Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text

Marching on: No. 1 Florida wins 21st straight gamE


I --- N DAYJ II


C ITRUS


Sunny.
PAGE A4


MARCH 2, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


C0 U N TY'


-ww.chronicl1online.com
I Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 119 ISSUE 207


Occupation
Russian troops occupy
Crimea./Page A16


County visit
During the
premiere
of "The
Incredible
Mr.
Limpet"
in 1964,
actor Don
Knotts
visited
Citrus
County.
/Page C1


LOEROT


h


ti

ei
IA
ny


Road plan sparks rage

Sib k jst to the west, and he can't do PDR
Sugar illWoodsresidents that without the Oak Village PDRR.
Boulevard extension because the
at developer'spermit request property is landlocked by houses.
And they are right. PRPR
MIKE WRIGHT vard to the Hernando County "To get to my40 acres, Ineedto
Staff writer line. go around Oak Village," Kalka
That's the only application on said. "Oak Village must give meC
As road projects go, this one file. County officials say they must access."
hardly turns a shovel, approve the permit so long as See 'Page A10P
But to residents in Sugarmill Kalka's plans meet county road- D
Woods' Oak Village, the 213 feet way standards, although the per- The southern end of Oak Village
that developer Nachum Kalka mit application is still pending. Boulevard stops at Poppy Court,
wants might as well be an Sugarmill residents, however, less than 250 feet north of the
expressway say Kalka has something else in Hernando County line. AStub-ou
Kalka, who lives in Sugarmill mind. developer wants to extend the
Woods, is asking for a county per- They say Kalka's goal is to de- road.
mit to extend Oak Village Boule- velop a 40-acre housing project Special to the Chronicle


A rodisaknfoaconypr ThysyKkasgaistdero. mu t


One thing
The Waterfront Advisory
Board of Crystal River is
asking everyone in
Citrus County to "do
one thing."/Page E6


Buzz off
The USDA hopes a
honeybee program will
help farmers and
ranchers./Page DI


Shaun Young, 13, of El Paso,
Texas, takes a bite of sno-cone
Saturday afternoon.


Perfect weekend

for scrumptious

strawberries

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

FLORAL CITY
hether your
stomach is
yearning for
something
sweet, savory or
healthy, it's not
too late to enjoy
all three at once.
Luscious flats of local, fresh
strawberries, strawberry
shortcakes and strawberry
pies filled many hungry bel-
lies Saturday at the 27th an-
nual Floral City Strawberry
Festival at Floral Park, 9530 S.
Parkside Ave., Floral City.
"Wow, I had one of those
strawberry shortcakes and I
think that I might have to take
one to go," said Tampa resi-
dent Sally Watinski. "I'll just
spend an extra 30 minutes to-
morrow at the gym. It is worth
it for another bite of the straw-
berry shortcake."
Even so, the sweet, succu-
lent fruit also seemed to have


LOGAN MOSBY/Chronicle
Julia Thomas of Inverness, right, and Myra Haddock talk about glass at the MMB Glassworks tent
Saturday on the first day of the 27th annual Floral City Strawberry Festival. The festival continues
today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Floral Park.


Charles Kernick, of Ontario, Canada, checks out the engine of an
antique car during the festival.


called thousands of eager bel-
lies, as flats of strawberries
were carried away
"We like to freeze the straw-


berries," said Homosassa resi-
dent Mike Liefer "When the
kids are hungry we just take
them out and it is like a frozen


" WHAT: Floral City
Strawberry Festival.
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today.
WHERE: Floral Park,
9530 S. Parkside Ave.,
Floral City.
COST: $3 per person,
12 and younger free.
PARKING: Available at
Citrus County Fairgrounds,
3600 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness for $1 roundtrip
shuttle.

strawberry Popsicle for them.
The part that they don't real-
ize is that it's healthy for
them."
Don't worry, the Liefers did
not purchase all of the flats.
There are plenty of Ferris
Farms strawberries still avail-
able today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
See TRET/Page A7


Job hopes
A Michigan program
finds success helping
veterans find new
employment./Page A19


Annie's Mailbox ...... A18
Classifieds ...........D4
Crossword .............. A18
Editorial ............... C2
Entertainment .......... A4
Horoscope........A4
Lottery Numbers ...... B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B4
M ovies .................... A 18
Obituaries.........A6
Together .................. A24
Veterans ........ A19




6 184578 200711o


Ronnie Newman: A character known for her generosity


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

BEVERLY HILLS When Diane
Abbinante first met Ronnie Newman, things
got off to a rocky start.
Abbinante and her now-late husband ar-
rived at a yard sale a day early and Mr
Abbinante wanted to buy a ladder
Ronnie, who was a caregiver for the woman
conducting the yard sale at the time, drove up
to the house and huffed at the Abbinantes, de-
manding, "What are you people doing here?
Come back tomorrow!"
A small skirmish ensued, ending with Mr

Veronica "Ronnie" E. Newman died Feb. 9 at
81. Ronnie Newman was a take-charge
person, the first to volunteer, the last person
to leave. And she loved seeing her picture in
the newspaper.
Special to the Chronicle


Abbinante getting the ladder
The following week, the Abbinantes went to
play bingo and who did they run into, but
Ronnie Newman.
"I know you two!" she said.
Mr Abbinante told Newman, "Yeah, you do
- and I got my way, didn't I?"
Ronnie Newman had met her match, and
from that day on they were friends, with New-
man and Mrs. Abbinante becoming best
friends, seeing each other every day until the
day Veronica "Ronnie" E. Newman died,
Feb. 9. She was 81.
"We were Bud Abbott and Lou Costello,"
Mrs. Abbinante said. "We would constantly
See O R/Page A7


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
79
LOW
51


I INS ]IDE I




SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 STATE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLI



Wounded warriors take on child pornographers


PAUL Guzzo
The Tampa Tribune

'AMPA Men who
Te seen and suffered the
Tors of combat steel
mselves each day for a
some find just as
inching: fighting child
crimes back home.
I am just dealing with a
'erent kind of terrorist,"
d retired Marine Cpl.
tin Gaertner, a 25-year-
native of New Port
!hey who lost both legs
)ve the knees three
irs ago while sweeping
mines in Afghanistan.
,aertner is an unpaid
rn in a new program
t provides training in
h-tech computer foren-
to wounded, injured
I ill special operations
ces members to help
eral agents investigat-
online child sexual
)loitation.
'he program is called
RO, for Human Ex-
itation Rescue Opera-
Child-Rescue Corps.
'hose who fight child
)loitation welcome the
p, because they say
y are outmanned by
-nographers.
There are special
rots who refuse to do
se investigations," said
vin Power, a computer
ensics special agent
h Homeland Security
estigations in Tampa
o is helping to train
rtner 'And those who
it get burned out on it.
L you can't let these peo-
go. Someone has to put
m in jail."
lower has investigated
ld exploitation since
'7.
,aertner joined the mil-
-y at 18 because he
dn't want another man
itecting my family's
edom."


He feared his injury
would keep him from serv-
ing. But he has learned to
walk again with the help of
prosthetics, and, like other
HERO interns, he is confi-
dent he is the man for this
new mission.
"We have a special
mindset," said 31-year-old
David Blau, a former Ma-
rine sergeant who interns
alongside Gaertner at
Homeland Security Inves-
tigations in Tampa.
MEN
Blau, a Fort Lauderdale
native, served two tours in
Iraq before head trauma
from a blast in Fallujah
forced him into civilian
life.
"I have three sons 10,
8 and 6 butI have been
brainwashed to move on
from whatever it is, to put
anything ugly behind me
and keep fighting," Blau
said. "I can keep going
with my life without letting
it affect me."
As computer forensics
agents, the two Marines
find, retrieve and catalog
electronic evidence on
computers, flash drives,
hard drives and other de-
vices, using meticulous
procedures that ensure a
court it has not been al-
tered. Gaertner compared
the work to the retrieval of
blood, DNA and other evi-
dence by crime scene
investigators.
Since 2003, Homeland
Security Investigations has
arrested more than 10,000
people for crimes against
children, including the
production and distribu-
tion of online child
pornography, traveling
overseas for sex with mi-
nors, and sex trafficking of
children. In 2013, more
than 2,000 people were ar-
rested by special agents
and more than 900 chil-


dren were rescued.
Homeland Security In-
vestigations could do even
more with more assis-
tance, said Grier Weeks,
executive director in
Knoxville, Tenn., with the
anti-crime lobby National
Association to Protect
Children. The association
provides private money for
the training, equipment
and other needs that make
the HERO program
possible.
Nationwide, 17 veterans
are working as interns in
the program. Weeks hopes
to have 200 HERO gradu-
ates battling child ex-
ploitation as computer
forensics agents within the
next five years.
"Law enforcement is
completely overwhelmed
in trying to stop child ex-
ploitation," Weeks said.
"The average backlog of
child exploitation cases
for a law enforcement
agency is nine months."
"The bulk of the prob-
lem is in the forensics,"
said Carissa Cutrell, a
spokeswoman in Tampa
for Homeland Security
Investigations.
"We have a limited num-
ber of computer forensics
agents, and that's where
the issue begins. Our case
agents can investigate
child exploitation cases all
day, but the electronic
media has to be analyzed
to present a case for fed-
eral prosecution."
MEN
Weeks said the story of
Somer Thompson is an ex-
ample of what happens
when law enforcement
can't keep up.
Thompson was a 7-year-
old girl from Orange Park,
near Jacksonville, who
was abducted and mur-
dered by Jarred Harrell in
2009.


Harrell was already on
the radar of law enforce-
ment because his room-
mates reported him for
having child pornography
But lacking computer
forensics experts, investi-
gators were still determin-
ing how to proceed on the
case when the girl was
killed.
"That man should not
have been walking
around," Weeks said.
"HERO hopes to prevent
more stories like this."
Homeland Security In-
vestigations has no money
to hire more forensics
agents. The HERO intern-
ships provide the agency
free help.
Since Gaertner and
Blau joined the Tampa
staff in November, the
child exploitation case
backlog has been cut in
half.
When the yearlong in-
ternship is up on July 31,
Weeks hopes the federal
government sees the value
of the program and funds
it.
If not, Gaertner and
Blau will leave with the
knowledge, skills and ex-
perience to apply for ca-
reers with federal, state
and local police agencies
or other employers in
the field of computer
forensics.
"They help us battle
child exploitation, and we
provide them training for a
new career," Weeks said.
"It is a great partnership.
Every law enforcement
agency will want to hire
these interns."
Weeks said HERO was
the idea of brothers John
and James Melia. John
founded the Wounded
Warrior Project. James is
an FBI agent who special-
izes in child exploitation.
When James lamented


how outnumbered he was,
John suggested approach-
ing wounded veterans to
help.
MEN
The HERO program was
developed by Homeland
Security Investigations,
the Tampa-based U.S. Spe-
cial Operations Command
and the National Associa-
tion to Protect Children.
It involves 10 weeks of
intensive computer foren-
sics training followed by 10
months of practical train-
ing experience helping
agents with Homeland Se-
curity Investigations on
criminal investigations
and prosecutions.
Previous computer
skills are not necessary
"My knowledge was how
to post on Facebook,"
Gaertner said.
Homeland Security In-
vestigations handles
crimes that cross the U.S.
border Its work in child
exploitation dates to pe-
dophiles mailing child
pornography to one an-
other With evolving tech-
nology, the crime like
many forms of communi-
cation has become
mostly Internet-based.
With a click of a button,


a pedophile can share and
receive child pornography
with anyone in the world.
Gaertner and Blau said
other law enforcement
agencies already have ex-
pressed interest in hiring
them, but they hope to re-
main with Homeland Se-
curity Investigations
because they see the work
as defending their country
"My service was cut
short," Gaertner said.
"This has allowed me to
transfer what I did in the
military to the civilian
world. I have the knowl-
edge and skill set to track
down these individuals."
Blau was working for a
cable company in Okla-
homa when he learned of
the internship. He be-
lieved so deeply in the
cause that he relocated to
Tampa for the yearlong in-
ternship while his family
remained at home. Like all
HERO interns, he gets no
pay beyond any veterans
benefits he may be already
be eligible for
"I'm out here trying to
make this happen," he
said. "I miss my kids, but
by doing this I can protect
them and countless
others."


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Page A3- SUNDAY, MARCH 2,2014



STATE & LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

STATE

Citrus County

Health care event set
at extension service
Citrus County Extension
Services will have an open
house from 3 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 13, titled
"Understanding the Health
Care Marketplace" at the
extension office, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Anyone with questions
about the new health care
law or qualification for tax
credits to help pay for
health insurance will have
the opportunity to clear up
confusion, understand op-
tions, make informed health
insurance decisions and
apply for coverage. Bring
2013 tax information, cur-
rent pay stubs and immigra-
tion papers if applicable.
Those unable to attend
can contact Sarah Ellis at
ellissm@ufl.edu. For informa-
bon, call 352-527-5700.
Republicans to host
property appraiser
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will meet at
9 a.m. Saturday, March 8,
at the Hampton Inn, Crystal
River. A buffet breakfast for
$5 is available at 8:30 a.m.
The guest speaker is Les
Cook, Citrus County prop-
erty appraiser.
For more information,
email NCRC2014@aol.
com, or call Connie at 352-
634-2503.
Waterways panel
to meet March 10
The Citrus County Task
Force of the Citrus/Her-
nando Waterways Restora-
tion Council will meet at
2 p.m. Monday, March 10,
at the Lecanto Government
Building, Room 166.
There will be three pre-
sentations with question-
and-answer periods:
0 Update on Homosassa
and Chassahowitzka TMDL
(total maximum daily load
- a scientific determination
of the maximum amount of
a given pollutant that a sur-
face water can absorb and
still meet the water quality
standards).
0 U.S. 19 storm water
treatment in the King's Bay
watershed.
0 Surface water im-
provement and manage-
ment (SWIM) -
Homosassa, Chassahow-
itzka and Weeki Wachee.
For more information, call
Al Grubman at 352-726-
2201 or Jennifer Noland at
352-796-7211 ext. 4378.

Daytona Beach

Bikers spend more
than NASCAR fans
Bikers are outpacing
Daytona 500 fans when it
comes to tourism spending
in the Daytona Beach area.
The Daytona Beach
News-Journal reported that
a recent study by Mid-
Florida Marketing & Re-
search found the 10-day
motorcycle rally provides a
bigger economic boost to
the region than the annual
NASCAR race.
The study found that Bike
week generated $74.8 mil-
lion in spending by Volusia
County visitors last year.
The Daytona 500 gener-
ated $40.34 million.
Bike week kicks off Friday.

Gainesville

Man gets life in prison
for beating death
A 24-year-old man has
been sentenced to life in
prison without parole for the
2012 home-invasion robbery
and beating death of an eld-
erly Gainesville homeowner.
Prosecutors had sought


the death penalty in the
case, but jurors recom-
mended a life sentence.
Judge Mark Moseley
agreed to the recom-
mended sentence forAustin
Mark Jones on Friday.
-From staff and wire reports


State ponders education reforms


Associated Press sage of several changes
following public hearings
MIAMI Sweeping and input from thousands
changes the Florida Legis- of parents, teachers and
lature has made to educa- education leaders around
tion in recent the state.
years are likely to The Legislature
come to the fore- could still make ad-
front again during ditional adjust-
the upcoming ses- ments to the newly
sion as lawmakers renamed Florida
grapple with their Standards, but any
implementation. changes are ex-
Contentious de- pected to be minor
bate over Pam The next topic law-
Florida's adoption Stewart makers are likely to
of the Common education focus on in the new
Core standards, a commissioner. session is how to
set of uniform bench- best hold students, teach-
marks in language arts ers and schools account-
and math, appears to have able. The state is required
simmered with the Board to implement a new test
of Education's recent pas- tied to the standards in the


next school year, but many
say that is too quick a time-
line, especially given that
the test has not been
selected.
Education Commis-
sioner Pam Stewart is ex-
pected to recommend a
vendor for the test by the
end of March. The new
test would replace the cur-
rent Florida Comprehen-
sive Assessment Test, or
FCAT.
"That is an aggressive
timetable," Sen. John Legg,
R-Lutz, chair of the Senate
Education Committee.
"Our concern is that may
be too aggressive. (It)
doesn't allow any wiggle
room for implementation."
The Florida Education


Association, the statewide
teacher's union, along
with the Florida PTA, are
asking the state to hit the
pause button and wait
until the exam has been
sufficiently tested and
schools prepared.
"If we go on the course
that is already laid out, we
can look at New York as an
example of what our fu-
ture will be, and every-
thing crashes," said Andy
Ford, president of the
union.
The rollout of the Com-
mon Core standards has
been widely criticized in
New York for being rushed
and uneven.
Around the country, and
particularly in Florida, the


standards have been at-
tacked as being part of a
"federal intrusion" into
state government and a
strategy to force children
to take more high-stakes
testing.
The standards were
adopted by Florida in 2010
and have been approved
by more than 40 other
states, and have a major
supporter in former Gov.
Jeb Bush. They were de-
veloped by a bipartisan
coalition of state leaders
with the input of teachers
and others with education
expertise. They outline
what a student should
know in order to be pre-
pared for college and the
workforce.


An African experience comes to Homosassa


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Trainer Tom Liebel gives Howard's Flea Market manager Ter Davis, top left, and flea market owner Alice Cushman, top right, a ride on
Nosey, a 31-year-old African elephant, Saturday. At 6 months old, Nosey was rescued after her entire herd in Zimbabwe was
slaughtered for their ivory. Her rescuer sold her to a circus, which is currently based in central Florida. Nosey will return today to offer
rides to flea market visitors from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pony rides are also available. Howard's Flea Market is at 6373 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa. For more information, call 352-628-3532.





Steak dinner benefits Boys & Girls Clubs


ERYN throw a fun party for our
WORTHINGTON youth. Who doesn't love to
Staff writer party at the farm? It is a
party where we can honor
Leaders of a local non- those students who have
profit organization are gone above and beyond.
inviting you to grab your That is a part of their lead-
country attire and join ership and we want to
them down on the make it exciting
farm. for the kids so that
At 5:45 p.m. they strive to be
Thursday, March 6, the next Youth of
the Boys & Girls the Year"
Clubs of Citrus Boys & Girls
County is going iClubs is a national
country with its organization with
13th annual Steak local chapters that
& Steak Dinner at Cindi Fein provides before-
M&B Dairy Farm, executive and after-school
8760 S. Lecanto director, Boys enrichment activi-
Highway, Lecanto. & Girls Clubs ties for youths in
"This is our sig- of Citrus the community.
nature event and County. Locally, each of
we are changing it up a lit- the three clubs has chosen
tle bit this year by hosting a Youth of the Month.
it at M&B Diary Farm," "Then out of the group
said Executive Director they choose one person to
Cindi Fein. "We wanted to be the Youth of the Year,"


0 WHAT: Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County's 13th
annual Steak & Steak Dinner.
0 WHEN: 5:45 p.m. Thursday, March 6.
0 WHERE: M&B Diary Farm, 8760 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
0 COST: $50 per person or $60 at door. VIP tables of
eight also available.
0 ATTIRE: Country cocktail.
0 INFO: For more information call 352-621-9225.


Fein said. "We will have
three youths at the Steak &
Steak Dinner to honor, one
from each club. Based on
the essays that they have
written, we will choose
who will be the Youth of
the Year"
In addition to the large
celebration of youth lead-
ership, area businesses
have donated various
items for silent and live
auctions fishing, golf
and cooking packages,


Busch Gardens tickets, re-
sort packages and much
more.
"We are even going to
have cow pie bingo," Fein
said.
However, Fein said the
main portion of the event
could not be possible if it
weren't for Kiwanis of In-
verness. Its members have
purchased and are cook-
ing all of the steaks and
baked potatoes.
"One of our major fo-


cuses is on the youth of our
county," said Kiwanis
member Rocky Hensley.
"With the Boys & Girls
Clubs, we have been sup-
portive of the Steak &
Steak Dinner food cost so
that all of their ticket pro-
ceeds can go solely to the
efforts of the clubs."
The Cool Corporate Cats
will provide the entertain-
ment for the evening.
"A large thank you to
those organizations that
have stepped up to the
plate to make this bene-
fit a success: Citrus 95.3,
Fox 96.3, WYKE, FD.S.
Disposal, Hometown Val-
ues, DAB Construction
and the Chronicle," Fein
said.
Seating is limited, and
the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus asks that reserva-
tions be made by calling
352-621-9225.


State BRIEFS


Two dead after crash
downs power lines
TARPON SPRINGS-Authorities
say two people are dead following an
early morning car crash in Tarpon
Springs that caused live power lines
to fall on a road.
The Tampa Bay Times reported the
collision happened around 3 a.m.
Saturday.
Witnesses told police a car flew
over a six-foot fence and into a reten-
tion pond.
Police said they found the body of
one man amid the downed power
lines. They said it is unclear whether
he was a pedestrian or had been a
passenger in the car. A dive team


found the body of another man buck-
led into the passenger seat of the car.
Officials said the driver of another
vehicle that struck the power line after
the initial crash was treated and re-
leased from an area hospital.
An investigation is ongoing.
Florida last in National
Guard-civilian ratio
JACKSONVILLE Despite ever-
present threats from hurricanes, floods
and other natural disasters, Florida ranks
last in the ratio of Army National Guard
troops to dvilian residents.
Numbers provided to The Florida
Times-Union by the Florida Army Na-
tional Guard show there are 10.3


guardsmen per every 100,000 civil-
ians in the state.
The newspaper reported Saturday
that Florida Army National Guard
leaders are worried about the low
numbers. The state's adjutant general
said his forces are already stretched
thin and that budget cuts could make
the situation worse.
"I'm deeply concerned," said Maj.
Gen. Emmett Titshaw. "During the
hurricanes we had in 2004 and 2005,
we pretty much used up everything
we had then, and we had more than
we have now."
Titshaw said calling in units from
other states as reienforcement isn't al-
ways the best option.
"Say a hurricane is bearing down


on Daytona Beach from the Atlantic
Ocean," he said. "Georgia is not going
to give up their assets to help us be-
cause that storm could turn and im-
pact Georgia."
Florida would then be forced to look
for help from farther away, and that
takes time, he said.
At a meeting of the nation's gover-
nors with President Obama on Mon-
day, 47 governors gave the president
a letter opposing further cuts to Na-
tional Guard forces.
Lt. Col. James Evans, spokesman
for the Florida National Guard, said
the allocation of troops hasn't kept
pace with the nation's shifting
demographics.
-From wire reports




SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014


)day S
OROSCOPES
hday Disregard people who try
revent you from forging ahead with
ambitions. Dedicate all your time
energy into putting your plans in
,e. Be resourceful and relentless in
uit of your goals. Endurance,
nina and focus will bring you the re-
you desire.
:es (Feb. 20-March 20) Time
it completing household tasks will be
h the effort. You may want to take a
ant relationship to the next step.
is (March 21-April 19) This is
the day to venture into uncharted
rs. Business dealings and other
agements should be put on hold.
nd some time with close friends or
ily members instead.
rus (April 20-May 20) No one
to be taken advantage of. Make
needs a priority. It isn't selfish to
it to spend some time alone.
nini (May 21-June 20) -Your
I is brimming with ideas to improve
iency and streamline various pro-
ires. Your cohorts will appreciate
r input if you present your theories
respectful and helpful manner.
icer (June 21-July 22) -Although
are often reluctant to make
iges, it is often necessary for
vth. Stop procrastinating and take
first step toward improving your life.
(July 23-Aug. 22) Take a break
your everyday routine. Visit an art
,ry, museum, or any destination
find stimulating.
lo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Spend
iy focusing on matters of the heart.
p strictly within your budget, and
'e your credit cards at home.
-a (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Try some-
g new. Use your imagination to dis-
r something that brings you
sure.
rpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You
a the ability to make favorable
iges to both your personal and
essional lives.
ittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
ik very carefully before implement-
any costly or untried notions. There
such thing as a foolproof scheme.
iricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
ieone you care about will find fault
your actions. You don't need to be
nsive about your feelings.
iarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
ifluenced or confused by changes
le by others. It's important that you
w your path and maintain your


ENTERTAINMENT


Pearl Jam executive
heading to prison
SEATTLE -A former execu-
tive with Pearl Jam is heading to
prison for 14 months after being
caught for bilking the band.
The seattlepi.com reported
55-year-old Rickey Charles
Goodrich pleaded guilty to theft
charges in December. He used
his position as chief financial offi-
cer at Pearl Jam's management
company Curtis Management
- to steal $380,000 in the four
years before he was fired in
2010.
Seattle Police determined
Goodrich's thefts cost the man-
agement company $566,000, in-
cluding investigative expenses.
King County prosecutors were
prepared to ask that Goodrich
be sentenced to six months in
prison, if he paid back the band
prior to Friday's hearing. He
failed to do so.
Two celebrations of
Hoffman life planned
ROCHESTER, N.Y. -The
mother of actor Philip Seymour
Hoffman said there will be pub-
lic celebrations of her son's life in
both New York City and
Rochester, N.Y., this spring.
The Rochester Democrat &
Chronicle reported that Hoff-
man's mother, Marilyn O'Con-
nor, also said she wants to
thank her friends and her son's
fans for all of their kind words
after his death.
O'Connor, a retired judge in
Rochester, had a friend read her
statement Friday during a film
series honoring Hoffman.
The friend, retired film critic
Jack Garner, read that Hoffman
was "a gift to me for 46 years."
Hoffman was found dead
Feb. 2 in his Manhattan apartment.
The New York City medical
examiner said Friday he was


Associated Press
Models wear creations for Comme des Garcons' ready-to-wear
fall/winter 2014-2015 fashion collection presented Saturday
in Paris, France.


killed by a toxic mix of drugs in-
cluding heroin and cocaine.
Chris Brown told
to return to rehab
LOS ANGELES A Califor-
nia judge ordered Chris Brown
to remain in an anger-
management rehab program
and told the pop singer to return
to court in two months.
On Friday, Superior Court
Judge James Brandlin sched-
uled Brown's next hearing for
April 23. That would come after
what's expected to be a brief as-
sault trial in Washington, D.C.,
earlier that month.
Prosecutors have asked that
Brown be sent to jail for violating
probation with his October arrest
in the district. In that incident,
Brown and his bodyguard are
accused of punching a man and
breaking his nose outside a
hotel. Brown is on probation for
his 2009 attack on then-
girlfriend, Rihanna.
But Brown's attorneys have
asked the judge to await the out-
come of the Washington, D.C.,
case before hearing evidence on
whether Brown should go to jail.


Liam Neeson chides
NYC mayor about
horse carriages
NEW YORK Liam Neeson
said he's "a little bit pissed off" at
Mayor Bill de Blasio for want-
ing to shut down the horse-
drawn carriage industry in New
York City.
The actor made the comment
during a Wednesday appear-
ance on "The Daily Show." The
actor complained to host Jon
Stewart that critics have put out
false information about how the
horses are treated. He said the
carriage drivers treat the horses
like their own children.
De Blasio has declared his in-
tention to shut down the industry,
saying it's inhumane to keep
horses in modern-day Manhat-
tan. The democrat wants to re-
place them with electric cars.
Carriage drivers said shutting
down the stables would have
the unintended effect of elimi-
nating a rare outlet for surplus
horses, which means they'll be
sent to the slaughterhouse
faster.
-From wire reports


CIOus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 2, the
61 st day of 2014. There are 304
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 2, 1939, Roman
Catholic Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli
was elected pope on his 63rd birth-
day; he took the name Pius XII.
On this date:
In 1861, the state of Texas, hav-
ing seceded from the Union, was
admitted to the Confederacy.
In 1917, Puerto Ricans were
granted U.S. citizenship as Presi-
dent Woodrow Wilson signed the
Jones-Shafroth Act.
In 1944, "Casablanca" won best
picture, best director and best
screenplay at the Academy Awards
ceremony in Los Angeles. Jennifer
Jones (whose 25th birthday it was)
received the best actress award for
"The Song of Bernadette" while
Paul Lukas won best actor for
"Watch on the Rhine."
Ten years ago: A series of coordi-
nated blasts in Iraq killed 181 people
at shrines in Karbala and Baghdad
as thousands of Shiite Muslim pil-
grims gathered for a religious festival.
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama introduced Kansas
Gov. Kathleen Sebelius as his
choice to be secretary of health and
human services.
One year ago: The day after
$85 billion in across-the-board fed-
eral spending cuts went into effect,
President Barack Obama and con-
gressional Republicans refused to
concede any culpability for failing to
stave off the sequester.
Today's Birthdays: Author Tom
Wolfe is 84. Former Soviet Presi-
dent Mikhail S. Gorbachev is 83.
Author John Irving is 72. Rock
singer Jon Bon Jovi is 52. Actor
Daniel Craig is 46.
Thought for Today: "Humor has
a tremendous place in this sordid
world. It's more than just a matter of
laughing. If you can see things out
of whack, then you can see how
things can be in whack." -
Theodor Seuss Geisel, AKA "Dr.
Seuss," American children's author
(born this date in 1904, died 1991).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
ILO PR HI LO PR HI I LO PR
39 0.09" 76/43 O.O0r 70/38 0.00


JHI/L0 p",R" HILO PR
NANA U.0.0 NA/NA 0.00r
IREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORtiNG
High: 79" Low: 51
Sunny

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High* 79' Low:54-
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High:71' Low: 50
w1 Partly sunny to mostly cloudy


city


FLORIDA TEMPEATU


H L Fcast City


Daytona Bch. 78 58 f Miami
Fort Lauderdale 82 68 pc Ocala
Fort Myers 83 62 f Orland
Gainesville 78 52 f Pensa
Homestead 81 66 pc Sarasc
Jacksonville 76 53 f Tallahe
Key West 79 70 pc Tampa
Lakeland 81 58 f Vero E
Melbourne 79 63 pc W. Pal

MMRNE QUTLI
Today: East then NW winds around
10 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay
and inland waters a smooth to light
chop. Tonight: North winds around 5
knots then. Seas 1 Foot. Bay and
inland waters smooth.


do
-ola
ota
assee
e
Beach
Im Bch.


H L F'cast
81 67 Pc
79 53 f
81 61 f
68 52 f
79 58 Pc
76 50 f
79 60 Pc
80 60 Pc
81 66 PC


.OOK
Gulf water
temperature


670
Token at Arlpsho


LAKE LWEL
Location SAT FRI Full
Withacoochee at Holder 29.04 29.08 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.49 38.51 39.52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.58 39.60 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.28 40,29 42.20
Levels iopOlet in fe above sea tevi Ro stage lakes are basec on 2 33-yeat food.
I meanaua ll whd h MS a 43.! ofe r being equaled Or exCeede ,
any ome year This data is obwed tm ih Sotilhwest Florida Water Manageient stfc
and Is subject o rvwo I no v, l wil M, Dil, r ct 1he l Sta Geocat Survey
be liable ot auny damges a ou o t1 u O fMdata. it you hve ay questions yt
should contac Ihe Hydoklgwa l Data Secon at (352) 796.721t1


AL UWI


MPERATURE*
urday 73,50
mrd /36
'mal 74/56
an temp. 57
feature from mean -8
ECIPITATION*
urday 0.00"
al (of the month 0.00"
31 for the year 4.95"
'mal for the year 5.13"
A 7 pmr at Iness


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 46.9
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 86%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, nettle, juniper
Today's count: 10.1/12
Monday's count: 10.8


' INDEX: 10 Tuesday's count: 10.5
minimal,3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALITY
high, 10+ very high
ROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed
30.15 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLU*AR TABLES "Uauno
TE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
02 SUNDAY 06:35 00'49 19:13 12:21
03 MONDAY 07:16 01:41 20:16 13:13
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSETTONIGNT 6 29 P'm,
0 (4 SUNRISEIIUMORROW 652 am.

uMWNRnIU TOBA 733 am.
ir8 Mar16 Mar23 Mar30 MOONSET51DAY 8,11 m
BURN CONDITIONS
Bar's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There Is no bum ban.
mwff Infnrnaton call Floda Divnsion ol Foreshty st I352) 754-6777 For more
jmajion on drought centilites please viSt the Div-il o Forestrys Web silo
,Mlamefldol corm/ire weamherbdi
WATERING RULES
nwaerig limited to two days per week, before l0a.m otalter 4 p.m,, as
iN addresses may water on Thursday andor Sunday.
D addresses may water on Wedresiay an&W Saturday
ld waterirg with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrgation of noLrass areas, Sti
'egetable gardens, flower and shrubs can be done on any day and at any
is County Uithes customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
di material 352-527-7669, Some new ian ngs may qualify for additional
wing allowances.
eport vicaaions, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321 City of Crystal
ir @ 352-795-4216 ext 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.


-rom mouths of rivers


f
ssmhowitzka'
ilacoochee'
isassa.""


7:28 a -tti
517 a.f"
2:51 am
6:39 a m


TIDES
*1Kingts "a -At Mason's Croek
SUNDAY
High Low
0.5ft, 732Px..0.5 tt, 150Oa MOJ 11 2 3p,nmr 1 ft
22tt 5:49prm. 22" 1215pm.1. 0211
33ft 2:52pm. 3.4", 9:38anm. 0.011 O1:Op.O,4ft
1211 637pm 13ft 1:24a-m-0,1I 1:40pm02 fl-


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuqueque
Atlanta
Atlantic Ciy
Austin
Batimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleson, S.C
Chaleson, WV.
Chario~e
Chicago
Cincinnat
Cleveland
Coumba. SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. NH
Da*Ras
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvie. IN
Hasburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobe
Mongomery
Nashvile


SAT SUN
H L P cp. H L Fcst


31 1
62 38 0V
56 28
61 41 01
44 10
82 53
44 14
-3 -13 .06
68 46 .04
46 39 .02
36 16
35 9
30 1
59 46
50 24
58 31
31 18 0
53 28
45 21
40 26
49 26
28 -5
81 46
28 10 .03
21 4 06
30 T7
78 51
52 36
37 12
33 0
83 64
49 26
64 48 .04
63 45
61 55 '61
5; 36
69 47
23 1 1A7
8 -3
73 51
70 50
59 43


24 5 sn
54 36 sn
67 29 t
72 43 pC
48 16 r
68 28 ts
47 14 r
2 -2 sn
72 36 pc
56 43 sh
34 16 0f
16 5 si
16 -3 fl
72 54 pc
45 11 r
70 34t
18 1 "i
30 13 i
21 5 Sn
12 -2 sn
2 7sn
31 5 A
38 16 1
22 16od
3 -14 pe
19 4 an
67 45 sh
31 14 1
37 5 i
32 13 tl
78 41t Is
2371
64 47 pc
56 17 ts
63 65 sh
36 18 i
52 21 is
12 0 pc
2 -11 pc
73 47t
76 43 pc
58 24 sh


SAT SUN
aity H L Pcp. H LFcst
New Oleans 75 57 74 52 1
Nw York City 37 20 36 18 sn
Norfolk 41 30 66 27 pc
OdahtmuiCity 46 39 20 7 i
Omaha 204 .01 1 -13 pc
Palm Springs 66 52 33 89 54 pc
Phldelphia 40 17 41 10 r
Phoenix 71 57 .37 69 52 sh
Pittburgh 47 17 27 14 sn
Potland, ME 28 3 32 7 If
Potland. OR 47 36 .01 46 44 r
Providence.tRI 36 35 16 fl
Raleigh 5828 68829 pc
RapidCity 1 -10 25 4 -8 cd
Ren 54 35 03 56 36 pc
Rochester.NY 39 11 18 4 sn
Sacramento 66 50 65 50 pc
SallLakeCity 58 47 12 55 41 sh
SanAntonio 86 48 74 34 Is
San Diego 65 57 .70 62 54 sh
SanFrancisco 63 53 11 58 52 r
Savannah 70 46 73 53 pc
Seattle 45 39 .02 44 42an
Spokane 20 12 22 21 sn
SI. Louis 43 33 19 4 1
SI Ste. Mane 10 3 -09 3 -16 pc
Syracuse 35 5 20 4 sri
Topeka 3118 7 -6sn
Washington 45 23 54 I8 r
YESTERDAY'S NATMM. 1iGN & LOW
LOW -33. WM City ND
WORLD CITES


SUN
CITY /M1SKY
Acapul 8673/s
Amsterdam 46/33Oc
Athens 5950"
Beljing 4424pc
Berlin 53371pc
Bermuda 69/62/r


KEY TO CONOIONS: c.cw ,- ; Cairo ,8/64/W d
ffai-lnhoazwpC -pattly cody; r--hi Calgary .9/-18/pc
"vutlaisnow mix; s-smrhsh wrs Havana 80/55s
mvsiwi ts-flwm1fdroms; w.winy. Hong Kong 7166/pc
WS Ifl14 Jenisaiem 75M //pc


Lisbon 59/53fr
London 4605/p
Madi 5714&r
Mexico Cily 7853(s
Montreatl 264/sn
Moscow 35221s
Paris 4&P33/r
Rio 8773/s
Rome 53/39ft
Sydney 7514rF
Tokyo 51i411#
Teronlo 33/12.td
Warsaw 5128,pc


K V LEGAL NOTICES


Meeting Notices
.............................................. D 6


Miscellaneous Notices
.............................................. D 6



-I C I T R U S r CIU N T Y E .

CHKONIIE

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To start your subscription:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CIOus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Citrus County Ticket Sales
Fresh Start DONUTS in
Beverly Hills, FL 527.1996


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 A5


,2KGLD MUIC I Ui

130+peole PRE0OLD


TICKETS AVAILABLE AT DOOR
SAMPLER MATINEE
2:00 -90 min. long

GOLDEN OLDIES SHOW
4:00.150 min. long
Only remaining Florida Shows...
Inverness FL. March 9
Ocala FL. March 16
March 16 at 4:00 is EXTRAVAGANZA


IM I


1 1


IF-, l




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries=


Octavio
ernandez Sr.,
75
DUNNELLON
)ctavio Osiris Pastor
rnandez Sr., 75, of Dun-
Ion, Fla., passed away
28, 2014. He was born
March 30,
1938, to
Nicolas
and Alba
Hernan-
dez in Hol-
g u i n ,
Cuba. A
supervisor
3ctavio of ship-
rnandez ping most
Sr. of his life,
0 ctavi o
ved to the area 12 years
from Miami, Fla. He
ned Rio Crystal
food Market in Crystal
Ter, and was a loving
;band, father, grandfa-
r and uncle.
)ctavio was preceded in
ith by his parents and
brother Cecilio Hector
rnandez. He is survived
ais loving wife, Maria A.
rnandez; children
ris A. Hernandez and
avio (Elisa) Hernandez
and grandchildren,
ath, Nicholas, Audra
I Terresa.
Visitation for Octavio
1 be held from 2 to
.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Sat-
lay, March 1, 2014, at
)wn Funeral Home &
matory in Lecanto, Fla.
family will receive
rnds again from 1 to
).m. Sunday, March 2,
4, with a service start-
at 2 p.m. Private cre-
tion will follow In lieu
lowers, donations may
made to HPH Hospice
indation c/o Citrus Care
ter, 12107 Majestic
d., Hudson, FL 34667,
-486-8784.
,ign the guest book at
w chronicleonline com.

Donald
aBrant Jr., 76
-ORMERLY OF
- PETERSBURG

)onald Scales LaBrant
76, formerly of St. Pe-
sburg, Fla., went home
his loving savior on
). 14,2014, in Inverness.
)on is survived by sons,
nald S. III (Trey) and
liam (Billy); brothers,
bert, Wilmer and Dick;
nddaughters, Ashley,
ttany, and Caetlin; and
er-in-law, Louise Bren-
1 (Weezie).
memorial service will be
Anona United
thodist Church Chapel,
Largo, at 1 p.m. Satur-
r, March 15,2014. In lieu
lowers, donations may
made to Grace Fellow-
p Center, 4240 Central
., St. Petersburg 33711.
,ign the guest book at
w chronicleonline com.

A


Rostislav
3elyakov, 94
MIG JETS
DESIGNER
IOSCOW The maker
MiG fighter jets said
t its chief designer Ros-
av Belyakov has died.
was 94.






'he company said in a
tement that Belyakov
d Friday in Moscow fol-






iing an unspecified
Less.
elyakov became the
i chief designer in 1969,
ceeding the firm's
nder, Artyom Mikoyan,
ti led the development



Funeral Home
With Crematory






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Cremation










ir Information and costs,


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Funeral Directors
Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
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CRYSTAL RIVER
152-795-2678
vw.strcklandfuneralhome.com


Joseph
Pannelli Sr., 87
INVERNESS
Joseph S. Pannelli Sr.
passed away Feb. 28, 2014,
under the loving care of
his family, Hospice of Cit-
rus County/Nature Coast,
and the caring staff of
Woodland Terrace.
Joseph S. Pannelli Sr.
was born and raised in
Philadelphia, Pa., entered
the U.S. Navy in 1944,
served in World War II,
and received several
medals during his service
to our country
Joseph married the love
of his life, Mary, in 1946;
she went to her Lord in
2012. During his younger
years, Joe worked for the
Philadelphia Shipyard as
a pipefitter Upon retire-
ment, Joe and Mary moved
to Haines City, Fla., and
later to Inverness.
Joseph and Mary are
survived by four children:
Joanne Marinelli
(Charles), Joseph Jr.
(Helen) and Carmella, all
of Inverness, and Frank, of
Haines City. Mr Pannelli
has one grandson, Christo-
pher; and one great-
grandson, Christopher Jr.
of Delaware, as well as
several nieces and
nephews. Joseph was the
son of Anthony and Emilia,
brothers William and An-
thony, and daughters
Amelia and Mary, who pre-
deceased him.
Cremation services will
be conducted by the Nep-
tune Society, followed by
interment at the Veterans
National Cemetery in
Bushnell, Fla., at a later
date.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Edward
Rossi, 94
HERNANDO
Edward F Rossi, 94,
Hernando, Fla., died
Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, at
Woodland Terrace.
Private arrangements
are by Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness, Fla.


Robert

Reuman, 75
INVERNESS
Robert W Reuman, 75,
Inverness, died Feb. 21,
2014.
Bob, born Sept. 24, 1938,
in Toledo, Ohio, to Carl
and Naomi Reuman,
served 12 years as a Naval
aviator, including one tour
in Vietnam. Bob worked 32
years as a commercial air-
line pilot for TWA, retiring
as captain. His last wishes
were for his friends and
family to remember him as
a loving father, good friend
and true adventurer
Services will be held at
11 a.m. Tuesday, March 11,
at St Margaret's Episcopal
Church, Inverness, Fla.,
with inurnment to follow at
Florida National Cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Julia Rhea, 68
CRYSTAL RIVER
Julia Lee Rhea, age 68,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Feb. 27, 2014.
She was born Feb. 15,1946,
in Jacksonville, Fla., to
Jack Reed and Rita
(Richards) Ball. Julia
moved to the Citrus
County area 13 years ago.
She previously lived in
Jacksonville, Lake City
and Inglis, Fla. Julia was a
member of the Catholic
faith.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded in
death by her brother, An-
drew Ball.
She is survived by her
husband of 43 years,
William Paul Rhea; three
children, Daniel Joseph
Rhea, Rita-Erin Jessica
Burge and John Paul
Rhea; two sisters, Mary
Kennedy and Elizabeth
Glenn; three brothers,
Jack Ball, Michael Ball
and Daniel Ball; and 10
grandchildren.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


OBITUARIES
0 The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle
online.com or phone 352-563-5660 for
details and pricing options.
0 Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the
next day's edition.
0 Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name
of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death;
place of death; date, time and place of visitation
and funeral services.
0 All obituaries will be edited to conform to
Associated Press style unless otherwise noted.



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Strawberries, the star of the weekend festival, await
purchase Saturday at one of the gates.


TREAT
Continued from Page Al

Visitors will see more
than 125 crafters line the
festival pathway as they
aim to catch wondering
eyes.
"I bought some hand-
made jewelry for my
bridesmaids," said Spring
Hill resident Tawnya
Spillberg. "I have been try-
ing to shop locally for a lot
of my wedding items.
When my fiance, Matt
Koester, wanted to spend
the day at the Strawberry
Festival, I thought, 'Why



POSTSCRIPT
Continued from PapAl


fight, but never leave each
other without a kiss on the
cheek goodbye."
She described her
friend of 20 years as head-
strong, independent, car-
ing and giving, a bubbly
personality.
"She was a character
and a half," Abbinante
said. "She wanted to know
everything about every-
body and wasn't afraid to
ask."
Newman had moved to
Beverly Hills in 1985 from
Freeport, Long Island,
N.Y, and immediately
threw herself into volun-
teer work, including the
Knights of Columbus and
VFW auxiliaries, where
she called bingo, among
other things.
"She was our bingo
angel," said Mary Jo


not spend quality time to-
gether while shopping for
the wedding?"'
In addition, the Straw-
berry Princess Pageant,
entertainment, pie-eating
contests, a child's play
area and, of course, flats of
strawberries await to sat-
isfy just about everyone's
desires.
"I'm thinking about com-
ing back tomorrow at
2 p.m. for the pie-eating
contest," said Marvin
Jones. 'Just watching them
eat those pies so fast is en-
tertainment in itself."
So pack up the family
and head to Floral City
today for some old-


Sharpe. "She usually had
doughnuts sitting at my
place for me."
Not only that, but be-
cause Sharpe is in a
wheelchair and needs an
end-of-table spot, Newman
would guard Sharpe's spot
like a mother bear protect-
ing her cub, pouncing on
anyone who tried to sit
there before Sharpe
arrived.
"She made it a joy to go
and play bingo," said
Cindy Pumroy, Sharpe's
daughter "She was a good
caller, but it went beyond
that It was her whole per-
sonality you just fell in
love with her And she was
one of those people that
when she fell in love with
you, you were hers. She
went above and beyond
the call of duty We were
lucky enough to be
'adopted' by her"
Newman's generosity
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The lines were long but steady as people queued up Saturday afternoon to get a taste Rachel Henry, of Wesley
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strawberry T-shirt just to


fashioned fun and sweet,
local strawberries.
Admission to the festival
is $3 per person; children
12 and younger are admit-
ted free.
There will be limited
parking at the festival, but
parking will be available
at the Citrus County Fair-


strength and weakness,
Abbinante said. Yes, New-
man was extravagant, but
she tended to go
overboard.
"She was always buying
knickknacks for people,"
she said. "I used to tell her,
'If they don't like you for
who you are, they're not
going to like you any more
if you give them a gift.' But
she'd say, 'I have to do it."'
She would tirelessly
drive to various organiza-
tions and businesses to ask
for gift certificates for
prizes. She brought bags of
candies to the monthly
VFW auxiliary lunches at
Main Street Grill "for
dessert" for the other
ladies, and doughnuts to
people in the community
whom she did business
with. She never went any-
where empty-handed.
Ronnie Newman was a
take-charge person, the
first to volunteer, the last
person to leave. She had a


grounds on U.S. 41 in
Inverness.
A shuttle service will
run from the fairgrounds
to the festival. The fee for
the shuttle is $1 per person
round trip.
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce or-
ganized the event.


distinctive wobble to her
walk, a stout strut. She
spoke her mind. She for-
gave easily And she loved
seeing her picture in the
newspaper
A "gallivanter," Ronnie
Newman hated staying
home, preferring instead
to be out and about, spend-
ing money, hunting for bar-
gains, wheeling and
dealing, taking care of
others.
"She cared about peo-
ple," Abbinante said. "We
were close, as close as
sisters."
"When grown men get
up at your memorial serv-
ice and start crying as they
talk, you get the idea of
what kind of person she
was," Sharpe said. "She
was loved."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


Contact Chronicle re- wear to the Strawberry
porter Eryn Worthington Festival and has waited
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, several months to debut
or eworthington@chroni- the look, which included
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SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 NATION CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



lo longer loyal to Scouts, boys join Trail Life


Associated Press

NORTH RICHLAND
LLS, Texas Chatting
the living room one
ht, Ron Orr gave his 15-
tr-old son Andrew a
)ice: He could stick with
Boy Scouts of America
I his mission to become
Eagle Scout, or he
ild join Trail Life USA
he new Christian-based
rnative that excludes
rely gay boys.
'his was no small deci-
n. Four generations of
- men had been Eagles,
luding Ron and An-
lw's older brother An-
w had spent years
rking toward Scouting's
hest rank, and was just
nths from reaching it
)ut the Boy Scouts had
ided to admit gays, and
ri Orr, a tall, soft-spoken
n with a firm hand-
ke, is clear about his
ristian faith and what it
s about homosexuality:
s a sin that cannot be
rated.
lis son agreed. He
uld forgo the century-
BSA for Trail Life,
ich officially launched
t last month.
It felt like I'd be hitting
aething higher than
sle in terms of achieve-
nt," Andrew said, in an
?rview
o Orr and his son left
k and set out with other
lilies to build a new or-
Lization based on what
y believe to be Christian
ues. Orr is a regional or-
Lizer who speaks to
itrches and groups about
dl Life. His son now as-
es to achieve a Freedom
ard, the new group's
hest rank.
'he Orrs and others in
ul Life say they are
iRing for the traditional
ues of Christianity and
Scouting, which in-
des a command in the
)ut Oath to be "morally
aight" even as a
ranging America grows
re accepting of gays and
I marriage. They are
ving an organization
Ltral to many of their up-
ngings with heavy


Associated Press
From left, Erick lzquierdo, Josiah Spear, 12, and Cole McSorley, 12, look at a Trail Life
handbook Feb. 4 during a gathering of members in North Richland Hills, Texas. Trail Life
USA says it has established units in more than 40 states, mostly from Boy Scouts and
parents who feel the century-old organization has lost its way.


hearts, but also with the
belief that the Scouting
they knew no longer exists.
As Christians from a
scriptural basis, we love
all folks, but the Scripture
is very clear that being ho-
mosexual is a sin," Ron
Orr said in an interview.
"We've got to be able to
hold a strong line and set a
consistent example for our
young men."
ME
Trail Life has estab-
lished units in more than
40 states, mostly from Boy
Scouts and parents who
feel their old organization
has lost its way It has
about 600 units up and
running or in the process
of registration, executive
director Rob Green said.
As many as half of those
who have expressed inter-
est were not affiliated with
the Boy Scouts before-
hand, Green said.
It is still a tiny move-
ment compared to Scout-
ing, which has nearly
2.5 million youth members
and remains a powerful
force in American life,
even with a 6 percent drop
in membership last year
Trail Life promotes it-
self on its website as the
"premier national charac-
ter development organiza-
tion for young men which
produces Godly and re-
sponsible husbands, fa-


thers and citizens."
Its official membership
standards policy welcomes
all boys, but adds, "We
grant membership to
adults and youth who do
not engage in or promote
sexual immorality of any
kind, or engage in behav-
ior that would become a
distraction to the mission
of the program."
For more than a century,
Scouting banned openly
gay youth and leaders,
fighting all the way to the
Supreme Court to defend
its right to do so. Leaders
who were revealed to be
gay were excluded, and
some boys were denied
Eagle Scout awards by re-
gional councils that were
notified of their sexual
orientation.
But the Scouts eventu-
ally began to face pressure
from sponsors and CEOs
who serve in Scouting
leadership but lead com-
panies with anti-discrimi-
nation policies. BSA
surveys also showed that
youths and parents of
Scouting-age children
were supportive of allow-
ing openly gay Scouts.
Scouting leadership
proposed a compromise:
Accept openly gay youth,
but exclude gay adult vol-
unteers. BSAs National
Council voted in May to
enact it.


