Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Resource Identifier:
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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text


Your guide to the Home & Outdoor Living Show /Inside


I --UNDAYJ II


4 4
Sunny, windy.
Sunny, windy.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
68
LOW
43


CITRUS C0UNT Y T Y





hnRONICLE
^& www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 119 ISSUE 235


'Stub out' puts developer in spotlight


Fair closed, but
midway rides
still open today
While the last day of
the Citrus County Fair
was Saturday, the mid-
way remains open from 2
to 7 p.m. today. There is
no gate admission, but
$22 armbands for rides
can be purchased at the
main gate.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA He's the big-time de-
veloper without the big name.
And that's just how Nachum Kalka
prefers it.
Kalka, who says he has invested more
than $20 million in Citrus County the
past 10 years, flies under the develop-
ment radar while names like Dixie
Hollins, Steve Tamposi and Stan Olsen
grab the headlines.
He owns more than 1,300 acres near
Floral City for a future residential/com-
mercial "town center"
He owns the Dunes golf course and
Seville community in northern Her-
nando County, including over 1,000 acres


that could bring 3,000 homes to Citrus
County's southern border
He bought the entire third floor of a
three-story condominium building in
Sugarmill Woods, where he lives and has
an office overlooking the 18th-hole fair-
way of the Sugarmill Woods Golf Course.
Kalka or the companies he oversees
have contributed to the campaign ac-
counts of four of the five current mem-
bers of the Citrus County Commission.
Board Chairman John "JJ" Kenney is
the only commissioner with no ties to
Kalka. That's not because Kalka doesn't
like Kenney Rather, Kenney said he po-
litely declined Kalka's offers to help the
commissioner's re-election campaign.
"I have a little bird sitting on my
See Page A8


Kenney seeks ruling on conflict

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
One of three county commission-
ers wary of a possible conflict in vot-
ing for any action involving
developer Nachum Kalka is asking 1-----"6 l
for a formal ruling.
Commission Chairman John "JJ"
Kenney sent a letter Friday to the
Florida Commission on Ethics to
learn if he can vote on Kalka issues .J, Kenney
involving his plans to connect a Citrus County
Citrus County
See Page A9 commission
chairman.


Breaking
through
Gators down Dayton
to advance to Final
Four/Page B1
IN THEIR WORDS:


Seabee
World War II veteran
Arthur Devlin keeps
history alive./Page A21
HOME DECOR:


IT
0 14


p;;i



Yin & yang
Duality infuses spring
styles. /HomeFront
BUSINESS:


Wreck tech
In this day and age of
constant connection,
the public has been
surprised to learn the
world remains a big
place./Page Dl
EXCURSIONS:


Citrus County HISTORY




Scofield's finest hour


Chronicle file photo
Kelcie Priest answers questions
from the media following her
acquittal in 1962 on second-
degree murder charges.

Attorney defends

battered wife in

murder case
MIKE ARNOLD
Chronicle
t is a warm, dry Monday
evening in October 1961,
and George Priest is
slapping around his
pretty, petite wife Kelcie
at their home in Pleasant
Grove.
Priest, a powerful man, will-
ful in nature and quick-tem-
pered, has been hardened by
his years operating a service
station on U.S. 19 and manag-
ing his citrus groves. A rela-
tive describes Priest as
straightforward, saying "If he
said he was going to hit you,
you had better believe it" Hit-
ting his wife is second nature
and something he's done more
than 50 times during their
27 years of marriage.
This night, though, George
Priest threatens to kill Kelcie
Priest and she runs to her
bedroom and picks up her
.22 caliber pistol. Priest
chases after her and, seeing
the gun, retreats into the bath-
room. Kelcie fires a shot into
the bed as a warning to Priest
He emerges from the bath-


Reprinted with permission from the Ocala Star Banner
George W. "Colonel" Scofield, left, poses for photographs in 1962 outside the courthouse in Inverness
after the second-degree murder trial of Kelcie Priest. Bill Edwards, right, assisted Scofield during the


room with plunger in hand
and strikes his wife again.
This time her bullet pierces
his torso, causing massive
hemorrhaging. He is dead
within minutes.
Dazed from shock, Kelcie
walks into the living room,
drops her pistol and calls the
operator "I'm Kelcie Priest.
I've just shot my husband."
MEN
The Scofield and Bradshaw
law firm in Inverness bustles
with activity. The firm, formed
in 1950, is steeped in experi-


ence and well respected in
West Central Florida. They
serve as attorneys for the Cit-
rus County Commission and
the Citrus County Board of
Public Instruction. In the fall
of 1961, they also have a new,
high-profile client Kelcie
Priest.
The lead attorney in the sec-
ond-degree murder case,
George W "Colonel" Scofield,
has a long, storied career as a
prominent attorney, business-
man and political figure in
Citrus County He earns his


law degree from Stetson Uni-
versity and passes the Bar in
1908. His formative years
practicing law are spent as a
prosecutor, serving as state at-
torney for the Fifth Judicial
Circuit from 1913 to 1925.
At 26, he serves his first of
three terms in the state House
of Representatives. At 34, he
serves two years as mayor of
Inverness. While no longer a
member of the state Legisla-
ture, in 1949 he drafts a bill to


. Page A5


Visit France
The French hamlet of
Bayeux boasts ancient
tapestry as well as D-
Day history/Page A17


Annie's Mailbox ......A19
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ............... A19
Editorial ................. ... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ..................... A19
Obituaries ................A6
Together................... A18
Veterans ........ A21



6 11 178200711 o


Permit challenge blamed for loss of grant


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Save Crystal River Inc.
is blaming an administra-
tive challenge to its
cleanup permit last year
for the loss of a $225,000
grant.
Last summer, the South-
west Florida Water Man-
agement District
(SWFWMD) offered up
$225,000 to match a simi-
lar amount of money re-
leased by Citrus County to
Save Crystal River and
Kings Bay Rotary to me-
chanically harvest Lyng-


bya from the bay
The administrative
challenge to the group's
use of the harvester by
Save the Manatee Club
halted the mechanical
cleanup of the filamen-
tous algae in King's Bay
According to Bob Mer-
cer, president of Save
Crystal River, SWFWMD
became concerned that its
funds would not be used
in the allotted time for the
grant because of the tur-
moil surrounding the per-
mit challenge last fall.
"We, the county and
SCR and Swiftmud


MORE INSIDE
Jerry Muetzel, the
owner and operator
of the harvester,
writes about his
work./Page Cl

(SWFWMD) mutually de-
cided that the money be
returned," Mercer said.
The county, which was the
conduit for the matching
grant, confirmed the
money was returned to
SWFWMD.
Mercer added that as
soon as SCR gets the
green light from the U.S.


Army Corps of Engineers
on its current permit ap-
plication, the group will
ask for the county portion
of the grant and will try to
get SWFWMD to re-re-
lease the previous
amount.
"We don't know if we
will get it again because it
was out-of-cycle funding,
but we will try," Mercer
said.
Tobey Phillips, Citrus
County public informa-
tion officer, said the
county's allocated amount
to SCR remains standing.
"And we are willing to


revisit Swiftmud's match-
ing funds with their board
when the time comes,"
Phillips added.
Patrick Rose, executive
director of the Save the
Manatee Club, dismissed
the notion that his group
had a role in the money's
return as "simply absurd."
Rose shared emails
with the Chronicle in
which he was lobbying for
the release of the funding
to the county
"I was very supportive
of the funding for the


Page A5


PAGE A4




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Housing Services is of-
fering a first-time homebuyer class to in-
terested individuals. Participants who
attend the entire session will receive a
certificate of completion required for
Neighborhood Stabilization Programs
and other first-time homebuyer assis-
tance programs.
The class encompasses the entire
home buying process, including prepar-
ing your credit and finances, shopping
for a home, home inspection, fair hous-
ing, available loan products, loan pre-
approval and closing. Industry profes-
sionals will present and answer ques-
tions throughout the session.
The class will run from 8:30 a.m. to


4:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804 W Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto. Call Jennifer
Pollard at 352-527-7522 or Pat Wilkerson
at 352-527-7526 or email Jennifer
Pollard@bocc.citrus.fl.us to register This
event is sponsored by Citrus County
Housing Services and Community Hous-
ing Partners.
There is no charge to attend these ses-
sions, but you must reserve your seat.
Lunch will be provided by Community
Housing Partners. Child care is not avail-
able.
Any persons who require a special ac-
commodation (ADA) for accessibility
must advise us in advance and allow at
least 72 hours to provide that accommo-
dation. TTY phone is 352-527-5901.


First-time homebuyer

class offered in May


Associated Press
Winter, a tailless dolphin, rests on her mat July 26, 2007, at the Clearwater Marine
Aquarium in Clearwater. The Clearwater Marine Aquarium was heavily featured in the
2011 film "Dolphin Tale," which told a fictionalized account of Winter the dolphin's
story. The aquarium's story is one that Film Florida, a lobbying group for the state's
entertainment industry, pushed recently when a delegation of filmmakers and others
met with lawmakers in Tallahassee about extending the state's incentive program for
luring movie and TV production.

Film industry lobbies

for continued tax credits


Associated Press
MIAMI The Clearwa-
ter Marine Aquarium was
heavily featured in the
2011 film "Dolphin Tale,"
which told a fictionalized
account of Winter the dol-
phin. In real life, Winter
lost her tail after it became
caught in a crab trap in
2005. She was found and
taken to Clearwater Ma-
rine Aquarium, where she
was fitted with a silicone
and plastic tail that en-
abled her to swim nor-
mally The film, starring
Harry Connick Jr, Ashley
Judd and Morgan Free-
man, reached audiences
worldwide.
The movie transformed
the aquarium, said David
Yates, the facility's CEO.
Approximately 200,000 peo-
ple visited the aquarium
the year before the movie
was released, but that num-
ber jumped to 750,000 the
next year More than
300,000 out-of-state aquar-
ium visitors said they came
because of the movie. Are-
cent movie industry study
said that almost 20 percent
of visitors said viewing a
movie or television series
filmed in Florida con-
tributed to their decision to
travel here.
"Driving tourism and
promoting the state
through movies is incredi-
bly valuable," Yates said.
"There's no other mode of


advertising or marketing
that can touch the value on
a dollar-for-dollar basis."
The aquarium's story is
one that Film Florida, a
lobbying group for the
state's entertainment in-
dustry, pushed recently
when a delegation of film-
makers and others met
with lawmakers in Talla-
hassee about extending
the state's incentive pro-
gram for luring movie and
TV production. The cur-
rent program, which was
supposed to run from 2010
to 2016, has already used
up the $296 million in tax
credits it was allocated
and has been suspended.
"The program effec-
tively is out of money,"
Film Florida President
Leah Sokolowsky said. "So
there's no ability to attract
new production."
Similar bills for a new
program have already
been filed in the House
and Senate (HB 983 and
SB 1640). The main differ-
ence is that the House bill
would provide $200 mil-
lion a year in tax credits
through 2020, while the
Senate bill would provide
$50 million a year
Advocates say the film in-
centive program not only
brings in tourists but pro-
vides good-paying jobs for
local actors, camera opera-
tors, sound techs, electri-
cians, hair stylists, make-up
artists and other trades that


comprise a TV or movie
crew Money is also spent
with local businesses. A
study released last month
by the Motion Picture Asso-
ciation of America con-
cluded that Florida's
current film incentive pro-
gram supported 87,870 jobs,
$2.3 billion in labor income,
and $7.2 billion in eco-
nomic spending across the
state, both through produc-
tion spending and induced
tourism, over the last four
years. Its findings could not
be verified.
'A majority of our em-
ployees are unionized,
blue-collar workers. Good
hourly wages ranging from
$23 to $55 an hour, with
benefits. We support gas
stations, lumberyards,
drycleaners, hotels and
restaurants. It's a diverse
range of businesses we
support," said Bob Lem-
chen, the senior vice pres-
ident of production at Fox
Television Studios.
Fox brought the USA
Network series "Bum No-
tice" to Miami-Dade
County in 2007, followed
by the A&E series "The
Glades" to Broward
County in 2010. Both
shows were set in Florida,
and Lemchen said the in-
centives allowed the stu-
dio to film the shows in the
Sunshine State, rather
than faking Miami or the
Everglades in California,
Louisiana or Georgia.


Saturday, April 12th

6:00- 9:00 pm

Liberty Park on

Lake enderson



Tood, Art &

We Entertainment

with 'Bwlue Stem

Trairie band

Beef O Brady's Chefs Of Napoli
Domino's Fox Den Winery
Highland Place Ice Cream Dr
Lakeside Bar & Grille Lynn's Ice
Cream McLeod House Bistro
Nicole's House of Cakes Papa
John's Pizza Pine Street Pub
ublix Catering Rustic Ranch
Rutabaga's Etc. Sonny's BBQ in
Inverness Stumpknocker's


Tickets




$25


ft the
Door


$30


'Presented 13y


EST
-ENTRAL
SOLUTIONS. -


rq.ught T jo 'By
. / W S>/-/;,"/" , .


Sponsored By
Citrus County) Sheriff's Office


Net proceeds to benefit
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus


the
County


MeliA iirF'-1 q14i u k..2 *.8FI'1
NOON To 4PM SAT & SUN
MARCH 22 3 APRIL

MARH 29-I-3Q| UP


Ci lqio, i C1 (


4 DUKE
X ENERGY.


*a *


| INSIGHT

1%1 111 L'


v ..i m.'-.' -,
vW, WN


For Info and Ticketing:
Boys and Girls Club 352.621.9225
City of Inverness 352.726.2611 ext. 1304
Online Ticketing:
https://inverness.webconnex.com/toi


8th Annual



<1ste(


BOYS & GIRIS C.LIIS
OF CnaiTjCOEITV


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


LOCAL/STATE







Page A3 -SUNDAY, MARCH 30,2014 fl



TATE


. LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Campaign
TRAIL
The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, can-
didate appearances and the
like for this year's political
campaigns. Send informa-
tion to mwright@chroni-
cleonline.com.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission District
2, will meet the public from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 2, at Booth P159,
Stokes Flea Market on
State Road 44, Crystal River.
Information: 352-257-5381.
Linda Powers, incum-
bent for school board Dis-
trict 5, will have a fundraiser
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
April 5, at Heidi's Italian
Restaurant on State Road 44,
Inverness. Information: Mary
Ann Virgilio, 352-726-0040.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will have a
forum for county commission
candidates at 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 12, at the College
of Central Florida in Lecanto.
The Citrus Hills Civic
Association will have a can-
didates forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.

Around the

COUNTY

ACS wants you to
paint the town purple
The American Cancer
Society Relay for Life of In-
verness/Lecanto is offering
an opportunity for businesses
and local communities to
show their awareness and
support in the fight against
cancer from Monday, March
31, to Saturday, April 5.
Community members are
encouraged to display pur-
ple ribbons or other purple
decorations inside or out-
side their home or business
to show their support for ACS's
Relay for Life of Inverness/
Lecanto. Residents can also
Paint the Town Purple by
doing other activities, in-
cluding putting up purple-
themed displays in storefronts
or selecting a day for every-
one to wear purple.
For information on the
American Cancer Society,
call 800-227-2345 or visit
cancer.org.
County has volunteer
opportunities
Citrus County has a vol-
unteer program and is look-
ing for bright, enthusiastic
and energetic adults who
are interested in assisting in
various departments
throughout the county.
Some examples of volun-
teer opportunities include:
working at events, typing and
filing or answering telephones.
Visit bocc.citrus.fl.us/
volunteering.htm, call Deb
Bloss at 352-341-6429 or
email deborah.bloss@
bocc.citrus.fl.us for details
on how to get started.
S.W. Democrats
to meet April 5
The Southwest Citrus
Democratic Club will meet
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
April 5, at the Sugarmill
Woods Country Club, 1
Douglas St., Homosassa.
All Democrats welcome
to attend. Officers for 2014-
2015 will be installed. Re-
freshments will be served.
For information, contact
swcdems@gmail.com or
call 352-382-0032.
Chronicle seeks 2014
graduate photos
The Chronicle wants to
include graduating home-
schooled seniors from Cit-
rus County in the upcoming
graduation section. Also
welcome are seniors from
out-of-county schools who
reside in Citrus County.
Send the graduate's name


and a photo to the Chronicle
at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL, 34429, at-
tention Cindy Connolly; or
email cconnolly@chronicle
online.com no later than
Friday, April 25.
-From staff reports


Weeks of activities planned for Children's Month


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

It's a cliche but true: It
takes a village to raise a
child and a village to keep
all its children healthy and
safe.
The Community Al-
liance of Citrus County, the
"village" of organizations
and agencies that focus on
the welfare and well-being
of children and families,
will be kicking off the in-
augural countywide Chil-
dren's Month, April 1 to 30,
with a slate of activities for
families.
"We used to be called the
Shared Services Alliance,"
said Renea Teaster, Com-
munity Alliance facilitator
"We are a collaborative
group of people who work in
health and human services
fields -the YMCA, Boys &
Girls Clubs, DCF, Kids
Central and Hospice."
Teaster said this is their
first year of a whole month
dedicated to children. Or-
ganizers hope to generate
a lot of interest and partic-
ipation, beginning with a
"One Voice atthe Steps" event
at 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 1,
on the steps of the Old
Courthouse in Inverness.


In addition to local
youths and officials,
Zachary Gibson, director
of the Office of Child Pro-
tection for Florida, will
speak. This event pro-
motes National Child
Abuse Prevention Month.
"In Tallahassee and
statewide, they celebrate
Children's Week the sec-
ond week of April, and
with April also being Child
Abuse Prevention Month
and with all the other
events going on in April
here in Citrus County hav-
ing to do with children, we
got together and combined
everything into one slate
of free events to make it
easy for parents and called
it Children's Month."
From library activities
and egg hunts to magic
shows and the sheriff's an-
nual safety expo, there's
something for everybody
Major events include:
April 1, 4 p.m.: "One
Voice at the Steps" public
kick-off and media event
for Children's Month. Old
Courthouse steps, Inver-
ness.
April 1: "Pinwheels
for Prevention." Pinwheel
gardens go up around the
county commemorating


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Ingrid Ellis, program manager for the Early Learning Coali-
tion of the Nature Coast, sets out pinwheels in front of
the office near Crystal River as part of the annual national
Pinwheels for Prevention campaign, drawing attention to
the issue of child abuse prevention.


National Child Abuse Pre-
vention Month.
April 5, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m.: Family Fun Day and
Community Expo. Easter
egg hunt, informational
booths, live music, activi-
ties, free hotdogs and
more. Little Springs Park,
Crystal River
April 6: "Hanging of
the Hands." Local li-
braries will display art-
work by children (on
display all month).
April 8: "Family Din-
ner Night" Eat at home to-


gether, or enjoy an evening
out.
April 10,4:30 to 7 p.m.:
"MythBusters." Teen town
hall hosted by the Anti-
Drug Coalition for middle
and high school students
and parents, at the Renais-
sance Center, 3620 Educa-
tional Path, Lecanto. Free
pizza and door prizes.
April 11, 4:30 to 7:30
p.m.: "Music and Magic."
Magic show, live music,
free hotdogs and family ac-
tivities. Whispering Pines
Park, Inverness.


April 12: "School-
house Hustle." Health Expo
and 5K and 10K Run. Reg-
istration begins at 6:30 a.m.,
race at 7:30 a.m. CREST
School, 2600 S. Panther
Pride Drive, Lecanto. For
information, visit school
househustle.com.
April 17: "Bookmark
Bonanza" at Homosassa
Public Library All day/all
ages, in conjunction with
National Library Week.
Lots of events at the Citrus
County libraries all month.
For more information go to
cclib.org.
April 19: Egg hunt and
Earth Day activities. Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park. Registration at
8 a.m. Egg hunt 9 a.m.
April 19, 11 a.m. to 2:30
p.m.: Underwater egg hunt
at Bicentennial Pool, Crys-
tal River Games, arts and
crafts.
April 26, 9 a.m. to 1
p.m.: Sheriff's Youth &
Safety Expo/YMCA
Healthy Kids Day, Citrus
County Auditorium,
Inverness.
For additional informa-
tion on Children's Month,
call the Community Al-
liance at 352-341-7075 or
visit citrusalliance.org.


Tim Owens posted a no-wake sign at his p
Homosassa, as the water from Saturday's thunders
"The water was a lot higher earlier and we've lost a I
said. The sign did not slow down the traffic, though
the displays. This was the scene at
as heavy rains, high winds, lightning and tornado wai
festivities. A fence is blown over,
the stage stands empty instead of playing host to IV
uled for the festivities, at the inaugural Crystal Rive


Meeting to take input

on fate of water tank


Special to the Chronicle

The Homosassa Spe-
cial Water District's ele-
vated storage tank,
located at the intersec-
tion of West Yulee Drive
and West Fishbowl Drive
in old Homosassa, is
aging and is in urgent
need of extensive repair
and rehabilitation.
It has been at that loca-
tion since 1965. The es-
tablishment of the
Homosassa Special Water
District and the installa-
tion of the water tank was
the result of work by ded-
icated local citizens to
bring potable water to the
area. The Homosassa
Special Water District
was created by a special
act of the Florida Legisla-
ture in 1959.
The elevated storage
tank stands 130 feet high,
holds 100,000 gallons of
water and, for many
years, was used as a point
of reference for local fish-
ermen and residents
alike. Many have fond
memories of the tank as a


longstanding local land-
mark.
Rehabilitation will be
expensive. The district
has been working on sys-
tem improvements. These
improvements, such as
installing new water
mains, a new storage tank
in the Riverhaven area,
and other system-wide
improvements, have
made the elevated stor-
age tank obsolete and no
longer a necessary part of
the system. The district
board has two options
and is faced with making
a decision.
Should the district
spend $220,000 to rehabil-
itate the tank and place it
on a 10-year maintenance
program, or spend $80,000
to remove the tank?
The HSWD was created
by the people of Homosassa
The board wishes to hear
public input on this issue.
A special meeting of
the board will be at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 9, at the
Homosassa Civic Club,
5530 S. Mason Creed
Road, Homosassa.


SERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER
organizers said the Crystal
| River Rib Jam would take
Place rain or shine.
l ._.. ,..They probably didn't have a tor-
nado watch and warning in mind.
Vf iOn Saturday, the sky thought it
.u could cook up something to challenge
" national award-winning grill masters
"*. and their ribs at the Crystal River Rib
Jam at the Crystal River Mall festival
-_., grounds, 1801 U.S. 19 N.W
*"'~ Promoters and personnel closed
c down the event as inclement weather
moved through Citrus County
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle After an all-clear was provided by
produce stand, First Fruits Market in local officials and weather stations,
storms encroached on his business, the Rib Jam reopened with live band
lot of mulch as it goes down," Owens performances and smells of scrump-
, and the wakes continued to batter tious ribs cooking at the American
Sthe Crystal River Rib Jam Saturday Legion Post 248-sponsored event.
mnings placed a temporary hold on the With better weather predicted, the
ankle-deep mud puddles abound and family-friendly event will continue
loccasin Creek, the first band sched- foamy-re 11 wl cn
Dr Rib Jam at the Crystal River Mall. today at 11 a.m.rmorinformation, email
For more information, e-mail
e hinfo@ribjam.com orvisit ribjam.com.
Band times today:
Noon Clemons Road
2 p.m. Clark Hill
4 p.m. Benton Blount
_6 p.m. Garth Brooks tribute with
Shawn Gerhard
*Meet Animal Planet's Gator Boys
Chris Gillette and Ashley Lawrence
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.





Make reservations now for

eighth annual Taste of Inverness


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS Don't
know where to eat on a
Saturday night?
How about paying one
price and sampling from
17 area restaurants all
for a charitable cause?
Come and taste from the
best of Inverness restau-
rants and eateries at the
annual Taste of Inverness
from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday,
April 12, at Liberty Park in
Inverness.
Admission is $25 in ad-
vance or $30 the day of the
event.
Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Inverness
Government Center, 212 W
Main St., Inverness, or on-
line at http://inverness.
webconnex.conm/toi. Proceeds
benefit the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County
"This event truly is a
work of love," said Sharon
Skeele-Hogan, Inverness
special events director
"This is our eighth year
and this year we're moving
it from the Inverness Gov-


emrnment Center to Liberty
Park, which has a beauti-
ful lake at sunset."
Each of the 17 restau-
rants and eateries, includ-
ing longtime Inverness
places like Stumpknock-
ers and Coach's Halftime
Pub, as well as newer
places like Fox Den Win-
ery, Lynn's Ice Cream &
Belgian Waffles, Nicole's
House of Cakes and Pine
Street Pub, will have its
own white tent along the
lakeside walkway
Other participants in-
clude Beef '0' Brady's,
Domino's Pizza, Highland
Place, McLeod House
Bistro, Rutabaga's Etc.,
Chefs of Napoli, Sonny's
BBQ, Ice Cream Dr, Lake-
side Bar & Grille, Papa
John's Pizza, Publix Cater-
ing and Rustic Ranch.
Beer and wine will also
be available for purchase.
In addition to lots of
great food, Blue Stem
Prairie Band, headed by
2013 Cooter Idol and Cit-
rus High School English
teacher Keith Crisp, will
play in the gazebo. Also,


eight original works of art
from local artists will be
on display in one of the
pavilions, with 20 percent
of any sales going to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County
"We've got at least 60
wonderful volunteers, in-
cluding our beloved super-
visor of elections, and a
panel of judges doing a
blind sampling of appetiz-
ers, desserts, casual, fine
dining or vegan entries,"
Skeele-Hogan said. "There
will also be a popular vote
so people can vote for
their favorite restaurant."
She added that next
year the event will most
likely be moved to a Sun-
day afternoon, which is
easier for the restaurants
and the public.
"The key is to keep it
fresh and add something
different from year to
year," she said.
For information, call
352-726-2611, ext 1304.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 ornkennedy@
chronicleonline. corn.


Call it a half-slab






A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday: You will gain support and re-
spect with your vigor, energy and out-
standing performance. Your ability to
take control of any situation is a sign of
true leadership.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Resist
the urge to say the first thing that
comes to mind. Negative comments or
complaints will not help your situation.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Others
will be happy to cooperate with you if
you are flexible. You will face opposi-
tion if you decide to challenge some-
one's authority.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -You may
be accommodating, but don't let any-
one intimidate you into taking on re-
sponsibilities that don't belong to you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't let
your artistic temperament lead to hy-
persensitivity. You have the skills nec-
essary for success. Stay composed
and let your talent do the talking.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Keep a close
eye on money matters. It's time to fi-
nalize the details of your current ven-
ture. Your efforts will be well-rewarded.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Love is
highlighted. Be considerate and
debonair. Discuss your personal goals
and be receptive of the ideas being of-
fered by someone you want to have in
your life for a long time to come.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Physical
activity will help you feel rejuvenated.
Networking or spending time with peo-
ple who share your interests will gener-
ate positive thoughts and expert tips.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You may
be feeling blue about personal issues.
A change of scenery will give you a
new perspective and help to take your
mind off your troubles.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Re-
consider a past partnership. You may
have failed to live up to your end of the
bargain or could be just as much to
blame as your former partner.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Finish
what you start. Relationships may be
confusing, but they should not be ignored.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Old
habits have been holding you back.
When you take the necessary steps to
rid yourself of negative behavior and
ideas, you will find a kindred spirit.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Ro-
mantic opportunities will brighten your
day. Being open and receptive will help
you gain respect. A rewarding partner-
ship will be based on sharing and
compromise.


ENTERTAINMENT


Group again tries
to set Rosie record
YPSILANTI TOWNSHIP, Mich.
Hundreds of women 778 in
all, according to organizers -
hoped to set a new Guinness
World Record for "The Most
Rosie the Riveters in One Place"
as part of efforts to save the
Michigan plant where the real
Rosie worked.
MLive reported organizers said
hundreds of women showed up
Saturday to an event in Ypsilanti
Township dressed as the iconic
World War II factory worker.
Last year, organizers of an ef-
fort to save portions of the his-
toric Detroit-area factory where
Rosie the Riveter once worked
failed to set the record. Save the
Bomber Plant activists say 143
Rosies showed up last time, but
778 showed up Saturday.
Organizers say they are confi-
dent they set the record, but it
will not be official until Guinness
officials weigh in.
The record attempt is part of
an ongoing effort to raise the mil-
lions necessary to save part of
the former Willow Run bomber
plant in Ypsilanti Township. The
group said Friday it must raise
$1.5 million in the next few
weeks to prevent demolition.
Shirley Jones wants
a high-flying 80th
LOS ANGELES Inspired by
a former president, Shirley
Jones can't wait to jump into her
birthday plans.
The Oscar-winning actress
and singer says she'll take her
very first skydive on Monday -
her 80th birthday.
"That's something I wanted to
do all my life," Jones said Friday.
The inspiration to try comes from
former President George H.W.
Bush's jumps on several birth-
days, including when he turned
85 in 2009.


Associated Press
Rosies applaud Saturday as the original Rosie the Riveters are
helped out to set the Guinness Record for Rosie the Riveters
in one place at the Willow Run Airport in Ypsilanti, Mich.


"When I saw him do it I
thought, 'Wow, if he can do this,
I can,'" Jones said.
Jones, who starred in TV's
"The Partridge Family" in the
1970s, gained fame with the
1950s film versions of the
Broadway musicals "Oklahoma!"
and "Carousel." She won an
Oscar for the 1960 drama
"Elmer Gantry."
She will be jumping in tandem
with an instructor in Perris, a
popular Southern California sky-
diving spot, according to her
husband, comedian Marty
Ingels.
Ingels was taken aback when
she suggested it but has since
come around, Jones said. Her
children, not so much.
She quoted her oldest son,
Shaun Cassidy, as saying,
"Mom, what's the matter with
you? Why would you want to do
this at your age?"
Jones said she understands
her sons' concerns, but she's not
deterred. It was either skydiving
or the other top item on her to-do
list, an African safari to satisfy
the animal lover in her, Jones
said.


Crowd injures guard
at Ultra Fest
MIAMI Police say a private
security guard has been seri-
ously injured after being tram-
pled by a crowd who stormed
the fences around Miami's Ultra
Music Festival.
The Miami Herald reported
the unidentified 28-year-old Con-
temporary Services Corporation
guard was hospitalized Friday
with severe brain hemorrhaging.
Police said those storming the
fence did not have tickets and
were trying to crash the festival
where organizers are expecting
more than 165,000 people.
Event security has been a fre-
quent concern. The newspaper
reported the area where the guard
was trampled did not feature
sturdier, unclimbable portable
fencing used in other areas of
the festival.
Miami police spokesman Del-
rish Moss said they are looking
for witnesses.
Meanwhile, 22 others were ar-
rested on the first night of the
electronic music fest.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 30, the
89th day of 2014. There are 276
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 30, 1981, President
Ronald Reagan was shot and seri-
ously wounded outside a Washing-
ton, D.C., hotel by assailant John
W. Hinckley Jr. Also wounded in the
attack were White House press
secretary James Brady, Secret
Service agent Timothy McCarthy,
and District of Columbia police offi-
cer Thomas Delahanty.
On this date:
In 1822, Florida became a United
States territory.
In 1867, U.S. Secretary of State
William H. Seward reached agree-
ment with Russia to purchase the
territory of Alaska for $7.2 million.
In 1870, the 15th Amendment to
the U.S. Constitution, which prohib-
ited denying citizens the right to
vote and hold office on the basis of
race, was declared in effect by Sec-
retary of State Hamilton Fish.
In 1945, the Soviet Union in-
vaded Austria during World War II.
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama asserted unprece-
dented government control over the
auto industry, rejecting turnaround
plans from General Motors and
Chrysler and raising the prospect of
controlled bankruptcy for either ail-
ing auto giant.
Today's birthdays: Actor-director
Warren Beatty is 77. Rock musician
Eric Clapton is 69. Actor Paul Reiser
is 57. Rap artist MC Hammer is 51.
Singer Tracy Chapman is 50. Actor
lan Ziering is 50. TV personality Piers
Morgan is 49. Singer Celine Dion is
46. Singer Norah Jones is 35.
Thought for Today: "In the best
of times, our days are numbered
anyway. So it would be a crime
against nature for any generation to
take the world crisis so solemnly
that it put off enjoying those things
for which we were designed in the
first place: the opportunity to do
good work, to enjoy friends, to fall in
love, to hit a ball, and to bounce a
baby." -Alistair Cooke (1908-
2004).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L Fecast City


Daytona Bch. 74
Fort Lauderdale 79
Fort Myers 77
Gainesville 72
Homestead 79
Jacksonville 72
Key West 79
Lakeland 74
Melbourne 74


173/64 2.30"- 68/64 3.10"
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fecasby
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 68" Low: 43
Sunny, windy

-HQ MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 49
Sunny

m TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
N High: 80 Low 50
'.N Sunny


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 75166
Record /41
Normal 78/60
Mean temp. 71
Departure from mean 2
PRECIPITATION* 0
Saturday 1,70"
Total for the month 4.95"
Total for the year 9.90"
Normal for the year 7.88g
*As of 7 p m al Iwrmess
UV INDEX: 13
0-2minimal.3-4low, 5-6moderate.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
29.99


SOLUNAR TABLES .n5S.0.0
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
iMORNINGj (AFTEPNOONM
03/30 SUNDAY 06:07 00:27 18:56 11:59
03/31 MONDAY 06:49 01:19 19:58 12:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TGHT ........ 7:46 Pm.
) 0 ^ SUlRiHSI.TOMfiQW ._ 7_20aQm.
0- ~ 4- IMOMNISE TONY, ...... ....... 7:06 a.m.
.,. ,.- MOQNSET' TODAY 7 54 pm
Mar 30 Apr7 Apr15 Apr22 M --NS-MO- -- 754--p- m
BURN CONDITIONS
Today' Fire Danger Rating is LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For moe irftormaon call Florida DMSIwon ol Foresry at (352) 754-6777 For more
rioin.llirI', cI' ,I,'it.]l ','r. hl'n. i Sa I st e DlviSIO l of Forestry's Web site
'"'llD Tla.1. fl d.;I, ,2 ,Tli. k. i'*:. ,', ,$1. j,
WATERING RULES
Lawn waterinNg limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or afher 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thusday and/or Sunday.
ODD adjre,. [rr4 Vi,'wir or. W.dnes1-ia lix.di, Sriihrmi
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of nor-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens. flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Ctrus Couny Utiliies! custonmeis thod CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant m aterial 352-527-7669. 3, -noT n o ai r ,ii, .j 3v q .LaII ,Ii IC r ,Aod iii "-,-.al
waleng allowances.
To repon violations. please call City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321. City ol Crystal
River 0 352-796-A2lt e'i J13 ui.ncorp:.ralted Cnj sC.,surir) y 35%.59,7.762-7.W


"From mouths of rivers
ctY
Chaahowtzka' 7:29 a m
Crystal R vef" 5:40 a.m
Wihlacoochee" 3:01 a.m.
HomwsasWa" 6:53 a m.


TIDES
"Ahngf'. B3v "-At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
High Low
o.4ft. -.4.,A, .6f I:58am, 0o0ol 1:47pnmO.2t
21 ft. 5'39p.mr. 2.3" 12:05p.m. 0 4
3.4ft. 249pm,. 3.7f 937sam. 0311 10'14pr,0Sft
1 t 6;31 1 pm. 13 1:403a- -0. 1 I4ta O1 l33p.m0.3l.


H L Fcast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: Nortnri-Northwesl winds Gulf water
around 20 knots dimnishing to 10 to temperature
15 knots in the afternoon. Seas 3 to 5
feet. Bay and inland waters choppy.
Tonight: North winds 10 to 15 knots
diminishing to 5 to 10 knots after
midnight. Seas 2 to 3 feet. ko at Artpaka
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
WithIacoocnee at Holder 29.07 28.96 3552
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.57 38.49 39.52
Ts3ala Apopka-lnverness 39.75 39.61 40,60
Tsala Apopka-FloraI City 40.36 40.28 42-20
Levels it mearn-amu 1oo a id ch th a 43-precent whace oI Be1ltg equaled Or exeeoied in
way one year This datais .'*r.,,i'- r.-.. r ,. j 1A r'
and is subject to rdfvisasm ~ ^.-o jii i~io c-i.'irr-i 11' lnmK uri lrl -r. ^,^ G i^,, j". ^i,
be iabe lToreany damages a ,u -', *', 1 -e- .'. 'h.: .- r 1;, r 1 -.. r-a. ;-, I - ,.
shouki cwtact the oirobgal Dat a Secun a (352) 796-7211

THE NATION
NO E _-I5E 1111111 EIIIIIII














FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
BoIse
Boston
Bullalo
Burlington. VT
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Chariotte
Chicago
Cinclnnati
Cleveland
Colurbla. SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harnsburg
Harford
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobi e
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT
H L Pep. H
53 37 42
66 39 75
62 52 .37 55
68 58 .09 65
53 46 1.0753
77 51 77
60 51 .53 50
64 42 44
64 56 .33 67
54 46 ,11 52
52 41 11 45
39 34 .01 39
42 36 .02 39
79 64 1.47 69
56 47 88 50
67 57 ,31 6t
41 33 58
47 37 ,86 55
41 34 ,18 43
54 34 74
48 37 9M 48
48 32 04 37
74 46 78
66 28 71
53 28 73
40 35 5t
786 44 84
46 40 .86 61
51 41 .35 40
52 37 .23 45
79 53 .02 75
38 33 .55 58
80 57 72
6448 .4268
76 53 7t
51 42 .81 61
59 47 3.0166
37 31 50o
43 22 61
71 58 ,64 71
67 60 .01 69
60 44 .46 62


SUN SAT SUN
LFcst City H L Pep. H LFcat
33 r NowOrleans 72 55 1.5370 52 s
41 pc Now York City 60 45 .32 52 37 Is
31 s Nodolk 71 60 .55 51 40 r
43 s Okahoma Cty 73 36 77 54 pc
39 r Omaha 54 20 73 40 pc
57 pc Palm Springs 85 59 80 55 pc
36 r Philadelphia 55 47 71 51 37 r
28 sn Phoenix 88 57 82 56 pc
39 s Pittsburgh 56 38 14 43 28 sn
34 sh Porlland,.ME 50 32 02 37 31 r
34 r Portland.OR 54 47 39 54 40 sh
27 sn Provietince. Rt 54 37 .20 49 34 r
29 I Raleigh 65 56 .74 53 37 sh
41 s Rapid City 62 23 55 25 Is
31 sn Reno 59 52 51 31 cd
35 S Rochester, NY 39 35 38 26 sn
44 pc Sacramento 57 53 -59 66 47 pc
34 pc Sal Lake City 66 46 51 38 fIl
29 pc San Antonio 82 57 80 57 pc
49 pc San Diego 71 56 64 56 pc
31 pc San Francisco 60 55 .55 59 52 pc
31 r Savannah 81 64 ,22 72 42 s
57 pc Seattle 52 45 .33 52 42 sh
36 pc Spokane 53 41 21 53 32 ts
45 pc St. Louis 48 40 .01 70 48 pc
30 s St Sle, Mane 40 19 .03 40 22 pc
60 pc Syracuse 41 33 .01 38 30 1
38 s Topeka 58 29 76 50 pc
34 r yls hrlor. U2 53 56 50 36 r
34 r YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH 1 LOW
57 pc HH10H8. PtxwowAnt
39 s LOW -7, In Fal, Minw,
51 pc
46 s WORLD CITIES
52 sh
Ss SUN Lisbon 6T48/pc
7 s CITY H/WLSKY London 64/501s
47 s
37 pc Acapulco 8673/s Madrid 60/421r
36 pc Amsterdam 62/42/s Mec-, C.tv 7.,5.p W
44 s Athens 64/150r M.iirq3ar 39 3,ed
39 s Belling 71148/s Moscow 35/22/s
40 s Berlin 62/441s Pats 6646/4d


Bermuda 7146W
Key TO CO WHDIOw ccoud I.*drtsel.; Ca"O 8&/57/s
-lalr, hahazy; pcpartly cloudV; r-rain. Calgary 30/17/I
rsorainJinow mix: asmunny: h.ishawv ; Havana 89/69/cd
sn=snow;, Isathundellormg w=wlndy Hong Kong 8071/s
WSl *C4 Jarusaiem 8'55/s


Rio 8&f7t
Rome 6W/461s
Sydney 78/66/pc
Tokyo 66/53/
Toronto 3930/pc
Warsaw 55r35/s


S4LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices

.................................................D7


Miscellaneous Notices

................................................. D7


Z-1 CITRUS U S COUNTY Y


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 222
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E d ito r, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Trista Stokes .................................................................. Online M manager, 564 -2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4U" Phone 352-563-6363
W 4W POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 66.9
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 93%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 10.1/12
Monday's count: 8.6
Tuesday's count: 8.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 25
Pollutant: Ozone





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HISTORY
Continued from Page Al

levy a 3-mill tax and create a
hospital board appointed by the
governor that would eventually
lead to the building of Citrus Me-
morial Hospital in 1957.
In 1949, a year before he part-
ners with Bradshaw, Citrus
County cattlemen enlist Scofield
as a special prosecutor in a case
of three Tampa men accused of
rustling cattle. Scofield's side
wins the case, defeating defense
attorney Pat Whitaker, who was
known at the time for saving
more men from the electric
chair than any other lawyer in
the state.
MEN
The term "battered women's
defense" is still nearly two
decades from being uttered in a
courtroom at the time of Kelcie
Priest's trial in
In 1962, August 1962, for
I J .9 the second-
most degree murder of
her husband,
local George.
In the early
courts 1960s, before the
treat '60s women's
rights movements
wife- took hold, society
sees women as
abuse second-class citi-
zens, subservient
cases to men wives
as civil, do not challenge
their husbands.
not Throughout his-
tory, women have
criminal, not been afforded
m the same rights as
matters, men. According to
an article in the
Fordham Urban Law Review, in
Roman civilization men were
permitted to break the noses or
blacken the eyes of their spouses
when disciplining them. In many
European countries throughout
history, wives were considered
property of men, and even into
the 20th century, women in Eng-
land were not allowed to own
property
In 1962, most local courts treat
wife-abuse cases as civil, not
criminal, matters. These "family
squabbles" are often mediated
rather than tried. The first abuse
shelter created in a U.S. state,
Haven House, is still two years
away from forming. Congress
won't pass the Violence Against
Women Act for another 30 years.
MEN
Makeshift fans struggle to pro-
vide relief from the hot, humid
August air that hangs heavy on
onlookers dressed in suits and
ties packed into the Inverness


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 A5


Chronicle file photo
Kelcie Priest poses with her son Edward following her 1962 trial on second-degree murder charges.


State Attorney Gordon Oldham Jr.
presents his case. He has the murder
weapon: Kelcie Priest's own .22 caliber
revolver. Citrus County Sheriff B.R. Quinn
testifies Kelcie Priest admits to killing her
husband. Quinn says he found the
defendant sitting on the floor in shock; the
gun next to the couch in the living room.


courtroom. Kelcie Priest, clad in
a striped summer dress and
white sandals, intently follows
the voir dire.
Months before jury selection
begins, state prosecutor Gordon
G. Oldham Jr challenges the
panel. In 1962, county commis-
sioners are charged with creat-
ing jury pools, and Kelcie Priest
is sister-in-law to Commissioner
Clyde Byrd. Judge Carroll W


Fussell rejects the motion.
Despite the original objec-
tions, jury selection ends un-
eventfully with the selection of
an all-male panel: Roy Randall,
Homosassa; John H. Wells, Crys-
tal River; R. Edwin Rooks,
Pleasant Grove; Clower
Faucette, Holder; and William
Boutillier, Inverness.
MEN
The next day, state attorney


Gordon Oldham Jr presents his
case. He has the murder
weapon: Kelcie Priest's own
.22 caliber revolver Citrus
County Sheriff B.R. Quinn testi-
fies Kelcie Priest admits to
killing her husband. Quinn says
he found the defendant sitting
on the floor in shock; the gun
next to the couch in the living
room. Oldham calls nine wit-
nesses on the day, all presenting
evidence to corroborate the
charges.
MEN
Colonel Scofield calls one wit-
ness- Kelcie Priest. She says on
the evening of the shooting she
was tired and not feeling well
and rebuffed her husband's ad-
vances, and that George Priest
began to knock her around and
threatened to kill her
The 77-year-old trial attorney
is in full character He whispers
during his questioning of Kelcie
Priest, forcing jurors and on-


lookers to hang on his every
word and the words of his client.
He paints a picture of George
Priest as a brutish man who has
killed before and who has ter-
rorized his wife for more than a
quarter-century
As the trial moves into its final
stages, he ramps up his the-
atrics, pounding on the banister
and clapping his hands sharply
to accentuate his points. During
closing arguments, he alter-
nately reads
passages from
the Bible while At
modulating his 3:55 p.m.
voice.
Judge Fussell Friday,
hands the jury
the case shortly Aug. 10,
after 1 p.m. Fri- 1-2,
day, Aug. 10, 16
1962. jury

At 3:55 p.m., foreman
jury foreman
Roy Randall ut- Roy
ters "We, the Randall
jury, find the d ll
defendant ... utters
not guilty."
Kelcie Priest "We, the
expresses relief
in her com- jury, find
ments to media the
following the
trial, defendant
"I'm so glad
this thing's over ... not
... that it turned
out the way it gUilty."
did. Nobody
knows how relieved I am."
MEN
In 1962, the trial is a sensation
because it involves the murder
of a prominent man in the com-
munity George Priest had
served on the Board of Public
Instruction and his grandfather,
J.C. Priest, was the first sheriff of
Citrus County in 1887.
More importantly, the trial
marks a change in public con-
sciousness. An acquittal with so
much evidence stacked against
a wife who has killed her hus-
band is unfathomable in this pa-
triarchal era of U.S. history
MEN
Colonel Scofield dissolves his
law firm less than three weeks
following the Priest trial. Six-
teen months later, he dies in
Tampa following a lengthy ill-
ness. Of all his volumes of ac-
complishments, his final stand
as the attorney for a battered
wife who found justice is one
from which legacies are built.


Mike Arnold is the editor of the
Citrus County Chronicle.
Email him atmarnold@
chronicleonline. com.


GRANT
Continued from Page Al

cleanup and actively tried
to help make it happen,"
Rose added.
However, Mercer said it
is clear that had it not been
for the administrative per-
mit challenge, the funding
would have been received
and used in cleaning up
Lyngbya in the bay
In November 2012, the
county commission pro-
posed using $225,000 of the
county's water quality re-
serves toward the cleanup
effort.
In February 2013, it was
adopted by the board.
However, in March 2013,
the harvester was only
briefly in the water before
Save the Manatee Club
and others raised con-
cerns about its use be-
cause of excessive
turbidity or cloudiness
of the water and claims


of harm to the bay Har-
vesting was suspended -
initially voluntarily, then
because of an administra-
tive challenge to the har-
vesting permit. Save the
Manatee Club requested a
monitoring plan be insti-
tuted before harvesting
could resume. Both sides
eventually inked an agree-
ment on the parameters of
a cleanup.
Recently, SCR sought
and got another permit
from the Department of
Environmental Protection,
but before the harvester
could be deployed, the
Corps of Engineers re-
quested to review the
permit.
A three-party meeting of
Rose, SCR and Corps offi-
cials is in the works to
allay Rose's concerns
about the conduct of the
harvesting.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County issues citations that carry with them
a fine of $100 for first offenders of local watering
rules. See the weather map on Page A4 daily.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In tiny Hampton,



shame will be



hard to shake


CAITLIN JOHNSON
Tampa Bay Times

HAMPTON For years, she saw
signs that something was awry in her
quiet city
Linda Godwin saw the city clerk grab-
bing cigarettes and drinks at the local
convenience store, telling the clerk
something and then walking out without
paying.
Her son-in-law told her of riding into
Gainesville in a city vehicle with the city
clerk's son, watching him rack up bills
at Walmart on the city credit card. He
suspected the expenditures were
personal.
She knew her daughter would go
months without the clerk collecting a
water bill. Occasionally, she'd go to the
clerk's house and pay cash. No receipt
was issued.
In a town about 1 square mile with
fewer than 500 residents, stories like
this don't stay secret But the city's small
size both allowed it to dodge external
oversight and made internal change
difficult.
"What can you do?" Godwin, 67,
asked. "They're up there and can do
what they want. You can't fight city hall."
Not everyone remained silent,
though.
For years, the Bradford County sheriff
and state representatives accumulated
files of complaints, mostly from mo-
torists disputing speeding tickets from
the city's tiny stretch of U.S. 301.
By April 2013, the smoke was too thick
to ignore, Sheriff Gordon Smith said.
The state's Legislative Auditing Com-
mittee requested an audit and pub-
lished the results last month.
A water supply with nearly half of the
water unaccounted for Duplicate salary
checks. Missing time sheets. A police de-
partment that wrote more tickets than
Fort Lauderdale in one year but still
outspent its budget.
The resulting outrage from Tallahas-
see and the shame that came from
being mocked in the media as the most
corrupt town in America shook the
tiny city Now, the Legislature is poised
to do what it has never done: revoke a
city's charter and revert it to an unin-
corporated stretch of land within the
county.
The residents of Hampton have just
weeks to prove their dysfunctional city
deserves another chance.
MEN
A century ago, Hampton aspired to
greatness. Hotels, a bank and a grocery
store lined County Road 18, then the
main highway in the area.
"We were the place to be at the turn of
the century" newly appointed City Clerk
Amy Davis said. Half a century later,
"when they brought in 301, it bypassed
Hampton and pretty much turned us
into a ghost town."
People here feel some pride that their
hometown once vied for county seat. But
they're also honest about the city's short-
comings. By the 1980s, Hampton, like
many small towns, dealt with a surge in
drug crimes. Its police force of two
worked the cases.
Faye Mullins moved to Hampton dur-
ing that time and worked at the conven-
ience store at the center of town. One
time, she saw a man chase someone
with a chain saw Another used the store
microwave to dry out his homegrown
marijuana.
"This cigarette vendor came in.
Looked like he was about 6-foot-5,"
Mullins recalled. "He said, 'I was scared
to come into Hampton.'
"There I was, 4-foot-ll, working until
11, 12 o'clock at night. I said, 'It's not as
bad as they make it out to be.' But it sure
did have a bad reputation."
By the 1990s, the city was ready to
build itself up again. That's when the
idea to annex about a quarter square
mile of land between the city center and
U.S. 301 came about.
"The entire intentions back in those
days was to gain more property revenue
because we were always so broke," said
former Mayor Jim Mitzel.
The city acquired around a dozen
houses along C.R. 18 and connected it-
self to a 1,260-foot stretch of land along
U.S. 301. Mitzel figured they would pick
up the property taxes and do a little
ticket writing along the way
Almost immediately, Hampton gained
a reputation among travelers. In 1995,
AAA labeled its small segment of the
highway a speed trap. But AAA
spokesman Mark Jenkins said John
Hodges, the police chief, was reluctant
at the time to use the land as a revenue
source, and fought with other city offi-
cials to change their practices. In 1997,
AAA removed the rating.
Over the next decade something
changed. Hodges was the one urging his
18 officers some who might not have
been properly certified to issue tick-
ets as a means of financial salvation for
the city They wrote $1 million worth
over seven years to Gator fans, out-of-
state visitors and Hampton's own state
Rep. Charles Van Zant, R-Keystone
Heights.
It wasn't just the number of tickets


that raised issues with Sheriff Smith
and other officials, but the manner in
which the officers would target cars.


In an attempt to enlarge their ticket-
writing jurisdiction, Hampton police
moved city limit signs. Smith sent his
deputies to mark the highway to indi-
cate the city limits because the signs
would disappear or be posted down the
road.
"It just became so absurd," Smith
said. "I finally went to City Hall and told
them do not move those city limit signs
or somebody's going to go to jail."
Things got so bad, Smith said, judges
started throwing out speeding tickets
from Hampton. Sometime in late 2011 or
early 2012, Smith said, Hodges agreed to
pull his officers off 301 and write tickets
only within the municipality But that
didn't last long.
"Sitting in the property of the Hamp-
ton Baptist Church, Chief Hodges him-
self told me they needed the money and
he's going back out on 301," Smith said.
The stories of Hampton police
perched on lawn chairs and holding
radar guns along the ribbon of highway
are true, said Mitzel, the former mayor
"And they about killed people out
there sometimes. They would shoot out
in front of that traffic, almost cause all
kinds of accidents," Mitzel said. The last
two accidents on Hampton's stretch of
road involved their own police vehicles,
Smith said.
The state audit revealed Hodges' offi-
cers wrote more than $616,000 in tickets
in three years. Nevertheless, over that
same period, Hodges overspent his
budget by $30,000. Much of the depart-
ment's gear, including M-16s, vehicles
and radar equipment, came from other
departments or grants. Shoddy record
keeping makes it difficult to see where
the money went.
"What do we have to show for it?"
Mitzel asked. "Do you see a new city
hall? You don't see nothing in here that
came from all that revenue money All
we kept getting were more police cars
and more police officers."
MEN
The speed trap annoyed travelers, but
the real headache for Hamptonites lay
inside the worn-down City Hall man-
aged by Jane Hall, a chain-smoking city
clerk who kept her own hours.
Hall, who resigned when the auditors
first came to Hampton, is the wife of
longtime City Council member Charles
Hall. Her son, Adam Hall, was the for-
mer maintenance operator Her daugh-
ter occasionally made appearances on
the city payroll.
"Everyone who was getting paid
through the city, their last name had to
be Hall, it seemed like," said former
Mayor Barry Moore.
The city itself saw no benefits from
the inflated salaries of its employees.
Sidewalks remained unedged. Roads
flooded easily When Moore made a
maintenance request, he was told the
city did not have a lawn mower, edger or
wheelbarrow.
The lack of a city code allowed homes
to decline. Lawns collected a medley of
broken-down vehicles, appliances and
trash. Residents say the worst culprits
were the Halls, across whose yards junk
sprawled.
Adam Hall's misuse of city vehicles
documented in the audit was also a com-
mon topic of discussion, said Shenika
Maisonet, 25, a lifelong resident.
"You knew he's using it for personal
business," Maisonet said. "And we've
said for years, 'Y'all don't even drive
around to check the (water) meters, but
you drive that truck to Gainesville and
Starke?"'
"The meters never got read," said
Gene Brannock, 69. "You had a $28 flat
fee if you used 100 gallons or 100,000
gallons."
Independent auditors told officials re-
peatedly that the water department
should take in more money than it did.
But that information didn't make it to
the public, in part because City Council
meetings were held during the workday
when residents were less likely to
attend.
"We don't have access to the books, as
far as citizens go," said Bill Goodge, a
City Council member elected last fall.
"We didn't know we were that broke. No-
body really knew how bad it was until
the audit came out. And now we're try-
ing to fix it. We're going to fix it."
That's what former Mayor Moore said.
He took office last fall as a reformer.
Even without the audit, he knew the city
was going to have to make some
changes. The first was getting rid of
Adam Hall.
"He was getting paid a large amount
of money every week to basically do
nothing," Moore said. "Everyone was
saying Hampton was broke, and he was
our biggest cost."
By Moore's estimates, Adam Hall
worked less than a quarter of the hours
for which he was paid.
But Moore didn't get the chance to put
his plan in motion. Two months after he
took office, Bradford sheriff's deputies
charged him with possession of oxy-
codone with intent to sell.
Moore, who maintains his innocence,
recently filed his resignation letter from
jail.


MEN

See HAMPTON/Page A7


Obituaries


Lillian
Chilson, 65
LECANTO
Lillian A. Chilson, 65, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
peacefully Thursday,
March 27, 2014, under the
care of Hospice. She is
survived by her son, Lelan
Chilson; three grand-
daughters, Macayla, Anali-
cia and Ariana; her
brothers, Charles H. Chil-
son and Patrick P Chilson;
and sister Marilyn M.
Burnette.
Lillian moved to
Lecanto to retire from
nursing. During her career
and to her final days, she
touched many lives as a
friend and mentor of holis-
tic health and nutrition as
well as in the medical
field. She will be missed by
many
A celebration of life cer-
emony will be held at her
home on April 4 and 5 be-
ginning at 4 p.m. Friday
with an open end time. All
family and friends are wel-
come to attend.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.





