Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Perfection achieved: Gators finish 18-0 in SE


Partly cloudy.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next "
morning


MARCH 9, 2014 Florida's Best Community


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 214


SO YOU KNOW
* Due to early
deadlines, certain
content lottery
numbers and
some sports
coverage do not
appear in today's
edition.


Spring forward
Don't forget to set
clocks ahead
one hour
f L at2 a.m.
E9 -U Sunday.
COMMNAAP



COMMENTARY:


in -t"Q.-A2
Neighbors
March is National
Developmental
Disability Awareness
Month. Learn more
about the Key Training
Center/Page Cl
FXCIIRSIONS!:


Tahiti
Peter Graulich continues
his travel series, this
time traversing the
Pacific./Page A17


Russia reinforces military presence


Associated Press
SEVASTOPOL, Ukraine
- Dozens of military
trucks transporting heav-
ily armed soldiers rum-
bled over Crimea's rutted
roads Saturday as Russia
reinforced its armed pres-
ence on the disputed
peninsula in the Black
Sea. Moscow's foreign
minister ruled out any di-


alogue with Ukraine's
new authorities, whom he
dismissed as the puppets
of extremists.
The Russians have de-
nied their armed forces
are active in Crimea, but
an Associated Press re-
porter trailed one military
convoy Saturday after-
noon from 25 miles west of
Feodosia to a military air-
field at Gvardeiskoe north


of Simferopol, over which
a Russian flag flew
Some of the army green
vehicles had Russian li-
cense plates and numbers
indicating that they were
from the Moscow region.
Some towed mobile
kitchens and what ap-
peared to be mobile med-
ical equipment.
The strategic peninsula
in southern Ukraine has


become the flashpoint in
the battle for Ukraine,
where three months of
protests sparked by Presi-
dent Victor Yanukovych's
decision to ditch a signifi-
cant treaty with the 28-na-
tion European Union
after strong pressure from
Russia led to his downfall.
A majority of people in
Crimea identify with Rus-
sia, and Moscow's Black


Sea Fleet is based in Sev-
astopol, as is Ukraine's.
Vladislav Seleznyov, a
Crimean-based spokes-
man for the Ukrainian
armed forces, told AP that
witnesses had reported
seeing amphibious mili-
tary ships unloading
around 200 military vehi-
cles in eastern Crimea on
See Page A14


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Last year's sediment removal from the spring head of the Chassahowitzka River is one of several projects the Southwest Florida Water
Management District has in the works for the five first-magnitude spring areas in Citrus County.


Welcomed
Operation Welcome
Home celebrates the
return of Sgt. Derick
Pierce./Page A20


HOMEFRONT:


Rosemary
Turning a bushy
rosemary plant into a
tree is easy/Page E15



For those who sub-
scribe to the Chronicle's
television guide, the
Wednesday evening
television grid in today's
Viewfinder contains an
error. Check the daily TV
listings in this Wednes-
day's C section for the
corrected TV grid. The
Chronicle regrets the
error.


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A18
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ....................A18
Obituaries ..........A6, A8
Veterans ........ A20


6 184118200711o


Water district's report sets priorities

for Citrus County through 2018


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

After what seemed
like more than a
decade of endless
studies and data-
gathering about
what ails the once-ebullient
springs of the Nature Coast,
government wardens of the
area's water resources are
saying the road to a cure may
be at hand.
The roadmap to at least
some kind of a cure is con-
tained in a recent report re-
leased by the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) called the
Springs Management Plan,
2013-2017.
The report lays bare the
reasons behind the increase


in water pollution and some of
the projects or solutions the
water district has embarked
on to mitigate what is a deteri-
oration of once-pristine bod-
ies of water
"This management plan
gives the public an idea of
where our priorities are, espe-
cially regarding the five first-
magnitude springs, and that
we are always looking for so-
lutions," said Chris Anasta-
siou, who heads the
SWFWMD springs restoration
team.
Citrus County has three of
the district's five first-magni-
tude springs in King's Bay, Ho-
mosassa River and the
Chassahowitzka River
"You know, what seemed


Page A7


Lawmaker supports senator's efforts


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
State Rep. Jimmie T Smith
says he is poised to
help provide funding
for springs cleanup in
Citrus County, but he is
leaving the push for 2
springs-related legis-
lation to the delega-
tion's senior member
Smith, R-Inverness,
said his legislative pri- Jimr
ority this year is pass- Sr
ing the G.I. bill, aimed R-Inv
at helping veterans ob-
tain jobs and college tuition.
The House quickly passed the
bill shortly after the session
started and a similar bill is
moving through committees
in the Senate.
Smith said with his focus on
the G.I. bill, he left the springs


Mandy Pate: Forever 17


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CITRUS SPRINGS Beautiful, viva-
cious, feisty, fun-loving, stubborn and
strong-willed to her family and
friends, Mandy Pate will be 17 forever
Although the 27-year-old died March 1,
her life ended in December 2004 when a
car accident left her with a traumatic
brain injury from which she never re-
covered. She was in her junior year and
a month shy of her 18th birthday when
the accident happened.
She had been in a care facility in Or-
lando since St. Patrick's Day 2005.
"Mandy always had her own little
world," said older sister Wendy
Marinelli. "She was carefree. She was al-
ways singing and dancing, ever since she
was little."
Mandy's mom, Pam Mann, said they
would take her to Cracker's in Crystal
River to sing karaoke and people would
give her money
"She was a little actress, the center of
attention," Mann said.
Mandy especially loved the movie


uz...'.5t#Cfip


"The Wizard of Oz," the character
Dorothy (who she called "Dorcy") and
the song "Somewhere Over the Rain-
bow," singing it any chance she had.
"She'd say, 'Sit down I'm going to do
a play' and she'd come up from behind
the couch and do something with 'Dorcy'
and sing 'Somewhere Over the Rain-
bow,"' Mann said.
Born and raised in Citrus County,
Mandy went to Crystal River Primary
and Lecanto Middle schools and had
started at Lecanto High School. She left
See .Page A8
Although Mandy Pate died March 1 at
age 27, her life ended in December 2004
when a car accident left her with a
traumatic brain injury from which she
never recovered. She had been in a care
facility in Orlando since St. Patrick's Day
2005.
Special to the Chronicle


I


Is

ni
ni
'ei


attention to Sen. Charlie
Dean, R-Inverness.
"You can only have one top
priority," Smith said. "We al-
ready have Sen. Dean
Championing the
springs bill. Why should
Stwo people carry the
same water? My job is
to back him up."
As a member of the
House Agriculture and
Natural Resources Ap-
ie T. propriations Subcom-
th mittee, Smith said he
ness will work to ensure
funding proposed by
Gov Rick Scott for springs,
particularly in King's Bay,
stays in the budget.
"My priority is to make sure
it's funded," Smith said.
Smith said he doesn't think
there is now a counterpart in
the House to Dean's Senate bill.


CITRUUUS CNT UNTY





[If(nNICLE
^& www.chronicleonline.com


HIGH
76
LOW
49


Springs projects aplenty








Few surprises in session's first week


BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service
of Florida
TALLAHASSEE This
is the way the legislative
session begins: Not with a
bang, but with a whimper
There wasn't much sur-
prising about the first
week of the legislative ses-
sion, which opened Tues-
day with the normal
arrangement of leadoff
speeches and Gov Rick
Scott's State of the State
address. After that were a
couple of drama-less votes
on bills that were certain
to pass.
But the week also
brought some reminders of
bills that could still bring
some drama to the process:
A massive expansion of the
state's de facto voucher pro-
gram and the beginnings of
movement on a proposal to
legalize medical marijuana
-just not that kind of med-
ical marijuana.
And it was just the start
of the 60-day demolition
derby that will presumably
end on May 2. Plenty of
time still remains to cause
trouble.
THE STATE OF THE
'LAND OF
OPPORTUNITY'
Scott had long laid out
most of his agenda in the
run-up to the legislative
session, and the one new
substantive proposal in his
annual State of the State
address a call to repeal
the differential tuition law
that allows universities to
increase their costs by
15 percent a year drib-
bled out in excerpts of the
speech released Monday
But the governor, facing
re-election in eight
months, used the speech to
make progress on two po-
litical goals, comparing the
state of the Florida econ-
omy now to what it looked
like in 2010 and highlight-
ing his personal biography
in hopes of connecting
with an electorate that has
never really viewed Scott
favorably


In one of the more per-
sonally evocative moments
of his speech, Scott
brushed away any con-
cerns that he was too nar-
rowly focused on job
creation and making
Florida "the land of op-
portunity" The governor
pointed, as he has only in
recent weeks, to his father
once losing a job and hav-
ing the family car
repossessed.
'All I can say is that
we're all a product of our
own experiences in life,"
Scott said. "I've seen what
happens to families who
struggle for a job. I've had
Christmas without pres-
ents. I don't want anybody
in our state to ever feel
stuck in those situations."
Even some Republicans
were surprised by the bi-
ographical tales from a
governor who has rarely
spoken about his own past.
"I'd never heard that
side of the governor, and I
thought it was very com-
pelling," said House
Speaker Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel.
Democrats focused their
fire on the other part of
Scott's speech, when the
governor blasted the
record of his predecessor
and chief opponent, for-
mer Gov. Charlie Crist The
Florida Democratic Party
once spent much of Crist's
term in office issuing simi-
lar criticisms of the former
Republican's economic
woes.
"Floridians heard
clearly that Rick Scott only
cares about his own re-
election," Florida Demo-
cratic Party Chairwoman
Allison Tant said in re-
sponse to the address.
"This speech wasn't about
the state of Florida. It was
about the state of Rick
Scott's campaign, and he is
desperate."
Whether Scott's speech
will help the effort to rein-
troduce himself to voters
won't really be known until
the polls open in Novem-
ber And Crist is sure to try
to rough up the incumbent


Weekly ROUNDUP


Associated Press
Florida Gov. Rick Scott is surrounded by employees
Wednesday at Tampa International Airport as he
announces a $1 billion expansion plan during a news
conference, in Tampa. The state will give $194 million to
help pay for the largest expansion since the airport's
opening in 1971, with the airport paying the rest.


in return. His campaign is-
sued a statement criticiz-
ing the address shortly


after Scott delivered it.
"With the blessing of the
people, next year I will de-


liver a State of the State
that puts people first,"
Crist said.
PARTY
ON THE FLOOR
The first day's slate of
action was confined to
bills in the joint House-
Senate "work plan" that
were certain to gain unan-
imous, bipartisan support.
Those parts of the work
plan that would spark par-
tisan food fights, as well as
other legislation that could
lead to pointed debates,
were left for the future.
So, with the mother of a
murdered child looking
on, the Florida Senate on
Tuesday unanimously
passed four bills intended
to make the state as inhos-
pitable as possible to sex-
ually violent predators.
Diena Thompson, whose
7-year-old daughter Somer
disappeared in Clay
County in 2009 while walk-
ing home from school,


watched in tears from the
gallery After an extensive
search, the child's body
was found in a South Geor-
gia landfill, and last year a
26-year-old man was sen-
tenced to life in prison for
her death.
The legislative package
has been at the top of Sen-
ate President Don Gaetz's
agenda since August, when
the South Florida Sun
Sentinel reported that 594
sexual offenders had gone
free since 1999 only to
commit 463 child molesta-
tions, 121 rapes and 14
murders.
"We will protect our chil-
dren and we will scorch
the earth against sexually
violent predators," said
Gaetz, R-Niceville. "We
cannot waste one more
day We cannot lose one
more child."
The House is expected
to take up that package of


3/Page A9


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A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I






Page A3-SUNDAY, MARCH 9,2014



TATE.& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Jessie's Place
benefit this evening
A buffet of Citrus County
restaurants will join forces
tonight to present Cooking
for a Cause, to benefit
Jessie's Place.
From 6 to 9 p.m., 16
restaurants will serve up
their special offerings and
will face off in "Top Chef'-
style competition.
Tickets are $35 and may
be purchased by calling
Jessie's Place at 352-270-
8814. Tickets are also avail-
able at the Crystal River
Mall and BS Publications.
Jessie's Place functions
as a central location to co-
ordinate all needed services
for children who have been
abused or neglected. It utilizes
a multidisciplinary team ap-
proach, bringing profession-
als to the child in one
building to expedite care
and spare the time, trauma
and inconveniences of trav-
eling to multiple locations.
Downtown Dems
meeting Tuesday
The Downtown Democratic
Club will have its monthly
meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday,
March 11, at B&W Rexall in
Inverness. All Democrats are
invited to attend. Contact
rcareyl 1809@yahoo.com
for any questions or for fur-
ther information.
Soccer fields
temporarily closing
The soccer fields at Ho-
mosassa Area Recreation
Park and Holden Park will
be closed from March 10
until April 4 to public use
due to maintenance
requirements.
For more information, call
Grounds Maintenance at
352-527-5760.
20120 board sets
March 17 meeting
The Citrus 20/20 Board
of Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, March
17, in Room 117, Lecanto
Government Building, 3600
W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto. All directors are
urged to attend.
Interested persons or or-
ganizations are cordially in-
vited to attend. For more
information, visit
citrus2020.org or call 352-
201-0149.
Attorney to speak to
Citrus County Council
Acting County Attorney
Kerry Parsons will be the
guest speaker at next
week's meeting of the Cit-
rus County Council (CCC),
a citizens' watchdog group.
Parsons has served in
her position since October
and will give information
about county legal issues to
members of the CCC and
members of the public, who
are invited to attend.
At this meeting, Commis-
sioner John "JJ" Kenney will
be the "Commissioner in
the Spotlight" to discuss
current county issues. Other
county staff members also
will give updates.
Doors open at 8:30 a.m.
Wednesday, March 12, for
refreshments and network-
ing, with the meeting start-
ing at 9 a.m. at the Beverly
Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
Questions can be sent to
secretary@citruscounty
council.org.
-From staff reports

Correction
Due to a photographer's
error, a name was mis-
spelled in a photo caption
on Page A3 of Saturday's
edition, "Outstanding
youths honored at annual
gala." Nathan Copp was
honored Thursday at the
13th annual Steak and


Steak Dinner at M&B Dairy
Farm in Lecanto for his
leadership in the community.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Final vote set on alcohol ban at Idiot'


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
One of the suggested ways
to muzzle rowdy conduct
and perhaps help address
overcrowding at the water
entrance of Three Sisters
Springs will get a final
hearing Monday night.
The city council will
vote on a measure banning
alcohol use at Idiot's De-
light, the area where the
springs are accessed by
water That area is where a


lot of manatees congregate
and has increasingly be-
come congested with
swimmers, paddlers and
other recreational boaters.
Last December, a group
called the Three Sisters
Springs Working Group
presented to the city a list
of recommendations
aimed at curbing the
sometimes-chaotic scenes
at the entrance.
Two weeks ago, the
council approved the
open-container ordinance
on first reading. If it is ap-


proved again on final
reading, it will become
law
The ordinance defines
the area's boundaries as
Cutler Spur Boulevard to
the east, King's Bay Drive
to the north and the west,
and Paradise Point Drive
to the south.
The measure describes
an "open container" as
any receptacle or con-
tainer immediately capa-
ble of being consumed
from by a person, or which
has been opened, or a seal


broken, or the contents of
which have been partially
removed.
'Alcoholic beverages"
include distilled spirits
and all beverages contain-
ing 0.5 percent or more al-
cohol by volume.
The fine for first-time vi-
olators can be up to $50
and a subsequent violation
can cost up to $300.
Some of the group's
other suggestions include:
working with enforcement
agencies to provide a pres-
ence to promote desired


s Delight
behaviors; establishing a
mooring system that
should help free up the
channel near the entrance
and provide safety for
swimmers; and creating a
kayak tie-up area east of
the water entrance.
The council also will
discuss creating a process
through which nonprofits
can apply for financial as-
sistance from the city
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Doll maker Harald Naber showing off his handmade wooden dolls Sunday to collectors at the Naber Kids Convention in Homosassa. Each
doll has a story behind it. The doll on the left woke up with no memory after being shipwrecked. Looking in the mirror, he determined
that his name must be Elbisnopser because that is what was printed on his shirt (responsible spelled backwards). The puppet on the
right is a Silliken. The Silliken are a very rare breed that live in the glaciers of Alaska. Extremely timid, they only walk towards the sun,
because they are afraid of their shadows.






Sillikens alive!


Doll maker Harald Naber unveils screenplay at annual convention


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HOMOSASSA Collectors
of ugly dolls were in paradise
Saturday, when Harald Naber
hosted his 22nd annual Naber
Kids convention.
Since 1984, Naber Kids Doll
Factory 8915 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
has been home to hundreds of
uncommon hand-carved
wooden dolls that have come
to life in millions of homes
around the world.
"I have over 30 of the Naber
Kids collector dolls," said
Riverview resident Bev Kelley
"When I received my first one,
I wasn't for sure if I liked it. In
fact, not everyone likes the
dolls. But once he sat in my


home for a few days, I saw the
personality start to evolve.
Now, my daughter and I collect
them."
Naber made his first Naber
Kid, Molli, in 1982 in Homer,
Alaska. Naber Kids are no
longer produced, but can be
found on eBay, sometimes sell-
ing in the hundreds of dollars.
"That's why I host the con-
vention every year," Naber
said. "So many people love the
dolls. They have now become
collectors' items."
At the convention, Naber
signed his book "Ugly Dolls,"
written by Pat Gaudette of
Lecanto. The free event had
plenty to offer, and collectors
brought their dolls to have
them signed.


"My life's imagination and
dream, when I started back in
the 1960s, was to bring the
dolls alive and animate them,"
Naber said. "In those days,
they would use stop-motion an-
imation. Today, it's computer-
generated animation. It's a
complete new aspect. So my
dream has come true."
Naber has created and in-
troduced his screenplay,
"Don't Eat Yellow Snow,"
about a young flood victim, El-
bisnopser, who washed up on a
beach riding a door. El-
bisnopser learns of his identity
when he gazes into the reflec-
tion of a door and sees the let-
ters e-l-b-i-s-n-o-p-s-e-r -
"responsible" spelled back-
wards.


Wine pairings benefit Habitat for Humanity


Special to the Chronicle

Habitat for Humanity
of Citrus County will have
its seventh annual
fundraising event,
"Building Dreams a
Wine and Food Pairing
Benefit," Thursday,
March 13, at Skyview
Country Club, Terra Vista
of Citrus Hills.
The Building Dreams
gala is a major source of


support for Habitat's mis-
sion to provide safe, de-
cent, affordable housing
for partner families in Cit-
rus County Every dollar
raised helps pay for the
lumber and nails, concrete
and shingles, plumbers
and permits needed to
complete a new home.
The public is invited to
be part of this event. The
evening will feature gour-
met foods and outstanding


wines from around the
globe, live musical enter-
tainment and an array of
auction items.
There are three ways
the public can participate:
Purchase tickets and
enjoy the evening with
friends and family;
Provide an item for
the silent auction; or
Become an event
sponsor with a financial
contribution to underwrite


the event.
Whether you donate
cash or an in-kind gift,
your contribution is tax-
deductible to the extent
permitted by law. Habitat
will provide a charitable
deduction acknowledge-
ment letter
Tickets are on sale now
and can be acquired by
calling the Habitat Re-
Store at 352-563-2744 or
calling 352-563-0700.


From then on, he feels re-
sponsible for everything and
decides to wander into the
mountains of Alaska, where he
discovers a kingdom of creatures
called Sillikens. They have
their own kingdom and way of
governing. Sillikens Oops and
Grin search for a magical
golden crystal, but only keep
stumbling across yellow snow
But they don't give up, and
their journey continues.
Naber said his dolls and
screenplay both reflect what
he said his philosophy is:
"Don't take yourself too seri-
ously Make someone laugh."
For more information,
call Harald Naber at 352-777-
0964 or email him at
haraldnaber@gmail.com.


State BRIEF

Honor Flight in
Lakeland canceled
LAKELAND-An Honor
Flight scheduled to take off
from Lakeland and bring
World War II veterans to view
the World War II monument
in Washington, D.C., has
been canceled. There likely
won't be a repeat of the No-
vember flight out of Lakeland
until September, if then.
-From wire reports




A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday -You have many
promising, exciting options at your
fingertips. Determine the most ben-
efidcial one before you take the plunge.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)-
Don't feel dissatisfied with your cur-
rent routine. Make a list of the things
you want to change and form a
concrete plan.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -
Socialize or take on a physical chal-
lenge in order to avoid boredom
and lethargy. New acquaintances
can make an impact.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Money
matters should take top priority.
Seek out a financial adviser and find
out all you can about budgeting and
investing your hard-earned cash.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Don't let your temper get the better of
you. The less you interact with others,
the easier it will be to get things done.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
You need to step back and re-eval-
uate a situation that has the poten-
tial to go bad.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -You
have the ability to influence others
in a positive way. Use your talents
to benefit causes that you care about.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You
can accomplish a great deal if you
focus on activities that you enjoy
and sidestep petty squabbles.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your
career concerns are overshadowing
your personal life. Lighten up and
enjoy your family and friends.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -A
friend or relative will need your help.
If you answer the call, you'll learn
something about your cultural back-
ground that will influence your future.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -
Do your best to encourage the peo-
ple around you. Positive affirmation
will help boost others' confidence.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
To move in a new direction, you need
to determine what's required. Self-
improvements should be made be-
fore tackling professional challenges.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -
Your adaptability has made a very
positive impression, leading to inter-
est and invitations that can improve
your future.


ENTERTAINMENT


Network: Signal
jammed in Egypt
during comedy show
CAIRO -A Saudi-owned
satellite network says the signal
of its Egyptian affiliate deliberately
was jammed while it aired the
country's top satirical program.
Mazen Hayek, a spokesman
of the Middle East Broadcasting
Center group, said Saturday that
the network's satellite carrier
identified small satellite transmitters
in two Cairo locations as the cause
of the jamming during satirist
Bassem Youssefs show, called
"The Program" in Arabic. Hayek
said it was not possible to identify
who was behind the jamming.
He called the jamming of "a
form of terrorism."
Youssef, often compared to
U.S. comedian Jon Stewart,
has faced legal challenges over
his skewering of Egyptian politi-
cians. A private Egyptian TV sta-
tion suspended his show last fall.
The Saudi broadcaster began
airing his show in February.
Police have warrant in
attempted Banksy theft
NEW ORLEANS New Orleans
police say they're looking for a Los
Angeles man accused of trying
to steal a big chunk of cinderblock
wall bearing a painting by the world-
renowned graffiti artist Banksy.
An emailed news release
says police have a warrant to ar-
rest 30-year-old Christopher
Sensabaugh on charges of at-
tempted theft and criminal dam-
age to property.
An Internet database does not
have a current phone number for
Sensabaugh.
Police say the mural could be
worth $200,000 to $1.1 million.
The man was photographed
by local residents. He told them
he was removing the piece for
an art show in London.


AsscUiatdI LPU re
Hot air balloons float over Lake Burley Griffin on Saturday during
the Balloon Spectacular in Canberra, Australia.


Connecticut could
curb loud movies
NEW HAVEN, Conn. Con-
necticut could become the first
state to curb loud movies under
proposed legislation that's draw-
ing opposition from the Motion
Picture Association of America.
A proponent of the measure
says the industry's decision to
use voluntary efforts to keep the
sound down doesn't work. But a
hearing loss expert says movies
are not harmful.
The legislature's Public Safety
and Security Committee is con-
sidering the bill, which would
prevent theaters from showing a
film or preview that exceeds 85
decibels.
Obama to introduce
'Cosmos' debut
LOS ANGELES The Fox TV
network says President Barack
Obama will introduce the debut
episode of the science series
"Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey."
The 13-part program is a
reboot of astronomer Carl
Sagan's groundbreaking 1980
"Cosmos" series. It debuts
9 p.m. Sunday on stations in-
cluding Fox and National Geo-
graphic Channel.


In Obama's taped video mes-
sage, he invites viewers to em-
brace the spirit of discovery and
imagine limitless possibilities for
the future, Fox said Saturday.
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse
Tyson is the host of "Cosmos,"
which also will air on Fox Inter-
national Channels and National
Geographic Channels Intemrnational.

Mistrial for promoter
in murder case
NEWYORK-Ajudge has
declared a mistrial in the murder
case of a hip-hop promoter al-
ready serving a life sentence for
smuggling cocaine.
U.S. District Judge Colleen
McMahon made the ruling Friday
in Manhattan federal court after
the jury said it was deadlocked.
Federal prosecutors had
charged James Rosemond and
Rodney Johnson in the 2009
shooting death of Lowell Fletcher,
an associate of rapper G-Unit.
James "Jimmy the Hench-
man" Rosemond was convicted
last October of shipping cocaine
in music equipment cases be-
tween studios in New York and
Los Angeles. He's represented
artists such as The Game and
Sean Kingston.


COIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 9, the
68th day of 2014. There are 297
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 9,1964, the U.S.
Supreme Court, in New York Times
Co. v. Sullivan, raised the standard
for proving libel, unanimously ruling
that public officials who charged
they'd been defamed by the press
concerning their official duties had
to demonstrate "actual malice" on
the part of the news organization in
order to recover damages.
On this date:
In 1916, Mexican raiders led by
Pancho Villa attacked Columbus,
N.M., killing 18 Americans.
In 1933, Congress, called into spe-
cial session by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt, began its "hundred days"
of enacting New Deal legislation.
In 1945, during World War II, U.S.
B-29 bombers launched incendiary
bomb attacks against Japan, result-
ing in an estimated 100,000 deaths.
In 1954, CBS newsman Edward R.
Murrow critically reviewed Wisconsin
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's anti-
communism campaign on "See It Now."
In 1964, the first Ford Mustang, a
Wimbledon White convertible, rolled
off the production line in Dearborn,
Mich. (Instead of being kept by
Ford Motor Co., the car was mistak-
enly sold to Canadian airline pilot
Stanley Tucker, who later agreed to
trade it back to Ford in exchange
for the one-millionth Mustang.)
In 1977, about a dozen armed
Hanafi Muslims invaded three build-
ings in Washington, D.C., killing
one person and taking more than
130 hostages. (The siege ended
two days later.)
Ten years ago: Convicted D.C.
Beltway sniper John Allen Muham-
mad was sentenced to death by a
judge in Virginia (Muhammad was
executed in Nov. 2009).
Today's birthdays: Actress
Joyce Van Patten is 80. Former
ABC anchorman Charles Gibson is
71. Actor-director Lonny Price is 55.
Actress Linda Fiorentino is 54.
Thought for Today: "Delay is
the deadliest form of denial." C.
Northcote Parkinson, British author
(1909-1993).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L F'Peast City


Daytona Bch. 75
Fort Lauderdale 76
Fort Myers 81
Gainesville 76
Homestead 77
JacKsonville 75
Key West 78
Lakeland 79
Melbourne 75


168134 0.00-1 72/41 .00'"
THREE DAY OUTLOOK 'e'"vy

TWDAY & TOMORROW MORNING 103
^ High. 76' Low: 49'
" f : "Partly cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low:51
1.-" Partly cloudy

W- ^ TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 59
| ": ~' Partly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 67/45
Record /34
Normal 75/57
Mean temp. 57
Departure from mean -9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00


H L F'cast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: NE winds 5 to 10 knots; Gulf water
becoming west around 10 knots in temperature
the afternoon. Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay 0 "
and inland waters a light chop.
Tonight: Northwest winds 10 to 15 6 7
knots; becoming northeast around 10
knots after midnight. Seas I to 2 feet. Tkein at Aillia
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.97 2898 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.48 38.50 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.57 39.59 40.60
Tsala Apopka-RForal City 40.27 40.28 42.20
Levels reported m leet above sea Ievl Rood stage for ak are based on 2.33-year Flood.
me wman annup iloc &no .cic nai N 43 wft'enr LnTce ol ix-,Ng &IiL-ald Be e Mizaie in
any orjrG N^ r TT..s ciala i5 obm.-nio ll.-i SUt- ej fin T FoIGIJi? TA.11-! Y-r.,&WrenTe'I Q.5b1.
a.".1 S i In n Ej ( niR ,rr? DIf'ii .c orm e Ur,113 ESIMMs r iiN.'3 ur^r.
b? ,Al'ek. o an-i nai r ,a,_ ,irng oI ,f J L se o I, dLfi If you have any questions you
ai THE NATION i 721
THE NATION


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 41.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 86'
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 1.19" Oak, juniper, nettle
Total for the year 6.14" Today's count: 9.4/12
Normal for the year 5.81" o c 1.
*As o7m atInv nes Monday's count: 10.4
UV INDEX: 9 Tuesday's count: 10.4
0-2minimal.3-4low,5-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high 10. very high A QAI
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 33
30.14 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES z Sb
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) AFTERNOONP
03/09 SUNDAY 01:52 07:38 12:47 19:13
03/10 MONDAY 02:37 08:25 13:37 20
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUUSE T IGT ...................- 7:33 p.m .
SUN =" .... ..B..- .. .... 7:44 a.m.
M 10 0 IMM SE TOWM...................... 145 p.m.
M/\~PW /MOOlrIS&TO AY ..............450am
Mar 16 Mar23 Mar30 Apr7 4 CMOIIT TWA 250 a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danwr Rating Is: LOW. There Is no burn ban.
FOr noe Intoal in cal For,aa Dl%.-on o! F".resir, al t352 i 754-6777 For tmoe
Informalion on drought cwrii.iins pieaw iciy IMh. DJis'in oi Forestry's Web site:
http:fflMme I-dol.comn/lire weaaheriB
WATERING RULES
Lawn wate"nr limited to two days per week, before 10a.m. orafter 4p.m.. as
folows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday ardor Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday,
Hand watering with a sht-off nozzle or miro wigaan of non-grass areas, sudi
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shntb. can be done on any day and at any
time,
Citrus County UBities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. S *Te new plant-r-gs nia y qualirtf loI addifna
waleting allowances.
To repon violations, please celk Cly cl invenass @ 352-726-2321, CAy Of C rysal
River 0 352-795-4216 exL 313 unncoraredJ Clnrus Counly @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "Al Ki ng s Bay -At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassahowltzka' 1;43am, 0.5.It, l:34p.4.m, 02M, 10A13am. 0.2. 6:23p.mD.2 t,
Crystal]Rws 12:1p.m.t.31t, 720 a.m. 0.5 658p,0mO.9 t.
Wllhlacoochee' 11:52 a.r, 2.1 it, 10:30op.m. 2.3ft. 5:50,n 0.4 t. 502p,m..l Bt
Homosasa*" 2;35 p.m. 0.8 t. 10:05 a.m 0.2t. 6:36 p.MOA.4 It.


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Alanta
Atlantic Ciy
Austin
BaIllmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charioston, S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cncnata
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
ColumbuS, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Deoit
El Paso
Evarnsile, IN
Harrisburg
Hartlord
Houslon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Mineapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT
H L Pcp. H
44 16 31
53 36 60
66 3 0 63
70 42 70
60 30 44
59 51 .12 50
62 26 49
53 29 60
68 37 67
58 36 53
55 27 35
33 29 28
36 30 27
71 36 .01 74
62 30 49
68 31 69
38 28 02 41
58 28 47
3929 .0634
43 32 56
54 30 44
49 12 32
56 45 56
51 28 A11 70
36 25 56
38 32 16 32
654 51 61
57 34 51
54 27 42
50 26 35
69 51 56
47 32 45
72 53 75
67 34 58
81 51 83
63 36 52
66 38 56
33 23 02 40
29 15 42
66 40 71
68 39 71
69 33 55


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

SUN SAT SUN
L Fcst City H L Pep. H L Fcst
20 pc NewOrteans 66 45 66 54 sh
36 pc NNewYor kCity 57 35 42 32 pc
37 pc Nodolk 64 36 .06 52 36 pc
48 pc Oklahomna City 51 33 56 37 pc
26 pc Omaha 39 18 02 83 36 pc
46 sh PalmSprings 84 65 B4 57 pc
26 pc Pladelphia 58 35 44 30 pc
37 cd Phoenix 80 54 80 53 s
48 pc Pitsburgh 52 31 38 29 pc
41 r PoillandME 47 16 32 17 pc
25 pc Portland. OR 51 43 .17 58 44 r
24 pc Providence, RI 59 28 36 26 pc
20 pc Raleigh 67 27 .01 66 39 pc
49 pc Rapid Ciy 56 21 68 40 pc
33 pc Reno 66 32 65 43 pc
43 pc Rocheslet.,NY 38 26 30 23 II
35 f Sacramento 70 42 70 54 pc
33 pc Sal Lake City 60 34 64 46 pc
29 pc San Antonio 64 56 .09 51 47 sh
35 s SanDiego 82 54 78 55 pc
33 pc San Francisco 67 48 66 55 pe
14 pc Savannah 70 36 75 49 pc
40 cd Seattle 51 44 45 55 45 r
37 pc Spokane 53 31 54 37 r
39 pc Sl, Louis 45 36 55 38 s
31 pc StSte Mane 23 14 02 29 25 sn
39 pc Syracuse 37 21 28 21 pc
36 s Topeka 42 30 61 37 s
30 pc Wal'ricn 67 3? 0 35 pc
24 pc YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
51 sh 8F-. P" Mugu, Calf
35 pc LOW -19,Iln#FallsJAM
53 pc
44 pc WORLD CITIES
3 SUN Lisbon 6851/ss
44 pc CITY H/SKY London 571441pc
34 pC Acaputco 84/73fs Madrid 66/37/s
35 pc Amsterdam 57t41/pc Mexico Cty 7515t"s
51 PC Athens 57144k Montreal B3&snt
51 PC Beljing 53/28/pc Moscow 44130/pc
S pc Berlin 5"37/pc Pans 62/4 t/pc
40PC .. .. ..


Bermuda 711fta
KEY TO CONDITIONS: cacioudy, dr*irzJe; Cairo 7857/s
1-Maln h-hazy; pcpitily cloud; r- rin: Calgary 42)2a
rsxalbVuow m ix; umnnymr, sh- shows Havana 7W59/s
e.moW tts=Uumdetstorff4 wwndP. Hong Kong 69/55&"
WSI CaZ4 Jferusalem 84/57fts


RIO 82/71tS
Rome 6239pc
Sydney BO66%pc
Tokyo 46W33/pc
Toronlo 33/13/pc
Warsaw 4830/pc


LEGAL NOTICES




Bid Notices................................D7

Meeting Notices........................D7

Miscellaneous Notices.............D7

Self Storage Notices ..................D7


CITRULIS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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(utSouh fSug@0 0Woos)
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SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A5


G?


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Nedra
Baumeister, 81
HOMOSASSA
Nedra E. Baumeister,
age 81, Homosassa, died
March 5, 2014, at Brent-
wood in Lecanto, sur-
rounded
by her
children.
Nedra
was born -
Dec. 26,
1932, in
Haverhill,
Mass., to
the late Nedra
Edgar and Baumeister
Ellen (Sor-
aghan) Johnson. A home-
maker with a sense of
adventure, Nedra enthusi-
astically supported her
husband's career around
the country and to Iran.
She enjoyed travel, gar-
dening, sailing, reading
and spoiling her grand-
children. Nedra was a
bridge player and golfer,
scoring two holes-in-one,
as a career highlight. She
was a parishioner at St.
Benedict Catholic Church
in Crystal River
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her son Matthew
(Elizabeth) Baumeister,
Jacksonville, Fla.; her
daughter Nora (Joseph)
Matus, Bethesda, Md.;
brother Hugh (Karen)
Johnson, N.H.; sister Claire
Maguire, Mass.; and grand-
children Andrew and
Gabby Matus and Jackson
and Anna Baumeister She
was preceded in death by
her husband of 52 years,
Joseph, on Nov 13,2012.
The family wishes to
thank the staff of Brent-
wood and Hospice of Citrus
County for the wonderful
care they provided Nedra,
and request donations in
her memory to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464, in lieu of flowers. A
memorial Mass for Nedra
will be offered in April at
St. Benedict Catholic
Church. Joseph and Nedra
will be interred at Arling-
ton National Cemetery in
Washington, D.C., at a later
date. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory is assisting the family
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Edmund 'Ted'
Spetz
HOMOSASSA
Edmund (Ted) Spetz,
formerly of Loveland,
Colo., and Largo, Fla.,
passed away peacefully at
home in Homosassa, Fla.,
on Dec. 13, 2013.
He is survived by his
mother, Charlotte; and sib-
lings, Kathryn, Andrew,
and Martin.
By his request, there
will be no service. Brown
Funeral Home & Crema-
tory is in charge of
arrangements.



'Your Trusted Family-Owned
Fu Pinrnl Homefroe 0Yns


Gerda
Dickins, 85
INVERNESS
Mrs. Gerda Dickins, age
85 of Inverness, Florida,
passed away on Janu-
ary 17,
2014 in In- J/
verness,
FL. She
was born
in Bre-
men, Ger-
many on .
Fe b r u -
ary4, 1928. Gerda
M r s Dickens
Dickins
was preceded in death by
her husband, Captain
Richard A. Dickins, USN
and a son, Mark Cox. Left
to cherish her memory is
her son, Craig S. Taltavall
and his life partner Jen-
nifer L. Campbell, both of
Inverness, grandson Talon
N. Taltavall, granddaugh-
ter Brittany M. Taltavall
and great granddaughter
Adison E. Taltavall all of
New York, and sisters
Thea Hurbsher and Ilsa
both of Germany
She was a wonderful
mother and homemaker
and loved to entertain
guests. Mrs. Dickins was
active for 30 years in the-
atre acting and directing
and belonged to the Citrus
County Art League for
many years. She loved
playing bridge and tennis
and enjoyed reading and
crossword puzzles.
Inurnment at Arlington
National Cemetery will
take place at a later date.
Friends who wish may
send memorial donations
to the Art Center of Citrus
County, 2644 North An-
napolis Avenue, Her-
nando, FL 34442. Online
condolences may be sent
to the family at www
HooperFuineralHome.com.
Private arrangements by
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

* All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.



CL. E. S6av(
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation Ic le,.iS & F flli!

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


1Iiooerle^


352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

^ Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com


Donald
'Donnie'
Darnell Jr., 44
RED LEVEL
Donald "Donnie" Royce
Darnell Jr, 44, of Red
Level, Crystal River, Fla.,
passed
a w a y
away[
Thursday,
Feb. 27,
2014. He r n. C.
was born L
in Brooks-
ville and
was a life-
long resi- Donald
dent of Darnell Jr.
Florida.
He was a former machinist
atA & N Corporation.
He is survived by his
daughter, Kennisha B.
Darnell of Fort Laud-
erdale; mother, Eunice
Thrasher of Red Level; fa-
ther, Donald R. Darnell Sr
of Homosassa; his brother,
Duane Darnell and family
of Dunnellon; and his
uncle, Troy Oliver of
Homosassa.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 5 p.m.
Wednesday, March 12,
2014, at Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory
Crystal River, with a cele-
bration of his life services
starting at 5 p.m.

DEADLINES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Jude Dunn, 67
HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
Jude Dunn, 67, of Ho-
mosassa Springs, Fla., for-
merly of Shirley, N.Y, and
the hideout at Lake Ariel,
Pa., passed away peace-
fully at her
h om e
March 5,
2014, after
a coura-
geous bat-
tle with
cancer.
She was
born Feb. Jude
21,1947, in Dunn
Brooklyn,
N.Y, and attended West
Babylon High School. She
was employed by New
York Telephone Company
before raising her family
She is survived by her
loving husband of 47 years,
Kevin Dunn; her four chil-
dren, Heather Sattler,
Brian, Erik and Shannon
Dunn; seven grandchil-
dren, Ian, Kayla, Sarah,
Hannah, Erik, Samantha
and Travis. She is fondly
remembered by her two
sisters, Dorothy Cast and
Joann McIntyre; her
brother, Vincent Capasso;
and many nieces and
nephews. Jude was well
known for her sense of
humor and joke telling,
she enjoyed country music
and dancing.
A celebration of life
prayer service will be 10
a.m. Tuesday, March 11,
2014, in the Strickland Fu-
neral Home Chapel, 1901


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

* i


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. A....
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralh om


Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you
prefer your loved ones celebrate
your legacy rather than stress about
making arrangements? Give them
the relief they'll need during a
tough time.
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S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River,
with Father Ron Marecki
presiding. Inurnment
services will follow at
12:30 p.m. at the Florida
national Cemetery, Bush-
nell. In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests a memo-
rial contribution to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, St.
Jude's Children's Hospital
or the Wounded Warrior
Project. Arrangements are
under the direction of
Strickland Funeral home
with Crematory of Crystal
River, 352-795-2678.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.





Anthony 'Tom'
Tuliani, 88
HOMOSASSA
Anthony Tulio "Tom"
Tuliani, 88, of Homosassa,
died March 4,2014.
Friends will be received
from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday,
March 9, 2014, at Wilder
Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, where a prayer
service will take place at
5:30 p.m. Military honors
at Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, will be at
9:30 a.m. Monday,
March 10.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Jane
Golden, 96
HERNANDO
Jane R. Golden, 96, of
Hernando, Fla., died
March 5, 2014, at her
home.
Jane was
born
b o r n Bi^ l
Feb. 15,
1918, in
Bellville,
N.J., the
daughter
of Howard
and Lo- Jane
rano Taff Golden
Faber She
served as a first lieutenant
in the U.S. Army Nurse
Corps during World War II.
She moved to Hernando in
2005 from Homestead.
Jane was a member of St.
Elizabeth Ann Seaton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs.
Survivors include her
husband of 66 years,
William M. Golden Sr of
Hernando; daughter,
Teresa "Terrie" Toney and
her husband Tonie of Her-
nando; son, William M.
Golden Jr and his wife Beth
of Baton Rouge, La.; and
grandchildren, Lauren and
Colin Toney and Jonathan,
Alex and William Golden.
Heinz Funeral Home,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


See Page A8


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A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPRINGS
Continued from Page Al
like a good decade of re-
search is what got us here.
We are now in a position to
try You've got to try, and
we will need the commu-
nity's help to make it
work," Anastasiou said.
He said community buy-
in to the solutions is criti-
cal to the success of all the
anti-pollution and sustain-
ability projects.
In the recent manage-
ment plan, the district re-
vealed four attributes for a
healthy spring: flow, water
clarity, aquatic vegetation
and fish and wildlife. The
district also identified the
five issues and drivers for
the decline of the area's
ecosystem: habitat loss,
nutrient enrichment or
pollution, flow declines,
salinity increase and
water use.
The plan also unveils
specific projects the dis-
trict is working on to help
restore the springs areas.
Citrus County is the recip-
ient of the bulk of the
projects.
Last year, the area near
the main spring vent on
the Chassahowitzka River
was dredged to remove
much of the muck that had
accumulated over the
years.
Another dredging proj-
ect is expected to begin in
2016 at the Chassahow-
itzka Canal turnaround
area.
The Chassahowitzka
River minimum flows and
levels (MFLs), which were
set last year amid contro-
versy, will be re-evaluated
in 2018.
In the Homosassa River
basin, the water district
plans a water treatment
wetland at Pepper Creek
in 2016. That same year, a
habitat enhancement proj-
ect will get under way, ac-
cording to Anastasiou.
He said concerns about
the dying vegetation and
scarce fish populations in
the river will be addressed
following a survey in
which the district will
partner with the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Southwest Florida Water Management District senior
scientist Chris Anastasiou, who heads the Springs
Restoration Project for water district, says a priority for
his agency is to improve water quality and help restore
area springs that were recently included in a five-year
management plan.

This summer, Anastasiou hopes to
plant eel grass at Hunter Cove as
part of a pilot program to bring
back valuable aquatic vegetation
to the area. The water district also
is developing an MFL for the bay
and it's expected to be complete
by 2016.


