Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Full Text

2014 county Medical & Wellness Directory /Inside
--- LJ I 1 I .] : .. -... . .


~_www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 242


Author Berger
dead at 96
The Nature Coast has
lost a voice.
Betty Berger, author,
colum-
nist, .
histo-
rian
and
artist, N AL
died
Sunday
at
home in Betty
Inglis, Berger
accord- died at age 96.
ing to
granddaughter Layla
LaLiberte.
Berger, 96, was the au-
thor of "Back Roads," a
collection of columns pre-
viously published in the
Crystal River Current,
and "Heaven to Earth."
She was also a friend to
Dessie Smith Prescott,
an inductee into Florida's
Women's Hall of Fame
and a pioneer of Florida's
wilder past.
She is survived by a
son, Darrel Berger; his
wife Carla; and three
grandchildren, Ruben,
Lance and Layla.
The Chronicle will have
more on Berger's death
in a forthcoming edition. If
you would like to learn
more about her, see our
archives at chronicle
online.com.


-From staff reports


Photo courtesy of Ginger Washburn's Facebook page


but not a mom


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ginger and Robert Washburn sit with their daughter Raelei, left, and Kathy Grantham sits with her daughters Kyla and Marl. Grantham
and the Washburns separately adopted the girls, who are siblings, when their birth mother lost her parental rights. The woman's newborn
son, above left, lives with his mother, though Grantham and Mrs. Washburn believe state authorities should place him in protective care.

Citrus women who adopted daughters worry about their brother's fate


Best buds
Give spring flowers a
snazzy home in new
vases. /HomeFront
IN THEIR WORDS:


Young Marine
Vietnam veteran Richard
Hunt never wanted to be
a hero./Page A16
BUSINESS:








Bid for beer
Milwaukee group wants
to buy Pabst Brewing
Company and bring it
home./Page Dl


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A 14
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A20
Veterans ........ A16


6 184178 i 20071 I o


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The birth mother was
still a teenager when
her first child, a girl,
came into this world.
At age 20, she had her sec-
ond, another girl.
Two years later, she gave
birth to a third girl.
Another girl was born two
years later
Big happy family? Not at all:
The oldest girl's father has
court-ordered custody


They need to place the baby
someplace else and let her prove she's
a fit mother. The baby doesn't deserve
to be an experiment.
Ginger Washburn
adoptive mother.


An Inverness woman, Kathy
Grantham, adopted the sec-
ond and third daughters -
Kyla and Mari after the


birth mother lost her parental
rights. The state stepped in
after the birth mother left the
children with a friend but


Lieutenant governor honored' to work with Scott


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO -As a state repre-
sentative from Miami, Carlos
Lopez-Cantera supported Re-
publican Charlie Crist's cam-
paign for governor in 2006.
Not anymore.
Crist, now a Democrat, is on
the ballot trying to unseat Gov
Rick Scott
And Lt. Gov Lopez-Cantera is
doing his best to make sure that
doesn't happen.
Lopez-Cantera brought the
pro-Scott, anti-Crist message
Friday night to about 250 Re-
publicans attending the annual


Citrus County Lincoln Heritage
Dinner at the College of Central
Florida.
Lopez-Cantera said Scott has
fulfilled election promises: Un-
employment is down, new jobs
are up, education funding is in-
creased and, just last week, Scott
signed a bill to roll back vehicle
tag fees to 2009 levels.


Page A8


Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera
speaks Friday evening at the
annual Citrus County Lincoln
Heritage Dinner at the College
of Central Florida in Lecanto.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


Inverness plans to honor Vietnam vets


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS For nearly 50
years, Vietnam War veterans
have been waiting to hear one
short, simple sentence from their
country: "Thank you for serving."
That's the message retired Air
Force Chief Master Sgt. John
Stewart delivered to the mem-
bers of Inverness City Council at
their recent meeting.
Stewart, himself a disabled
Vietnam War vet, serves as vice
chairman of the county's vet-
eran's advisory board and is also


* WHAT: Vietnam War
veterans' parade hosted by
Operation Welcome Home.
WHEN: Saturday, May 2,
2015.
WHERE: Inverness.
ONLINE: operationwelcome
homeveterans.org

with Operation Welcome Home.
He talked about how poorly
returning war veterans were
treated, the 75,000 who were se-
verely wounded, the 1 million
with lifetime post-traumatic
stress disorder, the high number


of homelessness and suicides
and the chronic, often terminal
illnesses they suffer
"We are sick, we are dying and
we are asking the city of Inver-
ness to help a long-overdue
process for Vietnam veterans in
our area, a long-overdue 'Thank
you for serving,"' he said. "But
despite the poor reception we
received upon our return, we re-
main proud to have served our
country ... we were simply
sailors, soldiers, airmen and
Marines following America's
orders to defend freedom."
See Page A8


never returned, according to
records and interviews.
A Lecanto couple, Ginger
and Steve Washburn, adopted
the fourth daughter Raelei
- who was born while her
mother was in jail for domes-
tic violence.
Now Grantham and Mrs.
Washburn fear for a fifth child
born Feb. 19 to the same
woman, this time a boy, who
lives with his mother
The Citrus moms believe a
See Page A8





China



ship



hears



'signal'

Associated Press
PERTH, Australia -A Chinese
ship involved in the hunt for the
missing Malaysian jetliner re-
ported hearing a "pulse signal"
Saturday in southern Indian
Ocean waters with the same fre-
quency emitted by the plane's
data recorders, as Malaysia
vowed not to give up the search
for the aircraft.
The Australian government
agency coordinating the search
for the missing plane said early
Sunday that the electronic pulse
signals reportedly detected by
the Chinese ship are consistent
with those of an aircraft black
box. But retired Air Chief Mar-
shal Angus Houston, the head of
the search coordination agency,
said they "cannot verify any
See Page All


HOMEFRONT:


I IN S I DE 1 II




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inaugural home show draws



hundreds to auditorium


Anna Mosle

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Hundreds of smiling
faces and curious minds
Saturday marked the suc-
cess of the inaugural
Home and Outdoor Living
Show at the Citrus County
Auditorium in Inverness.
Home and outdoor en-
thusiasts ventured out for
ideas about how to get
their home looking fresh,
with more than 50 vendors
covering everything from
recreation, to windows
and nursery
The Citrus County
Chronicle-sponsored
event brought together
community and business
partners such as the
Citrus County Extension
officials, Lowe's, the
Community Emergency
Response Team
(CERT), Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church and
many more.
The show featured an
"ugliest backyard" contest,
with the winner's yard get-
ting a $10,000 makeover.
Entries were posted at
chronicleonline.com, and
readers cast their votes for
the yard.
With 1,424 votes, Anna
Mosley of Hernando won a
makeover from Jason
Aquillar's Landscaping
Services.
Titled "Backyard not
suitable for my children,"
Mosley described her
backyard as "Broken
swingset and no grass.
There is nowhere to put
their bikes and toys. The
dogs need a good backyard
as well. I am hoping and
praying to win this for the
kids to have an awesome
new backyard. I know my
seven kids would be so
excited."
In the comment section
of the entry, Mosley wrote


the winner of $10,000 backyard makeover


MICHAEL PATE/Chronicle
Esteban Pinero of Beverly Hills helps daughter Sofia, 4, with a birdhouse while daughter
Eunice, 5, assembles her own project Saturday during the inaugural Home and Outdoor
Living Show at the Citrus County Auditorium in Inverness. Pinero's son Joel, 12, looks
on with Pinero's sister, Leyda Rivera of Inverness. The family was interested in mosaic tile.


State BRIEFS


Teen falls through
ceiling at nightclub
ORLANDO -Authorities
said about 800 patrons were
cleared from a nightclub after
a teen crawling on a drop
ceiling fell through the tiles.
Orlando police said 19-
year-old Justin Ponce was
found on a set of stairs at the
Roxy nightclub early Friday
morning, bleeding from his
head with what appeared to
be a broken leg.
The club was cleared be-
fore firefighters could deter-
mine the damage was only
to the drop ceiling.
Wrong-way driver
causes fatal crash
TAMPA-An elderly man
driving southbound in a north-
bound highway lane crashed
into another car, killing him-
self and the other driver in
Hamilton County. The acci-
dent just before midnight Fri-
day created a five car pileup
involving a Greyhound bus.
Some 13 passengers were
treated for minor injuries.
Florida Highway Patrol of-
ficials say 91-year-old Ernest
Lee Holmes of High Springs,
Fla., was driving a 1993 Buick
Century when he crashed
into 55-year-old Peter J. Linek,
of Ormond Beach. Linek was
driving his Ford Explorer
northbound in the correct di-
rection. Both men died.
Two other vehicles were
snared in the wreck besides
the bus.


Doctor gets six years
in pill mill case
WEST PALM BEACH -A
federal judge in West Palm
Beach sentenced a doctor to
more than six years in prison
on money laundering charges
related to her prescription of
millions of oxycodone pills
and other narcotics.
Also sentenced in the case
Friday, a fellow doctor who
received 18 months behind
bars on similar charges.
Both physicians were part of
a broad 2010 investigation
into so-called "pill mills."
Prosecutors said the cash-
only clinics where doctors
Cynthia Cadet, 43, and
Joseph Castronuovo, 74,
worked were part of one of
the nation's biggest illicit pre-
scription drug operations. The
two doctors worked in West
Palm Beach and Broward
county clinics overseen by
Chris and Jeff George of
Wellington. Both are serving
lengthy prison sentences.
Prosecutors said their clinics
raked in about $40 million
over two years.
Attorneys for both doctors
said they planned to appeal
Friday's ruling. Prosecutors
say Cadet earned $1.5 mil-
lion writing prescriptions for
2.5 million oxycodone pills
over 15 months. Castron-
uovo, who at the clinics for
less than a year, prescribed
more than 750,000 and
made $160,000.
-From wire reports


Special to the Chronicle
Anna Mosley's backyard received 1,424 votes in the chronicleonline.com "Ugliest
Backyard" contest, netting her $10,000 makeover by Jason Quillar's Landscaping Services.


to another contestant,
"This message is for Hay-
den. Even though I don't
know you, you came by
and gave your support
(vote). It means the ab-
solute world to me as you
are in the contest as well.


God bless you sweetheart
for doing that."
Mosley will be meeting
with the company to asses
her yard and begin plan-
ning what the renovations.
In addition to the ven-
dors and home makeover,


food and beverages were
available at the show, and
more than 40 door prizes
valued at $50 each were
given away The first 100
attendees received a
goody bag filled with free
items and coupons.


5612W.GulftoLakeHwy.,CrystalRivergo
OOHVAQ HU' 352-564-300 BHH 1


Patient-Centered ORTHOPAEDIC Care

"Explained My Surgery"


/ OakHil

C^ Hospital

30 Years New
1984 2014


Oak Hill's Orthopaedic & Spine Institute is committed to patient-
centered orthopaedic care that respects your preferences, values
and needs. From digital x-rays to rehabilitation, we're here to walk
you through the details. We're here to answer your questions.
We're here to listen-and to provide options for your care. We're
here for you-with some of the area's most respected orthopaedic
surgeons.


Orthopaedic&Spine"

Institu-te

Oak Hill Hospital


352.596.6632 OakHillHospital.com 352.628.6441
(Hemando) (Citrus)


A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


LOCAL/STATE





Page A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 6,2014



TATE & LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Campaign
TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, can-
didate appearances and the
like for this year's political
campaign. Send informa-
tion to mwright@chronicle
online.com.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission District
2, will greet the public from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 9, at Booth C-78,
Stokes Flea Market on
State Road 44, Crystal
River. Information: 352-257-
5381.
Les Cook, Republican
for property appraiser, will
greet the public from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday, April 24, at
Natalia's Pizza and Pasta
on State Road 44 in Crystal
River, across from Tire
Kingdom; and from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday, May 15, at
the Deco Cafe in downtown
Inverness.
The Citrus County
Chronicle will have its pri-
mary forum at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in Inver-
ness. The Chronicle's gen-
eral election forum is at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at
the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast
Republican Club will have
a forum for county
commission candidates at
6 p.m. Thursday, June 12,
at the College of Central
Florida.
The Citrus Hills Civic
Association will have a can-
didates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club.

Around the
COUNTY
Central Democrats
to meet April 12
The Central Citrus Dem-
ocratic Club will meet at 11
a.m. Saturday, April 12, at
the Central Ridge Library,
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills, at the corner
of Forest Ridge Boulevard.
There will be an open
discussion of current issues
of importance to the com-
munity will be encouraged.
For questions, email
ragnvald.read@gmail.com.
Paint, hazardous
waste to be taken
Citrus County Central
Landfill will have a house-
hold hazardous waste and
paint drop-off from 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m. Saturday,
April 12, in addition to
its regular Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday
drop-off days.
Participants may bring up
to 60 pounds or 10 gallons
of materials free of charge.
Hazardous waste over the
60-pound limit will be
charged at 35 cents per
pound.
Additional program infor-
mation is posted at www.
bocc.citrus.fl .us/pubworks/
swm. Questions may be
emailed to hazwasteinfo
@bocc.citrus.fl.us, or call
Solid Waste Management
at 352-527-7670.
Photos of graduates
sought for publication
The Chronicle wants
to include graduating
home-schooled seniors
from Citrus County in the
upcoming graduation tab
for 2014. Also welcome are
graduating seniors from
out-of-county schools who
reside in Citrus County.
Send the graduate's name
and a photo to the
Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429,
or email cconnolly@
chronicleonline.com no


later than Friday, April 25,
with the photo as an
attachment. Information
and photos can also be
dropped off at the
Meadowcrest office in
Crystal River.
-From staff reports


GOOD


PO N -"-"-S

- ** -if^ f -' A'"*'^ "^^' ::t "'t*^"l^
-TEP N ., --S--' -Ch --- .
v-~ m"inkr .1. iL J,,_ ,

STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


Anti-drug forum offers Meeting to take in

nizza. prizes and more Special to the Chronicle


1~~~~ ~


Special to the Chronicle
As partof Children's Month,
on Thursday, April 10, the
Anti-Drug Coalition of Cit-
rus County (ADC) is host-
ing an informative and fun
evening about myths re-
lated to drugs. There will be
door prizes and giveaways,
along with free pizza.
Did you know that in Cit-
rus County, middle and high
school students drink at a
rate that is higher than the
state average? The good
news is that teens in both
middle and high school
are binge drinking far less


than they were in 2012.
Did you know that the
age a child takes their first
drink can be a predictor of
becoming an alcoholic
later in life?
To find out more, attend
the Myth Busters Town Hall
meeting. The event, at the
Renaissance Center, 3620
Educational Path, Lecanto,
opens at 4:30 p.m. Thurs-
day with presentations
starting at 5:15 p.m.
This is the only event
during Children's Month
specifically for teens and
their families. For infor-
mation, call 352-584-6500.


There will be a special meeting of the
Homosassa Special Water District board
at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Homosassa
Civic Club, 5530 S. Mason Creed Road,
Homosassa, to discuss the district's ele-
vated storage tank, located at the inter-
section of West Yulee Drive and West
Fishbowl Drive in Old Homosassa.
The water tank has been in this loca-
tion since 1965. The establishment of the
Homosassa Special Water District and
the installation of the water tank was the
result of work by dedicated local citi-
zens to bring potable water to the area.
The Homosassa Special Water District
was created by a Special Act of the
Florida Legislature in 1959.
The elevated storage tank stands 130
feet high, holds 100,000 gallons of water
and, for many years, was used as a point


THREE-YEAR-OLD
Jonathan Cripe
of Crystal River
finds a prized
Easter egg Saturday at
Little Springs Park in
Crystal River. April is
Children's Month in Cit-
rus County. The Easter
egg hunt kicked off the
events of the day, which
included live music, free
hot dogs, information
booths for children and
more. Renea Teaster,
facilitor for the Commu-
nity Alliance, says the
purpose of the day's
events was to "celebrate
Children's Week and
provide free resources to
children and families."
After the Easter egg
hunt Saturday morning,
6-year-old Catherine
Hoag of Sugarmill
Woods relaxed with a
little workout on the
monkey bars at Little
Springs Park.


put on water tank
of reference for local fishermen and res-
idents alike. Many have fond memories
of the tank as a local landmark.
At this time, however, the tank is aging
and is in urgent need of extensive repair
and rehabilitation. This rehabilitation
will be expensive. The district has been
working on system improvements.
These improvements, such as installing
new water mains, a new storage tank in
the Riverhaven area, and other system-
wide improvements, have made the ele-
vated storage tank obsolete and no
longer a necessary part of the system.
The district board has two options and
is faced with making a decision: Should
the district spend $220,000 to rehabili-
tate the tank and place it on a 10-year
maintenance program, or spend $80,000
to remove the tank?
The board wishes to hear public input
on this issue.


EGGS




A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES

Birthday It's time to step into the
spotlight. Your talent and hard work de-
serve recognition, and it's up to you to
draw attention to your accomplishments.
If you don't act on your own behalf, it's
likely that someone else will try to take
credit for your ideas.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -An un-
happy past interaction with someone
will repeat itself if you let that person
back into your life. Honesty is necessary.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) A change
in scenery will do you good. Distance
yourself from conflicts that you are fac-
ing at home or at work.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -You take
great strides if you capitalize on your
knowledge and skills. Your imaginative
ideas can lead to financial gains and
favorable recognition.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Spending
time alone will give you the opportunity
to work on a project and bypass a petty
disagreement.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Your job could
be in jeopardy if you believe false infor-
mation. Make sure you are aware of
any details concerning your position.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your per-
sonal affairs are no one's business.
Don't let comments or criticism from
family members get to you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Someone
will take advantage of your good nature.
If a colleague has been extremely de-
manding lately, explain politely that you
need some time for your own devices.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Don't
spread yourself too thin, or your men-
tal, emotional and physical health will
suffer. It's OK to say no every now and
then.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A
joint venture will present difficulties.
Get all the details and flush out any
problems before you get involved.
Don't feel guilty about changing your
mind or pulling out completely.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Someone will feel left out. Find out
who, and do something to encourage
his or her involvement. A thoughtful
gesture will make a big impact.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Unfin-
ished business will cause a financial or
legal strain. Take care of impending dif-
ficulties before things get out of hand.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Keep
an eye on your cash and your posses-
sions. Work on projects that you've left
unfinished. Don't allow anyone to take
advantage of you.


ENTERTAINMENT


Web's grumpiest cat
hits her terrible twos
NEW YORK -Watch out
world, Grumpy Cat has hit her
terrible twos.
The top dog in Internet cat
stardom, known for her downward
smile and bugged-out baby
blues, spent her birthday Friday
touring New York City with an
entourage worthy of Hollywood.
And Hollywood is where the
funny-looking feline is bound, with
a movie project in the works to
add to her pile of endorsements
and licensing deals that include her
scowling face on limited-edition
bags of Friskies Party Mix treats
and her own line of "Grumppuc-
cino" bottled coffee drinks.
So who will voice the cat we
love to caption? Grumpy's not
saying, nor are her humans, the
brother-sister team of Tabatha
and Bryan Bundesen.
With her own agent, YouTube
videos that have racked up mil-
lions of hits, T-shirts, calendars
and a best-selling book available
in 14 languages, exactly how
much is this cat worth?
"The business is doing very
well," Bryan laughed. "Grumpy
doesn't like to discuss specifics."
The humans, to be sure, are
more than a little grateful.
"We both were blue-collar
people," Bryan said he a cable
company lineman in Ohio and she
a server at a Red Lobster near her
home in Morristown, Ariz. "It has
changed our lives. It's been a bless-
ing. We're very thankful for it."
The grump's real name is Tar-
dar Sauce, so dubbed (and mis-
spelled) by Tabatha's now 12-year-oldd
daughter, Chyrstal, soon after
their female pet calico gave birth
to her and three siblings. The cat
was tiny and is still petite, a vic-
tim of feline dwarfism, and wob-
bles a bit when she walks due to
elongated rear legs that have
only added to her popularity.


Associated Press
Grumpy Cat, an Internet celebrity cat whose real name is Tardar
Sauce, is pictured Friday in New York. Known for her facial ex-
pression, her owner Tabatha Bundesen says that Grumpy Cat's
permanently grumpy-looking face is due to feline dwarfism.


Stern on 'Late Show' Five-year-old finds flaw
job: 'My plate is full' in Xbox Live security


NEW YORK Howard
Stern is just one of the names
industry spectators are floating
around as a possible replace-
ment for David Letterman.
At least for now though, the
longtime radio personality says
of the idea, "My plate is full."
Stern addressed the late-night
TV talk show host's retirement
announcement while arriving in
New York on Friday for "Amer-
ica's Got Talent" auditions. Stern
is one of the judges on the show.
The 60-year-old stressed Let-
terman's impact on late-night TV,
saying he's sad to see Letter-
man leave. Letterman an-
nounced Thursday he plans to
retire next year.


SAN DIEGO -A 5-year-old
San Diego boy has outwitted the
sharpest minds at Microsoft -
he's found a backdoor to the Xbox.
Kristoffer Von Hassel man-
aged to log in to his father's
Xbox Live account. When the
password log-in screen appeared,
Kristoffer simply hit the space
button a few times and hit enter.
Robert Davies tells KGTV-TV
that just after Christmas he no-
ticed his son playing games he
supposedly couldn't access.
Davies, who works in computer
security, says he reported the issue
to Microsoft, which fixed the bug
and recently listed Kristoffer on its
website as a "security researcher."
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, April 6, the 96th
day of 2014. There are 269 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On April 6,1994, the Hutu presi-
dent of Rwanda, Juvenal Habyari-
mana, was killed along with the
president of Burundi, Cyprien
Ntaryamira, when their plane was
apparently shot down near the
Rwandan capital of Kigali; what fol-
lowed was a 100-day genocide in
Rwanda during which more than
500,000 minority Tutsis and moder-
ate members of the Hutu majority
were killed by Hutu extremists.
On this date:
In 1830, the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints was organized
by Joseph Smith in Fayette, N.Y.
In 1864, Louisiana opened a con-
vention in New Orleans to draft a
new state constitution, one that
called for the abolition of slavery.
In 1896, the first modern Olympic
games formally opened in Athens,
Greece.
In 1909, American explorers
Robert E. Peary and Matthew A.
Henson and four Inuits became the
first men to reach the North Pole.
In 1917, Congress approved a
declaration of war against Germany.
Five years ago: An earthquake
in central Italy killed some 300 peo-
ple in the country's deadliest quake
in nearly three decades.
One year ago: Militants killed six
Americans, including diplomat Anne
Smedinghoff, 25, and an Afghan
doctor in a pair of attacks in Afghanistan,
the deadliest day for the United
States in the war in eight months.
Today's birthdays: Nobel Prize-
winning scientist James D. Watson
is 86. Country singer Merle Hag-
gard is 77. Actor Billy Dee Williams
is 77. Actor John Ratzenberger is
67. U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann,
R-Minn., is 58. Rock musician War-
ren Haynes is 54. Musician Frank
Black is 49. Actor Paul Rudd is 45.
Actor Zach Braff is 39. Actress Can-
dace Cameron Bure is 38.
Thought for Today: "If 50 million
people say a foolish thing, it is still a
foolish thing." -Anatole France,
French author and critic (1844-1924).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


183/58 O.OD" 84/64 0.00"
THREE DAY OUTLOOK E daiy
"" TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
Ji.. High: 83" Low: 61
,,,4 J Partly cloudy

!!*" -T MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
)' High:85' Low:66
..pmw ~Partly sunny, breezy, isolated showers
laler, rain chance 20cO
F 'W TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 71 Low: 50
0144117110 Showers and storms ending, windy, rain
chance 70%
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from me
PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the yea
"As o 7 p mr at? l nes
UV INDEX:
0-2minimal,3-4 low
7-9 high, 10+ very
BAROMETRIC I


DATE DAY


i*


DEW POINT


82/65 Saturday at 3 p.m. 649
140 6,
79/61 HUMIDITY
73 Saturday at 3 p.m. 93%
ean 3 POLLEN COUNT**
* 0.00" Today's active pollen:
0.00" Oak, bayberry, pellitory
9.9 Today's count: 8.5/12
[ 846" Monday's count: 10.2
11 Tuesday's count: 8.7
.-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
high
PRESSURE Saturday observed: 52
30.03 Pollutant: Particulale matter
SOLUNAR TABLES kw ow
MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)


04/06 SUNDAY 00:31 06:19 11:29 17:53
04/07 MONDAY 01:15 07:04 1220 18:40
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SU SETT11 H65.0.m...............,7:50Bm.
> ISMM T01111OM ij 7 ,, . ,-i 7:12a~m.
S MOORISN TGUY 12:27 p.m.
M . OONSET TODAY ____ 1 29a
Apr 7 Apt 15 Apr 22 Apr29 MOO-SE7 --AY 129am
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For more Inforimaion call Florida Division ol Foreslry at (352) 754-6777 For more
roliJim wllm', ',ii rr,,,ll :, ,lll,.r, i.';f visi the Division or Forestrys Web site'
",lIi, *Tld,1-_ 11 <.'".l CC'm:rr lIf.-- alrP, k[i,
WATERING RULES
Lawn waternng limited to iwo days perwee before 10 am orater4p.m,., as
follows:
EVEI adrL'&e-,-. iia ,v iaier i Thursday andlor Sunday.
ODD rirve-SnI- y fnay. r 01 Wodnea a ndrxr &iriSai.ra_.
H A Wd Al ai' V3 ,'lr, w i li 3 JI- ,l rio / le : r r ,rr t imn, lga i ,-' r :J r tx i-, .ra a rs =Lv iU Cf i
as vegetae gardens. fowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
CTnic, Ijny ulie-' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant materiaJ 352-527-7669. S,.n: new cp,,r iii.s l-jy ,,.ailv ic.,r .ir''1,hai
watering allowances.
a rejor .-lanc- p aze-ail City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321. CityotCrystal
River @ 362-795-4216 ext. 313 uincorFraierd Crnj;, Courrv @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
From mouths of rivers "*At Kings Bay "*At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassahowtzka' 2213p.m. 03ft. B;31 m 0,2l 4:39p.nin.2ft
Crystal Rvef" 10:49m.. 1.4ft. 10:48p.m 1.9 5:25a.m. 0.511 4:59P.m0.9r
Wthlacoochee' 930a.m. 2. ft. 6:53p.m. 251t 3:t2a.m. 0.611 2:5p.i..7hL
Homosassa'" 12;49pm 06tt. 10:59p~m 1.2fl 8:08a-. 0.311 5;09p.m0.3fl-


City


H L F'cast City


Daytona Bch. 84
Fort Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 86
Gainesville 83
Homestead 84
Jacksonville 79
Key West 83
Lakeland 88
Melbourne 84


Today: South winds then soulhwesl
around 6 to 12 knots. Seas 2 feet.
Bay and inland waters a light chop.
Tonight: South winds 5 to 10 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters a moderate chop.


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


Gulf water
temperature


71
Iaken at Ariip.k


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Wthiacoochee at Holder 29.38 29.46 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.63 38.64 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.78 39.79 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.46 40.47 42.20
Levels iopoled in feet above sea 0vM Food stage oV akes are based on 2 33-year flood.
tte mean- 1ual Io0d bHCh Ms a -pecent chance l betr equaled or exceeOded In
any one year This da ais obtaned Iromn the SoLdhwest Floriia Water Managemient Distict
r1". : n[,. r-.:.-, InT rl H .4- 11 I',? O,. i,' r In. r.rE. !.r; : lv -,. ST Iu .
THE1,. Nq -..f !.. JI 11 .- r... p-r.
~r...il r ~li l 9. m~l..l: ,. D.'i. r. ar ,34[iV ,1,. ?SC "* I I

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheltovile
Atlanta
Atlantic Citly
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Bulffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston. S.C
Chardeslon, W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincirmnati
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Derwer
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrsburg
Hartford
Houston
Indlanapols
Las Vegas
UItile Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Motle
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT SUN
H L Pep. H LFcst


47 37
62 43
62 43
69 50
59 43
65 54
57 42
56 38
65 42
46 39
54 38
37 32
45 37
85 64
54 42
72 53
51 31
52 37
45 34
57 35
49 38
50 34
56 49
59 34
58 25
50 32
72 48
53 41
48 42
55 38
69 57
50 34
72 52
55 42
67 54
53 37
57 42
49 30
48 24
67 57
75 59
58 44


11 5s
63
59
65
59
67
.12 63
51
62
62
,49 52
15 49
.09 48
60
69
62
57
62
.01 53
61
60
.42 50
56
53
62
02 55
72
61
61
.21 56
74
60
79
61
79
62
64
53
54
,24 72
66
64


SAT SUN
City H L Pcp. H LFcst
NowOrleans 69 59 .41 77 66 ts
NewYork City 54 40 .18 58 42 s
Norfol 73 49 54 46 pc
Odahoma City 69 40 57 43 ts
Omaha 60 25 61 42 sh
Palm Springs 80 s50 B86 61 s
Philadelphia 56 43 .02 60 38 s
Phoenix 78 58 83 58 s
Pittsburgh 45 37 .10 58 38 pc
Portland, ME 53 37 .52 47 30 s
Portland, OR 55 47 I1 62 45 sh
Providence. Rt 55 38 .22 54 36 s
Raleigh 71 59 63 45 pc
Rapid City 58 25 55 33 Is
Reno 59 30 67 39 pc
Rochester.NY 43 34 .06 55 37 s
Sacramento 70 42 82 50 s
Sail LakeCliy 55 46 .05 58 40 sh
San Antonio 64 57 72 51 ts
San Diego 67 55 .09 68 56 pc
San Francisco 63 50 62 52 pc
Savannah 83 61 65 61 sh
Seatlte 53 46 .10 58 47 sh
Spokane 51 34 01 57 39 pC
St. Louis 56 39 60 44 pc
St Sie. Mana 30 18 .01 43 31 pc
Syracuse 44 32 .03 52 33 s
Topeka 63 27 61 44 pc
VA.hin gin 60 46 -6 62 41 pc
YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HICH A LOW
HIGH 87, Kndaftl. Fia
LOW .4, Lafl 0 La We.
WORLD CITIES


SUN
CITY HI4SKY
Acapulo 86/73/s
Amsterdam 62/4/pc
Ahens 69/55/ed
Beijing 64/41/s
Berlin 60/44/pc
Bermuda 7116Ws


KEY TO CONDITIONS: cloudy' drdrizld; Cairo 84/6pc
IWair. hahaz-y: pc.Iarlly cloudy; rrain; Calgary 4&/24/pc
r.tra'nSnow mix; s-nWMy ish-hav-nr Havana 87162/s
snonwi tslhumdwistomr wWWlyr. Hong Kong 73S8 s
WSI M14 Jerunjsalem 82J59/s


Lisbon 66W50/pc
London 59B
Madrid 69/48c
Mexlco City 84/55pc
Montreal 42/30
Moscow 37/24/pc
Paris 64/50/s
Rio 88024/pc
Rome 6446/&r
Sydney 71/64/s
Tokyo 51/37v
Toronto 42/32 pc
Warsaw 5335/pc


ILLEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices..............D6



Miscellaneous Notices...D6



Self Storage Notices.......D6


S CI T R U S COUNTY T Y



CHiR9NICLE
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FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A6SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Christopher
Caster, 63
FLORAL CITY
Christopher E. Caster,
63, of Floral City, Fla.,
passed away April 4, 2014,
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus County He was
born in Jacksonville
Beach, Fla., on Oct. 7,1950,
to the late Edwin and
Eleanor C. (King) Caster
Chris was a switchman for
the railroad, and arrived
in this area in 2000, com-
ing from Tallahassee, Fla.
He was a Christian and
loved music, painting,
going to the beach and
surfing, and playing and
restoring guitars.
He is survived by his
daughter, Brenda Caster of
Kissimmee, Fla.; and
brother Timothy Caster of
Manhattan, N.Y
A Celebration of Life
Memorial Service for both
Chris and his mother
Eleanor will be at 3 p.m.
Sunday, April 27, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Fla.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

* All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.



6. E. 5
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation \i-" 4rSil

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323





352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

^ Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com


Earl Dorr, 92
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Earl Henry
Dorr, age 92, of Beverly
Hills, Florida, will be held
11:00 AM,
Monday,
April 7,
2014 at the
Beverly $0
Hills
H i I I s B "'^
Chapel of
Hooper
Funeral -
H o m e s Earl
with Pas- DorrT
tor Chris
Whaley officiating. Inter-
ment will take place at
Washington Crossing Na-
tional Cemetery, New-
town, PA at a later date.
The family will receive
friends on Monday from
10:00 AM until the time of
service at the chapel. On-
line condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mr Dorr was born De-
cember 9, 1921 in Philadel-
phia, PA, son of Charles
and Caroline (Yocum)
Dorr. He died April 3,2014
in Inverness, FL. Mr Donrr
was an Army Air Force vet-
eran serving during World


War II in the Pacific The-
atre. He worked as a Civil
Inspector in the construc-
tion of the USS Kitty Hawk
air craft carrier and as
Section Chief for Social
Security Administration.
He moved to Beverly Hills
from Mystic Island, NJ 25
years ago. Mr Dorr was a
Sunday School Teacher at
First Baptist Church for 23
years before joining Bible
Baptist Church.
Mr Dorr was preceded
in death by his parents, 3
siblings, Charles, Anna T
and Margaret and a grand-
son, Brendan Heary Sur-
vivors include his wife of
72 years, Martha (Walters)
Dorr of Beverly Hills, 4
daughters, Carolyn (John)
Heary of Bucks County,
PA, Barbara (John)
Phillips of Langhorne, PA,
Kathleen (Henry) Bevan of
Cottage Grove,OR and Pa-
tricia Dorr of El Paso, TX,
11 grandchildren and 15
great grandchildren.

Sharon
Kelly, 61
HOMOSASSA
Sharon A. Kelly, 61, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Thursday, April 3, 2014,
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus County in Lecanto,
Fla. Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando, Fla.


Alfred 'Fred'
Mitchell, 80
HERNANDO
Alfred J. "Fred" Mitchell,
80, Hernando, was born
Nov 25,1933, and died Fri-
day, April 4, 2014. A native
of Northborough, Mass., he
moved here in 1995 with
his beloved wife of 44
years, Carole. After retiring
from Raytheon, Fred en-
joyed his retirement travel-
ing, playing golf and being
with his family and friends.
He is survived by his wife
Carole; his daughter Denise
Bracking (Jim); his son
Mark Mitchell; and his five
grandchildren, 11 great-
grandchildren and one
great-great-grandchild.
Memorial services will
be at 10 a.m. Wednesday,
April 9,2014, at Hernando
United Methodist Church.
In lieu of flowers, donation
may be made to HPH Hos-
pice of Citrus County or a
charity of one's choice.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Martin
Faso, 73
FLORAL CITY
Martin A. Faso, 73, of
Floral City, Fla., died
April 2, 2014. Martin was
born Aug. 4, 1940, in
Chicago,
Ill., the son
of Philip
and Jen-
nie Faso. .,,.
He was a
retired l
driver He .
moved to '
Floral City Martin
in 2002 Faso
f r o m
Naples, Fla. Martin en-
joyed classic cars and rid-
ing his motorcycle with the
Inverness Retreads. He
was preceded in death by
his two sons, Jeffery and
James.
Survivors include his
wife of 57 years, Sarah L.
Faso of Floral City, Fla.;
daughter Gina Portillo
(Michael) of Chicago, Ill.;
sister Millie Perri of
Schaumburg, Ill.; six
grandchildren, Chase Faso
(Jody), Kam Faso
(Stephanie), Nicholas Faso


El National Cremation
S 0 C I E T Yv


,qRE LUNC &j SEMI~ [ ~LINARi'
q~teMfiofp r S 411eqti


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. iS
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhom


CODY'S ROADHOUSE
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Friday, April 11 *11:00am
Wednesday, April 23 11:00am


(Samantha), all of Inver-
ness, Fla., Nicole Portillo,
Kaitlin Portillo and Sarah
Portillo, all of Chicago, Ill.;
seven great-grandchil-
dren, Colby, Kade, Collin,
Lani, Truitt, Tori and
Brantley; and several
nieces and nephews.
Martin's family will re-
ceive friends at the Heinz
Funeral Home in Inver-
ness, from 10 a.m. to the
hour of service Tuesday,
April 8,2014. Funeral serv-
ices will begin at 11 a.m.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.
See Page A7

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options. Deadline is
3 p.m. for obituaries
to appear next day.



"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"



Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland, LFD & Brian Ledsome, LFD
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfunera Ihome.com

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197

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ad s4bsiesdy
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> No closing costs on lines up to $250,000**
> Possible tax benefits^
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> Interest-only payment option available
Apply for a Home Equity Line of Credit just like a loan, and once you're
approved you can access this cash up to your full available credit limit -
whenever you need it. Stop by today or apply* online at www.ccbg.com.


5 area locations to serve you.
795.6100
www.ccbg.com/sale


e Capital City
Bank
More than your bank. Your banker.


f1s! Member FDIC *Subject to Credit Approval. The introductory rate will be in effect for the first six (6) months after
your account is opened. Upon expiration of the introductory rate, all balances will accrue interest at the variable
standard Annual Percentage Rate, which can range from Prime + 1% to Prime + 4.5% usingthe JP Morgan Chase Prime
(JPMCP) rate (currently an APR of 3.25%) not to exceed 18% at any time. Information accurate as of 03/10/2014. Subject
to change without notice. After the promotional period, the variable standard APR will be based on your line amount,
combined loan to value ratio, and credit rating. This offer is available to new equity line clients, and to existing equity
line clients with an increase in their existing credit line of at least $15,000, and is subject to change without notice.
Hazard insurance required and flood insurance, if applicable. Exclusions and limitations apply. **No closing costs will
be assessed on lines up to $250,000, subject to the following conditions: (1) Borrower must have a Capital City Bank
deposit account; and (2) if applicable, Borrower will pay for the second and any subsequent valuations of the property.
Borrower will participate in closing costs for lines exceeding $250,000. Minimum line of $15,000 required. If you close
your Credit Line and we release our lien within three (3) years from the date of closing, you will owe a prepayment
penalty of 2% of the line amount, not to exceed $1,500. Owner-occupied property only and CCB must be in a valid
first or second lien position. Refer to HELOC application or ask your banker for complete details. This offer may be
withdrawn at any time. AConsult your tax advisor about possible tax benefits.


Positively free.

Positively less pain.


I.

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41
3
Nt. I


Good News About Knee & Hip Pain
There's relief in sight. At our free seminar, learn about the causes and new
treatments, including medications, nutrition and exercise. Then, picture yourself
walking, sitting and sleeping in comfort.

Free Knee & Hip Pain Seminar Having knee or hip surgery?
Tuesday, April 8,10:30 a.m. Attend our Joint Camp held on
SRRMC Medical Offices Building, Community Room the first Tuesday of each month.
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River Call 352.795.1234.


Registration required 352.795.1234

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Call Your Representative
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CITRUS COUNT '"

CII IR.ONICLE
Swww.chronicleonline.com


IOOHPY5


BM@jB

imf


pppp.p




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Phyllis
Howard, 83
INVERNESS
Phyllis Ann Howard, age
83, of Inverness, Fla.,
passed away April 4, 2014,
at Hospice of Citrus
County Ms. Howard was
born in Salyersville, Ky., on
April 8,1930, and had been
a resident of Citrus County
for the past 14 years. She
received her master's de-
gree in theater from
Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity and, after earning a
law degree at the Univer-
sity of Florida, practiced
law in Fort Lauderdale,
Fla.
Ms. Howard is survived
by three children: Julian
Hogan of Holly Hill, Fla.,
Lee Hogan of Inverness,
Fla., and Garland Hogan of
Lady Lake, Fla. Celia
Hogan, her eldest daugh-
ter, is deceased. Her grand-
children include Kevin
Scott, Kelly Scott, Cameron
Scott, Christopher Hogan,
Tara Hogan Spizale and
Lacy Hogan Maffei.
Ms. Howard had seven
great-grandchildren and
one great-great grandson.
She had many relatives in
eastern Kentucky, includ-
ing the Oldfields, Hurts
and Howards. Her two sur-
viving sisters are Charlotte
Thompson and Carolyn
Cravens of Lexington, Ky.
The family wishes to
thank her friends and fam-
ily for their concern and
caring support, especially
Brigitte Catrett of Ho-
mosassa, who lovingly as-
sisted Phyllis in the last
years of her life. Private
cremation arrangements
are under the care of Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.
Sign the guestbook at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
charged a base fee of
$25 plus $10 per
column inch, payable
in advance.


Erwin
Poklacki, 82
LECANTO
Erwin Sigmund Pok-
lacki, 82, passed away Fri-
day, March 28, in Palatine,
Ill., surrounded by family
who had been caring for
him, after a prolonged bat-
tle with cancer His great-
est pleasure was to see his
children grow into adult-
hood, and to welcome all
his grandchildren into his
family with love.
Born April 13, 1931, in
Chicago, Erwin joins his fi-
anc6e Mary Francis Si-
monsen, who passed in
2012.
Awarded a Ph.D. in or-
ganic chemistry in 1961,
Erwin earned several
patents working as a re-
search scientist before re-
tiring in 1994.
He devoted much time
to volunteering by caring
for the elderly, which con-
tinued when he moved
from Arlington Heights,
Ill., to Lecanto, Fla., to
enjoy golfing and the
weather
Sign the guestbook at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.
OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obitu-
aries will be posted
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


'Cuban Twitter' a new hurdle for bloggers, exiles


Associated Press
MIAMI The revelation that a
U.S. government-funded program
set up a cellphone-based social net-
work in Cuba is likely to pose new
challenges for independent blog-
gers and exile groups that work to
increase access to technology
Yoani Sanchez, the island's most
prominent dissident, began her ac-
tivism with a blog and now has
nearly 600,000 followers on Twitter
She also is on the verge of starting a
digital news project.
In recent years, exile groups in
Miami have tried to help Cubans
break through the technology di-
vide by sending computers, laptops
and flash drives to store and share
information.
Sanchez and others have gone to
pains to say they are not supported
by the U.S. government. Yet even
without any connection, analysts
say findings by The Associated
Press that the U.S. Agency for In-
ternational Development oversaw
the financing and creation of a mo-
bile phone network used by more
than 40,000 people could be
damaging.
"It's going to be much more diffi-
cult for Yoani Sanchez to do the
things she wanted to do," said Andy
Gomez, a retired Cuba scholar from
the University of Miami and senior
policy adviser with the law firm
Poblete Tamargo. "I think the
Cuban government is going to say,
'You see, this is probably funded by
some of the USAID funding."'
Strategy documents obtained by
the AP show Sanchez was named
among marquee personalities
whom organizers said could broad-
cast her "Twitter microblog through
the ZunZuneo SMS platform."
The network was called ZunZu-
neo, which is slang for a Cuban
hummingbird's tweet.
It was not immediately clear if
the project's leaders reached out to
Sanchez for collaboration.
Sanchez did not immediately re-


Yoani Sanchez, a dissic
from Havana, Cuba, ta
2013, about the dif
practicing her branch
gathering during a ses
69th annual General
of the Inter Amenr
Association in Denver.
spond to an email requ
for comment.
The renewed skeptic
dents and exiles on thE
nlrark7 nnn 4-f n (


SU.S. officials have defended the
program, a "Cuban Twitter" that op-
erated from 2010 until 2012.
The AP investigation found the
U.S. government set up the network
to undermine the island's commu-
nist government. Tens of thousands
of Cubans signed up for the service.
The network allowed users to send
and receive text messages, mostly
news, sports and entertainment
clips.
U.S. officials say that the program
was in line with the U.S. Agency for
International Development's mis-
sion, that the Obama administra-
S tion had offered to discuss funding
Associated Press for the program with several con-
Associ ated Press j1J J J
dent blogger gressional committees, and that it
iks Oct. 20, wasn't a covert operation requiring
fficulties of White House approval.
I of news Users of the network, however,
ssion at the did not know it was created by the
I Assembly U.S. government.
ican Press The findings come the same week
Sanchez told an audience in Miami
that she plans to launch her digital
est Saturday news network this month, using
email, texts, and flash drives to
ismofdissi- spread the work of independent
e island was journalists.


dliecdUy appal-lliL 111 nLucl b U/IICili
media Friday The state news
agency Prensa Latina recalled a
Jan. 1 speech in which President
Raul Castro warned of "attempts to
subtly introduce platforms for ne-
oliberal thought and for the restora-
tion of neocolonial capitalism."
"Castro's denunciations of the
U.S. government's destabilizing at-
tempts against Cuba were corrobo-
rated by today's revelation of a plan
to push Cuban youth toward the
counterrevolution, with the partici-
pation of a U.S. agency," Prensa
Latina said.
Ted Henken, a professor at
Baruch College who helped organ-
ize part of Sanchez's tour to the
United States last year, said he felt
Sanchez would not be affected in
the long term.
"In the short term, however, it will
complicate her project," he said.


She has not commented publicly
on the ZunZuneo network.
Henken and others, however,
voiced concern about the fallout for
her
"Cuban authorities already try to
paint critical bloggers like Yoani
Sanchez as U.S.-funded mercenar-
ies, and the report about ZunZuneo
will only give them more ammuni-
tion," said Emily Parker, a former
State Department policy adviser
and author of the book, "Now I
Know Who My Comrades Are," a
portrait of Internet activists in
China, Cuba and Russia.
Parker said she is especially con-
cerned for less well-known blog-
gers, who lack the international
visibility that Sanchez has.
"Authorities are now even more
likely to paint such bloggers as U.S.-
funded subversives," she said.


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LOCAL/STATE


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 A7




AS SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


MOTHER
Continued from PageAl

communications break-
down at the Department of
Children and Families led
to the hospital not notify-
ing DCF when the child
was born.
"They need to place the
baby someplace else and
let her prove she's a fit
mother," Mrs. Washburn
said. "The baby doesn't de-
serve to be an experi-
ment."
Grantham said she wor-
ries what she would tell
her two daughters if some-
thing happened to their
half-brother
"We can make sure our
voice is heard," she said.
MEN
The Chronicle is not
naming the birth mother to
protect her identity She is
in her mid-20s, unmarried,
does not live in Citrus
County and has a job, ac-
cording to her Facebook
page.
DCF records provided
by Grantham and Mrs.
Washburn show case work-
ers believe the birth
mother has a history of
drug abuse. Three of her
first four children were re-
moved from her home due
to neglect, records show.
Court records show the
woman has arrests in Lake
and Polk counties from
2011-13. She spent 90 days
in jail on a battery charge,
and received a seven-
month jail sentence for vi-
olation of probation.
Her charges included a
2011 case where authori-
ties say she cut a man, be-
lieved to be one of the
children's fathers. The
man told DCF child-pro-
tection investigators that
there were other, similar
incidents and that the
woman also has cut herself
many times.
In Lake County, the
woman was summoned to
court twice for failing to
pay court-ordered child
support to the father of her
first child. The other
prospective fathers have
either denied involvement
or did not have paternity
tests.
Yet, DCF guidelines are
designed to give the birth
mother the best opportu-
nity possible to keep cus-
tody of her children,



WORK
Continued from PageAl

"I'm very, very humbled
and honored to work with
this man," Lopez-Cantera
said.
Crist, on the other hand,
left the governor's man-
sion in 2010 to run as an
Independent for U.S. Sen-
ate, losing to Republican
Marco Rubio.
"The only person Char-
lie Crist cares about is
Charlie Crist," he said.
Lopez-Cantera spent
eight years in the House of
Representatives, includ-
ing the last two as House
majority leader. Term lim-
its forced him from office,
but he was elected in 2012
to Miami-Dade County
property appraiser.
Scott appointed him
lieutenant governor on
Jan. 14, filling the spot that
had been vacant for
10 months following for-
mer Lt. Gov. Jennifer Car-
roll's resignation. Carroll
resigned after federal in-
vestigators asked about
her involvement with
a storefront gambling
operation.
Scott, who spent $75 mil-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ginger Washburn adopted Raelei after Raelei's birth mother told state caseworkers
she didn't want the child. Raelei's birth mother was in jail when she was born.


records show
"They would give her
chance after chance after
chance," Grantham said.
In both cases, the courts
gave the birth mother sev-
eral DCF-monitored tasks
that case workers would
use to determine whether
to ask a judge to terminate
parental rights. Those
tasks included:
Contacting the case
manager twice a month.
Maintaining stable
employment or income for
six months, and being able
to document wages.
Maintaining a stable
residence for six months,
and provide documenta-
tion, such as lease agree-
ment or utility bill.
Receiving a DCF-
approved psychological
examination.
Participating in home-
parenting programs.
In the two instances
where she lost parental
rights, the birth mother
failed to comply with any
of those tasks, according to
DCF documents.
Reports said the birth
mother "has a history of


lion of his own money to
defeat DemocratAlex Sink
four years ago, was sched-
uled as the keynote
speaker of Friday's dinner
However, he canceled a
few weeks ago and Scott's
campaign sent Lopez-
Cantera instead.
Following his 15-minute
speech, Lopez-Cantera
dashed off for the five-
hour drive to Miami so he
could be home when his
two daughters woke up
Saturday morning.
Also during Friday's din-
ner, the Republican Exec-
utive Committee honored
one of its own.
Last year, local Republi-
cans created a person of
the year award. This year,
the party changed the
name to the "Geoffrey
Greene Community Serv-
ice Award" in honor of the
late Citrus County prop-
erty appraiser, who took
his life in January
The service award went
to Barbara Mills for her
"Operation Welcome
Home" program that wel-
comes returning service-
men and -women.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn.


substance misuse, legal
problems and involvement
with the Department of
Children and Families."
Reports show that DCF
investigators know the
birth mother's history in
detail.
'According to collateral
reports, the mother has a
history of cutting herself
and mental health issues,"
one report states. "The
mother had two older chil-
dren removed from her
care in Lake County in Au-
gust of 2010 for substance
misuse allegations and do-
mestic violence allega-
tions. The mother was
given a case plan, which
she failed to complete and
her parental rights were
terminated in May of
2012."
So if DCF knew all that,
Washburn and Grantham
say, why has the state al-
lowed the birth mother to
keep her fifth child at
home?
"We're angry at the
state," Grantham said.
"They need to make her
take responsibility"
DCF spokeswoman


VETERANS
Continued from Page Al

He proposed to the
council that the city host a
one-time parade honoring
Vietnam veterans in con-
junction with the Vietnam
Traveling Memorial Wall
coming to Liberty Park, on
Saturday, May 2,2015.
Stewart said Citrus
County's Operation Wel-
come Home chose Inver-
ness because of its "Most


Kristi Gray could not talk
about this specific case.
However, she said the
agency doesn't ignore the
mother's past.
She added, however:
"Prior removals and prior
termination of parental
rights don't automatically
mean any additional chil-
dren will be removed. It
means we'll take a real
close look at that and be
involved."
MEN
Grantham, 49, had al-
ready raised four children
and wasn't looking for
more.
The Washburns, on the
other hand, had seven
children of various ages,
including three from adop-
tion plus they owned a
daycare center
Fate intervened.
In late 2009, Grantham
learned her son, Daniel,
and his pregnant girl-
friend were living in the
woods. She invited them to
stay with her and eventu-
ally the girlfriend brought
in her two other daugh-
ters, who had been staying
with the girlfriend's


Patriotic City" status.
Councilwoman Jacquie
Hepfer moved "that we
wholeheartedly support
everything Mr Stewart
talked about"
After a unanimous vote,
Ken Hinkle, council presi-
dent, told Stewart, "It was
a great disservice and a
travesty what happened to
you guys. We respect you
immensely ... We're a very
patriotic city, but not be-
cause we have to. We are
honored to do this, and we
thank you for choosing us."


