Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Fair: 2014 guidebook /Inside


Increasing clouds,
windy, 20%
chance of storms.
PAGE A4


TODAY
&next -:'
morning


MARCH 16, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 221


Woman dies, man
injured in crash in
Beverly Hills
An 82-year-old woman
died of injuries sustained
from a car accident Sat-
urday in Beverly Hills.
Verna Mae Vanwingen
of Beverly Hills was driv-
ing eastbound on West
Roosevelt Boulevard in
the area of North Chicka-
saw Way at approxi-
mately 2:15 p.m. on
Saturday when she lost
control of the 2000 Jeep
Cherokee she was driv-
ing while navigating a
curve in the road, accord-
ing to a Florida Highway
Patrol incident report.
The vehicle entered
the road's tree-lined me-
dian and careened into a
tree.
Vanwingen and her
passenger, 53-year-old
Thomas James Vanwin-
gen, also of Beverly Hills,
sustained injuries in the
crash and were trans-
ported to Citrus Memorial
hospital, where the elder
Vanwingen later perished.
Thomas Vanwingen's in-
juries were reported to be
minor.
Neither occupant was
wearing a seatbelt, ac-
cording to the report.
Damage to the vehicle is
estimated at $7,000. The
incident remains under
investigation.
Ugly backyard
could be worth
$10K makeover
If you have an ugly
back yard, it may be
worth $10,000 to you.
The Citrus County
Chronicle website is host-
ing a backyard makeover
contest.
Contestants must sub-
mit a photo of their back-
yard and tell why it is the
ugliest backyard in the
county and in need of a
makeover. To submit, go
to www.chronicleonline.
com/backyardmakeover
and sign in to the contest
and post your entry. Sub-
missions will be accepted
through March 23.
Readers will vote on
the entries March 24
through noon Saturday,
April 5. To vote, go to the
address above, sign in
and vote for your favorite
ugly backyard.
The winner will be an-
nounced at the Chroni-
cle's 2014 Home &
Outdoor Living Show Sat-
urday, April 5, at the Cit-
rus County Auditorium in
Inverness sometime fol-
lowing the close of voting
at noon.
-From staff reports



HOMEFRONT:
Smart art
IT Frames
open
from the
I front to
hold up
to 50
pieces of
I~I your
lttl
one s
art./HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ..............D4
Crossword ..............A18
Editorial ............... ... .C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ..............A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ....................A 18
Obituaries ..............A6
Together..................A25
Veterans ........ A20


6 1I8 0lJIJ8 I 071


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
With a crowd estimated at more than a thousand, the Dragon Boat Festival continued Saturday with the Antoinette Lempner,
St. Patrick's Day edition of the bi-annual Dragon Boat Race at Lake Hernando. pictured with Richard
Lempner, her husband of
Lu f t e 41 years, put her wedding
rings in the pocket of a pair
of jeans and accidentally
L c Of t e donated them to The Path
A AJ "Thrift Store in January.
S_ They've yet to be found,
lY~W and she is praying that
S |I somehoww they will show up.


UNLuljUI I U Lo


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO
t was Erin go Bragh or go
home Saturday as thou-
sands of spectators, com-
petitors and vendors
dressed in their finest St.
Patty's-themed boating attire at
the Lake Hernando Dragon
Boat Festival.
With a wee bit o' Irish charm,
teams from the southeastern
United States dragon boat cir-
cuit and local businesses and
organizations found Lake Her-
nando to be lucky
"We already won our first
heat," said Lona Woods, a mem-
ber of This Boat Rocks, a team


k.
..d
4, .4
~h1'iL, '~


Drummer Avalon Wolf, a senior at Crystal River High School, and fresh-
man port-side stroker Lee Longo high five after the Pirates won the
400-meter heat Saturday with a time of 1 minute, 39.94 seconds,
which was the fastest time of the day at that point.


from The Villages. "I have to say
that the location is beautiful.
Spectators have a great view of
the entire race. Plus, it does not


...* ~
1 -
*~' L.
* I.
I' .'~


take us that long to get here. It's
really a nice thing for the


See Page A5


S
* r~ L'Z~' I .a..s1EFuaL.&..I~Ih.g'~
4~ y


Dragon boats take off from the start line for a 400-yard race. Dragon boat races were conducted Saturday
at Lake Hernando as a part of the Dragon Boat Festival. Proceeds from the event will benefit the
Community Food Bank of Citrus County, according to Executive Director Tom Chancey.




Ren Renfro: 'A man of his word'


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -If
you've ever checked out a
library book, used a li-
brary computer, brought
your kids to story time or
attended a program at
any one of the Citrus
County Library System
branch libraries, then
thank Ren Renfro.
He and his late wife,
Shirley, had moved to
Crystal River in 1980
when Renfro, a retired


-.


U.S. Navy admiral, took
a job as director of nu-
clear operations at
Florida Power (now
Duke Energy).
"He always told the
same story, over and over
about how the library sys-
tem all started," said Eric
Head, CCLS director of


library services.
He found "six dinky li-
braries that were all
owned independently,"
Renfro told the Chronicle
in 2012.
Florida Power had had
a continuing education
program for employees,
but not one had signed


up. As Renfro investi-
gated, he discovered it
was because the libraries
were inadequate for re-
search resources or even
a place to study
"Ren always told me
that there weren't
enough resources here to
attract the types of peo-
ple that he wanted work-
ing at Florida Power,"
Head said. "He felt Citrus
County needed better li-
braries, and he's always


Page A8


Check


your


jeans


Couple gives

more than

theyplanned

to charity
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HERNANDO An-
toinette Lempner cries
every time she thinks
about it.
She wonders if she's
being materialistic, wor-
ries that her tears are triv-
ial and silly, crying over
lost jewelry
This past January, while
going through treatment
for breast cancer that left
her absentminded, she
misplaced her wedding
rings and just recently re-
membered what hap-
pened to them.
Thus, her heartbreak.
"I wasn't thinking
right," Lempner said
when she called the
Chronicle. "I was making
meatloaf and didn't want
to gum them up, so I took
them off."
Not wanting to leave
them on the counter, she
put all five rings, her wed-
ding set with a solitaire
and two bands welded to-
gether and two newer
rings, in the pocket of her
jeans.
Because her brain was
muddled, she forgot about
the rings in her pocket
and later hung the jeans
over a stepladder in her
closet and forgot about
them.
"I didn't even notice I
wasn't wearing them," she
said.
Time went by, and
See Page A6


Ukraine says Russian forces move outside Crimea


Associated Press

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine Russian
forces backed by helicopter gunships
and armored vehicles Saturday took con-
trol of a village near the border with
A pro-Russian soldier is silhouetted by
the sunset sky Saturday as he mans a
machine gun outside a Ukrainian military
base in Perevalne, Ukraine. Tensions are
high in the Black Sea peninsula of
Crimea, where a referendum is to be
conducted today about whether to split
off from Ukraine and seek annexation by
Russia.
Associated Press


Crimea on the eve of a referendum on
whether the region should seek annexa-
tion by Moscow, Ukrainian officials said.
The action in Strilkove appeared to be
the first move outside Crimea, where
Russian forces have been in effective
control since late last month. There were
no reports of gunfire or injuries. The in-
cident raises tensions already at a high
level before today's referendum.
In a statement, the Foreign Ministry
denounced the foray outside Crimea,
and said Ukraine "reserves the right to
use all necessary measures to stop the

See Page All


C ITRU S C 0 NT U TY






[If(oNICLE
^& www.chronicleonline.com


HIGH
79
LOW
63


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Death, defeat and tax cuts mark week in capital


BRANDON LARRABEE
News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE De-
spite all the action under-
way during the legislative
session over the last week,
the Capitol seemed like a
place stuck in past
decades.
The death of former Gov
Reubin Askew, one of the
most important figures in
Florida history, triggered
nostalgia for the days
when the teetotaling chief
executive worked to safe-
guard the environment, re-
pair scandal-tarnished courts
and open government
business to the public.
Askew passed away on
the same day that the
Florida Supreme Court
threw out a medical mal-
practice law approved by
the Legislature 11 years
ago and subject to con-
troversy ever since. Both
events came a couple of
days after former Florida
Chief Financial OfficerAlex
Sink, who first ran for state-
wide office in 2006, once
again stood before voters,
this time in a special con-
gressional election that was
instead won by Republi-
can lobbyist David Jolly
And while the Legisla-
ture spent the week on
present and future concerns,
GOP lawmakers devoted
much of their time to dis-
cussing one of the party's
favorite issues: Tax cuts.
The legislative session
isn't history yet not even
close but the week was
a reminder that even once
it has ended, its effects can
be felt for years.
'ONE OF THE
GREAT LEADERS'
With the exception of the
late Gov LeRoy Collins,
Askew is seen as perhaps
the most influential politi-
cian in Florida history
The prim, almost prudish
Democrat was first elected
in 1970, defeating incum-
bent Republican Claude
Kirk, the first GOP gover-
nor in the modern era.
Askew won again in 1974,
becoming the first gover-
nor in Florida history to be
elected to successive four-
year terms. (Many, though
not all, earlier governors
were barred from running


for more than one term, or
could only run for two-year
terms, depending on the
Constitution at the time.)
Florida was in the midst
of a population and devel-
opment boom when Askew
took over as chief execu-
tive. The state was still
grappling with racial ten-
sions prompted by the U.S.
Supreme Court decision
that put an end to school
segregation. The devoutly
religious Askew, born in
Muskogee, Okla., was on
the opposite side of many
other Southern politicians,
as well as many of his Pen-
sacola constituents, in his call
for racial reconciliation.
Askew clashed with con-
servatives over a "straw
poll" opposing school bus-
ing, offering his own pro-
posal asking voters if they
wanted to keep schools in-
tegrated. Neither was bind-
ing; both were approved.
The governor led a drive
to reform the state's judi-
cial system after two state
Supreme Court justices were
forced out of office. He
successfully pushed for a
constitutional amendment
requiring public officials
to disclose information
about their financial affairs
and forcing government
records into "the sunshine."
On the environment, Askew
backed legislation creating
water management dis-
tricts and requiring local
comprehensive planning.
"He was a visionary He
saw issues, whether they
were in areas of racial
fairness or educational op-
portunities or environmen-
tal protection, in a gener-
ational perspective, not just
what's going to be the best
position for the next elec-
tion. He led by his personal
example and by the wis-
dom of his ideas and the
strength of his passions,"
said former U.S. Sen. Bob
Graham, a Democrat who
also served as governor
Jeb Bush, Florida's first
Republican governor
elected to successive four-
year terms, also praised
Askew in a statement.
"Florida has lost one of
the great leaders who played
a pivotal role in shaping
the trajectory of our state
during a time of substantial
growth and change," Bush


said. "He led on con-
tentious issues, fought for
equality and did what he
believed was in the best in-
terests of Florida families.
Governor Askew always
put principle before poli-
tics, and I was fortunate to
know him, seek counsel
from him and learn from
his years of service."
'DISAPPOINTING,
AS USUAL' RULING
ON MED-MAL LAW
After more than a
decade of legislative and
legal battles, the Florida
Supreme Court had the
final say on a 2003 law lim-
iting damages in medical-
malpractice lawsuits. It
was unconstitutional, the
justices said in a 5-2 ruling.
The court sided with the
family of a Panhandle
woman who died of com-
plications after giving birth.
In doing so, justices also
sided indirectly with plain-
tiffs' lawyers who have
fiercely opposed limits on
so-called "non-economic
damages." Physicians and
insurance companies, who
have made a priority of rein-
ing in medical-malpractice
lawsuits, came outthe losers.
"At the present time, the
cap on non-economic dam-
ages serves no purpose
other than to arbitrarily
punish the most grievously
injured or their surviving
family members," Justice
R. Fred Lewis wrote.
The two most conserva-
tive justices dissented.
"This court has previously
recognized the existence
of a medical malpractice
insurance crisis as a legit-
imate state interest," Chief
Justice Ricky Polston
wrote. "Further, it is undis-
puted that increasing the
quality, availability and af-
fordability of health care
for Floridians is a legiti-
mate state interest. And
the Legislature's policy
choice of enacting a cap on
non-economic damages in
medical malpractice cases
is rationally related to
these state interests."
The ruling stemmed from
the February 2006 death of
20-year-old Michelle Mc-
Call, who gave birth to a
son at Fort Walton Beach
Medical Center but died


days later because of com-
plications from severe
bleeding.
Republicans, who have
often warred with the trial
bar over the years and
pushed the caps through
the Legislature in 2003,
were predictably upset by
Thursday's decision.
"Disappointing, as usual,
from them," Senate Rules
Chairman John Thrasher,
R-St Augustine, said when
asked about the ruling.
"But we'll see what we
have to do to address it."
JOLLY JOLLY;
SINK SINKS
While much of the state's
political and business es-
tablishment had been fo-
cused on the legislative
session underway in Talla-
hassee, the national media
and a handful of big-money
groups were zeroing in on
another corner of the state:
Pinellas County, where Sink
was attempting a come-
back and Jolly was looking
to move from K Street to
the U.S. Capitol.
In the end, Jolly won the
contentious and expensive
election on Tuesday to re-
place his former boss, the
late Republican Congress-
man C.W Bill Young. The
swingy district, which Young
and President BarackObama
both won in 2008 and 2012,
was monitored by strate-
gists and analysts looking
for tea leaves about the
November elections.
MO' MONEY,
MO' TAX CUTS
At a Wednesday meeting
in an obscure corner of the
Knott Building, state econ-
omists huddled and pre-
dicted that the state would
take in about $150 million
more over the next 16 months
than current estimates called
for It didn't take long for
House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, to decide where
the money would go.
"Obviously, a lot of it's
going to be spent on tax
cuts," he told reporters.
Lawmakers had already
set a goal of $500 million in
reductions in taxes and fees,


following a benchmark set
by Gov. Rick Scott last year
That overall number isn't
likely to change even with
the new revenue figures,
but it does give lawmakers
more wiggle room.
On Thursday, the Senate
Appropriations Committee
unanimously amended a
proposal (SB 156) by Chair-
man Joe Negron, R-Stuart,
to reduce the vehicle reg-
istration fees. Under the
revised proposal, motorists
would potentially save be-
tween $20 and $25 per ve-
hicle registration, depending
on the size of the vehicle.
The reduction would
collectively save motorists
about $309 million during
the upcoming 2014-15
budget year, with the new
rates going into effect
Sept. 1, and about $395
million the following fiscal
year, when they would be
in effect for the full 12
months starting July 1.
A similar House proposal
(PCB 14-04) was unani-
mously backed Thursday
by the House Finance and
Tax Subcommittee.


Other tax bills were also
moving. The Senate Com-
merce and Tourism Com-
mittee on Monday
unanimously supported a
measure (SB 792) by Sen.
Anitere Flores, R-Miami,
that would lift sales taxes
on clothes, school supplies
and electronics for three
days at the start of August.
And the Senate Commu-
nications, Energy and Pub-
lic Utilities Committee
approved a plan by Agri-
culture Commissioner
Adam Putnam (SB 1076) to
cut in half the sales tax
that businesses pay for
electricity and funnel
about half of it to an edu-
cation facilities program.
STORY OF THE WEEK:
Former Gov Reubin Askew
died at the age of 85.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
"I'm waiting on the day when
somebody gets indicted on
the Thursday before the
election, and they get elected
because everybody's already
voted and they can't get their
ballot back."- Sen. Jack
Latvala, R-Clearwater, on
the dangers of voting by mail.


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STATE


352-351-1883






SPage A3-SUNDAY, MARCH 16,2014



TATE.& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Vets Week meeting
set for Wednesday
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
conduct its initial planning
meeting for Citrus County's
22nd Veterans Appreciation
Week at 1:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 19, in the con-
ference room of the Citrus
County Chronicle building,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organ-
izations are encouraged to
send representatives to
participate in the planning
process. Individual veterans
are also welcome to partici-
pate. Call committee chair-
man Chris Gregoriou at
352-795-7000.
Waters Week
planning to begin
The Citrus 20/20 Inc.
Save Our Waters Week
Committee will meet at 10
a.m. Monday, March 17, in
Room 219 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to plan and coordinate
activities for Citrus County's
19th Save Our Waters
Week, Sept. 20 to 27. All in-
terested organizations and
individuals are welcome to
attend and encouraged to
participate. Call Lace Blue-
McLean at 352-201-0149.
The Citrus 20/20 Board
of Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m., Monday, March 17,
in Room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are urged to
attend.
Interested persons or or-
ganizations are invited to
attend. For more informa-
tion about Citrus 20/20 Inc.,
visit citrus2020.org or call
352-201-0149.
MOPH meeting
scheduled Tuesday
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will
conduct its bimonthly meet-
ing at 1 p.m. Tuesday,
March 18, at the Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491),
Lecanto, approximately a
half-mile south of State
Road 44 on the west side of
C.R. 491.
All combat-wounded vet-
erans and parents, lineal
descendants, spouses and
siblings of living or deceased
Purple Heart recipients are
invited to attend the meeting
and become a member.
To learn more, visit
citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.

Miami
Crime Stoppers chief
eats evidence
A Crime Stoppers admin-
istrator was found in con-
tempt of court after eating a
piece of paper a Miami-
Dade County circuit judge
ordered turned over.
The Miami Herald re-
ported that Judge Victoria
R. Brennan ordered
Richard Masten to turn over
information gained from a
tip, but Crime Stoppers pol-
icy guarantees anonymity.
Masten, who oversees the
nonprofit organization, re-
fused and ate the paper in
court, saying the identity of
the tipster could be deter-
mined.
The information concerned
a case in which a Hialeah
woman named Lissette Al-
varez, 45, was arrested on
a cocaine possession
charge. Alvarez's lawyer,
Jean Michel D'Escoubet,


said the information is im-
portant to the defense and
they are not interested in
the identity of the tipster.
Masten faces 14 days in
jail if he doesn't cooperate
by Thursday.
-From staff and wire reports


Property appraiser: Duke case, values firming up

Les Cook says foreclosure filings down, sales values up, county financially stable'


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
BEVERLY HILLS -
The county's property ap-
praiser for the past two
months, Les Cook, gave an
update Wednesday about
Duke Energy's lawsuit to
challenge its assessment.
Cook also told the Citrus
County Council, an um-
brella organization that
represents homeowners,
associations and taxpay-
ers, that property sales val-
ues have increased.
"With the early look at
the sales in the county,
we're seeing some stabil-
ity," Cook said. "Some of
the areas that are deed-
restricted, some of the
gated communities,
they're showing some pos-
itive signs. Pine Ridge is
showing some increase in
both sales and in some
new construction activity"
Citrus Springs and Bev-


early Hills had been hard Thatwould include changes
hit during the past five of ownership for any rea-
years, Cook said, but sale son whatsoever"
prices in those neighbor- The foreclosure filings
hoods were beginning to peaked in 2009 at about
stabilize. 2,001 notices of foreclosure.
Another positive sign of "Now they dropped
a strengthening from 1,935 in 2012
economy was the to 1,160 last year,"
number of permits Cook said. "The
applied for and is- sales of foreclo-
sued, which had sures are steady,
risen, but the number of
"We've got dou- filings is going
ble-digit increases down."
in permit activity Cook said he
in both residential Les Cook hoped this would
and non-residen- spoke to the mean that the tax
tial construction," Citrus County roll would be more
Cook said. "That's Council, a stabilized for resi-
a good sign for our citizens' group dential values.
local economy" representing His next topic
Total sales vol- homeowners was Duke Energy
ume was up about and taxpayers. "I am a princi-
34 percent over last year pal in that, so that I can be
"That's a huge amount of depositioned at any time,"
activity," Cook said. "When Cook said. "So anything I say,
you look at total transfers, I have to be very careful."
we're up around 9,000 to The trial is set for May
close to 12,000 transfers. 19.


"We did have some me-
diation on a March date,"
Cook said. "That's been
postponed. But the reason
is positive in that we are
exchanging information on
appraisals that were done
by the utility Also, revised
information that we've
provided. It's an undeter-
mined date as to when
there will be a mediation,
but the fact that we are ex-
changing information, I
see that as a good sign."
The judge ruled against
the county government tak-
ing part in the legal action
and against the property
appraiser in its application
of law in the assessment.
"In defending the tax
law and the values, it's im-
portant that we challenge
every legal question be-
fore we allow this value to
be taken off the roll," Cook
said. "I just wanted to let
you know that it's moving
forward."


During his 63 days in of-
fice so far, Cook said, he
has gone back over all the
documents filed, the rul-
ings by the judge and
appraisals.
"That's the No. 1 task that
I've laid out for stabilizing
the office," Cook said.
Cook took questions and
gave an answer that he was
cautiously optimistic about
the outcome of the court case.
The property appraiser's
data provided to county
government for its budget
was based on the worst-case
scenario, according to Cook
"Our county should be
financially stable regard-
less of the outcome of the
litigation," Cook said.
"They took advisement on
our worst-case numbers
and that was a prudent
thing to do, in my opinion."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormerat
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


WAR STORY

MAJ. MARK ANTHONY COOPER (GEORGE MOOR), ABOVE, COMMANDS HIS TROOPS
in the re-enactment of the Second Seminole War at Fort Cooper State Park on Saturday. The event was
a part of the entertainment during the Fort Cooper Days, which included living history demonstrations,
arts and craft booths and food and refreshment. The re-enactment will continue today with performances at
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.


A Seminole Indian (Hawkwood Kenny of Seffner) takes cover
behind a tree. The costumes used during the re-enactment are
as true to the period as possible, according to participant and
Safety Director Steven Creamer.


Program helps residents save on drugs


Veterinary medicine

also covered
Special to the Chronicle
County residents without pre-
scription coverage can save money
prescriptions through the NACo
Prescription (Free) Discount Card
program.
Even if an individual has pre-
scription insurance coverage, they
may still benefit from the discount
card since it may save money on pre-
scriptions that an existing plan does


not cover Just present the card
when picking up prescriptions to get
the best possible price available.
The card is provided through a
joint effort between Citrus County
and the National Association of
Counties (NACo).
Print a card or pick one up at a
local library or community center
and present the discount card at a
participating retail pharmacy along
with the prescriptionss, and save an
average of 24 percent on prescrip-
tion drugs. There are no limits on
how many times the card can be
used. This card can be used for the
whole family, including pets. If a pet


is prescribed a medication that is
also used for humans, ask your vet-
erinarian for a prescription to use at
a participating pharmacy There are
no claim forms to fill out and no
membership fees.
Residents can visit www.caremark.
com/naco to learn about the dis-
count program, print out a personal-
ized ID card for themselves, or
access other program tools. Savings
are available immediately at any
participating pharmacy
For more information, call Deb
Bloss at 352-341-6429 or visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
naco.htm.


Campaign
TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, ap-
pearances and the like for
the 2014 political campaign.
Send information to mwright@
chronicleonline. com.
Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 2, will meet the public
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 20, at the Rustic
Ranch restaurant in Inverness.
For more information, call
Kitchen at 352-302-6313.


Maj. Cooper's troops advance on the Seminole Indians in an ef-
fort to drive them from their fort, which is under construction.
The Second Seminole War spanned six years, from December
1835 to August 1842.




A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday This year will present pro-
fessional opportunities and personal
problems. Explain to the important peo-
ple in your life what your plans are and
how much of your time is required to see
them through. Emotional upsets can be
avoided if you share your dreams,
hopes and wishes.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You will
need to tread lightly. You will face hyper-
sensitive people looking for a battle.
Find some solitary activity to keep you
out of trouble.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If some-
one criticizes you, consider why. Your
reputation could be damaged if you
aren't giving your best.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Strive to
listen to any advice offered you. Although
it may not be what you want to hear,
give any suggestions a fair chance.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Try to sur-
round yourself with good friends and
steadfast allies. You may be subject to
criticism if you go against the grain.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You need
to laugh more. Gather with good friends
and family for some light entertainment.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Many learning
tools are available to you. Atrip to an ex-
otic location will be enlightening.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't let
your emotions get the better of you. Deal
with others in a non-confrontational manner.
Logic and reason will advance your cause
more than harsh words or accusations.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You may
feel a temptation to be a couch potato.
Get together with a friend and do some-
thing active instead.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Reckless
spending and extravagant purchases
will not win over the people you are
dealing with. You can't buy respect.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Inter-
actions with family members will be diffi-
cult. Remove yourself from potential
conflicts by getting together with friends.
Given enough time, thorny issues will
dissipate.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Make
financial matters your priority. Scrutinize
your paperwork to be sure that you have
all the pertinent documents. You may
uncover a new way to limit your
expenses.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You'll
experience an emotional tug-of-war.
Take an unbiased look at your personal
relationships. Perhaps someone isn't as
attentive as you'd like. Make your feel-
ings known calmly and sincerely


ENTERTAINMENT


Comedian Brenner,
'Tonight' favorite, dies
LOS ANGELES David
Brenner, the lanky, toothy-grinned
"Tonight Show"' favorite whose
brand of observational comedy
became a staple for other standups,
including Jerry Seinfeld and
Paul Reiser, died Saturday. He
was 78.
Brenner, who had been fighting
cancer, died peacefully at his home
in New York City with his family
at his side, according to Jeff
Abraham, his friend and publicist.
The tall, thin and always
sharply dressed Brenner be-
came one of the most frequent
visitors to Johnny Carson's
"Tonight" in the 1970s and '80s.
His 150-plus appearances as
guest and substitute host turned
the former documentary film-
maker into a hot comedian, one
who was ubiquitous on other talk
shows and game shows.
He also briefly hosted his own
syndicated talk show in 1987 and
starred in four HBO specials.
Brenner moved with the times,
trading routines about the humor
of everyday life for jokes about
social and political issues, and
appearing on MSNBC and Fox
News Channel cable programs.
Brenner, who was raised in
working-class south Philadelphia
and graduated with honors from
Temple University, was "always
there helping a bright young co-
median, whether it be Richard
Lewis, Freddie Prinze or Jimmie
Walker, and he was still doing it
until the very end," Abraham said.
Decades ago, he had burned
out on filmmaking "You don't
change the world by doing docu-
mentaries," he told "CBS Sun-
day Morning" in 2013 and
decided to give comedy a try. He
was on the verge of quitting
when his effort to impress talent
bookers at "Tonight" worked.


Associated Press
Comedian David Brenner is pictured July 13, 1977. Publicist
Jeff Abraham announced Brenner had died Saturday at the age
of 78.


His career soared after his first
appearance in January 1971. He
went from being nearly broke to
overwhelmed by a then-hefty
$10,000 in job offers the day
after he was on the show.
He also recalled how hard
Carson made him work on 'Tonight,"
asking Brenner to do a monologue
each time he appeared. Other
veteran comics headed straight for
the couch to banter with the host.
Carson's explanation was "I
like to sit back, smoke a ciga-
rette and laugh for six minutes,"
Brenner recalled.
In a 1995 interview with the
AP, Brenner imagined a different
path with "Tonight."
"I really believe that had ...
Johnny Carson retired in the
early '80s, then I would be sitting


behind that desk," he said. "I
don't think there's any doubt."
Brenner wrote five books, in-
cluding the post-9/11 "I Think
There's a Terrorist in My Soup,"
published in 2003. His last HBO
special, "David Brenner: Back
with a Vengeance," debuted live
in 2000.
In a statement, his family said
he left a last laugh: A final re-
quest that $100 in small bills be
placed in his left sock "just in
case tipping is recommended
where I'm going."
Besides son Cole, Brenner is
survived by his wife, Ruth, sons
Wyatt and Slade and a grand-
son, Wesley. Funeral plans were
not immediately announced.

-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 16, the
75th day of 2014. There are 290
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 16, 1964, President
Lyndon B. Johnson sent Congress the
Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 as
part of his War on Poverty. (The meas-
ure was passed by Congress, and was
signed by Johnson in August 1964.)
On this date:
In A.D. 37, Roman emperor Tiberius
died; he was succeeded by Caligula.
In 1521, Portuguese navigator
Ferdinand Magellan reached the
Philippines, where he was killed by
natives the following month.
In 1802, President Thomas Jeffer-
son signed a measure authorizing
the establishment of the U.S. Military
Academy at West Point, N.Y
In 1935, Adolf Hitler decided to
break the military terms set by the
Treaty of Versailles by ordering the
rearming of Germany.
In 1968, during the Vietnam War,
the My Lai Massacre of Vietnamese
civilians was carried out by U.S.
Army troops; estimates of the death
toll vary between 347 and 504.
In 1994, figure skater Tonya Hard-
ing pleaded guilty in Portland, Ore.,
to conspiracy to hinder prosecution
for covering up an attack on rival
Nancy Kerrigan, avoiding jail but
drawing a $100,000 fine.
Five years ago: Joining a wave of
public anger, President Barack
Obama blistered insurance giantAIG
for "recklessness and greed" for
handing its executives $165 million in
bonuses after taking billions in fed-
eral bailout money.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian-
director Jerry Lewis is 88. Game
show host Chuck Woolery is 73.
Actor Erik Estrada is 65. Rock
singer-musician Nancy Wilson
(Heart) is 60. Rapper-actor Flavor
Flav (Public Enemy) is 55. Actor
Judah Friedlander is 45. Actress
Brooke Burns is 36. Rock musician
Wolfgang Van Halen is 23.
Thought for Today: "Nearly all
our disasters come from a few fools
having the 'courage of their convic-
tions.'" Coventry Patmore, English
poet (1823-1896).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H I
Daytona Bch. 81
Fort Lauderdale 82
Fort Myers 85
Gainesville 80
Homestead 83
Jacksonville 78
Key West 81
Lakeland 84
Melbourne 83


L F'cast City
69 pc Miami
74 pc Ocala
69 f Orlando
59 pc Pensacola
73 pc Sarasota
59 cd Tallahassee
74 pc Tampa
67 f Vero Beach
72 DC W. Palm Bch.


H L F'cast
84 73 pc
80 63 pc
84 68 pc
67 54 ts
81 67 pc
73 63 ts
80 68 pc
82 71 pc
83 73 pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


INA/48 0.00" INANA 0.O'
THREE DAY OUTLOOK a lly
-I .., I -, "TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
J. High: 790 Low: 63-
..s S rIncreasing clouds, getting windy. 20%
q____ chance of evening storms

o MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
0MA0 High:71 LOW:57
SShowers and storms, windy, rain chance
.00% 800 C
- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
-" High: 69 Low: 49
~"' < Decveasing clouds
...ALMANAC
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 77/57
Record /35
Normal 76/58
Mean temp. 62
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION* .o
Saturday 0.00


Today: Southeast then South winds
10 to 20 knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay
and inland waters becoming choppy.
Tonight: South winds 10 to 20 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters choppy.


Gulf water
temperature


68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.71 28.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.42 38.43 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.49 39.51 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.19 40.21 42,20
Levels reported m feelt above sea leve Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood,
the mean-amual tncd which h has a 43-preemt eane of being equaled of exceeded in
T HrO, ..N[f ,r"l T, a[,. -, i.T i ,r,nF I F 1watr. ".lrCT,,Snl D'[i,
tI11,t -? d'.H IN miqIO.N- I" I it w r I M- 3 :rf If v- -V
t-. l,,t.- [~r d ., .~iru .'1 ail- L i-nr f l i.,y -. rl:,, 1 j5 :, 1 1 ,iu l"- -ri 4I->"..

THE NATION


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 53
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 810
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 1.44" Oak, juniper, nettle
Total for the year 6.39' Today's count: 9.2/12
Normal for the year 6.48' ona' .
*As o01 7 pm at invernws Monday's count: 7.6
UV INDEX: 9 Tuesday's count: 9.7
0-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed; 44
30.13 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES "15S
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING il (AFTERNOON)
03/16 SUNDAY 06:23 23:43 18:51 12:07
03/17 MONDAY 06:59 00:27 19:47 12:52
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SM1ISTTOUNIGHT ...................... 7:38 p.m
4 0 4 /f) SRISE TOMO ..... -7:36 a.m.
) WMOONRISE TODAY 7 250 p m
Mar16 Mar23 Mar30 Apr7 MONSET TODAY7 21 a n
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Divison of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
*1ll-C.,'n ri.I')in ni :i jujhl Cl.llllsl ll [Ird .''vhif irl?; Do-,rin ,l For.l Ir\ S Vitb ,l?
,ri)p .'li 1ne II 1 'I *:.,in',re Atfain i H:di
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week. before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.. as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday andror Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday,
Hard aTerng v itn a shul-otl i- rzzle cr rMicro jmrgatjn of rnon-grass ay.as such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
time.
Cilru_ Gounty IJhJlTrS' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To rnsprt .KxIizi'hns pief.se call City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, C.i of CrvsIa
River 352-795-4216 exid. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.


'From mouths oft rivers


city
Chassahowdzka"
Crystal RWer"
Withlacochee'
Homosassa""


7:37 a.m,
5:48 a-m
2:53 a m
7:00 am


SAT
City H L Pep. H
Albany 46 39 22
Albuquerque 55 37 57
Ashevllle 66 36 46
Atlanta 68 50 .02 60
Atlantic Cty 63 43 43
Austin 73 62 07 61
Baltimore 66 50 41
Billngs 50 36 62
Birmingham 66 55 69
Boise 42 30 68
Boston 57 38 .01 33
Buffalo 42 33 .06 17
Burlington, VT 44 38 18
Charleston, S.C. 73 50 70
Charleston, W.V. 63 50 40
Chardolte 73 48 51
Chicago 40 29 27
Cincinnalu 60 38 33
Cleveland 46 36 .02 23
Columbia, SC 72 36 32
Columbus, OH 53 37 .02 31
Concord, NH 50 32 26
Dallas 68 60 49
Denver 48 35 60
Des Moines 51 33 34
Detroit 41 36 25
El Paso 70 48 .02 62
Evansville, IN 66 33 33
Harmsburg 57 48 37
HartFord 55 37 31
Houston 68 62 .19 70
Indianapolis 55 32 31
Las Vegas 78 62 80
Utile Rock 65 50 59
Los Angeles 81 54 88
Louisville 67 41 38
Memphis 68 45 61
Milwaukee 39 30 23
Minneapolis 30 21 25
Mobile 64 53 .04 73
Montgomery 68 51 70
Nashville 68 45 48


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

SUN SAT SUN
LFest City H L Pep. H L PFcst
6 s New Orleans 69 60 74 5O is
35 s New York City 58 44 36 21 pc
36 r Norfolk 71 51 48 35 r
52 is Oklahoma City 63 48 43 28 sh
24 pc Omaha 61 28 39 24 pc
38 sh Palm Springs 89 57 85 61 s
26 sn Philadelphia 63 45 40 24 pc
36 pc Phoenix 86 55 83 56 s
45 Is Pittsburgh 55 38 .03 31 20 cd
42 pc Portland, ME 47 35 27 5 pc
19 pc Portland, OR 65 40 57 41 r
9 pc Providence. Rl 59 37 04 35 18 pc
1 pc Raleigh 72 46 49 34 r
47 ts RapidCity 43 34 .01 63 37 pc
27 sn Reno 69 35 74 43 pc
35 r Rochester, NY 44 35 06 18 8 fi
13 pc Sacramento 80 50 80 47 s
24 sn Salt LakeCily 55 43 65 43 pc
14 cd SanAntonio 80 64 .02 65 41 pc
17 I San Diego 74 57 81 58 s
21 cd San Francisco 75 51 63 52 s
3 pc Savannah 70 47 7352sh
33 r Seattle 59 45 .01 53 40 r
35 pc Spokane 51 31 56 39 r
19 pc St. Louis 72 36 32 18 1I
7 pc St. Ste.Made 30 12 .06 12 -9 s
38 pc Syracuse 46 34 .05 17 5 9
24 1 Topeka 75 33 40 22 sn
22 cd Washington 70 50 43 27 sn
15 pc YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
41 pc HIGH Q91 t.Tima.Ca,.
17 pC LOW -14. CraneLake. Mn,
53 s
29 r WORLD CITIES
57 s
7 I SUN Lisbon 68/48&s
31 is CITY H/ISKY London 62/44/cd
S Acapulco 84/71/s Madrid 71/35/s
i16 pc Amsterdam 53/46/pc Mexico City 80/55/s
47 i Athens 62148/s Montreal 39/6fr
49 is Beijing 69/37/pc Moscow 48/33/pc
32 sh Berlin 51/42/pc Paris 60/42/cd


Bermuda 62/e0/oc
KEY TO CONDffIONSM cloudy dr dr. Cairo 6 pc
Maihn h-haM pc-p >tly cloudy; r-rain; Calgary 48/37/pc
rairanianew mix; sumhn hshwers Havana 82(59/s
sfnl-sW tsU-thnderstams w-winy. Hong Kong 66(60/pc
WSI 1c 4 Jerusalem 6f46/pc


RiO
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


89/75/pc
66/411S
62141is
37/12/pc
4a("r


S1LEGAL NOTICES




Bid Notices.....................................D6

Meeting Notices.............................D6

Lien Notices...................................D6

Miscellaneous Notices..................D6

Self Storage Notices ......................D6


_C i o C IuTRUS C OUNTY


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


TIDES
'At Kings Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
High Low
0.51t. 7:33pm, 0.51 1:53am, 0.1 t. 2:22p.mD.2ft
221t. 5-58p.m 21 11 12:04am 0.2tt 12:28p.nA.3
3.211. 3:03p.m 3,41 9;41 am 01fOlf t. tp11pO-2
1 1I. 6:49pm 1311t 1:47am 00 ftt l:40pm0.2H.







Motorcyclist in accident on S.R. 44 Friday


Staff report
A motorcyclist with indeterminate in-
juries was transported to Ocala Regional
Medical Center on Friday afternoon after
he tried to avoid a vehicle turning in his


path in Lecanto, according to a Florida
Highway Patrol accident report
Joseph Aversano, 62 of Beverly Hills,
was driving his 2003 Ultra Classic Harley
Davidson motorcycle westbound
on the outside lane on State Road 44


when an unknown vehicle traveling
east turned left onto South
Kensington Avenue as Aversano was
approaching.
Reportedly, Aversano locked up his
brakes and slid through the intersection


and then overturned the vehicle onto its
left side.
Aversano was wearing a helmet; how-
ever, he was transported by ambulance to
hospital for treatment
Further investigation is pending.


Back in the saddle in Dunnellon


Women follow

dream, take up

riding lessons
AUGIE SALZER
For the Riverland News

women have decided
not to let age or illness
keep them from fulfill-
ing their lifelong dream of
horseback riding.
Judy Capone remembers hav-
ing a pony when she was
younger, but could never get
him under control.
"I've always loved horses,"
Capone said. "I've wanted to
learn to ride for a long time, but
it just didn't happen."
Capone's husband has been
very sick since August and is
now in a nursing home. Also,
her 70th birthday was fast ap-
proaching and she didn't know
what to do.
Then one day while eating in
one of Dunnellon's restaurants,
she overheard a man talking to
the waitress about his ranch
and all his horses.
"I went over to talk to him
and he gave me his card,"
Capone said. "It was Jim
Moore, the owner of Happy
Acres Ranch, and I knew then
it was meant to be."
The time to make her dream
come true had arrived. She
started taking horseback riding
lessons as a birthday present to
herself.
The second woman, Ginny
Barr, 67, has also dreamed of
being able to ride a horse for as
long as she could remember


seer
adrE
BOATS .
theit
Continued from Page Al ish 1
"V
community to host for us." sore
More than 50 teams in- his
vaded the banks of Lake ever
Hernando. Some teams mus
dominated in 40-foot-long SI
crafts with their 20 pad- Cou:
dlers and a drummer syn- mer
chronizing their strokes. High
Half the load, but just as the f
mighty, teams of 10 pad- exp(
dlers and a drummer also spec
maneuvered the smaller "I
boats through the water tean
Pushing with their legs, and
they leaned forward with tion.
their bodies and dug their varin.
paddles deep into the for t
water with their arms. Boal
Working the core of their thin
bodies, water splashed out
their teammates behind and
them. However, no one day


AUGIE SALZER/For the Riverland News
Sandy Grenz, left, instructor at Happy Acres Ranch, has been working with Dunnellon residents Linda
Porter, Ginny Barr and Judy Capone as the three women have hopped back in the saddle to learn how to
ride. Their equine "training partner" is Joe St., center. Porter, an accomplished rider, quit riding after
being diagnosed with a rare and debilitating illness that has left her struggling with balance and a sore
back. But a few months ago, when Porter was talking to Barr and Capone at a craft show at church, the
two were telling her how much fun they were having on the horses and talked her into trying to ride.


Loving everything about horses,
she was reading inspirational
stories about life in the saddle
in the book "Horse Sense." Her
husband, knowing of his wife's
dream, one day came home
with information about taking a
vacation at a dude ranch in
Colorado.
"There I was, reading 'Horse
Sense.' and Tom (her husband)
brought home the brochure on
the dude ranch," Barr remem-
bered with a smile. "It was
something I've always wanted

ned to mind as their
enaline raced and
r focus was on the fin-
line. tea
Vow, my body is so
," said one paddler to comic
teammate. "I didn't i"
n know I had those imp(
cles in my body" gets
)onsored by the Citrus
nty Chamber of Comn-
ce, Citrus County and
i Five Dragon Boat,
festival brought an un-
ected amount of Compet
4tators. Cme
near and
t's a giant community traveling
i-building kind of day, Jacksonvi
community recogni-
," said Christine Cane- OH
, director of marketing
;he High Five Dragon Why
t. "The most important
g is that everyone gets i mp
together and has fun %
enjoys the beautiful
on the water"


KNEE PAIN?

i


-^. .i


Attend a FREE Seminar:





Ocala
Quality Inn
3434 SW College Rd.

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


* Largo Medical Center
SA Teaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


to do. It all came together It
was meant to be."
Having very limited riding
experience, Barr decided to
take some lessons before going
on her dream vacation she
also picked the Happy Acres
Ranch.
Linda Porter, 61, the third
lady in the group, is an accom-
plished rider and had her own
horse on a small farm she
owned in Tallahassee. She
moved to Dunnellon in 2000 to
be with her family



It's a giant community
im-building kind of day,
unity recognition. The
ortant thing is that ever
out together and has fu
enjoys the beautiful day
Christine Ca
director of marketing, High Five Dre


itors haled from
far, with teams
from as far as
lie and Broward


County In the C
Division, Citru:
was represented
nesses, neighbor


'About four years ago, my
horse died of old age after a long
and happy life," Porter said. "I
decided then that I wouldn't own
another horse, because of all the
expenses involved."
In 2006, she also came down
with a rare and debilitating ill-
ness which has left her strug-
gling with balance and a sore
back.
A few months ago, she was
talking to Barr and Capone at a
craft show at church. The two
were telling her how much fun

sociations, civic orgar
ty tions, schools, the Nati
Guard and the sheriff'
and fice. Local dragon
clubs also participated
most "The teams have d
yone rated everything f
n their tents to themseb
n and Canevari said. "It's jt
beautiful sight, when
1. have all of these pec
just hanging out togeti
inevari Growth of the spol
gon Boat.recent years has spaw
community a circuit that started
s County weekend in Tampa
id by busi- runs through fall, w
rhood as- ping up back at Lake ]


they were having on the horses
and talked her into trying to
ride.
"I didn't think I could ride
again," Porter said. "I went to
one of Barr's lessons and was
so impressed with Sandy
(Grenz, the trainer). I wish I
had her as a trainer when I was
younger She is so patient and
she makes it fun for me to ride
again."
Grenz is the horse trainer
and instructor at the Happy
Acres Ranch, where she spe-
cializes in teaching and train-
ing dressage.
"I always stress safety first
when training," Grenz said. "I
love teaching because it gives
me a sense of accomplishment"
The horses used to teach the
riders are calm, older, experi-
enced and well-trained. They are
all well-groomed and healthy
"We set up the riding lesson
for the teens to enjoy, but the
seniors seem to be more inter-
ested," owner Moore said. 'As
long as they enjoy it, then they
will come back."
The ladies are enjoying their
time riding and continue to re-
turn for the lessons and trail
rides. Porter has spent the last
few months "refreshing my
skills," Barr still feels "like a
beginner" and Capone's New
Year's resolution is to be happy
every day, and riding is "the
one thing I make sure I have
time for every week."
They all agree that there is
some kind of horse magic
around.
"There is something about
being on a horse, in the barn
with them and just being
around horses that makes you
happy," Porter said. "That is the
horse magic."


aiza- nando in November and
onal concluding with Tampa in
s of- December
boat In addition to the races,
d. spectators enjoyed festival
eco- activities with more than
from 45 vendors, kids' play area,
es," live music and hot dogs,
ist a burgers and adult bever-
you ages sold at the Inverness
ople Elks Lodge.
her" A portion of the pro-
rt in ceeds from the festival
vned benefit Second Harvest
last Food Bank.
and Contact Chronicle re-
rap- porter Eryn Worthington
Her- at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 AS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries-


Jackie Dishong
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jackie (Mary lone
Meeks) Dishong passed
away March 13, 2014, in
Crystal River, Fla., after a
short illness.
She was the youngest of
eight children born to
Avarilla and George
Meeks. Jackie was born in
Gulf Hammock, Fla., and
raised in Williston.
Jackie married John
Dishong of Arcadia. They
moved to Miami, where
they owned and managed
a bus station and travel
agency until retiring to
Crystal River
She was active in the
community of Crystal
River and most especially
in the First United
Methodist Church. Family
was very important to
Jackie. In her later years,
she stayed in touch by
phoning and note-writing.
She also drove to Ocala to
visit her sisters, nieces and
nephews. For the sake of
her safety, her nieces got
her a cellphone to carry
with her on her outings.
Jackie is survived by one
sister, Jeannette Meeks
Barton; one stepson, John
David, and his children,
Jay and Sha; and numer-
ous nieces and nephews,
all of who have been privi-
leged to know and share
many good times together
Services for Jackie will
be at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
March 18, at First United
Methodist Church in Crys-
tal River with the Rev
David Rawls, officiating.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Jennifer 'Jenni'
Williams, 35
LECANTO
Jennifer Suzanne
"Jenni" Williams, 35, of
Lecanto, Fla., was wel-
comed
c o m e d -E^ -
home by
Jesus on
Thursday,
March 13, ,
2014,
under the
care of
Hospice of
C i t r u s Jennifer
County A Williams
P e n t e -
costal, she was known for
sharing her faith, praise
and worship. She was an
inspiration to all who knew
her Jenni was born in
Goldsboro, N.C., and lived
in San Diego and San Jose,
Calif. Jenni was a UNC
Tarheel fan and a No. 1
San Francisco 49ers fan.
Jennifer is survived by
her loving parents Ron
and Susan Williams of
Beverly Hills, Fla.; her
maternal grandmother,
Virginia Sellars of Her-
nando, Fla.; brothers Troy
Williams of Graham, N.C.,
and Tim Williams of Her-
nando, Fla., and Tim's
daughter, Cierra Williams
of Bradenton, Fla.; and
several uncles, aunts and
cousins.
A visitation is scheduled
from 6 until 8 p.m. Monday,
March 17, with a worship
service at 7 p.m. at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Fla. Private in-
ternment will occur at Oak
Hill Cemetery, Inverness.
Donation may be made in
Jennifer's name to the
Make a Wish Foundation
at www.wish.org.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


Michael
Kinder, 64
FLORAL CITY
Michael M. Kinder, age
64, Floral City, died Friday,
March 14, 2014. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.

Marie
Haspel, 82
DUNNELLON
Marie Haspel, 82, of
Dunnellon, Fla., passed
away March 8, 2014, in


Winches-
ter, Va.
Marie was
born in
Brooklyn
and moved
to Long Is-
land, N.Y,
where she
worked for
the town
of Brook-


LA
Marie
Haspel


haven payroll department.
She retired to St. Croix
with her husband and be-
came executive director of
the St. Croix Hotel Associ-
ation. She later moved to
Florida and taught quilt-
ing and purse making at
A.White Sewing. She was a
certified Eleanor Burnes
quilting instructor She
earned the prestigious
title of teacher, becoming
proficient at Japanese em-
broidery known as bunka.
Marie enjoyed knitting
and reading. She had a
book dedicated to her by
one of her favorite writers,
Debbie Macomber Marie
especially loved cruising
and traveling. She was a
Moose member, also.
Marie embraced and cele-
brated life with a vivacious
and expressive personal-
ity She was well loved and
respected. Marie will
surely be missed.
Surviving are a daugh-
ter, Annette Mannino and
husband Albert; a sister,
Rose Golsner and husband
Fred; and four stepchil-
dren, Kirk, Gary, Brad
Haspel and Cheryl
Franzreb. She was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band William, parents
Anna and Giro and daugh-
ter Linda.
A private celebration of
her life was Saturday,
March 15, 2014, at her
daughter's home in Win-
chester, Va. A public me-
morial service will be at
1 p.m. Saturday, March 29,
2014, at First United
Methodist Church, 21501
W Highway 40, Dunnellon,
Fla., with a celebration of
her life gathering to follow
immediately in the church
event room. Burial will be
April 2, 2014, at Florida
National Cemetery, Bush-
nell, Fla. Memorial contri-
butions can be made to
Operation Welcome Home,
Box 1046 Inverness, FL
34451, or a veteran's organ-
ization of your choice.
There is a tribute wall and
guestbook at wwwomps
funeralhome.com.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs! '


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. in'i
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhom


Douglas
Melanson, 46
BEVERLY HILLS
Douglas Melanson, 46,
passed away peacefully
March 13,
2014, at
the Hos-
p i c e
House in 1F
Lecanto, i
Fla. Doug 1 ._.-" '
was born
in Salem, ,
M a s s., Douglas
Aug. 27, Melanson
1967. He
graduated from Mas-
conomet High School in
1985. He was a contractor
and developer He spent
many years as a home
builder in Massachusetts
and New Hampshire be-
fore moving to Florida.
Doug's talent and pride
were obvious in the devel-
opment of Sandy Oaks RV
Resort in Beverly Hills.
His vision created a beau-
tiful wintertime home for
so many
Doug enjoyed family
time and providing a lov-
ing, fun-filled home life to
his children and wife. He
was close to his entire fam-
ily and will be deeply
missed by all.
Doug is survived by his
children Bradley and
Danielle Melanson; his
wife, Anne Melanson and
her children, Brooke and
Summer Armstrong; his
mother and stepfather, Pa-
tricia and Dennis
Rozumek; his father and
stepmother, Lionel and
Sandra Melanson; his
three brothers, Mark
Melanson, Greg Melanson
and Jeff (Shuri) Melanson;
his sister, Karen (Dan)
Mosman; and loving aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews
and other relatives. Doug
is preceded in death by his
brother, David Rozumek.
There will be a celebra-
tion of life Ceremony at
6 p.m. Monday, March 17,
2014, at Sandy Oaks RV
Resort Clubhouse in Bev-
erly Hills. All friends and
family are welcome. Also,
a Catholic Mass will be cel-
ebrated in Middleton,
Mass., at a later date. Mid-
dleton will also be Doug's
final resting place.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

FREE OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


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Associated Press
The newest Goodyear blimp was introduced Friday at Goodyear's airship base.


Goodyear unveils its next

generation of blimp, seeks name


Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio The next generation
of the well-known Goodyear blimp is
getting ready to take flight as the com-
pany moves toward replacing its old
fleet of airships with a new trio.
The helium-filled airship, assembled
at an Akron-area hangar and unveiled
there Friday, is bigger, quicker and more
maneuverable than earlier models,
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. said.
The 246-foot airship fits 12 passengers
and has a semi-rigid internal skeleton, a
feature that wasn't present in earlier
models and raises questions about
whether it is truly a blimp, though the
company still refers to it as such. The
structure is covered by a silver, balloon-
like body emblazoned with Goodyear's
yellow logo on a blue background.
It can travel at up to 73 mph and has
custom computer-controlled avionics,
an upgrade from the manual flight sys-
tem used by the blimp pilots since the
1920s, the company said. It plans to
build two more.
A spokesman wouldn't specify the cost



JEANS I'm
Continued from PageAl sont

Lempner decided to take anyth
some things and donate
them to The Path Thrift we
Store. Without thinking,
she grabbed the jeans
along with everything
else. lost five rin
"When I finally noticed
I wasn't wearing my rings,
I looked everywhere at Lempner
least 40 times," she said. "I've loo
"I was afraid to tell my where here
husband. I kept thinking Knight said,
they'd show up." she ever fin
She prayed, "God, that looks li]
please show me where nated in emrr
they are." That's when she take it to Tl
remembered the meat- office for s
loaf, remembered the with a note
jeans and remembered she found i
taking things to The Path. she found it.
"I didn't cry when the "I'm tellin
doctor told me I had can- maybe sor
cer, but I'm crying over doesn't hav
this," she said. "We got found then
married in 1973, so my wearing their
rings are 41 years old. making her h
Forty-one years married ner said. "
to the same guy, and hap- who needed
pily I still like him and he food or med
still tolerates me." it's somethi]
Her husband, Richard, something fr
offered to buy her a new Knight sai
wedding ring, but she ing too, that
doesn't want a new one. them somev
She wants her old ones Lempner wi
back.
Sherry Knight, man-
ager of The Path Thrift CU. .
Store in Lecanto, said Funeral
her heart goes out to Mrs. With Cre
SBurial
*Creni
"Your Trusted Family-Owned A
Funeral Home for over 50 Years" Cremaon

nFor Informatic
call 726


of the new airship, which is expected to
provide a longer flight range and better
aerial broadcast capabilities for event
coverage.
"The completion of the new blimp
marks the beginning of a new era for our
airship program and reflects Goodyear's
commitment to remaining at the fore-
front of aerial broadcast coverage and
support," Paul Fitzhenry, Goodyear's
senior vice president for global commu-
nications, said in a statement.
The airship is scheduled to start test
flights this month and go into service
this summer
It still needs one component: a name.
Ohio-based Goodyear is collecting sug-
gestions through a contest on its website
until April 4. Whoever submits the cho-
sen name will get to use the blimp for a
day, the company said.
Thousands of suggestions were sub-
mitted in 2006 when the company named
its Spirit of Innovation blimp, which now
operates from Pompano Beach, Fla.
That is where the old Ohio blimp,
Spirit of Goodyear, retired. It is being
decommissioned this year



telling myself that maybe
ieone who doesn't have
ing found them and she's
aring them and they're
making her happy.
Antoinette Lempner
igs in jeans she donated to The Path Thrift Store.


Dked every-
at the store,"
adding that if
nds anything
ke it was do-
or, she would
he Path main
safe keeping
as to the date
t and where

g myself that
neone who
ive anything
i and she's
n and they're
happy Lemp-
Or someone
A money for
icine. I hope
rig like that,
om God."
d she's pray-
God will put
where where
i11 find them.

VU

I Home
-matory
Shipping
nation

Wwaras & Famfily'
Memorial Carc-

on and costs,s
-8323


Like, maybe they really
fell out of her pocket and
they're way in the back of
her closet on the floor,
waiting for her to find
them.
"My husband saw me
looking at my bare hands
in church, and I asked
him, 'Am I being greedy or
materialistic?' He said,
'Don't be silly,' but I can't
stop crying," she said. "I
don't even have a picture
of them."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197

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A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


mai




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


iiU -a


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SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 A7




AS SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014

POSTSCRIPT
Continued from PagemAl

been our biggest sup-
porter He loved to talking
about and building up the
library system because of
the educational aspect."
Edward "Ren" Renfro
died Feb. 28 after a brief
illness. He was 88.
Although Renfro wasn't
the first to begin working
toward creating a county
library system, he was the
one with the drive and the
organizational skills to
take others' ideas and set
them in motion.
At the time, several
county commissioners told
Renfro that no one in the
county was interested in a
library system. But in 1984,
the county attorney
drafted a "secret" public
referendum that was
passed by the "biggest
margin of any public refer-
endum in the history of
Citrus County," Renfro
said in 2012.
The Lakes Region Li-
brary in Inverness and the
Coastal Region Library in
Crystal River opened in
1987.
"He was the first chair-
man of the Library Advi-
sory Board," Head said.
In 2011, Renfro was
awarded a Library Legacy
Award for his visionary in-
sight and enduring dedica-
tion to the Citrus County
Library System.
"He loved planning; that
was his thing," Head said.
"And he loved to ask ques-
tions about technology He
loved it and saw the need
for it, but he wasn't a big
user of it himself. He still
used the fax machine to
send me things. He tried
email once, but he didn't
like it"
In Renfro's online obitu-
ary guestbook, Dale Dietz
wrote: "Ren brought me
into the commercial nu-
clear world at Crystal
River many years ago. I re-
member him as a man of
his word, someone who
cares about his staff. In a
staff meeting, early in my
career, I overheard him
tell a colleague, when
speaking of professional-
ism, 'Not only must you ap-
pear clean, you must be


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Edward "Ren" Renfro died Feb. 28 after a brief illness. He was 88. Renfro was instrumental in merging the county's
independent libraries into the Citrus County Library System.


clean!' This speaks vol-
umes about Rear Admiral
Edward 'Ren' Renfro's
character, and I have
adopted this motto over
the years."
Lou Harmin, from Crys-
tal River, wrote: "Ren Ren-
fro will be remembered for
many things his work
ethics, his community in-
volvement and his friend-
ship, among many other
attributes. But, I will al-
ways remember him for
his organizational skills as
a member of the Fox Hol-
low Property Owners As-
sociation. He began as a
volunteer member and
later served as president.
He established the Long
Range Planning process
that will continue for years
to come. He developed
plans for future growth
while maintaining the
beauty of the community
He was a planner, an or-
ganizer and indeed a good
friend. I shall miss him.
Among his many av-
enues of community in-
volvement, eight years as
chairman of the board of
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, most re-
cently Renfro served on
the YMCA advisory board.


Fellow board member
Jewel Lamb called Renfro
a "true gentleman" and
someone who was not
scared to get involved in
his community
YMCA Executive Direc-
tor Joanna Castle said,
"We were honored to have
Ren Renfro as a member
of the YMCA advisory
board. He was involved in
many instrumental proj-
ects and working groups in
our community and was a
great leader Ren truly had
a strong interest in helping
us grow our YMCA here in
Citrus County and he will
be deeply missed."
As a World War II vet-
eran, Renfro was sched-
uled to go on an Honor
Flight to Washington, D.C.,


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on April 22. Barbara Mills
was going to be his
guardian for the trip.


"I met him through the
submarines several years
ago, with Operation Wel-


Positively free.

Positively life-savir


LIBRARY SYSTEM
* Citrus County Library
System:
http://www.cclib.org/
Central Ridge: 425
W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.
Coastal Region: 8619
W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Floral City: 8360 E.
Orange Ave.
Homosassa: 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.
Lakes Region: 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Administration: 425
W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.

come Home, and just
talked him into going on
this flight," she said. "He
asked me to be his
guardian, which made me
feel special, coming from
him. He was a great man. I
just wish he could have
hung in there a little
longer"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


A


Should you be worried about PAD?
If you are over the age of 50, smoke or have diabetes, a history of high blood pressure,
high cholesterol or leg pain, then you are at risk for developing peripheral arterial
disease (PAD). PAD limits your body's ability to sufficiently supply your body with
oxygenated blood. But the good news is that PAD can be treated or even prevented.
And it all starts with proper education about the causes.