The Homosassa River's
MFLs also will be re-
evaluated in 2018.
In King's Bay, Anasta-
siou said work is set to
begin this summer on a
wetland area on a third of
the land area at Three Sis-
ters Springs.
The water district also is
working with the city of
Crystal River to build a re-
claimed water pipeline to
Duke Energy's complex.
That project is expected to
at some point reduce
groundwater withdrawal
by up to 1 million gallons a
day
This summer, Anasta-


siou hopes to plant eel-
grass at Hunter Cove as
part of a pilot program to
bring back valuable
aquatic vegetation to the
area. The water district
also is developing an MFL
for the bay, expected to be
complete by 2016.
King's Bay alone has
nine projects slated to be
completed by 2016, and
they are all funded, ac-
cording SWFWMD
officials.
For more information
about the management
plan and to track the
projects, go to
watermatters.org.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A7




A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6




William 'Pete'
Kendall, 64
INVERNESS
William W "Pete"
Kendall, age 64, Inverness,
died Feb. 22, 2014, at
Munroe



M uo r o e ila
Regional
Medical
Center in
Ocala.
Pete was
born on
April 14,
1949, in
F o r t William
Pierce, Kendall
Fla., to the
late William M. and Doris
Jean Kendall. He proudly
served our country in the
U.S. Marine Corps. Pete
was a mail carrier for the
U.S. Postal Service in In-
verness for 31 years. He
was a NASCAR racing fan
and enjoyed fishing and
watching professional
wrestling. He also served
as a member of the Citrus
County Sheriff's Posse and
Citizens On Patrol.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are sons Pete Michael
(Danielle) Kendall, N.C.,
and Jeremiah Kendall,
Fla.; daughters Nancy
Kendall, Texas, and Malla-
rina Thornton, Fla.; his
former spouse, Donna;
brothers Leonard (Mary
Frances) Kendall and
Charles Kendall; sister,
Sissy Garwood; four grand-
children, Christina Smith,
Hayleigh Turner, Kalvin
and Ty Kendall; and six
great-grandchildren.
The family invites
friends to join them for a
celebration of life and trib-
ute to Pete at 3 p.m. Satur-
day, March 22, 2014, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory Vis-
itation will be from 2 p.m.
until the time of the serv-
ice. Please consider a do-
nation in Pete's memory to
American Heart Associa-
tion online in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

JoAnn
Queen, 80
HOMOSASSA
JoAnn Julia Queen, age
80, of Homosassa, Fla., and
formerly of Dayton, Ohio,
passed away at 1:50 p.m.
on March 5,2014.
She was
born
July 24,
1933, in
Dayton, -
Ohio, to
the late
John and
Mary
Benchic. JoAnn
JoAnn was Queen
a graduate
of Kiser High School, class
of 1951. She worked as a li-
brarian at Allen Elemen-
tary School in Dayton for
nearly 20 years. JoAnn en-
joyed playing bingo, and
her passion was with arts
and crafts (knitting).
She was preceded in
death by Mary and John
Benchic (parents);
Richard Queen (son);
Doris Queen (daughter-in-
law); and siblings, Bob
Benchic, Dorothy Miller
and Charlotte Picklesimer
She is survived by hus-
band Eugene Queen; sons
Gerry, Jeff (wife Wanda)
and Tom (wife Denise); sis-
ters Margie Parker, Mary
Lou Devers, Rosalie Matt


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and Katherine Lynn; along
with 16 grandchildren and
17 great-grandchildren.
JoAnn was also survived
by a special stepdaughter,
Jeanne Turpin. She was
very devoted to her family
and will be severely
missed.
Friends will be received
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday, March 12,
2014, at Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa, where
a chapel service will take
place at 2 p.m. with Fr.
Gregory Andrews officiat-
ing. Entombment will fol-
low at Fountains Memorial
Park, Homosassa.
wwwwilderfuneral.com

Nancy
Reese, 74
Nancy J. Reese, age 74,
went to be with the Lord
on March 6, 2014 sur-
rounded
by her l ov-
ing family.
Nancy
was born
March 2,
1940 in -
Cincin-
nati, Ohio,
to the late Nancy
Dr Paul J. Reese
and Alma
(Fischbach) Holderman. A
devoted and loving sister,
wife, mother and grand-
mother Nancy enjoyed all
aspects of being a house-
wife and spending week-
ends at the lake with her
family She was a dedi-
cated Christian that
served the Lord in numer-
ous ways, but mostly
through her gift of music.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her husband
Edwin "Ed" Reese; son,
preceded in death, Tim
Reese; daughters Tammy
and husband Tony Reese,
Middleburg, Fla., and
Cindy and husband Mike
Walker and their children
Tyler and Taylor Walker of
Safety Harbor, Fla.; and
her sister Carole and hus-
band Richard Hurley, Lin-
coln, Ill.
A celebration of her life
and tribute to Nancy will
be at 1:30 p.m. Friday,
March 14, 2014, at First
Christian Church of Inver-
ness. The family invites
guests to join them for a
time of visitation from
1 p.m. until the service be-
gins. In lieu of flowers,
please consider memorial
donations in Nancy's
name to First Christian
Church of Inverness or
Alzheimer's Research and
Family Organization, PO.
Box 1939, New Port
Richey, FL 34656. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.
All obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


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POSTSCRIPT
Continued from Page Al

there to attend Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, where she took
culinary arts classes.
"One time I had some people over
and she cooked and came out with
her white jacket from her culinary
arts class and her poofy hat just so
everyone would know that she had
cooked the meal," Mann said.
However, more than cooking,
what Mandy really loved was make-
up Bobbi Brown cosmetics, to be
exact. She would not leave the
house without makeup and was
quick to tell her mom or sister when
theirs was not right.
"Sometimes she'd do my makeup
and say, 'If I could get paid to do
this, that would be perfect.' We've
often said if the accident hadn't
happened, with her personality and
her drive to do things, that she
would be some makeup artist in
New York," Marinelli said.
The accident changed everything.
It happened Dec. 11,2004. Mandy
had been driving home from a
friend's house. At 11:15 a.m., she
was turning onto her street when
she was hit by a young boy who had


just gotten his learner's permit.
Mandy's car spun and overturned.
She was airlifted to Shands Hospi-
tal in Gainesville and then trans-
ferred to Orlando.
"She never really recovered, but
we knew she was still 'there,"' Mann
said. "She would recognize voices,
and if she heard a nurse in the hall
who she didn't like, she'd get a nasty
look on her face. Sometimes you
could say stuff to her and get her to
grin, and if a guy walked into the
room, you could forget about us be-
cause she would track him."
Marinelli said in the nine years
since Mandy's accident, the family
has had to find a "new normal" -
how to go on with life while riding a
rollercoaster of emotions, dealing
with both glimpses of hope and
setbacks.
"One thing, her friends have
never quit asking about her; they've
never forgotten her, and that says
something, especially when it's
something that happened in high
school and her friends have chil-
dren and families of their own,"
Marinelli said.
Over the past nine years, the fam-
ily has traveled back and forth to
Orlando, never giving up hope.
"I kept her stocked with lotions,
changing scents just to keep the


Her friends have
never quit asking
about her; they've
never forgotten her.
Wendy Marinelli
Mandy's older sister.
stimulation," Mann said. "I would
take lollipops and rub them on her
tongue so she could have different
flavors. If there's a message for par-
ents, you never give up hope and you
do whatever you can to keep going."
When Mandy was little, she
chased her sister with bugs. She
was a sucker for stray animals, one
time bringing home a tiny gray kit-
ten that she said she rescued from a
muddy ditch, even though she re-
ally got it from someone giving kit-
tens away
"She'll always be 17," Mann said.
"I don't think that will ever change.
"We knew this day would come,
but it feels like what we went
through nine years ago," Marinelli
said. "We had this normal life, and
then the accident happened. Then
we learned a new normal and that
got turned upside down again. But
this time it's final."


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LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROUNDUP
Continued from PageA2

bills in the next couple of weeks. On
Tuesday, it approved the so-called
"Florida GI Bill," aimed at encouraging
military veterans to take up residence in
Florida.
The measure (HB 7015) would increase
educational aid for veterans and Na-
tional Guard members, increase funding
to upgrade the state's National Guard fa-
cilities and buy land around U.S. military
bases. It would also set up a nonprofit to
attract more veterans to Florida.
The House proposal would cost the
state at least $33.5 million in the fiscal
year that begins July 1. The companion to
that bill (SB 860) sailed through the Sen-
ate Appropriations Committee and
headed to the full Senate.
Lawmakers also approved legislation
encouraging themselves to take up resi-
dence in their own districts, passing a
joint rule spelling out some standards for
legislators to follow in deciding where
they live. The measure passed the Senate
on 39-0 vote and flew through the House
on a voice vote.
"By, now, putting very clearly in our
rules what the residency standards are,
if someone were to ever file a complaint,
we'd have very clear standards to take
that complaint and put (it) up against,"
Weatherford said.
PENDING:
POT AND VOUCHERS
Two of the more intriguing bills that
lawmakers could approve during the ses-
sion took their first steps toward the
House floor this week: A measure legal-
izing non-euphoric marijuana and a
sweeping expansion of the state's
voucher plan.
While medical marijuana seems to be
getting nowhere with the Legislature, the
House Criminal Justice Subcommittee
voted almost unanimously to sign off on a
measure that would legalize a version of
the drug that doesn't produce a high but
can help treat children wracked by poten-
tially deadly seizures.
Subcommittee Chair-
man Matt Gaetz, R-Fort
Walton Beach, said the
vote on the bill allowing
"Charlotte's Web" was his-
toric because it's the first 'w
time in modern history
that the Legislature has
advanced any marijuana- Rep. Matt
related measure. Gaetz
Peyton and Holley R-Fort Walton
Moseley's 10-year-old Beach.
adopted daughter
RayAnn is one of about 125,000 Florida
children diagnosed with Dravet Syn-
drome, a rare form of epilepsy that can
cause hundreds of seizures a day and


does not respond to other treatments. The
couple said they traveled to Colorado,
where Charlotte's Web is manufactured,
and met with parents of other children
who had responded to the treatment
"These kids can walk now These kids
can talk now These kids are saying'I love
you' to their parents for the first time,"
Peyton Moseley told the panel.
The bill was not without its critics.
Some supporters of non-euphoric mari-
juana said the bill didn't do enough to
clear up the legal webs that surround pot.
And Rep. Gayle Harrell, who cast the
only vote against the measure, asked a se-
ries of questions highlighting concerns
about a lack of regulation over the sub-
stance, especially compared to other
drugs.
"If you really want to solve a problem
and just not legalize marijuana, then you
need to do it appropriately," she said.
Meanwhile, the House Finance and
Tax Subcommittee voted along party
lines to introduce the voucher bill (PCB
FTSC 14-02), which would broaden eligi-
bility for the "tax credit scholarships,"
boost the cap on the program for several
years, and allow retailers to divert sales-
tax revenue to nonprofit organizations
that award the scholarships.
Rep. Manny Diaz, a Hialeah Republi-
can who sponsored the measure, re-
jected the idea that it was an attack on
public education, suggesting that the
scholarship program was a part of that
system.
"When we're talking about public edu-
cation, I think we've got the idea a little
bit in reverse," he said. "We're talking
about educating the kids in the public,
not about sustaining public institutions."
Democrats said including sales-tax dol-
lars in the program marked a profound
change from a program that has been
funded until now through tax credits
against corporate income tax and other
taxes paid by the businesses.
"Taxpayers have a right to make
choices about the way they spend their
money," said Rep. David Richardson, D-
Miami Beach. "... If you have a person
that is opposed to this program and shops
at an entity that supports the program,
their money, their sales tax dollars that
they paid from their pocket, will be used
to support a program that they're in op-
position to."
STORY OF THE WEEK: The 2014
legislative session began, kicking off a 60-
day period when lawmakers are set to
approve a spending plan for the state and
consider a slate of other measures.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK: "That's be-
cause people here in Tallahassee have
realized that we can't just have a bumper-
sticker approach to marijuana where
you're either for it or against it. Not all
marijuana is created equally" Rep.
Matt Gaetz on a proposal to legalize non-
euphoric marijuana that can be used to
treat seizures in some children.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Domestic violence cases

spark protests in Lebanon


Associated Press
BEIRUT Nada Sab-
bagh received a brief,
chilling telephone call
from her son-in-law last
month telling her: "Come
to your daughter. I am
going to kill her"
Sabbagh said by the
time she arrived at her
daughter's home in Beirut,
her husband had kicked,
punched and beaten her
with a pressure cooker,
leaving her mortally
wounded and bleeding on
the floor
"I walked in and started
jumping in shock then
begged him to let me take
her out," Sabbagh later re-
counted. She said he re-
sponded by saying: "I will
not let her out I want her
to die in front of you."
Manal Assi's husband,
Mohammed Nuheili, was
detained shortly afterward
and is still being ques-
tioned by authorities. It re-
mains unclear if he has a
lawyer and he could not be
reached for comment.
The killing of Sabbagh's
daughter is one of three
domestic violence slaying
in Lebanon in recent
months, drawing new at-
tention to women's rights
in this country of 4 million
people. Although Lebanon
appears very progressive
on women rights com-
pared to other countries in
the Middle East, domestic
violence remains an un-
spoken problem and the
nation's parliament has
yet to vote on a bill pro-
tecting women's rights
nearly three years after it
was approved by the
Cabinet
"If a woman does not
have authority in her
house, how can she take
an authoritative post (in
government)? It starts
here," said Maya al-
Ammar, an official with a
Lebanese women's rights
group Kafa, Arabic for
"Enough." "If you don't re-
move (domestic) violence


and the woman can't be-
come the ruler of herself,
she will not be able to be
able to take a decision-
making post"
Civil rights activists say
that a woman is killed
every month by their hus-
bands on average in
Lebanon, while thousands
are subjected to physical
or verbal abuse every year
In the past, it used to be
taboo to openly speak
about such family issues.
Some used to claim that
their daughters died after
they fell in order to avoid
what could be seen as
"shameful." Today, how-
ever, the death of a woman
at the hands of her hus-
band gets extensive cover-
age by local media and has
sparked widespread
awareness campaigns
online.
"We are not doing any-
thing shameful. We are not
harming anyone," said a
Lebanese domestic vio-
lence survivor who only
gave her first name as
Bahiya out of fear of
reprisals. "We probably
reached this point because
of the word shame."
Bahiya described how
her husband of nearly 20
years regularly beat her
with his hands and a stick.
She once went to the hos-
pital after he grazed her
with a gunshot. With the
help of Kafa, she was able
to get a divorce recently
and won custody of her
four daughters.
The woman recounted


how once after fleeing to a
police station, an officer
there told her that she
faced merely "a family
affair"
Many Lebanese women
also see the laws in this
Arab country as discrimi-
nating against them.
Lebanese women married
to foreigners cannot pass
their citizenship to their
children and husbands.
The country's personal
status law, which deals
with cases involving di-
vorce or inheritance, is im-
plemented according to
the person's religion, and
their faith dictates their
fate. Some women younger
than 18 get kidnapped by
their future husbands and
get married with the help
of religious clerics against
the will of their parents.
The same goes for poli-
tics. There is no quota for
women in parliament or
government ministries.
Women now hold just four
seats in the country's 128-
delegate. Lebanon's newly
formed government has
only one female Cabinet
minister
Activists are urging
Lebanon's parliament to
approve a new law regard-
ing domestic violence at its
first meeting after a leg-
islative subcommittee ap-
proved it last year
On Saturday, about 5,000
people marched in Beirut
to demand protection for
women and urged the par-
liament to vote on the do-
mestic violence law


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Inverness farmer's Maret
9am-lp.m. with Sunny Cooter
Inverness Government Center
Help Sunny O'Cooter sprinkle some
Celtic magic over the farmer's Market for
Sresh buys from local vendors.
ocal, fresh products with over 40 vendors:
goat soaps, local honey, jewelry, essential oils,
custom signs, cookies, cupcakes, breads, jams,
jellies, produce and more!

Shamrock Scamper 5K & 10K
7-930 a.m. Starts at Citrus High School.
for information visit www.drcsports.com

4th Annual St Pat's Parade
5:30pm Historic Courthouse Square
Over 40 entrants: Marching Bands, Celtic Dancers,
Irish (Uolfhound Brigade, floats g More...March down
N Apopka Ave through Courthouse Square and up
N. Pine Ave. ...It's fun and fREE!

Sham-Rock the Bloch
7.p.m. Celtic Band Seven Nations
Celtic Rock Concert, Dowuntown Inverness,
on Historic Courthouse Square
Beer g (J.ine available street-side


Leprechaun Pub 8 Restaurant Crawl
Stop by the City tent during Sham-Rock
the Block and collect your crawl card.
(Dear your leprechaun costume! f ,
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Romanians protest dog euthanasia


Associated Press
A woman keeps a dog warm in her clothing Saturday during a protest against stray dog
euthanasia outside the government headquarters in Bucharest, Romania. Activists
called for a revision of a bill allowing the euthanasia of stray dogs, drafted by the
government after a 4-year-old boy was fatally mauled in Bucharest while left unattended
by his grandmother for an extended period of time in a park.


Should you be worried about PAD?
If you are over the age of 50, smoke or have diabetes, a history of high blood pressure,
high cholesterol or leg pain, then you are at risk for developing peripheral arterial
disease (PAD). PAD limits your body's ability to sufficiently supply your body with
oxygenated blood. But the good news is that PAD can be treated or even prevented.
And it all starts with proper education about the causes.


Free Educational Seminar
Monday, March 17, 2:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Featuring: John W. Royalty, D.O., Vascular Surgeon
Crystal River Woman's Club 320 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
Refreshments served.


Registration required 352.795.1234


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SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 All




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Thousands of bees
attack woman
PALM DESERT, Calif.--A
71-year-old woman is be-
lieved to have suffered about
1,000 stings in Southern Cali-
fornia after being attacked by
a swarm of killer bees that
covered her entire body.
Cal Fire Battalion Chief
Mark Williams said the
woman was expected to re-
cover after Thursday's attack
in Palm Desert. He said five
firefighters were also hospital- [
ized for stings.
A bee removal specialist
told the Riverside Press-En-
terprise that up to 80,000
Africanized honey bees found A
in an underground electrical Sc
vault stung a Verizon em- El
ployee who opened the vault. H
Lance Davis said the bees pa
then attacked the woman, di
who had just gotten out of a P
car nearby, a
Davis said her relatives g
tossed a blanket over her and sa
rushed her indoors. w
Davis said he removed the t
bees and planned to donate
them to farmers.
WikiLeaks' head
hints at more leaks
AUSTIN, Texas Fugitive
WikiLeaks founder Julian As-
sange says his living situation
is a bit like prison with a
more lenient visitor policy.
Speaking over Skype from
the Ecuadorian embassy in
London, Assange also hinted
that new leaks are coming
from WikiLeaks. But he's giv-
ing no specifics on what these
might be.
Assange, who has been
confined to the embassy
since June 2012, discussed
government surveillance, jour-
nalism and the situation in
Ukraine on Saturday in a
streaming-video interview
beamed to an audience of
3,500 attendees of the South
By Southwest Interactive fes-
tival in Austin, Texas.
NSA leaker Edward Snow-
den will appear remotely Mon-
day, speaking from Moscow
where he's living in temporary
asylum.
-From wire reports


NASA studying twins


Associated Press
astronauts Mark Kelly, right, STS-124 commander, and
cott Kelly are pictured in the check-out facility at
Ilington Field near NASA's Johnson Space Center in
ouston. NASA announced Friday that the brothers will
participate in 10 different investigations. Craig Kundrot,
deputy chief scientist of NASA's Human Research
program, said in a news release that the brothers provide
unique opportunity to study two people with the same
enetics who were in different environments. Officials
aid Scott Kelly spent a year in space while Mark Kelly
as on Earth. NASA said it is hoping the studies can be
ie basis for future research initiatives.




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NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


At 50, landmark libel case

relevant in digital age


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Singer
Courtney Love hadn't been
born and tweeting was re-
served for birds when The
New York Times won a
landmark libel case at the
Supreme Court in 1964.
But when a California
jury decided recently that
Love shouldn't have to pay
$8 million over a trouble-
some tweet about her for-
mer lawyer, she became just
the latest person to lean on
New York Timesv Sullivan,
a case decided 50 years ago
Sunday and the cases that
followed and expanded it.
The Sullivan case, as it is
known among lawyers,
stemmed from Alabama of-
ficials' efforts to hamper the
newspaper's coverage of
civil rights protests in the
South. The decision made it
hard for public officials to
win lawsuits and hefty
money awards over pub-
lished false statements that
damaged their reputations.
In the decades since, the
justices have extended the
decision, making it tough
for celebrities, politicians
and other public figures to
win libel suits.
Newspapers, magazines,
radio and television sta-
tions were the primary
means of publishing when
the Sullivan case was de-
cided. Today, the case ap-
plies equally to new media
such as Twitter, Facebook
and blogs. Because of the
ease of publishing online,
more people may claim the
protections granted by the
decision and others that
followed.
"It seems reasonably
clear that the protections
afforded by Sullivan and
the cases that came after it
apply to both media and
non-media speakers," said
Lee Levine, a First Amend-
ment lawyer who co-wrote a
recent book on the case.
"Technology has afforded
everyone and not just
people who can afford to
buy a printing press or own
a broadcast station the
ability to disseminate infor-
mation to the world. That
has increased the opportu-
nities for those people to
publish defamatory state-
ments to a very broad audi-
ence," Levine said.
Levine said it's unclear
whether that opportunity
will lead to more libel suits,
cases brought over the pub-
lication of false informa-
tion that injures someone's
reputation. More ways to
communicate could mean
more suits, or there could
be fewer because people
may discount what they
read online, and it may not
be worth suing individuals
who don't have corpora-
tions' wealth.
Or there may be other ex-
planations.
"Today one of the reasons
I think we don't have as
many libel cases is not just
because the Sullivan rule is
so widely accepted by
everyone, but in a digital
world there's so much
greater opportunity for re-
sponse," said Bruce W San-
ford, a Washington-based
First Amendment lawyer
If one person says some-
thing untrue online, the
person being spoken about
has many more avenues to
reply, agreed David Ardia,
a University of North Car-
olina law professor and the
co-director of the school's
Center for Media Law and
Policy In the 1960s, the


Associated Press
Musician Courtney Love is seen Sept. 20, 2010, in New
York. When a California jury decided recently that Love
shouldn't have to pay $8 million for a troublesome tweet
about her former lawyer, she became just the latest per-
son to lean on New York Times v. Sullivan, a case decided
50 years ago Sunday, and the cases that followed and
expanded it.


only way to respond to libel
and "reach an audience
was to get into the same
newspaper, and that's no
longer the case," he said,
adding that the "mega-
phone" of the Internet is
available to everyone.
The Internet was a long
way off when the Sullivan
case began in 1960. It
started when the Times
published a civil rights
group's full-page ad, with
the title "Heed Their Ris-
ing Voices," that described
the brutal treatment of
civil rights demonstrators
in the South.
Egged on by a local
newspaper editorial urging
all Alabamians to sue, a
Montgomery, Ala., city offi-
cial named L.B. Sullivan
claimed his reputation had
been sullied by the ad's er-
rors, though neither he nor
any other official was
named in it Under state
law preceding the
Supreme Court decision,
Sullivan won a judgment of
$500,000, and the Times
faced millions more in
other suits.
The legal peril
prompted the Times to
pull all its reporters out of
Alabama at a time of keen
news interest in the civil
rights movement.
Sullivan ultimately lost at
the Supreme Court Justice
William Brennan, writing
for a unanimous court, ac-
knowledged that published
errors can harm a person's
reputation. But Brennan,
himself ambivalent about
reporters even as he
emerged as a defender of
press freedoms, and his col-
leagues also decided that it
should be tough for public
officials to win libel suits.
False statements are an
inevitable part of the free
debate that is fundamental
to the American system of
government and must be
protected, Brennan wrote.
The only way to win: Show
that the false statement
was made knowingly or
with "reckless disregard
for the truth." The decision
freed news organizations
to write about the civil
rights movement without
fearing lawsuits.
The Sullivan decision
and others that followed
haven't been without criti-
cism, however, including
some from three justices
now on the Supreme Court
At her high court confir-
mation hearing in 2010,
Elena Kagan said the prin-
ciple laid out in the case is
vital to free speech, but she
noted that it allows for seri-
ous harm to a person's rep-


utation without any com-
pensation or remedy
Chief Justice John
Roberts wrote in a 1985
memo as a White House
lawyer that he favored
making it easier for public
figures to win in libel cases,
while limiting the financial
threat to the losing side.
Justice Antonin Scalia
has been quoted as saying
he would probably vote to
reverse the decision if given
the chance.
Still, scholars including
Robert Sack, a federal
judge who specialized in
media law while in private
practice, say the Sullivan
decision has become so
much part of the law that
it's hard to see it being
overturned.
That means anyone find-
ing themselves in singer
Love's situation may turn to
the decision. In Love's case,
the singer tweeted about a
former lawyer, writing that
the woman had been
"bought off" in a suit in-
volving the estate of Love's
late husband, musician
Kurt Cobain. The lawyer,
Rhonda Holmes, sued for
$8 million, claiming the
tweet was false and had
hurt her reputation.
But Holmes ran up
against the Sullivan rule. A
jury found in January that
though Love published a
false statement, she didn't
know it was false.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A13


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A14 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


RUSSIA
Continued from PageAl
Friday night after apparently
having crossed the Straits of
Kerch, which separates Crimea
from Russian territory
"Neither the equipment, nor
the paratroopers have insignia
that identify them as Russian,
but we have no doubt as to their
allegiance," Seleznyov said.
The amphibious operation ap-
peared to be one of the largest
movements of Russian military
forces since they appeared in
Crimea a week ago.
Seleznyov also said a convoy
of more than 60 military trucks
was spotted Saturday heading
from Feodosia toward Simfer-
opol, the regional capital. An AP
reporter caught up with the con-
voy and trailed it to a Russian-
controlled airfield. In the rear of
the vehicles, heavily armed sol-
diers could be seen, though none
appeared to have identifying
badges or insignia. Soldiers spat
at the reporters following them.
A small plane belonging to the
Ukrainian border guards was
fired on by "extremists" using
automatic weapons as it flew
near the administrative border
of Crimea, but took evasive ma-
neuvers and escaped unscathed,
the Interfax news agency re-
ported, quoting Ukrainian
officials.
The regional parliament in
Crimea has set a March 16 refer-
endum on leaving Ukraine to
join Russia, and senior lawmak-
ers in Moscow said they would
support the move, ignoring sanc-
tions threats and warnings from
President Barack Obama that
the vote would violate interna-
tional law
While the U.S. and the EU
urged Russia to engage in dia-
logue with new Ukrainian au-
thorities, the Kremlin has
refused to do so, denouncing the
change of power in Ukraine as
an "unconstitutional coup."
Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov said Moscow sees
no sense in talking with
Ukraine's new authorities be-
cause, in his view, they kowtow
to radical nationalists.
"The so-called interim gov-
ernment isn't independent. It
depends, to our great regret, on
radical nationalists who have
seized power with arms," he
said at a news conference. He
said that nationalist groups use
"intimidation and terror" to con-
trol Ukraine.


Associated Press
Volunteers of a self-defense group stand guard Saturday in Lenin Square after marching in the center of
Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine. The strategic peninsula in southern Ukraine has become the flashpoint in
the battle for Ukraine, where three months of protests sparked by President Victor Yanukovych's
decision to ditch a significant treaty with the 28-nation European Union after strong pressure from
Russia led to his downfall.


Despite that tough talk, the
Russian Foreign Ministry said
Deputy Foreign Minister Grig-
ory Karasin met Saturday with
Ukrainian Ambassador
Volodymyr Yelchenko, the first
such diplomatic contact since
the crisis began. In a terse state-
ment, the ministry said only that
they discussed issues related to
Russian-Ukrainian ties in a "sin-
cere atmosphere."
At a news conference in Kiev,
Ukraine's new foreign minister,
Andrii Deshchytsi, spoke hope-
fully about creation of a contact
group made up of foreign minis-
ters of various countries to me-
diate the crisis. Forming the
group was an idea discussed
during meetings between
Ukraine's prime minister and
European Union leaders in
Brussels on Thursday
Deshchytsi said that he
learned from mediators that
Russia hasn't "categorically' re-
fused the idea of permitting a
contact group to help broker an
end to the dispute.
"The Russians are thinking,"
Deshchytsi said, so there is "rea-
son to hope." He reiterated that
the new Ukrainian government
understands it is vital to estab-
lish good relations with all


neighbors, including Russia.
Lavrov also spoke by tele-
phone with U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry on Saturday a
U.S. official said on condition of
anonymity to describe a private
diplomatic conversation.
Kerry "made clear that con-
tinued military escalation and
provocation in Crimea or else-
where in Ukraine, along with
steps to annex Crimea to Russia
would close any available space
for diplomacy, and he urged ut-
most restraint," the official said.
Kerry and Lavrov agreed to
speak again soon.
Russian President Vladimir
Putin has said that Moscow has
no intention of annexing
Crimea, but that its people have
the right to determine the re-
gion's status in a referendum.
The Crimean referendum has
been denounced by Ukraine's
new government. The U.S.
moved Thursday to impose its
first sanctions on Russians in-
volved in the military occupa-
tion of Crimea.
Speaking on the BBC on Sat-
urday, NATO Secretary-General
Anders Fogh Rasmussen said
that while there is no military
response to the recent events of
Crimea, the crisis was a re-


minder of threats to European
security and stability
"I do believe that politicians
all over NATO will now rethink
the whole thing about invest-
ment in security and defense,"
he told the BBC. "Obviously de-
fense comes at a cost, but inse-
curity is much more expensive."
An international military mis-
sion composed of officers from
the U.S. and 28 other nations
tried again Saturday to enter
Crimea, but it was turned back
around the town of Armiansk by
armed men.
An AP reporter traveling with
the 54 observers from the Or-
ganization for Security and Co-
operation in Europe said that
after the group had stopped, the
armed men fired bursts of auto-
matic weapons fire to halt other
unidentified vehicles. No in-
juries were reported.
In Simferopol, meanwhile, a
public ceremony was held for
the swearing-in of the first unit
in the pro-Russia "Military
Forces of the Autonomous Re-
public of Crimea." About 30 men
armed with AK-47s, and another
20 or so unarmed, turned out.
They ranged in age from
teenagers to a man who looked
to be about 60. They were sworn


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APMPOINTMENTAISARECIMOMMENDE
^^^^^APP INTMENT RECO^^r^^^^^^^i^^^^^^^ M MENDED^^^^^^^^^BBBBBBt^^^^^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

in at a park in front of an eternal
flame to those killed in World
War II.
Sergei Aksyonov, the Crimean
prime minister, came to the cer-
emony and was greeted by the
soldiers with shouts of
"Commander!"
He said their main role, at
least until the referendum,
would be to "keep the peace."
He said he didn't foresee any
fighting with the Ukrainian sol-
diers still at bases in Crimea.
"We are not enemies with
those soldiers who pledged loy-
alty to the Ukrainian state. They
are not our enemies," Aksyonov
said. He said they could safely
leave Crimea if they wanted to.
In the week since Russia
seized control of Crimea, Russ-
ian troops have been disarming
Ukrainian military bases here.
Some Ukrainian units, however,
have refused to give up. Aksy-
onov has said pro-Russian
forces numbering more than
11,000 now control all access to
the region and have blockaded
all military bases that haven't
yet surrendered.
On Friday evening, pro-Russia
soldiers tried to take over an-
other Ukrainian base in Sev-
astopol, resulting in a tense
standoff that lasted for several
hours.
Lt. Col. Vitaly Onishchenko,
deputy commander of the base,
said three dozen men wearing
unmarked camouflage uniforms
arrived late Friday. While one
group climbed over a wall on
one side of the base, another
crashed a heavy military truck
through the gates, Onishchenko
said.
He said Saturday that they
turned off power, cut telephone
lines and demanded that about
100 Ukrainian troops, who barri-
caded themselves into one of the
base buildings, surrender their
weapons and swear allegiance
to Russia. The invaders left
around midnight.
No shots were fired in and no
injuries were reported.
Russia has described the
troops who wear green uniforms
without insignia as local "self-
defense forces." But On-
ishchenko said the troops who
tried to overrun his base were
clearly Russian.
"These were Russian service-
men specially ordered," he said.
"Their watches were set to
Moscow time. They spoke with
Russian accents and they didn't
hide their allegiance to the
Russian Federation."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Half of millennials more


likely to lean Democratic


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Most
of America's young adults
are single, don't go to
church and while half say
they have no loyalty to a
political party, when
pushed they tend to swing
further left politically than
those before them.
A new Pew Research
Center survey out Friday
showed that half of Amer-
ica's young adults, ages 18
to 33, consider themselves
political independents,
identifying with neither
party But asked which way
they lean politically, half of
the so-called millennials
say they lean toward the
Democratic Party, the high-
est share for any age group
over the past decade.
In addition, young
adults seem to be turning
away from their predeces-
sors' proclivity for religion
and marriage. Almost two-
thirds don't classify them-
selves as "a religious
person." And when it
comes to tying the knot:
Only about 1 in 4 millenni-
als is married. Almost half
of baby boomers were
married at that age.
The new survey shows
how the millennial adults
are "forging a distinctive
path into adulthood," said
Paul Taylor, Pew's execu-
tive vice president and co-
author of the report.
This can especially be
seen when it comes to pol-
itics. Only 27 percent said
they consider themselves
Democrats and 17 percent
said Republicans. The half
of millennials who say
they are independent is an
increase from 38 percent
back in 2004.
"It's not that they don't
have strong opinions, po-
litical opinions, they do,"
Taylor said. "It's simply
that they choose not to
identify themselves with
either political party"
The number of self-
described independents is
lower among their prede-
cessors. Only 39 percent of
those in Generation X said


they were independents,
along with 37 percent of the
boomers and 32 percent of
the Silent Generation.
Pew describes Gen Xers
as those from age 34-49,
boomers as 50-68 and the
Silent Generation as those
69-86.
When the self-identified
Democratic millennials
are combined with the
self-described independ-
ents who lean Democratic,
half- 50 percent of the
millennials are Democrats
or Democratic-leaning
while 34 percent are Re-
publicans or Republican-
leaning.
"They don't choose to
identify, but they have
strong views and their
views are views that most
people conventionally as-
sociate with the Demo-
cratic Party," Taylor said.
"They believe in a big ac-
tivist government on some
of the social issues of the
day gay marriage, mari-
juana legalization, immi-
gration. Their views are
much more aligned with
the Democratic Party"
Taylor said they don't
know whether millennial
voting trends will stay the
same as they get older
"People can change over
the course of their life-
times," he said. "At the
same time, the behaviors,
attitudes, the voting pat-
terns and experiences that
generations sort of en-
counter as they come of
age in their late teens and
early 20s are important."
Millennials also haven't
bought into the idea that


they should go to church or
get married early
Only 36 percent of the
millennials said the
phrase "a religious per-
son" described them very
well, compared with
52 percent of the Gen Xers,
55 percent of the baby
boomers and 61 percent of
the Silent Generation. And
they're significantly less
religious than their imme-
diately predecessors, the
Gen Xers. When they were
the same age, almost half
of the Gen Xers 47 per-
cent identified them-
selves as religious.
The 64 percent of the
millennials who say that
they are not religious "is
the highest for any age
group we've ever meas-
ured," Taylor said.
The millennials were far
less inclined toward mar-
riage than the groups that
preceded them. Only
26 percent of the millennial
adults are married. When
they were the same age, 36
percent of the Gen Xers,
48 percent of baby boomers
and 65 percent of the Silent
Generation were married.
The report also found:
68 percent of young
adults favor allowing gay
marriage, compared with
55 percent of the Gen Xers,
48 percent of the boomers
and 38 percent of those in
the Silent Majority
The support for legal-
izing marijuana at 68 per-
cent for millennials. The
next highest percentage
was the Gen Xers at 53
percent and the boomers
at 52 percent.


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The Anti-Drug Coalition Announces the 2014 Winners of



["Partners With A Heart"-


Overall Winner


Robert

Brashear


Brashear's Pharmacy


Youth Winner


Madisen j

Holton
SADD Club President
Crystal River High School


-ISf .4 TIINIFEKE IS


Angella Briggs
Prevention Therapist
for the Renaissance Center
The Centers


WAST L ," W.". -" .-1- --,1 f KM 7 -
Lisa Giddens Tom & Debbie Rogers Dr. Komala Bhushan Toby Rowlinson Rheannon Simas
Health Support Technician Creators of Tommy Tucker Pediatrican Teacher & Student and
for HIV/AIDS Program Superhero Against Substance Abuse and Patient Advocate SADD/SWAT Club Advisor Positive Peer Example
Citrus County Health Department Graphic Elite Printing Nature Coast Pediatrics Crystal River High School Citrus Spring Middle School


Shalay Jackson
School Social Worker
& Student Supporter
Citrus County School Board


Jill Santonastaso
AVIA Teacher
(Advancement via Individual Determination)
Citrus Springs Middle School


Not Pictured Nti Pictured



Deputy Steve Smith & Deputy Travis Parsons
Meth Lab r) .,. r!!! Citrus County Sheriffs Office
(Faces cannot be shown due to undercover work)


lomas (Gonzalez
School Social Worker
and Student Supporter
Citrus County School Board


Paxton Zancker
Student
ECKERD/SWAT


The 4th Annual Partners with a Heart banquet was held February 7, 2014. The event recognizes Citrus County residents who
provide outstanding support and assistance in the areas of prevention, intervention, and/or services for substance abuse. These
outstanding individuals were nominated for their commitment to making our community a safer and healthier place to live.

CLO (..-T ..U.. !


A WelCare Company


www.chronicleonline.com


352-601-6619
co alitio n ( anitidclru gcitru s.co n


COALITION OF CITRUS COUNTY


NATION


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A15










NATION
/16- 9,


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nat*


BR $ 1.2M bail for mom accused of driving into surf
G-A-U-N-T-L-E-T $


Associated Press
Sophia Hoffman reacts
Saturday as she spells a
word, which she got correct,
during the continuation of
the Jackson County Spelling
Bee against Kush Sharma
at the Central Library in
Kansas City, Mo. Two
weeks ago, the bee ran
out of words after the two
eliminated 23 other con-
testants and went an-
other 47 rounds against
each other. Kush later
won the competition in
the 29th round Saturday.

Missing girl found;
father charged
with murder
BALTIMORE -A Mary-
land girl who disappeared
after her mother was found
dead last week has been
located following a nation-
wide search, authorities
said.
The girl, 11-year-old Cait-
lyn Virts, was located along
with her father, Timothy
Virts, in a motel in Florence,
South Carolina, police said
late Friday.
She and her father had
been missing since the
body of the girl's mother,
Bobby Jo Cortez, was
found at her home Thurs-
day. Police have since
charged Timothy Virts with
first-degree murder in the
slaying of Cortez, 36.
The girl was found un-
harmed, according to a
statement by the Baltimore
County Police Department.
Virts is in police custody
and will be returned to
Maryland "pending an ex-
tradition process," the state-
ment said. Police hope to
return the girl home as soon
as possible.
Virts and his daughter
were located at the Colonial
Inn, according to local po-
lice in Florence. They first
rented a room on Thursday
night, said owner Carol
Gause.
Gause was checking her
Facebook page from the
front desk around 7 p.m.
Friday when she saw the
Amber Alert posted by a
friend and immediately rec-
ognized Virts and his
daughter. She called police
and officers quickly arrived.
For Obama, a last
stab at improving
ties with Hill
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama's new
legislative affairs team sent
him more than a dozen rec-
ommendations in Decem-
ber for ways to improve his
strained relations with Capi-
tol Hill.
The president responded
with some ideas of his own,
including a request for more
social events with lawmak-
ers at the White House.
It was a surprising sug-
gestion from a president
who's done little socializing
with lawmakers of either
party. He's also dismissed
the notion that sharing a
cocktail or a meal with law-
makers is a way to ease
Washington gridlock.
But within weeks, Obama
was mingling over martinis
and appetizers with Demo-
cratic lawmakers at two
White House receptions.
White House officials say
Obama's cocktail gather-
ings are part of a broader
overhaul of his congres-
sional outreach operation
following the dismal start to
his second term.
-From wire reports


Associated Press the water, saying "every-
one was OK" as she left the
ORLANDO A preg- van in the ocean, an affi-
nant South Carolina davit said. Wilkerson, 32, is
woman pointed to the charged with three counts
ocean, locked the of attempted mur-
doors and rolled der and three
up the windows, counts child abuse
telling her three causing great bod-
children she was ily harm.
"trying to take Volusia County
them to a better Court Judge Shirley
place" as she Green found prob-
drove her minivan able cause for the
into the surf, au- Ebony charges during
thorities said. Wilkerson Wilkerson's first
Ebony Wilkerson even appearance in court Sat-
tried to call off bystanders urday and set her bond at
hustling to rescue her $1.2 million. A date for an
screaming children from arraignmentwasnotreleased


The bystanders and
beach safety officers, pay-
ing no attention to the
mother, pulled the two
girls and a boy, ages 3, 9
and 10, through the win-
dows to safety Tuesday on
Daytona Beach.
Later, Wilkerson denied
trying to hurt her children,
telling investigators she
was driving too close to the
water "and the waves
pulled her in."
Her children told inves-
tigators another story
"Mom tried to kill us,"
they told detectives, ac-
cording to the document.
"Mom is crazy"


Associated Press
Lifeguards and bystanders rescue children from a minivan
that their mother, 31-year-old Ebony Wilkerson, drove into
the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday in Daytona Beach, Fla.
The pregnant woman who drove the minivan carrying her
three young children into the surf had talked about demons
before leaving the house, according to her sister.


Associated Press
Family members arrive Sunday in Beijing, China, at a hotel which is prepared for relatives or friends of
passengers aboard a missing airplane. Search teams across Southeast Asia scrambled on Saturday to find
a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 239 people on board that disappeared from air traffic control screens
over waters between Malaysia and Vietnam early that morning.




Oil slicks offer sign




missing jet crashed


Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -
Two large oil slicks spotted Sat-
urday by the Vietnamese air
force offered the first sign that a
jetliner carrying 239 people had
crashed into the ocean after van-
ishing from radar without send-
ing a single distress call.
An international fleet of planes
and ships scouted the waters be-
tween Malaysia and Vietnam for
any clues to the fate of the
Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777,
which disappeared less than an
hour after taking off from Kuala
Lumpur bound for Beijing.
The oil slicks sighted off the
southern tip of Vietnam were
each between 6 miles and 9 miles
long, the Vietnamese government
said in a statement.
There was no immediate con-
firmation that the slicks were re-
lated to Flight MH370, but the
government said they were con-
sistent with the kind of slick that
would be produced by the jet's
two fuel tanks.
After the oil was spotted, au-
thorities suspended the air
search for the night. It was to re-
sume Sunday A sea search con-
tinued in the darkness, the
airline said.
The jet's disappearance was
especially mysterious because it
apparently happened when the
plane was at cruising altitude,
not during the more dangerous
phases of takeoff or landing.
Just 9 percent of fatal acci-
dents happen when a plane is at
cruising altitude, according to a
statistical summary of commer-
cial jet accidents done by Boeing.
Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad
Jauhari Yahya said there was no
indication the pilots had sent a
distress signal. That might mean
that whatever trouble befell the
plane happened so fast the crew
did not have time to broadcast
even a quick mayday
The lack of a radio call "sug-
gests something very sudden and
very violent happened," said
William Waldock, who teaches
accident investigation at Embry-
Riddle Aeronautical University
in Prescott, Ariz.