There are signs that the
change worked. One of the
gay Scouts who rallied for
the change, Pascal Tessier
of Maryland, has since re-
ceived his Eagle award.
And threats of massive de-
partures from Scouting
ranks have not material-
ized. Early reports suggest
a small percentage of
Scouts left BSA due to the
policy far less than even
what Scouting leaders were
led to expect by surveys
conducted before the vote.
"Ultimately, Scouting
voted in favor of a new pol-
icy that allows us to serve
more kids," said Deron
Smith, BSAs national
spokesman, in an email.
"That said, we're pleased
that the strong majority of
our Scouting family re-
mains committed to
Scouting."
But the vote also an-
gered many people affili-
ated with Scouting,
particularly in more con-
servative parts of the
country Many of them
have stayed with Scouting
so far Others have sought
alternatives, from Trail
Life to other youth groups
sponsored by churches.
M
Some of the parents who
took their children out of
Scouting and into Trail


Life admit feeling the loss
of BSAs history and tradi-
tion. They remember
Eagle Scout ceremonies
and trips to BSAs national
campgrounds, and ac-
knowledge that their chil-
dren won't experience
those things in quite the
same way
But they say the threat to
their children's values out-
weighs any of that.
Orr home-schooled his
two sons, one of whom is
now in college, and leads
his local association of
home-school parents in
North Richland Hills,
Texas, a conservative sub-
urb of Fort Worth. Orr said
he was confident before
the vote that the policy
change would fail. When it
didn't, he and his associa-
tion's board began to study
alternatives.
Orr attended Trail Life's
national convention in
September, where he met
with others interested in a
new program and came
away confident that it
would work for his son and
other boys in the home-
school association. He's
now one of Trail Life's
leading recruiters, respon-
sible for six states in the
Southwest.
"When we saw Trail Life
unveiled, what I saw was a
program built on strong
Christian principles, but
those were integrated into
a young man's develop-
ment," he said.
All of the families in his
Trail Life unit belong to
the home-schooling associ-
ation. They put a great em-
phasis on traditional
Christian values, taking a
direct hand in their chil-
dren's education to make
sure those values are
instilled.
"We feel strongly enough
that they should be taught
at a young age and mod-
eled," said Lisa Glaspell,
the mother of three young
boys. She just signed up
her oldest, 5-year-old
Malachi, for Trail Life.
"I'm a single parent, and
I knew he would be sur-
rounded by men of good


strong character," Glaspell
said in an interview And
I knew they could provide
him with the example and
encouragement he's going
to need as a young boy"
ME
Trail Life has just seven
paid staffers so far. It is still
working through signing up
new units and building the
infrastructure that a na-
tional youth organization
will need. The organization
is relying on a $325 char-
tering fee for new units, as
well as membership fees,
merchandise sales and
some private donations.
Stemberger said he's
heartened by the "or-
ganic" growth so far and
predicts more Scouts will
defect, particularly if BSA
eventually opens its doors
to openly gay adult lead-
ers. "When they do that,
we'll be in a position to see
real growth," he said.
The boys and their par-
ents are still getting used
to a world of new names,
new ranks and new uni-
forms that haven't arrived
yet They hold up five fin-
gers while reciting their
oath, instead of three.
Scouts are now "Trail-
men," and troops are now
units. There is a new hand-
shake and a new salute.
Trail Life has issued a
chart to help transfer
Scouting ranks into Trail
Life ranks. It has a hand-
book that covers camping,
knots and other skills fa-
miliar to any Scout. To
achieve the Freedom
Award, boys will choose
subjects for a "major" and
two "minors," something
Trail Life organizers hope
will give the boys new op-
portunities to learn and
challenge themselves.
"I see all of these ele-
ments working together to
truly build upon the foun-
dation they received in
Boy Scouts and maybe go
to a new standard as they
move forward in Trail
Life," Orr said.
It will be years before
the parents know if the
change and their effort
were worth it.


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CIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE NATION SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 A9



One term is plenty for California congresswoman


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -It
took barely a year in Con-
gress for Democrat Gloria
Negrete McLeod to decide
that she could do more for
her California constituents
by serving in county
government.
She's one of 38 House
members, including six
from California, not to seek
re-election in November,
and during her single term,
she grew frustrated
quickly with the gridlock
on Capitol Hill.
Negrete McLeod has de-
cided to run for a seat on
the board of supervisors in
sprawling San Bernardino
County, which includes dis-
tant suburbs of Los Angeles
as well as the Mojave
Desert. Before winning
election to Congress, she
had served in the Califor-
nia Legislature.
"I've been kind of agoniz-
ing over it for the last few
months," she said in an in-
terview outside the House
chambers.
In the end, she asked
herself whether she could
make a bigger difference
for her constituents work-
ing locally rather than in
Washington.
"I believe the answer is
yes," she concluded.
Is her decision yet an-
other sign that Congress is
broken, or is it simply the
difficulty of being a fresh-
man in the minority party?
Rep. George Miller, D-
Calif., who was first elected
to the House in 1975 and
also is retiring this year,
said it's the former
"I think it's a reflection
that Congress is unfortu-
nately bogged down,"


Miller said. "If you com-
pare this Congress to any
other Congress in history,
it's the worst in terms of get-
ting things done. The peo-
ple who came here with the
expectation that this would
be a vibrant legislative
process have pretty good
reason to be disappointed.
It's not a mystery that states
and municipalities are
moving much faster on
many of these issues than
the Congress is."
Whatever Negrete
McLeod's motivation, Rep.
Duncan Hunter, R-Calif.,
said he believes serving in
Congress "is a lot harder"
than being a county
supervisor
San Bernardino County
has more than 2 million
people, exceeding the pop-
ulation of about a dozen
states. For their work, the
five county supervisors
make $151,971 annually
For Negrete McLeod, that
would be a pay cut of about
$22,000 from her congres-
sional salary She'd also get
a car, or car allowance of
$14,600 a year
Of course, she wouldn't
have to deal with the grind
of flying back and forth to
Washington most weeks.
Negrete McLeod said she
was shocked by the experi-
ence of moving from the
majority in the California
Legislature to the minority
in the U.S. House.
"Except for some case
work, it's really hard to see
what you've accomplished
at the end of the day if
you're a member of the mi-
nority party in the House.
You make some speeches,
you complain about proce-
dure, but you really haven't
had much impact on public


Associated Press
Then-Rep.-elect Gloria Negrete McLeod, D-Calif. is seen
on stage Nov. 13, 2012, during a news conference with
newly elected Democratic House members on Capitol Hill
in Washington. It took barely a year in Congress for
McLeod to decide that she could do more for her
California constituents by serving in county government.


policy," said Jack Pitney, a
political science professor
at Claremont McKenna
College in California.
Supervisors can have
more of an immediate im-
pact. They get streets
widened, flood control
projects approved, public
libraries and affordable


housing built, among other
things.
"It is by no means a de-
motion," Pitney said. "She
certainly can get more done
as a supervisor than as a
junior member in the mi-
nority party in the House."
Negrete McLeod, 72, is
no stranger to politics. She


served six years in the Cal-
ifornia Assembly and six
more in the state Senate
before defeating incum-
bent Democratic Rep. Joe
Baca in 2012 in the con-
gressional race. She serves
on the Agriculture and Vet-
erans Affairs committees
in the House.
In announcing last month
that she wouldn't seek re-
election, Negrete McLeod
wasn't nearly as blunt as
Rep. John Dingell, a Michi-
gan Democrat who is retir-
ing after the longest
congressional career in his-
tory He described the job
of serving now in Congress
as "obnoxious."
The public seems to
share Dingell's assessment.
In the latest Associated
Press-GfK poll in January,
14 percent of Americans
approved of the way Con-
gress was handling its job,
84 percent disapproved.
Approval hasft topped
25 percent in the poll for
nearly three years.
The public seems to be
fonder of their local gov-


ernment. An AP-NORC
Center for Public Affairs
Research poll in December
found that only 27 percent
of Americans expressed at
least moderate confidence
that the federal govern-
ment would be able to
make progress on impor-
tant problems and issues
facing the country this year
By contrast, 54 percent had
that much confidence in
their local government to
make progress on impor-
tant local issues.
Negrete McLeod said she
came to the House well
aware of how the politics
works.
"The party in charge gets
to set the agenda, and of
course, I have very little
seniority. That's OK," she
said. "I can get along. I go to
all my committee hearings,
and so I'm a good member I
like to participate. That's
my thing."
And on her decision to
leave: "I just felt I could
better serve my con-
stituents," she said.
"That's it."


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0 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014


'OAD
Continued from Page Al

lore than 100 residents
Lcerned about traffic on
at now is a quiet coun-
lane have bombarded
inty commissioners
h emails the past two
eks, demanding that
cted leaders stop the
ject
)ut there may be little
county can do.
The community is ex-
mely upset ... but this
1 not come to the board
!ounty commissioners,"
ird Chairman John '"J"
aney said. "The only al-
native for the commu-
is to file a lawsuit."
residents such as Alan
[1 say it may come to
t
It will mean tons of traf-
on that road," Bell, a re-
,d Realtor, said. "When
retire, you retire to an
a that doesn't have tons
raffic."
MEN
)ak Village is Sugarmill
ods south of County
ad 480. Oak Village
ulevard, a one-lane-
!h-way county road with
ee-lined median main-
ied by the homeowners'
ociation, continues far-
r south of U.S. 98 to the
rnando County line.
Vell, nearly there, any-
.
'he pavement stops less
n 250 feet from the
inty line. This "stub," as
idents call it, was plat-
in the 1970s to eventu-
7 continue south for
)ther Sugarmill Woods
age. The village was
Ter built and Oak Vil-
e residents say they
Ter saw any reason to
rik the road would be
ended.
alka, meanwhile, owns
mited-liability corpora-
i called South Oak Vil-
e, which is not
mected or affiliated
h Sugarmill Woods. His
acre parcel just above
Hernando County line
actually surrounded by
,armill's Oak Village.
n 2006, Kalka had trees

See L E/Page All


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Google Maps/Chronicle illustration
A developer says he wants Oak Village Boulevard extended 213 feet to the Hernando County line to give him access to a future housing project
(inset). Residents say the extension should be denied.


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CITRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDA MARCH 2, 2014 All


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
ABOVE: Joe Dube walks Saturday along Oak Village Boulevard. Dube says the roadway
can't handle more traffic. T: Oak Village Boulevard now ends less than 250 feet
from the Hernando County line.


VILLAGE
Continued from Page Al

cut down from 18 of those
acres without a permit. He
paid the county $79,806 in
fines and liens, and a set-
tlement of the code-
enforcement case in-
cluded his promise that he
wouldn't apply to develop
the property without giv-
ing residents in Oak Vil-
lage 60 days' notice first,
according to county
records.
MEN
Kalka's application to
extend the boulevard
makes no mention of why
he wants the extension,
and it doesn't have to.
County Development
and Planning Director
Jenette Collins said that
Kalka need only show that
the road will be built to
county standards. She said
the decision rests with the
county's Land Develop-
ment Division and the ap-
plication is pending.
Collins' email response
to residents complaining
about the permit applica-
tion said the road exten-
sion issue stands alone.
"... There have appar-
ently been some rumors in
the community that the
roadway will be used for


I would love to see him come
in from a different angle.

John "JJ" Kenney
Citrus County commissioner, about developer Nachum Kalka's
plan to extend Oak Village Boulevard to access his property.


access to a nearby 40-acre
parcel lying outside of
Sugarmill Woods but
within Citrus County," she
wrote. "To date our office
has not received any ap-
plications for development
of that parcel."
Bell said the county
should look at the broader
picture.
"What I believe he's try-
ing to do is not associate
the 40 acres with this,"
Bell said.
Kalka said it's the only
way he can connect a
county road to his property.
Once the boulevard is ex-
tended, Kalka said he will
ask Hernando County for
permission to connect the
boulevard to his property
so that when developed,
new homeowners can get
access to U.S. 98 from Oak
Village Boulevard.
Kalka heads another
corporation, New Seville
2011 Development, which
owns The Dunes golf
course in north Hernando
County


Bell said Kalka should
use the Hernando prop-
erty he owns to build a
road to the 40 acres near
Sugarmill.
Commissioner Kenney,
who lives in Oak Village,
said he hopes as well that
Kalka finds an alternative.
"I would love to see him
come in from a different
angle," Kenney said.
Kalka said he believes
the housing market will
move upward in about a
year, which is his timeline
for making a land-use
application.
He said the new commu-
nity will be designed to the
same standards that Sug-
armill Woods residents
have come to know
"I don't see any reason
anyone will object," he
said, adding: "There are
people who would object
to anything you're trying to
do."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.


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The middle can be an
amazing new beginning...

Seven Rivers Christian
Middle School


Entering middle school can be a daunting thought.
Will I be bullied? Ostracized? Fit in? Have Friends?
Will I be safe? Will teachers be glad to teach me?

At Seven Rivers, middle school is an exciting
beginning. We want the opportunity to present you
with a middle school experience that is safe,
exciting, and challenging with lots of opportunities
in academia, the arts, and athletics. So come join
us in the middle...it's a great time to begin at
Seven Rivers!


Middle School Warriors take to the field


Seven Rivers Christian School is not bound to state
mandates such as FCAT, Common Core, or end-of-
course tests, yet we produce AP scholars, dual
enrollment and honor graduates who get accepted
every year to many colleges, universities, and military
academies including every public university in Florida.
Seven Rivers Christian School is accredited
by the following agencies:
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools/
AdvanceEd
Christian Schools of Florida
The National Council for Private SchoolAccreditation
The faculty of Seven Rivers loves who they teach and
what they teach. All are degreed with 40% having a
master's degree or higher.


Mr. ielson teacnng te o t grade boys nistory class


At Seven Rivers Middle You'll Find
- An outstanding English program that prepares
students for the rigors of high school
- Algebra I for 8th graders, allowing them to earn high
school credit as middle schoolers
" Small mentoring groups, where the student is paired
with a teacher and group of peers, to foster
friendships and build relationships
" Gender split classes where boys and girls in middle
school can focus on...school
" A sports program geared especially for middle
school students
" Solid Biblical instruction from a faculty that includes
pastors and church elders
" Well supervised, structured, fun, social events
" An opportunity to join the band or tryout for the latest
drama performance
" Chances to get out of oneself and serve in the
community or on campus
" A comfortable, community environment with highly
structured classes and instruction
" Academic advisor offering college prep meetings
uniquiely tailored to 8th grade students and parents
" Moms in Prayer mothers of faith gathering weekly
on campus to pray for your children


Students study compounds in science class
Our students have been admitted to every single
public college/university in the state of Florida
as well as out-of-state colleges including:


Middle School band students perform at the Christmas concert.

Accepting Applications NOW for the 2014-15
school year. Stop by the school for
enrollment application or visit our web site.
www.sevenriverscs.org


,-American University, DC
o. Auburn University, AL
o. Berry College, GA
o. College of Charleston, SC
o. Covenant College, GA
o. Emory University, GA
o. Erskine College, SC
o. Kent State, OH
mo New York University, NY
o. North Carolina
State University


Rutgers University, NJ
P St. John's University, NY
P University of Alabama
P. University of Georgia
o University of Kentucky
m- University of Tennessee
m- U.S. Air Force
Academy, CO
P U.S. Coast Guard
Academy, CT
m Wheaton College, IL


Seven Rivers Christian School admits students of any race,
color and national or ethnic origin.


Some classes are already filling to capacity. Enroll now to ensure your child's seat in the coming school year.


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families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship.


M -1,111,1 S -l"Ill"I


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts and
minds of children
with a distinctly biblical program
of academic rigor, artistic
beauty, and athletic competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


2SUNDAYMARCH 2, 2014


00OH6C




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Party atmosphere


marks Iditarod's


ceremonial start


Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska
- Hoards of dogs, mush-
ers and their eager fans
mingled Saturday at the
jovial celebratory kickoff
of the Iditarod Trail Sled
Dog Race in Anchorage.
Sixty-nine mushers and
their teams of 16 dogs each
inundated Alaska's largest
city for the annual cere-
monial start of the race in
a fan-friendly atmosphere.
The real race starts
today, 50 miles north of
Anchorage.
Early Saturday morning,
musher trucks lined city
streets, and fans like Nancy
Alstrand of San Diego spent
hours meandering from
musher to musher, stopping
to chat or pet dogs.
'"Absolutely love the
dogs," Alstrand said
shortly after taking a pic-
ture of one Husky with her
iPad. "It infects you, their
energy does, and it just
makes you so happy"
Her brother lives in
Healy, Alaska, and they in-
tend to make attending the
Iditarod start an annual
family reunion.
Later in the morning,
mushers left the starting
gate two minutes apart in
the staggered launch to the
race. Each carried an "Id-
itarider," a person who
won their seat on the sled
in an auction.
The mushers take a
leisurely 11-mile jaunt on
urban trails within the city
ofAnchorage. Snow had to
be trucked in to cover the
streets of downtown An-
chorage until mushers
could get on the trail
system.
A lack of snow and warm
temperatures have been a
headache for Iditarod offi-
cials this winter. In fact,
temperatures in Anchor-
age were in the mid- to
upper 40s in the days pre-
ceding the start.


Officials had considered
moving the official starting
point hundreds of miles
north to Fairbanks, but
said conditions had im-
proved in the weeks ahead
of the race to keep it in Wil-
low, outside of Anchorage.
Concerns about the trail
were in areas south of the
Alaska Range and in the
mountains themselves, race
marshal Mark Nordman
said. But snow and espe-
cially colder temperatures
after a long January thaw
have alleviated worries
there and in areas such as
the Yentna River
"I think the thousand-
mile wilderness trail is
going to be a little bit of
mystery no matter what, if
it's warm or if it's cold, or
it's windy, or if it's rain-
ing," said musher Aily
Zirkle of Two Rivers.
Zirkle has finished second
each of the last two races.
"Every single year, I
have to say, I go into it
thinking, 'What is it going
to be like?' And I don't
think this year is any dif-
ferent I think it's going to
be hard, tough."
Another fan favorite is
veteran musher DeeDee
Jonrowe, a breast cancer
survivor whose signature
piece of apparel is a hot
pink parka.
"We've been out there a
lot of years, I've seen them
all," she said of trail condi-
tions. "I'm sure it's not
going to be anything I
haven't seen at some point
of my career"
There are six former
champions in the field, in-
cluding defending cham-
pion Mitch Seavey, also the
2004 winner
"We've had really good
training, real good condi-
tioning," Seavey told re-
porters. "We've been able
to get all our training done,
all our miles. I feel really
ready, and real happy with
my team."


City to taxis: Step off it


NYC eyes plans to

slow speeding cabs

Associated Press


NEW YORK Perpetually
rushed New Yorkers have been
telling cabbies to "step on it" for as
long as there have been taxis, but
the city wants to brake that hurry-
up habit, in part by attacking the fi-
nancial incentive to speed.
Cabs could be outfitted with
black-box-style data recorders and
devices that would sound warnings
- or even pause the fare meter-
for going too fast, even as speed lim- Taxis pa
its on most city streets would drop proposal
from 30 to 25 mph. financial
Mayor Bill de Blasio, who made toll meto
the proposals as part of his broader much of
safe-streets plan, says drivers of
New York's signature yellow cabs biggest
rightly should play a particular role all-time
in his push to curb traffic crashes. cials red
"They set the tone on our streets," sections
de Blasio said. But rece
While traffic advocates applaud pushed t
the ideas, they are getting a bumpy Nine-y
reception at taxi stands. Cabbies fear in a Mai
friction with passengers and feel his father
they're being scapegoated, and riders ing taxi I
say they're torn between the drive for Coope
safety and the need for speed. was tick(
"When I'm in a rush, anything is nally ch
appreciated," New Yorker Emily are still
Baltimore said as she waited in a rent ru
cab line outside Penn Station this grounds
week. clean lic
New York's Taxi and Limousine Coope
Commission says it is still exploring need to
the ideas, which would require a making
range of approvals. The traffic "They
safety plan also includes more taxi- in the c
rule enforcers, stiffer penalties for drivers,
cabbies' driving violations and chothere
many provisions aimed at all cars, is tough
not just taxis. crashes,
Deadly auto wrecks have other te
dropped sharply in the nation's driving.


Associated Press
ss through New York's Times Square on Thursday. Under ambitious
s that seek to get New York City cabs to slow down by taking the
incentive out of speeding, black boxes inside cabs would shut the
er off whenever a cab goes above the posted limit 25 mph in
Manhattan and drivers would be alerted they are going too fast.


city, from 701 in 1990 to an
low of 249 in 2011, as offi-
designed dangerous inter-
and made other changes.
ent pedestrian deaths have
the issue to the forefront.
year-old Cooper Stock was
nhattan crosswalk, holding
her's hand, when a left-turn-
hit them Jan. 10.
er was killed. The driver
eted but hasn't been crimi-
larged, though authorities
investigating. Under cur-
les, the accident wasn't
to suspend his otherwise
cense.
her's mother says cabbies
be held accountable for
streets safer
should be the best drivers
ity. They are professional
'said Dana Lerner, a psy-
apist. While her main goal
her consequences for taxi
she feels black boxes and
chnology could deter bad


The results would ripple through
traffic, as cabbies' driving "dictates
behavioral norms to other drivers,"
said Paul Steely White, who runs
Transportation Alternatives, a
group backing de Blasio's plan.
While New York's more than
50,000 cabbies may have a hard-dri-
ving image, they note they have
eight hours a day worth of reasons
to be careful.
Just about 4 percent of the roughly
200,000 vehicles involved in acci-
dents citywide last year were yellow
cabs, according to an Associated
Press analysis of police statistics.
A 2004 study showed taxis had a
below-average crash rate, on a per-
mile-driven basis, though a 2010
city report suggests they play a big-
ger role in collisions that kill or se-
riously injure pedestrians. Taxi and
car-service cabs were involved in 13
percent of those crashes, though
they account for only about 2 per-
cent of the cars on the road, the
Transportation Department report
showed.


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NATION


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 A13


/1,i








Saturated slopes worry California cities


Associated Press

,OS ANGELES Satu-
ed mountainsides
med over foothill com-
nities on Saturday as a
rm centered off Califor-
rotated bands of rain
a state that sorely
ds the moisture but not
3uch dangerously high
es.
evacuationn orders re-
ined in effect for hun-
ds of homes in Los
seles County foothill
nmunities where fires
Te burned away vegeta-
1 that holds soil in place,
I bursts of rain caused
mountains to belch oc-
ional debris flows.
'he storm marked a
trp departure from
ny months of drought
t has grown to crisis
portions for the state's
t farming industry.
wever, such storms
uld have to become
nmon to make serious
oads against the
ught, weather forecast-
have said.
)fficials warned that de-
te lengthy lulls, more
ivy downpours are ex-
,ted, and they urged
idents who left their
nes as much as three
Ts earlier to be patient.
These mountains are


Associated Press
A woman walks over mud and debris Saturday at the corner of Sierra Madre Avenue and Highcrest Road along the
hillside in Glendora, Calif. A burst of heavy showers before dawn impacted wildfire-scarred mountainsides above
foothill suburbs east of Los Angeles, causing another round of mud and debris flows in the city of Glendora.


now saturated and soaked.
We know where the mud's
gonna go, we just don't
how much and what the in-
tensity is going to be," As-
sistant Chief Steve Martin


of the Los Angeles County
Fire Department told a
webcast news conference.
The National Weather
Service said the storm is
forecast to move east over


the Rockies and into the
Plains and Mississippi Val-
ley through Sunday, bring-
ing a hodgepodge of
precipitation. Colorado's
ski resorts could see up to


6 inches of fresh snow. A
mixture of sleet and snow
in Kansas, Missouri and
Illinois will eventually
change over to all snow -
with up to 8 inches fore-


cast for Kansas City and St.
Louis area while north-
ern Arkansas will see
freezing rain. The system
also has its sights set on
the Appalachians and the
East Coast into Monday
The storm's eastward
move on Saturday finally
broke a 70-day streak with-
out precipitation in the
Phoenix area. An 85-day
spell of no measureable
rainfall in Las Vegas ended
Friday. Rain and snow also
finally came to drought-
stricken New Mexico.
In California, about
1,200 houses in the adja-
cent cities of Azusa and
Glendora as well as
nearby Monrovia have
been under evacuation
orders because of the
possibility of destructive
flows from the San
Gabriel Mountains, a
rugged range largely cov-
ered by the Angeles Na-
tional Forest. A dozen
homes in Azusa were in
particular danger.
Glendora City Manager
Chris Jeffers said experts
planned to study the con-
dition of slopes where rain
had fallen at the rate of 1.3
inches an hour at times.
The storm was the much
more powerful second act
of two systems that hit Cal-
ifornia during the week.


lontana avalanche rescue Navy ship commissioned

included neighborhood as tribute to Flight 93

Associated Press


rescue officials said about 100 neigh-
-s converged to help find three people
ied Friday when an avalanche swept
vn a mountain in a residential area of
;soula in western Montana and
shed a house at the bottom.
It was very chaotic but a lot of energy,"
I Jeff Brandt, assistant chief of opera-
is for the Missoula Fire Department.
cores of neighbors had already
rted the rescue effort when he arrived
)ut half an hour after the slide, and
ae 20 professional responders helped
ivide focus to the effort, Brandt said.
8-year-old boy was pulled from the
lw just as he arrived, he said.
'he three people remained hospital-
I Saturday, a day after the avalanche
I down 4,768-foot Mount Jumbo into
northeast Missoula neighborhood, a


Associated Press
Rescuers dig frantically Friday at the
scene of an avalanche in Missoula
Montana's Rattlesnake Valley, looking for
a boy buried in the snow.
St. Patrick Hospital spokeswoman said.
Fred Allendorf, 66, a retired professor
from the University of Montana, is in seri-
ous condition while his wife, Michel
Colville, is in critical condition, hospital
spokeswoman JoAnn Hoven said. The boy,
who hasn't been named, is in fair condition.


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Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA- A
new U.S. Navy ship
named to honor 40 pas-
sengers and crew killed
when their hijacked
United Airlines flight
crashed as they fought
with terrorists during the
Sept. 11 attacks was put
into service Saturday in
Philadelphia.
The USS Somerset is
named for the southwest-
ern Pennsylvania county
where Flight 93 crashed.


The amphibious transport
dock warship was formally
commissioned in front of
more than 5,000 spectators
at Penn's Landing.
"What we commemo-
rate is not that war or an
attack on America," said
Sen. Pat Toomey "We
commemorate the day
America began to fight
back."
The Somerset is the
third ship to be named in
honor of 9/11 victims, join-
ing the USS New York
and USS Arlington, which


honor those killed in the
World Trade Center tow-
ers and the Pentagon dur-
ing the attacks.
After its crew manned
the ship, the Somerset's
commanding officer, Capt.
Thomas Dearborn, said,
"Somerset, let's roll," pay-
ing homage to Flight 93
passenger Todd Beamer's
famous rallying cry.
Beamer helped lead the
passenger rebellion that
led to the plane crashing
about 50 miles southeast
of Pittsburgh.


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NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New Egyptian cabinet sworn in 4


Associated Press

CAIRO Egypt's new
interim government was
sworn in Saturday, a lightly
reshuffled Cabinet with fa-
miliar faces that keeps
powerful ministers in
charge of the country's se-
curity and military serv-
ices in place ahead of an


anticipated presidential
election.
The new Cabinet,
Egypt's sixth government
since its 2011 revolt
against autocrat Hosni
Mubarak, retains Field
Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-
Sissi as defense minister.
Many believe the wildly
popular el-Sissi, who led


the July 3 overthrow of Is-
lamist President Mo-
hammed Morsi, will run
for president.
The change of govern-
ment before the presiden-
tial vote appeared
orchestrated to curb rising
criticism of the outgoing
military-backed Cabinet,
which was accused of fail-


ing to stem widening labor
strikes and continued
protests. The new lineup
by new interim Prime Min-
ister Ibrahim Mehlib
largely removed Cabinet
members belonging to po-
litical parties formed after
the 2011 revolt, replacing
them with technocrats or
businessmen.


Associated Press
Interim Egyptian President Adly Mansour, center, Field
Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, fifth from right, and new
interim Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehlib, fifth from left, pose
Saturday with the new cabinet ministers.


Pakistani Taliban


to observe one


month cease-fire


Associated Press

PESHAWAR, Pakistan
- The Pakistani Taliban
announced Saturday that
the group will observe a
one month cease-fire as
part of efforts to negotiate
a peace deal with the gov-
ernment, throwing
new life into a
foundering peace
process.
Spokesman
Shahidullah
Shahid said in a
statement emailed
to reporters that the
top leadership of Shahi
the militant group Sha
has instructed all of Talit
its units to comply spoke
with the cease-fire.
"Tehrik-e-Taliban Pak-
istan has initiated talks
with the government with
sincerity and for good pur-
pose," Shahid said, refer-
ring to the group by its
formal name.
The leader of the gov-
ernment's negotiating
team, Irfan Sadiqui,
praised the cease-fire an-
nouncement while speak-
ing on Pakistan's Geo
Television, saying the gov-
ernment will review any
written document from the
Taliban about it.
In recent weeks, Pak-
istani jets and helicopters
have been striking militant
hideouts in the northwest,
after previous efforts at


negotiations broke down
when a militant faction an-
nounced it had killed 23
Pakistani troops.
The Pakistani Taliban
has been trying to over-
throw the government and
establish its own hard-line
form of Islam across Pak-
istan for years.
Tens of thousands
of people have died
in militant attacks.
Prime Minister
Nawaz Sharif has
long promoted ne-
gotiations over
military opera-
dullah tions as a way to
hid end the ongoing
ban crisis. His efforts
sman. gained speed this
year when both sides an-
nounced negotiating
teams held initial meet-
ings. But negotiations fell
apart after the deaths of
the 23 Pakistani troops,
and Sharif has been under
pressure to retaliate for
any Taliban violence.
Critics of the peace
process say militants have
used previous negotiations
to simply regroup. They
also question whether
there is room to negotiate
with militants who don't
recognize the Pakistani
constitution. The militants
in the past have also called
for the removal of all mili-
tary forces in the tribal
areas as well as an end to
American drone strikes.


Ward



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NATION


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W ORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ration BRIEFS

Pileup


WordBRIEFS


Cigar fest


Associated Press
urgency workers
pond Saturday to a
ssive pileup accident
Interstate 25 in
iver. Authorities said
; person was killed and
others were injured.


Noman claims
university's art
tolen by Nazis
)KLAHOMA CITY -
more than a decade,
University of Oklahoma
exhibited a piece of
.-looted artwork be-
athed to it by the wife
,n oil tycoon.
eone Meyer, who lives
rance and is Jewish,
sued the university in
v York federal court to
the 1886 Camille Pis-
-o painting "Shep-
less Bringing in Sheep"
k. It belonged to her
ants before World War

he school maintains it is
rightful owner, citing a
ss court decision from
3 that found post-war
iers had done their due
lence.
,aron and Clara
itzenhoffer bought the
citing in 1956. Clara
d it to the university
,n her death in 2000.
University President
fid Boren said the uni-
;ity must avoid setting a
precedent.
ston's St. Pat's
irade to feature
3y military vets
OSTON A marriage
ality group said Boston's
1atrick's Day parade is
ing its two-decade ban
lay organizations.
MassEquality official
I Saturday a group of
military veterans can
'ch under its banner as
[ of a deal brokered by
ton Mayor Martin
sh. But marchers from
gay-rights group would
be allowed to wear
hing or hold signs that
r to sexual orientation.
Valsh had threatened to
cott the city annual pa-
unless gay groups are
wed to march. He told
Boston Globe the
ement is a break-
ugh.
spokeswoman for
sh did not immediately
iment to The Associated
ss. A message left for a
3de organizer was not
iediately returned.
he parade draws an es-
ited one million specta-
to South Boston every
r.
Boy, 8, fatally
ihot by brother
'INCINNATI -Authori-
said an 8-year-old
cinnati boy was fatally
t after one of his broth-
was playing with a
led handgun that he be-
ed was a BB gun.
'incinnati Police Lt. Don
k told the Cincinnati En-
'er the three boys were



























:ing an uncle when one
ed the trigger of a hand-
that they thought was a
gun and hit Sammy



























nzo in the chest Satur-
afternoon.



























*he boy was taken to
cinnati Children's Hospi-
nd rushed into surgery,
later died.
uck said that no
rges are expected
inst the children and
it's too early to tell



























;ther charges will be
against any adults.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Police officers investigate the crime scene Saturday outside a railway station after an attack by knife-
wielding men left 28 people dead in Kunming, in southwestern China's Yunnan province.




Terrorists kill 28





in train station


Associated Press

BEIJING- More than
10 knife-wielding attack-
ers slashed people at a
train station in south-
western China late
Saturday in what author-
ities called a terrorist at-
tack, and police fatally
shot five of the as-
sailants, leaving 28 peo-
ple dead and 113
injured, state media
said.
The attackers, most of
them dressed in black,
stormed the Kunming
Train Station in Yunnan
Province and started at-
tacking people in the
late evening, witness
Yang Haifei told the offi-
cial Xinhua News
Agency in an interview
from a hospital where he


was being treated for
chest and back wounds.
"I saw a person come
straight at me with a long
knife and I ran away
with everyone," he told
Xinhua, adding that peo-
ple who were slower
ended up severely in-
jured. "They just fell on
the ground," Yang said.
Xinhua did not iden-
tify who might have been
responsible for the at-
tack, but said authorities
considered it to be "an
organized, premeditated
violent terrorist attack."
In an indication of
how seriously authori-
ties viewed the attack -
one of China's deadliest
in recent years the
country's top police offi-
cial, Politburo member
Meng Jianzhu, was en


route to Kunming, the
Communist Party-run
People's Daily reported.
The violence in Kun-
ming came at a sensitive
time as political leaders
in Beijing prepared for
Wednesday's opening of
the annual meeting of
the nominal legislature
where the government of
President Xi Jinping
will deliver its first one-
year work report
Xi called for "all-out
efforts" to bring the cul-
prits to justice.
A Xinhua reporter on
the scene in Kunming
said several suspects had
been "controlled" while
police continued their in-
vestigation of people at
the train station. The re-
porter said firefighters
and emergency medical


personnel were at the sta-
tion and rushing injured
people to hospitals for
treatment
The authorities said
five suspects were shot
dead but that their identi-
ties had not yet been con-
firmed, Xinhua reported.
Overall, 28 people were
confirmed dead and 113
injured, it said.
State media outlets
did not immediately cite
a motive for the attack or
say what group might be
behind it, but they typi-
cally use the phrase "ter-
rorist" for attacks
blamed on separatists
from the far western re-
gion of Xinjiang, home to
a simmering rebellion
against Chinese rule
among parts of the Mus-
lim Uighur population.


Russian troops take over Crimea


Associated Press

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine Russ-
ian troops took over Crimea as the
parliament in Moscow gave Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin a green light
Saturday to use the military to pro-
tect Russian interests in Ukraine.
The newly installed government in
Kiev was powerless to react to the
action by Russian troops based in
the strategic region and more flown
in, aided by pro-Russian Ukrainian
groups.
Putin sought and quickly got his
parliament's approval to use its mil-
itary to protect Russia's interests
across Ukraine. But while some-
times-violent pro-Russian protests
broke out Saturday in a number of
Russian-speaking regions of eastern
Ukraine, Moscow's immediate focus
appeared to be Crimea.
Tensions increased when
Ukraine's acting president, Olek-
sandr Turchynov, made a late night
announcement that he had ordered
the country's armed forces to be at
full readiness because of the threat
of "potential aggression."
Speaking live on Ukrainian TV,
Turchynov he had also ordered
stepped-up security at nuclear


Associated Press
Troops in unmarked uniforms stand guard Saturday in Balaklava while people
walk in a street on the outskirts of Sevastopol, Ukraine.


power plants, airports and other
strategic infrastructure.
Ignoring President Barack
Obama's warning Friday that "there
will be costs" if Russia intervenes
militarily, Putin sharply raised the
stakes in the conflict over Ukraine's
future, evoking memories of Cold
War brinkmanship.


After Russia's parliament ap-
proved Putin's motion, U.S. officials
held a high-level meeting at the
White House to review Russia's mil-
itary moves in Ukraine. The U.N.
Security Council started an open
and televised meeting on the grow-
ing crisis in Ukraine, despite objec-
tions from Russia.


Obama to push minimum wage in Conn.


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Striv-
ing to show momentum on
a top legislative priority,
President Barack Obama
is appearing next week
with Northeastern gover-
nors who back his push to
raise the federal minimum
wage to $10.10 an hour and
will pledge to lift the earn-
ings of the lowest-paid
workers in their states to
at least the same level.
Obama planned an ap-
pearance Wednesday at
Central Connecticut State


University in New Britain
with Democratic Govs.
Dannel Malloy of Con-
necticut, Deval Patrick of
Massachusetts, Peter
Shumlin of Vermont and
Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln
Chafee.
A higher minimum wage
and an overhaul of immi-
gration laws are Obama
priorities, but it remains
doubtful whether lawmak-
ers will send him either
piece of legislation this
year, particularly when the
entire House and one-
third of the Senate are up


for re-election.
A Senate-passed immi-
gration bill is stalled in the
House, while Republicans
oppose raising the federal
minimum wage from $7.25
an hour, arguing that jobs
will be eliminated, unem-
ployment will rise and the
economy will suffer if the
government forces busi-
nesses to cut bigger pay-
checks for their workers.
The White House be-
lieves momentum for a
higher minimum wage is
building, however, and
wants to keep the pressure


on Congress, in part to
help draw distinctions be-
tween the political parties
for November's voters.
"It is time to give Amer-
ica a raise or elect more
Democrats who will do it,"
Obama told Democrats at
the party's winter meeting
Friday in Washington.
Officials note that Cali-
fornia, Connecticut,
Delaware, New York, New
Jersey and Rhode Island
have raised the minimum
wage since early 2013,
when Obama first called
on Congress to increase it.


Associated Press
Welsh crooner Tom Jones
smokes a cigar during a
gala dinner marking the
end of the 16th annual
Cigar Festival in Havana,
Cuba.

Humidor auction
tops $1.1M
HAVANA- Cigar enthu-
siasts paid more than E$1.1
million for six handmade
Cuban humidors early Sat-
urday at the gala closing of
Havana's 16th annual Cigar
Festival.
The hot item was a one-
of-a-kind handcrafted humi-
dor packed with Monte-
cristo cigars that fetched
$235,000.
Welsh crooner Tom
Jones was among the invi-
tees at Saturday's auction
and sang three songs for at-
tending guests, including his
signature "It's Not Unusual."
"I love Cuban cigars to
start with. I started smoking
Cuban cigars in the '60s
and I've never been to
Cuba before. So this was a
wonderful opportunity to
come," Jones said.
The most expensive
Cuban cigars, currently the
Cohiba Behike, can cost
upward of $69 each in Eu-
rope and Canada.
Officials said this week
that sales of Cuban cigars
rose 8 percent last year, de-
spite increasing anti-
smoking measures around
the world, continued reces-
sion fears in Europe and the
U.S. embargo which bars
Americans from purchasing
island-made stogies.
While Europe remains the
top market for Cuban dgar
brands, sales in Asian nations
induding China are growing.
Proceeds from the auction
were to go to Cuba's state-
run health care system.
Doctors Without
Borders can stay
in Myanmar
YANGON, Myanmar-A
day after Doctors Without
Borders announced it was
being expelled from Myan-
mar, the government said
Saturday that negotiations
with the group were ongo-
ing and that it may be al-
lowed to resume operations
everywhere but Rakhine, a
state plagued by bloody
bouts of sectarian violence.
After intense international
pressure, presidential
spokesman Ye Htut told
The Associated Press that
Rakhine's government had
asked for the humanitarian
group's operations to be
suspended in the state, but
that its work would not be
disrupted elsewhere in the
country.
All of the aid group's clin-
ics in Myanmar were closed
Friday.
The group was told earlier
in the week that its license
was being revoked, in part
because it was hiring "Ben-
galis," the name Myanmar's
government uses to refer to
the long-persecuted Ro-
hingya ethnic Muslim minority.
Four crushed in
Carnival parade
LA PAZ, Bolivia Boli-
vian authorities said four
people were killed and
more than 60 injured when
an overloaded metal foot-
bridge collapsed onto a
group of musicians march-
ing in the opening parade of
Carnival in the highlands
city of Oruro.
Interior Minister Carlos
Romero said three of the
dead were musicians.
-From wire reports














EXCURSIONS


I rt


Efforts to turn the seaside village

of Loreto into a major destination

have been going on for years. So

far, though, the results have been

limited, and that in itself makes it

worth visiting.

Loreto is already a gem


a historic town nestled between

gold-hued mountains and the blue

Sea of Cortez. It's known mainly to

whale watchers (late winter), sport

fishermen (year-round) and

snowbirds who drive down from

British Columbia, Canada.


LORETO, Mexico
oreto was earmarked for tourism de-
velopment 30 years ago, part of an ini-
tiative that also included Cancun,
Ixtapa, parts of Oaxaca and Los Cabos.
While the others flourished, the develop-
ment of Loreto faltered.
In a renewed effort two years ago, Mex-
ico's tourism agency gave Loreto its "Magic
Town" moniker, a label to promote places
notable for natural beauty, cultural riches
or historical relevance. Still, the interna-
tional airport here welcomed only about
40,000 tourists last year, compared to the
million or so who flew to Los Cabos, 300


Karen Schwartz
Associated Press
miles to the south.
And there are no cruise ships. Instead,
there is the Loreto Bay National Marine
Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site made
up of five islands accessible only by boat.
I heard about Loreto by chance, and vis-
ited for a week this winter After a 90-
minute flight from Los Angeles the only
U.S. gateway at present- we found a town
seemingly frozen by the economic down-
turn, with half-built hotels and empty store-
fronts.


We also found a bit of "old" Mexico. There
are a fair number of people who speak no
English, friendly ex-pats happy to offer sug-
gestions, a scattering of small festivals, a
soccer stadium with spirited games, and a
local mariachi band that plays in khakis, not
costumes.
Here are some highlights:

History:
Loreto became the first Spanish settle-
ment on the Baja California Peninsula
when Jesuits missionaries established the


3/Page A20


Associated Press
The Mission of Our Lady of Loreto in Loreto, Mexico, sits in a seaside village on the Baja peninsula. When Jesuits missionaries established
the mission in 1697, it became the first Spanish settlement on the peninsula.


4iiiii......i




CiTus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UNDAY EVENING MARCH 2,2014 C: Conmwos Citrus B: Bright House DII: Conast, Dunnellon & Inglis F. Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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OF __ NB 8 8 8 8 8yNews Vocalists compete in blind auditions. 'PG' Program
On the Red Carpet at Oscars Red Carpet Live! (N) (In The Oscars Honors for achievements in film. (N) (In Stereo Live) '14, News
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CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News 6pm (N) Stereo) N 'PG' ] meets Red John. '14' Decision Tree"' PG' 11pm (N5 Program
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11 11 11 News Stereo Live) 'PG, L Nc D,L,V' cc
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370 271 370 Who" Thornton. 'R' c 'MA' cc *MA' cc Sandier. (In Stereo) PG-13' cc *MA'
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36 31 36 Shape TV Tales Skns Live! From the Pepsi Center in Denver. Live! Lightning Lightning
SY 31 59 31 26 29 **** "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981, Adventure) "The Last Airbender" (2010, Fantasy) *** "The Prestige"
g Harrison Ford, Karen Alien, Paul Freeman. PG I Noah Ringer, Dev Patel. PC' (2006) 'PG-13'
49 23 49 16 19 ** "Zoolander"(2001) Ben Stiller. "Anchorman: Legend of Ron" "Anchorman:Legend ofRon"
**** "Lawrence ofArabia" (1962, ****"Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935, Adventure) Charles *** "Captain Blood" (1935)
169 53 169 30 35 Adventure) Peter OToole. PG cc Laughton, Clark Gable. 'NR' (DVS) Errol Flynn.'NR' N
Epic Tech Homes (In Epic Houseboats (In Buying the Bayou (In Buying the Bayou (In Buyingthe Bayou (In Buying the Bayou (In
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) G' cc Stereo) G' cc Stereo) Stecc Stereo) NG' c Stereo *G' cc Stereo) 'G' c
(tD 50 46 50 29 30 My 600-Lb. Life 'PG' My 600-Lb. Life 'PG My 600-Lb. Life 'PG' My 600- Lb. Life 'PG' My 600Lb. Life PG My 600-Lb. Life 'PG'
*** "Gosford Park" (2001, Mystery) Eileen *** "Seven Psychopaths" (2012) Colin *** "Killing Them Softly"(2012) "Dazed &
350Atkins, Alan Bates. (In Stereo) R' cc Farrell. Premiere. (In Stereo) NR' c Brad Pitt. 'R Conf.
** "Cowboys & Aliens" (201 1) Daniel Craig, **** "ET the Extra-Terrestrial" (1982) Henry Thomas. A **** "E.. the Extra-Terrestrial"
af) 48 33 48 31 34 Harrison For.'PG-1' IDS) California boy befriends a homesick alien. (1982) 'PG'
38 58 38 33 "The Smuffs"(2011 HankAzaria. Steven Teen Kng/Hill IKing/Hill Burgers Burgers Fam.Guy IFam.Guy
TJW{jJ 9 106 9 44 Caribbean Escapes Jamaica: Paradise Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Castle Secrets Mysteries-Museum
25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Killer Karaoke'14' truTV To Funniest World's Dumbest...
32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan's island'G' Gillian Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Paymond IRaymond mond IRaymond Paymond Raymond
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47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14" Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit '14
CSI: Miami "Hell Night' CSI: Miami Speed-dat- CSI: Miami "Pirated" (In CSI: Miami "Afterthe CSI: Miami "Addiction" CSI: Miami Gan-
117 69 117 '14'c ing. 14' 1 Stereo)'14'[c Fail''14', 1 14'mc related gunplay.14'
WGN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny HomeVideos *** "The Matrix" (1999) Keanu Reeves.'R'N ** "Flightplan"


Don't contact



dad's children


D earAnnie: I re-
cently decided to
do a little digging
into my past and started
a family tree. While I
was doing this, I came
across information that
my biological father had
passed away some 10
years ago.
Annie, I had no con-
tact with my biological
father after the age of 2.
He had an af-
fair with my
mother and
then went
back to his
wife. I don't -
even know
what he
looked like.
In all honesty,
I have no
feelings
about his
passing. I AN NI
have never
regretted not MAl
meeting him.
The reason I am writ-
ing is that he had two
children by the woman
he was married to while
seeing my mother on the
side. I doubt they even
know that my two
younger brothers and I
exist, especially since he
went out of his way to
deny having fathered us
in the first place.
My mother suggested I
contact these now-grown
children and let them
know about us. I do not
think this is a good idea
and prefer to leave well
enough alone. Your
thoughts? Curious in
Minnesota
Dear Curious: We


II
L.I


agree with you to leave
things alone. We assume
you have relevant med-
ical information about
your biological father
Does your mother have a
photograph of him so
you can satisfy any cu-
riosity you have about
what he looked like?
These children may
deeply resent learning
that their father had an
affair that pro-
duced siblings,
and developing
a relationship
with you could
be too painful
for them. If
they do know
about you, they
can do the
same search
you are consid-
ering, so we'd
IE'S let them make
that decision.
BOX DearAnnie:
"Concerned in
Galesburg, Ill." disap-
proved of parents taking
photographs of their ba-
bies without clothing on.
We once had an attorney
general who went
around putting diapers
on statues of naked peo-
ple. I've often wondered
who his constituents
were. Babies Are
Adorable
Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar Email annies
mailbox@comcastnet,
or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254.


