Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text



Your guide to the Home & Outdoor Living Show /Sunday


I[-ATURD AYi


CITRUS


COUNTY


Mostly cloudy
and breezy, with
showers, storms.
PAGE A4


MARCH 29, 2014


NEWS



Citrus Springs
cleanup today
Citrus Springs will
have a community
cleanup day from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. today.
It is free to resi-
dents of Citrus
Springs and will be at
the recycling area in
Citrus Springs. Resi-
dents can bring:
household trash,
yard waste, electron-
ics, TVs, VCRs and
computers.
Items that will not
be accepted are
tires, appliances,
scrap metal, house-
hold garbage
(kitchen waste),
medical waste (nee-
dles, etc.), haz-
ardous waste, paint
and auto products,
pesticides or clean-
ers, propane tanks,
drums with residue
and unsorted loads.
Rib Jam kicks
off today
Tonight, Molly
Hatchet will rattle the
Crystal River Mall
festival grounds,
1801 U.S.19 N.W.,
Crystal River, as the
closing act at the in-
augural Crystal River
Rib Jam.
Molly Hatchet is
set to take stage at
8 p.m. after hours of
other live band per-
formances and
smells of scrump-
tious ribs cooking all
day at the American
Legion Post 248-
sponsored event.
Rain or shine, the
family-friendly good
time begins at
11 a.m. today and
Sunday.
Crystal River will
be heated up with
national award-
winning grill masters
cooking ribs and na-
tional and regional
touring artists playing
Southern rock and
country hits. There
will be a family kids'
zone along with other
activities, with pro-
ceeds benefitting
American Legion vet-
erans' organizations.
For more informa-
tion visit www.ribjam.
comn.
Band times today:
Noon Moccasin
Creek.
2 p.m. Night-
train's Guns N'
Roses tribute.
4p.m.-
SwampdaWamp.
6 p.m. Jimmy
Van Zant's Lynyrd
Skynyrd tribute.
8 p.m. Molly
Hatchet.
Sunday times:
Noon Clemons
Road.
2 p.m. Clark
Hill.
4 p.m. Benton
Blount.
6 p.m. Garth
Brooks tribute with
Shawn Gerhard.
The Animal
Planet's "Gator
Boys," Chris Gillette
and Ashley
Lawrence, will be at
the Rib Jam from
3 to 5 p.m. today and
Sunday.
-From staff reports



STATE & LOCAL:
Homecoming
A local soldier is
welcomed home from


Afghanistan./Page A3 I


Website results mixed


With only days left to sign up for health care, problems, confusion persist


Associated Press

MIAMI With just days left
to sign up for insurance under
the president's new health law,
people around Florida are
continuing to have mixed re-
sults as they try to enroll.
The website problems ap-
pear to be fewer than when the
site launched in the fall, but
users are still experiencing
minor hiccups and jammed


phone lines as they join the
millions around the country
seeking to beat the March 31
deadline. It can take several
visits to the website to finish an
application, even without tech-
nical glitches.
And aside from technical
problems, confusion persists
about who qualifies for tax
credits, along with enrollment
deadlines and extensions. The
deadline was recently ex-


tended through mid-April for
those who start the application
process by Monday
In Miami, a navigator sped
through Willie Washington's
See Page A2
Anthony Rouzier helps
Valentina Adarraga, 20, right,
sign up for health insurance
under the Affordable Care Act
in Miami.
Associated Press


National Women's History Month


Eloise Van Ness inspired generations of4-H riders, but she


At home on a horse


Editor's note: March is
National Women's History
month. The Chronicle has
chosen four notable women in
Citrus County who made a last-
ing impact. This is last install-
ment in a series of four stories.
Earlier articles can be found at
ww.chronicleonline. com.

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
he memories of Eloise
Van Ness are a continu-
ing connection to Citrus
County's rural roots.
Known to many as "Grand-
mother," she was more at home
on a horse than any place else
and inspired generations of
young residents through her
work with 4-H.
As a young girl growing up in
Inverness, off Turner Camp
Road on Cato Lake, she rode to
school on horseback. Later she
met a rancher who would be-
come her husband who
everyone called Mr Mike -
and she fit right in with the life,
riding the open ranges of rural
Citrus County
Decades ago, she started
Ease's Rough Riders 4-H horse
club and volunteered with 4-H
for 49 years, teaching kids how
to ride and how to live.
Her life was filled with 4-H,
the rodeo and horse shows. A
few years back, when the arena
at the county fairgrounds was
named after her, she was made
an honorary fair board mem-
ber and given a belt buckle, of
which she was extremely
proud.
And she could pop a mean
cow whip.
She led local Christmas pa-
rades on horseback, drove a
school bus, served with many
local organizations and earned
many honors and accolades.
Up until two years before her
death at age 89, she rode in the
annual cattle drive as part of
the Hernando Southern Her-
itage Days.
See Page A7


'I


/
~: ),
/
-7..


Eloise Van Ness' love of horses, 4-H and ranching reflect a pioneer spirit that
impression on many Citrus Countians. Van Ness died Feb. 14, 2012.


Honey bees find a home in Beverly Hills


Population

in decline
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

BEVERLY HILLS -Although
the honey bee population ap-
pears to be declining, they're not
gone completely
Recently, a swarm of Italian
honey bees found a home in a
tree at Hobson Herbs and More
in Beverly Hills, and on Thursday
Inglis beekeeper Ronald Baker
transferred them to a wooden


hive with his bare hands.
It took all of five minutes.
Baker, who has been keeping
bees at his home for years, came
out to the nursery after his
daughter-in-law, Betty Baker -
Hobson's floral designer called
him for help.
With bees swarming around
him, he grabbed the trunk of the
small potted tree and shook it vig-
orously, shaking the bees out of
their nest into the hive he had
brought.
First, however, he sprayed the
open hive with a solution of sugar
and water
"That's to attract them away


from the tree and into the hive,"
he explained.
After a few minutes he an-
nounced, "We've got the queen.
Once you've got the queen, the
rest will follow"
He said now the queen would
change her scent, and the bees
that had been with her in the tree
would follow her scent into the
See .Page A8

Inglis beekeeper Ronald Baker
transferred a hive of bees found
in a tree at Hobson Herbs and
More in Beverly Hills into a
wooden hive Thursday.
NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle


Classifieds ....... C10
Comics .......... C9
5 Crossword ........ C8


Community . .C6, C7
Editorial ........ A12
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C9


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C8


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
77
LOW
55


was happiest


Chronicle file
has left a lasting





A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


HEALTH
Continued from PageAl

application on Monday,
signing up the 50-year-old
construction worker for
health insurance in less
than an hour with minimal
problems.
"You'd be surprised. A
lot of guys in this neigh-
borhood still don't have it,"
said Washington, who said
he planned to spread the
word.
Washington chose a pre-
ferred medical plan with
no premium or deductible
and a $1,500 out-of-pocket
max thanks to a $352
monthly tax credit.
"It ends a lot of frustra-
tion because you can live a
better life knowing you
can go to the doctor now
that you've got insurance,"
he said.
On Tuesday, Sandy
Raphael tried to sign up at
a Miami hospital during
her work break, but the
website kept kicking her
out and she eventually had
to leave without complet-
ing her application.
"I'm frustrated," said
Rafael, a 37-year-old unin-
sured medical assistant.
All week long, dozens of
students at Florida Inter-
national University tried
to enroll with the help of
two counselors. Several
applications were stalled
by website glitches, while
others moved along
smoothly
"It's a mixed bag," said
counselor Anthony
Rouzier, who was helping
several students enroll at
the same time. When
healthcare.gov flashed a
message that it couldn't
verify one student's identi-
fication, he said the fed-
eral government's hotline
was too backed up to even
bother calling.
"I tried to call and they
said 'we're not accepting
calls right now,"' said
Rouzier
Gustavo Chabarro, a 34-
year-old graduate assis-
tant, said the process has
been complicated. He first
filled out an application in
February and the system
was down so he called the
hotline. He was instructed
to call back a week later


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"The system is down
more times than it's up,"
said Chabarro, who is hop-
ing to find a cheaper plan
for him and his wife. He
would have to pay $5,200 a
year to add his wife onto
the university's plan.
He finally made it
through the application
process Wednesday and
was narrowing down his
plans, hoping to find one
with a low deductible.
Still, the website trou-
bles are minimal com-
pared to the problems in
October and November
The White House an-
nounced that more than
6 million have signed up
nationwide, meaning the
Obama administration met
its target goal a few days
early
Florida has emerged as
one of the Affordable Care
Act's biggest success sto-
ries, enrolling more than
440,000 through the end of
February the highest
number of the three dozen
states relying on the fed-
eral exchange.
That comes despite Re-
publican opposition to the
law The state banned nav-
igators from enrolling con-
sumers at county health
departments and offered
no extra dollars to help
with outreach.
But with roughly 3.5 mil-


lion uninsured Floridians,
state Democrats, health
advocacy groups and En-
roll America formed
strategic partnerships to
fill in the gaps in this polit-
ically important swing
state, where the success or
failure of the law will
likely impact mid-term
elections. Enroll America
has 40 staff and nearly
5,000 volunteers in Florida
compared to 38 staff and
about 3,000 volunteers in
Texas.
Enrollment events have
been held around the state
nearly every weekend for
months. More than 350
people attended a Jack-
sonville event last week-
end hosted by Mayor Alvin
Brown and Democratic
Rep. Mia Jones. About 150
signed up for health plans,
said Tony Penna, a field di-
rector for Enroll America.
University of Miami
medical students staffed a
health fair earlier this
month attended by 170
consumers. Children
played in bounce houses,
ate snow cones and had
their faces painted, while
adults underwent health
screenings including
blood pressure, choles-
terol and bone density
exams. Ads ran on Spanish
and Creole radio stations
targeting residents in Lib-


erty City, a low-income
Miami suburb. Planned
Parenthood blanketed the
area with fliers in the days
leading up to the event.
Liann Gomez, a 23-year-
old senior at Florida Inter-
national, and her
22-year-old sister said the
enrollment process didn't
take as long as they
thought and were thrilled
to find they qualified for
tax credits. They're still
figuring out which insur-
ance plan to pick, but
hoped to decide soon.
"We haven't been to the
doctor in a long time be-
cause we can't afford it,"
Gomez said. "So when we
get the insurance, I'm
going straight to the
doctor"


State's unemployment

rate remains unchanged


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida added thousands
ofjobs last month, but new
numbers released on Fri-
day showed that the state's
overall unemployment
rate is remaining steady
The state's jobless rate
in February was 6.2 per-
cent, which is the same
rate it was the two previ-
ous months. There are an
estimated 588,000 people
out of work in the Sun-
shine State.
The unemployment


rate held steady even
though the state gained
an estimated 33,400 jobs
last month. Only Califor-
nia and Texas gained
more jobs in February
While the overall
statewide number re-
mained unchanged, some
counties including
ones such as Duval, Her-
nando and Manatee re-
ported a rise in
unemployment.
Gov Rick Scott stressed
the job gains on Friday
during an appearance at
the Port of Tampa.


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Page A3 -SATURDAY, MARCH 29,2014



TATEC&


CI-


LOCAL


TRUS COUNTY CHRO


NICEE


Around the
COUNTY

Victim airlifted after
Wednesday crash
Two work trucks collided
head-on on U.S. 41 in Inver-
ness on Wednesday, caus-
ing one driver to be airlifted
to a hospital and snarling
traffic for hours.
According to the prelimi-
nary report released Friday
afternoon by the Florida
Highway Patrol, David Paul
Jordan, 55, of Hernando was
driving his 2006 Ford F-150
northbound on U.S. 41, ap-
proaching Arlington Street, at
the same time a 2006 Isuzu
truck driven by Gerald Vince
Giles, 52, also of Hernando,
was traveling southbound on
U.S. 41, approximately a
quarter-mile south of Arling-
ton Street.
According to the report, for
undetermined reasons Jor-
dan failed to maintain his ve-
hicle in the northbound lane
and drove across the double-
yellow center line into the
path of Giles' vehicle. The
front of Jordan's vehicle col-
lided with the front of Giles'
truck. Jordan's truck was
pushed backward approxi-
mately 56 feet and rotated
clockwise, coming to rest
against the right side of Giles'
vehicle. According to FHP, no
skid marks were present
from either vehicle.
Neither driver was ejected,
but Jordan was airlifted to
Ocala Regional Medical
Center with severe injuries.
Giles was transported to Cit-
rus Memorial hospital with
possible severe injuries.
The accident occurred at
about 3:30 p.m. Traffic on the
busy road was held up for
about two hours.
The highway patrol in still
investigating the crash.
Paint, hazardous
waste to be taken
Citrus County Central
Landfill will have a house-
hold hazardous waste and
paint drop-off from 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m. Saturday,
April 12, in addition to its
regular Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday drop-off days.
Participants may bring up
to 60 pounds or 10 gallons
of materials free of charge.
Hazardous waste over the
60-pound limit will be
charged 35 cents per pound.
Additional program infor-
mation is posted on the
county website at:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
pubworks/swm. Questions
may be emailed to hazwast
info@bocc.citrus.fl.us or call
Solid Waste Management
at 352-527-7670.
Controlling garden
pests addressed
Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping is of-
fering a free gardening pest
management workshop from
2 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday,
April 8.
Managing lawn and land-
scape pests requires regular
inspection and pest identifi-
cation knowledge to correctly
survey and successfully con-
trol infestations. Many pest
problems can be seasonally
anticipated or eliminated
through resistant plant mate-
rial selection.
Florida Friendly Landscap-
ing practices use the least
toxic method to manage pest
problems in the landscape.
The class is at the Citrus
County Extension Service
building, 3650 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto.
Call Steven Davis at 352-
527-5708 to confirm your
participation.
VA clinic to have
open house April 12
The Lecanto Veterans Af-
fairs (VA) Community Based
Outpatient Clinic (CBOC) will
host an enrollment open
house from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, April 12, at the
dinic, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Enrollment and eligibility
staff will be available to an-


swer questions and enroll
veterans for health care.
If possible, bring your DD
214 for verification of military
service.
For information, call David
Gilmer at 352-746-8000.
-From staff reports


House pushing voucher


Program would

help low-income

children attend

private schools

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Backers of a
Florida program that helps low-
income children attend private
schools, many of them religious, are
trying a second time to move ahead
a bill that would authorize a major
expansion of the program.
Just last week it appeared that
private-school voucher legislation
was dead for the Legislature's
60-day session after the Senate
sponsor withdrew his bill. But Fri-
day a state House committee voted
along party lines for a revamped
version intended to win support
from Senate Republicans.


"There is a pent-up demand for
that program, a potential demand in
the future, and we are going to allow
for that demand be met," Rep. Erik
Fresen, R-Miami, told reporters
after the 8-4 vote by the House Edu-


cation Appropri-
a t i o n s
subcommittee.
This time
House Republi-
cans included
the expansion of
the voucher pro-
gram in an edu-
cation bill that
also would ex-


TI
pent-up d
that prog

Miami Republican
private-scho


pand a separate program that aids
disabled children. The Senate is ad-
vancing a similar bill to help parents
of disabled children get additional
services.
Nearly 60,000 students from low-
income families attend private
schools as a result of the voucher
program, which hands out state tax
credits to businesses that pay for the
vouchers. State figures show that


more than 80 percent of the
participating are religious.
Organizations that run tI
gram estimate as many 25,0(
tional students are trying to
the program now, although
point
here is a contendE
as ma
demand for 100,000 s
want toe
ram. it
The
Erik Fresen would
representative on the the near
ol voucher legislation, million
in severe
including removing some eli
restrictions, increasing the
available and, starting in 201
ing partial scholarships to f
who earn more than $60,000
U.S. Census data estimates t
2012 median household inc
the state was just more than
But the latest House versi
not include a testing requi
for students receiving voucl


expansion

schools "tax credit scholarships" as they are
also called.
he pro- Senate President Don Gaetz, R-
)0 addi- Niceville, said Friday that the Sen-
get into ate is "willing to listen" to the latest
i at one House proposal but said a testing re-
Fresen quirement needs to be part of the
ed that bill.
ny as Gaetz stressed that he is not in-
tudents sisting that students at the private
mnroll in schools take the Florida Compre-
hensive Assessment Test, which is
bill on the verge ofbeing phased out to a
expand new test But he said it has to be a
rly $300 "common assessment" that will
program "provide an accurate report to par-
al ways, ents as to where their children stand
igibility compared to other children in other
money schools."
6, offer- House Democrats on Friday
families broughtup similar arguments about
Sa year a testing requirement Rep. Karen
that the Castor Dentel argued that some par-
2ome in ents are given a "sales pitch" to
$47,000. move their kids to a school where
on does they are given good grades but then
rement return to public schools, where they
hers, or are farther behind.


Local heroes honored at Hernando VFW Post 4252


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Operation Welcome Home honorees Spc. Stanley Shaw and his K-9 partner Sgt. Branco (left) and Spc. Christian Mclntyre are presented
with gifts at the Hernando VFW Post 4252 Friday evening at a dinner held in their honor. Also pictured are VFW board members, from
left, Barbara Mills, Bob Pace, Cynthia Holden and retired Air Force Chief Master Sgt. John Stewart.


CCBA hosts fishing


tournament in April


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Builders
Association (CCBA) 19th an-
nual Family Fishing Tourna-
ment and Coastal
Conservation Association
(CCA) Aaron Monier Memo-
rial Youth Tournament,
hosted by Homosassa River-
side Resort, will run from
6 a.m. Saturday, April 26, to
3 p.m. Sunday, April 27, come
rain or shine. Boat captain
registration is 6 p.m. Friday,
April 25, and weigh-in at
3 p.m. Sunday, April 27, at the
Homosassa Riverside Resort,
Homosassa.
The CCBA tournament is
open to all anglers. CCBA
tournament fee is $150 per
boat and includes unlimited
anglers, two T-shirts, two free
drink tickets, one door prize
ticket and one "goodie"
bucket. The CCA/Aaron
Monier Memorial Youth tour-
nament fee, ages 3 to 15, is $35


and includes a T-shirt and a
one-year subscription to the
CCA Rising Tide newsletter
An Earlybird Boat
Entry/Hotel Bundle offer for
$274 includes two nights stan-
dard lodging (double occu-
pancy) at the Homosassa
Riverside Resort plus two
free cocktails at the Riverside
Crab House/Monkey Bar The
offer ends March 31. Entries
received after April 24 will be
subject to a late fee.
Based upon 125 paid boat
entries, CCBA tournament
cash prizes and door prizes
are estimated at more than
$12,500. A portion of the pro-
ceeds benefits the combat-
wounded veterans of Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776 Mili-
tary Order of the Purple
Heart.
Participants may register
online at www.ccba.camp9.
org. For more information,
call 352-746-9028 or email
info@citrusbuilders.com.


Councils for families, schools

team up for services meeting


Special to the Chronicle
Persons with developmental dis-
abilities (autism, intellectual dis-
ability, cerebral palsy, spina bifida,
Prader-Willi, and Down syndrome)
often require support throughout
their lives. Florida provides that
support through the Agency for
Persons with Disabilities (APD)
and through programs in local
schools.
The Family Care Council (FCC),
comprised of self-advocates and
family members of developmen-
tally disabled individuals who are
appointed by the governor, is
charged with helping those individ-
uals and families access and un-
derstand the programs offered by
APD, while providing oversight and
advice to APD staff. All FCC meet-
ings are from 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly and are
open to the public.
At 10 a.m. Monday, April 14, in
room 115 of Withlacoochee Techni-
cal Institute in Inverness, Citrus
County Schools Interagency Coun-
cil START will host the FCC meet-


ing. This meeting will give develop-
mentally disabled persons and
their families the chance to learn
how APD and area schools work to-
gether to provide services, how to
apply for services, the status of
those persons on the wait list or al-
ready receiving funding, and how
will the latest legislative changes
and funding affect all APD-eligible
persons.
Developmentally disabled indi-
viduals from birth to age 22 receive
the majority of services from local
schools through Exceptional Stu-
dent Education. Once these stu-
dents turn 14, they begin to plan
their transition into adult life. They,
and their families, begin to learn
about and transition to those com-
munity supports that will take the
place of services provided by the
schools such as transportation,
social/leisure opportunities and
continued education.
For information about the joint
meeting, call FCC member
Stephanie Hopper at 352-344-0288
or D.J. Bryan, ESE Department, at
352-726-1931, ext. 2331.


Get set to enjoy final weekend of the fair


Chronicle
Today is the last official day of
the 2014 Citrus County Fair, which
runs from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. How-
ever, the midway will be open from
2 to 7 p.m. Sunday with $22 arm-
bands for rides, which can be pur-
chased at the main gate tomorrow
As for today, admission for a
Daytime Magic armband special is
$20 for 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Satur-
day Night Magic armband special
is also $20 and is good from 6 to 10
p.m. General admission is $7 gen-
eral (ages 11 & older); $3 ages 5 to
10; ages 4 and under are free.
Parking is free.
Here's the schedule for today


10 a.m. Opening of the fair -
exhibit buildings open; Citrus Shrine
Club Jacobs Building; TNT Pony
Rides; Daisy Mae the Cow educational
display; Citrus Model RR club exhibit,
OttoAlen Building U.S. 41; Charles &
Yvonne Viet organ grinder; Youth Horse
Showmanship & In-Hand Trail Class-
Livestock Complex; The Wade Henry
Show strolling
10:30 The Sweeney Family
Band Main Gate Stage; Cadence
Schultz, Singer--Auditorium
S11 Midway Opens, Daytime
Magic (11 a.m. to 4 p.m.); Cross Cut
Saw Contest Livestock Complex
11:15-Molly Pope, Singer-Au-
ditorium; Lloyd &Willy-- Main Gate


Stage.
11:30 The Wade Henry Show -
Strolling.
Noon Oscar the Robot Strolling.
12:30 p.m. -The Sweeney Family
Band Main Gate Stage.
1 Paisley Greer, Singer -
Auditorium.
1:15-Lloyd & Willy-Main Gate
Stage.
2 The Sweeney Family Band -
Main Gate Stage.
3 Special Auction &Awards -
Livestock Complex; Lloyd & Willy -
Main Gate Stage; Oscar the Robot-
Strolling.
3:30 The Wade Henry Show -


Strolling; Julie Wemicki, Singer-
Auditorium.
5 The Sweeney Family Band -
Main Gate Stage; The Wade Henry
Show- Strolling.
6 Saturday Night Magic (6 to 10
p.m.); Lloyd &Willy- Main Gate Stage;
Oscar the Robot-- Strolling; Acoustic
Accent -Auditorium.
0 7:15-- Lloyd &Willy- Main Gate
Stage.
8 -AcousticAccent-Auditorium;
The Sweeney Family Band Main
Gate Stage.
8:30 The Wade Henry Show -
Strolling.
0 10-End of the 2014 fair.






A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday The more you speak
about your plans, the better. The re-
sponse you receive will help shape im-
portant decisions. Cast aside any
doubts you may be feeling and plunge
into positive forward motion. Be proac-
tive to achieve the success you crave.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
allow frustration and disappointment to
cause problems at home or work. Ac-
tions speak louder than words. Despite
the situation, do what needs to be
done.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If your in-
tentions are sincere, you will gather
support for your plans. You may face
some criticism, but, in time, others will
respect your efforts and applaud your
determination.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Confus-
ing changes may be occurring within an
important partnership. You may feel you
are being pulled in several directions.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You are
in need of a change. Break out of your
routine.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -A minor dis-
agreement or misunderstanding can
cause a delay in your plans. Make your
intentions clear, without criticism or ac-
cusations, in order to get back on track
quickly.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't let a
procrastinator hold you back. Ask
questions and be open and flexible
where change is concerned. Scrutinize
documents and proceed with your
plans.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You'll be
stressed out by too many obligations.
Don't be a pushover.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Some-
one may be trying to undermine your
achievements. Remember to speak up
and set the record straight.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You
may be thrown off balance by an unex-
pected obstacle. Pay attention to the ac-
tions of others before making a move.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -A
change in your routine will provide a
new path of achievement. Keep an
open mind.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Take
the helpful advice that someone is giv-
ing you. Change is only possible if you
allow new ideas to take hold.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Have
confidence in your plans, and continue
down your chosen path. With some
positive input and a creative idea, you
can make your dreams a reality.


ENTERTAINMENT




Festival offers Stradivarius violins


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Xiang
'Angelo" Yu is holding the
nearly 350-year-old Stradi-
varius violin casually by the
neck and explaining why
he'd like a little more time to
make its acquaintance.
"It's always an adventure,"
says Yu, 25, who has played
six or seven Stradivarius vio-
lins over his career "I only
have one or two days to get
used to it. Feels like a wild
horse you never know
what's coming."
The violins of Antonio
Stradivari, arguably the most
famous instruments ever cre-
ated, have an almost mystical
reputation for beauty and
heavenly tone. This week
eight of them have been
brought together in the City
of Angels.
"Strad Fest LA" is a four-
day series of performances
culminating with a Saturday
charity concert
"I think we're really giving a
gift to Los Angeles," said Mar-
garet Batjer, concertmaster of
the Los Angeles Chamber Or-
chestra. "To gather this many
instruments under one roof, to
be played night after night, is
an extraordinary event"
Yu called it a once-in-a-
lifetime experience. For the
festival, he's playing the 1666
"Serdet," the earliest known
existing Stradivarius violin.
"Somehow I feel like
every violin has its individ-
ual soul, that when I press
down my fingers I could
feel the soul of that violin
itself," he said before a
Thursday rehearsal.
"It's one of the most ex-
traordinary and expensive
and beautiful instruments,"
said violinist Chee-Yun, hold-


I, ..:. .:...,

Associated Press
South Korean Chee-Yun, left, plays the 1714 "Leonora
Jackson" Stradivarius, Russian-American Philippe Quint plays
the 1708 "Ruby" Stradivarius, and Margaret Batjer,
concertmaster of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, plays
the the 1716 "Milstein" Stradivarius during a rehearsal
Thursday at the Colburn School in Los Angeles.


ing a 1714 "Leonora
Jackson."
"The minute I started play-
ing a note on it, I felt like I
was floating in the air It's
like a dream come true. It's
beautiful."
Philippe Quint held the
1708 "Ruby"
"Growing up, my dream was
always to be able to time
travel," he said. 'And a couple
of years ago I realized that I've
had this time machine in my
hands my whole life. These vi-
olins have traveled for cen-
turies and have been in the
hands of some of the most in-
credible violinists."
"When I play on this in-
strument, the sound has so
much depth and mystery and
history," he said.
Stradivari created violins,
guitars, cellos and other
stringed instruments in his
workshop in Cremona, Italy
About 650 survive today and


they can sell for millions of
dollars.
The violins are revered as
extraordinary (despite some
experiments where listeners
have been unable to distin-
guish them from less-
renowned instruments).
Researchers have offered in-
numerable suggestions to ex-
plain the rich, resonant tones
of the best Stradivarius
violins.
"There was a certain magic
that happened in Cremona, in
northern Italy at that time,"
Batjer said. 'And people argue
all the time: Was it the
weather, was it the climate,
was it the conditions, was it
the wood, was it the crafts-
manship? It's probably a com-
bination of all of those things."
Throughout his lifetime,
Stradivari kept experiment-
ing, changing and refining
his instruments, and each
has a different voice.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March 29, the
88th day of 2014. There are 277
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 29,1951, Julius and
Ethel Rosenberg were convicted in
New York of conspiracy to commit
espionage. (They were executed in
June 1953.)
On this date:
In 1882, the Knights of Columbus
was chartered in Connecticut.
In 1943, World War II rationing of
meat, fats and cheese began.
In 1973, the last United States
combat troops left South Vietnam,
ending America's direct military in-
volvement in the Vietnam War.
Ten years ago: President George
W. Bush welcomed seven former
Soviet-bloc nations (Romania, Bul-
garia, Slovakia, Lithuania, Slovenia,
Latvia and Estonia) into NATO dur-
ing a White House ceremony. In a
stinging rebuke, Secretary-General
Kofi Annan fired one top U.N. official
and demoted another for security
failures leading to the August bomb-
ing of the U.N.'s Baghdad headquar-
ters that killed 22 people.
Five years ago: General Motors
CEO Rick Wagoner resigned under
White House pressure.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama promoted a plan to create
construction and other jobs by at-
tracting private money to help re-
build roads, bridges and other
public works projects during a visit
to a Miami port that was undergoing
$2 billion in upgrades paid for with
government and private dollars.
Today's Birthdays: Political
commentator John McLaughlin is
87. Former British Prime Minister
Sir John Major is 71. Comedian
Eric Idle is 71. Basketball Hall of
Famer Walt Frazier is 69. Interna-
tional Gymnastics Hall of Famer
Kurt Thomas is 58. Actor Christo-
pher Lambert is 57.Tennis player
Jennifer Capriati is 38.
Thought for Today: "The fate of
love is that it always seems too little
or too much." -Amelia Edith Barr,
American author and journalist
(1831-1919).


H L Pcast City


Daytona Bch. 82
Fort Lauderdale 83
Fort Myers 85
Gainesville 78
Homestead 83
Jacksonville 77
Key West 83
Lakeland 83
Melbourne 83


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


178/60D Tr | 11/U Tr
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excuse daiy
w TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
.. 1 j High: 77 Low: 55"
,1 ,-,.- .. ;Mostly cloudy and breezy; showers and
. > ,__ storms moving through.
--I ., SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
:'"* -. High:68 Low:45
U f ": ! Sunshine with high clouds; breezy and
--N I cooler
ii 1 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
L JJ High: 75 Low: 50'
Chilly start; mostly sunny and pleasant

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 78/63
Record /40
Normal 78/60
Mean temp- 60
Departure from mean -9
PRECIPITATION*
Friday Trace
Total for the month 3.17"
Total for the year 8.12'
Normal for the year 7.79"
'As of 7 p-mi- at Imerwss
UV INDEX: 7
0-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.13


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 57.9
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 84%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 3.8/12
Sunday's count: 9.3
Monday's count: 9.3
AIR QUALITY
Friday observed: 53
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES MSSS
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
03/29 SATURDAY
03/30 SUNDAY
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SW T .............M. 7:45 p.m
Mi7> K>(MM ----f------------ -7:21 am.
W0 4 MOONRISE /KJ W.. 6.24 a.m.
MHa i~ TODAY ............ ........ 6:52 p.m.
Mar30 Apr7 Apr15 Apr22 0--------------652m
BURN CONDITIONS
Today' Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no bum ban.
-,y m.:, 'riR ,r.'31 ir, E,il F.riia Dio1 n oI Fo.resrv 31 l352| ,7.2-37'i F-.r ml.
;nOim3lrin oir. droujghi conc-iions [.ear-a *ill itbA Dms~on ul F-.esuy s lv~eD jB
http://flamn e.l-dol.comtire a bwetherob
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited I to two days per week. before 10a.m. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addres n ay ialet on Thursday andor Sunday.
ODD addresse rnay water on Wedrneday arnor Sahrday
Hand waterng with a shut-off nozzle or micro irigalion o( non-grass area. such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrvubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Ctrus County Utlities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant mateda l 352-527-7669. Scfne ne pianlirgs ma fjuairly lor ad.'ilonai
wamerng allowances.
To report violations please eI: Oily of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City el C rsiail
River 0 352-795-4216 ext 313 unwncorporare1l Citr Couri/y d 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay "'At Mason's Creek
SATURDAY
City High Low
Chassahowtzka* 6:47am, O.5It, 6;44pm. 0.5 1:02 a.m. 01 t. 121 p.mD. ft.
Crystaliner" 4:57 am, 21 It,. S;03p.m 22 t, 11:26 a.m- 0,31. 11:52pr&0,O.
Withlacoochee 2:17 a.m. 3.5 tt, 220p.m. 3.6ft. 9:03a.m 0.1 t. 9:34p.m,-04 ti
Honosssa" 6:11 a.m. 1.1 It. 6;05p.m. .If. I12:46a.m.-.Ott 1:14p.m0.2ft.


Today: Southwest wind 15 to 20
knots. Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and
inland waters choppy. Tonight: West
to northwest wind 15 to 20 knots.
Seas 3 to 6 feet. Bay and inland
waters a choppy.


Gulf water
temperature


67
Taken at Aripia


LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Whnlacoochee at Holder 28.96 28.98 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.49 38.51 39.52
Tsala Apopka-tnvemess 39.61 3962 40.60
Tsala Apopka-RFloral Ciy 40.28 40.29 42.20
Levels reported m feet above s ea wevl Flood stage lor x as are based on 233year flood.
mhe n al anaroLl JK4] .n-.h n M-| a 43 ,cert cnr.t,'e I .U tlp'nqg ,:lwl- e-.:eTdeo I1
6n on year ,l d Tl,.5 Ould ,15 Qbfa'rrM;1 ,t,'l'3 I Scul .- t ncIrIida Via'lato Malrg^T-ierl L .-Ir
and Is suca to rWsion In no event w te Dise jc, or Ie Un4led Staleis Geological Survey
wTy ar 'ai- I. oi F I u% 0 irO.i 0.1i3 ll A T io have any queslons you
S.):ar-ln1 Tie H '.';I,)ICI 5OaF3 rr-lI' Ki 1 .I96 7_"1I

THE NATION


'7% .......