The plane was last inspected
10 days ago and found to be "in
proper condition," Ignatius Ong,
CEO of Malaysia Airlines sub-
sidiary Firefly airlines, said at a
news conference.
Two-thirds of the jet's passen-
gers were from China. The rest
were from elsewhere in Asia,
North America and Europe.
Asked whether terrorism was
suspected, Malaysian Prime Min-
ister Najib Razak said authori-
ties were "looking at all
possibilities, but it is too early to
make any conclusive remarks."
Contributing to fears of foul
play was word from foreign min-
istries in Italy and Austria that
the names of two citizens listed
on the flight's manifest matched
the names on two passports re-
ported stolen in Thailand.
Italy's Foreign Ministry said an
Italian man who was listed as a
passenger, Luigi Maraldi, was
traveling in Thailand and was
not aboard the plane. It said he
reported his passport stolen last
August.
Austria's Foreign Ministry con-
firmed that a name listed on the
manifest matched an Austrian
passport reported stolen two
years ago. It said the Austrian
was not on the plane but would
not identify the person.
The amount of time needed to
find aircraft that go down over
the ocean can vary widely Planes
that crash into relatively shallow
areas, like the waters off Vietnam
where the Malaysian jet is miss-
ing, are far easier to locate and
recover than those that plunge
deep into undersea canyons or
mountain ranges.
At Beijing's airport, authorities
posted a notice asking relatives
and friends of passengers to
gather at a nearby hotel to await
further information. A woman
aboard a shuttle bus wept, saying
on a mobile phone, "They want
us to go to the hotel. It cannot be
good."
Passengers' loved ones were
escorted into a private area at
the hotel, but reporters were kept
away A man in a gray hooded
sweatshirt later stormed out
complaining about a lack of in-


formation. The man, who said he
was a Beijing resident but de-
clined to give his name, said he
was anxious because his mother
was aboard the flight with a
tourist group.
"We have been waiting for
hours and there is still no verifi-
cation," he said.
The plane was last seen on
radar at 1:30 a.m. (1730 GMT Fri-
day) above the waters where the
South China Sea meets the Gulf
of Thailand, authorities in
Malaysia and Vietnam said.
Lai Xuan Thanh, director of
Vietnam's civil aviation author-
ity, said air traffic control in the
country never made contact with
the plane.
The South China Sea is a tense
region with competing territorial
claims that have led to several
low-level conflicts, particularly
between China and the Philip-
pines. That antipathy briefly
faded Saturday as China, the
Philippines, Vietnam, Singapore
and Malaysia all sent ships and
planes to the region.
The U.S. Navy was sending a
warship and a surveillance plane,
while Singapore said it would
send a submarine and a plane.
China and Vietnam also sent air-
craft to help in the search.
The plane was carrying 227
passengers and 12 crew mem-
bers, the airline said. The mani-
fest included 152 passengers from
China, 38 from Malaysia, seven
from Indonesia, six from Australia,
five from India, three from the
U.S., and others from Indonesia,
France, New Zealand, Canada,
Ukraine, Russia, Taiwan and the
Netherlands.
In the United States, a friend
confirmed that an IBM executive
from North Texas named Philip
Wood had been aboard the jet.
And an Austin, Texas, technology
company known as Freescale
Semiconductor confirmed that it
had 20 employees from Malaysia
and China on the flight.
Malaysia Airlines has a good
safety record, as does the 777,
which had not had a fatal crash
in its 19-year history until an
Asiana Airlines plane crashed
last July in San Francisco.


World BRIEFS

Poodle do


Associated Press
A poodle named Ryder Cup
awaits judging Saturday
during Day 3 of Crufts 2014
in Birmingham, England.
The annual dog show is
organized by Britain's
Kennel Club, with various
categories judged each
day leading to the Best in
Show title being awarded
Sunday.

Protest stymied
after Venezuelan
diplomatic win
CARACAS, Venezuela -
In a major show of force,
hundreds of National
Guardsmen in riot gear and
armored vehicles prevented
an "empty pots march" from
reaching Venezuela's Food
Ministry on Saturday to protest
shortages of staple items.
President Nicolas Maduro's
socialist government, mean-
while, celebrated as a diplo-
matic victory an Organization
of American States declara-
tion supporting its professed
efforts to bring a peaceful
solution to the country's worst
political violence in years.
On Saturday, more than
5,000 protesters banged
pots, blew horns and whis-
tles and carried banners in
the capital to decry crippling
inflation and now-chronic
shortages of basics including
flour, milk and toilet paper.
Similar protests were held
in at least five other cities.
All over Venezuela, people
spend hours every week queu-
ing up at supermarkets, often
before dawn, without even
knowing what may arrive.
"There's nothing to buy.
You can only buy what the
government lets enter the
country because everything
is imported. There's no beef.
There's no chicken," said
Zoraida Carrillo, a 50-year-
old marcher in Caracas.
Tymoshenko starts
medical treatment
in Berlin
BERLIN Ukraine's for-
mer prime minister, Yulia
Tymoshenko, has started
medical treatment at Berlin's
Charite hospital after arriving
late Friday, but doctors treat-
ing her say it's too soon to
say how long it will take.
Hospital chairman Karl
Max Einhaeupl said doctors
will decide by Monday
whether the 53-year-old
needs an operation for her
severe back pain resulting
from slipped discs she suffered
more than two years ago.
Einhaeupl told reporters
on Tymoshenko isn't suffer-
ing any paralysis, though
she requires a mobility aid
to walk around because
she cannot put any strain
on her right leg.
-From wire reports












EXCURSIONS


S. -- -





S, t ." r .





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wA^.w | ,' '?'p,....-


the


Pacific Ocean


On Day 17 we began
our transit of the
Pacific Ocean. The
Pacific Ocean is huge. It is
almost 64 million square
miles and covers roughly
half of the Earth's water
surface.

The first of many sea days was a
leisurely day that began with an-
other lecture by John Maxton Gra-
ham. His coverage of the early
ocean liners was fascinating, and
his knowledge immense.
Leslye and I had lunch in the din-
ing room instead of the outdoor buf-
fet just because we could. After
lunch, Leslye headed to bingo and
then trivia. I had been approached
by fellow passengers asking for help
with computers and photography
after finding out that I spent 40-plus
years in the electronics business.
That afternoon was our first com-
puter class, attended by about a
dozen passengers. Over the hour
and a half we covered computer ba-
sics, setup and operation. Most of
my students left the class with a
look of satisfaction, but some left
pulling their hair and promising to
throw their computer into the
ocean.
After dinner Leslye, was off to
some more trivia and I was off to
read. At the end of our first day in
the Pacific Ocean, we had traveled
a total of 5,245 miles.


Peter Graulich
For the Chronicle
Day 18 began with a lecture on
the HMS Bounty, a ship whose pres-
ence we discover at every stop we
make during the crossing.
The mutiny on the HMS Bounty
occurred on April 28,1789. The
ship, captained by Lt. William Bligh,
was overpowered by Fletcher Chris-
tian.
The mutiny has been covered in
great detail; however, its cause is
generally accepted to be harsh
treatment of the crew by the captain
and the captain's refusal to allow
members of the crew to stay on the
island of Tahiti where sexual oppor-
tunities were widespread.
Master Bligh was set afloat in a
small boat with 18 of the 22
crewmembers loyal to him. The mu-
tineers then settled on the islands
of Tahiti and Pitcairn where, the
Bounty was burned.
Lt. Bligh navigated the ship's boat
some 4,100 miles to the Dutch East
Indies over a period of seven weeks
using only a pocket watch and a
quadrant. He then returned to
Britain and reported the mutiny
The British government sent a
ship to arrest the mutineers. When
the ship arrived in Tahiti, four men
surrendered and 10 more were ar-
rested. All were imprisoned on the
ship to be returned to England. Dur-
ing the return voyage, the ship ran
aground on the Great Barrier Reef
with a loss of four of the prisoners
and 31 crewmembers. Eventually
the remaining prisoners were tried


in a naval court. Three were
hanged, four were acquitted, and
three were pardoned.
After lunch we went to the the-
ater to watch "The Bounty," the 1984
movie with Mel Gibson and Anthony
Hopkins. The movie is excellent
and gave us a better understanding
of the incident.
That night was our first formal
night, and after dinner we shared
conversation with our tablemates,
all of us having relaxed, our conver-
sation flowing freely
At 10 p.m. we proceed to the top
deck of the ship at the invitation of
Dr Caiise. The astronomer had
made arrangements with the ship to
turn off all of the lights on the upper
decks from 10 o'clock on so that we
may stargaze. Although he brought a
telescope, we found it unnecessary
as the Milky Way and the Southern
Cross were stunning.
On the way downstairs, we
stopped at the theater and listened
to Caitlyn Carr, a marvelous so-
prano singing arias from popular
operas.
At the end of the day, we have
traveled another 582 miles and we
are now 5,745 miles from Fort Laud-
erdale.
Peter Graulich loves to travel. He
first left the country in 1961 for six
weeks travellingEurope and the
United Kingdom with family. Since
then he has visited 97 countries,
every state in the United States and
every national park He has spent
about 300 days on Princess Cruise
Line ships.


Editor's note: This is the fourth installment in a series highlighting
Peter Graulich's 107-day trip around the world.


. .* *. .. .. .....
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AlS SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 9, 2014 C:Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House DO1: 1Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
~C B ID/IF H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
i ESH NBC 19 19 PGA Tour Golf Dateline NBC (In Stereo)'PG' N The Voice (In Stereo) 'PG' P NNews Access
Sk s Ps n RN (n S NewsHour WEDU Healing ADD With Dr. Daniel Amen, MD & Tana Masterpiece-Preview Ed Sullivan's Rock and Roll Classics The 60s
0] PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus Amen,-RN (In Stereo) 'G' sm ,(My Music) (In Stereo) 'G' sm
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O N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee "Asian F" (In Glee "Pot O'Gold" (In The Office The Office We There We There
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n WVE UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero AgufyAhora (SS) NuestraBellezaLatina(N)(SS)Saly Pimienta'PG' Corned. Noticiero
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A 54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Stereo)'PG' '14'm
AIJ *** "Dawn of the The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Dead (N) (Live) The Walking Dead
55 64 55 Dead" (2004)'R' "Claimed" 'MA' "Still" 'MA' "Alone" (N) MA' 14' "Alone"'MA
n 52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced Wild West Alaska (In Railroad Alaska (In Railroad Alaska"KIller Railroad Alaska "The Railroad Alaska "Killer
52 35 52 19 21 Stereo)'14' Stereo) 'PG' B Ice" 'PG' Beast" 'PG' Ice" 'PG'
S 96 9 9 ** "Meet the Browns" (2008 Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry, *k "King's Ransom" (2005) Anthony Anderson. A busi- Being Mary Jane "Uber
96 19 96 Angela Bassett, David Mann.'PG-13' nessman plots his own kidnapping to foil his wife. Love '14'
RAV 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Housewives/AtI. Housewives/AtI. Blood, Sweat Online Dating Rituals Happens Fashion
7 7 South Park South Park South Park South Park *** "Superbad" (2007 Jonah Hill. Co-dependent teens Tosh.O Tosh.O Tosh.O
27 61 27 33 14' 14' 14' 'MA' hopeto score booze and babes at a party. 'NR' '14'B '14'B '14'm
9 9 Party Down South '14' Party Down South '14' Party Down South '14' Party Down South'14' Cos Cps Co COps
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46 40 146 16 15 Blog'G' Blog'G' 'G' Nc G'N c Maddie It G' Ally'G' G'mc or Draw FarmG' G' c Blog'G'
SPN 33 27 :33 21 117 SportsCenter (N) Women's College Basketball Women's College Basketball SportsCenter (N)
EPN 34 28 34 43 49 CrossFit CrossFit World Series IWorld Series Word Series World Series World Series
WT 95 70 95 48 A Lenten Crossing World Over Live 'PG' Sunday Night Prime G.K. Rosary With Cardinal Dolan Saint Frances of
** "Monster-in-Law" ** "Meet the Fockers" (2004) Robert De Niro. Premiere. ** "Meet the Fockers" (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro.
H 29 52 29 20 28 (2005)'PG-13' Future in-laws clash in Florida. 'PG-13' Future in-laws clash in Florida. 'PG-13'
i 11 1 ** "Powder" (1995 Drama) Mary *** "Buffalo Soldiers" (2001) ** "Return to Paradise" (1998) Vince "Halloween:
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[FSNFLJ 35 39 35 __ NHL Hockey: Bruins at Panthers Panthers World Poker Tour The Best of Pride (N) Cutting Game365 World Poker Tour
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OL 727 67 727 Big Break Florida Central PGA Tour Golf Puerto Rico Open, Final Round. (N Same-da Tape) I PGA Tour Golf
S 5 n *** "Honeymoon for One" (2011, Romance) "A Ring by Spring" (2014, Romance-Comedy) When Calls the Heart The Middle The Middle
59 68 59 45 54 Nicollette Sherddan. NR' c Stefanie Powers. cN G' cc'PG' PG'
S 32 21 3 2 2 ** "Fantastic Four" ** "Snitch" (2013 Crime Drama) Dwayne True Detective (Season GirlFs (N) Looking True Detective (In
Ui 302 201 302 2 2 (2005)'PG-13' Johnson. (In Stereo) PG-13 B Finale) (N)'MA' MA MA Stereo) 'MA'I
mi "Vehicle 19"(2013) RealTimeWith Bill TrueDetective"After **4 "Now You See Me" (2013) Jesse *** "Heat" (1995) AI
HB2 303 202 303 Paul Walker. Maher 'MA' B You've Gone" 'MA' Eisenberg. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' B Pacino. 'R'
(]HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters HuntIntl Beach Beach Hawaii Hawaii Island Island Hunters Huntlntl
i 51 54 1 3 Ax Men "Ax is Back" Ax Men "End of a Ax Men "Dog Days" Ax Men "Albie Damned" No Man's Land "Adapt Cryptid: The Swamp
51 54 51 32 42 '14' mc Legend"'PG' 'PG' B (N)'PG' or Die"'PG Beast'PG'
ii 24 8 24 31 ** "Madea's Family ** "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" (2009, "The Trip to Bountiful" (2014, Drama) Cicely ** "Tyler Perry's
24 38 24 31 Reunion" Comedy) Tyler Perry.'PG-13' Bc Tyson, Vanessa Williams. B0 Madea Goes to Jail"
5 1 "A Mother's Nightmare" (2012, Suspense) "Complicity" (2012) Jenna Boyd. Several teen- "Homecoming" (2009 Horror) Mischa Barton,
50 119 Annabeth Gish. In Stereo)'NR' c agers are forced to decide their fate. Matt Long. (In Stereo)'R' c
n 30 2 32 3 3 *** "Lethal Weapon 3" (1992) ** "Lethal Weapon 4" (1998, Action) Mel MAX on *** "Pitch Perfect" (2012, Musical Comedy)
320221 320 3 3 Mel Gibson.'NR' B Gibson, Danny Glover. (In Stereo) 'R' Set PG' Anna Kendrick. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B
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42 41 42 "Into the Deep" ."Invasion!" per enters the jail.
109 65 109 44 53 The Original Cosmos Journey to Edge of Universe A cinematic Cosmos: A Spacetime Ultimate Survival Ultimate Survival
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31 59 31 26 29 Apocalypse" (2004) Milla Jovovich, Oded Fehr. 'R' BcFiction) Sanaa Lathan.'PG-13' B(2000)'NR'
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rWRNAj 118 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos ***, "A Few Good Men" (1992) Tom Cruise.'R'B c"Collateral Damage"


Dad's decision


befuddles family


D earAnnie: We are
facing an immi-
nent, irreversible
mistake with a family
heirloom. My husband's
elderly father is deter-
mined to sell a genera-
tions-old coin collection
to a coin shop and then
split the money between
his three sons.
My husband and his
brothers would rather
have the
coins them-
selves for the
sentimental
value. No one
involved is in
financial
trouble of any
kind, and all
the brothers
would do
their best to
divide theA
heirlooms ANN
fairly But MAI
when any of MAIL
them tries to
bring it up, their dad's
explosive temper puts
an end to the discussion.
The weirdest, most
hurtful part is that
Grandpa wants my hus-
band to deliver the coins
to an unknown third
party to sell, and he is
keeping them in a sealed
box, not even letting our
young daughter view
them once. Yet my hus-
band is one of the most
responsible, honest and
trustworthy people I've
ever met
We feel sad that his
family may lose this
piece of history forever,


II
.1


but I did try to get my
husband to stay on
friendly terms, as we
may not have Grandpa
around much longer Is
there any hope of chang-
ing his mind? Boon-
doggled in Boise
Dear Boondoggled:
Has Grandpa had a full
medical checkup lately?
He doesn't seem to be
entirely rational. Even if
he believes
selling the
coins would be
more equitable
than leaving
the collection
to his children,
it is peculiar
that he would
not want his
granddaughter
to see them
first --unless,
E'S of course,
Grandpa has
BOX already sold
many of the
coins and doesn't want
anyone to know

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers col-
umn. Email anniesmail-
box@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mail-
box, c/o Creators Syndi-
cate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox
and read features by
other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists,
visit www.creators.com.


-- Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
In 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7p.m., 8 p.m.
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 7:35
p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 5 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13)1:50
p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 2 p.m.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)


1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
4:15 p.m. No passes.
"300: Rise of an Empire" (R)
In 3D. 1 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No
passes.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Mr. Peabody and Sherman"
(PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Son of God" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7p.m.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Mrs. Homer
Simpson
6 Money owed
10 Discard
15 That lady
18 Audibly
19 Burned the
surface of
21 Desire
22 Fastening device
24 Feather
25 Memorial Day event
26 Stair part
27 Punta del-
28 Destiny
29 Did perfectly
31 Titleholder, for short
33 Strain
35 Pitcher
37 Covered with frosting
38 Incline
39 Change
40 statesman
42 Condition
43 Broad comedy
44 Held dear
46 Extra
47 Painter--Chagall
48 Go quickly
52 Misleading story
53 Usual weather
54 Spoiled
56 Evergreen tree
57 The cream
58 accompli
59 Aflower
60 Silly
62 Stop ona-
63 Protective
headgear
65 Table scrap
66 Orwell or
Foreman
67 --rule
68 Cleveland's lake
69 Suspend
71 Shipping
container
73 Depend
75 Resinous
substance
76 Self-esteem
77 Point
78 Flatboat
82 Rounded molding


84 Learning
85 Ill-mannered
86 Time
87 Billfold
90 Is able to
91 Kind of scholar
93 Boast
94 Equally
95 Card with two pips
97 Culture medium
98 A relative
99 Favorite -
100 South Dakota's capital
102 Wooden rod
104 Old messenger
105 Animal rights gp.
107 Lean
108 Ague
109 Church official
110 Stick out
112 Like the Capitol
113 Raccoon relative
114 Infest
117 Warning signal
118 Nanny
119 Watson or Bovary
123 NT book
124 Brick relative
125 Squirm
127 The dawn
personified
128 Amino-
129 Oil source
131 Take a breath
133 To pieces
135 Valley
136 Kitchen gadget
137 Go unsteadily
138 Perceive
139 Directed
140 Baking need
141 Unwanted plant
142 Diner


DOWN
1 Hard wood
2 Permit
3 Itinerary
4 Sticky substance
5 Perfect place
6 Casino worker
7 Kind of seal
8 Nail
9 Turner or Danson
10 Scuffle


Misdemeanor
Coarse file
- Maria
By necessity
Put off until later
Swiftness
Organic
compound
Added flavorings to
Announce
Saucy
Helped
Kind of chest
Abbr. in business
Tell
Fake
Tote
Something
enticing
Malice
Creature of myth
Overnight bag
Creature
Sludge
No longer relevant
Remotely
Hoop
Sapling
Fragrant wood
Cotton cloth
Fabric of wool
Usual food and drink
Wild
Reflect
Some votes
Serf
Seat for a king
"The Hunger-"
Melody
Of a tail
Horseman
Egg portion
Put
Breakfast fare
Shrine in Ancient
Greece
Conducted
Second in charge, for
short
Pilot's "OK"
Hornet
Succulent plant
Yarn fuzz
Snippy
Hemmed and -
Score in golf


Condescend
Gaelic
Unmixed, as
whiskey
Not real
Negative mark
Kiln
Tract of wasteland
Chafed
Links cry


Straw hat
Samovar
Amuse
Wound in spirals
Toward the mouth
Outspoken
Writer Zola
Rescues
Reduce to small parti-
cles


Puzzle answer is on Page A19.


Intended
Code name
A flower
Typewriter type
Yippee!
Facilitate
Rest
- Orleans
Legume


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
First-time surfer Andrew Dombek of North Ferrisburg, Vt., successfully navigates the waves at Playa Guiones in Nosara, Costa Rica. Nosara is a scenic coastal region with a
variety of outdoor recreation activities for visitors.


The beach in Costa Rica: Surfing, riding, fishing


LYNN DOMBEK
Associated Press
GUIONES, Costa Rica -A
vacation to escape the cold led
us to Costa Rica's Pacific Coast,
where we went surfing, horse-
back riding, deep-sea fishing
and even visited a dry tropical
forest. Our extended family of
seven, ranging in age from 17 to
55 years old, ranked it one of
the best vacations ever
But we also felt good about
choosing a destination, Playa
Guiones, that for nine years in a
row has been recognized for
sustainable tourism. The Costa
Rican government's Ecological
Blue Flag program honors
sound ecological practices,
community efforts and coastal
protections.
The consistent surf and long
breaks on Guiones' 3-mile
beach also make it one of the
most popular surfing beaches
around, and it's stunningly
beautiful besides.
The dry season here runs


November to April, and the re-
sult is dry tropical forests and
brilliant blue skies nearly every
day Costa Ricans we met said
the climate remains pleasant
even when the rainy season
starts in May, with sunny skies
in the morning, and rain in the
afternoons.
We arranged in advance for a
van to take us the 70 miles
from the airport in Liberia to
Guiones, and it was waiting
curbside when we arrived. Our
Costa Rican driver was a de-
lightful guide, patiently answer-
ing all our questions and
pointing out highlights along
the way
The ride took nearly three
hours as the two-lane highway
eventually turned into a bone-
jarring dirt road. On the way we
passed by arid pastures with
grazing horses and cattle, one-
story buildings with tin roofs
and dusty yards, sugar cane
fields and melon stands shad-
owed by palm trees.
The small town of Guiones


has a few gift and surf shops,
some restaurants, a bank and a
couple of small markets.
There's no high-end shopping
or rowdy nightlife, and except
for the constant roar of the surf
in the distance, the town quiets
down to near silence by 9 p.m.
Nearly all activity revolves
around the tides, and surfing.
We stayed at Villa Sonita,
which we'd rented through
VRBO.com. It was large and
clean, comfortably outfitted for
two families, and conveniently
located a short walk to the
beach. The owner, Scott Corn-
well, says he first came to the
area 12 years ago when access
was entirely by dirt roads, and
there were only three phones
in town. A lot has changed
since, but it remains a quaint
and lovely place to visit
For a horseback ride along the
Nosara River, our guides were
Eduardo and Raphael Hernan-
dez, brothers who live in the hills
alongside the Nosara with their
families. Eduardo matched each


rider with a suitable horse; I was
relieved to be given the mellow
Parte Blanca, who was more in-
terested in grazing than trotting.
The teenagers were given live-
lier steeds, which Eduardo
urged into gallops, much to their
delight
We rode through dry tropical
forests on a small dirt path.
Midway through we were
served a wonderful lunch of
"comidas tipica" -typical
local dishes by Eduardo's
mother in her home, three
small rooms accessible only by
the dirt path we rode in on.
Eduardo gave us a tour of
their land with its coffee plants
and fruit trees, let us hold tiny
chicks, and cut open coconuts
for us to drink. It was a
wonderful day
The dry tropical forests were
a great adventure we even
saw howler monkeys but the
beach and the surf quickly
drew us in. The teens and the
boldest among us rented surf-
boards and took surfing lessons,


and all were hooked after just a
couple of hours.
The instructors stood pa-
tiently in the ocean as our in-
trepid surfers paddled out
toward the break, turned, pad-
dled like mad as the waves ap-
proached, and practiced
popping up over and over, until
finally they managed a bal-
anced crouch on the board and
rode the waves in, upright! We
spent most of our time at the
beach after that, surfing, going
for long walks, reading, looking
out at the other surfers bobbing
like seals on their boards, wait-
ing for the next big one.
For a final treat we hired a
talented chef from Playa
Guiones, Lisbia Cruz Mora. She
caters to groups on vacation,
serving typical Costa Rican fare
in your home. She was wonder-
ful and the meal was delicious.
And once again, we were glad
to be supporting the local com-
munity and helping to foster an
environment of sustainable
tourism.


MARINE DEBT S R E














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SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A19


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ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

VFW to serve lasagna dinner
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a
fish fry from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
The March 17 St Patrick's Day dinner of
corned beef and cabbage with potatoes
and carrots will be served from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance only
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Game supports Honor Flight
Support Honor Flight by going to the
Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Phoenix Coyotes
game on Monday
Tickets are $60 each, with checks
payable to Honor Flight. Club Level seat-
ing is limited to 50 in Section 208/209 and
is available on a first-come, first-served
basis. The Lightning bus will leave Our
Lady of Fatima Church at 5 p.m. The
church is at 550 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
For tickets, contact Tony Sanchez at 352-
860-1821 or insuranceguy@tampa
bayrrcom, or Barbara Mills at 352-422-
6236 or barbaramills@remax.net.

Celebrate St. Paddy at VFW
Harry E Nesbitt Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 10087 in Beverly Hills will have
a St. Patrick's Day dinner from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday at the post, 2170 Vet Lane, behind
Cadence Bank, on County Road 491.
Donation is $7. Everyone is welcome.

Legion post to do flea market
Wall-Rives Post 58 of the American Le-
gion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, will have
its outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast beginning at 7:30 a.m. Saturday
On the menu are pancakes, French toast,
scrambled eggs, sausages, orange juice
and coffee. Donation is $5.
The public is welcome.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday March 21, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Auxiliary to host dinner
The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 77
will host a dinner dance Saturday at the
post home, 4375 Little Al Point, Inverness.
Dinner will be served from 5 to 6 p.m.
The dance will be from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. On
the menu are corned beef, cabbage, pota-
toes, carrots soda bread, tea, coffee and
dessert. Music will be provided by
Nashville artist John Thomas and The
Rambling Fever Band.
Cost is $15 for dinner and dance, or $10
for just the dance. To order tickets or re-
serve a table for six or more people, call
Alice at 352-476-7001, or the day of the
event call 352-726-0444.

Legion auxiliary to stage
American Legion Post 237 Auxiliary will
stage a yard and bake sale beginning at
8 a.m. Saturday, March 22, in Beverly Hills
Plaza.
Everyone is welcome.
The post is at 4077 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills.

Run, auctions to help vet
Members of the Independence Fund in
Citrus County a nonprofit organization
that supports severely wounded veterans,
will host a poker run on Saturday, March
22.
The poker run, which already has 66
people signed up, will begin and end at
Mickey's Bar and Billiards in Crystal
River and will feature food and music.
After the run, participants can partici-
pate in a silent auction, Chinese auction
and regular auction of several items to
help in fundraising efforts. Organizers
hope to raise $12,000 with the auctions. A
number of businesses have donated gift
certificates to auction off. The goal is to
raise enough money to purchase an all-ter-
rain wheelchair for a severely wounded
veteran.
Auction items will include a foursome
round of golf at Black Diamond Ranch,
golf at Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club
and golf at Twisted Oaks, Brentwood, Cit-
rus Hills, Lakeside and others. A queen-
size quilt in honor of the leader in this
effort, Linda "Road Queen" Dalton, will
also be auctioned.
Call Charles Mills at 352-746-5672 or
Linda Dalton at 352-232-2376.


WELCOME HOME F
P US MARINE CORPS Q

SGT, DERICK THOMAS PIERCE
.__ -.i ...


Special to the Chronicle
Sgt. Derick Pierce and Barbara Mills, president of Operation Welcome Home, join family members and representatives from
various organizations at the ceremony welcoming Pierce back from his overseas deployment.



Marine corps veteran honored


Special to the Chronicle

Operation Welcome Home (OWH),
Citrus County's volunteer organization
honoring local military veterans at
completion of their tour in the war on
terrorism, conducted a ceremony Feb.
28 at American Legion Post 155 to
honor a veteran who served in Opera-
tion Enduring Freedom in
Afghanistan.
The group welcomed U.S. Marine
Sgt. Derick Thomas Pierce, who
served with Headquarters Battalion,
3rd Marine Division, Truck Company
This military unit has a storied his-
tory of heroic operations in the war on
terrorism.
In 2005, three female Marines with
Truck Company were part of a 16-
truck convoy transporting foreign se-
curity force Marines and other U.S.
Marines back from an entry control
point when a vehicle carrying a bomb
ran into one of the 7-ton tactical vehi-
cles. Three women died a 20-year-
old who had enlisted to support her


mother, a 21-year-old former cheer-
leader and a 43-year-old single mother
on her second tour in Iraq. They were
the first female U.S. military person-
nel to be killed in Operation Iraq
Freedom. Three male Marines also
died.
Sgt. Pierce, a graduate of 2009 Crys-
tal River High School, is now home
serving in the inactive Marine Corps
until 2017 while attending a local
emergency medical technician school.
At the ceremony, local veterans' or-
ganizations, along with civilian
counterparts presented items
to thank the returning Marine for his
service.
Sgt. Pierce's grandmother asked
John Stewart, the master of cere-
monies, to read a family statement
about Sgt. Pierce.
"Derick has always been a special
person," said Linda Pierce.
"He has brought joy, humor, and love
to family and friends and has always
shown a strong commitment and dedi-
cation for what he values. He has in-


tegrity, a strong moral code, and a pas-
sion for life.
"We believe that his faith and the
support from his family, friends, and
church were with him during his mul-
tiple deployments. We are very proud
of him and grateful that he has re-
turned home," Stewart read.
Barbara Mills, Operation Welcome
Home president, presented a large
basket filled with gift cards and other
item in appreciation of Sgt Pierce's
heroic service.
"We are so thankful to have you
home safe and sound," said Mills.
"Welcome home Marine and thank
you for serving America!"
OWH needs gift card and monetary
donations to allow the organization to
continue the program. If you are a
business or private citizen wishing to
donate you can learn more by calling
Mills at 352-422-6236, mailing her
from the website at wwwoperation
welcomehomeveterans.org, or by
mailing John Stewart at
cornhusker69@yahoo.com.


Legion Riders raise $4,750


Special to the Chronicle
American Legion Riders Chapter 237 at 4077 N. Lecanto Highway raised $4,750 at the fourth annual Poker Run held
Saturday, Jan. 25. Proceeds benefitted Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian Cancer Research and patients and families served by
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast. Pictured with the American Legion Riders Chapter 237, from left, behind check,
are: American Legion Post 237 Commander Ray Roby, Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast Director of Development
Linda Baker and American Legion Riders Chapter 237 Director and Poker Run chairperson John Roby. The event
encompassed six stops, including Inglis Amvets, I.R.R.U. Social Club, Giovanni's Hernando, Crystal River Eagles, Mickey's
Billiards and Scoreboards. "We send our thanks out to our generous sponsors and to our riders," Roby said. "This was our
most successful event and everyone had a great time."




All-Airborne golf tourney set for March 22


Special to the Chronicle
The fourth annual Daniel
S. Campbell All-Airborne
Chapter, 82d Airborne Divi-
sion Association Golf Tour-
nament will be March 22 at
the Citrus Hills Golf&
Country Club's Oak Course
in Hernando.
Congress chartered the
82d Airborne Division Asso-
ciation in 1944. The Associa-
tion's nine Florida chapters,
as well as its chapters na-
tionwide, work diligently to


support assistance pro-
grams that benefit active
duty service members and
veterans.
Check-in for the four-per-
son scramble is 7:30 a.m.,
with a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. Individuals and groups
short of four persons will be
combined to make four-per-
son teams. Golfers need not
be a veteran to participate.
Entry fee is $55. Charita-
ble tax-deductible contribu-
tions for door prizes and
hole sponsorships for $300


and $50 are available. A
$300 hole sponsorship in-
cludes a foursome and busi-
ness card ad in the
chapter's monthly newslet-
ter
Each golfer's donation in-
cludes golf and cart, bever-
ages on the course and
lunch at the country club.
The tournament features
prizes for a hole-in-one,
closest to the pin and the
first-, second- and last-fin-
ishing teams, plus door
prizes.


Hole sponsorships and
participating golfers should
make their check or money
order payable to Daniel S.
Campbell Chapter and send
it with the form to Stephen
C. Leonard, 3848 E. Wilma
St., Inverness, FL 34453 no
later than March 20.
For registration form,
hole sponsorship or more
information, call 352-726-
3693 or email
teacup47@yahoo.com or
visit wwwcitruspurple-
heart.org.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Veterans panel sets meet
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Co-
ordinating Committee will conduct its initial
planning meeting for Citrus County's 22nd an-
nual Veterans Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 19, in the Conference Room
of the Citrus County Chronicle Building, 1624
North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River
All veteran service organizations are en-
couraged to send representatives to partici-
pate in the planning process.
Individual veterans are also welcome to par-
ticipate.
Any organization or person desiring addi-
tional information should call committee
chairman Chris Gregoriou at 352-795-7000.

Purple Heart will convene
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will conduct its
bimonthly meeting at 1 p.m., Tuesday, March
18, at the Citrus County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto, located approximately a half mile
south of State Road 44.
All combat wounded veterans and parents,
lineal descendants, spouses and siblings of liv-
ing or deceased Purple Heart recipients are
invited to attend the meeting and to become a
Chapter 776 member
To learn more, visit the Chapter 776 web site
at wwwcitruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-
3847.

VFW to serve beef, cabbage
The public is welcome to join VFW Post
4337 for a corned beef and cabbage dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Mar 15, at the post
home; 906 State Road 44 East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7, and includes dessert. Music
will be by Charlie De.
For more information call 352-344-3495 or
visit www.vfw4337.org.


NEWS NOTES

Celebrated t Patrick's information, call Elsie at 352-666- For more information, call 352-
Celebrte St. r l 2220 or Randi at 352-796-7016. 795-5307.
Day in Crystal River Moose Lodge on Relay for Life party


St. Patrick's Day will be cele-
brated from 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. in
downtown Crystal River Monday
Sponsored by Burkes of Ireland,
the event will feature entertain-
ment and food.
The Leprechaun Run, a 5K race
for charity, also begins at 8 a.m.
There is a $15 entrance fee. The
Dog Walk Parade, a dog/people pa-
rade for charity, begins at 10 a.m.
with a $15 entrance fee.
The shops of downtown Crystal
River will be offering St. Patrick's
Day specials and themed events all
day
For information call 352-436-
1806.

Dinner to mark
St. Patrick's Day
The Sons of Norway, Sun Viking
Lodge 607 plans a catered St
Patrick's Day celebration at 2 p.m.
Sunday, March 16, at Regency Oaks
Civic Association Clubhouse, 4445
Breakwater Blvd., Spring Hill.
There will be a corned beef and
cabbage dinner Prices are $16 for
adults and $9 for children 13 to 16
and free for children 12 and under
Reservations are required and
payment is due 10 days in advance.
Call Gail at 727-863-3145 or Clair at
352-596-2171. The public is wel-
come.
Sons of Norway is an interna-
tional fraternal society open to per-
sons of Scandinavian background,
affiliation by marriage or anyone
interested in Nordic culture. For


the search for stars set for Thursday


Loyal Order of the Moose Crystal
River Lodge 2013 will conduct
"Star Search" starting from 4 to 7
p.m. Sunday and continuing each
Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m. with finals
on March 30.
Members and guests are invited
to participate. There will be a small
entry fee and participants must
register Prizes for finalists are $150
for first, $75 for second and $50 for
third. Rules are available at the
lodge.
Hot dogs, pizza and snacks will
be available.
For more information, call the
lodge at 352-795-7030.

Freshman orientation
Thursday for Pirates
Attention futiture freshmen Pi-
rates: If you are planning to attend
Crystal River High School in the
fall of 2014, then you and your par-
ents are invited to attend Fresh-
man Orientation Night from 6 to 7
p.m. Thursday, at Crystal River
High School.
This is an important event for all
eighth-graders who will be attend-
ing CRHS in the fall. Come and ex-
plore elective choices before
completing and turning in course
selection forms. Meet guidance
counselors, teachers, coaches, club
sponsors and administrators. Meet
high school students who will talk
about the opportunities waiting for
freshmen at CRHS.


All are invited to the Crystal
River/Dunnellon Relay for Life
Team Party at 6:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Crystal River Middle School
Auditorium.
Wear your choice of cancer-
awareness color for spirit points.
There will be updates on event ac-
tivities, spirit points, awards, team
captain gifts and fundraising up-
dates.
RSVP to Rory Wells at rory
wellsrelay@gmail.com.

BioBlitz seeking help
BioBlitz is looking for volunteers
to help on Saturday and Sunday
There are three-hour shifts avail-
able for each job location 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. and 11:30 to 2:30 p.m. If
you cannot give us that much time,
let us know the specific times you
can help out.
Our needs are for one volunteer
shift at the information and sign-in
desk; three volunteer shifts for
parking attendants; two volunteer
shifts for the entrance gate; and
one volunteer shift for garbage and
latrine monitor
Visit www.watershed
ecology.org/bioblitz.html to view the
schedule and pick your events) of
interest. The website gives more
detail, including proper clothing
and protective gear Some activities
require advance registration.
For more information email Jean
Holbrook atJEHolbrookl@aol.com.


Citrus County -



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VETERANS & COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A21


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A22 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 EXCURSIONS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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5


Associated Press
Birds roam on the beach at the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center near Key Largo. The bird sanctuary accepts donations but has free admission.


Florida Keys creatures: Fish, birds, 6-toed cats


Associated Press
KEY LARGO -Activities for visitors
to the Florida Keys range from snorkel-
ing, boating and fishing to bar-hopping
in Key West at sunset. You don't even
have to leave your car to enjoy the tran-
quil scenery of water and sky on either
side of the toll-free Florida Keys Over-
seas Highway, a series of bridges and
roads that connects the 125-mile chain
of islands. And while the Keys are not as
well-known for beaches as other parts of
Florida, a few spots like lovely
Sombrero Beach in Marathon are
worth a visit.
But wherever your wanderings


through the Keys might take you,
chances are you'll encounter some of
the islands' many creatures on land, in
the sea or flying overhead. Tarpon fish
crowd the docks at waterfront restau-
rants, birds and tiny Key deer abound in
nature preserves, and stingrays can be
seen through glass-bottomed boats at
John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park.
And six-toed cats have the run of the
place at Ernest Hemingway's home in
Key West. Here are some details.
UNDER THE SEA
One of the first major attractions you
hit driving through the Keys from Miami
or Fort Lauderdale is Pennekamp Park.


Glass-bottomed boat tours are offered
three times a day (9:15 a.m., 12:15 p.m.
and 3:15 p.m.) to the offshore coral reef
The tours take about 2 1/2 hours and
you're likely to see sharks, stingrays and
smaller tropical fish through the clear,
angled panels in the floor of the boat
once you reach the reef; http://pen
nekamppark.com/, adults, $24, kids
under 12, $17. Snorkeling and other
boating excursions throughout the Keys
offer views of wildlife as well.
RESCUED BIRDS
Also in Key Largo, the Florida Keys
Wild Bird Center (near mile marker 93)
is a sanctuary for rescued and rehabili-


tated wild birds, http://fkwbc.org. You'll
see falcons, owls, cormorants and more
in large cages, but there are also wild
pelicans freely strolling about. More
wild birds can be found on the beach
nearby Admission to the center is free
but donations are encouraged.
HUNGRY TARPON
The Hungry Tarpon Restaurant at
Robbie's Marina in Islamorada is a Keys
institution. The food is good and reason-
ably priced, with everything from fish
tacos to Key lime pie, but the main at-
traction is what you see, not what you
See CREATURES/Page A23


For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
352-563-5592.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
An Atlantic bottlenose dolphin named Tanner is shown
during a demonstration at the Dolphin Research Center
on Grassy Key in Marathon.


CREATURES
Continued from PageA22
eat Outdoor tables overlook the water, which is
crowded with tarpon. For $3.30, customers can buy a
bucket of tiny fish to toss to the tarpon from a dock.
Pelicans float and waddle around, too, hoping to snag
whatever the tarpon miss. Restaurant customers get
free access to the dock; others can pay $1 to watch the
scrum, http://wwwhungrytarpon.com/, 77522 Overseas
Highway, Islamorada (a right after crossing the bridge
past mile marker 78, then another right).
TINY DEER
As you get to the Lower Keys, signs warn you to slow
down and watch for Key deer, an endangered species.
The small animals with white tails can often be seen
by the roadside in the vicinity of Big Pine and No
Name Keys, which are part of the 8,000-acre (National
Key Deer Refuge, http://www.fws.gov/nationalkeydeer/.
But you won't find a traditional park entrance. In-
stead there are a few trails accessed from Key Deer
Boulevard where you can take a short hike. If you're
lucky, you'll encounter a deer or two in the brush in a
moment of mutual surprise. From U.S. 1 on Big Pine
Key at mile marker 30.5, turn north on Key Deer
Boulevard and drive 2.8 mi. to the Blue Hole trail


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(park on the left). The entrance to the Jack Watson and
Fred Mannillo Trails is a bit farther down the road.
Reminders: Early morning and late afternoon are best
times for wildlife viewing, but don't feed the deer! A
visitor center is located in the nearby Winn-Dixie
Shopping Plaza.
DOLPHINS
The Dolphin Research Center in Marathon on
Grassy Key offers hands-on training in the care of ma-
rine mammals for would-be professional caregivers
and trainers, http://wwwdolphins.org. But the center
also welcomes visitors daily (adults, $23;
children 4-12, $18), offering narrated presentations
every half-hour with the opportunity to observe the
center's dolphins and sea lions. Pricey interactive ex-
periences are also available, such as a 20-minute
"Dolphin Dip" for $119 which involves interacting
with a dolphin in the water
Other places in the Keys offering interactive


Page A24


KNEE PAIN?


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CITRUS COUNTY
LOCATIONS
Inverness
2231 Highway 44 West
Suite 203
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400
Lecanto
521 N. Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746.0707


S~rl Cls Medicine Hoeow are L Seno


I


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 A23


3


I .-.I I A


1000000"k.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A Key deer is shown in the National Key Deer Refuge in the Florida Keys. It's not unusual to spot the tiny animals with white tails by the side of the road or wandering on
trails in the 8,000-acre National Key Deer Refuge in the vicinity of Big Pine and No Name Keys. The animals are endangered species.


ANIMALS
Continued from Page A23
dolphin programs are
Dolphins Cove, Key
Largo; Dolphins Plus, Key
Largo; Theater of the Sea,
Islamorada; and Dolphin
Connection at Hawks Cay
Resort, Marathon, Duck
Key
TURTLES
Sick and injured sea tur-
tles have their very own
hospital in Marathon at
mile marker 48.5. The Tur-
tle Hospital has released
more than 1,300 rehabili-
tated turtles into the wild
since it was founded in
1986. Daily tours of the hos-
pital and turtle tanks are
offered on the hour 9 am.-
4 p.m.; adults, $18, children
ages 5-12, $9; http://www.
turtlehospital.org.
HEMINGWAY'S CATS
The Ernest Hemingway
Home & Museum in Key
West offers an entertaining
look at the legendary
writer's life and times, and
you don't have to be a fan
of his fiction or films made
from his work to enjoy the
guided tour Stories of his
travels, his women and his
passions -hunting, deep-
sea fishing, bullfighting -
are fun to hear whether or
not you're familiar with
books like "The Old Man
and the Sea" or 'A
Farewell to Arms."


But one of the most
charming aspects of any
visit is encountering the
40 to 50 cats that loll
about, sprawling on vin-
tage furniture, pristine
bedspreads and in the
yard. Many of the cats are
polydactyl, meaning they
have an extra toe, just
like a six-toed cat Hem-
ingway owned. The kitties


are named after Holly-
wood stars like Clark
Gable and Audrey Hep-
burn. You're not supposed
to pick them up, but they
are amusing to watch.
Tours are offered daily 9
a.m.-5 p.m.; adults $13,
children, $6, http://www
hemingwayhome.com/,
907 Whitehead St., Key
West.


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always get the immediate, life-saving care you need. No matter what the clock says.

These specially trained, board-certified, fellowship trained physicians are exclusively dedicated to
ICU patients. Plus, 24/7 on-site radiologist coverage, with rapid results and immediate consults with
these ICU specialists you will receive the very best in comprehensive critical care-day or night.