Free Educational Seminar
Monday, March 17, 2:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Featuring: John W. Royalty, D.O., Vascular Surgeon
Crystal River Woman's Club 320 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
Refreshments served.


Registration required 352.795.1234


Positively


-SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
SevenRiversRegional.com Your Life. Our Story.


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A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


CRIME
Continued from PageAl

military invasion by
Russia."
The village is on a long
spit reaching northward
from the main part of the
Black Sea peninsula,
about 6 miles north of the
border between Crimea
and the Kherson region.
A spokesman for the
Ukrainian border guard
service, Oleg Slobodyan,
told The Associated Press
the Russians, about 120 in
all, took control of a natu-
ral gas distribution station
in the village. The Foreign
Ministry said the force
consisted of about 80 and
didn't mention the station,
but said the village was
seized.
As Crimea prepares for
today's referendum,
dozens of billboards
throughout the regional
capital proclaim "To-
gether With Russia." But a
few have been hit by spray-
painters who scrawled out
"Russia" and replaced it
with "Ukraine."
The referendum is de-
nounced by Kiev and the
West as illegitimate; the
West is threatening costly
sanctions against Russia if
it moves to incorporate
Crimea. But the result is
seen as a foregone conclu-
sion Crimea is almost
certain to vote to split off,
further aggravating
Ukraine's political crisis
and one of the harshest
East-West confrontations
since the end of the Cold
war
In Moscow, tens of thou-
sands of anti-government
protesters marched in cen-
tral Moscow against the
referendum. Protesters
carried banners that read:
"For your freedom and for
ours!" One demonstrator
held up a plate of salo -
cured pork fat that is a sta-
ple of Ukrainian cuisine
and adored by many Rus-
sians along with a
poster that read: "Make
salo, not war!"
Nearby, a rally of several
thousand people was held
close to the Kremlin in
support of Russian inter-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


vention in Crimea.
At the United Nations,
Russia vetoed a Security
Council resolution declar-
ing the referendum illegal,
and close ally China ab-
stained in a sign of
Moscow's isolation on the
issue. Supporters of the
U.S.-sponsored resolution
knew that Russia would
use its veto. But they put
the resolution to a vote
Saturday morning to show
the strength of opposition
in the 15-member Security
Council to Moscow's
takeover of Crimea. The
final vote was 13 members
in favor, China's absten-
tion, and Russia as a per-
manent council member
casting a veto.
The question of whether
Crimea, a strategically im-
portant Black Sea penin-
sula that is home to a key
Russian naval base, should
become part of Moscow's
orbit raises strong pas-
sions on both sides.
Supporters say the re-
gion rightfully belongs to
Russia and that the gov-
ernment that replaced
fugitive President Viktor
Yanukovych is a coterie of
fascist-minded nationalists
who will abuse Crimea's
majority ethnic-Russian
population. Opponents
bristle at Russia's heavy
hand. Crimea effectively is
already under Russian
control after forces were
sent in last month.
Tensions are also high
elsewhere in Ukraine. On
Friday night, two people
were killed and several
wounded in a shootout
that erupted after a clash
in the city of Kharkiv be-
tween pro-Russian
demonstrators and their
opponents.
On Saturday, thousands
of pro-Russia demonstra-
tors in the eastern city of
Donetsk stormed the local
offices of the national se-
curity service, smashing
windows, taking down the
building's Ukrainian flag
and raising a Russian one.
In downtown Simfer-
opol, at least 1,000 people
on Saturday jammed a
square in front of a sound-
stage and two massive TV
screens as a long succes-
sion of Russian musical


acts lauding "friendship of
nations" and Russia itself
Musical acts from distant
regions of Russia sang folk
songs and danced tradi-
tional dance. One ensem-
ble dressed as fairy-tale
characters sang "Don't
Fall Out Of Love with Rus-
sia!" No Ukrainian flags or
colors were visible.
"We have our great
mother, Russia, who has
taken us in her arms," said
40-year-old demonstrator
Nikolai Antonov "If Rus-
sia hadn't protected us, we
would have had to take up
arms" against the new au-
thorities in Kiev
Posters pasted to walls
throughout the city center
made comparisons be-
tween Russia and Ukraine
for gasoline prices, doc-
tors' salaries and student
benefits. The comparisons
all suggested Russia was a
more prosperous country
But referendum oppo-
nents at a smaller rally
said the economic argu-
ment is foolish.
"It's better to be poor
and live in a normal coun-
try than to live in a


police state," said Ine Sul-
tanova, a 66-year-old re-
tired engineer
"I'm a citizen of
Ukraine. I don't want to be
a citizen of another coun-
try, or of Russia. It's well
known what it's like to live
in Russia. There's ab-
solutely no civil society
whatsoever You can't say
what you want. People
can't gather for demon-
strations unless it's good
for the government," said
Andrei Voloshin, a 20-year-
old law student.
Details of the Friday
night shooting in the city of
Kharkiv were murky, but
local news reports said it
broke out after a skirmish
between pro-Russia
demonstrators and their
opponents.
Violence has escalated
in Ukraine's Russia-lean-
ing east in recent days, as
pro-Russia demonstrators
have seized government
buildings and clashed with
supporters of the new Kiev
government. At least one
person died and 17 were
wounded in clashes in
Donetsk on Thursday


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crimea secession vote: How, why and what next?


Associated Press
SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine
- The Ukrainian region of
Crimea votes Sunday in a
hastily organized referen-
dum to break away and
join Russia, in defiance of
broad condemnation from
the international commu-
nity, which has described
the process as illegitimate.
Moscow-backed politi-
cians in Crimea, a territory
of 2 million people, argue
the move will ensure the
local population protec-
tion from radical national-
ism that they say surged
after President Viktor
Yanukovych was forced to
flee Ukraine. No immedi-
ate proof of specific
threats has been pro-
duced, however, and the
leadership in Kiev de-
scribes what is happening
in Crimea as a crude land
grab.
THE ROAD
TO REFERENDUM
Ukraine's territorial un-
certainty has its roots in
the protests that led to the
downfall of Yanukovych,
who enjoyed support from
the Kremlin and had his
base of support in the
mainly ethnic Russian-
populated southeast. The
demonstrations began in
November when Yanu-
kovych abruptly refused to
sign a long-anticipated po-
litical association and free
trade agreement with the
European Union, opting
instead for closer ties with
Russia.
Weeks of peaceful ral-
lies were punctured by
bursts of violence, which
culminated with the death
of dozens of protesters in
late February
A peace deal between
the government and oppo-
sition was overseen by EU
diplomats, but that
arrangement was over-
taken within days when
protesters took control of
the capital, Kiev, and po-
lice abandoned posts. The
parliament voted to re-
move the president from
power and soon appointed
a replacement
An early proposal in the


Associated Press
A pro-Ukrainian demonstrator wearing a mask attends a
rally Saturday in Simferopol, Ukraine. Tensions are high in
the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea, where a referendum
is to be conducted today on whether to split off from
Ukraine and seek annexation by Russia.


new parliament that
would have seen the status
of the Russian language
downgraded was greeted
with alarm in some parts
of the country Russia has
also loudly expressed in-
dignation over what it
claims is the inexorable
rise of radical nationalist
groups, a concern that crit-
ics suggest is an exercise
in disingenuousness.
CAMPAIGN
The referendum ballot
will feature two questions:
One, to grant Crimea
greater autonomy within
Ukraine. The other, which
is widely expected to se-
cure the bulk of support,
envisions annexation by
Russia.
What little actual cam-
paigning there's been in
Crimea has taken place
under the often menacing
gaze of local militia forces,
as well as heavily armed
troops under apparent
command from Moscow
In the face of over-
whelming evidence, Rus-
sia denies it has deployed
any troops.
The pro-annexation
message has been crude
but effective, and is aimed


at instilling alarm over the
new Ukrainian govern-
ment's purported design
to marginalize the coun-
try's ethnic Russian
population.
One billboard showed
two maps of Crimea: one
emblazoned in the tricolor
of the Russian flag. The
other shows it against a
crimson background and
stamped with a swastika.
Supporters of the refer-
endum have argued it is
little different from the in-
dependence vote to take
place in Scotland later this
year But British officials
argue the latter vote has
been two years in the wait-
ing and is being held in a
climate of free discussion.
Crimeans have had less
than two weeks to ponder
on their referendum and
public debate has been no-
table for its absence.
THE FUTURE
Crimean authorities say
if Ukrainian soldiers res-
olutely occupying their
garrisons don't surrender
after the election, they will
be considered "illegal."
On the diplomatic front,
Russia looks ever more
isolated as it faces the


prospect of sanctions from
Western nations and the
ambivalence of China.
Leaders of the mainly
Muslim Crimean Tatar mi-
nority, who make up more
than one-tenth of the re-
gion's population, insist
they want to remain part of
Ukraine and worry about
what fate awaits them in a
country they have no de-
sire to join.
Inside Russia, President
Vladimir Putin has fared
well from his hard-line
stance on Crimea and en-
joyed a bump in popularity
ratings. Still, if public crit-
icism of his policies is


rare, it's in no small part
because the already em-
battled independent
media has faced a re-
newed onslaught of state-
led intimidation.
REMAINDER OF
UKRAINE
Once Crimea's pro-
Russian leadership seals
some vague semblance of
legitimacy through the ref-
erendum, attention will
likely swing to eastern
Ukraine, another heavily
Russian-populated area in
which the central govern-
ment is struggling to stamp
its authority


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The past few days have
seen ugly confrontations
between pro-Russians and
pro-Ukrainians, and anxi-
eties are stirring about the
potential for that situation
to worsen.
A national presidential
election set for May 25 is
seen by the interim au-
thorities as an opportunity
to restore democratic
processes in a country cur-
rently run by an interim
post-revolutionary Cabi-
net. Perceptions of an un-
certain security situation
could undermine confi-
dence in what that vote
produces, however


WORLD


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 All




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


South at heart of close fight to control US Senate


Associated Press

ATLANTA The South
is where President Barack
Obama and Democrats
long have struggled, and
it's where the party's
toughest battleground will
be this year in the fight for
control of the U.S. Senate.
Three incumbents must
face the consequences of
having voted for Obama's
health care law, but Re-
publicans first must settle
primaries in several states,
including a challenge to
Minority Leader Mitch Mc-
Connell of Kentucky
All but one of the poten-
tially competitive races is
in a state Obama lost in
2012, and the president re-
mains deeply unpopular
among whites in the re-
gion. Republicans are opti-
mistic they can achieve the
six-seat gain needed to re-
take the Senate.
Democratic Sens. Kay
Hagan of North Carolina,
Mary Landrieu of
Louisiana and Mark Pryor
of Arkansas are on the bal-
lot for the first time since
voting for the Affordable
Care Act in 2010. The law's
wobbly start and its image
as a power-grab have the
incumbents on the defen-
sive, emphasizing local is-
sues and avoiding
unnecessary mention of
the second-term president
who leads their party
Obama's Gallup job ap-
proval lingers in the low
40s, and is even lower in
several states with pivotal
Senate races. Republicans
want to feed on that and
follow the same road map
that carried them to a
House majority in 2010,
Obama's first midterm
election.
"Democrats hope this
doesn't become a national
election, but we don't think
that's the case," said Re-
publican National Com-
mittee spokesman Michael
Short.
Democrats want the Re-
publican primaries to
project divisions and ex-
tremism. With Congress
more unpopular than the
president, they seek to
highlight those Republi-
can Senate candidates
who are already serving in


Associated Press
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, accompanied by Sen. John
Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks to reporters March 5 on Capitol Hill in Washington.
The South, where President Barack Obama and his party have struggled for years, will
be Democrats' toughest battleground in the 2014 fight for control of the Senate. A trio
of incumbents must face the consequences of having voted for Obama's signature
health care law, but first Republicans must settle primaries in several states,


including a challenge to McConnell.

the House. 0 In Georgia, where Re-
In 2012, Democrats de- publican Sen. Saxby
fied early predictions and Chambliss is retiring, a
expanded their Senate ma- May primary is almost cer-
jority by winning in GOP- tain to lead to a runoff.
leaning Missouri and Three congressmen-
Indiana, where conserva- Jack Kingston and doctors
tive candidates tripped Phil Gingrey and Paul
over their own pronounce- Broun each says his
ments on rape and other record proves his conser-
issues. vative bona fides.
A look at Senate races Kingston, chairman of a
across the South: House Appropriations sub-
Arkansas sets up as a committee, tells voters
proxy for the tussle be- what he's cut in the federal
tween the White House budget.
and House Republicans. Gingrey's slogan is "Re-
Pryor, whose father served peal or go home," and he's
as governor and U.S. sena- banking on his opposition
tor, is the last remaining to the president's health
Democrat in the state's law carrying the day
Capitol Hill delegation. Broun, who once de-
His Republican opponent, cleared evolutionary theory
U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, is "lies straight from the pit
a young conservative of hell," says his colleagues
favorite, are poseurs. He tried to
Cotton and Pryor prove his conservative cre-
avoided primaries. Cotton dentials by holding a draw-
voted with GOP leaders in ing for an AR-15
October to end the partial military-style rifle.
federal government shut- Karen Handel, a former
down, but Democrats say secretary of state and com-
they can paint him as ex- mission chairman in Geor-
treme. They're already gia's most populous county,
pointing to his vote against says she's got the right ex-
the new farm bill. perience for the job, and
Arkansas voters, who without the blemish of
give Obama a 35 percent serving in Congress.
approval rating, have seen Former Dollar General
a barrage of ads reminding and Reebok CEO David
them that Pryor was "the Perdue, the cousin of for-
last vote" on the health mer Gov Sonny Perdue,
care bill. says business experience


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should trump the lot of"ca-
reer politicians," and he's
said he's willing to finance
his own race.
The Democratic favorite
is Michelle Nunn, the
daughter for former U.S.
Sen. Sam Nunn. Democ-
rats are confident that she
can pull in just enough
Mitt Romney voters -
rural and small-town
whites fond of her father,
and suburban white
women in metropolitan At-
lanta for an upset.
In Kentucky, Mc-
Connell finds himself criti-
cized from the left and
right. Wealthy business-
man Matt Bevin may be a
long shot in the Republi-
can primary, but he's got
enough organization and
money to grab attention as
he brands McConnell a ca-
pitulator to Obama.
Democrats back Secre-
tary of State Alison Lun-
dergan Grimes, a party
financier's daughter who
has gotten campaign ad-
vice and help from former
President Bill Clinton.
Like Nunn in Georgia,
Grimes wants to win big
among women. Like
Bevin, she is going after
McConnell as part of the
problem in Washington,
but she also says Mc-


Connell cares more about
his national party post
than about Kentucky.
McConnell has plenty of
money to respond. He'd al-
ready spent $10 million by
the end of 2013.
In Louisiana, Lan-
drieu is seeking a fourth
term never having topped
52.1 percent of the vote.
She won twice in Demo-
cratic presidential years.
She won in 2002, a
midterm year, by running
as a centrist who could
work with a Republican
White House. This time,
she has to run with
Obama's negatives a 40
percent approval rating in
Louisiana, according to
Gallup without having
him at the top of the ticket
to excite Democrats, par-
ticularly black voters.
U.S. Rep. Bill Cassidy
has the backing of national
Republican leaders and
donors. But he once con-
tributed to Landrieu and,
as a state senator, he
pushed a proposal similar
to Obama's health insur-
ance exchanges. At least
two other Republicans will
be on the all-party primary
ballot. Unless one primary
candidate receives more
than 50 percent of the vote,
the top two candidates go
to a runoff in December
That second round of vot-
ing might be Cassidy's best
shot at winning the Senate
seat
Landrieu defends her
health care vote but has
clamored for changes to
the law Democrats cite her
influence as head of the
Senate Energy and Natu-
ral Resources Committee,
saying her post is a boon
for Louisiana's oil-and-gas
industry and hammering
Cassidy as a rubber stamp
for House Republicans.
Both she and Cassidy
champion flood insurance
relief for coastal residents.
Mississippi hasn't seen
Sen. Thad Cochran truly
campaign in decades.
That's changing with a
challenge from state Sen.
Chris McDaniel, who
boasts endorsements from
national conservative and
tea party groups. Cochran


backers answered with a
super political action com-
mittee organized by Henry
Barbour, the nephew of the
former RNC chairman and
Gov Haley Barbour.
McDaniel wants to turn
Cochran's greatest asset -
his experience and what
it's meant financially to
Mississippi into a liabil-
ity by making the incum-
bent the face of the
nation's $17 trillion debt.
The Cochran team attacks
McDaniel's legislative
votes supporting bond
debt for public projects.
The comparison, Mc-
Daniel says, is intellectu-
ally dishonest. Henry
Barbour counters that Mc-
Daniel casting Cochran as
a "big-government liberal"
is just as ludicrous.
Democrats recruited for-
mer U.S. Rep. Travis
Childers and hope that
move positions them for a
surprise November victory
if McDaniel defeats
Cochran.
North Carolina voters
give Obama a 43 percent
job approval rating, and
some surveys put Hagan's
even lower It's tricky
enough that she decided
not to appear with Obama
in January when he spoke
at North Carolina State
University
Republicans have a free-
for-all primary
North Carolina's House
speaker, Thom Tillis, who
led a conservative resur-
gence in the Statehouse, is
the national Republican
favorite, but he must con-
tend with several conser-
vative challengers. If Tillis
emerges, Democrats plan
to use his legislative
agenda making it harder
to vote, cutting public edu-
cation financing and tight-
ening abortion regulations
- against him.
In West Virginia, U.S.
Rep. Shelley Moore Capito
avoided a bruising GOP pri-
mary, enabling her to build
an organization and raise
money for a race in an in-
creasingly Republican
state. Secretary of State Na-
talie Tennant will try to
hold retiring Sen. Jay Rock-
efeller's seat for Democrats.


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IllM


A12 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


NATION







Officers' body cameras raise privacy concerns


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Offi-
cers at thousands of law
enforcement agencies are
wearing tiny cameras to
record their interactions
with the public, but in
many cases the devices are
being rolled out faster
than departments are able
to create policies to govern
their use.
And some rank-and-file
officers are worried the
technology might ulti-
mately be used to derail
their careers if, for exam-
ple, an errant comment
about a superior is cap-
tured on tape.
Most law enforcement
leaders and civil liberties
advocates believe the cam-
eras will ultimately help
officers because the de-
vices give them a way to
record events from their
point of view at a time
when citizens armed with
cellphones are actively
scrutinizing their every
move.
They say, however, that
the lack of clear guidelines
on the cameras' use could
potentially undermine de-
partments' goals of creat-
ing greater accountability
of officers and jeopardize
the privacy of both the
public and law enforce-
ment officers.
"This is a brave new
world that we're entering
here, where citizens and
police both are going to be
filming each other," said
Chuck Wexler, the
executive director of the
Police Executive Research
Forum, a nonprofit police
research and policy
organization.
The U.S. Justice Depart-
ment has asked Wexler's
group to help develop
guidelines for the cam-
eras' use, from when the
devices should be turned
on to how departments can
protect the privacy of
those who are inadver-
tently captured on the
footage.
Equipping police with
cameras isn't a new con-
cept. For decades police
have used cameras
mounted to the dash-
boards of their patrol cars
- initially referred to with
suspicion by officers as
"indict-o-cams" until they
discovered the footage ex-
onerated them in most
cases.
As camera technology
and data storage has be-
come more affordable and
reliable, the use of
portable cameras has in-
creased over the last five
years. Now officers in one
of every six departments
are patrolling with them
on their chests, lapels or
sunglasses, according to
Scott Greenwood, general
counsel for the national
American Civil Liberties
Union and an expert on
the cameras.
With the push of a finger,
officers can show the dan-
gers and difficulties of
their work. Unlike dash-
board cameras, body cam-
eras follow the officer
everywhere when their
cruiser stays parked at the
curb, when they go into
homes on search warrants
or when they are running
after a suspect.
The cameras, if they
aren't turned off, can go
with officers into a bath-
room or locker room, or
capture private conversa-
tions between partners.
Footage can become evi-
dence in a criminal case,
or be used to discipline of-


Associated Press
A Los Angeles Police officer wears an on-body cameras during a Jan. 15 demonstration
for media in Los Angeles. Thousands of police agencies have equipped officers with
cameras to wear with their uniforms, but they've frequently lagged in setting policies
on how they're used, potentially putting privacy at risk and increasing their liability. As
officers in one of every six departments across the nation now patrols with tiny lenses
on their chests, lapels or sunglasses, administrators and civil liberties experts are
trying to envision and address troublesome scenarios that could unfold in front of a
live camera.


Los Angeles Police Sgt. Daniel Gomez demonstrates a video feed Jan. 15 from his cam-
era into his cellphone as on-body cameras are demonstrated for the media.


ficers or exonerate them of
false accusations.
Without strong policies,
experts say, departments
could lose the public's
trust. The public needs to
know cameras aren't only
being turned on when it'll
help officers. But there are
certain moments such as
during the interview of a
sexual assault victim or
talk with a confidential in-
formant when filming may
be sensitive or even com-
promise a case, said Bay
Area attorney Mike Rains,
whose firm often repre-
sents officers and has
worked on body camera
policies with departments.
The Los Angeles Police
Department is now field
testing cameras with an
eye toward ultimately de-
ploying them to all patrol
officers a move that
would make its program
the nation's largest. For
the six months of the test,
underway now, there will
be no official policy De-
partment officials say a
policy will be created with
input from the community
and union, when they
know more about how the
cameras work in the field.
Union chief Tyler Izen,
who represents more than
9,900 sworn officers, said
that while there've been
no complaints so far, the
strategy is risky and could
be problematic for his offi-
cers as well as the public,
which has become an in-
voluntary guinea pig in the
trial. "They're basically
taking their chances," Izen
said.
There's still very little re-
search into the impacts of
these cameras on policing
and their ripple effects on
the criminal justice system,


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said Justin Ready, assistant
professor at Arizona State's
department of criminology
and criminal justice. But
more studies are under-
way, including two that
Ready is involved in.
The police department
in Rialto, Calif, concluded
a yearlong University of
Cambridge study last year
that found an 89 percent
drop in complaints against
officers during the camera
trial. The chief has since
mandated its deployment
to its roughly 90 sworn
officers.
Rialto police Sgt.
Richard Royce said he was
exonerated by the footage
during the study
"I'd rather have my ver-
sion of that incident cap-
tured on high-definition
video in its entirety from
my point of view, then to
look at somebody's grainy
cellphone camera footage
captured a 100 feet away
that gets cropped, edited,
changed or manipulated,"
Royce said.
Greenwood of the ACLU
said he's provided input in
drawing up the Justice De-
partment guidelines. He
said the proposed policy is
pretty good, but gives offi-
cers more discretion than
is wise.


"It's a far better policy
decision to mandate the
encounter be recorded
and deal with the un-
wanted video," Green-
wood said. Because if a
situation goes bad quickly
and there's no footage, the
officer is in trouble,
Greenwood said.
Captured video could
protect the department -
and ultimately the tax-
payer- from a false claim
and expensive litigation or
result in disciplining a
problem officer
One case, also in Oak-
land, is being used to edu-
cate officers in California
about the technology. An
officer chasing a suspect
said he saw the suspect
with a gun in his hand be-
fore fatally shooting him
three times in 3/4 of a sec-
ond. A gun was later found
in the grass.
It cost the city $10,000 to
have roughly 15 seconds of
video analyzed by an ex-
pert, and because of the
angle of where the camera
was placed on the offi-
cer's chest no gun was
seen in the suspect's hand
on film, said Rains, an at-
torney whose firm repre-
sented the officer
Sgt. Barry Donelan, the
police union chief in Oak-


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Questions that arise when

placing cameras on cops

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES New tiny cameras are starting to be
worn by police officers across the U.S. roughly 3,000 of
18,000 law enforcement agencies are using or trying out
these cameras, and the numbers are expected to grow ex-
ponentially as technology has become more affordable and
reliable.
But with its myriad uses, departments are wrangling over
several major policy considerations and their implications on
privacy and officer liability.
WHEN DO YOU TURN THEM ON/OFF?
The biggest question for departments is whether officers
should be recording at all times. Should they turn them off
when speaking to confidential informants or during sensitive
victim interviews? What if the person doesn't want to be
filmed? And how might it impact the prosecution?
Many departments tell officers to wear their cameras at
all times, but allow them some discretion on filming. But that
could also create problems later, said Scott Greenwood,
general counsel for the national American Civil Liberties
Union and an expert on the devices.
"If officers are allowed to use the videos only when it's to
their advantage, then there won't be public support for this,
and most of the advantages to accountability and oversight
will be lost," he said.
CAN AN OFFICER WATCH THE TAPE?
Some departments allow officers to watch the tape before
they write their reports; others require them to make a state-
ment to internal investigators, if that's applicable, first.
"I'm going to acknowledge to you that a member's recol-
lection actually changes after seeing the video," Oakland
police union chief Barry Donelan said. "I've seen it."
Memory doesn't work the same as a video camera; it's
impossible to go frame by frame, and so what an officer saw
and remembered out of a high-adrenaline situation may not
match the tape, Donelan said.
It doesn't always mean they're lying, he said, sometimes
it just means they're human.
WHO GETS TO SEE AND WHO PAYS?
A key issue that's starting to arise is what happens when
someone files a public records request for the video is it
considered a police report, an investigatory file?
Policies generally don't always address this and there
haven't been enough requests.
Greenwood said the media and public should not have
access to anything they wouldn't have the right to be physi-
cally present to observe. For example, a reporter wouldn't
be present during a victim interview nor would they go in
with police on a search warrant.
In Phoenix, the police union made a records request for
all the footage from the initial 90-day camera trial and was
told it would cost $11,000 because of the review process
and to address privacy concerns, said Phoenix police Offi-
cer Joe Clure, who heads the union. They decided not to go
for it.
HOW LONG IS IT KEPT?
Some civil rights advocates recommend footage be re-
tained for up to the statute of limitations on filing a complaint
on an officer, which is usually a year in California.
If there's an ongoing case, or possibility the footage will
be used in prosecution, then it should be flagged and kept
until that's completed including any appeal. For basic daily
interactions that don't produce investigatory material, video
can be deleted between 30 and 90 days, Greenwood said.
Police in Rialto, Calif., keep videos in cases involving
felonies for seven years; homicides for 100. Sgt. Richard
Royce, the union chief, there's also a process for purging
videos from the system in case something is accidentally
recorded. The Los Angeles Police Department is currently
keeping video for at least five years.


land, said the department
initially moved to termi-
nate the officer for an ex-
cessive response, but he
was ultimately exonerated
because the video analysis
backed up the officer's
account.
Donelan said the danger
with such footage is it taps
into a human tendency to


over rely on video at the
expense of other accounts
of an event, and can
be especially problematic
in high-adrenaline
situations.
When that happens, "it's
just about the camera,"
Donelan said. "It's the ulti-
mate Monday morning
quarterbacking tool."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 A13







Tensions rise over access to local government


Editor's note: Sunshine
Week, promoting the im-
portance of access to pub-
lic information, runs from
March 16 to 22.
ADAM GELLER
AP national writer

It was a chilling crime
and, even with a quick ar-
rest, disturbing questions
lingered.
Derrick Thompson
called 911 in the coastal
Maine city of Biddeford to
report that he was being
threatened. Police
checked out the com-
plaint, decided it was a
civil matter and left the
scene. Three minutes
later, the teenager and his
girlfriend were shot dead.
In a state averaging 25
murders a year, the case
was clearly of public inter-
est and the police officers
were doing the public's
business. But answering
questions about their han-
dling of the call took a law-
suit, an appeal and 11
months after state prose-
cutors turned down the
Portland Press Herald's
request for 911 transcripts.
The faceoff was eventu-
ally settled in the newspa-
per's favor by Maine's top
court. But editors, advo-
cates and academics say
such situations reflect in-
creasing difficulty getting
access to information from
statehouses and city halls
across the country, as offi-
cials broadly interpret ex-
emptions in laws requiring
openness.
Tensions between gov-
ernment officials, journal-
ists and watchdog groups
are a constant in American
life. But while it can be dif-
ficult to measure change,
observers are troubled by
what they see as declining
transparency that some
say may be abetted by pub-
lic apathy Government's
swing away from openness
began with post-Sept. 11
security worries, they say,
and has been fueled more
recently by officials' con-
cerns about individual pri-
vacy, changes in
technology and opaque
laws on campaign finance.
"There's a clear trend
toward increased secrecy
in this country I see it in
my survey research of
journalists and I also see it
just on the ground, in
what's happening at state
capitals and the federal
government," said David
Cuillier, director of the
University of Arizona
School of Journalism, who
studies citizen and
press access to public
information.
While the federal gov-
ernment's resistance to
openness draws regular
attention, state and local
officials have also moved
to limit access to informa-
tion and proceedings, he
and others say
That is reflected in a
2012 report by the Center
for Public Integrity and
partner organizations that
gave more than half of
state governments grades
of D or F for transparency
and accountability Investi-
gators' findings included
states whose open records
laws included hundreds of
exemptions and others
that make critical budget
decisions out of view of the
public.
At the same time, re-
searchers say journalists
are finding it more diffi-
cult to obtain information
from government through
Freedom of Information
requests. And, in a survey


Associated Press
Cliff Schechtman, Portland Press Herald executive editor, left, and Steve Greenlee, man-
aging editor, right, talk with Brian Robitaille, seated, on the copy desk/slot, to discuss
the next day's front page March 11 in Portland, Maine. Just three minutes after police
officers in the coastal Maine city of Biddeford responded to Derrick Thompson's 911 call
and then left the scene, the teenager and his girlfriend were shot dead. But how much
were officers told when they were dispatched to Thompson's December 2012 call that
he was being threatened? Could they have done more to prevent the killings?
Answering questions about their actions took a lawsuit, an appeal and 11 months after
state prosecutors turned down the newspaper's request for 911 transcripts. The
faceoff was eventually settled in the newspaper's favor by Maine's top court.


of more than 450 state and
local reporters to be re-
leased this week, an over-
whelming majority said
that public information of-
ficers for agencies they
cover are increasingly re-
stricting access to officials
and imposing other con-
trols limiting their ability
to report on government.
"The problem is perva-
sive," said Carolyn Carl-
son, a professor of
communication at Kenne-
saw State University, out-
side Atlanta, who
conducted the survey "I
think it's a problem for re-
porters as well as for the
public. It means that re-
porters can't tell the story
that they want to be able to
tell them about their gov-
ernment."
Those findings are
echoed in the anecdotal
experience of newsroom
leaders surveyed recently
by the Associated Press
Media Editors. Of the 37
who responded, two-thirds
said that over the last five
years the governments
they cover had become
less cooperative in provid-
ing access to records,
meetings and officials.
"I think after 9/11 and
the constant concerns
about identity theft and
that sort of thing, that
there's been more reluc-
tance on the part of public
officials to give access to
information that's clearly
public," said Alan Miller,
managing editor/news at
The Columbus Dispatch,
the daily newspaper in
Ohio's capital.
Miller pointed to his
paper's efforts last year to
get data on city inspections
of rental housing. After a
December 2011 fire in a
rental home killed three
people, Columbus officials
pledged to reform code en-
forcement. But they re-
jected the paper's request
for records of their efforts.
When reporters continued
the push for the informa-
tion, the city eventually
turned over data that led
to a seven-month probe ex-
posing the city's worst
landlords that prompted
the city to follow through
on its enforcement
promise.
Other journalists report
similar tensions over ac-
cess to government infor-
mation and proceedings.


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University of Arkansas
at Fayetteville officials
discovered in mid-2012
that its fundraising divi-
sion had overspent its
budget by more than
$3 million. But over the
next five months, they
never told anybody outside
the university School offi-
cials acknowledged the
shortfall only when the
journal Arkansas Business
revealed it in a story But
they would not release au-
ditors' detailed findings,
claiming the report
amounted to a personnel
performance review of the
people responsible and
was exempt from public
records law. They released
the report after a lawsuit
by the Arkansas Democ-
rat-Gazette in February
2013, but said they were
doing so only because the
two people involved had
consented.
In past years, the univer-
sity had generally cooper-
ated with information
requests, said Sonny Al-
barado, the newspaper's
projects editor But when
the newspaper asked for
updated budget informa-
tion, officials repeatedly
said that they didn't have
the record requested, only
to later learn otherwise,
he said.
A university spokesman,
Mark Rushing, said the
school's chancellor told
about 200 people on cam-
pus about the shortfall be-
fore the first article was
published, proving there
was no intent to keep it
secret.
"I think the university's
perspective is that this is
the kind of thing, as
painful as it is, as large as
it is, as unacceptable as it
is, it's something we can
often take care of and han-
dle," said Rushing, the
school's director of strate-
gic communications.
Editors at Idaho's
Twin Falls Times-News


said they wondered for
years why most city coun-
cil meetings were brief,
with quick votes and little
discussion about even the
most complicated matters.
The answer came when an
official who had just at-
tended a forum on open
government wondered
aloud about the "working
groups" of council mem-
bers and others that
hashed over most issues
privately, without the ma-
jority that required doing
so in a public forum.
"The biggest struggle
was getting a list of the
work group because they
weren't keeping the list.
Not even the mayor knew
how many there were,"
said Kimberlee Kruesi,
the newspaper's city gov-
ernment reporter The
council eventually voted to
limit the size of work
groups and open some of
their meetings.
In the Maine case, the
Portland Press Herald
sued to obtain transcripts
of Thompson's initial call
to police; another by his
mother after she, her son
and his girlfriend were
shot; and a third from their
landlord, who was charged
with the murders.
"Two cops show up and
three minutes later the kid
and his girlfriend are
dead, so what's the obvious
question? Did the cops
know he was being threat-
ened? Did the dispatcher
tell them?" said Cliff
Schechtman, the newspa-
per's executive editor
"The reason we fought for
this is it's our obligation to
tell the community how
well the first responders
do their job."
The state attorney gen-
eral's office, which prose-
cutes murder cases in
Maine, argued that the
transcripts were intelli-
gence and investigative in-
formation whose release
might interfere with the


MORE ABOUT SUNSHINE WEEK
* Read about ratings for local government
transparency including Citrus County as a whole
and the city of Crystal River in today's
Commentary section.


case and eventual trial.
"I happen to believe that
the public does have a
right to know what we're
doing, but I also believe we
have to make sure that ju-
dicial proceedings are fair
and that the prosecution
doesn't dump all its infor-
mation in the media and
try it in the press," said
Bill Stokes, the deputy at-
torney general who runs
the office's criminal divi-
sion and argued the case.
In a unanimous ruling
last November, the state's
top court's sided with the
newspaper When the tran-
scripts were released, the
paper reported that in the
initial 911 call, Thompson
told a police dispatcher
his landlord was making
"death threats," pointing
his finger at him as if it
were a gun and making
shooting sounds. The man
charged also called 911. "I
told him that I gonna kill
you," the transcript
showed he said to a dis-
patcher. '"And the police
say, no (inaudible) way"
The state-level tensions
between journalists and
officials over openness co-
incide with similar, but
more widely known fric-
tion over access to federal
government information,
said Ginger McCall, direc-
tor of the Open Govern-
ment Project at the
Electronic Privacy Infor-
mation Center, a civil lib-
erties group.
McCall said federal
agencies regularly cite
supposed exemptions to
public records requests
despite the Obama admin-
istration's stated dedica-
tion to openness. She
pointed to her organiza-
tion's pursuit of data on ra-
diation emissions from full
body scanners used to
screen air travelers.
Much of the request,
filed in 2010, was turned
down by agencies arguing
it was part of the "deliber-
ative process" of govern-
ment decision-making.
A district court judge
upheld much of that
stance, but the group ap-
pealed and reached a set-
tlement last year that led
to information being
released.
"I think it's just a gen-
eral reluctance to accept
accountability for the pol-
icy decisions that are
made within the govern-
ment," McCall said. "You
know, it's difficult for there


to be any public outrage if
the public doesn't know
about the policy decision."
John Wonderlich, policy
director at the Sunlight
Foundation, a nonprofit
group that pushes for open
government, said officials
have become increasingly
skilled at "co-opting the
language of openness"
without following through.
"It's so easy to make a
plan (for openness) ... and
then to call that progress,
while at the same time re-
fusing to release certain
documents that there's
been a history of releasing,
and that's certainly been
our experience at the fed-
eral level," he said.
Meanwhile, at the state
level, some laws on open-
ness have failed to keep up
with changes in technol-
ogy, said Emily Shaw, who
oversees state and local
policy for Sunlight. Laws
on the books to require the
retention of paper records
have not been updated to
deal with email, she said.
And incremental but de-
liberate changes in state
and local policy are de-
creasing transparency, ed-
itors and open government
advocates say
In Tennessee, Gov. Bill
Haslam's first executive
act in 2011 eliminated re-
quirements that he and
top aides disclose outside
income. In Maine, Gov
Paul LePage exempted a
new business advisory
council from the freedom
of information law, citing a
need for "candid conver-
sations." In Arkansas, leg-
islators have added
exceptions to the public
records law, including one
disallowing release of the
names of juveniles in-
volved in traffic accidents,
after lawyers called stu-
dents who were on a bus
that crashed.
"I just see the access
being chipped away at,"
said Albarado, the
Arkansas editor "As a jour-
nalist and as a citizen who
believes in openness, it
just means that, OK, we're
letting the emotional im-
pact of a single incident ef-
fect a much broader
philosophy of being open
about what your govern-
ment is doing and the
records that it keeps."
Adam Geller can be
reached at fea-
tures@ap.org. Follow him
on Twvitter at https://
twitter com/adgeller.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


US goes high-tech to help

oversee Afghan aid work


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
main U.S. foreign assis-
tance agency wants to step
up use of smartphones,
satellite imagery and GPS
cameras to oversee tax-
funded development proj-
ects in Afghanistan that
aid workers no longer will
be able to observe first-
hand as American troops
leave the country
The U.S. Agency for In-
ternational Development
on Saturday began seeking
bids on a monitoring proj-
ect contract that could cost
up to $170 million. The
agency hopes the five-year
project will allow aid work
to continue in Afghanistan
despite the troop draw-
down and will satisfy law-
makers and others who
have criticized the agency
for weak monitoring.
Unless security improves
significantly, Afghans hired
by USAID contractors will
increasingly be on the front
line of overseeing the
agency's largest single-
country program.
"As the U.S. prepares to
have a smaller military
footprint, it could become
increasingly challenging
for us to do our direct
monitoring and have U.S.
employees on the ground
looking at things," Mark
Feierstein, associate ad-
ministrator for USAID,
said in an interview
"We are going to try to do
whatever oversight we can
with USAID employees,"
Feierstein said. "If we con-
clude that even with the
best technology we just
can't have eyes and ears
there, we just won't do the
project"
Since 2001, USAID has
spent $12 billion on devel-
opment projects in
Afghanistan. Millions
more will pour into the
country in the years
ahead.
USAID-funded projects
are monitored by aid
workers, contractors, other
U.S. government employ-
ees, USAID's internal
watchdog, the Government
Accountability Office, the
Afghan government and
civil organizations, and the
office of Special Inspector
General for Afghanistan
Reconstruction.
The new contract aims
to enhance oversight by
combining these existing
monitoring techniques
with stepped up use of
high-tech tools. USAID al-
ready has used them in
Afghanistan, Pakistan,
Yemen, Iraq and certain
areas of Colombia.
The tools include satel-
lite imagery, cameras that
take photos with the time,
date and GPS coordinates,
and cellphones that can be
used to collect data and
conduct informal public
opinion surveys.
Typically, Afghans are
hired to go to project sites
and collect information
useful in monitoring the
work. Such work can put
them in danger if they are
seen by insurgents fighting
America's presence in
Afghanistan.
The drawdown of forces
and further restricted
movement of U.S. civilian
workers in Afghanistan
has alarmed Sen. Claire
McCaskill, D-Mo., long crit-
ical of waste and fraud in
U.S. reconstruction proj-
ects in Afghanistan.
At a Senate hearing this
past week, McCaskill
noted that the special in-
spector general's office
predicts that soon no more
than 21 percent of
Afghanistan will be acces-
sible to U.S. civilian over-
sight personnel.
"Now that's a 47 percent
reduction since 2009," Mc-
Caskill said. "We had eyes
and ears on the majority of
Afghanistan during a time
period that ... billions of
dollars of American tax-
payer money was being
spent to build things. We're
only going to have eyes
and ears in 21 percent of


the country"
In its most recent quar-
terly report, the special in-
spector general's office
also expressed deep con-
cern that oversight could
suffer
'As the U.S. drawdown
continues, implementing
agencies and oversight
bodies will have far less


1Y


Associated Press
Mark Feierstein, associate administrator for the U.S.
Agency for International Development, testifies Feb. 28,
2103, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. USAID on Sat-
urday began seeking bids on a new monitoring project
contract, which could cost up to $170 million.
visibility over the recon- the past," it said in the re-
struction programs than in port in January



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nti Kenyan anti-terror squad's budget: $735

t *Associated Press By comparison, aI Somali terrorists are fi-
Kenyan member of nancing their terror at-
1\TATR lDT t-,nvP rrlinmi n nmrnov nkrl-it I i M +0 q c kq +wt 1 nr- fiin A if l thon


7.1
Associated Press
The Chicago River is dyed
green Saturday ahead of
the St. Patrick's Day
parade in Chicago.

Ducks hit hard by
severe winter, ice
DELMAR, NY. -The
Niagara River corridor from
Lake Erie to Lake Ontario is
renowned as a winter haven
for water birds. But this year's
bitterly cold season has
made it notable for some-
thing else: dead ducks.
Biologists say carcasses
began piling up by the hun-
dreds in early January after
consistently low temperatures
started icing over nearly the
entire Great Lakes, prevent-
ing the ducks from getting
to the minnows that are
their main source of food.
Necropsies have confirmed
the cause: starvation.
It's a phenomenon that
has been seen elsewhere
along the Great Lakes, with
news reports of diving
ducks and other waterfowl
turning up dead by the hun-
dreds along the southern
part of Lake Michigan.
They've also been found in
Lake St. Clair between
Lakes Erie and Huron.
Oil mars swamp
months after spill
ALICEVILLE, Ala. En-
vironmental regulators
promised an aggressive
cleanup after a tanker train
hauling 2.9 million gallons
of crude oil derailed and
burned in a west Alabama
swamp in early November
amid a string of North
American oil train crashes.
So why is dark, smelly
crude oil still oozing into the
water four months later?
The isolated wetland
smelled like a garage when
a reporter from The Associ-
ated Press visited last week,
and the charred skeletons
of burned trees rose out of
water covered with an iri-
descent sheen and swirling,
weathered oil. A snake and
a few minnows were some
of the few signs of life.
An environmental group
now says it has found omi-
nous traces of oil moving
downstream along an un-
named tributary toward a
big creek and the Tombig-
bee River, less than 3 miles
away.
The Environmental Pro-
tection Agency and the Ala-
bama Department of
Environmental Management,
which oversaw the cleanup,
say more than 10,700 gallons
of oil were skimmed from the
water after the derailment,
and workers collected about
203,000 gallons of oil from
damaged rail cars using
pumps. Another 290 cubic
yards of oily dirt was exca-
vated with heavy equip-
ment, or enough to cover a
basketball court with soil
nearly 2 feet deep.
Yet four months later, offi-
cials still say no one knows
exactly how much oil was
spilled. That's mainly be-
cause an unknown amount
of oil burned in a series of
explosions and a huge fire
that lasted for hours after
the crash. Since no one
knows how much oil
burned, officials also can't
say how much oil may be in
the swamp.
Agencies are now work-
ing with the company and
its contractors to recover oil
trapped in the rail bed, but
it's unclear when or how
that might happen.
-From wire reports


INAilfl 'JiL, lriiya. -
Kenya's lead counterter-
rorism agency is working
to stop another Westgate
Mall-style terrorist attack
- that many here believe
Somali militants will try
again on a shoe-string
budget: The Anti-Terror
Police Unit in Nairobi has
just $735 to spend this
month.
Documents seen by The
Associated Press show that
even after the September
attack by al-Shabab on an
upscale mall in Nairobi
that killed at least 67 peo-
ple, the country's top anti-
terror security force is
allocated only around
$2,205 for its operations -
for maintenance and fuel
for cars, travel expenses and
office supplies in Janu-
ary, February and March.


$45,000 in salary and al-
lowances during a three-
month period.
Kenya is facing a budg-
etary crisis brought on by
high salaries paid to some
government employees, its
government has said. Pres-
ident Uhuru Kenyatta and
his vice president each
pledged last week to take a
20 percent pay cut, and
Kenyatta is urging other
top government officials to
do the same, saying the
country cannot afford to
pay so much in salaries.
Last week Kenyatta said
more resources will be al-
located to the police and
military "For a long time,
the security sector has not
been given the attention it
deserves. We are changing
that," the president said.


AUsoid LaU aress
Heavy black smoke rises from the Westgate Mall on
Sept. 23, 2013, in Nairobi, Kenya, after multiple large
blasts rocked the mall during an attack that left multiple
dead and dozens wounded.


The anti-terror unit is
struggling to do its work
because of limited funds,
said a security official
from the police headquar-
ters, who insisted on


anonymity because he is
not authorized to share the
information. The limited
budget makes preventing
another attack difficult, he
said.


Associated Press
A board of messages and well-wishes dedicated to people involved with the missing Malaysia Airlines jet-
liner MH370 is placed at the viewing gallery of Kuala Lumpur International Airport on Saturday in Sepang,
Malaysia. The Malaysian passenger jet missing for more than a week had its communications deliberately
disabled and its last signal came about seven and a half hours after takeoff, meaning it could have ended up
as far as Kazakhstan or deep in the southern Indian Ocean, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Saturday.



Malaysian leader: Plane's



disappearance deliberate


Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
someone deliberately di-
verted Malaysia Airlines
Flight 370 and shut down
communications with the ground,
and the jetliner continued flying
for six hours, Malaysia's prime
minister said Saturday The an-
nouncement shifted the focus of
the investigation to the crew and
passengers on the plane, which
has now been missing for more
than a week.
Prime Minister Najib Razak's
statement also meant the flight
path of Malaysia Airlines Flight
370 to Beijing could have strayed
as far as the southern Indian
Ocean or northwest to Kaza-
khstan, complicating the work of
search crews who already have
been scouring vast stretches of
ocean seeking the plane's 12-per-
son crew and 227 passengers.
Experts have previously said
that whoever disabled the plane's
communication systems and then
flew the jet must have had a high
degree of technical knowledge
and flying experience.


Najib stressed that investiga-
tors were looking into all possi-
bilities as to why the Boeing 777
deviated so drastically from its
original flight path, saying au-
thorities could not confirm
whether it was a hijacking.
The plane departed for an
overnight flight from Kuala
Lumpur to Beijing at 12:40 a.m.
on March 8. Its communications
with civilian air controllers were
severed at about 1:20 a.m., and
the jet went missing.
Investigators now have a high
degree of certainty that one of
the plane's communications sys-
tems the Aircraft and Commu-
nications Addressing and
Reporting System (ACARS) -
was partially disabled before the
aircraft reached the east coast of
Malaysia, Najib said. Shortly af-
terward, someone on board switched
off the aircraft's transponder,
which communicates with civil-
ian air traffic controllers.
The ACARS has two aspects,
said John Goglia, a former mem-
ber of the U.S. National Trans-
portation Safety Board. The
information part of the system


was shut down, but not the trans-
mission part.
The Malaysia plane's ACARS
transmitter continued to send
out blips that were recorded by
satellite once an hour for four to
five hours after the transponder
was turned off. The blips don't
contain any messages or data, but
the satellite can tell in a very
broad way what region the blips
are coming from.
Malaysia's prime minister said
the last confirmed signal between
the plane and a satellite came at
8:11 a.m. 7 hours and 31 minutes
after takeoff Airline officials have
said the plane had enough fuel to
fly for up to about eight hours.
He said authorities had deter-
mined that the plane's last com-
munication with a satellite was
in one of two possible arcs, a
northern one from northern
Thailand through to the border
of the Central Asian countries
Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan,
and a southern one from Indone-
sia to the southern Indian Ocean.
Najib said search efforts in the
South China Sea, where the plane
first lost contact, had ended.


After ashes found, daughter asks: Who did I bury?


Associated Press


CINCINNATI Del-
laina Grundy isn't sure
whether any of the cre-
mated remains buried in
her father's grave in a vet-
erans cemetery are his,
and she doesn't expect to
ever know
"I have had to move on,
but it's something that will
always be with me,"
Grundy said recently of
the emotional pain from
learning that a box of re-
mains bearing her father's
name had been found at a


former funeral home di-
rector's house in Dayton.
The box with Leroy Met-
calfe's name was among 55
boxes of cremated remains
found there in 2012 a
decade after his family
buried what they believed
to be the Army veteran's
ashes at Dayton National
Cemetery
The Montgomery County
coroner's office notified
Grundy in September 2012
about the remains at a
house co-owned by Scher-
rie McLin, former director
of the funeral home that


handled Metcalfe's 2002
burial. Police said a con-
tractor removing items
from the foreclosed house
found the boxes in a closet
McLin was under inves-
tigation at the time over
missing funeral service
money Her director's li-
cense already had been re-
voked and the funeral
home closed. She pleaded
guilty to theft and other
charges for taking thou-
sands of dollars in prepaid
funeral payments for per-
sonal use and was sen-
tenced last year to four


years in prison. None of
those charges involved the
remains at the house.
The coroner's office said
the remains in the box la-
beled as Metcalfe's seemed
consistent with the volume
of ashes in the other boxes,
and the plastic bag of re-
mains inside the box con-
tained the traditional
metal disc with Metcalfe's
name. But definite identi-
fication isn't possible.
"There is no genetic ma-
terial left in cremated re-
mains to test" said Ken Betz,
coroner's office director


tLCH-JO VV1llIIUI1 lll'- l \,iUlHlO bLAAC.A
Kenya is spending on the
Anti-Terror Police Unit,
the official said.
He cited an incident in
September 2012 in which
police stopped a planned
attack on parliament. A
suspect was arrested in a
house in a Somali section
of Nairobi with four sui-
cide vests, two improvised
explosive devices, fourAK47
rifles and ammunition, the
official said. The suspect
told police that he had
been given about $82,000
to carry out surveillance
and launch the attack.
The U.S. and U.K. only
give material support to
the anti-terror unit, such
as vehicles, equipment
and training, but does not
give financial assistance,
the security officials said.


World BRIEFS

Pandamonium


AJssociated rress
Sixteen hundred paper
pandas and 200 paper
Taiwanese bears, created
by French artist Paulo
Grangeon, are displayed
in front of the Chiang
Kai-shek memorial Hall on
Saturday during an exhibi-
tion called "Pandas on
Tour" in Taipei, Taiwan.

Car bombs kill 19
in Iraq's capital
BAGHDAD -A series of
car bomb attacks targeting
commercial areas and a
restaurant killed at least 19
people Saturday in Iraq's
capital, Baghdad, authori-
ties said.
Police officials said a car
bomb went off at night in a
commercial street in al-
Ameen district in southeast-
ern Baghdad, killing four
people and wounding 13.
Minutes later, police said
another car bomb explosion
near a falafel restaurant
killed three people and
wounded six in the capital's
Qahira neighborhood.
A third car bomb ex-
ploded in a commercial
street in western Baghdad,
killing four persons and
wounding 14 others, police
said. Later, a car bomb in a
commercial area of Bagh-
dad's northwestern neigh-
borhood of Shula killed four
people and wounded nine,
police said.
In Baghdad's northern
district of Hurriyah, a car
bomb also exploded, killing
four people and wounding
10, police said.
Health officials confirmed
the casualty figures. All offi-
cials spoke on condition of
anonymity because they
were not authorized to re-
lease the information to re-
porters.
No one immediately
claimed responsibility for
the attacks, but they bore
the hallmarks of an al-
Qaida breakaway group
that frequently uses car
bombs and suicide attacks
to target public areas in
their bid to undermine confi-
dence in the government.
Violence has escalated in
Iraq over the past year. Last
year, the country saw the
highest death toll since the
worst of the country's sec-
tarian bloodletting began to
subside in 2007, according
to United Nations figures.
The U.N. said violence
killed 8,868 last year in Iraq.
-From wire reports










EXCURSIONS


Manatee


S rings


If you were lucky enough to grow up within reasonable driving distance of a
freshwater spring, you probably spent many summer and spring days jumping
out of trees and belly-flopping or cannonballing into crystal-clear water.

Amanda Mims
Special to the Chronicle


springs are as much a part of
Florida's culture as its landscape,
and most everyone who lives on
the Nature Coast is familiar with these
natural treasures. Although there are
some magnificent springs right here in
Crystal River, Homosassa and Dunnel-
lon, it's definitely worth venturing away
from Citrus County to visit the other
springs scattered around Florida.
One such spring is at Manatee Springs State
Park in Chiefland, about 53 miles north of
Crystal River Like Three Sisters, this is a


first-magnitude spring, and it pumps out an
average of 100 million gallons of cool, clear
water every day The spring is popular with
spring-breakers and families alike, and many
who visit choose to camp for a weekend or a
week. The manatees that frequent the spring
in the wintertime have mostly gone away for
the season, so the spring is once again open
for swimming and diving.
Plan a day trip or a longer stay at Manatee
Springs State Park and you'll see there's
much more to do than just swim.
Scuba diving
Divers are welcome at Manatee Spring and
Catfish Hotel Sink. Open water, cave and cav-
ern diving opportunities are available.
See Page A23


Park details
WHAT: Manatee Springs State
Park
WHERE: 11650 N.W. 115th St.,
Chiefland
INFO: http: / /www.florida
stateparks.org/manateesprings
or 352-493-6072

AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
Swimmers make their way across
the first-magnitude spring at
Manatee Springs State Park in
Chiefland.