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We are very involved. It's not
a situation where you check in
a couple of times and then
close the case.

Kristi Gray
spokeswoman, Florida Department of Children and Families.


mother in Lake County
One of the girls was
Kyla. The other was Kyla's
older sister, who would
later live permanently
with her father
Though Rice was father
of the woman's unborn
child, the couple split up
shortly after Mari was
born. A few weeks later,
DCF called Grantham
after the birth mother left
Kyla and Mari at a friend's
house and didn't return.
Grantham took the chil-
dren in as DCF worked
with the courts to develop
a case plan for the birth
mother Grantham said the
woman showed little inter-
est in the girls.
"I was trying to get
through to her: 'These are
your children and you're
going to lose them!"' she
said.
When a judge severed
parental rights from the
birth mother, Grantham
was thrilled to set the
process in place to adopt
Kyla and Mari, which be-
came official May 16,2013.
Ten months earlier, on
July 5, 2012, DCF again
called Grantham because
the woman gave birth to a
daughter while incarcer-
ated. No one in the birth
mother's family would
care for the infant while
DCF began a new case
plan for the woman, and
investigators asked
Grantham if she would.
"I said 'No, but I know
who will,"' Grantham said.
Grantham had gotten to
know the Washburns
through taking Mari and
Kyla to daycare. When
DCF called, they were
more than willing to be-
come Raelei's guardian.
The case plan allowed
the birth mother to spend
time with Raelei in a su-
pervised setting at the
Family Visitation Center
in Inverness.
Mrs. Washburn said she
recalls the visit. The
woman arrived with her
mother Though she was
allowed an hour, the


woman spent only a half-
hour with the infant. As
the woman and her
mother were preparing to
leave, Mrs. Washburn
asked Raelei's grand-
mother if she wanted to
kiss the child.
"She said, 'No, why
would I want to do that?"'
Mrs. Washburn said.
The birth mother never
visited Raelei again. As
with Kyla and Mari, a
judge removed parental
rights from the birth
mother for Raelei, who
was adopted by the Wash-
burns late in 2013.
With their experiences
behind them but still vivid,
Grantham and Mrs. Wash-
burn were incredulous to
learn that the woman was
pregnant again. Mrs. Wash-
burn said she called DCF,
which sent out alerts to
area hospitals in Lake and
Polk counties to call the
agency if the woman gave
birth. One hospital either
didn't receive the alert or
didn't act on it, as the
woman gave birth to a boy
and brought him home, the
Citrus women said.
Both mothers called
DCF and were told that
the agency was monitoring
the birth mother's situa-
tion and not to worry
Gray, the DCF spokes-
woman, said she under-
stands how Grantham and
Mrs. Washburn feel. With-
out discussing the birth
mother's specific case,
Gray said DCF will watch
to see if the birth mother is
following through on her
case plan.
"We are very involved,"
she said. "It's not a situa-
tion where you check in a
couple of times and then
close the case."
Grantham said time will
tell.
"If she can do what
needs to be done for that
baby," she said, "then I'm
thrilled."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn.


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LOCAL








Heroin spreads misery in US


Associated Press
On a beautiful Sunday last Oc-
tober, Detective Dan Douglas
stood in a suburban Minnesota
home and looked down at a life-
less 20-year-old a needle
mark in his arm, a syringe in his
pocket. It didn't take long for
Douglas to realize that the man,
fresh out of treatment, was his
second heroin overdose that day
"You just drive away and go,
'Well, here we go again,"' says
the veteran cop.
In Butler County Ohio, heroin
overdose calls are so common
that the longtime EMS coordina-
tor likens the situation to "com-
ing in and eating breakfast you
just kind of expect it to occur" A
local rehab facility has a six-
month wait. One school recently
referred an 11-year-old boy who
was shooting up intravenously
Sheriff Richard Jones has seen
crack, methamphetamine and
pills plague his southwestern
Ohio community but says heroin
is a bigger scourge. Children
have been forced into foster care
because of addicted parents;
shoplifting rings have formed to
raise money to buy fixes.
"There are so many residual
effects," he says. "And we're all
paying for it."


Heroin is spreading its misery
across America. And communi-
ties everywhere are indeed
paying.
The death of actor Philip Sey-
mour Hoffman spotlighted the
reality that heroin is no longer
limited to the back alleys of
American life. Once mainly a
city phenomenon, the drug has
spread gripping postcard vil-
lages in Vermont, middle-class
enclaves outside Chicago, the
sleek urban core of Portland,
Ore., and places in between and
beyond.
It remains a small part of
America's drug problem; co-
caine, Ecstasy, painkillers and
tranquilizers are all used more,
and the latest federal overdose
statistics show that in 2010 the
vast majority of drug overdose
deaths involved pharmaceuti-
cals, with heroin accounting for
less than 10 percent.
But heroin's escalation is trou-
bling. Last month, U.S. Attorney
General Eric Holder called the
45 percent increase in heroin
overdose deaths between 2006
and 2010 an "urgent and growing
public health crisis."
In 2007, there were an esti-
mated 373,000 heroin users in
the U.S. By 2012, the number
was 669,000, with the greatest in-


HEROIN USE
IN FLORIDA
The number of heroin-
related deaths statewide
nearly doubled between
2011 and 2012, from 57 to
108, with an increase from
15 to 33 deaths in the
Miami area.
Admissions for drug
treatment where heroin was
the primary drug rose from
4 percent of all substance
abuse admissions around
Miami in 2012 to 8 percent
in the first half of 2013.
creases among those 18 to 25.
First-time users nearly doubled
in a six-year period ending in
2012, from 90,000 to 156,000.
The surge is easily explained.
Experts note that many users
turned to heroin after a crack-
down on prescription drug "pill
mills" made painkillers such as
OxyContin harder to find and
more costly Whereas a gram of
prescription opiates may go for
$1,000 on the street, that same
gram of heroin will sell for $100,
authorities say
It's killing because it can be
extremely pure or laced with
other powerful narcotics. That,
coupled with a low tolerance


once people start using again
after treatment, is catching ad-
dicts off guard.
In hard-hit places, police, doc-
tors, parents and former users
are struggling to find solutions
and save lives.
"I thought my suburban, mid-
dle-class family was immune to
drugs such as this," says Valerie
Pap, who lost her son, Tanner, to
heroin in 2012 in Anoka County,
Minn., and speaks out to try and
help others. "I've come to realize
that we are not immune. ...
Heroin will welcome anyone
into its grasp."
IN MINNESOTA:
TAKING THE MESSAGE
TO THE MASSES
The night before Valentine's
Day, some 250 people filed into a
Baptist church in Spring Lake
Park, Minn., a bedroom commu-
nity north of Minneapolis that
brags of its "small-town charm
and friendly folks." There were
moms and dads of addicts, as
well as children whose parents
brought them in hopes of scaring
them away from smack.
From the stage, Dan Douglas
gripped a microphone as a pho-
tograph appeared overhead on a
screen: A woman in the fetal po-
sition on a bathroom floor Then
another: A woman "on the nod"


- passed out with drug para-
phernalia and a shoe near her
face.
Douglas didn't mince words.
"You just don't win with heroin,"
he declared. "You die or you go
to jail."
It was the third such forum
held over two weeks in Anoka
County which encompasses 440
square miles of urban neighbor-
hoods, rural homesteads and sub-
urban centers that are home to
nearly 340,000 souls. Since 1999,
55 Anoka County residents have
died from heroin-related causes.
Only one other Minnesota county
reported more heroin-related
deaths 58 and it has a popu-
lation three-and-a-half times
greater than Anoka's.
In 2009, when Douglas began
supervising a drug task force,
authorities were focused on
stamping out meth labs. Heroin,
with its dark and dirty image,
just wasn't a concern. Then in-
vestigators noticed a climb in
pharmacy robberies and started
finding Percocet and OxyContin
during routine marijuana busts.
As prescription drug abuse
rose, so, too, did federal and
state crackdowns aimed at shut-
ting down pill mills and increas-
ing tracking of prescriptions and
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 A9


v


f




AIO SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


HEROIN
Continued from PageA9

pharmacy-hopping pill
seekers. Users turned to
heroin.
"It hit us in the face in
the form of dead bodies,"
says Douglas. "We didn't
know how bad it was until
it was too late here in our
community"
Douglas says authorities
are doing what they can:
educating doctors about
the dangers of overpre-
scribing painkillers, hold-
ing events where residents
can dispose of prescrip-
tion opiates, and aggres-
sively trying to get drugs
off the street. But, he says,
"law enforcement cannot
do this alone."
The idea for the forums
came not from police but
rather from Pap, a third-
grade teacher whose
youngest son died of a
heroin overdose.
Tanner was an athlete
who graduated from high
school with honors. In the
fall of 2012, he was pursu-
ing a psychology degree at
the University of Min-
nesota, and dreamed of be-
coming a drug counselor
He had not, to his mother's
knowledge, ever used
drugs, and certainly not
heroin.
Then one day Tanner's
roommates found the 21-
year-old unconscious in
his bedroom.
Amid her grief, Pap real-
ized something needed to
be done to educate others.
She met with county offi-
cials, and the community
forums began soon after
At each, Pap shared her
family's story
"Our lives have been for-
ever changed. Heroin took
it all away," she told the
crowd in Spring Lake Park
Douglas says most
heroin-related deaths he
has seen involve victims
who struggled with the
drug for years. The detec-
tive usually tries to shield
his own boys, ages 7 and
11, from what he sees on
the job. But after meeting
parents like Pap, Douglas
shared his heroin presen-
tation with his oldest son
- complete with the
sobering pictures.
"Could I still be blind-
sided? Absolutely," he
says. "But it's not going to
be for lack of information
on my part.... I don't want
to scare my kid. I don't
want to scar my kid. But I
sure as hell don't want to
bury him."
IN OHIO: OD ANTIDOTE
HELPS SAVE SOME
Brakes screech. The
hospital door flies open. A
panicked voice shouts:
"Help my friend!" Medical
technicians race outside
with a gurney An uncon-
scious young man is lifted
aboard, and the race is on
to stop another heroin
user from dying.
It's known as a "drive-
up, drop-off," and it's hap-
pened repeatedly at Ohio's


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
This photo released Dec. 20, 2013, by the Massachusetts State Police shows some
of the 1,250 packets of heroin labeled "Obamacare" and "Kurt Cobain" that state
police troopers confiscated during a traffic stop in Hatfield, Mass. Four people were
charged with heroin trafficking. The death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman in
February 2014 spotlighted the reality that heroin is no longer limited to back alleys. The
drug has spread to the country and suburbs.


Fort Hamilton Hospital.
The staff's quick response
and a dose ofnaloxone, an
opiate-reversing drug,
bring most patients back-
but not all. Some are put
on ventilators. A few never
revive.
"We've certainly had our
share of deaths," says Dr
Marcus Romanello, head
of the ER. 'At least five
died that I am acutely
aware of ... because I per-
sonally cared for them."
Romanello joined the
hospital about two years
ago, just as the rise of
heroin was becoming no-
ticeable in Hamilton, a
blue-collar city of 60,000
people. Now it seems to be
reaching into nearly every
part of daily life.
"If you stood next to
somebody and just started
a conversation about
heroin, you'd hear: 'Oh
yeah, my nephew's on
heroin. My next-door
neighbor's on heroin. My
daughter's on heroin,"' says
Candy Murray Abbott, who
helped her own 27-year-old
son through withdrawal.
Abbott and childhood
friend Tammie Norris,
whose daughter was also a
heroin user, decided last
year to bring attention to
the problem in their
hometown, using Face-
book to organize poster-
waving demonstrations by
everyone from recovering
addicts to parents and
grandparents of children
who died of overdoses.
Norris could only shake
her head at the surge in at-
tention to heroin after Hoff-
man's death. "Well, duh,"
she says, "it's been happen-
ing to our kids every day -
and nobody sees it"
A couple decades ago,
the big problem in Hamil-
ton was cocaine. That
shifted to prescription drug
abuse, which morphed into
heroin as pharmaceuticals
grew harder to come by
Now heroin-related deaths
have more than tripled in
Butler County, where
Hamilton is the county seat
There were 55 deaths last
year, and within one two-
week period, the city's
emergency paramedic


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units responded to 18
heroin overdoses. Once,
they had five overdose runs
in a single day
Users run the gamut,
says EMS veteran Jennifer
Mason from streetwalk-
ers to business executives.
They die in cars, public
parks, restaurant bath-
rooms, a university build-
ing. Mason has found
people turning blue with
needles still in their arms.
Sojourner Recovery
Services, an addiction
treatment organization in
Hamilton, has a six-month
waiting list for beds for
male addicts.
Romanello's hospital
saw 200 heroin overdose
cases last year, and count-
less related problems: ab-
scesses from using
unsterile needles, heart-
damaging endocarditis
and potentially fatal sepsis
infections.
Overdose patients usu-
ally bounce back quickly
after given naloxone,
known by the brand name
Narcan. It works by block-
ing the brain receptors
that opiates latch onto and
helping the body "remem-
ber" to take in air
At least 17 states and the
District of Columbia allow
Narcan to be distributed to
the public, and bills are
pending in some states to
increase access to it Attor-
ney General Holder has
called for more first re-
sponders to carry it. Last
month, Ohio's Republican
governor signed into law a
measure allowing a user's
friends or relatives to ad-
minister Narcan, on condi-
tion that they call 911.
Romanello says his pa-
tients are usually relieved
and grateful by the time
they leave his hospital.
"They say, 'Thank you for
saving my life,' and walk
out the door But then, the
withdrawal symptoms
start to kick in."
"You would think that
stopping breathing is hit-
ting rock bottom," adds
Mason. "They don't have
that fear of dying. You've
blocked the heroin, and
they have to have it. They
go back out to get more.


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OB/GYN

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Independent member of the medical staff


You haven't fixed their
addiction."
IN OREGON: A FORMER
ADDICT FIGHTS BACK
Before 9 o'clock every
weekday morning, the se-
cret to one of the most suc-
cessful drug rehabilitation
clinics in Portland, Ore.,
waits behind a locked
door. Meet David Fitzger-
ald, leader of the mentor
program at Central City
Concern, which claims a
60 percent success rate for
treating heroin addiction.
The lock, Fitzgerald
says, is a necessity because
his addicts will take every
opportunity offered, in-
cluding early access to the
"mentor room."
Inside, the walls are cov-
ered in photos, including a
collage from last year's
group picnic. Recovering
addicts smile and hold
plates of food. Seven
months later, Fitzgerald
looks over the faces. Are
they all still sober? Are
they all still alive?
"Most of them," he says.
"Not all."
Heroin cut a gash
through the Pacific North-
west in the 1990s. Then pre-
scription pills took over
until prices rose. Now the
percentage of those in treat-
ment for heroin in Oregon
is back up to levels not seen
since the '90s -nearly 8,000
people last year and the
addicts are getting younger


The fastest growing drug problem
Prescription drugs were involved in over 16,600 deaths in
2010. There were about 3,000 drug poisoning deaths related
to heroin. Drug overdose deaths even outnumbered deaths
from gunshot wounds or motor vehicle crashes.
20,000 deaths ...........................................................................................
2010:16,651 deaths


1 5 ,0 0 0 ....................................................... ..............


Prescription painkillers
10,000............. i..... ...........
Cocaine
5,000 ...... ........ .... .. e .................................. ..................
Heroin

0 ......................................................................................................
I I I I I I I I I I I I
1999 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10
SOURCE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention AP


Central City's clients re-
flect that. In 2008, 25 per-
cent of them were younger
than 35. Last year, that
went to 40 percent
'A lot of them aren't
ready at a younger age,"
Fitzgerald says. "The drug
scene, it's fast ... it's differ-
ent It's harder than it was."
Fitzgerald, 63, speaks
with a laconic prison pat-
ois, a reflection of 20-plus
years incarcerated, all the
while addicted to various
drugs. The worst was
heroin. In 1997 he got
sober, and in 1999 he joined
Central City Concern, then
a burgeoning outfit
Fitzgerald saw that the
usual path for treating ad-
diction wasn't working.
Addicts were processed
through detox for seven or
eight days, then handed a
list of tasks that included
finding work, meeting with
a probation officer, and lo-
cating the drop site for
their daily food box.
"Like they're going to do
any of that," Fitzgerald
scoffs. "First thing they do
is see somebody they
know, get that fix."
Central City Concern in-
stead accompanies clients
to housing appointments,
keeps their daylight hours
filled with to-dos and re-
quires they spend idle
hours at the facility, where
they also sleep.
It's a bare-bones staff
operating on a razor-thin
budget, and the crop of
younger addicts presents a


new problem: finding ap-
propriately aged mentors
to match them with. But
Fitzgerald has hope in 26-
year-old Felecia Padgett,
who remembers clearly
the first time she fired
heroin into her veins.
"I heard one time some-
body say it's like kissing
God," says Padgett "It is.
It's like getting to touch
heaven."
Padgett's six-year tum-
ble involved, in order:
heroin smoked, heroin
shot intravenously, home-
lessness, one overdose,
two close calls, a suicide
attempt, arrest, jail, arrest,
jail, arrest, jail and, finally,
a one-shot, last-chance
stop at Central City.
Before sobriety, she
found herself selling to
people younger than her-
self, suburban kids rolling
up in their parents' cars.
Fitzgerald doesn't yet
have money to pay her, and
Padgett herself is still in
recovery But she, and oth-
ers like her, may play a
crucial role in confronting
the problem as the face of
Portland's heroin addic-
tion gets younger
Fitzgerald knows that
many of the clients he sees
at 25 may be back in rehab
at 35, but he tries to re-
main optimistic that some
of what they learn at Cen-
tral City will, ultimately,
make a difference.
"That's about all you can
do," he says, "hope some of
it sticks."


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NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'SIGNAL'
Continued from Page Al

connection" at this stage
between the electronic sig-
nals and the missing
Malaysia Airlines Flight
370.
Military and civilian
planes, ships with deep-sea
searching equipment and a
British nuclear submarine
scoured a remote patch of
the southern Indian Ocean
offAustralia's west coast, in
an increasingly urgent
hunt for debris and the
"black box" recorders that
hold vital information
about Malaysia Airlines
Flight 370's final hours.
After weeks of fruitless
looking, the multinational
search team is racing
against time to find the
sound-emitting beacons in
the flight and cockpit voice
recorders that could help
unravel the mystery of the
plane's fate. The beacons
in the black boxes emit
"pings" so they can be
more easily found, but the
batteries only last for
about a month.
A Chinese ship that is
part of the search effort
detected a "pulse signal"
in southern Indian Ocean
waters, China's official
Xinhua News Agency re-
ported. Xinhua, however,
said it had not yet been de-
termined whether the sig-
nal was related to the
missing plane, citing the
China Maritime Search
and Rescue Center
Xinhua said a black-box
detector deployed by the
ship, Haixun 01, picked up
a signal at 37.5 kilohertz
(cycles per second), the
same frequency emitted by
flight data recorders.
Malaysia's civil aviation
chief, Azharuddin Abdul
Rahman, confirmed that


the frequency emitted by
Flight 370's black boxes
were 37.5 kilohertz and
said authorities were veri-
fying the report.
Earlier Saturday, Xin-
hua reported that a Chi-
nese military aircraft
searching for the missing
aircraft spotted "white
floating objects" not far
from where the electronic
signals were detected.
Finding floating wreck-
age is key to narrowing the
search area, as officials
can then use data on cur-
rents to backtrack to
where the plane hit the
water, and where the flight
recorders may be.
Houston said the
Australian-led JointAgency
Coordination Centre head-
ing the search operation
could not yet verify the Chi-
nese reports and had asked
China for "any further in-
formation that may be rele-
vant" He said the
Australian air force was
considering deploying more
aircraft to the area where
the Chinese ship reportedly
detected the sounds.
"I have been advised
that a series of sounds
have been detected by a
Chinese ship in the search
area. The characteristics
reported are consistent
with the aircraft black
box," Houston said, adding
that the Australian-led
agency had also received
reports of the white ob-
jects sighted on the ocean
surface about 90 kilome-
ters (56 miles) from where
the electronic signals were
detected.
"However, there is no
confirmation at this stage
that the signals and the ob-
jects are related to the
missing aircraft," Houston
said.
Still, Malaysia's defense
minister and acting trans-
port minister, Hisham-


Search vessel reports a "pulse signal" in Ocean waters
China's official Xinhua News Agency reported that a Chinese ship that is part of the search
effort detected a "pulse signal" Saturday in southern Indian Ocean waters. The report said it
was not yet determined whether the signal was related to the missing jet.
( MALAY'A
Kuala "-Q-.-
Lumpur
INDONESIA


Possible
routes flight
370 might
have followed


4
-
Previous :
search areas :



/__


muddin Hussein, was
hopeful. 'Another night of
hope praying hard," he
tweeted in response to the
latest discoveries.
There are many clicks,
buzzes and other sounds in
the ocean from animals,
but the 37.5 kilohertz pulse
was selected for underwa-
ter locator beacons on
black boxes because there
is nothing else in the sea
that would naturally make
that sound, said William
Waldock, an expert on
search and rescue who
teaches accident investi-
gation at Embry-Riddle
Aeronautical University in
Prescott, Ariz.
"They picked that (fre-
quency) so there wouldn't
be false alarms from other
things in the ocean," he
said.


Saturday's
planned
W- search

AUSTRALIA

Perth


Chinese ship involved in the
search reported hearing a "pulse
signal" in Indian Ocean waters.


Honeywell Aerospace,
which made the boxes in
the missing Malaysia Air-
lines plane, said the Un-


derwater Acoustic Bea-
cons on both the flight data
recorder and cockpit voice
recorder operate at a fre-


WORLD


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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 All

quency of 37.5 kilohertz
plus or minus 1 kilohertz.
Waldock cautioned that
"it's possible it could be an
aberrant signal" from a
nuclear submarine if there
was one in the vicinity.
If the sounds can be ver-
ified, it would reduce the
search area to about 4
square miles, Waldock
said. Unmanned robot
subs with sidescan sonar
would then be sent into the
water to try to locate the
wreckage, he said.
John Goglia, a former
U.S. National Transporta-
tion Safety Board member,
called the report "excit-
ing," but cautioned that
"there is an awful lot of
noise in the ocean."
"One ship, one ping
doesn't make a success
story," he said. "It will
have to be explored. I
guarantee you there are
other resources being
moved into the area to see
if it can be verified."
The Boeing 777 disap-
peared March 8 while en
route from Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia, to Beijing with
239 people aboard. So far,
no trace of the jet has been
found.


OHPWC










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nat*


Pup oeSource of execution drugs under scrutiny
Puppy love


Associated rress
Becky Teri, of Ontario,
Canada, hugs her miniature
poodle Chipp on Saturday
while waiting between con-
tests at the Intergroom
dog grooming show in
East Rutherford, N.J.

Cat alerts residents
to mobile home fire
TUCSON, Ariz. Tucson
authorities say a cat woke
up a sleeping man, alerting
him to a fire in a mobile
home and allowing the man
and his wife to get out OK.
Fire Capt. Barrett Baker
described the cat's actions
early Friday morning as
"aggressively meowing" in
the face of the man.
On waking up, the man
smelled smoke and realized
there was a fire. He woke
his wife, and they got out
through a door close to the
bedroom.
The wife then called 911,
and responding firefighters
put out the fire.
Cause of the fire is under
investigation.
Archbishop to sell
Atlanta mansion
SMYRNA, Ga. -Trying
to appease angry parish-
ioners, the Roman Catholic
archbishop of Atlanta said
Saturday he will sell a $2.2
million mansion just three
months after he moved in.
Archbishop Wilton Gre-
gory announced the deci-
sion following a closed-door
meeting with members of
several church councils at
his headquarters north of
Atlanta.
A group of Catholics in
Gregory's archdiocese had
asked since January that
he sell the nearly 6,400-
square-foot mansion in keep-
ing with the tone of austerity
set by Pope Francis.
A generous gift from a
wealthy donor in Atlanta
made the luxurious resi-
dence possible.
Joseph Mitchell, the
nephew of the author of
"Gone With The Wind," left
an estate worth more than
$15 million to the archdio-
cese when he died in 2011.
Mitchell asked in his will
that the proceeds be used
for "general religious and
charitable purposes."
The mansion has an
upper-level safe room, an
eight-burner kitchen stove,
an elevator, public and pri-
vate offices and two dining
rooms. Architects initially
planned space for a wine
room and wanted an an-
tique chandelier in the
foyer, though those plans
were later dropped.
Gov't files lacking
for $6B in contracts
WASHINGTON -Agov-
ernment investigation has
found that the State Depart-
ment has incomplete files or
is missing files for more
than $6 billion in contracts
over the last six years.
In one case involving
State Department opera-
tions in Iraq, officials
couldn't provide 33 of the
115 contract files re-
quested. Those missing
files were for contracts
worth $2.1 billion.
A State Department
spokeswoman, Marie Harf,
said the $6 billion hasn't
gone missing and calls it a
"bureaucratic issue" that's
being addressed.
The report by the State
Department's Office of In-
spector General is dated
March 24, but was released
to the public on Thursday.
-From wire reports


Associated Press


ST LOUIS Dating to
the days when the guillotine
operator or the hangman
wore a mask, a certain
amount of anonymity has
always surrounded execu-
tions. But that secrecy is
increasingly coming under
fire, with judges, lawyers and
death penalty opponents
questioning why so little
can be known about a state's
most solemn responsibility
An Associated Press sur-
vey of the 32 death penalty
states found that the vast


majority refuse to disclose
the source of their execu-
tion drugs. The states
cloaked in secrecy include
some with the most active
death chambers among
them Texas, Florida, Okla-
homa and Missouri.
Most states have recently
begun relying on loosely
regulated "compounding
pharmacies" for execution
drugs but refuse to name
them, citing concerns that
could endanger the supplier's
safety But many states re-
fuse to provide even more
basic information how


much of the drug is on
hand, the expiration date,
how it is tested. Those who
question the secrecy wonder
how an inmate's constitu-
tional right against cruel and
unusual punishment can
be guaranteed if nothing is
known about the drug
being used to kill him.
The most prolific death
penalty states have success-
fully deflected most chal-
lenges to secretive protocols.
But momentum is building
toward unlocking details.
Last week, an Oklahoma
judge voided the state's ex-


ecution law, agreeing with
two inmates who claimed
a "veil of secrecy" that pre-
vents them from obtaining
information about lethal
injection drugs violated
their constitutional rights.
And on Wednesday, a
federal judge in Texas
halted the scheduled exe-
cution of a serial killer, or-
dering the state to disclose
the supplier of a new batch
of drugs, as well as infor-
mation on how they are
tested. A federal appeals
court threw out that ruling
hours later Tommy Lynn Sells


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Associated Press
Afghan men line up outside a polling station Saturday to cast their ballots in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan voters
lined up for blocks at polling stations nationwide, defying a threat of violence by the Taliban to cast ballots
in what promises to be the nation's first democratic transfer of power. Independent Election Commission
chairman Ahmad Yousuf Nouristani said estimates showed more than 7 million ballots were cast, although
he cautioned that was based on preliminary information.



In Afghanistan, a




vote for democracy


Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan
millions of Afghans defied
Taliban threats and rain
Saturday, underscoring
their enormous expectations from
an election that comes as the
country's wobbly government pre-
pares to face down a ferocious in-
surgency largely on its own.
With combat forces from the
U.S.-led coalition winding down
a 13-year presence and the mer-
curial Hamid Karzai stepping
aside, the country's new leader
will find an altered landscape as
he replaces the only president
Afghans have known since the
Taliban were ousted in the wake
of the Sept. 11 attacks.
But for some progress, partic-
ularly with women's rights, the
country's situation is inauspicious,
especially with its poor security
and battered economy Yet de-
spite spiraling carnage and grave
disappointments, Afghans by the
millions crowded mosque court-
yards and lined up at schools to
vote, telling a war-weary world
they want their voices heard.
Partial results could come as
early as Sunday, but final results
are not expected for a week or more.
International combat troops are
supposed to depart by the end of


the year, leaving Afghan security
forces not completely battle-
tested and plagued with insur-
gents even among their ranks -
to fight alone against what is likely
to be an intensified campaign by
the Taliban to regain power
There do not appear to be major
policy differences toward the
West among the front-runners:
Abdullah Abdullah, Karzai's top
rival in the last election; Ashraf
Ghani Ahmadzai, an academic and
former World Bank official; and
Zalmai Rassoul, a former foreign
minister A runoff is expected since
none is likely to get the majority
needed for an outright victory
All eight also preach against fraud
and corruption and vow to im-
prove security, while they differ
on issues such as the country's
border dispute with Pakistan.
The runup to the election was
troubling: the Islamic radicals of
the Taliban, reviled by many but
still popular in some areas, view
the entire enterprise as the work of
outsiders and infidels, and vowed
to disrupt it by targeting polling
centers and election workers.
To drive home the threat, in-
surgents in recent weeks stepped
up shootings and bombings in the
heart of Kabul to show they are
capable of striking even in highly
secured areas.


On Saturday, dozens of polling
centers did not open because of
rocket and gunfire attacks. A bomb
exploded in a school packed with
voters in the Mohammad Agha
district of Logar province, wound-
ing two men, one seriously, said
local government spokesman Din
Mohammad Darwesh.
Afghan Interior Minister Mo-
hammad Umar Daudzai said 20
people 16 Afghan security
forces and four civilians were
killed in 140 attacks or attempted
attacks over 24 hours. But the
feared wide-scale disruption did
not materialize.
"I went to sleep with my mind
made up to wake up early and to
have my say in the matter of de-
ciding who should be next one to
govern my nation," said Saeed
Mohammad, a 29-year-old mechanic
in the southern city of Kandahar
"I want to be a part of this revo-
lution and I want to fulfill my
duty by casting my vote so that we
can bring change and show the
world that we love democracy"
All voters were searched before
being allowed to enter the polling
stations. Once in, they showed their
ID cards, dipped a finger in in-
delible ink, then went behind a
cardboard booth and made their
choices for who should lead the
country into an uncertain future.


Al-Qaida's Zawahri condemns 'sedition'


Associated Press


CAIRO Al-Qaida's
leader called on fighters to
determine who killed his
chief representative in
Syria, a man many militant
groups believe died at the
hands of a rival militia, in
a move that highlighted a
conflict between rebels
that has killed hundreds.
In a thinly veiled criticism
of the breakaway Islamic
State in Iraq and the Levant
organization, Ayman al-
Zawahri called the killing
ofAbu Khaled al-Suri an act
of "sedition" that should be
handled in accordance
with Islamic law
'All Muslims should not
help anybody who blows


up the headquarters of the
holy fighters, or who sends
them car bombs and human
bombs," al-Zawahri said in
a recorded message posted
on militant websites Friday
"Whoever commits such
sins should remember that
he is fulfillingforthe enemies
of Islam what they were un-
able to achieve on their own."
Al-Suri was killed on
Feb. 23, when two suicide
bombers blew themselves
up inside the militantleader's
compound in the northern
Syrian city of Aleppo.
While he did not men-
tion the Islamic State by
name, it was clear he was
accusing the group and
staking out a hard stance
against it He also endorsed


a previous call for Islamic
arbitration over the death
of al-Suri to be overseen by
the Nusra Front-the official
al-Qaida affiliate in Syria.
Al-Suri was the founder
of a conservative, powerful
Syrian rebel group, Ahrar
al-Sham.
The Islamic State, led by
a man known as Abu Baker
al-Baghdadi, was once an
al-Qaeda-affiliated group
that operated in Iraq, but
also branched into Syria.
It was expelled from the
militant franchise in part
because of brutality that
included public behead-
ings considered exces-
sive even by the standards
of al-Qaida's ultraconser-
vative Muslim fighters. Al-


Qaida formalized the ex-
pulsion last week.
The shadowyAl-Baghdadi
is one of the world's most
feared terrorists, infamous
for his relentless bombing
campaigns against Iraqi
civilians, audacious jail-
breaks of fellow militants
and for expanding the or-
ganization into Syria.
Zawahri's message also
suggested that rebels will
remain locked in the in-
fighting that has eroded
their ranks and cost them
territory to governmentforces
supporting President Bashar
Assad. Thatfightinghaskilled
at least 3,000 rebels since
January, according to the
British-based Syrian Ob-
servatory for Human Rights.


was put to death Thursday
Lack of transparency
limits the ability of outsiders
to evaluate quality control,
said Rebecca Dresser, a
professor of law and med-
ical ethics at Washington
University in St. Louis.
That argument goes be-
yond the mere legal into
the ethical realm, she said.
"Lethal injection is sup-
posed to be a humane
method of execution, so
the risk is that by a lack of
adequate quality control,
the execution may not be
humane," Dresser said.


World BRIEFS

Downtime
'TV WaU,-nIIXX


Associated Press
Youngsters embrace
Saturday while taking a
break from a pillow fight in
Bucharest, Romania.
People in Bucharest and
other cities across the
globe gathered for flashmob
events for pillow fights to
mark International Pillow
Fight Day.

Explosions, clashes
kill 21 Iraqi soldiers
BAGHDAD -An explosion
at a booby-trapped house,
ensuing clashes with mili-
tants and roadside bombings
killed 21 soldiers Saturday
in Iraq, authorities said.
The house explosion
happened Saturday afternoon
when a group of soldiers
searched a farmhouse in
Garma, an area near the
city of Fallujah, 40 miles
west of the capital, police
said. Minutes later, police
said, gunmen opened fire
on arriving soldiers.
AI-Qaida-inspired mili-
tants took control of Fallu-
jah and parts of Ramadi in
late December, taking ad-
vantage of a months-long
surge in Sunni discontent
against Nouri al-Maliki's
government.
The country will hold its
first parliamentary elections
since the withdrawal of U.S.
troops on April 30.
Crowd attacks Ebola
treatment center
CONAKRY, Guinea--A
crowd angry about an Ebola
outbreak that has killed 86
people across Guinea at-
tacked a center where vic-
tims were being held in
isolation, prompting an in-
ternational aid group to
temporarily evacuate its
team, officials said Saturday.
The violence took place in
the southern town of Macenta,
where at least 14 people
have died since the outbreak
emerged last month. The
mob who descended upon
the clinic accused Doctors
Without Borders health
workers of bringing Ebola to
Guinea, where there had
never been any cases.
Some people threw rocks
at the aid workers, though
no one was seriously hurt,
said Sam Taylor, a spokesman
for Doctors Without Borders.
"We understand very well
that people are afraid be-
cause it is a new disease
here," Taylor said. "But these
are not favorable working
conditions so we are sus-
pending our activities."
Patients are continuing to
receive treatment from
Guinean health ministry
personnel, Taylor said.
There is no cure for
Ebola, which causes fever
and severe bleeding. Up to
90 percent of patients die
from the strain of the virus
detected in Guinea.
-From wire reports










E Travel & Leisure

EXCURSIONS



From the treasures of a 1622 shipwreck to 4,000 years of diving history, more than a dozen museums
are spread across the more than 100 miles of islands that make up the Florida Keys. Besides the water
and sky views on either side of the toll-free Overseas Highway, the scenic drive south from Miami to
Key West (about three hours) also includes plenty of opportunities to take in the island chain's rich
history. Sites include a Civil War fort, a World War II plane, an exhibit about playwright
Tennessee Williams and the home of writer Ernest Hemingway.


s


In Islamorada
The History of Diving Museum is hard to miss as
you drive by: Underwater sea creatures are
painted on the ocean-blue building along with an
old-fashioned bottomless diving helmet. The mu-
seum (mile marker 83, bayside) houses a large col-
lection of diving helmets and artifacts, tracing
4,000 years of diving history Highlights include a
gallery about treasure hunter Art "Silver Bar"
McKee; an exhibit of 45 historic dive helmets from
24 countries; nearly 2,500 books about undersea
exploration; and free monthly seminars. Open
daily (except major holidays), 10 a.m. to5 p.m.
Adults, $12; children 5 to 11, $6, http://www.diving
museum.org.
The Keys History & Discovery Center is located at
the Islander Resort, a Guy Harvey Outpost (mile
marker 82, ocean side). Exhibit themes include the
first inhabitants of the Florida Keys, shipwrecks
and salvage, pioneering families on the island
chain, sport fishing legends and Flagler's Over-Sea
Railroad. Open Thursday-Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Adults, $12; children 13 and under free;
http://www.keysdiscoverycom.


In Marathon
The EAA Air Museum, located in a hangar
adjacent to the Florida Keys Marathon Air-
port (mile marker 52), tells the story of avia-
tion history in the Keys. The museum offers
artifacts, photographs, memorabilia, books, a
flight simulator, a 1940s-era military DC3
plane and a Beechcraft Model 18 that trans-
ported officers during World War II. It's
funded by donations and a chapter of the Ex-
perimental Aircraft Association (EAA). Open
daily 10 a.m. to4 p.m., free admission.
Pigeon Key Foundation and Marine Science
Center is a 5-acre (2-hectare) coral island,
used as a camp between 1908 and 1912 for
400 laborers working on Henry Flagler's
Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad, which ran
from Miami through the once-isolated island


chain to Key West. The island now houses
quaint cottages and a museum filled with old
photos, artifacts and memorabilia. Marine
educational programs are held on the tiny is-
land, which is also a great spot for picnics
and snorkeling. Adults, $12, children 5-13, $9.
Ferries sail for the island from Pigeon Key
Visitors Center (mile marker 47, ocean side
in the railcar off the road), 10 a.m., noon and
2 p.m., http://wwwpigeonkeynet.

Crane Point Museum and Nature Center,
mile marker 50, bayside, houses nature
trails, a butterfly garden, a children's activity
center and a natural history museum. Arti-
facts in the museum's collection include a
600-year-old dugout canoe and remnants of
pirate ships. Open Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.
to5 p.m.; Sundays, noon-5 p.m. Adults, $12.50;
children 5-13, $8.50; http://cranepoint.net.


Associated Press
TOP: Visitors walk on Pigeon Key, near Marathon in the Florida Keys. More than 100 years ago,
the tiny 5-acre coral island beneath the historic Seven Mile Bridge was the base camp for
about 400 laborers working on Henry Flagler's Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad. Today, the
island houses quaint cottages and a museum chronicling construction of the railway.


In Key West
Ernest Hemingway Home & Mu-
seum, 907 Whitehead St, offers
guided tours of the house where he
lived for most of the 1930s and wrote
some of his most notable works, in-
cluding "To Have and Have Not."
Between 40 and 50 cats have the run
of the home and grounds, and many
of them have an extra toe, just like a
six-toed cat Hemingway owned.
Open daily 9 a.m.to 5 p.m. Adults,
$13, children 6-12, $6;
http://www.hemingwayhome.com.
The Tennessee Williams Exhibit, 513
Truman Ave. (behind the Key West
Business Guild), chronicles the
renowned playwright's life in Key
West, which he began visiting in the
1940s. The exhibit includes photo-
graphs, memorabilia, first-edition


plays and books, a typewriter he
used and more. Open Monday-Satur-
day, 10 a.m. to5 p.m.; Sundays, noon
to 5 p.m. http://wwwtwkw.org.
Custom House Museum, 281 Front St
near Mallory Square, is a national
landmark operated by the Key West
Art & Historical Society The four-
story building was once home to the
island's customs office, postal service,
and district courts and now showcases
fine art and historic collections,
among other artifacts related to Keys
history and culture. Grounds feature
sculptures by Seward Johnson. Open
daily (except Christmas), 9:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Adults $9; children 6 and up,
$5; http://www.kwahs.org/visit'custom-
house/.
Mel Fisher Maritime Museum, 200
Greene St., showcases treasure from


the 1622 Spanish galleons discov-
ered by Fisher, an American treas-
ure hunter known for his 1985
discovery of the wreck of the Nues-
tra Senora de Atocha. The museum
includes a rich collection of 17th
century maritime and shipwreck ar-
tifacts. Open weekdays 8:30 a.m. to5
p.m.; weekends and holidays, 9:30
a.m. to5 p.m. Adults, $12.50, children
6-12, $6.25, http://wwwmelfisherorg.
Fort East Martello Museum, 3501 S.
Roosevelt Blvd., is a national land-
mark. The 1860s fort was built to
protect Key West during the Civil
War, but it never saw any battles. It
was used by the military during
World War II, and then abandoned
until 1950, when it was restored and
reopened as a local art and history
museum. Today it features Civil War-
era relics and exhibits about the


Keys' shipwreck-salvage and cigar-
manufacturing industries. One of its
famous artifacts is "Robert the
Doll," whose mysterious history has
haunted visitors for decades. Open
daily, 9:30 a.m. to4:30 p.m. Adults, $9,
children over 6, $5; http://www.
kwahs.org/visiVfort-east-martello/.
Florida Keys Eco-Discovery Center,
35 E. Quay Road, showcases marine
habitat of the Keys, both from land
and underwater
There's a model of the Aquarius Un-
dersea Lab, the world's only under-
water ocean laboratory and the
Mote Marine Laboratory Living Reef
exhibit, with a 2,500-gallon reef tank
with corals and tropical fish. Open
Tuesday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to4 p.m.,
free admission, http://floridakeys.
noaa.gov/eco_discoveryhtml.


:Lo ora




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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TS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Men in Black ll" (2002) 'PG-13' Big Bang IBigBang Big Bang I Big Bang Big Bang IBigBang **"Hulk"
S* "Critic's Choice"(1963 Comedy) Bob *** "Mogambo" (1953, Adventure) Clark *** "Red Dust" (1932 Romance)Clark
LjEJ 169 53 169 30 35 Hope, Lucille Ball, Manlyn Maxwell. 'NR' Gable, Ava Gardner. 'NR' (DVS) Gable, Jean Harlow, Mary Astor. NR'
SFast N' Loud (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid Naked After Dark "After
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14'" Stereo)'14'" Stereo)'14'" Uncensored (N)'14' "Mayan Misery"'14' Belize"'14'
T 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss My Five Wives 'PG' Medium IMedium Medium IMedium My Five Wives'PG' Medium |Medium
3 2 3 "Boys *2 "As Cool aslAm" (2013) ***2 "Lincoln"(2012) Daniel Day-Lewis. Lincoln takes ,"W" rnnQ(? Josh Brolin. (In
350 261 350 Girls" Claire Danes. R' measures to ensure the end of slavery forever. :--,i.
S** "2012" (2009) John Cusack. A global cata- *** "Contagion" (2011) Marion Cotillard. Doctors try to *** "Contagion"(2011) Marion
TJ 48 33 48 31 34 clysmnearly wipes out humanity, contain the spread of a lethal virus. 'PG-13 Cotillard.'PG-13 B (DVS)
TOON 38 58 38 33 Ben 10 |Uncle Steven Teen Chicken IVenture Venture |Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam.Guy Chicken
TRAV 9 106 9 44 Food Paradise'PG' Food Paradise'PG' Mysteries-Museum Myste.-Vatican Secrets- Le e. Mysteries-Museum
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking truTV Top Funniest truTV Top Funniest Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers World's Dumbest...
(TVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan's Island'G' Gligan IGillian ligan Gilligan Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Cleveland
SLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Suits "Know When to
) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Fold'Em"'14'
S 11 11 CSI: Miami "Dead Air' CSI: Miami "Shock" (In CSI: Miami "Open CSI: Miami Gang mem- CSI: Miami "One of Our CSI: Miami "Driven" (In
117 69 117 '14'm Stereo)'14'B Water"'14'B bers.'14' Own"'14'B Stereo)'14'B
1WG 8 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos *** "Under Siege" (1992, Action)'R' Witches Funny Home Videos IVideos


Reach out to



sister gently


D ear Annie: I am a
recently divorced
and remarried 46-
year-old male. I was al-
ways very close to my
sister, but these past few
years, she only thinks of
herself.
My mother passed
away a year ago, and my
sister handled her me-
morial service. I was ex-
tremely grateful to her
because I was
a wreck.
However, on
a bulletin
board outside
of the chapel,
my sister
posted sev-
eral photo-
graphs,
including
wedding pic-
tures from my
first mar- ANN
riage. I didn't MAIL
understand MAIL
why Mom
wasn't in any of these
photographs. At the
time, I was separated
from my ex-wife and
going through a divorce.
My then-fiancee at-
tended the service with
me, and it was humiliat-
ing and hurtful.
A week later, I called
my sister and explained
how upsetting it was for
us to see those photo-
graphs. My sister told me
to "grow up." After that
phone conversation, I
cut off all contact with
her
For some unknown
reason, my sister doesn't


I
.I


like my new wife. Did I
handle it appropriately
by cutting off all contact
with her? C.J.
Dear C.J.: We under-
stand that you are angry
with your sister, and we
agree that those photo-
graphs had no place at
the memorial service.
Nonetheless, your deci-
sion to cut off all contact
was extreme. Divorced
couples often
don't realize
that parents
and siblings
might also
grieve the end
of their rela-
tionship. In-
stead of
repairing the
problem, you
burned the
bridge.
E'S If you want
to reconnect
BOX with your sis-
ter, you will
need to reach out to her
gently Don't rehash the
memorial service. Sim-
ply say that you miss her,
that you feel hurt when
she rejects your wife,
and that you hope they
will get along better
someday Ask how to im-
prove things. We hope
she will be willing.

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email
anniesmailbox@
comcastnet.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4p.m., 5p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 8:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 6:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Divergent" (PG-13)
12:05 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:35 p.m. No passes.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
12:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted"
(PG) 12:35 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 12 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:20 p.m.