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A24 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


ExcURSIONS









SPORTS


Early deadlines
All of Saturday's national
nighttime sports events will
appear in Monday's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College basketball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Auto racing/B3, B6
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 MLB, NBA, NHL/B4
0 Recreational sports/B5
0 Golf/B6


Citrus' Barbee signs with Nebraska Keamrney


'Canes center set

tojoin teammates

Juse, Pouncey
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
That makes it three.
On Friday, in a room at Citrus High
School crowded with friends and family,
the cameras blinked for several minutes
to capture the culmination thus far at
least of C.J. Barbee's moment of fame.
Photos told the story as an ever-chang-
ing assortment of the crowd found their
way to the table at the front of the room
to get their picture taken, with Barbee at
the center of all the attention.
Barbee, a senior at Citrus, was signing
a sheet of paper that would take him to


where Hurricane teammates Jaimee
Juse and James Pouncey had already
decided to go: the University of Ne-
braska Kearney
Another teammate, Steven Knowles,
committed to the school but never signed
and has since re-opened his recruiting.
The chance to play college football with
former Citrus teammates played a part in
Barbee's decision, but it wasn't his only
reason. Barbee, who carries a 4.05 grade
point average, explained that "it did
(make a difference) but Nebraska Kearney
also had my major It's a great fit for me."
His plan is to study pre-law as his
major with international business as his
minor Those programs together with his
football should keep him very busy
Not that he isn't capable. Of the four
recruited by Lopers' coach Darrell Mor-
ris, Barbee may have the best chance to
make an immediate impact. The 6-foot-2,
See Page B3


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus senior offensive lineman CJ Barbee, center, signed Friday morning with Division
II school University of Nebraska Kearney. From left is brother Alex, mother Wendy, CJ,
father Chris Barbee and Citrus assistant football coach Chris Stephenson.


erfec tru


No. 1 Florida

routs Kentucky,

goes 18-0 in SEC

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE With
strands of net behind their ears,
Florida seniors Casey Prather,
Scottie Wilbekin, Will Yeguete
and Patric Young stopped at
midcourt and kissed the floor
They stood up, started walk-
ing toward the locker room and
then paused at the edge of the
court. With their arms draped
around each other, they took
the last stride in unison. It was
the first step toward the next
goal winning it all.
Young scored 18 points in his
home finale and No. 1 Florida
routed 25th-ranked Kentucky 84-
65 on Saturday becoming the first
team in Southeastern Conference
history to go 18-0 in league play
"This is the way to go out,"
Young said. "You couldn't have
scripted this one any better ...
What else could you want?"
Prather (15) and Wilbekin (13)
also reached double figures for
the Gators (29-2, 18-0), who have
won 23 straight and 32 in a row
at home.
Coach Billy Donovan called
timeout with 36.9 seconds re-
maining to get his four seniors
another standing ovation. They
certainly deserved this one, es-
pecially since it was Florida's
largest margin of victory in se-
ries history
"When you invest four years
likes these guys have invested,
it means something to them,"
Donovan said. "They're going to
carry this with them for the rest
of their lives. They're going to
have their children and they're
going to come back here and
they're going to be remembered
for what they've done.
"They've done something
that's not happened here
before."
Prather, Wilbekin, Young and
Yeguete have now won 113
games in four seasons, four shy
of tying the school record held
by Walter Hodge. They have the
SEC tournament and the NCAA
tournament to break the mark


through


Associated Press
Florida forward Casey Prather goes for the basket as Kentucky's James Young (1) comes from behind
during the second half Saturday in Gainesville. The No. 1 Gators won 84-65.


The latest victory seemed a
lock early but was in doubt for
a while in the second half. That
was until no surprise the
seniors took over Wilbekin hit a
3, Young made a running hook


shot and Prather started mak-
ing plays at the rim.
"Those guys answered the
bell," Donovan said. "They
made some plays."
Julius Randle. who had his


right knee treated during the
first half, led the Wildcats (22-9,
12-6) with 16 points and 10
rebounds. James Young added
14 points, and Aaron Harrison
chipped in 10.


Lecanto


takes

2nd at


CR Invite

Wiregrass,

Springstead

win track meet
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Both
the Lecanto High girls and
boys track and field teams
took second places Saturday
at the Crystal River Invita-
tional track and field meet
The Panthers girls had 140
points and Wiregrass Ranch
had 162 points. Crystal
River's girls were fourth
with 105 points.
The Panther boys had 104
points. Springstead was first
with 158 points. Crystal
River was fourth with 91
points.
He's been "King of the
Road" in Citrus County for
several years in Citrus
County but Brandon Harris
has to move on.
The Crystal River High
School senior and distance
standout is enjoying his last
year of track. He was named
Citrus Chronicle Cross
Country Runner of the Year
for 2012.
This spring, he hasn't been
pushing himself on the track.
"I haven't been doing that
great this year," he said. "I've
been pacing younger kids in
the mile and doing my own
thing in the two mile.
"I am looking forward to
college. It will be a big dif-
ference."
He has been accepted to
the University of Tampa and
is looking at Warner Univer-
sity in Lake Wales.
His best two-mile this year
was 10:28. His best in the
one-mile has been 4:40.
He has been gearing up
for his last district.
"We'll see how it turns
out."
Saturday, he was third in
the two mile with a 10:58. He
See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kansas, Arizona both suffer upsets


Associated Press

MORGANTOWN, WVa. -
Eron Harris scored 28 points,
Juwan Staten added 24 and West
Virginia withstood 41 points by
Kansas freshman Andrew Wig-
gins in a 92-86 victory over the
No. 8 Jayhawks.
The Mountaineers (17-14, 9-9
Big 12) led by as many as 25
points early in the second half
before watching Kansas tear
into the deficit behind Wiggins,
who fouled out in the final sec-
onds after setting a season high
in scoring.
Devin Williams, WVU's star
freshman, had a season-high 22
points along with 13 rebounds. It
marked the first time this season
that Kansas had allowed three
opposing players to score 20
points.
Perry Ellis added 14 points for
Kansas (23-8,14-4).
Oregon 64,
No. 3 Arizona 57
EUGENE, Ore. Jason Calliste
made the go-ahead jumper and free
throw with 4:22 left and finished with
18 points as Oregon won its seventh
straight.
Johnathan Loyd added 16 points
for the Ducks (22-8, 10-8 Pac-10)
who greatly improved their chances
of a bid in the NCAA tournament.
Aaron Gordon had 21 points for
the Wildcats (28-3,15-3), who had al-
ready clinched the Pac-12 regular-
season title heading into next week's
conference tournament in Las Vegas.
The Ducks won 13 straight to start
the season and got ranked as high
as No. 10, but then they lost five
straight to tumble out of the poll and
fall in the Pac-12 standings.
No. 2 Wichita State 67,
Missouri State 42
ST. LOUIS Cleanthony Early
scored 20 points with three 3-point-
ers and a pair of dunks, and Wichita
State improved to 33-0 in the Mis-
souri Valley Conference semifinals.
Tekele Cotton also made three 3-
pointers for the top-seeded Shock-
ers (33-0), who matched the start by
Larry Bird and Indiana State in 1979
before they lost to Michigan State
and Magic Johnson in the NCAA title
game. Wichita State will be heavily
favored against Indiana State or
Southern Illinois to make it 34 in a
row, which would match the NCAA-
record start by UNLV in 1990-91.
The Shockers, who last won the
conference tourney in 1987, took
control with a 17-0 run in the first half
and topped it with 24 straight points
in the second, scoring at will while
Missouri State endured droughts to-
taling more than 15 minutes.
No. 6 Villanova 77,
Georgetown 59
PHILADELPHIA- Darrun Hilliard
scored 19 points to lead Villanova to
a dominating victory, preserving the
Wildcats' hopes of a No. 1 seed in
the NCAA tournament.
JayVaughn Pinkston added 13
points, and James Bell and Ryan Ar-


Associated Press
Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins scored 41 points but the No. 8 Jayhawks lost 92-86 to West Virginia.


cidiacono had 11 apiece for the Wild-
cats (28-3, 16-2), who won their sixth
straight game while tying the 2005-
06 team for second-most wins in pro-
gram history. Villanova's 16 Big East
wins are the most in school history.
The 18-point win marked the
largest margin of victory for Vil-
lanova in a Big East game between
the teams.
Markel Starks scored 20 points for
the Hoyas (17-13, 8-10), who are in
jeopardy of failing to make the
NCAA tournament for the first time
since 2009. D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera
added 14 points and Aaron Bowen
had 13 for Georgetown.
No. 11 Louisville 81,
No. 19 UConn 48
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Montrezl


Harrell scored 20 points, Russ Smith
recorded a career-high 13 assists
and No. 11 Louisville claimed a
share of the American Athletic Con-
ference championship.
Harrell added 11 rebounds and
several thunderous dunks to help the
Cardinals (26-5,15-3) finish tied with
No. 15 Cincinnati atop the upstart
league. A coin flip gave Cincinnati
the top seed in the AAC tournament
and Louisville the second seed.
A day in which Smith and fellow
seniors Luke Hancock, Tim Hender-
son and Stephan Van Treese were
honored beforehand as the pro-
gram's winningest class ended with
all playing key roles in their 116th
win together. Smith topped his previ-
ous assist high by two, Hancock
added 16 points, Van Treese


grabbed 13 rebounds and Hender-
son added an early basket.
No. 12 Michigan 84,
Indiana 80
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Glenn
Robinson scored 20 points, includ-
ing a tie-breaking 3-pointer with 1:10
to play, and Jordan Morgan had a
double-double in his final home
game to help Michigan finish off its
Big Ten championship season with a
victory over Indiana.
Morgan had 15 points and 10 re-
bounds for Michigan (23-7 15-3), fin-
ishing a season in which he had
been expected to be a backup until
Mitch McGary injured his back. Nik
Stauskas added 21, furthering his
case for Big Ten Player of the Year.
Will Sheehey led Indiana (17-14,


7-11) with 17 points, while Troy
Williams and Yogi Ferrell added 16
apiece.
No. 15 Cincinnati 70,
Rutgers 66
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Sean Kil-
patrick scored 24 points and No. 15
Cincinnati clinched at least a share
of the American Athletic Conference
regular-season title.
Kilpatrick converted a three-point
play and drove the lane for a layup
in the final 68 seconds as the
Bearcats (26-5, 15-3) rallied from a
late deficit against the Scarlet
Knights (11-20, 5-13).
Justin Jackson had given Cindnnati
a 65-64 lead with 1:46 to play, scoring
underneath after Kadeem Jack
blocked his original shot in the paint.
No. 16 Iowa State 85,
Oklahoma State 81, OT
AMES, Iowa Naz Long forced
overtime with a 30-foot 3-pointer at
the buzzer, DeAndre Kane scored
five of his 27 points in the closing
seconds, and Iowa State overcame
a 16-point deficit.
Kane hit a layup and a pair of free
throws to put Iowa State ahead
82-79 with 11.7 seconds left.
Georges Niang had 22 points for
Iowa State (23-7, 11-7 Big 12),
which snapped a two-game losing
streak and fell behind by as much as
45-29 before rallying.
Markel Brown missed two free
throws with 3 seconds left for Okla-
homa State (20-11, 8-10). Marcus
Smart had 27 points to lead the
Cowboys, but he and Cyclones star
Melvin Ejim fouled out in regulation.
Brown finished with 26 points and
12 rebounds.
No. 20 Memphis 67,
No. 18SMU 58
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Joe Jackson
scored 15 of his 18 points in the sec-
ond half to lead Memphis.
Jackson hit his first four shots
after intermission as the Tigers
(23-8, 12-6 American Athletic Con-
ference) shot 59 percent in the sec-
ond half while building the lead to as
many as 14.
Austin Nichols finished with 14
points and nine rebounds for Memphis.
Nic Moore led the Mustangs
(23-8, 12-6) with 16 points. Nick
Russell and Markus Kennedy
scored 13 each for SMU, which lost
its second straight, the first time this
season the Mustangs have lost
consecutive games.
No. 23 Oklahoma 97,
TCU 67
FORT WORTH, Texas Buddy
Hield scored 24 points and Okla-
homa clinched the No. 2 seed in the
Big 12 tournament.
TCU became the league's first
team in 10 years to go through the
regular season without winning a
conference game.
Isaiah Cousins and Cameron
Clark had 18 points each for the
Sooners (23-8, 12-6), who have won
five of their last six games.


Women's college basketball BRIEFS


No. 1 UConn 72,
Cincy 42
UNCASVILLE, Conn. -
Breanna Stewart scored 22
points Saturday to lead top-
ranked UConn to a 72-42
rout of eighth-seeded Cincin-
nati in the quarterfinals of the
American Athletic Confer-
ence tournament.
Bria Hartley added 17
points for the Huskies (32-0),
Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis
scored 12 and Stefanie Dol-
son had 10 points and nine
rebounds.
No. 2 N. Dame 83,
No. 14 N.C. St. 48
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Jewell Loyd scored 16 points
to help Notre Dame advance
to the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence championship game.
Kayla McBride was among
four in double figures with 10
points for the top-seeded
Fighting Irish (31-0), who had
no trouble putting away the in-
jury-depleted Wolfpack. Notre
Dame scored the first 12
points, led by 28 at halftime
and by 37 from there to con-
tinue their dominating run in
their new league.
No. 3 Louisville 88,
Houston 43
UNCASVILLE, Conn. -
Shoni Schimmel scored 15
points and Antonita Slaughter
added 14 to lead Louisville to
an easy win in the quarterfi-
nals of the American Athletic
Conference.
Sara Hammond added 11
points all in the first 8 min-
utes for the Cardinals (29-3).


No. 12 UK 68,
No. 5 South Car. 58
DULUTH, Ga. Bria
Goss scored 14 points and
Kentucky advanced to the
Southeastern Conference
tournament championship
game.
DeNesha Stallworth and
Linnae Harper each had 12
points for Kentucky (24-7),
which will play in its fourth
SEC tournament final in the
last five years. The Wildcats,
who will face Tennessee for
the championship, won their
only league title in 1982.
No. 6 Tenn. 86,
No. 15 TAMU 77
DULUTH, Ga. Isabelle
Harrison had 20 points and
13 rebounds, and Tennessee
held off Texas A&M to earn a
spot in the SEC tournament
title game.
Meighan Simmons had 15
points and Bashaara Graves
had 14 for Tennessee (26-5).
No. 7 West Va. 67,
TCU 59
OKLAHOMA CITY-Asya
Bussie had 18 points and 13
rebounds to help No. 7 West
Virginia defeat TCU 67-59 in
the Big Ten women's tourna-
ment quarterfinals.
Taylor Palmer scored 11
points and Christal Caldwell
added 10 for the Moun-
taineers, who won their 11th
consecutive game and ad-
vanced to Sunday's semifinals.
No. 9 Baylor 81,
Kansas 47
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Nina
Davis scored 20 points to help


Baylor to an easy win in the
quarterfinals of the Big 12
tournament.
Odyssey Sims, the nation's
scoring leader and Big 12
Player of the Year, added 15
points for the top-seeded
Lady Bears (27-4). Baylor, the
three-time defending tourna-
ment champion, advanced to
play No. 18 Oklahoma State
in the semifinals on Sunday.
No. 10 Duke 66,
No. 13 UNC 61
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Tricia Liston scored 17 points
and Ka'lia Johnson hit the go-
ahead free throws with 44.1
seconds left to help No. 10
Duke rally past No. 13 North
Carolina 66-61 in the semifi-
nals of the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament.
Johnson's two free throws
broke a 60-all tie and helped
the second-seeded Blue Dev-
ils (27-5) avoid a three-game
sweep by their fiercest rival.
Duke went 6 for 6 at the foul
line in the final minute of a
tight game, holding off UNC
freshman star Diamond
DeShields and the sixth-
seeded Tar Heels (24-9).


No. 16 Nebraska 86,
No.19 Mich. St. 58
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -
Tear'a Laudermill scored 20
points and Rachel Theriot
added 18 as Nebraska used a
50-point first half to cruise
past Michigan State in the Big
Ten semifinals.
The Cornhuskers (24-6)
advance to the tournament
championship game against
No. 23 Iowa, the fifth-seeded,
on Sunday.
No. 18 Okla. St. 67,
Iowa State 57
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Brit-
tney Martin scored 17 points
and grabbed 11 rebounds as
Oklahoma State pulled away
late in the quarterfinals of the
Big 12 tournament.
The Cowgirls (23-7) got 14
points each from Tiffany Bias
and Brittany Atkins and
Kendra Suttles, who was
clutch off the bench down the
stretch, had 11.
No. 23 Iowa 77,
Ohio State 73
INDIANAPOLIS Theairra
Taylor scored 21 points and


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made a go-ahead layup with
1:32 left as Iowa held on in
the semifinals of the Big Ten
tournament.
After Taylor's go-ahead layup
gave Iowa (26-7) a 75-73 lead,
AmerystAIston missed a layup
on Ohio State's ensuing pos-
session. Martina Ellerbe then
missed a potential game-win-
ning 3-pointer for Ohio State
(17-18) with 10 seconds left and
Melissa Dixon sunk two free
throws for Iowa with a second
remaining as the Hawkeyes ad-
vanced to the Big Ten title game


for the first time since 2010.
No. 24 Rutgers 68,
SMU 49
UNCASVILLE, Conn. -
Kahleah Copper scored
22 points and Tyler Scaife
added 18 to help Rutgers
rally past SMU in the Ameri-
can Athletic Conference
quarterfinals.
Trailing 35-31 early in the
second half, the Scarlet
Knights (22-8) went on a 18-4
run to take control.
From wire reports


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I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pirates plunk Rays


Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE Russell
Martin homered for the third time
this spring and drove in four runs to
lead Francisco Liriano and the Pitts-
burgh Pirates to a 10-5 victory over
the Tampa Bay Rays on Saturday
Martin had an RBI single during a
six-run first inning against Rays
starter Matt Moore. The catcher
added a three-run homer off Grant
Balfour in the fourth. With six hits in
his last 10 spring training at-bats,
Martin has boosted his average to
.462 through five games.
Liriano allowed one run and four
hits in three innings. The left-han-
der walked one and struck out three.
Nationals (ss) 4,
Cardinals 4, 10 innings
JUPITER Trevor Rosenthal had a
pain-free spring training debut and
Michael Wacha pitched three effective
innings for the St. Louis Cardinals in a
4-4 tie with a Washington Nationals split
squad that was called after 10 innings.
Groin pain prompted the Cardinals to
sideline Rosenthal for a few days this
spring, but that wasn't a problem Satur-
day. The hard-throwing closer said he's
nearly in regular-season form following
his first Grapefruit League appearance.
Mets 3, Tigers 2
LAKELAND Drew Smyly pitched
three scoreless innings and struck out
three in the Detroit Tigers' 3-2 loss to the
New York Mets.
Smyly, who is returning to the Tigers
rotation after going 6-0 last season while
pitching in 63 games out of the bullpen,
walked one batter in his third start of the
spring.
Non-Roster outfielder Matt Clark out-
fielder had a two-run, pinch-hit double in
the ninth inning to give the Mets their
only lead of the game.
Marlins 6, Braves (ss) 6
KISSIMMEE Jason Heyward went 3
for 3, Justin Upton drove in three runs
with a single and a double, and an Atlanta
Braves split squad tied the Miami Marlins
6-6 in a game stopped after nine innings.
Heyward, who hit his second homer of
the spring Friday against Boston, has
hits in five straight at-bats, raising his av-
erage to .348.
Casey McGehee homered and Rob
Brantley had a three-run double and a
single for the Marlins.
Freddy Garcia, who had retired 15
straight batters in his first two starts for
the Braves, allowed six runs on six hits
and four walks before being pulled after
2 2/3 innings.
Nationals (ss) 8,
Braves (ss) 2
VIERA- Ryan Zimmerman and
Adam LaRoche homered to lead the
Washington Nationals over the Atlanta
Braves 8-2 in a split-squad game.
Ross Detwiler, the leading candidate
for the No. 5 spot in Washington's rota-
tion, gave up one run and six hits in two-
plus innings. The left-hander continued to
work on throwing more off-speed pitches
instead of relying mostly on his fastball.
Taylor Jordan, another fifth-starter
candidate, followed with three strong in-
nings and struck out six.
Yankees 9, Astros (ss) 6
KISSIMMEE Kelly Johnson home-
red after Mark Teixeira's first hit of the
spring, and the New York Yankees beat
a Houston Astros split squad 9-6.
Teixeira, playing in his second spring
game after missing most of last season
due to wrist surgery, led off the third in-
ning with a long double off reliever Darin
Downs. Johnson hit the next pitch for his
first homer.
Chris Carter hit a three-run homer for
the Astros, and Jose Altuve had two hits
and scored twice.
Ivan Nova gave up three runs and
eight hits in four innings in his second
sprig start for the Yankees. Carter's first
spring home run came off Manny Banue-
los, the 23-year-old left-hander who
didn't pitch last season after having
elbow surgery.
Phillies 11, Astros (ss) 3
CLEARWATER Carlos Ruiz and
CodyAsche each hit a three-run homer
to send the Philadelphia Phillies past a
Houston Astros split squad 11-3.
Asche connected in the fifth inning to
give the Phillies a 3-1 lead, and Ruiz's
drive in the sixth made it 7-3.
Astros starter Dallas Keuchel held
Philadelphia hitless for three innings. His
only baserunner came on a walk, and he


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays relief pitcher Jake McGee warms up in the eighth inning
Saturday against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Port Charlotte.


struck out two.
Keuchel has been solid in his first two
starts this spring, giving up one hit in five
shutout innings.
Phillies starter Roberto Hernandez
walked four and struck out four in 3 1/3
innings.
Indians 4, Padres 4,
10 innings
PEORIA, Ariz. Michael Brantley ex-
tended his strong start to the spring with
four more hits, including two doubles, as
the Cleveland Indians tied the San Diego
Padres 4-4 in 10 innings.
In five Cactus League games, Brant-
ley is hitting .615 (8 for 13) with three
doubles.
Josh Johnson went three innings for
the Padres. The right-hander had a
rough first inning, giving up all three of
his runs one on a wild pitch. He al-
lowed four hits, though one came when
left fielder Seth Smith lost Jason Kipnis'
fly ball in the sun, and walked one.
Diamondbacks (ss) 6,
White Sox 4
GLENDALE, Ariz. White Sox pitcher
Jose Quintana was hit in the shin by a
line drive and removed from Chicago's
64 loss to an Arizona Diamondbacks
split squad after just two batters.
The left-hander gave up a leadoff sin-
gle toA.J. Pollock, then Gerardo Parra
lined one off Quintana's left leg. The
White Sox said Quintana was diagnosed
with a bruised shin and is day to day.
Quintana, who walked off the field,
said he does not expect to miss a spring
start.
Rockies 5, Athletics 4
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Brett Ander-
son pitched three positive innings in his
first start against his former team, help-
ing the Colorado Rockies to a 5-4 victory
over the Oakland Athletics.
The left-hander allowed one run on
three hits and struck out one.
Anderson was Oakland's opening-day
starter a year ago. But he spent four
months on the disabled list, was de-
moted to the bullpen and then traded in
December.
Troy Tulowitzki had an RBI double in a
three-run first against As starter A.J.
Griffin.
Oakland manager Bob Melvin was
ejected in the seventh for arguing a
strike call. He was gone by the time
Shane Peterson lost Ben Paulsen's fly
ball with two outs in the ninth. It fell in
front of him, and Cristhian Adames
scored from first to win it.
Mariners (ss) 18, Giants 3
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Backed by
early two-run homers from Brad Miller
and Michael Saunders, right-hander
Erasmo Ramirez cruised through four
scoreless innings to send a Seattle


Mariners split squad to an 18-3 rout of
the San Francisco Giants.
Ramirez earned his second victory in
his third start of the spring by giving up
one hit and walking one while striking
out four.
Ryan Vogelsong struggled in his first
start of the spring after two relief appear-
ances for San Francisco. He gave up
seven runs (five earned) and six hits in
2 1/3 innings. He walked one and struck
out two.
The Mariners scored four times in the
first on the homers by Miller and Saun-
ders. Seattle added five more runs in the
third, helped by a pair of Giants errors.
Cubs 9, Reds 0
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Nate Schier-
holtz hit a two-run homer and made a
diving catch for the Chicago Cubs in their
9-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds.
Schierholtz's drive off Alfredo Simon
followed a walk to Donnie Murphy in the
first inning. Schierholtz also singled and
scored in the third. Ryan Kalish singled
and scored twice for the Cubs.
Joey Votto doubled twice and walked
in three trips for the Reds.
Brewers 7, Royals 6
PHOENIX-Aramis Ramirez hit a
three-run double in the first inning on the
first pitch he saw this spring, and the Mil-
waukee Brewers beat the Kansas City
Royals 7-6.
The third baseman made his first start
since having surgery in early January to
remove a polyp from his colon. Ramirez
went 2 for 2 with a walk and scored a run
in his spring debut.
Marco Estrada, making his third start
of the spring for the Brewers, gave up
three runs and seven hits in 3 1/3
innings.
Dodgers (ss) 5, Rangers 5
SURPRISE, Ariz. Paul Maholm
pitched three steady innings and Mike
Baxter went 2 for 2 with two RBIs for a
split squad of Los Angeles Dodgers in
their 5-5 tie with the Texas Rangers.
The game was halted after nine
innings.
Adrian Gonzalez walked with the
bases loaded for the Dodgers. Maholm
allowed one run on three hits with four
strikeouts and no walks.
Gonzalez, who is hitting .353 in seven
games, drew a five-pitch walk from Tan-
ner Scheppers in the third to bring home
Justin Turner.
D'backs (ss) 5, Angels 2
TEMPE, Ariz. Didi Gregorious dou-
bled in two runs and Paul Goldschmidt
added an RBI double in the Arizona Dia-
mondbacks split-squad's 5-2 win over
the Los Angeles Angels.
Archie Bradley gave up two hits in
3 1/3 scoreless innings for the
Diamondbacks.


Bruins 4,
Lightning 3, SO
TAMPA- Reilly Smith
scored the lone shootout
goal in the seventh round to
lead the Boston Bruins past
the Tampa Bay Lightning 4-3
on Saturday night.
Smith put an in-close shot
between the pads of Ben
Bishop. Bruins goalie Tuukka
Rask caught a break on
Tampa Bay's seventh
shootout attempt when
Richard Panik hit the post.
The Bruins got regulation
goals from Daniel Paille,
Carl Soderberg and Johnny
Boychuk.
Ondrej Palat, Mark Barbe-
rio and Valtteri Filppula
scored for the Lightning.
Boston pulled even at 3
when Boychuk snapped a
20-game goal drought 8:11
into the third. The Bruins
have outscored their oppo-
nents 78-43 during the third
period this season.
Devils 5,
Hurricanes 4
NEWARK, N.J. Tuomo
Ruutu scored with 6:30 to play
against his former teammates,
and the New Jersey Devils
earned a 54 victory over the
Carolina Hurricanes after
squandering a three-goal lead.
Red-hot Adam Henrique
added two more goals, and
Travis Zajac and Damien
Brunner had the others as
the usually defensive-
minded Devils had another
lax game in their own end.
Jeff Skinner, Jay Harrison,
Nathan Gerbe and Alexan-
der Semin scored for Car-
olina, which has lost seven
of eight. Gerbe and Semin
tallied in the third period to
make it 4-4.
Ruutu, acquired by New
Jersey from Carolina on
Wednesday, scored the
game winner with a shot
from between the circles that
was set up by an outstand-
ing play by defenseman
Marek Zidlicky.
Senators 5, Jets 3
WINNIPEG, Manitoba-
Ales Hemsky had three as-
sists in his second game
with Ottawa, and the strug-
gling Senators held off the
Winnipeg Jets 5-3.
It was Hemsky's first
points for the Senators since
he was acquired on
Wednesday from the Ed-
monton Oilers. He was
placed on Ottawa's top line.
Milan Michalek scored the
game's first goal during a
power play with an assist
from Hemsky and center
Jason Spezza, who had


'Canes blank Tigers
in district play
Backed by Alex Atkinson's
efficient outing, the Citrus
baseball team defeated Dun-
nellon 5-0 on Friday night.
Atkinson allowed just
three hits and a walk while
striking out four batters in six
innings for the victory.
Austin Bogart threw a
scoreless seventh inning and
also led Citrus at the plate
(3 for 4, two doubles, two
runs, RBI).
Ben Wright (two RBIs),
Robert Wilkinson (run) and
Cody Bogart (RBI) each had
two hits.
Citrus (5-3 overall, 3-0
district) play 7 p.m. Tuesday
at Williston.
Warriors' huge
rally earns win
Down 14-7 in the sixth in-
ning, the Seven Rivers
Christian softball team
scored eight times in the last
two frames to earn a wild 15-
14 home victory over
Gainesville St. Francis
Catholic on Friday night.
Tessa Kacer went 3 for 4


three assists.
Defensemen Jared
Cowen and Eric Gryba, and
Kyle Turris and Mike Hoff-
man also scored for Ottawa
(28-25-11), which had lost
two straight and four of five.
Craig Anderson stopped
46 shots for the Senators.
Bryan Little scored his
20th of the season, and To-
bias Enstrom and Dustin
Byfuglien also had goals for
Winnipeg (30-28-7).
Blues 2, Avs 1
DENVER Ryan Miller
stopped 26 shots, and David
Backes broke up a scoreless
game in the second period,
helping the St. Louis Blues
beat the surging Colorado
Avalanche 2-1 Saturday in a
Central Division showdown.
Patrik Berglund added a
pivotal insurance goal early
in the third period as the
Blues won their fourth
straight.
Colorado finally solved
Miller midway through the
final period when PA. Par-
enteau lifted a shot over him
while he was trying for his
first shutout in nearly two
years. Miller is 4-0 since
being acquired from Buffalo.
Avalanche forward Nathan
MacKinnon had his point
streak snapped at 13
games. It is the NHL's
longest streak by an
18-year-old player.
Miller withstood a furious
rally by the Avalanche in the
final two minutes after they
pulled goalie Semyon Var-
lamov.
Capitals 3,
Coyotes 2
WASHINGTON -Troy
Brouwer scored a power-play
goal off a rebound to cap a
rally from a two-goal deficit in
the third period as the Wash-
ington Capitals beat the
Phoenix Coyotes 3-2.
After failing to score in the
first 49 minutes against Mike
Smith (30 saves), Washing-
ton tallied three times in a
span of 5 minutes, 2 sec-
onds. Carl Alzner started the
surge with a goal at the 9:45
mark. Just 32 seconds later,
Brooks Laich tied it on a feed
from Jason Chimera.
It was a successful Wash-
ington debut for goalie
Jaroslav Halak, who made 31
saves. Halak, acquired from
the Buffalo Sabers in a dead-
line deal on Wednesday,
helped Washington snap its
three-game losing streak.
Brandon McMillan and
Radim Vrbata scored for
Phoenix, with Keith Yandle
assisting on both.
From wire reports


with a triple and five runs
scored, while Warriors team-
mate Delaney Byers was 3
for 4 with a triple, three runs
and five RBIs.
Alyssa Gage (3 for 4, two
runs, three RBIs) and Alexis
King (2 for 4, home run,
three runs, RBI) also en-
joyed explosive perform-
ances on offense.
Sixth-grader Allison
Phillips also had a diving
catch to save two important
runs in the sixth inning for
Seven Rivers, who is 5-2
and hosts Wildwood on
Tuesday.
Panthers drop
preseason game
to Vanguard
The Lecanto girls flag foot-
ball team took a 36-7 loss to
Ocala Vanguard on Friday
night.
Stephanie Bandstra
caught a touchdown pass
from Dani Ronzo for
Lecanto's lone score. Band-
stra and Cassandra Swartz
each intercepted a pass.
Lecanto plays Monday at
Trinity Catholic.
From wire reports


INVITE
Continued from Page BI

was also third in the mile
with a 4:51 clocking.
CR Invitational
track and field
meet results
Lecanto's Britney Vick-
ers took second in the high
jump with a 4-10. Crystal
River's Madison Winship
was third with the same
height
Lecanto's Matthew Giar-


diano won the adaptive
shot put with a 23-5 toss.
Lecanto's Harrison
Mancke won the girls shot
put with a 33-4 toss.
The Lecanto girls took
third in the 4x800 relay
with a 11:09.12.
The Crystal River boys
won the 4x800 with a
8:43.78. Harris, Adam Ben-
nett, Nick Hays and Ryan
Spivey were on the team.
Crystal River's Abigail
Epstein was third in the
girls triple jump with a 31-
foot effort.
Crystal River's Hayley


Clark won the pole vault
with a 10-6 effort. Team-
mate Angela Byrne was
second with the same
height
Lecanto's Danyelle
Ulloa won the girls 100
meter hurdles with a 16.89.
Summer VanQuelef was
second with a 16.92.
Lecanto's Claire
Farnsworth won both the
girls 1,600 meters and the
,200 meters. She took the
1600 meters with a 5:33.71.
She took the 3,200 meters
with an 11:06.
The Lecanto girls were


second in the 4x100 with a
54.3.
The Crystal River boys
were third in the 4x100
relay with a 48.03.
Lecanto's Andreanna
VanQuelef won the 400
meters with a 1:02.
Lecanto's Jacob Rice
won the boys long jump
with a 21-3.
Lecanto's Dylan Stoner
won the boys shot put with
a 49-5.
Crystal River's Noah
Howard won the boys 400
meters with a 57.94.
Lecanto's Matthew Gia-


rdino won the 800 Adaptive
with a time of 2:30.44. Gia-
rdino also took the 200 me-
ters adaptive with a 35.89.
Crystal River's Angela
Byrne won the 300 hurdles
with a 48.97. Lecanto's
Summer VanQuelef was
second with a 49.55.
Lecanto's Joey Cruz took
third in the boys 300-meter
hurdles with a 47.71.
Lecanto's Jeff Burnette
won the pole vault with a
12-6.
Crystal River's Hayley
Clark was third in the 200
meters with a 27.94.


Crystal River's Hunter
Roessler was second in the
boys high jump with a
6-foot leap.
Lecanto's Harrison
Mancke won the girls dis-
cus with a 103-9 effort Crys-
tal River's Rebecca Roe
was second with a 98-2.
Crystal River's Roessler
took third in the boys 200
with a 24.56.
The Lecanto girls took
third in the 4x400 meter
relay with a 4:26.92 time.
The Crystal River boys
were third in the boys
4x400 relay with a 3:52.86.


NHL BRIEFS


Sports BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Men's flag football title decided


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ations 2013-14 Fall/Winter Men's
Flag Football league finished
Thursday, Feb. 27 at Homosassa
Area Recreational Park.
The Tie Dye team earned the
league title by defeating Blue 25-
20 in the championship game.
Spirits were high as the play-
off rounds commenced. Tie Dye
took the first win and sealed its
spot in the championship game
by beating Green 39-6. Blue and
Pink battled in the second play-
off game of the night, with Blue
coming out on top. Blue de-
feated Pink with a score of 19-13.
It was a great season and
Parks & Recreation hopes to see
all of the teams return.
For more information on
Men's Flag Football or any other
adult league, please contact Cit-
rus County Parks & Recreation
at 352-527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
P.L.A.Y.
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's P.L.A.Y. programs are de-
signed for children ages 3-5 who
aren't quite ready for the organized
sports leagues with in the county.
The P.L.A.Y. programs offered in
the upcoming session include: bas-
ketball which will be held at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center on
Monday or Wednesdays; and flag
football located at Bicentennial Park
on Tuesday or Thursdays.
The next session begins the week
of March 31. Boys and girls are en-


Special to the Chronicle
The Tie Dye team won the 2013-14 Fall/Winter Flag Football league on Feb. 27 at Homosassa Area
Recreational Park.


courage to join the six-week pro-
gram. After enrollment, each child
receives age appropriate sports
equipment and a team T-shirt.
Registration opens on Monday,
March 10. Please contact Crysta
Henry, recreation program specialist
for youth programs, at 352-527-
7543 or visit www.citruscountyparks.
com, for more information.
All programs and activities offered
by the Division of Parks and Recre-
ation are available to all persons
without regard to race, color, handi-
cap, sex, religion or national origin.


For persons with disabilities requir-
ing special accommodations, please
contact our office five days prior to
the program so that proper consider-
ation may be given to the request.
For hearing impaired, please contact
352-527-5901 (TTY) or 352-527-
7540 (Voice).
Youth Golf Lessons
Registration for spring golf lessons
opens on Wednesday, March 12.
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
- in partnership with Pine Ridge
Golf Course -will be holding youth


golf lessons. The lessons will be
held at Pine Ridge Golf Course on
Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m., begin Wednesday, April 2
and run for four weeks. Children
ages 6-15 are eligible and the cost is
$50 per child. Instruction will be
given by golf pro Randy Robbins
and several of his volunteers. During
these lessons participants will learn
putting, driving, chipping, on-course
play, and on-course etiquette.
For more information contact
Crysta Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth programs at


352-527-7543, www.citruscounty
parks.com, or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.
Men's softball
Registration for men's softball
opens on Wednesday March 12.
Players must be 17 years old and
up. Games are held at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River. The league is
set to begin the week of April 28.
Kickball
Our co-ed kickball league is for
adults 17 and up. It is a great way to
meet new people and get some ex-
ercise while having fun. Games are
at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30
p.m.on Tuesdays at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River, lasting an hour
or nine innings, whichever comes
first. The new season begins starting
the week of April 28. Registration
starts on March 12.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to
start the week of April 28. Games
are played at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River on Thursdays starting
at 6:30 p.m. Registration will begin
on March 12.
All players must be 17 and up to
participate. There is a $50 registra-
tion fee and league fees will be de-
termined by the number of teams
that register
For more information regarding
any of Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's adult leagues, please
visit www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-527-7540.


Bound for state


Special to the Chronicle
From left, Ethan Kennedy, Lindsey Cohee, Dylan Earnheart, Genevieve Kennedy and Jason "Jake" Steel all
qualified for the FLAG championship


Special to the Chronicle

Sun Coast Swim Team (SCST)
sent six swimmers to the 2014
Florida Swimming Spring Age
Group Championship (FLAG) and
the 2014 Florida Swimming Spring
Senior Championships.
Lindsey Cohee, 14, Ethan
Kennedy, 14, and Genevieve
Kennedy, 10, qualified to compete
at the 2014 Florida Swimming
Spring Age Group Championship
(formally known as the Florida Jun-
ior Olympics) at the Selby Aquatic
Center in Sarasota on March 13-16.
Cohee, Dylan Earnheart, 17,
Ethan Kennedy and Jason "Jake"
Steel, 17, qualified to compete at
the 2014 Florida Swimming Spring
Senior Championships at the
YMCA Orlando, which took place
from Feb. 27 to March 2.
The SCST girls are standouts this
year as Cohee qualified to swim a
team-record 10 events. Cohee said


she is really excited and looking
forward to the experience. She has
competed at FLAGS before, but this
will be her first time competing at
senior champs.
"I am glad that a few of my team-
mates will be there swimming with
me. I am confident we will do well,"
Cohee said.
Her goal is to get personal best
times in all her events, most espe-
cially in the 100Y and 200Y butterfly
"Another goal is to make finals in
my off events and to learn the races
as well as I can," Cohee said.
In addition to Cohee, the other
SCST girl heading to the state
champs is Genevieve Kennedy
Kennedy will be the first SCST 10
and under girl to ever qualify for
the Florida Swimming Spring Age
Group Championship in the over 20
year history of the swim team.
Each of the swimmers gave credit
to their coaches for their accomplish-
ments. SCST head coach Tim Holme


said, "The continuing goal of Sun
Coast swimming is to provide the op-
portunity for swimmers of all abilities
to reach their maximum potential."
Home also gave credit for the
team's success to the Citrus County
Parks and Recreation department's
support and to the SCST volunteers
whose dedication to the swimmers
has helped them reach their
personal best goals.
Swim coach Richard Tangeman
said about their accomplishments,
"Our championship-designated
swimmers and their supportive
teammates are all super students,
athletes and future community con-
tributors. These events will help
them and those around them move
forward in swimming and help
them to have a bright future."
For more information on the swim
team visit the Sun Coast Swim
Team's web site at www.
SunCoastSwimTeam.com or call the
Bicentennial Park Pool 352-795-1478.


SCORE golf
tourney in April
The 16th annual SCORE
golf tournament will be held
on April 7 at Sugarmill
Woods Country Club in
Homosassa on April 7. The
tournament is hosted by
Citrus County SCORE, who
offer free counseling to small
businesses. SCORE is look-
ing for players and sponsors
at the tournament.
The player entry fee is $60
including lunch. Sponsorship
for a hole or tee is $100 with a
sponsor receiving a free
foursome greens fee for use
at a future date in 2014.
For registration information
or to sponsor a hole, call Jim
Green at 352-249-1236 or
www.citruscounty.score.org.
Golf tourney to
benefit shelter
A golf tournament to benefit
the Citrus County Animal
Shelter in Inverness will be
held at the Royal Oaks Golf
Club in Ocala on April 19.
The benefit is called Hope's


Legacy, in honor of a little
stray dog named Hope that
was adopted by a loving fam-
ily. The fundraising event
strives to bring similar hope to
many other loveable shelter
animals, will help to make
needed improvements at the
aging shelter and also will
help pay for the special med-
ical needs and surgeries for
injured animals.
Opportunities for sponsor-
ships ranging from $100 to
$400 are available for individu-
als, corporations or busi-
nesses. They include printed
signs at tees advertising the
business name or donor. Entry
fee is $40 and includes green
fees, cart fees, various prizes
and lunch. A cruise raffle and a
silent auction will be offered.
Information regarding spon-
sorship and in-kind donations
are available from Citrus
County Foundation for Animal
Protection at 352-302-2664 or
352-249-7801.
For information regarding
golf sign-ups, call Marti Little
at 786-367-2834.
From staff reports


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus United Girls U14 soccer team won second
place at the eighth annual Tampa Presidents Day Soccer
Tournament held at the 301 Youth Sports Complex in
Temple Terrace. Pictured is, back row, from left, coach
James Waugh, Allie Fisher, ChiChi Nkwocha, Haley
Waugh, Callie Borst, Yesi Mondragon and head coach
Richard Valerio. Middle row, from left, is Stacey Borgen,
Emily Akers, Kayci Lindquist and Katy Valerio. In the front
row, from left, is Dana Houpt, Kallie Weidner, Emily
Hooper, Cassie Pleus and Jessie Walker.


Pair of Wildcat teams win Crystal River Clash


Special to the Chronicle
The 7th grade Citrus Wildcats boys team won The Crystal River Clash, hosted by Hoops
Link, on March 2. The Wildcats beat West Coast Florida Magic in the finals and were un-
defeated for the tourney. The team is, back row from left, coach Vilardi, Cayden Gunter,
Byron Foster, Caden Loreth, Daniel Nesby, Steven Brooks and coach Loreth. The front row,
from left, is Peyton Vilardi, Sean Murray, Kyle Mitchell, DeAndre Parker and Jaden Williams.


Special to the Chronicle
The lOth-grade Citrus Wildcats boys basketball team won the Crystal River Clash on
March 2 at Crystal River Middle School. The team is: back row, from left, coach Padilla,
coach Grasso, Jared Cleary, Greg Buettner, Josh Cole, Brendan Brown, Tyler Pollard,
Jacob Padilla and coach Justin Ward. In the front row, from left, are Matteo Loiero,
Kenon Wright and Tre Scrivens, while Steven Elliot is sitting.


-- Recreation B R I E FS


RECREATION SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 B5








Reed in the lead Changes likelyto
________________ affect NASCARs


Vegas race


Associated Press
Patrick Reed hits from the 13th tee during the third round of the Cadillac Championship golf tournament Saturday in Doral.