AlS SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 16 2014 C:Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House DO1: 1Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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302 201 302 2 2 Brad Pitt.'PG-13' DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire. (In Stereo) PG-13' c'MA' c cc c
H 2 303 202 303 ** "Epic"(2013) Real Time With Bill True Detective (In ** "A Good Day to Die Hard" *** "Harry Potter and the
303 202 303 'PG'Maher 'MA' c Stereo) 'MA' c (2013) Bruce Willis. 'R' cc Chamber of Secrets" (2002)
HW 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters ~Hunt Intl Hunters HuntIntl Beach lBeach Hawaii Hawaii Island Island Hunters IHuntlIntl
i 51 4 1 32 4 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Albie Damned" Ax Men "Tooth and No Man's Land (N) Cryptid: The Swamp
) 51 54 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'B Nail" (N)'PG'B c PG'B Beast'PG'
S3 4 3 "Hidden Away" (2013) "The Grim Sleeper" (2014, Docudrama) Army Wives: A Final Salute Cast and production "The Grim Sleeper"
S24 38 24 31 'PG-13' cc Dreama Walker, Macy Gray cc members reflect. (N) 'PG, D,L,V' (2014) cc
"Complicity" (2012) JennaBoyd. Several Restless Virgins" (2013) Vanessa "Bond of Silence" (2010, Docudrama) Kim
50 119 agers are forced to decide their fate. IJiii .. (In Stereoy'NR' c Raver, Greg Grunberg. (In Stereo)'NR' c
nI 3***0 '"Life of Pi" (2012) Suraj *2 "Armageddon" (1998) Bruce Willis. A hero tries to save ** "ThePurge"(2013) Ethan "Lolita
) 320 221 320 3 3 Sharma, Tabu. 'PG' c Earth from an asteroid. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc Hawke. (In Stereo) 'R' c Space
.J 4 4 4 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Lockup Tampa Lockup
42 41 42 "Overboard!" "Heart Stoppers" "Total Destruction"
J 109 65 109 44 53 Locked Up Abroad '14' Wicked Tuna Wicked Tuna "Into the Wicked Tii, i Operation Alaska Fish Wars Wicked Tuna "Operation
109 65 109 44 53 "Checkmate"'14' Storm"'14' T.U.N.,-. 14 "Rush the Line"'PG' TU.N.A."'14'
WItRJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. Sponge. Sam & Sam & See Dad instant Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
[W 103 62 103 Super Soul Sunday Super Soul Sunday Oprah Prime Oprah Prime (N) Lindsay (N)'14' Oprah Prime
44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
** "Beauty Shop" Shameless (In Stereo) Episodes House of Shameless (N) (In House of Episodes Shameless (In Stereo)
S340 241 340 4 (25)'P-f3' 'MA' 'MA' Lies MA Stereo)'MA' c Lies'MA' 'MA' 'MA' c
,_ 3 3 3 2 3 Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Crappy Bar Rescue "Hostile Bar Rescue "Critters Contractor Contractor Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
P37 43 37 27 36 PG Cantina"'PG' Takeover"'PG' and Quitters"'PG' 'PG'
(tA **3 "Men in Black 3" (2012, Action) Will Black Sails'VIII.' (iTV) Black Sails'VIII." (iTV) **2 "Total Recall" (2012 Science Fiction)
370 271 370 Smith. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Bc 'MA'Bc 'MA'c Colin Farrell. (In Stereo)'PG-13'Bc
S4 3 Ship Captain's Fins & Sport Sprtsman Reel Time MLB Preseason Baseball Boston Red Sox at Rays Season Preview
H 36 31 36 Shape TV Tales (N) Skins Fishing Adv. Tampa Bay Rays. (In Stereo) 2014
J,31 59 31 26 29 ,Robot" ** "The DayAfter Tomorrow" (2004, Action) Dennis *** "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984, "Alienvs.
S31 59 31 26 29 Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal, lan Holm. 'PG-13' cc Adventure) Harrison Ford. PG' ccPredator"
TS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Fast & Furious" (2009) Vin Diesel. **" 'Tower Heist" (2011) Ben Stiller. ** "Tower Heist" (2011) Ben Stiller.
*** "After the Thin Man" (1936, Comedy- **** "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance **** "Jesse James"(1939, Western) Tyrone
Ltf 169 53 169 30 35 Drama) William Powell. NR'c (DVS) Kid" (1969) Paul Newman. 'PG' cc Power, Henry Fonda.'GP' W
iJ Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid Survivalists take Naked After Dark Naked and
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'G' c Stereo)'G'c (In Stereo)'G' c on the Amazon. (N)'14' "Night 1"'14'c
J 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss My Five Wives 'PG' Long Island Medium Medium IMedium My Five Wives 'PG' Medium Medium
ni 350 26 30 "SteetDance"*** "Your Sister's Sister"(2011) **2 "Sahara"(2005) Matthew McConaughey **2 "Step Up Revolution" (2012) Ryan
350 261 350 Emily Blunt. R' (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Guzman. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c
sT 48 3 48 31 3 *** "Double Jeopardy" (1999, Suspense) ** "Along Came a Spider" (2001, Mystery) "Drb;au Suspense) Shia
48 33 48 31 34 Tommy Lee Jones.'R'B Morgan Freeman.'R' H DVS) Li-. 1, i .1 i i.- P'G-13'B (DVS)
TOON 38 58 38 33 ** "Garfield's Pet Force" [Regular Steven Teen King/Hill |King/Hill Burgers |Burgers Fam.Guy Fam.Gu
TRAV 9 106 9 44 PI.- Chowdown PI.- Chowdown Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Church Secrets Mysteries-Museum
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 truTV Top Funniest Selection Sunday (N) truTV Top Funniest World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
rtVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan's Island'G' Gilligan Gilligan Gligan Gilligan Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond
S 1- iLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Suits "Yesterday's
) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14a Victims Unit'14 a Victims Unit'14O Gone"'14'
t 117 9 117 CSI: Miami "10-7" (In '. :i i iiiii Fromthe CSI: Miami "Blood in CSI: Miami "Prey" (In CSI: Miami "48 Hours CSI: Miami
M 117 69 117 Stereo)'14'B c ., .-1 ithe Water"'14' Stereo)'14'B c to Life"'14' 'Vengeance"'14' c
WN J 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny HomeVideos *** "The Matrix" (1999, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves. 'R' "Collateral Damage"


Stop smoking on


Kick Butts Day


D earAnnie: From a
young age, I un-
derstood the
harmful effects of smok-
ing, because my grandfa-
ther died of lung cancer
just months before I was
born. He began smoking
in his teens, which is
when most adults who
smoke started.
Getting kids hooked
early is how tobacco
companies
ensure that a
future gener-
ation buys
their prod-
ucts. They
even create
tobacco prod-
ucts with fla-
vors like
cherry, mint
and cookies
'n' cream to K
appeal to
young people. ANNI
The result? MAIL
Every day,
more than
3,200 kids try their first
cigarette. According to
the surgeon general, 5.6
million kids alive today
will die early from smok-
ing unless we act to pre-
vent it. We must teach
kids about the dangers of
tobacco, no matter what
form or flavor it comes
in.
I hope everyone takes
a minute to learn more
about how they can help


by visiting tobac-
cofreekids.org. -Tyler
Long, 19, freshman at
Wofford College, Spar-
tanburg, S.C.
Dear Tyler Long:
Thank you for your let-
ter This year marks the
50th anniversary of the
first surgeon general's
report on smoking and
health, which made
headlines with its con-
clusions that
cigarette smok-
ing is responsi-
ble for a 70
percent in-
S crease in the
mortality rate
over non-smok-
ers, that there
is a correlation
between smok-
ing and lung
cancer, chronic
bronchitis, em-
E'S physema and
3BOX coronary heart
disease, and
that smoking
during pregnancy re-
duces the average
weight of newborns.
This year, Kick Butts
Day will be held Wednes-
day, March 19. This is a
national day of activism
empowering our young
people to speak out
against Big Tobacco.
For more information,
readers can go to
kickbuttsdayorg, as well
as tobaccofreekids.org.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
1:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
In 3D. 4:45 p.m. No passes.
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 2 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4;15 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) In 3D. 4 p.m.
No passes.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
4:30 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Ride Along" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
1 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
In 3D. 4:10 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Need for Speed" (PG-13)
In 3D. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13)
12:40 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7p.m.
"Tyler Perry's The Single
Moms Club" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Flash of light
6 Discord goddess
10 School (Abbr.)
14 City in Nigeria
19 Hindu princess (Var.)
20 Basil sauce
22 Blanches
24 Take on
25 Rapidly
26 State in India
27 Very short time
28 -Antoinette
29 Delivered
30 Piano adjuster
32 Ascot
34 Factor in heredity
35 Like some skirts
39 Rice Burroughs
41 Do needlework
43 Hearsay
45 With breath
47 Spinet
48 Part of NATO (Abbr.)
51 Four score and ten
53 Cut
55 Black cuckoo
56 Poor grade
59 Busy person
61 Ancient garment
62 Indigo
64 Stick together
66 Be in store for
68 Libertine
70 World
72 Place near India
73 Maladjusted one
75 Movable handle
77 Of the blood
79 Betsy or Diana
80 Old Greek city
82 Vetoed
84 Prevail
86 Go very slowly
88 Spiked
90 River in Russia
91 Drink of liquor
95 Ape
97 Deprive
101 Therefore
102 Hang in the air
104 Skull cavity
106 Damaged,
as a fender
108 Aim
110 Nullify


112 Streetcar
114 Baggy
115 Turn upside down
117 Toy-block name
118 Small bottle
120 Food fish
121 So-so grade
122 Abbr. in a
schedule
124 Part of speech
126 Sinew
128 Youngster
129 Ghost
131 Eddy orAllman
133 Forbidden
135 Magnetized rock
139 Drink noisily
141 Token amount
145 Image
146 Gaze
148 Miscalculation
150 Star State
151 Brown ermine
153 Sidestep
155 Store events
157 Lots and lots
158 Pavilions
159 Prevent from
acting
160 Brilliance
161 Facilitates
162 Precipitous
163 Ballad
164 Catch sight of
165 Way in


DOWN
1 Take hold of
2 Blazer part
3 Foolish
4 Delicious drink
5 Links item
6 Clean-air org.
7 What remains
8 Publish
9 One way to fly
10 Fitting
11 Jalopies
12 Juvenile heroine
13 Depart secretly
14 Take it on the-
15 Slowly, in music
16 Pierced with horns
17 Think
18 Bovine


Last letter
One of the Balkans
Phooey!
Former French money
Cask
Give off
Generous one
Of the kidneys
Burger topping
Kingly
Shore or
Washington
Genesis name
Namely (2 wds.)
Line for a pooch
Purloined
Yearned
Storage facility
Efface
Long fishes
Abundant
Dud of a car
Queen of the
Olympians
Shinbone
Wicked
Accurate
Made tractable
Fractional part
School event
Angry
Descendant
Actress Moore
Kind of orange
Mean dwelling
Force
Liable
Pointed arch
Muscle elasticity
Desert in Israel
Bend
"Dukes" deputy
Seat in a bar
Inventor Nikola -
Long poem
Stormed
Holy one
Act
Catches
unawares
Doughnut shape
"-, I'm Adam"
Goes quickly
Timber wolf
Cheered
Bundle


126 Paved area
outdoors
127 Show assent
129 Legislative body
130 Scoundrels
132 Hospital worker
134 Item for the
Tin Man


Leans
Musical group
"Lorna -"
One of the Muses
Where voters vote
Shore
Beneath
In disorder


Puzzle answer is on Page A23.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Perfect place
Do a farm job
Recipe meas.
Work unit
Piggery
Understand


2014 UrS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Poker run to benefit wounded vets


Special to the Chronicle

A "Star Spangled Heroes
Poker Run" fundraiser for the
Track Chair Initiative will be
staged Saturday beginning at
10 a.m.
The run will start with the


first card pickup at Mickey's
Bar & Grill, 770 N.E. Fifth St.,
Crystal River Subsequent stops
will be at American Legion Post
237,4077 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills; IR-RU Family
Social Club on U.S. 41, Inver-
ness (free food will be avail-


able); Crystal River Eagles
Aerie, 4272 Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa; and back to
Mickey's.
Registration and a $5 dona-
tion for the poker hand are
requested.
The event will include an


auction including a golfing
package at Black Diamond
worth $1,100 and a full-day fish-
ing charter There will be food,
live entertainment, raffles and
bike show
Special guest 16-year-old
Taylor Eve will sing the Na-


tional Anthem at 6 p.m.
For more information, call
352-563-0302.
The Track Chair Initiative
raises money to buy special
wheelchairs for wounded veter-
ans. To learn more, visit
www.independencefund.org.


VETERANS NOTES


Post 4252 open
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State
Road 200 in Hernando
(with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the pub-
lic at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch
every day and breakfast
on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include
bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show
Me the Hand at 2 p.m.
Thursday Dance music is
on tap every Friday and
bingo is played in the hall
Saturday
Friday features an all-
you-can-eat fish fry or
New England boiled
dinner
For more information
and menus, call the post
at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabayrr co
m and Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.


DAV transport
needs new van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has
more than 270,000 miles
on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with


DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and


The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and


veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish.

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits.
The monthly schedule:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa.
Third Wednesday -


Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment, call 352-527-
5915.

Chilton reunion
scheduled
The next reunion for
the USS Chilton will be
Sept. 17 to 24 in
Louisville, Ky.
For information, call
Joe at 352-341-5959.

Free yoga classes
offered for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with
the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes
to combat veterans at sev-
eral locations and times.
Call 352-382-7397.


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meetings, meals and
more for a specific post or
group, call or email the con-
tact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or correc-
tions to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost155@gmail.co
m, or visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Aux-
iliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brumett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. To accommodate
members who cannot drive at
night, breakfast meetings are
also held at Olive Tree at 9


a.m. weekly. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-2090
for days and other
information.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-


"j *rpr' ie,.The


Free Second
Opinion
If you have been to
another dentist and
would like a second
opinion about your
treatment, bring your
xrays and I will do a
'"%-,complete evaluation
and develop a
treatment plan with
I you that fits you
aind your needs.

6,l11e Cater to Cowards!'"
Ledger Dentistry
Jererr,. 'ALedger DMD PA

IJ-\rti r Hn _rr -, -
(352) 628-3443
SLedgerdentistry.com--11I
Led ge r dent ist ry. co m


447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M.
Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155,6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
National Seabee Veter-
ans of America Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call John Lowe at


352-344-4702.
National Seabee Veter-
ans of America Auxiliary
ISLAND X-23 meets at
9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-697-
5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citruspur-
pleheart.org or call 352-382-
3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at the
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim
Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-
637-6206.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at


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352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Remaining meetings in 2014
are: April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 meets at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or
email seacapt34447@
yahoo.com or Robert Currie
at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call


Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Mem-
bers can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition; call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, seeks to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. Call Charles
Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@
servicesource.org.


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VETERANS


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 A19




Paqe A20 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014




VETERANS
S- CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Lifetime of service


Post offers Tax-Aide service
Wall Rives Post 58 of the American
Legion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, hosts
the AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation
services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday
through April 9.
Call Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.

Come dance, dine at Legion
American Legion Post 155 invites the
public to a St. Patrick's Day Dinner and
Dance Monday in the smoke-free dining
hall at the post, 6585 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River
Tickets are $10. Doors open at 4 p.m. and
dinner will be served from 5 to 6 p.m. On
the menu are corned beef and cabbage,
red potatoes, coffee and tea and dessert.
Turner Camp Dave will provide entertain-
ment from 6 to 9 p.m.
Proceeds will benefit the programs of
the Voiture 40&8. Call 352-795-6526.

Purple Heart group to convene
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
conduct its bimonthly meeting at 1 p.m.,
Tuesday at the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto, a half mile
south of State Road 44.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib- U.S.
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart retired
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member
To learn more, visit www.citruspurple
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.

VFW to serve roast pork
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a
roast pork dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
The Monday St. Patrick's Day dinner of
corned beef and cabbage with potatoes
and carrots will be served from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance only A
For more information, call 352-465-4864. thc

Post 77 invites all to jam wo
Everyone is welcome to join the 28
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a car
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday with Nashville
artist John Thomas and the Ramblin' Gu
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing N(
instruments or singing, and those who- ra
want to just enjoy the music are welcome. Cuth
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks lings
are available for a donation. morE
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in force
Inverness. For more information, call 352- whe]
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444. 25, 1
which
Auxiliary to stage sales caI
American Legion Post 237 Auxiliary will got e
stage a yard and bake sale beginning at I joil
8 a.m. Saturday in Beverly Hills Plaza. Af
Everyone is welcome. meta
The post is at 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, ler v
Beverly Hills. Es
reco
Elks vets breakfast slated agait
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 on Lemon Unit
Street next to the boat ramp in Hernando shut
will host a veterans breakfast open to the for d
public from 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday March 23. N(
Omelets, pancakes, eggs and bacon, juice thou
and coffee will be served. Veterans will be in an
served free of charge. Donations will be work
appreciated from other guests. Espe
For more information, call 352-727-2027. As
rour
Bingo open to public at post on e
The public is invited to play bingo sure
Thursday at American Legion Wall-Rives throi
Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.; games start ing I
at 6 p.m. teari
Dinner is available for $5. caus
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. By
Butf
Public can eat shrimp, wings Hon
well
Everyone is welcome to join Blanton- as w
Thompson American Legion Post 155 in othe
Crystal River on Wednesday for wings or ship
shrimp basket lunches in the lounge from Yoke
noon to 3 p.m. "I
All proceeds benefit veterans' programs, short
For more information, call 352-795-6526. 15th
Japs
Post welcomes public for fun or
lievw
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170 But i
Vet Lane (County Road 491), offers several H(
events that are open to the public. Flor
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in the smoke- aftei
free hall. Card bingo and grill night is at vers,
5 p.m. Wednesday in the Canteen. Darts ing i
are at 7 p.m. Monday and Fridays in the then
Canteen. "S
Golf Leagues are Monday and Thursday worn
mornings, pack
For more information, call 352-746-0440. It

Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.


* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Navy and Army National Guard veteran Lt. Col., retired, Herman "Hank" Butler began his military service in 1950 and
ed in 1985.


)uty with National Guard follows war


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


our years in the
U. S. Navy
weren't enough
for Hank Butler
after he left following
SKorean War, he
uld add an additional
years to his military
reer, in the National
ard.
ow living in Crystal River, Butler
raised by his uncle on a farm in
hbert, Ga. was one of nine sib-
s, five of them combining to serve
e than 100 years in the armed
es. Butler wanted to join the Navy
m the Korean War started on June
950, but he was living on a farm,
ch meant bringing in the harvest
e first.
couldn't leave the farm until we
everything together," he said. "But
ied the Navy to get off the farm."
ter boot camp, and then attending
il smith school in San Diego, But-
was assigned to the USS Cape
sperance, an aircraft carrier
mmissioned when hostilities
rist Korea started. Its mission was-
Sprovide air support for the
:ed Nations ground troops, but to
tle aircraft from the U.S. to Japan,
deployment in other areas.
) planes flew from its decks. Al-
gh admittedly Butler "was never
ny combat situations," the repair
k he did to keep the Cape
erance afloat was vital.
were the nearly 500 planes -14
[d trips, approximately 35 aircraft
ach that were delivered.
here were some close calls, to be
. A typhoon the fleet sailed
ugh in 1952 wreaked havoc, flood-
parts of the Cape Esperance and
ing up portions of the deck, nearly
ing the ship to capsize.
y the time he left the Navy in 1954,
er had sailed to the Philippines,
g Kong, Guam and Thailand, as
as Japan, with a few other stops
ell. And before he left, he had an-
r assignment, aboard the repair
USS Ajax, which was docked in
)hama, Japan.
was in charge of the welding
p," he said. "That was actually my
trip (across the Pacific), to
in."
ice discharged in 1954, Butler be-
ed his military career was over
in truth, it was just beginning.
e caught up with his family in
ida, where they had relocated, but
r a while and after a few con-
ations with his sister, who was liv-
n Idaho he decided to move
e.
he told me there was plenty of
k out there," Butler said. "So I
:ed up and left."
was there that Butler first got


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


involved with the National Guard, and
one major reason he decided to join
was a chance to become an aviator In
1957, Butler was among the first en-
rolled in the Idaho National Guard's
Officer Training School, getting his
commission as a second lieutenant in
July 1958.
Unfortunately, his dream of becom-
ing a helicopter pilot was dashed
when he failed his vision test (he
would later pass that test twice -
but by then it was ruled he was too old
to become a pilot). So, his specialty
became field artillery
After graduating from the Armor
Officer Basic Course in Fort Knox, Ky,
he would serve with the Army
National Guard and the Army Reserve
until joining the Florida National
Guard in June 1964. He would eventu-
ally rise to the rank of lieutenant
colonel in the National Guard, taking
a variety of classes for different posi-
tions, from field artillery and tank de-
ployment to technician and, of course,
helicopter aviation.
During the two weeks spent during
summers on maneuvers, Butler would
command an artillery battery that con-
sisted of six guns and 105 personnel.
But despite the training, the Na-
tional Guard is not the Army It is,
however, a military force, with units in
all 50 states, plus the District of
Columbia and the U.S. territories of
Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin


Islands.
When Butler moved back to Florida
in 1964, he remained an active part of
the National Guard, training in
Tampa, Bartow, Lakeland, Panama
City, Pensacola and Miami, to name
a few
The National Guard has plenty of
people like Butler, former veterans
who want to remain active in a sup-
porting role. Guard units meet once
weekend a month, then spend two
weeks during the summer training -
not summer camp kind of training, but
something more serious, something
that includes tactical and strategic
support
Butler admits he enjoyed it.
"I had a good time," he said, then
added with some hesitation, "I en-
joyed most of it, some of it I didn't.
"In the summer of '75, we had those
hurricanes come through on the coast,
in Fort Walton Beach. That wasn't a
fun thing to do. But that's what the
National Guard does, help local
officials."
"I had an interesting career and I
enjoyed most of it"
Butler knows that despite his exten-
sive training in so many different
areas of the military, he never did see
action. He also knows how important
his job was.
"I'm not a combat soldier," he said.
"But it takes a lot of support to keep
combat soldiers going."


Name: Hank Butler
Rank: E4 in the U.S. Navy;
Lt. Col. in the U.S.
National Guard
Branches: U.S. Navy,
U.S. National Guard
Years: Navy, 1950-54;
Idaho National Guard,
1957-61 (active); Army
Reserve, 1961-64; Florida
National Guard, 1964-85
(active)
Stations: Navy, aboard
USS Cape Esperance,
USS Ajax in Japan;
National Guard (in
Florida), Bartow,
Lakeland, Tallahassee,
Pensacola, Miami,
Cape Blanding


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Awards: Navy Good Conduct Medal; National Defense Service Medal;
China Service Medal; Navy Occupation Medal; Korean Service Medal;
Armed Forces Reserve Medal with one hourglass device; Army Reserve
Components Achievement Medal with clusters; United Nations
Service Medal; Florida Distinguished Service Medal; Active State
Service Ribbon with one cluster




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Continuing thanks


to service members


always in order


his is for all the veterans, some of
whom I've had the privilege of
meeting throughout my 39 years
as a professional journalist. I won't drop
names, but I'll never forget them.
I only have enough room to list a
fraction of them, but my thanks go to
each and every one.
Two sisters both became active-duty
airplane mechanics during
World War II.
A gentleman, as a teen, was leaning
against the hangar at Lakehurst, N.J.,
and witnessed the Hindenburg explode.
He later joined the armed forces and
flew bomber runs.
A high school graduate from a tiny
town in the mountains of New England
served two tours in Vietnam, as a door
gunner and a tunnel rat. He hated him-
self for what he'd had to do, but if he
hadn't, how many of our soldiers would
have died?
A young (later famous) musician
worked as an engineer on the USS Nau-
tilus SSN-571, the world's first opera-
tional nuclear-powered submarine. He
was brave enough to forgo the warnings
that in working so closely with a vessel
such as this, he, his children or even his
grandchildren may be affected from his
exposure to the radiation.
Later, one of his sons trained U.S. Air
Force fighter pilots. Another served
both surface and submarine duty for the
U.S. Navy.
One seaman was aboard the hospital
ship Solace AH-5, which happened to be
in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7,1941. When I
met him, he was about to receive a
medal on the 50th anniversary of that
fateful day He couldn't understand why
he'd earned anything. In his mind, he'd
contributed little, since he wasn't shoot-
ing down enemy planes.
I asked him to describe the scene.
There was utter chaos; the water filled
with sailors splashing away burning fuel
atop the waves. He pulled injured men
from the water and carried them inside


Barbara
Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


the ship for treatment
When I asked, "what if you hadn't
been there to do that?" He replied that
many of them would have drowned.
I thanked him for being there. We
talked about what if this or that one
hadn't been brought aboard by him and
died before doing something else in life
that made even the smallest bit of his-
tory His eyes showed his realization.
He looked at me and to my surprise,
he said, "In the 50 years since that day,
I've never felt I'd done anything impor-
tant during that war, and now, 50 years
later, you're the first person to make me
feel what I did was worth something."
Everyone's part is important Peace
time. War time. Everyone touches some-
one else's life and the effects trickle
down through the years.
If you hear a veteran express dismay
that his or her part didn't or doesn't
matter, ask them what would happen if
they had not been at a particular place
on a particular day, at a particular time.
It makes a difference.
CCVC membership runs from January
through December Please renew your
$10 annual membership. We need you!
Call Gary at 352-527-4537.
Don't forget our next yard sale date is
April 12. Call Dan at 352-400-8952.
Barbara L Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She maybe
contacted via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group may
be found at wwwccvcfl.org.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.


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Going...


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SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 A21




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A22 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE EXCURSIONS SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 A23


Associated Press
Warm weather draws spring beakers and locals to Pensacola Beach at Pensacola Beach in Pensacola.





SPRING BREAK IN FLORIDA:




HERE COME THE TOURISTS


Associated Press

PENSACOLA- From
portable beach jails to extra
emergency medical staffing,
Florida is coping with the an-
nual but not altogether un-
welcome invasion otherwise
known as spring break.
But if your impression of
spring break from MTV and
"Girls Gone Wild" is of an un-
scripted, chaotic mess of
beaches, booze and bikinis,
you're only partly right The
state's Gulf Coast does experi-
ence an onslaught of thousands
of teenagers and college stu-
dents every spring. But the fact
is, the bulk of spring tourism to
the state is families, said Paul
Phipps, spokesman for Visit
Florida.
And this year, Phipps expects
March and April to break
Florida tourism records be-
cause of pent-up demand cre-
ated by unusually cold and
snowy weather in much of the


country
'January and February num-
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and we expect that trend to
continue," he said.
More than half the state's
spring break visitors will head
to theme parks and other at-
tractions in Orlando. This is the
third-most popular time of year
to visit Orlando after peak sum-
mer and Christmastime, ac-
cording to Mark Jaronski,
spokesman for Visit Orlando.
Advance hotel bookings for
March and April already indi-
cate a record spring season for
the area, he said, despite the
lack of discounts this time of
year
In Panama City Beach, offi-
cials are preparing for a differ-
ent demographic: thousands of
teens and 20-somethings. Dan
Rowe, president of the Panama
City Beach Convention and Vis-
itors Bureau, expects 250,000 to
300,000 college students during
March.


The city brings in dozens of
additional law enforcement
staffers from outside agencies
to handle the crowds, along
with a mobile booking unit with
a juvenile detention area.
Panama City Beach Police
Chief Drew Whitman, who has
20 years of experience with
spring break law enforcement,
said the mobile unit allows offi-
cers to enforce underage drink-
ing and other violations without
making the two-hour round trip
from beach to county jail.
The spike in law enforcement
activity following a slow winter
has already started. Between
March 7 and March 12, Whit-
man said Panama City Beach
made 211 arrests, most for un-
derage drinking, public intoxi-
cation, DUI and other spring
break-related offenses, includ-
ing one person charged with
sexual assault, he said.
And despite precautions and
enforcement, tragedies happen.
Rice University student Reny


Jose went missing early March
3 after witnesses said he took
LSD the previous evening at a
beach house. Officials have
been searching for him since.
Another spring breaker died
March 9 in a DUI-related crash.
Whitman encourages com-
monsense safety for spring
breakers, like sticking together
and keeping an eye on each
other and an eye on drinks, so
nobody can slip anything in
them.
"The hotels have extra secu-
rity staff, we have on our web-
site information about how to
enjoy spring break responsibly
and police walk the beaches
and interact with the kids
throughout the day to make
sure that they are staying smart
and to addresses situations be-
fore they occur," said Rowe, the
convention and visitors bureau
president.
Even after spring break,
Panama City Beach law en-
forcement stays busy through


the summer with tens of thou-
sands of visiting families and
other tourists.
Other beaches have fewer
college-age spring breakers, but
still expect crowds. Destin has
long been a favorite destination
for vacationers throughout the
Southeast and expects crowds
again this season.
Another concern is beach
safety in a region where rip
currents claim lives from
drowning every year
"The beach is a lot of fun but
it can be a dangerous place par-
ticularly when people are
drinking and there is rough
surf," said Sgt. Jason Fulghum,
who oversees beach patrols for
the Okaloosa County Sheriff's
Office.
Buck Lee, president of the
Santa Rosa Island Authority,
which oversees Pensacola
Beach, said officials monitor
beach conditions and add life
guards and beach patrols on
the roughest days.


SPRINGS
Continued from Page A17

Snorkeling
Snorkeling is a popular activity in the spring. Bring
a snorkel, mask, fins and an underwater camera if you
have it and you're ready to go.

Hiking
The park has more than 8 miles of off-road trails
that wind through swamp and upland areas.

Biking
Mountain bikers are welcome on the off-road trail.
Bicycles are also allowed on the roads within the
park.

Paddling
Canoes, kayaks and pedal boats can be rented from
the park's concessionaire for use on the Suwannee
River, which is connected to the spring. Shuttle serv-
ices are also available. The camp store and conces-
sion services are open Friday through Sunday from
October through April and every day May through
September

Camping
The park's campground has 78 campsites and three
loops. Each loop has its own bathhouse. Campsites
can accommodate recreational vehicles up to 40 feet
in length as well as tents.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
Besides swimming, snorkeling and scuba diving, visitors at Manatee Springs State Park also enjoy cycling,
paddling, hiking and camping.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nature Coast Mustangs go cruising


Special to the Chronicle
A group of Nature Coast Mustang club members, family and friends recently participated in a car cruise to Gator Joe's restaurant on Lake Weir in Ocklawaha, northeast of
The Villages. The weather was reportedly great as the 20 Mustangs in the caravan cruised along the Florida backroads through the countryside.



Garden Club to trek to Spring Garden Festival


Special to the Chronicle
The Garden Club of Crystal
River will host a day trip to the
Spring Garden Festival at the
Kanapaha Botanical Gardens
in Gainesville on Saturday,
March 22.


The bus will depart at
8:30 a.m. from the Winn-Dixie
at Meadowcrest Boulevard at
State Road 44 in Crystal River
Passengers need to arrive no
later than 8 a.m. Vehicles may
be left in the parking lot.
Estimated time of return is


5:30 p.m.
This is Gainesville's premier
horticultural event. The Spring
Garden Festival features about
200 booths offering plants, land-
scape displays, garden acces-
sories, arts and crafts, exhibits
and food. Also featured are a


walk-through butterfly conser-
vatory, children's activities
area, live entertainment and
live auctions.
A variety of food vendors will
be available for lunch. Bottled
water will be available during
the bus ride. Attendees who


may wish to purchase plants,
garden accessories, etc., should
bring a box or container for the
storage of purchases in the bus'
luggage compartment.
For reservations, call Mary
Lou Rothenbohl at 352-
795-1728.


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ExcURSIONS


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR THE RECORD


ENGAGED


Feb. 17-March 2, 2014
Divorces
Kara Nicole Mitchell Davis, Inverness
vs. Aaron Kieth Davis, Inverness
Natalie A. Krause, Inverness vs.
Dennis A. Krause, Beverly Hills
Bruce F. Storman, Crystal River vs.
Chloe J. Storman, Crystal River
Cynthia Turpin, Inverness vs. Vernon
Tyrone Turpin, Orlando
Tracy L. Vardaman, Crystal River vs.
John E. Vardaman Jr., Crystal River
Matthew Jason Chaney vs. Jessica
Dawn Chaney, Hernando
Robert Crowther, Dunnellon vs.
Nuchnapa Crowther, Citrus Springs
Aaron A. Shields, Beverly Hills vs.
Barbara A. Shields, Beverly Hills
Janice E. Smith, Inverness vs.
James W. Smith, Homosassa
Shawn Swenson, Inverness vs.
Peggy Swenson, Inverness

Marriages
Daniel Lee Clark, Beverly Hills/
Molly Shetrone, Beverly Hills
Michael Andrew Dinkins,
Inverness/Samantha Lynn Albury,
Inverness
Kenneth Julian Dyvig Jr.,
Homosassa/Elizabeth Marie Stevenfield,
Homosassa
Cesar Manuel Jaimes IV,
Floral City/Samantha Deann Crisp,
Floral City


Have St. Paddy's
with Knights
The Knights of Colum-
bus 15624 will have a St.
Patrick's Dinner Dance at
5:30 p.m. Monday at St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton.
The event takes place
in the parish hall and will
offer an Irish boiled din-
ner of corned beef and
cabbage, along with enter-
tainment. Tickets are $15
for adults and children
younger than 12 get in for
$7.
For more information,
call Don Reese at 352-
216-2966.

Water group to
gather Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Inc.
Save Our Waters Week


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of
public record, available from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Cody Michael Maguire,
Inverness/Meghan Renee Burns,
Inverness
Christopher Albert Marley II,
Homosassa/Cynthia Ann Brush,
Homosassa
Hugh Harold McMillan, Lecanto
/Kelly Lynn Merrick, Lecanto
Matthew Brett Pullen,
Citrus Springs/Brittany Nicole Dowling,
Citrus Springs
Vance Logan Shaffer,
Beverly Hills/Linda Randall Shaffer,
Beverly Hills
Robert James Spaanstra, Beverly
Hills/Amanda Noel James, Beverly Hills
Sean Michael Steffy, Citrus
Springs/Amanda Marie Driggers,
Citrus Springs
Jerry Wayne Williams,
Inverness/Linda Ann Ward, Inverness
John William Baker, Inverness/
Diana L. Brown, Inverness
Douglas B. Bannister,
Hernando/Rhonda Ann Spencer,
Hernando
Lynn William Brady, Homosassa/
Gail Shannon Dow Gilliland, Homosassa


GET TOGETHER


Committee will meet at
10 a.m. Monday in room
219 at the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600
West Sovereign Path, off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the
meeting is to plan and co-
ordinate activities for Cit-
rus County's 19th annual
Save Our Waters Week,
Sept. 20 to 27. All inter-
ested organizations and
individuals are welcome
to attend and encouraged
to participate.
For more information,
call Lace Blue-McLean at
352-201-0149.

Amateur radio
group to gather
The Citrus County Ama-
teur Radio Emergency
Service meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday on the


Henry Richard Campbell Jr., Bristol,
Conn./Soraya Del Carmen Suquilanda
Villavicencio, Machala, Ecuador
Kenneth Carl Dryden,
Inverness/Melanie Lynn Strickland,
Inverness
Jonathan Lagrant Dumas,
Lecanto/Natasha Adela Velasquez,
Lecanto
Johnny Alan Higginbotham Jr.,
Inverness/Krystal Lee Fultz, Inverness
Jason Allen Holleman, Beverly
Hills/Alison Rae Budzik, Beverly Hills
Stephen Gerald Jackson, Tuscola,
Il./Simone Adele Jackson, Tuscola, Ill.
Jason Josif Kozevski, Inverness/
Silvana Adjioska, Inverness
Benjamin Franklin Olson,
Homosassa/Angela Nicole Durrance,
Homosassa
Joseph Sciongay, Hernando/Julie
Arlene Walls, Hernando
Aaron Chadwick Tomasovic,
Clermont/Heather Erin Snodgrass,
Clermont
David Timothy Wilson,
Dunnellon/Jeannie Darlene Wilson,
Dunnellon


146.775 mhz repeater with
a PL tone of 146.2 hz.
Meetings are once a
month at the Citrus
County Emergency Opera-
tions Center in Lecanto.
For more information and
meeting dates, contact
Jerry Dixon, WA6QFC at
WA6QFC@ARRL.net.

Learn to play
the harmonica
The Citrus County
Harmonica Club jams
from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Heads & Tails
Lounge, 1.5 miles south of
Floral City on U.S. 41.
Beginners are welcome.
Harmonicas are available
for $5.
A free group lesson in-
corporating the Harmon-
ica Exercise for Lung
Program (HELP) devel-


oped by Dr John
Schaman will be offered.
If you ever wanted to
learn to play harmonica,
here's your chance.
Breathe better, live
longer, have more fun.
The Citrus County Har-
monica Club has no dues,
no officers and no mem-
bership list.
For information, call
Bruce at 202-669-1797.

Writers gather
to critique work
The Yankeetown/Inglis
Fiction Writers Critique
Group meets at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Yankee-
town/Inglis Woman's Club.
Any writers of fiction
are invited to join. Con-
tact Lynn Sholes at Lynn
sholes@gmail.com or call
352-447-2279.


Whitelaw/Thompson


Nichole Whitelaw and
Brian Thompson of
Crystal River have
announced their
engagement.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Sonja
Whitelaw and the late
Charles (Nick)
Whiltelaw of Crystal
River Nichole is a 2008
graduate of Lecanto
High School. She is
currently employed as
an assistant manager at
Cato Fashions in
Inverness.
Her fiance is the son
of Tim Thompson of
Inverness and Angie
Thompson of Troy, N.C.


Humane Society
CITRUS CO.

Scooby
Do


Brian is a 2006 graduate
of West Montgomery
High School, Mount
Gilead, N.C. He was
enlisted in the Marine
Corps from 2006 until
2010. Presently, he
works as a security
guard at Duke Energy in
Crystal River
The couple will
exchange wedding vows
in an afternoon
ceremony June 21, 2014,
at the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park gazebo. The
reception will follow at
Pepper Creek Terrace.
The couple will reside
in Lecanto.


Scooby Do is about
4 years old and weighs
about 12 pounds. He
appears to be a rat terrier
and, possibly, Dachshund
mix. He is a little shy in
the beginning, but once he
warms up, he loves
people. Scooby works so
hard to please, it is just
heart wrenching. He is a
complete gentleman in the
house and goes to the
door when he needs to go
out. He would do best in
an adult home. He gets
along with other dogs and
all his medical work is
done. To view Scooby Do
and other pets for
adoption, visit www.
roomforonemore.net. For
more information, call
Karron at 352-560-0051.
Special to the Chronicle


Stories worth telling.wr 0



Lives worth liZlV


"My wife and I both "
loved Dr. Cultrera
from the first time
we met her. I can
discuss anything with
her. She has been a---
marvelous support and always gives
us hope. I feel so much better when I
leave her office. She is just a fantastic
person and a great doctor."
ROY PHILLIPS, THE VILLAGES


the XA e-", ,co PC..C.\
he ,,Ie.; Mst e C). e (e W '
ifl HC1ALL,
-- BETTY1l'"
10000ow


"I knew Dr. Gandll / -
betore I ,as
diagnosed and there
Wias no quesdon
about \'hjch doctor i
90- tortreit me.. _
r. Gandi took all the fear out of,
it for me. He was so cahnin, and he
is such a kind person and so genuine.
I had no anxieties when I walked
through his door that's for sure."
,YERHxsurDO


Watch the videos

of our stories...

Go TOTE IKSBLO O0IW
* flcancer.com/fonseca
* flcancer.com/cultrera
M flcancer.com/gandhi


/ FLORIDACANCER


SP E C I A L I S T S
& Research Institute


CITRUS COUNTY
LOCATIONS
Inverness
2231 Highway 44 West
Suite 203
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400
Lecanto
521 N. Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746.0707


Word0las Mdiin. Hmeow Cae.FL anceco


TOGETHER


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 A25




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


There
are


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A26 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014










SPORTS


No. 1 Florida is back
in the SEC tournament
championship game after
defeating Tennessee./B4



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Baseball/B2
0 Tennis/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 College basketball/B4
0*NBA, NHL/B4
0 Golf/B5
l Dr. Ron Joseph/B5


Grey atop St. Pat's leaderboard


Golfer up two strokes

heading into today's

final roundat IG&CC
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
With rounds of 71 and 73, Austin Grey
leads a 149-man field after the second
day of the 52nd annual St. Patrick's Golf
Championship at the Inverness Golf and
Country Club.
The three-day event features golfers


from as far north as Cape Cod, Mass. and
as far south as Uruguay
Jack Sasso hails from the former, and
owns the highlight of the tournament
after firing a 187-yard ace from the No. 4
gold tee on Friday
"It took me 70 years to get my first
hole-in-one," said Sasso, who resides in
Inverness during the winter and has par-
ticipated in the St. Pat's tourney three
previous times. "I sort of choked up on
my driver and hit it up there, and it had
a little draw on it and bounced up and
disappeared. I thought it was either in
the hole or over the green."
Sasso added three birdies over his
couple of rounds to mount a six-stroke


lead in the eighth flight with a two-day
score of 173.
"(Saturday), I was playing a little cau-
tious, trying not to screw up my score,"
he said.
After carding a pair of 73s, a consistent
Chris Bernhard joins Grey as the only
other golfer to card lower than a 74 both
days. He sits two strokes back of Grey at
146 in the championship flight, which
tees off at 1:30 p.m. today
Seven players in the championship
flight knocked at least seven shots off
their first-day score on Saturday, includ-
ing third-place's Jerry Blake (148), who
came down from a 78 to card a tourna-
ment-low of 70 on Saturday


JeffNeugebauer tied Grey with a Fri-
day-low of 71, but fell to fourth after
posting a 77 on his second outing. Mike
Downing, the 2013 champion, is still in
striking distance at 150.
"The golf course is great, the
weather's beautiful, I'm just not making
any putts," Downing said. "I've gotta be
around a 67 on Sunday to have a chance,
so I've gotta make the putts. Any of us
first five can win this thing. Austin Grey
is younger, so none of us know what to
expect from him, but he's definitely a
great player It'll be fun (today)."
Crystal River's Jason Russ is certainly


Always thinking


Gurnani uses

brain on, off

court at Lecanto

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
There are athletes and there
are student/athletes.
Lecanto High senior Rishi
Gurnani would be categorized
in the latter department be-
cause the 5-foot-9, 145-pounder
is so much more than a tennis
player
Gurnani 101
Rishi is the youngest of three
children to Lecanto's Par-
manand and Jaya Gurnani.
In less than 11 weeks, Rishi
will also be the third sibling to
graduate from LHS. His two
older sisters, Tina and Sweta,
both graduated from and com-
peted for the Panthers tennis
teams.
Tina is completing her med-
ical residency at the University
of Florida while Sweta is cur-
rently working in Memphis with
International Paper
Rishi Gurnani initially
picked up a tennis racquet at "4
or 5 years old."
As a multi-sport athlete,
though, he didn't immediately
find his niche on the courts.
Instead Gurnani, who was
born at Inverness' Citrus Me-
morial Hospital and is a life-
long Citrus County resident,
remained athletically active
playing soccer, baseball, foot-
ball and even golf.
Prior to enrolling into sev-
enth grade, Gurnani recalled
his father encouraging him to
lean toward focusing on an in-
dividual sport
Since father knew best, he
followed dad's advice and
walked on to the Lecanto Mid-
dle School tennis team.
He was talented enough to
anchor the No. 1 singles as a
seventh- and eighth-grader
He concluded his eighth-grade
season by capturing the season-
ending Citrus County middle
school tennis tournament
See P Page B3
Lecanto senior Rishi Gurnani,
the Chronicle's Boys Tennis
Player of the Year the past two
seasons, is currently 10-2
overall at No. 1 singles for the
Panthers in 2014.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/Chronicle file photo


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Page B3


Local H.S.

runners


claim

Shamrock
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Running
in 52 degree weather
seemed to agree with two
Citrus County teen distance
runners.
Crystal River High School
senior Brandon Harris ran
through the cold to win the
16th annual Shamrock
Scamper 5K run Saturday at
Citrus High School. He had
a time of 15:53.
Citrus High junior Alyssa
Weber recorded a personal
best of 19:03 when she fin-
ished as the top female in
the race.
Beverly Hills resident
Erik Smith, 49, was happy
he wasn't running against
the teenagers Saturday He
won the first ever Shamrock
Scamper 10K with a time of
42:35.
"Cool," said Harris of his
win. "It was chilly A couple
of ups and downs. I've been
doing track. I would rather
run a 5K."
He said the cold weather
worked for him.
The weather did not
bother Phil Brunet. He fin-
ished second with a 16:13.
He came down from Mon-
treal, Quebec, Canada for a
kayak event in Floral City
"I was overheating," he
said. "It felt great. I stayed
on his (Harris) heels. I'm 27.
A lot of the kids from
Canada are here for the
paddling. I cook for them."
Weber, one of the top Cit-
rus County cross country
runners, was happy for the
cool temperature.
"It was good," Weber said.
"I love the cold. I couldn't
feel anything. This is my PR.
I always run it. I haven't won
this race before."
Laura Wingate, 49, fin-
ished 57th with a time of
24:41. Wingate is a teacher at
Crystal River High School.
She has become a triathlon
enthusiast and plans to com-
pete in a triathlon in late
June in Chicago.
She even overcame some
poor health before the race.
She found that running can
help get rid of some bad
feelings.
See Page B5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Myers leaves with bruised thigh in Rays' win


TB split squad

also defeats

Toronto

Associated Press
BRADENTON Wil
Myers left the game in the
third inning with a
bruised right quadriceps
and Ben Zobrist doubled,
scored a run and drove in
a run as a Tampa Bay
Rays split squad beat the
Pittsburgh Pirates 6-3 on
Saturday
Myers, last year's AL
Rookie of the Year, fouled
a ball off his leg and bent
over a few times. He was
then helped to the dugout
by Rays athletic trainer
Paul Harker
Zobrist drove in a run in
the first inning then dou-
bled and scored in the
third inning as the Rays
built a 4-1 lead against Pi-
rates starter Edinson
Volquez.
Rays 6, Blue Jays 3
PORT CHARLOTTE Erik


Bedard pitched into the fifth in-
ning in his bid to win a spot in
Tampa Bay's rotation, helping
a Rays split-squad beat the
Toronto Blue Jays 6-3.
Bedard allowed three runs
and six hits in 4 1/3 innings.
The left-hander is competing
with Jake Odorizzi and Cesar
Ramos to earn the fifth
starter's job as a fill-in for the
injured Jeremy Hellickson,
who's recovering from elbow
surgery.
Cards 6, Braves 2
KISSIMMEE Joe Kelly
pitched into the sixth inning
and had three hits to help the
St. Louis Cardinals beat the
Atlanta Braves 6-2.
Nationals 2,
Marlins 1
JUPITER Stephen
Strasburg outpitched Jose
Fernandez and the Nationals
beat the Marlins 2-1 in a
spring training game.
Orioles 2,
Yankees 1
SARASOTA- South Ko-
rean right-hander Suk-min
Yoon threw one shutout in-


Associated Press
The Baltimore Orioles' Jonathan Schoop hits a sacrifice
fly to score teammate Jemile Weeks from third during the
seventh inning Saturday against the New York Yankees in
Sarasota.


ning in his debut with the Bal-
timore Orioles, who got a
home run from Chris Davis in
a 2-1 victory over a New York
Yankees' split-squad.
Tigers 14, Astros 3
LAKELAND lan Kinsler
hit his first two home runs for
the Detroit Tigers, highlighting
a 14-3 win over the Houston
Astros.
Kinsler drove in four runs.
Torii Hunter and Danny Worth
each had three RBIs.


Mets 3,
Twins 3, 9 innings
PORT ST. LUCIE -Chris
Young hit his first home run
this spring and also singled as
a split squad of New York
Mets tied the Minnesota
Twins 3-all.
Diamondbacks 4,
Indians 2
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Paul
Goldschmidt hit a two-run
homer and an RBI double to


back Patrick Corbin's solid
tuneup for opening day in
the Arizona Diamondbacks'
4-2 victory over the Cleve-
land Indians.
Cubs (ss) 6,
Royals 5
SURPRISE, Ariz. James
Shields struck out 10 in six
scoreless innings for Kansas
City, but the Royals lost 6-5 to
a split-squad of Chicago
Cubs.
Reds 16, Brewers 4
PHOENIX-- Chris Heisey
hit his fifth spring homer and
Cincinnati had 18 hits in a 16-
4 victory over the Milwaukee
Brewers after Reds starter
Homer Bailey was scratched
with a sore right groin.
Dodgers (ss) 5,
Padres 4
GLENDALE, Ariz. Dee
Gordon had a leadoff triple in
Los Angeles' two-run first, and
a split-squad of Dodgers beat
the San Diego Padres 5-4.
Angels 4,
Rockies 4, 10 inns.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -


Mike Trout hit a two-run
homer, Jered Weaver labored
into the sixth inning and the
Los Angeles Angels tied the
Colorado Rockies 4-4 in 10
innings.
Giants (ss) 13,
Mariners 6
PEORIA, Ariz. Juan
Perez hit a solo home run and
Hector Sanchez had two hits
and an RBI as a split squad of
San Francisco Giants
pounded out 16 hits with a
lineup of mostly backups and
roster hopefuls in a 13-6 win
over the Seattle Mariners.
Mets 9, Cubs 4
LAS VEGAS Wilmer
Flores hit his first home run of
the spring and the Mets
topped the Chicago Cubs 9-4
in a split-squad game.
Rangers 16,
Athletics (ss) 15
PHOENIX Nick Williams
hit a pair of home runs and
Brent Lillibridge's sacrifice fly
in the ninth brought home the
winning run as the Texas
Rangers outlasted the Oak-
land Athletics 16-15.


Perfect first day for tennis


The Third Annual
Spring Classic
Tennis Tourna-
ment at Crystal
River High
School had a "
beautiful first -
day of competi- -
tion. The pro-
ceeds will
benefit the Ver- -,,
tical Ministries.
It all started Eric v
at 8:30 a.m. and Hoc
the first day ON TI
ended around 6
p.m. This morn-
ing, it will all start at 8:30
a.m. again. It is still possi-
ble to drop off donations of
non-perishable food
and/or barely used cloth-
ing at the tennis courts
until about 1 p.m.
Men's A Doubles
Jim Lavoie/Dave deMont-
fort def. Dennis Delapaz/
Matt Allen, 6-4, 6-0; Andy Bel-
skie/Barney Hess def. Mike
Walker/Wayne Steed, 6-3,


|







ra

E


6-0; Mike Brown/Donnie


Simmons def. Jim
Lavoie/
Dave deMontfort,
6-0, 6-2; Rick
t* Scholl/Kevin
t Scholl def. Andy
Z Belskie/Barney
Hess, 6-2,7-6.
Men's B
L Doubles
an den AJ Glenn/Dave
gen Goddard def.
ENNIS Marcial Irrizary/
Andrew Allen, 2-6,
7-5,10-7; Chris
Young/Vinnie Tremante def.
Matt White/Ryan Johnson, 7-5,
6-7,10-4;
Finals: Chris Young/Vinnie
Tremante def. AJ Glenn/Dave
Goddard, 6-1,6-4.
Men's Singles
Matt White def. Andrew
Allen, 6-2, 6-4; Coty Wiley
def. Ryan Johnson, 6-1, 6-4;
Matt Allen def. Dave Goddard,
6-1,6-0; Len Calodney def.
Matt White, 6-0,6-2; Coty


Wiley def. MattAllen, 6-2, 7-5.
Consolation Finals
Ryan Johnson def. Andrew
Allen, 6-3,6-0.
Ladies Singles
Finals: April Manley def.
Veronica Williams, 6-4,6-4.
Girls Singles
Peyton Burdette def. Mad-
die Seidenstucker, 8-2.
Ladies A Doubles
Micki Brown/Sally deMont-
fort def. Marjorie Bannish/
Beth Ensing, 6-7, 7-5,10-5;
Anna Mira/Lisa Steed def.
Veronica Williams/Maddie
Lewis, 6-3,7-6; Micki Brown/
Vicki Lavoie def. Peyton Bur-
dette/Maddie Seidenstucker,
6-1,6-2.
Girls Doubles
Burdette/Seidenstucker def.
Ensing/Williams, 6-4,4-6,10-4.
Mixed Doubles
Maddie Lewis/Coty Wiley
def. Judy Long/Gary Zolnierz,
6-2,3-6,10-8; April Manley/
Kevin Scholl def. Lisa Steed/
Wayne Steed, 6-0, 6-0.


Call Your Representative
Today! 352-563-5655


C TRUS .__ __COUNTY

Swww.chronicleonline.com


Sat., March 22, 3:00 PM



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




St. Pat's golf
tournament

Second round leaders
Championship Flight (blue tees)
Austin Grey71 73 144
Chris Bernhard 7373 146
Jerry Blake 7870 148
Jeff Neugebauer 71 77 148
Mike Downing 7476 150
Ken Godwin 7279151
First Flight (blue tees)
Nathan Connor 8178 159
Alan Chatman 8080 160
Tom Hendrick 81 80 161
Charles Kelly 8081 161
Second Flight (white tees)
Jason Russ 7773150
Bobby Shoemaker 8277 159
Dave Pollard 81 79 160
Third Flight (white tees)
Michael Fitzpatrick 7881 159
Rich Adamonis 7983 162
David McKean 7687 163
Fourth Flight (white tees)
Bill Vantassell 8578163
Richard Debusk 9078 168
Carl Cyr 8089 169
Bob Pennell 8386 169
Fifth Flight (white tees)
Jason Koon 8480164
Frankie Fama 8980 169
Mitch Hertig 8290 172
Sixth Flight (white tees)
Jim Jacobs 8789176
Frank Palka 8989 178
Mike Fitzpatrick 9386 179
Seventh Flight (gold tees)
Wes Pease 8783170
Bart Bennett 8788 175
Frank Pisarsky 8986 175
Bob Ruggere 8887 175
Eighth Flight (gold tees)
JackSasso 8192173
PatMitchell 9188179
LarryWood 9091 181
Ninth Flight (gold tees; scoring: birdie 4; par 3;
bogey 2; double bogey 1)
Nick Nicholas 434487
Jeff Baker 444892
Dave Carroll 454792
PGA Tour

Valspar Championship
Saturday
At Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club, Copper-
head Course, Palm Harbor
Purse: $5.7 million
Yardage: 7,340, Par: 71
Third Round
Robert Garrigus 69-66-70 205 -8
Kevin Na 70-68-68 206 -7
John Senden 72-71-64-207 -6
Justin Rose 71-68-69 208 -5
RetiefGoosen 72-73-64-209 -4
Charley Hoffman 70-72-67 209 -4
Scott Langley 71-69-69 209 -4
Luke Donald 71-72-67-210 -3
Jason Kokrak 74-68-68-210 -3
Matteo Manassero 69-70-71 -210 -3
George McNeill 73-71-67- 211 -2
Ted Potter, Jr. 73-71-67- 211 -2
Will MacKenzie 73-70-68- 211 -2
James Driscoll 73-70-68- 211 -2
Freddie Jacobson 70-71-70-211 -2
David Hearn 71-70-70- 211 -2
Jim Furyk 71-69-71 -211 -2
Matt Every 68-71-72- 211 -2
Chesson Hadley 75-70-67-212 -1
Jordan Spieth 71-70-71 -212 -1
Carl Pettersson 71-70-71 -212 -1
John Merrick 70-70-72-212 -1
Greg Chalmers 68-72-72-212 -1
Jason Dufner 72-73-68 -213 E
Chad Collins 73-71-69 -213 E
MattKuchar 73-71-69 -213 E
K.J. Choi 72-72-69 -213 E
Russell Knox 70-73-70 -213 E
Gary Woodland 72-71-70-213 E
JoshTeater 73-70-70-213 E
Jonathan Byrd 70-73-70 -213 E
James Hahn 69-74-70 -213 E
Ben Crane 70-72-71 -213 E
Kevin Streelman 73-69-71 -213 E
Justin Leonard 71-71-71 -213 E
Michael Thompson 72-69-72-213 E
Tommy Gainey 69-72-72 -213 E
Peter Hanson 75-70-69-214 +1
Nicholas Thompson 76-69-69-214 +1
Justin Hicks 72-72-70-214 +1
Robert Allenby 73-71-70-214 +1
D.H. Lee 74-70-70-214 +1
Graham DeLaet 75-68-71 -214 +1
Morgan Hoffmann 74-69-71 -214 +1
Stephen Ames 72-70-72-214 +1
Rory Sabbatini 70-72-72-214 +1
Bill Haas 69-73-72-214 +1
Brian Harman 71-70-73-214 +1
YE.Yang 73-72-70-215 +2
Cameron Tringale 74-71-70-215 +2
BrendonTodd 70-75-70-215 +2
Davis Love III 74-70-71 -215 +2
Jerry Kelly 76-68-71 -215 +2
Ben Curtis 70-74-71 -215 +2
Michael Putnam 69-72-74-215 +2
Charles Howell III 71-70-74 215 +2
Harris English 72-69-74-215 +2
Daniel Summerhays 77-68-71 -216 +3
J.B. Holmes 71-74-71 -216 +3
BrandtSnedeker 72-73-71 -216 +3
Sang-Moon Bae 72-73-71 -216 +3
David Lingmerth 73-72-71 -216 +3
Woody Austin 71-71-74-216 +3
Pat Perez 68-71-77-216 +3
ErikCompton 72-73-72-217 +4
Ryo Ishikawa 73-72-72-217 +4
Padraig Harrington 75-70-72-217 +4
Mark Calcavecchia 73-71-73-217 +4
PaulGoydos 75-69-73-217 +4
Darren Clarke 71-74-73-218 +5
Jason Bohn 71-74-73-218 +5
Sean OHair 73-71-74-218 +5
Marc Leishman 75-69-74-218 +5
StuartAppleby 71-73-74-218 +5
John Mallinger 71-73-74-218 +5
NicolasColsaerts 69-73-76-218 +5



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 37 27 .578 -
Brooklyn 33 31 .516 4
NewYork 27 40 .403 11/
Boston 22 44 .333 16
Philadelphia 15 51 .227 23
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB


x-Miami 44 19 .698 -
Washington 35 31 .530 10%
Charlotte 32 34 .485 13/2
Atlanta 29 35 .453 15/2
Orlando 19 48 .284 27
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-lndiana 49 17 .742 -
Chicago 37 29 .561 12


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 B3


For the record


Florid LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
0 9-9-1
y CASH 3 (late)


SPLAY 4 (early)
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PLAY 4 (late)
TM 6-2-3-2
H POWERBALL
2 5 -34-51-58
POWER BALL
9

Fantasy 5 and Lotto not
available at press time.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:
Mega Money: 10 -22 -28 -40 Fantasy 5:2 3 4 10 -36
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4-of-4 MB No winner 4-of-5 391 $104.00
4-of-4 8 $952.00 3-of-5 12,844 $8.50
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3-of-4 1,106 $45.00
2-of-4 MB 1,411 $24.50 Players should verify
1-of-4 MB 12,215 $2.50 winning numbers by
2-of-4 30,088 $2.00 calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Food City 500 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAmalie Motor Oil Gatornationals (Taped)
SPRING TRAINING BASEBALL
7 a.m. (MLB) Minnesota Twins at New York Mets (Taped)
10 a.m. (MLB) San Francisco Giants at Seattle Mariners (Taped)
1 p.m. (MLB) Pittsburgh Pirates at Philadelphia Phillies
1 p.m. (SUN) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
4 p.m. (MLB) Colorado Rockies at Los Angeles Dodgers
8 p.m. (MLB) Chicago White Sox at Texas Rangers (Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (MLB) Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
(Same-day Tape)
3 a.m. (MLB) Miami Marlins at Minnesota Twins (Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPNU) MEAC Tournament final: Teams TBA (Taped)
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Horizon League Tournament final: Teams TBA
3 p.m. (ESPNU) NEC Tournament final St. Francis (Pa.) at
Robert Morris
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m. (ABC) ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA
1 p.m. (CBS) Atlantic 10 Tournament final: Teams TBA
1 p.m. (ESPN) ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Sun Belt Tournament final: Teams TBA
3 p.m. (ESPN, WYKE 104.3 FM) SEC Tournament final: Florida vs.
Kentucky
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament final: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (CBS) NCAA Basketball Championship Selection
11:30 p.m. (ESPNU) ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA (Taped)
NBA
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Houston Rockets at Miami Heat
9:30 p.m. (NBA) Cleveland Cavaliers at LosAngeles Clippers
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Houston Rockets at Miami Heat (Same-day Tape)
BICYCLING
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Paris-Nice, Stage 8 (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Valspar Championship, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Valspar Championship, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Valspar Championship, Spotlight Coverage
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Toshiba Classic, Final Round
1:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Trophee Hassan II, Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
GYMNASTICS
11 a.m. (SUN) West Virginia at Florida (Taped)
HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins
12:30 p.m. (NHL) Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers (Taped)
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Vancouver Canucks at Florida Panthers
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Detroit Red Wings at Chicago Blackhawks
LACROSSE
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia at Notre Dame
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12:30 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series (Taped)
OLYMPICS
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2014 Paralympic Winter Games Closing
Ceremony
SOCCER
9:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Manchester United
vs. Liverpool
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs.
Arsenal
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP BNP Paribas Open, Men's and Women's finals
9 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP BNP Paribas Open, Men's and Women's finals
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Cleveland 26 40 .394
Detroit 25 41 .379
Milwaukee 13 53 .197
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 49 16 .754
Houston 44 21 .677
Dallas 39 27 .591
Memphis 39 27 .591
New Orleans 26 39 .400
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 48 17 .738
Portland 43 23 .652
Minnesota 32 32 .500
Denver 29 37 .439
Utah 22 44 .333
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 47 20 .701
Golden State 41 26 .612


'CANES
Continued from Page B1

enjoying his short game. His rounds of 77 and
73 lifted him to a nine-stroke lead at 150 in the
second flight, which plays from the white tees,
about 340 yards shorter than the blues, overall.
"These are the best greens in central
Florida right now," said Russ, who received


Phoenix 37 28 .569
Sacramento 23 43 .348
L.A. Lakers 22 44 .333
x-clinched playoff spot
Saturday's Games
NewYork 115, Milwaukee 94
Washington 101, Brooklyn 94
Memphis 103, Philadelphia 77
Indiana 112, Detroit 104, OT
Atlanta 97, Denver 92
Chicago 94, Sacramento 87
Sunday's Games
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 1 p.m.
Phoenix atToronto, 1 p.m.
Houston at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at New Orleans, 6 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Utah at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.


light-hearted ridicule from fellow competi-
tors for shooting well below his flight's
handicap average. "It's why I'm playing well
- they're lightning-fast and roll great, and
it's why they can get almost 160 players here
every year, because people come from all
over to play the greens."
Seven-time St. Pat's champion Berger
Warner and 2005 champ Lee Schultz, along
with Jayson Counsil and Cory Gibbs, who
improved significantly on their first rounds


Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Houston, 8 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
NCAA Automatic Bids
Albany (NY), America East Conference
American, Patriot League
Coastal Carolina, Big South Conference
Delaware, Colonial Athletic Association
Eastern Kentucky, Ohio Valley Conference
Gonzaga, West Coast Conference
Harvard, Ivy League
Iowa State, Big 12 Conference
Louisville, American Athletic Conference
Manhattan, Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
Mercer, Atlantic Sun Conference
Milwaukee, Horizon League
Mount St. Mary's, Northeast Conference
New Mexico, Mountain West Conference
North Carolina Central, Mid-Eastern Athletic Con-
ference
North Dakota State, Summit League
Providence, Big East Conference
Stephen F. Austin, Southland Conference
Texas Southern, Southwestern Athletic Confer-
ence
Tulsa, Conference USA
UCLA, Pacific-12 Conference
Weber State, Big Sky Conference
Western Michigan, Mid-American Conference
Wichita State, Missouri Valley Conference
Wofford, Southern Conference



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Boston 67 4517 5 95215 146
Toronto 68 3624 8 80201 207
TampaBay 67 3624 7 79194 175
Montreal 68 3625 7 79172 174
Detroit 66 3023 13 73174 184
Ottawa 66 2825 13 69189 218
Florida 67 2535 7 57166 217
Buffalo 67 1940 8 46132 200
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Pittsburgh 66 4418 4 92206 163
Columbus 67 3526 6 76195 184
N.Y Rangers 68 3628 4 76177 169
Philadelphia 66 3425 7 75188 190
Washington 68 3127 10 72197 205
New Jersey 68 2926 13 71166 176
Carolina 67 2929 9 67168 192
N.Y Islanders 69 2634 9 61195 233
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
St. Louis 67 4614 7 99223 151
Colorado 67 4319 5 91206 180
Chicago 67 3815 14 90227 178
Minnesota 67 3522 10 80164 164
Dallas 66 3223 11 75191 185
Winnipeg 68 3029 9 69186 199
Nashville 68 2929 10 68164 201
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Anaheim 67 4416 7 95216 171
San Jose 68 4417 7 95213 165
Los Angeles 67 3823 6 82164 142
Phoenix 67 3125 11 73185 191
Vancouver 69 3029 10 70163 187
Calgary 67 2733 7 61163 199
Edmonton 68 2336 9 55169 223
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Saturday's Games
Columbus 2, Minnesota 1, SO
Boston 5, Carolina 1
Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 0
Montreal 5, Ottawa 4, OT
Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 0
N.Y Islanders 4, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 4, Nashville 1
Calgary at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Florida, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 3 p.m.
Edmonton at Carolina, 3 p.m.
San Jose at N.Y Rangers, 4 p.m.
Colorado at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.