Tot/a> MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13)
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Anchorman 2 Recut" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 2 p.m., 8 p.m.
No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 5 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13) 1:50
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 4:30 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
1:40 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,


4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"LEGO" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Non-Stop" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 4:10 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Son of God" (PG-13) 12:30
p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ROSS
Rorqual
Dishonor
Small fish
Alloy of copper and zinc
of Troy
Kind of bear
Peace goddess
Lawful
Furious
Degrade
Dead language
Call forth
Thumb
Contemptuous sound
Spiked club of old
Health resort
Certain voter (Abbr.)
Sufficient
Raise up
Equipment
Skill
Go off course
Saved by the -
DDE, familiarly
Color
Oregon's capital
Greek epic
Climbed
Hideout
Bewildered
Drive too fast
Brick material
Pie - -
Call - day
Pied -
Mine's output
Beer or ale
Estuary
Neighbor of Cal.
"- Well That Ends Well"
Whistle sound
Tap
John Jacob -
Bridge support
Satiate
School subject
English poet
Old possessive
Departed
Legal tender
Private room
Debate
Do in
Hearts or clubs, e.g.
C-note


Damaged by fire
Chum
Ringlet
Term in tennis
- Baba
Mineral
Abbr. in citations
Not single-sex
Got along
Play on words
Papal residence
State near Cal.
Nobleman
Ebb or neap
Ardor
Bank worker
Vast multitude
Worn out
Set of parts
Four-poster
Go down
Easier said done
Craze
Disordered state
Overturn
Pressing
Frozen dessert
Curved path
Shine
Refute
Road surface
Hearsay
Goodbye, amigo!
Some beans
Purple shade
Boulder
Less
Set of steps
Military assistants
Doctrine
porridge hot..."
Hinder
Salad plant


DOWN
1 Great-shark
2 Egret
3 Texas landmark
4 Permit
5 Dir. letters
6 Reach across
7 Vagrant
8 Of wings
9 Newspaper's nameplate
10 Before
11 "- Marner"


Utilitarian
Nerve network
Singer DiFranco
Term in grammar
Blurred
Race an engine
Old marketplace
Falcon
Dozed
That girl
Wire measure
Oar
Part of the eye
Jewel
Ancient
Hair preparation
Small wave
Coffin stand
A letter
Shade tree
- Elmo's fire
Daisylike flower
Depart
Dregs
Jalousie part
Soil
Main artery
Numskull
Brings up
Ridiculous
Chilly
Stopped sleeping
Deserving of pity
Nat King -
Tub washing
Wee
Gone by
Transmit
Astonish
Young horse
Postal matter
Cheerful
Milky morsel
Quilt
- and beyond
Countrified
Garbo of old films
Backbone
City in Egypt
Stinging insect
Swift
Escape
Had a meal
Coconut fiber
Praise
Baseball player


Readily believing
Split
India-
Cakes and -
Feeling regret
Chinese dynasty
Weight units (Abbr.)
Hurry
Jolt
Inn in Turkey


Opposite of NNE
Simple dwelling
- Lady
Sharp
Evil spirit
Mischievous child
Sheriffs search party
Musical work
Pew places
Actress


Puzzle answer is on Page A23.


Lollobrigida
Give off
Bundle
Consumer
United
"- Fledermaus"
Drug letters
Name for a stranger
Ventilate


3-2 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT











ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post offers Tax-Aide service
Wall Rives Post 58 of the American Le-
gion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, hosts the
AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation serv-
ices from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesdays
through April 9.
Call Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066 for
information.

40&8 to have breakfast today
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
today at American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

VFW to serve lasagna dinner
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a
lasagna dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
The March 17 St. Patrick's Day dinner of
corned beef and cabbage with potatoes
and carrots will be served from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance only
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday with Nashville
artist John Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Post to have Mardi Gras Ball
Edward W Penno VFW Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites guests to its Mardi
Gras Ball at 5 p.m. Saturday at the post
Advance tickets are $12. The gala will
include live entertainment and Cajun
food. Costumes are optional. Photos will
be taken and can be purchased for $5.
For more information, contact Eva M.
White at evabusl5@yahoo.com, or 352-746-
6667 or 352-601-0197.

Yard sale set for Saturday
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call Dan at 352-
400-8952.

Post to celebrate Mardi Gras
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for a Mardi Gras party
Saturday at the post home, 906 State Road
44 East, Inverness.
Chicken gumbo dinner is $7 a plate and
will be served at 5 p.m. Music by Karen
and Danny will be from 6 to 9 p.m.
Call 352-344-3495 or visit
www.vfw4337.org, for information about all
post activities.

Game trip to support flight
Support Honor Flight by going to the
Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Phoenix Coyotes
game on Monday, March 10.
Tickets are $60 each, with checks
payable to Honor Flight. Club Level seat-
ing is limited to 50 in Section 208/209 and
is available on a first-come, first-served
basis.
The Lightning bus will leave Our Lady
of Fatima Church at 5 p.m. The church is
at 550 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
For tickets, contact Tony Sanchez at 352-
860-182 1 or insuranceguy@tampa
bay. com, or Barbara Mills at 352-
422-6236 or barbaramills@remax.net.

Celebrate St. Paddy at post

Harry F Nesbitt Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 10087 in Beverly Hills will have
a St. Patrick's Day dinner from S to 7 p.m.
Friday, March 14, at the post, 2170 Vet
Lane, behind Cadence Bank, on County
Road 491.
Donation is $7.
Tickets are now available and everyone
is welcome.


e for veterans


LAUREN PETRACCA/The Grand Rapids Press
Hugh Lehigh poses Feb. 6 for a photo in his cubicle at Priority Health in Grand Rapids, Mich.. Lehigh, who struggled to find
work after relocating to Grand Rapids in 2012, landed the job at Priority Health through Spectrum Health's Veteran
Explorers Program.



Program opens employment doors


Associated Press

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.


F or eight
months,

Hugh
Lehigh
struggled to find
work after
relocating from
Seattle to West
Michigan in 2012.

The 59-year-old Army vet-
eran was transitioning from
a three-decade career with
the U.S. Postal Service. He
applied for 100 positions in
the Grand Rapids area and
landed a few interviews.
But they didn't pan out, ac-
cording to The Grand
Rapids Press.
The Spectrum Health Vet-
eran Explorers Program,
which launched in 2013 and
is tailored to help put veter-
ans back to work, opened a
door for Lehigh. He's now a
senior reconciliation spe-
cialist at Priority Health,
where he said he's found his
passion working in the med-
ical field.
"In our economic environ-
ment now, it gives veterans
hope ... that when they re-
turn they have opportuni-


ties," Lehigh said of the pro-
gram that helped him land
his new career
"That is all a veteran re-
ally wants. They want op-
portunities to display their
skill set."
Lehigh was among four
participants of Spectrum
Health's pilot program.
Three were hired within
Spectrum Health and one
veteran was hired outside
the organization.
The program rotates vet-
erans through three depart-
ments, allowing for 10
weeks in each.
Gearing up for the second
round of veterans to begin
in March,
LeMark Payne,
director of di-
versity and in-
clusion, said
Spectrum opport!
Health seeks to
eventually ex- they bi
pand to 60 par-
ticipants.,- I do
He hopes the cost ai
program can
serve as a
pipeline for LeMark
other employ- director of d
ers looking to


hire veterans, as th
they acquire durin
internship are not
to health care.
"It's not unique t
care. And it really 1
community focused
said. "There's still t
other employers to


a part of the program and
present employment oppor-
tunities for other veterans."
Participants can try their
hand in departments such
as pharmacy, materials, in-
formation services, finance
and project engineering.
The program's organizers
take the veterans'
interests and skills into con-
sideration.
Randy Pomaville, like
Lehigh, learned about the
program through Michigan
Works. The former machin-
ist was unemployed for
about a year after his last
employer downsized.
His experience working


All of our veterans are
appreciative of the
unity and the value tW
ring to the organization
n't know if you can pi
round that.

k Payne
iversity and inclusion, Spectrum Health.


e skills on an aircraft carrier in the
g the paid Navy prepared him for navi-
exclusive gating Spectrum Health
Butterworth Hospital and
to health handling machinery, he
becomes said.
d," Payne The 49-year-old now
time for works as a material handler
become at a warehouse owned by


Spectrum Health -which
he referred to as the best
job he's had.
He and Lehigh said their
career shifts might not have
been possible without the
exposure they received and
networks they formed in the
Veteran Explorers program.
"The machine industry
kind of works you to the
bone and I kind of wanted a
break from it," Pomaville
said.
"When I found out how
different work is at Spec-
trum Health, I said this
looks a lot better and they
treat me a lot better than I
was treated."
Spectrum
Health's supervi-
e so sors are asking for
more veterans
after the first
iat group of partici-
pants left them im-
)n is pressed.
The veterans'
ut a discipline, time-
management skills
and attention to
detail is superior,
Payne said.
Veterans re-
ceive resume help
and coaching on how to
draw from their civilian
and military experience to
market themselves to po-
tential employers. Their
goal is to land interviews
that lead to full-time jobs
by the end of the 30-week
internship.


Auction fundraiser to benefit Veterans Village


Special to the Chronicle

The Ladies Auxiliary of the Harry
F Nesbitt Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills will host
a Chinese auction fundraiser on
Saturday at the post, located at 2170
Vet Lane, behind Cadence Bank on
County Road 491.
Doors open at 10 a.m. and


drawings will begin at noon.
Admission is a $2.50 donation to
benefit the VFW Veterans Village in
Fort McCoy- the only facility of its
kind. The VFW home provides af-
fordable, independent living accom-
modations in a homelike
atmosphere to those in VFW, Men's
Auxiliaries, Ladies Auxiliaries and
their spouses. The facility is not sub-


sidized by any governmental agency,
so the cost of operation is met by
rent income, donations and
fundraisers such as this.
There will be hot dogs available
for $1, along with free dessert and
coffee.
For more information, call Bettie
at 352-746-1989 or Donna at 352-
746-5215.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




0 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 ]EXCURSIONS CITUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Photos by the Associated Press
TOP: The white-sand beach and blue waters glisten on Coronado Island in Loreto Bay
National Marine Park in Loreto, Mexico. The seaside village is located on the Baja
peninsula. LEFT: Sea lions rest on Coronado Island. ABOVE: The Mission of Our Lady of
Loreto is seen in Loreto, Mexico.


IEXICO
Continued from Page A17

;sion of Our Lady of Loreto in 1697. The baroque-
le church still functions, and was used for a wed-
g during our stay
i adjacent Mission Museum highlights not only the
igious past, but also the political history, as Loreto
ved as the regional capital from 1697 to 1777.
i 18th-century church popular with pilgrims is lo-
ed an hour away, high in the Sierra la Giganta
untains in the hamlet of San Javier Following the
Tice of our innkeeper at Coco Cabanas, we drove
rented Jeep up part of a dry riverbed before re-
ting the scenic mountain road. Lunch is available
restaurant in the village, which only got full-time
ctricity in 2012.

terfrnt
new, multimillion-dollar promenade makes for a
asant waterfront stroll and provides for spectacu-
views east towards the islands. It passes a light-
ise and a small marina, where skippered pangas
tall open boats with outboard motors) can be rented
about $100 for fishing, bird-watching, wildlife-
wing or a lift to the white-sand beach on Coronado
md. Recycling bins and dog-waste bags might help
)lain why the town is so clean.
'arther down, the sidewalk runs past a city beach,
pty during the January chill but for the permanent
tched-roof palapas that provide relief from the sun.

0HECT1


Trash cans shaped like circus seals seemed sadly out
of place.

Dining
My favorite restaurant was Canipole, which has no
menu, no roof, and an open kitchen, and provides tra-
ditional blankets for diners to wear when tempera-
tures fall. The guacamole was made tableside,
followed by the daily special, which almost always in-
cludes some divine mole.
El Rey del Taco is so popular it routinely runs out of
food while those hungry for lunch still wait in line.
Mezzaluna has terrific empanadas and salads (all
the restaurants here cook with bottled water), while
Mexico Lindo Y Que Rico had great chili rellenos and
a 7-foot shark sculpture beaded in a classic Huichol
style to depict scenes of Loreto and the surrounding
mountains.

Beaches
The best beaches are a short drive from Loreto, but
the roads are good and the travel easy
Twenty miles south is the community of Ensenda
Blanca, which undoubtedly has the most spectacular
views of the marine park.
We accessed the beach through a time-share prop-
erty, the Villas Del Palmar. It sells a visitor pass for $65
per person, which includes unlimited food and drinks,


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

3527955797
Ever thing Outdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantalion on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALSWS







AHLfASKA CRUISE
NORWEGIAN PEARL Rates Starting lit
7 Night Inside Passage
Airfare and Transfers Are Additional.
Additional rates available.
Please call for information. pe8peso
per person.
Rates based on availability at time of booking. Based on double occupancy and
availability at time of booking.
.SNE17 0 .PneAeIvres I
d -~centaegru~o


and use of the pools and beach from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
However, since the beach in Mexico is public prop-
erty, we decided not to get the pass, and instead
bought lunch from the resort restaurant. Security kept
a watchful eye, but no one interfered as we headed to
the beach, where we rented kayaks and a stand-up
paddleboard from the resort concession.
Closer to Loreto, a mere 5 miles south, is the town of
Nopolo, where investors in 2004 envisioned a 6,000-
home tourist community along with shops and a golf
course. The course, a few hundred homes and the Inn
at Loreto Bay were built before the project stalled in
the recession.
We used the hotel to access the 4-mile beach, but
stayed only briefly as it hadn't been raked and the wa-
tersport rental shack was unstaffed. The lack of atten-
tion was surprising since the hotel was purchased a
few months ago by Carlos Slim, one of the world's
richest men.
His move into Loreto has sent quivers of excitement
through the local tourist establishments, who hope he
can revitalize the development. So far, Slim's pres-
ence is subtle, with the renaming of the hotel to the
Loreto Bay Golf Resort and Spa.
Whether Slim will do for tourism here what past de-
velopment efforts have not remains to be seen. But
whatever his plans, I certainly hope he keeps the
"magic" in Loreto.


Becky's 1"el Store


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(Lipizzaner Horses) Irish Pubs And Folklore
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dinr on your own. 8 days from $1078
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CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014


VETERANS NOTES


.gion post to have Post welcomes public DAV helps veterans
arket, breakfast for several fun events get to clinics


Vall Rives Post 58 of the
[erican Legion, 10730 U.S. 41
)unnellon, will have its out-
)r flea market and pancake
akfast beginning at 7:30 a.m.
urday, March 15. On the
nu are pancakes, French
st, scrambled eggs, sausages,
nge juice and coffee. Dona-
i is $5.
'he public is welcome.


,gion auxiliary
stage sales
Lmerican Legion Post 237
,iliary will stage a yard and
ze sale beginning at 8 a.m.
urday, March 22, in Beverly
ls Plaza.
,veryone is welcome.
'he post is at 4077 N.
anto Highway, Beverly
ls.

)me play games
[th Homosassa post
1FW Post 8189 in Homosassa
ites the public to have some

fingo is played at 2 p.m.
dnesdays and food is avail-
e. Jam sessions are from
7 p.m. Thursdays.
'he Mystery Bus trip is
nned for 9 a.m. Saturday,
rch 8, to visit other clubs and
anizations. Seats are still
tilable. Call Lou Whitten at
:-212-7876.

ngo open to public
ery Thursday
'he public is invited to play
go Thursdays at American
,ion Wall-Rives Post 58.
Drs open at 4 p.m.; games
rtat 6 p.m.
)inner is available for $5.
'he post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
nnellon.

iblic invited for
rimp, wings at post
,veryone is welcome to join
nton-Thompson American
,ion Post 155 in Crystal
,er on Wednesday for wings
;hrimp basket lunches in the
nge from noon to 3 p.m.
dl proceeds benefit veter-
;' programs.
,'or more information, call
'-795-6526.


VFW Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), offers several events
that are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sundays in
the smoke-free hall.
Card bingo and grill night is
at 5 p.m. Wednesdays in the
Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m. Mondays
and Fridays in the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and
Thursday mornings.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.

VFW Post 4252
invites ali for meals
VFW Post 4252, State Road
200 in Hernando (with the heli-
copter out front), welcomes the
public at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch every
day and breakfast on Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Activities include bar bingo
on Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and
Show Me the Hand at 2 p.m.
Thursday
Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in
the hall Saturday
Friday features an
all-you-can-eat fish fry or New
England boiled dinner
For more information and
menus, call the post at 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tam-
pabayrr.com and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.

'In Their Words'
wants your stories
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-
ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit
and veterans organization affil-
iations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your stories
and help set up obtaining
"then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story


The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a
need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office
in Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to be
placed on the van list
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

DAV transport needs
new van for program
The Disabled American Vet-
erans Transportation Network
requests contributions from the
public to reach a goal of $20,000
for a van.
The van program goes to the
clinic in The Villages, as well as
to the VA facility in Gainesville.
This service is available to all
veterans each weekday, for
scheduled appointments, tests
and procedures.
The program uses a loaner
van, which has more than
270,000 miles on it, to transport
to The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not ac-
cepted and it is requested that
any contributions be made by
check or money order made out
to: DAV Van Project- with
DAV van project also written in
the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible contri-
bution to: DAV Van Project, c/o
Joe Stephens, chairman, 2797
W Xenox Drive, Citrus Springs,
FL 34433, or mail it to the DAV
Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project!Treasurer, Gerald A.
Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter
70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34450.

Case manager aids
veterans in county
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department has a
case manager who is available
to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:


0 First Wednesday -Lakes
Region Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness.
0 Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.
0 Third Wednesday-
Coastal Regional Library, 8619
W Crystal St., Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To
make an appointment to meet
with the case manager, call 352-
527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers
help for veterans who have had
their post-traumatic stress dis-
order (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been de-
nied within the past two years
are asked to contact the office
to review the case and discuss
compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the Lecanto
VA Mental Health center and
have been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment
to discuss a claim, call 352-527-
5915. You will need to have
your denial letter and a copy of
your compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You can get
a copy of your exam either by
requesting it through the VA
medical records or from the
primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information about
the Citrus County Veterans Of-
fice, log onto wwwbocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department is looking
for veterans who have recently
transitioned from the military
(or returning reservist from
tours of active duty) to Citrus
County within the past two
years.
Veterans Services requests
that veterans and their spouses
call to be placed on a list for an
upcoming seminar, which will
discuss what benefits or serv-
ices they need to help ease
transition.
The office will schedule a
seminar to discuss benefits and
solicit ideas. Call 352-527-5915
to reserve a seat. For more in-
formation about the Citrus


VETERANS


0 Send veterans' news to community@chronicleonline.com


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CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



County Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Assist Coast Guard
Auxiliary in mission
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, vessel
safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime se-
curity and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uniform
with pride and your military
ribbons. Criminal back-ground
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-
597 6961.

Hospice has special
veterans' program
HPH Hospice, as a partner-
ing agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war It
also provides caregiver educa-
tion and a recognition program
to honor veterans' services and
sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and pro-
grams do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.

Free yoga classes
available for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom
is associated with the national
service organization, Yoga For
Vets. She teaches free classes to
combat veterans at several lo-
cations and times.
Call 352-382-7397.




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled
activities, meetings, meals
and more for a specific post
or group, call or email the
contact listed. Posts and
groups may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
0 Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call
352-795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPost155
@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPostl55.org.
0 American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
0 American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-
489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
0 American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto
Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org
or call 352-746-5018.
0 Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and
Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little
Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-
476-2134 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
0 American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. To accommo-
date members who cannot
drive at night, breakfast meet-
ings are also held at Olive
Tree at 9 a.m. weekly. Call
Commander Robert Scott at
352-860-2090 for days and
other information.
0 Herbert Surber
American Legion Post 225,
6535 S. Withlapopka Drive,
Floral City. Call 352-
860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491,
directly behind Cadence
Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
0 Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
0 Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-
726-3339, email vfw4252
@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.
0 Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19
between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
0 Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call Commander
Victor Houston at 352-344-
3495, or visit


www.vfw4337.org.
0 Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
0 AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
0 AMVETS Harry M.
Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
0 Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
0 Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
0 Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
0 Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
0 The Korean War
Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson
at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
0 U.S. Submarine
Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
0 National Seabee
Veterans of America Island
X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club, Hernando. Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
0 National Seabee
Veterans of America
Auxiliary ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565.
0 Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl155.org.
0 Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196
S. Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
0 Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers
Association of America
(MOAA) meets at 11:30 a.m.
the second Tuesday monthly
at the Olive Garden. Call
President Norm Cooney,
Lt. Col. U.S. Army, retired, at
352-746-1768, or Secretary
Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air


Force, retired, at 352-
746-0806.
0 Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or 352-476-6151,
or Wallace Turner at 352-
637-6206.
0 Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills,
behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
0 Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 186
meets at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
0 Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
0 Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Remaining meetings in 2014
are: March 8, April 12 and
May 10.
0 West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the
Country Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
0 U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4 meets at West
Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call
Wilbur B. Scott at 352-
628-0639 or email seacapt
34447@yahoo.com or Robert
Currie at 352-799-5250 or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
0 VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-
302-1037, or email
geneusawo@tampabay.
rr.com.
0 Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
0 Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
0 Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
0 Hunger and Homeless
Coalition can help homeless
veterans. Call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
0 Warrior Bridge,
developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, seeks
to meet the needs of
wounded veterans. 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at
352-527-3722, ext. 102,
or email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


Special to the Chronicle

Members of the Independence Fund
in Citrus County, a nonprofit organiza-
tion that supports severely wounded
veterans, will host a poker run on
Saturday, March 22.
The poker run, which already has 66
people signed up, will begin and end at
Mickey's Bar and Billiards in Crystal
River and will feature food, music and
fellowship.
After the run, participants can par-
ticipate in a silent auction, Chinese
auction and regular auction of several
items to help in fundraising efforts. Or-
ganizers hope to raise $12,000 with the


Eric 0. Pippin
Air Force Airman
Eric 0. Pippin graduated
from basic military training at
Joint Base San Antonio-
Lackland, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an


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auctions. A number of businesses have
donated gift certificates to auction off.
The goal is to raise enough money to
purchase an all-terrain wheelchair for
a severely wounded veteran.
Auction items will include a four-
some round of golf at Black Diamond
Ranch, golf at Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club and golf at Twisted Oaks,
Brentwood, Citrus Hills, Lakeside and
others. A queen-size quilt in honor of
the leader in this effort, Linda "Road
Queen" Dalton, will also be auctioned.
For more information about the
fundraiser, call Charles Mills at 352-
746-5672 or Linda Dalton at 352-
232-2376.


IN SERVICE

intensive, eight-week
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He is a 2013 graduate of
Citrus High School.


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Poker run, auctions



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VETERANS & IN SERVICE


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 A23


ooo A\,




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rhe heterosexual menace


x perts estimate the number
of homosexuals in the popu-
J lation is somewhere between
ercent and 10 percent. Since
ny people are reluctant to tell
ir sexual preferences, it is hard
nake an accurate assessment.
ichever number is true, it would
an that:
ninety percent of the people con-
Led of felonies in this country
heterosexuals.
ninety percent of all theft is com-
ted by heterosexuals.
ninety percent of all wife-beat-
is done by heterosexual men.
ninety percent of the ex-girl-
rnds murdered each year are
ed by heterosexual men.
Lmerican public schools, with
,und 90 percent heterosexual
chers, are consistently rated
ong the worst in the industrial-
I world.
inety percent of our rising
fith care costs are due to the
e of heterosexuals dying of lung
Lcer, liver failure and heart dis-
e, most of which have been self-
Licted by smoking, drinking and
eatingn.
lore than 90 percent of ugly
thing is bought by heterosexual
n.
lore than 90 percent of the prob-
is on all soap operas are caused
heterosexual characters.
lore than 90 percent of all
flying telemarketers are


heterosexual.
The heterosexual a
advocates that all Am
spend every waking i
sofa watching sportin
drinking tasteless Am
is making our nation
about to collapse froi
ancient Rome.
Coincidentally, 90 p
population of ancient
heterosexual.
If you have ever be
from an airline, a het
son probably got your
More than 90 perce
screaming, ill-behave
that same plane have
by heterosexual pare
Long lines in groce
consist overwhelming
heterosexuals.
More than 90 perce
is heterosexual.
Almost 100 percent
lock teen pregnancie,
by heterosexuals.
Nearly 100 percent


s are caused

t of divorces


Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


NEWS NOTES


luadron plans
rd party
crystal River Sail and
ver Squadron will host
[ilitary Card Party
rch 26 at the squadron
Hiding, 845 N.E. Third

'he fundraiser helps
ance the squadron's
iting safety and
ication classes
tilable for all.
)oors open at
30 a.m. with lunch,
ds to follow There will
raffles, prizes and fun.
,all Jennie at 352-382-
8 for information or
ida at 352-382-1758 for
ervations.


Benefit will help
boy with disease
A Crazy on Curing Lyme
Disease benefit will take
place at noon Saturday,
March 8, at the Crystal
Square Plaza parking lot
in Crystal River
This benefit fundraiser,
with help from Crazy On
Outdoors, M&B Dairy and
other local sponsors, is for
Tyler Vaughn to help
raise funds for his lyme
disease treatments and to
raise awareness of the
disease.
For more information,
call Tammy Scott at
352-628-6599 or email
Exittami@yahoo.com.


New chance to
swing in Citrus
The Premier Big Band
is now rehearsing. Instru-
mentalists of all kinds are
invited.


Rehearsals are from
6 to 8 p.m. Thursdays at
Better Health Technolo-
gies, 208 West Highlands
Blvd., Inverness.
Call 352-344-8122 or
email ThePremier
BigBand@gmail.com.


FOR THE RECORD


are between heterosexuals.
Around 95 percent of all sexual
Jim harassment complaints are against
heterosexuals.
Mullen More than 95 percent of all mili-
tary courts-martial are of hetero-
VILLAGE sexuals.
IDIOT Ninety percent of all drug users
are heterosexuals.
Ninety percent of all gang mem-
bers are heterosexuals.
Ninety percent of all traffic acci-
genda, which dents are caused by heterosexuals.
ierican men Vladimir Putin, Bashar al-Assad,
moment on a Fidel Castro and Kim Jong-Un are
Lg events while all heterosexuals, as were "Papa
nerican beer, Doc" Duvalier, Idi Amin, Joseph
weak and Stalin and Adolf Hitler
m within, like Ninety percent of welfare and
Medicare fraud is perpetrated by
)ercent of the heterosexuals.
t Rome was Ninety percent of our prison
cells are filled with heterosexuals,
en bumped costing us billions of taxpayer
erosexual per- dollars a year
seat. Ninety percent of income-tax
nt of the cheating is done by heterosexuals,
Ad children on costing us billions of dollars a year
been raised Ninety percent of the "too big to
nts. fail" banks that cost billions of
ry stores dollars to bail out were run by
gly of heterosexuals.
Which leaves the question:
nt of Congress Should we let heterosexuals marry,
adopt kids, lead the Boy Scouts,
t of out-of-wed- run for office or play in the NFL?


Feb. 10-16, 2014
Divorces
Maria F. Anderson,
Hernando vs. Timothy A.
Anderson, Hernando
Sandra Bennett,
Inverness vs. Salvatore
Bennett, Inverness
Shawna Marie Kilpatrick,
Crystal River vs. Kim David
Kilpatrick, Crystal River
Evelyn Korjack, Ocala
vs. Richard Korjack Jr.,
Homosassa
Karl Lorenzo, Hernando
vs. Juana De Lacruz
Ceballo, Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic
Anne M. Weber, Crystal
River vs. Frederick J. Weber,
Haines City

Marriages
David Robert Andrews,
Crystal River/Donna Sue
Younce, Crystal River
Donald Frederick Atwell,
Davison, Mich.Nivian 0.
Southern, Burton, Mich.
Anthony Howard Clark,
Crystal River/Tina Lynn
Lucas, Crystal River
Morise Conerly Jr.,
Prattville, Ala./Jutta Susanne
Carrington, Prattville, Ala.
Salvatore Di Silvestro Jr.,
Floral City/Judith Ann
Menard, Floral City
Jeffery Kyle English, Floral
City/Elaini Lee Freeman,
Floral City
Jeffrey Allen Gandy,
Dunnellon/Ashley Samantha
Meyer, Dunnellon
Jermaine Zavier Green,
Hernando/Sarah Marie
Franklin, Hernando
David Allen Honiker III,
Joint Base Lewis McChord,
Wash./Courtney Paige
Hartman, Beverly Hills
Edward Oliver Meadow


Stories worth telling.



Lives worthlit


"My wife and I both77
loved Dr. Cultrera
from the first time
we met her. I can
discuss anything with
her. She has been a
marvelous support and always gives
us hope. I feel so much better when I
leave her office. She is just a fantastic
person and a great doctor."
RoY PHILLIPS, THE VILLAGES


"I knew Dr. Gandhi
before I was
diagnosed and there
Was no question
about which doctor
was going to treat me.
Dr. Gandhi took all the fear out of
it for me. iHe was so calming ndh
is such a kin-leaso hir&and he
i shaknd person and so genuine.
I had no anxieties when I walked
through his door that's for sure,"_
...... BE 7 S MGF ......


zz'VLJUO


ole Saff I..ss
B E T T Y ISA '


Watch the videos

of our stories...



* flcancer.com/fonseca
* flcancer.com/cultrera
flcancer.com/gandhi /


:I3E FLORODC ONER



FLORIDACANCE R

& P E C I A L I S T S
& Research Institute


CITRUS COUNTY
LOCATIONS
Inverness
2231 Highway 44 West
Suite 203
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400
Lecanto
521 N. Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746.0707


W o l C l s M e i i e H o e t w C a e a n e n o


V seca
_1Qi. Voe


aoes


Hurley, Inverness/
Joan Alane Marpoe,
Newville, Pa.
Allen Keith Ingram Jr.,
Homosassa/Lisa Ann
Patterson, Tifton, Ga.
Galen Eugene Lohmeyer,
Homosassa/Emily Suzanne
McCollough, Homosassa
Dana Joseph McDonald,
Floral City/Kayla Marie Lynn,
Floral City
Michael Scott Meseroll,
Lecanto/Alpha Victoria
McGaughey, Hernando
James Randolf Nix,
HomosassaNicky Rebecca
Nix, Homosassa
Louis L. Orr IV, Crystal
River/Kristy Marie
Quackenbush, Crystal River
Shaun Douglas Perez,
Beverly Hills/Miranda Lynn
Ferris, Beverly Hills
Gary Marshall Pickel,
Hernando/Odalys Salgado
Guadamuz, Hernando
Thomas Scott Sharp,
Ocala/Christiana Lynne
Stevens, Dunnellon
Donald Eugene Simpson
III, Inverness/Cassandra Sue
Davis, Inverness
Daniel Lloyd Thompson,
Dunnellon/Rebecca
Quintanilla Vita, Dunnellon

FOR THE RECORD
0 Divorces and
marriages filed in the
state of Florida are a
matter of public
record, available
from each county's
Clerk of the Courts
Office.
0 For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit the
website at www.
clerk.citrus.fl.us.


4SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


NIFTY FIFTY,


NVlic











.SPORT S


0 David Price got the
start for the Tampa
Bay Rays' spring
training game against
the Pittsburgh Pirates
on Saturday/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 College basketball/B2
0 NHL, NBA/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL, golf/B5
0 Local sports/B5
0 Baseball/B6


Just enough to stay on top


Mcllroy in line for first PGA win

in 18 months at Honda Classic


Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy tees off on the 15th hole Saturday during the third round
of the Honda Classic golf tournament in Palm Beach Gardens.


Associated Press

PALM BEACH GARDENS -
Rory Mclroy is 18 holes away
from his first PGA Tour victory in
18 months, a chance to show the
world he is back on his game.
That's not the way Mcllroy
views the final round at the
Honda Classic.
Mcllroy started strong,
avoided a big number with a
brilliant bogey in the middle and
took on the wind and water on
the 16th hole for one final birdie
Saturday that gave him a
1-under 69 in the toughest con-


ditions and a two-shot lead over
Russell Henley at PGA National.
The 24-year-old from North-
ern Ireland has come to expect
this kind of performance.
He finished one shot behind
in Abu Dhabi. He played in the
final group in Dubai, where
nothing went well in the final
round. And here is again, mak-
ing key shots and big putt to
keep his nose in front in the
Honda Classic.
"I've been building and build-
ing toward getting my game to a

See OPPage B4


Sprint to the finish


No. 1 Florida

beats LSUfor

21st straight win

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida's
seniors, those four guys who fell
just short of the Final Four the
last three years, talked about
cutting down the nets after
clinching the Southeastern
Conference's regular-season
championship.
It was a brief conversation.
And a unanimous decision.
The top-ranked Gators chose
not to break out the scissors. If
they keep playing like they did
against LSU on Saturday, they
might end up with an even big-
ger celebration.
Dorian Finney-Smith scored
16 points, and Florida used a
season-high 13 3-pointers to
overwhelm the Tigers 79-61 and
extend its school-record win-
ning streak to 21 games.
"Everybody on the team did-
n't feel comfortable cutting
them down right now because
we knew we have more of a
journey to go," guard Casey
Prather said.
Prather and Michael Frazier
II added 14 points apiece for
the Gators, who also won their
31st straight at home.
This one was never in doubt.
Florida (27-2, 16-0 SEC) scored
the first eight points of the game,
opened up a double-digit lead
with consecutive 3-pointers
from DeVon Walker and Finney-
Smith and put the game away
early in the second half with a
flurry of points in the paint.
Prather made three consecu-
tive driving finger rolls after the
break. Patric Young had a dunk
and then a left-handed hook shot
And Prather followed with a
dunk and another driving layup
that put Florida up 62-38 with
about 11 minutes remaining.
About the only thing left to
see was whether Florida would
cut down the nets.


See /Page B4
Florida's Chris Walker goes for
two points with LSU forward
Jarell Martin (12) defending
during the first half Saturday in
Gainesville.
Associated Press


Associated Press
Kyle Busch poses for
photographers with the
winner's trophy after his
victory in the rain-shortened
Nationwide race Saturday in
Avondale, Ariz.


Busch


takes race


in rain


Driver wins

third straight

Nationwide

race at Phoenix

Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. -Kyle
Busch didn't mind the rain
that ended the race early
He would have been fine
with continuing, though -
his car was that good.
Busch became the first
driver to win three straight
NASCAR Nationwide races
at Phoenix International
Raceway, dominating his
way through a rain-short-
ened race Saturday
"We've been very domi-
nant here in the past and led
a lot of laps today," Busch
said. "I felt like we could
have won it if it was rain-
shortened or whether we
went the whole distance."
Busch took an early lead
and was still out front when
the race was halted with 32
laps left in the 200-mile race
around Phoenix's odd-
shaped mile oval. After a
delay of more than two hours,
the race was called, giving
Busch his series-record 64th
Nationwide victory
Busch led 155 laps for his
10th overall victory seven
in Nationwide at PIR and
the fourth straight Nation-
wide win for Joe Gibbs Rac-
ing at the track. It also was
the fourth straight win at PIR
for Busch's crew chief Adam
Stevens, who was at the helm
when Joey Logano won for
JGR in the 2012 fall race.
Kevin Harvick finished
second and pole sitter Brad
Keselowski was third, fol-
lowed by Kyle Larson and
Matt Kenseth.
"Kyle had the best car
today; we probably finished
where we should have," Har-
vick said. "You never know
and you always want to fin-
ish it out, but all in all it was
a good start."
Busch swept the two Na-
tionwide races at Phoenix in
2013, overcoming a pit-road
speeding penalty to end a
24-race winless streak in the
series in the spring and
See "'SC/Page B4


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SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL CITUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICL




Wichita St. still unbeaten


Associated Press

VICHITA, Kan. Wichita
te will carry its pursuit of
section into the Missouri
ley tournament.
leanthony Early scored 19
nts, Ron Baker added 13 and
second-ranked Shockers
[ed to a 68-45 victory over Mis-
[ri State on Saturday, easily
ting away a team that had
en them fits this season.
relying on the same stubborn
'ense that carried it on last
tr's improbable March run,
hita State (31-0, 18-0) became
first team since Saint
eph's in 2004 to enter its
gue tournament unbeaten.
Shockers will have a first-
[nd bye in St. Louis next
ek.
lissouri State (19-11, 9-9) had
im in trouble when they met
L. 11 in Springfield, Mo., but
Bears blew a 19-point sec-
I-half lead and ultimately lost
39 in overtime.
'hey never came close to
king it a game Saturday, trail-
by double-digits in the open-
minutes.
No. 12 Virginia 76,
No. 4 Syracuse 56
'HARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Mal-
n Brogdon scored eight of his 19
its during a decisive second-half
and No. 12 Virginia clinched the
seed in the Atlantic Coast
iference tournament.
,kil Mitchell added 12 points and
rebounds and Mike Tobey and
tin Anderson scored 11 each for
Cavaliers (25-5, 16-1 ACC), who
1 their only outright ACC regular
son title 33 years ago 1980-
- when Ralph Sampson was a
homore. The victory was their
i in a row and the final buzzer
Jght hundreds streaming onto
court.
yler Ennis and C.J. Fair scored
each for the Orange (26-3, 13-3),
) lost for the third time in four
ies. Syracuse played much of
game without ailing Jerami Grant
ause of a sore back.


v-,U big
41o. 21 Memphis 72, No. 10 Saint Louis 56
Nn- 7 InnnEqvill A......


IIV.I 16UUVlI IIll UU
lEMPHIS, Tenn. Chris Craw-
l hit a 3-pointer with 1:36 left to
Memphis ahead to stay, and the
irs swept the season series from
Cardinals.
lo. 21 Memphis (22-7, 11-5
erican Athletic Conference)
ed 65-57 with 4:45 left when
hael Dixon Jr. scored six straight,
pstarting the Tigers who scored
)f the final 16 points.
lo. 7 Louisville (24-5, 13-3) went
I after taking its biggest lead. The
dinals didn't score again until
is Jones hit a free throw with
3 seconds to go.
lontrezl Harrell scored a career-
125 points and grabbed 12 re-
nds. Russ Smith scored 15 of
19 points in the first half. Luke
icock had 11.
)ixon finished with 18, and Geron
nson scored 15 points. Austin
iols added 14, and Crawford fin-
d with 12 points, going 4 for 5
n beyond the arc.
Xavier 75,
No. 9 Creighton 69
'INCINNATI Justin Martin had
pointss and a career-high 16 re-
nds on Saturday, and Xavier led
;t of the way in front of the


Associated Press
Wichita State's Chadrack Lufile, left, and Nick Wiggins celebrate their perfect 31-0 regular season after defeating Missouri St. 68-45 on
Saturday in Wichita, Kan. The Shockers are the No. 2 team in the nation.


largest crowd in the 14-year history
of the Musketeers' arena.
It was a long-awaited rematch for
Xavier, (20-9, 10-6), which lost one
of the Big East's most wide-open
games at Creighton in January.
Martin led the way. The junior
guard helped Xavier control the
tempo and build a 13-point lead
early in the second half that was
more than enough.
Creighton (23-5, 13-3) couldn't
catch up despite 27 points by Doug
McDermott, who leads the nation in
scoring.
McDermott had 35 points during
the Bluejays' 95-89 win at home on
Jan. 12.
III'tllI / m


game's final 7 1/2 minutes.
But they held Cincinnati (24-5,
13-3) to just 13 baskets on 48 shots.
Napier, the Huskies' player of the
year candidate, bested Cincinnati's,
Sean Kilpatrick, who finished with 16
points.
No. 16 Michigan 66,
Minnesota 56
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Nik
Stauskas scored 21 points and
Glenn Robinson III provided an
emotional lift with his dunks as No.
16 Michigan clinched at least a
share of the Big Ten title with a
66-56 victory over Minnesota on
Saturday night.
The Wolverines (21-7, 13-3) didn't
arrive at the Crisler Center expecting
to have a chance to lock up their
third banner in three years, but Illi-
nois changed that by upsetting
Michigan State in East Lansing.
Michigan can clinch its first out-
right conference title since 1986 with
a win Tuesday at Illinois or next Sat-
urday at home against Indiana.
Caris LeVert added 13 points for
Michigan, and Jordan Morgan had
10 rebounds.
South Carolina 72,
No. 17 Kentucky 67
COLUMBIA, S.C. Brenton
Williams scored 24 points for South
Carolina, and Kentucky coach John
Calipari was ejected midway
through the second half as the
Gamecocks held off the 17th-ranked
Wildcats 72-67.
South Carolina (11-18, 4-12
Southeastern Conference) led by
three at halftime and hit six of its first
eight shots in the second half to go
up 48-32 with 14:13 left. Kentucky
made a furious charge after Calipari
was tossed, but came up short.
The Wildcats (21-8, 11-5) couldn't
make a basket, going 15:38 with
only one field goal on a goaltend-
ing call. Calipari was ejected with his
team down 12 after getting a second
technical with 10:21 left.


Illinois 53,
No. 18 Michigan St. 46
EAST LANSING, Mich. Tracy
Abrams scored 12 points, leading Illi-
nois past slumping Michigan State.
The Fighting Illini (17-12, 6-10 Big
Ten) have three straight victories for
the first time since winning four in a
row from Dec. 21 to Jan. 4. That
successful stretch included a win
over then-No. 23 Missouri.
The Spartans (22-7, 11-5) have
dropped two straight and six of their
last 10 games. They were full
strength for the first time in nearly
two months, but simply weren't good
enough to beat a streaking team that
seemed more inspired.
Branden Dawson returned from a
broken hand and played for the first
time since Jan. 21.
Michigan State's Gary Harris had
19 points.
No. 19 UNC 60,
Virginia Tech 56
BLACKSBURG, Va. James
Michael McAdoo scored 15 points to
lead No. 19 North Carolina to its
11 th straight victory.
McAdoo hit 6 of 9 from the floor
for the Tar Heels (22-7, 12-4), who
started Atlantic Coast Conference
play 1-4 and have not lost since.
The Tar Heels haven't won this
many games in a row since opening
the 2008-09 season with 13 straight
victories.
McAdoo scored 12 of his 15
points in the second half, including
10 after the Hokies had cut the Tar
Heel lead to 42-40 on a basket by
Jarell Eddie with 8:54 left in the
game. North Carolina answered with
seven straight points, with McAdoo
scoring the last two points on a bas-
ket with 6:57 left to make it 49-40.
Leslie McDonald added 14 points
and J.P. Tokoto finished with 12 for
North Carolina.
Eddie led Virginia Tech (9-19,
2-14 ACC) with 18 points.
No. 23 SMU 70, UCF 55
DALLAS Markus Kennedy


scored 18 points, Nic Moore had 11
of his 13 in the second half and SMU
took another step toward its first
NCAA tournament berth in 21 years.
The Mustangs (23-6, 12-4Ameri-
can Athletic) improved to 15-0 at
home, with the last nine coming at
newly renovated Moody Coliseum,
going into their final home game
Wednesday night against seventh-
ranked Louisville. The Cardinals lost
to No. 21 Memphis 72-66.
Isaiah Sykes had 18 points to
lead UCF (11-16, 3-13).
Oklahoma 77,
No. 24 Texas 65
NORMAN, Okla. Isaiah
Cousins scored a career-high 24
points and Oklahoma gained
ground in the race for second place
in the Big 12.
Buddy Hield hit four 3-pointers
and scored 17 points for Oklahoma
(21-8, 10-6), which entered the
game in a four-way battle with Texas
(21-8, 10-6), Kansas State and Iowa
State behind Kansas.
Cameron Ridley had his eighth
double-double of the season with 19
points and 14 rebounds for Texas.
Kansas St. 80,
No. 15 Iowa St. 73
MANHATTAN, Kan. Shane
Southwell had 13 points and Kansas
State overcame a huge game by
Iowa State star Melvin Ejim to beat
the 15th-ranked Cyclones 80-73.
Thomas Gipson and D.J. Johnson
added 12 points apiece for the Wild-
cats (20-9, 10-6 Big 12), who can
still earn the No. 2 seed in the con-
ference tournament. They play at
Oklahoma State on Monday and
then host Baylor on Saturday to end
the regular season.
Kansas State has won 15 straight
at Bramlage Coliseum, its longest
home winning streak since the
1981-82 season.
Ejim had 30 points and 16 re-
bounds, and DeAndre Kane added
24 points and eight rebounds to
pace the Cyclones (22-6, 10-6).


RICHMOND, Va. Treveon
Graham had 17 points and eight re-
bounds, and Virginia Commonwealth
added a quality win to its NCAA tour-
nament resume by beating No. 10
Saint Louis 67-56.
Briante Weber added 13 points
and four steals for the Rams (22-7,
10-4 Atlantic 10), who handed Saint
Louis its second consecutive defeat
following a school-record, 19-game
winning streak. The Billikens were
upset at home Thursday night by
Duquesne, a 14-point underdog.
Jordair Jett led Saint Louis
(25-4, 12-2) with 18 points. Austin
McBroom had 11 points off the
bench and Rob Loe grabbed nine
rebounds but turned the ball over
six times.
Leading scorer Dwayne Evans
had just four points on 2-of-ll shoot-
ing after scoring 21 when the Bil-
likens beat VCU 64-62 on Feb. 15 in
St. Louis.
Connecticut 51,
No. 11 Cincinnati 45
HARTFORD, Conn. Shabazz
Napier scored 18 points and
grabbed 11 rebounds to lead UConn.
The Huskies (23-6, 11-5 American
Athletic Conference) won despite
going without a field goal for the


o. 1 Connecticut romps over Rutgers 72-35


Associated Press

TORRS, Conn. Bre-
la Stewart and Bria
rtley each scored 20
nts to help No. 1 UConn
nain unbeaten with a
35 victory over No. 24
tgers on Saturday
'he victory gave the
skies (30-0, 17-0 Ameri-
L) at least a share of the
,ugural American Ath-
ic Conference regular
ison title. The Huskies
I play No. 3 Louisville
Monday with a chance
win the conference
impionship outright. If
iisville wins, a coin flip
uld determine the top
d for the conference
rnament.
aleena Mosqueda-
vis, who missed the
ious four games with
nonucleosis, returned
I scored seven points in
minutes.
). 3 Louisville 75,
Cincinnati 51
'INCINNATI Tia Gibbs
red 17 points and
isville pulled away from
cinnati in the second half.


