Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Newspaper
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Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text



Sweet 16: No. 1 Gators send Panthers packing


TODAY
& next .''
morning


CITRUS


COUNTY


Partly sunny,
10% chance of a
late-day shower.
PAGE A4


MARCH 23, 2014






Pedestrian dies
in Inverness
A 66-year-old Inver-
ness woman was fatally
injured Friday evening
after being struck by a
truck in Inverness.
According to prelimi-
nary information from the
Florida Highway Patrol, a
1999 Ford Ranger, driven
by 72-year-old Judith
Corman, of Floral City,
was traveling northbound
on U.S. 41 near Mossy
Oak Drive around 8 p.m.
At the same time, Re-
becca Young, 66, of In-
verness, was reportedly
walking across U.S. 41
and traveled into Cor-
man's path.
Reportedly, because of
the low-light conditions,
Corman was unable to
observe Young and sub-
sequently struck her.
Young suffered fatal in-
juries and died at the
scene of the crash, ac-
cording to FHP.
No charges have
been filed and the crash
remains under
investigation.
-From staff reports


MILITARY MATTERS:









Tribute
Ken Melton writes about
a Medal of Honor
recipient./Page A21


A story and headline
on Page Al of Saturday's
Chronicle, "Senate OKs
Dean's springs bill," con-
tained incorrect informa-
tion. Sen. Charlie Dean's
springs-protection bill
passed the Senate Envi-
ronmental Preservation
and Conservation Com-
mittee on Thursday. It has
two more committee
stops before it reaches a
Senate floor vote.
The Chronicle regrets
the error.


BUSINESS:
Sticker shock
Bringing
home the
bacon -
and
orange
juice, and
coffee -
is about
to get
Costly due
to global
supply
problems.
T./Page D1
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:
Art

Glass -
Collectors
eagerly
seek out
Art Glass
such as
this cruet,
made in
England.
/Page E4


Annie's Mailbox ....A18
Classifieds............ D5
Crossword .......... ATS
Editorial .............. C2
Horoscope............ A4
Lottery Numbers ....B4
Movies .............. AT8
Obituaries............ A6
Together............. A28
Veterans ........A21


S184118 200711


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 119 ISSUE 228


Warning in harvester issue


Meeting discussed not yet set


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER-
Patrick Rose, the head of
a manatee advocacy
group who is locked in a
permit battle with a local


group seeking to mechan-
ically remove Lyngbya
from King's Bay has a
warning: There will be "a
big mess" if representa-
tives of the groups and a
government agency re-
viewing a permit do not


all sit down and flesh out
concerns.
Rose, executive direc-
tor of the Save the Mana-
tee Club, said he recently
made overtures to Save
Crystal River (SCR) Inc.,
the seeker of an aquatic
removal permit, to meet
and in good faith to dis-
cuss his and others' con-


cerns about the legal op-
eration of a mechanical
harvester in the bay Rose
claims he was rebuffed by
an SCR board member
In response, Rose said
he sat down and wrote his
concerns in an email to
the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers (COE), the
agency that is currently


reviewing a Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion permit issued to SCR
to remove Lyngbya algae
by harvester from the bay
The following is an ex-
cerpt from what Rose
wrote to the COE:
"To this day, I am not
trying to stop anyone from
See Page A5


LHft Ihiamo


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Sheep will be exhibited this year in the Citrus County Fair's livestock barn. Lecanto Middle School FFA members from left, Hanna
Carpenter, 12, Taylor Williams. 13, and Brittany Troxtell, 13 work with their animals Wednesday afternoon at the school's livestock
area. The girls will show their sheep Monday at the fair.

I"This year, the county fair makes
room for another ruminant


Hanna Carpenter, 12, a seventh-grade student at Lecanto Middle,
prepares her sheep named Carmel for show practice.


Joe
Meek
county
commissioner.


Conflict not so

easy to define,

commissioners say

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
To Joe Meek, it was his father's business
dealings.
To John 'd" Kenney, it was where he lives.
And to Rebecca Bays, it was a matter of
insurance.
All three county commissioners were quick to
jump out of the way earlier this month when Sug-
armill Woods residents voiced their opposition
to a developer's plan to complete Oak Village
Boulevard and connect it to potential develop-
ments nearby
The three commissioners, all citing potential
conflicts of interest retreated to another room dur-
ing the commission meeting. They returned only
when Acting County Attorney Kerry Parsons cau-
tioned them that they could hear from residents,


Page A8


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
/- =r- he Citrus County
S u Fair is looking
| I collier this year
II with asheep exhibi-
tion on Monday
Some fair-goers may wonder
why sheep are showing up in-
stead of goats.
"We had a dairy goat pro-
gram here for many years and
it just seemed to become not
as popular as it was, so with
the time constraints and all
the effort it takes to produce a


FAIR SCHEDULE
See what's happening
when./Page All

show, that was phased out,"
said Hal Porter, manager of
the Citrus County Fair, speak-
ing last week.
"Then we had a request this
year to add sheep," Porter
continued. "We've started off
on a small scale with the
sheep program for this year
See Page All1


Deadline looms for Obamacare


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Four years ago today, the
Patient Protection and Af-
fordable Care Act was
signed into law, creating
what has become known as
"Obamacare."
Monday, March 31, is the
deadline for its center-
piece and possibly most
controversial provision.
It marks the end of the
open enrollment period for
purchasing health insur-
ance through the govern-
ment-run marketplace.
It also triggers possible
financial penalties for non-
compliance that will be as-
sessed with 2014 federal
income tax returns.
The act, which was up-
held by the U.S. Supreme
Court in 2012, contains a
slate of health insurance
provisions, some of which
have already taken effect.
It required participating
insurance companies to ac-
cept clients with existing
health conditions and to
cover a variety of preven-
tive health services with-
out charge.
As the deadline ap-
proaches, local assistance
is available for completing
the online enrollment


Associated Press
A volunteer health care worker in South Florida wears a
T-shirt March 15 while getting people to sign up for the new
health care programs. Medical, nursing and law students
across Florida are getting certified as counselors and are
staffing enrollment events as the March 31 deadline to sign
up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act looms.


process at both Citrus Me-
morial Health System and
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Spokeswoman Katie Mehl
reported Citrus Memorial
Health System has received
approval to become a Certi-
fied Application Counselor
Organization.
"Staff received training on
helping community mem-
bers learn about the cover-
age options available in the
health care marketplace,"
she said. "The certification
enables us to continue to as-


sist those in the community
by helping them understand
and apply for health care
service coverage.
"The folks in our Finan-
cial Counseling Depart-
ment are available at
352-341-6064, Monday to
Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m."
Dorothy Pernu, spokes-
woman for Seven Rivers,
confirmed the service is
available to the public.
"Our application coun-
selors help individuals
See NE/Page A5


HIGH
79
LOW
58


/B1


John "JJ" Rebecca
Kenney Bays
county county
commissioner, commissioner.


(D)





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obamacare brings hefty

fees for certain drugs


Associated Press
MIAMI Breast cancer
survivor Ginny Mason was
thrilled to get health cov-
erage under the Afford-
able Care Act despite her
pre-existing condition. But
when she realized her
arthritis medication fell
under a particularly costly
tier of her plan, she was
forced to switch to another
brand.
Under the plan, her
Celebrex would have cost
$648 a month until she met
her $1,500 prescription de-
ductible, followed by an
$85 monthly co-pay
Mason is one of the many
Americans with serious ill-
nesses including cancer,
multiple sclerosis and
rheumatoid arthritis -
who are indeed finding rel-
atively low monthly premi-
ums under President
Barack Obama's law But
some have been shocked at
how much their prescrip-
tions are costing as insur-
ers are sorting drug prices
into a complex tier system
and in some cases charging
co-insurance rates as high
as 50 percent. That can
leave patients on the hook
for thousands.
"I was grateful for the Af-
fordable Care Act because
it didn't turn me down, but
... it's like where's the af-
fordable on this one," said
Mason, a 61-year-old from
West Lafayette, Ind., who
currently pays an $800
monthly premium.
Before the federal health
law took effect, Mason paid
slightly more for her
monthly premium on a plan
that didn't cover her arthri-
tis or pain medications and
some routine doctor's visits.
Avalere Health, a mar-
ket research and consult-
ing firm, estimates some
consumers will pay half
the cost of their specialty
drugs under health over-
haul-related plans, while
customers in the private
market typically pay no
more than a third. Patient
advocates worry that in-


Insurers say prescription drugs are
one of the main reasons health
care costs are rising.


surers may be trying to dis-
courage chronically ill pa-
tients from enrolling by
putting high-cost drugs
onto specialty tiers.
Brian Rosen, senior vice
president for public policy
for The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society, said the
group studied premiums
and benefits for patients
with blood cancer in seven
states, including Florida,
California, Texas and New
York. They found 50 per-
cent co-insurance rates for
specialty drugs on several
plans in Florida and
Texas, while the highest
co-insurance rates on Cal-
ifornia plans were 30 per-
cent and in New York,
co-pays were typically $70.
Under the law, insurers
can't charge an individual
more than $6,350 in out-of
pocket costs a year and no
more than $12,700 for a
family policy But patients
advocates warn those with
serious illnesses could pay
their entire out-of-pocket
cap before their insurance
kicks in any money
"The challenge is for the
sickest patients, the ones
that need access to these
specialty drugs, the costs
are going to come in most
cases from that out-of-
pocket cap ... they are
likely to hit that $6,350
ceiling and in some cases
quickly" said Rosen.


Insurers say prescrip-
tion drugs are one of the
main reasons health care
costs are rising.
"Spending on specialty
drugs is growing rapidly It's
unsustainable," said Clare
Krusing, spokeswoman for
America's Health Insur-
ance Plans, a trade group
that represents the private
insurance industry
Only 1 percent of pre-
scriptions written in 2012
were for specialty drugs,
but they accounted for 25
percent of the total cost of
prescription drugs, accord-
ing to a study by America's
Health Insurance Plans.
Insurers can generally
choose to put whichever
drugs they want into the
specialty tier of a plan.
Generic drugs for blood
pressure or cholesterol
typically fall into cate-
gories that require pa-
tients to pay less than $20
out-of-pocket. But patients
can end up spending sig-
nificantly more when they
pay for a percentage of a
specialty drug's cost. Two
of the most frequently pre-
scribed specialty drugs in
recent years include the
cancer drug Avastin, with
an $11,000 average annual
price per patient, or the
hypertension drug like
Letairis, which costs
$32,000 per year, according
to health insurers.


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for voting us the


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We appreciate


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look forward to


serving you


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OOOHHRY X


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


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Page A3 -SUNDAY, MARCH 23,2014



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Building code changes on C.R. agenda


Mobile home ban among

plansfor flood insurancefix


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
City council members will
discuss potential changes
to the city's building codes
Monday night as officials
make a bid to qualify for
discounts under the new
premiums proposed for
the National Flood Insur-
ance Program (NFIP) in
flood-prone areas. One
proposal calls for the pro-
hibition of mobile homes
within the city limits.
Participation in the
Community Rating System
(CRS) program is designed
to reduce flood insurance
premiums but communi-
ties would have to first
adopt more stringent
building code require-
ments to minimize future
flood losses.


Around the
COUNTY

Lieutenant governor
on tap for dinner
Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-
Cantera will be the fill-in for
Gov. Rick Scott at the Cit-
rus County Lincoln Day din-
ner on April 3 at the College
of Central Florida.
Mike Moberley, chairman
of the county Republican
Executive Committee,
made the announcement in
an email Friday to sponsors
and ticket holders to the
sold-out event.
Scott was scheduled to
appear, but the governor's
office said he could not
make it. Moberley said he
was happy to have Lopez-
Cantera speaking to the
Citrus Republicans.
Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, is also sched-
uled to speak.
Democrats to meet
April 5 at Sugarmill
The Southwest Citrus
Democratic Club will meet
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
April 5, at the Sugarmill
Woods Country Club,
1 Douglas St., Homosassa.
All Democrats are wel-
come to attend. Officers for
2014-2015 will be installed.
Refreshments will be served.
For more information,
contact scdems@gmail.
comn, or call 352-382-0032
VA enrollment open
house April 21
The Lecanto Veterans Af-
fairs (VA) Community
Based Outpatient Clinic
(CBOC) will host an enroll-
ment open house from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
April 12, at the clinic, 2804
West Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
If possible, bring a DD
214 for verification of mili-
tary service.
For more information,
contact David Gilmer at
352-746-8000.
Sports fields to close
starting Monday
The baseball and soft-
ball fields at Bicentennial
Park and Central Ridge
District Park will be closed
to public use from Monday,
March, 24, until Sunday,
March 30, due to mainte-
nance requirements.
Fore more information,
call 352-527-5760.
Paper seeks stories
about stressful jobs
April is National Stress
Month and the Chronicle
wants to do a number of
stories about stress, includ-
ing stressful jobs. If your job
is particularly stressful and
you'd be willing to be inter-
viewed and photographed
on the job, contact Nancy
Kennedy at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com, or call
352-564-2927.
-From staff reports


According to the city, offi-
cials are looking at poten-
tial building code changes
to: address the impact of
the higher rates where they
will be applicable, and to
improve the city's ability to
withstand future storm
damage through the ulti-
mate redevelopment of
properties that are particu-
larly susceptible to flood
damage now
Officials say the city's
high exposure to flood
damage is borne out by the
fact that there are more
than 130 properties within
the city that have suffered
multiple flood losses.
City officials are there-
fore asking the city council
to discuss the potential for
some of the following
changes:
Alternative means of
elevating structures.


Additional freeboard.
Freeboard is additional
height above base flood el-
evation (BFE). The state
building code already re-
quires new residential
construction to include
one foot of freeboard and
for commercial construc-
tion to provide one foot or
more of freeboard (de-
pending on intensity of
public use), but the CRS
program provides addi-
tional credit if additional
freeboard is required. For
example, the city would get
additional points if a re-
quirement was adopted for
three feet of freeboard for
new residential structures.
Cumulative substantial
improvement and cumula-
tive substantial damage.
State building code cur-
rently requires a city to
look at the cost of proposed
improvements for a struc-
ture at the time a permit is
pulled to do the work If the
value of the proposed im-
provements exceeds 50
percent of the value of the


* WHAT: Crystal River government meetings.
* WHEN: Monday, CRA at 6:30 p.m.; council meeting
7 p.m.
* WHERE: Council chambers, city hall, 123 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* CONTACT: 352-795-4216, or visit crystalriverfl.org.


existing structure, the en-
tire structure is required to
be brought into compliance
with current codes. The
city currently does that
evaluation on a per-permit
basis. The CRS program
encourages communities
to evaluate cumulative im-
provements over an ex-
tended period of time (i.e.
10 years) inasmuch as this
has the long-term impact of
requiring more structures
to be re-built to new code
standards and thus re-
duces the number of
multiple-loss properties.
Prohibition of mobile
homes. The city currently
does not have specific zon-
ing districts for mobile
homes, although there is
Crystal River Village, which


is for manufactured hous-
ing and a mobile home park
in a High Density Residen-
tial zoning district. Mobile
homes and manufactured
homes are generally al-
lowed in Crystal River pro-
vided they meet applicable
development and appear-
ance requirements. Since a
significant part of Crystal
River is situated in a flood
plain, the CRS program
would reward action taken
by the city to prohibit mo-
bile and manufactured
homes.
Preceding the regular
council meeting, the panel
in its capacity as the Com-
munity Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) board, will
discuss possibly purchas-
ing the Chamber of Com-


Associated Press

WINDERMERE A police officer
was shot and killed early Saturday after
stopping two people and calling for help
in an Orlando suburb, authorities said.
Windermere Police Department Offi-
cer Robert German called for backup
after stopping a young man and woman
on foot shortly before 4 a.m., investiga-
tors said.
German, 31, reported his location and
was found lying on the ground when a
deputy arrived at the scene, Orange
County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman
Jane Watrel said.
"He just said he was doing a subject
stop and then all the tragic events un-
folded," Watrel said.
The deputy put German in his squad
car and rushed him to the fire depart-
ment. German was then taken to Or-
lando Regional Medical Center, where
he was pronounced dead.
As officers responded to the scene,


merce building at 28 N.W
U.S. 19 at the appraised
value of $150,000.
The chamber is finaliz-
ing arrangements to relo-
cate to a facility at 915 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19),
where it will share space
with the Tourist Develop-
ment Council and the Eco-
nomic Development
Council. That move is ex-
pected to occur later this
year
Officials say the purchase
of the property would sup-
port efforts under way to
work with merchants and
property owners along
South Citrus Avenue to up-
grade the area behind busi-
nesses there.
The acquisition of the
property also is expected
improve access issues cur-
rently being encountered
by two businesses located
on Citrus Avenue.
The city council also
will discuss of public input
from a Feb. 7 Three
Sisters Springs congestion
workshop.


Shrimp stars in Homosassa festival


Golf carts, old cars and parade walkers were decked out to the nines to kick off Shrimpapalooza on Saturday in Old Homosassa.


LEFT: Aiden Barnes, 2 1/2, and Sean Barnes, of Citrus Springs,
check out some bubble guns at the festival. RIGHT: Joe Pope, of
Beverly Hills, drills some potatoes at the Calypso booth at the
festival.


Campaign TRAIL


The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, ap-
pearances and the like for
the 2014 political cam-
paign. Send information to
mwright@chronicle
online.com.
The Democratic Exec-
utive Committee will have
a booth this week in the Ja-
cobs Building at the Citrus
County Fair
The Republican Exec-
utive Committee will have
a booth this week in the Ja-
cobs Building at the Citrus
County Fair
Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 2, will be at the Re-
publican booth from 5 to
9 p.m. Tuesday, and 1 to
9 p.m. Wednesday Infor-
mation: 352-302-6313.
Renee Christopher-


McPheeters, Republican
for county commission
District 2, will meet the
public from 2 to 4 p.m. Fri-
day and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at the G.H. Re-
search booth, in the Jacobs
Building at the Citrus
County Fair Information:
352-257-5381.
John "JJ" Kenney, Re-
publican incumbent for
county commission Dis-
trict 2, will have a fish fry
fundraiser from noon to
3 p.m. Saturday, March 29,
at Dan's Clam Stand on
State Road 44, Crystal
River Information: 352-
382-0430 or 352-228-2679.
The Citrus Hills Civic
Association will have a
candidates' forum at
7 p.m. Oct. 9 at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club.


vercast skies gave way to blue skies and
white, fluffy clouds Saturday morning as
the third annual Shrimpapalooza parade
kicked off in Old Homosassa. Golf carts big and
small were decked out from top to bottom in
seafood and Mardi Gras themes and took to the
streets as residents and visitors lined the roads to
get a look. Following the parade, festival-goers
flocked to the gates to check out vendors and their
offerings, from jewelry to wind chimes to soaps,
as well as to get a taste of the festival's namesake
- shrimp.


Photos by Logan Mosby


they heard shots fired and found two in-
dividuals dead nearby matching the de-
scription of the man and woman
German had stopped, Watrel said. They
are believed to have committed suicide.
Their identities have not been
released.
Windermere is located 15 miles west
of Orlando. It has a population of about
3,000 people and one of the lowest crime
rates in Florida, Mayor Gary Bruhn
said. He said it was the first line-of-duty
death in the town's history
"Violent crime is just not something
that happens in the town of Winder-
mere," Bruhn said. "So it's really, really
difficult"
German had been with the depart-
ment for five years and just recently re-
turned from desk duty after falling and
injuring his shoulder, Bruhn said.
"He loved working as a police officer
and he loved working at Windermere,"
Bruhn said.
The investigation is ongoing.


Officer shot, killed in Windermere


*






A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Monetary gains are possi-
ble if you express yourself in a positive
manner. Be forceful, and make your
presence known to the people who
count. If you stand in the shadows, you
will miss out. Make this a year to
remember.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Go be-
yond your traditional path and try
something out of the ordinary There
are sure to be some pleasant surprises
in store for you. An unplanned journey
can generate professional rewards.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You will
need to be industrious and shoulder
additional responsibility Those around
you will be preoccupied and unable to
help.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Manage
your money wisely Start by setting a
strict household budget. Unanticipated
financial expenses can take a big bite
out of your savings. Adequate prepara-
tion will help ease financial stress.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You may
be feeling emotional regarding some-
one's demands or pushy behavior.
Step back and size up your situation.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Take a lead-
ership role. Others will be full of admi-
ration for your ideas and will gladly do
what they can to assist you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) Partnerships
will be fragile today Keep a low profile
and concentrate on self-improvement.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You may
feel caught up in a whirlwind of respon-
sibilities. The demands of work and
home are taking a toll.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You are
in need of positive reinforcement. Get
together with a friend who will encour-
age and contribute to your plans.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You'll
be offered advice, but not all of it will
be good. Decide which option is in
your best interest.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -An ex-
citing business venture is within reach.
Make sure you have all the skills
needed to secure this chance, or you
will regret having missed a promising
opportunity
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
are known as an insightful and vision-
ary person. While some may feel
threatened by these qualities, there is
no reason for you to change.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You will
find great fulfillment helping others. You
have much to contribute, and you will be
rewarded for your time and effort.


ENTERTAINMENT


Actor Chris
Hemsworth, wife
welcome twin sons
LOS ANGELES Two more
Hemsworths have arrived.
Chris Hemsworth and his
wife, Elsa Pataky, have wel-
comed not one, but two sons to
the world. The twins of the 30-
year-old "Thor: The Dark World"
star and the 37-year-old "Fast
and Furious 6" actress were
born in Los Angeles.
Hemsworth's publicist, Robin
Baum, confirmed the births Fri-
day. No additional information
has been released.
The babies join the couple's
first child, daughter India, who is
22 months old.
The Australian actor told The
Associated Press last year that
family trumps moviemaking
these days. He said he loves the
work, but it's certainly not his
priority.
AC/DC's Brian
Johnson surprises
Billy Joel audience
NEW YORK- In a rare and un-
usual mix of rock legends, AC/DC
lead singer Brian Johnson made
a surprise appearance Friday night
at Billy Joel's concert at Madison
Square Garden and played the
metal band's classic, 'You Shook
Me All Night Long."
Joel introduced Johnson
about halfway through the show,
saying Johnson was part of one
of the best bands he'd ever seen
live. The packed arena erupted
when Joel and his band began
playing the rock anthem with
Johnson on lead vocals.
The show was part of a series
of concerts by Joel at the Gar-
den. He's playing there monthly
as an artist-in-residence.
Friday's show included a mix
of Joel standards such as "Up-


Associated Press
Elsa Pataky, left, and Chris Hemsworth arrive at the third
Annual Sean Penn & Friends HELP HAITI HOME Gala at the
Montage Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., in January. Hemsworth
and his wife Pataky have welcomed not one, but two sons.


town Girl" and "Big Shot" as well
as less-played songs, such as
"The Ballad of Billy the Kid."
Firm downplays
problems at L'Wren
Scott's company
NEW YORK -A public rela-
tions firm that focuses on the
fashion and beauty industries is
denying reports that fashion de-
signer L'Wren Scott's company
was on the verge of shutting
down.
The 49-year-old longtime girl-
friend of Rolling Stones frontman
Mick Jagger was found dead in
her Manhattan apartment Mon-
day. Authorities said she commit-
ted suicide.
New York-based PR Consult-
ing said in a statement Friday
that Scott was considering a re-
structure of her global business,
LS Fashion Ltd.
The firm said that while some
areas of the business had not
yet reached their potential, other
parts were successful. It said the
long-term prospects for the busi-
ness were encouraging.


Accounts filed by LS Fashion
Ltd. in London show the com-
pany had liabilities that ex-
ceeded assets by $5.9 million as
of Dec. 31, 2012.
Musicians plan Pete
Seeger celebration
ST. PAUL, Minn. Musicians
will gather in St. Paul in May to
honor Pete Seeger on what
would have been the renowned
folk singer and political activist's
95th birthday.
The concert called "For
Pete's Sake: Celebrating Pete
Seeger's 95th Birthday" will
be May 3 at the Fitzgerald The-
ater in downtown St. Paul.
Seeger died Jan. 27 at age
94. The singer-songwriter was
known for such folk classics as
"Where Have All the Flowers
Gone," "Turn, Turn, Turn" and "If
I Had a Hammer."
Musicians scheduled to per-
form include Robert Robinson,
Prudence Johnson, John
Gorka, Ann Reed, Larry Long
and Peter Ostroushko.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 23, the
82nd day of 2014. There are 283
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 23,1914, the first in-
stallment of "The Perils of Pauline,"
the legendary silent film serial star-
ring Pearl White, premiered at the-
aters in the greater New York City
area, including movie houses in
New Jersey, Connecticut and
Massachusetts.
On this date:
In 1775, Patrick Henry delivered
an address to the Virginia Provincial
Convention in which he is said to
have declared, "Give me liberty, or
give me death!"
In 1994, Aeroflot Flight 593, an
Airbus A310, crashed in Siberia
with the loss of all 75 people on
board; it turned out the teenage son
of a pilot who was allowed to sit at
the controls accidentally disen-
gaged the autopilot, causing the jet-
liner to plunge to the ground
Ten years ago: A report by
Medicare trustees said that without
changes, the federal health care
program would go broke by 2019,
seven years earlier than expected.
Five years ago: The Obama ad-
ministration unveiled a plan to take
over up to $1 trillion in sour mort-
gage securities with the help of pri-
vate investors; Wall Street
responded by hurtling the Dow
Jones industrials upward nearly
500 points.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama concluded a four-day visit
to the Middle East as he marveled
at the beauty of one of the region's
most stunning sites, the fabled an-
cient city of Petra in Jordan.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian
Marty Allen is 92. Sir Roger Bannis-
ter, the runner who broke the 4-
minute mile in 1954, is 85.
Singer-producer Ric Ocasek is 65.
Singer Chaka Khan is 61. Actress
Keri Russell is 38. Gossip colum-
nist-blogger Perez Hilton is 36.
Thought for Today: "A man who
fears suffering is already suffering from
what he fears." Michel de Mon-
taigne, French essayist (1533-1592).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
P JiRH/1LOR HI LO


178/60 0.00"- sZ8/0.I .uu
THREE DAY OUTLOOK lily
W... il TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
j -" High: 79* Low: 58
-' Parly sunny, 10% chance of a late day
--' shower
~ MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
:i,' HIgh: 72 Low:58
q^fl1@? Cloudy. 40% chance of showers

, -\-' TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
j-, High: 70 Low:-13
Mostly cloudy. 60o chance for mainly
-t, morning showers
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 79/65
Record /40
Normal 77/59
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean 5
PRECIPITATION* .
Saturday 0.00"
Total for the month 2.54"
Total for the year 7.49"
Normal for the year 7.20"
'As ol 7 p.m. at Invmrre s
UVINDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high. 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.04


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 63.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 90%/
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 9.1/12
Monday's count: 8.4
Tuesday's count: 7.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 43
Pollutant: Particulate matter


Provif0ded D
SOLUNAR TABLES ,nC,, n
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
03/23 SUNDAY 00:36 05:34 11:33 18:05
03/24 MONDAY 01:32 06:32 12:33 19:02
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TOmIHT ......................... 7:42 p.m
S SUNRISE TOMORMRW 7:28 a.m
Q MOONRISE TODAY ............ 1 35 a.m.
Mar23 Mar30 Apr7 Apr 15 MOONSETTODAY 1232-p
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For more ormallon wii FlixO-c, r,.ii3n oi l ForestryI 113521 "5.1 6-'' For ,T,-3
nfwrtFTllion vI rijul rii f ,lJr ple.sd \ V w IIe Do'un 0 For-irs tOSi'n .
lrlir p Ii,,,e TI a., .,nvfli,rP --.:-9I t/k4 bdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to wo days perweek. before 10 am. Or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday,
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday,
Harnr v3rnng wimn a shL-oIl ni,)zzle cr mricr mgatn of1 non-grass areai such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus County Ulites customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new planlings may quahty htor aIarl-inal
watering allowances.
To report 'xiciaons pefsle CAll City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, CW ofc Crv-,Ul
River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rwers "At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
ChassahcOwIka- 12:32a,m 0.6ft. 1l4pm, 02t. 9:11 a.m. 01it. 4:53p~m0.2ft.
Crystal Rver'" 11:35 a.m, 1-4 It. 11:25 p-m. 2.1 1 6:04a.m. 0.3 .- 5:34 p.mD.9 t
Withlacoochee' 929am, 241t, 7:53pm 2811t. 3:21 am, -0.0 It, 2:51 pm.l,5t
Homiosassa-" 12-49pm 0.5It. 11:38 p.m 1-4114. 8:47a.m- 0.3ft 5:21 p.mfl.3 It


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L Fecast City


H L F'cast


Daytona Bch. 82 63 pc Miami 87 71 pc
Fort Lauderdale 85 71 pc Ocala 82 59 f
Fort Myers 86 67 f Orlando 84 65 pc
Gainesville 81 57 ts Pensacola 68 49 ts
Homestead 84 69 pc Sarasota 80 66 pc
Jacksonville 81 54 ts Tallahassee 77 54 ts
Key West 81 71 s Tampa 78 65 pc
Lakeland 84 64 f Vero Beach 85 66 pc
Melbourne 84 65 pc W. Palm Bch. 83 69 pc

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: West winds 5 to 10 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and inland temperature
waters a light chop. Tonight: West 7
winds 5 to 10 knots then. Seas 2 feet. 0
Bay and inland waters a light chop. f7
Thken at Arlpeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.30 29.33 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.58 38.59 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.69 39.70 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.37 40.37 42.20
Levels reported MI teet above sea ev- Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year Ilood,
thee mean-annual onod which has a 43-preenrt chance ol being equaled or exceeded in
any one year This data is obtained from the Soulhwest Florida Water Management District
and is subject o revision n per I ,.v. D ,l t P. u ,. Slar. ',5j .,j.A', 5, ,
'. ii, a. r d"r ; ,, 3' "a,3,q1 al >.r ; r GI 3, f .r ffl, l Or,; ,,, 3 a IfI, u I .f: ,'r- P j-i'L',- .Lu
Ulic iililt'.*liT- r, M~aii;i,."l a S, .D., a! I'%5, 796-721

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


SAT
City H L Pap. H
Albany 50 23 28
Albuquerque 63 41 64
Ashevlle 69 41 49
Atlanta 75 53 65
Atlantick City 67 30 48
Austin 76 64 57
Baltimore 69 34 46
Billings 23 15 .02 33
Birmingham 78 50 55
Boise 50 26 57
Boston 57 28 40
Buffalo 49 33 .06 24
Burlington, VT 39 19 26
Charleston, S.C. 79 50 80
Charleston. W.V. 64 55 44
Chsrlotte 74 43 57
Chicago 41 36 31
Cincinnall 57 42 40
Cleveland 52 38 27
Columbia, SC 50 31 40
Columbus, OH 58 42 34
Concord, NH 43 18 .02 33
Dallas 67 58 55
Denver 36 19 .05 50
Des Moines 35 22 38
Detroit 42 34 .06 27
El Paso 80 54 71
Evansville, IN 57 41 45
Harrisburg 64 34 41
Hartlford 57 25 38
Houston 80 65 66
Indlanapolis 55 34 35
Las Vegas 78 58 78
UtIleRock 66 52 .18 56
Los Angeles 68 58 69
Louisvlle 60 45 47
Memphis 69 53 .14 52
Milwaukee 39 32 27
Minneapolis 22 8 23
Mobile 79 53 67
Montgomery 77 50 64
Nashville 66 51 52


SUN SAT SUN
LFcst City H L Pep. H LFcst
7 pc New Orleans 77 60 70 52 ts
38 pc New York City 63 41 45 20 pc
26 sh Norfolk 76 49 49 34 r
54 r Oklahoma City 56 43 51 33 pc
21 pc Omaha 34 20 38 25 pc
48 ts Palm Spnrings 81 55 83 61 pc
24 pc Philadelphia 68 35 46 23 pc
17 sn Phoenix 82 56 83 58 pc
35 sh Piltsburgh 55 40 31 14 pc
33 s Portland, ME 38 20 .02 34 3 pc
15 pc Portland, OR 61 32 61 39 pc
10 if Providence, RI 59 25 43 16 pc
0 pc Raleigh 76 46 53 29 sh
40 ts Rapid City 21 15 .06 41 21 pc
22 sn Reno 63 33 66 33 s
30 sh Rochester, NY 45 32 .03 23 11 II
17 pc Sacramento 76 43 78 48 s
20 pc Salt LakeCity 55 41 59 38 pc
16 pc San Antonio 80 65 60 50 ts
22 pc San Diego 67 62 65 58 cd
19 pc San Francisco 65 47 65 51 1
1 pc Savannah 75 53 80 44 ts
40 sh Seattle 52 34 56 43 pc
25 pc Spokane 47 23 48 31 pc
23 pc St. Louis 51 37 40 24 pc
16 i St. Ste. Marie 26 12 .18 15 -3 pc
48 pc Syracuse 42 24 23 7 fl
24 pc Topeka 47 29 43 27 pc
25 pc Washington 73 44 47 28 pc
15 pc YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
51 ts HIGH 2. Laredo. Texas
S18 pc LOW- -i.Waski.,rlnn.
54 pc
32 pc WORLD CITIES
S55 PCSUN Listbon 60/48pc
25 PC CITY H/tLSKY London 53/35ts
33 r
16 pc Acapulco 87/75/s Madrid 62/37/pc
15 PC Amsterdam 51/39/r Mexico City 86/57/s
45 s Athens 66/50/s Moflrea[ 32112fsn
41 sh Beijing 71/42/s Moscow 57/32/pc
27 r Berlin 60/41/ r Parts 53/35/r


Bermuda 66/64/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c.clody ddridzle;, Cairo 7757/s
-Main h-hay; pclpavtly claidy; r-rabI Calgary 24/12/pc
rsraiinoj w mix; s-suanny; shshowers; Havana 87/69/s
sn-snow; tsthunderstorms; w.wlndy. Hong Kong 71164/pc
WSI 21h4 Jerusalem 78/55/s


Rio 84f73/As
Rome 64/50/r
Sydney 82/I6s
Tokyo 57/42/s
Toronto 39/15tpc
Warsaw 64/50/pc


!.1LEGALNOTICES





Bid Notices

............................................D7


Miscellaneous Notices

............................................D7


C ITRULIS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
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To start your subscription:
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Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County comes together in 'One Voice' celebration


Kickoffevent

slated April 1

in Inverness

Special to the Chronicle

Parents, children, government
officials and representatives
from various health and human
services agencies and organiza-
tions will come together for the
inaugural celebration of Chil-
dren's Month in Citrus County.
The event, titled "One Voice at
the Steps," will take place at
4 p.m. Tuesday, April 1, on the
steps of the Old Courthouse in
Inverness.
A variety of speakers will be
on hand to commemorate the
event, including three local
youth speakers representing the
elementary, middle and high
school populations.
Also speaking will be local of-
ficials, including Superinten-
dent of Schools Sandra "Sam"
Himmel, Magistrate Keith
Schenck, Commissioner
J.J. Kenney and Commissioner
Rebecca Bays.


A variety of topics will be cov-
ered, such as the protection and
safety of children, and efforts
supporting families, to helping
children reach their potential.
The event will promote Na-
tional Child Abuse Prevention
Month, as well as celebrating all
the important work that local
agencies and organizations do in
the community concerning chil-
dren and youths.
Also attending will be special
guest Zackary Gibson, chief
child advocate for the state, who
was appointed to the position by
Gov Rick Scott. He is the direc-
tor of the Office of Adoption and
Child Protection for the State.
Gibson is scheduled to meet
with Community Alliance mem-
bers in the morning, followed by
a tour of Jessie's Place and
meetings with other local offi-
cials before attending the 4 p.m.
kick-off event.
For more information about
the "One Voice at the Steps"
event or other activities that are
planned for Children's Month,
contact the Community Alliance
at 352-341-7075 or visit the Com-
munity Alliance website at
www.citrusalliance.org.


CHILDREN'S MONTH ACTIVITIES IN APRIL
The month of April is Children's Month is Citrus County, and there will be many free activities for
families and children. Major events include:
* April 1 4 p.m. "One Voice at the Steps" public kick-off and media event for Children's Month.
Old Courthouse Steps, Inverness.
* April 1 Pinwheels for Prevention Pinwheel gardens go up around the county commemorating
National Child Abuse Prevention Month.
* April 5 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Family Fun Day and Community Expo. Easter egg hunt,
information booths, live music, activities, free hotdogs and more. Little Springs Park, Crystal River
* April 6 "Hanging of the Hands." Local libraries will display artwork by children (all month
display).
* April 8 "Family Dinner Night" Eat at home together, or enjoy an evening out.
* April 10 4:30 to 7 p.m. "MythBusters." Teen town hall hosted by the Anti-Drug Coalition for
Middle & High School Students & Parents. At the Renaissance Center, 3620 Educational Path,
Lecanto. Free pizza and door prizes.
* April 11 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. "Music and Magic" magic show, live music, free hotdogs and
family activities. Whispering Pines Park, Inverness.
* April 12 "Schoolhouse Hustle" Health Expo and 5K and 10K Run. Registration begins at
6:30 a.m., race at 7:30 a.m. CREST School, 2600 S. Panther Pride Drive, Lecanto. For information
visit www.schoolhousehustle.com.
* April 17 Bookmark Bonanza at Homosassa Public Library. All day/all ages, in conjunction with
National Library Week. Lots of events at the Citrus County libraries all month. For more
information, go to www.cclib.org.
* April 19 Egg Hunt and Earth Day activities Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park.
Registration at 8 a.m. Egg hunt 9 a.m.
* April 19 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Underwater egg hunt at Bicentennial Pool, Crystal River.
Games, arts and crafts.
* April 26 -9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sheriff's Youth & Safety Expo/YMCA Healthy Kids Day, Citrus
County Auditorium, Inverness.
For additional information on Children's Month, contact the Community Alliance at 352-341-7075
or visit the website at www.citrusalliance.org.


HARVESTER
Continued from Page Al

harvesting Lyngbya in ac-
cordance with the dic-
tates of the law and in a
manner that does not
jeopardize manatees or
the bay's beneficial
aquatic vegetation or
water quality or establish
a precedent for aquatic
plant harvesters being
used as dredges without
appropriate state and
federal permits with ap-
propriate safeguards
being required to protect
water quality critical
habitat and prevent the
take of endangered
manatees...
In fact, I called one of
the board members of
SCR yesterday and let
them know that I thought
the best way forward
would be to hold a joint
meeting with the COE to
discuss what they were
trying to accomplish and
see if there is a way for
their proposed work to be
done without violating
laws or creating an ad-
verse precedent since ac-
cording to an email from
their consultant they
were still intent on re-
moving the detrital layer
of unconsolidated sedi-
ments (my words) which
under any working defini-
tion are not living aquatic
plants. To my disappoint-
ment he was not inter-
ested in such a meeting"
But the SCR board
member Rose referred to
in his letter to the COE
flatly denied recalling
anything about a meeting.
"I am always open and
SCR is always open to sit-
ting down with Mr Rose
to discuss what we intend
to do with the cleanup of
the bay," Steve Lamb told
the Chronicle.
Lamb said he pro-
ceeded to call Rose im-
mediately after his
conversation with the
Chronicle to set up a
meeting between SCR,
Save the Manatee and the
COE. However, the man at
the Corps' regional office
is going to be off in the
next week and a meeting
could not be scheduled
until after he returns.
Rose said he was very
upset that Lamb doesn't
recall when he extended
an olive branch earlier
and that the COE also
may be done reviewing
the permit before they all
could meet.
"I told him (Lamb) if
that should happen, it
would be a big mess be-
cause we may have to do
what is necessary to make
sure the bay is not
harmed," Rose said.
Lamb, however, said
the COE timeline for re-
viewing SCR's permit is
beyond his control.
"I can't really do any-
thing about that I want to
meet with Pat so we can
put everything on the
table and he is able to see
that we care about the bay
and would like to do
things properly," Lamb
said.
"I think if the agencies
that have been issuing us
permits like our inten-
tions and are satisfied
with what we are going to


ON THE NET
Save Crystal River
Inc.: savecrystal
river.com
Save the Manatee
Club: www.savethe
manatee.org
U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers:
www.usace.army.mil

do, it should be good
enough for Pat, too,"
Lamb added.
Rose and SCR have
been at odds now for more
than a year, since he and
people from the county
and U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service reportedly be-
came extremely con-
cerned when a harvesting
company hired by SCR
was said to be doing what
amounted to dredging.
Rose challenged SCR's
permit, alleging "egregious
harm" to the bay if the har-
vesting continued. The
harvesting was stopped
and SCR sought and got
another permit, this time
from DEP; but before they
could begin harvesting, the
Corps asked to review the
permit
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


DEADLINE
Continued from Page Al

navigate the mechanics of
the website," she ex-
plained. "They are not
able to provide guidance
re: the selection of any
possible insurance plan
options. But during the
session with the individ-
ual, they can contact some-
one at the 800-number for
the Health Insurance Mar-
ketplace who, in turn, can
provide that insight and
guidance."
"This is where Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center can help the unin-
sured in our community,"
said Vickie Magurean,
chief financial officer
"With many people lacking
access to a computer or
just needing help maneu-
vering through the enroll-
ment website, our
application counselors can
help. We can assist indi-
viduals and their families
in evaluating the available
health plans and deter-
mine if they're eligible for
Medicaid or other insur-
ance options."
"Even though Florida
has chosen not to expand
Medicaid, there are still
many individuals in our


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community who qualify for
Medicaid coverage," ex-
plained Magurean. "We
can help screen these in-
dividuals and if they qual-
ify, we can enroll them
at any time, with
health coverage beginning
immediately"
Nerdwalletcom, a na-
tional consumer informa-
tion website, has rated
Citrus County as one of the
top 10 counties in Florida
that will benefit from Oba-
macare. Of the top coun-
ties, Citrus ranks second in
average insurance prices
for individuals and for
families.
The following general
information about Oba-
macare was provided by
the U.S. Department of
Health & Human Services
and the Internal Revenue
Service.
Q. If I miss the March 31
deadline, can I still enroll?
A. The next open enroll-
ment period starts on
Nov. 15 for coverage that


begins Jan. 1. 2015.
Q. How much is the
penalty for not enrolling
and how will I be charged?
A. Individuals without
coverage or a legal exemp-
tion will have to pay a
penalty when filing their
2014 federal income tax.
The individual penalty
will be $95 or 1 percent of
your income above a cer-
tain threshold.
Q. How much will mar-
ketplace health insurance
cost me?
A. Based on average fig-
ures for Citrus County, the
monthly cost for a basic
plan without any subsidy
for a 27-year-old will cost
approximately $184. For a
50-year-old, the monthly
cost for same plan will be
about $314.
Q. What type of financial
assistance is available to
help me pay the monthly
premiums?
A. The premium tax
credit can help make pur-
chasing health insurance


coverage more affordable
for people with moderate
incomes. Eligibility is de-
termined by an IRS for-
mula. The lower your
income, the bigger your
tax credit. The credit can
be applied right away to
reduce premiums.
Q. What are my options
if I do not qualify for re-
duced premiums?
A. There are four ways
to buy a qualifying health
insurance plan: You can
buy directly from an insur-
ance company you can buy
with the help of an agent
or broker, you can buy
from an online insurance
seller, or you can buy
through the marketplace.
Q. What is the govern-
ment website for accessing
the marketplace or getting
more information on in-
surance coverage?
A. Go to www health
care.gov
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


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Bataan Death March survivor


John Love dies at 91


Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. John
E. Love, a Bataan Death March sur-
vivor who led a campaign to change
the caption on a historic march
photo from The Associated Press,
has died. He was 91.
Love died Monday after a long
battle with cancer, said Gerry
Lightwine, pastor at La Vida Llena,
an Albuquerque retirement home
where Love lived.
As a 19-year-old member of the
New Mexico Guard, Love was one
of 75,000 Filipino and American sol-
diers who were taken captive by the
Japanese in World War II when the
U.S. forces surrendered in the
province of Bataan and Corregidor
Island in April 1942.
In all, tens of thousands of troops
were forced to march to Japanese
prison camps in what became
known as the Bataan Death March.
Many were denied food, water and
medical care, and those who col-
lapsed during the scorching jour-
ney through Philippine jungles
were shot or bayoneted.
"I was one of the first 300 or 400 off
the march to enter Camp O'Donnell,
and they (prisoners) began dying
that same day," Love told the Albu-
querqueJournalin a 2009 interview
He estimated he carried more than
1,000 bodies to the graveyard.
For the remainder of the war,
Love was forced to work in a Japan-
ese copper mine until being liber-


Associated Press
John E. Love, a Bataan Death March survivor, poses for a portrait Aug. 27,
2009, in Albuquerque, N.M. Love died March 17 after a long battle with
cancer. He was 91.


ated in 1945.
After the war, he enrolled at the
University of New Mexico and grad-
uated in 1950. He worked at Conoco
Inc., for 35 years and lived in El
Paso, Fort Worth, Houston and Ar-
lington, Texas, with his wife, Laura
Bernice Ellis, who died in 2000.
In 2009, Love joined a campaign
with other Bataan Death March
survivors to change the caption on
one of the most famous photos in
AP's library about the march. The
photo, thought to be of the Bataan
Death March, actually was an Al-


lied POW burial detail.
Following a six-month investiga-
tion, The AP corrected the caption
in 2010, 65 years after the image
was first published. AP archivists
confirmed Love's account of the
burial detail at a prisoner-of-war
camp in the weeks that followed the
Death March.
When Love learned of the caption
revision in March 2010, he became
emotional with a reporter
"Son of a gun. Isn't that great?"
Love said. "It brings tears to my
eyes. It really does."