Golfer builds 2-shot
cushion at Doral"
Tiger in the mix
Associated Press
DORAL Patrick Reed turned
his game around in four holes Sat-
urday and wound up with a 3-under
69 in much tamer conditions at
Doral, giving him a two-shot lead at
the Cadillac Championship going
into a final round that will promi-
nently feature Tiger Woods for the
first time this year
Reed rolled in a 40-foot eagle putt
on No. 8, and started the back nine
with consecutive birdies. He drove
the green on the par-4 16th for a
two-putt birdie and wound up with
a two-shot lead over PGA champion
Jason Dufner (68) and Hunter
Mahan, who bogeyed his last hole
for a 71.
Woods delivered the low round of
the tournament and his best round
of the year
He made three birdie putts of
about 15 feet or longer on the back
nine, including a 35-footer down the
slope on the par-5 15th, and had a 6-
under 66. His goal was to get back to
even par for the tournament and
hope to be within five shots of the
leader
It turned out much better
Woods was one of five players
who were under par, and he goes
into today only three shots behind
as he tries to win at Doral for the
fifth time. Jamie Donaldson of
Wales escaped from the palm trees


right of the 18th and made par for a
71 to share fourth place with Woods.
"It was nice to get back in the
tournament again," Woods said.
Reed will be going for his third
win in his last 14 starts dating to the
Wyndham Championship in August.
He was at 4-under 212, the highest
score to lead after 54 holes at Doral
since a three-way tie at 212 in 1985.
Asked what it would be like to see
Woods in a red shirt ahead of him
today, Reed didn't seem bothered.
"That's fine. I've seen Tiger a lot
on the driving range. Never had the
opportunity to play with him and I
still haven't been able to play with
him," he said. "Whenever he's close
to the lead, he's a guy you have to
watch out for But at the same time, I
have to go and just play my own
game."
Reed did that beautifully playing
with Dustin Johnson, which he said
is the reason he had his second
54-hole lead of the year He earlier
won the Humana Challenge.
The lack of big wind certainly
helped with scoring and attitudes
on Saturday The average scores
was 72.6, compared with 76.0 in the
second round, allowing for plenty of
movement on the leaderboard on a
sunny afternoon in Miami.
"Now it's playing more like a nor-
mal course," Woods said.
A dozen players were within five
shots of the lead.
Dustin Johnson failed to birdie
three of the par 5s and chopped up
the 14th hole, which featured one
shot he hit left-handed. He birdied
the last hole for a 73 that put him at
even-par 144, along with Miguel
Angel Jimenez (69) and Zach
Johnson (71).


Jimmy Walker, already a three-
time winner this season who is
starting to feel like contending is a
habit, had a 67 and was in the group
five shots behind with Bubba Wat-
son, Graeme McDowell and Matt
Kuchar
"The tournament will not be over
until the last putt drops on 18,"
Mahan said. "That always happens,
but it seems like you just can't coast
in here. You can't have a big enough
lead going into 18 this week. So I
don't think anyone is going to be too
bothered if someone gets out to a
three- or four-shot lead, because
there's so much golf out there. And
there's so much that can happen -
good and bad."
And it did on Saturday
Woods made his move early and
late, pouring four birdies in eight
holes to go out in 33. Looking confi-
dent with the putter, he made birdie
putts of 15 feet on No. 11, 20 feet on
the par-5 20th, and then followed
his long birdie putt on the 15th with
a bunker shot that narrowly cleared
the clip and settled a few feet away
for birdie on the 16th.
His only blunders came on par 3s
- a three-putt bogey on No. 4 and
taking two shots to get out of the
bunker on No. 13.
"I held it together yesterday a
long day, tough day and that gave
me a chance today," said Woods,
who scratched out a 73 in the sec-
ond round. "I figured, 'Hey, I'm only
six back. That's definitely doable,
especially with the conditions and
how difficult this golf course is play-
ing. If I just get back to even par for
the tournament, I'll be right there.'
And I did one better"


Associated Press
LAS VEGAS NASCAR
is about to start finding out
whether its offseason
changes will pay off on
tracks like Las Vegas
Motor Speedway
NASCAR worked tire-
lessly behind the scenes
last year to improve its on-
track product, particularly
at 1.5-mile speedways that
had turned into glorified
parades. After the drivers
opened the season on Day-
tona's superspeedway fol-
lowed by Phoenix's quirky
mile oval, it's time for the
first of 11 races on 1.5-mile
tracks.
While fans watch de-
fending champion Matt
Kenseth and early points
leader Dale Earnhardt Jr,
everybody on the north
end of The Strip is eager to
see if passing is any easier
and if the racing is any bet-
ter Sunday in Vegas.
Gene Stefanyshyn,
NASCAR's vice president
of innovation and racing
development, warned that
one show won't be a true
barometer of the changes
made to the rules package.
"We can't jump too
quickly and say that this is
the answer," Stefanyshyn
said. "Some teams will
take some time to figure it
out. I think the aero piece
of it, it's pretty much set.
It's just a matter of getting
the driver to find the limit
and feeling comfortable
with the aero.
"But the chassis, the en-
gineers will play around
with it for a while until that
settles down. Then the
driver will begin to find the


sweet spot and get comfort-
able. We won't have a good
feeling where all this lands
until we get about three
under our belt, and that
would be the Texas race."
NASCAR's new package
also will be scrutinized
March 23 at Fontana and
April 6 at Texas.
Those three races last
year had a combined 57
lead changes. In compari-
son, this year's Daytona
500 had 42 lead changes.
NASCAR won't get
Daytona-like passing at
speedways, at least not
anytime soon. And Ste-
fanyshyn wants to give this
rules package some time
before tinkering again.
"There's a learning curve
here," he said. "I think you
can't be too premature on
this. There's a lot of cars.
There's a lot of different en-
gineers, a lot of different
thoughts on getting down
the learning curve. So we'll
wait and see and see how it
all plays out"
Junior's jump
Dale Earnhardt Jr. has
never won at Las Vegas, and
he frequently struggled in Sin
City early in his career. But his
outstanding start to the sea-
son suggests he might be ac-
complishing a whole lot of
firsts this year. The Daytona
500 champion had top-three
finishes at the final two
1.5-mile tracks of last season,
and his Vegas confidence is
strong after a testing session.
Vegas bookmakers always
depress Earnhardt's odds be-
cause of his popularity, but
he's truly among the favorites
for a big finish.


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. puts on his helmet during qualifying for
today's NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race on Friday in
Las Vegas.


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B6 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NMUE









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



When innocents die, mercy's in short supply


he headline of last
Monday's Chronicle
gave me a start. It an-
nounced that the U.S.
Supreme Court was consid-
ering the appeal of a
Florida man who wants his
death sentence overturned
because he is mentally
handicapped.
Freddie Lee Hall was a
name that stirs deep emo-
tion with me. I was with
Freddie that night in Febru-


ary of 1978 when he got ar-
rested for the murder of a
Hernando County deputy
and the rape and execution
of pregnant Lake County
woman.
In fact, chances are pretty
good that it was the pres-
ence of our group of re-
porters and photographers
that protected Freddie and
his co-murderer Mack
Ruffin from dying that
very night.


I was a young reporter in
Hernando County and was
friendly with Lonnie
Coburn, the sheriff's deputy
who was shot and killed by
Hall and Ruffin at a con-
venience store in Ridge
Manor
Earlier that same day, the
two men had kidnapped
Karol Hurst, a 21-year-old
Leesburg woman. They
were driving her car when
they stopped at the conven-


ience store with the thought
of robbing it.
No one knew at that time
that Hall and Ruffin had al-
ready kidnapped Ms. Hurst
and taken her down a rural
road in North Sumter
County where they sexually
assaulted her She was
seven months pregnant and
begged for her life. She
even wrote the two men a
$20,000 check to pay for her
safety


Instead, they beat her to
the ground and then shot
her in the back of the head.
The $20,000 check was
found underneath her body
Not an ounce of mercy for
a pregnant woman.
When they exited the
convenience store in Ridge
Manor, Deputy Coburn was
waiting for them. A scuffle
ensued and Coburn was


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle file
The Key Training Center joins in the efforts to bring awareness and understanding during March National Developmental Disability Awareness
Month, encouraging you to learn more about the fears, hopes and challenges that confront the developmentally disabled and their families
and how this community can and does impact the quality of their lives. Each July, the Key Training Center's Run for the Money fundraiser
not only raises money but awareness to the struggles facing many developmentally disabled individuals.




THE BIGGEST




CHANGES COME




FROM NEIGHBORS

NEALE BRENNAN
Special to the Chronicle

Imagine what your life would be like if your child were diagnosed with a lifelong
condition that would change the fiber of your family forever Envision the devastation
you might experience as you are told that although there is no cause and reason for
guilt, there still is no cure, there is no fix, there is no remedy


Then picture further if you were walk-
ing in the shoes of that child with the
fears, hopes and confrontations of those
with developmental disabilities. Consider
the daily challenge of existing in a world
that reveres beauty, status and wealth.
How would it feel to be seen as different
by people who do not understand?
The Key Training Center, a nonprofit
organization providing services to adults
with developmental disabilities, joins in
the efforts to bring awareness and un-
derstanding during March National
Developmental Disability Awareness


Month, encouraging you to learn more
about these fears, hopes and challenges
that confront the developmentally dis-
abled and their families and how this
community can and does impact the
quality of their lives.
Historically, social attitudes toward
people with disabilities have presented
significant problems. People have a nat-
ural tendency to be uneasy around those
they think of as different from themselves
and such uneasiness often leads to mis-
conceptions and even fear Men and
women with disabilities are often


painted with a broad brush. For cen-
turies, typical perceptions often included
unwarranted beliefs that they are sick,
stupid or pose a danger
It has only been in the past few
decades, through the efforts of parents,
advocates, self-advocates and profes-
sionals, that remarkable progress has
been made toward the inclusion of adults
with developmental disabilities. Today's
services are driven by a vision that is
based in the belief that individuals with


Page 03


Fifty years ago, attack ads still a D.C. delicacy
Fifty years ago, attack ads still a D.C. delicacy


MIKE ARNOLD doubts about their opponents'
Chronicle abilities and past performance.
I'll admit I pretty much tune this
While watching a recent flurry stuff out, but it is irritating to
ofAlex Sink/David Jolly political think that this tactic works.
attack ads, I realized I had Attack ads have been around
learned nothing about either for decades. They work because
opponent they prey on the fears of voters.
The two politicians are running Fifty years ago, people were
for the seat of deceased U.S. worried Russia was going to drop
Rep. C.W Bill Young, who died a nuclear bomb on the United
Oct. 18,2013. Instead of focusing States. LyndonJohnson ran an ad
on the candidates' strengths, the of a girl picking daisy petals who
ads misinform while raising is, following a voiceover count-


down, obliterated by an atomic
blast Johnson's voice then chimes
in and he says, among other things,
"We must either love each other,
or we will surely die." The ad
was attacking opponent Barry
Goldwater's aggressive stance
on managing the Cold War
During that same election year
50 years ago in Citrus County, we
did not have negative ads. In
fact, they focused on the individ-
ual candidate, touting their
qualifications and character for


the job. Here is a sampling of
some of the campaign literature
that appeared in the local news-
papers in 1964:
Wade H. Langley, sheriff's
candidate -A lifelong resident
of Citrus County, Korean War
veteran and member of the
Lecanto Baptist Church. If
elected, he vows to "maintain
and enforce law impartially and
give rural areas law enforce-
ment protection."
Harvey Levins, county com-


missioner seeking re-election -
Levins says population increases
and explosive growth face the
county and he is the best candi-
date because of his experience.
Levins said, "With my years of
active participation in all phases
of county administration, my
knowledge of how to do things
correctly in the first place, and
in the most economical way, will
be of greater value to you ...
See PageC3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC4






OPage C2- SUNDAY, MARCH 9,2014



PINION


"Most people have seen worse things in private
than they pretend to be shocked at in public."
Edgar Watson Howe, "Country Town Sayings," 1911


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SV Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


MISMANAGEMENT




Hard lessons




learned from




mishandling




of a lease


he bureaucratic bumbling
involving the lack of
payment by a national
propane company that leases
land from Citrus County has
produced some learning
opportunities.
As has been extensively re-
ported, Citrus County somehow
forgot to collect lease payments
from Amerigas Propane Company
for a slice of land near Whisper-
ing Pines Park in Inverness.
The lease payments, which
amounted to about $650 a year,
have gone uncollected for more
than 20 years. This
comes despite the
fact that records in- THE I
dicate the issue has Lesso
been brought to the Lesso
attention of county Amerig
leadership on more
than one occasion. OUR 01
Yes, the leadership Take th
has changed many seriously
times over those 20
years, but there is no
real excuse for the sloppiness.
Then came word that one
member of the county commis-
sion Dennis Damato of Crys-
tal River owns a small amount
of stock in Amerigas Partners,
the national company that owns
the local affiliate. For those who
want to believe in conspiracies,
the stock ownership provides
just the right amount of fodder
County staff needs to move
quickly to regain the confidence
of local citizens.
As regular Chronicle readers
know, county commissioner
Scott Adams has portrayed the
Amerigas issue as a sign of cor-
ruption and he has asked the
Florida Department of Law En-
forcement to investigate. The
state agency has come to Inver-
ness and interviewed those in-
volved. A report of the FDLE
findings is forthcoming.
County government should
move quickly to resolve the
issues.
First, Amerigas needs to
demonstrate some good faith
and make payment on the entire
amount of lease payments owed
to Citrus County While legally
the county might not be able to
force the company to comply be-
cause of the statute of limita-
tions, we'd like to see an act of
concerned corporate leadership
and for Amerigas to do the right
thing.
Second, county government
needs to have the clerk's office
do a complete review of any
other land or building leases
that exist to make sure there
aren't any other Amerigas prob-
lems out there.


CALW

563-0579


Third, the county needs to
move forward and swap this
land with the city of Inverness
for the city property out at the
airport. The problem with this
lease surfaced when the two
governments discussed swap-
ping the land. Inverness needs
the Amerigas land to connect
the Withlacoochee Trail bike
path to Whispering Pines Park.
The county needs city prop-
erty at the airport to give access
to expanded airport facilities.
That deal still makes good sense,
and needs to move forward.
The final learn-
ing opportunity in-
SSUE: volves the
ns from potential conflicts
fso. of interest that
as fiasco. exist for all elected
members of county
PINION: government.
ihe issue Commissioner
y and act. Damato may not
think his $3,900 of
stock in Amerigas
poses a conflict, but it does in
the mind of some county citi-
zens. Damato has nothing to do
with the local company and he
clearly recorded the ownership
on his financial disclosure
forms.
But he should have made it
clear from the very beginning of
this bitter debate that this was
an issue. Commissioner Damato
should not be party to the debate
or any resolution.
The bigger question involves
all five commissioners and their
private financial holdings.
Citizens do not want any com-
missioner to personally benefit
from any decision they may have
to make while doing their offi-
cial job.
That's why we criticized Com-
missioner Adams about his own-
ership interest in a Sumter
County landfill, and that's why
we offer the same criticism to
Commissioner Damato.
We want our politicians to
stand above the mayhem. If any
board member has stock or an
interest in a business, we want
them to go out of their way to
make the public aware and to
stand down when any business
involving that holding comes be-
fore the board.
There is an anti-government
drum beating in our community
Our elected officials need to rec-
ognize the movement and do
their best not to dump gasoline
on an open fire.
They can do that through an
appropriate amount of intro-
spection and a total trans-
parency of any potential
conflicts.


Test the politicians


This is about today's paper (March 6,
page A2), "Bill addressing low nursing
school test scores" in Florida. Well, I think
they ought to have a test that people need
to take before they can be allowed to run
for office. They ought to have a minimum
test score and at least a minimum of a
high school diploma. I think there is quite
a few politicians in this state that can
barely read and write, have hardly any edu-
cation and don't understand what's really
going on, especially in Citrus County. We
have a couple of really good ones here
that would definitely not pass the test.


Why tax reform is doomed


ere are a dozen reasons
why the tax overhaul plan
that House Ways and
Means Chairman Dave Camp of
Michigan released last week -
or, indeed, any bill labeled "tax
reform"- will not pass this year:
It is an election year, and law-
makers don't take risks in elec-
tion years. The bill was crafted
by a Republican, so the Democ-
rats in the Senate will never
give it a fair shot. At its heart is
"dynamic scoring,"
an arcane account-
ing practice that as-
sumes lower taxes
spur higher rev- r
enues, a notion De-
mocrats aren't about 1 <
to accept. The eco-
nomic recovery, while
not robust isn't weak
enough to prompt David S
substantial changes OTH
in the tax code.
Wait there's more: VOI
Camp's involvement
in the movement to stop new
IRS regulations governing so-
cial-welfare groups alienates
some lawmakers and provides
an excuse to spurn his tax pro-
posal. Some Republicans won't
support Camp's drive even if
they agree with his precepts be-
cause they don't want to be
identified with a proposal that
has few prospects in the Senate.
Every fat-cat special interest
group in Washington watch
especially for the Realtors, who
don't want to undermine the
much-overrated home mort-
gage deduction will mobilize
against it.
Still more: Democrats are of-
fended they weren't consulted
by Camp. They're also miffed
the Republicans were briefed
before they were. The proposal
doesn't have a big-name co-
sponsor President Barack
Obama and the Republicans
will never agree on a major ini-
tiative. The political conditions
in 2014 don't begin to replicate
the conditions in 1985-1986 that
produced the last tax overhaul.
Here is one reason why the
Camp proposal, or another tax
overhaul, should pass this year:
The United States tax code is
an unredeemable mess.
Into this mess waded Camp,
who had hoped the bipartisan
super-committee on budget is-
sues might have tackled tax
overhaul four years ago. He's
devoutly conservative he
once rated a "0" score from the
liberalAmericans for Democratic
Action, a badge of honor on the
right. He's also devoutly com-
mitted to his quixotic mission.
Camp defeated his Demo-
cratic rival by a margin of
nearly 2-to-1 in 2012 far big-


h
I
C


ger than former Gov Mitt Rom-
ney's margin over Obama in the
same district- and his winning
percentage in a dozen races in
his district in Central Michigan
has never dipped below 61 per-
cent and once, in 1994, soared
to 73 percent.
Almost everyone on both
sides of the aisle comments on
how mild-mannered he is. Ex-
cept on one issue: the tax code.
His reprise line is that the tax
code is 10 times the
size of the Bible
without the good
news. The proposal
- (. | he unveiled
Wednesday would
S,.A reduce the top rate
from 39.6 percent to
25 percent for all but
some of the top 1
iribman percent of filers,
who would be sub-
IER ject to a 10 percent
DES surcharge on some
---- income.
Of course it was declared
dead on arrival by all the coro-
ners on Capitol Hill, who are
better at performing autopsies
than playing midwife to suc-
cessful births. And in truth,
there are some things about the
Camp proposal that are not to
everyone's taste or, to change
senses but not tenses, there are
in the Camp plan (many) things
on which all lawmakers do not
see eye to eye.
Camp and some others be-
lieve his proposal would spur
growth of more than $3 billion,
create nearly 2 million new jobs
and bring an additional $700
billion in additional revenues.
Maybe it will and maybe it
won't, but Camp deserves a hail
and hurrah for even bringing
the matter to the table.
There was a time, four
decades ago, when the tax code
had grown so hoary and mossy
that a man could run for presi-
dent and declare in his accept-
ance speech at his party's
national convention that the
country's income tax system
was a "disgrace to the human
race" (Jimmy Carter, July 15,
1976). He didn't prevail and it
took his successor, Ronald Rea-
gan, more than five years (May
28, 1985) to begin his public of-
fensive an offensive that
brought a landmark tax over-
haul in 1986.
In truth, the political circum-
stances of 1985-1986 are far dif-
ferent from the circumstances
in Washington in 2014.
In those years, a popular Re-
publican president held Con-
gress in his sway, even bringing
along many Democrats to his
tax and spending initiatives.
Today a Democratic president


LETTER to the


Not what we came for
"Call a place paradise, kiss
it goodbye..."
This quote from an Eagles
song refers to the effects of
rampant over-development
along the Southern California
coastline. A little of the same
may be happening here in
southern Citrus County
My wife and I moved to Oak
Village in Sugarmill Woods
from Washington, D.C., sev-
eral years ago. We were look-
ing for quiet surroundings,
natural beauty, friendly
neighbors, and a calmer pace
of life after 40-plus years in
the military, government serv-
ice and the private sector. We
specifically chose this idyllic
community because we felt
confident it would remain so
for many years to come. But,
hello...
We recently learned that a
developer has requested a
permit to extend our beauti-
ful, tree-lined Oak Village
Boulevard to the Hernando
County line. This maneuver is
suspected to be the first
phase of a plan to connect to
a 40-acre tract of land which
will be developed into a hous-
ing complex. The road exten-
sion was not requested by
Sugarmill Woods or Oak Vil-
lage. It is strongly opposed by
the residents of the commu-
nity and would have a devas-
tating impact on our quality
of life.
If this "improvement" is
permitted to go forward, traf-
fic will increase exponen-
tially, property values will


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

plummet, wildlife habitat
will be lost forever and peo-
ple will gradually move out of
Citrus County altogether.
Representing almost
8 percent of the population
of the county, the residents
of Sugarmill Woods signifi-
cantly contribute to the local
economy, fund the county
government with higher-than-
average property tax assess-
ments and provide long-term
stability for the surrounding
communities.


with tepid approval ratings has
no sway at all with the House
and minimum influence in the
Senate. In those years, tax over-
haul had many fathers (Democ-
ratic Sen. Bill Bradley of New
Jersey and Rep. Richard A.
Gephardt of Missouri along
with Republican Sen. William
Roth of Delaware and Rep.
Jack E Kemp of New York), and
it was a bipartisan push.
Today's Camp bill lost its Dem-
ocratic sponsor, former Sen.
Max Baucus of Montana, sworn
in 10 days ago as the new Amer-
ican ambassador to Beijing.
The Reagan effort was the
sort of spectacle that only the
Gipper could swing. His co-
conspirator was Rep. Dan Rosten-
kowski, the gruff Chicago pol
who headed the House Ways
and Means Committee, and in
Reagan's nationwide address
he urged Americans: "Write a
letter to Washington. Just address
itto Rosty, Washington, D.C." Two
days later, Treasury Secretary
James A. Baker, no one's idea of
a Republican-in-name-only, ap-
peared before the tax-writing
committee sporting a large black-
and-white "Write Rosty" button.
The following elements of 1985-
1986 are missing today: The kind
of goodwill that would prompt a
GOP president to elevate a De-
mocrat like Rostenkowski, who
died in 2010, from Capitol power-
broker to national celebrity A
president who can make his pri-
orities the priorities of Congress.
A chief executive who has
enough self-confidence to share
the limelight and the credit along
with the responsibility A Treas-
ury secretary with Baker's will
and acumen to steer the process.
Strong Senate leaders, such as
Sen. Robert J. Dole, adept in the
unwritten rules of the chamber
and with credibility on both
sides of the aisle and on both
sides of the Capitol.
This is the environment in
which the notion of tax overhaul
is being discussed, or being
dissed: Almost six in 10 Ameri-
cans give below-average grades
to Washington, according to a poll
the Marist Institute for Public
Opinion conducted last month
for the McClatchy newspapers.
Tax overhaul may not be the
public's highest priority but the
prospects for Camp's initiative
help explain why the public de-
mands an overhaul of the Wash-
ington political culture.
--In--
David M. Shribman is executive
editor of the Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette. He can be
reached via email at dshribman
@post-gazette.corn or on
Twitter at ShribmanPG.


Editor
What I find interesting is
that the county government
can apparently approve such
a permit without:
1. considering the impact it
will have on the residents of
an established neighborhood;
2. seeking the advanced ap-
proval of the citizens for
whom it works; or,
3. even simply informing
residents of what's about to
happen. Equally puzzling is why
a developer can be allowed to
use private funds to improve
a residential roadway man-
aged by the county without
consulting with the property
owners association or seeking
approval from the Board of
County Commissioners that
we elected ostensibly to rep-
resent us. Of course, all of
this was supposed to happen
in complete secrecy, with res-
idents waking up one morn-
ing to the sound of chainsaws,
road graders and paving rigs.
Something is fundamen-
tally wrong with this picture.
It lacks accountability, trans-
parency, and simple Southern
courtesy Residents of Sug-
armill Woods are doing every-
thing we can to stop this
blatant ambush before it gets
started.
For my fellow Citrus County
neighbors, thanks for the sup-
port, keep your eyes open,
and insist on transparency,
accountability and citizen-
oriented service from our em-
ployees and representatives
in local government.
Eugene White


Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No, you can't


"No, you can't always get
whatyou want... butifyou
try sometime, well you
might find you get what
you need."
"You Can't Always
Get What You Want,"Mick
Jagger and Keith Richards,
c. 1968.
I know that it is unusual
for me to begin a col-
umn with words by a
'60s rock group. It is not
uncommon for me to use
something from the Bible,
but from the Stones?
Why did I do it?
The quotation mirrors
what I was thinking at the
time I was writing this
piece.
Cheryl and I are old peo-
ple. She doesn't look it. I


do. But that's not the point;
as old folks, we watch
things on TV such as cook-
ing shows and travelogues.
Recently both of these fea-
tures have had folks crack-
ing crab claws or crab legs
and pulling out the beauti-
fully white and luscious
meat.
I love crab meat, but I
can't eat it.
That is, not unless I'm
ready for the proverbial
dirt nap. No other seafood
gives me a problem, and
crab didn't either until
20 years or so ago. Then, I
started to feel a bit uneasy
after eating crab. This pro-
gressed until the very last
time I had an out-of-this-
world delicious fried soft-
shell crab and I thought I


always get w

was actually going out of this Cheryl. She was not only
world. I wasn't feeling just a what I wanted, but most
little bit yucky: my pulse rate definitely what I needed.
became accel- But, back in
rated, my lips 1982 after I de-
became numb, r cided it was
my eyes swelled time to fully
shut, I was hav- .J leave state gov-
ing trouble *ernment, I
breathing and I began to try to
was sure I find a job as a
could hear a banker in the
choir some- capital city.
where singing Fred Brannen Every banker I
"Nearer, My A SLICE called in town
God, to Thee." told me how
I stopped OF LIFE they admired
eating crab. the job I had
You can't always have done at the state banking
what you want. department, but nobody
I'm never going to ever would hire me. I couldn't
acknowledge in column buy a job. I couldn't get
space that I even knew what I wanted.
girls existed until I met my After fully evaluating


hat you want


our circumstances, Cheryl
and I determined we must
leave Tallahassee to find
happiness and security for
our family I called a
banker here in Inverness,
a friend whose banking
company I knew very well
and was one that I re-
spected highly Within
minutes, he had hired me
and two weeks later, I
came here to work at
what I did best. I didn't
get what I initially thought
I wanted, but I most
certainly found what I
needed for the remainder
of my career, until 26 years
later when I knew it was
time for me to retire. Not
only that, my sweetheart
and I found a place to
call home and to raise our


kids in what was, and re-
mains, a truly marvelous
environment.
No, you can't always get
what you want, but if you
try, sometimes you find
what you need.
Crab is out of the ques-
tion, but oysters, shrimp,
scallops, clams and fish of
every type are all still
mighty tasty!

Fred Brannen, an Inver-
ness resident, has been a
Chronicle columnist since
1988 and is the author of
the recently published
novel, "At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay "Fred maybe
contacted at tbrannenjr
@gmail. com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


Citrus High students, a Miss Dias and Ashton Hester, ham
it up a bit.


CHANGES
Continued from Page Cl

disabilities, given high
expectations, opportuni-
ties and support, will live
successful adult lives.
Children can learn to be
independent adults, con-
tributing to society and
participating in the com-
munity through quality
education and social ex-
periences with their
peers.
In 1987, President
Ronald Reagan pro-
claimed March to be De-
velopmental Disabilities
Awareness Month. Ac-
cording to the Special
Needs Alliance, this ac-
tion further enforced the
deinstitutionalization
movement of the '70s and
early '80s as it called
upon Americans to "pro-
vide the encouragement


and opportunities neces-
sary for people with de-
velopmental disabilities
to reach their potential."
The idea that individu-
als with developmental
disabilities could become
productive members of
the workforce took hold
and expectations began
to shift. As has been the
philosophy of the Key
Training Center since its
inception in 1966, these
men and women were
embraced with kindness,
love, dignity and respect
and thrived in an envi-
ronment that offered
daily living and social
skills, job training, life-
sustaining care and resi-
dential services.
Expectations of people
with developmental dis-
abilities and their par-
ents began to shift.
Productive, self-directed
lives within the commu-
nity increasingly became


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Originally published in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Information for Back in Time is supplied by the Citrus
County Historical Society.
In 1939...
In its promotional movement to establish a fish
hatchery at some spot in Citrus County, the Inver-
ness Kiwanis club at its regular weekly luncheon
meeting tomorrow (Friday) at the Orange hotel
will hear 0. Lloyd Meehean, junior aquatic biol-
ogist for the government fish hatchery at Welaka.
Mr Meehean is expected to give many helpful
hints as to how a hatchery should be started and
operated.
During the 18-month period from July 1,1937,
when the State Welfare Board was inducted into
office, to Dec. 31,1938, the end of the last calen-
dar year, 219 residents of Citrus County applied
for Old Age Assistance, it was announced this
week at state headquarters of the Board in Jack-
sonville. On January 1, 1939, 198 applications
were received, this number being supplemented
by an additional 21 applications the succeeding
six months.

1954...
The Inverness Kiwanis Club has placed gum
ball vending machines in several places of busi-
ness during the past week. Proceeds from the
machines will be used for the club's program for
boys and girls.
Donald McBride and Tommie McQuarrie
opened their new fishing pier and bait house at
the foot of Third Avenue, Crystal River, last
week. They have constructed a 60 foot pier, have
dredged out a channel to provide easy access to
their property, have constructed a bait house
and plan to start work on boat houses soon.


the goal, and (increas-
ingly) an attainable goal.
Stereotypes remain.
Hurtful words are too
commonplace. Too many
uninformed and misin-
formed citizens still find
it easier to wear the
proverbial blinders than
to offer understanding
and support; and we are
far from free from experi-
encing incidents of abuse
and neglect.
Sadly, taxpayer-funded
programs for people with
disabilities continue to
be under pressure and
are more at risk in today's
economic environment.
Discussions at all levels
of government threaten
the advances made dur-
ing the past 25 years.
School districts across
the country are faced
with shrinking budgets,
forcing them to target
special education man-
dates as areas which can


be reduced rather than
reinforced.
At the same time, due
to improvements in
health care, people with
developmental disabili-
ties are living longer,
leading to questions
about the lifestyle of "re-
tirement-age" individu-
als. In the 1930s, the life
expectancy of adults with
developmental disabili-
ties was 20 years. Today,
that average life span is
65, which translates into
having to adapt to those
disorders which accom-
pany aging, such as de-
mentia and Alzheimer's.
Care for elderly adults
with developmental dis-
abilities is becoming a se-
rious medical challenge,
with too many being
placed in nursing homes
that are not prepared to
nurture geriatric adults
with developmental
disabilities.


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MISTORY THIS AND THAT


* HMEW W EU* I
Continued from Page C1

(than) at any other time in
the history of the county."
Ralph Rooks, chal-
lenger for Levins' seat -
Rooks pledges to work for:
firm control of tax monies,
a progressive road system,
promoting tourism, im-
proving libraries, expand-
ing work opportunities for
the young and preserving
the agricultural
community
John G. Dampier, can-
didate for clerk of court -
Dampier touts himself as
"a business man" who is
"courteous, civic minded,
efficient, sincere and
progressive."
Betty Williams, chal-
lenger for school board -
Williams created an ad
using the letters of the
words "school board" to
display her qualities:
"sensible, capable, honest,
objective, observant,
leader, businesslike, or-
derly, able, reliable and
dedicated."
Fortunately, the special
election for Young's seat
will be over Tuesday and
we will have a brief respite
from campaign attack ads.

As our nation strives to
address the full spectrum
of services needed for
people with disabilities
to live secure, fulfilling
lives, it is within our own
community that the dif-
ferences will be made. It
is up to our community to
recognize that these dis-
abilities cut across eth-
nic, racial, educational,
social and economic
backgrounds. It is up to
our community to under-
stand that a developmen-


It was announced this
week, 50 years ago, that
David Arthurs purchased
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle from St. Petersburg
mayor Herman Goldner
The county's firstA&P
store (Atlantic and Pacific
Tea Company) is planned
to be begin construction in
March 1964 on South Pine
Street in Inverness.
The county commis-
sion reorganized its board
in January 1964 with Clyde
Byrd as chairman and
Harvey Levins as vice
chairman. The other three
commissioners were Bob
Gilstrap, James Rooks Jr
and Fred Spooner
In February 1964, the
Citrus County Board of
Public Education (as it was
referred to in those days)
refused an offer from First
Federal Savings & Loan to
furnish report card covers
for the schools. School
board members said they
could not appear to en-
dorse any business.

Mike Arnold is the
editor of the Citrus
County Chronicle.
Email him atmarnold@
chronicleonline. com.

tal disability is not a dis-
ease but a lifelong condi-
tion that these men and
women did not cause nor
can they fix. And it is
within our community
that the challenges are
met head on through en-
lightened and responsi-
ble support and
increased awareness.

Neale Brennan is director
of the Key Training
Center Foundation.


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COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 C3


I


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

shot and killed.
They drove away in Ms. Hurst's car
They had Deputy Coburn's weapon
with them.
There was no question of guilt.
I am not a chest-thumping advocate
for the death penalty Something trou-
bles me about the government execut-
ing people.
Hall and Ruffin escaped being killed
that February evening because the
group giving chase included reporters
and photographers. When the deputies
finally captured them, the lawmen had
their guns drawn and their emotions
were raw
One of their own had been murdered
on the whim of two convenience-store
robbers. But the deputies overcame their
own emotions and did the right thing:
They brought the two killers to justice.
Without question, there was some-
thing mentally wrong with both of these
killers. Normal human beings do not
suddenly become stone-cold killers.
But should mental limitations be a good
enough excuse to avoid facing the
penalty for this crime?
If so, every person who murders an-
other could claim the same defense. "I
have mental limitations so I could not
possibly comprehend the ramifications
of me killing two other human beings.
And an unborn baby"
I just can't buy it.
Fortunately for everyone, I am not on
the Supreme Court and I'd be willing to
bet that none of the justices are going to
ring me up for any advice. But if they
did call, I would have to tell them that
Freddie Lee Hall shot Lonnie Colburn
in cold blood. And he kidnapped an in-
nocent woman who was seven months
pregnant and sexually assaulted her
And when he had the opportunity to
show just a little bit of mercy to a preg-
nant woman and an unborn child, he
did not choose that alternative.
And now he wants the court to show
him mercy
The death penalty is the law of our
land. If any person sitting on death row
is deserving of this ultimate punish-
ment, it's Freddie Lee Hall.
I am a man with many faults. One of
them is that I cannot find any mercy for
Freddie Lee Hall.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


joBT> \5e S eP'
SaTw TO a
?aiws c~e"












(Qf-inA to iQ -
INl \ r~lgirt;

Make us proud, Scott
Years ago, high school students went
to the county commissioners to pres-
ent a request to pass an ordinance.
The students were told as potential fu-
ture leaders of Citrus County they
would learn how government works
and how elected officials here work to-
gether to make Citrus County a better
place to live. Commissioners modeled
behaviors back then that were what
community members would like to see
in their kids: respect for each other
and the importance of decorum at
public events. Nobody slouched in
their chair, looking up at the ceiling
and chewing gum. Not one county
commissioner was disrespectful of an-
other. Shame on you, Scott Adams, for
setting such a poor example for our
youth. I am sure your mother instilled
values, morals and ethics in you. We
all make mistakes when we are young,
but you are now a husband and father.
You have an opportunity to make a dif-
ference in our community. Please
make the intelligent people who
elected you, along with your mother,
proud by acting like the professional
businessman you claim to be. Remem-
ber, the majority vote wins and you get
more with sugar than vinegar. Please
treat others the way you want to be
treated and maybe we can move forward.
Pot, meet kettle
Scott Adams calling the commis-
sioners corrupt and bullying the staff?
This is calling the kettle black. He lives
in a beautiful home with homestead that
is in Rebecca Bays' district. Really?
Not a trailer that is a cracker trailer.


,Not s s-A'oeTo.
"1"o ,_U% T'O.


Staunch supporter
I am for Scott Adams. I think he is
doing the right thing and I intend to
vote for him the next time. I also in-
tend to send him help in November.
Keep going, Scott Adams.
Nothing gained
I'm calling about Commissioner Scott
Adams. Apparently, Mr. Adams does
not know how to govern. He thinks that
baseless accusations against the other
commissioners is governing. Other than
unprofessional, disruptive behavior, he
has accomplished nothing. Repeat, as
a commissioner he has accomplished
nothing. He claims to be for the people.
What a fairytale that is. Mr. Adams is
only for Mr. Adams. The only commis-
sioner that is incompetent is Mr. Adams.
Adams' circle
In regards to Scott Adams: What
people don't realize is and they
need to find out, because a lot of us
people know who it is there's two
big shots here in Citrus County that is
backing Scott Adams and telling him
what to do and what to say. If you will
look into it, you will find out who these
two big people are that's backing him
up and causing all of this problem.
Won't get my vote
This is for Commissioner Scott
Adams: I will not vote for you again. I
have told you on several occasions you
are right but you go about it all wrong.
You are an embarrassment to Citrus
County. You will not get my vote again.
I also know you are being pushed by a
much larger bully.


Hot Corner:
OUT THE WINDOW

Off the mark
I want to address Gerry Mulligan's
comments in the Sunday (March 2) edi-
tion of the paper where he's calling Scott
Adams a bully. I want to tell Gerry, you're
definitely wrong. Scott is not a bully.
What he is is not politically correct. He
does not play on the puppet team that you
support with commissioners who want
to take care of dogs before they take care
of people and roads, commissioners who
want a port after a study's been told that
it's unfeasible. You don't have the people,
the talent or the product to use to ship.
One and done
Gerry Mulligan speaks for many of
us about Scott Adams' antics and the
effect he creates in our local govern-
ment. His distractions do little to fix the
problems he exposes. The hostility that
he spews is hurting the process changes
that are needed. It would be wise for
him to remember the old saying, "You
attract more flies with honey than with
vinegar." I voted for Scott Adams on his
campaign promises, but will not vote
for this man again after seeing the harm
that he has done in Citrus County.
Say nicer things
I wish the Chronicle would stop bad-
mouthing Scott Adams. In Sunday
March 2, Mr. Mulligan wrote everything
that was nasty that he could think
about. Obviously he's a fan of the other
commissioners and is against Scott,
who does try to do a good job but may
be a little unorthodox.
Look around
Gerry Mulligan's editorial about Scott
Adams (was) really, really interesting,
you know, saying what he did in his edi-
torial when in the Sound Off you've got
six people that wrote in and said they
liked what Scott Adams was doing. Ob-
viously Gerry Mulligan doesn't like what
Scott Adams is doing, but the people do.
Maybe when election comes around,
we'll get two or three more like Scott
Adams and then we can really get done
what constituents want done instead of
what the newspaper and the status quo
commissioners want done. So keep up
the good work, Scott Adams, and cut
spending. Get rid of this useless
spending and all this stuff we're doing
out here. Save our tax money. Thanks,
Scott. Gerry Mulligan, straighten up.
Look around, buddy. It's what the peo-
ple want, not what the Chronicle wants.


March 7 thru March 11
Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds *U.S.41 S,, Inverness
Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
dMon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day)
Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3abag)
Cash or Checks Only
ywww.foccls.org
For book sale information call ic .,I .
746-1334 or 527-8405 CIIIN .


|Emeritus at Barrington Place presents the
3rd Annual

Golf For Meals
1 Golf Tournament
Saturday, March 29, 2014
Registration begins at 8:00 am
Shotgun start 9:00 am
Four person scramble
7 Rivers Golf and Country Club
For more information call (352) 527-5975
Lunch during Hole-in-one prize
the vnt provided by: Harley
the event Davidson, Crystal River
SPONSORS: Citrus County Chronicle, Harley Davidson of
Crystal River, WYKE TV, Nature Coast Volunteer Center,
FOX 96.7, Citrus 95.3, 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club


SFort Cooper Days

Sat. March 15 & Sun. March 16
i 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
JFort Cooper State Park
S 3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness
Experience Florida History
Adults thru 13 yrs. $6 12 yrs. & under Free
A1 Come and Enjoy
"2nd Seminole War


Hosted by
the Friends
of Fort Cooper
CI Ii()NICLE
OOOHAJN


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S alii 726-0315


52nd Annual
St. Pat's Championship

Golf Tournament
March 14, 15, & 16
at Inverness Golf and Country Club
We hope you willjoin us for
three exciting days of golf,
camaraderie, food and prizes!

For more information
726-2583 or 586-6510


A w DragonBcoat ,.
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Hot Corner: SCOTT ADAMS


March 9 11 2:00 PM
Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
Citrus County Auditorium
Contact Phone: 746-1334 or 527-8405

March 09
Sertoma Youth Ranch Will McLean Music Festival
Sertoma Youth Ranch
Entrance Fee: At Gate Sun $15; Children under 12 Free
Contact Email: mlonghill01 l@gmail.com

March 09 6:00 PM 9:00 PM
Jessie's Place
3rd Annual Cooking for a Cause Crystal River Mall
Organization Contact Person: Melissa Bowermaster
Entrance Fee: $30.00 in advance, $35 at the door
Contact Phone: 352-634-0534
Tickets Call 352-270-8814

March 13 5:00 PM 9:00 PM
Crystal River Rotary Beast Feast
Rock Crusher Pavilion
Entrance Fee: $50 in advance, $60 at door
Contact Phone: 795-6100

March 13
Citrus County Historical Society
Music at the Museum: Castlebay Celtic Harp & More
with some Downeast Flavor
Old Courthouse Museum Inverness
Contact Phone:726-9814 or 201-2656

March 14-15
Withlacoochee River Bluegrass Festival
6 miles west of Dunnellon on Hwy 40
Advance Adult $20, Children 6-12 $10; Entrance Fee: At
gate Adult $25, Children 6-12 $10; Special two day ticket
Adult $45, Children 6-12 $10, children under 6 Free
Contact Phone: 318-3872

March 14-16
Inverness Golf and Country Club
52nd Annual St. Pats Championship Golf Tournament
Contact Phone: 726-2583 or 586-6510

March 15- 16:
Friends of Fort Cooper
Fort Cooper Days Fort Cooper State Park
Adult thru 13 years old $6.00 12 Years Old & Under Free
Contact Phone: (352)726-0315 County Animal Services

March 15 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Citrus County Parks and Rec
Dragon Boat Race Lake Hernando
Contact Phone: (352) 201-6500

March 15 11:30 AM
Pilot Club of Crystal River
Steppin Out in Style Fashion Show
Plantation on Crystal River Entrance Fee: $25
Contact Email: larkinsr@hotmail.com

March 22 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Lakeside Craft Show
3580 E. Lemon St., Hernando
Contact Phone: 352-860-2598

Mar 24-29
Citrus County Fair Association
Citrus County Fair 2014
Citrus County Fair Grounds
Contact Phone: (352) 726-2993


AA'


C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


COMMENTARY


BaH










BUSINESS
CITRUS


COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Jessica Palys, an enrollment counselor with Campaign for Better Health Care in Chicago, works with a new free
online tool developed by a nonprofit group that uses actuarial data to estimate total annual costs for each health
plan tailored to a consumer's profile. The website, HealthPlanRatings.org, which offers Illinois consumers more
information about insurance costs, could help address widespread confusion about choosing a plan on the
government sites that are a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's health care law.


the new s


em


A website that offers Illinois consumers more information about insurance costs could help
address widespread confusion about choosing a plan on the government sites that are a
cornerstone of President Barack Obama's health care law.