Antonita Slaughter added
14 points, Asia Taylor finished
with 12 and Shoni Schimmel
scored 10, helping keep alive
Louisville's bid for a share of
the inaugural American Athletic
Conference championship.
The second-place Cardinals
(28-2, 16-1) went into Satur-
day's game trailing top-ranked
and conference-leading
Connecticut by one game.
Before a crowd of 1,088 on
Cincinnati's Senior Day,
Bearcats senior Jeanise Ran-
dolph had 22 points and 11
rebounds her ninth double-
double of the season and
14th of her career.
No. 8 Penn St. 77,
Michigan 62
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Ariel Edwards scored 21
points and Penn State beat
Michigan to clinch a share of
the Big Ten title for the third
straight season.
Penn State can win the title
outright Sunday if Nebraska
loses to Purdue, and Michi-
gan State falls to Indiana.
Edwards' senior team-
mates, Maggie Lucas, Talia


Associated Press
Connecticut's Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis shoots as
Rutgers' Christa Evans defends during the second half
Saturday in Storrs, Conn. The No. I Huskies won 72-35.


East and Dara Taylor, scored
17, 16 and 11 points, respec-
tively for Penn State (22-6,
13-3 Big Ten).
No. 15 Okla. St. 67,
Kansas St. 62
STILLWATER, Okla. -
Senior Tiffany Bias scored 17
points in her final home game
and Brittney Martin added 13
rebounds as Oklahoma State


held on in the last 3 minutes
to defeat Kansas State.
Oklahoma State (22-6, 11-6
Big 12) led by 13 at the half
but Kansas State went on a
7-0 run, sparked by Kindred
Wesemann's 3-pointer, to
take the lead by four points
with 2:59 left to play.
Leticia Romero and Ash-
lynn Knoll scored 19 points
apiece to lead the Wildcats


(11-17, 5-12), and Wesemann
added four 3-pointers.
No. 22 Gonzaga 81,
Pacific 77
SPOKANE, Wash. -
Sunny Greinacher scored a
career-high 24 points as Gon-
zaga held on to beat Pacific to
close the regular season.
Lindsay Sherbert added 18
points and Haiden Palmer 17
for the Bulldogs (26-4, 16-2),
who wrapped up their 10th-
straight West Coast Confer-
ence title in their last game
and went 16-0 at home.
KiKi Moore kept Pacific
(17-11, 12-6), which had a
six-game winning streak end,
in the game by matching her
career-high of 33 points.
Hailie Eackles added 20 and
Kendall Kenyon 12 with 10
rebounds.
No. 23 Mid. Tenn.
68, UAB 58
MURFREESBORO, Tenn.
- Ebony Rowe, kept in check
most of the game, scored
nine-straight points in a late
12-0 run and finished with 22
as Middle Tennessee rallied to


defeat Alabama-Birmingham.
Their seventh-straight win
gave the Blue Riders (25-4,
14-1) their sixth-straight Con-
ference USA title outright.
KeKe Stewart added 15
points and Shanice Cason 12.
Behind Karisma Chapman,
the Blazers (15-12, 7-7) led
until Rowe took over. Chap-
man had 15 points and 13
rebounds but her only bucket
of the second half came with
14:05 to play. Chelsee Black
led UAB with 16 points.
Washington 70,
No. 18 Cal 65
BERKELEY, Calif. -
Kelsey Plum scored 22 points
with six boards and six assists,
while Jazmine Davis added 20
points, as Washington up-
ended No. 18 California 70-65.
Washington (17-12, 10-8
Pac 12) used a 9-0 run mid-
way through the first half, in-
cluding a 3-pointer by Plum, to
take a 36-32 lead at the break.
The Huskies led by as
much as 10in the second
half, but Cal (21-8, 13-5) cut
its deficit to three with 33 sec-
onds left on a pair of free
throws and a layup by Re-
shanda Gray.


E


- - -T I ---- -




CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 B3




Jagr reaches elite club with goal


Devil is seventh player to score 700

career goals; Lightning clip Stars 4-2


Associated Press

UNIONDALE, N.Y -Jaromir
Jagr became the seventh player
to score 700 NHL goals, sparking
New Jersey's four-goal second
period, and Martin Brodeur
earned the win in his first start
in over a month as the Devils
routed the New York Islanders
6-1 on Saturday
Jagr gave the Devils a 2-0 lead
early in the second, and Ryane
Clowe, Marek Zidlicky, and Mark
Fayne followed in rapid succes-
sion. The four goals came in a
span of 4:36 in the first 8:07 of
the second.
Adam Henrique opened the
scoring with a power-play goal at
5:00 of the first. New Jersey
needed only 12 shots to net its
first four goals and 16 total to get
to five against beleaguered
goalie Evgeni Nabokov Clowe
and Zidlicky, with a milestone
assist from Jagr, also tallied dur-
ing power plays.
Lightning 4, Stars 2
DALLAS Martin St. Louis
scored two goals for the second
consecutive game, leading Tampa
Bay over Dallas.
The Lightning had lost five of their
previous seven games.
Ben Bishop cooled off Dallas by
making 39 saves for his 29th win.
Nate Thompson and Sami Salo
also scored for Tampa Bay. Victor
Hedman and Ondrej Palat each had
two assists.
Antoine Roussel and Vernon Fid-
dler each had a goal and an assist
for Dallas.
Capitals 4, Bruins 2
BOSTON -Alex Ovechkin col-
lected his 800th career point and
raised his league-leading total to 43
goals with a pair of power-play
scores, leading Washington over
Boston.
Joel Ward and Eric Fehr also
scored, and Braden Holtby made 36
saves for the Capitals, who won
their fourth straight in their chase for
one of the Eastern Conference's


final playoff spots.
Ovechkin had the go-ahead goal
and two assists in a 5-4 win at
Florida on Thursday. It's his first sea-
son of 40-plus goals since collecting
40-plus in his first five seasons from
2005-06 to 2009-10.
Patrice Bergeron and Shawn
Thornton had Boston's goals. Goal-
tender Tuukka Rask stopped 27
shots in his first start since winning
the bronze medal with Finland at the
Sochi Olympics.
Flyers 4, Rangers 2
PHILADELPHIA- Wayne Sim-
monds had a goal and an assist to
lead Philadelphia over New York.
Vincent Lecvalier, Sean Couturier
and Luke Schenn also scored for
Philadelphia, which rebounded from
a 7-3 home defeat to San Jose on
Thursday.
Chris Kreider and Derick Brassard
scored for the Rangers, who lost for
just the second time in their past
nine games.
Blue Jackets 6,
Panthers 3
COLUMBUS, Ohio- Artem
Anisimov scored a short-handed
goal late in the second period and
Columbus' special teams provided
four goals in the Blue Jackets' win
over the Florida.
David Savard, Cam Atkinson and
R.J. Umberger added power-play
goals the Blue Jackets were 3 for
4 with a man advantage while
Jack Johnson had three assists.
Savard also had an assist.
Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 17
shots as Columbus ended a three-
game losing skid.
Shawn Mathias and Nick
Bjugstad each had a goal and an
assist and Sean Bergenheim also
scored for the Panthers.
Kings 3, Hurricanes 1
LOS ANGELES -Alec Martinez
scored the tiebreaking goal on a
power play with 11:45 to play,
Jonathan Quick made 24 saves, and
Los Angeles beat Carolina for its


Associated Press
New Jersey Devils' Jaromir Jagr (68) reaches for the puck ahead of New York Islanders' Kyle Okposo (21)
in the first period Saturday in Uniondale, N.Y. Jagr scored his 700th goal during the Devils' 6-1 win.


third victory in four days since the
Olympic break.
Mike Richards scored his second
goal since Thanksgiving and Justin
Williams added an empty-net goal
for the Kings, who have roared out
of the break with three wins in three
cities in about 70 hours. Low-scoring
Los Angeles put up eight goals at
Colorado and Calgary before hold-
ing off the Hurricanes in the Kings'
return to Staples Center.
Andrej Sekera scored and Anton
Khudobin stopped 28 shots for the
Hurricanes, who have lost three
straight on their five-game road trip
out of the break.
Jets 3, Predators 1
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Olli Joki-
nen, Andrew Ladd and Devin Se-
toguchi scored and Ondrej Pavelec
stopped 39 shots and Winnipeg beat
Nashville.
The Jets, ranked sixth in the NHL
in penalty kills coming into the
game, didn't allow a goal on six
Nashville power plays.
One of the Predators' strengths
has been converting man-advan-


tage chances. Entering the game,
they were fifth in the league, but
Pavelec stopped Nashville on each
power play.
Simon Moser scored his first NHL
goal for Nashville.
The Jets improved 11-3-1 since
hiring Paul Maurice as coach.
Canadiens 4,
Maple Leafs 3, OT
MONTREAL- Max Pacioretty
scored his second goal of the game
on a power play 3:28 into overtime
to lead the Montreal Canadiens past
the Toronto Maple Leafs 4-3.
Pacioretty took a feed from Andrei
Markov, who had three assists, and
beat Jonathan Bernier with a high
wrist shot for the winner.
Alex Galchenyuk and P.K. Sub-
ban also scored for the Canadiens,
who were coming off an overtime
win in Pittsburgh on Thursday.
James van Riemsdyk had two
goals and Phil Kessel also had one
for the Maple Leafs, who also lost in
overtime Thursday to the New York
Islanders.


LaFontaine resigns
as Sabres president
BUFFALO, N.Y. First, Ryan
Miller. Now, Pat LaFontaine.
A day after trading their star goalie
to St. Louis, the Buffalo Sabres lost
another face of their franchise after
LaFontaine abruptly resigned as pres-
ident of hockey operations on Satur-
day a little more than three months
after being brought in to provide a new
direction to the NHL's last-place team.
The Sabres announced the deci-
sion in a news release issued after
speculation had been raised of a po-
tential front-office shake-up involving
LaFontaine.
The Sabres said LaFontaine would
be returning to his previous role
working with the National Hockey
League. LaFontaine had been work-
ing with the league on player safety
issues before being hired by the
Sabres in mid-November.
The former Sabres captain's ar-
rival was hailed as a major turning
point for a struggling team. La-
Fontaine took over following a
change in the front office.


Heat beat Magic 76ers retire
Iverson's number


James help

Miami down

Orlando

Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron
James' switch to a clear
mask didn't hinder his
shooting eye, and he had
20 points Saturday to help
the Miami Heat earn their
seventh consecutive vic-
tory by beating the Or-
lando Magic 112-98.
At the NBAs request,
James dispensed with the
black mask he wore Thurs-
day when playing for the
first time since he broke
his nose. He missed only
four shots, grabbed nine
rebounds and had seven
assists.
Dwyane Wade scored 24
points and Chris Bosh 20
for the Heat, who shot 58
percent. Eleven players
scored for the Heat, and
their bench totaled 39
points.
The newer mask
seemed to bother James
more than the black one
did, and he frequently took
it off when the clock was
stopped. But while it was a
nuisance, it didn't hinder
his performance.
His streak of five con-
secutive games with more
than 30 points came to an
end, but he played only 31
minutes and took just 12
shots. After sitting out a
week because of his bro-
ken nose, he avoided an-
other injury when he went
stumbling into the third
row after making a fast-
break layup and settled in
an unoccupied seat.
The Heat improved to
10-1 since Feb. 1, and
they've won their past four
games by an average of 19
points. They completed a
sweep of the four-game
season series against their
in-state rivals.
The game was the first
for the last-place Magic
since they broke a 16-game
road losing streak at
Philadelphia on Wednes-
day Tobias Harris led Or-
lando with 20 points, and


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Allen Iverson cupped his
hand to his left ear and
asked to hear his favorite
tune one more time.
With that command,
20,000 roaring Philadel-
phia 76ers fans gave Al
the standing ovation he
earned by stamping him-
self as one of the fran-
chise's all-time greats.
Iverson, emotional as
he thanked former team-
mates and friends, had
his No. 3 retired at half-
time of Saturday's game
against Washington.
High above the Wells
Fargo Center court, Iver-
son's banner fit between
Maurice Cheeks' No. 10
and Charles Barkley's
No. 34.
"They all wanted me to
talk about how much y'all
loved me," Iverson said,
"but trust me, the feeling
was mutual."
Iverson officially re-
tired in October after last


Associated Press
Orlando Magic small forward Maurice Harkless goes to the basket against Miami Heat
small forward Michael Beasley during the second half Saturday in Miami.


Nikola Vucevic added 18.
Heat guard Mario
Chalmers had the high-
light play of the first half,
fetching a loose ball while
seated at midcourt with
his back to his basket, then
flipping a pass over his
shoulder to James to set
up a fast-break basket
James had a throw-down
dunk after catching an
alley-oop flip from Wade in
the second half for another
fast-break score.
Rockets 118,
Pistons 110
HOUSTON Terrence
Jones had 22 points and 10
rebounds, and the Houston


Rockets opened a big early points on 10 of 17 shooting off
lead and beat the Detroit Pis- the bench, and Josh Smith
tons 118-110 for their third win added 21 points for the Pis-
in four games. tons, who dropped their fourth
Jones finished 10 of 15 straight and seventh in eight
from the floor as Houston shot games.
50 percent for the game, in- Wizards 122,
cluding 61 percent in the first
half. Houston scored 41 76ers 103
points in the first quarter and PHILADELPHIA- Trevor
finished 11 of 33 from behind Ariza made eight 3-pointers
the arc.
JmeHar dnand scored a career-high 40
Jam es Harden added 20 pon st hep he W hi g n
points and 12 assists, Patrick points to help the Washington
Beverley had 19 points and Wizards win their sixth
Dwight Howard chipped in 17 straight game, 122-103 over
points and eight rebounds. the Philadelphia 76ers.
Reserve Omri Casspi scored Ariza made all six 3-point
16 points and Jordan Hamil- attempts in the first quarter for
ton had 13. 24 points and finished 14 of
Rodney Stuckey had 23 23 from the floor overall.


playing in 2010. He won
four scoring titles for the
Sixers and was the 2001
MVP when he led them to
the NBA Finals. He never
won a championship, the
lone omission in a career
that is destined for the
Hall of Fame.
The Sixers may as well
have turned the arena
into an Al museum. Four
banners greeted fans at
the main concourse en-
trance, and photos of him
were plastered all around
the arena. The merchan-
dise stands sold Iverson
jerseys for $130, and
lower level tickets were
going for as much for
$1,280 on Stubhub about
an hour before the 7:30
p.m. tipoff.
Iverson's return in-
jected a rare dose of ex-
citement into a franchise
playing some of the worst
basketball in the league.
The Sixers, in full-blown
rebuilding mode, had lost
12 straight entering
Saturday's game.


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SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014


Sprint Cup

rhe Profit on CNBC

500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
Brad Keselowski, Ford, 139.384.
1) Joey Logano, Ford, 139.265.
Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 138.969.
) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 138.35.
) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 138.344.
) Greg Biffle, Ford, 138.339.
) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 138.318.
) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 138.318.
)Aric Almirola, Ford, 138.281.
1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 138.047.
;) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 137.889.
1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 137.315.
,) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 137.815.
5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 137.81.
1) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 137.794.
5) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 137.788.
14) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 137.741.
3) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 137.588.
10) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 137.546.
4) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 137.483.
7) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 137.473.
'7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 137.347.
l9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 137.216.
) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 137.2.
7) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 137.179.
l5) Michael McDowell, Ford, 137.065.
'8) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 136.903.
8) David Gilliland, Ford, 136.867.
I) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 136.794.
4) David Ragan, Ford, 136.789.
'6) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 136.726.
3) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 136.721.
0) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 136.545.
3) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 135.875.
'3) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 135.614.
0) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 135.384.
5) Blake Koch, Ford, Owner Points.
;6) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
6) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
2) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points.
') Michael Annett, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
7) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, Owner Points.
1) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
Failed to Qualify
l8) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 135.287.
0) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 135.115.
'7) Dave Blaney, Ford, 134.238.




MLB standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
nore 2 0 1.000
sota 2 0 1.000
le 3 0 1.000
Ito 3 1 .750
land 2 1 .667
as City 2 1 .667
md 2 1 .667
,it 3 2 .600
ton 1 1 .500
ngeles 1 1 .500
y'ork 2 2 .500
1 1 .500
In 0 2 .000
Igo 0 1 .000
,a Bay 0 1 .000
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
3 0 1.000
ington 2 0 1.000
)urgh 2 1 .667
na 3 2 .600
nnati 2 2 .500
ado 1 1 .500
ngeles 2 2 .500
ukee 2 2 .500
-rancisco 1 2 .333
delphia 1 3 .250
ta 0 4 .000
Igo 0 2 .000
'ork 0 2 .000
Diego 0 3 .000
uis 0 2 .000
)TE: Split-squad games count in the standings;
s against non-major league teams do not.
Saturday's Games
)mi (ss) 5, St. Louis 4
ishington 16, Atlanta 15
Itimore 9, Toronto 7
(Yankees 4, Philadelphia 0
sburgh 2, Tampa Bay 2, tie, 10 innings
inesota 6, Boston 2
troit 5, Houston 1
)mi (ss) 9, N.Y Mets 1
;veland vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
ccd., Rain
n Francisco vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
Rain
nsas City 7, San Diego 3, 8 innings
kland 2, Texas 2, tie
attle 5, L.A. Angels 3, 7 innings
icinnati 3, Colorado 2
waukee 6, L.A. Dodgers 5
zona 2, Milwaukee 1, 5 innings
icago Cubs vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
Rain
Today's Games
troitvs. Atlanta (ss) at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
( Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
inesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
p.m.
tsburgh vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
p.m.






Itimore vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
( Yankees vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p m.







imi vs. Washington atViera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
mnta (ss) vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 pm.
isas City vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
nDiego (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale,
3:05 p.m.
kland vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.






icinnati vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 pm.
icago White Sox vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,






p.m.
zona vs. San Francisco at Scoffsdale, Ariz.,






p.m.
attle vs. Cleveland at Goo~dyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
aukee vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
uston vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.







( Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
inesota (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla.,
p.m.
ston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
onto vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, Fla.,






p.m.
Louis vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
shington vs. N.YYankees atTampa, Fla., 1:05 pm.






iladelphia vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
p.m.
veland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.






itfle (ss) vs. Cincinna'd at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 pm.
Iorado vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
icago Cubs vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m.
nDiego vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz.,


p.m.
. Dodgers vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m.
nsas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
3:05 p.m.
Angels vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.
lorado vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 9:10 p.m.




NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
In 59 37 17 5 79182 134
real 62 3421 7 75159 152
a Bay 60 3421 5 73174 150
Ito 62 3222 8 72185 191
,it 60 2820 12 68159 165
60 2623 11 63170 197


IFoar the ren cord(I



Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
6-1-8
oCASH 3 (late)

5-8-3

PLAY 4 (early)
6-1-7-7
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 9-4-3-0

POWERBALL
3 8 25 30 47
POWER BALL
13

Fantasy 5 and Lotto not
available at press time.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:

Mega Money: 20 22 30 34 Fantasy 5:1 2 25 28 31
Mega Ball: 19 5-of-5 2 winners $129,719.96
4-of-4 MB No winner 4-of-5 290 $144.00
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3-of-4 MB 27 $523.00
3-of-4 762 $55.00
2-of-4 MB 1,908 $26.50 Players should verify
1-of-4 MB 9,332 $3.00 winning numbers by
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On the AIRWAVES



TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: The Profit on CNBC 500 race
SPRING TRAINING BASEBALL
7 a.m. (MLB) Miami Marlins at New York Mets (Taped)
10 a.m. (MLB) St. Louis Cardinals at Miami Marlins (Taped)
1 p.m. (MLB) Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox
4 p.m. (MLB) Oakland Athletics at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
(Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (MLB) New York Yankees at Toronto Blue Jays (Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (MLB) New York Mets at St. Louis Cardinals (Same-day Tape)
3 a.m. (MLB) San Diego Padres at Los Angeles Dodgers (Taped)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Illinois at Florida (Taped)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 a.m. (ESPNU) Kansas at Oklahoma State (Same-day Tape)
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) George Mason at George Washington
2 p.m. (CBS) Marquette at Villanova
4 p.m. (CBS) Ohio State at Indiana
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Georgia Tech at Florida State
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Stanford atArizona
9 p.m. (FS1) Oregon State at UCLA
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia at Florida State
1 p.m. (ESPN) Duke at North Carolina
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Mississippi State at Georgia
1 p.m. (SUN) Pittsburgh at Miami
2 p.m. (MNT) LSU atAlabama
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Nebraska at Purdue
2:30 p.m. (ESPNU) South Carolina at Tennessee
2:30 p.m. (FS1) West Virginia at Baylor
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Vanderbilt at Kentucky
2 a.m. (ESPNU) Duke at North Carolina (Same-day Tape)
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Chicago Bulls
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia 76ers at Orlando Magic
7 p.m. (NBA) Dallas Mavericks at San Antonio Spurs
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) New York Knicks at Chicago Bulls (Same-day Tape)
BICYCLING
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Tour of Oman, Stage 1 (Taped)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA League Quarterfinals: Silver Lake Atom Splitters
vs. Dallas Strikers (Taped)
GOLF
5:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Tshwane Open, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Honda Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Honda Classic, Spotlight Coverage
GYMNASTICS
6 p.m. (ESPN2) LSU at Florida (Taped)
HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Flyers at Washington Capitals
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Heritage Classic- Ottawa Senators at Vancouver
Canucks
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston Bruins at New York Rangers
8 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Colorado Avalanche
LACROSSE
9 a.m. (ESPNU) Syracuse at Virginia (Taped)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series Baltimore (Taped)
FISHING
7 a.m. (ESPN2) Bassmaster Classic, Day 2 (Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Bassmaster Classic, Championship (Taped)
RODEO
1 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR Iron Cowboy V (Taped)
SOCCER
11:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur
vs. Cardiff City
TENNIS
5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Brasil Open final (Same-day Tape)
WATER POLO
11 a.m. (ESPNU) Harvard at Princeton


Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel
please contact your cable provider


Florida 60 2231 7 51146 194
Buffalo 60 1834 8 44122 180
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 59 4015 4 84191 144
N.Y Rangers 61 3325 3 69159 151
Philadelphia 61 31 24 6 68169 176
Washington 61 2923 9 67180 181
Columbus 60 3025 5 65178 169
New Jersey 61 2622 13 65146 149
Carolina 60 2625 9 61148 168
N.Y Islanders 62 2331 8 54170 210
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 59 3914 6 84196 137
Chicago 61 3512 14 84208 165
Colorado 60 3817 5 81182 161
Minnesota 61 3321 7 73150 148
Dallas 60 2822 10 66170 169
Winnipeg 62 3026 6 66174 178
Nashville 61 2625 10 62150 185
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 61 4214 5 89197 147
San Jose 61 3817 6 82184 149
Los Angeles 62 3422 6 74150 133


Vancouver 62 2824 10 66148 162
Phoenix 60 2722 11 65167 176
Calgary 59 2230 7 51137 181
Edmonton 61 2034 7 47153 202
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Minnesota 2, Vancouver 1, SO
Buffalo 4, San Jose 2
Colorado 4, Phoenix 2
Anaheim 1, St. Louis 0
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, Boston 2
New Jersey 6, N.Y Islanders 1
Philadelphia 4, N.Y Rangers 2
Columbus 6, Florida 3
Winnipeg 3, Nashville 1
Tampa Bay 4, Dallas 2
Los Angeles 3, Carolina 1
Montreal 4, Toronto 3, OT
Pittsburgh vs. Chicago, late
Calgary at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
San Jose at New Jersey, 3 p.m.
Florida at N.Y Islanders, 3 p.m.
Ottawa vs. Vancouver at Vancouver, British Colum-


bia, 4 p.m.
Boston at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Columbus atToronto, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Toronto
Brooklyn
NewYork
Boston
Philadelphia


Miami
Washington
Charlotte
Atlanta
Orlando


Indiana
Chicago
Cleveland
Detroit
Milwaukee


Atlantic Division
W L Pct
32 26 .552
28 29 .491
21 38 .356
20 40 .333
15 44 .254
Southeast Division
W L Pct
42 14 .750
31 28 .525
27 31 .466
26 31 .456
18 43 .295
Central Division
W L Pct
45 13 .776
32 26 .552
24 36 .400
23 36 .390
11 47 .190


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 42 16 .724 -
Houston 40 19 .678 2
Dallas 36 24 .600 7
Memphis 32 25 .561 9
New Orleans 23 35 .397 19
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 44 15 .746 -
Portland 40 18 .690 3
Minnesota 28 29 .491 15
Denver 25 32 .439 18
Utah 21 37 .362 22
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 40 20 .667 -
Golden State 36 23 .610 3
Phoenix 34 24 .586 5
Sacramento 20 38 .345 19
L.A. Lakers 20 39 .339 19%
Friday's Games
Cleveland 99, Utah 79
Oklahoma City 113, Memphis 107
Golden State 126, NewYork 103
Chicago 100, Dallas 91
San Antonio 92, Charlotte 82
L.A. Lakers 126, Sacramento 122
Phoenix 116, New Orleans 104
Saturday's Games
Washington 122, Philadelphia 103
Miami 112, Orlando 98
Houston 118, Detroit 110
Indiana 102, Boston 97
Brooklyn 107, Milwaukee 98
Cleveland at Memphis, late
Denver at Portland, late
Minnesota at Sacramento, late
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
NewYork at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Golden State atToronto, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Utah at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Memphis atWashington, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
NewYork at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10 p.m.
New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m.




Honda Classic
Saturday
At PGA National Resort and Spa, The
Champion, Palm Beach Gardens
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,140, Par 70
Third Round
Rory Mcllroy 63-66-69- 198 -12
Russell Henley 64-68-68- 200 -10
Russell Knox 70-63-68-201 -9
Jhonattan Vegas 70-66-66-202 -8
Stuart Appleby 69-69-65-203 -7
Keegan Bradley 69-68-66-203 -7
Luke Donald 67-68-68-203 -7
Ryan Palmer 68-66-69-203 -7
Maft Every 66-73-65-204 -6
Cameron Tringale 69-69-66-204 -6
Nicholas Thompson 68-70-66-204 -6
Ted Potter, Jr. 71-66-67-204 -6
Billy Hurley III 70-67-67- 204 -6
Rory Sabbatini 65-71-68-204 -6
Will MacKenzie 67-68-69-204 -6
DanielISummerhays 70-65-69-204 -6
TigerWoods 71-69-65-205 -5
Luke Guthrie 67-73-65-205 -5
Brian Stuard 72-68-65-205 -5
Freddie Jacobson 69-69-67-205 -5
Zach Johnson 67-70-68-205 -5
David Lingmerth 69-68-68-205 -5
Thomas Bjorn 69-66-70-205 -5
Tim Wilkinson 70-69-67-206 -4
Hudson Swafford 67-71-68-206 -4
Tyrone Van Aswegen 67-71-68- 206 -4
George McNeill 70-67-69-206 -4
Stewart Cink 69-68-69-206 -4
Brendan Steele 69-66-71 -206 -4
Jason Kokrak 70-66-70-206 -4
Derek Ernst 66-69-71-206 -4
Jamie Donaldson 65-69-72-206 -4
Lee Westwood 68-65-73-206 -4
Brendon de Jonge 66-64-76-206 -4
Martin Flores 69-70-68-207 -3
Carl Pettersson 72-67-68-207 -3
Brooks Koepka 71-68-68-207 -3
Derek Fathauer 67-71-69-207 -3
Rickie Fowler 69-69-69-207 -3
David Hearn 67-70-70-207 -3
Adam Scott 68-69-70-207 -3
Vijay Singh 69-71-68-208 -2
Sergio Garcia 72-68-68-208 -2
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 71-69-68-208 -2
Charlie Wi 69-71-68-208 -2
Brian Harman 67-72-69-208 -2
CamiloVillegas 71-68-69-208 -2
Chesson Hadley 73-66-69-208 -2
Patrick Reed 71-67-70-208 -2
Ben Crane 69-68-71 -208 -2
Chris Kirk 69-67-72-208 -2
Boo Weekley 68-67-73-208 -2
John Senden 72-63-73-208 -2
Chris Stroud 69-66-73-208 -2
PauICasey 72-68-69--209 -1
Charles Howell III 72-68-69- 209 -1
James Driscoll 68-71-70--209 -1
D.A. Points 70-69-70--209 -1
Andres Romero 70-68-71--209 -1
Maffeo Manassero 67-71-71--209 -1
Josh Teater 70-68-71 --209 -1
Seung-Yul Noh 69-68-72--209 -1
Troy Merritt 68-69-72--209 -1
Graeme McDowell 70-67-72--209 -1
Mark Wilson 67-69-73--209 -1
Nick Watney 71-69-70 --210 E
TrevorlImmelman 69-69-72--210 E
Jeff Overton 69-71-71 -211 +1
Justin Hicks 70-70-71 --211 +1
Ken Duke 68-71-72--211 +1


SCOREBOARD


Horford, cut down home nets
after winning the SEC title and
then lost its next two games.
"I regret that," Donovan said.
Although Donovan believes
his senior-laden team can han-
dle distractions, he figures it's
best to stay focused on the goals
within reach.
"You want to be playing well
this time of year," Donovan
said. "When you get to this
point in time of the season, you
don't want to play like you're
trying to protect something,
when you're back on your
heels, 'We don't want to lose
being No. 1 and we don't want
to lose at home and we want to
keep the streak going."'


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




BUSCH

Continued from Page B1


leading 169 laps in the fall for
his 12th Nationwide victory of
the season.
He had the dominant car at
PIR on Saturday, moving into
the lead on the sixth lap after
starting third. Busch led 83 laps
after that, retook the top spot
on a restart after a pit stop mid-
way through and stayed there
another with about 60 laps left.
'Another dominant day at
Phoenix," Busch said. "Those
days don't come around that
often, so you try to enjoy them
when you can."
Rain put a slight damper on
Busch's run to the checkers
and certainly delayed it.
PIR dodged the heavy down-
pours that spread across the
Phoenix area for most of the
day, but rain sent the fans
scrambling and halted the race
with 32 laps left.
NASCAR sent out the blowers
in an effort to get the track dry,
but another round of storms
moved across the area, soaking
the track and ending the race.
"I just had my hands full, for
whatever reason, and felt kind
of relieved to get it over with
here," said Keselowski, who
will start from the pole for Sun-
day's Sprint Cup race without
crew chief Paul Wolfe, who left
the team for the birth of his
first child. "Third was probably
the best I have done, I was
holding on pretty good there."




TOP

Continued from Page B1


level where I feel it should be,"
he said. 'And I'm pretty much
at that point now"
Saturday wasn't easy
McIlroy might have saved his
day with a bogey on the par-3
seventh. He took a penalty drop
from under a palmetto bush,
and faced a shot off the pine
straw across 20 yards of rough
to an elevated green with the
pin toward the back right The
shot came off perfectly, and he
holed the 8-foot putt for bogey
"It was one of the best up-and-
downs I've ever had, I guess,"
McIlroy said. 'And itwas almost
like a momentum builder I just
bogeyed the last, but walking off
that seventh green with a bogey
almost felt like I had saved par
or I had almost gained a shot on
the field. It kept any momentum
that I had going to the next few
holes."
He closed out his round with
a 5-iron into the wind to 10 feet
of the flag on the 16th for a
birdie, and then narrowly
missed two birdie chances on
the closing holes.
McIlroy was at 12-under 198.
Asked about the importance
of winning on a major tour for
the first time since the World
Tour Championship in Dubai
at the end of 2012, and the first
time since the BMW Champi-
onship at Crooked Stick in 2012
on the PGA Tour, Boy Wonder
grappled for the right answer
"It would be nice. It would be
my seventh PGA Tour win," he
said. "That's what it is. No big-
ger, no smaller"



FINISH


Continued from Page B1


The Gators clinched the title
Thursday night with Ken-
tucky's loss to Arkansas, and
many expected they would cer-
emoniously celebrate in front
of a sellout crowd Saturday.
It was never going to happen.
Prather, Young and fellow sen-
iors Scottie Wilbekin and Will
Yeguete chose not to cut down
the nets.
"We felt it was given to us
when Kentucky lost," Wilbekin
said. "I was sitting on my couch
watching TV I didn't do
anything."
Coach Billy Donovan would-
n't have let them do it anyway,
especially not with what hap-
pened in 2007. That team, the
defending national champion
led by Joakim Noah and Al




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AP source: Incognito receiving treatment


Associated Press

MIAMI Embattled for-
mer Miami Dolphins
guard Richie Incognito is
receiving treatment in the
wake of the team's bully-
ing scandal, a person fa-
miliar with the situation
said Saturday
The person commented
to The Associated Press on
condition of anonymity be-
cause Incognito hasn't dis-
cussed the situation
publicly The person said
the NFL Players Associa-
tion is supporting Incog-
nito's treatment.


Another person familiar
with Incognito's situation
said the veteran lineman
is exhausted after being
"dragged through the
mud" in recent months.
Incognito has sent
tweets in recent weeks
that varied dramatically in
tone. He went on a rant
that quickly went viral,
blasting former teammate
Jonathan Martin and his
agent, then later tweeted
apologies to Martin, Dol-
phins owner Stephen Ross
and Ted Wells, the attor-
ney who investigated the
bullying scandal for the


NFL.
On Thursday, police in
Scottsdale, Ariz., said In-
cognito told an officer he
put several dents in the
hood of his Ferrari in an
apparent tantrum.
Wells' investigation de-
termined Incognito and
two other offensive line-
men engaged in persistent
harassment of Martin, an-
other offensive lineman
and an assistant trainer.
After a report on the in-
vestigation was released
last month, the Dolphins
fired offensive line coach
Jim Turner and longtime


trainer Kevin O'Neill.
Martin abruptly left the
Dolphins last October, un-
derwent counseling for
emotional issues and al-
leged persistent harass-
ment by teammates.
Incognito was suspended
Nov. 3 and missed the final
eight games.

Embattled former Miami
Dolphins guard Richie
Incognito is receiving
treatment in the wake of
the team's bullying scandal,
a person familiar with the
situation said Saturday.
Associated Press


Good cause


Special to the Chronicle
From left, Dave Williams, former Tampa Bay Buccaneers tight end Anthony Becht and Hall Of Fame Big Buc Nasty
helped raise money for Tourette's Syndrome at the Plantation Inn Golf Tournament on Saturday.




KFC a big hit with children


Special to the Chronicle

The rain held off and
the fish were biting at Cit-
rus County Parks & Recre-
ation's 10th annual Kid's
Fishing Clinic. Over 250
children between the ages
of 5 to 15 came out to enjoy
the day and learn about
fishing and our local water
environments from FWC,
DEP, and a wonderful
group of volunteers. They
learned things such as
knot tying, the proper way
to handle a fish, the right
tackle to use and what
type of sea life are found
in the Gulf of Mexico.
After visiting each sta-
tion, the participants then
received their free rod
and reel thanks to Fish
Florida and were able to
do some fishing off the
Fort Island Trail Park Pier
in Crystal River After they
finished fishing, each par-
ticipant received a goodie
bag provided by Sea Tow
that was filled with fishing
information and extra
tackle.
P.L.A.Y.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's P.L.A.Y. pro-
grams are designed for chil-
dren ages 3 to 5 who aren't
quite ready for the organized
sports leagues with in the
county.
The P.L.A.Y programs of-
fered in the upcoming session
includes basketball, which will


Special to the Chronicle
The Kids' Fishing Clinic was held on Feb. 22 off the Fort Island Trail Park Pier in
Crystal River. The event, offered free of charge to kids aged 5 to 15, was a success.


be held at the Citrus County
Resource Center on Mondays
or Wednesdays; and flag foot-
ball, located at Bicentennial
Park on Tuesdays or Thurs-
days. The next session be-
gins the week of March 31.
Boys and girls, ages 3 to 5,
are encouraged to join the six-
week program. After enroll-
ment, each child receives
age-appropriate sports equip-
ment and a team T-shirt.
Registration opens on Mon-
day, March 10 and space is
limited. Please contact Crysta
Henry, Recreation Program


Specialist for Youth Programs,
at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com,
for more information.
Youth golf lessons
Registration for spring golf
lessons opens on March 12.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with Pine Ridge Golf
Course, will be holding
Spring youth golf lessons.
The lessons will be held at
Pine Ridge Golf Course on
Wednesday evenings from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. They will


begin on Wednesday, April 2
and run for four weeks. Chil-
dren ages 6 to 15 are eligi-
ble and the cost is $50 per
child. Instruction will be
given by golf pro Randy
Robbins and several of his
volunteers. During these
lessons, participants will
learn putting, driving, chip-
ping, on-course play, and
on-course etiquette.
For more info, contact
Crysta Henry at 352-527-
7543, www.citruscounty
parks.com, or Randy
Robbins at 352-746-6177.


Webb, Stanford set for showdown


Associated Press

SINGAPORE Karrie Webb and
Angela Stanford were so close down
the stretch Saturday at the HSBC
Women's Champions, matching each
other birdie for birdie, that Stanford
only sees one way to get the advan-
tage in Sunday's final round.
"I'm going to send Webbie a six-
pack (of beer) tonight," she said.
Webb wasn't sure that would
help. "I'll probably drink wine cool-
ers," the Australian veteran said.
The two players set up a show-
down between former HSBC cham-
pions after finishing off their third
rounds with identical birdies over


three of the last five holes Saturday
to separate themselves slightly from
the rest of the crowded leaderboard.
Webb, the 2011 winner, shot a 70
to move to 11-under 205, one stroke
ahead of 2012 champion Stanford,
who had a 69.
They both have a chance to be the
first repeat champion of the tour-
nament, although on two different
courses. Both players picked up
their first HSBC crown at Singa-
pore's Tanah Merah Country Club
and this year's event is being played
at the Sentosa Golf Club.
Still, Stanford said, there are
enough other quality players within
striking range after a momentum-


shifting day that anybody could
claim the title.
Among those chasing Webb and
Stanford are Spain's Azahara
Munoz, who fired an eagle and four
birdies for a 5-under 67, the low
round of the day; and Taiwan's
Teresa Lu, who gave up her LPGA
membership in 2010 to concentrate
on playing in Japan. Both are tied
for third at 8-under 208.
America's Paula Creamer, who
briefly held the lead with Webb and
Munoz on Saturday, had six birdies
to go with three bogeys to sit in fifth
place at 7 under
Morgan Pressel of the United
States was at 6 under


Praying for


average


kiing last week with
my oldest daughter,
a ski instructor in
Colorado and another one
of my dearest
friends, I be-
came acutely
aware of those
athletes that
are not average.
After going to
the washroom
at the top of this
rather_
p om p o u s Dr. Ron
mountain re-
sort and drying DOCi
my hands in a ORD
hand dryer
with tornado winds, I was
pushed from behind
rather rudely As I turned
to brawl, I saw the vest my
assailant was wearing, it
stated ...
visually impaired skier
Overlooked in the last
few years and especially
in the last few weeks with
the Olympics and athletic
feats of yes, Olympic pro-
portions, are the rest of us
... average athletes. Most
average athletes will
never be Olympians,
world champions or na-
tional competitors or will
they?
After viewing some of
the stories NBC has por-
trayed of kids with con-
genital birth defects and
veterans with devastating
war injuries returning to
Olympic competition and
Paralympic competition
puts a perspective on how
some of these athletes
have overcome severe
physical liabilities to go
well beyond average.
These Paralympians and
Special Olympians have
even a greater task to
overcome, significant
physical and intellectual
impairments.
The Paralympics in-
cludes mobility disabili-
ties including
amputations, blindness,
cerebral palsy and con-
genital problems. "Para",
a Greek preposition,
refers to a competition
held in parallel with the
Olympic Games. The Spe-
cial Olympics is the
sports organization for
children and adults with
intellectual disabilities.
It was started in order to
have intellectually-chal-
lenged children become
involved in physical ac-
tivity and athletic compe-
tition as both therapy and
fun.
Yes, NBC has severely
overdramatized athletes'
motivation by emphasiz-
ing the death of family
members, childhood dis-
asters and other attempts
at exuding emotion to
boost viewership. But the
point that seemed to be
lost by all the emotion, as
well as announcer Bob
Costas' ailments, was that
it was sports and athletics
that helped these people
not only become average
but exceed expectations
to Olympian heights of
accomplishment.
As these veterans re-
turned with their war in-
juries and these kids
were born with impair-
ments how often did they
and or their parents wish
and pray just to be
average.
There is a huge differ-
ence between parents
who are constantly cor-
recting homework, taking


II


B or C students to a tutor,
doing their kids projects
or getting overly involved
in their kids' sports suc-
cess. In compar-
ison, there are
parents putting
on artificial
limbs so a baby
or infant starts
adapting to legs
in order to
walk.
Other parents
are trying to
Joseph control an
OR'S overly aggres-
ERS sive child with
ADD/ADHD so
he or she can
participate in sports and a
social network or a blind
child skiing and gaining
confidence in her or his
ability to independently
access and enjoy the
world and sports.
Many times the common
treatment denominator is
through exercise and fre-
quently through sports.
Sports and athletics pro-
vide a goal. Exercise and
sports provide a level of
achievement; while it can
be frustrating regardless
of impairment, it is a
means of gaining access
and enjoyment of the
world, both physically and
mentally
For most impaired ath-
letes, sports, athletics and
exercise is a tool to be
able to function in a
world where most people
are average but with
limbs, vision or minds
that are considered
unimpaired.
According to "experts,"
only about 10 percent of
kids are really gifted; ac-
ademically, athletically or
creatively. The rest are
just average kids that are
fun, silly, act weird, are
tiring to parents and are
liked or disliked by some
peers. Most parents these
days don't want average
kids. Parents want their
children to excel in base-
ball, soccer, ballet, home-
work or the school
musical.
How many of those Spe-
cial Olympic and Para-
lympic parents would just
like to see their kids walk
into breakfast without a
prosthesis, a cane or
wheelchair?
By pushing our kids to
shoot for the brightest
star, we are signaling that
they are not good enough
exactly as they are. Again,
the "experts" note that the
long-term effect on these
kids pressured to excel
beyond their average abil-
ity, are adults who are in-
secure or believe that
their best is never good
enough.
Most of these extraordi-
nary Olympians with and
without impairments are
there because their par-
ents loved, supported and
cared for them. The thing
at which we don't want to
fail at is being good
parents.
When I look at it all, I'm
praying for average and
smile when the visually im-
paired guy is skiing past me.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand, shoulder and upper
extremity orthopedic sur-
geon with SeaSpine Ortho-
pedic Institute and
Olympic Bronze medalist,
can be reached at
rbjhandcox.net.


SPORTS


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 B5




SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 BASEBALL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLI





Rays, Pirates forge tie


Nationals win

iId 16-15 game

against Braves

Associated Press

)RADENTON Wandy Ro-
guez had a solid spring train-
debut while facing major
gue batters for the first time
nearly nine months, and the
tsburgh Pirates and Tampa
Rays played to a 2-all tie in
innings.
todriguez worked one inning
the Pirates, did not allow a
and struck out two. It was a
d first step back for the
,-hander, who missed most of
season due to persistent
earm pain.
tays left-hander David Price
sed 12/3 innings and allowed
run on one hit.
'he Pirates made three er-
s, including a booted
under by shortstop Robert
lino that led to an unearned
i. Clint Barmes had an RBI
ible and Russell Martin hit a
: home run.
Nats 16, Braves 15
'I ERA- Jordan Zimmermann
zed through two shutout innings
i only 20 pitches for the Washing-
Nationals in what turned into a
I, 16-15 win over the Atlanta
ves.
'immermann, who tied for the NL
I with 19 wins last season, gave
)ne hit and struck out one in his
f appearance.
,tlanta and Washington com-
d for 31 runs on 37 hits, includ-
11 doubles. There were six
rs, five by Washington, and a
ibined 14 walks.
like Fontenot drove in four runs
Tyler Moore had three RBIs for
Nationals.
ordan Schafer went 3 for 3 and
bled twice for Atlanta. Matt Lipka
three hits and four RBIs. Braves
ter Julio Teheran threw two
reless innings.
he scoring came mostly in the
die innings. It was 2-all after the
1, and 16-15 after the sixth.
'ankees 4, Phillies 0
AMPA- Masahiro Tanaka
hed two shutout innings in his
ng training debut, allowing two
and striking out three as New
(Yankees blanked the Philadel-
Phillies 4-0.
he Japanese star entered in the
inning, following CC Sabathia
Hiroki Kuroda. Some fans stood
m Tanaka took the mound.
oth Sabathia and Kuroda threw
shutout innings.
anaka signed a $155 million,
en-year contract in January. He
; 24-0 with a 1.27 ERA last year
e leading the Rakuten Golden
Miles to their first Japan Series title.
Twins 6, Red Sox 2
ORT MYERS Chris
melee's three-run homer off left-
ded reliever Jose Mijares broke
n a close game in the sixth in-
1, and the Minnesota Twins went
o beat the Boston Red Sox 6-2.
larmelee hit just .172 against left-
last year. He opened the season
he Twins' everyday right fielder
gradually lost playing time until
ig sent back to Triple-A at the


Associated Press
Tampa Bay pitcher David Price throws against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the first inning Saturday in
Bradenton. Price gave up one run on one hit in 1 2/3 innings of work.


All-Star break.
The former first-round draft pick is
out of minor league options.
The Twins unveiled a $48.5 mil-
lion renovation of their spring com-
plex. A Hammond Stadium-record
crowd of 8,547 was on hand.
Joe Mauer added a run-scoring
single in the first for the Twins.
Marlins (ss) 9, Mets 1
PORT ST. LUCIE Reed John-
son hit a two-run single to highlight a
five-run sixth inning as the Miami
Marlins' split-squad team beat the
New York Mets 9-1.
Lucas Duda hit a towering homer
to right-center field for the Mets' lone
run in the fourth.
Duda is competing with Ike Davis
to be New York's first baseman.
Davis hit a home run against Wash-
ington on Friday.
Marlins starter Kevin Slowey and
Mets starter John Lannan, both non-
roster invitees competing to be fifth
starters, each pitched two scoreless
innings. Slowey allowed one hit and
struck out four. Lannan allowed one
hit and struck out three.
The Mets committed three errors,
one by Duda. Mets reliever John
Church threw three wild pitches in
an inning.
Orioles 9, Blue Jays 7
SARASOTA- Chris Davis hit a
two-run double, scoring Nelson
Cruz in his Orioles debut and help-
ing Baltimore beat the Toronto Blue
Jays 9-7.
Cruz, who signed with the Orioles
on Monday, walked and scored from
first on Davis' double.
In his first game of the spring,
Davis, who led the majors with 53
home runs last season, was 1 for 3.
Toronto starter Drew Hutchison,
competing for the fifth starter's
job, struck out four in two score-
less innings.
Miguel Gonzalez gave up one
run on three hits in two innings for
Baltimore.
The Orioles overcame a 7-2
deficit when they scored seven runs
in the eighth. The big hits were a
bases-loaded triple by Francisco
Peguero and a two-run single by
Xavier Paul.