Christie's dissenters more visible


Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. -Crit-
ics of Republican Gov.
Chris Christie are becom-
ing more vocal and
more visible.
Opponents are showing
up at his public and pri-
vate events, hurling criti-
cisms on a range of topics
and questioning his
knowledge of a plot or-
chestrated by his aides to
tie up traffic near the
world's busiest bridge.
It may not seem unusual
for a brash politician with
a national following to at-
tract dissenters when he's
out in public, but Christie's
opponents mostly stayed


home until emails re-
vealed in January that peo-
ple loyal to him had stalled
traffic in Fort Lee for four
days, apparently to punish
the town's Democratic
mayor for not endorsing
Christie's re-election.
As his poll numbers
slipped, his second-term
agenda stalled and ques-
tions about his viability as
a 2016 presidential candi-
date arose amid the scan-
dal, people and groups
who opposed his policies
or his politics wanted to
make their voices heard.
"Christie has done his
best to project a sense of
normalcy" amid investiga-
tions into the lane closings


and allegations of miscon-
duct over the distribution
of storm-recovery aid, said
Rob Duffy, a spokesman
for New Jersey Working
Families, one group that
has organized protests.
"But his playbook is no
longer working."
"There is a tremen-
dously diverse group of
activists with various in-
terests who are united by
concerns over trans-
parency and accountabil-
ity," said Duffy, whose
group includes organized
labor, which has fought
the governor in the past.
Christie has denied
knowledge of his aides'
scheme to snarl traffic on


the George Washington
Bridge, and his adminis-
tration has also rejected
claims by the mayor of
Hoboken that it threat-
ened to hold up a river-
front city's storm recovery
funds unless she ap-
proved a favored redevel-
opment project.
About 40 protesters gath-
ered outside a Bloomfield
Hills, Mich., country club
on Wednesday while
Christie attended a
fundraiser for U.S. Senate
candidate Terri Lynn Land
and Gov. Rick Snyder One
protester carried a sign
that read, "Don't Mess with
Our Bridge," referring to
the bridge scandal.


Researchers learn pythons have good homing skills


Associated Press

MIAMI Aside from
being scarily large and vo-
racious, Burmese pythons
also are really good at
finding their way home,
according to new research
conducted in Florida's
Everglades.
The discovery about
pythons' unusual naviga-
tional abilities doesn't
much help wildlife agen-
cies desperately trying to
curb the invasive snake's
population in the fragile
wetlands. It might be
something reptile owners
should think about,
though, if they've consid-
ered illegally dumping an
unwanted pet python in
the wild.
"This is like the differ-
ence between homing pi-
geons and other birds,"
said the University of
Florida's Frank Mazzotti,
one of the researchers for
the study being published
Wednesday in Biology
Letters, a journal of
Britain's Royal Society
Mazzotti and other re-
searchers have been
studying what pythons eat
and trying to find a way to
keep their population
from growing. In 2006 and
2007, they captured 12
adult pythons in Ever-
glades National Park and
surgically implanted
radio transmitters in the

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snakes to track their
movements.
Six of the snakes were
released in areas 13 to 22
miles from where they
originally were captured.
To the researchers' sur-
prise, the snakes figured
out which way was home,
and they stayed on track
for months even when
temperatures dropped
and the cold-blooded
snakes were less active.
Unlike other snakes, the
pythons moved with a pur-
pose through their land-
scape instead of slithering
randomly It took the
snakes three to nine
months to get back to their
original locations, accord-
ing to the researchers.
Little is known about
pythons' movements in
their native habitats in
India and other parts of
Asia, and researchers had
expected the snakes to es-
tablish new home ranges
where they were released,
said Shannon Pittman
of the University of
Missouri-Columbia, the
study's lead author
It's not clear how the
snakes mapped out their



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routes whether they re-
lied on smell, light or some
kind of magnetic force. If
researchers can figure out
what the snakes look for in
the landscape, then maybe
they'll have an easier time
spotting pythons in the
wild, Mazzotti said.
"I can't say it's going to
provide us with any magi-
cal management solutions.
It's really neat that the
pythons do this," Mazzotti
said.
Along with Pittman and
Mazzotti, the study's au-
thors include researchers
from Davidson College,
the U.S. Geological Sur-
vey and the National Park
Service.
Estimates for how many
pythons now call South
Florida home vary wildly,
ranging from several thou-
sands to 100,000 or more.
The tan, splotchy snakes
can disappear in the vast
wetlands, and researchers
said they'll fail to see a


python they're tracking
with a radio tracking de-
vice until they're nearly
standing on it.
Florida's population of
Burmese pythons likely
developed from pets let
loose either intentionally
or in the aftermath of Hur-
ricane Andrew in 1992.
State and federal offi-
cials have evaluated spe-
cially designed traps, dogs
trained to sniff out
pythons and a massive
amateur hunt to try and
get a handle on the inva-
sive python population. So
far, only cold weather and
"exotic pet amnesty days,"
where people can relin-
quish non-native species
with no questions asked,
have reliably delivered
pythons to officials.
Florida prohibits pos-
session or sale of the
pythons for use as pets,
and federal law bans the
importation and inter-
state sale of the species.


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F1O (42M rnnv'Y ROAfHOUSF


IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Wednesday, March 26 11:00am
Friday, April 11 11:00am


Amelia
Verdino, 93
CRYSTAL RIVER
Amelia Verdino, 93, of
Crystal River, passed away
on Friday, March 21, 2014,
at the Hospice of Citrus
County Care Unit in Inver-
ness, Fla.
She was
born to
Luisa and ,- .e
Carminan- 1 -r e
tonio



Cyta o ie in 195 oh
Furno on C
Feb. 10,
1921, in Sa.
L e u c i o Amelia
B e n e Verdino
vento,
Italy, and came to America
in 1956. She retired to
Crystal River in 1975. She
was a member of St. Bene-
dict Catholic Church of
Crystal River She was an
extraordinary cook and
enjoyed making things by
hand. She was an expert
gardener and loved to
grow flowers of all kinds,
but above all she was a
beautiful and wonderful
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Er-
minio Verdino. She is sur-
vived by her children,
Anna and husband
Michael McElroy of
Tampa, Fla.,, Maria
"Luisa" and husband Fred
Koehl of Lecanto, Fla., An-
thony and wife Angela
Verdino of Clover, S.C.,
Rita Skerys of Sag Harbor,
N.Y, Richard and wife
Theresa Verdino of Stir-
ling, N.J., and Delia and
husband Glen Oberlander
of Dunnellon, Fla.; 14
grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be from
2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday, March 24, at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River A
funeral Mass will be cele-
brated at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
March 25, at St. Benedict
Catholic Church. Entomb-
ment will follow at Fero
Memorial Gardens, Bev-
erly Hills. In lieu of flow-
ers, please consider a
memorial contribution to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Strickland
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory of Crystal River as-
sisted the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Obituaries are at
www.chronicleonline
.com.


Th- e .
1 I. .

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Stephen
Gould, 61
Stephen E. Gould, age
61, died Feb. 22, 2014. A
Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered at 10 a.m.
Saturday, March 29, 2014,
at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory




Lawrence
Hoffman, 87
DUNNELLON
Lawrence J. Hoffman,
87, of Dunnellon, Fla., died
Monday, March 17, 2014,
while under the care of
Hospice of Marion County
Cremation Services are
under the Direction of
Fero Funeral Home.




James
McCormick III,
73
HERNANDO
James A. McCormick III,
73, of Hernando, Fla., died
Friday, March 21, 2014,
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus County in Inver-
ness, Fla. Arrangements
are by McGan Cremation
Service LLC, Hernando,
Fla.

Kasper
Trowell, 71
HUDSON
Kasper Trowell, age 71,
Hudson, died Thursday,
March 20, 2014. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
charged a base fee of
$25 plus $10 per
column inch, payable
in advance.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an ad-
ditional charge. Larger
photos, spanning the
entire column, can
also be used.



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 A7


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crossroads Cookoff


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
The familiar aroma of barbecue overtook Hernando on
Saturday at the annual Hernando Crossroads BBQ
Cookoff, sponsored by the New Church Without Walls.
Keith Adkins, left, and James Farr, right, of Samantha's
Caf6 of Hernando, was one of the dozen contestants who
participated in the fundraiser for the church and the
homeless community.


* Citrus County issues citations that carry with them a fine of $100 for first offenders of local watering rules.
Second violations cost $250, third or more cost $500. Find watering rules in the weather map on Page A4 daily.


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CONFLICT
Continued from Page Al

but not discuss the Oak Vil-
lage Boulevard "stub out"
issue.
Now all three acknowl-
edge they were premature
to declare conflicts of in-
terest, despite Parsons ad-
vising at least one
commissioner beforehand
that he should announce
his conflict and then ab-
stain from a vote if there
was any motion.
"She said I should not be
part of this discussion,"
Meek said.
The law requires com-
missioners to vote unless
they have a conflict of inter-
est. They must abstain
when they or anyone in
their families would re-
ceive a "special gain or
loss" financially from a vote,
according to state Commis-
sion on Ethics spokes-
woman Kerrie Stillman.
Meek and Kenney now
say they will ask for formal
opinions from the Commis-
sion on Ethics to see if they
have conflicts of interest in
voting on any matter in-
volving developer Nachum
Kalka or the 213 feet of un-
developed roadway known
as a stub out at the end of
Oak Village Boulevard
Commissioner Bays
could not be reached for
comment. However, Bays,
who said she sells insur-
ance to Kalka, shook her
head no when a reporter
asked her during a
March 14 interview
whether she had anything
to gain or lose by voting on
Kalka-Oak Village issues.
Parsons would not say
why she advised Commis-
sioners Bays, Kenney and
Meek to avoid discussing
the Oak Village Boulevard
issue when Commissioner
Scott Adams brought it up
March 11.
The Chronicle asked
Parsons to cite the specific
statute that supported her
advice to commissioners.
Through county spokes-
woman Tobey Phillips,
Parsons refused.
On Friday, Parsons again
advised commissioners to
refrain from discussing
the issue with anyone, but
this time for a different
reason.
The Oak Village Associ-
ation last week filed an ap-
plication for a street
vacation to remove from
public ownership the 213-
foot stub out which, if ap-
proved, would eliminate
Kalka's access to U.S. 98
through Oak Village
Boulevard.
The street vacation re-
quires a review from the
Planning and Develop-
ment Commission, and a
final vote from the county
commission. The PDC is
scheduled to hear it
May 15.
Parsons said in an email
to commissioners that with
the street vacation for-
mally submitted, commis-
sioners should not discuss
with the issue with anyone
outside of the meeting.
Meanwhile, Kalka's ap-
plication to complete the
Oak Village right of way,
which does not require a
public review, is in limbo.


On Feb. 27, county engi-
neering design technician
Larry Parker sent a letter
to Kalka's engineer with a
number of questions before
the permit could be issued.
The revised application
has not yet been sent back
to the county
Determining
'special gain or loss'
While state law says
commissioners must ab-
stain because of a finan-
cial "special gain or loss,"
it also leaves open a much
wider scenario.
The law allows for ab-
staining when there "ap-
pears to be a possible
conflict of interest."
Kenney and Meek said
they both thought that was
their case.
Meek's father, Joe, is a
partner with Kalka on
other projects outside of
Sugarmill Woods, building
homes in Pine Ridge and
Citrus Springs.
Commissioner Meek
said he wants to avoid a
situation where he would
vote on the Oak Village
issue, and then sometime
down the road, his father
joins Kalka in building
homes whose new owners
might access Oak Village
Boulevard.
Kenney lives in Oak Vil-
lage South, but not on the
boulevard in question. He
has repeatedly said he op-
poses Kalka using the
boulevard to connect with
his potential developments
in Sugarmill Woods and
Hernando County, and is
trying to broker a resolu-
tion between Kalka and the
Oak Village Association.
Kenney called the ethics
commission on Monday
and spoke to a staff attor-
ney He said the attorney
said he didn't appear to
have a conflict, but could
abstain anyway if anyone
had a perception that he
had a conflict
"The lawyer said if you
feel there's an appearance
of a conflict of interest, you
don't need to vote," Ken-
ney told the Chronicle Ed-
itorial Board on
Wednesday
Friday, however, Kenney
said he would vote on
the street vacation
application.
During the same conver-
sation, though, Kenney
said he would join Meek in
asking for a formal
ruling from the ethics
commission.
The ethics commission
issues formal rulings that
are specific to a commis-
sioner's situation, the
agency's Stillman said.
Those rulings, unlike in-
formal staff opinions such
as the one Kenney re-
ceived, are considered
legally binding on the
elected official who seeks
the ruling.
Sugarmill Woods resi-
dents, who have inundated
commissioners with
emails in opposition to
Kalka improving the stub
out deserve a vote from all
five commissioners, said
David Quinn, president
of the Oak Village
Association.
"We elected those peo-
ple to make decisions," he
said. "It doesn't get any
simpler."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


OOHNAU





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHEEP
Continued from Page Al

Tractor Supply was a great spon-
sor to get that started. We don't
have that many this year, but we
hope it's a stepping stone to cre-
ate some more interest, some-
thing we continue."
Not many sheep are roaming
around the county, but Lecanto
Middle School's Future Farmers
of America (FFA) program intro-
duced sheep last year. Porter
said he liked the idea of includ-
ing sheep in the fair's livestock
exhibits.
"I don't know that there are a
lot of sheep in Citrus County, my-
self personally, but any time you
give a child an opportunity to
participate in the fair, that's a
good thing," Porter said. "The
educational requirements and
the responsibilities required are
great learning tools for their fu-
ture development."
Exhibiting sheep will be dif-
ferent from the long-established
swine program, where the chil-
dren sell their animals after they
are judged. Rather than a mar-
ket program, the sheep are in a
breeding program. After judging,
the sheep get to go home.
Deborah Parker, teacher and
FFA adviser at Lecanto Middle
School, explained how the chil-
dren get to raise sheep.
"We joined the Meat Sheep Al-
liance this year and they had a
special promotional deal to get
kids to show more hair sheep,"
Parker said on Tuesday "Their
breeders sold them their sheep
for $100. At the end of the show
season in April, they buy them
back for $200."
About a dozen sheep are kept
at the middle school's farm on
the north end of the educational
complex, in addition to other
types of livestock. Sixth-, sev-
enth- and eighth-graders take
responsibility for all the live-
stock on the farm. Although the
rent may be free, the students
pay for feed, so the $200 they get


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LOCAL


*4

MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Taylor Williams, Hanna Carpenter and Brittany Troxtell display two
animals just days old at their school's livestock barn.


back reimburses them.
"They basically get to keep
them for free because the $100
pays for the feed," Parker said.
"Next year, they can take that
$200 and do it again."
Sheep are raised for meat and
wool. Breeds are distinguished
as hair sheep or meat sheep.
Some are dual purposed. One
widely known breed is
Katahdin, a hair sheep devel-
oped in the United States and
used for grazing in large land
management areas.
Students will show such
breeds as Katahdin, St. Croix-
Augustines and Wiltshire.
"I'm showing chickens, bunnies
and sheep this year," said Taylor
Williams. "I got interested in
sheep when I saw the other ones
here. That's why I got mine."
"This is my first year," said
Hannah Carpenter, who will also
show a rabbit at the fair
Sheep have different person-
alities. Sophie, a Southdown
that has been at the farm for two
years and gave birth to twins
eight days ago, is described as
friendly, but some of the other
sheep are "kind of crazy"
A Wiltshire horn cross sheep
hasn't made many friends.
"We decided we won't get an-
other one of those," Parker said.
Students learn all about the


sheep to get tested at the Skil-
lathon at the fair They are
tested on knowledge of the parts
of the sheep and how well the
sheep have grown.
Only nine sheep will be exhib-
ited at Citrus County Fair, which
is not bad for a first event.
"We went to the Pasco County
Fair a few weeks ago and they
had over 100 sheep," Parker
said. "It's growing in Florida.
The state fair probably had
about 200 sheep. Last week, we
went to the Sumter County Fair
and they had probably about 50."
Sheep have advantages over
other livestock.
"They take less room and they
cost a lot less," Parker said.
The students have found the
meat to be tasty
"It's amazing," said Brittany
Troxtell. 'At the Meat Sheep Al-
liance show, they have this
cookoff and you try all these dif-
ferent kinds of lamb and it's
very, very good. At the state fair,
they had a lamb dinner and it
was very good, too."
The students said some peo-
ple ask how they can eat an ani-
mal they raised.
"Same thing with rabbits,"
said Hanna Carpenter "They
say, 'Ooh, how can you eat
Thumper?' I love rabbit. It's
good."


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 All


FAIR AT A GLANCE
Midway Schedule
* Monday, March 24 Midway not open.
* Tuesday, March 25 Two Buck Tuesday. Midway open 5 to
10 p.m. All gate admission $2 per person. Each ride $2
starting at 5 p.m.
* Wednesday, March 26 Senior & Military Day, 1 to 10 p.m.
Seniors 55 and older admission is $5 for the entire day.
* Wednesday, March 26 Chronicle Night, 5 to 10 p.m.
Midway opens at 5 p.m. Armband regular price $20, $18 with
Chronicle coupon
* Thursday, March 27 Midnight Magic, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. $20
armband special.
* Friday, March 28 School Day Special, 1 to 5 p.m. Students
free until 5 p.m.
* Friday, March 28 Friday Night Magic. $20 armband special,
6 to 11 p.m.
* Saturday, March 29 Daytime Magic, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
$20 armband special.
* Saturday, March 29 Saturday Night Magic, 6 to 10 p.m.
$20 armband special.
Fair Highlights Auditorium
* 1 p.m. Sunday, March 23 Beautiful Baby Pageant &
Decorated Baby Pageant.
* 2:30 p.m. Sunday, March 23 Pre Teen Citrus County, Little
Miss/Mr. Pageant.
* 7 p.m. Monday, March 24 Mercy's Well gospel concert.
* 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 26 Youth Public Speaking Contest.
* 7 p.m. Thursday, March 27 Karaoke Contest bring your
Karaoke CD.
* 6 p.m. Friday, March 28-Jersey Dirt Band.
* 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, March 29 -Acoustic Accent.
Livestock Pre-Opening Events (Enter south gate only)
* 2 p.m. Sunday, March 23 Open Heifer Show &
Showmanship.
* 8:30 a.m. Monday, March 24 Open Rabbit Show &
Showmanship.
* 11:30 a.m. Monday, March 24-POM & Youth Rabbit Show &
Showmanship.
* 3 p.m. Monday, March 24 Open, POM & Youth Rabbit
Awards.
S11 a.m. Thursday, March 27 -Youth Swine Showmanship.
* 2 p.m. Thursday, March 27 PeeWee, POM & Youth Poultry
Showmanship.
* 3 p.m. Thursday, March 27 PeeWee, POM & Youth Poultry
Awards.


100 Cash Prize in All FourCateories
$100 Cash Prize in All Four Categories


Wn1r Lt r T Citrus County BarAssociation Kindergarten-5th grade 9th-12th grade / i
= T F LawWeek Art Contest 6 6th-8th grade Adult ji
SI Draw your best representation of our All entries must be mailed or dropped off by April 15
M ATT RS theme "American Democracy And Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429 A
II. The Rule Of Law: Why Every Vote Matters" for more information please call 352-795-0404


I!


)OHPWC









Libya's guns free-for-all fuels region's turmoil


Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya At
the heart of the Libyan
capital, the open-air Fish
Market was once a place
where residents went to
buy everything from meat
and seafood to clothes and
pets. Now it's Tripoli's
biggest arms market, with
tables displaying pistols
and assault rifles. Ask a
vendor, and he can pull out
bigger machine guns to
sell for thousands of
dollars.
Libya, where hundreds
of militias hold sway and
the central government is
virtually powerless, is
awash in millions of
weapons with no control
over their trafficking. The
arms free-for-all fuels not
only Libya's instability but
also stokes conflicts
around the region as guns
are smuggled through the
country's wide-open bor-
ders to militants fighting in
insurgencies and wars
stretching from Syria to
West Africa.
The lack of control is at
times stunning. Last
month, militia fighters
stole a planeload of
weapons sent by Russia for
Libya's military when it
stopped to refuel at Tripoli
International Airport en
route to a base in the
south. The fighters sur-
rounded the plane on the
tarmac and looted the
shipment of automatic
weapons and ammunition,
Hashim Bishr, an official
with a Tripoli security
body under the Interior
Ministry, told The Associ-
ated Press.
In a further indignity,
the fighters belonged to a
militia officially assigned
by the government to pro-
tect the airport, since reg-
ular forces are too weak to
do it.
Only a few weeks earlier,
another militia seized a
weapons' shipment that
landed at Tripoli's Mitiga
Airport meant for the mil-
itary's 1st Battalion, Bishr
said. Among the weapons
were heavy anti-aircraft
guns, which are a perva-
sive weapon among the
militias and are usually
mounted on the back of
pickup trucks.
The weapons chaos has
alarmed Europe just a
short distance across the
Mediterranean and the
United States. At a confer-
ence in Rome this month,
Western and Arab diplo-
mats, including U.S. Secre-
tary of State John Kerry,
pressed Libyan officials to
reach some political con-
sensus so the international
community can help the
government collect
weapons and rebuild the
military and police.
The problem is that Eu-
rope and the U.S. simply
don't know who to talk to
in Libya, a Western diplo-
mat in Tripoli told the AP
"It's about whether they
are capable of receiving
the help," he said, speak-
ing on spoke on condition
of anonymity to talk about
the discussions at the con-
ference. He pointed to an
international effort to
build storage houses in
which to collect weapons
in the western Libyan
town of Gharyan. That
project has stumbled, he
said, because of the prob-
lem of determining "who
is in charge and whom we
work with."
The 42-year rule of
Libyan strongman Moam-
mar Gadhafi left the coun-
try without solid political
institutions. Since his fall
and death in the 2011 civil
war, the instability has
only spiraled. The rebel
brigades that formed to
fight him have turned into
powerful militias, many
based on tribe, region, city
or even neighborhood, that
often battle each other as
they carve out zones of
control. Some have hard-
line Islamist or even al-
Qaida-inspired ideologies.
The militias outgun the


military and police, which
were shattered in the civil
war The government has
to hire militias to take up
security duties at airports,
seaports, hospitals and
government buildings. A
militia assigned to protect
oil facilities in the east
turned around and took
over the facilities last year,
demanding greater auton-
omy for the country's east-


Libyan militias from towns throughout the country's west parade Feb. 14, 2012, through Tripoli, Libya.


emrn region, and the vital oil
industry has been virtually
shut down since.
Libya's politicians are
themselves deeply di-
vided, broadly into an Is-
lamist-led and a rival bloc,
each backed by allied mili-
tias, turning politics into
an armed conflict Militias,
for example, have be-
sieged parliament to force
passage of particular laws
and once briefly kid-
napped the former prime
minister
Highlighting the divi-
sions, Libya sent two sepa-
rate delegations to the
Rome Conference, one
headed by then-Prime
Minister Ali Zidan, the
other by his rival, Islamist
parliament chief Nouri
Abu-Sahmain. Soon after
the conference, lawmak-
ers led by Islamists suc-
ceeded in removing Zidan
in a no-confidence vote.
Several officials told the
AP that the government
does not know how many
weapons there are in
Libya, a country of 6 mil-
lion people.
Saleh Jaweida, a law-
maker on parliament's Na-
tional Security Committee,
said that all figures are
speculation, but that a
plausible estimate is be-
tween 10 million to 15 mil-
lion light weapons -up to
an assault rifle and not
counting heavier caliber
weapons or armor
Many of the arms came
from the arsenals of the
Gadhafi-era military and
police, which were looted
during the civil war and
after the collapse of his
rule. Another source is the


large amount of weapons
shipped to the rebels dur-
ing the eight-month upris-
ing, largely from Gulf Arab
nations.
The hundreds of militias
around the country absorb
as many weapons as they
can because no group
knows how well armed
rival groups are, creating a
climate of "mutual fear,"
Bishr said.
There is also a strong
domestic market for
weapons among the public
for personal protection.
Nearly every household is
believed to have at least
one gun, but usually it's
several.
The Fish Market is one
main source in Tripoli -
located only steps from the
capital's historic Red Cas-
tle, where Gadhafi deliv-
ered a speech from the
ramparts during the 2011
uprising, threatening to
open his arsenal to the
public and turn Libya into
"a red fire."
Smuggling abroad is
also big business. Abdel-
Basit Haroun, a former top
intelligence official, said
tribes and militias that
control the eastern, west-
ern, and southern borders
are engaged in arms
smuggling.
A 97-page report re-
leased in March by United
Nations Panel of Experts
said weapons that origi-
nated in Libya were found
in 14 countries, often
reaching militant groups.
The report said smuggling
is mainly from Libyan
militias' arsenals.
Sophisticated man-
portable, ground-to-air


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missile systems, known as
MANPADS, have reached
four conflict zones, includ-
ing Chad and Mali.
"Fears that terrorist
groups would acquire
these weapons have mate-
rialized," the report stated.
A MANPADS that mili-
tants in Egypt's Sinai
Peninsula used to shoot
down an Egyptian military
helicopter this year origi-
nated in Libya, it stated.
Libyan weapons were
also found in Somalia, the
Central African Republic
and in parts of Nigeria
where the militant group
Boko Haram operates, it
stated.
In Niger, weapons used
in the country's first sui-
cide attack last May -
were typical of the Libyan
arsenals and appear to
have been smuggled in
through Mali.
Another major destina-
tion for Libya's weapons is
Syria. The report said in-


vestigators fc
Qatar has bee
air force fligh
port weapons
and eventually
from where
passed to rebe
The report sai
made weapons
2000 by Gadha
were found in t
Islamic militai
Syria.
"In a very 1
Libya is export
curity to si
countries," wr
the authors of
Brian Katulis
Fellow at the
American Prog
Efforts by Li
trol the weap
have gone nom
Catch-22, militia
cannot surrer
weapons until
proper military
force to keep
the country, yet
forces cannot


when militias have so
much power
Under the Libyan gov-
ernment's Disarmament,
Demobilization and Rein-
tegration program, some
160,000 militiamen have
been registered under the
Interior Ministry's War-
riors Affairs Agency
A small portion of them
have given up their
weapons and demobilized.
But most have been as-
signed various security
tasks in an attempt to rope
militias under state aegis.
Zuhair al-Ugli, the head
of communications for the
Warrior Affairs Agency,
said there is no mecha-
nism for dealing with the
tide of guns.
"The state is paralyzed
in collecting the weapons,"
he said.
Abdul Rahman AlAgeli,
a security coordinator in
the prime minister's of-
rfice, said the government
is "effectively drowning"
and that authorities have
"not demonstrated any
| tangible vision" for demo-
bilizing and disarming
S . militias.
....i Authorities are divided
Associated Press on how to deal with the
militias. Some see them as
the only hope for provid-
bund that ing security for the next
n using its few years until formal se-
ts to trans- curity services are rebuilt,
from Libya while others say the mili-
Sto Turkey, tias must be disarmed for
they are stability, he wrote in an on-
.ls in Syria. line presentation hosted
id Russian- by the Canadian-based
s bought in Centre for Security Gover-
ifi's regime nance think tank.
he hands of The problem is, young
nt rebels in Libyans in militias have no
incentive to hand over
real sense, their weapons, which are
ing its inse- their only source of secu-
urrounding rity and their only "bar-
rote one of gaining power vis-a-vis the
the report, new political order" If
a senior they disarm, they would ef-
Center for fectively surrender power
tress. to a military and police
bya to con- force they distrust, without
)ons traffic guarantees of reforms, he
here. In a wrote.
ias say they "Disarmament in any
under their context is never merely an
there is a issue of weapons reduc-
y and police tion, but rather a social
security in contract between the peo-
t the regular ple and its government,"
be rebuilt he wrote.


/-,~~~~~ 11 "' r- -*\CTUS COU T 1 1
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Today! 352-563-5655 ...J 1hroniNonI.,.-1 co


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A12 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


US schools add


Vietnamese to


dual immersion


Associated Press

GARDEN GROVE, Calif
- When Thuy Vo Dang
came to the U.S. as a young
girl, her English took off.
Her parents sent her to
Vietnamese school on the
weekends to learn her na-
tive language, but she
eventually had to study it
in graduate school to be-
come fully literate.
Now, the 35-year-old
mother of two and
archivist for University of
California, Irvine's South-
east Asian Archive has
been lobbying for her
Southern California
school district to start the
state's first dual-immer-
sion elementary school
program in Vietnamese.
She said she wants to help
keep the language alive for
the next generation.
"I can see how quickly
they're forgetting their
Vietnamese," Vo Dang said
of her 7-year-old daughter
and 3-year-old son. "I
would love if this were
available for him when he
starts kindergarten."
The move to expand the
use of Vietnamese in so-
called dual immersion
programs comes as the
children of refugees who
fled the aftermath of the
Vietnam War are coming of
age and striving to pre-
serve the language for
their American children.
Nearly 1.9 million people
of Vietnamese heritage
live in the U.S., and a third
were born here, according
to census data.
In the past few years,
schools in Texas and
Washington have begun
Vietnamese language
dual-immersion programs.
Another is planned for
Oregon in the fall. The
Garden Grove Unified
School District, which cov-
ers the area where Vo
Dang lives, voted last
month to consider starting
a program in one of
the country's largest
Vietnamese immigrant
enclaves.
Dual-immersion pro-
grams teach students sub-
jects ranging from math to
social studies in English
and another language.
Classes are usually split
between English speakers
and English learners so
children model the lan-
guages for each other and
work in pairs and groups
to help each other with
assignments.
Instructional time is
split between the two lan-
guages, depending on the
program design and the
age of the students. Most
programs start in kinder-
garten and run through el-
ementary school.
In the past few years,
dual-immersion programs
have taken off across the
country, said Julie Sugar-
man, senior research asso-
ciate at the Center for
Applied Linguistics. Sev-
eral hundred programs
were created during the
1990s, many of them in
Spanish, and more re-
cently the model has ex-
panded to more languages,
she said.


VIETNAMESE
AMERICAN
COMMUNITIES
Population:
1.9 million
Top states of
residence: California,
Texas, Florida,
Washington, Virginia
Percentage of foreign-
born Vietnamese who
arrived in the United
States before 2000:
74
Percentage of foreign-
born Vietnamese who
arrived in the United
States since 2010: 6
Percentage of
Vietnamese age 6 to
39 who speak English
very well or well: 71
Percentage of
Vietnamese over 65
who speak English not
well or not at all: 72
Sources: U.S. Census Bu-
reau, American Commu-
nity Survey 2012 and ACS
2012 PUMS data

In Vietnamese commu-
nities, the programs target
children who are native
speakers of the language,
but also the children and
grandchildren of Viet-
namese immigrants who
may be stronger in Eng-
lish, and families with no
background in Vietnamese
who want to learn.
As immigration from
Vietnam has slowed since
the war, the number of
English-speaking Viet-
namese American chil-
dren has grown.
Elders have worked to
pass on the language by of-
fering Vietnamese classes
on the weekends. The
number of students taking
the extracurricular classes
in Southern California has
doubled to 15,000 in the
past 15 years, said Quyen
Di Chuc Bui, chair of the
training committee for the
Association of Vietnamese
Language and Culture
Schools.
Often, new immigrants
are so eager for their chil-
dren to learn English
quickly and succeed in
school that learning their
native language takes less
priority By the third gen-
eration, use of the lan-
guage starts to decline
unless there is an active
effort to retain it, experts
said.
In many communities,
the English-speaking chil-
dren of immigrants who
may struggle to master
their first language are
leading the push for dual
immersion, and the Viet-
namese community is no
exception.
"Many of these young
parents are professionals,
and they themselves felt
the disadvantage of not
being able to communicate
in Vietnamese, and they
want that for their chil-
dren," said Kimoanh
Nguyen-Lam, director of
the Advanced Training
and Research Division in
the Office of International
and Foreign Language
Education.


Millions of kids to test


new education assessments


KIMBERLY HEFLING
AP education writer

WASHINGTON What's on the
new Common Core-based exams?
More than 4 million kids in U.S.
schools soon will have a clue.
Field testing begins this coming
week in 36 states and the District of
Columbia on assessments devel-
oped by two different groups of
states. Participating students will
be asked to sit for hours in front of
a computer or use a No 2 pencil to
answer questions.
But there's no need for kids to
worry The scores won't count, this
time. The actual exam-testing won't
be used for another year
The Common Core standards
spell out what math and English
skills students should have at each
grade, and are designed to develop
more critical thinking skills than
traditional school work. They were
first pushed by governors con-
cerned about the large number of
high school graduates needing re-
medial college help and lacking
basic skills. Most states have
adopted them.
The field tests, to be conducted
until June, are a big step forward in
the push to more fully integrate the
new academic standards into the
school environment They will give
education officials a chance to
judge things such as the quality of
each test question and the techni-
cal capabilities of schools to ad-
minister the tests, which are
computer-based but also will be
available on paper
But they also come as the stan-
dards face political push-back in
many states
Indiana lawmakers, for example,
last year paused implementation of
the standards and a measure end-
ing the state's participation is at the
governor's desk. House lawmakers
in Tennessee passed legislation
that would delay implementation -
and testing under Common Core
for two years, but that proposal has-
n't been taken up in the Senate.
Common Core supporters hope
the field tests provide an opportu-
nity to highlight the best of Common
Core.
"There's been a lot of talk and a lot
of planning and it's actually hap-
pening, which I think generates
some excitement and some reality, if
you will, for the fact that this is mov-
ing ahead," said Jeffrey Nellhaus,
director of research, policy and de-
sign with the consortium Partner-
ship forAssessment of Readiness for
College and Careers, or PARCC.
Joe Willhoft, the executive direc-
tor of the Smarter Balanced Assess-
ment Consortium, told reporters
there will be snags, and that's in
part due to the nature of what a
field test is a test run and an op-
portunity to see what works and
doesn't. Already, out of concern
there would be technical problems,
Smarter Balanced delayed by a
week to this week the start of its
field tests.
"We have a saying in Smarter Bal-
anced that if nothing goes wrong in
the field test, then actually we have
failed," Willhoft said.
While opposition to the standards
has been multi-dimensional, some
critics take issue with the tests and


PARTICIPATING STATES
States participating in the
field tests on the new
Common Core-based
assessments. The field tests
begin this coming week and
last until June:
From the Partnership for
Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers
(PARCC):
Arizona
Arkansas
Colorado
District of Columbia
Illinois
Louisiana
Mississippi
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
Maryland
Massachusetts
Ohio
Rhode Island
Tennessee
From the Smarter Balanced
Assessment Consortium:
California
Connecticut
Delaware
Hawaii
Idaho
Iowa
Maine
Michigan
Missouri
Montana
Nevada
New Hampshire
North Carolina
North Dakota
South Carolina
South Dakota
Oregon
Vermont
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

how the results will be used be-
cause the tests are designed to re-
place the annual assessments given
in states.
Also complicating matters are the
new teacher evaluation systems
rolling out in many states that rely,
in part, on student performance on
annual exams. Questions have been
raised about when or if the Com-
mon Core-based assessments
should count on these evaluations.
Supporters are warning that
scores on the new assessments will
drop compared with the old tests, but
they say they will be a more accurate
measurement of student knowledge.
The field tests themselves have
generated other concerns. Some
states' officials worry about double


ON THE NET
PARCC:
https://www.parcconline.org
Smarter Balanced:
www.smarterbalanced.org


Florida, for example,
recently signed a
contract with the
nonprofit American
Institutes for
Research to develop
an assessment for its
standards, which are
largely based on the
Common Core
standards.

testing, meaning some students are
participating in both the field test
and taking a state exam.
In response, the Education De-
partment gave California permis-
sion to just give the field tests to all
students in third- to eighth-grades,
meaning they won't be given the
state assessment this year Similar
permission was given to other
states, including Idaho, Montana,
and South Dakota, according to the
Education Department.
Smarter Balanced and PARCC
were created to help states pool re-
sources to develop the tests. But
some states have opted to use differ-
ent ones. Florida, for example, re-
cently signed a contract with the
nonprofitAmerican Institutes for Re-
search to develop an assessment for
its standards, which are largely based
on the Common Core standards.
For the states participating in the
field tests, how they will be con-
ducted varies.
PARCC said more than 1 million
students will participate in its field
tests, and about 10 percent of the
students in 14 states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia will take them. It
says its field tests will take no more
than three hours for most students.
Smarter Balanced said in its 22
participating states, more than 3
million students will participate,
with several states seeing most or all
of its students participating. The two
subject areas math and English -
are each expected to take 2 1/2 hours
to four hours to complete, but not all
students will take both parts.
Among the questions the consor-
tiums said they'll be addressing:
Do certain questions seem too
easy or too hard?
Is gender, race or ethnicity a
factor in how students perform?
Do students score better using
a computer or pencil and paper?
And, do they do better on a tablet
compared to a computer?
Do schools have the bandwidth
to handle computer-based
assessments?
Associated Press writers Erik
Schelzig in Nashville, Tenn., and
Tom LoBianco in Indianapolis con-
tributed to this report
Follow Kimberly Hefling on Twit-
ter: http://twittercom/khefling.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 A13









For kids of bankrupt Detroit, challenges abound


DAVID CRARY
AP national writer

DETROIT In a city
scarred by broken prom-
ises, the Moore brothers,
James and Robert, and fel-
low student Chelsea In-
yard are among the
fortunate ones. The
teenagers attend one of
Detroit's most promising
new public schools.
Set in the medical dis-
trict of the city's Midtown
neighborhood, Dr Ben-
jamin Carson High School
of Science and Medicine,
just 3 years old, offers a
rigorous curriculum, gung-
ho teachers and gleaming
facilities.
Yet beyond the campus
is a city in the throes of the
largest municipal bank-
ruptcy in U.S. history,
where life places special
stresses on young people.
Teachers and parents
are fighting to do right by
the children, and many be-
lieve Detroit is finally on
the rise after hitting bot-
tom. Yet they worry about
the toll of growing up amid
danger, dysfunction and
the blight epitomized by
tens of thousands of aban-
doned homes.
"This is what we're in-
graining into kids' psyches
- this emptiness, the lack
of safety," said Tonya
Allen, CEO of the Skillman
Foundation, which backs
many new, child-oriented
initiatives. "They're going
into school with a level of
fear that something bad is
going to happen."
Eighty-eight vacant
school buildings are for
sale some of the 200
schools closed in recent
years due to depopulation.
High levels of gang vio-
lence and premature
births combine to make
the youth mortality rate
the worst of any major U.S.
city, according to a recent
analysis by the Detroit
News. Most of the city's 300
parks are unusable, over-
grown wastelands.
"Detroit is a very diffi-
cult place to be a child,"
said Dan Varner, CEO of an
education watchdog group
called Excellent Schools
Detroit
Still, many young De-
troiters speak hopefully of
the future, though the
practical obstacles to get-
ting there come up in their
conversation, too.
Take, for instance, the
Moore brothers, who live
on Detroit's northern
boundary, about 10 miles
from Ben Carson. Like
many high school students,
they rely for transport on
the city's crime-ridden, in-
efficient bus system.
"Some days, I don't get
home until 9 p.m.," said
Robert, a 16-year-old jun-
ior aspiring to a military
career He recounted the
all-too-common phenome-
non of overcrowded buses
passing without stopping.
James, who's 15, said his
youth-league football team
was sometimes unable to
play because field condi-
tions were so bad "tall
grass, nasty bleachers,
trash everywhere."
Like most schools in De-
troit, Ben Carson has an
overwhelmingly African-
American student body
More than 80 percent
come from low-income
families not surprising
in a city where the child
poverty rate of 57 percent
is triple the national
figure.
"They need our arms
wrapped around them,"
said the principal, Brenda
Belcher. "It's important to
create a culture and cli-
mate to support them."
Waiting in the school's
reception area on a recent
day was Michael Inyard,
whose daughter, Chelsea,
is a 10th-grader. Unable to
drive because his license
is suspended, Inyard rides
with her on the bus to and
from school.
It's a brutal schedule,
given that he works