CARLA K. JOHNSON
Associated Press

CHICAGO
t can be frustrating now to try to
compare health plans on the
government online market-
places. For instance, the federal
website that serves Illinois and 35
other states has no central direc-
tory to easily show which plans in-
clude which doctors in their
networks.
What's more, it's nearly impossi-
ble to compare the out-of-pocket
costs of different policies. Picking
the wrong plan could mean paying
extra in some cases, up to thou-
sands of dollars a year more.
A nonprofit group is offering a
free online tool that provides more
information, with the goal of turn-
ing the new insurance exchanges
into truly functional competitive
markets.
HealthPlanRatings.org uses actu-
arial data to estimate total annual
costs for each plan tailored to a
consumer's profile. It offers a doc-
tor directory so people can see im-
mediately which plans include
their favorite doctors in their


network. And it includes a five-star
scoring system based on an inde-
pendent group's quality ratings of
health plans.
So far, it's being tested only in Illi-
nois, but the software may someday
be used to improve the official ex-
changes run by states and the fed-
eral government.
As envisioned, the exchanges
were supposed to help keep health
care costs in check as insurers com-
peted for the business of informed
customers. But the government
sites aren't giving consumers the
data they need to make the best
choices, said Robert Krughoff, pres-
ident of Consumers' Checkbook, the
nonprofit group that developed the
tool and would like to persuade
governments to use its features.
"It's much too complicated for
people and they end up with the
wrong answers," Krughoff said.
Consumers' Checkbook has a track
record: More than 50 federal agen-
cies subscribe to the group's online
guide for employees choosing
health plans available to them.
John and Alfiya Lambert recently
used the new tool to choose a
health plan in Illinois.
"We were impressed how easy it


was to compare the various plans,"
said John Lambert. He's covered by
Medicare, but his 56-year-old wife
was uninsured. The Chicagoans
were looking for a plan for her that
would include their favorite doctor
From 65 health plans available to
them on the marketplace, they nar-
rowed their choices to 42 that in-
cluded their doctor Then, based on
one composite number for their es-
timated yearly costs, they selected a
highly rated bronze plan.
The single-cost number "gives
consumers a fighting chance to
make a good decision," said Joel
Ario, who oversaw initial planning
for the insurance marketplaces in
the Obama administration and is
now a consultant with Manatt
Health Solutions. He predicts other
innovations will be developed by
private industry
"We'll have tools that go way be-
yond this," Ario said. "I'd bet on
Amazon and Google to create the
tools rather than a state exchange."
The list of complaints about the
government websites, even from
supporters of the law, is not limited
to the technical glitches that
plagued the sites initially, Krughoff
said.


SCORE's 16th annual Golf Classic set for April 7


n April 7, SCORE Citrus partners
with the Citrus County Chronicle
for the 16th year of the SCORE
annual Golf Classic. The event will
again be held at Sugarmill Woods Golf
Club starting at 11:30 a.m. with a buffet
lunch. Play format is a four-person
scramble with a shotgun tee time of 1
p.m.
Tournament play details
Team-play scoring will determine
flight winners. Contests will include
putting and chipping and other fairway
challenges. As players come off the
18th hole, they will be welcomed into
the clubhouse for free beer, soft drinks
and snacks. The awards ceremony will
announce the flight, raffle and other
winners. Silent auction winners will be
able to pick up the golf certificates for
play at 20-plus golf courses in and
around Citrus County There is more
than $1,200 in golf equipment prizes.
The cost of participation is tax-de-


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

EXPERIENCE
MATrERS


ductible
SCORE is a 501(c) 3 tax-exempt non-
profit organization. This special status
allows all player costs, donations and
raffles, etc., to be claimed as a legiti-
mate deduction on either individual
and/or corporate tax returns in 2014.
Tournament entry fees and other
costs
Credit card payments accepted
Tournament player costs are as


follows: Individual golfer entry fee is
$60. Foursomes are $240 per foursome.
Businesses or individuals can spon-
sor a hole for $100. Holes sponsors will
have a sign displaying their business
name at the tee box or green. Hole
sponsors will also receive a certificate
for free green fees for a foursome at
Sugarmill Woods during 2014, plus a
listing of their sponsorship in the
Chronicle. As an added bonus, all hole
sponsors will receive chances to win
quarter-page ads in the Chronicle and
$500 of free advertising on WYKE FM.
Special tournament discount
Sign up ASAP: Hole sponsors who
also purchase a foursome for this event
will receive a $40 discount
Golf outing revenue: How is it used?
After SCORE pays all expenses of
the tournament, such as green and cart
fees, prizes, food and drink etc., the


Pae D2


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises on solid gain
in US hiring; gas up

NEW YORK-The price of oil
crept up to near $102 a barrel Friday
after a solid increase in U.S. em-
ployment and a decline in the dollar
Benchmark U.S. crude forApril
delivery rose $1.02 to close at
$102.58 a barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. After a swing
in prices earlier in the week due to
the situation in Ukraine, oil ended
the week with a loss of 1 cent
Brent crude, used to set prices
for international varieties of
crude, gained 90 cents to $109 a
barrel on the ICE Futures ex-
change in London.
At the gas pump, the average
price for a gallon of gas across the
U.S. rose 1 cent to $3.48. That's 21
cents higher than a month ago, but
still 24 cents cheaper than at this
time last year

World markets mixed
after US jobs report
LONDON World stock markets
were mixed Friday after official fig-
ures showed hiring in the U.S., the
world's largest economy rose last
month despite the severe winter
weather
In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100
closed down 1.1 percent at 6,712.67.
Germany's DAX slumped 2 percent
to 9,350.75 and the CAC 40 in Paris
shed 1.2 percent to 4,366.42, likely
weighed by the continued rise of the
euro, which will hurt exports.
Earlier, in Asia, Japan's Nikkei
225 stock average gained 0.9 percent
to 15,274.07 while South Korea's
Kospi inched down 0.1 percent to
1,974.68. Australia's S&P/ASX 200
rose 0.3 percent to 5,462.20.
China's Shanghai Composite
Index fell 0.1 percent to 2,154.35 and
Taiwan's benchmark closed flat at
8,713.96. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell
0.2 percent to 22,660.49.
-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY




Perspective


might be a


panacea for


unfair rules

EAR BRUCE: I know of a
friend who is receiving
$1,200 from Social Security
Her daughter died last year and
my friend just received notice from
Social Security that her check was
decreased to about $800 because
she inherited a lot from her daugh-
ter
She went to our Social Security
office and was told that it was cor-
rect. How can this be? How can
our Social Security be taken from
us like that?
I'm concerned not only for her,
but because the same thing will
probably happen to me when my
mother dies. I stand to inherit
$500,000 to $750,000 possibly
I waited until I was 66 to start
drawing Social Security so I could
get the highest rate (instead of
drawing on it when I was younger).
It would not be fair to reduce the
amount of my Social Security
check just because I inherited
some money I worked hard for
that money all my life!
-M.T, via email
DEAR MT.: First of all, you are
asking me to explain the logic in
government programs. That is an
impossible task. As I read between
the lines, the government is sug-


gesting that because your friend's
income is essentially increased,
the money being distributed on So-
cial Security will be reduced.
While $400 a month seems to be a
See Page D2


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


You're never too old to learn new tricks


I recently responded for the
first time to a letter in Dear
Abby The writer, a 53-year-
old married mother of two,
wanted to know if it was too
late to go back to school and get
a degree and pursue a career
she would enjoy
"Too Old 4 New Tricks" also
asked where she might go to
"find answers about returning
to school at my age, choosing a
major and finding the money to
pay for it."
Jeanne Phillips, who pens
the syndicated advice column,
rightly responded that it is
never too late, noting that "peo-
ple in their 90s have earned de-
grees and been enriched by it."
Phillips also advised "Too Old"
to contact the nearest univer-
sity or college and ask if it of-
fers career counseling and
aptitude testing to determine
what she would need to com-
plete her education and find a
career suitable career
That's not bad advice, on the


Laura
Byrnies

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


face of it But I don't think it
goes far enough.
To begin with, at 53, "Too Old"
is hardly past her productive
prime; she may even be inter-
ested in an education not simply
to enrich her life but to enrich
her coffers. The Pew Research
Center's recent report, "The Ris-
ing Cost of Not Going to College,"
certainly makes the case that "on
virtually every measure of eco-
nomic well-being and career at-
tainment- from personal
earnings to job satisfaction to the
share employed full-time -


recent college graduates are out-
performing their peers with less
education."
The economic analysis finds
that Millennial college graduates
ages 25 to 32 who are working
full time earn more annually -
about $17,500 more than em-
ployed young adults holding only
a high school diploma.
While the report focuses on
those born after 1980, it does
slice across the demographic
spectrum to glimpse the earn-
ing power of other generations
at the same age. The median in-
come, in 2012 dollars, for Late
Boomers when they were 25 to
32, shows similar earning dis-
parity by educational attain-
ment: "Too Old" would have
earned $30,525 with just a high
school diploma; $34,595 with a
two-year degree, certification
or some college; and $44,770
with a bachelor's degree or
higher
Second, as we've already
seen, a four-year college degree


is a great pathway to prosperity,
but it is not the only pathway In
addition to excellent programs
available through our univer-
sity system, there are plenty of
enriching, high-demand ca-
reers to be had through two-
year degree and certificate
programs offered closer to
home by Withlacoochee Techni-
cal and the College of Central
Florida.
Moreover, and here is where
I wish Dear Abby would have
taken advantage of its national
platform, there are tens of hun-
dreds of one-stop career cen-
ters throughout the country
that provide career counseling,
interest and aptitude testing
and candidate assessments as
well as guidance finding and
paying for the right post-sec-
ondary education and job
placement assistance all at no
charge, and without a vested in-
terest in steering individuals to
one program over another
CareerSource Citrus Levy


Marion, formerly Workforce
Connection, is one of nearly 600
business-led workforce invest-
ment regions in place in all 50
states, Puerto Rico and the U.S.
territories. In this state, there
are 24 Regional Workforce De-
velopment Boards which over-
see and coordinate local
services as part of Career-
Source Florida's network of
nearly 100 one-stop career cen-
ters, including centers in
Lecanto as well as in Chiefland
and Ocala.
Regardless of age, it is never
too late to pursue higher educa-
tion. We know that leads to
greater economic well-being.
Happily this community is
blessed with resources and
partners to help.
Too old for new tricks? Never

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a
Florida Certified Workforce
Professional. Please contact
her at (352) 291-9559 or (800)
434-5627, ext. 1234.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

rather substantial decrease, you didn't
indicate how much inheritance was in-
volved.
The $500,000 to $750,000 you talk
about in your next paragraph is a sub-
stantial amount of money The fact that
you waited until you were 66 years old
to start withdrawing to get the highest
rate might have been a good plan, but
then you say you stand to inherit up to
$750,000.
The logic here is clear: You don't need
as much money, in the government's
opinion, if you inherit a large amount,
so your check is going to be reduced.
The fact that you worked hard for the
money is all very well, but those rules
were available to you before you made
the decision to wait. I assume you knew
you would be inheriting upon your
mother's death.
While the reduction in Social Security
may be a bit of a burden, I am certain
most people would be happy to share
your situation.
DEAR BRUCE: We have been mar-
ried for eight years. We are both in our
late 70s. We do not own anything to-


gether We keep our finances separate.
Do you think it's wise for a married cou-
ple to handle their finances like this?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: If you were a young
married couple in your early 20s, I
would say absolutely not. But clearly,
you are in your 70s, and I assume you
were married at least once before. You
may have children you want your assets
to go to.
For someone of your advanced years,
I have no problem with you keeping
your finances separated.
If you are trying to be certain that the
assets you acquired during your first
marriage go to your children, you
should also exercise a post-nuptial
agreement. Without it, at least a third of
your assets would have to be left to your
spouse. That may be perfectly accept-
able to you, but if not, the post-nuptial
could obviate that.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a mutual fund
account worth approximately $150,000.
My financial adviser recently called and
told me she wants me to come in and
discuss moving the money somewhere
else. I asked why, and she told me that
after five years the company no longer
deducts her commission from my ac-
count
Given the track record of the account


over the last two years, I am reluctant to
move it, but I do understand her want-
ing her commission. I already have
three annuities and don't want any
more. I want the money in mutual
funds. What do you recommend?
-M.J., via email
DEAR MJ.: I can understand, as you
can, your financial adviser wanting to
have a commission of some sort. That's
what she is in business for No problem
there.
However, it appears that she is also
trying to sell you an annuity of some
kind. As you must know, although there
are some annuities that under certain
circumstances I feel are appropriate,
many times they are sold to the ad-
viser's advantage and not to your own.
If you want a mutual fund, then by all
means buy one. You can purchase many
mutual funds directly, without the serv-
ices of a broker If your adviser offers
you nothing on this particular account
that you are comfortable with, switch it
to someone else, whether it's a direct
sale or a commissionable sale.
The bottom line is, it's your choice
and yours alone.
DEAR BRUCE: My husband and I
would like to protect our assets. Our
daughter is married and we have a sin-
gle grandson. We do not like her hus-


band. Can we legally see our assets go
directly to our daughter and grandson?
What type of lawyer should we contact?
D.T., via email
DEAR D.T.: You raise an interesting
problem. You say you would like to pro-
tect your assets. As long as they are your
assets, they are protected, but the mo-
ment you transfer them to your daugh-
ter, grandson or any other relatives
upon your death, you're out. You cannot
keep directing from the grave.
You say you and your husband don't
like your son-in-law, but as long as he is
your daughter's husband and the funds
come to her while he is married to her,
he will have an interest. Your grandson
is a different matter Assuming the
grandson has reached his majority (18),
the father will have no legal interest in
his son's account.
You might wish to consult an attorney
who specializes in trusts. This will prob-
ably be the best way to keep the money
separated, but at best, it is a tricky
proposition and will require top legal
advice.

Send questions to bruce@brucewil-
liams.com. Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


MATTERS
Continued from Page Dl

revenue remaining is used to pay the cost of office and
operating costs. SCORE also donates to other nonprofit


organizations such as the College of Central Florida.
Starting this year, SCORE established a scholarship
committee which will help fund a student/resident in
Citrus County toward a college or technical education
beyond high school.
How to sign up
You can call the SCORE office at 352-249-1236 or email


Tournament Director Jim Green at jim.green
@scorevolunteerorg. Credit card payments are
accepted.
Dr Frederick J. Herzog,PhD is the Immediate Past
Chairman of Citrus County SCORE. He can be
reached via email: therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


CIH ip


IT'S TAX TIME!
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Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352}344 407


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


BUSINESS






SUNDAY, MARCH 9,2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


hmCeR5os COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.cornm/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
March 14 Chamber
Luncheon sponsored by
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church and School
at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Citrus
County Commissioner
John "JJ" Kenney will
provide an update on
the county and his
chairman's agenda.
March 19 and 20 -
Legislative Days: Citrus
County is headed to Tal-
lahassee to talk with
state leaders about key
commerce issues.
March 26 Ribbon-
cutting for River Re-
gional Animal Hospital,
4:30 p.m. at 7660 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
April 1 Ribbon-cutting
for Suncoast Credit
Union, 4:30 p.m., at
2367 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
April 10- Mixer at
Black Diamond Ranch,
5 to 7 p.m., 2600 W.
Black Diamond Circle,
Lecanto.
April 24-Golden
Citrus Scholars Awards
Ceremony, 5:30 p.m.
College of Central
Florida, Lecanto.


Member
events
March 9 Cooking for
a Cause! Benefit for
Jessie's Place at Crystal
River Mall. Enjoy a variety
of delicious menu items
from Citrus County
restaurants. The restau-
rants will be judged by
special guests in seven
categories. Call Jessie's
Place 270-8814 for tick-
ets or The Crystal River
Mall 795-2585.
March 13 Citrus County
Extension Services will be
offering an Open House
on Thursday, March 13
titled "Understanding
the Healthcare Market-
place" from 3 to 7 p.m.
at the Extension Office,
located at 3650 W. Sov-
ereign Path in Lecanto.
If you have questions
regarding the new health
care law or qualification
for tax credits to help
pay for health insurance,
this is the opportunity
to clear up confusion,
understand your options,
make informed health
insurance decisions,
and apply for coverage.
Please bring 2013 tax
information, current pay
stubs, and immigration
papers if applicable.
March 14- Sunset
Cruise departs from the
Crystal River Preserve
State Park Visitor Center
dock at 7 p.m. 3266 N.
Sailboat Ave., Crystal River.
More information at
floridastateparks.org/
crystal riverpreserve/
activities.cfm
March 14 Moon Over
the Mounds, 8 p.m.,
3400 N. Museum
Pointe, Crystal River.
More information at
www.floridastatepa rks.o
rg/crystal riverarchaeo-
logica l/events.cfm



Dragon Ber ^^---j ^il
. Festival"..

March 15 Lake Her-
nando Dragon Boat Fes-
tival, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
Lake Hernando Park.
More information 352-
400-0960.


Floral City Strawvberry Festival organizer
the Citrus Count' Chamnber of
Commerce thanks its sponsoI'rs, volunteer:
board members, ambassadors and ourl
commlunit folr supporting this event.


Presenting Sponsor
FDS Disposal

Sustaining Partner
The Citrus County Chronicle

Gold
Citrus 95.3
The Fox 96.7
True Oldies o106.3
The Tampa Bay Times
Citrus County Sheriffs Office

Silver
Nature Coast EMS
StoreRight Self Storage

Bronze
Hometown Values
Insurance Resources and Risk
Management
M&B Dairy
Tobacco Free Florida with the
Florida Department of Health,
Citrus County


Friend
Brannen Bank
Insight Credit Union
WXJB/WWJB

Little Miss Strawberry
Princess: Lillian Shaw
Miss Strawberry Princess:
Kristine Zacharias
Pie Eating Contest Youth Winner:
Brian Parker
Pie Eating Contest Adult Winner:
Scott Cunningham


Berries, Brew & BBQ
Pre-Event Bash
The Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and the Floral
City Merchants Association
thank our generous sponsors.

Presenting Sponsor
Insurance Resources and Risk
Management


Bayside Realty, LLC O'Reilly Auto Parts


469 N.E. First St., Crystal River, FL 34428
citrusbayside.com o 352-795-1795


Chris Ensing, broker; Beth Ensing, financial
manager; Krissy Kydd, sales associate;
Ginette Litle, office manager; Abby Ensing;
Emily Ensing; Tony Pagan and Kloey Curry
are joined by Chamber ambassadors Betty
Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers; Dan
Pushee, associate member; Dennis Pfeiffer,
Orkin Pest Control; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay
Cosmetics; and Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle
Title Insurance.


1104 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River, FL 34429
oreillyauto.com o 352-795-0320


Thomas Heaton, store manager, is joined by
his daughter and team at O'Reilly Auto
Parts, Andy Huston, city manager of Crystal
River and Chamber ambassadors: Lillian
Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Janet Mayo, as-
sociate member; Bill Hudson, Land Title of
Citrus County; Nancy Hautop, Top Time
Travel; Dan Pushee, associate member; Lisa
Nash, FDS Disposal; Jim Ferrara, Insight
Credit Union; Jeanne Green, associate mem-
ber; and David Heinz, Heinz Funeral Home.


Ferris Farms
Aunt Martha's Produce
Angelo's Carts
Sunflower Springs


little Miss and Miss Strawberry
princess Pageant the Chamber thank:

organizer and Emcee: Mary-
nn Virgilio
idges: Linda Powers, Angela
ick, Winn Webb, Sue Howard
'abulator: Arnold Virgilio
assistant: Savannah Heimann

agent Sponsors
&WRexallDrug Store &Restaurant
eef 'O'Brady's
lama's Kuntry Kaf6
ew Concepts International
lair Salon
im Herndon Plumbing
FWPost 4337 Ladies Auxiliary
irgilio Insurance Services
Val-Mart of Inverness



Last call for

Legislative

Days

Join the Citrus County
Chamber and the Citrus
County Economic Development
Council on March 19 and 20 in
Tallahassee.
We have time with key lead-
ers, such as:
Adam Putnam, Florida
Agriculture commissioner
Herschel Vinyard, secretary
of the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
Ananth Prasad, secretary of
the Florida Department of
Transportation
JeffAtwater, Florida chief
financial officer
Pam Stewart, Florida edu-
cation commissioner
Mike Harrell, Citrus County
lobbyist
More representatives are being
confirmed in the coming days.
Check out our great rates for
round-trip bus transportation
on citruscountychamber.com
or call 352-726-2801.


Nature Coast Ministries is
looking for volunteers to as-
sist with its operations at the
thrift store and medical and den-
tal clinic. This organization serves
the community in many ways
from essential medical and dental
services to operating a thrift store.


They are looking for volunteers to
help with delivery truck driving,
assisting in food pantry and thrift
store, clerical work, fundraising
and public relations. Please con-
tact Sheree Monroe at 352-422-
2779 or email
monroesheree@gmail.com


Nature Coast Ministries seeking

volunteers for all tasks




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


( 55% of respondents typically
DO NOT make New Year s
resolutions

Main reasons why people don't make resolutions:
49%


2Q9%


20%


18%


2%

$


STICKING WITH


YOUR





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RESOLUTIONS


In 2014, 42 Of respondents say they WILL NOT

In 2014, 42% Of respnndents say they WILL NOT


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pically make resolutions compared



Of those that typically
make resolutions. 58% will
make more than one resolution


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


The three most popular categories for resolutions are:


S


make a personal finance
resoluUtion In 2014 (51 %) than
have typically made In ihe past
(45%)


O Despite their best efforts. ihe
majority of respondents (55%)
abandon their resolutions
before May However, 26% of
respondents say they See
through their resolutions

There are numerous ways people try to keep their
resolutions


30%


46%


a

S
S

b-.


40%


23%


20%


FAMILY FEATURES

to celebrate a fresh start or looking to make a change no matter the time of year, maintaining resolutions can
be difficult. In fact, a recent survey from Bank of America found that 49 percent of respondents don't make
New Year's resolutions because they prefer to set goals throughout the year.
Goals tied to the new year, and those set at various points in the year, are all aimed at making significant life changes.
According to the survey, 81 percent of resolutions involve health and fitness, 45 percent involve personal finances and
30 percent are targeted toward making changes in social life and relationships. With the large number of people planning
to make changes in their finances, it is helpful to determine how to best ensure you achieve your goal.
"I'll be the first to admit keeping to a financial resolution takes a lot of hard work. It takes good behavior and good
habits," said Famoosh Torabi, a consumer finance expert. "With life being so complicated, stressful and complex, we often
abandon them. Get the systems in place the small steps you need to take now to help you get on the right track."
Research shows that consumers who understand their behaviors and motivations are more likely to build and keep posi-
tive habits for the long term. That's why it's so important to have strategies to keep those financial resolutions throughout
the year. A few pointers to stick with your financial resolutions include:


Prepare before
your resolution begins
Putting thought into your resolutions before you spring into
action can put you on the path to change. Starting early
with a few small changes can also improve your odds of
staying the course to achieve your goals.
For example, if you're looking to improve your financial
health, begin by imagining a debt-free life. Visualizing
how things may change can provide additional motivation
you may need to move forward. Think about having more
money available each month and how it would change
your stress levels. Imagine what it would be like to not
worry about meeting your payments, or saving more for
retirement, education or emergencies. Thirty percent of
survey respondents said they identify their New Year's
resolutions early as a way to stick with them throughout
the year.
Develop an action plan
It's fine to make a resolution, but the odds of sticking
with it improve dramatically if you create an action plan
of smaller steps to support your goals. If your number
one resolution is to lose weight, your plan might include
budgeting money for a gym membership and cleaning
out any junk food from your pantry. Creating a budget?
Start by tracking your spending to see where the money
is going. Then create a budget that's tight but workable,
to give you more flexibility to pay down debt, increase
savings or invest for retirement. If have to carry a balance,
but want to responsibly manage your credit card, consider
a card that helps build positive habits. For example, Bank
of America's Better Balance Rewards card pays you to
manage your credit card use. Every quarter that you pay
more than your minimum balance on time, you earn $25
cash back. If you have at least one other qualifying account
with Bank of America, you can receive another $5 bonus,
totaling up to $30 a quarter. You'll be eligible for up to
$120 a year toward your balance, and you'll feel better
knowing how much you can spend each month.


Write it down
Forty percent of survey respondents say they use written
reminders to help stay on track with their resolutions. Try
writing your resolutions on Post-it notes, in Evemote, in
calendar reminders or on notes stuck to the refrigerator
whatever you'll look at regularly to keep yourself com-
mitted and on track. Research shows that a written goal is
more likely to be achieved. If your goal is managing your
finances better, write a reminder on your daily calendar to
check your credit card statements as they come in it's
the best way to spot transactions you don't recognize.
Get a little help from your friends
Sometimes a gentle reminder from a family member or
friend can work wonders. Share your resolutions with a
trusted person and ask for occasional reminders. Some
23 percent of survey respondents plan to enlist help this
way. A friend may be able to coax you to going to the gym,
or even talk you out of buying that handbag you've been
eyeing that's out of your budget. The key to cutting debt is
to stop adding to it. If you're in a hole, stop digging.
Partner up
Find a friend or loved one with the same resolution and
agree to motivate and support one another to stick to your
goals. It's easier to manage a diet, exercise plan or budget
if you have support. Twenty percent of respondents plan to
partner up to keep to their resolutions.

Start your New Year's resolutions thinking today, and keep
the big goals in mind every day, whether they aim for
better health, sounder finances or better relationships. With
the right attitude and commitment, 2014 could be a very
good year.
For more information, visit www.bankofamerica.com.


o1,o3 AankoAtmroa m cfqtCfion 2.500 respondents surveyed between September and October 2013


Multi-Instrumentalists
Fred Gosbee
& Julia Lane
Thursday, Mar. 13
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


CHRpNICLE
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRus COUTYHis HTOMCA SOCIETY


SCORE 16th
ANNUAL u
Monday, April 7,2014
:1 s' i /I' 1I 'r.. I, l I'; L l .I.IS S IC


Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2014
11:00 a.m. Registration
11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March28,2014
For information call Jim Green (352) 249-1236


WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER

BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL
FRIDAY & SATURDAY MARCH 14th & 15th, 2014
19730 SE 127th TERRACE INGLIS FL.
6 MILES WEST OF DUNNELLON ON HWY 40
^ S n3B^ En ^^

ANNON & HEATHER SLAIHThR
MANDI S:CTT & CVOUN't CLARE TfINI'iY RIVER BAND
ANDENRC. BlAN _


Lchrs3-Hr- H B 4RA
I^^-M ACK PORCH PICKERS ^4S~~ '1-U WE C


DALE KENNEDY BAND MARTMNGALE
BACKWAMTR BLUEGRA$ 3 S WHi I'
ADVANCE TICKETS MAIL CHECK PAYABLE TO "TIN ROOF SHACK"
PO BOX 144 NEWBERRY FLORIDA 32669 PHONE 1352)472-2703
FESTIVAL TICKET PRICES INCLUDE TAXES DOES NOT INCLUDE CAMPING
SHOW TIMES ADVANCE GATE
FRI 12:oop100110:PM ADULT $20.00 $25. 00 (pnir1F
SAT11:00AM.10:15PM ADULT$20D 00 $2500
SPECIAL 2 DAY TICKET ADULT $35.00 $4.00
hR & CRF CHILDREN 6.-12 YEARS $10.00 EACH DAY |FIN
FOODVENDOORS CHILDREN UNDER 6 FREE WITH AN AOULT jj
ADVANCE TICKET SALES ENDS MARCH IOT
FOR CAMPING AND RESERVED SEATING CALL (352)489-9367
SHOW GOES ON RAIN OR SHINE NO PETS NO ALCOHOL NO COOLERS
IN CONCERT AREA
WWW.T1NROOFSHACK.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION
OOHAVZ PRODUCED BY TIN ROOF SHACK PRODUCTIONS LLC


D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


BUSINESS


kea 0 !-tc A




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563=5966



~Classifieds


In Print


and



Online


All


The Time


Fa: 32)56-66 TllFee. (8).5.240 1Em i: *asfi0scroi .0nln 0m I ebi0:ww hrn 0lonie 0o


i#.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
reclinerottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Mar. 15th 9a-5p
Sun. Mar. 16th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605



Your World

I--9w-49e444u


GOLF CLUBS
Like new, 1 set North-
western, 1 set Ping
Zing, Plus bags, balls
etc $350 for all
(352) 341-0866
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374
Reclining Lift Chair
Good Condition
$250.
(352) 212-6187
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



FREE BACKYARD SPA!
self-contained,
6' x6.5'x3', 220volt
4seats, lots of jets.
You Pick-up
(352) 746-1644 or
518-524-9948
Free Dog, Jack
Russell/Pomeranian
Mix. 9 mos. old
male, neutered
Free to good home
(352) 201-2510
FREE
Polish Black & White
Crested Rooster
and 2 Hens
(352) 637-2674
Leave message


Female Black Lab
& Pit mix
free to good home
(352) 464-4001
FREE PUPPY
COLLIE MIX
&
3 YEAR OLD COLLIE
MALE
(352) 293-7642



Black and white
male miniature Aus-
tralian Shepard.
Coat is shaved. Lost
in the Withlacoochie
forest near trail 18
and trail 15. Please
call or text
352/201-5797
German Shepherd
lost in Homosassa trail
Rosedale area. Tradi-
tional color. 1 yr old,
answers to Buddy.
Family with children
devastated.
Handsome REWARD.
Please call
(352) 212-7381
Lost Male Cat
No tail, area of
Lourdes & Hayes
Inverness
REWARD
(352) 678-8760
LOST PUPPY 9 weeks,
red nose & brindle pitt
black & white, Near
Tuck Point, Inverness
REWARD
Owner Heartbroken
(352) 287-4615

Sand read


LUOTI YUKII LUOI
IN HERNANDO
NEAR TRUCKS RD/
RHAPSODY LN
AREA ACROSS
FROM
DOLLAR GENERAL
813-389-2793
Rottweiler/Husky Mix,
Black/Tan one blue
eye, 5 mo old puppy.
Lost in Highlands off
Apopka in Inverness
(352)476-4116


Set of 2 keys
found near Office Max
in Inverness, the store
is holding the keys

Found Small Dog Off
Shady Acres Dr in
Inverness. Call to
describe 352-419-0223


w












Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


&Online


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966






Certified Dietary
Manager

Join an
Exciting Team!
Certification Re-
quired w/ 2 yrs exp.
Excellent Benefits.
APPLY AT:
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness 34453 or
Email to: atadmin
@southernltc.com
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D


Citrus Podiatry
Center
with the following
Positions available.
Podiatric Assistant
Part-time. 32 Hrs/wk.
X-ray license
preferred.
Front Office/Billina
Part-time. 32 Hrs/wk.
Both positions:
Two years minimal
exp in office setting.
Must have local
work references.
Two Local
established offices
since 1989.
Partial benefits.
Competitive salary.
Mail Resume:
P.O. Box 1120
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120.
No faxes Accepted.


CNAs
Expanding our
Nursing Services
3-11
Excellent Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D



NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
UNIT MANAGER RN
Full-time positions
available. Must be a
Florida-licensed RN.
Supervisory experi-
ence preferred.
REGISTERED NURSE
Full-time position
available for 11
p.m.-7 a.m. shift.
PRN positions availa-
ble for all shifts. Must
be a Florida-
licensed RN.
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT
Full-time positions
available for 11
p.m.-7 a.m. shift.
PRN positions availa-
ble for all shifts.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne
Ln.Lecanto, FL 34461
HannahMand
@LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
46738





4#


A


CIR cN1cl.E


(352) 563-5966


,I


I HppyNo


Executive
Assistant II
Announcement
#14-26
Assists supervisor
and/or staff with
daily operations by
maintaining project
update report,
performing research
for various projects,
maintaining admin-
istrative files and
more. Requires
Associate's degree
and formal training,
special courses or
self education that
is equivalent to satis-
factory completion
of two years of
college education
or specialized
advanced training.
Must be able to
deal with hard to
handle situations
and work in a fast
paced, sometimes
stressful environ-
ment. Starting salary
$1,472.15 B/W
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You may also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 14,
2014. EOE/ADA


ARNP

Family Practice
Physician, located
in Inverness seeking
ARNP, please email
cvto:iinccare@
tampabay.rr.com

HIRING: RN,PT
F/T w/benefits
Fl. Homecare Sp.
(352) 794-6097

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience req'd
for very busy
medical office.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list. Finan-
cial aid for qualified
students. Apply now
at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219

RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF

RN's/LPN's *
Ready to "Spring
Forward" with the
Best of the Best for
the past 2 years in
Citrus County?
Working at DRHRC is
a nurses "day-light"!
Unique Opportunity
for PT/PRN
Floor and MDS
CONTACT
Linda Pursley, don@
diamondridgehealth
andrehab.com
352-746-9500 est#725
Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab




COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
Multiple Employ-
ment Opportunities
are Available!
Library Director -
Ocala Campus
The college is seek-
ing an experienced
Library Director
responsible for the
administration and
management of the
library and for
providing supervi-
sion and leadership
for library staff.
Minimum
Requirements:
ALA-accredited
Masters in Library
Science/Information
Science required.
Minimum of five
years of professional
experience in a
library or learning
resource center
required. Addition-
ally, a minimum of
3 years supervisory
and administrative
experience
required.
Other Ocala
Campus Openings
* Business Accounts
Coordinator -
Financial Operations
. Faculty-
Health Information
Technology
* Faculty -
RN to BSN Program
(168 and 220 Work-
day positions avail.)
Staff Assistant IV -
Health Sciences
For more
information about
these positions and
To APPLY please go
to www.CF.edu.
Click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit an elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and copy of
unofficial transcripts.
Transcripts may be
emailed to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885. 3001
SW College Road,
Ocala, FL 34474.
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


This area's
#1
employment
source!

IWMi. IE
Classifieds


Fiscal Specialist
Announcement
#14-27
Track and/or over-
see department
revenues and ex-
penditures, assure
accuracy and com-
pliance with County
policies and proce-
dures, statutes, reg-
ulations and GAAP.
Graduation from an
accredited college
or University with a
Bachelor's degree
in accounting or a
related field. A
comparable
amount of training
or experience may
be substituted for
the education quali-
fications. Starting
pay $1,769.72 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 14,
2014 EOE/ADA.





Ik




Putting

you in

touch

with the

Nature

Coast

Our family of newspaper
reaches more than
170,000 readers in Citrus,
Marion, Sumter, Levy,
Dixie, Gilchrest, Gadsden
& Wakulla Counties.
, nji Comty Chrmlde ,CenbJ Udge Ww
*Itn1_oI-n ImM-er
,yi cr C.m SunA CMdoC Tia-
* tt rws~ ioi t touth Mrn Citia
*kU.i..d Ne IKu.d Sh.pW
* ctefiiMClOh. TrnCotyhIlleUn
Gu;dam Couirty ITt WiluaIi Ne
The best way to reach the
growing Nature Coast market is
through our award-winning,
growing newspapers.


1624 Nath Medowcmst Boubvard
Cryst vari. FL 34429
(352) 563-6363
www.chroniciao niin e.com


quaiitieu
employee?


CLASSIFIEDS


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 D5


I Hfi ZgaB




D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


ACCOUNTING &
ADMINISTRATION
Need strong computer
and administrative
skills. Able to multi-
task. Personable, or-
ganized and detailed
oriented with strong
work ethic. Great
opportunity with suc-
cessful growing co.
Full Benefits.
Mail Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1859P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
FL. 34429





PROGRAM
ASSISTANT
Announcement
# 14-28

Performs routine
office tasks, assist
citizens locate
resources. Data
entry into the State
CIRTS system. Pro-
vides administrative
support to the
supervisor. Prepare
reports tracking
units delivered
versus authorized.
Performs related
duties as required.
Must successfully
pass a level II
background check.
Starting pay $11.09
hourly. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 14,
2014 EOE/ADA.


EXP. LINE COOK

Apply in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill


EXPERIENCED
LINE COOK
Fast, Coordinated
Full time, Non-
smoking. Call for
Interview Appt.
(352)447-2406, Inglis





AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have Val. fl. DL,
Robert 352-586-0305


NURSERY SALES

O'Connell's Nursery
PT/FT, Must have Ex-
perience in Plants
Call (352) 628-6700


Pest Control
Inspectors/Sales
Wanted for Citrus/
Sumter Co. Salary,
Plus Commissions.
Company vehicle.
APPLY IN PERSON
3447 E. Gulf to Lake


Traes/B
B~as


AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
Entry level position.
Exp not necessary
Apply in Person.
Mon Fri 8a-5p
Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
Ask for Greg Riggs
2440 US. 19
Crystal River
Drug Free Workplace
FOE


CDL-ATeam
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease Incen-
tive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfinartners.com




t ill '. r l I ll St.
L i )i Lkl)


C~^NidiE
.1.t11'V. %,.lII 11St.I




Classifieds

Exp. Laborer
& Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
Scott Wright Stucco




wante .1d 1for early

morning delivery of]











the CiYtrusCont


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

EXP. MECHANIC
Must have own tools.
Apply in Person
American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd.
No Phone Calls Please

Looking For
Exp. Ceramic
Tile Installers
Call Our Store at:
352-564-2772 For Info

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full benefits,
achievable
bonuses. Call for de-
tails 1-888-378-9691
or www.hevl.net

OTR Drivers
Wanted
Food grade
tankers,
Class-A CDL
/tanker endorse-
ment, Prefer 2 yrs
experience, Mile-
age & Drop Pay,
Vacation, Health,
Dental & 401k.
For information
call 800-569-6816
or go to our
website
www.ottervtran
soortation.com





Can't Keep Your
Mouth Shut!

Spouse may not like
it? But we'll pay you
top dollar for it.
Appointment Setting
Commission Only
352-503-6860


CLASSIFIED



Carpet Installa-
tion Helper
LOCAL,
Call (440) 742-0559


FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. ONLY, P/T Hrs
& Holidays.
352-726-9666


GROUNDSMAN

for a Tree Service
(352)628-9884 Iv.msg


Head Chef
Dell Manager
FT position at a grow-
ing natural food store
with large food serv-
ice area. Exp required
Send resume to:
CCC, Blind Box 1857
106W Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450


Heavy Machine
Mechanic
DAB Constructors
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
(352) 447-5488


Support Profes-
sionals /CNA's
Moving Mountains,
Inc. & Bridging
Mountains LLC
Reliable individuals
to work flexible
hours with the
developmentally
disabled, and Senior
Citizens. HSD/GED,
clean background
check, reliable
transportation
required. Training
provided.
Applications and
services details at
www.movina
mountains, me or at
2615 N Florida Ave.,
Hernando, FL.
8-4 Mon-Thur., Fri 8-2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Busine^W^ss -"- Storage^^
Oppo^-- -rtunitie |I^^^^^EL ^^


BCQj
P/T Boat Captain

min. 25 ton license
established dive
shop looking for
friendly, enthusiastic
tour guide, pls call
352-257-1794




CLEANERS
Reliable, Energetic
Individual/Couple
Retirees Welcome
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555

P/T Line Cooks
Must be available to
work week-ends.
Skyview Restaurant
at Citrus Hills
Apply in Person
2100 N. Terra Vista
Blvd. Mon.-Sun
8a-10a Or3p-5p

Tumbling &
Dance
Instructor
call (352) 563-5550




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com

Heating And Air
Conditioning
Technician
Training!
Fast Track. Hands
On National
Certification Pro-
gram. Lifetime Job
Placement. VA
Benefits Eligible!
1-877-994-9904


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547







BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu




SPRINGHILL
CAMPUS

a, Cosmetoloav
March 17th
Day & Night School
w, Barber
April 28th
Night School
w Massage Ther.
April 28th
Day School
a, Massage Ther.
April 28th
Night School
w" NAIL TECH

or FACIAL TECH
Day School
Open Enrollment
INTRODUCING *
NEW Niaht School
MARCH 17th
Classes for Nail Tech
or Facial Tech
Mon., Tues., Wed.
5:00 PM-9:00 PM
(727) 848-8415
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
Full & Part time
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Gorgeous Wellness
Spa for Rent, for Thera-
pist, Chiropractors or
Cosmetologist, ETC.
Includes Clientele &
Equip. (352) 464-1166
Well Established
Breakfast/Lunch Diner
15 yr History, Inverness
Brad Gibbs Broker, 75k
cash 352-212-5286



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


ANTIQUE ROCKER
Can be viewed on
craigslist super nice $65
call 352-257-3870
PAIR OF GREEN MAR-
BLE TABLES ON
WOOD PEDESTALS
Great condition $100
both call 352-257-3870



Beanie Babies
Specials, Bears,
Rabbits, Holiday &
MISC. (352) 465-6580

Look
VVVVTVV
BUSINESS Great op-
portunity to own
your own business.
Includes real estate
and 2 buildings
w/ample parking,
fenced, plus inven-
tory. Antique & Col-
lectibles items Only
serious inquiries call
352-746-6731
CAKE PLATE Milkglass
hobnail pattern w wavy
edge, pedestal base.12
1/2" diam x 5" tall.
$25.00 352-422-1309
COOKIE JAR Milkglass
hobnail pattern with lid.
11 1/2" tall x 8" diam.
$35.00 352-422-1309



BRAND NEW
30" Gas Stove GE
Stainless Steel
model # JGBT33SET2SS
retail $899. never used
$350. (352) 563-9811


#1 Employment source is



www.chronicleonline.com


Acctg/Bkkr QuickBooks
Certified, set-up, train-
ing, payroll, sales tax.
No job to small! Call
352-287-1909 for appt.


Airport Transport
352-746-7595 |



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19CR*461-4518



JAKES'
TRIM CARPENTRY
No job too big or small
Free Est. 352-601-7064



Your World







CH RNICljl


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lie/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



A- 1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765,352-513-5746


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



"ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
s FAST. 100%Guar.
a AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
0" Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crcl 330081
(3521 949-2292



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-613-8137
Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Comn. Lic.352-503-9621


Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557
Hom


**Budd Excavating"
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086


#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lie., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570




W*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Absolute Exterior
Restoration Any
Surface roof & gutter
cleaning, int/ext painting
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838













TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lie/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


SERVING CITRUS COUNTY lONGER THAN THE REST,
CONSISTENT VOTED I BEST OF THE BEST! i




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
.. Sod Sales & Install
3 Time Winner
2011-2012-2013

746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lie. #2646 Insured Bonded





Ted's Painting
a Name Services Co.







All Types of Home Repairs
746-5190
LIC/INS Lic #240270





GENERAL
Stand Alone -
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-61-124


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Qualify Specialist

Spring Tune $ 995
Up'Special 4 R
Guaranteeing 1Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Particle Scan to determine
the quality of thile air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires March 31, 2014
lI t~o I *A IC C1815891
0 wQAV Back To News,- 19
SHeating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz




3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallway is Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt. Wi th coupon.