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
Atlantic City
Ausinr
Balltmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boslorn
Buffalo
Burlngton, VT
Charleston. S.C
Charleston. W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnatl
Cleveland
Columbta. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
Doeltrot
El Paso
Evansvllte, IN
Harrisburg
Hartlofd
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
I Aiaennles,


FRI
H L Pcp. H
43 35 .65 45
63 43 72
58 48 ,01 66
59 53 .47 68
60 39 54
89 68 77
6635 05 56
53 25 61
64 57 1.4867
44 36 55
60 35 01 50
52 40 .21 38
41 32 10 40
75 49 78
69 49 .11 53
64 48 72
55 35 .22 41
61 49 23 41
56 42 .23 38
47 37 .46 57
63 50 .02 36
43 32 .12 47
80 66 75
54 29 .08 68
39 33 15 56
52 42 .03 41
74 56 77
60 48 .57 52
63 36 14 51
50 34 11 52
85 70 02 79
52 41 .22 44
73 50 82
68 60 .42 66
71 56 71


SAT
L Fcst
37 r
46 pc
34 Is
56 r
41 r
52 pc
41 r
29 ts
3B ts
39 Is
38 sh
30 i
33 f
48 is
32 t
42 Is
28 pc
27 sn
26 sn
36 pc
27 sn
34 t
47 pc
40 pc
39 s
22 fl
52 pc
32r
32 r
36 shi
S3 pc
27 sn
6O pc
41 pc
56 f


FRI SAT
City H L PC. H LFert
NewOrleans 72 63 2.4274 53 pc
NewYorkCity 59 37 .04 52 43 r
Norfdolk 75 43 68 47 ts
OklahomaCity 60 45 69 45 s
Omaha 38 26 .01 60 42 pc
PalmSpnngs 80 54 85 60 pc
PtIadelpia 6S 36 02 53 43 r
Phoenix 79 55 86 59 pc
Pillsburgh 61 52 46 28 sh
Porlamnd ME 48 34 48 32 pc
Portland. OR 53 47 1.3955 44 Bs
Providence, RI 57 33 53 40 sh
Reelglh 69 44 .02 72 45 Is
Rapid City 27 22 05 68 37 pc
Reno 61 39 56 34 r
Rochesle.rNY 57 39 13 38 30 1
Saoramenio 66 53 62 48 ts
SaU Lake City 59 39 68 41 cd
SanAntonio 95 67 81 53 pc
San Diego 68 57 65 57 pc
San Francisco 69 55 60 54 r
Savannah 75 52 78 47 ts
Sealtle 50 45 64 55 45 s
Spokane 48 33 08 53 35 Is
St. Louis 52 41 04 57 38 pc
St.Ste.Mane 37 32 36 33 4 pc
Syracuse 52 33 27 42 30 r
Topeka 48 30 61 43 s
Washington 68 46 04 57 43 r
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIG'H 98. Edfuog, Texas
LOW -8, Cfan Lah., Minnr
WORLD CITIES


... u... .... SAT
Louisville 65 50 .22 47 30 r C SAir HiSKY
Memphis 75 58 1.3364 43 pc ACITY 8 Ts
Mlwaukee 50 34 .55 40 28 p Acapulco 87751s
Minneapolis 38 29 44 34 pc Amsterdam 62142/s
Mobile 66 60 2.9176 44 is Athens w5s
Montgomery 63 57 2,1071 42 s Beiing 7514x
Nashville 68 55 .57 58 37 sh Berlin 60/42 pc
Bermuda 66162/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c.cloud, ddrizzle. Cairo 8160/s
Weair. hAhy, pc palty cloudy; r-rin; Calgary 3021
rs-rnin/ow mil: .s-uim uishaowers; Havana B7fM/pc
wt-msowf tis-Unndestomlm W=wbldy Hong Kong 8071/pc
1WSI 2B14 Jerusalem 84)57/s


Lisbon 57142/r
London 55/44A
Madrnid 62/41/pc
Mexico City 82/55pc
Montreal 412B/r
Moscow 42/17/s
Paris 60/41/pc
Rio af471fl
Rome 64/441s
Sydney BSB66/pc
Tokyo 69157/pc
Toronto 46W3Or
Warsaw 6W39/s


C I T R U S


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


C 0 U N T Y


JHRONICLt
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:

Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
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1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
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In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ........................................................................... P publisher, 563 -3222
Trina Murphy ........................... .. ,, 4 .. Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E d ito r, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ........................................................ Classified M manager, 564-2946

Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories ................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content .................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content ................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The ( t'. .. '.' is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AERICAN IEIBON POST 2f4f PI'ETS

CRYSTAL RI


ER


I.EUuT1EVI&;;
/UU
March 29th-30th
Crystal River Mall Festival Grounds
FOR MORE INFO AND TICKETS VISIT
MUnAEMn U M UM A Ii LA m


ULTIMATE GARTH BROOKS TRIBUTE
by Shawn Gerhard
R BENTON BLOUNT
CLARK HILL
CLEMONS ROAD i


1801 US HIGHWAY 19 NORTH AT TURKEY OAKS ROAD; CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA 34428
Crystal River Mall Festival Grounds Concerts and Celebrities Meet & Greet included in price of Admission


1H~1IIjk1k


Kids 12
& Under
FREE
Admission


FOR MORE INFO AND TICKETS VISIT 3. TIX $10 Gates open
WW.RBJAM.C Mat 11 a.m.
WWW. RI BJAM.COM o-_ADV. Daily


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 A5


L11





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Donna
Black, 72
MONTGOMERY,
ALA.
Donna Kay Black, 72, of
Montgomery, Ala., and for-
merly of Lecanto, Fla.,
passed away Tuesday,
March 25, 2014, at her
home. A native of Marion,
Ind., she was born Sept. 1,
1941, the only child to John
and Frieda (Coates) Keel-
ing. A lifelong homemaker,
Donna was also a former
CNA as well as a member
of both First Christian
Church of Homosassa and
the Order of The Eastern
Star No. 319. Mrs. Black
moved to Montgomery in
2005 from Lecanto and will
be remembered by her
family as an amazing
mother and grandmother
She is survived by her
three daughters, Sheryl
Black, Montomery, Ala.,
Janet Black, Lecanto and
Jackie Rispoli, North Car-
olina; grandchildren, An-
thony, Joshua and Rebecca
Schuler, all of Lecanto,
Jonathan Schuler, Ala-
bama, Ethan Black, Mon-
tomery, Ala., and Shawn
Rispoli, North Carolina; as
well as one great-grand-
child, Kayla Rispoli of
North Carolina.
Friends will be received
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Mon-
day, March 31, 2014, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, where a chapel
service will take place at
11:30 a.m., with Chaplain
Larry Strickland officiat-
ing. Interment will follow
at Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, at 1:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, please
make memorial contribu-
tions in Donna's name to
your local chapter of the
Leukemia Society
wwwwilderfuneral.com
Keith Nank, 52
FLORAL CITY
Keith A. Nank, 52, Floral
City, Fla., died March 27,
2014.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.



d6oA. 46. 2bavl
Funeral Home With Crematory
KEITH NANK
Private Arrangements
DAVID WILLIAMS
Service: Mon. 11:00 AM
GATHAVANDIVER
Private Arrangements
PAULINE BUTTERWORTH
Service: Sun. 3:00 PM
DON PURVIS
Private Arrangements
JOHN WARREN
Private Arrangements
KEVIN LEPUMA
Private Arrangements
726-8323


To Place Your
S"In Memory" ad, RU
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931 v
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Coin t imfoplcn
adis uinesdy


Philip Dunn, 79
INVERNESS
Philip Joseph Dunn, 79,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away March 18, 2014, just
after his favorite holiday,
St. Patrick's Day He was
born June 3,1934, to Alfred
and Kathleen Dunn in
Manhattan, N.Y, and was
the second of four ram-
bunctious boys. Philip
served in the Navy and
was a plumber most of his
life. He moved to the area
16 years ago from Yonkers,
N.Y, and was Irish
Catholic. Philip was al-
ways very creative and de-
lighted in making toys,
shirts, crafts and puppets
for his granddaughter
They were most fond of a
leprechaun he created
named Shamus.
He was born to be a
grandpa and is survived by
his granddaughter,
Kathryn Dunn; his former
wife, Eleanor; and good
friend, Boris Dimitriev;
sister-in-law, Jane Dunn;
his god-daughter and
niece, Kathleen Dunn and
her daughter, Angelina;
and nephew, Sean Dunn
along with his wife
Siovhan and two children,
Conner James and Ryan
Patrick.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, and he will be
joining his mother, father,
second-born son Stevie,
Uncle Wolf and Aunt
Mamie in St. Raymonds
Cemetery of the Bronx,
N.Y
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


-The =
Fe anital_, .

NlIei-nlorialI Par-k
i ,, ,, . .



i Markers -Urns-Monuments11
352-628-2555
5635 W Green Acres StHomosassa


Helen
Gregaitis, 88
HERNANDO
Helen Gregaitis, 88,
passed away peacefully
Tuesday, March 25,2014, at
Superior Residences in
Lecanto, Fla. Helen was
the youngest of ten chil-
dren, born to Joseph and
Christiana (Chovanec)
Matzura.
She was predeceased by
her first husband, Tony
Porzi, and second hus-
band, Captain Alphonsus
Gregaitis; brothers,
Joseph, Michael, Andrew
and Stephen; and sisters,
Mary Kriskie, Catherine
Redlitz, Verna Tomesko
and Christina Derkacs.
Helen is survived by a sis-
ter, Anna Tripodi of
Clifton, N.J.; nieces, Eliza-
beth Kriskie of Washing-
ton, D.C., and Diane Jones
of Hardwick, N.J.;
nephews, Michael Matzura
of Cave Creek, Ariz.,
Joseph Redlitz of Franklin
Lakes, N.J., Joseph
Tomesko of Bloomfield,
N.J., and Raymond
Tripodi of Wayne, N.J.; and
many great-nephews and
great-nieces, all of whom
she loved and adored.
Helen was born and
raised in the tiny coal min-
ing town of Mount Carmel,
Pa. She terminated her
schooling early to care for
her ailing mother After
marriage to her beloved
Tony Porzi, she moved to





352.795.1424
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Clifton, N.J., where she
and Tony worked for many
years at Continental Can
Company in Passaic. Upon
retirement, they returned
to Pennsylvania, where
they lived in Elysburg until
her husband's death.
Helen met Capt. Alphon-
sus Gregaitis, with whom
she enjoyed many years of
joyful marriage living in
Lehighton, Pa., and Her-
nando, Fla. Helen was a
member of Saints Peter
and Paul Catholic Church
in Tamaqua, Pa. Helen
was a lively, vibrant
woman with a terrific
smile and laugh, who
loved to dance, play golf,
travel and socialize. She
was one who truly loved
life to the very fullest.
Helen will be sorely
missed by all who had the
privilege to know her
Visitation, from 2 to
4 p.m. Monday, March 31,
2014, at Fero Funeral
Home in Beverly Hills. Fu-
neral Mass will take place
at Saints Peter and Paul


Catholic Church, with in-
terment following at Sky-
View Memorial Park in
Tamaqua, Pa. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Fero
Funeral Home, www.fero
funeralhome.com.





Donald
Purvis, 66
FORT WHITE
Donald D. Purvis, 66,
Fort White, Fla., died
March 27, 2014. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.
See Page A7

Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in sub-
mitted material are
charged at the same
rates.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
* Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
* Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)


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A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VAN NESS
Continued from PageAl

She was a lifelong mem-
ber of the First United
Methodist Church in In-
verness, read her Bible
every day and kept a jour-
nal, writing in it every day
Van Ness died on Feb.
14, 2012. Following her
death, Hal Porter, Citrus
County fair manager, re-
called the first time he saw
her She was driving cattle
down U.S. 41 to Eden Drive
in Inverness. Being just a
boy, he shouted, "Look!
There's a real cowgirl!"
And that's what she
was, working right along-
side her husband for
decades. They raised live-
stock, butchered and ate
what they raised, and
gave much of it away -
vegetables from their gar-
den, as well.
Summing up her life,
Porter said, "The legacy
she left and the greatest
tribute to her are the gen-
erations of children she
impacted. I'm a different
person for having known
her"
A Facebook page, "Mrs.
Eloise 'Grandmother' Van
Ness Matriarch to
Many" is maintained as a
continuing tribute and op-
portunity to share memo-
ries and photos of her life
and legacy
Last month, the tribute
to Eloise "Grandmother"
Van Ness Bar-B-Que and
Equine Demonstration
was held at Soquili Sta-


Chronicle file
Eloise Van Ness was a lifelong member of the First
United Methodist Church in Inverness.


bles and Faith Haven
Christian Retreat Center
Her horse Lady, now
part of Soquili Stables,
was a star attraction as
Van Ness family members
and friends reminisced.
One of the few remain-
ing full-blooded Cracker
horse mares, she came to
Soquili through the fam-
ily, and a plaque denotes
her background,
"We're carrying on
Grandmother's legacy of
working with youth


through horses," said
owner Scott Baggerly, who
had met Van Ness through
her granddaughter "And
we're keeping the Cracker
Horse line alive."
Along with her horse, a
large painting of Van Ness
with her dog Scooty, by
local artist Vicki Pritchard,
stirred emotions at the
event
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


State BRIEFS


State abruptly cancels talk
by professor, writer
TALLAHASSEE Florida officials have
abruptly canceled a talk by a Florida State Uni-
versity professor and writer who has been criti-
cal of the administration of Gov. Rick Scott.
Diane Roberts, who does commentary for
National Public Radio and writes columns for
various publications, was supposed to give a
talk at the state-owned Mission San Luis on
April 3.
Roberts planned to discuss Florida's envi-
ronment and problems with the state's rivers,
lakes and springs.
Brittany Lesser, a spokeswoman for Sec-
retary of State Ken Detzner, said an "internal
decision" was made within the secretary's of-
fice to cancel the talk.


Lesser said that Roberts' topic did not fit
with agency programs such as historical re-
sources. She said that Roberts has been
asked to come back later to talk about "our
mission and programs."
NY rape suspect in custody
ST. PETERSBURG -A New York man ac-
cused of raping three girls under the age of 6
and posing in pictures with them was arrested
Friday in the Tampa Bay area, authorities said.
Jesse Sawyer Jr., 25, was taken into custody
on an FBI warrant on charges stemming from
the alleged abuse in Troy, NY, authorities said.
Pinellas Park Police Sgt. Adam Geis-
senberger said Sawyer was living at the Cal-
vary Chapel church as part of a rehabilitation
program.
-From wire reports


DEATHS
Continued from PaeA6

Bancroft
'Dudley' Hall,
81
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Bancroft
"Dudley" Hall, age 81, of
Inverness, Florida, will be
held 11:00 AM, Monday,
March 31, 2014 at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church,
Inverness with Father Eu-
gene Reuman officiating.
Entombment will follow at
Fountains Memorial Park,
Homosassa, Florida. The
family will receive friends
from 5:00 PM until 8:00
PM, Sunday, March 30,
2014 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. The family re-
quests expressions of sym-
pathy take the form of
memorial donations to
Love A Child, Inc., PO Box
60063, Fort Myers, FL
33906 or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mr Hall was born March
26, 1933 in Craighead, Ja-
maica, son of Hubert and
Doris (Glave) Hall. He died
March 27,2014 in Lecanto,
FL. Mr Hall earned his
Bachelors Degree from
Mico College in Jamaica
and worked as a teacher
and headmaster before
immigrating to the United
States in 1962. He worked
as a Senior Safety Admin-
istrator for Polaroid Cor-
poration. After retiring
from Polaroid, he worked
as a safety administrator
for Massachusetts General


Hospital for an additional
five years. He moved to In-
verness from Sharon, MA
in 1998. Mr Hall enjoyed
music, gardening, outdoor
activities, cycling, jogging
and anything that re-
minded him of his home-
land, Jamaica. He was
steadfast in his devotion as
a husband and father
Mr Hall was preceded
in death by his parents, 2
brothers, Kenneth Hall
and Conroy Hall and 3 sis-
ters, Lenora Davy, Linda
Hall and Hazel Reid. Sur-
vivors include his wife of
55 years, Laura Hall and
son, Dr Dudley B. Hall,
both of Inverness, 4 daugh-
ters, Dr Heather (Anthony)
Hall-Scuderi of Sacra-
mento, CA, Dr Hope


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 A7
(Kenneth) Hall-Wilson of
Henderson, NC, Dr. San-
dra (Kevin) Hall-Ross of
New York, NY and Maxine
(Ossen) D'Haiti, M.M. of
Oakton, VA, 3 brothers,
Owen (Fay) Hall, Wesley
(Claudette) Hall and Louis
Hall, sister, Jean Williams
and 9 grandchildren, Dud-
ley, Amanda, Nicole,
Hillary, Elizabeth, Grace,
Kevin, Benjamin and
Myles.
SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SFor the RECORD


Arrests
Kenneth Lindquist Jr.,
36, of North Bearmount Ter-
race, Crystal River, at 6:40 a.m.
March 27 on a misdemeanor
charge of retail petit theft. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
Lindquist is accused of shoplift-
ing a Mike's Hard Lemonade
alcoholic beverage, three pairs
of sunglasses, a hat and a "doo
rag" with a total value of $61.42
from the Circle K in Crystal
River Bond $250.
Shanna Houle, 29, of
East Grayson Street, Inver-
ness, at 12:34 p.m. March 27
on an active warrant for felony
charges of trafficking in stolen
property, and false verification
of ownership to a pawnbroker.
According to her arrest affi-
davit, Houle was transported
to the Citrus County Detention
Facility from the Lake County
Jail. Bond $7,000.
Jericho Lawson, 24, of
South Sonata Avenue, Ho-
mosassa, at 8:50 p.m.
March 27 on a felony charge
of driving with a suspended li-
cense as a habitual offender.
Bond $2,000.
Andrew Buch, 40, of In-
verness, at 12:55 a.m.
March 28 on a misdemeanor
drunk and disorderly charge.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, Buch was sleeping near
a brush fire in Crystal River,
near the Church of the Living
God. Buch reportedly admitted
to starting the fire in an effort to
keep warm, but stated the fire
got out of control. Bond $150.
Ricky Dorman, 34, of
East lona Lane, Inverness, at
12:30 a.m. March 28 on an ac-
tive warrant for felony violation
of probation stemming from an
original charge of possession
of methamphetamine. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, Dor-
man made arrangements to
turn himself in to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. He
was also charged with misde-


meanor violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of trespassing.
Shane Simms, 29, of
West Grant Street, Homosassa,
at 5:13 a.m. March 28 on a
felony charge of possession of
a controlled substance, and
misdemeanor charges of pos-
session of cannabis and drug
paraphernalia. According to his
arrest affidavit, Simms had
methamphetamine, a small
amount of marijuana, and a
glass pipe in his possession. He
was a passenger in a vehicle
stopped for failing to come to a
complete stop at a red light.
Bond $6,000.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
Vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 11:38 a.m. Thursday,
March 27, in the 2800 block of
N. Wheaton Point, Hernando.
A residential burglary was
reported at 1:50 p.m.
March 27 in the 5400 block of
S. Leonard Terrace, Inverness.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:34 p.m. March 27
in the 1100 block of W. Cairo
Drive, Dunnellon.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 6:16 a.m. Thursday,
March 27, in the 3200 block of
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping
for a view of where
each type of crime
occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record
reports are archived
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.

A grand theft was re-
ported at 4:13 p.m. March 27
in the 400 block of E. Highland
Blvd., Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 5:38 p.m. March 27
in the 4000 block of S. Old Flo-
ral City Road, Inverness.
Vandalism
SA vandalism was reported
at 5:55 p.m. Thursday,
March 27, in the 3400 block of
N. Holiday Drive, Crystal River.


Ex-FAMU band member gets

one year in hazing death


Associated Press Robert Chai
vember2011
ORLANDO A former In a hear
Florida A&M band mem- nearly three I
ber on Friday became the attorney ca
first person to be sen- character w
tenced to jail time for his the 22-year-o
role in the hazing death of eluding his n
a drum major their He alsc
Jessie Baskin was sen- brief that coi
tenced to 51 weeks in the pleading for]
county jail, five years of Baskin w:
probation and 300 hours of throughout,
community service for wiping awa
participating in the beat- other times
ing death of 26-year-old his seat.



BEES
Continued from Page Al

Maybe.
"There's no guarantee that they'll stay,"
Baker said.
Betty Baker said customers had been
commenting about the lack of bees around
the area, and a customer had spied the
hive Wednesday afternoon.


npion in No-
ng that lasted
hours, Baskin's
killed several
witnesses from
old's family, in-
nother and fa-
o submitted a
intained letters
leniency
as emotional
several times
y tears, and
trembling in


"I've sentenced a hun-
dred people to life in prison.
This is one of the hardest
sentences that I've ever had
to deal with," Judge Marc
Lubet said. "No matter what
I do, I can't bring Robert
Champion back"
Baskin of Miami had
faced nine years in prison
after pleading no contest to
manslaughter in November
Champion died during a
hazing ritual aboard a bus
parked outside an Orlando
hotel.


"Since we moved to this location this
past July, we didn't see a lot of honey bees
here, and I've been wanting to put a hive
on the property, so we were all excited
when we discovered the bees," said
Randy Hobson, owner of Hobson's Herbs
and More. "We've got landscaping plants
and fruit trees as well as a garden with
flowers and vegetables and herbs, and
bees are important for pollinating. So,
when we saw that the bees chose this
spot, I took it as a blessing."


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r~*~i I 7 TAA. "CITRUS_ _COUNTYTy
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A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,920 ................................. S& P 500
Close: 1,857.62
%.'%* Change: 8.58 (0.5%)
1,840 *... 10 DAYS


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
-, :, Dow Jones industrials
_, ,,, ,J' Close: 16,323.06
Change: 58.83 (0.4%)
S,:,,:, 10 DAYS


1,9 0 0 : ............... ............ ............. ............. ............ ............ 17,0 0 0 : .............. :. ............. ............. ............ ............ ............
1 8 5 0 :! .. .. .... . .i. .. ..16 5 0 0 :! . . . . . . .. . . .
1 ,800 ... . .. ....... .... .... .... ... 16,000 :. .. ....I .... .. ......
.. .. . .. .. : ; ........ .. .. ...... .. .... ... ... ...........
,750 15,500 .........


1,650 .....6.. N................ J....... F ... 14,500; 0 N D


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
2,929
3,660
2184
894
74
10


NASD
1,976
2,225
1311
1279
33
38


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16414.86
7511.52
527.38
10473.12
4203.49
1866.63
1367.75
19924.54
1167.52


LOW
16267.77
7411.81
524.00
10398.42
4144.69
1850.07
1351.54
19726.03
1149.61


CLOSE
16323.06
7451.36
526.94
10434.87
4155.76
1857.62
1358.20
19809.28
1151.81


CHG.
+58.83
+39.93
+1.06
+61.43
+4.53
+8.58
+7.29
+83.25
+0.37


%CHG.
+0.36%
+0.54%
+0.20%
+0.59%
+0.11%
+0.46%
+0.54%
+0.42%
+0.03%


YTD
-1.53%
+0.69%
+7.41%
+0.33%
-0.50%
+0.50%
+1.17%
+0.52%
-1.02%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 0- 8.47 6.90 +.04 +0.6 V A V -15.9 +103.0 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 -0- 39.00 35.07 +.11 +0.3 A A -0.3 +0.4 11 1.84
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -0- 62.05 51.33 +.01 ... V V -2.5 +20.5 24 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 0 106.83 105.81 +1.56 +1.5 A A V -0.6 +9.6 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 11.23 --0- 18.03 16.98 -.03 -0.2 V A A +9.1 +39.3 17 0.20f
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 --- 14.59 13.03 -.16 -1.2 V 7 A +10.7 +7.0 37 0.08
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 -0- 38.40 32.68 +.09 +0.3 A A A +2.6 -1.1 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 41.60 -0- 55.28 47.25 -.20 -0.4 7 7 -9.3 +6.8 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 19.55 -- 28.10 26.04 -.03 -0.1 V 7 A +11.7 +22.0 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 55.87 --0- 83.65 78.99 +.51 +0.6 7 7 A +3.4 +40.5 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -0- 75.46 70.44 +.02 ... A 7 A +2.1 +2.5 19 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.69 -0- 61.18 52.77 +.18 +0.3 V 7 A +7.3 +7.5 16 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 -- 101.74 97.70 +1.46 +1.5 A A 7 -3.5 +9.0 11 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.15 18.02 15.45 +.20 +1.3 V A A +0.1 +18.6 9 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 21.11 --- 28.09 25.88 +.07 +0.3 A A 7 -7.7 +15.3 19 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 35.20 0 52.49 51.14 +.78 +1.5 A 7 A +7.2 +24.6 15
Home Depot HD 69.00 --- 83.20 78.72 +.04 +0.1 V 7 7 -4.4 +15.3 21 1.88f
Intel Corp INTO 20.75 -- 27.12 25.62 +.31 +1.2 A A -1.3 +20.1 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -- 214.89 190.45 +.62 +0.3 A A A +1.5 -8.2 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.28 -0-- 34.32 25.89 +.76 +3.0 A 7 7 -21.3 +16.9 25
Lowes Cos LOW 37.09 -- 52.08 48.92 +.38 +0.8 7 7 -1.3 +29.0 23 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 -- 103.70 97.24 +1.08 +1.1 A A A +0.2 +0.4 17 3.24
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 27.96 0 40.99 40.30 +.94 +2.4 A A A +7.7 +42.3 15 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 -- 67.69 64.30 -.06 -0.1 V 7 7 -4.7 +3.1 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 0 95.43 94.72 +.11 +0.1 A A A +10.6 +26.6 22 2.90f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 --- 19.63 8.83 -.14 -1.6 A A 7 -3.5 -39.8 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 --- 21.09 16.85 +.16 +1.0 V 7 A +2.0 -10.4 31 0.80
Regions Fncil RF 7.62 11.54 10.95 +.16 +1.5 V A A +10.7 +32.7 14 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 32.85 -0-- 67.50 46.61 +.05 +0.1 7 A 7 -5.0 -8.1 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -0-- 114.72 96.48 +.41 +0.4 A 7 7 -6.9 +1.0 18 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 33.56 0 47.65 46.64 +.56 +1.2 V A A +6.2 +34.7 27 1.20
Time Warner TWX 55.71 -0- 70.77 64.65 +1.18 +1.9 V 7 7 -7.3 +14.2 17 1.27f
UniFirst Corp UNF 87.28 --0- 117.91 107.38 +.31 +0.3 V 7 A +0.4 +19.4 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 --- 54.31 47.42 -.27 -0.6 A 7 7 -3.5 +1.7 12 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 27.49 --- 42.14 36.45 +.40 +1.1 7 7 -8.8 +24.5..
WalMart Strs WMT 71.51 -0- 81.37 76.01 -.13 -0.2 7 A 7 -3.4 +4.3 16 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 43.31 --0- 69.84 65.36 +1.01 +1.6 A 7 A +13.8 +38.8 23 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a -Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates

if'


The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
rose to 2.72
percent Friday.
Yields affect
rates on
mortgages and
other consumer


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
copper extend-
ed its recent rise
after the world's
largest produc-
er reported a
drop in output.
In other trading,
wheat fell, while
corn and soy-
beans were un-
changed.



QD
C.EI


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .04 0.04 ... .07
6-month T-bill .06 0.06 ... .10
52-wk T-bill .11 0.11 ... .12
2-year T-note .45 0.45 .. .25
5-year T-note 1.75 1.72 +0.03 .78
10-year T-note 2.72 2.69 +0.03 1.85
30-year T-bond 3.55 3.53 +0.02 3.11


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.35 3.32 +0.03 2.81
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.74 4.73 +0.01 4.15
Barclays USAggregate 2.37 2.38 -0.01 1.85
Barclays US High Yield 5.28 5.26 +0.02 5.67
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 4.29 4.33 -0.04 3.87
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.90 1.88 +0.02 1.04
Barclays US Corp 3.07 3.08 -0.01 2.76


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 101.67
Ethanol (gal) 3.27
Heating Oil (gal) 2.96
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.49
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.94


METALS
Gold (oz)
Silver (oz)
Platinum (oz)
Copper (Ib)
Palladium (oz)


CLOSE
1293.80
19.77
1404.70
3.06
774.10


AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.47
Coffee (Ib) 1.81
Corn (bu) 4.92
Cotton (Ib) 0.94
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 334.40
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.51
Soybeans (bu) 14.37
Wheat (bu) 6.96


PVS.
101.28
3.00
2.95
4.58
2.94
PVS.
1294.70
19.69
1397.20
3.04
761.00
PVS.
1.46
1.76
4.92
0.93
335.50
1.50
14.37
7.11


%CHG %YTD
+0.39 +3.3
+0.50 +71.0
+0.35 -3.9
-1.16 +6.0
-0.17 +5.5
%CHG %YTD
-0.07 +7.7
+0.42 +2.2
+0.54 +2.5
+1.58 -11.1
+1.73 +7.9
%CHG %YTD
+0.02 +8.9
+2.41 +63.1
... +16.6
+1.27 +10.8
-0.33 -7.1
+0.17 +10.3
... +9.5
-2.11 +14.9


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.52 +.09 +0.9 +15.0 +12.0 +16.1
CaplncBuA m 58.46 +.22 +1.4 +10.6 +9.4 +13.8
CpWIdGrIA m 45.48 +.20 +0.7 +18.2 +10.5 +16.8
EurPacGrA m 49.02 +.34 -0.1 +16.7 +6.7 +15.1
FnlnvA m 51.15 +.26 -0.4 +20.5 +12.7 +19.1
GrthAmA m 43.03 +.09 +0.1 +23.3 +13.9 +18.8
IncAmerA m 20.91 +.08 +2.1 +13.2 +11.1 +16.5
InvCoAmA m 37.07 +.14 +1.4 +22.9 +13.8 +18.2
NewPerspA m 37.41 +.17 -0.4 +18.9 +11.2 +18.3
WAMutlnvA m 39.69 +.21 +1.1 +21.7 +15.2 +19.6
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 43.90 +.37 +2.0 +24.3 +9.0 +19.7
Stock 170.30 +1.03 +1.5 +27.7+16.7 +23.2
Fidelity Contra 94.94 +.19 -0.2 +22.6 +14.6 +20.0
LowPriStk d 50.06 +.30 +1.2 +23.2 +15.5 +23.6
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 66.13 +.30 +1.0 +20.8 +14.8 +20.4
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.51 +.01 +3.6 +12.1 +9.4 +16.7
IncomeA m 2.48 +.01 +3.8 +12.3 +9.9 +17.2
Harbor Intllnstl 71.25 +.49 +0.3 +14.8 +7.2 +17.8
Oakmark Intl 1 26.39 +.21 +0.3 +23.1 +12.4 +23.1
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.95 +.21 +0.9 +17.8 +13.4 +20.4
GrowStk 51.51 +.02 -2.0 +26.6 +15.8 +21.6
Vanguard 500Adml 171.27 +.80 +1.0 +20.8 +14.8 +20.4
500lnv 171.27 +.80 +1.0 +20.7 +14.6 +20.3
HItCrAdml 81.26 +.02 +7.4 +34.4 +23.6 +22.5
MulntAdml 13.98 +.01 +2.7 +0.8 +5.2 +5.2
PrmcpAdml 99.21 +.10 +3.6 +26.9 +16.6 +21.0
STGradeAd 10.72 ... +0.7 +1.3 +2.5 +5.1
Tgtet2025 15.93 +.05 +1.1 +12.7 +9.4 +15.5
TotBdAdml 10.69 -.02 +1.9 -0.3 +3.7 +4.8
Totlntl 16.65 +.13 +0.1 +12.0 +4.6 +14.7
TotStlAdm 46.98 +.20 +1.1 +21.5 +14.8 +21.3
TotStldx 46.96 +.20 +1.0 +21.4 +14.7 +21.2
Welltn x 38.38 -.10 +1.8 +13.8 +11.3 +15.5


WelltnAdm x 66.28
WndsllAdm 66.61


-.20 +1.8 +13.9 +11.4 +15.6
+.40 +2.1 +21.0 +15.0 +20.5


*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Major stock market indexes crept
up Friday following news of a
modest increase in consumer
spending last month. Microsoft
led the 30 big companies in the
Dow Jones industrial average on
news that it will make its Office
products available for use on
Apple's iPad.

PG&E PCG
Close:$41.89V-1.75 or -4.0%
The power company said it will likely
face federal criminal charges for its
role in a fatal gas pipeline explosion
in 2010.
-I,7


-' I F r
52-week range
$39.42 $48.50
Vol.:12.7m (4.4x avg.) PE:22.9
Mkt. Cap:$19.17 b Yield: 4.3%
Visa v
Close:$212.09V-3.68 or -1.7%
Wal-Mart is suing the world's largest
processor of debit and credit card
payments over fees it was charged
for transactions.
$240-
230
2-r,
21 J F M
52-week range
$161.27 $235.50
Vol.:3.7m (1.2x avg.) PE:27.0
Mkt. Cap: $106.96 b Yield: 0.8%
Red Hat RHT
Close: $52.23 V-3.90 or -6.9%
An outlook that many considered
weak overshadowed better-than-ex-
pected quarterly earnings from the
open-source software company.



.I F r
52-week range
$41.89 $61.45
Vol.:7.1m (4.4x avg.) PE:57.4
Mkt. Cap:S $9.9 b Yield:...
Tesla Motors TSLA
Close:$212.37A5.05 or 2.4%
The U.S. closed an investigation into
electric car battery fires after the
company agreed to install more
shields beneath its cars.
$3001 ---------



52-week range
$40.21 $265.00
Vol.:9.6m (1.Ox avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$26.16b Yield:...
Amazon.corn AMZN
Close:$338.29V-0.18 or -0.1%
There is considerable buzz about a
streaming service from the online re-
tailer, which is holding a news con-
ference next week.



I'"' F r
52-week range
$245.75 $408.06
Vol.:4.0m (1.Ox avg.) PE: 573.4
Mkt. Cap: $155.36 b Yield:...


Stocks edge higher


Associated Press

NEW YORK A posi-
tive report on U.S. con-
sumer spending helped
push stocks mostly higher
Friday for the first time in
three days.
The gains were modest
as investors continued to
cut their holdings in
biotechnology stocks,
some of the best perform-
ing names of 2013. Instead,
the stocks that advanced
the most were mostly ma-
ture, large companies such
as Microsoft, Exxon and
Cisco Systems.
The Dow Jones Indus-
trial average rose 58.83
points, or 0.4 percent, to


16,323.06. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose 8.58
points, or 0.5 percent, to
1,857.62. The Nasdaq com-
posite, which includes a
number of large biotech
companies, rose just 4.53
points, or 0.1 percent, to
4,155.76.
The biggest gainer in the
Dow was Microsoft, which
rose 94 cents, or 2.4 per-
cent, to $40.30. The com-
pany announced Thursday
it was bringing Microsoft
Office to the iPad and
would shift its focus away
from Windows, a move that
analysts liked. Satya
Nadella made the an-
nouncement in his first
public appearance as the


new leader of Microsoft.
Microsoft helped lift
other large technology
companies, with Cisco Sys-
tems, Intel and Oracle up
roughly 1 percent or more.
In contrast to technology,
biotechnology had another
horrible day Gilead Sci-
ences, Biogen Idec and Ver-
tex Pharmaceuticals were
all down 4 percent or more.
The higher they rise, the
harder they fall, investors
say Biotechnology stocks
had been among the
hottest sectors in the stock
market for the past two
years, with the S&P 500
Biotechnology index rising
74 percent in 2013 and 38
percent in 2012.


Business B R I E FS


Fandango, Credit Karma
reach security settlement
PORTLAND, Ore. -The Federal Trade
Commission said the mobile applications of
movie ticket-seller Fandango and credit re-
port-provider Credit Karma may have exposed
millions of users' sensitive personal informa-
tion, including credit card data and social se-
curity numbers.
The companies failed to properly secure
their apps over a multiyear period, potentially
exposing information users sent or received
through the apps, according to the FTC.
Fandango and Credit Karma fixed the secu-
rity issue last year.
The companies said Friday that they are not
aware of any individual's information being
compromised. But the FTC said that due to
the nature of the types of attacks, it would be
nearly impossible to trace.
As part of the settlement agreement, the
companies must establish more comprehen-
sive security programs and undergo inde-
pendent security assessments every other
year for the next 20 years.
Fandango may have exposed consumers'
credit card, email address and passwords
through its application for Apple's iOS operat-
ing system between March 2009 and March
2013, according to the complaint.
Credit Karma's may have exposed con-
sumers' names, Social Security numbers,
birthdates, addresses, phone numbers, credit
scores and more. This affected its iOS appli-
cations used between July 2012 and January
2013. The company also launched an Android
version of its app in 2013 without proper secu-
rity steps, an issue it later resolved.
NC regulators cite Duke
Energy for crack in dam
RALEIGH, N.C. North Carolina regulators
say they've cited Duke Energy for a crack in a
dam at a coal ash pit near the Cape Fear River.
The state Department of Environment and
Natural Resources said Friday it had issued
Duke a notice of deficiency, and called on the
company to take steps to ensure the earthen
dam's stability.
If Duke doesn't submit a comprehensive en-
gineering report about the dam by April 7, the
company could face a fine.
Duke finished emergency repairs Monday
to the dam that holds back millions of tons of
coal ash. Duke said no water was flowing
through the dam.
The structure is at the Cape Fear River
plant, where North Carolina regulators said
Duke illegally pumped 61 million gallons of
contaminated water from a coal ash pit.
Appeals court rules
in favor of meat labels
WASHINGTON -Afederal appeals court
is allowing labels on certain cuts of meat to
say where the animals were born, raised and
slaughtered.
The appeals court decision issued Friday
dismissed an attempt by the meat industry to
block the rules, which took effect last year and
require packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts
of meat to include country of origin labels. The
industry has long fought the labels, saying
they are costly and provide no health benefits
to the consumer.
In court, the meat industry said the rules go
beyond what Congress intended and violate
First Amendment rights to freedom of speech.
The industry argued that the rules violate the
U.S. Constitution because they force meat
producers to provide information about their
products, and that the information is of no real
value to the consumer.