Philip
Hussey, 82
HERNANDO
Philip D. Hussey, 82, of
Hernando, Fla., died
March 25,2014. Philip was
born May 20, 1931, in
Salem, Mass., son of
William and Blanche
Hussey He served in the
U.S. Army Philip retired
from American Can Co.
with 36 years of service
and was president of IAM
Local Union in Portland,
Maine. He moved to Her-
nando in 1997 from Bev-
erly, Mass. He was past
president of the Italian So-
cial Club, Hernando, Fla.
Other memberships in-
cluded the Elks, Inverness
Moose Lodge 2112, DAV
and American Legion.
Philip was a member of
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, Inver-
ness, Fla.
Survivors include his
wife, Claire Hussey of Her-
nando, Fla.; four children,
Deborah Foley, Albu-
querque, N.M., Philip D.
Hussey Jr (Patricia) Hor-
tonville, Wis., Julie Gra-
ham (Fred) Sharps Chapel,
Tenn., and Laurie Hussey
(Jim Lindsay) Arlington,
Mass.; brother Ralph
Hussey; sister Nancy
Nadeau; grandchildren
Christopher Graham,
Lindsay Graham, Michael
Foley, Joseph Foley,
Amanda Hussey, Brian
Hussey and Philip Lind-
say; and several nieces
and nephews.
Visiting hours for Mr
Hussey will be from 2 to
4 p.m. Sunday March, 30,
2014, at Heinz Funeral
Home. A funeral Mass will
be at 10 a.m. Monday,
March 31, 2014, at Our
Lady of Fatima Church, In-
verness, Fla. Interment
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
Fla. Heinz Funeral Home
& Cremation, Inverness,
Fla.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.



CL. . Qav
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

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For Information and costs,_
call 726-8323 I

To Place Your
r "In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931


Closing timeforplacing
ad is 4 business days


1 Darrell Watson 564-2197
prior to run date.
There are advanced Adeadlines
for holidays.
- ---I- I


Olin 'Pete'
Dobbs, 84
DUNNELLON
Olin (Pete) Dobbs, 84, of
Dunnellon, Fla., passed
away March 27, 2014. Olin
was born June 6, 1929, in
Gibbs, Mo.
Olin is
survived
by his lov-
ing wife of -" .
63 years,
Annabelle *
of Dunnel-
lon; chil-
d r e n Olin "Pete"
K a t h y Dobbs
( R a y )
Sanders of Harrison, Ohio,
and Patty (Dennie) Adams
of Bradenton; five grand-
children; two great-grand-
children; and other family
and friends. Olin is pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents, William A. Dobbs and
Luella Stewart; two broth-
ers and two sisters.
He achieved his associ-
ate's degree, was a veteran
of the Marine Corps, and
worked as a postal carrier
for the U.S. Post Office of
Quincy, Ill. He was an ac-
tive member of First
United Methodist Church
of Dunnellon, National As-
sociation of Watch & Clock
Collectors, Rainbow
Rivers Club, honorary
member of Dunnellon
Chamber of Commerce,
Master Gardener of Citrus
County Chapter and for
the past 20 years he
worked with Citrus County
Fair in the Horticultural
Building. Olin (Pete) will
be greatly missed by many
The funeral service will
be at 3 p.m. Monday at
First United Methodist
Church, the Rev Eddie
Fulford officiating. Visita-
tion will be at 2 p.m. Mon-
day at the church.
Internment will be at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell. Funeral
arrangements are being
carefully handled by
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon. For those who
wish to make donations in
memory of Olin, First
United Methodist Church
Library or First United
Methodist Church Prayer
Garden would be appreci-
ated by family
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Gerald
Ruble, 79
INVERNESS
Gerald G. Ruble, 79, of
Inverness, Fla., died
Thursday, March 27, 2014,
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus County in Inver-
ness, Fla. Arrangements
are by McGan Cremation
Service LLC, Hernando,
Fla.

SO YOU KNOW
All obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.corn.


The


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'Markers. Urns. Monuments | |

352-628-2555
5635 W Green Acres StHonosassa


Kevin
LaPuma, 38
HERNANDO
Kevin Michael LaPuma,
age 38, Hernando, died
March 25, 2014.
Kevin
was born ___
in Long Is-
land, NY,-
to John R.
and Susan
(Peterson)
LaPuma.
H e
worked for Kevion
L e P a g e LaPuma
Carpet
and Tile as a tile setter
Kevin enjoyed dining out,
trying new food choices,
traveling and meeting peo-
ple. He also liked playing
with his remote-control
cars and airplanes, boat-
ing and jet skiing. He will
be deeply missed by all
who knew him. His outgo-
ing personality, hilarious
sense of humor and beau-
tiful smile could light up
the room.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his father and step-
mother, John and Judy
LaPuma; his fiance
Stacey LePage and their
beloved dog, Tootsie; sis-
ters Cheryl LaPuma and
Brandy LaPuma; brothers
John LaPuma Jr and
Devin LaPuma; nephews
Ryan and Ian LaPuma;
Stacey's family, Al and
Sharon LePage, sisters
Alycia LePage and Audrey
Lloyd, her husband John
Lloyd and their daughter
Kamryn Lloyd. He was
preceded in death by his
mother, Susan.
Private arrangements
are under the care of Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Margaret
Soper, 95
Margaret Soper, 95, died
Thursday, March 27, 2014,
in Lecanto, Fla.
Roberts Funeral Home
of Dunnellon is in charge
of arrangements.

Janet Wire, 82
INVERNESS
Janet A. Wire, 82, of In-
verness, Fla., died Friday,
March 28, 2014. Funeral
services will be conducted
this spring in Youngstown,
Ohio.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.


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A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEFS


Nesting hawks attack
patrons outside library
PORT ORANGE Six people have been at-
tacked outside a central Florida library this week
by a pair of hawks nesting in a nearby tree.
County officials are advising library patrons
to use umbrellas as shields from the two red-
shouldered hawks. County spokesman Dave
Byron said three patrons of Port Orange Re-
gional Library were scratched on the head, but
no one was hospitalized.
The Daytona Beach News-Journal reported
the hawks were trying to protect what appears
to be three babies in the nest.
Byron said the hawks are a federally pro-
tected species and the nest can't be removed
without a special permit.
Troopers to look for
distracted drivers
NAPLES Expect increased patrols in the
coming weeks as Florida Highway Patrol troop-
ers step up enforcement along Interstate 75.
Anew initiative called "Staying Alive On 75"
pairs Florida troopers with law enforcement
agencies in a handful of other states with the
overall goal of reducing deaths on 1-75 by
15 percent in the year 2014.
Troopers on 1-75 are using aircraft to step
up their enforcement through this weekend


HAMPTON
Continued from PageA6

MEN
Goodge and other con-
cerned residents have
until the end of the month
to devise a plan to con-
vince state Rep. Van Zant,
who ordered the latest
audit, and the other legis-
lators that Hampton is
worth saving.
They admit it won't be
easy
De-annexing the land
adjacent to U.S. 301 is a
first step. Council mem-
bers hope the good-faith
effort will show Hampton
has a renewed desire to do
things by the books.
Amy Davis, who as city
clerk in the 1990s helped
bring in state grants for
housing and a city park, is
back in the job and taking
on the arduous task of try-
ing to sort through the
city's finances and restore
order to the water plant
"I felt like I owed it to
my community to take the
knowledge I have in my


and the coming weekends. FHP Lt. Greg
Bueno says this weekend's focus is on dis-
tracted driving.
The Naples Daily News reported that future
weekends will include focus on other issues
with motorists, including driving while im-
paired.
Deputy shoots man after
couple has sex in pool
BOCA RATON -Authorities say an off-
duty deputy has shot a man after confronting
a couple while they were having sex in the
pool of a Boca Raton subdivision.
Palm Beach County Sheriff's officials said
the deputy walked into the complex pool area
where he lives just after midnight Saturday
and found the couple having sex. He asked
them to leave the premises. Authorities said
the couple, who do not live in the area, re-
turned a short time later.
Authorities said the male victim approached
the deputy while he was sitting in a lounge
chair and hovered over him in a threatening
way. The two fought and the unnamed deputy
shot the suspect.
The unidentified victim was hospitalized in
critical condition.
The deputy has been placed on administra-
tive leave, which is standard protocol.
-From wire reports


head from being here so
many years," Davis said. "I
want to do my part to cor-
rect any wrongs there
might be. I can tell you
this, there won't be a check
or receipt that walks out of
this office that's not cross-
referenced. There'll be a
paper trail."
To Davis, the city is
worth fighting for Where
else, she asks, can you re-
cite your neighbors' names
and leave your doors un-
locked?
She treasures Friday
nights spent watching kids
play outside as the church
projects movies on the
side of the old building. In-
side the community hall,
the teens play pool and
crack jokes.
Davis isn't the only one
stepping up. Brannock,
who moved to town two
years ago, said he would
run for mayor if the Legis-
lature allows the city to
keep its charter
He has pored over the
budgets and records dat-
ing to 2006 and feels confi-
dent the city can find a
way forward.


"We need to get
new blood in there,"
Brannock said.
Others, such as Joshua
Davis, have considered
running for City Council.
Davis, 28, lives in Fox Hol-
low, a subdivision of newer
homes and well-mani-
cured lawns.
"Calling us the most cor-
rupt town in America is a
bit far-fetched," Davis
said. "The problem is that
this town got found out
about. But this is not the
only town in America that
has these kinds of issues
going on with it every day"
For many, Hampton los-
ing its status as a city
would be like losing your
last name.
"It's kind of hard to be
living in a place your
whole life and then some-
one comes and wants to
take it away from you,"
said Frank Bryant, 60, a
City Council member
decades ago who moved
back in November
"Give the city a chance.
It took time to get this way
and it's going to take time
to straighten it out."


Mom charged with



fatally stabbing son


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG- A
Tampa Bay mother was
charged with first-degree
murder after authorities
say she fatally stabbed her
4-year-old son Friday night
St. Petersburg police
said Tasha Trotter was
waiting on the apartment's
porch when Joseph Artis
and his grandmother
came home. Police said
Trotter was acting odd and
grabbed a knife once in-
side the house and went
after the boy Police said
the grandmother, Carolyn
Trotter, tried unsuccess-
fully to stop her
A short time later, Trot-
ter carried her son out the
front door. Police found
the boy outside with mul-
tiple stab wounds. Artis,
who lived with his grand-
mother, was pronounced
dead at the hospital.


Neighbor Sherry Ford
told the Tampa Bay Times
she heard screams from
her home.
Officers told Trotter to
hand over the child and
she complied.
"She just laid him on the
ground," Ford said. "She
just politely laid him on
the ground. She still had
the knife in her hand."
St. Petersburg police
said Tasha Trotter did not
want to talk to detectives
Friday night and said they
don't have a motive for
why she allegedly stabbed
her son. She was taken to
Pinellas County Jail. It's
unclear if she has re-
tained an attorney
Department of Chil-
dren and Families offi-
cials worried about the
boy's safety in 2009 after
receiving a call about vio-
lence in the home that ap-
peared to involve the


child's father Trotter and
the boy moved in with the
child's grandmother and
the father agreed not to
contact the child, DCF
spokeswoman Natalie
Harrell said.
In 2010, Trotter volun-
tarily gave the boy's grand-
mother, Carolyn Trotter,
temporary guardianship
and moved out of the
home. A judge made it
permanent a year later
Two other siblings, one
older and one younger,
had already been re-
moved from Trotter's cus-
tody prior to the stabbing,
according to DCE
DCF officials were un-
able to provide what treat-
ment, if any, Trotter had
received, due to privacy
laws. Family members
told police she had a his-
tory of mental illness and
has been in and out of sev-
eral treatment facilities.


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STATE


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 A7





AS SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014

DEVELOPER
Continued from PageAl

shoulder and that little
bird is telling me it's not a
good idea," Kenney said.
That's because the spot-
light is now shining
Kalka's way, due to a 213-
foot strip of scrub and
trees called a "stub out"
Kalka wants to pave that
stub out, which sits on
county right of way at the
end of Oak Village Boule-
vard at the southern tip of
Citrus County
Less than a mile to the
west, Kalka owns 40 acres
that he wants to develop.
The problem: Those 40
acres are surrounded on
three sides by Oak Village,
a Sugarmill Woods com-
munity, and Kalka wants to
connect his land to Oak
Village Boulevard for easy
access to U.S. 98.
Residents, who packed
the county commission
chambers last Tuesday
even though there was
nothing on the agenda con-
cerning the stub out, are
fighting back.
The Oak Village Associ-
ation filed an application
for a street vacation to re-
move the stub out from
public ownership. That
would stop Kalka from
connecting his devel-
opable property with the
boulevard.
While Kalka and associ-
ation president David
Quinn say they want to
compromise they met
two weeks ago at Kenney's
suggestion both have
also dug in.
"It's going to be a fight,"
Quinn said. "He can't
come in through Oak Vil-
lage. It's simple as that."
Kalka has alternatives for
access. He can go west to
U.S. 19 or east to U.S. 98, or
south to his Seville develop-
ment But he won't do that
because it's more expensive
than either Oak Village
Boulevard or two alterna-
tive Oak Village streets.
"I see the whole issue
very simple," he said. "It's
a matter of right of way
There are three options of
right of way I'm giving
them any choice they want


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office
Nachum Kalka's property holdings include 1,338 acres near Floral City and 40 acres adjacent to Oak Village in Sugarmill Woods. Kalka's
company also owns 1,033 acres in north Hernando County, zoned for more than 3,000 homes. His Citrus County holdings are indicated above by
black boxes.


But if they pick none, no
one will support them. No
court will support them."
'I'm developing
projects all the
time'
Kalka, 83, declined a re-
porter's request to take his
picture. He said he doesn't
want anyone to recognize
him.
He said he rarely gives
newspaper interviews.
Google his name and you'll
find just one a 1988 New
York Times story about
Kalka discussing his first
development in the U.S.,
119 high-end homes in
Yorktown, N.Y
"I've been in this busi-
ness more than 60 years,"
he said. "I'm developing
projects all the time."
Kalka's development ca-
reer began in Tel Aviv, Is-
rael, his homeland, and
continued to New York.
A former business part-
ner and childhood friend
sued him in 1996 over a
bungled real estate deal
and won an $8 million ver-
dict, according New York


court records.
Already one Sugarmill
Woods resident has men-
tioned this piece of history
to Citrus County commis-
sioners. Asked about the
lawsuit, Kalka shook his
head.
"It was a personal
issue," he said.
He came to this part of
Florida because he saw it
as ripe for his kind of work.
"The weather and the
nature here, it's very
friendly," he said. "I de-
cided to develop here."
He bought the Dunes
golf course in 2002 in
northern Hernando
County, along with Seville,
an underdeveloped stretch
of about 1,000 acres just
south of the Citrus County
line. In 2011, Kalka re-
designed Seville and the
Hernando County Com-
mission gave its blessing to
a 3,800-unit development.
Kalka moved to the Cy-
press Run condominiums
in Sugarmill Woods in 2004
and, that same year, pur-
chased 1,334 acres south of
Floral City for $5 million


for a future "town center"
mixed-use community
But it's the much
smaller 40 acres and the
1,033 acres in Hernando
County that have people
taking notice.
Sugarmill residents say
their caution with Kalka is
largely in part to a 2006
case, where he paid the
county $79,806 in fines and
liens for illegally clear-cut-
ting 18 of the 40 acres.
Kalka called the inci-
dent "very stupid," and
blamed it on a contractor
who didn't get a permit to
clear the land. He said he
wanted scrub and smaller
trees removed to eliminate
the chance of a brush fire.
Quinn, for his part, does-
n't hold either the land-
clearing incident or the
18-year-old New York law-
suit against Kalka. In fact,
he said the recent meeting
with Kalka showed him to
be a straight-talking
businessman.
"I liked his candor I re-
spect the man," Quinn
said.
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LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Oak Village residents are asking the county to vacate a 213-foot-deep piece of
property, known as a stub out, at the end of Oak Village Boulevard to prevent a
developer from getting access to their community.


DEVELOPER
Continued from PageAS

That doesn't mean
Quinn is giving in, though.
"He has other accesses
to get out from where he
is," Quinn said.
Kalka: 'There must
be a compromise'
Kalka doesn't have a
specific plan for the 40
acres, although county
zoning code allows up to 10
residential units an acre if
he provides central water
and sewer
Access to U.S. 19 re-
quires him to buy right of
way from a private
landowner and the South-
west Florida Water Man-
agement District.
To the east, there's al-
ready the beginning of a
road in place to connect
Seville to U.S. 98 near the
Suncoast Parkway
Kalka has ruled out that
access.
"Forty acres to build a
road 2 miles long? That
doesn't make sense," he
said.
As for suggestions that
he build a road from the 40
acres to Seville, Kalka said
that community is not
planned to even touch
Sugarmill Woods or Citrus
County.
His reasoning is simple:


If they let me in, I will
never apply for a permit for
the right of way. There must
be a compromise.
Nachum Kalka
developer.


He never offered that during
our meeting. Maybe we should
have another meeting.
David Quinn
president, Oak Village Association.


The Seville development
will be so top-of-the-line,
he doesn't want Oak Vil-
lage residents driving
south into his community
Kalka said he would do
what is legally necessary
to assure Oak Village resi-
dents that he will never
connect Seville to their
boulevard if they stop
opposition to his stub-out
application.
"If they let me in, I will
never apply for a permit
for the right of way," he
said. "There must be a
compromise."
That offer to block
Seville from Oak Village
was new to Quinn.
"That sounds really good.
I would love to do that,"


Quinn said. "He never of-
fered that during our meet-
ing. Maybe we should have
another meeting."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
(@chronicleonline. corn.


RULING
Continued from PageAl

development to Oak Village Boulevard, or
the community's efforts to stop it
Kenney lives in Oak Village South,
though not on the boulevard.
He's also a member of the Oak Village
Homeowners Association, which filed an
application for a street vacation to block
Kalka's access to Oak Vil-
lage Boulevard. The
county commission will
vote on the application.
State law says commis-
sioners cannot abstain L2
from a vote unless they --
will receive a specific fi-
nancial gain or loss from
the vote to themselves or Joe
their family Meek
There is a gray area Citrus County
that allows commission- commissioner.
ers to abstain if there is
an appearance of a conflict of interest An
attorney general's opinion states that
commissioners may seek a formal, bind-
ing ruling from the ethics commission for
their specific situation.
Kenney said he called an ethics com-
mission attorney two weeks ago and re-
ceived an informal opinion that he could
bow out to avoid the appearance of im-
propriety Kenney said he would vote if


Positively free.

Positively less pain.


the Kalka issue came before the board,
but then decided instead to ask for a for-
mal ruling from the ethics commission.
Commissioner Rebecca Bays said she
would ask acting county attorney Kerry
Parsons for her opinion and abide by that
Commissioner Joe Meek, who said last
week he would also seek a formal ethics
opinion, has not taken any action so far
Meek's father, Joseph Jr, is president of
Citrus Builder Owner Corp., a construc-
tion company that is partnering with
Kalka to build homes in
jPine Ridge. Kalka said in
an interview Friday that
he buys the lots and
'- Joseph Meek Jr builds
the houses.
VKalka said they have
collectively built five or
10 homes in Pine Ridge
Rebecca since 2012.
Bays "I was looking for a
Citrus County good builder and he's a
commissioner, good builder," Kalka
said.
Commissioner Meek said he also spoke
with a staff attorney at the ethics com-
mission office in Tallahassee who said he
had reason to abstain from any votes in-
volving Kalka.
Bays said in interviews last week that
she sells property insurance to Kalka but
didn't think the insured property in-
volved any of the areas of contention in
Oak Village.


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A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


National soil collection may unlock mysteries


Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. The
government has been col-
lecting dirt lots of it.
Clumps came from the
Texas Panhandle, a shady
grove in West Virginia, a
picked-over corn field in
Kansas and thousands of
other places in the lower
48 states.
A small army of re-
searchers and university
students lugging pick axes
and shovels scattered
across the country for
three years to scoop sam-
ples into plastic bags from
nearly 5,000 places. They
marked the GPS coordi-
nates, took photos and la-
beled each bag before
mailing them back to the
government's laboratory
in Denver
Though always under-
foot and often overlooked,
dirt actually has a lot to
tell. Scientists say infor-
mation gleaned from it
could help farmers grow
better vegetables and
build a better understand-
ing of climate change. A
researcher of forensic sci-
ence said mud caked on a
murder suspect's boots
could reveal if he had
traipsed through a crime
scene or had been at home
innocently gardening.
David Smith, who
launched the U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey project in 2001,
said data about the dirt
will feed research for a
century, and he's sharing it
with anyone who wants it.
"The more eyes and brains
that look at it, the better,"
Smith said.
The idea for the massive
research project came in
the late 1990s, when Smith
was in charge of handing
out the government's store
of soil data what little
there was.
The archive held infor-
mation collected in the
1960s and 1970s. It was
spotty and based on out-
dated science. Just about
every researcher returned
with the same disappoint-
ment, saying: "There must
be more."


Associated Press
Joseph Daniel, at the time a student at North Carolina State University, collects soil
June 1, 2010, in Southern California for the U.S. Geological Survey. The federal
government sent students and scientists to more than 4,800 places across the nation
to collect soil that was analyzed for its composition. The results are now highly sought
after by researchers in a wide variety of fields.


Smith told them that,
sadly, no, there wasn't.
So he took action. Dur-
ing the next several years,
Smith and his fellow geol-
ogists refined a plan for
collecting and document-
ing the makeup of the na-
tion's soil.
Digging started in 2007
and wasn't done until 2010.
They strategically sunk
their shovels at a spot in
every 600 square miles. At
each locale they took three
samples starting at the
surface and going no
deeper than three feet
Before retiring, U.S. Ge-
ological Survey geologist
Jim Kilburn trained many
of the 40 surveyors and
went into the field himself
several times for up to a
month. He sent back hun-
dreds of samples on the
road from Nebraska down
to Texas and from Kansas
west to the California
coast.
Only once was Kilburn
told to go away A rancher
near Sacramento, Calif,
had let government re-
searchers onto his pas-
tures before, where they


found a rare clover and
told him he could no
longer graze cattle there.
"No matter what I told
the guy, he wasn't going to
let me on," Kilburn said.
"He had good reason."
A student Kilburn su-
pervised caused a panic by
leaving behind a sticky
note on her motel room
mirror with the reminder,
"Send anthrax." The bac-
terium occurs naturally in
soil throughout the coun-
try but it also has sinister
uses. A housekeeper
thought the worst, spark-
ing a series of calls with
geological survey head-
quarters until the confu-
sion was resolved.
The hard work paid off.
In October, the geological
survey published a snap-
shot of minerals and
chemicals in the ground.
No other work captures
the same information on a
national scale, said Smith,
who estimated the project
cost $10 million.
Researchers at universi-
ties, institutes and govern-
ment agencies have just
begun using the data.


Geologist Jim Kilburn, now retired from the U.S. Geological Survey, collects soil
April 16, 2008, from Kansas.


Geologist Helen Folger of the U.S. Geological Survey col-
lects soil Sept. 11, 2008, in West Virginia.


tioned his summer job on
the geological survey crew
collecting dirt samples.
Problem solved. Xia
emailed Smith, who of-
fered her thousands of soil
samples and a decade's
worth of research.
Jennifer Phelan at RTI
Inc., a research institute in
Raleigh, N.C., is using the
dirt to study acid rain's
harm to forests, starting in
Pennsylvania.
Cornell University pro-
fessor Johannes Lehmann
is leading a group of grad-
uate students sifting
through soil data for evi-
dence of black carbon, a
byproduct of forest fires
and industrial smoke-
stacks. The research may
increase understanding of
global warming.
"Without this sampling
effort, we couldn't do this


Kang Xia, a professor of
environmental chemistry
at Virginia Tech, stumbled
upon the soil survey by
chance and at exactly
the right moment.
She had set out to study
and map the levels of or-
ganic carbon and nitrogen
in soil both critical for
growing healthy crops. But
she couldn't find samples
of dirt from across the
country
"I was scratching my
head," she said. "What do
I do about this?"
Not long after that, a
graduate student men-


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type of research,"
Lehmann said.
Dirt under the finger-
nails of a murder victim
could help detectives fig-
ure out if the body was
dumped there but killed
elsewhere, said Sarah
Jantzi, whose 2013 doc-
toral dissertation at
Florida International Uni-
versity in the field of
forensic science drew
upon the government
work.
A government scientist
for 38 years, Smith said
those after him can use
this soil analysis as a start-
ing point for decades of re-
search. His data is
available to anyone who
thinks it will advance his
or her project.
"The opportunities for
further research are al-
most limitless," he said.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cuban lawmakers OK key

foreign investment law


Associated Press
HAVANA- Cuban law-
makers on Saturday ap-
proved a law aimed at
making Cuba more attrac-
tive to foreign investors, a
measure seen as vital for
the island's struggling
economy
Meeting in an extraordi-
nary session, parliament
replaced a 1995 foreign in-
vestment law that has
lured less overseas capital
than the island's Commu-
nist leaders had hoped.
Cuba's GDP expanded
2.7 percent last year, below
targets and weak for a de-
veloping nation. Govern-
ment officials say the
economy needs 5 percent
to 7 percent annual growth
to develop properly
"Cuba needs from $2 bil-
lion to $2.5 billion a year in
direct foreign investment
to advance its socialist
socioeconomic model,
prosperous and sustain-
able," said Marino Murillo,
a vice president and
the czar of President
Raul Castro's economic
reforms.
"Not using those sources
would retard national de-
velopment," Murillo told
lawmakers in comments
broadcast on state televi-
sion, where news of the ap-
proval was announced.
Murillo said Cuba will
especially look for agricul-
tural investment
Foreign media were not
given access to the closed-
door meeting.
Some details of the leg-
islation emerged in official
media in recent days.
Among other things, it
would cut taxes on profits
by about half, to 15 per-
cent, and make companies
exempt from paying taxes
for the first eight years of
operation.
An exception would af-
fect companies that ex-
ploit natural resources,
such as nickel or fossil
fuels. They could pay taxes
as high as 50 percent.
Meanwhile, many for-
eigners doing business


Associated Press
Cuba's President Raul Castro, left, Cuba's Vice President
Miguel Diaz-Canel, center, and Rrst Vice President of the
Council of State Jose Ramon Machado Ventura, right,
applaud Saturday during an extraordinary session at the
National Assembly in a vote that overhauls the foreign
investment law in Havana, Cuba. Cuban lawmakers
approved a law Saturday that aims to make it more
attractive for foreign investors to do business in and with
the country, a measure seen as vital if the island's
struggling economy is to improve.


with the island would be
exempt from paying per-
sonal income tax.
Cuban-born economist
and University of Pitts-
burgh professor emeritus
Carmelo Mesa-Lago said
elements such as lower
taxes, a shorter timeline
for approvals and the abil-
ity to invest in property
send encouraging signals,
but it's too early to tell.
"The test of the law is
how it will be imple-
mented in practice," Mesa-
Lago said.
Investment projects
wholly funded by foreign
capital would be explicitly
allowed in all sectors ex-
cept health care and edu-
cation, something that is
essentially unheard of
today
But Murillo's remarks
suggested the government


intends to continue in at
least a watchdog role "so
that there is no concentra-
tion of property"
"What the new law estab-
lishes is that the state must
always be there," he said.
It's also not clear that
wholly foreign-owned ven-
tures would enjoy the
same tax benefits.
Washington's 52-year-old
economic embargo on
Cuba prevents most U.S.
trade with the island and
includes sanctions to dis-
courage foreign outfits
from doing business with
Havana.
Cuban officials promise
there will be no national-
izations of property, as
happened after the 1959
Cuban Revolution, except
in cases of national
interest and only with
compensation.


In week, Mexico finds 370
abandoned child migrants
MEXICO CITY-Authorities in Mexico
say that in one week they found 370 migrant
children who had apparently been aban-
doned by the traffickers they paid to take
them to the United States.
The National Migration Institute says the
children were rescued in 14 Mexican states
between March 17 and 24, and the youngest
was 9 years old. It said 163 of the children
younger than 18 were found traveling alone.
Most migrants heading through Mexico to the
United States come from Central America.
The institute said in a statement Saturday
that the children told officials the traffickers
abandoned them after being paid between
$3,000 and $5,000.
Man in Italy gets 20 years in
acid attack on woman
ROME -An Italian lawyer has been con-
victed and sentenced to 20 years in prison
for ordering an acid attack on his ex-girl-
friend, who became a symbol in the fight
against men's violence toward women.


The acid burned and disfigured the face of
Lucia Annibali, also a lawyer. Luca Varani
was convicted Saturday by a court in Pesaro
of masterminding the 2013 attack. Two Alban-
ian men were convicted of throwing the acid
and each received a 14-year term. Varani de-
nied ordering an acid attack on Annibali.
Newcomer Andrej Kiska
elected Slovak president
BRATISLAVA, Slovakia Nearly com-
plete results show that businessman-turned
philanthropist Andrej Kiska has won the
runoff race for the largely ceremonial post of
Slovakia's president.
Kiska, a political newcomer, had nearly
59.6 percent of the vote, while Prime Minister
Robert Fico trailed with 40.4 percent, accord-
ing to results released Saturday night by the
Statistics Office from 93 percent of almost
6,000 polling stations.
Fico has conceded the election and con-
gratulated his challenger.
Fico and Kiska advanced to the runoff
after leading the first round of voting on
March 15.
-From wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obama offers allies assurances


Associated Press

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -
From the heart of Europe to the
expanse of Saudi Arabia's
desert, President Barack
Obama's weeklong overseas trip
amounted to a reassurance tour
for stalwart, but sometimes
skeptical, American allies.
At a time when Obama is grap-
pling with crises and conflict in
both Europe and the Middle
East, the four-country swing also
served as a reminder that even
those longtime partners still
need some personal attention
from the president.
Europe is a crucial linchpin in
Obama's efforts to rally the inter-
national community in opposi-
tion to Russia's incursion in
Ukraine, but the continent's lead-
ers have concerns about the im-
pact tougher Western sanctions
on Moscow could have on their
own economy Saudi Arabia has a
hand in nearly every Middle East
crisis consuming White House at-
tention, including the Syrian civil
war, nuclear negotiations with
Iran and peace talks between the
Israelis and Palestinians, but has
grown anxious about Obama's po-
sitioning in the region.
Obama departed for Washing-
ton Saturday with much left un-
resolved on each of those
matters. Still, officials said the
president had made progress
during his pilgrimage to Saudi
King Abdullah's desert oasis, as
well as in his hours of conversa-
tions with European leaders.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama meets Thursday with Pope Francis at the
Vatican. From the heart of Europe to the expanse of Saudi Arabia's
desert, Obama's weeklong overseas trip amounted to a reassurance tour
for stalwart, but sometimes skeptical, American allies.


The president's advisers were
particularly bullish about his
meeting in the Netherlands with
allies from the Group of Seven
leading industrial nations,
which agreed to indefinitely sus-
pend Russia from the larger
Group of Eight
"There's been a lot of move-
ment in the last several days that
suggest that Europe has been
stirred to action by the events in
Ukraine, and I think the presi-
dent felt a degree of unity in that


G7 meeting, in the EU session at
NATO, and then with the indi-
vidual leaders that he met with,"
said Ben Rhodes, Obama's
deputy national security adviser
Obama's stops in the Nether-
lands and Belgium were sched-
uled long before Russia's
provocations in Ukraine but
ended up being a well-timed op-
portunity for the president to
discuss the crisis personally
with Europe's leaders. As
Obama sought pledges that Eu-


rope would cooperate if tougher
economic sanctions on Russia
become necessary, he also
recommitted American support
for NATO, the trans-Atlantic mil-
itary alliance.
Those personal assurances
from the president were wel-
comed by a continent that has
developed something of an infe-
riority complex while watching
Obama curry favor with Asia and
get consumed by Mideast crises.
Though Obama remains popular
with the European public, he has
also irked some leaders with
what they've seen as slights to
the European Union, the often
unwieldy 28-nation bloc.
A particular sticking point for
Europe was the fact that Obama
had never visited Brussels, the
headquarters city of both the EU
and NATO. Obama finally
checked that box on this latest
trip, using his stop in the Belgian
city to deliver a speech urging Eu-
rope to take a leadership role in
protecting Ukraine's sovereignty
against Russian provocations.
"The policies of your govern-
ment, the principles of your Eu-
ropean Union, will make a
critical difference in whether or
not the international order that
so many generations before you
have strived to create continues
to move forward, or whether it
retreats," he said, standing be-
fore a crowd of young people at
the Palais des Beaux-Arts
museum.
After stopping in Rome for a
highly anticipated meeting with


Pope Francis, Obama headed to
Saudi Arabia for a visit with the
kingdom's aging monarch. De-
spite the decades-long alliance
between the U.S. and the oil-rich
Gulf nation, Saudi's royal family
has grown skeptical of the presi-
dent's positioning in the region
during a period of rapid and un-
predictable change in the Arab
world.
Tensions with Saudi Arabia hit
a high point last fall, when Obama
pulled back plans to launch a mil-
itary strike on Syria. That deci-
sion compounded Saudi
frustration with what it sees as
the White House's tepid response
to the more than three-year civil
war that has ravaged Syria.
Obama's personal visit to the
king's desert compound was
seen as a show of respect for the
monarch's concerns over Syria,
as well as U.S. nuclear talks with
Iran. Senior U.S. officials said
the president and king had a
frank discussion about their dif-
ferences and emphasized the
importance of Obama being able
to make his case in person.
Though there were no new
agreements struck between the
president and king, officials said
the meeting may help their
countries bridge their differ-
ences over Syria in particular
One potential breakthrough
area could be over the Saudi's
request for U.S. approval to send
air defense systems to Syrian
rebels, a step Obama is said to
be considering, despite contin-
ued reservations.


London skeletons reveal secrets of the Black Death


Associated Press

LONDON You can
learn a lot from a tooth.
Molars taken from skele-
tons unearthed by work on
a new London railway line
are revealing secrets of the
medieval Black Death -
and of its victims.
This week, Don Walker,
an osteologist with the Mu-
seum of London, outlined
the biography of one man
whose ancient bones were
found by construction work-
ers under London's Char-
terhouse Square: He was
breast-fed as a baby, moved
to London from another
part of England, had bad
tooth decay in childhood,
grew up to work as a la-
borer, and died in early
adulthood from the bubonic
plague that ravaged Europe
in the 14th century
The poor man's life was
nasty, brutish and short,
but his afterlife is long and
illuminating.
"It's fantastic we can
look in such detail at an in-
dividual who died 600
years ago," Walker said.
"It's incredible, really"
The 25 skeletons were
uncovered last year during
work on Crossrail, a new
rail line that's boring 13
miles of tunnels under the
heart of the city. Archaeol-
ogists immediately sus-
pected the bones came
from a cemetery for
plague victims. The loca-
tion, outside the walls of
the medieval city, chimes
with historical accounts.
The square, once home to
a monastery, is one of the
few spots in the city to stay


Associated Press
Don Walker, an osteologist with the Museum of London, poses for photographers
Wednesday with one of the skeletons found by construction workers under central
London's Charterhouse Square.


undisturbed for centuries.
To test their theory, sci-
entists took one tooth from
each of 12 skeletons, then
extracted DNA from the
teeth. They announced
Sunday that tests had
found the presence of the
plague bacterium,
Yersinia pestis, in several
of the teeth, meaning the
individuals had been ex-
posed to and likely died
from the Black Death.
The findings didn't stop
there. Archaeologists, his-
torians, microbiologists
and physicists worked to-
gether to apply techniques
from several scientific dis-
ciplines to the discovery
Radiocarbon dating and
analysis of pottery shards
helped determine when


the burials took place.
Forensic geophysics -
more commonly used in
murder and war-crimes in-
vestigations helped lo-
cate more graves under
the square. Studying oxy-
gen and strontium iso-
topes in the bones
revealed details of diet
and health.
These were, by and
large, poor people. Many
of the skeletons showed


signs of malnutrition con-
sistent with the "Great
Famine" that struck Eu-
rope 30 years before the
Black Death. Many had
back injuries, suggesting
lives of hard labor One
man became a vegetarian
late in life, indicating he
may have entered an order
of monks.
Archaeologists were sur-
prised to discover that the
skeletons lay in layers and


appeared to come from
three different periods:
the original Black Death
epidemic in 1348-1350, and
later outbreaks in 1361
and the early 15th century
"It suggests that the bur-
ial ground was used again
and again for the burial of
plague victims," said Jay
Carver, Crossrail's lead
archaeologist.
The Black Death is
thought to have killed at
least 75 million people, in-
cluding more than half of
Britain's population, yet
the burials suggest a sur-
prisingly high degree of so-
cial order at first As the
plague ravaged continen-
tal Europe borne west-
ward by fleas on rats city
fathers leased land for an
emergency burial ground.
The burials were simple
but orderly, the bodies
wrapped in shrouds and
laid out in neat rows,
sealed with a layer of clay
The later skeletons,
however, show more signs
of upper-body injuries,
consistent with a period of
lawlessness and social
breakdown.
Archaeologists are plan-
ning a new dig this sum-
mer to learn how many
bodies lie under the
square. Carver says the
number appears to be in


the "low thousands."
And the teeth may not
have yielded all their se-
crets. Experts in ancient
DNA at McMaster Univer-
sity in Canada are working
to sequence the plague
genome found in the teeth,
in order to learn more
about a disease that still
infects several thousand
people a year around the
world. Most patients re-
cover if treated early with
antibiotics.
Scientists want to know
if the 14th-century disease
is the same as the modern
version, or whether the
disease has evolved. Study
of DNA from the teeth of
skeletons discovered in
the 1980s at another Lon-
don plague cemetery sug-
gested the bug was largely
unchanged, but the scien-
tific jury is still out
Brendan Wren, a profes-
sor of molecular biology at
the London School of Hy-
giene and Tropical Medi-
cine, said the new
information could help
scientists "understand
how the plague bacillus -
and other nasty bugs be-
come so virulent to hu-
mans."
"It is useful information
that could warn and avert
potential epidemics and
pandemics," he said.


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American farmers confront 'big data' revolution


Associated Press

WICHITA, Kan. -
Farmers from across the
nation gathered in Wash-
ington this month for what
has become an annual trek
to seek action on the most
important matters in
American agriculture,
such as immigration re-
form and water
regulations.
But this time, a new,
more shadowy issue also
emerged: growing unease
about how the largest seed
companies are gathering
vast amount of data from
sensors on tractors, com-
bines and other farm
equipment.
The increasingly com-
mon sensors measure soil
conditions, seeding rates,
crop yields and many
other variables, allowing
companies to provide
farmers with customized
guidance on how to get the
most out of their fields.
The involvement of the
American Farm Bureau,
the nation's largest and
most prominent farming
organization, illustrates
how agriculture is cau-
tiously entering a new era
in which raw planting data
holds both the promise of
higher yields and the peril
that the information could
be hacked or exploited by
corporations or govern-
ment agencies.
Seed companies want to
harness the data to help
farmers grow more food
with the same amount of
land, and the industry's
biggest brands have of-
fered assurances that all
information will be closely
guarded.
But farmers are serving
notice in Washington that
the federal government
might need to become in-
volved in yet another de-
bate over electronic
security and privacy Some
members of Congress from
rural states such as Kansas
were already aware of the
concerns, although the
issue is new to many urban
lawmakers.
Rep. Lynn Jenkins, a
Kansas Republican who
grew up on a dairy farm,
said agriculture must
achieve technological ad-
vances to keep up with
population growth, which
is expected to require 60
percent more food by 2050.
But she has heard farmers'
concerns about data
collection.
"Information and data
utilization is the way of the
future," Jenkins said in an
emailed statement. '"And
just as our federal govern-
ment struggles with pri-
vacy concerns through
records at the NSA and
various health records, so
too must we maintain ap-
propriate privacy protec-
tion of individuals from
corporate entitles."
The Farm Bureau isn't
sure what it needs from
Washington, or whether
action is even warranted
yet But farmers want their
elected officials to be
aware of how the industry
is changing.
This year's trip to Wash-
ington was primarily "an
educational effort" to
make sure members of
Congress know about the
data collecting and under-
stand "the implications of
the issue for our farmers
and ranchers," Steve Bac-
cus, an Ottawa County
farmer and president of
the Kansas Farm Bureau.
"We may need to come
back at some time in the
future and talk to them


Associated Press
Nick Guetterman climbs into a combine Feb. 19 on his farm near Bucyrus, Kan. Farmers from across the nation gathered in Washington this month
for their annual trek to seek action on the most important matters in American agriculture. But this time, a new issue emerged: growing unease
about how the largest seed companies are gathering vast amount of data from sensors on tractors, combines and other farm equipment. The
sensors measure soil conditions, seeding rates, crop yields and many other variables.


about legislation."
Farmers worry that a
hedge fund or large com-
pany with access to "real-
time" yield data from
hundreds of combines at
harvest time might be able
to use that information to
speculate in commodities
markets long before the
government issues crop-
production estimates.
Others are concerned
that GPS-linked farm data
could be obtained by the
Environmental Protection
Agency, antagonistic envi-
ronmental groups or, in the
Farm Bureau's words, "an
overall-clad Edward
Snowden," a reference to
the former National Secu-
rity Agency analyst who
disclosed intelligence-
gathering operations.
"It is not like we don't all
trust them," Mark Nelson,
director of commodities for
the Kansas Farm Bureau,
said of agribusiness com-
panies. The new data-
collection systems deliver
"a lot of good things" to pro-
ducers. "But as an organi-
zation we are looking at,
'What is the big picture?"'
The Farm Bureau Fed-
eration put together a "pri-
vacy expectation guide" to
educate its members and
recently drafted a policy
asserting that data should
remain the farmer's prop-
erty The bureau also op-
poses allowing any federal
agency to serve as a clear-
inghouse for proprietary or
aggregated data collected
by private companies.
Agribusiness giant Mon-
santo and other corpora-
tions have tried to allay
fears by reassuring farm-
ers their data is secure
and will not be used be-
yond providing services
farmers request.
This season, growers in
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and
Minnesota can even buy
for the first time a Mon-
santo "prescription" that
offers a precise seeding
recipe tailored to their soil
type, disease history and
pests.
The St. Louis-based
company, which has domi-
nated the bioengineered
seed business for more


Guetterman looks over the data shared by his crop sprayer and cellphone.


than a decade, expects to
expand its prescription
services to other states. It
calls the advancements the
"Green Data Revolution"
- a play off the so-called
Green Revolution of the
20th century in which me-
chanical, chemical and bi-
ological advancements
drove unprecedented in-
creases in food production.
Monsanto expects the
use ofag data to offer com-
parable improvements in
the next few years. It
bought Precision Planting,
a high-tech farm equip-
ment maker, in 2012, fol-
lowed last October by the
purchase of the Climate
Corporation, a data-analyt-
ics firm that provides
weather-related farm serv-
ices and crop insurance
and is handling Mon-
santo's fledgling data-
related services.
The Green Data Revolu-


tion will help farmers
make more profit per acre,
said Dave Friedberg, chief
executive officer of The
Climate Corporation. The
average farmer, he says,
won't have to be "tech
savvy"
"Tech will just become
integral to the work that
they do ... in the same way
that more than 100 years
ago, we adopted machine-
based farming equipment
as the standard in the in-
dustry," Friedberg said.
Companies are also
pushing an Open Ag Data
Alliance, which would set
uniform data standards
and allow systems built by
different manufacturers to
talk to one another
Farm equipment manu-
facturer John Deere has
partnered with DuPont Pi-
oneer to tout what it calls
"Decision Services," a sys-
tem in which farmers up-


load data onto servers that
respond by sending seed
and fertilizer prescrip-
tions directly to Deere
tractors in the field. Other
companies offer services
that let farmers connect a
tablet computer to the
seed monitor in the cab
and download the
information.
Farm groups are con-
flicted about what role, if
any, government should
have in regulating data-
gathering practices.
"We don't believe ulti-
mately there is a legisla-
tive fix for this," said Terry
Holdren, chief executive
officer and general coun-
sel for the Kansas Farm
Bureau. "It is a contractual
model for folks who have
technology and folks who
want technology"
Nick Guetterman, who
farms roughly 10,000 acres
of corn and wheat with his


Just as our
federal
government
struggles with
privacy
concerns
through
records at the
NSA and
various health
records, so
too must we
maintain
appropriate
privacy
protection of
individuals
from corporate
entitles.
Rep.Lynn
Jenkins
R-Kansas.
father and three brothers
in eastern Kansas, already
uses GPS technology and
has been considering
sending all his data to a
specialized service. But he
still has reservations about
what a seed company or an
equipment manufacturer
will do with it
"I have not found it on
my farm beneficial enough
to pay them to analyze my
data," Guetterman said. "I
either analyze it myself or
do nothing with it."


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Nation BRIEFS

Cleanup on aisle I


71 V .
Associated Press
Cosmetics are strewn
across the floor of a Wal-
greens on Friday night in
La Habra, Calif., following
a 5.1-magnitude earthquake.
No injuries reported
in Calif. earthquake
LOS ANGELES-A
moderate earthquake that
rattled a swath of Southern
California forced several
dozen people in one com-
munity out of their homes
after firefighters discovered
foundation problems that
made the buildings unsafe
to enter, authorities said
Saturday.
Fire crews red-tagged 20
apartment units in a build-
ing in the Orange County
city of Fullerton after finding
a major foundation crack.
Structural woes including
broken chimneys and lean-
ing were uncovered in half
a dozen single-family
houses, which were also
deemed unsafe to occupy
until building inspectors clear
the structures. The damage
displaced 83 residents.
Despite the evacuations,
Friday night's magnitude-
5.1 quake centered about
25 miles south of downtown
Los Angeles mostly frayed
nerves. The quake was pre-
ceded by two smaller fore-
shocks, and more than 100
aftershocks followed, in-
cluding a magnitude-4.1
that hit Saturday afternoon,
the largest in the sequence
so far. No injuries were
reported.
Obama urged to
improve slaughter
WASHINGTON -Two
animal welfare groups and
dozens of lawmakers are
urging the Obama adminis-
tration to improve humane
treatment of poultry at
slaughterhouses, citing sta-
tistics that show hundreds
of thousands of chickens
being accidentally dropped
alive into scalding tanks
every year.
The Animal Welfare Insti-
tute and Farm Sanctuary
have petitioned the Depart-
ment of Agriculture to
strengthen humane treatment
regulations by banning live
birds from the scalding tanks.
When things go accord-
ing to plan, birds are al-
ready dead by the time
they're dropped into the
tank, but a small percent-
age miss the automatic
slaughtering knife and wind
up dying in the tank.
The Food Safety Inspection
Service stresses, however,
that the number of birds who
die that way represents a tiny
fraction of the billions of chick-
ens slaughtered every year.
Sandusky's wife:
Accusers lied
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
In an interview this week at
her home, the wife of former
Penn State assistant football
coach Jerry Sandusky argued
her husband's conviction
was unjust and claimed the
accusers who testified
against him told inaccurate
stories to cash in. An attor-
ney for one of the accusers
calls her denials "obscene."
"I trust my husband," Dot-
tie Sandusky said. "That's
what the world is about today.
People don't trust anybody.
And all these young kids, all
they think about is sex."
Jerry Sandusky, 70, was
convicted in 2012 of sexu-
ally abusing boys over 15
years but maintains his in-
nocence and is pursuing
appeals.
-From wire reports


Town awaits ruling on moment of prayer
Associated Press unless, of course, the U.S. from you," said the Rev town residents Susan Gal- prayer-givers were again
Supreme Court orders Mike Metzger of First loway, who is Jewish, and invited Christian clergy, ac-
GREECE, N.Y At them to. Bible Baptist Church. "In Linda Stephens, an atheist cording to court documents.
their most recent monthly A ruling could come any Jesus' name, I pray" complained the Christian The two residents lost
meeting, the five members daynowonwhetherthetown Greece's expeditious, prayers at town board their suit in U.S. District
of the Greece Town Board violated the Constitution matter-of-fact Christian meetings made them un- Court after the judge found
took their seats, gaveled to with its opening prayers prayer, with no mention of comfortable. Every meeting that the town did not in-
order and moved quickly because nearly every one in those who believe differ- from 1999 through 2007 had tentionally exclude non-
through the regular open- an 1 1-year span was overtly ently, is at the heart of a been opened with a Chris- Christians and that the con-
ing agenda: Christian. This month's case with potentially wide- tian-oriented invocation, tent of the prayer was not
Roll Call. (Check.) was no exception- a Bap- ranging impact: Govern- After the complaints, the intended to proselytize or
Pledge of Allegiance. tist minister delivering a mental bodies from Congress town, in 2008, had a Wiccan demean other faiths. But
(Check.) head-bowed, eyes-closed, and state legislatures to priestess, the chairman of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court
Moment ofPrayer (Check) 40-second invocation, school boards often pause the local Baha'i congrega- of Appeals said the prac-
Leaders of this town of "Lord, we ask that the for prayer before getting tion and a lay Jewish man tice of having one Chris-
96,000 outside Rochester say decisions that are made will down to business, deliver four of the prayers, tian prayer after another
they have no plans to shake be made with a lot ofthought The case, Greece v Gal- But from January 2009 amounted to the town's en-
up the longtime routine and with a lot of wisdom loway, began in 2008 when through June 2010, the dorsement of Christianity


Associated Press
An object floats in the southern Indian Ocean on Saturday in this picture taken from a Royal New Zealand
Air Force P-3K2 Orion aircraft searching for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. A day after the search
for the Malaysian jetliner shifted to a new area of the Indian Ocean, ships plucked objects from the sea to
determine whether they were related to the missing jet. None were confirmed to be from the plane, leaving
searchers with no sign of the jet three weeks after it disappeared.




Still no evidence





of missing jet


Associated Press
PERTH, Australia
A day after the search for
the Malaysian jetliner
shifted to a new area of
the Indian Ocean, ships on Sat-
urday plucked objects from the
sea to determine whether they
were related to the missing jet.
None were confirmed to be from
the plane, leaving searchers with
no sign of the jet three weeks
after it disappeared.
Meanwhile, a Chinese military
plane scanning part of the search
zone, which is roughly the size of
Poland, spotted several objects
floating in the sea, including two
bearing colors of the missing jet.
It was not immediately clear
whether those objects were re-
lated to the investigation into
what happened to Malaysia Air-
lines Flight 370, which disap-
peared March 8 en route from
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Bei-
jing, and officials said the second
day of searching in the new area
ended with no evidence found of
the jet.
Dozens of relatives of passen-
gers on the missing plane were to
fly from Beijing to Kuala Lumpur
on Sunday to seek answers from
Malaysia's government as to what


happened to their loved ones.
Two-thirds of the 229 passengers
aboard Flight 370 were Chinese,
and their relatives have ex-
pressed deep frustration with
Malaysian authorities since the
plane went missing.
Ships from China and Aus-
tralia on Saturday scooped up
items described only as "objects
from the ocean," but none were
"confirmed to be related" to
Flight 370, said the Australian
Maritime Safety Authority, which
is overseeing the search.
A Chinese Ilyushin IL-76 plane
spotted three floating objects,
China's official Xinhua News
Agency said, a day after several
planes and ships combing the
newly targeted area, which is
closer to Australia than the pre-
vious search zone, saw several
other objects.
The three objects spotted by
the Chinese plane were white,
red and orange in color, the Xin-
hua report said. The missing
Boeing 777's exterior was red,
white, blue and gray
Investigators have been puz-
zled over what happened to
Flight 370, with speculation rang-
ing from equipment failure and a
botched hijacking to terrorism or
an act by one of the pilots.


The latter was fueled by re-
ports that the pilot's home flight
simulator had files deleted from
it, but Malaysian Defense Minis-
ter Hishammuddin Hussein said
checks, including one by the FBI,
had turned up no new information.
Newly analyzed satellite data
shifted the search zone on Friday,
raising expectations that searchers
may be closer to getting physical
evidence that the plane crashed
into the Indian Ocean.
The U.S. Navy has already sent
equipment that can detect pings
from the back boxes, and Aus-
tralian Prime Minister Tony Ab-
bott told reporters in Sydney that
the equipment would be put on
an Australian naval ship soon.
The newly targeted zone is
nearly 700 miles northeast of sites
the searchers have crisscrossed
for the past week. The redeploy-
ment came after analysts deter-
mined that the Boeing 777 may
have been traveling faster than
earlier estimates and would there-
fore have run out of fuel sooner
The new search area is closer to
the southwestern Australian city
of Perth than the previous one, with
a flying time of 2 1/2 hours each
way allowingforfive hours of search
time, according to the Australian
Maritime Safety Authority


New cholesterol drugs showing promise


Associated Press


WASHINGTON A
new class of experimental
medicines can dramatically
lower cholesterol, raising
hopes of a fresh option for
people who can't tolerate
or don't get enough help
from Lipitor and other
station drugs that have been
used for this for decades.
The first large studies of
these drugs were pre-
sented Saturday at an
American College of Car-
diology conference in
Washington, and more will
follow on Sunday


Several companies are
developing these drugs,
which are aimed at 70 mil-
lion Americans and mil-
lions more worldwide who
have high LDL or "bad"
cholesterol, a major risk
for heart disease.
Three studies of Amgen
Inc.'s version of these drugs,
called evolocumab, found
it lowered LDL or "bad"
cholesterol by 55 to 66 per-
cent from baseline levels
compared to others who took
a fake drug, and by nearly
that much when compared
to Merck's Zetia, another
cholesterol medication.


As impressive as that is,
it's still just part of the pic-
ture. Doctors want evidence
that the way these drugs
lower cholesterol also will
lead to fewer heart attacks
and deaths, because that
proof already exists for stations.
New studies are under way
to test this, but Amgen said
it will seek approval for its
drug this year based on
cholesterol-lowering alone.
That was enough to win
approval for stations and
Zetia, but use of Zetia has
declined since 2008, when
research showed it failed
to help prevent heart at-


tacks even though it cut
cholesterol. Hopes are high
thatthe newAmgen drug and
others like it will do better
The new drugs block
PCSK9, a substance that
interferes with the liver's
ability to remove choles-
terol from the blood.
They have big draw-
backs, though. Statins are
pills sold as generics for as
little as a dime a day The
new drugs are proteins
rather than chemicals, and
those tend to be very ex-
pensive to make. They also
must be given as shots every
two weeks or once a month.


World BRIEFS

Time's a-changin'


taw,


Associated Press
The national flag of Russia
flies atop a city clock tower
Saturday in Sevastopol,
Crimea. Crimea switched
to Moscow time at 2 a.m.
local time on Sunday,
March 30. The clocks were
moved forward two hours.

Militants killed in
Afghan standoff
KABUL, Afghanistan -
Afghan police killed all five
militants who attacked the
election commission head-
quarters in Kabul on Satur-
day with rocket-propelled
grenades and machine
guns, ending a four-hour
standoff, according to a top
government official.
The Taliban claimed re-
sponsibility for the assault.
It is the latest in a series of
high-profile attacks by the
Islamic militant movement
as it steps up a campaign
of violence to disrupt presi-
dential elections due to be
held in a week.
Deputy Interior Minister
Mohammed Ayub Solangi
said the attackers wore the
all-encompassing burqa to
sneak unnoticed into a
building that looked on to
the heavily fortified Inde-
pendent Election Commis-
sion headquarters on the
eastern edge of the capital.
They were never able to
breach the heavily defended
compound housing the
commission itself, though
two warehouses were hit
and caught on fire. Two po-
licemen were wounded in
the firefight.
UK holds first
same-sex weddings
LONDON Gay couples
in Britain waited decades
for the right to get married.
When the opportunity
came, it took just a few min-
utes to make history.
Londoners Sean AdI-
Tabatabai and Sinclair
Treadway were among the
first to tie the knot when
Britain's new marriage law
came into effect Saturday.
The two men wed in front
of about 100 guests at their
local town hall in the Lon-
don borough of Camden -
one of several locales hold-
ing late-night ceremonies to
mark the occasion. By 10
minutes past midnight they
were married, with a kiss
and a registrar's declara-
tion: 'You are now husband
and husband."
Same-sex marriage has
been welcomed with enthu-
siasm by Britain's Conser-
vative-led government.
Rainbow flags went up over
two government buildings
Friday in what Deputy
Prime Minister Nick Clegg
called "a small symbol to
celebrate a massive
achievement."
-From wire reports














EXCURSIONS


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Billed as the first major town
liberated by the Allies, Bayeux
was miraculously spared
damage during the war. Today,
the old town center boasts
cobblestone streets, upscale
shops, small eateries and
picturesque mills along the
narrow Aure River; lacemakers
practice the intricate local art
across from a cathedral with
stunning Norman architecture.


French hamlet boasts ancient tapestry, D-Day history

Kathy Matheson
Associated Press


BAYEUX, France
here's a digital clock on
display outside the visi-
tors center in the charm-
ing Normandy town of Bayeux
- but it doesn't tell the time. It's
counting down the days until the
70th anniversary of D-Day in
June.
My husband and I visited
Bayeux last fall to spend the
weekend at a conference. The
"clock" seemed to indicate we
had landed in the right place to
squeeze in some historical sight-


seeing, since we weren't far
from the beaches where Allied
forces invaded on June 6,1944.
But we soon learned that
World War II-related tourism
comprises only part of the at-
traction of Normandy, a region
rich in history and natural
beauty The countryside also
features quaint cities and cen-
turies-old chateaus, as well as
apple farms and windswept
coastlines.
Bayeux, about three hours by
bus from Paris, is a great place
to start.