"Son of God" (PG-13)
12:20 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted"
(PG) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 11:45 p.m.,
3:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 12:30 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:25 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Commence
6 Tantrum in public
11 Pro-
16 Hidden supply
21 Martini fruit
22 Grew wan
23 Inventor- Howe
24 Bel-
25 Lunar-landscape vehi-
cle
26 Annoyed
27 may-care
28 Inert gas
29 Unclose,
poetically
30 Fairy tale menace
32 Hoarfrost
34 Put into office
36 Holiday time
37 Hawaiian goose
39 Some paintings
41 Nobleman
43 Sunday talk (Abbr.)
44 Victim
45 Swell
48 Police action
50 Purplish color
52 Sit on one's heels
55 Jib
57 "The of the Rings"
59 Had a meal
63 Knight's weapon
64 Egyptian deity
66 Friendly, in a way
68 French river
69 Ponder
70 Turn a horse to the
right
72 Merchandise
73 Trouble
74 Application
75 Mistrustful
76 Deep opening
78 Pop
79 Singer-- James
80 Holds up
82 Kitchen item
83 Prodded
85 Not at all ripe
86 Exclaim
87 Monk's title
88 Circular edge
89 Hang down
90 Take a swim
93 Sheen
95 Vacation result
96 Habitual
100 Gen. Robt.--


101 By way of
102 Cotton cloth
104 Game fish
105 Actress Lupino
106 Jewel
107 Neighbor of
Mercury
109 Stage signal
110 Tibia locale
111 Liquefy
112 Look
115 Sheen or
Scorsese
117 Aspect
118 Desire for drink
119 Sour
121 Judge
122 Major
thoroughfare
123 Of the ear
125 Reveal
127 Bank transaction
129 Shark-terror movie
132 Fuel
134 Soft mineral
136 "Dr. Zhivago" character
137 River in Spain
141 --loss
142 Doughnut shape
144 Maladies
146 Kind of palm
148 Nonsense!
149 Saltpeter
151 Dead language
153 Astound
155 Lookout man
157 Body of Muslim schol-
ars
158 Egg-shaped
159 Playing card
160 Outpouring
161 Playauke
162 Man of
La Mancha
163 Sugary
164 Consumerist Ralph-

DOWN
1 Metalloid element
2 Run off to wed
3 Granted
4 "- Got a Secret"
5 Roman despot
6 Morale
7 Without concern
8 Wapiti
9 -do-well
10 Cantor or Cibrian
11 Part of FBI


Spanish cheer
- gauche
Posts
Dozing
Go away!
Seaman
A deadly sin
Heating apparatus
Something sweet
Golly!
Impair
Flattened
Bring out
Aquarium creature
Big cat
Melon or gourd, e.g.
Frost
Movie-set VIP (Abbr.)
Sketched
Chicago players
Make obscure
Elevate
Start
- as a feather
Royal crown
Talk on and on
The cream
Poet Thomas
A pronoun
Red or Yellow
Former student, for
short
Lots and lots
Sixth sense (Abbr.)
Telegram
Glide
Colorful eel
Cogito sum

Pain
Paid athlete
One's relatives
Apparel
Show off
Eschew
Sired
First Hebrew letter
Largo, presto, etc.
Actress
Lollobrigida
Dry, as wine
Tire surface
Goatee site
A relative
Goldbrick
Snide
Dizzy sensation
Liquor
Intelligent ape


107 Extensive
108 Strikebreaker
110 Tough alloy
111 Dull surface
113 God of love
114 PartofQED
116 Eric the-
117 Calendar abbr.
120 Health club
employee
122 On the double!


124 Castaneda or Santana
126 Building wing
128 The East
129 Two-faced god
130 Slanting
131 Irrigate
133 Smooth and
sophisticated
135 Student group
138 Wide
139 Itinerary


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


140 Aquatic mammal
142 Mine wagon
143 Getz or Laurel
145 Merganser
147 Org.
150 Australian bird
152 Japanese
statesman
154 Maria
156 Ledger pro (Abbr.)


C 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cyclist couple shares overseas experiences


he last meeting of the
Rails to Trails of the
Withlacoochee was held
on Feb. 20 at the Lakes Re-
gional Library The group
meets four times a year and
tries to include a guest speaker
for each meeting.
At the February meeting, Ann
and Fred Abeles had a Power-
Point presentation and talked
about their recent trip to Ro-
mania and Bulgaria. The
Abeles are snowbirds from
Maryland and have biked over
many continents and countries.
This trip included them cy-
cling through the Transylvania
region of Romania, enjoying
the quiet farmlands, small vil-
lages and fortified churches.
After a day's trip to Bucharest,
they flew to Bulgaria and spent


Al
Hamage

RAILS TO
TRAILS


a week cycling in the Rhodopie
Mountains of Southern Bul-
garia. This area, bordering
Greece, has an ancient history
dating back to the Thracians.
Previous presentations by Ann
and Fred have been both enter-
taining and informative, and
they did not disappoint with
this one. Great job!
Several items of business that
were discussed at the last


board meeting and the CSO
meeting were as follows:
1. The Apopka pavilion is in
need of electric being installed
for use in the pavilion.
2. The Inverness Trailhead is
in need of revitalization and
grants are being looked into for
this purpose; we are still await-
ing an estimate for this project.
3. We are still working on re-
pairs to potholes on the trail
and how to best fix them.
4. The Floral City restroom is
scheduled for completion by
December When further action
is taken on these items, I will
keep you posted.
We are on Facebook! Like us!
Rails to Trails went live with a
Facebook page on March 25,
and before 24 hours had
passed, 117 people had "liked"


us. If you are on Facebook, we
invite you to "like" us and then
invite your friends to do so as
well. We encourage you to post
pictures of your trip on the
Withlacoochee Trail, as well as
interesting things you see while
enjoying the Friendliest Trail
in the county If you are not on
Facebook, email your photos to
heathernagy@gmail.com or
bonsw@mindspring.com.
The next CSO meeting,
scheduled for April 17 at the
Lakes Regional Library, will
begin at 5:30 p.m. Our guest
speaker will be Adam Thomas
of the Citrus County Visitors
Bureau. He will give us infor-
mation about off-road biking in
Inverness and what our local
trails have to offer He will also
discuss the heart of the bike


path connection with Citrus
and Marion counties and what
the future holds for cycling in
Citrus County and how our des-
tination is designed to assist
recreational cycling throughout
the community The
A meeting was held on
Feb. 18 with Citrus County offi-
cials, trail managers and inter-
ested citizens about connecting
the new Dunnellon Trail and
the Withlacoochee State Trail.
The various routes were toured
and discussed. There will be
more information coming on
this.
Thank you for your continued
interest in the Withlacoochee
State Trail.

Al Harnage can be reached at
352-527-3263.


How to save money on your summer vacation hotels


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Summer
vacationers looking for
deals on hotel rooms are
going to have to search a
little harder
The average cost of a
room now stands at $110,
up 4 percent from last
year and 8 percent from
two years ago, according
to travel research com-
pany STR.
A recovering economy
and the return of business
traveler spending have
helped to drive up the
cost of a good night's rest.
But that doesn't mean
that hotel stays need to
break the bank. Here are
some tips to save on your
family's summer lodging:

CONSIDER THE
EXTRAS:
Booking a hotel isn't as
simple as just looking at
the rate and taxes. Some
hotels include Wi-Fi,
breakfast, bottled water
and parking. Others add
on hefty fees for some or
all of the above. Then
there are those dreaded
resort fees. They were
once just levied at resorts
or Las Vegas casinos, but
today hotels in big cities
- not your typical idea of
a "resort" are adding
on the charge. Most hotels
disclose the fees on their
websites, but you often
have to hunt around to
find them. You can always
pick up the phone, call
the front desk and inquire
before booking.
KITCHENS, LAUNDRY
AND PRIVACY
These amenities won't
directly save you on the
room rate, but can make
your vacation cheaper If
you are a large family, you
might want to prepare a
few meals in your room.


Extended-stay hotel
brands such as Towne-
Place Suites by Marriott,
Starwood's Element and
Homewood Suites by
Hilton offer in-room
kitchens. Many hotels also
offer on-site laundry ma-
chines for guests to use.
To avoid getting two
rooms, but still have some
privacy consider a chain
like Hilton's Embassy
Suites, which offers par-
ents their own room and a
pull-out sofa in the living
room for the kids.

CANCELLATION
POLICIES
Many hotels let you can-
cel up to 4 p.m. or 6 p.m.
the night of check-in.
Read the fine print and
then use that to your ad-
vantage. Hotel rates are
constantly changing. Re-
serve at a fully refund-
able rate, and consider
that the most you will
need to pay for your lodg-
ing. Then, watch the
price. If it falls, rebook at
the new, lower rate.
TRY TINGO
Tingo is a booking web-
site that plays the cancel-
lation game for you. The
site requires prepayment
for the room but focuses
on fully refundable rates.
Each day, Tingo automati-
cally checks to see if ho-
tels lowered prices for the
nights you booked. If the
price falls, Tingo cancels
the original reservation
and rebooks you at the
new, lower rate. The site,
which is owned by Trip
Advisor, says travelers
have a 20 percent chance
of getting at least some
money back. Those who
are lucky enough to get a
rebate typically see about
$50, according to the com-
pany, but occasionally it is
much more.


DAY-OF-STAY DEALS
You have until 4 p.m. to
cancel that hotel, right?
Well, a handful of new
services are offering
deals for people checking
into hotels that night.
HotelTonight offers
discounted rooms at more
than 2,000 hotels via its
iPhone and Androids
apps. Each day at noon
local time, a slate of
rooms is released for
each of the big cities it
serves.
There are luxury ho-
tels, hip hotels and those
categorized as "solid" or
"basic." HotelTonight
users can't request room
types, so it is best used by
solo travelers or couples.
And while many hotels
offer ample nonsmoking
rooms, nothing is guaran-
teed using the app.
Rooms can be booked for
up to five nights, but
check-in must occur the
day of booking.
Priceline has also
jumped into the same-day
hotel sale frenzy Offers
start to post at 11 a.m. Un-
like Priceline's tradi-
tional service where
travelers bid on unknown
hotels, here the hotel
names are displayed
along with descriptions,
maps, photos and cus-
tomer satisfaction scores.
Last Minute Travel re-
cently launched a new
mobile app which can
also help with last-second
bookings. The app inte-
grates TripAdvisor ratings
and reviews. Unlike the
other apps, hotels can be
booked at any time in ad-
vance of your trip; you
don't have to wait until 11


a.m. or noon that day of
arrival.

NON-REFUNDABLE
RATES
Hotels know that some
people cancel and rebook
at a lower rate. That leads
to lots of uncertainty for
them about how many
guests will actually show
up on a given night. To get
a better sense of their fu-
ture business, hotels offer
discounted rates to travel-
ers willing to lock in that
rate in exchange for giv-
ing up the ability to can-


cel. Sometimes these can
be a great deal, but only
for travelers who are cer-
tain that flights won't be
delayed or their plans
won't change in any other
fashion. Occasionally
fully-refundable rates will
fall and become cheaper
than the non-refundable
ones, especially when
booked months in ad-
vance.

JOIN LOYALTY
PROGRAMS
InterContinental Hotels
- the parent company of


Holiday Inn as well as
Omni, Fairmont and
Kimpton all give program
members free basic Wi-Fi
- even those who have
yet to spend a night Fair-
mont gives its members
free access to its health
clubs.
Kimpton gives a $10
credit toward snacks in its
minibars.
Other programs some-
times give rate discounts
to their best members. If
you are an elite member,
remember to log into your
account before searching
for a hotel.


r______Social Membership


PANTATON r CanToday

o n ier

SOCIAL MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES
* 7-Day Advance Tee Times
*Use Of Fimtness Center
* Use Of Swimming Pool
*Use Of Volleyball Court.
Horseshoe Pits & Croquette Court


* Use Of Tennis Courts
* Usc Of Boat Ramp
* DISCOUNTED GOLF RATES
* 10% DISCOUNT ON FOOD
* 10% DISCOUNT ON PRO SHOP
MERCHANDISE (Soft Goods Only


SPINE CARE

YOU CAN TRUST

Learn about
the Florida
r Spine &
Neuro Center
Sand the
innovative
\J treatment
options
available.



Attend a FREE Spine Seminar:


Mond^ay, pil 7,,2014^^


Brooksville
Holiday Inn Express
14112 Cortez Blvd.

call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.

Imiir
I II.l l h l
*5 Largo Medical Center ''
ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA SPINE & NEURO CENTER


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested CARNIVAL LIBERTY CIE TOURS

8 night Eastern Carribean
.rba352-795a5797Ocober2 d Tu Raste of Ireland Tour
h ..... www.crystalriverdivers.com Aruba, Curacao and Grand Turk Rates Starting at:
Plantaton on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River atesStartng at: 898.00 per person
Spectacular 36per person Based on double occupancy.
P CA S Based on double occupancy. Land only, airfare and transfers
SPECIALS Includes Port and Gov't. Fees. are additional.
Based on availability at time of booking Based on availability at time of booking.
.-r-SIC 172- 20 N in Ae, nvres, I


KUR


ODCKv.iy irvei I

Bishop
Planetarium &
Amish Lunch
(Bradenton FL)
May 6,2014
$78.00


Sii~ t ~ Bi HI I i i 1 ,i i i

Pink Sand Cruise to Bermuda
10 nights Vision of the Seas
Sailing Aug 18,2014
Motorcoach to the Pier
Inside............................... $1147.00
Oceanview...................$1362.00
Junior Suite..................$2717.00


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ,(35)5 27.885
Located Next to Winn Dixie ( . ,OO.2 -8


9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL
352-795-7211 www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com


Bethlehem
THE HOLY LAND
Presentation for tour 2015
April 9, 2014 2:00 P.M.
at the Quality Inn
350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (Rte. 486), Hernando
To reserve your seat call
(352) 527-8002
email: gerrystravelclub@aol.com
__ THE TRAVEL CLUB_


COLLETTE National Parks of America
VACATIONS
$3,729.00 pp/dd Book Now and Save $100 per person!
September 6 -17, 2014
Includes:
* Round trip transportation including Air
* 16 Meals + 1 Additional Meal from Seaport Tours and Travel
* Hotels and Hotel Transfers
Visit: Scottsdale, Lake Powell, Grand Canyon, Bryce, Zion, Salt Lake
City, Grand Teton & Yellowstone National Parks, Old Faithful, Sheridan,
Bighorn Mountains, Mount Rushmore, Crazy Horse Memorial.
Seaport Tours and Travel _,
Toll-Free: (800) 833-5402 Local: (352) 621-0170
Seats are very limited; If you are interested, call now! rt


SCENIC CRUISES^^

ALL INCLUSIVE LUXURY
*-' ". ~LAST MINUTE LUXUR, SAVINGS,,
OF UP TO $5,000 per couple ,I
PRIMEMAYD--.':-.
JEWELS OF EUROPE
15 Days starting at $4,tb5 per person
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
S.Hidden352-860-2805
jTA L LY,-HF .es wwwtallyhovacations.com
S dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
(V WBK [.','1 n ~i i [MJC

- & AA,


1


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 A15


ST3541 5, ,,+^










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Veteran artists sought
The Florida Artists Gallery is planning a
special exhibit honoring Citrus County
veterans who are artists, with a juried ex-
hibit that will run the full month of May
Painters, illustrators and fine art pho-
tographers are being sought, and the only
rule for eligibility is that the artist be a
veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces who re-
sides in Citrus County no less than six
months per year, and is willing to sell his
or her art.
There is no entry fee and awards will be
given in each category, in addition to a
best of show award. Both military and non-
military subject matter is appropriate.
Application deadline is April 15.
Entry forms can be obtained at the
Florida Artists Gallery in Floral City, or by
mailing floridaartistsgallery@gmail.com.
A good-quality photograph preferably a
digital photograph should be submitted
for each work of art to be considered.
Work does not have to be framed, but it
must be fitted with a durable hanging
wire.
The Florida Artists Gallery and Caf6 is
in the historic Knight House at 8219
Orange Ave. in Floral City For more infor-
mation, call 352-344-9300, or go to
wwwflartistsgallery com.

Male descendants sought
The American Legion Post 166 of
Homosassa Springs is seeking all male de-
scendants, adopted sons and stepsons of
members of the American Legion and
such male descendants of veterans who
died in the service to their country during
times of war
Such men in the Chassahowitzka, Ho-
mosassa, Homosassa Springs and the Sug-
armill Woods area who are interested in
becoming members of the Sons of the
American Legion are needed. There is no
form or class of membership, except as ac-
tive membership.
Those interested in becoming members
may contact Clay Scott, vice commander of
American Legion Post 166. He may be
reached by writing to American Legion
Post 166, PO. Box 767, Homosassa Springs,
FL 34447-0767, or at 928-848-8359. His
email address is eaglerider@gmx.com.
Interested men may stop by the post on
the regular meeting night, the first Mon-
day monthly, at 7 p.m. at the Spring Lodge
No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S. Memorial Drive.

Vendors sought for health fair
Organizers of the May 10 Health Fair at
the Crystal River Mall are looking for
vendors.
The event, sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter 158 and the Crystal
River Mall, will be in the Westend Market
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Spring into Healthy Living" is the
theme for the fair, which will feature edu-
cation, screening and healthy living con-
sultations.
Those interested in participating may
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104.

Post forming auxiliary
American Legion Post 166 of Homosassa
Springs invites women in the Chassahow-
itzka, Homosassa, Homosassa Springs and
Sugarmill Woods areas to take part in
forming an American Legion Auxiliary for
the post.
Come to an organizational meeting at
7 p.m. Monday at Springs Lodge No. 378
F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive.
Membership in the Auxiliary is limited
to mothers, wives, daughters, sisters,
granddaughters, great-granddaughters
and grandmothers of the American Le-
gion, or to those who were in the U.S.
Armed Forces during times of war Senior
members are age 18 and older; junior
members are younger than 18.

Post offers Tax-Aide service
Wall Rives Post 58 of the American Le-
gion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, hosts the
AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation serv-
ices from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday
through April 9.
Call Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.

Get a free haircut, support
Beverly Hills post's works
Quick Stop Barber Shop owner Donna
Bowman and her staff of hair care profes-
sionals will donate their time and provide
free men's, women's and kids' haircuts
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 13.
It is only requested that a donation be
made.
The event will include music, food, raf-
fles and a silent auction. All proceeds will
be donated to the Beverly Hills American
Legion Post 237.
The Quick Stop Barber Shop is at 3541
N. Lecanto Highway Beverly Hills, in the
Winn-Dixie Plaza. Call 352-527-3030.


Bowed, but not bent


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Richard Hunt, commander of Florida's Military Order of the Purple Heart, visits the Fallen Soldiers Monument at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. Hunt is a Purple Heart recipient, having been wounded in Vietnam. Hunt holds
the Purple Heart medal awarded to deceased fellow veteran and friend Murphy H. Gross while visiting the Fallen Soldiers
Monument.


Vietnam vet chose combat at young age


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


Richard Hunt
never wanted
be a hero,
although he
admits thoughts like
may have lingered a
when he initially enl
in the U.S. Marine C(
He was only 17; the y
was 1967.

"It was kind of strange," the I
City resident said. "My grandfal
was in the Navy and he was at I
Harbor, he got me involved in r
And I did a lot of reading, it was
my biggest hobbies.
"I read about the Marines in P
and in World War II, and other
ices as well. I was raised among
of military people, so being you
very stupid, I enlisted in the Ma
Corps; it sounded like
something I really wanted
to be involved in.
"There's a certain
amount of romance (in
military books), depend-
ing on how it's written.
The fact of the matter is
there's nothing romantic
about combat. I was young
and very foolish and of
course I didn't understand
that."
There were a lot of
things Hunt, now 65,
never fully understood.
Many lessons that would
persist throughout his life
would be taught to him
during the next few years.
"I volunteered for com-
bat," he said. "I had op-
portunities to go into
aeronautics or radio or
electronics school or
something else, based on n
the tests we took, but I chose
the infantry"
After boot camp at Camp Leje
Jacksonville, N.C., Hunt- a hit
school dropout from Charlestor
he was still only 17 was too y
Marine guidelines for combat.
was sent to Hawaii, which is wi
was stationed when the USS Pt
was captured off the coast of N
Korea in January 1968.
For Hunt, this marked the be
of a military career that would
with a stressful situation and w
just escalate from there.
"We were the closest noncom
ground troops to (the Pueblo) ai
time," Hunt said. "We were on ]
minute standby, which meant w
to be airborne within 15 minute
things got worse). We were to be
first American troops in
(North) Korea.
"As a young boy I read about 1


............... ii aii: i

to :Their

Words]


Chosin Reservoir (a famous battle dur-
ing the Korean War) and the Chosin
Few, guys going into combat without
winter gear, all that snow and ice. I
was raised in Charleston. I wasn't in-
terested in going somewhere with all
that snow and ice."
He wouldn't The situation calmed,
prisoners from the Pueblo eventually
released after an 11-month negotia-
tion. So Hunt's outfit was sent to an-
other hotspot.
To Vietnam, to help repel the Tet Of-
fensive, which proved to be the biggest
North Vietnamese offensive of the
war
"They had captured Hue City," Hunt
said. "We were involved in its recap-
ture."
It was during that five-week battle


Name: Richard Hunt
Rank: Sergeant
Branch: U.S. Marine Corps
Dates: 1967-71
Stations: Boot camp in Camp
Leguene, N.C.; Hawaii;
Vietnam; Germany
Jobs: An infantryman, had
assorted combat duties. Served
in the recapture of the city of
Hue during the Tet Offensive,
from Jan. 31 to March 3, 1968.
Awards: Two Purple Hearts;
Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry
with the Bronze Star
attachment; Vietnamese Cross
of Gallantry with Palm for Unit;
three Presidential Unit
Citations; Navy Unit Citation
Organizations: American Legion; 4
Military Order of the Purple
Heart state representative


that Hunt received the first of his two
eune in Purple Hearts, awarded to those who
gh are wounded in battle. The city was lo-
, S.C., cated on a major supply route be-
byun b tween the coastal city of Da Nang and
oung the Vietnamese Demilitarized Zone. It
Sere he was not well defended, however, and
heblo troops there were quickly overrun
orth when the offensive began, which coin-
cided with the Tet New Year
ginning It took a month of house-to-house
begin fighting for allied troops to recapture
would Hue, and the cost was high nearly
4,400 allied troop casualties and more
mitted than 5,000 civilians, many of them exe-
t the cuted by Viet Cong guerrillas, with
15- most of the ancient city destroyed.
'e were "Most of the (wounds) I got were
es (if minor, I was hit by shrapnel," Hunt
e the said. "I got shrapnel in most of the
back of my body Things that go boom
in the night, you don't know what it is,
the a mortar shell or land mine or what-


ever
'There was a lot of close combat at
that time."
Hunt recalled during one firefight
some Marines were hurt and he was
"covered with blood."
"Later on, while we were on patrol,
someone asked me why my rifle was
so wet I looked and there was blood
on my gun. A bullet had gone right
through my hand. I wasn't even aware
I had been hit but it had gone through
my hand and that was leaking (blood)
on my rifle. The doc patched me up
and I went back out"
Several months later, Hunt then a
corporal -received a summons to re-
port to the general. He didn't know
why, but he followed orders and found
himself standing in front of the gen-
eral to receive his
second Purple
Heart.
"I was
Stinking,
1 'What the
hell is this
Iafor?"' Hunt
said. "It was
just one of
those deals
that well,
stuff hap-
pens."
Hunt spent
nine months
in Vietnam,
being trans-
ferred after
that to em-
bassy duty in
Germany He
was dis-
charged from
the service in
m1971, having
achieved the rank
of sergeant, but being discharged as a
private first class after a disagreement
with his ranking sergeant.
It wasn't until about four years ago
that Hunt became involved in the Mili-
tary Order of the Purple Heart, whose
members are those who have received
the award while serving in the
U.S. military
He has served as the state's repre-
sentative in that organization for the
past two years.
Hunt knows he's been fortunate.
He's seen wounds that varied by a
fraction of an inch in either direction,
could have saved a man. Or killed him.
"One of the patrols I was on, I was
on point and got called back for some
reason," Hunt said. "Guy that replaced
me ended up getting two 50-cals
(bullets) in the chest.
"It wasn't my day to die, and I really
don't know why."


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


..................................
....................................................
mmmmmm......................................................................m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


VFW plans fish fry, sock hop
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864,10199 N. Citrus
Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a fish fry dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday Cost is $8; children younger than
6 eat for $4.
On Saturday, Allen ONeil will provide music for a
sock hop at 6:30 p.m. Food will be for sale.
The public is welcome. For more information, call
352-465-4864.

Join post for chicken parmesan
The public is welcome to join the VFW Post 4337
family for a chicken parmesan and spaghetti dinner
Saturday, April 12, at the post home, 906 State Road 44
East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7 from 5 to 7 p.m., with music by Just Us
from 6 to 9 p.m.
Call 352-344-3495 or visit wwwvfw4337.org.

Sons of Legion plan meal, drive
Squadron 155 Sons of the American Legion will host
its quarterly blood drive from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday,
April 12, in front of American Legion Post 155 in
Crystal River
The blood drive is open to the public; age 16 with
permission from guardian and others age 17 and
older

VA to host enrollment open house
The Lecanto Veterans Affairs (VA) Community
Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC) will host an Enroll-
ment Open House from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April
12, at 2804 West Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Enrollment and eligibility staff will be available to
answer questions and enroll veterans for health care.
While not required, bring your DD 214 for verification
of military service. For more information, call David
Gilmer at 352-746-8000.

CCVC yard sale set for April 12
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales
September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the
second Saturday of the month Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41
and State Road 44 split
Sellers may come and set up the day before (typi-
cally Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the se-
curity of their own items overnight. The spots are
typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is appreciated.
For more information and to make reservations, call
Dan at 352-400-8952.

Cook-off competitors sought
Signups are being accepted for the April 26 BBQ
Cook-Off sponsored by the Crystal River DAV Chapter
and the Crystal River Mall.
Barbecue categories include chicken, ribs, brisket
and butt. Entry fee is $300.
The cook-off will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the
mall.
Applications must be received by April 15. For infor-
mation or to register, call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-
0337 or 352-794-3104, or email mgodfrey222@
gmail.com or becky crystalrivermall@gmail.com.

Legion Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the American Legion
Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam from 6 to 9 p.m. April 18
with Nashville artist John Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing instruments
or singing, and those who want to just enjoy the music
are welcome. Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft
drinks are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in Inverness. For
more information, call 352-476-2134, 352-476-7001 or
352-726-0444.

Flea market, food on tap
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the American Legion will
have an outdoor flea market and pancake breakfast at
7:30 a.m. Saturday, April 19.
On the menu are pancakes, French toast, scrambled
eggs, sausages, orange juice and coffee for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Come play games with post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa invites the public to
have some fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m. Wednesday and food is
available. Jam sessions are from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans Drive, Homosassa.

Bingo open to public on Thursdays
The public is invited to play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58. Doors open at
4 p.m.; games start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Public can eat shrimp, wings at post
Everyone is welcome to join Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 in Crystal River on
Wednesday for wings or shrimp basket lunches in the
lounge from noon to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit veterans' programs.
For more information, call 352-795-6526.

Post 10087 welcomes public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind Cadence Bank), offers sev-
eral events that are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in the smoke-free hall.
Card bingo and grill night is at 5 p.m. Wednesday in
the Canteen. Darts are at 7 p.m. Monday and Fridays
in the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and Thursday mornings.


For more information, call 352-746-0440.

Post 4252 invites all for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road 200 in Hernando (with
the helicopter out front), welcomes the public at its
meals and activities.
Meals include lunch every day and breakfast on
Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities include bar
bingo on Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me the
Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-can-eat fish fry or New
England boiled dinner
For more information, call the post at 352-726-3339,
email vfw4252@tampabayrr.com.


'Flags for First Grade'


Special to the Chronicle
Inverness Primary School first-grade students had the privledge of the 40&8 presenting "Flags for First Grade"in
February. The students learned about the history of the flag, who made it and the meaning of the flag. Members
of the 40&8 also explained how to properly fold a flag and the meaning of each fold. At the conclusion, each
student was presented with their own flag. Those taking time for the presentation were Tom Smith, Cheryl
Smith, John Kaiserian, Jimmy White, Dennis Marion, Ken Deschamp and Red Appleby.


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VETERANS


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 A17




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Support for Hospice veterans


Donation to van project


Special to the Chronicle
Giovanni's was a recent participant in the fourth annual American Legion Post 237
Poker Run and was recognized for its ongoing support of veterans served by Hospice
of Citrus and the Nature Coast. Giovanni's is at 3451 E Louise Lane, Hernando.
Pictured with Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast Development Director Linda
Baker, left, are American Legion Riders Chapter 237 Director John Roby, center, and
Giovanni's owners Shannon Noble and Tony Noble.


ROCHELLE KAISER/Chronicle
Joe Stephens of the Disabled American Veterans accepted a donation from Ho-
mosassa Civic Club President Eleanor Macias recently for the DAV van project. A
newer van had to be purchased to help veterans get to appointments in Gainesville
and The Villages.


Marine of the Year


VETERANS NOTES


DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic


stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus. fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat. For more informa-
tion, log onto
wwwbocc. citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.


Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental pro-
tection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
background check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
corn, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice has
program for vets
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver educa-
tion. Care and programs
do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call 352-
527-4600.


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Special to the Chronicle
Marine Dennis Gibson was named Marine of the Year for the Citrus Detachment
of the Marine Corps League 819 in March during the group's annual Installation
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A1S SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Partner in care
H Scoreboard Sports Bar, 2075 N Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, is a Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast
Partner in Care. The local establishment was a sponsor
of the fourth annual American Legion Post 237 Poker
Run held Jan. 25. Proceeds from the event went to
benefit Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian Cancer Research
and local veterans served by Hospice of Citrus and the
Nature Coast. Pictured outside the venue, from left,
are: American Legion Post 237 Commander Ray Roby,
Scoreboard Sports Bar owners Sam Benge and Pam
Benge, Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast
Development Director Linda Baker and American Legion
n Riders Chapter 237 Director John Roby.

ESpecialAto the Chronicle



VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


AMERICAN
LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPost155
@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-
3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto
Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org
or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and
Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little
Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness.
Call Commander Norm
Brumett at 352-476-2134 or
Auxiliary president Alice
Brumett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. To accommodate
members who cannot drive at
night, breakfast meetings are
also held at Olive Tree at
9 a.m. weekly.
Call Commander Robert
Scott at 352-860-2090 for
days and other
information.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral


City. Call 352-860-1629.
VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012.
Joe Nic Barco
Memorial VFW Post 7122,
8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral
City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
SAMVETS Harry M.
Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at


352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
The Korean War
Veterans Association, Cit-
rus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson
at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
National Seabee
Veterans of America Island
X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
National Seabee Veter-
ans of America Auxiliary IS-
LAND X-23 meets at 9:30
a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-


VETERANS NOTES


Prior enlisted sought
The U.S. Air Force is looking for prior
enlisted men and women from all serv-
ices interested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously obtained career
fields or retraining into select career
fields.
Some of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other
specialties. Enlisted career openings
that include the opportunities to retrain
consist of special operations positions
and unmanned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are based on Air


Force needs. Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes offered
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is asso-
ciated with the national service organi-
zation, Yoga For Vets. She teaches free
classes to combat veterans at several lo-
cations and times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397.

Chilton reunion scheduled
The next reunion for the USS Chilton
will be Sept. 17 to 24 in Louisville, Ky.
For information, call 352-341-5959.


C I f US c 0 U N T jJ


697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers
Association of America
(MOAA) meets at 11:30 a.m.
the second Tuesday monthly
at the Olive Garden. Call
President Norm Cooney, Lt.
Col. U.S. Army, retired, at
352-746-1768, or Secretary
Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air
Force, retired, at 352-
746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-
637-6206.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.


352-351-1883


Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 186
meets at the DAV Building, In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill. Re-
maining meetings in 2014
are: April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 meets at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940
Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or
email seacapt34447@
yahoo.com or Robert Currie
at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. second Saturday at
Elks Lodge No. 2522, 3580
Lemon Drive, Inverness. Visit


www.rollingthunderfl7.com,
call PresidentArchie Gooding
at 352-464-0863 or email
GatorDad0527@tampabay.rr.
com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Mem-
bers can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition; call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge,
developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, seeks
to meet the needs of
wounded veterans. 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@
servicesource.org.

This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more
information about scheduled
activities, meetings, meals
and more for a specific post
or group, call or email the
contact listed. Posts and
groups may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 A19


OHRWK




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


60th ANNIVERSARY


TheAndersons


March 17-23, 2014
Divorces
Thomas Glenn Ermatinger vs. Teresa
Renee Lewis Cassidy
Susan L. Harshaw, Hernando vs.
James D. Harshaw, Hernando
Jerry Ledsome, Crystal River vs.
Julie Ledsome, Coolville, Ohio
Christina Marie Snead vs. David
Wayne Grubbs

Marriages
Harold Gerard Boylan, Crystal
River/Debra Lynn McDaniel,
Crystal River
Michael John Brennan, Beverly
Hills/Patricia Sarah Enberg,
Beverly Hills
Kevin Walter Brightman, Citrus


FOR THE RECORD

Springs/Jacqueline Rivera,
Citrus Springs
John Robert Chance, Inverness/
Jennifer Marie Brown, Inverness
GauravAshok Chavda, Coppell,
Texas/Shital Hasmukh Patel, Hernando
Jarrod Glynn Gilman, Dunnellon/
Katie Lane Luckern, Dunnellon
Jared William Hoefsmit,
Beverly Hills/Jennifer Lembi Rieger,
Beverly Hills
Geovane Luiz Teixeira Honorato,
Beverly Hills/Amanda Lynn Klemann,
Beverly Hills
Stephen Douglas Horton, Weeki
Wachee/Janice Smith Cornacchione,
Homosassa
Todd Charles Keen, Homosassa/
Pauline Emily Hart, Homosassa


Michael Nicholas La Rosa,
Inverness/Rachel Marie Calma,
Inverness
Christopher James Lavoie, Crystal
River/Cecily Rae Buck, Crystal River
David Monroe Lazenby Jr.,
Lecanto/Charity Denise Eadler,
Inverness
Kevin Michael Peck, Inverness/
Megan Elizabeth Dewar, Inverness
Chad Derrick Richie, Inverness/
Lauren Ashly Umphress, Inverness
Donald Edward Vaughan,
Hernando/Radsma Ayson Maquema,
Hernando, FL
Russell Linn Vedder, Crystal
River/Angela Mae Platt, Homosassa
Bryant Keith Williams, Crystal
River/Candice Lee King, Crystal River


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Ted Anderson from
Scranton, Pa., and Jane
Clark Anderson from
Fleetville, Pa., were
married April 12, 1944, in
Fleetville.
Ted was in the Air
Force during World War
II, stationed in the
Philippine Islands and
Korea. Jane enjoyed
painting and is a great
cook and baker Ted
worked at Gleason Works
in Rochester, N.Y, and


they lived in Mendon,
N.Y, until 1987, when
they moved to Dunnellon.
Ted and Jane moved to
Highland Terrace in
October 2012. They have
four children, Dave (Sue)
in Bloomfield, N.Y; Jim
(Peg) in Blue Mounds,
Wis.; Don (Gail) in
Grasonville, Md.; and
Ellen (Bruce) Delmar,
N.Y They also have nine
grandchildren and nine
great-grandchildren.


GET TOGETHER


Learn social
ballroom dance
Social ballroom dance
classes with June
Queripel are offered
Wednesday at the
Central Citrus Com-
munity Center, 2804
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Basics are taught at
1:30 p.m., Plus classes
are at 2:45 p.m.
The one-hour lessons
are $5 each. Proceeds
help support In-Home
Senior Services.

Come for tea at
Hospice House
The community is in-
vited to Afternoon Tea at
Hospice House at 2 p.m.
every Friday
Afternoon Tea offers
an ideal way to greet
neighbors and friends
and meet Hospice of Cit-
rus County staff who will
provide information and
tours of the facility
The Hospice House is


a place of comfort and
peace which emphasizes
privacy dignity and the
inclusion of family mem-
bers for the provision of
end-of-life care.
For more information,
call 352-527-2020. Visit
on Facebook or visit
www.hospiceofcitrus.org.

Spirited group
welcomes all
Spirit of Citrus
Dancers, USA Dance
chapter 6072, holds so-
cial ballroom dances on
the second and fourth
Saturday of the month
at Kellner Auditorium
Jewish Center, 92 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
Doors open at 6:45
p.m. with complimentary
dance lessons at 7 p.m.
and general dancing
from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Ad-
mission is $6 for mem-
bers and $9 for others.
Ice, coffee and snacks
are provided.
For more information,
call Barb or Jack at 352
344-1383.


NEW ARRIVAL

Mason William Dixon

John and Karen Edge
of Homosassa announce
the birth of their
grandson, Mason William
Dixon. Mason was born
March 20,2014, at
10:16 p.m. at Spring Hill
Regional Hospital and
weighed 6 pounds, ....
10 ounces.
The proud parents are
Dustin and Carrie Dixon
of Homosassa.
The paternal -
grandparents are the
late Steve Dixon of Mason was welcomed
Homosassa and Sandra by his big sister, Hailey
Dixon of Homosassa. Nicole Dixon.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your
name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.
To submit story ideas for feature sections, call
352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again,
be prepared to leave a detailed message.


Scott and Linda April 8,2014.
Walkers of Hernando will The couple exchanged
celebrate their 25th wedding vows on
anniversary on Tuesday, April 8,1989.


ENGAGED


Kirk/McDonald


THANK YOU
CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM


VOLUNTEERS

Over 450 volunteers

Serving in 51 departments


Kelley Jeane Kirk of
Dallas, Ga., and William
Dennis McDonald of
Acworth, Ga., have
announced their
engagement.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Jeane and
Rudy Weddle of Floral
City She earned her AAS
in electronics from Chat-
tahoochee Technical Col-
lege, Marietta, Ga., and is
employed by Kennesaw


State University,
Kennesaw, Ga.
Her fiance, son of the
late William and Lorraine
McDonald of Island Lake,
Ill., is a graduate of the
University of Wisconsin.
He has been CEO of
McDonald Insurance
Agency for more than 20
years in Marietta, Ga.
The couple will marry
at noon on May 10, 2014,
in Marietta.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.
B E G I IN S C E N E 0 R M A S T A S H
0 L I V E P A LED E L I A S MC A IN T 0
R 0 V E RnIlR K EIDENVD I L A R G OIN
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OIN E I MUL 1L S GEIR SE W RES AlL
C R o u c H S- A oLRD S U P E D
L A IN C E 0 SI I SR IN E I H O R L Y
0 IISE M U L GE A I L
U SIE WARY CHAM DAD E T T A
DETAINS POT POKED REEN
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B AIT-HE0 GLSOSS T-ANCH ON I C
E L E E VIIA T ER RYC H UBNI DA
GEMI VENUS UE HIINIMELT
A P P EARANCE MR T I NF A C E T
TH I RSIT T ART D EEM A RT ER Y
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ST R U MS E N SRWSEET IN A D E R
4-6 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Volunteers donate th eir time and

equipment for patient satisfaction.


"The happiest people are those


25th ANNIVERSARY


The Walkers


2013 Volunteer
of the Year


ack Condron
ack Condron


Congratulations to our
2013 Volunteers
of the Month

Grace Copeland Shirlev Gosselin
Ginnv Thompson Kaija Therrell
Jeff Shields Milton Kelly
Earl Hammond Sara Kell'
Paul Oliver Judv Ford
Tammv MNoone Jean Clarke
Bob Sperber Delores Pakes


A20 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


TOGETHER









SPORTS


Tony Stewart is on
pole for today's
Sprint Cup race./B6




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


-0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Golf/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0*MLB/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Auto racing/B6


Rays stage home rally to stop Rangers


Loney's double

the difference in

5-4 win for TB

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG -James
Loney hit a go-ahead, two-run
double in the eighth inning and
the Tampa Bay Rays beat the
Texas Rangers 5-4 on Saturday
night.
Loney lined an opposite-field
drive off Neal Cotts (0-1) that
went over left fielder Shin-Soo
Choo and put the Rays up 5-4.


Rays box score
For the stats from the
Tampa Bay-Texas baseball
game, see Page B4.

Brandon Gomes (1-0) pitched a
perfect eighth before Grant Bal-
four got the final three outs for
his first save.
Yunel Escobar and Matt
Joyce homered for the Rays.
David Price gave up four runs
and nine hits in six innings.
Texas right-hander Nick Mar-
tinez allowed three runs and
four hits over six innings in his
major league debut.
Alex Rios put the Rangers up
2-0 with a two-out, two-run dou-


ble in the tirst offtn rice. Rios has
12 hits in 30 at-bats with 10 RBIs
against the Rays left-hander
Elvis Andrus made it 3-0 on a
second-inning RBI single be-
fore Escobar pulled Tampa
Bay within two on a solo homer
in third.
It was announced before the
game that Escobar and the Rays
had agreed to a two-year
See Page B3
Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Yunel
Escobar greets teammates in
the dugout after hitting a solo
home run during the third inning
Saturday against the Texas
Rangers in St. Petersburg.
Associated Press


Gators si


outplayed


After big early lead, Gators have no answer for UConn, who advances to the NCAA title game


Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas Connecticut didn't wait for the
final buzzer to beat Florida this time.
The Huskies, the seventh seed in the East Regional,
had outstanding games on both ends of the court to beat
overall No. 1 seed Florida 63-53 on Saturday night.
The win ended Florida's 30-game winning streak,
which began after the Huskies beat the Gators 65-64 on
Dec. 2 on a buzzer-beating jumper by Shabazz Napier
Napier helped seal this game with about 2 minutes to
play when he made two free throws for a 59-47 lead. That
margin was the deficit the Huskies faced in the opening
minutes after a cold shooting start.
"We have been in a lot of dog fights," Napier said. "We
are just an experienced group. We believe in each other
and continue to believe in
each other... We are
what we do."

tigdoing towin. Thard isct
With second-year
coach Kevin Ollie in
a defensive stance
himself most of the
game, the Huskies
sidetracked the
Florida offense by shut-
ting down point guard Scot-
tie Wilbekin and 3-point specialist
Michael Frazier II, who scored a combined seven points.
The Huskies were impressive on offense, shooting 55.8
percent (24 of 43) from the field against a team that al-
lowed opponents to shoot 39.9 percent this season.
"Everybody was at Level 5 and that was the most im-
portant thing," Ollie said. "Whomever I put in the game,
it was positive and they were productive."
The Huskies (31-8) will play the winner of the Wiscon-
sin-Kentucky game for the national championship on
Monday night.
DeAndre Daniels had 20 points and 10 rebounds for
Connecticut, and it was his two 3-pointers in a span of 1:43
that helped ignite the Huskies after they had fallen
behind 16-4.
"DeAndre was huge for us," Ollie said. "He stepped up
and really rebounded for us and was pretty much
unstoppable."
Daniels was 9 of 14 from the field and played the entire
game.
Napier, who leads the team in almost every category,
didn't dominate, but he finished with 12 points and six as-
sists. He definitely got the better of Wilbekin in a matchup
of senior point guards, both conference players of the
See Page B2
Florida center Patric Young dunks as Connecticut's Niels
Giffey looks on during the second half of the NCAA Final
Four game Saturday in Arlington, Texas.
Associated Press


Presidential tourney underway


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Brian Brown tees off on the 10th hole Saturday during the first round of the Presidential Golf Tournament
at 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club in Crystal River. The Presidential will conclude today; check Monday's
Chronicle to find out who won the event.


I S ORS B IES-


Warriors baseball
runs record to 16-1
The Seven Rivers Christian
baseball team scored a 9-0 tri-
umph against Gainesville Corner-
stone Academy on Saturday
afternoon.
Cory Weiand doubled and
scored twice, while also striking
out nine in 5 1/3 innings to get the
pitching victory for the Warriors.
Adam Gage doubled, homered,
scored twice and drove in two runs
to pace Seven Rivers offensively.
For the Warriors, Parker Pills-
bury (two runs, three stolen
bases), Garrett Griggs (RBI, run),
Tyler Pillsbury (double, run, RBI)
and Allen Rivers (two hits, run,
stolen base) also chipped in.
Coy Phillips tossed 1 2/3 in-
nings of scoreless relief with two
strikeouts, and also collected three
hits at the plate.
SR (16-1 overall, 8-0 district)
host HCA on Monday at home for
Senior Night.


Escobar, Rays agree
on 2-year extension
ST. PETERSBURG Short-
stop Yunel Escobar and the
Tampa Bay Rays have agreed to a
two-year contract extension cover-
ing 2015 and 2016 worth a guar-
anteed $13 million.
The deal announced Saturday
also includes a club option for
2017. The extension replaces a
2015 club option.
The 31-year Escobar played in
a career-high 153 games and
made 149 starts last season for
the Rays. After establishing club
records with a .989 fielding per-
centage and 53 consecutive error-
less games at shortstop, he was a
finalist for the American League
Gold Glove Award.
"He's a really, really good player
at a position that's extremely
scarce around the game," Tampa
Bay executive vice president of
baseball operations Andrew Fried-
man said.
From staff, wire reports




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rec league signups ending soon


Special to the Chronicle

Join one of Citrus County
Parks and Recreation adult
leagues today Registration is
now open.
There is a $50 team commit-
ment fee due at registration and
league fees will be determined by
the number of teams that register
The leagues are:
Men's softball, coed softball
and coed kickball -registration
closes April 14.
Men's flag football and men's
basketball registration closes
April 28.
Please sign up at Citrus
County Parks and Recreation of-
fice, located at 2804 W Marc
Knighton Ct. in Lecanto.
Visit us online at www
citruscountyparks.com or call us
352-527-7540.
P.L.A.Y.
Don't miss out on Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's P.L.A.Y.
programs.
The P.L.A.Y. programs offered in


the upcoming session include: bas-
ketball, which will be held at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center on
Monday or Wednesdays; and flag
football located at Bicentennial Park
on Tuesday or Thursdays.
The next session begins the week
of April 7. Boys and girls, ages 3-5,
are encouraged to join the six-week
program. After enrollment, each
child receives age appropriate
sports equipment and a team T-shirt.
Registration is now open and spots
fill up fast. For more information, contact
Parks and Recreation at 352-527-7540
or visit www.dtruscountyparks.com.
All programs and activities of-
fered by the Division of Parks and
Recreation are available to all per-
sons without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or national
origin. For persons with disabilities
requiring special accommodations,
please contact our office five days
prior to the program so that proper
consideration may be given to the
request. For hearing impaired
please contact 352-527-5901
(TTY) or 352-527-7540 (Voice).


C


Men's flag football is one of five adult sports now accepting registrati


Underwater Egg Hunt
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation's Sixth annual Underwater Egg
Hunt is on April 19 at the Bicenten-
nial Park Pool in Crystal River. There
will be two Egg Hunts for different
age groups: Children 6 and under


hunt from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
while children ages 7 to 12 hunt
from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m..
Make sure you bring your own
basket! Eggs are turned in after the
hunt in exchange for a gift bag filled
with little nick-knack toys and candy.


Special to the Chronicle
on.

There will be food for sale and
festivities outside around the pool
grounds such as egg races,
arts-n-craft station, pictures with the
bunny and much more.
For more information, call
352-527-7540.


Vaulting ahead


Kuchar takes

4-shot lead at

Houston Open

Associated Press

HUMBLE, Texas Matt Kuchar
didn't have the result he had hoped
for while playing in the final pair-
ing at last week's Texas Open.
The six-time PGA Tour winner,
who closed with a final-round 75 on
his way to a fourth-place finish last
week, will have the opportunity to
show what he learned from that dis-
appointing finish at this week's
Houston Open.
Playing in the final pairing,
Kuchar vaulted past a struggling
Sergio Garcia with a 4-under par 68
on Saturday overcoming windy
conditions at the Golf Club of Hous-
ton to match the low round of the
day and take a four-shot lead after
three rounds.
Kuchar stands at 15 under over-
all heading into Sunday's final
round, four shots ahead of second-
round leader Garcia and Cameron
Tringale. The three will be paired
together on Sunday
"It's a nice position to have
played well last week, to have been
in the last group with a chance to
win and again to come back this
week, completely different course,
and have another shot to win,"
Kuchar said.
Kuchar's last win came at the Me-
morial last year, and he has eight
top 10 finishes this season in 10
events.
He'll have the opportunity add to
that resume on Sunday, weather
permitting, as well as fuel his surg-
ing confidence leading into next
week's Masters, where he finished
in a tie for eighth last year
The prospect of a winner's share
of nearly $1.2-million, however, has
Kuchar locked in on this weekend
first even with the prospect of
competing for his first major cham-
pionship looming next week.
"I've been playing some steady
golf for a couple of years now and
feel like my chances of playing well
tomorrow are pretty good," Kuchar
said. "Having a four-shot lead is a


Associated Press
Matt Kuchar hits off the tee Saturday on the eighth hole during the third
round of the Houston Open golf tournament in Humble, Texas.


great position to be in."
The golfers went off both tees in
threesomes early Saturday morning
in anticipation of severe weather in
the evening, a format they'll use
again Sunday with hopes of avoid-
ing a Monday finish leading into
next week's visit to Augusta
National.
Garcia, who surged ahead with a
7-under 65 on Friday, began the day
with a one-shot lead over Kuchar.
That disappeared quickly after the
Spaniard bogeyed the first to fall
back to 11 under and into a tie with
his playing partner, Kuchar
That was just the beginning of the
struggles for Garcia, who later put
his tee shot into the water on No. 10.
He finished with a 1-over 73 after
matching the course's low mark of
12 under after two rounds.


Wie, Thompson tied for
Kraft Nabisco lead
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. Michelle
Wie and Lexi Thompson topped the
Kraft Nabisco leaderboard, setting up a
possible final-round showdown the
LPGATour has been waiting for.
The 24-year-old Wie shot a bogey-free
4-under 68 on Saturday to match Thom-
son at 10-under 206 at Mission Hills in
the first major championship of the year.
The 19-year-old Thompson settled for a
69 after driving into a fairway bunker and
missing a 3-foot par putt on the par-5 18th.
She also missed two short birdie putts.
Charley Hull, the Englishwoman who
turned 18 last month, was two strokes
back along with five-time major cham-
pion Se Ri Pak. Hull birdied the 18th for
a 66.