Associated Press
Student Jalen Pickett, talks during a Feb. 27 class that teaches anger management and conflict resolution skills at
Cody High School in Detroit. Jalen, now a diligent student with aspirations to be a defense lawyer, had an
inauspicious start to high school. His fighting earned him a spot in the new police department program the Chil-
dren in Trauma Intervention Camp, which gives students an alternative to expulsion in the form of training and coun-
seling from police officers and other adult mentors. "If Detroit can change, it's up to the youth to do it," Jalen says.
"I feel Detroit can come back. And if I do go away to college, I plan on coming back here and giving back to Detroit."


overnight at a Chrysler
plant but he considers the
crowded buses too danger-
ous for Chelsea to ride
alone.
"I'd be a bundle of
nerves any other way, won-
dering what's going on
with her," the father said.
Speaking generally
about Detroit's upcoming
generation, he added,
"These kids have a rough
time. They've got to be on
the alert for whatever,
whenever."
MEN
Ten miles west of Ben
Carson, at one of Detroit's
less glamorous high
schools, 17-year-old junior
Jalen Pickett was indeed
on the alert a police of-
ficer was about to shove
him during a workshop
aimed in part at teaching
anger management and
conflict resolution skills to
a dozen often-in-trouble
students.
"How would you react to
that?" Officer Melvin
Chuney asked the group
after using Jalen as his
foil.
The setting was a dis-
used classroom at Cody
High School. The deterio-
rating 60-year-old building
is to be the target of a vol-
unteer face-lift effort this
summer
Jalen, now a diligent stu-
dent with aspirations to be
a defense lawyer, had an
inauspicious start to high
school.
"I got into a fight my first
day," he said. "I was kicked
out a lot, didn't get along
with any of my teachers."
His penchant for fight-
ing earned him a spot in
the new Police Depart-
ment program the Chil-
dren in Trauma
Intervention Camp. It of-
fers the students an alter-
native to expulsion in the
form of training and coun-
seling from police officers
and other adult mentors.
"Everybody knows
you're in here because
sometimes you made bad
decisions," said the pro-
gram's leader, Officer
Monica Evans, whose ex-
hortations included bibli-
cal references and raw
street language.
The program has clearly
motivated Jalen Pickett.
He now opts to wear a
necktie each day despite
teasing from his friends
and is studying hard with
hopes of going to an out-of-
state university
Childhood was difficult.
Jalen said he was neg-
lected by both parents and
now lives with a cousin,
though he's determined to
help out his mother
financially
"I fought but that's
like every boy," he said. "I
have a clean record, I've
never been locked up ... I


never give up hope."
John Matthews, Jalen's
principal, empathizes with
his students.
"I grew up in Detroit. We
always felt life was going
to get better," Matthews
said. "These young people
don't see the future as
bright."
Unlike the city's elite
high schools, the three
separate academies at
Cody don't have selective
admissions, and the result,
Matthews said, "is a cer-
tain feeling of inferiority"
"But I tell our students
that they have more grit,"
he said. "We want them to
be proud of what they've
overcome."
MEN
Detroit was a city of 1.8
million residents in the
1950s; today, it has about
700,000. The exodus has in-
cluded many families
seeking improved educa-
tion. Since 2002, Detroit
Public Schools enrollment
has declined from 164,496
to about 49,500 in 97
schools now
Meanwhile, the separate
charter school sector has
exploded. According to
Excellent Schools Detroit,
the city now has 116 char-
ter schools serving 45 per-
cent of K-12 students.
That's about the same
share as DPS, which once
served more than 80 per-
cent of all students, and it's
one of the highest market
shares for charter schools
in any U.S. city
Some of the charter
schools and some DPS
schools are top-notch, said
Dan Varner of Excellent
Schools Detroit, but over-
all he assessed educa-
tional quality in both
sectors as "very poor"
Budget-wise, Detroit's
bankruptcy doesn't di-
rectly affect the public
school system, a separate
entity with its own taxing
authority, revenues and
governance. Nonetheless,
DPS' deficit is $94 million,
and is projected to reach
$120 million later this year
Then there's the aca-
demic scorecard. While
DPS schools have im-
proved their performance
on state-run standardized
tests, their showing on the
National Assessment of
Educational Progress re-
mains abysmal.
In 2013, DPS schools
ranked the worst among 21
major cities in the per-
formance of 4th and 8th
graders on math and read-
ing tests. Just 4 percent of
Detroit fourth-graders and
3 percent of eighth-graders
were proficient in math,
compared with 33 percent
and 27 percent, respec-


tively, in the average large
city
Nonetheless, DPS offi-
cials say the district is on
the upswing. Current en-
rollment is little changed
from the fall of 2012 no-
table given annual enroll-
ment losses of more than
10 percent over much of
the past decade.
Since there are far more
classroom seats than
school-age children these
days, individual schools
have been competing
fiercely to attract students.
"Nobody is managing
the market," said Shar-
londa Buckman, CEO of
the Detroit Parent Net-
work. "You've got every
Tom, Dick and Harry com-
ing in and trying to snatch
kids from other schools."
For parents, the multi-
plicity of options and the
hard-sell tactics can seem
overwhelming.
"How do I make the best
choice for my child? What
parent can
do all this
r e -
search?"
wondered
Arlyssa
Heard, a
43-year-
old single
mom of
two sons. Arlyssa
'At the be- Heard
ginning of single mother
the yearof two sons.
the year,
everyone
puts on a good show about
how wonderful the cur-
riculum is ... It's not until
the end of the year, you re-
alize it's more of the
same."
Heard's older son, 18,
needed remedial courses
at the start of community
college. Her 8-year-old son,
a third grader at DPS's
Paul Robeson-Malcolm X
Academy, has attention
deficit hyperactivity disor-
der and has struggled in a
class with nearly 40 stu-
dents, she said.
"I don't want my son to
be experimented on," she
said. "The clock is ticking.
I don't want when he's
16 to discover he's not
prepared."
Emo
Whatever happens in-
side Detroit's schools, the
environment outside can
be menacing.
The city-backed Detroit
Youth Violence Prevention
Initiative recently sur-
veyed 1,300 high school
students. Asked if a family
member had been shot,
murdered or disabled as a
result of violence in the
past 12 months, 87 percent
answered yes.
"Far too many children
walk to and from school in


I III II lllI~li

,I I I ,III~l~ -








COMPLETRE DEALS ARE IMPORTANT
APPtOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED RE


fear, lack trust in those
who took the oath to pro-
tect and serve, and con-
sider retaliation to be a
means to an end," said the
initiative's director, Annie
Ellington.
In response to such chal-
lenges, residents have
formed volunteer patrols
to enhance the safety of
students between school
and home.
Indeed, as municipal
services for families and
children withered, a host
of community associations,
volunteer groups and non-
profits have sought to fill
the void.
"We work with people
every day who haven't
given up, who love kids,
who are committed to
making things better," said
Sharnita Johnson, a De-
troit native who helps
oversee the Kellogg Foun-
dation's grants to neigh-
borhood and youth
programs in the city
"Detroiters are really
clear that they can't be
passive residents any-
more," she said. "The cav-
alry is not coming in to
help."
So it is that neighbor-
hood task forces have
formed to clean up parks
left untended due to city
budget cuts.
The new Detroit mayor,
Mike Duggan, recently la-
beled the parks "an em-
barrassment" with only
25 of the 300 parks in well-
maintained condition last
summer He vowed to have
150 parks in good shape
next summer, and urged
churches to launch an
"adopt-a-park" program
that might allow 50 more
to be revived.
The mayor also plans to
work with the medical
community on reducing
the high rate of premature
births and to lobby in tan-
dem with Michigan Gov
Rick Snyder to expand
pre-K education. He's
promised to expand the
bus fleet and fit existing
buses with security
cameras.
Others are pitching in to
help Detroit's children.
The Detroit Children's
Choir, which serves about
200 young people, says its
funding is up by $30,000
from last year Detroit PAL
- the police athletic


Detroit's

kids face

obstacles

Associated Press

DETROIT As De-
troit struggles through
bankruptcy, the city's
young people face spe-
cial challenges. A look
at a few of the problems,
and possible remedies:
Since 2002, Detroit
Public Schools enroll-
ment has declined from
164,496 to around 49,500.
About 200 schools have
closed in recent years
due to depopulation; 97
schools are in operation
now The district is
mounting an intensive
campaign, including
door-to-door outreach,
in a bid to increase
enrollment.
Gang violence is a
major problem, directly
affecting children and
their families. In a re-
cent survey of 1,300 high
school students, 87 per-
cent said someone in
their family had been
shot, murdered or dis-
abled as a result of vio-
lence in the past 12
months. Neighborhood
patrols have formed to
safeguard children
going to and from school,
and the police depart-
ment has launched a
program trying to keep
fight-prone students
from getting expelled.
Rates of premature
births, underweight ba-
bies and infant mortal-
ity are among the
highest in the nation.
Mayor Mike Duggan is
asking the city's medical
community to get en-
gaged in reducing these
rates.
The public bus sys-
tem, which many high
school students rely on,
is considered inefficient
and crime-ridden. Dug-
gan wants to expand the
fleet and fit existing
buses with security
cameras.
Only 25 of the city's
300 parks were in well-
maintained condition
last summer, according
to the mayor He has
vowed to have 150 parks
in good shape next sum-
mer, and is urging
churches to launch an
"adopt-a-park" program
that might allow 50
more to be revived.


league has about 1,500
adult volunteers coaching
11,000 kids in sports
programs.
There's also the Mosaic
Youth Theater, founded in
1992, which has sent en-
sembles of young singers
and actors on overseas
tours.
Roughly 165 young peo-
ple engage in Mosaic's
main programs each year
One of the troupe's
dancers, 10th-grader
Javon Jones, hopes to
study at the Juilliard
School in New York City,
but would like to return to
a revitalized Detroit.
"There's a lot of talent
here that can bloom, but
not a lot of opportunities to
express it," Javon said.
"Why can't we do it here,
in the place we love?"
Follow David Crary on
Twitter at http://www.
twitter.com/craryap.


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Final


stand


Associated Press
Pro-Russian militia members evacuate a local resident on Saturday as Russian troops assault the Belbek airbase,
outside Sevastopol, Crimea.

Pro-Russian forces storm Ukrainian base in Crimea


Associated Press
BELBEK AIR BASE, Crimea -
Ukraine's armed forces took what
may prove to be one of their final
stands Saturday in Crimea, as pro-
Russian forces stormed and seized
control of an air force base amid a
barrage of gunfire and explosions.
A tense blockade of the Belbek
air base base that has endured for
more than a week looked set for an
inevitable culmination following
the seizure of one Ukrainian-held
military facility after another in re-
cent days.
It was the last major Ukrainian
military facility in Crimea to fall
into the hands of pro-Russian
forces. The Ukrainian Defense
Ministry hasn't provided details of
how many bases it still controls on
the peninsula.


Crimea residents voted last week
to secede from Ukraine and join
Russia a process that was for-
malized this week with the blessing
of President Vladimir Putin. The
vote, which was held under condi-
tion akin to martial law under the
gaze of apparently Moscow-led
militia forces, has been rejected as
illegitimate by the international
community.
The assault on the Belbek base
mirrored events at other Ukrainian-
held military facilities on the
peninsula in recent days.
In footage provided by the
Ukrainian Defense ministry, a
Russian-made BTR-80 armored
personnel carrier could be seen
smashing open a front gate at Bel-
bek, a base across the bay from the
port city of Sevastopol.
APCs crashed through walls at


two other locations and were fol-
lowed by armed personnel, who
advanced in crouching position as
they secured the area. Four BTR-
80s were involved in the assault,
Ukrainian officials said.
Ukrainian troops offered no re-
sistance. Later, a separate motley
group arrived at the scene. The
crowd appeared to be made up of
professional soldiers, members of
a recently-formed militia unit and
Cossacks.
The cause of the explosions
wasn't immediately clear, although
Ukrainian officials said they were
stun grenades used to disperse any
potential resistance.
Two ambulances arrived and
then departed shortly after
Ukraine's Defense Ministry said
one reporter and a Ukrainian sol-
dier were injured in the raid.


Bin Laden associates show no remorse


Associated Press
NEW YORK In public
statements a week apart, al-
Qaida's self-professed
Sept. 11 mastermind and a
Kuwaiti imam who met with
Osama bin Laden in a cave
soon after the attacks once
again demonstrated that
time hasn't softened their
anti-American views.
If anything, Khalid Sheik
Mohammed in new writ-
ings from his Guantanamo
Bay cell and Sulaiman
Abu Ghaith on trial in
Manhattan federal court-
are using courtroom theater,


intention-
ally or not,
to press
their case
that the
United
States is
such a bully
Khaiid Sheik in the Mid-
Mohammed dleEastthat
even killing
civilians was justified.
"The entire trial is frozen
in time if you think about
it," said Karen J. Greenberg,
the director of the Center
on National Security at
Fordham Law who was one
of the few people in the


Sulaiman
Abu Ghaith


Manhattan
courtroom
Thursday
when the
surprise an-
nounce-
ment was
made that
Abu Ghaith
would tes-
tify "Be-


cause the trial is focused on
the moment of 9/11, it makes
everybody seem like they're
frozen in the time of 9/11."
Mohammed's words
emerged a week ago in a writ-
ten statement responding to
more than 400 questions from


defense lawyers in their
failed bid to win the court's
permission to have him tes-
tify on behalf of Abu Ghaith,
who is on trial on charges that
he conspired to kill Ameri-
cans and aid al-Qaida after
the terrorist attacks.
Mohammed, who was
captured in Pakistan in
2003, boasted that
Afghanistan under Taliban
leadership "was the first Is-
lamic state that treated all
Muslim men equally,
whether they be Chinese,
Indian, Chechnyan, Arabs,
or Westerners." There was
no mention of women.


Associated Press
The Washington Department of Transportation
said mud, trees and building materials are block-
ing both directions of State Route 530 near the
town of Oso after a mudslide Saturday.



Massive



mudslide



kills three

Six houses destroyed

Associated Press
SEATTLE A massive landslide of dirt,
trees and rocks in rural Washington killed
three people on Saturday, critically injured an
infant and several others, and destroyed six
houses, authorities said.
The slide that was at least 135 feet wide and
180 feet deep hit just before 11 a.m., Sno-
homish County authorities said.
The landslide completely blocked State
Route 530 near the town of Oso, about 55 miles
north of Seattle. Also blocked was the North
Fork of the Stillaguamish River, which
prompted an evacuation notice because of con-
cerns about possible severe downstream flood-
ing affecting more homes.
People who live in the North Fork's flood
plain, from the small communities of Oso to
Stanwood, were urged to flee to higher ground.
Initially the Snohomish County sheriff's office
reported that two people had been killed in the
landslide. Authorities said later that one of the
people who was rescued died at a hospital.
The injured included a 6-month-old boy, who
was in critical condition at Harborview Med-
ical Center in Seattle.
Hospital spokeswoman Susan Gregg said
two other victims were in critical condition -
an 81-year-old man and a 58-year-old man -
while a 37-year-old man was in serious condi-
tion. Gregg said Harborview had one other
male patient from the landslide, but no infor-
mation on his condition was available.
Five of the injured were brought to Cascade
Valley Hospital in Arlington, but one has al-
ready been treated and released, said hospital
spokeswoman Jennifer Egger
The facility was expecting more injured peo-
ple, but Egger said she didn't know how many
and couldn't comment on the condition of
those already at the hospital because they
were still being evaluated.
"We're on standby waiting to see what hap-
pens next," Egger said.
The American Red Cross has set up at the
hospital and is seeking donations of food,
water, blankets and clothing, Egger said. An
evacuation shelter has been set up at Post Mid-
dle School in Arlington.
One eyewitness told the Daily Herald thathe
was driving on the roadway and had to quickly
brake to avoid the mudslide.
"I just saw the darkness coming across the
road. Everything was gone in three seconds,"
Paulo Falcao told the newspaper


Rhode Island speaker to
step down after FBI raids
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Rhode Island
House Speaker Gordon Fox is resigning from
his leadership post and will not run for re-elec-
tion, he said Saturday, a day after federal and
state authorities raided his Statehouse office
and home as part of a criminal investigation
that they would not detail.
"Because of the respect I have for all mem-
Sbers of the House of Repre-
sentatives, I am resigning
as Speaker," Fox said in a
written statement emailed
SSaturday evening to re-
porters. "The process of
governing must continue
and the transition of leader-
Gordon Fox ship must be conducted in
plans to serve an orderly manner."
the remainder The 52-year-old Provi-
of his term. dence Democrat said he
planned to serve out the remainder of his
term, but that "my personal focus going for-
ward will be on my family and dealing with the
investigation."
The Friday raids were carried out by the
U.S. attorney's office, FBI, IRS and state po-
lice. Boxes of evidence were carried off, but
officials have not said whom or what they are
investigating.
MasterCard investigates
report of DMV breach
A spokesman from MasterCard said it is in-
vestigating reports of a potential breach at the
California Department of Motor Vehicles.
Seth Eisen said the breach is not with


MasterCard's systems.
KrebsOnSecurity.com was the first to report
the possible breach, which it said involved on-
line payments from Aug. 2,2013, to Jan. 31,
2014.
In a statement, the DMV said law enforce-
ment alerted it to a potential security breach.
The agency said there's no evidence of a di-
rect breach of its computer system. But it has
opened an investigation as a precaution and
is cooperating with state and federal law en-
forcement officials.
Appeals court halts gay
marriages in Michigan
MASON, Mich. Same-sex couples
rushed to Michigan county clerk's offices Sat-
urday to get hitched a day after a judge over-
turned the state's constitutional ban on gay
marriage, and several hundred managed to
do so before an appeals court reinstituted the
ban, at least temporarily.
The order by a federal appeals court in
Cincinnati came after Glenna DeJong, 53,
and Marsha Caspar, 51, of Lansing, were the
first to arrive at the Ingham County Court-
house in the central Michigan city of Mason.
DeJong and Caspar, who have been together
for 27 years, received their license and were
married by Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum.
Similar nuptials followed in at least four of
Michigan's 83 counties.
Later Saturday, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals froze until at least Wednesday a deci-
sion by a lower court judge to overturn Michigan's
ban. The appeals court said the time-out will
"allow a more reasoned consideration" of the
state's request to stop same-sex marriages.
-From wire reports


WorldBRIEFS


Pope names members for
sex abuse commission
VATICAN CITY-- Pope Francis named
the initial members of a commission to advise
him on sex abuse policy Saturday, signaling
an openness to reach beyond church officials
to plot the commission's course and priorities:
Half of the members are women, and one
was assaulted by a priest as a child.
The eight members were announced after
Francis came under fire
from victims' groups for a
perceived lack of attention
to the abuse scandal, i-
which has seriously dam-
aged the Catholic Church's 00N
reputation around the world
and cost dioceses and reli-
gious orders billions of dol- Cardinal
lars in legal fees and Sean
settlements. O'Malley
The Vatican in December key advisor
announced that Francis to the pope.
would create the commission to advise the
church on best policies to protect children,
train church personnel and keep abusers out
of the clergy.
In a statement, the Vatican said the com-
mission would look into both "civil and canoni-
cal duties and responsibilities" for church
personnel. Canon law does provide for sanc-
tions if a bishop is negligent in carrying out
his duties, but such punishments have never
been imposed on a bishop for failing to report
a pedophile priest to police.
The eight inaugural members include Marie
Collins, who was assaulted as a 13-year-old by a
hospital chaplain in her native Ireland and has


gone on to become a prominent campaigner for
accountability in the church.
Also named was Cardinal Sean O'Malley,
one of Francis' key advisers and the arch-
bishop of Boston, where the U.S. scandal
erupted in 2002.
Two other members are professors at
Rome's Jesuit Pontifical Gregorian University,
which in 2012 hosted a seminar for bishops
from around the world to educate them on
best practices to protect children. Several
participants from that conference are now
founding members of Francis' commission,
including Baroness Sheila Hollins, a British
psychiatrist.
China satellite detects
object in jet search area
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Search
planes headed back out to a desolate patch
of the southern Indian Ocean on Sunday in
hopes of finding answers to the fate of the
missing Malaysia Airlines jet, after China re-
leased a satellite image showing a large ob-
ject floating in the search zone.
The object, which appeared to be 72 feet
by 43 feet, was captured by satellite on Tues-
day in a location that falls within the search
zone that planes and ships have been criss-
crossing since similar images from another
satellite emerged earlier in the week. But offi-
cials have found no trace of it.
The maritime authority, which is over-
seeing the search in the region, said a civil air-
craft reported seeing a number of small objects
in the 14,000-square-mile area on Saturday, in-
cluding a wooden pallet, but a New Zealand
military plane diverted to the location found
only clumps of seaweed.
-From wire reports


Nation BRIEFS









EI Travel & Leisure


EXCURSIONS


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CaraAnna
Associated Press

I don't have much to tell you about Scotland, really. It's true, they have whisky, and kilts, and some
people speak with an accent so thick that you wonder whether you're hearing English or Gaelic.
All of that's fun. But I'm just here to tell you about the walks I took.


TARBERT, Scotland
f you've heard anything about
the weather in Scotland, you've
heard the word "wet." Or per-
haps "boggy." Or "ever-changing."
These conditions make even more
impressive the large collection of
well-known footpaths that are the
best way to explore the stunning
countryside.
The most famous one is the West
Highland Way, a 95-mile trail from
the outskirts of Glasgow into the re-
mote and moody Highlands. It ends
shortly past the foot of the highest
mountain in the UK, Ben Nevis,
which can be walked up and down
as a day hike, if you're fit. Near the
summit, I saw small children and
dogs.
The Way was my appetizer for
more walks to come. I did its north-
ern half, skipping the lowland part


of the hike and heading straight into
the landscape so heart-skippingly
shown in the James Bond movie
"Skyfall." It's easy; there are hotels
or hostels at every stage, and even
baggage transport service.
The single most useful tool for
planning walks in Scotland is the
popular website WalkHighlands.
com. The site breaks down dozens of
trails, with frank talk about muddy
or risky conditions. It also links to
that other essential tool, Ordnance
Survey topographical maps.
And then there are the photos.
WalkHighlands does what other trail
guides don't: It shows what the
scenery looks like at several differ-
ent stages of each walk. Before leav-
ing for Scotland, I spent hours
clicking through trails and shopping
for landscapes.
That's how I came across the path
to a place called Rhenigidale.


It looked like a modest walk, just
about 5 miles long, but the details
that emerged made it more and
more intriguing. It seemed the tiny
seaside village in the string of is-
lands called the Outer Hebrides had
a hostel, one that didn't take ad-
vance bookings but rarely would
turn anyone away, especially if they
arrived on foot.
It seemed so remote, somehow so
unlikely, that I emailed to make
sure. The reply was prompt. "The
hostel door is never closed," Peter
Clarke, the chair of something called
the GatliffHebridean Hostels Trust,
replied. "You may put your
overnight fees in cash, or by cheque,
in the honesty box. If it is not in the
hostel, the warden usually visits in
the morning and early evening."
To this triple-locked Manhattan
resident, it had the whiff of a fairy
tale.


The next sign that I might be on to
something came in an article by
British author Robert Macfarlane,
who has written movingly about na-
ture and exploring it on foot. He
called the winding old postman's
path to Rhenigidale, its only land
route to the outside world until a
road was completed in 1989, "one of
the most beautiful paths I know"
And once in Scotland, after finish-
ing the West Highland Way and hap-
pily making day hikes around the
Isle of Skye, I found that speaking of
Rhenigidale could have a profound
effect. One especially excited bus
driver nearly ran off the road. A hos-
tel manager beamed and confided,
"No tourist has mentioned that for
months!"
There's something satisfying in
taking a vacation and actually
See Page A19


Associated Press
TOP: Startling white-sand beaches glisten on the west coast of the Outer Hebrides in Scotland. The beaches are an easy draw for travelers, though getting
into the cold water above your ankles in cooler weather takes some courage and a squeal. ABOVE LEFT: The Isle of Skye in Scotland highlight the Black
Cuillin hills in the background. The dramatic peaks of the craggy hills make them appear more imposing than their actual height; the tallest one is 3,255
feet. ABOVE RIGHT: Loch Coruisk, a lake on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, as seen from the vantage point of a 15-mile round-trip trail. But the freshwater lake
is just steps from the sea, so when the weather is clear, a boat trip to the lake is possible from elsewhere on the coast of Skye.


jor :


...........
....... ..... .
A l o OA 2 .5l






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Give ex chance


to make it right


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D earAnnie: Four
years ago, my
wife, "Joann," was
the executor of her
mother's will. Per in-
structions, she divided
the estate equally with
her three siblings. How-
ever, a few months later,
the estate received an
award of $200,000 for a
lawsuit her mother had
filed 30 years ago. Joann
and one of
her siblings
split the
award and
did not tell
the other two.
Since that
time, Joann
and I have
separated.
(She was un-
faithful.)
What she and
her sibling ANN
did was dis- MAIL
honest and __AlL
cheated the
other two, both of whom
struggle financially I am
still in contact with
Joann's siblings and am
fond of them. But my
conscience is bothering
me.
If I reveal this secret,
the entire family will be
rocked and Joann may
be charged with fraud.
While we are not on
good terms, I don't want
to send her to prison.
What do I do? -Anony-
mous Husband


Dear Anonymous:
Joann is not likely to go
to prison, but she could
be sued by her siblings
and held liable for this
money, and such secrets
have a way of coming out
eventually You would
not be the one rocking
the family That respon-
sibility falls squarely on
Joann's shoulders (and
the sibling who shared
in the windfall)
for defrauding
her siblings.
Tell Joann that
you are plan-
ning to inform
the other sib-
lings of this
money and you
are giving her
the opportunity
to make it right
before she is
E'S hauled into
court. Let her
BOX know she can
put whatever
spin on it she wishes in
order to make herself
look better We hope she
has sense enough to fix
this before it's too late.

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar Email anniesmail
box@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
1:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No
passes.
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
In 3D. 5 p.m. No passes.
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:25 p.m.,
8p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4;30 p.m.
No passes.
"Muppets: Most Wanted"
(PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 2p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) In 3D. 4:35 p.m. No
passes.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
In 3D. 4:25 p.m. No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13)


1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Divergent" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7p.m.,
9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) In 3D. 4:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Muppets: Most Wanted"
(PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
4p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) In
3D. 12:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's The Single
Moms Club" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Lawn-care machine
6 Government
takeover
10 Milady
15 plexus
20 River in Italy
21 Church part
22 Blue color
23 Great lack of food
24 Sidestep
25 of heaven
26 Particulars
27 De Havilland or Newton-
John
28 Before
29 Like a doily
31 Creeping plant
33 River in Belgium
35 Reveal
36 Interlock
37 Straightforward
39 Showed the way
41 Fasten
44 Dry outer cover
45 Ready, willing
and -
48 Badger relative
53 Minimal
54 Tub event
55 Rivulet
57 Malediction
58 Twain or Wahlberg
59 Busey or Cooper
60 That girl
61 Developed
63 Ship of 1492
64 Qty.
65 Clenched hand
66 Scandinavians
68 Freshly
70 Precious stone
71 Went down
72 Having made
a will
74 Salty drop
76 Muddle with drink
79 Period
81 Gull
83 Suitable
87 Blackberry
drupelets
88 Car for hire
89 Experts
91 Awaken
92 Trinidad and -
94 Branch
96 Cut
97 Drive
98 OTbook
100 Chewy candy
102 Cry heard at sea
104 Edge


107 School in England
109 Flaxen fabric
110 Box
111 Crete's Mount-
114 Woodwind
instrument
116 Nonpareil
118 Dir. letters
119 Mimic
120 Cut short
121 -of the ball
123 Citrus fruit
125 Drama
126 Salty solution
127 Raise in rank
128 Italia's capital
129 Chef
130 Schoolroom item
131 High card
133 One of the sciences
136 Plant genus
137 Arrest
141 Nil
144 Electrical unit
145 Color
146 Spot on a card
149 Actress
-Andress
151 Something of value
153 Apronoun
155 Peace goddess
157 Sheen
158 Boutique
159 Old Greek coin
160 Portion
161 English poet
162 Group of six
163 Nick at-
164 Inn

DOWN
1 Produced
2 Redolence
3 Farand -
4 Breakfast item
5 Put back into
office
6 Capture
7 Grand Ole -
8 Application
9 Easily annoyed
10 The Pine Tree State
11 Indian of Mexico
12 Payable
13 Horde
14 Gl's meal
15 soda
16 Leave
unmentioned
17 Dwell
18 Indigo dye
19 Not imaginary


Golfer's cry
Fire residue
Annoy
Component
False face
Obligation
Roofing material
Sawbones
- mater
Group of players
Bakery treat
Stag
Implore
Name in "Doctor
Zhivago"
Cask
Math branch,
for short
Serf
Quantity of paper
Wicker container
Transmitted
Handle
Martini ingredient
Chopped food
Sob
Make weary
Based on ten
King or Hawking
Soldier
Radar relative
Poisonous
Actor Flynn
Spacious
Cudgel
Environment
(Prefix)
Bro or sis
Chum
Likewise not
One of a litter
Native of (Suffix)
Kinsman (Abbr.)
Make it -!
- Von Bismarck
Fetch
Merganser
Prize recipient
English queen
Dried grasses used as
fodder
Kimono
Wild goat
Sunfish
Fiddling despot
Steep
Part of the eye
Sufficiently cooked
Copycat
Building wing
Male sheep
Surfeit
Study in haste


Greek letter
Seize
Seaplane part
Like a beast
Ripken of baseball
Eagle
Russian ruler
of old
- barrel


Lugged
Way between seats
Pout
Genuine
Mountain in Greece
Golf action
Too hasty
Bone (Prefix)
Horse's gait


- moss
Concerning (2 wds.)
Skin
French article
Boston Red-
- supra
Letter after pi


Puzzle answer is on Page A28.


2014 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.I


AlS SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Updates of rails to trails of the Withlacoochee


he purpose of my column
is to keep you informed of
what is happening on the
Withlacoochee State Trail, and
that is why I might jump from
one subject to another in any
given column.
The Citrus County Master
Bike Route Plan, which in-
cludes bike trails and routes,
will be added to the Citrus
County Comprehensive Plan in
June if approved and all public
hearings are completed.
0 0
The Board of Directors of the
Citizens' Service Organization of
Rails to Trails is seeking nomi-
nations for the annual Gerald
Clark Award. Nominees should


B


Al
Harnage

RAILS TO
TRAILS


be a volunteer who has dedi-
cated themselves to making the
Withlacoochee State Trail a bet-
ter place for all users. A plaque
showing all previous winners is
located in the kiosk at the Inver-
ness Trailhead next to the red
caboose. For your information,
the board is also continuing to
ask for input to evaluate a name


change for our organization.
"Rails to Trails of the Withla-
coochee, Inc. Citizens Support
Organization" is cumbersome.
We would consider a name more
aligned and matching what other
organizations like our state parks
use as a name. The board is sug-
gesting the name to be consid-
ered as "Friends of the
Withlacoochee State Trail." We
are a rail trail, but we are not af-
filiated with the national Rails to
Trails. The history of the Trail
development is important and
will be preserved.
0 0
The Wednesday work crew
has been chipping and trim-
ming as much as this weather


will permit The Friday work
crew has been replacing wood
on some benches and kiosks up
and down the trail, along with
other assorted jobs on the trail.
We applaud those workers and
we cannot do without our vol-
unteers!
0 0
FLORAL CITY RESTROOM
UPDATE:
After many months of plan-
ning and the money now in
place, we continue with more
talk and information. The Bu-
reau of Design and Construc-
tion has given us the following
timeline:
(1) Design and permitting to


include completion of the sur-
vey geotechnical work and as-
sess soil conditions for the
septic, site plan and architec-
tural/engineering drawings -
120 days.
(2) Prepare bid documents
and hire construction firm -
60 days.
(3) Construction 90 days.
Completion by the this Christ-
mas is anticipated.
Don't ask me what any of
those big words mean, just wait
and we will be there soon. A
further update will be forth-
coming and I will, in turn, let
you know
Al Harnage may be reached
at 352-527-3263.


Associated Press


A simple house, called a "bothy," sits at the bay at Camasunary on the Isle of Skye. The bothy provides free, if basic, shelter to hikers.


SCOTLAND
Continued from Page A17

getting away from it all. As my ferry left Skye for the
Outer Hebrides, it was decided: No Internet. No
phone, even if it had signal. After the ferry docked in
the village of Tarbert, I bought simple provisions at a
small grocery oats, tea, lentils because Rhenigi-
dale has no shops, just a handful of homes. And the
next day, Sunday everything on the stoutly Protestant
island would be closed, except the churches.
The path soon split from the paved road out of Tar-
bert and climbed into the low, stony hills. It eventually
topped a rise, and there was the sea, which the track
began to follow There were ruined stone houses, the
snuffling of porpoises, rabbits skittering out of sight.
It's a lovely place to watch for the aurora borealis, and
the stars.
In my two days at the hostel, no one appeared but
the friendly warden, Kate Langley, who lives with her
husband and small children across the road. She knelt
in the cozy sitting room of faded maps and old cush-
ioned chairs and lit the coal stove.
On a little radio, BBC Scotland played bagpipe
music and folk songs.
I almost wished for a pipe and slippers. I spent a
startling amount of time just standing outside with a
mug of tea.
The modest GatliffHebridean Hostels Trust also
runs two other rustic hostels in stellar locations for
those who wander through the islands, many of them
by bike in the bracing winds. Some say the repurposed
farmhouse on the small island of Berneray is the best,
with its front doors and outdoor benches just a few
steps from the sea. But there's no pilgrimage-like ap-
proach, since the public bus service stops a couple
minutes' walk away
The third hostel, on the island of South Uist is next
to a ruined churchyard and a short walk from the At-
lantic, past rich stretches of colorful machair or shell-
sand and wildflowers. The hostels make excellent
bases for walks on sprawling white-sand beaches and
climbs of the nearby hills. In the summer tourist sea-
son, the islands bloom with galleries, B&Bs and local
seafood.
While the Gatliff hostels don't have the perks of
more traditional getaways, notably laundry or the dry-
ing rooms that many places have for wet gear, each
has the essentials -full kitchens, heat, electricity, hot
water That's in addition to simplicity a sense of place
and stunning, changing skies.
"Three weeks ... in Scotland?" more than one per-
son had asked, with a touch of doubt. Absolutely


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I


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


CCVC yard sale
set for April 12
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has yard sales Sep-
tember through May from
7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Sat-
urday of the month Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church in In-
verness, south of where U.S. 41
and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up
the day before (typically Friday
afternoon) and are responsible
for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are
typically 15 feet by 30 feet and
cost $10.
A donation of at least one can
of food is appreciated. Call Dan
at 352-400-8952.

Post welcomes public
for food and fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), offers several events
that are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in
the smoke-free hall. Card bingo
and grill night is at 5 p.m.
Wednesday in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m. Monday
and Fridays in the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and
Thursday mornings.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.


Bingo open to public
on Thursday
The public is invited to play
bingo Thursdays at American
Legion Wall-Rives Post 58.
Doors open at 4 p.m.; games
start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Public can come eat
shrimp, wings at post
Everyone is welcome to join
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155 in Crystal
River on Wednesday for wings
or shrimp basket lunches in the
lounge from noon to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit veter-
ans' programs.
For more information, call
352-795-6526.

Come play games
with Homosassa post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa
invites the public to have some
fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m.
Wednesday and food is
available.
Jam sessions are from 3 to
7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans
Drive, Homosassa.


Post 4252 invites all
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road
200 in Hernando (with the heli-
copter out front), welcomes the
public at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch every
day and breakfast on Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities
include bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday
Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in
the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-
can-eat fish fry or New England
boiled dinner
For more information and
menus, call the post at 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabayrrcom and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.

DAV helps veterans
get to VA clinics
The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a


need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office
in Lecanto at 352-527-5915.

DAV transport
program needs van
The Disabled American Vet-
erans Transportation Network
requests contributions from the
public to reach a goal of $20,000
for a van.
The van program goes to the
clinic in The Villages, as well as
to the VA facility in Gainesville.
This service is available to all
veterans each weekday
The program uses a loaner
van, which has more than
270,000 miles on it, to transport
to The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser.
Cash donations are not ac-
cepted and it is requested that
any contributions be made by
check or money order made out
to: DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also written in
the memo section.
Mail to: DAV Van Project, c/o
Joe Stephens, chairman, 2797
W Xenox Drive, Citrus Springs,
FL 34433, or mail it to the DAV
Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald A.
Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter
70,1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34450.


'In Their Words'
wants your stories
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-
ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit
and veterans organization affil-
iations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email cjrisak2@yahoo.com.

Want to assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary?
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, vessel
safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime se-
curity and environmental pro-
tection.
Criminal back-ground check
and membership are required.
Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.


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A20 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


VETERANS


I












ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Health fair vendors sought
Organizers of the May 10 Health Fair at
the Crystal River Mall are looking for
vendors.
The event, sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter 158 and the Crystal
River Mall, will be in the Westend Market
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Spring into Healthy Living" is the
theme for the fair, which will feature
education, screening and healthy living
consultations.
Call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or
352-794-3104.

Post offers Tax-Aide service
Wall Rives Post 58 of the American Le-
gion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, hosts the
AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation serv-
ices from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday
through April 9.
Call Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.

Auxiliary to serve baked ham
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864 Ladies
Auxiliary, 10199 N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus
Springs, will host a baked ham dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
The March 17 St. Patrick's Day dinner of
corned beef and cabbage with potatoes
and carrots will be served from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance only
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Celebrate special vets' day
VFW Post 4337 will celebrate National
Vietnam Veterans Welcome Home Day on
Saturday at the post home, 906 State Road
44 East, Inverness.
There will be an open house for all vet-
erans and their families. Mark B. will play
Vietnam-era music and there will be a pig
roast by Victor at 3 p.m.
For more information, call 352-344-3495
or visit wwwvfw4337.org.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. April with Nashville
artist John Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Sons of Legion do meal, drive
Squadron 155 Sons of the American
Legion will have its monthly "Meatloaf
Friday" on April 4 at the post from 5 to
6:30 p.m. in the American Legion Post
dining hall.
A 50/50 drawing will be held to benefit
youth programs; music will follow in the
lounge afterwards.
Squadron 155 will be host its quarterly
blood drive from noon to 4 p.m. April 12 in
front of American Legion Post 155 in
Crystal River
The blood drive is open to the public;
age 16 with permission from guardian.

40&8 to serve breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
April 6, at American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.

VA to host open house
The Lecanto Veterans Affairs (VA) Com-
munity Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC)
will host an Enrollment Open House from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 12, at 2804
West Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Enrollment and eligibility staff will be
available to answer questions and enroll
veterans for health care. While not re-
quired, bring your DD 214 for verification
of military service. For more information,
call David Gilmer at 352-746-8000.

Cook-off competitors sought
Signups are being accepted for the April
26 BBQ Cook-Off sponsored by the Crystal
River DAV Chapter and Crystal River Mall.
Barbecue categories include chicken,
ribs, brisket and butt. Entry fee is $30.
The cook-off will be from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the mall.
Applications must be received by April
15. For more information and to sign up,
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337 or 352-
794-3104, or email mgodfrey222
@gmail. com or beckycrystalrivermall@
gmail.com.


Saluting true hero


Associated Press
The honor guard of Special Forces soldiers carries the flag-draped casket of Medal of Honor recipient Col. Ola Lee Mize at
Crestwood Cemetery in Gadsden, Ala., on Saturday March 15.


Medal of Honor recipient makes deep impression


It's not every day you see a report
about the death of someone you
know on NBC's Nightly News.
So it got my attention when Brian
Williams recently announced the
death of U.S. Army Col. Ola Lee Mize,
a soldier who received the Medal of
Honor for his heroic actions in June
1953 during the Korean War
Mize received the medal for moving
through a barrage of enemy fire to res-
cue a wounded soldier and then fend-
ing off enemy assaults, inflicting heavy
causalities.
During the onslaught, he was re-
peatedly blown down by artillery and
grenade blasts, but each time returned
to his position to fight and successfully
repel hostile attacks. He protected
wounded comrades, called in artillery
strikes and eventually helped to
launch a counterattack that repulsed
enemy forces.
Later, Mize joined the Special
Forces the Green Berets and
served in Vietnam, where I met him.
It was 1969 and he was commanding
the Third Mobile Strike Force, basi-
cally a Special Forces A Team con-
ducting operations with Cambodian
soldiers in an area northeast of Saigon
(now Ho Chi Minh City) called War
Zone D.
His troops had uncovered what, at
the time, was the largest cachet of
weapons and ammunition ever found
inside the country Later, larger ca-
chets were discovered when U.S.
forces invaded Cambodia and Laos.
Each member of an A team has a
specialty operations, logistics but
at the time, the team was missing its
member with military intelligence
background.
I was serving as an intelligence ana-
lyst with the 219th Military Intelli-
gence Detachment, attached to


Ken
Melton

TRIBUTE TO
VETERANS


Second Field Forces Vietnam. So I,
and other members of my unit, was
dispatched to see if we could help fig-
ure out what it all meant
What was the purpose of all those
AK47s, and SKSs (Soviet carbines) and
that ammo? Was there a major opera-
tion planned or was something else
afoot?
That's where I met Mize, who was a
major at the time, knowing in advance
he was a Medal of Honor winner, who
was still living.
Hell, he was still serving, still
fighting.
He was a living legend and there I
was working with him. I found him
to be one of the most amazing individ-
uals I would ever know
He was "old school" an Army man
all the way
Not only had he served in Korea
and Vietnam, but he would casually
mention something about being in the
Congo during the Simba Uprising in
1964 and in the occupation of the Do-
minican Republic in 1966. He once
said something about Bolivia, but
stopped when he realized what some
of us were thinking, that he was maybe
involved in the effort to get Che Gue-
vara in 1967. I still wonder about that.
It was clear he loved being a combat
commander and was devoted to taking
the best care possible of the soldiers
under him. He was going to be sure


they had everything they needed to
fulfill their missions and be as safe as
possible.
He was serious about getting things
done and didn't tolerate foolishness.
When the size of the cachet became
widely known in Vietnam, it wasn't un-
common for high-ranking officers to
show up in helicopters looking for war
trophies. Soldiers weren't allowed to
take AK47s home, but SKSs weren't
automatic weapons, so they were
allowed and were treasured as
souvenirs.
Mize tolerated the first couple of
trophy hunters, but quickly tired of
that nonsense.
One day he demanded that a
colonel, who outranked him by two
grades, get his you-know-what back on
that bird and get the hell out of there.
I still grin every time I think about
it, knowing that incident has been a
constant reminder for me to do the
right thing and not worry about the
consequences.
After that, Mize put out the word
that if you didn't have specific pur-
pose for being there, no landing per-
mission was going to be given.
And then, he and his unit got back to
the serious mission of fighting a war-
something he was destined to do.
He made a deep impression on me
and left me grateful and somewhat in
awe that there are people like him -
but especially him on our side who
are totally devoted to serving this
country
So, as a final salute to Col. Ola Lee
Mize, I want to simply say, "Thank you
for your service, sir!"

