Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
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Newspaper
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English
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Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text



Perfection: Citrus' Dodd undefeated in singles


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH .
81 Partly sunny.
LOW 20 percent
56 chance of rain.
5v PAGE A4


CITRUS COOUNTYTY e






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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500 VOL. 119 ISSUE 227


Senate OKs Dean's springs bill


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
TALLAHASSEE "I'm proud to
say 'We passed it,"' state Sen. Char-
lie Dean said Thursday, fresh from
a committee that had just given
unanimous support to his springs
protection and restoration bill.
Dean recounted the process of
developing the bill with a team of
other senators and the early oppo-
sition it encountered.
He explained how they overcame
and converted various opponents and


reached out to environmentalists.
"We asked them to come in," he
said. "Every one of them was on .
board; everyone was there this
morning, because it's the right thing
to do."
The senator was addressing a del-
egation from Citrus County in Tal-
lahassee as part of the annual Charlie
Legislative Day Dean's position on Dean
springs was a view they would hear senator
affirmed by other state officials, developed
Dean said the 38-page springs bill springs bill with
a team of other
See Page A7 senators.


Hospital taxing district will end


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
TALLAHASSEE When state
Rep. Jimmie T Smith addressed
the Legislative Day delegation
from Citrus County on Thursday,
Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce president Josh Wooten
asked about the status of the leg-


isolation concerning the Citrus
County Hospital Board.
"Our big concern is a bill that is
going to give final resolution to
what that board is going to look
like," said Wooten. "What we are
adamantly opposed to is giving
this group the ability to keep


Page A2


National Women's History Month

Dessie Smith Prescott was a Cracker woman who inspired many before she became





A pioneering legend


Editor's note: March is Na-
tional Women's History
month. The Chronicle has
chosen four notable women
in Citrus County who have
made a lasting impact. For
the remaining Saturdays in
March, we will tell the stories
of these women, including
Florida Women's Hall of
Fame inductee Dessie Smith
Prescott.

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
andace Boothe doesn't
want the old stories of
her best friend Dessie
Smith Prescott to be lost or
forgotten.
As her caretaker for 18
years, she learned of the pio-
neer life that Prescott lived
and now travels around Cit-
rus County in hopes of bring-
ing her friend's tales to life.
Prescott is recalled as an
old Cracker woman who is a
pioneer legend and an inspi-
ration to many
She was born in the back-
woods ofAlachua County in a
place called Island Grove. At
a very young age, Prescott
was left as an orphan when
her widowed mother, Sally
Morrison, died in a flu epi-
demic in 1918 Prescott was
only 12 years old.
At a very young age, she
learned the necessity of sup-
porting herself. She found


Special to the Chronicle
At the age of 29, female pioneer Dessie Smith Prescott, above, met Pulitzer Prize-winning author Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and
developed a strong friendship.


ways to live off of the land by
hunting and fishing.
Later in life, she built the
old Withlacoochee River
Lodge in Inglis for fishing
and hunting.
Boothe highlighted the fact


that people admired Prescott
for her adventurous spirit
and hard-working nature.
"The rumor has it that she
could shoot better than any
man," Boothe said.
At the age of 29, Prescott


met Pulitzer Prize-winning
author Marjorie Kinnan
Rawlings, who was 15 years
older than her
While Prescott was teach-
ing locals how to survive off
of the land, she and Rawlings


took a historic trip up the St
Johns River to Jacksonville.
Their trip down the hy-
acinth-filled waterways was
later chronicled in the

See .PageA2


State brass to keep $8.34-a-month health insurance


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Classifieds ........ C9
Comics .......... C8
Community . .C5, C6
Crossword ........C7
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ...........C8
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C7


Select employees

to getpay raises

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick
Scott, as well as thousands of
other top-ranked state workers,
could continue to pay low health
insurance premiums in the com-
ing year
Scott has pushed for four
straight years to have all state
workers, regardless of salary or
position, to pay identical amounts
for health insurance.
But both the House and Senate
this week released initial budgets
that would keep premiums at the


Rep. Seth
McKeel
said the
perception of
special
treatment for
legislators
was fixed.


same rate. Those
budgets which
are roughly $75
billion would
also only offer
pay raises to se-
lect employees as
opposed to an
across-the-board
increase.
The move to
lock in low insur-
ance rates for
top-ranked em-
ployees comes as
the Republican-


controlled Florida Legislature
continues to reject expanding
Medicaid coverage to cover more
low-income Floridians.
There are nearly 200,000 peo-
ple enrolled in the state health


insurance program, but nearly
30,000 of them, including top offi-
cials in state agencies, legislative
staff, as well as the governor and
members of the Cabinet like At-
torney General Pam Bondi, pay
the lowest possible rate.
The budgets released this week
would keep that rate the same:
$8.34 a month in premiums for in-
dividual coverage and $30 for
family coverage. Scott wanted all
state workers to pay $50 a month
for individual coverage and $180
a month for family coverage.
State legislators in the past two
years have started paying the
higher rate.
"There was a perception of
special treatment for legislators
and we fixed that," said Rep. Seth
McKeel, R-Lakeland and the


Substitutes wanted: Search continues:


The Citrus County school district needs
substitute teachers./A3


Countries join the search for lost Malaysia
Airlines Flight 370./A12


House budget chief
McKeel said since legislators
are already paying the higher
rate, there was a decision to keep
rates the same for other high-
ranking state employees.
This doesn't mean that changes
still won't come for the state
health insurance plan. The
House this week rolled out a pro-
posal to overhaul employee ben-
efits in the next few years,
including creating a tiered sys-
tem for health insurance by 2017.
But there's nothing similar mov-
ing in the Senate, so it's unclear
if the legislation will pass this
year
The two budgets rolled out this
week by the House and Senate
See BILUPage All


Grace Notes:
Nancy Kennedy writes about how God grieves
over your losses./Cl


I I N S I D E I





A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014

HOSPITAL
Continued from Page Al

taxing us, whether they say
it's for lawsuits or whatever."
"Our goal is to get that
lease signed," he said, say-
ing he favored keeping a
minimum assessment in
case it is needed. "Please
look out for the taxpayers of
Citrus County. We know if
you get rid of that taxing dis-
trict, we'll never get it back"
"We are getting rid of the
taxing authority," Smith
said. "We're going to do
away with it completely"
The taxing district dates
back to 1965.
What will happen is the
trust will have the finan-
cial responsibility for any
lawsuits. He said details
about the trust are still to
be worked out, but it will
be a diverse body
"Both the elected body
will have a say and the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


constituents will have a
say, and also we will make
sure the doctors have a
say," Smith said.
He concluded the hospital
board of trustees will be
there, the taxing authority
will not The board will re-
main as the landlord.
"There should be two
sides," he said, "with the
hospital run by the busi-
ness side.
"I can't guarantee what
the end product will be,"
he said, explaining once
the bill hits the floor, other
areas including some
that have gone through the
same process will be
weighting in on it.
As filed, the bill author-
izes the hospital board to
create a community foun-
dation or trust to manage
the proceeds from the hos-
pital lease.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


Accident sends one person to hospital


MATT VAUGHN/Special to the Chronicle
This vehicle was headed northbound on U.S. 19 Thursday afternoon when the driver lost control and cut across
into southbound traffic, according to the Citrus County Sheriff's Office. It struck another vehicle and the primary
vehicle rolled. One person was transported to Ocala Regional and the other person refused treatment.


Special to the Chronicle
Dessie Smith Prescott is described as Southern Cracker who loved exploring the
outdoors throughout her life.


SMITH
Continued from Page Al

"Hyacinth Drift" chapter
of Rawlings' "Cross
Creek."
Boothe describes
Prescott as a Southern
Cracker who loved explor-
ing the outdoors through-
out her life, which
included marriages to six
different men.
Dresses were not her
ideal wardrobe. Instead,
she sported boots, pants
and plaid shirts while
hunting the land for the
family's next meal.
During World War II,
Prescott served in the
Women's Army Corps as
first lieutenant.


"And she was Florida's
first professional woman
guide and the first female
licensed pilot in the state,"
Boothe said.
Later in her life Prescott
bought the Wahoo Ranch,
a piece of land off of Citrus
Avenue.
Boothe said she chose
this land because it had
access to water and was
good hunting grounds.
That's when Prescott
and Boothe's relationship
began. Prescott searched
for a caretaker to help her
around the Wahoo Ranch.
After an instant bond,
Boothe moved into one of
the four houses on the
property
In 1999, Prescott was in-
ducted into the Florida
Women's Hall of Fame.


Prescott died in 2002,
at the age of 95. Her
homestead was left to
her caretaker and friend,
Boothe.
Boothe has taken her
beloved friendship as a
caretaker and has dedi-
cated her life to retelling
Prescott's journey
She tells anyone who
will listen the stories that
Prescott told her of old,
wild times as a pioneer
When she is not telling
tales, she hosts Cracker-
style dinners at the Wahoo
Ranch, the way she said
Prescott would have
wanted it.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


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Citrus County Mosquito Control would
like to invite the Citizens of Citrus County
to visit our Headquarter's Office located at
968 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, Fl.
-Aftt\ during our A rj
S"Open House"
Thursday, March 27,2014
10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.
Come see what we do for you!
J^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


JOHNNY
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Page A3-SATURDAY, MARCH 22,2014



TATEC&


CI-


LOCAL


TRUS COUNTY CHRO


NICEE


Around the

COUNTY

Beagan out of
school board race
The supervisor of elec-
tions office announced Fri-
day that John Thomas
Beagan has withdrawn from
the Citrus County School
Board District 3 race.
With official qualifying
three months away, three
candidates are in the race
so far: Doug Dodd, Quinton
Herrin Jr. and Sheila
Whitelaw.
Incumbent Pat
Deutschman is not seeking
re-election.
Breakfast to support
return of POW
From 8 to 11 a.m. Sun-
day, the public can have
breakfast
and sup-.
port the
effort to
call on
the gov-
ernment _-.
Of
Afghan- Bowe
istan to Bergdahl
release prisoner of war
prisoner in Afghanistan
of war held by the
Bowe Taliban.
Bergdahl.
The breakfast, at Beef '0'
Brady's restaurant at 1231
U.S. 41 N., Inverness, costs
$5 and includes pancakes,
sausage, coffee and orange
juice.
Bring Bowe Home Proj-
ect information will be avail-
able, there will be petitions
to sign and wristbands and
decals available for a
donation.
Event set to honor
Vietnam veterans
VFW Post 4337, 906
State Road 44, Inverness
invites all Vietnam War vet-
erans and their families to
observe Welcome Home
Vietnam Veterans Day on
Saturday, March 29.
The post will open at
9 a.m., with Vietnam War-
era music playing all day
and into the night. There
will be a pig roast, with food
to be available starting at
3 p.m.
For information, call 352-
344-3495 or 352-220-3487.
Taste of Inverness
to feature local fare
The eighth annual Taste
of Inverness will take place
from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday,
April 12, at Liberty Park on
Lake Henderson. Enjoy
food, art and live entertain-
ment with the Blue Stem
Prairie Band.
Participating restaurants
include Beef '0' Brady's,
Chefs of Napoli, Coach's
Halftime Pub, Domino's
Pizza, Fox Den Winery,
Highland Place, Ice Cream
Dr, Lakeside Bar & Grille,
Lynn's Ice Cream, McLeod
House Bistro, Nicole's
House of Cakes, Papa
John's Pizza, Pine Street
Pub, Publix Catering, Rus-
tic Ranch, Rutabaga's Etc.,
Sonny's BBQ in Inverness
and Stumpknocker's.
Tickets are $25 in ad-
vance or $30 at the door.
Net proceeds will benefit
the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County.
For tickets and informa-
tion, call the Boys & Girls
Clubs at 352-621-9225 or
the city of Inverness at 352-
726-2611, ext. 1304; or, on-
line at www.inverness.
webconnex.com/TOI.
Democrat Club
meeting Tuesday
The Crystal River Demo-
cratic Club will meet at
7 p.m. Tuesday, March 25,
at Oysters Restaurant,
Crystal River. Those wish-
ing to have dinner before
should arrive by 6p.m.
The speaker will be
Steve Davis, Citrus County


Yards and Neighborhoods
coordinator.
Business will include the
election of officers.
All Democrats are wel-
come. For information, call
352-795-5384.
-From staff reports


School pride on the line


Schoolhouse Hustle races raise funds

for educational resources


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

LECANTO Area businesses
and organizations are hustling to-
gether to raise funds for Citrus
County students.
Beginning at 7:30 a.m. Saturday,
April 12, the Citrus County Edu-
cation Foundation (CCEF) will
host the inaugural Schoolhouse
Hustle 5K, 10K and 1-mile walk at
Citrus Resources for Exceptional
Students in Transition (CREST)
school, 2600 S. Panther Pride


Drive, Lecanto.
The CCEF is a 501(c)3 nonprofit
organization that provides re-
sources for Citrus County schools.
"We want to have a community-
wide event and entire day where
the schools can all be involved
and have a fun time together,"
said CCEF executive director
Stephen Barbieri.
Working together with DRC
Sports, Citrus Road Runners, Sun-
coast Schools Federal Credit
Union Foundation and the Citrus
County School District, the new


fundraiser will raise dollars for
CCEF as well as promote healthy
competition between the schools,
according to CCEF board member
Tracy Blair Bryson's news release.
The Schoolhouse Hustle will
also feature a Family Health
Expo, YMCA kid zone and
entertainment.
"We want it to be a very special
event that brings businesses, com-
munity members, teachers and
students together," Barbieri said.
"That is what our foundation is
about all together in one place
so that we can share a common vi-
sion of working together"
Trophies, prizes and $1,000 will
be awarded to each of two schools'
student advisory enhancement
councils that possess the most


Substitutes needed


MAnTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Substitute teacher Marilyn Key works with a Floral City Elementary School class Thursday morning as they
read a poem aloud.

School districtputs out callfor applicants throughout area


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

After educating students for
more than 35 years and retiring,
Marilyn Key thought her career
was over
But that wasn't the case, since
her heart yearned for the children.
"I enjoyed going home and
knowing that I have helped some-
one learn that day," Key said.
A year after retirement, Key re-
turned to the classroom as an in-
structional substitute and she
said her life is now complete.
Director of Human Resources
Jonny Bishop said the Citrus
County School District needs
more people like Key to instruct
in the classroom.
"Our substitute pool plays a
vital role in the success of our
school district," Bishop
said. "Having the ability to staff
our schools with high-performing
and effective substitutes provides
a high degree of continuity in the


HOW TO APPLY
Must be 18 years of age or
older.
Must be a high school
graduate or have a higher
degree.
Visit www.citrus.k12.fl.us.
Click on "Employment."
Click on "Complete an
Application." Select the
substitute teacher position.
Click the box to the right that
is labeled "Apply for Selected
Positions."

instructional services we provide
our students."
When Key sat down with the
Chronicle, she described the in-
structional substituting process
as straightforward.
"Applicants must have their
high school diploma, be finger-
printed and have a background
check," she said. "There is also a
mandatory workshop/class that I


had to attend. Other than that, the
process is simple. I will receive a
phone call from a computerized
service that will let me know what
jobs are available. I get to choose
from that list and the position I
want that day"
Key loves Floral City Elemen-
tary School the school she re-
tired from- and said she works a
typical 8:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. day
"The teachers leave a terrific
schedule and detailed plans for
me," Key said. "All I have to do is
just follow their instructions and
stay on track."
She encourages others in the
community to think about becom-
ing an instructional substitute
and making a difference in the
lives of children.
"Just think about that one kid
that you can help inspire or learn
something new," Key said.
For more information about be-
coming an instructional substi-
tute for the Citrus County School
District, visit wwwcitrus.kl2.fl.us.


Officials: FBI agent cleared in shooting


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
Florida prosecutor has
cleared an FBI agent of
any criminal wrongdoing
in the fatal shooting of a
Chechen man as he was
being questioned about a
Boston Marathon bombing
suspect, two law enforce-
ment officials with knowl-
edge of the investigation
said Friday
The officials, speaking
on condition of anonymity
Friday because they
weren't authorized to
speak publicly about the
case, said State Attorney
Jeff Ashton won't bring
charges against the agent
who shot Ibragim Toda-
shev, a 27-year-old mixed
martial arts fighter
The circumstances sur-
rounding Todashev's
death in Orlando have re-
mained mysterious: Offi-
cials initially said the man


had lunged at an agent
with a knife while FBI
agents and Massachusetts
state troopers were ques-
tioning him about his
friendship with suspected
Boston Marathon bomber
Tamerlan Tsarnaev Later,
they said it was no longer
clear what happened.
Todashev's father,
Abdul-Baki Todashev, in-
sisted during a May news
conference that his son
was unarmed and has
maintained his son's inno-
cence. He presented pho-
tographs, which The
Associated Press could not
authenticate, showing his
son was shot six times in
the torso and once in the
back of the head.
The Washington Post
first reported the prosecu-
tor's decision. Ashton's of-
fice said in an emailed
statement that he has not
made a final decision re-
garding the investigation


into Todashev's death and
denied sharing any such
decision with federal
officials.
The Justice Department
also has been investigat-
ing, but has not yet re-
leased its findings. A third
law enforcement official
said the Justice Depart-
ment is expected to reach
the same conclusion,
based on a recommenda-
tion from the FBI.
Federal prosecutors
have said in court filings
that Todashev named
Tsarnaev as a participant
in an earlier triple homi-
cide in Massachusetts. The
filings were made in the
case against Tsarnaev's
brother, surviving bombing
suspect Dzhokhar
Tsarnaev
According to the filings,
Todashev told investiga-
tors Tamerlan Tsarnaev
participated in a triple
slaying in Waltham on


Sept. 11, 2011.
In that case, three men
were found in an apart-
ment with their necks slit
and their bodies report-
edly covered with mari-
juana. One of the victims
was a boxer and friend of
Tamerlan Tsarnaev
The filing was prosecu-
tors' attempt to block
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev from
getting certain informa-
tion from authorities, in-
cluding investigative
documents associated
with the Waltham slaying.
Authorities allege that
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20,
and 26-year-old Tamerlan
Tsarnaev, ethnic Chechens
from Russia, planned and
carried out the twin bomb-
ings near the finish of the
marathon on April 15.
Three people were killed
and more than 260 were
injured.
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev
faces 30 federal charges.


HAT: Schoolhouse Hustle.
HEN: Health expo and kid
ne begins at 6:30 a.m.
nd races commence at
30 a.m. April 12.
HERE: CREST school,
600 S. Panther Pride Drive,
canto.
4FO: Visit www.schoolhouse
istle.com.

1 spirit and participation.
th every detail, we have
to make this as top-notch as
n," Barbieri said.
EF encourages students to
out in their school colors.
more information, visit
schoolhousehustle.com or
citruseducation. org.



Atound the
STATE

Center: Hurricane
predicting improves
MIAMI The National
Hurricane Center said its
storm track forecasts keep
improving, helping to shrink
the so-called "cone of un-
certainty" a bit in forecasts
this year.
Coastal residents won't
notice much of a change in
the forecasts showing the
probable path of the center
of a tropical storm or hurri-
cane. In fact, forecasters
worry that people mistak-
enly believe that the cone
shows all the areas at risk
for storm damage.
A storm's winds and
storm surge can extend
well beyond the forecast
track. This year, forecasters
are trying color-coded maps
to show people where
storm surge could happen
during storms.
GOP stepping up
Hispanic outreach
MIAMI- Republicans
are taking steps to boost
their standing with Florida's
fast-growing Hispanic
population.
The Republican National
Committee on Friday an-
nounced a group of Hispanic
advisers to help its efforts to
court Latinos in the Sun-
shine State. Among those on
the panel are county and
state elected officials, as well
as Hispanic pastors.
The effort is part of a na-
tional GOP campaign to ap-
peal to Latino voters after
the 2012 election. Mitt
Romney received just
27 percent of the Hispanic
vote, the lowest portion for
a Republican in 16 years.
Nationwide, the RNC has
deployed 20 staffers to 10
Latino-rich states with com-
petitive elections this fall.
Operatives are registering
Hispanics to vote and gaug-
ing voter opinions.
In Florida, Hispanics
made up 17 percent of the
electorate in 2012, up from
14 percent in 2008.
Four charged with
feeding sharks
WEST PALM BEACH -
Four employees of two
South Florida dive boat op-
erations have been charged
with illegally feeding sharks.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission reported Thursday
that it launched an investi-
gation in February after re-
ceiving several complaints
that shark feeding was tak-
ing place off the coast of
Palm Beach County during
dive charter trips.
Officials have charged
Randall Jordan and
Thomas Smith, of Emerald
Charters of Jupiter, and
Luis Roman and Toni
Crumrine, of Calypso Dive
Charters, with operating a
vessel for hire within state
waters to allow passengers
to observe fish feeding. Jor-
dan and Roman were also
charged with fish feeding.
Each count carries up to 60
days in jail and a $500 fine.
Fish feeding in Florida


waters has been illegal
since 2002.
-From wire reports






A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Don't just think about it -
take control of your destiny this year.
Collaborative efforts will not offer the
most beneficial opportunities. Have
faith in your abilities and do what
comes naturally Step to the forefront,
because it's time to show the world
what you have to offer.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Take a
look at the bigger picture. You can
broaden your horizons by getting in-
volved in new interests.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You will
be approached by someone wanting
details of your investment dealings.
Don't gamble. Ignore promises of in-
stant financial rewards, and keep your
money matters private.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- You may
have a false impression of the circum-
stances surrounding you. Get all the
facts before you make any accusations
or declarations, or you could damage
your reputation.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Ad-
vancement or a change in career could
be coming your way.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Show your
competitive side to come out on top of
any challenge you face.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There is
some conflict going on around you.
Zero in on your own objectives, or you
may be caught up in the middle of an
unpleasant emotional situation.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Set your
sights on a particular goal. You have all of
the talent necessary to succeed, but you
may have to resort to some unorthodox
methods to get what you want.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Even
though you work hard, you may fall
short of your objectives. To speed up
your progress, develop a different
method to achieve your goals.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Rather than depress yourself by reliv-
ing past problems, set your sights on
the future.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You
need to be proactive to exploit an op-
portunity that comes your way
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
sit at home feeling lonely. Congeniality
will be instrumental in helping you
make new friends.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It's time
to make a clean sweep. Put your af-
fairs in order and donate or dispose of
unwanted objects. Refresh your envi-
ronment, and your mind will feel re-
freshed as well.


ENTERTAINMENT


Disney inviting
'small world'
sing-along videos
NEW YORK Disney on Fri-
day launched a website to cre-
ate a global sing-along for "it's a
small world," marking 50 years
since the classic attraction with
the unforgettable earworm of a
song opened at the 1964
World's Fair in New York.
The "it's a small world" ride
became a centerpiece of Dis-
neyland in Anaheim, Calif., in
1966, and the famous song still
plays in a continuous loop at
"small world" rides in Disney
parks.
The new website, www.
SmallWorld50.com, invites the
public to submit videos of them-
selves singing the song. Fans
can also create virtual dolls on
the site, mixing and matching
faces, clothes and other ele-
ments to build a unique avatar-
like figure.
Walt Disney wanted the
music and lyrics to be catchy
and easy for kids to sing, but
some adults find the tune inexpli-
cably maddening, lodging in the
brain for hours after emerging
from the 12-minute boat ride.
The original "small world" at-
traction was billed in 1964 as "a
salute to UNICEF and all the
world's children." To mark the
50th, Disney is donating
$150,000 to UNICEF and will
donate another $1 for each
video and doll posted or shared
on SmallWorld50.com or related
social media, up to $100,000.
The World's Fair opened
April 22, 1964, in Flushing
Meadows Park in Queens.
The fair hosted more than
51 million visitors over two
years. A 12-story-tall steel globe
called the Unisphere still marks
the place where the fair was


SWALT DISNEY'S
Uj/H C t r..*i


WA i D-. I 0LN

WALT DISNEYS
* 1 *. .. '; 0 s


Associated Press
People wait to enter the "it's a small world" attraction at the
1964 World's Fair in New York. Disney is marking the 50th
anniversary of the ride's debut at the fair with a website,
SmallWorld50.com, that invites the public to post videos of
themselves singing the ride theme song.


held in Queens. Local officials
also plan activities to commemo-
rate the anniversary of the fair.
The SmallWorld50.com site
launched with a video of singers
from 25 countries performing the
song. On April 10, a live sing-
along will be held at Disneyland
and Disney World, and will be
paired with sing-alongs recorded
earlier in the day from other Dis-
ney parks, to air on "Good Morn-
ing America" along with others
singing snippets of the song.
Martha Wainwright
working on memoir
due in 2016
NEW YORK -A member of
folk music royalty, singer-song-
writer Martha Wainwright, is
working on a memoir.
Wainwright has a deal with
Flatiron Books for "Stories I Might
Regret Telling You," set to come
out in early 2016. Wainwright is
the daughter of musicians
Loudon Wainwright III and the
late Kate McGarrigle, and the
sister of Rufus Wainwright.
Flatiron, an imprint of Macmil-


lan, announced Friday that the
book will be an intimate story,
covering such topics as her fa-
mous family, her "strange love
affairs" and dabbling with drugs
and alcohol.
$5-million stolen
Rembrandt found
after 15 years
PARIS -A stolen Rem-
brandt masterpiece valued at
more than $5 million has been
found in Nice and returned to its
rightful owners after 15 years in
the wilderness.
The haunting chiaroscuro oil
painting, "Child with a Soap Bub-
ble," was raided from the Draguig-
nan Museum in July 1999 by
robbers who slipped in through an
adjacent library amid celebrations
for the Bastille Day holiday.
Authorities recovered the 17th-
century work Tuesday inside a
Nice home and returned it to cura-
tor Jeanine Bussieres Thursday
in an emotional ceremony.
Two suspects have been
detained.
-From wire reports


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March 22, the
81st day of 2014. There are 284
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 22,1934, the first
Masters Tournament opened under
the title "Augusta National Invitation
Tournament," which was won three
days later by Horton Smith.
On this date:
In 1312, Pope Clement V issued
a papal bull ordering dissolution of
the Order of the Knights Templar.
In 1765, the British Parliament
passed the Stamp Act of 1765 to
raise money from the American
colonies, which fiercely resisted the
tax. (The Stamp Act was repealed a
year later.)
In 1894, hockey's first Stanley
Cup championship game was
played; home team Montreal de-
feated Ottawa, 3-1.
In 1963, The Beatles'debut
album, "Please Please Me," was re-
leased in the United Kingdom by
Parlophone.
Ten years ago: Terry Nichols
went on trial for his life in the Okla-
homa City bombing. (Nichols, al-
ready serving a life sentence for his
conviction on federal charges, was
found guilty of 161 state murder
charges, but was again spared the
death penalty when the jury
couldn't agree on his sentence.)
Five years ago: The Mount Re-
doubt volcano in Alaska began
erupting (it took about six months to
settle down.
One year ago: The Internal Rev-
enue Service said it was a mistake
for employees to have made a
$60,000 training video spoofing
"Star Trek" and "Gilligan's Island."
Today's Birthdays: Composer-
lyricist Stephen Sondheim is 84.
Evangelist broadcaster Pat Robert-
son is 84. Actor William Shatner is
83. CNN newscaster Wolf Blitzer is
66. Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber
is 66. Sportscaster Bob Costas is 62.
Thought for Today: "Do not the
most moving moments of our lives
find us without words?" Marcel
Marceau, French mime (1923-
2007).


City H I
Daytona Bch. 81
Fort Lauderdale 82
Fort Myers 84
Gainesville 79
Homestead 83
Jacksonville 79
Key West 81
Lakeland 85
Melbourne 83


L F'cast City
59 sh Miami
68 ts Ocala
63 pc Orlando
54 ts Pensacola
66 ts Sarasota
56 ts Tallahassee
73 pc Tampa
59 f Vero Beach
62 ts W. Palm Bch.


H L Fcast


MARINE OUTLOOK


Today South winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and inland
waters a light chop. Tonight: West
winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet
or less. Bay and inland waters a light
chop.


180ao/51 o.o,1| 157 0.0"
THREE DAY OUTLOOK by:
NW TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 81* Low: 56
,,lSpe- Partly sunny. 20% chance of showers.

.......... ,,,r SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High:81 Low:58
Partly sunny and breezy. 20% chance of
wool. showers.
W W-R. MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 58
.i i Mostly cloudy and breezy. Rain likely.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 85/60
Record /35
Normal 77/59
Mean temp. 66
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00
Total for the month 2.54"
Total for the year 7.49"
Normal for the year 7.10"
As ol 7 p.m. atl Inverness
UVINDEX: 10
0-2mlnimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. %
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 9.1/12
Sunday's count: 10.3
Monday's count: 8.4
AIR QUALITY
Friday observed: 56
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES HndrM
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
03/22 SATURDAY 23:39 04:38 10:36 17:08
03/23 SUNDAY 00:36 05:34 11:33 18:05
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TUUIBS T ...........................7:41 p.m
30 SUNROE TOUNNOW 729am
MOO N SETOUDAY 12 37a.m.
Mar 23 Mar 30 Apr7 Apr 15 m n"M ...................11:35 a.m.
Mar 23 Mar 30 Apr7 Apr15 OOSTSA1I3a.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more nfomalion call Florida Divsion of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informanion o drcug, cofg l liorS p .-e.e v.ill rh3l Dioi' of Foreslry s wet sde
ht ,/llame fl-d l -:,oml~ire. ,alte 'lbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watemg limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.. as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand wateeg with a shut-off nozzle or mictro irrigation of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shaubs, can be done on any day and at any
time.
Citrus County Ui ies' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new planrirus mmay qualriv for ac lionar
watering allowances.
To report violations ptaas call Ciy of Irnverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal
River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, iunincoporaled Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay ."At Mason's Creek
SATURDAY
City High Low
Chassahiowka" 12:08 p,m. 0.2 It. 8:00 am. 0.1 ft. 4:08pm0.2fl.
CrystalRtver" :34 a.m. 1.51t- 10:23p.m. 2.2 fl. 4:49 am. 0.2 t. 4:04 p.mOD.9 ft.
Withtacoochee* 7:53am,. 2.41. 6:25p.m. 3.1-f :59a.m, -0o1 t. 1:23p.m.1.411.
Homosassa"' 11:15a.m. 0.6 l:30pm. 13pmI.ft. 6:46a.m. 0.31t. 4:20p.mO.2 ft.


Gulf water
temperature


69
o"e t rpl


LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.33 29.39 35.52
Tsafa Apopka-Hernando 38.59 38.59 39.52
Tsala Apopka.lnverness 39.70 39.71 40.60
Tsala Apopka -Floral City 40.37 40.39 42.20
Levels reported in feel above sea level, Flood stage for akes awe based on 2.33-year flood,
Ihe men-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in
any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwiest Florida Water Managemel nt District
an.3 is subie,:l TO flew In n ,3 enl wii tne Distr'ci c ime Un'ted Siai-s Gect,-gical Surey
-. latle I.:4 any 0,magfe- e3ing. Ou! ti ine e01 tI.,. ata i you a.e an* au, .?Sor.s t .i
snouui ocn r ap Hdrciogicai DatA Seor. i a3521 -;6.721 i


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charieston, S.C.
Charleston, W.V.
Chariotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colurnmbla, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Molnes
Datroll
EI Paso
Evansville, IN
Hari-lrsburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianrapols
Las Vegas
Little Rlock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FRI
H L Pcp. H
37 33 43
70 39 66
64 28 69
68 40 59
56 33 68
o80 54 74
53 31 .07 66
33 23 .06 27
71 35 71
33 24 51
45 36 51
36 26 .01 40
39 31 36
71 43 78
69 38 61
69 30 77
57 30 39
69 34 53
47 27 .01 39
78 45 48
64 35 49
37 32 39
82 53 63
50 24 36
60 34 36
41 24 45
79 61 78
69 43 55
54 34 58
45 36 52
78 50 76
68 36 49
77 52 77
75 38 60
67 55 64
73 41 56
72 41 62
41 26 36
45 3O 23
77 44 76
75 39 76
70 34 63


SAT FBI SAT
LFcst City H L Pcp. H LFcst
16 I NewOrleans 75 53 76 64 ts
39 pc Now Yotk City 51 39 63 29 pc
38 sh Norfolk 67 34 76 38 pc
41 pc Oklahoma City 76 48 56 34 ts
31 pc Omaha 59 30 36 17 pc
53 pc Palm Sprlngs 82 53 80 58 pc
36 pc Philadelphla 55 34 66 34 pc
18 sn Phoenix 85 56 81 56 pc
45 is Pittsburgh 45 24 .05 48 20 pc
31 pc Portland, ME 41 33 39 18 sn
25 f1 Portland, OR 56 35 59 36 1
17 f1 Providence ,RI 45 32 54 27 pc
13 sn Raleigh 89 32 76 40 pc
56 sh RapidCity 35 26 27 16 sn
29 sh Reno 63 37 60 30 pc
40 pc Rochester, NY 38 29 -02 40 16 r
21 pc Sacramento 75 45 76 47 pc
29 pc Salt Lake City 53 35 54 34 pc
21 fl SanAntonio 81 54 79 56 pc
23 pc San Diego 67 62 62 55 pc
26 pc San Francisco 64 48 60 51 pc
16 sn Savannah 72 43 78 56 sh
44 is Seattle 50 37 53 40 r
20 sn Spokane 44 24 48 29 pc
18 pc St. Louis 77 49 50 25 pc
19 pc St.Ste Manrie 35 14 21 1 Ifl
53 pc Syracuse 34 27 01 41 14 fl
30 pc Topeka 67 40 49 22 cd
31 pc Washington 57 44 68 36 pc
23 II YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
58 is "M 91.wDryden.Texas
25 pc LOW 46. Yllowtone., Wyo-
54 PC
41 is WORLD CITIES
55 pc SAT Usbon 6251tpc
33 P CMITY WLISKY London 53137/pc
42 sh
Is pC Acapulco 87F73/s Madnrid 69146/pc
S Amsterdam 50(39r Mexico City 84/55/s
52 pc Athens 64/48/s Montreal] 37/19fpc
52 cd Beijing 69/146/1s Moscow 37/33/pc
39 sh Be!lin 69/42/pc Paris 55/42/r


Bermuda 66/B4/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cIouy drdrlle Cairo 7753/s
f=tair hhay; papaUy cloudy; rran Calgary 19/3/sn
rs-rakVswow mix; s-inny; sthshowes Havana 82/66ts
n-MfWso sthulertonrms; w wlkdy. Hong Kong 66/60/pc
WIO214 Jerusalem 73/50/s


Rio 86/73/ts
Rome 69/48/S
Sydney 6o/66/pc
Tokyo 59/39/pc
Toronto 37/33/pc
Warsaw 69/48fpc


C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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April 5, 2014 I 1
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w w w c h r o nico ic/muov n


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Marilyn
Baggett, 90
LECANTO
Marilyn I. Baggett, 90, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
peacefully March 19, 2014.
She was born in Colum-
bus, Ga., Feb. 8,1924, to the
late Sterling A. Lenoir and
Minnie Lee Stewart. Mari-
lyn married Osbond V
Baggett, June 19, 1948, and
they were married for
61 years, spending most of
their years in Miami, then
Fruitland Park, and finally
Lecanto. Marilyn and Obby
started an upholstery shop
in Miami and then Obby got
a job with the Miami Fire
Department and Marilyn
became a full-time house-
wife. Marilyn was kind and
loved everyone, and in re-
turn, everyone who knew
her loved her She recently
celebrated her 90th birth-
day with a grand open
house attended by many
friends and family She
was under the care of Gulf
to Lake Church Care Min-
istry, Woodland Terrace
nursing home and Hospice
of Citrus County
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her daughter Gwen
Cook and husband Glen;
her daughter-in-law San-
dra Baggett-McCandless of
Sevierville, Tenn.; grandson
Timothy E. Baggett and wife
Carrie Denise Baggett;
three great-grandchildren,
TJ. Baggett, Tyler Baggett
and Tiffany Baggett, of
Blaine, Tenn.; and a spe-
cial nephew, Don Baggett
of Duluth, Ga. Marilyn was
preceded in death by her
husband Osbond V Baggett
in 2010 and son Newell E.
Baggett in 2008.
A private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Beyers Funeral
Home in Leesburg. In re-
membering Marilyn, you
may donate to Hospice of
Citrus County or the Salva-
tion Army Online condo-
lences may be left at www.
beyersfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements entrusted
to Beyers Funeral Home
and Crematory, Leesburg.