Sprint Cup

Food City 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, Tenn.
Lap length: .533 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1.(11)Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 129.991 mph.
2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 129.965.
3. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 129.073.
4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 128.83.
5. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 128.727.
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 128.245.
7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 128.159.
8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 127.946.
9. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 127.801.
10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 127.69.
11. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 127.385.
12. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 127.073.
13. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 128.322.
14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 128.271.
15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 128.245.
16. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 128.236.
17. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 128.168.
18. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 127.929.
19. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 127.903.
20. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 127.792.
21. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 127.682.
22. (47)A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 127.648.
23. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 127.605.
24. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 127.605.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 127.597.
26. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 127.529.
27. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 127.444.
28. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 127.436.
29. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 127.351.
30. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 127.343.
31. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 127.182.
32. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 127.174.
33. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 127.165.
34. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 126.896.
35. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 126.645.
36. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 126.628.


37. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (32)Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
43. (33)Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.


in firing a 72 and 73 on Saturday, respec-
tively, are tied for seventh at 153, two behind
sixth place Ken Godwin.
It's a tight race at the top of the first flight,
which also plays from the blue tees, making
its competitors eligible for the champi-
onship. Nathan Connor (159) carries a one-
shot advantage over Alan Chatman, while
Chatman, who has a pair of 80s, holds a
razor-thin, one-stroke edge over Tom Hen-
drick and Charles Kelly


ALWAYS
Continued from Page B1

Since matriculating to
Lecanto High, Gurnani has fo-
cused on his two passions: his
education and his love of tennis.
He's played varsity tennis
under 13th-year skipper Jack
Hall all four seasons.
For the past three, he's
served as team captain and he's
the Chronicle's defending
Player of the Year
As a senior, he's compiled a
county-leading 10-2 won-lost
slate in singles.
His lone singles setbacks this
season are to Ocala-Forest sen-
ior Phillip Libby, 6-2, 6-4 and
Nature Coast Technical junior
Jesse DeWitt, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4.
In doubles action, Gurnani is
a combined 9-3 alternating with
partners Sam Alford and Dhruv
Patel.
On the 7-7 Panther team,
coach Hall describes Gurnani
in glowing terms.
"He's a four-year starter and
our captain," said Hall. "He's
extremely motivated. He's not
the hardest hitter out here, but
he's a very smart player He's an
IB kid and an excellent stu-
dent/athlete.
"He's like a computer on the
court," Hall added. "It's as if he's
playing chess on the court. He's
always hitting a shot with pur-
pose and staying 2 to 3 moves
ahead of whoever he's playing."
Gurnani believes Coach
Hall's description fits like a
glove.
"I know I'm not the biggest guy
out there," Gurnani said. "I'm
not the tallest, not fastest and I
don't try to crush the ball every
time. My goal is to be the hardest
worker on the court Sometimes
you face guys with more physical
tools in their tool box, so you
have to out-work them."
Rishi draws his strength from
his dad.
"I owe my blessings to my
mom and dad. They came from
India to the United States seek-
ing a better life," Gurnani
proudly recalled. "Dad did sent
out 1,300 applications for his
medical residency and got back
one. But he's worked his tail off
for his kids.
"My work ethic is a direct les-
son from my parents," he
added. "I consider myself, more
than anything else, a smart
player I don't have the (physi-
cal) tools some guys have, so I
have to play smart and out-work
my opponents."
Gurnani said his approach on
the court is simplistic.
"Sure, like everybody else I
listen to scouting reports on dif-
ferent opponents, but the mo-
ment the match starts I'm
evaluating the guy on the other
side of the net," he said. "I at-
tack to find a weakness. I dic-
tate my play around my
opponent's weaknesses."
Despite his team's current
.500 record, the 10-team, Dis-
trict 3A-5 tournament is just
around the corner beginning
April 1 on Gurnani's home turf.
LHS hasn't reached the re-
gional level since his freshman
year, and he longs to go deep
into the state series.
"I've been captain for the last
three years and we haven't
made it out of regionals since
my freshman year," Gurnani
said. "In two weeks I have two
goals. I want to win either No. 1
singles or No. 1 doubles to
automatically qualify for states.
'And as a captain, I'd love to
lead this team into the regional
playoffs. I look at it as my duty"
On whether the Panthers can
solve Ocala-Vanguard, Ocala-
Forest and Springstead in dis-
tricts, "Right now, I'm focused
on improving my game," he
said. "The key for us is execut-
ing in singles 1 through 5. In my
mind, there's no doubt we can
go to regionals."
Gurnani isn't your typical stu-
dent/athlete he's at an elite
level.
How elite? He currently car-
ries a 4.6 weighted grade point
average and if graduation were
held tomorrow, Gurnani would
rank 11th in his senior class.
He's extremely proud of scor-
ing a 2,300 on his SAT and he's
awaiting responses from eight
schools vying for his acceptance.
Interestingly, Gurnani be-
lieves his future after com-


mencement exercises lies
outside the Sunshine State.
"I'm a life-long resident of
Citrus County," Gurnani said.
'As much as I like it here, I want
to go out of state. It's time for me
to spread my wings."
In the short term, Gurnani is
looking forward to competing
on LHS' Academic Team in its
quiz bowl-style competition at
Disney World on April 10 to 12.
The following day, the 93rd an-
nual FHSAA State Tennis Finals
begin in nearby Casselberry
"I hope to do both," Gurnani
said with a smile.


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UF in SEC title game today


Gators will

take on UK

Associated Press

ATLANTA Patric
Young scored 16 points
and No. 1 Florida turned
up the defensive pressure
in the second half, rallying
for a 56-49 victory over
Tennessee in the semifi-
nals of the Southeastern
Conference tournament
Saturday
Florida (31-2) extended
its school-record winning
streak to 25 in a row after
trailing by 10 in t he first
half. The Gators were
down 35-28 at the break,
but they wore down the
Volunteers (21-12) over the
final 20 minutes. After
shooting 54 percent in the
opening period, Tennessee
made just 5 of 20 shots and
turned the ball over 11
times, leaving its fate in the
hands of the NCAA selec-
tion committee.
The Gators, improving to
20-0 against SEC oppo-
nents, will face Kentucky
in the championship game
today
Florida's Scottie
Wilbekin added 14 points
and Casey Prather had 12.
Kentucky 70,
Georgia 58
ATLANTA-Aaron Harri-
son scored 22 points and
Kentucky took a methodical
70-58 win over Georgia to ad-
vance to another Southeast-
ern Conference tournament
championship game.
Kentucky will play No. 1
Florida in today's champi-
onship game, creating the at-
tractive matchup of the
tournament's two top seeds.
James Young had 14 points
and Julius Randle had 12
points and 11 rebounds for
Kentucky (24-9).
Kenny Gaines had 13
points, all in the second half,
and Charles Mann had 12 for
Georgia (19-13).
UCLA 75,
No. 4 Arizona 71
LAS VEGAS Kyle An-
derson had 21 points and 15
points, Jordan Adams hit a
huge 3-pointer in the final
minute, and UCLA outlasted
No. 4 Arizona 75-71 in a
spirited Pac-12 champi-


Associated Press
Florida forward Casey Prather shoots against Tennessee forward Jarnell Stokes during the second half Saturday in
the semifinal round of the SEC men's tournament in Atlanta. No. 1 Florida won 56-49.


onship game.
The Pac-12's two best
teams during the regular sea-
son, UCLA (26-8) and Arizona
(30-4) put on a show in the
tournament final, trading big
plays and floor burns.
Offense ruled the first half
and defense the second until
Adams dropped in his con-
tested 3-pointer to put the
Bruins up 71-68 with 45 sec-
onds left.
David Wear and Norman
Powell combined to hit four
free throws down the stretch,
giving UCLA the Pac-12 title
in its first year under coach
Steve Alford.
Nick Johnson had 22 points
and Kaleb Tarczewski added
12 for Arizona (30-4).
No. 5 Louisville 71,
No. 21 UConn 61
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mon-
trezl Harrell had 22 points, 11
rebounds and three blocks,
and fifth-ranked Louisville


beat No. 21 Connecticut 71-
61 for the inaugural American
Athletic Conference tourna-
ment title in the Cardinals'
lone season in the league.
The Cardinals (29-5) have
won three straight league
tournament titles after taking
the last two in the Big East.
Russ Smith had 19 points
and five steals for Louisville,
and Chris Jones added 11
points.
UConn (26-8) came in look-
ing for an eighth tournament
title to go with seven from the
Big East. DeAndre Daniels
led the Huskies with 17 points
and 10 rebounds.
No. 6 Virginia 51,
Pittsburgh 48
GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Anthony Gill hit two free throws
with 8.5 seconds left to help
Virginia hold off Pittsburgh in
the semifinals of the Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament.
Gill was shooting 63 per-


cent from the line for the Cav-
aliers (27-6) but calmly made
both free throws after James
Robinson's hanging layup had
brought the Panthers to within
49-48.
Pitt had a chance to tie with
4 seconds left, but Justin An-
derson tipped Robinson's 3-
pointer to Gill with 0.5
seconds left.
Joe Harris scored 12 points
to lead the Cavaliers, who
shot 47 percent against the
fifth-seeded Panthers (25-9).
No. 7 Duke 75,
N.C. State 67
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Jabari Parker scored 20
points and Duke advanced to
the Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament championship.
Rasheed Sulaimon added
16 points for the third-seeded
Blue Devils (26-7) while Rod-
ney Hood had 14 points and
keyed the defensive effort
against ACC player of the


year T.J. Warren.
The Blue Devils will play
No. 6 Virginia today.
Warren scored 21 points
but was just 4 of 13 after half-
time while facing a barrage of
double teams.
No. 20 New Mexico
64, No. 8 San
Diego State 58
LAS VEGAS Cameron
Bairstow scored 17 points to
lead No. 20 New Mexico to a
64-58 victory over No. 8 San
Diego State in the Mountain
West Conference champi-
onship game, giving the
Lobos the automatic berth
into the NCAA tournament.
New Mexico (27-6) had its
five-point halftime lead disap-
pear when the Aztecs opened
the second half on an 8-0 run,
to take a 30-27 lead.
After the Lobos tied it at 30
apiece, the teams exchanged
baskets over the next five
minutes, until New Mexico


went on its run.
San Diego State (29-4) was
led by Xavier Thames, who
scored 15 points.
No. 8 Michigan 72,
No. 24 Ohio St. 69
INDIANAPOLIS Michi-
gan blew a 12-point second-
half lead, then finished the
game on a 7-1 run to advance
to the Big Ten tournament title
game.
The league's regular-sea-
son champs will face No. 22
Michigan State in today's
championship game.
Nik Stauskas had 18 points
and Caris LeVert had 17 to
lead the Wolverines (25-7),
winners of seven straight. It
will be Michigan's first title
game appearance since
1998, when it won its only
tourney title, which was later
vacated.
Ohio State (25-9) was led
by LaQuinton Ross with 19
points and Shannon Scott
with 18.
No. 22 Michigan
St. 83, No. 12
Wisconsin 75
INDIANAPOLIS -Adreian
Payne scored 18 points,
Branden Dawson had 14 and
Michigan State beat Wiscon-
sin to reach the Big Ten tour-
nament championship.
The third-seeded Spartans
(25-8) won consecutive
games for the first time since
winning 11 straight in a stretch
over December and January.
They will face No. 8 Michigan
in the final today.
Frank Kaminsky had 28
points and Sam Decker
added 11 points and seven
rebounds for the second-
seeded Badgers (26-7).
No. 23 VCU 74,
George Wash. 55
NEWYORK -Treveon
Graham scored 22 points and
VCU pressed and pressured
its way into another confer-
ence tournament champi-
onship game, beating George
Washington in the Atlantic 10
semifinals.
The second-seeded Rams
(26-7) will play for the A-10
title for the second year in a
row, facing fourth-seeded St.
Joseph's today.
Isaiah Armwood led third-
seeded George Washington
(24-8) with 15 points.


Bolts strike hot


Bishop gets 31st

win, Lightning

top Devils 3-0

Associated Press

TAMPA- Ben Bishop stopped 23
shots to set Tampa Bay's single-sea-
son record with 31 victories as the
Lightning beat the New Jersey Dev-
ils 3-0 on Saturday night.
Bishop (31-11-6) broke the mark
held by Nikolai Khabibulin, which
was set in 2002-03. It was Bishop's
fifth shutout this season.
Michael Kostka had a goal and an
assist for Tampa Bay, which has
won two in a row following a five-
game losing streak (0-3-2). B.J
Crombeen and Nate Thompson had
the other goals for the Lightning.
Martin Brodeur made 29 saves
for the Devils, who were coming off
a 5-3 loss Friday night at Florida.
Brodeur had beaten Tampa Bay
twice earlier this season, allowing
just one goal overall.
Flyers 4, Penguins 0
PHILADELPHIA- Matt Read scored
a pair of goals to lift the Philadelphia
Flyers to a 4-0 victory over the short-
handed Pittsburgh Penguins.
Scott Hartnell and Vincent Lecavalier
also scored for Philadelphia, which is in
the middle of a tightly bunched pack of
teams battling for a playoff spot.
The Penguins, who are comfortably
atop the Metropolitan Division, were
shut out for the fourth time this season.
Pittsburgh played without its third- and
fourth-leading scorers, Chris Kunitz
(lower body) and James Neal (concus-
sion). The Flyers neutralized Pittsburgh
stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.
Steve Mason made 25 saves for his
fourth shutout of the season and 23rd of
his career.
Islanders 4, Sabres 1
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Frans Nielsen
and Kyle Okposo scored first-period
goals, and the New York Islanders went


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing J.T. Brown is hooked by New Jersey Devils
defenseman Jon Merrill during the second period Saturday in Tampa.


on to a 4-1 victory over the Buffalo
Sabres.
The Islanders (26-34-9) earned their
10th home win (10-17-8), and did it in a
rare matchup against an opponent they
are ahead of in the standings.
Backup goalie Anders Nilsson (3-4-2)
earned the win in his 15th NHL game.
He lost his shutout bid 56 seconds into
the third when Tyler Ennis scored a
power-play goal.
Nilsson made 33 saves while subbing
for No. 1 netminder Evgeni Nabokov,
who lost 4-3 to San Jose on Friday.
Bruins 5, Hurricanes 1
BOSTON Jarome Iginla scored a
pair of goals, backup goaltender Chad
Johnson made 29 saves and the East-
ern Conference-leading Bruins won
their eighth straight, 5-1 over the Car-
olina Hurricanes.
Milan Lucic had a goal and two as-
sists, Torey Krug and Chris Kelly each
scored a goal and David Krejci added
three assists, his first coming as he was
falling to the ice on Lucic's score.
Alexander Semin had the goal and
Cam Ward made 36 saves for the
Hurricanes, who lost for the eighth
time in 11 games.
Johnson, playing with regular goalie
Tuukka Rask getting the day off, is
8-0-1 in his past nine starts.


Canadiens 5,
Senators 4, OT
MONTREAL- Francis Bouillon
scored in overtime as the Montreal
Canadiens erased a three-goal deficit in
the third period and defeated the Ot-
tawa Senators 5-4.
Lars Eller, Brian Gionta and David
Desharnais scored late third-period
goals for the Canadiens, who trailed 4-1
five minutes into the final period. Daniel
Briere also scored, and Carey Price
made 29 saves in his first NHL game
since the Olympic break.
Jason Spezza, Zack Smith, Ales Hem-
sky and Clarke MacArthur scored for Ot-
tawa, while Robin Lehner made 43 saves.
Blues 4, Predators 1
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Patrik
Berglund scored twice to lead the St.
Louis Blues to a 4-1 victory over the
Nashville Predators.
Vladimir Tarasenko and Alexander
Steen had the other goals for the Blues,
who have won seven of their last eight.
The game also marked the fifth and final
game of the season series between the
Central Division rivals, with the Blues
winning all five matchups.
Ryan Miller made 30 saves to im-
prove to 6-0-1 since the Blues acquired
him in a trade with Buffalo on Feb. 28.


Bulls charge


past Kings 94-87


Associated Press

CHICAGO Joakim
Noah had 23 points and 11
rebounds, Taj Gibson
scored seven of his 19
points in the fourth quar-
ter and the Chicago Bulls
held off the Sacramento
Kings 94-87.
Mike Dunleavy added 16
and DJ Augustin 12 for the
Bulls.
Isaiah Thomas led the
Kings with 26 and DeMar-
cus Cousins had 25.
Both teams struggled on
offense, with the Bulls
shooting 40 percent and
the Kings 37 percent.
The Bulls, who are
fourth in the Eastern Con-
ference, improved to 3-2 on
their six-game homestand.
The Kings are 2-4 on their
seven-game road trip.
Cousins hit a layup with
1:01 left to cut the Bulls'
lead to 88-85.
Gibson responded with
a jumper and the Bulls
made four of six free
throws to seal the win.
Pacers 112,
Pistons 104, OT
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.-
Paul George scored 30 points
and the Indiana Pacers rallied
from a 25-point second-quar-
ter deficit to beat the Detroit
Pistons 112-104 in overtime.
Evan Turner added 20
points for the Pacers, and
David West scored six of his
15 points in overtime. Indiana
leads Miami by 3 1/2 games
in the race for the top seed in
the Eastern Conference.
Josh Smith scored 23
points for the Pistons, who
lost star centerAndre Drum-
mond in the first quarter to a
neck injury. Drummond was


able to walk off with some as-
sistance, but he was expected
to have further testing.
Detroit led 56-31 in the sec-
ond quarter but couldn't hold
on.
Knicks 115,
Bucks 94
NEWYORK -Carmelo
Anthony scored 23 points,
Tim Hardaway Jr. had 20, and
the New York Knicks beat the
Milwaukee Bucks 115-94, giv-
ing them a season-high six
straight victories as they pre-
pare to welcome Phil Jackson
back to the franchise.
Amare Stoudemire and
J.R. Smith each scored 15 for
the Knicks, who easily ended
their daytime woes by pound-
ing the team with the NBA's
worst record.
New York began the day 3
1/2 games behind Atlanta for
the final postseason spot in the
Eastern Conference. But the
playoff push has taken a back-
seat to the news that Jackson
was coming in to run the
Knicks' front office. The Knicks
will introduce the 11-time
champion coach at a news
conference Tuesday morning.
Hawks 97,
Nuggets 92
ATLANTA- Paul Millsap
had 24 points and 11 rebounds,
JeffTeague added 15 points
and 10 assists, and the Atlanta
Hawks rallied for their third
straight win with a 97-92 victory
over the Denver Nuggets.
Kenneth Faried finished
with 25 points and Wilson
Chandler scored 12 for the
Nuggets, who were coming
off a dramatic victory Friday at
two-time defending champion
Miami.


B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stretching an athlete's dilemna


recently, I consulted a 53- conflict comes from the confusion
year-old marathoner who regarding a proper warm-up. It is
had to stop running due to the warm-up that prevents injury,
a recurrent Achilles whereas stretching
tendon and calf prob- _. probably has no effect
lem. His miles of run- Thus most athletes,
ning in training had weekend warriors and
stretched and inflamed professionals alike are
the tendon fibers. He faced with the dilemma
was religiously trying of stretching or not Rec-
to stretch the knot out. ommendations to stretch
By simply not stretch- ,t or not change from year
ing, he was able to train to year and from expert
and win a recent na- to expert Stretching has
tional age group level Dr Ron Joseph been promoted as an es-
half marathon. Few DOCTOR'S sentialpartofanyfitness
runners need extra D C R program and as a way to
range of motion for any ORDERS reduce the risk of injury,
joint. Stretching is a prevent soreness and
habit that can lead to improve performance.
injury The reality is that there is no ev-
This will probably upset some of idence for either side. Stretching
you. Think about the fact that it is before exercise was found to not
loose or less stable joints that con- prevent muscle soreness. Those
tribute to developing arthritis as who stretch say that it feels good.
we get older Having treated ballet However, stretching can also lead
dancers from major national com- to injury The primary rule is
panics, their high rates of injuries stretching should never be painful.
are not only the result of too many Decide why you are stretching.
hours of practice, but also their To gain the range of motion
need for joint laxity or looseness, around a specific joint is better
There is a big difference be- known as flexibility There is the
tween stretching tendons and lig- impression that flexibility and
aments versus muscles. Muscles stretching are the same. Flex
are controlled by reflexes in the means to bend and flexibility
brain and are difficult to stretch means the ability to bend your
with lasting benefit. Much of the joints during body movement But


this entails three elements: joint
mobility, tendon and ligament
elasticity and muscle relaxation.
For superior performance flex-
ibility is required and needs im-
provement if you are a ballet
dancer, swimmer, gymnast, hockey
goalie, wrestler or wide receiver
extending your joints to make a
play These are sports requiring
extra range of motion to a specific
joint or several joints in the sport,
then stretching joints should be
part of your exercise routine.
The idea that good flexibility is
essential for successful perform-
ance is not based on scientific ev-
idence, though it is really not
possible to be a world class swim-
mer without hyper-mobile joints.
Swimmers shoulders almost come
out of joint with each stroke and
stretching shoulder joints is
needed to prepare for the extra
range of motion required. Most
recreational athletes require only
normal amounts of flexibility
There is a need for muscle and
ligament balance all the way
around the joint Throwing sports
stretches the front of the shoulder
and elbow and have a tendency to
develop tightness in the back
shoulder ligaments or outside of
the elbow So stretching the back
ligaments of the shoulder or
elbow before playing baseball,


tennis or golf would help prevent
aggravating joint injuries or ten-
donitis such as tennis elbow
Hamstring injuries are com-
mon to all sports and can add to
back pain. There is a place for
stretching hamstrings if you are
doing it for low back pain. But the
remedy for a painful hamstring is
do exercise that stretch ham-
strings. Take several days off your
sport and return at a more mod-
erate level. Be sure to warm up.
Cross training is the answer to
persistent problems with muscle
or tendon. Cross training unloads
repetitious activity and gives less
used muscles a work out, helping
to balance muscle and joint loads.
Confused at this point? You are
not alone. Remember stretching
helps gain range of motion in
joints, does not stretch muscle,
and may be detrimental in exces-
sively loosening some joints or
overstretching ligaments or ten-
dons. It is a good warm up that is
most beneficial in preventing in-
jury The biggest benefit of
stretching that science can't quan-
tify is that it just feels good.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand,
shoulder and upper extremity or-
thopedic surgeon at Seaspine Or-
thopedic Institute and Olympic
bronze medalist, can be reached
atrbjhand@cox.net.


SPORTS


Sports BI


CCA banquet
this Thursday
On Thursday, March 20,
the Citrus chapter of the
Coastal Conservation Associ-
ation (CCA) is holding its 27th
annual banquet and auction
at Rock Crusher Canyon in
Crystal River.
Individuals tickets are $75
and include a two-hour open
bar, dinner and CCA mem-
bership. The open bar and
silent auction start at 6 p.m.
while dinner and a live auc-
tion are at 7:30 p.m.
Corporate sponsorships
are also available.
For more information,
contact Mike Friddle at 352-
697-2188 or Mike Modisett
at 352-257-7333.



CLAIM
Continued from Page Bl

"It was really good," she
said. "I had been sick so I
wasn't expecting any-
thing. I had a cold and
everything. I got out and
started feeling pretty
good. For me, it seemed
like it was fast. I'm at the
point where I don't really
need to worry about win-
ning it. I want to feel good
after I race. Perfect for
running. The air was
good. The last mile has all
the hills on it. Everybody
ran fast. If I were feeling
better, I would have run
the 10K. Maybe, next
year."
Smith was enjoying the
10K win.
"I feel good," Smith said.
"I ran as fast as I could. I
run triathlons. I was just
fortunate the fast runners
all ran the 5K."
Race director Chris Mol-
ing was happy with the
cool but sunny morning.
'A beautiful day" Moling
said. "Everything is great.
We are happy to be here.
Everybody is dressed in
green. We have about 300
runners. It's our first time to
add the 10K event We have
75 10Kers. Everybody's ex-


RIEFS
Warriors score 53
runs in pair of wins


The Seven Rivers Christian
baseball team defeated St. Au-
gustine Beacon of Hope 36-0
and 17-0 in a doubleheader
Saturday afternoon at Dazzy
Vance Field in Homosassa.
In the first game, which
lasted 2 2/3 innings, Tyler
Pillsbury hit a grand slam for
the Warriors while Adam
Gage struck out nine batters
and gave up two hits in the
victory.
Parker Pillsbury struck out
12 batters and yielded a sin-
gle hit in the second contest
for Seven Rivers.
The Warriors (9-0 overall)
plays 4:30 p.m. Tuesday at
Hernando Christian.


cited about this. Canadians
are here for the camp. We
are glad to have them.
Everything else is rocking."
Winners of 16th Annual
Shamrock Scamper 5K Run
Overall Male Brandon
Harris, Crystal River 15:53
Master Male Joel Rich,
Gainesville 17:36
Overall Female-Alyssa
Weber, Inverness, 19:03
Master Female Laura
Spain, Hernando 22:29
Top 10 Finishers
Brandon Harris, Crystal
River 15:53; 2. Phil Brunet,
Montreal, Quebec 16:13; 3.
Caelon Ratliffe, Montreal,
Quebec 17:29; 4. Joel Rich,
Gainesville 17:36; 5. Austin
Fowler, Inglis 17:52; 6. Gre-
gory Buetner, Hernando
18:06; 7. Thomas Budag,
18:42; 8. Logan Butters,
18:51; 9. Cedrick Morisette,
18:52; 10. Clayton Trainer,
Box Elder, South Dakota
18:57.
Winners of First Shamrock
Scamper 10K Run
Overall Male-Erik Smith,
Beverly Hills 42:35
Master Male-Danny
Stevens, Dunnellon 43:31
Overall Female-Linda
Mutchie, Ocala 46:25
Master Female-Connie
James, Lake Panasoffkee
47:01


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Go/fBRIEF

Garrigus stays
in Valspar lead
PALM HARBOR-
Robert Garrigus missed two
short putts on the back nine
and had to settle for a 1-
under 70 and a one-shot
lead Saturday in the
Valspar Championship.
Garrigus, who needs a
win to get into the Masters
next month, opened with
back-to-back birdies on the
Copperhead course at Innis-
brook and stretched his lead
to four shots with a nifty flop
shot off the pine straw to set
up a birdie on the par-5 fifth.
He still had a four-shot
lead when he missed a
4-foot par putt on the 12th
hole, and his lead was down
to a single shot when Garri-
gus missed a 3-foot par putt
on the final hole. Kevin Na
chipped in for birdie on the
15th and shot a 68.
John Senden matched
the low score of the tourna-
ment with a 64 in perfect,
sunny weather. He moved
up 32 spots to third, and
goes into the final round
only two shots behind.
From wire reports


1


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Reubin Askew, one of Florida's great governors


ormer Gov. Reubin
Askew was 85 when
he passed away ear-
lier this week.
Askew, from Pensacola,
served as Florida's gover-
nor from 1971 to 1979 and
did much to bring the state
into the modem era.
He was a reform governor
when most of the state did-
n't want to be reformed.
From a Citrus County per-
spective, he defeated in-


cumbent GOP Gov Claude
Kirk, who was not that pop-
ular after he ousted four
members of the Citrus County
Commission for being
"grossly incompetent."
Askew led the effort to
open government meetings
and public records laws in
Florida. He was the creator
of what we call today the
"Sunshine Laws" in Florida
- the rules that still guar-
antee us that government


will operate in the open.
He pushed ethics legisla-
tion and reformed the state
courts. He also led the ef-
fort to create the state's cor-
porate tax and passed the
first real environmental pro-
tection laws in our history
He worked hard for
racial integration at a time
when it was unpopular He
was the first to appoint mi-
norities to courts and im-
portant agencies.


Two stories on Gov Askew
that I wanted to share -
one personal and one local.
Most folks forget that
when Gov Askew left office
after eight years of service,
he was extremely popular
with Republicans and De-
mocrats. In 1984 Askew de-
cided to seek the Democratic
nomination for president.
One of the places he chose
to make that announcement
was the Plantation Inn in


Crystal River He gathered
reporters and local sup-
porters in the large room
just inside the main lobby of
the Plantation Inn and ex-
plained his purpose.
I have come in contact
with numerous presidential
campaigns over the years,
and this was by far the most
relaxed effort I've ever wit-
nessed. Maybe that's why the


Associated Press


A boater cruises at sunrise March 4 near Bonita Springs, Fla.


FOR MUCH OF


FLORIDA,


THE


SUN DOESN'T



SHINE ONLINE


First Amendment Foundation releases report
card on local government transparency
Special to the Chronicle

W ebsites created by Florida's cities and counties to
provide citizens with information frequently fail to provide
fundamental facts about the costs and consequences of
decisions by those governments, a survey conducted by
the First Amendment Foundation for Sunshine Week has revealed.
Overall, the websites of Florida's 67 counties and 47 of its cities earned only about half the possi-
ble credits on a transparency scorecard developed by the Foundation. The websites were evaluated
by journalism students at the universities of Florida, South Florida and Miami, who were asked if
they could find specific information ranging from budgets to neighborhood crime information -
through a reasonable search.
While most websites offered convenient links to everyday functions seeking a permit, finding a
park or bidding for a government contract few made it easy for citizens to request public records.
And while almost every government posted its annual budget and detailed agendas for elected
and appointed boards, records critical to understanding how a government operates from finan-
cial analyses and a copy of its checkbook, to databases of vendors and financial disclosure forms
filed by elected and appointed officials were mostly unavailable.
"Many city and county websites include the stated goals of 'transparency' and 'accountability,"'
said Barbara Petersen, president of the Tallahassee-based FAF "But this survey shows that, in many
See Page C4

To view the scorecard and breakdowns of the data, visit http://tinyurl.com/citrusfafgrades


CITRUS,
CRYSTAL

RIVER

FALL NG

EVEN

SHORTER
While counties
averaged 50
points out of a pos-
sible 100 in the FAF's
transparency survey
and cities averaged
46 points, the scores
for Citrus County and
Crystal River were
below even those low
marks. Inverness
was not included in
the FAF survey.
CITRUS COUNTY
scored a 45, getting
8 out of a possible
20 points for finan-
cial transparency,
3 out of 20 for ac-
countability, 14 out
of 20 in public
meetings, 2 out of
5 for availablility of
contact informa-
tion, 8 out of 16 for
availability of pub-
lic records, 8 out of
10 for website func-
tionality, and 2 out
of 9 in the "other"
category.
CRYSTAL RIVER
scored a 36, the re-
sult of the following
scores: 4 of 20 (fi-
nancial); 1 of 20
(accountability); 17
of 20 (public meet-
ings); 3 of 5 (con-
tact information); 1
of 16 (public
records); 8 of 10
(functionality); and
2 of 9 (other).


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Page C3










OPINION


"The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet."
Aristotle, quoted in Diogenes Laertius'
"Uves and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers," third c. A.D.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisher
4 ^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DEUS INCREMENTUM DAT



Catholic school's


future important


to Citrus County


ope John Paul II
Catholic School in
Lecanto may be on life
support, but that does not
mean it must die.
The Catholic community in
Citrus County was taken by
surprise this week when the
Diocese of St. Petersburg an-
nounced that the 30-year old
elementary school was going
to be closed at the
end of the current THE I
school year.
Bishop Robert The fu
Lynch backed off Pope Jol
from that position Catholki
a little on
Wednesday when OUR 01
he told parents
and educators omr
that low enroll- should
ment and needed its su
costly repairs
could spell the end of the
school, but he is willing to lis-
ten to alternatives.
As has been reported, the
Bishop said he would wait
until April 15 before he
makes a final decision.
The future of Pope John
Paul II Catholic School is an
issue that is not just impor-
tant to Catholics and those
concerned about educational
opportunities; it is an impor-
tant issue to all residents of
Citrus County.
This community has suf-
fered some institutional
blows over the past few years
that have been difficult. The
closing of the Duke Energy
nuclear plant in Crystal
River resulted in about 400
high-paying jobs being moved
from our county to other lo-
cations. Some of those fami-
lies had their children in
PJPII and supported the
school financially.


Spend those pennies
I'm calling about a thing that
I'm curious about. The postage
keeps going up and up and up
and they're talking about cutting
down deliveries, etc. Why can't
they spend a couple of dollars?
We go to the Lecanto post office
and they don't even have the lines.
They've worn out and they've
faded away. Why can't they re-
paint the lines where you park
over at the Lecanto post
office? Just a question. Qo
Litter riders s


Would it be possible
for the Chronicle to
publish a number that
we could call to report
litter? I can't believe
that (U.S.) 41 north of
Hernando to Citrus CAL
Springs has been left 563-
the way it has for so
long. Both sides of the
road are just littered with house-
hold trash, egg cartons, pop cans,
you name it everything, but
it's obviously household trash
and it's just terrible. It's just
amazing that nothing has been
done about this for so long. Any-
way, if we knew who to call, I'm
sure the public would try to alert
the people who are in charge of
keeping the roadways clean.
Editor's note: The county en-
courages citizens to help with
roadside cleanup through its
Adopt-A-Highway program. It also
takes reports of illegal dumping.
Call 352-527-7670.


Is
C
It
h


F
T
C
IP
Im
id
ip


I
-c


The closing of major de-
partment stores at the Crystal
River Mall has further de-
pleted some of our vibrancy.
The availability of a Catholic
education is one of the im-
portant factors some families
look at before they move to a
new place. A quality, results-
oriented religious education
is part of the fabric of any
community.
SUE:. Citrus County is
S fortunate to have
:ure of the Seven Rivers
n Paul II Christian School
School. and several other
small religious
'INION: institutions.
But a successful
u n ity Catholic education
J lend is critical for all
pport. people concerned
about a healthy
balance of educational op-
portunities. Bishop Lynch
has not slammed the door
completely shut.
There is still time for the
community to come together
and try to figure out a plan
that will keep the school open.
Financial support from par-
ents, Catholics throughout the
region and all Citrus County
residents is a starting point.
The parents, teachers and
administrators must also con-
duct a healthy self-analysis to
figure out why enrollment has
declined to the point where
the regional leaders feel it is
necessary to shut the doors.
Pope John Paul II has pro-
duced some of the best and
brightest graduates in our
community. The alumni need
to join in the effort to find
solutions.
There is much at stake for
the students, parents and all
of Citrus County.


Scott on spending
Scott Adams is the only county
commissioner who doesn't jump
for joy at every spending pro-
posal that comes down the pike.
Why? Because he is a business-
man. He realizes and knows that
all of our reserves are empty.
As seen on TV
I would like to say I approve
of the (Feb. 20 Sound Off), "Dis-
appearing morals,"
JND about TV shows "Kirstie,"
"Soul Man," "Two and a
OFF Half Men," "Exes," and
"Hot in Cleveland." I am
f very upset that we are
l teaching our children bad
morals through these
kinds of programs.
Thanks Dr. Kim!
)57Q I just want say that
)5 Citrus Memorial hospital
and Dr. Kim are the best.
Olsen's opinion
This is in regards to Mr. (Stan-
ley) Olsen's letter to the editor
(Feb. 24, "Setting record straight
on Meadowcrest office"), regard-
ing the Meadowcrest building. I
just finished reading it and I think
he did a fantastic job explaining
how the complicated parts of
what's going on with that building
in the county. It's very obvious at
this point that the county should
buy that building. It's a natural
home. The mall Mr. Kitchen's al-
luding to would become a disas-
ter if the county moved in there.


Our un-American schools


ormer Chief Judge of
New York State Judith S.
Kaye always makes nec-
essary sense, as she did when she
recently wrote this in the opinion
pages of the New York Times:
"As universal pre-K and the
Common Core standards domi-
nate the headlines, we cannot
overlook a third subject that de-
serves top billing: keeping chil-
dren in school and out of courts"
(Letters, the New
York Times, Feb. 22).
Kaye was writing
in response to an op-
ed that had run in
the Times last month.
In it, Robert K. Ross
and Kenneth H.
Zimmerman, the re-
spective heads of the
California Endow- Nat F
ment and the United OT
States programs for T
the Open Society VOl
Foundations, wrote:
"Large numbers of students are
kicked out, typically for nonvio-
lent offenses, and suspensions
have become the go-to response
for even minor misbehavior,
like carrying a plastic water
gun to elementary school...
"The Civil Rights Project at
UCLA found that the number of
secondary school students sus-
pended or expelled increased
by some 40 percent between
1972-73 and 2009-10. ... A study
of nearly one million Texas stu-
dents found that those suspended
or expelled for violations at the
discretion of school officials
were almost three times as
likely to be in contact with the
juvenile justice system the fol-
lowing year" ("Real Discipline
in School," Robert K. Ross and
Kenneth H. Zimmerman, the
New York Times, Feb. 17).
The "pipeline" that takes stu-
dents from school to prison has
become a national cliche. This
mass creation of student out-
casts is the product of "zero tol-
erance" policies in schools
across this land of the free and
home of the brave.
Only one organization, The
Rutherford Institute in Char-
lottesville, Va., headed by con-
stitutional lawyer and defender
John Whitehead, has continu-
ously intervened. Whitehead
and his team of lawyers have
represented in court at no
charge these victims of zero
tolerance. He also reports on
these and other cases in his
commentary at rutherford.org,
which is distributed to hun-
dreds of newspapers. Moreover,
these penetrating reports and
accounts of different cases also
appear online in news websites
and in blogs.
He is the Paul Revere of na-


State bill wou
hinder educate
A bill was filed recent
the state Legislature tha
massively expand the vo
system and funnel millii
sales tax revenue paid f
the public many into the
of the private few This i
quintessential example
ation without represent
The private schools do i
ticipate in the statewide
aren't required to have E
certified teachers, and d
have to stick to state curr
standards all establish
elected officials. I woulc
the tea party would be u
arms about this!


HI

(


tional alerts to preserve the
constitutional liberties of cur-
rent and future generations of
self-recognizable Americans.
Here is such a case whose
characteristics typically merit
Whitehead's expertise (and
which he wrote about last year):
At South Eastern Middle School
in Fawn Grove, Pa., 10-year-old
"fifth-graderJohnny Jones asked
his teacher for a pencil during
class. Jones walked
to the front of the
classroom to retrieve
the pencil, and during
his walk back to his
seat, a classmate and
f friend of Johnny's
held his folder like
an imaginary gun
and 'shot' at Johnny
entoff "Johnny playfully
-ER used his hands to
draw the bowstrings
DES on a completely
imaginary 'bow' and
'shot' an arrow back.
"Seeing this, another girl in
the class reported to the
teacher that the boys were
shooting at each other...
"The teacher ... contacted
Johnny's mother, Beverly Jones,
alerting her to the 'seriousness'
of the violation because the
children were using 'firearms'
in their horseplay" ("Ruther-
ford Institute Defends 10-Year-
Old Suspended for Shooting
Imaginary Arrow, Threatened
With Expulsion Under Weapons
Policy," www.rutherford.org,
Dec. 4,2013).
The district's zero tolerance
policy in addition to prohibiting
"weapons," includes any "replica"
or "look-alike" weapon.
The school's code of conduct
required Principal John Hor-
ton to "contact the appropriate
police department complete an
incident report to file with the
school superintendent and
begin the process of mandatory
expulsion immediately"
Added Rutherford senior staff
attorney Douglas R. McKusick
in a Dec. 4,2013, letter to South
Eastern School District Super-
intendent Rona Kaufmann:
'Johnny's rights were trampled
without the due consideration.
He was immediately threatened
with expulsion, and thereafter
summarily suspended without
adequate justification...
"It is our belief that Johnny
was deprived of adequate pro-
cedural safeguards in the prin-
cipal's unilateral and misguided
application of the zero toler-
ance policy against him. No ac-
tual gun, 'replica' or 'look-alike'
was ever presented in any phys-
ical form, and Johnny's conduct
amounted to nothing more than
the kind of horseplay typical of


LETTER to the Editor

Lid opi
ion I volunteer in our local
schools and I see the job our U The oi
tly in public school teachers are doing Chron
ions a
t would every day The vast majority are editor
)ucher dedicated, caring, hardwork- Viewp
ons of ing and grossly underpaid. cartoewp
or by I urge all to protest this at- not ne
e hands tempt at misappropriation of opinic
is a our tax dollars. Even if you are All let
of tax- retired and presently have no includE
ation. children in public schools, all home
not par- children are part of our coun- letter.
testing, try's future. The public school U Letter
state- system in this state and this 600
do not country is in desperate need of limited
riculum help, not hindrance from us U SEND
hed by the citizen voters. 1624
d think Crysta
to 352
ip in Judith Rystar letter
Pine Ridge


children his age.
"For this reason, we request
that you rescind the suspension
and immediately remove all
reference to it from Johnny's
permanent school record."
And what was the eventual
outcome, decided in January?
According to Rutherford's
bold headline: "Victory" The
story went on: "In response to
pressure from The Rutherford
Institute, school officials have
agreed to rescind their suspen-
sion of a 10-year-old boy who
was penalized under a school
zero tolerance policy for shoot-
ing an imaginary 'arrow' at a
fellow classmate, using nothing
more than his hands and his
imagination" ("Victory: School
Officials to Lift Suspension
From 10-Year-Old Who Shot
Imaginary Arrow at Pennsylva-
nia Elementary School,"
www.rutherford.org, Jan. 16).
Hooray! Johnny Jones remains
an American! Quite a victory
But then I read about another
student turning into an outcast
in Chicago a child whom
Rutherford is defending:
"Criticizing Chicago school
officials for being overzealous,
misguided and incapable of dis-
tinguishing between an impo-
tent toy and a dangerous
weapon, The Rutherford Insti-
tute has come to the defense of
an 11-year-old boy who was sus-
pended from school after he
voluntarily turned in a non-firing
plastic toy gun that had been
forgotten in his jacket pocket
"Caden Cook, a sixth grader
at Fredrick Funston Elemen-
tary School, was suspended for
allegedly violating the school's
weapons policy against danger-
ous objects, in addition to being
ordered to undergo counseling,
and subjected to intimidation
tactics, interrogation, and dire
threats by school officials all
without his mother being pres-
ent" ("Zero Tolerance: Chicago
School Officials Suspend 11-
Year-Old Boy Under 'Dangerous
Weapons' Policy for Voluntarily
Turning in Non-Firing Toy Gun,"
www.rutherford.org, Feb. 6).
With The Rutherford Insti-
tute's intervention, I don't ex-
pect Caden's suspension to last
for long, though.
But John Whitehead and his
band of attorneys can't be
everywhere.


Nat Hentoff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the
Bill ofRights. He is a member
of the Reporters Committee
for Freedom of the Press, and
the Cato Institute, where he
is a senior fellow


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
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LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


We're talking' baseball... and softball


heryl doesn't feel
the same way about
my writing about
baseball as she does about
me writing about football,
so I think this column
might be safe from her
"blue line." If she blue-
lines a column, that means
there is no repair for it,
it is gone, and gone
forevermore!
Baseball? I used to be a
fervent baseball fan. I'd
stay up until 2 in the morn-
ing watching my favorite
team. Then, a couple of
decades ago, baseball
strikes seemed to be in
vogue. I became disen-
chanted with both the
owners and the players
and simply stopped watch-
ing. My opinion was that if
they didn't care enough for
me as a fan to settle their
differences, I didn't care
enough about them to
watch when they were


ready to play The one ex-
ception was Mike Hamp-
ton. I stopped being a
baseball fan, but I always
remained a Mike fan
and would watch him at
every opportunity until he
retired.
While baseball is still
not that important to me, a
recent news story about
the game caught my eye. It
seems that a rule is to be
put in place that will out-
law collisions at home
plate. Say what? That is
one of the most exciting
parts of the game. With a
runner barreling toward
the catcher, the catcher
must catch the ball, get the
tag down before the run-
ner crosses the plate and
maintain possession of the
ball throughout. It is al-
ways a thrill, and I don't
see it as being so danger-
ous. After all, a baseball
catcher is covered head to


toe in protective eq
As you might s
never played
after Little Leagi
an adult I did pa
in church leagues
did that while
Tallahassee,
which is very
much a civic
and church-
league softball
town. For what
it is, it is the big
time. I was the
assistant coach
and a catcher
Unlike base-
ball catchers,
the only pro-
tection a slow-
pitch softball
catcher has is
sense.
One evening as
got into a brouh
the home plate
Most folks didn't 1
outside the ball]


iuipment
suspect, I
baseball
ue, but as
irticipate
softball. I
living in


ump and I were longtime
friends. The circumstance
was that he had called one
of our team's players out
for stepping out of the bat-
ter's box to hit a drive
down the third-base line,


which other-
S wise would
have scored
two runs. I ve-
c hemently ob-
4jected because
there was clear
evidence that
the batter
came down
Fred Brannen within the bat-
A SLICE ter's box, but
his foot slid
OF LIFE outside. The
ump and I put
common on a good show, but all the
time he was agreeing with
s coach, I me that he'd missed the
aha with call. He then became seri-
umpire. ous and, while pointing his
know that finger in my face, gently
park, the said, "Fred, these things


have a way of evening out.
Now, get your glove and
get behind the plate, play
ball or I'm going to have to
toss you."
The game rocked on and
came to the bottom of the
seventh inning with our
team up 2-1 and the oppos-
ing team at bat. They had
one out and a runner on
third base. Their batter hit
a ball high and fairly deep
into left field. It was obvi-
ous that a catch would be
made, the runner would
tag up, and there would be
a play at the plate. I posi-
tioned myself so as to be
able to lay a tag on the
third-baseline edge of the
plate, hopefully avoiding a
collision. As expected, our
left-fielder gloved the ball
and threw a screamer to
the plate. I caught it on the
fly, put the glove down, and
then looked. My glove was
resting well up on the run-


ner's calf, the classic indi-
cator of a late tag and a
runner safe at home. His
foot had crossed the plate
before I put the tag down.
Then I heard, "Batter
out by caught ball, runner
out by tag at the plate.
Game over Tallahassee
Church of God wins."
I looked at the umpire
questioningly I knew that
he and I both knew the
runner had beaten the tag.
He then said softly, "Fred,
I told you these things
even out."


Fred Brannen, an Inver-
ness resident, has been a
Chronicle columnist since
1988 and is the author of
the recently published
novel, 'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay." Fred may
be contacted atffbran-
nenjr@gmail.com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


Hot Comer:
ROAD MSBU

What about gas tax?
I was always told that in this
county, in Citrus County, we're al-
ways charged the full 12 cents that
they were allowed to charge for gas
tax and that was to resurface the
roads. Now (Joe) Meek wants to
charge some more. These county
commissioners just can't get
enough money to spend. Maybe
Scott Adams is right after all.
Oh look, another fee
I'm calling about the voluntary
road resurfacing MSBU in the
works in Saturday's paper, March 8,
about the people having to pay an
additional tax to have the roads
resurfaced. I mean I thought that's
why the gas was so high in this
county is be-
0 ND cause that's
OIJUN what they were
W using that
IF money for, to
pay for road
resurfacing. Ap-
parently they're
not using it for
S that. Now they
CA want to hit us
563-0579 with another
56 0 Iv fee to have the
roads resur-
faced when they're supposed to be
doing that with the exorbitant
money they're charging on the gas
now. I mean we're the highest in
anywhere I've seen. I go up North
quite a bit and you can buy gas up
North for $3.09. Down here you're
looking at $3.49 the same day. I
mean and now they want more
money for road resurfacing when
they're supposed to be using that
extra money from the gas for road
resurfacing. They better get their
act together.
No more MSBUs
This message is for the Citrus
County commissioners: You people
are nuts. Now that you've instituted
that MSBU, you think you can throw
that at any project you need to get
done. As far as road surfacing;
that's why we pay that gas tax. And
you always want to hire a consult-
ant. If you don't know how to do
the job, then get out. And we're
going to make sure when election
time comes, that you will be out
and we'll put somebody in there
that can do the job. We're retired on
Social Security. Now you're going to
use that MSBU for whatever project
you want to achieve and slap us
with another fee. We're tired of it.
We don't have the cash
This is for the county commis-
sioners: I'm a resident of Citrus
Springs for more than 20 years. We
already pay an MSBU fee. We're
paying an extra fee for the fire serv-
ices. Out of our MSBU fee, we con-
structed that community center
which we turned back over to the
county. But the county is wasting
all kinds of millions of dollars on
this hospital deal. Do these county
commissioners think that our taxes
are only to pay their salaries? We're
running out of money down here.
We can't even get potholes fixed.
The section between going out to
the golf course, the section be-
tween Deltona Boulevard and the
golf course is like an obstacle
course. Somebody better do
something.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

campaign didn't go much further
than the Plantation Inn.
Reubin Askew was too nice of
a guy to get elected president of
the United States.
My second Askew story is
more personal.
I was a self-proclaimed trou-


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chronicle required only small quarters like this in August, 1968, when this photo was taken. After this
photo, it was greatly enlarged and redesigned under the ownership of David S. Arthurs. The legend "Est. 1890" is printed
over the door in this picture.


Originally published in the Citrus County
Chronicle. Information for Back in Time is
supplied by the Citrus County Historical
Society.
In 1939...
n its promotional movement to es-
tablish a fish hatchery at some spot
in Citrus County, the Inverness Kiwa-
nis club at its regular weekly luncheon
meeting tomorrow (Friday) at the Or-
ange hotel will hear 0. Lloyd Mee-
hean, junior aquatic biologist for the
government fish hatchery at Welaka.
Mr Meehean is expected to give many
helpful hints as to how a hatchery
should be started and operated.
During the 18-month period from
July 1, 1937, when the State Wel-


fare Board was inducted into office, to
Dec. 31, 1938, the end of the last cal-
endar year, 219 residents of Citrus
County applied for Old Age Assis-
tance, it was announced this week at
state headquarters of the Board in
Jacksonville. On January 1, 1939, 198
applications were received, this num-
ber being supplemented by an addi-
tional 21 applications the succeeding
six months.

In 1954...
he Inverness Kiwanis Club has
placed gum ball vending ma-
chines in several places of business
during the past week. Proceeds from
the machines will be used for the
club's program for boys and girls.


Donald McBride and Tommie Mc-
Quarrie opened their new fishing
pier and bait house at the foot of Third
Avenue, Crystal River, last week Theyhave
constructed a 60 foot pier, have dredged
out a channelto provide easy access to their
property, have constructed a bait house
and plant startwork on boathouses soon

S sponsors of Inverness' Hi-Neighbor
Week, now being observed, are still
seeking more nominations of persons
for outstanding acts of courtesy The
Inverness Kiwanis Club and the Junior
Chamber of Commerce, who are pro-
moting the courtesy campaign, want to
recognize some Inverness person or
a person who works in Inverness -
with a suitable award.


Let public enjoy
Three Sisters
I have read the plan sub-
mitted to the city council by
Mr Bob Mercer regarding ac-
cess to Three Sisters Springs
and am submitting some of my
thoughts regarding this plan.
The plan:
1. Daily access limited to
between 10 a.m. and noon
and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
2. Temporary use of King's
Bay Drive by shuttles into
the park until the permanent
entrance is completed.
3. No toilets in the park, so
tourists are told to use facili-
ties where they buy their
tickets before entering the
park. Portable toilets might
be made available until a
structure can be made.
4. Sell tickets at tour offices
and dive shops (cost $5 to
$15).
One would wonder why
this plan would accomplish
anything but discouraging
use of the park. Are we going
to limit access to the park by


blemaker in college and managed
to get myself kicked out. I was a
member of the newspaper staff,
and we wrote some editorials
critical of the college adminis-
tration's financial decisions.
The administration responded
by abolishing the paper and
telling the entire staffwe were not
invited back for the next school
year Even our sports reporters,
who had nothing to do with critical
editorials, were given the boot.


tour boats and paddleboats,
and are the tour boats going
to be required to tell their
customers to get out of the
water during the park clo-
sures? Also, are we going to
chase customers out of the
park who have just paid $5 to
$15 to get into the park, and
make them wait two hours to
get back into the park for two
more hours or less? The rule
must apply equally to every-
one and not just a chosen
few
Shuttle buses are not a bad
idea, but what will they cost,
how often will they run and
what about security in the
parking area? Not to men-
tion how the parking lot
owner feels about such an
idea.
Most astonishing is the
concept of telling the cus-
tomers there are no facilities
in the park and to use the fa-
cilities at the ticket vendor's
location before they go to the
park. Really! I'll just bet ven-
dors such as tour boat opera-
tors, hotels and restaurant


The high-handed response to
criticism created a backlash and
we were eventually permitted
back in school. But the newspa-
per remained abolished, so we
had to create an off-campus
paper to fill the void.
The Gov. Askew connection
was that he was the commence-
ment speaker that year at the
college's graduation ceremony
Part of the pressure put on the
school to readmit the student


owners are going to love hun-
dreds of tourists using their
facilities never meant to ac-
commodate that many peo-
ple. What about us older
folks who have urgency prob-
lems? Can you just see these
folks impatiently waiting for
a shuttle to take them back to
the parking lot which also
has no facilities.
Asking vendors to collect
the admittance fees is prob-
lematic. Any business person
knows the more people who
handle the money, the more
problems you have. Has any-
one asked the vendors about
this? Sure, they may get a
commission, but will it be
worth it. For example, a tour
boat operator selling tickets
to the park would be compet-
ing with his own business for
a commission well below
what he would get for a tour
ticket.
Personally, I'm not about to
pay $15 a head to spend a lit-
tle time on the boardwalk,
and I can't imagine this will
do much for tourism. I hope


journalists was from the gover-
nor, who said as the creator of
the "Sunshine Amendments" he
would have to cancel his speech if
the students were not readmitted.
After the college dropped its
antics, Gov Askew came and
gave his speech. But to the cha-
grin of the administration, he
changed the content
While the college president
who kicked us out of school sat
squirming on the commence-


the plan will be exposed for
what it is. Just another
scheme to try to limit access
to the park. The situation
could be worse. The property
could have been sold to
condo builders! Does anyone
think they would have been
concerned with the area
homeowners? Let's stop pro-
longing the fight and get this
park operational.
David Zelher
Crystal River

Return my heron
To the person who borrowed
my tall heron lawn ornament
from my yard, I can't believe
an American would steal it.
Please return it. I'd like it
back now that the weather
will be getting nice again. As
you recall, it was the center-
piece to my Japanese garden
entryway
Your old Korean Conflict
vet on Annapolis Avenue.
Norm Schmidt
Hernando


ment stage, Gov. Askew gave a
very nice speech on the impor-
tance of freedom of the press.
How can you not love a gover-
nor like that?
Reubin Askew was one of the
great governors of Florida and
his leadership is missed.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline. com.


Letters to THE EDITOR


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


On the high and low ends, the transparency of a

website was directly related to the size and resources

of a government. Each of the three lowest-scoring

counties (Glades, Liberty and Washington) has fewer

than 25,000 people. Similarly, the three lowest-scoring

cities (Blountstown, Bonifay and Chipley) are tiny

communities in the Florida Panhandle. Calhoun

County, whose seat is Blountstown, is the only

Florida county that doesn't have a website.


SUNSHINE
Continued from Page Cl

ways, these governments fall short
of those goals.
"On most websites, it's far easier
to pay a water bill than it is to find
out how much a government is
paying to run the water depart-
ment- and who's selling services
to the
department."
The survey rated information
available under seven categories:
financial, accountability, public
meetings, contact information,
public records, ease of use and
other features, such as whether
citizens could check on reported
crimes in their neighborhoods
(most couldn't.)
The average score of 65 counties
(Calhoun County has no website,
while the 67th county was scored
as the city of Jacksonville) was 50
out of a possible 100 points. The
average score of the 46 cities sur-
veyed was 52.8.
On the high and low ends, the
transparency of a website was di-
rectly related to the size and re-
sources of a government. Each of
the three lowest-scoring counties
(Glades, Liberty and Washington)
has fewer than 25,000 people. Sim-
ilarly, the three lowest-scoring
cities (Blountstown, Bonifay and
Chipley) are tiny communities in
the Florida Panhandle. Calhoun
County, whose seat is Blountstown,
is the only Florida county that
doesn't have a website.
What follows is a summary of the
scoring in each of the seven survey
categories.

FINANCIAL
Almost all of the cities and coun-
ties put their budgets online. (The
exceptions were the three lowest-
scoring counties and cities: Wash-
ington, Liberty and Glades;
Blountstown, Bonifay and Mari-
anna.) Most also posted some man-
ner of analysis. But breakdowns of
revenue and spending were often
not posted separately and had to
be derived by studying the budget.
Only three cities (Deltona, Fort
Walton Beach and Tallahassee)
and six counties (Broward, Clay,
Marion, Miami-Dade, Sarasota
and Wakulla) posted check regis-
ters, which allow citizens to track
who actually gets money Just 11
cities posted their current prop-
erty tax millage in an easily find-
able manner, though half the
counties did. The average score
for the cities was 11.5, for the
counties 10. Miami-Dade scored a
perfect 20 points, while Deltona
and Fort Walton Beach, each with
18, led the cities.