Judge Stephen F. Williams of the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled
those claims were unlikely to succeed in court
and refused to block the labeling rules, agree-
ing with a lower federal court.
Under the rules, labels must specify that a
meat product was "Born in Mexico, raised and
slaughtered in the United States" or "Born,
raised and slaughtered in the United States."
The Agriculture Department has also pro-
hibited meat processors from mixing meat
from animals born, raised or slaughtered in
other countries with meat from the U.S.
Sally Beauty's security
breach grows in scope
DENTON, Texas Sally Beauty said a se-
curity breach in March may have affected
more of its customers than it earlier estimated.
The beauty products seller said last week
that the breach affected fewer than 25,000
credit and debit card accounts. It said Friday
that based on an investigation into the inci-
dent, a larger number of records containing
payment card data may have been illegally
accessed and removed from its system.
Sally Beauty refused to say how many ac-
counts may have been impacted until the
forensic review is complete.
The company said it is offering one free
year of credit monitoring and identity-theft pro-
tection to customers who may have been af-
fected by the incident.
Sally Beauty Holdings Inc., based in Den-
ton, Texas, sells and distributes products
through 4,700 stores worldwide.
Another year, another $1
for Google co-founders
SAN FRANCISCO Google paid co-
founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin their
customary $1 salaries last year while Execu-
tive Chairman Eric Schmidt's compensation
more than doubled to $19.3 million.
Most of Schmidt's raise stemmed from
stock grants valued at $11.4 million. Google
issued them to make up for an administrative
error in the handling of another large award
given to Schmidt in February 2011, according
to regulatory documents filed Friday.
If not for the mix-up, Schmidt's pay package
last year would have risen 4 percent from the
$7.6 million that he got in 2012.
Page, Google's CEO, and Brin, another top
executive, have insisted on capping their
salaries at $1 annually since Google Inc. went
public nearly a decade ago. It's a symbolic
gesture that many other Silicon Valley execu-
tives have made after amassing fortunes
through the stock that they held in their re-
spective companies.
Page, 41, and Brin, 40, each own Google
stock currently worth about $26 billion.
Schmidt, 58, has accumulated wealth esti-
mated at $9 billion by Forbes magazine. He
also limited his salary to $1 annually while he
was CEO.
The pay scale has changed dramatically
since Schmidt turned over the CEO's job to
Page three years ago. In 2011, Schmidt re-
ceived compensation valued at $101 million,
with most of the money tied up in restricted
stock designed to keep him working at
Google. Last month, Google disclosed that
Schmidt is receiving another stock award val-
ued at $100 million this year.
As Google's executive chairman, Schmidt
primarily deals with regulatory issues, govern-
ment relationships and company acquisitions.
The Mountain View, Calif., company thought
Schmidt did such a good job last year that he
received his maximum cash bonus of $6 mil-
lion to supplement his $1.25 million salary.
-From wire reports


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BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 All







Page A12 SATURDAY, MARCH 29,2014



PINION


"There is one difference between a tax
collector and a taxidermist the
taxidermist leaves the hide."
Mortimer Caplan, Time, Feb. 1, 1963


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
i EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
M Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


COMMON SENSE




Legislators'



move to end



taxing district



good news


he constantly shifting
target that is the resolu-
tion of a governance
battle between competing
boards at Citrus Memorial
hospital seems to have
squared itself, at least in
terms of positive
news coming out
of the 2014 THE I
Florida legislative State Rc
session. ay l
State Rep. Jim- says let
mie T. Smith told getting
Citrus County del- taxig n
egation members
March 20 that the OUR 01
latest version of Credit (
the bill delineat- legisla
ing process and handling
procedures for
governance elimi-
nates the taxing authority.
The taxing district is not
popular among taxpayers, es-
pecially in the wake of a
multimillion-dollar legal cost
to settle the dispute. The bill
will set who is in charge of the
lease and how the board is to
form a community foundation
to manage the proceeds from
the hospital lease.
Citrus County is somewhat
unique in it uses the taxing


C
Is
!el
gi
Ig
au

IP
dL,
att
Ig
21
2
U

F
I
t


district to offset the costs for
indigent care. However, in
most other Florida counties,
hospitals treat indigent pa-
tients without the benefit of
public tax dollars to supple-
ment the costs. They typically
write off the
charges or take
ISUE: advantage of fed-
SSmith eral programs
J. Smith that reimburse a
islature portion of the
rid of costs. When the
authority. tax dollars were
being used strictly
'INION: for indigent care,
ue local taxpayers were
ors for not as concerned
Sof bill. with supporting
the hospital in
this fashion. Un-
fortunately, the hospital board
began to rack up administra-
tive and legal costs in its battle
with the hospital foundation
over governance and public
sentiment soured on the tax-
ing district concept.
State Sen. Charlie Dean and
Rep. Smith deserve credit for
listening to their constituency
and recommending the elimi-
nation the hospital taxing
district.


= Hot Corner: LITTER


Who are the litterbugs?
I wonder who could be throw-
ing out of their car windows all of
this litter along the roads. I sup-
pose now with McDonald's being
built in Beverly Hills, there will be
even more empty soda cups,
straws, napkins and wrappers. I
wonder who the slobs are. Par-
ents, do you have any idea?
Hold parents to task
I'm just calling in response to
the "Neighborhood
coastline" in the Sound OL
Off. I just want to say "
that I totally agree and I
do clean up my commu-
nity with my fellow
neighbors. But I have an
issue that it's still pick-
ing up after our children.
Somehow I think we
have to hold the parents CAL
to task that allow their 5 (
children to throw out the 006 -
trash on the highways.
Also would like to see signs. I
never see a sign about any littering
fines. And I think if we had some
signs and we caught some people
in unmarked cars and saw people
throw stuff out and the police ar-
rest them, the judge fines them
and it gets put in the paper, that
might set back some of these
slobs.
Get litterers to quit
I'm calling about all the litter in
Citrus County. Why should we
have to go out and pick up after all
these slobs out there who can't
take care of themselves and throw
out the litter all over the place?
What are they, a bunch of little ba-
bies that we have to pick up after
them? They should have enough
pride in Citrus County to take care
of it and help keep it clean.
A 10-cent fix
I am a Michigan snowbird, have
been for 20 years, and I'm still ap-
palled at the ungodly litter in this


I

)


state. I live in Homosassa in a
small subdivision and there's al-
ways trash in certain spots; the
same trashy person throws it. We
instituted a 10-cent bill in Michi-
gan on all cans of pop. We don't
have it on water yet, but our state
is now 90 percent cleaner than it
was before the bottle bill was in-
stituted. I do not think there is any
state south of the Mason-Dixon
Line that has a bottle bill. I guess
they like trash on the highways.
No one really does. I
Turned in an individual by
IND plate number last year
'EF that dropped litter on the
highway-two bags near
3 Venable Street. And the
police said, "Well, we
can't really do anything
about it because we
didn't see him do it." So
that's the attitude and
that's one of the reasons
1579 we've got all these
problems.
Levy heavy fines
I see yet another caller is say-
ing the citizens of Citrus should
pick up and clean the roadways
of trash thrown by slobs passing
cars. Someone must witness it -
a camera or another driver. Why
don't we enact or enforce littering
laws? Take the license number
down and issue a strong fine of a
few hundred dollars. Maybe this
would offer a deterrent. Wouldn't
this be included as road mainte-
nance on our taxes? Just a
thought.
Look up, not down
I read with interest the com-
ments about the dirty roads and
so forth, which are true. But I
think we need to get to the root of
the problem. We need to educate
the (children) in school. The lib-
eral views these days. You don't
throw trash, you don't do this, you
treat people with respect, etc. Put
prayer back in school.


God and Caesar

S TT ell, then," Jesus sponse of some of the justices.
'/l said, "give to Cae- 'At oral arguments on Tues-
V sar what belongs to day," writes the Huffington Post
Caesar, and give to God what "the women justices were the
belongs to God." most aggressive in their
(Mark 12:17 Living questioning of Hobby
Paraphrase) Lobby's lawyer, former
When consider- Solicitor General Paul
ing what belongs to D. Clement Justices
Caesar and what Sonia Sotomayor and
belongs to God, Elena Kagan asked
what happens when whether other compa-
the federal govern- nies should be allowed
ment seeks to re- to refuse to cover other
place God by procedures, like blood
defining "church" Cal Thomas transfusions and vac-
and when life be- OTHER cines, if employers had
gins to have value, VOICES a religious objection
the latter having ___________ to such medical
been done in Roe v treatments."
Wade and subsequent court rul- I put that question to Professor
ings? Joshua D. Hawley of the Univer-
While there are other issues in sity of Missouri School of Law
the Hobby Lobby case argued be- Hawley is also counsel to the
fore the Supreme Court on Tues- Becket Fund for Religious Lib-
day these are the major ones. erty In an email, Hawley wrote:
To review quickly for those "...the Religious Freedom
who haven't been paying atten- Restoration Act (which states
tion, the owners of Hobby Lobby that government shall not sub-
a crafts supply chain based in stantially burden a person's ex-
Oklahoma City, are conservative ercise of religion) does not give
Christians. They believe their religious objectors a blank check
faith prohibits them from offer- The statute requires objectors to
ing a health insurance policy for show that they have a sincere re-
their female employees that cov- ligious belief that is substantially
ers birth control, including all burdened. And it permits the
forms ofintrauterine devices and government to impose the regu-
emergency contraception. The lation anyway if the government
government says the religious can show that its interest is truly
exception they are seeking under compelling and that it has no
the Affordable Care Act applies other viable means available for
only to churches and religiously achieving it"
affiliated nonprofits, such as Specifically addressing the
schools and hospitals, and that comment by Justices Kagan and
for-profit companies, like Hobby Sotomayor, Hawley says the com-
Lobby, are required under the pulling interest standard "would
ACA to cover all aspects of likely work to defeat many other
women's preventative care, or religious objections," including
face a hefty fine. for blood transfusions and vac-
Let's consider the arguments cines, because "the government
before the Court and the re- could almost certainly show that


(again)

it had a compelling interest in re-
quiring businesses to pay for life-
saving procedures and
treatments, including antibi-
otics." Hawley notes the RFRA,
signed by President Bill Clinton,
has been on the books since 1993
and there has not been a flood of
civil exemptions.
Justice Anthony Kennedy may
have come up with the best com-
promise. He asked Clement why
Hobby Lobby could not drop
health insurance altogether, pay
the fine and increase salaries of
their employees so each could
buy health insurance that fits
their needs.
Come to think of it, that ap-
proach makes sense for every-
one. Unfortunately, it is not the
one-size-fits-all approach of the
Obama administration, its Af-
fordable Care Act and its ap-
parent march toward a
single-payer health plan, which
is and always has been the lib-
eral lefts goal.
Caesar needs to get back on his
side of the church-state line,
which the left freely invokes
when it claims the church is tres-
passing on the state's territory
Secular progressives seem less
concerned when the state
crosses the line in the other di-
rection and seeks to impose its
will on people of faith.
It's going to take a Republican
Congress and a Republican pres-
ident with courage and a new
health insurance plan to repeal
Obamacare and start over with
real reforms that protect reli-
gious believers and enhance
health care.

Readers may email
Cal Thomas at
tcaeditors@tribune.com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Uncivil actions
On Feb. 25, I attended my first
county commission meeting in
quite some time what an ex-
perience. At the open mic ses-
sion, many people said they did
not want the "civility code" or-
dinance passed, and I do not re-
call anyone pressing to have it
passed. I made comments to the
commissioners that this was a
subjective rule and could easily
cross the line to cutting into
someone's First Amendment
rights. As long as nobody used
profanity or made illegal
threats, no speech should be off
limits. Another speaker asked
where "the line" would be
drawn? Who would draw it?
Who would enforce it? How
many warnings would be given
before punishment? What
would be the punishment? Who
would mete out the punish-
ment? These were all good
points. Commissioner Scott
Adams suggested the decision
be tabled until the next BOCC
meeting. It was clear this meas-
ure was going to be passed and
quickly There was no delay -
as expected, the comments of
all the citizens meant nothing.
At some point in the meeting,
Commissioner Adams told Com-
missioner Joe Meek that he was
holding out the olive branch in
the hopes they could work to-
gether more harmoniously He
made this offer at least three
times. Commissioner Meek said
that he would not accept the
olive branch. Who is keeping
any feud alive?


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

At the scheduled time for
Commissioner Adams to speak
about Port Citrus, Commis-
sioner Meek walked out of the
commission chambers. Appar-
ently I was not the only one who
thought that incredibly rude, as
there were quiet rumblings in
the audience. Who is being
rude to whom in the BOCC?
In reply to questions from
Commissioner Adams, County
Administrator Brad Thorpe ex-
cused some sloppy bookkeeping
by saying that "things just
slipped through the cracks."
Huh? "Things" cannot be al-
lowed to "slip through the
cracks."
I have no dog in this fight As a
former officer of the Republican
Executive Committee, I know all
five commissioners to one de-
gree or another They are all
honorable people, but it seems
that all this infighting is per-
sonal rather than procedure-
driven. There are obviously dif-


fering points of view on issues
and commissioners should
bring out their points as they see
fit If anyone is offended, so be
it If all are acting with clear
conscience for the citizens of
Citrus County, the verbiage can
proceed as it needs. To stifle the
constitutional right of free
speech of a commissioner not
only infringes on their own
speech, it negatively impacts
their effectiveness for their con-
stituents and that just cannot be
condoned.
Once, Mayor Richard J. Daly
told the Chicago City Council, "If
you don't like what I am doing,
please notice the mistletoe on
my coat tail." Our Board of
County Commissioners probably
would have found that uncivil.
Harry Cooper
Hernando

Reconsider all-way
stops on Cutler Spur
Am I alone in thinking that
the introduction of all-way stop
signs on Cutler Spur have ru-
ined its functionality?
I know why it was done to
slow traffic on the widened
road but the result is that it
is now quicker to use U.S. 19
for most journeys.
I assume that Cutler Spur
was created to take local traf-
fic off U.S. 19, and this is now
no longer the case.
Please reconsider and re-
move the all-way stops.
Peter Beavan
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


Golf tournament
successful
On behalf of Take Stock
in Children of Citrus
County, I would like to ex-
press our sincere appreci-
ation to those individuals,
businesses, organizations
and individuals in our
community who helped us
make our first annual
"Dollar$ for Scholar$" golf
tournament a success.
Many thanks to our
Black Diamond friends
Doug Egly, Bryan
Richard, Lara Holiday,
Bill Holiday, Bill Hardin
and Kerry Rosselet for
their generous support of
our program and the stu-
dents who we serve.
To our wonderful spon-
sors Black Diamond,
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, Harley-Davidson of
Crystal River, the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
and the Rustic Ranch
restaurant we are very
much appreciate your
generous support.
We could not have done
it without your support
and the support of many
members of our incredi-
ble community: Best Ver-
sion Media, Black
Diamond Ladies Associa-
tion, Black Diamond Re-
alty Inc., Brannen Bank,
Peter and Elizabeth Blick,
Jan and Mike Carter, Cit-
rus Memorial Health Sys-
tem, Mary Jane and
Dalton E. Smart Jr, Rus-
sell and Judy Delaney
Edward Jones Invest-
ments, Duke Energy, Lois
and Jim Filby, Golf Smith,
Nick Nicholas Lincoln
Ford, Gulf Coast Marine
Service, the Lancaster
Family, Ted Williams Mu-
seum, Pat Pierce, Publix
Supermarkets, state Rep.
Jimmie T Smith, Ray's
Celtic Stone LLC, Sun-
coast Credit Union, Ray-
mond James Financial
Services Inc., Barbara
and Dudley Smith, Gene
Taormina, the Freezer,
Volkswagen/BMW/
Porsche of Ocala, Pat
Walker, Dr and Mrs. John
Williams, Janet and


Joseph Zimmers, Graphic
Elite Printing, WYKE,
Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, Citrus
Springs Golf and Country
Club, Color Country Nurs-
ery, Crackers Restaurant,
Enve Salon and Spa, El
Diablo Golf and Country
Club, Escalante Golf Inc,
Jim Houle, Candy and
Kelly Kofmehl, David and
Elizabeth Lininger, Lolly-
gaggers Sports Pub and
Grill, Mr King Chinese
restaurant, New Concept
International Hair Salon,
Skyview at Terra Vista,
Matthew Smith, Southern
Woods Plantation Club,
The Little Golf Spot,
Twisted Oaks Golf Course
and Linda Williams
To all of our mentors and
those who played golf in
our tournament, thank you
from the bottom of our
hearts! We will work hard
to keep our promise to you.
Pat Lancaster
program coordinator,
Take Stock in Children

The passing
of a leader
Rear Adm. Edward
"Ren" Renfro, an accom-
plished yet most humble
retired naval officer, has
departed from us. He
chose to live and continue
to serve others in this
community after a long
and distinguished service
as a senior naval officer,
an educator and a leading
manager in developing
the Navy's nuclear power
capability, which stands
as vital contribution to
our national security.
Though my personal
contact with Ren was lim-
ited to our mutual partici-
pation in local veterans
affairs, I came to admire
not only his many signifi-
cant accomplishments, but
also his absolute humility
and inspiring avoidance of
seeking recognition for
having served well for the
benefit of others.
As a pioneer in the de-
velopment of the naval nu-
clear capability serving


under perhaps one of the
U.S. Navy's most contro-
versial and difficult-to-
satisfy program managers,
Adm. Hyman Rickover-
Ren Renfro not only sur-
vived, but he excelled in
the successful accomplish-
ment of bringing safe and
manageable nuclear
power to the Navy
In one of my encounters
with him, in preparation
for the celebration of the
60th anniversary of the Ko-
rean War armistice, Ren re-
counted his role as a young
naval lieutenant participat-
ing in the successful am-
phibious assault which
launched U.S. Marines at
Inchon, South Korea, in
September 1950. While he
downplayed his participa-
tion in that historically fa-
mous event, he emphasized
his concern for the great
risk to others going ashore.
One of the participants in
that operation is a local
Marine combat veteran
who survived, and joined
with Adm. Ren in our
armistice celebration.
Subsequent to his mili-
tary career, which spanned
three wars, Ren Renfro
moved on to other signifi-
cant accomplishments both
in academia, the nuclear
power field and other en-
deavors with local business
and civic organizations.
As can be noted from
his obituary the admiral
served his neighbors and
friends well in many ca-
pacities, never seeking re-
ward or recognition.
Nevertheless, he is well
remembered by many of
us in the veteran commu-
nity who know him as a
regular guy, who among
other things, enjoyed the
camaraderie and close
friendships of our local
submariner veterans, who
lament the fact of his
passing and are standing
by to accord him the
honor and respect he so
well deserves. Citrus
County present arms!
Robert Crawford
Korean War Veterans
Chapter 192, Citrus Hills


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OPINION


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 A13












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Dulcimer


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gov't agency missed Cobalt clues


World BRIEFS

Spring


Associated Press
A woman plays a
dulcimer Friday during a
beginners class at the
Palestine Old Time Music
and Dulcimer Festival at
the Museum for East
Texas Culture in
Palestine, Texas. The
three-day festival
features old-time instru-
ments such as dulcimers,
concertinas, autoharps,
harmonicas, guitars,
mandolins and fiddles.


Navy: Goodbye
to nuclear sub
KITTERY, Maine -The
Navy said farewell Friday to
the USS Miami, the nu-
clear-powered submarine
whose service was cut
short when a shipyard em-
ployee trying to get out of
work set it on fire, causing
$700 million in damage.
The somber deactivation
ceremony at Portsmouth
Naval Shipyard marked the
beginning of an inglorious
end: Next year, the subma-
rine will be towed to the
West Coast to be cut up for
scrap metal.
At the end of the cere-
mony, the crew filed out of
the auditorium after its top
enlisted sailor, Chief Tyrus
Rock, led them in a cheer,
shouting out the first part of
the ship's motto, "No free
rides!" The crew finished by
responding, "Everyone
rows!"
Union: Engineer
worked long hours
CHICAGO -A union for
Chicago Transit Authority
drivers said the operator of
the train that crashed at
O'Hare International Airport
worked 69 hours in the
seven days before the
accident.
Amalgamated Transit
Union Local 308 President
Robert Kelly said Friday
that the operator's call-in
status without a consistent
work shift caused her to
work "strange" hours, which
was a factor in the crash.
Kelly said the operator is
"torn to pieces" over the
crash. He said the union will
fight the CTA if it seeks to
fire her.
A federal investigator is
looking into Monday's crash
in which 32 passengers
were injured. The investiga-
tor said the operator ac-
knowledged she dozed off
before the accident.
Study: Kids risk
high cholesterol
There's fresh evidence
that a lot of young people
could be headed for heart
trouble.
A large study of preteens
in Texas found that about
one-third of them had bor-
derline or high cholesterol
when tested during routine
physical exams.
The results seem to sup-
port recent guidelines that
call for every child to have a
cholesterol test between 9
and 11 -the ages of the
13,000 youths in this study.
Many doctors and adults
have balked at screening all
children that young, but re-
searchers say studies like
this may convince them it's
worthwhile.
"A concerning number of
children" are at risk of heart
problems later in life, and
more needs to be done to
prevent this at an earlier
age, said Dr. Thomas Seery
of Texas Children's Hospital
and Baylor College of Medi-
cine, study leader.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

DETROIT For years,
the U.S. government's auto
safety watchdog sent form
letters to worried owners
of the Chevrolet Cobalt
and other General Motors
small cars, saying it didn't
have enough information
about problems with unex-
pected stalling to establish
a trend or open an
investigation.
The data tell a different
story
An Associated Press re-
view of complaints to the
National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration
shows that over a nine-
year period, 164 drivers re-


Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Wash. A
mountainside community waited
in anguish Friday to learn the full
scope of the Washington state
mudslide as authorities worked
to identify remains and warned
that they were unlikely to find
anyone alive nearly a week after
the disaster
Leslie Zylstra said everybody in
town knows someone who died,
and the village was coming to
grips with the fact that many of
the missing will never turn up.
"The people know there's no
way anybody could have survived,"
said Zylstra, who used to work in
an Arlington hardware store.
"They just want to have their loved
ones, to bury their loved ones."
Authorities delayed an an-
nouncement that they said would
substantially raise the death toll
to allow the Snohomish County
medical examiner's office to con-
tinue with identification efforts.
That job, along with the work of
the exhausted searchers, was
complicated by the sheer magni-
tude of the devastation from Sat-
urday's slide. Tons of earth and
ambulance-sized boulders of clay
smashed everything in their path,
leaving unrecognizable remnants
in their wake.
"There's a process that we have
in place, and I don't want to get
into too many details of that,"


GM IGNITION RECALL GROWS
* General Motors is boosting by 971,000 the number
of small cars being recalled worldwide for a defec-
tive ignition switch, saying cars from the model
years 2008-2011 may have gotten the part as a re-
placement.
* The recall involves six cars: the Chevrolet Cobalt,
Chevrolet HHR, Pontiac G5, Pontiac Solstice, Sat-
urn Ion and Saturn Sky.
* Owners will be contacted the week of April 21.


ported that their 2005-2007
Chevrolet Cobalts stalled
without warning. That was
far more than any of the
car's competitors from the
same model years, except
for the Toyota Corolla,
which was recalled after a
government investigation


in 2010.
Stalling was one sign of
the ignition switch failure
that led GM last month to
recall 1.6 million Cobalts
and other compact cars,
including the Saturn Ion,
Pontiac G5 and Chevrolet
HHR. GM has linked the


Il"m, CAN
1inn km f I


I UU I 11

Se
Olympi *a
o Olympia
t^
0f


I


attle


SOURCE: ESRI


I


Snohomish County
Fire Chief Travis Ho
day "It's not as simp
this is the number of
we have that we have
The fire chief said
to receive an upda
medical examiner's o
day evening.
Authorities have ac
the deaths of at least
with 17 bodies recove
of more bodies being
trickled in from re
workers on the scene
Searchers are woi
list of 90 missing pe
equates to about half
lation of Oso, a Nor
foothills community
miles northeast of Se
That list has not
public, but officials
includes not just re
may have been in the
others thought to be i:
traveling the highway
slide struck.


problem to at least 12
deaths and dozens of
crashes. The company said
the switch can slip out of
the "run" position, which
causes the engine to stall.
This knocks out the power
steering and power-
assisted brakes, making
the car harder to maneu-
ver Power to the device
that activates the air bags
is also cut off.
GM has recently ac-
knowledged it knew the
switch was defective at
least a decade ago, and the
government started re-
ceiving complaints about
the 2005 Cobalt just
months after it went on
sale.


A ~ Authorities have all but elimi-
D nated the possibility that some
I*. people on the list may have been
n l out of the area and simply have
not checked in. And they warned
the chances of finding anyone
WASH. alive amid the tons of silt and
mud was slim.
"I would say there's always
OREGON some hope, but ..." Tom Miner
AP said Thursday, trailing off before
finishing his thought. He is an
District 21 urban search-and-rescue leader
ots said Fri- for the Federal Emergency Man-
)le as saying agement Agency
People that Besides the 90 missing, author-
recovered." ities are checking on 35 other peo-
he expected ple who may or may not have been
te from the in the area at the time of the slide.
office by Fri- The mudslide could go down as
one of Washington's worst disas-
2knowledged ters, along with the 1980 eruption
25 people of Mount St. Helens that killed 57
red. Reports people and a 1910 avalanche near
found have Stevens Pass that swept away two
natives and trains and killed 96.
The deadliest landslides in his-
rking from a tory include one that killed 500
*ople, which people when a dam in San Fran-
' of the popu- cisquito, Calif, collapsed in 1928,
th Cascades causing an abutment to give way,
y some 55 according to data from the U.S.
*attle. Geological Survey
been made Crews that had worked for days
have said it in the rain and mud were getting
sidents who some relief as replacements ar-
ir homes but rived. The Colorado National
n the area or Guard sent 16 members of its fa-
ay when the tality search-and-recovery team
to Washington.


Study: Married folks have fewer heart problems


Associated Press


Love can sometimes
break a heart, but mar-
riage seems to do it a lot of
good. A study of more than
3.5 million Americans
finds that married people
are less likely than singles,
divorced or widowed folks
to suffer any type of heart
or blood vessel problem.
This was true at any age,
for women as well as for
men, and regardless of
other heart disease risk
factors they had such as
high cholesterol or dia-
betes, researchers found.
"It might be that if some-
one is married, they have a
spouse who encourages


them to take better care of
themselves," said Dr Jef-
frey Berger, a preventive
cardiologist at NYU Lan-
gone Medical Center in
New York.
But "we can't prove by
any means cause and ef-
fect," he said.
This is the largest look at
marriage and heart health,
said Dr Carlos Alviar, a
cardiology fellow who led
the study with Berger Pre-
vious studies mostly com-
pared married to single
people and lacked infor-
mation on divorced and
widowed ones. Or they just
looked at heart attacks,
whereas this one included
a full range from clogged


arteries and abdominal
aneurysms to stroke risks
and circulation problems
in the legs.
Researchers used
health questionnaires that
people filled out when
they sought various types
of tests in community set-
tings around the country
from an Ohio company,
Life Line Screening Inc.
Some of these screening
tests, for various types of
cancer and other diseases
or conditions, are not rec-
ommended by leading
medical groups, but peo-
ple can still get them and
pay for them themselves.
The study authors have
no financial ties to the


company and are not en-
dorsing this type of screen-
ing, Berger said.
Life Line gave its data to
the Society of Vascular
Surgery and New York
University to help promote
research.
The results are from
people who sought screen-
ing from 2003 through
2008. Their average age
was 64, nearly two-thirds
were female and 80 per-
cent were white. They
gave information on smok-
ing, diabetes, family his-
tory, obesity, exercise and
other factors, and re-
searchers had blood pres-
sure and other health
measures.


Recovery, not rescue


-From wire reports


Associated Press
A family of Egyptian
Geese preen their
feathers Friday at Kew
Gardens in London. The
Royal Botanic Gardens,
Kew is a popular tourist
attraction. It was founded
in 1759 and declared a
UNESCO World Heritage
Site in 2003.


Australians to
check objects
PERTH, Australia Ob-
jects spotted floating in a
new search area for debris
from the missing Malaysian
jetliner need to be recov-
ered and inspected before
they can be linked to the
plane, Australian officials
said Saturday.
Eight planes were ready
to comb the newly targeted
area off the west coast of
Australia after several ob-
jects were spotted Friday,
including two rectangular
items that were blue and
gray, and ships on the
scene will attempt to re-
cover them, the Australian
Maritime Safety Authority
said.
Newly analyzed satellite
data shifted the search
zone on Friday, raising
hopes searchers may be
closer to getting physical
evidence that Flight 370
crashed in the Indian
Ocean on March 8 with 239
people aboard.
The newly targeted zone
is nearly 700 miles north-
east of sites the searchers
have crisscrossed for the
past week.
8 cases of Ebola
in Guinea's capital
CONAKRY, Guinea -
Health officials in the West
African nation of Guinea
said they're now treating
eight cases of Ebola in the
capital.
Dr. Sakoba Keita, a
spokesman for the health
ministry, announced on na-
tional television the virus
had reached the city of
3 million.
Keita said Friday at least
70 people have died in the
country's south since the
Ebola outbreak began last
week.
The highly infectious
virus causes hemorrhagic
fever in its victims, with a
fatality rate of up to
90 percent.
Ousted leader
urges referendum
MOSCOW-- Ukraine's
fugitive leader pushed Fri-
day for a vote to determine
the status of each of the
country's regions a call
serving the Kremlin's pur-
pose of turning Ukraine into
a loosely knit federation.
The statement from Vik-
torYanukovych, the former
Ukrainian president who
fled to Russia last month
after three months of
protests, raised the threat of
more unrest in Ukraine's
Russian-speaking eastern
provinces, where many re-
sent the new Ukrainian
government.
Also Friday, Russian De-
fense Minister Sergei
Shoigu told President
Vladimir Putin that the
Ukrainian military with-
drawal from Crimea was
complete.
Ukrainian soldiers were
seen carrying duffel bags
and flags as they shipped
out of the Black Sea penin-
sula that Russia has
annexed.


Associated Press
Workers comb through debris Friday at the site of a deadly mudslide in Oso, Wash. Besides the bodies
already found, dozens more people could be buried in the debris pile left from the mudslide a week ago.

Washington community waits to hear full toll ofmudslide


NA










SPORTS


Michigan
punches ticket
back into Elite
Eight with win over
Tennessee./B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Baseball/B2, B5
'0 Golf, tennis/B2
U Scoreboard/B3
r. 0U Sports briefs/B3
) U NBA, NHL/B4
NCAA tournament/B4
'. U Auto racing/B5
Football/B6


UF set to face Dayton for Final Four berth


Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -The Day-
ton Flyers are feeling very con-
fident and loose with the upsets
they've already pulled this
NCAA tournament. They're also
ready to wreck what's left of any-
one's bracket with their greatest
challenge ahead and a trip to
the Final Four on the line.
Enter the Florida Gators, the
overall top seed.
While the llth-seeded Flyers
already have exceeded expecta-
tions going into Saturday's
South Regional final, the Gators
are driven too. They talk of
chasing greatness, trying to add
to a 29-game winning streak


that's the best in school history
Florida also is back in the Elite
Eight having lost here the past
three years.
"We're just very blessed and
fortunate to be a team that can
put themselves in this opportu-
nity to play for a Final Four
again," Florida senior Patric
Young said Friday "Going to
prepare and do the best we can,
especially as a senior class, be-
cause it's our last go-round to
make it to that next step."
The Gators' past three sea-
sons were ended by Butler in
overtime, Louisville and Michi-
gan. Young said the Gators
have learned lessons from
each of those regional final


NCAA tournament
South Regional final
No. 1 UF (35-2) vs.
No. 11 Dayton (26-10)
Time: 6:07 p.m. today.
TV: TBS
What's at stake: The
winner advances to the
Final Four against
either No. 7 UConn or the
winner between No. 1
Virginia and No. 4
Michigan State.
losses from not finishing a
game when they had a lead or
not coming out ready like a
year ago when Michigan
routed them 79-59.
"We're going to do the best we Associated Press
can and make sure we go out Florida freshman guard Kasey Hill had 10 assists off the bench
during the Gators' 79-68 victory over UCLA in the Sweet 16 on
See i ,Page B3 Thursday night.


I


arri


in


in


Kacer, Byers bik
strength for
SRCS softball .,.
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
heck the listing of the local
high schools softball stats
and it is clearly evident:
Seven Rivers Christian, a very
young team with nary a senior on .......
its roster, has developed into an
offensive dynamo. In nearlybD" frt "' '1
every category a Warrior leads .. ..... ... .
the county, and in runs batted
in -four of the top five spots are
inhabited by Warriors. ........
Granted, they don't consis- ......
tently play the same level of
competition other teams play. ..r... ..S
But if that's included, one ..........
should also consider that Seven
Rivers has a far smaller enroll-
ment to draw from.
However one decides to bal-, 11
ance those numbers, it might be
surprising to consider the com-
ment issued by Seven Rivers
coach Gary Dreyer: "Our pitch-
ing has carried this team."
Where this team has been car-
ried is to a District 2A-3 title and
a 10-2 overall record, and the two S
people most responsible for the
hauling are junior Tessa Kacer Ai,.
and eighth-grader Delaney .1.
Byers. Both are 5-1, Kacer pos-
sessing a 2.14 earned-run aver-
age and Byers a 2.71 ERA, and
each is averaging at least a strike- 7
out an inning. Only Citrus' Kelly .. .
Abramowich has posted better .. .. .
numbers within the county. ..,.
"Pitching is a key for any soft- ,,.. ,. ". -
ball team, particularly for us," .. ,"
Dreyer said. "For us to be able j Zf'b ,,.-
to throw either of them out ,
there and the girls have a con 4 ... ...
fidence, they know whoever is n ,z..= ,., -,.,, ,
on the mound, we'll have a
chance to win, because of our .-p"4 ..,
f .,. . .. .a .... '
two pitchers." ea.'.'
A year ago Seven Rivers went
11-10, and the reason for their .. .....
MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
See Page B3 Seven Rivers Christian School eighth-grader Delaney Byers is a big reason behind the team's 10-2 start to the Warriors' season.


Top-seeded Gators face upstart
Flyers in South Regionalfinal


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Phil Mickelson makes cut in Texas Open


Bowditch

leads entering

weekend

Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO Phil
Mickelson made the cut on
the number in the Texas
Open on Friday, blasting
out of a greenside water
hazard to 5 feet to set up a
birdie on the final hole.
Mickelson shot a
2-under 70 after opening
with a 77 at TPC San Anto-
nio's AT&T Oaks Course.
Lefty was 11 strokes be-
hind leader Steven
Bowditch, the Australian
who had a 67 to reach
8-under 136.
Mickelson was in the
stream that runs in front of
the 18th green after at-
tempting to reach the par
5 in two from 288 yards
with a 3-wood.
Bowditch holed out
from 83 yards for an eagle
on the par-4. The 30-year-
old topped the leader-
board at the end of a round
for the first time in his
PGA Tour career
Chad Collins and rookie
Andrew Loupe were a
stroke back. Collins shot
66, and Loupe had a 70.
Dori Carter takes
Kia Classic lead
CARLSBAD, Calif. Dori
Carter might have gotten a bit
ahead of herself late in the


second round of the Kia Clas-
sic. She still left everyone else
behind Friday.
After birdieing six of the first
seven holes on the back nine,
Carter bogeyed the final two
holes for an 8-under 64. The
round was her lowest in com-
petition and broke the Aviara
course record.
Winless on the LPGA Tour,
the former University of Mis-
sissippi player had 11 birdies
and three bogeys. At 10-
under 134, she had a two-
stroke lead over Stacy Lewis
and Cristie Kerr.
Lewis shot 66, and Kerr
had a 68.
Europe up 7-3
at EurAsia Cup
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
-Asia had two wins and two
halves in the five foursomes
matches at the Eurasia Cup,
with Europe needing a late
rally in the other match to hold
a 7-3 lead after two days at
Glenmarie Golf and Country
Club.
Prayad Marksaeng of Thai-
land and South Korea's Kim
Hyung-sung had a 4 and 3
win over the Danish pair of
Thomas Bjorn and Thorjorn
Olesen in the first result of the
day. Then Anirban Lahiri and
Siddikur Rahman closed out a
1-up victory over Joost Luiten
and Victor Dubuisson after
Asia led 2-up with two to play.
Europe, which led 5-0 after
winning all fourball matches
Thursday, then gained two
halves before Graeme Mc-


Associated Press
Jordan Spieth hits from a bunker Friday on the 15th hole during the second round of the
Texas Open in San Antonio.
Dowell and Jamie Donaldson Chad Collins 71-66-137 -7 Aaron Baddeley 70-71 -141 -3
combined to give the visitors Andrew Loupe 67-70-137 -7 Zach Johnson 70-71 -141 -3
Combined t give the ameron Beckman 69-70-139 -5 Wes Roach 75-66-141 -3
their only full point of day two. Pat Perez 68-71 -139 -5 Brian Harman 70-72-142 -2
VO Daniel Summerhays 72-68-140 -4 Jason Kokrak 71-71 -142 -2
Va ero xas ei Kevin Na 70-70-140 -4 Martin Flores 71-71 -142 -2
Friday, AtTPC San Antonio, San Antonio, Freddie Jacobson 70-70-140 -4 Jerry Kelly 71-71 -142 -2
Purse: $6.2 million, Yardage: 7,435, James Hahn 71-70-141 -3 Chesson Hadley 69-73-142 -2
Par: 72 (36-36), Trevor Immelman 70-71 -141 -3 Matt Kuchar 70-72-142 -2
Second Round (made cut only): Josh Teater 71-70-141 -3 Fred Funk 70-72-142 -2
Steven Bowditch 69-67-136 -8 Will MacKenzie 69-72-141 -3 Justin Hicks 69-73-142 -2


Bo Van Pelt
Brian Davis
Geoff Ogilvy
Michael Putnam
Scott Gardiner
Ryan Palmer
William McGirt
Carl Pettersson
Brice Garnett
Russell Knox
Scott Brown
Brian Gay
CamiloVillegas
Tim Wilkinson
Robert Streb
Briny Baird
Jim Furyk
Alex Prugh
Alex Aragon
Cameron Tringale
Stephen Ames
Andres Romero
Brendon de Jonge
Justin Leonard
Miguel Angel Carballo
Troy Merritt
Jamie Lovemark
Jordan Spieth
Michael Thompson
John Senden
Charley Hoffman
Ben Curtis
Troy Matteson
Seung-Yul Noh
Brooks Koepka
Branden Grace
Jeff Maggert
Johnson Wagner
Luke Guthrie
Andrew Svoboda
John Peterson
Charlie Beljan
Greg Chalmers
Charlie Wi
Jim Herman
Morgan Hoffmann
Jimmy Walker
Kevin Foley
JoeOgilvie
Tyrone Van Aswegen
Richard H. Lee
J.B. Holmes
Phil Mickelson
John Merrick
Stuart Appleby
Mike Weir
Brendon Todd
John Mallinger
Bronson La'Cassie


Now they count


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's Patrick Leonard is tagged out Friday by Detroit second baseman lan Kinsler during a steal attempt in
the third inning of a spring exhibition baseball game in Lakeland.