Marlins (ss) 5,
Cardinals 4
JUPITER Cardinals starter
Lance Lynn allowed one hit in two
shutout innings as a split squad of
Miami Marlins beat St. Louis 5-4.
Lynn is coming off his first season
of pitching at least 200 innings. He
said he hasn't experienced any ill ef-
fects following that workload.
The Marlins won on Avery Romero's
game-ending single in the ninth.
St. Louis hit Nathan Eovaldi hard
but only managed one run off the
Marlins starter.
Randal Grichuk, acquired in the
trade that sent David Freese to the
Angels, appeared to be fooled by
Eovaldi's offspeed pitch yet still gen-
erated enough power with a one-
handed swing to send a line drive
over the head of center fielder Mar-
cell Ozuna for an RBI triple.
Miami scored four times in the
fourth, with Jarrod Saltalamacchia,
Greg Dobbs, Jeff Mathis and Ozuna
all getting RBIs.
Scott Moore's solo homer in the
Cardinals eighth made it 4-all.
Tigers 5, Astros 1
LAKELAND Scott Feldman
pitched two scoreless innings in his
first spring start for Houston, allow-
ing only one hit in the Astros' 5-1
loss to the Detroit Tigers.
Austin Jackson had two hits for
Detroit, which scored all five runs in
the fourth inning.
Feldman signed a three-year, $30
million contract with the Astros in the
offseason, and Houston hopes the
31-year-old right-hander can provide
stability at the top of the rotation.
Feldman went 12-12 with a 3.86
ERA last year while splitting time be-
tween the Chicago Cubs and Balti-
more Orioles.
He allowed a walk to Miguel Cabr-
era and a single to Jackson.
Cabrera's single started Detroit's
fourth-inning rally, which also in-
cluded a two-run double by Don
Kelly.
Brewers (ss) 6,
Dodgers 5
PHOENIX- Ryan Braun ignored


loud boos in his home spring debut,
producing a single and a walk as a
Milwaukee Brewers split squad beat
the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-5.
Braun's first at-bat at Maryvale
Baseball Park was met with a vocal
and extended chorus of boos, espe-
cially from the third-base side
loaded with a large contingent of
Dodgers fans.
Braun walked and scored on a
single by Carlos Gomez. In the third,
Brewers fans on the first-base side
tried to drown out the boos with a
louder round of cheers before his in-
field single.
The former NL MVP was sus-
pended for the final 65 games of the
season last year for his role in the
Biogenesis drug scandal. Braun
homered Thursday in his first at-bat
of exhibition play at Oakland's park.
Milwaukee starter Kyle Lohse
threw two perfect innings. Los Ange-
les starter Dan Haren allowed a run
in two innings.
Reds 3, Rockies 2
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Ramon
Santiago singled home a run, stole
second and scored on a wild pitch
as the Cincinnati Reds beat the Col-
orado Rockies 3-2.
Brayan Pena doubled and scored
on Santiago's single. Neftali Soto
doubled home a run.
Pena and Satiago both played in
Detroit last season.
Nelson Arenado had three singles
and an RBI. Former Reds infielder
Paul Janish singled and scored two
runs for the Rockies.
The game was played despite the
first rain in the Phoenix area since
December 21.
Chien-Ming Wang pitched for
Cincinnati for the first time this
spring. He allowed one run on five
hits, striking out two.
Royals 7, Padres 3,
7 innings
SURPRISE, Ariz. Jason Var-
gas pitched two scoreless innings in
his Kansas City debut and Alex Gor-
don doubled home two runs as the
Royals beat the San Diego Padres
7-3 that was called after seven in-
nings because of rain.


Vargas, who signed to a four-year
$32 million contract in the offseason,
allowed one hit and struck out one,
throwing 13 strikes in 19 pitches.
The Royals signed Vargas to re-
place Ervin Santana, who remains
unsigned on the free agent market,
in the rotation.
Gordon's double in the four-run
third scored Christian Colon and Jar-
rod Dyson, who walked twice and
scored a pair of runs.
Cameron Maybin, who was lim-
ited to 14 Padres games last year
because of injuries, hit a long two-
run homer in the third.
Padres right-hander Ian Kennedy
threw two scoreless innings, striking
out two.
Mariners 5, Angels 3,
7 innings
PEORIA, Ariz. Robinson Cano
got two hits and made a pair of
smooth plays in the field as the
Seattle Mariners beat the Los Ange-
les Angels 5-3 in a game shortened
to seven innings because of rain.
Cano struck out in the first inning
against C.J. Wilson. The Seattle
newcomer hit an RBI single in the
third and later scored on Dustin Ack-
ley's RBI double.
Cano was sharp at second base,
making a charging grab and flip to
get Ian Stewart in the first. This was
Cano's second game for the
Mariners in his debut, he singled
on the first pitch he saw.
Scott Baker threw two scoreless
innings to start his bid for a spot in
Seattle's rotation. He gave up one hit,
walked one and struck out win in his
first start of the spring as Seattle im-
proved to 3-0 in Cactus League play.
Athletics 2, Rangers 2,
9 innings
PHOENIX Oakland designated
hitter Yoenis Cespedes drove in a run
with a sacrifice fly against Martin
Perez as the Athletics and Texas
Rangers played to a 2-all tie. The
game was stopped after nine innings.
Billy Burns, who replaced Coco
Crisp in the starting lineup just be-
fore gametime, had two hits, stole
two bases and recorded a pair of
outfield assists for the A's. He also
scored both runs, tying the game on
an infield error.
Engel Beltre had two hits for the
Rangers. Jurickson Profar and
Jared Hoying each drove in runs.
Perez allowed a run on one hit in
his two innings. He walked two and
struck out one. A's starter Sonny
Gray also went two innings, giving
up a pair of hits, walking two and
striking out two.
D'backs (ss) 2, Brewers
(ss) 1, 4 1/2 innings
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Mark
Trumbo homered in his return to
the lineup and the Arizona Dia-
mondbacks beat the Milwaukee
Brewers 2-1 Saturday in a split-
squad game shortened to 4 1/2
innings because of rain.
The game was delayed 36 min-
utes at the start by showers. The
rain came back in the bottom of the
fifth inning and the game was called
with one out.
Logan Schafer tripled and scored in
the top of the first for the Brewers.
Trumbo answered with a towering
home run to left field in the bottom half.
Trumbo went 1 for 2. The Dia-
mondbacks newcomer was
scratched from the lineup on Friday
with a sore left heel.


Ia

season after slump, 7rvs'po regroups


Associated Press
anta Braves outfielder B.J. Upton bats Thursday
iinst the Detroit Tigers in Lakeland.


Associated Press

KISSIMMEE -B.J.
Upton was suffering
through the most dreadful
season of his career and lit-
tle brother Justin was in the
same Atlanta clubhouse, a
perfect shoulder to lean on
as he navigated through the
unfathomable time.
But he didn't seek com-
fort from him.
In fact, he didn't reach
out to anyone for help.
"It was difficult, but I'm
kind of a loner," Upton told
The Associated Press, his
gaze fixed skyward as he
sat in the dugout on a re-
cent dreary day in spring
camp. "I handle things my
own way. That's just kind
of the way it is."
Justin is three years
B.J.'s junior, shorter and
stockier, but in his face
and the timbre of his
voice, the resemblance is
unmistakable.
The younger Upton
shook his head when asked
if it surprised him that B.J.
didn't ask for his support
when he dealt with hitting
just .184 and being
benched in his first year


with the Braves. The
season-long slump came
after he signed a five-year,
$75.25 million contract
"Nobody's going to help
you fix yourself," Justin
said. "People take that a
little too far, I think. Until
something clicks with you
in your mind things won't
go the right direction. You
have to fix yourself before
anyone else can."
OK, but surely B.J.
talked to his parents, with
whom he's very close,
about his problems.
Nope.
Not his mother and not
even his father, Manny
"Bossman" Upton, his
namesake and the reason
the man born Melvin
Emanuel is known as
"Bossman Junior" or sim-
ply B.J.
"What could anyone re-
ally say to me? None of
them had gone through
what I had gone through
last year," he said. "No-
body could relate, so I
dealt with it on my own."
So he'd trudge home fol-
lowing each bad game and
try to sort through things
solo.


"I'd go home and re-
group and come back the
next day to work and try to
fix it," he said. "It just
never panned out"
The center fielder's dis-
taste at confiding in any-
one about just how much
his struggles bothered him
didn't stop scores of peo-
ple from offering unso-
licited advice. It seemed
there was someone at
every turn with a proposed
solution to his woes.
'And that's the prob-
lem," he said, "everybody
wants to throw in their two
cents all the time and you
start trying to listen to
everybody and before you
know it you've got 100 peo-
ple in your head. And
you're trying to play with
him telling you something
and him telling you some-
thing, and you just kind of
take it with you to the
field."
The 29-year-old, who
was the second overall
pick in the 2002 draft by
Tampa Bay and made his
major league debut at just
19, doesn't fault those who
reached out to him. But, he
believes at almost 30, he


should be able to handle
things alone.
"They want to help, but I
just think sometimes you
can get too much informa-
tion and that's kind of what
happened," he said. "It
just kind of snowballed. I
started off struggling, kind
of hit the panic button and
it never stopped."
His contract was the
biggest ever given to a free
agent by the Braves, a fact
that Upton said led to a
"bad situation." He was so
busy striving to live up to
the expectations put on
him by such a huge deal
that he let it affect his play
But lofty expectations
aren't anything new for
Upton, who was touted as
a five-tool, game-changing
player when he was
drafted out of high school.
He became a key starter
for Tampa Bay, hitting
seven home runs in the
postseason when the Rays
reached the World Series
in 2008, becoming the first
player in franchise history
to hit for the cycle a year
later and stealing more
than 40 bases in three
consecutive seasons.


- - -T I ---- -


E











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Taxpayers will pay to clean up the chaos


ounty Commissioner
Scott Adams called
me out on Tuesday at
the Board of County Com-
missioners meeting.
Adams manages to make
the headlines almost every
time the county board
meets because he attacks
those who don't see the
world the way he does.
What I have told Adams
on the side is that he could
be an effective county com-


missioner if he cut out the
wild accusations and drama.
During a heated debate
over an ordinance that
would require commission-
ers and citizens to be civil,
Adams said: "Gerry Mulli-
gan wants Scott Adams to
do exactly what the status
quo does and that's not
going to happen. I'm going
to do the right thing for
everybody in Citrus
County"


Adams missed the point
of our conversations, so I
think it's important to put
this out for public consump-
tion. Rejecting the status quo
is fine and even desirable.
But attacking, defaming and
insulting those who dis-
agree with you is a fighting
technique that won't result
in any accomplishments.
The biggest problem with
Adams' first year as a com-
missioner is that he does


not know how to make his
point without insulting many
of the folks in the room.
Sometimes his point is a
good one. But usually it gets
lost in the uproar he causes
by his totally inappropriate
delivery
Other times his points are
absurd and extraordinarily
paranoid, and his delivery
is just as bad at those times.
The freshman commis-
sioner is acting like a


schoolyard bully who walks
up to an adversary, punches
him in the nose, and then
demands that the bleeding
adversary listen to his point
of view
It's not going to happen.
There are times when it
does not appear that Adams
even realizes what he says.
During the Tuesday debate
on civility, Adams actually

See""N"/Page C3


BOB TANNEHIILJChronicle file
Don Knotts casts one of his signature expressions while posing with Citrus County Chamber of Commerce President Arthur Gouldbourn, left,
and Suncoast Chamber of Commerce President Duncan MacRae on Feb. 17, 1964, at the premiere of "The Incredible Mr. Limpet" in Weeki Wachee.


DON,




IF NOT




DON JUAN


MIKE ARNOLD
Chronicle

t was the talk of the town
the year, early in the
196os, the famous movie
star came to town.

He stayed at the Plantation Inn
and mugged for photos in all the
local newspapers. He brought an
entourage of other famous movie
and radio stars at the time.
No, I am not talking about Elvis.


On a rainy Friday night, Feb. 17,
1964, comic actor Don Knotts
watched the premiere of his new
movie, "The Incredible Mr.
Limpet," 20 feet underwater at
Weeki Wachee.
Knotts, his costar Carole Cook,
and famous radio personality
Arthur Godfrey were among the
dignitaries who attended the
event. The stars and their en-
tourage stayed at the Plantation
Inn in Crystal River

See DON/Page C3


Don Knotts and Arthur Godfrey at the premiere of Knotts
new film "The Incredible Mr. Limpet."


F

Forget tests: Focus on the love of learmng


I have always been a follower
of Gerry Mulligan's writing.
I don't know if it is the com-
mon Catholic school influence
on our view of life or he just has
an interesting perspective on
the world. I am sure it is both. It
touched me when he wrote
about a childhood experience as
a young paperboy who took a lit-
tle time to listen to a Holocaust
survivor Mrs. Larson, Gerry's
customer, was marked by a de-
grading series of numbers tat-


tooed on her wrist, put there giftedness. It is one-dimensional
when she entered the Auschwitz and tragically linear in thought.
camp. No human should ever be On the same day Gerry's col-
a number, and it obviously moved umn was published, Nat Hentoff
him to this day wrote about a 70-
This scarring by Greg Biance year-old retired ed-
numbers still goes GUEST ucator named
on today not to COLUMN Carmen Farina. The
minimize the hor- mayor asked her to
rific event that tar- return and help re-
geted Jews. I loathe the current form New York's education sys-
business model driving education tem. Her vision is about bringing
today It marks humans without "joy" back into the classroom. It
a soul and without depth of other is about inspiring children to


learn and grow
As the politically right have
continued to push accountabil-
ity through excess testing in
Florida, the classroom has suf-
fered. Yes, our end-of-course
scores can go up, but it is the
lifelong learning where my
greatest concern has height-
ened. The trick is not in moving
numbers, but moving people to
want to learn. I am disillusioned
by Florida's political forces that
place monetary value to human


value. If that is the case, I have
little value as an educator The
rich businessman, ballplayer,
actor only have real value. Num-
bers do not lead to superiority,
just more money or a bigger pay-
check. A few kids get bragging
rights and others walk away
marked as not good enough to
learn in school. This negative
correlation can metastasize into
every fiber of a human.

See B----E/Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW




"We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately."


DPage C2- SUNDAY, MARCH 2,2014

PINION


IIITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Rebecca Martin ........................ citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ............ ....... copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DEAD-END STREET




ack of respect



responsible for



dncivii behavior


ast week, Citrus County
Commissioners voted
. 4-1 to adopt a Civility
I Decorum Code.
'his measure is not the
t of its kind numerous
cities and municipalities
Florida have adopted sim-
r ordinances.
,ommissioner Scott
ams, who voted against the
finance, is the one who
'st needs to adopt a greater
asure of civility in his


alings with fel-
v commission-
;and county
ff, according to
least one other
nmissioner.
'hat said, this
finance will
L have a posi-
E effect.
civility is a mat-


For his part, Commission
Chair "JJ" Kenney will con-
tinue to gavel away and call
for recess in the hope cooler
heads will prevail.
What happens when the
gavel no longer works and
stronger measures are needed?
Will dragging a commissioner
from chambers accomplish
anything? Will Adams suddenly
develop the necessary personal
responsibility to act civil?
No.


THE ISSUE:
County Civility and
Decorum Code.

OUR OPINION:
Measure will have
no positive impact.


of personal responsibility.
-equires addressing others
,h respect. Adams has
,de it clear he does not re-
,ct his fellow commission-
;, nor does he respect
inty staff. They, in turn,
ve lost any respect, profes-
nal or personal, they might
ve reserved for Adams and
elected position. Civility
I decorum will not prevail
t because a piece of paper
lares it must.
dams will continue to
1 at staff, calling them in-
npetent when they don't
)duce the answers he
,ks. He will label his fellow
nmissioners as liars when
,y don't agree with his
;itions.


Some will cheer,
others will jeer,
but the black eye
for the county will
not fade for years.
It is time com-
missioners recog-
nized Adams'
actions for what
they are pure
theater.


His mission is not to become
a reasonable lawmaker who
is setting a proper course for
the county's future. He aims
to inflame, discredit, and fer-
ret out perceived wrongdoing
and in the end he wants four
more just like him straws
stirring things up.
What will really have an
impact is if commissioners
and senior staff refuse to be
part of the act. Don't engage.
If Adams wants to act out, let
it be on his own.
If there is substance to the
blather, so be it- the citizens
deserve to know. However, if
the alternative is true, and
this is all an act, voters will
quickly tire of the one-man
show.


Benjamin Franklin, at the signing of the
Declaration of Indepdendence, July 4, 1776


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Thinking outside the cell


ttorney General Eric
Holder, long dutifully
obedient to his boss's
vandalizing of the Constitution,
now emerges as a vital oppo-
nent of one of the most damag-
ing abuses in our history of the
American definition of justice.
Quoted in "Breaking our
prison habit" in the Feb. 13
New York DailyNews by the in-
valuably probing news analyst
Errol Lewis, Eric Holder declares:
"Too many Americans go to too
many prisons for far
too long, and for no
truly good law en-
forcement reason."
How many Ameri-
cans are what Errol
Lewis adds to Eric
Holder's judgment of
our overflowing cages:
"The number of
inmates in federal Nat H
prisons has soared
by a staggering 800
percent since 1980, VOl
and federal lockouts
are now 40 percent over
capacity...
"Individual states are groan-
ing under the burden as well.
Nebraska's prisons are at 140
percent of capacity Oklahoma's
have exceeded 99 percent of
capacity
Adds Lewis: "The failed war
on drugs has also swelled the
prison population. Addicts
caught with small amounts of
the illegal poison they ingest-
30 grams of cocaine, for exam-
ple, the equivalent of 30 restau-
rant sugar packets can be
labeled 'traffickers' and tossed
into prison for years."
And in 'America on Probation,"
(New York Times, Jan. 27), Bill
Keller, the Times columnist and
former executive editor, made
this key accusatory point: "The
quest for safe and humane al-
ternatives to lockup faces oppo-
sition from prosecutors protecting
their leverage, from corrections
employee unions protecting
jobs and from a private prison
industry protecting profits.
"(Private prison operators,
who house about 9 percent of
prison inmates, have a vested
interest in keeping prisons full


r
HI
c


because they are paid based on
occupancy)."
And now comes Eric Holder,
not only protesting our epi-
demic of prisons but also trying
to do something about keeping
Americans released from pris-
ons from going back after they
become free citizens again.
On Feb. 11, the Brennan Cen-
ter for Justice at New York Uni-
versity school of Law reported
on Holder's "great step forward
on restoring voting rights."
On that day, the at-
torney general
"urged states to re-
store voting rights to
people of past crimi-
nal convictions." To
be covered, the
Brennan Center ex-
plained, are "those
who have completed
entoff probation, parole and
IER paid all fines. Many
states already go
DES further than this and
restore rights upon
release from incarceration."
But Myrna Perez, Democracy
Program Deputy Director, re-
minds us that "Nearly 6 million
Americans are barred from vot-
ing because of a criminal con-
viction in their past."
And dig this: "Three states
permanently disenfranchise
the citizens."
Calling Eric Holder's pledge
"a significant step forward for
democracy," she makes the im-
portant point that "citizens with
criminal convictions who are
living and working in our com-
munities should have the re-
sponsibility and the right to
participate in our democracy by
voting.
"Congress should act quickly
to pass the Democracy Restora-
tion Act, which would restore
voting rights and federal elec-
tions to those who have served
their time." This Congress?
Where a majority of both par-
ties are far less concerned with
strengthening actual real-time
democracy than with dominat-
ing the ceaseless civil war in
the House and Senate?
Moreover, adds Nicole
Austin-Hillery, director of the


Brennan Center's Washington
office: "With the largest prison
population in the world and
millions of Americans caught in
a system of mass incarceration,
ensuring that former offenders
can fully regain their core
rights as American citizens is a
vital means of reducing recidi-
vism, by integrating them back
into society"
As I will report in detail later,
a new book by Doran Larson
presents a collection of essays
written by prisoners across
America. In "Fourth City: Es-
says From the Prisons in Amer-
ica," (Michigan State University
Press), Larson tells you in his
introduction:
"The United States imprisons
a greater number and percent-
age of its own citizens than any
other nation on Earth; greater
than Russia, China, Cuba or Iran"
From his cage, James Cas-
trillo of Maine writes in "Fourth
City:" "I was blind to the reality
that the path I was on leads
nowhere, and fast ... Is this too
great an obstacle to overcome?
A part of me says, yes, there's no
sense in trying; it's too hard, too
late...
'Another part of me, the
strongest part, won't quit. Wants
to keep fighting. I think of how
badly... I want to make it in this
world, the right way ... Can I
overcome the disappointment
that tests my sanity?
"Disappointment is useless
in a place like this because it
gets you nowhere."
What Eric Holder and others
are doing, says Errol Lewis,
"adds up to the start of some-
thing big: a nation beginning to
think outside the cell when it
comes to crime and justice."
As always, how big a change
depends on you, the citizen
voter


Nat Hentoffis a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


Hot Corner: ADAMS & BOCC

hople's commissioner We want Adams' voice


looray for Commissioner
)tt Adams standing up for the
zens of Citrus County. Why is
iat if you do not go along
i the flow, you are labeled a
iblemaker. For too long now,
commissioners have been
ying favorites and not listen-
to the people who elected
m. It is time for a big change
v, and next election we need
;peak up and break up the
)d-ol' boys and vote for peo-
who will represent the
inty. Thank you,
)tt Adams, for being
the people.
)n't stop, Scott
,eep up the good work,
)tt. We finally have a
inty commissioner
D is bringing to light
ne of the backdoor
ils our county com- CA
;sioners have been
)lved in for years. 563
)tt is holding their feet
he fire and they don't like it.
applause for Adams
applaud Scott Adams. I believe
is trying to point out the
)d-ol'-boy network in the
nmissioners. I believe he is
dinst like David and Goliath. I
ieve that (Rebecca) Bays and
e) Meek are trying to silence
i, as well as (JJ) Kenney. Just
:ause he's pointing out cor-
,tion and just inadequacy in
county commissioners, he's
ng singled out. We elected
i because he was not afraid
;tand up to the boys.


I

(


I am watching the county
commission meeting on Feb. 25.
What a joke. Commissioners
need to realize that Scott
Adams won election by more
than 40 percent of the vote with
four people in the race in 2012.
He is a very popular and smart
commissioner. He is the only
commissioner who has the Cit-
rus County taxpayer at heart. To
try to silence him is not what we
want. Thank you, Commissioner
Scott Adams. We love you.
Uncivil civics
JND I certainly hope there
fl~ wasn't any civics
Fll classes watching the
_uncivil proceedings of
our county government.
It was embarrassing to
watch on television
today (Feb. 25). I
watched every second
79 of it. That was embar-
57 rassing. It's getting al-
most embarrassing to
watch these people work together.
Please don't show this to our
students and our young children.
Can we call for recall?
I have a question: I wonder if it's
possible for the citizens of Citrus
County to start a recall petition or
motion or some other legal doc-
ument to recall a county commis-
sioner like Commissioner Adams?
Come cleaner
That Scott Adams is going to
clean these commissioners up.
Trouble is, they weren't dirty to
begin with.


Sell the hospital
"No lease!" "Sell it!" "Get
the cash now!" These are the
headlines I optimistically was
keyed up to see printed in the
Chronicle about the sale or
lease of Citrus Memorial hos-
pital. Why? Because Citrus
County is now monetarily hurt-
ing; hurting badly
There was a huge tax short-
fall initiated by Duke Energy.
Then the wasted millions of
tax dollars in legal fees cre-
ated by some irrational, my-
opic members of the two
hospital boards. There were
sweetheart consultant costs as
well as several hundreds of
thousands in "walk away" money
And on, and on, ad nauseum.
Taxpayers can not afford to
take a foolish "Band-Aid" ap-
proach. This dreadful dilemma
surely requires major surgery
Furthermore, cash on the
barrelhead could eliminate most,
if not all, of the tax shortages.
This draining financial chaos
must end. The hospital prop-
erty should be placed on the
tax roll and the present man-
dated hospital tax abolished.
Besides, who in their right
minds would want to have a
new trust board to make dubi-
ous decisions over the next 50


OPINIONS INVITED
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ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
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not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
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years and, after that get back a
70-plus-year-old decaying
building? Does this make any
kind of sense to residents?
Think about this. How does
one predict the future? Who
knows what will occur over the
next 50 years? Will our na-
tional government exist? Will it


become a Third World nation?
Will there be more world
wars? Will the U.S. dollar re-
main as the world's "reserve
currency" with an oppressive
$13 trillion debt?
It is bad enough the county
doesn't know what it will be
doing in 5 or 10 years, let alone
50. I have been a resident here
for more than 25 years. I can
still recall the many discus-
sions that U.S. 41 will be
widened. Nothing has been
done for more than a decade.
Sell Citrus Memorial and
you eliminate the governing
boards, the enormous salaries
and perks of executives, the
day-to-day maintenance and
the required medical upgrades.
Peter Monteleone
Pine Ridge

Public works at work
A tip of the hat to our De-
partment of Public Works
Road Maintenance Division.
The recent work modernizing
a drainage ditch and road re-
pair has been nothing but pro-
fessional and more than I
expected. Refreshing to see a
team work so well together!
Joseph Ives
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


I I




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I think his name was Elvis Parsley


I have taken note of the
Elvis events which
have occurred re-
cently in our county.
No, I wasn't here back in
1961 when Elvis came to
town, but as a relative
newcomer my family
and I have only been here
for 31 years I still find it
amazing that the King ac-
tually came to little Citrus
County to make a movie at
the height of his popularity.
And it wasn't just any old
movie, it was the ever-
popular"FbllowthatDream."
Most refreshing was that
by all accounts, Elvis was a
genuine gentleman and
good guy


Too bad the young stars
of today aren't always quite
so well-bred and respectful.
Back to Elvis and the
movies. Of course, as we
all know, Elvis made many
other movies, but one which
he didn't make that brought
his voice to the attention a
much younger generation
was Disney's "Lilo and Stitch"
As I recall, a part ofthe movie
included a little Hawaiian
girl, Lilo, assisting a space
alien, Stitch, in becoming
an Elvis impersonator My
research indicates that the
RCA tracks of Elvis singing
as well as covers of his
songs by other artists were
used in making the movie.


Stitch singing Elvis was while riding in my red
certainly a hit with the sporty, Ford Sport Track, I
four grandchildren we had put the CD of Elvis' great-
at the time, est hits in the
Misses Ariana, player
Emily, Kaylee All of the
and Ashley girls were glee-
Soon after fully singing
the movie had along and hav-
first played ing a great time
and impressed when the
all of them out youngest one,
of their collec- Ashley, made
tive gourds, Fred Brannen the excited pro-
they were rid- A SLICE nouncement.
ing with me in "It's Stitch. It's
my truck OF LIFE Stitch!"
well, I think of The oldest
it as a truck; my good and self-presumed most
brother William calls it a knowledgeable of the
wimpy impostor Anyway, group, Ariana, who must


have been about 7 years
old at the time, corrected
her by saying, "No, it isn't
Stitch. He is a cartoon
character, but it is a man
actually singing the songs."
She would have been
just fine if she had stopped
right there, but much like
her grandfather, sometimes
she doesn't know when to
quit and added, "I think
his name is Elvis Parsley"
Snicker
I wasn't about to rain on
her parade, and as far as
her younger cohorts were
concerned, the singer they
were listening to was Mr
Parsley
Presley?


Parsley?
By either name, Elvis'
music rocked and contin-
ues to rock our world al-
most six decades after he
first came on the scene -
a scene which, at least for
a short while one summer,
included Citrus County.


Fred Brannen, an
Inverness resident, has
been a Chronicle colum-
nist since 1988 and is the
author of the recently
published novel, 'At the
Bottom ofBiscayne Bay."
Fred maybe contacted at
tbrannenjr@gmail.com or
via brannenbooksllc. com.


Continued from Page Cl


Rain washed out most of the ex-
cursions planned for the distin-
guished guests, but famous local
guide Dessie Prescott Smith did man-
age to take a couple of jeeploads of
crew members on a hog hunt in Gulf
Hammock.
While no one is suggesting the
Knotts visit rivaled Elvis filming here
in 1961, Knotts did win five Emmys
(three by the time he showed up in
Crystal River) while playing Barney
Fife on "The Andy Griffith Show"

BUDGETARY CONCERNS
LEAD TO TIFF
While Citrus County was in the
midst of a huge growth spurt in 1964,
county government remained at odds
with its citizens over hikes in the
millage rate.
For the first time since 1952 (12
years), commissioners voted to raise
the millage rate for a total budget of
$847,005.
One area of contention stemmed
from an additional $4,000 for Judge
Frank 0. Scofield's office. County At-
torney Johnson Savary, acting as a cit-
izen and not a representative of the
county, questioned Scofield on the
added expense. He also wanted to
know if Scofield was paying rent for
the insurance business he was run-
ning out of the county judge's office.
Scofield bristled at the questions
and demanded to know why his
budget was the only portion being
questioned. He also said state audi-
tors had already checked on the
arrangement with his insurance busi-
ness and cleared him.
When pressed for details on what
the $4,000 would be spent on,
Scofield said his office was full and
he needed more time to produce the
information.
While the exchange between
Savary and Scofield proved tense,
Commission Chairman Clyde Byrd
did not have to gavel either
participant.
Commissioners unanimously ap-
proved the new budget.

WHIPPED IN COURT
Some readers may remember a few
of the more exotic sentences passed
down by former Citrus County Judge
Gary Graham, but many probably
have never heard about the sentenc-
ing choice Judge Troy Hill Jr gave
four Citrus County teens in Septem-
ber 1964.
Graham once sentenced a man to
60 days in jail for saying "bull" in his
courtroom. Another time he ordered
a man to yell "slow down" for 32 hours
to boaters speeding in the river after
the man had run over a manatee.
Hill gave his four defendants, rang-
ing in ages from 16 to 18, a choice of
jail or a public whipping.
The teens had broken into
Heiskell's Garage across the street
from the jail and were parties to a
fifth teen stealing a car. All four chose
the whipping, which consisted of 25
whacks in open court from a 2-inch
black leather strap administered by
each teen's father They were also
placed on five years' probation and
fined $300 to be paid over three years.


Mike Amold is the editor of the
Citrus County Chronicle. Email him
at marnold@chronicleonline. com.


Chronicle file photo
Future Farmers of America is just what its name implies, an organization of young farmers. Annually, they vie for awards
in different activities. Here, James E. Connor, civic and political leader, presents trophies to two outstanding lads.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

tried to apologize for his tactics. Less
than a minute later, he called fellow
Commissioner Joe Meek "a liar"
Adams' underlying position is that
most of his fellow commissioners are
corrupt and on the take and he is the
only one looking out for the people.
He is constantly sending emails to
the Florida Department of Law En-
forcement and the FBI, the state and
federal agencies that investigate such
things, demanding official probes
into wrongdoing by county staff and
his fellow commissioners.
The most recent controversy over
the uncollected lease revenue from a
propane gas company is a perfect ex-
ample. Over a period of 20 years, the
county did a really dumb thing and
failed to collect lease payments for a
small piece of land in Inverness that
was purchased for a possible right of
way around town.
Adams has come out swinging like
he has uncovered the 18-minute gap
on the Watergate tapes. On Tuesday,
he was waving papers that he insists
show corruption while he demanded
the resignation of the county admin-
istrator and the county attorney
Really? What he has found is an
example of typical government bu-
reaucratic incompetence. Everyone
hates this type of thing, and Adams
could have made some good points if
he didn't jump off the cliff at Para-
noid Point and allege that all sorts of
powerful people are involved in
stealing money from the county.
Here's a reality check: If powerful
people are going to steal from gov-
ernment, they are not going to spend
20 years bumbling around to steal
$20,000 in lease payments. They
would steal millions and do it quickly
And here's some irony: Scott
Adams' mother worked in the county
department that created the deal to
purchase the property in question
with county attorney Richard Wesch's
father Scott Adams worked hard to
force attorney Wesch to leave the county.


Adams' unrelenting personal at-
tacks on fellow commissioner Re-
becca Bays and her husband Mike
are equally troubling. During almost
every meeting, Adams talks trash
about Mrs. Bays and her husband. He
slams Mike Bays because he is a vol-
unteer board member on the Eco-
nomic Development Council and
Adams believes that must be a con-
flict of interest
And now he has taken to publicly
fighting with Kerry Parsons, the
newly appointed interim county at-
torney Ms. Parsons is a young woman
in her first job, and Adams tries to
run her down with a pan-scraper
every chance he gets. She has
warned the freshman commissioner
that a discrimination lawsuit could
be filed if continues his attacks.
Adams' real strategy is to throw so
much unsubstantiated mud at his fel-
low commissioners that no incum-
bent gets re-elected this November
Since Adams isn't on the ballot, he
doesn't have much to lose.
But Citrus County has a lot to lose if
he is successful. Scott Adams has
single-handedly thrown county
government into chaos.
Good government and chaos have
nothing in common.
Fighting the status quo, pointing
out bureaucratic incompetence and
reducing taxes are all good goals. My
point to Scott Adams was that he
could accomplish those goals without
getting into a mud-wrestling match
with every other person in county
government.
You can disagree with people with-
out calling them crooks and liars.
Many citizens are amused at Scott's
fight against his fellow politicians and
the county staff. But if the end result
is that local government completely
comes off the tracks, we the taxpayers
are the ones who are going to have to
pay the bill to set things straight.
And that won't be amusing.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him at gmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


Thanks aplenty, Patty
I'd just like to say thank you to a special
person out on (County Road) 486 by the
name of Patty. She owns and runs a barber-
shop where the Chevron station is. The other
day I was in there and I dropped a $100 bill
and a $50 bill combined so I could use it to
purchase my medicine that I needed. I got to
the drugstore and, needless to say, I lost the
money. And also, I didn't get my medicine.
So the next day I went back to see Patty to
just ask her if she had found anything and,
lo and behold, she had found it. And I just
wanted to say a very
OUJND special thanks to her
and I wish her all the
l best in her new barber-
shop. She's really a good
woman.
A few thoughts
As an elderly person in
Citrus County, I would
CAL like to state a few opin-
563057 ions and as an impartial
"30 7 newspaper, I would hope
you would print them.
On Sunday's front page (Feb. 16), the Tourist
Development Council considers raising the
bed tax by 1 percent. It seems nearly every-
one in the government is greedy to get every
penny they can. They think making an addi-
tional $200,000 is a lot of money, but wast-
ing $2.5 million on Ottawa is OK and
wasting Port Citrus money. Also, the money
made from the hospital sale was to be $90
million. Gerry Mulligan states upwards of
$80 million. Now Bill Grant says it should be
closer to $10 million to $15 million. That's a
big difference. One last thing: I thought the
piece on the sheriff's department, the fire-
men, was really informative. I enjoyed it.
No coffee in schools
I'm responding to the article I guess it's
an editorial in the Citrus paper in reference
to coffee in schools. It just makes me think
that, my goodness gracious, have you guys hit
your head? That's not where it belongs. And
it's not just a vote from the school board or
the parents; it's a vote from the citizens who
pay taxes towards the school. I'm a health
professional and coffee is addicting. I thought
we were supposed to be fostering healthy
choices, healthy foods to be given to our chil-
dren within the schools. There's a place for every-
thing and coffee in school is not the place.


BIANCE
Continued from Page C1

I see zombies walking blindly
encouraging this practice. How
can one obtain passion, when it
appears that the big test be-
comes the center of this new
universe? The misinterpretation
of two to three poorly written
test questions on our past
Florida Comprehensive Assess-
ment Test scores or the evolu-
tion of the new end-of-course
testing can affect the students'
ranking, stigmatize schools and
affect our district's ranking and
funding. The demographics of
local regions, a collective effort
of the majority of parents' mini-
mized involvement with teens


working towards educational
achievement. Local hardships
and disconnected parental con-
trol have not been factored into
education's business model. It is
the area we do not discuss in so-
ciety because it is culturally bi-
ased and makes people nervous.
Unfortunately, real estate's term
of "location, location, location"
is real.
The number is all that is seen
these days. It removes the face of
the child, it masks the modern
emotional impact that is evident
of our confused culture. I feel
they compare areas that are not
apples with apples. That is what
a spreadsheet does in business
when the bottom line is a number
The complexity of each human
and their unique strengths out-
side of the test are lost. This


should never be a reality, yet it
crept in and now is embedded
deeply in Florida's dialogue in
teacher training and professional
development. The contradiction
is when these two somewhat op-
posing forces push and pull on
the educators to chase the data
on the sheet. Teachers are ex-
pected to juggle both the data
and a conflicting demand to en-
gage our youth with interesting
ideas and intellectual thought.
More engaging teacher prep is
essential as conceptual ideas are
noted, but questioning to support
concepts is left to others. Now
others write these test questions,
which are supposed to be from
objectives or standards, yet they
integrate some confusing rea-
soning skills that require assem-
blage. They create a high-stakes


test. College-bound students
would have seen these questions
in entrance exams, but now the
total student body is driven by
possible vagueness, with less so-
phisticated reading comprehen-
sions skills and abilities. Yes,
there is giftedness in some test
takers. Are they really smarter?
I believe I can write a pretty
challenging test in biology, but
my variety of assessment and
teaching style is of much better
use of time while developing les-
sons. The money holders control
these enterprises. Something has
to give, and many need to start
speaking up to counter the biased
number The state is stepping up
the testing across the academic
arena. Kids will be tested to
death, with a number deciding
their destiny How many gradu-


ating classes of students will
have to succumb to this myopic
methodology? This business
model has brought us to this un-
fortunate stage in education. Ask
a well-experienced politician to
pass the very test they imple-
mented and you will be sur-
prised by the data spreadsheet.
Elections and moving ideas to
the center might alter the future.
So when I read another
human story, it stirred my pas-
sion to combat any program that
limits individuals to a number
We are more than this. We are
better than this. Giftedness
comes in so many packages.


Greg Biance is a teacher
in Citrus County and is a
former Teacher of the Year


DON


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 C3




SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 COMMENTARY CITRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Harry, Harry, Harry
regarding (the Feb. 15 letter to the editor written
Harry Cooper), "Americans not entitled to free
befits:" Harry, Harry, Harry. Most of your thinking
,ree with. However, isn't it a bit harsh to not help
truly needy? If there were only some way to sep-
te the freeloaders from those who need help,
t's what we need.
Cleaning out drug houses
lot of people have a lot to say about our Sheriff
wsy and his henchmen, as they call them, but no-
Jy has anything to say when the wonderful sheriff
ans out one drug house after another. I'd like to
thank you, Sheriff Dawsy. Have a good day.
I need the VA
OUNI'ID I can't believe somebody actu-
W ally wrote into the paper and
thought it was a bad idea for our
IT county to rent a space for the VA
up on Marc Knighton. I, for one,
have shed my blood for this
country and I need that. Check
and see how many veterans feel
L disgusted about that report.

S3-0579 Too long to wait
I agree trying to get in touch
i the Social Security offices is terrible. I've called
fla several times and when I call these numbers
he Sunday paper, the toll-free numbers, every
e I call, they put me on hold and say I have an
ir and a half or more before somebody can an-
wr the phone. What is a person supposed to do?
It's come to this
was just wondering if any of the citizenry of this
intry wonder why it's necessary in the media that
have PolitiFact fact-checking system. Is it be-
ise we can't trust what is printed or what words
ne out of mouths? I just wonder what is coming
:his country that they can give out false informa-
and it's OK.
People need food, not soda
m just seeing in the paper today (Feb. 15) that
n Chancey from the (Community) Food Bank of
-us County, the picture where he's sitting in the
d bank. And I see a whole lot of Coca-Cola and
b soda and all of this sitting there on the shelf. I
not understand people. The food bank doesn't
!d soda and Coca-Cola or any of this stuff. They
!d food. People need food, not soda. That's just
opinion.
Loved 'Squabbles'
Squabbles" at the Art Center was very funny and
acting was superb. Vinnie DeMaio, who jumped
it the last moment to take over the role of Abe,
just terrific. His acting was so good, nobody
ided the booklet in his hands to remember some
[he many lines he had to do on such short notice.
er Abrams, as the director and also one of the
ors, did a great job. It shows that out of all the
abbles came something very good. Go see it. You
enjoy it.

S ri ~-..From
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musk s March 7 tfo

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To BENEFH THE (iTRus CouwY YfisrTocI SOCIETY


Letters to THE EDITOR


Socialism won't make
everyone rich
That was quite a letter published
in the Feb. 14, 2014, Chronicle
about forming a better union. The
author hit on about every socialist
talking point imaginable. He even
threw out a new one, at least new
to me.
He says "85 people have more
wealth than 3.5 billion people."
That's probably true but its cherry
picking data. I prefer hard num-
bers, but the left likes to deal in
sweeping generalities. If he had
said 1.5 billion people exist on $2 a
day or less, we could agree on that.
I would answer all of his accusa-
tions as I always do the proponents
of socialism; just show me one suc-
cess story Please show me a place
in the world where socialism is
more successful than what we have
in America. Just so there is no
question, let's define success. You
must find a place that exceeds the
wealth, power and standard of liv-
ing of America. I won't accept some
left-wing U.N. definition. It's that
clear, wealth, power and standard
of living in toto.
It's not worth addressing each of
his points because none of them are
true, but let's look at a couple. He
said, "Here is the real truth. We as a
nation have never had less in federal
taxation or federal regulation."
He's right in one aspect. Never
in our history have we had 47 per-
cent of the population not paying
any federal income tax. That's an
all-time high in being a ward of the
government. Here's the real truth.
Our business tax rate is at an all-
time high, not just for us, but com-
pared to the rest of the world. It's
twice what it is in several provi-
dences of our great frozen socialist
state to our north. Compare it to
the socialist countries of Europe.
It s twice as much as several of them.
Lets look at tax loopholes for the
rich. In the great debate about War-
ren Buffett's secretary, the left ig-
nores that capital gains and
dividends are a return of an in-
vestor's money It's his money, not
the governments' or yours. You
own no fair share of his money It's
his money that he risked losing in a
business venture. It's his profits on
his investment. Companies pay a
35-percent tax rate on money they


distribute as dividends. When the
investor receives it, he pays an ad-
ditional 15 percent tax bringing the
total tax up to 50 percent. Again,
that's the highest rate in the world
by far In many countries there are
no taxes on investment income.
When the yearly page total for
the Federal Registry runs into the
thousands of pages, we can blow
off his claim of fewer regulations.
Federal regulations are costing
American business $1.7 trillion a
year
That's a hard fact not a socialist
talking point.
There is no doubt in the letter
that he favors government regula-
tion of every aspect of American
business. It's a small step from
there to government ownership of
the business. That's fine, but he
has to first show me an example
where that has worked, and he
can't. Socialism and communism
have never worked and never will.
The last point I will address is
about each generation having it
better than their parents. He said
that's not true anymore. I agree
and I'll tell you why Our country
has been on a slow drift to the left
for several years and greatly accel-
erated that drift in the last five
years. Welcome to socialism. So-
cialism can't make everybody rich,
but it can make everybody poor
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Moral obligation to
protect Constitution
Militia Acts were adopted by
Congress in 1792, with amendments
in 1798, 1861 and 1903. These acts
were to implement the Second
Amendment to our Constitution,
making sure state militias would not
be eliminated in favor of a "stand-
ing army" Our Founding Fathers
were concerned a standing army
would be oppressive and give the
federal government too much power
Mr Barnett, writer of "The roots
of the right to regulate firearms," is
a lawyer and elegant in his writing,
but misses the point when it comes
to state's militia as coined in our
Constitution. If you read all of the
Constitution, articles and amend-
ments and research the beginning
of America, the militia was and is


Tom, Dick, Harry, Mary and anyone
above the age of 16 (at that time)
who owned a gun, or anything used
as a weapon. In that era, mostly
men and young boys were consid-
ered the militia, but in reality all
were and still today are the militia
as far keeping the United States of
America free. Mr Barnett assumes
Congress has a right to "regulate"
the militia because the Second
Amendment reads, 'A well-regu-
lated militia..'. Regulated is to
adapt to requirements, subject to
restrictions, synchronize, adjust,
harmonize and coordinate, as in
the Articles of Confederation in
our Constitution, Article VI, para-
graph four reads in-part: "but
every State shall always keep up a
well-regulated and disciplined
militia, sufficiently armed and ac-
coutered, and shall provide and
constantly have ready for use, in
public stores, a due number of
filed pieces and tents, and proper
quantity of arms, ammunition and
camp equipage." Can you see that
today? I am regulated by my state's
laws, and I am legal, have all per-
mits, training and ready to fight as
regulated by the Constitution in a
moment's notice, all hunters,
shooters, etc. are part of the well-
regulated militia that is the citi-
zenry of every state in America. I
am in part, "We The People." And
have the Constitutional right to
bear arms without being told what
kind, how many, as long I follow the
state laws, which is regulation in
its own right. We are all regulated
by our conscience, beliefs, actions,
common sense, and love of our
Constitution. We have a moral right
and obligation to protect the con-
stitution and here are three quotes
from three great men in our history:
"The Constitution shall never be
construed ... to prevent the people
of the United States, who are
peaceable citizens, from keeping
their own arms." Samuel Adams
"Our Constitution was made only
for a moral and religious people. It
is wholly inadequate to the govern-
ment of any other" -John Adams
"We the people are the rightful
masters of both Congress and the
courts, not to overthrow the Consti-
tution but to overthrow the men who
pervert it." -Abraham Lincoln
Don B. Powell
Hernando


March 7 thru March 1 1
Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds U.S. 41 S., Inverness
Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (halfpriceday)

Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3 a bag)
dCash or Checks Only
www.foccls.org
For book sale information call
746-1334 or 527-8405 C i

Suncoast Credit Union

FOUNDATION
cS'c3ooihoad'e


HUSTLE n&~
HEALTH EXPO 5K
YMCA KID ZONE
SCHOOL SPIRIT CONTESTS 1OK
APRIL 12, 2014 1MILEtWALK
CREST SCHOOL,42
LECANTOFTo Beefi the (irus' Coanty
6:30AM REGISTRATION, E6uca-ti F olaton
7:30AM START FOR MORE INFO CALL 352-586-3396
www.schoolhousehustle.com, *www.facebook.com/schoolhousehustle
SPONSORS: AARON'S, CITRUS 95.3/THE Fox, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE,
GULF TO LAKE MARINE & TRAILERS, NATURE COAST EMS, NATURE COAST FINANCIAL ADVISORS, SUBWAY,
SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION FOUNDATION, TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA, VANALLEN INSURANCE AGENCY, T
VAUGHN/MCLAUGHLIN TEAM OF RAYMOND JAMES, WEST COAST INSURERS AND THE YMCA. 0


WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER

BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL
FRIDAY& SATURDAY MARCH 14th & 15th, 2014
19730 SE 127th TERRACE INGLIS FL.
6 MILES WEST OF DUNNELLON ON HWY 40




SHANNON & HE8AER SLAUGHTER
AMANDAA SCOTT &CU"NY L AIRE" RiNi.RJVVR BND
ANDERSON SAND


BACK PORCH PICIIR S PASTURE PRItmr
ARNOLD MSER &
LONESOME HIGHWAY


DALE KENNFOY BAND MARTINGALE
BACKWATER BLUEGRASS WRY WHISKEY
ADVANCE TICKETS MAIL CHECK PAYABLE TO "TIN ROOF SHACK"
PO BOX 144 NEWBERRY FLORIDA 32669 PHONE (352)472-2703
FESTIVAL TICKET PRICES INCLUDE TAXES DOES NOT INCLUDE CAMPING
SNOW TIMES ADVANCE GATE
FRI 12:00PM-10:15PM ADULT $20.00 $25.00 QWN1
SAT 11:00AM 10:15PM ADULT $20.00 $25.00
SPECIAL 2 DAY TICKET ADULT $35.00 $45.00
ARiiT i & CRAFT CHILDREN 6.12 YEARS $10.00 EACH DAY
CHILDREN UNDER S FREE WITH AN ADULT
ADVANCE TICKET SALES ENDS MARCH 18!
FOR CAMPING AND RESERVED SEATING CALL (352)489-9367
SHOW GOES ON RAIN OR SHINE NO PETS* NO ALCOHOL* NO COOLERS
IN CONCERT AREA
WWW.TINROOFSHACK.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION
PRODUCEo Y lTN ROOF SHACK PROOUC71ONS LLC


Silent Auctions Door Prizes
$25.00 per person
Tickets may be purchased at
Century 21 Nature Coast,
Connie's Boutique,
The Cotton Club, or any
Member of the
Pilot Club of Crystal River
A= F1eaturing:I
Fresh Produce Vea Bradley
TommyBahama -BrghtonAccessores Proceeds benefit Citrus County Charities
For more information, call Jo (352) 208-1490




CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14TH ANNUAL






FRI. MARCH 7,2014 & SAT. MARCH S, 2014
5 PM. TIL 9 P.M. AT YULEE DR. IN OLD HOMoSASSA
Look for the lighted pathways Get to know your local artists Artist Demonstrations
Refreshments- ree Admission & Parking
I Olde Mill House Gallery & Cafe P1hotography, Painting & Print Museum
2- River Safaris & Safari Cafe-Pottery, Wood, Glass & Metal Work
3 Glass Garage-Stained & Fused Glass, Jewelry Wildlife Paintings on Wood
V- la- epprraeekPtery Sulptural Fuctional C lay Works & Stu dio
5 PReierw & o n a a S n okelo iseC oper Sc ture & Driftw ood Furnit re
All shps ownd and opera ated by loeal arits.. AL/
For2)6 more2 info caB
(352) 628-5222 or (352) 212-3617





L ak e rXISM C" 4"o



DoragcnaBoat

f*17et
.* March 15, 2014
9am-5pm
HERNANDO -FLORIDA
VFriendly e
,1rin9Blaket. S Char. OA
F .04 & WI.. ft-.I.
Kd Zo.. Vr.do-.
A" c *&ftam-
BUILD rA TEAM



352 4000960
i- = ;H=a a -, l n.1 i- c1 U m


I/t' lre ittitd to our Srd3inmual


we're


FOR A CUE






W Sunday, March 9, 2014


$ 6



Iduf:
$30.00 par pmon
by Jan ... Jem


MWv at 4"&



outition!

tm mwew pc
nda~m&*k ffiemfim


:OOpm to 9:00pm
Crystal River Mall
Cas Bar @Cocktail Attire
E*V a wIt D i m ba





ssie's Place (352)27rO14

* ."e A tl & t a ds Ib t n K a
Q*WM BdIW IS sR IWS cUEM
*mf P". ~ Coib. bA~mlw, tuRW1 Pka a Poof
Sa.dw Cm*mA K p My Saoted a.w m wCafi
ck, sa m oe UF Akowm S ~dag
Um l Datma CeON "Wwage "weTa .
&a a 04-0a Bak.Tlee VhtogS "t0 so
*R~ Woe~d Bw &AOGM Wst W w ow 00~


V Saturday, March 22, 2014
9 am 3 pm
Inverness Elks Lodge #2522

3580 Lemon 9free, Hernando
(on Hernando Lake, turn between tackle shop and martial arts studio)
Raffle Drawings Food and B roes.e
Inside and Oufside Craffers
SPONSORED BY
For more information, call
C iI (NCiE.f Mimi Salton 860-2598





Fort Cooper Days

Sat. March 15 & Sun. March 16
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fort Cooper State Park
3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness
Experience Florida History
Adults thru 13 yrs. $6 12 yrs. & under Free


Come and Enjoy
* 2nd Seminole War
Reenactments
at 11a.m. & 2p.m.
SPeriod Arts & Crafts
Great Food & Refreshments
Living History Demonstrations
Exhibits/Demonstrations
For more information,
call 726-0315


Hosted by
the Friends
of Fort Cooper
& F.......
tROIC'


C(7i




Starring
ANDY COONEY
"Irish America's Favorite Son"- NY Times
Featuring Noel V. Ginnity, Comedian,
The Darrah Carr Dancers
Bugs Moran & The Guiness Irish Band

SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 2014 $22
2:00 PM Per Person

CURTIS PETERSON AUDITORIUM
CI 'L For more information, call (352) 860-1292


Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
rd
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
anq e
at
'uat Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2014
11:00 a.m. Registration
t '




11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
sM
All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 28,2014
For information call Jim Green (352) 249-1236
E
IN .' 1.
.1


I


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 CS




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Pay up or no service
nteresting headline: "Inverness
ling disrespected."
'he whole county is being disre-
,cted by the BOCC and Sheriff
f Dawsy We are already paying
re tax, but how dare the city of
erness think it can just opt out
)aying the MSBU and still re-
ve the fire service that the peo-
outside of the city limits are
ring for?
t is not "Should the city of Inver-
;s be paying the MSBU?" it is
iould anyone be paying the
BU?" Yes, it would be nice to
re a new fire truck and new fire
iipment, but I would also like to
able to afford living in this
inty and still have money
)ugh to live on. I have to watch
ere I spend my money and only
nd it on necessary things, so I
ieve that the BOCC and Sheriff
wsy should also have to only
-chase what is necessary
eff Dawsy is telling us "Do as I
or you have no fire services"
en we already pay fire tax.
Marilyn Smith
Inverness

In union, strength
Ls a young boy, I was naturally
uisitive about creation stories
I eager to learn all I could
)ut cosmology I wondered how
tos could be transformed into
ler except through the interven-
i of a Supreme Being. Scrip-
e tells us that God is infinite.
i will not get an inch closer to
i by climbing Mount Everest.
arch buildings are the product
luman labor the same as every
er structure we erect. The
use of God encompasses the
ole cosmos. A very big house,
eed!
remember Jonah? He found he
ild not run away from God. God
vith us wherever we go. We can-
keep anything hidden from
i. On the other hand, every-
rig depends upon God's con-
)usness. If at any moment God
iuld fall asleep, everything
uld stop. Time, itself, would
p. Nothing, absolutely nothing,
L happen without God's aware-
;s and consent. Without it, we
I every other creature would
tse to exist.
4ow suppose the Biblical narra-
about Adam and Eve in the
rden of Eden is just another
ation myth. The story of the
pent tempting Eve could be in-
preted as an allegory What if


an ever-vigilant deity is not watch-
ing over mankind? Well, for one
thing, we would be left adrift in a
hostile universe to make our way
as best we could. Every creature
on Earth is endowed by nature
with an instinct to guide it through
whatever difficulties it may en-
counter. Folks, we humans are
short on instinct, but we are intel-
ligent and resourceful. We rely on
these mental faculties every day
to make decisions. In union there
is strength. When we join together,
we can accomplish things that
singly would be impossible.
It is said that love conquers all,
and nothing could be truer It
brings a sense of fulfillment into
our lives. Love engenders happi-
ness and contentment. Love tells
us to embrace our brothers and
sisters and to work with them to
make this Earth, our only home, a
safe place where we no longer re-
sort to war to resolve our differ-
ences. Jesus said, "Love your
neighbor as yourself."
Franklin G. Aretz
Beverly Hills

A transparent mystery
Tuesday's Chronicle contained a
thoughtful article from the Associ-
ated Press titled "Wealth gap: A
guide to what it is, why it matters."
After several columns of discus-
sion, the last column opens with
the question "So why has income
inequality increased?" Then it fol-
lows with the pointedly naive
statement, "There is no simple
answer"
However, that statement is fol-
lowed immediately by the word
"globalization." Globalization is as
simple and complete an answer to
the question as could be
desired.
Quite obviously, opening our
country to manufacturing done in
countries with dirt-cheap labor
devastates the bargaining power of
labor versus capital. Ross Perot
put it quite simply when arguing
against NAFTA with Al Gore in
1992. He stated that people like
him who made money with money
would do fine. But there would be
a giant sucking sound as jobs were
drawn south of the border
Some champions of globaliza-
tion have suggested that protect-
ing factory workers is unfair to
those in the service trades by forc-
ing people in that area to pay
more for manufactured goods.
And unfair to taxpayers when de-
fense spending is limited to do-
mestic sources.