Ken Melton is the Community
Affairs Team editor at the Citrus
County Chronicle. He can be reached
at 352-563-3224.




| Successful
P poker run
Hospice of Citrus and the
r- Nature Coast Development
Director Linda Baker and
Legion Riders Chapter 237
Director John Roby,
center, present IR-RU
Social Club President T.J.
Jeffries with a plaque in
recognition of the club's
outstanding support of the
fourth annual American
Legion Post 237 Poker
/ Run held Jan. 25. The
event raised $4,750 to
benefit Moffitt Cancer
Center Ovarian Cancer
Research and local
veterans served by
Hospice of Citrus and the
Nature Coast.
Special to the Chronicle


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Transitioning vets
can get assistance
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservista from tours of
active duty) to Citrus
County within the past
two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat. For more informa-
tion about the Citrus
County Veterans Office,
log onto www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for


veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension
examination.
All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the
Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915.
You will need to have
your denial letter and a
copy of your compensa-
tion examination by


Gainesville. You can get a
copy of your exam either
by requesting it through
the VA medical records or
from the primary care
window in Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc. citrus. fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are invited to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
For more information,
call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.


Hospice has
vets'program
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect


veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.

Prior enlisted
sought for service
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select ca-
reer fields.
Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other
specialties.
Assignment locations
are made based on Air


Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes
offered to vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with
the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes
to combat veterans.
Call 352-382-7397.

Chilton reunion
set for September
The next reunion for
the USS Chilton will be
Sept. 17 to 24 in
Louisville, Ky.
For information, call
Joe at 352-341-5959.


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CITRUS COUNTY
LOCATIONS
Inverness
2231 Highway 44 West
Suite 203
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400
Lecanto
521 N. Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746.0707


F-AI] 1 WoI~'rld. [Class Mei inle. Homtown a ri e FLa(cecoII if~ ~i]


/


/FLORIDACANCER

S S P E C I A L I S T S
& Research Institute


A22 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


VETERANS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS &
SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more
information about scheduled
activities, meetings, meals
and more for a specific post
or group, call or email the
contact listed. Posts and
groups may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost155@gmail.
corn, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-
3544, or email boosc29
@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brumett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. To
accommodate members who
cannot drive at night,
breakfast meetings are also
held at Olive Tree at 9 a.m.
weekly. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-2090
for days and othe
information.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.


VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491,
directly behind Cadence
Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M. Bai-
ley Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
See Page A25


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VFW flag donation


Psi" BREATHING -
A RAIRtT


..U U Ln imUlJ, ( ..U)


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue thanks District 7 Veterans of Foreign Wars for its generous donation of an American
flag. The flag will be displayed from fire rescue's Tower 1 engine during events for the community to enjoy. The
flag is 29 by 40 feet and usually costs anywhere from $800 to $1,000. The last time Fire Rescue received a
donation of a flag like this was five years ago from District 7 VFW.


CREST donation


Special to the Chronicle
CREST school held a spaghetti dinner fundraiser March 12 at the American Legion Post 155 dining hall in Crystal
River. The event was open to the public and proceeds benefited a special project for handicapped students. The
Squadron 155 Sons of the American Legion made a donation to the school project at the dinner. Commander
George Singer made the presentation to representatives of the school.


IN SERVICE

James D. Williams Matthew D. Hooks


Air Force Airman James D.
Williams graduated from basic
military training at Joint Base
San Antonio-Lackland, San
Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core
values,
physical fit-
ness and
basic war-
Si fare princi-
ples and
skills.
Airmen
James who com-
D. Williams plete basic
U.S training
Air Force. earn four
credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the
Air Force.
Williams is the son of Jen-
nifer and David Williams of
Crystal River. He is a 2012
graduate of the Academy of
Environmental Science,
Crystal River.


Air Force Airman Matthew
D. Hooks graduated from
basic military training at Joint
Base San Antonio-Lackland,
San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week pro-
gram that included training in
military discipline and studies,
Air Force
core values,
physical fit-
ness and
basic war-
fare princi-
ples and
skills.
Airmen
Matthew who com-
D. Hooks plete basic
U.S. training
Air Force. earn four
credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the
Air Force.
Hooks is the son of Patricia
and John Hooks of Inverness.
He is a 2011 graduate of
Citrus High School,
Inverness.


| H Emeritus at Barrington Place presents the
3rd Annual
Golf For Meals
Golf Tournament
Saturday, March 29, 2014
Registration begins at 8:00 am
Shotgun start 9:00 am
Four person scramble
7 Rivers Golf and Country Club
For more information call (352) 527-5975
Lunch during Hole-in-one prize
the event provided by: Harley
lth eve Davidson, Crystal River
SPONSORS: Citrus County Chronicle, Harley Davidson of
Crystal River, WYKE TV, Nature Coast Volunteer Center,
FOX 96.7, Citrus 95.3, 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club


NEWS NOTES


Card party
Crystal River Sail and
Power Squadron will
host a Military Card
Party Wednesday, March
26, at the squadron
building, 845 N.E.
Third Ave.
The fundraiser helps
finance the squadron's
boating safety and edu-
cation classes available
for all. Cost is $12.
Doors open at
11:30 a.m., with a light
lunch and dessert at
noon; cards to follow at 1
p.m. There will be raf-
fles, prizes, Share the
Wealth, Money Tree and
more fun. Call Jennie at
352-382-0808 for informa-


tion or Linda at 352-382-
1758 for reservations.

MOAAto meet
The Military Officers
Association of America
(MOAA) will meet at
noon Friday, April 4, with
the Ocala MOAA Chapter
at Stumpknocker's on
State Road 200 at the
Withlacoochee River
This will be a social
meeting, starting at 11:30
a.m.; reservations are re-
quired. Call LTC Arlo
Janssen at 352-237-9720
no later than April 1.
For more information,
call Ron Resare at 352-
344-3123 or email
resareron@aol.com.


GROUPS
Continued from Page A23

70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus
Unit 498 meets at Leroy
Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in
Hernando. Call Susan Mc-
Quiston at 352-666-0084, or
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson
at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-
489-0728.
U.S. Submarine
Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
National Seabee Veter-
ans of America Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
National Seabee
Veterans of America Auxil-
iary ISLAND X-23 meets at
9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando.
Call Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959. Visit www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associ-
ation of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at the
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim
Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detach-
ment 1139 meets at Leroy
Rooks Jr. VFW 4252 in
Hernando. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or 352-476-
6151, or Wallace Turner at
352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


SHARE YOUR POST NEWS
Share all the news from your post. Photos of
events and news briefs about upcoming events
may be emailed to community@chronicle
online.com. Events should be open to the public
to be printed.

FL - - - 1 C1ThU5 COUNT-


ART CENTER Of CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center Theatre


Onmm

Goldenf


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Saturday April 26, 2014 a. .1 Si.,ig s- i,,
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SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 A25

Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087
on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills,
behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault
at 352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 186
meets at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness.
Call Bob Huscher, secretary,
at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and
Merchant Marine Veterans
of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Satur-
days at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill. Remaining
meetings in 2014 are:
April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 meets at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940
Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur
B. Scott at 352-628-0639 or
email seacapt34447@
yahoo.com, or Robert Currie
at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rollingth-
underfl7.com, call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north. Ap-
pointments are encouraged
by calling 352-400-8952.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition; call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, seeks to
meet the needs of wounded
veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call em-
ployment specialist Charles
Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.
lawrence@servicesource.
org.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Living the United Way


Special to the Chronicle
Old Florida Bank awarded United Way of Citrus County with a $2,500 grant for
"most voted on Facebook." United Way is building brand awareness through social
media and has a plethora of information on their pages; United Way has a page for
everything from Twitter to Pinterest. From left are: Pat Fitzpatrick, market
executive; Carey Berman, executive vice president; Amy Meek, CEO of United Way;
and Mike Reed, market president.


Special to the Chronicle
After a very successful golf tournament at Southern Hills, UPS driver and safety
co-chair Louis Hallal and business manager Jamie Ferguson presented United Way of
Citrus County with the net profits from the event. From left are: Jamie Ferguson, Amy
Meek, United Way CEO, and Louis Hallal.


Recently, district manager
Marlin Sexton presented
Amy Meek, CEO of the
United Way of Citrus
County, with a corporate
contribution from the
Withlacoochee River
Electric Cooperative.


Halt, who dates there?


A anyone who has seen the many
S movies made about World War II
. Xknows that soldiers who had for-
gotten the day's password, or who hap-
pened upon Allied troops who weren't
from their own company, were always
asked something like "Who won the
1939 World Series?" It was a question
designed to prove that they were real
Americans and not enemy spies. And
all real Americans would know the an-
swer, and they'd also probably know
the names of every player on each
team, because everybody had listened
to the games on the radio young and
old, black and white, Jew and Gentile.
If I had to answer a similar question
today "Who won the 2012 World Se-
ries?" they would shoot me on the
spot because I haven't got a clue. And
the sad thing is, I watched the entire
series. The only thing I'm sure of is
that it couldn't have been the Cubs.
Like many people, I haven't lost my
memory I've just handed it over to
Google and Wikipedia for the duration.
Why bother to remember anything
when those two will do it for you and
better? I didn't remember that the Yan-
kees beat the Cincinnati Reds in the
1939 World Series; I Googled it.
Are there any questions you could
ask today that every American would
know the answer to, but few foreign-
ers? Can you name all the Kardashi-
ans? Can you name the winner of last
season's "Survivor"? Who won 'Ameri-
can Idol" two years ago? Who won the
Super Bowl two years ago? What
movie won Best Picture at last year's
Academy Awards? Who is the host of
"Jeopardy!"? What time of day is "The
View" on? What was the No. 1 country
song last year? How about the No. 1
rap song?
Few people can answer all those
questions because there are very few
things all of us watch or listen to at the
same time anymore.
Even dating sites are dividing people
into smaller and smaller groups. I've
started seeing ads for dating websites
targeted to specific groups, instead of
singles in general: FarmersOnly com,
ChristianMingle.com, BlackPeople
Meetcom, Matel.com for people older
than 30, ProfessionalSingles
Over40.com, OurTime.com for singles


SJim
Mullen


VILLAGE
IDIOT


older than 50, and SingleParent-
Meet.com. Sounds like it's OK to be a
single parent of any age. Or maybe sin-
gle parents are just not that picky
about who they date.
But even these categories are proba-
bly too vague for a lot of people. Would
a dairy farmer really want to date
someone who raises beef cattle? Would
a Baptist want to date a Catholic?
Would their families approve? How
long before we see ads for
MethodistMingle.com or
LutheranLove.com? More and more
specific dating services are sure to fol-
low as time goes by with something for
everyone. Can Single
UndertakersUnder35.com or
DrunkenGamblersWithoutPartners.
com be that far away?
How did people ever hook up before
the Internet? I don't remember so
many people being single before the
Internet came along is there a con-
nection? Maybe the more connected
we are, the less connected we become.
Or is it something even more basic?
Could money have something to do
with it? I doubt we'll ever see a dating
site called LonelyProAthletes.com,
SingleHedgeFundManagers.com or
MovieStarMatch.com because those
people don't seem to have any trouble
finding dates. Lots and lots of dates.
You might say, "But look how many
of them break up or get divorced!" Yes,
but so do regular people. When a cou-
ple two blocks away from you splits up,
you don't read about it in the newspa-
per; it's not splashed on the magazine
covers at the grocery store. You might
not even hear about it Until you see
the two parties show up on Wont-
MakeTheSameMistakeAgain.com

Contact Jim Mullen atJimMullen
Books.com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Features Editor Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed
message.
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.


Special to the Chronicle


Dancing to entertain


Special to the Chronicle
Jack and Barbara Krejca of Hernando dance March 11
with the All Star Ballroom Dancers to entertain the
patients at Life Care Center in Lecanto. The dancers are
available to perform at local assisted-living facilities.
The program is organized by June Queripel and dancers
perform a program of foxtrot, waltz, swing, polka,
rumba, meringue, Texas two-step, West Coast swing,
Carolina shag, tango, cha cha, salsa or boleros. To join
the group or to schedule a performance, call 352-
560-0070.


Humane Society OF CITRUS CO.

Asa
Asa is a loving little 8-
pound Chihuahua looking
for a loving forever home.
He would do best in an
adult home; preferably,
with a woman. He is not
real comfortable with men.
Asa is 3 to 4 years old,
neutered, up to date on
vaccinations, heartworm
negative, microchipped
and crate trained. Visit
www.roomforonemore.net
to fill out an adoption
application or to view
other available pets. For
more information, call
Karron at 352-560-0051.


Special to the Chronicle


A26 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


COMMUNITY


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A28 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014

FOR THE
RECORD

March 3-9, 2014
Divorces
Rosalind M. Chacon,
Beverly Hills vs. Joseph M.
Chacon, Beverly Hills
Theresa G. Krim,
Dunnellon vs. Mark A.
Krim, Crystal River
Shirley J. McNeil vs.
George T. McNeil Jr.
Marriages
Daniel Wayne AlIlred,
Inverness/KellyAnn
Grainer Thompson,
Inverness
Neville Emmett
Anderson, Crystal
River/Junyu Zhou,
Crystal River
Alistair Cyril Wee Co,
Lecanto/Gloricel Nerissa
Flores Enot, Lecanto
Stephen Grossman,
Inverness/Emily Jean
Thornton, Inverness
Brian Lawrence Hill,
Floral City/Susan Mary
Wardach, Floral City
Dominic Antonio Hills,
Citrus Springs/Ashley Len
Truelove, Citrus Springs
Neil Roger Jordan, Floral
City/Christine Gail
Stackhouse, Floral City
Shaine Samuel
McDonald, Homosassa/
Eileen Kay Colon,
Homosassa
Tucker McClain Medlin,
Floral City/Espereta
Nichole Rochay, Floral City
James Randal Parker,
Homosassa/Sharla Ann
Weaver, Homosassa
Timothy Michael Stetson
Jr., Inverness/Reanna Lee
Trowell, Inverness
Jessie Lee Wellman,
Inverness/Kathleen Ann
Ostrowski, Beverly Hills
Brandon Michael Wills,
Homosassa/Ashley Megan
Usrey, Homosassa

* Divorces and
marriages filed in
Florida are a matter
of public record,
available from each
county's Clerk of
the Courts Office.
For Citrus County,
call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or
visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


55th ANNIVERSARY

The Foxes


Gene and Marian Fox
celebrated their 55th
wedding anniversary with
family and friends.
They were married on
Feb. 28,1959, in Spring-
field, Va. They have three


children, three
grandchildren and two
great-granddaughters.
The Foxes have lived in
Florida for 46 years, the
past 18 years in Citrus
County


FORMS AVAILABLE
The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.
Call Sarah Gatling, community editor, at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1197, for copies.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.






MAR K GIAIR Y R nRIErW Ni N
3I 23 I 204 UEC sTTE.y ir UIf
C H S K AIEPBOLRENP0RTOT E R

T B H S IONIE R E lA IY C URSO P
G A N -oRALAY- I N E
EX A STDIARNIE M O K E E I A SER

I N K T EE S ,TAT EO1,Is lA RE
3-23 E20 14C UFH DiT.E R UNiveRsalclikEfRUF


IiiT ~ni 'I







1 in 5 Americans will develop skin
cancer in their lifetime.

Melanoma, the most common form of cancer for
young adults is fatal if left untreated and
1 in 58 will be diagnosed during their lifetime.

Routine screening and early detection
of skin cancer is key to treatment.

A

Asymmetry
One half unlike
- the other half.

mBorder
Irregular
Scalloped or poorly
circumscribed border.

Color varied
from one area to
another: shades of tan &
brown, black, sometimes
white, red or blue.

Diameter D
larger
than 6 mm as a rule
(diameter of
pencil eraser).


Participating with: I
Medicare, BCBS,
Cigna, Humana, Aetna,
United Healthcare (specific plans)


www.dermatologyonline.com ,ItA
JUnCORA/T DERMATOLOGY i
RAND KIn SURGERY CEnTER
Lecanto Office 352-746-2200
Ocala Office 352-873-1500


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SPORTS


It wasn't just
the Aussies who
had g'days when
the Dodgers and
Diamondbacks
took the Show
Down Under./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


BREF


Serena advances
at Sony Open
KEY BISCAYNE -A
succession of long rallies
Saturday left Serena Williams
grunting, stumbling, lunging,
squealing, flailing her arms
and scolding herself.
Despite all the drama and
trauma, she reached the
fourth round at the Sony
Open by beating Caroline
Garcia 6-4, 4-6, 6-4.
Three-time champion
Novak Djokovic was off Sat-
urday but advanced to the
fourth round anyway when his
next scheduled opponent,
Florian Mayer, withdrew be-
cause of a groin injury.
No. 10-seeded John Isner
rallied to win an all-Ameri-
can matchup against Don-
ald Young, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4.
Sam Querrey, Ryan Har-
rison and Jack Sock lost
second-round matches.
Stanislas Wawrinka
bounced back from his first
loss of the year by beating
Daniel Gimeno-Traver 6-0,
3-6, 6-3. No. 7 Tomas
Berdych joined Wawrinka in
the third round by beating
Stephane Robert 7-6 (5), 6-1.
No. 12 Ana Ivanovic ad-
vanced to the fourth round
by beating No. 20 Flavia
Pennetta 6-4, 6-3.
Angelique Kerber, seeded
No. 5, defeated Tsvetana
Pironkova 6-0, 6-2, and No. 8
Petra Kvitova beat qualifier
Donna Vekic 6-3, 6-4.
No. 14 Sabine Lisicki
withdrew because of the flu,
giving No. 19 Kirsten Flipkens
a walkover. No. 23 Ekate-
rina Makarova beat No. 9
Sara Errani 6-3, 2-6, 6-4.
Indians release
OF Jeff Francoeur
GOODYEAR, Ariz. -
The Indians released
outfielder Jeff Francoeur.
The Indians signed the
30-year-old to a minor
league free-agent contract
on Jan. 6 and invited him to
major league training camp.
Francoeur had 35 at-bats
with the Indians this spring,
hitting .286 with one home
run and 10 RBI.
Francoeur played 59 games
for Kansas City last season,
hitting .208 with three home
runs and 13 RBI. He was
released by the Royals on
July 5 and signed by the San
Francisco Giants four days
later. Francoeur hit .194 for
the Giants in 22 games with
no home runs and four RBI.
The Indians want to help
Francoeur find another job in
the major leagues, which led
to the timing of the decision.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Florida forward Will Yeguete yells Saturday after scoring against Pittsburgh during the second
half of a third-round game in the NCAA tournament in Orlando, Fla. The Gators won 61-45.





SWEET 61

No. 1 FLORIDA TOPS PITT 61-45, MAKES SWEET 16


Associated Press


Scottie Wilbekin s
the bench for th(
minute, holding
of ice against his left k
It was about the only
he wasn't giving Pittsb
huge problems on bot]
of the court.


Wilbekin scored 21 points, including 11
of the team's 13 during a 7-minute stretch
ORLANDO in the second half, and top-seeded Florida
S on handled the Panthers 61-45 in the NCAA
>1L O1 tournament Saturday The Gators' 28th
e final consecutive win put them in the Sweet 16
for the fourth consecutive year
a bag The latest victory followed a lackluster
fnee. and head-scratching performance in the
,e. team's NCAA opener against Albany two
Time days earlier
iurgh The Gators vowed to play with more en-
ergy and intensity and Wilbekin spear-
h ends headed the effort.
See Page B4


Upsets?


Oh, there


are some


upsets

Underdog wins

mean Buffett

keeps his billion
Associated Press
The billion-dollar dream is
over
A second day of upsets ended
any chance of someone having
a perfect NCAA tournament
bracket in Warren Buffett's $1
billion challenge. It was a fa-
vorite that provided the first
blemish on the final three peo-
ple's brackets in the Quicken
Loans contest on the Yahoo
Sports website.
All three had ninth-seeded
George Washington beating
Memphis. The Tigers won 71-66.
"If Warren Buffett wants to
donate the (billion) to our uni-
versity we will take it and use it
in good company," Memphis
coach Josh Pastner said.
It only took 25 games for
everyone to be eliminated. Then
again most of brackets were
knocked out on the tournament's
first full day The number of un-
blemished brackets kept dwin-
dling after third-seed Duke,
sixth-seed UMass and seventh-
seed New Mexico lost Friday
Only 16 people remained per-
fect after 10th-seeded Stanford
topped New Mexico. Then Ten-
nessee routed UMass, leaving only
six people with a chance of beat-
ing the 9.2 quintillion-to-1 odds.
Gonzaga's victory over Okla-
homa State cut that down to the
final three.
Even though no one won the
$1 billion, the top 20 scores will
still each get $100,000.
Quicken Loans, which is spon-
soring and insuring the Buffet
contest, said on its Twitter feed
it wouldn't reveal the number of
entrants to the challenge. The
pool was supposed to be capped
at 15 million entries. It probably
wouldn't have mattered if they
had let more people join.
At CBSSports.com, only 0.03
percent of entrants were still
perfect after Mercer upset
Duke. The final remaining un-
blemished entries were also ru-
ined by the Memphis win.
A year ago, not a single person
of the 11 million who entered on
ESPN's website was perfect after
a first day filled with upsets.
Just four got 15 out of 16 right
This year people lasted a lit-
tle longer After 28 games, all 11
million entries had at least one
mistake.


Larson holds off Harvick at Fontana for first career win


Associated Press
FONTANA, Calif Kyle
Larson won his first Nationwide
Series race Saturday holding off
Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch
in a thrilling finish at Fontana.
The 21-year-old Larson be-
came the first California native
to win a Nationwide race at the
2-mile oval, surviving a three-
man derby in the final laps that
had the fans on their feet.


After Harvick's final attempt
to pass him failed, Larson
celebrated with a burnout in
Victory Lane, but only after
detaching his steering wheel
and holding it out the
window
"Those last 11, 12 laps were
the longest laps of my life," Lar-
son said. "I've been so close to
winning so many times, but the
fashion we did it in was extra
special."


One of NASCAR's most prom-
ising young drivers, Larson is from
Elk Grove, near Sacramento.
After being named Nationwide's
top rookie last season, he's driving
the No. 42 car for Chip Ganassi
Racing in the Sprint Cup series.
Harvick finished just 0.342
seconds behind after barely
missing on repeated attempts to
slip underneath Larson's Chevy


Page B4


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Kyle Larson
takes the
checkered
flag, his first
career win,
Saturday in
the NASCAR
Nationwide
Series race
in Fontana,
Calif.

Associated Press


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rays, O's play to tie as Dodgers and Dbacks play
Associated Press Cardinals 5, Astros 2 Yankees 5, Twins 4


PORT CHARLOTTE -
Alex Cobb struck out 12 in
seven innings and the
Tampa Bay Rays and Bal-
timore Orioles played to a
3-3, 10-inning tie.
Delmon Young home-
red, singled and picked a
catch off the top of the left
field wall with the tying
run on base in the eighth
inning for the Orioles.
Young led off the second
with the first spring home
run against Cobb, who gave
up six hits in his third start
Cobb struck out the side in
the first inning and threw
67 of 88 pitches for strikes.
James Loney hit his sec-
ond home run for the Rays
in the first inning, driving
in two runs off Baltimore
starter Ubaldo Jiminez.
In his third spring start,
Jiminez gave up five hits
and a walk in six innings.
Pirates 5, Phillies 3
BRADENTON Jimmy
Rollins, Ryan Howard and
Cody Asche each homered,
but the Pittsburgh Pirates ral-
lied for a 5-3 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies.
Rollins and Howard went
deep in the first inning against
right-hander Stolmy Pimentel.
Asche broke a 2-2 tie in the
fifth inning with a long homer
to right field.
Phillies right-hander A.J.
Burnett pitched 5 1/3 innings
against his former team and
allowed two runs on seven
hits. He walked six and struck
out two.
Blue Jays 9, Tigers 4
DUNEDIN Edwin Encar-
nacion hit a three-run homer,
Colby Rasmus drove in two
runs and the Toronto Blue Jays
beat the Detroit Tigers 9-4.
Toronto shortstop Jose
Reyes left the game after the
third inning due to tightness in
his left hamstring. Reyes said
his exit was just a precaution
and insisted that he is fine.
Two-time American League
MVP Miguel Cabrera was 0
for 2 with a strikeout and an
RBI for the Tigers.
Encarnacion finished 2 for
4 with a double and three
RBIs.


KISSIMMEE Matt Adams
hit a home run among his two
hits and drove in three runs,
leading the St. Louis Cardinals
past the Houston Astros 5-2.
Michael Wacha gave up two
runs in seven innings, his
longest outing of the spring. He
allowed two runs and struck out
eight without allowing a walk.
Brett Oberholtzer, who was
named the No. 3 starter in the
Astros rotation, allowed five
runs in five innings as his
ERA rose to 11.00.
Braves 6, Braves 3
KISSIMMEE Freddie
Freeman was 4 for 4, Andrel-
ton Simmons and Dan Uggla
each homered and the Atlanta
Braves beat the Boston Red
Sox 6-3.
Uggla's homer was a two-
run drive in the fifth inning and
Red Sox starter John Lackey
was relieved one batter later
after allowing five runs and 10
hits. Lackey struck out six.
Nationals 6,
Marlins (SS) 5
VIERA- Doug Fister
pitched 3 2/3 scoreless in-
nings in only his second
spring training start and
Danny Espinosa hit two home
runs, his second a game-
ending shot that lifted the
Washington Nationals to a 6-5
win over a Miami Marlins'
split-squad.
Fister, who was diagnosed
with inflammation in his right
elbow following his March 2
spring debut, struck out four
and only allowed two hits. He
has one more Grapefruit
League start to make before it
will be determined whether he
will be ready for the start of
the regular season.


FORT MYERS Masahiro
Tanaka struggled a bit in one
of his final tuneups for the
regular season, allowing three
runs while pitching into the
sixth inning, but the New York
Yankees still beat the Min-
nesota Twins 5-4.
Facing a close approxima-
tion of the Minnesota Twins'
opening-day lineup, Tanaka
yielded five hits and a walk in
5 1/3 innings. The high-priced
Japanese star walked just
one and struck out six.
Rockies (ss) 4,
Mariners (ss) 3
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Roenis Elias impressed again
in his improbable quest for a
spot in Seattle's rotation,
throwing 5 1/3 strong innings
for the Mariners in a 4-3 loss
to the Colorado Rockies in a
game between split squads.
The 25-year-old Cuban de-
fector was a non-roster invi-
tee. He's pitched in only 59
games, nothing above Dou-
ble-A. But injuries have cre-
ated holes for Seattle, and
Elias has shined.
Robinson Cano went 0 for 4.
Giants 8,
White Sox (SS) 5
GLENDALE, Ariz. Tim
Hudson pitched six strong in-
nings, Buster Posey had three
hits and the San Francisco
Giants beat a Chicago White
Sox split squad 8-5.
Hudson allowed one run
and scattered seven hits in
his fifth Cactus League start
for his new team. The 38-
year-old right-hander walked
one, struck out two and gave
up a second-inning.


Associated Press
The Los Angeles Dodgers and Arizona Diamondbacks line
up for the national anthems Saturday before the Major
League Baseball opening game at the Sydney Cricket
Ground in Sydney, Australia.


Kershaw, Dodgers
top D-backs in
Australian opener
SYDNEY-- Opening day
turned out to be a pretty g'day
for the Los Angeles Dodgers
and ace Clayton Kershaw.
Kershaw flashed his Cy
Young form, Scott Van Slyke
homered and the NL West
champions opened the Major
League Baseball season with
a 3-1 win over the Arizona Di-
amondbacks on Saturday night
at Sydney Cricket Ground.
A crowd of about 40,000
watched as MLB played its
first regular-season game in
Australia.
Kershaw, who signed a
seven-year, $215 million con-
tract in January, allowed one
run and five hits in 6 2/3 in-
nings. Van Slyke hit a two-run
homer and also doubled.
The first pitch was delayed
because of rain for 14 minutes.
By then, the long trip Down
Under had taken even longer
for some Arizona players.
A team bus had a flat tire,
and the Diamondbacks said


Mets 10, Mailins (SS) 2
JUPITER Ike Davis and FE G
Travis d'Arnaud each hit a FEGI
two-run homer, leading the LF
K I... \ R A t_ ,


New York iviets to a i u- rout
of a Miami Marlins' split-squad.
Wilmer Flores had a three-
run homer among his three hits
and drove in four runs, and Chris
Young was 3 for 3 for New York.
Mets starter Bartolo Colon
allowed two runs and five hits.
He struck out three.


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"a handful" of players decided
to walk the last half-mile to the
stadium instead of waiting for
a replacement bus.
Kershaw was impressive while
making his fourth consecutive
opening-day start. He struck out
seven, walked one and was
pulled by manager Don Mattingly
after throwing his 102nd pitch.
Three relievers kept the Di-
amondbacks scoreless with
hitless work. Chris Perez, a


o impress
two-time All-Star with Cleve-
land before joining the
Dodgers in the offseason, got
the last out in the seventh.
Brian Wilson pitched the
eighth and closer Kenley
Jansen got the save.
There were plenty of
Dodgers and Diamondbacks
uniforms in the crowd, some
worn byAmerican visitors and
others by Australians who had
flown across the country to
watch the opener and Sunday's
second game, when another
capacity crowd was expected.
They feasted on baseball-
style treats like nachos stuffed
in batting helmets and Cracker
Jack, which is not usually sold
in Australia. If you could afford
the cost and the calories, a 2-
foot-long hot dog sold for $36.
Both teams finished with
five hits.
Sydney Cricket Ground was
refurbished two weeks ago to
create the baseball diamond
and an outfield with an 8-foot
wall. It was 328 feet down the
foul lines and 400 feet to
straightaway center.


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BASEBALL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


P.L.A.Y., adult programs open


Special to the Chronicle

The PLAY programs of-
fered in the upcoming ses-
sion include basketball,
which will be held at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center
on Monday or Wednesdays;
and flag football located at
Bicentennial Park on Tues-
days or Thursdays.
The next session begins
the week of March 31. Boys
and girls, ages 3 to 5, are
encouraged to join the six-
week program. After en-
rollment, each child
receives age-appropriate
sports equipment and a
team T-shirt
Please contact Crysta
Henry, Recreation Pro-
gram Specialist for Youth
Programs, at 352-527-7543
or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com, for more


information.
Youth golf lessons
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership with
Pine Ridge Golf Course, is
holding spring youth golf les-
sons. The lessons are at Pine
Ridge Golf Course on Wednes-
day evenings from 5:30 p.m. to
6:30 p.m., beginning on
Wednesday, April 2 and run-
ning for four weeks. Children
ages 6 to 15 are eligible and
the cost is $50 per child.
Instruction will be given by
golf pro Randy Robbins and
several of his volunteers. Dur-
ing these lessons participants
will learn putting, driving, chip-
ping, on-course play and on-
course etiquette.
For more information, con-
tact Crysta Henry, Recreation


Program Specialist for Youth
Programs at 352-527-7543,
www.citruscountyparks.com,
or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.
Men's softball
Registration for Men's soft-
ball is now open. Players
must be 17 years old and up.
Games are held at Bicenten-
nial Park in Crystal River. The
league is set to begin the
week of April 28.
Kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kick-
ball league is for adults 17 and
up. Games are at 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. on
Tuesday at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River, lasting an hour
or nine innings, whichever
comes first. The new season
will be starting the week of April


28. Registration is now open.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled
to start the week of April 28.
Games are played at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River
on Thursday starting at 6:30
p.m. Registration is now open.
All players must be 17 and
up to participate in the adult
sports leagues. There is a
$50 commitment fee and
league fees will be deter-
mined by the number of
teams that register
For more information re-
garding any of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's adult
leagues, please visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or call
352-527-7540.
Signups for kickball are
now open.
Special to the Chronicle


Almost here


Baseball 2014: Major shifts all around the major leagues


Associated Press

Mike Scioscia moved his left
fielder onto the infield dirt, then
watched him start a double play
Matt Williams tried a similar trick
- he put his right fielder on the
grass behind the mound, only to see
a bases-loaded triple fly into the
vacated spot.
All over the majors this year, the
shift is on.
From the designer defenses tak-
ing over the game, to expanded re-
play, to opening day on a cricket
ground in Australia, baseball is
changing.
Those scraggly beards of the
World Series champion Boston Red
Sox? Shaved off, mostly Soon
Derek Jeter will be gone, too.
"You can't do this forever," the
Yankees captain said. "I'd like to,
but you can't do it forever"
Ryan Braun and the Biogenesis
bunch are back in, reckless crash-
ing into catchers is an automatic
out. Robinson Cano, Shin-Soo Choo
and Japanese ace Masahiro Tanaka
changed sides, as did Jacoby Ells-
bury, Prince Fielder and Curtis
Granderson.
Plus, there's a rookie with real
pedigree sweet Hank the Dog got
a second chance. He found a home
in Milwaukee; no telling if he'll
later visit Petco Park.
This spring has been much
rougher for others.
Even before the Dodgers and Di-
amondbacks started the season in
Sydney, Major League Baseball's
first regular-season games Down
Under, there were serious setbacks.
Kris Medlen, Brandon Beachy,
Jarrod Parker and Luke Hochevar
already are out for the year with
Tommy John surgery, and Patrick
Corbin may soon join them.
Aroldis Chapman likely will miss
at least two months after getting hit
on the head by a line drive. There
was no defense for that, not even
those protective caps now in play
for pitchers likely would've saved
the Cincinnati reliever
Defense, though, has rapidly be-
come a major focus in the majors.
Be it Dodger Stadium or Fenway
Park or anywhere in-between, it's
easy to spot the trend taking over
baseball: Creative ways that clubs
are positioning their fielders.
The Detroit Tigers even hired a
defensive coordinator Ever expect
to hear about a defensive coordina-
tor in baseball?
Matt Martin got that job, and
pointed to the overloaded align-
ments Red Sox slugger David Ortiz
sees on a daily basis.
"That's not out of the norm now
That is the norm. With left-handers,
if you'd have seen this 25 years ago,
the way they play Big Papi and


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon is a shifting maven, having employed
four-man outfields and routinely putting three players on one side of the dirt
at different depths.


15,20 guys in the league playing like
that you'd be, 'What happened?
Did I wake up and come to a soft-
ball game?"'
Makes perfect sense to Pittsburgh
second baseman Neil Walker
"The data is so undeniable, the
defensive metrics are so prevalent,"
he said. "You have so much more
information, you should use it."
"There were some times a few
years ago when I felt out of place,"
he admitted. "I was out there in
right field and kind of like, 'Where
am I supposed to be?' But we prac-
tice it, I practice my throws from ex-
treme angles and I'm comfortable."
An hour later, Walker was stand-
ing in shallow right when Phillies
slugger Ryan Howard batted in a
spring training game. Walker made
a diving stop on a hard grounder,
scrambled to his feet, but threw the
ball past first base.
"It's not an exact science," he
said.
Fielding always lagged far be-
hind pitching and hitting in statisti-
cal analysis, mainly because it was
hard to quantify glovework. Teams
are trying hard to play catchup.
Baseball Info Solutions tracks de-


fensive shifts, and reports there
were 8,134 instances in the majors
last season. That's way up from
4,577 in 2012, and far more than the
2,358 in 2011.
"It's not as much fun as it used to
be," Tampa Bay manager Joe Mad-
don lamented. "Everybody's using it"
Maddon is a shifting maven, hav-
ing employed four-man outfields
and routinely putting three players
on one side of the dirt at different
depths.
In a recent exhibition, with a run-
ner on third base, Maddon over-
shifted his infield in the middle of
an at-bat. No luck. A wild pitch
scored the run.
Maddon has a theory on why it
took teams so many years to shift
around.
"They were afraid they might be
wrong," he said. "But it always
made sense to adjust your fielders.
Why would you play someone in a
place where a guy never hits it?"
And if a big bopper tries to bunt
down the unprotected third base
line, that's OK.
"There are times when I'm beg-
ging him to bunt against us,"
Maddon said.


Presidential
tourney
accepting signups
The 47th annual Presiden-
tial Invitational at Seven
Rivers Golf & Country Club is
accepting entries.
The tournament runs from
Friday, April 4 to Sunday, April
6 and is a 36-hole individual
stroke-play event. Flights are
determined by handicap index.
The entry fee of $199 in-
cludes tee gift, breakfast and
lunch both days, as well as
prizes for flight winners. For
more information, call 352-
795-2100. Entry deadline is
Tuesday, April 1.
Superintendent's
golf event on tap
for April 26
The 16th annual Superinten-
dent's Golf Classic is sched-
uled for an 8:30 a.m. shotgun
start on Saturday, April 26 at
Sugarmill Woods Golf Club.
The event is a four-person
scramble and the field is lim-
ited to 144 golfers.
The registration fee is $55
per golfer, which includes
greens fee, lunch, door prizes
and hole contests.
For more information, call
Dave Hamilton or Bruce
Sheffield at 352-726-1931, or
Phil McLeod at 352-726-2241.
Golf tourney to
benefit shelter
A golf tournament to benefit
the Citrus County Animal
Shelter in Inverness will be
held at the Royal Oaks Golf
Club in Ocala on April 19.
Opportunities for sponsor-
ships ranging from $100 to
$400 are available for individ-
uals, corporations or busi-
nesses. They include printed
signs at tees advertising the
business name or donor.
Entry fee is $40 and in-
cludes green fees, cart fees,
various prizes and lunch. A
cruise raffle and a silent auc-
tion will be offered.
For information regarding
golf sign-ups, call Marti Little
at 786-367-2834.
Third annual Golf
for Meals tourney
During the month of March,
your local Meals on Wheels is
going the extra mile to raise
awareness to fight senior
hunger.
Citrus County's Meals on
Wheels Program is hosting its
third annual "Golf for Meals"
fundraising golf tournament on
Saturday, March 29, at Seven
Rivers Golf and Country Club.
All proceeds from this event
go toward feeding seniors in
Citrus County.


Show your support by
sponsoring a hole, providing
items for gift bags or by donat-
ing prizes that can be given
away or raffled off for addi-
tional funds.
For more information or to
become a sponsor, call 352-
527-5975.
Citrus Fishing Club
angles for members
If you like to fish with people
who like to fish, and maybe
learn to fish better, come see
what the Citrus Fishing Club is
all about. Men and women alike
meet at 7 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at American Legion
Post No. 155 at 6585W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
For more information, call
Steve Tresnak at 352-445-
6743 or visit citrusfishingclub.
org.
Golf tourney to
benefit shelter
A golf tournament to benefit
the Citrus CountyAnimal
Shelter in Inverness will be
held at the Royal Oaks Golf
Club in Ocala on April 19.
Opportunities for sponsor-
ships ranging from $100 to
$400 are available for individu-
als, corporations or busi-
nesses. They include printed
signs at tees advertising the
business name or donor. Entry
fee is $40 and includes green
fees, cart fees, various prizes
and lunch. A cruise raffle and a
silent auction will be offered.
Information regarding spon-
sorship and in-kind donations
are available from Friends of
Citrus County Animal Services
at 352-201-8664.
For information regarding
golf sign-ups, call Marti Little
at 786-367-2834.
Annual golf tourney
on tap April 12
at Citrus Hills
The Zeke Lepinskie Memo-
rial Golf Tournament is slated
for Saturday, April 12, at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, with
registration at 7:30 a.m. and
shotgun start at 8:30.
The tourney benefits Pope
John Paul II Catholic School
for programs. Lepinskie was a
graduate of the school.
Sponsors are being ac-
cepted: major sponsor, $500
including hole recognition and
four players; gold sponsor,
$250 including hole recogni-
tion and two players; silver
sponsor, $150 and one
player; and hole sponsor,
$100 for hole recognition.
All donations are tax-
deductible. For more info,
email David Moerschbacher
at Davidm5455@yahoo.com
or Jane Moerschbacher at
janemoerschbacher
@yahoo.com.
From staff reports


Citrus County seniors down Hernando 117-113


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County boys bas-
ketball seniors beat Hernando
County 117-113 in the second an-
nual State Farm SR All-Star
Game.
The Citrus team led 70-60 at
halftime.
Hernando nearly erased a 12-
point Citrus lead late in the sec-
ond half thanks to the hot
shooting of Central High School
guard Sinjin Blaha, who hit four
straight three-pointers in the
last three minutes to cut the
lead to 114-113 with 14 seconds
left. Hernando was forced to
foul, however, and Lecanto
High School guard Thomas Vi-
lardi hit both free throws to give


Citrus County a 3-point lead.
Vilardi stole the ball on Her-
nando's next possession as
Blaha tried to get off a tying shot.
Citrus point guard Devin Pryor
then hit one of two free throws
with 3 seconds left to seal the
win.
Pryor and Ben Janacki led the
Citrus squad with 23 points
each. Vilardi added 16 and
Seven Rivers swingman Adam
Gage added 15. All 10 players on
Citrus County's roster scored.
Hernando was led by Blaha,
who ended up with a game-high
34 points, and Springstead
guard Deontae Valentin added
20 points.
Valentin won the Hoops Link
3-point Challenge before the game


by hitting eight out of 10 threes.
"It was a nice win, they beat us
last year so we wanted to even
up the series," Citrus County
coach Frank Vilardi said.
"We had a great game and a
great crowd. It would not be pos-
sible without all the State Farm
Agents in both counties. We also
want to thank Hoops Link for
sponsoring the 3-point Challenge
and the halftime activities,"
Frank Vilardi added.
Central High School basketball
coach Matt Zandecki, who led the
Hernando All-Stars, agreed.
"This a great event," Zandecki
said. "It allows kids to celebrate
their collective years and play
against the best completion in
the area."


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County boys basketball seniors all-star team earned a
117-113 victory over its Hernando County counterpart on March 15
at Lecanto High School.