Ned Dye Jr., 88
LECANTO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Ned Dye,
Jr, age 88, of Lecanto,
Florida, will be held 11:30
AM, Tuesday, March 25,
2014 at the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Pastor Lloyd
Bertine, Pastor Leary
Willis and Mr Cary Hamil-
ton officiating. Interment
will follow at Fountains
Memorial Park, Ho-
mosassa, Florida. The
family will receive friends
from 10:30 AM until 11:30
AM, Tuesday at the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Following
committal services every-
one is invited for fellow-
ship and a continued
sharing of memories at the
Homosassa Lions Club.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at www
HooperFuineralHome.com.
Mr Dye was born June
16, 1925 in Mitchell, GA,
son of Ned and Myrtle
(Johnson) Dye. He died
March 20, 2014 in Lecanto,
FL. Mr. Dye was a Navy
veteran serving during
World War II. He worked
as a Mechanic for Florida
Power Corp. and moved to
Lecanto from Lake County
in 1971. He enjoyed hunt-
ing and fishing and was a
member of Gulf to Lake
Church, Crystal River
Mr. Dye was preceded in
death by his parents, his
wife, Effie A. Dye and 4
brothers, Raymond, Frank,
Luke and Roy Dye. Sur-
vivors include 5 sons,
Ronald Dye, Steven Dye
Sr, Kenneth Dye, Cecil
Dye, Benion Dye, a
daughter, Marshi (Cliff)
Hadley, 2 brothers, Bill
Dye, Allen Dye, 14 grand-
children, 25 great grand-
children and 13 great-


great grandchildren.

Charlotte
Goldberger, 92
HOMOSASSA
Mrs. Charlotte Gold-
berger, 92, of Homosassa,
Fla., died Thursday March
20, 2014, in Inverness.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the
Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory


Carol Hart, 88
FLORAL CITY
Carol J. Hart, of Floral
City, Fla., died March 20,
2014. She was born in Buf-
falo, N.Y, March 30, 1925,
spending her early life in
Gowanda, N.Y
She is survived by her
daughters Barbara Hart,
Cathy Foley, Cindy and
husband Fernando Gallo;
as well as seven grandchil-
dren; and six great-grand-
children. Carol was
preceded in death by her
husband Robert Hart
(2002) and
Then her
loving
compan-
ion Dodi
Mac Leod
(2012).
She had
a long and
Carol wonderful
Hart life, trav-
eling worldwide. She
owned and operated sev-
eral businesses in Pinellas
County, including The
Snoop Shop and The
Florida Suncoast Bed and
Breakfast Agency Carol
was a licensed Realtor and
a sales agent for Laura
Brown Travel. She was an
award-winning gardener, a
member and officer in the
Floral City Garden Club as
well as being very involved
for a number of years in
the Oak Forest Home Own-
ers Association.
A memorial service will
be 3 p.m. Friday, April 4,
2014, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory The family invites
friends to join them in vis-
itation from 2:30 p.m. until
the hour of service. In lieu
of flowers, please make a
contribution to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 or a charity of your
choice.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.




Elinor Rieker, 91
LECANTO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Elinor
Shepherd Rieker, age 91,
of Lecanto, Florida, will be
held 3:30 PM, Monday,
March 24,
2014 at
Oak Ridge
Cemetery
with
Chaplain
Chuck
Cooley of-
ficiating.
Elinor The fam-
Rieker ily will re-
ceive friends from 2:00 PM
until 4:00 PM, Sunday at
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
The family requests ex-
pressions of sympathy take
the form of memorial do-
nations to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Online condolences
may be sent to the family
at www.HooperFuneral
Home.com.
She and her sister,
Elaine were born May 18,
1922 in Hibbing, MN,
daughters of Roy and
Anna (Schregardus) Shep-
herd. She died March 19,
2014 in Lecanto. Elinor
grew up in Russellville, AL
and is the last member of
the family of eight They
moved to her mother's
home in Iowa during the
Depression. She went to
business school and was in
the military in World War
II. Her adult life was spent
in Brooklyn, NY with her
husband, Edwin, where
she was employed by the
Army at the Eastern Area,
Military Traffic Manage-
ment and Terminal Serv-
ices in the Finance and
Accounting Division. In
1975 they retired to Inver-
ness to join his family Eli-
nor was a member of the
Lutheran Church and en-
joyed volunteering there.
She was an AARP volun-
teer helping others with


taxes. Everyone knew her
as a hostess and growing
up in a musical family, she
loved to sing and to attend
musicals. Later years were
spent at Brentwood where
she enjoyed senior activi-
ties and good care. Her
twin is buried at Bronson
and sister, Dorothea at
Bushnell.
There are several nieces
and nephews, Godchil-
dren and friends left to re-
member her


Joseph
Prive', 99
INVERNESS
Joseph Alfred Prive', 99,
died March 20, 2014, at his
home in Inverness, Fla.
Joe was born Nov 9, 1914,
in Masonville, Quebec,
Canada, to the late Joseph
and Josephine Prive'. He
served his country in the
U.S. Army, Company B,
2nd Armored Replace-
ment Battalion as a tank
mechanic. He was origi-
nally assigned under Gen.
George Patton, but literally
missed the boat and ended
up following him through
North Africa and Europe.
After the war he married
the late Carmen Florence
Kane, a marriage that
lasted 63 years. They
moved to Tampa from St.
Albans, Vt, in 1963, where
Joe worked as a master
plumber and technician.
Upon retirement, Joe
moved to Inverness and
continued helping neigh-
bors and family with his
many do-it-yourself skills.
He also ran a small lawn-
care business for many
years. Joe liked to attend
the VFW He also enjoyed
boating and fishing in his
beloved lake.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his two daughters
Alice, Seffner, Fla., and
Jane and her husband
Bruce Giller, Silver Spring,
Md.; five sons, David and
his wife Diane Handley,
Tampa, Paul and his part-
ner Keith Langford,
Seffner, and Steven, John
and James, Inverness. He
also leaves behind 10
grandchildren, Jeanne,
Brian, Erin, Nikki, Greg,
Jesse, Amanda, Loren,
Janelle and Juliann; and
10 great-grandchildren.
One of eight siblings, he is
survived by his sister
Theresa and was preceded
in death by brothers
George and Raymond and
sisters Antoinette, Biola,
Alexina and Gertrude.
A memorial service will
be 11 a.m. Friday, April 11,
2014, at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
For information on
submitting an obituary,
call 352-563-5660 or
send an email to obits
@chronicleonline.com


Charles
Stewart, 56
HOMOSASSA
Charles G. Stewart, 56, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Sunday, March 16, 2014, at
his residence. Private
arrangements provided by
Cremation Center of The
Nature Coast, Crystal
River

Louise M.
Wildes, 93
HOMOSASSA
Louise M. Wildes, 93, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
March 17, 2014. A celebra-
tion of her life will be
10 a.m. March 28, at the
Sugarmill Manor in Ho-
mosassa. Arrangements
are under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory of Crystal
River

Justina
Popp, 75
INVERNESS
Justina D. Popp, 75, In-
verness, Fla., died Thurs-
day, March 20, 2014, at
Hospice of Citrus County
Service 11 a.m. Saturday,
March 29, 2014, at First
Baptist Church of Floral
City Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.

OBITUARIES
All obituaries
are archived at
chronicleonline.com.


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Appeals court upholds

Fed's cap on 'swipe' fees


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
federal appeals court has
handed a defeat to a
coalition of retail groups
that challenged as too high
the Federal Reserve's cap
on how much banks can
charge businesses for
debit card transactions.
The ruling issued Friday
by the U.S. Appeals Court
for the District of Columbia
overturned a lower court's
decision in July that fa-
vored the merchants and
was a setback for banks.
In the July ruling, a fed-
eral judge struck down
the Fed's cap on so-called
"swipe fees," saying the Fed
didn't have the authority
to set the limit the way it
did in 2011, improperly
including data that made
the cap too high.
The retail groups had
sued the Fed over its setting
the cap at an average of
about 24 cents per debit-
card transaction. The ap-
peals court ruling upholding


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland, LFD & Brian Ledsome, LFD
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


the Fed's cap was a blow to
an industry already buf-
feted by public and con-
gressional outrage over
the massive data breach
that hit Target Corp. dur-
ing the holiday season
and other data-security
violations at big retailers.
Congress mandated a
ceiling on debit-card swipe
fees as part of the 2010 fi-
nancial regulatory over-
haul. Prior to the cap, fees
averaged 44 cents per
swipe.
The retailers had ar-
gued the Fed deviated
from the 2010 law's intent
by factoring banks' ex-
penses into the cap that
the law didn't allow
The three-judge panel
of the appeals court said
that in making that argu-
ment, "far from summiting
the steep hill, the merchants
have barely left basecamp."
The judges said they de-
cided to defer to the Fed's
"reasonable interpreta-
tion" of the law and reject
the retailers' challenge.

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JEREMIAH WINDHAM
Memorial: Sat. 11:00 AM
First Baptist Church of Rutland
WILLIAM KENDALL
Service: Sat. 3:00 PM
JOSEPH HARRELL
Visitation: Sun. 4:00-6:00 PM
Service: Mon. 1:00 PM
ELEANOR CASTER
Service: Sat. March 29 3:00 PM
726-8323


IServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694J
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Obituaries


REFresh RENew REVamp


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A ~25%~off -
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Citrus County Mosquito Control would like to invite
the Citizens of Citrus County to

visit our
Headquarter's Office
located at
968 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, FI.
during our

"Open House"

Thursday, March 27, 2014

10 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.
OOOHNZV


A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


FRIy





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


DUI arrest
Mark Wessel, 46, of South
Stanley Terrace, Homosassa, at
9:44 p.m. March 20 on a misde-
meanor charge of driving under the
influence. He also faces charges of
misdemeanor DUI with damage to
property, possession of cannabis,
and felony feeing law enforcement.
According to his arrest affidavit, Wes-
sel crashed into the rear of an un-
marked sheriff's vehicle at a traffic
signal at the intersection of State
Road 44 and Independence High-
way. He reportedly fled the scene
and was eventually pulled over by a
deputy in a marked vehicle. Wessel
was asked to perform field sobriety
tests and did poorly. He refused
Breathalyzer tests to measure his
blood alcohol concentration. After the
arrest, three marijuana "roaches" in
a cigarette box were found on the dri-
ver's side floor board. Bond $2,500.
Domestic battery
arrests
John De Jacimo, 51, of Bev-
erly Hills, at 5:25 p.m. March 20 on a
misdemeanor charge of domestic
battery.
Hope Lohr, 23, of Inverness, at
11:50 p.m. March 20 on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic battery.
She was also charged with felony vi-
olation of probation.
Other arrests
James Foust Jr., 48, at
9:16 a.m. March 20 on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit theft.
According to his arrest report, Foust
is accused of shoplifting playing
cards, medication and other small
items, valued at $35.25, from the
Crystal River Dollar General. When
approached by loss-prevention em-
ployees, he reportedly fled on a bicy-
cle. Bond $250.
Bernard Rutkowski, 40, of In-
glis, at 1:04 p.m. March 20 on a


felony charge of sexual battery on a
victim over the age of 12 without
consent while the victim was
incapacitated.
Ashley McGrath, 29, of West
Caraway Place, Lecanto, at
3:03 p.m. March 20 on a misde-
meanor charge of drug parapherna-
lia. According to her arrest affidavit,
deputies came to the residence to in-
vestigate a potential narcotics issue.
Two clear plastic baggies containing
methamphetamine residue were
found in her possession. She was re-
leased on her own recognizance.
Thomas Pina, 52, of Crystal
River, at 3 p.m. March 20 on a felony
charge of failing to change his dri-
ver's license within 48 hours of relo-
cating as a registered sex offender.
According to his arrest affidavit, Pina
moved from his registered address in
Citrus Springs on March 1 and did
not contact law enforcement or
change his driver's license. Pina is
reportedly staying at a motel in Crys-
tal River. Bond $20,000.
Ronald Speckner Jr., 43, of
South Berkshire Avenue, Inverness,
at 2:36 p.m. March 20 on an active
warrant for felony conspiracy to com-
mit a crime. According to his arrest
affidavit, Speckner is accused of con-
spiring to manufacture methamphet-
amine. Bond $50,000.
James Talbot Jr., 52, of South
Lee Street, Beverly Hills at 6:19 p.m.
March 20 on an active warrant for
felony petit theft. According to his ar-
rest affidavit, Talbot turned himself in
to the Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
Bond $2,000.
Christopher Jones, 22, of East
Turner Camp Road, Inverness, at
10:50 p.m. March 20 on felony
charges of possession of a controlled
substance and tampering with evi-
dence, along with a misdemeanor
charge of resisting an officer without


violence. According to his arrest affi-
davit, Jones was observed pulling
into the Circle K parking lot in Inver-
ness. He remained in his vehicle and
a short time later another vehicle
pulled up beside him and a possible
drug transaction reportedly took
place. After the transaction, Jones
was followed by deputies and pulled
over for speeding. Seven oxycodone
pills were found in his possession,
and he was reportedly attempting to
destroy the pills by grinding them
against the curb where he was sit-
ting. Bond $7,500.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
SA vehicle burglary was reported
at 1:37 p.m. Thursday, March 20, in
the 7000 block of W. Sasser St.,
Homosassa.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported at 8:57
a.m. Thursday, March 20, in the 700
block of S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported at
11:39 a.m. March 20 in the 600 block
of W. Lightwood St., Dunnellon.
A grand theft was reported at
11:58 a.m. March 20 in the 50 block
of Beverly Hills Blvd., Beverly Hills.
A grand theft was reported at
1:20 p.m. March 20 in the 700 block
of Moray Drive, Inverness.
A grand theft was reported at
4:20 p.m. March 20 in the 2300 block
of W. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto.
EAgrand theftwas reported at 5:01
p.m. March 20 in the 11000 block of
W. Timberlane Drive, Homosassa.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported at
12:55 p.m. Thursday, March 20, in
the 9600 block of W. Sandra St.,
Crystal River.


SPRINGS
Continued from PageAl

is not set in stone, but will be-
come a yearly process.
"Some bad parts will fall off,"
he said, "and new parts will be
added to it."
He cited the enthusiasm of
everyone wanting to get involved
and the momentum he believes
that will carry to the next gener-
ation of legislators.
Dean said it now goes over to
the House and is not high on its
leadership list.
"I don't know how much we're
going to get, but we won't be de-
nied," he said. "We just want to
have enough to do a little good."
"We're on a roll," he said.
"We're going to get there."
The bill would create the
Florida Springs and Aquifer Act.
It would require the Department
of Environmental Protection to
delineate the springs protection
and management zone for each
outstanding Florida spring.
It prohibits specified activities
within the zones. It addresses
minimum flows and levels,
runoff, waste treatment, septic
tanks, fertilizer, agriculture and
the roles of local government
and water management districts.
PROJECT FUNDING
Project funding would come
from documentary stamp tax
revenues.
Michael Harrell, lobbyist for
Citrus County, said Dean's bill
would about cost about $340 mil-
lion, while the House would con-
sider a much smaller amount.
"They will end up somewhere in
the middle," he said.
However, the lobbyist thinks
next year could be a bigger year


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Today, March 22

Yulee Dr., Old Homosassa, FL
9 AM 6 PM Parade Starts at 10 AM
Shrimp, Food, Beer & Wine, Vendors,
Kid's Zone, Arts & Crafts


Mitch & The Zydeco Band
Susanne Smith Band
Dave Hunt & The Southern Branded Band


Live
Music


Supported by S CRYSTAL
(b-. (,iT|<()(--iirAmeriprise. M A- oID M -0 1fVB
iGgg"WO W4 R AL MOM
w~~b M O NO W iwvl^ jii *


Noon:
2 PM:
4 PM:


Springs 0) 4
Hi-
Halls River Rd. W. Grover Cleveland


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Florida Department of Environmental
Protection Secretary Hershel
Vinyard was the keynote speaker
Thursday at the annual Citrus
County Legislative Day luncheon
in Tallahassee.
for springs funding. He said Rep.
Steve Crisafulli, R-Merritt Island,
the incoming speaker of the
House, wants to own the water
issue.
"You can get big bang for your
bucks," said Adam Putnam, com-
missioner of Agriculture and
Community Affairs, in terms of
springs' preservation. "We can
afford to fix the first-magnitude
springs."
"I view the springs issue as
there is still time to do things,"
he said, "without the craze that
has overtaken Everglades'
restoration."
"This administration has spent
more money on springs in the
last three years than in any three
years in Florida's history," said
Hershel Vinyard, secretary of the
Department of Environmental
Protection, citing the Three Sis-
ters banks stabilization project.
"Get ready; I'm sure we're
going to have a big chunk of
change available for springs,"
he said. "Get your plans to-
gether and tell us where the
match is coming from. The gov-
ernor has proposed $55 million
this year for additional
springs' projects."


LOCAL


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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1,920 ................................. S& P 500
.;,:, Close: 1,866.52
Change: -5.49 (-0.3%)
1,800 10 DAYS .........


16,040........ 10 DAYS ....


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 16,302.77
Change: -28.28 (-0.2%)


900l ....................................................... .............. 17,000 ......................................... .......................
1,850 ....................................... 16,500 ................... ........... .
1800 ................................... 16,000"i .............."-..
1,750 0 ........ .... ......... ..................... 15,500 .""



S1 7 0140
1650 N .. ....N
1,50 .......... ............ ....................... ...... ...............145,000-;N D... ......F..... ..


StocksRecap
NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 4,939
Pvs. Volume 3,271
Advanced 1818
Declined 1288
New Highs 196
New Lows 18


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16456.45
7588.57
526.22
10481.91
4344.39
1883.97
1393.60
20188.89
1208.14


LOW
16290.79
7507.35
517.32
10381.77
4268.34
1863.46
1379.12
19979.74
1192.80


CLOSE
16302.77
7515.18
521.66
10392.22
4276.79
1866.52
1379.87
20007.07
1193.73


%CHG.
-0.17%
-0.36%
+0.84%
-0.08%
-0.98%
-0.29%
-0.13%
-0.32%
-0.44%


YTD
-1.65%
+1.55%
+6.34%
-0.08%
+2.40%
+0.98%
+2.78%
+1.53%
+2.59%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 8.47 6.97 +.27 +4.0 A A V -15.0 +89.8 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 -0-- 39.00 34.30 +.21 +0.6 A A -2.4 -0.8 10 1.84f
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -0- 62.05 52.92 -.11 -0.2 A A A +0.5 +24.3 25 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 -- 106.83 101.94 +1.41 +1.4 A A V -4.2 +7.2 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 11.23 0 18.00 17.56 -.36 -2.0 A A A +12.8 +40.5 17 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -- 14.59 13.68 -.09 -0.7 A A A +16.2 +15.0 39 0.08
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 -0-- 38.40 31.34 -.03 -0.1 A A V -1.6 -3.0 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 41.60 --- 55.28 50.08 -.14 -0.3 A A -3.9 +9.0 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 19.55 28.10 26.90 -.12 -0.4 V V A +15.4 +20.4 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 55.76 83.65 80.35 -.46 -0.6 A A A +5.2 +43.4 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -0- 75.46 69.08 -.09 -0.1 V 7 A +0.1 +2.7 18 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.69 -0- 61.18 53.40 +.45 +0.8 V A A +8.6 +10.0 16 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 -0- 101.74 94.31 -.27 -0.3 A 7 7 -6.8 +9.6 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.15 -0- 18.02 15.47 -.08 -0.5 A A A +0.3 +19.6 9 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 21.11 --- 28.09 25.40 +.13 +0.5 A A 7 -9.4 +11.2 19 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 35.20 52.49 50.14 +.71 +1.4 A A A +5.1 +28.2 15
Home Depot HD 68.42 83.20 80.42 +.33 +0.4 A A 7 -2.3 +18.7 21 1.88f
Intel Corp INTO 20.75 --- 27.12 25.17 -.26 -1.0 A A 7 -3.0 +24.3 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0-- 215.82 186.67 -1.23 -0.7 A A -0.5 -10.9 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.28 -0-- 34.32 25.74 -.07 -0.3 V 7 7 -21.8 +22.0 25
Lowes Cos LOW 37.09 --0- 52.08 49.25 -.30 -0.6 A A 7 -0.6 +30.8 23 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 --- 103.70 95.47 -1.13 -1.2 V 7 7 -1.6 +1.0 17 3.24
Microsoft Corp MSFT 27.81 0 40.65 40.16 -.17 -0.4 A A A +7.4 +46.0 15 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 0 67.69 66.81 +.15 +0.2 A A 7 -1.0 +8.7 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 73.96 0 95.28 94.57 +1.03 +1.1 A A A +10.5 +27.1 22 2.90f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 --- 19.63 8.49 +.13 +1.6 7 A 7 -7.2 -48.3 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 --- 21.09 16.90 +.27 +1.6 A 7 A +2.3 -10.8 31 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 7.62 0 11.37 11.09 -.21 -1.9 A A A +12.1 +36.0 14 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 32.85 -- 67.50 47.94 -.56 -1.2 A A 7 -2.2 -7.3 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -0-- 114.72 96.02 -.68 -0.7 7 -7.3 +2.3 18 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 33.56 0 46.97 47.15 +.20 +0.4 A A A +7.4 +37.2 27 1.20
Time Warner TWX 55.17 -- 70.77 66.34 -.16 -0.2 7 A 7 -4.8 +20.1 17 1.27f
UniFirst Corp UNF 86.49 -- 117.91 110.61 -.27 -0.2 A 7 A +3.4 +26.2 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 -0-- 54.31 46.91 -.30 -0.6 A 7 7 -4.5 +1.4 12 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 27.49 --- 42.14 37.31 -.07 -0.2 A 7 7 -6.7 +29.5.
WalMartStrs WMT 71.51 -- 81.37 76.10 +.72 +1.0 A A 7 -3.3 +5.9 16 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 42.13 --0- 69.84 64.75 -1.75 -2.6 7 7 A +12.7 +47.2 23 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd- Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates

Elm
fflU

The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
fell to 2.74
percent Friday.
Yields affect
rates on
consumer loans.


Commodities
The price of oil
rose above $99
a barrel on Fri-
day as the U.S.
and European
Union expand-
ed sanctions
against Russia
and warned of
possible penal-
ties against its
energy indus-
try.


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


3-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .06
6-month T-bill .07 0.08 -0.01 .10
52-wk T-bill .12 0.13 -0.01 .12
2-year T-note .43 0.42 +0.01 .26
5-year T-note 1.71 1.70 +0.01 .79
10-year T-note 2.74 2.77 -0.03 1.91
30-year T-bond 3.61 3.67 -0.06 3.13

NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.42 3.47 -0.05 2.87
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.79 4.80 -0.01 4.15
Barclays USAggregate 2.44 2.43 +0.01 1.89
Barclays US High Yield 5.34 5.27 +0.07 5.64
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.44 4.45 -0.01 3.94
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.91 1.91 ... 1.09
Barclays US Corp 3.17 3.17 ... 2.78


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 99.46
Ethanol (gal) 2.86
Heating Oil (gal) 2.92
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.31
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.91
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1336.00
Silver (oz) 20.29
Platinum (oz) 1436.00
Copper (Ib) 2.99
Palladium (oz) 788.75
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.44
Coffee (Ib) 1.71
Corn (bu) 4.79
Cotton (Ib) 0.93
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 335.00
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.53
Soybeans (bu) 14.09
Wheat (bu) 6.93


PVS.
99.43
2.82
2.92
4.37
2.90
PVS.
1330.50
20.40
1434.80
2.98
772.00
PVS.
1.44
1.74
4.79
0.92
340.40
1.54
14.34
7.04


%CHG
+0.56
+0.32
-0.04
-1.28
+0.43
%CHG
+0.41
-0.58
+0.08
+0.60
+2.17
%CHG
-0.29
-1.72
+0.10
+1.23
-1.59
-0.39
-1.74
-1.49


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.54 -.02 +1.0 +16.4 +12.2 +17.1
CaplncBuA m 57.79 +.01 +0.2 +10.5 +9.3 +13.9
CpWIdGrIA m 45.10 -.20 -0.1 +18.7 +10.5 +17.3
EurPacGrA m 48.15 -.12 -1.9 +15.4 +6.3 +15.2
FnlnvA m 51.42 -.19 +0.2 +23.0 +13.2 +20.4
GrthAmA m 43.63 -.46 +1.5 +27.5 +14.9 +20.3
IncAmerA m 20.78 -.01 +1.4 +13.7 +11.1 +16.9
InvCoAmA m 37.06 -.15 +1.4 +25.2 +14.2 +19.2
NewPerspA m 37.27 -.21 -0.8 +19.6 +11.4 +19.1
WAMutlnvA x 39.69 -.24 +1.1 +23.4 +15.6 +21.0
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.77 -.04 -0.6 +20.2 +8.5 +20.0
Stock 171.51 -.53 +1.6 +29.8 +17.1 +24.9
Fidelity Contra 97.37 -.81 +2.3 +28.0 +16.1 +21.5
LowPriStk d 49.99 +.01 +1.1 +24.6 +15.8 +25.0
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 66.43 -.20 +1.4 +23.3 +15.3 +22.0
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.49 +.01 +2.8 +11.7 +9.3 +17.1
IncomeA m 2.46 ... +2.9 +12.4 +9.8 +17.6
Harbor Intllnstl 69.35 -.03 -2.3 +12.1 +6.3 +17.8
Oakmark Intl 1 25.76 +.04 -2.1 +18.7 +11.5 +23.0
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.97 +.04 +0.4 +18.6 +13.4 +22.0
GrowStk 53.25 -.66 +1.3 +33.3 +17.6 +23.6
Vanguard 500Adml x 172.03 -1.29 +1.4 +23.3 +15.3 +22.0
5001lnv x 172.04 -1.24 +1.4 +23.1 +15.2 +21.8
HItCrAdml x 82.10 -4.99 +8.5 +39.0 +24.4 +23.5
MulntAdml 13.94 -.01 +2.3 +0.6 +4.9 +5.1
PrmcpAdml 100.56 -1.13 +5.0 +32.2 +17.6 +22.8
STGradeAd 10.71 ... +0.5 +1.2 +2.5 +5.1
Tgtet2025 15.90 -.02 +1.0 +13.5 +9.6 +16.5
TotBdAdml 10.67 +.02 +1.6 -0.3 +3.4 +4.7
Totlntl 16.33 -.02 -2.5 +9.5 +3.9 +15.1
TotStlAdm 47.60 -.14 +1.9 +24.4 +15.5 +23.0
TotStldx 47.57 -.15 +1.9 +24.3 +15.4 +22.9
Welltn 38.46 -.01 +1.4 +14.3 +11.3 +16.1
WelltnAdm 66.43 -.03 +1.4 +14.4 +11.4 +16.2
WndsllAdm 66.44 +.01 +1.8 +22.4 +15.1 +21.8
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The stock market finished lower
Friday. All of the major indexes
fell less than 1 percent. Early in
the day the S&P 500 set an
all-time intra-day high, but
momentum shifted downward.
Despite Friday's losses, all of
the major indexes moved up for
the week.

Darden Restaurants DRI
Close:$50.66A1.36 or 2.8%
The restaurant operator said its
fourth-quarter revenue slipped 1 per-
cent, hurt by a sales drop at its Red
Lobster chain.



45
1)D J F M
52-week range
$44.78 $55.25
Vol.:2.8m (1.9x avg.) PE: 18.7
Mkt. Cap: $6.65 b Yield: 4.3%
Exelon EXC
Close:$32.55A1.18 or 3.8%
Credit Suisse said the competitive
power sector has reached a bottom
and upgraded the energy provider to
"Outperform."



'D J F M
52-week range
$26.45 $37.80
Vol.:13.9m (2.0x avg.) PE: 16.3
Mkt. Cap: $27.91 b Yield: 3.8%
Media General MEG
Close:$17.44A0.10 or 0.6%
The company is buying fellow TV
broadcaster LIN Media in a deal
worth about $1.6 billion in cash and
stock.

I_,7

i' .1 f r 1
52-week range
$5.40 $23.97
Vol.:2.4m (7.4x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$1.53 b Yield:...
Nike NKE
Close: $75.21 V-4.06 or -5.1 %
The athletic shoe and apparel maker
warned that a stronger U.S. dollar
will dampen its results this quarter.
'$8


D J F M
52-week range
$57.87 $80.26
Vol.:15.8m (4.2x avg.) PE:25.6
Mkt. Cap: $53.21 b Yield: 1.3%
Symantec SYMC
Close:$18.20V-2.71 or-12.9%
The security software maker termi-
nated President and CEO Steve
Bennett and named a temporary re-
placement.



I',
52-week range
$17.95 $27.10
Vol.:60.9m (7.3x avg.) PE: 14.8
Mkt. Cap: $12.59 b Yield: 3.3%


Bright outlook




fades late in day


Associated Press

NEW YORK- An early
surge on the stock market
evaporated Friday, as
health care stocks tugged
major indexes down.
Biotech companies were
especially hard-hit after
U.S. lawmakers ques-
tioned the pricing of a
Hepatitis C drug made by
Gilead Sciences.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index raced past an
all-time high in early trad-
ing, then lost steam in the
afternoon. It still finished
with a solid weekly gain,
up 1.4 percent.
It might sound surpris-
ing that the stock market
is trading near an all-time
high with all the uncer-
tainty surrounding
China's slowing growth
and simmering tensions
between Russia and the
West. Last week, those
concerns were credited
with knocking the S&P 500
index down 1.9 percent, its
worst weekly loss in
nearly two months.
This week investors
seemed to return their
focus to the basics.
"There are always bad
things going on in the
world, but they don't all
matter to the ultimate di-


Associated Press
Specialist Christopher Culhane, left, and trader Vincent
Quinones work Friday on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange.


reaction of markets," said
Douglas Cot6, chief market
strategist at ING U.S. In-
vestment Management.
"The only thing that mat-
ters is the following: cor-
porate earnings,
manufacturing and the
consumer And they've all
been solid."
The S&P 500 slipped
5.49 points, or 0.3 percent,
to close at 1,866.52 Friday
It traded as high as 1,882
earlier in the day, four
points above its record
high reached March 7.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average lost 28.28
points, or 0.2 percent, to
16,302.70. The Nasdaq
composite dropped 42.50


points, or 1 percent, to
4,276.79.
Health care stocks fell
the most in the S&P 500
index. Gilead lost $3.46, or
5 percent, to $72.07. Biogen
Idec fell $28.51, or 8 per-
cent, to $318.53.
Nike fell after warning
that a stronger U.S. dollar
will dampen its results this
quarter. Still, strong de-
mand for its shoes and ap-
parel ahead of the World
Cup in June helped it beat
analysts' earnings expec-
tations in the previous
quarter, the company said
late Thursday Nike, one of
the 30 stocks in the Dow,
lost $4.06, or 5 percent, to
$75.21.


Walmart's new tool will



give prices of competitors


Associated Press

NEW YORK The "Every Day Low
Price" king is trying to shake up the
world of pricing once again.
Walmart told The Associated Press that
it has rolled out an online tool that com-
pares its prices on 80,000 food and house-
hold products from canned beans to
dishwashing soap with those of its
competitors. If a lower price is found
elsewhere, the discounter will refund the
difference to shoppers in the form a store
credit.
The world's largest retailer began of-
fering the feature, called "Savings
Catcher," on its website late last month in
seven big markets that include Dallas,
San Diego and Atlanta. The tool com-
pares advertised prices at retailers with
physical stores, and not at online rivals


Life __

oCaitr

Center
of Citrus County


like Amazon.com that also offer low
prices on staples.
The move by Walmart, which has a long
history of undercutting competitors,
could not only change the way people
shop, but also how other retailers price
their merchandise.
Behemoths like Target and Best Buy
have started offering to match the lower
prices of rivals but only if shoppers do
the research on their own. The idea be-
hind Walmart's online feature, on the
other hand, is to do the legwork for
customers.
Citibank launched a similar program
two years ago that sends Citi credit card
customers a check for the difference if
Citibank finds a lower price from an on-
line retailer But Walmart is the first tra-
ditional retailer to offer such a program,
and if it's successful, others may follow


American

Red Cross


NASD
2,942
1,805
1111
1546
165
22


TREASURIES YEST PVS


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Beverly Hills -


DENTAL CENTER
SDentures, Partials & Bridges
Fast Braces I-I
Children Welcome i
Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions EXAM,
One Visit Root Canals
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OpenFridays 74610330 \ W L J
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Life Care Center of Citrus County "
will be hosting a "Made to Order"

Waffle Breakfast.


Tuesday, March 25th

from 8:00 am to 10:30 am

Life Care will custom make your waffle breakfast for $5.00.
100% of the proceeds will be donated to the American Red
Cross in honor of American Red Cross month.

Life Care Center is located at

3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto

Any questions please contact Melissa Dickinson at 352-746-4434


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 A9







Page A10 SATURDAY, MARCH 22,2014



PINION


"Success means we go to sleep at night
knowing that our talents and
abilities were used in a way that
served others."
Marianne Williamson, "Work," 1992


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
!!I^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
I Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

COME ONE AND ALL




County fair:




A lasting




tradition of




community


ome one, come all;
come tiny, come tall;
come young, come old;
come the brave, come the
bold.
The Citrus County Fair
kicks off Monday and it prom-


ises to be one of
the best so far.
From corndogs
and funnel cakes
to rides and
clowns to live-
stock and cow-
boys, there will
be shortage of
fun and frivolity
on tap during the
weeklong event.
Each year, the


socializing and visiting be-
tween families and neighbors
near and far, this year's fes-
tivities, set for March 24 to 29,
offers festival-goers who are
young at heart the opportu-
nity to step back in time and


THE ISSUE:
The fair returns to
Citrus County.

OUR OPINION:
Give back to
community by
having a good time.


entertainment seems to get
better and better, offering
more fun and games and tasty
festival fare. And this year's
fair looks to be no different.
The Citrus County Fair As-
sociation and its volunteers
work all year to cultivate a
welcoming atmosphere
where residents from all
areas of the community can
come out and have a good
time, making memories that
will last them a lifetime.
In a tradition that harkens
back to olden days when
county fairs were a mecca of


relive the days of
their youth, as
well as appealing
to the younger
crowd yearning
for some fun and
excitement.
From baked
goods and candy
to mooing cows
and snorting pigs,
exhibitors will be
lined up to show-


case their wares and their
ways of life, the fair gives res-
idents the opportunity to re-
unite with friends and
neighbors across the county
and the chance revel in some
old-fashioned whimsy
But mostly, it's an opportu-
nity to give back to the com-
munity and its volunteers
who do so much for you and
ask so little in return. Show
them your appreciation by
heading out the fairgrounds
next week and having a good
time. It's the biggest thank-
you you could ever give.