Tigers top Tampa

Associated Press

LAKELAND Miguel Cabrera
had a single in three at-bats soon
after the announcement of his $292
million, 10-year contract as the De-
troit Tigers topped the Tampa Bay
Rays 6-3 Friday in the final Grape-
fruit League game for both teams.
Alex Avila hit his first home run of
the spring for Detroit. Victor Mar-
tinez, Ian Kinsler, and Austin Jack-
son each had two hits.
Brandon Guyer homered for the
Rays.
Tampa Bay starter Matt Moore al-
lowed three runs in three innings,
striking out four Jake McGee
pitched an inning and struck out the
side.
Red Sox 4, Twins 0
FORT MYERS Mike Napoli hit a
solo homer to help the Boston Red Sox
defeat the Minnesota Twins 4-0.
The Red Sox gave Grady Sizemore
the day off after telling the oft-injured
three-time All-Star that he will be their
starting center field on opening day. He
has not played in the big leagues since
2011.
Red Sox starter Felix Doubront struck
out seven and gave up seven hits and
two walks in five innings. He lowered his
spring ERA from 9.64 to 7.11 in five
appearances.
Phil Hughes struck out two, walked
one and gave up four runs and four hits
in 5 1-3 innings in his final spring tuneup
for the Twins. He finished spring training
with a 4.74 ERA in five appearances.
Yankees 3, Marlins 0
TAMPA- Masahiro Tanaka struck out
10 and allowed three hits over six in-
nings in the New York Yankees' 3-0 win
over the Miami Marlins.
It was the final spring training appear-
ance for the Japanese star, who will


Bay 6-3 infinal spring training contest


Trout, Angels agree to
$144.5M, 6-year deal
LOS ANGELES Mike Trout and
the Los Angeles Angels have agreed
to a $144.5 million, six-year contract
that runs through 2020.
Baseball's brightest young star, the
22-year-old Trout was a unanimous
choice for AL Rookie of the Year in
2012. He finished second inAL MVP
voting to Miguel Cabrera the past two
years.
The outfielder would have been eli-
gible for arbitration for the first time
after this season, and for free agency
fnllnwinn the 9 17 \Wrlrl dSries. Now


he won't be eligible for fr
until at least age 29.


make his first regular-seas
Friday in Toronto. He replay
roki Kuroda in the fourth ir
struck out the first three ba
- Garrett Jones, Jarrod &
and Derek Dietrich.
In five exhibition games
up five runs and struck ou
innings.
The right-hander signed
lion, seven-year contract i
was 24-0 with a 1.27 ERA
leading Rakuten to its first
title.
The Yankees were held
Kelly Johnson had a lead(
ing a two-run eighth.
Pirates 3, Phi
PHILADELPHIA- Neil
three hits and an RBI to le
burgh Pirates to a 3-0 vict
Philadelphia Phillies.
Pirates starter Charlie [M
one hit in three scoreless
ing out one. Morton, who i


start the Pirates' second regular-season
game on Wednesday against the Cubs,
ended the spring with a 0.82 ERA in four
starts.
Tony Watson pitched a scoreless in-
ning. Watson hasn't given up a run in five
innings this spring. Russell Martin and
Clint Barmes added RBIs for the Pirates.
Chase Utley had all three of Philadel-
phia's hits, breaking out of a spring
slump with a pair of doubles. Utley en-
tered batting .175 with one extra-base hit
this spring. The Phillies have been shut
out in each of its last three games while
combining for six hits in those losses.
Blue Jays 5, Mets 4


eAanvv MONTREAL- Pinch-hitter Ricardo
ee agency Nanita singled with two out in the ninth

From wire reports inning to give the Toronto Blue Jays a
5-4 victory over the New York Mets at
son start next Olympic Stadium.
aced starter Hi- Acrowd of 46,121 turned out for the
inning and first baseball game at the Big 0 since the
matters he faced Montreal Expos' farewell game on Sept.
3altalamacchia 24, 2004.
The Blue Jays' Munenori Kawasaki
, Tanaka gave opened the ninth with a double and
t 26 over 21 scored from third as Nanita singled up
the middle. Jeremy Jeffress pitched the
d a $155 mil- final two innings for the win.
n January. He Royals 5, Brewers 4
last year while MILWAUKEE Brewers outfielder
Japan Series Ryan Braun homered and doubled in his

I hitless until first public appearance at Miller Park
off double dur- since his doping suspension, but Milwau-
kee lost 5-4 to the Kansas City Royals in
an exhibition game.
lilies 0 Braun's homer traveled 409 feet over
I Walker had the wall near straightaway center, giving
ad the Pitts- Milwaukee a short-lived, two-run lead in
ory over the the third. The hometown crowd show-
ered Braun with overwhelming applause.
lorton allowed The 2011 NL MVP went 2 for 3 with
innings, strik- three RBIs. He's now hitting .412 this
is scheduled to spring.


Nadal, Djokovic


walk into Sony


Open title match


Both receive

semifinal

walkovers

Associated Press

KEY BISCAYNE -No.
1-ranked Rafael Nadal
and No. 2 Novak Djokovic
advanced to the Sony
Open final without playing
a point Friday
Both received walkovers
when their semifinal op-
ponents withdrew for
health reasons. That left
Nadal and Djokovic to play
for the title Sunday in their
40th career meeting and
their first of 2014.
It was the first time since
at least 1968 that an ATP
Tour event had two
walkovers in the
semifinals.
Djokovic was given a
walkover for the second
time in the tournament
when Kei Nishikori with-
drew because of a left
groin injury Four hours
later, Tomas Berdych
pulled out before his
match against Nadal due
to gastroenteritis.
"It's very unlucky, very
unusual," Nadal said.
"Sorry for Kei, sorry for
Tomas, and sorry for the
tournament, especially
sorry for the fans."
Perhaps a thousand fans
arrived at the stadium un-
aware the Nadal match
had been canceled,
and they jeered the
announcement
The wave of ailments
left the tournament with
only two women's doubles
matches. Former No. 1
Martina Hingis advanced
to her first doubles final
since 2007 when she and
Sabine Lisicki beat Cara
Black and Sania Mirza 6-3,
6-4.
Today, No. 1 Serena
Williams will try for her
seventh Key Biscayne title
when she plays No. 2 Li Na
- health permitting.


Tournament director
Adam Barrett said the
withdrawals by Nishikori
and Berdych made it a
tough day for the event
"I ran into Cliff Buch-
holz, who was the tourna-
ment director before me
for many, many years,"
Barrett said. "He looked at
me and said, Adam, that's
never happened before. I
think you just set a record.'
I said, 'Cliff, not a record I
want to set"'
Djokovic also received a
walkover in the third
round and has played only
six sets in the tournament
He's seeking his fourth
title in the event, while
Nadal is 0-3 in Key Bis-
cayne finals, one of only
three ATP Masters 1000
tournaments he has yet to
win.
Nadal leads his rivalry
with Djokovic, 22-17, and
they went 3-3 last year
Nishikori and Berdych
both said they did what
they could to feel better
Each pulled out less than
two hours before his
match.
"I tried to warm up and I
couldn't move" Nishikori
said. "With anybody on the
other side, I don't think I
could win today"
Berdych has been
beaten in his past 16
matches against Nadal, but
the Czech blamed a virus
- not the losing streak -
for the stomach pains that
hit him Friday morning.
He said he became dehy-
drated despite receiving
intravenous fluids.
"That's the worst basi-
cally that a tennis player
can get," Berdych said.
"Without any energy or
anything, you cannot do
anything."
Spectators on Friday
will be offered a chance
to exchange their tickets
for a session at the 2015
tournament
"We will try to take care
of all of our fans the best
that we can," Barrett said.
"It's not an optimal
situation."


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B2 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-Toronto 41 31 .569 -
Brooklyn 38 33 .535 21
NewYork 30 42 .417 11
Boston 23 49 .319 18
Philadelphia 15 57 .208 26
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 49 22 .690 -
Washington 37 35 .514 12/2
Charlotte 35 38 .479 15
Atlanta 31 40 .437 18
Orlando 21 52 .288 29
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-lndiana 52 21 .712 -
Chicago 40 32 .556 11/2
Cleveland 29 45 .392 23/2
Detroit 26 46 .361 25/2
Milwaukee 14 58 .194 37/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 55 16 .775 -
Houston 49 22 .690 6
Memphis 43 28 .606 12
Dallas 43 30 .589 13
New Orleans 32 40 .444 23/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 53 19 .736 -
Portland 47 27 .635 7
Minnesota 36 35 .507 16/2
Denver 32 40 .444 21
Utah 23 50 .315 30/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 51 22 .699 -
Golden State 44 27 .620 6
Phoenix 43 29 .597 7/2
Sacramento 25 47 .347 25/2
L.A. Lakers 24 48 .333 26/2
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Orlando 110, Charlotte 105, OT
Washington 91, Indiana 78
Toronto 105, Boston 103
Brooklyn 108, Cleveland 97
Miami 110, Detroit 78
Portland 91, Chicago 74
Minnesota 143, L.A. Lakers 107
Oklahoma City 94, Sacramento 81
New Orleans 102, Utah 95
San Antonio at Denver, late
NewYork at Phoenix, late
Memphis at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Utah at Oklahoma City, 3 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Golden State, 9 p.m.
Memphis at Portland, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
NCAA Tournament
EAST REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
At Madison Square Garden
NewYork
Friday, March 28
UConn 81, Iowa State 76
Michigan State (28-8) vs. Virginia (30-6), late
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
UConn (29-8) vs. Michigan State-Virginia win-
ner, TBA
SOUTH REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
At FedExForum
Memphis, Tenn.
Thursday, March 27
Dayton 82, Stanford 72
Florida 79, UCLA 68
Regional Championship
Today
Dayton (26-10) vs. Florida (35-2), 6:09 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
At Lucas Oil Stadium
Indianapolis
Friday, March 28
Michigan 73, Tennessee 71
Kentucky (26-10) vs. Louisville (31-5), late
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
Michigan (28-8) vs. Kentucky-Louisville win-
ner, TBA
WEST REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
At The Honda Center
Anaheim, Calif.
Thursday, March 27
Wisconsin 69, Baylor 52
Arizona 70, San Diego State 64
Regional Championship
Today
Wisconsin (29-7)vs. Arizona (33-4), 8:49 p.m.
FINAL FOUR
At AT&T Stadium
Arlington, Texas
National Semifinals
Saturday, April 5
East champion vs. South champion
Midwest champion vs. West champion
National Championship
Monday, April 7
Semifinal winners



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Boston 73 50 17 6 106233 153
Montreal 75 4226 7 91195 188
TampaBay 73 4024 9 89217 195
Detroit 73 3326 14 80195 209
Toronto 75 3631 8 80218 235
Ottawa 73 3029 14 74210 246
Florida 74 2739 8 62178 240
Buffalo 73 2045 8 48139 218
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Pittsburgh 74 4722 5 99228 184
N.Y Rangers 74 4129 4 86197 179
Philadelphia 73 3927 7 85210 206
Columbus 73 3730 6 80205 198
Washington 73 3427 12 80212 218


New Jersey 73 3128 14 76177 190
Carolina 73 3232 9 73184 205
N.Y Islanders 73 2835 10 66204 246
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 73 50 16 7 107238 164
Chicago 75 42 18 15 99247 196
Colorado 73 4621 6 98224 200
Minnesota 74 3726 11 85183 188
Dallas 73 3527 11 81210 210
Winnipeg 74 3332 9 75206 216
Nashville 75 3232 11 75186 226
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-San Jose 75 4719 9 103230 181
x-Anaheim 72 4718 7 101231 182
LosAngeles 74 4325 6 92185 157
Phoenix 74 3626 12 84205 209
Vancouver 75 3430 11 79183 201
Calgary 73 3036 7 67185 214
Edmonton 73 2539 9 59180 241
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot


SCOREBOARD


For the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:


Thursday's winning
numbers and payouts:
Fantasy 5:2 4 16 -20 -21
5-of-5 2 winners $113,440.78
A _f C; -IA7 tlr-c


CASH 3 (early)
1-9-5
CASH 3 (late)
9-6-7
PLAY 4 (early)
3-8-0-9
PLAY 4 (late)
9-1-8-4
FANTASY 5
1-5-15-21-30
MEGA MONEY
14 20 25 34
MEGA BALL
4
MEGA MILLIONS
2-3-9-50-73


'+-uOi- i3+4 iu$ MEGA BALL
3-of-5 10,444 $9.50 12
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850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
10 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Sportsman Series (Taped)
10 a.m. (FS1) Sprint Cup: Martinsville practice
11 a.m. (FS1) Camping World Truck Series: Martinsville
qualifying
2:30 p.m. (FS1) Camping World Truck Series: Martinsville
race
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRASummitRacing.com Nationals
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Malaysian Grand Prix
BASEBALL
7 a.m. (MLB) Houston Astros vs. Texas Rangers (Taped)
10 a.m. (MLB) Cleveland Indians at San Diego Padres
(Taped)
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at New York Yankees
1 p.m. (MLB) New York Mets at Toronto Blue Jays
4 p.m. (MLB) Cleveland Indians at San Diego Padres
9 p.m. (MLB) Los Angeles Dodgers at Los Angeles Angels
of Anaheim
12 a.m. (MLB) San Francisco Giants at Oakland Athletics
(Same-day Tape)
3 a.m. (MLB) Seattle Mariners at Colorado Rockies
(Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Miami at North Carolina State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN) NCAATournament- Baylor vs. Kentucky
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament- Notre Dame vs.
Oklahoma State
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) NCAAToumrnament- BYU vs. Connecticut
7 p.m. (ESPN) NCAATournament- DePaul vs. TexasA&M
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (CBS) NCAA Division II Tournament Central
Missouri vs. West Liberty
6 p.m. (TBS, WYKE 104.3 FM)) NCAATournament-
Dayton vs. Florida
8:30 p.m. (TBS) NCAA Tournament-Wisconsin vs. Arizona
NBA
8 p.m. (NBA) Los Angeles Clippers at Houston Rockets
8:30 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Milwaukee Bucks
BOXING
10 p.m. (HBO) CedricAgnew vs. Sergey Kovalev
HORSE RACING
1 p.m. (FS1) Jockey Club Tour: Dubai World Cup
6:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Florida Derby/Louisiana Derby
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Valero Texas Open, Third Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Valero Texas Open, Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Valero Texas Open, Spotlight
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Kia Classic, Third Round
GYMNASTICS
11 a.m. (ESPN2) SEC Championship (Taped)
COLLEGE HOCKEY
NCAA Tournament
3 p.m. (ESPN2) East Regional Final: Teams TBA
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Boston College vs. Denver. Northeast
Regional final
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Minnesota vs. Robert Morris. West
Regional First Semifinal
6:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Midwest Regional Final: Teams TBA
9 p.m. (ESPNU) Notre Dame vs. St. Cloud State. West
Regional Second Semifinal
11:30 p.m. (ESPNU) UMass- Lowell vs. Minnesota State-
Mankato. Northeast Regional Second Semifinal (Taped)
NHL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Montreal Canadiens at Florida Panthers
7 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Toronto Maple Leafs
LACROSSE
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Notre Dame at Syracuse
2 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina at Johns Hopkins
6 p.m. (FS1) St. John's at Providence
MOTORCYCLE RACING
8:30 p.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross
RODEO
1 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR Table Mountain Casino
Invitational (Taped)
SOCCER
8:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Manchester
United vs. Aston Villa
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Crystal Palace
vs. Chelsea
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Arsenal vs.
Manchester City
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Chicago Fire at D.C. United
SOFTBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas-El Paso at Tulsa
TENNIS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP Sony Open, Women's Final
8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Sony Open, Women's Final
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Friday's Games
Philadelphia 4, Toronto 2
Pittsburgh 2, Columbus 1
Ottawa 5, Chicago 3
Dallas 7, Nashville 3
N.Y Rangers at Calgary, late
Anaheim at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Boston atWashington, 12:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 7 p.m.


New Jersey at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Dallas at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Anaheim atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m.
Calgary at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Nashville, 8 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Edmonton, 8 p.m.


Tim Uncecum goes down
with left foot injury
SAN FRANCISCO San Francisco
Giants right-hander Tim Lincecum left his
final exhibition start of the spring with a
left foot injury.
Lincecum went down writhing in pain
when he was hit in his back leg by a
hard-hit grounder from Oakland's Daric
Barton in the top of the fourth inning Fri-
day night. Lincecum tried to run toward
first but immediately fell to the ground,
unable to put any pressure on his foot.
He limped off the field with the assis-
tance of two trainers.
The two-time NL Cy Young Award win-
ner is suddenly a question mark with the
season opener Monday at Arizona. He
was set to pitch Thursday in the series fi-
nale against the Diamondbacks.
Lincecum signed a $35 million, two-
year contract in late October to stay with
San Francisco.
Texas A&M women
top field events
AUSTIN, Texas Top-ranked Texas
A&M got a strong performance in the
women's field events Friday at the Texas
Relays, winning the discus and triple
jump.
Aggies sophomore Shelbi Vaughan
set a school record with a throw of 198
feet, 10 inches at the meet held at the
University of Texas.
Texas A&M's LeQue Moen-Davis of
Texas A&M won the triple jump at 43-4 1/4.
Texas' Ryan Crouser set a meet
record in the men's shot put at 69-9.
Texas leads Cal in NCAA
men's swim meet
AUSTIN, Texas California won the
200-yard medley relay an American-
record 1 minute, 22.27 seconds Friday
night in the NCAA men's swimming
championships, and host Texas led the





WARRIORS
Continued from Page BI

success rested largely upon Kacer. She
was the Warriors' top pitcher, posting
an 11-9 record with a 2.71 ERA and 80
strikeouts in 118.2 innings. She also
paced the team in nearly every offen-
sive category, batting .438 with four
home runs, 32 runs batted in, 29 runs
scored and 31 stolen bases in 32
attempts.
With the loss of seven seniors, the
pressure to lead this year's senior-less
squad fell to juniors Kacer, Alyssa Gage
and Kim Iwaniec and Kacer knew it.
"Oh yeah, I put a lot of pressure on
myself on stuff like that," she admitted.
In retrospect, there was no reason.
That's how good the new additions
have been.
"They surprised me," Kacer added.
"We knew what to expect but they were
all pretty mature coming into this (sea-
son), they weren't scared of playing
harder teams, and they've all stepped
up."
In particular Byers, who has taken a
lot of the pitching pressure off of
Kacer. She isn't a four-sport athlete
like Kacer who also competes in
cross country, volleyball and basket-
ball choosing instead to concen-
trate on softball. She plays travel ball
for the 14-and-under Orlando After
Shock, a team that faces a lot of under-
16 teams because, according to Byers,
"in 14U there isn't a lot of competition
for us."
That's helped the Warriors' cause.
"Coming into this season I was sort of



FINAL FOUR
Continued from Page BI

there leaving no regrets," Young said.
Coach Billy Donovan, who won his
450th career game at Florida when the
Gators downed UCLA on Thursday
night, said this team is so very different
from each of the past three. Donovan
noted he had to replace three starters
in Mike Rosario, Kenny Boynton and
Erik Murphy from last year's team
alone.
But every loss to end a season hurts,
and Donovan isn't ready to separate
one from another
"I can tell you it was just as painful
in 2000 walking off the court losing the
national championship game as it was
losing last year in the Elite Eight,"
Donovan said. "So I don't know if
there's any easy way because I think
everybody this time of year is putting
their heart and soul."
Florida (35-2) hasn't lost since Dec. 2
at UConn, and the Gators' win over
UCLA matched the school record for
most wins in a season set by the 2007
national championship squad. Their


string of Elite Eights is even more im-
pressive considering no other team has
even made four straight Sweet 16s in
the same span.
Dayton coach Archie Miller was
asked if he has quizzed brother Sean
for tips on Florida's press considering
Arizona played the Gators last season.
Miller said his brother's too busy and
they're not talking anyway right now
But the Dayton coach has seen the
Gators plenty on TV
"You understand kind of their pedi-
gree right now," Miller said. "They're
the number 1 overall seed for a reason.


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 B3


Golden Bears by six points with one day
left in the meet.
California's Ryan Murphy, Chuck
Katis, Tony Cox, Tyler Messerschmidt fin-
ished 0.56 seconds shy of the NCAA
meet record set by Michigan last year en
route to the team title.
California is trying to win the team title
for the third time in four years.
Texas freshman Michael Hixon, the
1-meter springboard winner Thursday,
again sparked the Longhorns by taking
the 3-meter springboard Friday with
457.20 points.
Junior Boxing Championship
will be at Crystal River Mall
The 2014 Florida State Junior Olympic
Boxing Championship will take place on
Saturday, April 5 and Sunday, April 6 at
the Crystal River Mall.
Showtime on Saturday is at 5 p.m. and
on Sunday at 12 p.m.
The public is welcome to come sup-
port local youth from the Citrus County
Boxing Academy, a non-profit 501 C3 or-
ganization located in Homosassa.
Ticket prices are children 4 and under
are free, ages 5 to 11 are $5, children 12
and over and adults are $10.Aspecial
two-day family deal is $50. Tickets will be
available at the door.
For more information call Coach Don
at 352-476-8620.
Citrus Fishing Club
angles for members
If you like to fish with people who like
to fish, and maybe learn to fish better,
come see what the Citrus Fishing Club is
all about. Men and women alike meet at
7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at Ameri-
can Legion Post No. 155 at 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
For more information, call Steve Tres-
nak at 352-445-6743 or visit citrusfishing
club.org.
From staff, wire reports



ready for (varsity)," Byers said. "You
can't think about how much older (the
competition is), you can only think
about you and your catcher and throw-
ing strikes. That's it"
Byers has adjusted to varsity softball
well for a 13-year-old. Like Kacer last
year, Byers is among the team's offen-
sive leaders, currently batting an in-
credible .730 with two triples, two
homers, 28 RBI and 24 runs scored. She
also leads the county in stolen bases
with 21.
"We knew (Delaney) was a good hit-
ter, but we never thought she'd be (hit-
ting) .700," Dreyer said. "She hits the
ball solid, every time up at the plate."
Although at present she's not match-
ing last year's offensive output, Kacer
is still performing extremely well with
a .378 batting average that includes two
triples, a home run and 18 RBI.
"Hitting, I've been struggling with
this season, been in a slump all sea-
son," said Kacer, who also plays third
base. "I don't know what it is, but I've
been working on fixing some things. It's
been a developing process.
"Pitching is my favorite. I don't
throw it often, but I worked on a rise-
ball and that's probably my favorite
pitch. I have three pitches, a rise,
changeup and a fastball."
Byers has the same type of pitches
and has come close to mirroring
Kacer's prowess on the mound.
"They are (getting better)," Dreyer
said. "With Delaney going out or with
Tessa going out, we feel strong with ei-
ther girl. I feel blessed to have both of
them on our team."
It's the kind of blessing any team
would enjoy


They've won 29 games in a row I don't
know who can help me, to be honest
with you."
Miller will counter Florida's experi-
ence and winning tradition with his
very deep bench. Dayton (26-10) played
12 Flyers in beating Stanford 82-72 in
the semifinal, and they aren't worried
about seeding at this point of a tourna-
ment where they've already knocked
off Ohio State followed by Syracuse in
the opening weekend.
"It made us think we can play against
anybody in the country," Dayton guard
Jordan Sibert said. "It's just our nature
to know we can go out there and com-
pete for 40 minutes. At the end of the
game, we'll be right there to win it"
Donovan has been impressed by the
Flyers' unselfish approach with any of
12 scholarship players capable of scor-
ing double figures in any given game.
"The ball always finds the open
man," Donovan said.
Defense likely will be the key
Florida ranks third nationally in scor-
ing defense, allowing 57.8 points a
game. The Gators haven't allowed more
than 68 points in a game over the past
10 games. Dayton is pretty stingy too, al-
lowing only two opponents to top 70 or


more in its past seven games.
With plenty of Gators' fans setting
their sights on the Final Four in
Texas, Dayton could wind up with a
home-court advantage at the FedEx-
Forum. Miller said he had heard Fly-
ers' fans already have taken over
downtown Memphis with the raucous
campus celebration relocating to
Tennessee.
The Gators are ready to tune them
out, though they did have Tim Tebow
cheering them Thursday night
"We've been able to handle that all
year long," Young said.


I SPORTS BRIEFS I









Michigan holds on late to beat Tennessee
with 19 points as Florida beat UCLA
UConn tops ISU 79-68 Thursday night to reach its
inthe Ga-rde nalfourth consecutive NCAA regional
in the Garden final.


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Jordan
Morgan scored 15 points and Nik
Stauskas had 14 including a key
free throw to help Michigan hold
on for a 73-71 victory over Ten-
nessee in Friday's first Midwest
Regional semifinal.
The second-seeded Wolverines
now play either Louisville, who
they lost to in last year's national
championship game, or 2012 na-
tional champion Kentucky
Sunday
The Wolverines (28-8) led by 15
with 10:55 to go, but committed
four turnovers in the final 97 sec-
onds. Tennessee (24-13) cut the
lead to 72-71 and had a chance to
take the lead, but Jarnell Stokes
was called for an offensive foul
with 6 seconds left
Stauskas then made 1 of 2 free
throws and Tennessee's long des-
peration heave was off the mark.
Jordan McRae scored 24 to
lead the llth-seeded Vols.
UConn 81,
Iowa State 76
NEW YORK- DeAndre Daniels
scored 26 points, 18 in the second
half, and UConn held off Iowa State
81-76 to reach the East Regional


Associated Press
Michigan's Jon Horford, left, and Tennessee's Jarnell Stokes go after a rebound Friday during the
second half of an NCAA Midwest Regional semifinal game in Indianapolis.


final a year after the Huskies were
barred from the NCAA tournament.
Daniels hit his first six shots after
halftime, the only Husky to make a
field goal for over 8 1/2 minutes. His
3-pointer gave seventh-seeded
UConn a 49-32 lead.
The Cyclones rallied late, pulling
within 67-63 with 2 1/2 minutes re-


maining. But senior Niels Giffey hit a
3 in the corner for his first points
since the game's opening moments,
and when the Huskies (29-8) made
their free throws in the final minute,
the UConn fans packing Madison
Square Garden could celebrate.
Dustin Hogue scored a career-
high 34 points for third-seeded Iowa


State (28-8).
Late Thursday
South Regional
Florida 79,
UCLA 68
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Michael Fra-
zier II hit five 3-pointers and finished


The Gators (35-2) also extended
the best winning streak in school his-
tory to 29 straight in reaching the
South Regional final. The tourna-
ment's overall top seed will play
1 th-seeded Dayton tonight for a trip
to the Final Four.
Scottie Wilbekin added 13 points
for Florida, which is back where the
last three Gators seasons ended.
Casey Prather had 12 points, and
Dorian Finney-Smith had 10. Kasey
Hill had 10 assists.
Jordan Adams led the Bruins with
17 points, KyleAnderson had 11 and
five assists with nine rebounds.
Travis Wear added 14.
West Regional
Arizona 70,
San Diego St. 64
ANAHEIM, Calif. Nick Johnson
scored all of his 15 points in the last
2:45, after missing his first 10 shots,
and Arizona rallied to beat San Diego
State 70-64 and advance to the final
eight of the NCAA tournament.
Aaron Gordon and Rondae Hollis-
Jefferson scored 15 points each for
the top-seeded Wildcats (33-4). They
next play Wisconsin in the West Re-
gional final today.
Xavier Thames scored 25 points
for the Aztecs (31-5).


Orlando in overtime


Raptors clinch

playoff berth with

win over Celtics

Associated Press

ORLANDO Nikola Vucevic
scored 24 points and grabbed 23
rebounds, and Jameer Nelson
had five points in overtime as the
Orlando Magic edged the Char-
lotte Bobcats 110-105 on Friday
night.
Aaron Afflalo, who finished
with 17 points, sent the game into
overtime with a 3-pointer with 7.6
seconds remaining as Orlando
won its second straight.
In overtime, Nelson's 3-pointer
with 2:26 left put Orlando ahead
for good.
Orlando, which trailed during
the first 44 minutes, took a 94-93
lead on an Afflalo's free throw
with 1:12 left. But Josh
McRoberts, who had a career-
high 24 points, drove the lane to
put Charlotte ahead. Kemba
Walker then hit a fadeaway
jumper with 14.6 seconds left to
put the Bobcats up three.
Tobias Harris had 15 points for
the Magic, while Victor Oladipo
added 14 and Kyle O'Quinn 13.
Nelson, who missed the last four
games with a sore knee, had 11.
Raptors 105, Celtics 103
TORONTO -Amir Johnson scored
the winning basket with 7 seconds left,
and the Toronto Raptors clinched their
first playoff berth in six seasons by beat-
ing the Boston Celtics 105-103.
DeMar DeRozan scored 30 points as
the Raptors won for the 18th time in 24
home games. Terrence Ross had 17
points, Greivis Vasquez scored 15 and
Jonas Valanciunas finished with 13.
The Atlantic Division-leading Raptors
last reached the playoffs in 2007-08,
losing in five games to Orlando in the
first round. This is their sixth playoff
berth in 19 seasons.
Jerryd Bayless scored 14 of his 20
points in the fourth quarter, but it wasn't
enough for Boston, which has dropped
three straight and eight of nine.
Wizards 91, Pacers 78
WASHINGTON John Wall
scored 20 points, and the Washington
Wizards avenged two of their biggest
losses of the season, never trailing in
a 91-78 win over the cold-shooting,
turnover-prone Indiana Pacers.
Marcin Gortat added 17 points and
12 rebounds, and Al Harrington added
12 points, including a personal 10-0
run in the second quarter, for the Wiz-
ards, who dropped their first two
games against the Pacers this season
by a combined 47 points.
Paul George scored 19 points for
the Pacers, who have lost a season-
high four straight road games.
Heat 110, Pistons 78
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. LeBron
James had 17 points, 12 assists and
10 rebounds to help the Miami Heat
build a big lead, and then he rested in
the fourth quarter of a 110-78 victory
against the Detroit Pistons.
The banged-up Heat had little trou-
ble even though they were without
Dwyane Wade, Mario Chalmers, Ray
Allen and Greg Oden. Udonis Haslem
scored 12 of his 17 points in the first
quarter, when James already had


Associated Press
Orlando's Victor Oladipo, left, ties up the ball Friday as Charlotte guard Luke Ridnour goes up for a shot,
resulting in a jump ball during the first half in Orlando.


seven assists.
Greg Monroe and Will Bynum each
had 12 points for the Pistons, who
honored their 1989 championship
team at halftime.
Nets 108, Cavaliers 97
NEW YORK Paul Pierce scored
17 of his 22 points in a flawless first
quarter, and the Brooklyn Nets quickly
pulled away in the second on the way
to their 12th straight home victory,
108-97 over the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Joe Johnson added 14 points for
the Nets, who played three straight
overtime games on their road trip, los-
ing the last two of them. But things
were much easier back home, where
they won for the 19th time in their last
21 games.
They are hoping to open the play-
offs here, but still have work to do to
catch either Toronto or Chicago for
home-court advantage in the first
round.
Trail Blazers 91, Bulls 74
CHICAGO Mo Williams scored
18 points to lead five players in double
figures as the Portland Trail Blazers
won on the road for a second straight
night with a 91-74 rout of the Chicago
Bulls.
Damian Lillard had 16 points, Nico-
las Batum and Robin Lopez each had
13, Wesley Matthews had 11 and
Thomas Robinson added 10 for the
Blazers, who won in Atlanta on Thurs-


day after dropping the first three
games of their road trip.
Carlos Boozer had 16 points and
12 rebounds in 24 minutes to lead
Chicago.
Thunder 94, Kings 81
OKLAHOMA CITY- Kevin Durant
scored 29 points to help the Oklahoma
City Thunder beat the Sacramento
Kings 94-81.
Durant has scored at least 25 points
in 37 consecutive games, the longest
streak since Michael Jordan's 40-game
run for the Chicago Bulls during the
1986-87 season. Durant could have
done more damage, but he sat for
good with 1:25 left in the third quarter.
Russell Westbrook had 18 points
and six assists and Jeremy Lamb
added 13 points for the Thunder, who
have won five of six.
Ben McLemore scored 18 points and
Travis Outlaw added 17 for the Kings.
DeMarcus Cousins, who entered the
game ranked 10th in the league in
scoring, finished with four points on
2-for-8 shooting while dealing with foul
trouble.
Pelicans 102, Jazz 95
NEW ORLEANS Tyreke Evans
had 22 points and 15 assists, and the
short-handed Pelicans overcame the
loss of Anthony Davis to extend their
winning streak to a season-long five
games, 102-95 victory over Utah.
Davis left the game with a left ankle


injury less than four minutes in, further
depleting New Orleans' already injury-
riddled roster. Evans played point
guard for a second straight game, as
he did in an upset of the Los Angeles
Clippers on Wednesday night.
Anthony Morrow scored 20 points,
AI-Farouq Aminu added 13, and Austin
Rivers and Darius Miller each had 12.
Derrick Favors had 18 points and 11
rebounds for the Jazz, which lost their
third straight. Gordon Hayward added
21 points.
Timberwolves 143,
Lakers 107
MINNEAPOLIS Kevin Love had
22 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists
for his second career triple-double
and the Minnesota Timberwolves
hammered the woeful Los Angeles
Lakers 143-107.
Nikola Pekovic scored 26 points on
9-for-10 shooting in his first game
back from an ankle injury and Love hit
three of five 3-pointers in just three
quarters. Kevin Martin scored 17
points for the Wolves, who led by 19
points in the first quarter, 37 in the
second and 40 in the third.
Steve Nash made a surprise appear-
ance for the Lakers, picking up four
points and six assists in 14 minutes of
just his 12th game of the season. It was
about the only notable development for
the Lakers, who allowed the Timber-
wolves to shoot 67.1 percent.