Visitors flock to see the town's
namesake tourist attraction: the
Bayeux Tapestry The nearly
thousand-year-old treasure,
which is actually more of an em-
broidered scroll, depicts the
story of how William, the duke
of Normandy, became king of
England.
I admit to being skeptical
about how impressive this
would be textiles are not usu-
ally high on my list of sightsee-
ing priorities. Yet as I moved


Page A25


* ^^^^iW





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENGAGED


Barker/Felthoff
Mr and Mrs. William Barker of
Lecanto and Mr and Mrs. Brock Felthoff
of Inverness announce the betrothal of
their children, Brittany Danielle Barker
and Dalton Anthony Felthoff.
The couple became engaged March 15,
2014, at St. Petersburg Beach.
The bride-elect is a 2012 graduate of ..
Lecanto High School and is currently
attending the College of Central
Florida, where she majors in medical
office administration.
Her fiance is a 2011 graduate of Citrus
High School and is now in the U.S.
Coast Guard. He is currently stationed
in Dubuque, Iowa.
The couple plan to exchange wedding
vows in the spring of 2015.


FOR THE RECORD


March 10-16, 2014
Divorces
Renee June Christopher McPheeters vs.
Rodger Franklin McPheeters
Thomas John Cunliffe, Beverly Hills vs.
Josephine Judith Cunliffe, Beverly Hills
Jamie Lynn Moore Kaczyk, Dunnellon vs.
Charles W. Kaczyk, Saddle Brook, N.J.
Andrea Hirsh Pearce, Beverly Hills vs.
Lionel Michael Pearce, Homosassa
Edward Allen Peters, Inverness vs. Judith
Perl Quatrano-Peters, Brooksville
Felicia Shewbart, Crystal River vs. Keith
Michael Shewbart, Crystal River
Erika Beatriz Tuchbaum-Biro, Ocala vs.
Stephen Scott Biro, Tampa, FL
Marriages
Anthony Elie Belcastro Jr., Floral
City/Alexandra Marie Jones, Dunnellon
Eli Gram Burks, Homosassa/Brittany Lynn
Lord, Homosassa
Thomas Robert Cardona, Inverness/Bonnie
Jean Simonetti, Inverness


FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and marriages filed in the
state of Florida are a matter of
public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.
Joseph Emmanuel Coldsnow,
Ocala/Michele Jean Faver, Marion
Gregory Lee Entrekin, Dunnellon/Haidee
Marie Olson, Dunnellon
Joseph Anthony Hanley,
Homosassa/Suzanne Carol Mascatelli,
Homosassa
George Anthony Lozito, Citrus
SpringsNeronica Hope Palmer, Beverly Hills
Bobby Lee Smith, Heiskell, Tenn./Donna
Leora Cox, Heiskell, Tenn.
Walter Thomas Turk III, Inverness/Felisha
Lynn Johns, Inverness


Humane SocietyOF CITRUS COUNTY

Snickers .
Don't let Snickers' gray muzzle make you think she is a
senior that is near the end of the line. She is 7 to\
8 years old and spayed, but spry and loves to play ball
and in the water. This Lab loves people and gets along
great with other dogs. Adoptions require an approved
application and adoption fee. If you are interested in
Snickers or wish to view other adoptable pets, visit the
website at www.roomforonemore.net, and for additional
information, call Karron at 352-560-0051.
Special to the Chronicle


Introducing

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Care


A18SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


TOGETHER


d ^






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keep eyes open


for cancer signs


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 30. 2014 C:Comcast. Citrus B: Bright House DII Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F. Oak Forest H: Holday Heights
C B DAI F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:001I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00111:30
SWESHNBC 19 19 News News The Voice (N)'PG' Dream Builders Believe (N)'14' Crisis (N)'14'a News Access
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( FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Burgers Dad 14' Simpsons 14' Odyssey'PG (In Stereo) N Notice'PG'
3 WJABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Resurrection (N)'PG' Revenge (N)'PG' News Inside Ed.
m L IND 2 2 2 22 22 o Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken Doug Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
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Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee (In Stereo)'14' Glee Will plans a sur- The Office The Office We There We There
MO IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory prise for Emma.'14' 'PG' I'PG' Yet? Yet?
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54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynty y Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty by Mia"'PG' Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
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I 52 35 52 19 21 Glades" (N) 'PG' identify a predator. PG, L M Ness monster. (In Stereo) PG B Unhooked'PG'B
S 96 1** "Daddy's Little Girls" (2007, Romance) BET Awards 2013 Chris Brown; Mariah Carey.'PG, D'
96 19 96 GabrelleUnion.'PG-13'"
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S1 27 **3 "Liar Liar" (1997, Comedy) *** "Dumb & Dumber" (1994) Jim Carrey. Two witless Amy Schumer: Mostly South Park South Park
S27 61 27 33 Jim Carrey. PG-13'" wonders take a cash-laden briefcase to Aspen. Sex Stuff *MA' 'MA'
S"Mall Cop" 12004) *** "The Rock" (1996 Action) Sean Connery Nicolas Cage. Alcatraz Cops Cops Cops Cops
iMY) 98 45 98 28 37 Derek Cecil. NR' Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. 'R 'Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded
S 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed American Greed The Profit
S 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Special Report Death Row Stores Death Row Stories Chicagoland Death Row Stories
Austin & Austin & Jessie I Didn't Do *** "Despicable Me"(2010) Phineas Jessie Win, Lose A.N.T. Good-
iSJ 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Ally'G' 'G'" It'G' Voices of Steve Carell.'PG'" and Ferb 'G'" or Draw Farm G' Charlie
PN 33 27 33 21 17 Bowling Sunday Night Countdown MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at San Dieg o Padres. (N) SportsCenter (N)
S 34 28 34 43 49 Basket Update Women's College Basketball College GameDay SportsCenter (N) NHRA Drag Racing
WT 95 70 95 __ 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live'PG' ISunday Night Prime G.K. IRosary Heart of the Matter Life on the Rock 'G'
29 52 29 2 28 ** "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1" (2010, Fantasy) *** "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2" (2011) Daniel
29 52 29 20 28 Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. PG-13' Radcliffe. Harry may have to make the ultimate sacrifice.
rcix 118 170 ** "Antitrust" (2001, Suspense) Ryan ** "Cocktail"(1988) Tom Cruise. *** "Born on the Fourth ofJuly"(1989, Docudrama)
118 170 Phillippe. (In Stereo) PG-13' (In Stereo)'R' Tom Cruise, Willem Dafoe.R'[
f 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
fD 26 56 26 Worst Cooks Chopped 'G' Food Court Wars'G' Chopped (N)'G' Cutthroat Kitchen'G' Restaurant: Im.
CS 732 112 732 Monster Jam (N) NASCAR UFC Anthony Pettis World Poker Can./Australia FOX Sports Live (N)
[S L 35 39 35 __ NBA Basketball Toronto Raptors atOrlando Magic. Magic The Best of Pride (N) Cutting Game 365 Word Poker
1 *** "Thor" (2011, Action) Chris Hemsworth. Cast out of *** "Captain America: The First Avenger" (2011, Action) Chris "Capt.
X 30 60 30 51 Asgard, the Norse god lands on Earth. 'PG-13' Evans. Capt. America battles the evil HYDRA organization. 'PG-13' America"
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) LPGA Tour Golf Kia Classic, Final Round. PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, Final Round.
_ *** "Just Desserts" (2004, Romance- "A Crush on You" (2011 Romance-Comedy) When Calls the Heart The Middle The Middle
HLL 59 68 59 45 54 Comedy) Lauren Holly. B Brigid Brannagh. NR' _1RM cG'Ba'PGrt ThMiddle
S 302 201 30 2i 2 "Wrath- ** "Mama"(2013, Horror) Jessica Chastain. ** "The Heat" (2013, Comedy) Sandra VICE 'MA' ** "The Hangover
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S 30 20 3Boxing NowYou Real Time With Bill ** "The Great Gatsby" (2013, Drama) Leonardo *** "Prometheus" (2012) Noomi
303202 303 See Me Maher'MA' DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire. (In Stereo)'PG-13'B Rapace.'R'm
H 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntIntl Hunters HuntlIntl Carb Carib Beach Beach Alaska Alaska Hunters Huntlntl
5 5 American Pickers American Pickers Ax Men "Battle Ax" Ax Men "Trucked Up" No Man's Land "My Cryptid: The Swamp
*51 54 51 32 42 'PG'" 'PG'" 'PG'" (N)'PG'" Desert Gold" (N)'PG' Beast'PG'"
2 3 2 "Zoe Gone"(2014) "The Ugly Truth" (2009, Romance-Comedy) Drop Dead Diva "First Drop Dead Diva "First "The UglyTruth"
24 38 24 31 Jean Louisa Kelly. Katherine Heigl.'R' B Date" (N)'PG' Date"'PG' (2009)'R'
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320 221 320 3 3 Mary" Nicholas Hoult. PG-13' JLawrence. (In Stereo)'PG-13'" Christian Bale. (In Stereo)'PG-13'BF
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42 41 42"Confrontation" "The Thin Blue Line"
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340N241 340 4 Naomi Watts.PG-13' m Lies MA 'MA'B 'MA'B Lies'MA' Lies'MA' 'MA'B
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31 59 31 26 29 Hungry vampires descend on an Alaskan town.'R' befriends the strange new girl who lives next door. "Blade II"
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D earAnnie: I am a
53-year-old sur-
vivor of the na-
tion's No. 2 killer cancer:
colorectal (colon) cancer
Two years ago, I re-
quested a colonoscopy
because I had one
alarming symptom of
cancer: blood and tissue
in my stool. Doctors dis-
covered a large tumor in
my colon. It was a slow-
growing can-
cer, and the
doctors said
it could have
started 10
years prior, in
my early 40s.
It was still
stage one and
easily re-
moved with
no chemo-
therapy or
radiation. ANN
My life is MA
back to nor- AI
mal, and I am
a survivor
Every year, more than
50,000 people die from
colorectal cancer It is
easily diagnosed and, if
caught early, is usually
very treatable. Your
chances of having colon
cancer increase with
age, but more young peo-
ple are being diagnosed
with colon cancer than
before.
Readers should be
aware of these signs:
1. Blood in the stool or
rectal bleeding when
you have a bowel
movement.
2. Stomach aches,
pains and cramps that
continue with no
apparent cause.


3. Difficulty eating or
swallowing.
4. Losing weight with-
out cause.
Many times colon can-
cer causes no symptoms
until it has spread.
Please discuss colon
cancer screenings with
your physician. A
colonoscopy is an easy
procedure that shows
polyps, both cancerous
and non-
cancerous, and
they can be re-
moved at the
time of the
screening to
prevent them
from becoming
cancerous.
Please help me
to save lives by
letting every-
one know
E'S about this
killer disease.
BOX --L.

Dear L.:
Thank you for reminding
our readers how impor-
tant it is to take those
preventive measures
that allow us to stay
healthy Please, folks, if
you are over 50 or have a
family history that in-
creases your risk, make
an appointment today

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
4:40 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Divergent" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) 2 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted"
(PG) 1:25 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:10 p.m.,5 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
1:35 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13) 7:45 p.m.
"Sabotage" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13)


1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Divergent" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:20 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted"
(PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Zodiac sign
6 Spiritual leader
10 Tsunami
14 Kite appendage
18 Be innate
20 "- Brockovich"
21 Attention-getting sound
22 Matter
24 Light fixture
25 Place in SE Asia
26 Plantation
27 "-days hath ..."
29 Air
30 Marsh bird
32 Sprite
34 Phi Kappa
36 Trig function
37 Exist
38 Tie
39 Pole for walking tall
41 Sharp flavor
43 Actor Aykroyd
44 Pip
45 Design
47 Prejudice
49 Collect
52 Postal matter
53 Twosome
55 Man of the cloth
59 Not at all sociable
60 Like oxen
62 Commotion
64 Hippodrome
65 Crippled
66 Student at
Annapolis
67 Calendar abbr.
69 Japanese drama
71 Helper (Abbr.)
72 Grassland
73 Also-ran
74 Bill and-
75 Place
77 Set
78 Vagrant
80 Liken
82 Very much so
84 Balance
85 Hospital area
87 Rainbow (Prefix)
88 French painter
89 Tapped
90 Plain to see
92 Kind of goose
93 Nest-egg letters
94 Firearm
96 Fall behind
97 Indistinct


99 Demand payment from
102 Traveler's permit
104 Barracks item
105 -capita
106 Hasten
107 Beak part
108 Consume (2 wds.)
110 Machine part
112 Promise
114 Eat to excess
115 "- no business like ..."
117 Wreck
119 Villain in
Shakespeare
120 Kind of sheet
121 Palo-
123 Ajoint
125 One-liner
126 Devilkin
129 Lights-out signal
131 Saplings
132 Ceramic item
133 Luau fare
136 Regrets
138 500 sheets
140 Heir, often
141 Grocery store
142 Blueprint
143 Lady's companion
145 Tribe of Israel
147 Inoffensive oath
149 Consider identical
151 Stand
152 Fruitless
153 "- Like It Hot"
154 Long carpet
155 Observe
156 Designer
Cassini
157 Go up
158 T-man


DOWN
1 Prospect
2 Bring about
3 River in France
4 Kelly or
Roddenberry
5 Tolkien monster
6 Very cold
7 River in Russia
8 Vegas casino
9 Discombobulate
10 Was indecisive
11 Cry of discovery
12 Action word
13 M.-Walsh
14 Colossal


15 Fire residue
16 Egyptian goddess
17 Scandalous
19 More uncanny
23 Lab burner
28 Hankering
31 Plus
33 Kindled
35 Bar bill
38 Complaint
39 Sanctified one
40 Reliance
42 Festival
44 Brake part
45 Kitchen tool
46 After deductions
48 Antitoxins
49 Effrontery
50 Winglike parts
51 Spaghetti sauce ingre-
dient
(2 wds.)
52 Fashion
54 Dyed
56 Shining brilliantly
57 Offend
58 Malicious
60 Box-lid hardware
61 Condemn
63 Fish eggs
66 Relating to farce
68 Kind of saw
70 Agreement
73 Light-beam device
74 Baby
75 Lanka
76 Distributed cards
79 Rend
80 Dernier-
81 Skill
83 Literary collection
84 One who is
outcast
85 Disorderly mass
86 Maria
89 Bolt
91 Wyatt of the
Old West
92 Beget
95 Pea soup
97 Soft candy
98 Jason's vessel
100 Press
101 Requirement
103 Unseen
emanation
105 Lithograph or
photograph
106 Mends


Mention
Hit repeatedly
Sea bird
Semblance
Tour de France vehicle
Surprise
Kind of home
Nurture
Unclose,
poetically


Big-biz VIP
Container
Wrath
Clio is one
Oval nut
Burst of guns
Darth -
Carpentry tool
Of a grain
Sluggish


Middling (Hyph.)
Crushed grain
Baby talk
Box sleigh
Soak flax
Contend
Something sticky
Sine non


Puzzle answer is on Page A28.


Q 2014 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


II
LE


ENTERTAINMENT


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call
352-795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost1l55@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544,
or email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness. Call Com-
mander Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary presidentAlice
Brumett at 352-476-7001.
N American Legion Post 166
has a new schedule. Meetings are
the first Monday at 7 p.m. at the
Springs Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. To
accommodate members who can-
not drive at night, breakfast meet-
ings are also held at Olive Tree at
9 a.m. weekly. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-2090 for
days and other information.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-
860-1629.

VETERANS
OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087,
County Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post


This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled
activities, meetings, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and
groups may email changes or corrections to community@chronicleonline.com.


4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tampabay.rr.
com and Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west of
U.S. 19 between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW
Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call
352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post
447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis,
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M. Bailey
Post 89, Homosassa. The newly
formed post meets the first Thurs-
day of the month. Call Roger Ingall
Jr. at 352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American Veterans
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter No. 70,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at
the intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-
419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call
Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-
794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans
Chapter No. 158, Crystal River,
meets at the Crystal River Mall. For
more information, call Duane


Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies
Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498 meets at
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in
Hernando. Call Susan McQuiston at
352-666-0084, or Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
National Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23 meets at
10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
National Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De
Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of


Military Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at
the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or Secre-
tary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252
in Hernando. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or Wal-
lace Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Saturdays at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.
Remaining meetings in 2014 are:
March 8, April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at
West Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or email


seacapt34447@yahoo.com or
Robert Currie at 352-799-5250 or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at Elks Lodge No. 2522,
3580 Lemon Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
President Archie Gooding at 352-
464-0863 or email GatorDad0527
@tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport
Administration Building, 750 S.W.
60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV property in
Inverness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition; call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource,
seeks to meet the needs of
wounded veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email charles.
lawrence@servicesource.org.


To submit story ideas for
feature sections, call
352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby, features
editor. Be prepared to give
your name, phone
number and brief
information regarding the
idea.


JrWHYEVERYT Citrus County BarAssociation
lT C2 Law Week Art Contest


$100 Cash Prize in All Four Categories
* Kindergarten-5th grade 9th-12th grade
* 6th-8th grade Adult


Draw your best representation of our All entries must be mailed or dropped off by April 15
theme "American Democracy And Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429 ,
The Rule Of Law: Why Every Vote Matters" for more information please call 352-795-0404


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A20 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


VETERANS


MHPWC









SRPaqeOA21 -SUNDAY, MARCH 30,2014

VETERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Artists sought for exhibit
The Florida Artists Gallery is planning a
special exhibit honoring Citrus County
veterans who are artists, with a juried ex-
hibit that will run the full month of May
Painters, illustrators and fine art pho-
tographers are being sought, and the only
rule for eligibility is that the artist be a
veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces who re-
sides in Citrus County no less than six
months per year, and is willing to sell his
or her art.
There is no entry fee and awards will be
given in each category, in addition to a
best of show award.
Both military and nonmilitary subject
matter is appropriate. Application dead-
line is April 15.
Entry forms can be obtained at the
Florida Artists Gallery in Floral City, or by
mailing floridaartistsgallery@gmail.com.
A good-quality photograph preferably
a digital photograph should be submit-
ted for each work of art to be considered.
Work does not have to be framed, but it
must be fitted with a durable hanging
wire.
The Florida Artists Gallery and Caf6 is
in the historic Knight House at 8219
Orange Ave. in Floral City For more
information, call 352-344-9300, or go to
www.flartistsgallerycom.

Vendors sought for fair
Organizers of the May 10 Health Fair at
the Crystal River Mall are looking for ven-
dors.
The event, sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter 158 and the Crystal
River Mall, will be in the Westend Market
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Spring into Healthy Living" is the
theme for the fair, which will feature edu-
cation, screening and healthy living con-
sultations.
Those interested in participating may
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104.

Post 166 forming auxiliary
American Legion Post 166 of Homosassa
Springs invites women in the Chassahow-
itzka, Homosassa, Homosassa Springs and
Sugarmill Woods areas to take part in
forming an American Legion Auxiliary for
the post.
Come to an organizational meeting at
7 p.m. Monday, April 7, at Springs Lodge
No. 378 F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive.
Membership in the Auxiliary is limited
to mothers, wives, daughters, sisters,
granddaughters, great-granddaughters
and grandmothers of the American Le-
gion, or to those who were in the U.S.
Armed Forces during times of war
Senior members are age 18 and older;
junior members are younger than 18.

Post offers Tax-Aide service
Wall Rives Post 58 of the American
Legion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, hosts
the AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation
services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday
through April 9.
Call Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066 for
information.

VFW plans fish fry Friday
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a
fish fry dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. April 4 with Nashville
artist John Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Sons of Legion plan meal
Squadron 155 Sons of the American
Legion will have its monthly "Meatloaf
Friday" on April 4 at the post from 5 to
6:30 p.m. in the American Legion Post
dining hall.
A 50/50 drawing will be held to benefit
youth programs; music will follow in the
lounge afterwards.
Squadron 155 will be host its quarterly
blood drive from noon to 4 p.m. April 12 in
front of American Legion Post 155 in Crys-
tal River
The blood drive is open to the public.
Those age 16 are welcome to donate
with permission from a guardian. Others
age 17 and older are also asked to donate
the gift of life.


Building a career


MATTHEW BECK/Special to the Chronicle
A native of Bethlehem, Pa., Arthur Devlin was drafted when he was 18 in July 1943. His initial inclination was to join the
U.S. Navy because he had a relative there and because he wanted to see the world. Unfortunately, because his vision
wasn't up to grade, he wasn't allowed in. So, he ended up in the Seabees, which is actually a spelled-out version for the
acronym CB, referring to construction battalion. Now living in Crystal River, he created the Crystal River Village Veterans
History Project, aimed at recording the histories of residents who served their country during a time of war.



Seabee vet works to keep history alive


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

In the Pacific
campaign during
World War II, the
road to victory
had to be paved. Guys
like Arthur Devlin did
just that.
A native of Bethlehem, Pa., Devlin
was drafted when he was 18 in July
1943. His initial inclination was to join
the U.S. Navy because he had a rela-
tive there an uncle who was a career
Navy man and because, like so many
others, he wanted to see the world. Un-
fortunately because his vision wasn't
up to grade, he wasn't allowed in.
So, he ended up in the Seabees,
which is actually a spelled-out version
for the acronym CB, referring to con-
struction battalion.
"I couldn't get into the Navy because
of my eyesight," said Devlin,
now 89 and living in Crys-
tal River 'And the
Navy is superior to
the Army, anyway"
The American
war effort in
World War II, es-
pecially in the
South Pacific,
was dependent
upon the efforts
of the Navy's
Seabees. The U.S.
strategy was de-
signed around is-
land hopping, which
meant a strong navy
was a necessity.
The initial Japanese
successes through the first
half of 1942 allowed them
to take command of an
area stretching from the
Philippine Islands and In-
dochina to much of China,
south to the Solomon Is- De
lands and as far north and
east as the Aleutian
Islands at the tip of
Alaska.
Recapturing these islands would
allow the U.S. to inch closer and closer
to Japan itself. But just taking over an
empty island would not be enough; it
had to be unusable. When U.S. troops
landed on Guadalcanal in August 1942,
the objective was to gain control of an
airfield that was under construction
they would later rename Henderson
Field.
Enter the Seabees. That project and
hundreds of others throughout the Pa-
cific campaign from building other
airfields to the construction of roads
and docking facilities and storage


areas for supplies and equipment-
were vital.
That's what Devlin was part of
"I was involved in a very important
project over there, near the Philip-
pines," he said. He was referring to his
assignment in the Philippines with the
61st Battalion, which landed on Leyte
Island in October 1944, four days after
Gen. Douglas MacArthur's famous re-
turn to the islands.
They went from there to Samar Is-
land, just north of Leyte. Their task was
to build an airstrip in excess of 6,000
feet in length, large enough to accom-
modate heavy bombers that could
reach targets in Japan. Working two
shifts per day their work was com-
pleted and the first U.S. bombers
landed in December 1944.
Japanese planes still threatened the
base and snipers were a menace. Also,
simultaneous with the start of their
airfield construction on Samar, the


Name: Arthur Devlin
Rank: Machinist mate Third Class
Branch: U.S. Navy Seabees
Service dates; Drafted July 1943,
discharged February 1946
Station areas: Guadalcanal Island;
SRussell Islands; Pavuvu Island;
SSamar Island in the Philippines
Jobs: Construction of much-needed
commodities such as a mobile
hospital, a pontoon dock and an
airfield
Awards: Pacific Theater Ribbon,
Philippine Liberation Ribbon with two
stars, American Theater Ribbon,
Victory Medal
Veterans organizations: Creator of
Crystal River Village Veterans
History Project


vlin as a 19-year-old in the Navy Seabees ir
Special to thi



largest naval battle of the war was
fought, the Battle of Leyte Gulf
The Imperial Japanese Navy mus-
tered nearly all of its remaining naval
vessels for the battle, but the U.S. Sev-
enth and Third fleets repulsed the
Japanese. Their losses were so heavy
they would never again sail into battle
with a force of comparable size to its
opponents.
When Devlin first shipped out, pass-
ing through the Panama Canal in Janu-
ary 1944, his first stop was Guadalcanal,
which was by now a secure U.S. base.


His initial duty was to water the area
around the command post, to keep the
dust down hardly an illustrious duty
one that earned him a lot of derision
from passing soldiers. More notewor-
thy tasks were to come, however
Two weeks after landing at Guadal-
canal, Devlin was reassigned to the
Russell Islands, 35 miles to the north.
Assigned to the 15th NCB unit, he
worked on the construction of a much-
needed mobile hospital and one he
would soon take advantage of In June
1944, Devlin was diagnosed with ap-
pendicitis, and he had to have his ap-
pendix removed. The operation was
done at the same hospital he helped
build.
Devlin also helped construct a pon-
toon dock on Pavuvu, which is where
he was working when he was stricken
with appendicitis.
He was honorably discharged in Feb-
ruary 1946, and took advantage of the


'Wi


rL!
-, MA









- n.


GI Bill to earn his bachelor's degree at
Moravian College and his master's de-
gree at the University of Delaware,
both in physics.
He worked at General Electric for 34
years before retiring and eventually
moving to Crystal River, where he
created the Crystal River Village Vet-
erans History Project, aimed at
recording the histories of residents
who served their country during a
time of war


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VFW post to
serve roast pork
The public is welcome
to join VFW Post 4337 for
a roast pork dinner by
Max from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, April 5.
Cost is $7 and includes
sides and desserts. Nell
will provide music from
6 to 9p.m.
Call 352-344-3495 or
visit wwwvfw4337.org for
news about all post
activities.

40&8 to have
breakfast April 6
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 welcomes the public
to breakfast from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. April 6, at
American Legion Post 155
on State Road 44 in
Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for
adults; special on kids' (8
and younger) meals. Spe-
cialty drinks available for
$1. The hall is smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit pro-
grams of the 40&8.

VA to host
open house
The Lecanto Veterans
Affairs (VA) Community
Based Outpatient Clinic
(CBOC) will host an En-
rollment Open House
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, April 12, at 2804
W Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Enrollment and eligibil-
ity staff will be available
to answer questions and
enroll veterans for health
care. While not required,
bring your DD 214 for ver-
ification of military serv-
ice. For more
information, call David
Gilmer at 352-746-8000.

CCVC yard sale
set for April 12
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Coalition has yard
sales September through
May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
the second Saturday of
the month Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church
in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State
Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and
set up the day before (typ-
ically Friday afternoon)
and are responsible for
the security of their own
items overnight. The
spots are typically 15 feet
by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least
one can of food is appre-
ciated. For more informa-
tion and to make
reservations, call Dan at
352-400-8952.

Get a cut, support
local post's efforts
Quick Stop Barber
Shop owner Donna Bow-
man and her staff of hair
care professionals will
donate their time and
provide free men's,
women's and kids' hair-
cuts from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday, April 13.
It is only requested that
a donation be made. The
event will include music,
food, raffles and a silent
auction. All proceeds will
be donated to the Beverly
Hills American Legion
Post 237.
The Quick Stop Barber
Shop is at 3541 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, in the Winn-Dixie
Plaza. Call 352-527-3030.

Flea market, food
on tap at Post 58
Wall-Rives Post No. 58
of the American Legion
will have an outdoor flea
market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m.
Saturday, April 19.
On the menu are pan-
cakes, French toast,
scrambled eggs, sausages,
orange juice and coffee


for $5 per person.
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Cook-off entries
being sought
Signups are being ac-
cepted for the April 26
BBQ Cook-Off sponsored
by the Crystal River DAV
Chapter and the Crystal
River Mall.
Barbecue categories in-


elude chicken, ribs,
brisket and butt. Entry fee
is $30.
The cook-off will be
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
the mall.
Applications must be
received by April 15. For
information or to register,
call Duane Godfrey at
352-228-0337 or 352-794-
3104, or email mgod-
frey222@gmail.com or
becky crystalrivermall
@gmail.com.

Come play games
in Homosassa
VFW Post 8189 in
Homosassa invites the
public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at
2 p.m. Wednesday and
food is available. Jam ses-
sions are from 3 to 7 p.m.
Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5.
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Public can eat
shrimp, wings
Everyone is welcome to
join Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
in Crystal River on
Wednesday for wings or
shrimp basket lunches in
the lounge from noon to
3p.m.
All proceeds benefit
veterans' programs.
For more information,
call 352-795-6526.

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), offers
several events that are
open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sun-
days in the smoke-free
hall. Card bingo and grill
night is at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m. Mon-
days and Fridays in the
Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Post 4252 invites
all to meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State
Road 200 in Hernando
(with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the pub-
lic at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch
every day and breakfast
on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include
bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show
Me the Hand at 2 p.m.
Thursday
Dance music is on tap
every Friday and bingo is
played in the hall Satur-
day
Friday features an all-
you-can-eat fish fry or
New England boiled
dinner
For more information
and menus, call the post
at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay
rrcom and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other


from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need.
Veterans who need to
go to appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must
be made before 1 p.m.


VETERANS NOTES


IN SERVICE

Dillon Aguirresaenz
Army Pvt. Dillon A. Aguirresaenz has graduated from
basic infantry training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier re-
ceived training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map
reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physi-
cal fitness, first aid and Army history, core values and
traditions. Additional training included development of
basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tac-
tics, and experiencing use of various weapons and
weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman.
Aguirresaenz is the son of Dwight and Thadee
Aguirresaenz of Wahiawa, Hawaii.
He is a 2012 graduate of Lecanto High School.


DAV transport
needs new van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures. The program
uses a loaner van, which
has more than 270,000
miles on it, to transport to
The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-


ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.


Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas.
Call 352-527-5915 to re-
serve a seat. For more in-
formation about the
Citrus County Veterans
Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.


Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
back-ground check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
com, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice has
veterans program
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans benefits. Call
the 352-527-4600.

REUNION
The next reunion for
the USS Chilton will be
Sept. 17 to 24 in
Louisville, Ky.
For information, call
Joe at 352-341-5959.


WorriedAbout A Heart Attack Or
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COLLEGE o f

CENTRAL

,g u FLORIDA

wv www.CFedu/Equity

El College of Central Florida ofrece acceso por igual a oportunidades de empleo. inmscripciones y actividades
educacionales. El colegio no discriminard en base de raza, color, etnicidad. religion, g6nero. edad.estadocivil
nacionalidad de origen, informrnaci6n genetica o discapacidades, en sus practlicas laborales o enflalinscripcion
trato de sus alumnos qReconociendo que el acoso sexual constitu) e una discrimination en base a genero
que viola /o establecido por esta political el colegio no tolerari dicha conduct. El College of CentraliForida-es un
coleglo de igualdadde oportunidades y manifiesta su creencia en la igualdad de acceso } oportuni a p od
los estudiantes, empleados y visitantes de la instituci6n. Si usted tiene alguna preocupacionsbrediscnminacion
o acoso, por favor contact a official de equidad, Ocala Campus, Ewers Century Center. Saln62 35285-2322,
w
ext. 1437, email: smithc@cf.edu.

College of Central Florida offers equal access and opportunity in employ ment. admissions and educationalactivities.
The college will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, gender, age. marital sausTnationalu
origin, genetic information or disability status in its employment practices or in the admission and.7 ratraent f students
Recognizing that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination on the basis of gender and violateshispolicystatement.
the college will not tolerate such conduct. College of Central Florida is an equal opportuni.c gean navomits7ibfelef
inequal access and opportunity for all students employees and guests of the institution. If,ou lav a e oncemregar ing
discrimination or harassment, please contact equity officer, Ocala Campus. Ewvers CenturyCenrRome201
351-854-2322. ext 1437. email: smithc@cf.edu .


A22 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


VETERANS & IN SERVICE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


352-322-5607


SHRED-A-DRIVE


ON-SITE HARD DRIVE SHREDDING
& COMPUTER RECYCLING
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Personal Information On Your Computer Hard
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A24 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Be ready to shape up and ship out in only one week


after spending a week in
the Caribbean on a
cruise ship, I wondered
if Sue had been intentionally
starving me all these years. We
never have mid-morning pas-
tries at home. She never serves
a dessert with lunch. And
where is our late afternoon
slice of pizza? Where is our be-
fore-dinner margarita and bar
nuts? Where are our four-
course meals nightly with
wine? We don't need a vacation;
we need a chef
I'm now wondering if it is pos-
sible for a human to go without
food for three or even four hours.
What will happen if we have to
go five entire hours without
something to eat? Surely that is
just as deadly as eating the
wrong part of the pufferfish.
It wasn't until I saw how the
other half ate that I realized


exercising, avoiding beer and
liquor, always asking our host-
..Jim ess for "just a half a slice,
please" when someone invited
Mullen us out to dinner Then when I
get on board this ship, I realize
VILLAGE that I'm the only person on the
SIDIOT planet who's doing that. Every-
one else is having two of every-
thing, snacking between meals,
drinking liquor and beer, then
how deprived I was. Why do I doing it all over again the next
have to get up every morning day And not only are they still
and walk to the kitchen to have alive, they're wearing Speedos.
breakfast when on the ship "I didn't know Speedos came
they brought it right to my in that size," I told Sue.
room? I had the feeling they She responded, "Obviously
would cut it up and feed it to they don't"
me if I had only thought to ask. It is clear to me now that I
Next time I will. Why waste my have been doing this eating
precious energy lifting a fork thing all wrong. When my doc-
and a knife? tor said I should be eating a
For years I've been trying to Mediterranean diet, I thought
lose weight, watching what I he meant eat the way they do in
eat staying away from sweets, southern Europe: more fish


and vegetables, less meat; more
olive oil, less butter Clearly
what he really meant was, "Eat
like you're on a cruise in the
Mediterranean."
And it wasn't as if I was get-
ting no exercise. I can't tell you
how many times that week I
had to reach out and hit the ele-
vator button to get to the dining
room. Often I would wait for an-
other passenger to do it, but
most of them were cruise veter-
ans and knew how to wait me
out. I also had to turn the pages
of my own book between meals.
Sheesh! I might as well have
been at home.
When I told my friends I'd
been on a cruise, the first thing
most of them asked was "Did
you get sick?" which is an odd
question coming from my
friends. They seem to forget
that I've been in their kitchens


and bathrooms, and if that
doesn't make me sick, nothing
will. Bob told me once that his
kitchen floor "was so clean you
could eat off it." And it cer-
tainly looks like he does. Be-
sides, I wonder if some of the
stomach flu we hear about on
cruises really starts the plane
ride to the port city Every time
I get on a plane, the moment
the cabin door closes, the guy
behind me starts blowing his
nose and coughing deep, wet-
sounding coughs. So three days
later, if I got sick on the boat,
would it be the cruise line's
fault?
Actually, I was kind of hoping
I would catch something. It's
only way I will ever lose all the
weight I gained.

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. corn.


Associated Press
Tourists outside of the seaside D-Day Museum (Musee du Debarquement) in Arromanches, France, take photos. Arromanches is one of several beaches on the coast
of Normandy likely to see an influx of tourists for the 70th anniversary of D-Day on June 6.


FRANCE
Continued from Page A17

through the dimly lit museum where the
tapestry is displayed, the 230-foot-long
piece of fabric came to life like a
graphic novel. A quickly paced, hand-
held audio narrative conveyed an en-
gaging tale of power, intrigue and
double-crossing that culminates in
William's triumph at the Battle of Hast-
ings in 1066.
The threaded illustrations of battle
proved a fascinating contrast to the rea-
son we had come to Bayeux.
We were attending events for the 20th
anniversary of the Prix Bayeux-Calvados,
journalism awards given each year to
honor war coverage in print photo, radio
and video. Prize-winning pictures of
global conflicts were exhibited at indoor
and outdoor venues throughout the town.
The searing images inspired us to pay
our respects at the reporters memorial,


about a 10-minute walk from the heart
of Bayeux. The quiet grove features a
path lined by dozens of stone pillars en-
graved with the names of 2,000 corre-
spondents who have died on the job
since World War II.
Nearby sits Bayeux's museum of the
Battle of Normandy, marked by several
tanks parked outside. It's an analog af-
fair by today's standards instead of
interactive iPad displays there are de-
partment-store mannequins dressed in
battle gear but the building is packed
with information, wall maps, military
equipment and period artifacts.
Across the street lies evidence of the
true cost of war: a British cemetery and
memorial for soldiers killed in the cam-
paign to liberate France. It's hard not to
be moved by the young ages on the
headstones and the grateful comments
left in the guest registry by tourists from
around the world. "Thank you for my
freedom!" was written more than once.
To reach the actual invasion beaches
about 10 miles away, you'll need to rent


a car or reserve a spot on any of several
organized tours.
Each of the five plagess du debarque-
men't" Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and
Sword has its own memorial or mu-
seum. The American cemetery above
Omaha beach in Colleville-sur-Mer is
the final resting place of 9,400 service
members, its graves marked by somber,
meticulous rows of crosses overlooking
the English Channel. A German battery
at Longues-sur-Mer between Omaha
and Gold, still has its original guns.
Along that same stretch of shore,
you'll find remains of the Allies' artifi-
cial harbor at Arromanches. Without ac-
cess to a port to unload the tons of
supplies needed to support D-Day, offi-
cials realized they'd have to create their
own. So they floated over pontoons and
other structures from England to create
roadways from ships to shore; some are
still rusting away on the beach. You can
learn more at the waterfront war mu-
seum or, farther down the road, at a 360-
degree movie theater


Our quick trip did not leave time for
many other regional highlights, includ-
ing the abbey on the rock at Mont-St-
Michel; the artist Claude Monet's house
and gardens at Giverny; and the
renowned Gothic cathedral in Rouen,
which took nearly 400 years to build.
Many of the region's farms offer tours,
tasting and demonstrations of cider
making. It's a favorite local product and
bottles of cider- as well as apple
liqueurs known as calvados and pom-
meau de Normandie are frequently
found in souvenir stores. Such shops
also have no shortage of war-related me-
mentos, from cheap "Operation Over-
lord" wallets to old bullets and even
"D-Day" branded beer
Tourism is expected to be heavy for
the 70th anniversary of D-Day 'Jour
J" in French with President Barack
Obama and Queen Elizabeth among the
heads of state expected to mark the day
But the history and beauty of Normandy
can be experienced long after the clock
ticks down.


AMAWAT E RWAYS-
LEADING THE WAY IN RIVER CRUISING
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THE HOLY LAND
Presentation
April 9, 2014 2:00 P.M.
at the Quality Inn
350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (Rte. 486), Hernando
To reserve your seat call
THE TRAVEL CLUB
S gerrystravelclub@aol.com

(352) 527-8002


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

l352.795.5797
0Evr ln Outdoor www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS

0 0T


CARNIVAL LIBERTY
October 25, 2014
8 night Eastern Carribean
Aruba, Curacao and Grand Turk
Rates Starting at:

J736.85 per person
Based on double occupancy.
Includes Port and Gov't. Fees.
Based on availability at time of booking.


CIE TOURS
Taste of Ireland Tour
Rates Starting at:

898.00 per person
Based on double occupancy.
Land only, airfare and transfers
are additional.
Based on availability at time of booking.


The Homosassa River Garden Club invites you to join us at the
Riu Guanacaste Resort, Costa Rica
October 25th November 1st
This is a 5 star resort and the all-inclusive package includes rt airfare
from Tampa, all taxes, tips, transfers to resort, food and beverages.
Space is very limited. A $250.00 per person deposit will hold your space.
Total for this trip is $1590 pp/do
Call Buzz at The Travel Authority (352) 628-0668
7L 7Sll t 5390 South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa
______- (352) 628-0668
www.travelauthorityfl.com
of t6 i Email: buzzgwen@yahoo.com


COLLETTE National Parks of America
VACATIONS
$3,729.00 pp/dd Book Now and Save $100 per person!
September 6 -17, 2014
Includes:
* Round trip transportation including Air
* 16 Meals + 1 Additional Meal from Seaport Tours and Travel
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Visit: Scottsdale, Lake Powell, Grand Canyon, Bryce, Zion, Salt Lake
City, Grand Teton & Yellowstone National Parks, Old Faithful, Sheridan,
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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 A25




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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April 5, 2014 1
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A26 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Walk to defeat ALS
to be held in Ocala
On Saturday, April 5, more
than 300 people from Marion,
Citrus, Lake, Sumter, Levy,
Alachua, and Putnam counties
will gather at Jervey Gantt
Recreation Complex in Ocala to
join the fight to find a cure for a
deadly illness.
ALS, also known as Lou
Gehrig's Disease, progressively
paralyzes its victims, attacking
nerve cells and pathways in the
brain or spinal cord. ALS has
no known cause or cure, but the
Ocala community is rallying to-
gether to change that.
Wheelchair-bound patients,
along with their families and
friends, will make a two-mile
trek in The Walk to Defeat ALS,
hoping their steps will make a
difference for ALS patients liv-
ing in North Central Florida.
The Walk to Defeat ALS is
the ALS Association's signature
event, in which all funds di-
rectly support research, pro-
grams and patient care.
All interested walkers may
call 888-257-1717, or register at
www.WalktoDefeatALS.org.

Annual banquet
to help Grace House
The Sanctuary and Grace
House Mission's fourth annual
fundraising banquet -Free-
dom 2014 will be held at
6 p.m. Thursday, April 3, at
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa.
Tickets are $35 for individu-
als, $60 for a table or $300 to
sponsor a table. The speaker
will be Pastor Doug DeRespiris
of Lifepoint Family Church.
Testimonies from previous
and current clients are also
planned, as well as music and
singing, with a special song


a- 16


from current residents.
For more information, call
352-422-1877.

Floral City Library
slates Mini Book Sale
Friends of Floral City Library
will have a Mini Book Sale from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 5,
at the library, 8360 E. Orange
Ave., Floral City
Stock up for summer reading
and help the library make room
in the storage garage.
The sale will offer a selection
of hard-cover and paperback
books.
A special feature will be vin-
tage books priced accordingly
Call 352-726-3671 for more
information.

Go see Rays, help
feed Citrus' seniors
The Senior Foundation of
Citrus County and Citrus
County's Meals On Wheels Pro-
gram, along with sponsor the
Citrus County Chronicle, an-
nounce trips to attend Tampa
Bay Rays baseball games.
Tickets are $50 per person
and include round-trip trans-
portation on a chartered bus
from the Citrus County Re-
source Center to Tropicana
Field and seating at the game.
Tickets available for two up-
coming games:
Sunday, April 20 Rays vs.
Yankees; game time 1:40 p.m.
Bus leaves at 9:30 a.m.
Friday, May 9 Rays vs.
Indians; game time 7:10 p.m.
Bus leaves at 3:30 p.m.
The Rays vs. Indians game
will be with the Rays Fan Ex-
press Bus/Fox Sports Florida;
each bus rider will receive a
press-level (second tier) ticket
and a free Rays hat Each per-
son riding the Fox Sports
Florida bus must sign a waiver,


FUNDRAISERS
as pictures may be taken and
used for promotional purposes.
Tickets are on sale at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center,
2804 W Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. All proceeds go to-
wards helping seniors in Citrus
County For more information,
call 352-527-5900.

Power of the Purse
coming in June
The Power of the Purse
brings designer bags and more
together to Black Diamond in
one three-hour event on
Saturday, June 7.
United Way's second annual
Power of the Purse fundraiser
features silent auctions of gen-
tly used purses and live auc-
tions of new purses.
Donations of gently used
purses are being accepted now
United Way also accepts dona-
tions of new designer purses.
Purse donations are tax
deductible.
Proceeds from the event are
used by the Women's Leader-
ship Council (WLC) in its con-
tinued social philanthropy,
working with children and fam-
ilies in Citrus County
More than 100 women at-
tended the inaugural event in
June 2013, which raised more
than $8,000. To learn more
about the WLC or to inquire
about membership, visit
www. citrusunitedway org/
womens-leadership-council.

Event to benefit
Citrus United Basket
iStorage in Crystal River is
teaming up with Citrus United
Basket for a community chari-
table event from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, April 19, at 7957
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway in
Crystal River
iStorage will be giving all


donors of food, clothing and
cash a promotional gift bag
filled with various coupons
from local restaurants, bowling
alley and movie theater iStor-
age will provide food and
drinks on site.
All cash donations go to Cit-
rus United Basket.
For more information, call
Ray Speerly, iStorage store
manager, at 352-563-1412 and
visit the website at www
istorage.com.

Bunco Bash to help
spay/neuter pets
SnippetCitrus will host a
Bunco Bash on Sunday, April
27, at the Citrus County Re-
source Center, 2804 W Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
From 11:30 a.m. until
12:30 p.m. there will be snacks,
a Bunco Bags auction, Share
the Wealth and vendors. Bunco
will begin at 12:45 p.m.
There will be help for those
who do not know how to play, as
well as snacks, prizes and fun.
Everyone is welcome.
The person who registers the
most people will win four free
reservations for the next Bunco
Bash in July
Entry is a $12 nonrefundable
donation. All proceeds will ben-
efit SnippetCitrus.
SnippetCitrus is a group of
concerned Citrus County citi-
zens seeking to reduce the
homeless population of dogs
and cats in Citrus County
The Bunco Bash will raise
funds to provide low-cost
spay/neuter services to families
who qualify, as well as educate
the community on the impor-
tance of spaying and neutering
pets. Only those who make a
reservation will be guaranteed
a seat.
For more information, call
Lois at 352-382-0777.


'Diaper Dump' comes
to Homosassa area
The Kiwanis Club of
Homosassa Springs is collect-
ing diapers for lower-income
families in Citrus County
The "Diaper Dump" will take
place in front of the Walmart in
Homosassa from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 19. Unopened
packages of diapers of all sizes
are sought, including adult dia-
pers.
Florida Kiwanis Clubs are
striving to collect and distribute
750,000 diapers to those babies,
mothers and others who need
help. The Homosassa Springs
club is partnering with Walmart
and the We Care Food Pantry to
provide diapers to residents.
Infants require approxi-
mately 12 diapers a day and
government programs do not
cover any of the cost for dia-
pers. One of every three fami-
lies struggles to provide
diapers, sometimes causing ba-
bies in poorer families to spend
all day in the same diaper
For more information, call
352-628-5281.

Learn to survive with
PediAquatics class
Scholarships are now avail-
able for survival swim lessons
for children ages 1 to 4 at Pedi-
Aquatics. Apply online at
www.GiftOfPediaquatics.org.
Partial scholarships are also
available.
There will be a Swim-A-Thon
fundraiser on Saturday May 3.
All ages, children and adults,
can participate. All proceeds go
toward scholarships. Register
online at wwwGiftOfPedi
aquatics.org by April 25. The
participant with the most funds
raised wins four park-hopper
tickets to Disney
Call 352-586-6695.


C CI T R U S .- -CO U N T Y

HKONiICLE
V www.chronicleonline.co,m


F ? __
.... "-"g\


Ic ia
1-352-566-6615
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m w4Rp
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SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 A27


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All That Jazz


CLAIRE PHILLIPS LAXTON/Chronicle
"All That Jazz" with plenty of glitz and glamor was presented on March 14 by the Women's Ministry of the First
Baptist Church for the 2014 Women's Event. Multi-talented Tempe Brown a jazz singer, published author,
former art director and editor was the guest speaker and singer. She performs around the country and
internationally, speaking for various organizations. Besides wooing the audience with her vocals, Brown gave an
uplifting spiritual talk after dinner. She is also the Stonecroft Regional Speaker Trainer for South Carolina. From
left are: Tempe Brown, Shandry Hembree, chairwoman of the event, and some of the committee members Pat
Van Ness, Jo Brasington and Vivian O'Dell.


Safe boaters


Special to the Chronicle
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-01 of Crystal River prepared another group of local residents recently for a
safe boating experience. From left are: Dave Hurt, Diane Larson, James Perry, David Weiser, Harold Nicholson,
Katherine Nicholson, instructor Linda Jones and instructor trainee Bill Burley. Plan to increase your boating
knowledge by taking their next class, Boating Skills and Seamanship, which begins Wednesday. To register for
the class, call Linda Jones at 352-503-6199. For membership information, call Vince at 917-597-6961.


NEWS NOTES


Diamonds in
April coming up
The BFF Society Inc.
presents its fifth annual
"Diamonds in April" from
6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at
Tuscany on the Meadows.
The organization has
partnered with Tuscany
on the Meadows, Jim
Green Jewelers and Tay-
lor Rental, for the event.
For $20, you have a
chance to win a set of
half-carat diamond stud
earrings (valued at over
$1,000). All others receive
cubic zirconia earrings
and a fun girls night out,
with a chocolate fountain,
music by Rick Depirro
and hors d'oeuvres. There
will also be a money boa
and a Chinese auction.
You do not have to be
present to win.
All proceeds go toward
Citrus County educational
scholarships. For tickets
call or text Gwen at 352-
634-1725.

Artists to gather
in Weeki Wachee
The Nature Coast Deco-
rative Artists, Chapter of
the Society of Decorative
Artists, meets at 9 a.m. the
first Saturday monthly at
Weeki Wachee Senior
Center, 3357 Susan Drive
and Toucan Trail.
A brief meeting begins
promptly at 9 a.m., along
with "Show & Tell." The
April class will be a lunch
swap and mini workshop.
For more information,
call Dottie at 352-527-
2778.

MOAAto meet
with Ocala group
The Military Officers
Association of America


(MOAA) will meet at noon
Thursday, with the Ocala
MOAA Chapter at Stump-
knocker's on State Road
200 at the Withlacoochee
River
This will be a social
meeting, starting at
11:30 a.m.; reservations
are required.
Call LTC Arlo Janssen
at 352-237-9720 no later
than April 1.
For more information,
call Ron Resare at 352-
344-3123 or email
resareron@aol.com.

Parliamentarians
to meet April 4
The Citrus County Unit
of Parliamentarians
(CCUP) meets the first
Friday monthly, Septem-
ber through May, at Whis-


pering Pines Park, 1700
Forest Drive, Inverness,
in the recreation building.
The program begins at
9:30 a.m., followed by a
business meeting.
For more information,
call Connie at 352-527-
2599 or Herb at 352-
795-7159.

Kiwanis slates
car show April 5
The second annual Ki-
wanis Car Show will be
held Saturday, April 5, at
Nick Nicholas Ford, 2901
State Road 44 West,
Inverness. All years and
makes of cars and trucks
are invited to participate
in the show
Registration is from 8 to
10 a.m., with over 30
awards being presented


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score. Pre-registration is
$15.
For more information,
call Pete at 352-527-0039
or Ken at 352-341-1165.
Proceeds benefit chil-
dren's programs in
Citrus County


UPCOMING EVENTS


Concert Choir
begins season
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir begins its
llth season with the
presentation of its spring
concert, "Le Sacre Du
Printemps" (The Rite of
Spring).
The centerpiece of the
concert will be Schu-
bert's magnificent "Mass
in G," which will be per-
formed with a string
quartet. Included in the
program will be selec-
tions by Bach, Ed Lo-
jeski and several of
Brahms' love song
waltzes. Members of the
choir will perform the
Lojeski music later this
spring in Normandy,
France, during the 70th
anniversary commemo-
ration of the D-Day inva-
sion, which took place on
June 6,1944.
The concerts will be
performed at 3 p.m.
today at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, 439
East Norvell Bryant
Highway in Lecanto, and
at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 6,
at Faith Lutheran
Church, 935 South Crys-
tal Glen Drive in
Lecanto.
Admission for adults is
$10 at the door, and chil-
dren younger than 12
will be admitted free.
Proceeds from the con-
certs will be used to fund
the choir's 2014 scholar-
ship program.

Walking tour of
CR set for April 5
Historical Society
President John Grannan
has created a new his-
toric walking tour of the
Crystal Street area on
Saturday, April 5. Two
tours will be offered,
with the first at 11 a.m.
and the last at 1 p.m.
Ticket price is $5 per
person and space is lim-
ited to 12 guests per tour
The tour will start at the
Calvary Baptist Church,
corner of Third Avenue
Northeast and 10th
Street Northeast.
For more information,
call the Coastal Heritage
Museum at 352-795-1755
to make a reservation.

Woman's club
slates card party
The GFWC Crystal
River Woman's Club will
host a Military Card
Party and Luncheon on
Thursday, April 10, at the
clubhouse at 320 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River
Doors open at 11:30 a.
m. Lunch will be served
around 11:45 a.m. Tick-
ets are $12 and it is rec-
ommended reservations
be made for tables of
four Let us know early if
you need a sub.
Money is given to the


first-, second- and third-
place winners. Two entry
tickets will be drawn for
two foursomes to attend
the Military Card Party
free on Oct. 9. There will
be other prizes as well.
Tickets may be pur-
chased by calling Lois at
352-382-0777. Proceeds
from the event will go to-
ward the club's commu-
nity projects.

Club to picnic in
Inverness park
The New York Club of
Citrus County will have
its annual picnic at noon
Thursday, April 10, at
Whispering Pines Park
in Inverness.
There will be no guest
speaker at the picnic, no
door prize, raffle or
50/50.
The club will supply
the hamburgers, hot dogs
and all the buns. Mem-
bers and guests are re-
quired to bring a side
dish or dessert to share
with others. Also, bring
your own drinks, cutlery
and plates.
Current members are
free and guests are $5.
RSVP by mailing
Veronica Markiewicz at
sewandsew@centu-
rylink.net, or leave a
message on her cell at
352-445-1997.
Checks should be
made out to The New
York Club of Citrus
County and mailed to
PO. Box 641261, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.

Enjoy 'Night at
the Museum'
The Crystal River Her-
itage Council is hosting a
fundraiser: 'A Night At
The Museum" from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on
Thursday, April 24.
The evening will in-
clude a personal night-
time tour of the Coastal
Heritage Museum and
beverages, light refresh-
ments and musical en-
tertainment at the Wine
Shop II a few doors
down. Ticket cost is $25
per person. Tickets are
limited and will be avail-
able for purchase
April 2.
For more information,
contact the museum at
352-795-1755 or Sharon
Padgett at 352-212-8390.

Come for tea at
Hospice House
The community is in-
vited to Afternoon Tea at
Hospice House at 2 p.m.
every Friday Afternoon
Tea offers an ideal way
to greet neighbors and
friends and meet Hos-
pice of Citrus County
staff who will provide in-
formation and tours.
For more information,
call 352-527-2020. Visit
www.hospiceofcitrus.org.


Are you going to the Carnival
Citrus County Fair? LightS
Take your camera along Lg
and get some photos Comltli
of the fair happenings & cou tr
and/or your friends. lights

*LlI O. H O!TIS. P RJ E: O _MS 011 ...


Submit your photos to be entered into the contest
with an opportunity to have your photo published
in our after fair guide, "And The Winner Is".

This special section announces all of
the winners for the various fair
activities and contest
,
You can vote once per day during the voting
period. The Winner will be determined by
online voting and judge's choice.


Submission Period
Sun, Mar 23 2014
Sun, Mar 30 2014


Voting Period
Mon, Mar 31 2014
Sun, Apr 06 2014


*wwwchronic leniets


A28SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


COMMUNITY


3-30


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SPORTS


The Rays finish up
their exhibition season
by facing minor league
team./B5



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Auto racing/B2, B6
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 NBA, NHL/B4
0 College basketball/B4
0 Baseball/B5
0 Tennis, golf/B6


Bowditch on top at Texas Open; Lefty out


Mickelson withdraws

with pulled muscle

Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO Steven Bowditch
opened a three-stroke lead Saturday in
the Texas Open, while Phil Mickelson
withdrew after 10 holes because of a
pulled muscle in his right side.
Bowditch, the 30-year-old Australian
seeking his first PGA Tour title, shot a 4-
under 68 to reach 12 under at TPC San
Antonio. Matt Kuchar and Andrew
Loupe were tied for second. Kuchar shot
65, and Loupe had a 70.
"I've won four or five times on be-
tween Australia and Web.com," said
Bowditch, who would get into the Mas-
ters with a victory "I've got a little expe-
rience, but not a great deal, especially at
this level. I've never slept on a lead, so
we'll see how we go."


Mickelson withdrew after pulling the
muscle teeing off on No. 1 his 10th
hole of the round. He hopes to play next
week in the Houston Open, the last event
before the Masters.
"I pulled a muscle on my downswing
trying to hit it hard," Mickelson said a
statement. "It just killed and it wouldn't
subside for 10 or 12 seconds. I'm going
back to San Diego (for) a couple of days
and have a doctor look at it, but there's
really not much you can do for a pulled
muscle. I hope I'll be OK to play the
Shell in Houston, but I just don't know"
Lefty was 1-over par in the round and 4
over overall when the three-time Masters
champion was taken off the course in a
cart. His caddie, Jim Mackay said
See Page B3
Steven Bowditch watches hits his tee
shot on the ninth hole during the third
round of the Texas Open golf
tournament on Saturday in San Antonio.
Associated Press


Bound for Dallas


Gators overwhelm

Flyers to earn trip

to Final Four

Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. First yet
again this season, the Florida
Gators want more. Much more.
Try a national championship.
Scottie Wilbekin scored 23
points and Florida became the
first team to advance to the
Final Four with a 62-52 win Sat-
urday night over the llth-
seeded Dayton Flyers in the
South Region final.
The Gators reached their
fifth Final Four after losing at
this point in each of the past
three NCAA tournaments. This
time, they came in as the coun-
try's top-ranked team and the
overall No. 1 seed.
Florida won its 30th straight
game and improved to 36-2, top-
ping the 35 wins by the 2007 na-
tional championship squad.
"I couldn't be prouder and
happier," Florida coach Billy
Donovan said after being
drenched with water in the
Gators' locker room.
"In a lot of ways, outside the
Michigan game, we were close
to being in three out of four
Final Fours right now, and that
says a lot about these guys. But
I think those experiences
maybe helped us be a better
team this year than maybe we
would have if we'd have gotten
to a couple of ones earlier"
Patric Young scored 12
points, and Michael Frazier II
added 10 for Florida. The
Gators will play either UConn
or Michigan State in Arlington,
Texas, in the national semifinal.
The celebration was a bit
muted because a regional title
isn't the Gators' end goal.
"There's more hunger within
us, within this whole team to
keep going," Young said.
Dyshawn Pierre led the Fly-
ers with 18 points, including the
final 11 for Dayton (26-11).
Devin Oliver added 12 points.
Dayton came in trying to be-
come only the fourth 11 seed to
advance to the Final Four The
Flyers had upset Ohio State and


Associated Press
Florida's Lexx Edwards holds Michael Frazier II in the second half of an NCAA tournament regional final
game against Dayton Saturday in Memphis, Tenn. Florida won 62-52 to advance to the Final Four.