Les' legacy
Les Cook for president. The
settlement of the lawsuits over
property valuation with the
county's largest taxpayer is the
biggest and best news we've
had around here in quite a
while. Les Cook will always be
beloved for his part in ending
this debacle.
Following the money
Congratulations to Mr. Cook
for settling the dispute with
Duke Energy and the taxes.
However, there's one question:
Among the dividing amounts of
money that's going to the com-
missioners, is that for their use
or for the future commissioners
and their usage? Is it the depart-
ment's or is it just so they could
do whatever they want with the
money? It's a lovely settlement


Enforce manatee rules
Please protect the manatee.
Could we please get
the sheriff's patrol 0
and/or the FWC out on
the Homosassa River
in the winter-imposed
no-wake zone? I can
understand visiting
boats and rentals not
knowing the laws or
rules, but now the
crab boats, the shrimp
boats, many of the CAL
guides and many of 563
the sports boats are
not slowing down. I
believe the reason is because
there is no law enforcement out


I


(


and I'm sure everybody's happy
with it. But all that money going
to the commissioners, what do
they do with it, give themselves
raises?
A grand example
Congratulations to Les Cook
in the settlement with Duke.
This should have never hap-
pened in the first place. There
should have been a settlement
in the beginning. He is setting
the stage, an example for the
county commissioners and es-
pecially for the county adminis-
trator, who are all for business
people, with the exception of
possibly Scott Adams. Les
Cook, you're doing a wonderful
job. Much better than what
we've seen in the past. And
you've got a lot of the citizens'
votes. Thank you so much. We
appreciate all you've done.


there and they know it.
Very thoughtful
|ND While shopping at
JND the Lecanto Walmart
Wlml last Sunday (Feb. 23),
r we lost my car keys.
I would like to thank
the individual who
turned the car keys in
to customer service.
That was very caring
v and thoughtful.
I would also like to
)7 thank Kellan in cus-
)579 tomer service for sav-
ing the car keys for us
and helping us get home
quickly. Thank you.


Now it's LBJ's turn


as he a romantic with a
vision of an America
free of poverty and ig-
norance? Was he a craven war
leader, sacrificing tens of thou-
sands to his fear of losing a
small country in battle or the
presidency in impeachment?
Did he create a nation that cel-
ebrated and elevated fairness
and justice? Or did his policies
perpetuate social pathology
and sow depend-
ence? Did he possess
the fatal flaw of
hubris? Or is it a flaw
at all to think big, _
plan big, dream big?
An unusual battle 'A .
for history is now un-
derway, pitting
American memory
against the historical
legacy of an Ameri- David S
can president. O
There hasn't been T
an intellectual strug- VOl
gle like this for years.
But the battle over how to re-
gard Lyndon Baines Johnson
almost certainly will be more
emotional, more tendentious
and more significant than the
last struggle of this kind, over
how history should rate Harry
S. Truman.
The Truman battle over war
(Korea), race (desegregating the
armed forces) and style (the
down-home manner of Inde-
pendence, Mo.) was but a
miniature version of the John-
son legacy of war (Vietnam),
race (two civil-rights bills,
bloody marches and urban un-
rest) and style (not so much the
humanity of the Pedernales
Valley as the brutality of the po-
litical perdition Johnson threat-
ened to the reluctant and the
rebellious).
The Truman battle was set-
tled, probably permanently, by
one book, David McCullough's
1992 biography, which sold
more than a million copies. The
Johnson battle, stoked by scores
of books, especially Robert
Caro's multivolume biography,
is far from over Indeed, this
clash gives new meaning to
Johnson's remark that "yester-
day is not ours to recover, but to-
morrow is ours to win or lose."
In this battle are Johnson loy-
alists, particularly his daugh-
ters and some surviving former
aides; Johnson rivals, espe-
cially those who will never for-
give him for Vietnam; Johnson
revisionists, who opposed him
in life but came to recognize his
vision and virtues after he died;
Johnson folklorists, who exag-
gerate physical characteristics
and a personal character that
once were so overpowering that
they seemed immune to exag-
geration; and Johnson in-
genues, who never knew
Johnson or didn't live in the



A IMATURAL

me4RTH.


AMP MAN.TUeN
USiNeM11eWMANt
i RlR~


h
H



Johnson years, but who view
him as a distant figure, much
like William Howard Taft or
Grover Cleveland.
All this because the gentle
watercolor wash of half-century
retrospective, so warm and
kind to his martyred predeces-
sor, John E Kennedy, makes a
new series of 50th-anniversary
reassessments on the War on
Poverty this winter, on the fa-
mous Great Society
speech at the Uni-
versity of Michigan
Sin May, with the Civil
Rights Bill in July
r and the Gulf of
Tonkin Resolution in
*-.. \ August and more to
follow irresistible
and perhaps even
necessary
iribman Ordinarily a half-
century's passage is
IER enough to quell the
DES chants and cheers of
events long ago, and
the rule in Great Britain for al-
most six decades has been that
public records and Cabinet pa-
pers are open for inspection
after 30 years. But the events of
1963-69 are so central to our na-
tional identity-and increased
longevity so dramatic that many
of the participants of the prin-
cipal events of that period are
still alive that the passions of
the Johnson period have not
dimmed.
George W Bush, speaking in
Johnson's home state recently,
showed no preoccupation with
how he will be regarded in the
future.
"History," he said, "will ulti-
mately judge whether I made
the right decisions or not"
But for Lyndon Johnson -
who had no nonchalance for
the verdict of anybody, includ-
ing Clio, the muse of history-
the time of judgment is nigh.
And at this juncture of judg-
ment all of the many faces of
Johnson are colliding: the vi-
sionary and the reactionary, the
idealist and the ideologue, the
wily negotiator and the stub-
born autocrat, above all the
strongman and the broken man.
In the Kennedy retrospec-
tives last year, Johnson was an
afterthought in Old Spice after-
shave bored, ridiculed, pe-
ripheral. In this year's
retrospective, he will be en-
gaged, feared, central.
Johnson has been dead for
nearly as long as John Kennedy
was alive. The Johnson years
are as distant to us today as the
World War I armistice was to
Johnson when he took office.
Johnson's Civil Rights Act of
1964 is separated from the sec-
ond term of Barack Obama by
the same amount of time sepa-
rating the landmark White
House bill-signing ceremony


AND
11M.Toe
SUN...


from the White House screen-
ing, for Woodrow Wilson, of the
racist film "Birth of a Nation."
Presidents who make history
also understand the history
they made is constantly chang-
ing. The nation that in 1953 was
mild about Harry was, 60 years
later, almost wild about Tru-
man, and this September's 40-
year retrospective of Gerald R.
Ford's decision to pardon
Richard Nixon will vividly un-
derline how perspectives
change with time.
In the case of Johnson bat-
tered and blamed for city riots,
student protests, family permis-
siveness and street violence by
the time he left office in Janu-
ary 1969 to the strains of
"Stormy Weather," one of his fa-
vorite songs the revisionism
began with the new century
Around the beginning of 2000,
two major critics of the presi-
dent, Harvard economist John
Kenneth Galbraith (a principal
in the effort to dump Johnson
from the 1968 ticket) and 1972
Democratic presidential nomi-
nee George S. McGovern (a
leader in the anti-war movement
in the Vietnam era), proclaimed
publicly their admiration for
LBJ. McGovern, who served in
Congress when Johnson roamed
the Capitol halls as a colossus,
went so far as to argue that, aside
from Wilson and the two Roo-
sevelts, "Lyndon Johnson was
the greatest president since
Abraham Lincoln."
Now the debate is raging
again, and not only because
half-century reassessments are
so seductive.
In the White House today is a
legatee of the Johnson years, a
black man who acknowledges he
was the beneficiary of LBJ ini-
tiatives and whose health care
plan has antecedents in the
Great Society Yet Obama repeat-
edly is criticized for not being
more like Johnson for not
herding vast amounts of legisla-
tion through Congress, for not
bending lawmakers to his will,
for not frightening his opponents,
for not seducing his putative sup-
porters into submission over
Cutty Sark and sweet talk
The 36th president lingers in
the American consciousness by
virtue of the triumphs and the
tragedies that filled his era.
This year and the years that fol-
low will be filled with historical
re-runs. Johnson as president
didn't get everything right But
now it's important for us to get
Johnson right.

David M. Shribman is
executive editor of the
Post-Gazette
(dshribman@post-gazette. corn,
412263-1890). Follow him on
Twitter at ShribmanPG.


AND l ..
3ITIN .
6MATUM ..,


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LETTER to


CCBA golf tourney
helps youth club
We thank the Citrus County
Builders Association and all the
golfers that turned out to Inver-
ness Golf& Country Club on
Feb. 22. The hard work and ded-
ication by the CCBA guaranteed
a fun time was had by all.
Everyone pitched in to make
sure the golfers were fed and
well hydrated. A little rain
shower didn't dampen the spir-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.

its at all.
It was our honor to be the re-
cipient of the CCBAs generos-


'e Editor
ity again this year The mem-
bers of our clubs and their fam-
ilies thank you for supporting
our mission and programs that
allow young adults a safe haven
in which to grow and mature
into responsible, caring adults.
Our volunteers loved working
side by side with you and we are
grateful for all that your organi-
zation does in our community
Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Comrner: LES COOK


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Police phone-tracking contracts often kept secret


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Police across the
country may be intercepting phone calls
or text messages to find suspects using a
technology tool known as Stingray But
they're refusing to turn over details about
its use or heavily censoring files when
they do.
Police say Stingray, a suitcase-sized de-
vice that pretends it's a cell tower, is use-
ful for catching criminals, but that's
about all they'll say
For example, they won't disclose details
about contracts with the device's manu-
facturer, Harris Corp., insisting they are
protecting both police tactics and com-
mercial secrets. The secrecy at times


imposed by non-disclosure agreements
signed by police is pitting obligations
under private contracts against govern-
ment transparency laws.
Even in states with strong open records
laws, including Florida and Arizona, lit-
tle is known about police use of Stingray
and any rules governing it.
A Stingray device tricks all cellphones
in an area into electronically identifying
themselves and transmitting data to po-
lice rather than the nearest phone com-
pany's tower Because documents about
Stingrays are regularly censored, it's not
immediately clear what information the
devices could capture, such as the con-
tents of phone conversations and text
messages, what they routinely do capture


based on how they're configured or how
often they might be used.
In one of the rare court cases involving
the device, the FBI acknowledged in 2011
that so-called cell site simulator technol-
ogy affects innocent users in the area
where it's operated, not just a suspect po-
lice are seeking.
Earlier this month, journalist Beau
Hodai and the American Civil Liber-
ties Union of Arizona sued the Tucson
Police Department, alleging in court
documents that police didn't comply
with the state's public-records law be-
cause they did not fully disclose
Stingray-related records and allowed
Harris Corp. to dictate what informa-
tion could be made public.


Associated Press
Local police may be tracking your
cellphone, but they're regularly censoring
information about how the technology is
used or how much it costs taxpayers.


BILL
Continued from Page Al

have some substantial dif-
ferences that will be
worked on in the next few
weeks. The House spending
plan is nearly $75.3 billion,
while the Senate version is
nearly $74.9 billion.
Some of the highlights
from the initial versions:
The House has 5 per-
cent pay raises for high-
way patrol troopers and
other state law enforce-
ment, while the Senate
budget grants pay raises to
people who work in the
state's judicial system but
not judges. Sen. Joe Ne-
gron, R-Stuart and Senate
budget chief, said court of-
ficials have made a "per-
suasive case" that they are
losing employees to better
paying jobs elsewhere.
The House sets aside
substantially more money
for school-related con-
struction projects. The
House for example set
aside $219 million for uni-
versity construction proj-
ects, including $30 million
for a sciences building at
Florida State University
House Speaker Will
Weatherford's father-in-
law is the chairman of the
FSU board. The Senate set
aside $57.4 million.
The House proposes to
increase per-student
spending public schools by
3 percent, while the Senate
increase is 2.58 percent.


Disparities remain in schools across the country


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sixty years
ago, the Supreme Court ruled
that black children have the right
to the same education as their
white peers.
But civil rights data released
Friday by the Education Depart-
ment reflect an education system
rife with inequities for
blacks and other minority
students and those with
disabilities.
Minority students are
less likely to have access
to advanced math and sci-
ence classes and veteran
teachers. Black students
of any age, even the An
youngest preschoolers, Dun
are more likely to be sus- secre
pended. And students educ
with disabilities are more likely
than other students to be tied
down or placed alone in a room
as a form of discipline.
"It is clear that the United
States has a great distance to go
to meet our goal of providing op-
portunities for every student to
succeed," said Education Secre-
tary Arne Duncan.
But the department offered no
explanation of why these dispar-
ities exist.
Here are five things to know
about the department's findings:
ACCESS TO
ADVANCED CLASSES:
STEM is the buzzword in educa-
tion these days. Education in the
fields of science, technology, engi-
neering and math is considered


krn
nc
eta
)ca


critical for students to succeed in
the global marketplace. Yet the de-
partment found that there was a
"significant lack of access" to core
classes like algebra, geometry, bi-
ology, and chemistry for many stu-
dents. That lack of access was
particularly striking when it came
to minorities.
'A quarter of high schools with
the highest percentage of
black and Latino students
do not offer Algebra II; a
third of these schools do
not offer chemistry," the
department said.
And it's not just lack of
access to core curriculum
subjects.
ne Only a quarter of black
can and Latino students were
ary of enrolled in an Advanced
ition. Placement class, which
allows high school students to
earn college credit, and fewer
than one in five got a high enough
score generally necessary to get
college credit.
Even as black and Latino stu-
dents represent 40 percent of the
enrollment in schools offering
gifted and talented programs,
they represent only a quarter of
the students in their schools en-
rolled in them.
EXPERIENCED TEACHERS:
Quality teachers can play a key
role in student performance.
Minority students are more
likely to attend schools with a
higher concentration of first-year
teachers than white students.
And while most teachers are cer-
tified, nearly half a million stu-
dents nationally attend schools


where nearly two-thirds or fewer
of teachers meet all state certifi-
cation and licensing require-
ments. Black and Latino students
are more likely than white stu-
dents to attend these schools.
There's also a teacher salary
gap of more than $5,000 between
high schools with the highest and
lowest black and Latino students
enrollments, according to the
data.
DISCIPLINE:
The Obama administration is-
sued guidance earlier this year
encouraging schools to abandon
what it described as overly zeal-
ous discipline policies that send
students to court instead of the
principal's office, the so-called
"schools-to-prisons pipeline." But
even before the announcement,
school districts had been adjust-
ing policies that disproportion-
ately affected minority students.
The civil rights data released Fri-
day from the 2011-2012 school
year show the disparities begin
among even the youngest of
school kids. Black children repre-
sent about 18 percent of children
in preschool programs in schools,
but they make up almost half of
the preschoolers who are sus-
pended more than once. Six per-
cent of the nation's districts with
preschools reported suspending
at least one preschool child.
Overall, the data show that black
students of all ages are suspended
and expelled at a rate that's three
times higher than that of white
children. Even as boys receive
more than two-thirds of suspen-
sions, black girls are suspended at


higher rates than girls of any other
race or most boys. More than half
of students involved in school-
related arrests or referred to law
enforcement were Hispanic or
black
SECLUSION AND RESTRAINT:
"Seclusion and restraint" is a
term used to describe when stu-
dents are strapped down or phys-
ically restrained in schools. The
data show students with disabili-
ties represent about 12 percent of
the student population, but about
60 percent of students placed in
seclusion or involuntary confine-
ment and three quarters of stu-
dents restrained at school. While
black students make up about
one in five of students with dis-
abilities, more than one-third of
the students who are restrained
at school are black. Overall, the
data show that more than 37,000
students were placed in seclu-
sion, and 4,000 students with dis-
abilities were held in place by a
mechanical restraint.
PRESCHOOL:
The Obama administration
views access to preschool as a
civil rights issue. It says 40 per-
cent of school districts do not
offer preschool programs. Their
numbers don't include private
programs or some other types of
publicly funded early childhood
programs outside of school sys-
tems. Obama has sought a
"preschool for all" program with
the goal of providing universal
preschool to America's 4-year-
olds that would use funding from
a hike in tobacco taxes.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ukraine splits


Associated Press
Azalea Belle Madison
Jobe holds a parasol
Friday during the Azalea
Trail Opening Ceremony
in Tyler, Texas. The
Azalea Belles, a mix of
area high school students,
including home schoolers,
wear Antebellum-style
fashions and serve as
official greeters guiding
tourists along the eight
miles of trails.


Crimea goes east, rest goes west

in two new deals Friday


Associated Press

BRUSSELS Two al-
most simultaneous signa-
tures Friday on opposite
sides of Europe deepened
the divide between East
and West, as Russia for-
mally annexed Crimea and
the European Union
pulled Ukraine closer into
its orbit.
In this "new post-Cold
War order," as the Ukrain-
ian prime minister called
it, besieged Ukrainian
troops on the Crimean


Peninsula faced a critical
choice: leave, join the
Russian military or demo-
bilize. Ukraine was work-
ing on evacuating its
outnumbered troops in
Crimea, but some said they
were still awaiting orders.
With fears running high
of clashes between the two
sides or a grab by Moscow


for more of Ukraine, the
chief of the U.N. came to
the capital city Kiev and
urged calm all around.
All eyes were on Russian
President Vladimir Putin,
as they have been ever
since pro-Western protests
drove out Ukraine's presi-
dent a month ago, angering
Russia and plunging Eu-
rope into its worst crisis in
a generation.
Russia's troubled eco-
nomic outlook may drive
its decisions as much as
any outside military threat


People watch fireworks Friday at the central Lenin square
in Simferopol, Crimea. Russian President Vladimir Putin
completed the annexation of Crimea on Friday, signing a
law making the Black Sea peninsula part of Russia.
Associated Press


Countries join in search for plane


Four bodies found
in NJ motel fire
POINT PLEASANT
BEACH, N.J. -Afire early
Friday destroyed a New
Jersey shore motel that was
housing people displaced
by Superstorm Sandy,
killing four people and injur-
ing eight, authorities said.
The blaze erupted at the
wooden Mariner's Cover
Motor Inn in this popular
summer resort town at
around 5:30 a.m., and
flames were shooting out
the building by the time fire-
fighters arrived. At least one
person leaped from a sec-
ond-floor window to escape.
The victims were identi-
fied as male adults, but the
prosecutor's office said no
positive identifications had
been made yet and the
cause of the blaze was
unknown.
NC pulls pollution
deal with Duke
RALEIGH, N.C.- North
Carolina regulators say they
have asked a judge to with-
draw a proposed settlement
that would have allowed
Duke Energy to resolve en-
vironmental violations by
paying a $99,000 fine with
no requirement that the
$50 billion company clean
up its pollution.
The state Department of
Environment and Natural
Resources said in a state-
ment Friday that it would
scuttle the proposed con-
sent order to settle viola-
tions for groundwater
contamination leeching
from coal ash dumps near
Charlotte and Asheville.
The decision comes after
a Feb. 2 spill at a Duke coal
ash dump in Eden coated
70 miles of the Dan River in
toxic sludge.
Judge strikes
Michigan ban
DETROIT- Michigan's
ban on gay marriage is un-
constitutional, a federal
judge said Friday as he
struck down a law that was
widely embraced by voters
a decade ago the latest
in a recent series of deci-
sions overturning similar
laws across the country.
There was no indication
that U.S. District Judge
Bernard Friedman was sus-
pending his decision. Attor-
ney General Bill Schuette
said he was immediately fil-
ing a request with a federal
appeals court to suspend
Friedman's decision and
prevent same-sex couples
from immediately marrying.
The decision was released
shortly after 5 p.m.
Seventeen states and the
District of Columbia issue li-
censes for same-sex mar-
riage. Since December,
bans on gay marriage have
been overturned in Texas,
Utah, Oklahoma and Vir-
ginia, but appeals have put
those cases on hold.
-From wire reports


'Extraordinary

riddle' of lostjet

now 2 weeks old

Associated Press

PERTH, Australia -Aircraft
and ships from China headed to
the desolate southern Indian
Ocean to join the search for
Malaysia Airlines Flight 370,
now lost for two full weeks, and
Australia promised its best ef-
forts to resolve "an extraordi-
nary riddle."
A satellite spotted two large
objects in the area earlier this
week, raising hopes of finding
the Boeing 777 that disap-
peared March 8 with 239 peo-
ple on board. Three Australian
planes took off at dawn Satur-
day for a third day of scouring
the region about 1,550 miles
southwest of Perth.
Australian officials tried to
tamp down expectations after a
fruitless search Friday, even as
they pledged to continue the
effort.
"It's about the most inacces-
sible spot that you could imag-
ine on the face of the Earth, but
if there is anything down there,
we will find it," Prime Minister
Tony Abbott said at a news con-
ference in Papua New Guinea.
"We owe it to the families and
the friends and the loved ones
of the almost 240 people on
Flight MH370 to do everything
we can to try to resolve what is
as yet an extraordinary riddle,"
he added.
A total of six Australian air-
craft were to search the region
Saturday: two ultra long-range
commercial jets and four P3
Orions, the Australian Mar-
itime Safety Authority said.
Two merchant ships were in
the area, and the HMAS Success,
a Navy supply ship, was due to
arrive late Saturday afternoon.
Weather in the search zone was
expected to be relatively good,
with some cloud cover
Two Chinese aircraft are ex-
pected to arrive in Perth today
to join the search, and two
Japanese aircraft will arrive


Associated Press
Japanese Air Self-Defense Force's Capt. Junichi Tanoue, left, and co-pilot Ryutaro Hamahira scan the
ocean aboard a C130 aircraft Friday while it flies over the southern search area in the southeastern
Indian Ocean, 124 to 186 miles south of Sumatra, Indonesia. Search planes scoured a remote patch
of the Indian Ocean but came back empty-handed Friday after looking for any sign of the missing
Malaysia Airlines jet, another disappointing day in one of the world's biggest aviation mysteries.


Sunday
Abbott spoke with Chinese
President Xi Jinping, describ-
ing him as "devastated." The
passengers included 154
Chinese.
In Kuala Lumpur, where the
plane took off for Beijing,
Malaysian Defense Minister
Hishammuddin Hussein
thanked the more than two
dozen countries involved in the
overall search that stretches
from Kazakhstan in Central
Asia to the southern Indian
Ocean. He called the whole
process "a long haul."
The search area indicated by
the satellite images in the south-
ern Indian Ocean is a four-hour
round-trip flight from western
Australia, leaving planes with
only enough fuel to search for
about two hours. The images
were taken March 16, but the
search in the area did not start
until Thursday because it took
time to analyze them.
While the Orions are only
able to search for two hours at a
time, the commercial jets can


stay in the search area for five
hours before they must head
back to the base.
Searchers on Friday relied
mostly on trained spotters
aboard the planes rather than
radar, which found nothing
Thursday, Australian officials
said. The search will focus
more on visual sightings be-
cause civilian aircraft are being
brought in. The military planes
will continue to use both radar
and spotters.
"Noting that we got no radar
detections yesterday, we have
replanned the search to be vi-
sual. So aircraft flying rela-
tively low, very highly skilled
and trained observers looking
out of the aircraft windows and
looking to see objects," said
John Young, manager of the
maritime safety authority's
emergency response division.
There is a limited battery life
for the beacons in the cockpit-
voice and flight-data recorders
- about 30 days, said Chuck
Schofield, vice president of busi-
ness development for Dukane


Seacom Inc. He said it's "very
likely" that his company made
the beacons on the missing jet
The devices work to a depth
of 20,000 feet, with a signal
range of about two nautical
miles, depending on variables
like sea conditions. The signals
are located using a device op-
erated on the surface of the
water or towed to a depth.
Experts say it is impossible to
tell if the grainy satellite images
of the two objects -one almost
80 feet long and the other meas-
uring 15 feet were debris
from the plane. But officials
have called this the best lead so
far in the search that began
March 8 after the plane van-
ished over the Gulf of Thailand
on an overnight flight to Beijing.
Aircraft pieces have some-
times been found floating for
days after a sea crash. Peter
Marosszeky, an aviation expert
at the University of New South
Wales, said the wing could re-
main buoyant for weeks if fuel
tanks inside it were empty and
had not filled with water


Afghan journalist, family killed in hotel attack


Associated Press
Afghanistan's intelligence service displays some of the
weapons and belongings of attackers on the Serena hotel
during a news conference Friday at the Interior ministry
in Kabul, Afghanistan.


Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan The luxury
hotel was considered one of the safest
spots in the Afghan capital. Yet four gun-
men walked in, proceeded to the restau-
rant and pulled out pistols hidden in
their shoes. They killed nine people, in-
cluding a journalist for a French news
agency, his wife and two children who
were shot in the head.
One child survived, but was seriously
wounded.
The Taliban boasted that the assault
Thursday night shows they can strike any-
where, and Afghan officials issued a string
of conflicting statements as they scram-
bled to explain how the attackers pene-
trated the Serena Hotel's tight security
It was a major embarrassment to govern-
ment security forces less than two weeks be-
fore national elections and came on the heels
of an uptick in bombings and shootings
against foreigners in the capital, something
that had been relatively rare. A Swedish
journalist was shot on the street earlier this
month, and a Lebanese restaurant popular


with foreigners was attacked by a suicide
bomber and gunmen in January
The latest attack was particularly
brazen because it was considered one of
the best-protected sites for civilians in
Kabul. Sheltered behind a nondescript
wall, entrants must pass through a secu-
rity room at the gate where they are pat-
ted down and go through a metal detector
as bags are put through an X-ray machine
and sometimes searched.
The attackers hid their small pistols and
ammunition in their shoes and socks, In-
terior Ministry spokesman Sediq Sediqqi
told reporters, but he could not say how
the weapons went undetected. The hotel
security had been known not always to act
when the metal detector beeped.
The dead included five Afghans, two
Canadians, an American and a Para-
guayan. Six people were wounded, in-
cluding a child, a foreigner, two policemen,
a hotel guard, and an Afghan lawmaker
A U.S. official confirmed an American
citizen was killed in the attack The official
spoke on condition of anonymity because
the death had not been made public.











SPORTS


* Mercer
stuns
No. 3
seed
Duke in
NCAA
opener./
B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 High school sports/B2
0 MLB Spring Training/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Golf, NHL/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 NCAA Tournament/B4, B5
0 NBA/B5
0 High school tennis/B6


Citrus tops Lecanto to secure No. 1 seed


Austin Bogart slams

the door on Panthers

with strong relief work
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO The Citrus baseball team
employed small-ball tactics to secure it-
self a big district win at Lecanto on Friday
While taking advantage of six walks and
five Panther errors, with three coming on
bunts, the Hurricanes generated five runs
off five hits, and got eight strikeouts over
3 2/3 innings of relief from Austin Bogart
to clinch the No. 1 seed in District 5A-6
with a 5-2 victory
With the score knotted at 2-2 entering
the fourth inning, a Bogart fly ball to right
field scored DH Alex Barbee, who
reached on a walk and advanced on a pair
of bunts from shortstop Alex Atkinson and
left fielder Chad Dawson.
In the bottom of the same inning, Bog-


art took the mound for senior Ben Wright
(three strikeouts, no earned runs, three
walks and two hits allowed) with one out
and junior Kyler Speagle on second base.
Bogart later hit junior Caleb Southey on
the foot to load the bases for Lecanto (6-8
overall, 2-2 in district) with two outs, be-
fore getting out of the jam with a strikeout
Atkinson (2 for 4) drove in second base-
man Robert Wilkinson in the fifth with a
bloop single to center, and his 'Canes (6-7,
4-1) added one more in the sixth, when
Bogart walked and advanced on a Brooks
Brasher single, then scored on a wild
pitch.
Bogart fanned seven more Panthers
while walking two in the remaining three
innings in protecting the lead for good.
Senior Levi O'Steen tossed six complete
innings for the Panthers and grew in-
creasingly frustrated with the seemingly
inconsistent strike zone, as he yielded
four hits, six walks and four earned runs.
Sophomore catcherAlex Delgado pitched
the seventh, when he recorded his team's
only strikeout of the night on the mound.
See .Page B3


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus High School second baseman Robert Wilkinson slides into home plate Friday
past Lecanto catcher Alex Delgado at Lecanto High School. Citrus won 5-2.


n perfect form-Girs Tennis
In p f ormNOTEBOOK

In pefectformTeams


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus senior Melanie Dodd is a perfect 13-0 in No. I singles play this season.

County's defending POYDodd remains unbeaten at No. 1 singles


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
Among the Citrus County female net-
ters, there is none better than Melanie
Dodd.
The Citrus High School senior is the
county's defending Player of the Year
In her fourth and final season as a Hur-
ricane, she's unbeaten at the most ardu-
ous position in tennis No. 1 singles -
at 13-0.
Dodd is a rare four-time district cham-
pions (three times in singles, once in dou-
bles). She owns first-place blue ribbons at
No. 4 (freshman), No. 2 (sophomore), and
No. 1 singles (junior).
What's more impressive? Consider
Dodd hasn't dropped a singles match
since the first-round action at 3A states
last season in Seminole County falling to
Eau Gallie's Christi Woodson, 6-1,6-1.


In doubles play this season, she and
her main partner, junior Paige Jordan,
stand 8-3 in the rugged No. 1 doubles. She
and her younger sister, freshman Natalie,
are also 1-0 at No. 1.
Yet tennis is but a single slice of Dodd.
She's also an outstanding student/ath-
lete carrying an unweighted 3.91 grade
point average and a weighted 4.5 GPA.
She's also the reigning Homecoming
Queen and Miss CHS.
Unless the Hurricanes solve defending
district champions Ocala-Forest and
Springstead, along with Ocala-Vanguard,
Ocala-West Port and Lecanto, Thursday
evening's match against Leesburg might
have been her last on the CHS courts.
With the single-elimination state series
looming, Dodd realizes that she might be
11 days removed from possibly playing
her final prep match during the opening
round of the loaded District 3A-5 tennis


tournament at Lecanto High School.
The 5-foot-3, 115-pounder remains a
source of inspiration to area tennis
players.
Dodd 101
Melanie Dodd was born in Inverness
as the second of four siblings to Doug and
Laurie Dodd.
Tennis is byproduct of Dodd's DNA.
Melanie's older sister Stephanie plays
for NAIA's Southeastern University in
Lakeland, while her younger sis, Natalie,
is freshman at CHS under third-year
mentor Scott Waters.
The proverbial apple didn't fall far
from the family tree as Dodd's parents
are both tennis aficionados.
As a result, Dodd grew up around the
game.
Even when she was home-schooled,
See Page B6


prepare



for the



playoffs

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
With spring break beginning this
weekend, only a tiny sampling of
matches separated Citrus County's
three girls' tennis teams from reach-
ing the regular-season conclusions.
Panthers continue climb
Lecanto closed its regular season
Thursday evening versus Ocala-
Vanguard.
The Panthers (12-2) had previ-
ously spanked their 3A-5 counter-
parts in Marion County on Feb. 13,
6-1.
LHS entered the match on a two-
game winning skein thanks to
shredding Central, 7-0, and Spring-
stead, 6-1, last week
On March 11 versus the young
Bears, Lecanto swept all five singles
matches and both doubles clashes
via pro sets.
In the following day's district
make-up match in Citrus County
against defending district champion
Springstead, the Panthers suffered
only one loss.
With 3A-5's top seed at stake,
Springstead senior Robyn Cotney
(13-0) edged junior Simi Shah at No.
3 singles, 6-3, 1-6, 10-2. The loss was
Shah's first after 12 straight wins.
Despite the loss, LHS mentor
Sammie Hall remained upbeat
prior to her team's final regular-
season test
"I'm never upset with the girls.
These girls play very hard, that's all
I can ask," she said. "Districts will be
a great test It always comes down to
the draw and who wants it the
most"
Additionally, with Citrus' March
13 forfeit win over Crystal River,
See. Page B6


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal River softball


tops Dunnellon in extras


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER- Here's
a lesson Crystal River's soft-
ball team should have
learned, if they didn't already
know it going into Friday's
game against Dunnellon -
the Tigers don't need any
help.
This was a team averaging
9.4 runs per game prior to this
contest. So when the Pirates
entered the sixth inning with
a 6-0 lead, they still shouldn't
have felt safe.
Two innings later, they
weren't. Fortunately, less than
three innings later- thanks
to a lead-off double by Emily
Doughman followed by a
game-winning, run-scoring hit
by Alexa Mack, her fourth of
the game Crystal River es-
caped with a 7-6 victory in
eight innings in the first-ever
game to benefit Autism
Awareness.
Although it was a game be-
tween 5A-6 rivals, it did not
count toward the district
standings. Crystal River im-
proved to 9-7 overall, while
Dunnellon slipped to 9-7.
"I think we hit the ball re-
ally well," Crystal River coach
Cassidy Rash said. "We came
out and hit it and when we did


make an error, we focused
and came out and made the
next play That's something
we've been concentrating on."
This game started far dif-
ferent than the way it ended.
Tiffany MacDonald got the
pitching start for the Pirates
and she was unhittable to
start, retiring the first nine
batters she faced. Crystal
River got on the board in the
third on Doughman's infield
single, an RBI triple by Mack,
an infield single by Becka
Carrico and a two-run triple
by Marissa Pool, making it 3-0.
The Pirates increased it to
6-0 with three more runs in
the fourth on singles by
Doughman and Mack, an RBI
double by Kathryn Desomma
and a two-run double by Pool.
Everything was going well
for Crystal River through five
innings, MacDonald having
allowed three hits with the
Pirates not committing an
error But in the sixth, two Pi-
rate errors, combined with
three hits to put two runs on
the board for Dunnellon, was
followed by base hits by Kelly
Howard and Jody Weber to
score runs.
Then in the seventh, Court-
ney Heinritz and Kasey Bern-
stein singled to lead off the
inning, with Heintritz scoring


Seven Rivers
pounds Lakeside
The Seven Rivers softball
team improved to 10-2 on the
season Friday with a 13-3 six
inning victory over Lakeside
Christian.
Delaney Byers allowed one
earned run on four hits and
struck out seven for the win.
She also went 2 for 4 at the
plate with a home run and four
RBIs.
Alexis King went 3 for 4
with four RBIs and 3 runs,
while Tessa Kacer drove in
three runs for the Warriors.
Seven Rivers returns to ac-
tion March 31 against Citrus.
-From staff reports

on an error and leaving two
runners aboard. Both came
home on Ele Goodloe's hit to
left field, and Goodloe scored
when the ball got past the out-
fielder to knot it at 6-all.
That set the stage for
Mack's eighth-inning heroics.
"We made some errors but
we came back and overcame
them, and we made the plays
after the errors," said Rash.
"And that's the difference be-
come overcoming and just
falling apart."