Flyers 4,
Maple Leafs 2
PHILADELPHIA-
Vinny Lecavalier, Scott
Hartnell, Claude Giroux
and Wayne Simmonds
scored goals, leading the
Philadelphia Flyers to a
4-2 win over the Toronto
Maple Leafs on Friday
night.
Toronto's James van
Riemsdyk scored 4 sec-
onds into the second,
matching an NHL record
for fastest goal from the
start of the period. But the
Maple Leafs' skid reached
seven games.
Penguins 2,
Blue Jackets 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Chris Kunitz and Beau
Bennett scored goals 47
seconds apart midway
through the third period
and Marc-Andre Fleury
made 35 saves and the
Pittsburgh Penguins
clinched a playoff spot with
a 2-1 win over the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets.
Curtis McElhinney, tak-
ing the place of the ill
Sergei Bobrovsky, stopped
the first 28 Penguins shots
before Kunitz notched his
34th with 9:25 left.
Senators 5,
Blackhawks 3
OTTAWA, Ontario -
Craig Anderson had 46
saves and Clarke
MacArthur had a goal and
two assists and the Ottawa
Senators beat the Chicago
Blackhawks 5-3.
Erik Condra, Cody Ceci,
Milan Michalek and Kyle
Turris also scored for the
Senators.
Patrick Sharp, Marian
Hossa and Brent
Seabrook scored for
Chicago. Antti Raanta
made 24 saves.
Ottawa scored twice in
the third and killed off a 34
second two-man advantage
to hold off the Blackhawks.
Stars 7,
Predators 3
DALLAS The Dallas
Stars had seven players
score goals in a 7-3 vic-
tory over the Nashville
Predators.
Alex Goligoski had
three assists, tying his ca-
reer high.
Colton Sceviour, Trevor
Daley and Ryan Garbutt
each had a goal and an
assist.
Stars goalie Kari Lehto-
nen allowed three goals
on 28 shots.
Pekka Rinne had 22
saves.
After Nashville pulled
within 5-3 in the third pe-
riod on Eric Nystrom's
goal, Valeri Nichushkin
and Cody Eakin scored 9
seconds apart for a 7-3
edge.
-From wire reports


B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Busch blazes way to Martinsville pole


Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va. Kyle
Busch has seen it time and again
at Martinsville Speedway
Driving down pit road, head-
ing back onto the track and in
contention for the lead, Busch is
used to seeing the pole-sitter
gun the engine just off the jack
and reassume the race lead.
Busch hopes to finally get to
experience that for himself at
Martinsville Speedway on Sun-
day after earning the pole on
NASCAR's smallest, tightest
track for the first time in 19
career starts.
"I think that's a great thing for
us," Busch said after winning
the pole with a lap at 99.674
mph. "We get to pit there and of
course drop the jack and just
lunge across the line and be
good.
"You need to still run up front
all day I think that it's a great op-
portunity for us to pick up some
spots say if we're second, third,
fourth, whatever, but you defi-
nitely always want to stay as
close to the front as you can and
try not to use that box as much as
some guys have in the past"
The pole is the 14th of Busch's
career
In an interesting twist under
NASCAR's new knockout quali-
fying system, Busch won it while
Joey Logano set a track record.


Associated Press
Kyle Busch claimed pole position Friday for Sunday's Martinsville
Sprint Cup race.


That came at 100.201 mph dur-
ing the first phase of two-session
qualifying. All 44 cars competed
in the 30-minute first session,
and the top 12 moved into the
10-minute phase two.
Denny Hamlin earned the
No. 2 starting spot with a lap at
99.548 mph, and will be followed
on the starting grid by Logano
and Hendrick Motorsports team-
mates Jimmie Johnson and Jeff
Gordon. That puts Busch in
some pretty accomplished com-
pany because Hamlin (4), John-
son and Gordon (8 each) have
won a lot.
Busch, though, is coming off a
victory last week at Auto Club
Speedway in Fontana, Calif, and
while he said it wasn't dominat-


ing, it gave him hope that the Joe
Gibbs Racing teams are coming
together
"It just seems to be working
well right now, whatever is work-
ing," he said.
Hamlin, who promised earlier
in the day that he would win on
Sunday, wasn't in love with the
outside starting spot because it
can be tricky to get down to the
bottom on restarts from the out-
side, said nothing that happened
in practice or qualifying made
his change his view of how it can
all unfold.
"I knew, even going into this
weekend, I knew we were going
to be really good contenders and
be in the mix anyway," he said.
"I feel like after running a cou-


ple laps of practice I felt like this
was a car that was capable of
winning. I think with tire man-
agement being more of a factor
than it's ever been, it kind of
lends itself to my driving style
even more. For that reason I
think we'll be tough on Sunday"
Logano has two top-10 finishes
on the 0.526-mile oval, but none
since 2010.
"So we've got a track record,
but we don't have a pole. How
does that work?" he asked.
A solid pit position, he said,
could help turns things around
on Sunday
"Obviously, the pit stall is very
important, especially here. It's a
dangerous pit road, so you want
to get a nice spot you can get in
and out of, but obviously here it's
a slow pit road and you can
make up a lot with timing lines
on pit road," he said. "For that
reason alone it's big, and that's
worth multiple spots throughout
the race when you're thinking
about making a lot of pit stops."
Danica Patrick qualified 10th,
her best starting spot in a race
not held at Daytona. Her previ-
ous best starting position was
21st, accomplished twice last
season.
Sprint Cup

STP 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway


Martinsville, Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 99.674 mph.
2. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 99.548.
3. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 99.428.
4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 99.178.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 99.048.
6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 99.048.
7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 98.883.
8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 98.846.
9. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 98.625.
10. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 98.165.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 97.764.
12. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 97.382.
13. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 98.965.
14. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.929.
15. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 98.888.
16. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 98.877.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.712.
18. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 98.707.
19. (23)Alex Bowman, Toyota, 98.661.
20. (43) AricAlmirola, Ford, 98.625.
21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 98.61.
22. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 98.61.
23. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 98.599.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 98.599.
25. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 98.43.
26. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 98.379.
27. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.359.
28. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 98.333.
29. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 98.246.
30. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 98.206.
31. (78) Martin Truex Jr, Chevrolet, 98.2.
32. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 98.002.
33. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 97.957.
34. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 97.886.
35. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 97.82.
36. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 97.759.
37. (33) David Stremme, Chevrolet, owner points.
38. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, owner points.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner points.
40. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, owner points.
41. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, owner points.
42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, owner points.
43. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (35) David Reutimann, Ford, 97.759.


Ready to roll


Associated Press
Scott Dixon is strapped into his car before practice Friday for the IndyCar Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg
in St. Petersburg.


Former driver Franchitti returns to IndyCar as a spectator


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Dario
Franchitti found a spot on the Chip
Ganassi Racing timing stand and
settled in for the first IndyCar prac-
tice of the season. He donned a
headset, listened carefully to Tony
Kanaan's comments and studied
the speed charts.
It's the new normal for the three-
time Indianapolis 500 winner
Forced into a reluctant retire-
ment because of injuries suffered
in an October crash at Houston, the
40-year-old Franchitti is now at the
track in an undefined role with
Ganassi. He's been replaced in his
red No. 10 Target car by good friend
Kanaan, and finds he's got a lot
more free time on his hands now
that he's hung up his driving suit.
Franchitti said Friday there was-
n't any sadness as he watched the
series go on without him. But he did
have some of those emotions in Jan-
uary when he watched the Rolex 24
at Daytona as a spectator
He went to dinner with the
Ganassi drivers the night before the
opening practice, and that's when
the realization came over Franchitti
that he was no longer a competitor
"I started thinking about the next
day and I've got to get ready and it
suddenly hit me, no, I don't. I don't
have to worry about that" he said.
"That was a little sad. And then the
start of the race was a bit difficult
Sometimes I find myself sort of slip-
ping into the driver mindset of get-
ting ready and quickly it comes back
that no, I'm not doing that anymore."
Franchitti's career came to a
close because of a fractured spine,
broken right ankle and concussion.
It was the concussion that led doc-
tors to advise Franchitti that one
more crash could do permanent
damage to his brain.
Retirement has allowed Fran-
chitti to plan a move home to his na-
tive Scotland, where he's finding it's


nice to be able to relax a little bit.
"I used to put a lot of pressure on
myself, and my intensity level was
fairly high," he said. "I thought
about (racing) all the time. This is
all I did, and so I enjoyed the fact I
can just chill out a little bit. But I do
miss that little hit of adrenaline
sometimes that you get from the
pressure and being up against it,
being up against that pressure."
Franchitti, with 31 wins, four
championships and three Indy 500s,
was the face of the IndyCar Series.
Now he's just an employee for Chip
Ganassi, who is struggling to figure
out just what he wants Franchitti to
do for the team.
"If he can improve each driver
one position in the standings, he'll
be mission accomplished. That's all
you're looking for It's a tight grid.
It's a tight business," Ganassi said.
"I think the important thing is he's a
champion, he's a winner and we
wanted him as part of the team. I
would like that role to develop even
further than just sort of being a
driver coach. I don't like that term,
'driver coach."'
Some things from opening day
of the IndyCar opener at St.
Petersburg:
FAST FRIDAY
The first day of practice at St.
Pete showed that Honda has come
prepared for the season. After
struggling at this race a year ago,
Honda drivers paced both of Fri-
day's practice sessions and Takuma
Sato and Graham Rahal ended on
top of the board. Sato turned a lap
in 1 minute, 2.5615 seconds. Rahal
was second at 1 minute, 2.6122 sec-
onds and Will Power in a Chevrolet
was third at 1 minute, 2.6443 sec-
onds. The top 10 was an equal mix
of five Chevy drivers and five
Honda drivers.
Sato said his A.J. Foyt Racing
entry has a lot more in it.
"I'm happy with the balance and
the boys and the team worked re-


ally well," he said. "Let's hope this
continues and we will work on
speed for tomorrow."
Qualifying is today
MONTOYA RETURNS
Juan Pablo Montoya quickly
made himself back at home in an
open-wheel series after seven years
in NASCAR. He wasted no time
hopping on a Team Penske motor-
ized scooter to navigate his way
through the paddock. Scooters are
not allowed in NASCAR, but are
common for drivers and team own-
ers in IndyCar
The Colombian was 18th out of 22
cars in Friday's final practice, and
said his crew has work to do before
qualifying.
"Obviously we wanted to be a lit-
tle further up the speed charts, but
we knew it was going to be a learn-
ing process," Montoya said. "This is
my first time on this circuit so we
had to guess a little bit on the
setups."
RACE CONTROL
There have been two significant
changes to the 2014 rule book, with
double file restarts being elimi-
nated this season.
The second change was a re-
structuring of race control, which
will now be by committee and race
director Beaux Barfield won't be
solely charged with penalty deci-
sions this season. According to the
series rulebook, there will be three
stewards (for the season opener it's
Barfield, Brian Barnhart and
Johnny Unser) in race control. Any
one of them can call for a review of
replays and car data, which is fol-
lowed by a vote.
The senior steward will deter-
mine the severity of the infraction
and issue a corresponding penalty
if warranted. IndyCar president of
competition and operations Der-
rick Walker said he's proposed a ro-
tation of stewards for the 2015
season.


MLB toughens



drug agreement


Associated Press

NEW YORK In the
wake of the Biogenesis
scandal that led to 14 sus-
pensions last summer,
Major League Baseball and
its players' union an-
nounced Friday they are
toughening penalties and
increasing the frequency of
testing in the most substan-
tial revisions to their drug
agreement in eight years.
Players suspended dur-
ing the season for a per-
formance-enhancing drug
violation will not be eligi-
ble for that year's postsea-
son. In addition, discipline
will increase from 50
games to 80 for a first test-
ing violation and from 100
games to a season-long 162
for a second. A third viola-
tion remains a lifetime ban.
While there were two-
to-four major league sus-
pensions annually from
2008-11, the number in-
creased to 12 in 2012 and 14
players were penalized
following last year's inves-
tigation of the Biogenesis
of America anti-aging
clinic. Among them were
former NL MVP Ryan
Braun, who agreed to a 65-
game ban, and three-time
AL MVP Alex Rodriguez,
who is suspended for the
entire 2014 season.
"Obviously, that showed
that there was a need for
harsher and stiffer penal-
ties and this is a very
clear and resounding an-
swer for all of that," Los
Angeles Dodgers catcher
A.J. Ellis said.
Detroit shortstop
Jhonny Peralta and Texas
outfielder Nelson Cruz re-
turned from their 50-game
suspensions in time to
participate in last fall's
playoffs. Peralta became a
free agent and was given a
$53 million, four-year con-
tract by St. Louis during
the offseason.
"In the past it hasn't
been fair that guys, they
get popped, they serve
their suspension and they
come back and play in the
playoffs," said Oakland re-
liever Sean Doolittle,
whose team lost to Peralta
and the Tigers in the divi-
sion series. "Then on top
of that guys parlay it into a
bigger contract and getting
a raise ... it was frustrating,
mainly because he did so
well against us."
Accused of being slow to
react to steroids in the
1990s, baseball started
testing with penalties in
2004, established a 10-day
suspension for an initial
testing violation in 2005
and increased discipline
to 50 games in 2006.
In the last year or two,
many players spoke out
and said the deterrent
wasn't sufficient.
"There are 32 states that
have the death penalty for
murder, and murders hap-
pen in those states every
single day It's not going to
stop people from commit-


ting the crime, even if you
have a death penalty," Ari-
zona pitcher Brad Ziegler
said. "You've got to put
things in place better to get
them caught. That's the
thing. People do it when
they think they can get
away with it."
New union head Tony
Clark, a former All-Star
himself, said his members
wanted to make sure "a
player is not coming back
and affecting a change in
the postseason as a result
of the decision that partic-
ular player made earlier
in the year"
"Our hope here is that
the adjustments that we've
made do inevitably get that
number to zero," Clark
said. "In the event that that
doesn't happen, for what-
ever reason, we'll reevalu-
ate and move forward from
there. But as I sit here, I
am hopeful that players
make the right decisions
that are best for them, for
their careers and for the
integrity of the game."
Players who serve a
PED suspension also will
not be eligible for auto-
matic postseason players'
pool money shares but
may be given cash awards
at the discretion of their
teammates.
"There are a lot of guys
who haven't done it right"
San Francisco pitcher Tim
Hudson said, "and I think
the one thing that puts a
bad taste in people's mouth
that are playing are the
guys who have messed
around with the stuff but
then somehow have still
benefited contractually and
gotten paid more money
than they might have done
if they had been clean.
Those are the things that
kind of stick some players."
A player serving a
season-long suspension
will lose all his pay Under
the previous rules, Ro-
driguez gets 21-183rds of
his $25 million salary this
year, or $2,868,852.
'Although we had the
strongest program in pro-
fessional sports before
these changes, I am com-
mitted to constantly find-
ing ways to improve the
program in order to eradi-
cate performance-
enhancing drugs from the
game," said baseball Com-
missioner Bud Selig, who
had called a year ago for
harsher penalties.
An arbitrator would be
allowed to reduce a sus-
pension for a first or sec-
ond testing violation by up
to 50 percent if a player
proves by "clear and con-
vincing evidence" that a
positive test was not
caused by his "significant
fault or negligence." How-
ever, penalties may not be
cut for muscle-building
substances such as testos-
terone, human growth hor-
mone, Boldenone,
Nandrolone and
Stanozolol.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 B5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eagles cut DeSean Jackson


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Un-
able to find a taker on the
trade market, the Philadel-
phia Eagles Friday re-
leased dynamic wide
receiver DeSean Jackson.
Jackson was coming off
a career-best season in
The Philadelphia Eagles
released wide receiver
DeSean Jackson on Friday.
He was coming off a career-
best season in Philadelphia,
leading the team with 82
catches for 1,332 yards
and nine touchdowns.
Associated Press


Philadelphia, leading the
team with 82 catches for
1,332 yards and nine
touchdowns.
"After careful consider-
ation over this offseason,
the Philadelphia Eagles
have decided to part
ways with DeSean Jack-
son," the Eagles said in a
statement.
Jackson thanked the
Eagles organization and
fans in his own statement
Friday, and also denied
"unfounded reports" that
he was released for off-
field issues.
"I would like to make it


very clear that I am not
and never have been part
of any gang," Jackson said
in a statement. "I am not a
gang member and to spec-
ulate and assume that I am
involved in such activity off
the field is reckless and ir-
responsible. I work very
hard on and off the field
and I am a good person
with good values.
"I am proud of the ac-
complishments that I have
made both on and off the
field. I have worked tire-
lessly to give back to my
community and have a pos-
itive impact on those in


need. It is unfortunate that
I now have to defend myself
and my intentions. These
reports are irresponsible
and just not true."
Jackson has 356 career
receptions for 6,117 yards
and 32 touchdowns. He's
a dangerous returned who
went to the Pro Bowl in
2009 after taking two
punts the distance. Jack-
son has four career scores
on punt returns, including
the memorable 65-yard
game-ending return to
cap a comeback win over
the New York Giants in
2010.


Colter: Union idea good


Associated Press

BRADENTON Kain
Colter is not completely
sure what the landscape
will one day look like if col-
lege athletes are allowed
to unionize. He's just more
convinced than ever that
it's become necessary
The former Northwest-
ern quarterback, now es-
sentially the face of the
movement that could com-
pletely reshape college
sports, said Thursday that
a federal agency's decision
to allow the Wildcats to
form a union was an ex-
pected victory but also
represents just the first
step in what he knows will
be a lengthy process.
"There's so many differ-
ent components," Colter
said in an interview with
The Associated Press. "But
what this does ... it ensures
that players have a voice
and whatever route this
goes and whatever struc-
ture comes from college
sports, we have input.
We're out there sacrificing
so much. We're a big part of
what college sports is today
and the revenue that's gen-
erated off of it. We deserve
to have a say in that We de-
serve a seat at the table."
A two-page online letter
that he wrote might have
made it all happen.
Colter, 21, wasn't the first

NFL BRIEFS

Raiders sign
RB Maurice
Jones-Drew
ALAMEDA, Calif. Free
agent running back Maurice
Jones-Drew has agreed to a
three-year contract with the
Oakland Raiders.
The team announced
the deal on Friday to bring
Jones-Drew back to his
native Oakland.
Jones-Drew was hampered
by injuries and poor play his
final two seasons in Jack-
sonville and was allowed to
leave as a free agent. He had
8,071 yards rushing and 68
touchdowns in eight seasons
with the Jaguars.
Jones-Drew will join re-
cently resigned Darren Mc-
Fadden in the backfield this
season for Oakland.
Dolphins see
versatile Moreno
as a 3-down back
MIAMI Miami Dolphins
newcomer Knowshon Moreno
showed last year he can run,
catch and block, and they're
counting on him to do all three
a lot.
"Knowshon is a very tal-
ented back," general manager
Dennis Hickey said Friday.
"He's a three-down back who
can help our team in lot of dif-
ferent ways."
Moreno signed a $3.275
million, one-year contract to
play for Miami after five sea-
sons with the Denver Bron-
cos. He helped them reach
the Super Bowl last year
when he rushed for 1,038
yards, caught 60 passes,
scored 13 touchdowns and
reinforced his reputation as a
blocker of blitzing linebackers.
His catching skills should
make him a valuable option for
quarterback Ryan Tannehill,
who was sacked a franchise-
record 58 times last year.
"As a running back, you
want to be able to do it all,"
Moreno said. 'You need a run-
ning back to be an outlet for
the quarterback, and to run the
ball. You have to be versatile."
The Broncos made Moreno
the 12th overall pick in the
2009 draft, and he had his
best season last year.
From wire reports


to question why athletes
feel like their rights in col-
lege are limited, but it was
an online rant that he sent
to the National College
Players Association that
started the roll of this now-
enormous snowball. From
that note, an idea was
born, and the notion got le-
gitimized Wednesday
when a regional director
of the National Labor Re-
lations Board said North-
western's players should
be allowed to unionize.
The university will ap-
peal. Colter isn't worried.
"You saw how strong of a
ruling it was and that we
won every single claim,"
Colter said. "It's going to
be something that's really
hard to overturn."
At the root of Colter's ar-
gument for change is that
he believes college ath-
letes lack basic protec-
tions, such as the
guarantee of medical cov-
erage and the promise of a
four-year scholarship at
most institutions. It's com-
mon for scholarships to be
renewed annually, and
athletes have long felt that
they could be vulnerable
in situations like a change
in coaches or philosophy
He stresses, though, that
he enjoyed his time at
Northwestern. He raves
about Wildcats coach Pat
Fitzgerald, calling him the


best in college football. His
experience was not a bad
one, but Colter still can't un-
derstand why his attempts
to talk to the NCAA about
possible changes were re-
peatedly turned down.
"You can have the best
employer in the world and
you still deserve basic pro-
tections and basic rights,"
Colter said. "That's what
this is all about.... It wasn't
a complaint. It wasn't us
filing this out of abuse or
mistreatment or anything
like that This is what it is."
For that, he actually
thanks Northwestern.
"With any big change
there's going to be people
who are unsure and it's
too much, we're not going
to be able to do this, we're
not going to be able to do
that," Colter said. "But at
Northwestern, especially
at Northwestern, I've been
taught to think outside the
box, be a great thinker,
free thinker, be a leader,
make change. That's just
what we're doing. That's
what Northwestern pre-
pared us to do, to tackle
this challenge."
It would be very simple
for the 6-foot, 190-pound
Colter to just worry about
himself right now
He accounted for 5,023
yards and 50 touchdowns
- 18 passing, 28 rushing
and four receiving in his
four years at Northwestern.


Are you going to the CarnIval
Citrus County Fair? tlitS
Take your camera along Lg
and get some photos c o[ltl*X
of the fair happenings
and/or your friends. INigbts

* lI M' O F 5, O T O EoIS P ER.: IE R- O 10_o


Submit your photos to be entered into the contest
with an opportunity to have your photo published
in our after fair guide, "And The Winner Is".

This special section announces all of
the winners for the various fair
activities and contest

You can vote once per day during the voting
period. The Winner will be determined by
online voting and judge's choice.


Submission Period
Sun, Mar 23 2014
Sun, Mar 30 2014


Voting Period
Mon, Mar 31 2014
Sun, Apr 06 2014


I wwwchronic leolnects


Thi s 0 T S'na'
This Sunday's CHikfONIdE
www chronicleonline corn


B6 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


FOOTBALL


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RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nancy
Kennedy

GRACE
NOTES


It is, of course, a biblical blockbuster,
a 21st-century answer to Cecil B.
DeMille. It's also a disaster movie -
the original disaster, you might say It's
an intense family drama. Part sci-fi
film. An action flick? Definitely, along
the lines of "The Lord of the Rings." At
times you might also think of "Trans-
formers," and at one point, even "The
Shining."
But there's one thing "Noah" is not,
for a moment: Dull. So, what to make of


^,;


K*41
. -. : !


6-.. *'*7,'"^


- a- -


~~-# 42--


"Noah?" It's a movie that, with all its
occasional excess, is utterly worth your
time -138 minutes of it.
Although the real star of the film is
its visual ingenuity particularly in a
few stunning sequences, one must give
ample credit to Russell Crowe, who
lends Noah the moral heft and ground-
edness we need to believe everything
that ends up happening to him. Noah's
near-descent into madness would not
be nearly as effective had Crowe not


already convinced us of his essential
decency At the same time, the actor is
believable when pondering the most
heinous crime imaginable. It's one of
Crowe's more effective performances.
It wouldn't have been possible,
though, without considerable liberties
taken by Aronofsky and his co-screen-
writer, Ari Handel, in framing Noah's
story There's been controversy here,
See Page C2


:~% WI ThL
- -- ~uj~


Associated Press


Gospel


dreaming'


leads to


questions


As I mentioned in last week's
column, here at the paper
we never know what kind of
conversation we'll have when the
phone rings.
Recently, as I picked up the
phone, a woman blurted out, "Do
you believe God talks to you
through your dreams?"
My first thought: Is this a trick
question? Does she believe it or
does she believe it's hocus pocus
hooey-balooey?
My second thought: I hope she
didn't dream that God wants her to
run me over with a forklift.
I took a breath and took a chance
and told her that yes, I actually do
believe God talks to people
through their dreams, that there
are plenty of examples in the Bible
and that I believe he sometimes
talks to me through my dreams,
too.
(Although the one where Jesus
had Hugh Laurie's face Dr Gre-
gory House on "House" and was
eating a bag of potato chips is still
up for interpretation.)
The caller said she had had a
troubling dream and wanted to tell
me about it hoping that I might be
able to help her figure out its mes-
sage.
To set the dream up, she said she
had recently listened to a teaching
from the Book of Revelation where
Jesus tells the church at Ephesus
that they have "left their first
love."
As for her dream, here's the gist
of it:
She had left her husband, her
"first love," to go on a trip with an-
other man. They were in a car,
driving to a vacation place. I think
she said Nashville.
"We were happy and laughing
and having a great time, but the
closer we got, the more unsettled I
became," she said.
When they arrived, she knew she
couldn't go through with it.
"But I also knew just going that
far was too far," she said. "I had
hurt my husband and I was so,
so sorry"
She paused and said, "This
never happened in real life I
love my husband. But this dream
was so real, scary real."
In her dream she looked around
and wondered how she had gotten
there and she wanted to go home,
but she was afraid it was too late.
"I told the man, 'I have to go
back,' but I didn't know how And
then I woke up," she said. "What
do you think it means?"
I told her the truth, that I had no
idea. Dreams are personal, and I
would hate to say it means one
thing when God may have meant
something else. I told her to pray
and ask God to explain it. Maybe
she'd have another dream with the
answer
After we hung up, I couldn't stop
thinking about our conversation,
beginning with Jesus' words to the
church: "I have this one thing
against you. You do not love me as
you did at first" (Revelation 2:4,
New Life Version).
I thought about the words of the
hymn that play on a continuous
loop in my brain: "Prone to wan-
der, Lord I feel it. Prone to leave
the one I love."
I am acutely aware of my
propensity to leave Jesus as my
first love and of not knowing how
to get back.
However, rather than despair, I
thought about some other words of
Jesus, his story of the wayward son
who wanted to go home, but was
afraid his father wouldn't take him
back, and of the son's utter sur-
prise when he saw his father from
far away running to greet him and
eager to welcome him home.
But what if the story was not
about a son but about a wayward


Russell Crowe (top) and Logan Lerman (above) are shown in scenes from "Noah."


B


Y




Aronofsky's 'Noah' is


everything except boring


What to make of Darren Aronofsky's "Noah?" Perhaps that's the wrong question.
Indeed, what NOT to make of "Noah?" Because it is so many things.

Jocelyn Noveck
Associated Press


-, ?-," *- ," -..t'- :- *-.


See Page C3


,N





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOAH
Continued from Page Cl

but if you glance at the Bible, you'll see
why liberties are necessary: the story
takes up only a few passages, hardly
enough for a feature-length script.
And yet, it's one of the best-known
tales in the Bible, if most of us only re-
member the children's version, with vi-
sions of brightly painted animals
standing two-by-two on the ark. But
there's a much more serious backdrop:
Man's wickedness, and God's desire to
purge the earth of that wickedness.
Aronofsky dives headlong into this story
of good vs. evil, not only between men,
but within one man's soul.
We meet Noah and his family as they're
attempting to live peacefully off the land,
and ward off the greedy violent descen-
dants of Cain. Noah has three sons and a
wife, Naameh (Jennifer Connelly, genuine
and appealing). Along the way they pick
up Ila, an injured young girl who will
grow to love Noah's son Shem (an in-
vented character, played with sensitivity
by Emma Watson.)
Noah visits his grandfather, Methuse-
lah, embodied with scene-stealing vigor
by Anthony Hopkins. The old man -
and by the way, this is relative, because
Noah himself is already over 500 years
old, according to the Bible helps him
induce a hallucination, which brings a
vision. The Creator will destroy the
Earth in a great flood. Noah's job, of
course, is to build that great ark, and get
out of Dixie.


Associated Press


Russell Crowe is shown in a scene from "Noah."


It's a monumental task, but Noah has
help: the Watchers, huge, lumbering
creatures made of rock, who, for Aronof-
sky, represent the biblical Nephilim.
Are they angels, giants or men? Inter-
pretation varies.
But it is here that the movie courts
ridicule. These creatures look a little
too much like Transformers, and detract
from the mystical feel of the film. A gig-


gle is surely not what the director was
going for here, but he may get a few
But that ark? It's a wondrous thing -
constructed on a Long Island field, ac-
cording to measurements specified in
Genesis, and finished up digitally
Also stunning: the flood itself, more
chilling than any you've seen in a disas-
ter flick. It's also rather magical to
watch the animals arrive, two by two


(and by virtue of CGI) at the ark.
But for sheer cinematic beauty, it's
hard to beat the dreamlike sequence in
which Aronofsky illustrates the story of
creation, as recounted by Noah. At this
moment, you may well forgive any ex-
cesses in the film. Like his flawed hero,
Aronofsky has a vision a cinematic
one and the results, if not perfect, are
pretty darned compelling.


Places of worship


that offer love, peace:.

and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


NORTH CITRUS

CHRISTIAN

CHURCH
Phone: (352) 527-0021



Sunday Services: 10:30am
Bible Study:
Wednesday 6:30pm
Minister
George Plantz
Where your search for a
friendly Bible Church ends


4f Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


Hernando
Cturchof
The azarene
4A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


SPastor
Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday Aiiv it Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.

t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran
Church (L( XIS)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
. &w^r,,om;,- 'ot...
.fyffieort .% e.


Floral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.cori

1 PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM- Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraoi6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les 'Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel96fono: (352) 341-1711



^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
SDairold

Bettye
Rushing
















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I '- I l, r











Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1lumc.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


Hearts, ^



Voors
. .. Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1 V2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45AM- 9:30AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.




I, ......I ....


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday Worship
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Children's Ministry
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Student Ministry
7:00 pm
Wednesday
UPLIFT Prayer & Praise 7 pm
Child Care Provided
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com


MM Crystal
EME River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
0CkJN FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKySNL J
RIVICK
VJNITCD
N ECTHODI ST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:- A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


SFirst Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship ii'ih Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA

Come






Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KENNEDY
Continued from Page Cl

wife returning to her first love -
the husband she left? Would the
story end differently?
Maybe in real life it would, but
not when it comes to God as the
jilted husband. God would run to
greet his unfaithful wife and would
never hold her leaving against her
as a human husband might. He
would forgive without strings at-
tached. He would take her out to
dinner and shopping or maybe
they'd go to the beach or watch
movies together on the couch.
"Prone to wander, Lord I feel it,"
is the song that we all sing. We are
all wayward wives, leaving the One
we love to travel with another
lover
But the good news is, we never,
ever have to be afraid to return. In
Christ, there's no condemnation,
only forgiveness and mercy for
those who want it.
That's not a dream either That's
grace.
Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over, Victoria I
Know the Real Secret," "Girl
on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace." She can
be reached at 352-564-2927,
Monday through Thursday, or
via email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. corn.


Carter: male-dominated
religions oppress women
ATLANTA Former President
Jimmy Carter says male-dominated re-
ligions contribute to the oppression
and abuse of women by twisting sacred
texts to portray females as inferior to
men "in the eyes of God."
The 89-year-old Carter makes that ar-
gument in his new book, 'A Call to Ac-
tion: Women, Religion, Violence and
Power"
In an interview broadcast on NBC's
"Meet the Press," the former president
faulted his former denomination, the
Southern Baptist Convention, and the
Roman Catholic church for denying
women the same opportunities as men
to serve as pastors and priests.
Carter said some married men who
belong to those churches conclude that
their wives are inferior and treat them
accordingly
The Catholic Catechism and the 2000
Baptist Faith and Message declare that
men and women have different roles
but are equal in the eyes of God.


RELIGION BRIEFS
care law's birth control mandate.
The case involves family-owned com-
panies that provide health insurance to
their employees, but object to covering
certain methods of birth control that
they say can work after conception, in
violation of their religious beliefs.
Tuesday's arguments at the court fo-
cused mainly on the question of
whether profit-making businesses have
religious rights. The Obama adminis-
tration says they don't, but lawyers for
Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Spe-
cialties argue that a 1993 federal law
on religious freedom extends to busi-
nesses as well as individuals.
If the justices agree, they would have
to decide whether the government pol-
icy is crucial and is put in place in the
least objectionable way possible.
Justice Anthony Kennedy, whose
vote could decide the case, showed in-
terest in the argument that the compa-
nies could stop offering health
insurance and instead pay a tax of
$2,000 per employee. That route might
allow the court to sidestep the thorni-
est questions in the case.
b 1V41T rt y3 r -r~nL rilnt ,xr


Ull yClll Luillges uIUSllou
High court appears to be to hire gay Christians
divided over birth control NEW YORK -A prominent evangel-


WASHINGTON The Supreme
Court seems divided over whether
companies have religious rights that
should exempt them from the health


ical charity is reversing a policy
change announced two days ago to hire
Christians in same-sex marriages.
The humanitarian relief agency
World Vision said in a letter to support-


ers Wednesday that the nonprofit had
made a mistake by changing its policy
for the United States. The aid group's
leaders said they were broken-hearted
over the pain the decision had caused.
Agency officials had said Monday
they would now hire Christians in
same-sex marriage to avoid a divisive
fight that would hurt their work. But
the announcement sparked a social
media firestorm. Critics said they
would no longer give money to the
agency, while supporters increased
their donations.
World Vision is a $1 billion-a-year
agency based in Washington state that
provides disaster relief and supports
economic development.

Ball State, legislators
talk intelligent design
MUNCIE, Ind. Ball State Univer-
sity's president is planning to meet
with four conservative Indiana legisla-
tors who have questioned her decision
to prohibit the teaching of intelligent
design in a science course.
Ball State President Jo Ann Gora is
inviting the lawmakers to the Muncie
campus following their letter this
month about whether the school had
violated the religious and academic
freedoms of the professor involved.
The StarPress reports that Gora
wrote to the legislators that she felt it
would be more productive to talk in
person.


Places of worship


that offer love, peace ,


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
._ 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670

Come To ES I
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Shepherd

m s of the

T Hills

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offtiilith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truthli
of Jesus Chriit.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
S Wednesday
S 10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9-30-10-00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus C ~ i ~ "
714 ..
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES-
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm
795-4479


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.
p Woo



US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30

Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
David Curry


"The
Church






4~Hoosasa Spingsh
-DAYAII$ bm CH URCH
-.po jt~r Rumid Iy
I a 11 1th1a
t'i 'Iallrsor thto
CQ Sunay Sch o l mun30A. y"


C, HMorning Servc i11:0 gsM
Q Wed. SPr oayer tgD&BileSt'Cudy-


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor William Bremmer
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 4:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
SiLd.,, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong. A place to become."