PGA Tour
Houston Open
Saturday
At The Golf Club of Houston, Humble,
Texas
Purse: $6.4 million
Yardage: 7,441, Par: 72
Third Round
Matt Kuchar 66-67-68-201 -15
Cameron Tringale 68-68-69-205 -11
Sergio Garcia 67-65-73- 205 -11
Matt Jones 68-68-71 -207 -9
Rickie Fowler 70-70-68 208 -8
Ben Curtis 67-70-71 208 -8
Shawn Stefani 67-69-73 209 -7
Jon Curran 69-72-69 -210 -6
J.B. Holmes 66-73-71 -210 -6
RetiefGoosen 68-71-71 -210 -6
Phil Mickelson 68-70-72 -210 -6
Andres Romero 72-69-70 -211 -5
Chris Stroud 68-72-71 -211 -5
Brice Garnett 68-71-72 -211 -5
Ryan Palmer 70-68-73 -211 -5
Brian Gay 71-70-71 -212 -4
Charl Schwartzel 67-75-70-212 -4
Hunter Mahan 69-72-71 -212 -4
Martin Flores 68-72-72 -212 -4
ErikCompton 66-73-73 -212 -4
Jason Gore 67-71-74 -212 -4
Jim Renner 66-72-74 -212 -4
Luke Donald 71-71-71 -213 -3
Graham DeLaet 70-71-72 -213 -3
Lee Westwood 70-72-71 -213 -3
CamiloVillegas 67-73-73 -213 -3
Michael Putnam 68-72-73 -213 -3
Steve Stricker 68-69-76 -213 -3
JimmyWalker 71-65-77-213 -3
Webb Simpson 68-73-73 -214 -2
John Huh 71-71-72 -214 -2
Russell Henley 73-69-72 -214 -2
Nicholas Thompson 71-69-74 -214 -2
Freddie Jacobson 68-72-74-214 -2
Justin Hicks 67-73-74 -214 -2
Ryo Ishikawa 69-74-71 -214 -2
Brian Harman 70-71-74 -215 -1
Rory Mcllroy 70-71-74 -215 -1
Jonathan Byrd 68-74-73 -215 -1
Carl Pettersson 69-74-72 -215 -1
Bill Haas 65-74-76 -215 -1
Jeff Overton 73-69-74 -216 E
JeffMaggert 69-73-74 -216 E
Angel Cabrera 68-73-75 -216 E
Stewart Cink 67-75-74 -216 E
Brendon Todd 69-74-73 -216 E
James Hahn 71-72-73 -216 E
Keegan Bradley 66-77-73 -216 E
Robert Garrigus 74-69-73 -216 E
John Rollins 68-76-72 -216 E
Ben Crane 70-74-72 -216 E
Brendon de Jonge 71-73-72- 216 E
Chris Kirk 68-74-75 -217 +1
John Merrick 74-68-75 -217 +1
David Toms 71-71-75 -217 +1
Michael Thompson 67-73-77-217 +1
Ricky Barnes 70-73-74 -217 +1
Kyle Stanley 69-74-74 -217 +1
JhonnattanVegas 67-75-76- 218 +2
Harrison Frazar 71-71-76 -218 +2
Greg Chalmers 69-74-75 -218 +2
Ernie Els 68-76-74 -218 +2
TyroneVanAswegen71-73-74- 218 +2
Bubba Dickerson 74-70-74-218 +2
Davis Love III 68-73-78 -219 +3
Charley Hoffman 65-76-78-219 +3
Kevin Chappell 71-72-76 -219 +3
Henrik Stenson 71-72-76 -219 +3
John Mallinger 72-72-75 -219 +3
Tommy Gainey 71-72-77 220 +4
Hudson Swafford 70-74-76 220 +4
Stephen Ames 72-71-78 -221 +5
J.J. Henry 72-71-78 -221 +5
Kevin Kisner 71-70-81 222 +6
Justin Leonard 70-71-81 -222 +6
Roberto Castro 71-72-83-226 +10
Sean O'Hair 69-72-WD


LPGA Tour
Kraft Nabisco
Championship
Saturday
At Mission Hills Country Club, Dinah
Shore Tournament Course, Rancho
Mirage, Calif.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,738, Par: 72
Third Round
a-denotes amateur
MichelleWie 67-71-68-206 -10
LexiThompson 73-64-69- 206 -10
Charley Hull 73-69-66 -208 -8
Se Ri Pak 67-70-71 -208 -8
Catriona Matthew 72-68-70- 210 -6
Cristie Kerr 69-70-71 -210 -6
ChellaChoi 70-72-69 -211 -5
ShanshanFeng 66-73-72-211 -5
Stacy Lewis 73-70-69 212 -4
Angela Stanford 74-69-69-212 -4
Azahara Munoz 72-70-70-212 -4
Gerina Piller 77-65-70 -212 -4
Jiyai Shin 69-73-70 -212 -4
AmyYang 68-73-71 -212 -4
Jee Young Lee 71-75-67 -213 -3
Mirim Lee 71-72-70 -213 -3
Karrie Webb 73-70-70 -213 -3
Anna Nordqvist 71-69-74 -214 -2
a-B. Henderson 77-68-70 -215 -1
Tiffany Joh 70-75-70-215 -1
Haeji Kang 70-74-71 -215 -1
HeeYoung Park 72-72-71 -215 -1
NaYeon Choi 72-71-72-215 -1
Christina Kim 74-69-72 -215 -1
Mo Martin 73-68-74 -215 -1
Morgan Pressel 70-70-75-215 -1
PK. Kongkraphan 74-74-68- 216 E
Eun-Hee Ji 74-73-69 -216 E
Pernilla Lindberg 73-74-69-216 E
MiHyang Lee 72-72-72 -216 E
Pornanong Phatlum71-73-72 216 E
Lydia Ko 73-70-73 -216 E
a-Minjee Lee 75-68-73 -216 E
llhee Lee 78-69-70 -217 +1
Jenny Shin 74-73-70-217 +1
AlisonWalshe 73-74-70-217 +1
HaNaJang 73-73-71 -217 +1
Jessica Korda 73-73-71 -217 +1
SunYoungYoo 74-72-71 -217 +1
Austin Ernst 71-74-72 -217 +1
Caroline Masson 73-72-72-217 +1
T. Suwannapura 73-72-72-217 +1
Inbee Park 74-70-73 -217 +1
SoYeonRyu 70-72-75 -217 +1
Nicole Castrale 71-73-74 -218 +2
Mariajo Uribe 72-72-74 -218 +2
a-Alison Lee 75-74-70 -219 +3
Karine Icher 75-72-72 -219 +3
I.K. Kim 74-73-72 -219 +3
Giulia Sergas 73-74-72 -219 +3
Jodi EwartShadoff76-70-73 -219 +3
Juli lnkster 76-70-73 -219 +3
a-LiliaVu 73-73-73-219 +3
JiminKang 76-69-74 -219 +3
Jennifer Resales 69-74-76-219 +3
Sandra Gal 72-70-77 -219 +3
Paula Creamer 72-74-74 -220 +4
Candie Kung 74-70-76 -220 +4
a-Su-Hyun Oh 74-74-73 -221 +5
Caroline Hedwall 71-74-76-221 +5
Sei Young Kim 75-70-76 -221 +5
Carlota Ciganda 73-69-79-221 +5
Danielle Kang 76-73-73 -222 +6
Haru Nomura 75-72-75 -222 +6
a-AngelYin 68-79-75 -222 +6
SakuraYokomine 75-70-77- 222 +6
Hee-Won Han 75-73-75 -223 +7
Meena Lee 74-74-75 -223 +7
Christel Boeljon 73-72-78-223 +7
D. Claire Schreefel 75-74-75 224 +8
Ai Miyazato 77-71-76 -224 +8
Brittany Lincicome 77-72-76 225 +9
Mina Harigae 76-72-77 -225 +9


SIMPLY
Continued from Page B1

year
Napier had two key second half
steals on Wilbekin, both of which led
to UConn baskets. Wilbekin was both-
ered by cramps throughout the game.
"It was right when the second half
started. I was getting a little cramp, it
wasn't too bad," Wilbekin said. "I got
out of the game and got some ice and it
wasn't really a problem from then on."
The Connecticut guards were.
Florida had 11 turnovers and a sea-
son-low three assists.
"That's crazy, that's not usually
what we do," Wilbekin said. 'All
credit goes to them and their guards
and the way they were denying and
putting pressure on us."
Patric Young had 19 points for
Florida (36-3), which had won all of its
NCAA tournament games by at least
10 points. The Gators shot just 38.8
percent from the field (19 of 49), well
off their 46.1 percent average.
"I thought they played extremely
well today unfortunately for us I did-
n't think it was one of our better
games and I think Connecticut had a
lot to do with that," Florida coach
Billy Donovan said. "We got off to a
very, very good start in the game, and
the reason we got off to a good start
was our defense was very, very good.


Once they got their defense set, I
thought we had a hard time dealing
with their pressure up top."
The Huskies used the 3-pointer to
open things up inside, hitting 5 of 12
from long range. They had such an
easy time scoring inside that they had
only basket outside the paint in the
final 20 minutes, shooting 63.6 per-
cent (14 of 22).
Florida was just 1 for 10 from
3-point range and the Gators' most ef-
fective weapon through most of the
game was an offensive rebound off a
miss. They had 12 in the game and
turned them into 13 points.
Florida's defense which was No.
3 in the nation was suffocating
early and the Gators took a 16-4 lead
with a 7-0 run that was capped by a
drive by Wilbekin with 9:47 to play
The Huskies suddenly found their
shooting touch. Connecticut made
four straight shots and three of them
were from beyond the 3-point line -
two by Daniels and another by Ryan
Boatright. A 3 by Napier brought Con-
necticut within 20-18 and a three-
point play by Niels Giffey gave the
Huskies their first lead of the game,
21-20 with 3:18 left in the half They
never trailed again.

Florida guard Kasey Hill shoots as
Connecticut forward Phillip Nolan
defends during the second half
Saturday in Arlington, Texas.
Associated Press


B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Mariners 3, A's I


Seattle


Oakland


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Almontcf 4 1 1 1 Crisp cf 3 0 1 0
BMillerss 4 0 1 0 Dnldsn3b 4 00 0
Cano2b 3 0 2 0 Lowriess 4 1 2 1
Smoaklb 4 00 0 Mossdh 4 02 0
Hartdh 4 0 0 0 Cespdsl If 4 0 0 0
Seager3b 4 1 1 0 Jasoc 4 0 1 0
Morrsnrf 3 0 1 0 Reddckrf 4 00 0
MSndrsrf 1 00 0 Barton 1b 3 00 0
Ackleyl If 4 1 1 2 Sogard2b 3 00 0
Zunino c 3 000
Totals 34 37 3 Totals 33 1 6 1
Seattle 000 030 000 3
Oakland 000 000 001 1
LOB-Seattle 5, Oakland 6. 2B-B.Miller (2),
Seager (2), Moss (2). 3B-Crisp (1). HR-AI-
monte (1), Ackley (1), Lowrie (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
HernandezW,2-0 81/36 1 1 1 8
Rodney S,1-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Oakland
StrailyL,0-1 6 6 3 3 1 7
Pomeranz 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ji.Johnson 1 1 0 0 0 2
Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP-FHernandez, Straily.
Umpires-Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny
Gonzalez; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Sean
Barber.
T-2:22. A-30,290 (35,067).
Marlins 5, Padres 0
San Diego Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi


ECarerss 4 0 2 0 Hchvrrss
Venale rf 2 0 0 0 Yelich If
Denorfi ph-rfl 0 0 0 Stanton rf
Headly3b 3 0 1 0 GJoneslb
S.Smith If 4 0 0 0 McGeh3b
Alonsolb 4 0 1 0 Sltlmchc
Gyorko 2b 4 00 0 Dietrch 2b
Amarst cf 3 0 0 0 Ozuna cf
Riverac 2 0 0 0 Frnndz p
Grandlph 1 00 0 ARamsp
Thayerp 0 00 0 Dobbs ph
Benoitp 0 0 0 0 MDunnp
Vincent p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph
Nady ph 1 0 0 0 Marm lp
Cashnrp 2 000
Hundlyc 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 05 0 Totals
San Diego 000 000 000
Miami 001 001 12x


33510 5
0
5


E-Dietrich (2). DP-Miami 1. LOB-San Diego
8, Miami 10. 2B-Alonso (2), Stanton (3),
McGehee (4), Saltalamacchia (3). SB-
Amarista 2 (2). CS-E.Cabrera (1). SF-
R.Johnson.
IP H RERBBSO


San Diego
Cashner L,0-1
Thayer
Benoit
Vincent
Miami
Fernandez W,2-0
A.Ramos H,2
M.Dunn H,2
Marmol


6 5 2
1 2 1
2/3 3 2
1/3 0 0

62/33 0
1/3 0 0
1 1 0
1 1 0


WP-Fernandez, M.Dunn. PB-Rivera.
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Brian Knight; Third, Quinn Wolcott.
T-2:49.A-35,188 (37,442).
Angels 5, Astros I


Los Angeles Houston
ab r h bi
Cowgill rf 3 1 1 0 Villar ss
Calhon ph-rf2 0 1 1 Grssmn cf
Trout cf 5 0 1 0 Altuve 2b
Pujolslb 4 0 1 0 GuzmnIlf
Freesedh 4 2 2 1 Carter lb
JHmltnlf 5 1 3 2 MDmndh
HKndrc2b 5 02 1 Hoesrf
lannettc 4 0 0 0 Corprnc
Aybarss 5 1 2 0 MGnzlz3b
JMcDnl3b 4 0 1 0
Totals 41 5145 Totals
Los Angeles 010 030 010
Houston 100 000 000


ab r h bi
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
3110
3 1 1 0
4000
4000
3000
3010
3 0 1 0
3000
3010
3 0 1 0

311 4 0
5
1


E-Jo.McDonald (1), Pujols (1), Ma.Gonzalez
(1). DP-Los Angeles 1, Houston 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 12, Houston 4.2B-Cowgill (1), Pujols
(3), H.Kendrick (2). 3B-Aybar (1). HR-
J.Hamilton (2). SB-Calhoun (1), Altuve (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
SkaggsW,1l-0 8 4 1 0 1 5
J.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
KeuchelL,0-1 5 8 4 4 2 5
Albers 2 2 0 0 0 2
Quails 1 2 1 1 0 2
Fields 1 2 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Albers (Pujols).
Umpires-Home, Eric Cooper; First, Chris Guc-
cione; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Tom Hallion.
T-3:02.A-28,515 (42,060).
Braves 6,
Nationals 2


Atlanta


Washington


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Heywrdrf 5 00 0 Span cf 4 1 0 0
BUpton cf 5 02 0 Harper If 4 00 0
Fremnlb 2 1 2 0 Werthrf 3 00 0
CJhnsn3b 5 1 2 0 LaRochlb 2 1 2 2
J.Uptonlf 4 2 2 0 Zmrmn3b 2 00 0
Uggla2b 5 1 1 2 Espinos2b 2 00 0
Doumitc 5 0 1 1 Dsmndss 4 0 1 0
Smmnsss 4 1 1 1 Rendon2b-3b4 0 1 0
Tehernp 4 02 1 Loaton c 3 00 0
Thorns p 0 0 0 0 Strasrg p 1 0 0 0
JSchafrph 1 00 0 Barrettp 0 00 0
JWaldnp 0 0 0 0 Frndsnph 1 0 1 0
Detwilrp 0 0 0 0
Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0
Blevinsp 0 0 0 0
Storenp 0 00 0
McLothph 0 00 0
Totals 40 6135 Totals 31 2 5 2
Atlanta 000 240 000 6
Washington 200 000 000 2
E-Zimmerman (2), Harper (1). DP-Atlanta 1.
LOB-Atlanta 12, Washington 8. 2B-B.Upton
(1), Freeman (1), Simmons (1). HR-LaRoche
(2). SB-J.Upton (1), Span (1), Werth (1). SF-
Simmons.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
TeheranW,1l-1 7 3 2 2 4 6
Thomas 1 1 0 0 0 2
J.Walden 1 1 0 0 1 2
Washington
StrasburgL,0-1 41/38 6 3 3 6
Barrett 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Detwiler 2 4 0 0 1 2
Blevins 1 1 0 0 0 1
Storen 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP- by Teheran (Werth).
Umpires-Home, Jim Joyce; First, Doug Ed-
dings; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Cory
Blaser.
T-3:36.A-37,841(41,408).
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-SPerez, Kansas City, .538;
JHamilton, Los Angeles, .500; AIRamirez,
Chicago, .444; AJackson, Detroit, .438; Pedroia,
Boston, .421; Cano, Seattle, .421; Plouffe, Min-
nesota, .400; Morgan, Cleveland, .400.
RUNS-Bautista, Toronto, 5; Fowler, Hous-
ton, 5; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 5; Smoak, Seattle,
5; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 5; 17 tied at 4.
RBI-Colabello, Minnesota, 7; Smoak, Seat-
tle, 7; Abreu, Chicago, 6; Ackley, Seattle, 6;
TorHunter, Detroit, 6; Plouffe, Minnesota, 6; 6
tied at 5.


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 B3


FoT the ecoird


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
6-0-5
SCASH 3 (late)
o 1-9-3

PLAY 4 (early)
4-2-2-0
PLAY 4 (late)
T. 9-7-7-0


Due to early deadlines, Saturday's late
lottery numbers were not available. For
those numbers, please see Monday's edition
or visit www.flalottery.com.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 10 -16 -17 -38
Mega Ball: 4
4-of-4 MB No winners


4-of-4 2
3-of-4 MB 46
3-of-4 800
2-of-4 MB 1,278
1-of-4MB 11,274
2-of-4 26,707


$3,346.50
$318.50
$54.50
$23.50
$2.50
$2


Fantasy 5:11 -20 -22 -24 -31
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 347 $555
3-of-5 10,456 $19.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Gulf Air Bahrain Grand
Prix race
12 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
2:30 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Duck
Commander 500 race
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) San Diego Padres at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (MLB) Baltimore Orioles at Detroit Tigers or New
York Yankees at Toronto Blue Jays
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN2) San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Notre Dame at Florida State
2:30 p.m. (FS1) Middle Tennessee St. at So. Mississippi
3 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina State at Clemson
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida A&M at Bethune-Cookman
(Same-day Tape)
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Miami Heat
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Lakers at Los Angeles Clippers
6 p.m. (NBA) Atlanta Hawks at Indiana Pacers
9 p.m. (NBA) Oklahoma City Thunder at Phoenix Suns
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA TOURNAMENT FINAL FOUR
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Maryland vs. Notre Dame
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Connecticut vs. Stanford
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (CBS) American Family Insurance Slam Dunk &
3-Point Championships (Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA League Semifinals: Silver Lake Atom
Splitters vs. Philadelphia Hitmen
CRICKET
9 a.m. (ESPN2) ICC World Twenty 20 final
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) Drive, Chip & Putt Championship
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Shell Houston Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Shell Houston Open, Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Kraft Nabisco Championship,
Final Round
HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NBC) St. Louis Blues at Chicago Blackhawks
12:30 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Montreal Canadiens
(Taped)
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Dallas Stars at Florida Panthers
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Buffalo Sabres at Philadelphia Flyers
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12:30 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series (Taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Everton vs.
Arsenal
10:30 a.m. (CNBC) English Premier League: West Ham
United vs. Liverpool
SOFTBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN) Arkansas at Alabama
TENNIS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA Family Circle Cup final
4 p.m. (TENNIS) Davis Cup quarterfinal: Switzerland vs.
Kazakhstan (Taped)
7 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Monterrey Open
semifinal (Same-day Tape)
9 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Monterrey Open
semifinal (Same-day Tape)
11 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Monterrey Open final
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


HITS-MeCabrera, Toronto, 9; JHamilton,
Los Angeles, 9; Cano, Seattle, 8; Flowers,
Chicago, 8; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 8; Pedroia,
Boston, 8; Plouffe, Minnesota, 8; AIRamirez,
Chicago, 8.
DOUBLES-DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 5;
SPerez, Kansas City, 4; Colabello, Minnesota, 3;
Plouffe, Minnesota, 3; Pujols, Los Angeles, 3;
Solarte, NewYork, 3; 29 tied at 2.
TRIPLES-Fuld, Oakland, 2; 20 tied at 1.
HOME RUNS-Bautista, Toronto, 3; De Aza,
Chicago, 3; MeCabrera, Toronto, 2; NCruz, Bal-
timore, 2; ADunn, Chicago, 2; JHamilton, Los
Angeles, 2;TorHunter, Detroit, 2; BMiller, Seat-
tle, 2; Smoak, Seattle, 2; Trout, Los Angeles, 2.
STOLEN BASES-Altuve, Houston, 3; Ells-
bury, NewYork, 3; LCain, Kansas City, 2; Crisp,
Oakland, 2; Kipnis, Cleveland, 2; Lough, Balti-
more, 2; AIRamirez, Chicago, 2.
PITCHING-FHernandez, Seattle, 2-0; Allen,
Cleveland, 2-0; 33 tied at 1.
ERA-Cosart, Houston, 0.00; Gray, Oakland,
0.00; Kazmir, Oakland, 0.00; Odorizzi, Tampa
Bay, 0.00; Masterson, Cleveland, 0.00; Buehrle,
Toronto, 0.00; Feldman, Houston, 0.00;
Scherzer, Detroit, 0.00; Paxton, Seattle, 0.00.
STRIKEOUTS- FHernandez, Seattle, 19;
Price, Tampa Bay, 12; Buehrle, Toronto, 11;
Dickey, Toronto, 10; Paxton, Seattle, 9; Sale,
Chicago, 8; Lester, Boston, 8; CWilson, Los An-
geles, 8; Quintana, Chicago, 8; Tanaka, New
York, 8.
SAVES-Holland, Kansas City, 2; Axford,


Cleveland, 2; Santos, Toronto, 2; 10 tied at 1.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Blackmon, Colorado, .563; Boni-
facio, Chicago, .542; Utley, Philadelphia, .476;
ArRamirez, Milwaukee, .467; Freeman, Atlanta,
.467; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .462; Hechavarria,
Miami, .458.
RUNS-Stanton, Miami, 7; Belt, San Fran-
cisco, 6; Hechavarria, Miami, 6; Posey, San
Francisco, 6; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 6; 9 tied at 5.
RBI-Stanton, Miami, 11; McGehee, Miami,
10;Trumbo, Arizona, 9; LaRoche, Washington,
8; Pagan, San Francisco, 8; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 7; Belt, San Francisco, 6; Blackmon, Col-
orado, 6; Ethier, Los Angeles, 6.
HITS-Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 12; Hechavarria, Miami, 11; Pagan,
San Francisco, 11; Cuddyer, Colorado, 10;
Uribe, Los Angeles, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10.
DOUBLES-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 4; Hill,
Arizona, 4; McGehee, Miami, 4; Uribe, Los An-
geles, 4; 7 tied at 3.
TRIPLES- Barnes, Colorado, 1; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 1; Lagares, NewYork, 1; Marte, Pitts-
burgh, 1;AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 1; McGehee,
Miami, 1; Segura, Milwaukee, 1; Span, Wash-
ington, 1; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 1.
HOME RUNS-Belt, San Francisco, 3;
Trumbo, Arizona, 3; 13 tied at 2.
STOLEN BASES-Bonifacio, Chicago, 4;
DGordon, Los Angeles, 3; Revere, Philadelphia,
3; Amarista, San Diego, 2; CCrawford, Los An-
geles, 2; Owings, Arizona, 2; 30 tied at 1.


PITCHING-Lee, Philadelphia, 2-0; Machi,
San Francisco, 2-0; Fernandez, Miami, 2-0; 34
tied at 1.
ERA-Hudson, San Francisco, 0.00; Hale,
Atlanta, 0.00; Harang, Atlanta, 0.00; Cingrani,
Cincinnati, 0.00; Wacha, St. Louis, 0.00; Mor-
ton, Pittsburgh, 0.00; Wainwright, St. Louis,
0.00; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 0.00.
STRIKEOUTS-Fernandez, Miami, 17;
Cueto, Cincinnati, 17; Strasburg, Washington,
16; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 14; Ryu, Los Angeles,
14; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 13; Miley, Ari-
zona, 13.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 3; Romo, San
Francisco, 2; Cishek, Miami, 2; Jansen, Los An-
geles, 2; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 2; 8 tied at 1.



NBA standings


x-Torontc
x-Brookly
NewYork
Boston
Philadelp


y-Miami
x-Washin


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
0 44 32 .579
yn 42 34 .553
S 33 44 .429
23 54 .299
*hia 17 60 .221
Southeast Division
W L Pct
52 23 .693
ngton 40 37 .519


x-Charlotte 39 38 .506
Atlanta 33 42 .440
Orlando 22 55 .286
Central Division
W L Pct
y-lndiana 53 24 .688
x-Chicago 45 32 .584
Cleveland 31 47 .397
Detroit 28 49 .364
Milwaukee 14 62 .184
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
y-San Antonio 59 17 .776
x-Houston 50 25 .667
Dallas 46 31 .597
Memphis 45 31 .592
New Orleans 32 44 .421
Northwest Division
W L Pct
y-Oklahoma City 55 20 .733


Portland
Minnesota
Denver
Utah


y-L.A. Clippers
Golden State
Phoenix
Sacramento
L.A. Lakers


49 28 .636
38 38 .500
33 43 .434
24 52 .316
Pacific Division
W L Pct
54 23 .701
47 29 .618
45 31 .592
27 49 .355
25 51 .329


x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Memphis 100, Denver 92
Toronto 102, Indiana 94
Charlotte 91, Orlando 80
Brooklyn 116, Detroit 104
Philadelphia 111, Boston 102
Minnesota 122, Miami 121,20T
Atlanta 117, Cleveland 98
Washington 90, New York 89
Chicago 102, Milwaukee 90
Utah 100, New Orleans 96
Houston 111, Oklahoma City 107
Phoenix 109, Portland 93
Golden State 102, Sacramento 69
Dallas 107, L.A. Lakers 95
Saturday's Games
Orlando 100, Minnesota 92
Chicago 96, Washington 78
Brooklyn 105, Philadelphia 101
Charlotte 96, Cleveland 94, OT
Detroit 115, Boston 111
Toronto at Milwaukee, late
Today's Games
NewYork at Miami, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Dallas at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 7 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 9 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-Boston 78 5318 7 113251 167
x-Montreal 79 4527 7 97212 199
x-TampaBay 78 4227 9 93229 211
Detroit 78 3727 14 88211 222
Toronto 79 3833 8 84229 248
Ottawa 78 3331 14 80226 261
Florida 78 2743 8 62185 256
Buffalo 77 2147 9 51148 229
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA


y-Pittsburgh
N.Y Rangers
Philadelphia
Columbus
New Jersey
Washington
Carolina
N.Y Islanders


78 4924
79 4331
77 3929
77 3931
78 3428
78 3530
78 3433
77 31 35


5 103237 195
5 91212 190
9 87215 218
7 85215 207
16 84191 200
13 83222 236
11 79196 215
11 73215 254


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 77 5218 7 111243 173
x-Colorado 77 5021 6 106237 206
x-Chicago 78 4419 15 103255 205
Minnesota 78 4026 12 92195 194
Dallas 77 3828 11 87225 218
Winnipeg 79 3534 10 80220 232
Nashville 77 3432 11 79195 231
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Anaheim 77 5019 8 108249 198
x-San Jose 78 4920 9 107239 189
x-Los Angeles 78 4527 6 96196 164
Phoenix 78 3628 14 86209 221
Vancouver 77 3432 11 79185 209
Calgary 78 3338 7 73200 228
Edmonton 78 2742 9 63193 259
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Edmonton 3, Phoenix 2, SO
Montreal 7, Ottawa 4
Chicago 4, Columbus 3
New Jersey 2, Washington 1
Detroit 3, Buffalo 2
Calgary 2, Florida 1
Nashville 5, Anaheim 2
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, N.Y Islanders 3, SO
Boston 5, Philadelphia 2
Colorado 4, St. Louis 0
Winnipeg 4, Toronto 2
Montreal 5, Detroit 3
Dallas 5, Tampa Bay 2
Ottawa 3, N.Y Rangers 2
New Jersey 3, Carolina 1
Minnesota 4, Pittsburgh 0
Los Angeles at Vancouver, late
Nashville at San Jose, late
Today's Games
St. Louis at Chicago, 12:30 p.m.
Dallas at Florida, 5 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Calgary at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Anaheim atVancouver, 10 p.m.


Miami QB Williams
injures right ACL
CORAL GABLES Miami quarterback Ryan
Williams will require surgery in the coming days to
repair an injured right knee.
The school says he injured his anterior cruciate
ligament during a scrimmage Friday night. There is
no timetable for his return, but the typical recovery
from ACL surgery is several months.
Williams was Stephen Morris' backup last season.
The only other quarterback on Miami's roster
with any experience is Gray Crow. Freshman Kevin
Olsen has been battling Williams throughout the
spring for the No. 1 spot on the depth chart.

McCormick, Bryzgalov lead
Wild past Penguins, 4-0
ST. PAUL, Minn. Cody McCormick had a goal
and an assist and Ilya Bryzgalov stopped all 20
shots he faced as the Minnesota Wild beat the
Pittsburgh Penguins 4-0 Saturday night.
Erik Haula, Mikko Koivu, and Stephane Veilleux
also scored for the Wild, who maintained a five-
point cushion over Dallas for the seventh playoff
spot in the Western Conference.
Bryzgalov posted his second shutout since being
acquired by the Wild on March 4. He was steady
throughout and made a pair of outstanding saves in
the second period to keep the shutout intact.
First he sprawled to his right to rob James Neal
with a stick save. Afew minutes later, he kicked out
his right leg just in time to stuff Lee Stempniak, who
was alone at the left post after a rebound off the
back boards had bounced out to him.
From wire reports





Women's AP



awards picked



Stewart and McGraw are

AP Player, Coach of Year

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Breanna Stewart
picked up right where she left off as a freshman.
Connecticut's versatile star has had a stellar
sophomore year
The 6-foot-4 guard/forward earned The Asso-
ciated Press Player of the Year award Saturday,
becoming just the third sophomore to achieve
the honor Notre Dame's Muffet McGraw was se-
lected coach of the year for the second straight
season.
The pair accepted their awards in front of a
standing room only crowd that included the en-
tire UConn and Notre Dame teams as well as
Stewart's family
"It's obviously a huge deal and I think the fact
that being able to be named player of the year is
awesome and I think it just shows how hard I've
worked this season and the offseason," Stewart
said. "But it doesn't compare to what could hap-
pen this weekend. I think this is nice, but it's a
team game and we want to win a national cham-
pionship."
Stewart, a unanimous All-American, got 20
votes from the 36-member national media panel
that selects the weekly Top 25. Stanford's Chiney
Ogwumike received eight votes while Baylor's
Odyssey Sims had six. Kayla McBride of Notre
Dame received the other two votes.
Stewart joined former UConn star Maya Moore
and Oklahoma's Courtney Paris as the only soph-
omores to win the award. Stewart helped the
Huskies win the national championship as a
freshman and has been a major reason why the
Huskies are undefeated this season.
"I just think she grew up," UConn coach Geno
Auriemma said of his young star "She's a year
older it's not easy to be that good when you're
that young and haven't played a lot of college bas-
ketball. She has year's more experience as to
what it takes to go through a college basketball
season and knowing her, I think she is going to
get better and better each day each week and
each month. I'm really happy for her"
Like UConn, McGraw's Irish squad hasn't lost
either, winning their first 36 games this season.
McGraw is only the second coach ever to win
the award in consecutive years, joining Au-
riemma. West Virginia's Mike Carey was second
with eight votes. Auriemma was third and South
Carolina's Dawn Staley was fourth.
McGraw also was honored with the award in
2001. She didn't know until she got on the team
bus to head to the arena that the Irish would be
coming to watch the ceremony




RAYS
Continued from Page B1


extension for 2015 and 2016 worth a guaranteed
$13 million. There is a 2017 club option.
After Choo had a sacrifice fly in the fourth,
Joyce cut the Rays deficit to 4-3 with a two-run
homer in the bottom half.
Rays manager Joe Maddon had a successful
challenge for the second straight game. It was
first ruled that Robinson Chirinos had beat Es-
cobar's throw from shortstop to first for an infield
single in the second, but after a 1-minute, 35-sec-


ond delay the umpires changed the call to an out.
Maddon won his first replay reversal in the
seventh Friday night after it was first ruled that
right fielder Wil Myers didn't make the catch
while sliding forward onJ.PArencibia's two-out
flare. After a 1-minute, 43-second delay, the um-
pires ruled Myers did make the catch.
Notes: Rangers ace Yu Darvish (neck stiffness)
could throw up to 100 pitches in his first start this
season Sunday ... Alex Cobb (0-1) will pitch Sun-
day for the Rays. ... Texas 2B Jurickson Profar
(right shoulder muscle tear) is fielding
grounders, but no date has been set to swing a
bat ... Rangers LHP Joe Saunders (bruised left
ankle) played catch and will have his status de-
termined by Monday ... Martinez had his contract
purchased from Double-A Frisco. ... Texas RHP
Daniel McCutchen was optioned to Frisco


SCOREBOARD




B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota


Central Division
Pct GB WC L
1.000- 4
.600 1% 3
.500 2 2
.400 2 /2 /2 2
.400 2% % 2


Str Home
W-4 4-0
L-1 1-1
W-2 2-0
L-3 2-1
W-1 0-0


Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
NewYork
Baltimore




Miami
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington
NewYork


W
Seattle 4
Houston 2
Los Angeles 2
Oakland 2
Texas 2


East Division
GB WC L10
7 4-2
1 3-3
1 2-2
0 1 /2 /2 2-3
0 2 1 /2 1-4


West Division
t GB WC


Str Home Away
W-3 4-2 0-0
W1 1-1 2-2
L-1 0-1 2-1
L-1 0-0 2-3
L-4 1-2 0-2



Str Home Away
W-3 5-1 0-0
W-40-0 4-1
W-2 0-0 3-2
L-2 0-2 3-0
W-2 2-3 0-0


Str Home
W-1 0-0
L-3 2-3
W-2 0-3
L-1 2-3
L-2 2-1



Str Home
W-4 0-0
L-2 0-2
W-1 1-0
L-4 1-2
L-3 1-5


Texas Tampa Bay
ab r h bi
Choolf 4 1 2 1 DeJessdh
Andrusss 4 1 3 1 Myers rf
Fielder 1lb 4 0 0 0 Zobrist2b
ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Longori 3b
Riosdh 4 01 2 Loneylb
Choice rf 4 0 0 0 DJnngs cf
Chirins c 3 1 0 0 Joyce If
LMartn cf 3 0 0 0 JMolin c
JoWilsn 2b 3 1 3 0 Forsyth ph
Morlnd ph 1 0 0 0 Hanign c
YEscor ss
Totals 34 49 4 Totals
Texas 210 100 000


NL

Phillies 2, Cubs 0
Philadelphia Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Revere cf 5 0 1 0 Bonifac cf 5 02 0
Rollinsss 4 00 0 SCastross 4 03 0
Utley2b 3 23 1 Ruggin rf 4 00 0
Howard 1b 3 01 0 Russellp 0 00 0
Byrd rf 3 00 0 Grimmp 0 00 0
DBrwnlf 2 01 1 Rizzolb 4 02 0
Nieves c 4 00 0 Lake If 3 0 1 0
Asche3b 4 00 0 Olt3b 4 00 0
CI.Leep 3 01 0 Castilloc 4 00 0
Diekmnp 0 00 0 Barney2b 3 00 0
CHrndzph 1 00 0 Kalishph 1 00 0
Papelnp 0 0 0 0 Smrdzjp 2 01 0
Schrhltph-rf 2 0 1 0
Totals 32 27 2 Totals 36010 0
Philadelphia 100 100 000 2
Chicago 000 000 000 0
DP-Philadelphia 1, Chicago 2. LOB-Philadel-
phia 8, Chicago 10. 2B-Utley (2), Lake (2).
HR-Utley (2). SB-Revere (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
CI.LeeW,2-0 7 10 0 0 0 6
DiekmanH,2 1 0 0 0 1 0
PapelbonS,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Samardzija L,0-1 7 6 2 2 3 8
Russell 2/3 1 0 0 2 2
Grimm 11/30 0 0 0 1
T-2:53.A-30,651 (41,072).
Mets 6, Reds 3


Cincinnati


NewYork


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Berndn cf-lf 3 0 0 0 EYongl If 4 0 1 0
Phillips2b 4 1 1 2 DnMrp2b 4 0 1 0
Vottolb 4 00 0 DWrght3b 3 1 0 0
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Grndrsrf 4 1 1 2
Ludwcklf 4 1 1 1 Dudalb 4 00 0
BHmltn cf 0 00 0 Lagars cf 2 1 1 0
Frazier3b 3 0 1 0 Reckerc 3 1 0 0
Cozartss 4 00 0 Tejadass 2 1 1 0
Brnhrtc 4 02 0 Geep 3 00 0
Cuetop 2 01 0 Ricep 0 0 0 0
Heiseyph 1 1 1 0 CTorrsp 0 0 0 0
LeCurep 0 00 0 I.Davisph 1 1 1 4
Hooverp 0 000
Totals 33 37 3 Totals 306 6 6
Cincinnati 000 010 020 3
NewYork 000 002 004 6
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Phillips (1). DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-
Cincinnati 5, NewYork 6.2B-Heisey (1), Te-
jada (1). HR-Phillips (1), Ludwick (1),
Granderson (1), I.Davis (1). S-Bernadina,
Recker.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Cueto 7 5 2 2 3 9
LeCureH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hoover L, 1-1 BS, 1-1 0 1 4 4 2 0
NewYork
Gee 71/36 3 3 1 4
Rice 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
C.TorresW,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 2
Hoover pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
Balk-Cueto.
T-2:48. A-25,424 (41,922).
Giants 7, Dodgers 2
San Francisco Los Angeles
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pagan cf 4 1 2 1 Puig rf 4 01 0
Pence rf 5 02 0 JuTrnr2b 3 0 1 0
Sandovl3b 3 1 1 3 Ethierph 1 01 1
Posey c 5 12 1 Howellp 0 00 0
Morse If 2 2 1 1 Crwfrdl If 0 00 0
J.Perezlf 1 00 0 HRmrzss 3 0 1 0
Casillap 0 0 0 0 AdGnzllb 3 0 1 0
HSnchzph 1 00 0 Kemp cf 4 00 0
Petitp 0 0 0 0 VnSlykl If 3 2 1 0
Beltib 5 0 1 0 Jansenp 0 00 0
B.Hicks2b 4 0 1 0 JWrghtp 0 00 0
BCrwfrss 2 1 0 1 Uribe3b 4 0 1 1
Bmgrn p 2 1 1 0 A.Ellis c 4 0 1 0
Blanco If 1 0 0 0 Mahlm p 1 0 0 0
JDmng p 0 00 0
Figgins ph 1 0 0 0
PRdrgzp 0 00 0
C.Perez p 0 0 0 0
DGordn ph-2b2 0 1 0
Totals 35 7117 Totals 33 2 9 2
San Francisco 010 141 000 7
Los Angeles 010 000 100 2
DP-San Francisco 1, Los Angeles 2. LOB-
San Francisco 8, Los Angeles 7.2B-Pagan (3),
Pence 2 (2), H.Ramirez (2), Ad.Gonzalez (2),
Uribe (4). HR-Sandoval (1), Posey (2), Morse
(1). CS-Puig (1). S-Bumgarner.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
BumgarnerW,1-0 61/38 2 2 1 10
Casilla 12/31 0 0 2 1
Petit 1 0 0 0 0 1
Los Angeles
MaholmL,0-1 41/37 5 5 2 1
J.Dominguez 2/3 1 1 1 0 2
RRodriguez 1 1 1 1 1 1
C.Perez 1 1 0 0 1 0
Howell 1 0 0 0 1 0
Jansen 2/3 1 0 0 1 1
J.Wright 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
T-3:42. A-49,520 (56,000).
Cardinals 6,
Pirates I


St. Louis


Pittsburgh


ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt3b 3 21 0 Martelf 5 01 0
JhPerltss 4 2 1 2 Snider rf 4 1 2 0
Hollidyl If 5 1 1 1 JGomzp 0 00 0
Neshekp 0 00 0 JHrrsnph 1 00 0
Craigrf 3 0 0 1 AMcCtcf 4 0 1 0
YMolin c 4 1 2 1 PAIvrz 3b 1 0 0 0
MAdmslb 4 02 1 RMartnc 3 00 1
Bourjos cf 3 00 0 NWalkr2b 4 00 0
Wong2b 4 00 0 Ishikawlb 3 0 1 0
J.Kellyp 3 0 1 0 GSnchzph-lbl 0 0 0
CMrtnzp 0 00 0 Mercerss 4 00 0
Siegristp 0 00 0 Lirianop 2 0 1 0
Jayph-lf 1 00 0 Tabataph-rf 1 00 0
Totals 34 68 6 Totals 33 1 6 1
St. Louis 300 001 002 6
Pittsburgh 001 000 000 1
LOB-St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 11. 2B-J.Kelly (1).
HR-Jh.Peralta (2), YMolina (2). SF-Craig.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
J.KellyW,1-0 51/36 1 1 4 4
C.MartinezH,2 12/30 0 0 1 0
SiegristH,2 1 0 0 0 0 1
Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
LirianoL,0-1 6 7 4 4 2 4
J.Gomez 3 1 2 2 2 3
HBP-by J.Kelly (Tabata).
T-2:58. A-30,092 (38,362).


Associated Press
Toronto Blue Jays base runner Adam Lind slides into second base while New York Yankees second baseman
Brian Roberts tries to turn the double play with a throw to first during the seventh inning Saturday in Toronto.




Blue Jays blank Yankees


Associated Press

TORONTO R.A. Dickey and
three relievers combined for a
shutout, Jose Bautista and Melky
Cabrera homered and the Toronto
Blue Jays beat the New York Yan-
kees 4-0 on Saturday afternoon.
Dickey (1-0) allowed six runs and
five hits in his season-opening start
at Tampa Bay last Monday but was
much sharper against New York.
The 2012 NL Cy Young winner gave
up five hits in 6 2/3 innings, walked
one and struck out six.
Aaron Loup got one out and
Brett Cecil two before Sergio San-
tos worked the final 1 1-3 innings
for his second save in as many
chances.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Twins 7, Indians 3
CLEVELAND Kyle Gibson lim-
ited Cleveland to one run in his sea-
son debut after Brian Dozier led off the
game with a home run, leading Min-
nesota to a 7-3 win over the Cleveland
Indians and giving Twins manager
Ron Gardenhire his 1,000th career
victory.
Gibson (1-0) allowed three hits in
five-plus innings as the Twins
snapped a seven-game losing streak
against the Indians.

Royals 4, White Sox 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Salvador
Perez hit a go-ahead RBI double with
two outs in the eighth inning and the
Kansas City Royals beat the Chicago
White Sox 4-3.
Alex Gordon doubled off left-hander
Scott Downs (0-1) before Perez hit
Maikel Cleto's second pitch down the
left-field line.
Wade Davis (1-1) let the White Sox
tie it at three when gave up two runs
in the eighth on two singles, a walk, a
hit batter and sacrifice fly.

Tigers 7, Orioles 6
DETROIT Torii Hunter homered
and drove in five runs, and the Detroit
Tigers withstood a five-run ninth inning
by Baltimore to beat the Orioles 7-6.
Rick Porcello (1-0) allowed a run
and three hits in 6 2/3 innings in his
first start of the season, and the Tigers
(4-0) remained baseball's only unde-
feated team. But the Orioles nearly
pulled off a remarkable rally after trail-
ing 7-1 entering the ninth.
Joe Nathan got the final two outs
for his first save with the Tigers, retir-
ing Chris Davis on a flyout with two
on to end it.

Mariners 3, Athletics 1
OAKLAND, Calif. Felix Hernan-
dez took a shutout into the ninth inning,
Dustin Ackley and Abraham Almonte
hit home runs and the Seattle Mariners
beat the Oakland Athletics 3-1.
Hernandez (2-0) retired the first 11
batters on the way to his 16th career
win over the Athletics, his most
against any team. Hernandez walked
one and struck out eight while allow-
ing a run on six hits over 8 1/3 innings.
Fernando Rodney got the final two
outs to record his first save with the
Mariners. Robinson Cano had two hits.

Angels 5, Astros 1
HOUSTON Josh Hamilton hit a
two-run home run to support eight


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 7, Cleveland 3
Toronto 4, N.Y Yankees 0
Detroit 7, Baltimore 6
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Seattle 3, Oakland 1
L.A. Angels 5, Houston 1
Tampa Bay 5, Texas 4
Milwaukee at Boston, late
Today's Games
Minnesota (Nolasco 0-1) at Cleveland (Masterson 0-
0), 1:05 p.m.
N.YYankees (Sabathia 0-1) atToronto (Hutchison 1-
0), 1:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at Detroit (Verlander 0-0), 1:08
p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-0) at Boston (Lester 0-1), 1:35
p.m.
Texas (Darvish 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1), 1:40
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 1-0) at Kansas City (Shields
0-0), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-1) at Houston (Feldman 1-0),
2:10 p.m.
Seattle (E.Ramirez 1-0) at Oakland (Gray 0-0), 4:05
p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y Mets 6, Cincinnati 3
Philadelphia 2, Chicago Cubs 0
San Francisco 7, L.A. Dodgers 2
Atlanta 6, Washington 2
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 1
Miami 5, San Diego 0
Milwaukee at Boston, late
Arizona at Colorado, late
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Simon 0-0) at N.Y Mets (Niese 0-0), 1:10
p.m.
San Diego (Kennedy 0-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 1-0), 1:10
p.m.
Atlanta (A.Wood 1-0) at Washington (Jordan 0-0),
1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-0) at Boston (Lester 0-1), 1:35
p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 0-0),
1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (Burnett 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Vil-
lanueva 0-2), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 1-1) at Colorado (Anderson 0-1), 4:10
p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke
1-0), 8:05 p.m.


strong innings by Tyler Skaggs as the
Los Angeles Angels won their second
straight 5-1 over the Houston Astros.
Skaggs (1-0) allowed one run -
none earned on four hits with five
strikeouts. Skaggs was making his An-
gels debut after being acquired in the
offseason from Arizona in a trade that
sent outfielder Mark Trumbo to the
Diamondbacks.
Hamilton followed David Freese's
run-scoring single with his second
homer in as many days, extending the
lead to 4-1 in the fifth off Dallas
Keuchel.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 6, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON Julio Teheran al-
lowed two runs in seven solid innings
and had two hits, and Atlanta knocked
out Stephen Strasburg in the fifth in-
ning, as the Braves beat the Washing-
ton Nationals 6-2.
Dan Ugly had a two-run single for
the Braves and Freddie Freeman
reached base five times with two hits
and three walks.
Teheran (1-1) limited Washington to
three hits in seven innings, one of them
a two-run home run byAdam LaRoche.

Mets 6, Reds 3
NEWYORK-- Pinch-hitter Ike Davis
hit a game-ending grand slam and the
New York Mets were aided by a favor-
able ninth-inning replay review in rally-
ing to beat the Cincinnati Reds 6-3.
Brandon Phillips had given the
Reds a 3-2 lead with a two-run homer
off Dillon Gee in the eighth, two in-


nings after Curtis Granderson con-
nected for a two-run drive off Johnny
Cueto, his first homer with the Mets.
Trailing by a run in the ninth, Juan
Lagares walked leading off against fill-
in closer J.J. Hoover.
Anthony Recker bunted and first
baseman Joey Votto threw to second
base for the force play. Second base
umpire James Hoye called Lagares
out and Mets manager Terry Collins
raced out of the dugout to ask for a
challenge. After a review of 2 minutes,
15 seconds, the call was overturned
by crew chief John Hirschbeck.

Phillies 2, Cubs 0
CHICAGO Chase Utley went
3-for-3 and homered for the second
day in a row, and Cliff Lee pitched
seven scoreless innings to lead the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 2-0 victory
over the Chicago Cubs.
Dominic Brown drove in Utley for
the Phillies' other run with a single in
the fourth inning.
Lee (2-0) allowed 10 hits and had
just one 1-2-3 inning.
The Cubs wasted another strong
start from Jeff Samardzija (0-1), who
allowed two runs on six hits in seven
innings. He walked three and struck
out eight.

Giants 7, Dodgers 2
LOS ANGELES Madison Bum-
garner struck out 10 while working into
the seventh inning and San Francisco
Giants hit three home runs in a 7-2
victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers
and Yasiel Puig.
Puig started in right field and batted
leadoff for the Dodgers a day after he
was benched for arriving late for
stretching and batting practice.
Michael Morse had a solo shot in
the fourth inning and the Giants got
back-to-back homers in the fifth from
Pablo Sandoval and Buster Posey.
Bumgarner (1-0) was charged with
two runs and hit hits in 6 1/3 innings
and struck out 10 in his second outing.

Marlins 5, Padres 0
MIAMI Jose Fernandez struck
out eight in 6 2/3 innings while lower-
ing his ERA to 0.71, and the Miami
Marlins won again, beating the punch-
less San Diego Padres 5-0.
The Marlins improved to 5-1, their
best start since 2009. Last year their
fifth victory came in their 21st game,
and they finished with 100 losses.
Fernandez (2-0) improved his ca-
reer record at home to 11-0 even
though he was at less than his best.
Giancarlo Stanton had two RBIs to
increase his season total to 11.

Cardinals 6, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH -Yadier Molina hit
his second homer of the season,
Jhonny Peralta added a late two-run
shot and the St. Louis Cardinals beat
the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-1.
Molina finished 2 for 4 and his solo
homer in the sixth gave the Cardinals
plenty of cushion as they bounced
back from a 12-2 loss on Friday night
by jumping on Pittsburgh ace Fran-
cisco Liriano (0-1) early.
St. Louis used a three-run first in-
ning to put the Pirates in an early hole
then held on as Joe Kelly (1-0) wig-
gled his way out of trouble.