Pirates break out
against Dunnellon

against Dunnellon


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent

DUNNELLON Crystal River
ended a mini slump with a 9-2 dis-
trict baseball win against Dunnellon
Friday night
The Pi-
rates (7-8
overall,
2-3 Dis-
trict 5A-6)
keyed off
Tiger mis- .
takes in
the sec-
ond in-
ning to
build a 4-0 lead. It was all starting
pitcher Mason Pateraki needed to
get the win, pitching six strikeouts
and giving up one earned run.
Entering the game against Dun-
nellon (4-8 overall, 1-3 District 5A-6),
Crystal River found itself in the
midst of a midseason skid. The team
lost 11-0 against Trinity Catholic on
Wednesday, and 10-0 the following
night to Williston in non-district
games.
Historically a tough rivalry, the Pi-
rates played with energy on the base
paths, forcing throwing errors that
scored two runs in the second inning.
Jordan Humphreys capped the in-
ning with two-run double.
The Pirates capitalized on some


Seven Rivers baseball
remains perfect
Parker Pillsbury fired a four-hit
gem and went 3 for 4 at the plate to
lead the undefeated Seven Rivers
baseball team to an 8-0 district vic-
tory over St. John Lutheran at home
Friday night.
Pillsbury struck out seven batters
in seven strong innings of work. At
the plate he had a home run, scored
twice and had two RBIs.
Adam Gage had three doubles,
scored twice and had an RBI, while
Cory Weiand, Tyler Pillsbury and Coy
Phillips each had a hit, RBI and run.
The Warriors (11-0) travel to the
Mount Dora Bible Tournament on
Monday and play at 11 a.m.
-From staff reports

good fortune as well in the top of the
fifth inning, when Zachary Pattison
hit a bunt double past the shortstop
against a shifted Tigers defense with
runners at first and second base. The
play brought a run home and took
any remaining energy from the
Tigers.
Pateracki commented afterward
"That was huge ... two district wins in
a row"
Head coach Bobby Stack added "I
like our energy right now"


Power outage


Rays held to three

hits in 5-0 loss

to BlueJays

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE Brett
Lawrie hit his first homer of the
spring as the Toronto Blue Jays
held AL East rival Tampa Bay
Rays to just three hits in a 5-0
victory Friday
Erik Bedard, in his final bid to
earn the Rays' fifth rotation spot,
struggled through 5 2/3 innings.
He gave up four runs over 94
pitches, walking one and striking
out four
Bedard, who entered the game
with a 7.15 ERA, is in a three-
way competition with LHP Cesar
Ramos and RHP Jake Odorizzi.
Manager Joe Maddon said the
decision on the fifth starter will
come this morning.
Marlins 7, Astros 2
KISSIMMEE Garrett Jones
homered in the first inning and drove
in three runs, leading the Miami
Marlins to a 7-2 win over the Hous-
ton Astros.
Jake Marisnick went 3 for 3 and
scored twice for Miami. Marisnick is
batting .429 in 16 spring games.
Miami starter Nathan Eovaldi
gave up two runs in 4 2/3 innings.
He allowed six hits and walked two.
Scott Feldman, the Astros' open-
ing-day starter, gave up seven hits
and four runs in five innings.
Orioles 8, Braves (ss) 0
SARASOTA- Miguel Gonzalez
proved to be an excellent substitute
for the Baltimore Orioles, tossing six
innings of three-hit ball in an 8-0 vic-
tory over an Atlanta Braves split-
squad.
Gonzalez, who got the start after
Chris Tillman was scratched due to
an illness, walked none and struck
out five.
Chris Davis had a sacrifice fly and
a bases-loaded walk, pushing his
spring RBI total to a team-leading 11.
Braves starter Gus Schlosser re-
tired 12 in a row after David Lough's
double to lead off the first.
Yankees 4, Pirates 0
TAMPA- CC Sabathia pitched
seven sharp innings but Derek Jeter
remained in a funk at the plate,
going hitless in three at-bats during
the New York Yankees' 4-0 victory
over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
The Yankees captain fouled two
balls off the area around his left
ankle in the first inning, drawing
groans from the Steinbrenner Field
crowd, before striking out against
Edinson Volquez.
Jeter had an RBI grounder in the
second, hit another grounder in the
fifth and is 5 for 41 overall (.122) in
14 spring training games.
Tigers 3, Braves (ss) 0
KISSIMMEE Justin Verlander
tuned up for his opening-day start by
extending his spring training scoreless
streak to 13 2/3 innings and helping
the Detroit Tigers beat an Atlanta
Braves' split squad 3-0.
Coming off core muscle surgery in
January, Verlander allowed five hits in
five innings, struck out four and


Associated Press
Detroit's lan Kinsler steals second base Friday as the ball pops out of Atlanta shortstop Tyler Greene's
glove during the fourth inning in Kissimmee.


walked one, throwing 58 of 84 pitches
for strikes. He has one more exhibi-
tion outing before the March 31
opener at home against Kansas City.
Julio Teheran, expected to start the
Braves' opener at Milwaukee on
March 31, gave up two runs and two
hits in six innings with four strikeouts,
one walk and a wild pitch.
Detroit took a 2-0 lead in the fourth
when lan Kinsler walked, Ezequiel
Carrera hit an RBI double and ad-
vanced on a wild pitch, and Victor
Martinez had a run-scoring groundout.
Mets 9, Twins 1
FORT MYERS Ricky Nolasco
allowed seven straight batters to
reach in a seven-run first inning for
the New York Mets, who beat the
Minnesota Twins 9-1.
The Twins' opening-day starter
threw 43 pitches in the inning but he
was encouraged that he didn't be-
come fatigued. He was lifted after
three innings.
Five of the Mets' six hits in the in-
ning went for extra bases, including
Ike Davis' two-run double, Kirk
Nieuwenhuis' triple and a two-run
homer by No. 8 hitter Taylor Teagar-
den. Davis went 3 for 3 with two
doubles.
Red Sox 2,
Phillies 2, 10 inn.
CLEARWATER-- Philadelphia's
Cliff Lee struck out six over six innings
in his next-to-last tuneup for opening
day, helping the Phillies to a 2-2, 10-
inning tie against the Boston Red Sox.
Lee allowed two runs, three hits
and one walk-just his third in 19 2/3
innings during spring training.
Lee walked Jonny Gomes with two
outs in the sixth, then gave up a single
to Will Middlebrooks and a two-run
double toA.J. Pierzynski that hit off
the left-field wall.
Red Sox starter Jon Lester gave up
four hits in 5 2/3 scoreless innings,
struck out five and walked one.
Cardinals 2 Nationals 0
JUPITER Cuban shortstop
Aledmys Diaz went 2 for 2 in his
spring training debut for the St. Louis
Cardinals, and Adam Wainwright al-


lowed three hits over eight innings in
a 2-0 victory over the Washington
Nationals.
Diaz lined a single to left field in
the second inning and grounded a
single to center int he fourth. The
Cuban defector agreed March 9 to
an $8 million, four-year contract and
could not play in a big league exhibi-
tion game until obtaining a U.S. work
visa. He is expected to be sent to
minor league camp soon and begin
the season at Double-A Springfield.
Wainwright, preparing for a March
31 opener at Cincinnati, dominated a
Washington lineup devoid of most
regulars. He struck out seven and
walked none, throwing 81 pitches.
Angels 7, Royals (ss) 3
TEMPE, Ariz. C.J. Wilson al-
lowed three runs and struck out nine
over 5 2/3 innings as the Los Ange-
les Angels defeated a Kansas City
Royals' split squad 7-3.
Making his fifth spring training
start, Wilson labored early during a
99-pitch outing.
Raul Mondesi and Alex Gordon
singled with one out in a four-hit first,
Justin Maxwell singled in a run and
Gordon scored on Chris lannetta's
passed ball.
Just one run was earned against
Wilson, who gave up seven hits and
two walks.
Reds 9, Royals (ss) 3
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Chris
Heisey hit his sixth spring-training
homer and tripled, helping the
Cincinnati Reds to beat a Kansas
City Royals' split squad 9-3.
Brett Marshall started in place of
Homer Bailey, who threw a bullpen
session and is expected to pitch in a
minor league exhibition on Sunday.
Marshall allowed two runs, two hits
and three walks in four innings with
four strikeouts.
Royals starter James Shields
gave up five runs and six hits in six
innings with six strikeouts and no
walks.
Cubs 7, White Sox 0
GLENDALE, Ariz. Luis Valbuena
hit a three-run homer just inside the
right field foul pole to highlight the


Chicago Cubs' 7-0 win over the
crosstown rival Chicago White Sox.
Cubs pitcher Chris Rusin helped
his bid for a roster spot by holding the
White Sox to two hits in five innings.
Four relievers shut out the White Sox
the rest of the way.
White Sox starter John Danks gave
up four runs and six hits in five in-
nings, including Valbuena's homer.
Cubs designated hitter Mike Olt
went 2 for 3.
Indians 14, Rockies 3
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -A day
after contract talks with the Indians
stalled, Cleveland ace Justin Mas-
terson threw six strong innings in a
14-3 rout of the Colorado Rockies.
Masterson's spring training score-
less streak was snapped after
14 2/3 innings, with both runs
against him scoring on wild pitches.
While he doubled his walks total to
four, Masterson struck out six and
allowed five hits in his next-to-last
start before opening day.
Rockies opening day starter
Jorge De La Rosa was knocked
around for five runs and nine hits in
three innings. The Indians batted
around in a four-run third. Elliott
Johnson had two RBI singles off De
La Rosa, who walked two.
Rangers 7, Brewers 5
SURPRISE, Ariz. Prince Fielder
hit a two-run homer and Tanner
Scheppers pitched six strong innings
to help the Texas Rangers beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 7-5.
Fielder homered in the sixth off
Rob Wooten with Shin-Soo Choo
aboard.
Scheppers, who has made 115 re-
lief appearances in the majors but is
in the mix for a rotation slot, gave up
two runs in the first on three hits, in-
cluding Ryan Braun's RBI double.
Scheppers settled down after that,
retiring 16 of the final 18 batters he
faced, striking out six and without
walking a batter.
Yovani Gallardo, who earned his
fifth opening day assignment for the
Brewers, gave up four runs. Gallardo
allowed eight hits, and struck out four
in 51/3 innings.


Citrus


handles


Lecanto


in flag


football
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent

INVERNESS Citrus High
School remained unbeaten in
girls flag football with a 19-6 win
against Lecanto on Thursday
Sam Kanawall threw for
three touchdowns and the Hur-
ricanes (2-0) escaped scoring
chances from a speedy Pan-
thers team that couldn't capital-
ize on momentum-swinging
plays. Lecanto fell to 1-2 with
the loss.
Kanawall's 35-yard touch-
down pass to Micah Jenkins at
the end of the first half looked
to put the game out of reach,
with the Panthers missing scor-
ing chances. The Panthers got
within 20 yards of the Citrus
end zone twice in the half, but
an interception and dropped
pass in the end zone kept them
scoreless.
The Panthers faced a fourth
and goal midway through the
third quarter, when quarter-
back Rebekah Paprzycki spot-
ted Maya Shah behind 'Canes
coverage near the end zone.
Her throw was high and Shah
appeared to lose the ball in the
setting sun as it went past her
On the ensuing possession,
Kanawall threw an interception
that gave the Panthers the ball
at the Citrus 16-yard line. Two
plays later, Paprzycki threw a
short touchdown pass; a one-
point conversion attempt was
no good to leave the Panthers
trailing by 7.
Kanawall was able to put the
game away when she connected
with NaShally Morales on a 30-
yard pass a few minutes into the
fourth quarter Two subsequent
'Canes interceptions sealed any
chance of a Lecanto rally
Despite an identical score to
the previous week's win against
Crystal River, Kanawall said
completing passes was more
difficult against Lecanto.
"This time, it was definitely
harder on our girls because
they were actually more cov-
ered than the last game,"
Kanawall said. "So it was kind
of harder for me to see the
routes, as well as them to get
open."
So far, Jenkins is pleased with
her team's play but sees room
for improvement
"I think we can get better, I
think we practiced a lot more
on our passes, and seeing the
routes," Jenkins said.
Kanawall added, 'As more
time's progressing, I can un-
derstand her speed, and my
other wide receivers' speed,
and she understands where
I'm going to be throwing it and
how far, and how fast she needs
to be running."


B2 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 38 30 .559 -
Brooklyn 36 31 .537 1/
NewYork 29 40 .420 91
Boston 23 47 .329 16
Philadelphia 15 54 .217 23/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 47 20 .701 -
Washington 35 33 .515 12/2
Charlotte 33 36 .478 15
Atlanta 31 36 .463 16
Orlando 19 50 .275 29
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-lndiana 51 18 .739 -
Chicago 38 31 .551 13
Cleveland 26 43 .377 25
Detroit 25 42 .373 25
Milwaukee 13 56 .188 38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 51 16 .761 -
Houston 46 22 .676 51
Dallas 42 28 .600 10/2
Memphis 40 28 .588 11/2
New Orleans 28 40 .412 23/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 -
Portland 45 24 .652 6
Minnesota 34 33 .507 16
Denver 31 38 .449 20
Utah 22 47 .319 29
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 48 21 .696 -
Golden State 44 26 .629 4/2
Phoenix 39 29 .574 8/2
Sacramento 24 44 .353 23/2
L.A. Lakers 22 45 .328 25
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Indiana 91, Chicago 79
NewYork 93, Philadelphia 92
Oklahoma City 119, Toronto 118,20T
Brooklyn 114, Boston 98
Miami 91, Memphis 86
New Orleans 111, Atlanta 105
Dallas 122, Denver 106
Detroit at Phoenix, late
San Antonio at Sacramento, late
Washington at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Portland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 69 47 17 5 99223 149
TampaBay 70 3924 7 85208 185
Montreal 71 3826 7 83182 180
Toronto 71 3627 8 80208 219
Detroit 69 3224 13 77183 194
Ottawa 69 2828 13 69198 234
Florida 70 2636 8 60173 225
Buffalo 70 2042 8 48136 206
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 69 45 19 5 95218 173
Philadelphia 69 3725 7 81199 197
N.Y Rangers 71 3829 4 80188 175
Columbus 70 3628 6 78200 192
Washington 71 3327 11 77205 211
New Jersey 70 3027 13 73172 183
Carolina 70 3031 9 69174 198
N.Y Islanders 70 2635 9 61195 239
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 69 4715 7 101226 156


Chicago
Colorado
Minnesota
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville

San Jose
Anaheim
Los Angeles
Phoenix
Vancouver
Calgary
Edmonton


71 41 15 15
70 4420 6
70 3623 11
69 3226 11
71 3230 9
70 2931 10
Pacific Division
GP W LOT
71 4618 7
70 45 18 7
70 3925 6
70 3425 11
72 3230 10
69 2834 7
71 2537 9


97240 184
94216 192
83174 172
75196 201
73199 208
68165 208
PtsGF GA
99219 170
97222 178
84170 149
79194 197
74172 194
63168 203
59177 228


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Rangers 3, Columbus 1
Chicago 3, Carolina 2
Boston at Colorado, late
Nashville at Calgary, late
Today's Games
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
Ottawa at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Florida at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Montreal atToronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Washington at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.



MLB Spring Training


Cleveland
Tampa Bay
Seattle
Baltimore
NewYork
Oakland
Detroit
Los Angele
Kansas City
Toronto
Chicago
Minnesota
Boston
Houston
Texas


AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
16 5
14 5
15 6
12 7
14 9
11 8
12 9
s 12 10
S10 11
10 11
7 11
7 11
8 13
8 13
7 13
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L


Miami 15 7 .682
San Francisco 12 9 .571
Arizona 11 9 .550
Pittsburgh 11 9 .550
NewYork 11 10 .524
Washington 11 11 .500
Cincinnati 11 13 .458
Milwaukee 11 13 .458
Colorado 10 12 .455
St. Louis 8 10 .444
Chicago 11 14 .440
Los Angeles 6 10 .375
Atlanta 8 16 .333
San Diego 6 12 .333
Philadelphia 6 14 .300
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
St. Louis 2, Washington 0
Miami 7, Houston 2
Philadelphia 2, Boston 2, tie, 10 innings
Baltimore 8, Atlanta (ss) 0
Detroit 3, Atlanta (ss) 0
Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 0
N.Y Mets 9, Minnesota 1
Chicago Cubs 7, Chicago White Sox 0
Texas 7, Milwaukee 5
Cincinnati 9, Kansas City (ss) 3
L.A. Angels 7, Kansas City (ss) 3
Cleveland 14, Colorado 3
N.Y. Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 0
Oakland vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,


SCOREBOARD


For Uthev record


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TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m. (FS1) NASCAR K&N Pro Series: Bristol (same-day
tape)
12:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Fontana, Practice
1:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Fontana, Qualifying
3:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Fontana, Final Practice
5 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Nationwide: Treatmyclot.com 300
2 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Treatmyclot.com
300 (same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
10 p.m. (MLB) Los Angeles Dodgers at Arizona
Diamondbacks. From Sydney, Australia
MLB PRESEASON BASEBALL
10:30 a.m. (MLB) Wash. Nationals at St. Louis Cardinals (taped)
1 p.m. (MLB) New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins
4 p.m. (MLB) Texas Rangers at Kansas City Royals
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Cincinnati Reds at Chicago Cubs
1 a.m. (MLB) Detroit Tigers at Toronto Blue Jays (same-day
tape)
4 a.m. (MLB) San Francisco Giants at Chicago White Sox
(same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
4 p.m. (SUN) Florida Atlantic at Rice
8:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Mississippi State at Vanderbilt
MEN'S NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
12 p.m. (CBS, WYKE 104.3 FM) Pittsburgh vs. Florida
2:30 p.m. (CBS) St. Louis vs. Louisville
5 p.m. (CBS) Texas vs. Michigan
6 p.m. (TNT) North Dakota State vs. San Diego State
7 p.m. (TBS) Dayton vs. Syracuse
7:30 p.m. (CBS) Oregon vs. Wisconsin
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Harvard vs. Michigan State
9:30 p.m. (TBS) Connecticut vs. Villanova
WOMEN'S NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Arizona
State vs. Vanderbilt, Duke vs. Winthrop, Florida Gulf Coast vs.
Oklahoma State and Kentucky vs. Wright State
1:30 p.m. (ESPN) Notre Dame vs. Robert Morris
1:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Akron vs.
Purdue, DePaul vs. Oklahoma and UT-Chattanooga vs. Syracuse
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: California
vs. Fordham, Florida State vs. Iowa State, Fresno State vs.
Nebraska and Northwestern State vs. Tennessee
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Baylor
vs. Western Kentucky, BYU vs. North Carolina State,
St. John's vs. USC and South Dakota vs. Stanford
MEN'S NIT TOURNAMENT
11 a.m. (ESPN) Louisiana Tech at Georgia
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at New Orleans Pelicans
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Philadelphia 76ers at Chicago Bulls
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Utah Jazz
10:30 p.m. (NBA) San Antonio Spurs at Golden State Warriors
GOLF
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Arnold Palmer Invitational, Third
Round
2 p.m. (NBC) PGATourArnold Palmer Invitational, Third Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGATourArnold Palmer Invitational, Spotlight
Coverage
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic, Second Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour JTBC Founders Cup, Third Round
NHL HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL, SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Pittsburgh Penguins
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Los Angeles Kings
7 p.m. (NHL) Montreal Canadiens at Toronto Maple Leafs
COLLEGE LACROSSE
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Maryland at North Carolina
4:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Johns Hopkins at Virginia
MOTORCYCLE RACING
7:30 p.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross Toronto
2014 PARALYMPIC WINTER GAMES
1 p.m. (NBC) From Sochi, Russia (Taped)
SOCCER
8:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) Chelsea FC vs Arsenal FC
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cardiff City FC vs Liverpool FC
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) West Ham United FC vs Manchester
United FC
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Los Angeles Galaxy at Real Salt Lake
6:55 p.m. (UNI) ClubAmerica vs CD Tiburones Rojos de Veracruz
TENNIS
11 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Sony Open
7 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Sony Open
NCAA TRACK AND FIELD
6:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Men's and Women's Indoor Championships
(same-day tape)
COLLEGE WRESTLING
11 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Championships, Medal Round
8 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Championships, Final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Ariz., late
San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., late
Today's Games
Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Miami (ss) vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Miami (ss) atJupiter, 1:05 p.m.


Colorado (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Seattle (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. San Diego at
Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Chicago White Sox (ss)
at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Seattle (ss) vs. Colorado (ss) at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.


Rangers 3, Blue Jackets 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio Derick Brassard
and Derek Stepan scored third-period goals,
and Henrik Lundqvist made 25 saves to lead
the New York Rangers to a 3-1 victory over
the Columbus Blue Jackets on Friday night.
Nick Foligno scored for Columbus, 7-2-2
in its last 11 games. Bobrovsky made 29
saves.
Blackhawks 3,
Hurricanes 2
CHICAGO Jonathan Toews' short-




CITRUS
Continued from Page BI

"We were thinking too much about
what Levi was going to throw first,"
CHS coach Brady Bogart said. "But we
did a better job late in the count mak-
ing him throw a lot of pitches per at
bat
"We told the kids you're either going
to feel the pressure or apply the pres-
sure, and we did more of the latter,"
added Bogart, whose club had at least
two base runners in five innings and
boarded its leadoff hitter in all of the
first six innings. "We're trying to make
defenses move on the pitch and make
something happen."
In the No. 8 spot, Atkinson reached
base on all four of his at bats and drove
in a run in the second on a bunt, before
scoring on a liner to center by Dawson.
Following Dawson's hit, Bogart walked
to load the bases with one out But sen-
ior shortstop Nathan Hines stemmed
the rally when he scooped a ground
ball by Wright, stepped on second and
fired to first in midair for a 6-3 double
play
In all, CHS enjoyed two runs and


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 B3


Scott builds a 7-shot


lead at ]

Associated Press

ORLANDO -Adam Scott matched
the lowest 36-hole score at the Arnold
Palmer Invitational to take a record
seven-shot lead into the weekend.
On a tougher and more blustery af-
ternoon at Bay Hill, the Masters cham-
pion ran off five birdies in an eight-hole
stretch late in the second round Friday
Even with a three-putt bogey on his last
hole, Scott had a 4-under 68.
He was at 14-under 130, tying the
36-hole record at Bay Hill shared by
Tom Watson and Andy Bean in 1981.
His seven-shot lead over J.B. Holmes,
Chesson Hadley and Francesco Moli-
nari shattered the mark for the largest
lead at this event. Tiger Woods (2002)
and PaulAzinger (1988) both led by four
shots, and both went on to win.
Couples takes lead
at Fallen Oak
SAUCIER, Miss. Fred Couples shot a
6-under 66 to take a two-shot lead after the
first round of the Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic at Fallen Oak.
The 54-year-old Couples continued his
run of good play after winning the Toshiba
Classic in Newport Beach, Calif., last
weekend. He has also had recent success
at Fallen Oak, winning in 2012.
Jeff Maggert shot a 68 in his Champions
Tour debut, joining Kenny Perry, David
Frost, Jay Haas and last year's tournament
champion Michael Allen in second place.
Lee leads Founders Cup
PHOENIX-- Mirim Lee remained atop
the JTBC Founders Cup leaderboard in her
third LPGA Tour start.
The 23-year-old South Korean player shot
a 5-under 67 to take a two-stroke advantage
over 16-year-old Lydia Ko into the weekend
at Desert Ridge's Wildfire Golf Club.
A three-time winner on the Korean LPGA,
Lee played the final eight holes in 5 under,
making an eagle and three birdies to reach
13-under 131.
PGA- Bay Hill
Friday, At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course, Orlando,
Purse: $6.2 millionYardage: 7,419, Par: 72,
Second Round, (a-amateur); Note: partial.
Adam Scott 62-68- 130 -14
J.B. Holmes 68-69-137 -7


Bay

Chesson Hadley
Francesco Molinari
Keegan Bradley
Jamie Donaldson
Jason Kokrak
Brandt Snedeker
Morgan Hoffmann
Freddie Jacobson
Matt Every
Ryo Ishikawa
lan Poulter
John Merrick
Charles Howell III
Padraig Harrington
Erik Compton
Aaron Baddeley
Harris English
Sam Saunders
Seung-Yul Noh
Pat Perez
Ryan Moore
Kevin Chappell
Chris Kirk
Stewart Cink
Kevin Na
Trevor Immelman
Brendan Steele
Zach Johnson
Henrik Stenson
David Hearn
Matt Jones
Chris Stroud
Russell Knox
Luke Guthrie
Patrick Reed
Jhonattan Vegas
George McNeill
Woody Austin
Martin Laird
Danny Lee
Briny Baird


Hill


Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 66-77-143 -1
Davis Love III 70-73-143 -1
Champions Tour
Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic
Friday, At Fallen Oak, Biloxi, Miss., Purse: $1.6 million,
Yardage: 7,088, Par 72 (36-36), First Round (Partial):
Fred Couples 34-32- 66 -6
Jeff Maggert 34-34-68 -4
Kenny Perry 34-34- 68 -4
David Frost 36-32- 68 -4
Jay Haas 35-33-68 -4
Michael Allen 35-33-68 -4
DuffyWaldorf 37-32-69 -3
John Riegger 34-35-69 -3
Fred Funk 34-35-69 -3
Roger Chapman 34-35-69 -3
Tom Kite 33-36-69 -3
Scott Dunlap 36-33-69 -3
Anders Forsbrand 35-34- 69 -3
RickFehr 37-33-70 -2
JimThorpe 36-34-70 -2
Sandy Lyle 37-33-70 -2
Mark McNulty 34-36-70 -2
Tom Lehman 35-35-70 -2
MarkO'Meara 37-33-70 -2
Bart Bryant 37-33-70 -2
Jeff Sluman 34-36-70 -2
Olin Browne 35-35-70 -2


I S P RTS B RI FS


Matt Kenseth claims
NASCAR pole in Fontana
FONTANA, Calif. Matt Kenseth has
won the pole for the NASCAR race at
Fontana, edging Brad Keselowski in a
knockout qualifying session Friday domi-
nated by now-familiar faces.
Kenseth won his first pole of the sea-
son for Joe Gibbs Racing by turning a
lap at 187.315 mph, beating Ke-
selowski's 187.105.
Five-time Fontana champion Jimmie
Johnson was third at 38.516, followed by
Kevin Harvick. Clint Bowyer came in fifth.
Kenseth has won three times at
Fontana, most recently in 2009.
Jets sign Vick
and release Sanchez
The New York Jets have signed quar-
terback Michael Vick and released Mark
Sanchez.
The Sanchez move comes as no sur-
prise. He competed for the starting quar-


terback job with rookie Geno Smith last
season in training camp, but the competi-
tion was cut short when Sanchez injured
his right shoulder in a preseason game.
He missed all of last season recover-
ing from surgery.
Vick was a free agent after playing for
the Eagles for the last five seasons.
Williams leaves
Marquette for Va. Tech
MILWAUKEE Buzz Williams is
headed to Virginia Tech after six mostly
successful seasons coaching at Marquette.
Virginia Tech athletic director Whit Bab-
cock announced Williams' hiring Friday
night in a statement. He will be formally in-
troduced at a press conference Monday in
Blacksburg.
Marquette thanked Williams in a state-
ment for elevating the program in the Big
East. The Golden Eagles finished 17-15
this year, ending their eight-year streak of
NCAA tournament appearances.
-From wire reports


handed breakaway goal early in the third
period snapped a tie, and the Chicago
Blackhawks beat the Carolina Hurricanes
3-2.
Patrick Sharp scored his team-leading
30th goal and Kris Versteeg ended an
eight-game drought to help the Black-
hawks win.
Corey Crawford made 26 saves.
Alexander Semin scored his 20th and
21st goals as the Hurricanes fought back
from a two-goal deficit, but lost to Chicago
for the second time this season.
-From wire reports


three RBIs from the bottom third of its
lineup.
With the Panthers down 2-1 in the
bottom of the second, junior first base-
man Zach Bonick sliced a double down
the third-base line, and tied the game
moments later while scoring on a
grounder by left fielder Jacob Schenck.
Lecanto struck in the first inning on
a line-drive base hit to right by Spea-
gle, scoring Schenck.
Bonick and Schenck each finished
the night 1 for 2 with a walk and a run.
"Citrus manufactured the runs
tonight, there's no doubt about it," LHS
coach Dave Logue said. "You can't ex-
pect to win when you can't get a leadoff
guy out until the seventh inning. A
team like Citrus and a coach like
Brady (Bogart) has their guys ready to
score those runs. We got both our runs
after getting our leadoff guy on, but it's
hard to manufacture runs when you're
down by two or three.
"I thought we were ready it would
have been a good win for us. I told peo-
ple whoever executed the best was
going to win the game, and we didn't
execute the best."
Citrus plays at Orlando's Dr Phillips
1 p.m. Monday Lecanto is off next
week.


SNHL BRIEFS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Midwest REGIONAL


McDermott has

30 in Creighton

victory over

Rajun' Cajuns

Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Nick Johnson
scored 18 points, Aaron Gordon
added 16 and top-seeded Arizona
overcame a shaky start and a late
run by Weber State to beat the
Wildcats 68-59 in the NCAA tour-
nament's West Regional.
Arizona (31-4) fell into an eight-
point hole in the opening minutes
to give the 16th-seeded Wildcats
hope of a monumental upset.
The desert Wildcats tried to
squash the dream quickly with
two big second-half runs, but
Weber State fought its way back
from a 21-point deficit to make it
close in the second half.
Davion Berry had 24 points to
lead Weber State (19-12) in its first
NCAA tournament appearance
since 2007.
Creighton 76, Louisiana-
Lafayette 66
SAN ANTONIO Doug McDer-
mott scored 30 points and third-
seeded Creighton got three huge
3-pointers in the second half from
Ethan Wragge to beat No. 14
Louisiana-Lafayette 76-66 in the
West Regional.
McDermott had a double-double by
halftime but went scoreless for nearly
14 minutes of the second half, leaving
it to Wragge's long shots to bail out
the Bluejays from a potential upset by
Ragin' Cajuns, who attacked
Creighton (27-7) with fearless de-
fense and rebounding.
Sun Belt tournament champion
Louisiana-Lafayette (23-12) led 50-48
before Wragge struck from long
range to turn momentum.
The win means the Creighton fam-
ily keeps marching on its final days
together. McDermott, the nation's
leading scorer, opted against going to
the NBA after last season to play one
more year with his father, Creighton
coach Greg McDermott.
Gonzaga 85,
Oklahoma St. 77
SAN DIEGO Kevin Pangos


i


Mercer shocks

No. 3 Duke in

NCAA opener

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. -
Daniel Coursey scored 17
points and Mercer pulled
off the biggest upset in the
NCAA tournament so far
by knocking off Duke 78-71.
Jakob Gollon added 20
points for the 14th-seeded
Bears.
The Bears were simply
too much for a Duke team
with stars Jabari Parker
and Rodney Hood.
Mercer scored 11
straight points during the
late 20-5 run that clinched
the biggest victory in
school history It's the sec-
ond one-and-done in three
years for the third-seeded
Blue Devils.
Mercer won the Atlantic
Sun conference champi-
onship. That's the same
conference that produced
2013 tournament darling
Florida Gulf Coast
Wichita St. 64,
Cal Poly 37
ST. LOUIS Cleanan-
thony Early had 23 points and
unbeaten Wichita State faced
no resistance from Cal Poly,
going to 35-0 for the best start
in NCAA history with a 64-37
rout of Cal Poly in the Mid-
west Region.
The Shockers (35-0) domi-
nated from the tip-off against
the only team with a sub-.500
record in the tournament. The
losers managed 13 points in
the first half and shot 21
percent.
Malik Love had nine points
for Cal Poly (14-20).
Tennessee 86,
Massachusetts 67
RALEIGH, N.C. Jarnell
Stokes scored a career-high
26 points and grabbed 14 re-


S


aye


Associated Press
Mercer forward Jakob Gollon (20) and guard Langston Hall (21) celebrate Friday aftel
defeating Duke 78-71 in an NCAA Tournament second-round game in Raleigh, N.C.


bounds to help Tennessee
beat Massachusetts 86-67 in
the second round of the
NCAA tournament.
Jordan McRae added 21
points for the Volunteers
(23-12), the No. 11 seed in the
Midwest Regional. Tennessee
had little trouble with the sixth-
seeded Minutemen (24-9),
shooting 54 percent from the
field and handling UMass'full-
court pressure in a surpris-
ingly one-sided performance.
Chaz Williams and Maxie
Esho scored 12 points each
for UMass in its first NCAA


appearance since 1998.
Late Thursday

Michigan 57,
Wofford 40
MILWAUKEE Glenn
Robinson III scored 14 points
and second-seeded Michigan
started their quest for a sec-
ond straight trip to the Final
Four by beating 15th-seeded
Wofford 57-40.
The Wolverines (26-8) capi-
talized on their decisive edge
in athleticism on the under-
sized Terriers (20-13) but still


had some nervous moments
after missing 15 of their first
18 shots in the second half.
Karl Cochran finished with
17 points for Wofford.
Louisville 71,
Manhattan 64
ORLANDO Luke Han-
cock hit two huge 3-pointers in
the final 1:19 to help Louisville
finally shake free from tena-
cious Manhattan, 71-64 in the
NCAAtournament.
The defending national
champion Cardinals (30-5)
were down 58-55 with less


Associated Press
Baylor's Isaiah Austin dunks the ball Friday against Nebraska during the
second half of a second-round game in the NCAA Tournament in San
Antonio.


scored 26 points and Gary Bell Jr.
added 17 for eighth-seeded Gonzaga,
which beat Marcus Smart and the
ninth-seeded Oklahoma State Cow-
boys 85-77 in the West region of the
NCAA tournament.
The Bulldogs (29-6), in their 16th
straight NCAA tournament, will play


top-seeded Arizona on Sunday.
The refs called 61 fouls, and five
players fouled out. Pangos made 12
of 14 free throws, most of them in the
closing minutes.
Smart had 23 points, 13 rebounds,
seven assists and six steals for Okla-
homa State (21-13). He is projected to


'S


than 4 minutes to play before
coming alive from the 3-point
line.
Silky smooth guard Russ
Smith, who finished with 18
points, got things going with a
game-tying 3 from the wing.
Hancock delivered the knock-
out blows. He stole an inbound
pass, got fouled and made
both free throws. He hit the first
dagger with 1:19 remaining
and sank a wide-open look
from behind the arc with 28
second left.
Hancock finished with 16
points.
Ashton Pankey led 13th-
seeded Manhattan (25-8) with
16 points.
Saint Louis 83,
NC State 80, OT
ORLANDO Rob Loe
scored 22 points and grabbed
15 rebounds, helping St. Louis
wipe out a late 14-point deficit
and pull away in overtime to
beat North Carolina State
83-80 in the NCAA tournament.
Jordair Jett overcame a slow
start to score 18, doing most of
his damage while the fifth-
seeded Billikens (27-6) were
making their comeback in the
last five minutes of regulation.
T.J. Warren scored 28 points
for the Wolfpack (22-14).
Texas 87,
Arizona State 85
S MILWAUKEE Cameron
r Ridley's buzzer-beating layup
lifted Texas to an 87-85 victory
over Arizona State in the
second round of the NCAA
tournament.
Jonathan Holmes missed
badly on a long 3-pointer for
the seventh-seeded Longhorns
in the final seconds, but Ridley
emerged from the scrum with
the ball and banked it in as time
expired over the outstretched
fingers of an ASU defender.
Ridley finished with 17 points
and 12 rebounds for the Long-
horns (24-10).
Jordan Bachynski scored 25
points for No. 10 seed Arizona
State (21-12).


be a high NBA draft pick. He passed
up the NBA draft last year. The Cow-
boys won five of seven games coming
in, a run that coincided with Smart's
returning from a three-game suspen-
sion for shoving a Texas Tech fan.
Baylor 74, Nebraska 60
SAN ANTONIO Cory Jefferson
scored 16 points and No. 6 seed Bay-
lor kept 11th-seeded Nebraska winless
in its NCAA tournament history with a
74-60 second-round victory.
The Bears (25-11) kept up a two-
month tear. Baylor has won 11 of 13
after a dismal start in the Big 12, re-
capturing the kind of momentum that
vaulted the Bears to the Elite Eight in
2010 and 2012.
Terran Petteway scored 18 points
for Nebraska (19-13), which fell to 0-7
in tournament history.
The Cornhuskers hadn't played on
this stage since 1998 and often looked
like it. Frustration boiled over for Big
Ten coach of the year Tim Miles, who
was ejected with 11 minutes left.
Late Thursday
San Diego St. 73,
New Mexico St. 69, OT
SPOKANE, Wash. In the fourth
and final overtime game on Day 1 of
March Madness, San Diego State out-
lasted New Mexico State for a 73-69
victory.
Xavier Thames scored the first bas-
ket of the extra session and the
fourth-seeded Aztecs (30-4) never
trailed. Thames finished with 23 points
for San Diego State.
Seven-foot-5 Sim Bhullar had 14
points and seven boards for the
13th-seeded Aggies (26-10) before
fouling out in the OT. Daniel Mullings
led the Aggies with 18.
North Dakota State 80,
Oklahoma 75 OT
SPOKANE, Wash. Lawrence
Alexander hit a 3-pointer with 11 sec-
onds left to force overtime and fresh-
man Carlin Dupree scored four points
in the final 75 seconds as No. 12 seed
North Dakota State knocked off Okla-
homa 80-75.
The Bison (26-6) picked up their
first NCAA tournament win by rallying
in the final minute and then outlasting
the No. 5 seed Sooners in overtime.
Alexander finished with a career-high
28 points.
Cameron Clark led Oklahoma
(23-10) with 25 points.