FIRST
FIR T Ito Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
S9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I Missouri Synod
www. 1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion- 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School .............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Fm'.
352-422-(6 ;1
PaIor
Todd
Langdon


0j Crystal River
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12thAve') Nurser
| Provided




*fe^



road
Entist



rch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


THE
SALVATION M1I
My DI CITRUS COUNTY
ARM CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish
712S. cbol ve
Lec/nt
51 960....


unnTY
of Citrus County

A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING



WE ARE A JOYOUS COMMUNITY
WHICH INSPIRES, EMBRACES,
AND NURTURES ALL THOSE ON
THEIR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY.
SERVICE OFFERINGS:
SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT
CLASSES, WEDDINGS,
CHRISTENINGS, MEMORIALS,
AND HOLY UNIONS
WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30
NURSERY/SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30
I FOUND
NEW HOPE...,




FoundrI., La
KNOWING GOD, LOVING
GOD, SERVING GOD

2628 WWOODVIEW LANE
S LECANTO, FL 34461
352-746-1270
WWW.UNITYOFCITRUS.ORG


RELIGION


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION NOTES


Special events
Calvary Chapel's Holy
Grounds Cafe, 960 S. U.S.
41, Inverness, will host a dis-
cussion on first book of
Samuel and offer free coffee.
For information, call 352-726-
1480.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa invites everyone
to its outreach at 6 p.m. start-
ing Friday, April 4 through
Sunday, April 6. Special
guests, The Strength Team,
are a group of professional
athletes who are ministers
under the leadership of Mike
Hagen, a professional football
player who has put together a
special team of professional
athletes from various back-
grounds to help people come
to know Jesus Christ though
its powerful program.
Admission is free and do-
nations will be received. The
church is located at 10540 W.
Yulee Dr. in old Homosassa.
For more information call the
church at 352-628-3858.
Dave Sanderson, a sur-
vivor of the crash of U.S. Air-
ways Flight 1549 into the
Hudson River on Jan. 15,
2009, will speak at 3 p.m.
Sunday in the sanctuary of
Homosassa First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., off U.S. 19.
Sanderson, the last person off
the back of the plane, largely
responsible for making sure
many others made it out
safely, offers his personal ac-
count in his book, "Brace for
Impact." Exposed to frigid
water and freezing tempera-
tures, doctors feared Sander-
son would suffer a heart
attack or stroke from the or-
deal, but he returned to his
job as a sales manager the
following Monday. The talk is
the last of the seasonal offer-
ings of the church's Arts
Council Series. For tickets or


more information, call the
church office at 352-628-
4083, Jim Love at 352-746-
3674 Jim Potts at
352-382-1842, Karen Kline at
352-382-7263, or Ron
Hesketh at 352-382-4518.
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir will perform at
3 p.m. Sunday at Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church on
County Road 486 opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard, in Her-
nando. Holy Week service
schedule: Maundy Thursday
at 7 p.m. April 17; Good Fri-
day Tenebrae at noon and 7
p.m. April 18; Easter Vigil at 7
p.m. Saturday, April 19;
Easter sunrise worship at
6:45 a.m. Sunday, April 20,
with Festival Celebration of
Holy Communion at 8:30 and
11 a.m. For more information,
call 352-746-7161.
Rock Crusher Road First
Church of God will host an
"Old Fashion Hymn Sing and
Salad Supper" at 5:30 p.m.
Sunday. Everyone is invited to
bring a salad to share and
have a fun evening singing
some favorite hymns. The
church is at 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road, Crystal River.
For more information, call the
church office at 352-795-5553
or visit www.rockcrusher
church.com.
Everyone is welcome to
the April "Forgotten Film Festi-
val" at 3 p.m. Thursday at
the Unitarian Universalist Fel-
lowship, 7633 N. Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. A$3
donation is appreciated. For
information, call 352-465-
4225. Films to be shown:
Thursday "The World's
Fastest Indian." Anthony Hop-
kins plays a quirky speed
demon from New Zealand
who dreams of taking his mo-
torcycle to Bonneville Flats in
Utah to set a speed record.
Also starring Diane Ladd.
April 10-"The Help." The
story revolves around race re-


lations in the Kennedy-era
South. A young girl returns
home from college and tells
the story of the black maids in
a book that scandalizes the
town. Starring Emma Stone
and Olivia Spencer. April 17 -
"A Family Thing." An Arkansas
man learns he has an African
American half-brother in
Chicago. The two men strug-
gle through their long-held
grudges and prejudices and
gain an understanding of
each other and themselves.
Starring Robert Duvall and
James Earl Jones. April 24 -
"Unfinished Song." A group of
British senior citizens enter a
choral competition singing
rock and heavy metal songs.
Starring Terrence Stamp and
Vanessa Redgrave.
The Sanctuary and Grace
House Mission's fourth annual
fundraising banquet Free-
dom 2014-is at6 p.m.
Thursday at First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw
St., Homosassa. Tickets are
$35 for individuals, $60 for a
table or $300 to sponsor a
table. The speaker is Pastor
Doug DeRespiris of Lifepoint
Family Church. Testimonies
from previous and current
clients are also planned, as
well as music and singing,
with a special song from cur-
rent residents. For more infor-
mation, call 352-422-1877.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly out-
door flea market from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 5, on
the church property at 6 Roo-
sevelt Boulevard in Beverly
Hills off North Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491).
Shoppers are welcome. Up to
50 commercial and private
vendors from throughout Cit-
rus County are expected to
display their wares. Commer-
cial vendors and private indi-
viduals are welcome to bring


and sell goods. Spaces are
available for $10 and should
be reserved in advance. Cof-
fee, sodas doughnuts and
hotdogs will be available for
breakfast and lunch. This
church-sponsored flea market
takes place the first Saturday
monthly, September through
May. The next flea market is
May 3. For more information
or to reserve a space, call
Rose Mary at 352-527-6459
or email wjeselso@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The Holidaze Crafters of
Hernando United Methodist
Church will have their annual
spring craft sale from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 5.
The kitchen will be open and
there will be a bake sale by
the United Methodist Women.
For vendor information, con-
tact Robin at 352-445-1487 or
jbaker2051 @tampabay.rr.
comn. The church is at
2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486),
Hernando.
Floral City United
Methodist will have its last
chicken and biscuit dinner of
the season from 3:30 to
6 p.m. Saturday, April 5. Pur-
chase a complete meal for
$7.50. The church is at 8478
E. Marvin St., across the
street from the elementary
school. For more information,
call 352-344-1771.
The Christian Women's
Club's brunch is at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, April 8, at Southern
Woods Clubhouse. Featured


guest is Louise Whitney, a
stained-glass artist. Music will
be by Dan and Sandy More-
head. Speaker Kathy Baar-
man of Fort Pierce will
discuss her escape from com-
munist Hungary. Cost is $15
per person. For reservations,
call Hazel at 352-382-7990.
All are welcome. Visit www.
cwcfl.net.
Pope John Paul II
Catholic School's Class of
2014 Annual Lenten Fish Fry
is from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Friday
through April 11 at 4341 W.
Homosassa Trial, Lecanto.
This year's new menu in-
cludes hand-battered fried
fish, homemade clam chow-
der and fresh baked goods.
For more information, call
352-746-2020 or visit www.
pjp2.org.
Inverness Church of God
will host the "The Hunt" from
noon to 2 p.m. Palm Sunday,
April 13. Bring your Easter
basket and join us for lunch
and an afternoon of fun,
games, prizes, face painting,
and the egg hunt. The public
is invited and admission is
free. The church is at416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. For
more information, call the
church office at 352-726-
4524.
Holy Faith Episcopal
Church in Dunnellon plans its
Easter week events. Services
are as follows: April 13 Palm
Sunday at 8 and 10 a.m.; April


17 Maundy Thursday at 4
p.m.; April 18- Good Friday
at 4 p.m.; April 19 Easter
Vigil at 7 p.m.; April 20 -
Easter Sunday at 8 and
10 a.m.; and Stations of the
Cross at noon Fridays during
Lent. Everyone is welcome.
Reflections Church will
host its first "Easter Egg Mud
Run" from 9 to 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, April 19, with the
traditional Easter egg hunt at
11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Mid-
dle School. Cost of the "Mud
Run" is $10 per participant or
$40 for a family of four or
more. There is no cost for the
traditional egg hunt. To pre-
register or prepay for the
race, go to reflection-
schurch.net. The church's
Easter Sunday worship
service is at 10:17 a.m.
St. Paul's Lutheran
School and Precious Lambs
Preschool, at 6150 N.
Lecanto Highway in Beverly
Hills, invites all families in the
community with children up to
age 10 to attend its "Easter
Eggstravaganza" from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday, April
19. Enjoy an Easter egg hunt,
crafts, music, games, prizes,
food, fun and it's all free.
Families who pre-register at
www.stpauls.edu will be en-
tered into a drawing for a free
gift certificate. For more infor-
mation, call 352-489-3027.

See NOTES/Page C5


" Pastor
Tom Walker INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.,Jnve iiT, n 44-'-' ,
Saturday Nite

"The Ovations" in Concert
6:00 P.M.
Great Music, Fine Fellowship,
|Good Food!
S Never A Charge, -"
Come prepared to participate! | ,1


Places of worship


that offer love, peace ..


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


ftcci
I "Fir stFor C~hrist..John 1:41
FIRsT CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS H
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





"Rightl
.digthe
2:5

Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15 AM
Worship Service..10:15 AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
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I.l ld i .lL I.-

INVERNESS
CHURCH OF GOD
Sunday Services:
Worship Services..8:30 AM & 10:30 AM
Sunday School.....................9:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Classes For All Ages at 7:00 PM
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center" & "Cornerstone
Christian Supply"



| Pirsf
Ckusck
ofLake, Poas-eaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email: us" ,, ,,,
Check us out on Facebook


B ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation ml
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org










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Congregation
SMALL SERVICE







S T. 9: u0AM
A i f Cu ot ilsareCetheir
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afterward for a light lunch in
Felebrlowship Hall.te
:Youth Sunday :
: March 30th. :
m There will be one service m
at 10:00 AM. 0
Our youth will share their
*gifts, talents and faith with*
" our Church family and m
" community. Join us 0
*afterward for a light lunch in
Fellowship Hall.
ONEENEENEENE00.


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033



First United

Methodist

(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
Senior Pastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages

Sunday Worship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM- Vertical Kids
10:30 AM-Traditional

Wednesday Worship
6:00 PM-Vertical Youth
Foosteps Preschool
6:00 AM- 6:00 PM
Monday-Friday
S352-344-4331
Lic. #C05C10056


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239




169 00 0 00 0 00 r.




Hwy. 44 E @
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services .
Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
0 5th Sunday
0 of Any Month Combined 10am *
SSunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
0 Nursery Provided U
SFellowship & Youth Group
Sunday Evening
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgf
" Podcast: fpcinv.com

SChurch Office 637-0770*
Pastor James Capps


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org












VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PM. to 3:15 PM. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
-. .cathoflcweb.com .


C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buddhist mobs attack aid workers' homes in Myanmar


Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar Bud-
dhist-led mobs tore through
streets hurling stones at the of-
fices and residences of interna-
tional aid workers in
Myanmar's western Rakhine
state Thursday, prompting the
evacuation of almost all non-es-
sential staff, residents and offi-
cials said. Some were flown
out, others placed under pro-
tection at a police guest house.
There were no immediate in-
dications anyone was hurt in
the violence, which started in
the state capital, Sittwe, late
Wednesday and picked up
again early Thursday, with
angry crowds swelling in size
from several hundred to more
than 1,000.
At least one building was
looted and three cars damaged,
aid workers said on condition
of anonymity because they
feared retaliation.
State-run television said a
commission would be formed to
investigate the incident
Myanmar, a predominantly
Buddhist nation of 60 million,
emerged from a half-century of
military rule in 2011. But new-
found freedoms of expression
that accompanied its transition
to democracy have given voice
to religious hatred, causing vio-
lence that has left up to 280
people dead and sent another
140,000 fleeing their homes.
Most of the victims have been
members of the long-persecuted
Rohingya Muslim minority.
Aid groups that have been
providing care for those now
living in crowded camps -
where they have little access to
food, education or health care
- have for months faced
threats and intimidation by
Buddhist Rakhine, hampering
their ability to work.
Last month, the government
stopped the Nobel Peace Prize-
winning aid group, Doctors
Without Borders, from working
in the state altogether, in part


Associated Press
International and national staffs of non-governmental organizations transfer into a bus upon arriving in
Yangon from Sittwe Thursday, following Buddhist-led mobs that tore through streets hurling stones at
the offices and residences of international aid workers in Myanmar's western Rakhine state on
Thursday, prompting the evacuation of staff members. Tensions in Rakhine have been soaring ahead
of a national census the first in 30 years with many Buddhist ethnic Rakhine saying members of
the religious minority should not be allowed to identify themselves as
Rohingya on the survey.


because it had hired Rohingya.
Tensions in Rakhine have
reached fever pitch ahead of
next month's national census -
the first in 30 years. Many Bud-
dhists say members of the reli-
gious minority should not be
allowed to identify themselves
as Rohingya while not listed
among the 135 ethnicities,
there is an "other" category
where respondents could write
it in over fears it could legit-
imize their existence in the
country
Though many of their fami-
lies arrived generations ago,
they have been denied citizen-
ship by law
As part of the anti-Rohingya
campaign, Buddhist flags have
been place in front of almost
every house and office in Sit-
twe in recent days.
Up to 300 people surrounded


Malteser International late
Wednesday following reports
that a woman had removed the
flag from the group's office,
Rakhine state spokesman Win
Myaing said, adding that police
had to fire 40 to 50 warning
shots to disperse the crowd.
The organization could not
immediately be reached for
comment, but residents said the
woman who took down the flag
was seen holding it near her
waist, a sign of disrespect.
The violence continued
Thursday, with more than 1,000
people running through a street
that houses international aid
workers, throwing rocks at
homes and damaging several of
the residences.
"If police stopped them at
one place, the mob moved to a
different location and threw
stones at (nongovernmental or-


ganization) houses," Sittwe res-
ident Aung Than said by phone.
Police escorted aid workers
from their homes for safety rea-
sons Thursday, he said.
Dozens were taken to a guest
house.
Other aid groups said they
were evacuating all local and
foreign non-essential staff from
Sittwe, some on regularly
scheduled flights, others on
charters. Nearly a dozen ar-
rived in Myanmar's main city of
Yangon on Thursday afternoon,
some carrying blue "Save the
Children" bags.
Among those shepherded to
safety Thursday were three
Americans.
The U.S. Embassy in Yangon
said it was deeply concerned by
the mob violence and the in-
ability of security forces to stop
its spread.


"Unhindered and regular hu-
manitarian access to communi-
ties in need, and the safety and
security of humanitarian aid
workers to ensure the effective
delivery of these services, are
core international principles,"
it reminded the government in
a statement
Local Rakhine residents
have been angry with interna-
tional non-governmental staff
since communal violence first
erupted in mid-2012, accusing
them of being biased in favor of
the Muslim community There
have been several peaceful
protests in the past, but this is
the first time property of the in-
ternational aid organizations
has been so directly targeted.
Authorities were driving
around the city announcing the
6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew through
loudspeakers, said Tun Tha, a
Sittwe resident adding that sol-
diers and police were being sta-
tioned near the offices of the
United Nations and interna-
tional aid groups.
A statement by the U.N. resi-
dent and humanitarian coordi-
nator in Myanmar, Toily
Kurbanov, urged the govern-
ment to protect aid workers
and warned that "any reduction
of humanitarian presence
could negatively affect the pro-
tection of vulnerable people."
He called on authorities to
make sure those responsible
would be held accountable.
Almost all of Myanmar's 1.3
million Rohingya live in
Rakhine. Some descend from
families that have been here
for generations. Others arrived
more recently from neighbor-
ing Bangladesh. All have been
denied citizenship, rendering
them stateless.
For decades, they have been
unable to travel freely, practice
their religion, or work as teach-
ers or doctors. They need spe-
cial approval to marry and are
the only people in the country
barred from having more than
two children.


NOTES
Continued from Page C4


Rock Crusher Road First Church of God will host a com-
munity Easter egg hunt from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 19, on
the church property, 419 N. Rock Crusher Road, Crystal River.
There will be food, games, face painting, community booths,
fire trucks, and, of course, lots of eggs. Everyone is invited.
For more information, call the church office at 352-795-5553 or
visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
The annual rummage sale at Peace Lutheran Church will
take place from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 26. There
will be no early sales. Shoppers will find many unusual items
at amazing bargain prices. Hot dogs, chips and soft drinks will
be available. The church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles north
of downtown Dunnellon. For more information, call the church
at 352-489-5881.
SAt 10 a.m. Sunday through April 27, Rock Crusher Road
First Church of God will unpack what "SoulShifts" are with
practical, biblical suggestions for life. Join us in worship each
Sunday morning through this series as we explore a new
"SoulShift" every week. Be a part of one of the community
groups that meet Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Each week,
these groups take the "SoulShift" message and place empha-
sis on how to apply it to our lives. The church is at 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road., Crystal River. For more information, call the
church office at 352-795-5553 or visit www.rockcrusher
church.com.
Beverly Hills Community Church Food Pantry is participat-
ing in the 2014 Alan Shawn Feinstein 17th annual $1 Million
Giveaway to Fight Hunger. The more donations made to the
food pantry through April 30, the more of the Feinstein money
the pantry will receive. Donations can include cash, checks
and food items.
The Knights of Columbus will sponsor a Country Western
Dinner Dance featuring an "encore performance" by the Coun-
try Sunshine Band on Saturday, May 3, in the parish hall of St.
John the Baptist Catholic Church, 7525 U.S. 41 South in Dun-
nellon. The evening includes a country-style dinner, cash bar,
50/50, basket raffles and a door prize. Doors will open at 5:30
p.m., with dinner served at 6:30. Tickets are $15 and are avail-
able at the church office, from the Knights or by calling 352-
489-6221 for tickets/table reservations.
Southern Gospel solo artist Keith Plott will appear at 6:30
p.m. Saturday, May 3, at Lifepoint Family Church, 6430 S.
Lewdinger Drive, Homosassa, and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, May
4, at First Baptist Church of Homosassa, 10540 W. Yulee
Drive, Homosassa. Admission is free. A love offering will be
collected. Plott is a Southern Gospel Music Dove Award win-
ner along with multiple-time winner of the Southern Gospel
Fanfare Awards. He has performed at the "Grand Ole Opry"
and at the National Quartet Convention, and with such groups
as "Brian Free and Assurance," "Danny Funderburk & Mercy's
Way" and "Safe Harbor."
The Dunnellon Community Chorale will present its spring
concert "Down Memory Lane," at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 4, at
First United Methodist Church, 21501 W. State Road 40, Dun-
nellon. The concert is free to the public. A love offering will be
accepted.
"Awakening Florida" is coordinating a statewide prayer
gathering from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Park Av-
enue Baptist Church, 2600 S. ParkAve., Titusville. This will be
a day of prayer and fasting, calling people to cry out for God's
purposes and seek the destiny of the Lord for the state of
Florida. Everyone is invited to join this solemn assembly. En-
trance fee is $10. Registration and information at: awakening
florida.com.
Helping Hands Thrift Store, a ministry of Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church, is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund the food
pantry. The store accepts donations of household items, cloth-
ing and small appliances. Call 352-726-1707.
The Genesis Project, an in-depth analysis and discussion
of the text of Genesis, is conducted from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday


at Etz Hayim Institute the Adult Education Program of Con-
gregation Beth Sholom, 102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A class
on American-Jewish History is also offered from 8:15 to 9:15
p.m. Monday through June 23. Both classes are taught by
Hazzan Mordecai Kamlot. For more information, call 352-643-
0995.
Cornerstone Christian Supply, a ministry of the Inverness
Church of God, has available for purchase the newly released
novel, "At the Bottom of Biscayne Bay," by Fred H. Brannen,
Jr. The novel is a quixotic courtroom drama, wrapped in a love
story, with a thread of the inspirational truth concerning God's
unfailing faithfulness interwoven within its lines. Cornerstone
Christian Supply is an excellent source for all your Christian
needs: Bibles, greeting cards, books, T-shirts, gifts, etc. Cor-
nerstone Christian Supply is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
For more information, call the store at 352-344-2470.
The ladies of Lecanto Church of Christ meet for Bible
study at 10 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly. Bible study is
followed by a luncheon. Studies have included such subjects
as prayer, love and patience. All ladies are invited to attend
and enjoy Christian fellowship.
Community Christian Karate Club (CCKC) offers a Citrus
County group for learning karate skills, working on cardio, and
meeting new friends. Three different classes for three different
age groups are offered: the 4- to 7-year-old class, 8- to 12-
year-old class, and the teen/adult class. Classes take place
Tuesday evenings at New Hope Baptist Church, 8635 W.
Goodman Lane, Homosassa. Cost is $25 a month with dis-
counts for families. For more information, contact fifth-degree
black belt instructor Greg Gunn at 352-428-6348 or email
ggunn14@gmail.com or visit www.topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist Catholic Church offers Bingo at
11:30 a.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday featuring
regular, double and special bingos, together with a jackpot and
"pickle" game. Doors open at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m.
Wednesday. Kitchen features "homemade" soups and sand-
wiches. The church is on U.S. 41, three miles north of Dunnellon.
SAll widows in the community are invited to join the Widows
Ministry Group from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
"God isn't finished with us yet!" For information, call Darla at
352-270-8115.
m A Christian Bible-based spiritual recovery group meets


from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Living Water Ministry
Complex, 1 Beverly Hills Blvd., Beverly Hills. For more infor-
mation, call Meg at 352-527-2443.
"Get in Touch With Your Faith," a Christian information
class at Peace Lutheran Church," continues at 6 p.m. Thurs-
days. Pastor Terry McKee conducts the class for 1 hour
weekly. Everyone is welcome. There is no fee. To register, call
the church office at 352-489-5881 .The church is at 7201 S.
U.S. 41, five miles north of Dunnellon.
The Beverly Hills Community Church spaghetti suppers
take place from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday monthly in the Jack
Steele Hall at 86 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation of $8
per person or two tickets for $15 includes all-you-can-eat
salad, spaghetti with meat sauce, Italian bread, dessert and
coffee or tea. Come and enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door.
Ladies, come to "The Well" for refreshment and prophetic
prayer ministry at 7 p.m. the first Friday monthly at FresHope
Ministries, 2991 E. Thomas St., Inverness. If you are hurting,
need to hear a word from God, and/or spiritual growth and
strength, then this is the night just for you. Come comfortable
and come expecting to receive. You will not leave the same
way you came in. Call 352-341-4011 or visit www.freshope
ministries.com.
The Men's Club of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church on
U.S. 41 in Dunnellon play horseshoes at 9 a.m. Saturday.
Horseshoes are provided to anyone needing them along with
instructions in pitching, scoring and court maintenance.
Women, children and persons who have never pitched horse-
shoes before are invited to attend and share in the fun and
fellowship. For more information, call 352-489-5954.
The Saturday night Gospel Jubilee takes place the last
Saturday night monthly at First Church of God 5510 Jasmine
Lane, Inverness. Everyone is invited to come to enjoy or come
and participate. Prepare a number, bring your instrument if you
have one and join in this fun-filled evening. For more informa-
tion, call 352-344-3700.
The public is welcome to Zen meditation sessions at
2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto (off County Road 491). For more information, call
352-464-4955.

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7. Breakfast & Lunch Bake Sale.- By HUMW


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Hernando United Methodist Church
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486), Hernando
Vendor Information 352-445-1487
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$60.00 for a Couple
$300 to Sponsor a Table


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To obtain tickets, call Judy Awe at 352-697-0100.|


RELIGION


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 CS







P age C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 29,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Bus drivers plan sale to
benefit Relay For Life
Lecanto school bus drivers will
stage a big yard sale from 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m. today and Sunday at
3511 E. Delight St., Hernando,
River Lakes Manor
All proceeds will benefit Relay
For Life.

Learn to boat safely
with Flotilla 15-01
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 15-01 of Crystal River will
offer its most comprehensive safe
boating class, Boating Skills and
Seamanship, beginning
Wednesday
The class meets for nine ses-
sions from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday
Wednesday and Friday, and con-
cludes April 28 at the auxiliary
building, 148 N.E. Fifth St. in
Crystal River
Cost is $40 with a 50 percent
discount for the second family
member if participants share the
book. Nine topics about safe boat-
ing are covered in detail during
the two-hour sessions. After pass-
ing the test at the end of the class,
participants will earn the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Safe Boater's
card.
For more information or to
register, call Linda Jones at 352-
503-6199.

Encounter critters
at flea market
Howard's Flea Market, 6373 S.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Ho-
mosassa, will be up to its teeth in
alligators today and Sunday
Explore myths and facts in an
alligator encounter A wildlife
specialist will be on hand to an-
swer questions and will bring live
alligators and crocodiles for a
hands-on experience.
Next weekend, April 5 and 6,
alpacas will pay a visit to the flea
market There will be a demon-
stration of how luxurious fiber
has been made from their fur for
centuries with a spinning wheel.
Handcrafted items of alpaca fur
will be for sale.
The market is open 7 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday, 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday and 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday For more information,
call 352-628-3532.

Model A club to meet
Tuesday in Floral City
The Citrus As Model A group
will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
April 1, at the Floral City Lions
Club.
For more information, call
Secretary Denise Brimmage at
352-848-0810 or visit
wwwcitrusas.com.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Silver Bell


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Program that helps seniors needs more volunteers


Special to the Chronicle

Do you have time to do-
nate to seniors and those
with disabilities?
SHINE, a volunteer pro-
gram of the Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs, is
looking for volunteers in Cit-
rus and Hernando counties.
SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders)
is not for the working


person.
This program requires the
dedication of about 16 hours
per month, mostly during
workday hours, and more at
certain times of the year
Training is three full days
in length, followed by men-
toring sessions with trained
volunteers.
SHINE is about helping
clients make the best
Medicare health care


choices for their budget and
needs. SHINE is unbiased
and free of charge to the
public.
Volunteers will have all
costs covered during train-
ing and after Training will
take place May 28 to 30 in
Homosassa.
For more information or
to request an application,
call 800-262-2243 or visit
online at FloridaSHINE.org.


Keeping families safe


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue thanked Home Depot, Crystal River, for its donation of 108 smoke
alarms for families in Citrus County. The alarms will be distributed to families that don't have
them and do not have the financial means to purchase them. Those who qualify may call the
Fire Marshal's Office at 352-794-5505. If there is no answer, leave a message with your
name, physical address and telephone number. Fire Rescue staff will return the call and
schedule an appointment for an installation. Pictured, from left, are: Capt. Chase Hurst,
Home Depot assistant manager Julie Shutt, Fire Marshal Kenneth Clamer and driver/engineer
Nicholas Faso.


Lucky
winner

Citrus Macintosh Users Group
(CMUG) had its annual social
at Citrus Hill Golf & County
Club recently. Rita Coffman,
pictured, was the lucky
winner of an lpad2 and Paul
Thomas won an Apple TV.
CMUG is an all-volunteer,
nonprofit educational
organization, dedicated to
helping all people in our area
become familiar with their
computers, iPads or iPhones.
For more information, email
Laurie Martin at
cmugsftmc@gmail.com.

SANDRA REED/Special to the Chronicle


BRIDGE


Special to the Chronicle
Silver Bell has a very pretty and
soft dark gray coat. This kitten is
shy, but playful, and she is fixed
and ready for a home of her own.
There are other varieties of felines
to choose from as well. Drop by
and enjoy our felines in their
cage-free, homestyle environment
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians' Hardin
Haven on the corner of State Road
44 and N. Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of our felines online at
www.petfinder.com/shelters/
fl186.html.


SHARE Bridge Club
SHARE Bridge Club meets at 1 p.m. second and
fourth Mondays at Cornerstone Baptist Church,
1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness. All levels of
players are welcome. For more information, call
Julia Grissom at 352-341-0554, or Barbara Hackett
at 352-341-0149.
Point 0' Woods
Are you a card player, need a place to meet new
friends and enjoy a few hours of social moments?
Point 0' Woods Country Club, at 9228 E. Gospel
Island Road, welcomes residents in the area to join
us for lively afternoon of cards and laughter.
Duplicate bridge is played at noon Tuesday and
Friday. Call Barbara Pofahl at 352-341-1756 or
Elaine Spangenberg at 352-860-0358. Party bridge
is played Wednesday afternoon and Saturday
night. Call Mary Thomas at 352-637-0045.
For more information, call President Sandra
Koonce at 352-341-1747 or membership chairman
Marilyn Pruter at 352-287-2545.
Citrus Bridge Club
Learn to play bridge at the Citrus Bridge Club at
the Nature Coast Bank on the corner of County
Road 486 and Citrus Hills Boulevard in Hernando.


Instructor Pat Peterson has taught hundreds of
people for many years.
Lessons start at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 1. This is
a four-week course and it is free. Participants will
be able to play with peers in a relaxed game.Citrus
Bridge Club conducts games at 1 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.
Peterson also gives a free lecture for intermedi-
ate players at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday at the club.
Come and play anytime; partners are guaranteed.
Call Peterson at 352-746-7835 for more
information.
Nature Coast Bridge Club
Nature Coast Bridge Club has bridge games
(open and points) at 12:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday and at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at 3021 Com-
mercial Way, south end of Towne Square Mall,
Spring Hill. Games for all levels of players are of-
fered. Beginners lessons are at 11 a.m. Thursday;
other classes are conducted occasionally.
The games attract many Citrus County players.
For details and a complete schedule of games or
lessons, call Gary at 727-215-7651, or Mary Ellen
at 352-596-1524. Visit the website at
daily-recap.com., or Annabelle at 352-597-5221.


NEWS NOTES

Get ready to PLAY
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's PLAY programs to be of-
fered in the upcoming session
include basketball, which will be
held at the Citrus County Re-
source Center on Mondays or
Wednesday, and flag football at
Bicentennial Park on Tuesdays or
Thursday.
The next session will begin
Monday Boys and girls, ages 3 to
5, are invited to join the six-week
program. After enrollment, each
child receives age-appropriate
sports equipment and a team T-
shirt.
Registration is now open and
spots fill up fast. Space is limited.
Call Crysta Henry, recreation pro-
gram specialist for Youth Pro-
grams, at 352-527-7543, or visit
wwwcitruscountyparks.com, for
more information.

Platter Party at
Dunnellon Depot
Step back in time at a Platter
Party at Dunnellon Depot from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday The
Depot is across from the
Dunnellon Police Department.
Listen to golden oldies, or sell
or buy or trade oldies records.
Visit historical Dunnellon Depot
Have lunch in a local restaurant
and come back for dancing and
fun from 1 to 3 pm.
An appraiser will be on prem-
ises to evaluate old records free
of charge.
Door prizes will be awarded.
For more information, call 352-
489-2795.

AARP slates driver
courses in April
Florida is a mandated state and
any insurance company doing
business in Florida must give a
discount to those completing an
AARP Safe Driving Course, open
to everyone age 50 and older
Contact your agent for discount
amounts.
Update yourself to earn a dis-
count and learn about newly en-
acted motor vehicle and traffic
laws.
Course fee is $15 for AARP
members; $20 for all others. Call
the listed instructor to register:
Crystal River, Homosassa
Wednesday and Thursday,
April 23 and 24, 9 a.m. to noon,
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W Bradshaw Blvd.,
Homosassa. Call Frank Tobin at
352-628-3229.
Tuesday and Wednesday
April 29 and 30,10:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., Homosassa Public
Library Call Phillip Mulrain at
352-628-7633.
Inverness, Hernando, Floral City
Tuesday and Wednesday,
April 15 and 16, 9 a.m. to noon,
Citrus Memorial Health System
auditorium. Call Bob Dicker at
352-527-2366.
Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs
Tuesday and Wednesday
April 1 and 2, from 9 a.m. to noon,
Brown Funeral Home, 5430 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
Call Pat Hubbell at 352-586-2731.

Learn ballroom dance
at community center
Social ballroom dance classes
with June Queripel are offered
Wednesday at the Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Basics are taught at 1:30 p.m.,
Plus classes are at 2:45 p.m.
The one-hour lessons are $5
each. Proceeds help support
In-Home Senior Services.

Meals On Wheels
needs more drivers
Do you have a few hours a week
to volunteer your time?
If so, Citrus County Support
Services has a "feel-good" volun-
teer opportunity Become a volun-
teer Meals On Wheels driver
today
Each meal route consists of 10
to 20 meals, taking one to two
hours to complete, and drivers
are paid mileage.
The program especially needs
drivers for the Inverness area.
For more information about


how to volunteer to help feed
Citrus County seniors, call
Support Services at 352-527-5975.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

AT THE LIBRARY
CENTRAL RIDGE LIBRARY
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465-4281
352-746-6622
www.citruslibraries.org
March 31
Scrabble Game, 10a.m.
Senior Crafters, 1 p.m.
April 1
AARP Tax-Aide, 10a.m.
Education Research Group, 10 a.m.
Word: Getting Started, 10:15 a.m.
Preschool Stories, 11 a.m.
Fun & Games, 1 p.m.
Pre-GED Math Foundations,
4:30 p.m.
April 2
Tai Chi, 10a.m.
Mother Goose, 11 a.m.
Florida Breast and Cervical
Cancer Early Detection Program,
1 p.m.
April 3
Depression & Anxiety
Support Group, 10a.m.
Getting started with
Computers 1,10:15 a.m.
Wall Street Coffee Club, 10:15 a.m.
Pre-GED Social Science, 3 p.m.
April 4
AARP Tax-Aide, 10a.m.
April 5
Historical Novel Society, 1 p.m.


NEWS NOTES

Native plant group
to gather Tuesday
The Citrus Native Plant Society
will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic
Circle in Beverly Hills.
The meeting topic is "Forestry
in Central Florida" presented by
Eric Hoyer The meeting starts
with a brief business meeting, fol-
lowed by a speaker The group
will take a break for refreshments
and have its monthly native plant
raffle.
Anyone with an interest in na-
tive plants is invited to attend.

Come Zumba
in Citrus Springs
Who doesn't like a workout that
doesn't feel like one?
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation offers a Zumba class with
certified instructor Christine
Mehlenbacher
Let loose and burn up to 650
calories per session while having
fun dancing to easy-to-follow
steps.
Classes are held from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays
at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W Citrus Springs
Blvd. Register at the door
For cost and other information,
call Parks & Recreation at 352-
465-7007 or 352-527-7540.

BH Hadassah to meet
at Kellner Auditorium
Beverly Hills chapter of Hadas-
sah will meet at 1 p.m. Monday,
April 7, at the Kellner Audito-
rium, 102 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills.
Hadassah is a 100-plus-year-old
service organization open to all
men and women of every faith. It
supports colleges, universities,
medical schools and medical re-
search including stem cell re-
search, hospitals, infrastructure
and children's camps in both Is-
rael and America.
For more information, call
Miriam at 352-746-0005.

Get haircut, support
local Legion post
Quick Stop Barber Shop owner
Donna Bowman and her staff of
hair care professionals will do-
nate their time and provide free
men's, women's and kids' haircuts
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday,
April 13.
It is only requested that a dona-
tion be made to help American
Legion Post 237 perform its chari-
table and community programs.
The event will include music,
food, raffles and a silent auction.
All proceeds will be donated to
the Beverly Hills American
Legion Post 237.
The Quick Stop Barber Shop is
at 3541 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills, in the Winn-Dixie
Plaza. Call 352-527-3030.


Spirited group dances
bi-monthly in BH
Spirit of Citrus Dancers, USA
Dance chapter 6072, holds social
ballroom dances on the second
and fourth Saturdays of the
month at Kellner Auditorium
Jewish Center, 92 Civic Circle.
Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with
complimentary dance lessons at
7 p.m. and general dancing from
7:30 to 10 p.m. Admission is $6 for
members and $9 nonmembers.
Ice, coffee and snacks are pro-
vided. Sodas and bottled water
may be purchased. For informa-
tion, call 352 344-1383 or 352 746-
4274. Visit www.socdancer.org.


COMMUNITY


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 C7


Cleaning up Pine Ridge


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Association members and volunteers of the Pine
Ridge Civic Association participated in the group's
Adopt-a-Highway cleanup day recently. LEFT: Snoopy and
friends Nancy Doyle, Judy Lyon and Joe Spoto were among
the participants.


Informational meeting in Pine Ridge
Candidates MaryAnn Smith, Mike McCoy and Brenda
Roberts invite Pine Ridge residents to come and join
them at an informational meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
VFW Post 10087 Hall, 2170 Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
The candidates will discuss their plans and goals for
the Pine Ridge Community's future that must be heard
prior to the upcoming board election.
Also, these three candidates will then take questions
from the audience. Light refreshments will be served.


C news from the Beverly Hills area

COMMUNITY





Living history at library



Novelist to present Florida history program in Dunnellon Thursday


Special to the Chronicle
The Friends of the Dunnellon Public
Library will welcome Betty Jean Stein-
shouer with her latest program: "Florida
History from Palmetto-Leaves to the
Yearling to River of Grass at 1 p.m.
Thursday at the library meeting room,
20351 Robinson Ave.
Friends of the Dunnellon Public Li-
brary are pleased to present Stein-
shouer's Florida History Chautauqua
free of charge.
This is the first time she has character-


ized Harriet Beecher Stowe, Marjorie
Kinnan Rawlings and Marjory Stoneman
Douglas all in the same program, and the
first time their subject matter has been
dedicated to the history of"La Florida,"
their adopted state.
Steinshouer developed the program es-
pecially for libraries and has been tour-
ing with one of the Dreamers & Schemers
theatrical troupes. The audience will be-
come a part of her performance.
She was appointed a Fellow in the new
Florida Studies Program when it was
founded in 2000 at the University of


South Florida in St. Petersburg. She has
worked with the National Endowment for
the Humanities and the Big Read pro-
gram of the National Endowment for the
Arts throughout the country
Steinshouer is a poet, columnist and
writes fiction, as well as literary
nonfiction.
Some of her books are available on
amazon.com, and she is working on a se-
ries of enhanced e-books on her
Chautauqua characters.
For more information, call 352-
438-2520.