40THURA LEAN hC
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091






Inslahl t Reiir Now's the
Pinus. filters. time for pool
H a- remodeling
Healers remodeling
Z Salt Systems
-- Pool Refinishing

Rf n sh ng
S Construction
SPavers
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
Wood S ervingAll Of Citrus Count
POOl'& Spa Free Consultation
sMWPODS.eOM 9382-4421
S aI -% W ;tte rti PolGontrfmtodr Lk #1458326


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County
Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
flAll Home Repairs
9 Smnl Carpentry
1 I^H9 fencing

I lean Dryer Vents
N fAffordoble & Dependable
Ki V" ExE Eptfi'ence lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
|L J Licensed & Insured Lic#37761


S KNOCK OUT"
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
SWorkers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too

352.942.8434
Callo Today for a
S Clean Tomorrow


* Propane Appliances
* Electrical Repair
* Plumbing Repairs
* Water & Collision Damage
* Roof Sealing & Damage
* Mobile Service
* Fully Stocked Parts Dept.
"We Do It All"
Nature Coast RV
352-795-7820
9800 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
www.NatureCoastRV.com


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
S352-364-4610
(%MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
24 Ion--ursa-n-l-n- - --I rS aWeek
I24 Hours a DaY 7 DaYS a Weeki


I" neir/xeirPainting SevcIc


Wallpaper Removal



352-597-2440r 352-293-5088
Toll Free: 877-893-3895 |


*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill



YOUR INTERLOCKING
BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST



CI'L






POOL MAD PAVERLLC
352-400-3188





WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
Driveways i

SSeal Coating 1faijjj
" Maintenance I
" Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmrnail.comrn
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
ELECTRIC STOVE
GE, Like New
White, $300
(352) 795-8728
GE ELECTRIC RANGE
White Four Element
Stove, Digital Oven,
Oven needs Heater Coil
$100341-0450
MICROWAVE KEN-
MORE MOUNTS OVER
THE STOVE WHITE
$90 352-613-0529
Refrigerator Kenmore
Olive Color
Good Cond.
$100.
(352) 382-5661
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179

SOLD
Washer & Dryer, GE
extra large capacity
excellent cond.
White,
SONYO T.V. /FREE
WORKS.CALL FOR
MORE INFO Linda
4234163
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398
Whirlpool
Cabrio, Lg. capacity
Washer Machine
$300. 352-586-2562




ABSOLUTE
AUCTION *
2.5 ACRES,
March 20, 10am
Ed Messer, Broker
messersales.comrn




Craftsman 2HP 6Gal
Air Compressor; Craft.
10" Drill Press 1/2HP 5
spd; Craft. 5.25HP
Wet/Dry Vac; Bench
Grinder; 352-270-8341
CRAFTSMAN ROTARY
CUTTER All-in-one cutt-
ing tool with case. $35.
352-6344905
MAKITA CORDLESS
DRIVER DRILL 9.6 V
including charger, bat-
tery and case.
$30. 352-6344905
MAKITA POWER
PLANER Electric; in-
cludes case and extras.
$35. 352-6344905
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80 HAND
HELD HEAVY DUTY
METAL INVERNESS
419-5981
WESTINGHOUSE
JOINTER/EDGER ON A
STAND Good working
condition $35 call
352-257-3870



CENTER SPEAKER
FOR HOME THEATRE
Danish SEAS CoAxial,
150W, Ported Solid Oak
Box, $100 341-0450
CENTER SPEAKER
FOR HOME THEATRE
Black and Silver, Dual
Woofer MTM, Silver
Wire $75 341-0450
HIFI SPEAKER KIT
2-Way, 8inch 85Watt
woofers, Silver Wire
Crossover, Nuance
Tweeters $75 341-0450
JVC DVD PLAYER +
VCR COMBO UNIT Like
New, Remote Control,
Excellent Performance,
In Box $50 341-0450
JVC SURROUND
SOUND RECEIVER
Original Dolby Surround,
Clear Sound, Clean $40
341-0450
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
PANOSONIC 13" TV
WITH REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $25
352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $70
352-613-0529



TOILET American
Standard elongated
white toilet $25
(352)465-2853



COMPUTER GAMES 6
multi-packs, 1 with
500,000 games, ($10)
(352)613-7493
COMPUTER Gateway
desktop with Windows
XP. Includes computer
desk. $75
352-344-1503
WIFI ROUTER CISCO
LINKSYS E1200 Has
WPA2 Security, Wire-
less N, Mac or PC, $30
341-0450



8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
recliner~ottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634
LANAI 9 pc set
glass table 66 x40,
6 chrs, 2 footstools, sm
round glass coffee ta-
ble. Like New $300
(352)422-2317 John
PATIO SET 48"
OCTAGON TABLE & 4
CHAIRS WITH


CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529
PVC PATIO LOUNGE
w/cushions & matching
serving cart.
$50.00. Ruth
352-382-1000
VINTAGE ROD IRON
SOFA & 2 CHAIRS
Sturdy condition $100
call 352-257-3870




20 8 ft.
Wooden Tables
Folding Metal Legs.
$75. ea.
Wiil Sell Separate
(352) 621-0987
100
Metal Chairs
$15ea.
Will separate
(352) 621-0987


ASIAN STYLE TABLE
with glass top red and
gold perfect condition
$75 call 352-257-3870
DESK KIDS HEIGHT
Light Oak, 2 Drawers,
Book Shelf, 2x4 Foot
Top, Sized K to 8th
$100 341-0450
Entertainment Center
Light Oak, ExcCond.
$200; Couch, Dark
color, Good Cond $85
(352) 697-2452
FURNITURE Double
dresser w/mirror, Ash-
ley, med. oak $175.
5-pc metal dinette set,
blk faux marble top, tan
micro-fiber seats $225.
(352)637-1857
HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
KING BEDROOM SET
custom made, match-
ing Entertainment
Center, lots of storage!
can text photos askg
$475obo 352-220-2037
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Green, like
new. No pets or
smoking. Exc Cond!
$225. (352) 746-2329
Oak Dining Room Set
inc. ext. leaf, 4 high-
back chairs, beautiful
hutch w. beveled glass
doors, $300.set obo
Dinette Set 4 padded
chairs w/coaster wheels
$225. obo, can text
photos (352) 220-2037
Reclining Lift Chair
Good Condition
$250.
(352) 212-6187
SOFA
Bassett, floral and
rattan, like new.
Coffee & End Table.
All for $250
(352) 794-3693
SOFA Blue and white
plaid. $50.
(352)637-1857.
Sofa, Love seat, Cof
fee table, matching
recliner, printed mate-
rial w/ some wicker
excellent condition
$400. (352) 341-4406
Solid Wild Cherry
Buffet, natural finish,
16W" x40"Lx40"H
glass doors, Amish
made, beautiful!
$200. (352) 860-0124
TEAK QUEEN BED-
ROOM SET Platform
bed with attached night
stands, mattress, 6
drawer dresser and mir-
ror. Gently used. $499
352-527-2874
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TRADITIONAL SOFA
AND LOVE SEAT blues
and brown needs
cleaning $25 Call
352-257-3870
TV STAND ON
WHEELS 24H X 28W
MEDIUM COLOR $20
352-613-0529
WHITE METAL
BAKERS/WINE RACK
with a wood top like new
$45 352-257-3870




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
LAWNMOWER Sears
Craftsman self-propelled
with rear bagger. $50
352-322-1160
Toro 3spd self
propelled Mulching
Mower $100.Sears
Push Mower mulch or
discharge,like new
$100. (352) 507-1490




HOMOSASSA
Sunday 9am-6pm
Items for ALL aces
4195 W Boxer Ct
(end of Meadow)
INVERNESS
BIG MOVING SALE
CALL (352) 637-4791




DRESS perfect for
prom, never worn, tags
still on, red & black,
large ($35)
352-613-7493
MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS SIZE
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS $20
352-613-0529
SHOES very high heels,
size 8, pewter with silver
studs, new, ($10)
352-613-7493
VINTAGE LONDON
FOG Rain Coat excel-
lent condition $40 call
352-257-3870




BROTHER FAX COP-
IER SCANNER WITH
MANUAL ONLY 35.00
__ 464 0316 __



(1) ALUMINUM
DOUBLE PANE
WINDOW measures
71"high x35"wide $30
call 352-257-3870
4 WOODEN BOXES
$20 FOR
GARAGE/WORKSHOP
2 SIZES INVERNESS
419-5981
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $20
HEARTS/ANIMALS
PAINT DECORATE
419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck


tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Blue Glass Ware
$150.
10 Deviled Egg Strays
$50.
(352) 795-7254
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DISHES Prestige fine
china, spring pattern,
service/8 plus and
serving pcs. $25.00
352-422-1309


watt OTT Light for crafts
& sewing. $179.00 New.
Sell for $50..
352-628-3585
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
HEARING AID
Kirkland, w/charger, &
2 rechargable batt. +
remote control. Like
new. Orig price $1000,
asking $400 OBO
(352) 462-7024
Home Generator
6.5 kw, Briggs &
Stratton, will run entire
house except central
air. runs great! $400.
(352) 613-5522
HONDA ENGINES
Straight shaft, 15 hsp
w/elec. starter, runs
good $450. 10 hsp,
bored out to 30 hsp,
$475.352-637-4791 or
352-419-2915
MICROSCOPE
with accessories $75
352-628-0221
Oreck Air Purifier.
Like New. $150.
(352) 270-0269
Sears Heavy Duty
Propane Gas Dryer
$75. Toro Push Mower
5hsp, 21" cut $60.
(352) 507-1490
Television
13" color Sylvania w/
remote $35
Nightstand, 2 drawers
$25
(352) 726-2566
VACUUM CLEANER
LG upright, compressor
compact, pet care, like
new, bagless $150
(352) 465-9395



4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
352464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Medical Lift Chair
exc. cond. neutral
color, $200.
(352) 513-4621 or
(417)-592-0557
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. 20.00 464-0316
SHOWER BENCH
SEAT ALUMINUM &
FIBERGLASS BENCH
TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
352464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
100.00 464 0316



"NEW SG" ELECTRIC
GUITAR &GIGBAG,
PLAYS,LOOKS,
SOUNDS100% $45
352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER
ACOUSTIC GUITAR &
GIGBAG,STRAT NECK
SMALL BODY $100
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GRAND CONCERT
GUITARFISHMAN
PREAMP $85
352-601-6625
KIMBALL ORGAN In
good working order
some computerized
functions $30 call
352-257-3870


Household

FLORAL WALLPAPER
3 DOUBLE ROLLS $25
PREPASTED 165SQ
FT E-MAIL PHOTO
INVERNESS 419-5981
Liberation by
American Standard
Walk-In Bath -
Don't Struggle
Getting Out Of A
Normal Bathtub.
Stay in your home
longer, safely,
independently.
Liberation Walk-In
Baths Commended
by the Arthritis
Foundation. Best
Lifetime Warranty
in the industry.
Hydrotherapy,
Chromatherapy,
Aromatherapy no
extra cost. Installa-
tion Included! Get
$1,000 Off -Call
Toll-Free Today
1-866-583- 1432.
PFALTZGRAF AMALFI
STONEWARE Service
for 12 w/serving pcs.
$100 513-4614
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
WORK GREAT. SEL-
DOM USED. ONLY
185.00 352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE


MACHINE
electronic readouts
all digital, works great
$185.00 352 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE DIGITAL
READOUT GREAT
SHAPE.ONLY 100.00
3524640316
Recumbent Exercise
Bike. Edge 280,
like new, scans dis-
tance, speed, time
odometer, calories
$100. (352) 465-7269

SOLD
Recumbent Exercise
Bike. Edge 280,
like new, scans dis-
tance, speed, time
odometer calories


TAPERFLEX WATER
SKI In perfect shape
$25 call 352-257-3870




BICYCLE WHEELS Al-
loy 700x23mm Pair by
WTB, for Fast Street or
ATB, Straight, No Tires
$60 341-0450
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Like new, 1 set North-
western, 1 set Ping
Zing, Plus bags, balls
etc $350 for all
(352) 341-0866

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Mar. 15th 9a-5p
Sun. Mar. 16th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605

MOTOR SCOOTER
2013 VIP Future
Champion,
only 2,300 miles
$795
(812) 207-5691(cell)
Tennis Racket
stringing machine,
electronic Alpha Ultra
Edge, w/6 pt hold,
Exc. Cond. $400. obo
Recumbent Bike
2 wheel Bike E, 21 spd.
aluminum, 29 Ibs,
Exc Cond. $350 obo
(352) 489-0105
Treadmill
PaceMaster ProElite
like new, ($2000 new)
asking $150; Ironman
inversion table new, $50
(352) 382-2525




BOYS CLOTHES sizes
12mths 5Toddler
.25-$1 like new call
352-257-3870
ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE $60 HAND-
CRAFTED SOLID OAK
CAN E MAIL PHOTOS
INVERNESS 419-5981
Stroller, Car Seat,
Walker, Blankets,
clothes, & a youth bed
$200. obo
(352) 795-7254


Sell r Swa


*\V;



IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




Palomino 1999
POP-Up Camper
sleeps 6, queen & full
bed, a/c, refrig, gas
cook stove & heater
add-on screenroom
$3200.ob 813-748-9875


DOLLY
Dolly, a 6 y.o.
Bulldog/ terrier mix,
weight 54 Ibs,
spayed, housebrkn,
very friendly & af-
fectionate, playful.
Good w/children.
Should be only dog,
fenced yard pre-
ferred, active. Had
unfortunate early
life, no fault of her
own. Call Joanne
@ 352-697-2682 or
352-513-5754.


KANE
Kane, beautiful
4-y.o. Blackmouth
cur mix, friendly,
affectionate, eager
to please. Neu-
tered, weighs 60 Ibs.
Sits for treats, walks
well on a leash,
eager to please,
happy, playful,
would make great
family dog.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


a and read


II' M n Izr /-tM'L UU
NEAR TRUCKS RD/
RHAPSODY LN
AREA ACROSS
FROM
DOLLAR GENERAL
813-389-2793


MACK
Mack, a 2 y.o.
black/tan coon-
hound, neutered,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, 45 Ibs,
gentle, intelligent.
Loves car rides,
walks well on leash.
Good w/cats. Loves
outdoor exercise,
but loves his home &
human friends also.
Protective
companion.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363,
email: jamcbriar
@yahoo.com.
Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female
Schnauzer Pups
Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pups
Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827



Welsh Driving Pony
Buggy, Harnace,
& Boots.
$3,000.
(352) 212-4981




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510
ALUMINUM BOAT
10' Long, Good Cond.
Easy to load. Light
weight. + trolling mtr.
$300. (678) 617-5560
COBIA 2000
17.5 Ft., lOOHYam.,
4 strk, Great Shape
$5,700,813-244-3945
352-634-4768
LOGIC
2001 15" Center
Console 40 H.P.
Yamaha,Galv.trailer,
Bimini topless than 12
hours. You can not tell
this boat is not brand
new.$5700.
(352)563-0133 or
(352)302-9159
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
endcl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792
Sea Eagle
deluxe inflatable
twin Pontoon fishing
boat, fits in car trunk,
12' fully equipped
w/motor, used once
like new $2700.
value asking $1450.
630-337-3999
Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
VISION BASS
1991. 18.5' W 175 hp
Johnson. Great Cond.
Well Maintained.
$5500. (352)419-5560
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
WINNEBAGO
'07, Journey, 36 SG,
excel, cond 300 Cum.,
Non smoke, no pets
22K mi, tow veh. avail
$98K, 352-598-5616



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Look
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ







'07 Dodge Caravan
97k miles, $5195


'05 Ford Focus
121k miles, $3595

'04 Dodge Neon SXT
102k miles, $3395

'01 Dodge Utility
Truck $6895

Everything Motor's
7039 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Homosassa, Fl
352-503-9969


-ui, rAuai rAu
Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUICK
99 Century Custom
Green, 59k mi.
garaged, runs great!
$3000.(352) 270-3909
Buy Here/Pay Here

'94 Ford Taurus
$1500 Cash

'95 Chevy S-10 Cust.
$1800 Cash

'97 Dodge Neon
$2700 Cash

'99 Chevy Cavalier
$2900

'00 Olds Silhouette
$2700

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVROLET
2000, Camaro
5 speed $3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003, Monte Carlo LS,
$5,995
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring green
convertible, looks and
runs great,cold air.
$2000.00 352-364-2375

IMMACUlATE
CHRYSLER
SPORTS CAR
2005 Crossfire Yellow
convertible w/black top,
auto trans, excellent
condition, 45k,built in
Germany w/Mercedes
V6 engine $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
Reduced price for a
well maintained '03,
Taurus SE, Looks &
drives great $3,200
firm/ 141khwymi.
Shown on appointment.
(352) 422-1798
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR'*461-4518
VW Passatt
2010, 28kmi, many
options, like new
$14,500
(352) 344-4157




2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



MERCEDES BENZ
1978 450 SL, Convert.
Roadster w/two tops
excel, cond. 84k mi.
$13k obo 352-464-3187




CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier
4 Door, $4,250.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004, S10
Crew Cab, 4 x4,
$7,995.
352-341-0018
DODGE 3/
2006 SLT, Quad Cab;
5th wheel hitch. 88k
miles, $14,900
Frank's (352) 726-2494
FORD
2013, F150V6, Stand
Cab. Trir tow pkg,
Cust. bed liner &
cover. Much More
only 1,800 miles.
$23,800 352-419-5771

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA


US 19& US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440|




FORD
'09, Edge, 57K miles
all pwr. loaded,
2 tone interior $15,000
firm. (352) 201-1866
Serious Inquiries Only
Selling/Health reasons
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
SUZUKI
2007, Vitara
4 WD, V6, $7,950.
352-341-0018


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment




CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306

ESelf Strae'
*Notices


Harley Davidson
2009 Electra Glide
Classic, black, 9300
mi, lowered, pristine,
illness causes sale,
$13950, 352-270-8019
HARLEY-DAVIDSO
N
2003 FLHTC Electra
Glide Classic 100th An-
niversary. Black & Lots
of Chrome. 24K miles.
$10,500. Call Cell: 814
282-0184

Self StT~f!!aT
*Notices


2013 Honda
Scooter PCX 150
Red, Great Cond.
$3500 OBO
352-422-8601




KAWASAKI
2000 ZRX 1100
12,700 mi.
GREAT BIKE!
$3700. 352-322-1160


-efStrg


350-0316 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage 3-269 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SAT-
ISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY
ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
#34 Robert Simon Katz;#183 Wayne Edward Penninger;#219 Myslie Dawn Geiger;#222
Tracy Shasteen Lipford;#261 Patricia Ann Seymour
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M.. WEDNESDAY. MARCH 26. 2014.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 9 & 16, 2014.


327-0202 SUCRN
TDCB-3/20 Regular Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 20th day of March 2014 at the Citrus
County Transit Center, 1300 S Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, FL 34460.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)

JOHN J KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 9,2014.


338-0316 SUCRN
DOCTORS OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The PEDIATRIC DENTAL OFFICE of
MID FLORIDA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY OF CITRUS COUNTY
Located at 22 REGINA BLVD, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 Phone number: 352-270-8860
Is CLOSING on MARCH 28, 2014.
We thank you for your patronage. It has been our pleasure to serve your children's
dental needs.

Patients are welcome at our primary office in Lake County and all records will be
transferred there. If you wish to have records transferred to another dentist, we will
be happy to transfer them for you at no charge with your written authorization.
Please contact us at this number prior to our permanent closing day.
After March 28, 2014, records will be held at 1340 E. Orange Ave, Eustis, FL
Any inquiry about records should be directed to phone number 352-483-9183.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, March 2,9, & 16, 2014.


345-0309 SUCRN
03/13/2014 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, March 13 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central Florida,
Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 9, 2014.


347-0309 SUCRN
3/13 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 13, 2014 in Room 280 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.

Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 9, 2014.


348-0309 SUCRN
3/18/14 Budget Meeting CCTDC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a Budget meeting on Tuesday, March 18th at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN "JJ" KENNEY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 9, 2014.


349-0309 SUCRN
CCMCD Bid Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO BID
The Citrus County Mosquito Control District is offering the following equipment thru
Sealed Bids.
2002 Dodge Dakota Pickup Truck
2003 Ford F-150 Super Cab Pickup Truck
3 2004 Ford Ranger Pickup Trucks
2004 Ford Ranger 4X4 Pickup Truck
2005 Ford Ranger Pickup Truck
2005 Ford Ranger 4X4 Pickup Truck
2004 Honda ATV Four Wheeler
Cub Cadet Riding Mower poor condition
Security Camera poor condition
All items sold in "as is, where is" condition without representation or warranty. Any
potential purchaser may inspect and examine the condition of these vehicles prior
to submitting any bid. Successful bidder will be required to sign a release form trans-
ferring all liability of the item. Winning bidder has 24 hours to pick up and remove
item from the property, after which the next highest bidder will be awarded the
item.
These items may be seen Monday thru Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Bid sheets are
available at the District Headquarters, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, Fl. 34461. All
bids must be received by 3:00 p.m. on March 14, 2014.
Bids will be awarded no later than close of business Wednesday, March 19,2014.
Further information may be obtained by contacting the office at (352) 527-7478.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any and all for-
malities.
By order of the Board of Commissioners of the Citrus County Mosquito Control Dis-
trict.
Albert Jordan
Chairman of the Board
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 9, 2014


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 D7


I Misc.Not


I Misc.Not


I Misc. Not


Metn


Metn


Meeting
I Notices


I Bi


mB


mB




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


___i,
\~' a "/^II yy


2014 Nissan
SentraS
VIN# 213390
MODEL #12014


2014 Nissan
Rogues


VIN# 791030
MODEL # 22114


W.RONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE


I MSRP: ....................
Savings Off MSRP:


$24,439
.$6,444


2014 Nissan
JukeSv
VIN# 360823
MODEL #20114


2014 Nissan
Frontiers


VIN# 213390
MODEL # 12014


ONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE
MSRP: ........................................................ $23,425
Savings Off MSRP: .....................................$5,599
.i N AF W Y


New 2014 Nissan


Altima
VIN# EC183916
MODEL # 13114


MSRP:.......................................................... w$23,720
Savings Of MSRP: .................6,041


J.~tpyjp~


CRYSTAL
THE CLERHNISSANL
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE |


800-584-8755 EXTI0 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:30am-8:OOpm n Saturday 9:00am-7:30pnm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30amn-5:30pmn Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00amrn-4:00prnm Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30amn-5:30pnm Saturday & Sunday-Closed
Includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. With approved credit *Price includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify.
Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.


ONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE

Savings Off MSRP: ..................................... $3"555- i


VA07 mf =-- D T~7 w'& I


-%W B- i.Ara


I MSRP: ....................
Savings Off MSRP:


ONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE


$21,600
-9 -,a2


S


ONE OR MORE
AT THIS PRICE


.....................................
....................................


IIIIII.................................III


.....................................iWl 7ummaU


D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


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HOM FRONT 9,2014
.OMEFRONT


B Sikorski's
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PAGE E4


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E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 CITRUS COuNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM





1332 S. BROOKFIELD DR., LECANTO
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot
* Nearly 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained
* Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows
DIRECTIONS Enter Crystal Glen on Hwy 44 in Lecanto,
follow Crystal Glen Dr to right on Brookfield to home on right
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 1
(352) 527-7842 m&
352) 422-3875 1

Enter houseI



F 4

11 OAK VILLAGE BLVD
SUGARMILL WOODS
* 3BR/2BA/2CG w/Den Sweetwater Custom
* Solar Heated Pool Remodeled Kitchen
* Living RM + Fam. RM Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


LOWEST PRICED HOME
IN PINE RIDGE!!!
*3BR, 3BATH *2-Car Garage
*1,802 Sq. Ft. Living Updated Kitchen
*HVAC 2009 Timbedine Shingles 2013
*Extended Screened LANAI -1 ACRE Lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 i
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com


WM*





REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted
4,

3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


... .. ...




CONVENIENT LOCATION
CLOSE TO THE INVERNESS COUNTRY CLUB,
GOLFING, FISHING, BIKE TRAILS, & SHOPPING.
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA HOME WITH A TOTAL OF
2,746 UNDER ROOF. CORNER LOT, LARGE
FLORIDA ROOM, & FENCED BACKYARD.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbmaijmills@earthlink.net lI


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-1PM






1220 E. WHIRL AWAY
3 bed/2 bath 2car garage pool home.
Vacation home, hardly used, pristine condition.
Belmont Hills Subdivision.

PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491 fI.
Email: pparvi@yahoo.com It2


3/2/2 waterfront on deep canal leading to river/Gulf. Kit
open to family room viewing water Lg screen lanai -
Open floor plan. DIRECTIONS: U.S. Hwy. 19 to Halls
River Rd. R on Riverhaven Dr. L on Stetson to #5090.

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email. remaxga122@yahoo.com R J


CASUAL LUXURY LIVING! TOPS IN COMMUNITY!
Spectacular 4 BD home on Skyview Incredibly maintained 3 BD home on scenic preserve
Course. Features central courtyard lot. Spacious design loaded with features including
2 guest suites, pool/spa & ourmet wood flooring, granite countertops and upgraded
kitchen. $300K BELOWV orig. figures. Includes benefit of Citrus Hills CC
appraisal. Membership!


242 N.1 Ie l Hw. eel Hls5774 w wRtAI o I 10 U..Hy.4 Invres6760


px




GREAT BONES!
3 Bedrooms/2 Baths Bonus Room
New Floors Vaulted Ceilings
New Exterior Doors 1 Acre Corner Lot
2 Garages Fully Fenced
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [ 1
Email: sherylpotls@aol.coim
Websile: www.CrysalRiverLiving.coim


rHpHE


131 N. SKYFLOWER PT., LECANTO
Affordable 3/3/2 pool home in beautiful, gated Heather Ridge.
Nicely maintained interior features split plan, high ceilings,
plant shelves, laminate flooring, upgraded carpet, sliders to
pool area, separate living room/family room. Master bath
boasts separate shower, jetted bath and dual sinks. Pool area
overlooks over sized backyard. Community offers clubhouse,
pool, tennis and recreational vehicle parking.
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 I-J
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com a


FOR THE DISCRIMINATING BUYER!
One Of A Kind Custom Built 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath Pool Home On
The 6th Fairway & Green Of Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
Architecturally Designed To Withstand Over 250 MPH Winds
Some Features Include Poured Concrete Constriction, Galvanized
Aluminum Roof, Covered Wrap Amround Decks, Pavered Driveway
& Pool Deck, Hurricane Shutters & More Too Many Upgrades To
Mention This IsA Must See Homel
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 Iii
Email: martha.sather@remax.net


Bn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SReal Estate DIGEST

Lambert named district Plantation congratulates
VP of Florida Realtors Kristi Bortz


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 E3


Cheryl Lambert, sales associate,
CHP Realty in Inverness, is the 2014
District 7 vice president of Florida Real-
tors, the state's largest professional asso-
ciation. She will serve her fellow
professionals in District 7, which encom-
passes Lake, Sumter, Hernando, Marion
and Citrus counties. She is a member of
the Realtors Association of Citrus County.
Lambert served as 2013 president of
the Citrus County association, and chair of
its strategic planning committee. She has
also chaired the technology and member-
ship committees. She is a member of the
state association's board of directors and
a graduate of Florida Realtors Leader-
ship Academy. In the community, Lam-
bert has served on the Citrus County
Planning and Development Roundtable
team, the Affordable Housing Coalition and
the Inverness Old Town Association. She
also is a member of the Affordable Hous-
ing Advisory Committee for Citrus County.


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
Many neighborhood
feuds in the U.S. are
caused by barking and
parking. When it comes
to barking, animal
trainers say dogs are
usually bored, scared
or anxious, so they
shouldn't be blamed for
fights that involve their
masters.
Incessant barking
has stirred neighbor-
hood violence and bred
an industry of shock
and sound devices de-
cried as hurtful by
some but hailed as so-
lutions by their makers.
Ultimately, owners
need to take responsi-
bility for devoting


I Plantation Realty
Inc. would like con-
gratulate Kristi Bortz
for being recognized by
the Board of Realtors
t in Citrus County. She
is in the Top 10 of the
multimillion-dollar pro-
ducers for Citrus
Kristi County. You can contact
Bortz Kristi at 352-228-9505.

|McClory wins
top agent
0 Congratulations to
SSteve McClory with
EXIT Realty Leaders
for winning Top-Listing
Agent for the month
Steve of February, with a
McClory listing total of $310,000.


enough time to pet
care, experts say They
urge people to get to
the root of the problem
before boredom, anxi-
ety or fear turn into
shredded bedspreads,
puddles in the house or
escape attempts. Make
sure bored animals get
plenty of exercise and
find out what's upset-
ting them maybe it's
just a car's backfire.
"Barking definitely
affects people's lives,"
said Sgt. Dustin Del-
ridge, an officer for the
Missoula, Mont, Police
Department who deals
with quality-of-life is-
sues, such as barking.
By the time he gets in-
volved, bad feelings
usually are brewing.


Sometimes solutions
are as simple as moving
a kennel to the other
side of a yard or asking
an owner to keep a dog
inside.
"Most of the time, we
can come up with a so-
lution," he said. "Once
in a while, we can't
make anybody happy"
So far, that includes
Gary Garrett, who's los-
ing sleep as three Rot-
tweilers howl through
the night in his neigh-
borhood in Visalia,
about 200 miles north
of Los Angeles. He says
the sound penetrates
his walls like "blow
horns or subwoofers."
He visited his neighbor

See BARKING/Page E7


I SEMVZ 40ALL 9*4= C7y-MUS 9OUyiV


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


QIO Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
AWOpen 7 Das rties
AWeeld Properties


7 tZjh 5582 N Mock Orange Dr ,$ fA 1657W Skyview Crossing Dr
MLS 703701 $245,900 MLS 707198 $224,900
REDUCED $2,000! New 2013 construction Spacious home on a premium homesite -
3bd/2ba with 3-car garage. 3BD/2BA.
Dir Rte ': L 7 Tine i il~kyview
Ridge t .- ..
Phil Phillips 352 302 3146 Maria Fleming 352 422 1976
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4PM


Meticulously maintained 2/2/2 with
fabulous upgraded features.
Dir. 486 W to L on Essex, R on Keller, L on
Fresno, R on Pearson.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764
NEW LISTING


C'tf1" I
iJ,lls 435 E Keller Ct
MLS 708899 $299,900
Spacious, open & bright 3bd/2ba pool
home on Oaks Golf Course.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING


//iy-- itu N L ui ic 9 'a 0UUp
MLS 708933 $199,900
Beautiful 4/4/2 pool home w/private
guest quarters.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


,U,,,$ 365 E Glassboro Ct
g MLS 706396 $119,900
Lovely 3/2/2 home w/wood burning
fireplace & views of golf course.
Dir. Rte. 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd, R on
Glassboro Ct
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


3776W Douglasfir Cir
MLS 708957 $239,000
Custom pool home on a private corner lot.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700
NEW LISTING





810 E GilchrisL Cl, 28-4A
MLS 709026 $79,900
Cottage unit with 2/2/CP and enclosed
lanai. Fully Furnished.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


."1| | I I ** S "
WHOSAD TRE's A .CROWD


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4PM



\-,$if 2136 N Lakecresl Lp
MLS 708329 $194,500
Beautiful maintenance free 3/2/2/ home is
truly move in ready.
Dir. Go thru the main entrance of Terra Vista,
take the first R after the gate-Skyview
Crossing Or, L on Lakecrest Lp.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-3PIV


Ulii, 1620 WTacoma St
MLS 707838 $239,000
Freshly painted,well maintained 3/2.5/2
home w/private backyard.
Dir 486 to Ottawa Av follow as it becomes Quartz
Av, L on Tacoma St Hwy 44 to SchoolAv Ron
Union St, quick L on Nashville, L on Tacoma St
Anna Moore Graf 352-613-0060
NEW LISTING


UijJ 549 W National St
~ MLS 708939 $219,900
Well cared for 4 bdrm 2 bath pool home
w/den.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


T,.t* ^1,0,- VV d-Ulllld rl
MLS 706917 $79,900
Neat, clean 2/2/2 with screened
front porch.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
-First Time Home Seller


numie nuyer/i 1lir STULuy! --
'I II II ,I.Ih i III .. .. II, I ,11 I ,,II I I ,lIi ,,i I 1 I .Ihh1 i III I,, ,.l I I ,h I i ,, h I I I I , i I, I . .I ii
[ I1 "h l .. .. .II .. .. I,I II I ,,hh ,, i, I I . .. i,,, I, ... .II I II h ., ,I . Ih Ih ,1,, I, I1,,,I .,,h l ,I H h ,, &
S 0. O~ -


When barking bites at


relationships, working


together the key to quiet




E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci4ikNid.E

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Everything you need



to know about counties


J an Salter noticed the fe-
male counties in the
parking lot island at Dun-
nellon Library dropped their
bright orange seeds in Febru-
ary She emailed Louise Bono,
a friend of the library in
charge of landscaping, with a
series of questions that Louise
forwarded to me. As a long-
time grower of this Jurassic Jane
survivor, the following is some J
advice. JAN
Coontie is a native plant in- GARI
digenous to Florida alone of
all the United States. Its range extends
south to Caribbean Islands including
Cuba. It may be extinct in the wild on His-
panola and Puerto Rico due to habitat
loss and harvesting. It is near threatened
everywhere today due to commercial har-
vesting for landscaping. There are geo-
graphic subpopulations with different
leaf sizes wide, narrow and folded -
but all are one species, Zamia pumila,
Zones 8 to 12. Modern DNA testing proves
the sole correct name old inaccurate


Veber
E'S
DEN


former names should be
dropped from the vocabulary
so as not to misinform younger
people.
Zamia is a cycad, not a fern
or palm. There are about 30
species in the genus. The pop-
ular tropical to subtropical
Mexican cardboard plant is
Zamia furfuracea, Zones 10 to
12. Female Zamias, if polli-
nated by male pollen in Feb-
ruary or March locally,
develop cones bearing up to a
hundred seeds. After about 9


months, the ripe cones open to expose at-
tractive seeds surrounded by a fleshy or-
ange covering. Seeds drop and are eaten
by wildlife. The flesh prevents the seed
from drying until the inside embryo de-
velops enough to sprout from May to July
about 15 months after pollination.
The seedling will have only two 4-inch
long leaves with two pairs of opposite
leaflets during the first year of its life. It


See JANE/Page E5


Inside...


Herb tree? Why not?
PAGE Ell
There's a pond in
your future
PAGE E8
Get frugal with DIY
laundry supplies
PAGE E12
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Dutch candlesticks could fetch hundreds


ear John: A friend told me about Dear John: Below you will see some
your article in the Chronicle a photographs of a treadle sewing ma-
while back and I really enjoy all chine I purchased in Galena, Ill., in the
the different questions peo- early 1980s. I cannot figure
ple ask and your ability to out what brand it is except
give them a straightforward from any pics I have seen on-
answer. So here is a photo- line it is not a Singer The
graph of my candlesticks, I last patent date I can read is
hope you can help me. I 1 186?. The serial number
bought them ages ago at a under the head is 513535. It
flea market in Miami for '. has mother of pearl inlay on
about $20. They say Gouda the machine head. The
Holland on the bottom and wheel does turn and the foot
are in good condition. treadle also moves. Hope-
TD., Internet John Sikorski fully from the pics you can
Dear T.D.: Thank you for SIKORSKI'S see the cabinet does fold out
the good photographs. The ATTfor the work surface. I do
very attractive candlesticks ATIC know it was at least last used
are in the "art pottery" cate- in 1906 from a newspaper
gory They were made in Gouda, Hol- pattern that is in the front drawer Two
land, likely 100 years ago or so. Gouda questions. What brand do you think it is
art pottery has been a specific category and does it have any value? I am want-
of collector interest for a long time. Po- ing to sell this. The prices on eBay vary
tential dollar value is $100 to $200 for a lot. Thank you for your help.
the pair -M., Internet


Dear M.: During the late 19th and
early 20th century, there were numer-
ous small sewing machine manufactur-
ers. I do not know what company
manufactured your sewing machine.
Your treadle sewing machine is not old
enough to be of interest to serious col-
lectors. Current potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I was given many years
ago, what appears to be a song in Latin,
written on what I have been told is vel-
lum. It looks very old and reminds me of
pictures I have seen of things done by
See ATTIC/Page Ell
This attractive candlestick reads
"Gouda Holland" on the bottom, and for
good reason that's where it was
produced, likely nearly a century ago.
Our reader picked up a pair for roughly
$20, but columnist John Sikoriski
estimates their worth at potentially
10 times that.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

will develop a fattened swelling of the un-
derground stem. Roots sprout from the
deep taproot and out of the fat stem. In
year two there can be four leaves, each
with three to four pairs of leaflets. On
year three, a coontie may have six or
more leaves.
Young male counties produce their
first pollen cone at 5 to 7 years of age. Be-
fore that, I cannot tell visually if the plant
is a boy or girl. Girls mature more slowly,
producing their first reproductive cone at
6 to 8 years old. The underground turnip-
like stem will develop two or more sepa-
rate growth crowns of age. An old plant
could develop a dozen growth crowns
that each sprout new leaves once a year
in spring. Each leaf can last up to three
years before it is shed naturally
Since mature counties have 4-foot-long
leaves that arch out from the crowns, they


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 E5


should be planted no closer than five feet
apart and three feet from a path or build-
ing. Gardeners can temporarily fill in be-
tween them with perennials like
black-eyed Susan, Stokes aster, spider-
wort and crinum lilies. When the coon-
ties need more room, the perennials can
easily be dug up, divided and relocated
elsewhere. They make great gifts to fel-
low gardeners.
Jan wondered if the seeds at Dunnel-
lon library could be gathered and relo-
cated elsewhere on the property They
could be widely dispersed in the forested
border west and north of the building.
Some will be eaten or dry out. Some will
See JANE/Page E6
Female Zamias, if pollinated by male
pollen in February or March locally,
develop cones bearing up to a hundred
seeds. After about 9 months, the ripe
cones open to expose attractive seeds
surrounded by a fleshy orange covering.
The seeds drop and are eaten by wildlife.
Special to the Chronicle


REALTY GROUP


Speia lzing in TerraVist

-IBren.w.dRsl
ww.TrrS fistafeflyr c


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787' SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133' VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
eight bright and open describe this fabulous golf course home. Lots of room with upgrades 1111 Elegance, simplicity and breathtaking describes this 3/2.5/2 with den. Home has arguably one of
uch as Conan countertops, dual pane windows, energy-efficient radiant barrier. Neutral DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS the best views in Terra Vista overlooking 8th green of prestgious Skyview golf course.
colorss complement ths home. Fall in love with the views from your oversized lanai Enjoy maintenance-free giving in this 2 ith office inTerra Vista.Dual-pane sliding glass Professionally decorated throughout with completely upgraded kitchen featuring stately cabinets
overlooking Koi pond with waterfall. Backdrop is a lushness landscape of majestic oaks and pocketdoors lead outtoa beautiful screened private inground pooland lanai. Itsthe perfect and Conan counters.Stone accented front with brick pavers on driveway and lanai set this home
reener Located in maintenance-free section of Terra Vista. MLS70781 $291,000 place t o enjoy your morning coffee in the fresh Florida air. MLS 358772 ...............$210,000 apar from all others. Maintenance-free living atts best. MLS 707623 ...................... $349,000
greenery. Located ma ten nce-fee section 0 Terr Vsta. MLS 707811.....$291,000 pae0eoy o gc e ee L 572 $1,0 par fom 0l etes. Mainenace-fee hvg ats Dest. M[S 7076Z3 ............$349,000


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Beautiful custom Martinique model Located in the Plush Community of Terra Vista in
Citrus Hills. Home has a formal living area as well as a separate family room. Great for
entertaining with an open floor plan and lots of tile. Cooks will love the large walk in
pantry with plenty of storage. Enloy tropical garden view from your private lanai. Come
and enjoy the Florida lifestyle at it's best. MLS 705279...................................... $199,900


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3 BATH 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
Beautifully appointed 3BR/3B2g ge exclusive pool hone.Custom reat room floor plan DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
with upgrades thru-out including, designer window treatments, luxurious tile floors, energy- This beautifully landscaped, enhanced, maintenance-free villa will draw you in from the Move right into this immaculate villa and start enjoying the Florida lifestyle. Open and DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
efficient radiant barrier and enormous gourmet kitchen highlighted by upgraded wood momentyou walkthroughthe door. Recently painted inside and outthis home features spacious, 2 bedrooms,2 baths, plus a demand a 2-cargarage, largegreatroom, d g area 8 Spacious and absolutely lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage, plus den/office. Tastefully
cabinetry, spacious entertaining island and a butler's pantry. Over-sized lanai perfectly custom surround sound, Kitchen Aid appliances, designer lighting fixtures, and so much fullyapplae nced kitchen. Light and bright and all rooms a re spacious. Top it off with enclosed decorated in neutral colors with lots of ceramic tile flooring in all wet areas plus the great room!
complements gas heated pool a nd spa. Enjoy the comforts of maintenance-free iving in the more all situated in a great location at Terra Vista of Citrus Hills. Enjloy peaceful evenings ......... .. .... ............... i Open floor plan with a great use of space. Great room overlooks private screened lanai. Home is
premiere Country Club of Terra Vista. MLS 7089 ...................................................$449,000 on your private screened in lanai. MLS 708425 ..................... .......................... $213,000 ....... .. ... ... .. i 148.900 inanexcellentlocation in amaintenance-freeareaofTerraVista.MLS707735...... $209,900
Terms 6 Moth or More
Ter Vist & rnw odR nas Soca Mebrsi g* n e wihal-Rntl







DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS "
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE Custom Martinique model with a lovely garden view from the lanai. This home has a formal Nicely Maintained Unfurnished home in Brentwood. Great open floor plan. Tile, BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR
Wow! Come take a oo at this single family home with 4 bedrooms plus a den. Very spacios living room as well as a separate family room. Cooks will love the large pantry with plenty carpet, extended lanai, lots of upgrades. Immaculate. Social Club Membership Unfurnished Brentwood Townhome 2 Bedrooms and 2.5 Bathrooms
unfurnished home w th lots to offer.Socal membership included.1131 .....................$1,950 of storage. Lots of tile. The home will be rented unfurnished. 1250........................$1,450 Included. 1224.................................................................................................... $1 200 1 car garage Social M em bership included. 6017............................$1,050




E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lonely boy gets surprise b-day party
Associated Press to purchase a post office box. until it was shown on a big
Messages were posted screen in the GMA studio.
KALAMAZOO, Mich. -When a from around the world. The He'd been told they were
Michigan boy told his motherhe didn't family managed to keep visiting the program to test
wantan llthbirthdaypartybecausehe the page secret from Colin a new video game.


had no friends to invite, she created a
Facebook page to ask for well-wishes
- and the response was overwhelming
Colin was the guest of honor Friday
at a surprise bash on the set ofABC's
"Good Morning America" in New York
where he learned that the page had
drawn more than 2 million "likes."
He also received tens of thousands of
cards, so many that his mother had

n Serving Citrus& Levy Counties Since 1970
EI> David G. Griffin
7 ^Real Estate
S Licensed Real Estate Broker
Cell 352-228-1812
NIS AU Office 352-795-0330


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney ^
Realor- A HOUSE Realtor @
302-379 sOLD Name. 287-9022 [jj
746-6700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
The golden irl WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
.1 qRA 0 A 55-plus community offers this nice
larger than normal 1/1/1 villa
overlooking the beautiful scenery that
you can only find here. Home has
enclosed back porch/den under air for
the overnight guest plus additional
screen porch with vinyl windows. Enjoy
your morning coffee out there or in the
front den/breakfast room off the
kitchen. A/C is 3 yrs old and newer
berber carpet. Lovely community,
close to County Activity/Community
Center and pool. Call today to set up
your private viewing.


Special to the Chronicle
While counties make an attractive plant around the house, they should only
be procured from domesticated seedlings. Because of their threatened status,
counties should never be harvested from the wild.


JANE
Continued from Page E5

be weed-whacked, trampled or destroyed.
A few will survive and grow to matu-
rity I have thousands of sexually ma-
ture counties in pots in my back yard
ready for adoption and planting.
The four counties Louise and I
planted last September flanking the
library entrance are deliberately all
males. We did not want to tempt cu-
rious children to play with or nibble
the noticeable seed. All parts of all
cycads are toxic if ingested in quan-
tity by humans. Domestic animals
don't usually graze on counties.


The commercial harvesting of the
underground stems for arrowroot
flour ceased in Florida in 1925 when
there were few counties left in the
wild. The Florida Department of
Agriculture put the coontie in its list
of species of special concern. No
coontie should ever be harvested
from the wild.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands
ofnative plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden. For an
appointment, call 352-249-6899 or
contactJWeber12385@gmail.com.


ffF- ;TkrA T r W 4. Pjr., liTkr rrTTT-7-DyT IFIM I A. I I II oInIl'lh.lTll]




Updated 3/2/2. Move-in ready 3/2. Open and spacious 3/2/2. Historic District, 3/1.
708572 $154,900 708705 $79,900 707451 $119,900 708445 $44,900
Becky Paradiso 634-4581 Barbara Stone 586-3072 Steve McClory 422-3998 Sherri Orendorf 573-9968

k S "17111113 o l I SA:71^II I IIII


how




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A dog available for adoption barks Tuesday at Downtown Dog Rescue in
South Gate, Calif. Barking is one of the biggest causes of feuds in
neighborhoods across America. Dogs usually bark if they are bored, afraid, or
anxious, and owners can help with all of those things. Lori Weise, founder and
owner of the rescue, teaches the rescue's 17 dogs to bark on command.