San Diego
Arizona 68, Weber State 59
Gonzaga 85, Oklahoma State 77
Third Round
Today
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee
Wisconsin (27-7) vs. Oregon (24-9),
7:45 p.m.
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
San Diego State (30-4) vs. North
Dakota State (26-6), 6:10 p.m.
Sunday, March 23
At The AT&T Center
San Antonio
Creighton (27-7) vs. Baylor (25-11)
At Viejas Arena
San Diego
Arizona (31-4) vs. Gonzaga (29-6)


SWest REGIONAL



Top-seeded Arizona survives scare


FIRST ROUND
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio
Tuesday, March 18
Albany (N.Y) 71, Mount St. Mary's 64
N.C. State 74, Xavier 59
Wednesday, March 19
Cal Poly 81, Texas Southern 69
Tennessee 78, Iowa 65, OT
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At First Niagara Center
Buffalo, N.Y.
UConn 89, Saint Joseph's 81, OT
Villanova 73, Milwaukee 53
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
Harvard 61, Cincinnati 57
Michigan State 93, Delaware 78
Friday, March 21
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Memphis 71, George Washington 66
Virginia (28-6) vs. Coastal Carolina
(21-12), late
At The AT&T Center
San Antonio
North Carolina 79, Providence 77
Iowa State (26-7) vs. North Carolina
Central (28-5), late
Third Round
Today
At First Niagara Center
Buffalo, N.Y.
Villanova (29-4) vs. UConn (27-8),
9:40 p.m.
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
M ichigan State (27-8) vs. Harvard (27-
4), 8:40 p.m.
Sunday, March 23
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Virginia-Coastal Carolina winner vs.
Memphis (24-9)
At The AT&T Center
San Antonio
Iowa State-North Carolina Central
winner vs. North Carolina (24-9)
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At First Niagara Center
Buffalo, N.Y.
Dayton 60, Ohio State 59
Syracuse 77, Western Michigan 53
At The Amway Center
Orlando
Pittsburgh 77, Colorado 48
Florida 67, Albany (N.Y) 55
Friday, March 21
At Scottrade Center
St. Louis
Stanford 58, New Mexico 53
Kansas 80, Eastern Kentucky 69
At Viejas Arena
San Diego
Stephen F. Austin 77, VCU 75, OT
UCLA (26-8) vs. Tulsa (21-12), late
Third Round
Today
At First Niagara Center
Buffalo, N.Y.
Syracuse (28-5) vs. Dayton (24-10),
7:10 p.m.
At The Amway Center
Orlando
Florida (33-2) vs. Pittsburgh (26-9),
12:15 p.m.
Sunday, March 23
At Scottrade Center
St. Louis
Kansas (25-9) vs. Stanford (22-12)
At Viejas Arena
San Diego
UCLA-Tulsa winner vs. Stephen F
Austin (32-2)
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At The Amway Center
Orlando, Fla.
Saint Louis 83, N.C. State 80, OT
Louisville 71, Manhattan 64
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee
Michigan 57, Wofford 40
Texas 87, Arizona State 85
Friday, March 21
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Mercer 78, Duke 71
Tennessee 86, UMass 67
At Scottrade Center
St. Louis
Wichita State 64, Cal Poly 37
Kentucky (24-10) vs. Kansas State
(20-12), late
Third Round
Today
At The Amway Center
Orlando
Louisville (30-5) vs. Saint Louis (27-
6), 2:45 p.m.
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee
Michigan (26-8) vs. Texas (24-10),
5:15 p.m.
Sunday, March 23
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Mercer (27-8) vs. Tennessee (23-12)
At Scottrade Center
St. Louis
Wichita State (35-0) vs. Kentucky-
Kansas State winner
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
At BMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee
Wisconsin 75, American 35
Oregon 87, BYU 68
At Spokane Arena
Spokane, Wash.
North Dakota State 80, Oklahoma 75,
OT
San Diego State 73, New Mexico
State 69, OT
Friday, March 21
At The AT&T Center
San Antonio
Baylor 74, Nebraska 60
Creighton 76, Louisiana-Lafayette 66
At Viejas Arena


B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


NCAA TOURNAMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 NCAA MEN'S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT


East REGIONAL




UNC survivies


Tar Heels edge

Providence 79-77

Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO -James Michael
McAdoo sank two free throws in the
final 3.5 seconds, and No. 6 seed
North Carolina rallied to beat
11th-seeded Providence 79-77 Fri-
day night.
Providence's Bryce Cotton scored
a career-high 36 points and made
one dazzling shot after another
down the stretch. But he also fum-
bled a long rebound in the final mo-
ments, robbing the Friars of a
chance for a last-second miracle.
Had North Carolina (24-9) lost, it
would've been the first time since
1979 the Tar Heels and rival
Duke lost on the same day of the
tournament.
The Blue Devils fell earlier to
14th-seeded Mercer, and the Friars
nearly handed North Carolina a
similar stunner
Marcus Paige led North Carolina
with 19 points.
Memphis 71,
George Washington 66
RALEIGH, N.C. Michael Dixon Jr.
scored 19 points and hit four free throws
in the final 10 seconds to help Memphis
hold off George Washington 71-66 in
the second round of the East Regional.
Joe Jackson added 15 points for the
eighth-seeded Tigers (24-9). They en-
tered the tournament having lost three
of five to fall out of the national rankings,
and shot 49 percent in this one but
struggled to put the ninth-seeded Colo-
nials away until the final seconds.
Isaiah Armwood scored a season-
high 21 points after playing the final 12
minutes with four fouls for ninth-seeded
GW (24-9), which was just 2 of 12 from
3-point range yet never fell behind by
more than 10 points.
Leading scorer Maurice Creek -
who averages 14 points finished with
nine on 2-of-13 shooting for GW, but he
airballed a 3-pointer in the final seconds
that would have tied it.
Late Thursday
Villanova 73,
Milwaukee 53
BUFFALO, N.Y Darrun Hilliard
scored 16 points, JayVaughn Pinkston
added 13 and Villanova beat Milwaukee
73-53 in the second round of the NCAA
tournament.
The Wildcats (29-4), the No. 2 seed in
the East Region, will play seventh-seeded
Connecticut (27-8) in the third round
today. The Huskies held off Saint
Joseph's 89-81 in overtime.
No. 15 seed Milwaukee (21-14), the
surprise champion of the Horizon League,
made it a game all the way, leading much
of the first half before fading late.


Associated Press
North Carolina's James Michael McAdoo, left, is fouled Friday by
Providence's Carson Desrosiers during the closing seconds of the second
half of a second-round game in the NCAA Tournament in San Antonio.
McAdoo's free throws lifted North Carolina to a 79-77 win.


Connecticut 89,
Saint Joseph's 81, OT
BUFFALO, N.Y Shabazz Napier
shook off a miss at the second-half
buzzer to score nine of his 24 points in
overtime and lead seventh-seeded Con-
necticut to a 89-81 win over Saint


76ers nearly halt long lo
Associated Press set the record of 26 con- vision, went on a 19-0 run in
secutive losses in the the third quarter.
PHILADELPHIA-The 2010-11 season. DJ Augustin and Jimmy
76ers have fumbled their The Sixers (15-54) would Butler each scored 17 points
way toward the wrong kind have to pull off an upset to for the Bulls, who have lost
of NBA history avoid tying the record, two of their last three games.
Amare Stoudemire had Up next, three straight
22 points and 10 rebounds, road games at Chicago, Nets 114, Celtics 98


Carmelo Anthony scored
21 and the New York
Knicks won their eighth
straight game, 93-92 over
Philadelphia on Friday
night, sending the Sixers to
their 23rd straight loss.
The Sixers have
matched the Vancouver
Grizzlies (1995-96), Denver
Nuggets (1997-98) and
Charlotte Bobcats (2011-
12) for the second-longest
single-season losing streak
in NBA history
The Cleveland Cavaliers


San Antonio and Houston.
If the Sixers lose all three,
the potential record 27th
loss would come March 29
vs. Detroit.
Pacers 91, Bulls 79
INDIANAPOLIS Luis
Scola had 19 points and
Lance Stephenson finished
with 15 to lead the Indiana
Pacers to a 91-79 win over
the Chicago Bulls.
The Pacers (51-18), who
took a 13-game lead on the
Bulls (38-31) in the Central Di-


Associated Press
New York's Amar'e Stoudemire, center, tries to squeeze
past Philadelphia's Hollis Thompson, left, and Henry Sims
during the second half Friday in Philadelphia.


NEW YORK Joe John-
son hit six 3-pointers in his 27
points, Mason Plumlee added
18 points, and the Brooklyn
Nets won their 11th straight at
home, beating the Boston
Celtics 114-98.
Former Celtic Paul Pierce
had 14 points and Andray
Blatche and Jorge Gutierrez
added 10 apiece for the Nets,
who won their third straight
game and ninth in the last 10
to remain within 2 1/2 games
behind the Atlantic Division-
leading Toronto Raptors.
Avery Bradley led Boston
with 28 points and Rajon
Rondo had 12 points and 12
assists.
Pelicans 111,
Hawks 105
ATLANTA- Anthony Davis
had 34 points and 11 re-
bounds, New Orleans took
the lead with a 12-0 run that
began at the end of the third
quarter and the Pelicans beat
the Atlanta Hawks 111-105.
Tyreke Evans had 21
points for New Orleans, which
completed a two-game sweep
of the season series.
Jeff Teague led Atlanta with
26 points and eight assists.
Paul Millsap had 20 points.
Heat 91,
Grizzlies 86
MIAMI RayAllen scored
18 points to lead the Miami


Joseph's in the second round of the
NCAA tournament.
DeAndre Daniels scored 18 while
freshman center Amida Brimah forced
overtime by completing a three-point play
in the final minute for UConn (27-8).
Langston Galloway scored 25 points
for Saint Joseph's (24-10).


sing ski(
Heat to a 91-86 comeback
victory over the Memphis
Grizzlies.
LeBron James finished with
15 points for the Heat.
Zach Randolph scored 25
points and had 14 rebounds
for Grizzlies. Marc Gasol fin-
ished with 14 points, but left
with an ankle injury midway
through the third quarter.
Thunder 119,
Raptors 118, 2 OT
TORONTO Kevin Du-


South REGIONAL


Jayhawks hold


off pesky EKU


Associated Press
ST LOUIS Andrew
Wiggins scored 19 points,
Jamari Traylor and Perry
Ellis had double-doubles
and second-seeded Kansas
pulled away down the
stretch to beat pesky East-
ern Kentucky 80-69 on Fri-
day in the second round of
the NCAA tournament.
Traylor finished with 17
points and 14 rebounds,
and Ellis had 14 points
and 13 boards for the Jay-
hawks (25-9), who trailed
56-53 with 9 minutes to go
before their game-ending
charge.
They advanced to play
No. 10 seed Stanford, a
58-53 winner over seventh-
seeded New Mexico, on
Sunday in the third round
of the South Regional.
Glenn Cosey hit five
3-pointers and had 17
points for the 15th-seeded
Colonels (24-10), the Ohio
Valley Conference cham-
pions. Tarius Johnson and
Eric Stutz finished with 15
points apiece.
Stephen F. Austin
77, VCU 75, OT
SAN DIEGO- Desmond
Haymon scored on an im-
probable four-point play with
3.6 seconds in regulation and
hit a big 3-pointer in overtime


to lead No. 12 seed Stephen
F. Austin to a 77-75 win over
fifth-seeded Virginia Com-
monwealth in the NCAA tour-
nament's South Region.
VCU (23-10) was firmly in
control for most of the second
half before SFA (32-2) rallied
in the closing seconds.
Haymon hit one of the
biggest and most improba-
ble shots of what's already
been a wild March, knocking
down a 3-pointer and a free
throw after being fouled by
Jordan Burgess at the end of
regulation.
Stanford 58,
New Mexico 53
ST. LOUIS Chasson
Randle scored 23 points and
No. 10 seed Stanford made
an impression in its first
NCAA appearance since
2008, leading almost start to
finish in a 58-53 victory over
seventh-seeded New Mexico.
The Cardinal (22-12) built
an early 16-point lead then
held on after New Mexico ral-
lied to tie it midway through
the second half.
Cameron Bairstow had 24
points and eight rebounds but
the Lobos (27-7) got off-days
from their other top threats.
Kendall Williams and Alex
Kirk, who together average 30
points, combined for just six.


Associated Press
Kansas' Tarik Black dunks the ball Friday during the
second half of a second-round game against Eastern
Kentucky in the NCAA Tournament in St. Louis.



I against Knicks


rant had 51 points and 12 re-
bounds, All-Star guard Rus-
sell Westbrook limped off in
the third quarter with a
sprained right knee but the
Oklahoma City Thunder sur-
vived to beat the Toronto Rap-
tors 119-118 in double
overtime.
Reggie Jackson scored 25
and Serge Ibaka had 13 for
the Thunder.
DeMar DeRozan scored 33
points and Amir Johnson had
25 points and 12 rebounds for


the Raptors.
Mavericks 122,
Nuggets 106
DALLAS Monta Ellis
scored 26 points, Dirk Now-
itzki added 21 and the Dallas
Mavericks pulled away from
the Denver Nuggets in the
fourth quarter of a 122-106
victory.
J.J. Hickson led Denver with
18 points and eight rebounds
before leaving with an appar-
ent injury in the fourth quarter.


Call Your Representative ITU UITYJ
Today! 352-563-5655 ww hni clo inco
AU~d ^? ^ ^U ? ^U ^ Y ww~cronileon ieco


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 B5





B6 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


TENNIS


Epstein sets pace


Boys Tennis NOTEBOOK

NT\4- rcaiiilf Pirnfac


I i 1 W UiI 1 11c A. .o

for Pirate netters claim county rown


CR sophomore

leads team

with 17 wins

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

One of the biggest bright
spots for the Crystal River
boys' tennis team has been
the play of sophomore Ben
Epstein.
Epstein 101
Epstein was born in In-
verness as the older of two
siblings to Daniel and
Colleen Epstein.
The current 6-foot-2,
165-pounder was versatile
enough to play basketball
in his eighth-grade season
for Crystal River Middle
School, switching between
small and power forward.
While at CRMS, though,
he followed his heart with
tennis.
As a seventh-grader he
was at the bottom of the
totem pole.
"When I joined the
team, I was so bad I was
the last seed," Epstein re-
called. "When I went out
for the team I thought it
would be interesting. I
started out so poorly I
knew I needed to take
some lessons to improve.
"In the beginning, it was
very frustrating," he said.
"I had no form. It was like
I'd hit it and hope it would
go over (the net)."
He began taking lessons
locally 2 to 3 times a week
and played endlessly on
Saturday until 10 p.m.
As an eighth-grader, he
switched to Brooksville
tennis instructor Judy
Jeanette for pointers and
advice.
In a year's time, Epstein
rose to CRMS' top seed. To
compound his growth, he
captured the season-
ending Citrus County mid-
dle school tournament
Upon matriculating to
Crystal River High School,
he continued his approach
as a multi-sport
student/athlete.
On the hardwood courts,
he's played both forward
positions at the junior var-
sity level as a freshman
and sophomore.
In tennis, he's anchored
the No. 3 singles position
and mixed in some dou-
bles action over the past
two years.
Being eliminated in the
opening round of districts
last spring has served as a
source of motivation this
season.
For the 8-5 Pirates
under skipper Bill Reyes,
Epstein leads the Pirates
with 17 combined wins.
He's a team-best 8-4 in sin-
gles play and 9-2 at No. 2



PERFECT
Continued from Page B1

she remained athletically
active playing for Inverness
Middle School.
As a seventh- and eighth-
grader she played tennis for
the Falcons.
In eighth grade, she cap-
tured the season-ending
Citrus County middle
school tennis tournament
She also stretched her
athletic boundaries by par-
ticipating in volleyball. Ini-
tially she played both
seasons at IMS.
After matriculating to
CHS, she played volleyball
for four seasons (two junior
varsity and two varsity sea-
sons), mostly as a defensive
specialist
This season was extra
special as the Hurricanes
captured their first district
title since 1996.
"I started playing volley-
ball in middle school and
just wanted to keep it up,"
the 18-year-old Dodd said.
'A lot of my friends played.
It was fun to play a team
sport"
But make no mistake
about it, tennis is her pri-


mary sport
"I really enjoy the mental
part of the game," she de-
scribed. "Playing tennis is
always a challenge. When
I'm on the court, I look for
opportunities. I'd say I have
a lot of tools in my tool box.


Ben Epstein
Sophomore leads Crystal
River with 17 victories.
doubles with junior Matt
White.
"I love to play the sports
I play," the 16-year-old Ep-
stein said. "I love basket-
ball practice and the
adrenaline rush from
games. In basketball, you
have to rely on your team-
mates for success.
"In tennis, you can only
rely on yourself. There is a
team concept, but really
tennis is an individual
sport," he added.
From middle school to
the present day, Epstein
believes he's upped his
stock.
"In every aspect of my
tennis game, I've gotten
better," Epstein said. "I
used to get really frus-
trated when I lose a point.
Now, I've learned to con-
trol things.
"I try to figure out the
other person," he said.
"How agile are they? Can
they place the ball? I like
to go to the net and spike it
or drop it in right over the
net. My job is to mentally
break my opponent. I do
that by speeding up the
game."
Despite retaining the
team's finest success, Ep-
stein doesn't feel he's
ready to surpass either
junior Matt Allen at No. 1
or senior Ryan Johnson at
No. 2 singles.
"Those guys aren't that
much better than me," he
said. "But I've got to work
harder on my mental ap-
proach before I play at
No. 1 or No. 2 (singles)."
Perhaps Epstein's
biggest strength is his com-
petitive nature.
"Even since I was small,
dad always said I hated to
lose," Epstein said.
With the District 2A-7
tennis tournament quickly
approaching, CRHS is
nearing the end of the line
of its regular-season
matches.
Friday's match versus
Gainesville-Oak Hall is the
final test before March 31
district tourney at CRHS.
"I really wish I had 3 to 4
more matches left," said
Epstein on the fast-ap-
proaching state series. "I

The biggest is I work really
hard. I try to remain men-
tally strong no matter what
happens."
On Dodd's biggest
strength, "I pray a lot God
has blessed me. He's given
me a chance to play to the
best of my abilities. In really
tight matches, I think I wear
my opponents down."
Dodd keeps an even keel
by focusing at what's
straight head.
"I've done better than I
thought I would," she said.
"Right now, I really want to
go back to states. I know it
won't be easy The easiest
way (to states) is to win
districts."
Despite her success, after
tennis season Dodd is un-
decided on whether she'll
even continue to play
"I'm not a D-I level
player," she said. "But I
might play at D-II or NAIA
I have considered joining
my sister in Lakeland. She's
my best friend."
Academically Dodd's fa-
vorite class at CHS is
anatomy She aspires a ca-
reer in occupational ther-
apy She'd like to work with
children with disabilities.
Prior to stepping on to the
LHS courts on April 1, "I
want to be known as a hard-
working player who never
gave up on the courts," she
declared. "Sure, it would be
nice to win districts in sin-
gles) as fourth time. I want
to leave as a district
champion."


lost last year in the first
round of singles and dou-
bles; I was so mad. I hated
the feeling. I'm doing
everything I can not to feel
that way again."
In doubles, he enjoys the
bond with White.
"Last year, I played with
Ryan (Johnson), but the
chemistry with Matt
(White) is so much better
We communicate so well
together We both can play
the net and we both can hit
it from the baseline. Dur-
ing a match we know what
to fix."
In the classroom, Ep-
stein is an exceptional stu-
dent. He carries an
unweighted 3.9 and a
weighted 4.6 grade point
average. His favorite class
is chemistry
"Ben's a great kid and
great student," Pirates
coach Bill Reyes said.
"He's a very nice, well-
mannered kid. But you can
see the fire in his eyes. He
gets on himself on
mistakes.
"So far, he's 17-6 (com-
bined in singles and dou-
bles) that's a nice little
record for a second-year
player," Reyes added.
"He's helped carry the
team. Hopefully, he'll con-
tinue carrying us in
districts."
On what Epstein's future
will hold, "He's gonna
have to get ready to play at
least at the No. 2 (singles)
next year," Reyes said.
"The expectation is for
him to move up. I'll agree,
he's still working on his
mental game that's huge
in tennis. He's got to be
mentally ready, but I think
he's on the right path."
Epstein's short-term
goal is simple.
"I've carried the loss of
last year's districts with
me," he said. "I want to be
a district champion. Being
a district champ will boost
my confidence going into
next season."


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

On the eve of the 93rd FHSAA state series beginning
March 31, there was encouraging news from Citrus
County's three male tennis programs.
Pirates: No. 1
Crystal River's fourth-year skipper Bill Reyes is re-
joicing thanks to his team's thrilling come-from-
behind 4-3 win over archrival Citrus on March 14.
With the win, the Pirates clinched the Citrus County
championship.
"The win was huge," Reyes said. "We were down
3-1 after No. 4 singles. We won at No. 5 singles and
swept both doubles. Our No. 2 doubles team (featuring
juniors Ben Epstein and Matt White) both lost to their
singles opponents, but came back and got the job done
in doubles."
The 8-5 Pirates closed their regular play Friday
against Gainesville-Oak Hall before hosting the Dis-
trict 2A-7 tournament at home beginning March 31.
LHS lambasts Leesburg, 7-0
Lecanto (8-7) climbed over .500 behind Tuesday's
7-0 shutout over visiting Leesburg.
"We're playing like I hoped we would be," Lecanto
coach Jack Hall said. "But we realize there's no com-
fort level in our district (3A-5). To me, any one of four
teams could win it
"The draw is huge and really it's about who has a
good day and who doesn't," added Hall, regarding the
fast-approaching April 1-2 tourney at LHS.
Hall is not a fan of scheduling a district tournament
on the heels of next week's spring break
"The week off (right before districts) is horrible," he
said. "But it is what it is. Families make plans to take
this time off. If we schedule practice, the odds aren't
great that we will get everybody there. In terms of get-
ting in practice, this is not an ideal situation."
CHS: MacGinnis done
It's been a tough week for the Hurricanes netters.
On March 14, CHS couldn't hold on to a 3-1 lead after
four singles matches, losing to archrival Crystal River,
4-3.
On Monday CHS bounced backs by taming Lake
Minneola, 7-0.
But the following day versus defending district
champion Ocala-Forest, CHS learned that its finest
player junior Noah MacGinnis would be out for
the remainder of the season following hernia surgery
To complicate matters, with MacGinnis out, skipper
James Martone had to reshape his lineup prior to a
5-2 loss to the Wildcats.
CHS (4-6 overall) was scheduled to close out its reg-
ular season play Thursday evening in Lake County
against Leesburg.
Recapping the lastweek, MacGinnis, ErikVestervall
and Jarrod Muse each captured two singles matches
while Brady Hayes/MacGinnis each captured two wins
at No. 1 doubles.
"We're not in the business of making excuses," Mar-
tone said. "MacGinnis is out and we won't have him for
districts and beyond. Our guys have had a great year
and they've played well in their other sports. Right
now, we're kinda under the gun with an injury to our
best guy"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTEBOOK
Continued from Page B1

CHS and LHS finished tied
for the county champi-
onship at 3-1.
Both the Panthers and
Hurricanes split during
their two matches and
swept both meetings
against Crystal River
'Canes: Claim
four wins
According to third-year
coach Scott Waters, both
West Port and Crystal River,
backed out of matches last
week giving the Hurri-
canes two forfeit nods.
On Tuesday, CHS clubbed
Groveland-South Lake, 7-0,
and won by the same score
Thursday night over Lees-
burg to climb to 13-2 on the
season.
Since dropping the initial
meeting in Marion County
against West Port, 4-3, CHS'
nod over Leesburg pushed
its winning skein to nine
matches in a row
"I would have preferred
to have a played a tougher
schedule going into the
break, but we played the
hand that was dealt," Wa-
ters said. 'At least Lees-
burg's No. 1 singles and
No. 1 doubles was a good
test"
After the Leesburg re-
match, senior Melanie
Dodd and freshman Natalie
Dodd stood with identical
13-0 won-lost records.
CRHS: 2-2 week
Over the past week, Crys-
tal River went 2-2 to dip to
4-5-1.
The Pirates were swept
by defending district cham-
pions from Dade City-
Pasco, 7-0, and forfeited to
Citrus.
On the plus side, CRHS
edged district runner-up
Hernando, 4-3, and crushed
Weeki Wachee, 7-0.
Anna Lane, Olivia Parker
and Shannon Hancock each
won twice against the Leop-
ards and Hornets in singles
play
In doubles action,
Lane/Parker at No. 2 dou-
bles added a pair of doubles
victories against Hernando
and Weeki Wachee.











RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


It's easy to think of God as a God of

wrath and judgment, which is what he

is. It's even easier to overlook the fact

that His wrath is based on His love for

his people, and because of that love, His

wrath was inflicted on His Son so his

people can be spared.










I,

iIi
fI




/












i / ,


hen the phone rings here at the
newspaper, you never know who's on
the other end and what the person
will say
That's why we have an antacid dispenser in
the break room. (Not really)
One day last week I got a call from a woman
who sounded greatly distressed; she had lost
her wedding rings.
It happened several months ago when she
was going through cancer treatment. She said
the treatment muddled her brain, made her
absent-minded and forgetful.
Back in January she was making meatloaf
and didn't want to get raw hamburger gunk in
her 41-year-old ring set so she took them off,
plus two other newer rings five rings in all.
She put them in the pocket of her jeans and
then later put the jeans on a little stepladder
in her closet and forgot about them.
"Didn't you notice your hands were
ringless?" I asked her
She said back then she didn't notice any-
thing. Days, maybe weeks later, she gathered
up a bunch of stuff to donate to a local thrift
store, and the jeans accidentally along with
it.
When she finally noticed she wasn't wear-
ing her rings, she looked everywhere in her
house, frantic. For weeks she cried as she
tried to remember where she put them and
then cried when she remembered. She was
crying when she called me.
She asked if I thought she was silly and I
told her no. The rings meant something to
her, something beyond mere jewelry
Her husband had offered to buy her a new
set, but she didn't doesn't want a new
set. She wants the set she lost, the set she
loves.
A week or so before the woman called, my
pastor had talked about Jesus telling para-
bles about the kingdom of heaven and about
lost things and found things:
A pearl merchant goes out looking for fine
pearls, which in biblical times were more
valuable than diamonds are today He finds
one of great value and sells everything he has
to purchase it
A man finds a treasure hidden in a field,
hides it again and sells all he has to buy the
field and the treasure.
A woman has 10 silver coins, each worth
about a day's wages, and loses one. She turns
her house upside down, searching carefully
until she finds it.
A man has 100 sheep and one wanders off.
He leaves the 99 to go after the one lost
sheep. When he finds it, he joyfully puts it
across his shoulders and carries it home.


Nancy Kennedy
( GRACE NOTES



When he returns, he calls his friends and
neighbors together to celebrate.
"Rejoice with me; I have found my lost
sheep," he says.
Likewise, when the woman who lost the
coin finds it, she, too, calls her neighbors to
celebrate.
"In the same way, I tell you, there is rejoic-
ing in the presence of the angels of God over
one sinner who repents," Jesus said (Luke
15:10).
I've heard these stories that Jesus told all
my life, and often that's all there is. I hear
them; I read them; I say, "Oh yeah, I remem-
ber that one," and go on to the next.
But when the woman who lost her rings
called, crying, and I talked to her long enough
to get a glimpse of the extent of her grief-
for that's what it is I thought about how
God grieves over his lost creation.
Maybe He doesn't cry or wring His hands or
feel despair, but He does grieve over lost peo-
ple, those whom he loves, those who either
defiantly run from him or who just sort of
wander away
Lost is lost no matter how you get there.
It's easy to think of God as a God of wrath
and judgment, which is what he is. It's even
easier to overlook the fact that his wrath is
based on his love for his people, and because
of that love, his wrath was inflicted on his Son
so his people can be spared.
Therefore, the people who are lost don't
need to fear being found. Instead, they can
look forward to a party a time of great
rejoicing and celebration. The Bible says so.
I sincerely hope the woman finds her rings.
I imagine she'll cry even harder, but with
tears of joy and thankfulness. What was lost
has been found!
Maybe God cries those kinds of tears. I
think maybe he just might.
Nancy Kennedy is the author of "Move
Over, Victoria -I Know the Real Se-
cret," "Girl on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via email at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn.


RELIGION

BRIEFS


Ted Cruz embraces
his religious side

DES MOINES, Iowa Long
known as a fiscal conservative,
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz is embracing
his religious side for Christian
home schooling advocates in Iowa.
The Texas Republican told a
crowd of more than 500 home-
schoolers in Des Moines on Tues-
day that "there is no liberty more
important than religious liberty"
And Cruz decried what he called
the federal government's attempts
to impede it
He said the Obama administra-
tion has been more openly hostile
to religious freedom than any
other in American history
Cruz is frequently mentioned as
a possible 2016 presidential candi-
date. His fourth visit to Iowa since
last summer has fueled that specu-
lation. Cruz addressed the Iowa
Republican Party's annual Ronald
Reagan dinner in October, and met
with Christian conservatives and
evangelical leaders during two vis-
its last summer
Iowa is expected to host the first
nominating caucuses for the 2016
presidential election.


Mennonite reviews
same-sex hiring policy

HARRISONBURG, Va. East-
ern Mennonite University is re-
viewing its policy against hiring
people who are in same-sex
relationships.
The review includes a six-month
listening process that began in Jan-
uary The university, in Harrison-
burg, Va., is conducting an online
survey through April 30 to gather
public input The survey is posted
on the university's website.
Eastern Mennonite conducted a
previous survey to obtain input
from students, faculty, staff, alumni
and donors.
Valley Family Forum Chaplain
John Sloop told WHSV-TV that
changing the policy would go
against the word of God. He says
the university would lose support
But Claire Whiting, who attends
a Mennonite church, believes the
change could be positive.
The President's Cabinet will
make a recommendation on
whether to change the policy to the
university's board of directors in
June.


Underground bishop
of Shanghai dies

BEIJING Catholic groups say
the underground bishop of Shang-
hai, Joseph Fan, has died at age 97
following decades of imprisonment
and house arrest.
The U.S.-based Cardinal Kung
Foundation says Fan died early
Sunday evening following a brief
illness. It says officials in China's
financial hub turned down a re-
quest to hold his funeral at the
city's cathedral.
Fan was named Shanghai bishop
by John Paul II in 2000, but was re-
fused recognition by the Commu-
nist Party body overseeing the
church in China. Fan was placed
under house arrest and another
priest, Aloysius Jin Luxian, was
named as bishop.
China rejects the Vatican's insis-
tence on the right to appoint bishops
and the sides have no formal ties.
Jin's successor, Thaddeus Ma
Daqin, has not been seen since
being taken into custody in 2012.

Christians, Muslims
join anti-slavery push

VATICAN CITY Christians
and Muslims have joined to try to
help free millions of men, women
and children who are held in mod-
ern-day slavery, being forced to
work as maids, prostitutes, child
soldiers and manual laborers.
The Global Freedom Network
launched Monday at the Vatican
aims to eradicate slavery by en-
couraging governments, busi-
nesses, educational and faith
institutions to rid their supply
chains of slave labor. The initiative
is the brainchild of billionaire Aus-


tralian mining magnate Andrew
Forrest, who founded the Walk
Free Foundation in 2012 to mobi-
lize a grass-roots movement to end
slavery





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION NOTES


Special events
Two years after the resignation of their
ministerial leader, Unity Church of Citrus
County announces the installation of its new
minister, the Rev. Marciah McCartney. The sa-
cred candle lighting ceremony took place on
Sunday, Feb. 2 in the sanctuary of the church
with Reverend Art Holt presiding.
As senior minister and spiritual leader of
Unity Church of Citrus County, Reverend Mar-
ciah said sees herself "leading and co-creating
with a diverse spiritual community where the
sacred worth of all people is honored."
Unity of Citrus County is located at 2628
West Woodview Lane in Lecanto, east of CR
491, north of County Road 486. Call 352-746-


1270 for additional information, or visit them
on the Web at www.unityofcitrus.org.
n St. Timothy Lutheran Church will host a
Bluegrass concert featuring the Special Con-
sensus Band at 7 p.m. Friday, March 28. Tick-
ets are available in advance or at the door
(suggested donation is $10). Bring family and
friends for an enjoyable evening of music. For
tickets or more information, call the church of-
fice at 352-795-5325. The church is at 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Pope John Paul II Catholic School's Class
of 2014 Annual Lenten Fish Fry is from 4:30 to
7 p.m. Friday through April 11 at 4341 W. Ho-
mosassa Trial, Lecanto. This year's new menu
includes hand-battered fried fish, homemade
clam chowder and fresh baked goods. For


more information, call 352-746-2020 or visit
www.pjp2.org.
The Agape House will continue its
fundraising sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at
First Baptist Church, 700 N. Citrus Ave., Crys-
tal River. Funds are used to purchase Bibles,
toiletries, and other miscellaneous items. For
more information, call the Agape House
(Wednesdays) at 352-795-7064 or First Bap-
tist Church at 352-795-3367.
The "Hernando Crossroads BBQ
Competition" will take place at 11:30 a.m.
today. This event is free to the public. Come
out for family fun and see who is crowned
"Best BBQ in the South." There will be an old
antique car show and a bounce house. For
vendor information and more, call the New


Church Without Walls at 352-344-2425.
St. Anne's Episcopal Church's "Home-
coming Celebration" fundraiser with a catered
dinner and a cash bar is at 5 p.m. today. The
event will also feature a parody of "The Newly-
wed Game," "The Dating Game," "Kids Say
the Darnedest Things," and other comic acts.
"Embrace the Journey Lenten Series" contin-
ues at 5:30 p.m. Friday through April 11, in
the sanctuary with Stations of the Cross, fol-
lowed by a soup and salad dinner with guest
speakers discussing end-of-life issues.
Come out tonight at 6 as we study the first
book of Samuel and enjoy free coffee and
dessert as we sit and learn in an informal
See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship


that offer love, peace:


and harmony to all.

I Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted'??


"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Comlmunity"
Ill



"o7s talR F





-t Cuc
Of HernSnd


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA


Coe





Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-1 6


kPastor
Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GoD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday .,vih, Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference
Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


ISiid., Evening 6:00 PM


Wednesday


7:00 PM


Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplace to belong. Aplace to become."

** ...*
99 UN

HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
,, CKPJNC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKyM\L
RIVEF, y
VJNITCD
N-ICTHODI5T
C H U KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www. crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


NORTH CITRUS

CHRISTIAN

CHURCH
Phone: (352) 527-0021



Sunday Services: 10:30am
Bible Study:
Wednesday 6:30pm
Minister
George Plantz
Where your search for a
friendly Bible Church ends



^ 1.Hernando
i~aMChurchof
16 TheNazarene
A Place to Beloirng

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org



unITJ
of Citrus County

A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING


WE ARE A JOYOUS COMMUNITY
WHICH INSPIRES, EMBRACES,
AND NURTURES ALL THOSE ON
THEIR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY.
SERVICE OFFERINGS:
SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT
CLASSES, WEDDINGS,
CHRISTENINGS, MEMORIALS,
AND HOLY UNIONS
WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30
NURSERY/SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30
I FOUND
NEW HOPE...