ACCOUNTABILITY
Scores in this category were dis-
mal, averaging 5.6 for the cities
and 6 for the counties out of a pos-
sible 20 points. Six cities and eight
counties scored a 0. Only one
county, Miami-Dade, and not a sin-
gle city surveyed posted a list of
employees along with their


salaries (though some did post a
salary schedule of pay per posi-
tion, and a few smaller municipal-
ities posted a list of employees and
their phone numbers.) St. Johns
County did link to a Florida
Times-Union story listing county
salaries.
Just seven cities and eight coun-
ties posted a list of people regis-
tered to lobby A total of 19 cities
and 23 counties posted a list of
current vendors critical for
someone looking into possible self-
dealing or political payoffs but
it wasn't always certain if the lists
were 100 percent complete. Seven
cities and 14 counties posted ex-
isting leases between the city and
other entities. Only 16 cities and 30
counties posted spending informa-
tion for quasi-public agencies as-
sociated with the cities such as
housing and airport authorities -
that often control significant addi-
tional dollars. In short, even the
governments that do a good job of
showing how much money they
take in and how much they spend
do a poor job of informing taxpay-
ers about where that money actu-
ally goes and who influences how
it is spent.

PUBLIC
MEETINGS
It's pretty clear that local gov-
ernments have gotten the message
that public meetings must be
posted and that citizens are enti-
tled to an advance look at the
agendas and backup materials
- that will be considered by a city
council or other board or commis-
sion. The 47 cities averaged 15 out
of a possible 20 points the high-
est average of any of the survey
categories. Counties did not do
quite as well, averaging 13 points.

CONTACT
INFORMATION
The cities averaged 2.6 out of a
possible 5 in this category, the
counties 2. As with agendas and
minutes, virtually every city and
county posted the names of com-
missioners, and some manner of
contact information, but many did
not indicate when they must run
again. Most also posted names and
contact information for the man-
ager/administrator and depart-
ment heads. But only a handful of
cities Daytona Beach and three
in Broward County and just one
county (Broward) posted financial-
disclosure or conflict-of-interest
forms filed by city commissioners.

PUBLIC
RECORDS
This was another dismal cate-
gory, with the average score just 7
out of a possible 16 for both cities
and counties. Just 11 cities and 17
counties scored 12 or more points,
while 7 cities and 6 counties
scored a 0, including otherwise
user-friendly sites in Fort Laud-
erdale and Tallahassee. The latter
has links to literally dozens of pos-
sible responses to the question


"How can I..'' including everything
from finding a park and calculat-
ing one's carbon footprint to ac-
cessing pictures of the mayor at
public events. But there's not a
single word of advice about how to
file a public records request, nor
any indication that a citizen can do
so electronically The city of Jack-
sonville and Columbia County had
the only perfect scores.
Only 20 cities' websites contained
a clear statement of a citizen's
right to obtain public records, and
only 19 allowed a citizen to file a
records request electronically
That means that residents in most
cities and half the counties in the
state must request records the old-
fashioned way, by making the trip
down to city hall or the county
courthouse and finding someone
who can help them.

EASE
OF USE
This was one of the higher-scor-
ing categories, with cities averag-
ing 6.6 and the counties 6 out of a
possible 10 points. Five cities (Hol-
lywood, Marianna, Miramar, Palm
Bay and Pompano Beach) racked
up perfect scores, while 18 others
registered an 8. Eight counties
scored 10s (Brevard, Charlotte,
Clay, Lafayette, Leon, Monroe,
Seminole and Volusia) while 19
had 8 ratings.
Virtually every site allows users
to download information, although
documents like budgets are usu-
ally available only as PDFs, mean-
ing the data in them can't be
conveniently crunched. Most sites
are also word or phrase search-
able, though some sites utilize
Google applications that include
advertisements in the results, or
show previous years' budgets or
other reports in random rather
than chronological order The
least-common feature, available
on only 15 city and 20 county
websites, was a link enabling citi-
zens to provide feedback to their
government.

OTHER
FEATURES
There were only 11 perfect
scores of 9. Most city and county
sites posted building and zoning
regulations critical information
for residents seeking information
about what changes are possible in
their neighborhoods. But only 15
cities provided links that would
enable property owners to check
their assessments, and just 11
posted information about how a
resident could appeal his or her
assessment. By contrast, 47 coun-
ties had links to assessments and
31 to appeals information. Only 18
cities and just 11 counties -
posted links that allow citizens to
check on reported crimes in their
neighborhoods.
Though Florida cities and coun-
ties have entered the Internet age
- all of the 47 cities and 65 of the
66 counties surveyed had websites
- most have a long way to go be-
fore their governments can be con-
sidered proactively transparent.


Roads are a mess
We have no snow, ice or freezing weather. Why is it
we have such problems with our roads? Cracks,
patches, patches on top of patches, all taking its
toll, damaging our vehicles, front-end tires, trans-
missions, brakes. Never mind all the money wasted
on consultants, how about using our road tax money
for resurfacing roads? Beverly Hills is an utter disgrace.
Conserving and happy
Conserve water, save money, buy American. I was
so impressed with the very informative letter to the
editor on (Feb. 12) titled "Start conserving water now,"
that I was motivated to share one of the water-saving
methods we are using in our home. About two years
ago I purchased an electronic, tankless water-heating
system from a manufacturer that is located in Miami.
All other systems seem to come from other countries
and were much more expensive. The system I bought
was less than $300 and I was able to do the installa-
tion myself. We have been very satisfied with the effi-
ciency of this system since our
OUN water is no longer being continu-
0 UND ously heated in a tank. We now
F have hot water on demand.
PAs know the business
In reply to the article in Sound
Off (Feb. 24), the man complain-
) ing about seeing a PA instead of
S the doctor: I find all PAs that I
CA have associated with have been
563 0579 very confident and some of them
56 0579 even more knowledgeable than
the doctor. I put in a good word
for all PAs and for nurse practitioners. They are on the
ball. They know their business.
Kissing a squirrel
It's kind of funny to read what people like as far as
pets. The person who wrote in about their dog and that
it has adopted and taken up with squirrels. Apparently
they don't know that squirrels are a direct descen-
dant of a rat. They're kissing cousins. They're about
as dirty as a rat and they're about as mean as a rat.
Good information
When dialing 411 (information), the phone num-
ber you request is spoken in a machinegun voice. To
prevent this, immediately on hearing an operator, tell
her to give you the number manually and not by au-
tomated voice. For those of us with hearing problems
or who have difficulty writing, we need more time.
Out they all go
In response to the AmeriGas lease: I hope at the com-
missioners meeting, action will be taken to terminate
the people who were incompetent in this situation and
that the attorney issues a letter that if full payment is
not received within the next 30 days, eviction will be
forthcoming the following week, and what action the
county will take so nothing like this ever happens again
with the taxpayers' money or the taxpayers' property.
Train your cats
I see a lost pet ad in the paper for a declawed Hi-
malayan cat that someone lost. This cat is out there
somewhere. It's defenseless and this is a perfect ex-
ample of why you should not declaw your cat. Train
them, same as you would a dog, not to scratch the
furniture. Do not declaw them. I feel bad for this cat.
Forget John, you want Emeril
I'm reading in the paper today about a person that
called in and said that they were glad that McDon-
ald's was coming in Lecanto and they hoped a Papa
John's and KFC followed. Well, we have Papa John's
here. This guy needs to wake up and look around his
neighborhood. And to begin with, he needs to get
some pots and pans and learn how to cook.
The kindness of strangers
We want to thank all the kind people at the Floral
City Library Wednesday (March 12) when my wife fainted
in the reading room. Terry Ann and Gary at the
counter, EMTs Glen and Jonathan were all calm and
professional. We also thank the young lady who first
came to help. We're sorry we did not get a name.
Kathy's fine now and we're both very grateful.


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Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2014


C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


COMMENTARY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Community, diocese must support school


e, the members of the
School Advisory & De-
velopment Council
(SADC) of Pope John Paul II
Catholic School, are not as en-
couraged by the bishop's visit on
Tuesday as we are by the sup-
port from the local community,
parents of the school and mem-
bers of the six supporting
parishes. We are humbled by the
outreach of financial and emo-
tional support provided by com-
munity and other religious
leaders. A special thanks to Pas-
tor Douglas Alexander from the
New Church without Walls, who
showed support not only at our
school meeting with our bishop,
but preached about our cause to
his non-Catholic congregation.
He is now recommending our
early childhood school to his
members for a private, values-
based education. We are also
grateful to members from Seven
Rivers Christian School who
embraced us with tears and
open arms to allow our children
to join theirs in a Christian-
based education. We are hum-
bled by a community that has
joined us in our prayers.
The bishop did offer our
school a glimmer of hope with
an extension of one month to
provide a plan (however with no
recommendations from him or
the superintendent of schools).
Per the bishop, the plan needs to
provide a strategy as well as


funds to turn around the school
that he contends has been on IV
support for years.
We, the SADC, were disheart-
ened with some components of
his talks. The first being when
the bishop said "I have been
providing the IV" Why did he
not say we, the church, have
been providing the IV? Does he
not see us as part of his church
community who contribute to
the collections on Sundays that
fund the operations of the
church as well as the diocese?
Per a letter of notice to our
school parents last Monday, the
diocese and parishes con-
tributed $2.1 million over five
years an average of $420,000 a
year to subsidize the school.
The bishop was asked how much
of that $420,000 comes directly
from our six supporting parishes
via the 11 percent of the weekly
collections earmarked for Catholic
education. He answered that
$267,000 is directly allocated
from only 11 percent of our local
parishes annual contributions.
Additionally, we are discour-
aged by the fact that we did not
know to what extent the school
was in trouble for five years. We
were aware that we needed to
work more diligently at
fundraising efforts, but that was
the extent of it We have not had
access to the detailed numbers
or the operating budget of the
school. We are encouraged that


We, the SADC, were disheartened

with some components of (Bishop
Robert Lynch's) talks. The first

being when the bishop said
"I have been providing the IV."

Why did he not say we, the church,
have been providing the IV? Does

he not see us as part of his church
community who contribute to the

collections on Sundays that fund
the operations of the church as

well as the diocese?


the bishop offered transparency
at last Tuesday's meeting.
The diocese's projected en-
rollment numbers were inaccu-
rate. We knew we were losing a
large graduating eighth-grade
class, but were anticipating re-
placing that number with addi-
tional growth. The bishop
painted a glum picture with his
statement of concern that there
are not enough Catholics in Cit-
rus County to support such en-
rollment. Pope John Paul II
currently has 10 percent of its
enrollees as non-Catholics and


readily accepts enrollment of
children from all religious de-
nominations. This travesty has
certainly made us aware that we
need to do a better job at mar-
keting, our educational stan-
dards and values, as well as step
up scholarship opportunities.
Thus far, the bishop has only
agreed to an extension of one
year if he approves the recovery
plan submitted by the school on
April 15. We are apprehensive
about supporting the financial
burden on the community,
school parents and parishioners


to repair the building and in-
crease the value of a diocesan
asset without a larger commit-
ment for the longevity of
Catholic education in our
county We are confident that we
can gather the funds to repair
the building and increase en-
rollment for next year and years
to come, but we do not think we
can guarantee the enrollment
increase that the bishop expects
in one year If we are going to in-
vest this type of capital in reno-
vations, we need a longer
commitment from the bishop
that won't cripple our ability to
increase enrollment.
We are grateful that the bishop
rescheduled plans to speak to
our community in person. We
are certain that we can keep and
exceed our end of the bargain.
We already have had a certified
roofer evaluate the roof and as-
sured that it was not in need of
replacement any time in the
near future. We just hope Bishop
Lynch will reconsider how long
he will commit in return. The
battle is far from over, and we
still need support for funding di-
rectly to the school and have cre-
ated mechanisms for that. Our
faith is strong and we are grate-
ful to live in a community where
God is present in all areas.
Sincerely,
Jennifer Hewitson
Members of SADC


Keep carts off streets No need to rush He's what we wanted OUND


More GPs, please Don't do the crime...


I am a resident of Tim-
berlane Estates and I
would like to inform my
other residents of this
community that we are not
a gated community; we
are not a private commu-
nity. Our roads are gov-
erned by the state of
Florida and the county of
Citrus. Unauthorized, unli-
censed vehicles, golf
carts, utility vehicles and
everything else are not al-
lowed on this road and we
need to stop this before
there is a serious accident.


In my humble opinion,
the reason older drivers'
accidents have decreased
is once you retire, you no
longer have the need to
get where you're going in
five minutes. You take your
time and drive closer to
the speed limits so you
don't get speeding tickets
and lose your driving privi-
leges, which is uppermost
to older persons to feel in-
dependent. It's bad
enough we get to where we
just can't and have to de-
pend on others.


*Suncomt Credit Union
FOUNDATION ^


~ch',oo6hoa6e
lBUS'TLE *
HEALTH EXPO 5K
YMCA KID ZONE
SCHOOL SPIRIT CONTESTS 0 K
APRIL 12, 2014 1 MILE WALK
CREST SCHOOL .'" .
LECANTO ToFBenft the Citrue Conty
6:30AM REGISTRATION, EucatinFoulaton
7:30AM START FOR MORE INFO CALL 352-586-3396
www.schoolhousehustle.com www.facebook.com/schoolhousehustle
SPONSORS AARON'S, CITRUS 95 3/THE Fox, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE,
GULF TO LAKE MARINE & TRAILERS, NATURE COAST EMS, NATURE COAST FINANCIAL ADVISORS, SUBWAY
SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION FOUNDATION, TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA, VANALLEN INSURANCE AGENCY, T
VAUGHN/MCLAUGHLIN TEAM OF RAYMOND JAMES, WEST COAST INSURERS AND THE YMCA C-
^IN II


Best Ball
Format
Lunch Prior to Start
Prizes
50/50
Mulligans


Tournament
sponsored by the
St. Scholastica
Knights of Columbus
Council/#14485

Cfl ii",'p ii:f.E


LENNY NAVICKAS
GOLF TOURNAMENT
at Citrus Hills Skyview Country Club

April 5,2014 at 1 p.m.
IN MEMORY OF LENNY NAVICKAS. PROCEEDS GO TO HIS CHILDREN.
OOHJWD $75 DONATION









SSaturday, March 22, 2014
U 9 am- 3 pm
S Inverness Elks Lodge #2522 1 '
3580 Lemon 9freet, Hernando
(on Hernando Lake, turn between tackle shop and martial arts studio)
Raffle Drawings Food and Bever" es
SInside and Outside Crafters- 4)
SPONSORED BY '
l ..... ... . For more information, call
C1I IR,0N16U1 Mimi Salton 860-2598


In regards to your edito-
rial and Sound Offs in
today's paper, Sunday,
Feb. 23: We voted Scott
Adams into office because
we didn't like what the
county commission had
been doing for the past
years. And we voted Scott
Adams in to stir things up
a bit and that's exactly
what he's doing and every-
thing he's stirring up is
truthfully. Again, that is
why we voted him into of-
fice is because we don't
like the way the county


563-0579

commission has been
doing things and spending
taxpayers' money. Scott
Adams, keep it up.


ART CENTER Of CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center Theatre


On E^

Golden

POND
,j Dramatits Play
.. ServK, Inc.

By EarnestThompson
Dir bySharon Harrs


March 21-
April 6,2014
Frd. & StL nig at 7:30o pm
SundayMatiee at 2:00 pm
Adioml Saturday Mamtee
Mard ,2%2
Tickets: $19.00
352-746-7606
skoofr:
ou4i0 4pmp MUot. Ihnlm FI.
www.awftcrc


iEmeritus atBarrington Place presents the
3rd Annual
Golf For Meals
Iw xqp l^ Golf Tournament
Saturday, March 29, 2014
Registration begins at 8:00 am
Shotgun start 9:00 am
Four person scramble
7 Rivers Golf and Country Club
For more information call (352) 527-5975
Lunch during Hole-in-one prize
the event provided by: Harley
he evet Davidson, Crystal River
SPONSORS: Citrus County Chronicle, Harley Davidson of
Crystal River, WYKE TV, Nature Coast Volunteer Center,
FOX 96.7, Citrus 95.3, 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club

C 16THRANNUA





.- *; A* 6:30 P.M.

-L__ 0 atthe
!, '.Curtis Peterson
gAuditorium
I ",Tickets $10 per person
Children under 10 are free
Masters of Ceremonies:
Brad Thorpe County Administrator and Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator
For ticket information call c r. -)N/, ",I.
527-5900 (Doors open at 6pm) !


I called in late February
to get an appointment with
a general practitioner. I am
a 79-year-old male. I called
one doctor. They could not
see me until April. I called
two other doctors. They could
not see me until June. If I was
to get sick and go to the
emergency room and the
emergency room doctor
admits me, I understand
Medicare will not pay for
that. I'd have to be sent in
by a local doctor. I think
Citrus County could use some
more general practitioners.


This is in response to
your front-page story on
Thursday (March 13), "Judge
rules evidence can be released
in theater shooting case." I
don't understand the attor-
neys for Mr. Reeves saying
any sentence is a life sen-
tence because of this man's
age. Are we supposed to
feel remorse for this man
Reeves because he's an
old man? I didn't know
that Mother Justice said,
"Well, it's OK to rob a bank
if you're 80 years old,
we'll let you go home."


March 16
Inverness Golf and Country Club
52nd Annual St. Pats Championship Golf Tournament
Contact Phone: (352) 726-2583 or (352) 586-6510
March 15 & 16 9:00 AM
Friends of Fort Cooper Fort Cooper Days
Location: Fort Cooper State Park
Entrance Fee: Adult thru 13 years old $6.00
12 years old and under FREE
Contact Phone: (352) 726-0315
Contact Email: dianne.drye@dep.state.fl.us

March 21 &April 6
Fri. and Sat. Nights at 7:30 PM, Sunday Matinee at 2:00 PM,
Additional Sat. Matinee Mar. 29 at 2:00 PM
Art Center Theatre On Golden Pond
Location: ACT
Entrance Fee: $19 each
Contact Phone: (352) 746-7606

March 22 9:00 AM
Lakeside Craft Show
Location: 3580 E.Lemon St. Hernando
Contact Phone: (352) 860-2598
Contact Email: mimisalton@tampabay.rr.com

March 24-29
Citrus County Fair Association Citrus County Fair 2014
Location: Citrus County Fair Grounds
Contact Phone: (352) 726-2993
Contact Email: citruscountyfair@embarqmail.com

March 29 9:00 AM Shotgun Start
Meals on Wheels Citrus County Resource Center
Golf for Meals
Location: 7 Rivers Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: $55 Per Golfer
Contact Phone: (352) 527-5975
Contact Email: pat.coles@bocc.citrus.fl.us

March 29.-11:00 AM
St. Scholastica Council of Catholic Women
Hats Off to Fashions
Location: Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: $20.00
Contact Phone: (352) 341-3603 or (352) 746-2873
Contact Email: cfhayes0102@gmail.com

April 1 6:30 PM 8:00 PM
The BFF Society (Changing Lives Through Education)
5th Annual Diamond in April
Location:Tuscanyon the Meadows
Entrance Fee: $20.00
Contact Phone: (352) 697-2279

April 3 6:00 PM
The Sanctuary & Grace House Mission
4th Annual Fundraising Banquet
Location: First United Methodist Church Homosassa
Entrance Fee: $35 individual, $60 couple,
$300 for a table of 10
Contact Email: (352) 697-0100 or (352) 422-1877
Contact Email: deorgan61@gmail.com

April 4-5 6:00 PM
American Cancer Society Relay for Life
Relay for Life
Location: Inverness
Entrance Fee: Fundraiser for Cancer
Contact Phone: (352) 563-6363
Contact Email: kcommon@chronicleonline.com


national Cjrish %merican -jeritage jonth A( lo1,
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og. -Mf30 31


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 CS


, 1_-m m l i ll




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DO YOU HAVE

A DRYER'
IS IT ON THE INTERIOR WALL OF YOUR HOME?
If so, chances are it exhausts into a vent pipe that runs inside the wall all the
way UP to and through your roof or DOWN under the floor.
If not properly maintained this pipe can retain lots of flammable lint,
causing your dryer to use more electricity by taking longer than it should to
dry clothes, shorten the life of the dryer AND create a tremendous fire
hazard.
We all clean our dryer's lint trap with each load, but THAT"S NOT ENOUGH!
The National Fire Protection Association nfpa.org and the Department of
Homeland Security usfa.dhs.gov both recommend that your dryer's vent pipe
be cleaned at least once per year, or even more if you notice clothes taking longer
to dry or your dyer becoming warmer during cycles.
This is one risk you can DO SOMETHING ABOUT in a painless, inexpensive
way. Not to mention added benefits of saving electric $$ and appliances life!!


III
I


2


-4i
af q~it~fii1i^^^
.';^6N


> r
p *


Dryer Vent
Cleaning


III


CLEAN
'A
ALL THE WAY"
UPTHRU
.THE ROOFSd


.,' 1 I 1 1ILI


****************************
Cetiid raute- eoelr- GauaeMstrBile V N I A W L


rr, Fl


SPEAKING OF RISK: Make sure that any company you hire is FULLY INSURED, including both Worker's Compensation AND General Liability
Insurance. It's important- ASK FOR PROOF. Even if the company you hire is not REQUIRED to carry Workers' Compensation Insurance, if a
worker gets hurt while on your property (ie: your roof), you want to be sure the company carries Workers' Compensation so you are not held
responsible. If your property (i.e. your dryer vent pipe) were to be damaged in the cleaning process you would
want to know the company you hired has general liability insurance to make the repair. For 25 years Will c c
Construction has been FULLY INSURED including Workers' Compensation AND General Liability Insurances.
DON'T TRADE ONE RISK FOR ANOTHER-CALL WILL CONSTRUCTION for peace of mind. President, Will Construction Corp.


C6 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


Illl,:111:114 ,N ll4 :1l










TECHNOLOGY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Watch out


New smart devices have fitness feature


Samsung unveiled two new computerized wristwatches on last week,
this time including health sensors and related fitness features to give


BARCELONA, Spain
S amsung's first Galaxy Gear
smartwatch came out last
fall amid much fanfare, but
it landed with a thud in the mar-
ketplace. Samsung and its smart-
watch rivals had failed to
persuade many consumers that
they need to be able to constantly
check messages from their wrists.
Wearable devices that succeeded
tended to be fitness products
such as the Fitbit.
The new Gear 2 and Gear 2
Neo will have a heart rate sensor,
a pedometer and various tools to
measure exercise, sleep and
stress levels. The low-resolution,
2-megapixel camera on the Gear
2 is being moved to the main
body; it was on the strap on the
original Gear The Gear 2 Neo has
no camera and is slightly larger,
but lighter Available colors are
also slightly different.
It's unclear whether the new
watches will continually display
the time. In the original Gear, that
was shut off to save battery which
lasted just a day The new watches
promise two or three days under
normal use, putting them more in


people a reason to buy on(


Anick Jesdanun
Associated Pres
Associated Press
The Gear 2 Neo, one of two new
computerized wristwatches, this
time including health sensors
and related fitness features to
give people a reason to buy one,
unveiled at the Mobile World
Congress in Spain. Samsung's
first Galaxy Gear smartwatch
came out last fall amid much
fanfare, but it landed with a
thud in the marketplace.



line with what rivals offer
Samsung didn't announce
prices for the new watches, but
said they would be available in
April. The original cost $300.
Samsung Electronics Co. an-
nounced the new watches Sunday
before the Mobile World Congress
wireless show in Barcelona. Sam-
sung had a major event Monday
evening, during which it was
announced a successor to its
popular Galaxy S4 smartphone.
The company decided to make


the latest smartwatches with a lit-
tle-known operating system
called Tizen OS, instead of the
Android system from Google used
in the original Gear, as the South
Korean electronics company tries
to break the dominance Google
has on mobile devices.
The move gives some credence
to a fledging system that Samsung
and other backers want to see on
all sorts of devices, including tel-
evisions, refrigerators and cars.
Samsung already has a Tizen
camera out, but a Tizen phone
has yet to emerge, despite expec-
tations of one last year For now,
Samsung is putting Tizen on a
smartwatch instead.
Although Google gives away An-
droid for any manufacturer to use
in its gadgets, it's loaded with a
range of Google services, includ-
ing stores for apps, music and
video. Samsung is trying to pro-
mote its own stores as well and
ends up confusing users by in-
cluding two of everything.
To prevent Google from having a
similar dominance in wearable de-
vices and other gadgets beyond
phones and tablets, Samsung is
pushing Tizen OS as an alternative.


Smartphone cameras closer to high-end power


Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea -
Expect sharper, clearer
selfies this year
Samsung Electronics Co.
has beefed up the camera in
its Galaxy S5 smartphone due
for April release and added
smarter camera software, fol-
lowing Sony and Nokia in
their upgrades of handset
cameras. The tweaks mean
smartphone photos, ubiqui-
tous nowadays because of so-
cial media such as Facebook
and Twitter, will be closer in
quality to images captured by
digital single-lens reflex cam-
eras, also known as DSLR.
How to give a super-thin
smartphone the power of a
DSLR camera that can cap-
ture moving images with


clarity is a key challenge for
the likes of Samsung, Sony,
Nokia and LG as they try to
differentiate their offerings
in a crowded handset mar-
ket. Their efforts to make
smartphone cameras more
powerful have taken a toll on
the compact point-and-shoot
camera market, but catching
up to the high-end cameras
used by professional photog-
raphers had appeared a far-
fetched ambition.
The gap is getting nar-
rower thanks mainly to im-
provements in camera
software and other technolo-
gies, but may never close
completely
The global wireless show
that wraps up in Barcelona on
Thursday showed smart-
phone makers using software


trickery to offset their camera
weaknesses: inferior image
sensors and lack of optical
zoom lens. The companies are
also making photo manipula-
tion on the phone easier to
learn than manually control-
ling DSLR cameras.
Instead of touting their
smartphones as thinner,
lighter or bigger screened,
Samsung, Sony and LG were
boasting how their latest mo-
bile gadgets can record
ultra-high definition videos
known as 4K, take big-pixel
pictures without a second of
delay and capture clearer
images even at a low-light
settings and when a subject
is moving.
One trend in smartphone
camera this year will be phase
detection autofocus, previ-


ously available only in cam-
eras with interchangeable
lens, said Chris Chute, a direc-
tor at research company IDC.
Samsung showcased the
feature in the Galaxy S5, the
latest version of the South Ko-
rean company's flagship
smartphone. It reduces the
time it takes to focus on a sub-
ject to 0.3 second so even
when the subject is moving,
the image can be captured
with a sharp edge, said Seshu
Madhavapeddy Samsung's
senior vice president for U.S.
product and technology.
"Now that phones are start-
ing to have this, consumers
will only be more likely to use
phones for not just everyday
pictures, but more and
more for special event
photography," Chute said.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil prices edge up
amid China worries

NEW YORK-The price of oil
edged slightly higher on Friday but
remained under $100 a barrel as
traders weighed whether an appar-
ent pickup in the U.S. economy
could spur enough demand to offset
a slowdown in China.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for April de-
livery was up 44 cents to $98.64 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange. On
Thursday, the Nymex contract rose
21 cents to close at $98.20.
Oil prices also benefited from the
latest forecast from the Interna-
tional Energy Agency which raised
its estimate for global oil demand in
2014 to 92.7 million barrels a day
95,000 barrels a day more than its
projection made last month.

China fears continue
to drive markets

LONDON Concerns over the
Chinese economy and the ongoing
tensions in Ukraine continued to
drive stock markets around the
world lower Friday
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares was down 0.4
percent at 6,530 while Germany's
DAX fell 0.1 percent to 9,009. The
CAC-40 in France was 1 percent
lower at 4,209. The biggest casualty
was Russia's main RTS index, which
was trading around 3 percent lower
Japan's Nikkei 225 stock had a
particularly bad session, falling
3.3 percent to 14,327.66. As a result
the index ended the week 6.2 per-
cent lower
Elsewhere in Asia, Hong Kong's
Hang Seng dropped 1 percent to end
at 21,539.49 and China's Shanghai
Composite fell 0.5 percent to
2,004.34.

-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY




Marketplace

is still a smart,

solid bet for

your savings

EAR BRUCE: I have been
reading everything I can
find about investing for re-
tirement, but still don't know
what's best for me and my hus-
band. We are in our early 50s and
have two children. One is a fresh-
man in college, and he has a Roth
IRA that he contributes to from his
summer job. The other is a fresh-
man in high school.
We believe an inexpensive route
is through the junior college trans-
fer method. We have about $25,000
in an ETrade account that we use
for tuition. We will add to it
monthly to save enough for our
second son's education.
My husband makes $250,000 a
year and has stock options and
bonuses that we will be able to in-
vest. We have about $60,000 in a
401(k). We have sold some property
and will be totally out of debt as
soon as it closes. We will probably
have one car payment, but no
mortgage, school loans, credit
cards, etc.
We will have about $100,000 left
after the property sells, and I
would love to know how to invest it
for retirement. We are planning to
buy long-term-care insurance as
soon as our youngest son finishes
college.
-TO., via email
DEAR T.O.: There is very little


you say that I disagree with. As to
the inexpensive route through a
junior college, I find no way to crit-
icize that. However, more and
more people are learning about it,
See Page D2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Managing your volunteer workforce


R ipley was known for the "Believe
it or Not" anecdotal tales many of
us read and passed along to fam-
ily and friends. Here's a "Believe it or
Not" Ripley did not write. Nonprofit
volunteers need to be managed. This is
a statement that is absolutely true be-
lieve it!
Volunteerism is a strong byproduct of
our American culture. This is especially
true in Citrus County We are the proud
possessors of more than 700 nonprofits
according to the records. Properly man-
aged they all have the potential to be
successful. Professionally trained non-
profit managers are taught to practice
proven techniques that help manage
their volunteers. Here are some of the
suggested practices:
Volunteer management
recommendations
Start with a written document on
what is expected of volunteers. Label it
"Volunteer Practice Guidelines." The
Mission and Purpose is a good begin-
ning. Bylaws are the operating rules of
the organization, and should be given to
all volunteer candidates. Everyone
should have a set when they first come
into the organization. National nonprof-


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

NONPROFIT
BRIEFS

its, those with chapters or stand alone
community nonprofits, need structure.
That's basic to any organization. These
documents establish expectations, sug-
gest the culture and tone and represent
a reference point for new volunteers.
Communicate-Communicate-
Communicate
Communication formats different as
does individual learning styles. Picking
the methods) that work best for any cer-
tain group is key Publish your informa-
tion in written format, via emails or
present it verbally Repeat often so
everyone understands want is required,
has changed or is new Along with talk-
ing to volunteers goes listening to them.


Listening is the harder of these two ac-
tivities. Listening is critical because it
can lead to improvements and establish
greater cooperation from volunteers.
Remember volunteers are on the front
line, and often closer to the realities of a
situation. They may just uncover some-
thing that really moves the organization
forward. Listening and validation is an
integral piece of professional manage-
ment.
Pick volunteers that understand
nonprofit work
The majority of people can not be ex-
pected to know and understand the
principles of nonprofit management.
Most people generally understand vol-
unteerism if they have been active in an
organization. Those persons with some
involvement represent the best choice
for a volunteer Pick people who have
volunteered in your community
People working for free
Volunteers work for free. Smart lead-
ership understands this situation re-
quires special treatment. Volunteers are
not employees. Common knowledge un-
derstands employers usually tell em-
ployees what to do and often how to do
their job. Volunteer management can be


a world apart from an employee/em-
ployer relationship. Nonprofit leader-
ship must continually show proper
respect for their involvement. Volunteer
managers should describe and suggest
what is to be done. Leadership should
seek acceptance, ask for cooperation
and earn the buy-in for the jobs the vol-
unteers do.
The power of "thank you"
Trophies and plaques were devel-
oped by the American Awards Industry
Association and its' members. These
physical products represent, a perma-
nent "thank-you." Everyone is proud to
have at least one plaque hanging on
their wall or a trophy on a shelf. A ver-
bal thank-you in front of a group is an-
other effective way to give grateful
recognition for volunteer efforts. It's
called psychological income. Use these
award opportunities generously It's
basic.
Dr. Frederick J. Herzog, PhD is the
Founder and Executive Director of the
NonProfit Resource Center in Citrus
County He can be reached via email:
therzog@tampabay.rrcom or 847-899-
9000.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

and enrolling in a junior
college is getting more
competitive.
As to the $100,000 that
is being generated by the
property sale, I can do no
better than to recommend
investing in the market-
place. If you invest in
solid American compa-
nies paying dividends,
you should be able to
combine the ordinary ap-
preciation of the stock
with the dividends to earn
a 6 percent to 8 percent
return. Some years you
may lose money, but on
balance, the return that I
stated is not an unreason-
able expectation.
DEAR BRUCE: My son
will be graduating from
graduate school soon and
has found a good job in his
chosen field. He wants to
move from his student
slum apartment to a nicer
place. Is there a rule of
thumb he should follow for
how much rent and utili-
ties to pay as a percentage
of gross or net income?
-J.J., via email
DEAR JJ.: Congratula-
tions on your son graduat-
ing and getting a good job


in his chosen field. I am
wondering why he has to
move from his "slum"
apartment to a nicer
place. If the apartment is


in a bad neighborhood,
that's a different matter
But if he has been com-
fortable there through
college, what's the hurry?


You can fix it up a little
bit, if it's necessary Stay-
ing there would allow him
to start to accumulate
some savings, and there is


nothing wrong with that.
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn. Questions of general


*****************
*'L R FLORIDA *

( OA CAREGIVERS *
**CA INC.*

* Hourly or Live-In Care *
SNurses, Nurse Aides, Home *
Health Aides, Companions *





* *
Assistance with: *
Personal care *
0 Meals *
* Transportation *
Housekeeping *
SMedication *
Reminders *

Serving Citrus, Marion, Lake and Sumter Counties
SFor more information call *
* 352-795-7800 *
Licensed Nurse Registry *
*R NR#30211698 *


interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing
to the volume ofmail, per-
sonal replies cannot be
provided.


Fo *or nfrato
on advrtiingcal
Ann Frro4a

325 4-231o
- IrllWtsna


S Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs



FreeA .U i l,, ,hro u .laI onf rne Ilin


SWILLIAMS,
b McCRANIE
WARDLOW
AAlmw & CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


I Tax Professional 30+ Years Experience
Belinda Brown ED SERRA
Glori (uill a C-riifiedPublicAccountan
Im] t*i^\&FL)


Werner & Company, PA ?'
A Certified Public Accounting Firm
www.wernercpas.com


Taxes & Accounting
Financial Planning

1011 E. Norvell 3ryani Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442


Fraud Investigations
Independent Audits

Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352) 344-4397


BOB LANE,Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
44 Years in Business 32 Years in Inverness



TaxPrpaatonServic


Accurate and affordable service year round
Experienced, trained tax professionals
Convenient evening and weekends hours
Audit assistance
Electronic filing

Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352) 795-4733/564-1010 H&R BLOCK"
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660 HLF


IT'S TAX TIME!
There 's Still Time iLeft
To Place YVour Ad Call
563-5592



PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA
*Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation

i Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services


www.pwprice.com


L.NNJOME TX DREirR


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


BUSINESS






SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRus COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.cornm/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
March 19-20 Legisla-
tive Days: Citrus County
is headed to Tallahas-
see to talk with state
leaders about key com-
merce issues.
March 26 -Ribbon-cut-
ting for River Regional
Animal Hospital, 4:30
p.m. at 7660 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
March 5 -Ribbon-cut-
ting for Suncoast Credit
Union, 4:30 p.m., at
2367 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness
April 10- Mixer at
Black Diamond Ranch,
5 to 7 p.m., 2600 W.
Black Diamond Circle,
Lecanto.
April 24- Golden Cit-
rus Scholars Awards
Ceremony, 5:30 p.m.
College of Central
Florida, Lecanto.
May 2 Pillar Awards
Dinner inspired by the
style of the Kentucky
Derby, 6 p.m. to 10
p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Cock-
tail attire and hats are
recommended. Table
sponsorships $300 and
individual reservations
$35 per person.


Member
events
March 18 Affordable
Housing Advisory Com-
mittee Meeting, 5 p.m.,
Lecanto Government
Building. On the agenda
will be Hardest Hit,
SHIP, CDBG, NSP 1 &
3, Section 8, Shelter
Plus Care and Emer-
gency Solutions Grant.
For further information,
please call Citrus
County Housing Serv-
ices at 352-527-7520.
April 7- SCORE 16th
annual Golf Classic,
Sugarmill Woods Coun-
try Club in partnership
with the Citrus County
Chronicle. Register
www.scoresitrus.org.
April 11- Roast 'n'
Toast Mike and Rebecca
Bays, Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club pre-
sented by the Florida
Public Relations Associ-
ation Nature Coast
Chapter. A star-studded,
Hollywood-themed
event. Tickets $35 per
person available at
fpranaturecoast.org.
Roastmaster, Chamber
CEO/President Josh
Wooten.


Nature Coast
Ministries in
needs of new
volunteers for
clinics, store

Nature Coast Ministries is
looking for volunteers to assist
with its operations at the thrift
store and medical and dental
clinic. This organization serves
the community in many ways
from essential medical and
dental services to operating a
thrift store. They are looking
for volunteers to help with de-
livery truck driving, assisting in
food pantry and thrift store,
clerical work, fundraising and
public relations. Please call
Sheree Monroe at 352-422-
2779 or email monroesheree
@gmail.com.


Last call for Legislative Days

Join the Citrus County Economic Development Council March 19-20


Join the Citrus County Cham-
ber and the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Council in
Tallahassee
We have time with key leaders
such as:
m Adam Putnam, Florida


Commissioner on Agriculture
Herschel Vinyard, Secretary
of the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection
Ananth Prasad, Secretary of
the Florida Department of
Transportation


Citrus County



Education



Foundation


he Citrus County Education Founda-
tion was established in 1988 to pro-
vide funds and other resources to the
Citrus County School District. The CCEF
is a not-for-profit organization whose mis-
sion is "funding success in the classroom."
Its board is comprised of varied individu-
als from Citrus County representing all
facets of life here. It prides itself on its
long-term partnerships with businesses
and organizations that focus on literacy,
opportunity and success for our public
schoolchildren.
The CCEF provides funding for teacher
mini-grants, scholarships for aspiring
teachers and graduating seniors, STEM
and school-to-work programs, the Pre-
Kindergarten First Library, The River


Project, Youth Leadership Citrus, Web-
based programs such as Gizmos and
BrainPOP, support for AVID college visits,
science fair, Festival of the Arts and Math
Field Day.
In addition, the CCEF hosts the annual
Galaxy of Stars event, honoring our
Teachers and School-Related Employees
of the Year.
The CCEF's best-known annual
fundraiser is coming up on April 26 when
the 16th annual Superintendent's Golf
Class will take place once again at Sug-
armill Woods County Club. Foursomes
from the community are welcome to play.
And there's a new event in town! The in-
augural Suncoast Credit Union School-
house Hustle 5K/loK/1-Mile Walk is


JeffAtwater, State of Florida
Chief Financial Officer
Pam Stewart, State of
Florida Education Commis-
sioner
Mike Harrell, Citrus County
Lobbyist


More representatives are
being confirmed in the coming
days.
Check out our great rates for
roundtrip bus transportation on
citruscountychamber.com or call
352-726.28l01


Providing resources,


ding to teachers, school
trict for past 26 years

scheduled for April 12 at the Lecanto Edu-
cational Complex. Registration begins at
6:30 a.m.; the 1oK is schedule for 7:30
a.m., 5K 7:45am.
Superintendent Himmel will be leading
the Walk at 8am. The event also includes
a Family Health Expo, YMCA Kids Zone
and School Spirit competition. Funds
raised benefit the CCEF and will continue
to help fund both new and ongoing initia-
tives. Visit www.schoolhousehustle.com
by April 9 to register.
Contact Executive Director Stephen
Barbieri at 352.246.8352 or
barbieris@citrus.k12.fl.us to become a
corporate partner, sponsor an event, play
in the golf tournament, volunteer or visit a
monthly board meeting.


Debbie Lattin, far left, Citrus County Blessings
and Cindi Fein, Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County, are all smiles as they accept donation
checks from Brandon Moore, branch manager
at Enterprise in Inverness. Each year, the
Enterprise Foundation accepts nominees for
the donations.


even Rivers Regional
Medical Center offers
health education pro-
grams and screenings facili-
tated by board-certified
physicians and licensed
medical professionals. Call
352-795-1234 to register.
Should You Be
Worried About PAD?
If you are over the age of
50, smoke or have diabetes,
a history of high blood pres-
sure, high cholesterol or leg
pain, then you are at risk
for developing peripheral


arterial disease (PAD). PAD
limits your body's ability to
sufficiently supply your
body with oxygenated
blood. The good news is
PAD can be treated or even
prevented. Presented by
John W. Royalty, DO,
on Monday, March 17,2
p.m., at the Crystal River
Woman's Club. Registra-
tion required.
Breastfeeding &
Newborn Care
Provides expectant or
new mothers with effective


techniques that may help
them successfully breast-
feed.
Fathers are encouraged
to attend.Tuesday, March
18, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Regis-
tration required.
Balance Screenings
Seven Rivers Outpatient
Rehab offers free balance
screenings. Located at
11541 W. Emerald Oaks
Drive, Crystal River (adja-
cent to the hospital). Call
795.0534 to schedule your
screening.


Enterprise Foundation


Seven Rivers Regional


Medical Center Health


Education Programs

Classes open to the public with registration




D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


11 C^M^^hroil


F : 5 5 5 T Fe ( ) 2 317: a0=*0 0 1 0 0c n 0l 0


Pinochle Players
Tom's flexible Pinochle
Club, meets every
Thursday Evening.
Looking for a few new
players
call 352-527-9632.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Change your water
Change your life.
Kangen Water Presen-
tation. Thursday 3/20
6 pm. No Charge!!
Call Jackie for reser-
vation (352) 634-3333
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
FORD
96 Escort LX Wagon
beautifully main-
tained, original green
paint, garaged, 40k
mi. new tires, By Appt.
$4k (352)860-1439
Kenmore
4 Coil Burner Stove
self cleaning, white
w/black door, $120.
Kenmore Refrigerator
w/icemaker, white
$100.(352) 344-4192

LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Experience. Must
have valid DL. and
own transportation.
Drug free work
place. Please leave
exp. history on msg.
352-533-7536 or
LGS.Florida@
gmail.com

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568
Toy Hauler
2011 Forest River, 18'
w/living quarters,
like new condition
$11 ,500. ask for
Bill (352) 422-5622



tl l ia ll l I[ i St.
L ) Da)


CHI)NiCLE
Classifieds




$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for narts 352-63'7.2100


Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



2 yr. old Purebred
Blood Hound 100+ lbs
needs to room to
roam! free to good
home!
(352) 364-1309
Collecting items for Na-
ture Coast Community
Church rummage sale
such as:
tools,fishing,sports,toys
dishes,bikes,household,pato.N
o doting. Wll
pick up. 352-621-0175
FREE KITTEN
5 mo's old
white w/tan & gray
spots, pis call
(352) 628-3829
FREE PINE STRAW
YOU LOAD & HAUL
INVERNESS
630-605-0774
Free Rabbits
Easters Coming!
2 Pen of Meat Breed-
ers. Californian Buck &
Doe. 1 Mini Rex torte
Buck w/ papers. Pedi-
greed & shown.
(352) 464-4617
Free Red Nose Pitt
Adults only inquire
After 5om


DIacK & WhiTe CaT,
neutered. Area of
Seven Rivers Dr &
Rockcrusher. Missing
for a few months.
Handsome Reward for
safe return.
(352) 601-8454
Boxer-Pittbull
Puppy
approx 8 mo's old
Brown w/white chest
and feet. not
neutered lost in the
vicinity of Roebuck St.
Homosassa
(352) 422-8742 or
(352) 436-5265
Dapple Colored
Dotson, Male,
orange collar, no tag.
Floral City, S. Bedford
Rd (352) 634-2188
Lost Cat on Mon 3-10,
10:30a. Blue Point Him-
alayan. Goes by "Blue".
Has one eye, under-
bite. Front paws
declawed. License &
rabies tags on. Cream
colored w/ gray tips &
tail. Last seen 44 E.
westbound after VFW in
the woods on right. Deb
@ 201-4800.

a and read


LOST YORKIE LOST
IN HERNANDO
NEAR TRUCKS RD/
RHAPSODY LN
AREA ACROSS
FROM
DOLLAR GENERAL
813-389-2793
Missing adult male black
cat.last seen on 3-7-14
near Emerald Oaks
Dr./Shamrock Acres
352-423-0495




w Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Exceptina $15
yearly Membership
sianups aaes 6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League*
Leadership Clubs.
download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.com for info


-app


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001




w Boys and Girls
Club Dunnellon
Branch
20077 SW 110 St.
Dunnellon, Fl 34432
Excepting $15
yearly Membership
sianups aaes 6-18
*AFTER SCHOOL
PROGRAM
*SPRING BREAK
CAMP*
*SUMMER CAMP*
*Snack*transport-
ation*concession
*volunteer credit
*League'Leadership
Clubs, download
application.www.
bacofmarion.com
contact
tiackson@bacofmari-
on.com for into




LEGAL
SECRETARY

Law firm seeks full
time legal secretary.
Prior law firm experi-
ence preferred.
Proficient In all
Microsoft applica-
tions. Send resume
to: Blind Box 1860P
Citrus County Chron
106 W Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




Do you want
to make a
difference?

Medlcald Eligibility
and Denial Solutions
(M.E.D.S.), seeks
FT candidates In
Crystal River, FL who
will assist Individuals
with Medlcald appli-
cations. We are
accepting resumes
from candidates
with varying levels of
experience. Some
schedules will In-
clude evenings
and/or weekends.
Social service and
/or medical office
background are
pluses. Bilingual
skills an added
bonus. Competitive
pay and benefits.
Please send
resumes to:
amy.meyer @
bhs-meds.com.
EOE._

Exp. Dr.'s Assist.

With knowledge of
EKG, Blood draws,
and Computer
Experience.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1861M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal RIv. Fl 34429

FITor PIT
Licensed
Dental Hygienist

for fast paced
Dental Office
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email:
lynn.swanson@
rswansondental.com

FRONT OFFICE

Medical Experience
Preferred.
Fax Resume, Attn:
Candi, 352-522-0098

HIRING: RN,PT
F/T w/benefits
Fl. Homecare Sp.
(352) 794-6097




LouI\\ ,ild hi st

Neecld a ,l

qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHRpNiO.E
Classifeds
.m.u..uo mo -


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list. Finan-
cial aid for qualified
students. Apply now
at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219

RN/PRN

For GI Center, Pre
Post & Proceedures
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

RN's/LPN's *
Best of the Best SNF
interviewing for
Best of the Best
to complement our
fantastic team
of exceptional, top-
drawer nurses! Must
have recent acute
care exp. & demon-
state a strong
working ethic with
excellent clinical &
interpersonal skills.
Second-to-none
wrkng environment!
PRN/PT/Possible FT
Staff/MDS
Diamond Ridge
Health&Rehab
Contact Linda
Pursley, DON
352-746-9500#725
don@diamondridge
healthandrehab
.corn





ACCOUNTING &
ADMINISTRATION

Need strong computer
and administrative
skills. Able to multi-
task. Personable, or-
ganized and detailed
oriented with strong
work ethic. Great
opportunity with suc-
cessful growing co.
Full Benefits.
Mail Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1859P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
FL. 34429

Exp. Processor/
Closer

Busy Title Company
In Citrus County.
Fax Resume:
888-713-3272

PRE SCHOOL
TEACHER

Footsteps Preschool
a ministry of First
United Methodist
Church of Inverness
is hiring a teacher.
This person would be
required to have the
40/10 hours DCF
training courses.
Foot Steps teachers
must be mature and
sensitive in working
with children, parents,
and other staff. Those
interested in applying
for the position may
email a resume to:
Rev. Sarah R Camp-
bell, Senior Pastor, at
Pastorsarah(d
invernessfirstunc.orq
Footsteps license
number is
C05C10056





LINE COOK
EXP. ONLY
ApplyJ in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill

Lollygaggers

Now Accepting
Applications
For all Positions
and Management
Applv In Person Only
744 SE US Hwy 19


P/T Dishwashers

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now Accepting
Applications for
P/T dishwashers.
ADDlv in Person at
505 E Hartford St
Mon-Sat between
2:00-5.00 pm.

PT, Kitchen, Bar
Back & General
Help Needed

PLEASE CALL
(352) 628-2602 ext. I





SALES
PROFESSIONALS

Not too late to
change the out-
come for 2014.
/ High commission
sales with guaran-
teed hourly wage.
/ Comprehensive
benefits package:
Life Insurance, long
& short term disabil-
ity, vision, dental,
prescription, com-
pany contributing
401 K, Paid Holidays,
personal days, sick
days. Paid vacation
and training.
Life Insurance Lic.
preferred but not
required. (No selling
insurance)
Call Tony Rocco
(352) 746-4646
Fero's Memorial
Gardens and
Funeral Home.
Beverly Hills, FL
EOE





AUTOMOTIVE
BODY TECH/
PAINTER

5 yrs exp, light body
work, base coat
clear coat painting.
Valid dl, must own
tools. Call 795-1420
or Email
autosportracing@
hotmail.com

CDL-ATeam
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfioartners.com

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

Exp. Laborer
& Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
Scott Wright Stucco

Experienced
Subcontract
Installers
Needed
Very busy kitchen &
bath company with
multi-county work.
Must have own tools
& vehicle. Lic/Ins w/
workmans comp.
Steady work. Needs
to be quality con-
scious & self-starter.
Pay per bi-weekly
per job.

Contact: Deem
Cabinets Dave
Foley 352-628-3122
3835 S Pittsburgh
Ave, Homosassa

LAWN
MAINTENANCE


Now Hiring:
OTiR CDLAl














Drivers
W 'ITIMM7417'&































New Pay Packare
and $1500 Sign On













Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full benefits,













achievable
bonuses. Call for de







CITRUS MAIDS
Blvd, rystal ie

































CLEANING PERSON
oP/T leading to F/T










Needed. Must have
flex, schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925
Creative Person













wanted for floral
design intern. Will
train and then employ










PT, 352-726-9666

Exp. Appt. Setter
Needed

For Busy Insurance
Office in Floral Citye








(352) 344-1521

Exp. General
Maintenance
Require qualified
& versatile person









Must have own
vehicle for multi









facility servicing
Adbin Tues-Fri @









505 E Hartford St,
Hernando











INSIDE SALES!
APPT. SETTERS!
TELEMARKETERS

Great Pay Weekly.
Needed. uthv

Ofic./ehin loralxp.ty



























Daily Bonuses
352)-503-68075



Major Colatilectirson








Agency

needs 8 collectors
FiT P/T. smlalary









bonus, benefits
Experience a plus
dBobbi 352-563-2221
trainand ten poY


Ex.APPT. SetterS


ForiBuyBonsuranes
(352)-544-1521


Mainenace

F/TP/Tsatleaprson
Mousthaeoneft

HxerinceandoLus



obJ352-503-6807


MOVING
COMPANY
LOOKING FOR

CLASS B DRIVER
/HELPERS
Must Have
Transportion
(352) 621-1220

Park Attendant
Casual,
on call position

Assist regular staff
with ongoing adult
programs special
events and sports
tournaments when
necessary Must be
at least 16 years of
age. $8.02 hourly.

Casual labor
applications may be
completed on line
at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
and returned by
mail or in person
to Citrus County
Human Resources
Department.
3600 W Sovereign
Path Lecanto, FL
34461.

This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.

Support Profes-
sionals /CNA's

Moving Mountains,
Inc. & Bridging
Mountains LLC
Reliable individuals
to work flexible
hours with the
developmentally
disabled, and Senior
Citizens. HSD/GED,
clean background
check, reliable
transportation
required. Training
provided.
Applications and
services details at
www.movina
mountains.me or at
2615 N Florida Ave.,
Hernando, FL.
8-4 Mon-Thur., Fri 8-2

Team Members

Valid Dr Lic Req
Call Advanced
Aluminum
at (352) 628-7519




CLEANERS

Reliable, Energetic
Individual/Couple
Retirees Welcome
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555

P/T DISHWASHER

ELKS LODGE
Hernando
Wed & Fri Evenings,
& Special Occasions
$8.00/hr. Experience
needed. References
a plus (352)726-2027




AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com


Change y water
Change your life.
Kangen Water Presen-
tation. Thursday 3/20
6 pm. No Charge!!
Call Jackie for reser-
vation (352) 634-3333
MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547




BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu





SPRINGHILL
CAMPUS

Cosmetoloavy
March 17th
Day & Night School
w Barber
April 28th
Night School
w Massage Ther.
April 28th
Day School
Massage Ther.
April 28th
Night School
or NAIL TECH
or FACIAL TECH
Day School
Open Enrollment
INTRODUCING *
NEW Niaht School
MARCH 17th
Classes for Nail Tech
or Facial Tech
Mon., Tues., Wed.
5:00 PM-9:00 PM
(727) 848-8415
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
Full & Part time
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


till -S~





BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731

Well Established
Breakfast/Lunch Diner
15 yr History, Inverness
Brad Gibbs Broker, 75k
cash 352-212-5286






CITRUS COUNTY
Lg well maint.& profit-
able coined laundry
for sale. Qualified buy-
ers only 352-270-0943




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
SA local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


Leesburg Regional Medical Center
Tuesday, March 18th
We'll be in the West Lobby from 7:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

and

The Villages Regional Hospital
Thursday, March 20th
We'll be in the Main Lobby from 12:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.




Here at CFHA we want to extend the new season's
warmth to you to make new friends and to share a little
a bit about ourselves with the community. Come ask us
questions, learn about our award-winning team and see if
a career at CFHA is the right decision for you.


Drawing for $100 Visa Gift Card
Must register online and attend to be eligible.

Visit www.CFHACareers.com/CareerFair to register today!!





XCentral Florida Health Alliance Opwlo
L L R E1 Ae CH' u* ThWi- WC ViUiiLs Rq "Iu Ho ,ral -

EEO AA H- V 'Drug liq ce*olkw cc Tlobaco leO e *C kolac


To place an ad, call 563=5966




Chssifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


Thie Tint e


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wired & Finished in-
side. $1500
(352)341-2196





3 very collectible
works. Lrg. glass
framed Beatles,
believed to be one of
a kind. Lrg. popular
color print of famout
work; "Red Caboose"
glass framed poster
of: "Bull Durham
Tobacco" Titled; With-
out A Match. Downsiz-
ing due to health and
age. All $300. Will send
info & photos to your
email. Call John
(352) 726-1076



,.4


Sour"\ world ihrst

Need a jh)
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CH ,iE


30" Hotpoint 4 coil
White Electric Stove
like new, $125.00
(352) 382-5883
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Dryer, Stove,
Refrigerator white,
Good Condition $325
will sell separately
352-212-3600
(678) 617-5560
ELECTRIC RANGE
5 burner great shape
$195.00
352-465-7981
FREEZER 30 in. GE
chest freezer, like new,
$80.00 phone 352 382
5883
FREEZER
Lg, upright, Hotpoint,
Works great
$75
(352) 422-2662
GE GAS Front load
(propane) clothes dryer.
Excellent. $85 Call
(352)341-0736. You
pick-up.
Kenmore
4 Coil Burner Stove
self cleaning, white
w/black door, $120.
Kenmore Refrigerator
w/icemaker, white
$100.(352) 344-4192
OVER THE STOVE
WHITE WHIRPOOL
MICROWAVE
$100 352-422-2719
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER AND DRYER
Good Condition $100
(352)795-0763


1I Eroymentsouicelis



Iwww.chronicloonline.com


IAppianc


_


WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398








2.5 ACRES
Mar. 20, 10AM
-*******
ED MESSER,
"Your Favorite
Auctioneer"
messersales.corn
(32)212-6672




2-HP COMPRESSOR
Like New..$75.00
352-502-0722
Craftsman,
Jointer/Planer new
prtbl, $50.
BIck. & Dckr elec. trim-
mer $25.
(352) 382-5521
MITER SAW
Chicago 8/" Comp.
w/ metal stand $50
mechanic's creeper,
cushionedon wheels
$25 (352) 637-6284



KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
PANOSONIC 13" TV
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
SPEAKERS SHARP 2
10" 150 WATTS $25
352-613-0529
SPEAKERS YAMAHA 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $70
352-613-0529


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 D5


TV ANTENNA 20 ft tv
antenna still on house.
Will be removed by
owner on 3/24. $100
/obo 352-628-4153



Breaker Box Square D
100 Amp NEW main
lug, 6 spaces, 12 cir-
cuits, indoor use $50.00
352-249-7212



8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
reclinerottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634
PATIO SET
PVC Table 5 chairs
with cushions
no rips $100
352-419-5549




BookCase & Match-
ing Computer Cabinet
w/glass doors
and lighted, good
condition $200.
(352) 795-7254
DINETTE SET Black
marble-look top, 4 metal
chairs with tan micro-
fiber seats. $175.
352-637-1857.
DINING SET Table and
4 Chairs $100
(352) 795-0763
Entertainment Center
Light Oak, Exc Cond.
$200; Couch, Dark
color, Good Cond $85
(352) 697-2452
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER Lt.Oak glass
doors and rollout draw-
ers Exc. Condition $25.
352-344-8212
RECLINER Wall hugger
two seater. Tan micro
fiber material. Exellent
condition asking 250.00
352 726 9964


CLASSIFIED



WHUNED U6EDY-
FURNITURE 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
Reclining Lift Chair
Good Condition
$250.
(352) 212-6187
RUG 6 x 8 contempo-
rary wool rug. Mostly
brown and tan colors.
$50.00.352-270-3117
SOFAAND CHAIR
Leaders bamboo tropi-
cal print sofa and
matching chair, two
years old barely used.
colors are greens yel-
low, and coral. $500 for
set. sugarmill woods
352-212-0233
SOFA Blue and white
check. $45.
352-637-1857.
TEAK QUEEN BED-
ROOM SET Platform
bed with attached night
stands, mattress, 6
drawer dresser and mir-
ror. Gently used. $499
352-527-2874
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TV STAND ON
WHEELS OAK $20
352-613-0529
TWIN TRUNDLE BED
AND T.V. ARMOIRE ex-
cellent condition,paid
over $1000.00 at Cribs
2 College solid wood
$450.00 352-422-2434
Water Softener. Used.
$200 obo. King mat-
tress w/box spring.
$125 obo
(352) 226-3883



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019,201-5147
Craftsman 42"
Riding Mower
Clean & Rebuilt
Carb/Valves/ Rings
$400. with out Battery
(352) 270-4087


LEAF SWEEPER
42", Pull behind most
tractors, Ig leaf bag,
easy dumping. Plus
manual. $125
(352) 419-7882

SOLD
LEAF SWEEPER
42", Pull behind most
tractors, Ig leaf bag,
easy dumping. Plus
manual.
Toro 3spd self
propelled Mulching
Mower $100.Sears
Push Mower mulch or
discharge,like new
$100. (352) 507-1490




HIBISCUS 3 GAL
Beauties, 3 colors, 3
for $36 Compare to 2
gal for $20 at Stores.
Inv, off Croft 613-5818




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun 8am-?
Huge Yard Sale *
Vintage and More H
1076 N Citrus Ave
CRYSTAL RIVER
Trash and Treasure
Sale Cry. Riv. Women's
Club Sun. Mar. 16th,
8a-2p, Collectibles,
clothing, Hshold jew-
elry, crafts, Christmas,
Baby Items, lots more!
320 N. CITRUS AVENUE




DRESS perfect for
prom, etc., red & black,
new never worn, with
tags, large,($30)
352-613-7493
LONDON FOG
MENA?i' /,S JACKET
Size 40/42 Like New
$25 Call 726-0040
SHOES very high heels,
size 8, pewter with
studs, like new, ($10)
352-613-7493


2 FENWICK SPINNING
RODS- HMX 570ML,
7ft, 1/8-1/2 oz. lure,
4-121b line, cork grip,
Ex., $80. 628-0033
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
ALUMINIUM LADDER
commercial aluminium
8'ladder. Excellent
condition. $15.00 call
352-726-1337
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CB RADIO 40 channel
mobile Brand new used
once.Asking $60.00
637-9611
COMPUTER GAMES
6 multi-packs, 1 with
500,000 games, can be
used without internet,
($10) 352-613-7493
EAGLE CLAW FLY
ROD & REEL- #1010
Reel, 8' Rod, Model
MC300, 2pc., size 6/7#,
$30. 352-628-0033
FERNS
2 Big Staghorns
$125 each
(352) 726-1327
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001
GAS GRILL Webcor
Gas Grill excellent
condition. Propane tank
like new. Asking $85.00
637-9611
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HEARING AID
Kirkland, w/charger, &
2 rechargable batt. +
remote control. Like
new. Orig price $1000,
asking $400 OBO
(352) 462-7024


I

~


Acctg/Bkkr QuickBooks
Certified, set-up, train-
ing, payroll, sales tax.
No job to small! Call
352-287-1909 for appt.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Automotive


TransmissionI
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR *461-4518





JAKES'
TRIM CARPENTRY
No job too big or small
Free Est. 352-601-7064


Canvas/ "I


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873




A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lie/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




*ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
& RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
0, Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(3521 949-2292



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-613-8137
Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Comn. Lic.352-503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic.. Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner. Pet Sit-


**Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


3' NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570

Painting
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Absolute Exterior
Restoration Any
Surface roof & gutter
cleaning, int/ext painting
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


ii **Budd Excavatinag
& Tree Work clearing
Floors /walls. Tubs to hauling, rock drives,
shower conv. No job demo, bushhogging
too big or small. Ph: Lamar 352-400-1442
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441 .