BARKING
Continued from Page E3

when it started six months ago, and
she told him to get earplugs.
Garrett is also upset with animal
control and the city. Animal control
needs to hear the barking to take ac-
tion, but he says representatives
come during the day and the barking
happens at night.
His neighbors "are being inconsid-
erate and the city is not doing any-
thing about it. I don't want a battle
here. I just want to sleep at night,"
Garrett said.
Many municipalities post online
instructions on filing complaints or
petitions.
Garrett has completed paperwork,
but even if a citation is issued, "it's no
guarantee the barking will stop,"
said Tami Crawford, executive di-
rector of the Valley Oak Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani-
mals, which the city contracts to pro-
vide animal control services.
"It's a tough problem," Crawford
said. "It takes cooperation on both


sides of the fence, and sometimes
neighbors can't do that."
Lori Weise, founder of Downtown
Dog Rescue in South Gate, a city just
south of Los Angeles, knows barking
can be an adoption deal-breaker. So,
she's training her rescue's 17 dogs to
bark and go silent on command.
It's important because simple feuds
can quickly escalate to violence:
In December, a Detroit man was
accused of killing a neighbor who
complained about his dog's barking.
He's facing murder and firearms
charges.
Last April, an Oregon father re-
portedly paid his 30-year-old son
$500 to shoot and kill a neighbor's
barking Lab. The father pleaded no
contest, and the son pleaded guilty
Experts say problems could be
avoided if potential pet owners think
ahead before they bring a dog home.
"It's really important to 'think be-
fore you adopt' and determine if you
have the time, the lifestyle and the
schedule to give a dog the kind of
care he or she needs," said Made-
line Bernstein, president of the So-
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals in Los Angeles.


www.CitrusCounty


3 ~ ~ S SaI~t11


And while barking can
grate on neighbors' nerves,
it can also be rough on an-
imals, said Mychelle Blake,
CEO of the South Carolina-
based Association of Pro-
fessional Dog Trainers.
They can get hurt misbe-
having, by jumping over
fences or barking them-
selves hoarse, she said.
If a dog is bored, in-
crease its exercise. "If you
don't give them something
to do, they will find some-
thing, and it's not always


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 E7
what you want" Blake said.
If it stays out all day,
sprinkle its kibble around
so it has to hunt for food,
she suggested.
Anxiety and fear are
harder to deal with, and
the problems get worse the
longer they go on, Blake said.
Sometimes they require
vet care and medication.
Barking can even be a
good thing, and it's often a
neighbor who benefits
when a dog warns of a fire
or an intruder


"Always There For You"
EAL GAIL COOPER
,,' O, / Multimillion Dollar Realtor
ME X (352) 634-4346
GS mail^ Office: (352) 382-1700
0 1 % E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


LOOKING FORA HAMMOCKS VILLA?
Custom built 3/2/2 Aruba model
10' flat ceilings throughout
Paneled cabinetry under counter lighting
Glassed Florida room under air
Dual paned windows include Florida room
Oversized custom Master walk-in closet
Large breakfast room corner windows
Furnishings available separately
#706332 $137,900


.. I I
OPEN PLAN WITH 2 MASTER SUITES!
S2/2/2 with 1824 square feet of living
SSpacious tiled family room off kitchen
SLarge backyard and deep greenbelt
SRoom to add a pool!
SExtra living area in the Florida room
SEating area could be formal dining room
SSeller to install new roof prior to close
SConvenient to Sugarmill golf course
#705485 $84,500


SeeVitual ToIurs..ivv..U.JII...sIuJ.I.m GHF


I -




E SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"I'm looking forward




to that first cup of coffee




by the pond."


Associated Press


About this time of year,
Lee Neiman walks

outside to his back

yard every morning and

impatiently counts the days.


It's not until late March
or early April that the
backyard paradise at his
Pittsburgh home usually
returns to life. The cascad-
ing waterfall starts run-
ning again and the pond
catching it thaws. The fish
that went dormant below a
sheet of ice during the
winter swim back into view
"I'm looking forward to
that first cup of coffee by
the pond," said Neiman, a
doctor practicing internal
medicine. "What I really
like is at night when I can
open the windows and
hear the waterfall."


Backyard ponds, which
range from the simple to
the elaborate, can become
a passion for many gar-
deners. And technological
improvements over the
past 15 years have made it
easier and more economi-
cal than ever to build one.
"The pumps today are
much more energy-
efficient and last a lot
longer," said Randy Stew-
art, division manager for
Pondlinercom, a Shaw-
nee, Okla.- based company
that has been selling such
supplies since 1998. 'As for
the filtration systems,


Aff American Realty F
ONE & Investments my
ERA 117 S. Hwy. 41 ia
REAL EsATEr Inverness, FL a






PERFECT GEM OF A HOME
S3 BR, 2 BA in a split plan
STile floors except BR #3 & master
S2-Car gar has 3rd bay, soak sink, cabinetry
SMaple cabinets
SPavers, porch & extended lanai
SOn a private acre
SCitrus Hills optional membership
$169,000 MLS 707722


or a Visual Tour of
listings and all MLS:
;kie@bjdavis.com


WVVIU UF'IM vitW
OF LAKE DAVIS
* 3 BR, 2 bath, 2-car gar
* Large picture window keeps view in sight
* C/H/A is 3 years old
* Heated pool, screened lanai
* Near Inverness Golf & Country course
$160,000 MLS 707670


some can clean with mini-
mal maintenance. You can
now maintain your pond
wearing dress clothes in-
stead of standing in the
pond, pulling out the sys-
tem and getting dirty"
Neiman was introduced
to backyard ponds about
15 years ago when several


of his friends had them.
"I was envious of what I
saw and decided to pro-
ceed and do it myself with
the help of my son,"
Neiman said.
Three years ago, he
hired someone to expand
the original pond. It now
stands 6 feet wide and 12


EVELYN
5SURRENCY
CONTEMPORARY STYLE REALTo
2 story executive home is waiting for your family to enjoy' CELL
Double mahogany front doors welcome you into a grand foyer 352-634-1861
with staircases to the 2nd floor Main floor has marble flooring OFFICE
with open concept style that every buyer wants Great room 32750
leads to the pool/lanai and beyond to the 16th tee of the golf 352-795-0021
course no neighbors behind Gourmet kitchen boasts granite FAX 352-795-1323
counters, huge island, stainless steel appliances Open living evelnsurren etur|21 com
space offers versatility depending on your family's needs What Aweel|nsurenOCm
a gem nestled in Pine Ridge ready and waiting for the
discriminating buyers MLS#702488 $379,500 EACH OFFICE ISINDEPENDENTLY
NATUR -COAT-83- NE-ighwy-19 OWNED AND OPERATED
. __.77 NATURE COAST 835 NE Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34429


Jackie Davis Cl
(352) 634-2371 Cell |


Lp~teL


A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN
S*2BR, 2 BA Skylight in walk-in
* Maintenance-free condo Carport
* New disposal, carpet, int paint, washer, dryer, C/H/A
* Fridge, range replaced in '07 Move-in condition
* Citrus Hills optional membership
$59,900 MLS 707817


feet long, and has 16 fish -
koi, goldfish and one cat-
fish. The larger pond is
more practical and benefi-
cial for fish and plants,
Neiman said. Plus, it looks
nicer


CRYSTAL RIVER totally renovated,
2 bdrm, 1 bath home with carport, fully
fenced, downtown Crystal River, Ig
laundry room Currently rented on month-
to-month basis Makes a nice investment,
#700696 $43,000


2 story; 1 45 acres, well & septic, private
road, dock & boat house, eat-in kitchen
w/corian top breakfast bar & counter tops
Laminated .1 ;, i I,
family rn. i *..... i
#708278 f I ,"


CRYSTAL RIVER ready to move in
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is in cul-de-sac Has pool &
spa, patio foi 1 ,1 ,; 1ll i
backyard 14 " '
#359466 $104,900



SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H
handyman/woman special, needs lots of
work, roof does not leak, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, private well & septic, no
appliances or outside A/C unit On 0 40
acres #702483 PRICE REDUCED TO
$24,500


Many people who build
backyard ponds end up
expanding them, said
Bob Dorrance, founder
and operator of

See Page EO10


'BEST-
Rl I
E ealtor


I 1 I 1 "1 I .- I-1 1


CITRUS SPRINGS open 1 l;.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath w/family r .
16 patio Large kitchen opens to dining/
,,;1 ... 1; ;, . .. Ceramic tile
" i 1.... ., .. *", .':, $122,900




HOMOSASSA-1988 3bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2
acre, with living & family rooms & wood
....... 'over in 2000; both
.. ently; dbl paned
windows, new A/C unit 2013 Dead end
paved road #707609 $54,900
p m\.- .N -


HERNANDO waterfront home w/
bedrooms, 2 baths, (flood ins not req);
non-sink hole certified; gourmet kitchen w/
granite counter tops, electric fireplace in
living rm, fountain & hot tub in family rm
Canal flows into Tsala Apopka lake chain in
the Potts Wildlife PRESERVE #707145
PRICE REDUCED TO $169,900


x/eeXa4"&de
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWWAIfVRfIOM -T AIf,(5AIfVRfrM


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 E9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Sonny Alansky feeds the 14 koi fish in his backyard pond
in Rockledge, Fla.


POND
Continued from Page E9

www.backyard-pond-
guide.com, a website de-
voted to amateur pond
enthusiasts.
"The first one never
seems big enough," Dor-
rance said. "You're al-
ways adding something
little to it lights, flow-
ers, bushes, whatever
your taste is. You can
probably look at 100
ponds and they are all
different. You can make
it your own according to
whatever you like."
Getting started, he
said, is the most daunting
step.
"The hardest part is
digging the hole," he
said. "If you get a couple
strong people to get out
there and build the hole,
you're in good shape."
Before you dig, design
the pond, taking into con-
sideration the surround-
ing trees and vegetation,
he said. Be sure to follow
any homeowner's associ-
ation or other regulations
for the property
Once the hole is dug,
Dorrance said, line it


with a quality, thick liner
Investing a little more
will be worth it to avoid
holes or tears.
It's a myth that back-
yard ponds do best in
warm climates, he said.
They can thrive pretty
much anywhere.
Northern ponds just
need a little extra prepa-
ration for winter.
"All you have to do is
get a lightweight net and
put it over the top of the
pond to keep leaves and
debris out of it," Dor-
rance said. "Also, make
sure you pull any acces-
sories out of the water,
like filters or UV lights,
so they don't freeze."
Those who live in
colder climates may lose
some vegetation each
winter, but if you plan
you can minimize the
loss.
And winter should not
hurt the fish that call
your backyard pond
home.
"All the fish will go to
the very bottom of the
pond and go dormant for
the winter," Dorrance
said. "You do need to
have a small hole to allow
any gases to escape."
Algae buildup is usu-


ally the biggest problem
pond owners face wher-
ever they live, he said.
The solution is a water
pump and an ultraviolet
clarifier, a small device
that exposes algae to UV
light and kills it. They
can run anywhere from
$100 to nearly $2,000.
Living in warm, central
Florida, Sonny Alansky
gets to enjoy his pond
year-round. Just off his
backyard porch, the pond
measures 37 feet in di-
ameter, and includes
three waterfalls, 14 koi,
and a plethora of tropical
vegetation such as palm
trees, hibiscus and birds
of paradise.
Alansky, a retired elec-
trician, designed the
pond about three years
ago when he moved into
his Rockledge, Fla.
home.
"I'm out here every day
enjoying it," Alansky
said. "I love coming out
and feeding the fish.
They see me coming and


they swim right up to
me."
He's always adding
something new, whether
it's more decorative
stones or more devices to
deter predators; he's al-
ready lost one fish to a
heron. Fake alligators
and owls and even a mo-
tion-detector sprinkler
help protect the fish.
He has spent roughly
$20,000 on the pond so
far. It has three pumps,
which run constantly, re-
sulting in a $100 per
month increase to Alan-
sky's electric bill. He
said the extra expense is
worth the enjoyment he
and his wife get out of
the pond. Friends
and neighbors also
admire the view and
enjoy the murmur of the
waterfalls.
"Nothing relaxes us
more than watching the
koi fish swimming among
the lily pads with the
brightly colored lily flow-
ers," Alansky said.


Trustee Ordered Home Auction
SE Ocala
ONLINE Mar 14-19

Desirable Woodfields area
3/2 with 2,296 sf under roof
Large .65 ac cul-de-sac lot
Other FL Properties:
Mar 19 2 Residential Lots, Ocala
Mar 25 Foreclosed 31-Room Motel, High Springs
Mar 26 Regardless of Price-Comm Bldg on 1.85 ac, Inverness

See website for details!
Tranzon ODggen Walter J. Origge Ill, LUtc. Real Estle Broker. FL LI# AU707 & AB3145 10% BP
AN O M 87 -744 3


CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT
A taste of unspoiled nature secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, I, .1 ,I ,,, I Ii.. I , I. P ......
C LA S S IC ELEG A N C E ponds, mature oak trees The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully ,i ii i ,, i i ,i .. ,1, ,.,. ,i.i ,. ,. i,,.i.i.
French Country Estate n nearly Ed positioned in a beautiful setting, 11 1 11 , n .... .... ... I .....
.ut l$800,000 waiting for you and your family to move right mi
acres in desirable location close to ractivetour $549,000
Inverness 4,078 sq ft of luxury living ,, ,- racetour__5_9_000
separate 0 car garage with office and
apartment ,1
$739,000

ITTA THE GLEN HIGHVIEW ESTATES
| |A 55+ community Enjoy maintenancefree INCREDIBLEVISTAS HAMPTON LAKE PINE RIDGE ESTATES Citrus Hills
G T ated in The Glen This 3/2/1 situated on 1 2 acre elevated Beautiful 2004 Avanzam Model, mcely
A R de laundry, 'with lots of fruit trees Recently treed 1 ac lot High ceilings, fireplace,
carpet and paint, great room boasts large picture tub
It is in perfect conditions Just unpack the w indow s f . na l
B A R T H suitcase and relax Close to shopping, dining meta roof
REALTOR@ and medical faclties $65,000 SSapp $274,000 11 $469,000 '$189 900


gbarth@mnyflorida-house.comn j
SECONDS TO KINGS BAY FASCINATING RIVER VIEWS MOVE RIGHT IN-BEAUTIFULCITRUS HILLS!! DESIRABLE CYPRESS
no bndgesi 2 master suites, apart- 3/2 home built 2007 on 13 acres on Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre VILLAGE LOCATION!
ment on the lower level Upper level the banks of the Withlacoochee across corner lot with mature oak trees and Elegant 3/2/2 pool home on quiet
00 accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane lots of privacyl Very well maintained, cul-de-sac Family room w/wood beams
Investors RealtyD8 i-- shutters, security system, updated n 11 i & fireplace Open kitchen w/eating,
Investors Rat jz&0
kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of i , ., , .. .. .
of Citrus County, Inc seawall, boat iftl Everything just '
ywebsiteat wwwlyforida house co waiting for you $488,000 $521,961 $169,000 11. $169,000


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Want your notice in Homefront? Send an email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com with
"Real Estate Digest" in the subject line.


Special to the Chronicle
Though old, this sewing machine is not yet old enough to pique collector interest.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

monastery monks. My
question is, would you
know of anyone in my
area who might be able
to translate the text and
evaluate what I have? I
would be willing to
travel to Gainesville if
you thought there
might be someone at
UF who might be able
to help me. Thank you
so much for your con-
sideration.
-D.L, Internet
Dear D.L.: Yes, I
imagine there is some-
one in the language de-
partment atthe University
of Florida who could help


you translate the text.
However, you could do
it yourself with Google
translate, or another
Internet translator
might get close enough.
Dear John: I have
several Cabbage Patch
dolls, including the Christ-
mas edition from 1980
dressed in red velvet
clothes, Noel and Nicholas
special edition from Baby
Land general in Cleve-
land, Ga., ZIP code
30528. My registered
numbers on the dolls
are 0506 and 2345.
Could you please ad-
vise me of where I may
sell them and what the
value is of each one? -
WC.C., Internet
Dear WC.C.: Cabbage
Patch Kids dolls were in


the limelight of the doll
marketplace a long time
ago. Market interest has
disappeared.
To pursue the issue
further since you want
to sell them, contact
Theriault's Antique
Doll Auctions at
www.theriaults.com.


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the
antiques business for
30years. He hosts a
call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic, P.O
Box 2513, Ocala, FL
34478 or asksikorski
@aol.com.


A MAN'S AMBITION A WOMAN'S DREAM! Stunning 4/3/2 Pine Ridge pool home on 2.99 AC
MOL feat. 3,229 living, gourmet kitchen, living & family rooms, formal dining room, decorator lights, fireplace,
lanai, workshop, interior laundry & more! 3990 N Buckhorn Dr. 706883. $339,900! 352-212-5752


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 Ell








Making your own laundry detergent can be easy


Associated Press

It's convenient to pick up some
laundry detergent at the store, but
it's not difficult to create your own.
Soap and water are a time-tested
duo against dirt and germs, and
homemade cleaners can carry away
grime without added chemicals or
perfumes.
All it takes are a few, simple in-
gredients to make laundry detergent
- liquid or powder and fabric sof-
tener Then cut down on drying time
and static cling by tumbling wet
clothes with homemade dryer balls.
Faith Goguen Rodgers' switch to
homemade cleaners began a few
years ago after she used a commer-
cial-brand cleaner on the bathtub.
"I'd cleaned it, and then I really
didn't want to get in it. The bleach
smell and feel it didn't feel good,"
she says.
"Then when I had kids, it didn't
make sense at all. It feels a lot safer
knowing what's in my cleaners."
Rodgers is an herbalist with three
young children who creates all the
cleaners she uses in her Lafayette,
Colo., home even the toothpaste.
While the health piece is "really big"
for her, she's also motivated by cost.
"You save a ton of money making
your own," she says, especially if you
buy ingredients in bulk.
Homemade cleaners, particularly
laundry soap, lack much odor, but a
pretty scent can be added with es-
sential oils.
Karyn Siegel-Maier shares laun-
dry and other "green" cleaning for-
mulas in "The Naturally Clean
Home" (Storey, 2008). The publisher
recently posted her recipes for liq-
uid and powder laundry detergent
at its blog, Inside Storey, to "sanitize,
soften and scent clothes and linens
-naturally"
Some recipes from these experts:

HOMEMADE LAUNDRY
DETERGENT (POWDER)
Supplies:
m 3 cups washing soda (similar to bak-
ing soda; look for it near laundry prod-
ucts at the supermarket)
* 3 cups borax
* 1 cup baking soda
* 1 bar of castile (olive oil-based) soap,
such as Dr. Bronner's Pure Castile Soap
* Pure, organic essential oils (optional)


Directions:
1. Grate the bar of soap into a small
bowl and set aside.
2. In a large mixing bowl, combine
the washing soda, borax and baking
soda. Mix well to get rid of clumps. Add
the essential oils, if desired. Mix them
into the powder well to avoid clumping.
3. Add the grated soap and mix in-
gredients together.
4. Store detergent in a half-gallon
mason jar or other well-sealed con-
tainer. Use 2 to 4 heaping tablespoons
per load of laundry.

BASIC LAUNDRY LIQUID
FORMULA
Supplies:
* 2 1/4 cups liquid castile soap
* 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar
* 1 tablespoon glycerin
* 3/4 cup water
* 10 to 15 drops essential oil of your
choice
Directions: Combine all the ingredients
in a plastic container or squirt bottle.
Shake once or twice before adding to the
wash. Use 1/4 cup per average load; 1/2
cup for extra large or heavily soiled loads.

NATURAL LAUNDRY
FABRIC SOFTENER
Supplies:
* 3 cups white vinegar
* 1/4 cup rubbing alcohol
* 20 drops of essential oil (optional)
Directions: Combine all ingredients in
a glass jar and shake. Add to the fabric
softener dispenser of washing machine.

WOOL DRYER BALLS
Supplies:
* 100 percent wool yarn
* Pantyhose
* Essential oil (optional)
Directions:
1. Wrap wool yarn around two or
three fingers at least a dozen times,
then make a bow by wrapping yarn
tightly around middle of wrapped yarn.
Bring the two sides together and con-
tinue wrapping tightly in different direc-
tions to make a small ball the size of a
lemon. Repeat to make several balls.
2. Push the wool balls into one
pantyhose leg, knotting the pantyhose
between each ball so they don't touch.
Run through the washer with a load of
towels on hot cycle, then toss into dryer
on hot. Once dry, remove from panty-
hose. Each ball should appear "felted"
- the wool fibers tightly adhered. Snip
any loose strands.
To use:
1. Scent balls with essential oil, if de-
sired (it'll last a few loads).
2. Toss at least 2 balls into dryer with
wet laundry.


r: WIThis photo pro-


vided by Sherri
Griffin shows
dryer balls that
reduce drying
time, static cling
and wrinkles.
"I often hear that
people can't give
up the fresh
smell that they
get from using
dryer sheets, but
what people
don't understand
is that smell
comes from ...
chemicals,"
says Griffin.

Associated Press


9 Im : I mIl


m3L59746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkins F Ho Pr An7l6i
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOIATE REALTO Free Home Price Analysis
v,,-,,,,,-[-=i[trusbasJ bu.=om_ i


I 7M
COSMOS CT 5049 W. PINTO LOOP
773$229,900 3/2/2 706941 $215,900


inRE IDGEI


1 *i'1


E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








Real Estate


Classifieds


Moie


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cuttffing
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
DUNNELLON/488
2/2, extra clean, cprt &
shed, part. fenced, new
carpet & paint $550/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970
FLORAL CITY
RENT TO OWN
3/2 DW on canal to
lakes & rivers, new apple
& carpet. $4000 down,
$400/mo 352-726-9369
LECANTO
5225 Shaker PI 2/2 DW
$575. Nice, 464-0999



1982 SW Mobile Home
Great Shape, 15K
Delivered to your
property. Will not last!!
727-967-4230
Bad Credit?
Here's your chance!
Repo' s available in
your area!
Financing Available
(352) 795-1272
Mobile Home Crystal
River Fl. 2 BD., 2BA,
Audult Park All furni-
ture, carport for 3
cars, Lg. screened
patio, Dishwasher, All
appliances, shed, Re-
modeled Bathroom
Drastically Reduced
(352) 794-6316
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Fleetwood
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at$499/month
John Lyons (a)
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
Rent to Own
Owner Financing on
used/repo/new
Manufactured Homes
352-795-2377




FLORAL CITY
3/2-1+AC, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $91,900
716-807-8847


-obieHme'

3/2/1 DW MH
1/2 acre corner lot
exc. cond. open floor
plan, laundry room,
all apple, Ig scn porch,
fenced,3 carports,
shed, Homosassa
$51k 352-410-1072
4/3, 32x80, w/ 2 master
suites in Homosassa.
2006 MH, Must See!!
Owner Financing Avail
SReady to move in
(352) 795-1272
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 727-967-4230
COUNTRY LIVING IN
LECANTO $42.500
Dbwd, 3bd/2ba, % acre
NEW c/heat/air & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond!
No Owner Finance
(352) 621-3929
Hernando DW, MH
3 BR w/walk-in closets
Roof over, single car
garg, chain link fence
39,999 Will take RV in
Trade; 352-726-2494
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre. New
bathrooms, Ig screened
porch, dead end rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No owner Financing
Homosassa
Huge Quad 3160 Sq Ft,
4br/3ba on 1.89 ac.
Too many options to list,
Must see/Beautiful
(352) 795-1272
West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
must sell $15,000
(352) 344-5172
2Br, IBa in 55+ Park
carport, shed, wshop,
scorned Patio, In great
shape, fully furn. Ask-
ing $15k, $225/mo lot
rent. 352-419-4428
AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf. over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077

Melody Park, Inverness
2 bd 1-1/2 bath. 12x64
with 12x22 Fl room.
$3,800. obo
727-808-6000


AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf. over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077

Beautiful Triple Wide
In Gated Community
with Drywall. 2000+ SF
Must See-will owner
finance. MUST SELL
727-967-4230
BEVERLY HILLS
Sandy Oaks 55+ PK
2BD, 2 BA, Open
House Sat & Sun, 11-2p
completely remode.,
new Kit. & new appl's,
Fl. Rm. Lot Rent $274
incld's, wtr sewer &
trash, Pool/ Clubhouse
$37,500 (352-322-8941

For Sale ,,,

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financina. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374












Rea. Eteg-


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 E13


-ACTION--
SRENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S850 & UNDER
9218 N. Salinwood Terr.
3/2/2,1254 sq. ft.
7149W. Creslview Ln.
2/2/1 984 sq. ft
7416W. Kendale Ct.
3/2,D/Won anAcre
S650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/2,992 sq. ft
59 S. Tyler St.
2/1,936 sq. ft
1063 N. Commerce Terr.
2/1 apt 820sq. ft
8469 W. Drew CI.
2/2,M/Hon Canail w/BoatDock
For More Listings Go To
www.Cf0rusCountyHomnlRentals.(on


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
j

31212...................$875
31212............................
31212..................$850
21111 .................... $650
21211 ..................$750
LAWNCARE INCLUDED

2 1211 ...................$650
211.511.................$650

211.5...................$600
MOBILE
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
S352-726-9010





3S11 637-3100
71 Mr< 1117 a -7, 11 ~-




RENTALS

COUNTYWIDE!

Starting at

$450

Call Today!






CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
Large apt with washer
dryer hook, large yard,
patio and garage in
quiet neighborhood
Stewart 813-927-4647
Kelly 813-927-0525
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352- 563-2114,
352-257-6461

CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Mnthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb.,
maint. Incl., peaceful
No pets, $600. plus
mo. 352-628-6700

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 & 3BR APT. HOMES
Handicap Unit
Available
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants
Monthly rent starting
at $686 plus utilities
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer









FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514


INVERNESS
Office Space for Rent,
1 blk. North of court
house. 352-634-5232




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
Fully Furn. or Unfurn.
2/2, 2nd Fl Condo, w/
carport. Avail. April 1
$850., (352) 201-7229




Crystal River
2/2/1.5 Meadowcrest
new painted, ss app
tile (630) 453-8178
HOMOSSASSA
2/1 Lrg. yrd, renovated,
Miss Maggie, 1st, last &
Sec. $700.00/mo.+
Elec. Wash/Dry Room.
Call aft 5pm
954-325-7431,or Text




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2 Pos. 3BR, 2BA, $600.
mo. (352) 465-5777
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, Huge House
$800. 352-464-2514
Citrus Hills
BrentwoodTownhome
2bd.w/garage,w/club
membership, furn. or
unfurn. 352-302-7559
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
Sugar Mill Woods
3/2/2 2500+ SF
99 Oak Village Blvd
$925/mo 352-584-5983




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




Wanted:Furn house
on/near horse trail w/
horse accommodations
From Dec'14 Apr'15
(352) 249-7498





INVERNESS
6,000 sq ft Warehouse
Space, for Rent, 1 blk.
North of court house
352-634-5232


Rentals

Wanted:Furn house
on/near horse trail w/
horse accommodations
From Dec '14 Apr'15
(352) 249-7498






Buy Mountain
Property
AT BELOW COST!!!
Streamfront
Acreage. 2 nicely
wooded acres with
mountain views,
private streamfront
& spring head.
Loaded with mature
hardwoods. Gentle
building site.
Private paved roads,
municipal water,
underground power,
fiber optic, more.
Just $19,900.
Excellent financing.
Only one, call now
1-866-952-5303,
x 183


DEB
THOMPSON

w One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
w Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.

Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebflvahoo.com
and
debthomeson.com





Regardless of Price
Comm Bldg on
1.85 ac, Inverness
ONSITE
Mar 26@11am
200' directly on busy
Hwy 41 North
2 buildings, 4550 sf &
1,600 sf, tenants in place
* High traffic count on
major Citrus County hwy
Property #DG801

OTHER FL PROPERTIES:
* Mar 19 3/2 Home, SE Ocala
* Mar 192Res Lots, Ocala
*Mar 25 Motel, High Springs
SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS!
Tranzon DriggersWalter J. Driggers, III,
lic Real Estate Broker, FL Ud
AU707&AB3145 1O%BP

0 0


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


,vf'.i i....


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Up to 9 acres from
$14,900. Mountain
cabin only $89,900.
Access to lake and
trout stream. Views
of the Atlanta sky-
line. 45 minutes from
Northern Atlanta.
Priced below
developer cost!
Call 866-950-5263
Ext. 17.




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickgbf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854,FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514




2 block homes side by
side. 1/1, rented $450
each TAW. Good
Cond. Quite Loc.
$70,000 for both. Call
Kevin (603) 498-5124
Attractive 2 Bd/2BA
Home near library.
please call for details
By Owner, asking
$84,900. No calls after
9pm (352) 746-3919
Laurel Ridge,3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks
Golf Comm.(with club
house& pool.) 1754SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kit w/ pantry &
nook. MBR has 2 clos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639





For Sale %I,
Crystal Glen 4/2/2 on
corner landscaped
lot. Salt pool w/heater
and lanai, under roof
with kit area. $159,900
410-804-1454
no brokers please



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
Great open floor plan.
Liv. room has stone FP
& wd floors. Caged
Pool (352) 746-6552





PeveSanes
For We I,(, Mi

Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hoe




SAL



Great Starte Home
S. Little John Ave.
Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
Call For Deatails
877-500-9517

For Sle -is
Pritchard Island
Comm unity, access to
pool w/tennis court,
close to downtown
Inverness, 1 owner,
2BD/2BA/2CG
$125k By owner,
Call. (352) 726-0044



For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Appt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!





ForSale %,
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

SECLUDED 3BR/2BA.
1653sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
3A acre buildable lot.
$99,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289


11102 COVE HARBOR DRIVE
Don't miss your chance to see a beautiful waterfront
condo in the Pelican Cove Community! 2 bedroom,
2 bath unit is partially updated and move-in ready!
Comes with boat slip and lift. Only $184,500.
Contact Kristi Bortz for more information (352) 228-9505
Contact Kristi Borfz for more information (352) 228-9505


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comrn
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351

L 4Wk
Spacious 2/2/1 with
New roof, AC,& win-
dows, Inclds all Kit ap-
pliances. Sunroom
overlooking Green-
belt. Inside utility rm.
$85,000 352-422-3256

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


3/2/2 CUSTOM BUILT HOME with a view of the lake. Tile
throughout w/handicap assist bath. Screened room
overlooks the lake. $179,000. Call Capt. Lee Harris at
352-489-4949. 158D734/707108/400213.








j 2-2 ALL TILEU, SPLIT FLOOR PLAN HOME w/cathedral
ceilings. Chain link fenced backyard. Being sold "as is".
$55,000. Call Capt. Lee Harris at
I352-489-4949. 158D742/708346/402778.

I 957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness Fl 3445~2


I --B^


352-344-5535
wwwCridland.com


I
i


I


i


i


I


i


i


I


Hme


Hoe








Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


j








BETY J.
POWELL
Realtor
"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"
BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bjpowell@
netsca e.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments



Buying or Sell-
ing,
it's time to make
your move!








Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone(&tamoabav.rr.c
om
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt
THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.comrn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855










Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.comrn






Here's Your
Chance" TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
$10.000 Down.
10 vrs (a) 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5000




Floral City 2bd/lba
Mobile on Lake Tsala
Apopka, 1 lot from
main lake, exc. cond.
boat dock/covered
boat slip, $59k
(352) 423-0289


I


Hoe

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


Hme


Desperately
Need Rentals
ROD KENNER
Office Open 352-436-3531
7 Days a Week ERA
Suncoast Realty
LISA
VANDEBOE O iiP
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com OM
SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNa-ureCoast
Get Proerties.comW
Results in myproperties"
the -cn
homefront PBot
classified! ASL
ABSOLUTE
I*&AII1TIAM 4I


528 SW 1st Court
3 bedrm., 2-1/2 bath
Exciting opportunity
to live on Paradise
Isles in the heart of
Crystal River, Flor-
ida with two sided
deep, crystal clear
water and access to
the Gulf of Mexico.
Located across from
a 57 acre wilderness
preserve and a man-
atee sanctuary.
Watch the dolphins
and manatees play
in your own back
yard. Paddle board,
kayak, See Doo,
boating and water
skiing to your hearts
content. This %/half
acre property has 2
docks, one with a
10,000 pound lift and
220 foot sea wall.
This beautiful 3,2 %/
home has granite
counter tops, 2 fire
places, 2 % car gar-
age, hurricane win-
dows and doors,
panoramic water
view, sunrise and
citrus fruit trees.
Enjoy low utilities
with hot water on
demand and water
to air AC. This prop-
erty won't last,
priced to sell at
$585,000. Owner
will finance part.
1(352)795-7400


LAKE ROUSSEAU
Fishing- Nature Lovers
2/1BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642


2.5 ACRES,
March 20, 10am
Ed Messer, Broker
messersales.com


Hoe

"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014


GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


4 ADJOINING LOTS
1 Acre MOL,Close to
Town Gospel Island
Gunn Ct.$12,700. Make
Offer(352) 726-2038
or (352) 613-4958

Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High, Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner

PINE RIDGE
1 ACRE
By Owner, build
ready, no fill, $26,900
(352) 249-7812




PARADISE! OZELLO!
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583

WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 100 ft on
water. All utilities.
$165,000.352-634-1171








How to turn a rosemary bush into a tree


Associated Press
Picture a little rosemary tree
at your kitchen window, stand-
ing there upright and green as if
in defiance to the wintry scene
beyond the panes.
This little tree offers more
than decoration and winter
cheer Pass your hand lightly
over the leaves, close your eyes,
and the scent will carry you to a
sunbaked Mediterranean hill-
side, the plant's native habitat.
Snip off a few leaves for cooking,
and your tongue will similarly
transport you to milder climes.
Grown as a little tree rather
than as a sprawling shrub (its
natural inclination), a rosemary
plant takes up little sill space
and is easy to prune. Here's how
to make that tree.
START WITH A TRUNK
Begin with a small rosemary
plant, grown from seed or cut-
tings, or bought. Seed is slowest
and most difficult, cuttings root
easily, and the bought plant will
still offer you the satisfaction of
training the tree. Even naturally
creeping varieties can be coaxed
into becoming little trees, but if
you have a choice, choose a nat-
urally upright variety such as
Majorca Pink or Salem.
Single out one stem to become
the future trunk of your plant,
completely removing all stems
except for this trunk-to-be at the


base of the plant. The most vig-
orous, upright stem is the obvi-
ous candidate. In the case of a
creeping variety, just select any
healthy stem and stake it upright.
Poke a dowel or thin piece of
bamboo into the soil near the base
of the plant and tie a piece of soft
yarn tightly around the stake,
then loosely around the stem.
As growth begins, the trunk-to-
be will elongate, new stems will
sprout out along it, and other
stems might sprout near the
base of the plant as trunk
wannabes. The latter are most
common with creeping varieties,
which have bushier inclinations.
Your goal in the weeks ahead
is to promote elongation and
thickening of the trunk-to-be. To
that end, keep cutting away any
new stems sprouting from the base
of the plant Pinch back to just a
few leaves any stems sprouting
along the trunk-to-be. Doing so
keeps them subordinate but lets
them help thicken the trunk.
AND NOW THE HEAD
Once the trunk reaches full
height, your goals change: You
now want to stop growth and cre-
ate a bushy head. But how high
is "full height?" It's all for show,
and what looks good depends on
how big a head you are going to
give the plant and how big a pot
the plant will eventually call
home. Generally, a head 2 to 3
times the height and just slightly


more than the width of the pot
looks good. Stop growth at the
desired height by pinching off the
growing tip of the trunk, a simple
operation that awakens growth
of buds down along the trunk.
Create the bushy head by re-
peatedly pinching and thus
inducing more branching the
tips of all shoots that sprout from
the top few inches of trunk. Now
define that head more clearly by
completely removing all stems
and leaves further down the trunk
All these prunings need not be
wasted, of course. They could be
used as flavoring or as cuttings
to make yet more plants.
ONGOING CARE
Maintain your little tree by
nipping back the ends of stems,
which keeps your plant compact,
neat and elegant, and provides
plenty of leaves for flavoring.
A final tip: Although rosemary
thrives in the dry air of the
Mediterranean region and of our
homes, the soil must be kept moist
Rosemary's narrow leaves never
droop, so your only indication
that the plant needs water might
otherwise be a dead plant!
A small rosemary "tree" sits
on a windowsill providing
beauty, fragrance, and
flavoring despite the snowy
background on the other side
of the window Feb. 24
in New Paltz, New York.
Associated Press


I DARR UViELu-EnciniMnuu, rL DARM1 VIILUni l u-nunij rL
I t -III. MII ,I 1 h IhI
acre tract. $12,500 MLS#705805 2700 sq. ft. $132,900 MLS#707187
I AdU,]I A -.I


lOzy lDK ii0me SiuaeiU on 1. 1 aUces.
Great location. $66,900 MLS#708261


I Dril UVYInE'U-P.NII.L RIVcn, IrL
3BR/2BA home with office in Shamrock Acres. I
2.5 acres. $152,900 MLS#708173 I


1B^^ .JOANN MARTIN
Preferred
REAL ESTATE

BrokerAssociate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net
-NHI-M


WONDERING IF

YOU SHOULD
SELL YOUR

HOME?
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$12.2 million closed in 2013

Call Debbie Rector's Team r-- r-"--\
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
[ To Learn More rE .YfS
S(352) 746-9924


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 To1
After Hours 352302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allcitrusrealty.can


SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


hun''i 16111 111i
I~V.ui II i'M.l, :,l l,. iii Mi = 1:111 ill .
JUST REDUCED TO $120,000
Please call Isaac Bajlon lot a
personal tout 352 697 2493


I UIW
LOT ON DEEP WATER CANAL IN INGLIS

I.i I'. 1 .. ; I. ll l I. h w H I .II


Mi =iii:ii ASKING $74,500
Call Slelan Stuai I at 352 212 0211


CLEARVIEW ESTATES POOL HOME


i.. .. II.. 'd. hi I.'m .l -II.-1.- I .

MN l.. ;ii;'.; ASKING $148,700
STRETCH YOUR SSS HERE
PRi D.nis, 352 212 1280
I',ell lisinfg I c21.ild.i is corn


NEAR LAKE PANASOFFKEE
ll.. .' ...II 1I lh VViin lh.,uu. u h

Mil = lu:R.:l $95,0000
Call Buddd' Gibson at 13521 391.4385
lot a personal tout


* I -i.Vllf IW _1_
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* I_..in.i ...'i|..| I ':., ..i _II Ii- lii.i.I PI.Ij1
* VlAI(IUI:I I:I....l.. ['J im il.ll.h i... _ilU'l ll :_
* I IIll-. Hill I__ MBF._HII
MI 3 =III:.II. $229,727
Jeanne ot Wiillaid Pickiel 352212.3410
vnawt CittusCoun'tiSold corn


WELL MAINTAINED NEWER 3/2
h l l 7 1, I. ,- 11 1 1 ii H ii i i i

H i- i ii I u.i~iiiiii hlii .Iuuuuuuiii IiI. I~ i ,,. I,.
,,,,h-I TI, h,,, ,-u u u u l,,,, -h, II
Ml. =;-ii.. $93,900
Cill DAiniel G.iddi 0/ice 352 126 6668
of Cell 954 55/ 3215


SPACIOUS, OPEN PLAN
h . niih I.iniil i, n i ,i ni im iiJ,
I hl.~ 'o h ... .I l.hl F..hl l.."...J,

.l jl iJ mI dil] .. l~ ..ii ..uI J] 1,..
WV ..N I I.I ..1 .. il hi. II.. -
MIl.-. =ni.i.-/ ASKING $71,700
Pat Davis f3521 2127280
View listing ,iiir c2lIatdavis corn


,,i. .., ,,i .. I... -,, ,h .' I,, ,,, ,-I ,h,',, ,',,I ,,,I
I ,11 .... .. .,.... ........ .. ...... I

6. h h l l 1' 6', ,,r" -nn1 h .1 1 d I." 1
d, 1,1., rl,',h h h ,I , 'h ..
ri: ASKING S388.,900
_____ Ppullii:: !,, ,k2'2i 280 ____
P -h: . 1 .-M8,i

HEATHERWOOD
I ,l. ,I : ii .-








1, 1. 'lulh l $6. 1


,, ,ONLY $89,900
Call me Ruth Fiedetick 13525636866


3BR/2BA LECANTO HOME
lVVI l '.I II.I.I il I .. I l\j-ln| l ,I, 6I1
Mi_, =i:ihl'h ONLY $115,500
Call laWanda Watt 352.212 1989
today lot jout personal lout!


CANTERBURY LAKE ET.
I I 1) ..I "1 ". H...... y.ll.. fi"

I Ii. h-I ,,,, i..I li.i).' j. I hi ltI. .'.
IIII HIIH I 'II. -IIhIII-II-il ,uuuu i-,,InII IIII,'I

Mil ;1- 1 -r ASKING $120,000
Cill NAPic; Jenks it 352 400 8012


* i B .h.i.: i' u-ilh l.:i i, .,i- F e .i :.i ....
* All Appi.i..i.:I. NfVv F IIf
* Pi A i ANT A .F VI ,:i.:l.:..:.I i 111. 1i.
Mi I =l1l hl/ $110,000
Jeanne Ot Willaid Pickiel 212 2410
ir'ri'tr. CitliusCountIvSold. corn


.: .. ....", .,, .,,.. ,,1.. ... h ,,,, v rj v :

..v ,, ..:..:.I iiI..1 ....l i I... .:.. I .. . .. 1.:1 4 .:1

NEW ASKING PRICE: S164,900
Cti inI.tI J,,h. 3524008072


* I lp li .. I 'l. .. ..ll..l P ll. V lII,
* _" B',i iii.:._ Bi Vhiiii i:i l:..ii .i,1
* lrj li..:n .i u m, W .:..:..I .I \I ,
Mi1 = h1l I ASKING $73,500
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


h IIlll, l: ill .li ,lh I~ll l] .:h: r. i I II .. 1.1:.hh .

ONLY $99,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3






660 E. KELLER CT., HERNANDO
"Cilrus Hills 'Pool Home 'Goll Course
eI i *,ii i .l I =*:l l /r "'ih '

PRICED RIGHT AT $199,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352-302 7699


BEAUTIFUL HOME
*i V'* IIH FJPMII.HIIII _P 1 i ::,:I .j) i..:.i i
I ..l ..I : .. lI.::.I ..l.- l, I.-.- I JI .Hi I.j.I i ..l I

h............I..iI,....I. ..I
h .n., :~..I.I- d *,, l.l. l.I .. lihi. Iv~
.J. . .:I i~ii l .-..I. jll, I.:.*.-dH:
ril: = -,:i Yi- ASKING $172,900
Pt D,,: 352212 17280


r _- p- 11111

* I .,iiii iii-, I-i-.i- ilu
* I: ,: ]. p,:,,:,I ,\I P.i.l
* I_:l. j.ii . Ii.l :i..: .l. 'i.':..l
* H i. i T1 ,, l :.i lm .l I .i l.. : .:
Mi = ii:iii:uu $219,000
Jeanne O li'illaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
nun CiliusCounli Sold coon


1 _. ..-.- . l v I .h _.

S Il. .-. I iI.. -l vii.....] '. .l
* I- ...i ii 'ii ;, ,i l | ... I i ., t i l .
VV ,,,j [1 .... 1:1 ,., 1.m ,C. ,J...
* lV..' ,lh l lii ,J .ll i *ii.i 4 i il i
* UHH i d h. IHI. IHIJ b mIIJIh mI'Ji h fi'-III
MI'. = mii.-.I.l ONLY $317,500
Call Chatles lellj 352 422 2387


MORE FOR THE MONEY
I .6 u, h,, I i,,, ,,,,, I:,q ,1 ... i, 1 .....6 d I 1h


', ',%,11 I h,, i,,,,'llh Id h. u ,,,-u I,, ..,, .
I I~.61 h. 1--u--u I ".uu.m L .u~uuI. L.11-Il,

ALL THIS AND MORE ONLY S104.800
Cm IA/lim: S.idi, itodn 352 4768727 mid
ni ?

* N THi E i )Al,, I i.iL- i:Ul :
* : F. Al H PIJIJl HIJM-
* hiIi.PiAlf_ f I Pilj N IVINi.
* iliiT PliAN HAlI: Al: .I
* A ei 1I0., I-FiIJM THI- I NHIJII-
Mi =i:ihiI:i'1 $194,600
Jeanne ot l-'illaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
Inni CiliusCouni Sold coon


SERVING[, LF]
COUNTY R F*-, N WORTH?


OVER37FO e .=...-E
YEARS. FL 3 44 *i*l l TA F