Tampa Bay 001 200 02x 5
DP-Texas 1. LOB Texas 6, Tampa Bay 5.
2B-Rios (2), Loney 2 (2). HR-Joyce (1),YEs-
cobar (1). SB-Andrus (1). S- L.Martin, Zobrist.
SF-Choo.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
N.Martinez 6 4 3 3 3 3
FrasorH,1 1 2 0 0 0 0
CottsL,0-1 BS,1-1 1 1 2 2 2 0
Tampa Bay
Price 6 9 4 4 0 6
McGee 1 0 0 0 0 0
B.GomesW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
BalfourS,l-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Price (Chirinos).
T-2:48. A-30,364 (31,042).
Blue Jays 4,
Yankees 0
NewYork Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Ellsury cf 5 03 0 MeCarrl If 4 12 1
Jeterss 2 00 0 Rasmscf 4 1 1 0
Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 11 2
McCnndh 4 00 0 Encrnclb 4 00 0
ASorinl If 4 0 0 0 Linddh 3 11 0
KJhnsnlb 4 00 0 Lawrie3b 3 00 0
Cervelli c 3 02 0 Thole c 2 01 1
Solarte3b 3 02 0 Kratzph-c 1 00 0
Anna2b 2 00 0 Goins2b 3 01 0
Roberts2b 1 0 0 0 Diazss 3 0 1 0
Totals 32 070 Totals 31 4 8 4
NewYork 000 000 000 0
Toronto 010 000 03x 4
DP Toronto 1. LOB-NewYork 10, Toronto 4.
2B-Cervelli (1), Rasmus (2), Lind (2), Goins (1),
Diaz (1). HR-Me.Cabrera (2), Bautista (3).
CS-Thole (1).
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Pineda L,0-1
Nuno
Phelps
Toronto
Dickey W,1-1
Loup H,2
Cecil H,1
Santos S,2-2


651105
000010
233303
6 5 1 1 0 5
0 0 0 0 1 0
2 3 3 3 0 3


62/35 0
1/3 0 0
2/3 1 0
11/31 0


Nuno pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Dickey (Cervelli), by Loup (Solarte).
T-2:45. A-45,446 (49,282).
Tigers 7, Orioles 6
Baltimore Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Loughl If 4 1 1 1 Kinsler2b 5 1 2 0
N.Cruzrf 5 00 0 TrHntrrf 4 12 5
C.Davislb 5 1 2 1 MiCarrib 4 0 1 0
A.Jones cf 4 1 1 1 VMrtnzdh 4 00 0
Markksdh 3 0 1 1 AJcksn cf 4 02 0
Hardyss 3 1 2 0 Avila c 4 00 0
Wieters c 4 1 1 0 AIGnzlz ss 3 2 1 0
Lmrdzz2b 4 1 1 0 D.Kelly3b 4 2 3 1
Schoop3b 3 0 0 0 RDavislf 3 12 1
Clevngrph 1 0 1 2
Flahrty pr 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 6106 Totals 35713 7
Baltimore 100 000 005 6
Detroit 003 022 00x 7
E-AI.Gonzalez (2). DP-Baltimore 1, Detroit 1.
LOB-Baltimore 6, Detroit 7.2B-Clevenger(1),
Tor.Hunter (1), Mi.Cabrera (2). 3B-Lough (1),
A.Jones (1), D.Kelly (1). HR Tor.Hunter (2).
SB-Lough (2), A.Jackson (1), R.Davis (1). SF-
R.Davis.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
B.Norris L,0-1 5 9 5 5 0 2
Matusz 1 2 2 2 2 1
Meek 1 0 0 0 0 1
ODay 1 2 0 0 0 1
Detroit
PorcelloW,1-0 62/33 1 1 2 3
E.Reed 11/32 0 0 0 1
Coke 1/3 2 3 3 1 0
Alburquerque 0 1 1 1 0 0
NathanS,1-2 2/3 2 1 1 0 1
Alburquerque pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
T-3:20. A-32,041 (41,681).
Royals 4,
White Sox 3
Chicago Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Eaton cf 5 01 1 Aokirf 3 11 0
Semien2b 5 1 1 0 Infante2b 4 11 0
Abreulb 4 11 0 Hosmerib 3 01 0
Viciedo rf 3 0 1 0 BButlerdh 2 11 2
Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 1 Dyson pr-dh 0 0 0 0
Konerkdh 3 00 1 AGordnl If 4 1 2 0
DeAzalf 4 00 0 S.Perezc 3 0 1 1
AIRmrzss 4 1 2 0 Mostks3b 3 00 1
Nieto c 3 0 0 0 L.Cain cf 3 0 0 0
A.Dunnph 0 0 0 0 AEscorss 3 00 0
LGarcipr 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 38 3 Totals 28 4 7 4
Chicago 000 010 020 3
Kansas City 000 210 01x 4
E-Abreu (2), Moustakas (2). DP-Chicago 1.
LOB-Chicago 9, Kansas City 6. 2B-Aoki (2),
A.Gordon (2), S.Perez (4). SB-L.Garcia (1), Aoki
(1). CS-Dyson (1). SF-Konerko, B.Butler.


Chicago
Danks
Downs L,0-1
Cleto
Kansas City
B.Chen
Crow H,2
WDavis W,1-1
G.Holland S,2-2
Twins
Minnesota
ab r
Dozier2b 4 1
Mauerlb 5 1
Wlngh If 5 1
Colaelldh 4 2
Plouffe3b 3 2
Kubelrf 5 0
Pinto c 4 0
A.Hickscf 2 0
Flormn ss 4 0


IP H RERBBSO

7 5 3 3 4 6
2/3 1 1 1 1 1
1/3 1 0 0 0 0

61/36 1 0 0 7
2/3 0 0 0 0 0
1 2 2 2 1 1
1 0 0 0 1 2
7, Indians 3


Cleveland
h bi
1 1 Morgan cf
2 0 Swisherlb
1 0 Kipnis2b
1 0 Santandh
1 1 Brantlylf
3 2 ACarerss
1 1 DvMrprf
0 0 Raburn ph-rf
0 0 YGomsc
Chsnhll 3b


ab r h bi
2020
4000
1000
3100
4110
4011
2000
2000
3001
3110
1 0 0 0
3 1 0 0
4 1 1 0
4 0 1 1
2 0 0 0
f2 0 0 0
3 0 0 1
3 1 1 0


Aviles ph 1 00 0
Totals 36 7105 Totals 293 5 2
Minnesota 302 000 002 7
Cleveland 001 000 002 3
DP-Minnesota 2. LOB-Minnesota 8, Cleve-
land 6.2B-Willingham (1), Plouffe (3), A.Cabr-
era (1), Chisenhall (2). HR-Dozier (1).
SF YGomes.
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
Gibson W,1-0
Duensing
Burton
Perkins
Cleveland
Carrasco L,0-1
Atchison
Outman
Pestano


52/37 5
11/30 0
1 0 0
1 3 2


Gibson pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Carrasco (Colabello, Dozier). WP-
Gibson, Pestano. PB-YGomes 2.
T-2:50.A-14,153 (42,487).


West Division
Pct GB WC
.833 -
.571 1/2 -
.400 2/2 1
.200 3/ 2
.143 4/2 3


East Division
GB WC


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 3 2 .600 3-2 L-1 3-2 0-0
St. Louis 3 2 .600 3-2 W-1 0-0 3-2
Milwaukee 2 2 .500 1 1 2-2 W-1 1-2 1-0
Chicago 1 4 .200 2 2 1-4 L-2 0-2 1-2
Cincinnati 1 4 .200 2 2 1-4 L-3 1-2 0-2


San Fran.
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


BASEBALL


ab r h bi
3000
3100
3 1 0 0
3000
3100
2122
4010
4122
2000
1010
0000
3111
3 1 0 0
2 1 2 2
4 0 1 0
4 1 2 2
2 0 0 0
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 1 1
285 7 5
4


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 5, Rangers 4









Lightning waxed by Stars 5-2


Benn scores twice

for Dallas

Associated Press

TAMPA Jamie Benn had
two goals and an assist to lead-
ing the Stars in a 5-2 victory over
the Tampa Bay Lightning on Sat-
urday night
Tyler Seguin had his team-
leading 35th goal, and Vernon
Fiddler and Antoine Roussel
also scored for Dallas. Kari
Lehtonen stopped 27 shots.
Steven Stamkos and Andrej
Sustr scored for Tampa Bay,
aand Ben Bishop finished with
23 saves.
Benn produced all of his
points in the first period. The
left winger opened the scoring
40 seconds in, redirecting a shot
byAlex Goligoski from along the
right boards into the left side of
the net. He struck again at the
5:37 mark, snapping a shot past
Bishop from the right circle.
Two minutes later, Lightning
defenseman Radko Gudas was
dealt a match penalty for an ille-
gal check to Roussel's head. Dal-
las failed to capitalize on the
five-minute major, but Benn and
his brother Jordie setup Seguin
late in the period to make it 3-0.
Tampa Bay responded with a
pair of goals early in the second
period. Stamkos scored two min-
utes in, and Sustr lifted a re-
bound past Lehtonen at 6:44 for
his first NHL goal.
Fiddler and Roussel beat
Bishop with backhanders in the
third to secure the victory that
lifted Dallas past Phoenix into
the second wild-card position in
the Western Conference. The
Stars last reached the postsea-
son in 2008.
Senators 3, Rangers 2
NEW YORK Robin Lehner
made 41 saves and held off a furi-
ous late push by New York to lift the
Ottawa Senators to a 3-2 victory
that prevented the Rangers from
clinching an Eastern Conference
playoff berth.
The Rangers needed only one
point to secure a postseason spot
for the fourth straight year, but were
shut down by the Senators, who
hold only faint playoff chances.
Mark Stone and Mika Zibanejad
scored in the first, and Jason
Spezza made it 3-1 in the second
for Ottawa, which squandered a 3-0
lead in a 7-4 loss to Montreal on
Friday.
Mats Zuccarello deflected in two
goals in the middle period to bring
the Rangers within a goal each time.
Henrik Lundqvist made 31 saves in
the loss.
Devils 3, Hurricanes 1
RALEIGH, N.C. Dainus Zubrus
scored two goals and the New Jer-


Associated Press
Dallas Stars center Tyler Seguin carries the puck against Tampa Bay right wing Teddy Purcell during the first period Saturday in Tampa.


sey Devils beat the Carolina Hurri-
canes 3-1.
Travis Zajac scored the go-ahead
goal on a deflection in the second
period to help the Devils earn a point
in their seventh straight game.
They improved to 4-0-3 during a
stretch that has given their playoff
chances a significant boost.
Jeff Skinner scored for Carolina,
which had its two-game winning
streak snapped. The Hurricanes had
kept their faint playoff hopes alive by
earning points in their previous five
games.
Cory Schneider stopped 26 shots
for the Devils, including all eight he
faced in the third period of his sec-
ond straight victory.
Anton Khudobin made 20 saves
in his first loss since March 25.
Capitals 4,
Islanders 3, SO
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Evgeny
Kuznetsov scored in regulation and
had the only goal in the shootout to
lift the Capitals to a 4-3 win over the
New York Islanders and keep Wash-
ington's playoff hopes alive.
Capitals goaltender Braden
Holtby stopped all three Islander at-
tempts in the shootout and Washing-
ton snapped a five-game losing
streak and moved within two points
of Columbus for the final Eastern
Conference playoff spot.
Kuznetsov tied it 1-1 at 2:36 of the
second period, but John Persson
put the Islanders back ahead at 4:16


and Frans Nielsen made it 3-1 on a
power-play goal at 9:55. The Capi-
tals fought back to tie it, getting
goals from Nicklas Backstrom at
12:45 and Joel Ward at 15:01.
Cal Clutterbuck gave the Is-
landers a 1-0 lead 12:55 into the first
period.
Holtby stopped 35 shots for
Washington and Evgeni Nabokov
made 26 saves for New York.
Avalanche 4, Blues 0
ST. LOUIS Semyon Varlamov
tied the franchise single-season
record for goalie wins held by Col-
orado Avalanche coach Patrick
Roy and Paul Stastny had another
big game in his hometown in a
penalty-filled 4-0 victory over the
St. Louis Blues.
Stastny had a goal and two as-
sists and Nathan Mackinnon had a
goal and an assist for Colorado,
which has won six in a row and has
106 points, third-most in franchise
history. Roy became the fifth coach
in NHL history to win 50 games in
his first season.
Varlamov made 31 saves for his
second shutout of the season and
NHL-leading 40th win, matching
Roy's total in 2000-01. The Ava-
lanche reached 50 wins for the sec-
ond time in franchise history and
tied the franchise mark with 24 road
victories.
The Blues fell two points behind
Boston, which beat the Flyers 5-2,
for first place overall. They've been


dependent on goalie Ryan Miller
with Vladimir Tarasenko out since
mid-March with a hand injury and
Alexander Steen also sidelined, and
scored two or fewer goals for the
seventh time in 10 games.
Bruins 5, Flyers 2
BOSTON Johnny Boychuk
scored the tiebreaking goal with 6:06
left in the third period, Milan Lucic
had two goals and the Boston Bru-
ins clinched the Eastern Confer-
ence's best record with a 5-2 win
over the Philadelphia Flyers.
David Krejci also scored for the
Bruins and Patrice Bergeron ex-
tended his consecutive point streak
to 11 games, setting up Boychuk's
go-ahead score.
Wayne Simmonds and Jay Rose-
hill scored for the Flyers, who are in
a tight race with a group of teams for
a playoff spot.
Tuukka Rask stopped 24 shots for
the Bruins, who had lost their past
two games.
Ray Emery made 37 saves for the
Flyers. Philadelphia has lost three
straight.
Jets 4, Maple Leafs 2
TORONTO Tobias Enstrom
scored the tiebreaking goal late in
the second period and the Win-
nipeg Jets beat the Toronto Maple
Leafs 4-2.
Brian Little and Jacob Trouba
scored in the first period, and Olli
Jokinen had a goal in the third to


give the Jets some cushion. Ondrej
Pavelec stopped 23 shots for Win-
nipeg, which was eliminated from
playoff contention on Thursday.
Phil Kessel tied a career high
with his 37th goal and Nazem Kadri
also scored for Toronto, which re-
mained at 84 points. The Leafs
have just three games remaining
and trail Columbus by one point for
the Eastern Conference's last play-
off spot. The Blue Jackets have five
games left.
Canadiens 5,
Red Wings 3
MONTREAL- Brian Gionta
scored his second goal of the game
late in the third period to give the
surging Montreal Canadiens a 5-3
victory over the Detroit Red Wings.
Michael Bournival, Max Pacioretty
and Alex Galchenyuk also scored for
Montreal, while Carey Price made
34 saves. The Canadiens are now
10-2-0 in its last 12 games.
Pavel Datsyuk, Luke Glendening
and Niklas Kronwall scored for De-
troit, which snapped a four-game
win streak. Jonas Gustavsson
stopped 19 shots.
With the score tied 3-all, Gionta
was credited with his second goal of
the game when his shot, which was
initially saved by Gustavsson,
bounced off defenseman Brian
Lashoff's skate and into the net.
Galchenyuk added a fifth for the
Canadiens two minutes later.


Magic end three-game skid vs. Timberwolves


Associated Press

ORLANDO Arron Af-
flalo scored 18 points and
Tobias Harris and Maurice
Harkless added 17 apiece
to lead the Orlando Magic
to a 100-92 victory over the
Minnesota Timberwolves.
Rookie Victor Oladipo
contributed 16 points and
six assists to help Orlando
snap a three-game losing
streak. Kyle O'Quinn had
14 points and 13 rebounds.
Ricky Rubio led Min-
nesota with 18 points and
10 rebounds. Corey
Brewer had 15 for Timber-
wolves, who were missing
many key players.
Minnesota played with-
out its three leading scor-
ers, Kevin Love, Kevin
Martin and Nikola Pekovic,
all out with injuries. Chase
Budinger, starting in place
of Martin, left in the first
minute with an ankle in-
jury and didn't return.
Orlando used a 10-1 late
in the fourth quarter to fin-
ish off a second-half come-
back in which the Magic
rallied from 12 points
down with five minutes to
go in the third quarter
Bulls 96,
Wizards 78
WASHINGTON D.J. Au-
gustin scored 25 points,
Joakim Noah had 21 points
and 12 rebounds, and the
Chicago Bulls turned a possi-
ble first-round playoff preview
into a laugher, never trailing in
a 96-78 win over the Wash-
ington Wizards
Augustin made 6 of 11
3-pointers but only 2 of 8 2-
pointers and Carlos Boozer
added 16 points for the Bulls,


who have won five straight and
are battling the Toronto Rap-
tors for the No. 3 seed in the
Eastern Conference. Augustin
has averaged 19.8 points dur-
ing the winning streak.
John Wall scored 20 points,
and Marcin Gortat had 19 for
the Wizards, who sit in sixth
place in the East. If they hold
that spot, they would face the
third-seeded team.
Pistons 115,
Celtics 111
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Rodney Stuckey came off the
bench to score 26 points and
help the Detroit Pistons rally
fora 115-111 win over the
Boston Celtics.
The Pistons trailed by as
many as 19 points in third
quarter and were down 95-85
at the start of the fourth before
going on a 15-4 run that gave
them their first lead since
early in the game. The teams
traded the lead several times
before Stuckey made a pair of
free throws with 57 seconds
left to break a 111-all tie.
Jerryd Bayless tried for a go-
ahead shot in the final seconds
but his 3-point try rimmed out.
Greg Monroe scored 21
points, Brandon Jennings
had 20 and Andre Drum-
mond added 19 and 20 re-
bounds to help Detroit end a
two-game skid.
Bayless had 25 points and
Jeff Green had 22 as the
Celtics lost their eighth
straight.
Bobcats 96,
Cavaliers 94, OT
CLEVELAND--Al Jeffer-
son scored 24 points, includ-


ing seven in overtime, and the
Charlotte Bobcats clinched a
playoff spot with a 96-94 win
over the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Charlotte is in the postsea-
son for the second time in its
10-year history and the first
time since 2010. The Bobcats
(39-38) are over .500 for the
second time this season and
hold seventh place in the
Eastern Conference.
Kyrie Irving scored a ca-
reer-high 44 points for Cleve-
land. The Cavaliers (31-47)
trail eighth-place Atlanta by
3 gamess for the final playoff
spot in the East.
Irving was 16 of 31 from the
field, including five 3-pointers.
He added eight assists and
seven rebounds.
Gerald Henderson's basket
gave Charlotte a 90-89 lead
with 1:08 remaining and the
Bobcats made four free
throws down the stretch to
seal the win.
Nets 105,
76ers 101
PHILADELPHIA- Kevin
Garnett scored 10 points in
his first game in more than
five weeks to help the Brook-
lyn Nets beat the Philadelphia
76ers 105-101.
The 37-year-old Garnett
missed 19 straight games
since Feb. 27 because of
back spasms. The Nets went
14-5 over that span.
Garnett was back in the
starting lineup and was sharp
from the start. He scored on
an alley-oop in the first quar-
ter, made his first four shots,
and had a nasty block on
Michael Carter-Williams' layup
attempt that knocked the
rookie guard to the ground.


Associated Press
Orlando Magic guard Victor Oladipo scores a basket past Minnesota Timberwolves
forward Ronny Turiaf during the second half Saturday in Orlando. The Magic won 100-92.


/ s Al


pQ~


4 y


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 BS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Sm oke' slips in Sprint Cup
Duck Commander
500 I inammn


On last lap of day,

Stewart blazes

way topoleposition

Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas Tony
Stewart knocked Brad Keselowski
from the pole as qualifying ended
Saturday at Texas Motor Speedway
Stewart waited right until the end
of the final round to attempt his lap
and circled the speedway at 195.454
mph to grab the top starting spot for
Sunday's race.
It's Stewart's 15th career pole and
first since Atlanta in 2012.
"It was cool. I'm not normally a
qualifier," Stewart said.
Keselowski made his attempt
earlier in the session and turned
his lap at 195.419. He was out of his
car and watching the scoring pylon
as Stewart crossed the finish line,
and Keselowski dropped his head
in disappointment when he saw
he'd been beaten.
"Stewart put down a great lap at
the end, didn't see that one com-
ing," Keselowski said. "That's why
they do it this way Really exciting
and a lot of fun to watch, and quite
honestly, a lot of fun to participate
in this new format of qualifying."
Kevin Harvick qualified third as
two Stewart-Haas Racing Chevro-
lets were in the top three. The or-
ganization is the only one in the
Sprint Cup Series with two wins
this season Harvick won at
Phoenix and Kurt Busch won last
week at Martinsville but the four
cars have been all over the map and
lacked consistency
"Tony capturing the pole is as
good as it gets for the organization,"
Harvick said. "That's a huge im-
provement for where we've been as
a company the last few weeks."
Busch qualified llth as three of
the four SHR drivers advanced into
the third and final round of knock-
out qualifying.
The final session was dominated
by Fords as blue oval drivers
claimed six of the final 12 spots and
were led by Keselowski, who will
start on the front row for the fifth
time in seven races this season.
Ford drivers Greg Biffle and Carl
Edwards qualified fourth and fifth
for Roush Fenway Racing.
Then came Joe Gibbs Racing's


I *." Uuu L. lu p


Associated Press
Tony Stewart jokes around after taking the pole position Saturday for
today's Sprint Cup race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas.


Denny Hamlin, the only Toyota
driver to make it to the top 12.
Trevor Bayne was seventh in his
first appearance in the final group
this season, and he was followed by
Ryan Newman, Marcos Ambrose,
Joey Logano, Busch and Jeff Gordon.
Six-time NASCAR champion Jim-
mie Johnson failed to advance to
the final round for the first time this
season.
Chase Elliott grabs first
career Nationwide victory
FORT WORTH, Texas Chase Elliott
used a strong move on the outside to
pass Kevin Harvick for the lead at Texas
Motor Speedway and then sailed away
his first career Nationwide Series victory.
The 18-year-old won in his sixth ca-
reer start and is the second youngest
winner in series history. He's roughly
four months older than Joey Logano,
who was 18 years and 21 days when


he won his first career Nationwide race
in 2008.
Elliott won in a Chevrolet for JR Mo-
torsports, driving the No. 9 as a tribute
to his father, 1988 Cup champion Bill
Elliott.
"I can't believe it, just to have the op-
portunity to race with these guys at JR
Motorsports, just to have this opportu-
nity is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity
for any racer who wants to make it to
the top," Elliott said. "It just means the
world for me to be here."
Elliott became the fourth driver in Na-
tionwide history to earn his first series
victory at Texas, joining Dale Earnhardt
Jr., Kurt Busch and Trevor Bayne.
The victory continues the youth initia-
tive in NASCAR as first-time winners
have now won consecutive races for the
first time since 2008. Two weeks ago,
21-year-old Kyle Larson scored his first
career win at California.


After Saturday qualifying; race today
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevy, 195.454 mph.
2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.419.
3. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 195.298.
4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.7.
5. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 194.637.
6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.623.
7. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.503.
8. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 194.14.
9. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.056.
10. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 193.743.
11. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.126.
12. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 192.089.
13. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.259.
14. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.084.
15. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 194.021.
16. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.007.
17.(43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.59.
18. (78) Martin Truex Jr, Chevrolet, 193.493.
19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 193.354.
20. (3)Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 193.154.
21. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 193.154.
22. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 192.981.
23. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.768.
24.(10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 192.761.
25. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.988.
26. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.637.
27. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.602.
28.(95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 194.581.
29. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.539.
30. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 194.454.
31.(17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 194.44.
32. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.028.
33.(47) A JAIImendinger, Chevy, 193.611.
34. (35) David Reutimann, Ford, 192.954.
35.(77) Dave Blaney, Ford, 192.52.
36. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 192.219.
37. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, owner points.
38. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevy, owner points.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner points.
40. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevy, owner points.
41. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, owner points.
42. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, owner points.
43. (34) David Ragan, Ford, owner points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (33) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 190.759.
45. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 189.401.
46. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 188.587.
47. (44) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, 185.44.
Nationwide

O'Reilly Auto Parts
300 Results
Friday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (6) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 200 laps,
127.5 rating, 47 points, $72,094.
2. (36) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 126.3, 0,
$50,375.
3. (37) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 113.1, 0,
$40,875.
4. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 134.3,
0, $41,275.
5. (4) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200,
120.2, 0, $29,200.
6. (2) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 104.2, 0,
$26,025.
7. (3) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 104.7,
37, $30,903.
8. (9) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 200, 99.1, 0,
$28,928.
9. (38) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 91.4, 35,


RESULTS


$28,238.
10. (5) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 91.2, 34,
$28,328.
11. (7) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 200,
89.3, 33, $27,628.
12. (13) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 93.2, 32,
$27,128.
13. (11) James Buescher, Toyota, 200, 84.8,
31, $26,878.
14. (10) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet, 200,
82.3, 30, $26,518.
15. (12) David Starr, Toyota, 199, 75.5, 30,
$26,608.
16. (17) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 199, 76.5, 29,
$26,198.
17. (21) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 199, 70.2, 28,
$25,688.
18. (18) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 198,
65.3, 26, $25,303.
19. (23) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 198,
66.3, 25, $25,168.
20. (16) Ryan Reed, Ford, 196, 65, 24,
$25,558.
21. (20) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 195, 57.2, 0,
$24,948.
22. (25) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 195, 53.3,
22, $24,833.
23. (8) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 195, 71.7, 21,
$24,648.
24. (29) Eric McClure, Toyota, 194, 43.5, 20,
$24,538.
25.(24) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 194, 54.4,
19, $24,753.
26. (27) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 191,45.5, 18,
$24,293.
27. (39) Chris Buescher, Ford, accident, 167,
70.4, 17, $24,183.
28. (26) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, accident, 164,
44, 16, $24,063.
29. (33) Mike Harmon, Dodge, suspension,
131, 34.6, 15, $23,888.
30. (30)Tanner Berryhill, Dodge, wheel bear-
ing, 120, 40.4, 14, $24,078.
31. (14) Chad Boat, Chevrolet, accident, 119,
56.9, 13, $23,648.
32. (15) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 119, 45.4, 12,
$23,538.
33. (19) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, vibration,
66, 45, 11, $16,995.
34. (31) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, ac-
cident, 52, 37.9, 10, $23,312.
35. (22) Tommy Joe Martins, Dodge, brakes,
34, 42.5, 9, $16,755.
36. (35) Derek White, Dodge, transmission,
29, 30, 8, $15,195.
37. (32) Mike Wallace, Toyota, electrical, 23,
33.1, 7, $15,075.
38. (34) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, engine, 6,
34.5, 6, $15,040.
39. (28) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, vibra-
tion, 5, 32.1, 5, $14,790.
40. (40) Blake Koch, Toyota, vibration, 2, 31.3,
4, $14,755.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 137.545 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 10 minutes, 52 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.666 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 26 laps.
Lead Changes: 14 among 9 drivers.
Lap Leaders: KHarvick 1-87; KBusch 88-100;
KLarson 101; M.Kenseth 102; J.Yeley 103-104;
D.Starr 105-106; R.Sieg 107-108; K.Busch
109-121; C.Elliott 122; K.Busch 123-134; C.EI-
liott 135-154; D.Earnhardt Jr. 155-169; C.Elliott
170; KHarvick 171-184; C.Elliott 185-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 2 times for 101 laps; C.EI-
liott, 4 times for 38 laps; K.Busch, 3 times for
38 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 15 laps;
D.Starr, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Yeley, 1 time for 2
laps; R.Sieg, 1 time for 2 laps; K.Larson, 1
time for 1 lap; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. C.Elliott, 224; 2. R.Smith,
222; 3. TDillon, 214; 4. E.Sadler, 208; 5.
T.Bayne, 206; 6. B.Gaughan, 193; 7. B.Scott,
192; 8. D.Kwasniewski, 179; 9. J.Buescher,
176; 10. R.Reed, 141.


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Steady, competent leadership got the job done


hen Andy Houston
plays golf, he al-
ways hits the ball
right down the middle.
Houston, the city manager
of Crystal River, does not hit
long. He does not slice.
It's always right down the
middle.
Those who play golf in
Citrus County know that
consistency is the key to the
game. Sure, the guy who
hits the ball 300 yards gets


to thump his chest and strut
around, but he's usually the
same guy who loses his ball
in the woods on the next
hole.
If I am going to place a
wager, I will always go with
consistency
Andy Houston is Mr
Consistency
Last Monday Houston an-
nounced he was going to re-
tire from his position as the
city manager in July He ad-


vised council to start look-
ing for his replacement.
Houston's management of
Crystal River has been like
his golf game he con-
stantly hit the ball right
down the middle.
For the past eight years,
the unassuming city man-
ager has directed the city on
a steady course. That was a
unique adventure for Crys-
tal River, because for the
previous 25 years, the Gulf


MISMANAGEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
A brief history of Crystal
River's many managers.
/Page C3
Coast municipality would
terminate its city manager
at the drop of a hat
There were two warring
factions in Crystal River
that fought over every issue
that came down the pike.


They fired city managers
with such regularity that in-
coming managers would live
in travel trailers. (OK, maybe
that's an exaggeration.)
I seriously remember one
time the city council got
into a dispute over what
type of flowers would be
placed in official city flower
boxes. I personally was
rooting for the petunias.


broken




it's bouu


A new report confirms what you've long

suspected: The energy industry exerts

outsized political influence in Florida.


DAN KRASSNER AND BEN WILCOX
Special to the Chronicle
TALLLAHASSEE
NONPARTISAN GOVERNMENT WATCHDOG GROUP INTEGRITY FLORIDA
recently released a research report titled "Power Play:
Political influence of Florida's top energy corporations."
The findings conclude that, increasingly, the Florida Legislature
sets its agenda and policy outcomes based on the needs of large po-
litical donors rather than the public interest. In one recent example,
the sitting state senate president openly explained his position on a
public policy issue as supporting whatever one major campaign
donor tells him to support. A large Budweiser distributor contributed
nearly $300,000 to political candidates and committees aligned
with Senate President Don Gaetz and had the edge on its smaller
craft beer industry competitors.
See Page C3


WHAT DID THEY FIND?
Major campaign donations.
Electric utilities contributed more than $18 million
to state-level candidates and party organizations
between the 2004 and 2012 election cycles.
Significant lobbying.
Lobbying spending by Florida's four largest
electric utilities was more than $12 million
between 2007 and 2013.
A revolving door and cronyism.
Electric utilities have made a point of hiring
former state regulators and have employed the
firms of several sitting state legislators.
Higher electric bills for consumers.
Floridians have faced higher electric utility bills
from each of the four corporations examined in
See Page C3


Crystal River: Yesterday, today and tomorrow


nce upon a time,
Crystal River was the
crown jewel of the
Nature Coast It carried the
seat of commerce in Citrus
County for many years. In
the 1950s, Sam Pickard, one
of the co-founders of CBS,
was fascinated with Crystal
River and invested more
than $2 million in the devel-
opment of the Port Para-
dise, the Village of Picardy
and a golf course. As the


years progressed, growth
continued, with the DeBar-
tolo Corporation bringing in
a multimillion-dollar mall
with anchor stores includ-
ing J.C. Penney, Sears and
Belk-Lindsey National fran-
chise hotels and several re-
gional banks also began
opening branches here.
Unfortunately, we have
seen the tide turn drasti-
cally over the past few
years. Major retail stores,


including the anchors of the
Crystal River Mall, have
shut down. The population
has declined and strip cen-
ters are empty The major
demise has lead to an ero-
sion of the city's tax base.
The city manager, council
and Community Redevelop-
ment Agencies (CRA) are
facing an enormous eco-
nomic challenge. In this
struggling economy, CRA
members (who are also


council members) are pre-
sented with a huge
dilemma: whether or not to
spend taxpayers' money to
redevelop Crystal River
Redevelopment entails
many projects, including
building the Riverwalk,
purchasing the Chamber of
Commerce Building on U.S.
19, adding parking and de-
veloping mixed-use lands.
Crystal River's many
small commercial lots and


building codes obstruct the
growth of any new build-
ings. With the future vision
in mind, county Chamber of
Commerce President/CEO
Josh Wooten offered our ail-
ing city the first right of re-
fusal to buy the present
Chamber of Commerce
building at a very reason-
able price. The city man-
ager recommended the
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3


Paresh Desai
GUEST
COLUMN


'We have a




nature

that is not


99





0Page C2 SUNDAY, APRIL 6,2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"Our national flower is the concrete cloverleaf"
Lewis Mumford, quote, Oct. 8, 1961


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Sh Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

TOO FAST, TOO FURIOUS




On road talk,




let's bypass




the rhetoric


downtown Floral City is
in a tough spot.
Picturesque, and
nearly small enough to fit in
a picture frame, the historic
district is located at the busy
junction of the former State
Road 48 and U.S. 41 a spot
that meant prosperity at the
turn of the 20th century, but
could mean the opposite for
its future.
The volume of traffic flow-
ing through downtown has al-
ways been of concern to
residents and business own-
ers, but a recent attempt to
mitigate those concerns has
only inflamed them:
With the addition of
a left-turn lane for TI
East Orange Avenue ISS
by the state Depart- Prop
ment of Transporta- Flora
tion (FDOT), drivers orc
on U.S. 41 have yr
taken to blowing pror
through downtown outs
at high speeds, no resp
longer restrained by
the potential of a 01
long line of brake OPIN
lights at downtown's Politi
only traffic signal, is a r
Ideas on how to now
bring the pace of
traffic closer to the
pace of life in Floral City
have varied from graduated
speed zones to lower limits
outside the city and round-
abouts outside downtown.
None have met with much
enthusiasm, and those kinds
of proposals are likely losers
for the community because
they're fundamentally at
cross purposes with the state:
FDOT wants to speed up traf-
fic on its roads, not slow driv-
ers down.
How, then, can the city and
the state reconcile their in-
terests? In two ways: by
breadth or by berth. Widen-
ing the road is, has been and
always will be a non-starter
for locals, as it would take out
historic landmarks and, the
handful of business owners
operating downtown fear,
their businesses. That leaves
only a bypass in reality, the
re-routing of U.S. 41 as a
way to satisfy drivers, resi-
dents and the state.
The bypass is an idea with
some baggage, and it's pick-
ing up even more as the
squeal of tires in downtown
Floral City pricks some emi-
nent ears: This week County
Commissioner Scott Adams
railed against the idea after
learning the proposed path of
the bypass would run through
property owned by a devel-
oper recently embroiled in
controversy on the other side
of the county, and state Sen.
Charlie Dean sent a letter to
FDOT Secretary Ananth
Prasad requesting that FDOT
withhold funding from any
projects in Floral City or Sug-
armill Woods. It's worth not-
ing, before we proceed, that
the Floral City bypass pro-
posal is positively prenatal,


H
SI
po
al

T
m
si
O

U
)01

C

ic
lo
vh


being a full two decades from
construction, and that Sug-
armill Woods which has no
such projects planned is
both home and headache
to Nachum Kalka, the afore-
mentioned developer who
was the target of Adams'
objections.
With that context, let's eval-
uate some of the recent
claims and objections.
Adams, Dean and Floral
City business owners all con-
tend that a bypass would be
detrimental to their busi-
nesses, and the rationale
seems logical: Fewer cars
going through down-
town means fewer of
IE those cars stopping
UE: at Floral City shops.
sed It is, however, likely
ose i that the vast major-
City ity of cars that travel
nss through Floral City
izedpt on U.S. 41 are doing
e just that: passing
nse. through on their
way to someplace
JR else. Taking those
ION: cars out of the equa-
cking tion likely won't
)ad to harm business, and
iere. may even lure in po-
tential customers
unwilling to deal
with the present traffic.
Absent any hard data on
the matter, any assumptions
one way or the other are
unfounded.
Adams' objections to
Kalka's involvement are par-
ticularly puzzling, especially
given Adams' professional
history. Yes, Kalka and the
other two landowners with
property bisected by the pro-
posed route would likely do-
nate right of way, may have a
voice in the process, and may
very well end up benefitting
for it. That's why so many
planned communities are
conveniently located; to sin-
gle out Kalka in this instance
is unfair and disingenuous.
Private investment drives
public investment and vice
versa, as the commissioner
well knows. As long as Kalka
or any other developer -
follows the rules, why vilify
him?
Furthermore, if Kalka is
such a suspicious actor that
his involvement warrants
Adams' attention, why did the
commissioner accept cam-
paign contributions from
Kalka?
Whether or not a bypass is
the best solution to the prob-
lem of traffic in Floral City is
for residents and the state to
decide, and whether it ever
gets built at all is another
matter altogether. If it does,
in any event, it will be
decades from now, and so for
the present is hardly a work-
able solution to Floral City's
problems. In the interim, the
residents of Floral City will
be better served by reasoned
discussion than by personal
politics and letters to high-
ranking state officials.


Eric Holder discovers true justice


Editor's note: This is the first
in a series on addressing injus-
tices in the U.S. prison system.
ver since Eric Holder be-
came our chief law en-
forcement officer, I have
described him as being Barack
Obama's faithful vassal, who
supports the president's defiling
of the Constitution.
But recently, there
has been a valuable
exception: Holder's
call for reforming
America's prison
system, a topic I have -
repeatedly covered.
As reported in i
multiple media out-
lets, the attorney Nat F
general spoke to the OTFI
American Bar Asso-
ciation in San Fran- VOI
cisco last August. He
was adamant about the state of
America's prisons:
"It's clear ... that too many
Americans go to too many prisons
for far too long, and for no truly
good law enforcement reason.
It's clear, at a basic level, that
20th-century criminal justice so-
lutions are not adequate to over-
come our 21st-century challenges.
'And it is well past time to im-
plement common-sense changes
that will foster safer communi-
ties from coast to coast" (jus-
tice.gov, Aug. 12, 2013).
According to The Guardian's
Dan Roberts and Karen McVeigh,
the first of the administration's
common-sense reforms would
include keeping "minor drug
dealers" from serving "manda-
tory minimum sentences that
have previously locked up many
for a decade or more" ("Eric
Holder unveils new reforms
aimed at curbing U.S. prison
population," Dan Roberts and
Karen McVeigh, The Guardian,
Aug. 12,2013).
Last month, Holder elabo-
rated on this plan in testimony
to the U.S. Sentencing Commis-
sion, according to Teresa Welsh
of U.S. News & World Report
"The measure," Welsh writes,
"would reduce the base offense
and sentencing associated with
substance quantities involved in
drug dealing crimes, reducing the
average sentence by 11 months."
So the average sentence is re-
duced, but not by much. What's
the big deal? Well, "the change
would impact almost 70 percent
of all drug trafficking offenders,
as many who are imprisoned
for such offenses are nonviolent
criminals" ("Should Sentences
for Nonviolent Drug Offenders
Be Reduced?" Teresa Welsh,
U.S. News & World Report,
March 13).


HI
I
(


Furthermore, small as this
first step is, Welsh reports, "the
Sentencing Commission estimates
that if adopted, the proposal would
reduce the Bureau of Prisons
inmate population by 6,550."
And dig this:
"The government spends al-
most $83 billion each year on a
prison system that has grown by
700 percent in the
past 30 years. U.S.
prisons are 40 per-

and half of all inmates
are serving time for
drug-related crimes."
Holder calls this a
part of his "Smart on
Crime" reforms, and
entoff he's not alone in
IER wanting to bring jus-
E- twice, of all things, to
DES the boundless "War
on Drugs."
Welsh goes on: "This move
has found bipartisan support in
Congress, with both Democrats
and Republicans sponsoring a
prison reform bill also favored
by the administration."
Anything "favored" by the
Obama administration usually
gives me no confidence. But what
are the chances that Holder's
welcome reform gets adopted?
It doesn't look good. Welsh
gives you a sense of how rigidly
stiff and self-righteous the op-
position is: "The National Asso-
ciation ofAssistant U.S. Attorneys,
a group representing assistant
U.S. attorneys employed by the
Department of Justice, said the
drug sentencing system does
not need to be 'fixed.'
"In a letter to the Senate Ju-
diciary Committee, the group
said that 'we are winning the
war against crime' because more
criminals are serving longer
sentences. The association said
no changes should be made to
current sentencing law until
more is known about how it
could impact crime rates."
The Sentencing Commission
vote on the proposal is due this
month. If the "Smart on Crime"
reform passes, Welsh writes, it
"would take effect in Novem-
ber" as long as Congress does
not voice any opposition. We'll
see if there is sufficient biparti-
san support for Eric Holder to
have a somewhat more favor-
able place in U.S. history
Maybe the money saved by
this initiative will move it along.
Brian Resnick of National Jour-
nal writes:
"Reducing the prison popula-
tion by 6,550 would mean, on av-
erage, a savings of $169,238,900
a year, per data from the Urban
Institute. Money aside, the
human-interest case for sen-


tencing reform is easy to make"
("Eric Holder's War on Drug
Sentences a Bright Spot in
Obama's Second-Term Legacy?"
Brian Resnick, National Jour-
nal, March 13).
Resnick then quotes Holder's
remarks to the Sentencing
Commission:
"This overreliance on incar-
ceration is not just financially
unsustainable; it comes with
human and moral costs that are
impossible to calculate."
Joining this Democratic at-
torney general is Texas Gov Rick
Perry, who, according to Resnick,
told the Conservative Political
Action Conference last month:
"The idea that we lock people
up, throw them away, and never
give them a chance of redemp-
tion is not what America is
about. Being able to give some-
one a second chance is very
important."
Resnick adds that "in 2012,
Pew found that 84 percent of
Americans agreed with the
statement, 'Some of the money
that we are spending on locking
up low-risk, nonviolent inmates
should be shifted to strengthen-
ing community corrections pro-
grams like probation and
parole."'
According to Pew, whose
polling I find generally reliable,
77 percent of Republicans also
agreed with the statement.
Furthermore: "Sixty-nine
percent of Americans agreed
with the statement, 'One out of
every 100 American adults is in
prison. That's too many, and it
costs too much."'
Hillary Clinton is currently
polling ahead of other potential
2016 presidential candidates -
of either party What's her posi-
tion on this?
At the very least, it would ap-
pear that Eric Holder has a
firm majority of We The People
behind him. In his testimony
before the Sentencing Commis-
sion last month, he made this
stinging point: "Today the United
States comprises just 5 percent
of the world's population, but it
incarcerates almost a quarter of
the world's prisoners."
Does that make you feel
proud?
To be continued next week,
with more on the reawakened
Eric Holder

Nat Hentoffris a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
of Rights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


Iv wufE*Amais iwma eenwGo uwe ckacaRe.,.


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an carae character o Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
many businesses here in Citrus to 352 563-3280, or email to Our sincere appreciation,
County. All we can say is thank letters@chronicleonline.com.
you so very much on behalf of Leadership Citrus 2014


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The faith of


ife necessarily
changes once you
retire. While work-
ing, there is the expecta-
tion of receiving income
commensurate with our
worth to an employer, but
once we retire, the likeli-
hood is that our income
will decrease, sometimes
dramatically
Yes, some income will
continue from various
sources including Social
Security Please don't cate-
gorize Social Security as
an entitlement. It is not a
gift that the government
gives to recipients, but
payback for the thousands,
or in many cases, hun-
dreds of thousands of dol-
lars that have been paid in
without choice during the
past 30, 40, 50 or more
years. For the more fortu-
nate, there may also be



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

Houston managed to
overcome most, but not all,
of the silliness.
Instead, he focused on
getting things done in a
city that struggled with its
own identity
How bad was it? Well,
think about this for a mo-
ment: In 1999, Crystal River
won a grant from the state
to replace all of the aging
septic tanks that were pol-
luting King's Bay and the
river The city council pro-
claimed that cleaning up
the river was its top prior-
ity But when Houston
joined the council in 2006,
the first pipe in the sewer
plant expansion had not
been put in the ground.
The state wanted its
money back.
The turmoil and lack of
leadership was so bad that
a city couldn't address its
most serious problem,
even though it had free
money from the state.
Houston got the project
on track, and the final pipes
will be placed in the ground
within the next month.
The purchase of Three
Sister Springs, the renova-
tion of Cutler Spur,
stormwater retention proj-
ects, the renovation of Cit-

andwiched between
Crystal River's first city
manager, John Morrison,
and its most recent city
manager, Andy Houston,
have been 12 city man-
agers in 23 years. Collec-
tively, each averaged 19
months on the job. Here's
a brief history of C.R. city
managers:
* John Morrison, hired
1969, terminated by a 3-2
vote Jan. 3, 1983. Walter
Bunts, Dr. O.J. Humphries
and Phil Price voted to ter-
minate after Morrison
failed to use a donation of
stock from W.W. Carruth to
pay for a $3,000 fire boat
pump and instead used
city funds designated for
sewer renewal and replace-
ment. Sidney Kennedy and
Raddie Jones voted to re-
tain (13 years).
* Wallace Payne, hired
from a list of 10 appli-
cants provided by county
government in April 1983;
resigned September 1985.
Payne, who previously
served as Oldsmar's first
city manager, had become
unpopular with council and
citizens due to his support
of a sewer disposal system
and sewer assessment dis-
trict (29 months).
* John Kelly, hired Sep-
tember 1985; resigned Au-
gust 1987. Kelly guided
the city through a troubling
financial time when it
nearly defaulted on a loan.
He cited constant nagging
by council and a $12,500
raise to take the city man-
ager job in Fort Worth as
reasons for his departure
from Crystal River (23
months).
* Gilbert Hess, hired Janu-
ary 1988, forced to resign
April 1990 over budget is-


sues. Two months prior to
his resignation, in February
1990, the police chief and
two officers were forced to
resign following grand jury
indictments on a number
of charges (27 months).
* MervWaldrop, hired
April 1990 as interim man-
ager and later installed
permanently, resigned
June 1993 for a better job


dollars which have
saved for retirement
once upon a time,t
was a reasonable ra
interest paid on thosE
lars. No such luck at
ent. Nowadays, the t
can still invest in s
which bring a higher
of return to go along \
higher risk. I'm not o
the brave. My conce
more the return of n
vestment than is the r
on my investment.
Whew!
I have just gone fu
into the details of n
tary economics than ]
did during the timeI
both working in the f
cial services industry;
writing this column.
ing stuff, isn't it?
First and foremos
must always reme
wherein our source f


fixing st

been things lies, and it is not the
;, and almighty dollar, but the
there Almighty. Amen and amen.
ate of Cheryl and I have been
e dol- blessed, mightily blessed
pres- so many times and in so
brave many ways, but
tocks the truth is,
r rate even though
vitha we have faith
)ne of in our Heav-
irn is enly Father,
ny in- long-term r
eturn budgeting be-
came a priority
for us once I
rather stopped draw- Fred I
none- ing a regular A S
[ever paycheck.
I was My sweet- OF
minan- heart and I
y and have placed into our


Bor-

t, we
mber
or all


rus Avenue and plans for
the Riverwalk all hap-
pened under Houston's
leadership and all amid
a reduction in the size of
city staff and taxes.
He rebuilt relations with
the business community
and worked to solve all
sorts of problems.
Houston's service has been
more than projects, it has
been aboutworking together
There are still at least two
factions in Crystal River
that don't like each other
But somehow, folks have
learned to work together
to move the needle forward.
Houston looks to take
none of the credit for him-
self, and that in itself is the
secret
When politicians or public
servants spend all of their
time patting themselves on
the back and telling us
how great they are, they
usually don't have enough
time left over to get the ac-
tual work done.
But when they keep
their heads down and
work, they can hit the 170-
yard shot down the middle
and achieve good results.
Andy Houston has done
just that for Crystal River


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.

in Georgia. Six months into
his interim post, Council-
man Alex Ilnyckyj sought to
have him removed from
the job, but the majority of
council supported Waldrop
(38 months).
* Terry Leary, hired Octo-
ber 1993, fired August
1994. Council members
were unhappy with her per-
formance (10 months).
* Roger Krieger, hired Au-
gust 1994, resigned Febru-
ary 1995 after being
disgusted with December
1994 election (6 months).
* Roger Baltz, hired Au-
gust 1996, resigned Febru-
ary 1998 for job as
administrator in Putnam
County (18 months).
* Russ Kreager, hired April
1998, fired February 1999
for reasons unknown (10
months).
* David Sallee, hired June
1999, contract not re-
newed in November 2000
for reasons unknown (17
months).
* Phil Lilly was hired in
September 2001 and sud-
denly took another job
after 11 months when rela-
tions soured with the coun-
cil (11 months).
* Susan Boyer, hired in
2002 as interim city man-
ager and five weeks (No-
vember 2002) later picked
from all the applicants to
head city administration.
She served until March
2005. Boyer negotiated a
settlement after a 3-2 vote
to fire her. She was not
fired, but was allowed to
leave on her own and re-
ceived severance pay in the
settlement (28 months).
* Phil Deaton, a member
of musical group the
Range Riders, was selected
as interim city manager
and was selected May 9,
2005, for the full-time job.
The council formally hired
him Wednesday, May 18.
Retired June 30, 2006 (14
months).
* Andy Houston, July
2006 to present. Set to re-
tire in July 2014 (8 years).


budget many things, things
we know we will want to
do such as continuing to
travel as long as our health
permits, but also some


uff on a fixed income


3
I
I


things we will have to do
which might be consid-
ered unexpected but
aren't, not really In time, a
new roof will be required,
a new home air condi-
tioner will be
necessary, a
new car or per-
haps two, and,
of course, final
expenses. Even
so, once in a
while, there is
something that
didn't cross our
rannen minds.
LICE Some time
ago, the skim-
LIFE mer in our
small swim-
ming pool's filtering sys-
tem simply stopped
skimming. Not that big of a
problem. I have been using
a small handheld device to
skim the pool's surface on


a regular basis. The filter
is still working fine and
keeps the water clean. The
pool is screened, so there
is no big problem with
leaves, but smaller plant
debris continuously blows
in through the screen.
When we worked through
this year's budget, we
mentally put in a sum for
having the pool's filtering
and skimming setup over-
hauled. I was thinking per-
haps a few hundred of
dollars.
The day came when we
called the pool repairman.
He arrived and I spent
much too much time ex-
plaining the malfunction.
The repairman walked
over to the mechanism and
said, "Here's the problem.
The filter is turned on; the
skimmer is turned off." He
moved a small dial one


notch, and voila, every-
thing was working per-
fectly once more. There
was no charge, not even for
the house call.
Did I feel like a doofus?
Of course I did.
But I was thankful,
thankful that what we
thought might be a major
problem was totally incon-
sequential. Planning is im-
portant, but so is trusting
in the One who is in charge
of all things.