BOYS & GnIus CLUEM
OF CITRUS COUNTY
13th Annual
Steak & Steak Dinner
Celebrating 22 years of dedication
to the children of Citrus County


Thursday, March 6,2014
M&B Dairy Farm,8760 Lecanto Hwy.
k a Reception 5:45 p.m.


w



For tickets o
call 302-4


$50 in advance $60 at door
VlP Tables start at $500 (table of 8)
Business Casual

)r more information
882 or 422-6704 CHNifE


It is hard to tell whether such
people are being naive or dishon-
est. Probably both.
Moving most of our industrial
employment to Communist China,
India, or Bangladesh by way of
Germany and Japan takes a lot of
jobs out of the country Before
Nixon started exporting jobs in
1970, General Motors was the
largest employer in the country
Having lost many of those jobs,
Walmart is (last I heard) the
largest employer now
In those primitive times, GM
workers had substantial salaries
and solid benefits, such as excel-
lent health insurance and substan-
tial defined benefit pensions. And
of course, the company hadn't
gone through bankruptcy
Many Walmart employees are on
food stamps. The "defined benefit"
(solid retirement income) pension
has largely faded out in favor of
"defined contribution" in the pri-
vate sector
Much envy and hatred has been
leveled by right-wing nuts against
the salaries and benefits of public
employees. Before globalization,
public employee unions were rela-
tively toothless. But since public-
sector jobs have not yet been
outsourced to Communist China,
what were second-class career
fields were looking better
Meanwhile, corporate execu-
tives' comparative compensation
with workers has increased by a
factor of 10. And that includes
Hostess Inc. executives whose only
business plan was to roll back em-
ployee salaries. When that failed,
they filed for bankruptcy along
with a request to the court for mil-
lions in bonus pay for themselves.
I won't elaborate on our local case
in which a public utility has raked
in billions and paid a retiring ex-
ecutive tens of millions when their
only accomplishment was the de-
struction of a nuclear plant.
In the case of Caterpillar Corpo-
ration, union demands years ago
were met by closing down and
sending half of the jobs to Osaka,
Japan. Since that time wages have
been frozen, but profits increased
nearly 30 percent. Productivity has
increased, but not wages.
Nobody should be fooled by
claims that the elite plutocracy are
"makers" while those whose jobs
have been sent to Communist
China are "takers." Not, that is,
unless by pretending to be fooled
they can make out like the bandits
they are.
Pat Condray
Ozello


Event Sponsor -Pe r P eron Pr izen dRaffls! 1
CRYSTAL Tickets may be purchased at
AUTOMOTIVE Crystal Chevrolet Homosassa,
AUTOMOIVE at, Hagar Insurance Inverness,
M --- -- Brashear's Pharmacy Lecanto,
Law Office Fancys Pets- Crystal River,
Gulf to Lake Sales Lecanto,
of Keith Taylor Capital City Bank Crystal River
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: www.rotarybeastfeast.com


F NISII




T -IE




F GIT
April 4 & 5, 2014
Citrus High Schoo



CITRUS MEMORIAL


Register your team today by

visiting www.relayforlife.org

or by calling 1-800-227-2345 cip)N;LE


Every eight minutes, the American
Red Cross brings help and hope to
people in need. Every dollar you give
helps us do more of what we do.
Bea hero.
Donate today.
Visit redcross.orglmid-florida
A-es.n Red Cross
352564-8455


wwchronli nie.com



9 101112131415
1617 1819202122
23242526272829


Mli e s 3 0 311_4 3 ..................................................................... .................
-4 1H


Should have closed Dozier
That was an excellent article about the young men
being imprisoned years ago in Dozier. It's a shame
that all the governors that we had during that time
never closed that school. That's how radical the
South was and how mean they were to their chil-
dren. And also, would you please tell me where is
this Mission in Citrus that you wrote about? You
didn't give us a location.
Editor's note: The Mission is on Pennsylvania
Avenue off State Road 44 in Crystal River.
Get busy on springs money
There is government money and has been govern-
ment money available for our springs cleanup. I have
been waiting for our county or town to apply for that
money before some other locale gets it. We need
smart people that know how to
OIJ NOget these government grants
and are capable of filling out the
Wl actual forms. Do your jobs now.
Save our Homosassa Springs
before the money goes to some
other county. You are working for
us, the taxpayer. Get busy and
do your job.

CAL Who cleans up?
When there is a motor vehicle
5 63-0579 accident and glass, metal, etc.,
ends up on the street, whose re-
sponsibility is it to sweep it up and remove the de-
bris? Is the responsibility the same for a private
street, county road or state road? If it is not cleaned
up, who should a member of the public notify?
Editor's note: It's the responsibility of the towing
company that is called to the scene to sweep up the
debris.
Lights on in fog
I'm calling on Tuesday, Feb. 4, and it is a very
foggy day in Citrus County. Intense and dense sea
fog has rolled in yesterday evening. This morning I
had an appointment. It was after 8 o'clock and I
cannot believe the people that are driving with no
lights on. You take your life in your hands when you
pull out from a side street because someone will be
right there out of the fog with no headlights. I am
just wondering what they are thinking. What makes
them think you can see this huge 2,000-pound vehi-
cle barreling down the highway with no lights in
dense fog? Hopefully someone will read this and
maybe take some responsibility.
Took a beating at Dozier
I'd like to commend the Chronicle for printing the
"Dozier dig 'just scratching surface"' article (Feb. 4)
on the Dozier school for boys in Mariana, Fla. After
reading the article, I can verify that everything in
that article is exactly the way it was. I was in there
for 11 months in '58 and '59 and took one of those
beatings. I got 56 licks. They had to hospitalize me
and remove my underwear where they beat it into
my flesh. Thank you for printing that. The public
needs to know what horrible history some of Florida
has on its record.

March 2
Art Center Theatre Squabble
Location: ACT Entrance Fee: $19.00
Event Time: Sunday Matinee at 2PM
Contact Email: vitografx@yahoo.com

Mar 2 & Mar 3 Sat 9-5, Sun 9-4
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
STRAWBERRY FEST
Floral City Entrance Fee: $3
Contact Phone: 352-795-3149

Mar 2 3:00pm
Take Stock in Children "Dollars for Scholars" Doo-Wop
Curtis Peterson Auditorium, Lecanto
Entrance Fee: $10.00
Contact Phone: 344-0855,422-2348

Mar 2
Citrus County Cruisers Car Club
30th Manatee Car and Truck Show
Crystal Motors Homosassa
$20 day of show for entrants, free for visitors
Contact Phone: 352-382-5501

Mar 6 5:45 pm
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Steak and Steak M&B Dairy Farm
8760S Lecanto Hwy. $50 ticket/$60 at the door
sponsor levels and tables available
Contact :352-302-4882 or 352-422-6704

Mar 7
Citrus County BOCC Parks and Recreation
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey
Citrus Springs Community Center
Doors open at 6PM, Show 7PM -9PM
Entrance Fee: $5
Contact: 352-465-7007, 352-527-7540

Mar 7 -11 2:00pm
Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
Citrus County Auditorium Entrance Fee: $20.00
Contact Phone: 746-1334 or 527-8405

Mar07 08* PM -9PM
Homosassa Shops l4th Annual Luminary Arts Night
Old Homosassa Contact Phone: 628-5222

Mar 7 -09:
Sertoma Youth Ranch Will McLean Music Festival
Before Mar 1 Weekend tickets are $35,
Children under 12 Free. At gate, weekend $40,
Fri $20, Sat $25, Sun $15
Contact Email: mlonghilOl@gmaUl.com

Mar 8.2:00pm
The American Irish Club of West Citrus
Cooney's Irish Cabaret Entrance: $20.00
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Contact Phone: 352-746-3947


Mar 8
Hospice of Citrus County
2nd annual Elvis Blue Suede Shoes Run
Stumpknockers on the Square Entrance Fee:Varies
Contact Email: jfoster@hospiceofcitrus.org

Mar 8 9a.m.to 3p.m
Citrus County Craft Council Spring Fling Craft Show
Crystal River National Guard Armory
Contact Phone: 352-503-6329 or 352-527-3378

Mar 8 9:00 am
Nature Coast Corvair Club
1 1th Annual Car &Truck Show
Inverness City Hall
Contact Phone: 352-344-4210


ubw


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014











BUSINESS


Online:

Due to space constraints, Fred
Herzog's column, Experience
Matters, can be found on
chronicleonline.com. It will
appear in print next week.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A honeybee is attracted to a flower near an apiary in Washington, D.C. The USDA hopes to help honeybees by
providing $3 million to farmers and ranchers in five states to improve their pastures.


bees


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil down ahead of

trimming in growth

NEW YORK -The price of oil
slipped closer to $102 a barrel on
Friday ahead of an expected reduc-
tion in the estimate of U.S. economic
growth in the last quarter
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for April de-
livery was down 14 cents to $102.26 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange. On
Thursday, the Nymex contract
closed 19 cents lower at $102.40.
The price of oil has stayed above
$100 for most of February amid ex-
pectations that demand for heating
oil would rise in the U.S. due to the
severely cold weather


Markets buoyed by

push to record high

MUMBAI, India -World stock
markets rose Friday, boosted by a
strong performance on Wall Street,
where the S&P 500 index was on
track to close at another record high.
In Asia, China's tightly controlled
currency, the yuan, was allowed to
fall to 6.1450 to the dollar That fol-
lowed a steady decline over the past
two weeks after the yuan hit record
highs, coming close early this year to
breaking through six to the dollar
China's Shanghai Composite
Index rose 0.4 percent and South
Korea's Kospi gained 0.1 percent
The Hang Seng in Hong Kong was
little changed while India's Sensex
gained 0.4 percent
Japan's Nikkei 225, the regional
heavyweight, was an exception,
dropping 0.6 percent after a raft of
economic data released Friday sug-
gested the economy needs still more
help in weathering a 3 percent sales
tax increase in April.
In currency markets, the euro was
up 0.8 percent to $1.3815 while the
dollar fell 0.1 percent to 102.06 yen.
-From wire reports


I F


Bruce
Williams


U.S. Department

of Agriculture

announced Tuesday

it will spend millions

of dollars to help

farmers and ranchers

improve pastures in

five Midwestern

states to provide

food for the nation's

struggling

honeybees.


SMART
MONEY


MJ. Johnson
Associated Press


MILWAUKEE

ommercial honeybees polli-
nate an estimated $15 billion
worth of produce each year
Many beekeepers bring hives to the
Upper Midwest in the summer for
bees to gather nectar and pollen
for food, then truck them in the
spring to California and other
states to pollinate everything from
almonds to apples to avocadoes.
But agricultural production has
been threatened by a more than
decade-long decline in commercial
honeybees and their wild cousins


due to habitat loss and pesticide
use. Colony collapse disorder, in
which honeybees suddenly disap-
pear or die, has made the problem
worse, boosting losses over the
winter to as much as 30 percent
per year
The USDA hopes to stem those
losses by providing more areas for
bees to build up food stores and
strength for winter The new pro-
gram will be "a real shot in the
arm" for improving bees' habitat
and food supply, said Jason Weller,
See- /Page D2


Troubled state-run websites get health care law fix


Associated Press

WASHINGTON States that have
experienced technical problems run-
ning their own health care enrollment
websites are getting some help from
the Obama administration.
The administration quietly issued a
health law fix Thursday to help those
states. Several Democratic-led states,
including Oregon, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts and Hawaii, are still trying to
solve website problems that have
eclipsed those experienced earlier by
the federal HealthCare.gov site, now
largely repaired.
Although the new policy fix is avail-
able to any state, Republican gover-
nors basically defaulted to federal
control of online sign-ups in their
states. Those who stand to benefit the
most are Democratic governors who
plunged ahead and ran into problems.
Some are facing sharp criticism at


home, from both sides of the political
aisle.
"Today's news means that many
more Oregonians will be able to access
better coverage at a more affordable
cost," said Oregon Democratic Gov.
John Kitzhaber, whose state is near the
bottom on enrollments.
Kitzhaber announced the change
after the federal Health and Human
Services Department posted it on one
of its websites without further elabora-
tion.
HHS said state residents who were
unable to sign up because of technical
problems may still get federal tax
credits if they bought private insur-
ance outside of the new online insur-
ance exchanges.
The federal policy change is signifi-
cant because until now the administra-
tion has stressed that the only place to

See X/Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce De-
partment releases personal income
and spending for January, 8:30 a.m.;
Institute for Supply Management re-
leases its manufacturing index for
February, 10 a.m.; Commerce De-
partment releases construction
spending for January, 10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Senate Bank-
ing Committee will question three
of President Barack Obama's nomi-
nees for the Fed, 10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless claims,
8:30 a.m.; Labor Department re-
leases fourth-quarter productivity
data, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.


Paying off


mortgage


the best


use of life


insurance

EAR BRUCE: When my

husband died, he left me
with a $500,000 home and $1
million in life insurance. I cur-
rently earn $65,000 a year Do you
think I should pay off the mortgage
and invest the balance in a CD or
money market, or invest the whole
million and keep paying on the
mortgage?
-PD., via email
DEAR PD.: It's fortunate that
your husband left a large insur-
ance policy because at $65,000 a
year, there is no way you can pay
off a mortgage on a $500,000 home.
If you are considering investing
your money in a CD or money mar-
ket, for goodness sake, pay off the
mortgage. CDs and money markets
are paying little or no interest, so
you would be better off paying off
the mortgage.
You will then have to consider
what to do with the balance of the
cash. Once again, CDs or money
markets are not viable choices. I
don't believe bonds are attractive
at this time, either The only invest-
ment, in my opinion, that is worth-
while is in the market.
You can invest in the market
very conservatively and still earn
multiples of what the CDs or
See.- /Page D2




CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EES
Continued from Pae D1

ef of USDAs Natural Resources Con-
vation Service.
)airy farmers and ranchers in Michi-
L, Minnesota, Wisconsin and the
kotas can qualify for about $3 million
-eseed pastures with alfalfa, clover
I other plants appealing to both bees
I livestock.
armers also can get help building
ces, installing water tanks and mak-
other changes that better enable
m to move their animals from pas-
e to pasture so the vegetation doesn't
!ome worn down. The goal is to pro-
e higher quality food for insects and
mals.
It's a win for the livestock guys, and
a win for the managed honeybee
)ulation," Weller said. 'And it's a win
n for orchardists and other specialty
p producers across the nation be-
ise then you're going to have a
fithier, more robust bee population
t then goes out and helps pollinate
)ortant crops."
'he USDA is focusing on those five
Les because 65 percent of the nation's
imated 30,000 commercial beekeep-
bring hives there for at least part of
year With limited funds, Weller said,
goal is to get the biggest payoff for
investment.
,orn, soybean and other farmers can
flify for money to plant cover crops,
ich typically go in after the regular
west and help improve soil health, or
,row bee-friendly forage in borders
I on the edges of fields.




Ix
Continued from Page D1

taxpayer-subsidized insurance
ler President Barack Obama's health
7 is through the new online markets,
led exchanges. Previously, people
o bought outside the marketplace
re not eligible for subsidies, although
y benefit from consumer protections
he law
'he tax credits that subsidize cover-
under the law can greatly reduce
cost of a policy This year virtually
Americans are required to have cov-
ge or risk fines.
'he administration's Republican crit-
are certain to question the move.
ng with a delay in a key mandate
t medium to large companies pro-
e coverage or face fines, it's another
tmple of the administration trying to
I flexibility to smooth out rough
ches in the law's implementation.


The program is just the latest in a se-
ries of USDA efforts to reduce honeybee
deaths. The agency has partnered with
universities to study bee diseases, nutri-
tion and other factors threatening
colonies. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vil-
sack also recently created a working
group on bees to coordinate efforts
across the department
The work is already paying off with
changes to once-common beekeeping
practices, such as supplementing bees'
diet with high-fructose corn syrup, said
David Epstein, a senior entomologist
with the USDA. He noted that the qual-
ity of bees' food is as important as the
quantity.
"You can think of it in terms of your-
self," Epstein said. "If you are studying
for exams in college, and you're not eat-
ing properly and you're existing on cof-
fee, then you make yourself more
susceptible to disease and you get sick."
Tim Tucker, who has between 400 and
500 hives at sites in Kansas and Texas,
said he may take some of his bees to
South Dakota this year because the
fields around his farm near Niotaze,
Kan., no longer provide much food for
them.
"There used to be a lot of small farms
in our area that had clover and a variety
of crops, whereas in the last 20 years it's
really been corn, soybean and cotton
and a little bit of canola," Tucker said.
"But those crops don't provide a lot of
good nectar and pollen for bees."
Tucker, who is president of the Ameri-
can Beekeeping Federation, said the
last "really good" year he had was 1999,
when he got more than 100 pounds of
honey per hive. Last year, he averaged
about 42 pounds per hive.



"I applaud the federal government for
its efforts to make this financial assis-
tance available for more Oregonians,"
Kitzhaber said in a statement. Financial
help is available on a sliding scale
based on income for low-income and
middle-class households.
The policy change was couched in
technical jargon, and it may not be easy
for states and insurers to carry it out.
For instance, consumers must have
made an effort to enroll in the ex-
change, and the plan they purchased
outside the government market must
meet certain requirements of the law
On the plus side, those who qualify can
get financial assistance retroactively
In a statement, the Obama adminis-
tration said: "We recognize that some
states have experienced difficulties in
processing automated eligibility deter-
minations and enrollments, and (are)
providing options to marketplaces to en-
sure eligible consumers have access to
financial assistance and issuers are
paid."


BUSINESS DIGEST


Holiday Inn Express

earns recognition

The Holiday Inn Express, Crystal
River, has received the IHG (Inter-
Continental Hotels Group) 2013
Torchbearer Award, the company's
most prestigious award. The
Torchbearer Award was presented
during the 2013 IHG Americas In-
vestors & Leadership Conference in
Las Vegas.
The Holiday Inn Express was also
awarded the "Voice of the Guest All-
Star Hotel" award at this conference.
Since the Holiday Inn Express was




MONEY
Continued from Page D1

similar investments are offering.
ments are offering.
You should make a connection with
one or more brokers. Sit down and
explain exactly what you are trying to
do, taking into account your age and
other factors. Let them present to you
a viable plan. Then make your
choice.
DEAR BRUCE: Where can I get the
best rate when transferring money
from my British Barclays checking
account to my Bank of America
checking account? When I check the
rates on the Yahoo conversion tables,
they are far higher than what the
bank gives me. I have British retire-
ments and rental income, and eventu-
ally I will sell my house in Britain.
How can I get more bucks for my
pounds? I've asked some brokers
about this to no avail.
-Jan, Beverly Hills, Fla.
DEAR JAN: First, let's talk about
how much money you are talking
about. If you have a modest amount


awarded the New Comer of the Year
award from IHG, in 2010, it has con-
tinued to receive recognition year
after year; it was awarded the New
Image Award in 2010 from the Crystal
River Chamber of Commerce and in
2011, received the City of Crystal
River Mayor's Business of the Year
Award. Additionally, it received the
Torchbearer Award for 2011 and
2012, the Certificate of Excellence
from Trip Advisor for 2010, 2011, 2012
and 2013, Green Leaders Silver
Award in 2013, Honorable Mention in
the Citrus County Chronicle "Best of
the Best" Award and were AAA Ap-
proved Diamond rated in 2013.
-Special to the Chronicle


of money, you are not going to get the
higher rate that's quoted by the daily
press. If, on the other hand, you have
substantial monies, like several hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars, you can
negotiate to that number or very
close to it.
As to the best rate for transferring,
the rate is largely a function of three
things: Where is the money going?
How much is involved? And how long
will you have it tied up? It's important
that you understand these variables.
On balance, when you sell a house
and there is a lot of money involved,
you can get pretty much the regular
exchange rate, with a small penalty
or commission. But if it's a few dol-
lars, say $5,000 to $10,000, you're
going to have to pay a bit more be-
cause the expenses are the same to
accomplish the transfer of a modest
amount of money as they are on a
large amount.

Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered in
future columns. Owing to the volume
ofmail, personal replies cannot be
provided.


Woman pleads guilty to embezzling from Blackfeet


Associated Press

GREAT FALLS, Mont The former
director of a federally funded aid pro-
gram on the Blackfeet Indian Reserva-
tion has pleaded guilty to embezzling
almost $300,000 from the program to
support her gambling addiction.
Sandra Marie Sanderville of
Browning pleaded guilty Thursday to
embezzlement and fraud charges dur-
ing a hearing before U.S. District


Judge Keith Strong in Great Falls. A
sentencing date has not been set, the
U.S. Attorney's Office said.
Sanderville, 58, was director of the
tribe's Temporary Assistance to
Needy Families program from 2006 to
2010, during which the program re-
ceived $12 million in federal funding.
Sanderville admitted she used var-
ious schemes to make overpayments
to families, who then provided her
with a cash kickback.


BOB LANE, Accountant
accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
4 Years in Business 32 Years in Inverness






Werner & Company, PA.%
A Certified Public Accounting Firm ,
www.wernercpas.com


Taxes & Accounting Fraud Investigations
Financial Planning Independent Audits


1011 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442


Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352) 344-4397


.ax Prp rto S ervic



I Accurate and affordable service year round

I Experienced, trained tax professionals

I Convenient evening and weekends hours

I Audit assistance

I Electronic filing


inellon (352) 489-4760
terly Hills (352) 527-4117
'stal River (352) 795-4733 / 564-1010
erness (352) 726-5349
rnosassa (352) 628-3660


IH&R BLOCK"


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., CrystalRiverFL 563-2522
e 2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs
A
tt tt
tio st tio
ar
ry






R t s
C r s C Co' i fo

ta u 5
m CP
AjWq Tax Preparation:
er



Individual, Business or Fiduciary All States
authorize e-file provider
Business accounting and payroll reporting
Visit www.ChrisEek.com i In

Sh Ek information station


PRICE & COMPANY, RA.
Certified Public Accountants

795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA


" Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation
" Corporate Tax Preparation
" Business Accounting Services
" QuickBooks Consulting
" Payroll Services

I www.pwprice.com


Tax Professional 30+ Years Experience


Belinda Brown
Gloria Cain


ED SERRA
Certified Public Accountant
(NY& FL)


. Individual Taxes IRS Problem Resolution
* Business Taxes E-File Fast & Efficient
Multi state expertise Member FICPA



(352) 794-3879
www.edserra.com
6118 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River, FL


kI LLLIAMS,
cCRANIE
W&MARDLO
& CASH, PA.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
1-e $E-7 ,E -

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212 www*wrnwccpa.cor


Inverness
726-8130


U [*X-~ TI :F-1 I~-(*1~ k1'J I I~ J [*1' U


IT'S TAX TIME!






There's Still Time Left



To Place Your Ad Call


563.5592


LINNCOME TAX DIREEqCIrORY


For more information

on advertising call

Anne Farrior at

352-564-2931 or

Darrell Watson at

1 352-564-2917 1


I I --- ---- ..... I


b, SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014


BUSINESS







SUNDAY, MARCH 2,2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CIT R US COUNTY
Chamber of commemc


number Connection

28 N.W.U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149. 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450. 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.com/
events!, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
Today Floral City
Strawberry Festival, 9 a.m.
to4 p.m.
March 4 Bayside Re-
alty, 4:30 p.m. 469 N.E.
First Street, Crystal
River, FL 34429
March 5 Ribbon-
cutting for O'Reilly Auto
Parts, 4:30 p.m., 1104
N.E. Fifth Street, Crystal
River, FL 34429
March 14 Chamber
luncheon sponsored by
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church and School
at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Citrus
County Commissioner
John "JJ" Kenney will
provide an update on
the County and his
chairman's agenda.
March 19 and 20 -
Legislative Days: Citrus
County is headed to Tal-
lahassee to talk with
state leaders about key
commerce issues.
April 24-Golden
Citrus Scholars Awards
Ceremony, 5:30 p.m. Col-
lege of Central Florida,
Lecanto.
May 2- Pillar Awards
Dinner inspired by the
style of the Kentucky
Derby, 6 p.m. to 10
p.m. at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
Cocktail attire and hats
are recommended.
Table sponsorships
$300 and individual
reservations $35 per
person.


Member
events
March 7 Florida Pub-
lic Relations Associa-
tion, Nature Coast
Chapter Luncheon,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Citrus Hill Golf and
Country Club, speaker
Nicole
Yucht,
director
of Mar-
keting
for the
Univer-
sity of
Florida.
She'll
NICOLE speak
YUCHT about
the UF brand and the
Gator Nation. More in-
formation at fpranature
coast.wordpress.com/
March 9 Cooking for
a Cause! Benefit for
Jessie's Place at Crystal
River Mall. Enjoy a vari-
ety of delicious menu
items from Citrus
County restaurants. The
restaurants will be
judged by special
guests in seven cate-
gories. Call Jessie's
Place at 352-270-8814
for tickets or The Crys-
tal River Mall at 352-
795-2585.
March 15 Lake Her-
nando Dragon Boat Festi-
val, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
Lake Hernando Park.
More information 352-
400-0960.
March 15 -Inverness
Farmer's Market, 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., Inverness
Government Center.
Fresh and local prod-
ucts with more than
40 vendors. For more
information, call 352-
726-2611.
March 15- Fourth
annual St. Pat's Parade,
starts at 5:30 p.m. At
Courthouse Square,
Inverness.


Come out while you still can


Annual Floral City Strawberry Festival ends today; admission $3


T he final day of the Floral
City Strawberry Festival
will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today at Floral Park, 9530 S.
Parkside Ave., Floral City FL


34436. Parking is available at
the Citrus County Fairgrounds,
3600 S. Florida Ave., Inverness.
Admission is $3 for adults and
free for children age 12 and


under. There is a roundtrip
shuttle available from the
Fairgrounds for a cost of $1.
Entertainment scheduled
for the day is as follows:


9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Mel and
Chris Linkous; 1 p.m. to 4
p.m., Sugarbear Band; 2 p.m.
to 3 p.m., Strawberry Pie
Eating Contest.


Chamber debuts


new Inverness Office


Chamber Board Chair Rob Wardlow cuts the ribbon alongside Chamber ambassadors:
Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Mike
Buchanan, Excel Printing; Dan Pushee, associate member; Jeanne Green, associate
member; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Lillian
Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal. Also in attendance were
Chamber Board members and staff, City of Inverness staff and local officials.





Fox Den Winery
lo9 W. Main Street, Inverness


3oto boost the


Rob Wardlow, Chamber board
chair; Terry Joll; Josh Wooten, Chamber CEO/
president; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; George
Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Lillian Smith,
Mary Kay Cosmetics; Jeanne Green, associate
member; Fox Den Winery's Robert and Un Young
Madys; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Peter
Retzko, Citrus County Chronicle; Bill Hudson,
Land Title of Citrus County; Janet Mayo, associate
member; Frank DiGiovanni; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin
Pest Control; and Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel.



Sever Rivers appoints

Anastasia Solovieva
A nastasia Solovieva, M.D., was recently
appointed to the medical staff at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cen-
ter. Dr. Solovieva specializes
in obstetrics and gynecology.
Dr. Solovieva is a graduate of
Moscow Medical Academy in
Moscow, Russia. She completed
her obstetrics and gynecology
residency at Baylor College
ANASTASIA of Medicine in Houston,
SOLOVIEVA Texas. Dr. Solovieva is
board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology
and has been practicing for eight years.
For more information about the hospital
and its staff, visit SevenRiversRegional.com.


D o you have a great
idea that will help
move our economy for-
ward? The Citrus County
Economic Development
(EDC) is looking for pre-
senters for the 2014 Fire
Up Citrus! event later
this year. The EDC will
select approximately 12
presenters for the Thurs-
day, Oct. 2 Fire Up Cit-
rus!
In 2013, 12 presenters
focused on issues such as
social services, tourism
and transportation. It is
called Fire Up because it
the goal is to bring posi-
tive ideas to the fore-
front, but also ideas that
can be expressed in five
minutes. Each presenter
will have the floor for
five minutes. If you are
interested in seeing last
year's presentations, go
to YouTube.com/user/
CitrusChamberVideos
and select the playlist
called Fire Up Citrus. To
submit your idea and
learn more about the re-
quirements, contact Ar-
dath Prendergast at
352-795-2000 or Ar-
dath@citrusede.com.
In the coming months,
the EDC and Chamber
will be following up with


ADDRESS: 106 W. Main
Street, Inverness
PHONE: 352-795-2000
ONLINE: Citruscounty
chamber.com


a hot idea


economy?


Event organizers, from left: Bob Wesch, emergency
management planner; Cira Schnettler, manager of
administrative services; Josh Wooten, CEO/president;
Molly Thomas, ServiceMaster; Judd Wright, Blue
Skies Professional Services; and Ardath Prendergast,
Citrus County Economic Development Council.

Business Continuity Training
R ecently the Citrus County Economic
Development Council and the Chamber
partnered with the Citrus County Sheriffs
Emergency Management Office to host a free
workshop for local businesses on preparing for
a disaster.


last year's Fire Up Citrus!
presenters to see how
their ideas have pro-
gressed and how this
platform helped them
gain support and mo-
mentum. Fire Up Citrus!
Is the kick-off event for
October's Industry Ap-
preciation Month, during


which the EDC and the
Chamber celebrate local
business and industry for
its positive impact on the
community. Save the
dates for the Industry
Appreciation Month
Luncheon Oct. lo, Mixer
Oct. 16 and Barbecue
Oct. 30.




D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 2,C2014


To place an ad, call 563=5966





Classifieds


In Print



and


Online


All

The Time


Fax: ( 61IIIIcIoo


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Hap ithday
wihaclassified

ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




1936 Grinnell Brothers
Baby Grand Hand
carved, french pro-
ventrial legs, match-
ing bench $2,500 obo

352-422-3829
Beverly Hills
By Appt. Only:
Entire Estate Items
pls call (352) 302-6764
CHRYSLER
01 PT CRUISER, good
cond. 90k mi. $2600.
obo (352) 249-7451
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
THOR
CHALLENGER
model 37KT, 11,000 mi.
$108,000. 352-586-2562
Welsh Driving Pony
Buggy, Harnace,
& Boots.
$3,000.
(352) 212-4981
Whirlpool
Cabrio, Lg. capacity
Washer Machine
$300. 352-586-2562




$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

ILQ Qk

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 bowl kitchen sink,
bisque color and a
toilet
(352) 476-7973
2 Female Pit Bull
Puppies, approx.
6 mos. old
(352) 513-5249
Free
3 Bathroom mirrors
40 x 40, 26 x 40
& 32 x 40
(352) 697-1030
Free Firewood
Lecanto
most of it cut
(352) 513-4161
Free Kittens
to a good home
some are black, also
black & white, 10 wks.
old. (352) 364-6341
Male, 1Iyr old,
Neutered+Rabies,
Cosmo is Salt &
Pepper colored. Very
Loving, but needs to
be the only cat in
home.(352) 628-1382



















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966

CioiclenlinE
www.ch ronicleonline.com


!zeer ta pillow
top mattress only. Very
clean. Purchased 2007.
563-1265
Swimming Pool
Vinyl Liner for
Above Ground Pool,


Lost 2 Keys with
Magnet & Marine
Core Dog Tag & Cross
made of 3 nails
Inverness area
(352) 746-5077
LOST CAT
Seal Point Siamese
151bs, lost in Pine
Ridge, needs
medication, REWARD
Ps call (352) 527-1408
or 352- 400-1924
Lost Siamese Cat
female, 101bs, last
seen on 2/26/14 in the
vicinity of Anna Jo
and Pleasant Grove
in Inverness
pls call (352) 344-1718
Male Pomeranian
lost off Grover Clvd on
Sunny Terr He is rust
colored with white
fluffy tail & white chest
(352) 364-7311
Orange Fluffy Cat
male, 5 yrs. old, lost
in the vicinity of
Sandree & Country
Club, Citrus Springs
$100. REWARD
(352) 476-5321


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
SHagpy Birthday"
wit a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Need to contact
person at Hospice,
Inverness who was
buying exercise
machine, regarding
motorcycle accident
at Applebee's, Inv. on
Feb. 15, or anyone
who witnessed this
accident Please call
(503) 428-0162



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001




Real Estate
Office Coord.

Computer Skills, MS
Office. Multi tasking
Phone Skills, &
Customer Service.
Email Resume to:
servingyou@era
americanrealty.com
Subject Line: resume











Tell that special
person
"Hapy Birthday
wto a classi-
fMed ad under
Happy Notes.
Ony $28.50
includes
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966 _




Are YOU
a professional,
joyful, caring,
experienced
Medical
Receptionist or
Medical Assistant
Looking to work at
a successful
Physician's office?
Then send YOUR
Resume To:
resumk@
rocketmail.com

Avante
At Inverness

HAS THE FOLLOWING
OPEN POSITIONS
PRN Dietary Cook
PRN Dietary Aid
PRN Floor Tech
Full time 11 -7 CNA

Please apply online
Avantecenters.com


I Happy Not


Citrus Podiatry
Center

with the following
Positions available.
Podiatric Assistant
Part-time. 32 Hrs/wk.
X-ray license
preferred.
Front Office/Billina
Part-time. 32 Hrs/wk.
Both positions:
Two years minimal
exp in office setting.
Must have local
work references.
Two Local
established offices
since 1989.
Partial benefits.
Competitive salary.
Mail Resume:
P.O. Box 1120
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120.
No taxes Accepted.

CNAs

Expanding our
Nsg Services
3-11 & 11-7
Excellent Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer MIF/VID

Crystal River Dental
Practice seeking a
motivated
Dental Assist/
Sterilization Tech

to add to our team.
Candidate should
be enthusiastic,
energetic, and
willing to be a team
player. Part-time
position, average
18-20 hours weekly.
Experience a must
and Dentrix dental
software preferred.
Email Resume To:
info@kgsdds.com

DIETARY AIDE

Part-Time
Exp. Preferred
APPLY AT:
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness
An EE0/AA
Employer, M/F/V/D

HIRING: RN,PT

F/T w/benefits
Fl. Homecare Sp.
(352) 794-6097


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience req'd
for very busy
medical office.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

UNIT MANAGER RN
Full-time positions
available. Must be a
Florida-licensed RN.
Supervisory experi-
ence preferred.

REGISTERED NURSE
Full-time position
available for 11
p.m.-7 a.m. shift.
PRN positions availa-
ble for all shifts. Must
be a
Florida-licensed RN.

CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT
Full-time positions
available for 11
p.m.-7 a.m. shift.
PRN positions availa-
ble for all shifts.

Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.

Hannah Mand
352-746-4434 I
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne
Ln. I Lecanto, FL
34461
Hannah Mand@LCC
.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
46738









Patient
Advocate-
Crystal River, FL

MEDS, patient advo-
cacy leader, seeks
FT candidate to
assist ci ents with
Medicaid and char-
ity programs. Work
onsite at a medical
facility conducting
assessments to
match individuals to
medical assistance
programs. Social
work background
and/or medical of-
ice background
ar +'s. Degree pre-
ferred. Bilingual skills
a +. Competitive
pay and benefits.
Resumes:
jobs@bhs-meds.com
EOE


NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months,
not years. Small
classes, no waiting
list. Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219

RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payrolldhealth
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl134461
EOE/SF/DF





Experienced
Closing Agent

Busy Title Company
in Citrus County.
Fax Resume:
888-713-3272

Litigation
Asst/Paralegal

5 yr litigation exp.
mandatory Salary
negotiable/Benefits
avail. Fax resume:
352-726-3180

Senior
Accountant

The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office is
now accepting
applications. For
more information
and to apply visit
our website http: //
www.sheriffcitrus.
org/career.aspx
EqualOpportunity
Emplyer

M/F/D/V








SPORTSTERS

Have Openings for
EXP. SERVERS
& BARTENDERS
Applv in Person
Mon., Tue. or Wed.
10am-2pm
390 N. Suncoast Bvd





CDL-A Team
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease Incen-
tive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfioarnerscom

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

Exp. Laborer
& Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
Scott Wright Stucco

EXP. MECHANIC

Must have own tools.
Apply in Person
American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd.
No Phone Calls Please


EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS

All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973

F/T P/T POOL /
MAINTENANCE

Apply in person
Spruce Creek
Preserve
SR 200 Dunnellon
9am 4pm
See Julie

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

PUMP TRUCK
DRIVER

CDL Class B., Exc Ben-
efits. Must Pass Drug
Screen. A-Able Septic
Sewer Service. Call
352-795-1554 EOE

UNDER GROUND
UTILITY
CONTRACTOR
SEEKING

Skilled Pipe
Crew Laborers

for upcoming
project experi-
enced only for
work in down town
areas, in Marion,
Citrus, Lake &
surrounding coun-
ties, Drug Free
Work Place/EEO
contact Croft
Contracting Inc.
(352) 860-1202
k.croftcontractina
inc@earthlink.net

Utilities
Operator I
Announcement
#14-25

Skilled technical
work related to
water/wastewater
treatment plant
operations. Must
have experience in
a related field or an
equivalent combi-
nation of training
and experience.
Certification as a
Florida Water
and/or Wastewater
Class 'C" Operator
or if you have the
significant relevant
experience and are
able to obtain
Water and/or
Wastewater Class
'C" Operator
Certification within
6 months of employ-
ment. Starting pay
is $12.67 hourly.
Excellent Benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, March 7,
2014 EOE/ADA





Administrative
Assistant

PT with potential for
full time. Minimum 3
yrs. in an Admin Pos.
Fax or Email
Resume to:
352-489-8505
ksipper@
pathofcitrus.org

Animal Services
Clerk Typist
Casual,
on call position

Answer phones,
data entry, performs
adoptions and
owner claims; proc-
ess owner surrenders
and strays; complet-
ing forms, taxing
and ebridging;
process citations
and bite reports;
high customer
interaction in person
and via telephone.
Must be at least
18 years of age.
$8.70 hourly.

Casual labor
applications may
be completed on
line at www.
bocc .citrus.fl. us
and returned by
mail or in person to
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, FL
34461I.

This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.


Animal Services
Technician
Casual,
on call position

Manual labor in the
care of impounded
animals and the
cleaning and main-
taining of the Citrus
County animal
shelter. Must be at
least 18 years of
age. $8.70 hourly.

Casual labor
applications may
be completed
on line at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
and returned by
mail or in person to
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, FL
34461.

This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.




Asphalt
Distributor
Truck Operator
Needed

CDL class B required.
Full time position w/
benefits. Drug
screening and Back-
ground conducted.
Send resume to:
jobs@pavettetlorida.com
or applyat
Pave-Rite, Inc.,
3411 W Crigger Ct.
Lecanto.




COUNTER
ATTENDANTS,
Cafeteria, Food
Concessions, and
Coffee Shop Worker
for RUDY'S INC.
6 temporary
positions open from
5/12/14 to 10/26/14.

Job involves:
Perform a variety
of duties at mobile
food concessions
operation, combin-
ing preparing
and serving food
and nonalcoholic
beverages. These
duties may include
completing cash
and/or charge
transactions, taking
customer order,
serving retail food
and beverage
items, preparing
food order, working
as short order cook,
set-up and tear
down of mobile
food stand and
dining area.

Post-employment,
random drug testing
and background
checks may be req.

Travel with Mobile
Food Concessions
is required.

No training or expe-
rience is required.
Equal Opportunity,
FLSA (13)(a)(3) ex-
empt employer not
subject to Federal
hourly wage, over-
time or recordkeep-
ing requirements.
No overtime ex-
pected. Overtime, if
any, calculated
and paid as per ap-
plicable regulations.

Work schedule var-
ies widely, typically
35 Hrs/Wk Wed-Sun,
5:00PM to 10:00PM.

Employer will pay
$425.00 per week,
starting in Citrus
County, FL and
traveling to Virginia
Beach City, Fairfax,
Suffolk Co, VA;
Suffolk, Delaware,
Washington,
Columbia Co, NY;
Plymouth, Bristol,
Barnstable, Franklin,
Hampden Co, MA;
New London Co, CT;
Sussex Co, NJ; Wake
Co, NC.

Employer certifies
that if there are
changes in work
locations, employer
will obtain applica-
ble prevailing wage
for work location
and pay such wage
Merit increases
and/or bonuses
may be awarded at
employer discretion.
Employer makes
available mobile
housing valued at
$300.00 /week.

Employer makes
available transpor-
tation from venue
to venue and
scheduled transpor-
tation to laundry,
shopping valued
at $25.00/ wk

Send resume to
rudyseastcoas
@aol.com or fax to
352-489-7635.
Rudy's, Inc,
5935 N. Highland
Park Dr., Hernando,
FL 34442. Please
include complete
contact information
in your submission.


Can't Keep Your
Mouth Shut!

Spouse may not like
it? But we'll pay you
top dollar for it.
Appointment Setting
Commission Only
352-503-6860

FUEL TRUCK
DRIVER

Class B /Tanker
/Hazmat
apply in person
1021 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River or send
resume to: Whetco
@earthlink.net or
fax 352-795-1121

Head Chef
Deli Manager

FT position at a grow-
ing natural food store
with large food serv-
ice area. Exp required
Send resume to:
CCC, Blind Box 1857
106 W Main St
Inverness, Fl134450

Heavy Machine
Mechanic

DAB Constructors
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
(352) 447-5488

Houseman,
Housekeeper &
Laundry Person

Experience Preferred
No Phone Calls
Aoolv In Person
614 NW Hwy 19,
BEST WESTERN

OTR DRIVER

-Dedicated Run**
**Home Weekly"
5 yrs. exp.
call 352-212-3770

SERVICE
WORKER

The City of
Dunnellon is
accepting applica-
tions for Service
Worker. Duties
include tree trimm-
ing & removal, road
and right of way
repair work, lawn
maintenance
and landscaping.
Basic carpentry
& heavy equip op-
eration skills a plus.
must have a valid
FL DL. obtain a job
description and
submit a Employ-
ment Application
package to the
City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500.
Apps can be pack-
age
downloaded at
www.dunnellon.org.
Electronicap-
plications /resumes
not accepted.
Starting pay is $9.17
hr Application
deadline 03/17/2014
Positions will
oened ur il
filed.