Syracuse in reaching their first
regional final since 1984. They
missed their second Final Four
and first since 1967 as Florida
held them to their lowest scor-
ing game this season.
Coach Archie Miller compli-
mented the Gators, saying that
just being on the floor with


Florida gave Dayton a "big-time
feeling."
"It's always hard to lose the
last game of the season, but in
the back of my mind, I'm not
sure a team in the nation cap-
tured more people's hearts
than these guys did, and they
did it the right way," Miller said.


The Flyers hit one more field
goal than Florida (19-18), but
the Gators outrebounded them
37-26. They also had a massive
edge at the free throw line (21 of
28) to (6 of 8).
Florida finished the first half
See .Page B3


Constitution wins
Florida Derby
HALLANDALE BEACH -
Javier Castellano saw a couple
horses in front of him and
thought about steering Constitu-
tion to the outside in an effort to
pass everyone.
Then a gap opened on the rail.
Constitution knew what to do
from there, and the Kentucky
Derby is his likely reward.
In only his third start, not to
mention his first stakes race,
Constitution won a fierce stride-
for-stride battle down the stretch
with Wildcat Red to take the
Florida Derby at Gulfstream Park
on Saturday, giving trainer Todd
Pletcher's powerful stable yet
another option and maybe a
very real contender for the
Run for the Roses on May 3.
"This colt's come so far in
such a short period of time,"
Pletcher said. 'You know, three
months ago we were not even
thinking about this. Everything's
fallen into place. It's a real tribute
to how talented he is and how
far he's been able to come."
Constitution remained un-
beaten, with all three of his victo-
ries coming at Gulfstream, where
he broke his maiden on Jan. 11.
He finished the 1 1-8 miles in
1:49.16 and returned $8.60,
$4.20 and $3.60 for the win.
"He's a super horse," said
jockey Javier Castellano, who
could be aboard Constitution
again in the Kentucky Derby if
he chooses.
Wildcat Red paid $4.80 and
$3.40 for second. General a
Rod paid $3.40 to show and
Cairo Prince, which officially
went off at 6-5 as the favorite,
was fourth and beaten by nearly
nine lengths.
"The great thing about today's
race is we got some experi-
ence," Pletcher said.
Wildcat Red started on the in-
side and went to the front as ex-
pected, with General a Rod
settling in second much of the
early way. Castellano who an-
ticipated a different trip for his
horse, but audibled nicely -
guided Constitution to a spot
near the rail and stalked the lead,
then with about three furlongs to
run thought about finding open
space along the outside.
From wire reports


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Hendrick has links to Martinsville


Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va. Jim-
mie Johnson doesn't dwell on
the negatives when he thinks
about himself or his Hendrick
Motorsports team when it comes
to Martinsville Speedway, and
that's more than understand-
able. He has won eight times at
the track in 24 career starts.
The first of them, however,
was hardly a day for celebration.
It was Oct. 24, 2004, the day a
plane carrying 10 members of
the Hendrick Motorsports fam-
ily on their way to the race
crashed in fog-shrouded moun-
tains a few miles from the speed-
way No one survived and so
when Johnson prepares to re-
turn to NASCAR's smallest
track, his thoughts drift in many
directions.
"Like today," he said. "I flew
up. It's overcast It's cloudy The
whole week leading into Mar-
tinsville, I've been excited about
coming here to race and feel like
we have a great chance to win. I
wake up this morning and it's
overcast, and I just can't help but
think of the airplane incident."
Among those lost in the crash
were Ricky Hendrick, son of
team owner Rick Hendrick, and
John Hendrick, the owner's
brother
Johnson and the other team
members didn't know of the
crash until the race was over
"I look back on that day a lot
and think about how things went
down," Johnson said. "NASCAR
called all four cars to pit lane.
We get to pit lane, and there are
police officers standing around
our cars, and I'm like 'What in
the world has happened?' Nor-
mally there are NASCAR Offi-
cials, not police officers.
"I walk through that from time
to time. I hope to never ever go


Associated Press
Jimmie Johnson would like to put last week's subpar outing in California behind him, starting today at
the STP 500 in Martinsville, Va.


through anything like that
again."
Thankfully for Johnson and
the Hendrick organization,
there are also many great mem-
ories of the 0.526-mile oval.
Johnson has added seven more
victories on the track, teammate
Jeff Gordon also has won eight
times and GeoffBodine gave the
fledgling team its first victory on
the paper clip 30 years ago.
It all makes the oldest track in
NASCAR's top series an emo-
tional stop no matter what
Hendrick's teams have won 20
more Sprint Cup races at Mar-
tinsville since Bodine got the
first one.
"To see Rick and his face and


the expression that he has and
you can sense in his voice and in
his eyes you can see how
much it means to him to win
here," Johnson said. "It is a cool,
amazing experience to go
through. ... With all the emotion
that you have here, I think we
are in a good place here."
Five more things to watch in
NASCAR's sixth race of the year:
REPEAT AFTER ME
Through five races, there have
been five different winners.
Through six qualifying ses-
sions, there have been six differ-
ent pole-sitters.
Kyle Busch and Brad Ke-
selowski are the only drivers


with one of each.
GO GO GO
There's a sense among drivers
already with a victory that the
pressure is off because a victory
almost assures them of a spot in
the 10-race playoffs. Dale Earn-
hardt Jr is among the winners,
and but said that go-for-broke at-
titude always prevails at Mar-
tinsville Speedway
"I don't think I've ever raced
here walking on egg shells. I
think you can get in trouble
pretty quickly if you do that,"
EarnhardtJr said.
BACK FLIPPING
Carl Edwards earned his lone


Martinsville victory in October
2011, and otherwise has found
the track to be most unforget-
table. He's finished outside the
top 10 in his last four starts here,
but said he arrived this week-
end with no pressure at all. He,
like Earnhardt, already has won
this year
"I'm kind of the eternal opti-
mist when it comes to Mar-
tinsville, but it doesn't seem to
work out," Edwards, the points
leader through five races, said.
"But I feel like we have an op-
portunity to try some things be-
cause of our position in the
points, already having a win," he
said. "... We're just going to go
out and be extremely aggressive.
That's a fun way to be able to
come to a race at Martinsville."
HOW ABOUT THAT MATT?
Matt Kenseth's longtime frus-
tration with Martinsville seem-
ingly ended last October when
he finished second to Jeff Gor-
don on the 0.526-mile oval. His
Joe Gibbs Racing teammates,
Kyle Busch and Denny Hamlin,
will start on the front row Sun-
day, with Kenseth starting sixth.
"They used to always pick me
to watch because they figured I
would be the wreck or the ac-
tion," he said.
DRIVEN DANICA
Danica Patrick's No. 10 start-
ing spot is her best anywhere but
Daytona in her Sprint Cup
career
"I've got to get better at get-
ting all of it out of the car every
time and I have such kind of a
negative attitude about qualify-
ing that I said I need to be posi-
tive and at least be neutral on it
and let these be positive rein-
forcements," she said. "It's so
important, especially at a place
like this."


NASCAR RESULTS


Sprint Cup
STP 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway
Martinsville, Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 99.674 mph.
2. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 99.548.
3. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 99.428.
4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 99.178.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 99.048.


6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 99.048.
7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 98.883.
8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 98.846.
9. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 98.625.
10. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 98.165.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 97.764.
12. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 97.382.
13. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 98.965.
14. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.929.
15. (47)A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 98.888.
16. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 98.877.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.712.
18. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 98.707.
19. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 98.661.
20. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 98.625.


21.(27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 98.61.
22. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 98.61.
23. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 98.599.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 98.599.
25. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 98.43.
26. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
98.379.
27. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.359.
28. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 98.333.
29.(32)Travis Kvapil, Ford, 98.246.
30. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 98.206.
31. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 98.2.
32. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 98.002.
33. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 97.957.
34. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 97.886.


35. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 97.82.
36. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 97.759.
37. (33) David Stremme, Chevrolet, owner
points.
38. (83) RyanTruex, Toyota, owner points.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner points.
40. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, owner
points.
41. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, owner
points.
42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, owner
points.
43. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (35) David Reutimann, Ford, 97.759.


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NCAA Tournament FOT hi rCOTd
Glance l: 0JL. .


All Times EDT
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20 Hle
At First Niagara Center Sai
Buffalo, N.Y. Sat
UConn 89, Saint Joseph's 81, OT
Villanova 73, Milwaukee 53
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
Harvard 61, Cincinnati 57
Michigan State 93, Delaware 78
Friday, March 21
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Memphis 71, George Washington 66
Virginia 70, Coastal Carolina 59
At The AT&T Center
San Antonio
North Carolina 79, Providence 77
Iowa State 93, North Carolina Central 75
Third Round
Saturday, March 22 Due
At First Niagara Center IOtt4
Buffalo, N.Y. tho,
UConn 77, Villanova 65
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
Michigan State 80, Harvard 73 I,
Sunday, March 23 1
At PNC Arena Mega
Raleigh, N.C.
Virginia 78, Memphis 60 Mega
At The AT&T Center 4-of-4
San Antonio 4-of-4
Iowa State 85, North Carolina 83 3-of-4
Regional Semifinals
At Madison Square Garden 3-of-4
NewYork 2-of-4
Friday, March 28 1 -of-4
UConn 81, Iowa State 76 2-of-4
Michigan State 61, Virginia 59
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
UConn (29-8)vs. Michigan State (29-8), 2:20
p.m.
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At First Niagara Center
Buffalo, N.Y. 12
Dayton 60, Ohio State 59
Syracuse 77, Western Michigan 53 3 F
At The Amway Center rac
Orlando, Fla. 11
Pittsburgh 77, Colorado 48 Q
Florida 67, Albany (N.Y) 55 (Se
Friday, March 21
At Scottrade Center 6 a
St. Louis Na
Stanford 58, New Mexico 53
Kansas 80, Eastern Kentucky 69 9 a
At Viejas Arena Ra
San Diego 12
Stephen F. Austin 77, VCU 75, OT p
UCLA 76, Tulsa 59 Dia
Third Round 8 F
Saturday, March 22 3::
At First Niagara Center Pa
Buffalo, N.Y.
Dayton 55, Syracuse 53
At The Amway Center 1::
Orlando, Fla. 2 p
Florida 61, Pittsburgh 45
Sunday, March 23 9:3
At Scottrade Center
St. Louis
Stanford 60, Kansas 57 12
At Viejas Arena
San Diego 2:"
UCLA 77, Stephen F. Austin 60 4::
Regional Semifinals sel
At FedExForum
Memphis, Tenn.
Thursday, March 27 Re
Dayton 82, Stanford 72
Florida 79, UCLA 68
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 29 2:1
Florida 62, Dayton 52 4:5
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20 6 F
AtThe Amway Center 9 F
Orlando, Fla.
Saint Louis 83, N.C. State 80, OT 2 a
Louisville 71, Manhattan 64
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee 5 F
Michigan 57, Wofford 40 cit
Texas 87, Arizona State 85
Friday, March 21
At PNC Arena 1 F
Raleigh, N.C. 3 :
Mercer 78, Duke 71 3 I
Tennessee 86, UMass 67
At Scottrade Center Co
St. Louis 7 I:
Wichita State 64, Cal Poly 37
Kentucky 56, Kansas State 49
Third Round 12
Saturday, March 22 12
At The Amway Center Le.
Orlando, Fla.
Louisville 66, Saint Louis 51 5 F
At BMO Harris Bradley Center 7::
Milwaukee Pe
Michigan 79, Texas 65
Sunday, March 23
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Tennessee 83, Mercer 63 5 5
At Scottrade Center 7:3
St. Louis
Kentucky 78, Wichita State 76
Regional Semifinals 12
At Lucas Oil Stadium 12
Indianapolis
Friday, March 28
Michigan 73, Tennessee 71 12
Kentucky 74, Louisville 69
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30 6 F
Michigan (28-8) vs. Kentucky (27-10), 5:05 (Tc
p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round 8::
Thursday, March 20 EV
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee 11
Wisconsin 75, American 35 Tol
Oregon 87, BYU 68
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash. 2 1:
North Dakota State 80, Oklahoma 75, OT
San Diego State 73, New Mexico State 69, 2 F
OT
Friday, March 21 2:"
AtThe AT&T Center 8 F
San Antonio Ta
Baylor 74, Nebraska 60 l
Creighton 76, Louisiana-Lafayette 66
At Viejas Arena Note
San Diego
Arizona 68, Weber State 59 discn
Gonzaga 85, Oklahoma State 77 on th,
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
At BMO Harris Bradley Center p.m.
Milwaukee
Wisconsin 85, Oregon 77
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
San Diego State 63, North Dakota State 44


Sunday, March 23 East ch,
At The AT&T Center Midwes
San Antonio
Baylor 85, Creighton 55
At Viejas Arena
San Diego Semifin
Arizona 84, Gonzaga 61
Regional Semifinals
At The Honda Center
Anaheim, Calif. N
Thursday, March 27
Wisconsin 69, Baylor 52
Arizona 70, San Diego State 64
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 29 x-Toronto
Wisconsin (29-7) vs. Arizona (33-4), 8:49 Brooklyn


rlOria LO I I I 1


?re are the winningnumbers selected
turday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
pl I 6-1-7
CASH 3 (late)
0 3-0-9

1 4 PLAY 4 (early)
i 4-3-7-1
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 8-9-9-5




e to early deadlines, Saturday's late
ery numbers were not available. For
se numbers, please see Monday's edition
visit www.flalottery.com.


iday's winning numbers and payouts:


a Money: 14 20 25 34
Ball: 4
4 MB No winners
4 7 $861.50
4 MB 43 $307.00
4 778 $50.50
4 MB 1,145 $24
4 MB 9,649 $2.50
4 22,306 $2


Fantasy 5:1 5 15 21 -30
5-of-5 2 winners $121,454.12
4-of-5 390 $100.00
3-of-5 11,325 $9.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


FINAL FOUR
At AT&T Stadium
Arlington, Texas
National Semifinals
Saturday, April 5
ampion vs. Florida (36-2), TBA
t champion vs. West champion, TBA
National Championship
Monday, April 7
al winners



BA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
41 31 .569 -
38 33 .535 21


NewYork 30 43 .411
Boston 23 49 .319
Philadelphia 16 57 .219
Southeast Division
W L Pct
y-Miami 50 22 .694
Washington 38 35 .521
Charlotte 35 38 .479
Atlanta 31 41 .431
Orlando 21 52 .288
Central Division
W L Pct
y-lndiana 52 21 .712
x-Chicago 40 32 .556
Cleveland 29 45 .392
Detroit 26 47 .356
Milwaukee 14 59 .192
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
x-San Antonio 57 16 .781


111
1
251

G

121
151
1
291

G

111
231
2
3


G


Houston 49 23 .681
Memphis 43 29 .597
Dallas 43 30 .589
New Orleans 32 41 .438
Northwest Division
W L Pct
x-Oklahoma City 53 19 .736


Portland
Minnesota
Denver
Utah


L.A. Clippers
Golden State
Phoenix
Sacramento
L.A. Lakers


47 27 .
36 35 .
32 41 .
23 50 .
Pacific Division
W L
52 22 .
45 27 .
44 29 .
25 47 .
24 48 .


x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Orlando 110, Charlotte 105, OT
Washington 91, Indiana 78
Toronto 105, Boston 103
Brooklyn 108, Cleveland 97
Miami 110, Detroit 78
Portland 91, Chicago 74
Minnesota 143, L.A. Lakers 107
Oklahoma City 94, Sacramento 81
New Orleans 102, Utah 95
San Antonio 133, Denver 102
Phoenix 112, NewYork 88
Golden State 100, Memphis 93
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 123, Detroit 98
L.A. Clippers 118, Houston 107
Washington 101, Atlanta 97
Miami 88, Milwaukee 67
San Antonio 96, New Orleans 80
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Utah at Oklahoma City, 3 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Golden State, 9 p.m.
Memphis at Portland, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Antonio at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Denver, 9 p.m.
NewYork at Utah, 9 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Boston 74 51 17 6 108237 155
Montreal 76 4326 7 93199 189
Tampa Bay 74 4124 9 91221 198
Detroit 74 3426 14 82199 211
Toronto 76 3632 8 80220 239
Ottawa 73 3029 14 74210 246
Florida 75 2740 8 62179 244
Buffalo 74 2045 9 49142 222
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
x-Pittsburgh 74 4722 5 99228 184
N.Y Rangers 75 4130 4 86200 183
Philadelphia 73 3927 7 85210 206
Columbus 74 3830 6 82208 200
Washington 74 3428 12 80214 222
New Jersey 74 3128 15 77178 192
Carolina 74 3232 10 74186 208
N.Y Islanders 74 2935 10 68206 247
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
x-St. Louis 74 5017 7 107240 168
x-Colorado 74 4721 6 100227 202
Chicago 75 4218 15 99247 196
Minnesota 74 3726 11 85183 188
Dallas 74 3627 11 83214 212
Winnipeg 74 3332 9 75206 216
Nashville 75 3232 11 75186 226
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
x-San Jose 76 4720 9103232 184
x-Anaheim 73 4718 8 102234 186
Los Angeles 74 4325 6 92185 157
Phoenix 74 3626 12 84205 209
Vancouver 75 3430 11 79183 201
Calgary 74 3136 7 69189 217
Edmonton 74 2639 9 61184 244
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 4, Toronto 2
Pittsburgh 2, Columbus 1
Ottawa 5, Chicago 3
Dallas 7, Nashville 3
Calgary 4, N.Y Rangers 3
Edmonton 4, Anaheim 3, OT
Saturday's Games
N.Y Islanders 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Boston 4, Washington 2
Colorado 3, San Jose 2
Tampa Bay 4, Buffalo 3, OT
Detroit 4, Toronto 2
Montreal 4, Florida 1
Columbus 3, Carolina 2, OT
Dallas 4, St. Louis 2
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Anaheim atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 10p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m.
Calgary at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Nashville, 8 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Carolina at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.



Valero Texas Open
Saturday
AtTPC San Antonio, San Antonio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,435, Par: 72
Third Round


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: STP 500 race
p.m. (ABC) IndyCar: Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg
;e
p.m. (ESPN2) NHRASummitRacing.com Nationals
ame-day Tape)
MLB
i.m. (MLB) Preseason: Detroit Tigers at Washington
tionals (Taped)
i.m. (MLB) Preseason: Houston Astros vs. Texas
ngers (Taped)
p.m. (MLB) Preseason: Chicago Cubs at Arizona
amondbacks (Taped)
p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at San Diego Padres
O30 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Dodgers at San Diego
dres (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
O30 p.m. (FS1) Baylor at West Virginia
p.m. (ESPNU) Kentucky at Vanderbilt
O30 p.m. (SUN) Missouri atAuburn (Taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAATOURNAMENT
p.m. (ESPN) Maryland vs. Tennessee. Regional semifinal
O30 p.m. (ESPN2) Louisville vs. LSU. Regional semifinal
O30 p.m. (ESPN2) Penn State vs. Stanford. Regional
mifinal
p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina vs. South Carolina.
gional semifinal
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAATOURNAMENT
10 p.m. (CBS) Regional Final: Teams TBA
55 p.m. (CBS) Regional Final: Teams TBA
NBA
p.m. (FSNFL) Toronto Raptors at Orlando Magic
p.m. (NBA) Memphis Grizzlies at Portland Trail Blazers
BICYCLING
i.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Criterium International (Taped)
BOWLING
p.m. (ESPN) PBA League Semifinals: L.A. X vs. New York
y Wtt Kingpins (Taped)
GOLF
p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Valero Texas Open, Final Round
p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Valero Texas Open, Final Round
p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Valero Texas Open, Spotlight
overage
p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Kia Classic, Final Round
HOCKEY
p.m. (NBC) Boston Bruins at Philadelphia Flyers
:30 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Toronto Maple
afs (Taped)
p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Detroit Red Wings
O30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Pittsburgh
nguins
COLLEGE HOCKEY
NCAATOURNAMENT
p.m. (ESPNU) Northeast Regional Final: Teams TBA
30 p.m. (ESPNU) West Regional Final: Teams TBA
LACROSSE
p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia at Maryland
p.m. (SUN) Penn State at Florida
MOTORCYCLE RACING
:30 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series (Taped)
SKATING
p.m. (NBCSPT) ISU World All-Around Championship
iped)
SOCCER
30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Fulham vs.
erton
a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Liverpool vs.
ttenham Hotspur
SOFTBALL
p.m. (SUN) LSU atAlabama
TENNIS
p.m. (FSNFL) PowerShares Series: Oklahoma City (Taped)
30 p.m. (ESPN) ATP Sony Open, Men's Final
p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Sony Open, Men's Final (Same-day
pe)

: Times and channels are subject to change at the
etion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
e listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


69-67-68-
70-72-65-
67-70-70-
68-71-69-
70-70-69-
72-68-70-
71-66-73-
72-71-68-
70-71-70-
69-72-70-
70-74-68-
74-69-69-
71-71-70-
74-71-68-
75-70-68-
69-73-71-
73-73-67-
69-73-71-
75-66-72-
70-70-73-
70-73-71-
70-73-71-
69-73-72-
74-70-71-
70-75-70-
72-71-72-
71-71-73-
70-71-74-
71-76-68-
72-72-72-
73-72-71-


Heat wrap up Midwest trip,
beat Bucks 88-67
MILWAUKEE Chris Bosh scored 14 points, Le-
Bron James had 13, and the short-handed Miami Heat
wrapped up their three-game trip through the Midwest
with an 88-67 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks.
James Jones added 10 for Miami in place of star
guard Dwyane Wade, sidelined a second straight
game with a sore hamstring. The Heat also played
without Ray Allen and Mario Chalmers.
It didn't matter against the team with the NBA's
worst record. Milwaukee tried to match Miami's en-
ergy, but couldn't keep with the more talented oppo-
nent even one without two All-Stars.
Defense keyed Miami's win. The Heat led 46-29
at halftime and held the Bucks to a season low for
points in a half and in a game.
John Henson had 12 points and 10 rebounds for
Milwaukee.

Oberholtzer leads Astros
past Mexican League club
HOUSTON Brett Oberholtzer allowed two hits
in six innings and a Houston Astros split squad beat
Rojos del Aguila de Veracruz 2-0 Saturday night in
the opener of a two-game exhibition series against
the Mexican League club at Minute Maid Park.
Dexter Fowler hit his first home run of the spring
and Matt Dominguez had a sacrifice fly in the fourth.
Oberholtzer struck out two and walked none. An-
thony Bass, MattAlbers and Josh Fields each
pitched an inning to finish the shutout.

Belinelli, Spurs top Pelicans
96-80; streak at 17
SAN ANTONIO Marco Belinelli scored 18
points and the San Antonio Spurs never trailed after
their opening possession, extending their winning
streak to 17 games with a 96-80 victory over the
New Orleans Pelicans on Saturday night.
Kawhi Leonard and Manu Ginobili scored 15
points each, Patty Mills added 13 and Tim Duncan
had 12 points and eight rebounds.
San Antonio (57-16) extended its lead to 3 1/2
games over Oklahoma City (53-19) for the league's
best record.
From wire reports





TEXAS
Continued from Page Bl

Mickelson felt a twinge on his tee shot on No. 1.
"It's definitely not his back," Mackay said. "It's
his right side. The thing he had been talking
about is how good his back had been feeling
here. He'll definitely play Houston, if he can."
It's the second time this year Mickelson has
withdrawn in the middle of a tournament. He
pulled out at Torrey Pines after making the cut
because of a back injury
On Friday, Mickelson made the cut on the
number, following an opening 77 with a 70.
Bowditch, ranked 339th in the world, chipped
in at the first two holes, for birdie at No. 1 and an
eagle at the par-5 second. He drove to chipping
distance at the 338-yard fifth hole and made a 4-
foot birdie putt
"(The chip on the first hole) calmed my nerves
a little bit," Bowditch said. "It was as easy a chip
as you're going to have out here."
He cooled after that when he missed the green
at No. 9 and bogeyed, then strung together pars
until he drove close to the at the 324-yard down-
wind 17th. He chipped inside a foot and tapped
in for birdie and kept his two-stroke lead when
Loupe matched the birdie.
Loupe closed with a bogey
Kuchar, a six-time winner on the tour, had the
best round of the week. He holed out the green-
side bunker on No. 1.
"Still surprised to be at 7 under today" Kuchar
said. "It's not a score I would have thought was
out there with these sort of (windy) conditions."
Pat Perez was fourth at 8 under after a 69.
Kevin Na, who had a 16 on the ninth hole three
years ago, was 7 under after a 69.




BOUND
Continued from Page Bl

on a 15-1 run to take the lead for good, going up
38-24. The Flyers opened the second half with
two quick 3s to pull within eight, only to watch
the Gators push their lead to 17 with 11:35 left on
a layup by Young.
The Flyers kept coming but couldn't get closer
than eight in the second half, the last at 58-50.
The Gators went cold down the stretch, once
missing five shots on one possession with five of-
fensive rebounds.
Dayton missed chances to cut the lead as
Oliver missed a 3-pointer with 2:07 left, then
Scoochie Smith threw it away trying to pass out
to Matt Kavanaugh.
Miller said Pierre was completely exhausted
late.
"You can't go to a guy eight times in a row and
expect him to score every time, but he gave us a
fighting chance," Miller said.
Then Wilbekin ended the Gators' scoring
drought at 4:39 with a pair of free throws, and he
hit four of six at the line to finish the game.
Dayton took over the FedExForum so thor-
oughly that the Gators were booed when they
came out for warm-ups and pre-game introduc-
tions. Miller tried to use his deep bench, using 11
Flyers at least 5 minutes trying to wear out the


Gators with sheer numbers. Donovan nearly
matched Dayton by going 10 deep himself.
The Gators went cold for nearly 6 minutes be-
tween a dunk by Casey Prather with 11:55 left in
the half and a baseline drive by Frazier with 6:00
to go. The Flyers scored eight straight when
Smith's 3 gave them their first lead of the game at
21-19 with 6:58 remaining.
Kendall Pollard's layup tied up Florida for the
last time at 23, then Dorian Finney-Smith hit a
free throw with 4:22 left putting the Gators ahead
to stay
As Florida went on its run, Dayton missed its
final five shots. Finney-Smith grabbed a rebound
of a missed 3 by Frazier and threw the ball back
out for the final shot of the half. Wilbekin then
beat the buzzer with a 3-pointer that helped
quiet the Flyers' faithful for the first time all day


On the AIRWAVES


Steven Bowditch
Matt Kuchar
Andrew Loupe
Pat Perez
Kevin Na
Daniel Summerhays
Chad Collins
Ryan Palmer
Zach Johnson
Will MacKenzie
1 Jim Furyk
8 Geoff Ogilvy
2 Jerry Kelly
Stephen Ames
B Jordan Spieth
- Bo Van Pelt
S Andrew Svoboda
2 Chesson Hadley
9 Wes Roach
2 Freddie Jacobson
Carl Pettersson
B Brice Garnett
- Justin Hicks
2 Russell Knox
3 Charley Hoffman
6 William McGirt
8 Martin Flores
Trevor Immelman
Brendon Todd
B Briny Baird
- Brendon de Jonge


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 B3





SPORTS


SPistons.98Stamkos in OT!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PHILADELPHIA--The
Philadelphia 76ers snapped
their NBA record-tying, 26-
game losing streak, routing
the Detroit Pistons 123-98
to avoid establishing a new
longest skid in U.S. major
pro sports history.
Michael Carter-Williams
and Thaddeus Young each
scored 21 points for the
76ers, who won for the first
time in exactly two months
and did it with surprising
ease, leading by as much as
32 points. They also ended
an 18-game home losing
streak, which was one shy of
another NBA record.
Their 26 straight losses
equaled the 2010-11 Cleve-
land Cavaliers.
Clippers 118,
Rockets 107
HOUSTON Chris Paul
had 30 points and 12 as-
sists, Jamal Crawford added
22 points and the Los Ange-
les Clippers clinched their
franchise-record third
straight playoff appearance
with a 118-107 win over the
Houston Rockets.
The loss broke a five-
game winning streak for
Houston, which was without
two of its starters as Dwight
Howard and Pat Beverley
sat out with injuries.
Wizards 101,
Hawks 97
WASHINGTON John
Wall scored 25 points,
Drew Gooden had 26, and
the Washington Wizards
inched closer to their first
playoff spot since 2008 with
a 101-97 win over the free-
falling Atlanta Hawks.
Washington entered the
game needing a win and a
loss by the New York
Knicks on Sunday to make
the playoffs.
Wall scored 13 points in
the last 7:16 of the third
quarter and the Wizards
finally escaped the pesky
Hawks.


Philadelphia
guard Mich
Williams tries
pass by Det
guard Brando
during the
Saturday in P


--m --m m m wm -qmmwm m w -


to \


Associated Press
Buffalo Sabres' Matt Hackett (31) looks up after an overtime goal by the Tampa Bay Lightning, as the Lightning's Ryan Callahan (24), Valtteri
Filppula (51), Steven Stamkos (91) and Teddy Purcell (16) celebrate a goal by Stamkos on Saturday in Buffalo, N.Y.


Center's goal

puts Lightning

past Sabres

Associated Press

BUFFALO, N.Y. -
Steven Stamkos scored
two goals, including the
winner in overtime, and
Tampa Bay beat Buffalo 4-
3 to remain two points be-
hind Montreal for second
place in the Atlantic
Division.


Alex Killorn and tyan
Fmwrerepos Callahan also scored for
the Lightning, who have
earned at least a point in
11 consecutive games.
Matt D'Agostini, Cody
Hodgson and Cory
Conacher scored for Buf-
falo, which finished March
with a 2-11-1 record.
Bruins 4,
Capitals 2
WASHINGTON Carl
Soderberg and Jarome Iginla
*i scored 41 seconds apart in
the second period to break
Associated Press
76ers point open a close game, and the
ael Carter- Boston Bruins clinched the At-
s to block a lantic Division title Saturday
roit Pistons with a 4-2 win over the Wash-
on Jennings ington Capitals.
first half Iginla scored twice to reach
*hiladelphia. the 30-goal mark, and Patrice


Bergeron added a goal as the
Bruins won for the 14th time
in 15 games. Chad Johnson
made 31 saves, and he and
Tuukka Rask have combined
to allow only 13 goals over 11
games.
Jason Chimera and Evgeny
Kuznetsov scored, and
Braden Holtby stopped 32
shots for the Capitals, who
were down 3-0 before they
could find any traction against
the possession-minded Bruins.
Avalanche 3,
Sharks 2
DENVER Semyon Var-
lamov had a season-high 47
saves and Colorado clinched
its first playoff berth in four
years by beating San Jose.
Center John Mitchell had a
goal and an assist for the Ava-
lanche, who moved past
Chicago into second place in
the Central Division with 100
points in what might have
been a costly victory.
Center Matt Duchene in-
jured his knee injury on the
opening shift Saturday when
he collided with teammate
Jamie McGinn near the
Sharks' blue line. He fell to
the ice and then gingerly
skated to the bench.
Mitchell moved up to center
Colorado's top line, and came
through with a big power-play
goal to give Colorado a 3-1
lead at 6:32 of the second


period.
Red Wings 4,
Maple Leafs 2
TORONTO Darren Helm
had a hat trick and Detroit
sent Toronto to its eighth con-
secutive regulation loss, the
Maple Leafs' first such streak
since 1985.
The Maple Leafs have 80
points with just six games re-
maining and might have to
run the table to give them-
selves a legitimate shot at a
second straight playoff
appearance.
They have two fewer
games left than the Red
Wings (82 points), the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets (82 points)
and the Washington Capitals
(80 points) in the Eastern
Conference.
Cody Franson and Joffrey
Lupul scored for Toronto.
Gustav Nyquist also had a
goal for Detroit.
Jonathan Bernier, playing
his third game back from a
groin injury, stopped 24 of the
28 shots. Red Wings goal-
tender Jimmy Howard fin-
ished with 25 saves.
Blue Jackets 3,
Hurricanes 2, OT
RALEIGH, N.C.- Ryan
Johansen scored a power-
play goal at 2:40 of overtime
and Columbus beat Carolina
to earn two points in its push


for the second playoff berth in
club history and first since
2009.
Artem Anisimov had a goal
and an assist and Matt
Calvert also scored for the
Blue Jackets
Jeff Skinner and Andrei
Loktionov scored and Riley
Nash had two assists for the
Hurricanes, who fell to 6-11
since the Olympic break.
Curtis McElhinney made 25
saves for Columbus in his
second straight start in place
of flu-stricken starter Sergei
Bobrovsky.
Brandon Dubinsky rang the
left post midway through the
extra session for the Blue
Jackets. Goalie Anton Khu-
dobin couldn't cover the puck,
but forward Jiri Tlusty did -
drawing the Hurricanes' first
penalty of the night at 1:54.
Johansen then ended it
with a snap shot that trickled
past Khudobin.
Islanders 2,
Devils 1, SO
UNIONDALE, N.Y. -
Frans Nielsen scored in the
second period and then
added a goal in the shootout
to lift New York over playoff-
hopeful New Jersey.
Nielsen scored in the first
round, and Brock Nelson
added a goal in the second
against New Jersey's Cory
Schneider to hand the Devils


their 14th straight shootout
loss 0-10 this season. An-
ders Nilsson turned aside
Adam Henrique, who scored
in regulation, and Patrik Elias
to win it.
The Devils earned one
point, but are still behind sev-
eral teams in the Eastern
Conference playoff race with
eight games left. They are 2-
4-2 in their last eight.
Nielsen gave the Islanders
a 1-0 lead early in the second
before Henrique tied it.
Canadiens 4,
Panthers 1
SUNRISE Max Pacioretty
had two goals and an assist to
help Montreal extend its win-
ning streak to five games with
the win over Florida.
Thomas Vanek added a
goal and an assist for Mon-
treal and Carey Price made
36 saves. David Desharnais
had an empty-net goal.
Pacioretty's second goal
put the Canadiens ahead 3-0
in the second period. Pa-
cioretty camped at edge of the
crease and tipped in a pass
from Desharnais at 14:00 for
his 35th of the season, a ca-
reer high. Pacioretty has 11
points in his past 10 games.
Brad Boyes scored for
Florida and Dan Ellis stopped
15 shots for the Panthers,
who have lost five of their
past six games.


No. 1 UConn thwarts BYU's challenge


Associated Press

LINCOLN, Neb. Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis had 19 points to
lead four Connecticut players in
double figures, and the defending
national champion Huskies shook
off BYU early in the second half
to win 70-51 in the NCAA women's
regional semifinals Saturday
The Huskies (37-0), winners of
43 straight, will try for their sev-
enth straight Final Four when
they take on Texas A&M on Mon-
day night. The Aggies advanced
with an 84-65 victory over DePaul.
UConn season scoring leaders
Breanna Stewart and Bria Hart-
ley overcame slow starts, with
Stewart having 12 of her 16 in the
second half and Hartley all 12 of
hers after halftime. Moriah Jef-
ferson had 11 for UConn.
Kim Beeston led the Cougars
(28-7) with 16 points, and Morgan
Bailey added 14. Jennifer Ham-
son had nine points to go with 13
rebounds and six blocked shots.
Texas A&M 84,
DePaul 65
LINCOLN, Neb. Courtney
Walker scored 25 points to power
Texas A&M to the regional finals.
The Aggies (27-8) led by 14 points
at halftime and turned back two De-
Paul runs. Courtney Williams had 14
of her 15 points in the second half.
DePaul (29-7) shot 40 percent, 28
percent in the first half, and struggled
defensively against the physical Ag-
gies. Jasmine Penny had 16 of her 24
points in the second half and Megan
Rogowski added 14 points for the
Blue Demons.
Texas A&M shot 60 percent and
has won each of its three tournament
games by at least 15 points.


Karla Gilbert and Jordan Jones had
11 points apiece and Tori Scott added
10 for the Aggies.
Notre Dame Regional

Notre Dame 89,
Oklahoma State 72
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Natalie
Achonwa got Notre Dame going early
and never let up as she finished with
23 points and Jewell Loyd added 20
to lead the Fighting Irish to a victory
over Oklahoma State.
Notre Dame (35-0) is a victory
away from its fourth straight Final
Four berth, while the Cowgirls (25-9)
missed a chance to advance to a re-
gional final for the first time in school
history. They fell to 0-3 in regional
semifinals.
To get to the Final Four, the Irish
will have to beat Baylor, the last team
to knockoff Notre Dame at home.
The Irish jumped to a 14-0 lead in
the opening 3:31, capped by a three-
point play by Achonwa, as the Cow-
girls missed their first six shots. The
Cowgirls later used a 7-0 run to cut
the lead to 24-14, but that was as
close as they got.
Baylor 90, Kentucky 72
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Odyssey
Sims scored 25 points, including her
1,000th this season, to lead No. 2
seed Baylor to a rout of third-seeded
Kentucky.
Sims became only the second
player to reach that milestone in a sin-
gle season. She is 41 points behind
Jackie Stiles' record of 1,062 for one
year set in 2001.
The last time Baylor and Kentucky
met, they played one of the most ex-
citing games in the history of women's
basketball. The Wildcats came away


Associated Press
Connecticut's Bria Hartley shoots in front of BYU's Kim Beeston during
the second half of an NCAA women's tournament regional semifinal
Saturday in Lincoln, Neb. Connecticut won 70-51.
with a 133-130 four-overtime victory Now the Lady Bears (32-4) will face
back in December. either Notre Dame or Oklahoma State
This one fell far short of matching in the regional final on Monday night.
that thriller as Sims and Baylor put the DeNesha Stallworth scored 19 points
game away by the half. to lead Kentucky (26-9).


NCAA tourney
BRIEFS

East Regional

Michigan St. 61,
Virginia 59
NEWYORK-- Branden
Dawson had 24 points and
10 rebounds and Michigan
State beat top-seeded Vir-
ginia 61-59 on Friday night
to advance to East Re-
gional final.
The fourth-seeded Spar-
tans (29-8) will play Con-
necticut (29-8) on Sunday
with a Final Four berth at
stake. The seventh-seeded
Huskies beat third-seeded
Iowa State 81-76 on Friday.
Joe Harris and Malcolm
Brogden both had 17 points
for Virginia, which became
the second No. 1 seed to
be eliminated, joining
Wichita State.
Midwest Regional

Kentucky 74,
Louisville 69
INDIANAPOLIS -
Aaron Harrison made a 3-
pointer with 39 seconds left
to give Kentucky the go-
ahead points Friday night
in a 74-69 victory in the
Midwest Regional over in-
state rival Louisville.
Harrison, Julius Randle
and Dakari Johnson, all fin-
ished with 15 points for the
eighth-seeded Wildcats
(27-10), who will play Michi-
gan in today's regional final.
Fourth-seeded Louisville
(31-6) got 23 points from
senior Russ Smith.


B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


m m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Archer shines in Rays' final tuneup vs. Biscuits


Associated Press

MONTGOMERY, Ala. Chris
Archer pitched four scoreless
innings and 21-year-old prospect
Justin O'Conner hit three dou-
bles in the Tampa Bay Rays' 6-5
loss to their Double-A Mont-
gomery affiliate Saturday
Archer completed a strong
spring with six strikeouts and no
walks in the Rays' final tuneup
before Monday's season opener
against Toronto.
Luke Maile scored on Richie
Schaffer's sacrifice fly in the
eighth to give the Biscuits the go-
ahead run. All the runs came off
relievers from Montgomery's
roster after the Rays built a 5-0
lead.
The Biscuits scored four times
in the sixth, including Jeff
Malm's two-run homer
The Rays scored twice in the
fifth on a bases-loaded walk and
Evan Longoria's RBI single.
Braves Future Stars 13,
Braves 4
ROME, Ga. Mike Minor retired
all four batters he faced in his first
game this spring, and the Atlanta
Braves lost 13-4 to the Braves Fu-
ture Stars in an exhibition game.
Minor will open the season on the
15-day disabled list as he recovers
from tendinitis in his left shoulder. He
said he felt good in his rain-short-
ened start against Atlanta prospects.
The Braves need a healthy Minor
after losing starting pitchers Kris
Medlen and Brandon Beachy to sea-
son-ending elbow injuries.
Orioles 4,
Tides 3, 5 1/2 innings
NORFOLK, Va. Jonathan
Schoop tried to say he just had some-
thing in his eye. Then he came clean.
Yes, the infielder did get emo-
tional when he was told he had
made Baltimore's 25-man roster.
The 22-year-old Schoop is one of
Baltimore's top prospects and pro-
vides infield depth in the absence of
injured third baseman Manny
Machado. But manager Buck
Showalter said Schoop might have
made the team anyway.
Cubs 9, D'backs 8
PHOENIX Cubs shortstop



Trout


thrilled


with


new deal

Associated Press

ANAHEIM, Calif -Mike
Trout said he had no prob-
lem giving up a few years of
free-agent freedom in ex-
change for lifelong finan-
cial security and a chance
to win championships with
the Los Angeles Angels.
Owner Arte Moreno
would have liked to lock up
baseball's best young player
for even longer He sai he
met Trout in the middle on a
record-setting contract that
keeps the Angels' star cen-
ter fielder under the halo
for another six seasons.
Trout formalized his six-
year, $144.5 million deal
on Saturday, committing
himself to the Angels
through 2020.
The 22-year-old out-
fielder said it was "hard to
turn down" the big num-
bers offered by the Angels.
He became the first player
with less than three years
of service time to sign a
deal worth more than $20
million annually.
Plumbing problems
in A's clubhouse
OAKLAND, Calif. -
Coaches from the Oakland a
Athletics were sent scram-
bling after toilets in the home
clubhouse backed up and
overflowed before Saturday's U
exhibition game against the ii
San Francisco Giants.
It was the latest in a series
of plumbing problems that
have plagued the aging sta-
dium, which was built in the
late 1960s.
There were multiple prob- ,


I


L c r"rr --r- "- -',, I
Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Chris Archer starts against the
Montgomery Biscuits during an exhibition baseball game Saturday
in Montgomery, Ala.


Starlin Castro returned from a ham-
string injury and played his first
spring training game since March
2 in Chicago's 9-8 victory over the
Arizona Diamondbacks.
Castro went 0 for 2 with a walk
and looked fine running out a
grounder in the first inning. The
game was the exhibition finale for
both clubs before their season open-
ers Monday.
Bats 1, Reds 0,
S 1 /9 innindF


Louisville Bats team 1-0 in a rain-
shortened game.
The game was called in the mid-
dle of the sixth inning. It was the
second straight day that Cincinnati's
pitching plans were affected by rain.
An exhibition against minor leaguers
in Pensacola was rained out Friday.
After a day off, Cincinnati opens
the season at home on Monday
against the defending NL champion
St. Louis Cardinals.
Padres 9, Indians 8


a i/ ........ 15SAN DIEGO Seth Smith and
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Homer Bai- Chase Headley homered, and Yon-
ley pitched three innings without a derAlonso hit a three-run double to
problem, showing he has recovered lead the San Diego Padres to a 9-8
from a groin injury, and the Cincin- victory against the Cleveland Indians
nati Reds ended their spring training at the University of San Diego's
schedule by losing to their Triple-A Fowler Park.


..... ..... :


70f


Blue Jays 2, Mets 0 Rockies 2, Mariners I


MONTREAL Melky Cabrera's
two-run homer in the eighth inning
gave the Toronto Blue Jays a 2-0 vic-
tory over the New York Mets and a
sweep of their two-game exhibition
series at an Olympic Stadium packed
with former Montreal Expos fans.
Moises Sierra was on third with
two outs when Cabrera connected
off left-hander Adam Kolarek.
Blue Jays starter Brandon Mor-
row pitched six sharp innings, allow-
ing two hits and striking out eight in
the spring training finale for both
teams.


5CO I T UALE, Ariz. unrins
Young tossed shutout ball in his
Seattle debut, providing a much-
needed pitching boost for the
Mariners as they closed spring train-
ing with a 2-1 loss to the Colorado
Rockies.
With pitchers Hisashi Iwakuma,
Taijuan Walker and Stephen Pryor
all sidelined, the Mariners signed
Young on Thursday after he was re-
leased by Washington. The 34-year-
old right-hander allowed four hits,
struck out two and issued no walks
in 4 2/3 innings as he moves into a
rotation spot.


lems last year alone. '
In September, A's players
reported foul smells from the .
bathroom end of their dugout. 'Lij
That came after a clogged ',
pipe caused a sewage
backup and flooding on the
bottom floor of the ballpark in
June, sending the Seattle
Mariners and A's scrambling -
around in towels and heading m
for higher ground in the Oak-
land Raiders' locker room.


The Padres will host the defend-
ing NL West champion Los Angeles
Dodgers in baseball's North Ameri-
can opener at Petco Park tonight.
The Indians open at Oakland on
Monday night.
Padres starter Eric Stults held the
Indians to one run and one hit in four
innings.
Cleveland's Danny Salazar, who
will start the home opener Friday, al-
lowed six runs five earned and
seven hits with five strikeouts in five
innings. He gave up Alonso's bases-
clearing double in the third and
Headley's opposite-field homer to
left-center in the fifth.
Cleveland's Matt Carson drove in
five runs.
Twins 7, Red Sox 4,
8 1/2 innings
FORT MYERS Josh Willing-
ham finally hit his first home run of
the spring in Minnesota's exhibition
finale, and the Twins beat the
Boston Red Sox 7-4.
The game was called because of
rain with two outs in the top of the
ninth inning.
Mike Napoli went 2 for 2 with a
home run and three RBIs for the
Red Sox. Jake Peavy, making his
third Grapefruit League start, gave
up one run and three hits in five in-
nings. He walked one and struck out
three.
Mike Pelfrey went four innings for
Minnesota in his sixth start of the
spring. He allowed four runs on five
hits and three walks.
Boston left-hander Tommy Layne
gave up five runs on two homers in
the seventh.


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 B5


Mets right-hander Daisuke Mat-
susaka also struck out eight and
gave up five hits in five scoreless in-
nings.
Toronto beat the Mets 5-4 before
a crowd of 46,121 on Friday night.
The games were organized in an ef-
fort to show that Montreal wants
Major League Baseball back. A total
of 96,350 fans attended the two
games, mostly chanting "Let's go
Expos!" and "We want baseball!"
Brewers 7, Royals 2
MILWAUKEE Marco Estrada
pitched five scoreless innings and
Jonathan Lucroy hit a two-run dou-
ble, leading the Milwaukee Brewers
past the Kansas City Royals 7-2.
The Royals managed only two
hits off Estrada, who retired his last
10 batters. Estrada finished the
spring by pitching 17 consecutive
shutout innings.
Lucroy, who struggled at the plate
this spring, connected off hard-
throwing starter Yordano Ventura
with two outs in the third.
Aramis Ramirez singled, doubled
and drove in a run for the Brewers..
Astros 13, Rangers 6
SAN ANTONIO Jesus Guzman
and George Springer hit consecutive
home runs in the first inning,
Jonathan Meyer had a grand slam in
the fifth and the Houston Astros
rolled to a 13-6 victory over the
Texas Rangers in the Alamodome.
Nolan Fontana added a three-run
shot in the seventh to help the As-
tros sweep two weekend games in
the Alamodome, designed primarily
for football and special events such
as the NCAA Final Four.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Powering through


Asia stages


improbable rally


Associated Press
Serena Williams returns to Li Na during the women's final Saturday at the Sony Open Tennis tournament in Key
Biscayne. Williams defeated Li Na 7-5, 6-1 for the title.

Serena Williams beats Li Nafor Sony Open women's title


Associated Press
KEY BISCAYNE Serena
Williams won a record seventh Key
Biscayne title Saturday when she
overcame a slow start and a set
point to beat Li Na 7-5, 6-1 at the
Sony Open.
Williams surpassed the tourna-
ment record of six titles she shared
with Andre Agassi. But on a muggy
spring afternoon, the No. 1-ranked
Williams looked sluggish at the out-
set and served poorly, and she was
broken twice to fall behind 5-2.
"At that moment I felt like I had
nothing to lose," Williams said. "I
just was able to relax. Whenever I
relax, I enjoy myself."
Li held a set point serving at 5-4,
but Williams erased it with a back-
hand winner
Williams needed another 21 min-
utes to pull out the set. The final
game of the set went to deuce six
times, but she finally won it with a
booming backhand that Li couldn't
handle.
Williams ran to her chair with a
satisfied scream, her left fist lead-
ing the way She dominated from
there, sweeping the final five
games, and closed out the victory


with a service winner
After a succession of happy
hops, she was twirling, waving,
laughing and mugging for the cam-
era a familiar ritual from a fa-
miliar champion.
"I think we're going to have to re-
name this tournament," former top-
five player Mary Joe Fernandez
said during the trophy ceremony
It's a commentary on the yawning
gap between Williams and the rest
of the women's tour that she won in
straight sets against the No. 2-
ranked player while playing less
than her best. She made only 44
percent of her first serves and con-
verted just five of 17 break-point
chances.
Even so, Williams extended her
winning streak against top-10 oppo-
nents to 15 matches.
The world's top-ranked players
will also meet in the men's final
Sunday, when No. 1 Rafael Nadal
tries for his first Key Biscayne title
against No. 2 Novak Djokovic, a
three-time champion.
Williams lives 90 minutes up 1-95
from Key Biscayne and considers
it her home event. She said the
fans provided a boost when she
fell behind.


"It was like, 'Oh my gosh, if I can
just hang in here and just try to
enjoy myself,"' she said. "Honestly
the crowd pulled me through. I
heard some fans go, 'Go Serena."'
Williams has played in the tour-
nament 14 times and also won the
title in 2002-04, 2007-08 and 2013.
Her earlier finals victories came
against Maria Sharapova, Jelena
Jankovic, Justine Henin, Elena De-
mentieva and Jennifer Capriati
twice.
She also lost finals to her sister
Venus in 1999 and to Victoria
Azarenka in 2009.
Li, who won the Australian Open
in January, was at the top of her
game for most of the first set. Even
so, she couldn't close it out.
"Only one mistake: I think I
should go party last night," Li said
with a smile.
Williams committed six unforced
errors in the opening game, and it
took her 16 minutes to win a game.
She double-faulted to fall behind 5-
2, and the comeback came slowly
from there.
The first set lasted 73 minutes,


longer than
matches.


many of Williams'


EurAsia Cup

ends in tie

Associated Press
KUALA LUMPUR,
Malaysia -Asia staged an
improbable Ryder Cup-
like comeback on the final
day of the EurAsia Cup on
Saturday picking up seven
of 10 points available in
singles to level the score at
10-all and share the trophy
with Europe.
Asia, trailing 7-3 going
into the final day, briefly
took the lead at 9 1/2 to 8
1/2 before Joost Luiten
beat Koumei Oda 1-up to
pull the Europeans level.
The final match between
Asia's Hideto Tanihara
and Europe's Gonzalo Fer-
nandez-Castano then fin-
ished all square.
Tanihara sank an eight-
foot putt to halve the 17th
after Fernandez-Castano
eagled the 16th to even the
match.
On the 18th, Tanihara
had a chance to give Asia
the win but his birdie putt
was a foot to the left. Fer-
nandez-Castano then
holed a three-footer to
halve the hole, their match
and the Cup.
It was a familiar sce-
nario for Europe both
good and bad.
The Europeans came
back from a 10-6 deficit in
the 2012 Ryder Cup at
Medinah, Illinois, to win by
a point. But they also blew
a 10-6 lead on the final day
in 1999 at Brookline, out-
side Boston, to allow the
Americans to win.
The Europeans had a
strong team at Glenmarie
Golf and Country Club in
Kuala Lumpur despite
missing some of the bigger
names who will help de-
fend the Ryder Cup
against the United States
at Gleneagles, Scotland,
from Sept 26-28.
Europe, which led 5-0
after the opening fourball
competition Thursday and


by four points after Fri-
day's foursomes, only
needed 31/2 points Satur-
day to clinch the trophy
But the Asians won six
of the singles matches and
halved two others in their
comeback.
Asia captain Thongchai
Jaidee beat Graeme Mc-
Dowell 3 and 2 in his
match, joining Kiradech
Aphibarnrat, Kim Hyung-
sung, Gaganjeet Bhullar,
Anirban Lahiri and Sid-
dikur Rahman as winners
for Asia.
Europe captain Miguel
Angel Jimenez defeated
Nicholas Fing 1 up, but
his win was one of only
two by his side on Satur-
day Luiten's victory was
the other
Europe's Jamie Donald-
son was 4-up after nine
holes against Prayad
Marksaeng, but had to set-
tle for a draw
Kerr, Salas share
Kia Classic lead
CARLSBAD, Calif. -
Cristie Kerr made a 55-foot
par-saving putt after hitting
her final approach into the
water Saturday atAviara, giv-
ing her a share of the lead
with Lizette Salas after the
third round of the Kia Classic.
Kerr finished with a 2-under
70 to match Salas at 10-under
206. After dropping a stroke
on the par-5 17th, Kerr holed
out from the edge of the
green on the par-4 18th after
taking a penalty drop.
Salas, the former Southern
California player from Azusa,
had a 69. She birdied the par-
5 17th for a share of the lead
and matched Kerr with a par
on the last
Kerr won the Kingsmill
Championship last year for
her 16th LPGATour title.
Dori Carter, the second-
round leader after a course-
record 64, had a 74 to drop
into a tie for third at 8 under
with Thailand winner Anna
Nordqvist, Ayako Uehara and
Shanshan Feng. Nordqvist
and Uehara shot 67.


Trucks race rained out


Race part of

twinbill today

Associated Press
MARTINSVILLE, Va. -
The NASCAR Truck Se-
ries race at Martinsville
Speedway was rained out
Saturday and will be made
up as part of a rare dou-
bleheader at the track
today
The Sprint Cup race will
start at 1:13 p.m., and
NASCAR and track offi-
cials aim to start the night-
cap as quickly as possible
afterward. NASCAR said it
hopes it can start by about
5:30 p.m.
The tricky part will not
only be cooperation from
the weather-the forecast
is good but a smooth
Cup series race because
Martinsville Speedway,
the oldest in the premier
series, does not have
lights.


Associated Press
Trucks sit under covers as Air Titans try to keep the track
dry during a rain delay Saturday at the NASCAR Truck Se-
ries auto race at Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va.


The doubleheader will
be the first since a truck
race washed out after 17
laps at Pocono in August
2011 was completed the
following day, with the
Sprint Cup race run after-
ward.
Kevin Harvick won the
truck race, and Brad Ke-
selowski took the Cup win.
In another unusual twist
especially for Martinsville,
which hosts two truck races
every year, no Cup drivers


are entered in the truck
race this weekend, so no
one will drive both races.
It is the first time a truck
race at Martinsville was
postponed since March
2009.
The track said tickets for
both races will be hon-
ored, with the caveat that
ticket holders with truck
race tickets only will have
to wait until 100 laps have
been run in the Cup race
to enter the track.


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B8SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



You can't clean up history or at least I can't


nce every 10 years I
clean up my office.
The cleanup usually
happens when one of the
very large piles of paper
falls over and crashes to the
floor
I am not a packrat, but as
the publisher of Citrus
County's newspaper, I have
this disturbing belief that if
I don't save certain things,
no one else will.
I knew it was time to


clean up last week when I
went searching for a note-
book. When I found it, the
paper inside was an agenda
for a meeting held in 1995 to
discuss Citrus 2020.
On my shelf underneath
the agenda was an old book
titled "Stories of American
History" by N.S. Dodge. It
was published in 1879.
I am old, but not that old.
Someone else stashed the
history book on my shelf.


I am responsible for the
stack of 10 copies of the only
special edition ever published
by the Chronicle. On the
morning of Sept. 11, 2001,
our nation was rocked by a
terrorist attack. By 3 p.m. we
had a free special edition
on the streets of Citrus
County
I do have a copy of Life
Magazine's special edition
from Oct. 2, 1964, on the
Warren Commission report.