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
-------------- TREE REMOVAL &
NATURE COAST RV STUMP GRINDING
RV service. Darts, sales Trim/Tree Removal,
Mobile Repair/Maint. 55ft. Bucket Truck
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins. 352-344-2696 Lie/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lie/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


GENERAC A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians,
ER0015377















AVII
* Interior/Exterior Painting
* Drywall RepairsTextures
| Wallpaper Removal











in.Bsinss kisonts
352-597-2440;352-293-5088
Toll Free: 877-893-3895







WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
" Driveways -

" Seal Coating
" Maintenance
" Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmail.comrn
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
flAll Home Repairs
S* Small Carpentry
.* Fencing
s Screening
9 Clean Dryer Vents
affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722 S
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


Inslall & Repair
Pumps Fillers
Healers
; Salt Systems




Sugarmill
Woods
Pool a Spa


Now's the
time for pool
remodeling
SPool Refinishing
SConstruction
SPavers
Leak Detection
Pool Tile & Repair
Serving All Olf CariR Cilnv


smooLso.M 382-4421


Ted's Painting
a Home Services Co.







All Types of Home Repairs

746-5190:
LIC/INS Lic #240270


SERVING CITRUS COUNTY IOHGER THAN THE REST,
GREENISTTtP VOTED BEST OF THE BEST!

A( ^

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Irrigation Repairs & Installation
COMPLETEYEAR ROUND SERVICE .,, Sod Sales & Install
3 Time Winner
Mowing,-TrimmingEdging i- 2011-2012-2013
Mulch Fertilization 746-4451
~^746-4451
FREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured 1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
PIZZA I I tll N M0el ld,7]M Lecanto, FL 34461
S 352-503-7063 c.#2646- Insured -Bonded


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
Generators Lighting Fixtures
Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
352-364-4610
(MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated
Lc #EC13003381 Insured & bonded
24Hoursa Day-7IDaysaWeek


" Propane Appliances
" Electrical Repair
" Plumbing Repairs
* Water & Collision Damage
* Roof Sealing & Damage
" Mobile Service
" Fully Stocked Parts Dept.
"We Do It All"



9800 N. C itrus Ave.-C -stalllrI


-IPOLANP.iES


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist

Spring Tune $4995
Up Special 4l



Guaranteeing 10x Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Pardicle Son to determine
the quality of the air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHERCOMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
MExpres/arch 31, 2014
OIQAt" Back To New s.
.=,,=, ToNew s,; i9
Heating & Cooling
S 628-5700 newair.biz


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

OTHURA GLEAN hc
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091





WiNDCWV-
GENIE.07
W. QCI W.,.gr i ^ oViA t. re
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill



KNOCK OUT


CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RNLS& CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
S Licensed, Insured,
) Workers Comp.
S W Pressure
StWashing Too

I., 352.942.8434
SCall Today for a
rnh B Clean Tomorrow


HOLIDAY CLASSIC
CDA?i6/%2S Top Artists
25 for $50 [will separate]
Call 726-0040
KENNEDY TOOL BOX
# K24-8332- heavy
duty, tray, 24" x 8-3/4" x
9-1/2", $30.
352-628-0033
King size bed, little
used in guest room,
$400; Antique Paul
Whiteman 4 stringed
banjo w/ case. Beau-
tiful sound & cond.
$400 (352) 746-1305
LIKE NEW Ladies Day 6
DREAM BICYCLE
21 speed, easy step
thru, $800.
(352) 860-1872 or
(304) 673-5550
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
WHITE $80
352-613-0529
PAMPERED CHEF
Vegetable Chopper &
Measuring Cup $25
Call 726-0040
PFALTZGRAF AMALFI
STONEWARE
12 place settings
w/serving pieces $100
513-4614
RECIPROCATING
SAW-CHICAGO, 6
AMPs, ltem# 65570,
rotating handle, new in
box, $30. 352-628-0033
SCHWINN AIRDYNE
BIKE w/ergometer
exc. cond. $300.
MEDICAL RECLINING
LIFT CHAIR, exc. cond.
brown, $200.
(352) 860-1439
Sears Heavy Duty
Propane Gas Dryer
$75. Toro Push Mower
5hsp, 21" cut $60.
(352) 507-1490
SNOW PLOW
Great to take back
North for truck.Five feet
long.Asking $85.00
637-9611
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529


VACUUM CLEANER
LG upright, compressor
compact, pet care, like
new,bagless $150
(352) 465-9395



4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Scooter & Car Lift
Sold as a package
Both in Good Cond
$800
(352) 344-2679
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. 20.00 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
100.004640316



"NEW" ELECTRIC"SG"
GUITAR, GIGBAG &
CORD PLAYS GREAT
BLACK&CHROME$50
352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER
NEWPORTER
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
WITH GIGBAG$100
352-601-6625
"NEW'ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
ONBOARD TUNER
PLAYS GREAT $70
352-601-6625


IL


I




D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


5 String Banjo,
Marquis Harmony
$75. includes Case
(352) 795-3764
1955 Juke Box
Rocola, 300+ records,
needs some TLC
$650.
(812) 360-3834
Karaoke Rack system.
Complete system of
high quality Karaoke
in rack. Includes pow-
erful CDG Amp unit.
Color CDG monitor,
Mikes & stand. Vocal
monitor, double cas-
sette unit. 2 super
sound speakers, mixer
board and approx.
300 music tracks. Exc.
cond. Must sell due to
health & age. $500
firm. Call John
(352) 726-1076




AUCTION

Public Auction
Organic Dynamics,
LLC.
LIVE & ONLINE Tues,
March 18 at 10am
1300 SW 2 Street,
Pompano Beach,
Fl 33069
Food Waste Recycl-
ing Machinery &
Equipment, Forklift,
Insulated
Containers, Walk-in
Cooler, $120K Air
Fltration/Treatment
System, Compres-
sors & more!
Preview: 03/17
10-4pm
Receivership Case
No.:CACE 13-
19350(07)
Details & cases at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
15%- 18%BP, $100 ref.
cash dep. Subj to
confirm. AB-1098
AU-3219, Eric Rubin
FOOD PROCESSOR
Black & Decker new, in
box food processor.
Never used. $15.00
352-513-5777
KITCHEN WARE
Oneida 18/8 excellent
quality dozen pieces.
Early bird catches
worm. $99.99.
352-513-5777




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
WORK GREAT. SEL-
DOM USED. ONLY
185.00 352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE
electronic readouts
all digital, works great
$185.00 352 464 0316
ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
Nordic Track E7 ellipti-
cal. Fully assembled.
Hardly used. Pick up
only, in Inverness. Ask-
ing $200 Please call
352-560-3379
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BIKE
DIGITAL READOUT
GREAT SHAPE.ONLY
$100.00 352-464-0316
RECUMBENT
STATIONARY BIKE.
Nordic Track GX5.0 Pro.
Excellent condition.
$220. 352-382-5951
WEIGHT BENCH.
Incline-decline weight
bench with leg attach-
ment. $50.00.
352-270-3117

Sgofiring

Club Car Golf Cart
1991, Family owned
Exc con. Lights,
Battery 1 yr. old, Must
Sell due to health
$1,500. (352) 527-3125
Club Car Golf Cart
48V, side curtains,
charger, good cond.
$1,275.
(812) 360-3834
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dahon Folding Bike
Used for RV, Trails
& Camp Grounds,
$125.
(352)601-6064
GOLF CLUBS
Like new, I set North-
western, I set Ping
Zing, Plus bags, balls
etc $350 for all
(352) 341-0866

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Mar. 15th 9a-5p
Sun. Mar. 16th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
MOTOR SCOOTER
2013 VIP Future
Champion,
only 2,300 miles
$795
(812) 207-5691 (cell)
Tennis Racket
stringing machine,
electronic Alpha Ultra
Edge, w/6 pt hold,
Exc. Cond. $400. obo
Recumbent Bike
2 wheel Bike E, 21 spd.
aluminum, 29 Ibs,
Exc Cond. $350 obo
(352) 489-0105




14 ft. Equipment Trailer


Double Axle,
10,000 Ib capacity,
2-5/16, Hitch
$1,650.
352-212-5747
2013, 7x12, TRAILER
Enclosed, Tandum
Wheels, white, drop
gate, $2,300. obo
(352) 746-3228
4'x8' UTILITY TRAILER
with tilt, good condition
$425.00
352-422-0273
Utility Trailer
8 ft. Like new
with side rails & full tail
gate $1,200 obo
(352) 422-0135



Stroller, Car Seat,
Walker, Blankets,
clothes, & a youth bed
$200. obo
(352) 795-7254


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted to Buy
Model Rail Road
N Scale, track,
engines, scenery,
buildings
(352) 564-8605




WEEDEATER
Bolens B100, 17" cut,
runs perfect, needs gear
at blades replaced,
($10) 352-212-1596


BENNY
Benny is a 4-y.o.
bulldog mix, Very
friendly & affection-
ate and loving.
Loves kids & gets
along w/some other
dogs. Loves to
chase the tennis
ball & go for car
rides. He appears to
be housebroken.
Call Laci @
352-212-8936.










FISHER
Fisher, 3-y.o. Bulldog
mix, Heartworm
negative, neutered,
weight 45 Ibs. Love-
able, playful, loves
treats, knows com-
mands, beautiful
puppy face. Would
be your best friend if
given a chance.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-513-5754.


a and read


L'- O I ST IYOiIE L L O I
IN HERNANDO
NEAR TRUCKS RD/
RHAPSODY LN
AREA ACROSS
FROM
DOLLAR GENERAL
813-389-2793

Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female
Schnauzer Pups
Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pups
Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827










ZOEY
Zoey, 6-10 y.o. Blue
spayed American
Pit Bull mix,
HW-negative.
Weight 55 Ibs. Gets
along w/other dogs,
gentle, affection-
ate, very loving,
plays with the ball,
housebroken.
Obedient, rides
well in the car
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-513-5754.




51/2 HP Johnson Out-
board, full gear case,
fresh water motor,
5 gal. tank, runs &
starts great. $375.
CR (513) 260-6410 Cell




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

CANOE
Mad River Canoe 17 ft
Galv Continental Trlr,
Elec motor & battery.
w/ outriggers & Equip.
Ex Cond $1600
352- 564-2765
COBIA 2000
17.5 Ft., 10H, Yam.,
4 strk, Great Shape
$5,700,813-244-3945
352-634-4768
LOGIC
2001 15" Center
Console 40 H.P.
Yamaha,Galv.trailer,
Bimini topless than 12
hours. You can not tell
this boat is not brand
new. $5700.
(352)563-0133 or
(352)302-9159


I Sl rSa


1675SSuncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVROLET
2000, Camaro
5 speed $3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600

IMMACULATE

CHRYSLER
SPORTS CAR
2005 Crossfire Yellow
convertible w/black top,
auto trans, excellent
condition, 45k,built in
Germany w/Mercedes
V6 engine $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150


LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792
POLAR SKIFF
1995, 17ft, CC, 8ft Wide
75HP Yamaha, Trailer,
very good cond. $4,800
352-476-1113
Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
VISION BASS
1991. 18.5' W 175 hp
Johnson. Great Cond.
Well Maintained.
$5500. (352)419-5560
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
Toy Hauler
2011 Forest River, 18'
w/living quarters,
like new condition
$11,500. ask for
Bill (352) 422-5622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
WINNEBAGO
'07, Journey, 36 SG,
excel, cond 300 Cum.,
Non smoke, no pets
22K mi, tow veh. avail
$98K, 352-598-5616
WINNEBAGO
2006, 24 FT, Class C
Chalet, 64K mi., V10,
5 speed, generator,
loaded, real nice cond.
Call for Info. $23,900
(352) 422-1026




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




05, Audi A6
Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




'07 Dodge Caravan
97k miles, $5195

'05 Ford Focus
121k miles, $3595

'04 Dodge Neon SXT
102k miles, $3395

'01 Dodge Utility
Truck $6895

Everything Motor's
7039 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Homosassa, Fl
352-503-9969

Buy Here/Pay Here

'94 Ford Taurus
$1500 Cash
'95 Chevy S-10 Cust.
$1800 Cash
'96 Saturn SL1
$2200 Cash
'99 Chevy Cavalier
$2900
'00 Olds Silhouette
$2700
CALL 352-563-1902


2003, Monte Carlo LS,
$5,995
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring green
convertible, looks and
runs great,cold air.
$2000.00 352-364-2375
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
Mercedez Benz
300E, 1986, gas,
good cond.health
forces sale,$3000.obo
Terry(352) 577-5670

Transmission]
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR *461-4518











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



MERCEDES BENZ
1978, 450 SL, Convert.
Roadster w/two tops
excel, cond. 84k mi.
$13k obo 352-464-3187

SelfStorag


CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier
4 Door, $4,250.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,S10
Crew Cab, 4 x 4,
$7,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
'99, XLT 150, 4/WD,
club cab, topper, clean
189K mi., red, $4,995.
(352) 341-4949
GMC
2008 Sierra C/K1500
Denali Crew Cab, AWD,
46483 miles, black,
leather, sunroof, naviga-
tion, DVD, excellent
condition, $11800,
shad@netscape.com

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
SUZUKI
2007, Vitara
4 WD, V6, $7,950.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




Harley Davidson
2004 Heritage Softail
Classic, loaded, garage
kept $10,000.
(352) 270-8488


SUZUKI
2012 Boulevard S40
650 cc 200 miles
Great first ride
$3900 352-586-0568
SUZUKI
2012 TU250X Only 14,
yes 14 miles, and wind-
shield

$3,850 Firm
352-212-6398

Self Stoffrage1
*Notices


350-0316 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage 3-269 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SAT-
ISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY
ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
#34 Robert Simon Katz;#183 Wayne Edward Penninger;#219 Mystie Dawn Geiger;#222
Tracy Shasteen Lipford;#261 Patricia Ann Seymour
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M.. WEDNESDAY. MARCH 26. 2014.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 9 & 16, 2014.


338-0316 SUCRN
DOCTORS OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The PEDIATRIC DENTAL OFFICE of
MID FLORIDA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY OF CITRUS COUNTY
Located at 22 REGINA BLVD, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 Phone number: 352-270-8860
Is CLOSING on MARCH 28, 2014.
We thank you for your patronage. It has been our pleasure to serve your children's
dental needs.
Patients are welcome at our primary office in Lake County and all records will be
transferred there. If you wish to have records transferred to another dentist, we will
be happy to transfer them for you at no charge with your written authorization.
Please contact us at this number prior to our permanent closing day.
After March 28, 2014, records will be held at 1340 E. Orange Ave, Eustis, FL
Any inquiry about records should be directed to phone number 352-483-9183.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, March 2,9, & 16, 2014.


351-0316 SUCRN
3/27 LIEN SALE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
gives Notice of Foreclosure
of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on March
27, 2014 10:00:00 AM at
1635 NE 32nd Ave, Ocala,
FL 34470 pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Flor-
ida Statutes. S M Duggan
Towing LLC. reserves the
right to accept or reject
any/or all bids.
1B7GL23X3TS561733
1996 DODG DAKOTA
JS2GB31S6W5151372
1998 SUZI ESTEEM
GL/GLX
March 16, 2014
353-0316 SUCRN
3/27 Sale


PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
KNIGHTLY AUTO SERVICE
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles on
Thursday, March 27, 2014
@8:00 AM at 61 NE HWY
19 SUITE A CRYSTAL RIVER
FL pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the FL. Statutes.
VIN#1FTEX15N6PKB84063
1993 Ford F1 50 PK Blue
KNIGHTLY AUTO SERVICE
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or
all bids.
March 16, 2014

355-0316 SUCRN
March Lien Forclosures
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned has


Meeting^
Not^ices


intent to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidd-
ing on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
are located at Adam's 24
Hr Towing, 4212 W Hwy
44, Lecanto, FL 34461
DOS:03-27-14@8AM
1974 CHRIS
VIN# CCTJG2571074
Purchases must be paid
for at the time of sale,
cash only. All vehicles are
sold as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. All sales are subject
to cancellation in the
event of settlement be-
tween owner and the
obligated party.
March 16, 2014


354-0316 SUCRN
Code Compliance 3/19 Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance Awill conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Andrews, Nicole & Meadows, Ronald
6937 W Arter St, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: No permits obtained for
newly installed mobile home siding.
Bunnell, Sarah B. & Smith, Kevin M.
5301 W Cinnamon Ridge Dr, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A mattress and box springs, a couple empty coolers,
approximately 6 10 plastic chairs, an aquarium, broken movable basketball hoop,
and miscellaneous junk and debris in the backyard.
Cartdav LLC
700 S Thompson Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Failure to comply with permit number 201207791. To Wit: DRA with constructed con-
crete flumes. Construct per plans or provide design alternate for review/approval,
each flume.
Chambers, Phillip
7865 W Liberty Bell Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: No permits obtained for an
open pole barn approximately 12'x1 8' in size.
Crisp, Robert & Lynette
8474 N Pine Haven Pt, Crystal River, Fl 34428


I Tuks -


352-0316 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
KINGS BAY CLEANUP MECHANICAL REMOVAL OF LYNGBYA
BID NO 14-B-05
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for KINGS BAY CLEANUP MECHANI-
CAL REMOVAL OF LYNGBYA. You are hereby invited to submit a bid for the above
referenced project. The Owner is the City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on April 10, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The bid is to mechanically remove LYNGBYA from the bot-
tom of Kings Bay, Crystal River and its tributaries. This entire bid is based on a Beach
Management Funding Assistance Grant, DEP Agreement No. LP14C11. Execution of
the grant will be monitored by Save Crystal River Inc. and City of Crystal River per
Grant specifications, FWC and DEP permit requirements. The order of magnitude of
funding to be released for mechanical removal of LYNGBYA is $30,000.00 to
$50,000.00 to be completed within the 2014 funding year. Base LBID should be cal-
culated on the cost for 30,000 cubic feet of lyngbya.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"KINGS BAY CLEANUP MECHANICAL REMOVAL OF LYNGBYA, BID #14-B-05" AND THE
NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora) or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE March 16 2014.


Warey Pvison
2009 Electra Glide
Classic, black, 9300
mi, lowered, pristine,
illness causes sale,
$13950,352-270-8019
HONDA
2013 Honda
Scooter PCX 150
Red, Great Cond.
$3500 OBO
352-422-8601
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200

03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999
Motorcycle Hydrolic
lift. In great condition
$45
(352) 637-6284
Motorcycle Trailer
Dark Green,
excellent cond.
$450.
(352) 795-8880
SUZUKI
'06, C-50 Boulevard,
805CC FI/Water
Cooled/ Shaft Drive-
windshield, bags
& engine guard,
7K mi. Adult Owned,
Garaged, Exc. Cond.
$4,000. firm 795-1586


It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of household garbage, broken furni-
ture, broken household items, car parts, clothing, metal and plastic debris, and other
miscellaneous trash and debris.
Dawson, Joseph
4698 W Peters Ln, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A large pile of cardboard and packing debris in and
around burn pit, several empty 5 gallon buckets around shed, brick debris and pal-
lets in backyard, at the NW corner of the lot there is a large area of broken brick and
concrete in front of the dumpster, and miscellaneous packing debris in backyard.
Diversified Properties LLC
6630 W Gulf To Lake Hwy, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: The renters built a 40x10
extension on the rear of the shop, built a batting cage with carport, and two awn-
ings for the horse jump assembling area.
Dodson, Myrtle Lynn
281 S Honey Bear Way, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: The property owner built a
15x30 oval pool, a deck around the pool, 1 1x12 carport, 12x10.5 front deck w/roof
over, a 20x19 garage with electric and an addition on the house for a bedroom and
bathroom. The owner applied for permit but were never approved or issued.

Ivkovic, Michael J.
6679 W Berrigan Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Interior household furniture in side and backyard, bro-
ken lumber and construction debris, several tires, household trash scattered inside
yard, and miscellaneous junk and debris throughout the yard.
Malave, Antonio & Jose A.
599 W Kuhns Ln, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: A mobile home.
Malave, Antonio & Jose A.
599 W Kuhns Ln, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Papers, plastics, tvs, tires, metals, and other miscellane-
ous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Perez, Minerva **REPEAT VIOLATION-
3514 E Mcdonald Ln, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Excessive amounts of household garbage and debris
throughout the yard.
Pitcavage, Bonnie Anne
9632 W Plantation Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
On Site sewage treatment and disposal system, hereafter referred to as OSTDS, own-
ers within the service area must connect to the utility within the following time peri-
ods: If the OSTDS is properly functioning, the OSTDS owner must connect to the utility
within 365 days after receiving notification that the utility is available for connection
pursuant to Section 42 164 herein and specifically 42 163(a) (1) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances and in accordance with Chapter 381.00655, F.S.
Stephens, Frances
10758 W Woodland PI, Homosassa, F 34448
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To
Wit: An untagged and unregistered blue and white 20'+ boat name Dream Catcher
and an untagged, unregistered teal and white 16'+ boat named Lily Rae sit on the
SE corner of the property without trailers.
Tomer Inc.
7739 E Watson St, Inverness, Fl 34450
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: Joined two single wide
mobile homes and converted them into a triplex without permits.
Willard, Ryan Lee
8470 N Windbreak Ter, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken furniture, broken
household items, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
GREGG R. BRENNAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, Sunday, March 16, 2014.


Metng
I Notices I


Meetin
I Ntic$


Meeting
I Notes


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


IMisc.Ntice


I Misc. Nti


I Misc.Not


I i otcs


I Bi


I i otcs




OTus CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 20147 0





I ... ....

22014 ESCAPS r 2014'FLEX.SE -..
$23,995. ....... MSRP $29,910. ..MSRP -
-$2,000. Reta.I Customer cash '$1,000 RetQli Cust~mertash
$2 19, $289 i
)9)7 $ 1 .....


2014 FUSIONS HvpRi -
$J7,020 .... -'" SRP
-$I QO.\ Retail customer Cqsh &
--



2 14 MUSTANG CO VERTIBL
$3 280 MSRP
- 2, 00 etilCustoerCash \
:00 Ford C dit Custo r Cash-
-6 Nick Nic olas Ford mount



2 4 TAUR SSEL
$29,9 5 MSRP
-3,75 Retail Cstomer Cash
-750. Ford Credit Ct tomnr Casfh
-$500 iNick Nicholas F:rd Discount

*24.101


2-i


A\


u-_ -F "J N, w-= --r rw--" \

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
1 FORD CERTIFIEDPRE-OWNED Call For Savings!
Relax, It's Covered. C ,l For Savings!
P for 3 m n h 172-pol ini pe,'ihon h, Ford faclor,-lraiied le.hnircians .. ...11 2 "i 2 "-iUo L--a-o."' I
APR for 36 months' :;'-,ea' 100 000-n-,le Ford P,-,,er"lrain ,arran[, Co,,,era ge3 ...
l ]: -:o'h1 |: 2. : For, : L e 2r r 0[ii im ii : .l i.]Co.er:,. e "
J II u Is l" .1 I. 1 1 ""1: 1".T.II.- I f-.ii 1 1 1 ] I I l .--. 1. 1 l l i l i ., 1 l

fl"4jr "- rw a.M


2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID
$" jc wI- o o 7, 19 '
$17,950


2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4WD
$1, '7',' 95-0P'7
$17,950


2012 FORD FUSION SE
$17,950


2011 LINCOLN MKZ 2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE
Oni- ',,.Mn,, .. il.-", G4;'. Ori- uvnlto-er. lu- 31 Ira3d-. G4TCir-i.A
$20,950 $24,450


iP-a-r ,r c a
2011 LINCOLN MKT AWD 2012 FORD EDGE
Liillr r S.rr,,,l F'ir U' E C-P176.4 S,.r'r,,l J1 S'.,lini GP17 6
$28,950 $29,950


2012 FORD EXPLORER SEL
$ 3 2 95llii:, 01IIiP *u ,,,. J 1 I7:,7
$32,950


2012 LINCOLN MKX
'rl l, 1 ,,(1') l 1 k I 1:.-.1 rr PF'I l 7 4
$33,950


2012 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR L
4 3,' m9il "iii,[Iil 1) 1A. 1
$43,950


NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER
M' --"- L T -... ..T P d i M. al I I._I _


2006 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 1999 FORD F350 X.CAB XLT 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 2011 FORD FIESTA SE
$8,950 $11,450 $11,950 $13,950
-- rm


2009 fORD 1EDG LIMITED 2010 FORD FUSION bE
,,. , ', ,' 1 , ,' ,1, I I. 11, ,1, .- 1: 1 .
$15,950 $15,950
fl! I^IsM i


2011 ESCAPE
$13,950


200UU7 TUTUTA bULAKA CONV. 2002 FORD FJ50 EW 2012 FORD FUSION SPORT
.1 :'LE L-.ir,-r L ,.,`' E L L L 4 4 'L F I ' IjI fn,,i- i- ,Ir-r ,iirr,r .,
$16,950 $17,950 $19,950
W:- MBRiW


XLT 2006 JEEP WRANGLER
.:: $13,950a rl 1 a,: I I.
$13,950
"?1 "'" *fcIi


2012 FORD TAURUS SEL
L-_Iiri-r I, l, 1 ri,- L-r f 1 I- ". -
$20,950
*R^" T


2009 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
$21,950


2008 FORD EXPEDITION EL
,'" ,,, ,f I--r I i i, 1 1f1- L l, I -
$21,950


2011 BUICK ACROSS CX5
Ii 1$23,450,.'''


SI3 FORD EXPLORERE
$25,950


2013 TOYOTA PRERUNNER
$26,950


2014 F250 CREW CAB
', 3 I 7 A A 9 T J J I T ., -
$37,950


Nick Nicholas __ic
Hwy. 9 N.Ford
Crystal River HLin9N.l
I yO~d I~l~ d795m7371 Rick Petro n "
kWw.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com Sesprson of he 5-o 7371h
*Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only.
Not all buyer will qualify for Ford Credit financing. For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 3/31/14.


!7 \
261N




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ja







2014 Chevy Malibu
MSRP: 'l
$258155
Your Price:
$22280*

2014 Chevy Equinox
MSRP:

Your Price:


2014 Chevy Si*verado
MSRP:
$281s 55
Your Price:..O
$23,880*__

2014 Chevy Traverse
MSRP:
$32,22O
Your Price: "8 '
$28872*._____


~* ~


C CRYS1TA L
FIND ROADS' CHEVROLET


800-584-8755 EXT.10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
*Prices include all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. AOn select models, includes all rebates and
incentives, not everyone will qualify. With approved credit.


DSSUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014




INSIDE


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEI REAL ESTATE GUI DE 11


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


Art frames from Dynamic Frames Inc.
open from the front so parents can easily
change out their children's artwork. The
frames can hold 50 pieces of artwork, so
they also help the parent store and
preserve their children's masterpieces.
Associated Press


ii ~]imiLPALLi,:L
'11d: ;IJD JJJJ:

#J /j IJ,:dajt
i-j is
'" ""lI ,ii ,l. l r, ,
Z uUJJr'_,Z J JJ^iJ




E2SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14 WEEPING WILLOW
*COMEONHOME! ,GORGEOUS VILLA
*3/2/2 REALLY SHARP Reasonable Fees
* Next to New/Extras Elegant Bathrooms
* Wood Cab/Tile/Opt Solid Surface Counters
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-39976
SEnnuil ellIesullon" lemnlx nel|
Swww.Flo iduLisling Inlo.c Un


LAKEFRONT
Terrific waterfront views on Lake Rousseau Whether you are a
fisherman or just love the views this home will fit the bill This
completely remodeled 3BR, 2 bath, 2-car garage has many
extras. Don't miss out on this one. Home features nice dock,
2 sheds and no deed restrictions. Call now.
MURPHY & PATRICIA COMBS F
"The Combs Team" I 1
(352) 212-9566 1..iV
Email: combsleuaml@gmail corn


2)[ OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-2PM
)Ennter h!:..#'O


FOX HOLLOW CRYSTAL RIVER
*2BD/2BA/2CG Detached Villa
* Maintenance-Free Community of Fox Hollow
* Lots of Wonderful Upgrades
* Part of Meadowcrest with 2 Community Pools
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


*3BD/2BA/2CG with HEATED POOL
* Golf Community Living RM & Fam. RM
* All newer Appliances Furnishings Available
* Double-sided gas fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [V
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit
MnIR~~nl nii


NEW LISTING
A ray of sunshine on a cloudy day! Completely
remodeled from floor to roof. All new tile floors, new
appliances and cabinets. Fenced in yard for your pets.
Conveniently located and ready to move into. Call
today to see this home.
MURPHY & PATRICIA COMBS
"The Combs Team" I flS
(352) 212-9566 1 I
Email: combsleuml@gmailcom iS


I.I9 AI;Htb
GREAT COUNTRY LOCATION
S2 BR, 2 BATH & OFFICE Frame/Stucco Home
* Updated Wood Cabinets Stone Fireplace
* Wood Flooring Updated Baths
SLarge Wooden Deck Storage Shed a
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com






%rr


REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
Jl 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

2 uyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


lI IUNIl LUU NUMeIt run ALIt
10533 W Larchwood, Homosassa
"Abe Lincoln" style with 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms.
Originally built in 1829 with NEW kitchen and bathrooms
added in 1996. All the conveniences of modern day living in
this well maintained and modernized ONE-OF-A-KIND home.
Come and take a close look at this one! Call listing agent for
directions or follow signs
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491
Email: pmparvi@yahoo.com


861 N. SPEND-A-BUCK DR.
SWell-Maintained 3BR/3BA/2CG
SLiving & Family Room
SLg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
SPool & Lanai Area
SBeautiful Landscaped Setting
SLots of Living Space & Storage f
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 L
Email: lenpflmer@remax.net m


733 E. BISMARK HERNANDO
- 2007 Pool Home 3/2/2.5 w/2,309 Living Sq. Ft. on 1 Acre
* Open Split Plan ,Awesome Kichen w/Upgraded Appliances
* Great Location Huge Lanai Made for Entertainment
GREAT POOL HOME ATA FANTASTIC PRICE!
GEILA 'gainl' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net I
www.sellngcitruscountyhomescom L


MOVE IN READY WITH OPEN FLOOR PLAN!
CLOSE TO TOWN!
This is a 3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom, 2-Car Garage Home in Inverness
with City Water. Home Features; Opern/Split Floor Ran, Walk-in-Closet,
Shower in Master Bedroom, Kitchen Bar Seating, Decorative Lighting,
Screen Porch, Screen Garage, Jacuzzi, Shed Utility Building, Fenced
Bacdard and Much More. Take a look! Dir.: FROM HWY. 44 IN
INVERNESS, TO APOPKA, TO L ON CABOT, TO HOME ON R (SEE
SIGN). r
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080 I
Email: dawnwright@remox.net 1


^ ....* U i lll "l.,lii



3/2/2 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS
BUILT IN 2005
Open floor plan with great room, formal dining,
breakfast room, split bedrooms. 10x51' 4-season
lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 10 Ox82' & 20x20
attached carports and detached carport/boat
parking. Everything yourfamily needs is right here.
CHERYL HADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadalk'remax.net


CHARMING CONDO!
*2 BD Parkside Village
* Cozy Cul-De-Sac
* 55+ Living
* Large Front & Rear Porches
*A/C, Plumb & Electric Upgrades i


GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812
Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleeman.com


UI


242 N.1 Ie l Hw. eel Hls5774 w wRtAI o I 10 U..Hy.4 Invres6760


el




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Senators push



bill to overhaul



mortgage giants


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A plan to phase
out government-controlled mortgage
giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
and instead use mainly private in-
surers to backstop home loans has
advanced in Congress.
The agreement by two key sena-
tors and a White House endorse-
ment sent shares of Fannie and
Freddie sinking Tuesday Fannie
stock fell $1.79, or more than 30 per-
cent, to $4.03. Freddie dropped
$1.48, or 26.8 percent, to $4.04.
The plan by Sen. Tim Johnson, D-
S.D., chairman of the Banking Com-
mittee, and Sen. Mike Crapo of
Idaho, its senior Republican, would
create a new government insurance
fund. Investors would pay fees in ex-
change for insurance on mortgage
securities they buy The government
would become a last-resort loan
guarantor
President Barack Obama pro-
posed an overhaul of Fannie and
Freddie last year, but Congress has
struggled to craft legislation. The
government rescued the two mort-
gage giants at the height of the fi-
nancial crisis in September 2008
with a $187 billion bailout, which
they have repaid.
The senators' proposal "repre-
sents a good-faith compromise,"
Bobby Whithorne, a White House
spokesman, said in a statement. "We
support this effort and believe it is a
workable bipartisan approach to
complete the biggest remaining
piece of post-recession financial
reform."
As the housing market has gradu-
ally recovered and made Fannie and
SSir inqCitrus& Levy Counties Since 1970
> David G. Griffin
FO Real Estate
oLicensed Real Estate Broker
S3lE Cell 352-228-1812
HNL |Office 352-795-0330


Freddie profitable again, they have
repaid their government loans as
dividends each quarter Those re-
payments helped shrink last year's
budget deficit to the smallest gap in
five years.
The idea behind the overhaul
plan is to shift more mortgage fi-
nancing risk from the government to
the private sector to prevent taxpay-
ers from having to pay for any future
bailouts.
"There is near-unanimous agree-
ment that our current housing fi-
nance system is not sustainable in
the long term, and reform is neces-
sary to help strengthen and stabilize
the economy," Johnson said in a
statement. "This bipartisan effort
will provide the market the certainty
it needs, while preserving fair and
affordable housing throughout the
country"
The Banking Committee is ex-
pected to vote on the proposal in
coming weeks after Johnson and
Crapo draft legislation. The pro-
posal would then be sent to the full
Senate.
A fight over the legislation is
likely Most Democrats, and an array
of consumer and community groups,
tend to favor a continued govern-
ment role in supporting the mort-
gage market because they say it
stabilizes the housing market. Many
House Republicans, especially con-
servatives, say they want to end gov-
ernment involvement and let the
free market rule.
In the House, the Republican
chairman of the Financial Services
Committee praised Johnson and


Burke already hitting
highs in 2014
It has already been a great
year for Jeff
Burke at
RE/MAX Re-
alty One. He
passed the
coveted mil-
lion-dollar
mark in sales
volume this -- B -
week. Jeff Burke
Jeff is a Re- RE/MAX
altor in the Realty One.
Central Ridge office of RE/MAX
on County Road 491 in Lecanto.
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX congratulate Jeff on
this accomplishment.


Geistfeld makes
mark for new year
Karis Geistfeld has been
named the top sales agent for
February at the Villages of Cit-
rus Hills. Karis
is off to a great
start, with five
new home
sales in two
months.
The Wel-
come Center
for the Villages Karis
of Citrus Hills is Geistfeld
at 2400 N. Villages of
Terra Vista Citrus Hills.
Boulevard in
Citrus Hills. Visit www.
CitrusHills.com.


Real Estate DIGEST


CITRU RIDGE R L I


See GIANTS/Page E5


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 E3


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate
agents and associates
submitted for the Real
Estate Digest are kept on
file in the Chronicle Edi-
torial Department. It is
the responsibility of the
individuals submitting
real estate news notes to
ensure headshots have
been sent to the news-
room, and to advise
staff of any name
changes.
* Photos submitted elec-
tronically should be in
maximum-resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.
* For more information,
call 352-563-5660.


CITRUS SPRINGS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tips for growing bulbs in your garden


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Veteran bulb growers have
learned to put patience ahead of
pruning in helping their perennials
bloom season after season. They're
in no rush to remove the unsightly
leaves and stems of these botanical
storehouses, which need time after
flowering to renew their growth
cycle.
"We consider the foliage of the
bulbs the 'recharging batteries',"
said Becky Heath, president and
chief executive officer of Brent and
Becky's Bulbs at Gloucester, Va. "If
they aren't recharged, the flowers
won't bloom again."
Bulbs will green up despite pre-
mature pruning, but return with
fewer and smaller blossoms. How
long must you wait before trimming
the foliage to get successive seasons
of color?
"After spring-flowering bulbs fin-
ish blooming, allow for approxi-
mately six to eight weeks before
removing the foliage to ground


level," said Hans Langeveld, co-
owner of Longfield-Gardens.com, a
retail website for bulbs, perennials
and edibles in Lakewood, N.J. 'An-
other rule of thumb is to wait until
the foliage turns brown and dries
out."
That garden grooming tip applies
to all spring-flowering bulbs includ-
ing tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, cro-
cus, alliums and specialty varieties,
Langeveld said. But there are ways
to make the decay less unsightly
"An idea is to combine bulbs with
other perennials in the borders like
hosta so that hosta foliage covers the
dying bulb foliage," he said.
Summer-blooming bulbs that
flower until cold weather arrives
need differing levels of mainte-
nance. "This (first killing frost)
would be the time to cut to ground
level and dig the bulbs that are not
winter-resistant, like dahlias, gladi-
olus and begonias," Langeveld said.
Other post-bloom, bulb-care
suggestions:

See BULBS/Page E5


Make sure you don'tprune too early


Large home with easy flow 3/2/2.
705142 $89,900
Becky Paradiso 634-4581






Beautifully maintained 2/2.
707224 $63,500
John Maisel 302-5351


Updated 3/2/2.
708572 $144,900
Becky Paradiso 634-4581


Wrap around porch overlooking the
water, 3/2.5.705665 $189,900
Pam Shemet422-2939


Pretty as Pie 4/2.
707377 $74,900
Becky Paradiso 634-4581






Move-in Ready 2/2.
708383 $89,990
Pam Shemet 422-2939


Cozy with updated bathroom and Centrally located 2/2.
floors. 2/2/2.706156 $40,500 706630 $74,900
Randy Morehouse 287-2934 Pam Shemet 422-2939


Golf course out your back
door, 3/2.707444 $121,500
John Maisel 302-5351


Centrally located 4/2.
707899 $76,500
Randy Morehouse 287-2934


iiI I h .- ,i 111 I, ,, 4 _
708427 $150,000
Randy Morehouse 287-2934


* _^^^^^^- rSa tl-i^^^
r^ B stiSfc;.




Move-in ready 3/2. Open and spacious 3/2/2.
708705 $79,900 707451 $119,900
Randy Morehouse 287-2934 John Maisel 302-5351


/ uo+. ?tt,-uu
Sherri Orendorf 573-9968


3 LCTIONS TO SERVE YO!329 88 5-i2112 524449


Tulips during
spring in New
Market, Va.
Spring flowering
bulbs can be cut
back after they
bloom, but
premature
pruning will see
them return with
fewer and smaller
blossoms. That
includes tulips,
daffodils,
hyacinths,
crocus, alliums
and specialty
varieties.
DEAN FOSDICK/
Associated Press


MUST SEE I


E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIANTS
Continued from Page E3

Crapo "for working hard and pro-
ducing a reform plan, because the
status quo is unacceptable." Their
plan includes "several common-
sense provisions," said the
chairman, Rep. Jeb Hensarling of
Texas.
Still, he warned that the window
of time for Congress to enact a
housing finance overhaul during
this legislative session "is rapidly
closing."
Wall Street's biggest lobbying
group, the Securities Industry and
Financial Market Association, called
the senators' proposal "a positive de-
velopment toward achieving the
shared goal of establishing a more
sustainable housing-finance system."
The government stepped in in
2008 to rescue Fannie and Freddie
as they veered toward collapse
under the weight of losses on risky
mortgages. During the housing
boom, the two had taken high risks
to try to compete with big banks and
collect higher profits.
The companies were encouraged
by supporters in Congress who por-
trayed Fannie and Freddie as es-
sential to making home ownership
available for more Americans.
Fannie and Freddie don't directly
make loans to borrowers. They buy
mortgages from lenders, package


BULBS
Continued from Page E4

Braiding. "The only foliage that
lends itself to be braided are daf-
fodils," Langeveld said. "It is not a
necessity, but it will help keep your
borders neat and tidy"
Seed pods. "Make sure to re-
move the seed pods that sometimes
form after blooming," he said.
"These eat up a lot of energy from
the bulbs."
Fertilize when planting for
healthier roots. Before and during
bloom also are good times to apply
bulb fertilizer, said Leonard Perry,
an extension professor with the Uni-
versity of Vermont. "This can be a
granular form (of fertilizer) as bulbs
are emerging or you can water with
a liquid fertilizer," he said in a fact
sheet. "The key is to provide nutri-
ents as the leaves are making food


The government
stepped in in 2008 to
rescue Fannie and
Freddie as they
veered toward
collapse under the
weight of losses on
risky mortgages.
During the housing
boom, the two had
taken high risks to try
to compete with big
banks and collect
higher profits.

them as bonds, guarantee them
against default and sell them to in-
vestors. That helps make loans avail-
able and keeps the housing market
running.
Combined, the two companies
own or guarantee nearly half of all
U.S. mortgages and 90 percent of
new ones. They buy mortgages
from lenders, package them as
bonds, guarantee them against de-
fault and sell them to investors.
This system helps free up more
money to lend.

for the next year"
Divide the bulbs if they're be-
coming too crowded, as often hap-
pens with large daffodil clumps, or if
they are blooming less each year,
Perry said. "Dig and shake the soil off
bulbs after bloom, leaving leaves at-
tached if not died off already Bulbs
should separate naturally, otherwise
plant back ones still joined together,"
he said. "Don't forcibly pry bulbs
apart"
Should you treat tulips as annuals
or perennials?
Tulips need to be in dry, well-
drained soils during their summer
dormancy if they're to multiply or
return to bloom, said Scott Kunst,
head gardener and owner of Old
House Gardens in Ann Arbor,
Mich. "That's hard to come by in
the rainy eastern half of the U.S. or
where people water during the
summer," he said. "In those situa-
tions, many people just grow tulips
as annuals."


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


-7 11 197 -


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


QSbPrudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
AWOpen 7 Dasrties
A Week!. Properties


- t, 1390 W Double Eagle Ct JLiLLS 782 E KellerCt
MLS 702524 $595,000 *-MLS 700636 $265,000
Stunning 3bd/3ba home on golf course. Fully furnished 3bd/2ba pool home
Dir. Hw' L overlooking the golf course.
round-, Dir. Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd,
R on Double Eagle. L on Keller
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING
:, *- Bl -


Su 5585 W Pawnee Dr .MftLI' 701 E Falconry Ct
MLS 709097 $299,900 MLS 709078 $229,000
Large family pool home w/fabulous A must see this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home
finishes thru-out, is move-in ready.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Helen Forte 352-220-4764


I.J- Ji I31i lRal"ieen ier
vLS iu 164 $155,000
HANDYMAN SPECIAL! 2.5+ lovely acres
w/4/3/2 home.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


"7)tSt 936W Sun Vista Ct
MLS 703389 $349,000
Elegant, spacious, true luxury in this 3bd/
2ba home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


Dislt 541 W Ted Williams Ct
MLS 704863 $829,000
Stunning 4bd/4ba home-elegant,
luxurious, spacious!
Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553




Qak -^^
, ?aj 77 W Forest Oak PI
MLS 706602 $169,900
Large, open, bright 3/2/2 in pleasant
subdivision.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM




411pe 81 E Gilchrisl Cl, 28 4A
MLS 709026 $79,900
Cottage unit- 2/2/CP w/enclosed lanai.
Fully Furnished.
Dir. 486 to S on Annapolis, R on Gilchrist to
building 28 on left
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING


-/Afe 819 N Lafayette Way
SMLS 709069 $189,900
Outstanding 3/2/2 w/solar heated pool.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774






All'~g ( 21273 N Cro~sswaler Path
MLS 706407 $675,000
Absolutely stunning, neat & clean
3/3.5/3 golf course home.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036

Fr^>J H


,(711,401"- 720 E Gilchrisl CI 25.3a
F VMLS 35558a $63,900
Furnished 2bd/2ba ground floor unit.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501

*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


I m i i.rh I i 1.... 1 I, ,, I I II, I ,, I II 1 1 1,h I In I,,, 1,, ,,Im 1,,, .11 .11,, h I I -, I I , I I .. .
I ii--S
[ VV, I ,,Ih ,I.. ...I .. ,I I ,,h ,iI, I... i,,h oI. .I I ,,, I. .Ih Ih 111,, I1 I ,t[i ,, I ,,,Im


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 E5




E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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"The market leader in real estate information"

CiiRG NiCLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Longleaf pines



and woodpeckers


Trees provide nestingfor threatened species


visitors to my garden
comment on the tall
Longleaf Pines, Pinus
palustris, scattered throughout
the landscape. They ask, "don't
pines attract lightning?"
The answer is "yes." Light-
ning is attracted to the tallest
thing that can lead it to the
ground. The tall pines do just
that. Lightning killed one Lon- Jane
gleaf the first month I bought
the house in the sandhill habi- JAIN
tat of the Brooksville Ridge. GAR
Each year, several pines
nearby get struck by lightning. Neither I
nor the neighbors have had lightning
damage inside our homes. Mature Lon-
gleafs conduct lightning to the ground.
Our houses are spared, but the trees
slowly die. Needles turn orange and fall
off. After two to three years, the Longleaf


\

II


will drop most of its branches.
These fall straight down close
to the standing trunk. A year or
two later, the top third will top-
ple. The tree top seldom lands
far from the trunk. It decom-
poses on the forest floor to re-
lease its stored nutrients into
the soil. Other plants grow on
the nutrients.
Aeber Remaining dead snags pro-
vide nest sites for cavity-
E'S nesting birds and wildlife. Fi-
DEN nally the roots rot away, allow-
ing the trunk to fall naturally
Pushing on the snag is sometimes enough
to direct the snag to fall where it will do
the least harm to other vegetation.
Longleaf once dominated the natural
Florida landscape. It ranged from
See JANE/Page Ell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Beginning artists
PAGE E8
Florals are back
PAGE E14
Real Estate Digest

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Salvador Dali sculpture could possibly be the real thing


D ear John: Enclosed are Dear John: I recently was
photographs of the given an old-time shoeshine
bronze "Trojan Horse" stand. The bottom is about 4
by Salvador Dali. It sits on a feet by 4 feet by 2 feet with a
heavy marble stand. step in front. Both
Stamped on the cap have black-ribbed
below his name is rubber covering.
"B25/520." Can you The chair is solid
tell me if this a copy oak and large, with
or an original? Is H I a red leather back
there any value?- and seat. I would
VM., Homosassa say the whole thing
Dear VM.: I think- including the two
your Salvador Dali cast iron foot stands
bronze titled "Tro- is in good condition.
jan Horse" is gen- John Sikorski Do you have any in-
uine; however, I am SIKORSKI'S formation on the
not a Salvador Dali ATTIC market and value?
expert. There are _______- WP, Dunnellon
experts who could Dear WE.P: A
authenticate it available, just shoeshine stand is a novelty
do a Google search and follow item without any specific col-
the yellow brick road. If it is lector interest. After all, how
genuine, it would likely sell in many could one want to have?
the $1,000 range. They are bought and sold in


the antiques marketplace with
prices based on their eye ap-
peal. If you like, send a couple
of good photographs, I will give
my opinion of what it might
sell for based on the look.
Dear John: My father was an
antique collector and left me
this cabinet and barometer
The hardware on the lock on
the door has a crown-looking
shape with a "V R" under-
neath. My father told me be-
fore he died that the cabinet
and barometer were valuable,
but I did not ever ask how
See ATlTIC/Page ElO
This bronze Salvador
Dali sculpture, titled
"Trojan Horse," might be an
original. A trained art expert
would be needed to
authenticate the piece.
Special to the Chronicle




SU-N-DA- (MAR 12H04NICLE


SUNDAY, *ARCH 16 2014E7

..,._ .--. ...


uuaiey's Auction
& Malne-ly Real Estate
IL ^- A --. -


MARCH 21 ON SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION- CITRUS SPRINGS
Pieviev.: 12pm AuLiConl: 1ipni
2071 W. Greenwa PI., Citrus Springs, Fl. 34434



MARCH 28 ONSITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION BEVERLY HILLS



"Il' i 1 h h1Ir il i I1 ,fIi 'l li it' 1n
T H I, : i. l l I f ir, E hln.: i ,'h< ; i 1 1 1
hi 'll l ,,' I l 'lh^ ; H 'I I ] j-ii 1 il r 1 irn i llo r- ,,in ui fililv i i lii -ir j.
a l ,i r '.ijii 1 1 lir 2' ,i r 'i-i i ,i
riih ,[iw lll -i 1 i .H '~ll I l) 'li ',' f ; I


t o ni II E Ih, i t, l:h' ,,-vi 1 :' It,.l, l," ,S4 (11.


MARCH 21 ON SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION CRYSTAL OAKS
Pre ,ieu,: 2pni AL(tion: 3pmn
5101 W Kristina Loop, Lecanto, Crystal Oaks.
S ~. E.IStAtE SI TLEI FIIT Cill,,T till
h- "' nin l' ? I i' i In iiiri' hit
r*, l [.i lirii.c.i iti li '.. lrl i, hi
,1 rd,,. Id Ih ~ ir',:: t, '[, = ,,

itli .lt. il". It~ ji i"ht, lrI A u T~' r2 lO r~ i24-Y" l'


MARCH 28 ONSITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION -BEVERLY HILLS
P eview: 12 pin ALIciIon: 1pi
35 S Harrison St., Beverly Hills, 34465
hihl op 'i lht hihl Hi'.nt
I _ i^ i.TA:TF" -' -' ,,',,Ih r,,;,",< 1,
I""- "i l, .iii, ul ri 7 li I ,
up'li,:,J- bill ,hill l,j
,q ,i hr,,j lri ':, ,'i: ir, Pi.,i'i:t h r'. l- I ;r'. i "' il'. i l ;if :l 1 /71 *:ni ']';t, iJ -.1,.
t ni.,T .iii' ~l 1 / 14 '::. ,i: lh., h., I" i: i'/ltiiriini .:, Ihr tunjT: ,full b' ':.]L.'lJ


'I


MARCH 28 ONSITE REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS -INVERNESS
Pievcv,,: 2:30 pm AuICiuon: 3:30 pm MARCH 29 ON SITE REAL ESTATE & CONTENTS AUCTION- MARION OAKS OCALA
9426 E Fernwood Place, Inverness 34450 Pievist: 8am Au,:(,on: 9am Real Esiatre: 10am
Jt 'W C2'1,,1,1 "1 ,,, ",, "i 1 i ,- 4231 SW 148th St Ocala 34473 MARION OAKS
.,I' I l T I r I ,i ,it i i r

1., ii h.11 1 ,d H il I -I ; I.. -I iri, I'll'
y ii ^ ii~nii i. -In i r i .ji .nni i rivi rdi ln .1linii Ji]i i n .11ir l ,11 dir hufi in 1111 7 p i i l P n i: 1 :( li i' ~ j T CR E E ': 1cT
1 iin Il.l n llil. l il*l, liI ,, j,, ji ';i| i 'III ir' 1ilrl .'."r^'. mfle LOH TEHT i. inrli h,1..l ,ju,~i l-. ii liifr'yi riP fc, E"i: T A :. i Tl.
1lt ;0.I ,1E l H, i l y r,, i. F ll i. F ilF in: I ill" fll, p ll,. i, I" lilln j %w, ihi.ii,.l ,n i i. nili lh ltl [1,,1:11:1 jli, -1. T-111':1t T-,,

Abseteead phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588
il .,: '" ..^ ". t )1 ':' '-""1...... ',l ;I ,i.'- '.: F I--_;'11 1 m;, ,[. "'I - "-" 1 ... I..I I
I 1d .. .li ,,,IL ,





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a


p


MARCH 22 ON SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION HOME/
COMMERICAL PROPERTY & CONTENTS, FLORAL CITY
Preview: Sam Auction: 9am Real Estate lOam
7820 S Great Oaks Dr., Floral City, 34436
MUST BE SOLD TO SETTLE ESTATE Unique property in highly sought
after Historic Floral City just off Orange Ave. This 161x220 lot
contains a mostly restored and added on to cracker house with new
roof, flooring, kitchen and bath. The Porch and wrap around deck
would be wonderful for outdoor dining and has the potential with the
GNC general commercial zoning for additional uses as restaurant/
pub/retail or used as a residential home to rock and watch the world
go by. The property has two income producing rentals as well,
original cookhouse/shop, newer sheds and covered areas. ALSO
r CONTENTS: Contractor Tools, trailer, work truck, minivan, camper,
Household furniture & furnishings. GREAT AUCTION!l
Altkey:1857449


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---


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A-


MARCH 21 OM ON ITEREAL ESTATE AUCTIONy
WICONYTEN4TS DUNNE'LO
Pre9view: 9am Auction 10pm
9640 1 ParkwoDunneon FL 34433

N'i to., S 1".1' LUTE-i.I TI 'TL E f l. ,) ,rllo. ,,, FL 34433
& fp' I 'dUt 4c u t i Ti O
i iT F hll-d H Wi ill
I l ll. bll
Jeit lJ'lP ii~r ,lf#i~: Itlifl
fL ilt r4 E'rjc P Ti ll : : 11 ) rl 1 rt ,- t r L to 4 S
-Timi iilh riTujtl ,I rti n Jh I IJ 1,


I


4


I


41




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's easy to quickly
add art to these
cabinet-style frames
from Dynamic Frames
Inc. The frames open
from the front to allow
parents to slip in
artwork without
taking the frame off
the wall.
Dynamic Frames Inc./
Associated Press


fiME IS WHERE THE



g Go
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Is!

Use kids' art to give
your decor a personal touch

MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON
Associated Press
t's a conundrum many parents face: what to do with
ore that children bring home from school and
Iamp? Which are the keepers and besides stick-
ing them up on the refrigerator with magnets how
you display them creatively?
"They caught me throwing some away and they were
not happy about it," Mandy Rose of Carterville, Ill., said of
her three children.
Rose, who loves to decorate her house and writes about
it at houseofroseblog.com, decided to combine some of her
kids' work with professional pieces and family photos in a
montage on her dining room wall. She even commissioned
one of the kids to create a finger painting for an eye-
catching frame she had bought
"People always ask, 'Did your kids make that?"' she
said. "It's a real conversation starter"
Children's art absolutely has a place in home d6cor and
can add a welcome personal touch, said Esther Sadowsky,
owner of Charm & Whimsy, an interior design firm in Jer-
sey City, N.J.
"Sometimes my jaw drops when I see the work of my
customers' children," she said. "Children's art displayed
in a house it's a home then."
Like Rose, she suggests displaying kids' works in art group-
ings. She often lays out the pieces on the floor so she and her
client can visualize how they fit together "You can make a
beautiful arrangement," said Sadowsky, who has a painting
she made as a 12-year-old hanging in her own living room.
See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 E9


artE


ART
j Continued from Page E8

S Rose laid out the items
for her "gallery wall" on
Sthe floor as well. She
-, snapped photos of various
arrangements so she
could compare them, and
went through her house to
find frames in the same
color palette to create co-
hesion in the grouping.
Sadowsky has sent par-
ents to big box stores or
craft stores to buy inex-
pensive frames. It's possi-
ble to find frames with
precut mats for a more
professional look. Do-it-
yourselfers also can use
construction paper or
foam core to create mats
for artwork, she said.
In her children's play-


room, Rose strung wire
between two hooks and
allows the kids to pick
and choose what they
want to hang up. The
setup allows them to high-
light favorite paintings
and projects until they
make something they like
better
Finding a temporary
place like that to display
work makes sense, agreed
Jeffry Cudlin, a professor
of curatorial studies and
practice at Maryland In-
stitute College of Art in
Baltimore. He routinely
highlights the work of his
4-year-old son, Miles, at
home to show him that
the family values hand-
made art.
Cudlin uses binder
clips to hang Miles' art in

See Page E14


ir^ JackieCaffney Jason Gaff ney
I ., Realtor,-;, -- Realtor@
32A HOUSE
302.3179 sOL. Name! 287-9022 [ |
746-6700 UToUVT
,The, f^ ,THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
oI dm e wmn aw WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


7.- 1.-'!


-~ nUll
-a -


MANDY ROSE/Associated Press
This photo provided by Mandy Rose shows how Rose incorporated her children's artwork on a gallery wall in the din-
ing room of her home in Carterville, II. The framed finger painting is a real conversation starter, she said.


JOANN MARTIN
Preferred
REAL ESTATE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net


I 3/2/2 Featuring Wood Cabinets in Kitchen, New Wood
Flooring, Carpeting & Tile. Fresh coat of Paint in and out. Vinyl
exclosed lanai 12 X 30. Double pocket door. Gated community.