E.O.E., DFWP

The City of
Dunnellon
is accepting
applications for

Master Mechanic.
This position req. HS
diploma/ GED, 2 yrs
exp as heavy equip,
gas, diesel & small
engine mechanic &
public safety and
emergencyvehicles.
Class 'B" Comm FL
and A.S.E. Cert. in
the truck and
automotive fields
mandatory.
Must obtain a job
description and
submit a Employ-
ment Application
package to the City
Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500.
App package at
www.dunnellon.org.
Electronic applica-
tions /resumes
not accepted.
Salary range
($26,874 $40,310)
deadline 03/17/2014
Positions remain
opened until filled.
E.O.E., DFWP.

Window Installer

Exp. not neccessary.
Construction exp.
helpful. CleUan
drivers record.
Benefits available.
Aoolv in Person
Mon. Through Fri.
8am-4pm
Tropical Window
1731 Hwy 19
Homosassa





PIT Line Cooks

Must be available to
Aork week-eds
Skyview Restaurant
at Citrus Hills
Aoolv in Person
2100 N. Terra Vista
Blvd Mon.-Sun.
8a-l0a Or 3p-5p


Heating And Air
Conditioning
Technician
Training!
Fast Track, Hands
On National
Certification Pro-
gram. Lifetime Job
Placement. VA
Benefits Eligible!
1-877-994-9904


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAR HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547






BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
wwwtbenes.edu





SPRINGHILL
CAMPUS

Cosmetoloav
March 17th
Day & Night School
w Barber
April 28th
Night School
w Massage Ther.
April 28th
Day School
Massage Ther.
April 28th
Night School
a, AIL TECH
or FACIAL TECH
Day School
Open Enrollment
INTRODUCING *
NEW Niaht School
MARCH 17th
Classes for Nail Tech
or Facial Tech
Mon., Tues., Wed.
5:00 PM-9:00 PM
(727) 848-8415
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
Full & Port time
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Can You Dig It?
Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, and
Excavators.
3 Week Hands
On Training
Provided. Become
Nationally Certified.
Lifetime Job
Placement Assis-
tance. GI Bill Eligible!
1-866-362-6497






You can become an
expert in HVAC
installation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute Online
HVAC education in as
little as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961
or go online:
www.HVAC-Online-
Education.com






CITRUS COUNTY
Lg well maint.& profit-
able coined laundry
for sale. Qualified buv-
em onl352-270-0943





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$1 3,995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida 'Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**



DRESSER
WITH MIRROR
Cherry Wood $100 call
352-257-3870
WOOD ROCKER
Great shape $65
call 352-257-3870



LENOX Crystal Bowls.
Set Of 4,3.5inch diam-
eter. Made Czech Re-
public. Lovely. New.
$40.00. 352-513-5777
ONEIDA Stainless Plat-
ter and Bowl, Large.
Excellent Condition.
$30.00. 352-513-5777
STAINLESS Oneida
18/8 vintage coffee pot
and water jug. Nice.
$89.00 352-513-5777



2 WHITE KENMORE
PEDESTALS for washer
and dryer like new $80
call 352-257-3870
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BRAND NEW
30" Gas Stove GE
Stainless Steel
model # JGBT33SET2SS
retail $899. never used
$350. (352) 563-9811
DISHWASHER black
Kenmore Ultrawash.
Top of line model. $45
(352)795-7813
Dryer
white, Good
Condition $100.
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
ELECTRIC STOVE
30 Inch
Excel condition
$125.
352-302-8265
ELECTRIC STOVE
GE, Like New
White, $300
(352) 795-8728
GE Refrigerator
21.6 CU. f. frost free
about 12yrs old, in good
condition .$100.00 call
875-8442
Kenmore Refrigerator
Elite Side by Side
25.6 cu ft, 2 comput-
ers, auto defrost
w/side mounted
freezer, thru-door
ice/water $500.
(352) 465-0339
Kitchen Aooliance Set
GE, Almond, S-by-S
Refrig w/ ice/water
Range glass top, and
Diswasher. May Divide
$1,000; 352-601-3728
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398
Whirlpool
Cabrio, Lg. capacity
Washer Machine
$300. 352-586-2562










DUDLEY'S


Th l2-- Walk
About Estate Auction
3pmComplete con-
tents of several
homes, furniture,
tools, boxes of
treasures
w, Sun 3/2 Antique
Auction 1pm Kawai
Baby Grand,
Victorian-Primitive-
Marble Top Furniture,
Signed memorabilia,
Jewelry,
Coins, Rugs, Porc,
Sterling, 500 +lots

call for info 637-9588
dudleysauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US415) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CILASSIFEIDS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
2.5 ACRES,
March 20, 10am
Ed Messer, Broker
messersales.com





10" Table Saw,
with stand $50.
Craftsman Wood
Lathe antique? $75.
(352) 765-4011

Air Compressor/
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, 125 PSI
$325
(202) 425-4422 cell

BENCH TOP GRINDER
$30 in good condition
call 352-257-3870

DELTA BENCH PRESS
$40 in good condition
call 352-257-3870

MACHINE SHOP
Lathe, Milling Mach.
Drill Press, 2 saws, A.
torch, M. welder, sup-
ply of steel/allum.
$10,000 352-400-1074

WESTINGHOUSE
JOINTER/EDGER ON
STAND $40 in good
working condition call
352-257-3870




KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920

PANASONIC 13" TV
WITH BUILT IN VCR &
REMOTE $30
352-613-0529

SHARP SPEAKERS
2 10" 150 WATTS $25
352-613-0529

YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS 1 5" 80
WATTS $70
352-613-0529


(3) WHITE ALUMINUM
WINDOWS Double
pane no screen meas-
ures 71"h x 36"w;$30 ea
call 352-257-3870
SLIDING DOORS 6'
white insulated with
frame, heavy duty $100
very good condition
352-302-7451




DEL FLAT SCREEN 14
in Good condition
$20.00 Linda 423-4163
DELL MONITOR 16 in
wide Fair condition
10.00 Linda 423-4263



PATIO SET5 PIECES 1
48" OCTAGON TABLE
& 4 CHAIRS WITH
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529
Round Patio Table,
120" round with 4
chairs, good condition
$100. (352) 795-7254
White PVC Table w/
4chairs $150. obo
2 Seater lawn Chairs
still in the case $50.
(352) 209-4311- Iv msg.




20, 8 ft.
Wooden Tables
$75. ea.
Wiil Sell Separate
(352) 621-0987
100
Metal Chairs
$15ea.
Will separate
(352) 621-0987
Antique Rocker,
round table & desk.DR
table, 4 chrs, 2 leafs;
dresser, overstuffed
chr, kit storage unit, &
paintings. $250 obo
(352) 419-5635
ASIAN STYLE TABLE
$75 glass top red and
gold perfect condition
call 352-257-3870
Bunk Bed & Futon
Combination
heavy duty metal
construction,
excel. cond. $250.
(352) 249-7796


Dresser & Night Stand
Antique, Pine, $100
obo, China Cabinet,
Glass doors, w/ cabinets
$75 obo (352) 226-3883
Dual Recliner/Love
Seat. New Cond.Sea
Foam Green. No
Smoker, No Pets. $250
obo. (352)344-8277
dr HIGH END USED
FURNITURE 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
KING BEDROOM SET
custom made, match-
ing Entertainment
Center, lots of storage!
can text photos askg
$475obo 352-220-2037
King Mattress
& 2 twin boxsprings
for King $175. obo
kids bedroom set,
3 pc. set $200. ob
(352) 226-3883
LIVING ROOM SET
couch, love seat, chair
and ottoman, first $100
352 302 7451
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Green, like
new. No pets or
smoking. Exc Cond!
$225. (352) 746-2329
Oak Dining Room Set
inc. ext. leaf, 4 high-
back chairs, beautiful
hutch w. beveled glass
doors, $300.set obo
Dinette Set 4 padded
chairs w/coaster wheels
$225. obo, can text
photos (352) 220-2037
OVERSIZED RECLINER
Leather, good cond
$400; Oversized lift
chair, like new $700
(352) 746-4245
RUG. 6x8, 100% wool.
Contemporary rug.
Color: browns, tans,
beiges
$85.00 352-270-3117
SOFA& LOVE SEAT
Blue with a floral patter
$40 call 352-257-3870
Solid Wild Cherry
Buffet, natural finish,
16W" x 40"Lx 40"H
glass doors, Amish
made, beautiful!
$200. (352) 860-0124
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500


beige $50
352-344-4323
TRADITIONAL WING
BACK CHAIR Medium
Rose Color $25 great
shape call
352-257-3870
TV STAND ON
WHEELS 28" W X 24"H
MEDIUM COLOR $20
352-613-0529



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
John Deere
Riding Mower
17.5 HP Kawaski
Motor, 42" deck. $500
(352) 746-7357


RIDING LAWN
MOWER John Deer 42"
riding lawn mower.17hp
$500 352 613 5522




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a-5p
665 NE 9th St, Near
CR area schools.
FLORAL CITY
Benefit Sale for
Precious Paws Rescue
Fri. 28 & Sat. I & Sun. 2
8am-3pm
7360 S. Florida Ave.
INVERNESS
Sun. 9-3 MOVING
349 Golf Harbor Path
The Moorings



LECANTO
4425 W Glen Street
Furniture, Tools,
Books, Housewares,
yard items
Sat/Sun March 1-2
9am 3pm
must sell!




Beverly Hills
By Appt. Only:
Entire Estate Items
pls call (352) 302-6764


CLASSIFIEDS




DRESS perfect for
prom, red & black,
large, new-never
worn,($35)
352-613-7493
MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS SIZE
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS LARGE $20
352-613-0529
MENS JEANS/NEW
Roots / 36 W x 30 L
15.00 Linda 423-4163
SHOES size 8,
high-heels, metallic
pewter with studs, new,
($15) 352-613-7493
VINTAGE CASHMERE
COAT Women size S
Camel Color great
condition $100 call
352-257-3870
VINTAGE FAUX FUR
Black size (S) Glenoit
fabric for Glensea II $40
call 352-257-3870




BROTHER FAX COP-
IER SCANNER WITH
MANUAL ONLY 35.00
464 0316




2003 FORD GRILL.
Original 2003 Ford Ex-
pedition grilllike new.
$50 727-463-4411

20" Whirlybird
Driveway Cleaner
$200. obo
352-302-8265
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
ALPHA/OMEGA HOME
SCHOOLING BOOKS
9th/10th grades
50.00 obo Linda
423-4163
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 D5


BASE CABINETS 2
new, wood, maple. 30"
X 22" X 31.5" H. $35
each or $60 both. Call
527-2598 10am-9pm
Blue Glass Ware
$150.
10 Deviled Egg Strays
$50.
(352) 795-7254
Broan White Range
Hood $35.00
Double bowl composite
sink $35.00
(717) 994-2362
Chain Link Fence,
6 ft high, 176 feet,
complete setup
Asking $600.
(352) 341-6213
Chandelier
$50
Garment Steamer
Rowenta 1500
$50.
(352) 563-2706
COMPUTER GAMES
6 multi-packs, 1 with
500,000 games, great
shape, ($10)
352-613-7493
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DESK SOLID DARK
WOOD w/ Hutch Excel.
Used Cond. 7 drawers.
Org. $1,300.
Selling for $245.00
352-249-7212
DOME TOP STEAMER
TRUNK. Excellent con-
dition in/out. 20"H x
30"W x 18"D. $100.
527-1239
Easy Boy Rocker
Recliner, Swivel,
$200.
Combination Safe,
24H 18W 18L
$100. (352) 445-9448
ELVIS PRESLEY
CARDBOARD POSTER
Highly collectible only
$25 call 352-257-3870
FLOOR LAMPS
65" metal, all white,
3 adj. globes $35. 71"
brass torchiere $70. Call
527-2598 10am-9pm.
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
15ct@ $5/Ib, FRESH
Gulf Grouper @ $7/lb
delivered 352-897-5001


GENERATOR
Honda, Black Max
8125, 6500 watts,
low hours, $550
Will take hunting eq.
on trade 906-285-1696
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES NEW
FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
Karcher
Pressure Washer
6 hp, 2300 psi, $150.
Queen Sofa Couch
multi color, like new
$150. obo
(352) 270-0269
Kerosene Lamps
set of 10, $100.
(352) 795-7254
Large Shed, with
windows & skylight
w/ portible air cond.
$850. obo, Pd. $2,000
Leave Message
(352) 637-6310
Recumbent Bike
Schwin, stationary,
$250; large wooden
rocking chair $150
Both in good cond
(352) 746-4245
Regulation Bathtub
Opaque, Glass
Shower Sliding Doors
Like New $200.
(352) 527-9395
SILENT AIR PURIFIER
Ionic Breeze 3.0 New
$249 used 1 week $50
No more Filters!
352-613-4279
Tall Metal Pet Gate
fits 36" door, Paid $90
Asking $50. Walnut
Wood Pet Gate Fits 36"
door Pd $110. Asking
$50 352-563-2706
TWIN BEDDING blan-
ket $5, pillow & sheet
set $10, new sheet set
in pkg. $10. Call
527-2598 10am-9pm.
VIDEO GAME CON-
SOLE Play station 2,
two controllers, dvd re-
mote and 14 games.
$100.00 352-613-0823
YARN Knitting worsted
& baby weight. $1.50
skein,supersize $3 ea.
Var. colors. Call
527-2598 10am-9pm


iM ERNE


6 FOOT WIDE BY 4
FOOT HIGH $30
352-613-0529




4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Electric
Wheelchair
With lift, Like New,
$800.
352-897-4154
Philips, "Hard Start"
Brand New
Home Defibrillator,
for sudden cardiac
arrest, Internet, price
$1,199, Sell for $500
(352) 382-1088
SHOWER BENCH
SEAT ALUMINUM &
FIBERGLASS BENCH
TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
352-464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316




"NEW"FENDER
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
SMALLBODY, STRAT
NECK,&GIGBAG $100
352-601-6625
"NEW'LIQUID BLACK
ELECTRIC GUITAR
"SG"STYLE PLAYS
SOUNDS GREAT! $65
352-601-6625
1936 Grinnell Brothers
Baby Grand Hand
carved, french pro-
ventrial legs, match-
ing bench $2,500 obo

352-422-3829


ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR, GRAND
CONCERT, FISHMAN
ELECTRONICS $85
352-601-6625
BLACK&GOLD
LESPAUL STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
SET-NECK "NEW"
$100 352-601-6625






DUDLEY'S


-Thur 2-27 Walk
About Estate Auction
3pmComplete con-
tents of several
homes, furniture,
tools, boxes of
treasures
w- Sun 3/2 Antique
Auction pm Kawai
Baby Grand,
Victorian-Primitive-
Marble Top Furniture,
Signed memorabilia,
Jewelry,
Coins, Rugs, Porc,
.Stering, 5.0 0.+lots.

call for info 637-9588
dludlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ae
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.

KIMBALL ORGAN
$30
call 352-257-3879
LOWREY ORGAN
MX-2, With all the
bells and whistles.
Exc Cond, w/ bench
$1400; 352-601-3728




FRYING PAN + Lid.
Oneida Stainless
Deep at 9.5 dia.
Wooden Handle. Nice
pc. $20 352-513-5777
PFALTZGRAF AMALFI
12 place settings
w/serving pcs $100
513-4614
Plant Hanger
Beautiful Hand made,
macrame, with plant &
glass holder $60
(352) 746-2479


Airport TransPort
352-746-7595





SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




STransmission

Repair & Finance I
CONSIGNMENT USA I
US 19 CR *r 461-4518





Caring, Exp. Caregiver
with Excellent Ref's,
Clean, Shop, Etc. for
You (352) 613-3114




JAKES' General
Carpentry, No Job too
Big or Small. Porches &
MORE 352-601-7064





CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352 -341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



**ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144


Ron's Affordable

Ha nd ym an IServices
fAll Home Repairs
*Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761



W7-1 h A I I

WATKINS & SONS

PAVING, INC.
Driveways -
Parking Lots
Seal Coating
Maintenance
Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@grmail.corm
Licensed and Insured Lic. #Sp13889


F1+E N LI E
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
Vo FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
Pe RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Vo FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
Pe RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
w Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352U 949-2292




Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-613-8137
Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Com. Lic.352-503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Liclins 352-795-5755


Budd Excavating &
Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442


Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards


Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed *Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086






#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273


Crosby's Lawn Care &
Maintenance
Offering exceptional
lawn care, tree re-
moval, and pressure
washing.Call now for
your free quote! Fam-
ily owned and oper-
ated
352-247-5163
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V1ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


(352) 270-4672


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
Generators :Lighting -Fixtures
Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
R 352-364-4610
MWR.
LECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
independently owned & operated.
L,c #,EC13O3381 ,,insred & bonded
24 Hours a Da.v 7DaysaWeek











I Interior/ExteriramIntng
Drywall RepairsTextures
Wallpaper Removal



352-597-2440; 352-293-5088
Toll Free: 87-893-3895


A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Absolute Exterior
Restoration Any
Surface roof& gutter
cleaning, intext painting
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557









Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE /lic# 2441


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallways Free) only $69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on sae appt, With c aon

THURA IClAN c
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091




5EVfGCTUS COUNlTY tONlGER THANl THE REST,
COVITENlTY VOTED BE-ST OF TE- BEST





Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install
\ / 3 TimeWinner
2011-2012 -2013

746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Licensed Insured Bonded


S D.Cent
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
SGenerac CenturionI

Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.










Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


qualified
employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!



Classifieds


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


KNOCK OUT Ted's Painting
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIALVACATINHomeeis
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN UP





LLne wInLID/INrsueLaicn27
icensed, Insured,
Workers Comp. Intro xeio
WPressure giveav/BIk
Washi94ng 83Too 1 Irol/Txtr

352.94.8434 All Types of Home Repairs

Call Today for a 740R-5-190
00hfY5 Cean Tomorrow Lc/ NS Li 240270


-.OO A&SAEKI


DETECTION
Licensed


Electronic
Leak
Detection
Jor allpools
and spas
We'iifind leak
no charge!


352-433-6070

30 day guarantee on all work

BayLeakDetective@gmail.com


Is





Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill




"Hasta La Bye Bye."




TH-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


,-I


Musical
Instruments 11


"A i.r ;dlTmi.
orlado


CLEANING


PAINTING & HOME REPAIR




D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 2,2014


SHARPER IMAGE Ionic
Breeze 3.0 New $249
used 1 week $50. No
more filters to buy.
613-4279
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529




MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
WEIGHT BENCH
Incline-decline. In-
cludes leg attachment.
$60.00. 352-270-3117




14' x 10' Screen Room
still in the case $100.
Coleman Weekender
Hammock,
still in case $100.
(352) 209-4311 l-v msg
Club Car Golf Cart
Gas, lifted, large tires,
needs restoration.
Good project for
hunting buggy $800
(352) 564-2756
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Like new, I set North-
western, I set Ping
Zing, Plus bags, balls
etc $550 for all
(352) 341-0866
Ping G25,
9.5 Graphite Reg. Flex
Driver w/ adjustible
shaft $225.
(352) 341-0302
TAPERFLEX
WATER SKI $25.00
in great condition
call 352-257-3870
THOMPSON CON-
TENDER MUZZLE
LOADER Hawken 45
caliber, like new with
complete set of
'possibles' $350 firm.
352-212-8624.




6ft x 16ft, flat deck,
w ramps, pressure
treated deck, new
elect, brakes, $2,000
obo(603) 702-2491




BOYS CLOTHING
Sizes 12mths -
5Toddlers .25-$1.00 like
new call 352-257-3870


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Ha py Birthday"
wihaclassified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




TRAILER HITCH
10,000 lb weight distrib-
uting hitch with sway
control. 2 5/16 ball


I wistl LU dpuuL uu ,
male lab, light choc, or
lab golden mix, 2-5
yrs,80-90 Ibs, well be-
have and trained. Must
walk well on lease at my
side. Must not climb or
jump fence. Must be
medically up to date.
extremely loving, must
be able to get along well
with a female dog,
should have smooth
sleek fur. Please call
me and leave message
on VM (352) 746-3087
LABRADOODLE PUP
PIES 3 adorable males,
1 black, 2 apricot, par-
ents on premises, vet
checked, health certifi-
cates. Ready for new
homes! $500
352-410-0080
Macaw- Female
$2500; Quarter horse,
National Champion,
takes intermediate
rider $2500
352-860-2457
Shih-Poo Puppy,
1 female
Schnauzer Pups
Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pups
Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


SKINNEY
Skinney, an Ameri-
can pit bull terrier, a
great favorite
among the shelter
volunteers. Bears
the scars of a previ-
ous hard life, but is
looking for a new
wonderful life with a
loving family. Rides
well in a car, takes
treats gently, loves
to play with toys.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


Welsh Driving Pony
Buggy, Harnace,
& Boots.
$3,000.
(352) 212-4981




** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*

ALUMINUM BOAT
10' Long, Good Cond.
Easy to load. Light
weight. + trolling mtr.
$300. (678) 617-5560
LOWE
20' PONTOON, 60hp
Merc, new cover, +
full canvas camper
encl. askg. $6250. obo
Iv msg (352) 795-8792
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555.*
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
RV & Truck for Sale
Mobile Suite 5th Wheel
Custom 3 slides, 37 '
2003 FORD F350 Lariat,
Dually Super Duty V-8
TURBO, Easy Rider
Reese, 16k Hitch
MANY EXTRA'S ON
BOTH, PACKAGE
$37K 352-897-5339
Sport Coach IV
Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans,1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814
THOR
CHALLENGER
model 37KT, 11,000 mi.
$108,000. 352-586-2562
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



'05, Audi A6

Quattro, white,
clean car fax, abso-
lutely new 114k miles
'03 Ford Explorer,
Red, 3rd Row Seat
Extra clean
$4,995.
'08 Suzuki Forenza
Gas Saver, Red,
$5,995.
'01 GMC Jimmy
White, $2,995
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUICK
2002 LeSabre
38,000 mi, Exc Cond,
$6900
(352) 527-9509
Buy Here/Pay Here

'00 Pontiac GR AM
$625 Down

'00 Mazda Protege
$750 Down

'01 Ford Explorer
$850 Down

'95 Toyota Camry
$2195 CASH

'96 Cadillac Deville
$2725 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
01 PT CRUISER, good
cond. 90k mi. $2600.
obo (352) 249-7451

IMMACULATE

CHRYSLER
SPORTS CAR
2005 Crossfire Yellow


convertible w/black top,
auto trans, excellent
condition, 45k,built in
Germany w/Mercedes
V6 engine $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150
DODGE
2012, Avenger RT,
Sunroof, leather, navi,
$17,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
Ford
2010 Fusion SEL,
8k miles. loaded,
(352) 344-5307


Reduced price for a
well maintained '03,
Taurus SE, Looks &
drives great $3,200
firm w/ 141khwy mi.
Shown on appointmnt.
(352) 422-1 798

HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

LINCOLN
89 TOWNCAR. 75,300.
mi. very clean, exc.
condition, all original,
$3500. (304) 678-4070

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MITSUBISHI
'99, Galant ES, 3.0 Liter,
V6, snrf., full Pwr., 226k
mi., AC, alloy wheels
$1,400. (352) 746-5490

OLDSMOBILE
'01, Aurora, loaded,
with many options,
128k miles, w/ new
battery new upholst.
$4,800 (352) 257-3802

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA I
US 19CIR,*461-45181






AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAR. 2ND.
1-800-438-8559


2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
wit a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





CHEVROLET
2010, Silverado
Reg Cab WT
$13,495,
352-341-0018
DODGE 3/
2006 SLT Quad Cab;
5th wheel hitch. 88k
miles, $14,900
Frank's (352) 726-2494
DODGE
1995, 2500, Reg Cab
Work Box Truck
$2,888.
352-341-0018

FORD
2013, F150 V6, Stand
Cab. Trlr tow pkg,
Cust. bed liner &
cover. Much More
only 1,800 miles.
$23,800 352-419-5771

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


CLASSIFIEDS




United Rentals
is selling surplus
equipment at no
reserve internet
auction on March 14.
Bid now on service
trucks, F350, F450,
F550's, pickup
trucks at
www Durole
wave com





CHRYSLER
2005, Pacifica AWD,
low miles, leather
extra clean $9,450.
352-341-0018

FORD
'09, Edge, 57K miles
all pwr loaded,
2 tone interior $15,000
firm. (352) 201-1866
Serious Inquiries Only
Selling/Health reasons

FORD
2003 Excursion XLT
V-10 New Michelin tires,
new master brake cylin-
der, new fuel pump, new
transmission. Great tow
vehicle, class IV heavy
duty hitch, tow package,
loaded. Regularly main-
tained and serviced.
$7,900. (352) 344-1823

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHRYSLER
2010 Town & Country
Touring Handicap
Van, w/ side ramp.
Exc Cond, 46,800mi
352-726-5070


CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306










2005 HD 1200C
EZ Finance $3,900.

2004 YAMAHA
VSTAR I1100
BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.

2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14,500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047

GOLDWING
'12, 1800 Trike,
Red, 31 k miles, Serious
inquires only $26,000.
(352) 341-5762

HONDA
2013 Honda
Scooter PCX 150
Red, Great Cond.
$3500 OBO
352-422-8601

KAWASAKI
2004 Vulcan Classic
800 cc lots of extras
$2500
(352) 726-1460
SUZUKI
'06, C-50 Boulevard,
805CC FI/Water
Cooled/Shaft Drive-
windshield, bags
& engine guard,
7K mi. Adult Owned,
Garaged, Exc. Cond.
$4,000. firm 795-1586


338-0316 SUCRN
DOCTORS OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE

The PEDIATRIC DENTAL OFFICE of
MID FLORIDA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY OF CITRUS COUNTY
Located at 22 REGINA BLVD, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 Phone number: 352-270-8860
Is CLOSING on MARCH 28, 2014.
We thank you for your patronage. It has been our pleasure to serve your children's
dental needs.

Patients are welcome at our primary office in Lake County and all records will be
transferred there. If you wish to have records transferred to another dentist, we will
be happy to transfer them for you at no charge with your written authorization.

Please contact us at this number prior to our permanent closing day.

After March 28, 2014, records will be held at 1340 E. Orange Ave, Eustis, FL
Any inquiry about records should be directed to phone number 352-483-9183.

Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, March 2, 9, & 16, 2014.


343-0302 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Matthew R. Thorman
3221 S Buckley Pt
Inverness, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, March 2, 2014.


344-0302 SUCRN
03/05/2014 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 at 5:00 pr. at the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, March 2, 2014.


Get the Facts: Gators;


Seminoles; Hurricanes;


Bulls; Knights


College teams from coast to coast have a large Florid

base. 6.5 million Floridians consider themselves F

college football fans. Over 9.5 million Floridians

consider themselves Florida newspaper readers.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... GET THE FACTS

AND GET IN THE GAME.


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


OOOBXGY


C ...R.US ... O U N T Y



CH\kONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


IMis.Ntcs


IMis.Ntcs


IMis.Ntcs


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


M


M


I =





Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 2,2014


SOME
CI


RONT
-ITRUS COULNTIY CHRO)NICi.E REAL ESTIATEFF


1 Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E8


-Lj 13


A multifunctional-horizontal wall bed and home
office combination from California Closets. The piece
allows guests to feel comfortable when they visit and
provides a workable space throughout the year, with
additional wardrobe and large storage for added benefit.
California sets/Associated Press


-go**- -0111111lb- -4006- d%- -qPO -low-

-woo& -40- -040-
Ake






52 t637
fleros56 Etrhue#61Etrh6-8 2 8
(....5 6. Euse #4720




5366 CHAPARREL 3621 N. TAMARISK AVE. LAUREL RIDGE 3 BR/2BA/2 CAR. WALK OUT BASEMENT!
'HORSE WELCOME 'FENCED2.8ACRES BEVERLY HILLS SPACIOUS HOME!!! Waterfront on deep canal to river & Gulf. .3Bdrms/2Bath/lCarGarage .6AcreLot
, Lovely Home 'Lanai Plus Front Porch *2BD/2BA/1CG 1,923 SF Under Roof 2 BR, 2 BATH w/OFFICE *2-Car Garage w/Screen Kitchen open to family room with corner New Metal Roof Neutral Interior
2 BR/Office/2-CarGar. ,LotsofWOODCabinets Living RM&Fam. RM AII NewWindows Living&FamilyRM *HVACUpdated2012 fireplace and sliders out to screen lanai
SAppliances Inc. W/D 'Pet Friendly Location Beautifully Updated and Maintained ,1999 Sq. Ft. Living Community POOL viewing dock & canal. Great price in '1 000 Sq F Unfinished ConvenienttAll Necessities
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL Updated Appliances 8 Person SPA Riverhaven.
gB ,ljki llq [. .i[.]lr~liF! ] lgB e _] l PETR & ARVA KROLSHERRY POTTS (352) 097-5500
Em.hI: ellsuton@rmax.nt ~k (352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 JODY BROOM (352) 034-5821 Email: sheryIpotts@aol.com
www.Florld_____is __nglnfo __om (352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com Emai3 r8maxga122@yahoo.com Websile: www.CrysialRiverLiving.com
1: 1 z2 4 / 7 z L l ; i 4 7 I F O L N 4 7 N O L N I N F O L I N E
__ 2/7 N~o INE52) 63 .282
(_352)6 7 8 2637-282 Enter houe 3rh use #1239
Enter house #4665 Enter house #3Enehus#43
-)



4665 N. JADEMOOR 3 GRAYTWIG CT. W. 4438 N. RATH RUE PT., OAKWOOD Gated Community, Acreage and aStunning Home
SUGR 2,906 Sq. Ft. Liv. on 2.2 AC
'ON 3RD GREEN 'OF TWISTED OAK SUGARMILL WOODS ALTY O2BD/2BAV2CG UpdatedKitchen. Appliances, Baths *3Bed+ Office/2.5 BA/ 3-Car Garage
'3/2/2 w/Fam. rm. '2,032 sq. ft. Living Area 3BD/2BA2CG Great Location TSplYi Floor Plan Glassed/Screened Florida Room Formal Living & Dining + Family Room,
High Ceilings/Built-Ins Lanai w/Great View Formal Dining Room REat-n Kitchen Area 24/7 IH FO L INE Lots of New Tile Beautifully Maintained Home Fireplace & Caged Pool w/Solar Heat
'0 RoH Neay2,3OOSFliving ia 6 7 8 8 L New Roof 2013 Cul-De-Sac in Great Neighborhood Gourmet Kitchen
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 E n Stainless Steel Appliances
ErLL STO 3.]-1..] 9 ; ]iPETER & MARVIA KOROL GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961 CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
Eml: lleuln~eoxnl j (352) 527-7842 i mi ~nlshcremax.nm I (352) 637-620
:,-,,,,,~ne VA M I HR'SHW 637 2828 mry..,,
www.FlorIiLis.nglnlo com (352) 422-3875 www.sellingcitruscountyhomescom Email: kcunningham@remaxnet

E 282RENTALS 1 Buyer calls exclusive
Ene ose #1848 E T L
O Ise #1848 f 24/7 Info Line
.AVAILABLE 637-2828
Visit+

I isit Buyerente rh u e#rs house
FREEMAN PLACE WWEAIcflRw n number when 3/2/2 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS
SNOWBIRD ALERT GOLF NEARBY prompted O f BUILT IN 2005
Newer Cpt./PaintlBlinds Inside Laundry rOpen floor plan with great room, formal dining,
NewedroCpot encd Backyard Lanr breakfast room, split bedrooms. 1 0x51' 4-season
3Bedroom/Carport: Fenced Bakar lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 1 0x82' & 20x2O
Close to Bike Trail Community Tennis Ct. 3 Buyer listens to attached carts and detached carport/boat
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 property parking. Everything your family needs is right here
presentation in #1 in Citrus County CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Em 1e_,,,,,,.n_ I English or Spanish 302-35
www.FlorlUiaistinglnio.com n Emaih cnadal@remaxnet
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM 52 27 INFO LINE
III I IEnter huse #2959
0INDIAN WATERS
Seawall with City Water & Sewer
INDIAN WATERS
861 N. SPEND-A-DUCK DR. CUSTOM BUILT HOMOSASSA! PICTURE PERFECT!
CLEAR VIEW ESTATES HIGHLAND HOME 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR GARAGE HOME Seawall, CityWater, & Dock Pristine 3 BD -2.5 Bath Home on Lush, cul-de-sac Preserve
C Well-Maintained 3BR/3BA/2CG 2BR/2BA BUILT IN 2005 WITH A TOTAL OF 2103 WELL-MAINTAINED, 1-CAR DETACHED GARAGE WOODLAND ESTATES Lot in Canterbury Lake Estates. Beautifully maintained and
eLiving & FamilyvRoom BI 5 O 1A IRT Loaded with Upgrades including Wood Flooring, Garden Tub,
Lg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook SQ. FT UNDER ROOF PRIVACY FENCED LIVING AND FAMILY ROOM, HEATED AND COOLED Granite Countertops and Designer Faucets. Spacious 1,850
Pool & Lanai Area BACKYARD, AND SCREEN ROOM. LARGE FLORIDA ROOM, NEWER CENTRAL HEAT/AIR, Deep Water..No Bridges Dock, Seawall and Cut in Slip Sq. R. Great Room design ideally caters to casual lifestyle.
Beautiful Landscaped Setting BEDROOMS, SPLIT PLAN 2 -CAR GARAGEG Includes Citrus Hills CC Membership plus use o
Lots of Living Space & Storage [78 G 5Y2 Recreation Cente
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 Email lucybarnes@remaxne GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-1812
Email: lenpalmer remax~net Emai. barbaromi s@earthfink.net Email: dmfl@yahoo.om Visual Tours www.cryslalriveAl.com Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleeman-com

I I A 11


E2 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Home contracts barely budge in January

Experts say real estate market


might be struggling


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
number of Americans who
signed contracts to buy
homes was essentially flat
in January, a possible sign
of a softening real estate
market.
The National Associa-
tion of Realtors said Fri-
day that its seasonally
adjusted pending home


sales index inched up 0.1
last month to 95. The index
has fallen 9 percent over
the past 12 months as sales
momentum has faded.
Pending sales are a
barometer of future pur-
chases: A one- to two-
month lag usually exists
between a signed contract
and a completed sale.

See HOMES/Page E5


A for sale sign hangs in front of a house in Mount Lebanon, Pa.


UEEIIVVUUu-IIVInI"I rL DARIK uVwrIlU)-.KT:IAL KIVIK, 'L
Cozy 2BR home situated on 1.15 acres. 13BR/2BA home with office in Shamrock Acres.
Great location. $66,900 MLS#708261 1 2.5 acres. $152,900 MLS#708173
Associated Press CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 #wI
After Hours (,z 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allcitrusrealty.corn


"Always There For You"
GAIL COOPER
Multimillion Dollar Realtor
(352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


TRUE FIVE BEDROOM HOME! PALMWOOD CABANA COURTYARD HOME!
Custom 5/3/3 home with heated pool 3+office/3/2.5 with 2437 sq ft of living
Over 2900 sq ft of living built in 2004 Solar heated pool new pump in 2013
Zodiac kitchen opens to family room *3rd bay of garage is office under air
Pantry and French door refrigerator Extra large glassed Florida room
Outdoor shower- total privacy for pool Conan island kitchen with nook
2 pull down garage stairs for storage New AC/heat system in 2011
#708760 $308,900 #706972 $289,900


-ii






5430 ROSEDALE CIRCLE, PINE RIDGE
Pine Ridge Blvd. to Alamandra,
north to Rosedale.
See Sandy McDermott
957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100, Inverness, FL 34452
352-344-5535
w.Cridland.com,


~41


)"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods'

NANCY Direct: 352.634.4225
KEY 1 REALTY INC.

PONTICOS Nancy@Nanyknows.com
Multi-Million $$$ Producer ii
9 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 382-1700 I =J


1 L83


. 9 BIRCHTREE ST. 44 KINDER DR. ,
Heated POOL New Roof Sweetwater Ridgewood
Tile Floors Over 2,660 Living Area
Wood Burning Fireplace Wood & Tile Floors
> Cathedral Cel ins Open Family Room & Shower
Separate Guest ing Lots of Fruit Irees
of Ready to Move In Privacy Galore
I& MLS#356074 $157,000 MLS#705418 $234,500

'I'emy ift01 t 0,


111A = N


SUNDAY MAkRCH 2, 2014 E3


I


I I
*A K




CITus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Flower show to use blooms as canvas


kPhiladelphia exhibition largest in the country


Associated Press


PHILADELPHIA- Winter-
weary gardeners and painters
alike may find inspiration in
the colorful palette of the
Philadelphia Flower Show,
which uses plants and petals
to pay homage to work by
artists like Matisse, Calder
and Kandinsky
The main exhibitors part-
nered with major U.S. muse-
ums to produce
'ARTiculture," this year's flo-


ral extravaganza which opens
Saturday and runs through
March 9.
A perennial harbinger of
spring, the flower show will
be perhaps more fervently
welcomed this season after
the toll of an unusually cold
and snowy winter along the
Eastern Seaboard.
"Living in the Northeast ...
everyone is so sick of snow
that coming in and seeing
color, and seeing the flower
show, it's going to be a wel-


come respite this year," said
Drew Becher, president of the
show's sponsor, the Pennsyl-
vania Horticultural Society
Previous themes for the 10-
acre show have been places:
England, Hawaii, Paris. But
this year's museum-related
theme is more abstract, in
some cases literally
Schaffer Designs of
Philadelphia partnered with
the Guggenheim Museum in

See SHOW/Page E5


Associated Press
Flowers are seen in the foreground Thursday as workers prepare for the
annual Philadelphia Flower Show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center
in Philadelphia. The nation's largest flower show will feature huge
horticultural displays inspired by the work of artists such as Matisse,
Mondrian, Calder and Kandinsky. "ARTiculture" is the theme of this year's
show, which runs from March I to 9.


I] '* 17P I[l ] l
183 Staggerbush, Beverly Hills
2-2-2 move-in ready.
MLS #708629
$82,000
Barbara Stone
352-586-3072


706156 $45,000
Randy Morehouse 287-2934






Golf course out your back door 3/2.
707444 $121,500
John Maisel 302-5351


PiO -ee 47,7-9
PanShemet422-2939


-1-ly IU-CtU L/L.
706630 $80,000
Peg Price 302-5633


Adorable 3/2/I.
708609 $74,900
RandyMorehouse 287-2934


Large home with easyflow 3/2/2.
705142 $89,900
6aryAyres 302-9329


D LUtll Uiiy IIIdIIItdIIU a ,
707224 $69,900
John Maisel 302-5351


OnTop OfTheWodd Community charming 2/2.
707736 $45,000
Steve McIory422-3998


)around porch overlooking thewater3
705665 $199,900
Sherri Orendorf 573-9968


r-l~ y -} rl i z.
707377 $74,900
Becky Paradiso 634-4581


Open Concept 3/2/2.
708060 $102,500
ParSheret422-2939


Move in ready 3/2.
708705 $79,900
PegPrice302-5633


.3 LCTOS TO SEVYO!329408 3552112-524-


E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMES
Continued from Page E3

Higher mortgage rates, rising
prices and a tight supply of homes
have restricted sales in recent
months. Snowstorms across much of
the country also delayed purchases.
The Realtors project that sales will
total 5 million this year, down from
5.1 million in 2013.
Ian Shepherdson, chief economist
at Pantheon Marcoeconomics,
thinks home buying could slow fur-
ther through March.
"The bad news is that existing-
home sales need to fall a bit further
to move fully into line with the pend-
ing-sales index," he said in a client
note.
The rising costs of buying a home
have contributed to a slowdown in
signed contracts over the past seven
months. Sales of existing homes
plummeted in January to the weak-
est pace in 18 months, the trade
group said last week.
Some of the price pressures will



SHOW
Continued from Page E4

New York to come up with "Kandin-
sky's Canvas," a floral representa-
tion of three abstract paintings by
Wassily Kandinsky: "Circles in a Cir-
cle," "Little Accents" and "Domi-
nant Curve."
The "circles," for instance, have
been transformed into colorful balls
of carnations and other plant mate-
rial. They look randomly placed
until viewers stand on a premarked
spot and see them a through an
empty picture frame.
"They will actually see the paint-
ing come to life as it was originally
meant to be," said designer Bill
Schaffer.
The show's colorful entrance gar-
den pays tribute to Alexander
Calder, a sculptor and painter
whose work can be found through-
out the city. Visitors are greeted by a
huge floral mobile and three over-
sized picture frames, the largest
measuring 30 feet high by 50 feet
wide. The aerial dance troupe Ban-
daloop will perform regularly
within the multi-dimensional
display
Other exhibits take inspiration


be eased if more homes come onto
the market in the months ahead.
One way to increase the supply is
through the construction of new
homes, a sector not measured by the
Realtors' indicator on sales.
Purchases of new homes rose
9.6 percent in January to a season-
ally adjusted annual rate of 468,000,
the Commerce Department said this
week. That was the fastest pace
since July 2008 and could lead to an
uptick in construction.
More homeowners might also
choose to put their properties on the
market, a possibility suggested by a
decline in underwater mortgages at
the end of 2013, according to a re-
port Friday by real estate data
provider Zillow. Homeowners are
considered underwater if they owe
more on their mortgage than their
home is worth.
A decline in underwater mortgages
should enable more Americans to list
their homes for sale because they
would no longer be unloading their
homes at a financial loss.
The share of mortgage holders
with negative equity in their homes


WANT TO GO?
U The show opened Saturday
and runs through Sunday,
March 9 at the Pennsylvania
Convention Center, 12th and
Arch streets, Philadelphia.
General admission tickets
range from $15 for children to
up to $32 for adults, depend-
ing on the day and point of
purchase; VIP packages are
available. Details and hours
can be found at www.theflower
show.com.

from the Philadelphia Museum of
Art's new "Treasures from Korea"
exhibit; the Wyeth family collection
at the Brandywine River Museum in
Chadds Ford, Pa.; and outdoor as-
pects of the J. Paul Getty Museum in
Los Angeles.
Rarely seen prints from Andy
Warhol's "Flowers" series, from the
Bank of America Collection, will
also be displayed.
Billed as the world's largest in-
door flower show, the Philadelphia
Flower Show dates back to 1829. It
also includes plant judging, a but-
terfly garden, interactive exhibits
and craft workshops.
About 270,000 visitors came to the
show in 2012.


fell to 19.4 percent in the final three
months of last year, down from
27.5 percent during the same period
in 2012. Still, the negative equity
rate remains four times the level of a
healthy housing market.
So even if the supply of homes in-


creases, it will be several years be-
fore the market returns to its usual
conditions.
"Negative equity likely won't be
back to normal levels for another
five years," said Stan Humphries,
chief economist at Zillow


I S4fZ0L 9W C7-M 9O~r


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


330 E Ireland Ct
MLS 707409 $299,900
Oaks Golf Course views-4/3/2 w/pool &
plenty of storage.
Dir. Hwy 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd,
R on Ireland Ct.
Helen Forte 2-220-4764


7 0Z~i~ 4141 W Haciend Dr
MIS 705887 $329,900
REDUCED Fenced 5.93 acres w/12x12
barn. Lovely 3/2/2 pool home.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


I Prudential
Open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A Weeld Properties


MLS 707635 $78,500
Neat, clean & ready for you! 2/2/2, fenced
yard on cul-de-sac.
Dir. Forest Ridge Blvd to Roosevelt Blvd,
nn Tallow
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


MLS 708839 $
Tastefully decorated & furnishE
2/2 condo.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


-/4 0tj aJ4ZZ IVl DMUKnIUrllU ur L.)g, = 4... VV uUrr rdtn
MLS 355561 $299,000 MLS 703227 $273,000
Fenced acreage-bring your horses! Well maintained villa-3bd/3ba plus an
Beautifully designed 3/3/2. office.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


"4uas 509 N Fresno Ave 1980 WTall Oaks Dr
MLS 704188 $229,900 MLS 706190 $224,900
Beautiful 3/2/3 pool home with many Customized 3/2.5/2 w/pool on 1+ acres.
"extras". New roof in 2012.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


"'0, 990 W Silver Meadow Lp
MLS 356919 $194,900
"Malibu" model 3/2/2 maintenance-free
villa.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


4tik I:11 I Ceaule lew wlr
MLS 705988 $199,900
3/2/2 in gated community in Citrus Hills.
Near amenities.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


-00'0 979W Skyview Crossing Dr -.s4,4LLLs 453 W Blueflax Ct
MLS 707041 $189,000 MLS 707227 $129,900
Maintenance-free 3/2/2 villa has beautiful NEW ROOF FEB 2014! 4/3/2 pool home
curb appeal. on cul-de-sac.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Joy Holland 352-464-4952


-Repeat Home Buyer
-First Time Home Buyer
-First Time Home Seller


. @2013 BRER Affiliates [[C.An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAffiliates [[C. Prudential the Prudential logo andthe Rock symbol are registered service marks li
of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunty. m. s
VVW0Flo Sa-ow S~oper So


SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 ES









Help our water, one step at a time


Ongoing series to give monthly tips


Special to the Chronicle

The Waterfront Advisory Board of
Crystal River is asking everyone in
Citrus County to "do one thing."
Our springs, rivers, and bays are
in trouble. This is not a problem that
someone else can handle; it takes all
of us. Nor is this a problem that
those who live on the water can han-
dle alone; it takes those of us who
are inland too. If everyone does only
one thing at a time, we can all help
to improve our water
Starting this month, the Chronicle
will run a single suggestion a month.
Most are neither difficult nor ex-
pensive. Some will even save money
We are asking those of you who
have done something to your yard or
home to reduce the amount of water
used or to keep nitrates or impuri-
ties out of the water to let us know
Email your suggestion to
emcbride@crystalriverfl.org. If you
have pictures, please include them.


THIS MONTH'S
SUGGESTION
0 TASK: Use less water and
fertilizer.
0 HOW TO DO IT: Aerate your
lawn. Use a plug aerator once a
year. Your lawn will need much
less water and fertilizer by aer-
ating this way. A plug aerator
makes a hole in the lawn and
subsoil while depositing the
plug on top of the grass. This
allows both for new root growth
and the use of pre-existing nu-
trients without adding more ni-
trates to the watershed.
Aerating also makes a much
healthier lawn.

We will publish your suggestion -
with a picture if possible.
The more people who take us up
on our suggestions, the more we will
help our damaged springs.