Lee Harvey Oswald did the
dirty deed.
How can I throw that out?
Also sitting on my office
floor is the bound volume of
all of the 1929 editions of
the Chronicle. It has been
on that floor since 1993
when I did some research
that I failed to finish.
And as it would be, when
I flipped open the book, the
front page from Jan. 18,
1929, had a headline that


read: "Sheriff Chas. H.
Dean captures banker miss-
ing for three months."
Sheriff Dean, who was
the father of the Sheriff
Dean who is now in the
Florida Senate, had just
been elected to the job.
Sheriff Dean had arrested
L.E. Carter, the former as-
sistant cashier at Citizens
Bank in Inverness.


PageC3


DOUG SONERHOLM/Special to the Chronicle
This aerial photo, taken by Doug Sonerholm from an airplane a few hours after Jerry Muetzel with Florida Aquatics ran his harvester in
Hunters Spring Run earlier this month, shows the clean streaks left behind after the harvester passed by and took out the Lyngbya in its path.
The orange harvester is obscured by trees at the bottom of the frame. It is parked directly below the manatee tour boat, where at least four
manatees are being petted by snorkelers within 100 feet of the harvester. Sonerholm said he hopes the photo helps people understand that
no damage occurs after the harvester operates, but a lot of Lyngbya is removed. "Ten tons were taken out in this area in a couple days and
that is only a drop in the bucket compared to what would happen if it were allowed to continue unimpeded," said Sonerholm. "I am one of
the local homeowners who received a plant removal permit from FWC and paid to have my area cleaned, which is the sandy area toward
the top. I couldn't be happier with the results all positive with no downside."





I AM THE






HARVESTER


i am the owner and operator of the mechanical harvester Save the Manatee
Director Patrick Rose referred to in A.B. Sidibe's recent article on the harvester.
Here are some facts and other information that you should be aware of:


I have been operating har-
vesters for over 30 years in the
Crystal River, and other rivers
and lakes within the region as a
operator for several different
machine owners. All the ma-
chines I have operated are
manufactured by the same
Canadian company as the ma-
chine I own. All machines are
essentially the same machine
but come in various sizes. The


table width and Jerry]
length of the con- GU
veyor (called head) COL
which removes the
material off the bot-
tom also varies. The machine
then offloads the material to an-
other conveyor, which dumps it
into a trailer Ultimately the ma-
terial is transferred to a site ap-
proved by the Florida
Department of Environmental


M
E
.1


[uetzel Protection for dis-
-ST posal or transfer
S0A I use the same
JMN operating tech-
niques for all my
customers depending on what
they wish to accomplish and
what the permit or permits they
hold require. These permits are
on board my machine when I
am operating, including maps
provided by the Florida Fish


and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's (FWC) Aquatic Plant
Removal division. Sometimes I
apply for the permits; other
times the individual property
owners obtain their own per-
mit, which was the case men-
tioned by Rose in the article.
I was told by the one of the
individual permit holders, who


PageC3


Knowledge is in the journey, not the destination


he computer age is ad- I teach biomedical science at
vancing our society in Crystal River High School's
many ways, including Health Academy The very
minimizing time in research, brightest get selected. Itis amaz-
Adults see its oppor- ing what great minds
tunistic impact. Our Greg Biance do when they assimi-
younger generations GUEST late information and
have only known this COLUMN yield a conclusion. It
method of acquiring ___________ stills my heart. Now
knowledge and intel- understand, these
ligence. The more mature child are highly motivated people -
sees this as an opportunity to lazy is not part of their physical
grow and get ahead. Unfortu- makeup. They are driven to
nately, there is another battle on higher success and want to be
the horizon, doctors or research scientists


searching for a cure for the com-
mon cold. This is Google power
with perfection. It is not this
mentality that disturbs me. It is
the child who uses this device to
replace the use of their own
brain. Many children and teens
mentally develop with false
pretense.
Most educators understand
the value of Google as a tool to
learning. To us it is another
strategy to gaining personal
knowledge. If I wanted to build
a high-rise building with all the


bells and whistles, I have to do
the math to create the structure
that can support this massive
design. There has to be a foun-
dation upon which to build.
Adults get this, and savvy chil-
dren see it, as well. They under-
stand that building a foundation
is essential to long-term mem-
ory But we service many more
than the college-bound student.
Some see this device as a status
item to carry in hand. It tem-
porarily allows them to level the
playing field regarding intelli-


gence. They miss the boat about
this tool. It is to build personal
knowledge, not to replace the
mental development.
The rationalization in many
teens is, "Why should I study or
build vocabulary if I can just
Google the answer?" It is a good
quick answer, but leaves many
educators with their jaws
dropped. The repertoire of re-
sponses begins to assimilate:
Knowledge builds over time.


PageC3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW






OHe tha,
Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 30,2014



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


t plants thorns must never expect to gather roses."
Fables of Bidpai, c. 750


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
i EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista .............................copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SUGARMILL WOODS




Compromise




a better




alternative




to roadwork


he county commission
is facing a conundrum
regarding a proposal to
pave 213 feet of a currently
platted roadway in the Oak
Village section of Sugarmill
Woods.
A developer has asked for
permission to extend the
road to gain access to 40
acres he owns south of the
Oak Village development,
and local property owners
are up in arms over the pro-
posal. Local resi-
dents contend THE I
that if the devel- T
oper paves the Develop
roadway, the now- to extend
quiet residential road to r
boulevard could develop
become an access
point for a much OUR 01
larger tract the
developer owns County
in Hernando find at
County that
At the last two involved
commission meet- the
ings, angry resi-
dents from the Oak Village
section of Sugarmill Woods
have demanded that the com-
mission deny the application
for paving the road and in-
stead approve a request by
Oak Village residents to
abandon the roadway. This
would prevent the developer
from using the road to access
his property
While the issue is clear, the
answer is not simple. Accord-
ing to county staff, since the
land in question is platted as
a road, the developer is not
required to state the purpose
for paving and extending it.
All that is required is for
the developer to certify in his
application to the county
Land Development Division
that the roadway will be built
according to county standards.
The commission is not required
to vote on whether to approve
paving a platted road, but a
commission vote would be re-
quired to approve the peti-
tion to abandon the roadway
With some justification,
residents believe that should
the roadway be extended and
then linked into the proposed
Hernando county property,
the tree-lined Oak Village
Boulevard could become a
major access road for con-
struction vehicles and
equipment.
This would change the
character of the quiet resi-
dential community.


W563-0579
563-0579


Is
C
)e
d



F
r
)P

P
n
s
do
ex
rc


According to those familiar
with the issue, when Sugarmill
Woods was platted, this road
was intended to go to another
village in Sugarmill Woods,
but the village was never
completed, and no one paid
much attention to the fact
that Oak Village Boulevard
was platted to continue past
where it now dead-ends.
But now, the unpaved strip
of land is the center of a
swirling controversy that pits
the property rights
$SUE: of those who live
*S E on or near the
er wants boulevard against
existing those of a devel-
each new oper who wants
)ment. to use the road to
access his property
'INION: Absent cooler
heads prevailing
ieeds to and a resolution
solution being found to re-
oesn't solve the conflict,
tending this has the mak-
oad. ings of a nasty and
costly legal battle.
We believe this can be
avoided, and the legitimate
issues of both the residents
and the developer can be
met. Commissioner J.J.
Kenny has been meeting with
residents and the developer
looking for solutions. We en-
courage continuation of this
kind of discussion and search
for alternate routes to the
property.
Also, since the proposed
larger development that con-
cerns residents would be in
Hernando County, we en-
courage Citrus and Her-
nando officials to work
together to come up with a so-
lution that provides access to
the developer's property
without damaging the char-
acter of the existing Oak Vil-
lage community
We also encourage every-
one involved to remember
the old proverb that "a bad
compromise is better than a
good lawsuit."
With good-faith negotia-
tions and open minds, this co-
nundrum can be resolved
in a way that avoids exten-
sion of Oak Village Boulevard
and still meets the needs of
the developer to access his
property.
This kind of compromise
agreement would cool pas-
sions, avoid litigation, and
still protect the property
rights of both the developer
and local residents.


Sidewalks save lives
Today is Monday (March 3). I was reading in the
Chronicle in the Sound Off where somebody wrote
how disgusting it is to have sidewalks on (State Road)
44 and now on Cardinal. They asked us to count
the people who actually walk the sidewalks. I can't
count the people that walk on the sidewalks but I
can read the paper and count the people who get
killed who aren't on the sidewalks. You ought to
look at how many people die. I think one human
life is worth one long sidewalk.


Keep your eye on the watchers


n 1975, Frank Church, a
Democratic senator from
Idaho, told the American
people that a government intel-
ligence agency most of them
had never heard of the Na-
tional Security Agency "had
the capability to secretly moni-
tor everything: telephone con-
versations, telegrams, it doesn't
matter There would
be no place to hide."
Like many Ameri-
cans, regardless of
their political party,
I was startled at this
news.
At the time, Church
was the chairman of
the Senate Select
Committee to Study Nat H
Governmental Oper- OTl
nations With Respect
to Intelligence Ac- VOI
tivities, better
known as the Church Commit-
tee. He worked hard to spread
this frightening news as fully as
he could, which I reported in
columns and my book, "The
War on the Bill of Rights and
the Gathering Resistance"
(Seven Stories Press, 2003).
This exemplary patriot as-
sured us that "never again will
an agency of the government be
permitted to conduct a secret
war against those citizens it
considers threats to the estab-
lished order"
But he could not predict the
coming of a Congress wholly
forgetful of the Church Com-
mittee and absorbed in internal
wars to gain political party as-
cendancy, not to mention a two-
term president who largely
exterminated the separation of
powers.
However, as I've been report-
ing, the revelations of former
NSA contractor Edward Snow-
den and Democratic. Sen. Di-
anne Feinstein have partially
reawakened Congress.
Meanwhile, Frederick A.O.
("Fritz") Schwarz Jr, who was
chief counsel for the Church
Committee and is currently the
chief counsel for the Brennan
Center for Justice at New York
University School of Law, chal-
lenges us to rescue our fading
identity as a self-governing cit-
izenry In his column, "Why We
Need a New Church Commit-
tee to Fix Our Broken Intelli-
gence System," from the March
31 issue of The Nation, he
writes:
"Now it is time for a new
committee to examine our se-
cret government closely again,
particularly for its actions in
the post-9/11 period.


HI

(


"This need is underscored by
what has become a full-blown
crisis, with Senate Intelligence
Committee chair Dianne Fein-
stein accusing the CIA of spying
on the committee, possibly vio-
lating the Constitution's separa-
tion-of-powers principles, the
Fourth Amendment and other
laws" (Schwarz, The Nation,
March 31).
In a spectacularly
unexpected fusion of
warring public fig-
ures, Feinstein, who
had accused Edward
Snowden of being a
traitor, has now
joined with him to
expose government
entoff secrecy and make us
IE Americans again.
IER And so will this
DES Church Committee
---- revival.
But how will this new com-
mittee actually operate to ac-
complish this mission? In a
March 13 interview with Kevin
Gosztola, author of The Dissenter
blog, Schwarz explains how ex-
tensive this penetration of past
government secrecy should be.
The Church Committee, he
points out, studied the uses of
presidential power, from
Franklin Roosevelt to Richard
Nixon. He tells Gosztola:
"We concluded that each of
the six presidents in that period
abused their secret powers. We
looked at all of the intelligence
agencies. We looked at what
Congress itself had been doing.
And a new investigation should
do the same thing" ("Former
Church Committee Chief Coun-
sel Pushes for New Investiga-
tion Into Secret Government,"
Kevin Gosztola, dissenter
firedoglake.com, March 13).
So We The People should now
look deeply into the dark, extra-
constitutional, subterranean
activities of Bill Clinton, George
W Bush and Barack Obama.
This committee should not
engage in prosecutions,
Schwarz says, but rather focus
on the scope and depth of the
culture of secrecy in govern-
ment Such exposure would stir
our interest in trying to main-
tain ways to be alert to continu-
ing government duplicity in
what Dick Cheney called "the
dark side."
For one example, the new
committee should study and
recommend deeper examina-
tion of continuing government
super-surveillance technology
As Schwarz tells Gosztola: "The
technology the government now
has to surveill is infinitely more


LETTERS to the


Happy Doctor's Day
I don't know if you're aware,
but National Doctor's Day is
coming up on March 30, so nat-
urally it seems like an oppor-
tune time to say "Thank you"
to the many physicians who
touch our lives and those of
our patients, on a daily basis.
Our doctors are a part of our
community; they are our
friends and neighbors. They
are soccer moms and commu-
nity leaders. They are our
caregivers. One day hardly
seems enough to celebrate
those physicians who play such
an important role in caring for
our community
Doctor's Day actually began
on March 30,1933, by Eudora
Brown Almond, the wife of Dr
Cha Almond. The date was
chosen because it was the date
of the first use of general anes-
thesia in surgery But it wasn't
until 1990 that it became na-
tionally recognized after Presi-
dent George Bush signed a
resolution declaring March
30th as National Doctor's Day
As a registered nurse, I've
spent years (admittedly many,
many years) working alongside
physicians in our community
Since opening my own home
health agency, Horizon Home-
care, 10 years ago with my
business partner Stephanie
Henchey, I've seen many doc-
tors in our community go
above and beyond for their pa-
tients. There are so many
heartwarming stories to be
told of doctors who go above
and beyond. And it happens in
our community every single day
To quote President George
Bush, "medicine is a special
calling and those who have


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

chosen this vocation in order
to serve their fellow man un-
derstand the tremendous re-
sponsibility it entails...
reverence for human life and
individual dignity is both the
hallmark of a good physician
and the key to truly beneficial
advances in medicine."
To our physicians on Doc-
tor's Day, "Thank you" for all
that you do to promote health
and well-being in our commu-
nity and for your dedication
and commitment to improving
our quality of life! We appreci-
ate you!
Happy Doctor's Day
Velvet Baxley, R.N.
Spring Hill


powerful than it was in 1975 when
we did our land-breaking work."
Furthermore, as Gosztola
writes, pursuing this culture of
secrecy "reflects a developed
understanding that secret gov-
ernment does not just come
from secret programs or opera-
tions that are kept secret, but
also from the manner in which
officials believe they can gov-
ern in Washington without hav-
ing the public know what
exactly it is they are doing be-
hind closed doors."
This also requires, I would
add, a lot of examination by our
media in all its forms to keep
digging into how the envelop-
ing, self-aggrandizing power of
elected officials leads members
of both parties to hide from us
what they're doing.
Gosztola continues: "There is
an extensive amount of conduct
that goes on irrespective of pro-
tecting 'national security,' and
citizens remain in the dark
about what (else) it is that they
are conspiring or planning for
the nation.
"Limits and mechanisms
should obviously be put in
place to make it harder for
them to commit the kinds of
abuses and wrongdoing, which
they will work so tirelessly to
cover up. But, for any such
development to happen, a
committee with congressional
and institutional backing will
have to do the work of studying
the issues and proposing
remedies."
But, I caution: Don't count on
congressional backing. It is al-
ready clear that both parties
have no meaningful concern
that this is still trying to be a
self-governing republic. How-
ever, there are civil liberties in-
stitutions run by citizens who
do give a damn about having an
open government, and they
should get behind this new
Church Committee.
And so must you. We can't al-
ways depend on other Edward
Snowdens to shock us into
knowing what our government
is hiding from us.
If, by the 2016 elections, the
CIA, NSA, et al. are still myste-
riously ensconced, don't bother
to celebrate Independence Day


Nat Hen toff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


Editor

Uplifting film
Yesterday my wife and I at-
tended the showing of "Honor
Flight" at Curtis Peterson Au-
ditorium. It is the most heart-
warming film I have ever seen.
For those who may not know it,
it is about the World War II
U.S. veterans still living. The
Honor Flight is sponsored by vol-
unteers who arrange for the
veterans (True Heroes) to fly to
Washington, D.C., for a day to
view the WWII memorial and
other sights including Arling-
ton National Cemetery They are
treated like the royalty they are.
The war ended in 1945 and
most people living now weren't
alive at that time.
Books cannot fully depict or
explain how horrific it was. I
was fortunate to be in school at
that time and remember the
days I was an airplane spotter;
my dad was an air raid warden
and I remember we had to have
the windows blacked out at night
just in case we were attacked.
Thank God, it never happened.
We should be very appreciative
of the hard work by people like
Barbara Mills and lots of others
too numerous to mention in as-
suring our heroes that their
sacrifices are appreciated. The
ones who have flown on these
flights were so excited and grate-
ful of the recognition that it made
many cry like babies, as did
many of the viewers of this film.
If you have the opportunity to
see it, do! You will have a greater
appreciation of the country we
live in Our elected officials should
also see it; maybe then they
would realize what their job is.
George Bendtsen


Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sentimental journey on a crse s
A sentimental j ourney on a cruise ship


oris von Kappel-
hoff was born on
April 3,1922, and if
all goes well, she will soon
have her 92nd birthday In
1940, after singing locally
with various groups, Doris
landed a job as vocalist
with the very popular
Les Brown orchestra. In
1944, she had her first
No. 1 hit with "Sentimen-
tal Journey"
Somewhere along the
way, during World War II,
she changed her name to
Doris Day Under the
circumstances, Day
seemed better than von
Kappelhoff.
Cheryl Ann Lynch was
born on July 22, 1948. In


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Carter skipped town on a dark
day in October 1928 when the
bank suspended operations. An
audit later revealed that
$126,000 was missing, along with
a few other employees.
That same week, Sheriff Dean
busted a still operation south of
Dunnellon and confiscated 150
gallons of mash.
It sounded like a lot more fun
being sheriff in 1929.
And speaking of Sheriff Dean
(the younger one) I also have
leaning against the office wall a
sign that reads: "Mulligan for
U.S. Congress."
Sen. Dean dropped that off a
few years back when Mark Mul-
ligan was running for Congress
from Jacksonville. He came in
last place and I doubt the sign
has much value except to me.
Also in my office is a manual
Royal typewriter dating from the


1966, she changed her
name to Cheryl Brannen.
Though she certainly had
the pipes for it, she never
sang professionally Her
list of No. 1 hits has in-
cluded Beth, Becky and
Fred 3.
No, she never made the
big time as a singer, but she
could, and still can, give
Doris a run for her money
when it comes to singing
"Sentimental Journey"
More than once, when
she has been singing
karaoke, especially aboard
ship, I have smiled when
people have whispered,
"She's a ringer She's a
member of the entertain-
ment troupe. She's a pro-


fessional singer" Cheryl performed in a
Naturally, when such talent show onboard ship,
comments begin, I will in- a show featuring passen-
sert myself into gers. To honor
the conversa- my wishes, she
tions and as- did "Sentimen-
sure the tal Journey"
doubters that I'm going to
Cheryl isn't a have to be very
professional careful with
singer, that the next few
she's a profes- words, but here
sional wife, goes: She still
mother and, Fred Brannen never ages in
now, grand- A SLICE my eyes, but 20
mother years ago, not
I specifically OF LIFE only could she
remember an sing it as well
incident 20 or more years as Doris did in 1944, she
ago, before the passing looked every bit as good as
years had taken so many Doris did doing it ... and
World War II vets. not just to me.


1940s. The typewriter was the
editor's machine for decades, and
was given to me when I joined
the Chronicle in the 1970s. The
other historical tidbit is that the
Royal machine has a sticker on
the front that says "Walt Con-
nors, Inc., Sales and Service."
Walt Connors was our long-
time clerk of the court in the
county, and he also owned the
largest office supply store in In-
verness. Walt would come into
our office himself and service
our typewriters. He would al-
ways tell me I needed a new rib-
bon because he could install
now and bill later
Walt was one of the best politi-
cians to ever run for office in Cit-
rus County, and possibly the
cheapest man to ever get
elected. There was never a dime
too thin for Walt.
Today's historical connection:
His daughter is Sam Himmel,
the superintendent of the county
school system.
Sitting on top of the Royal
typewriter is the very first laptop


computer used in Citrus County
It dates back to 1983 and was
used by our reporters to cover
breaking news.
The Radio Shack TRS-80 had
8K of memory The average
news story took up 16K of mem-
ory So reporters at the time had
to write the first half of their
story and then send it to the
paper via a telephone. The re-
porter would then erase the first
half of the story and write the
second half. Then the reporter
would send the rest of the story
This was sometimes done in a
phone booth in the hot Florida
summer You younger readers can
go to Google to see what a tele-
phone booth used to look like.
I certainly can't throw this his-
torically significant machine out.
Sitting on a book shelf is an
eight-inch slab from the cedar
tree that former Tax Collector
Bob Gilstrap planted on the
front lawn of the old courthouse
in Inverness. The cedar tree was
planted more than a half cen-
tury ago when Gilstrap first got


The following day, the
closed-circuit television
system on the boat ran and
re-ran the tape of the pre-
vious evening's entertain-
ment, and that meant a
steady diet of Cheryl's
performance.
We could go nowhere
without her being stopped
by one or more aging gen-
tlemen, fellows of the
WWII era, and being told
how she had improved
their day
Was I jealous? Maybe a
little. But what I really re-
member is being proud -
proud of her, of course, but
also proud that these guys
confirmed what I'd been
trying to tell her for years:


elected. He died while in office
and his wife, Norine, continued
in the job for another 26 years.
The cedar tree was declared
dead in 2010 by a committee of
important bureaucratic people
and was cut up and removed. My
slab of the tree has been sitting
on the shelf since then. Can I re-
ally throw that out?
Then there is the framed 1991
invitation to Gov Lawton Chiles'
inauguration that is sitting in a
pile with official Hampton Dunn
photos of the Chronicle office in
Inverness from 1969.
I have a "Doug Head for County
Commission" hat and one from
judicial candidate Charles "Cut
the Bull" Horn. Both hats are
red. Both candidates lost.
I would be careful about using
a red hat in a Citrus County po-
litical race.
I have a framed copy of a Belk-
Lindsey ad from 1993 that fea-
tured the famous painting by the
late Don Mayo of the flag and an
eagle. Belk closed down and left
the mall last year


She looked and sounded
very, very good.
As good as Doris Day?
Probably none of you
would believe that, but I
still think my sweetheart
was and remains every bit
as good as Doris von
Kappelhoff!


Fred Brannen, an
Inverness resident,
has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and
is the author of the
recently published novel
'At the Bottom ofBiscayne
Bay." Fred may be
contacted a t fbrannenjr
@gmail. com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


Who else would keep this
stuff?
My office may be messy, but
it holds items of historical
importance.
I have the original plan we put
together back in the 1980s when
we turned the Chronicle into a
daily newspaper I have a trophy
that named the Chronicle the
best newspaper in Florida in
1983.
How about a Mike Hampton
signed baseball? A Ted Williams
autographed photo? A Rawlings
bat signed by Stan Musial when
he visited the county? New York
Mets garbage can? (OK, that has
no significance other than they
finish in last place all the time).
I feel bad that my office is a
mess, but I'm not cleaning this
place up. I wouldn't know where
to start Or stop.
So I won't

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


More sidewalk ideas
This is regarding the sidewalk that no
one will walk on. How about the children
in Old Homosassa? Kindergarten and
grade-school children walk to school
with no sidewalks and narrow roads.
Commissioners, don't forget there's a
west side to the county.
Great fishing clinic
I would just like to thank the Citrus
County Parks and Recreation for the fishing
clinic they had. It was such a success
and my grandson went and learned all
kinds of things. Thank God our tax
money is going for something positive.
Spot on, Bernie
What an excellent letter to the editor
by Bernie Leven (March 1). He is right
on with his analysis of the failure of the
EDC. I have said for many years now, we
need to quit giving them money. They're
not doing anything, but he vocalized it
in his letter with much more detail and
with some evidence. I was very interested
in the amount of the money that he's
talking about and also the fact that he's
been involved in some of the efforts and
presentations. He is spot on with his analy-
sis. Thank you, Mr. Leven, for your letter.
Clean up the glass
I am glad to read in the Chronicle today,
March 2, that someone else is concerned
about glass and other debris on the roads
after an accident. I had called about this
problem in the past. The editor's note
says it is the responsibility of the towing
company called to the scene. Not all ac-
cidents require a towing company.
Therefore, my question is: whose job is
it then? Something needs to be done to
improve this situation, as other vehicles
forced to run over the debris can get tire
damage. Who do we call to change this?
Editor's note: We're not sure either, but
you might try first with the sheriff's office.
Thanks for great music
Congratulations to the Nature Coast
Community Band for putting on a won-
derful array of music for the public at
the Citrus Springs Community Center.
The same usual job wonderful that
they have been doing over the past five
years. Please keep up the good work.
And again, thanks to the Citrus Springs
Community Center for allowing them to
present this.



KNOWLEDGE
Continued from Page C1

Knowledge allows us reason to con-
nect the dots as more knowledge is pre-
sented. The Google brain develops a
dependency, like a fetus dependent on
its umbilical cord to survive. It develops
a sense of false intelligence. Why should
I study if I can just Google the answer?
Good question, but wrong attitude. It is a
challenging question that all adults
should start singing in unison. This is
why all adults must play an integral part
of monitoring and controlling the usage
of this tool.
The rate of change in the computer in-
dustry is motivated toward selling prod-
ucts for profit. Unfortunately, humans
have to process this change. Too fast is
not good, because often reflection is not


Difficult hill to climb
I don't usually complain about things,
but we just came from the Strawberry
Festival and I hope you will put this in
the Sound Off column. We're in our 80s
and it was so difficult where the handi-
capped parking was. It never was this
bad before, but you had to park so far
away and then climb a hill. It was just
too much for us. We won't be able to do
it again and I'd like for the Strawberry
Festival to really know about that. It was
very, very difficult this year. Otherwise
we loved it.
Don't feed the deer
While driving between Color Country
and the dump on (State Road) 44 this
weekend, I saw a deer on the side of the
road in the middle
OUND of the day eating
OUND food out of the
IFVC trash bags that were
iMWf thrown all over the
sides of the road.
It's dangerous for
Ithe animals that are
being drawn there
and it's dangerous for
CAL the people driving
563 0579 that the deer might
563~0 7 run out. The trash
really should be picked
up. Somebody has got to do a better job
of cleaning up Citrus County roads.
Lack of doctors
This morning I called three physi-
cians, general practice to get an ap-
pointment as a new patient. One said
they're not taking any patients until
April. The other two asked me what kind
of coverage I had. I had Medicare and
Blue Cross. They're not taking any pa-
tients until June. Do we need more doc-
tors in this county?
Doing his job
Commissioner Adams was chastised
for looking into the practices of the
county employees. What's the point of
having elected officials if they have to
answer to the appointed bureaucrats?
Blind justice
I read in the paper today where a lady
got 17 years for abusing her child. I
read in the paper yesterday where a
lady who murdered her child got 12
years. Where is the justice?


in the equation. In medical research, I
would like to see the five-plus years in a
peer review to make sure the product is
safe for consumption. Should not the
computer rate be reviewed with the
same precaution? The heavy push to
schools becoming completely depend-
ent on technology could be the end of
education as we know it. Some say good,
others say bad, while many have not
even addressed the notion.
We reap what we sow The answer lies
with the adults. Teach a common mes-
sage about an avoidance of a "Google
brain." Keep learning centered on the
love of learning and gaining knowledge,
not on short-term memory fixes. A good
parent is a good teacher


GregBiance is a Crystal River High
School teacher and former District
Teacher of the Year


HARVESTER
Continued from Page C1

represents the homeowner group, that
they had been approached by Save
Crystal River asking for permission to
film the Lyngbya removal operation of
my harvester. They further asked if it
would be OK to mount a camera on my
machine, which I agreed to do.
I have seen the video and know the
amount of time which was taken to pro-
vide the film and feel that it accurately
depicts the standard operation tech-
niques which I employ when tasked
with removing Lyngbya. As is common
practice with all harvesters used in the
bay, I remove my cutter bar and replace
it with a bubbler bar. I
survey the area and T rhr
consult maps pro- I lt e
vided by FWC as to lo- Roses'
cation of good plants R s'
beds and avoid those n s
areas. I also observe ayainstI
what is coming up off project h
the bottom to make
sure that it is only the fact f I
Lyngbya and other J c u
dead and decaying nrea tfit
plant material which
is being removed, harm to
Most importantly for
those who are not fa- and my
miliar with har-
vesters, the machine as I am
is not capable of
dredging, as the con- small oi
veyor will only hold
material which is fi- operator
brous in nature or the
occasional piece of other thG
wood, leaves, flip-
flops, bottles and is not aL
other debris which is
human in nature. In compete
fact, years ago I once
harvested an old large con
handgun! I operate by
feel, and after years of experience I am
quite capable of putting the harvester
head down, feeling the actual bottom,
then pulling the head up to the proper
level to remove only the appropriate
material, leaving the natural substrate
alone.
As far as the manatee issue is con-
cerned, I have been operating har-
vesters for 30 years and have never had
an encounter with a manatee. My expe-
rience is that they hear the harvester
and usually swim away Occasionally, a
young one or possibly one which has
not been exposed to harvesters will
come up close out of curiosity Of
course, I stop the machine until it goes
away Over the years, I have taken sev-
eral pictures of this from my harvester
The day the video was taken, I in fact
elected to do the removal during the af-
ternoon low tide after observing a num-
ber of manatees, swimmers and tour
boats present during the morning low
tide. I have great respect for the mana-
tees, swimmers and my partner in
watching for manatees, the META tour
operators. I am the only operator that
has a VHF onboard and monitors chan-
nel 17, the tour operators' communica-
tion channel.
Lastly, I have heard that there is a
big to-do about turbidity Anything that
moves man, fish, manatee, power
boats and paddles and gets close to


the bottom creates a certain amount of
turbidity I can tell you these facts from
my long experience; the turbidity dissi-
pates within a couple of hours after I
cease harvesting to the conditions
which were there previously I am told
this is called background turbidity
The more I harvest an area removing
the Lyngbya, the less the cloudiness is
from my harvester and the quicker it
dissipates. To my knowledge, after
years of removing first water hyacinth
and water lettuce, then Hydrillia and
now Lyngbya, I have never heard of any
harm to the bay or its waters from har-
vesting activity, no matter who is doing
it. So I have no understanding of what
Rose is talking about.
I also wish you to know that I have
worked for many people and organiza-
tions, including Art
t of Jones during the early
t of days of the King's Bay
tion Rotary Club's One
.,lions Rake at a Time pro-
th gram. I was harvesting
the then as I am now and
as in have no idea why
Rose is attacking Save
sed Crystal River/One
)e Rake at a Time. I can
zancial tell you that I have not
been told to dredge,
me which I could not do if
required. I have not
family been given any differ-
Sent instruction than
a before, so I just do not
know what the prob-
)ner/ lem is.
The result of Rose's
Swho, actions against the
S project has in fact
in price, caused great financial
harm to me and my
le to family, as I am a small
owner/operator who,
with other than price, is not
able to compete with
ripanies, large companies. My
son has a serious lung
disease which requires constant treat-
ment and has put additional strain on
the family I was so overjoyed with the
fact that the DEP permit had been is-
sued, as I could finally get back to work
and have a steady income. Now here
we go again.
I am just a country boy who is a tal-
ented harvester operator who loves to
be outside and enjoys what he is doing.
I can tell you I am not going to get rich.
I also don't fully understand what is
going on with the agencies or Save the
Manatee Club. I am a simple man who
through many years of experience
knows what harms the environment
and what does not. I can tell you this:
Until something else comes along
which is superior to the harvester other
than a full dredging operation, this is
the only tool we have in the box, other
than spraying. Please do not spray, as
that is one of the contributing factors to
what we have now I also have heard
that there is no known spray or a chem-
ical which will eradicate Lyngbya. The
mechanical harvesting is the most effi-
cient and least costly way to remove
Lyngbya where the machines are capa-
ble of reaching it.


Jerry Muetzel is the owner
of Florida Aquatics. He has been
running a harvester for 27 years.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 C3


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C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


Scott harming state's
public schools
Do citizens realize that Gov
Rick Scott is trying very hard to
undermine the public school
system in Florida by replacing
it with charter schools? As
stated in the Tampa Bay Times
editorial on March 2, "In three
years, Scott has done more
harm than any modem gover-
nor, (from) public schools to
higher education."
What are charter schools?
Straight from the Department
of Education website: "Charter
schools are public schools that
operate under a performance
contract, or a 'charter' which
frees them from many regulations
created for traditional public
schools." "Charter schools may
create innovative measurement
tools; provide competition to
stimulate improvement in tra-
ditional schools..'.
In what world does it make
sense to form other schools to
improve public schools? Isn't
anyone curious as to why this
money is not put directly into
the existing public school sys-
tem? My guess is that it is just
increasing the power of Scott's
rich friends.
My research has uncovered
some interesting facts:
Johnathan Hage, whose
company is Charter Schools
USA, has given more than
$100,000 to the Republican
Party and Scott's campaign.
Scott cut the school budget,
according to Charlie Christ, by
more than $1 billion when he was
first elected. Scott is promising
to, and campaigning to "increase"
the education budget by $542
million. That math absolutely
does not add up to an increase.
Scott cannot take credit for "in-
creasing" a budget when the
state is now spending less per
public school student than it was
before Scott became governor
Scott has cut off construc-
tion funds for public schools,
but funded construction for
charter schools.
During the 2012-13 school
year, "scholarships" totaled
$206.9 million. They were given
to a total of 51,075 students who
attended 1,338 charter schools.


This is no small amount of money
or effort, and the goal is clearly
to undermine public schools.
Take a look at the bill in the
Florida House of Representa-
tives titled Bill PCB FTSC 14-02
Relating to Tax Credit Scholar-
ship Programs. (The title says
nothing about charter schools.)
It recommends increasing the
student "scholarship" (money
paid to the charter school).
I wish that Florida's government
would stop punishing public
school teachers and gleefully
labeling public schools as "fail-
ing." Without giving the public
schools appropriate funding, we
are asking them to run a marathon
with a ball and chain on their
ankles. Children's success is de-
pendent upon many factors, in-
cluding parental support and
student motivation. How sad it
is that the politicians who don't
want to "throw money" at the
problems public schools face
are willing to fling obscene
amounts of money if the recipi-
ent is a charter school.
Vicky lozzia
Crystal River

Don't take children
on presidential trips
Since when does the first lady
Obama take her daughter to
China? Is this right? It is our
tax money at work. It cost us
enough at this point. Now we
have to worry about her daugh-
ters going everywhere she
goes? She should not have to
take her daughters. At what
cost is this going to be for us?
This has gone too far They are
spending money like it is going
out of style. This is not what I
remember any first lady doing.
Does she think the rules do not
apply to her in any way? This is
not the America I grew up with.
I guess they think anything goes
at this point while we stand by and
watch all this mess unfold. I hope
you are all angry about this as I am.
He plays golf when there is a
crisis instead of taking care of
things like a real president
does. Some leader!


Anna DeRose
Lecanto


Don't block access
to springs
I watched the video produced
by 'Action at Save the Manatees.
org" and, if that were the only
information I had, I would be to-
tally in favor of closing Three
Sisters, House and Jurassic
springs. Fortunately, that is not
the case. I think that if this idea
were to prevail, the results
would be catastrophic for the
manatee for several reasons:
1. The only reason that there
are "idle speed" and "slow
speed" boating zones is that the
manatees provide income for
the area. Power boaters have
lobbyists too, and if the point
could not be made that mana-
tees generate local income,
these areas would soon disap-
pear, resulting in increased
manatee deaths.
2. The situations that are
shown in the video are the ac-
tions that we as USFWS mana-
tee watchers get up early and
go out in kayaks in 40-degree
weather to prevent, and I think
we do a darned good job. Edu-
cation, not prevention, is the
answer to bad behavior on the
part of a very few rowdy tourists.
Some visitors come from over-
seas, particularly Germany, to
see these miraculous creatures
up close. When reminded of the
fact that these are vulnerable
animals just trying to survive a
stressful situation, even the
most overly excited visitors in-
evitably comply with the rules.
3. The majority of tour captains
do a great job of reminding
their groups of the criticality of
abiding by all the rules, and the
fragile nature of this environ-
ment. They demonstrate a true
love and concern for the welfare
of the manatees -none of which
was mentioned in the video.
In summary, to simply eliminate
access to these beautiful crea-
tures would take them out of the
realm of public concern, and that
would ultimately lead to their
demise. I feel that it is crucial that
I state an opposing point of view
before a lot of well-intentioned
citizens make a very bad decision.
Bob Boccuti
Crystal River


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I



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For Info & Ticketing:
Boys and Girls Club
352.621.9225
City of Inverness
352.726.2611 Ext. 1304
Online Ticketing
https://inverness.webconnex.com/toi


HI CNTE Of CITRUS CCT
Art Center Theatre


On*

Golden
POND

Dram s. ,e Pl.ay
< 5 snC!t~fl~t

By Earnest Thompson
Wed ySharon Hanis


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Tih /kct. $2 ,,
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Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRus COUFTYHJisTOmC SOCIEP!


Thanks for making
read-in successful
The seventh annual African-
American Read-In, held to bring
our community together to pro-
mote literacy, was enthusiastically
received by a diverse audience
of approximately 250 at the
Learning and Conference Center
on CF's Citrus campus on Feb. 9.
The Planning Committee, made
up of private citizens as well as
representatives from Citrus County
Schools, Citrus County's Historical
Resources Office and Library Serv-
ices Division, and the College of
Central Florida, would like to thank
all who participated as readers
and volunteers to make this af-
ternoon such an entertaining one.
Special thanks to our musical
entertainers: the Jazz Music of
Jim Davis and Rev Jerry Carris,
and The Journey Men's Christian
Gospel (Nathan Duncanson, Ron
Hoopes, Michael O'Grady, Tony
Singer and Jim Witherow). Gail
Bockiaro, fourth-grade teacher
at Crystal River Primary School,
deserves special thanks for involv-
ing her students again this year
Finally thanks to our financial
supporters, without whom the
event would not have been as
enjoyable. The Afro-American
Club of Citrus County, Annie M.
McCray Educational Foundation,
Citrus County Historical Society,
Citrus County Sheriff's Office,
CF's Institute for Community
Advancement, all five Friends
of the Library groups, The New
Church without Walls and Saint
Leo University were all generous
supporters. Businesses sponsors
include Bunch Lawn Care, Insight
Credit Union, Oysters Restaurant
and Catering, Publix Super
Markets, The Rustic Ranch
Restaurant and Bakery, Walgreens,
Wells Fargo and, of course, the
Citrus County Chronicle. Dona-
tions from Mason J. Holly Betty
Jackson, Purvis and Bernadette
Hunt, Andrea K. McCray, Jam-
mal McCray, Teegan E. McCray,
Dr Jane Perrin, and Lillian
Smith were appreciated.
Please plan on joining us
next year on Feb. 22, 2015.
Karen Slaska
African-American Read-In
Planning Committee


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Development does
not fit Sugarmill
Woods model
Our neighbors have described
in detail the effects Mr Kalka's
development will have on our
community and the access road,
the beautiful oak tree-lined
boulevard, that will be forced to
become the main access route
- for both the construction and
residential approach to this
development. This threatens
the very character of our Sug-
armill Woods way of life.
I submit that two other con-
siderations are relevant to this
discussion: first is the fact that
Mr Kalka is a significant
landowner in Hernando County
of properties abutting his 40-
acre tract. While he obviously
prefers an access route through
a portion of Sugarmill Woods that
would benefit his development
with the cachet of this commu-
nity, his development has no
right to identify itself as a part
of Sugarmill Woods, which it is
not. He should build his own
approach to his own property
Second, he has said that his
development will be built to the
same quality and character as
Sugarmill Woods. At the same
time he is saying that he in-
tends to build 400 homes on
these 40 acres. What? In Sug-
armill, with its unique Green-
belt design, as Jim Sanders the
president of Sugarmill Woods
during its construction phase
has stated, the housing density
of this community works out
one and a third homes per acre.
At the housing density Mr
Kalka is proposing, his develop-
ment will be one of apartments,
not stand-alone homes, and
clearly the Greenbelt design,
the distinguishing feature of
Sugarmill Woods, will be non-
existent. And this proposed
"Oak Village South" yet an-
other attempt to cash in on the
reputation of our community-
most certainly will not have the
character of Sugarmill Woods.
Mr Kalka needs to realize
that the residents of Sugarmill
Woods are in this engagement
for the long haul.
Dick and Jeanine Hirsch


Suncoast Credit Union
FOUNDATION ,

Schoolhoaue
HUISTLF, i
HEALTH EXPO 5K
YMCA KID ZONE
SCHOOL SPIRIT CONTESTS .O


APRIL 12, 2014*
CREST SCHOOL
LECANTO
6:30AM REGISTRATION,
7:30AM START


To efit the- C(itrus C(oant
S EcatINCn 5-o 58wdato/ 3
FOR MORE INFO CALL 352-586-3396


www.schoolhousehustle.com www.facebook.com/schoolhousehustle
SPONSORS AARON'S, CITRUS 95 3/THE Fox, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE,
GULF TO LAKE MARINE & TRAILERS, NATURE COAST EMS, NATURE COAST FINANCIAL ADVISORS, SUBWAY
SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION FOUNDATION, TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA, VANALLEN INSURANCE AGENCY, T
VAUGHN/MCLAUGHLIN TEAM OF RAYMOND JAMES, WEST COAST INSURERS AND THE YMCA C-

|11 I -


Best Ball
Format
Lunch Prior to Start
Prizes
50/50
Mulligans


Tournament
sponsored by the
St. Scholastica
f r ,Columbus
,.:,- ,/#14485


LENNY NAVICKAS
GOLF TOURNAMENT
at Citrus Hills Skyview Country Club

April 5,2014 at 1 p.m.
IN MEMORY OF LENNY NAVICKAS. PROCEEDS GO TO HIS CHILDREN.
_ooHJD $75 DONATION


eicrm
b


present their 1
... wine and beer


Citrus Avenue
W 14C Cry2tZl River

Saturday, April 5, 2014 2:30-6:00
Look for the tents in back properties for
Wine Shop and Burkes of Ireland


352-794-3834
tickets go on sale March 17th


CHRNJClE


LedngsL~)


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SPONSORS "

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March 21-
April 6,2014
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Let the dogs out
Crystal River needs an off-
leash dog park.
Dog parks have become very
popular recently across the
country I have been to several
in Florida and elsewhere when
I travel with my dogs. They al-
ways enjoy the romp and inter-
action with other dogs. People
at dog parks tend to be very
open and friendly, and the
dogs provide the center of
conversation.
Crystal River could certainly
benefit from a centrally located
dog park. There are several
parcels of land that would
work. They don't necessarily
have to be owned by the city or
forever tied up for such use.
The vacant fields around Cutler
Spur and Fort Island Trail appear
suitable. Also, unused portions
of land around the lower Citrus
Avenue area would work. All
that would be needed is a chain
linked fence, a water source,
doggy doo pickup bags with
trash can, and a parking area.
Crystal River only has a
handful of activities that bring
people out of their homes to in-
teract with each other A dog
park would be an inexpensive
addition to the city and add to
its sense of community And
dogs like them too.
Bob Goethe
Crystal River


Stone Crab Jam a hit
Once again our annual Stone
Crab Jam was a huge success,
which we could not make hap-
pen without the support of nu-
merous nonprofit groups who
come out to assist us in putting
on this event. So, while 9,000 of
our citizens and out-of-town
guests were enjoying them-
selves that first Saturday in
November, we were raising
money for local and interna-
tional charities. This year we
were able to net over $72,000 to
be used to support our charita-
ble endeavors. Last year Kings
Bay Rotary donated $53,328 to
local and international
charities.
Since the early 1980s,
Rotary International has
been waging war on polio. In
1988 there were 125 countries
in the world at the epidemic
stage. Today it can only be
found in three countries, with
new cases counted only in the
hundreds.
Rotarians also work to bring
positive changes in our own
local community. It is the prac-
tice of the King's Bay Rotary
Club of Crystal River to thank
our many volunteers by donat-
ing funds to the charity organi-
zations they represent. On
Jan. 23, we gathered with our
community partners to start our
year of giving in 2014 by distrib-
uting $13,320 between 21 com-


munity nonprofit groups in-
cluding Citrus Habitat, Hospice
of Citrus County, YMCA, and
Future Farmers of America to
name just a few These funds
will be used by the groups to
further their programs here in
Citrus County The Kings Bay
Rotary Club also supports many
other local groups trying to
make a difference in our com-
munity by addressing hunger,
improving education, cleaning
our water through "One Rake
at a Time" and supporting our
veterans.
"We want to thank all of our
guests and visitors who came
out and had a great time at our
event. Knowing that the pro-
ceeds from the food, beverages,
and merchandise you pur-
chased helps to improve the
lives of people across Citrus
County and around the world
only makes the evening better"
Steve Burch, 2013 Stone Crab
Jam Chairman.
"Once again the hard work of
our volunteers has resulted in
one of the premier events in
Citrus County It is our motto to
work hard, raise a lot of money,
give it all away, and have fun
doing it."
Art Jones
Kings Bay Rotary, president
Steven Burch
Stone Crab Jam committee
chairman


County faces road
maintenance issues
On March 8,2014, reporter
Chris Van Ormer wrote an arti-
cle in the Chronicle regarding
Commissioner Joe Meek. Meek
stated he had spoken to the Cit-
rus Springs Civic Association
concerning "road resurfacing"
and was informed by them this
was a major issue in their com-
munity Van Ormer's article in-
cluded an assertion by
Commissioner "JJ" Kenney,
who after riding his motorcycle
through this community said,
"We've got a lot of roads like
that. I would support the fact
we take a look at the voluntary
resurfacing,"
I was absolutely astonished.
Where have these gentlemen
been? Citrus Springs has a vol-
untary road resurfacing pro-
gram administered by its own
Municipal Services Benefit
Unit (MSBU) for over 20 years.
The Civic Association has noth-
ing to do with the MSBU. This
is an independent nine-mem-
ber resident advisory group,
chosen by the governing board
of the Citrus County Commis-
sioners. This advisory group
meets each month to discuss
the various projects in their
community.
Here's some pertinent back-
ground: In 1993, only 60 miles
out of 419 private roads were


maintained by the county The
MSBU voluntarily spent mil-
lions of dollars to bring the bal-
ance of 359 miles up to an
acceptable county standard.
This enormous voluntary finan-
cial undertaking was (over a pe-
riod of seven years) achieved
and finished by the year 2000.
At that time the county offi-
cially assumed responsibility of
perpetual maintenance for all
of these once-private roads. Un-
fortunately, the MSBU contin-
ues to subsidize the county's
maintenance upkeep. For each
year after 2000, it voluntarily
has contributed thousands and
thousands of extra dollars for
road resurfacing projects in
Citrus Springs.
The advisory board is well
aware of the lack of county re-
sources. They realize if annual
voluntary contributions were
discontinued, it would take too
many years for the county to
deal with road resurfacing is-
sues in their community I am of
the opinion the real reason for
considering a road resurfacing
MSBU is because the county al-
locates insufficient dollar
amounts in its budget to main-
tain roads, and commissioners
most likely prefer to pass this
expense on to various commu-
nities rather than raise taxes
countywide.
Peter Monteleone
Pine Ridge


Every eight minutes, the American
Red Cross brings help and hope to
people in need. Every dollar you give
helps us do more of what we do.
Bea hero.
Donate today.
Visit redcross.org/mld-florlda
+ A--9lc~n Red ross
IMid-lorida=Rgion
352-564-8455

*f -- MgRa I -2O-)


y"CITRUS COUNTY [W
CHRIONICLE:,J
i k w..chronlcleonllne.com

2 3 4 5 6 7 8
2345678

9 101112131415
16 17 18 19 20 2122
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
3031


16th Annual
Superintendent's Golf Classic
Saturday April 26, 2014 3 "; .=1. sig,. iB
Sugarmill Woods $.% RegrzIr..Tl, Fee
Golf Club $1000 and $1001
Food Sponsorshi








For more information 726-1931 or 724-1931 or 726-2241
Door PrizesAalae
Hole in One Prizes
50/50 Drawing









Memorynhacnt CeneroAerc
CHsN for








L e inforaio h 7213 .ool o r749 or
inlued- Photos





W1M 0 .EIEN T R BI
For moreinformatio
call (352) 726-3874.
li A* g j5Si~B~fl
^^'''Y ^g *^^a


6TH ANNUAL HA TALNT
CfIgTR- HAS TALENT-


- -- -- ~L~7LL~J


Api II 2 1
J iy: 6:30 P.M.
~ at the
Curtis Peterson
j& bAuditorium
(Tickets $10 per person
Children under 10 are free
Masters of Ceremonies:
Brad Thorpe County Administrator and Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator
For ticket information call fCii i)N iE
527-5900 (Doors open at 6pm)


) KIWANIS

CAR & TRUCK
5HOW

ISaturday, April 5, 2014
8 am to 2 pm
Registration 8 -10 am
Pre-Registration $15 Day of Show $20
!icK Nichols Ford-ULincoln
2901 W. Highway 44 Inverness

Contact Pete for information 527-0039 or pdelia8@aol.com
30 Awards plus
"Best of Show" 11( )N II N
"Kiwanis Choice Award" .


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

SKids Day at the Market:
Inverness Farmers Market
0 Saturday, April 5 -
9:00 am 1:00 pm


0 Health Awareness by PedlM
0 Child I.D. Packets Clowns
Firetrucks and Fireman -Juggler
0 Face Painting
0 Crafts -create your own book
Sponsored by Citrus County Chronicle, 96 7 FOX, ..
S Duke Energy, Citrus 95 3, Tobacco Free Florida, I '
0 Insight Credit Union, Nick Nicholas,
Great Bay Distributors, Waste Management
" For more information call 352-726-2611 A

......................
_'._) IThE (i'.,C (ommuity) m 17 (Ir Cir 0_
is proud to present

NE DU PRITN
ME PM OF SPRING) EVp
Sunday, March 30, 2014 3:00 PM
G>od Shepherd Lulheiran Church
439 E. Norell Br~an! H%%.. Hernando
Sunday. April 6, 2014 3:00 PM
Fhiilh Lutheiran Church
935_ S. C ('ltll Glen Dr.. Lento

N l I11 1 .,1 iJ ru l r III ..i. I' OIL Iik L ii I -I' & iin i -i -P I
For moe inl'orninmtioii, o to
,, i Iv~ i r sl u rc n


3rd Annual 7 3 Iueq0HFWW


/l4asi CJestwio
at Fort Cooper State Park
Sat., April 19th. 10am to 4pmr RAIN OR SHINE
Hosted by the 3100 S.Old Floral City Rd Tickets
F.... I :'I....... 52-726-03-o15 $10.00@ gate
Fc J 1 2 No Coolers Advance
or Alcohol Advance tickets
available at the park
$7.00
BRNA Children Under 12 Free


S--'' -C_ '''_ ANTIQUE AUTOS
GREAT FOOD
^ ______ i*--------------







Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 6:00pm
First United Methodist Church of Homosassa


Tickets:
$35.00 for Individual
$60.00 for a Couple
$300 to Sponsor a Table


J-^'?e Sanctuaf
| |'ttte'ce JHovje
"Ikih-


To obtain tickets, call Judy Awe at 352-697-0100.|


Tuscancy on the Meadows Quality Inn & Suites
| 350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
For more information, please call: Robin (352) 697-2279
TUre,ny on the Meadw',
nd Jim Green Jeoeiers for


Mar 30- April 6
Art Center Theatre
On Golden Pond ACT
Entrance Fee: $19 each
Fri and Sat nights at 7:30PM
Sunday Matinee at 2PM
Addtl Sat Matinee Mar 29 at 2PM
Contact Phone: 746-7606

March 30 3:00 PM
Citrus County Community Choir
Le Sacre Du Printemps (The Right of Spring)
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
Entrance: $10, Children 12 & under free
Contact Phone: 212-1746

April 1 6:30 PM 8:00 PM
The BFF Society (Changing Lives Through Education)
5th Annual Diamond in April
Tuscany on the Meadows
Entrance Fee: $20
Contact Phone: 697-2279

April 03 6:00PM
The Sanctuary & Grace House Mission
4th Annual Fundraising Banquet
First United Methodist Church Homosassa
Entrance Fee: $35 individual, $60 couple,
$300 for a table of 10
Contact Phone: Call 697-0100 for tickets

April 4-5* -6:00 PM
American Cancer Society
Relay for Life Inverness
Contact Phone: 800-227-2345

April 05 Shotgun start 1:00 PM
St. Scholastica Knights of Columbus
Lenny Navickas Golf Tournament
Citrus Hills Skyview County Club
Entrance Fee: $75 pp
Contact Phone: 563-5994

April 05 2:30 PM 6:00 PM
Wine Shop III &Wine Bar and Burkes of Ireland
Grand Tasting
Downtown Crystal River
behind the Wine Shop and Burkes
Entrance Fee: $30 plus tax
Contact Phone: 794-3934

April 05 Registration 8-10
Kiwanis
Car and Truck Show
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Hwy 44 in Inverness
Pre-registration $15, Day of show $20
Contact Phone: 527-0039

April 05:
CASA-Tee Up with CASA
"Drive Away Domestic Violence"
Citrus Hills Meadows Golf Course
Contact Phone: 746-4425 or 344-8111

April6*-3PM
Citrus County Community Choir
Le Sacre Du Printemps (The Right of Spring)
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
Entrance: $10, Children 12 & under free
Contact Phone: 212-1746


-1


I -


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 C5


I1


I1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Repeal nuke cost
recovery statute
Sen. Charlie Dean seems like a very
nice, honest man who regretfully has
been fooled. I have read the statute in
question- Florida Statute 366.93-
completely With this letter I am asking
all the elected officials to get together
and repeal that statute immediately
The Progress Energy now Duke En-
ergy-utilization of Florida Statute
366.93, Cost recovery for Nuclear and
Integrated Gasification, is the most out-
rageous legalized theft, tax and citizen
duping that I can remember
Please note the title addresses Nu-
clear and Integrated Gasification. We as
citizens have been ripped off by this
statute as it relates to the nuclear power
issue. If you read the statute, you will
see the power companies can do it
again and again as long as that
statute is on the books, there is nothing
stopping them.
They can use the same procedure to
justify charging the citizens for an inte-
grated gasification plant or another nu-
clear plant.
The statute is wrong philosophically,
i.e. anti-capitalism, and it is wrong as
policy If building a nuclear plant or a
gasification plant was a good invest-
ment, why couldn't the utilities get the
money in the open market? Sound busi-
ness plans attract financing. Plans that
make no economic sense do not.
Further, under this statute the utilities
have no risk. They can do any stupid
thing they want and the citizens must
pay They actually did. Plus, they get a
"rate of return" on a no risk, silly (or stu-
pid) investment They actually did.
In the statute, "cost" is defined to in-
clude "all capital investments" and, get
this, including rate of return. So they
get to build it, charge the citizens for the
costs and the utilities get to own the
capital improvement that the citizens
paid for That is like the Legislature
passing a bill that pays for my mortgage
and allows me to still own the property.
The rate of return section allows them
to "earn" a return on our money equal
to the utilities rate of return last ap-
proved by the commission. Really? A
rate of return is determined by how
risky the investment is. This investment
has zero risk. All their costs are shifted
to the consumer
Under this statute the Public Service
Commission is nothing but a rubber
stamp. The hearings before the PSC
were a shame. The fix is in because of
the wording of this statute.
The utilities do not have a vested
right to the money granted by this
statute. The PSC hearings were a joke
because the statute tied the PSC's
hands. The PSC could not end the cost
recovery on its own. The only fix is im-
mediate repeal of this statute.
Tom Donnelly
Crystal River
HCA takeover of CMH
could be traumatic
After reading in Tampa Bay Times
yesterday and today (March 9 and 10)
about the way Hospital Corporation of
America is charging its trauma-center
patients in Florida exorbitant prices,
does anybody with an IQ higher than a
turnip think letting them have Citrus
Memorial for 50 years is a good idea?
In every phase of trauma-center care
they are the highest in the state. With
bills three to four times other hospitals,
do we want this for Citrus County?