FredBrannen, an
Inverness resident,
has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and
is the author of the re-
cently published novel
'At the Bottom ofBiscayne
Bay." He may be contacted
at fbrannenjr@gmail. corn
or via brannenbooksllc.com.


Continued from Pags Cl

study in recent years.

ti-consumer regulations.
Florida Legislature and the Florida
)lic Service Commission routinely
with electric utilities rather than
summers.


HAT CAN BE DONE?

ply uniform ethics rules for
gislators and local officials.
local officials are banned from legisla-
lobbying, then apply the same rules
legislators lobbying local officials.

t inspector general reports
line.
)ector general investigative reports
audits should be posted online by
Florida Public Service Commission
all state and local agencies.
gift and client disclosures made by
state and local officials online.
uire additional disclosure for politi-
donations from government vendors
companies regulated by the Public
vice Commission.

tablish electric bill
nsparency.
bundle bills with detailed disclosure
ate components.


As a former member of the CRA
and a resident of Crystal River for
over 30 years, I agree with City
Manager Andy Houston's sugges-
tion to buy the chamber building
and its surrounding lots for new
development. One can redevelop
an area only when one controls the
land. We need to take advantage of
the low prices today Otherwise the
public will have to pay a higher
price in the future, similar to what
happened with Three Sisters.
Three Sisters was offered for
$600,000 by George Sterchi, and
then for $3 million by George Good-
man, and finally the public paid
approximately $10 million five
years ago. I leave you with a quote
from H. Jackson Browne's mother,
quoted in Browne's "PS. I Love You:"
"Twenty years from now you will
be more disappointed by the things
that you didn't do than by the ones
you did do. So throw off the bow-
lines. Sail away from the safe har-
bor Catch the trade winds in your
sails. Explore. Dream. Discover"


Dr Paresh G. Desai is a former
CRA board member and resident
of Crystal River


Continued from Page C1

"The corrupting influence of money in politics is the defining
issue of our time," said Dan Krassner, executive director of the
nonpartisan government watchdog group Integrity Florida. "We
have a Legislature that is not broken, it's bought"
A similar pattern exists for the energy
To view a copy of sector in Florida, where the Florida Legis-
thefull report, lature maintains a traditional, regulated
visit http://bit.ly/ monopoly-utility model. This report ex-
lmwtJL3, or click amines the political influence of the state's
four largest electric utility companies:
on this story at Florida Power & Light, Duke Energy (for-
www.chronicle merly Progress Energy), TECO Energy
online.com. and Gulf Power
These four corporations registered, on
average, one lobbyist for every two state legislators each legislative
session between 2007 and 2013. For the past five election cycles,
these electric utilities were among the largest donors to state-level
campaigns in Florida.
In the same period of time, the policy wins for the four electric
utilities included rate increases for customers, legislation that al-
lows early cost recovery for nuclear facilities that have not been
built, the defeat of a proposal that would have increased electric
bill transparency and the removal of consumer-friendly state reg-
ulators who opposed two proposed rate hikes.
"Our state's monopoly power corporations have demonstrated
how political influence investments can be profitable," said Ben
Wilcox, Integrity Florida's research director "The volume of
spending on campaigns and lobbying may explain the industry's
outsized influence on public policy"

Integrity Florida is a nonpartisan research institute and government
watchdog whose mission is to promote integrity in government
and expose public corruption. Dan Krassner is co-founder and
executive director for Integrity Florida. Ben Wilcox is research
director for Integrity Florida.


DESAI
Continued from Page Cl

purchase of the essential piece of
real estate with CRA funding, but
was met with some resistance.
Let's take a glimpse into how,
historically, the Redevelopment
Agency (RDA) and CRA have revi-
talized distressed areas similar to
Crystal River
RDAs were established after
World War II to counteract the fail-
ures of traditional "market-driven"
development. Cities historically
have depended on the private sec-
tor to determine growth patterns
and drive industry, jobs and hous-
ing. Taxes generated from these
sources would then pay for schools,
roads, parks and other public serv-
ices. These economically dis-
tressed areas do not have access to
the financing mechanisms that
would otherwise enable cities and
counties to leverage additional
public and private investments to
revitalize neighborhoods.
Redevelopment agencies have
budgets and income streams that
are separate from those of the city


They can issue their own bonds
and pay them back by collecting in-
cremental property taxes gener-
ated in redevelopment over the life
of the plan. These funds are then
used to provide loans or grants, ac-
quire or assemble land and im-
prove infrastructure. They can also
purchase land, assemble small
parcels into larger sites, and de-
velop large-scale projects that can
be used for the public good.
The Florida Legislature adopted
the Community Redevelopment Act
in 1969 to revitalize economically
distressed areas to improve public
welfare and increase the tax base.
The dollars can be used to do
many things. They can rectify inad-
equate street layouts, develop
parking facilities and build a
Three Sisters Springs Welcome
Center, roadways, bridges and
bike/walking paths, such as the
Riverwalk. The dollars can also be
used for stormwater management,
sewer and the purchase of inade-
quately sized parcels for develop-
ment without the use of the
eminent domain. The CRA can
help economically distressed areas
and use the process to create a vi-
sion for the future.


INFLUENCE FINDINGS


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Floral City bypass
will ruin town
A brilliant move to allow a
bypass in Floral City It is sure
to alleviate all the traffic issues.
It will allow the speeding
tourists to bypass your small
town. It will allow the tourists
dollars to also bypass the
town. Rather than drive past
the small mom-and-pop shops
and pop in and spread their
dollars, it will allow them to
"bypass" and allow your
shops and town to live in
peace and quiet actually
enough quiet for your shops
to go out of business and
close. Then you will not need
to worry about people walk-
ing along the streets and the
speeding cars.
A brilliant move. Funny, I
have seen it happen in small
towns in Maryland and Penn-
sylvania. A bypass is what they
needed also. Shame; it was the
death of the local small shops.
But it did cure the speeding
car issues.
Jay Eicholtz
Inverness

Solution to Floral
City speeding
To solve this current prob-
lem the county needs to look to
a town less than 100 miles to
the north. They have a major
highway running through the
town and have no speeding
problem. They have no expen-
sive bypass and have an an-
nual income from people who
try to speed through the town.
It's Waldo. The county does
not need to spend half a mil-
lion dollars on a bypass! They
just need to aggressively en-
force the speed limit that al-
ready exists. It won't take long
for the word to spread and
speeding will not be a major
issue.
Dave Messenger
Homosassa

Hoping Floral City
can work out solution
I just read the article on the
proposed Floral City bypass in
the April 2 issue of the
Chronicle. We are snowbirds
from Kentucky and drive many
times each winter through Flo-
ral City It's such a beautiful
drive through the old oaks and
such a quaint city that it would
be such a shame to destroy the
drive and lose the uniqueness
of Floral City. By the same
token, it would also be bad to
route traffic around the city
and lose tourist dollars as well
as tourists' beautiful view
Being from out of state we
don't have a vested interest ei-
ther way, but why make Floral
City just like so many others and
lose its wonderful character?
Once it's gone, it's gone forever
I hope Floral City can work
out a proper solution, good
luck.
Richard Keith
Bowling Green, Ky.

Save Sugarmill Woods
I and everyone in my neigh-
borhood is worried about the
increased traffic on Oak Vil-
lage Blvd. and our roads.
I am worried about the beau-
tiful view being replaced by
two-story units or higher in
our back yard. If you think that
Mr. Kalka only needs our little
stub-out to access his 40 acres,
then you are very mistaken
and very misinformed. Mr.
Kalka has his entire
Dunes/Seville/Ascott develop-
ment to access his 40 acres.
Also, our elected officials
and paid representatives
should know that if they allow
it, they will turn Sugarmill
Woods' little stub out and Oak
Village Boulevard into a major
shortcut to access U.S. 98 and
the Suncoast Parkway road for
4,211 for all of his develop-
ments. With 3,811 Hernando
County approved units on top
of 400 units expected from the


40 acres, the traffic potential
will be overwhelming with the
average family having two-plus
cars per unit
As my county commissioners
and leaders, I want you to
know that this is unacceptable.
You obviously are not looking
at the big picture. If you are,
then you are not very good at
planning.
You are planning on sacrific-
ing Sugarmill Woods for
what? You will not be getting
county taxes from the 3,811
units in Hernando County that
will be using Sugarmill Woods
roads. Citrus County will have
to pay to widen Oak Village
Boulevard to at least four
lanes, the association would no
longer be custodians of the
landscaping and center islands
because the county would have
to do away with our beautiful
Oak-treed centers, add red
lights and sidewalk.
They would have to increase
the size of the police depart-
ment to take care of traffic
jams and accidents at the cor-
ner of U.S. 98 and Oak Village
Boulevard, take care of in-
creased crime in Sugarmill
Woods, take care of speeders,
pedestrian deaths and pick up
dead and injured animals.
Sounds like poor planning, and
Citrus County residents will
have to pay for it in taxes, loss
of property value, loss of desir-
ability in their neighborhoods
and the a loss of a way of life.
Maybe our representatives
have figured out a way to get
some of Hernando County's
property taxes, some of Her-
nando's construction permit or
some other funds to make this
worthwhile for Citrus County
residents.
I request (more like de-
mand) that you stop this folly
now! The only thing that
makes sense is the probable
payoffs. Rest assured that all
involved will have their per-
sonal financial records investi-
gated by the state of Florida,
the media, the FBI and others.
We are taking those steps now
You can of course forget
about re-election in Citrus
County as the voting power of
10,000 residents will be enough
to not only remove you but end
your political careers. I im-
plore you not to expect this
matter to go away Everything
in our means will be done to
stop you and we advise you to
govern yourself accordingly
Gene Murray
0V Coalition
Sugarmill Woods

We are fostering
China's growth
In today's Chronicle (March
11), L. M. Eastman writes about
the evils of North Korea and


the disaster of buying goods
made in China. The writer is
absolutely correct about North
Korea, but there are even
more abuses that are not re-
ported in this country Because
of the work I do, I have con-
tacts in 74 countries and one of
our contacts in Japan frequently
reports that North Korean
agents are kidnapping young
South Korean and Japanese
women and smuggling them
into North Korea as "toys" for
those in power Quite frequently
small North Korean submarines
are detected in the waters of
Japan and also South Korea,
landing agents in those countries.
North Koreans are indoctrinated
with a hatred of Americans at
a very young age and this is in-
deed, a very evil place.
While we applaud Eastman's
suggestions that we boycott
Chinese made goods and I
agree, it is more difficult than
one might imagine. I was in
Red China 20 years ago and
saw the preparations for a
take-over of the global manu-
facturing because they can
mass produce anything at a
fraction of the cost of industri-
alized nations, but in many
cases, you get what you pay for
My son loves apple juice and
my wife always bought one of
the biggest American name
brands until one day he com-
plained that it tasted bad. I
tried it it was awful. Check-
ing the label and beneath the
large brand name, in tiny little
letters, it said "Product of
China." Who wants apple juice
from China? We now look at
the labels much more closely
and if it says "Made in China,"
we leave it on the shelves.
What is not at all apparent is
- where does all this money
go when we buy Chinese made
goods. Again, because of the
work I do, I have contacts in
many of the world's navies and
we see that China now has op-
erational aircraft carriers and
they are building three more
in a secret shipyard on an is-
land off the Chinese coast.
They have at least four (we
think six) JIN-class sub-
marines that can reach any
point in the world and they
carry nuclear ballistic mis-
siles. Their surface fleet is
building even faster than our
naval intelligence knows (or is
ready to admit). Their air
force now has fighters equal to
our F-16 and they have stealth
aircraft all thanks to the
money pouring in from their
products.
Even if everybody in the U.S.
stopped buying anything made
in China today, it would not
dent their economy much. I
spent last September in Ger-
many and Austria, spent No-
vember in Honduras and spent
this past January 2014 in Ar-


gentina. These countries are
just as saturated with Chinese-
made products as the United
States. It is like a fast-spreading
cancer nations that sell Chi-
nese-made products are, in ef-
fect, cutting their own throat
economically while feeding
the dragon in the East and
building a massive military for
China. There does not appear
to be a simple solution to this
problem and it is growing at
an alarming rate.
Harry Cooper
Hernando

Playing the
recusalcard
Residents of Citrus County
were treated to a comedy of
the absurd at the March 11
BOCC meeting. However, as
my wife and I incredulously
watched the proceedings on
Channel 622, we weren't
amused by the comedic dis-
play of incoherence unfolding
before our eyes. I'm sure many
others in our community had
the same reaction.
The agenda item, introduced
by Commissioner Scott Adams,
was a discussion of the pro-
posed extension of Oak Village
Boulevard. The permit request
for this extension from an out-
side developer is vigorously
opposed by many residents of
Sugarmill Woods. Citizens
were attempting to submit a
request for a delay of a final
decision on the permit until a
request to vacate the county's
easement for that section of
the road could be completed
and submitted to the appropri-
ate county functionaries. Sim-
ple, right? Well, maybe not.
Even before the speakers
could start making their case,
three of the five commission-
ers, one by one, recused them-
selves from any further discussion
of the matter, promptly got up
and proceeded to leave the
room. The three eventually re-
turned to the table when coun-
sel advised them that they
could listen to the presenta-
tions as long as the issue was
not up for a vote.
Counsel further said that if
the application to vacate had
been filed, they would be
"locked down" from any fur-
ther discussion. This brings up
several interesting questions:
1. What does it really mean
when public officials recuse
themselves? The American
Heritage Dictionary defines
"recuse" as: to disqualify or
seek to disqualify from partici-
pation in a decision on
grounds such as prejudice or
personal involvement. Do we
really have any of that here?
2. What happens to the peo-
ple's business when three of
the five commissioners recuse


themselves from any involve-
ment in a matter before the
board? Does the absence of a
quorum mean that no action is
taken? Is the issue referred to
the courts? If so, do we really
want the courts arbitrating is-
sues between citizens and
their elected officials?
In a democracy, the good of
the many usually outweighs the
good of the few (or the one). We
elect our public officials to fight
for our rights and implement
this principle on our behalf. In
my view, it is inappropriate for
public servants to recuse
themselves from this funda-
mental responsibility
That's what accountability is
all about.
Meanwhile, the fight to de-
fend Oak Village Boulevard
and the integrity of our com-
munity continues to pick up
support and momentum.
Eugene White
Homosassa

Two sides of the issue
There have been more
"Sound Offs" and articles in
your paper about the Oak Vil-
lage stub out. I live in Cypress
Village, so it wouldn't affect me
as much as the homeowners in
Oak Village, and I can see their
point, but I can also see the
point of the developer Don't
know when he bought his 40
acres, but I'm sure the real es-
tate agent assured him that he
could get the street through.
Why would he buy the land if
he wasn't assured it could hap-
pen? (No problem, sure you
will be able to get it through.)
I used to sell property in
Clearwater and surrounding
areas when I lived there and I
know what the brokers prom-
ise their clients to close a deal.
The man has the right to build
on his land, but of course he
has to get the OK from the
county board of commission-
ers, which now three of those
have recused themselves be-
cause one lives there, another
sold him insurance, the other
has a father who has dealings
with him. So they will have to
hire a special agent to come in
from somewhere else to figure
this out. More money spent.
It seems like if this developer
has all this opposition, then let
him open it to U.S. 98. Rest as-
sured he will be given the OK
to build those houses or what-
ever on that land. Just think of
the tax money going through
the commissioners' heads.
These three people are
treating this like a Hollywood
movie by getting up and walk-
ing out at the meeting. If I had
been there, I think I would
have laughed out loud.
Betty L. Smith
Homosassa


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
* SEND LETTERS TO:
The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to 352-
563-3280, or send via
email to letters@
chronicleonline.com.
* Letters must be no
longer than 600
words, and writers will
be limited to four let-
ters per month.
* We reserve the right
to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness
and good taste.


ULT&UJi




~4-~ri


Hw/ 81m4( 3F1vCf^


^qL^l Th^JjimdjSti,


Y&d-a Y. Jzill -am, z
Cn"ie i" with your hot wheels or stroll in (or this FREE
fun-ftled event! Make an evening of it and enjoy the
shops, restwat.nts, and pubs in downtown fnverrness


( 'f er O l

d a br=Rmtw up


favr rIteS fr thuys perform yo' t &
faivorites from the 50's & 60's!


Historic Coudiou m Squar Downtown rnvimiss
Interest In cruln'? ContaCt Ken McNaIly at 3JS2.141.116S or MIke Bonadonna at 3S2.341.1019
lwww!Iwtm*.s*-ftq4 v 352.726.2511 W Friend Sunny Coote on foacebook


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


COMMENTARY


'ew. N- rk3 E-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


What would
Jesus do?
Last Friday, an emissary
from the bishop in St. Peters-
burg traveled to Pope John
Paul II School with very sad
news: Because of the financial
cost of running a Catholic
school here in Citrus County,
the school must close its doors
in June. There will be no
Catholic school for our chil-
dren in Citrus County
Going back in time a few
months, all parishioners in Cit-
rus County were invited to
seminars run by a costly, high-
powered public relations firm.
The purpose of these meetings
was to strongly urge us to make
pledges to Bishop Lynch's
"Forward in Faith" fundraiser,
which will be his legacy as
bishop when he steps down in
two years. The money raised
was earmarked to "improve
our schools," provide retire-
ment funds for our religious,
provide for the education of
seminarians, and retool our
cathedral in St Pete. We were
further urged from the pulpit
to let go any grudges about
priestly abuse, which caused
such a financial drain on our
Church. "Let it go," our new
mantra, looking toward a fresh
new Catholicism! It's a sin to
hold a grudge!
Jesus taught in parables. He
taught that he cared more for
the lost lonely lamb than he
did for the entire flock. He
said that whatever you do to
the least of His brethren, you
do unto Him! He supped with
the poor and the outcasts of so-
ciety Most important of all, he
commanded, "Suffer the little
children to come unto Me."
At a hastily called meeting
on Tuesday, March 11, Bishop
Lynch reminded us that we are
a poor county Is that why we
can't support a Catholic
school? How can we raise
staunch Catholics without a
school? Bet there aren't many
priests, bishops, or popes who
haven't had the benefit of a
Catholic education!
Bishop Lynch owes it to us to
provide solutions, not to lower,
in his words, "the sword of
Damocles." The diocese has
taken over the running of
parochial schools in the last
few years. It's their job to help
us make this work. My heart
went out to the dear sincere
parents who were offering
their services free of charge.
As I thought of the stately,
well-appointed cathedral, the
flash of Bishop Lynch's gold
ring caught my eye; I took a
step back in time. It was a time
of lies and cover-ups, with the
people of God left to pick up
the pieces.
My husband had a brother
He was an altar boy A priest in
Delaware repeatedly abused
him and other altar boys. My


MACU fOMA WAMTS AWWe$ATo5 69T AWN


mother-in-law bravely re-
ported this to the bishop and
police, and she watched it
swept under the rug (she was
told further action on the fam-
ily's part would lead to excom-
munication). The priest
continued to receive assign-
ments that involved children,
including being chaplain for
the Boy Scouts of America.
Years later, he was finally
brought to justice. Many years
before that, my husband's
brother took his own life.
My husband is a Harvard-
trained infectious disease spe-
cialist. His heart broke as he
treated endless numbers of
HIV-infected priests. Special
hospices were set up for the
survivors across the country...
at what cost to our diocese?
Why should our innocent,
bright children pay any price
for a shortage of funds?
It's truly time to look to the
future. Maybe then we can let
it go.
Eve Taylor
retired educator and proud
volunteer at Pope John
Paul II School

Transparency
needed for fuel tax
I am 75 years old and have
been a Florida resident for 62
of those years and a Citrus
County resident since Novem-
ber 1976. I have seen many
changes.
Of course one of those
changes have been fuel prices.
I do recall purchasing gas for
my 1938 Chevy two-door
deluxe for 18 cents a gallon in
Sarasota.
If you notice, there is a
sticker on all gas pumps that is
placed there by a representa-
tive of the Florida Agriculture


Commission and Customer
Services stating that the pump
has been checked, verifying
that the pump accurately
measures the correct amount
of fuel pumped. This is done
once a year Also a sticker used
to be applied to the pump that
identified the amount of Fed-
eral and State tax that was ap-
plied. At that time, I don't
believe there was a county fuel
tax authorized.
During the 1980s, the Rea-
gan administration passed a
bill reducing the individual in-
come tax; however, what is sel-
dom reported by the media is
that during that administration
there were eight other tax ini-
tiatives that increased taxes.
That is commonly known as
the hidden tax initiative, used
to replace the tax revenue lost
by the reduction of individual
income taxes. At the same time,
states had to initiate their own
tax increases to make up for
the lost tax revenues previ-
ously returned to the states by
federal government.
During this same period, the
sticker on the gas pump that
identified the amount of taxes
applied to a gallon of gas dis-
appeared.
In today's newspaper there
was a wonderful article re-
garding the late Gov Reubin
Askew and his initiative to-
ward transparency in Florida
government operations. Of
course, Askew's period of pro-
gressive leadership preceded
Reagan's time in office.
So back to the original dis-
cussion regarding the stickers
applied to the gas pumps. Why
do we have a present situation
at the gas pump where the
public can no longer easily
identify the amount of taxes
applied to a gallon of gas? Why


are we not transparent
Florida regarding tax a
tion to products like th:
What is the need for "tl
den gas tax?" Where is
transparency?
If the present state le
ture is so intent on idei
themselves as the anti-
resentatives, why don't
initiate a requirementI
Florida Agriculture Co
sion and Customer Ser
Agency identify with an
private sticker on every
pump what the Federa
County and Municipali
are applied to our fuel
chases? There is no rea
that these taxes applie(
fuel, which is a large pc
each individual consul
expenses, be treated as
den tax.
It's time to have the a
private transparency rul
plied to fuel taxes. It's t
state Sen. Charlie Dear
state Rep. Jimmie Smit
show by deed that they
sent not only their part
also represent their vot
introducing such a bill
Florida State Legislatu
Dar


Stop the nons<
in its track
I found Nat Hentoff
cle "Our un-American
schools" to be very int
and thought-provoking
points out school susp
have increased 40 per(
over the past 40 years.
points out that once a,
has been suspended, t!
three times as likely tc
in contact with the juv
justice system in the n
year. Because of poorly


thought-out "zero tolerance"
policies, we have allowed our
educational system to create
a caste of "student outcasts"
and a "pipeline" from school
to prison.
Although Nat is too nice to
say it, I'm not. Socialism
began an assault on our edu-
cational system nearly 60
years ago and they were suc-
cessful beyond their wildest
dreams. Today we have a
Democratic party that more
properly should be labeled
the Socialist party of America.
If you just can't believe that, I
challenge you to compare
their party platform side by
side with the socialist parties
of the EU.
Almost all of the "zero toler-
ance" policies have to do with
guns and drugs. We all agree
that neither belong in schools
in the hands of students, but
gun-free zones should be la-
beled killing zones. However,
that is not what this is about.
It's about mind control, mold-
ing young minds to socialist
beliefs. The first thing a so-
in cialist/communist system does
ipplica- is confiscate the guns, disarm
is? the citizens so that once they
he hid- have achieved power, there is
the no turning back.
Young male children since
egisla- before recorded history have
ntifying played at and practiced the
tax rep- art of war It's in the genetic
they code, and not just in humans.
that the The zero tolerance policy is
mmis- supposed to address real
vice threats, not fifth-graders
n appro- pointing their fingers at each
fuel other, but overzealous social-
1, State, ist administrators in our pub-
ty taxes lic education system have
pur- adopted a policy of making it
ason a teaching moment. Their
d to the message is guns are bad, and
portion of thinking about them is
mer's equally bad. In my America
Sa hid- we would have called that
brain washing. Today I call it
appro- mind control and political
les ap- correctness.
time for Today, 100 million Ameri-
n and cans own 300 million guns.
th to The socialists see that as one
repre- step too high, but they will
y, but keep trying. The flake sena-
ters by tor from California said if
to the she could get 51 votes on the
ire. Senate floor, she would con-
fiscate them all. America
SGroner will turn them in while she
Lecanto keeps her personal .357.
These people think long
sense term. If they can brainwash
S this generation into believ-
ing that guns are bad, they
's arti- are probably two genera-
tions from success in de-
eresting stroying the Second
g. Nat Amendment. That's what
tensions "zero tolerance" is about,
cent mind control and brainwash-
He also ing and a plan to destroy the
student Second Amendment. We
hey are need to step up and stop this
Come nonsense in its tracks.
enile
ext Harley Lawrence
y Homosassa


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters
do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial
board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a phone number and
hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be pub-
lished or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will
be limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or
send via email to letters@chronicleonline.com.


SA
CIT


NtL^bLJJ


ITURDAY, APRIL 26
RUS COUNTY AUDITORIUM
9AM. I PM 1
Giveaways for parents and more!
SPONSORED BY: CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE I
(ITPIK(mCIONTY CHOOI. ROARD YMC A
.U I~ ~~ ~I,. I I, I 1 I- I1:1 ,.III .
,.II I II l II

For more information ;=9
y) call 726-4488 W ^


Citrus Count3's
201+ World's Greatest EIabu 5kower


Join us on


Lc?


-i


Thursday, May 1, 2014!
at Cornerstone Church in Inverness
(1100 West Highland Blvd)

Iit Session: 3:00pm 5:00pmORI
i ( Second Session: 6:00pm -8:00pm /
CHOOSE ONE

CiiR()NI(CIE -Staywelli
.. . . ............. _...;


A Stan Getz Tribute
with Jeff Rupert
& The Johny
Carlsson Trio

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427
nnnFMJA


SPHONSORS.
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CTRUs COuwTYHisTOicAL SOCETY


Q rritrus Oral c
('qaxillofacialurlierV, PA
Ibrt L BMdMttDA,M,,


O0
V4 -|



CITRUS COUNTY
KID9 TRIATHLON
May 10, 2014 Inverness, Florida
Whispering Pines Park


3
Exciting
Divisions

Junior
Age 5- 10

Senior
Age 11 15

Tri4Fun
All Ages


Entry Fees
Before April 14th: $25
After April 15th May 7th: $30


For info go to www.CitrusKidsTri.com or contact
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475 or email: info@drcsports.com

C....N..E


UUU-A


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 CS


A=,hz.]L -




C6 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


Not doing too well
Well, I guess the good-ol'-boy
commissioners in Citrus County
aren't doing too well, according
to the Sunday's paper (March
16). They keep going after Scott
(Adams) for bringing all these
things out in the public, but, you
know, they want to put an
MSBU. They spent $3 million for
a road that we don't need ...
and now they have no money to
fix the roads.
Plan those events
Who does the planning of
events that take place in Citrus
County? We go three to four
weeks at a time with nothing
going on and then we have three
big events going on at the same
time. The dragon races, which
are new in Citrus County, should
have been planned for a differ-
ent weekend when two other
events weren't going on at the
same time. The following week
we'll have the fair and then will
be nothing at all. Someone
should get their act together
and start setting different dates
for different activities.
Seeking water tank info
For the person who called in
about the tankless water-heating
system from a manufacturer
that is located in Miami: Could
you please put the manufac-
turer's name and the model of
water heater system that you
have? We're very interested in
that and I'd like to know how to
obtain one.


Not worth a DUI
I'm reading today's paper
Tuesday, March 18. Yes, I just
wanted to report an 84-year-old
man was arrested for a misde-
meanor charge of driving under
the influence. The man had pulled
out of the parking lot without its
headlights on. The police asked
him to perform a Breathalyzer
test and it showed he blew a
0.065 and a 0.067. Well, the
legal limit, it says right here, is
0.08. So he was below the legal
limit and he was still arrested
for a DUI? I don't understand
the math or the justification.
Editor's note: There are other
factors involved in a drunk-driving
arrest, such as performance on
field-sobriety tasks, slurred speech,
glassy eyes, etc. Even with a blood
alcohol content under the legal
limit, a police officer may exercise
personal judgment to consider
someone reasonably impaired.
Cardinal needs sidewalk
I'm calling about the Sound
Off from March 3's paper, "Bright
sidewalks." I live out Cardinal.
I'm very fortunate to have a car,
but there are many people who
walk up and down Cardinal and
there's an older lady who rides a
electric wheelchair on the road
and as we were coming the other
evening, she had a light strapped
around her head so she could
see. I think if anybody needs a
sidewalk, it's Cardinal. And also,
they walk on (U.S.) 19. But Car-
dinal really has a lot of people
who are walking to Walmart.


Time is money Not a matter of opinion


I was informed today by my
doctor that he is cutting his pa-
tient load by three-quarters. In
doing this, he will be able to give
his patients the best possible care
he can: longer visits, on-time ap-
pointments, extensive examina-
tions, doctor available 24 hours
a day. But the catch is, now we
have to pay him a yearly fee and
it's quite expensive if you pay him
a couple grand a year on top of
everything else you have to pay
- health care insurance, meds,
X-rays, tests as do other doc-
tors want. There seems to be a
movement running through this
country to destroy the middle
class and something like this,
for whatever good intentions, is
only the start. The rich get
richer, the poor get poorer.


This is to the person who
wrote the letter, "Sign your
name to your opinions," com-
plaining
O O ND |about peo-
,4 N wple com-
ions plaining
about
Scott
Adams.
Most peo-
pie do not
complain
about
CL .Scott
563-0579 Adams'
opinions
--not at
all. He has a right to his opin-
ions. What we're complaining
about is his behavior of how he
expresses his opinions.


COMMENTARY


16th Annual
Superintendent's Golf Classic
Saturday April 26, 2014 3 ho ;.lg, Sii.,1igiI
Sugarmill Woods R Reg, cr.i. irain,1
Golf Club $1000 and $10Hl
SponsorshInPS
Food Availabl$e
Door Prizes
Hole in One Prizes
50/50 Drawing


on Founidation

CHRONICLE y S 1
For more information 726-1931 or 724-1931 or 726-2241

_6TH ANNU


A L .

_l 6:30 P.M.
'at the
Jllk Curtis Peterson
Auditorium
,Tickets $10 per person
Children under 10 are free
Masters of Ceremonies:
Brad Thorpe County Administrator and Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator
For ticket information call .,-,.. r
527-5900 (Doors open at 6pm) .1


3rd Annual 314,6Wass5


/l4sic -esioal
at Fort Cooper State Park
Sat., April 19th. 10am to 4pm RAIN OR SHINE
Hosted by the 3100 S.Old Floral City Rd Tickets
Fi;- -I- -f 4 ('" en ?--- ?6-7"?i? $10.00 @ gate
Fc :i Arjvance
~ ~ ~~ i, I ,,, I ,- ,
$7.00


flTh, Ow Cin',Community Con -, rt Choir' _
is proud to present


\MaE DUPRZ^j
/D U


S (THE RITE OF SPRING)
Sunday, Alpril 6, 2014
3:00 PMI
Faith Lutleran Ch lurch
935 S. ('rstal Glen Dr.. Lecanito

N III 1 1 1. 11 d !j r d i. ..1.0 !,dio i I' & ,d\ [. L- L-
For more ilnlIrniatiol, to Ioi
( I% ww.ci.ruSchAir.cni i .. _



American Irish Club
Annual Invitational Golf Tournament

SATURDAY, APRIL Z6, 2014
SEVEN RIVERS COUNTRY CLUB
Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun Start at 12:30pm
Scramble Best Ball Format
|Prizes for men and women
for the longest drive (#4)
Pot-0-Gold (optional) on Hole #5
~I Cost $55 per person includes
golf, cart, prizes & lunch
Social hour with cash bar and appetizers
0 during awards ceremony 4:45-6pm
PROCEEDS TO BENEFITAIC LOCAL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
& CITRUS COUNTY CHARITIES
For information and sign-up contact:
Dave Horsman 897-1398 or Herb Duval 794-7565 C[i )IN i(' .E


CARE FOOD A/yT
fourth Annual

SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURNAMENT


(Cii( .... il
1 2 3 4'5
" "' h n 4~il



6 7 8 9 101112
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 2122 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30


Citrus Springs Library's

BOOK SALE
at
Citrus Springs Community Center
on
Friday, April 25 from 8:30 am to 5 pm
and
Saturday, April 26 from 8 am to 2 pm


* Puzzles
* Paperbacks
* Hard Covers
* Story Hours


* DVDs
* CDs
* Face Painting


We also will be accepting donations for:
CASA, the Animal Shelter
and Local Area Food Banks
.... Cl IKO: : 1.
_______________________________________QQ HNJW __0I____ !- -----I t

April 6 Sunday Matinee at 2PM
Art Center Theatre On Golden Pond ACT
Entrance Fee: $19 each
Contact Phone: 746-7606

April6*-3PM
Citrus County Community Choir
Le Sacre Du Printemps (The Right of Spring)
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
Entrance: $10, Children 12 & under free
Contact Phone: 212-1746

April 7:
SCORE 16th Annual Golf Classic
Sugarmill Woods Golf & Country Club
Entrance Fee: $60pp
Contact Phone: 352-249-1236

April 12* 8:00 am
Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
8599 E. Marvin St., Floral City
Contact Phone: 352-560-3879

April 12 6:30 am
Citrus County Education Foundation, Inc.
Inaugural Schoolhouse Hustle
5K/10 OK Race and 1-Mile Walk
CREST School/Lecanto High School
Entrance Fee:Varies by age group
Contact Phone: 352.586.3396

April 12 6pm-9pm
City of Inverness Taste of Inverness
Downtown Inverness
Entrance: $25 in advance and $30 at door
Phone:726-2611 Ext 1304 or 621-9225 I

April 17
Citrus County Historical Society
Music at the Museum:
Johnny Carlsson Presents A Stan GetzTribute
Entrance: $20 includes appetizers and cash bar
Contact Phone: Call 341-6427

April 19 10:00 am
Friends of Fort Cooper
Bluegrass Music Festival
Fort Cooper State Park
Advance ticket $7.00 Day of event $10.00
Contact Phone: (352)726-0315


April 22 9:00 AM
Keep Citrus County Beautiful
Citrus County Recycles
County Landfill
Entrance Fee: $10 donation
Contact Phone: 352-201-0149


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Patrol Three Sisters
This is about the Three Sis-
ters (Springs). The Three Sisters
is out of control. We have too
many people there. Nobody to
patrol it. Our volunteers can't
say anything when they see vio-
lators doing something because
they have no authority. It is time
we either put some more patrol
or turn it into a state park
where the place will be con-
trolled and the only things
swimming in there will be the
manatees. So either get some
patrol at Three Sisters or turn it
into a state park where we can
control it.
Bypass is the answer
This is in reference to the
traffic problem at Floral City.
First it's too slow and now it's
too fast. I believe the mer-
chants are really concerned
about people buzzing by their
businesses and not noticing
that they could spend their
money there. It would seem like
a bypass would solve the entire
problem.
Blinker fluid
I want to call in about the
sheriff's department not using
their blinker lights, signal lights,
and people not using their
blinker lights. Maybe they ought
to check and find out if they've
got blinker light fluid in their
blinker lights because some-
thing is definitely wrong that
they don't use their blinker
lights. Have a nice day.










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


-







I


Milwaukee group wants to



buy Pabst Brewing Company


Long before it was known for fine cheddar cheese or the Green Bay Packers,
Wisconsin was famous for beer, especially the national brands brewed in
Milwaukee: Schlitz, Blatz and Pabst Blue Ribbon.


CARRIE ANTLFINGER
Associated Press
MILWAUKEE
he brewing tradition started
by Milwaukee's German im-
migrants in the 1800s en-
dured for more than a century,
until industry consolidation in the
1980s and '90s began sending famil-
iar brands to other companies and
cities.
Now a small group of Milwaukee
residents wants to revive part of
that proud history by buying Pabst
Brewing Co. from a California exec-
utive in hopes of returning the
brand to its birthplace, possibly as
a city-owned brewery
The effort appears to be a distant
long shot, requiring hundreds of
millions of dollars to acquire the
170-year-old beer best known as
PBR. But Milwaukee officials like
the idea enough to talk about it,
and at least one industry analyst
says the plan is not beyond the
realm of possibility
"When I think about Pabst being
anywhere else but Milwaukee, it
just doesn't make sense," said Susie
Seidelman, an organizer of the
"Bring Pabst Blue Ribbon Home"
effort. "Milwaukee made this beer
what it is. ... It's right on the can."
The beer, with its pale gold color
and light, fizzy taste, has become
especially popular over the last
decade among urban hipsters, in


part because it's one of the cheap-
est on the market.
The company that started in Mil-
waukee in 1844 is now headquar-
tered in Los Angeles after being
bought by food industry executive
C. Dean Metropoulos in 2010 for a
reported $250 million.
Reports surfaced last month sug-
gesting that Pabst might be looking
for buyers. Organizers of the group
want Metropoulos to give them first
rights of sale so they can begin rais-
ing money toward any asking price.
Pabst representatives would not
comment on any potential sale or
the efforts to bring the brand back
to Milwaukee, saying only that they
"are considering financial alterna-
tives" that will help Pabst "aggres-
sively pursue its next phase of
growth through strategic acquisi-
tions."
The effort to buy Pabst has a core
of seven people with various busi-
ness and nonprofit backgrounds. It
also has a Facebook page titled
"Milwaukee Should Own Pabst
Blue Ribbon" and a website at
bringpbrhome.com, which lets visi-
tors sign a letter to Metropoulos.
The letter acknowledges that the
purchase proposal might seem
"crazy" but asks readers to "humor
us for just a moment."
"We want to bring PBR home,"
reads the letter, expected to be sent
next week.
In 1996, Pabst headquarters left
and beer production ceased at the


company's main complex in down-
town Milwaukee, opening a "gaping
hole in our city's economy," accord-
ing to the letter PBR is now
brewed in another part of town as
part of a deal with MillerCoors.
Bringing Pabst back is less about
the beer and more about "investing
in the city of Milwaukee," Seidel-
man said.
A letter to the Milwaukee mayor
and city council asks them to con-
sider the purchase of Pabst using a
community ownership model simi-
lar to that of the Green Bay Pack-
ers, in which the public buys stock
that does not increase in value and
pays no dividends. But, Seidelman
said, they are also considering
other options, including forming a
cooperative.
Another organizer, Erika Wolf,
said the group wants to hold town-
hall-style meetings and online
chats about how to buy and run
PBR. The first meeting is sched-
uled for April 23.
Regardless of the business struc-
ture chosen, they want to put the
profits back into the city, she said.
The group's website was put to-
gether by the great-great grand-
daughter of brewery founder
Frederick Pabst. Bridget Byrnes, a
web designer in Missoula, Mont,
volunteered after seeing the Face-
book page. The return of Pabst
back would hopefully create jobs
and "bring Milwaukee back to the
beer city it was."


Associated Press
Beer wagons and horse teams are shown lined up to carry one day's delivery of beer for Milwaukee
establishments in 1900. A small group of Milwaukee residents wants to revive the city's beer brewing tradition
by buying Pabst Brewing Co. from a California executive in hopes of returning the brand's headquarters to its
birthplace.


Companies


often offer


safe, reliable


investments

EAR BRUCE: We are in our
90s and want to know where
we can get 6 percent inter-
est on investments.
-M.N., via email
DEAR M.N.: I think I should an-
swer this question once a week be-
cause it continues to come up.
Even in your 90s, there is no rea-
son you shouldn't be taking a small
amount of risk. That small risk can
easily gain from 5 percent to 9 per-
cent a year In the last few years, it
has done a whole lot better than
that.
All I am suggesting is that you in-
vest in solid American companies,
such as, but not limited to, IBM,
Johnson & Johnson, etc. Over a pe-
riod of time, you can be certain to
get that 5 percent to 9 percent in-
terest You won't earn that every
year, but certainly with a reason-
able selection of companies such
as I described, there is absolutely
no reason you can't achieve your
investment goals. Good luck.
DEAR BRUCE: Am I correct in
understanding that anyone can
give up to $14,000 per year to any-
one else without it counting to-
ward the federal estate exclusion?
My spouse and I are both retired
and are considering gifting annu-
ally to our adult son (age 25) to
begin reducing our estates.
Does the gift have to be given di-
rectly to the individual, or can it go
into a trust for that individual? We
are concerned about our son hav-
ing access to it immediately, given
that in five years it could be
$140,000 (or more, as the allowed
amount rises over the years), if we
both make maximum gifts. We
would like to consider a trust
where we could specify parame-
ters for its withdrawal/use, if that
is allowed.
Mike, via email
DEAR MIKE: You are correct. A
relative or anyone else can be
gifted as much as $14,000 per year
without any tax impact. Since both
you and your wife are thinking
about giving annually to your son,
that would be $28,000 a year
The gifts may be put into a trust.
That would require the help of an
attorney who is skillful in the mat-
ter of trusts. You can give reason-
able parameters to when the
money will be paid and how
As for its use, that's a different
problem. I think sooner or later
you are going to have to decide ei-
ther that your son is capable of
handling the money or designate a
trustee who will distribute the
money in accordance with your
wishes. Keep in mind that the
more complicated this becomes,
the more likely it is to end up in lit-
igation at some time, which I think
you would like to avoid.
DEAR BRUCE: Why do compa-
nies rely on credit scores when the
scores are always wrong? I
checked mine one year and found
there were reports from compa-
nies I did not do business with. It
took me almost six years to get it
straightened out.
Recently, I checked again and
found the same thing. When I con-
tacted the credit score companies,
they would not believe me; they
took the word of the companies re-
porting it. Why? Everyone I talk to
says their scores are wrong also.
EH., via email
DEAR EH.: I don't agree that the
scores are always wrong, but they
can be. I, like yourself, have found
reports from companies I haven't
done business with in many years.
Why it took six years to get yours
corrected is another question.
The credit score agencies won't
believe you, but take the word of
the companies reporting because
agencies have little to gain by
being completely accurate. When
you say "everyone I talk to says
their scores were wrong also," I


See Page D2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How to form a successful advisory board


Businesses seeking
growth, financial success
and competitive market-
ing often use the advice of inde-
pendent experts by inviting
them to be the company advi-
sory board. This group would
be asked to provide specific ex-
pertise, time, experience and
group decision-making. They
are not the same entity as a cor-
porate board of directors. Ad-
visers are usually not owners or
paid consultants. They are well-
respected experts in their re-
spective fields of business.
A corporate board of direc-
tors is comprised of the officers
and directors who have legal
responsibilities to the corpora-
tion and its shareholders. This
group manages the company
and usually shares ownership.
When the board of directors de-
cides on company concerns, it
bears the legal responsibility of
its decisions and subsequent
outcomes.

Finding and establishing
advisory board members
The best advisers are:


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

EXPERIENCE
MA'rERS


1. Someone that you already
have a business relationship
with, like your lawyer or ac-
countant.
2. A person you know and
trust through your networking
activities.
3. Someone with specialized
experience as in finance, mar-
keting, accounting, human re-
source management, sales and
IT management, etc.
4. Honest, objective and have
a good reputation in your com-
munity
Professionals agree it is best
to limit the advisory board to
three, five or seven members,


providing an odd number
which can help to break a tie
vote if needed.

Working with your advisory
board's suggestions
Don't assume family mem-
bers make good advisers. The
potential of emotional involve-
ment can cause problems, lead-
ing to bad decisions. Family
may want your company to do
well, but their advice may not
contain the experience and ob-
jectivity of experts. There is
also the potential of creating
family tensions. Other advisers
may sense this, and disagree-
ments can build into resent-
ments. This can frustrate the
effectiveness of group decision-
making.
Advisers should not be ex-
pected to be "on call" to answer
your questions at any time. Set
up individual meetings or advi-
sory board meetings as a group
to decide on important issues.
Group meetings tend to offer
the best outcomes. Treat advis-
ers to a lunch or evening meal
to show respect for their efforts


and expertise. You can also
offer a reasonable honorarium.
Check with your accountant to
determine if some type of com-
pensation will require report-
ing to the IRS.

Confidentiality
All communications with ad-
visers should be confidential. It
is not excessive to ask for non-
disclosure and non-competition
agreements. Remember, this is
a business relationship; it's
best to keep it that way Your
discussions are confidential -
period!
When an adviser discusses,
even on a casual basis, any con-
fidential information, this act
itself sets up a potential com-
petitive disadvantage for the
business. This is especially true
when trade secrets offer a real
competitive edge for business
success. When they become
public, a breach in ethics oc-
curs and the competitive ad-
vantage could easily be lost

Try SCORE we do it all
SCORE offers a wide range of


counseling services in various
business skills, one on one,
client to mentor All counseling
sessions are held in confidence.
Every counselor signs an an-
nual confidentiality/non-com-
pete agreement for the
protection of our clients.
SCORE offers a huge library
of books, manuals and pam-
phlets free for the asking.
SCORE clients have Internet
access to work with other men-
tors. Co-counseling of two or
more mentors is always avail-
able.
SCORE services are free.
Try Citrus County SCORE. It
may just be the best place to go
for help.
Call 352-249-1236 and leave
your information so we can
contact you. Office hours are 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday through
Thursday

Dr Frederick JHerzog, PhD
LLC is Immediate Past Chair-
man of Citrus County SCORE.
He can be reached via email:
therzog@tampabay.rrcom or
847-899-9000.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

think that must be a very
select list. On balance, the
scores are reasonably accu-
rate.
The fact remains that
credit scores are a strong
criterion used when you
are applying for credit.
That's the reality. You
should check your credit
scores from time to time,
but keep in mind that
changes of 10 to 15 points in
either direction are not
going to make a whole lot of
difference.
I understand your frus-
tration as I have experi-
enced the same frustration
when I wanted something
corrected. It required nu-
merous pieces of corre-
spondence. But that's the
system, and there's little we
can do about it except go
with the flow
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


BUSINESS DIGEST


Chronicle's Faherty
earns recognition

Citrus County Chronicle
Business Reporter Pat Faherty
has been selected as the Small
Business Administration North
Florida District Small Business
Media Advocate of the Year
Faherty is an experienced
journalist with more than 25
years in the business.
In his career, he has served
as general manager editor, re-
porter and photographer
He has been with Landmark
Communications since 2007
working as weekly newspaper
editor with the Riverland News,
general manager and editor with
the Gadsden County Times and
in his present position as Senior
Reporter for the daily Citrus
County Chronicle, where he is
responsible for business and
government reporting.


Pat has a bachelor's of science
degree in communications from
Southeast Nova University and a
master of science degree in
urban and regional planning
from the University of Miami.
He has experience as a planner
and in the analysis of demo-
graphics and economic trends
with the city of Miami.
He has earned multiple writ-
ing awards in his career and led
the Daily Tribune in Hibbing,
Minn., to the Minnesota Newspa-
per of the Year award while
working as its managing editor

Ternri Moore earns
certification for
parks and rec
Ocala Terri A. Moore, Spe-
cial Services Division Head for
the City of Ocala was recently
certified as a Certified Park


and Recreation Professional
(CPRP) by the National Certifi-
cation Board (NCB) and the
National Recreation and Park
Association (NRPA).
Moore started her career with
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation and then served success-
fully as the Assistant Director of
Parks and Recreation for the City
of Inverness before joining the
City of Ocala Recreation and
Parks Department recipient of
the 2013 Florida Recreation and
Parks Association Agency Excel-
lence Award. As the Special Serv-
ices Division Head she oversees
special events, cultural arts, mar-
keting, resource development,
partnerships, volunteer services
and the Discovery Center
Her education and profes-
sional development includes
graduation from Cleveland State
University in Ohio, the Abra-
ham's Leadership Academy
(2009), Leadership Citrus Class
of 2005 and the City of Ocala's


Citizens Academy (2012).
Moore's membership affilia-
tions include Florida Recre-
ation and Parks Association.
She is involved with many civic
organizations in both Marion
and Citrus Counties.
The CPRP certification is
granted to individuals employed
in the recreation, park resources
and leisure services professions
who meet the eligibility require-
ments -including a combination
of higher education and/or work
experience and who success-
fully complete the national CPRP
examination. The examination
tests knowledge in all aspects of
general administration, program-
ming and operations manage-
ment for parks and recreation.
CPRP certifications are valid for
a period of two years, and profes-
sionals who wish to re-apply are
required to complete a profes-
sional continuing education unit
requirements or equivalent aca-
demic course work


Got a news tip?
The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.