I Found Uj
KNOWING GOD, LOVING
GOD. SERVING GOD

2628 WWOODVIEW LANE
I LECANTO, FL 34461
S352-746-1270
WWW.UNITYOFCITRUS.ORG


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


SWest

Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.
p Woo



US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30

Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST,
L David Curry








rad:

fist




535E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00AM
Sunday
10:45AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!

A Homosassa Springs
AIR rn+Dr ,i .E!*ThT CHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor William Bremmer
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 4:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1 umc.org


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy 0171
Pastor 0
Marple Lewis III
Sunday Worship
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Children's Ministry
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Student Ministry
7:00 pm
Wednesday
UPLIFT Prayer & Praise 7 pm
Child Care Provided
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com

NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH



"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9- 30-10-00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor' f .
714S. Scarbor .. .
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


Shepherd

m of the

T Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offiilith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and iriulith
of Jesus Chriit.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


RELIGION


fY "





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Places of worship


that offer love, peace:


and harmony to all. 1J


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! I


SFloral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.coin

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm^
795-4479


t ccJ
"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
344-1908*
u~walf '


,? Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lennrmy Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon





*Nie,_Smll i ls.h


VEYNICEl .ll


(II ];o F- v






FIRST is
LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
&Bible Class
SA4.9:00 A.M.
726-1637
M Aissouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran net
F1900R W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH





The ReC Thommunias Beaverson






][ Crystal
SEvery Sunday ativer
7:45am & 10:00am








1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.y School








795-6720
A FULL GOSPELass









FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P .M.
11 726-1637









S Prayer Sat. 4-6pmynod
www.1Pastor John Hager
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


MM Crystal
DOIE River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.m.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pmn
Pastor John 2ae


p~j~lAssembly
Rev. Stephen Lane Assembly

Faith of God
I I w4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Lutheran (Hw. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452
Church (h.M.'.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto Pastor,
Crystal Glen Subdivision Dairold
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325


COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
{otKo,,o ro,, O(n..


"Where everyone is special!"
"Jesus Christ-central theme
of our worship"
Sunday School
9:30 a.m.

Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m & 6:00 p.m.

Wednesday Worship
7:00 p.m.
"Ministries for all ages"
Nursery Available


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

THE
SALVATIONr
A D IUIV CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY _CoWs.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish




Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
/I 'l tll /lh" I' L l .L I Pill


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
l.iffiln Up Jesus \
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

opew
opW*

opew


2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)

(1 miles from Hwy 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30AM
Worship Service
O10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.

h , , l l . I .


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I '- I ,i1 ,, ll -, ,r ,-
, ,]h[. l 'i ] 1 t H ,1 ,I . ] ]




Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School .............9:00
W worship ..................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Fom
352-422-6;1;
Pafor
Todd
Langdon


thl 1 1 \I Timothy\V
,L, of
SnIL 1 2:15

Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen


5 Crystal Qiver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided








Hwy. 44 E@
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services0
" Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
* 5th Sunday .
* of Any Month Combined 10am *
*Sunday School for all ages
* 9:30 AM
* Nursery Provided U
Fellowship & Youth Group
* Sunday Evening
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgfl
* Podcast: fpcinv.com U
* Church Office 637-07701*
* Pastor James Capps


Come To S
ST.
MARGARET's7
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


\ I ).I' u l I tl a. ,! .
INVERNESS
CHURCH OF GOD
Sunday Services:
Worship Services..8:30 AM & 10:30 AM
Sunday School..................... 9:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Classes ForAll Ages at 7:00 PM I
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Dayeare
and Learning Center" & "Cornerstone
Christian Supply"

E)PRIMERA IGLESIA
/ HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoracid6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les 'Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711






All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033


(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
SeniorPastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages

SundayWorship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM-Vertical Kids
10:30 AMr- Traditional

Wednesday Worship
S6:00 PM-Vertical Youth
mR r m


SST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org








Celebrate
Youth Sunday
March 30th.
There will be one service I
at 10:00 AM.
Our youth will share their
gifts, talents and faith with
S our Church family and
community. Join us
afterward for a light lunch in
Fellowship Hall.

aFirst Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i li Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AlIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org
Com Worshi B atiUs"








ofLake J Ala s Ri ea
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday ll:00am
& 6:00pmo
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
E-mail: us ut on ,, ,,.
Check us out on Facebook


8:00 Am. & 10:30 Am.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PA, to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 Am.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills |
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
:. .catholicweb.com .:


First Unite r

Methodist


SChurch _
of Inverness VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. *
Inverness, FL 34452 cauinv AV A.CC.


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 C3









Gay student says Baptist school denied readmission


Associated Press

ST LOUIS -An honors-cal-
iber college student who re-
cently disclosed publicly that
he's gay said he was denied
readmission to a northern Mis-
souri Baptist school because of
that declaration.
Chase Martinson, 20, of Jeffer-
son County in suburban St
Louis, spent his first two years at
Hannibal-LaGrange University
which has about 1,200 students.
He temporarily withdrew in Oc-


tober due to illness but hoped to
return this fall.
School documents show that
in January he was initially ac-
cepted to return and then of-
fered a spot in the private
college's honors program in
early March before recently re-
ceiving another letter saying
his application was inactive.
That letter alludes to a school
morals clause that forbids ho-
mosexuality as a "misuse of
God's gift" The student con-
duct code also forbids incest,


adultery and fornication.
Martinson said he was told by
the school's admissions direc-
tor that "it was brought to his
attention that I was outside the
moral guidelines of the school."
Martinson, a nursing major and
member of the dean's list who
was recruited to the Hannibal
campus as a men's volleyball
player, came out on Facebook
in December
"I know one student who be-
came pregnant on campus and
all they had to do was recommit


their life to the Lord and they
were able to continue their ed-
ucation," he said in an inter-
view Thursday "It's ridiculous.
If they're so firm upon their
Christian views as biblically
founded, they should be more
accepting of everyone."
Martinson, who grew up in a
Baptist household but doesn't
identify with the denomination,
said he now plans to attend the
University of Missouri-St Louis
in the fall semester rather than
pursue the two options pre-


sented by his former school: ap-
peal the decision directly to its
president or write a statement
renouncing his homosexuality
Hannibal-LaGrange officials
did not respond to several tele-
phone and email messages
seeking comment. A university
lawyer said federal education
privacy laws forbid a public re-
sponse.
Legal experts say the school's
private status and religious
affiliation allow for such
exclusions.


NOTES
Continued from Pag e C2

setting at Calvary Chapel's Holy Grounds
Cafe, 960 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. For informa-
tion, call 352-726-1480.
Wednesday is "Metaphysical Movie Night"
at Unity of Citrus County. The award-winning
documentary, "For the Bible Tells Me So," will
be shown at 6:30 p.m. Popcorn and lemonade
will be served. A $5 love offering will be col-
lected. Unity of Citrus County is at 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Rudy's BBQ chicken dinner will be served
from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday at Inverness
First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleas-
ant Grove Road. Tickets are $10 for 1/2
chicken portion and $5 for 1/4 chicken portion
(children younger than 12). Proceeds go to-
wards educational supplies and playground
equipment. Call 352-726-2522.
The Citrus Community Concert Choir will
perform at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 30, at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard, in Her-
nando. For more information, call 352-746-
7161.
Dave Sanderson, a survivor of the crash
of U.S. Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson
River on Jan. 15, 2009, will speak at 3 p.m.
Sunday, March 30, in the sanctuary of Ho-
mosassa First United Methodist Church, 8831
W. Bradshaw St., off U.S. 19. Sanderson, the
last person off the back of the plane, largely
responsible for making sure many others
made it out safely, offers his personal account
in his book, "Brace for Impact." Exposed to
frigid water and freezing temperatures, doc-
tors feared Sanderson would suffer a heart at-
tack or stroke from the ordeal, but he returned
to his job as a sales manager the following
Monday. The talk is the last of the seasonal of-
ferings of the church's Arts Council Series. For
tickets or more information, call the church of-
fice at 352-628-4083, Jim Love at 352-746-
3674 Jim Potts at 352-382-1842, Karen Kline
at 352-382-7263, or Ron Hesketh at 352-382-
4518.
Rock Crusher Road First Church of God
will host an "Old Fashion Hymn Sing and
Salad Supper" at 5:30 p.m. Sunday, March 30.
Everyone is invited to bring a salad to share
and have a fun evening singing some favorite
hymns. The church is at 419 N. Rock Crusher
Road, Crystal River. For more information, call
the church office at 352-795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Everyone is welcome to the April "Forgot-
ten Film Festival" at 3 p.m. Thursday at the
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. A $3 do-
nation is appreciated. For information, call
352-465-4225. Films to be shown: April 3.
"The World's Fastest Indian." Anthony Hopkins
plays a quirky speed demon from New
Zealand who dreams of taking his motorcycle
to Bonneville Flats in Utah to set a speed
record. Also starring Diane Ladd. April 10:
"The Help." The story revolves around race re-
lations in the Kennedy-era South. A young girl
returns home from college and tells the story
of the black maids in a book that scandalizes
the town. Starring Emma Stone and Olivia
Spencer. April 17: "A Family Thing." An
Arkansas man learns he has an back half-
brother in Chicago. The two men struggle
through their long-held grudges and preju-
dices and gain an understanding of each other
and themselves. Starring Robert Duvall and
James Earl Jones. April 24: "Unfinished
Song." A group of British senior citizens enter
a choral competition singing rock and heavy
metal songs. Starring Terrence Stamp and


Vanessa Redgrave.
Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills will host its monthly outdoor flea
market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 5,
on the church property at 6 Roosevelt Boule-
vard in Beverly Hills off North Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491). Shoppers are
welcome. Up to 50 commercial and private
vendors from throughout Citrus County are
expected to display their wares. Commercial
vendors and private individuals are welcome
to bring and sell goods. Spaces are available
for $10 and should be reserved in advance.
Coffee, sodas doughnuts and hot dogs will be
available for breakfast and lunch.This church-
sponsored flea market takes place the first
Saturday monthly, September through May.
The next flea market is May 3. For more infor-
mation or to reserve a space, call Rose Mary
at 352-527-6459 or email wjeselso@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The Holidaze Crafters of Hernando United
Methodist Church will have their annual spring
craft sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April
5. The kitchen will be open and there will be a
bake sale by the United Methodist Women.
For vendor information, contact Robin at 352-
445-1487 orjbaker2051 @tampabay.rr.com.
The church is at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486), Hernando.
Floral City United Methodist will have its
last chicken and biscuit dinner of the season
from 3:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday, April 5. Pur-
chase a complete meal for $7.50. The church
is at 8478 E. Marvin St., across the street from
the elementary school. For more information,
call 352-344-1771.
The Christian Women's Club's brunch is
at 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 8, at Southern Woods
Clubhouse. Featured guest is Louise Whitney,
a stained-glass artist. Music will be by Dan
and Sandy Morehead. Speaker Kathy Baar-
man of Fort Pierce will discuss her escape
from communist Hungary. Cost is $15 per per-
son. For reservations, call Hazel at 352-382-
7990. All are welcome. Visit www.cwcfl.net.
Rock Crusher Road First Church of God
will host a community Easter egg hunt from 3
to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 19, on the church
property, 419 N. Rock Crusher Road, Crystal
River. There will be food, games, face paint-
ing, community booths, fire trucks, and, of
course, lots of eggs. Everyone is invited. For
more information, call the church office at 352-
795-5553 or visit www.rockcrusher
church.com.
At 10 a.m. Sunday through April 27,
Rock Crusher Road First Church of God will
unpack what "SoulShifts" are with practical,
biblical suggestions for life. Join us in worship
each Sunday morning through this series as
we explore a new "SoulShift" every week. Be
a part of one of the community groups that
meet Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Each
week, these groups take the "SoulShift" mes-
sage and place emphasis on how to apply it to
our lives. The church is at 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road., Crystal River. For more infor-
mation, call the church office at 352-795-5553
or visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Beverly Hills Community Church Food
Pantry is participating in the 2014 Alan Shawn
Feinstein 17th annual $1 Million Giveaway to
Fight Hunger. The more donations made to
the food pantry through April 30, the more of
the Feinstein money the pantry will receive.
Donations can include cash, checks and food
items.
The Knights of Columbus will sponsor a
Country Western Dinner Dance featuring an
"encore performance" by the Country Sun-
shine Band on Saturday, May 3, in the parish
hall of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church,
7525 U.S. 41 South in Dunnellon. The
evening includes a country-style dinner, cash


bar, 50/50, basket raffles and a door prize.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m., with dinner
served at 6:30. Tickets are $15 and are available
at the church office, from the Knights or by call-
ing 352-489-6221 for tickets/table reservations.
Southern Gospel solo artist Keith Plott will
appear at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 3, at Life-
point Family Church, 6430 S. Lewdinger
Drive, Homosassa, and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
May 4, at First Baptist Church of Homosassa,
10540 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa. Admission
is free. A love offering will be collected. Plott is
a Southern Gospel Music Dove Award winner
along with multiple-time winner of the South-
ern Gospel Fanfare Awards. He has per-
formed at the "Grand Ole Opry" and at the
National Quartet Convention, and with such
groups as "Brian Free and Assurance,"
"Danny Funderburk & Mercy's Way" and "Safe
Harbor."
The Dunnellon Community Chorale is be-
ginning rehearsals on a new program to be
held May 4 at First United Methodist Church,
and is looking for singers for all parts. This is a
great program with familiar songs from Broad-
way to television. All sopranos, altos, tenors
and basses are encouraged to participate in
this community-based group. Rehearsals are
2:30 p.m. at the Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, in the Historical District, corner of
Ohio and Chestnut Streets.
The Dunnellon Community Chorale will
present its spring concert titled "Down Mem-
ory Lane," at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 4, at First
United Methodist Church, 21501 W. State
Road 40, Dunnellon. The concert is free to the
public. A love offering will be accepted.
"Awakening Florida" is coordinating a
statewide prayer gathering from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, May 10, at ParkAvenue Bap-
tist Church, 2600 S. ParkAve., Titusville. This
will be a day of prayer and fasting, calling peo-
ple to cry out for God's purposes and seek the
destiny of the Lord for the state of Florida.
Everyone is invited to join this solemn assem-
bly. Entrance fee is $10. Registration and in-
formation at: awakeningflorida.com,
Helping Hands Thrift Store, a ministry of
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, is open
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Satur-
day at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund the food
pantry. The store accepts donations of house-
hold items, clothing and small appliances. Call
352-726-1707.
The Genesis Project, an in-depth analysis
and discussion of the text of Genesis, is con-
ducted from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday at Etz Hayim
Institute the Adult Education Program of
Congregation Beth Sholom, 102 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. A class on American-Jewish His-
tory is also offered from 8:15 to 9:15 p.m.
Monday through June 23. Both classes are
taught by Hazzan Mordecai Kamlot. For more
information, call 352-643-0995.
The ladies of Lecanto Church of Christ
meet for Bible study at 10 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly. Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have included such subjects
as prayer, love and patience. All ladies are in-
vited to attend and enjoy Christian fellowship.
Community Christian Karate Club (CCKC)
offers a Citrus County group for learning
karate skills, working on cardio, and meeting
new friends. Three different classes for three
different age groups are offered: the 4- to 7-
year-old class, 8-to 12-year-old class, and the
teen/adult class. Classes take place Tuesday
evenings at New Hope Baptist Church, 8635
W. Goodman Lane, Homosassa. Cost is $25
a month with discounts for families. For more
information, contact fifth-degree black belt in-
structor Greg Gunn at 352-428-6348 or email
ggunn14@gmail.com or visit www.
topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist Catholic Church of-


fers Bingo at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday featuring regular, double and
special bingos, together with a jackpot and
"pickle" game. Doors open at 10 a.m. Tuesday
and 4 p.m. Wednesday. Kitchen features
"homemade" soups and sandwiches. The church
is on U.S. 41, three miles north of Dunnellon.
n All widows in the community are invited to
join the Widows Ministry Group from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
"God isn't finished with us yet!" For informa-
tion, call Darla at 352-270-8115.
n A Christian Bible-based spiritual recovery
group meets from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
days at Living Water Ministry Complex,
1 Beverly Hills Blvd., Beverly Hills. For more
information, call Meg at 352-527-2443.
"Get in Touch With Your Faith," a Christian
information class at Peace Lutheran Church,"
continues at 6 p.m. Thursday. Pastor Terry
McKee conducts the class for 1 hour weekly.
Everyone is welcome. There is no fee. To reg-
ister, call the church office at 352-489-
5881 .The church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41,
5 miles north of Dunnellon.
Cornerstone Christian Supply, a ministry
of the Inverness Church of God, has available
for purchase the newly released novel, "At the
Bottom of Biscayne Bay," by Fred H. Brannen,
Jr. The novel is a quixotic courtroom drama,
wrapped in a love story, with a thread of the in-
spirational truth concerning God's unfailing
faithfulness interwoven within its lines. Corner-
stone Christian Supply is an excellent source
for all your Christian needs: Bibles, greeting
cards, books, T-shirts, gifts, etc. Cornerstone
Christian Supply is at 416 U.S. 41 South, In-
verness. For more information, call the store
at 352-344-2470.
n The Beverly Hills Community Church
spaghetti suppers take place from 4 to 6 p.m.
the third Friday monthly in the Jack Steele Hall
at 86 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation of
$8 per person or two tickets for $15 includes
all-you-can-eat salad, spaghetti with meat
sauce, Italian bread, dessert and coffee or tea.
Come and enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door.
Ladies, come to "The Well" for refresh-
ment and prophetic prayer ministry at 7 p.m.
the first Friday monthly at FresHope Min-
istries, 2991 E. Thomas St., Inverness. If you
are hurting, need to hear a word from God,
and/or spiritual growth and strength, then this
is the night just for you. Come comfortable
and come expecting to receive. You will not
leave the same way you came in. Call 352-
341-4011 or visit www.freshopeministries.com.

Whoops!
We erroneously printed Saturday's
Jumble on Friday, so here's Friday's
puzzle and if you'd like to try Saturday's
again, you can find it on Page C7.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words
7ASORET


7FONET7"_




SANDIU


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
HN. Here's the cThat'sd yot
calen arposed That.,a sl
for In cotle tin e sago.





J---A h

THE FORMC R '
MAL- MOPL-' CALENPAR
PHOTOS WEE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer as
suggested by the above cartoon


Answer rT '-cc -'-Thee
here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles ORBIT VENOM SICKEN FRUGAL
Answer The cemetery raised its burial fees and
blamed it on the -COST OF LIVING


A A
V
RELAY
FOR LIFE


A community event
where people
come together to
remember loved
ones, inspire others
and celebrate life.

Join

Relay

for Life

today!


F NISI-I



T-IE



F GHT

April 4 & 5, 2014
SC itrus H igh S :- -0 l1


CITRUS MEMORIAL


Register your team today by
visiting www.relayforlife.org
or by calling 1-800-227-2345 ciiijTIC


LooWk at



P U
JUStfOPPEDP.


CHRONICLE COUPdjN




NIGHT
Present this coupon at
Ticket booth for $2 off a
tf Midway Armband during
I Chronicle Night at the
ICitrus County Fair

CHRONICLE NIGHT
S -- -FOR $2 OFF A
KUE -* MIDWAY I
AR" M ARMBAND ON .
WEDNESDAYAAD
MIDWAY RCH 26
-- ARMBAND C*Nia


C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CPage C5 SATURDAY, MARCH 22,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

BH Lions to serve
pancake breakfast
The Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will have its
pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. Sunday
Cost for adults is $4; and chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for $2.
This includes all-you-can-eat pan-
cakes, choice of bacon or sausage
or combo, orange juice and coffee
or tea.
For more information, call 352-
897-4899.

FC Library slates
Mini Book Sale
Friends of Floral City Library
will have a Mini Book Sale from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 5, at
the library, 8360 E. Orange Ave.,
Floral City
Stock up for summer reading
and help the library make room
in the storage garage.
The sale will offer a selection of
hard-cover and paperback books.
A special feature will be vintage
books priced accordingly
Call 352-726-3671 for more
information.

Golf tourney to benefit
county animal shelter
A golf tournament to benefit the
Citrus County Animal Shelter will
be held at the Royal Oaks Golf
Club in Ocala on April 19.
The benefit is called Hope's
Legacy, in honor of a little stray
dog named Hope that was
adopted by a loving family The
fundraising event strives to bring
similar hope to many other love-
able shelter animals, will help to
make needed improvements at
the aging shelter and also will
help pay for the special medical
needs and surgeries for injured
animals.
Opportunities for sponsorships
ranging from $100 to $400 are
available. They include printed
signs at tees advertising the busi-
ness name or donor Entry fee is
$40 and includes green fees, cart
fees, various prizes and lunch. A
cruise raffle and a silent auction
will be offered.
Sponsorships and in-kind dona-
tions are available from Friends
of Citrus County Animal Services
at 352-201-8664.
For information regarding golf
signups, call Marti Little at 786-
367-2834.

Have photo taken
with Easter Bunny
The Easter Bunny will be on
hand this Saturday and Sunday,
then again March 29 and 30, April
5 and 6, and April 13 and 19 (Pet
Day), from noon to 5 p.m. at the
Crystal River Mall on U.S. 19
North. Come have a photo made
by KNS Photography
For more information about
events at the mall, call 352-
795-2585.


Humanitarians OF
FLORIDA


Brannen


Special to the Chronicle
Brannen is 5 months old and has
lost his home through no fault of
his own. This adorable brown tabby
is smart, playful and loving, and
will make a good buddy. Adoption
fees include microchip,
spay/neuter and all required
vaccinations. There are more
varieties of felines to choose from
as well. Drop by and enjoy the
felines in their cage-free, home-
style environment from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Hardin Haven on
the corner of State Road 44 and
North Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, or
view felines online at www.pet
finder.com/shelters/f1186.html.


Drive safely with AARP


Special to the Chronicle

Florida is a mandated state and any in-
surance company doing business in
Florida must give a discount to those
completing an AARP Safe Driving
Course, open to everyone age 50 and
older Contact your agent for discount
amounts.
Update yourself to earn a discount and
learn about newly enacted motor vehicle
and traffic laws.
Course fee is $15 for AARP members;
$20 for all others. Call the listed instruc-
tor to register:


Crystal River, Homosassa
Monday and Tuesday, March 24
and 25, 9 a.m. to noon, St. Benedict
Church Parish Hall, 455 S Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River Call Pat Hubbell at 352-
586-2731.
Wednesday and Thursday, April 23
and 24, 9 a.m. to noon, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W Bradshaw
Blvd., Homosassa. Call Frank Tobin at
352-628-3229.
Tuesday and Wednesday, April 29
and 30,10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Homosassa
Public Library Call Phillip Mulrain at
352-628-7633.


Inverness, Hernando, Floral City
Tuesday and Wednesday April 15
and 16, 9 a.m. to noon, Citrus Memorial
Health System auditorium. Call Bob
Dicker at 352-527-2366.
Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs
Wednesday and Thursday, March 26
and 27, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly
Hills. Call Joe Turck at 352-628-6764.
Tuesday and Wednesday, April 1 and
2, from 9 a.m. to noon, Brown Funeral
Home, 5430 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Lecanto. Call Pat Hubbell at 352-586-2731.


Fox Hollow honors Edward 'Ren' Renfro


Special 10 te Cnronicle
The YMCA recently received $940 from the volunteers of the Fox Hollow Property Owners Association in recognition of the volunteer
service of Rear Admiral (Ret.) Edward "Ren" Renfro. Most recently, Renfro had served as an advisory board member of the Citrus
County YMCA. His volunteer efforts also include having served as the chairman of the board of Seven Rivers Medical Center,
chairman and member of the Citrus County Library Advisory Board, president of the Fox Hollow Board of Directors, as well as
member of the Georgia Tech Board of Trustees. He died Feb. 28, and the check was accepted in his honor and memory. From left
are: Joanna Castle, YMCA executive director; Paul Cash, YMCA Advisory Board member; Barbara Benson, Fox Hollow Board of
Directors (FHBD); Peg Evans, FHBD; Paul Panella, FHBD; Anthony Rastello, FHBD; Bev Brown, FHBD; and Don Phillips, FHBD.


BRIDGE


SHARE Bridge Club
SHARE Bridge Club meets at
1 p.m. second and fourth Mondays
at Cornerstone Baptist Church,
1100W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
All levels of players are welcome.
For more information, call Julia
Grissom at 352-341-0554, or
Barbara Hackett at 352-341-0149.
The winners on March 10 were:
Barbara Beyer, 4030; Julie
Grissom, 3080; and Tracy Humble,
2840.
Point 0' Woods
Are you a card player, need a
place to meet new friends and
enjoy a few hours of social mo-
ments? Point 0' Woods Country
Club, at 9228 E. Gospel Island


Road, welcomes residents in the
area to join us for lively afternoon
of cards and laughter.
Duplicate bridge is played at
noon Tuesday and Friday. Call
Barbara Pofahl at 352-341-1756 or
Elaine Spangenberg at 352-860-
0358. Party bridge is played
Wednesday afternoon and Satur-
day night. Call Mary Thomas at
352-637-0045.
For more information, call Presi-
dent Sandra Koonce at 352-341-
1747 or membership chairman
Marilyn Pruter at 352-287-2545.
Citrus Bridge Club
Learn to play bridge at the Citrus
Bridge Club at the Nature Coast
Bank on the corner of County Road


486 and Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando. Instructor Pat Peterson
has taught hundreds of people for
many years. Lessons start at
10 a.m. Tuesday, April 1. This is a
four-week course and it is free.
Participants will be able to play with
peers in a relaxed game.Citrus
Bridge Club conducts games at
1 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Friday.
Pat Peterson also gives a free
lecture for intermediate players at
12:15 p.m. Tuesday at the club.
Come and play anytime; partners
are guaranteed. Call
Peterson at 352-746-7835 for more
information.
Nature Coast Bridge Club


SElite
gymnasts
Citrus Gymnastics sent
three Level 1 competitors to
the second AAU Qualifier in
Gainesville in February. This
was the first time for the
girls to compete. From left:
Aubrie Choe had an
all-around score of 36.50,
Alli Wilson had an all-around
score of 35.70 and Molly
Rose had an all-around score
of 35.00. The scores
qualified them for state
competition and they all
received one of the highest
honors in gymnastics by
becoming elite gymnasts for
the 35.00 or better scores.
The girls will attend the
state competition in
Daytona Beach at the Ocean
Center in April.
Special to the Chronicle





Nature Coast Bridge Club has
bridge games (open and points) at
12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
and at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at 3021
Commercial Way, south end of
Towne Square Mall, Spring Hill.
Games for all levels of players are
offered. Beginners lessons are at
11 a.m. Thursday; other classes
are conducted occasionally.
The games attract many Citrus
County players.
For details and a complete
schedule of games or lessons, call
Gary at 727-215-7651, or Mary
Ellen at 352-596-1524.
Visit the website at
daily-recap.com., orAnnabelle at
352-597-5221.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AT THE LIBRARY


Public welcome at
'Organizing' meeting
Organizing for Citrus is a
grassroots group that meets once
a month to discuss ideas and
write letters about political issues
that affect the community, state
and country
The public is welcome to the
meetings at Central Ridge
Library in Beverly Hills.
Scheduled meetings are:
Thursday, April 10, from 5:30 to
7 p.m.; Monday, May 12, from 5 to
7 p.m. and Monday, June 16, from
5:15 to 7 p.m.
For more information, call
Vicky lozzia at 352-563-2651.

Citrus Hills women
plan card party
Come join the fun at the Citrus
Hills Women's Club's Military
Card Party fundraiser at 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 17.
The event will be held at the
Beverly Hills Lions Club and is
open to the public.
Coffee and bottled water, along
with desserts, are included in the
price of $12.
Cash prizes will be awarded to
the top three winners. There will
be a drawing for door prizes, and
a donation to the Scholarship/
Charitable Fund will get tickets to
win one of several baskets of
goodies.
For tickets, call Andrea at 352-
344-3391 or Carol at 352-860-2818.
Get a table of four together or
sign up as a single and you will be
placed in a foursome.
Checks should be made payable
to CHWC.
Tickets will not be sold at the
door the night of the event Funds
raised go to scholarships for local
high school students and/or dona-
tions to charities.

Go country with
Knights in Dunnellon
The Knights of Columbus will
sponsor a Country Western Din-
ner Dance featuring an "encore
performance" by the Country
Sunshine Band on May 3 in the
parish hall of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, 7525 U.S. 41
South in Dunnellon.
The evening includes a coun-
try-style dinner, cash bar, 50/50,
basket raffles and a door prize.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.,
with dinner served at 6:30.
Tickets are $15 and are avail-
able at the church office, from the
Knights or by calling 352-489-6221
for tickets/table reservations.

Healthy-living fare
available at market
Everyone is invited to the
Beverly Hills Farmers Market,
open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Lake Beverly Park, 77 Civic
Circle.
Check the weather forecast
Thursday night; if it is supposed
to rain, there will be no market.
Produce will be available from
Camilo's Market and about 15
other vendors will be present to
tempt visitors with their arts and
crafts and healthy-living
products.
Flea market vendors are also
welcome. For more information
about becoming a vendor (in-
cluding flea market items) at $5
per market day, call Bonnie
Larsen at the Beverly Hills Civic
Association from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday through Friday at
352-746-2657.


Living history at library


CENTRAL RIDGE LIBRARY
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465-4281
352-746-6622
www.citruslibraries.org
March 24
Nature Coast Painters Group,
10a.m.
Scrabble Game, 10 a.m.
Senior Crafters, 1 p.m.
Coin Club, 5:30 a.m.
March 25
AARP Tax-Aide, 10 a.m.
File Management, 10:15 a.m.
Preschool Storytime, 11 a.m.
Fun & Games, 1 p.m.
Superhero Training Academy, 2 p.m.
Pre-GED Math Foundations,
4:30 p.m.
March 26
AARP Safe Driving Course, 10 a.m.
Mother Goose Time, 11 a.m.
Afro-American Club of
Citrus County, 3:15 p.m.
March 27
AARP Safe Driving Course, 10 a.m.
Depression & Anxiety
Support Group, 10a.m.
Library Advisory Board Meeting,
4 p.m.
March 28
AARP Tax-Aide, 10 a.m.
March 29
Citrus County Council for
Environmental and Natural
Resources Committee, 10 a.m.


NEWS NOTES


nshouer to bringprogram to Dunnellon in April


ings and Marjory Stone-
man Douglas all in the
S same program, and the
first time their subject
matter has been dedi-
cated to the history of"La
Florida," their adopted
state.
Betty Jean Steinshouer developed
Steinshouer the program especially for
to perform in libraries and has been
Dunnellon. touring with one of the
Dreamers & Schemers
theatrical troupes. The audience will be-
come a part of her performance.


She was appointed a Fellow in the new
Florida Studies Program when it was
founded in 2000 at the University of
South Florida in St. Petersburg. She has
worked with the National Endowment for
the Humanities and the Big Read pro-
gram of the National Endowment for the
Arts throughout the country Steinshouer
is a poet, columnist and writes fiction, as
well as literary nonfiction. Some of her
books are available on amazon.com, and
she is working on a series of enhanced e-
books on her Chautauqua characters.
For more information, call 352-
438-2520.


News from the Central Ridge area

COMMUNITY


0 0

Profile of determination


Charter member ofBeverly Hills Horseshoe Club stillpitching at 91


EILEEN Fox
Special to the Chronicle
Ninety-one-year-old Al Bernier was 19
years old when he started working for the
U.S. Postal Service on April 1,1942, as a
letter carrier
He moved up to vehicle operations
maintenance, served as branch president
in Bristol, Conn., and was the scribe to
the postal record, the monthly NALC
(National Association of Letter Carriers)
publications.
In July 1942, he enlisted in the Navy
and earned his wings, with three stars,
one air medal and a Unit Citation, flying
as a radioman-gunner with the VB-6 dive
bombing squadron in the Pacific.
The squadron was first assigned to Air-
craft Carrier USS Enterprise and then to
the USS Intrepid, now anchored in the
New York harbor as a museum. He was
then assigned to VC-8 USS Nehenta Bay,
flying in torpedo planes.
Coming home after serving in the Navy,
Al returned to the post office in January
1946 and retired on Oct. 1,1979. He has a
gold card and is a life member of the
NALC. He also is a member of the VFW
Post 10087 of Beverly Hills.
Al and his lovely wife of 68 years, Vir-
ginia, moved to Beverly Hills in October
1979 from Terryville, Conn. There were
horseshoe pits in his back yard where he


Talking about


hospice services


Special to the Chronicle
Approximately 90 club members were in attendance
as Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast Public
Relations Manager Joe Foster discussed hospice
services at the most recent meeting of the Beverly
Hills Fishing Club March 19 at the Lions Club, 72
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.


Special to the Chronicle
At 91, charter member Al Bernier is still
active with the Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club.
played with friends. His hobbies included
travel in the U.S., dancing (round and
square), photography, camping, fishing,
bowling and horseshoes.


He was instrumental with Alex Gritske
in the starting of the Beverly Hills Horse-
shoe Club. Alex was the driving force be-
hind the club and Al did publicity was
secretary and kept statistics for the newly
formed club. Tony LaGarde was the first
president. A lease giving the club permis-
sion to put the horseshoe courts at the
Civic Circle was signed in perpetuity on
July 23,1991, which Al was a part of.
He helped organize the first NHPA
(National Horseshoe Pitching Associa-
tion) tournament, which was held in 1984,
and the first state tournament in 1988.
Virginia helped serve food for the
tournaments.
The club has grown from two sand pits
to now 25 professional clay courts. With
the contributions, participation and en-
thusiasm of Al and the rest of the charter
members, the Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club is now one of the largest horseshoe
complexes in Florida.
Al also bowled in the senior men's
league and did publicity for the bowling
league. He was an original contributor to
the Beverly Hills Visitor with a byline
and photo.
Thank you, Al Bernier, from the mem-
bers of the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
for determination in the forming of this
growing horseshoe club. You are a most
gifted conversationalist with remarkable
ability for recall and superb intelligence.


Woman's Club speaker


Special to the Chronicle
Connie Martin Carter, right, president of the Beverly Hills Woman's Club,
thanks Marie Pettibone, president of the Citrus County League of Women
Voters, for speaking to the Woman's Club about the League and its
functions. Her talk was followed with a question-and-answer session.



Volunteers needed for thrift store


The Home Again Resale Store is
looking for volunteers to staff a
new store in Beverly Plaza, next to
Dollar General.
The not-for-profit store donates
all of its net income to the Central
Ridge Boys & Girls Club, one of the
three clubs operated by the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Since June of 2012 the store has
featured quality consignment fur-
niture and furniture accessories at
1980 N. Future Terrace along
County Road 486, directly across


from the Chevron. Consignments
are 50/50.
Sales volunteers are being
sought particularly from Pine
Ridge and Beverly Hills.
Volunteers would work from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or from 1 to 5 p.m.
starting in April when the new
store is scheduled to open.
For more information, call
Maxine "Mike" Hulse at 352-
746-6063. Hulse is volunteer
coordinator for the nonprofit
Nature Coast Affordable Housing
Corp. that operates the Home
Again Resale Stores.