1a "Always There For You"
KEYN GAIL COOPER
REALTY Multimillion Dollar Realtor
^E^ (352) 634-4346
U.. 1[g Office: (352) 382-1700
I m I- H_ t ,_: E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


D4I i D iVVIILU-tIInUJ jrnlriuj DM1il UVrILU-L.KIHIIL KIIVIK L II
2-story 4BR/2.5 bath with huge living room. 3BR/2BA home with office in Shamrock Acres. I
Office/Den $139,000 MLS#707912 2.5 acres. $152,900 MLS#708173
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 w i
After Hours 12)302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allcitrusrealty.com


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9330 E Kenosha Ct Beverly Hills
Floral City FL 3 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage home
Beautiful Waterfront Home with cage in-ground pool. Home offers
Gourmet kitchen, stainless steel 1824 sf of living area. Split floor plan,
appliances. New roof and air 2011, roof 2009, heat & air 2003. Home
Pazebo, double pane windows, extra needs some TLC.
large lot. Fish from your own dock. Priced at $114 900
Home available for viewing 3/17/14 Dir: From 491 to left on Honeylocust
Offered for $259,000. Dr. to left onto Passion Flower to
MLS# 709137 1#3928


POPULAR SWEETWATER DRIFTWOOD!
3/2/2 pool home- 2267 sq ft of living
18" tile and newer neutral carpeting
New pool surface in 2013
Pool motor and filter new in 2013
Lanai, pool deck & ceiling redone in 2013
Dual paned windows for efficiency
AC/heat replaced in 2009/2010
Convenient to daily shopping
#703307 $199,900


RARE AND VERY PRIVATE!
2/2/1 end unit single story condo
'Additional guest parking spaces
Views of #3 green of Cypress course
Stainless steel appliances convey
Updated kitchen raised panel cabinets
Hardwood floors in dining & Great Room
Convenient to SMW's country club
Home warranty for the buyers
#707553 $66,000


See .JVirtual IIIurs..i w..r. saJII.I.I.!s Iu .I..m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

valuable. I have sent some pictures.
Any information would be wonder-
ful. -M.S., Internet
Dear M.S.: Barometers have been
a collecting category for decades.
The one you have appears to be
made of oak. It was likely made dur-
ing the mid-20th century Potential
dollar value is $75 to $150.
The cabinet photographs are not
very helpful. I think it was manufac-
tured in Europe perhaps close to 100
years ago. Current market interest
in the style is very soft Potential dol-
lar value is below $500.
Dear John: I got your name from a
friend of mine in reference to some
clocks I have. One is a Palais Royal
mantel clock with a shelf and the
other is a Howard Miller wall clock
that looks like a miniature grandfa-
ther clock. I would be able to send a
picture of each of them. J.M.,
Internet
Dear J.M.: Yes, send good clear
photographs. Make sure to include a
photo of the front and back of each
clock and include any information
that is there, including dimensions.
Then I will finish the story

John Sikorski has been a profes-


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place
and other details.
* News releases are subject to editing. Call 352-563-5660 for details.


Special to the Chronicle
Barometers such as this one are a
category of interest to collectors.
This one looks to have been made in
the mid-2Oth century.
sional in the antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@a ol. com.


'AMERICAN
Lou M'99 RealtorM ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Leamo Hw.
lell: (352) 697.1685 ie-465
Cell:'(3521 697.1685 fl327630


jQUIIKUb HILLb
-~ ~. Beautiful gated community
of Belmont Hills. Fabulous
I.. l o3/2/2 pool homelwith
spacious rooms and high
ceiling s. A must see!!
21-S 706313


]CLASSIC ELEGANCE
mu French Country Estate on 6 acre MOL in desirable location close to Inverness
4,078 sq ft of luxury living spacc '.11 t+1. I,,,ll, end finishes you desire
INCREDIBLE VISTAS gourmet kitchen, family room, pool' *", 11 1 '. deck, 3 car garage, plui
HAMPTON LAKE sep 6 car gar, office & apartment PIs visit www MyCitrusCountyEstate corn for
This 3/2/1 situated an 12 acreelevated an interactive tour $739,000
lots of fruit trees Recently
SSapp $274su000 ft laf pnh
SS -pl$7,0


GITTA

BARTH ,
REALTOR a
Cell: (352) 220-0466 I
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


Investors Realty B.-w -a
of Citrus County, Inc. se
o0 4i ywebsite at: www.nryflorida-house.conrr w


$469,000


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014




CimRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



JANE
Continued from Page E6

South Florida north to south-
west Virginia and west to south-
eastern Texas in cold hardiness
Zones 7-10. Over-harvested, Lon-
gleafs now grow across less than
10 percent of their former range.
Marion County forester Greg
Barton told me the Florida
range today is about 2 percent of
its historic range before Euro-
pean contact.
Red-cockaded woodpeckers
nest mainly in Longleaf Pines.
South of Longleaf range, some
nest in South Florida Slash
Pines, Pinus elliotii. In Texas,
these birds nest in Loblolly
Pines, P taeda.
As humans removed the Lon-


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 E11


gleafs, the red-cockaded wood-
pecker population declined.
These woodpeckers are feder-
ally endangered and have disap-
peared from Tennessee and
probably Virginia and Kentucky
Commonly called RCW, they can
be spotted in Goethe State For-
est in Levy County and in three
locations in the Ocala National
Forest in Marion County Citrus
County has recovering popula-
tions in the Withlacoochee and
Croom State Forests. Look for a
wide, white-painted band mark-
ing colony trees near the inter-
section of Trails 10 and 13 near
Central Landfill south of State
Road 44.
Charlie Pedersen oversees the
RCWs in Goethe State Forest.
His tip is to look for Longleafs
with their lower trunks wrapped
in aluminum foil in May This


prevents red rat snakes from
climbing the tree and eating the
nestling RCWs in that particular
tree. Birders can easily see par-
ent and helper juveniles flying
in to feed babies. RCW food is in-
sects particularly ants found
on pine bark.
Birdwatchers from around the
world come to see this rare
woodpecker Some Citrus
County birds have been relo-
cated to other protected Lon-
gleaf forests in Florida where
there is sufficient food. Nest
boxes are installed inside
healthy Longleaf Pines to en-
courage breeding. RCWs seek
out trees infected with red heart
fungal disease, as the wood is
softer to chip. Biologists gas-drill
starter holes to encourage
colonization.
Lightning is normal and in-


evitable in Florida, particularly
in the hot summer Land warms
early in the day, heating the air
above it. Hot air rises; the ocean
and gulf on both sides of
Florida's long peninsula are
cooler, with cooler air above
them. Rising air above hot land
leaves a place for cooler, denser
air to be drawn to. The two air
masses collide, producing light-
ning, thunder, and drenching
rains.
Lightning ignites natural fires
which cause some pine cones to
open and release their seeds.
Longleaf seeds flutter down from
open cones still on the trees in
winter If the seed lands on min-
eral, sandy soil it germinates and
sends down a long tap root From
January to March, I watch for the
seed wing sticking up indicating
a tiny pine seedling. Tiny


seedlings can be dug up without
damaging the tap root and
promptly be replanted in a suit-
able location where they may
grow to maturity I usually have
potted seedlings ready for visi-
tors to adopt. They remain in the
grass stage for five to eight years
before growing a foot of trunk
the next year After that, the
trunk can grow 3 feet per year
Mature Longleafs grow 120 feet
tall with a 30 to 50 foot spread.
Lifespan can be 200 years.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For an appoint-
ment, call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


Spcaiing in errit
Brentwood Rsae
ww .era isa eat ru.co I


p DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
Maintenance-free villa with an open floor plan design with great use
INGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HUNT CLUB of the space. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry,
absolutely gorgeous 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car expanded garage, pool living room, family room, formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed
ome, with spacious kitchen, breakfast nook, formal dining, family lanai, screened courtyard, 2 car oversized garage, all situated in
om, great room and lanai overlooking the lake. beautiful Terra Vista.
LSMLS 703250..............................$179,04798 ................................................................................ $379,000 MLS 703250 ........................................................................... $179,000


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


1TV -A- 'i BRENTWOOD
TOWN HOME
3 BED.
2.5 BATH. 1 CAR
r,',~~~~ ., ....... I', , ,
I.. d 1 .. 1 ,


plan, screened lanai, professionally decorated, furniture negotiable.
M LS 359587 ................................................................................ $ 1 1 9 ,0 0 0


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Spacious maintained Villa home on one of the most desired streets
in this premeire country club community. Great floor plan with
extended lanai, extended garage with side entry golf cart door.
Ceramic tile and many other upgrades. Located on a premium
homesite with expansive views of Terra Vista.
M LS 707755 ........................................................................... $ 2 3 9 ,0 0 0


DETACHED VILLA
-2 BED, 2. v BATH, AR,
.. l"' "BRENTWOOD VILLAS
_____ .^^B~llir^^g'^SII^^^B^ ^^ 1 ~ ^^j^HB 1 ^B^^^^^-d^ ^ ^^^ _____________________ premier resort communitiesort cmmuniiesin
oBe part of one of Florida's
p . B....., 2 BATH,. 2 CAR,.
the 2 bedroom, maintenance-
AI V1 free villa located in the cozy
Village of Brentwood at Citrus Hills. This home is located in close
DETACHED VILLAS 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR SKYVIEW VILLAS proximity to Brentwood Fitness & Pool Facility & the Brentwood Golf
This home comes with all the luxuries you'd expect from this gated DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Course. The open floor plan allows you to live a casual Florida
ETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR LAKEVIEWVILLAS community. 2 bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2 car garage, high This lovely TerraVista 3/2 home isthe ideal placeforanyoccasion, whether lifestyle. Home features a Florida room that allows for year-round
cely maintained Malibu model with great open floor plan on Golf ceilings, enclosed lanai with hottub, plantation shutters,triple slider, seasonal use, retirement, or full time living! From the sliders to the lanai comfortto enjoythat lifestyle. The master suite offers a large walk-
iurse homesite. This home has 2 bedrooms plus a den, which can Your backyard overlooking the water fountain and it backs up to the overlooking the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, in closet, spacious vanity &walk-in shower in the bathroom. "Social
used as a third bedroom. An outstanding home for year round or park. This home has been built with lust the right amount of space, this home has whatyou've been looking for. Let others maintain the exterior Membership" is required, providing you access to an array of world
actionn getaway, nottoo big and certainly, nottoo small! whileyou enjoythe social lifethatcomeswiththe social membership! class amenities. All this is available in one of Brentwood's
LS 706854 ........................................................................... $ 2 14,9 0 0 M LS 707118 ............................................................................ $ 3 0 4 ,9 0 0 M LS 703807 ................................................................................ $ 2 8 8 ,0 0 0 G R EA T EST value. M LS 704580 .............................................. $ 9 9 ,9 0 0


STerms 6 MonthS oSr Mor
Terra Vist &Brnt oo R na l Socil Mp i d wh a l


solid surface countertops and -ooand........
upgraded SS appliances. Other BRENTWOOD 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR FOXFIRE features include a tankless hot water heater and outdoor grill. Plenty of Come take a look at thisfully furnished home in the Community of BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATHS, 1 CAR
Wow! Come take a look atthis single family home with 4 bedrooms room in the 2 cargarage forstorage.AIll ofthis plus the Citrus Hills Social Brentwood. 2 bedroom plus a bonus room. Close to the community Unfurnished BrentwoodTownhome, 2 Bedrooms and 2.5 Bathrooms,
plus a den. Very spacious unfurnished home with lots to offer. Social Club Membership, including golf, the Bella Vita Fitness Center and Spa, pool and exercise area. Perfect for seasonal orfull time residence. All 1 car garage. Social Membership Included. Come and enjoy the
membership included, indoor & outdoor pools, restaurants and more. rental prices are based on one year rental. 6 months are negotiable. lifestyleyou deserve.
# 1 1 3 1 ............................................................................................ $ 1 ,9 5 0 # 12 8 8 .................................................................................................. $ 1 ,5 5 0 # 1 1262 6 ........................................................................................... ...... $ 1 3 5 0 # 6 0 17 ............................................................................................. $1,050


REALTY GROUP





E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014



Choncl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563-5966



;ii- 7 Classifieds


MobieHoe


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
I1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
DUNNELLON/488
2/2, extra clean, cprt &
shed, part. fenced, new
carpet & paint $550/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970
LECANTO
5225 Shaker PI 2/2 DW
$575. Nice, 464-0999



1982 SW Mobile Home
Great Shape, 15K
Delivered to your
property. Will not last!!
727-967-4230
Bad Credit?
Here's your chance!
Repo' s available in
your area!
Financing Available
(352) 795-1272
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

MUST SELL**
2006 Fleetwood
MH 32 x 66
Entertainer floor plan
Great Shape!!
1-877-578-5729


Palm Harbor Homes
2014 Models are here!
$8,500 Pre-
Construction Savings
John Lyons ()
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
Rent to Own
Owner Financing on
used/repo/new
Manufactured Homes
352-795-2377
SAVE SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




FLORAL CITY
3/2-1+AC, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $91,900
716-807-8847
FLORAL CITY
Large 3/2 DW
Remodeled on canal
to River, Small Lot,
Assessd $34,400.
Asking $29,400 obo
352-726-9369




3/2/1 DW MH
/2 acre corner lot
exc. cond. open floor
plan, laundry room,
all apple, Ig scn porch,
fenced,3 carports,
shed Homosassa,
$51k 352-410-1072
4/3, 32x80, w/ 2 master
suites in Homosassa.
2006 MH, Must See!!
Owner Financing Avail
SReady to move in
(352) 795-1272
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 727-967-4230
Hernando DW, MH
3 BR w/walk-in closets
Roof over, single car
garg, chain link fence
$39,999 Will take RV in
Trade; 352-726-2494


COUNTRY LIVING IN
LECANTO $42.500
Dbwd, 3bd/2ba, /2 acre
NEW c/heat/air & carpet
handi-cao ramp. nicely
furn, move -in cond!
No Owner Finance
(352) 621-3929
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre. New
bathrooms, Ig screened
porch, dead end rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No owner Financing
Homosassa
Huge Quad 3160 Sq Ft,
4br/3ba on 1.89 ac.
Too many options to list,
Must see/Beautiful
(352) 795-1272

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807

West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
must sell $13,000
(352) 344-5172

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf. over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077


AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf., over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077

Beautiful Triple Wide
In Gated Community
with Drywall. 2000+ SF
Must See-will owner
finance. MUST SELL
727-967-4230

BEVERLY HILLS
Sandy Oaks 55+ PK
2BD, 2 BA, Open
House Sat & Sun, 11-2p
completely remode.,
new Kt. & new appl's,
Fl. Rm. Lot Rent $274
incld's, wtr sewer &
trash, Pool/ Clubhouse
$37,500 (352-322-8941


For ,Sale ,

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858

Melody Park, Inverness
2 bd 1-1/2 bath. 12x64
with 12x22 Fl room.
$3,800. obo
727-808-6000

Singing Forrest 55+
Park, SW 2/1,LRoom
addition, new floor
Furnc,AC. Lanai, shed.
Lot rent $183/mo
$26,500; 352-860-1463


WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financina. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374










-ACTION7
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S800 & UNDER
10862 N. Airway Loop
3/2/2 nice and roomy
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 Spacious 2 story Townhome
1318 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 Spacious 2 story Townhome
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 Whispering Pines Park

$650 & UNDER
7096 N. Dawson Dr.
2/2M/H 960sq.ft.
6383 S. Tompaul Ter.
1/1 786 sq. ft. / has potential
1063 N. Commerce Terr.
2/1 apt. 820 sq. ft.
4 Utah St.
2/2 move in ready 992 sq. ft
For More Listings Go To
www.GtrusCountyHomieRentals.ar









I c


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf


21211 ..................$700
LAWNCARE INCLUDED
21111....................$650
2/2/2..................$750
2/1 ....................... $500
2/2...................... $550


2/1.5...................$600
MOBILE
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
S352-726-9010


BEVERLY HILLS
Beautiful 2/2/2
New Roof, New A/C
New Appliances
MLS 707667
352-637-3800






CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352- 563-2114,
352-257-6461

CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Mnthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb.,
maint. Incl., peaceful
No pets, $600. plus
mo. 352-628-6700

INVERNESS
2/1 Immaculate, in town,
$650/mo, $500. Dep.
(352) 895-0744


LECANTO
2/2, eat-in Kit.
screened porch, laundry
room, CH/A, near new
Walmart $500. 1st/Sec,
352-746-4191 or
352-697-5900


PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 & 3BR APT. HOMES
Handicap Unit
Available
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants
Monthly rent starting
at $686 plus utilities
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer






SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD












FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514


For Rent
Warehouse
1200 sq ft $600,
Storage 8x8 $85,
Office $550
(352) 634-0129
INVERNESS
Office Space for Rent,
1 blk. North of court
house. 352-634-5232




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
Fully Furn. or Unfurn.
2/2, 2nd Fl Condo, w/
carport. Avail. April 1
$850., (352) 201-7229
INVERNESS
2/2, Completely
Remodeled $750. mo.
+ Sec., 227 Trout Ave.
(352) 895-6549
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $775. mo
+ sec. (352) 382-8935




INVERNESS
2BR/1BA Duplex
352-746-2932
INVERNESS
DUPLEX 2/1 Fenced
yd., all appl.s $550.
1st, last & $500.sec
(786)255-6955

Efficiencies/


HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
HOUSES FOR RENT
$550 to $675.
352-422-2798
CITRUS SPRINGS
Beautiful, 3/2/2, $950.
mo. (352) 528-9774
(352) 529-7111





SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 E13


HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INV. HIGHLANDS
3/2/2, Clean, Irg. scrn.
Patio $800., 302-0431




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
6,000 sq ft Warehouse
Space, for Rent, 1 blk.
North of court house
352-634-5232


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.





UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Up to 9 acres from
$14,900. Mountain
cabin only $89,900.
Access to lake and
trout stream. Views
of the Atlanta sky-
line. 45 minutes from
Northern Atlanta.
Priced below
developer cost!
Call 866-950-5263
Ext. 17.


ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lie. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514



2 block homes side by
side. 1/1, rented $450
each TAW. Good
Cond. Quite Loc.
$70,000 for both. Call
Kevin (603) 498-5124
Attractive 2 Bd/2BA
Home near library.
please call for details
By Owner, asking
$84,900. No calls after
9pm (352) 746-3919
BEVERLY HILLS.
REMODELED 2/2/1
w/NEW ROOF AND
1525 sf, heat/ac. SALE
or RENT/OWN.
$66,900. 527-1239
Laurel Ridge,3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks
Golf Comm.(with club
house & pool.) 1754 SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kt w/ pantry &
nook. MBR has 2 clos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639




For SaleI I,*
Crystal Glen 4/2/2 on
corner landscaped
lot. Salt pool w/heater
and lanai, under roof
with kit area. $159,900
410-804-1454
no brokers please



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
Great open floor plan.
Liv. room has stone FP
& wd floors. Caged
Pool (352) 746-6552





For Sale %$0
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367


Hoe



-FOR


SAIS


Great Starter Home
S. Little John Ave.
Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
Lease or Cash
Call For Deatails
877-500-9517


ForSalerI&
Pritchard Island
Community, access to
pool w/tennis court,
close to downtown
Inverness, 1 owner,
2BD/2BA/2CG
$125k By owner,
Call. (352) 726-0044

Homj^sassaf
Homes~j


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY!!!






For Sale "1,
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell





Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


.,1 1,r,.=., oo,',
-I ,; "I V I-
......':..'":*.[ .. .. .. Spacious 2/2/1 with
*..- ..._ ,New roof, ACA& win-
Sdows, Inclds all Kit ap-
___ ____ Fmrirtc o(5280| 8pliances. Sunroom
Reap" liteoverlooking Green-
Ra Re lKe. belt.velt Inside utility rm.
For more information, call Jayson Bortz (352) 228-9506 $85,000 352-422-3256


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www. bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETMY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bpowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone(&tampabav.rr.c
om
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments





I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Hme


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

INVERNESS, 2BR/1BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749
LAKE ROUSSEAU
Fishing- Nature Lovers
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
ProDerties.com
"To view
my properties"


For Sale'

Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some furn, new Lanai,
Lam, & Ceramic floors.
$47,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EBBB


2.5 ACRES
Mar. 20, 10AM

ED MESSER,
"Your Favorite
Auctioneer"











2.5 ACRES
Mar. 20, 10AM

ED MESSER,
"Your Favorite
Auctioneer"
messersales.com
(352) 22-672




**** ** **
GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905
** *** *** *
4 ADJOINING LOTS
1 Acre MOL,Close to
Town Gospel Island
Gunn Ct.$12,700. Make
Offer(352) 726-2038
or (352) 613-4958
PINE RIDGE
1 ACRE
By Owner, build
ready, no fill, $26,900
(352) 249-7812



WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 100 ft on
water. All utilities.
$165,000.352-634-1171










.'' I, f ''




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florals back in style this season


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

After years of simple solids and
geometric prints, the lowly flower is
making a comeback in decor Floral
patterns have been blooming all
over fashion runways in recent
months, and they are slowly finding
their way back into the world of
home decorating, too.
It wasn't long ago that any mention
of floral upholstery or wallpaper
brought back memories of 1980s cab-
bage roses, flowery Shabby Chic bor-
ders stenciled high on bedroom
walls, and suburban homes de-
signed to feel like precious cottages
swathed in pink and green.
But today's new patterns aren't
your grandmother's florals. And they
can be a refreshing antidote to the
minimalist patterns that have domi-
nated home decorating in recent
years.
"It's what we're all craving," says
New York-based designer Jon Call,
founder of Mr Call Designs. "It's ro-
mance, it's a softness ... and it feels
fresh again, because no one has de-
fined it for our generation."
While brands like Laura Ashley
delineated the floral look of a gen-
eration ago, the new florals have no
rules. Which makes them more fun
- and more challenging to use
successfully
Here, Call and two other interior
designers Betsy Burnham of Los
Angeles' Burnham Design, and
Brian Patrick Flynn, executive pro-


Associated Press
Interior designer Brian Patrick Flynn designed this Mulholland Drive house in
the Hollywood Hills using a style of decorating referred to as "updated tradi-
tional" which is known for putting youthful, updated spins on classic floral
patterns through a fresh use of color and clean, simple lines.


ducer of HGTVcom's Spring House
series offer advice on working
with this fresh crop of floral
patterns.
What size?
"Scale is the most important fac-
tor in modernizing the look and feel
of florals," says Flynn. He suggests
avoiding flowers that are depicted at
their actual size. Instead, pick pat-
terns where the flowers are bigger
- between 50 percent and 200 per-
cent larger than life-size.
Call agrees: He's a fan of using


vintage prints in "the largest scale
you can find," so that the print's eye-
popping size contrasts with its tradi-
tional style.
But Call and Burnham also think
floral prints can look modern if
they're printed on a very small scale,
especially if they're used on smaller
items like throw pillows.
Which pattern?
Find a floral print that really ap-
peals to you personally, Burnham

See FLORALS/Page E15


CAROLE LISTER |
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor -
Ial Ceil: 422-4620 0l
ELR A Office: 382-1700


CHARMING VILLA near CC
2/2/2 all new *Fam. room
Eat-in kitchen *Berber & tile
Huge master bath Updated kitchen
Scr. Atrium Move-in ready
#701368 $114,900


FABULOUS CUL-DE-SAC HOME
* 3/2/2 + Fam rm. *Pool:
SWood, tile & carpet *Walk in ,,I hoai
* Cath ceilings Br.:akfao i (,:
* Master tub & shower 2 'iuolk in :, 1:1l
#707215 $158,500


ART
Continued from Page E9

an ornate frame that usu-
ally hangs in his dining
room; the clips mean he
can rotate different pieces
through the frame for an
ever-changing display
Deciding which pieces
to keep long-term can be a
challenge, Cudlin said. He
looks for work that in-
cludes loved ones or com-
memorates a special event
He routinely frames Miles'
work and gives it to family
members who are repre-
sented in the drawing.
He also finds that he
appreciates many of his
son's drawings more after
he asks questions about


them. The art provides in-
sights into how the pre-
schooler views the world,
and helps preserve his
thoughts, Cudlin said.
"His way of thinking
about things the way he
experiences the world -
you're not going to get
that back," he said.
Cali Sanker, education
coordinator of the Ohio
State University Urban
Arts Space in Columbus,
recommends saving a
child's pieces from vari-
ous ages to create an
artistic record of his or
her growth.
"It is not only a special
way to reminisce about
your child's younger
years, but a special way of
embracing how much they
have grown," she said.


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OCE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.AIfXUF.MV SAlfS(&AIFXUFIOnM


I I
BaEST

-eato


. .I.. .... . . .I.
AGENT ONl DUTY] SEVENh D[.] AYS~ 1=-V,"',A=IWEEK!


CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
carport, screen porch, inside laundry room;
,..1. on a hill, downtown crystal river, no
- I insurance required #709076-


HOMOSASSA D/W M/H on 18 acres on
a comer in green acres 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
dual pane windows, sheet rock walls, open
S1,.:.l r ,,,,,11: ,. I,,,. 4 fam ily
r ,, i ,. . .... i i i ;creened
S... i ,. , .. .I ..,. room


I I aa
INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage .. .....I vinyl lined caged
pool, t" r ., )n 3 sides, cathedral
ceiling in great room, country kitchen w/
1 ,, I I .1 counter tops tile floors


HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H w/3
bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved
road,screen i .,I I i i ....
fans, formal I,,,,,, .... i ** *,
breakfast bar immaculate inside, near by
to shopping #706376 $44.000




DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
nm/h '-r- for 6 cars/workshop on 2
acres , wood cabinets, china
cabinet carpet throughout except for
kitchen, bath and laundry room Large
family roor. I. 1, ,, ,. . ,,. net
kitchenw/i i ... I ',, h' $. I.i"


CRYSTAL RIVER Commercial
opportunity in nursery, wholesale; .
& landscaping sales also, 5 acres ,
fenced, plants, office, equipment,
,, & samples of fence work
".JI9. $300,000


IJ BEVERLY HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2
LECANTO Nice half acre with well, car ..... /opener, w/rear wooden deck,
septic and impact fees paid mobile not rear , on comer lot, cathedral &
livable but, take it off and replace with standard *.... 11 maintained newer
new center of county, Lecanto School tile, carp I flooring #705360
District #703990 $18,000 $97,000


OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 16- 1-3 PM







1295 N Selkirk Pt., Crystal River
Lovely maintained home with 1,918 sq. ft of light & bright FL living. Situated
in Meadowcrest offering community pools, clubhouse, tennis courts & more!
Directions: From Hwy 44 towards Crystal River turn R
on Meeting Tree, R on McVicar, 1st R on Douneray Lp.,
around to Selkirk Pt, house on the right.
Tony <
Pauelsen

1942 N. Prospect Ave. (352) 303-0619
Lecanto, FL 34461 www.letstalkflrealestate.com


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


ww *lstrisins 0o


_= I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORALS
Continued from Page E14

suggests. "Nothing corny, nothing or-
dinary," she says. You want "some-
thing really special."
You might try chinoiseriess that
include figures and florals," Burn-
ham says, "or flora and fauna ...
That's a way to do it if you're kind of
scared of just flowers."
Another option is choosing a pat-
tern that's more "botanical" than
flower-filled.
"Homeowners with aversions to
super-girly florals featuring rose-
buds or elaborate petals may find
botanicals a better fit," says Flynn.
"While floral prints include shapes
and silhouettes of actual flowers,
botanicals rely more on stems and
leaves."
Call points out that designers like
Vivienne Westwood have created
digitized, pixilated floral prints that
mix traditional and modern style.
But, he says, even the most classic
chintz fabrics can look great in a
modern home if they're handmade
and high quality
Flynn encourages clients to mix
floral patterns with other prints.
"The floral cottage style of a
decade ago was all florals and rib-
bons," Flynn says. "Anytime I'm
dealing with a home occupied by
couples arguing over masculine and
feminine styles, I'm likely to mix
botanicals or florals with classic
masculine prints such as gingham,
check or plaid."
That juxtaposition of "classic girly
prints with iconic patterns used for
men's spaces" creates a modern,
gender-neutral room.
Where to use it?
Floral patterns can work espe-
cially well on sleek, modern pieces
of furniture, Burnham says. Rather
than choosing a floral sofa that's
rounded and tufted, use floral up-
holstery on a simple sofa with
straight, clean lines.
And rather than hanging floral
draperies in a bedroom or choosing
a floral bedspread, use solid colored
fabrics in those locations and then
upholster the headboard in a bold,
oversize floral.
What colors?
A great pattern can look dated if
you pick the wrong color palette,
says Flynn. "Florals with mustard
yellow and burgundy palettes in-


Associated Press
Traditional floral wallpaper is
contrasted with modern furniture and
unexpected accessories like a bike
helmet and a vintage Japanese poster
for the movie "Sabrina," to create a
fresh and edgy look designed by
Betsy Burnham and Max Humphrey of
Burnham Design.

stantly feel old and stuffy To make
them fresh and fun, look for those
with unexpected color palettes, such
as black and violet or springy greens
and punchy pinks. The pattern will
keep its classic appeal, but with a
youthful update."
Burnham says floral patterns
done in just two colors (or in two
shades of the same color) can look
more modern than florals that in-
clude several colors. And "if you go
for something on a crisp white back-
ground," she says, it "might read
more current than something on a
tea-dye that's more muted."
Call's thinks just about any color
can work, though he prefers to steer
clear of pinks and purples. "It gets
too sweet, too endearing," he says.
You have to "be careful with the sen-
timentality," he says, or you'll lose
some of the modern edge.


PRIVATE BOATHOUSE on Big Henderson Lake, comes
with a cozy 2/1/2 house (needs TLC) across the road, al HOME SWEET DOUBLEWIDE 1985,3/2, split plan,
for $109,9001 1105 & 1106 Hwy 44E Inverness frepac oversized wokshp w l 1 AC. Well
#706639; Tonya Koch tel: 352-613-6427. mantaned. 2018 S. unwood Pt. $54,000. 708667.
Jean Cassese tel: 352-201-7034.





T"HIS" IS TIT 2/2 closeto Rairs to Trails, updated kitchen
WAIT 'TIL YOU SEE THESE AMAZING & master bath w/cookoutready backyard. $74,900.
SUNSETS! 2/2, well kept Inverness waterfront home, 1002 E. Inverness. #708149. Sheila Bensinger tel:
move-in ready. $117,500 #701 492. 352476-5403


SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014 E15





E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014


* I p I i.'. 1 I..a1.
* .i .iJ-h .I r.Ih I l.. .|. ,r ii l
* Hi h1|l ll:.q, f.l il- ll..1I,:r.
M_ 1_ =R/11:l,111 :.l, $219,000
Jeanne o l'illaidl Pwickiel 3522123410
uit11 CiliusCouni Sold corn











* I aU- ~i-.. -I Piri. ai.-~ hm I $.i i
* ] ''. ,i.:i, h i.:.r.I Ipin.vi ,i (I e ,',i .i
* All Ai..i..l,.i .:F i. NIW FV ili
* IIIA _A T L.F.lJV i _. li.....l I i.11. 1
Mi __ = h/iu.u/ $110,000
Jeanne oi Wi/laid Pickiel 212 2410
It'i:'I'. CiliusCounl'Sold. corn










3255 S. FRANKLIN TERRACE
INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
* eF u e.,:'i ,jI L .:..
* PIJll I-.-.n -, l_,II _,I,,1I
MlI =/11 1. ?./
REDUCED -- $170,000
Jeanne oi W/laid Pickiel 212 3410


HOME PLEASES EYE -
PRICE PLEASES WALLET
I/h. I,,,, ... ,,,,.,. ,, ... ,] l,: . ...... ,) ),- jl .,,..,..,,,
II. I mn m.......... ilr m
.I I O.rHr 1 1 I,-.1 I, ,, l ... rl 'H.r.)l
I_ JRI- '- '". I: J IC'TJIH I :I I-uJRull- I\'NRI ;HI:I
h ,,. rH .I I. , l. In. ,r Ii .1 r I
ri.: i i-,-r v ASKING $68.900
Pit Di>-,352 212 7280









TWO BANK OWNED COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS ON HWY 41!
4401 S Floiida Aut Inltintss FL 34450
...... 4 ii : f r l l.. n.......... .:.

II 11 : .. I" l1 u.h H-, 41H| Hrli S I126 ,0
1i: = ,:r OFFERED AT S 268.000
Ci" E. G K1111! 1t 352 4002635 lI'
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1995 MOBILE HOME
M ':'. III I.- i. 'il a
MliH: :1I"! ONLY $55,900
Please call
laWanda Wattll 352212 1989


SUBDIVISION PROPERTY
A l1.i. llhll.l I _" i .- i iv.r l. l: h.i n .l1
A il l II. 1 /I& = 11f.1
ASKING $129,900
Call Mailha Snyidet to pieviei,







LARGE POOL HOME
PRICED TO SELL AT S142.500
SEVEN LAKES PARK 3105 JEAN AVE.
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Mlv_.-: = 113'iil $99,000
David K/itz Cell 9543838786
Oil 3527266668








SITTING ON A GOLD MINE?
IHil 4'jr1| rr:1.ar |rrI Ir|I .rr.Ir I arr..ini u.rtir l:r.-
iri.-', VV,:alrrr,:ar IU, l I IIP ilrrurJ lhr- ,.,,iiri-i lhr.-
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l-Ul.-rf h .aI- .j.- I .I..r.a .-Irr.-rI r.. I.. rr 111
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Ml,- 1 = A ';.l;' ASKING $149.000
wilh possible ownei financing.
Ask lot Ma/lti/ Bnooth 6374904


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A LOT OF HOME FOR THE MONEY!i
.:, ..-. r ..rr i, Ih .-I, 4 l..lr .:..:.- r : Lr.,rr lr I.:.rl lr .
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Ml.- ili:.' ASKING $110,000
Call Nancj Jenks 352 400 8072


-OPEN PLAN-A LOT OF LIVING
AREA FOOTAGE FOR THE MONEY
FOR SALE 5600+ SO. FT. J.,,,H,,JH,, : .:, ......
I'I ,11 .IIIll lll ,:I l I ,II~ l: li .. .... ....-,I i,- ,~ lh. .... .. d .,,i 1,, 0l id l ,
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R E D U C E D T O $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 1,,.. 1, 1 1. ,rJHii.
o'i' f v ASKING $138.900
Call Teii Sleiail 52220 1008 Pt Di,, ,352 12127280
Mail lelliann sleiail cenli 121 coin [ i .


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Ml.- =i:lii.'i:i. $229,727
Jeanne o0 W/llaid Pick'el 352212341/0
nI,,, CiliusCountl Sold corn


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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* l:,ili.ii l H 1.i, h. A l: IIL, l. ,il: i

Ml=h /u/::-, ASKING $49,500
Call Chadles Kelly 352 422 2387


SPACIOUS 3/2/2 POOL HOME
ON HALF-ACRE ++ HOMESITE





i i -iii I $128.,900
Pit Di ,352' 212 7280
r.. ,4 ,.pm iijUL d mm r -j


A 6.., 1.- .rr..l.-uiu ..l.- ii.. ni.. _' l i,

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Call Rulh Fiedetick 13525636866


WATERFRONT!
A NATURE LOVERS DREAM!

P ill.. II..- I al arin .- rrr I
ONLY $89,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3


L r-


WELCOME HOME"
I: h l ,,, l- ',, ,II,,, I, ,,, l I .. 1.I. ,,
r ,6 h,,, I ,, H,1, , I,.


ri: =1:.1 (.1:1 ASKING $88.900
Pi Di,. 352212 7280
[' --? p t tif Ll L t / ffij _n


PINE RIDGE ESTATE
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
4I Ir.l.r....i ,: .a W r rr ..r ..Ir r II .. rlll ", l l 1111 1. ri I

I air ll. pi r-rr .l r raalar. rr

Ml. II:=/I:I.4_'II ASKING $264,900
Call Nancl Jenks 352 400 8072


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III I IrIIIIIIIIIII.... rr~I.':"-I rrr IIr-r IIIIIIr IIIII
52 S HERON CREEK LOOP
rii : = -:i:- 4 $59.000
Ci" Sl.I. Stiu w it 352212 0211


SERVING
COUNTY HOM
hLER3 R .- L F- .A rE I PENC.W R H

YEARS W. Mai SUNDA InensF450Cl oa o





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Page H2 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


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Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H3


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Page H4 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


Carnival Lights & Country Nights at the Citrus County Fair
March 24 29, 2014

Welcome to the Citrus County Fair

We would like to welcome friends and neighbors to the 2014 Citrus County Fair featuring Carnival
Lights & Country Nights. We have put together a variety of vendors and great fair food for your en-
joyment. There will be entertainment all week in the auditorium and outside on our grounds.

On Monday night we will be having a free gospel concert with paid gate admission. The group,
Mercy's Well, will be performing at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. The Livestock Complex and Arena
will host our youth animal projects all week. Thursday and Friday night will feature our steer and
swine sales. The youth are blessed to have so much community support for these sales.

Belle City Amusements will provide rides and games for your enjoyment on the midway. There are
many specials on the Midway all week including the Midway Bonus Special on Sunday, March 30,
2014. Free gate admission for everyone with an armband special from 2 to 7 p.m. for unlimited
rides. Come join the excitement.

There is something for everyone to enjoy. We hope you have a wonderful time. See you at the Fair.

Thank you,

Lee E. Stokes, President


Hal Porter, Manager




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H5


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


What's Inside


Welcome to the Citrus County Fair...................... H4
Letter from Commissioner of Agriculture .............. H6
Fair O officers .......................................................... H 7
Fair D directors ........................................................ H 7
Honorary Directors .............................................. H7
O office S taff ............................................................ H 7
Individual M em bership.......................................... H8
Fam ily M em bership .............................................. H9
Fair Com m ittees ................................................ H10
Livestock Committee and Superintendents........ H11
Fair Managers 1974-2014 .............................H.....H11l
Past Presidents 1947-2013 ............................H....H11
FairAssociation Directors 1947-2014 ................ H12
V endo rs .............................................................. H 13
History of the Citrus County Fair........................ H14
Fair Map and Midway Specials .......................... H20
M mission Statem ent.............................................. H22
2014 Goal Premium Award
Educational Program Sponsors .................... H23
Livestock Schedule ............................................ H24
How you can helt the
Youth Animal Exhibitors ................................ H25
2013 Pen of Meat Poultry Buyers ...................... H26
2013 Pen of Meat Rabbit Buyers........................ H26
2013 Sw ine Buyers ............................................ H26
2013 Steer Buyers.............................................. H26
2014 PeeWee Poultry Trophy Sponsors ............ H27
2014 Pen of Meat Poultry Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H27
2014 Youth Poultry Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H28
2014 Open Rabbit Trophy Sponsors .................. H28
2014 Pen of Meat Rabbit Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H28
2014 Youth Rabbit Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H29
2014 Sheep Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H29
2014 Horse Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H30


2014 Open Heifer Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H30
2014 Youth Heifer Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H31
2014 Swine Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H32
2014 Swine Skill-A-Thon
Placement Sponsors ....................................H32
2014 Steer Trophy
and Belt Buckle Sponsors ............................ H32
2014 PeeWee Poultry Exhibitors........................ H34
2014 Youth Poultry Exhibitors ............................ H34
2014 Pen of Meat Poultry Exhibitors .................. H34
2014 Youth Rabbit Exhibitors ............................ H34
2014 Open Rabbit Exhibitors.............................. H34
2014 Pen of Meat Rabbit Exhibitors .................. H36
2014 Youth Heifer Exhibitors .............................. H36
2014 Open Heifer Exhibitors .............................. H36
2014 Sheep Exhibitors ...................................... H36
2014 Sw ine Exhibitors........................................ H37
2014 Horse Exhibitors ........................................ H38
2014 Steer Exhibitors ........................................ H39
2014 Citrus County Fair Schedule...................... H42
Fair at a G lance .................................................. H48
Fair Highlights -Auditorium ................................ H49
Livestock Pre-Opening Events .......................... H49
2014 Citrus County Fair Entertainment.............. H50
Youth Public Speaking Contest.......................... H52
Karaoke Contest ................................................ H53
Competitive Exhibit Rules, Entry Times.............. H64




Page H6 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014
CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


S


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES
COMMISSIONER ADAM H. PUTNAM
TIE CAPITOL
February 24, 2014



Welcome to the Citrus County Fair!
Each year, approximately 5 million people attend one of the numerous fairs
around our state. As Florida's Commissioner of Agriculture, I am enthusiastic
about the positive impact fairs and livestock shows have on the agricultural
industry. Events like the Citrus County Fair are an excellent platform for
showcasing the finest "Fresh From Florida" products and services while
viewing the industry's latest technological advancements and innovations.
As Florida's ag industry looks toward the future, momentum and growth will
depend on engaging the enthusiasm of our youth. Fairs and livestock shows
are a great way to cultivate the next generation of industry leaders by
providing opportunities to discover and celebrate Florida's rich agricultural
heritage. As I travel the state, I am encouraged by our future farmers, ranchers
and producers who are preparing to lead the charge. From where I stand, I see
great days ahead.
While you are visiting the Citrus County Fair today, I hope you will take the
opportunity to enjoy the outstanding food, entertainment, contests and youth
exhibits. Most importantly, I hope your day at the fair will allow you to
experience Florida's agricultural roots and its impact on our great state.
Enjoy!
Sincerely,



Adam H. Putnam
Commissioner of Agriculture




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H7


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2013 2014 Citrus County Fair Association


- - OFFICERS - -
President ........................................ Lee Earl Stokes
Vice President ............................................Tom Wolf
Secretary............................................ Debbie Parker
Treasurer .................................................... Joe Law
Past President .................................... Nell Mayberry


- - DIRECTORS - -
Neale Brennan Paul McPherson
C.L. Calloway John Messer
Kevin Dixon Daniel Parker
Laura Dixon Margaret Roddenberry
Dr. Ron Dumas Larry Rooks
Doris Graska Charles Simmons
Bob Iverson Irma Stokes
Albert Jordan David Tomczak
Jaret Lubowiecki Kim Whitton
Kandi McPherson David Wilson










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Page H8 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Individual Membership as of 2/24/14


Abbott, John
Alsobrook, David and Patty
Bailey, Ron and Cheryl
Bailey III, Ron
Brennan, Neale
Calloway, C.L. and Melba
Copeland, Grace
Corbin, Carol and Lori
Davis, Lyle and Louise
Dean,Judy
Dean Sr., State Senator Charlie
DeBusk, Bill and Sharon
Dixon, Earl
Dixon, Laura
Dolley, Diana and Martin
Dumas, Dr.Ron and Marie
English-Legros, Jennifer
Eubank, Jack and Joan
Evans, Lamar
Fenton, Lynda and Jim
Freund, Andrew
Fuller, Christine
Gelin, John and Granada
Gervasi, Anthony
Gibbs, Ann
Graska, Doris
Gray, Lisa, Deonna and Megan
Green, Dustin and Rebecca
Gutierrez, Carlos
Hagaman, Robert and Nancy
Hedberg, Edwin and Susan
Hedberg, John and Cathy
Henson, Patrick
Holloway, Mare
Hunt, Sonny and Dora
Indelicato, Kathleen
Iverson, Robert and Mabel
Jablonski, Adam
Jenkins, Claire
Jones, Kelsey
Jordan, Albert and Marilyn
Jordan, Paul
Kendall, William
Lambert, Julie


Law, Joe and Marlene
Law, Travis
Lisenby, Johnie and Beverly
Lubowiecki, Jaret
Marsh, Virgil
Mayberry, Nell
Maynard, Don and Annette
Maynard, Donnie and Kelsie
Owen, Libby
Parker, Daniel and Debbie
Porter, Bill, Ginger and Hal
Pospiech, Holly
Powers, Linda and David
Rash, Tracy
Ressler, Tom and Debbie
Rife, Jack and Mary Sue
Roberts, J. Austin
Roddenberry, Margaret
Roddenberry, Charles and Nadine
Roddenberry, Charlie
Rooks, Larry and Nancy
Ruzycki, David
Scott, Joe
Sergent, Angela
Simmons, Charlie and Deanne
Smith, Tomi and Gene
Steele, Mike
Stokes, Lee Earl and Mary Nell
Stokes, Irma
Strickland, Jonce and Tara
Taggart, Lawrence
Thomas, David
Uzar, Christine
Webb, Winn and Suzanne
Wheeler, Peggy
Williams, Mary
Wilson, David and Saundra
Wilson, Florence
Wilson, Jeff and Doris
Wilson, Jeffrey
Winder, Mark and Melissa
Wisser, Carol
Wolf, Tom




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H9


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Family Membership as of 2/24/14


Alexander: Mary, Jalena, Aleigha, Aston
Anderson: Beth, Mike and Nathan
Baker: Greg, Danelle, Brianna
Barlow: Arthur, Karen, Brianna, Aaron, Rebekah, Isaac
Boynton: James, Tonya, Devin, Ricky, Alexis
Brown: William, Linda, Rachel, Jeremiah, Matthias,
Becky
Brown: Keith, Sunniva, Chalise
Capps: Amanda, Evan, Ned, Emily, Sam, Sophie
Carpenter: Michael, Denise, Kacie, Travis
Cobb: Penny, Gregg, Maggie, Gregory, Ella
Copeland: Randall, Cecilia, Layton, Colton
Cunningham/Maynard: Gerald, Candy, Katie, Gerald
Davis: Donna, Jessica, Cristal, Rebecca
DeBusk: Brian, Penny, Charity
DellaTorre: Mike, Sandy, Allison, Katie, Mikey
Dewitt/Cunningham: Gerry, Amy, Kristen, Brandi,
Geremy
Dixon: Kevin, Kane, Patti, Macee
Ellis/Hawks: James, Kelly, Gabrielle, McKenzie
Ferguson: Don, Michele, Rachel, Jade, Samantha
Graham: Chris, Jim, Amanda, John


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Grow: JJ, Jennifer, Hannah, Hillary, Hadley
Handy/Wickline: Nora, Audrey, Sage, Marshall, Rowan
Hanna: Will, Tina, Carrie, Allie, Brianna, Bill
Hinde: Michael, Tracy, Michael, Savannah
Hughes: Josh, Liz, Audrey, Joshua
Jones: Bill, Katie, Cassie, Kelly, Julia
Jones: Tad, Libby, Katie, Kaleb
Kanawall/Schwartz: Linda, Tara, Skye, Robert, Saman-
tha
Krause: Mike, Rebecca, Raylee, Brody
Lancon: Al, Jill, Amanda, Domenique, Bryce, Mason,
Deven
Leturno: Marcus, Margie, Tanner, Elise, Evan
Mann: Mary, George, Cole
Mantor: David, Catherine, Tucker, Logan
Mattingly: Joseph, Linda, Abigale
Mattingly: Tony, Kim, Katie, Kenny, Charlie, William
Mayes: Shelly, Larry, Tori, Casey
McClain: Marisa, Chase, Yasmein, Jenna, Westen,
Matthew, Alexis
continued on Page H10




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Page H10 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Family Membership as of 2/24/14


continued from Page H9


McFarlin: Rick, Jenn and Lacie
McPherson: Paul, Kandi, Hunter
Meeks: David, Cara, Nathan
Mentz: Jim, Hollie, James, Lauren
Messer: John, Amy, Madison, Riley, Blakely, Turner
Miller: William, Tricia, Shyanna, Bailey
Philipps: Tim, Stephanie, Kylie, Lauren, Lyndsee
Poteet: Sonny, Kim, Amber, Caitlynm
Rainier: Robert, Rhonda, Victoria
Remley: James, Chrystell, Colton, Mykenzie, Will
Rose: Jimmie, Michele and Justin
Rowland: Charles, Kelley, Shawn, Haleigh


Shoemaker: Dawn, Guy, Grant, Gregory
Standard/Rand: Joellen, Randy, Scott, Jocelyn
Tomczak: David, Meagan, MaKenzie, Kody
Traum: Michael, Ashlyn, Madyson
Tschuschke/Reinhardt: Lisa, Dale, Sophia
Uzar: Lance, Patricia, Peter
Waller: Danny, Christine, Taylor, Macie
Ward: Marnie, Bill, Diana, Will, Grace
Welch: Brad, Dot, Sarah
Wheeler: John, Erin
Wheeler: Matthew, Alison, Luke, Nicholas
Whitton: Carl, Kim, Karlie
Williamson: Cory, Deana, Cason, Paisley, Waylon
Wisser/Wayman: Todd, Cheryl, Morgan, Jasmine
Wyman: Brian, Heather, Lindsey, Garret, Abby


Citrus County Fair 2013 2014 Committees


Committee:
Admissions .............

Baby Pageants ..........
Budget & Finance .......
Building & Grounds ......

By-Laws & Standing Rules
Commercial Exhibits .....
Competitive Exhibits .....
Fine A rts ...............
Horticulture .............
Flea Market ............
H historian ...............
Insurance ..............
Livestock ..............


Membership
Midway ....
Publicity and


Premium Book


R ace Track ..............................

S nack B ar ..............................
S special Events ...........................

T ro p h ies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Truck & Tractor Pull .......................


Chairman: Co-Chairman:
.Joe Law ........................................ D avid W ilson
Bob Iverson
.Kim Whitton .................................. Margaret Roddenberry
.Larry Rooks .................................. Joe Law
.C.L. Calloway ................................ Albert Jordan
Danny Parker
.Dr. Ron Dumas .............................. Laura Dixon
.Charlie Simmons .......................... John Messer
.Irm a Stokes.................................... Doris G raska
.Jaret Lubowiecki
.David Tomczak .............................. Debbie Parker
.David W ilson .................................. Tom W olf
.Doris G raska.................................. Neale Brennan
.Lee Stokes .................................... Kevin Dixon
.Debbie Parker................................ Larry Rooks
Kandi McPherson
.Tom Wolf .................... Dr. Ron Dumas
.Laura Dixon .................................. Nell M ayberry
.Margaret Roddenberry ......... Doris Graska
Neale Brennan
.Albert Jordan ................ C.L. Calloway
Doris Graska
.Tom W olf........................................ Irm a Stokes
.David W ilson.................................. Jaret Lubowiecki
David Tomczak
.Kandi McPherson .......................... Paul McPherson
.Paul McPherson ............................ Charlie Simmons
Larry Rooks
Margaret Roddenberry
Kim Whitton
Danny Parker




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page Hll

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


Citrus County Fair

2014 Livestock Committee
Chairperson: Debbie Parker
Co-Chairpersons: Larry Rooks Kandi McPherson

Superintendents Co-Superintendents
Rabbit ......Dawn Shoemaker ..... Shelly Mayes
Heifer ....... Gene Smith ..........Tomi Smith
Sheep ..... Joan Eubank .........Jennifer English-Legros
Swine .......Margaret Roddenberry Stephanie Philipps
Mark Winder
Steer .......Larry Rooks ......... Jonce Strickland
Poultry ......Rick McFarlin .........Marnie Ward
Horse ....... Patricia Uzar .......... Kathy Indelicato
Sales .......Nancy Rooks .........Larry Rooks
Kim Whitton
Libby Jones
Add-Ons ........Marlene Law..........Margaret Roddenberry
Ag
Educational ....Kandi McPherson ..... Cara Meeks
Marnie Ward
Pat Henson
Dr. Dumas
Scholarship Hal Porter


Fair Managers
1974
Quentin Medlin, County Agent

1974-1976
Art Alston, County Agent

1977 1978
Gene Pyle, Fair Manager

1978-2006
Jean Grant, C.F.E.

2001 -2002
Doris Graska, Assistant

2006 Present
Hal Porter, Fair Manager


Past Presidents 1947 2013
1947-1948 ..............................................James E. Rooks, Sr.
1948-1957 .................................................. Norman P. Savory
1957-1958 ...................................................... Doug Stephens
1958-1963 ........................................................ Harley Levins
1963-1965 ............................... ............. .................... Earl W elty
1965-1967 ........................... .............. ................... Horace Allen
1967-1968 ............................... ............. .................... Earl W elty
1968-1969 .......................................................... Carroll Cason
1969-1977 ........................................................ W ilbur Langley
1977-1979 ............................... ............................... Curtis Rich
1979-1980 ........................................................ Quentin Medlin
1980-1981 .................................................... Catherine Rooks
1981-1984 .............................. ............. ..... ...... ........ ..Otto Allen
1984-1987 ........................................................ David LaPerle
1987-1989 ............................ .............. .... ............... ... Hal Porter
1989-1991 ............................ ......... ..................... Nell Mayberry
1991-1992 ............................ .............. .... ............... ... Hal Porter
1992-1994 ........................................................ David LaPerle
1994-1995 ............................ .............. .... ............... ... Hal Porter
1995-1996 .......................................................... Nell Mayberry
1996-1998 .......................................................... C.L. Calloway
1998-2000 .......................................................... Doris Graska
2000-2010 .......................................................... Nell Mayberry
2010-2012 ........................... ............. .................... Larry Rooks
2012-2013 .......................................................... Nell Mayberry
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Page H12 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


Citrus County Fair Association Directors 1947 2014


Bernie Adkins
Ervin A. Adler
Horace Allen
Otto Allen
John Alligood
Art Alston
David Anderson
Wilma F. Anderson
Gene Barbour
Sybil Barco
Bette Barga
Marge Barker
G.O. Barnes
John T. Barnes
Ella Barnes
Mrs. Oscar Barnes
Don Bartlett
Steve Barrow
Betty Bauer
Mrs. Ray Baxter
Marcia Beasley
Audrey Bellamy
Beverly Bender
Don Bender
Kenny Bender Jr.
Murray Bennett
C.A. Bertine
Brandy Blanton
Cynthia Blanton
Mike Blanton
Eleanor Bonifield
Denver Boston
Desso Bowen
Harold Braaksma
Leone Braaksma
TO. Brackeen
Neale Brennan
Estelle Brass
Mrs. C.P. Breckenridge
Desso Brown
Solon Brown
Alta Bunts
W.J. Bunts
Walter Bunts
Bert Burnham
Clyde Byrd
C.L. Calloway
Henry Campbell
Mrs. Henry Campbell
Jack Carpenter
Carroll Cason
Mrs. Emory Cason
"Jocky" Cason
J.E. Cason
Ruth Cason
Pat Cassidy
James Cato
Carlton Chappell


L.C. Chappell
Pat Chitty
Dale Collett
B.J. Collins
James E. Connor
DeWitt Crawford
Dawn LaPerle Crawley
Joyce Creel
Don Crist
C.W. Croft
Mrs. Ben Croft
Rosella Crummie
Book Cunningham
Daisy Cuyler
Frank Cuyler
Doris Dabney
Leonard Damron
F.E. Daniels
Charles E. Davis
Lyle Davis
Lorene Detmer
Kevin Dixon
Laura Dixon
Mary Dixon
Brown Dumas
Dr. Ron Dumas
Brandel Eldridge
Pat Eldridge
E.L. Ellis
Bob England
David English
Earl Ericson
Steve Evans
Kevin Fitzpatrick
Shawn Fitzpatrick
Richard "Spike"
Fitzpatrick
Bruce Flaig
Allen Fort
Andrew Freund
Mike Friddle
Sue Ellen Friddle
Paula Gilbert
Mary Nell Gillen
Bob Gilstrap
Norine Gilstrap
Jane Glover
Patrick Grady
George Grant
Jean Grant
Doris Graska
Alex Griffin
Elmer Grover
Margaret "Monkey"
Hagar
Margie Haley
Gerta Hansen
Clifford Harman


Cyril Harrington
L.W. Harris
Hilda Hatcher
Rocky Hensley
George Herkomer
Tim Hess
Scy Hibbard, Jr.
Sam Himmel
John Hodgkins
Ruby Hofecker
Dixie Hollins
Leff Holloway
Ruth Hooper
Bill Hoppert
Jack Hunnicutt
Helen Hutchinson
Bob Iverson
Jake Jacobs
Frank Jerkins
Karen Johnson
Paula Stanley Johnson
Gary Johnston
R.O. Jones
Turner C. Jones
Albert Jordan
Norma Jordan
Wayne Jordan
Dick Kaufman
Richard Kelly
Mary Sue Kennington
B.A. King
Mary Knox
Sue Koon
Brenda LaPerle
David LaPerle
Travis LaPerle
Bell Land
David Langer
Alida Langley
Wilbur Langley
Katie Lashley
Joe Law
Harley Levins
Dick Locke
H.J. Locklear
Mrs. Julian Locklear
Jaret Lubowiecki
Dr. Charles Magill
O.M. Maines Jr.
Ira Martin
Nell Mayberry
Annette Maynard
M.R. McCullough
Guy McKettrick
Kandi McPherson
Paul McPherson
Quentin Medlin
John Messer


Baker Miley
Dennis Miller
Linda Miller
Louise Mills
Marie Morris
John Morrison
Dorothy Nelson
Candy Newman
Mrs. George Ogden
Al Owens
Daniel Parker
Debbie Parker
John Pelham
Mary Perrin
John Polter
Billy Porter
Hal Porter
Linda Powers
Jim H. Priest
Mrs. Jim H. Priest
W.C. Priest
Barbara Renney
Curtis Rich
Doc Richards
Shirley Richards
Bo Roberts
Dick Roberts
Ellis Roberts
Carol Rockman
Margaret Roddenberry
Catherine Rooks
Doris Rooks
Frances Rooks
James E. Rooks
James E. Rooks Jr.
Karla Rooks
Larry Rooks
Margaret Rooks
Nancy Rooks
Ralph Rooks
Robin Rooks
Valentine Rooks
Andy Rose
Charles Rowland
Sherri Sanders
Norman Savary
Ellen Schneider
M.C. Scofield
Cookie Scott
Helen Sells
Frank Shaw
Thelma Sheffield
Don Sheppard
Bud Sigmon
Charlie Simmons
Ben Simon
Joe Smith
King Smith


Maggie Smith
Marlys Spiegel
W.P. Spivey
Fred Spooner
A.G. Spratt
Wilma V. Stephen
Owen Stephenson
Irma Stokes
Lee Earl Stokes
Mary Nell Stokes
Roseann Straub
Bobby Strickland
Dick Strickland
Ruth Strickland
Vickie Strickland
Ray Tallent
Jesse R. Thomas
Linda Thomas
Mrs. W.A. Thomas
David Tomczak
Cliff Travis
Doris Turner
Mrs. Ruben Turner
Danny Tvenstrup
Kelly Tyler
Eloise VanNess
Mike VanNess
Herbert VanNess
Ed L. Watkins
Kathy Wear
Suzanne Webb
Dot Welch
Rick Welch
Earl Welty
John West
Patricia White
Willie White
L.J. Whittingham
Buster Whitton
Kim Whitton
Lucky Whitton
Skeeter Whitton
Will Whitton
Gloria Wilcox
Clyde Wilcox
Mrs. Eldon Wilder
Betty Williams
Herbert Williams
Mrs. John Williams
Mary King Williams
Royce C. Williams
David Wilson
Thomas Wolf
Mae Spencer
Woodford
Red Wright
E.A. Zellner




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H13


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Vendors


2014 Main Gate Building
Fine Arts Exhibit Citrus County Fair

2014 Miley Vendors
Adult and Youth World Exhibits
Shoebox Floats
Wood Carving Display

2014 Riggs'Vendors
Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County
Carnahan's Supply
Citrus County Cattlemen Education Foundation
Citrus County Speedway
Citrus Kia
Citrus United Basket, Inc. (CUB)
Citrus United Soccer
GR's Feed & Western Outlet
HPH Hospice
LaPerle Enterprises
Nature Coast Containers
Powers Protection Inc.
Pro H20
Ridgeline Tire & Service
Tinsley Electric
Wade Metal Works
Williams Fence Co.