Mission accomplished
With his 2015 budget Barack Obama,
can report to his handlers: "Mission ac-
complished: I have bankrupted America
and her destruction will surely follow"
He followed a plan I've mentioned
many times, the evil Cloward-Piven
Strategy which seeks to cause the fall of
capitalism by overloading the govern-
ment bureaucracy with a flood of impos-
sible demands, thus pushing society into
crisis and economic collapse.
They seek to overload the welfare sys-
tem, have it collapse and watch chaos
and anarchy erupt across the land.
Obama keeps harping on deficit re-
duction, counting on you to not know the
difference between the deficit and the
national debt. The deficit is the amount
we fail to balance the budget on a yearly
basis. The national debt is the total of
all the deficits we have accumulated
over the years. The national debt was $7
trillion when Obama took office. It will
hit $18 trillion by the time he leaves of-
fice in 2017. He ran it up more than all
prior presidents combined. If we proj-
ect his budget to 2024, our national debt
will hit $25 trillion. Obama's budget
leaves the deficit at around $500 billion
a year forever If that runs for 10 years,
the national debt increases $5 trillion.
Let's look closer at his budget: It's one
month late, never balances, and has 8.5
times as much in tax increases as in tax
cuts. It features $55 billion in additional
spending in 2015 alone. It expands the
size and scope of government, and
leaves us with $25 trillion of debt by
2024. It fully funds Obamacare, leaves
us with a much weaker national de-
fense, abandons Social Security reform,
and creates a $1 billion climate fund.
Assuming our interest rates stay at
their current levels, by 2017 our interest
payments will exceed Medicaid pay-
ments, and by 2020, they will exceed the
national defense budget. His budget
shows the interest on the national debt
growing from $223 billion this year to
$800 billion by 2024.
It's not at all certain that the Fed can
hold the rate on our debt given the
amount of money they are printing. The
10-year Treasury is going for 2.69 per-
cent this week, up from 1.88 percent at
this time last year For comparison pur-
poses I ran a little Excel project to cal-
culate the median and average 10-year
Treasury rate from 1871 to present, 143
years, and the sample is large enough
that they are both 4.01 percent. That's
frightening enough, but for the average
to be 4.01 percent there were decades
and decades when it was well above
that. If Treasury rates should surge to 6
percent, it would destroy us today
Obama has painted us into a corner
where we have to keep interest rates
low by printing money like crazy all the
while knowing that will cause interest
rates to rise.
You couldn't run your household like
this, continually running up more and
more debt for years. You can't run a city
county, or state like this, although some,
like Detroit and California, try Half the
countries of the European Union are
teetering on economic collapse because
they can't service their debt. As far as
Obama goes, you need to watch what he
does, not what he says. His actions have
set us on a course to bankruptcy
You can't be this stupid; it has to be
deliberate.
Of course, there is a simple solution.
Ignore his proposed budget like his own
Democratic-controlled senate did last
time and never let it see the light of day
in the House.


Michael Andrews Harley Lawrence
Hernando Homosassa


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Letters to THE EDITOR


C6 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


COMMENTARY


V0.4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Our community
is in good hands
After a few years here, I
decided to learn about my
community How does our
local government and its
communities operate?
It started with a cham-
ber of commerce brain-
storming event about how
to bring business to the
community There were
some interesting recom-
mendations as an aquar-
ium, housing for veterans,
and additional ways to ex-
plore our beautiful envi-
ronment. I learned that
county business leaders
are seeking ways to bring
new and diverse economic
opportunities and jobs.
Next, I signed up for
BOCC's Citizen Academy,
a multiweek course, to gain
a better understanding of
how local government works.
Through the artful organi-
zation of Deb Bloss, each
week we visited different
departments and met many
of the employees. I learned
that county employees'
hard work, creativity and
persistence make the
county function.
I learned that people
come from around the world
to learn to fly at our airport;
I learned that the new on-
line local maps used by
our planners are online
for you too; I learned about
the teen peer court's
unique way of trying to
keep kids out of trouble; I
learned that Citrus bus
transportation systems
delivers service to many
individuals daily; I learned
how refurbishing derelict
houses to sell helps neigh-
borhoods. Many services
provided are essential to
citizens for a normal life:
fire, safety, health, envi-
ronment conservation,
parks, youth activities, fi-
nancial security, taxes,
water treatment sanitation,
voting, libraries, pools,
recreation and senior
centers, sports leagues and
more. Our Nature Coast is
a travelers' destination and
we live here. Although not
perfect this county gov-
ernment is striving to main-
tain good benefits and
meet future challenges.
Then, I signed up for the
CERT (Community Emer-
gency Response Team),
which trains volunteers
for emergencies. Citrus
County professionals are
not waiting for a disaster to
happen, they are planning
and practicing to meet the
need The health department
continues to upgrade skills,
supplies and personnel to
be ready to act The sher-
iff's office continues to
train its officers not only
for their professional re-
sponsibilities, but learn-
ing new technology and
procedures. CERT involves
both private and public
resources being available
to meet unforeseen needs.
Education is our foun-
dation. I became involved
with a small study on
Florida's charter schools.
The only local charter
school is the Academy of
Environmental Science
(AES), started in 1999.
This school enables stu-
dents to study their county
through a rigorous science
curriculum centered on
Citrus' natural environ-
ment. This school is an
exemplary "public char-
ter school" model that is a
partnership between two
separate entities with all
educational funding stay-
ing within the district.
The school continues to
maintain an A rating and
is rated No. 2 in math out
of all Florida schools.
The big plus is AES is
educating students who
are intrinsically aware of
the community's environ-
mental needs. I learned
that we have a very good
public school system that
must continue to act for
students, and it needs our
support to keep it local.


warm climate. Okay, noth-
ing is ever entirely perfect,
and things happen, but all
in all we have a pretty
good thing going here.
Both individually and to-
gether as a team, I am
confident we can all make
more good things happen.
Kathleen O'Donoghue
Hernando

Middle-class
spending declining
I appreciate the response
from Mr Lawrence on
March 2. I'll try to explain
further
When I point to the fact
that 85 people on planet
Earth have more wealth
than 3.5 billion people,
I'm directly correlating
that income inequality
has risen to a level that is
unsustainable. At this
level, it is detrimental to
the economy
When does income in-
equality become detri-
mental to the economy
and society?
In 1928, the top 1 percent
took in over 23 percent of
income per year There is
only one other time that
has risen above that level.
That was in 2007. In both
of those periods, the mid-
dle class went into a debt
bubble and a speculative
bubble appeared on Wall
Street. The data don't lie.
When the wealthy move
huge portions of wealth
into the global capital
markets, very little social
utility comes from it. They
don't buy 6,000 cars, only
a few They are not mov-
ing the economy The
speculative instruments
they use don't reach the


middle class. The middle
class drives consumer
spending. Consumer
spending accounts for 70
percent of the economy
per year When consumer
spending nosedives, the
middle class does not have
enough capital to keep the
economy moving. We would
be fooling ourselves into
believing that the wealthy
are the job creators. They
merely react to demand.
Demand is made in huge
majority by the middle
class. Customers are the
job creators. In 1970, peo-
ple stopped being paid
more. Adjusted for infla-
tion, pay has not risen
since 1970. Why? Thirty
years ago, the markets
began to deregulate. How
did the Dow Jones go from
1,000 points in 1985 to over
10,000 points in 2010?
They are more profitable
by keeping pay down and
deregulation. Offshoring
and technology also played
a role. CEOs started pay-
ing themselves huge mul-
tiples compared to
average worker pay Exec-
utive pay jumped from 50
times the average worker
pay for many decades to
over 350 times the pay in
the 2000s. Clinton tried to
tie CEO pay to profitabil-
ity, and that's where stock
options came from. Union
memberships fell or were
busted. Paychecks stayed
the same. The "job cre-
ators" started destroying
jobs. Unethical behavior
like this is should be a
crime.
To make up for it
women entered the work-
force to make up the dif-
ference in pay during the
1970s. People started


working longer hours in
the 80s. In the 90s the
middle class started going
into debt to keep their
standard of living. Today,
we're past the breaking
point. Productivity in the
economy continued to
rise non-stop because of
technology. With global-
ization and technology,
the wealthy have had all
the tools they need to take
complete control. There
is no liberal conspiracy
keeping corporations
down. Corporations are as
healthy and profitable as
they have ever been.
What happens when pro-
ductivity and technology
makes the average worker
completely unneeded?
What "socialist" coun-
try is better than the sta-
tus quo? That's easy It's
the United States from
1945 to 1977. Higher edu-
cation exploded from 5.9
percent in 1944 to 24 per-
cent in 1977. Union mem-
bership grew from 15
percent in 1933 to 33 per-
cent in 1955. That country
doesn't exist anymore. We
can take every mistake
made by Europe and the
U.S. and learn from it. We
had something good going
for nearly 40 years. Con-
sidering that 42 percent of
the children born into
poverty in the United
States will never leave it,
compared to Denmark at
25 percent and Great
Britain at 40 percent,
we're not the best. We can
find a better solution. If
it's not socialism, it's defi-
nitely not what has oc-
curred in the last 30 years.
Ryan Gill
Pine Ridge


Setting record
straight on ACA
Once again I have been
frustrated by a letter to
the editor because the au-
thor either doesn't know
the facts or intentionally
omitted facts in order to
support his position. In
his letter Mr Robert
Hagaman charges that the
president's use of executive
order to modify the imple-
mentation of the Afford-
able Care Act is illegal.
He then attacks the media
for what he perceives as a
lack of responsible jour-
nalism because of their
collective failure to ex-
pose this illegal activity
The facts he omitted are
that, with the exception of
President William Harri-
son, every president since
George Washington has is-
sued executive orders
and executive proclama-
tions. Of the 15,156 presi-
dential executive orders
issued by all presidents,
as of March 6,2014, only
two orders (Truman, Clin-
ton) have been overturned
by the courts. Obviously
Mr Hagaman's contention
that the president is act-
ing illegally is baseless.
In the third paragraph
of his letter, Mr Hagaman
writes that Medicare will
not pay if a patient is ad-
mitted to the hospital for
observation rather than
as an inpatient and he at-
tributes this to multiple
problems arising from the
Affordable Care Act. On
Oct. 1, 2013, the Center for
Medicare Policy (CMS)
stated that inpatient ad-
missions will be paid
under Medicare Part A
and that admissions for


COMMENTARY


UC


DOCTORS'




DAY Ofl



Honoring excellence in medicine.

We proudly salute our doctors.


Because of my interest
in voter registration, Laura
Zayas at the Supervisor of
Elections office introduced
me to the work they do to
ensure you can vote and
your vote counts. This of-
fice had none of the voting
issues that have recently
made headlines in the na-
tional press about Florida.
My active research made
me realize why I like Cit-
rus County besides my
great neighbors and the


CITRUS MEMORIAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 C7



observation will be paid
under Medicare Part B.
CMS further defined that
an admission would be
classified as observation
if the patient did not re-
main in the hospital for at
least two midnights. Mr
Hagaman would like his
readers to sympathize
with the hospitals in the
matter The facts are that
this rule was instituted
because hospitals were
billing Medicare for the
higher inpatient rate when
the patient was actually
an observation admission,
for which Medicare pays
a lesser rate.
Mr Hagaman closes his
letter by writing that with
regard to the Affordable
Care Act (ACA) "many of
the so-called great policies
cover almost nothing and
in fact are only catastrophic
care policies." That state-
ment is absolutely false.
Each ACA insurer posts the
coverage details of each
policy on the healthcare.gov
website and a review of
the various coverage de-
tails clearly shows that
these are good policies in-
tentionally designed under
ACA mandate to provide
excellent health care cov-
erage. The "policies that
cover almost nothing and
in fact are only cata-
strophic care policies"
are the very policies that
are making headlines be-
cause they are being can-
celled by the insurance
companies. Preventing in-
surers from selling that
type of policy is a benefit,
not a drawback, of the Af-
fordable Care Act.
Kenneth Golubski
Crystal River


OK;Z&O




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3................ .......











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


In this day and age of constant connection, the public has been surprised to learn that radar and
satellites aren't actually all-seeing, cellphone locations aren't always traceable and key data about
the plane is only recorded, not transmitted in real time to the ground. And onboard tracking
systems can be disabled manually one theory holds that someone in the cockpit of Malaysia
Airlines Flight 370 intentionally diverted the plane and disguised their actions.


Associated Press
TOP: A ground controller guides a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion to rest after sunset upon its return from a search
for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, over the Indian Ocean, at the Royal Australian Air Force Base Pearce in Perth,
Australia. ABOVE: Royal Australian Air Force Loadmasters Sgt. Adam Roberts, left, and Flight Sgt. John Mancey, launch a
Self Locating Data Marker Buoy from a C-130J Hercules aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean.


Associated Press
NEW YORK-The disappearance
of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
has presented two tales of modern
technology
The limitations of tracking and com-
munications devices allowed the plane
to vanish from sight for nearly three
weeks. But satellites' advanced capa-
bilities have provided hope that the
mystery won't go unsolved.
"Technology can track a flight, but
assuming malice was involved, it
wouldn't change the outcome of this
disaster Only better human intelli-
gence and screening can do that," said
Richard Aboulafia, an aviation con-
sultant with the Teal Group.
Still, the mystery of Flight 370 would
have been even more perplexing if it
wasn't for some of these technologies.


The little information we have today
about where the plane might have
crashed came from satellites.
"If it weren't for the technologies,
nobody would have had a clue where
to look," said Scott Hamilton, manag-
ing director of aviation consultancy
Leeham Co.
Here is a look at how old and new
technologies have aided or hindered
the search effort.
TRANSPONDERS
These cockpit devices send signals to
radar stations on the ground with details
about the plane's flight number, head-
ing, speed and altitude. The transponder
also can be used to send predetermined
messages to air traffic controllers. For
instance, if a plane's transponder
squawks out a code of "7500" it means
there has been a hijacking. A squawk of


"7600" refers to a radio failure and
"7700" means an emergency
Flight 370 took off from Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia at 12:40 a.m. local
time on March 8, heading to Beijing.
Then at 1:20 a.m., the transponder
stopped transmitting. The Boeing 777-
200ER with 239 passengers and crew
aboard kept flying for several hours
but no further signals were ever re-
ceived from the transponder
It's rare for a commercial pilot to in-
tentionally turn off a transponder dur-
ing flight, but occasionally there is a
legitimate reason, such as a malfunc-
tion, electrical short or fire. Pilots
would want to shut it down rather than
risk a fire spreading.
RADAR
Radar was developed just before the
See' Page D2


Research


your new


financial


planner

EAR BRUCE: I have about
$3 million invested through
a financial planner, and I
need your advice.
This past year I earned zero in-
come from my investments. He
said that he was playing it safe
with my money He also said he
didn't lose any of my money I
wrote him back and said in a sense
he did lose money for me because
the market has soared this past
year He said in return that invest-
ing in the stock market was like
putting money in a slot machine in
Las Vegas. I had 30 percent in the
market with him.
My question is, should I change
to another financial planner? I
have to live off my investments. I
think some of these so-called fi-
nancial planners are just good
salesmen.
C.M., via email
DEAR C.M.: Cut very quickly to
the chase: Any investment adviser
who says putting money in the
stock market is like putting money
in a slot machine in Las Vegas
should be shown the door immedi-
ately You have $3 million and no
return? Even a private conserva-
tive investor should have come up
with at least $100,000, and I would
never have been satisfied with a
$100,000 return on $3 million.
I would like to know what kind
of fees he has made for himself
Even at 4 percent, which is a no-
brainer, your $3 million should
have brought in $120,000, and you
could figure the percentage if you
didn't invest it all with him. This
guy is a loser and should be
dumped instantly!
DEAR BRUCE: I'd like to know
if I have any legal recourse when a
retailer sells a debt that wasn't
dealt with correctly Can I sue in
small claims court? Can I recover
in any way?
I got an X-ray taken at a medical
radiation company The X-ray was
required by the hospital (and the
surgeon) where I was going to get
surgery Fifteen months later, they
sent me a bill for the X-ray, saying
that Medicare refused to pay
I called Medicare. An agent told
me that Medicare does pay for pre-
op X-rays when required by the
surgeon or the hospital.
I mailed this information to the
X-ray company along with a copy
of the last bill it had sent me.
Shortly after, I learned that the X-
ray company had already sold the
debt to another agency Under
these circumstances, do I have any
legal recourse against the X-ray
company, and thus, some way to re-
verse the adverse reports to the
credit bureaus that were set up?
B.E., via email
DEAR B.E.: I can sympathize
with your problem; it is not an un-
usual one. It appears that one of
the major problems here is that
the X-ray company did not supply
the correct information to
Medicare. There is no question
that Medicare usually pays for this
kind of service.
The first thing to do is write to
the company and explain that it
was deficient for not replying in a
timely fashion, and that you have
no intention of paying anything
until that deficiency is overcome.
If it cannot be, then the company is
going to have to eat it.
Second, send a copy of your cor-
respondence to the collection
agency There was no legal obliga-
tion for you to pay; therefore, the
X-ray company had no legal right
to sell your account to the collec-
tion agency

Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams. com. Questions of general
interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies cannot be
provided.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TECH
Continued from Page Dl

start of World War II. The word radar is actually an
acronym: radio (use the R and the A) detection and
ranging.
An antenna on the ground sends out electromag-
netic waves. They reflect, or backscatter, from the sur-
face of an aircraft and almost instantly return to the
radar station. Since these radio waves travel at a
known, set speed the speed of light the radar sys-
tem is able to calculate how far away a plane is from
the antenna.
But radar's only able to track planes within 200 to
250 miles, depending on the age of the technology and
the weather Station locations are selected to allow for
a slight overlap so planes in high-traffic areas are
never out of reach.
In the case of the Malaysia Airlines jet, military
radar picked up a signal at 2:14 a.m. of a plane flying
in the opposite direction of Flight 370's original path.
The radar signal was infrequent and there was no
transponder data, making it harder to track.
Normally, when planes leave areas of radar cover-
age, pilots use high-frequency radios or satellite text
communications to update air traffic controllers of
their position at routine intervals.
SATELLITE TRACKING
Some jets use satellites to regularly send mainte-
nance data back to headquarters. Malaysia Airlines
did not opt to subscribe to this service from Boeing.
The jet's disappearance has many calling for airlines
to live stream information from planes' voice and data
recorders. However, transmitting data by satellite
from all 80,000 daily flights worldwide wouldn't be
cheap it costs $7 to $13 a minute for each plane.
And it's not like airlines are flush with extra cash. On
average, they made $4.13 in profit per passenger last
year and $2.05 in 2012.
Other satellite transmissions from the plane, how-
ever, helped searchers ultimately narrow in on the
plane's final location in a remote part of the Indian
Ocean.
The plane automatically sent a brief signal a "ping"
- every hour to a satellite belonging to Inmarsat, a
British company, even after other communication sys-
tems shut down. The pings indicated that the jet kept fly-
ing for seven hours after its last radar contact
Inmarsat was able to calculate two long arcs indicat-
ing where the plane might have flown. It refined that
analysis by factoring in the jet's speed relative to the
satellite. The company gauged how the frequency was
received and transmitted the so-called Doppler ef-
fect is similar to the way the sound of a passing car
changes as it approaches and passes by a fixed point.
This Burst Frequency Offset method had never been
used before. Its validity was confirmed by applying the
analysis to six other Boeing 777 flights -whose posi-
tions were known- on the same day, flying in various
directions.
That new information led to an announcement Mon-
day night by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak
that the plane ended its flight in a remote part of the
Indian Ocean.
SATELLITE IMAGES
Private satellites and those of several governments
have spotted what were initially believed to be parts
of the plane in the southern Indian Ocean, about 1,550
miles southwest of Perth, Australia. But the search
area was moved 680 miles to the northeast on Friday,
as Australian officials said a new analysis of radar
data suggests the plane had flown faster and therefore
ran out of fuel more quickly than had been previously
estimated.
That means searchers have concluded that the hun-
dreds of floating objects detected over the last week
by satellite weren't from the plane after all. Any im-


ages picked up by satellites might be the best tool in
ultimately finding the remains of the plane.
BLACK BOXES
There are two so-called black boxes, which are actu-
ally orange. One records conversations and noises in
the cockpit. The other saves key flight data such as
speed and altitude.
The boxes are designed to withstand strong impacts
and large fires. They also come with a device that
pings to help searchers find it underwater, though the


deeper the box, the more difficult it is to hear those
pings. The U.S. Navy has sent a Towed Pinger Locator
to the Indian Ocean. It can hear the black box pinger
down to a depth of about 20,000 feet.
The black box battery is required to last at least 30
days, but information can be retrieved for years. It
took 23 months to find the black boxes from an Air
France crash in 2009. All of the data was recovered.
In the case of Flight 370, there's a problem. The
cockpit voice recorders only save the last two hours of
conversations.


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I&R BLOCK


INNCO ME A I1RE.CxiR


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


BUSINESS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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)Over the /ceas 1e have .%_sood hd otu, be/lie li/at i C/7/ ill
NOT he in competition \l'itli0/11'h our proles.ionlt /
hliedcaper% that come il aind prll'chl0se o)li/0 prod(Icts 1%
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hlave the need for palvers' fo" 'ot drive or" o'af//\'av. o/" y
.s]/l/ al/d ,/eete" ', ir c'all \/ a ys'. recommend/'MHM'o//// l
slppliers'a an/d installers close to voit.
At Diinnellon NMulch and Stone .
our customer is always #1 ,






- ,- r' ,jI.
*".*-* ,- \,








Pick Up or Delivery Available! Retail & Wholesale

Corner of US 41 and Dunnellon Road


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 D3










D4


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Comme ce


(humber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.cornm/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
April 1- Ribbon-cutting,
Suncoast Credit Union,
4:30 p.m., 2367 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
April 2 Ribbon-cutting,
Waverley Florist, 4:30
p.m., 302 N.E. Third
Street, Crystal River.
April 9- Ribbon-cutting,
League of Women Voters,
4:30 p.m., Chamber, 28
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
April 10 Mixer at
Black Diamond Ranch,
5 to 7 p.m., 2600 W.
Black Diamond Circle,
Lecanto.
April 14-Ribbon-cutting,
Bedinotti Photo, 4:30
p.m., Chamber, 28 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
April 21 Ribbon-cutting,
Nature Coast Ministries,
4:30 p.m., 1590 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River.
April 23 Ribbon-cutting,
Reel Burns Charters,
4:30 p.m. 5300 S. Chero-
kee Way, Homosassa.
April 24-Golden Citrus
Scholars Awards Cere-
mony, 5:30 p.m. College
of Central Florida,
Lecanto.
May 2 Pillar Awards
Dinner inspired by the
style of the Kentucky
Derby, 6 p.m. to 10
p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Cock-
tail attire and hats are
recommended. Table
sponsorships $300 and
individual reservations
$35 per person.

Member
events
April 7-SCORE 16th
annual Golf Classic,
Sugarmill Woods Coun-
try Club, in partnership
with the Citrus County
Chronicle. Register at
www.scoresitrus.org.
April 11 Roast 'n'
Toast of Mike and Re-
becca Bays, Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club,
presented by the Florida
Public Relations Associ-
ation Nature Coast
Chapter. A star-studded,
Hollywood-themed event.
Tickets $75 per person
available at fpranature-
coast.org. Roastmaster
will be Chamber CEO/
President Josh Wooten.

$S te






April 12-Taste of In-
verness, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
at Liberty Park on Lake
Henderson. Food, art and
music by the Blue Stem
Prarie Band. For informa-
tion, call the Boys and
Girls Club at 352-621-
9225 or the City of In-
verness at 352-726-2611
ext. 1304. Online ticket-
ing https://inverness.
webconnex.com/toi
April 12 Ryan Weaver
in concert at the Citrus
County Auditorium, In-
verness, 7 p.m. with spe-
cial guests Ricky Gunn
Band and Ricky Tannar.
Tickets $15; call 813-
501-7350, visit www.
ezticketapp.com or
purchase at the gate.
April 26 Dash for
Dementia, 9 a.m. to
12 p.m., Lecanto High
School. For information,
call 352-746-0125.


Chamber visits the Capitol


Li


the Citrus County Economic Development
Council, along with a large group of Citrus
County residents, spent two days last week
meeting with state legislators and Cabinet members on
key issues from transportation to our local waters.

The Chamber thanks presenting sponsor DAB Construction,
session sponsor Commissioner Rebecca Bays and
luncheon sponsor Suntrust of the Nature Coast.


GABRIELLA
NEGRON
Gabriella
Negron
joins BWA
The Business
Women's Alliance,
a committee of the
Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce wel-
comes its newest
member Gabriella Ne-
gron, office manager
at Canadian Meds.


Wendy's
502 W. Main Street, Inverness
352-726-1985


wendys.com


- |j
Rob Wardlow, chair of the Chamber's Board of
Directors, along with CEO/President Josh Wooten and
Ambassador Lisa Nash, present Wendy's of Inverness
with the New Image Award for its efforts in revitaliz-
ing its Inverness location.


Nature Coast Ministries

looking for volunteers
N ature Coast Ministries is want to volunteer, call 352-
looking for volunteers. 563-2630 or 352-220-4981.
Individuals who need dental Donations of old clothes, call
assistance, call 352-422-4327. 352-563-1860. Donors and speaker
Health care professionals who requests, call 352-464-4348.


Krista A Cleaning Lady
352-563-2908


Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keep-
ers, and Bonnie Hardiman, associate member, welcome Krista
Bevil, owner of Krista A Cleaning Lady, to the Chamber.


r


I 1


Lillian Smith, chair of the Citrus County Chamber's Am-
bassador Committee, presents Bill Hudson with the
first Gold Star Ambassador Award for his dedication
and service to his community.


Aleman to focus on care,

quality as CMHS CEO


Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem this week announced
that Ralph Aleman has joined
the company as interim presi-
dent and chief executive officer.
Aleman, a highly experienced
health care executive, spent the
past two years as a health care
consultant with a focus on
physician relations and opera-
tional improvement. He has
over 40 years of experience in
the health care industry, serving
as CEO most recently for 378-
bed Hialeah Hospital.
Aleman will succeed Ryan
Beaty, who left Citrus Memorial
Health System as talks between
the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Citrus County Hos-
pital Board and Health Corpo-
ration of America (HCA) came
to a head.
Sandy Chadwick, chairperson
of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, said, "We are de-
lighted to welcome Ralph Ale-
man to Citrus Memorial. He
brings with him a wealth of
knowledge in health care, and
we look forward to working
with him over the next few


RALPH ALEMAN
months as we come closer to a
final agreement with HCA."
As interim CEO, Aleman
plans to spend his time listening
to concerns of physicians, staff
and community members and
focusing on patient care. In a
letter sent to Citrus Memorial
employees, this week Aleman
said, "I look forward to working
with employees, volunteers,
medical staff and community
leaders to ensure this impend-
ing transaction goes smoothly.
But I will remain focused on our
number one job taking excel-
lent care of our patients."


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


Bill Hudson
Land Title of Citrus County 352-628-5191
3899 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Springs
citruscountyrealestate.com/landtitle.htm


< Ji






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 D5


[I To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classified

SS ---^~ ^^ f. l ^^y lJ m ll. ^~


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 32)56-66 TllFee. (8).5-240 1Em i: *asfi0scroi .0nln 0m I ebi0:ww hrnclonie 0o


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




FREE MANURE.
No shavings,
Already bagged,
Ready for pick-up at our
pasture gate
(352) 249-7127
Free to a Loving home
Pitt Bull &
Bull Mastiff Mixed
Puppies
(352) 287-0270
SONYO T.V. FREE
WORKS.CALL FOR
MORE INFO Linda
4234163




Cat-10 mo. old neu-
ter male. 10 Ibs, rac-
coon tabby w/ white
belly.
Lost 3/25 Cinnamon
Ridge (352) 201-7681
Dalmatian & Terrier
female dog, short,
med build. White w/
black spots. 13 yrs. Ans
to Cassy. Oak Lawn
area Homosassa. 352-
613-9234, 287-2624


Female Pit/Lab Mix
1/2 yr old, golden
color. Chipped, wear-
ing a blk shock collar.
Last seen on Rte 488/
Red Level. Call Hanna
352-440-0336 or Robt
316-0488. REWARD!!
Lost Cat on Mon 3-10,
10:30a. Blue Point
Himalayan. Goes by
"Blue". Has one eye,
underbite. Front paws
declawed. License &
rabies tags on. Cream
colored w/ gray tips &
tail. Last seen 44 E.
westbound after VFW in
the woods on right. Deb
@ 201-4800.

Lost Dog, Mix Breed
Male, reddish brown
Vicinity of
N. Meyers Square
Citrus Springs
REWARD *
(352) 465-8479,
(352) 637-6161

Lost wallet insert
for pictures, it has
cherished pictures
of loved ones inside
pis call (352) 897-4265

LOST YORKIE
3-4 Ibs, silver & gold
female,
the Woodlands
REWARD
(352) 489-7585
352)812-2027Cell
(352) 239-4815 Cell




Male German
Shepherd, black/light
beige ,no tags or chip,
not neutered
found on mini-farms
Dunnellon, pis call
(352) 465-0077




Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
AcceDtina $15
yearly Membership
sianupsaaes6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
volunteer credit
*League*
Leadership Clubs.
download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.corn for info


-IH


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/lb, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001




" Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
ExceDtina $15
yearly Membership
sianupsaaes6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*Leadership
Clubs, download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.comrn for info





Customer
Service
Representative
Excellent customer
communication skills,
for both outbound and
inbound calls.
Good problem solver,
Solid growing com-
pany with full benefits
Please mail Resume
to: Blind Box 1862P
Cit. Co. Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
Florida 34429





PT Housekeeper

Floral City Area
flexible hours, 2
houses to maintain
paid hourly based
on Exp. References
Back-Ground Ck
email resume to:
BELCOSYLVIE@
CENTURYLINK.NET








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





w Certified
Veterinary Tech;
a- Veterinary
Tech/Assistant;
o- Veterinary
Receptionist
Needed for busy,
state-of-the-art
AAHA accredited
Veterinary hospital.
Join a great team
of qualified profes-
sionals who provide
comprehensive
animal health care
ranging from pre-
ventive medicine
and vaccination to
intensive care and
involved surgical
procedures.
Education required
and experience
preferred for surgery
and dentals. Part
time or full time posi-
tions are available.
Full time position
includes medical
and retirement ben-
efits, paid vacation,
and continuing
education.
Please send resume
with references to
animaldoc24z@
yahoo.com.


COME WORK
FOR THE
BEST OF THE BEST
RN'S, LPN'S, CNA'S,
MDS-PRN
FT, PT, PRN
ALL SHIFTS
3-11 SUPERVISOR
WKND. SUPERVISOR
DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB
Contact
Linda Pursley, DON
352-746-9500 #725
don@diamondridge
healthandrehab
.corn



DENTAL
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com



Healthcare positions
with Leesburg
Regional Medical
Center (LRMC)
and The Villages
Regional Hospital
(TVRH) Include:
****
Cardiovascular
Tech
****
CNAs
(Cert. Nursing
Assistants)
****
Certified
Pharmacy Tech
****
Lab Shift
Supervisor
****
Respiratory
Therapists
(TVRH only)

Call 866-298-2091
or 352-751-8816
or visit us at www.
cfhacareers.com
for more Information
on these positions &
other opportunities
throughout Central
Fl. Health Alliance.
EEO/AA/ H/V. Drug-
free Workplace
Tobacco -free
Workplace.

XCenral Florida
Health Alliance


EXP. MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
For Busy Specialty
Group. Previous EMR
required. Must have
excellent computer,
organizational skills
and be a team
player. Competitive
Salary and Benefits
Email: citruspulmon
ary@hotmall.com or
Fax 352-795-2269

Fast growing
HHA coming to
Citrus County
Looking for prn
positions for:
RN's, LPN's,
Home Health
Aides
* Physical Therapist
Occupational
Therapist
* Speech Therapist
With exp. in Home
Health and would
like to join our team!
Please send resumes
to:pattiw@classic
homehealth.com or
Fax 1-800-690-3901/
call 1-866-568-8203
for more info.
Lic# HHA29999 1659


of Citrus County

Housekeeping
Laundry
Floor Tech

APPLY IN PERSON
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
Florida, 34442

RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
FOE/SF/DF


NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219



THE CENTERS,
INC.
Stepping Stones
Recovery Center
3238 S. Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto FL 34461
Residential
Substance Abuse
Therapist
(Exempt Pay Range
$32k-38k)
Provides clinical ser-
vices to individuals,
families, and group
formats, along w/
assessment, treat
ment planning, crisis
management, &
multi-disciplinary
team membership.
Master's Degree in
the Human Services
field required w/ 1 yr
of work exp in a
clinical setting.
EOE/DFWP;
Full benefits pkg;
Tel 352-291-5555;
Send resume to
lobs@thecenters.us
or walk In.
Visit
www.thecenters.us
for more Info



WE ARE
GROWING
COME JOIN OUR
TEAM!

Full Time Positions:

RN, QI RN
and Staffing
Coordinator

Per Diem Positions:
RN, PT, OT, MSW
LPN, HHA
Must have home
health experience

COMPIENESIVE
Horn Cue
For more
information contact
Mikesha at:
352-861-8806 or
email resume to:
mbeam@cwshome
health.com


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T Caregiver
for senior citizen
psbl room& board
(352) 513-5547

Live-in Caregiver
for elderly female
CNA pref. salary +
board, mail resume
to: Blind Box 1863M
CC Chronicle 1624
N Meadowcrest Bvd
Crystal River 34429




CITY CLERK
The City of Crystal
River is seeking
candidates for the
position of City
Clerk. This position
is responsible for
recording the
actions taken by
City Council and
maintaining all
official City records,
coordinating the
City's record
retention program
and serving as the
Elections Supervisor
for all City of Crystal
River elections.
Qualified applicants
should possess an
Associate's Degree
in business, public
administration, or
a related field, or
an equivalent
combination of
experience and
education. Prior
experience in a re-
lated position within
local government
with exposure to
statutory require-
ments, ordinances,
policies and proce-
dures is desirable.
The salary range
for this position is
$34,309 $48,602
Interested candi-
dates should submit
a letter of interest
and a resume
by no later than
close of business
April 24, 2013 to:
City of Crystal River
Attn: Office of the
City Manager
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL
34428
or Fax 352-795-6351


B





I'm lovin' it
McDonald's
in Beverly Hills..

is accepting
applications for
employment for
I All Part Time &
Full time Positions
I Opening & Closing
Managers needed
Please apply at the
McDonald's in
Crystal River, 625
N. U.S. Hwy. 19.

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
o P/T Cooks
or Hostesses
Call 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment





u.
r ....-
mill









How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966



www.chroniceonline.com


@4



#4




Chronicle,


Classifieds .

In Print


& Online


HBELP
WANTED




BOOMING
SENIOR
MARKET
*.**k***
OUTSIDE
SALES AGENTS

.Training Provided
* Licensing Provided
* Leads Supplied
* Adv. Commission
* Trips & Incentives
* Awesome Income
Opportunity!!
Tired of dead end
Jobs? or workplace
uncertainty?!
Email Resume to
mfloyd@amerilife.
corn, EST. 1971


Sales Positions
PT & FT for growing
Moving & Storage Co
CALL TYE 228-4900


Traes/^


AC Service Tech
1 year experience.
ETA cert., 40 hrs. wk
take home truck,
benefits and sign on
bonus after 90 days
Aoopply in Person
814 N. Old Wire Rd,
Wildwood or
Call 352-330-4433
Fax or Email Resume
to 352-330-1177 fax,
dsantisac@aol.com


AUTO
DETAILERS &
MANAGERS

Homosassa Springs
& Brooksville
Dealerships
Call 727-808-0341


CDL-A Team
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfioartners.com


CAPTAIN
25 Ton & Up Only

Manatee Tours, in
water guide a must.
Apply
River Ventures at
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-12:30PM

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Wemrner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624

Exp. Plumber
Very busy plumbing
company searching
for plumbers that are
hard working, reliable
and motivated.Valid
drivers license. Serv-
ing all of Central Flor-
ida. 352-341-4243
































OTR Drivers
Wanted
Food grade
tankers,
Class-A CDL
/tanker endorse-
ment, Prefer 2 yrs
experience, Mile-
age & Drop Pay,
Vacation, Health,
Dental & 401k.
For information
call 800-569-6816
or go to our
website
www.ottervtran
sVortation.com


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Af mAf At


/


CLASSIFIED


.....


^7~-


A







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full benefits,
achievable bonuses.
Call for details
1-888-978-3791 or
www.hevl.net

PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have Dr. Uc.
We provide 401k &
Health Ins. Apply:
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa




Accounting
Clerk
Announcement
#14-36
Maintains financial
records which may
include invoices,
requisitions and
accounts payable
and receivable.
Requires at least 6
months of related
experience. Must
proficient with
Excel and other
Microsoft Office
Suite of Products.
$11.09 hrly. to start.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
you can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 4, 2014
EOE/ADA


BBt


CUSTOMER
SERVICE
Fast paced environ-
ment. Motivated to
learn all aspects of
business. Clean Driv
ers Lic. Apply daily
until 2:00pm:
River Ventures
498 SE Kings Bay Dr
Crystal River



Maintenance
Worker
Announcement
# 14-35
This position is
unskilled and semi-
skilled work assisting
in the road mainte-
nance operations
and use of con-
struction and main-
tenance equip-
ment. Starting pay
rate $8.02 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, April 4, 2014
EOE/ADA.



WRECKER
DRIVER

EXPERIENCED ONLY
APPLY. Must live In
Inverness area.
Weekends a Must.
"Apply within*
Ed's Auto Repair.
4610 S. Florida Ave
No Phone Calls


iBct

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F

Pail-time
Help

P/T Caregiver
3pm to 9am, for
elderly woman w/
copd 352-322-0178
Caee

Oporuite


Leek



BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731




ALL STEEL


CLASSIFIED



OAK FRAMED CHAIRS
with cane seats. Excel-
lent condition. Early
1900's. Set of 4; $60
each. $240.
352-6344906


Collect ble


S)


pl
le


AIRLINE BUILDINGS
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA I
approved Aviation I
Maintenance Techni- |
clan training. Housing v
and Financial aid for fr
qualified students. Job ti
placement assistance.
Call AIM 130 MPH
877-741-9260 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) tri
www.fixiets.com Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
Heating And Air 4" Concrete Slab.
Conditioning $13.995. INSTALLED
Technician 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Training! 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
Fast Track2 Hands i Entry Door, 2 G-vents
On, National 4" Concrete Slab
Certification Pro- $15.995. INSTALLED
gram. Lifetime Job 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Placement. VA Roof w/Overhang,
Benefits Eligible! 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1-877-994-9904 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
MEDICAL $27.995 Installed
M C L A local Fl. Manufact.
OFFICE We custom build-
TRAINEES We are the factory
NEEDED' Meets & exceeds
2010 F. wind codes.
SFlorida "Stamped"
Trainto become a engineered drawings
Medical Office All major credit
Assistant NO cards accepted
EXPERIENCE METAL Structures LLC
NEEDED! Online 866-624-9160
training gets you Job Lic # CBC1256991
ready ASAP.HS State Certified
Diploma/GED & Building Contracor
PC/Internet needed! www. metal
(888)528-5547 structureslic.com


SALEM CHINA 6 salad
plates and 6 mugs. Sa-
em Christmas Eve de-
sign. $99. for all
352465-6619
Wedgewood English
Bone China. Pattern
;harnwood WD 3984.
Better part of serv. for
8 + serving pieces &
cabinet. $1,000
(352) 564-8874



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
idges 30 day warranty
rade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER General Elec-
ric, stainless steel drum
$200.00 352462-7041


Y0







I
e


T


en



Cfi

M


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
WHITE $75
352-613-0529
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, White,
super clean, Ice Cold
$150. obo
(352) 212-1751
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
WASHER & DRYER
White, good condi-
tion, both work well.
$100 for both
(352) 382-0849 aft 1:00
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398



:.- ,-ci/ 'LJ A In


Record Power
Drill Master Lathe
9" over center, 11/2"
center to center 110V,
5.4 amps, Cast iron
bed 27" long, wood
stand $225.
(352) 382-3470 Bob
RV CORD ADAPTER
NEW 30 AMP
Female-50 AMP Male
Cord 18" $10
352-382-3650
Werner 8' Fiberglass
Ladder, holds 250 Ibs
$70. Craftsman
Corded Reciprocating
Saw, w/manual,
blades & case $25.
352-476-1578



40" Sony TV
HD 1080 Bravia
A1 condition
$150. call
(352) 637-5227
KAROKE WITH CD
PLAYER & 5.5"
SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
DAMANQOMIC TV 13"


-E-
DELL MONITOR 16 in
wide .Fair condition
10.00 Linda 4234263
SAMSUNG FLAT
SCREEN MONITOR 17
in NEW $50 LINDA
4234263



..200 Bottle-
Wine Credenza
just replaced cooling
unit in March, looks
like new, 50 btu
Breezeaire cooling
unit, solid maple trim,
doors & panels w/vin
view top, glass inserts
38'/2"Lx 68" Wx30" D
bought new $3600.
sell for $1500.
(352) 249-3248
2 CREAM VINYL
CHAIRS WITH ARMS &
CASTORS $20 for both
352-228-9451
2 Twin Beds
w/nightstand &
bedding $125.00
Sofa. $75.00, both
good condition
(423) 612-9229
6 Pc. Vintage Black


Adjustable High WITH BUILT IN VCR & Asian King
f Back,Swivel, Black. REMOTE $25 Bedroom Set $250.
e,'*l $30 (352)5644214 352-613-0529 Pictures
$30. for All
PANOSONIC TV 27" (815) 980-8642
tH% ridl'i, tWITH REMOTE&
I rI MANUAL $50 6FT BLACK VINYL
352-613-0529 FUTON, $150.
Ace/Oxy Bottles SYLVANIATV 32" Black wrought iron
AceOxyBotles SYLVANIA TV 32" glasstop coffee
(leed ajl) Hose, Regulators, WITH REMOTE $50 tpce e
Torch $175. 352-613-0529 table, $25.
oir a 352-419-4066 (352) 777-9307
qualified Generac Generator B l BRAND NEW
qualified -mbw B^ P?
12.5 KW, mobile with Queen Size Pillow Tc
employee ? cover, factory sparessMattress Set $150.
used twice, $1,500 STILTS FOR DOING Still in Original Plastic
(352) 746-6962 or SHEETROCK WORK. (352) 484-4772
Cell 239-272-8101 GREATOK SHAPE COFFEE TABLE
Ihis area's JIGSAW BLADES (PAINT ON THEM) Metal & glass table
#1 porter cable new blades. ONLY $75. 464-0316 Excellent condition $7
75 wood and steel. 352-746-7502
nployment $45.00 firm for all. i mpute COFFEE TABLE woo
352-382-5275 Vd 44 by 33. Eight storac
source! POULAN PRO CHAIN drawers. $50.00
SAW mod 262,18", 2.6 COMPUTER 352-462-7041
CID/42 cc SPEAKERS/NEW$5.00 Entertainment Cent,
Sengine,carrying case, LINDA 423-4263 49" wide x 48" tall x2
oil. NEW in box DEL FLAT SCREEN 14 deep, dark wood
$150.Walt 527-2598 in Good condition grain, $120. call Lar
10am-9pm $20.00 Linda 423-4163 (352) 344-1692


'n




rp
C.


'5.

id
)ge

er
28"

ry


w HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
METAL FUTON Great
Futon sofa/bed with
mattress. Silver/Black
$80 352-875-4760
Dunnellon
Queen Sofa Sleeper.
Gd Cond. Beige
stripes.Non smoking.
$150. (352)344-9391
Sectional Sofa
neutral color. Coffee
and end tables and
trundle bed. All
Great Condition
$250 (352) 563-1327
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
Two Matching Sofas
one is a sofa bed,
excellent condition
$100. each
(352) 382-2664 SMW
Unique Wood & glass
end table. Excellent
condition. $45.
352-746-7502.
Wicker Book Stand
with white dishes
$100.
Green Dishes $100.
(352) 795-7254
WROUGHT IRON,
GLASS TOP
TABLE AND TWO
CHAIRS $35.00
352-228-9451



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Cherrywood Triple
Dresser & night Stand
$125.
Qn. Size Futon 1 chair
& 3 tables $175.
(352) 344-0521
CHIPPER/SHREDDER
10 HP,
3 inch branch cut
$150
(352) 344-1423


Acctg/Bkkr QuickBooks
Certified, set-up, train-
ing, payroll, sales tax.
No job to small! Call
352-287-1909 for appt.



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Affordable Care + lite
housekping, cooking
errands, trans. Call
Lisa (352) 423-0298



JAKES'
TRIM CARPENTRY
No job too big or small
Free Est. 352-601-7064



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





Yourw-i ridfirst

Need a joih
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHRO0cCLE
Classifieds
bi.i.ij iuii -i.aiB


BmXE
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Cesar Jaimes
Computer Repair
the most affordable PC
Repair in Citrus County.
352-560-3380




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




A- I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V 'RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
* FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
0- Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crcl 330081
(352) 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557











w NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




*Budd Excavating**
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442

A.t.


r
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Arbor Reds Tree Care
24 Hr. Emergeny Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
All Major Credit Cards
352-583-3141/206-1153


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


GENERAL

Generator
Thomaes Electricn LgC

ReIdenti a Come Services Co.










Interao- Centerionr

Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377
l PrTpes of surome RepWashingrs

















Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
4352-519003-8465
__ LIC/ INS Lic #240270 I




7PENERAC A"~g*














Stand Alonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill
Thomas Eeti.LC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians|


ERO 15377JJIJI







*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

*Pressure Washing
*Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465I
Bonded & Insured
1www.windlowgenie.com/springhill


A A








Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
C' nmill Carpentry


st C lean Dryrer Vents

^J~ S& fjor~otle & Dependable

Tl8l 352-344-0905
or cellt: 400-1722
S Licensed & Insured Lic3771



"IHasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County
Services Ince

Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured _____


* Propane Appliances
* Electrical Repair
* Plumbing Repairs
* Water & Collision Damage
* Roof Sealing & Damage
* Mobile Service
* Fully Stocked Parts Dept.
"We Do It All" 8

Naue .ostR
35-75-82
q8MQ'twq S. SBve


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
4 352-364-4610
MR.
ELECTRIC*
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL

24 Hours a a10 'f lavs a Weeli


Pa*inteing/Exervice, PInc.g


Wallpaper Removal





w T ee 877-893-389


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quali3y Specialis 3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned
Spring Tune $ 995 (HaayisFre) only 69
Special 4 Reg.
Guaranteeing 1Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free Get Dryer and Dryer Vent
Includes Our Exclusve Laser Particle Scan to determine Cleaned for $3 5
the quality of thile air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE! Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.
[o-Expires Marc h 31,2 01 4 I __ 8 T H 1
........ C8 H U R A b L EA N C
OIQAr.A Back To New s,-1 997h
Heating & Coolin rCarpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services
628-5700Heating & Coolingr.biz 3525032091
|628-5700 newair.biz 352-503-2091


rDUS-TBUSTERS
CLEANING SERVICE

RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & NEW HOME CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
S Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too

352.942.8434

S Coall Today for a
S Clean Tomorrow


I-.IOLSAN.lJAVES


InslhlaRmeir Now's the
I Punins.fifs. time for pool
S Healers remodeling
A. Sall Sysleins
i. -- *Pnnl PRpfnchinq

00,~

Sugarmill i I I
IWouods ServingqAll OiCilrui'CeOinl
S ool a Spa 1 -,,,,,,
sMwpoOs.coM -382-4421





WATKINS & SONS

SDriveways

Parking Lots
Seal Coating fiUjj
Maintenance
Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmrnail.comrn
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889



SERVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE REST,
CONSISTENTLY VOTED REST OF THE REST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install
S 3 Time Winner
S2011 -2012-2013

746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PRESSURE WASHER,
2000psi, 2.0gpm,
3.75HP with attach-
ments. Never used.
$150.00 352-746-3605
JOHN DEER
LAWN TRACTOR
with wagon D100, 17.5
HP, 42" cut, used
25hrs. $1,250.
570-441-8609 Lecanto
JOHN DEERE 125
Riding Mower
22 HP, Auto, 42" Cut,
Twin Bags
Only 280 Hrs. I $750
Getting Larger Mower
352-341-1756



AZALEAS 1 GAL POTS
3 for $18 Gorgeous
Compare to $10 ea in
stores 613-5818
PHILODENDRON
3 Gal Huge Beauties
3 for $36 Inv. Off Croft
Rd. 613-5818




BEVERLY HILLS
2 S.Desoto St.Selling
entire contents of
house. Sat.9-5
Sun.10-3
Crystal River
Sunday Only 3/30
noon to 6pmr
MOVING SALE
30 Valare Lane, #202A
Magnolia Lodge Est.
off of Kings Bay Drive
INVERNESS
Sat 29th & Sun 30th
9am to 4pm
INDOOR SALE
Household Items
713 Constitution Blvd




CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
Sunday Only, 3/30
8a to 4p,furn, nicnacs,
odds & ends, more
505 NE 16th CT
Naturewalk Comm.



Harley-Davidson Lady
Lrg. White Leather
Fringe Jacket $150. 7.5
Black Boot Ladies ?
$25. All in good shape.
Ted (352)465-2372
MENS JEANS/NEW
Roots / 36 W x 30 L
15.00 Linda 4234163



MOTOROLA WX416
Cell NEW with case,
Consumer
Cellular/unlock or 911
$39 352-382-3650



!!!!! 245/50 R20 !!!!!
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
....225/65 R17...
Nice tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
-- 235\55 R18 --
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
3 VISION & 1 PYREX
COOKWARE- Cran-
berry, sauce, casserole,
double boiler, cake pan,
$30. 628-0033
4 RADIAL TRUCK TIRES
exc. tread,
P265/70R16
$120. call Don
(352) 220-2204
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
38" Craftsman
16HP Riding Lawn
Mower, with 2 bin
grass catchers,
$800. (352) 503-6032
Homosassa
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
ALPHA/OMEGA HOME
SCHOOLING BOOKS
9th/10th grades
$50 obo
Linda 423-4163
Aluminum Truck Box.
Diamond plate design.
19" W, 59" L, 10" Deep.
$200
(352)341-4674
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOOKSHELF Tall book-
shelf light colored wood.
Like new. $20.00
352-4224146
Car Mats
for a Toyota Prius
gray, WeatherTech
$50. 352-476-1578
CB RADIO Use for car
or truck. Used Once
$50.00 637-9611
Cello 30". $50. Box Car
Kit, Railroad, narrow
gage. Offer upon look-
ing at items for kit.
(352)382-4638
ConAir make-up
lighted 3-way mirror
$20. 2 Ceiling light
fixtures $10.
(352) 746-5453
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
Electrolux
Shampoo Machine
Floor & rug cleaner
$100.
IBM Typewriter $50.
(352) 287-9073
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/Ib
delivered 352-897-5001
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN


$35 352-613-0529
GRADING PLOW-
Plow forATV or Tractor
$50.00 637-9611
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
(352)464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
HOT TUB
Seats 3/4, with cover
$900
Lg Computer Desk $80
(352) 746-1184
LG BIRD CAGE/STAND
good condition / 40.00
Linda 423-4163
OLD COLEMAN
CAMPING 2 BURNER
STOVE OK SHAPE
20.00 352 464 0316


Pfaltzgraff service for
eight; dishes, cups,
saucers & accessory
pieces. Rose pattern.
$50 (352) 726-5832
Sewing Machine
Singer, Portable. Used
2x Does blind stitch &
buttonholes. Carry case
& instruction bk
$125 (352) 726-5832
SPEAKERS SHARP 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
SPEAKERS YAMAHA 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $70
352-613-0529
TREADMILL, Weslo
Cardio Stride Plus, man-
ual, folds to store, excel-
lent condition, $75,
(352) 465-1813

Medical

4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
Korean Veteran in
need of a Scooter Lift,
must hook into trailer
hitch. Call Don
(352) 601-5119
SEMI-ELECTRIC
HOSPITAL BED
Semi-Electric Hospital
Bed includes
Matress, side rails
remote controlled like
new. 200.00
352419-6655 after 6pm
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316
WHEELCHAIR
manual, good cond.
comes with leg
& foot rest.
$85
(352) 344-4105



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
G35FXAMP
12"SPEAKER,REVERB
DELAYCHORUSO.D.
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" BLACK
SAMICK/SILVERTONE
ROCKIT 21 "SG"
PLAYS,SOUNDS 100%
$50.00 352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER NEW-
PORTER ACOUSTIC
GUITAR&GIGBAG
"STRAT"STYLE NECK
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE BLACK&GOLD,
ARCHTOP ELECTRIC
GUITAR ONLY $100
352-621-6625
"NEW" SG STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG&CORD
PLAYSLOOKS GREAT
$50 352-601-6625
GUITAR I INSTRUMENT
WALL HANGERS
ROUND METAL BASE
$5.00 EACH
352-601-6625



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
WORK GREAT.
SELDOM USED. ONLY
$185.00 352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
REBOUNDER
TRAMPOLINE(indoor)
with stretch band attach-
ments 352-564-4214.
$40
RECUMBENT BIKE.
marcy recumbent bike.
brand new.sell half price
for $70.00.
352-382-5275
RECUMBENT
EXERCISE BIKE
DIGITAL READOUT
GREAT SHAPE.ONLY
$100 (352)464-0316
SCHWINN RECUM-
BANT 230 EXERCISE
BIKE (700. NEW)ALL
DIGITAL ONLY 195.00
352 464 0316



12 SPEED HUFFY
MOUNTAIN BIKE
MENS 26". GREAT
SHAPE. $60
(352)464-0316
12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
Club Golf Cart
1993,
Excellent condition
side curtains, 36V
$1,500.
Cell (314) 831-1356
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
TERRATRIKE Recum-
brent Well equipped
and maintained.
$1350.00.
352-344-5334
352-344-5334


*w



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


DOLLY
Dolly, 6-8 y.o. Terrier
mix, Wt 54 Ibs, had
an unfortunate prior
life, not her fault.
The sweetest dog
ever, full of love for
people amazingly,
playful, very happy,
craves affection &
returns it, gets along
w/some dogs,
finally deserves a
home of her own.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808,
Joanne @
352-697-2682











GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, a
Special Needs
spayed brindle/
white Bulldog, possi-
ble hound mix, Wt.
66 Ibs. Gentle, calm,
good on leash,
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she seems to
think is normal, no
problem to her.
Good family & com-
panion dog. Fee
$30. Call Joanne
at 352-697-2682 or
Dreama @
813-244-7324












INDY
Indy, a beautiful
Blackmouth Cur
mix, 2yrs old,
friendly with most
dogs, walks very
nicely on a leash,
is housebroken,
loves kids. Playful
& friendly, likes
having people
with him.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.












MIKA
Mika, a 1 yr 9 month
old happy, friendly
spayed little Bulldog
mix girl. She is very
sweet and loveable,
walks very nicely on
a leash. Rides
quietly in the car.
She is just the right
size for a family
life at 30 Ibs.
Call Rebecca @
419-262-3222.

PUPPIES
Rottie/Shepard mixed
pups. 2 females, pop,
mom & dad akc, pup-
pies come with
shots/worming & health
certificate. 200.00 each
352 419-5097


RAYNA
Rayna, gorgeous
Bulldog mix, 4 y.o.,
weight 52 Ibs.
Appears housebrkn.
Good energy, loves
to run. Very friendly
& smart, no food
aggression. Learning
to play with dogs &
cats. Working on
leash training with
trainer, to be your
best friend ever
Fee $60.
Call Trish @
352-586-7547.












SEDONA
Sedona, beautiful
possible hound mix
female, housebrkn,
Hearlworm-negative,
dog&cat
friendly, 6 yrs old,
weight 77 Ibs. Very
calm & collected,
very sweet girl
nothing rattles her!
Walks well on leash,
ideal companion
pet. UTD on vacs,
microchipped.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.
Fee $60.

Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Peek-a-zu Pups
Available
Starting @ $500.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827


SNOW
Snow, a sweet, play-
ful, affectionate, en-
ergetic mixed breed
dog, petite @ 33 Ibs,
with beautiful green
eyes. Smart, active
& engaged. Very
protective of her
home & family,
would make a good
watch dog. Fee 60$
includes spay, HW
test, vacs.,
microchip, 30 days
insurance.
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821.


TASHA
Tasha, beautiful
brindle 2 1/2 y.o.
boxer mix, very
sweet, gentle, intelli-
gent, well man-
nered. Housebrkn,
does well w/most
dogs. NO CATS.
Loves to be petted.
Fee $60 for vacs,
spay, microchp,
HW test.
Call Marti @
786-367-2834
YELLOW INDIAN RING
NECK BIRD For Sale:
Yellow Indian Ringneck
bird Age 10
$500 Including Cage &
accessories.
352-220-9608




Horses. Tack, new &
used. All priced right.
Diamond Pea Farm
(352)873-6033




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

18FT PONTOON
1990 w/depth finder,
'95 trailer, 25HP
Evinrude w/power Tilt
& Trim. $2,800 firm.
Call (352) 637-1727 or
802-522-9423
ALUMICRAFT
2013, V16, Black with
floor, 2013 Suzuki 4
stroke mtr., trolling mtr.
& trailer $5,250.
(352) 419-5053


BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
BayLiner
Ciera Cabin Cruiser,
1990, 27 ft, owned 18
yrs, just replaced engine
looks/runs good. $8500
352-795-1863
CANOE
Mad River Canoe 17 ft
Galv Continental Trlr,
Elec motor & battery.
w/ outriggers & Equip.
Ex Cond $1600
352- 564-2765
COBIA 2000
17.5 Ft., 10H, Yam.,
4 strk, Great Shape
$5,700, 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792
PONTOON
20 FT., with 40HP
Yamaha, Trailer,
Good cond. $6,000
(352) 527-9376
QUANTUM
1990 15ft Bass Boat
50HP, w/trailer, live well,
troll, motor. & More
$2,500 (352) 697-1910




















Sportscraft 88
27 Coastai l Fisher-
o~nalll makes and
models.



Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
SUNBIRD
'92, Prowler 16'.7"
40HP Evin Trailer.,
charge system
Troll. motor.
$3,200
(352) 341-1950
VISION BASS
1991. 18.5' W 175hp
Johnson. Great Cond.
Well Maintained.
$5500. (352)419-5560
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
Bike Carrier
Early Model $25.
Falcon 5250 Tow Bar
$100
(352) 564-2541


I Pets I


'05, Audi A6
Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




'07 Dodge Caravan
97k miles, $5195

'05 Ford Focus
121k miles, $3595

'04 Dodge Neon SXT
102k miles, $3395

'01 Dodge Utility
Truck $6895

Everything Motor's
7039 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Homosassa, Fl
352-503-9969

Buy Here/Pay Here

'97 Ford Taurus
$2495 Cash

'00 Buick LeSabre
$895 Down
'97 Dodge Neon
$2595 Cash
'01 Chevrolet Impala
$895 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVROLET
2000, Camaro
5 speed $3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
Sportscar,05 Crossfire
cony. auto, ex. cond
45k mi., V6 $11,000
OBO (352) 563-5150
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 D7


CLASSIFIED

Recreation
Vehicles
FORD
2005 Diesel 3/4 Ton
Power Stroke Truck &
2004 27' Fifth Wheel
Lg tip-out, like new
fully loaded!
$17k or $8500. ea.
(352) 795-1590
Hitch Hauler
inch and quarter $25.
Centrimatic
Wheel Balancers
19.5, P30 $100
(352) 564-2541
Holiday Rambler
'95, Endeavor LE,
34 ft, loaded, new ti-
res, new carpet, Sirius
XM, tag axle, & dish
$13,900. 352-408-2870
TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River, 18'
w/living quarters,
like new condition
$11,500. Ask for Bill
(352) 564-1299
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




FORD
2001 Van Camper
V-10, 64K mi. Exc
Cond. Road ready.
$25K obo. 419-7212
HEARTLAND
NORTH TRAIL
SERIES
2011 Travel Trailer 21 ft.
Tandem axel, sway
bars, hitch and hitch sta-
bilizer, electric brakes,
full bath, one slideout,
fully loaded in excellent
condition. Optional 12
ft. Porta-Bote with 5 hp
Mercury engine. Price
with boat and motor
$19,800. Call
352-726-2750.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
TERRY
22 ft, Cream Puff
Inside & Out
Tandem Wheels
$3,500 (352) 628-3674
VIKING POP UP
2011 2385 ST. Used 4
times, like new. Slide,
electric lift, stove, refrig-
erator, A/C and heat.
352.464.0443 $5,800







CAutoPaID-s30/&U
New ADCO Travel
Trailer Cover, never
used, fits 26 to 281/2 ft.
trailer, many options,
New $250. ask. $150.
(352) 637-6765

Vehicles

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352)771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794


MOTORCYCLE
FOR SALE
2012 YZF-R6 Moving
out of state and need to
sell like new motorcycle!
Yamaha R6-Raven edi-
tion. Only 6000 miles on
it! Only one owner.
Inludes twin helmets
and Joe Rocket riding
jacket! Asking price is
$7900 but willing to ne-
gotiate. Just in time for


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568


10% OFF ALL
TRIKES IN STOCK
(352) 726-6128




Misc. Notice


Motorcycle


2003, Monte Carlo LS,
$5,995
352-341-0018
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MERCURY
'03, Marquis, LS
Good condition
1 owner, 97k miles
(352) 249-3274
Mitsubishi
3000 GT '99
Adult lady owner.
Leather. Cold A/C etc.
117k mi. BO or trade
for NICE Crown. Vic.
Grand. Marquis Town.
Car. (352)220-6040




Chevrolet
ClOStepside, 1983
crate350, 4 brl, 4spd
auto, perf. exhaust
restored, blue on blue
$6500.(352) 637-5143
FORD
1923 Model "T"
Coupe. Original.
Call 352-697-5530
FORD REPLICA
1929 Model A Roadster
Replica, Rumble Seat,
Convertible. 727- 422-
4433 or 727-423-1385






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII
MUSTANG GT
2003 63,600k miles
Showcar, Supercharger,
lots of chrome!
352-228-4012
SHAY
1980 Reproduction
Model A
please call
(352) 201-2958




CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier
4 Door, $4,250.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004, S10
Crew Cab, 4 x4,
$7,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
'99, F250 Pick Up,
super duty, long bed,
w/ tool box, $3,800.
(352)464-4138
FREIGHT LINER
'98, Century Class
set up for Dry or Liquid
500 Detroit make offer
Call (352) 564-9124




HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
SUZUKI
2007, Vitara
4 WD, V6, $7,950.
352-341-0018



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner.
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200

'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999

must sell!


361-0330 SUCRN
CCCC License Compliance Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly License Compliance Special Master Hearing on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10,2014
at 2:00 p.m. in room 166 at the Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place all persons interested are in-
vited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the License Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to the hearing date. If you have any
questions, contact Code Compliance Division at 352-527-5350.
Citations:
* John Melott Citation 0023; case 154397 Engage in the business or act in the ca-
pacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus County.
Note: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the License Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
HEATHER SMITH, LICENSE COMPLIANCE SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, Sunday, March 30, 2014.



366-0330 SUCRN
3/18/14 Regular Meeting CCTDC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a Regular meeting on Wednesday, April 9th at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN "JJ" KENNEY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 30, 2014.



367-0330 SUCRN
04/02/2014 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 30, 2014.


362-0330 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Public meeting for residents to discuss the Lake Lena portion of the Lake Hancock
project. The purpose of the meeting is to inform residents about the project and ac-
tivity that may occur on the neighborhood roads. The meeting is an open house for-
mat. One or more Governing Board members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Wednesday, April 9,2014; 6:30 8 p.m.
PLACE: Polk Nature Discovery Center, 4399 Winter Lake Road, Lakeland, FL 33803
Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinatoraswfwmd.state.fl.us
For more information, you may contact: michael.peck@watermatters.ora;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4404
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 30, 2014. #EXE0315



363-0330 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Roundtable discussion between the SWFWMD Board members and the SRWMD Board
members to discuss Water Use Caution Areas (WUCAs) and Minimum Flows and
Levels (MFLs). All or part of this meeting may be conducted by means of communi-
cations media technology in order to permit maximum participation of Governing
Board members.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa FL 33637
Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinator&swfwmd.state.fl.us

For more information, you may contact: Cara.Martin@watermatters.ora
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4636
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 30, 2014. #EXE0316



364-0330 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
The District's Environmental Advisory Committee will be touring the Lake Hancock
Lake Level Modification and Outfall Treatment Projects. One or more Governing
Board members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, April 15, 2014; 1 p.m.
PLACE: 2205 Old Bartow Eagle Lake Road, Bartow, FL 33830
Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinatoraswfwmd.state.fl.us
For more information, you may contact: cindv.tavlor@watermatters.ora;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4150
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 30, 2014. #EXE0318



365-0330 SUCRN
Town of Inglis
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
REGARDING AMENDMENTS TO THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE
TOWN OF INGLIS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

BY THE TOWN COMMISSION OF THE TOWN OF INGLIS, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that, pursuant to Chapters 163 and 166, Florida Statutes and Section 34-42, of
the Town of Inglis Land Development Code, comments, objections and recommen-
dations regarding the following described amendments to the Future Land Use Map
of the Town of Inglis Comprehensive Plan will be heard by the Town Commission, at
hearings on Monday, April 14, 2014 at 3:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as these mat-
ters can be heard. The hearing will be conducted in the Town of Inglis, Town Hall lo-
cated at 135 Highway 40 West, Inglis, Florida.
First Reading of Ordinance 03-14: Referencing application CPA13-L3, by the Town of
Inglis to amend the Future Land Use Map from undesignated property to Planned In-
dustrial and Industrial. The 28.49 Acre property is located as the northern extension
of the Town Limits on the East and West sides of US Hwy 19 North of Gladys Avenue
and South of CR 40A.
At the hearings, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the
amendments. Copies of said amendments as described above are available for
public inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk, located at Inglis Town Hall 135
Highway 40 West, Inglis, Florida, Any person requiring reasonable accommodation to
participate in this meeting should contact the Town Clerk at (352) 447-2203 (TDD) at
least three days in advance.
All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at a public
hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made; said
record including the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 31,2014.


1--i


Harley Davidson
**Road King 2007**
24k mi, many extra's
beautiful bike, head-
ing north, HURRY! 12K
obo (608) 438-8812


Misc. Notice


I Misc. No


Metn


Meeting
I Notces


Meeting
I Notces




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE


EVENT


Learn Why Ford Is America's Favorite Brand
See Dealer For Complete Details.

DOWN

PAYMENT

DUE AT

SIGNING


2014 FOCUS 2014 FUSION 2014 ESCAPE
$229 mo. $279 mo. $279 mo.


36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO tsl Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


S2014 FIESTA 2014 EDGE 2014 EXPLORER
IST MONTH'S $229 mo. $329 mo. $339 mo.
A M T 36 Month Lease 36 Month Lease 36 Month Lease
S I S Down Paymen s $0cDue ft Signing 0s M lon llhs fymentl SO D Down Paymenl ,* S Due to signing 0 I sf l Months fPaymenl S Down Paymenl S 0Due ao Signing 01 s Monihs Paym&enl
P A Y1 E N I Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees. Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees. Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT


I FORD CREDIT L U OVA
0 BLUE OVAL; ER' ,
SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00
L GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
726-1231
Rex Adiar
www.nicknicholasford.com SaespesonoftheMonth


**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 04/04/14.


Inglis Dunnellon
.^-^?Ocala
SBeverly Hills
Crystal 486 ----
River HW.4 4nverness
Floral City
Homosass 490 Nick Nicholas
a Springs Hwy.98
Spring Hwy-.50
Hill ________Brooksville


i L2 YO- 3 A


DSSUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014





H Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 30,2014


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUlD


* Sikorski's
g ,Attic
PAGE E6


ON THE COVER:
SMW SiVIES E9
HOWE AND GARDEN:
LUUES EU

REAL ESTATE
SEacwim


* A slipper chair from
SHomeGoods in Pantone's Color of the Year,
SRadiant Orchid. After the brutal bite of
winter, even a gloomy spring day welcomes
us with warmer breezes and an emerging
palette of delicate hues. We welcome both
the pale, early buds and the saucy bursts of
color that follow.


I .


I==ms







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


%t 637-282
1E S tUNr 1-#4


OPE HOUSE SUNDAY 12-4PM..........


74 SOUTH HARRISON ST.
*INGROUND POOL PRIVATE BACKYARD
* Elegant Bath/UPGRADES 2BR/2 Bath/Family Rm.
* Glassed Porch w/Tile Neutral Decor/SHARP!
* Granite Counters BONUS RM. w/Wood Floor
DIR.: Hwy. 491, TURN ON Truman, left on Harrison
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 r1
Einul elliesullon ii lemnx nel
w ww.Flot idnL isinglnlo.colnt









SOH SO NICEI WOODCABINETS
. New Stainless Steel Appliances ,New Washer/Dryer
o New Roof Shingles o New'Tile/Carpet/Blinds
SOwner Finance Agent Owner
DIR.: Hwy. 491, turn on Truman, right on Jackson
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
..I~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I IIiI : ] I I I I - I f 4 m


SEwinies elliaesulone *i e wn shx ne r
www.F lon idaLislinglnlo.co n


4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
GREAT VALUE
* 4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
* New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM
* Beautifully Maintained Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ul
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


GREAT HOME, GREAT PRICE!!!
*3 BR, 3 BATH 2-Car Garage
* 1,802 Sq. Ft. Living Updated Kitchen
* HVAC 2009 *-,r,.,-iiii,- i:
* Extended Screened LANAI -1 ACRE Lot

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 f
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com F






WM*
WA'
V



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S12 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


F I 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


This is a 3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom, 2-Car Garage Home in Inverness
with Oity Water. Home Features; Open/Split Floor Plan, Walk-in-Closet,
Shower in Master Bedroom, Kitchen Bar Seating, Decorative Lighting,
Screen Porch, Screen Garage, Jacuzzi, Shed Utility Building, Fenced
Bacard and Much More. Take a bok! Dir.: FROM HWY. 44 IN
INVERNESS, TOAPOPKA, TO LON OABO", TO HOME ON R (SEE
SIGN).
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1000
Email: dawnwriht@remax.net


KINHS BAY DH.
NEW WATERFRONT LISTING...
3/3/2 with cover boat lift, large corner
lot, crystal clear water, circular
driveway. Must to see.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@reimax.net l tl
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriveril.com i








FABULOUS
2/2 doublewide on a fully fenced acre. Laminate flooring
throughout. Family room, plus a kitchen to die for with cabinet
& counter space galore, built in desk, island cook-top and much
more. Add the 20x24 screened patio, 12xl 6 back deck and
the 25x50 detached garage and you have a WOWsome home
to call your own. Sellers loss is your gain. Come take a look at
this one and you will fall in love.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadalc'remax.net L a I


C '-- ur. i^l"^iii

ROOM TO GROW!
* 3 Bedroom/2 Bath Fully Fenced Acre
* 2-Car Attached Garage New Floors
* 2-Car Detached Garage Updated Master Bath
* Security System New Ceiling Fans
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [ 1
Email: sherylposts@aol.com i
Welsile: www.CrysalRiverLiving.com


.4/3/2 on 70Acres Large Eat-In Kitchen,
* Great Room w/Stone Fireplace Formal Dining
SLarge Master Suite Bedrooms are Very Large
'In-Law Setup Unique Wood Flooring
'Over 2,900 Sq. Ft. of Liv.w/Caged Pool
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net








3/2 DOUBLEWIDE on an acre
in Crystal River Must sell. A little
TLO and you will have a lovely home
for your family. Take a look and make
an offer.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 U
Email: cnadal@remax.net IMil


oU I n. 1 CLIU'r"uUW1 un.
SWell-Maintained 3BR/3BA/2CG
SLiving & Family Room
Lg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
Pool & Lanai Area
Beautiful Landscaped Setting
Lots of Living Space & Storage
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 M
Email: lenpalmer@remax.neti m


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-2PM I OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-2PM I


6223 W. WESTON DR.
3BR/2BA + 2-CAR GARAGE in Meadowcrest. Open
floor plan, bright, cheery, eat-in kitchen, liv./dining combo,
split bedroom plan, indoor utility rm., & screen lanai. Enjoy
the easy FLA living lifestyle.
DIR.: Meadowcrest Blvd. to Pinehurst Village. See Signs.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Ema: remaxga122@yahoo.com 0


* Built in 2008 4 Bedrooms
* Tile Flooring 3 Full Baths
* Large Kitchen .53 Acre
* 2,406 Square Feet of Living Space
* Beautiful Community of Cambridge Greens
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663 f
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com K
Certified Distressed Property Expert n-


2421~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ N. Ieol Hw.Ieel il 2-82wwRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


3621 N. TAMARISK AVE.
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2BA/N1CG 1,923 SF Under Roof
* Living RM & Fam. RM All New Windows
* Beautifully Updated and Maintained
PETER & MARVIA KOROL nI
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


E2 SUNDAY, MNACH 30, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Antiques: Something for everybody


Gypsy's Two Cents: At
only 12 inches high, I see
and smell a lot of shoes.
Some sniffs are helpful,
others I regret. I also have r
a list of favorite cus-
tomers who pick me up k
and walk around the
shop. Since I am in
charge of security which Steve
includes inventory con- TIME
trol, this heightened per- TI
spective allows me to TE
check on everything.
Thanks, Margaret!
re you looking for that special
or unique gift? It could be for
any event, or even a "just be-
cause." Your local antiques shop
carries such a wide variety that you


Barnes
WILL
LL


will likely find it there.
Citrus County has been
a retirement community
for decades, and the re-
sult is an abundance of
quality items at reason-
able prices. There is a
wide range of pricing,
from a few dollars to hun-
dreds and even thou-
sands. Every day, dealers
from out of county or even
the state come in looking
for those very deals. For


example, a 1960 Hess toy truck No. 1
with the box may seem costly at
$495, but do your research and you
will discover this is a great deal.
For the person who has everything,
how about a gold plated toothpick?


When it comes to furniture, I ac-
cept antiques shops may not satisfy
personal taste or style, but quality is
hard to beat. Solid wood with dove-
tail joints made in the USA? Or ve-
neers with staples made somewhere
else? Let's see... easy choice. Even if
you don't find THE gift, I'm sure you
will come away with great ideas. For
your pleasure, there are a dozen or
more antiques shops in Citrus
County
Here's a story from Dick Lewis. To
those people who think their items
are not valuable enough to consider
selling them, remember that bar-
gains are found almost everywhere.
Let's consider Martin, a retired

See ANTIQUES/Page ElI


GOT A NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call 352-563-5660, and be pre-
pared to give your name, phone number, and the
address of the news event.


r jackie Gaffney Jason Gaff ney
II' -_ Realtor -unE Realtorl *AI
RealHol A HOUSE Realtor
B302-3179 soLD Naie! 287.-9022 l
L 746-6700
J a 74A67aM Pr0 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
II1;IdelMIn lirl tueeir DoailV e neUEDIV ull nlun I


170 S MAJESTIC RIDGE PT 3057 N. DELEON
3/2/2 split plan home featuring wood Kingsley model 2/2/1. Relax on
cabinets in kitchen, new carpet tile
and real wood flooring. New paint in the large front screened porch or
and out. Vinyl enclosed 12 x 30 enclosed lanai, eat in kitchen,
Lanai. Absolutely Turn Key Minutes partially fenced yard. Newer A/C,
to shopping and restaurants, roof and appliances.


SpcaiigiTerVit
& EenwoResa.e


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


CARl MANiJi -52.1)2.1 77 SJ.qAN Miii FN 52.422.21.1 VICTORIA FRANKI IN 152.427.777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, SKWYVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, BELLAMY RIDGE
Beautifully appointed 3BR/3BA/2+ garage exclusive pool home. Custom great room floor Elegance, simplicity and breathtaking describes this 3 bed room, 2.5 bath, iving room, den, Located in the village of Bellamy Ridge within Terra Vista this customized Cordova model
plan with upgrades thru-out including: designer window treatments, luxurious tile floors, formal dining room, pool home in Skyview Villas a gated commu nty of Terra Vista. Enjoy provides style and elegance from informal to formal living at its best. Situated in a private setting.
energy- efficient radiant barrier and enormous gourmet kitchen highlighted by upgraded maintenance-free iving so you can relax. Conan countertops, cozy fireplace, central vacuum Features include hardwood and tile flooring in the main areas, wood cabinetry in then and
wood cabinetry, spacious entertaining island and a butler's pantry. Over-sized lana. justto name a few. Wood kitchen cabinets, luxuries master bath with glass block shower and baths, granite tops in kitchen, volume ceinomgs providing an open airy feel. Expansive owners
perfectly complements gas heated pool and spa. Enjoy the comforts of maintenance-free .. .. .. .. .. ... ..... .. ...... . .. 11 ..
living in the premiere Country Club of Terra Vista. MLS #708900......................$449,000 ........... ........ ... '11 r.iJ. .. .334.000 ...........S............... II iii. 419.900





SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
ELEGANCE! Windward model with many upgrades! This nicely appointed open floor Lovely 2 BR/2 BA/2 Car garage villa at Hillside of Terra Vista. Open and Don't miss this exception value in Terra Vista. This always-popular Windward model has
plan home was designed to let the Florida sunshine in. 3 bedrooms 3 baths, 2-car bright home features great room and den, oak cabinetry, butler's pantry, been customized to include a second owner's suite plus a guest room and a den. The
garage. Some of the many upgrades include Brazilian hardwood floors, cathedral top of the line appliances, lots of tile, many upgrades and large lanai for home has had 1 owner and is well maintained. Located near the front gate -the location
ceilings luxurious master bath, amazing pool and Jacuzzi, bonus enclosed sunroom, entertaining. Maintenance-free living at its best. Gated golf community that offers easy access to shopping. Come and enjoy life in one of Florida's premier lifestyle
incredible kitchen and on a cul-de-sac! You'll be proud to return to this elegant home offers state-of-the art fitness center, indoor lap pool and many other communities. The home is located in a care-free village allowing you plenty of leisure time
with lush landscaping & on a large corner lot. MLS 705865....................... $319,000 activities that fit one's lifestyle. MLS709399..................................... $229,000 to enjoy all that isto offer. Make this a home a MUST SEE. MLS 709464........$259,900


Terms 6 Mots or More
Te rait Br nt oo R na ls Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


I TOWNHOME,
2 BED, 2.5 BATH.
I-CAR. BRENTWOOD
TOWNHOMES
h li., ,, 1 ... .. ... 1. h h ,,,
dI h ,,,,, . . ... ., .,I
h I, h ,, I ... ... . ....I .
.. ... .. .... .... .... .. ,,h.I
-. ,... :.......
-b ,, 1,s
,,:: l k, ... ,. ,, 1150


We need RENTALS

in the TERRA VISTA &

BRENTWOOD communities!
List your rental with us!


.11


I. J


| J


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 E3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SReal Estate DIGEST


RE/MAX
salutes elite
agents .
The associates and
staff of RE/MAX Re- t
alty One are pleased
to recognize Alan _
Ivory for surpassing Alan Ivory
the $2 million mark in RE/MAX
sales volume. Realty One.
Alan joins a very
small group of agents who have qualified
for the multi-million dollar club this year.
--. He is an agent in the
rCrystal River office of
RE/MAX and has been
a top agent in the com-
munity for many years.
The brokers of
RE/MAX congratulate
Alan on his continued
Kelly success.
Goddard Realtor Kelly God-
RE/MAX dard successfully sur-
Realty One. passed the $1 million
mark in sales volume
this week. In less than three months, she
has qualified for the prestigious million
dollar club.
Kelly is an established Realtor in the
Lecanto office of RE/MAX on Country
Road 491. The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One would like to
congratulate Kelly on this significant
accomplishment.


ERA agents
climb ladder
in 2014
ERAAmerican Re-
alty & Investments is
proud to announce the
latest production levels
achieved by its agents
in 2014.
Gary and Karen
Baxley, Inverness of-
fice, have surpassed
the $1 million mark in
closed sales volume.
Reach them at 352-
726-5855.
Joanna Morris, In-
verness office, has
surpassed the $1 mil-
lion mark in closed
sales volume.
Betty Powell, Inver-
ness office, has sur-
passed the $1 million
mark in closed sales
volume.
ERAAmerican Re-
alty is proud to recog-
nize the achievements
of these fine real es-
tate professionals.
Reach them at the In-
verness office of ERA
American Realty at
352-726-5855.


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engagement announcements,
anniversaries, birth announcements and first birthdays.


Karen and
Gary Baxley
ERA American
Realty.


Joanna
Morris
ERA American
Realty.






ill
k- p/



Betty
Powell
ERA American
Realty.


* Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday for
publication Sunday.
* News notes are published as space is available.


!~ l UVflU.UolfEL,.,r. 1 L~f~ [........... ~V .LI.TI......... !
2-story 3BR/3.5 Bath home atop a hill on fenced 5 Ground floor 2BR/2BA/1 Car gar. Convenient
acres. $150,000 MLS#705895 locale. $72,900 MLS#706979
Ir I


UttKVWUUU-IIIVtKrIt, rL urtin LAiWKIiUI hUIVL-MhIK'AMUU, rL
Nifty 2BR home on 1 acre. Close to everything. I 1/2 acre Updated 2BR/2BA, Fam. Room. I
$66,999 MLS708261 Newerroof $199,900 MLS709344
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 #o
After Hours 352302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.alldctrusrealty.com


7815 Central, Coleman ..................................... $25,900
819 Cedar, Inverness ........................................ $29,900
3189 CR 431, Lake Panasoffkee ........................ $33,500
7190 Greenwood, Crystal River .......................... $34,900
909 Spruce St., Inverness ................................. $36,900
57 Douglas St. Unit 107, Homosassa .................. $39,900
3835 S Kindness Terr., Homosassa ..................... $48,000
8899 CR 647S, Bushnell ................................. $49,900
150 Hibuscus, Crystal River ................................ $49,900
12 S Jackson, Beverly Hills ................................ $49,900
9510 Village Green .......................................... $51,500
4895 Withlacoochee Tr., Dunnellon ..................... $52,500
118 Edison St., Inverness .................................. $52,900
1313 Emerson, Inverness .................................. $54,900
932 NW 1 5th Ave., Lake Panasoffkee................. $62,500
6110 Coronado, Lecanto ................................... $62,990
6022 E. Slate St., Inverness .............................. $63,500
3173 Thornapple Terr., Beverly Hills .................... $64,000
204 S. Lucille, Beverly Hills ................................ $67,500
6545 Anna Jo, Inverness ................................... $69,500
15 SE 9th Ave., Crystal River ............................. $69,900


8176 N. Creek, Citrus Springs ............................ $74,900
263 W. Baker, Citrus Springs ............................ $79,900
695 Star Jasmine, Beverly Hills .......................... $85,000
1407 Lakeview Dr., Inverness ............................ $85,500
415 Pineaire St., Inverness ................................ $87,500
256 Charles, Inverness ..................................... $87,900
9143 Zanmar, Floral City ................................... $89,900
10586 N. Caldera, Citrus Springs ........................ $94,900
12281 S. Canna Pt., Floral City .......................... $97,500
5610 S. Barco, Inverness ................................ $114,900
8 Zinnas Ct., Homosassa ................................. $129,900
6141 Peter Ln., Dunnellon .............................. $159,900
3784 W. Birds Nest, Beverly Hills..................... $159,900
5621 W. Corral PI., Beverly Hills ...................... $165,000
65 Beach Ln. Unit T, Crystal River..................... $179,900
4435 N. Aztec Pt., Beverly Hills ....................... $205,000
363 NW 14th PI., Crystal River........................ $219,900
3 Honeysuckle, Homosassa ............................. $219,900
1005 Stoney Pt., Homosassa .......................... $315,000
3990 Buckhorn, Beverly Hills ........................... $329,900


OOOHSB3


E4SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lilies a good fit




for local gardens



Popularplants cover several species


ardeners like perennial lilies
for their attractive flowers,
strap-like leaves and elegant
form. Bulb and solid corm lilies that
grow well in Central Florida gar-
dens include true lilies in the Lilium
genus; American ever-
green and/or deciduous
Rain lilies, Zephyranthes
genus; Asian Hemerocal-
lis daylilies; large, frost- -
tender Crinum lilies;
African Agapanthus;
South American
Hippestrum Amaryllis;
and native Hymenocallis,
spider lily. Lilies come
from several families con- Jane
training many genera, JAN
each with numerous
unique species. GARI
DNA testing has firmly
confirmed lily names and origins:
Some of the old names and syn-
onyms were incorrect or misleading.
Rain, Zephyr or Atamasco Lily are
common names for Zephyranthes
native species that grace roadsides,
woodlands and forests from north
Central Florida to Virginia and west
to Mississippi in cold hardiness
Zones 7 to 9. Three species are na-
tive to Florida Z atamasco with
quarter-inch wide leaves; rarer
Treat's, Z. treatiae, with narrow
quarter-inch leaves and wider-
leafed Z. grandiflora, which is hy-
bridized for color and has a wider
range.
Atamasco Lily has four to six thin,
grass-like leaves up to 16 inches
long, which die back after a new
corm and side babies develop in late
summer Spectacular trumpet-
shaped six-petaled white flowers, 3
to 4 inches long, rise from separate
mature corms once a year from late
February to May Atamasco (a native
word) Lilies mass in colonies. Older
flowers fade to pink. Seeds form and
are distributed by wildlife, wind and
rain. Bulbs are toxic to humans.


I think the Zephyr Lilies in my
garden are Treat's, as they have very
thin leaves. I put separate corms a
few inches apart among border
plants such as evergreen Asian Liri-
opi; deciduous summer flowering
Peacock Ginger; ever-
green, spring-flowering
Florida Violets; fall-flow-
ering Liatris, and short-
lived but self-seeding
native Blue-eyed Iris.
Over the years they all
multiply and need
little maintenance, no
fertilizer and no supple-
mental irrigation once
Veber established.
E'S Z grandiflora is a frost-
hardy rain lily with ever-
DEN green leaves a half-inch
wide and various flower
colors. There are named varieties
readily available.
Amaryllis, one of 80 Hippestrum
species native to South America in
Zones 10 to 11, can be planted in
Central Florida gardens if given
winter protection close to a struc-
ture, under trees and taller shrubs
and insulated by mulch. Often used
as a pot plant forced to bloom for the
winter holidays, Amaryllis will
flower in April or May in a partly
shaded location locally Only one
flower stem is produced per bulb.
Leaves must remain until they die
naturally so as to replenish the en-
larging bulb.
Agapanthus, from southern
Africa, has been selected and hy-
bridized to produce the varieties,
colors and large flower heads gar-
deners prefer The strap-like leaves
die after frost but new ones emerge
in March locally After four to five
years, the clump will need digging
up, carefully dividing and replanting
in groups of three to seven for mass
display Colors are white, blue,


See JANE/Page Ell


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place
and other details. News releases are subject to editing.
* Call 352-563-5660 for details.

11 9 -W 97/TFA


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1



,,eSlls 858 N Benn
Spacious pool home. Beautiful
2.5 bath, pool home has all
desirable features.
Dir 486 to south on Annapolis, E on
south on Monopoly to B
JoAnn Condit 352 212 9
OPEN HOUSE SUN.


11( .ll 810 E Gilchrist Ci 28 4A
1 .0Li :',. S79.900
Cottage unit-2/2/CP & a A/C glass &
screen enclosed lanai. Fully Furnished.
Dir. 486 to S on Annapolis to R on Gilchrist to
bldg.28 on left.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING


ill( 270 S Paladinn Cir
ivMLS luaJ445 $249,000
Immaculate 3/2/2 on impeccable half acre.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947






i;tA 60 W Mickey Mantle Path
SMLS 707861 $249,900
Quality 3/2.5/2 +den, pool & fireplace
w/built in warming drawer.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


(w0 Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
A Week! Properties
-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM



incilonTerE
$234,900 Falconr C
3 bed, .1 1: :,,'ii $229.000
the A MUST SEE! 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is
move-in ready.
Hartford, Dir. Hwy 486 to South on Citrus Hills Blvd.
Left on Falconry
14 Helen Forte 352-220-4764
I-3PM NEW LISTING


, i {lfA 1642 N Shadowview Path
MLS 709394 $344,000
Professionally decorated 3/2.5/2 w/pool
on cul-de-sac.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING


MLS 709393 $2
3/2/2, on a cul-de-sac, with an in-gr
hot tub.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


ebst14&. .. ..."'.....", -t, -,
MLULo ;u6642 $155,000
3/2/2 home w/plenty of room to roam
offers hilltop views.
Dir Hwy 486 to South on Annapolis, L on
Liberty, Ron Cherry Pop Dr
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING


P eeIM 5218W Yuma Ln
.L: :,r.d:. S259.000
EXQUISITE 3/2/2w/hugelanai on a lovely,
private acre.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952
NEW LISTING


*"- 7 ,' -LAS 199 W Toucan Loop
MLS 709448 $79,900
2/2/2 with lanai located on
quiet cul-de sac.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


C tfW__ [S' i0-69 Ill 55 U viml
MLS 706932 $235,000
Large family home-4 bdrms, 3 full baths &
inground pool.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


.,,,,
I I h I I II l ,


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 ES


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROWD7


!

I






E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci, i Ni R ,. fcLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


US loan rate up




to 4.4 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON- Average U.S. rates
on fixed mortgages rose this week in the
wake of comments by Federal Reserve
Chairman Janet Yellen suggesting that
the Fed could start raising short-term in-
terest rates by mid-2015.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday the average rate for the 30-year
loan increased to 4.40 percent from 4.32
percent last week. The average for the 15-
year mortgage rose to 3.42 percent from
3.32 percent.
A key home-price index showed Tues-
day a robust 13.2 percent increase in Jan-
uary compared with 12 months earlier
But the Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller
20-city index was down from a 13.4 per-
cent increase in 2013 and was the second
straight decline.
There have been signs recently that the
home-sales market could pick up in the
coming months.


Most economists expect sales to re-
bound as the weather improves and the
spring buying season begins. Not only
does warmer weather bring more traffic
to open houses, but families are usually
reluctant to move in the middle of the
school year
Mortgage rates have risen about a full
percentage point since hitting record lows
roughly a year ago. The increase was
driven by speculation that the Federal Re-
serve would reduce its $85 billion-a-month
bond purchases, which have helped keep
long-term interest rates low Indeed, the Fed
has announced three $10 billion declines in
its monthly bond purchases since Decem-
ber The latest plan is to cut its monthly long-
term bond purchases to $55 billion.
The Fed also said after its two-day pol-
icy meeting last week that even after it
raises short-term interest rates, the job
market strengthens and inflation rises,
the central bank expects its benchmark
short-term rate to stay unusually low


Inside...


Yin and yang
PAGE E9
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Weller pottery tankard likely would catch eye of collectors


ear John: I am not sure
these pictures are good
enough to tell anything
from them. The out-
line of the fish and
plants are etched
into the clay On the
bottom of the vase, it |
says "Dickensware
- Weller- #X328."
On one side at the
bottom rim is "Up-
john 1902." On the
other side, it says
"Ferrelli." The finish John S
is matte. SIKOF
Some of the scales AT
and mouths are also A
etched. It is 12 1/2
inches high. I have tried library
books and of course found
things by Dickensware and
Weller but nothing like this.
Anything you can tell me will be
appreciated. -G.D.S., Leesburg


i
I
I


Dear G.D.S.: Art Pottery is a
large specific category of col-
lecting. Weller Art Pottery is
widely recognized by
collectors. Samuel A.
Weller formed the
Weller Company in
1872 in Ohio and the
S?.I company continued
until 1949. They pro-
Sduced a number of
lines in Art Pottery,
as well as large
quantities of com-
korski mercial tableware.
SKI'S The Dickensware
cC Art Pottery line was
first issued in 1900.
The dolphin handle
and spout decoration gives your
Art Pottery tankard lots of piz-
zazz factor The overall detail
appears to be well done. I think
your tankard would sell in the
$300 to $600 range, perhaps


more on a lucky day
Dear John: I read your col-
umn in the Chronicle. I thought
I should write to you about my
mother's Haviland china that is
mine now It must be 150 years
old or older The 12-piece set I
have is green and gold. I think
one dinner plate is cracked.
There are all kinds of pieces
that go with it covered
dishes, gravy boats, etc. I would
like you to tell me what it is
worth.
How can I put it out for sale?
I did run it in the paper for
seven days and just one person
called. I am interested in get-
ting rid of it D.B., Internet
Dear D.B.: The Haviland
China Company has been in
business in Limoges, France
since 1842. They are probably
one of the most recognized
brand names in the world for


fine porcelain tableware. Sets
are not easy to sell, as you have
discovered.
Individual pieces of hol-
loware, e.g. oyster plates,
chocolate pots, coffee pots,
teapots, etc., are of collector in-
terest It would be better to pass
the set on to someone in the
family
However, if there is no inter-
est and you are determined to
sell, contact Replacements Ltd.
They buy Haviland china. The
phone number is 1-800-
REPLACE (737-5223).
See AlTTIC/Page E15
This tankard is from the Weller
Company's Dickensware line of
Art Pottery. Weller is a known
name among pottery collectors.
This piece might well catch a
collector's eye.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

* TASK: Use less water and less
fertilizer.
HOW TO DO IT: Homeowner
Jack Flynn makes two sugges-
tions. One reduces the use of
water and the other reduces ni-
trates that get into our water:
"We take Navy showers. That is,
get wet, turn water off, soap up,
turn the water on, and rinse," he
said. "We use an organic fertil-
izer for the lawn and flowers. It
exceeds EPA quality standards
and has earned the EPA bio-pre-
ferred designation. The name of
the fertilizer is Milorganite."
Edward Fuchs had a great idea
for cleaning as well as for saving
water.
"I use those eraser sponges to
clean my shower walls and
doors, among other surfaces. I


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 E7


just wet the sponge in a con-
tainer of about a gallon of water
and wash the walls and doors.
This is good for many surfaces,
takes little effort, and easily re-
moves soap scum and water
spots."
The single "crop" that demands
the most water and fertilizer is a
lawn. Remember: A green lawn
often contributes to green water.
Aerating lawns can help use less
water and less fertilizer, and
homeowner Karl Schultz really
targeted the problem caused by
lawn maintenance.
"We removed our lawn a few
years ago and put in mulch and
various plants. No more lawn-
mower fees, no fertilizer, no pest
company," Schultz said. "We
save water and money."


Do one thing for local waters


Special to the Chronicle
Homeowner Karl Schultz decided to help the environment and his bottom line at the same time
by landscaping with mulch.


L lE .. AMERICAN
LO. U yiee Realtor ER REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Cell: (352) 697-1685 12 fiw 3 -7r&---nn


Tmiffmw^
Conminuous tIlo ing spnrng-tedJ rier running
thru property and lust iarJs Ironm our door

PRICE REDUCED
$4 s s395,00O
1 1,, h I ....- 1 r , [ , . .. r l F ,., r I... . r,ii ,,.


-~~.1.


~A
'I


z' . .. l, ,I,,h ,,,,, l r
N ,1,11,,,. 1...... 1 i~i.... i. . . .
., "'HONI #2.

Ial HIS=


TERRA VISTA
Gorgeous waterfront pool home in the "Hunt
Club", 2006 built, 3/2/2 with 2,327 s.f. living
_area. MLS 707324 $386,900


CITRUS HILLS
Bfea.tilul gated community ol Belmont Hillc.
I Fabulous 3/2/2 pool home with spacious
rooms and high ceilings. A must see!!
MLS706313 $224,999
II _~t~J-


.1 1UUNNI:LLUN ZUUO 5UILI
1 5 BEDROOM POOL HOME 2.5 acres!! Out 3BR, 2.5BA, two story country home with new
Sin the country, but close to everything!! hardwood, kitchen cabinets, Corian and remodeled
S ; MLS 704491 REDUCED $114,900 baths. Beautiful. MLS 707164 $129,900
BLACK DIAMOND
RANCH
Beautiful Golf Course Lot
HOME #1 .,sitting above the road is
IF1', ,.,.1'.. J CITRUS SPRINGS This 4 BR home is sure to perfect for your dream home.
....."" please. Over 2,200 sf living with loads of upgrades $89,900
III I ,ri .1 iF like granite counters, stainless appliances,
beautiful flooring. MLS 708812 $164,900 (lot next door also available)


To Se Viua Tour an vie AL Ciru Conylsigvst..Lu ie~


352-795-033






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


These lampshades from Seascape Lamps can be
purchased in several sizes for table or pendant
lamps. Clockwise from top right: A whimsical drawn
garden image embellishes the Foliage lampshade;
photorealistic cherries offer a fresh graphic punch;
a retro design in hot orange adds a crisp,
contemporary punch to the Olive lampshade;
modern graphics and trendy colors make the Milo
Bullseye lampshade a good option if you just want to
change out a few details in a room.
Seascape Lamps/Associated Press


W.


r


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


yin Yangg


duality infuses spring styles


PWrMM4i George Sleeman
Realty One Broker/Associate
2421 N. Lecanto Hwy (352)464-7812
Let 30 Years oal Real Estate Experience Waort For Ya!


KIM COOK
Associated Press

Make it such an interesting
season. After the brutal bite of
winter, even a gloomy spring day
can lift our spirits with
warmer breezes and an emerging
palette of delicate hues those
first tinges of new greens, a fuzzy
gray bud, a brushstroke of crocus
blue. Then, as the season really
plants its feet, fresh bright color
starts popping up all over
As "The Secret Garden" author
Frances Hodgson Burnett said of
spring, "It is the sun shining on the
rain, and the rain falling on the
sunshine."
We welcome both the quiet emer-
gence of the season, and those
saucy flaunts of azalea, rhododen-
dron and forsythia that follow


That's the nature of spring 2014
decor, as well.
The yin
Think ballet- and watercolor-in-
spired pastels; soft fabrics and
sheer window treatments; and
curvy furniture, often in traditional
shapes but updated with modern
fabrics and pattern.
Benjamin Moore's color of the
year, "Breath of Fresh Air," is a
whispery blue-gray with a pensive
yet positive quality "We've de-
tected a lighter touch hints, tints
of color," says Ellen O'Neill, Ben-
jamin Moore's creative director
"They're colors that can make a
room happy"
Accent hues include pale peach
and lavender Quiet colors, yes, but
not insipid ones. They're versatile,

See Page EO10


CAROLE LISTER |
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor -*
Sell: 422-4620 K..
ERIA Office: 382-1700

OPEN HOUSES
MA~rTRiCH 30, i 2 S I-


3 Bd ,2.5 Bath 1850 sq ft living area on
lush, cul-de-sac PRESERVE lot.
* Granite Countertops
*Wood/Tile Flooring
* Garden Tub & Upgraded Fixtbdures
*Citrus Hills CC Membership
MLS # 708188 $166,000


* Swimming Pool
* Spacious Bedrooms
* Oversized Garage
* Large Country Kitchen
MLS#708122 $188,900


Quaint 3/2/2. Quiet and peaceful 3/2/2.
709420 $82,900 709384 $74,500
Sherri Orendorf573-9968 Sherri Orendorf 573-9968


Move-in ready 3/2/2. 3/2/2. Great investment opportunity 2/2. Updated 4/2/2.
708705 $75,900 708572 $144,900 708448 $49,900 708427 $150,000
Yolanda Canchola 219-2196 Gary Ayres 302-9329 Pam Shemet 422-2939 Randy Morehouse 287-2934
000HT1S
QQH1_________________________________________________________________


I wvvw.listerlistings.com I


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 E9






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPRING
Continued from Page E9

working as well with dressed-up
rooms as with slouchier, more re-
laxed spaces.
New York City-based designer
Elaine Griffin sees "a new feminiza-
tion in design daintier details,
urban materials interpreted in ele-
gant, classical shapes. It's an overall
softening of decor"
She also likes a color that had its
heyday a couple of decades ago but
is poised for a design stage revival:
"Beige is back! And it looks fresh
again anchoring a room of subtler
hues gray, ivory, taupe, pink, aqua,
a softened olive," she says.
Watercolor songbirds and irises
are on artwork at West Elm, the lat-
ter painted on birch wood for an in-
teresting effect. (wwwwestelm.com)
Lauren Conrad's Tea Berry bed-
ding collection for Kohl's is done in
a dreamy mix of peach, mint and
cream. (www.kohls.com)
The yang
At the other end of the spectrum,
clean, clear bright colors add exu-
berant pops.
'Americans seem ready to infuse
their surroundings with optimistic,
bold, mood-changing color," says
Jackie Hirschhaut, vice president of
the American Home Furnishings Al-


liance, in High Point, N.C. At last
fall's High Point Furniture Market,
where designs for spring are intro-
duced, the emphasis was on one hue
in particular, she says: "Intense
blues seemed to dominate."
Think dramatic yet familiar
shades like cobalt, lapis and sap-
phire.
Wisteria offers a Louis XVI-style
chair upholstered in royal blue linen
and a blue-glazed ceramic stool that
could find a comfy spot indoors or
out. Pottery Barn's Cambria collec-
tion of Portuguese stoneware comes
in a deep ocean blue, and there is co-
ordinating indigo napery in polka
dots or tile prints. (www.wisteria.com;
www.potterybarn.com)
Radiant Orchid and Exclusive
Plum, two more colors of the year,
are showing up on accessories and
furniture like All Modernm's Sunpan
velvet bench with Lucite legs, and
slipper chairs, side tables and trays
at Homegoods. Pennsylvania-based
custom cabinet-maker Plain &
Fancy is even offering versions of
the hue, suggesting it for accent
pieces like kitchen islands, media
centers and armoires. (wwwAll
Modern.com; www.homegoods.com;
wwwplainfancycabinets.com)
Crisp apple red adds punch to
neutrals check out Target's
Threshold Windham collection of
floor cabinets for practical storage
in a fun, fresh color. The Candace
upholstered armchair in a zippy,


red-on-white oversize floral print
would energize a room. (www.
target.com)
Griffin likes lemon yellow as an
accent color Fashion designers like
Marissa Webb and Derek Lam, and
retailers like H&M and Joe Fresh
embraced that hue this season, and
decor is following suit. A throw pil-
low quilted to resemble subway
tiles; octagonal and square dinner-
ware; and a galvanized trunk that
could work as both storage and table
are all at CB2 in taxicab yellow.
(www.cb2.com)
Muse and You turns a single
bloom into modern art underfoot
with the Rosa rug, while the Mo-
rocco employs hot pink, carnation
and plum in a statement tile-print
rug. (www.museandyou.com)
Portuguese artist Danny Ivan
creates digital prints with a pop art
aesthetic: His Colorful Mountains
design, offered several ways in-
cluding as a throw pillow, is a
happy explosion of vivid, graphic,
cubist shapes. Three of the Pos-
sessed, an Australian design col-
lective, renders geometric patterns
and images of birds and animals in
colorful prismatic designs.
(www.society6.com)
Sometimes, all you need to give a
room a spring facelift is to change
out a few elements. New lamp-
shades are an easy tweak. Seascape


Lamps has punchy modern graphic
designs for a wide range of fixtures,
in on-trend plum and tangerine. A
whimsical sketched garden on deep
burgundy brings in a contemporary
country vibe, and there are photo-
printed lemons and cherries here as
well. (wwwseascapelamps.com)


2595 N Bucknell Terrace, 324 Camelia, Inverness
Inverness OMG! What a deal of the week!
QUIET, AFFORDABLE AND NEAR THE Reduced to $219,500, this
WATER! At $62,500, This is a steal! immaculate, well appointed 3/2 pool
Totally remodeled cracker cottage off home in the center of Inverness has a
Parson's Point and near boat ramp and marble fireplace, lush gardens, almost a
Lakes. Cute home on 1/2 acre private 1 ac lot, a greenhouse, outbuildings and
lot. Call today before it's gone! so much more. See this now!
MLS 704140 MLS 704204




3230 N Stirrup Drive, Pine Ridge
5454 W Piute Dr., Pine Ridge MOTHER IN LAW or Teenagers live with
WANT HORSES BUT DON'T WANT A you? This amazingly great deal has 5
HUGE LOT? This immaculate home on 2 BR, 4 BA and is only $309,000.
acres backs to the community barn and Really? Come and see this one. The
pastures. It has a wonderfully appointed caged pool is gorgeous and the property
barn and home w a split 3/2 floor plan is private. Added features are barrel tiled
and a luxurious pool. MLS 706173 roof and gated entry. Call today for an
Only $329,000. appt. MLS 706472.


) Sweeh
Cathec
Two SF
) Update

*Tlake my virtual to'


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

NANCY Direct: 352.634.4225
KEY 1 REALTY INC. kw
P0ONTI~COS Nancy@Nancyknows.com
Multi-Million $$$ Producer @
8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 382-1700 ERA 1,,,



.!...........






12 IPOMOEA CT.
vater Built Open Great Room
dral Ceilings 8 FT Pocket Sliders
plit Bedrooms Eat-In Kitchen
ed Master Quiet cul-de-sac )


MLS#706827 $1


10,000 ____
nows. S..


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E5

purple and two-toned cream and
violet
Hemerocallis daylilies origi-
nated in temperate Asia. Hybrids
sold locally are bred for repeat
blooming, flower color, fragrance,
semi- to evergreen leaves and size.
Leaves last several months, con-
stantly being replaced. Deadhead-
ing spent flowers hastens a second
and third period of bloom. Select
several varieties, mass three to five
identical plants in a close group in
amended, humus-rich, well-
drained sandy soil. After establish-
ment, daylilies need no fertilizer or
supplemental irrigation.
I douse all lilies with a systemic
liquid insecticide like Talstar in
late March. The pesky Southeast-


emrn Lubber Grasshopper prefers to
munch on all kinds of lily leaves.
The toxic insecticide remains in
the lilies for up to six weeks.
Grasshopper eggs overwinter in the
ground.
Hordes of small black babies
with an orange/yellow stripe
emerge late in March or early
April. When these lubbers eat
sprayed lilies, they are poisoned
and die young before they breed.
Lubbers are slow-moving and do
not fly They can be stomped, cap-
tured and killed with bug spray


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appoint-
ment, call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


ANTIQUES
Continued from Page E3

postal worker who likes to dabble in
antiques and haunts thrift stores
looking for that something special.
Just recently, he and his wife visited
a local thrift store, where his wife
was attracted to a unique-looking
wood bowl.
Martin wasn't impressed by his
wife's find. However, she made the
purchase and brought it home. After
a couple of days, he decided to give
this bowl a closer look. After re-
searching online and locally, much
to his surprise, this wood bowl his
wife purchased for $7 had a value of
$5,500. In fact, one identical to their
find sold at a Chicago auction for
$9,300.
What happened to the bowl? I be-
lieve it made a trip to Chicago.


Steve Barnes owns and, along
with his shop dog Gypsy, operates
Olde Inverness Antiques.


1 A. Robert& Holly Jones AMERICAN
U 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
S, hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com"Always There For You"
H R A 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 b


COSMOS CT 4496 N. CANARYWOOD I
7/$229,900 32/2 709421 $198,500


SOOOHSK5 ^

REAL ESTATE, INC. |st7
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. E
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OCE: (352) 795-6633 Realt-
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM I
AGI ENET ION D l SE DA A WEEKI!V 2
E ~~ -


MEADOWCREST VILLA Crystal
River; lovely 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar
villa fully furnished; cathed, .1 ;1.
family room; Ig kitchen with ....
community has clubhouse, pools & tennis
courts #709409 $95,000
L --. A- -- r- I


LECANTO "SHORT SALE" 3 bedroom
2 bath, D/W M/H on half acre comer lot
country kitchen, well & septic, cathedral
.t.,. ,.,. i. laundry, large
.. .. ...... 48.000


HOMOSASSA Nice older mobile
w/2 bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear
screened porches Newer roofover in 2010,
newer appliances approximately 2 years
old Fully fenced backyard with shed
#700919 $22,500


CRYSTAL RIVER Huge workshop,
mobile has been removed, 3 roll up doors,
1 ';. . .. .I. to drive RV iu i .i
ha i., i .1. washer dryer i,, h .n
of upstairs looks like it was planned on
being living area #703919 $80,000





HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 1 bath, S/W
M/H on 1 47 acres of land Impact fee
waived if M/H replaced, fenced rear & one
side, being sold "as is" no value given to
mobile Septic, no well #703991 $25,000





INGLIS 2001 Skyline w/3 bedrooms,
2 baths, newly remodeled, on 2 lots
(2 acres), cathedral ceilings, inside
laundry, secluded & private Lg living rm,
1;,;,. .... I, I. ,. Easy access to Gulf of
.. $80,000


CITRUS SPRINGS Very nice older HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
home w/2 bedrooms, 1 bath, open living/ garage home on 0 46 acres w/additional 2
1,.... oom 1 car carport, fenced waterfront lots go with this house Has
i, . 10x7 utility shed Convenient extra carport, screen porch & shed Has
location, close to community amenities well and central water #706017 $99,900
#708004 $46,900


l 2 E746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson TomBalfour Walt Engelken Yvonne. Jenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE REALTOR F Home P Analysis


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 Ell








E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I. F)ITol Fre.l.-,-MS) -8 1 ,m i, le Icl-oline, ,. I -w,


INVERNESS. FL


55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
mincl. grass cutting
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
HERNANDO
1/1 & 2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1st last +dep
352-201-2428
Homosassa
2bd/2ba, front & back
screened porches
$550. mo. 1stlast, sec.
(352)634-1176 or
(352) 628-7300



-1982 SingleWide**
2-1, 15K firm
MUST SEE!
352-795-1272
Cabin 12X32'
w/front prch & tin roof.
Full bath/kitchen. Bd/Liv.
w/10X12 unfnshd add.
You move. $7000 obo.
(352)746-9211
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
Rent to Own
Owner Financing on
used/repo/new
Manufactured Homes
352-795-2377


** MUST SELL **
2006 Used Mobile
Home, 3-5 bdr/2 ba
Deliver to your property
45k Great Shape!!
1-877-578-5729
Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.
Triple Your Tax Refund
At Palm Harbor Homes
Plant City!!
www.olantcitv.oalm
harbor. com
Call John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details





**FLORAL CITY 3/2-
1+ACRE treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
Assessd $34,400.
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369



COUNTRY LIVING IN
LECANTO $42.500
Dbwd, 3bd/2ba, % acre
NEW c/heat/air & carpet
handi-cao ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond!
No Owner Finance
(352) 621-3929
Hernando DW, MH
3 BR w/walk-in closets
Roof over, single car
arg, chain link fence
39,999 Will take RV in
Trade; 352-726-2494


Homosassa
0" Beautiful Large
MH 4/3 on almost 2
Acres. MUST SEE!
$145,000 OBO
(352) 795-2377

INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Homel248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


V THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
must sell $13,000
(352) 344-5172
2br/2ba in 55+ Comm.
Extend, carport, furn'd,
washer/dryer, computer,
printer. Porch w/ sliding
windows. Lot rent $250
$22,000, 352-794-3441

Beautiful Triple Wide
In Gated Community
with Drywall. 2000+ SF
Must See-will owner
finance. MUST SELL
727-967-4230


BEVERLY HILLS
Sandy Oaks 55+ PK
2BD, 2 BA, Open
House Sat & Sun,1 1-2p
completely remode.,
new Kit. & new appl's,
Fl. Rm. Lot Rent $274
incld's, wtr sewer &
trash, Pool/ Clubhouse
$37,500 (352-322-8941
HANDICAP ACCESS
with Vertical Lift,
Stonebrook, 2/2 MH
1,400 sf., $28,900. Lot
Rent $442., Must See.
352-628-5311

For Sale 891[
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858
Singing Forrest 55+
Park, SW 2/1,LRoom
addition, new flooring &
Furnc/AC. Lanai, shed.
Lot rent $183/mo
$24,500; 352-860-1463
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090


Rea .1 le Est:ate i







.Inc
33iN rofveu
gSInvernes Fl 34453?
352-341-4663el J ii'
CITU COUNi _~TY


AfflO
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S800 & UNDER
1302 Cypress (eCove (Ct.
2/2.5 2 story townhome, canal side
7698 N. Voyager Dr.
3/2/2 coming soon. Citrus Springs
9218 N. Satinwood Ter.
3/2/2 nice home. Citrus Springs

$650 & UNDER
8496 W. Drew (Ct.
2/2 waterfront mobile with own dock
1063 N. Commerce Ter.
2/1 apartment centrally located
59 S. Tyler St.
2/1 with coipot and Bne Florida room
7096 N. Dawson Dr.
2/2 MH in Hilhn-Dale Subdivision
For More Listings Go To
www.CitrusCountyHonreRentals.ro
J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf

2/2/1 ...................$625
2/1.5/1 ................$750
2/1 APTS............$525
1/1 APT...............$400
AVAL MAY

2/1.5 MOBILE...$600


2/2/1 ...................$700
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


Home Finder

www.chroniclehornm finder.com


Fiut/ Yowu tmrwea How&

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomriefinder.com

763572


4
Mobile Homes
For Rent








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-Uc
, Mll i. Ambn q., 1:
I J2 ibj7..iao0




INVERNESS
3/2/1 House ...........$800
Mobiles.......$525-$600
Waterfront Condo..$795
Duplex w/most utili.. $450

CITRUS HILLS

Villa. ................ $825
HOMOSASSA
4/2/2 Home.........$1200
2/1 Mobile..............$500
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 House..............$650
CRYSTAL RIVER
Historic 3/2............. $825
Historic 2/1 .............$750




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR, TV Rm. Lg. Liv Rm
CHA, $425., Ist/Last &
Sec. 352-697-1680
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $600/mo. will
help w/sec. no dogs
352-726-9570
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352-257-6461

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 & 3BR APT. HOMES
Handicap Unit
Available
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants
Monthly rent starting
at $686 plus utilities
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer


OQppRTUNIT'


CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."