C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


COMMUNITY


Novelist Betty Jean Steii

Special to the Chronicle
The Friends of the Dunnellon Public
Library will welcome Betty Jean Stein-
shouer with her latest program: "Florida
History from Palmetto-Leaves to the
Yearling to River of Grass at 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, April 3, at the library meeting room,
20351 Robinson Ave.
Friends of the Dunnellon Public Li-
brary are pleased to present
Steinshouer's Florida History Chau-
tauqua free of charge. This is the first
time she has characterized Harriet
Beecher Stowe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawl-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATU R DAY EVENING MAR C H 22, 2014 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House oDil: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

This season's Christmas Competition drew a
record entry, perhaps because many answered
the declarer-play problem correctly And some
gave slight variations on the published solu-
tion that were also accurate.
After I checked all the answers to the sub-
sidiary questions, the best entry came from
Moray King of Orem, Utah. Tied for second
were Craig Cordes of Baton Rouge, La.; Bruce
Perry of Riverview, New Brunswick, Canada;
and Jim Ritts of Knoxville, Tenn.
Everyone who got the first question right is
named on my website
(phillipalderbridge. corn).
Now let's look at today's deal, in which re-
sponder has his sixth really weak hand of the
week. It could have been right to pass over two
no-trump, which showed a good 22 to 24 points.
But with a five-card major and a couple of
points, it was reasonable to transfer into
spades, then rebid three no-trump to offer a
choice of games. South, since he had three
spades and no diamond stopper, preferred
four spades. (Note that the defenders should
take five diamond tricks against three no-
trump.)
South loses the first two tricks in diamonds.
Let's assume the defenders shift to a heart.
How should declarer continue?
South can afford one trump loser, not two.
He should plan to take two spade finesses. At
trick three, declarer overtakes his heart jack
with dummy's queen (entry one) and plays a
spade to his jack. West wins and returns a
heart. South takes the trick, ruffs his last dia-
mond on the board (entry two), plays a spade to
his 10, cashes the spade ace, and claims.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
| DOTSO

2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC -
All Rights Reserved
| FETHT



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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek




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ipe rfect.



I 1 l* l~t
i-


r "


THE DALMATIAN 5AIP THIS
TO THE MAS5FUSE PUQING
HER MA55AO.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: AROSE OFTEN STIGMA UNSAID
I Answer: The former male model's calendar photos
were OUT-OF-DATE


ACROSS
1 Stir-fry pans
5 Short
9 Recede
12 Owl's cry
13 Melville opus
14 "- TeChing"
15 General
Bradley
16 Girlish
18 Poise
20 Tots of
whiskey
21 and hearty
22 So long!
23 Full of holes
26 Central part
30 Underhanded
33 Grow together
34 Slender
35 Try a case
37 Mirth
39 Rx writers
40 Cry of
surprise
41 Also-ran
43 Peace gesture


45 Legionaire Answer to Previous Puzzle
headgear
48 Worth D-W
51 Quaking trees
53 Haughty SU I NGWO ER A L E
56 Spoken M I LAN I A NH 0 E
57 Mattress L'E D
problem
58 Doing nothing UIR U M %S 8
59 Ms. Turner C|EAOEcRU EA R|S
60 Caughtya! T EES D R E W
61 Alleviate
62 Passel MNO D NA S.P A
GRETIR oEK0AT


DOWN
1 Rider's
command
2 Get-up-and-go
3 Eucalyptus
muncher
4 Amble
5 Remove
tangles
6 Ms.Thurman
7 King, to
monsieur
8 Rum drink


R SA I NY
KARMA BY
EE-LA NID


0RNSTIENDEMUNR
jTjAE EjRjE T INAY


9 Long-active
volcano
10 Liniment
11 Some
youngsters
17 On both feet


19 Mild-mannered
22 Data units
24 Sharp corner
25 Metric weight
27 Electrical unit
28 Dispose of
29 Naval off.
30 Not forward
31 Luau welcome
32 Bark
36 Las Vegas
show
38 Bloncdte's
shrieks
42 Transplants,
in a way
44 Spooky
46 Hazard
47 Ridiculous
48 Travel
document
49 Rani's servant
50 Links org.
51 Helm position
52 Popular side
dish
54 Spud st.
55 Hirtand
Pacino


Dear Annie: For the
past 14 years, my fam-
ily has not spoken to
me. Worse, they have spread
lies and brought lawsuits,
none of which they have won.
The gossip has been hurtful
and damaging to
my small immedi-
ate family No one,
of course, has ever
asked to hear the
truth. Life is short,
and every time we
extend an olive
branch, it is thrown
back at us with
more vindictive-
ness.
Could you please
find and print the
essay titled "My AN I
Name Is Gossip"? MAIL
Maybe someone
will read it and un-
derstand, if not for my sake,
for others. Pennsylvania
Dear Pennsylvania: How
sad. We can only hope your
family will see the column
and open their hearts.
My Name is Gossip (author
unknown)
My name is Gossip. I have
no respect for justice. I maim
without killing. I break hearts
and ruin lives. I am cunning
and malicious and gather
strength with age. The more I
am quoted the more I am be-
lieved. My victims are help-
less. They cannot protect
themselves against me be-
cause I have no name and no
face. To track me down is im-
possible. The harder you try
the more elusive I become. I
am nobody's friend. Once I
tarnish a reputation, it is
never the same. I topple gov-
ernments and wreck mar-
riages. I ruin careers and
cause sleepless nights,


I
I-


heartaches and indigestion. I
make innocent people cry in
their pillows.
Even my name hisses. I am
called Gossip.
I make headlines and
headaches.
Before you re-
p-- eat a story, ask
yourself:
Is it true?
Is it harmless?
Is it necessary?
If it isn't, don't
repeat it.
DearAnnie:
Now that the holi-
days and Valen-
tine's Day are over,
there are doubtless
thousands of single
IE'S people who feel as
BOX I do. To me, these
holidays are just
another day to get
through in any way possible.
I am a 69-year-old unmar-
ried male. I have never been
in circulation or introduced
to anyone and am ignored at
social gatherings. I find every
excuse to avoid them. Right
now I don't know whether
there is anyone out there for
me. One woman asked me
whether I could support her
in the manner to which she
was accustomed, meaning a
new car every year, a home
priced over $200,000, deluxe
appliances, new furniture
and credit cards with a
$100,000 limit. I told her
goodbye and best of luck.
I wonder whether she'll
ever have any luck finding a
guy who can do this for her. I
wonder how many other sin-
gles feel this way S.D.
Dear S.D.: When someone
tells us they have never been
able to meet the right person,
we have to consider every-


thing, including your appear-
ance, your personality, your
expectations and the type of
women you gravitate toward.
If you have friends or family
who will be brutally honest
with you, ask them to critique
the way you come across to
women. Try to listen with an
open mind and understand
that they may see things you
don't Then consider doing
some volunteer work, auditing
college classes, joining a
church or community choir or
theater group or a travel tour
These things provide opportu-
nities to meet others, do inter-
esting things and become a
more engaging companion.
DearAnnie: I can relate to
all of the parents who write
about being estranged from
their children. I, too, am es-
tranged, from my sister She
is 65, and I am 70.
Unlike the parents, I know
full well the problem. Three
years ago, I took legal action
to get the inheritance my
mother left me in her will. My
sister hasn't spoken to me
since. I do sometimes wonder
whether getting my fair share
was worth the resulting fall-
out. Can Relate in N.Y
State

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit
www. creators. com.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


(j 2014 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


--I


10


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 C7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014

Peanuts


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth
SO WI-IAT DOG I LIKE TO
WE DO WiTH ALL 'WE V C NO! N' M OT THI OFIT
THIS STUFF WE TO CHAiTIS. MAYBE HAVING STRANGRS A POC,'EM AS A POWERFUL
NO LOSTRU WANT we COULS JULGE EARLY SOCWEM EXPLORATION OF
IN THE ARZAGE HAWET P OS WS .rSROT, r [TERMINATION
SAL.e THAT I MUSr SAtLY WITHOUT THE AND DESOLATION
PART WiT--- PLURAL






Dilbert


BEFORE WE START MY
PERFORMANCE REVIEbJ. I
SHOULD REMIND YOU
THAT IT WOULD TAKE
THREE PEOPLE TO
REPLACE ME.
K- /W}


AND I LJILL RESIGN
AT THE SLIGHTEST
CRITICISM, LEAVING
YOU WITH A HUGE
HIRING AND BUDGET
PROBLEM.,
RKA


THIS L AS
SUPPOSED TO THAT
MAKE YOU THINKING
NERVOUS, IS SO PRE-
NOT ME. GOOGLE_


Beetle Bailey

WOW, BEETL6, YOU WELL, FIRT 1: BrUY
SELPOM LOSE A "AME A &007P RACQUET,
ANYMORE. W4AT5 I KIEEPM EYE ON
YOUR STRATEGY? \ TS 9ALL ANP I
HIT IT SQUARE


The Grizzwells

LAMT MiA&T, I W M Kr E AIE, PUT Fl4J tl6
jjA C 4L cV n -5 AKA
lova To M"VA W+LL y, 15-Ul

-om' " k V" LI' o


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


The first and last day Ernie showed up
early for class


Doonesbury Classic


Big Nate
11W( T44AT KID
PETEk CET 50
SMART? HE 5 IN
FIRST GRADE!
H ATUJRAL-






Arlo and Janis

riu&B D YEAH, I
Wi-SlHbWARM AmD
1bmoo bWr1m~ibt
FEOUDr6 15WM
LFOUU* I./ 2-'.
B2 '


dkr^or' %fta


HE'S JUST ONE OF
TKOSE PEOPLE WHO
KNOWS EVERrTHIHG.
HE'S A GENIUS.


TH.T MUST BE WHY
HE AND I GET
ALONG SO WELL- -

F-


YES. THAT
MUST &E ITr

5PFfNGe -
010 --/O

__-p 'n&-


Today% MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R) 1:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R) In 3D. 5 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Divergent" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:25 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4;30 p.m. No passes.
"Muppets: Most Wanted" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman" (PG) 2 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman" (PG) In 3D.
4:35 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) In 3D. 4:25 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.


"Non-Stop" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Divergent" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman" (PG) In 3D. 4:40 p.m.
"Muppets: Most Wanted" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) 4 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's The Single Moms Club" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m.


*pWTWoIuR43WYO1. REMEMBER,
WHEEvER We Go, ..W'RE ThERE."

Betty


"Whenever you sneeze here
you never have to worry
about getting' a 'bless you.'"


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEiKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famoLis people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE. D3 slenb V

"NHJNKH RPJ PGXH G TEYBDDKH GOL


G VCDPE EJ EGAZKH. EPGE'T RPGE


COEHYHTET WH." NPCKCN THMWJBY


PJVVWGO

Previous Solution: "I went out hitchhiking, when I met a man named Woody
Guthrie. He was the single biggest part of my education." Pete Seeger
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-22


Garfield


Pickles


flA
wW


COMICS









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, MARCH 22,2014 C9


I To place an ad, call 5635966


Classifieds


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(352)563-56651TollFree :(88i: 24 1Em lcls
0 .. A, 0 0 0 -,)7


Pinochle Players
Tom's flexible Pinochle
Club, meets every
Thursday Evening.
Looking for a few new
players
call 352-527-9632.


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




**200 Bottle-
Wine Credenza
just replaced cooling
unit in March, looks
like new, 50 btu
Breezeaire cooling
unit, solid maple trim,
doors & panels w/vin
view top, glass inserts
381/2 'Lx68" W x 30" D
bought new $3600.
sell for $1500.
(352) 249-3428
**FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE treed lot
DOCK, garage,
very nice! $89,900
716-434-6527
3/2/1 DW MH
/2 acre corner lot
exc. cond. open floor
plan, laundry room,
all apple, Ig scn porch,
fenced,3 carports,
shed, Homosassa,
$51k. 352-410-1072

American Trading
Post Has been Hired
to Liquidate
SUGARMILL
WOODS
BIG SALE!!
Saturday Only
8am to 3pmr
Great furniture, lots
of household, Lg
Book Collection
MANCAVE BAR
WITH BARSTOOLS
20 Morning
Glory Ct
Everything Must Go!
NOW ACCEPTING
CREDIT CARDS

BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lidc/Ins #2579
352-257-0078

BRENTWOOD
Sat. 22 8AM
3 Family
2442 N. Brentwood
Cir. Lecanto

CITRUS HILLS
Forest Ridge
Village
ANNUAL SALE
Saturday 3/22
** 10** HOUSES
Across from school
on Forest Ridge Blv


Car Toddler Bed
with inner spring
mattress, & 10 sheets
& pad excel, cond.
$60.
(352) 621-1953


LISTINGS


crystal River 3 bedroom.
2 bath. Ideal location
near 7 rivers golf course
$119,000...Also second
home $59,900
2/2/1..Both homes in ex.
cond. 352-220-4158


YARD SALE

CRYSTAL

RIVER
MIDDLE SCHOOL
"For Relay For Life"
Sat March 22 8a-3p
HUGE
RUMMAGE SALE
Tons to choose from
344 N.E. Crystal St.
Harley-Davidson Lady
Lrg. White Leather
Fringe Jacket $150. 7.5
Black Boot Ladies?
$25. All in good shape.
Ted (352)465-2372
HIBISCUS 3 GAL $12
Beauties, 4 Colors,
compare to 2 Gal for
$20 @ Stores. Inv off
Croft 613-5818
INVERNESS
SAT ONLY 9a to 2p
COMMUNITY
Yard/Movina Sale
8618 E. Gospel Island
Road, INV
INVERNESS
Sat. 22 & Sun. 23, 9-4
Multi-Family Sale *
N. Point Lonesome Rd.
INVERNESS
Saturday Only 3/22
8am to 4pm
MOVING, HUGE SALE!
Everything Must Go!
592 N Cherrypop Dr.
INVERNESS
Saturday, 22, 8am
3091 East Weeks Lane
Itasca Sundancer
97 DL, 29' Class C
basement model, Ford
460, V8, 26k mi.
generator, $14k
(352) 746-0683
LINCOLN
'08, MKX, $18,400 SUV
46k mi., Red ext. Tan
leather int. showroom
cond., Auto, AWD,
fully loaded. A/C,
ABS, airbags, alarm,
AM/FM/CD, Sirus, cli-
mate control, cruise,
pano roof, power
locks, mirrors, seats,
steering, windows, tilt
wheel, tint, new tires
(352) 382-1531
LOGIC
2001 15' Center Con-
sole 40 H.P. Yamaha,
Galv. trailerBimini
topless than 12 hours.
Not a rebuild. You can
not tell this boat is not
brand new. $5500.
(352)563-0133 or
(352)302-9159
MINI COOPER
'05, Yellow, 5 speed
manual, 1 owner,
25k miles, $11,500
(352) 489-5239
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, White,
super clean, Ice Cold
$175.
(352) 212-1751


'92, Bass, 16.7" Wide,
4OHP outbrd, Evin.,
Trlr. Dbl. onbrd
charge sys. Minnkota
Edge, Troll. mtr. $3,200
(352) 341-1950
Two Matching Sofas
one is a sofa bed,
excellent condition
$100. each
(352) 382-2664 SMW
VIKING POP UP
2011 2385 ST. Used 4
times, like new. Slide,
electric lift, stove, refrig-
erator, A/C and heat.
352.464.0443 $5,800



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-2704087

1-Q10k
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 yr. old Purebred
Blood Hound 100+ lbs
needs to room to
roam! free to good
home!
(352) 364-1309
Free
Dog Needs Good
Home Owner in
Senior Facility
Part Pitt, Pretty Dog
(352) 419-5549
Free Firewood
oak, cut, free
you haul away
(352) 341-0008
FREE KING SIZE BED
complete with sheets,
spread and solid
wood headboard
with shelves to first
person that calls
344-5896 and arrives
before noon with a
trailer and enough
help to carry it out of
the house.
FREE MAGAZINES
Gun, Knife, Wood-
working and Many
Telephone Books
(352) 489-1962
Leave Message
Free Rabbits
Easters Coming!
2 Pen of Meat Breeders.
Californian Buck & Doe.
1 Mini Rex torte Buck w/
papers. Pedigreed &
shown.
(352) 4644617



Chihuahua/Terrier
Mix, black w/white,
female, 6 yrs. old,
last seen March 13th,
@ Citrus Spgs Texaco,
Please Call
(321) 439-4229 or
(352)434-8893
REWARD
Lost Female
Poodle/Pekinese
mix, black w/white
vest and right front
paw. 15 yrs. old
answers to the name
Sheri, pls call. REWARD
(352) 613-2089


14rurirsrrar 444#%am All of our
structures

Installations bBrian CBC 1253853 wins

uaa4&aedbr caaqaa^n352-625.7519

'000 -- -- -'~~ ^ --

Permit And lbll l
Engineering Fees I 1 !1 1
S Up to $200 value I '' . i

* Siding *Soffit Fascia Skirting *Roofovers Carports *Screen Rooms Decks *Windows Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Tortoise Shell, female
Lost behind OReilly's
Inverness
(352) 572-9845
Nissan Marine. Engine
cover for 20 hp,
Purple/black color.
Reward. (352)4654629
SmI Jack Russell
Dog, 12 yrs. old,
tri-colored
missing from
Hernando area
pls call (352) 726-7611



Found Orange Cat
Male, short hair
Turner Camp Area
Cell 352-573-5527
Junior Baseball Mitt
call (352) 895-9864
to describe




- Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Accepting S15
yearly Membership
sianups aaes 6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*
Leadership Clubs.
download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.corn for info


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.fnendsofccas.org


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001

Situations


w Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Exceotina $15
yearly Membership
sianupsaaes6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*Leadership
Clubs. download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.com for info


Domestic








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


Avante At Inverness
Is seeking Full Time
11-7, C.N.A's

New Nursing
Management
Excellent benefits
and 401K
Please appoolv online
Avantecenters.com

Exp. Dr.'s Assist.

With knowledge of
EKG, Blood draws,
and Computer
Experience.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1861M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal Riv. Fl 34429

F/Tor PIT
Licensed
Dental Hygienist

for fast paced
Dental Office
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email:
lynn.swanson@
rswansondental.com

F I At~re RN
+4 VNurses

For GI Center, Pre
Post & Proceedures
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

LICENSED
OPTICIAN

Part-Time
Call (352) 795-2020

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885




EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR

At 5 yrs. experience
and/or a bachelors
degree in social
services, education
or business. Exp.
in public speaking,
grant writing and
fundraising. Requires
good writing skills
Send Cover Letter
and Resume to:
Daystar Life Center
6751 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Crys. River Fl.
34429 or Email to:
daystarlifel1@
tampabay.rr.com
NO PHONE CALLS

LEGAL ASSISTANT
/PARALEGAL
NEEDED

Legal Secretarial
Exp. Required
Experience with
Personal Injury and
Discovery a Plus.
Mail, fax or deliver
resume and refer-
ences immediately!
Law Office of GRANT
& DOZIER. LLC
Attorneys at Law
123 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Fax (352) 726-7244

PRE SCHOOL
TEACHER

Footsteps Preschool
a ministry of First
United Methodist
Church of Inverness
is hiring a teacher.
This person would be
required to have the
40/10 hours DCF
training courses.
Foot Steps teachers
must be mature and
sensitive in working
with children, parents,
and other staff. Those
interested in applying
for the position may
email a resume to:
Rev. Sarah R Camp-
bell, Senior Pastor, at
Pastorsarah()
invernessfirstumc.orq
Footsteps license
number is
C05C10056




LINE COOK
EXP. ONLY

Ay l in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
a P/T Cooks
et Hostesses

Call 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment




SALES CLERK

Apphcant must have
computer skills, self
motivated, works well
with others and cus-
tomer friendly. Must
be at least 18& have
a valid driver's license
Apply in person
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.
2661 E Gulf to Lake


Bu~s

Exp. Laborer
& Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
Scott Wright Stucco





Manufacturer of
A/C Grilles, registers
and diffusers is
currently accepting
applications for
Experienced
Assembly Workers.

Aoolv in Person
(Mon-Fri between
the hours of
8:00 am to 3:00 pm).
METAL INDUSTRIES
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, F1l33513.
Excellent benefits
package, 401k.
DFW, EOE.


Metal Building
Erectors

Experienced. $14/hr
w/overtime. Call
(352)266-6042.




































Plumber
& Plumbers
Helper

Very busy plumbing
company searching
for plumbers that are
hard working, reliable
and motivated.Valid
drivers license. Serv-
ing all of Central Flor-
ida. 352-3414243


PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have driver's
license. Apply at
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa


TRUCK DRIVERS

Experienced Mail
Transport is
taking applications
for a Class A Tractor
Trailer Driver.
Part Time, staRing at
$18.61 perhr.&
$4.46 per hr. in
benefits. Fax
7 year MVR to:
904-354-0204 with
your phone #,
we will contact you.
Plumber





















Administrative
Help

part to full-time work
assisting fiscal
assistant and toll
collecting at Wildlife
Park, $9/hour. Call
352-628-5343 or
stop into the office

DELI CLERK

EXPERIENCED ONLY
Sat & Sun. a must.
No calls. Apply
in person:
Brooklyn Dockside
Deli, Crystal River


General
Maintenance

24 hours per week
at Wildlife Park
$8/hour. Call
352-628-5343 or
stop into the office


HOUSEKEEPER
In our skilled nursing
Facility. We offer a
good salary & benefit
package. Including,
liberal paid time off.
Health & dental Ins.
APPLY IN PERSON
Citrus Health &
Rehabilitation Center
701 Medical Court E
Inverness, EOE/DFW
Not for profit


BCB

INSIDE SALES/
APPT. SETTERS/
TELEMARKETERS

Great Pay Weekly.
Daily Bonuses
352-503-6807

TOWER HAND

Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F





SALES/CASHIER
Sat. & Sun. Tourism/
Hospitality exp. pref.
Apply iDDI n Person Only:
RIVER SAFARI
10823 W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa





MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547








vvvvvvv
BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com
LarkShed. 10'X14'
Wired & Finished in-
side. $1500
(352)341-2196




(4) VINTAGE LAWN
CHAIRS Hunter green
metal chairs $80 for all
call 352-257-3870
DARK WOOD
DRESSER WITH MIR-
ROR needs restoring
but sturdy $80 call
(352)257-3870
FIVE(5) OAK
CLAWFOOT DINING
CHAIRS, dining chairs
upholstered seats
one with arms $150
(352)341-2107
OAK ARMED CHAIR
with tan leather cushion
$75 call 352-257-3870




4 Antique Chairs
2 are Hitchcock,
$200.
Side Board $100.
(352) 563-1327
CAKE PLATE Milkglass
hobnail pattern w wavy
edge, pedestal base.12
1/2" diamx5" tall.
$25.00 352-422-1309
COOKIE JAR Milkglass
hobnail pattern with lid.
11 1/2" tallx8" diam.
$35.00 352-422-1309
LENOX Candlesticks,
candy dishes, bowls and
other pieces.Made in
USA.$15.00 each
352-422-1309


30" Hotpoint 4 coil
White Electric Stove
like new, $125.00
(352) 382-5883
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BLACK SAMSUNG
RANGE Glass top
range with two single
and two double ele-
ments and warming
center. True European
convection and conven-
tional baking and roast-
ing. 2013 mint condition
Lowes $850. $400 firm
613-6495 Cell 513-4632
Home after 5
FREEZER
Lg, upright, Hotpoint,
Works great
$75
(352) 422-2662
GE Profile
Refrigerator.
Side by Side. Ice/water
in door. $150.
(352)726-9132
GE USED DISH
WASHER
Nautilus,almond,runs
good.
$50 firm. (352)382-5297
Kenmore
4 Coil Burner Stove
self cleaning, white
w/black door, $120.
Kenmore Refrigerator
w/icemaker, white
$100.(352) 344-4192
Kenmore Refrigerator
20 cubic ft. Almond
w/icemaker, adj. glass
shelves, works good
$150. (352) 746-6911
MICROWAVE KEN-
MORE MOUNTS OVER
THE STOVE WHITE
$75 (352)613-0529
MICROWAVE
Panasonic 1250 Watt
works great $50
(352)628-0221
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, White,
super clean, Ice Cold
$175.
(352) 212-1751
SHARK STEAM MOP
w/2 cleaning pads& fill
cup $20 (352)628-0221
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& DQers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
(352)613-0529
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398



ANTIQUE OAK ARMED
CHAIR with tan leather
cushion $75 call
(352)257-3870
DESK CHAIR
Adjustable High
Back,Swivel, Black.
$40 (352)564-4214









DUDLEY'S
AU'WTIO
**BIG WEEK!**
**5 AUCTIONS**
Thur 3-20 Estate
Adventure Auction
700+lots @ Hall-
3pm out rows of
treasures 6pm in-
estate furniture,
lighthouses+++
4 Real Estate
Auctions
w Fri 3-21 Prev-9 am
9640 N Parkwood
Ave, Dunnellon 5
acres w/mobile
home
SOLD ABSOLUTE ALL
TOGETHER Hoarder
home-barn-motor
cycles, vehicles,
tractor +++
Prey 12pm 2071
W Greenway PI
Citrus Springs
3BRr corner lot
Prey 2pm 5101 W
Kristina Loop Crystal
Oaks Lecanto 3/2
Estate Settlement
0,_Sa 3-22 Prey
8am 7820 S
Great Oaks Drive
Downtown Historic
Floral City GNC
Commercial/
residential onRails
to Trails Home-
2 mobiles-cook
house CONTENTS
Minivan-truck-cammper-to
ols-househdd-&
more CALL FOR INFO
......................
call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384


4 WOOD BOXES $20
FOR
GARAGE/WORKSHOP
HOLD TOOLS ETC
419-5981

JOINTER/EDGER ON
STAND Westinghouse
$35 in good working
condition call
352-257-3870

MITER SAW
Chicago 8'/4" Comp.
w/ metal stand $50
mechanic's creeper,
cushionedon wheels
$25 (352) 637-6284

ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80 HEAVY
DUTY METAL HAND
HELD INVERNESS
419-5981





40" Sony TV
HD 1080 Bravia
A1 condition
$150. call
(352) 637-5227

AV receiver/amp with
speakers $40.
352-419-4464

DVD PLAYER 7 inch
screen ideal for travel
$45- (352)220-4158

PANOSONIC TV 13"
WITH BUILT IN VCR
$25 (352)613-0529

PANOSONIC TV 27"
WITH REMOTE &
MANUAL $60
352-613-0529

SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
(352)613-0529

SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $20
(352)613-0529

TV 32" SYLVANIA
WITH REMOTE $40
(352)613-0529

TV PANOSONIC 27"
WITH REMOTE CON-
TROL & MANUAL $50
(352)613-0529

TV SYLVANIA 32"
WITH REMOTE CON-
TROL $40
(352)613-0529

YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $70
(352)613-0529





CEILING FAN WHITE -
42"- $20
(352) 527-8993

STILTS FOR DOING
SHEETROCKWORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316





COMPUTER MONITOR
New Samsung 19" color
monitor. $50.
(352)746-7512 Still in
original pkg. phone

COPY MACHINE
CANON IMAGE CLASS
D320 -XCOND. $41
(352)527-8993

DEL FLAT SCREEN 14
in Good condition
$20.00 Linda 423-4163

FAMILY GUY DVD
SERIES 75 DVDS no
cases brand-new, no
scratches $70 OBO re-
tail $170 (352)446-9620

PLAY STATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $20
(352)613-0529

RESCUE ME DVD
SERIES SEASONS 1-3
11 DVDs, no cases,
brand-new no scratches
$25 obo (352)446-9620

ROSEANNE DVD
SERIES 20 DVDS no
cases brand-new no
scratches $60 obo retail
$140 (352)446-9620


52-473869 1l

618 259 4 7 3
93 74 162 58

382 25 9447 16
7 9 5 1 6 3 24

4461 8 72 5 39
8 5 9 3-4.7 1 6 2
143625987
276 9 8,13 45


CLASSIFIED









ClO SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


SCREEN MONITOR 17
in NEW $50 LINDA
423-4263



Small Glass covered
Raton coffee table. Ex-
cellent Condition, asking
$50 OBO
(352)446-9620



**200 Bottle-
Wine Credenza
just replaced cooling
unit in March, looks
like new, 50 btu
Breezeaire cooling
unit, solid maple trim,
doors & panels w/vin
view top, glass inserts
38/2 Lx68" W x 30" D
bought new $3600.
sell for $1500.
(352) 249-3428
2 Twin Beds
w/nightstand &
bedding $125.00
Sofa. $75.00, both
good condition
(423) 612-9229
6 Pc. Vintage Black
Asian King
Bedroom Set $250.,
Pictures
$30. for All
(815) 980-8642
BookCase & Match-
ing Computer Cabinet
w/glass doors
and lighted, good
condition $200.
(352) 795-7254
DAY BED WITH TRUN-
DLE, BASSINET Day
bed $100.00 Bassinet
$15.00 both in good
shape. 352-364-1704
DINETTE SET Black
marble-look top, 4 metal
chairs with tan micro-
fiber seats. $175.
352-637-1857.
w- HIGH END USED
FURNITURE 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Olive Green,
like new. No pets or
smoking. Exc. Cond!
$210. (352) 746-2329
LYON SHAW SPRING
BASE CHAIRS (2) Two
Lyon Shaw Spring base
chairs, double cushions,
covered in marine cloth,
very durable. Chairs
are made of steel con-
struction. Asking price
$50 each Call
352-419-5362 or
352-221-2412
MAKE-UP TABLE WITH
MIRROR AND SEAT
Gold Metal -super cute
$40 call 352-257-3870
Navy Plaid Flex Steel
Couch and Ottoman
$400. Oak Trimmed
Billiard Light $75.
will sell both- neg.
(352) 726-6487
Oak Dining Room
Table w/ 2 Leaves
8 chairs $125.
(352) 726-1327
Cell 352-201-5410
PATIO DINING SET
Lyon Shaw Patio Dining
Set, 48 inch round glass
top table, 3 spring base
chairs and 1 stationary
chair. Table and chairs
are made out of steel
construction. Double
cushions on all chairs,
22X22 cushion size,
covered in marine cloth,
very durable. Asking
price, $200 Call
352-419-5362,
352-221-2412
RECLINER Wall hugger
two seater. Tan micro
fiber material. Exellent
condition asking 250.00
352 726 9964
SMALL ASIAN STYLE
TABLE red and gold
with glass top $75
perfect condition call
352-257-3870
Small Glass covered
Raton coffee table. Ex-
cellent Condition, asking
$50 OBO
(352)446-9620
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500


TUADTIONALL FFAA & HlV-FL ALffi
LOVE SEAT floral blues CITRUS HILLS MULTI FAMILY SALE
and browns needs Forest Ridge Thurs. Fri. & Sat.
cleaning $25 Village 223 Baker St. Lot 223
352-257-3870 ANNUAL SALE INVERNESS
Two Matching Sofas Saturday 3/22 SAT ONLY 9a to 2p
one is a sofa bed, ** 10 * HOUSES COMMUNITY
excellent condition Across from school Yard/Movina Sale
$100. each on Forest Ridge Blv 8618 E. Gospel Island
(352) 382-2664 SMW Road, INV
Wicker Book Stand CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS
with white dishes MOVING SALE t Sn 9
$100. Fri, Sat 8am to 3pm Sat. 22 & Sun. 23, 9-4
Green Dishes $100. furniture, lots of misc.. Multi-Family Sale*
(352) 795-7254 6041 W Dorset Drive N. Point Lonesome Rd.
WICKER ROCKER Meadowcrest INVERNESS
Antique, painted white, Saturday Only 3/22
back & seat cushions 8A-3P, 685 N.
& pillow. $100 '. Independence Hwy
352-422-1309 NVERNESS
*-, I N V E R N E S S
Gre, a nSaturday Only 3/22
8am to 4pm
MOVING, HUGE SALE!
AFFORDABLE Crystal River Everything Must Go!
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch Sat & Sun, 8a to 2p 592 N Cherrypop Dr.
Hauling & Tractor Work lots of tools, saws, INVERNESS
352-341-2019, 201-5147 welder, hshld, misc. Saturday, 22, 8am
Craftsman 42" 7769 N Brahma Ter. 3091 East Weeks Ln.
Riding Mower CRYSTAL RIVER --
Clean & Rebuilt Sat. & Sun. 8am-?. /'
Carb/Valves/ Rings MOVING SALE, Tools "
$400. with out Battery Furn. & all Hshld. Items -'"
(352) 270-4087 1921 NW 15th St.
LEAF SWEEPER Woodland Estates PINE RIDGE
42" Pull behind most 3/21 & 3/22 8a-3p
tractors, Ig leaf bag, YAR Ai tools, hsehold items,
easy dumping. Plus 32 collectibles & more
manual. $125 3672 W Capa Path
(352) 419-7882 Crystal River
iVillage
ANNUAL SALE
Sat. March 22nd American Trading
3 Big Staghorn Ferns. 8a.m. to 2 p.m Post Has been Hired
Well taken care of. 950 SE Serendipity to Liquidate
$275. (352)465-8090 Place, CLUBHOUSE SUGARMILL
AZALEAS 1 gal pots (Formally 1601 SE 8th WOODS
3 for $18 Gorgeous Ave). BIG SALEI
Compare to $10 ea in Accumulation of items Saturday Only
Stores 613-5818 10ohomesr 200thom es
HIBISCUS 3 GAL $12 fromoe200 homes 8am to 3pm
HIBeauties 4 Colors$12 DUNNELLON Great furniture, lots
Beauties, 4 Colors, Sa9t
compare to 2 Gal for Sat. 9th, 7:30-4pm of household, Lg
$20 @ Stores. Inv off Hshold, Tools, & more! Book Collection
Croft 613-5818 11963 N Elkcam Blvd MANCAVE BAR
IE__4 State Sale WITH BARSTOOLS
Estate Sale 20 Morninga
Yr Fri &Sat8a-2p Glory Ct
Furniture, clothes, toys, Everything Must Go!
Beverly Hills tools, collectibles. NOWACCEPTING
Fri 3/21 & Sat. 3/22 94 S. Jackson St. BH CREDIT CARDS
8am to noon
LOTS OF GOOD STUFF! FLORAL CITY Left Over Estate Sale
54 SJKellnerBlvd Fri.& Sat. Last 2 days. everything must Mo!
SJ Kellner Blvd Everything cheap. 9pc.sectional & 7
BRENTWOOD Must go. Penbrook Ln pc.sectional w/ends
Sat. 22 8AM Frst Rid that rock & recline &
3 Family Forest Ridge matching recliner,
2442 N. Brentwood Village only 6 mo's old, tables,
Cir. Lecanto Sat. 3/22 8a-2p. 2 bedroom suites, two
Military & war books & floor lamps, wall
The -- Mag. p/back novels, hangings, 2 cocktail
/ Th\ New "dorm" 3.1 cuft table sets.
0.\AGAPE\ refrigerator- misc. furn. pls call (352) 586-5166
SHOUSE 646 Diamondbird Lp. or (765)748-4334
!Hernando. ^RAINBOW LAKES
HOMOSASSA Estate/Moving Sale
CRYSTAL RIVER Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm Fri. 3/21 thru Sun. 3/24,
HUGE INDOOR Storaae Unit Items 8a. to 4p.good quality
For Sale Furniture turn bdrm, dining, pa-
Fundraising Sale Jewlry, Clothes, Ruby tio, curiosofa, Ivseat
Fri. 21 & Sat. 22 glass, wallpaper, band -w/collectibles, tools,
8am- 1pm saw, tbl. saw & MORE garden, sml appl,
am-t pm tCrosby Sq. Storage books, N. of Rt. 40 on
Ist Baptist 6411 S. Tex Point., Rt. 41 & Rainbow Blvd.
Church Across from How- -follow signs,
700 N. Citrus Ave. ards Flea Market, 21598 SW Peach
TO BENEFIT Follow Pink Signs Blossom, Dunnellon
AGAPE HOUSE HOMOSASSA
A MINISTRY FOR Fri. 21 & Sat. 22, 9am-?
PEOPLE IN NEED NEIGHBORHOOD SALE
8 HOUSES Harley-Davidson Lady
7614 RADIANCE LANE Lrg. White Leather
YARI L I Follow signs from 490 Fringe Jacket $150. 7.5
'U yTools, Collect., wagon Black Boot Ladies ?
rocker, coach bags, $25. All in good shape.
CRYSTAL Longaberger Baskets Ted (352)465-2372
LEATHER SEMINOLES
RIVER INVERNESS JACKET embroidered
MIDDLE SCHOOL Beta Sigma Phi, logo no iron-on paid
"For Relay For Life" Annual Yard Sale, $299 pics avail $100
Sat March 22 8a-3p plus two families on OBO (352)446-9620
HUGE Sat.& Sun. 8a-1p MEN'S DRESS PANTS
RUMMAGE SALE 12595 E Boy Scout Like new, 6 pair 5.00
Tons to choose from Rd (44 E turn rt before each 36X29 Linda
344 N.E. Crystal St. the river on boy scout). 423-4163
follow signs, antiques,
CRYSTAL RIVER furniture, clothing, RYKA FLEXOLOGY
Nature Coast electronics, kitchen & SNEAKERS Women s
MiNature Coast horse stuff, tools size 9.5 teal/gray $15
Moving Sale & jewels etc.. great shape!
MovLng S__ale_ (352)628-0221
** 60% OFF** Inverness SEMINOLES JERSEYS
Furn* Medical Eq* Fri & Sat 8a-1 p. 2 avail size 18/20 worn
Wall Art*Appliances* Don't miss this one! one time for pictures
TVs*Toys*Games* MultiFamily. many new $15 OBO each, paid
Baskets*Boutique* items. 7431 E. Allen Dr. $35 each(352)446-9620
Sport Gds* Glassware
*FILL A BAG SALE* INVERNESS r.l..l.|.MJ! M.
clothing,shoes,books Fri & Sat 9am-2pm
$3 Plastic Bag; Complete Contents of -
$5 Paper Bag Home ~ Estate Sale, HTC ANDROID 4G
999 NE 5th ST 44 E Furn., Hshld. & More CELL PHONE One year
Next to Race Trac 3083 Blackmountain Dr Cold, HTC Android 4G
352-563-1860 INVERNESS cell phone, like new.
10a-4p Mon-Sat Fri, Sat. 8a to 1 p Plus 2 chargers and
Volunteers needed HUGE SALE! case. Asking $80 Call
for new Location 1351 N. Timucuan Trail 352-419-5362 or
Apply at 5th St Loc. Lakeside Subdivision 352-221-2412