-- Recreation BRIEFS


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014



NCAA tournament
glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
At UD Arena, Dayton, Ohio
Tuesday, March 18
Abany (N.Y) 71, Mount St. Mary's 64
N.C. State 74, Xavier 59
Wednesday, March 19
Cal Poly 81, Texas Southern 69
Tennessee 78, Iowa 65, OT
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At First Niagara Center, Buffalo, N.Y.
UConn 89, Saint Joseph's 81, OT
Villanova 73, Milwaukee 53
At Spokane Arena, Spokane, Wash.
Harvard 61, Cincinnati 57
Michigan State 93, Delaware 78
Friday, March 21
At PNC Arena, Raleigh, N.C.
Memphis 71, George Washington 66
Virginia 70, Coastal Carolina 59
At The AT&T Center, San Antonio
North Carolina 79, Providence 77
Iowa State 93, North Carolina Central 75
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
At First Niagara Center, Buffalo, N.Y.
Villanova (29-4) vs. UConn (27-8), 9:40 p.m.
At Spokane Arena, Spokane, Wash.
Michigan State (27-8) vs. Harvard (27-4), 8:40 p.m.
Sunday, March 23
At PNC Arena, Raleigh, N.C.
Virginia (29-6) vs. Memphis (24-9), 8:40 p.m.
At The AT&T Center, San Antonio
Iowa State (27-7) vs. North Carolina (24-9), 5:15 p.m.
Regional Semifinals
At Madison Square Garden, NewYork
Friday, March 28
Villanova-UConn winner vs. Iowa State-North Car-
olina winner
Michigan State-Harvard winner vs.Virginia-Memphis
winner
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
Semifinal winners
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At First Niagara Center, Buffalo, N.Y.
Dayton 60, Ohio State 59
Syracuse 77, Western Michigan 53
At The Amway Center, Orlando, Fla.
Pittsburgh 77, Colorado 48
Florida 67, Abany (N.Y.) 55
Friday, March 21
At Scottrade Center, St. Louis
Stanford 58, New Mexico 53
Kansas 80, Eastern Kentucky 69
AtViejas Arena, San Diego
Stephen F. Austin 77, VCU 75, OT
UCLA 76, Tulsa 59
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
At First Niagara Center, Buffalo, N.Y.
Dayton 55, Syracuse 53
At The Amway Center, Orlando, Fla.
Florida 61, Pittsburgh 45
Sunday, March 23
At Scottrade Center, St. Louis
Kansas (25-9) vs. Stanford (22-12), 12:15 p.m.
AtViejas Arena, San Diego
UCLA (27-8) vs. Stephen F.Austin (32-2), 7:10 p.m.
Regional Semifinals
At FedExForum, Memphis, Tenn.
Thursday, March 27
Dayton (25-10) vs. Kansas-Stanford winner
Florida (34-2) vs. UCLA-Stephen F. Austin winner
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 29
Semifinal winners
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At The Amway Center, Orlando, Fla.
Saint Louis 83, N.C. State 80, OT
Louisville 71, Manhattan 64
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee
Michigan 57, Wofford 40
Texas 87, Arizona State 85
Friday, March 21
At PNC Arena, Raleigh, N.C.
Mercer 78, Duke 71
Tennessee 86, UMass 67
At Scottrade Center, St. Louis
Wichita State 64, Cal Poly 37
Kentucky 56, Kansas State 49
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
At The Amway Center, Orlando, Fla.
Louisville 66, Saint Louis 51
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee
Michigan 79, Texas 65
Sunday, March 23
At PNC Arena, Raleigh, N.C.
Mercer (27-8) vs. Tennessee (23-12), 6:10 p.m.
At Scottrade Center, St. Louis
Wichita State (35-0) vs. Kentucky (25-10), 2:45 p.m.
Regional Semifinals
At Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis
Friday, March 28
Wichita State-Kentucky winner vs. Louisville (31-5)
Michigan (27-8) vs. Mercer-Tennessee winner
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
Semifinal winners
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At BMO Harris Bradley Center, Milwaukee
Wisconsin 75, American 35
Oregon 87, BYU 68
At Spokane Arena, Spokane, Wash.
North Dakota State 80, Oklahoma 75, OT
San Diego State 73, New Mexico State 69, OT
Friday, March 21
At The AT&T Center, San Antonio
Baylor 74, Nebraska 60
Creighton 76, Louisiana-Lafayette 66
AtViejas Arena, San Diego
Arizona 68, Weber State 59
Gonzaga 85, Oklahoma State 77
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
At BMO Harris Bradley Center, Milwaukee
Wisconsin 85, Oregon 77
At Spokane Arena, Spokane, Wash.
San Diego State 63, North Dakota State 44
Sunday, March 23
At The AT&T Center, San Antonio
Creighton (27-7) vs. Baylor (25-11), 7:40 p.m.
AtViejas Arena, San Diego
Arizona (31-4) vs. Gonzaga (29-6), 9:40 p.m.
Regional Semifinals
At The Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif.
Thursday, March 27
Wisconsin (28-7) vs. Creighton-Baylor winner
San Diego State (31-4) vs. Arizona-Gonzaga winner
Regional Championship


Saturday, March 29
Semifinal winners
FINAL FOUR
At AT&T Stadium
Arlington, Texas
National Semifinals
Saturday, April 5
East champion vs. South champion
Midwest champion vs. West champion
National Championship
Monday, April 7
Semifinal winners


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 38 30 .559 -
Brooklyn 36 31 .537 1/
NewYork 29 40 .420 9/2
Boston 23 47 .329 16
Philadelphia 15 54 .217 23/2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foir the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
~ 0-2-3
CASH 3 (late)
0, 8-1-7


O PLAY 4(earlty)
2-0-3-4
PLAY 4 (late)
-M 4-2-4-7


Due to early deadlines, Saturday's late
lottery numbers were not available. For
those numbers, please see Monday's edition
or visit www.flalottery.com.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 13 -24 -38 -42
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB No winners


4-of-4 5
3-of-4 MB 81
3-of-4 728
2-of-4 MB 1,129
1-of-4 MB 10,258
2-of-4 21,279


$1,207.50
$163
$54
$24
$2.50
$2


Fantasy: 3-5-6-8-21
5-of-5 4 winners $61,553.67
4-of-5 613 $64.50
3-of-5 14,541 $7.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Auto Club 400
MLB PRESEASON BASEBALL
7 a.m. (MLB) Cincinnati Reds at Chicago Cubs (taped)
10 a.m. (MLB) St. Louis Cardinals at Houston Astros (taped)
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Detroit Tigers
1 p.m. (MLB) Toronto Blue Jays at New York Yankees
4 p.m. (MLB) Cleveland Indians at Los Angeles Angels
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Oakland Athletics
8 p.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox (same-day tape)
12 a.m. (MLB) San Diego Padres at Texas Rangers (same-
day tape)
3 a.m. (MLB) Chicago Cubs at Oakland Athletics (same-day tape)
NCAA MEN'S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
12 p.m. (CBS) Third Round: Teams TBA
2:30 p.m. (CBS) Third Round: Teams TBA
5 p.m. (CBS) Third Round: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (TNT) Third Round: Teams TBA
7 p.m. (TBS) Third Round: Teams TBA
7:30 p.m. (TRUTV) Third Round: Teams TBA
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Third Round: Teams TBA
9:30 p.m. (TBS) Third Round: Teams TBA
NCAA WOMEN'S NCAA TOURNAMENT
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Army
vs. Maryland, Georgia Tech vs. LSU, Hampton vs. Michigan
State and Penn State vs. Wichita State
3 p.m. (ESPN) Whip-around coverage includes: Albany (N.Y.)
vs. West Virginia, Dayton vs. Florida, North Carolina vs. UT-
Martin and Pennsylvania vs. Texas
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Whip-around coverage includes: Cal State
Northridge vs. South Carolina, Georgia vs. Saint Joseph's,
Gonzaga vs. James Madison and Idaho vs. Louisville
8 p.m. (ESPN) Connecticut vs. Prairie ViewA&M
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Iowa vs.
Marist, Middle Tennessee State vs. Oregon State and North
Dakota vs. Texas A&M
MEN'S NIT TOURNAMENT
11 a.m. (ESPN) Illinois at Clemson
3 p.m. (ESPN2) St. Mary's at Minnesota
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Southern Mississippi at Missouri
NBA BASKETBALL
9:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Los Angeles Lakers
GOLF
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATourAmrnold Palmer Invitational, final round
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour Arnold Palmer Invitational, final round
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Champions: Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic, final round
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour JTBC Founders Cup, final round
NHL HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL) St. Louis Blues at Pittsburgh Penguins
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Minnesota Wild at Detroit Red Wings
SOCCER
9:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur
FC vs Southampton FC
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Aston Villa FC vs
Stoke City FC
1:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: Pumas de
la U.N.A.M. vs CF Monterrey
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Alabama at Florida
2:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Alabama at Florida (same-day tape)
TENNIS
11 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Sony Open
7 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Sony Open

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Southeast Division


x-Miami
Washington
Charlotte
Atlanta
Orlando


x-lndiana
Chicago
Cleveland
Detroit
Milwaukee
WES


San Antonio
Houston
Dallas
Memphis
New Orleans
IN


W L Pct
47 21 .691
36 33 .522
34 36 .486
31 36 .463
19 50 .275
Central Division
W L Pct
51 19 .729
38 31 .551
26 44 .371
25 43 .368
13 56 .188
STERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
52 16 .765
47 22 .681
42 28 .600
41 28 .594
29 40 .420
Northwest Division


W L Pct
Oklahoma City 51 18 .739
Portland 45 25 .643
Minnesota 34 33 .507
Denver 31 38 .449
Utah 22 47 .319
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 48 21 .696
Golden State 44 26 .629
Phoenix 40 29 .580
Sacramento 24 45 .348
L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324
x-clinched playoff spot


Friday's Games
GB Indiana 91, Chicago 79
NewYork 93, Philadelphia 92
1112 Oklahoma City 119, Toronto 118,20T
14 Brooklyn 114, Boston 98
15/2 Miami 91, Memphis 86
28 New Orleans 111, Atlanta 105
GB Dallas 122, Denver 106
Phoenix 98, Detroit 92
12/2 San Antonio 99, Sacramento 79
25 Washington 117, L.A. Lakers 107
25 Saturday's Games
37/2 Charlotte 124, Portland 94
Houston 118, Cleveland 111
Memphis 82, Indiana 71
GB New Orleans 105, Miami 95
Philadelphia at Chicago, late
51/2 Orlando at Utah, late
11 San Antonio at Golden State, late
112 Detroit at L.A. Clippers, late
231/2

GB NHL standings

6/2 EASTERN CONFERENCE
16 Atlantic Division
20 GP W LOT PtsGF GA
29 x-Boston 70 4817 5 101225 149
TampaBay 71 3924 8 86211 189
GB Montreal 72 3926 7 85186 183
S Toronto 72 3628 8 80211 223
8 Detroit 70 3324 13 79186 196
24 Ottawa 70 2829 13 69199 237
25% Florida 71 2637 8 60173 229
Buffalo 70 2042 8 48136 206


Metropolitan Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Pittsburgh 70 4619 5 97222 176
Philadelphia 70 3825 7 83203 198
N.Y Rangers 72 3929 4 82190 175
Columbus 70 3628 6 78200 192
Washington 71 3327 11 77205 211
New Jersey 71 3028 13 73172 185
Carolina 71 3131 9 71177 200
N.Y. Islanders 70 2635 9 61195 239
WESTERN CONFERENCE


St. Louis
Chicago
Colorado
Minnesota
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville

San Jose
Anaheim
Los Angeles
Phoenix
Vancouver
Calgary
Edmonton


Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
70 4716 7101227 160
71 41 15 15 97240 184
71 4421 6 94216 194
71 3624 11 83176 175
70 3326 11 77199 202
72 3231 9 73201 211
71 3031 10 70171 213
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
71 4618 7 99219 170
70 4518 7 97222 178
71 4025 6 86174 149
70 3425 11 79194 197
72 3230 10 74172 194
70 2835 7 63173 209
71 2537 9 59177 228


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
N.Y Rangers 3, Columbus 1
Chicago 3, Carolina 2
Boston 2, Colorado 0
Nashville 6, Calgary 5
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 1
Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 3, OT
Detroit 3, Minnesota 2
Dallas 3, Ottawa 1
Los Angeles 4, Florida 0
Montreal 4, Toronto 3
N.Y Rangers 2, New Jersey 0
Carolina 3, Winnipeg 2
Boston at Phoenix, late
Calgary at Edmonton, late
Washington at San Jose, late


TreatMyClot.com
300 results
Saturday at Auto Club Speedway,
Fontana, Calif.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevmrolet, 150 laps, 123.2 rating, 0 points,
$66,800.
2.(6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 150,121.5,0, $54,100.
3.(39) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 150,123.2,0, $45,525.
4.(4) Joey Logano, Ford, 150,142.6,0, $36,325.
5. (1) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 150,104.8,39, $39,982.
6.(5) Chase Elliot, Chevrolet, 150,103.2,39, $31,606.
7.(2) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 150,109.8,0, $22,400.
8.(3)Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 150, 98.1,36, $27,231.
9.(13)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 150, 94.6,35, $26,091.
10. (11) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 150, 88.9, 34, $28,081.
11. (7) Dylan Kwasniewslk, Chevrolet, 150,84.9,33, $25,756.
12. (9) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 150, 97, 33, $25,456.
13. (16) David Ragan, Ford, 150, 84.6,0, $18,975.
14. (19) Chris Buescher, Ford, 150,77.2,30, $24,996.
15.(10) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 150,83.5,29, $25,611.
16. (12) James Buescher, Toyota, 150,81.6,28, $24,951.
17. (15) Ryan Reed, Ford, 149, 69.2, 27, $24,541.
18. (18) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 149, 74,26, $24,406.
19. (14) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 149, 72.7,0, $24,296.
20. (27) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 148, 60.4,24, $24,886.
21. (26) Mike Wallace, Dodge, 148, 56.7,23, $24,076.
22.(17) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 148,65.2,0, $23,911.
23.(25) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 147, 56.1,21, $23,826.
24. (21) David Starr, Toyota, 147, 60.2,20, $23,666.
25. (33) Eric McClure, Toyota, 146,47.9,19, $24,031.
26. (30) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 145,43.5,18, $23,421.
27. (35) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, 145,42.9,17, $23,286.
28. (36) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 143, 37.5,16, $23,166.
29.(37) Cadros Contreras, Chevmrolet, 140,34.7,15, $22,991.
30. (28) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 140, 50.2,14, $23,181.
31. (31 (Tanner Benrryhill, Dodge, 131,44.7,13, $22,751.
32.(38) Jason WhiteToyota, ponersteenng, 128, 35.8,12, $22,641.
33. (24) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, engine, 126,56.3,0, $16,320.
34.(34) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 126, 33.4,10, $22,415.
35. (23) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, fuel pump, 108, 57.9, 9,
$22,294.
36. (20) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 107,41.6,8, $20,801.
37. (22) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, vibration, 8, 34.7, 7,
$14,475.
38. (40) Carl Long,Toyota, electrical, 7,33,0, $14,365.
39. (32) Blake Koch, Toyota, vibration, 6,31.3,5, $14,115.
40. (29) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4,29.7,0, $14,080.


Spring Training
glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE


Tampa Bay
Cleveland
Baltimore
NewYork
Seattle
Oakland
Detroit
Los Angeles
Kansas City
Toronto
Chicago
Minnesota
Boston
Houston
Texas


W L
14 5
16 6
12 7
15 9
15 9
12 9
12 10
12 10
11 11
11 11
7 12
7 12
8 14
8 14
7 14
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L


Miami 15 9 .625
San Francisco 14 9 .609
Pittsburgh 12 9 .571
Arizona 11 9 .550
NewYork 12 10 .545
Washington 12 11 .522
Colorado 12 12 .500
Cincinnati 12 13 .480
St. Louis 9 10 .474
Milwaukee 11 13 .458
Chicago 11 15 .423
Los Angeles 6 10 .375
San Diego 7 12 .368
Atlanta 9 16 .360
Philadelphia 6 15 .286
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Detroit 3, Atlanta (ss) 0
St. Louis 2, Washington 0
Philadelphia 2, Boston 2, tie, 10 innings
Miami 7, Houston 2
Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 0
N.Y Mets 9, Minnesota 1
Baltimore 8, Atlanta (ss) 0
Texas 7, Milwaukee 5
L.A. Angels 7, Kansas City (ss) 3
Cincinnati 9, Kansas City (ss) 3
Chicago Cubs 7, Chicago White Sox 0
Cleveland 14, Colorado 3
N.Y Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 0
San Francisco 3, Oakland 0
San Diego 7, Seattle 2
Saturday's Games
Toronto 9, Detroit 4
N.Y Mets 10, Miami (ss) 2
Washington 6, Miami (ss) 5
Atlanta 6, Boston 3
St. Louis 5, Houston 2
Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 3, tie, 10 innings
N.Y Yankees 5, Minnesota 4
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 3
San Diego 3, Chicago White Sox (ss) 3, tie
L.A. Angels vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (ss) 14, Cleveland 6
Oakland 6, Seattle (ss) 5
Kansas City 8, Texas 4
Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 3
San Francisco 8, Chicago White Sox (ss) 5
Colorado (ss) 4, Seattle (ss) 3


Scott's lead



slips to three



heading into



Bay Hill final


Associated Press

ORLANDO -Adam Scott still has the lead at
Bay Hill. At least five other players suddenly
have a realistic chance at winning.
Scott lost more than half his lead Saturday in
the Arnold Palmer Invitational. He missed three
par putts inside 8 feet and had to settle for a 1-
under 71. That gave him a three-shot lead over
Keegan Bradley going into the final round.
Bradley's approach to the 18th narrowly
cleared the rocks and set up a 4-foot birdie putt
for a 66.
Scott was at 15-under 201.
Matt Every (66) and Jason Kokrak (67) were
four shots behind. Neither has ever won on the
PGA Tour Chesson Hadley and Francesco Moli-
nari each shot 69 and were another shot behind.
Hadley can qualify for the Masters with a high
finish.
Andrade shoots 65,
grabs share of Champions lead
SAUCIER, Miss. Billy Andrade shot a 7-under 65
to share the lead with Fred Funk after the second
round of the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic at Fallen
Oak on Saturday.
Andrade had the low round of the day, capping it
with a 20-foot birdie putt on 18. Funk shot a 67.
The 50-year-old Andrade is playing in just his fourth
Champions Tour event. His best finish was eighth
place at the ACE Group Classic in
February.
Fred Couples started the day with a two-stroke lead,
but fell into a tie for second place after shooting a 71.
Jay Haas and Jeff Maggert both had 69 to join Cou-
ples one stroke behind the leaders.
Andrade and Funk are at 8-under 136 for the
tournament.




NATIONWIDE
Continued from Page B1l

"We had a lot of fun there at the end, obvi-
ously," Harvick said. "You'd rather win the race,
but any time you can put on a show like that for
the fans, you're excited about that."
Larson had finished second in five previous
Nationwide races, but never won. Busch held
him off at Bristol last week, and Larson was be-
ginning to wonder when he would get his break-
through win.
Busch, the defending champion at Fontana
after last year's weekend sweep, started 39th
after missing qualifying with car problems. He
roared through the field to take the lead before
coming up just short in the big finish.
"He deserved it," Busch said after congratu-
lating Larson in Victory Lane. "He's worked
hard, and that's why he's in Cup."
Joey Logano was fourth after leading 96 laps
early on, and Elliott Sadler finished fifth.
After a caution for fuel on the track, a green
flag with 16 laps to go kicked off a wild scramble
for the lead. Larson got out front, while Busch
swerved in front of Harvick for second.
Larson and Busch dueled for the next few laps,
trading the lead. Harvick soon joined the hunt,
and Busch stayed in the group despite scraping
the wall with seven laps to go.
Busch nudged back in front by a bumper
with five laps to go, but Larson cut in front
moments later to push Busch back. Harvick
repeatedly drove down hard into the turns in
an effort to get in front, but Larson barely held
him off




GATORS
Continued from Page B1l

"We just wanted to come out and not let them
play harder than us or not play as hard as we
can," Wilbekin said. "I think we did a good job of
having our energy up at the start of the game, and
we played together on offense and played to-
gether on defense."
Wilbekin took over in the second half, scoring
eight consecutive points at one point. Patric
Young wasn't too shabby, either, finishing with
seven points and eight rebounds. Will Yeguete
added eight points all in the paint.
Michael Frazier II chipped in 10 points for the
Gators. Frazier was just 2 of 9 shooting from 3-
point range. Had Florida not been cold from be-
hind the arc, the game would have been
essentially over much sooner than it was. The
Gators finished 5 of 20 from 3-point range, with at
least five of those rimming in and out.
Florida will face either fourth-seeded UCLA
or 12th-seeded Stephen E Austin on Thursday in
the South Regional in Memphis, Tenn. The Bru-
ins and Lumberjacks play Sunday in San Diego.
The Gators have the longest current streak of
Sweet 16 appearances-- and expect to go further
If Wilbekin continues to play like he did against


the Panthers, Florida surely improves its chances
of making another deep run in the tournament.
Wilbekin ended up getting iced down after
banging knees with a defender He got a well-de-
served standing ovation as he limped off the court
"He's a great point guard," Panthers forward
Lamar Patterson said. "He took care of business."
Wilbekin hit a running 3-pointer at the first-
half buzzer and drained a back-breaking 3 with
8:24 remaining that gave Florida its largest lead at
that point, 45-31. His consecutive floaters inside 5
minutes to play were equally troublesome for Pitt
His best play didn't even show up in the box
score. Wilbekin saved one of the many loose balls
Florida got to first, turned around and threw a
strike to Casey Prather Prather drove the lane
and dropped the ball to Young for a dunk that en-
ergized the pro-Florida crowd.


SCOREBOARD





HOCKEY / NBA BASKETBALL


Bolts' streak ends with ninth straight loss to Pens


Associated Press


PITTSBURGH James
Neal's power-play goal 1:27 into
overtime lifted Pittsburgh to a
wild victory over Tampa Bay
Neal's slap shot over Anders
Lindback's right shoulder
capped a frantic final 15 minutes
of play as the teams traded the
lead three times.
Evgeni Malkin had two goals
and two assists, and Sidney Crosby
added a goal and two assists for
the Penguins, who have won
nine straight over the Lightning.
Jeff Zatkoff stopped 21 shots and
Pittsburgh ended Tampa Bay's
five-game winning streak.
Steven Stamkos, Valtteri Filp-
pula and Ondrej Palat scored for
the Lightning, who have earned at
least one point in eight straight
games. Lindback made 25 saves.
Flyers 4, Blues 1
PHILADELPHIA- Scott Hartnell
and Brayden Schenn scored in the
second period, and the Philadelphia
Flyers rallied to beat the Western
Conference-leading St. Louis Blues
4-1 for their fifth straight victory.


Jakub Voracek and Wayne Sim-
monds added goals, and Steve Mason
made 32 saves to help Philadelphia
improve to 12-2-1 in its last 15 games
to maintain its hold on second place
in the Metropolitan Division.
Red Wings 3, Wild 2
ST. PAUL, Minn. Gustav
Nyquist's third-period goal helped
Detroit top Minnesota for its fourth
win in five games.
Jimmy Howard made 28 saves,
and Brendan Smith and David Leg-
wand each scored on a power play
for the Red Wings, who were in a
2-for-25 slump with the man advan-
tage until getting goals on both of
their opportunities against the Wild.
Mikko Koivu gave the Wild an
early lead, on a power play, and
Charlie Coyle tied the game on a
penalty shot. But the Wild, clinging
to a wild-card spot in the Western
Conference race, fell to 2-3-4 in nine
games since the trade deadline.
Stars 3, Senators 1
DALLAS Trevor Daley and Jamie
Benn scored third-period goals to help
Dallas rally for a victory over Ottawa.


The Stars snapped a four-game
losing streak (0-3-1) and sent the
Senators to their sixth consecutive
defeat (0-5-1), tying Ottawa's
longest skid this season.
Jordie Benn had two assists for
the Stars. Cody Eakin had tied the
game with a second-period goal.
Kari Lehtonen made 26 saves in his
second game since returning from a
head injury sustained on March 11 in
Dallas' previous victory.
Jamie Benn reached 30 goals for
the first time in his five NHL seasons.
Robin Lehner made 39 saves
against Dallas, which had a 42-27
shots advantage.


Kings 4, Pa
LOS ANGELES -
Quick broke the Kin
goalie wins, making
Cf.iffh chi* ,ifr if rifin in :


The Pittsburgh Rangers 2, Devils 0
Penguins'
Evgeni Malkin NEWARK, N.J. Henrik
(71) puts the Lundqvist made 21 saves in posting
puck behind his Rangers record 50th NHL
Tampa Bay shutout, and New York improved
Lightning its playoff chances with a 2-0
goalie Anders victory over the fading New Jersey
Lindback for a Devils.
goal Saturday Rick Nash scored his team-lead-
in the third
period. ing eighth game-winning goal and
Derek Stepan added an empty-net,
power-play tally with 8 seconds left
Associated Press to give the Rangers their third
inthers 0 straight road win.
- Jonathan New Jersey lost for the fifth time
gs record for in five games and is in danger of
gs hreor i or missing the playoffs for the second
d24 saves inhis straightyear.


IIILIIt IIULUUL ul dai iiijur y-iin il[j.er ui
season as Los Angeles beat Florida.
Trevor Lewis, Mike Richards, Alec
Martinez and captain Dustin Brown
scored for the Kings.
Quick earned his 172nd career
victory and surpassed Rogie Vachon.
The shutout was the 30th of Quick's
career, two shy of Vachon's fran-
chise mark. The Kings recorded
their 11th shutout, tying the franchise
record set two seasons ago.


Hurricanes 3, Jets 2
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -The
Carolina Hurricanes scored three
straight goals in just under three
minutes in the second period and
held on for a 3-2 win over the Win-
nipeg Jets.
Hurricanes defenseman Andrej
Sekera had a pair of assists, giving
him 31 on the season to go with 11
goals.


Pelicans down depleted Heat 105-95


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -An-
thony Davis had 30 points,
11 rebounds and three steals,
and the New Orleans Peli-
cans handed the struggling
Miami Heat their seventh
loss in 11 games 105-95.
LeBron James twisted his
right ankle while stepping
on Pelicans guard Tyreke
Evans' foot during a drive to
the hoop late in the third
quarter, but remained in
the game and finished with
25 points, nine assists and
eight rebounds. It was not
enough for Miami, which
gave guard Dwyane Wade
and center Greg Oden the
night off following Friday's
victory at Memphis.
Pelicans guard Eric Gor-
don sat out, but New Orleans
got 14 points from Evans,
12 from Al-Farouq Aminu
and 11 from Luke Babbitt.


Rockets 118,
Cavaliers 111
CLEVELAND James
Harden scored 37 points, in-
cluding 17 in the third quarter,
and the Houston Rockets led
from wire-to-wire in a 118-111
victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
Harden was 9 of 15 from the
field, hit five 3-pointers, made
all 14 of his free throws and had
11 assists without playing the
fourth quarter after Houston built
a 29-point lead late in the third.
Rockets center Dwight
Howard missed his third straight
game with a sore left ankle,
but Houston is undefeated in
the eight-time All-Star's absence.
Cleveland has lost four
straight and played again
without point guard Kyrie Irv-
ing, who has been sidelined
for three games with a
strained left biceps.


Houston made its first four
shots and took a quick lead in
snapping a three-game road
losing streak.
Bobcats 124,
Trail Blazers 94
CHARLOTTE, N.C.--Al
Jefferson scored 28 points
and two others finished with
more than 20 as the Charlotte
Bobcats routed the Portland
Trail Blazers 124-94 on Satur-
day night.
Kemba Walker added 26
points, Gerald Henderson had
23 and Chris Douglas-
Roberts 11 for the Bobcats,
who finished with their
highest-scoring game and
most-lopsided victory in snap-
ping a two-game losing
streak.
Damian Lillard scored 20
points, Dorell Wright added
17 and Wesley Matthews 15


Associated Press
New Orleans Pelicans forward Anthony Davis dunks the
ball over Miami Heat forward Udonis Haslem, right, and
Miami Heat forward Michael Beasley, left, on Saturday
during the first half in New Orleans.


for the Trail Blazers, who
trailed by as many as 34
points late in the second half
in their worst loss this season.
Charlotte shot 52 percent
from the field (49 of 94),


outscored Portland in the
paint 54-32 and held a 50-36
rebounding advantage over
the Trail Blazers, who had
won their last four games
against the Bobcats.


Grizzlies 82,
Pacers 71
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike
Conley scored 21 points,
Zach Randolph added 18
points and 13 rebounds, and
the Memphis Grizzlies held
the Indiana Pacers to their
lowest output of the season in
an 82-71 victory.
Mike Miller added 13 points
as Memphis won for the sev-
enth time in nine games and
maintained its hold on the
final playoff spot in the West-
ern Conference. Marc Gasol
had 10 points and nine re-
bounds.
Lance Stephenson led the
Pacers with 15 points and
eight rebounds. David West
added 10 points.
Paul George, was held to
eight points, missing eight of
his 10 shots, and Indiana shot
37 percent for the game.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 B5





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Elation for Dayton


Flyers 55,
Orange 53
Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. -
Dyshawn Pierre scored 14
points and Jordan Sibert
hit a key 3-pointer with
47.7 seconds left as Dayton
stunned Syracuse 55-53 to
earn a spot in Sweet 16 for
the first time in three
decades.
Syracuse was poised to
pull out another close vic-
tory, but Tyler Ennis' 3-
point attempt clanged off
the rim at the buzzer
Dayton (25-10), the llth
seed in the South Regional,
advances to the regional
semifinals next week and
will play Kansas or Stanford.
The third-seeded Orange
(28-6) struggled all game
against the swarming Day-
ton defense, missing all 10
attempts from beyond the
arc, while the Flyers hit
seven times from long range.
Louisville 66,
Saint Louis 51
ORLANDO Luke Han-
cock scored 21 points and de-
fending national champion
Louisville shrugged off a cold
shooting performance to beat
Saint Louis 66-51 and ad-
vance to the Sweet 16 of the
NCAA tournament for the third
straight year.
The fourth-seeded Cardi-
nals (31-5) shot under 45 per-
cent, had 19 turnovers and
only got 11 points from star
Russ Smith. It didn't matter
with the fifth-seeded Billikens
(27-7) going 0 for 15 from 3-
point range and struggling to
take care of the basketball.
Louisville moves on the
Midwest Regional semifinals
in Indianapolis against either
No. 1 seed Wichita State or
No. 8 seed Kentucky. The un-
beaten Shockers and Wildcats
meet Sunday in St. Louis.
Saint Louis, which has
never been to the Sweet 16,
lost in the third round of the
tournament for the third con-
secutive year.


Syracuse's Rakeem Christmas and Dayton's Vee Sanford
vie for control of the ball Saturday during the first half of
a third-round game in Buffalo, N.Y.


Michigan 79, Texas 65
MILWAUKEE Nik
Stauskas and Michigan are
headed back to the Sweet 16.
Stauskas had 17 points
and eight assists to lead the
Wolverines to a 79-65 victory
over Texas in the third round
of the NCAA tournament on
Saturday.
Jordan Morgan added 15
points and 10 rebounds as
Michigan (27-8) advanced to
next week's Midwest Regional
semifinals in Indianapolis. The
Wolverines will face the win-
ner of Sunday's Mercer-Ten-
nessee game in Raleigh, N.C.
Michigan lost to Louisville
in the national championship
game a year ago.
Isiah Taylor scored 22
points for Texas on 8-for-22
shooting.
SDSU 63, NDSU 44
SPOKANE, Wash. -
Xavier Thames scored 30
points, and fourth-seeded San
Diego State reached the
round of 16 for the second
time in school history, ending
the run of No. 12 seed North
Dakota State 63-44.
The Aztecs (31-4) now get
to make the short drive up the
interstate to Anaheim, Calif.,
where they will face either
No. 1 seed Arizona or eighth-
seeded Gonzaga in the
West Regional semifinals on
Thursday.
Thames, who was 9 of 19
from the field, had five assists
and ended the comeback hopes


of the Bison with a six-point
spurt late in the second half.
Kory Brown led the Bison
(26-7) with 13 points, but the
best shooting team in the
country shot only 31.9 percent.
Friday's late games
Kentucky 56,
Kansas State 49
ST. LOUIS Julius Randle
had 19 points and 15 re-
bounds, Aaron Harrison fin-
ished with 18 points and No. 8
seed Kentucky beat Kansas
State 5649 to earn a date with
top-seeded Wichita State.
UCLA 76, Tulsa 59
SAN DIEGO -Jordan
Adams scored 21 points and
Norman Powell added 15 in
his hometown to lead fourth-
seeded UCLA to a 76-59 vic-
tory over 13th-seeded Tulsa.
UCLA (27-8) advances to
Sunday's third round against
12th-seeded Stephen F. Austin.
Iowa State 93, NC
Central 75
SAN ANTONIO Georges
Niang scored 24 points to lead
third-seeded Iowa State as the
Cyclones pulled away from
No. 14 North Carolina Central
for a 93-75 win.
Virginia 70, Coastal
Carolina 59
RALEIGH, N.C.--Anthony
Gill scored 17 points to help
No. 1 seed Virginia pull away
late and beat Coastal Car-
olina 70-59.


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Good things are happening, if you look for them
I's .o/


he Rev. Ray Cortese
called community
leaders together last
week to talk about our
flourishing community
It was a much-needed
pep talk.
The Rev Cortese is the pas-
tor at Seven Rivers Presby-
terian Church and School in
Lecanto. He invited county
commissioners, city leaders
and business folks to listen
to a presentation about the


expansion of the private
school. Seven Rivers is
building a new facility for
pre-k children and a sepa-
rate athletic complex for
the students who attend the
elementary/high school.
Good things are happen-
ing at Seven Rivers, but the
Rev Cortese is wise enough
to know that Citrus County
has been struggling over the
past year to find its footing.
He talked to the gathered


community leaders about
working together to create a
"flourishing community" He
urged the leaders to take the
time to encourage each other
and focus on the positive
things that are happening.
In the broader commu-
nity, the Rev Cortese is cor-
rect. There have been some
good things happening that
should be recognized.
The tax dispute with
Duke Power has been set-


tled and there is finally
some stability about what
the future looks like. Citrus
County did not have a win-
ning case and newly ap-
pointed Property Appraiser
Les Cook made the decision
to settle. It was a positive
move. And it might even
mean some tax relief for
property owners.
Duke is also moving
forward with plans to con-
struct a new $1.3 billion gas


plant in northwest Citrus
County The project will
bring up to 1,000 jobs to the
county during the construc-
tion stages.
The four-year battle at
Citrus Memorial hospital in
Inverness is finally coming
to an end. The hospital lease
deal with HCA is being fi-
nalized, and barring any
last-minute catastrophe,


Page C3


...A.. :. _';N.

i;";a.&
_^kll .,Mf


-
--A


Associated Press
An oil-soaked bird is examined in April 1989 on an island in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Exxon Mobil Corp. was ordered to pay about $500 million
in interest in June 2009 on punitive damages for the Exxon Valdez oil spill off Alaska, nearly doubling the payout to Alaska natives, fishermen,
business owners and others harmed by the 1989 disaster.



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS



OF STUBBORN STAIN


Associated Press ANCHORAGE, Alaska
before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in
2010 in the Gulf of Mexico, there was the
Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, at the
time the nation's largest oil spill. The 987-
foot tanker, carrying 53 million gallons of
crude, struck Bligh Reef at 12:04 a.m. on
March 24,1989. Within hours, it unleashed an estimated
lo.8 million gallons of thick crude oil into the water.
Storms and currents then smeared it over 1,300 miles of
shoreline.


My pledge to my school


As I watched my 3-year-old daugh-
ter scurry behind her kinder-
garten-aged big brother into the
beautiful entrance of Pope
John Paul II Catholic School ..
of Citrus County, Fla., Tues-
day morning, I was filled
with mixed emotions. My
heart was heavy with the re-
cent news of the suggested
closure at the end of this
school year As an alumna of
our county's Catholic school,
I can truly understand the Kelly L
detrimental effects this will GU
have on our county Every
year for the past 29 years, a COL
graduating class has left this -
school with good morals, ethics, knowl-
edge, friendship and values and has gone
into the world to make it a better place.
I was one of the first classes that at-
tended this school when it was in the


La
E
.1


old Daystar building on State Road 44.
That is where I began my journey of
Catholic education with some people
who I am proud to say will al-
ways be some of my closest
friends. To this day, I still
carry a special bond with my
classmates from Catholic
school that will always re-
mind me of the excellent val-
ues that were instilled in
each of us as we learned and
S grew there. We would race to
stinger see who could get our tests
EST done the fastest and most ac-
curately, who could have the
JMN highest score among us. I
will never forget when a
classmate taught me a math concept be-
fore the final eighth-grade math test
that boosted my score to 100 percent


See Page C3


For a generation of people around the world, the
spill was seared into their memories by images of
fouled coastline in Prince William Sound, of sea ot-
ters, herring and birds soaked in oil, of workers
painstakingly washing crude off the rugged
beaches.
Twenty five years later, most of the species have
recovered, said Robert Spies, a chief science ad-
viser to governments on the oil spill restoration
program from 1989 to 2002. But some wildlife, as
well as the people who live in the region, are still
struggling.
Here's a look at what's changed since the spill:
See Page C4


Sometimes you ask for it


ill Grant, the Citrus County Hos-
pital Board attorney who is
something of a public records-
requesting machine, isn't-
happy with a recent en-
counter with county govern-
ment, and he wasn't shy
about his feelings, either
First, I want to mention
that the county has a very J
easy-to-follow public
records practice. When I
request records, the request
is sent to Nancy Cologna, Mike
the records manager The WRI
request is given an identify-
ing number, which she sends ON TA
to me, along with any -
questions if the request is confusing.
Later she will either send me the
records or let me know if there's a fee.
Sometimes I forget about the request-
what was a big deal today might not be


v
14
tic
AI


a big deal a week from now so she
sends me a reminder and asks if I still
want the records. If not, she closes the
file.
L It could not be any easier
or efficient.
Last November, Grant
made a public records re-
quest for Josh Nemzoff
j emails to and from county of-
ficials. Nemzoff, the fired
CCHB transaction consult-
ant, was at the time suing the
right hospital board.
GHT The request went to
Cologna, who responded to
RGET Grant on Nov 6 with an at-
---- tached letter
"Good afternoon Mr Grant," she
wrote. "I have attached our response
letter for your public records request,


PageC3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW







OPage C2- SUNDAY, MARCH 23,2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY C


"His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly
through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of
their last end, upon all the living and the dead."
James Joyce, "Dubliners," 1914


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
/ J Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
( ^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
*I Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DUKE SETTLEMENT




Settlement



brings end



to costly



uncertainty


itrus County Property
Appraiser Les Cook did
the right thing last week
when he negotiated a settle-
ment over the tax dispute
with Duke Energy Company
The contentious two-year
legal battle between the county
and the nation's largest elec-
tric utility was ill-conceived
from the very beginning.
Cook, who was
just appointed by THE I
Gov. Rick Scott to
the property ap- Tax d
praiser's post between
two months ago, and Duk
wasted little time
in finding resolu- OUR 01
tion with the
county's largest Property
employer and Cook
largest taxpayer, prudent
The sad reality
of this dispute is that it took a
toll on Citrus County. When
negotiations first broke down
in 2012, Duke made a "good
faith" payment of $19.6 mil-
lion to the county and vowed
to dispute the remaining
charges in court.
Despite the initial period of
chest-thumping by county of-
ficials, Citrus lost the first round
in court over taxing the pol-
lution-control equipment. At
the same time, Duke announced
it was going to close the troubled
Crystal River nuclear plant.
The opportunity for success
in court looked bleak, but
outside attorneys had already
billed the county $1.4 million
in fees and a final court settle-
ment was probably years away
Cook pushed away the at-
torneys and went at it alone.
He negotiated a settlement that
makes sense for the county and
our school system. The agree-
ment calls for a $500 million
increase in the assessed value
of Duke's property, but a far
lower numberthan the increase
sought by the late Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene.


S
]is
n
e

P
A
T
d


Duke will now pay the
county and the school system
about $7 million more for the
2012 and 2013 budget years.
The assessed value for
Duke in 2014 will be $1.3 bil-
lion, a lower number tied to
the closure of the nuclear
plant.
Cook's settlement with
Duke now brings some
stability to local
5SUE: government's ex-
pectations and
spute an end to the ab-
county surd legal fees.
Energy. At the same
time, Cook's
'INION: leadership brings
to an end the to-
\ppraiser tally unproduc-
iade a tive feuding with
Decision. the county's
largest taxpayer
Duke needs to be seen as a
partner to Citrus County, not
an adversary.
The utility company is the
largest industry in the region
and it can play a vital role in
developing our local econ-
omy. Even while the dispute
was going on and trust was
low, Duke contributed hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars
to the county's economic de-
velopment agency and se-
lected the county as a site for
a new $1.3 billion gas plant.
Our local elected officials
need to take a cue from Prop-
erty Appraiser Cook and cul-
tivate better relations with
Duke Energy.
We'd also like to see the
county use its portion of the
$7 million coming through
the settlement to restock de-
pleted reserves. And it would
be nice to see some tax relief
from last year's big millage-
rate increase.
The settlement with Duke
gives Citrus County the op-
portunity to start moving for-
ward again. Let's make the
most of it.


Unavailable option Knock on wood
Why can't the FCC or the tele- There was a call-in on March 17
phones have that when some- that made the comment: "When
body calls you, they have their I lost my job I didn't go into the
name up there and it doesn't woods and wait 'til I became dirty
say "Unavailable"? I mean if and stinky. I went and got a job."
they're giving you a call, Many of the homeless
they should at least U UND have mental health issues.
have the decency to O ,qU They need to be on their
have their name there. rr meds to function. Others
Could somebody please are alcoholics or drug
answer why they can addicts who need treat-
get away with "Unavail- ,, meant. A number can't
able" and just a phone function (at) the level of
number? I don't answer filling out a job application.
"Unavailable." You have CA Some with mental prob-
a name, I answer it. lems so severe even on
That's it. We're being 563b-0579 meds (it) makes it im-
plagued by those calls, possible to keep a job.
Parishes support school Loved 'Biscayne Bay'


I think the letter Jennifer Hewit-
son wrote (March 16) is a very good,
informational letter and I totally
agree with her. Bishop Lynch thinks
he's the only one providing the
IV. He forgot that there are
parishes in this community that
are providing the IV.


I just finished reading the book
by Fred Brannen Jr, "At the Bottom
of Biscayne Bay," and I tell you, it's
a good book to read. It's full of
fiction, a love story, mystery sto-
ries, as well as an autobiogra-
phy of his life and I thoroughly
enjoyed it.