"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD








FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




For Rent
Warehouse
1200 sq ft $600,
Storage 8x8 $85,
Office $550
(352) 634-0129




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242


CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/carport, $750.
mo., 600 Gilchrist 5-A
(352) 422 2798
HERNANDO
2/2/Carport, Furnished
& Unfurn. Extra Clean.
(352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2 Scm. rm., patio
(352) 344-8046

Duplexsl

Citrus Springs
2/2/1, $650. mo.
352-746-7990
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, furnished, util. incl.
quiet country liv., CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $600/mo. will
help w/sec. no dogs
352-726-9570
INVERNESS
Duplex 2BR/1BA
352-746-2932




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk 828-497-2610




io For Rent
Warehouse
1200 sq ft$600,
Storage 8x8 $85,
Office $550
(352) 634-0129





NEAR BOONE, NC
2+/-ac. tract 350ft of
rushing streams
3000ft elevation pri-
vate and secluded
underground utilities
and paved roads
from only $9900. Call
1-877-717-5273ext91


DEB
THOMPSON
w One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(Svahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


OPPO RTUNIT Y



Tennessee Log
Home Sale!
Saturday April 12th
Only. New 1200sf
ready to finish
log cabin on 10
acres with FREE Boat
Slip on 160,000 acre
recreational lake.
Only $89,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
877-888-0267, x76


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


RelEtt


Up to 9 acres from
$14,900. Mountain
cabin only $89,900.
Access to lake and
trout stream. Views
of the Atlanta sky-
line. 45 minutes from
Northern Atlanta.
Priced below
developer cost!
Call 866-950-5263
Ext. 17.




Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Open House Sunday
Mar 30th, 1-4pm
...$149,900
6654 Silverbell
Terrace, Hernando,
Fl. Get More for
Your Money at this
meticulously
maintained 3/2/3
car garage home
on 2 lots, high and
dry with every
upgrade! Split BR
plan, large covered
lanai, jetted tub,
high ceilings.
Mint Cond. Approx
2400sf.
Debra Shannon,
Broker. Town Centre
Realty 813 610-8006


I I


ml


/ *,~2
1 4'


,1

~


& Online / -


0 i iI. E ,


C1 I16NlICI $C96ONIC /ti l




(352)563-5966 / i'^


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ... .
........................................................................................... x::............-. .. - - :
..... .. . ... ; q .......... ...............
.............................. .. .... .......... ...............
......................... p, p ..
..........
W,


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print


P


ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickgbf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854,FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




Realstat

FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 E13


I


11w-Do

you St&




Your D








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2/2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext., Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202
Pine Ridge, 3 bedroom.
3 bath. with salt water
pool, a 20x45 workshop
and carport with 15 ft
enclosed full solar
compliment, solar elec-
tric, pool pump, pool
heaterhot water and
solar assisted air condi-
tioning 352-746-9435



2 block homes side by
side. 1/1, rented $450
each TAW. Good
Cond. Quite Loc.
$70,000 for both. Call
Kevin (603) 498-5124
BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525sf heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$64,900. 527-1239
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


YOU'LL w THIS!
6385 W Cannondale
Drive 2 bedroom. 2
bath. Cozy
1000SF(approx.)home,2
car attached garage, Irg
screened lanai,newly
updated $94,500
352-794-6686




Citrus Hills 3/2/2
Great open floor plan.
Liv. room has stone FP
& wd floors. Caged
Pool (352) 746-6552





ForSale 11
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367

RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


Hoe


For Sale ,.
Pritchard Island
Community, access to
pool w/tennis court,
close to downtown
Inverness, 1 owner,
2BD/2BA/2CG
$125k By owner,
Call. (352) 726-0044





LISTINGS


crystal River 3 bedroom.
2 bath. Ideal location
near 7 rivers golf course
$119,000...Also second
home $59,900
2/2/1..Both homes in ex.
cond. 352-2204158

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


IAMI SU II
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY !




For Sale ,,A
MUST SELL
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $63,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell
SECLUDED 3BR/2BA.
1653 sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
/4 acre buildable lot.
$99,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!



0N


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatoneihtampabav.rr.c
om
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Wat


NOW IS GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattOd
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855











Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com





2/2 Citrus Hills. Master
w/lg walk-in closet. Lg
utility rm/pantry. Scrn
porch. Walk to pool!
Tile floors, very clean,
lots of natural light!
$58,000. 586-260-2848


For Sale %,l
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some furn, new Lanai,
Lam, & Ceramic floors.
$47,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100


Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507


Nomosassa
Hol~mes I


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNa -re-Coast
ProDerties.corn
"To view
my properties"

*rman's Paradise
mrness East Cove.
nished 2/2 plus
)ck& seawall. ** **
p water. $61,900 GOLF COURSE LOT in
152) 344-0101 Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905
Floral City *********
rfront. 6 adj. Lots, PINE RIDGE
acre on chain of 1 ACRE
Huge oaks, good By Owner, build
g. $110,000 OBO. ready, no fill, $26,900
352)596-2921 (352) 249-7812


SHome 0 Finder -
www.ch ornicil t:,, ri linder.corn


Fuid Your Dreamu Home.
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014


E9
Citrus County
IHolmes-


q
Citrus County
Homes


Ou fTw


INVERNESS, 2BR/1BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749
LAKE ROUSSEAU
Fishing- Nature Lovers
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


Waterf rent
Homes
I -






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Dear John: I have a copy of
Rudyard Kipling's Verse Inclu-
sive Edition, 1885-1918, Double-
day, Page & Company, 1923. The
binding is all but gone and I am
afraid to even handle it. I would
like to have the book refurbished,
rebound and made accessible
again. It belonged to my mother
and was one of her favorites. I
have kept it stored for years, not
knowing what to do with it


SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 E15


I inquired with the Tampa
Public Library once, but they-
said if it could be repaired it
would have to be sent to New
York. I am reluctant to ship the
book so far away and have been
hoping I could find a bookbinder
closer to home. Could you possi-
bly recommend someone?
My mother, as a child, also put
together a wonderful little col-
lection of greeting cards, busi-
ness calling cards, and postcards
of her time, circa 1917 to 1920. It
must have been a popular pas-
time for children to cut out the
beautiful birds, flowers, etc.


It must have been a popular pastime for
children to cut out the beautiful birds,
flowers, etc. from cards and paste them
into volumes for their own picture books.


from cards and paste them into
volumes for their own picture
books. The artwork of these
times is spectacular The bind-
ing on this book is also in need
of repair and I wonder if it is
cost-prohibitive. Perhaps the
bookbinder you could recom-
mend would know Some of the


cutouts are worn, but the bulk of
the work is in very good shape.
Your help in this matter of re-
furbishing these books will be
greatly appreciated. S.S.,
Brooksville
Dear S.S.: Yes, there is a book
conservator in Daytona Beach
who could help you. I have had


several good recommendations
from people who have used his
services. His name is Paul
Sawyer. His website is
www.sawyerbinder.com, and his
phone number is 386-253-1161.

John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


ENJOY LIVING ON THE WATER! SELLER TO INSTALL NEW ROOF!
S3/2.5 end unit condo -1711 sq ft living Over 1800 sq ft of living area
New roof 2010 newAC/heat 2010 2/2/2 2 Master suites
New dock 2011 with dedicated slip Eating area could be formal dining
Never flooded even in "no name" storm Florida room gives extra living space
Only 35 minutes to the gulf Large tiled family room for entertaining
Hurricane film on all windows Convenient to SMW Country Club
Open deck overlooks Indian River All appliances will convey with the home
Condo flood insurance through drywall Plenty of room to add a pool!
#706963 $235,000 #705485 $84,500
r .... .... .i


iI




SUPDATED & UPGRADED turn key 2/2 home w/newer everything.
Reflects touch of New England. $92,500. Call Capt. Lee
Harris at 352-489-4949. 158D744/709172/404480





LAKE VIEW OF QUARRY 9 from most locations in this home. Very

Slight & bright. All custom drapery for privacy. New roof in
2012. Membership not required but available. 3 private suites.
Great office. Call 352-344-5535 for info
today. 1583151/709131.p
957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452
352-344-5535
g www.Cridland.com '


lie- JOANN MARTIN
(PPreferred
REAL ESTATE H-
(a t 1 tjMLS
Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefmn.net






9330 E Kenosha Ct, Floral City 2599 W Apricot Pine Ridge
Beautiful Waterfront Home Beautiful 2002 Rusaw pool home. 3
Gourmet kitchen, stainless steel appliances, bedrooms plus office/den upgraded
New roof and air 2011, gazebo, double pane HVAC 2008, master suite with sitting
windows, extra large lot. Fish from your own HVAC 2008 master sute th
dock. Home available for viewing 3/17/14 area, dual pane windows, bright
Offered for $259,OOO. MLS# 709137 kitchen w/skylight. A must see, call
Directions: U.S. 41 FI Ave South from Inverness, Left on today. Priced at $209,900.
Orange Ave. (Hwy 48) Left on Duval Island. Left on Directions: Rte. 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to left on Apple
Grove. Left on Kenosha. Valley to right on Apricot.

l-j IJ.I!Mi II.0


HAMPTON LAKE
This 3/2/1 situated on 12 acre elevated
lots of fruit trees Recently
room boasts large pcture
SSappl $274,000


GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220.0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com



Investors Realty B
of Citrus County, Inc.
wi ywebsite at: wv .nuryflorida-house.con


^^pl^^B ^ .^&. OOHSKB 30
F H KE YS *** =IIIIII
ERA View All Listings:
352-382-5579 www.goFLhomes.com
Office 38241700 -1t800-2371112
Louise Schmid
FBroke~r Ass~ociate






1 Hackberry Court S $209,000
Great Room Home in Sugarmill Woods
3 Bedrooms + Office 1966 sq. ft. underAir
3 Baths Furnishings Available
3 Car Garage Separately
Heated Pool and Spa Granite Counters & 42"
Built in 2004 Cabinets in Kitchen
Dir Hwy. 480 to N. on Corkwood (Southern Woods CG) to Hackberry Dr. on Left to Corner ofHackberry Ct S. #1


CLASSIC ELEGANCE UNSPOILED NATURE
French Country Estate on 6 acre MOL in desirable location close to Inverness Secluded 80+ acre farm close to Crystal River Rolling pastures, lush meadows,
4,078 sq ft of luxury hiing spacn ',1 tl,. i.i end finishes you desire ponds, mature oak trees 2 spacious and luxuriously remodelid r,-ttnnp. are
gourmet kitchen, family room, pool I deck 3 car garage plus carefully positioned in a beautiful setting for maximum I r, visit
sep 6 car gar, office & apartment PIs visit www MvCitrusCountvEstate cam for www mycrystalriverfarm corn for an interactive tour
an interactive tour $739,000 $800,000


FASCINATING RIVER VIEWS MOVE RIGKT IN -BEAUTIFUJL CITRUS HILLS..
3/2 home built 2007 on 13 acres on Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
the banks of the Withlacoochee corner lot with mature oak trees and Eli
across from Half Moon Gum Slough lots of privacy Very well maintained, cu
Preserve HW floors, fireplace, cherry
$489I 000 $169,000
$489.000 hI $169,000








CITRUs COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* Rh ,iL III ,I'.-, VIi1i
* F_ .j I.1m l l:'..uh i l I_,,I
* hR _* B.ir.lh l l'l.ii'i
* I... ..l ..... h ,i...J- I _i. l -..l ..
_.i l, II, -'I F~il If' l. lh li
i',. -iihri-$. $80.000
Jea.nne oi Wil'l/id Pickiel 352 212 3410
iiiin CitiusCounli Sold com


h l . II. .1 i'" .I I ..I 1h .. idI I.
i d l p'' l l li~. ilh I i" li.

Nil lii... ASKING $69,999
Ca/ luke 1l'hilehuisl 46 55/8


' r a ^ I. .
* j:i .:... _i j .iIi. H.).i:
* ih 61:1 M I, I eiJilihi,,i
* I:. ?,I: W.:.il Ih; l..
* _"l '! ?,_ l-li,:l, (h .| l .i, i ,j
* I I- -I h i ll. hIi. .I,.'.1

Mi_ hui:i.ll ONLY $260,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


VV.vI,I Ilh b:. 1,: .l..i.: Ill H-I ,li~l:l _3 ., ,,i in ; Ill,,I

_ l .:l,:l h. j; ,:. d .I .,i i & i h. i. i 1

$65,000 Mi'3= 1iI:I:,'.:I
Call Rulh Fiedetick 1352-56386666


ELEGANTLY SITTING ON
CORNER LOT IN CITRUS SPRINGS

- 6) l I, ) l.jl,,q i ,l.

I ,i.:i i MI__= I:._
lotaine 0 Regan 352 56 0075


. 1 li, llili h. II il jl h l,. ,,
.j,, i, .l l~. dllh M I_ _3 = I)_1
JUST REDUCED TO $120,000
Please call Isaac Baylon lot a
personal lout 3526972493


THIS IS A GEM
rJ,, .,,, ,1, i ,h ih,,,i ,Ih h ,,i,, I. ,i ,I
,,,I~ ~~ ~ ~ 1. 6 1,,11,,,,l h ,, -, .. ... 1,, ,I, ,,
I,,I ,I,- llh l, l lll lh ll I [ ii i l,-lh l ,,l', I, i lh -



ir i -i 14 ASKING $37.500
Pi Di,- ,352 212 7280
l',4,?l /,strip fl ,t ,f ,l 21pfld = ,s ,;,ir


I rinv i OiLEE U I lll
OF MOBILE HOMES
IN PARKS AND ON LAND
FROM $12,500 TO $39,900
I/ you ate inletesled in
buying ot selling call Dots Mineir
726 6668 ot 422 4627


* v fv- lly z.,il rl '"r viI Ih. i
* .:, U h _' U .ill, I_. il _]^ i.l ,. .l I_. ,.ii .i
h ill.1 FIJI',, h~l d, F I,-,I 'd ( ,:l :
J ,I .l U h .11. 1 i ..: llI: l I. 1, -: . II : .I

MI__ =IIii'.Iilll $95,000
Jeanne mot l'llaid Pickiel 352-212-3410
iiii CiliusCounli Sold corn









CALLING ALL PILOTS!!!
,thh. : 6M Jl hlll l 1 :1 1 .lll h .: 1:1:1: 1 .t~ l I l.. lr ...
H.~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~~. ) ,, .... ,, ,u....... .. I ,,
,i-Li l ,' 6. 1... ,j hi.j 1.il hi.j ,hLd I." ,.. IL. Vj..

'lMi'.- =iLA.il ASKING $299,000
liancj Jenks 352 400 8072


$119,900
WATERFRONT HOME IN INVERNESS
fi"" l ._ ,, I ,, l l.. ; 'l


I .h~ ~ ~ ~ ~~l I 'tl, l ,'..: i Ni. h...).ll ...iC'l,

lllua1 Paisons 634 1273









HIGHLANDS HOME
IN TOWN WITH HUGE YARD
ON .66 ACRE!
P .i.I Il .1 . lll li: ,| W l 1I 1.1111l.m i ,,'!
'" F. I CA M .:v ,,, ,il 1

M1Mi i = Mi:ii' $66,000
laWanda Wall 352212 1989


AMAZING NEW PRICE!
Cilirus Hills 'Pool Home "Goll Course
I/I, ..." .. h. ,ill' rj,,,, I .hi .h i
I~i .l [.l .,i h u i..I


PRICED RIGHT AT $199,900
Call Onade Feese, 352 302 7699


MORE FOR THE MONEY

I. ll i. I . .. h 'ii ii l'i '1 .I l i i l Iml



"...I hr,6I h I I "iL .
ALL THIS AND MORE ONLY S104.800
Cjil Ulint- Sai~f ..ri,;ij 362 J^6S;2; ifH
ir, jh ,i..ur )H.i~ ,i..u lli//il..il H li jpimWiili


4 BEDROOM MOBILE IN LECANTO
Tin l; ll,:d, I wl. l ..i.. ll i i I- I. i...illl I:1 ;

:, II ,I i hwlll lI.11 ,lm l h ,1 : l.jll ,l
bii. i, l.lh VV,:,, ... I& :I; l .- i j-

Mi1 = iiIi I-/1. ASKING $69.900
Call Slelan Stuati at 352-212-0211


l.l i ,:l l i i Ill 'll:
* : '" P i-1_I_, II,,
* l: .i l P.:..:., F.V 'P.i.l
* Hi.ih h,:J l.ir h.ii.ii :. hii.l..li.:.:
Mi = /i:i:.ii:i:i. $219,000
Jeanne o ll'dllaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
it it i CiliusCouniil Sold corn


1,,l.hhl,,,, f lh I. fiI iu mlu i N, d',llu'III,' I I. I l ,
'" l' ,,,u L,, -, l ,,,r l, ,' -


Nil. .i ASKING $120,000
C/ll Nawc Jenks a. 352-400 8072


WOODSY PRIVACY

I l ll l 1 11 lh I h l Hhll -1 lll l lI h ,lml l

....... ..... .. ... ,. .. II%
PRICED TO SELL AT $151,900
Pat OAni i352l 212 7280


THE FOREST PRIMEVAL
A I-. I. ilUZ O l1.1, i _A _n,I .' Ai I_ f iie f .:
T1.A l. .iini.iil .i] Hi .ll .: ..:..|


bI.:l II .ill II l' i .:n]i.:i 'I
MI 3= I.I'_l i,.
GREATLY REDUCED TO $39.900
Ask lot Mailyn Booth 637 4904


BEAUTIFUL & INVITING

I I,,,, h *,,,l hI l- Il~ ,I ,.l- I,
...I ...... .l- d ~ I. I h , d ... 11.



ih: =1:1:-1 ASKING $297.800
Pit Dil,- 352 212 7280
i,.l i, t it llll ll t l t. ,.


E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014












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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


....E.vefyfhi





BASS PRO'S Ive/i
FDOORI RC
PRZES. .
'I


TREVOR FITZGERALD WAYNE BLACK CAPT. RUSSELL THARIN CAPT. CHAD MANNING JOE MERCURIO
2010 Southern Open Champion, Over Legendary Northeast FL Seen weekly on the Chev Insider Fishing Vete T pa Bay Host ofthe "Professional Tarpon
$750,000 tournament winnings I Tournament Series"
Ownerand developer tourW ,gler television show seen on
He's won numerous tournaments
,t' CastinglInstructor
an! for sale


12^S


Nothing compares to the muscle of a Yamaha Midrange Four Stroke.
Smoke-free, quiet and fuel-efficient, there's no better choice for your
pontoon or runabout or fishing boat. With choices from 40hp to 90hp
- all featuring electronic fuel injection, we've got one that's just right
for you. Yamaha and good times go together.

GYAMAHA


A ra Cth
..... ... . ..... ... 7 T TN N T i .
THiUR OGET OT .....


G2 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


www.CitrusPest.com -
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS


,W W TERMITE & PEST CONTROL
406 N.E. 1ST ST. CRYSTAL RIVER


The

Swarm

Is Here!

TERMITE
TREATMENT
SPECIAL


OFF
New Residential Customers Only. Expires 4/15/2014.
Up to 250' lineal.

For Solutions
To All Your
Pest Problems,
Call Today!


LICENSED & INSURED #8688


( /v ,


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G3


HOME AND OUTDOORS


*S- BBBf11' Anoi^s list ^
r^l IMICO IIOL
l
VISA \^^ j Discwrej






G4 Sunday March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS


Citrus Publishing

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

352-563-6363

www.chronicleonline.com


Gerry Mulligan Publisher

Ken Melton Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly Community Affairs Graphic Artist

Sarah Gatling Community Editor

Trista Stokes Advertising Sales Manager


"Buy With Confidence From People Who Care!"


I


Family Owned
and Operated!


w
o-
I-
o, fj=


980N irsAe
r stlRvr I342
Hours


-mds EverGreen RV
Ascend, Ever-Lite,
i-GO, Sun Valley


Augusta Travel Lite r.i
Flex Truck Campers,
iDea TT


Consignments
Welcome!


Motor Homes, Fifth Wheels,
Travel Trailers, Truck Campers,
Ultra-Lites

We SERVICE
What We Sell...
and a
Whole Lot More!
MOBILE
SERVICE Also!
And Announcing Our
Newest Dealership:
FOREST RIVER, RV!


Heritage Glen & Wildwood X-Lite


We Deliver & Install 2 -2 -6436
Reasonable Delivery 35 026 3
Available Same Day
1/4 Mile East Of Publix On Hwy. 44
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY., CRYSTAL R]


Year-round
backyard safety
tips for families

.................... Page 12

Time to clean
deck and patio
.................... Page 13

Green home
and garden
....................Pa e 1
.IPage 19


I New color trends
in exteriors
.................... Page 21

Prepare home for
JOE and PEGGY warmer weather


.................... Page 22


352-795-7820
www.naturecoastrv.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

What's

Inside

Home and
Outdoor Living
Show introduction
...................... Page 6

Show at a glance
...................... Page 6

Vendors
...................... Page 8

Ugly Backyard
Makeover
.................... Page 10


/


0OHKOK





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Solar Pool Heating
* Eliminate Pool Heating Costs
* Enjoy Family Fun & Exercise
* Swim Year Round in Comfort
* Enjoy Romantic Late Night Swims


-am-E-0-U-imp


n N- ne
s o*


*Ask about our panel upgrade program
: _:_^y \ A ----

Solar Water Heating .
* Save up to 90% on your water heating costs P4 0-q'1N
* Make hot water with FREE energy from the sun OI
* Extra capacity for those long hot showers Ad FRE1r
* Save $2500 or more on energy tax credits Li e ffr
FI3FCO-'"
- -- -- --***c*""##' Tl


Solar Electric Systems
* Fast Credit Approval No equity required
* $0 out of pocket for installation
* Save Instantly Every Month
* Positive Cash Flow puts money in your pocket
* FREE Clean Abundant Energy Source


S


^t-k
-forivjn
onthly SavjingsA!^y
i iA9C.
Of Expires 431


Solar Tubular Skylights
& Solar Attic Fans
* Tubular Skylights brighten any room with
FREE Natural Light
* Solar Attic Fans Reduce Heat & Moisture -
build up in your attic


Natural Light
ENERGY SYSTEMS


^T75


Limited ffe^*?S^ ^r ^
-e
i-
"-*^**- ^ -


0 -
IT 1 a .~ I s L- d~ F Tal IsL


rr


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G5


HOME AND OUTDOORS


T.,1. I--


T-


m


low


- ,'s ^ J#- .If.I


10%


mm






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Home and Outdoor Living Show


T he Cit ,i- County
C ,.,/i '/s 2014
Home and Outdoor
Living Show fea-
tures an ugly backyard
makeover contest worth
$10,000, a chance to get
lawn and gardening advice
from experts, children's
building projects by Lowe's
and lots more.
The show will be from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
April 5, at the Citrus
County Auditorium,
Inverness.
The first 100 attendees
will receive a goody bag
filled with free items and
coupons.


The ugly backyard contest
is sponsored by Crystal Ca-
sual, Color Country Nurs-
ery, Jason Aguilar's
Landscaping Services and
Mosaic Tile and Remodel.
Entries have been posted on
the Cl,.ii' 1c's website
where readers can vote until
noon April 5 for their fa-
vorite ugly backyard.
The winner will be an-
nounced at 3:30 p.m. at the
show.
More than 40 vendors will
be on hand offering their
products and services.
The will be cash and carry
items available at the show.
The Citrus County Exten-
sion Office and the Florida


Friendly Landscape pro-
gram will be providing in-
formation along with
several local garden and
flower clubs.
The Community Emer-
gency Response Team
(CERT) will also be on
hand at the show.
Lowe's will have a special
project area for children and
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church will have children's
crafts and activities.
Those attending have an
opportunity to win one of
the more than 40 door
prizes valued at $50 that
will be given away.
Food and beverages will
be available for purchase.


At a glance
What: 2014 Home and Outdoor Show
When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, April 5
Where: Citrus County Auditorium, Inverness
Contact: 352-563-6363


.0. yo . .W .Y AD E ... .
lowl Hundreds.. of Lihtn Fitue on .is .a


Lighting, Fans, Lamps Faux Finishes Hardware, Tile,
Custom Lamp Shades Cabinet Refinishing Backsplashes
Window Treatments, Ralph Lauren Paints, Expert Design
Blinds, Shades, Shutters Modern Masters Services Available
Reupholstering Accessories & Home D6cor

352-624- '1 4 139 SW College Ad.,Ocala
SMonday-Friday 9-5
www.DecoratlveDesignsOcala.com Saturday 9-3


G6 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS




Sunday, March 30, 2014 G7


MAKE THE MOST OF IT!


Bush Home Services f
Designs, Creates & Maintains:
* Outdoor Kitchens
* Outdoor Fire Pits
* Paver Patios
* Retaining Walls

Bus
,.BUSH-L,

HOME SERVICES
352-621-7700 In Homosassa


Visit our showroom at
7363 W. Fair Acres PI.
Homosassa, FL 34448
(Hwy. 19 & Fair Acres) or see us online at
www.bushhomeservices.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Home & Outdoor Living Show vendors


Automotive
Sponsor

Nick Nicholas Ford
* Nick Nicholas Ford, State
Road 44 Inverness, has been
providing America's highest-
quality cars and trucks to the
families of Citrus County for 33
years. For more information
visit www.nicknicholasford.com.


Platinum
sponsor

Citrus Pest Management

Solar Lights & More
* Solar Lights & More is a state
certified solar contractor, special-
izes in quality high-tech, energy-
efficient solar products that save
money while helping to save the
environment. They carry the in-
dustry's best solar products -
solar hot water heaters, pool


heaters, pool pumps, attic fans,
solar lights and solar electric.

Bush Pest Control

Recreation
Sponsors

Love Motorsports
0 The Nature Coast's largest
powersports dealership, featur-
ing products from Polaris,
Yamaha, Suzuki, Arctic Cat, Vic-
tory, Haulmark and Big Tex with


thousands of in-stock parts and
accessories.

Apopka Marine
* Apopka Marine is a full-
service marine dealership with
sales and service, selling Ben-
nington Pontoon boats, Skeeter
performance fishing boats, Sea
Hunt boats, G-3 aluminum fish-
ing boats and Yamaha outboard
motors.
Continued on Page 9


[If,: -


Exterior ^^^^ Installation^

Let Lowe's trained installers do !,
Windows
Roofing
Decking
Fencing
Siding
Standby generators
HVAC
Seamless gutters
Insulation and air sealing


Worry Free Guaranti
If any plant you buy at Lowe 's
survive a year, bring it in along
receipt, and we '1 replace it at n


2301
(352)


ee! Live Spring Plants
tdoesnyourt You'll love the choices & the
o charge. 1 year guarantee

E. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Inverness, FL
860-5800


m


G8 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS


tffEgg


-nHI1


(W





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gold
sponsors
Cash Carpet & Tile
* Cash Carpet & Tile has
been serving Citrus County
families and businesses for
over 25 years. It's a family-
owned business that takes
pride in the company and the
work it does. Its job is not
only to help you select the
proper flooring for your
needs and lifestyle, but to
also make sure you are com-
pletely satisfied with the
sales and installation.
Citrus Equipment
and Repair
* Citrus Equipment and Re-
pair is west central Florida's
premier outdoor equipment
supplies and repair facility. It
carries everything from the
20-inch walk-behind push
mowers to 80-inch commer-
cial zero-turn mowers and
carries the best brands like
Gravely, Hustler, Toro, Stihl,
Echo and many more. Repair
of all makes and models with
pickup and delivery are of-
fered. Come visit the newly


remodeled showroom and re-
pair facility with more than a
million dollars in inventory to
choose from.
Decorative Designs
Whole Home Center
* Decorative Designs Whole
Home Center offers lighting,
fans, lamp shades, floor and
table lamps, window treat-
ments, design services,
home decor, paint, consign-
ment room, outdoor foun-
tains and much more
featured in the 11,000-
square-foot showroom. Let
their team of experts make
life easier for you.
Tropical Windows Inc.
* Tropical Windows Inc. has
been in Florida for 64 years
and has been serving Citrus
County with quality service
for 28 years. They are a
provider of replacement and
new construction windows,
sliding glass doors and serv-
ice for all make and models.
Some 168 brands of parts for
windows are carried.
continued on Page 14


314 Home& Outdoor

Living ShW vendor


j j "';"




y






I1eed Some

Your Spring
1"3 -OO -'I I.R LST'EnY
ROO MS FREE C1
r'sioords p ,gic
I &1HALLWAYi ORRECI
$179095* C:LEAN
Siwith purc
EXPIRES3/31/14 i 8 11u11 & II
*L Musa t meet minimum charge Restrictions apply EXPIRES 3/3

From Start to Satisfacti
Other Services Include:
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
SCarpet Protector Pet Odor Removal Spot Removal


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G9


HOME AND OUTDOORS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


s your home or backyard
in need of attention?
i Then the first ever 2014
Home & Outdoor Living
Show is the place for you on
April 5 at the Citrus County
Auditorium.
Voting has just begun for
one lucky resident to win a
Backyard Makeover. Resi-
dents can simply visit
see Makeover Page 11


Wicker Aluminum Pvc Wall Art Table Decor Cushions Accessories -.M OSAIC TILE
BUY QUALITY! SAVE BIG! Visit our showroom or give us a call. M and REM ODEL
7449 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Suite 8, Crystal River
Mon.-Fri. 9:00-4:30, Sat. by Appt.
EVERYTHING IS ON SALE www.MosaicTileAndRemodel.com
(352) 564-2378
Full Landscape Design Availahie


uist tevishoroom
visit our Neim ShO" oom
and find out .o..you can Receiv e.









W A 0Af
One Offer Per Person. C 19nnot Be Used T
...... i 352-795-2794
IIJIJLi4 [:M MADEas a In
W N / A I 111F 1 AIN USA a sl I n .J
32 NE HWY. 19, CRYSTAL RIVER (I BLOCK N. OF WENDY'S) ,.,


G10 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Makeover
from Page 10

www.chronicleonline.com
/backyardmakeover to
vote. One lucky winner re-
ceiving the most votes will
receive a $10,000 Backyard
Makeover.
Local businesses have
banned together to help
create a new and exciting
backyard for one lucky
winner just in time for
summer thanks to Mosaic
Tile and Remodel, Color
Country Nursery, Jason
Aquilar's Landscaping
Services and Crystal
Casual Inc.
Once a winner is chosen,
Jason Aquilar's Landscap-
ing Services will jump into
action by meeting with the
homeowner to assess the


HOME AND OUTDOORS


ugly backyard. He wants
to include the homeowner
to find out what their
needs are and in choosing
the plants. He's already
taken on a lead role by
meeting with other busi-
nesses to help coordinate
what will be taking place.
"There's no telling what
I'm going to come across.
If the yard is rugged and a
jungle, obviously, clearing
this will chew up a lot of
the budget. It's my biggest
unknown right now," said
Aguilar.
With spring and sum-
mer their busiest time of
year, Color Country Nurs-
ery is prepared with a
large selection of plants
for the winner and Aguilar
to choose from. Owner
Craig Collins will assist in
helping to make sugges-


tions of plants for the right
area.
"We don't know yet
what plants will be
needed. It depends on
how much sun or shade
the winning backyard
has," said Collins.
Collins will be working
closely with Jason Aquilar
Landscaping Service and
the homeowner to deter-
mine the best selection of
plants to use.
Mosaic Tile and Re-
model is excited to be a
participant in the contest.
Owner Clayton Andrews
already has ideas on what
he'd like to do for the win-
ner. He's in the process of
designing an area approxi-
mately 16 x 20.
"I will be working in
conjunction with the land-
scaper. I will create a


space with 320 square feet
of pavers and an outdoor
firepit design. Landscap-
ing will be done around
the area," said Andrews.
Since Mosaic Tile and
Remodel also offers water
features, tile and wood
flooring in addition to
pavers, once Andrews can
see the winning backyard
he can then create his final
design.
Once the landscaping is
done, the plants are in and
Mosaic Tile has finished,
in comes Crystal Casual
Inc. with the finishing
touches of seating.
It's time for the winner
to make a big choice.
"I will be giving the
winner an allowance to
spend so they can choose
their own style of seat-
ing," said Diane Mitchell,


Sunday March 30, 2014 G11


Crystal Casual Inc. owner.
The winner will be able
to choose from wicker, pvc
or aluminum outdoor fur-
niture. Mitchell will be
available to help the win-
ner put together some-
thing to fit their needs,
space and lifestyle.
When everything is fin-
ished, the winning home-
owner will have a custom
backyard they can enjoy
year-round.
Aguilar is excited to get
started and plans to take
before and after pictures.
"This is going to be a
fun project," said Aquilar.
The Ugliest Backyard
winner will be announced
at approximately 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 5, during
the Home and Outdoor
Living Show at Citrus
County Auditorium.


SBUY ONE GET ONE
FREE
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*b LANDSCAPING SERVICES -
11 (352) 302-3005 .
r,1 www.jalandscape.com.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(StatePoint) Your backyard is a
space where you enjoy quality time
with your family all year long.
But accidents can happen anywhere
- even in the oasis of your backyard.
For parents, taking extra safety pre-
cautions out back should be just as
important as childproofing done
indoors.
To prep and maintain your yard for
outdoor safe play and relaxation, here
are several important steps.


ChristinGasner Fotolia.com
Lawn
Remove tree stumps and level con-
crete footings to avoid tripping. Lawn
debris such as rocks could become
projectiles when cutting the grass. So
be sure to clear the yard. Additionally,
children should never be nearby
while you're using motorized equip-
ment. Store potentially dangerous
tools, equipment and chemicals com-
pletely out of the reach of children,
such as in a locked shed or garage.


Fencing
A yard without a fence is like a
house without walls. Fences help pro-
tect children from danger, keeping
toddlers out of swimming pools, hot
tubs, ponds, or away from traffic or
strangers. Fences can also improve
pet safety, keeping your pets in your
yard and other animals out, and can
reduce your liability by preventing in-
juries to uninvited guests on your
property.
With that in mind, be sure your
fences and gates are functional and free
of rust that can render them useless or
dangerous.
"Rusty metal gate hardware that no
longer functions properly or becomes a
threat to children is a top homeowner
concern, according to our research,"
says Jim Paterson, senior vice president
of D&D Technologies, which manufac-
tures gate latches and hinges made of
ultra-strong engineering polymers.
Eliminate this worry by installing
high-quality fencing impervious to sea-
sonal weather, ground settling and
other factors that can cause gates to be-
come misaligned over time. Opt for
gate hardware that can be easily ad-
justed to function properly over the
long-term.
Additionally, be sure to install pool
barrier access gates with adjustable
self-closing hinges and self-latching
gates where the latches are out of the
reach of children. Both products carry
lifetime warranties and are adjustable
both vertically and horizontally for
easy adjustments.
Homeowners can peruse a bevy of
rust-free gate hardware and child
safety latches online at www.ddtech-
global.com or in person under the
Stanley Hardware brand available
through most Lowe's stores.

Sun protection
When the sun is bearing down, skin
can be susceptible to bums and perma-
nent damage year-round.
And children's skin can be even
more sensitive to harmful UV rays.
Your yard should have plenty of shady
areas to seek respite. Plant trees and
watch them grow. Install a canopy
Adorn patio furniture with an um-
brella.
Your backyard can be one of the
most exciting places for your children
to play through the entire year. A little
prevention along the way will keep it
safe and fun.


btpsfor


G12 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Time t


(StatePoint) It's the time of
year when sprucing up your
deck and patio becomes a top
weekend priority. Whether
you use the space for enter-
taining or for solitude, you'll
want it clean, comfortable and
safe this spring.
Take time to dust off your
outdoor furniture and wipe
down cushions that have
been in storage all winter. In-
spect flower pots, bird feeders
and other outdoor d6cor to
ensure they withstood the
cooler months. Replace any-
thing that is damaged.
Before setting furniture and
d6cor back, give the surface -
below a good clean. Whether _
you're dealing with cement,
brick or wood, the quickest ---._. -
and most thorough way to -
deep clean and restore sur- --_..
faces to a like-new condition
is with a pressure washer. -
Knowing how to use one
properly is important for a
quality job and for your
safety.


Usage Tips
* Different surfaces require
different cleaning techniques.
Ensure you're following the
instructions for the surface
you're cleaning.
* Always read and follow the
operator's manual and all op-
erating instructions.
* High-pressure spray can cut
through skin, so never spray
people or animals. Wear
closed-toed shoes and goggles
while pressure washing.
* Assume a solid stance and
firmly grasp the spray gun
with both hands to avoid in-
jury if the gun kicks back be-
fore squeezing the spray gun
trigger.
* Never spray near power


lines, service feeds, electrical
meters, wiring and windows.
* Check the engine oil level
each time you use a pressure
washer. When changing or
adding oil, don't overfill the
engine crankcase. Doing so
can cause smoking, hard start-
ing, spark plug fouling and oil
saturation of the air filter.

Buying tips
Buying a pressure washer


for the first time or replacing
an old one? Here are some
guidelines:
* Pressure washers are cate-
gorized in groups based upon
frequency of use and the
types of products and sur-
faces they are best suited for
cleaning.
Selecting the right pressure
washer for your needs de-
pends on what you're going
to clean, how often you plan


to do so, and how much time
you want to spend. Ask your-
self these questions before
making a purchase.
* Look for a versatile pressure
washer that can be used for a
variety of tasks. Deep clean
your patio and driveway in
high-pressure mode or clean
more delicate surfaces and
rinse away debris in high-
flow mode.
* Consider going green with a


model having reduced envi-
ronmental impact. If you have
an older pressure washer, a
newer model could offer
lower emissions and better
fuel efficiency.
* Learn more about pressure
washers before making an in-
vestment.
With a deep clean, you can
restore and refresh your out-
door spaces and make them a
friendly place to relax.


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G13


HOME AND OUTDOORS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Home & Outdoor Living Show vendors


Gold
sponsors

Mike Scott Plumbing
* "If water runs through it...
We do it" is the motto of Mike
Scott Plumbing, a family-owned
plumbing company that han-
dles residential, commercial
and industrial plumbing in
seven counties for over 25
years.


Silver
sponsors

Absolute Air
of Citrus County
* Absolute Air is a residential
and commercial air condition-
ing company with over 20 years
of experience installing and
servicing air conditioning and
indoor air-quality products.


Air FX Inc.
* Air FX Inc. is a full-service
residential and commercial air
conditioning company provid-
ing service and installations for
all brands of air conditioners
with a commitment to quality
and affordable prices.

Dream Kitchens & Baths
* Dream Kitchens & Baths of-
fers kitchen and bath remodel-
ing, cabinets, granite, Silestone


and a complete line of Solid
Surface counter tops, kitchen
sinks, bath sinks and floor and
wall tile.

Hondcu Countertops
0 Hondcu Countertops has
just opened its new showroom
featuring the latest in kitchen
and bath cabinetry, countertops
and flooring. Come by for a free
quote.
continued on Page 15


Spring Cleaning

Don't forget your A/C







Your Heating & Cooling Experts
* Cooling 6 Heating Installation, Service 6 Repair
* Residential 6 Commercial Dryer Vent Cleaning


Free Service C
With Repair
Senior And Mil
Discounts
Free Dryer Vern
Cleaning With
Tune-up
Tune-up
Special S4995


all
III

itary

it


A I A


JE J : r
J LILJL-IOT asfs

absoluteairofcitruscounty@yahoo.corn
Licensed & Insured wvw.absoluteairofcc.com CAC1817038


TIME IS RUNNING OUT! -W.; I
SENICA REBATES END 5/30/14
See Senica Air for complete details .. .
2. Guaranteed Lowest Price!
We'll beat any legitimate competitors' written price on an apples-to-apples systems quote.
3. We're the Area's #1 Air Conditioning Dealer.
And one of the largest air conditioning companies in Florida.
SENICA BONUS: Get an additional $20 OFF ANY SERVICE CALL
$100 OFF any 16+ SEER system or larger! Cannot be combined with any
Cannot be combined any other other offer. Please present a at
offer. Expires 5130114 time of service. Expires 5130114
6.100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
If you're not happy, we're not happy. /
1. Senica is a Carrier "President's Award" Winner. ,
Carrier's highest honor for its dealers and an example of true excellence
8.10-Year Parts and Labor Guarantee.
On select new Carrier systems
WSMa 9. "Ask The Seal" Seal of Safety.
Lowst, All Senica employees are drug-tested, background-checked, bonded
a. and insured.
10. Technicians are factory-trained & NATE certNfied.
I Ourtechnicians are up-to-date on the latest equiment
and ready with the expertise your comfort depends on.

888-473-1669,
wwwsomJciamlrom


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G14 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Home & Outdoor Living Show vendors


Silver
sponsors

Lowe's
* Lowe's provides customers
with installation of appliances,
exterior products, kitchen and
bath remodeling services for the
entire project and an outdoor gar-
den center featuring live plants
that are guaranteed.


Nature Coast RV
* Nature Coast RV is one stop
for all RV needs with sales (new
and used), service (mobile) parts
and accessories, propane and RV
storage. Consignments are
welcome.

R.J. Roofing
* R.J. Roofing is family owned
and operated, where no job is too
big or too small. They specialize
in shingles, metal, tile and flat
roofs. One- and two-year


warranties are offered on repairs, windows and more.


Bronze
sponsors

Blackshears II Aluminum
* Blackshears II Aluminum is a
family-owned and -operated
home improvement company
serving Citrus County since 1977.
There are three generations of
experience, providing screen
rooms, house replacement


DMT Cabinets
* DMT Cabinets is a local
kitchen and bath retail store that
specializes in all-wood cabinetry.
DMT supplies and installs lami-
nate, solid surface and granit
counter tops and also supplies
and installs flooring laminate,
wood, travertine and tile.

continued on Page 16


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G15


HOME AND OUTDOORS





G16 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



2014 Home & Outdoor


Living Show vendors


Bronze
sponsors

Meeks Water Treatment Inc.
* Meeks Water Treatment Inc.
is a family-owned and
operated water treatment busi-
ness with custom systems to
meet your water needs. They
service all makes and models.


Senica Air Conditioning
* Senica Air Conditioning is
family owned and operated, of-
fering same-day and after-
hours service with no overtime
rates for residential and com-
mercial customers.
continued on Page 17


We Specialize in:
SWhole House Re-pipes
SWater & Drain Lines for Kitchen & Bath Additions
SSlab Leak Repairs
SWater Heater Service & Replacement
STankless Water Heater Repair & Replacement
SDripping Faucet or Hose Bib Repair & Replacement


Additional Hose Bib Installations
Water Softener Installation
Toilet Repair & Replacement
Sewer Line Repair & Replacement
Sewer Camera Services
and much more!


"IF WATER RUNS THROUGH IT.. WE DO IT"

7 .....e '..
Over 25 Years of Plumbing Excellence.


: $10 OFF ANY SERVICE ;
Restrictions apply. Offer expires 8/31/14.
668 E. Overdrive Circle, Hernando, FL 34442
24 Hour Emergency Service! Toll Free: 866-314-4443
Crystal River- 352-563-9976Licensed & Insured.
Crystal River 352-503-9970 CFC1426202 Inverness- 352-344-0322


BfeDMT
CABINETS, INC.
ALL WOOD CABINETRY
Outdoor Kitchens
Entertainment Centers
I Custom Offices Baths
^ -- Kitchen Laminate Floors
Hardwood & Travertine Specialists


r. --
S 500 OFF CABINETS,
A Complete Ri 2
SKitchen Purchase
Expires 4/30/14. Must present Ie s
coupon at time of purchase. 19 41


NOT JUST KITCHENS ANYMORE!
J&J CONSTRUCTION
341-3020
Any &All Your Remodel& New Construction Needs!


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Home & Outdoor Living Show vendors


Bronze
sponsors

Suncoast Plumbing
& Electric Inc.
* Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
Inc. has been providing quality
residential and commercial plumb-
ing and electrical services to Cit-
rus and surrounding counties for
over 35 years.


Sunshine Nursery
* Sunshine Nursery has served
Citrus County for five years with
quality service and products. It
sells pavers, sod, mulch and
plants and over 50 types of rocks.
Installation is available. Come by
and see the large landscaped
nursery and get help designing a
beautiful lawn.


Will Construction
* Will Construction is the area's
premier home improvement spe-
cialists. For 25 years, they've pro-
vided peerless service, leaving no
stone unturned to ensure their
clients total satisfaction.

Booths

Carports and More
* Carports and More handles jobs
from start to finish on carports, RV
covers and metal buildings. They can


have the land cleared, slabs poured,
spray insulations and electric
services.
Conner Home Solutions
* Conner Home Solutions offers
professional and quality lawn mainte-
nance, landscaping, pest control and
hardscaping services for residential
and commercial properties.


continued on Page 18


Blackshears !


SAlufinumE


SComplete Aluminum Service


HWY. 44, CRYSTAL RIVER
795-9722
1-888-474-2269
s L nsREEd
www.6racvsears.com
Licensed & Insured RR 0042388


bEST
I T ir'


Meeks Water
Treatment, Inc.
Specializing in all your
softener and filter needs

- SALT DELIVERY

-SERVICE

SNEW INSTALLS

MAINTENANCE

Call us today (352) 257-2597
Located at 200 NE US Hwy. 19, Suite B
Crystal River, FL 34429
Right across from Burger King on Hwy 19
CITRUS, MARION, LEVY
0HQ1D _LICENSED AND INSURED


I _,, CONST UCTIOp.


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G17


HOME AND OUTDOORS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Home & Outdoor Living Show vendors


Booths

Dan's Fan City
* Dan's Fan city is America's
largest independent ceiling fan re-
tailer. Gulf Coast and TroposAir
Fans over 6,500 models are in
stock at 44 locations including
Ocala, Spring Hill and Leesburg.


Rock Solid Creations
* Rock Solid Creations, based
in Citrus County, specializes in
kitchen and both custom granit
and Silestone countertops.

Taylor Rental
* Taylor Rental, Crystal River,
has been serving the rental
needs of Citrus County since
1973 and is ready to serve you
today.


West Coast Flooring
* West Coast Flooring carries
all types of flooring including
wood, laminate, carpet, ceramic
and porcelain tile. Also carried
are carpet, VCT and laminate for
commercial-grade use. The
owner also does tear outs and
installations for all of the
products.


Windows & Siding Unlimited
0 Windows & Siding Unlimited
has been in business for over 20
years, serving Citrus and sur-
rounding counties. They offer
approximately 15 different man-
ufacturers' products, including
very high-performance win-
dows, which save homeowners
approximately 40 percent off
their electric bill all year long.


Aim1 J]V^^IC.

AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING
(352) 201-7224
We Install, Service, & Provide Warranty
Services For Nearly All Brands!
Fully Licensed & Insured!


I


FREE
ESTIMATES!


I
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FREE 2nd
OPINIONS!


Ask about our financing offers!
0% -

o Interest
For 48 months
I OExpires 6/14
16- - -- -- -- -- -- - -


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Free
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,quotes
f6r your
p proroject
our


G18 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS


- - - - - - - -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and garden

i StatePoint) Going green at home
doesn't have to turn your life upside
d ,>vn. There are simple measures you
,i n take in your kitchen and garden to
I Lun a planet-friendly home.
Reduce waste
Ensure your kitchen is properly out-
fitted with labeled paper and plastic re-
cycling bins. Keep these receptacles
handy to encourage your family and
guests to make use of them.
Take your waste reduction a step fur-
ther by setting up a bin for food scraps,
see Green Page 20


wwing iStock.com


- A XYA!~ ~


Citrus Equipment S'
& Repair Inc.
6659 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Crystal River (Hwy. 486, just east of Hwy. 44)
352-795-6635
www.outdoorpowerplace.com


Sunday, March 30, 2014 G19


HOME AND OUTDOORS






G20 Sunday, March 30, 2014


Green
from Page 19
which you can add to
your yard trimmings.
Composting creates a
natural fertilizer that's
makes a planet-friendly
alternative to the chemi-
cal variety.
By recycling and com-
posting, you can join the
ranks of Americans re-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


during the waste they
send to the landfill. In
fact, recycling and com-
posting prevented 86.9
million tons of materials
from being disposed in
2011 in the United States,
up from 15 million tons
in 1980, according to
government estimates.
Protect wildlife
You may think of your
yard as "yours," but you
are actually sharing the


space with furry crea-
tures, insects and birds.
Habitat destruction and
loss, as well other man-
made and natural
threats, put beautiful
species like humming
birds at risk.
Make your garden a
safe haven with bird
feeders and by planting
native, sustentative
shrubs, trees and flow-
ers.
Unfortunately, bird to
building collisions, par-
ticularly with windows,
are estimated to kill be-
tween 100 million and 1
billion birds in the


United States alone, ac-
cording to a new report
from the Cooper Or-
nithological Society.
Ensure the safety of
your airborne visitors by
applying static-cling de-
cals to your windows,
which helps birds detect
glass, thereby avoiding
injury or death.
Decals from Win-
dowAlert, for example,
rely on special ultravio-
let-reflecting coating that
looks like etched glass to
humans, but is quite visi-
ble to birds, and add a
decorative appearance to
your home.


The coating can fade
over time, so remember
to replace decals every
six to nine months.
More information can
be found by visiting the
website www.Win-
dowAlert.com.
Eat local
Source your food lo-
cally to reduce your car-
bon footprint. If possible,
buy local, in-season
fruits and vegetables that
didn't have to travel the
world to reach your
plate.
And while flowers are
beautiful to look at -


and the right ones can
provide nectar for polli-
nating insects and birds
- consider turning at
least part of your garden
into a space for herbs
and vegetables to grow.
When dinner comes
from your own back
yard, it means fresher
produce that's good for
your family, and good
for the planet.
Don't just enjoy nature
this season, take care of
it.
With a few small
tweaks, it isn't hard to
run your home more
sustainably.


S .......
- Full Poest Control Services
* Lawn Maintenance i :' t-
* Landscaping ~ Mulching.
Rock. Lighting
* Outdoor Living Designs
* Pressure Cleaning z"tee &


352-341-3930
5m www.connerhomesolutions.coml


I JAN YARBOROUGH
352-220-2607 I
5240 S. SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA
JansCarports@(aol.com
.~IJ ll): F._I d t *_I .I JII l
UT 0~Tr 71I


Ocala
2701SW ( .11.
352-237-6


Spring Hill
., I, 4202 Commercial Way 171
999 352-688-3267 3
www. D ansFanCitv. corn


Leesburg
2 N. Citrus Blvd
52-326-9018


"PUPPY PROOF"
Your Home With This Laminate!
IMM I Lifetime saIWarranty ft00-9pea9e
While supplies Lst! Installation Available q. nft. Afpfalth n
OP West Coast A fWE

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Aapd~ a bIhm ,








OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT fff
SALES & SERVICE Husqvrna
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River 352-795-5600
www. taylorcrystalriver, corn ......
"e"











EXQUSITEFREE
SELECTION ESTIMATES
Visit Our Showroom


7765 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River (Next to Manatee Lanes)
OOOHIC 563-2005 www.qetrocksolidqranite.com


( 9SFAS^NCSTY^


HOME AND OUTDOORS


i






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(StatePoint) One of the
simplest ways to make a big
impact on your home's exte-
rior is with your front door.
But if you are tired of the old
standards colors,
0 you're not alone
r- experts pre-
)I dict bolder trends
This year.
"Exuberant
S hues will be pop-
Sular this year as a
Sway for home-
owners to show
the world their
ors energy," says
Kate Smith, a
o r color trend fore-
caster and presi-
dent of
Sensational
Color. "For those going for a
classic feel, colors that are vi-
brant, yet at the same time,
offer comfort, warmth and re-
liability will reign."
For homeowners looking to


express their "colorful
selves," consider selecting a
paintable fiberglass door with
a smooth finish. For example,
those from Therma-Tru Clas-
sic-Craft Canvas Collection
and Pulse, feature clean lines,
crisp angles and attractive
glass configuration options,
and are ideal for adding per-
sonal expression to a home.
According to Smith, the top
five door colors for the "exu-
berant homeowner" in 2014
include:
* Capri: A tropical blue that
wakes up natural woods and
neutral surroundings, this hue
adds a splash of energy.
* Raucous Orange: This color
demands attention with its
energetic tone and makes the
perfect punctuation point for
homes with a modem look.
* Dynamo: This flirty violet
see Colors Page 22


S|,BTropical Window, Inc. can help you protect your home against rainstorms, high winds,
| tropical storms and hurricanes. We have an option that will work for you!


From our humble beginnings in 1953 in St. Petersburg, Florida, to the opening of our
additional store in Citrus County in 1986, to the present day, Tropical Window, Inc. has grown
to a family of over 25 employees and has become the number one supplier of windows,
sliders and shower doors in this area.

EXPERT INSTALLATION FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATES





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Where we sell windows!


www.SeeTropical.com352-"795-"4226


NEW- VINYL? ALUMINUM? WOOD?
Our experts can guide you to making the proper selection for your home.
We use our own in-house installers and stand behind all products and installations.
REPLACEMENTS
* Free Estimates Aluminum Windows Energy Efficient Windows
* Insulated Glass Products -Vinyl Frame Windows Sliding glass Doors
*Window Parts for 168 Brands
REPAIRS
* Windows Custom Made Screens Sliding Glass Doors Repair/Replace Broken glass


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1$25 OFF $50 OFF

1 Each New Window Impact Windows i
I Coupon can't be combined with other specials. Orders must be placed byApril 15, 2014
- - - - - - -- =


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Sunday, March 30, 2014 G21


HOME AND OUTDOORS






G22 Sunday, March 30, 2014

Color
from Page 21

hue instantly updates tradi-
tional color schemes for a
trendier home front.
* Relic Bronze: A deep, al-
most brown mustard color,
"Relic Bronze" reflects aged
beauty.
* Quixotic Plum: This so-
phisticated deep purple is
where trendy meets timeless.
The top five door colors for
those following the more
classic trend of comfort, as
identified by Smith include:
* Georgian Bay: Brighter
than dark navy, this step-
above reserved blue is a
trusted color when it comes
to the welcoming message it
sends to family and friends.
* Show Stopper: Like classic
red at dusk, "Show Stopper"
adds a touch of mystery to
this bright hue. A slight spin
on traditional red, this color
warmly welcomes people to


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a home.
* Polished Mahogany: The
deep, rich shade of brown
has a staying power that
traverses trends and captures
a solid feeling for homeown-
ers.
* Classic French Grey: Step-
ping out of the shadows to
stand on its own..
Whether you follow new
trends or stick to tradition,
don't forget to take your en-
tire home's exterior into con-
sideration. From roof to
door, a "top down" approach
can help you pick color com-
binations that are eye-pleas-
ing and flow naturally to
create curb appeal.
For tips on picking the
perfect colors for your
home's exterior, including
the front door, download a
free copy of Smith's e-book
at www.thermatru.com.
This year, don't conform
or be bored. With a paintable
door, you can make fresh up-
dates as often as you like.


(StatePoint) Warmer weather is
just around the comer, which means
higher temperatures. But does it
have to mean higher energy bills
too? The answer is no. There are nu-
merous ways to keep your home
cool and bills low this summer.
After a few months off, it is vital to
check that your air conditioning sys-
tem is still working in an efficient
and optimal manner. If you have a
central air conditioning system, for
peace of mind, you might want to
have your system checked by an
HVACR professional. In order to
save, be sure to shop around for spe-
cial deals, which are not difficult to
find for seasonal preventive mainte-
nance. Understand however, that the
proficiency of HVACR technicians
differs greatly.
When searching for the right
HVACR technicians for your home,
one way to make certain that the job


will be done properly and effectively
is by hiring a professional certified
by North American Technician Ex-
cellence (NATE), the nation's largest
independent, non-profit certification
body for HVACR technicians.
NATE-certified technicians are qual-
ified to properly install and service
equipment, which means maximum
home comfort and energy savings.
Once a NATE certified HVACR
technician has inspected your sys-
tem for efficiency, there are a num-
ber of things you can do to keep
energy bills low:
* Clean your air filters. Check them
every couple of weeks and change
them at least twice in the season, or
as directed by the manufacturer.
* Don't obstruct airflow around air
conditioner units keep them clear
of plants and debris.
* Raise the thermostat about five de-
grees, because each degree you raise


the thermostat will save you a per-
centage off your cooling energy bill.
* Compare energy bills from last
year. If your costs have significantly
increased, simply contact a qualified
HVACR technician they can help
determine the source of the problem.
Remember, just because you have an
energy-approved, eco-friendly, high-
efficiency product, it does not mean
automatic money and energy sav-
ings. For substantive results, proper
installation, service and mainte-
nance are important too. So do your-
self a favor request the service of
a NATE-certified technician. In order
to locate a contractor that employs
certified technicians, look for the
NATE logo or go to
www.HVACRAdvice.com.
By taking preventive measures,
you can rest assured that this season
you will be cool while saving money
and energy.


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*MATERIAL ONLY
* Lifetime Limited residential warranty
* 15 yr. limited light commercial
warranty


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In-stock patterns
Easy care wear surface -A
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Prepare home for warmer weather


HOME AND OUTDOORS


C Like Us On
i, facebook f lwa"41= 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto
746-7830 Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44
Visit us at www.cashcarpetandtile.com
*Floor Prep & Trims at Additional Cost. Min. labor charges may apply. All Prior Sales Excluded. See store for details. **While Supplies Last.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE HOME AND OUTDOORS Sunday March 30, 2014 G23
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NICK NICHOLAS -
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River 7 5 3
TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371 795m7371
Sales : Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM; Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM *Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


S"We're
SCommitted"
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GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEOPLE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
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Hwy. 44 W. Inverness W .71
www.nicknicholasford.com 7 6 1
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 7261 231


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G24 Sunday, March 30, 2014


HOME AND OUTDOORS


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