Scrn
porch. Walk to pool!
Tile floors, very clean,
lots of natural light!
$58,000. 586-260-2848




Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507




Country Home + 80
Acres Land, Near
App. St. Univ., Ideal
for Summer Home
In Cool. NC Mtns.
828-297-2669, details





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$140,000. 2/2, Garage
TV Rm, Irg. covered
dock, canal to the
gulf, great fishing,
pics avail, by inter
(352) 382-0893 or
Cell 352-220-2868


Fisherman's Paradise
in Inverness East Cove.
Furnished 2/2 plus
dock & seawall.
Deep water. $61,900
(352) 344-0101
Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921
Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
ProDertiescom
"To view
my properties"




U, ftK


** *** ***
GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $45,000. Call
Ray 352-322-6304
** ** ** ***



14FT Sears
Gamefisher alum.
boat, Shoreland'r
trailer, 8HP Mariner
motor, $800
(352) 601-0180


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barren
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-61-0n173


** BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510**
BayLiner 1990
27 ft Cabin Cruiser
Exc cond. Just replaced
engine & more. Will
e-mail pics. Reduced!
$6900 352-795-1863
Custom Made 18ft
Center console 2006
Mercury Optimax 115hp
jack plate, hyd steering.
Too many extras to list!
$8,000 323-819-5161
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792



















GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Beoats






**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



HONDA
dep~aril'tment,' worksj














U 11,CRY, Equipped
with Blue Ox
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &




FiTowshing Packagets
details (352)52 746-055524




TOW DOLLY
lights, electric brakes
& new strap.
boatsuexelr cond. $750.com
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
TOW DOLLY
lights, electric brakes
& new strap,
excel,. cond. $750.
(352) 382-1627
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



Air Conditioner
Coleman 3 ton
straight cool Mobile
Home unitw/ 10Okw
electric heater $600
315-729-2634
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500 352-201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Real Lite 1987
Travel Trailer, gas
stove, oven, AC, micro,
full Bath, twin bed, fold
out couch $2500
352-746-9435
SUNDANCE
2010 5th wheel, 28FT
w/large slider, 6'x4'
deck, asking $14,500
(352) 637-6679
Terry 5th Wheel
93, remodeled, 28',
w/slide, clean title
$3800. obo
(352) 697-0361






Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


-j-
Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
w" ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





Buy Here/Pay Here

'05 Chevy Cavalier
$895 Down
'01 Dodge
Dakota R/T
$995 Down
'00 Mitsubishi Galant
$650 Down

'03 Ford Focus
$3595 CASH
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CADILLAC
97 Deville Conc. 4drs
Runs great, good tires,
Northstar system.
$3,000 802-745-8718
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
HONDA
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
Details (352) 746-0524
JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
34, VI0, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995
CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19&US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MERCEDES BENZ
1980, 4505L, 50k mi.
$8,000. obo
(352) 795-0125
MUSTANG
Conyv,2000,6 CYL, 5 sp.
man, repainted 2013
+ graphics, very clean
71K mi, 352-746-7215
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440









I11111Ii

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
1111111I


Collection of classic
cars in Spring Hill. Make
offer 727- 422- 4433




CHEVROLET
2000 Silverado 1500
Extended Cab. 144000
mishortbed w/topper
V8, 4.8 Liter. LS pkg.
A/C.Automatic, 2WD.
AM/FM/CD. Bed liner.
Towing pkg. Red. You
won't regret buying it.
$5,800 Call 527-6709

CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018

TOYOTA
'91, 4 x4FR5, 22RE/
5Spd. Ext. Cab, rebuilt
mtr., pilgrim canopy
$4,800 obo, 341-0818




FORD
2007 Eddie Bauer
Explorerleather,87k
miles, Black on beige
$13,800 352-794-3930

GMC
2005 Envoy XL, Bose
with XM, Power Sun-
roof, Towing package,
171K miles, $5500
352-302-0173

TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306

FORD
2000 Windstar
good cond, runs well
$2200. obo
352-601-5110




Harley Davidson
2001, Fat Boy
Garage kept,
23,659 miles, $9,700
352-601-7911

Harley Davidson
2010 Ultra Classic
loaded, garaged,
xtras, 13,900 mi.
$19500.(352) 419-4053

Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055

IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1 200 C. Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568


I PACKAGE DEAL! $15,500
Boat Motor and Trailer
1660 Brute
iIh ,I . .. I. . I IIh I I . .Ih
ii I .. i i .. . . II ,


AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR
1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768
aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@gmail.com


2001 HONDA250 EX 1996 FOURWINDS
2 Owner with title. Excellent shape. 4.3 V6 Power, Bow Rider

12,OOO 5,000


EVERYTHING MOTORS 352-503-9969 EVERYTHING MOTORS 352-503-9969
7051 W. GROVER CLEVELAND BLVD., HOMOSASSA OOOHY5V 7051 W. GROVER CLEVELAND BLVD., HOMOSASSA OOOH C


WE SELL E~w FAS-111




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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