U.S. ignores human rights abroad


mong the reporter-
columnists whose bylines
I never miss, Pulitzer
Prize winner Charlie Savage of
the The New York Times is at the
top of the list. He is penetrat-
ingly factual and stays on sto-
ries that are often surprising.
At the bottom of Page 12 of
the March 14 Times in what
should have been on the front
page, garnering Sav-
age another Pulitzer
- was this: "U.S.,
Rebuffing U.N., Main-
tains Stance That
Rights Treaty Does
Not Apply Abroad."
This treaty, signed
by our Senate in 1992,
is the International
Covenant on Civil Nat F
and Political Rights, OTI
which, Savage notes,
"bans arbitrary VOI
killings, torture, un-
fair trials and imprisonments
without judicial review."
This treaty jumped into the
news, thanks to Savage, because,
as he states in his opening para-
graph: "The Obama administra-
tion declared... that a global Bill
of Rights-style treaty imposes
no human rights obligations on
American military and intelli-
gence forces when they operate
abroad."
Speaking in our country's
name, the "administration af-
firmed that stance in a meeting
in Geneva of the United Nations
Human Rights Committee..."
Savage makes clear that
Obama's administration has not
been the only one to take that
position: "The United States first
expressed the stance in 1995
after the Clinton administration
was criticized for its policy of
intercepting Haitian refugees
at sea, and the Bush adminis-
tration later amplified it to de-
fend its treatment of terrorism
suspects in overseas prisons."
George W Bush and Dick Ch-
eney sure did amplify it. Re-
member the CIA secret prisons,
waterboarding and other U.S.
"enhanced interrogations" that
were as far from human rights
as the agency could malignantly
manage?
Other reporters and I have
documented scores of Obama
continuations of Bush-Cheney
atrocities abroad. It was hardly
surprising, as I wrote back in


HI

C


2010, that "there were hundreds
more photographs of American
torture practices in Afghanistan
as well as in Iraq that President
Obama commanded ... must not
be released, despite a previous
court order to the contrary He
said they would have a 'chilling
effect' on further investigations
of abuses of detainees" (my col-
umn, Feb. 17,2010).
How sensitive of
him to consider pos-
sible U.S. torturers!
Savage quotes Mary
McLeod, Obama's
acting legal adviser
at the State Depart-
ment:
"The United States
continues to believe
entoff that its interpretation
IR that the covenant
ER applies only to indi-
DES viduals both within
its territory and within
its jurisdiction is the most
consistent with the covenant's
language and negotiating history"
So, in other words, Obama
doesn't believe he is violating
the International Covenant on
Civil and Political Rights.
Really? The CIA isn't within
the United States' jurisdiction?
And when CIA "renditions"
captured suspects from the
streets of their countries to be
tortured in other countries in
agreement with the agency, that
isn't a wholesale violation of the
treaty we signed in 1992?
Moreover, as I keep reporting,
U.S. renditions continue, but in
secret, so we don't know who -
or where the victims are.
Meanwhile, Americans and
the rest of the world have been
hearing from longtime stalwart
Obama administration supporter
Dianne Feinstein, the Califor-
nia Democrat who chairs the
Senate Select Committee on In-
telligence. She has called hero
"leaker" Edward Snowden a
traitor, but has also spoken of
the "horrible details of a CIA
program that never, never,
never should have existed."
As The Guardian recently re-
ported, Feinstein "accused the
Central Intelligence Agency of
a catalogue of cover-ups, intim-
idation and smears aimed at in-
vestigators probing its role in
an 'un-American and brutal'
programme of post-9/11 deten-
tion and interrogation" ("Fein-


stein accuses CIA of'intimidating'
Senate staff over torture re-
port," Dan Roberts and
Spencer Ackerman, March 11).
According to Roberts and
Ackerman, the senator, "nor-
mally an administration loyal-
ist, accused the CIA of
potentially violating the U.S.
Constitution and of criminal ac-
tivity in its attempts to obstruct
her committee's investigation
into the agency's use of torture.
"She described the crisis as a
'defining moment' for political
oversight of the U.S. intelli-
gence service."
Moreover, Feinstein "re-
vealed that CIA officials had
also been reported to the De-
partment of Justice for alleged
violations of the Fourth Amend-
ment and laws preventing them
from domestic spying."
This time the agency is ac-
cused of spying on the Senate's
intelligence committee.
There will surely be more on
this startlingly revealing historic
civil war within the Obama ad-
ministration, but the most vital
immediate action, as Feinstein
said, is for "the White House to
declassify" her Senate Intelligence
Committee's "major findings"
on the CIA, "which the presi-
dent has the power to order"
As for President Obama's
reaction?
"The president has great con-
fidence in (CIA Director) John
Brennan and confidence in our
intelligence community and in
professionals at the CIA," said
White House Press Secretary
Jay Carney
But meanwhile, the CIA,
buoyed by our president's glow-
ing support of its leader, contin-
ues to be its own rule of law
within the administration's dis-
integrating rule of law over us.
In a month or more, how
much media coverage, even
analysis, will there be of this
"defining moment" in the pro-
hibition of our Constitution's
separation of powers?

Nat Hentoff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


LETTER to the Editor


This isn't even
the first verse
As a follow-up to Mr White's
letter ("Not what we came for,"
Eugene White, Letters to the
Editor, Page C2, March 9),
here's the rest of the story:
We fought this battle once, and
the outcome was considerably
different In 2007, the Oak Village
Property Owner's Association
and the Citrus County government
rose up against this builder, who
was planning the same kind of
invasion of Oak Village. We said
"no," in 2006, to exactly the same
kind of project, i.e. medium-
density housing units with sin-
gular access through Oak Village
South on an existing county road.
At that time, Citrus County Code
Enforcement levied steep fines
on that organization for multiple
code violations and environmental
infringements. Citrus County
government officials, including
county commissioners, recognized
the harm that would be done to
Oak Village by such a project


The Citrus County Chronicle
did an excellent job of covering
the story and printing the facts.
So, Mr White, this picture is even
more wrong now than it was
seven years ago. At that time we
faced this exact same problem
and the county, in conjunction
with the Oak Village Property
Owners' Association, did things
right. We protected our com-
munity and we protected the
environment. On top of that,
we got a written agreement
from the project owner and
from Citrus County that this
would never happen again un-
less they first consulted with
Oak Village. The question now,
Mr White, is, "Why isn't that
agreement being honored by
the developer and why isn't
Citrus County enforcing it?"
Why aren't we saying "no" in
2014 like we did in 2006? Were
we just smarter seven years ago,
or is something else going on?

Dave Groff
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
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* Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A song that could bring a tear to a glass eye


he U.S. Air Force
Academy Band is
made up of 50 pro-
fessional musicians. The
members are not cadets,
but are active-duty Air
Force personnel. They not
only do regular band stuff,
there are various special-
ized groups that represent
the Air Force, and our
country, worldwide.
One of these units, Wild
Blue Country, is a five-
piece country music en-
semble, and they must be
pretty good. If things went
as scheduled, last night,
Saturday, March 22, Wild
Blue Country played the
Grand Ole Opry
The NCO in charge of
Wild Blue Country is Mas-


ter Sgt. Stephen Brannen,
and, uh, yes, we are re-
lated. He is the son of one
of my favorite first cousins,
Lowell I think that
makes Stephen and I sec-
ond cousins.
A few days ago, after
hearing about this pending
performance, I sent
Stephen a congratulatory
email, but when sending it,
I couldn't fight off the urge
to include one of my very
early writings. After my fa-
ther died much too young
at the age of 60 in 1979, I
wrote a tribute to him.
This was before I had
found my voice as a news-
paper columnist, or most
recently, as a novelist, so I
wrote it in a style very sim-


ilar to country music him a flattop box guitar
lyrics. Here goes: "With talent that can't be
"No, he wasn't Hank or learned, with a love that
Willie, and you might think deeply burned, he played
I'm silly, you the cards he'd
might even been dealt by
think that what life, though he
I say's absurd, dreamed of
but when he'd Nashville's
play and sing, glare, that
he made the dream could
rafters ring, not compare
and I know he with his love
was the best I for his children
ever heard. Fred Brannen and his wife.
"He grew up A SLICE 'A life can
hard and mean, end so soon,
the sawmillkept OF LIFE first it's morn-
him lean, the ing, then it's
good things in his life were noon, and the shadows of
few and far, but his mama the night so swiftly fall, he
found a way, and on his was here but now he's
16th birthday, she bought gone, and those he loved


are left alone with his gui-
tar standing silent against
the wall.
"No, he wasn't Hank or
Willie, go ahead and think
I'm silly go ahead and think
that what I say's absurd, but
when he'd play and sing,
the love in his heart would
ring, and I know he was the
best I ever heard, my Daddy
was the best I ever heard."
I told Stephen that if his
great-uncle Fred was still
alive, he'd probably simply
swell up and burst with
pride. Stephen is not only
playing on the grandest
country music stage of them
all, he has also made a se-
cure life for his lovely wife
Rachel and their children.
When he replied to my


note, Stephen said that
after reading the lyrics, he
immediately set about to
set them to music. He
added, "This is one of
those songs that could
bring a tear to a glass eye."
Maybe so.
I wrote the words, and
35 years later, I still cry
every time I read 'em.


Fred Brannen, an Inver-
ness resident, has been a
Chronicle columnist since
1988 and is the author of
the recently published
novel, 'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay." He may be
contacted at lbrannenjr
@gmail.com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


LETTERS to the Editorr


Is York without sin?
I wish to respond to Byron York's
March 8 column, "Why Hillary's past
is fair game." As far as I can determine,
finding fault, non-stop accusations,
and misleading suggestions are not
helpful to anyone. The people need
accurate information about potential
candidates running for elected office
and they need to know what poli-
cies they subscribe to for the better-
ment of the people. Now we constantly
hear from the so-called "right and
left," berating arguments on all sub-
jects. I do not find this helpful in de-
ciding whom I shall vote for, nor do I
find it promoting a true democratic
process for the betterment of our
country I think they (all candidates
and media persons) would do far
better if they would subscribe to
the verse in the Bible in John 8:7,
"Let anyone among you who is with-
out sin be the first to throw a stone."
You see, none of us are perfect Yet
being rude or angry does not solve
any problems! I beg everyone try to
be thoughtful and responsive to the
needs of all people. The current en-
vironment does not bode well for
our city, county, state or nation.
Thank you for striving for humility
and truthfulness first and foremost.


Sandy Engelman
Inverness


Sharing tragedy's cost Banks caused recession


It is easy to be a Monday-morning
quarterback, but of course we do not
always know all the details. I refer to
the 17-year sentence meted out to the
mother of a severely abused and
neglected baby found chilled, starved,
feces-encrusted, emaciated, etc.
The mind recoils from such a sce-
nario, as stated by Judge Ric Howard
in his sentencing. A quick mathe-
matical jotting shows that at $30,000
per year for the mother's incarcer-
ation, just to jail this unfortunate
person the state will be spending at
least $510,000. I will not attempt to
estimate the cost of care for the baby
What is the point of this? If this
child were delivered in a hospital,
is there not personnel available
who can spot abnormal behavior of
a mother toward her newborn? Did
there seem to be any kind of a "sig-
nificant other?"
Not for the first time, I see the
ounce of precaution is worth the
pounds yea, even tons of "cure."
Let us hope that in some way there
is some kind of cure for a helpless
infant whom our "civilized society"
failed in a most heinous way In the
interim, we all share the cost and
the shame for allowing this tragedy
Marilyn Booth
Inverness


A recent letter claims the collapse
of the banking system that led to the
Great Recession was caused by Pres-
ident Carter's Community Reinvest-
ment Act of 1977. That law forbids
banks from refusing to write mort-
gages on low-cost homes. Banks often
redlined whole sections of metro
areas where no mortgages would be
considered. This made it necessary
for an owner to finance the sale.
The letter also stated banks would
be fined if they required proof of
financial capability before granting
a mortgage. The terms of the Com-
munity Reinvestment Act are avail-
able on the Internet. The law
emphasizes that mortgages be executed
in a safe and sound manner and
doesn't require banks to make high-
risk loans. The financial collapse
that led to the Great Recession was
caused by banks making loans as
high as $700,000 to persons with no
assets and in some cases no job.
Banks have been fined billions of
dollars, with J.P Morgan Chase
fined $20 billion. In that case, the
judge stated that considering the
huge profit the bank realized from
the fraudulent mortgages, the fine
was only a slap on the wrist
Stan Clewett
Homosassa


Hot Corner: UP IN SMOKE

I smoke, therefore he isn't
I just wanted to call and make a comment about
the Sounding Off I read this morning (March 19)
about smoking marijuana making you sterile. I still
can't quit laughing over that one. I'm guessing who-
ever called that in probably got their information off
the Internet and if you got it off the Internet, you
know it must be true. I have to remind my son
that's 31 years old that has a master's degree that
all the years I grew up smoking the smoke, he
shouldn't exist. Just saying.


a Am maman


Tell it to junior


- U NU This is in response to "Popu-
S lation control" Sounding Off on,
V1 ~what is today ... yes, I believe it
is Wednesday, March 19, the
very first one, "Population con-
trol." Just so that that caller
4 knows, I'm a 43-year-old man,
'AL n very stable job, been smoking
CAL marijuana since the age of
56i3-0579Q maybe 16. I was a little lapse in
u56u v5J9 my life earlier, but I made up
for it, especially the fact that
my son, who is 23, 24 this March 25. He just got
accepted to medical school and my grandbaby was
born last night, my grandson. Yay! So, so much for
population control.
A theory gone to pot
I just had to call in and comment about the
Sound Off, "Population control." I do not think that
marijuana makes people sterile since my husband
smokes pot and we had two children. My son
smokes pot and he has two children. Where do peo-
ple get their facts?


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

this crisis will be out ofthe headlines.
CMH can then get back to the
business of providing excellent
health care to the community The
new interim CEO, Ralph Aleman,
seems like a really smart guy
who can bring employees, physi-
cians and the community together
A deal is being finalized at
the Crystal River Mall to bring in
a new anchor to the struggling re-
tail complex. At the same time,
Art Jones of "One Rake at a
Time" group continues with his
plan to open an aquarium at the


old Belk store.
Sen. Charlie Dean has
gained huge levels of support in
Tallahassee to funnel millions of
dollars of state assistance into
cleaning up the springs in
Florida and most especially
in Citrus County King's Bay and
the Homosassa River are in des-
perate need of the help.
Crystal River is finalizing
plans to solve the parking and
stormwater problems that have
slowed down business develop-
ment along the waterfront and
on Citrus Avenue. The new city
plans will open the way for
restaurants and tourist develop-
ment in the downtown area.
The new Cutler Spur bypass


in Crystal River has been
opened and it has a great new
bike path along the boundaries
of Three Sisters Springs.
The county has just finished
the improvements on State Road
486 and the two years of con-
struction is over (Maybe soon
they will have the guts to raise
the speed limit to an appropri-
ate 55 mph.)
Inverness is moving forward
with the renovation of the Valerie
Theater, and a new entertain-
ment venue is about to be born.
And speaking of new enter-
tainment venues, the city of
Crystal River has just opened
the Third Street Park music
venue and city events coordina-


tor Leslie Bolin is doing a great
job offering new programs.
The coolest new bike path
in Florida is about to be opened
in Citrus Springs. The path will
run from County Road 39
through some back woods and
then across a bridge on the With-
lacoochee River. It then runs
along a stretch of the Rainbow
River on the unpopulated side
of the waterway It is beautiful.
Fundraising continues for
the new YMCA, which will be
built on C.R. 486 near Pine
Ridge. After 25 years of talking
about this, something is going to
finally happen. (OK, this is a bit
self-serving, as Jewel Lamb and
I are heading up the committee


to raise the $8 million to make
this happen).
So the Rev Cortese is right. If
you focus on the negative stuff,
it's pretty easy to feel bad about
things. But if you work together
to accomplish good things, amaz-
ing outcomes can happen.
It's not all about bellyaching
and finger-pointing.
The Rev. Cortese has made
that happen at Seven Rivers. It's
up to all of us to stay positive on
the future of Citrus County and
move forward.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


SCHOOL
Continued from Page C1

and gave me the title of valedictorian of my class.
She was the type of person we all should emulate in
life. Many of the children who are given the oppor-
tunity to attend Pope John Paul II Catholic School
have these characteristics, which is why we as a
community should fight to keep the doors open.
As soon as I heard the dismal news about the im-
pending closureof our county's only Catholic school,
I immediately made a pledge to support a child
from the community to attend the school. It will be
a sacrifice for my family but what better sacrifice
than to give a child this opportunity for education
and the development of morals and values? If our
main issue is low enrollment, then let's do our best
to get the enrollment up. We learned many things as
students at our school, but an important philosophy
that will always stand out to me is, "Where there is
a will, there is a way!" and we definitely have the
will to keep the doors open. I am extremely im-
pressed with the way our parents, teachers and sup-
porters of the school have pulled together with
outstanding resources to keep us open at least an-
other year If we can do that in two weeks, imagine
what we can accomplish in the upcoming year
I have written this letter in hopes that somebody
in the community is also willing to sponsor a child
to attend Pope John Paul II Catholic School. It is a
wonderful environment for a child to experience
and a great gift to allow him/her
We need to keep our school open for the future of
children growing up in our community There is
nothing more important than a person's character
and integrity This school has a reputation for help-
ing children grow up to become adults with good
character, morals, values, ethics and, most impor-
tantly an understanding of the power of prayer
If you are willing to make any donation, please
call 352-746-2020 and speak to Donna Osbourne in
the school office. The school offers a Guardian
Angel Program which is fund to collect donations to
assist with scholarships to the school. Please par-
ticipate if you can. If you can't, please say a prayer
that we will keep our doors open for years to come.


Kelly Lastinger is an occupational therapist at the
Central Florida Clinic for Rehabilitation and an
alumna of Pope John Paul II Catholic School


TARGET
Continued from Page Cl

PRR 2013-539. The records will be
released upon payment of fees due.
Thank you."
The letter stated: '"Attached are
records in response to the informa-
tion you provided in your public
records request stated below"
The records, however, were not at-
tached. Instead the letter noted Grant's
request, and it included a $27 invoice
for the staff hour it took to search
emails looking for Grant's records.
Grant's response, same day:
"There are no records attached as
indicated in your letter Are there
any documents or not?"
Same day, Cologna answered:
"Good afternoon Mr Grant. The
email had a PDF attachment of our
response and fees due. Did you re-
ceive the attachment?"
Now, I'm going to interrupt for a
minute to say the county acknowl-
edges that a response letter that be-
gins with "attached are records.."
could give someone the impression
that records are attached. Officials
have since changed the form letter
to acknowledge the request and list
the fees, if any
Grant's response to Cologna, same
day:
"Yes, I received the letter and it
said the records were attached; they
were not Are there any records or not?
"Please read your own letter and
response. Your letter states, At-
tached are records in response to
the information you provided..'.
"I want a clear answer to the ques-
tion I asked, Are there any records
or not?' If you say yes, the payment is
forthcoming. If no, then no payment
will be made.
"Please describe in detail, pur-
suant to FS 119 what you or
whomever did for $27 and if that is
the lowest possible dollar amount to


charge under FS 119. Certainly
there are other personnel available
at a lower rate. The law requires
that the agency use a person at the
lowest salary possible. Please ad-
dress this pursuant to the FS 119.
"I await the response."
(This from the same office that last
year wanted to charge Commis-
sioner Joe Meek $1,900 to review fi-
nancial records before releasing
them to him.)
Cologna's response, same day, re-
ferred to administrative regulations
and Florida Statute.
"Good afternoon Mr Grant," she
began.
"Yes there are records. The De-
partment of Systems Management,
where I work, is tasked with all
email searching & vetting processes
for public records requests for the
Citrus County BOCC.
"I am the lowest paid person in
our department charged with that
task, in accordance with our Public
Records policyAR 17.02 and ES. 119."
Nothing happened for a while. On
Feb. 28, Cologna wrote to Grant say-
ing the request was still open with
$27 in fees due. She noted that Grant
had just paid fees for a prior public
records request and thought he may
have forgotten about the Nemzoff
request.
Then Cologna wrote:
"In accordance with the Citrus
County BOCC Public Records Policy,
AR 17.02.2, Section V Revenue Col-
lection, Deposits, Refunds, #2. 'The
County may refuse to produce sub-
sequent requests if the fees for pre-
vious requests for records have not
been paid for by the requester' There-
fore, no further public records re-
quest will be processed for your office
until PRR 2013-539 is paid in full.
"Thank you for your immediate at-
tention to this matter"
Grant responded on the same date
to Cologna. This is what he wrote:
"The cited public records request
was paid. The check was delivered


some time ago. Please check your
records for the check; it was hand
delivered.
"The check has not been negoti-
ated by your office.
"Furthermore, do you just try to
piss people off with your responses
by citing an ordinance without in-
quiring first if payment had been
made. You need to be much more
user friendly How about, 'Bill I see
an open account for public records,
did your office make payment? Can
you please advise? Need to close the
matter- thanks.'
"After you do your search, let me
know if you find the check. You ob-
viously have recd many other pay-
ments from my office. If you fail to
locate the check that was delivered,
please advise.
"I will inquire with my bank if
there is a stop payment charge.
'As to your ordinance, let me be
clear, it DOES NOT trump FS 119. If
you fail to produce record requests
all civil remedies under that statute
will be pursued.
"Please do not forget to look for
the check that was delivered.
"It is no wonder people in the
county are upset.
"Thank you for your immediate at-
tention to this matter"
This time Cologna did not respond.
But a week later, on March 3, County
Administrator Brad Thorpe did:
"Mr Grant: Ms. Cologna makes
every attempt to provide you with
the information you request accu-
rately in a professional manner
Your e-mail was inappropriate and
an embarrassment to your profes-
sion. Thank you, Brad."
Grant's response: There was none.
Have a great Sunday everyone.


Mike Wright is a senior reporter
and assistant editor for the
Citrus County Chronicle. He can
be reached at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A sea otter swims last month in the bay near the ferry dock in Valdez, Alaska. The U.S.
Geological Survey report released Feb. 28 concludes sea otters in Alaska's Prince William
Sound have recovered to levels seen before the Exxon Valdez oil spill nearly 25 years ago.


STAIN
Continued from Page Cl

FISHERMAN
Bernie Culbertson was
preparing to fish cod when
the Exxon Valdez ran
aground. With oil in the
water, fishing came to a
standstill and life for he
and other fishermen dras-
tically changed.
"The bottom fell out of
the price of fish," he said.
Pink salmon that sold for
80 cents per pound fell to 8
cents per pound. Consumers
turned to farm fish or tuna
out of fear of tainted
salmon. His boat caught
2.5 million pound of pinks
one season and lost money
Culbertson turned to
other fisheries, traveling
as far as California. Fish-
ing 12 months a year, his
marriage failed. Friends
couldn't repay loans and
lost boats or homes. Exxon
compensation checks,
minus what fishermen
earned on spill work, ar-
rived too late for many


The fisheries today are
not the same.
"The shrimp are slowly,
slowly coming back. The
crab aren't back. The her-
ring aren't back. The
salmon are back in abun-
dance," he said.

INDUSTRY
At the time of the spill,
complacency among gov-
ernment officials and the
oil industry had set in
after a dozen years of safe
shipments, said Mark
Swanson, director of the
Prince William Sound Re-
gional Citizens Advisory
Council and a former
Coast Guard officer
When the tanker ran
aground, for instance, spill
response equipment was
buried under snow
Alyeska Pipeline Service
Co. in 1989 had 13 oil skim-
mers, five miles of boom
and storage capacity for
220,000 gallons of spilled
oil.
Now, Alyeska has 108
skimmers, 49 miles of
boom and on-water stor-
age capacity of almost 38


million gallons. North Slope
oil must be transported in
double-hull tankers, which
must be escorted by two
tugs. Radar monitors the
vessel's position as well as
that of icebergs.
The company conducts
two major spill drills each
year And nearly 400 local
fishing boat owners are
trained to deploy and
maintain the boom.

PACIFIC
HERRING
After the spill, the popu-
lation of herring crashed.
It is now listed as "not re-
covering." The silvery fish
is a key species because it is
eaten by salmon, seabirds
and marine mammals from
otters to whales. Four years
after the spill, the esti-
mated herring population
based on modeling shrunk
from 120 metric tons to
less than 30 metric tons.
How that happened re-
mains a question, said
Scott Pegau, research pro-
gram manager for the Oil
Spill Recovery Institute in
Cordova, Alaska.


Here's what's known:
Adult herring feed on zoo-
plankton, which crashed
for three years after the
spill. With less to eat, her-
ring may have been more
susceptible to disease nor-
mally fended off within a
herring population.
Herring populations can
stabilize at a low or high
number, but something has
prevented a rebound. Oil
likely is no longer a factor,
Pegau said.

SEA OTTERS
Responders estimated
that as many as 3,000 sea
otters died the first year
Hundreds more died in
the years after of exposure
to oil that persisted in sed-
iment, where otters dig for
clams.
Three factors could
have had an impact on the
otters' ability to survive.
Oiled fur loses insulating
value. Otters ingest oil as
they groom, and re-
searchers years after the
spill found blood chem-
istry evidence consistent
with liver damage. Groom-
ing takes time away from
feeding.
"One of the lessons we
can take from this is that
the chronic effects of oil in
the environment can per-
sist for decades," said
Brenda Ballachey, who
moved to Alaska a few
months after the spill and
spent the next summer
dissecting sea otter car-
casses collected from
beaches and frozen.
The U.S. Geological Sur-
vey research biologist is
the lead author of a fed-
eral study released last
month that concludes
that sea otters have finally
returned to pre-spill
numbers.

PIGEON
GUILLEMOTS
The pigeon guillemot,
which looks like a black pi-
geon with web feet, is one
species that has not recov-
ered. Numbers were de-


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Children under 10 are free
Masters of Ceremonies:
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For ticket information call Cj; ,, N ?I.E
527-5900 (Doorsopenat6pm) .1.


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clinging before the spill. An
estimated 2,000 to 6,000
guillemots, or 10 percent
to 15 percent of the popu-
lation in spill areas, died
from acute oiling.
Researchers suspect
river otters, mink and
other predators targeted
guillemot eggs as an alter-
native to foraging on oiled
beaches.
Like sea otters and an-
other bird that took years
to recover, harlequin
ducks, pigeon guillemots
forage for invertebrates in


sediment and likely were
affected by lingering oil,
said David Irons, a
seabirds expert with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service.
The decline of its other
prey, juvenile herring, did-
n't help. Numbers con-
tinue to decline in both
oiled and non-oiled areas.
Irons has proposed reduc-
ing mink numbers on the
heavily oiled Naked Is-
lands, once prime habitat
for guillemots, to restore
their numbers.


I CONSTRUCTION






March 23 April 6
Art Center Theatre On Golden Pond
Fri and Sat nights at 7:30PM,
Sunday Matinee at 2PM,
Addtl Sat Matinee Mar 29 at 2PM
Entrance Fee: $19 each
Contact Phone: 746-7606

March 24-29
Citrus County Fair Association
Citrus County Fair 2014
Citrus County Fair Grounds
Contact Phone: (352) 726-2993

Mar 29 9AM Shotgun Start
Meals on Wheels Citrus County Resource Ctr.
Golf for Meals
7 Rivers Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: $55 per golfer
Contact Phone: 527-5975

March 29 11:00 AM
St. Scholastica Council of
Catholic Women Organization
Hat's Off to Fashions
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: 20.00
Contact: 352-341-3603 or 746-2873

April 1 6:30 PM 8:00 PM
The BFF Society
(Changing Lives Through Education)
5th Annual Diamond in April
Entrance Fee: $20
Contact Phone: 697-2279

April 3 6:00 PM
The Sanctuary & Grace House Mission
4th Annual Fundraising Banquet
First United Methodist Church Homosassa
$35 individual, $60 couple, $300 for a table of 10

April 4-5* S6:00 PM
American Cancer Society
Relay for Life Inverness
Contact Phone: 800-227-2345

April 5 Shotgun start 1:00 PM
St. Scholastica Knights of Columbus
Lenny Navickas Golf Tournament
Citrus Hills Skyview Country Club
Entrance Fee: $75 pp
Contact Phone: 563-5994

April 5 Registration 8:00 10:00 AM
Kiwanis Car and Truck Show
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln
Hwy 44, Inverness
Entrance Fee: Pre-registration $15, Day of show $20
Contact Phone: 527-0039

April 5
CASA Tee Up with CASA
"Drive Away Domestic Violence"
Citrus Hills Meadows Golf Course
Registration 7:30AM, Shotgun Start 8:30AM
Entrance Fee: $60 PP
Contact Phone: 746-4425 or 344-8111


Suncolt Credit Union
FOUNDATION

Schoolhouae
HUSTLE
HEALTH EXPO
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SCHOOL SPIRIT CONTESTS


(all JiZ-74b-445 or J35Z-34-8111
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C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY


Sticker shock


The price of bacon is surging and the cost of other

morning staples, like coffee and orange juice, is set to

rise because of global supply problems, from drought in

Brazil to disease on U.S. pig farms.


Associated Press
NEW YORK
A nd it's not just the
first meal of the day
hat's being affected.
The cost of meats, fish and
eggs led the biggest in-
crease in U.S. food prices
in nearly 1/2 years last
month, according to gov-
ernment data. An index


Bacon


Bringing home the bacon is
costing more.
The price of pork in the futures
market is at record levels and is
up 52 percent since the start of the
year, to $1.31 a pound. Traders are
concerned about a deadly virus in
the U.S. hog population.
That could further boost bacon
prices, which were already ris-
ing after farmers cut pig produc-
tion because of higher feed costs.
Those cost climbed after a
drought in 2012.
The average price of a pound
of sliced bacon in U.S. cities was
$5.46 in February, up from $4.83
a year earlier and $3.62 five
years ago, government data
shows.
The retail price of pork is pro-
jected to climb by 2.5 percent to
3 percent this year, according to
government forecasts.


that tracks those foods rose
1.2 percent in February
and has climbed 4 percent
over the last 12 months.
While overall inflation
remains low, the increases
in food prices are forcing
shoppers to search out
deals and cut back.
Denise Gauthier, 54, a
screenwriter in North Hol-
lywood, Calif, calls the ris-
ing prices "shocking and


outrageous." To cope, she
has become more frugal,
hunting for discounts and
buying less food overall.
"I will look for things that
are on sale and adjust my
menu for that," says Gun-
thier, who now stocks up on
her favorite coffee when it
goes on sale for $4.99.
Even though food compa-
nies use a range of cost-cut-
ting methods to limit the


effect of higher food costs,
consumers will likely feel
the "ripple effects" of rising
commodity prices, accord-
ing to the Grocery Manufac-
turers Association, a trade
organization for more than
300 food, beverage and con-
sumer product companies.
Here's a rundown of why
breakfast food costs are ris-
ing, and why they could
keep going up.


g3h


0k


Coffee


Orange juice


You need your morning brew,
and you'll likely pay more for it,
at least at the supermarket.
Coffee futures have surged 57
percent this year and this month
rose above $2 a pound for the
first time in two years. Coffee
growing regions of southern
Brazil, the world's largest coffee
producer, have been hit by
drought. Analysts are forecasting
that Brazil's crop could shrink by
about 20 percent this year
Shoppers should be prepared
to pay more at grocery stores, if
the current trend continues for
more than a month.
The price impact will be less
noticeable at coffee stores.
That's because the cost of
beans makes up only a fraction
of the final price, compared to
other costs like rent and staff
wages.


Say squeeze when you pass the
OJ.
Orange juice futures are up 12
percent this year, and climbed as
high as $1.57 a pound March 6,
their highest price in two years.
To be sure, moves in retail
food prices won't match the wild
jumps in commodities markets,
says David Garfield, a consultant
at AlixPartners who advises
food-makers. The reason: food
companies worry about losing
market share.
The price of a 12-ounce can of
frozen orange juice edged up in
February to $2.43 from $2.41 in
January, according to govern-
ment data.
A series of problems are driv-
ing the increases. Florida's or-
ange crop is forecast to be the
worst in almost a quarter of a
century


Move to the


South might


be best for


ailing dad

EAR BRUCE: Recently my
family has been forced to
place my father in an as-
sisted living facility. We have sold
his residence for $350,000 to pay
for the $5,500 to $6,000 monthly
costs for the facility Due to his
monthly rates being raised in the
future, or for additional care as his
health further declines, I don't
know what the future costs may be.
I hate to see the $350,000 sit in
the bank, collecting a little more
than 0 percent interest. Being the
son assigned power of attorney and
medical proxy, I must make a deci-
sion on what to do with this money
I'm leery of investing anywhere
where there's a chance of loss for
his future care.
C.A., Massachusetts
DEAR CA: In an assisted living
facility the costs can be as high as
$70,000 a year I know that you live
in Massachusetts and that costs
can be considerably higher there
than in some Southern states. In
Florida and some other warmer
states, geriatrics is an industry and
it is very competitive. There are
very good assisted living facilities
in Florida where $3,000 a month
would be considered a reasonable
top-of-the-line facility
I know it would be nice to have
your dad around, but a reduction
of this kind might be very much to
your advantage. At the rate you
mentioned, $350,000 could be gone,
even with the interest it earns, in a
matter of six or seven years. Given
the relatively limited amount of
money available, you might wish to
consider relocating.
DEAR BRUCE: We are in our
60s and being advised to put some
of our retirement money in an in-
dexed annuity. Is this a good move?
Mark, via email
DEAR MARK: This is a question
that is constantly asked and there
is no specific answer There are
many new annuity products, and
some are deserving of attention.
Unfortunately, space restraints
don't allow me to spend great
amounts of time on this subject.
Indexed annuities are of value in
some very narrow circumstances. I
would encourage you to investigate
the annuity products you're being
offered. Look at them with some
degree of skepticism. Many are not
appropriate for all age groups.
Also look closely at the person
advising you to buy annuities. Of-
tentimes, because of the commis-
sions, there is a certain amount of
self-interest for the folks who are
selling the annuities. At the very
least, be very careful.
DEAR READERS: If there is
ever any doubt in a writer's mind
that anybody is reading his work,
that doubt disappears in an instant
when one makes a mistake. It's em-
barrassing when you blow it, and I
blew one; I fully admit it. And I
thank the many readers who have
brought it to my attention.
In a recent column, a writer
asked if it could be true that a
friend's Social Security payments
were reduced due to an inheri-
tance. Among the letters I received
was one from J.J. and C.W of Ship-
man, Va., who provided a clear and
thoughtful explanation of this com-
plicated issue. It is by far the best
information I received, and I'll
share it in part with you:
"Once a person starts receiving
Social Security benefits, the only
reasons that they may change are
the following:
"1. An increase due to a cost-of-
living adjustment;
"2. A rise in Medicare premiums,
which are deducted from the So-
cial Security payment and would
result in a slight decrease;
"3. If a beneficiary works and
continues to pay Social Security
taxes, the benefit would be re-cal-
culated and increased;
See Page D2


SM9


:*: -3&





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans workshops upcoming in spring


It is safe to say that Ca-
reerSource Citrus
Levy Marion takes the
needs of our U.S. military
veterans seriously
How seriously? The
mission of our veterans
program is to promote
and maximize veterans'
employment, especially
for those with barriers.
Our Local Veteran Em-
ployment Representa-
tives, or LVERs, are all
former or retired U.S.
military who provide pri-
ority services year round
to service men and
women and their eligible
spouses.
Our chief executive offi-
cer, Rusty Skinner, is him-
self a veteran who served
two tours in Vietnam.
So please believe me
when I say that LVER
Michael Barrington, and
all the members of our
veterans unit, under-
stands what vets are up
against and are trained to
help by providing one-on-
one consultations, assis-
tance with job referral
and placement, informa-
tion about the local job
market, skills assessments
and assistance with train-
ing or retraining.
Before I circle back to
those services, it's worth
taking a moment to un-
derstand who our unem-
ployed veterans are. The
most current information
available comes from the
U.S. Census Bureau's
2012 American Commu-


nity Survey (ACS
reports that of th
working-age vete
(ages 18 to 64) inC
County, 63.7 perc
3,919 are in the la
force (working or
seeking work). f01
470 were jobless
unemployment ra
12 percent.
We also know t
veterans ages 18
jobless or nearly
all vets in the lab
in that age group
48, or 2.3 percent
ages 55 to 64 arel
for work. The ma
unemployed vete
35- to 54-year old
there are 333 oft
These veterans
educated: 34 per
high school diplo
percent attended
college or have e
associate's degre
percent hold bac
degrees or high:
Barrington, a N1
eran with 19 yeai
ice, said that "vel
issues are quite c
my heart." He no
veterans have my
strengths and ski
a high degree of


yriad
lls, plus
expert-


force Professional and
communications manager
at CareerSource Citrus


Levy Marion, formerly
Workforce Connection.
Please contact her at (352)


291-9559 or (800) 434-5627,
ext. 1234 or lbyrnes@
careersourceclm. com.


ise, developed through
military service that can
Laura transfer to the civilian
n workforce, but that "they
Byrnes may need help learning
how to market their
CAREER skills."
SOURCE That's why, in addition
to our priority services,
CareerSource Citrus Levy
Which Marion is kicking off a se-
e 6,163 ries of workshops this
rans spring designed to help
Citrus veterans navigate today's
ent or labor market
labor These workshops start
r actively March 28 with an intro-
fthose, duction to computer ba-
for an sics, continue April 18
ate of with an introduction to
Microsoft Office and con-
hat 88 of clude May 16 with use of
to 34 are social media as an effec-
half of tive job-search tool.
or force "I believe that our
, and that country made a promise
t of those to veterans and their fam-
looking ilies," Barrington said of
jority of his commitment to the
*rans are program. "Too many vet-
s, and erans, especially older
hem. ones, don't receive the
Share well support they have
cent have earned."
)mas, 42 Seats are limited for
Some these workshops, which
earned an are available at no charge
e and 15 and reserved exclusively
helor's for US military veterans.
r If you or someone you
STavy vet- know has served our
rs of serv- country, now please let us
terans' serve you. For more infor-
close to mation, call 352-249-3278,
ted that ext. 5200.


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Did you
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Visit www.ChronicleOnline.com to read today's headlines, add your
thoughts to the weekly opinion poll, search the classified ads, look up
movie times or play games.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

"4. If earnings from
work are high enough to
be subject to what is
known as the 'retirement
test.'
"We suspect that the
friend was also receiving
Supplemental Security In-
come (SSI), which is a
means-tested program,
and does count inheri-
tance income as an asset


in determining eligibility
and benefit levels. Inheri-
tance income would cer-
tainly affect or potentially
eliminate an SSI benefit."
Once again, please ac-
cept my humble apologies
for the error
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. co
m. Questions ofgeneral in-
terest will be answered in
future columns. Owing to
the volume of mail, per-
sonal replies cannot be
provided.


OOOHJJ7


Why is a will ( r i
important? wil ealyav



Get the answers to your questions Can I change m j mi

about wills and trusts at the

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Workshop On Wills /;


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Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

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Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


I&R BLOCK


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA
* Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation
f Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
S* Payroll Services
lwww.pwprice.com


Werner & Company, PA '
A Certified Public Accounting Firm
www.wernercpas.com


Taxes & Accounting
Financial Planning

1011 E. '4vrveill 3rvari Hwv.
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Fraud Investigations
Independent Audits
Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352) 344-4397


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795-3212


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


BUSINESS


AIR CONDITrfONIN HEATING

AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING










D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Cpmmerce


Chamber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.com/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
April 1 Ribbon-cut-
ting for Suncoast Credit
Union, 4:30 p.m., at
2367 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
April 10- Mixer at
Black Diamond Ranch,
5 to 7 p.m., 2600 W.
Black Diamond Circle,
Lecanto.
April 24- Golden Cit-
rus Scholars Awards
Ceremony, 5:30 p.m.
College of Central
Florida, Lecanto.
May 2 Pillar Awards
Dinner inspired by the
style of the
Kentucky
SDerby, 6
K p.m. to 10
O p.m. at Citrus
Hills Golf and
Country Club. Cocktail
attire and hats are rec-
ommended. Table spon-
sorships $300 and
individual reservations
$35 per person.



Six CMHS

volunteers

better than
90 years

young
At 99, one active auxiliary
member claims volunteer-
ing is what keeps him alive.
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is blessed to have six volun-
teers more than 90 years old who
are actively assisting patients
and families. They assist with
transporting patients, as sur-
gery hosts, admitting assistants,
medical records assistants and
even in knitting baby items.
Glen Bortell is the "senior" of
the group at 99 years old and
volunteers two days per week as
a transporter for Diagnostic Im-
aging. He will celebrate his
looth birthday at the Citrus
Memorial Auditorium on Sept. 9.
Mr. Bortell has been honored as
the Volunteer of the Year and has
received the Presidential Award.
Dante Caldera, 98 years
young, is a host in the surgery
area and has logged more than
8,oo000 hours in his 18 years with
the hospital. He, too, is a recipi-
ent of the Presidential Award.
Arthur and Sabina Mitchell
- each 93 years old have
both received the Presidential
Award for serving more than
4,oo000 hours. Art is active in
transporting and Sabina makes
beautiful items for new babies
and patients in the Hospice of
Citrus County unit.
Mary Dewalt, 92 years young,
has also received the Presidential
Award and as a retired employee
decided to come back and vol-
unteer for medical records.
The youngster of the group is
Dot Welsch, who isjust a little past
90. She has logged more than
10,000 hours and was recently
named Citrus Memorial's Volun-
teer of the Year. She has also re-
ceived the Presidential Award.
Ms. Welsch volunteers two days
a week one in the Admitting
Department and one as a surgery
hostess. She has been praised
by many patients and families
for her kind and generous spirit.
Three volunteers remain life-
time members, but due to health
reasons, no longer serve an ac-
tive role. Agnes Bokus, Dub
Miller and Verna Hass have all
served more than 4,000 hours.
Each of these "senior" volun-
teers has expressed their happi-
ness at being well enough to still
help others. Mr. Bortell often
says that volunteering is what
keeps him alive. More than 400
volunteers serve at the hospital
each week. Of that group, 25
percent are over the age of 80.


Member spotlight:


Suncoast Credit Union


ur mission is simple improve the quality of our members' lives by maintaining a strong, secure and in-
novative credit union that builds trust, shows respect and maximizes efficiency.
As the largest financial institution headquartered on Florida's west coast and the largest credit union in
the state, Suncoast Credit Union (formerly Suncoast Schools Credit Union) serves 569,737 members, has
assets of more than $5.5 billion and employs 1,098 people throughout 17 counties. Suncoast Credit Union
offers a full range of deposit, lending and investment products with access through branches, extensive ATM networks,
Members Contact Center and the Internet.
Although we offer virtually the same products and services as banks, we're very different in key ways. Profits are re-
turned to members, we keep our loan rates and fees low and our savings interest rates high, and members get to reap
the benefits. In 2012, Suncoast Credit Union provided $63.7 million in direct financial benefits to members.