50 years
of service
Edwin Davis of Beverly
Hills was awarded his
50-year Service Award at
Ridge Masonic Lodge
No. 398 in Floral City on
Monday, March 10.
Worshipful Master Pete
Raymond of Inverness
presided over the
ceremony, which was
attended by over 40
dedicated Masons from
around Citrus County.
Following the ceremony,
dinner was prepared by
Cliff and Wallie Hammer,
consisting of garden salad,
baked lasagna and Italian
bread, with "Desserts by
Mary" Raymond.
Special to the Chronicle


Citrus Hills women plan card party


Special to the Chronicle
Come join the fun at the Cit-
rus Hills Women's Club's Mili-
tary Card Party fundraiser at
7 p.m. Thursday, April 17.
The event will be held at the
Beverly Hills Lions Club and


is open to the public. Coffee
and bottled water, along with
desserts, are included in the
price of $12.
Cash prizes will be awarded
to the top three winners.
There will be a drawing for
door prizes, and a donation to


the Scholarship/Charitable
Fund will get tickets to win
one of several baskets of
goodies.
For tickets, call Andrea at
352-344-3391 or Carol at 352-
860-2818. Get a table of four to-
gether or sign up as a single


and you will be placed in a
foursome. Checks should be
made payable to CHWC. Tick-
ets will not be sold at the door
the night of the event. Funds
raised go to scholarships for
local high school students and
donations to local charities.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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IS 46 40 46 6 5 Blog'G' Blog'G' Mandy Moore.'PG' Yof Steve Carell. (In Stereo)'PG'7 Med'Y7 'G'N Maddie
[PN 33 27 33 21 17 Basket Update Women's College Basketball NineforIX'G' SportsCenter SportsCenter (N)
ESPN 34 28 34 43 49 College Hockey NHRA Drag Racing Play Ball (N) E:60
WT 95 70 95 48 Living Cross Mother Angelica Live Night of the Prophet'G' Rosary Living Right Thirst for Truth
in 29 2 9 2 2 *** "Harry Potter and the Goblet *** "Harry Potter and the Orderof the Phoenix" (2007) Daniel *** "Harry Potter and the Half-
29 52 29 20 28 of Fire" (2005) PG-13' Radcliffe. Harry prepares a group of students to fight Voldemort. Blood Prinice" (2009) PG
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(TSJ 732 112 732 College Lacrosse St. John's at Providence. (N) I Motorcycle Racing Monster Energy Supercross St. Louis. (N) Sports
(Si 35 39 35 Panthers Panthers NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Florida Panthers. IPanthers lBoxing
F "Fantastic Four: *** "Rio" (2011, Comedy) Voices of Anne *** "Rio" (2011, Comedy) Voices of Anne Saint Anger
( 30 60 30 51 Silver Surfer" Hathaway, Jesse Eisenberg.'G' Hathaway, Jesse Eisenberg.'G' George
LF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) LPGA Tour Golf Kia Classic, Third Round. Central I PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, Third Round.
hr 59 9 5 5 "The Sweeter Side of "Meet My Mom" (2010, Romance) Lori When Calls the Heart *** "Just Desserts" (2004, Romance-
59 68 59 45 54 Life" (2013) NR' Loughlin, Johnny Messner. N (N)'G', cComedy) Lauren Holly .
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303 202 303 Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. R c cN N N 'MA' I Stereo) 'MA' "Mhysa" 'MA' c
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51 54 51 32 42 PG' 'PG begins between. 14' ancelorms.'14' 14'm Eye"14' Blood"' 14'
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24 38 24 31 Suspense) Moira Kelly David Cubitt. 'MR' c Kelly Andrea Bowen. Premiere. NR' McKellar, Jonathan Bennett. MR'N N
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3 2** "Fallen" (1998) **** "The Godfather" (1972) Marion Brando. A mafia patriarch tries to **** "The Godfather, Part II" (1974, Crime
320 221 320 3 3 Denzel Washington. hold his empire together. (In Stereo) R' B Drama) Al Pacino. (In Stereo)'R' c
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31 59 31 26 29 Evolution" (2006) R' Horror) Michael Sheen. R' Hungry vampires descend on an Alaskan town. R' of Night"
[B 49 23 49 16 19 2014 NCAA BasketballTournament (N) (Live) 12014 NCAA BasketballTournament N) (Live) Inside Madness
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r 35 6 ** "A Little Help" ** "Sahara" (2005) Matthew McConaughey "No Tell Motel" (2012, Horror) ** "Hiqh Tension" (2003, Horror)
C 350 261 350 (2010) Jenna Fischer (In Stereo)'PG-13' Angel McCord. NR' Cecile de France. R'
S 48 3 48 31 3 ***4/, "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers" (2002, Fantasy) Elijah *** "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" (2003,
48 33 48 31 34 Wood, Ian McKellen, LivTyler. PG-13' (DVS) Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen. PG-13' (DVS)
TD 38 58 38 33 Steven |Uncle **), "Diary of a WimpKid" (2010) King/Hill IKing/Hill Fam.Guy IFam.Guy Boon ISpace
f1IV 9 106 9 44 Food Paradise'G' Food Paradise'PG' Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures The Dead Files'PG'
iiiY 25 55 25 98 55 LLizILizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard i Lizard Lizard Safe Most Shocking
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47 32 47 17 18 Stereo)'PG' guesses himself.'14' Family Family Family Family Family Family Knows Plan"
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hJ 117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Knows Best? Knows Best?
WN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Bones'14' BBones'14'm IFunny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Rules Rules


North 03-29-14
S6 5 3
V A K 10 6 3
Q 10 4
I& A 8
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West East
A 10 9 2 Q J 8
S 5 4 Q 7 2
+98 9 763
4- Q J 10 9 3 4# 7 5 4 2
South
4 K74
V J 98
A K J 52
K6
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2* Pass
2 V Pass 3 NT Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: Q


SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

W Somerset Maugham said, "It's asking a
great deal that things should appeal to your
reason as well as to your sense of the aes-
thetic."
Bridge deals are sometimes aesthetic, but
the right answer to all of them can usually be
found by applying reason. In today's deal, what
is the reasonable approach for South in four
hearts after West leads the club queen?
North used a transfer bid followed by a jump
to three no-trump to show the values for game
with exactly five hearts and, probably, a bal-
anced hand. Here, South would have done best
to pass, but it is hard to quibble with opting for
the eight-card major-suit fit. (Note that the
transfer did its job. Four hearts by North goes
down if East leads the spade queen.)
Taken in isolation, declarer would finesse in
hearts. But here a heart finesse ought to be
fatal. East would win with his queen and
should shift to the spade queen.
Not wanting a spade lead through his king,
declarer should try to keep East off the lead.
South wins the first trick and cashes dummy's
two top hearts. When the queen does not drop,
he turns to the diamonds. Yes, East ruffs the
fourth round, but declarer has discarded one
of dummy's spades, so loses only one heart and
two spades.
Note that if West has queen-third of hearts,
South's play costs only an overtrick. And if
East can ruff the second or third diamond, de-
clarer is still all right when East either does
not switch to spades or holds the spade ace.
Always take the full deal into account.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
| CLEET

2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rghts Reserved
KALEN -_



FOCEFE



TOIWUT !



Print answer here:

Yesterday's Jumbles: BLIMP
Answer: When his
he was -


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

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Now arrange the circled letters r,





to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
SHOVE INFUSE IODINE
twin brother started mimicking him,
-BESIDE HIMSELF
l, _ ,- _f ,s \~
1 ,,



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Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon,


(Answers Monday)
SHOVE INFUSE IODINE
twin brother started mimicking him,
- BESIDE HIMSEFI


ACROSS
1 IRS employee
4 Earth, in
combos
7 Nail a fly
11 Alley from
Moo
12 Try out
13 "I did it!"
(hyph,)
14 Most
bryophytic
16 Pakistan's
language
17 Libertines
18 Probabilities
19 Opposite of
post-
20 Part of TNT
21 Hurry
24 Trellises
27 Ms. Hagen of
films
28 Venetian
magistrate
30 Fall guys
32 Seeks alms
34 Complaint


36 201, to Ovid Answer to Previo
37 Had to have
39 Palace
dweller JAME F I R
41 Fiddle idly USO |IcoN
42 Trot Mi 8 K L
43 Gets tangled
45 Bitter IPANF|R I ED
48 Metal thread I1 A D E E
49 Squabbled j I NX SAR
52 Pinnacle
53 Writing fluids 0UR 0 SITIU

55 The the A T
limit! L
56 HBO receivers G E N O A A
57 Bird beak I IlINf Pl


DOWN ILL1) L
1 Web suffix iS- U-- L a
2 Flat broke LSHJI
3 Lhasa 7 Small
4 Formation apartments
flyers Guardian's
5 Winding curve charge
SOld-time 9 Finds the sum
slugger F l
Mel 10 Frat letter


S. O014 UIFS. Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


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FAT
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L. H I tL:IVIH
ILEL E N
2 D ENT 9
12 Like a
wedding cake
15 Bldg.
manager
18 Sun,
poetically
20 Willow or
birch
21 Center
22 Pharaoh's
god
23 Herb or guru
24 Mellowed
25 Slightly
improper
26 Humane Org.
29 Knuckle
under
31 vous plait
33 Medium-size
sofas
35 Dresses
38 and don't
40 Hideous
monster
42 Face cards
43 Jagger of the
Stones
44 Military force
46 Man
Triathlon
47 Lox purveyor
48 Used to be
49 Drill
attachment
50 MdIse. bill
51 Party girl


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: This is in
response to "Bedwet-
ter," who is afraid to
move in with his girlfriend
for fear she'll find out he still
wets the bed.
My oldest son had a prob-
lem with bedwet-
ting and was
unable to attend
sleepovers because
he didn't want his
friends to know he
wore pull-ups at
night. My husband
and I decided to
take him to a urolo-
gist, and it was the
best decision we
ever made. His
doctor explained
that most people's AN I
brains produce a MAIL
chemical at night
that stops or slows
urine production. My son's
body wasn't producing this
chemical on its own. The doc-
tor prescribed a drug that
worked immediately, and my
son had no accidents as long
as he took the medicine be-
fore bed. It changed his life.
I strongly urge "Bedwetter"
to make an appointment with
a urologist as soon as possi-
ble. Happy Mother of an
Ex-Bedwetter
Dear Mother: Thank you.
We also recommend that
readers check the National
Kidney Foundation
(kidneyorg) at 1-888-WAKE-
DRY (1-888-925-3379) for ad-
ditional information. We
heard from a great many
readers on this subject and
appreciate their desire to
help. Here are a few of their
suggestions:
From New York: My broth-
ers and I were bedwetters
into elementary school. It


m
I
L


made life both difficult and
shameful. When my children
had the same problem, I took
them to the homeopathic doc-
tor who had been helping me
with my allergies. She said
research shows this can be an
inherited problem.
She said it was
handed down by
some distant an-
cestor who had
syphilis. I have no
idea whether this
is true, and it does-
n't really matter
Her remedies took
care of the prob-
lem for my kids.
What a blessing.
This young man
IE'S has a real problem.
.BOX No woman wants
to sleep with some-
one wearing dia-
pers. He needs help.
Florida: When I learned I
was pregnant, my mother told
me, "Congratulations. Now
you won't wet the bed any-
more." I didn't. When my son
was desperate to quit bedwet-
ting, he heard that honey
would help. He hated honey,
but took a teaspoon every
night before bedtime. I don't
remember how long he had to
suffer, but eventually, he
stopped wetting the bed.
Texas: My teenage grandson
had the same problem, and
nothing his doctor recom-
mended helped. My daughter
found a bedwetting alarm on-
line that trains the brain to
wake up when there is an urge
to urinate. After all the years
of bedwetting, it only took
three days before my grandson
had a wet-free night and about
a week before the problem
was solved completely
Ithaca, N.Y: I wanted to


add to your list of suggestions
that this fellow seek out a chi-
ropractor who has a proven
track record with correcting
nocturnal enuresis (nighttime
bedwetting). The chiroprac-
tor would be able to deter-
mine whether the enuresis is
coming from spinal nerve in-
terference. If so, then the
man is in the right place for
permanent correction of a
problem whose solution will
not be found with medica-
tions. I have been fortunate
enough to have helped a half-
dozen people with this prob-
lem who suffered needlessly
for years because they did
not know that a qualified chi-
ropractor could help.
Chicago: We had that same
problem in our family for
years, and a friend told us
that it could be due to a dairy
allergy After removing all
dairy from his diet, our son
stopped wetting the bed
within 24 hours. Dairy hides
in lots of foods, so be sure to
read the ingredients and look
for anything with milk, ca-
sein, cheese, sour cream,
whey or yogurt. For some rea-
son, butter and goat cheese
were not a problem.

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT


\FL I 1Cq F F! I HL I FK11j"Im 11, -r- Cmi I JIi





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


Sally Forth


S011501 PU5, HE'S
so, rbo PW1HE
JU5T SJT AT THE EATEN NOTHING
DINNER TABLEt OR CHEETQOS FOR
FO= NaCKJNS O THE PAST THREE
SOMETHING? f Y SQ..


Dilbert


For Better or For Worse -

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Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


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.//_ .-._.- *T, 5<|- ,NSTEAD ( LAST ONE




NrSV



Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"I agree. It's innovative, revolutionary and
groundbreaking, but 'better than sliced
bread'? ... Let's not get ahead of ourselves."


"Mommy, I think our soup is
contributing to global
warming!'


Doonesbury Classic


Big Nate
ANYtotrt S~l-TINGi
HERZE, r TER.?
TAKE A LOAD
OFF, YOUNGSTER')I1







Arlo and Janis


SAY, you I WAS
OKAY, JUST IN
SON? YtOU lTHE COMlICS
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Betty


Frank & Ernest


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R) 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) 2 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted" (PG) 1:25 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman" (PG) 1:10p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:35 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13) 10:25 p.m.
"Sabotage" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,


7:20 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Divergent" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:20 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Sabotage" (R) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Loca RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A enIeX


"VBB IW FZO GOFR' HIVN ATJR


VLVTJRF FZO NINLOHR FZTR XOVH


IDDPHHON VF NINLOH RFVNTPG." -


VJJIPJDOH HVBSZ UTJOH

Previous Solution: "Do I contradict myself? Very well, then, I contradict myself; I
am large I contain multitudes." Walt Whitman
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-29


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Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


COMICS


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 C9








CIO SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 DECLASSIFIED CITRUS Couivry (FL) CHROAIICLE


Chronicle






Classifieds (^


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


S @0 0 KZ,.,' - .. -,*@ *-^ 0 -0-0 -_- 0 0.0


10% OFF ALL
TRIKES IN STOCK
(352) 726-6128








BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
BEVERLY HILLS
2 S.Desoto St.Selling
entire contents of
house. Sat.9-5
Sun.10-3
BEVERLY HILLS
3129 N Tamarisk Ave
Sat Mar29 8AM 1PM
3 family misc items
CHIPPER/SHREDDER
10 HP,
3 inch branch cut
$150
(352) 344-1423
CRAFSMAN
PRESSURE WASHER,
2000psi, 2.0gpm,
3.75HP with attach-
ments. Never used.
$150.00 352-746-3605
Crystal River
Sunday Only 3/30
noon to 6pmr
MOVING SALE
30 Valare Lane, #202A
Magnolia Lodge Est.
off of Kings Bay Drive
FORD
1923 Model "T"
Coupe. Original.
Call 352-697-5530
FORD REPLICA
1929 Model A Roadster
Replica, Rumble Seat,
Convertible. 727- 422-
4433 or 727-423-1385

HOMOSASSA
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 8am-?
7464 S. Mindy Point
Indoors rain or shine
Nice Furniture
Everything Must Go!

INVERNESS
Sat 29th & Sun 30th
9am to 4pm
INDOOR SALE
Household Items
713 Constitution Blvd
JOHN DEERE 125
Riding Mower
22 HP, Auto, 42" Cut,
Twin Bags
Only 280 Hrs. I $750
Getting Larger Mower
352-341-1756
Korean Veteran in
need of a Scooter Lift,
must hook into trailer
hitch. Call Don
(352) 601-5119



LECANTO
Sat 3/29 8am
Garage work benches,
cabinets, tools, portable
generator, lift chair, and
miscellaneous items
750 Savoy St
OAK FRAMED CHAIRS
with cane seats. Excel-
lent condition. Early
1900's. Set of 4; $60
each.$240.
352-634-4906
PONTOON
20 FT., with 40HP
Yamaha, Trailer,
Good cond. $6,000
(352) 527-9376


INVERNESS
Tools & More, Sat 9-1
1017 E Harvard St
WASHER & DRYER
White, good condi-
tion, both work well.
$100 for both
(352) 382-0849 aft 1:00
Wedgewood English
Bone China. Pattern
Charnwood WD 3984.
Better part of serv. for
8 + serving pieces &
cabinet. $1,000
(352) 564-8874
P/T Caregiver
for senior citizen
psbl room& board
(352) 513-5547




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

L.ok

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-it
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Free to a Loving home
Pitt Bull &
Bull Mastiff Mixed
Puppies
(352) 287-0270
SONYO T.V. FREE
WORKS.CALL FOR
MORE INFO Linda
4234163



Cat-10 mo. old neu-
ter male. 10 Ibs, rac-
coon tabby w/ white
belly.
Lost 3/25 Cinnamon
Ridge (352) 201-7681
Dalmatian & Terrier
female dog, short,
med build. White w/
black spots. 13 yrs. Ans
to Cassy. Oak Lawn
area Homosassa. 352-
613-9234, 287-2624


Female Pit/Lab Mix
1/2 yr old, golden
color. Chipped, wear-
ing a blk shock collar.
Last seen on Rte 488/
Red Level. Call Hanna
352-440-0336 or Robt
316-0488. REWARD!!
Lost Cat on Mon 3-10,
10:30a. Blue Point
Himalayan. Goes by
"Blue". Has one eye,
underbite. Front paws
declawed. License &
rabies tags on. Cream
colored w/ gray tips &
tail. Last seen 44 E.
westbound after VFW in
the woods on right. Deb
@ 201-4800.
Lost Dog, Mix Breed
Male, reddish brown
Vicinity of
N. Meyers Square
Citrus Springs
(352) 465-8479,
(352) 637-6161


LOST1 YI RKIt
3-4 Ibs, silver & gold
female,
the Woodlands
REWARD
(352) 489-7585
352) 812-2027Cell
(352) 239-4815 Cell




Found Dog
Male Shepherd Mix
Leisure Acres Area
pls call (352) 628-3736
Male German
Shepherd, black/light
beige ,no tags or chip,
not neutered
found on mini-farms
Dunnellon, pls call
(352) 465-0077




w- Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Acceptina $15
yearly Membership
signups ages 6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*
Leadership Clubs.
download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.corn for info


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org


H.7ffiPY


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001





w- Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Exceptina g15
yearly Membership
sianups aaes 6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*Leadership
Clubs. download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.comn for info





Customer
Service
Representative

Excellent customer
communication skills,
for both outbound and
inbound calls.
Good problem solver,
Solid growing com-
pany with full benefits
Please mail Resume
to: Blind Box 1862P
Cit. Co. Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
Florida 34429





PT Housekeeper

Floral City Area
flexible hours, 2
houses to maintain
paid hourly based
on Exp. References
Back-Ground Ck
email resume to:
BELCOSYLVIE@
CENTURYLINK.NET








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





Certified
Veterinary Tech;
Veterinary
Tech/Assistant;
w Veterinary
Receptionist

Needed for busy,
state-of-the-art
AAHA accredited
Veterinary hospital.
Join a great team
of qualified profes-
sionals who provide
comprehensive
animal health care
ranging from pre-
ventive medicine
and vaccination to
intensive care and
involved surgical
procedures.
Education required
and experience
preferred for surgery
and dentals. Part
time or full time posi-
tions are available.
Full time position
includes medical
and retirement ben-
efits, paid vacation,
and continuing
education.
Please send resume
with references to
animaldoc24z@
yahoo.com.


COME WORK
FOR THE
BEST OF THE BEST

RN'S, LPN'S, CNA'S,
MDS-PRN
FT, PT, PRN
ALL SHIFTS
3-11 SUPERVISOR
WKND. SUPERVISOR

DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB
Contact
Linda Pursley, DON
352-746-9500 #725
don@diamondridge
healthandrehab
.corn



LI lrill *'. IrI j llt.
'v LlI st.
E i) Da)y


CHIPNICE
Classifieds


DENTAL
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo com

EXP. MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Busy Specialty
Group. Previous EMR
required. Must have
excellent computer,
organizational skills
and be a team
player. Competitive
Salary and Benefits
Email: cltruspulmon
ary@hotmall.com or
Fax 352-795-2269


Housekeeping
Laundry
Floor Tech

APPLY IN PERSON
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
Florida, 34442

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

WE ARE
GROWING
COME JOIN OUR
TEAM!

Full Time Positions:

RN, QI RN
and Staffing
Coordinator

Per Diem Positions:

RN, PT, OT, MSW
LPN, HHA
Must have home
health experience

COUIPREPEHSlVE
I3"Kom Care
For more
information contact
Mikesha at:
352-861-8806 or
email resume to:
mbeam@cwshome
health.corn

P/T Caregiver
for senior citizen
psbl room& board
(352) 513-5547

Live-in Caregiver
for elderly female
CNA pref. salary +
board, mail resume
to: Blind Box 1863M
CC Chronicle 1624
N Meadowcrest Bvd
Crystal River 34429








ft


I'm lovin' if

McDonald's
in Beverly Hills..

is accepting
applications for
employment for
0 All Part Time &
Full time Positions
I Opening & Closing
Managers needed
Please apply at the
McDonald's in
Crystal River, 625
N. U.S. Hwy. 19.

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
a- P/T Cooks
e Hostesses

Call 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment




Sales Positions

PT & FT for growing
Moving & Storage Co
CALL TYE 228-4900




AC Service Tech
1 year experience.
ETA cert., 40 hrs. wk
take home truck,
benefits and sign on
bonus after 90 days
Applyv in Person
814 N. Old Wire Rd,
Wildwood or
Call 352-3304433
Fax or Email Resume
to 352-330-1177 fax,
dsantisac@aol.com


im^

AUTO
DETAILERS &
MANAGERS

Homosassa Springs
& Brooksville
Dealerships
Call 727-808-0341

CAPTAIN
25 Ton & Up Only

Manatee Tours, in
water guide a must.
Apply
River Ventures at
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-12:30PM

Exp. Plumber

Very busy plumbing
company searching
for plumbers that are
hard working, reliable
and motivated.Valid
drivers license. Serv-
ing all of Central Flor-
ida. 352-341-4243

Immediate
Opening

for talented and
energetic construc-
tion personnel
in an aggressive,
customer-focused,
performance-driven
environment.If you
would like to submit
your resume for con-
sideration, please
send them to:
constructionteam
resume@gmail.com
DFWP/EOE.


































PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have Dr. Uc.
We provide 401 k &
Health Ins. Apply:
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa




CUSTOMER
SERVICE

Fast paced environ-
ment. Motivated to
learn all aspects of
business. Clean Driv-
ers Lic. Apply daily
until 2:00pm:
River Ventures
498 SE Kings Bay Dr
Crystal River

TOWER HAND

Starting at $1O.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F

WRECKER
DRIVER

EXPERIENCED ONLY
APPLY. Must live In
Inverness area.
Weekends a Must.
"Apply within"
Ed's Auto Repair.
4610 S. Florida Ave
No Phone Calls




P/T Exp. CNA

Needed 2 Days Wk.
Mon. & Fri. 7am-3pm
Inverness and
Wlldwood Area
352-697-1625

P/Th7Tregiverl
3pm to 9am, for
elderly woman w/
copd 352-322-0178




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAR HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


Leek

vvvvvvv
BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
527.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




OAK FRAMED CHAIRS
with cane seats. Excel-
lent condition. Early
1900's. Set of 4; $60
each.$240.
352-634-4906




4 Antique Chairs
2 are Hitchcock,
$200.
Side Board $100.
(352) 563-1327
COLLECTABLES
6 Franklin Mint McDon-
aids plates $99.00
364-465-6619
SALEM CHINA 6 salad
plates and 6 mugs. Sa-
lem Christmas Eve de-
sign. $99. for all
352465-6619
Wedgewood English
Bone China. Pattern
Charnwood WD 3984.
Better part of serv. for
8 + serving pieces &
cabinet. $1,000
(352) 564-8874




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER General Elec-
tric, stainless steel drum
$200.00 352-462-7041
GE BUILT-IN
DISHWASHER
nautilus, almond,
runs good.$50.00
(352)382-5297
GE Profile
Refrigerator.
Side by Side. Ice/water
in door. $150.
(352)726-9132
HAIER MINI REFRIG-
ERATOR with freezer.
Total dimensions
19x19x34, in perfect
condition. $75.00
352-503-7114
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
WHITE $75
352-613-0529
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, White,
super clean, Ice Cold
$150. obo
(352) 212-1751
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dkers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
WASHER & DRYER
White, good condi-
tion, both work well.
$100 for both
(352) 382-0849 aft 1:00
WASHER
GE Large Capacity
Good Condition
Stainless Steel tub
$150
(352) 503-2109
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398


139
476
285
612
957
348
593
764
821


247
851
369
583
412
976
728
135
694


DESK CHAIR
Adjustable High
Back,Swivel, Black.
$30 (352)564-4214









DUDLEY'S
"KUL'31OW




*5 AUCTIONS*
r 3-27 Estate
Adventure 3pm
outside treasures,
6:00pm 95' GMC
24'Box truck Cat
Diesel, Feather
machine,
Estate Furniture,
r 3-28 REAL ESTATE
*THREE HOMES**
Two in Beverly Hills
11 a 6 N Tyier St
Beverly Hills
1:00pm 35 S Harr-
ison St. Beverly Hills
3:30pm 942 E
Fernwood Place
Inverness
e 3- 29 REAL ESTATE
& CONTENTS
**MARION OAKS **
Auction: 9 Real
Estate: 10am 4231
SW 148th St Ocala
34473 2/2 starter
Crnr lot CONTENTS:
Antiques, house-
hold, great furniture,
garage.
call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction
.corn
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384




Ace/Oxy Bottles
Hose, Regulators,
Torch $175.
352-419-4066
Generac Generator
12.5 KW, mobile with
cover, factory spares
used twice, $1,500
(352) 746-6962 or
Cell 239-272-8101
JIGSAW BLADES
porter cable new blades.
75 wood and steel.
$45.00 firm for all.
352-382-5275
POULAN PRO CHAIN
SAW mod 262,18", 2.6
CID/42 cc
engine,carrying case,
oil. NEW in box
$150.Walt 527-2598
l10am-9pm
Record Power
Drill Master Lathe
9" over center, 11/2"
center to center 110V,
5.4 amps, Cast iron
bed 27" long, wood
stand $225.
(352) 382-3470 Bob
Werner 8' Fiberglass
Ladder, holds 250 Ibs
$70. Craftsman
Corded Reciprocating
Saw, w/manual,
blades & case $25.
352-476-1578




40" Sony TV
HD 1080 Bravia
A1 condition
$150. call
(352) 637-5227
AV receiver/amp
$20.
352-4194464
Fisher Amplifier CA-58
with Yamaha NS-A525
Speakers $20.
352-4194464
KAROKE WITH CD
PLAYER & 5.5"
SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
PANOSONIC TV 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
PANOSONIC TV 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $50
352-613-0529
SYLVANIA TV 32"
WITH REMOTE $50
352-613-0529




STILTS FOR DOING
SHEETROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316


658~

392
417

974

863
521
146
289
735


COMPUTER
SPEAKERS/NEW $5.00
LINDA 423-4263
COMPUTER
SPEAKERS/NEW 5.00
LINDA 423-4263
CYBER ACOUSTICS
CA-2.2 COMPUTER
SPEAKERS Brand
new, never used, only
$10.00 (352)465-1616
DEL FLAT SCREEN 14
in Good condition
$20.00 Linda 423-4163
DELL MONITOR 16 in
wide .Fair condition
10.00 Linda 423-4263
KEYBOARD Brand
new, never used, only
$5.00 (352)465-1616
SAMSUNG FLAT
SCREEN MONITOR 17
in NEW $50 LINDA
423-4263



**200 Bottle-
Wine Credenza
just replaced cooling
unit in March, looks
like new, 50 btu
Breezeaire cooling
unit, solid maple trim,
doors & panels w/vin
view top, glass inserts
38/2 -Lx68" W x 30" D
bought new $3600.
sell for $1500.
(352) 249-3248
2 CREAM VINYL
CHAIRS WITH ARMS &
CASTORS $20 for both
352-228-9451
2 Twin Beds
w/nightstand &
bedding $125.00
Sofa. $75.00, both
good condition
(423) 612-9229
6 Pc. Vintage Black
Asian King
Bedroom Set $250.,
Pictures
$30. for All
(815) 980-8642
6FT BLACK VINYL
FUTON, $150.
Black wrought iron
glasstop coffee
table, $25.
(352) 777-9307
BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in Original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
COFFEE TABLE
Metal & glass table.
Excellent condition $75.
352-746-7502
COFFEE TABLE round
black glass coffee table.
75.00 352-795-9664
COFFEE TABLE wood
44 by 33. Eight storage
drawers. $50.00
352-462-7041
Entertainment Center
49" wide x 48" tall x 28"
deep, dark wood
grain, $120. call Larry
(352) 344-1692
a, HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
LOVE SEATS Two
white love seats
$100.00 3527959664
METAL FUTON Great
Futon sofa/bed with
mattress. Silver/Black
$80 352-875-4760
Dunnellon
Navy Plaid Flex Steel
Couch and Ottoman
$400. Oak Trimmed
Billiard Light $75.
will sell both- neg.
(352) 726-6487
Queen Sofa Sleeper.
Gd Cond. Beige
stripes.Non smoking.
$150. (352)344-9391
Sectional Sofa
neutral color. Coffee
and end tables and
trundle bed. All
Great Condition
$250 (352) 563-1327
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
Two Matching Sofas
one is a sofa bed,
excellent condition
$100. each
(352) 382-2664 SMW
Wicker Book Stand
with white dishes
$100.
Green Dishes $100.
(352) 795-7254
WROUGHT IRON,
GLASS TOP
TABLE AND TWO
CHAIRS $35.00
352-228-9451


ATM ANTIQUES &
COLLECaIBLES AUCaION
Saturday 3/29/14 10:00 AM
Preview Friday 9-5 FREE
352-795-2061 LUNCH
Jewerly, Coins, Sterling Silver & More!
www.atmantiqueacutions.com
AB3279 AE450 AU1593 10%BP


Instalain b B iantuturAll osf our
wfwn m withstand
Installations by Brian CBC 1253853 '1win


CIO SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
1.
Per
Mo.


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
2.
Per
Mo.


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
1.
Per
Mo.


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
2.
Per
Mo.
_^r'ig


SAVE! NOW ONLY...


SAVE! NOW(


SAVE! NOW ONLY...


e-Owned Vehicles inch


Pre-Owned


APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when ya
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details


mited Powertrain Warrar


Fis5-DAYl
EXCHANGE:
PROGRAM!
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SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 Cll


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MSRP:...........................................18,543
Savings Off MSRP:........................ 3,555


2014 Nissan Altimas
V1N# EC18391B
MODEL # t1t14




AfS ......................................................... 23,720
Saigbp O AIS .P: ..................................... ,04


ONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE


2014 Nissan Jukesv


VIN# 360823
MODEL# 20114




AfSfP: ....................
Savkwgs OfffiW:


...$23,425
...05,596


2014 Nissan Frontiers


VIN# 213390
MODEL # 12014 d




ASSP: ....................
Samwis Off MSRP:


2014 Nissan Rogues


VIN# 791030
MODEL# 22114


- 1
L_


-$21960 S ..................................S24,439
-S 3, 638 'savla ofMP .:..................................... $6,444


CRYSTAL A
N NISSAN
-V THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE

800-584-8755 EXTI0 n CRYSTALAUTOS.CNOM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:30am-8:OOpm Saturday 9:00am-7:3Opm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm m Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:OOpm m Saturday 8:00am-4:OOpm
Sunday-Closed Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm m Saturday & Sunday-Closed


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ales ------ restrict stock.


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C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i I PEIO q9


INEI


y ,ZU1 -u 2 14 ESlCAPE 2zu14 IFLEX SE
$ $23,995 MSRP $29,910 MSRP
i -$2,000...........Retail Customer cash -$1,000 Retail Customer Cash


Stock #G4T102 No 0 2


2014 EXPLORER
$31,335..............................MSRP
-$2,000........ Retail Customer Cash


2014 FORD F150 XL


2014 FUSIONS
$22,820.. .........................:.M SRP _,
-$1,500 ...:.....Retail Customer Cash _
-$500 ............................Bonus cash -
-$500. ...................60 minute Cash -. .
-$500 ... Nick Nicholas Ford Discount
$ 11- 9,)320-- Stock#G4092
9> '' 2= -,J O \


14 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
1280. MSRP
1000. Retail Customer Cash
,000..Forl Credit Customer Cash
50...Nick Nicholas Ford Discount


,. 2014 TAURUS SEL
$29,905 ..MSRP
-$3,750 i Retail Customer Cash
-$750 Ford Credit Customer Cash
-$500 Nick 'Nicholas For Discount


WW


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES


Rfela5x, |FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED Call For Say
..... ..... :Call For Savi
Relax, It's Covered. ^ i ,
* 172-poil inirhpcoi1 0, Ford taclor, -lrained lrUrhnicians .
* 7-,ear 1i),i f 01-n.ilp Ford Po'.prtraiii Warranit, Co.erage-" .3, 3 5 2 7 9 5 7 i i
* 12-monlh 12 00O-mile Ford Limiled W\arrant, Co,.-erage-
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2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID 2012 FORD FUSION SE 2011 LINCOLN MKZ
'$9$9,'5, 01 0i.I, Ir,.9c GP171" h L '",-l l.4 I,,, nl ,-h... On ,,, ,, ,-- 'I
$17,950 $17,950 $20,950


2013 FORD MUSTANG 2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE
DI-jn'i p.-l.i r .1" GI P'l 7.'l, O ur'- it: vvrn-r. Iuio al3 Ira3d- G4. T i'iA
$21,950 $24,450


2010 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
$.2i4,9lu5 0 LI, _" '11"11 m'i LHT6i"H
$24,950


h",- d m -
2011 LINCOLN MKT AWD 2012 FORD EXPLORER SEL
L $.$ll8.,r 9 5.r',E,,, 0i '. U' GP176-' l li2:liii,9- i ,-i5.l- 0i r :,7
$28,950 $32,950


2012 LINCOLN MKX
:n, 1 1')(1'i) 1 1 k" I -:,t' r GPFl'1`74
$33,950


2012 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR L
;'-I, m5il i ", I .n 17
$43,950


NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER
T-&- kft -- -~-w2pT. f t


2001 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX
L 4 r I.. d 0-,-1- -
$4,1950


1998 MERCEDES SLK230
$5,950
aw^^*


2011 FORD FIESTA SE
$13,950


2011 ESCAPE XLT
$13,950


2006 JEEP WRANGLER 2009 FORD EDGE LIMITED
S$13,950 '* ** $15,950
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JU2 FORUKD F5U KI
L7 : L ,LT " ,4:- l--f:,
$17,950


2U11 FORUKD TAUKUS L
L arI._r I,:,., ir,,3 i-F 17 I I
$18,950
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2013 FORD ESCAPE SE
$19,950


2012 FORD TAURUS SEL
L $- ,r-r I. -Il-ri- i:-I I
$20,950


2010 LINCOLN MKT
L $- 29l l5 0- 1,In ,l',IH,, LJi1'1"-
$21,950


2009 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
$21,950


2008 FORD EXPEDITION EL
,',-" I--. r I, I fIa - T L .I'I -
$21,950


2011 BUICK ACROSS CX5
I $23,450


01 3J FURD APLOKE
$25,950


$26,950


2014 F250 CREW CAB
',3'lI, .' *I T J J J T I I ., -
$37,950


U0

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Crystal River Hwy. 1
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*Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only.
Not all buyer will qualify for Ford Credit financing. For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 3/31/14.