LI.NOM TAI[.W4DIREm iORY


Fo *or nfrato

on advrtiingcal
Ann Frro4a


325 4-231o
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.. -Family Owned and Operated
__ 6220 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.
SCHLUMBERGERACCOUNTING SERVICES, INC. Crystal River, FL 34429
In Business For Over 34 Years
795-3691Ya
www.schlumbergeraccounting.com
Robert Schlumberger E.A.
In affiliation with Jennif-r ,r.ir,,, ...ir j.: %
Jennifer SchlumOerger-Jones


IT'S TAX TIME!


There's Still Time Left

To Place Your Ad Call

563-5592



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Experienced, trained tax professionals

Convenient evening and weekends hours

Audit assistance
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Fraud Investigations
Independent Audits

Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352) 344-4397


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA
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Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
i Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services


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WILLIAMS,
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2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
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795-3212


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Inverness
726-8130


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910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs



M I 1.4 IL III





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FBeflndaBro-n ED SERRA
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I NOCARG CONSULATI


D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


BUSINESS


C PAFiC


d






SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.cornm/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
April 10 Mixer at
Black Diamond Ranch,
5 to 7 p.m., 260o W.
Black Diamond Circle,
Lecanto.
April 14 Ribbon-
cutting, Bedinotti
Photo, 4:30 p.m. at
the Citrus County
Chamber of Com-
merce Crystal River Of-
fice, 28 U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
April 18 -Chamber
Offices closed for
Good Friday.
April 21 Ribbon-
cutting, Nature Coast
Ministries, 1590 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River.
April 23 Ribbon-
cutting, Reel Burns
Charters, 4:30 p.m.,
5300 S. Cherokee Way,
Homosassa.
April 24-Golden Cit-
rus Scholars Awards
Ceremony, 6 p.m., Col-
lege of Central Florida,
Lecanto.
May 2 Pillar Awards
Dinner inspired by the
style of the Kentucky
Derby, 6 p.m. to 10
p.m. at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
Cocktail attire and
hats are recom-
mended. Table spon-
sorships $300 and
individual reservations
$35 per person.


River Region Animal Hospital
766o W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., CrystalRiver, FL 34429 o 352-564-1 VET (1838)
riverregionah.com/home/


: Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Dan
Pushee, associate member; Bonnie Hardiman, associate member; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal;
and Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers welcome Dr. Shane Henry and wife.


Pericht named to Ambassadors Committee


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomes Mary Pericht of Cadence Bank to the
Ambassadors Committee.


IIA


The Florida Public Relations Association Nature Coast Chapter presents

THE ROAST OF MIKE & REBECCA BAYS


0O OS ari 1


35.29.77


* 0 0 00 0 0~or


35.29.77




jos wote

0oe m 00
0 0ullga
h*r 0 erars


& moreu... 0


the9
"Oler'ath^*


Paparazzi
on the prowl
a star-studded, hollywood-themed event


citrus hills golf & country club 505 w hartford st, hernando
6:30p cash bar 7p dinner & show s 9p champagne toast


Nature Coast's

Adams awarded

Star of Life
Every year Nature Coast EMS nom-
inates one of its best and brightest
caregivers to the American Ambu-
lance Association's Stars of Life award
ceremony in Washington, D.C. The
Stars of Life award recognizes and cel-
ebrates the achievements of individu-
als working in the ambulance
industry. It is the highest award an
EMS caregiver can receive. We are
proud to announce William Leigh
Adams, a Nature Coast EMS EMT, has
been awarded the Star of Life Award
from the American Ambulance Asso-
ciation.
William began his career with Na-
ture Coast EMS five years ago. In the
beginning he served Nature Coast
EMS as a volunteer, where he demon-
strated the utmost dedication, caring
and professionalism as a seasoned
team member working in the field for
years. After three years, William at-
tended EMT school and obtained his
EMT certification. At the first avail-
able opening, William was hired as a
full-time employee and continues to
excel as a dedicated and engaged team
member. He is always places Nature
Coast EMS and the citizens we serve
in the forefront.


Taguejoins

Plantation golf

instructor team
The Plantation on Crystal River re-
cently named Tim Tague as its
newest golf instructor at the exclusive
Central Florida golf resort featuring
27 holes of challenging golf. To cele-
brate his addition to the team, Tague
and good friend and proficient golfer
John Elliott are conducting a golf
swing seminar at the Plantation on

to 3 p.m. The seminar
is $50 per person and
includes lunch.
A veteran in the golf
world, Tague has given
more than 70,000 les-
"-sons, and conducted
TIM golf schools and semi-
TAGUE nars in 17 states and
eight countries. He has also had stu-
dents win all the major tours and two
NCAA Championships. Prior to join-
ing the Plantation, Tague was a PGA
Professional Instructor at Royal
Kaanapali Golf Course in Maui, The
Olympic Club in San Francisco and
Wolf Run Golf Club in Zionsville, Ind.
Tague also hosted a golf instruction
series on cable and public television
for four seasons.
"Tim is a welcomed addition to the
Plantation Golf team and we think
that his success in his professional ca-
reer and his great track record and
history as a teacher in the industry
will suit our area golfers very well,"
said Andrew Bartlett, Plantation on
Crystal River general manager.
Joining Tague for the March 29
swing seminar, Florida native John
Elliott won the team and individual
Florida State High School Champi-
onship in 1964, was a Junior College
All-American in 1967 and competed in
two PGA Championships at Riviera and
Shoal Creek in 1983 and 1984. Elliott
has also been named one of the top 50
and top 100 instructors in the world
by Golf Digest and Golf Magazine.
To book your space for the seminar,
call 352-795-7211. For more informa-
tion on Plantation on Crystal River,
visit PlantationonCrystalRiver.com or
call 800-632-6262.




D4 SUNDAY,APRIL 6, 2014


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(352)563-566510TollFre:(8750r o


#1 Employment source is
















www.chronicleonline.com


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


2014 KZ SONIC
14 ft "Like New",
completely loaded
MUST SELL, Homosassa
$12,900; 315-729-2634



tilll0 11 B't
oU l \\ o Id first.
lu) DL)


TURE 3-piece sectional
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StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178





BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087


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Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



45' TV and Satellite
Tower, u take down
and move
Ozello area
(352) 586-5018
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch U load
and haul it away


-I.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





Realtor Needs
ASSISTANT
Exp. necessary
Send resume to:
reoffice.assistant3
@gmail.com





PT Housekeeper

Floral City Area
flexible hours, 2
houses to maintain
paid hourly based
on Exp. References
Back-Ground Ck
email resume to:
BELCOSYLVIE@
CENTURYLINK.NET







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


CNA'S
3P-1IP &11P-7A
RN/LPN
11P-3P &11P-7A
Apply In Person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


IHpyNt^l


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


C CITRUS 0 U N T Y


HRCONI2CLE
w c icleonline.com
Scaborugh 2010


0008XQOZ


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo.com


HEALTH CARE
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
in Lecanto
MARKETING
DIRECTOR
Full-time position
available. Must
have a BS degree or
equivalent back-
ground in market-
ing, business, jour-
nalism or commu-
nications. Health
care experience
required. Must be
familiar with profes-
sional community.
Prior case manage-
ment or nursing
experience benefi-
cial. Admissions,
marketing or sales
experience in a
long-term care sett-
ing preferred. Can-
didate will perform
both facility-based
an external market-
ing and admissions
duties.
RN I LPN
Full-time position
available for
11 p.m.-7 a.m. shift.
PRN positions availa-
ble for 3 p.m.-11 pm
and 11 p.m.-7 a.m.
shift. Must be a Flor-
ida -licensed nurse.
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT
Full-time position
available for 3 pm
-11 pm shift and PRN
positions available
for all shifts. Must
be able to work
weekends. Must be
a Florida -certified
nursing assistant.
LAUNDRY AIDE
PRN position availa-
ble. Laundry experi-
ence in a long-term
care facility pre-
ferred. High school
diploma or equiva-
lent required. Must
be able to work
weekends.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.
Admissions: Amy_
Derby@LCCA.com
Nursing: Hannah
Mand@LCCA.com
Laundry: Apply
in person to
Nina Davidson.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne In
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
47557




Cliu =Ca-i



MEDICAL ASST
Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
352-746-3838


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I ond:


Annuncmen




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219

REHAB Manager

Are you a leader?
Arbor Trail Rehab,
a 116 bedSNF
offers an excellent
opportunity to join
an exciting team.
Must have 1-3 yrs
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tion, clinical plann-
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and operations of
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Email Resume to
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Inverness, FL
An EEO/AA
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RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, FI 34461
EOE/SF/DF


Live-in Caregiver
for elderly female
CNA pref. salary +
board, mail resume
to: Blind Box 1863M
CC Chronicle 1624
N Meadowcrest Bvd
Crystal River 34429








C COLLEGE f
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida

Multiple
Employment
Opportunities
are Available!

Faculty -
Emergency Medical
Services
Financial Aid
Specialist II
Outreach
Specialist -Xcel-IT
(Grant Funded) -
3 Year Limited
SSpecialist Catering
Services
Open Until Filled
Faculty -
Health Information
Technology
Faculty -
RN to BSN Program
(168 and 220
Workday positions
available)

HOW TO APPLY:
Please go to
www.CF.edu.
Click on Quick Links
then Employment
at CF. Submit
an electronic
application, pool
authorization card
and copy of unoffi-
cial transcripts. Tran-
scripts may alterna-
tively be emailed to
hr@CF.edu or
fax to 352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road, Ocala,
FL 34474.
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


Fiscal Specialist
Announcement
#14-37
Track and/or over-
see department
revenues and
expenditures, assure
accuracy and
compliance with
County policies and
procedures, stat-
utes, regulations
and GAAP. Gradu-
ation from an ac-
credited college or
University with a
Bachelor's degree
in accounting or
a related field.
A comparable
amount of training
or experience may
be substituted for
the education quali-
fications. Starting
pay $1 ,769.72 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 11, 2014
EOE/ADA.


j",If P ,,,I eW`


Ylxuiir\\orld lirMq

Need ;i Ijob


qualified
employee?


This area's
#1


EXP. LINE COOK
Apply iDDV n Person
2492 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernandoor 108W.
Main St. Inverness
NO PHONE CALLS








I'm lovin' it

McDonald's
in Beverly Hills..

is accepting
applications for
employment for
0 All Part Time &
Full time Positions
Opening & Closing
Managers needed
Please apply at the
McDonald's in
Crystal River, 625
N. U.S. Hwy. 19.

New Bistro on Citrus
Ave accepting
resume's for service
positions. To Apply
email resume:
amyw307@me.com





SEEKING
FULL TIME
AD SALES REP
The Williston Pioneer
Sun News

Salary Plus
Commission, Based
out of Williston, FL.
Service new and
existing advertising
customers. Meet &
exceed sales goals
Excellent customer
service skills. Strong
computer skills
Reliable transporta-
tion required to


CLASSIFIED

ETrades


ATTN: Drivers!
Bring a Rider! $$$
Up to 50 cpm $$$
BCBS + 401k+ Pet
& Rider Quality
Hometime Orienta-
tion Sign On Bonus
CDL-A Req
877-258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com

Averitt Express has
New Dedicated
CDL-A Driver
Opportunities w/
Excellent Benefits &
Regular Hometime.
855-430-8869
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer -
Females, minorities,
protected veterans
and indivdiuals with
disabilities are
encouraged to
apply.

CDL-A Team
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfinartners.com

DRYWALL
HANGERS

Crew or individual.
Crews capable of
hanging minimum
of 60 boards per
day. Also looking for
a REPAIRMAN able
to hang finish & tex-
ture.Truck or van
only. To apply call:
352-220-9016



Your World

94 "we K ee4


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 D5


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Wemrner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624


Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver
3 day shift/30hrs
**Apply in Person**
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl
no phone calls pis





wanedfor ear ly=1f





























Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers


Office Clerical
Position
General clerical
help. Filing, some
phones, vehicle
records keeping,
etc. FT position. Paid
vacation holidays,
life insurance,
heath insurance at
split cost. Drug Free
Work Place, EOE
Apply within:
NO Phone calls
Eagle Buick GMC
1275 S Suncoast
Blvd, Homosassa, Fl

Plasterer
Apprentice &
Laborer

Must have stucco
experience To apply
call Daniel Haag Inc
352-746-9807
Drugfree workplace.

Section Chief
Traffic Control
Announcement
#14-38

Responsible posi-
tion supervising staff
on the day-to-day
operations of the
Traffic Control Sec-
tion. Requires Inter-
national Municipal
Signal Organization
Level II certification
in traffic signals and
have the ability to
respond to traffic
signal emergencies,
'on call" 24/7. Must
have over 4 years
experience in traffic
control or related
field. Starting pay
$1,199.46 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources


EXP. PAINTER

Wanted, w/ own trans.
352-400-1404

PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have Dr. Uc.
We provide 401k &
Health Ins. Apply:
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa

Roofers & Laborers

Commercial, Exp.
(352) 564-1242

Roofers Wanted
APPLY IN PERSON
AAA ROOFING
CRYSTAL RIVER
(352) 563-0411
OCALA
352-840-0445




CITRUS COUNTY
YMCA
Now hiring the
following positions:
Camp Leader
Camp Coordinator
Lifeguard
Swim Instructor
Apply online at by
4/12: www.vmca
suncoast.ora.
DFWP/EOE.
(352) 637-0132

DOOR TO DOOR
SALES
Big Money
Start Immediately
Rob 352-419-7983

EXP. PAINTER
Needed, Plenty of
Work Must have Dri.
Lic. 352-302-8265

MOBILE HOME
PARK MGR


Part-Time Gate
Security
Coordinators
Neat, energetic and
outgoing persons with
good people and
telephone skills for
part-time work at the
main entrance of
Citrus Hills. You will
greet, identify and log
all visitors. Preferred
experience: customer,
military service or law
enforcement. Good
vision, able to stand
for prolonged periods
of time. Starting pay
is $7.93 per hour.
Must be available for
any of the three (3)
shifts of 24/7 operation
or extra daytime
coverage as needed.
Apply in person @
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL.


PERSONAL ASSIT.
Plus household
responsibility 25-40
hrs. $10 hr. + benefits
background check
Email Resume
gwsosa6
@gmail.com


School Bus driver
Private Christian
organization needs
driver for Citrus
County bus route.
First pick up 7 AM,
only 4 stops. Less
than 20 kids $9.60/
hr. 25 hrs week plus
opportunity for
more. Must be fully
school bus licensed
Must past security
check 2 character
references. Family
oriented/patience/ki
ndness a plus.
EMAIL TO:
Christianbus@
tampabay.rr.com


employment make sales calls New Pay Package Department, lOWER HAND
Sand $1500 Sign -On 3600 W Sovereign Couple to live-in,
source! Email Resume to i-R'iN(Fl Bonus! Mostly 5-10 Path, Suite 178, manage & maintain Startina at $10.00/Hr.
djkamlot@" days out. Full benefits, Lecanto, FL 34461 mid-size Mobile Home Building
IlW T chronicleonline.com achievable bonuses. Pk. 55+ in Central FL Communication
k" Drug screen Call for details to apply online by good maintenance & Towers. Travel, Good
Classifieds required for final 1-888-978-3791 or Friday, April 11, 2014 people skills required Pay & Benefits. OT,
S candidate, EOE www.heyl.net EOE/ADA. 727-799-4906 352-694-8017, M-F


b



I'


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Affordable Care + lite
housekping, cooking
errands, trans. Call
Lisa (352) 423-0298
Private Home Care
Male CNA. avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793




I SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO. all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
PeFAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
W RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


SERVING CITeUS COUNTY LONGER THAN TiHE REST,
CONSISTENTtY VOTED BEST OF THE IBEST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
,. Sod Sales & Install


746-4451

1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded




FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C
and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202
Lic.#CAC057482


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
01 Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352) 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
* QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672



Math Tutoring Algebra I,
Algebra II, Geometry,
Trigonometry, Precalcu-
lus, Calculus, Develop-
mental Math, Intermedi-
ate Algebra, College
Algebra, Statistics,
Calculus I, Calculus II,
Calculus III, and
Differential Equations.
Name: Dudley Hall.
Phone Number:
352-476-1477.
Email:
dbha2ahotmail.com


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
R 352-364-4610
MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
24n--r-n-l-nsai- - --i -irWee--k
I24 Hours a DaY. 7 DaYS a Weeki


AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Misc Srvice


3, NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374


lnislall & Rei,.r Now's tlhe
Pumpinfiiuers. time for pool
Healers remodeling
a Sail Svsleins n
SPool Refinishing
* Construction
00* Pavers
Leak Detection
SUgarmill Pool Tile & Repair
Woods Servilno All Of Citrus County
POOlIa Spa Free Consultation
SMWPOIS.CeoM 382-4421
00"JlS ,taeOiiWlPflntmcLtork#148326|

I A k f 0


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORPEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
Driveways
Parking Lots

Seal Coating
Maintenance
Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
EmaiI-ronniewatkins.rw@gmail.corn
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889





GENERAC Zx,
Stand Alone ,
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-61-124


UH 1771 :I I :


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




*Budd Excavatina**
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955



YOt L illl list.



Classl ifie
C CapN ifiE
Classifreds


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist

Spring Tune $ 995
[YpSpecial 47Rg
Guaranteeing 1Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Part icle Scan to determine
thile quality of thile airyou breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
[Expires April 30, 2014
__ Lc [ICAC1815891
O1-QAr Back To New S-9
Heating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz




Ron's Affordable


Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
Small Carpentry
i *iS0 Fencing
9l,5c.%reening
i lean Dryer Vents
If i ,odobl e & Dependable
iEsP<,n'ce lifelong
T. 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
SLicensed & Insured Lic #3 7761


Arbor Reds Tree Care
24 Hr. Emergeny Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
All Major Credit Cards
352-583-3141/206-1153







Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


D4



Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


IJ..i nj.I I


A CUT ABOVE LAWN
352-419-2779
* Interior/Exterior Painting or 352-201-2201
* Drywall RepairsTextures
Wallpaper Removal M M z


5 I0 irtcut!


30 ear- Fr9^^WE WILL BEAT ANY
inBusiness DicountWRITTEN ESTIMATE
352-597-2440 352-293-5088 1
Toll Free: 877-893-3895 Mowing, Hedging, Trimming, Blowing
Tree Trimming, Brush Removal,
Seasonal Planting.


I


IT Tades
rs k lls -


[Bcz


PINTINGJISERVJICES


Ceertn




D6 SUNDAY,APRIL 6, 2014


___


Administrative
Assistant P/T

position to begin in
mid May. 20 hours,
three days per
week. Excellent
phone skills & multi-
tasking needed.
Candidate must
possess in depth
knowledge of
Excel. Send resume
only to: bbussard
@myedtours.com.




AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





Look
vTyvy,,

BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731




COMPUTER GAMES 6
multi-packs, can be
used without internet,
great shape. ($10)
352-613-7493
WEEDEATER Bolens
B150, 17" cut, runs
great, gear at spool
needs replacing ($10)
352-212-1596



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



OAK FRAMED CHAIRS
with cane seats. Excel-
lent condition. Early
1900's. Set of 4; $60
each.$240.
352-634-4906






OLD PHONOGRAPH
RECORDS
A variety(76) of
Stereo #33 $75.00;
27 Children's records
in 33 and 78. They are
instrumental, teach-
ing, instructional,
music and more.
$40.00; Stereo 45
Records (29) Free.
(352) 628-6948
Wedgewood English
Bone China. Pattern
Charnwood WD 3984.
Better part of serv. for
8 + serving pieces &
cabinet. $1,000
(352) 564-8874



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE GAS DRYER
Front Load, with ped-
estal, good cond.
white, $300.
(352) 419-5604


Maytag Gas Dryer,
white, runs great
$100. obo
Old Homosassa area
(330) 646-6267
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
OVER THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $75
352-613-0529
Side by Side
LG, Refrigerator
Stainless,
$300 as is
(352) 422-4492
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER&
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
Washer & Dryer
Sears Kenmore
$150 ea or best offer
(352) 503-6923


DESK CHAIR
Adjustable High
Back,Swivel, Black.
$30 (352)564-4214









DUDLEY'S
A-ICTfTOW
TWO--ACTIONS

4-3 ESTATE Walk
About Auction
3pm-10pm
Furniture-tools-house-
hold & more
4-6 ANTIQUE & Col-
lectible Aucton 1pm
Hwyman Art, Listed
Russian art, Jewelry,
Furniture -Victorian
to Mid Century rugs,
Sports memorabilia,
ephemera & more.
500+ lots

call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction
.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.


AIR COMPRESSOR
Champbell Hausfeld
26 gallon, oil less, air
compressor, 150 PSI
Vertical on wheels 1.7
HP 120 volts. $175.00
Call Mike @
352-637-6754
RV CORD ADAPTER
NEW 30 AMP Female/
50 AMP Male 18" cord
$10 Homosassa
352-382-3650



TV PANOSONIC 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $50
352-613-0529
TV SYLVANIA 32"
WITH REMOTE $50
352-613-0529



Chain link fencing
40' of 6' of cl fencing,
10 posts, gate & buck-
etfull of hardware
$80. obo
(352) 228-0658
SCREEN DOOR
aluminum approx
35" wide good $75.
352 476-8056
SLIDING GLASS
DOORS 6 foot wide slid-
ing glass doors, excel-
lent condition $225
Homosassa area Tele-
phone 352 503 7114



Awning
Sunsetter, Electric,
12x18 $1500
(352) 503-6923



**200 Bottle**
Wine Credenza
just replaced cooling
unit in March, looks
like new, 50 btu
Breezeaire cooling
unit, solid maple trim,
doors & panels w/vin
view top, glass inserts
38/2 -Lx 68" Wx 30" D
bought new $3600.
sell for $1500.
(352) 249-3248
2 Lazy Boys Recliners
Lg. Wine colored,
rocker $400.2nd
smallergreen $300.
like new (352)270-0269
4 Sale Thomasville 80"
Red Leather Couch,
club chair & ottoman
great condition
$850. org. owner
(352) 794-3217
42" sq. Blonde Wood
Table Setw/one leaf,
4 captains chairs &
Lighted China
Cabinet 44" wide,
very good cond. $225.
obo(248) 701-7353
6FT BLACK VINYL
FUTON, $150.
Black wrought iron
glasstop coffee
table, $25.
(352) 777-9307
American-Drew Solid
Wood Bedroom Set,
two dressers,
1 Ig. mirror, qn. sz bed
w/headboard, 1 night
stand, $725. obo
Leave Message
(352) 746-3597
Dining Table
Glass top, 4 floral
upholstered caster
chairs. Orig $1800+
Very Comfortable Set
$600 OBO
(352) 527-2778
Entertainment Center
49" wide x 48" tall x 28"
deep, dark wood
grain, $120. call Larry
(352) 344-1692
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER solid pine,
sturdy, ($20)
352-212-1596
FUTON
excellent condition
light oak, upgraded
mattress, $200.
(352) 270-9035
King Sealy Mattress
Set, w/frame & head-
board, exc. cond.
$250. 24" Sanyo TV.
$30. (352) 726-3730
or (352)422-0201
Leather Recliner
dark burgundy
exc. cond. $175.00
(352) 382-5057
Leather Sectional
Natuzzi tan leather
good cond.3 love-
seats, 51" long ea.
1 sofa 72" long. $900.
(352) 489-7674
LIVING ROOM FURNI-
TURE 3-piece sectional
sofa, 2 Rocker Reclin-
ers, octagonal table and
end table. $300 OBO
305-394-1000
LIVING ROOM
SECTIONAL Bauhaus.
Moss grey with green
undertones. Ex shape
$99 (352)795-7813
Oak 48" Table
2 leaves, 4 chairs,
2pc hutch/buffet,
$600.
(352) 249-7405
Power Lift Recliner
Chair. Retail $899
Used one month, new
condition. Asking
$450 (352) 795-1109


^^zeensee^
like new wicker &
black rodiron, matt
box spring$300.
Dresser French Prov.
Oak 9 drawer $100
(352) 503-6313
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500


2 Rain Barrels
& 1 compose Barrel all
for $50.
352-601-7911
2 Rear Engine
Riding Mowers,
Snapper 33" cut
w/ Wisconsin Robin
Engine $400.
Honda 30" Cut 9HP
$350. (352) 507-1490
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Chipper/Shredder
Brush Master. 1'%yrs.
old, with paperwork.
Purchased for $1000,
asking $500.
(352) 341-0866
CRAFSMAN
PRESSURE WASHER,
2000psi, 2.0gpm,
3.75HP with attach-
ments. Never used.
$150.00 352-746-3605
Grass Trimmer
Stihl, 50c, curved
shaft $75
(352) 795-4674
SCAG MOWER
48" cut, 14 HP, Zero
Turn walk behind or
ride. Zero Turn sulky,
Low Hours. Asking $900
will split (352) 257-3288



AZALEAS 1 GAL POTS
3 for $18 Gorgeous
Compare to $10 ea in
stores. Inv Off Croft
613-5818
ROSE OF SHARON
Nice 2-3 Yr Old
Seedlings 3 for $18
Inverness Off Croft Rd
613-5818
VEGGIE PLANTS
Mix & Match $2. Each
(352) 628-1991,
(352) 423-3100 Cell




BEVERLY HILLS
2 S. Desoto St.
Selling entire contents
of house.
Sat.9-3 & Sun.10-3
DUNNELLON
Moving Sale low
prices, furn, tools,
washer, dryer, solar
panels, snorkel equip.
5311 W. Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642

HOMOSASSA
Sunday Only 9a-4p
Walking Sticks, Elvis
collectibles, tools
and much more!
2009 S. Moonlit Pt
Lawn Spreader,
Large $25
Small rotter tiller
Original $195, used
twice. Asking $50
(352) 344-0484
LECANTO
BIG SALE *
Sat & Sun 9am-2pm
254 S. Easy Street



DRESS perfect for prom
or formal, new, tags on,
large, black and red,
($25) 352-613-7493
HIGH HEELS pewter
with studs, great shape,
($10) 352-613-7493
SKECHERS
D'Lites black size 7
$5. 352 476-8056
SKECHERS TENNIS
shape-ups, 6.5 blue
new 20. 352 476-8056



MOTOROLA WX416
Cell NEW with CASE,
Consumer
Cellular/unlock or 911
$39 352-382-3650



!!!!!!!255/40 R18!!!!!!!
Really nice tread!! Only
asking $70 for the pair!
352-857-9232
....265/65 R17...
Great tread! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
352-857-9232
----.215\65 R16----
Like new tread!! Only
asking $70 for the pair!
352-857-9232
~----215\65 R16----
Like new!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
352-857-9232
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BMW LICENSE PLATE
FRAME Chrome-Like
New-$20 Call 726-0040
CRAFTSMAN 12"
BANDSAW ON STAND,
with metal cutting
blade. $95, Call (352)
465-1813 (Dunnellon)
Dryer Front load Whirl-
pool $75; Free Stand-
ing, heavy magnetic
6' by 20" advertising
stand with slots. (New
$500) want $75. 352-
503-6313 Homosassa
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$30 352-613-0529
GENERATOR
5600 WATT.
Used Very Little
$200
(352) 344-0484
JAGUAR LICENSE
PLATE FRAME
Chrome-Like New-$15
Call 726-0040
PAMPERED CHEF
Vegetable Chopper &
Measuring Cup
New-$20 Call 726-0040
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $15
352-613-0529
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $15
352-613-0529


SPEAKERS 2 SHARP
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
Troy Bilt 5550 watt 10
hsp Generator
never used,
maintained, $300.
available "Reliance"
power transfer equip-
ment, box, ext, plug
$95. (352) 382-1088


SPEAKERS YAMAHA
SET OF 5 $65
352-613-0529



"NEW BLEM"
BLACK LES PAUL COPY
W/GOLD HARDWARE,
SETNECK BLOCK
INLAYS! $100 601-6625
"NEW BLEM" BLACK SG
COPY CHROME HARD-
WARE,PICKGUARD,
FREE GIGBAG&CORD
$65 CALL 601-6625
ACOUSTIC LEAD AMP
G35FX,12" SPEAKER,
OVERDRIVE,REVERB,DELAY,
CHORUS & STAND
$90 CALL 601-6625
CASIO PIANO
Keyboard WK-6500 with
stand. $175.00 Phone:
352-564-1668
FENDER STUDENT or
LADY SIZED ACOUSTIC
GUITAR W/GIGBAG,
(new $279) SELLING @
$100 CALL 601-6625



KITCHEN AID
AUTOMATIC COFFEE
MAKER Stainless Steel
12 Cup Thermal Carafe
$25 Call 726-0040



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
WORK GREAT.
SELDOM USED. ONLY
$185.00 352-464-0316
REBOUNDER
TRAMPOLINE(indoor)
with stretch band attach-
ments 352-5644214.
$40.
SCHWINN RECUM-
BANT 230 EXERCISE
BIKE (700. NEW)ALL
DIGITAL ONLY 150.00
3524640316
TREADMILL,
Weslo Cardio Stride
PLUS, manual, folds to
store, excellent cond.
$75, (352) 465-1813



2 Black Diamond
Golf Gift Certificates
Valued at $350. will
sell for $250. obo
(352) 795-2947
BICYCLE Men/Boys 18
speed bicycle Good
condition $60.00 352
364-7353
BIKE 21 speed mens,
element racing MGX
bike for sale. Great con-
dition, $30 Crystal River
area. 231-510-5454
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
1 set Northwestern,
1 set Ping Zing, Like
new, Plus bags, balls
etc, $250 for all, will
seperate.352-341-0866
IZOD MEN'S PANTS
Med.Blue 40X30. Near
Plantation $20, new,
352-794-6721
Ladies Bicycle
Pacific Regency,
26 inch, 15 speed, $75
(352) 795-4674
Men's Gold Izod Pants
Sz. 40/30 New
$20.
352-794-6721



CHILD'S BIKE
CARRIER & BIKE both
in nice shape $100/both
or $50 each
352-897-4154


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

I I I I I I I I


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted 8FT
Step Ladder
reasonable
call (352) 489-3016
Wanted to buy Girls
good Used Clothing,
6 mos. to 24 mos.
(352) 201-2120



2005, 31 FT FLEET-
WOOD TT, 2 br, 2
slides, sleeps 6, Q bed,
fridge/freezer, AC,
stove, $10,500 Local
850-672-0744




Ls k


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci@ 352-212-8936


DOLLY
Dolly, 6-8 y.o. Terrier
mix, Wt 54 Ibs, had
an unfortunate prior
life, not her fault.
The sweetest dog
ever, full of love for
people amazingly,
playful, very happy,
craves affection &
returns it, gets along
w/some dogs,
finally deserves a
home of her own.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808,
Joanne @
352-697-2682


MANDY
Mandy is the per-
fect size & perfect
temperament. She
is a 6-y.o. spayed
Basset hound mix.
Goes with the flow
& gets along with
everyone. Very
calm, walks great
on a leash, & would
be a great fit for
any home.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.

PUPPIES
Miniature Short Hair
Daschunds
2 male 1 female CKC
papers, register ,HC
$400 ea; 786-879-0221











RAYNA
Rayna, gorgeous
Bulldog mix, 4 y.o.,
weight 52 Ibs.
Appears housebrkn.
Good energy, loves
to run. Very friendly
& smart, no food
aggression. Learning
to play with dogs &
cats. Working on
leash training with
trainer, to be your
best friend ever.
Fee $60.
Call Trish @
352-586-7547.


RED MINIATURE POO-
DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352419-8233











SEDONA
Sedona, beautiful
possible hound mix
female, housebrkn,
Hearlworm-negative,
dog&cat
friendly, 6 yrs old,
weight 77 Ibs. Very
calm & collected,
very sweet girl
nothing rattles her!
Walks well on leash,
ideal companion
pet. UTD on vacs,
microchipped.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.
Fee $60.

Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$500
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827
Sweet Little Puppies
Chihuahua & Mini
Daschshund &
Chiweenies, ready
soon, ckc reg.
w/health certs.
& puppy kits
Janet (352) 628-7852




Horses. Tack, new &
used. All priced right.
Diamond Pea Farm
(352)873-6033




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*




Your World









CHRpNICLE



.. "I 1,,- ll-. ",,T


1997, Depth Finder,
Trailer, 60HP Yamaha
pwr. tilt & trim $5,500.
(352) 637-3996


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
Glasstream
1987 14' Bass Boat
4Ohp, Yamaha
4-stroke, 50hp foot
control trolling motor
never in salt water
incl. boat motor & trlr
$2700.(352) 628-3019
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792
PONTOON
20 FT, with 40HP
Yamaha, Trailer,
Good cond. $6,000
(352)257-9376





















We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
FLV












Fishingen Boats

**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
Holiday Rambler
'95, Endeavor LE,
34 ft loaded, new ti-
res, new carpet, Sirius
XM tag axle & dish
$13,900. 352-408-2870

HONDA
'11 CRY, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



2013 5TH WHEEL
must sell by 4/15,slides
metal ext. loaded
call anytime, $26,500.
(813) 699-2262







2014 KZ SONIC
14 ft "Like New",
completely loaded
MUST SELL, Homosassa
$12,900; 315-729-2634
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$8,900 256-244-6377
Holiday Rambler
2008, SAVOY, 26 ft.
Travel trlr. New awning,
1 slide out, central vac.
ducted air. Emmucalate
inside & out $12,500.
352-586-1694
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
TERRY
22 ft, Cream Puff
Inside & Out
Tandem Wheels
$3,500 (352) 628-3674
Terry 5th Wheel
93, remodeled, 28',
w/slide, clean title
$3800. obo
(352) 697-0361
VIKING POP UP
2011 2385 ST. Used 4
times, like new. Slide,
electric lift, stove, refrig-
erator, A/C and heat.
352.464.0443 $5,800



New ADCO Travel
Trailer Cover, never
used, fits 26 to 28/2 ft.
trailer, many options,
New $250. ask. $150.
(352) 637-6765



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
HelD Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
u- ANY CONDITION


Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ


ACURA
2012, TL, 23,000 miles,
gray with black int.
Exc. cond. $27,000.
(352) 513-4759
BUICK
2002 Rendevous
has hitch,100k mi.
Stood cond. asking
4k (352)419-6530

Buy Here/Pay Here

'97 Ford Taurus
$2495 Cash

'00 Buick LeSabre
$895 Down

'97 Dodge Neon
$2595 Cash

'01 Chevrolet Impala
$895 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CADILLAC
97 Deville Conc. 4drs
Runs great, good tires,
Northstar system.
$3,000 802-745-8718
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
HONDA
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
Details (352) 746-0524
HONDA
1998 Accord 215k mi,
new parts (eng, tran)
etc. First $2,000 as is
(352) 527-8618

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCEDES BENZ
1980, 450SL, 50k mi.
$8,000. obo
(352) 795-0125
NISSAN
'04, 350 Z Converitble
Roadster, 17k miles,
well equip. $17,900.
(352) 422-0008




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. APRIL 6th.
1-800-438-8559






BMW
2000, Z3 Roadster
5 Spd. 57k mi. $9,500
Excel Cond. Hernando
256-244-6377

Misc. Notice


CLASSIFIED


TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018





CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018

CHRYSLER
2010 Town & Country
Limited, Excellent
Cond $18,000
(352) 637-5073

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306





HARLEY 2008
ELECTRA GLIDE
CLASSIC FLHTC
ABSOLUTELY GOR-
GEOUS! SHOWROOM
CONDITION!! WHITE
GOLD PEARL &
PEWTER GOLD
PAINT. 96ci Serious
Inquiries only $14,500
352 344 0355

Misc. Notice


Collection of classic
cars in Spring Hill. Make
offer 727- 422- 4433






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111

MUSTANG GT
2003 63,600k miles
Showcar, Supercharger,
lots of chrome!
352-228-4012





CHEVROLET
2000 Silverado 1500
Extended Cab.144000
mishortbed w/topper
V8, 4.8 Liter. LS pkg.
A/C.Automatic, 2WD.
AM/FM/CD. Bed liner.
Towing pkg. Red. You
won't regret buying it.
$5,800 Call 527-6709

CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018


373-0406 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Arvana, Inc.
5164 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-5430
March 26, 2014
SALE OF CONTENTS
Pursuant to Florida Stat-
ute 83.8055 the entire
contents of the following
storage unit(s) will be sold
in order to pay for past
due rental, advertising
and other charges owed
by these tenants. The sale
will take place 2 weeks
from the first publication,
at 10:00 a.m. on April 14,
2014.
Pam Nolan
A- 19
Kristina McMahon
B-53 & B59
April 6, 2014.


372-0406 SUCRN
Order to Demolish
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH MOBILE HOME AND SHED

CASE NUMBER: 146602
Description of property: AK: 1872383 and legally described as SUBURBAN ACRES UN-
REC SUB TRACT 19: E 1/2 OF NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 DESC IN OR BK 543 PG 30,
DC IN OR BK 826 PG 41 & OR BK 2073 PG 889 OR BK 2073 PG 891
BARBARA ECKLAND & PATRICIA MAHER ET AL
6247 E MCMULLEN RD
FLORAL CITY, FL
On February 11,2014, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Of-
ficial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 6247 E. McMullen Rd.;
Floral City, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition..
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: April 6, 2014.


368-0406 SUCRN
04/17/14 Rescheduled Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. scheduled meeting for Thursday, April 10, 2014 has been rescheduled to Thurs-
day, April 17, 2014 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, April 6, 2014.


369-0406 SUCRN
4/11 CMHS MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
A Conflicts Committee meeting of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., will be held
on Friday, April 11, 2014, at 12:15 pm, in the Board Room located on the second floor of the
Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Flor-
ida. Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to
appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such
meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must
include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: April 6, 2014.


370-0406 SUCRN
4/10 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 10, 2014 in Room 280 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Divsion, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: April 6, 2014.


371-0406 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
4/9 Special Meeting
HOMOSASSA SPECIAL WATER DISTRICT
The Board of Commissioners of the Homosasso Special Water District will be holding a
Special Meeting on Wednesday, April 9,2014 @ 6:00 P.M. This meeting will be held at
the Homosassa Civic Club located at 5530 S. Mason Creek Rd., Homosassa, FL. The
purpose of this meeting is to discuss the status of the Elevated Storage Tank in Old
Homosassa.
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle: April 6, 2014


**Road King 2007**
24k mi, many extra's
beautiful bike, head-
ing north, HURRY! 12K
obo (608) 438-8812
Harley Davidson
2001, Fat Boy
Garage kept,
23,659 miles, $9,700
352-601-7911
Harley Davidson
2010 Ultra Classic
loaded, garaged,
xtras, 13,900 mi.
$19500.(352) 419-4053
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200

'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Metn


MeetiBn
I NOUTes


Meeing
I NodG65^




H Section E SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEi REAL ESTATE GUIDE 11


INSIDE


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


The Pooley 2 fully glazed ceramic
bud vases come in 8- or 12-vase
configurations, and attach to a
rectangular base. A flower can be
placed in only one or two, or in the
full array using only one type of
bloom or leaf looks particularly
striking. The vases, available at
Chive.com, come in a wide range
of subtle yet saturated hues.
Associated Press


\


lo


^e


f4L
'S.,
^ a


!




E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WATERWAYS TO GULF! 5989 ORCHIS TER. N 1/2 ACRE L & OVERSIZED ARAE!!!! CHARMING INSIDE AND OUT' ROOM TO GROW!
'MAGNIFICENTVIEW 'HURRICANE SHUTTERS PINE RIDGE *3BR, 2 BATH *As Large as 3-CAR Sheparfct f4mero homeon Large and cae d h Bath Fully Fenced Acre
New Roof Shingles Elevator/Carport 4BD/3BN3CG Over 3,600 SF Living *1990 Built Concrete Patio cathedralfcailyngs, meatirosm with *2-CarAttached Garage .New Floors
,312- HUGEGREAT Rm. ,Large Kitchen-Bkfst.r 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath Enclosed Lanai Large Eat-in Kitchen crae ilast bar anustiflesp appsites n Split bo 2-Car Detached Garage Updated Master Bath
'Wrap-Around Dec BOATHOUSE *Office or Den Many Extras Stainless Appliances Jacuzzi Tub & Shower plan also includes a laundry room, breakfast nook and Security System d New Ceiling Fans
ELLIE SUTTON 352-217-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL I Escreened porch. A must see. Ft ] [O)0
Emnimmi ellnesullon ...,,. eU nn( 2 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 Email: sherylpots@a01.cm [
)352( 527784 82 HRY OT 32)0750



www.slomuduuLusluglnlo.OU (35ut) 422-38aa Email: kellygoddardsellsllorida.com EmMl: stevvarnadoo@romax~nt A Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com
(352)3 O282COMM





20 5. LE:SRE332 S. BROOKFIELD DR. R 5 ~ lp 4 131 N. SKYFLOWER PT., LECANTO FAIR VIEW ESTATES CITRUS HILLS
LS A T 1 ALECANTO n A a ur Affordable 3/3/2 pool home in beautiful, gated Heather Ridge. *Over 3400 Sq Ft of Living 32 +2HalfBaths 2Car Garage
2/2/1-Car Garage Nice Front Porch/Bk. Pao 3/2BA/20G Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot l i L N IE E N mne interio n e Lag Ktn wtnBreaka Nok F rra DnngR
plant shelves, laminate flooring, upgraded carpet, sliders to
Nearly 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained E24F11 po oIE l area separate living roomfmily room. Master bath Frma LingrStdy SecuritySysyem SrmShutr ers
MOVEIN READY MINUTES TO GOLF! Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows /111 iiiru boasts separate shower, jetted bath and dual sinks. Pool area Bricked Drive and Pool De Lots and Lots of Storage Space
ELLIE SUTTON 352-V17-3997 a I EIIL overlooks over sized backyard. Community offers clubhouse, Large Florida Room Overlookng the Caged Pool and Spa
. .PETER & MARVIA KOROL 07 000 l pool tennis and recreational vehide parking. yFM CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM -i
EmnImmiI e lon .UUc h (352) 527-7842 bo i -L DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 *EJ (352) 637-6200
www._loid___iiinglnlo.C __U (352) 422-0a | Email: davidsivory@hotliail.com El Email: kcunningham@remaxnwt|
1 c elusive


2 2 Buyer enters house
325 5. IACKSON STREET NATURE AT ITS BEST! number when MOVE-IN CONDITION 31212 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS
NRea Bedroom 2 Bath Home Nestled In The Woods Just prompted 2 BEDROOM HOME WITH 1,479 SQ. FT. BUILT IN 2005
'NWSAPLACS'GREUKICE Of eWithlaesoohee River With Private Boat Ramp For I pnforpa ihgetro omldnn
Super Nice Jiiliiy Room .NewCarpet[file Residents Features Open Floor Plan, Split Bedrooms, UNDER ROOF. FENCED YARD, NEWER Oreaf room split bedrooms fx5or4aseasoni
SDecorator Fans/Fixtures Tiled Front Porch Fireplace, Huge 14x24 Screened Lanai, NEW ROOF 2012. APPLIANCES AND AC. METAL ROOF, OUT- lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 10x82' & 20x20
oWNER FINANCE AMUSTSEETOCOMDARE! Toally Fenced Backyard. Additional Detached Garage ForThe 3 Buyer listens to BUILDING PLUS DETACHED GARAGE AND attached carports and detached carport/boat
Enthusiast! Tender Loving Care By Original Owners. Perfect O rt
ELESTO35-8-97Permanent Or Weekend Retreat! -.^ J V^ .CITY WATER. CALL NOW TO SEE. "B
WA u O G. 58 MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 E "re t BARBARA AlLS (352) 637-6200 i i CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 R
Eil__nllelieullon1___i___n__ne [T ) Ese in SARnARA em helar ge LLae t 3B
www.FlidnLusuungmnlo con Email: marha.salheraremax.net re_ nelEnglish Spanish bi jniuiiartUmr Email inadal, aemoaxuiwel
|OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1 -3PM | i Rs ,|^ ENTAST^ i-^ K ~ B
SWi VIULADLEI


PIE" MOVE. INRAYWT Visit ..
44 PINE DRIVE- SMW PINOVE I DGEi SlS 3 TJIICCslDa 296 W. QUEENCUP BEST IN CANTERBURY!
Well Maintained 3BR/2BA2CG- 2,644 SF Living Area OPEN FLOOR PLAN! CLOSE TO TOWN! EBEDIVHILL Pristine 3 BD 2.5 Bath w/1 850 SF living area
Living Rm./Family Rm. Style, Open Floor Plan This is a 3 Bedr m. 2 Bathr m 2-Car Garage Home in LEaE LaVE L on lush Cil Sul-de-sac PRESERVE lot Loaded
Formal DR & Wood Burning FP in Fai. Rm nverne with City Water Home Features OpenSpiit Fir Pian Oversized Comer Lot East of Forest Ridge Blvd. with upgrades including wood flooring, garden
11 x32 Enclosed Porch Overlooks Greenbelt Wak-in- C oset Shower in Master Bedroom Kitchen Bar Seating n oo n i S N Ci F
Reroof 2013w50yr. Shingles, NC Repl. 2009 Decorative Lighting, Screen Por h. Screen Garage, Jacuzzi, Shed | 1,456 Sq. Ft. Under Air Large Living & Dining Room tub, granite countertops & designer faucets.
GaageBump-Ou Utility Building, Fenced Backyard and Much More Take a lukr | Bonus Room Fenced Area for Pet Includes Citrus Hills CC Membership, plus
r IEp r so Dir' PFROMH 44 INVEP NE OAPOPKA OLON sClose to Shopping Canterbury Recreation Center.
Dir: W Cypress Blv to R on Pine Dr House on Right ABOT 0O HOME ON R SEE SIGN) SLEEMAo(352)o0Shopping
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 r DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080 DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840 GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812 [
Email: iounalley@itampailiiy.rff.com 32Email: dawn wri ti@romax.ieti Email: debrapilny@ revmax.nelt Email: RealEslale@iGeorgeSleemian.com
Q I 0. 241
- ML #7594 3 ,0 1 1Q 84




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Citrus Hills
agent
scores fir
in March ;, I
Susan Mas-
trangelo has been k ^,
named the top sales
agent for March at
the Villages of Cit- Susan
rus Hills. She Mastrangelo
recorded four new Villages of Citrus
home sales during Hills.
the month.
The Welcome Center for the Villages
of Citrus Hills is located at 2400 N. Terra
Vista Blvd. in Citrus Hills. Visit www.
CitrusHills.com.


-j -
Len Palmer Lucy Barnes
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.


Sherry Potts
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Ellie Sutton
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX agents
notch new highs
Several RE/MAX Realty One agents
qualified for the prestigious Million Dollar
Club this week.
Len Palmer, Lucy Barnes, Sherry
Potts, Ellie Sutton, Kim DeVane and
Sally Cure have all closed more than
$1 million in sales volume already this
year.
RE/MAX Realtor Jody Broom has
once again qualified for the Multi Million
Dollar Club.
She joins the top percentage of local
agents who have qualified for this desig-


Kim DeVane
RE/MAX
Realty One.


nation this year.
She is an agent in
the Crystal River of-
fice of RE/MAX Re-
alty One and has
been a Realtor for
more than 25 years.
The brokers and
staff of RE/MAX are
proud to recognize
these agents
for their
accomplishments.


I"
Peg Price
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Sally Cure
RE/MAX
Realty One.









Jody Broom
RE/MAX
Realty One.

Price is
tops at
EXIT Realty
EXIT Realty
Leaders wishes to
congratulate Peg
Price on being top
sales producer for
March.
Peg had eight
closings last month.
Contact her today
at 352-794-0888.


New
blood at
Century 21
Century 21 J. W.
Morton Real Es-
tate Inc. is pleased
to announce the ad-





0 f CitrusCounty
Aso Dreattaeam
Casey ttsoaa
ofaens CeI~ntury 21


Shanna, along with her husband Mike
and kids Miriah, 18, and Jake, 14, comes
from Las Vegas, Nev., where she was a
mortgage broker.
ERA American
agents soar to new
records in 2014
ERA American Realty & Invest-
ments is proud to announce the latest
production levels achieved by its agents
in 2014.
Dawn Theroux, Inverness office, has
surpassed the $1 million mark in closed
sales in 2014.
Dawn can be reached at the Inver-
ness office of ERAAmerican Realty by
calling 352-726-5855.
Debra McFarland, Inverness office,
has surpassed the $1 million mark in


Dawn
Theroux
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Debra
McFarland
ERA American
Realty.


closed sales volume in 2014.
Reach her at the Inverness office of
ERAAmerican Realty by calling 352-
726-5855.
ERAAmerican Realty is proud to rec-
ognize the achievements of these fine
real estate professionals.


U 5746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER' REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKER ASSOCIATE REALTOR F H P i Anal ysi s


PINRIDGE~


CIRU HILL


DIGEST
GUIDE
* News notes
submitted
without pho-
tos will not
be reprinted
if the photo
is provided
later.
* Digest pho-
tos are kept
on file for fu-
ture use.
* The
Chronicle re-
serves the
right to edit
news notes
for space
and/or
clarity.