Address:
2367 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness FL
34453
Phone:
800-999-5887
Website:
suncoastcreditunion.com
Manager:
Linda Rodgers


Commissioner recognized for leadership


by Withlacoochee Water Authority

[WI S "G A W ithlacoochee Regional Water Supply Authority's Board of Directors, represent-
ig ing Citrus, Hernando, Marion and Sumter counties, honored the authority's
immediate past chairman Citrus County Commissioner Dennis Damato for his out-
V f. I r standing leadership at their meeting on Feb. 19.
\SV ACommissioner Damato served as the authority chairman from January 2012
6A through January 2014, during an important period of time when the authority was
selecting its new executive director, Richard Own, and transitioning into a new per-
manent office in the Lecanto Government Building. During his tenure, Commissioner
Damato led the authority through a variety of critical projects to benefit of the entire
-f. rfour-county Withlacoochee region, including: joining funding of water supply proj-
~ J ects for member governments, a regional irrigation evaluation pilot program, updat-
'' ing the authority's regional water supply plan, repealing of out-of-date agency rules,
Updating the authority's interlocal agreement, and advocating for the authority and
member governments on such issues as springs protection and the establishments of
Dennis Damato, left, accepts his award, minimum flows and levels (MFLs).

Nature Coast EMS
President /CEO
presents at National
Association of EMS
Professionals
N ature Coast EMS President/CEO
MikeHa 1ll reoentV nresentd at was


The Florida Public Relations Association Nature Coast Chapter presents
THE ROAST OF MIKE & REBECCA BAYS


citrus hills golf & country club 505 w hartford st, hernando
6:30p cash bar 7p dinner & show 9p champagne toast


the National Association of State EMS
Officials. The meeting was held in
Orlando and attending by 130 state
EMS directors from around the country.
The presentation encompassed EMS
leading clinical performances and how
Nature Coast EMS uses outcome data to
accomplish and reach high levels of
clinical performance compared to other
emergency medical services throughout
the country.


Hall speaks before the assembled
members at the conference.


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.












SUNDAY
MARCH 23, 2014


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's Connection


Golf outing supports community


Saturday, Feb. 22,2014, was a
beautiful day for the Citrus
County Builders Association
Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf
Outing presented by Crystal
Chevrolet Golfers enjoyed the
great game of golf with fair
weather and lunch as well as
many prizes and raffles. A fan-
tastic showing for this event
with 86 golfers and almost
$4,000 raised for the Boys &
Girls Club of Citrus County
Congratulations to outing
winners Lecanto Veterinary
Clinic on their second consecu-
tive first place win, to second
place winners: Gulf Coast
Ready Mix, and of course the
"Here for the Beer" winners:
Marco & Taylor Wilson and Jeff


& Marie Woods. Stay
tuned for winner photos
in next month's edition.
Special thanks to all
of our sponsors, donors
and volunteers who
helped make this event
successful! Please be -
sure to patronize these j
businesses who provide Blac
so much support in our
community
Presenting Sponsor: Crystal
Chevrolet
Hole in One Sponsors: Eagle
Buick GMC and Harley-
Davidson of Crystal River
Beverage Cart Sponsors: Cit-
rus Pest Management, Eco-
nomic Recovery Group, FDS
Disposal, Sheldon-Palmes


Jir
ks


Insurance, Lora Wilson
Attorney and Coldwell
SBankers.
Longest Drive Spon-
sor: Lecanto Veterinary
Hospital
Closest to the
Centerline Sponsor:
S Awareness Marketing
shear Closest to the Pin
Sponsors: Central Ridge
Insurers, David Rom State
Farm and Young Boats
Print Media Sponsors: Citrus
County Chronicle and Home-
town Values Magazine
Water Sponsor: AAA Roofing
Tee & Green Sponsors:
Deem Cabinets, Gardner's Con-
crete, Gulf Coast Ready Mix,
J.W Morton Century 21,


Porter's Locksmithing,
Prize & Goodie Bag Sponsors:
AAA Roofing, Back to New
Heating & Cooling, Blackshears
II Aluminum, Crystal River
Firestone, David M. Rom State
Farm, FDS Disposal, Florian
Masonry, Mac Rae's of Ho-
mosassa, Porter's Locksmithing,
and Wollinka Wikle Title.
Committee Members &
Volunteers:
Chairman Dan Kern, Gulf
Coast Ready Mix
Vice Chairman Kevin Blacks-
hear, Blackshears II Aluminum
John & Dusty Porter, Porter's
Locksmithing
Melissa Olbek, Sheldon-
Palmes Insurance
Eric Swart, Citrus Pest


Management
Erin Ray, FDS Disposal Inc.
John Jobe, City Electric
Supply
Marie Brotnitsky, Duke
Energy
Wayne Bardsley, Quality
Crafted Builders
Fred Clark, Awareness
Marketing
Executive Director Cindi
Fein and Tom Feeney, Mike
Gufford, Debbie Davis, Gail
Faria, Donna McClimont,
Tamaiya Jones, Shirley Greene,
Amy Creel, Dylan Stewart,
Nikki Moynihan, Loretta Jones
and Thomas Beno of the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Special thanks to Larry
Gamble of Inverness Walmart


Luncheon to host EDC speaker on March 27


Dan Kern, CCBA Governmental Affairs Chairman.


A message from the CCBA Gov-
ernmental Affairs Chairman:
The CCBA March GMM Lunch-
eon with guest speaker Don Taylor
of the Citrus County Economic De-
velopment Council will be from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday
March 27, at the Citrus County
Builders Association. Cost is $10
per person and includes Chinese
lunch.
I encourage all of you to come to
this meeting. Don has agreed to do
this presentation because he and
the EDC truly want the input from


our industry as well as to become
more involved with the CCBA and
build a bridge between our groups.
This 5 Year Strategic Plan could
very well be the turning point in
the revitalization of Citrus County
and with the number of successful
business people in our industry; we
have so much insight to offer
I know this is not new to some of
you. You have heard it all before.
But, for those of you who know
Don Taylor, you know he is pretty
much a no non-sense type of guy,
a very task-oriented former


Progress Energy engineer, and he
plans on pushing this 5 Year Plan
through.
If we don't stop looking back to
"how it was," we will never be able
to see forward to "how it can be."
Dan Kern
Vice President/General Manager
Gulf Coast Ready Mix, LLC
8778 W. Jump Court, Homosassa,
FL34448
0-352-621-3900
F-352-621-3996
C-352-400-0107


Citrws County Atmldrs Association Cerefirate

Legends Qenera !embersfitp Meetbg

Presented by: Duke ETnergy
MINw I- --_- ____-----


Vt]


Duke Energy and the Citrus County Builders Association celebrated
Legends Night on, February 27,2014 at the CCBA Headquarters. It was a
night of tales and testimony that was a huge success. Industry legends and
newer members had the opportunity to network and share in the stories of
how the association was formed and the importance of membership.

Presenting Sponsor Duke Energy and the CCBA would also like to thank
the following Legends Night Sponsors for helping to make this evening
possible: Colony Stone & Plastering, Event Solutions by Linda, Fero & Sons
Insurance, Gulf Coast Ready Mix, Ken Lindquist Corporation, Neapolitan
the Ice Cream Shop, Quality Crafted Builders, Sheldon-Palmes Insurance,
Sweetwater Homes of CC, Tropical Window Inc, Village Crier Newspaper,
the Ron Kitchen Jr. Campaign, the John J Kenney Campaign, the Winn
Webb Campaign


For more information on the benefits of membership or
to join the CCBA, please call (352) 746-9028 or
visit ,2i. w". (t rt i1, ili ers.coi _n


Sponsorships


open for annual


fishing tourney

The 19th annual Family Fishing Tournament, pre-
sented by Exclusive Platinum Sponsor FDS Disposal,
has been scheduled for April 26 and 27 at the Ho-
mosassa Riverside Resort in Homosassa. The Cap-
tain's Meeting will take place Friday, April 25, at the
same location beginning at 6 p.m. This year's tourna-
ment will boast more than $12,500 in cash and prizes,
based on 125 paid boat entries. CCBA expects a record
tournament to beat 2013 totals of 121 paid boats at
97 percent prize payout.
The CCBA presented the Aaron A Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) with a
check in the amount of $1,682.69 from the 2013 tourna-
ment and hopes to beat that number this year (pic-
tured). The Fishing Tournament Committee is excited
to partner with the Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH
for the third consecutive year and to be able to again
offer veteran fishing opportunities again through the
generosity of some local captains. CCBA will continue
hosting the Coastal Conservation Association/Aaron
Monier Memorial Youth Tournament in conjunction
with the adult tournament and youth registration forms
are now available online and at the CCBA.
CCBA would like to thank the following sponsors
already committed to the 2014 tournament:
Exclusive Platinum Sponsor: FDS Disposal Inc;
Official Weigh In Sponsor: Florian Masonry; All New
Heart Sponsor: Sodium Fishing Gear; Gold Sponsors:
Citrus 95.3, 96.7 The Fox and True Oldies 106.3; Silver
Sponsors: City Electric Supply, Sherwin Williams and
Village Crier newspaper; and Bronze Sponsor:
Gainesville Ice.
Silver and Bronze sponsorship levels are still avail-
able and door prize and goodie bucket donations are
now being accepted. Tournament information as well
as online registration and payment are available at
the events page of www.CitrusBuilders.com in person
at the CCBA between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Monday through Thursday For more information
about participating in or donating to this tournament
and next year's tournament date, please contact Exec-
utive Officer Donna Bidlack at 352-746-9028.


Last year's fishing tournament raised $1,682.69 for
the Aaron A Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart. The CCBA hopes to top that with this
year's Family Fishing Tournament on April 26 and 27
at the Homosassa Riverside Resort in Homosassa.


BANQUET HALL AVAILABLE
The Citrus County Builders Association has a Ban-
quet Hall available to rent, for weddings, recep-
tions, anniversary parties, graduation celebrations,
club meetings, etc. -and it's open to the public.
Come and look at the hall during regular business
hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Thursday.
The office is atl 196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461, centrally located a short drive south of
State Road 44. Visit www.citrusbuilders.com or call
Donna Bidlack at 352-746-9028.


1196 S Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
Phone: (352) 746-9028 Fax: (352) 746-9029
Email: info@citrusbuilders.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 D5


To place an ad, call 563=5966


ISa: 32)5356510 olFr0 (8) 5-34..E al cas *id@ch* 0 .0 0 0 -0 0e w w~hrnilenlneco


AT




Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Baby Sitting My Home
Early Childhood
degree $8. hr. Wkdays
Only, Homosassa
Cindy (352) 621-0240
Crystal River
Sat 12p-5p. &
Sun 9a-4p.
Estate Sale!
106 N. Pompel Ave.
Electrolux
Shampoo Machine
Floor & rug cleaner
$100.
IBM Typewriter $50.
(352) 287-9073

OPEN HOUSE
SAT. 22 & SUN. 23
10AM-3PM
5470 N. Buffalo Drive
Beverly Hills
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178


TERRATRIKE Recum-
brent Well equipped
and maintained.
$1350.00.
352-344-5334
352-344-5334



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

Loek
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 yr. old Purebred
Blood Hound 100+ Ibs
needs to room to
roam! free to good
home!
(352) 364-1309
Free
Dog Needs Good
Home Owner in
Senior Facility
Part Pitt, Pretty Dog
(352) 419-5549
Free Firewood
oak, cut, free
you haul away
(352) 341-0008
FREE MAGAZINES
Gun, Knife, Wood-
working and Many
Telephone Books
(352) 489-1962
Leave Message
Free Rabbits
Easters Coming!
2 Pen of Meat Breeders.
Californian Buck & Doe.
1 Mini Rex torte Buck w/
papers. Pedigreed &
shown.
(352) 464-4617


Lost Cat
Tortoise Shell, female
Lost behind OReilly's
Inverness
(352) 572-9845
Lost Female
Poodle/Pekinese
mix, black w/white
vest and right front
paw.15yrs. old
answers to the name
Sheri, pls call. REWARD
(352) 613-2089
Nissan Marine. Engine
cover for 20 hp,
Purple/black color.
Reward. (352)465-4629
Smi Jack Russell
Dog, 12 yrs. old,
tri-colored
missing from
Hernando area
pis call (352) 726-7611



Found Orange Cat
Male, short hair
Turner Camp Area
Cell 352-573-5527
Junior Baseball Mitt
call (352) 895-9864
to describe




e Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Acceptina $15
yearly Membership
sianups aaes 6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*
Leadership Clubs.
download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.corn for info


-B.


Tell that special
person
Happy Birtdy
with aclassfe
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Fi, Yorf rD W* H/W"N & Call our Classified
Sewch Hunreds ofiLoc Lasngs Dept for details
www.chroniclehomefinder.com 352-563-5966
IIIIIIII1




You've Got It!







Somebody







Wants







It!


C)' Pt-2


S ~
-'I
I


C 1,C I T R U 0 U N T Y


CHRONICLE



(352)563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com


I HappyN


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001




w Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Exceptina $15
yearly Membership
sianupsaaes6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*Leadership
Clubs. download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.corn for info











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR

Seeking a dynamic
RN Leader w/exp. to
join a progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
atdon@
southernltc.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D

Avante At Inverness
Is seeking Full Time
11-7, C.N.A's
New Nursing
Management
Excellent benefits
and 401K
Please apply online
Avantecenters.com

Exp. Dr.'s Assist.

With knowledge of
EKG, Blood draws,
and Computer
Experience.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1861M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal Riv. Fl 34429

F/Tor P/T
Licensed
Dental Hygienist

for fast paced
Dental Office
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email:
lynn.swanson@
rswansondental.com

FtIUirroe RN
+ wNurses

For GI Center, Pre
Post & Proceedures
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

LICENSED
OPTICIAN

Part-Time
Call (352) 795-2020

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list. Finan-
cial aid for qualified
students. Apply now
at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219



Your World








CHipNiCE



.. .. 1, ,-1, l lI 7 i l -


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

RN I LPN
Full-time 11 pm-7 am
shift and PRN posi-
tions available for
Fl.-licensed nurses.

CERTIFIED NURS-
ING ASSISTANT
PRN position
available for a
Florida-certified
nursing assistant.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer great pay
in a team-oriented
environment.

Apply in person or
email r6sum6.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
HannahMand
@LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
47054




41 _J~
-eter H







Clerk Typist
Announcement
#14-29
Answer phones,
data entry, performs
adoptions and
owner claims: proc-
ess owner surrenders
and strays: complet-
ing forms, taxing
and ebridging;
process citations
and bite reports:
high customer inter-
action in person
and via telephone.
Must have good
problem solving
skills, able to inter-
act appropriately
with animals; pos-
sess a basic under-
standing of animal
breeds. Ability to
hand emotionally
charged issues with
tact and diplo-
macy: computer
skills a must. Per-
forms related work
as required. $8.70
Hourly to start.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
Website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
you can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online
By Friday, March 28,
2014 EOE/ADA


EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
At 5 yrs. experience
and/or a bachelors
degree in social
services, education
or business. Exp.
in public speaking,
grant writing and
fundraising. Requires
good writing skills
Send Cover Letter
and Resume to:
Daystar Life Center
6751 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Crys. River Fl.
34429 or Email to:
daystarlife 1@
tampabay.rr.com
NO PHONE CALLS


LEGAL ASSISTANT
/PARALEGAL
NEEDED
Legal Secretarial
Exp. Required
Experience with
Personal Injury and
Discovery a Plus.
Mail, fax or deliver
resume and refer-
ences immediately!
Law Office of GRANT
& DOZIER. LLC
Attorneys at Law
123 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Fax (352) 726-7244

PRE SCHOOL
TEACHER
Footsteps Preschool
a ministry of First
United Methodist
Church of Inverness
is hiring a teacher.
This person would be
required to have the
40/10 hours DCF
training courses.
Foot Steps teachers
must be mature and
sensitive in working
with children, parents,
and other staff. Those
interested in applying
for the position may
email a resume to:
Rev. Sarah R Camp-
bell, Senior Pastor, at
Pastorsarah(
invernessfirstumc.orp
Footsteps license
number is
C05C10056


LINE COOK
EXP. ONLY

Ap8 l iYn Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill

Oak Run
Country Club
and Crown
Jewel Club
Operations

have openings
for qualified
candidates for the
following positions;
+ STAFF
ACCOUNTANT:
3+ years accounting
experience.
Proficient in Quick
Books & Excel.
ACCOUNTING
CLERK:
Accounting
background.
Organizational,
communication
and computer skills
a must. We offer
a great work
environment, team
atmosphere and
benefits.
Apply today at
Oak Run County
Club located on SR
200 & 110 Oth Street,
Ocala or call
352-854-6557 x13.
EEO/DFWP

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
or P/T Cooks
Hostesses

Call 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment




SALES CLERK

Applicant must have
computer skills, self
motivated, works well
with others and cus-
tomer friendly. Must
be at least 18 & have
a valid driver's license
Apply in person
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.
2661 E Gulf to Lake




CASE MANAGER
Announcement
# 14-32

This position is com-
munity care services
case management
work under the
Community Care for
the Elderly (CCE),
Homecare for the
Elderly (HCE), and
Alzheimer Disease
Initiative (ADI) grant
programs and the
HOPE private pay
program. Must
have a valid Florida
driver license and
a reliable means
of transportation
during work hours.
Must have or obtain
DOEA case man-
agement certifica-
tion (current case
management
certification a plus)
to provide services
under all programs.
Starting pay
$12.67 hourly,
excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.

Code Compli-
ance Officer
Announcement
# 14-34

This is specialized
technical and cleri-
cal work enforcing
County codes,
primarily the Land
Development
Code, Nuisance
Abatement section
of the County Code
of Ordinance and
assist with water
enforcement. Must
possess a valid Flor-
ida Driver License
with a good driving
record. Florida
Association of Code
Enforcement train-
ing/ certification
preferred. Full time.
Starting pay $15.00
hourly. Excellent
benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 28,
2013 EOE/ADA.


imm
Trades/

CDL-ATeam
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfioartners.com


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624


Exp. Laborer
& Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
Scott Wright Stucco


LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Experience. Must
have valid DL. and
own transportation.
Drug free work
place. Please leave
exp. history on msg.
352-533-7536 or
LGS.Florida@
gmail.com


Lead Aquatic
Plant Technician
Announcement
#14-33

Responsible techni-
cal work involving
a variety of tasks
related to aquatic
plant control. Leads
and participates
in work of crews in-
cluding operation of
airboats, handling
and mixing of herbi-
cides. Must possess
or be able to obtain
within six months
of employment a
Public Applicator's
Restricted License
with Aquatic
endorsement. Must
possess a valid
Florida Driver Li-
cense. $11.88 hourly
to start. Excellent
benefits. Full time
position working
4-10 hour days,
Monday-Thursday.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, March 28,
2013 EOE/ADA.





Manufacturer of
A/C Grilles, registers
and diffusers is
currently accepting
applications for
Experienced
Assembly Workers.
Aoolv in Person
(Mon-Fri between
the hours of
8:00 am to 3:00 pm).
METAL INDUSTRIES
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, Fl 33513.
Excellent benefits
package, 401k.
DFW, EOE.




































Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign lOn
















Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full benefits,






achievable
hoedeivery


















bonuses. Call for de-
tails 1-888-978-3791
or www.hevl.net


OTR Drivers
Wanted

Food grade
tankers,
Class-A CDL
/tanker endorse-
ment, Prefer 2 yrs
experience, Mile-
age & Drop Pa,
Vacation, Health,
Dental & 401k.
For information
call 800-569-6816
or go to our
website
www.ottervtran
snortation.com

Plumber
& Plumbers
Helper
Very busy plumbing
company searching
for plumbers that are
hard working, reliable
and motivated.Valid
drivers license. Serv-
ing all of Central Flor-
ida. 352-341-4243

PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have driver's
license. Apply at
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa

TRUCK DRIVERS
Experienced Mail
Transport is
taking applications
for a Class A Tractor
Trailer Driver.
Part Time, starting at
$18.61 per hr. &
$4.46 per hr. in
benefits. Fax
7 year MVR to:
904-354-0204 with
your phone #,
we will contact you.

We have an
opening for talented
and energetic
Construction
Personnel

to join our dynamic
team. You will work
on projects from
setup to closeout in
an aggressive,
customer-focused,
performance-driven
environment. If you
would like to submit
your resume for con-
sideration, please
send them to:
constructionteam
resume@gmail.com
Drug Free
Workplace and EOE.





Customer
Support
Associates
SECO Energy,
a large electric
distribution cooper-
ative in Central Fl.,
has immediate, mul-
tiple, full-time open-
ings for qualified
Customer Support
Associates working
from our Call Center
Offices located in
Sumterville
(330S. US Hwy. 301)
and Inverness
(610 US Hwy. 41 S.)

Requirements in-
clude a HS diploma
/ GED; a min. of two
years recent job
experience in a call
center environment;
punctuality and
consistent work at-
tendance; excellent
written and verbal
communication skills
with attention to
detail and ability
to adapt communi-
cation style to
various audiences;
demonstrated
telephone etiquette
skills and computer
skills to include basic
Microsoft Office
programs and inter-
net; ability to learn
in-house computer
programs and
phone system;
ability to work in
a fast-paced,
high-pressure envi-
ronment and sit for
long periods of time.
Call Center hours
are a minimum of 40
hrs/week (8 hrs/day)
between 7:00 am-
7:00 pm, M-F,
with overtime and
call-out as required.
Fluency in Spanish
is preferred.
Minimum starting
pay is $15.75/hr.
plus competitive
benefits including:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insur-
ance, Retirement
Plan, 401(k), Vaca-
tion, Holiday and
Sick pay, and many
additional benefits.

Technical skills
testing, background
check, post-offer
drug screen and
pre-employment
physical are
required.

Applications
accepted ONLINE
ONLY at:
https://www.seco
energyjobs.com
EOE/E-Verify M/F/
Disability/Veteran


I Home40Finder
www-ch a ti t e h m -elindercomn


Administrative
Help
part to full-time work
assisting fiscal
assistant and toll
collecting at Wildlife
Park, $9/hour. Call
352-628-5343 or
stop into the office

DELI CLERK

EXPERIENCED ONLY
Sat & Sun. a must.
No calls. Apply
in person:
Brooklyn Dockside
Deli, Crystal River

General
Maintenance
24 hours per week
at Wildlife Park
$8/hour. Call
352-628-5343 or
stop Into the office

HOUSEKEEPER
In our skilled nursing
Facility. We offer a
good salary & benefit
package. Including,
liberal paid time off.
Health & dental Ins.
APPLY IN PERSON
Citrus Health &
Rehabilitation Center
701 Medical Court E
Inverness, EOE/DFW
Not for profit

INSIDE SALES/
APPT. SETTERS/
TELEMARKETERS
Great Pay Weekly.
Daily Bonuses
352-503-6807

Library Assistant
Announcement
# 14-31
Advanced clerical
work assisting cus-
tomers in the library.
Must be able to
bend, stoop and
lift approximately
20 pounds on
occasion. Primarily
assigned to Lakes
Region branch in
Inverness and will
also work at various
branch locations
when needed. Must
be available to
work some evenings
and Saturdays.
Starting pay
$10.29 hourly
(30 hours weekly).
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department, 3600
West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, March 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.

Meter Reader
Announcement
#14-30

Perform daily meter
reading as sched-
uled. Complete
daily meter reading
books and routes.
Requires a valid
Florida driver license
with a good driving
record. Starting pay
$9.50 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F

300 for 19
Businesses
8-20 $, ok'd by
commissioners
Resumes to: 14-0955
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Lecanto, FL 34461




^ui\\ 0id firN


Need a jill)


qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classiteds
Si I.U i -IJI. i iJUIIB -


CLASSIFIED


34080







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


Hel


SALES/CASHIER
Sat. & Sun. Tourism/
Hospitality exp. pref.
Apply in Person Only:
RIVER SAFARI
10823W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa





AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


Wired & Finished in-
side. $1500
(352)341-2196



FIVE(5) OAK
CLAWFOOT DINING
CHAIRS, dining chairs
upholstered seats
one with arms $150
(352)341-2107



4 Antique Chairs
2 are Hitchcock,
$200.
Side Board $100.
(352) 563-1327
CAKE PLATE Milkglass
hobnail pattern w wavy
edge, pedestal base.12
1/2" diam x 5" tall.
$25.00 352422-1309
COOKIE JAR Milkglass
hobnail pattern with lid.
11 1/2" tall x 8" diam.
$35.00 352422-1309
LENOX Candlesticks,
candy dishes,bowls and
other pieces.Made in
USA.$15.00 each
352-422-1309



30" Hotpoint 4 coil
White Electric Stove
like new, $125.00
(352) 382-5883


ImTed -


Lok \#1 Employment source isk


yvvyyvvv
BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731


www.chronicleonline.com


-I
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BLACK SAMSUNG
RANGE Glass top
range with two single
and two double ele-
ments and warming
center. True European
convection and conven-
tional baking and roast-
ing. 2013 mint condition
Lowes $850. $400 firm
613-6495 Cell 513-4632
Home after 5
FREEZER
Lg, upright, Hotpoint,
Works great
$75
(352) 422-2662
GE Profile
Refrigerator.
Side by Side. Ice/water
in door. $150.
(352)726-9132
GE USED DISH-
WASHER
Nautilus,almond,runs
good.
$50 firm. (352)382-5297
Kenmore
4 Coil Burner Stove
self cleaning, white
w/black door, $120.
Kenmore Refrigerator
w/icemaker, white
$100.(352) 344-4192
Kenmore Refrigerator
20 cubic ft. Almond
w/icemaker, adj. glass
shelves, works good
$150. (352) 746-6911
MICROWAVE KEN-
MORE MOUNTS OVER
THE STOVE WHITE
$75 (352)613-0529
MICROWAVE
Panasonic 1250 Watt
works great $50
(352)628-0221
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, White,
super clean, Ice Cold
$175.
(352) 212-1751
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


CLASSIFIED



SHARK STEAM MOP
w/2 cleaning pads& fill
cup $20 (352)628-0221
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
(352)613-0529
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398



DESK CHAIR
Adjustable High
BackSwivel, Black.
$40 (352)564-4214
OTT-LITE LOW VISION
FLOOR LAMP Why pay
more? Sell $50.
Anywhere else $160.
Call 613-4279




ABSOLUTE
AUCTION

2 log cabins, farm-
house, cottage, 20+/
-acres in Alabama
overlooking Tennes-
see River, between
Huntsville and Chatta-
nooga, vacation rental
history, April 1, 1:00
pm. Details
Gtauctions.com,
1.205.326.0833,
Granger, Thagard &
Assoc. Inc., Jack F
Granger, #873.

ONLINE ONLY
AUCTION

Buses, Tractor &
Equipment & More for
Sale! Ends April 3rd
@ 7PM. Gulf Bay
Auctions:
251-600-9595 or Visit
GulfBayAuctions.com,
AU3301 For SPL
Internal Use Method
of Payment
Comments: Satellite
Prolink.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 WOOD BOXES $20
FOR
GARAGE/WORKSHOP
HOLD TOOLS ETC
419-5981
MITER SAW
Chicago 8/4" Comp.
w/ metal stand $50
mechanic's creeper,
cushionedon wheels
$25 (352) 637-6284
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80 HEAVY
DUTY METAL HAND
HELD INVERNESS
419-5981


Th/Stell

40" Sony TV
HD 1080 Bravia
A1 condition
$150. call
(352) 637-5227
AV receiver/amp with
speakers $40.
352-419-4464
DVD PLAYER 7 inch
screen ideal for travel
$45- (352)220-4158
PANOSONIC TV 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR
$25 (352)613-0529
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
(352)613-0529
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
(352)613-0529
TV 32" SYLVANIA
WITH REMOTE $40
(352)613-0529
TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE CON-
TROL & MANUAL $50
(352)613-0529
TV SYLVANIA 32"
WITH REMOTE CON-
TROL $40
(352)613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $70
(352)613-0529


STILTS FOR DOING
SHEETROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316




COMPUTER MONITOR
New Samsung 19" color
monitor. $50.
(352)746-7512 Still in
original pkg. phone
FAMILY GUY DVD
SERIES 75 DVDS no
cases brand-new, no
scratches $70 OBO re-
tail $170 (352)446-9620
PLAY STATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $20
(352)613-0529
RESCUE ME DVD
SERIES SEASONS 1-3
11 DVDs, no cases,
brand-new no scratches
$25 obo (352)446-9620
ROSEANNE DVD
SERIES 20 DVDS no
cases brand-new no
scratches $60 obo retail
$140 (352)446-9620




Small Glass covered
Raton coffee table. Ex-
cellent Condition, asking
$50 OBO
(352)446-9620



..200 Bottle-
Wine Credenza
just replaced cooling
unit in March, looks
like new, 50 btu
Breezeaire cooling
unit, solid maple trim,
doors & panels w/vin
view top, glass inserts
38/2 -L x 68" W x 30" D
bought new $3600.
sell for $1500.
(352) 249-3428


Fumiture

w/nightstand &
bedding $125.00
Sofa. $75.00, both
good condition
(423) 612-9229
6 Pc. Vintage Black
Asian King
Bedroom Set $250,
Pictures
$30. for All
(815) 980-8642
BookCase & Match-
ing Computer Cabinet
w/glass doors
and lighted, good
condition $200.
(352) 795-7254
DAY BED WITH TRUN-
DLE, BASSINET Day
bed $100.00 Bassinet
$15.00 both in good
shape. 352-364-1704
DINETTE SET Black
marble-look top, 4 metal
chairs with tan micro-
fiber seats. $175.
352-637-1857.
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Olive Green,
like new. No pets or
smoking. Exc. Cond!
$210. (352) 746-2329
LYON SHAW SPRING
BASE CHAIRS (2) Two
Lyon Shaw Spring base
chairs, double cushions,
covered in marine cloth,
very durable. Chairs
are made of steel con-
struction. Asking price
$50 each Call
352-419-5362 or
352-221-2412
Navy Plaid Flex Steel
Couch and Ottoman
$400. Oak Trimmed
Billiard Light $75.
will sell both- neg.
(352) 726-6487
Oak Dining Room
Table w/ 2 Leaves
8 chairs $125.
(352) 726-1327
Cell 352-201-5410
... rl ,,," 'I1

IIur v >1l II luIst.



Classified


-r HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
PATIO DINING SET
Lyon Shaw Patio Dining
Set, 48 inch round glass
top table, 3 spring base
chairs and 1 stationary
chair. Table and chairs
are made out of steel
construction. Double
cushions on all chairs,
22X22 cushion size,
covered in marine cloth,
very durable. Asking
price, $200 Call
352419-5362,
352-221-2412
RECLINER Wall hugger
two seater. Tan micro
fiber material. Exellent
condition asking 250.00
352 726 9964
Small Glass covered
Raton coffee table. Ex-
cellent Condition, asking
$50 OBO
(352)446-9620
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
Two Matching Sofas
one is a sofa bed,
excellent condition
$100. each
(352) 382-2664 SMW
Wicker Book Stand
with white dishes
$100.
Green Dishes $100.
(352) 795-7254
WICKER ROCKER
Antique, painted white,
back & seat cushions
& pillow. $100
352-422-1309



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Craftsman 42"
Riding Mower
Clean & Rebuilt
Carb/Valves/ Rings
$400. with out Battery
(352) 270-4087


*

0: m, I *3
Acctg/Bkkr QuickBooks
Certified, set-up, train-
ing, payroll, sales tax.
No job to small! Call
352-287-1909 for appt.



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



LIC. CNA seeks in
home care of elderly.
Dr's visits, groc., etc.
lite cleaning, meals.
(352) 726-2882



JAKES'
TRIM CARPENTRY
No job too big or small
Free Est. 352-601-7064




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



Baby Sitting My Home
Early Childhood
degree $8. hr. Wkdays
Only, Homosassa
Cindy (352) 621-0240


Your World







CrnIpNICLE
4 a &le


JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lie/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



A- I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765,352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lie. & Insured
** 352-422-7279**


painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lie/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
VFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570


Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
w Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crcl 330081
(3521 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
* QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-613-8137
Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Comn. Lic.352-503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


**Budd Excavating**
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lie/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557

Misc Srvice


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



Fie^iT^l
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.




ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




.Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442









TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lie/ins.


Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Arbor Reds Tree Care
24 Hr. Emergeny Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
All Major Credit Cards
352-583-3141/206-1153


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lie/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Ted's Painting

a Home Services Co.






All Types of Home Repairs

746-5190
LIC/INS Li #240270





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator &Etr

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion

Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians |
ER0015377
*DwAll veofHm Repairsexre


3452 -597240 135-93-08
TlI/ISliFree:0877-9-39


C-DUST BUSTERS
CLEANING SERVICE
REIETACOMMERCIAL, VACATION
RNLS&NEW HOME CLEAN-UP
I Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too

352.942.8434
Callo Today for a
Clean Tomorrow


Mowing Trimming Edging
Mulch Fertilization
FREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured
352-5 l'03-70
352-503-7063


IRRIGATION
SERVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE REST,
CONSISTEItHY VOTED REST OF THE REST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install
1 A3 Time Winner
y 2011-2012-2013














Small Carpentry


1 :lean Dryer Vents


E~p,.,ien lifelong
746352-344-0905
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured L#ecanto, FL 3447761
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
-All Home Repairs
^ '' ^ Small Carpentry

i 10:/i~S Fencing

^S ~ 9 (.vsn Dryer Vents
U yfi w oihle & Dependable
iSK~i~ir ^Eqoientce lifelong
i^T 352-344-0905I
*5 cell: 400-1722
| f jf Licensed & Insured Lic.it37761


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Qualify Specialist

S ring Tune S995
Up'Special 49Reg.
$439.95
Guaranteeing 1Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusve Laser Particle Scan to determine
the quality of thile air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires March 31,2014
.__ Lh #c # C1 815891
QAI. Back To New s,-199
Heating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $3 5
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

4 THURA GLEAN he
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091





SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
M 352-364-4610
(5MR.
VEECTRIC*
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL

24 Hours a Day 7 Days a Week





WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
Driveways

" Parking Lots
* Seal Coating 1
" Maintenance '
" Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmrnail.comrn
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


Install a ReNir Now's the
Pumus.filers. time for pool
Healers remodeling
& Salt Systems
Pool Refinishing
S* Construction
0 Pavers
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
ioods ServingAll Of Citrus Count
POOl'& Spa Free Consultation
sMWPOOsomM .382-4421
j WB Slte ertiid PoolConlmdtor Lk #1458326




* Propane Appliances
* Electrical Repair
* Plumbing Repairs
* Water & Collision Damage
* Roof Sealing & Damage
* Mobile Service
" Fully Stocked Parts Dept.
"We Do It All" |






NaCh WturBd* ae Coast RVen
980 Citrus Av., Crystal iver

E N IE.",;.


*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


42", Pull behind most
tractors, Ig leaf bag,
easy dumping. Plus
manual. $125
(352) 419-7882



3 Big Staghorn Ferns.
Well taken care of.
$275. (352)465-8090
AZALEAS 1 gal pots
3 for $18 Gorgeous
Compare to $10 ea in
Stores 613-5818
HIBISCUS 3 GAL $12
Beauties, 4 Colors,
compare to 2 Gal for
$20 @ Stores. Inv off
Croft 613-5818




,- i..-............ t!





Crystal River
Sat & Sun, 8a to 2p
lots of tools, saws,
welder, hshld, misc.
7769 N Brahma Ter.
INVERNESS
Sat. 22 & Sun. 23, 9-4
Multi-Family Sale *
N. Point Lonesome Rd.


Crystal River
Sat 12p-5p. &
Sun 9a-4p.
Estate Sale!
106 N. Pompel Ave.
RAINBOW LAKES
Estate/Moving Sale
Fri. 3/21 thru Sun. 3/24,
8a. to 4p.good quality
furn bdrm, dining, pa-
tio, curio ,sofa, Ivseat
-w/collectibles, tools,
garden, sml appl,
books, N. of Rt. 40 on
Rt. 41 & Rainbow Blvd.
-follow signs,
21598 SW Peach
Blossom, Dunnellon



Harley-Davidson Lady
Lrg. White Leather
Fringe Jacket $150. 7.5
Black Boot Ladies ?
$25. All in good shape.
Ted (352)465-2372
LEATHER SEMINOLES
JACKET embroidered
logo no iron-on paid
$299 pics avail $100
OBO (352)446-9620
RYKA FLEXOLOGY
SNEAKERS Women's
size 9.5 teal/gray $15
great shape!
(352)628-0221
SEMINOLES JERSEYS
2 avail size 18/20 worn
one time for pictures
$15 OBO each, paid
$35 each(352)446-9620



HTC ANDROID 4G
CELL PHONE One year
old, HTC Android 4G
cell phone, like new.
Plus 2 chargers and
case. Asking $80 Call
352-419-5362 or
352-221-2412
MOTOROLA WX416
Cell NEW w/case,
Consumer Cellular
or unlock $39
352-382-3650



1 -10' LADDER
1- & 6'LADDER
$130. for both
(352) 746-6848
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALLPAPER
$25 PREPASTED
165SQ FT E-MAIL
PHOTOS 419-5981
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD
HEART/ANIMALS $20
ARTS/CRAFTS
419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
Aluminum Truck Box.
Diamond plate design.
19" W, 59" L, 10" Deep.
$200
(352)341-4674
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Cello 30". $50. Box Car
Kit, Railroad, narrow
gage. Offer upon look-
ing at items for kit.
(352)382-4638
Electrolux
Shampoo Machine
Floor & rug cleaner
$100.
IBM Typewriter $50.
(352) 287-9073
FIREKING
SAFE-19X13X16 with
key & combo lock
$100.00 OBO 527-1399
FIREWOOD 1 cord
(pickup load) approx.,
$25..Buyer must trans-
port. (352)2204158
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
$40 (352)613-0529
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
(352)464-0316
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
(352)341-6920
LIKE NEW Ladies Day 6
DREAM BICYCLE
21 speed, easy step
thru, $800.
(352) 860-1872 or
(304) 673-5550
MICROSCOPE $65
comes with many ac-
cessories
(352)628-0221
OLD COLEMAN
CAMPING 2 BURNER
STOVE OK SHAPE
20.00 352 464 0316
OTT-LITE LOW VISION
FLOOR LAMP
glare-free, flex neck.
paid $160 sell $50.
Call 613-4279
ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE $55 HAND-
CRAFTED SOLID OAK
E-MAIL PHOTOS IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
STANLEY STEEMER
WORK SHIRTS Size
large, one is new, $22
for both. Lecanto
860-367-8571


U e Mnneeets GOLF TRAVEL BAG
$20. 4 Chair Cushions, Tommy Armour padded
Brown $12. golf bag with rollers.
(352)746-5453 $20. call 352-746-7512
VINTAGE SLIDE PRO- phone
JECTION TABLE $45 TERRATRIKE Recum-
ACME LITE PROJEK brent Well equipped
E-MAIL PHOTO and maintained.
419-5981 $1350.00.
Wooden Doll House 352-344-5334
Kit. New, unopened 352-344-5334
box. $50.
(352)341-1143 tit
You Had A Stroke and i r ir
now you have shoulder 20 ft. Hudson
pain. We may have an Equipment Trailer
option for you: Learn Double Axle, 10,000 Ib
more about a clinical Capacity,
study to evaluate a 2- 5/16, Hitch $1,650.
potential treatment at: 352-212-5747
www.painafterstroke.co Utility Trailer
m Call 1-800-269-0720. U8 ft. LikeTrailerew


Lecanto (860)367-8571


with side rails & full tail
gate $1,200 obo
(352) 422-0135



BABY STROLLER Blue,
has canopy, deluxe
model $18 Lecanto
860-367-8571
Car Toddler Bed
with inner spring
mattress, & 10 sheets
& pad excel, cond.
$60.
(352) 621-1953


Sell r Swa


4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 (352)464-0316
OTT-LITE Low Vision
FLOOR LAMP 24 watt,
glare-free, flex neck,
Paid $160 Sell $50.00
Call 613-4279
Scooter & Car Lift
Sold as a package
Both in Good Cond
$800
(352) 344-2679
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY
$50 464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316
WHEELCHAIR
Light weight
Excellent Condition
$50. (352) 287-9073
WHEELCHAIR
manual, good cond.
comes with leg
& foot rest.
$85
(352) 344-4105


Musicnsal

1955 Juke Box
Rocola, 300+ records,
needs some TLC
$650.
(812) 360-3834
Crate Cimarron 15 watt
acoustic guitar amp
$85. (352)419-4464
First act 3/4 size acous-
tic guitar $20.
(352)419-4464
First Act acoustic guitar
$35. (352)419-4464
First Act MA215 Bass
amp $45.
(352)419-4464
Peavey Amplifier
w/ 2 speakers
works great $250.
Yamaha Organ HS8
exc. cond $150.
(352) 726-3562
Peavey Max 112 Bass
amp $85.
(352)419-4464
Peavey Vypyr 15 watt
guitar amp $65.
(352)419-4464
Peavey VYPYR 30 watt
guitar amp $85.
(352)419-4464
Vox DA-10 guitar amp
$65. (352)419-4464
Yamaha Organ US1
w/software
exc. cond. $300
Yamaha Organ HS7
exc. cond. $100.
(352) 726-3562
ZOOM Fire 15 guitar
amp $65.
(352)419-4464



DELTA ADJUSTABLE
SHOWER HEAD [new
in box] (2) $35 Each
Call 726-0040
OTT-LITE Technology
Low Vision Floor Lamp.
Like New $50. Can't
see? Call 613-4279
Pampered Chef Easy
Accent cake/cookie
decorator $12 like new!
(352)628-0221



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BIKE
DIGITAL READOUT
GREAT SHAPE.ONLY
$100 (352)464-0316
RECUMBENT
STATIONARY BIKE.
Nordic Track GX5.0 Pro.
Excellent condition.
$220. 352-382-5951
Trimup Treadmill
cost $2200.00 sell
for $150. obo
(352) 382-1842



12 SPEED HUFFY
MOUNTAIN BIKE
MENS 26". GREAT
SHAPE. $60
(352)464-0316
12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
Club Car Golf Cart
1991, FamIly owned
Exc con. Lights,
Battery 1 yr. old, Must
Sell due to health
$1,500. (352) 527-3125
Club Car Golf Cart
48V, side curtains,
charger, good cond.
$1,275.
(812) 360-3834
COLEMAN SLEEPING
BAG Exponent mummy
style 36x96 extra long.
Almost new, warm
$40 897-5410
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dahon Folding Bike
Used for RV, Trails
& Camp Grounds,
$125.
(352) 601-6064
FED 357 MAG AMMO
JHP Self-Defense
New 50rd box $65


4Ma
GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, a
Special Needs
spayed brindle/
white Bulldog, pos-
sible hound mix, Wt.
66 Ibs. Gentle, calm,
good on leash,
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she seems to
think is normal, no
problem to her.
Good family & com-
panion dog. Fee
$30. Call Joanne
at 352-697-2682 or
Dreama @
813-244-7324.