Stock# G4T040


1,9%
APR for 36 months
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$16,950


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Jll


al +new2014 Chevys!
AT WE PAY! MNOT A PENNY MORE! IV.l.
V1ITED TIME ONLY!


RADODOUBLE
L RADOCAB IWT
#1097* MSRP $32,240
........ GMSupplier Discount
..e a........ ............ -- Rebate
.... ........--.--....PBC
.... Cash or Trade Equity


60


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2014 Chew
INICL?
248 MSRP $16,840
...GMSuppler)Dscount
... .USAA
_. Cash orTrade Equity


New 2014 Chew
CRUZELS
STK #C14047 MSRP $19,255
'*50a-----GMSupp*6,rDcwto
^TSO_________Rebate
-750.. ..USAA
2 ......-....... Cash orTrade Equity

-ps1Is4,753"


New 2014 Chew
MALIBU LS
STK#C14254 MSRP $23,735
703OO1 GMSuppIer. scalMut
$750- R--et
$750___-_USAA
25OO _- Cash orTrade Equity

siam18,0370


New 2014 Chewvy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14207 MSRP $28,520
s---GM5DpberMwisct
50---Rebate
sT75O ......... .......................... Jw
s2.5 .CashorTrade quity
Yuft $22,877"


New 2014 Che
AMARO 2LS
STK#C14162 MSRP $26,055
i-- -..GMSupplIe Discount
I--------Rebate
.- -- PBC
........ USAA
._.._.. _Cash or Trade Equity
$2OA42821


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK #C14106 MSRP $25,315
sO77' -- GMSupperIfDsuo'nt
'/5 0 ......... ....... ...... ..... .,,,...IJ ate
9M -- --,-USAA
2.,5.oo Cash or Trade Equiy

s 20,487T


New 2014 Chewvy New 2014 Chew
TRAVERSELT TAHOE LS
STK#C14112 MSRP $35,395 STK#CT14041 MSRP $45,115
s,1f611' GMASupplierDiscout s3,3064.GmSuppa6 w wswxnt
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S .s29,78330- -sO 600


OVER 90
Used & Certified
Pre-Loved Vehicles


AU Pre-Loved Certified


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTYT


2YEARS-
24,900 MILE
MAINTENANCE'


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealerfor complete details.


IEWVehicles!


12CHEVYMAUBULT
123886SPEEDAUMIO,ALLSTABPK(
smks


CheckOut Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


OS UIK(iCENTURY
12371 CUSTOM


08 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
C238M W)o
$"95


11HONDAACCORD EXCOUPE
12260 SU ROOF, LOW ,MlS
$13-WS


09COIEVIETTPAVERSELT 09CHEVYTRAVERSE LT 09TOYOTAVENZA
1205SUNROOFONSIAR Il45SM!ROfALtW WHEELSOMSTAR 12404 LEATHER, NAVIGATION
5% SA $%4%95


11TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
12374 SE LEATHER
S2w95


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12248
S23M904


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C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Unique Wood & glass INVERNESSWF
end table. Excellent Fri, 3/28 & Sat. 3/29
condition. $45. 8am to ?
352-746-7502. 418S Rooks Ave
G e aInverness
Sat. 8a-2p only.
S piBlock Sale. Lots of
AFFORDABLE good. clean stuff. Rid-
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch ing mowers.
Hauling & Tractor Work 8723 E. Devonshire Rd.
352-341-2019,201-5147 INVERNESS
Cherrywood Triple Saturday 298a-lpm
Dresser & night Stand 3250 S Black Mountain
$125. Hshold items, HD TV,
Qn. Size Futon 1 chair sofa, & MUCH MORE
& 3 tables $175. INVERNESS
(352) 344-0521 Tools & More, Sat 9-1
CHIPPER/SHREDDER 1017 E Harvard St
10 HP,
3 inch branch cut I lli
$150
(352) 344-1423 LECANTO
CRAFSMAN Sat 3/29 8am
PRESSURE WASHER, Garage work benches,
2000psi, 2.0gpm, cabinets, tools, portable
3.75HP with attach- generator, lift chair, and
ments. Never used. miscellaneous items
$150.00 352-746-3605 750 Savoy St


JOHN DEER
LAWN TRACTOR
with wagon D100, 17.5
HP, 42" cut, used
25hrs. $1,250.
570-441-8609 Lecanto
JOHN DEERE 125
Riding Mower
22 HP, Auto, 42" Cut,
Twin Bags
Only 280 Hrs. I $750
Getting Larger Mower
352-341-1756
LAWNSWEEPER 42
inch lawnsweeper
$50.00 3527959664



AZALEAS 1 GAL POTS
3 for $18 Gorgeous
Compare to $10 ea in
stores 613-5818
PHILODENDRON
3 Gal Huge Beauties
3 for $36 Inv. Off Croft
Rd. 613-5818



**INVERNESS**
Fri, 1Oam to 2pmr
Sat, 9am to 1 pm
INDOOR Movina Sale
2162 E Hampshire St
BEVERLY HILLS
2 S.Desoto St.Selling
entire contents of
house. Sat.9-5
Sun.10-3
BEVERLY HILLS
3129 N Tamarisk Ave
Sat Mar29 8AM 1PM
3 family misc items
Citrus Springs
Multi-Family Sale
Sat 8a ? baby-more
8399 N Manuetta Dr
Crystal River
Sunday Only 3/30
noon to 6pm
MOVING SALE
30 Valare Lane, #202A
Magnolia Lodge Est.
off of Kings Bay Drive
HERNANDO
Sat. 3/29 8a-2p
Freezer, Collectibles,
Furn. Lots of Great Stuff
3907 N Sean Terrace
HERNANDO
Thurs., Fri., & Sat. 8A-3P
LOTS OF STUFF!!
RAIN OR SHINE
21 E. Katie St., Off Hwy.
486 & Anthony Street
HOMOSASSA
Fri. Sat. & Sun 8am-?
7464 S. Mindy Point
Indoors rain or shine
Nice Furniture
Everything Must Go!
HOMOSASSA
RIVER HAVEN
Fri & Sat 8a-3p
3 Homes: antique
trunk, furn, antiques,
exercise mach,tools
decor, golf cart, misc.
11927W Tlmberlane Dr
INVERNESS
Multi-Family Yard Sale
8 am-3 pm
Fri & Sat 28th & 29th
213 Hiawatha Ave -
1st street behind
Applebee's House-
hold items, clothing,
furniture . someth-
ing for everyone!!
INVERNESS
Sat 29th & Sun 30th
9am to 4pm
INDOOR SALE
Household Items
713 Constitution Blvd


Beverly Hills
Fri, & Sat. 8a to noon
furn, appl, & more!
215 S MonroeSt.
CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
Sunday Only, 3/30
8a to_4p,furn, nicnacs,
odds & ends, more
505 NE 16th CT
Naturewalk Comm.
HOMOSASSA
Thurs & Fri, 8am-7pm
Sat 8am-2pm
Pool table, furn, wall
furnishings, clothing,
some antiques & more
5809 W Gvr Cleveland
LECANTO
Fri, Sat 8am to 2pm
LARGE ESTATE SALE I
furniture, hshld, etc..
1343 N. Prospect Ave



Harley-Davidson Lady
Lrg. White Leather
Fringe Jacket $150. 7.5
Black Boot Ladies ?
$25. All in good shape.
Ted (352)465-2372
MENS JEANS/NEW
Roots / 36 W x 30 L
15.00 Linda 423-4163



!!!!! 245/50 R20 !!!!!
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
....225/65 R17...
Nice tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
-- 235\55 R18 --
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
3 VISION & 1 PYREX
COOKWARE- Cran-
berry, sauce, casserole,
double boiler, cake pan,
$30. 628-0033
4 RADIAL TRUCK TIRES
exc. tread,
P265/70R16
$120. call Don
(352) 220-2204
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
38" Craftsman
16HP Riding Lawn
Mower, with 2 bin
grass catchers,
$800. (352) 503-6032
Homosassa
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
ALPHA/OMEGA HOME
SCHOOLING BOOKS
9th/10th grades
$50 obo
Linda 4234163
Aluminum Truck Box.
Diamond plate design.
19" W, 59" L, 10" Deep.
$200
(352)341-4674
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOOKSHELF Tall book-
shelf light colored wood.
Like new. $20.00
352-422-4146


-Uea


11


BOOTS Boys John
Deere Boots Like new
size 11 $30.00
352422-4146
BOOTS Justin Gypsy
Boots ladies size 5 1/2
$30.00
352422-4146
Car Mats
for a Toyota Prius
gray, WeatherTech
$50.352-476-1578
CB RADIO Use for car
or truck. Used Once
$50.00 637-9611
Cello 30". $50. Box Car
Kit, Railroad, narrow
gage. Offer upon look-
ing at items for kit.
(352)3824638
ConAir make-up
lighted 3-way mirror
$20. 2 Ceiling light
fixtures $10.
(352) 746-5453
CRAB TRAP- Metal
trap, 24" x 24" x 20" tall,
with rope, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
Electrolux
Shampoo Machine
Floor & rug cleaner
$100.
IBM Typewriter $50.
(352) 287-9073
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$35 352-613-0529
FURBY Furby Toy
like new in box
$30.00
352422-4146
GRADING PLOW-
Plow for ATV or Tractor
$50.00 637-9611
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
(352)464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
HOT TUB
Seats 3/4, with cover
$900
Lg Computer Desk $80
(352) 746-1184
LG BIRD CAGE/STAND
good condition / 40.00
Linda 423-4163
OLD COLEMAN
CAMPING 2 BURNER
STOVE OK SHAPE
20.00 352 464 0316
Pfaltzgraff service for
eight; dishes, cups,
saucers & accessory
pieces. Rose pattern.
$50 (352) 726-5832
PINFISH WIRE HOLD-
ING CAGE- 20" dia. x
24" tall, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
PRO-TECH
COMPOUND MITER
SAW- 10" diamond
blade, dust bag, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
Sewing Machine
Singer, Portable. Used
2x Does blind stitch &
buttonholes. Carry case
& instruction bk
$125 (352) 726-5832
SPEAKERS SHARP 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
SPEAKERS YAMAHA 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $70
352-613-0529
TABLE Pottery Barn
Teen Media Table
$50.00
352422-4146
TODDLER BED Toddler
Bed and mattress-light
colored wood with
matching bookshelf
$35.00 352-4224146
TREADMILL, Weslo
Cardio Stride Plus, man-
ual, folds to store, excel-
lent condition, $75,
(352) 465-1813



4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316


DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
&ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
Korean Veteran in
need of a Scooter Lift,
must hook into trailer
hitch. Call Don
(352) 601-5119
SEMI-ELECTRIC
HOSPITAL BED
Semi-Electric Hospital
Bed includes
Matress, side rails
remote controlled like
new. 200.00
352-419-6655 after 6pm
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316
WHEELCHAIR
manual, good cond.
comes with leg
& foot rest.
$85
(352) 344-4105



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
G35FX AMP
12"SPEAKER,REVERB
DELAYCHORUSO.D.
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" BLACK
SAMICK/SILVERTONE
ROCKIT 21 "SG"
PLAYSSOUNDS 100%
$50.00 352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER NEW-
PORTER ACOUSTIC
GUITAR&GIGBAG
"STRAT"STYLE NECK
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE BLACK&GOLD,
ARCHTOP ELECTRIC
GUITAR ONLY $100
352-621-6625
"NEW" SG STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG&CORD
PLAYS, LOOKS GREAT
$50 352-601-6625
Black Piano bench
$10.
352-419-4464.
GUITAR/ INSTRUMENT
WALL HANGERS
ROUND METAL BASE
$5.00 EACH
352-601-6625
YAMAHA PORTABLE
KEYBOARD PSR11
very good shape.
$25.00 (352)382-5297



GENERAL Automatic
BP tester $20, Office
Depot rolling, folding
cart $10. 352 4656619
GENERAL GE convec-
tion toaster oven $20,
Mr Coffee expression
coffee maker $10.
352-465-6619
HOUSEHOLD Ralph
Lauren navy/gray queen
sleeping bag $30 300
count grip cap nails $25,
3524656619



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
WORK GREAT.
SELDOM USED. ONLY
$185.00 352464-0316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
REBOUNDER
TRAMPOLINE(indoor)
with stretch band attach-
ments 352-564-4214.
$40
RECUMBENT BIKE.
marcy recumbent bike.
brand new.sell half price
for $70.00.
352-382-5275


DOLLY
Dolly, 6-8 y.o. Terrier
mix, Wt 54 Ibs, had
an unfortunate prior
life, not her fault.
The sweetest dog
ever, full of love for
people amazingly,
playful, very happy,
craves affection &
returns it, gets along
w/some dogs,
finally deserves a
home of her own.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808,
Joanne @
352-697-2682.


CLASSIFIED



RECUMBENT
EXERCISE BIKE
DIGITAL READOUT
GREAT SHAPE.ONLY
$100 (352)464-0316
SCHWINN RECUM
BANT 230 EXERCISE
BIKE (700. NEW)ALL
DIGITAL ONLY 195.00
3524640316



12 SPEED HUFFY
MOUNTAIN BIKE
MENS 26". GREAT
SHAPE. $60
(352)464-0316
12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
Club Golf Cart
1993,
Excellent condition
side curtains, 36V
$1,500.
Cell (314) 831-1356
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
TERRATRIKE Recum-
brent Well equipped
and maintained.
$1350.00.
352-344-5334
352-344-5334


Sell r Swa


INDY
Indy, a beautiful
Blackmouth Cur
mix, 2yrs old,
friendly with most
dogs, walks very
nicely on a leash,
is housebroken,
loves kids. Playful
& friendly, likes
having people
with him.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


MIKA
Mika, a 1 yr 9 month
old happy, friendly
spayed little Bulldog
mix girl. She is very
sweet and loveable,
walks very nicely on
a leash. Rides
quietly in the car.
She is just the right
size for a family
life at 30 Ibs.
Call Rebecca @
419-262-3222.



PUPPIES
Rottie/Shepard mixed
pups. 2 females, pop,
mom & dad akc, pup-
pies come with
shots/worming & health
certificate. 200.00 each
352 419-5097













SEDONA
Sedona, beautiful
possible hound mix
female, housebrkn,
Hearlworm-negative,
dog&cat
friendly, 6 yrs old,
weight 77 Ibs. Very
calm & collected,
very sweet girl
nothing rattles her!
Walks well on leash,
ideal companion
pet. UTD on vacs,
microchipped.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.
Fee $60.


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 C15

11 I I


GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, a
Special Needs
spayed brindle/
white Bulldog, possi-
ble hound mix, Wt.
66 Ibs. Gentle, calm,
good on leash,
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she seems to
think is normal, no
problem to her.
Good family & com-
panion dog. Fee
$30. Call Joanne
at 352-697-2682 or
Dreama @
813-244-7324.


3-29


"I saw that same look four years ago.
i He's got a royal flush."





5anA rToiqU r 1jM 1aroIf Ve

&AuTOi u RESULsi

; arWILL e Mpes
C INSTRUCTION CORP
ESL 1989

I Ia Of ,


^ 15 r$Ol r


RAYNA
Rayna, gorgeous
Bulldog mix, 4 y.o.,
weight 52 Ibs.
Appears housebrkn.
Good energy, loves
to run. Very friendly
& smart, no food
aggression. Learning
to play with dogs &
cats. Working on
leash training with
trainer, to be your
best friend ever.
Fee $60.
Call Trish @
352-586-7547.
Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female, 9 mo. old
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Peek-a-zu Pups
Available
Starting @ $500.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827


SNOW
Snow, a sweet, play-
ful, affectionate, en-
ergetic mixed breed
dog, petite @ 33 Ibs,
with beautiful green
eyes. Smart, active
& engaged. Very
protective of her
home & family,
would make a good
watch dog. Fee 60$
includes spay, HW
test, vacs.,
microchip, 30 days
insurance.
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821.


TASHA
Tasha, beautiful
brindle2 1/2 y.o.
boxer mix, very
sweet, gentle, intelli-
gent, well man-
nered. Housebrkn,
does well w/most
dogs. NO CATS.
Loves to be petted.
Fee $60 for vacs,
spay, microchp,
HW test.
Call Marti @
786-367-2834

YELLOW INDIAN RING
NECK BIRD For Sale:
Yellow Indian Ringneck
bird Age 10
$500 Including Cage &
accessories.
352-220-9608




Horses. Tack, new &
used. All priced right.
Diamond Pea Farm
(352)873-6033




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
I bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


1/1 & 2/2 $400-$500
per mo. 1st last +dep
352-201-2428
Homosassa
2bd/2ba, front & back
screened porches
$550. mo. 1stlast, sec.
(352)634-1176 or
(352) 628-7300



-1982 SingleWide-
2-1, 15K firm
MUST SEE!
352-795-1272
Cabin 12X32'
w/front prch & tin roof.
Full bath/kitchen. Bd/Liv.
w/10X12 unfnshd add.
You move. $7000 obo.
(352)746-9211
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on '2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
*# MUST SELL **
2006 Used Mobile
Home, 3-5 bdr/2 ba
Deliver to your property
45k Great Shape!!
1-877-578-5729
Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.


Acctg/Bkkr QuickBooks
Certified, set-up, train-
ing, payroll, sales tax.
No job to small! Call
352-287-1909 for appt.



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



JAKES'
TRIM CARPENTRY
No job too big or small
Free Est. 352-601-7064




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



Baby Sitting My Home
Early Childhood
degree $8. hr. Wkdays
Only, Homosassa
Cindy (352) 621-0240



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Cesar Jaimes
Computer Repair
the most affordable PC
Repair in Citrus County.
352-560-3380

M J
#1 Employment source is


www.chronicleonline.com


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lie/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873




A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838











ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020


OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V 'RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
S RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570


Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
a, Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352) 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
* QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672



**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442


Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873

Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lie/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374

Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129

V* ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397

A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.



ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



*Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442









TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lie/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Arbor Reds Tree Care
24 Hr. Emergeny Serv.
Lie/Ins. Free Estimates
All Major Credit Cards
352-583-3141/206-1153


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


HERMAN"
D LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UClick for UFS, 2014


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

I I I I I I I I


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted: 4 wheeled
aluminum walker with
seat and eight inch
wheels 352-527-9860



1995 HY-LINE RV
PARK MODEL
TRAILER needs work,
good for hunting cabin
$1000 obo
(352) 628-2000
betw. 9am & 3pm.


Iet


I et


I %&cwvllrc



,jia&
a w .74


I MiSrvce







C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014




WORDY GUARD Y TRICKY RICKYKANE
1. "That belongs to actor Brad!" (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Horn section school session (1) they will fit in the letter
_-_ -----_ -|-|-| squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. From the time that coach Lombardi (1) syllables in each word.
S112014UFS,Dist byUniv UcickforUFS
4. Wall-mounted award display stand (1)


5. Captain's superior's gaming bets (2)


6. Parisians tightly grip, as fists (1)


7. Guilt-clearing person pointer-to (4)


HOIYVINI HOlV INIA 'L HONT'I3 HONAd "9 SHOVA SH1OPVWI '
3%V 3aabV'Id'' 3ONIA 3ONIS SSWI SSV 'g SJuId SI II
3-29-14 SIRASNV


I!U


Rent to Own
Owner Financing on
used/repo/new
Manufactured Homes
352-795-2377
Triple Your Tax Refund
At Palm Harbor Homes
Plant City!!
www.Dlantcitv.Dalm
harbor.com
Call John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details





**FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
Assessd $34,400.
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369



COUNTRY LIVING IN
LECANTO $42.500
Dbwd, 3bd/2ba, /% acre
NEW c/heat/air & carpet
handi-cao ramp. nicely
furn, move -in cond!
No Owner Finance
(352) 621-3929
Hernando DW, MH
3 BR w/walk-in closets
Roof over, single car
garg, chain link fence
39,999 Will take RV in
Trade; 352-726-2494
Homosassa
Beautiful Large
MH 4/3 on almost 2
Acres. MUST SEE!
$145,000 OBO
(352) 795-2377
INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home 1248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


THIS OUT!
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
must sell $13,000
(352) 344-5172
2brl2ba in 55+ Comm.
Extend. carport, furn'd,
washer/dryer, computer,
printer. Porch w/ sliding
windows. Lot rent $250
$22,000, 352-794-3441
Beautiful Triple Wide
In Gated Community
with Drywall. 2000+ SF
Must See-will owner
finance. MUST SELL
727-967-4230
BEVERLY HILLS
Sandy Oaks 55+ PK
2BD, 2 BA, Open
House Sat & Sun, 11 -2p
completely remode.,
new Kit. & new appl's,
Fl. Rm. Lot Rent $274
incld's, wtr sewer &
trash, Pool/ Clubhouse
$37,500 (352-322-8941
HANDICAP ACCESS
with Vertical Lift,
Stonebrook, 2/2 MH
1,400 sf., $28,900. Lot
Rent $442., Must See.
352-628-5311

ForSaleB1 l

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must seel Must sellI
$65,000 813-464-9858
Singing Forrest 55+
Park, SW 2/1,LRoom
addition, new flooring &
Furnc/AC. Lanai, shed.
Lot rent $183/mo
$24,500; 352-860-1463


WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090



[ AaION5I


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
S800& UNDER
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.52 story townhome, canal side
7698 N. Voyager Dr.
3/2/2 coming soon. Citrus Springs
9218 N. Satinwood Ter.
3/2/2 nice home. Citrus Springs

S650& UNDER
8496 W. Drew Ct.
2/2 waterfront mobile with own do&
1063 N. Commerce Ter.
2/1 apartment cenitrally located
59 S. Tyler St.
2/1 with carport and nice Florida room
7096 N. Dawson Dr.
2/2 MH in Hill-n-Dale Subdivision
For More Listings Go To
www.CitrusCountyHomieRentals.wom




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR, TV Rm. Lg. Liv Rm
CHA, $425., Ist/Last &
Sec. 352-697-1680
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $600/mo. will
help w/sec. no dogs
352-726-9570
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352-257-6461

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 & 3BR APT. HOMES
Handicap Unit
Available
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants
Monthly rent starting
at $686 plus utilities
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer








FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




For Rent
Warehouse
-1200 sq ft $600,
Storage 8x8 $85,
Office $550
(352) 634-0129




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/carport, $750.
mo., 600 Gilchrist 5-A
(352) 422 2798
HERNANDO
2/2/Carport, Furnished
& Unfurn. Extra Clean.
(352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
Whisperina Pines Villa
2/2 Scrn. rm., patio
(352) 344-8046



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, furnished, util. incl.
quiet country liv., CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000


Citrus Springs
2/2/1, $650. mo.
352-746-7990
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $600/mo. will
help w/sec. no dogs
352-726-9570
INVERNESS
Duplex 2BR/1IBA
352-746-2932



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225



RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225



CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk 828-497-2610




a, For Rent
Warehouse
1200 sq ft $600,
Storage 8x8 $85,
Office $550
(352) 634-0129









DUDLEY'S

*5 AUCTIONS*
r 3-27 Estate
Adventure 3pm
outside treasures,
6:00pm 95' GMC
24'Box truck Cat
Diesel, Feather
machine,
Estate Furniture,
a, 3-28 REAL ESTATE
**THREE HOMES**
Two in Beverly Hills
11 a 6 N TyierSt
Beverly Hills
1:00pm 35 S Harr-
ison St. Beverly Hills
3:30pm 942 E
Fernwood Place
Inverness
o" 3- 29 REAL ESTATE
& CONTENTS
-MARION OAKS **
Auction: 9 Real
Estate: 10am 4231
SW 148th St Ocala
34473 2/2 starter
Crnr lot CONTENTS:
Antiques, house-
hold, great furniture,
garage.
........g.~g...........
call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction
.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL KOVSt
OPOTOiJNtTYl


aE


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
w Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb6avahoo.com
and
debthompson.com

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


CLASSIFIED









Open House Sunday
Mar 30th, 1-4pm
...$149,900
6654 Silverbell
Terrace, Hernando,
Fl. Get More for
Your Money at this
meticulously
maintained 3/2/3
car garage home
on 2 lots, high and
dry with every
upgrade! Split BR
plan, large covered
lanai, jetted tub,
high ceilings.
Mint Cond. Approx
2400sf.
Debra Shannon,
Broker. Town Centre
Realty 813 610-8006




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy486**
352-584-9496/464-2514



Built 2005, 2,300 SF,
1.7 Acres 3/2/2
All Appliances,
installed new in 2012,
jetted tub, plantation
blinds, newly painted
interior/ext.,Relocating,
$170,000 352-513-5202


1 i. ll l l st.




CClassifieds


Pine Ridge, 3 bedroom.
3 bath. with salt water
pool, a 20x45 workshop
and carport with 15 ft
enclosed full solar
compliment, solar elec-
tric, pool pump, pool
heaterhot water and
solar assisted air condi-
tioning 352-746-9435



2 block homes side by
side. 1/1, rented $450
each TAW. Good
Cond. Quite Loc.
$70,000 for both. Call
Kevin (603) 498-5124
BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525 sf heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$64,900. 527-1239
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




YOU'LL v THIS!
6385 W Cannondale
Drive 2 bedroom. 2
bath. Cozy
1000SF(approx.)home,2
car attached garage, Irg
screened lanai,newly
updated $94,500
352-794-6686



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
Great open floor plan.
Liv. room has stone FP
& wd floors. Caged
Pool (352) 746-6552




For Sale u.,l,
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367

For &Sale ",,
Pritchard Island
Community, access to
pool w/tennis court,
close to downtown
Inverness, 1 owner,
2BD/2BA/2CG
$125k By owner,
Call. (352) 726-0044
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


LISTINGS .*R'J


crystal River 3 bedroom.
2 bath. Ideal location
near 7 rivers golf course
$119,000...Also second
home $59,900
2/2/1..Both homes in ex.
cond. 352-220-4158


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY II!







For Sale1,,1
MUST SELL
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $63,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

SECLUDED 3BR/2BA,
1653 sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
3/4 acre buildable lot.
$99,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For YouI

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.cam
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now Is the time
to get listed.

Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email.
Cfatone6ptamnabav.rr.
corn

ERA American
Realty &
Investments


aeed arJOB?
1 #1 Employment source is


|www.chronicleonline~o


C itr u s C o t r eC ITaR U S C O U N T Y
-' For more information on how to reach HI R IC I
3-35 n eCitrus County readers calloi
"4 '. --" J 352-563-5592. wwwchronicleonline.com


OOOBXH2


ScarboroLugh 2010


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

s= 11^^^ I^^^^^m


Cstal RNA
omes


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattd
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515



Your World







HRpNILE


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




2/2 Citrus Hills Master
w/lg walk-in closet. Lg
utility rm/pantry. Scrn
porch. Walk to pool!
Tile floors, very clean,
lots of natural light!
$58,000. 586-260-2848

For Sa%04
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some furn, new Lanai,
Lam, & Ceramic floors.
$47,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100




Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507
Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $39,900
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507


Country Home + 80
Acres Land, Near
App. St. Univ., Ideal
for Summer Home
In Cool. NC Mtns.
828-297-2669, details


in Inverness East Cove.
Furnished 2/2 plus
dock & seawall.
Deep water. $61,900
(352) 344-0101


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty


-m
Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921
INVERNESS, 2BR/1IBA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749
LAKE ROUSSEAU
Fishing- Nature Lovers
2/ 1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642




**** * *
GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905
*** ** *

PINE RIDGE
1 ACRE
By Owner, build
ready, no fill, $26,900
(352) 249-7812




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

18FT PONTOON
1990 w/depth finder,
'95 trailer, 25HP
Evinrude w/power Tilt
&Trim. $2,800 firm.
Call (352) 637-1727 or
802-522-9423

ALUMICRAFT
2013, V16, Black with
floor, 2013 Suzuki 4
stroke mtr., trolling mtr.
& trailer $5,250.
(352) 419-5053







BASS BOAT
1989 Sling Shot 150hp
Johnson,Barron
Trailer. Hull in good
condition. Runs like a
dream. Lowrance
GPS/Sonar/Plot Map.
$4000 By appointment
352-613-0173
BayLiner
Ciera Cabin Cruiser,
1990, 27 ft, owned 18
yrs, just replaced engine
looks/runs good. $8500
352-795-1863
CANOE
Mad River Canoe 17 ft
Galv Continental TrIr,
Elec motor & battery.
w/ outriggers & Equip.
Ex Cond $1600
352- 564-2765

LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792


CLASSIFIED



COBIA 2000
17.5 Ft., OHYam.,
4 strk, Great Shape
$5,700,813-244-3945
352-634-4768
PONTOON
20 FT., with 40HP
Yamaha, Trailer,
Good cond. $6,000
(352) 527-9376
QUANTUM
1990 15ft Bass Boat
50HP, w/trailer, live well,
troll, motor. & More
$2,500 (352) 697-1910


















Sportscraft 88
27 *Coastal Fisher-


SUN BIRD
'92, Prowler 16'.7"
40HP Evin Trailer.,
charge system
Troll, motor.






$3,200
(352) 341-1950
VISION BASS
1991. 18.5 Wl175 hp
Johnson. Great Cond.
nWell Maintained.
$5500. (352-)419-5560






WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pray CASH For
Used Cleain Boatser






Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555**





boatsupercenter.com



ALLEGRO BAY
'907, 37 DB, 25K miles







Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
Bike Carrier.








Early Model $25.
Falcon 5250 Tow Bar
$100
(352)5641-19541












FORD
2005 Diesel 3/4 Ton
Power Stroke Truck &
VIShIONgBoAtSS





















2004 27' Fifth Wheel
Lg tip-outn like new
fully loaded.
$ 17k or $8500. ea.
(352) 795-1590










Hitch Hauler
inch and quarter $25.
Centrimatic
Wheel Balancers
195. P30o$100o
BikedClanrrier
Falont520oon, Bckr













(352) 564-2541
R05Derela/4tion

















Holiday Rambler
'95, Endeavor LE,
F34ft loaded, new ti





res. new carpet. Sirius
XM. tag axle. & dish
$13,900. 352-408-2870.
(352- 795-71590











iTOY HAULER





2011 Forest River, 18'
w/living quarters$25.
like new condition






$11,500. Ask for Bill
(352) 564-1299541










rFTO
'95ipou, Endeavn ew
34ull, loaded! e i
$17k900.$852-00.2870
TYHicHauler
inchvind quarters,25
lie new condtion
$I19.,5 P00. $skor0 il
(352) 564-2599


WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



FORD
2001 Van Camper
V-10, 64K mi. Exc
Cond. Road ready.
$25K obo. 419-7212
HEARTLAND
NORTH TRAIL
SERIES
2011 Travel Trailer 21 ft.
Tandem axel, sway
bars, hitch and hitch sta-
bilizer, electric brakes,
full bath, one slideout,
fully loaded in excellent
condition. Optional 12
ft. Porta-Bote with 5 hp
Mercury engine. Price
with boat and motor
$19,800. Call
352-726-2750.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
TERRY
22 ft, Cream Puff
Inside & Out
Tandem Wheels
$3,500 (352) 628-3674
VIKING POP UP
2011 2385 ST. Used 4
times, like new. Slide,
electric lift, stove, refrig-
erator, A/C and heat.
352.464.0443 $5,800



New ADCO Travel
Trailer Cover, never
used, fits 26 to 28/2 ft.
trailer, many options,
New $250. ask. $150.
(352) 637-6765



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
a, ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




Ti


'05, Audi A6
Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


LoEk
'07 Dodge Caravan
97k miles, $5195
'05 Ford Focus
121k miles, $3595
'04 Dodge Neon SXT
102k miles, $3395
'01 Dodge Utility
Truck $6895
Everything Motor's
7039 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Homosassa, Fl
352-503-9969

Buy Here/Pay Here
'97 Ford Taurus
$2495 Cash
'00 Buick LeSabre
$895 Down
'97 Dodge Neon
$2595 Cash
'01 Chevrolet Impala
$895 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVROLET
2000, Camaro
5 speed $3,995.
352-341-0018

CHEVROLET
2003, Monte Carlo LS,
$5,995
352-341-0018

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600

CHRYSLER
Sportscar,05 Crossfire
conv. auto, ex. cond
45k mi., V6 $11,000
OBO (352) 563-5150

FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600

HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014 C17


- UI


'03, Marquis, LS
Good condition
1 owner, 97k miles
(352) 249-3274
Mitsubishi
3000 GT '99
Adult lady owner.
Leather. Cold A/C etc.
117k mi. BO or trade
for NICE Crown. Vic.
Grand. Marquis Town.
Car. (352)220-6040



Chevrolet
ClOStepside, 1983
crate350, 4 brl, 4spd
auto, perf. exhaust
restored, blue on blue
$6500.(352) 637-5143
FORD
1923 Model "T"
Coupe. Original.
Call 352-697-5530
FORD REPLICA
1929 Model A Roadster
Replica, Rumble Seat,
Convertible. 727- 422-
4433 or 727-423-1385





11111111

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII
MUSTANG GT
2003 63,600k miles
Showcar, Supercharger,
lots of chrome!
352-228-4012
SHAY
1980 Reproduction
Model A
please call
(352) 201-2958



CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier
4 Door, $4,250.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004, SO10
Crew Cab, 4 x 4,
$7,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
'99, F250 Pick Up,
super duty, long bed,
w/ tool box, $3,800.
(352)464-4138
FREIGHT LINER
'98, Century Class
set up for Dry or Liquid
500 Detroit make offer
Call (352) 564-9124



HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
SUZUKI
2007, Vitara
4 WD, V6, $7,950.
352-341-0018


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




| 10% OFF ALL
TRIKES IN STOCK
(352) 726-6128
Harley Davidson
**Road King 2007**
24k mi, many extra's
beautiful bike, head-
ing north, HURRY! 12K
obo (608) 438-8812
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
HONDA
2013 Honda
Scooter PCX 150
Red, Great Cond.
$3500 OBO
352-422-8601
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990
'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999

must sell!
M 11


MOTORCYCLE
FOR SALE
2012 YZF-R6 Moving
out of state and need to
sell like new motorcycle!
Yamaha R6-Raven edi-
tion. Only 6000 miles on
it! Only one owner.
Inludes twin helmets
and Joe Rocket riding
jacket! Asking price is
$7900 but willing to ne-
gotiate. Just in time for
riding season!
352-364-1268


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568


S Automatic, Power Windows


I 35 MPG, Spoiler, Tilt Wheel
II I


EI I


Il I* I 1r


Cashmere Interior, Automatic

I j f T i


rvW/IrL, nemoe Siart/Eniry

L [ I:Ii1


Automatic, rower winuowS

UBK i! a


Li WIiIE


reyiess:: Enry, un:iar

B b; i 411


B^-lI I


AM/FM/CD, Cloth, Chrome

LIUiUia


..L ellnginle, .UuomdIL;

u.kJ u


ia ikiI


* I
* S


HP RH I


dIIFlL11 ILI


I ,


I t Pre-owned pri cs are plus a, tag, title and $, .5.0.. ea e.r, .fee.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Chevy Cruze /
MSRP:
$19,280
Your Price:
$17,688*
2014 Chevy Malibu
MSRP:
825,155
Your Price:
$22 280* --
2014 Chevy Equinox
MSRP:
$25,535
Your Price:
$22 831*
2014 Chevy Silverado
MSRP: C
$28,155
Your Price:
$23880*
2014 Chevy Traverse
MSRP:
$32,220
Your Price: i
$28 872*


i I ~


CRYSTAL
FIND ROADS- CHEVROLET_


800-584-8755 EXT.10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
TPrices include all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. AOn select models, includes all rebates and
incentives, not everyone will qualify. With approved credit.


C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2014