2014 Food Vendors
Andrew Broomfield Java Hut
B. J.'s Concession
Bianco's Ice Cream & Drinks
Bianco's Quality Foods, Inc.
Bob McGinnis
Charlotte's Snack Shack
Della Ryan Ice Cream
Findlays Smokehouse BBQ
Frazier Fair Foods
Greek Corner
John J. Marrone Kettle Corn
Kona Ice
Miller Foods Sausages, etc.
Miller Foods Drinks
Ross Concessions
Rudy's Pizzeria
TBA Concessions, LLC


2014 Outside Vendors
Advanced Aluminum
Alachua Nature Coast Baptist Assoc.
Antique Engine Display
Beaudry Nursery
David Osborn Face Painting & Tattoos
Eagle Buick GMC
Hidden Acres Ranch
Mercer Concessions
Mike Scott Plumbing
Sunshine Western Hats
Therese Marie Scanlon Foundation
Uncle Freds Photos

2014 Jacobs' Vendors
Advanced Waste Solutions, Inc.
AirFx, Inc.
Amazing Grace Mission
Baai Florida Blue
Bath Fitter
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus County Democrat Executive Committee
Citrus County Elections Office
Citrus County Historical Society
Citrus County Right to Life
Citrus County Schools
Citrus County Sheriffs
Citrus Republican Party
Citrus Shrine Club
Community Housing Partners
Gideons International
Green Life Pallets
Groundhog News & Research
Harvest Time Ministries
HPH Hospice
Lions International
Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus, Inc.
RJ Roofing, Inc.
Tina Hanna Independent Consultant for Tupperware
United Health Care

2014 Levins Vendors
Adult & Youth Horticulture Exhibits
UF/IFAS Extension Citrus County
Florida Forest Service
Citrus County Fair History
Daisy Mae, the Cow Educational Display




Page H14 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


History of the Citrus County Fair


The first reference to the
Citrus County Fair is found in
the minutes from a meeting of
the Board of County Com-
missioners dated Oct. 5, 1920.
Mr. Dorsett, Citrus County
Extension Agent, was advis-
ing the Board of County
Commissioners of a change in
fair dates to the 14 and 15 of
December, 1920. This county
fair began as an outgrowth of
several previous 4-H exhibits
organized by the County
Agent and the Home Demon-
stration Agent. These 4-H
shows had previously been
held in a tin building in
Lecanto.
On Feb. 1, 1926, the Board
of County Commissioners
went on record as favoring an


annual fair. Later, the Board
of County Commissioners
adopted a resolution declaring
Jan. 21, 1927, as a legal holi-
day due to the fair and West
Coast Highway Association
meetings in Crystal River. A
request was made for busi-
ness houses and public busi-
ness to be suspended for that
day. The fair was held in
Lecanto until 1928, at which
the time the Florida land bub-
ble burst. Records are unclear
of the location of the fair
from 1928 through 1947.
In June 1933, a motion was
made by the Board of County
Commissioners not to move
any more material from
Lecanto without the Citrus
County Fair Association and


Board of County Commis-
sioners approval. It was dur-
ing this period that the Board
of County Commissioners ap-
proved that citizens would
serve as directors of the Fair
Association, with some of the
commissioners also serving
on the board. Small accounts
of tax money were allocated
to the assistant running the
fair; however, this is no
longer the case.
The first Miss Citrus
County Beauty Pageant was
organized in 1930. This pag-
eant qualified our contestants
to participate in the Miss
Florida and Miss America
pageants. In 1985, we
changed the pageants to
scholarship pageants which


allow us to give scholarship
prize money directly to the
pageant participants. This
change no longer made the
pageants qualifiers for the
Miss Florida and Miss Amer-
ica pageants; therefore, the
pageant names were changed
to the Miss Citrus County
Scholarship Pageant and Miss
Teen Citrus County Scholar-
ship Pageant. The Little Miss
and Little Mister Pageants,
Decorated Diaper, and Pre-
Teen pageants are also held
on a Sunday, either directly
before the fair or during the
fair.
In 1947, a school day was
set aside whereby students
were bused to the fairgrounds
continued on Page H15


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Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H5I

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


continued from Page H14

on Friday. While the busing
is no longer in operation, the
day is still recognized by the
Fair Association and the Cit-
rus County School Board.
The first fair was held in
Inverness on the football field
at Citrus High School in Janu-
ary 1947. At this point, tents
loaned to the Citrus County
Fair by the carnival company
were used to house exhibits.
On the second night of the
fair in 1947, a windstorm
blew down the main exhibit
tent, destroying all of the ex-
hibits. Shortly after this dis-
aster, a Fair Association was
chartered.
After the formation of the
Citrus County Fair Associa-
tion, the Board of County
Commissioners donated land


to the association. This land,
which is located one-half mile
south of Inverness on U.S. 41,
covered approximately 45
acres and is the location of
our current fairgrounds,
which is now only 28 acres.
The first fair held on these
grounds was in 1948.
Belle City Amusements, a
Florida Midway, owned by
the Charles Panacek family,
was the first midway on the
new grounds and continues to
operate the midway to the
present day. Midnight Mad-
ness, later changed to Mid-
night Magic, was started on
Thursday nights from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. giving fairgoers un-
limited rides for one price.
Several additional one price
opportunities have been
added over the years for vari-
ous times and days.


Most of the pioneer fami-
lies of Citrus County were
represented on the original
Board of Directors. Many of
these people serve for years
donating their time, labor and
money. Growth in the early
years was painfully slow due
to limited funds and a small
population. Therefore, in an
attempt to gain funds so that
the fair could continue to
grow, some of these original
members of the Board of Di-
rectors loaned money to the
Fair Association on a long
term basis, taking a low rate
of interest. James E. Rooks,
Sr., was the first president of
the Citrus County Fair Asso-
ciation serving from 1942 to
1948.
Bonds were floated to start
building and the first concrete
block building, the Levins


Building, was erected imme-
diately. Director Harley
Levins spent many hours on
this building. The tin build-
ing from the 4-H site in
Lecanto was moved to the
new grounds.
In 1955, a request was
made to build a 1/4 mile dirt
race track, which the Board of
Directors of the Fair Associa-
tion ran for several years be-
fore it was leased to Leonard
Damron. The track was later
paved with asphalt and has
been repaved periodically.
After a short time, the Board
of Directors renegotiated the
lease and the bid went to the
West Coast Racing Associa-
tion, with improvements and
operated by various promot-
ers, the race track has grown
over the years. Grandstand
continued on Page H16


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Page H16 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


continued from Page H15

boxes were later constructed
on the pit side of the track.
The Citrus County Speedway
is still in operation with races
every Saturday night from
February until November,
with practices taking place on
Thursday nights. Several
statewide special races have
been held at the speedway, in-
cluding NASCAR-sanctioned
truck races.
In 1966, Paula Stanley
Johnson, Quentin Medlin,
Wilbur and Helen Langley
traveled the state looking for
a steel building to be used as
an auditorium. The current
auditorium was built in 1967.
The auditorium was turned
over to the county in the early
1970s for operational services
due to the fact that the Fair


Association did not have any
permanent employees. The
Fair Association retained
ownership of the parking lot
and has full use of the audito-
rium during the fair, the an-
nual meeting, and the
volunteer appreciation dinner.
In 1965, the Jacobs Build-
ing was erected. This was
named after Charles Jake Ja-
cobs, a volunteer who was an
old carney or carnival worker.
Jake taught us how to count
joints (midway concession
stands and games) and make
collections.
In 1975, the Baker Miley
Building was built between
the Levins Building and the
Jacobs Building. Baker
Miley was a past director of
the Fair Association who
made many contributions dur-
ing his tenure. The Baker


Miley Building included a
snack bar where civic associ-
ations put on dinners during
the fair. After that, the home-
makers baked bread there and
sold it for 25 cents a loaf.
The smell of the bread baking
drew people to the building
where the competitive ex-
hibits were held. The bread
baking was later taken over
by churches.
In 1977, a 12'x 60'trailer
was purchased as a point of
coordinating all fair business
and was later used as the
headquarters for the Live-
stock Committee. That same
year, Mrs. Jean Grant was
hired as the first fair manager.
Prior to her hiring, the previ-
ous managers were County
Extension Agents.
In 1979, the Riggs Building
was built on the other side of


the Jacobs Building. This
began as a red steel clear span
building and was later painted
gray to match the rest of the
buildings. The building was
named for Inez and Raymond
Riggs who ran the flea market
for several years. In the late
1970s, Helen Langley took
over management of the flea
market and ran it until 2008.
She and her husband, Wilbur,
an honorary life director, also
ran the snack bar in the Miley
Building on Saturdays. In
2009, the flea market man-
agement contract was
awarded to Cathy Johnson
and the hours were expanded
to include Fridays. The flea
market closes during August
of each year.
In 1980, the building at the
main entrance was built and
continued on Page H17


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Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H17

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


continued from Page H16

named after Eleanor Bonifield
who was in charge of the hor-
ticulture exhibits for many
years.
In the early 1980s, a grant
was received from the State
of Florida with the help of
State Representative Dick
Locke and the first part of a
new barn was built and a few
years later a swine barn was
added. The livestock com-
plex is named for Quentin
Medlin, a county agent for
many years. In those days,
the county agent also served
as the fair manager. Mr.
Medlin served in the early
1970s followed by Art Alson
and Gene Pyle. The building
known as The Little Red
Schoolhouse was moved onto
the grounds in 1983 after buy-


ing it from the School Board
for $6,000. Otto Allen was
President at that time and the
building was later named in
his honor. It was later voted
to allow the Citrus County
Railroad Club full use of the
building to show their model
railroads and they would be
open during flea market hours
and during the fair. The rail-
road club has made many im-
provements to the building
and with the help of the Fair
Association, installed central
air conditioning and a new
ceiling.
The Fair Association built a
new office in 1986 at the rear
of the Levins Building. New
restrooms were built on the
east side of the fairgrounds
adjacent to The Little Red
Schoolhouse which has now
also been painted gray to


match the rest of the build-
ings.
In 1986, Jean Grant became
President of the Florida Fed-
eration of Fairs and Livestock
Shows, Inc., and served until
1987.
1988 was our first effort to
have a nine day Fair. After
the nine day Fair it was de-
cided by the Board of Direc-
tors to return to a six day fair
in 1989. The three extra days
were not as profitable as ex-
pected, in addition to the wear
on a small staff and volun-
teers.
In the late 1980s and early
1990s, the Citrus County Fair
Association, in cooperation
with the Citrus County Com-
mission, provided a county
exhibit at the State Fair in
Tampa. Several first place
ribbons were received, as well


as a district first place award.
In 1990, new restrooms
were built at the main en-
trance and restrooms with
showers were built at the
racetrack/midway area.
In 1990, the Dr. Dumas
Scholarship was established
in honor of Dr. Ron Dumas
for his many contributions to
the livestock program. Dr.
Dumas continues to serve as a
member of the Fair Associa-
tion to this date.
In 1992, due to overcrowd-
ing of the Citrus County Jail,
Judge Edwards ordered that
the Citrus County Auditorium
be converted into a temporary
jail. A chain link fence went
down the middle of the walk-
way between the jail and the
Fair office. During the time
the auditorium was used as a
continued on Page H18


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Page HS18 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


continued from Page H17

temporary jail, the pageants
had to be moved to the Curtis
Peterson Auditorium in
Lecanto and a tent was rented
to provide entertainment in
the area of the horse arena.
On March 13, 1993, prior
to the opening of the fair, the
No Name storm blew the
huge tent down and also top-
pled one of the large rides be-
longing to Belle City
Amusements.
In 1997, Jean Grant was
elected to the Florida Federa-
tion of Fairs Hall of Fame.
In 1999, the horse arena
was named for Eloise Van-
Ness. Eloise was a director
for many years and was in-
volved in horse shows and 4-
H. An announcer's stand was
later added to the arena, as
well as a roof over.
In 1999, Hal Porter, Direc-
tor and Past President, was
voted Florida's most out-
standing 4-H Alumni Mem-
ber. Hal continues his many
years of service to the Fair
Association by serving as the
current Fair Manager, which
he has done since 2006.
In January 2000, the An-
nual Antique Tractor Show &
Pull was started as a two-day
event. On the first day of the
tractor pull, a ceremony was
held to raise the flag. A large
concrete pole was installed
near the fair office courtesy of
David and Brenda LaPerle.
The flag and ropes were do-
nated by C. L. Calloway and
Withlacoochee Electric. In
2001, it was changed to a
three-day event on the last
weekend in January. The
event was so successful that
three new scholarships were
awarded in the Youth Exhibit
Division. An essay was re-


quired stating why the student
exhibited at the fair. In 2001
there were nine entries and
three $500 scholarships were
awarded. Since then, scholar-
ships have been added and
awarded in memory of David
LaPerle. The first year equip-
ment was rented or borrowed,
the next year a sled was pur-
chased and a scale. Antique
tractors were phased out as
exhibitors, though many still
pull. In 2010, the pull was
dedicated to the memory of
David LaPerle (1948-2009)
who was one of the organiz-
ers and later chairman of the
event. David also served as
past president of the associa-
tion from 1984-1987 and
1992-1994. In 2013 the truck
and tractor pull was scaled
back to the original two days
and was very successful,
again affording the opportu-
nity to award scholarships to
area youth participating in
competitive exhibits.
In 2000, courtesy of Sumter
Electric, the electrical service
on the midway was buried,
eliminating poles and increas-
ing safety. The same year, a
cart path was established and
all golf carts or other vehicles
were eliminated from the
grounds, including the mid-
way. In July, we were hosts
for the first time of the
Florida Federation of Fairs
Summer Workshop. Over
100 people were in atten-
dance from all over the state
of Florida. The first Volun-
teer Appreciation Dinner was
held in 2000 in the Riggs
Building.
New air conditioned gate
houses were constructed for
the main gate, exhibitor gate,
and livestock gate and an in-
formation booth was placed
continued on Page H22




Sunday. March 16. 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H19


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Page H20 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


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Page H22 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


continued from Page H18

near the flag pole.
In the summer of 2001, a
truck pull was held which,
though profitable, was discon-
tinued and trucks became part
of the annual tractor pull.
In 2001, the Florida Federa-
tion of Fairs established the
Blue Ribbon program which
judged and awarded fairs on
their merit. The Citrus
County Fair Association was
a recipient of a blue ribbon
award that first year and has
received a blue ribbon award
every year since.
In 2002, prior to the open-
ing of the fair, the lone tree on
the midway disappeared with-
out a trace.
In 2003, the fair office was
expanded to add additional
offices and storage area. This
took part of the western end
of the Levins Building.
When five hurricanes af-
fected the state of Florida in
2004 (Hurricanes Bonnie,
Charley, Frances, Ivan and
Jeanne), the fairgrounds be-
came an emergency opera-
tions center for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office and
FEMA. The Riggs Building
was used to house supplies
and water.
After receiving a grant from
the State of Florida with the
help of State Senator Nancy
Argenziano and State Repre-
sentative Charles Dean, the
Eleanor Bonifield Horticul-
ture Building was air condi-
tioned. Using a portion of the
same grant money, the con-
struction of a 175' x 150' roof
over the arena began in 2004.
The first event held in the
new arena was the 4-H
Rodeo, followed by the An-
nual Tractor Pull. The live-
stock program was held for


MISSION STATEMENT
The Citrus County Fair Association is an organization
of volunteers united to showcase the talent of the youth of
Citrus County; to provide scholarship and scholarship op-
portunities; provide the community with agricultural, ed-
ucation, and cultural pursuits, thereby added to the quality
of life for its residents.
Exhibits at the annual Citrus County Fair consist of
Agriculture, Horticulture, Livestock, 4-H, FFA, Fine Arts,
Extension Homemakers, local churches and civic groups,
plus business people exhibiting their wares. Handcrafted
items by men, women and children and school exhibits
are also on review. In addition to the exhibits, there is a
midway with rides, sideshows and games. Entertainment
is furnished by local, as well as professional entertainers
who come from other counties or out of state.
Food, such as popcorn, ice cream, sandwiches, pizza or
complete meals can be purchased. This is considered a
time to have good clean fun which is geared to entertain a
person or entire families.
The fairgrounds and buildings are rented for various ac-
tivities in order to support our non-profit fair, to continue
to be self-supporting without receiving any county, state
or federal operational funding.


the first time under the cov-
ered arena during the 2005
Fair.
A cattle camp and swine
camp was held and has be-
come a yearly event.
In October 2006, Manager
Jean Grant was made Fair
Manager Emeritus and Hal
Porter was hired as the Fair
Manager.
In 2007, after receiving a
grant from the State of
Florida with the help of State
Senator Charles Dean, the
roof over the arena was com-
pleted in 2008. This included
a 5,000 person capacity
grandstand. Again, the first
event held in the completed
arena was the 4-H Rodeo, fol-
lowed by the 2009 Annual
Truck & Tractor Pull. The
first livestock events were
held during the 2009 Fair.
In 2008, Doris Graska, di-


rector and past president, was
elected President of the
Florida Federation of Fairs,
Inc. Later that same year we
again hosted the Florida Fed-
eration of Fairs Summer
Workshop. At the IAFE an-
nual convention in Las Vegas,
Doris was presented with the
Heritage Award, which recog-
nizes recipients for outstand-
ing volunteer service. As part
of the award, the Citrus
County Fair Association re-
ceived a $500 check.
Over the years, many of the
Directors of the Citrus County
Fair Association have held
chairmanships and been
members of committees of the
Florida Federation of Fairs
and Livestock Shows, Inc. A
majority of the directors at-
tend the annual meeting of the
federation held each year in
May in various areas of the


state.
In December 2008, a schol-
arship was established in
memory of Jean Grant (1926-
2008).
The Citrus County Fair As-
sociation Board of Directors
is composed of 25 members
who are elected at the associ-
ation's annual meeting in
June. The term of office is
two years with 13 members
being elected one year and 12
members elected the next.
The officers of the Associa-
tion are elected at the July
meeting. Membership is open
to all Citrus County residents
age 18 and over. Membership
privileges include admission
to the fair and pageants and
the opportunity to volunteer
in many areas of the fair. The
fair is very fortunate to have
many leaders in our commu-
nity serve on the board of di-
rectors.
Honorary Life Membership
has been given to very few.
Those are: Quentin Medlin,
former County Agent/Man-
ager/Past President; Paula
Stanley Johnson, County Ex-
tension Agent/Director and
Secretary of the Association;
Wilbur Langley, Past Presi-
dent/Director; Wilma Ander-
son, Director/Admissions
Chairman/Exhibits Chairman;
Dick Locke, Director/State
Representative; Richard Spike
Fitzpatrick, Director/Attor-
ney; Frances and Valentine
Rooks, Directors; Eloise Van-
Ness, Director/4-H Leader
and Charlie Davis who served
as Director for over 25 years
as well as many years as the
Treasurer of the organization.
The newest honorary member
is Bob Iverson who served as
chairman of admissions for
several years and then as
Treasurer.




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H23


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Goal Premium Award
Educational Program Sponsors


Ace Hardware Hernando
Ace Hardware Inverness
Ace Septic Tank Service, Inc.
American Farm & Feed
Barco Farms
Citrus County Ag Alliance
Citrus County Cattlemen's Educational Foundation
Citrus Hills Dental
Citrus Lodge #118 FAM
Randall and Cecilia Copeland
Countryside Animal Clinic
Don's Plumbing
Eagle Lake Farm
John and Jean Eschenfelder
FDS Disposal, Inc
Family Auto Service, Inc.
Fitzpatrick Law Offices
Homosassa Game Fish Club


I 11


Inverness Elks #2522
Bob and Mabel Iverson
Joseph Indelicato Law Firm
KS Land Services, LLC
Louie and Candy Lott
McPherson's Outdoor Pro Shop
Michael's Floor Covering, Inc,
Nature Coast Charters Dick and Janet Yant
Hal Porter
Post Oak Ranch
Bo Rooks
Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery
TNT Enterprises Patrick Grady
Tidwell Bros. Paving
Top Hat, Inc.
Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Winkle Construction, Inc.


4ijYJ~i m.ji z-.. Fforida
iJ AI 1T11


It Health Care
Bir We t.. and Death Certificates
In Children's Care
*Dental Care
Disaster Preparedness
Disease Prevention
Environmental Health


* Family Planning/Women's Healt
* Health Education
* Healthy Start/Mom Care
* Illness Investigation
* Tobacco Prevention
* Walk in Clinics
* WlC/Nutrition


To make a medical appointment 352-527-0247 for Dental 352-249-9258
www.citruscountyhealth.org




Page H24 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Citrus County Fair Livestock Schedule


Saturday, March 22, 2014
9 a.m ..................................................... B arn S et U p
(See General Rule #22)

Sunday, March 23, 2014
8 a.m. 10 a.m ............................... Enter Open and
Youth Heifers
9 a.m 11 a.m ................................... Enter Rabbits
TBA ............................................ Rabbit M mandatory
Exhibitor Meeting
Noon .................................. Open and Youth Heifer -
Mandatory Exhibitor Meeting
2 p.m ................................... Open Heifer Show and
Showmanship
TBA.................................. Open Heifer- Excused by
Superintendents

Monday, March 24, 2014
8 a.m 10 a.m ................................... Enter Swines
8:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m ................. Open Rabbit Show
and Showmanship
11:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m ........... POM and Youth Rabbit
Show and Showmanship
Noon 2 p.m ......................................... Enter Sheep
2:30 p.m ..................................... Sheep Mandatory
Exhibitor Meeting
3 p.m ................................................. Rabbit Aw ards
4 p.m ........................................... Sw ine M mandatory
Exhibitor Meeting
5 p.m ............................................. Sheep Show and
Showmanship
7 p.m ................................... Youth Heifer Show and
Showmanship
9 p.m ................................................. Sheep Leave
10 p.m ..................................... Youth Heifer- Leave

Tuesday, March 25, 2014
8 a.m 10 a.m ..................................... Enter Steers
TBA .............................................. Steer- M mandatory
Exhibitor Meeting
7 p.m ..................................................... Sw ine S how

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
7 p.m .................................................... S teer S how
10 p.m ............................................. Rabbits Leave


Thursday, March 27, 2014
8 a.m 10 a.m ..................................... Enter Poultry
11 a.m ..................................... Swine Showmanship
TBA .......................................... Poultry M mandatory
Exhibitor Meeting
2 p.m ............................... PeeWee, POM and Youth
Poultry Show and Showmanship
3 p.m ................................................. Poultry Aw ards
5 p.m ............................. POM Rabbit Silent Auction
7 p.m ....................................... POM Rabbit Auction
(Grand and Reserve Only)
7 p.m ................................................... S teer A auction

Friday, March 28, 2014
1 p.m ...................................... Steer Show m anship
5 p.m ............................. POM Poultry Silent Auction
7 p.m ....................................... PO M Poultry Auction
(Grand and Reserve Only)
7 p.m ................................................ Sw ine A auction

Saturday, March 29, 2014
8 a.m ................................................... E nter H orses
TBA.................................. Horse Exhibitor Meeting
10 a.m ..................................... Horse Showmanship
and In-Hand Trail Class to Follow
Noon .................................. All items for Dr. Dumas/
Barn Renovation Auction to
Livestock Trailer for inventory
3 p.m ........................... Dr. Dumas/Barn Renovation
Auction with Awards to follow
10 p.m ............................... All Rabbit, Poultry, Steer
and Swine Leave

Friday, April 11, 2014
By 5 p.m.
All Thank You Letters (Buyers, Trophy and Add-ons)
are DUE in the Fair Office by 5 p.m. Or at Barn
Clean Up on Saturday, April 12, 2014

Saturday, April 12, 2014
9 a.m ................................................. Barn C lean U p
(See General Rule #22)




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H25


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

Anyone can participate in this youth program!

Here is how you can help the Youth Animal Exhibitors


* You can purchase a Steer or
Swine and keep the meat.
. Make joint purchases and split the
carcasses as well as the cost.
* We will have meat processors on
hand to assist you with your purchase
(if needed).
* We will offer a return to the floor
option at market price in the event
that you do not want to keep your
purchase (you would pay the
difference in your Bid amount per
pound and the Market price).
* You can donate your purchase to
a charitable organization (you would
pay the entire bid price).


* You can also help the exhibitors
by placing an add-on amount to their
total sale price. (You would not
receive anything in return except the
joy of helping a child and his/her
gratitude).
. Come early at 5 pm on sale nights
for pre-registration and have the op-
portunity to meet the exhibitors and let
them show you their projects, they are
eager to share their accomplishments!
. Brannen Banks will once again
provide the services for us to honor
your Visa and MasterCard.
* Any questions! Please call the
Citrus County Fair Office at
352-726-2993.


The Home Outfitter
Gifts & Decor for the
Outdoor Enthusiast

e Birds Garden

Nature Nautical Fishing

Hunting Lodge Man Cave

e Motorcycle Rustic

Western Wilderness

11875 Cedar St. (CR 40) Dunnellon, FL
Located within the Historic Village Shops
of Dunnellon
352-213-4663 www.thehomeoutfitter.com
Hours: Tues Fri lOam 5:30pm Sat lOam 2pm


Visit Our Booth
In The Jacobs Building
Primary Election General Election
August 26, 2014 November 4, 2014
Register by July 28, 2014 Register by October 6, 2014
" Register to Vote
Update Your Registration
SVoting System Demonstration
SVoter Resource Materials
SVote By Mail & Early Vote Information
* Sign Up to be a Poll Worker or Volunteer

Suevio of Eletios
Su anGl
(32 34-670




Page H26 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


201 Pe ofMaoltyByr

Grn Champio
-urgr Far Jae Horne

Reserve Grn Chmpon
Dr. Anela an Jh S pn


201 Pe ofMa abtByr
Grn Champio
Marcus an Magi Leu

Reev Grn Champion

P../. Sv of ~ Fl Digosi I agn


2013 Swine Buyers


Grand Champion
Swine
Pospiech Contracting

Reserve Grand
Champion Swine
Charles E. Davis
Funeral Home

7th Heaven Salon &
Day Spa
Ace Septic
Arbor Trails Nursery
Robert & Heather Armstrong
Mike and Rebecca Bays (2)
Bill Gregory Escavating


Bonded Septic Tank
Boulerice Roofing & Supply
Caldwell Construction Co.
LLC (2)
Charles E. Davis Funeral
Home
Chet's Septic Tank Service
Clark A Stillwell LLC
CMG (2)
Curry's Roofing
Dennis Family, The
Don Poss Roofing
Fergerson Enterprises
Dr. John and Granada Gelin
JJ and Jennifer Grow (4)
GR's Feed & Western
Hidden Acres Ranch (2)


HM&M Services, LLC
Joseph Indelicato P. A.
Inverness Kiwanis
Knights Farm Fresh Feed (3)
Marcus and Margie Leturno
Joseph and Linda Mattingly
McPherson Archery & Gun
Super Store
Mike Scott Plumbing (7)
Nature Coast Containers (2)
Nature Coast Insurance
Agency
Nettles Sausage, Inc
Patricia Duffy, CRNA
Pospiech Contracting, Inc
Powers Protection Inc. (2)
Publix Super Markets, Inc. (3)


Don and Martha Pullian
Bryan Reaves
Jimmy and Michele Rose
with Craven Realty
Michelle Russo (2)
Rustic Ranch Restaurant
and Bakery
Dr. Angela & John Spann
Tomika Spires-Hanssen
Suregrip Farm -
Janet Homrne (2)
Turbine Broach Company (2)
Underwood Meats
VanNess Auto Parts
Danny & Christine Waller
Mark & Melissa Winder


2013 Steer Buyers


Grand Champion Steer
Ferris Farm

Reserve Grand
Champion Steer
Charles E. Davis
Funeral Home

AAble Septic (2)
A.D. Waller, Inc.
Ace Septic
Aero Pest Control
Mike and Rebecca Bays
Boulerice Roofing & Supply
Brannen Bank
Burch Automotive
CBC Plants Inc.
Charles E. Davis Funeral
Home


Chet's Septic Tank Service
Chuck Everidge Insurance
Citrus Sod Inc.
Citrus Well Drilling
CMG
Gene and DeAnna Davis
Dolan Smith Carpentry
Don Poss Roofing (2)
Ed's Repair Inc
Edward Jones Co.
Fenco Farms
Ferris Farm
Ferris Groves Store
Foggy Bottom Ranch (2)
Dr John and Granada Gelin
JJ and Jennifer Grow (4)
Home Stuff Interiors
ICC David Ziebarth and
Connie Hooker
Inverness Kiwanis


Knights Farm Fresh Feed (2)
Joseph and Kimberly Lee
Marcus and Margie Leturno
Mike Scott Plumbing (5)
Tim and Kari Nash
Nature Coast Containers
Nature Coast Insurance
Agency
P.E.T./C.T. Svc of Fla
Diagnostic Imaging
Patricia Duffy, CRNA
Pat's Pawn
Darren and Lynne Pillsbury
Charles and Debbie
Poliseno
Pospiech Contracting, Inc
Jody Powell
Powers Protection Inc. (2)
Publix Super Markets, Inc. (3)


Don and Martha Pullian
Jimmy and Michele Rose
with Craven Realty
SMG, Inc.
Spires Contracting (2)
Tomika Spires-Hanssen
Steven and Regina Epple,
ARNP
Dr. Julie Sudduth
Sumter Co Farmers Market
Sumter Electric
The Hagar Group
The Shamrock Inn
Turbine Broach Company
West Coast Insurers
Wheeler Construction
Joshua Williams
Mark and Melissa Winder
Winkel Construction




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H27


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 PeeWee Poultry Trophy Sponsors
G ra nd C ha m p io n ..........................................................................................................................................T he M e e ks fa m ily
Reserve Grand Champion .......................................................................................................... State Senator Charles Dean
M modern G am e Bantam .................................................................................................................... C het's Septic Service, Inc.
Single C om b C lean Legged Bantam ............................................................................................................ Bo Rooks
Rose Comb Clean Legged Bantam .................................................................................................. Bob and Mabel Iverson
Feather Legged Bantam ................................................................................................................ C het's Septic Service, Inc.
All Other Clean Legged Bantam .................................................................................................... Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
A m e rica n ..............................................................................................................................................B o b a nd M a be l Ive rso n
A ll O their Standard Breed................................................................................................................ C het's Septic Service, Inc.
T u rke y ............................................................................................................................................................................ W R E C



2014 Pen of Meat Poultry Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors
Grand Champion Pen of Meat.................................................................................................... GR's Feed & Western Outlet
Grand Champion Pen of Meat Belt Buckle .................................................................................... Joyce's Courtside Pub
Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Meat .......................................................................................... Citrus Dental of Inverness
Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Meat Belt Buckle .......................................................................... Hooper Funeral Homes
Pen of M eat Record Book .................................................................................................................... KS Land Services, Inc.


Whr EcectcFn et


Tire of Wrsln wit
you Gaag Door


We'll
S: Make It
I ,Right!

DIOR TOM FORD ROBERTO CAVALLI Ocala
COSTA DEL MAR MAUI JIM 351-1432

7Hernando
726-0072
mez mer Ejes TR-OU T
631 N. Citrus Ave. Suite C Crystal River mynimezmereyes.com TRI-CO U N TY
Located at The Shoppes of Heritage Village
(FORMERLY OPTICAL EXPRESS AT CR MALL) Overhead Door Sales
M-F 10-5:30 Sat. 10-3 Exams Available on Saturday 32 Years Experience
352-795-2020 1110 E. Amberjack Dr., Hernando, FL


I




Page H28 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Youth Poultry Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors

G rand Cham pion ......................................................................................................................................Floral City Hardware
G rand Cham pion Belt Buckle .................................................................................................. Dan and Kathy Bracewell
Reserve G rand Cham pion.................................................................................................................. M cFarlin Feed & Supply
Reserve G rand Cham pion Belt Buckle .................................................................................................. W indm ill Self Storage
M odern Gam e Bantam .......................................................................................................... Classified O nline Paul G rogan
Single Com b Clean Legged Bantam .............................................................................................................. Don's Plum bing
Rose Com b Clean Legged Bantam ................................................................................................................ Carey Bantam s
All other Com b Clean Legged Bantam ........................................................................................................ The Jones Fam ily
Feather Legged Bantam ............................................................................................................................Swam water Farm
Am erican ....................................................................................................................................Little General M market & Feed
Asiatic ....................................................................................................................................Classified O line Paul G rogan
English ............................................................................................................................................................ Don's Plum bing
M editerranean ..................................................................................................................................................Don's Plum bing
Continental ..................................................................................................................................State Senator Charles Dean
All Other Standard Breed ................................................................................................................................Don's Plum bing
W after Fow l ................................................................................................................................Ace Septic Tank Service, Inc.
Turkey ......................................................................................................................................................Nature Coast Lodge
G uinea ...................................................................................................................................................... Nature Coast Lodge
Jr. Show m anship.................................................................................................................. Health & W ellcare Services of FL
Int. Show m anship ................................................................................................................................................Barco Farm s
Sr. Show m anship ................................................................................................................................KS Land Services, Inc.
Herdsm an ..............................................................................................................................................Lyle and Louise Davis
Jr. 4-H Record Book.................................................................... Rebecca Bays Insurance Resources & Risk M anagem ent
Int. 4-H Record Book ..................................................................................................................................Swam water Farm
Sr. 4-H Record Book .................................................................................................................... Ace Hardware of Inverness
Jr. FFA Record Book .................................................................. Rebecca Bays Insurance Resources & Risk M anagem ent
Sr. FFA Record Book .................................................................................................................... Ace Hardware of Hernando




2014 Open Rabbit Trophy Sponsors

G rand Cham pion ........................................................................................................ Pro Line Tile Dennis and Gail Jenkins
Reserve G rand Cham pion ..........................................................................................................................Citrus Hills Dental
Am erican Fuzzy Lop ...................................................................................................................... Joseph Indelicato Law Firm
Dutch ........................................................ ......................................................................................................... Craven Realty
English Angora ................................................................................................................................Top Hat Pest Control, Inc.
English Lop ............................................................................................................................Citrus County Historical Society
Florida W white ..............................................................................................................................Top Hat Inc. Chim ney Sweep
Him alayan ................................................................................................................................................................ Stead Lott
Holland Lop .............................................................................................................................................................. Stead Lott
Jersey W ooly ..................................................................................................................................Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
M ini Rex.................................................................................................... Hidden in the Oaks Rabbitry G regory Shoem aker
Netherland Dwarf ..........................................................................................................................Hom e Instead Senior Care
Polish ............................................................................................................................................Joseph Indelicato Law Firm
Californian ......................................................................................................................................Hom e Instead Senior Care
O pen Show m anship..........................................................................................................................Tony and Sue W illiam son



2014 Pen of Meat Rabbit Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors
G rand Cham pion Pen of M eat .................................................................................................. Hom osassa Gam e Fish Club
G rand Cham pion Pen of M eat Belt Buckle .............................................................................................................. Stead Lott
Reserve G rand Cham pion Pen of M eat ............................................................................................ M ichael's Floor Covering
Reserve G rand Cham pion Pen of M eat Belt Buckle .................................................... Hernando-Citrus County Farm Bureau
Pen of M eat Record Book................................................................................................................ Precious Cargo Preschool




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H29

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Youth Rabbit Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors

Grand Cham pion ........................................................................................................................State Senator Charles Dean
Grand Cham pion Belt Buckle ..................................................................................................................................Stead Lott
Reserve Grand Cham pion ............................................................................................................ Atkinson Construction, Inc.
Reserve Grand Cham pion Belt Buckle............................................................................................ Lee and Mary Nell Stokes
Am erican Fuzzy Lop ....................................................................................................................................Ferris Farm s, Inc.
Britannia Petite ..................................................................................................................................................Ice Cream Dr.
Californian .................................................................................................................................................... Ferris Farm s, Inc.
Dutch ................................................................................................................................................Joseph and Kim berly Lee
English Angora ......................................................................................................................................................Pat Henson
English Lop ................................................................................................................................Hom osassa Gam e Fish Club
Flem ish Giant ...................................................................................................................................... Beautiful Buns Rabbitry
Florida W white ................................................................................................................................................Ferris Farm s, Inc.
Havana ........................................................................................................................................................The Mayes Fam ily
Him alayan ........................................................................................................................................................... ... Pat Henson
Holland Lop ....................................................................................................................................Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
Jersey W ooly ..................................................................................................................................Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
Lionhead ......................................................................................................................................................The Mayes Fam ily
M ini Lop .................................................................................................................................................................. Just Sports
M ini Rex.............................................................................................................................................................. Ice Cream Dr.
Netherland Dwarf ..........................................................................................................................................Ferris Farm s, Inc.
Polish ...................................................................................... Hidden in the Oaks Rabbitry Gregory Shoem aker
Silver Fox ................................................................................................................................................................ Just Sports
Thrianta .................................................................................................... Hidden in the Oaks Rabbitry Gregory Shoem aker
Jr. Showm anship ................................................................................................................................................Doris Graska
Int. Showm anship..........................................................................................................................Danny and Christine W aller
Sr. Showm anship ..........................................................................................................................................Jaret Lubowiecki
Jr. 4-H Record Book ......................................................................................................................Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
Int. 4-H Record Book ......................................................................................................................Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
Sr. 4-H Record Book .................................................................................................................. Hom osassa Gam e Fish Club
Jr. FFA Record Book ................................................................................................................................................Bo Rooks
Sr. FFA Record Book .................................................................................................................... Precious Cargo Preschool
Youth Herdsm an ................................................................................................................................Branch O ut Tree Service





2014 Sheep Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors

Grand Cham pion Haired Breed.................................................................................................. Tractor Supply of Hom osassa
Grand Cham pion Haired Breed Belt Buckle.................................................................................... Dunnellon Anim al Hospital
Reserve Grand Cham pion Haired Breed .................................................................................. Tractor Supply of Hom osassa
Reserve Grand Cham pion Haired Breed Belt Buckle.................................................................... Lecanto M iddle School FFA
Division I ....................................................................................................................................Tractor Supply of Hom osassa
Division II ..............................................................................................................................Tidwell Bros. Paving
Division III ............................................................................................................................................ Just Sports
Grand Cham pion W ool Breed .................................................................................................... Tractor Supply of Hom osassa
Grand Cham pion W ool Breed Belt Buckle........................................................................................ Lecanto High School FFA
Division IV ..............................................................................................................................Ace Septic Tank Service, Inc.
Int. Showm anship ......................................................................................................................................Ice Cream Dr.
Sr. Showm anship ............................................................................................................ Tractor Supply of Hom osassa
Sr. 4-H Record Book ........................................................................................ Eubanks Acres Barbados Blackbelly Sheep
Jr. FFA Record Book ............................................................................................................................Sound Track Farm s
Sr. FFA Record Book ........................................................................................................................Jennifer English-Legros




Page H30 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Horse Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors
Jr. Horse Showmanship........................ Lance and Patricia Uzar Sr. Horse Showmanship............Just Horse'n Around Fun Show
Jr. Horse Showmanship Sr. Horse Showmanship
Belt Buckle ...................... Just Horse'n Around Riding Stable Belt Buckle ................................ Joseph Indelicato Law Firm
Int. Horse Showmanship ...................................... Pro Line Tile In-Hand Trail ................................ Little General Market & Feed
Dennis and Gail Jenkins In-Hand Trail Belt Buckle ...................... Fat Daddy's Restaurant
Int. Horse Showmanship Belt Buckle .... Fat Daddy's Restaurant


2014 Open Heifer Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors
Jr. Grand Champion .............................................................................................................. Charles E. Davis Funeral Home
Jr. Reserve Grand Champion ............................................................................................................ Tom and Nell Mayberry
S r. G rand C ham pion............................................................................................................................A m erican Farm & Feed
Sr. Reserve Grand Champion .................................................................................................... Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Cow Grand Champion ................................................................................................................ Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Cow Reserve Grand Champion ................................................ Eagle Lake Farm "In Memory of Major and Audrey Bellamy"
Supreme Grand Champion Belt Buckle .................................................................................................. F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.
D iv is io n I ..................................................................................................................................................E sc h e nfe ld e r F a m ily
D iv isio n II ......................................................................................................................................Le ca nto V e te rina ry H o sp ita l
D iv isio n III ............................................................................................................................................C ry sta l R ive r F ire sto ne
D iv isio n IV ......................................................................................................................................Le e a nd M a ry N e ll S to ke s
D division V ..........................................................................................................................R ustic R anch R restaurant & Bakery
D iv isio n V I ........................................................................................................................................P u re W a te r S yste m s Inc .
D ivisio n V II ....................................................................................................................................Leca nto V ete rina ry H ospita l
D iv isio n V III .............................................................................................................................................................. S tea d Lo tt
Showmanship .................................................................................................................. Blue Diamond Horseshoe Bar Beef
Jr. P re m ie r B reede r ....................................................................................................................................C rave n R ea lty, Inc.
Sr. Premier Breeder.............................................................................................. Withlachoochee River Electric Cooperative
Cow Premier Breeder .............................................................................................................. Countryside Animal Clinic, Inc.


5-joVAi=^ ti .Ji 7 I


~flMDIIYPD


DIAGNOSTIC OIL CHANCE
C UTER SCAN Drain old oil and refill with the
COMPUTER SCAN required amount of quality motor
Don't Know Why That Service oil. install new oil filter.
Engine Light Is On? OFF:
__ __ $ OOOFF~
S^ ( Not Just O1il
5 00 ZOL PENNZOIL-
I / I Explr --- Most Cars
3131/14 gi4 WOST H O & -Fl r -
... ... .. ... .. ... .. .........E-L .....
CRC Ex 4 'CRC poutr"'c

WIPER" 4 WHEEL
WIP *ALIGNMENT
B LA D ES ^BL BHelps prevent early tire wear.with
computerized accuracy, plus we inspect
B LA DES steering/suspension.
Quality
wiper blades
visibility I MOST
Incl es Per Pair h p
Installation Most ,
Vehicles extra f needed.
'CRC Exgpres 3/31/14 I CRC Exgpres 3/31/14
F irestone IrnimGmEsoIne
CRYSTAL RIVER Et
nof ,~
Fire stoneO
795511S US HWY 19 S.
795-5l190 (ACROSS FROM AIRPORT PLAZA ON US 19) OHHD4




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H31
CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS
2014 Youth Heifer Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors
Jr. G ra nd C ha m pio n ................................................................................................................................F.D .S D isposa l, Inc.
Jr. Reserve Grand Champion .................................................................................................. Ace Septic Tank Services, Inc.
Sr. Grand Champion .............................................................................................................. Knights Farm Fresh Feeds, Inc.
Sr. Reserve Grand Champion .......................................................................... Dick and Janet Yant Nature Coast Charters
C ow G rand C ham pion ..............................................................................................................................F.D .S D disposal, Inc.
Cow Reserve Grand Champ ............................................................................................................ Winkel Construction, Inc.
Supreme Grand Champion Belt Buckle............................................................................................ Bill and Rachael Langley
D iv isio n I ..........................................................................................................................................Le e a nd M a ry N e ll S to ke s
D iv isio n II ..................................................................................................................................P ro Line T ile of C itrus C o u nty
D iv isio n III ..........................................................................................................................................M c F a rlin F e e d & S u p p ly
D iv isio n IV ........................................................................................................................................B ra nch O ut T re e S e rv ice
D iv isio n V ................................................................................................................................................................ H a l P o rte r
D ivisio n V I ..................................................................................................................................Tow nse nd C o nstructo rs, Inc.
D iv isio n V II .......................................................................................................................................................... D o ris G ra ska
Division VIII ........................................................................................ Post Oak Ranch "In Memory of Naomi Cunningham"
Jr. S how m a nsh ip ................................................................................................................................................M a ry W illia m s
Jr. Show m anship Belt Buckle ............................................................................................................ Shane and A rnie Harrell
Int. Showmanship.................................................................... Citrus County Fair "In Memory of Mike and Eloise VanNess"
Int. Showmanship Belt Buckle........................................................................ Bryant Lisenby Memorial The Lisenby Family
S r. S how m anship ............................................................................................................................Lee and M ary N ell S tokes
Sr. Showmanship Belt Buckle .............................................................................................................. HM & M Services, LLC
Individual Herdsman...................................................................................................... Michele Rose, Realtor Craven Realty
Dr. Dumas Sportsmanship Award Belt Buckle ........................................ Home Instead Senior Care The Quintanilla Family
Jr. 4-H Record Book ............................ Jimmy & Michele Rose Jr. Premier Breeder .................... Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Int. 4-H Record Book.......................................... Ginny Celano Sr. Premier Breeder ...................... "In Memory of Thayer Fair"
Sr. 4-H Record Book.................................. Candy & Louie Lott Cow Premier Breeder ...................... Michael's Floor Covering
Jr. FFA Record Book .................................................. No Entry Harold Braaksma Plaque...................... Mike and Jerry Brewer
Sr. FFA Record Book................................ F.D.S. Disposal, Inc. Harold Braaksma Memorial ..................Mike and Jerry Brewer


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Page H32 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Swine Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors


Grand Champion ...................... John Thomas Spreader Service
Grand Champion Belt Buckle .................................... Lori Corbin
Grand Champion Carcass.......................... Tidwell Bros. Paving
Grand Champion Carcass
Belt Buckle .......................................... Gene and Tomi Smith
Reserve Grand Champion.......................... Van Ness Auto Parts
Reserve Grand Champion
Belt Buckle............Marlene and Joe Law dba: Travelisfun.us
Division I ........................................ Townsend Constructors, Inc.
D division II ................................................................ D & D S w ine
D ivisio n III .................................................................. S tead Lott
Division IV.............................................. American Farm & Feed
Division V.............................................. Robin's Country Kitchen
Division VI ...................................... Joseph Indelicato Law Firm
Division V II ...................................................... W indham Ranch
Division VIII................ Marlene and Joe Law dba: Travelisfun.us
Jr. Showmanship .............................. Venero's Appliance Center


Jr. Showmanship Belt Buckle................................ The Hay Barn
Int. Showmanship ........Chuck Everidge State Farm Insurance
Int. Showmanship Belt Buckle.................. GR's Feed & Western
Sr. Showmanship ........................ Pro Line Tile of Citrus County
Sr. Showmanship Belt Buckle .............................. The Hay Barn
Jr. 4-H Record Book.................................................... Hal Porter
Int. 4-H Record Book .................... Inverness Elks Lodge #2522
Sr. 4-H Record Book ........................ Venero's Appliance Center
Jr. FFA Record Book ........................ Venero's Appliance Center
Sr. FFA Record Book .................... Inverness Elks Lodge #2522
Individual Herdsm an .............................................. D & D Swine
Herdsman Belt Buckle ............................ Mike and Kara Coover
Skeeter Whitton Memorial ........................ Livestock Committee
Premier Breeder.................. Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery
Best Decorated Swine .......................................... Mary Williams
Group Herdsmen .............................. Good Guy Termite Control
Love my Pig Award Belt Buckle................ The Concidine Family


2014 Swine Skill-A-Thon Placement Sponsors


PeeWee
First place ................................................ Croft Contracting, Inc.
Second place............................................ Croft Contracting, Inc.
Third place................................................ Croft Contracting, Inc.
Fourth place.................................................... Carolyn Hohmann
Fifth place ...................................................... The Meeks Family
Sixth place ........................................ Waid and Tammy Robison

Jr.
First place ............................ Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery
Second place ............................................ Dr. Mario Mendizabal
Third place ...................................... Marcus and Margie Leturno
Fourth place ...................................... Gary and Theresa Godwin
Fifth place .................................................. Tad and Libby Jones
Sixth place ........................................ Waid and Tammy Robison


Int.
First place ........................................ Home Instead Senior Care
Second place................................................ Lovelady Showpigs
Third place.......................... Wilma Anderson and Willie McClain
Fourth place ...................................... Joni and George Eastman
Fifth place ............................................ Nathan and Coy Gilstrap
S ixth place ............................................................ C arol H illeson

Sr.
First place ................................................ GR's Feed & Western
Second place................................................ Lovelady Showpigs
Third place...................................................... Don Poss Roofing
Fourth place........................................ Dick and Frances Dolbow
Fifth place ................................................................ B ill M cH ugh
Sixth place ........................................................ C aitlin Johnston


2014 Steer Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors
Grand Cham pion ........................................................................................................................G R's Feed & W western Outlet
Grand Cham pion Belt Buckle .................................................................................................... Pro Line Tile of Citrus County
Grand Cham pion Carcass ............................................................................................................ Carnahan's Feed & Supply
Grand Cham pion Carcass Belt Buckle.................................................................................................................... Lori Parker
Reserve Grand Cham pion...................................................................................................... Knights Farm Fresh Feeds, Inc.
Reserve Grand Cham pion Belt Buckle ............................................................................................................ Austin Roberts
Division I .............................................................................................................................................................. .. Pat Henson
Division II ......................................................................................................................................Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
Division III .............................................................................................................................................................. .. Hal Porter
Division IV ....................................................................................................................................Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
Division V ............................................................................................................................................Top Hat Inc. Lawn Care
Division VI ......................................................................................................................................................... ... Barco Farm s
Division VII ......................................................................................................................................Branch Out Tree Service
continued on next page




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H33
CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Steer Trophy and Belt Buckle Sponsors

continued from previous page
D iv isio n V III ............................................... ......... .................................................................................................... S te a d Lo tt
D division IX ........................................................................................................................ Blue D iam ond H horseshoe Bar Beef
Int. Show m anship........................................................................................................................ G R 's Feed & W western O utlet
Int. Showm anship Belt Buckle ............................................................................................ ServiceMASTER of Citrus County
S r. S how m anship ................................................................................................................................V al and Frances R ooks
Sr. Show m anship Belt Buckle .............................................................................................................. C hassahow itzka Hotel
Kyle Pratt M em orial Aw ard ................................................................................................................ The Fam ily of Kyle Pratt
Keven D VanNess M em orial .................................................................................................................... Ken Fair and Fam ily
P re m ie r B re ed e r ..........................................................................................................................................T he Jo ne s F a m ily
G a in In W e ig ht ....................................................................................................................................F itzpa trick & F itzpa trick
Individual Herdsman .................................................................... Post Oak Ranch "In Memory of L. E. "Book" Cunningham"
Individual Herdsm an Belt Buckle .................................................................................................. Danny and Christine W aller
Jeff Barco M em orial .................................................................................................................... G eorge and C indy Brannen
Int. 4-H R record Book .......................................................................................................................... Val and Frances R ooks
S r. 4 -H R e co rd B o o k ............................................................................................................................................B a ke r M ea ts
Jr. F FA R e co rd B o o k ................................................................................................................................................H a l P o rte r
Sr. FFA Record Book ........................................................................................................................ Branch O ut Tree Service
How ard E Cunningham M em orial, (C.V P.D.A.).............................................................................................. Post Oak Ranch
Best Decorated Steer .................................................................................................................... Venero's A appliance Center
G ro u p H e rdsm e n ..................................................................................................................................................P a t H e nso n
D r D um as S scholarship ............................................................................................................................Livestock C om m ittee




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Page H34 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


2014 PeeWee Poultry Exhibitors


Samantha Butt
Katherine Costa
Jerry Cunningham
Phillip Giordano
Trenten Henick


Noel Hunsberger
Ashton Jenkins
Kylie King
Cole Lawrence
Evan Leturno


Reese McPherson
Taylor McPherson
Charlotte Nash
Grant Sanders
Cooper Stewart


Payton Sowell
Joseph Uzar, Jr.
Macie Waller
Grace Ward
Rebekah Zabinski


2014 Youth Poultry Exhibitors


Aleigha Alexander
Jalena Alexander
Jeff Anderson
Brooke Brown
Charlie Butt
Nicole Cassell
Jade Crosby
Savannah Davis
Danny Dunn
Aneillo Elridge


Brittany English-Troxtell
Rachel Ferguson
Samantha Ferguson
Cheyenne Goodman
Abigail Graham
Amanda Grande
Tegan Henick
Tori Henick
Emily Huckabee
Chloe Lawrence


Elise Leturno
Tanner Leturno
Logan Mantor
Tucker Mantor
Casey Mayes
Rebekah McDaniel
Mathew Meeks
Lauren Mentz
Victoria Rainier
Tiana Reed


Brianna Saltmarsh
Jon Schenk
Gregory Shoemaker
Shyanne Waller
Diana Ward
Will Ward
Taylor Williams
Jeremiah Zabinski
Matthias Zabinski
Rachel Zabinski


2014 Pen of Meat Poultry Exhibitors


Eagle High 4-H Club
Samantha Ferguson


Tegan Henick
Elise Leturno


Tanner Leturno
Nathan Meeks


2014 Youth Rabbit Exhibitors


Brooke Brown
Drayke Burns
Nicole Butt
Alexandria Couch
Nathaniel Draughn
Buddy Garvin
Jacquelin Garvin
Amanda Grande






Kambree Burns
Robert Burns III
Samantha Butt
Colton Draughn
Nathaniel Draughn
Jacquelin Garvin
Garrett Hinson


Elizabeth Hopper
Bryce Kocher
Elizabeth Ladkani
Lecanto Middle FFA
Kaitlyn Lee
Kyle Lee
Jenna McClain
Isaac McDaniel


Matthew Mennella
Victoria Rainier
Gregory Shoemaker
Sasha Solida
Alex Streeter
Desiree Streeter
Dillon Streeter
Gabriel Streeter


2014 Open Rabbit Exhibitors
Alexis Holmes Autumn Lighthill
Elizabeth Ladkani Abigale Mattingly
Briana LaPointe Hannah Rowe
Kaitlyn Lee Ronnie Schreckengost
Kyle Lee Simeon Sorrells
Amber Lighthill Payton Sowell


Levi Streeter
Ashlyn Traum
Madyson Traum
Shawn Trujillo
Sophia Tschuscnke
Diana Ward
Taylor Williams
Logan Yost






Cooper Stewart
Chelsea Strickland
Macie Waller
Grace Ward
Paisley Williamson
Waylon Williamson


Will Ward




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H35


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Page H36 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS


2014 Pen of Meat Rabbit Exhibitors


Hanna Carpenter
Buddy Garvin
Jacquelin Garvin


Elizabeth Ladkani
Lecanto Middle FFA


Brianna Saltmarsh
Sasha Solida


2014 Youth Heifer Exhibitors


Jada Armstrong
Brianna Baker
Cheyenne Concidine
Eagle High 4-H Club
Ease's Rough Riders
4-H Club
Bailey Fisher


Cheyenne Goodman
Rebecca Gray
Emma Rae Jordan
Bailey Karpf
Lecanto Levi's 4-H Club
Bailey Miller


Aiden Mulvaney
Rebecca Roe
Justin Rose
Michaela Smith
Morgan Sowell
Sophia Tschuschke


Taylor Waller
Morgan Wayman
Erin Wheeler
Karlie Whitton
Andrew Yost
Logan Yost


2014 Open Heifer Exhibitors


Brandais Austrino
Brianna Baker
Morgan Blommel
Cheyenne Concidine
Clay Cooper
James Corbin
Eagle High 4-H Club
Ease's Rough Riders
4-H Club
Bailey Fisher


Foggy Bottom Ranch
Rebecca Gray
Cathy Hedberg
Mare Holloway
Alicia Indelicato
Emma Rae Jordan
Lecanto Middle FFA Chapter
Rebecca Mann
Sarah Mann


Victoria Mann
Mann Ranch
Bailey Miller
Kylie Philipps
Hannah Roddenberry
Rebecca Roe
Justin Rose
Michaela Smith
Sharon Smith


Morgan Sowell
Sophia Tschuschke
Taylor Waller
Morgan Wayman
Erin Wheeler
Cheyanne White
Karlie Whitton
Andrew Yost
Logan Yost


2014 Sheep Exhibitors


Margaret Cobb
Brittany English-Troxtell


Elizabeth Ladkani
Lecanto Middle FFA


Maddie Shannon


Taylor Williams


Logan Yost




Sunday, March 16, 2014 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H37


CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Swine Exhibitors


Savannah Bennett
Sarah Bessler
Raylee Blanton
Alexis Boynton
Monique Bridges
Matthew Cahoon
Nicole Cassell
Colton Copeland
Layton Copeland
Rebecca Davis
Charity DeBusk
Allison Della Torre
Cody Dillon
Ease's Rough Riders 4-H
Club
Kaiden Ellis
Rachel Ferguson
Abigail Graham
Hannah Gregory
Mallory Grumbling
Michael Hinde
Audrey Hughes
Mackenzie lift
Inverness Middle FFA
Emma Jordan
Deanna Kersey
Bryce Kocher
Chloe Lawrence
Lecanto Middle FFA
Owen Lee
Elise Leturno
Kelsey Lilley
Shayla Liseby
Molly Lovestrand
Faith MacQueen
Christopher Matser
Donna Matser
Zachary Mattaway
Kenneth Mattingly


Kathleen Mattingly
Madison McClain
Rebekah McDaniel
Lacie McFarlin
Gabrielle Mclntosh
Nathan Meeks
Zane Muller
Sean Oneill
Cheyenne Pate
Lyndsee Phillips
Kylie Phillips
Caitlyn Poteet
Amber Poteet
Jordan Quintanilla
Jencye Quintanilla
Hannah Roddenberry
Justin Rose
Paige Rowand
Hannah Schmidt
Hillary Schmidt
Morgan Sowell
Amadou Speach
Domenique Speach
Brittany Swain
Clayton Thomas
Kody Tomczak
Anna Venero
Shyanne Waller
Abby Walls
Will Ward
Diana Ward
Morgan Wayman
Jasmine Wayman
Sarah Welch
Austin Whitehead
Cason Williamson
Danielle Yant
Jeremiah Zabinski
Matthias Zabinski


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Page H38 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, March 16, 2014

CARNIVAL LIGHTS & COUNTRY NIGHTS

2014 Horse Exhibitors

Ava Marie Armato .
Sarah Bessler 4'
Nicole Brake
Nicole Butt
Jessica Couch "...
Camryn Cyr
Natalia Evan
Cheyenne Goodman
Bailey Karpf
Martina Malphurs
Casey Mayes
Savannah McCullough
Mary Margaret McGeoch
Lindsey Rodda
Brianna Saltmarsh
Sage Sonnier
Makenzie Tomczak
Veronica Tumminia
Peter Uzar
Lindsey Wyman
Tiffany Young














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