^*T~~ ~LT T7TTTTTr^


BEVERn~LY ILLS


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 E3


r.iaHl




E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci ii, cNci1

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Average 30-year

0 0

loan rises again


Now at 4.41 percent, but still near historic low


Associated Press
WASHINGTON- Average U.S. rates
on fixed mortgages rose slightly this week
but remained near historically low levels.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday the average rate for the 30-year
loan ticked up to 4.41 percent from
4.40 percent last week The average for the
15-year mortgage increased to 3.47 percent
from 3.42 percent. Mortgage rates have
risen about a full percentage point since
hitting record lows about a year ago.
A report released Tuesday by real es-
tate data provider CoreLogic showed U.S.
home prices rose in February from a year
earlier at a solid pace, suggesting that a
tight supply of available homes is boost-
ing prices despite slowing sales.
Most economists expect home sales to
rebound as the weather improves and the
spring buying season begins.


The increase in mortgage rates over the
year was driven by speculation that the
Federal Reserve would reduce its $85 bil-
lion-a-month bond purchases, which have
helped keep long-term interest rates low
Indeed, the Fed has announced three
$10 billion declines in its monthly bond
purchases since December. The latest
plan is to cut its monthly long-term bond
purchases to $55 billion because it thinks
the economy is steadily healing.
The Fed also said after its two-day pol-
icy meeting last month that even after it
raises short-term interest rates, the job
market strengthens and inflation rises,
the central bank expects its benchmark
short-term rate to stay unusually low
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen
made clear this week that she thinks the
still-subpar U.S. job market will continue
to need the help of low interest rates "for
some time."


Inside...


Vase variations
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sizing up a clown painting; what's going on with Hummel


ear John: Thank you for the pictures will give you the
all the interesting dis- help you request each Sunday
closures throughout the I thank you in advance for any
years. I hope you assistance you may
may shed some light offer about this
on my painting. I funny little clown. -
I inherited it from J.S., Inverness
my mother It was a DearJ.S.: I was not
donation to the 4. able to find any in-
Carmelite Cloistered formation about the
Sisters annual signer of your clown
garage sale over 60 painting. Relative to
years ago. It is oil on potential dollar
canvas, 12 inches by value, the artist is
10, and unframed. John Sikorski not relevant. This
The Van Pelt SIKORSKI'S leaves dollar value
Gallery listed on the ATTIC at the catch-as-catch-
back is stamped on can level.
the canvas. The Dear John: I am
gallery was located in Chicago attaching a file that sums up the
and I cannot find a listing any- recent history of the M.I. Hum-
where for it currently mel Club and the owners who
I have also tried in vain to were producing the Hummel
discover who the artist might figurines. I belong to the Ocala
be, but have had no luck. I hope What's New Chapter of the de-


funct M.I. Hummel Club. One
our members found this infor-
mation online. Hope this sheds
some light on the subject.
In September 2013, the Hum-
mel Factory, operated by Mr.
Koster under the name of
"Manufaktur Rodental GmbH
& Co." was declared "insolvent"
and the factory was closed.
Then in October, the M.I.
Hummel Club, headquartered
in New Jersey, by ruling of the
German insolvency court, also
declared bankruptcy The staff
were fired and all assets were
liquidated. This is why no one
answers the telephone or any
mail inquiries.
As a consequence of these ac-
tions, it is highly unlikely that
any of the 2012 and 2011 mem-
bership gifts that were prom-
ised will ever be delivered. If
you didn't receive either of


these items, you likely never
will. If you are so inclined, you
may wish to file a complaint
with the New Jersey Office of
Consumer Protection. The web
address is wwwnjconsumer
affairs.gov/comp.htm.
In November 2013, a group of
German investors purchased
the assets of the Hummel fac-
tory and the factory is now op-
erating again and producing
Hummels under the name of
"Hummel Manufaktur GmbH &
Co." Apparently, the new own-
ers did not purchase the M.I.
Hummel Club, which is in a
tangled financial situation due
to the German insolvency
See ATTIC/Page E5
This painting of a clown came
from the Van Pelt Gallery in
Chicago.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 ES



Use testing to find out what's in your soil


LEE REICH
Associated Press

If plants could squeal like
hungry pigs, we gardeners
would pay more attention to
their fertilizer needs.
But plants do tell us when
they are hungry with poor
or distorted growth and with
leaf discolorations. Why wait
for your plants to become so
desperate? Test your soil
every few years.
Testing can be done by you
or by a private or state labora-
tory, and there are options in
what to test for At the least,
test the acidity (pH), because
if it is unsuitable, plants can-


not absorb certain nutrients,
even if those nutrients are
present.
Most plants like a slightly
acidic soil, with a pH about
6.5. A standard test checks
levels of the so-called
macronutrients phospho-
rus, potassium, calcium, mag-
nesium and sulfur A
complete checkup would also
include testing for micronu-
trients, such as iron, man-
ganese and zinc, which are
essential but required in only
minute quantities.
The accuracy of any soil test
depends on how you take the
sample. In even a modest-size
garden of 100 square feet, one


cup of soil-the amount used
for the test represents only
0.001 percent of the top 6
inches of soil, so that sample
must be as representative as
possible of the whole area to
be tested.
The test area should be
See SOIL/Page E13
This young leaf is yellowing,
though its veins remain
green, indicating that this
plant is hungry for iron. Plants
do tell us when they are
hungry with poor or
distorted growth, and with
leaf discolorations. Test your
soil every few years.
LEE REICH/Associated Press


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

It is our understanding that the
new owners of the Hummel factory
desire to resurrect some form of the
M.I. Hummel Club in the United
States and are in discussions with
some interested people. We further
understand that after their plans are
finalized, they will attempt to con-
tact the previous M.I. Hummel Club
members in early 2014 to discuss
their new plans for the continuation
of some form of the M.I. Hummel
Club.
Hopefully, their communication
will address the prior M.I. Hummel
Club membership figurine gifts that
were never delivered.
The Convent of Siessen still retain
their previous rights to the Hummel
figurines and are working closely
with the new factory owners to make
the new operation a success.
The Hummel family also retain
their previous rights, and are work-
ing closely with the new factory
owners to make it successful. Visit
the German Hummel Museum web-
site at wwwhummelmuseum.
de/english/Olnews/index.php.
You may read some additional in-
formation that was published in
Brenda and Randy McKenrick's No-
vember 2013 Hummel newsletter,


which can be viewed at wwwdas
bumblebeeshaus.com/voll7l.html.
This is all the information that we
know or have learned, and is not of-
ficial. We are just collectors like
everyone else. Even we, as a local
chapter of the Hummel Club, have
never received official notification
from the M.I. Hummel Club head-
quarters stating it no longer exists.
-J.E, Internet
DearJ.E: I am glad you responded
about the Hummel queries. I spoke
with Joan Mumma, secretary-
treasurer of the San Francisco East
Bay chapter, where the above infor-
mation came from. For further in-
formation, go to their website
www mumma. org/hummel.
Hopefully, the new ownership will
honor the club members with what
they are owed. I suspect the outlook
for Hummels relative to both old
and new production is not very good.
The younger generation has their
own interests and Hummel collect-
ing does not appear to be part of
those interests.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski&aol. com.


SSplit floor
S" pln ainground pool
3/2.
709633
$69,900


.911-11 WAs


183 STAGGERBUSH, BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 move-in condition.
708629 $79,900
Barbara Stone 352-586-3072


ei----.- -i-^
Quiet and peaceful 3/2/2.
709384 $74,500
Sherri Orendorf 573-9968


Move-in ready 3/2/2. 3/2/2.
708705 $75,900 708572 $144,900
Yolanda Canchola219-2196 RandyMorehouse 287-2934


Quaint 3/2/2.
709420 $82,900
Sherri Orendorf573-9968





fe- -.. ....... -rL._
Great investment opportunity 2/2.
708448 $49,900
Barbara Stone 586-3072


2/2 condo.
708789 $81,500
Yolanda Canchola 219-2196


Steve McClory 422-3998


S IOS TO SEV YO!3279-88- 5-2-11 524749




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


W.Va. rustic living brings artistic inspiration


MARY WADE BURNSIDE
The Exponent Telegram

CLARKSBURG, WVa. -
Using Mother Earth News and
the Whole Earth Catalog, Beth
Crowder and her husband,
David Wentz and some friends
scoured ads for cheap land until
they found 420 acres for sale in
Doddridge County, where the
couple moved in 1977.
Crowder and Wentz had been
living in a communal home in
Denver, but members wanted to
get away from the city and give
rural life a try, taking the prac-
tices they cultivated sharing a
house among six to 12 people
and spreading it out on a tract of
land. Several members paid
$5,000 for the land.
Then, using a series of books
called "Foxfire" that outlined
Appalachian culture step by
step, the couple, among the first
in their group to move to West
Virginia, set about building a
dovetailed log home, a process
that took a few years. In the
meantime, they lived on their
property in a mobile home.
"Ironically, we live 12 miles
from Fort New Salem and that's


INCREDIBLE VISTAS -
HAMPTON LAKE


SS apple $274,000


GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220.0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com



Investors Realty S
of Citrus County, Inc.
on itywebsite at: ww.mynflorida-house.com


exactly the kind of construction
they had," Crowder said re-
cently "We didn't know We
could have seen what it looked
like, but we were going by the
'Foxfire' books."
Crowder and Wentz expected
others who had gone in on the
land to join them and a few did,
coming and going through the
years. Also, they each set about
making a living. Wentz learned
how to be a wood turner Always
artistic, Crowder set up shop in
places like Middletown Mall in
Fairmont and painted portraits
of people and their pets and also
served as an artist-in-residence
for Harrison County schools.
Eventually, she had more time to
devote to her own pieces and
won two Governor's Awards and
one Award of Excellence in the
West Virginia Juried Exhibition.
Nearly 40 years later, the two,
now divorced, own about three-
fourths of the original 420 acres,
but have been discouraged by
the hydraulic fracturing for gas
that has been taking place on
Wentz's property, which has
meant increased traffic and
noise that they both experience,
so much that Wentz plans to


I used to be
able to hear if
somebody was
driving up my
road. Now I
couldn't tell if
somebody was
standing on
my front porch
beating on the
door.

Beth Crowder
about hydraulic fracturing for
natural gas that occurs onher
ex-husband's land.
move to Washington state to be
closer to the couple's son. Wentz
owns the land, but not the min-
eral rights.
"I used to be able to hear if
somebody was driving up my
road," Crowder said. "Now I
couldn't tell if somebody was
standing on my front porch beat-


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ing on the door"
And those are just two of many
stories of the back-to-the-
landers who moved to West Vir-
ginia during the 1970s in large
numbers.
Carter Taylor Seaton of Hunt-
ington has written a book detail-
ing how West Virginia benefited
from these residents. "Hippie
Homesteaders: Arts, Crafts,
Music, and Living on the Land in
West Virginia," was set for re-
lease last Tuesday by West Vir-
ginia University Press.
Many of the new state resi-
dents turned to art to make a liv-
ing and many of them in turn
also were helped out by a variety
of outreach programs and move-
ments, such as artist-in-
residencies and eventually,
Tamarack, the Best of West Vir-
ginia facility in Beckley that
sells the works of juried artists.
Plus, those West Virginia Juried
Exhibition prizes not only put
Crowder's work in the state's
permanent collection; it also
meant a four-figure payday each
time she won.
Seaton worked with a craft co-
operative in Huntington and
came in contact with many of


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these new West Virginia resi-
dents. But not until much later
did she decide to look into why
so many non-natives had ended
up as artists in her home state.
"I learned that many of them
would admit to the fact that if it
hadn't been for the people they
found on the land already -
older couples they would
have frozen or starved to death,"
Seaton said.
'Also, what was interesting
was these people they met were
a generation older and they
turned out to be the same age as
these older couples' children
who had left West Virginia dur-
ing the out-migration where so
many young people had left. It
was like a whole cycle of some-
body leaves and somebody else
comes back in."
Not only that, but the older
people had surrogate children
to whom they could pass on their
knowledge of the land, Seaton
said.
Also helping artists was a craft
revival that began with the
state's centennial in 1963, as
well as the creation of events

See RUSTIC/Page E12

- - --

ElHI




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E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Coral Honeysuckle flowers all months but most prolifically from February to
June. Pull off a flower and nibble the bulbous base to taste the sweet nectar.
Butterflies and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds feed on the nectar of
these plants.


Springtime brings


hummingbirds


and honeysuckles
arm weather and The deciduous Turkey
longer days are n Oak, Quercus laevis, trees
welcome signs of were just leafing out; it
spring anywhere. Gar- was too early to see any of
deners delight in spring the four native butterfly
flowers, particularly if caterpillars which de-
they did little mainte- pend on these leaves for
nance other than prepar- food.
ing planting beds, A dozen Turkey Oaks
amending soil and in- Jane Weber were decorated in clus-
stalling perennial and ters of red, tubular Coral
self-seeding flowering JANE'S Honeysuckle flowers on
plants. GARDEN evergreen native vines I
Upon returning from a had planted two years ago
month-long birding trip to tropical at the tree bases. Initially a bucket
Trinidad and Tobago on March 22, I of fine mulch was dumped around
was welcomed by a profusion of
flowers in my abandoned garden. See Page ElI


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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 E7




E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Give spring flowers a snazzy home


Associated Press

e've been picking flow-
ers and sticking them in
containers for thousands
of years.
The early Egyptians did it, as did
the Chinese: Feng Shui guidelines
for creating harmony in a home










A Zouzous vase from the
MoMA Design Store.
created by the French
design team r
Charlotte Arnal and r :.- -
Francis Fevre to orV l
explore the tension
between texture -
and color in a
commonplace object. -
To make each versatile
piece, bristles are 7
snipped in a variety of o
lengths, giving the
classic vase a
sculptural form and
an unconventional
cuddliness.
MoMA Des -,.- ---,
AssocI2 [- 1 i,-


suggest placing vases of fresh-cut
flowers throughout the dwelling to
relieve stress, and increase produc-
tivity and creativity. Ikebana, the
600-year-old art of Japanese flower
arranging, became a craft of high
regard, with a spiritual element.
See /Page EO10


A playful Chalkboard Vase
from the MoMA Design Store
by designer Ricardo Saint-Clair,
available at momastore.org.
It features a chalkboard front
which can be used for drawings,
messages, and more. The top of
the bud vase houses a removable
glass tube designed to hold water
and flowers. Saint-Clair seeks
to foster communication and
interaction through his designs.
MoMA Design Store/Associated Press


(

1 .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 E9


//"SW^ 1- .7..'s^^








/,



iI' ,,






i ', ', ,, ,,
I'..


,, ,


A minimalist style
Big Bloom Vase from the
MoMA Design Store.
designed by Charlie
Guda. The vase
features a powerful
fresnel lens which
magnifies the flower
placed in the vial
in front of it. It is
available at
momastore.org.
MoM. -: ,- _:.:-,.
Ass ::, 1 ,i- : :


it..


I I APR II ,


-. 4-




EIO SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014



VASES
Continued from Page E8

Today, artisans, design-
ers and even florists con-
tinue to dream up
interesting new vessels.
New York City-based flo-
ral designer Matthew Rob-
bins has created a simple
line of vases for Teroforma
that takes some of the
guesswork out of flower ar-
ranging. Each vase -Bud,
Cutting, Bouquet, Branch
- describes what works
best in it, and each is
crafted of the same neu-
tral white bisque porce-
lain, with a subtle yet
referential etched motif.
(wwwteroforma.com)
"We wanted to create a
line of vases that provided
a perfect visual anchor for
fresh flowers. Clean


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


shapes and surfaces are
wonderful; they keep the
focus on the flowers," says
Robbins.
The Museum of Modern
Art's store offered several
interesting vases at this
spring's design preview in
New York. French design
team Charlotte Arnal and
Francis Fevre's Zouzous
vase is a polycarbonate re-
ceptacle enrobed in a
shaggy coat of colorful
polypropylene bristles.
Also at the MoMA store,
Charlie Guda perches a
narrow vial in front of a
small yet powerful lens to
magnify a single flower
Guda created the Big
Bloom vase as homage to
18th century French physi-
cian Augustin-Jean Fres-
nel, who invented a lens to
enhance the brightness of
lighthouse lanterns and
contributed to naval navi-


Chive/Associated Press
Chive's Hudson 4 Caterpillar glass vase works well on a long table or window sill.


gation safety And Ricardo
Saint Clair's playful chalk-
board-faced vase gives you
a surface to add an image
or a message, and comes
complete with chalk.
(www momastore.org)
Bliss Home and Design
has an array of ceramic
vases with textural ele-
ments that add drama: The
Pompon vase is festooned
with white balls; the Sea
Sponge is made of layers


of glazed clay resembling
fronds of ocean sponge,
and Monkey Paw is made
of dozens of iridescent ce-
ramic blooms. (www.
blisshomeanddesign.com)
Toronto-based design
outfit Chive has decided to
focus solely on selling
vases. At the NY Now show
in February, their booth
was abuzz with buyers
placing orders for Pooley 2,
a cluster of glazed ceramic


bud vases affixed to a slab,
as well as the Hudson 4
collection of clear glass
vessels in configurations
ranging from simple single
shapes (such as a hanging
egg) to conjoined vases that
form caterpillar or bub-
bles. A porcelain bird vase
in gray, white, blue or black
seems to rest on the flow-


ers or greenery placed in a
receptacle at its feet.
(www.chive.com)
Waterford's Evolution se-
ries has some striking ex-
amples of artisanal
glasswork. The Menagerie
Trinidad vase interprets
the markings of a graceful
ocelot, while the Nairobi
invokes the bold stripes of a
zebra. The Agate vase was
inspired by the colors and
concentric bands of quartz
agate. (www.macys.com)
Ikea's Socker vase is an
enameled steel-and-
eucalyptus-handled
bucket of diminutive pro-
portions, so flowers dis-
played in it have the look
of a European flower mar-
ket. Ikaprig is a stoneware
cylinder with a homespun
aesthetic. (wwwikea.com)


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



JANE
Continued from Page E7

each tree before planting the
honeysuckle. Vines soon wound
up the trunks, twining between
the rough ridges of the bark. The
Turkey Oak branches are natu-
rally covered in epiphytes -
harmless lichens, mosses and
flowering air plants.
Coral Honeysuckle, Lonicera
sempervirens, flowers during all
months but most prolifically
from February to June. Pull off a
flower and nibble the bulbous
base to taste the sweet nectar
This feeds large butterflies hav-
ing long, tube-like, coiled pro-
boscis and also Ruby-throated
Hummingbirds, the only species
documented as breeding in
Florida.


Ruby-throateds can winter in
south Florida, as there are
enough nectar-bearing flowers
there and no frosty mornings.
They do not winter in Central
Florida. Stray hummers occa-
sionally seen in winter here are
possibly rare Black-chinned but
likely Rufous Hummingbirds at
well-tended feeders.
There are about 320 species of
hummingbirds occurring only in
the Americas from southeast
Alaska to Chile. About 12 species
spend the summer in the United
States, where there is ample
flower nectar to feed them.
Hummers weave an inch diame-
ter, teacup-shaped nest of
lichens or moss mingled with
spider silk. The camouflaged
nests are attached to small hori-
zontal branches, often on Turkey
Oaks. Hummingbird eggs are the
size of Tic-Tacs. One to three


those muscles at work.
All by themselves, the hum-
mers had found a garden with a
natural supply of flower nectar
in the Coral Honeysuckle flow-
ers, plus suitable nest sites and
building materials. I rarely use
pesticides, so there are garden
spiders to spin silk for the breed-
ing hummers. There are lots of
tiny flying insects for the hum-
mers to catch to feed their grow-
ing nestlings. Hummers also eat
protein-packed pollen and lap
tree sap from holes drilled by
sapsuckers and other wood-


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 Ell


eggs per brood is normal.
Boil a cup of white granulated
cane sugar with 4 cups of well
water, let it cool and fill a plastic
hummingbird feeder My artifi-
cial nectar feeder is suspended
on a hook 6 feet from the front
window Within minutes, three
Ruby-throateds were lapping
nectar from the small feeder
holes. They lap very rapidly like
a dog. Their long tongues are not
hollow straws. The large muscles
to work the tongue wrap around
to the backs of their heads. Close
observation lets bird lovers see


There are about 320 species

of hummingbirds occurring only in

the Americas from southeast

Alaska to Chile.


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erra Vista maintenance free villa with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car
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I .-,I1 ,,1 i*edroom plus den, 2.5
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STerms 6 MonthS oSr Mor
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1 2 5 4 ............................................................................................. $ 1 ,4 5 0 # 1 9 14 .......................................................................... ... ...................... $ ,3 5 0 # 1 1 2 6 .................................................................................................. $ 1 ,3 5 0


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peckers. The artificial feeder is
a bonus to lure them close to
amuse gardeners.
Plants blooming by April in-
clude Florida Violet, Blue Spi-
derwort, Rain Lily, Redbud,
Dogwood, Walter's Viburnum,
strawberries, azaleas and Indian
Hawthorn. Coral Honeysuckle,
Red Salvia and Cape Honey-
suckle bloom in early spring.
Their long, tubular, nectar-rich
flowers attract hummingbirds.
Spring is a favorite time of the
year for gardeners.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For an appoint-
ment, call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeber12385@gmail.com.


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Nicely maintained Malibu model with great open floor plan on Golf
Course homesite. This home has 2 bedrooms plus a den, which can
be used as a third bedroom. An outstanding home for year round or
a vacation getaway.
M LS 706854 ........................................................................... $ 2 1 4 ,9 0 0




E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


RUSTIC
Continued from Page E6

such as the Mountain
State Art and Craft Fair at
Cedar Lakes in Ripley,
Seaton added.
Crowder and Wentz are
not among the many artists
that Seaton profiles in her
book, but Sutton sculptor
Bill Hopen, who carved
"The Immigrants" statue
that can be found at the
Harrison County Court-
house, is.
Like Crowder and Wentz,
Hopen also bought land in
rural West Virginia this
time in Braxton County, in
1973. The New York City
native wanted to move to a
place where he could af-
ford to build studio space,
which was not possible in a
crowded, high-priced me-
tropolis.
However, he never re-
ally lived on his land, in-
stead opting to buy a place
closer to town, which gave
him some cultural ameni-
ties while still affording
him the amount of room he
wanted.
"Homesteading I
found out how much work
that was, and I ended up
not becoming a true back-
to-the-lander," Hopen
said. "I did build a little
place in the country, but I
never lived in it.
"What I found living in


town was that the eco-
nomic pressure was off liv-
ing in West Virginia and I
was able to make a decent
living as a carpenter and a
tree trimmer and I had
time left over to pick up art
again."
Like Crowder, Hopen
spent time in Harrison
County schools as an
artist-in-residence, which
led to a commission for
"The Immigrants," which
he did in 1985. Hopen
found the environment in
West Virginia to be wel-
coming, although now he
has mostly out-of-state
clients and his successful
career can boast commis-
sions of up to six figures.
"It seems like every-
thing I did was appreci-
ated as out of the ordinary
here," he added.
No hard and fast num-
bers exist as to how many
people moved to West Vir-
ginia with the intention of
living off the land. But
Seaton said West Virginia
census figures indicate
that the only population
increase in the past 50
years was in the 1970s,
with about 10,000 of the
200,000 new residents esti-
mated to be part of the
movement.
Seaton believes that in
addition to Tamarack, the
state also would not be
home to the West Virginia
Public Radio music show
"Mountain Stage" without


Hopen also has added to
the quality of life in Sut-
ton, smack-dab in the mid-
dle of the state. He bought
and renovated two circa
1885 churches that had
been slated to be torn
down; one of them now
serves as the Landmark
Studio for the Arts and the
other is his metal shop.
These artistic newcom-
ers, Seaton said, usually
"were college educated
and brought with them a
different sophistication to
their art than the people


PROPERTY
LEVY COUNTY, FL

Ii 11 I P R IC E ......1.1.. . .,, r ,., i,, ,,
PRICE
L REDUCED ......
.- '*, ijitw K ^ ^

ILDAVID G. GRIFFIN REAL ESTATE 352-795- 0330-


LIVE YOUR
I ~WATERFRONT
DREAM! 4
-ii on deep water
IiiCrystal River
5j A S4' two baths, EVELYN
"- : h , I .. i "i 1 garagee Elevation
...... ,. I,, i,, .i .i ,,, the rough" and SURRENCY
needs some TLC to pool and pool deck New roof July 2013,
A/C 2010 85'of seawall Watch wonderful Mother Nature REALTOR
right in your backyard with dolphins, manatees, bald eagles CELL
and bass and mullet jumping Home is ADA compliant also
Come and take a look MLS#704254 $299,500 352-634-1861
S GREATWEEKEND OFFICE
PLACE 352-795-0021
III .Ider 3 bedroom, 2 bath
h i,..I,,, home Needs some FAX 352-795-1323
I', situated on 2 buildable evel suen m
just minutes from the
Gulf Second lot you can build your dream house now e Fel|u com
Possibilities are endless Take a lookI MLS #347803 $145,000
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY
elmU OWNED AND OPERATED
-- Z NATURE COAST 835 NE Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34429


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


the back-to-the-landers.
The show's house band
evolved from the Putnam
County Pickers, with the
members independently
migrating to West Virginia,
mostly from Texas, to live
on land in Putnam County
The show's host, Larry
Groce, also grew up in
Texas but he arrived in the
state as a National Endow-
ment for the Arts musi-
cian-in-residence in 1972
and decided to stay, origi-
nally settling in Barbour
County.


COULD BE BEST BUY IN SUGARMILL! GAS HEATED POOL & SPA!
4/2/3 custom heated pool home Elevated treed setting on .33 acre .lot
SOverlooks 2 ponds 3 fairways 3+office/3/3 built in 2004
SEat-in granite kitchen open to views Granite with stainless steel
SSalt system heated pool added in 2007 42" cabinetry walk-in pantry
SFloor-to-ceiling brick fireplace AC/heat new in 2013
SExtended 3rd bay "Perfect Man Cave" Exterior was recently repainted
"Breeze Thru" pool cage protects from high winds All furnishings available separately
| Quality built meticulously maintained Home warranty for the buyers
#707008 $287,700 #709345 $209,000
See.-Virtual T u.I ,.--- J .resalehomesIB.I..


You see on the news how
people talk about juggling career
and marriage and how
stressed they are. I never
felt any of that.

Beth Crowder
about living in West Virginia.


who were already here,
and a willingness to go out-
side their comfort zone to
sell it and push the edges
of design rather than stick-
ing with what granny had
done."
All these years later,
Crowder has some mixed
feelings about her move to
Doddridge County
When she and her then-
husband bought their land,
they gave no thought to
their future ability to sell
it. Also, Crowder realizes if
she loses her ability to
drive, she would not be
able to get out and sell her
art which she does at
arts festivals up and down
the East Coast let alone
go to the grocery store.
"I want to live in an
adorable town like Lewis-
burg and walk to the coffee
shop and yoga class," she
said. "I am jealous that I


70 S MAJESTIC RIDE PT 3057 N. DELEON
3/2/2 spt plan home featuring wood Kingsley model 2/2/1. Relax on
cabinets in kitchen, new carpet, tile
and real wood flooring. New paint in the large front screened porch or
and out. Vinyl enclosed 12 x 30 enclosed lanai. eat in kitchen,
Lanai. Absolutely Turn Key Minutes partially fenced yard. Newer A/C,
to shopping and restaurants. roof and appliances.


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL REGENCY PARK CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
4BR/2BA 998DW situaedon 5 acres of country Ground floor 2BR/2BA/1 Car gar. Convenient
living. $87,900 MlS0761 9 locale. $72,900 MLS#706979


DAHI Uv lIIIU '.II rU in rti, r urir LAItcrKurI fUIVIc-rItI'rILAJUU, rL
2 story 4BR/2.5 BA with huge living room & office. 1/2 acre Updated 2BR/2BA, Fam. Room.
$134,000 MLS#707912 Newer roof. $199,900 MLS#709344
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 #i
After Hours Q52 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.comrn www.allcitrusrealty.corn


wasn't one of those people
who moved to Lewisburg.
They got land for cheap
and when they sold it, they
got loads of money, be-
cause it was outside of
Lewisburg."
On the other hand, she
appreciates the lifestyle
she has had in West Vir-
ginia and the support she
has received as an artist
from entities such as
Tamarack and the state in
general.
"I feel like I've had a
pretty leisurely lifestyle,"
she said. "You see on the
news how people talk
about juggling career and
marriage and how stressed
they are. I never felt any of
that. We never got a
babysitter until our son
was 3. We could have made
more money but what kind
of price do you pay on not
having pressure?"


.wes iirj. uj "M i"l$ t m -.1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SOIL
Continued from Page E5

relatively uniform. Areas devoted to
very different kinds of plants -veg-
etables versus lawn, for example -
require separate samples. Vegetable
and flower gardens can be sampled
together
Subdivide the area where obvious
differences in topography or soil
exist, and stay away from walls, sites
of old compost piles, etc. Even out
small differences over even rela-
tively uniform soil by taking a half-
dozen samples from random spots.
Sample the top 6 inches of vegetable
and flower beds, and the top 2
inches of lawns, first removing any
surface debris such as compost,
weeds or sod.
Whoa don't use that first trow-
elful of soil. It's cone-shaped, with a
greater proportion of soil from the
surface layers than from lower
down. Take a slice, uniformly thick
from top to bottom, from along the
edge of that hole you just made. Al-
ternatively, use a soil sampling tube,
home-made or bought, to get a uni-
form sample.
Combine all your samples from a
test area into a clean plastic bucket.
Thoroughly mix the composite soil
to average out differences between
samples, crumbling it and discard-
ing stones, sticks, insects and other
debris as you mix. Spread the soil
out on a clean baking pan to air dry
for a day, then remove about a cup
for testing.
If you are sending your sample out
for testing, follow any instructions
supplied by the laboratory about
packing the soil. For testing at home,
use a portion of that 1-cup subsam-
ple you got from the combined sam-
ples. Home testing kits involve
mixing small amounts of your soil
sample with various solutions and
noting color changes, which you
compare against standards all de-
tailed in the included instructions.
If you are testing more than one
area, label samples from each area
and make a note to yourself of the lo-
cations. A testing laboratory may
also want other information, such as
past fertilization history, as well as
what you intend to grow Indicate


whether you wish any special tests,
such as for micronutrients or toxic
elements (such as lead) in the soil.
Your completed soil test will give
you information about your soil's or-
ganic matter, texture (clay, sand,
etc.), acidity and levels of specific
nutrients, along with a recommen-
dation for fertilizer and lime. Fertil-
izer recommendations are based on
what is in the soil and what kinds of
plants you intend to grow Follow
fertilizer recommendations closely,
because too much can be as harmful
as too little, causing nutrient imbal-
ances, even death, of plants.
Keep in mind that a soil test de-
termines fertility and acidity, but
does not address such problems as
waterlogging, pests or insufficient
sunlight. An observant eye over com-
ing months is a necessary adjunct to
soil testing. There's truth in the old
saying that the best fertilizer is the
gardener's shadow
If you are sending your sample out
for testing, follow any instructions
supplied by the laboratory about
packing the soil. If you are testing
more than one area, label samples
from each area and make a note to
yourself of the locations. Equally im-
portant is to supply the laboratory
with any information requested
about past fertilization history, as
well as what you intend to grow In-
dicate whether you wish any special
tests, such as for micronutrients or
toxic elements (such as lead) in the
soil.
When your soil test is complete,
you will receive information about
your soil's organic matter, texture
(clay, sand, etc.), acidity and levels of
specific nutrients, along with a rec-
ommendation for fertilizer and lime.
Fertilizer recommendations are
based on what is in the soil and what
kinds of plants you intend to grow.
Follow fertilizer recommendations
closely, because too much can be as
harmful as too little, causing nutrient
imbalances, even death, of plants.
Keep in mind that a soil test de-
termines fertility and acidity, but
does not address such problems as
waterlogging, pests or insufficient
sunlight. An observant eye over com-
ing months is a necessary adjunct to
soil testing. There's truth in the old
saying that the best fertilizer is the
gardener's shadow


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of
the news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask
for Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


7 4 9 T9d! a NJ# 170 71/1TIF All


PINE RIDGE Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. SW l ia S
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Flda Showcase
(352) 527-1820 A weekm Properties

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12:30-2:30 PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


L -/ll 3642W Dalodil Dr
[11L_ ;U0U;8 $374,000
Exclusive Estate Golf Course Home
features 4/3.5/3 1+ story pool home.
Dir: Rts. #486 or #491 to Pine Ridge Blvd,
turn on Carnation, R on Daffodil.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


S, .t4 270S Paladinn Cir
,Tt1' iiL_: : St'. $249.000
Immaculate 3/2/2 on impeccable half acre.
Dir: Hwy 44, enter Citrus Hills on Run For
The Roses, thru gate into Belmont Hills,
Ron Citation, Ron Paladinn.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4PM


,ViA. 15i4Z N bnaaowview rain
MLS 709394 $344,000
Professionally decorated 3/2.5/2 with pool
on cul-de-sac.
Dir: Go thru main gate of Terra Vista, Rat
roundabout onto Fenway Dr, 1st Lon
N. Bogey Pt, Lon Shadowview Path.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


- & Us c 1154 E Triple Crown Lp
t MLS 706932 $235,000
Large family home;4 bdrms/3 full baths &
inground pool.
Dir: Hwy 486 to South on Annopolis, L on
Hartford, L on Triple Crown Loop.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


(llPV 1W 810EGilchrisC1 28'4B -
*MLS 704927 $170,0008 ,;,Il5 L.-
You've got to see this totally updated 2bd/ Mli'J 2495 Fairwa Loop
2.5ba Townhome; come by today! MLS 709614 $79,000
Dir: Hwy 486 to Annapolis, R on Gilchrist Nice and spotless 2/2/1 with den on golf
to 1st building on left, Bldg 28. course.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


i~--fft ^ k rThe!"- ^
,Dit, 936 W Sun Vista Ct 41lteil 3123 N Barton Creek Cir
MLS 709571 $349,000 I MLS 708531 $205,000
Elegant, spacious, true luxury..just a few Golf Cottage home,well maintained &
words to describe this 3bd/2ba home. spacious.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
ainl cnri a-smela4ncii' t1


WH SAID THE' ACOWD


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM




785 E Keller Ct
MLS 707988 $285,000
Custom built 3/3/2+ golf cart parking, pool
home on the Oaks Golf Course.
Dir: Hwy 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd,
Lon Keller Ct.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM





-kj/ 7Ae 17, W Forest Oak PI
^.- MLS 706602 $169,900
Large, open, bright 3/2/2 in nice subdivision.
Dir 491 to Whispering Oak Loop, L on
Forest Oak
Brian Murray 352-212-5913






3542 N Palomino Ter
MLS 706410 $399,000
REDUCED! Expansive 5/4/3 pool home-
nearly 6 acres on horse trail.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


-jLLI"- 3674 N Laurelwood Lp
MLS 708624 $57,200
Maintenance-free 2/2/1 in 55+
community.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer


..- irs. nme nome seiier
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl -


11111 ies 11 I
1 1( Ih, l ... I ,~ a I,, I ,a I I I S( ..hh,- -l S,,O,, m I ,, ~ ,l ,, i S I I , I . .I I


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 E13





E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 5635966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
r:






INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HERNANDO
1/1 &2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1 st last +dep
352-201-2428
LECANTO
5225 Shaker PI 2/2 DW
$575. Nice, 464-0999




Cabin 12X32'
w/front prch & tin roof.
Full bath/kitchen. Bd/Liv.
w/10X12 unfnshd add.
You move. $7000 obo.
(352)746-9211
Great Shape *I
Singlewide 2Br/1Ba
Delivered to you!
$15k 727-967-4230

MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

MUST SELL **
2006 Used Mobile
Home, 3-5 bdr/2 ba
Deliver to your property
45k Great Shape!!
1-877-578-5729


-I.
Palm Harbor Homes
Plant City!! $5K Home
Replacement; Over
22 models to view -
Free Factory Tours!
new Velocity home
$67,903 includes
delivery, set and A/C
plantcitv.
nalmharbor.com or
800-622-2832

Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.





**FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527

FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
$5,000 down
with $425 monthly
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369





Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on /2 acre. Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974

Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing


INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352)201-7081
INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home 1248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807

V THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




2br/2ba, 55+ in Thun-
derbird Park, Lot 45
carport, furn'd, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. Lot rent
$250 352-794-3441
HANDICAP ACCESS
with Vertical Lift,
Stonebrook, 2/2 MH
1,400 sf., $25,000.,
Must See to Believe!
352-628-5311
Singing Forrest 55+
Park, SW 2/1 ,LRoom
addition, new flooring &
Furnc/AC. Lanai, shed.
Lot rent $183/mo
$23,000; 352-860-1463


For Sale ,I
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090





-ACTON

E NTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S800 & UNDER
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 story townhome, canal side
7698 N. Voyager Dr.
3/2/2 coming soon. Citrus Springs
9218 N. Satinwood Ter.
3/2/2 voice home. Citrus Springs

$650 & UNDER
8496 W. Drew Ct.
2/2 waterfront mobile with own dck
1063 N. Commerce Ter.
2/1 apartment centrally located
1071 Commerce Ter.
2/1 apartment centrally located
7096 N. Dawson Dr.
2/2 MH in Hill-n-Dale Subdivision
1872 W. Freeman PI.
2/1 just reduced 902 sq. ft.
For More Listings Go To
www.CirusCountyHomnRel ntalsno


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL
Ill q II nyl q VT N 4 11[1 '1:;+Z2

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf

2/2/1 ............1$625

2/2/1 ............$700625

2/2/1 ............ $700
2/1 ............... $500
APARTMENTS



2/2/1 ............$700

Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010






Inc)











CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR, TVRm. Lg. Liv Rm
CHA, $425., 1st/Last &
Sec. 352-697-1680


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352-257-6461

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD










FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514








SL5~ b&Cr.3ue




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Lovely, historic homes in
outstanding city location.
Each with lovely sprawling
porches, zoned commercial
and ready for your business!
Call today!
352-637-3800


Brentwood
Townhome 3/2.5
w/social membership
(352) 613-4459
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/carport, $750.
mo., 600 Gilchrist 5-A
(352) 422 2798




Citrus Springs
2/2/1, $650. mo.
352-746-7990




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 + Loft on Canal
$1,000. (352)795-0125

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$749 3/2 Lrg. fm. rm.,
tiled, Spotless, quiet
cul-de-sac, Fenced,
Pets OK. 527-0493

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

^Bjmnmj


HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225





CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk 828-497-2610


Wanted: Small place
to live, single retired
male. Apt, MH or
room w/bath & prvt
ent.352-400-9453


DEB
THOMPSON
a One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb _vahoo.com
and
debthomuson.com


NEAR BOONE, NC
2+/-ac. tract 350ft of
rushing streams
3000ft elevation pri-
vate and secluded
underground utilities
and paved roads
from only $9900. Call
1-877-717-5273ext91


Tennessee Log
Home Sale!
Saturday April 12th
Only. New 1200 sf
ready to finish
log cabin on 10
acres with FREE Boat
Slip on 160,000 acre
recreational lake.
Only $89,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
877-888-0267, x76


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.








Your World







CHIRpNi.IE




CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 E15


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial




.Al


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
cross landrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




Absolute Auction-
Black Warrior River,
creek, Us Hwy
78,Walker County,
Alabama parcels,
Jasper residential
lots,
April 17,1:00 pm
Details:
Gtauctions.com.
205.326.0833-
Granger, Thagard &
Assoc, Inc,
Jack F Granger #873


Open House
BEVERLY HILLS. SUN
12-3. 104S FILLMORE.
2 bed, 2 FULL baths, 1
gar. 1558 sf heat/ac.
NEW: Kit, baths, appli-
ances, carpet, lights,
more. $62k. 527-1239



Your World







CHiiNicLE


Open House



OPENP

HOUSE
a





Open House at
2085 N. Brentwood
Circle Lecanto FL
*April 4th, 5th, 6th*
Noon to 4pm
BRAND NEW!
"never lived in" de-
tached Villa, 3/2/2
w/screened in lanai,
beautiful home &
setting. Tons of
upgrades. MUST SEE!
Offers wonderful
lifestyle, call
716-244-3780 for
a viewing anytime



ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!



Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2/2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext., Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202
Pine Ridge, 3 bedroom.
3 bath. with salt water
pool, a 20x45 workshop
and carport with 15 ft
enclosed full solar
compliment, solar elec-
tric, pool pump, pool
heaterhot water and
solar assisted air condi-
tioning 352-746-9435



BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525 sf heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$64,900. 527-1239
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISS 10 ION.COM


YOU'LL t THIS!
6385 W Cannondale
Drive. Reduced Price
$84,900.2 bedroom. 2
bath. Cozy
1000SF(approx.)home,2
car attached garage, Irg
screened lanai,newly
updated. (352)794-6686



RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY I!



SECLUDED 3BR/2BA.
1653 sf, 2 carCP, 2
story barn. Includes
34 acre buildable lot.
$99,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289

For Sale *
TURN KEY
4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE, 1,200 sqf
Turn key, Good location
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


C,'Pe-w",.t
'fi: iI\\o'rld liIi

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


SIiClassifieds


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!



e


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatonehtamoabav.rr.c
om
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


LaWanda Watt

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattO
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


E 14
Citrus Count


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments





2/2 Citrus Hills. Master
w/lg walk-in closet. Lg
utility rm/pantry. Scrn
porch. Walk to pool!
Tile floors, very clean,
lots of natural light!
$58,000. 586-260-2848


For Sale %*
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some turn, new Lanai,
Lam, & Ceramic floors.
$47,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100





Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle car towards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507





Country Home + 80
Acres Land, Near
App. St. Univ., Ideal
for Summer Home
In Cool. NC Mtns.
828-297-2669, details


Fisherman's Paradise
in Inverness East Cove.
Furnished 2/2 plus
dock & seawall.
Deep water. $61,900
(352) 344-0101

Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921

"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


INVERNESS, 2BR/1BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureeCbast
Prooerties.com
-10 view
my properties"









GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $45,000. Call
Ray 352-322-6304


PINE RIDGE
1 ACRE
By Owner, build
ready, no fill, $26,900
(352) 249-7812


Home 4 Finder
wwW. I finderfcomn


Flia Your Drea&t Hon&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Hme


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor




E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* i IJ.i wl I
* Iuh e.II. pi 1 iii.
* .H', ll _' ,ll I.. :1:1 hi. : ,,,,


Mi_ =/ III.IrI' $194,600
Jeanne o0 ll'illaid Pickiel 3522123410
1ititi CiliusCounli Sold corn


k4^|~~~~~oU H^ = 1!]* c


,SERVINGcT U 'AI lW

ECITRUS 01. 0u~f^
COUNTY ,.[l^^ ^ ^ ^ ^p ,. ," ^"" .(9,"
FOOUR HOME
OVER 3R7 F- . Cp
YEARS 164 W. *ai* SUNDA InensF450Cl oa o


WiIEN1rNUNII IlU NHIMlNiUU LAUE


(Ii ,] l ,,
ALL THIS FOR ONLY $63,000
Call Maltha Sny'dei 352 476 8727 to
pteo'iei' this piopeily: file =705780


MOBILEHOME ON 1.88 ACRES
B, I BP A I i hi i .i I I.. 1
i6i l:.. : l I' I. i -i ii lh ii :. l I . I l:
,,,,,,lf ,& Ica W.lV: i mt' ilIi:l 1,,) .... 1.- i
Mi W /1r3w.2'x
Call laWanda Watt 352212 1989


VERY NICE WATERFRONT
SM hl.I, I.....,
Ll_: ,: I ,.il. i (.Mlll ,:,
Mi _: = /li. $90,000
Call Buddy Gibson at t3521 391 4385
lot a personal tout


$96,900 COMMERCIAL -
DOWNTOWN DUNNELLON!

I VVI'r, ,h^ i v rli'ii pu i,.,il'l biu '
ilhat. I Paisons 352, 34 2,,,l,3 ,., ,,,,
a/!t/ Paisons 3S2B634.1273


1,,, ,. 1 I., ... .. rj. I .i.. ..

.)I.H. h) d.....~ ~ ~.. ... .... "h.. I..)
I.-.h I ...... .1 h .... .)...... I .._ H .I -
i: i-,.-.. ASKING $83,500
Pit Di ,, 352' 212 7280


I ,,,,,,,-, b.1ir ii_ r...-.i
l_:,-.i :.. i|.,.J I .i ,:,.... I ..11,I ,I,-,,-,, 1F IN1N.
VNINIJ I1..... o. n ,~.h,1,1,...n,. :.i~l~l.i:.-:
* If liI ', Hill'., l I I IR'.HIP
MiL'-, =/I:ii:.'i.',. $229,727
Jeanne ot Iillaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
\zzi'\\ CiiusCounlti Sold corn


NEW ASKING PRICE: $159,900
S.i ll Je ks 3 2 411,,, 8 12,,,.,
I ,III I I,,I , ',,,,,I h ,- I h ,,
,il ll-~ I h, 1. 1,1, i,,,1 /1I h,,l l,,,i I,h
,- i ,- I .i'1 1 1 ,1,- i 'i ''1 ,- , -I I h ,
rJ . I lll i,,,, l l ,, l i ll l ll i i 1 i ,
NEW ASKING PRICE: $159,900
Call Nino; Jenks 352 #00 80/2


,, .,,,,, ,I.. ... ... .. .... .. ,

,,1.. ., h ... ... -,, 1t ,-, 11,,- 6 .,,, 1,- ,
6 ,, .. 1. .6 .1 ,,, 1 1,, ....., I... ,

r1. ,,i ASKING S38 00
Pu /h, ,. ).2'212 ,280i


POOL HOME GOLF COURSE
/ I. i i; h l W i n, M l. I :. .iz:lh


PRICED RIGHT AT $199,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


HOME PLEASES EYE -
PRICE PLEASES WALLET
[-',, I',,, ,, ,,,h ,,, I.. ,I h I, .1 I I,,n

,.I h,.1 ih ,,I IL : I I
I L11 I I m III I I 11 I I',I ,I , F 1.... I, ,
r,,,, I l , -I'l
rhi: f-i ti ASKING $67,900
Pit D, ,352 212 7280
oooi '"'". i l p/ifrfio4 comn


Ki ,i h, i'iil r .i l,T .il li r ll, bljI l ,Ii ,iJ1
li~i: n .l hiJ kii-vi (n Ih i:: v]i, :i~ll .iiji vi: liijlt: iJ
llh Vhjji d l-.i, vjl, ,:.',iIj ,l h, lj l,,,J,:
I.I. I hf l.hi
MicI'. =/iII:'].I $150,000
Call Shanna Casej 352 270 1352


UUUMLiWIUi" IN CCI" rn

i lll -, h ll ll'll I In1,: ll l l lh l1h n ll ,] ii I nl l l
n6 6 11n lml, .iln l l, nt l n l l
Ilu l..:.u i i 3 '1 l":": I I_.:.1n 'l 3,'K
PRICED a- $24,500
Owner will pay IsI 6 months lol irenl
Call Willaid Pickiel 352 726 66668


MOBILE HOMES IN PARKS
i-Jn 1 L, n d l,:Jn, ln ,'n
$12,500 to $39,900
/I you aie aie inleiested in
buying ot selling call
Dots Minei 726 66668 oat 4224627


CANTERBURY LAKE EST.
.:. I, ,,, I, H ... l .. .I.... .... I. l Ih
lh.:. .. j I j h I... I. ..[ ) j .... lj h .1 .


r 1i.: -,:,::- ASKING: $118,500
Cil Nmneii J.Am. i 352 4008072


I .1l6... 1 h:. I 1Hh* "11 1 ljlhfJ
* IIIf* W i iih Si: :I I h i i _.i h:iii.



Mi:, =/.',/'i ASKING $135,000
Call Chailes Kelly 3524222387


THIS COZY LITTLE HOME
h 1-1.h~ l' Ih 1 l Id ,I'. h.. "'.1l'h I.,
,,, ,,,,I,6 I i,,,,...1",, ', ''.Ih,1,1 -
I,, lll ih h ,' I ... !,, ,,l id l "''l rj, lhl. ll'l
', 61 q,, .- 1 i I, . 1l II ..... I.. I

Ii.:= -1.4 ASKING $50,000
CnniI lubq II .itu, i 352' 476 5578


I h.i~ 1 16 1 h" .


....1 1,, 1 .i... ,, ,, ,,1. $ 3 7 5 ,9 0 0
Ci Ru fdt, I 352 5.93 800
1711 Rut', fl'qdq'~e 1352 563 6866


Ulott aine 0II. Reganlilil 55605.:..1 I i,:l,,:,,
, ,l ,nn:.l l l li _ i.,1. |.|' l.in, : nn *: slllllllll:,lll -i h l, ,llnll,:


lo aine 0 Regan 586.0075


ROOMS GALORE IN BEVERLY HILLS
llnn:I ; nn.nlJ : j ln, ; ,: Ln lJnn In ,.li nn.nn.nnnn n :; .lllll
III.:..h ., h I... I 1 ....111 ll '.in ...1.nn
lii, ,i i i., ii -lu 1[iij l ii.., 11. I [.I:, l, l .,,.,I ',

Mi liiwhl'.I ASKING $49,000
Call Slelan Stuatil at 352 212 0211


TWO BEDROOM/TWO BATH
END UNIT VILLA IN WINDERMERE
,.,, nn 'nn nn l |i ,I ,:I n' nn ,:I'I .In:nll ,.i ll n'nl n v I I,,,,

Mi.:,.= /:u',_' OFFERED AT S99.500
Please call Isaac Bal Ion 352 697 2493
lot a personal lout