*ftare iL.t4


INDY
Indy, a beautiful
Blackmouth Cur
mix, 2yrs old,
friendly with most
dogs, walks very
nicely on a leash,
is housebroken,
loves kids. Playful
& friendly, likes
having people
with him.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908


MIKA
Mika, a 1 yr 9 month
old happy, friendly
spayed little Bulldog
mix girl. She is very
sweet and loveable,
walks very nicely on
a leash. Rides
quietly in the car.
She is just the right
size for a family
life at 30 Ibs.
Call Rebecca @
419-262-3222.
Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female
Schnauzer Pups
Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pups
Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day


SHIH-"ZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $600.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827


rt






SNOW
Snow, a sweet, play-
ful, affectionate, en-
ergetic mixed breed
dog, petite @ 33 Ibs,
with beautiful green
eyes. Smart, active
& engaged. Very
protective of her
home & family,
would make a good
watch dog. Fee 60$
includes spay, HW
test, vacs.,
microchip, 30 days
insurance.
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



1995 HY-LINE RV
PARK MODEL
TRAILER needs work,
good for hunting cabin
$1000 obo
(352) 628-2000
betw. 9am & 3pm.
RV CORD ADAPTER
NEW 30 AMP Fe-
male-50 AMP Male
Cord 18" $10
(352)382-3650













FISHER
Fisher, 3-y.o. Bulldog
mix, Heartworm
negative, neutered,
weight 45 Ibs. Love-
able, playful, loves
treats, knows com-
mands, beautiful
puppy face. Would
be your best friend if
given a chance.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-513-5754.


CLASSIFIED




'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River, 18'
w/living quarters,
like new condition
$11,500. Ask for Bill
(352) 564-1299
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




FORD
2001 Van Camper
V-10, 64K mi. Exc
Cond. Road ready.
$25K obo. 419-7212
HEARTLAND
NORTH TRAIL
SERIES
2011 Travel Trailer 21 ft.
Tandem axel, sway
bars, hitch and hitch sta-
bilizer, electric brakes,
full bath, one slideout,
fully loaded in excellent
condition. Optional 12
ft. Porta-Bote with 5 hp
Mercury engine. Price
with boat and motor
$19,800. Call
352-726-2750.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
VIKING POP UP
2011 2385 ST. Used 4
times, like new. Slide,
electric lift, stove, refrig-
erator, A/C and heat.
352.464.0443 $5,800

Vehicles

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794


TASHA
Tasha, beautiful
brindle 2 1/2 y.o.
boxer mix, very
sweet, gentle, intelli-
gent, well man-
nered. Housebrkn,
does well w/most
dogs. NO CATS.
Loves to be petted.
Fee $60 for vacs,
spay, microchp,
HW test.
Call Marti @
786-367-2834




Horses. Tack, new &
used. All priced right.
Diamond Pea Farm
(352)873-6033




5/2 HP Johnson Out-
board, full gear case,
fresh water motor,
5 gal. tank, runs &
starts great. $375.
CR (513) 260-6410 Cell




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510*

ALUMICRAFT
2013, V16, Black with
floor, 2013 Suzuki 4
stroke mtr., trolling mtr.
& trailer $5,250.
(352) 419-5053
CANOE
Mad River Canoe 17 ft
Galv Continental Trlr,
Elec motor & battery.
w/ outriggers & Equip.
Ex Cond $1600
352- 564-2765
COBIA 2000
17.5 Ft., 100H, Yam.,
4 strk, Great Shape
$5,700, 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
ISMH
1959 Fiberglass Boat,
195935 HP Evinrude,
elect, start, w/ trlr.
$1,800 (352) 637-6304
LOGIC
2001 15' Center Con-
sole 40 H.P. Yamaha,
Galv. trailerBimini
topless than 12 hours.
Not a rebuild. You can
not tell this boat is not
brand new! $5500.
(352)563-0133 or
(352)302-9159
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792
QUANTUM
1990 Bass Boat 15ft,
50HP, Too many items
to list. Hurry it won't last.
$2,500 (352)697-1910




















Sportscraft 88
I I












27 Coastal Fisher-t
departmentaworks




man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
SUNBIRD
'92, Bass, 16.7" Wide,
40HP outbrd, Evin.,
Trlr. Dbl. onbrd
charge sys. Minnkota
Edge, Troll. mtr. $3,200
(352) 341-1950
VISION BASS
1991. 18.5' W175hp
Johnson. Great Cond.
Well Maintained.
$5500. (352)419-5560

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




FORD
2005 Diesel 3/4 Ton
Power Stroke Truck &
2004 27' Fifth Wheel
Lg tip-out, like new
fully loaded!
$17k or $8500. ea.
(352) 795-1590
Itasca Sundancer
97 DL, 29' Class C
basement model,
Ford 460, V8 26k mi.
generator, $14k
(352) 746-0683

SOLD
WINNEBAGO
2006, 24 FT, Class C
Chalet, 64K mi., V10,
5 speed, generator,
loaded, real nice cond.


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 D7


Chevrolet
C10Stepside, 1983
crate350, 4 brl, 4spd
auto, perf. exhaust
restored, blue on blue
$6500.(352) 637-5143







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII

SHAY
1980 Reproduction
Model A
please call
(352) 201-2958




CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier
4 Door, $4,250.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004, S10
Crew Cab, 4 x4,
$7,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
'99, XLT 150, 4/WD,
club cab, topper, clean
189K mi., red, $3495.
(352) 341-4949
FREIGHT LINER
'98, Century Class
set up for Dry or Liquid
500 Detroit make offer
Call (352) 564-9124
GMC
2008 Sierra C/K1500
Denali Crew Cab, AWD,
46483 miles, black,
leather, sunroof, naviga-
tion, DVD, excellent
condition, $11800,
shad@netscape.com

SOLD
FREIGHT LINER
'98, Century Class
set up for Dry or Liquid
500 Detroit




HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LINCOLN
'08, MKX, $18,400 SUV
46k mi., Red ext. Tan
leather int. showroom
cond., Auto, AWD,
fully loaded. A/C,
ABS, airbags, alarm,
AM/FM/CD, Sirus, cli-
mate control, cruise,
pano roof, power
locks, mirrors, seats,
steering, windows, tilt
wheel, tint, new tires
(352) 382-1531
SUZUKI
2007, Vitara
4 WD, V6, $7,950.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




Harley Davidson
2004 Heritage Softail
Classic, loaded, garage
kept $10,000.
(352) 270-8488
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
HONDA
2013 Honda
Scooter PCX 150
Red, Great Cond.
$3500 OBO
352-422-8601

IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200

'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999


must sell!
S=1


MOTORCYCLE
FOR SALE
2012 YZF-R6 Moving
out of state and need to
sell like new motorcycle!
Yamaha R6-Raven edi-
tion. Only 6000 miles on
it! Only one owner.
Inludes twin helmets
and Joe Rocket riding
jacket! Asking price is
$7900 but willing to ne-
gotiate. Just in time for
riding season!
352-364-1268
Motorcycle Trailer
Dark Green,
excellent cond.
$450.
(352) 795-8880


'05, Audi A6
Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




'07 Dodge Caravan
97k miles, $5195

'05 Ford Focus
121k miles, $3595

'04 Dodge Neon SXT
102k miles, $3395

'01 Dodge Utility
Truck $6895

Everything Motor's
7039 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Homosassa, Fl
352-503-9969

Buy Here/Pay Here

'94 Ford Taurus
$1500 Cash

'95 Chevy S-10 Cust.
$1800 Cash

'96 Saturn SL1
$2200 Cash

'99 Chevy Cavalier
$2900

'00 Olds Silhouette
$2700

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVROLET
2000, Camaro
5 speed $3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003, Monte Carlo LS,
$5,995
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
Sportscar,05 Crossfire
conv. auto, ex. cond
45k mi., V6 $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
2011 Forte Ex
Gray, 4 dr,29k mi.
$10,900. (352) 601-2294
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MINI COOPER
'05, Yellow, 5 speed
manual, 1 owner,
25k miles, $11,500
(352) 489-5239
Mitsubishi
3000 GT '99
Adult lady owner.
Leather. Cold A/C etc.
117k mi. BO or trade
for NICE Crown. Vic.
Grand. Marquis Town.
Car. (352)220-6040


357-0323 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Brian H. Demint
16 W Golden St
Beverly Hills, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 23, 2014.

355-0323 SUCRN
Order to Demolish
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH HOUSE AND SHED
CASE NUMBER: 150936
Description of property: AK: 1608431 and legally described as FOREST LAKE NORTH PB
8PG 101 LOT 252
ORVILLE K & GALE A HILL
2015 E DEARBORN DR
HERNANDO, FL
On January 15,2014, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 2015 E. Dearborn Dr.;
Hernando, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition..
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, Sunday, March 23, 2014.

356-0323 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meetings to which all interested persons are invited:
Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evalu-
ate and prioritize fiscal year 2015 requests for project funding in their appropriate re-
gions. All or part of this meeting may be conducted by means of communications
media technology in order to permit maximum participation of Governing Board
members.
Northern Region (Citrus. Sumter. Marion. Lake. Lew & Hernando)
Wednesday, April 9,2014 at 10:00 a.m.
2379 Broad Street Brooksville, FL 34604
Heartland Region (Polk. Highlands & Hardee)
Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 9:00 a.m.
Bartow City Hall, City Commission Chambers, 450 N Wilson Avenue, Bartow, FL 33830
Tampa Region (Hillsborouah. Pasco and Pinellas)
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at 10:00 a.m.
SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 Hwy 301 North, Tampa, FL 33637
Southern Region (Sarasota. Desoto. Manatee & Charlotte)
Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 1:30 p.m.
SWFWMD Sarasota Service Office 6750 Fruitville Rd, Sarasota, FL 34240
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
special accommodations to participate in these meetings is asked to advise the
agency at least five (5) days prior by contacting the SWFWMD Human Resources Bu-
reau Chief at 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899; 352-796-7211 or
1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703; TDD (FL only) 1 800 231 6103; or email
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to
any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to be issued.
Agendas are available seven days prior to the meeting from the SWFWMD website:
WaterMatters.org Boards, Meetings & Event Calendar; or contact Cara Martin
@watermatters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211 ,x4636
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 23, 2014. #EXE0314


358-0323 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Mowing Services
BID No. 14-B-06
The City of Crystal River is seeking bids for a three year Mowing Services Contract of
Two Cemeteries & Cross Town Bike Trail. Also an Alternative Bid maintain Cutler Spur
and NE 3rd Avenue Right of Way. You are hereby invited to submit a bid on the
above referenced project.

BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER


34428


CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL


Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on April 14, 2014 and they will be opened and
read aloud at 10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
A voluntary pre-bid meeting will be held Monday, March 31, 2014 at 10:00. There will
be a tour of the sites and a brief presentation of the information within the bid.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 23, 2014.

359-0323 SUCRN
BOCC INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE
ITB No. 014-14
House Demolition & Replacement
SHIP Program RPL # 2014-03
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
bid to provide residential home replacement services for a home located in Crystal
River, FL that is qualified under the SHIP Housing Rehab Program Job # RPL 2014-03.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on April 3, 2014 at 9:00 AM at 3450 N.
Holiday Dr., Crystal River, FL. 34429. Only those companies who are present at the
pre-bid conference will be permitted to submit a Bid in response to this solicitation.
Additional information concerning the scope of the home rehabilitation work will be
distributed at the pre-bid conference. Interested parties must attend in order to be
considered for award.

SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 15, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 15, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Site Visit or at the Public
Opening because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of
Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.

To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select 'BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 23, 2014

360-0323 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
CHAIN LINK FENCE REPLACEMENT AT
WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT BID #14-B-07
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for chain link fence replacement at
the wastewater treatment plant. You are hereby invited to submit a bid for the
above referenced project. The Owner is the City of Crystal River
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on April 8, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work consists of removing and replacing 2,100 L.F. of 6
ft. high chain link fence and a gate at the City's wastewater treatment plant. Quan-
tities may be increased or decreased at the discretion of the Owner.

ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"CHAIN LINK FENCE REPLACEMENT AT WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT, BID #14-B-07",
AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
34428

All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crystalriverfl.org), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised to
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 23, 2014.


IMisc. Nod


I Misc. Nt


Misc


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568


BidNotic


I ^ ^BidNtc


mB




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Chevy Cruze /
MSRP:
$19,280
Your Price:
$17,688*
2014 Chevy Malibu
MSRP:
825,155
Your Price:
$22 280* --
2014 Chevy Equinox
MSRP:
$25,535
Your Price:
$22 831*
2014 Chevy Silverado
MSRP: C
$28,155
Your Price:
$23880*
2014 Chevy Traverse
MSRP:
$32,220
Your Price: i
$28 872*


i I ~


CRYSTAL
FIND ROADS- CHEVROLET_


800-584-8755 EXT.10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
TPrices include all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. AOn select models, includes all rebates and
incentives, not everyone will qualify. With approved credit.


D8SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014





H Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 23,2014


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUlD


M Sikorski's
L Attic
PAGE E4


A Toto Neorest 750H
high-tech toilet. Toto's
top-of-the-line toilet, a
tankless wonder with all
the gizmos, comes out
this fall priced at around
S10.000. A new generation
of toilets may one day
make toilet paper -
and the need to put one's
hands anywhere near the
unspeakable seem like
chamber pots and
outhouses: outdated
and somewhat messy
throwbacks reserved for
camping trips.
T-'-T-'; .: :* 1 P.*- :


iHE HOUSE .8


AND GARDEN. .- ..

Vf IV PiANTS, E4


tMETEULSTINUS


apma


-'.. -\,, '


I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


77rra


/-







E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014


CIRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1U/U W. UAKUkN:HIA UK.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 2BD/1.5BA/1 CG Nicely Updated/Maintained
SBathroom Remodeled Stainless Appliances
, Large Bedrooms Screened Porch
PETER & MARVIA KOROL !
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


Stunning 2007 Builder's showcase
award-winning home!
Priced 45% below replacement VALUE!!
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828 I
Ad Code #1043
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


GORGEOUS 3BR PLUS OFFICE
* 3 BR, 3 Bath 2-Car Gar Plus Extra Storage
* 2006 Built Living & Family Rooms
* Granite Counter Stainless Appliances
* Each BR has a Bath Level, Cleared 1 ACRE Lot

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 1
Email: kellygoddardsellsllorida.com






V



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

+
- 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

H 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


This 3/2/2 Home On Corner Lot Is Lowest Priced 3 Bedroom
In The Great Community Of Canterbury Lake Estates. Offers
Split Bedroom Plan, Greatroom, Nook, Double Pane
Windows, Huge Master Walk-In Closet, Security System,
Covered & Screened Lanai. New A/C& Water Heater 2010.
Community Has Clubhouse, Pool & Tennis Courts Ponds
Close To Rails To Trails. Great Buy!
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: mortha.sather@remax.net I4


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM






3205 PIERCE ST.
INVERNESS
2BR/2BA HOME ON 3 LOTS, 240 X 115.
CLOSE TO SHOPPING. CORNER LOT,
FENCED BACKYARD, GARAGE, AND A
DOUBLE CARPORT.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 F^
I Email: brbaraijmills@earthlink.net

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM
\# f^35, -82.


*2007 Pool Home 3/2/2.5 w/2,309 Living Sq. Ft. on 1 Acre
* Open Split Plan Awesome Kitchen w/Upgraded Appliances
* Great Location Huge Lanai Made for Entertainment
GREAT POOL HOME AT A FANTASTIC PRICE!
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net I fI
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com

I NDFN HmniIF IIjnAv 1i-.IDM


RIVERHAVEN WATERFRONT
Just one lot off main river, with low maintenance
yard, large screened lanai with hot tub and wrap-
around party deck & views of the Homosassa.
Directions: Riverhaven Dr., L on Stetson, L on
Valley Spring, Ron Spyglass #5263.

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.tom


THE WOW FACTOR INCLUDED... 2 Master suites,
gourmet kitchen w/granite & maple cabinets, crown
molding custom, wood accents throughout 3-car garage,
a den of master #1, plus an large office. Energy efficient
w/zoned A/C (20 seer & 18 seer), R30 insulation, Argon
thermal windows and doors, and beautiful pool and lanai
for entertaining. Situated in an elevated gated community.
Over 3,000 sq. ft. of living. [
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 I .
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerih.ccm


SWEETWATER BUILT!
Beautifully maintained! Under Contract for new
ROOF! Don't miss this exceptional opportunity! New
carpet. New flooring. New bathroom vanities. New
kitchen cabinets and countertops. Fresh paint through
out! Pocket sliders open onto expansive lanai. Just
move in and enjoy!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpols@ aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


SBeautiful Inside and Out
S3/2/2 with 2,114 Sq. Ft. of Living
SWood Laminate Flooring
SPlantation Shutters
SBreakfast Bar & Eat-In Kitchen
SLarge Florida Room
SMaintenance-Free Living
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM -
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


fk.


BEST IN CANTERBURY!
Pristine 3 BD 2.5 Bath w/1,850 SF living area
on lush, cul-de-sac PRESERVE lot. Loaded
with upgrades including wood flooring, garden
tub, granite countertops & designer faucets.
Includes Citrus Hills CC Membership, plus
Canterbury Recreation Center. '
GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812
Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleeman.com


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


PINE RIDGE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Planning foundation beds


ext to my home's
concrete pad, I re-
moved 2 inches of
sand 2 feet wide and put
down commercial woven,
carbon-black ground
cover fabric costing about
12 cents per square foot/
This was covered with 3/4
inches of limerock, about
$25 per from the mine on
County Road 491 south of
State Road 44 in Lecanto.
The weigh scale operator
can load pickup trucks.


PM
Jane
JAN
GARI


Rain from the roof dissolves some
limerock, which leaches alkalinity
into the subsoil. Insects do not bur-
row through this natural barrier, as
their bodies would dry out. No in-
sects means no predators like spi-
ders, frogs and snakes prowling
close around my home. The Univer-
sity of Mississippi published the re-
sults of a 10-year study on this
in 2008.
I scattered excavated sand 4 feet
beyond the limerock insect barrier
This was topped with 4 inches of
fine mulch from Central Landfill on
S.R. 44 west of Inverness. I thor-
oughly mixed and spaded 8 inches
deep. Then I added more fine mulch
and mixed again. This created


humus-rich amended soil
in a raised planting bed
surrounding the house.
This is edged with 8-inch
square concrete pavers.
The fun part is the
planting. To soften the
front corners of the
house, I planted native
evergreen shrubs that
Veber could grow to a small
tree. I chose two multi-
E'S stemmed Simpson's Stop-
DEN pers, Myrcianthes
fragrans, for the fragrant
small white flowers in May and
June, which attract pollinators like
butterflies and bees. Small orange
fruits are ripe in July and August.
One Simpson's Stopper produces
enough fruit for jam, syrup, eating
fresh, freezing and for birds and
wildlife to eat. In February, after
three years of growth, I cut out the
largest trunk closest to the house
and tipped the branches to promote
denser growth. The pruning is not
noticeable and was done early
enough to not interfere with flowers
or fruit.
To shade the air conditioner near
the west-side garage door, I planted
an evergreen Weeping Yaupon holly
tree, Ilex vomitoria. She will grow 30


feet tall and shade the house. Six
feet from the foundation is sufficient
for the roots. All Weeping Yaupons
are female. I planted a Walter's
Viburnum beside the entry slab,
which was a mistake. It grew too big,
so it had to be relocated after three
years. The female Yaupon bore few
berries. The Walter's Viburnum was
replaced with a male Schilling's
Yaupon holly, which flowers in May
to attract pollinators.
Between the Simpson's Stopper
and side door, I planted a triple-
trunked, native deciduous River
Birch, Betula nigra, to shade the
walls and garage roof. It grew 20 feet
See JANE/Page E5


FORMS AVAILABLE
The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.



-Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney 7
S- ,JARealor HOUSE Realtor@
302-3179 SOLDNae! 287-9022 H
746-6700
IT l7.670. 0 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
The oldaen ir WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


Inventory Low
WE Get Results!!
CALL TODAY!
15 Closed and Pending Transaction Sides so far for 2014!


3 5 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkins Free Hm e Price Analysis
BROKER. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKER ASSOCIATE REALTOR F Home P Analysi s


I 8E. COSMOS CT 5049 W. PIN
4/3/2 707718 $229,900 3/2/2 706941 1


SReal Estate DIGEST


Ivory,
Hemmerich
are bright
spots at
RE/MAX
In less than three
months, two more
RE/MAX agents have
qualified for the 2014
Million Dollar Club.
With more than $1
million in closed sales
volume, David Ivory
and Wayne Hem-
merich have each
qualified for this distin-
guished club.
David and Wayne
are Realtors in the
Crystal River office of
RE/MAX Realty One.


David Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Wayne
Hemmerich
RE/MAX
Realty One.


They both have a long history of suc-
cess in the Citrus County real estate
market and great reputations in the
industry.
The associates and staff of RE/MAX
congratulate David and Wayne on their
continued success.


Ayres keeps
shining at
EXIT Realty
Congratulations to
Nancy Ayres of EXIT
Realty Leaders. She
was the top-producing
agent for February,
with four transactions
totaling $451,000.
The associates and
staff of EXIT Realty
congratulate her on her cc
success.


1974 W. ALHAMBRA
3/2/2 705787 $108,000 L



299 5. SCHOOL
Nancy 1 3/2/2 709101 $242,250 L
Nancy
Ayres
EXIT Realty
Leaders. I
8 PAW PAW CT. N.
>ntinued 3/2/2 709343 $199,000
3521 N. LECA


C-3BITUSPING


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 E3






E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiiR k IE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Invasive species:



The air potato


Plant a menace to native Florida gardens


Editor's note: This is the
first of a two-part series on in-
vasive plants.
Invasive plants are a prob-
lem throughout Florida.
These are plants which
were introduced from else-
where, generally outside the
United States, often with good
intentions. Many of these
plants have adapted well to
Florida's climate and, without
natural pests or diseases to
keen them in check, have "in-


Eric Hoyer


spread and assisting in their
control. To this end, I am intro-
ducing Alicia Campanella, a
guest writer who has con-
tributed articles to the Florida
Land Steward newsletter Be-
cause her articles are informa-
tive and well written, I will be
utilizing them, with her per-
mission, from time to time. Her
articles are entitled "Plants
Behaving Badly"
Air potato


vaded" and, in many cases, ARBOR One of the most invasive and
overrun our natural CULTURE damaging exotic plant species
ecosystems. in Florida continues to choke
Several species are particularly preva- out native vegetation with
lent in our area. It is my intention to in- growth habits that make it one of the most
troduce readers to these invasive plants tenacious and problematic of all the
to make them aware of their existence
and educate them on preventing further See INVASIVE/Page E12


Inside...


Fancy flushes
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E3
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


'Art Glass' cruet and vintage ribbon typewriter get scrutiny


ear John: Enclosed is a
picture of a vase I inher-
ited years ago. I have
never seen the like.
Please let me know
what it might be
worth. -JJS., Crys-
tal River
Dear J.J.S.: You
have a beautiful Art
Glass cruet. Art Glass
is a large category of
collector interest. I
think your cruet was
made in England by John S
the highly recog- SIKOI
nized art glassmaker AT
Stevens & Williams,
likely close to 100
years ago. Collectors eagerly
seek out their beautiful Art
Glass, which has been produced
since the 19th century Potential
dollar value is $100 to $200, per-
haps more on a lucky day


1t
1"


Dear John: I have an old
manual ribbon typewriter,
probably from the 1960s. Where
would you suggest I
S look to see if anyone
wants it, someone
who collects them or
S buys them? L.,
Internet
Dear L.: There is
no collector interest
in your typewriter
because it is not old
enough for those in-
korski terested in early
SKI'S typewriters. You
Ic might consider a do-
nation to a charity of
your choice if it is in
good working condition.
There are artisans who use
various parts of manual type-
writers for unique design for
jewelry A good resource for
more information about col-


lecting typewriters is the Early
Typewriter Collectors Associa-
tion. The website is www.
etconline.org.
Dear John: Your articles have
been a favorite of mine in the
Chronicle for a long time. It has
been very helpful, as we have a
house full of things passed
down through the family How-
ever, we plan on selling it all,
including the house, and pur-
chasing a motorhome to go on
an extended vacation while we
are still in good health. Can you
help advise us on the best way
to deal with all these antiques
and stuff that we have? B. T,
Internet
Dear B.T.: Yes, I offer what I
call a verbal walk-through ad-
vice appraisal. I come to your
home and look at the items in
question, talking with you about
potential dollar value and the


best venue to use to sell. It goes
quickly and brings you up to
speed on current potential dol-
lar value. Feel free to contact
me at asksikorski@aol.com.
Dear John: I listen to your
radio program almost every
Saturday I have 13 coins in a
wooden, velvet-lined case.
Each one has the name of each
of the original 13 states. They
are 1.75 inches in diameter, a
quarter-inch thick and weigh 2
ounces each. My wife bought
them around 1976.
Here is the information I
have with them. "The Official
See ATTIC/Page Ell
This piece appears to be an
"Art Glass" cruet from English
glassmaker Stevens &
Williams. Such examples are
sought after by collectors.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Monitor: Big banks



abiding by settlement


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The nation's
four biggest banks slashed billions of
dollars from mortgages and other
debts, enough to satisfy their obliga-
tions under a national mortgage set-
tlement that stemmed from
so-called robo-signing.
A report on Tuesday from the
monitor overseeing the settlement
says Bank of America Corp., JPMor-
gan Chase & Co., Citigroup Inc., and
Wells Fargo & Co. have provided
some $50 billion in relief to more
than 600,000 borrowers.
The settlement, reached in Febru-
ary 2012, was prompted by disclo-



JANE
Continued from Page E3

tall in three years due to runoff from
the roof. A matching birch 25 feet
away grew only 10 feet in similar
amended soil during the same time.
It gets only natural rainfall.
Beneath the garage birch is a
3 foot by 16 inch slate slab on con-
crete blocks serving as a cool
bench. Behind it in summer shade
is a red Encore azalea that will ma-
ture only 3 feet in diameter Be-
tween the birch and the Stopper
are three equally spaced Autumn
Angel' white Encore azaleas that
will mature to about 2.5 feet diame-
ter. In front of the azaleas are
patented Agapanthus called 'Queen
Mum.' They will need dividing after
several years.
In February or March, the fallen
birch leaves are blown off the plant-
ing bed, across the 4 foot wide path
and onto the surrounding firebreak
lawn. The mower then mulches
them to add nutrients to the lawn.
Five feet from the air conditioner
and a foot from the entry slab, I
planted a palm tree, Sabal Palmetto,
Florida's State Tree. The sound of
the fronds rustling in the breeze is
pleasant. A native woody vine, Vir-
ginia Creeper, Parthenosisus
cinquefolia, was planted to scramble


sures that some mortgage-servicing
companies had processed foreclo-
sures without verifying documents.
The problem became severe after
housing prices crashed around the
time of the 2008 financial crisis.
Because of the settlement, banks
cut the size of mortgage balances,
modified loans and allowed home-
owners to sell their house for less
than they owed. It also let some bor-
rowers refinance even though they
wouldn't usually qualify because
they owed too much.
The settlement with the federal gov-
ernment and 49 states "resulted in an
unprecedented amount of consumer
relief," monitor Joseph Smith wrote.


among the leaf boots on the Sabal.
The vine leaves turn scarlet in the
fall. Both have flowers for pollen
and nectar and fruit for birds and
wildlife. The planting bed is topped
with attractive pine needles to pre-
vent unwanted seed germination.
There is always a plant flowering
somewhere each day of the year
Along the edge of the raised founda-
tion bed, I planted a border of ever-
green Florida violets wherever they
would get afternoon shade. Violets
flower through February and into
March. Among them are small corms
of Atamasco or Zephyr Lilies,
Zephyranthes species, which flower
in March or April. Three perennial,
evergreen Stokes Aster, Stokesia
laevis, multiplied on both sides of a
small terrace outside a bedroom
window These were dug up in mid-
February, carefully teased apart and
replanted in a row about 8 inches
apart and 8 inches behind the bor-
der violets. Stokesia flowers in late
spring. The foundation bed is a work
in progress, a pleasant pastime.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place
and other details.
* News releases are subject to editing. Call 352-563-5660 for details.


4/T Ali


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Ufl Prudential
Open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A Week! Properties


K%,w =-, f- -1NNII _= -- 1J 1 H lIIJLIIIUC'I UI
q4((l330 E Ireland C, il l S220.000
S MLS 707409 $299,900 REDUCED $5,000! Upgraded 3/3/3-two
Fabulous Oaks Golf Course views- master suites & pool.
4/3/2 pool home. Dir Hwy
Dir. Hwy 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd, (Sugarmill = ,
R on Ireland Ct. '
Helen Forte 352-220-4764 Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261
PIIW I IQTIPMN PIW I IRTINr.


,/ L-- JUDD IM illmlny Ier
MLS 709258 $57,500
Lovely, refreshed villa in park-like
55+ community.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


/" 2820 N Crosswaler Palh
MLS 707483 $1,150,000
MAGNIFICENT estate home at 9th T-box
on award winning golf course.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


I L: ,IIJKI S165
3/2/2 cul-de-sac home w/many NE\
items inside &out.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power


Ff'ld'O 2246 W Nautilus Dr
MLS 709259 $52,900
Well maintained; nice starter or
investor home.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


"Zi!Je 4531 N Saddle Dr
MLS 707511 $199,500
One-of-a kind 3/3.5/2 pool home in need
of TLC.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


fjia- o1o I unciiy rup ui
MLS 706642 $155,000
3/2/2 with plenty of room to roam in
areat neighborhood.


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


/3m E Glassboro CI 18 3B
MLS 705063 $68,500
Furnished 2bd/2.5ba townhome near
community pool.
Dir. 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd, R on
Glassboro Ct.
DickHildebrandt 352-586-0478


O 10985W Bentbow Path
MLS 709202 $39,900
GORGEOUS land, GREAT pole barn,
mobile needs TLC.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


/1I0fCC- Ie I II 111ulldllbu VVdy
V ILS 1 U245 $1179,900
3bd/2ba home with beautiful pool.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


1674W Spring Meadow Lp
MLS 706743 $114,500
A rare find-3 bdrm, 2 bath corner unit
townhome w/beautiful views.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947

*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer


and Associates' 2013 *P|< .First Time Home Seller
Home Buyer/Seller Study! l

5I .. I 1 I.. ..I" i .I I, I II, ,IH


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 ES






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Report: 30-year


mortgage loans


fall to 4.32 percent


Fed'splan to scale back bondpurchases

in future sends ripples through market


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Average U.S.
rates on fixed mortgages declined
last week, edging closer to histori-
cally low levels.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday that the average rate for
the 30-year loan fell to 4.32 percent
from 4.37 percent last week. The av-
erage for the 15-year mortgage
eased to 3.32 percent from
3.38 percent.
Mortgage rates have risen about a
full percentage point since hitting
record lows roughly a year ago.
The increase was driven by spec-
ulation that the Federal Reserve
would reduce its $85 billion-a-month
bond purchases, which have helped
keep long-term interest rates low
Deeming the economy to be gain-
ing strength, the Fed announced in
December and January and again
on Wednesday that it was reduc-
ing its monthly bond purchases.
The Fed said after its latest two-
day policy meeting that even after it
raises short-term interest rates, the
job market strengthens and inflation
rises, the central bank expects its
benchmark short-term rate to stay
unusually low
Fed Chair Janet Yellen stressed
that with the job market still weak,
the Fed intends to keep short-term
rates near zero for a "considerable"
time and would raise them only
gradually Yellen also suggested that
the Fed could start raising rates six
months after it halts its monthly
bond purchases, which most econo-
mists expect by year's end. That
means short-term rates could rise by
mid-2015.
The National Association of Real-
tors reported Thursday that sales of
U.S. existing homes slipped in Feb-


ruary, the sixth decline in seven
months as severe winter weather,
rising prices and a tight supply of
homes discouraged buyers.
Still, there were some signs that
the market could pick up in the com-
ing months. Sales improved in the
South and West, where weather was
less of a factor And more people de-
cided to sell, boosting the supply of
available homes.
To calculate average mortgage
rates, Freddie Mac surveys lenders
across the country between Monday
and Wednesday each week. The av-
erage doesn't include extra fees,
known as points, which most bor-
rowers must pay to get the lowest
rates. One point equals 1 percent of
the loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-year
mortgage was unchanged at 0.6
point. The fee for a 15-year loan also
held steady at 0.6 point.
The average rate on a one-year
adjustable-rate mortgage edged up
to 2.49 percent from 2.48 percent.
The average fee remained at 0.4
point.
The average rate on a five-year
adjustable mortgage fell to 3.02 per-
cent from 3.09 percent. The fee was
unchanged at 0.4 point.


Associated Press file


A home for sale recently in Glenview, III.


Updated 3/2/2. Move-in ready 3/2. Open and spacious 3/2/2. Historic District, 3/1.
708572 $144,900 708705 $75,900 707451 $119,900 708445 $44,900
Becky Paradiso 634-4581 Steve McClory 422-3998 Steve McClory 422-3998 Yolanda 352-219-2196
000I.HQE5 .!gi l 11 1 1


E11SUNDAY, NMACH 23, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Orchid cactus: Easy to grow, beautiful in bloom


LEE REICH
Associated Press

The biggest problem with growing
orchid cacti is figuring out just what
they are.
They are cacti, but are not spiny
Their spectacular blossoms are nei-
ther orchids nor orchid-like.
Sometimes orchid cacti are called
epiphyllums, which is also the botan-
ical name of some (but not all) orchid
cacti. The word epiphyllum means
"on the leaf" and refers to the way the
flowers just pop out from the edges of
the ... well, they look like leaves but
they're really just flattened stems.
Enough with the semantics! The im-
portant thing is that fat flower buds on
my orchid cacti's stems are about to


burst open into spectacular white,
pink or scarlet blossoms. And coaxing
forth these blossoms required very lit-
tle effort on my part.
Although orchid cacti, or epies
(short for epiphyllums) as they are
sometimes called, are true cacti, they
are not native to deserts but to lush,
tropical jungles. There, they nestle
into forks in tree branches or into rock
crevices where enough humus has ac-
cumulated to retain moisture. The
plants enjoy soils that are both well-
drained and retain moisture. I use my
standard potting mix with a little extra
perlite for drainage; you could also
make up a mix using peat moss, com-
post, and perlite or sand.
Here, out of the jungle, the plants
look right at home in hanging baskets,


from which their arching, flattened
stems, scalloped along the edges, can
swoop up and out as fountains of
greenery
In contrast to the night-blooming
cereus cactus, an epiphyllum species
that is spectacular and fragrant the
few nights that it blossoms, the flat-
tened, green stems of orchid cactus
are nice to look at year round.
On some of my plants, the stems are
so thin they droop languidly right over
the edge of the pots from their own
weight. My white-flowered epi, in

See CACTUS/Page Ell
An easy to grow, flamboyant red
orchid cactus in New Paltz, New York.
LEE REICH/Associated Press


SeiaiigiTerVst
& EenwoRe.ae


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
CARI MANlirCC 52..12.X7R7 Sl.qAN Mll i FN N2.4922.21 s VICTORIA FRANKI IN .12.427.777


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 3 BATH, 2.5-CAR, BELLAMY RIDGE
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS Stunningly beautiful 4/3/2.5 Michael Angelo model with custom changes allowing for a more SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3-CAR, WOODSIDE
Elegance, simplicity and breathtaking describes this 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, living room, den, open feel. Situated on a private, amazingly landscaped lot at the end of a cul-de-sac in Spectacular Cordova model loaded with upgrades, including granite countertops in
formal dining room, pool home in Skyview Vllas a gated community of Terra Vista. Enjoy Bellamy Ridge. Heated pool with waterfall feature. Custom designed fish pond complete with DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS your beautiful gourmet kitchen with built in sky light, custom window treatments and
maintenance-free living soyou can relax. Coran countertops, cozy fireplace, central vacuum water fountain. Exterior stone. Brick paver drive way, entrance and pool deck. Golf cart Beautiful maintenance-free home 2 bedrooms with a den 2 bath 2-car garage open gorgeous lighting fixtures. Formal dining and living areas plus a large family room
juSt tonamea few. Wood kitchencabinets, luxuros master bathwithglass block showerand garage. Private well for irrigation. This home is immaculate inside and out. Granite floor plan design with a great use of space, sunroom with plantation shutters. Superior give great spaces for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on your extended
. . .. I . . .... .. countertops. 42" staggered wood kitchen cabinets. Sliding doors throughout the home condition, lots of added closetspaceand upgrades in everyroom! Readytomove in on a screened Lanai with Shoji hottub. All this plus a 3+ car-garage with a separate golf
....... .. ....... ..... iii 334.OOO allowing formaximum eight. Custom Armstrong flooring. MLS706244 ...................$679,000 cornerlot in premierecommunityofTerraVista.MLS708652.........................$189,000 cartentrance. PRICEDTO SELL! This home isa mustsee. MLS353844....$345,000
.DETACHED

"< ....HE VILLA 3 E BTa ARW OVEWVLAS 2 BATH,2 cAR,"''^^^ BB ^ Hinlacokn.ietrtemiaes.oeaexaddticuealudyrowt
VILLA, 3 BED,
ai BATH,
:~f,.-CAR,
HILLSIDE
VILLAS
This is NOT your
average Lanta naI
..Designer kitchen,
top lne applances
.......... E, AT,2 A, O DVE VLA incl gas cooking. Tie thru the main areas. Home was expa nded to include a laundry room with
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS .-_ gco ge e e~ wep aa e ao
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS This lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is the ideal place for any occasion, whether DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS cabssink and a large storage room. Garagewas enlarged to incl a wider 18'door and extra
SPACIOUS & OPEN 32/2 golf course home in the gated "Brentwood community of Citrus seasonal use, retirement or full time living! From the sliderstothe lanai overlooking Spacious maintained Villa home on one ofthe most desired streets in this premeire storage space to the side. Front bedroom has bay style windows offering extra space. A
Hlls comfort e open floor plan with a nice view from the lanai. Siding g lass door to a the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what country club community. Great floor plan with extended lanai extended garage with convenient Powder Room off of the great room. Backs up directly to g green space. Located on
screened porch. The 3rd bedroom is currently being used as a den. Home s e w ntr you've been ookg for. Let oers maintain the exterior while you y e ocl side entry golf cart door. Ceramic te and many other upgrades. Located on a csog e so P. Hoe ws well thought out to provide comfortable ing in just
$nyou've see thks for. Let anr aaae the exterior whMle !Su en;oy thee soew iaI side ee.ry golf cart door. Ceramic tile and many other upgrades Located on a lunhusf e. MUS T SE Me 7as well.thou.ht.out.to.prov.de.comfortab.... $27 u9 t
g Co seelife that comes with the social membership! MLS 703807. $288,000 premium homesite with expansive views ofTerra Vista. MLS 707755. $239,000 e s. Te value. MUST SEE. MLS 707 ...................................................$274,900
Terms 6 Moth or More
Ter Vist & rnw odR nas Soca Mebrsi inldd ihaletl


TOWNHOME,
2 BED, 2.5 BATH.
I-CAR, BRENTWOOD
TOWNHOMES
I.l ,, d , 1... . h ,
I i ,11 ,.. .. I .... .... I.

... ......... .r .. I. i. .
... .. i n .... i 1..h .I. .u "
A .. . .. .... I ... .
, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i ,,,,,,,,,, O,5


WE NEED RENTALS

IN THE TERRA VISTA &

BRENTWOOD COMMUNITIES!
List your rental with us!


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 E7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Actilight Bowl
of the $10,000
Toto Neorest 750H
high-tech toilet.
TOTO/Associated Press


''11'1'1


I


I..


ESSUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Toto Washlet high-tech
toilets in the Toto showroom in
the Soho neighborhood of New York.


A Toto
Neorest 700 high-tech
toilet.
TOTO/Associat- 1 iP-:


OOOHQOK


REAL ESTATE, INC.
r -- 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
S CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OcE: (352) 795-6633
VWWWFAIT PY0F COM 7m~n QAI iN( AI iYXREF M


OZELLO WATERFRONT CRYSTAL RIVER bu
commercial resident combo; bait & tackle location just east i I
shop, boat & boat motor repair business, professional office complex, dowr
gulf access, 120ft dock space, owner says receptionist area w/cathedral cei
i i i e; concrete boat waiting area, 1 office, loft office,
n aI. " bait shop= 16x56; carpet, lots of parking #70
newer appliances, #704510 $389,000 $57.500


CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bedroom, 1 5
baths, frame home ready to move in
condition, hard wood pine floors, metal
roof, bonus room off main bedroom, den
i ir 1 ,. room, screen porch, 2 Ig out
S.... to store 3 cars & have 2
workshops #709295 $85,000

1 -A L A -1


DUNNELLON 1998 Nobility D/W M/H
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 25 acres
master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
shower Country kitchen, vaulted ceilings,
16 x 20 workshop w/electric, inside


limits,
stairs
lings,
berber
2921


HOMOSASSA 4 duplexes, side by side
Well maintained; fully leased @ $600/
month; roi=10 6%; all new roofs in 2001
& 2002 and central A/C units installed in
2004 2 wells, each bldg has own septic
system #703762 $396,000








LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of
3 mobile 1 1 ...1 I... center of
county I ii appointment
only One rented for $450/mo #703819
$106,000


2 bath, one ....... screen porch HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home,
w/slider to :i. .. I .I, rm & main 1 bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean
bedroom ceiling fans w/lights in w/ circular driveway half way between
bedrooms new counters in kitchen w/ Crystal River and Homosassa 2 lots,
newer appliances; fenced rear yard 2 sheds 1 I :.i screen porch Fully
#708524 $89,900 furnished a,' .,i. $45,000


Vt


AGENT ON DUTY SEVEN DAYS A] WE] K


'-.BEST '


Realtor


i


SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 E9


FEATURED.HOME


COLDWO(LLl

BANKPRj


T TT T T 1 ...... 1. A ........