CLASSIFIED




UX510- EX.COND. $45
(352a) 527-8993
MOTOROLA WX416
Cell NEWw/case,
Consumer Cellular
or unlock $39
352-382-3650



1 -10' LADDER
1- & 6' LADDER
$130. for both
(352) 746-6848
2 CARLISLE CANOE
PADDLES- gold ano-
dized aluminum, 54"
long, Ex.
$15 each. 628-0033
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALLPAPER
$25 PREPASTED
165SQFT E-MAIL
PHOTOS 419-5981
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD
HEART/ANIMALS $20
ARTS/CRAFTS
419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
ALPHA/OMEGA HOME
SCHOOLING BOOKS
9th/10th grades
$50 obo
Linda 423-4163
Aluminum Truck Box.
Diamond plate design.
19" W, 59" L, 10" Deep.
$200
(352)341-4674
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Cello 30". $50. Box Car
Kit, Railroad, narrow
gage. Offer upon look-
ing at items for kit.
(352)382-4638
FIREKING
SAFE-19X13X16 with
key & combo lock
$100.00 OBO 527-1399
FIREWOOD 1 cord
(pickup load) approx.,
$25..Buyer must trans-
port. (352)220-4158
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
GOOD CONDITION
$40 352-613-0529
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
(352)464-0316
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
(352)341-6920
LIKE NEW Ladies Day 6
DREAM BICYCLE
21 speed, easy step
thru, $800.
(352) 860-1872 or
(304) 673-5550
MICROSCOPE $65
comes with many ac-
cessories
(352)628-0221
OLD COLEMAN
CAMPING 2 BURNER
STOVE OK SHAPE
20.00 352 464 0316
OTT-LITE LOW VISION
FLOOR LAMP
glare-free, flex neck.
paid $160 sell $50.
Call 613-4279
PINFISH TRAP- 14-1/2"
x 17" x 10-1/2" tall, inter-
nal bait box, $15.
352-628-0033
Queen Flannel Sheets
$20. 4 Chair Cushions,
Brown $12.
(352)746-5453
ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE $55 HAND-
CRAFTED SOLID OAK
E-MAIL PHOTOS IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
VINTAGE SLIDE PRO-
JECTION TABLE $45
ACME LITE PROJEK
E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
Wooden Doll House
Kit. New, unopened
box. $50.
(352)341-1143


B~
4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.
$50. 628-0033
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 (352)464-0316
OTT-LITE Low Vision
FLOOR LAMP 24 watt,
glare-free, flex neck,
Paid $160 Sell $50.00
Call 613-4279
Scooter & Car Lift
Sold as a package
Both in Good Cond
$800
(352) 344-2679
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY
$50 464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316
WHEELCHAIR
manual, good cond.
comes with leg
& foot rest.
$85
(352) 344-4105




1955 Juke Box
Rocola, 300+ records,
needs some TLC
$650.
(812) 360-3834
KIMBALL ORGAN
WITH BENCH Electric
and Computerized $30
call 352-257-3870
Peavey Amplifier
w/ 2 speakers
works great $250.
Yamaha Organ HS8
exc. cond $150.
(352) 726-3562
Peavey VYPYR 30 watt
guitar amp $85.
(352)419-4464
Yamaha Organ US1
w/software
exc. cond. $300
Yamaha Organ HS7
exc. cond. $100.
(352) 726-3562




DELTAADJUSTABLE
SHOWER HEAD [new
in box] (2) $35 Each
Call 726-0040
OTT-LITE Technology
Low Vision Floor Lamp.
Like New $50. Can't
see? Call 613-4279
Pampered Chef Easy
Accent cake/cookie
decorator $12 like new!
(352)628-0221




ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
Nordic Track E7 ellipti-
cal. Fully assembled.
Hardly used. Pick up
only, in Inverness. Ask-
ing $200 Please call
352-560-3379
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
REBOUNDER
TRAMPOLINE(indoor)
with stretch band attach-
ments 352-564-4214.
$60
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BIKE
DIGITAL READOUT
GREAT SHAPE.ONLY
$100 (352)464-0316


CITRUS COUNTY (FD CHRONICLE


HERMAN'
3-22 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCick for UFS, 2014

"I don't care if it is plastic. I could
have had a heart attack."


RECUMBENT
STATIONARY BIKE.
Nordic Track GX5.0 Pro.
Excellent condition.
$220. 352-382-5951
Trimup Treadmill
cost $2200.00 sell
for $150. obo
(352) 382-1842


ScirfJjina

12 SPEED HUFFY
MOUNTAIN BIKE
MENS 26". GREAT
SHAPE. $60
(352)464-0316
12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
Club Car Golf Cart
1991, Family owned
Exc con. Lights,
Battery 1 yr. old, Must
Sell due to health
$1,500. (352) 527-3125
Club Car Golf Cart
48V, side curtains,
charger, good cond.
$1,275.
(812) 360-3834
COLEMAN SLEEPING
BAG Exponent mummy
style 36x96 extra long.
Almost new, warm
$40 897-5410
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dahon Folding Bike
Used for RV, Trails
& Camp Grounds,
$125.
(352) 601-6064
GOLDEN EAGLE BOW,
compound,glass/wood
laminate., sight/sheath,
4 arrows, 45/501bs.,
$75, 628-0033
GOLF TRAVEL BAG
Tommy Armour padded
golf bag with rollers.
$20. call 352-746-7512
phone
TAPERFLEX WATER
SKI Superior new
sport's concept quality
design $25 call
352-257-3870


Bdm^

20 ft. Hudson
Equipment Trailer
Double Axle,10,000 Ib
Capacity,
2-5/16, Hitch $1,650.
352-212-5747

Utility Trailer
8 ft. Like new
with side rails & full tail
gate $1,200 obo
(352) 422-0135





20 Items of BOYS
Clothing sizes,12mths
-5Toddler$1 each
in like new condition
all 352-257-3870

BASSINET Boy or girl.
Good shape, Asking
$15 (352)364-1704

Car Toddler Bed
with inner spring
mattress, & 10 sheets
& pad excel, cond.
$60.
(352) 621-1953



Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369






1995 HY-LINE RV
PARK MODEL
TRAILER needs work,
good for hunting cabin
$1000 obo
(352) 628-2000
betw. 9am & 3pm.


Heavy Duty Box
Trailer. 14X7X7.
Tandum Wheels. $1900
obo. (317)947-8015


RV CORD ADAPTER
NEW 30 AMP Fe-
male-50 AMP Male
Cord 18" $10
(352)382-3650


GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, a
Special Needs
spayed brindle/
white Bulldog, pos-
sible hound mix, Wt.
66 Ibs. Gentle, calm,
good on leash,
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she seems to
think is normal, no
problem to her.
Good family & com-
panion dog. Fee
$30. Call Joanne
at 352-697-2682 or
Dreama @
813-244-7324.


K-~ D~y


Acctg/Bkkr QuickBooks
Certified, set-up, train-
ing, payroll, sales tax.
No job to small! Call
352-287-1909 for appt.



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



LIC. CNA seeks in
home care of elderly.
Dr's visits, groc., etc.
lite cleaning, meals.
(352) 726-2882



JAKES'
TRIM CARPENTRY
No job too big or small
Free Est. 352-601-7064




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
# 39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


RABE=ALL
M&W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
* AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
PRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
0' Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352U 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
QUALITY WORK *
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447


HomelGOffic


CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773

Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-613-8137

Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Corn. Lic.352-503-9621

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755

Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
SDrina Clean-UD. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


ftNUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570





*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998






*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


Absolute Exterior
Restoration Any
Surface, roof & gutter
cleaning, int/ext painting
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




SAll chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




.Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442


^-A






TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Arbor Reds Tree Care
24 Hr. Emergeny Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
All Major Credit Cards
352-583-3141/206-1153


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FISHER
Fisher, 3-y.o. Bulldog
mix, Heartworm
negative, neutered,
weight 45 Ibs. Love-
able, playful, loves
treats, knows com-
mands, beautiful
puppy face. Would
be your best friend if
given a chance.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-513-5754.

E.Jl


INDY
Indy, a beautiful
Blackmouth Cur
mix, 2 yrs old,
friendly with most
dogs, walks very
nicely on a leash,
is housebroken,
loves kids. Playful
& friendly, likes
having people
with him.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


MIKA
Mika, a 1 yr 9 month
old happy, friendly
spayed little Bulldog
mix girl. She is very
sweet and loveable,
walks very nicely on
a leash. Rides
quietly in the car.
She is just the right
size for a family
life at 30 Ibs.
Call Rebecca @
419-262-3222.

Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female
Schnauzer Pups
Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pups
Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $600.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827









SNOW
Snow, a sweet, play-
ful, affectionate, en-
ergetic mixed breed
dog, petite @ 33 Ibs,
with beautiful green
eyes. Smart, active
& engaged. Very
protective of her
home & family,
would make a good
watch dog. Fee 60$
includes spay, HW
test, vacs.,
microchip, 30 days
insurance.
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821.


TASHA
Tasha, beautiful
brindle 2 1/2 y.o.
boxer mix, very
sweet, gentle, intelli-
gent, well man-
nered. Housebrkn,
does well w/most
dogs. NO CATS.
Loves to be petted.
Fee $60 for vacs,
spay, microchip,
HW test.
Call Marti @
786-367-2834




Horses. Tack, new &
used. All priced right.
Diamond Pea Farm
(352)873-6033




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
F






INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
I bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

LECANTO
5225 Shaker PI 2/2 DW
$575. Nice, 464-0999
MINIFARMS
Spacious 4+Bd/2 Ba on
2 1/2 fenced acres.
$750/mo. 352-795-5220



**1982 SingleWide**
2-1, 15K firm
MUST SEE!
352-795-1272
Cabin 12X32'
w/front prch & tin roof.
Full bath/kitchen. Bd/Liv.
w/10X12 unfnshd add.
You move. $7000 obo.
(352)746-9211

MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
MUST SELL **
2006 Used Mobile
Home, 3-5 bdr/2 ba
Deliver to your property
45k Great Shape!!
1-877-578-5729
Palm Harbor Homes
2014 Models are here!
$8,500 Pre-
Construction Savings
John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
Private Owner
Financing
USED/NEW/REPO
Serving the South
East United States
1-877-578-5729


I Pets


Rent to Own
Owner Financing on
used/repo/new
Manufactured Homes
352-795-2377

SAVE, SAVE. SAVE.
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




-FLORAL CITY 3/2"
1+ACRE treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
FLORAL CITY
3/2-1+AC, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $91,900
716-807-8847
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
Assessd $34,400.
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369



4/3, 32x80, w/ 2 master
suites in Homosassa.
2006 MH, Must See!!
Owner Financing Avail
* Ready to move in *
(352) 795-1272
COUNTRY LIVING IN
LECANTO $42.500
Dbwd, 3bd/2ba, % acre
NEW c/heat/air & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond!
No Owner Finance
(352) 621-3929
Hernando DW, MH
3 BR w/walk-in closets
Roof over, single car
garg, chain link fence
$39,999 Will take RV in
Trade; 352-726-2494
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre. New
bathrooms, Ig screened
porch, dead end rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No owner Financing
Homosassa
0 Beautiful Large
MH 4/3 on almost 2
Acres. MUST SEE!
$145,000 OBO
(352) 795-2377

INVERNESS,
N. Leisure Point
3BR/2BA Mobile
Home 248 sqft,
Nice .40 Acre Lot
Lease or Cash
Call For Details
877-519-0180

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807

West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
must sell $13,000
(352) 344-5172


Beautiful Triple Wide
In Gated Community
with Drywall. 2000+ SF
Must See-will owner
finance. MUST SELL
727-967-4230
BEVERLY HILLS
Sandy Oaks 55+ PK
2BD, 2 BA, Open
House Sat & Sun, 11-2p
completely remode.,
new Kit. & new appl's,
Fl. Rm. Lot Rent $274
incld's, wtr sewer &
trash, Pool/ Clubhouse
$37,500 (352-322-8941
HANDICAP ACCESS
with Vertical Lift,
Stonebrook, 2/2 MH
1,400 sf., $28,900. Lot
Rent $442., Must See.
352-628-5311

For Sale ,,16

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858
Melody Park, Inverness
2 bd 1-1/2 bath. 12x64
with 12x22 Fl room.
$3,800. obo
727-808-6000
Singing Forrest 55+
Park, SW 2/1, LRoom
addition, new flooring &
Furnc/AC. Lanai, shed.
Lot rent $183/mo
$24,500; 352-860-1463
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ PARK
Sales $8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs Work
$3,500. obo
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
(352) 628-2090




[-ACION i

L~INC~
i~ff -:,f'f


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. n
352-795-7368
S800 & UNDER
9218 N. Satinwood Ter.
3/2/2 lots of room, all appliances
10862 N. Airway Loop
3/2/2 nice home with lots of space
7149W. Crestview Ln.
2/2/1 dall applances, fenced in yard
7916 W. Grove St.
2/15/1 real nice home in Homosassa
S650 & UNDER
8496 W. Drew Ct.
2/2 waterront mobile with own dock
1063 N. Commerce Ter.
2/1 apartment centally located
59 S. Tyler St.
2/1 with carport and nice Flonda room
7096 N. Dawson Dr.
2/2 MH in H dlnDle Subdivision
For More Listings Go To
www.itrusCountyHoneRentals.conm




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $600/mo. will
help w/sec. no dogs
352-726-9570
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352- 563-2114,
352-257-6461


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 CII


CLASSIFIED




PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 & 3BR APT. HOMES
Handicap Unit
Available
Carpet, Appliances,.
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants
Monthly rent starting
at $686 plus utilities
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer








FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




or For Rent
Warehouse
-1200sq ft$$600.,
Storage 8x8 $85,
Office $550
(352)634-0129




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long orShrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242




Citrus Springs
2/2/1, $650. mo.
352-746-7990
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $600/mo. will
help w/sec. no dogs
352-726-9570




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
Country Cottage, effi-
ciency, furn. until. inmc'd
no pets, no smoking
$550 mo., $400 dep
(352)560-0370 Cell




Homosassa
Beautifully remodeled.
2/2/2+Office. In SMW.
1700Sqft, furnished or
can be unfurnished to
suit. $795/mo. Rental
app+l1st/last/sec. Call
(352)634-4547




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, fenced, sunrm.
W/D, Nice area $620.
mo. 352-228-3454
BEVERLY HILLS
HOUSES FOR RENT
$575. to $675.
352-422-2798
INVERNESS
3/2/1 $700/mo. $2100.
moves you in! Avail
now (352) 302-7349
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


-I


HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225










DUDLEY'S
"AOC~rOR-

**5 AUCTIONS"
Thur 3-20 Estate
Adventure Auction
700+lots @ Hall-
3pm out rows of
treasures 6pm in-
estate furniture
lighthouses+++
4 Real Estate
Auctions
0EFriL3-21 Prev-9 am
9640 N Parkwood
Ave, Dunnellon 5
acres w/mobile
home
SOLD ABSOLUTE ALL
TOGETHER Hoarder
home-barn-motor
cycles, vehicles,
tractor +++
Prey 12pm 2071
W Greenway PI
Citrus Springs
3BRr corner lot
Prev 2pm 5101 W
Kristina Loop Crystal
Oaks Lecanto 3/2
Estate Settlement
w Sat 3-22 Prey
8am 7820 S
Great Oaks Drive
Downtown Historic
Floral City GNC
Commercial/
residential onRails
to Trails Home-
2 mobiles-cook
house CONTENTS
Minvan-truck-camper-to
ols-household&
more CALL FOR INFO
......................
call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


m', 1$ T I, %


4. Kleenex discussion matter (2)


2014J FS, Dist. byUniv. Ucickf


g
AT
E), and

erthe
any


for UFS


5. Quicker ray gun (2)


6. Put a dozen on hold for now (1)


7. Hawaiian areas' mountainous regions (2)


S(INVMHIH SflNVISI 'L IAIMAI IaIH '9 HJaSVIH HHiSVd'9







Tinst Is To Do ItIGHT!We're FULLY INSURED tar i



Bol General Uability D1 Workers'Conp! .


Wi S


DEB
THOMPSON

One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
E Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
" Service with a smile
seven days
a week.

Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebiOvahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







A
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





72 HOUR SALE...
Open Houses
Saturday, March 22
11am-2pm
Several Homes in the
Forest View & Stone-
brook Retirement
Communities will hold
Open Houses this
Saturday from 11 -2
Prices range from
$14,000 and up.
New Homes from
$52,800. and up or
build new for under
$50,000. Call
Lorelie LeBrun, Sales
Counselor for more
information.
352-795-7799,
Forest View Sale
Center is located at
960 S Suncoast Blvd
(Hwy 19)
Homosassa
south of Ozello Trail.
www.forestview
fla.com or www.
stonebrookfla.com

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday llam-3pm
8711 N. Upland Drive
Citrus Springs
Mostly furnished
Move in Ready, 3BR,
2BA, near Golf Crse
Screened in Ground
pool covered Lanai
Asking $138,000.




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


Rea ,,l E .state

FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514


Pine Ridge, 3 bedroom.
3 bath. with salt water
pool, a 20x45 workshop
and carport with 15 ft
enclosed full solar
compliment, solar elec-
tric, pool pump, pool
heaterhot water and
solar assisted air condi-
tioning 352-746-9435


For Sale L
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell
SECLUDED 3BR/2BA.
1653 sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
1/4 acre buildable lot.
$99.900 or reasonable


2 block homes side by offer 352-613-2289
side. 1/1, rented $450
each TAW. Good S ar l
Cond. Quite Loc. o
$70,000 for both. Call
Kevin (603) 498-5124
BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525 sf heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$64,900. 527-1239

OPEN HOUSE
SAT. 22 & SUN. 23
10AM-3PM
5470 N. Buffalo Drive Buying or Selling
Beverly Hills REAL ESTATE,
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck! Let Me Work
352-464-6020 For You!
JADEMISSION.COM
sBETTY HUNT
KLean REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
For Sale% 0Realty, Inc.
Crystal Glen 4/2. 352 586-0139
2car XLgar/scrn drs. hunt4houses68
Salt pool w/heater. @yahoo.com
Move in ready. wwW.bettyhunts
$159,900 homes.com.
(410)804-1454
no brokers please Condo for Sale
SSugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351
YOU'LL THIS!
6385W Cannondale
Drive 2 bedroom. 2
bath. Cozy
1 OOOSF(approx.)Ihome,2
car attached garage, Irg
screened lanainewly
updated $94,500
352-794-6686



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
Great open floor plan. Phyllis Strickland
Liv. room has stone FP Realtor
&wd floors. Caged MAKT
Pool (352) 746-6552 THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Inv m s Thinking of
-selling?
Home Now is the time
to get listed.
For Sale 'li Still great values out
Point of Woods, there. Call for
Inverness 3/2, foreclosure lists
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367 Phyllis Strickland
i TROPIC SHORES
For Sale REALTY.
Pritchard Island 352-613-3503-Cell
Community, access to 352-419-6880- Office
pool w/tennis court,
close to downtown
Inverness, 1 owner,
2BD/2BA/2CG
$125k By owner,
Call. (352) 726-0044
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


Hm BETTY J.

EOEII POWELL
LISTINGS Realtor

H"Your Success is my
E goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
crystal River 3 bedroom. SELLING
2 bath. Ideal location
near 7 rivers golf course CALL ME
$119,000...Also second
home $59,900 352-422-6417
2/2/1 ..Both homes in ex. bipowell@
cond. 352-220-4158 netscaoe.com
ERA American
Hemosas Realty & Investments






A -,tii ,rrld first

Need a iiii)

TAMISCOTT orra
Exit Realty Leaders qualified
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com employee?
When it comes to
Realestate...
I'm there for you! This area's

The fishing is areat #1
Call me for your new m n
Waterfront Home employment

LOOKING source!
TO SELL? ?ON.
CHRONICLE
CALL ME .1
TODAY I. I


WORDYGURDYBY TRCKY RICKY ANE
1. Frighten Wonderland's March animal (1) Everyanswer is a rhymin
II EIZ- ~ pair of words (like FAT C,
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Full-of-ruffles calla flower (2) they will fit in the letter
m- -squares. The number after
definition tells you how m
3. Out-of-focus Scrabble play (1) syllables in each word.


RelEstt


00HHE1








C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!



A


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
mail:
Cfatone(htamnabav.rr.
corn
ERA American
Realty &
Investments

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn









LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt(
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


#1 Employmet source is




www. ch ron i cieon linecr


Citrs out
Hoeiq


2/2 Citrus Hills. Master
w/lg walk-in closet. Lg
utility rm/pantry. Scrn
porch. Walk to pool!
Tile floors, very clean,
lots of natural light!
$58,000. 586-260-2848

For Sale BO
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some furn, new Lanai,
Lam, & Ceramic floors.
$47,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100


eu fTw


-m
Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921
INVERNESS, 2BR/1BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749
LAKE ROUSSEAU
Fishing- Nature Lovers
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642





GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905

4 ADJOINING LOTS
1 Acre MOL,Close to
Town Gospel Island
Gunn Ct.$12,700. Make
Offer(352) 726-2038
or (352) 613-4958
PINE RIDGE
1 ACRE
By Owner, build
ready, no fill, $26,900
(352) 249-7812




51/2 HP Johnson Out-
board, full gear case,
fresh water motor,
5 gal. tank, runs &
starts great. $375.
CR (513) 260-6410 Cell




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*

ALUMICRAFT
2013, V16, Black with
floor, 2013 Suzuki 4
stroke mtr. trolling mtr.
& trailer $5,250.
(352) 419-5053
CANOE
Mad River Canoe 17 ft
Galv Continental TrIr,
Elec motor & battery.
w/ outriggers & Equip.
ExCond $1600
352- 564-2765
COBIA 2000
17.5 Ft., O10H, Yam.,
4 strk, Great Shape
$5,700, 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
ISMH
1959 Fiberglass Boat,
195935 HP Evinrude,
elect, start, w/ trlr.
$1,800 (352) 637-6304
LOGIC
2001 15' Center Con-
sole 40 H.P. Yamaha,
Galv. trailerBimini
topless than 12 hours.
Not a rebuild. You can
not tell this boat is not
brand new! $5500.
(352)563-0133 or
(352)302-9159


Recreation
Vehicles
ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
FORD
2005 Diesel 3/4 Ton
Power Stroke Truck &
2004 27' Fifth Wheel
Lg tip-out, like new
fully loaded!
$17k or $8500. ea.
(352) 795-1590
Itasca Sundancer
97 DL, 29' Class C
basement model,
Ford 460, V8, 26k mi.
generator, $14k
(352) 746-0683
SOLD
WINNEBAGO
2006, 24 FT, Class C
Chalet, 64K mi., V10,
5 speed, generator,
loaded, real nice cond.
TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River, 18'
w/living quarters,
like new condition
$11,500. Ask for Bill
(352) 564-1299
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



FORD
2001 Van Camper
V-10, 64K mi. Exc
Cond. Road ready.
$25K obo. 419-7212


20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792


















Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634.4768
SUNBIRD
'92, Bass, 16.7" Wide,
40HP outbrd Evin.
Trir. Dbl. onbrd
charge sys. Minnkota
Edge Troll. mtr. $3,200
(352) 341-1950
VISION BASS
1991. 18.5' W 175 hp
Johnson. Great Cond.
Well Maintained.
$5500. (352)419-5560
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555*
boatsupercenter.com


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




'05, Audi A6
Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




'07 Dodge Caravan
97k miles, $5195
'05 Ford Focus
121k miles, $3595
'04 Dodge Neon SXT
102k miles, $3395
'01 Dodge Utility
Truck $6895
Everything Motor's
7039 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Homosassa, Fl
352-503-9969


HEARTLAND
NORTH TRAIL
SERIES
2011 Travel Trailer 21 ft.
Tandem axel, sway
bars, hitch and hitch sta-
bilizer, electric brakes,
full bath, one slideout,
fully loaded in excellent
condition. Optional 12
ft. Porta-Bote with 5 hp
Mercury engine. Price
with boat and motor
$19,800. Call
352-726-2750.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
VIKING POP UP
2011 2385 ST. Used 4
times, like new. Slide,
electric lift, stove, refrig-
erator, A/C and heat.
352.464.0443 $5,800


Buy Here/Pay Here
'94 Ford Taurus
$1500 Cash
'95 Chevy S-10 Cust.
$1800 Cash
'96 Saturn SLI
$2200 Cash
'99 Chevy Cavalier
$2900
'00 Olds Silhouette
$2700
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVROLET
2000, Camaro
5 speed $3,995.
352-341-0018

CHEVROLET
2003, Monte Carlo LS,
$5,995
352-341-0018

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600

CHRYSLER
Sportscar,05 Crossfire
conv. auto, ex. cond
45k mi., V6 $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150

FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600

HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

KIA
2011 Forte Ex
Gray, 4 dr,29k mi.
$10,900. (352) 601-2294

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MINI COOPER
'05, Yellow, 5 speed
manual, 1 owner,
25k miles, $11,500
(352) 489-5239

Mitsubishi
3000 GT '99
Adult lady owner.
Leather. Cold A/C etc.
117k mi. BO or trade
for NICE Crown. Vic.
Grand. Marquis Town.
Car. (352)220-6040




Chevrolet
C10 Stepside, 1983
crate350, 4 brl, 4spd
auto, perf. exhaust
restored, blue on blue
$6500.(352) 637-5143


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII
SHAY
1980 Reproduction
Model A
please call
(352) 201-2958




CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier
4 Door, $4,250.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,S10
Crew Cab, 4 x 4,
$7,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
'96 Silverado, ext. cab
Red, original owner,
282K mi. always maint.
Good tires. Many new
parts recently. $2,200
Cash (352) 270-4529
FORD
'99, XLT 150, 4/WD,
club cab, topper, clean
189K mi., red, $3495.
(352) 341-4949
FREIGHT LINER
'98, Century Class
set up for Dry or Liquid
500 Detroit make offer
Call (352) 564-9124
GMC
2008 Sierra C/K1500
Denali Crew Cab, AWD,
46483 miles, black,
leather, sunroof, naviga-
tion, DVD, excellent
condition, $11800,
shad@netscape.com

SOLD
FREIGHT LINER
'98, Century Class
set up for Dry or Liquid
500 Detroit




HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LINCOLN
'08, MKX, $18,400 SUV
46k mi., Red ext. Tan
leather int. showroom
cond., Auto, AWD,
fully loaded. A/C,
ABS, airbags, alarm,
AM/FM/CD, Sirus, cli-
mate control, cruise,
pano roof, power
locks, mirrors, seats,
steering, windows, tilt
wheel, tint, new tires
(352) 382-1531
SUZUKI
2007, Vitara
4 WD, V6, $7,950.
352-341-0018


MOTORCYCLE
FOR SALE
2012 YZF-R6 Moving
out of state and need to
sell like new motorcycle!
Yamaha R6-Raven edi-
tion. Only 6000 miles on
it! Only one owner.
Inludes twin helmets
and Joe Rocket riding
jacket! Asking price is
$7900 but willing to ne-
gotiate. Just in time for
riding season!
352-364-1268
Motorcycle Trailer
Dark Green,
excellent cond.
$450.
(352) 795-8880


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568


Automatic, Power Windows

X! ~~IF1 -


I 4.01 Engine, Automatic

17! 1


2003 Chevrolet Silverado 1500


V Vortec Engine, Automatic

UI ) -


2007 Lincoln Town Car


S 4.6LV8 Engine, 25 MPG

Is JU]IjI


2008 Buick Lucerne CX


I Cashmere Interior, Automatic

M i n~I


Leatner, Automatc


A2010Honda-V-l
2010 Honda CR-V EX-L


I AM/FM/CD, Cloth, Chrome


SAutomatic, rower windows

B hL ^ Ii


*yjb 6T


I Keyless tntry, unStar

Bh F;fI*


32 MPG, Sunroof, PW/PL

ie 9,1A


i3.31. Engine, Automatic

U VIKft'


rvW/rL, Remote Start/ntry

BhlIII


Auto, Alloy Wheels, PW/PL

u 1:14 1 ii


I


I


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306



Harley Davidson
2004 Heritage Softail
Classic, loaded, garage
kept $10,000.
(352) 270-8488
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
HONDA
2013 Honda
Scooter PCX 150
Red, Great Cond.
$3500 OBO
352-422-8601
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990
'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999

must sell!
w -


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Waterfron
^Ho~mes 1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 Chevy Cruze /
MSRP:
$19p280
Your Price:
$17,688*
2014 Chevy Malibu
MSRP:
$25 ,155
Your Price:
$22 p280*
2014 Chevy Equinox
MSRP:
$25P535
Your Price:
$22 831*
2014 Chevy Silverado
MSRP:
$28, 55





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Your Price:
$23880*
2014 Chevy Traverse
MSRP:
*32,220
Your Price: I
$28 872"

if CRYSTAL Y

I FIND ROADS" CH E V ROL E T


800-584-8755 EXT.10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
*Prices include all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. AOn select models, includes all rebates and
incentives, not everyone will qualify. With approved credit.


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 C13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Jll


al +new2014 Chevys!
AT WE PAY! MNOT A PENNY MORE! IV.l.
V1ITED TIME ONLY!


RADODOUBLE
L RADOCAB IWT
#1097* MSRP $32,240
........ GMSupplier Discount
..e a.................... Rebate
.... ........--.--....PBC
.... Cash or Trade Equity


60


Pay.


2014 Chew
INICL?
248 MSRP $16,840
...GMSuppler)Dscount
... .USAA
_. Cash orTrade Equity


New 2014 Chew
CRUZELS
STK #C14047 MSRP $19,255
'*50a-----GMSupp*6,rDcwto
^TSO_________Rebate
-750.. ..USAA
2 ......-....... Cash orTrade Equity

-ps1Is4,753"


New 2014 Chew
MALIBU LS
STK#C14254 MSRP $23,735
703OO1 GMSuppIer. scalMut
$750- R--et
$750___-_USAA
25OO _- Cash orTrade Equity

siam18,0370


New 2014 Chewvy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14207 MSRP $28,520
s---GM5DpberMwisct
50---Rebate
sT75O ......... .......................... Jw
s2.5 .CashorTrade quity
Yuft $22,877"


New 2014 Che
AMARO 2LS
STK#C14162 MSRP $26,055
i-- -..GMSupplIe Discount
I--------Rebate
.- -- PBC
........ USAA
._.._.. _Cash or Trade Equity
$2OA42821


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK #C14106 MSRP $25,315
sO77' -- GMSupperIfDsuo'nt
'/5 0 ......... ....... ...... ..... .,,,...IJ ate
9M -- --,-USAA
2.,5.oo Cash or Trade Equiy

s 20,487T


New 2014 Chewvy New 2014 Chew
TRAVERSELT TAHOE LS
STK#C14112 MSRP $35,395 STK#CT14041 MSRP $45,115
s,1f611' GMASupplierDiscout s3,3064.GmSuppa6 w wswxnt
M5- Reate e 510_RebO
S 1 ------I. I..... ..USAAM'750USAA
$215 Cashh orTade E*t sZ,5-O CashorTradeEquity

S .s29,78330- -sO 600


OVER 90
Used & Certified
Pre-Loved Vehicles


AU Pre-Loved Certified


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTYT


2YEARS-
24,900 MILE
MAINTENANCE'


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealerfor complete details.


IEWVehicles!


12CHEVYMAUBULT
123886SPEEDAUMIO,ALLSTABPK(
smks


CheckOut Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


OS UIK(iCENTURY
12371 CUSTOM


08 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
C238M W)o
$"95


11HONDAACCORD EXCOUPE
12260 SU ROOF, LOW ,MlS
$13-WS


09COIEVIETTPAVERSELT 09CHEVYTRAVERSE LT 09TOYOTAVENZA
1205SUNROOFONSIAR Il45SM!ROfALtW WHEELSOMSTAR 12404 LEATHER, NAVIGATION
5% SA $%4%95


11TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
12374 SE LEATHER
S2w95


11 FORD EXPEDITION XLT
12248
S23M904


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C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014


iia ON4




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
1.
Per
Mo.


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
2.
Per
Mo.


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
1.
Per
Mo.


DRIVE FOR ONLY...
2.
Per
Mo.
_,^rig


SAVE! NOW ONLY...


SAVE! NOW(


SAVE! NOW ONLY...


e-Owned Vehicles inch


Pre-Owned


APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when ya
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details


mited Powertrain Warrar


Fis5-DAYl
EXCHANGE:
PROGRAM!
I fse deaitr oi rompietp detliLs ^j


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i select new Honda models
a, an daDrov'ed cred= .A


SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 C15


mW./JC
LFral ^^pB^ ul

'__ 'A A______ h ___


prli




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MSRP:...........................................18,543
Savings Off MSRP:........................ 3,555


2014 Nissan Altimas
VIN# EC18391B
MODEL # t1t14




AfS ......................................................... 23,720
Saigbp O AISP: ..................................... ,04


ONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE


2014 Nissan Jukesv


YIN# 360823
MODEL# 20114




AfSfP: ....................
Savkwgs OfffiW:


...$23,425
...05,596


2014 Nissan Frontiers


VIN# 213390
MODEL # 12014 d




ASSP: ....................
Savings Off MSRP:


2014 Nissan Rogues


VIN# 791030
MODEL# 22114


- 1
L_


-$21960 S ..................................S24,439
-S 3, 638 Sa g 0of M P.:...................................... $6,444


CRYSTAL A
N NISSAN
-'- THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE

800-584-8755 EXTI0 n CRYSTALAUTOS.CNOM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:30am-8:OOpm Saturday 9:00am-7:3Opm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm m Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:OOpm m Saturday 8:00am-4:OOpm
Sunday-Closed Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm m Saturday & Sunday-Closed


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ales ------ restrict stock.


...................................... A
I ................................. WI WWW


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C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014