E6 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Benefits to going 'native' with plant choices


Diversity can add beauty to garden


LEE REICH
Associated Press

More and more gardens are going
native these days. Butterfly weeds
are edging out delphiniums, clethra
is hobnobbing with flowering dog-
wood, and sunflower is strutting like
a prima donna.
Fruit plantings, though, are
stalled in the past, with many people
still planting apples, peaches or
pears all non-natives.
Yet native fruits are worth plant-
ing even if they are less familiar
Many are highly resistant to pests,
which is more than can be said for
apples, peaches and the like. In ad-
dition to distinctive and delectable
flavors, some native fruits also are
borne on handsome plants that can
mingle in the landscape with other
ornamentals.
Let's foray out into the American
wilderness and look at a sampling of
such delectables (also covered in my
book "Uncommon Fruits for Every
Garden," Timber Press, 2008).
Fruit trees
Why not start with trees, with
American persimmon (Diospyros
virginiana)? This native lives up to
its botanical name, meaning "food of
the gods," only if you choose one
known to bear tasty fruits and can
ripen them within your growing sea-
son. The best are something like a
dried apricot that's been soaked in
water, dipped in honey and then
given a dash of spice.
In the northernmost growing re-
gions (into USDA Zone 4) or in
coastal areas where summers stay
cool, good choices are Szukis,
Mohler, Yates and Dooley In hot-
summer areas and further south,
choose from a slew of good varieties,
including Early Golden, John Rick
and Garretson. None of these vari-
eties need another tree for cross-
pollination, and all are draped

0 CitrusCounty


a ~ r a 0eaa


throughout summer in languorous,
slightly bluish leaves that, in au-
tumn, turn a rich, golden yellow.
With some varieties, the orange
fruits cling to branches long after
leaves drop, decorating the bare
limbs like Christmas ornaments.
Mulberry (Morus rubra) is a native
that perhaps would be more loved if
it were more difficult to grow. (We
also have non-native mulberries,
and their hybrids with our natives -
all delicious.)
This familiar fruit resembles a
blackberry in shape, but ranges in
color from deep black to red to
lavender to pure white. Fruits on
wild trees usually are cloying, ap-
pealing mostly to children. Illinois
Everbearing and Oscar are among
the best varieties to adults for
their refreshing dash of tartness.
Mulberry leafs out late and fall
color is inconsequential, so it is in
summer that the tree comes into its
own as an ornamental. Some weep-
ing forms also bear fruit.
Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a na-
tive tree with tropical aspirations.
With large, drooping, lush leaves
that resemble those of avocado, this
is not the sort of plant you would ex-
pect to find in woodlands of the east-
ern U.S. It does have botanical
connections with the tropics, being

See NATIVES/Page E13

Serving Citrus & Levy Counties Since 1970
David G. Griffin
Real Estate
FOR Licensed Real Estate Broker
Cell 352-228-1812
Office 352-795-0330


OPEN HOUSE ""
Sunday lpm to 4 pm





Newly updated 2/2/2 pool home.
Newer roof & AC. Lawn Sprinkler.
3229 N Juniperus Way $114,900
Near the Central Ridge Library.
352-249-7892


LEE REICH/Associated Press
Clove currant's spring show of deliciously fragrant flowers, left, is followed in midsummer by a
crop of delicious, sweet-tart berries.



m ra m 746-9000

Airk&Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkins 7 4 6 -9 0 0 0
BROKER REALTOR, GR REALTOR REALR Free Home Price Analysis
vvv-=ir sb sSu. o


AFT 52 1 51.MONO 2479 N.,
$29,000 2/1/1 707140 $69,900 2/2 708841
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 E7




ES SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information ..................... 352-563-5966
News information ............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing ........ www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
Ci iiipN;{ci!;E



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
0 Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Moles actually a




benefit to gardens



Critters control insects, naturally aerate soil


ecently a reader
emailed to ask how to
remove pesky moles
from the garden. Their telltale
raised mounds, which indicate
feeding tunnels, were creating
quite a mess in her yard.
The Eastern Mole, Scalopus
aquaticus, is found throughout
Florida except in the Keys. It is
an insect-eating mammal in Jane
the Insectivora class, which in-
cludes shrews and hedgehogs. JAIb
The class has four families, GAR
with 442 species globally Star-
nosed moles are found in northeastern
Florida in the wetlands around the Oke-
fenokee Swamp.
Moles are part of the natural environ-
ment and are beneficial in the garden, be-
cause they eat about 60 percent of their
weight each day in insects and earth-


II


worms. They loosen and aerate
the soil while searching for
food.
The feeding tunnels just
under the surface are dug in
early evenings and mornings
when the moles leave their
deeper living chambers to for-
age. After they eat the insects,
they burrow further in search
Veber of more, so they rarely reuse
the same feeding tunnels for
E'S long. An Eastern Mole can dig
DEN about 18 feet an hour, and up to
_ 150 feet in a single day
Eastern Moles are about 5.5 inches long
with a short, 1 to 11/2 inch tail. Their vel-
vety, dark gray fur stands straight up, en-
abling them to burrow forwards and
backwards. It does not gather dirt as the

See JANE/Page E19


Inside...


Murphy beds
PAGE EIO
Flower show
PAGE E4
Native plants
PAGE E7
Stealing a property
PAGE E14
Homeless housing
PAGE E18
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Villeroy & Boch plaque should be of interest to collectors


ear John: I have a 17.5-
inch Villeroy & Boch
plate, pictures attached,
that has holes
through the bottom
rim so it can hang on
the wall. I want to
know where I can get
information on its
value. Thanks.
R.R., Internet
Dear RR.: Villeroy
& Boch wall plaques
are a specific cate-
gory of collecting. John S
After deciphering the SIKOF
date code on the back AT
of your plaque, I es-
tablished it was pro-
duced in 1881. It seems to be
decorated in a storybook theme.
The overall condition appears
to be excellent. Potential dollar
value is $100 to $200.
Dear John: Please help me


I


identify the plate in the attached
photo. I would really appreciate
it. Thank you. -A.R, Internet
DearA.B.: You have
a pretty porcelain
plate. I assume there
are no marks on the
back of the plate. The
style is similar to the
world-famous Meis-
sen porcelain works
and was likely made
in Germany
If the plate is hand-
ikorski painted, it will have a
ISKI'S considerable effect
Ic on potential dollar
value. Take a hand
magnifier and look
closely at the decoration. If you
see a pattern of dots, it is not
hand-painted. That is all I can
say
Replacements Ltd. in Greens-
boro, N.C., may be able to recog-


nize the pattern and the maker
Their phone number is 1-800-
REPLACE (737-5223). replace.
Let us know what you discover
Dear John: An oil-on-canvas
painting was given to my wife
and I years ago and we are curi-
ous about its origins and value.
The painter is Fuentes Sala-
manca, and the painting is
named "Pan Fresca." We
googled Mr Salamanca and dis-
covered he has become quite fa-
mous and now only paints icons
for the Vatican, but could get no
information about the value of

See ATTIC/Page E13

This wall plaque was produced
by Villeroy & Boch, a recognized
name in collector circles. It was
produced in 1881, according to
an inscription.
Special to the Chronicle




CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Success in numbers!


ii,


2013 MULTI-MILLIOH DOLLAR PRODUCERS


REN & GARY KATHY
BAXLEY CANFIELD


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SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 E9


TOP

COMPANY

PRODUCER

STEVE LATIFF

2013

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DOLLAR
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PRODUCERS DAVIS JAI




110 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 CIRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR


THE


ABOVE AND LEFT: Laura Casey designed this
Murphy bed for clients who wanted comfortable
guest accommodations and a place for their child
to play in the basement of their home in Char-
lotte, N.C. Casey, an interior designer, worked
with a local carpenter to construct the piece.
While stowed away, it appears to be a couch with
a shelf over it. The bed comes out of the wall
when someone pulls on the shelf, which doubles
and the bed's foot support.


Classic hideaways can

maximize home's flexibility

MELISS KOSSLER DUTTON
Associated Press

-he clients came to interior designer
0 r Laura Casey with a space dilemma:
They did not want to give up the guest
room in their suburban home, yet they
needed a place for their child to play
Casey came up with a solution often used in
small urban apartments: a Murphy bed. It
takes up less space than a sofa sleeper or
futon and- unlike many of those- uses a
standard mattress, so guests, including elderly


See /PageEl2


AI


S


A




CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


" Laura Casey Interiors: www.lauracaseyinteriors.com.
" The Bedder Way Co.: www.bedderway.com.
" Resource Furniture: www.resourcefurniture.com.
" Nicole Sassaman: www.nicolesassaman.com.


q AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS Fran Perez F
I 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Realtor@
E N Office: 352-746-3600 f Cell (352) 586-8885
ER H franprealtor@gmail com
5 ,, ; ....r '


Uu TuU IAWL A HUKbIt IT SO tis is an arroruaie tarmeire matn you
should absolutely look at. Practically New 3 board fencing with electric back
up, newer garage with built in area for feed & hay room as well as a work
area. Barn is 2 stalls w/access in and out. Wash area. Automatic waterers
in paddocks. Home is adorable w/2 nice size bedrooms, 2 full baths, a
cozy wood burning fireplace to snuggle up to in cold winter nights. Home is
unique and abuts horse trails. Roof is 2008, sprinkler system updated.
Come and take a look, Everything for the horse enthusiasts.
4938 N. Buffalo MLS 707788 $179,900


.u deuus D.D wuuueU uue Iui IleSIle
Beautiful 2.93 wooded acre homesite, Waiting for you to build. Horses welcome.
horses welcome. MLS 708248 $52,000 MLS 705862 $105,000


SPACE, SPACE & MORE SPACE ARCHITECTURALLY EXCITING GREAT VALUE
* 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs, Office 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths 3 Bedrooms, 3 baths
* Appliances new in 2011 3-Car garage 2,242 SFLA
* Just replaced: all 3 C/H/A, roof PLUS 1 bedroom, bath, guest suite Large rooms, split plan
* Heatedpool with spa 3,100 SFLA
* 14'xl4' workshop, power/water 3-Zone C/H/A 30' Lanai w/ caged pool
* Sec sys, intercom, 2 skylights Heated pool Interior laundry
* Tip top condition on an acre One acre One acre
$335,000 MLS 707544 $249,000 MLS 708393 $179,900 MLS 705784


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 Ell




E12 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014



BEDS
Continued from Page E1O

grandparents, have a more
comfortable stay
"They did not want to
compromise the quality of
the mattress," said Casey,
owner of Laura Casey In-
teriors in Charlotte, N.C.
The Murphy bed -
which tucks into cabinetry
when not in use is en-
joying new popularity as a
stylish space-saver in
many kinds of homes, not
just studio apartments.
"It's an interesting
trend," said Chris Fahy,
vice president of The Bed-
der Way Co. in Indianapo-
lis, which makes Murphy
beds and has seen sales
rise in recent years. He
says many customers are
Baby Boomers, empty
nesters, and other home-
owners who want to turn a
bedroom into a hobby
room or exercise room but
still need a place for grown
children, grandchildren or
other guests to sleep.
Fahy's Murphy beds
range in price from $1,300
to $3,100.
California Closets, which
also makes custom wall
beds, has seen the same
upward trend, said Ginny
Snook Scott vice president
for sales and marketing.
Customers still buy Mur-


CITRus CouNTy (FL) CHRONICLE


phy beds for studio apart-
ments and vacation homes,
she said, but many others
are looking to get more use
out of an extra room.
The company designs
vertical and horizontal
Murphy beds, often incor-
porating them into cabi-
netry units for home
offices or craft rooms.
Prices range from $3,000
for a simple wall bed and
desk to $20,000 for a cus-
tom project with extensive
cabinetry
Support pieces vary by
manufacturer, but gener-
ally the mattress is en-
cased in a frame that pulls
out from a cabinet ad-
hered to the wall. Today's
improved mechanism for
lowering and raising the
bed makes the process an
easy job for one person,
Fahy said.
The bed Casey designed
for her client does not in-
clude a piston or spring
mechanism, which most
manufacturers use to
lower the bed onto the
floor
"It just slowly drops
down," she said.
Her design, which she
had a carpenter build,
does not look like cabi-
netry The bed is incased
in a faux wall. When not in
use, the bed looks like a
couch with a shelf over it.
In order to reveal the bed,
the homeowner removes


1047 N. Indianapolis Ave. W I
Absolute Must See! 3bed/2 Bath
Citrus Hills Pool Home on 1.12 acres.
$224,800 Hosted By: Sara Denny
Directions: Norvell Bryant to Essex. Essexto Keller. West on Keller to Indianapolis


Interior designer Nicole
Sassaman recently designed a
room that she and the client
nicknamed the "jackknife room"
because it served so many
purposes, including guest room,
meeting room and home office.
It included a Murphy bed; they're
more versatile and comfortable
than sofa beds, she said.

the couch cushions and is really a platform for the
pulls on the shelf, which queen-size mattress. The
causes the faux wall to shelf becomes the support
drop to the floor The wall for the foot of the bed.


00HIS1


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5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
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#706582 $82,500 $99,900





INGLIS great fixer upper, bring your IERNANDO 2 bedroom, 1 bath, S/W
tools & imagination. 1 bedroom, 1 bath M/11 Rear yard chain link fence w/dog
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#706379 $22,900 range oven #702262 $24,900




CRYSTAL RIVER huge workshop LECANTO "short sale" 3 bedroom,
mobile has been removed, 3 roll up doors: 2 bath, D/W M/H on half acre comer lot.
I high enough to drive RV in; 18 ft high, Country kitchen, well & septic, cathedral
has full bath washer dryer hookups, half ceilings w/ceiling fians. Inside laundry
of upstairs looks like it was planned on large pantry neat as a pin. #700662
being living area. #703919 $80,000 $48,000




HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 1 bath, S/W HOMOSASSA nice older mobile
M/H on 1.47 acres of land. Impact fee w2 bedrooms I bath large front and rear
waived if M/H replaced, fenced rear & screened porches. Newer roofover in
one side, being sold as is" no value given 2010, newer appliances approximately
to mobile. septic, no well. #703991 2 years old. FULLY fenced backyard with
$25,000 shed. #700919 $22,500


It was the first time Casey
ever recommended a Mur-
phy bed to a client She
wrote about the project on
her design blog, at www.
lauracaseyinteriors.com,
and the post drew inquiries
from around the country,
she said.
She's not the only one to
think of a new twist on the
Murphy bed. Some manu-
facturers also have de-
signed beds that, like hers,
are hidden in a faux wall
rather than a traditional
cabinet. Resource Furni-
ture in New York sells a
wall bed that flips down
over the top of a couch at-
tached to a fake wall, said
interior designer Nicole
Sassaman of Century City,
Calif


"The whole bed comes
down over the couch, and
it's a proper bed,"
she said. "It's pretty
amazing."
Sassaman recently de-
signed a room that she and
the client nicknamed the
"jackknife room" because
it served so many pur-
poses, including guest
room, meeting room and
home office. It included a
Murphy bed; they're just
more versatile and com-
fortable than sofa beds,
she said.
"People are far more de-
sign-savvy, and they need
multipurpose rooms," Sas-
saman said. "There are so
many reasons why the
Murphy bed works in so
many places."


CAROLE LISTER s
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
SCell: 422-4620 rE-
ERA Office: 382-1700


3/2/2+ Eat-in Kitchen
Granite Tile
High ceilings 3 walk-in closets
New ext. paint Oversized garage
Exp. pavered lanai Beautiful landsc.
#708845 $159,000


JOANN MARTIN
Preferred
REAL ESTATE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefm.net
S'W 1 I 6' 14611


3459 N. Honeylocust Drive
Beverly Hills
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, Imperial
Executive II offering 1604 sf of living area.
Granite countertops, new roof 2012, new
flooring, new tile in kitchen and bathrooms.
Freshly painted inside & out.
Priced at $86,500.
Directions: 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd. to Honeylocust
drive to #3459.


A3r V n / prucui rne Kmuge
Beautiful 2002 Rusaw pool home. 3
bedrooms plus office/den upgraded
HVAC 2008, master suite with sitting
area, dual pane windows, bright
kitchen w/skylight. A must see, call
today. Priced at $209,900.
Directions: Rte. 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to left on Apple
Valley to right on Apricot.




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This porcelain
plate looks
similar to the
Meissen
porcelain works
in Germany. The
value of the plate
depends on
whether or not
it's hand-painted;
a hand-painted
plate would be
considerably
more valuable.
Special to the Chronicle


ATTIC
Continued from Pap E8

his paintings. It is a still life of
bread baking in an ancient stone
oven. It is very beautiful. Thanks so
very much for your help. LB.,
Internet
Dear L.B.: There is secondary
market interest in Salamanca paint-
ings. Take several good, clear photo-
graphs and I will be glad to help.
Dear John: My family has a collec-
tion of Roman terra cotta vases, oil
lamps, urns, etc., which we collected
probably from northern Syria about
40 years ago. I think one or two have
been broken, but much of it is still in
pristine condition after a couple
millennia.
I do not think it is too valuable
since there is no artwork. It is sim-


ple kitchen stuff. I was just wonder-
ing what you might suggest as far as
getting an appraisal, or maybe if you
had some idea of value. Thank you.
-J.S., Internet
Dear J.S.: Perhaps if you had in-
cluded some photographs I could
have offered some information. Fa-
ganarms Inc. specializes in antiqui-
ties and offers appraisals.
I do not know what they charge.
The website is www.faganarms.com
and the phone number is 586-
465-4637.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, P. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


NATIVES
Continued from Page E7

the northernmost member of the
Custard Apple family, which in-
cludes such delicacies as the cheri-
moya and soursop.
Pawpaw sheds some of its tropical
airs in the fall, when its leaves turn
a clear yellow The fruits, though,
carry on the tropical theme. They
are the size and shape of mangos
and ripen in clusters like bananas.
Plant two different varieties for
cross-pollination (and fruit from
each).
Juneberry (Amerlanchier spp.),
also known as serviceberry or shad-
blow, is a native tree more often
planted as an ornamental than for
its fruit. Early spring brings clouds
of white or reddish blossoms; fall ig-
nites the leaves in purples, oranges,
and yellows. The fruits look like
blueberries but have a unique flavor
that is sweet and juicy
Fruit bushes
If you are looking for a native,
fruiting bush rather than a tree, you
might again turn to juneberry Bushy
juneberries have the same qualities
as the trees do, except that they are
more multi-stemmed and shrubby
And speaking of fruits that look
like blueberries, let's segue over to
the real thing. Blueberries (Vac-
cinium corymbosum and V asheii)
would undoubtedly be planted as or-


namentals if they were not so valued
for their fruits. Clusters of blossoms
dangle from the stems like dainty,
white bells in spring, and the leaves
turn a fiery red in autumn. Even in
winter, blueberry's red stems add
welcome color to the landscape, es-
pecially against a snowy backdrop.
The secret to success with blue-
berries is a soil low in fertility, rich
in humus and very acidic.
A blueberry relative also ideal as
a native fruit is lingonberry (V vitis-
idaea). This half-foot-high plant
sports evergreen leaves as lustrous
as those of holly
In spring and again in summer,
flowers dangle from lingonberry
stems like rosy white urns. Lin-
gonberry requires the same soil con-
ditions as blueberry, and in fact
grows well in a bed with lowbush
blueberry (V angustifolium).
Both spread to create an edible
groundcover; they are as happy to-
gether in a garden bed as their fruits
are in a jar of jam.
Perhaps the star performer among
native plants offering beauty and
good flavor is a relatively unknown
currant, the clove currant (Ribes
odoratum). At the turn of the 19th
century, it was a common dooryard
shrub whose large, yellow flowers
would waft spicy fragrance indoors.
Clove currant is a tough plant,
able to laugh off drought, heat and
cold, as well as insects and diseases,
deer and birds. The shiny, blue-
black berries are aromatic, fairly
large and have a sweet-tart flavor


-, ,E- AMERICAN
Lou Miele Realto aRAMEIA
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU HAL ESTATE REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly HillsF FL 34465
Cell: (352) 697-1685 C~frt?352-74A-nA00


I Gorgeous waterfront pool home in the "Hunt
Club", 2006 built, 3/2/2 with 2,327 s.f. living
area. MLS 707324 9386.900


5 BEDROOM POOL HOME 2.5 acres!! Out I
in the country, but close to everything!!
MLS 704491 REDUCED $114,900


CITRUS HILLS
Beautiful gated community of Belmont Hills.
Fabulous 3/2/2 pool home with spacious
rooms and high ceilings. A must see!!
MLS 706313 $239,900


UUINII1tLLUI 2UUO BUILI
3BR, 2.5BA, two story country home with new
hardwood, kitchen cabinets, Corian and remodeled
baths. Beautiful. MLS 707164 $129,900


BLACK DIAMOND
RANCH
Beautiful Golf Course Lot
sitting above the road is
CITRUS SPRINGS This 4 BR home is sure to perfect for your dream home.
please. Over 2,200 sf living with loads of upgrades $89,900
like granite counters, stainless appliances,
beautiful flooring. MLS 708812 $164,900 (lot next door also available)
To. Se Viua Tor an vie AL irsCut itns ii o~ iee


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 E13




14 SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014 CIRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Case shows how easy it can be to steal a house


JEFF OSTROWSKI
The Palm Beach Post

JUPITER, Fla. -A real estate
scam broken up recently shows
just how easily a savvy grifter
can file phony documents that
make him appear to own a
home.
"I could steal your house to-
morrow, sell it to three other
people and be out of the country
in Buenos Aires by the end of the
month," said Jupiter mortgage
broker Corey Crowley
Crowley owns a house near
one of the 35 properties that
Robert A. Tribble Jr allegedly
used to defraud unsuspecting
buyers and renters of $240,000.
Tribble filed bogus deeds that
showed him as the owner of
homes from Stuart to Miami, the
Florida Department of Law En-
forcement said.
Tribble didn't escape to
Buenos Aires. He's in the Martin
County jail on an $8 million bail.
But Crowley said the case ex-
poses holes in the way deeds are
recorded. Among other tricks,
Tribble allegedly forged no-
taries' signatures, a tactic that
made documents appear legiti-


mate when they arrived at
county clerks' offices, police say
"He had the system figured
out and he took advantage of it"
Crowley said.
Palm Beach County Clerk
Sharon Bock said she began to
look into Tribble after he was ar-
rested. Her office found more
than 100 documents filed by the
self-described real estate in-
vestor, although she said it's un-
clear which are real and which
are fake.
Tribble isn't the first person to
be accused of using phony docu-
ments to take over vacant
homes, and Bock acknowledged
that it's possible for a bad guy to
steal a house.
"Can it be done? Yes," Bock
said.
Crowley, who contacted police
in April with his suspicions
about Tribble, said clerks should
do more. He suggested phoning
notaries to verify that they
signed deeds, and paying special
attention to people like the oft-
arrested Tribble, who was con-
victed of a felony in Georgia in
the 1980s and later faced a fed-
eral indictment.
But Bock said Florida law


doesn't allow clerks to make
judgment calls on the legitimacy
of the deeds they receive. So
long as the documents pass legal
muster, they're recorded.
What's more, the Palm Beach
County Clerk's Office handled
5.4 million documents last year
When it comes to the validity
of deeds, Bock said, "There is no
such thing as people having an
expectation that government
can protect them. It's just not
possible."
Dennis Bedard, a Miami attor-
ney representing several of the
victims in Tribble's case, agreed
that scammers face little
scrutiny when filing deeds.
"It is way too easy, but it's im-
possible for the clerk to detect if
the deed is a fraud," Bedard
said.
The phony deeds in Tribble's
case wouldn't have fooled a title
insurer or a real estate attorney,
but they tricked some victims.
Nikola Malbasa delivered
$23,500 in cash to Tribble as a
down payment on a foreclosed
home in Fort Lauderdale.
Malbasa checked the house on
the Broward County Property
Appraiser's website, which indi-


cated the owner was Tribble
Investments.
Some say state lawmakers
should tighten rules about who
can file deeds.
"The easy fix is to make legis-
lation saying deeds can only be
prepared by title companies or
attorneys," said David Dweck,
head of the Boca Real Estate In-
vestors Club. 'At least you would
have some sort of control."
But Martin County Clerk Car-
olyn Timmann said such a rule
might go too far If a parent
wants to deed a house to a child,
for instance, the homeowner
shouldn't have to hire an attor-
ney, she said.
Still, Timmann lauded
tougher penalties for filing
fraudulent deeds. She said
county clerks pushed for a state
law that took effect in October
imposing criminal and civil
sanctions on people who file
bogus deeds as part of a fraud.
And some county clerks take
steps to prevent fraud. Bedard
said the Miami-Dade County
clerk sends a letter to everyone
whose property is transferred
for no consideration to alert
them to potential chicanery


Timmann said her office tells
police or tax collectors about du-
bious deeds.
"If we have any suspicions of
wrongdoing, even though it
meets the statutory requirements
on its face, we notify appropriate
authorities," Timmann said.
Just as consumers should
check their credit once in a
while to ward off identity theft,
Bock suggested homeowners
look at their property records
once a year to make sure no one
has filed a bogus document.
Such warnings aside, she dis-
puted the notion that stealing a
home and selling it is easy Police
say Tribble scouted for vacant
homes in foreclosure, then filed
bogus paperwork and broke in.
He marketed the properties for
rent on Craigslist, then per-
suaded his marks to put down as
much as $20,000 on lease-to-own
deals, they say He later filed
eviction notices against some.
By all indications, researching
properties, filing paperwork and
marketing homes required full-
time hours.
"This guy may have made
$240,000," Bock said, "but he did
a heck of a lot of work."


BY BY
APPOINTMENT: APPOINTMENT:
324 Cmelia, Inverness 323 tirupDr. Bevery Hills (Pine Ridge)


SPECTACULAR HOME IN THE
CENTER OF INVERNESS
Walk to schools, hospitals, downtown
Inverness and shopping. Enjoy
swimming in your pool while enjoying
the privacy of your charming gardens.
Lovely details such as marble
fireplace, family room, pool table
sized lanai, greenhouse, and room for
RV parking will satisfy your housing
needs and wants. The lot is almost an
acre and right in town!
Priced to sell quickly at only
$229,500. MLS 704204.


BRING THE HORSES BRING
MOM, BRING THE TOYS!
This 5 BR, 4 Bath luxurious pool
home on 2.75 acres sits privately
behind iron gates and boasts a
mother in law suite and room for
everyone. Other amenities include
barrel tiled roof, newer A/C, water
heater and pool pump. Ride the 28
miles of horse trails in Pine Ridge
Estates or play tennis or golf in your
leisure time.
You deserve this one!
MLS 706472. Only $309,000.


Rponds mature oak trees The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully Parklike settingpooi Dock your yacht or sailboat deep water and no bridges to
3/2 hm 2007 positioned in a beautiful setting the Gulf of Meaicoi This sophisticated 5,916 sq. ft. home is a true master piece
3/h e b ult2ks of th 13 h ac rces I This Shangri-La can be yours for $800,000 waiting for you and your family to move right ini
t acro s oaf Moo -Gu W Stl o gh Get a tast of it & visit www.mycrystalrverfarm.com/ for an Interactive tour. $54 9 ,0 0 0
Preserve! HW floors, fireplace,
cherry cabinets & granite counters
are just a few details.
$521,961

aunit qjy n f INCREDIBLE VISTAS-HAMPTON LAKE PINE RIDGE ESTATES Citrus HillS
G T AA 5 t c m H yE EG aNliv in g in th is 2 1211 ''a l tdIn Tir Gle T h is ,/ 211 s Auat e n 1.2 a c re e lev a te d E le g a n t c u so m b ilt 3 4 3 p o re d n c n I C t ru s H A a z 0 M i cly
With u d i . laundry, grounds with lots of fru vt .... Recently aa 20t 0 Avc lt H y
remB A Ia[ car and paint, addedgreat room boasts large picture details and inner
It IS in, pe 1coniin Just un pack the win dows for amazing lake views. New ,H-fn kitchen prvtletagrhepret o e h ge w alk rn sh We i prv Tuna
sutean d re 1xCs t shop n, dining metal proof n 2013, remodeled kitchen with fo r a sohs; ae ifsye utte ih iewtso prds
REALTOR@ and $6 5,0 $274,000 $469,000 $189,900

Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com
SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW QWR FLORAL CITY LAKE,!! MOVE RIGHT IN-BEAUTIFULCITRUS HILLS!! DESIRABLE CYPRESS
no bridges! 2 master suites, apart- 1.2a1u Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home 0n a I acre VILLAGE LOCATION!
ment an the lower level. Upper level 1.2 ancorner lot with mature oak trees and Elegant 3/2/2 pool home an quen
accessible via elevator. Pool, hurricane setting with major oak trees. Charming lots i V w aatai0
Investors Realty & 0 0 brick home, first time offered a some n oursa l n & i ita
of & County, Inc. original fixtures and fireplace Int1ll tn n i ov r hou nit fe are tub & large ow er e
it aruh u I seawall, boat IT! Everything st place. Large d t. gar. w/wor$kshop,,
.%iiLy ebsitat:wwntnyflorida-housenconm waiting foryou. $488,000 seawall. $159,900 MLS#358397 5169,OOO n2008, A/Cin20l01 $169,000










S To place an ad, cal 563-5966



Real Estate Classifieds


Classifieds In Print



Iand


Online


All


The Time


Fax (352 56-56 1. Tol Fre (888 85-24 1 mi:casfescrnceniecm Iwbie w4hoilol


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
Vr.


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
FLORAL CITY
1/1, 2/2, $350-$425/mo.
Rent to own (352)
422-3670, 341-2438


JUISTMES

LECANTO
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
m/h for rent/w option
to buy owner financing
available next to
walmart clubhouse
for your enjoyment
352-476-6144 or
240-310-8122




Bad Credit?
Here's your chance!
Repo' s available in
your area!
Financing Available
(352) 795-1272
Mobile Home Crystal
River Fl. 2 BD., 2BA,
Audult Park All furni-
ture, carport for 3
cars, Lg. screened
patio, Dishwasher, All
appliances, shed, Re-
modeled Bathroom
Drastically Reduced
(352) 794-6316
Rent to Own
Owner Financing on
used/repo/new
Manufactured Homes
352-795-2377


Palm Harbor Homes
55+ Community
Special!
$5K for your old home!
Many models to
choose from
Call John Lyons (a
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details




FLORAL CITY
3/2-1+AC, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $91,900
716-807-8847






v' THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/ screened
patio on over % acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512

3/2/1 DW MH
12 acre corner lot
exc. cond. open floor
plan, laundry room,
all appl, Ig scn porch,
fenced,3 carports,
shed, Homosassa,
$51k 352-410-1072
4/3, 32x80, w/ 2 master
suites in Homosassa.
2006 MH, Must See!!
Owner Financing Avail
Ready to move in
(352) 795-1272
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 727-967-4230
COUNTRY LIVING IN
LECANTO $42.500
Dbwd, 3bd/2ba, 2 acre
NEW c/heat/air & carpet
handi-caD ramp, nicely
turn, move -in cond!
No Owner Finance
(352) 621-3929

Hernando DW, MH
3 BR w/walk-in closets
Roof over, single car
garg, chain link fence
$39,999 Will take RV in
Trade; 352-726-2494


-ili
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre. New
bathrooms, Ig screened
porch, dead end rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No owner Financing
Mobile Homes with
acreage. Ready to
move in.
Seller Financing
(subject to credit
approval).
Lots of room for the
price, 3Br 2Ba.
No renters.
850-308-6473
VMFhomescom

West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scr. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, Ind. most turn.
Rent $408/mo Ind
water, sewer, trash,
must sell $15,000
(352) 344-5172
2Br, 1 Ba in 55+ Park
carport, shed, wshop,
scrned Patio, In great
shape, fully turn. Ask-
ing $15k, $225/mo lot
rent. 352-419-4428
AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rt. over
Storage shed, $6,500
turn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rt. over
Storage shed, $6,500
turn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 5 Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077

Melody Park, Inverness
2 bd 1-1/2 bath. 12x64
with 12x22 Fl room.
$3,800. obo
727-808-6000


Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273


For Sale 5V0o4

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financina. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374




R ;."el EstateI k'









.Ic
I 1 4 I BEDROOMS


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
EALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
$850 & UNDER
9218 N. Satinwood Terr.
3/2/2,1254 sq. ft.
7149 W. Crestiew Ln.
2/2/1 984 sq. ft.
7416 W. Kendale Ct.
3/2, D/W on an Acre
S650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/2, 992 sq. ft
874 NEl st Terr.
2/1 720 sq. ft
1063 N. Commerce Terr.
2/1 apt. 820 sq. ft
8469 W. Drew Ct.
2/2, M/H on Canal w/BoatDock
For More Listings Go To
www.CtrusComntyHomneRentals.MN


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FL
111471 W ql[ ElI l,' 4Iah,

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Br/ngus your vacanthome
and watg work for you!

3/2/2 ................... $875
3/2/2 ............................
31212 .................. $850
21111 .................... $650
21211 .................. $750
LAWNCARE INCLUDED

21211 ................... $650
2/1.5/1 ................. $650

2/1.5 ................... $600
MOBILE
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


SPECIAL!
Inverness
1 Bedroom Apts.
$400/month
Inc. Water, trash, pest,
and lawn main
Will include washer/dryer
with new ease








16 N.

Melbourne

Just remodeled,
fresh paint,
new tile floor,
roof, AC & privacy
fenced yard.





66 New

Florida Ave.

Excellent
Condition.

Call for more info.

Richard

352-422-2180
DDDHIWM




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025







CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR, TV Rm. Lg. Liv Rm
CHA, $425., 1st/Last &
Sec. 352-697-1680


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water, CHA, $600.
mo. 352- 563-2114,
352-257-6461



CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS


I BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Mnthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."



,IJ t
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside













FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




INVERNESS
Ottice Space tor Rent,
1 blk. North of court
house 352-634-5232




HERNANDO
UnFurnished Condo &
Furnished Town Home
(352) 613-4459




INVERNESS
Duplex 2BR/I1BA
352-746-2932




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813





BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Close to Shopping
$500. + dep. 422-2433

Citrus Hills
BrentwoodTownhome
2bd.w/garagew/club
membership, furn. or
unfurn. 352-302-7559

INV. HIGHLANDS
3/2/2, Clean, Irg. scm.
Patio $800., 302-0431

LECANTO
5225 Shaker PI 2/2 DW
$575. Nice, 464-0999





CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1% Very clean, float-
ing dock, upscale area
$900. 352-795-0102

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85lwk. includes elect,
sat. dish (352)564-1155





INVERNESS
6,000 sq ft Warehouse
Space, for Rent, I blk.
North of court house
352-634-5232


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buy Mountain
Property
AT BELOW COST!!
Streamfront
Acreage. 2 nicely
wooded acres with
mountain views,
private streamfront &
spring head. Loaded
with mature hard-
woods. Gentle
building site.
Private paved roads,
municipal water,
underground power,
fiber optic, more.
Just $19,900.
Excellent financing.
Only one, call now
1-866-952-5303,
x 183


DEB
THOMPSON

One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
Service with a smile
seven days
a week.

Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebcvahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com






Regardless of Price
Comm Bldg on
1.85 ac, Inverness
ONSITE
Mar 26@11am
200' directly on busy
Hwy 41 North
2 buildings, 4550 sf &
1,600 sf, tenants in plac
- High traffic count on
major Citrus County hwy
Property #DG801

OTHER FL PROPERTIES:
* Mar 19 3/2 Home, SE Ocala
- Mar 19 2 Res Lots, Ocala
Mar 25 Motel, High Springs

SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS!
Tranzon Ddigqer Walter J. DWggeri, III,
Lic. Real Estate Bmker, Fl Lid
AU07 &AB3145 10%BP


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUN4ITY



Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



Up to 9 acres from
$14,900. Mountain
cabin only $89,900.
Access to lake and
trout stream. Views
of the Atlanta sky-
line. 45 minutes from
Northern Atlanta.
Priced below
developer cost!
Call 866-950-5263
Ext. 17.


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
'Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www,
cross landrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Citrus Springs
Sun, 3/2/14, 2-4pm
MOVE IN READY
2/2 w/pool. Lots
of upgrades and is
a MUST SEE!
1982 W. Gardenia dr








IHO U )I

PINE RIDGE
Sun3/2/14, 2-4pm
Beautiful Estate
Home -
5/4 w/pool and
mother in-law suite.
3089 W. Daffodil Dr






ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856







FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-94961464-2514


Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
3BD., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Justa Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $104,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
(866) 351-1234






Attractive 2 Bd/2BA
Home near library.
please call for details
By Owner, asking
$84,900. No calls after
9pm (352) 746-3919


Laurel Ridge,3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks
Golf Comm.(with club
house & pool.) 1754 SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kit w/ pantry &
nook. MBR has 2 clos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639







For SWe %K*
Beautiful home you
are looking for! 4
bedroom. 2 bath, 2
car garage in gated
community large
14K sq. ft. lot, cus-
tom pool many up-
grades. 3300 sq.
ft.Can email info.For
Sale by Owner NO
brokers please!
352-601-6942
352-513-4463



For Sale B11o,*
Crystal Glen 4/2/2 on
corner landscaped
lot. Salt pool w/heater
and lanai, under roof
with kit area. $159,900
410-804-1454
no brokers please






Citrus Hills 3/2/2 on
I acre, pool, open fir
plan, LR beamed ceil-
ing, stone FP & wood
floors (352) 746-6552







For Sale 1
Desirable Neighbor-
hood, access to pool
w/tennis court, close
to dwntn Inverness, 1
owner, 2BD/2BA/2CG
call for appt. Mon-Sat
8:30amto12pm. $125k
(352) 726-0044


4FOR~




Great Starter Home
S. Little John Ave.
Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
Lease or Cash
Call For Deatails
877-500-9517





For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Appt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.


IAIVII 1U I I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate
I'm there for you

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!




Por SIe BWO11


HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell
SECLUDED 3BR/2BA,
1653 sf, 2 car CP, 2
story barn. Includes
3A acre buildable lot.
$99,900 or reasonable
offer 352-613-2289





Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351




Spacious 2/2/1 with
New roof, AC& win-
dows, Inclds all Kit ap-
pliances. Sunroom
overlooking Green-
belt. Inside utility rm.
$85,000 352-422-3256


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.

Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists

Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


I S=11 I


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone@tamoabav.rr.
com

ERA American
Realty &
Investments







1%AlI


Dream ieam
At Keller
Williams Realty

Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.

Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty

Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.

Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol

www.CitrusSold.com

"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


Buying or Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt(

Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I '11 work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo-com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com








Here's Your
Chance" TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000

Owner Financina
$10,000 Down.
10 vrs @ 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5000






Citrus Hills Townhouse
2br/21/ba + carport
Fully FurnishedVery
nice, many extra's
near pool, great view
Must See $79,000
(352) 527-4518


CirsCony


E16 SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




528 SW 1st Court
3 bedrm., 2-1/2 bath
Exciting opportunity
to live on Paradise
Isles in the heart of
Crystal River, Flor-
ida with two sided
deep, crystal clear
water and access to
the Gulf of Mexico.
Located across from
a 57 acre wilderness
preserve and a man-
atee sanctuary.
Watch the dolphins
and manatees play
in your own back
yard. Paddle board,
kayak, See Doo,
boating and water
skiing to your hearts
content. This %half
acre property has 2
docks, one with a
10,000 pound lift and
220 foot sea wall.
This beautiful 3,2 %
home has granite
counter tops, 2 fire
places, 2 % car gar-
age, hurricane win-
dows and doors,
panoramic water
view, sunrise and
citrus fruit trees.
Enjoy low utilities
with hot water on
demand and water
to airAC. This prop-
erty won't last,
priced to sell at
$585,000. Owner
will finance part.
1(352)795-7400



HOMOSASSA-Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000 352-422-1311




INVERNESS, 2BR/1 BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$1 25.000,352-422-4749


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty









SCAN OR GO
TO www.
B est Na~ a--Coast
me ffs es.com
"To view
my properties"J







ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
2.5 ACRES,
March 20, 10arm
Ed Messer, Broker
messersales.com







GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


4 ADJOINING LOTS
1 Acre MOLClose to
Town Gospel Island
Gunn Ct.$14,000. Make
Offer(352) 726-2038
or (352) 613-4958

Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High, Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner





PARADISE! OZELLO!
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583


WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 100 ft on
water. All utilities.
$165, 000.352-634-1171


Chronicle



Classifieds



In Print



& Online


7/


C1 IkON ICLE


(35)563.5966


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 E1I7




CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tiny-house trend eyed



to help the homeless


Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. While tiny
houses have been attractive for
those wanting to downsize or sim-
plify their lives for financial or envi-
ronmental reasons, there's another
population benefiting from the
small-dwelling movement: the
homeless.
There's a growing effort across the
nation from advocates and religious
groups to build these compact build-
ings because they are cheaper than
a traditional large-scale shelter, help
the recipients socially because they
are built in communal settings and
are environmentally friendly due to
their size.
"You're out of the elements,
you've got your own bed, you've got
your own place to call your own,"
said Harold "Hap" Morgan, who is
without a permanent home in Madi-
son. "It gives you a little bit of self-
pride: This is my own house."
He's in line for a 99-square-foot
house built through the nonprofit
Occupy Madison Build, or OM Build,
run by former organizers with the
Occupy movement The group hopes
to create a cluster of tiny houses like
those in Olympia, Wash., and Eu-
gene and Portland, Ore.
Many have been built with do-
nated materials and volunteer labor,
sometimes from the people who will
live in them. Most require residents
to behave appropriately, avoid drugs
and alcohol and help maintain the
properties.
Still, sometimes neighbors have
not been receptive.
Organizer Brenda Konkel hopes
to allay neighbors' concerns by the
time the City Council votes in May
on the group's application to re-
zone the site of a former auto body
shop to place the houses there.
Plans include gardens, a chicken
coop and possibly bee hives and
showers and bathrooms in the
main building.
"I think a lot of them we can work
through. I think there is some ways
we can be a real asset to the neigh-
borhood," she said.


The group has already built one
house that's occupied by a couple
and parked on the street. A volun-
teer moves it every 24 or 48 hours as
required by city ordinances.
The house, which cost about
$5,000, fits a double bed with over-
head storage, a small table and a
small room with a compostable toi-
let. There's no plumbing or electric-
ity, but the home is insulated and
has a propane heater to get the res-
idents through the harsh Wisconsin
winters.
Organizers want to eventually add
solar panels.
Morgan, who has struggled with a
spinal cord surgery, alcohol addic-
tion and unemployment, lives in a
trailer provided by OM Build. He
hopes to work as a cook again.
The tiny house effort in Eugene,
Ore., sprang up after the city shut
down an Occupy encampment that
turned into a tent city for the home-
less. Andrew Heben and others
worked with the city, which pro-
vided them with land for the project.
Opportunity Village Eugene
opened in September with little re-
sistance, said Heben, 26, who is on
the board of directors. Most of the
nine huts, which are 60 square feet,
and 21 bungalows, which are 64
square feet and 80 square feet, are
already built.
Thirty people are living in them
now, and he expects 40 to 45 resi-
dents ultimately The houses don't
have electricity, water, bathrooms,
showers or kitchens, but separate
shared buildings do.
They've done it all for less than
$100,000, which is about half the me-
dian home price in Eugene, all from
private donors with no taxpayer
money. He said the story has
changed from how tent cities were a
problem in America to how the com-
munity is banding together
"It's an American success story ...
Now we see in different cities peo-
ple coming up with citizen driven so-
lutions," Heben said.
Ministries in Texas and New York
also are developing communities
with clusters of small houses.


NO MORE LOOKING AT OPEN HOUSES....You'll be ready to close on this one! Fairview Estates
3/2.5/2 pool home MOVE-IN READY! Home boasts a caged inground pool, BRAND NEW ROOF NEW
interior & exterior paint & NEW flooring! A few perks include, gas fireplace, formal living & dining rooms,
interior laundry, central vac & covered lanai $205,500. #708880. Kimberly Fullertel: 352-212-5752.


E18 SUNDAY MAkRCH 2, 2014




CIRmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E8

cute little animal forages. They
prefer sandy, well-drained soil
and shun stony or rocky areas.
The soil must be able to main-
tain the deeper living chambers
without caving in.
Surface feeding tunnels will
collapse in a heavy rain or if
stomped or driven on. While an-
noying, these tunnels do no last-
ing damage. Moles occasionally
displace bulbs and could dam-
age grass roots while searching
for insects, and unearthed
plants could dry out and die.
I have many resident moles in
my yard. They are attracted to
the earthworms in the humus-
rich amended soil I have created
to grow a fire-break lawn encir-


SUNDAY MARCH 2, 2014 E19


cling my home, fruit trees, veg-
gies and ornamental flowering
plants. The back half of the yard
is largely original sandhill scrub
with indigenous vegetation. I
find just as many feeding tunnels
there as in the amended areas.
Moles are beneficial carnivores,
while the alien nine-banded ar-
madillo and feral pigs can devas-
tate a garden overnight.
Moles are solitary creatures
that breed once a year in Janu-
ary or February locally Nest
chambers are 12 to 20 feet below
ground, 4 to 6 inches in diameter
and lined with dry grass and
leaves. After about 45 days' ges-
tation, 2 to 5 live babies are born.
The mother nurses them for
about 4 to 5 weeks until the
young are able to forage on their
own. Moles are prey food for
foxes, snakes, skunks, hawks,
owls and free-ranging cats and


Moles are
beneficial
carnivores, while
the alien
nine-banded
armadillo and feral
pigs can devastate
a garden overnight.

dogs. Terriers in particular like
to hunt them. Any cornered
wildlife tries to defend itself and
could bite attackers. Cats and
dogs are so big and quick, the
mole doesn't have much chance
to bite them.
There are traps sold in farm
stores that may kill one mole at a
time. The vacated territory will


soon be claimed by another
mole. Chemical control of insect
pests would require repeated
applications of poisons to your
garden that eventually flush into
the aquifer for everyone to
drink. Soil drenches of emulsi-
fied repellants last longer in
amended loam and clay soils,
but rains wash these castor and
ricinus oils away, so they must be
reapplied often.
Mole tunnels are seen on
roadsides where traffic vibra-
tion does not bother them. While
there has been no scientific
study on the solar-powered sonic
vibrators sold in hardware
stores for about $20, I have
found them useful in my garden.
Make a 10-foot-deep, 1.5-inch-
diameter hole with a piece of
pipe in full sun and angled
slightly toward the south. Insert
the battery tube with the plastic


solar panel at soil level. It makes
a high-pitched sound that travels
well through the soil but is
barely audible to humans. The
resident moles will have their
daytime sleep disturbed and ini-
tially tunnel to the source to in-
vestigate. After a few days, they
leave the immediate area to
sleep and forage further from
the annoying sound. The plastic
lens breaks down after a year of
sun exposure, and can be re-
newed with car headlight
cleaner


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appoint-
ment, call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeber12385@gmail. com.


TeTaY ROUP

REALTY GROUP


Seilzn in Terist

Brnwo Rale
ww .Ter st4aty ru.com


UJLIMR WflL ILLR,413LIIVVIV, ZDRMfl,&tIR, DflLNWVVU ILR
Golf course home in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. 3 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage. Citus Hills DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
construction built home. Beautifully upgraded, great room floor plan with tile floors woo Expanded Lantana model perfectly located on 1st tee of the Skyview Golf Course.
ca es.Hot o spcs w pnor nvewogo corseMove i ey. oy Professionally decorated, Built-ins in iving room, surround sound, cherry cabinets with roll-
co untyclu community ifestyle. MLS708778 ....................................................... $ 152,700 outs and so much more. Move-in ready! MLS701779 .............................................. $259,000

__ IF >


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133' VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


Merllat ca bnets, soft-close feature & crown mo ding. Cor co e ops & gourmet stress ELEGANCE! Windward model with many upgrades! Nicely appointed open floor plan home
steel kitchen sink Butlers pantry, eat-in kitchen & formal dining room. Greatroom has designed to let the Florida sunshine in. Some of the many upgrades include Brazilian
specity bu l-in with custom arches & remote control fireplace. Minks rotating double bladed hardwood floors, cathedral ceilings, luxurious master bath, amazing pool and Jacuzzi, bonus
ceiling fan& many more upgrades. Enclosed Florida room with "summer kitchen" plus a large enclosed sunroom, incredible kitchen and on a cul-de-sac! You'll be proud t o this
screen enclosure with a very tropical feel. Oversized garage MLS 705613..........$289,000 elegant home w/lush landscaping& on a large corner lot. MLS 70565 ............... $319,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Very po pular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2.5 baths, great roomn
I floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades. Situated on Skyview Golf
I Course with breathe taking views. Over sized lanai with lush landscape.
Located in the premiere connunity of Terra Vista. MLS 702685...$334,900


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Beau ful 3 bedroom plus den, 2.5 bath 2-car enlarged garage, magnificent pool with waterfalls.
Premiere residential Skvfew Golf Course homosits. Picturesque viewwith preferred exposure gives
this customized expanded Windward great room floor plan with voluminous ceiling a radiant perfect
settng. Extensive upgrades throughout, including tile flooring, kitchen cabinetry, ightng, exterior
anal paversplantation shutters, upgraded energy efficient featres and many more. Recently
painted exterior.Truly special feeling in prestgious move-in condition. MLS 706562...$369,000


Ters 6 s or Mo
Ter Vist & rnwodRnas Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
LE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE Custom Martinique model with a lovely garden view from the lanai. This home has a formal
takea is singlefyome 4 bedroomsplus ceVeyspcos living as ell as a separate family room. Cooksill love the large pd d p0 .
homevit los t ofer~cia mem ersip nclded111 ..............of 1,tile. Thee.Lot horre Th willwllhe rented unfurnished. 1250..........$1,450 ca ;


WE NEED RENTALS
in the Terra Vista
& Brentwood
communities!
List your rental with us!




CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THIS HOME LOOKS LIKE IT
JUMPED OFF A MAGAZINE PAGE!
3BR, 2 new baths, & 2+ car garage. Totally
remodeled for your enjoyment. Laminate & tile floors.
Stainless appliances. New wood cabinets & counters.
Double panned windows. New A/C. fenced yard.
Shed. Close to boat launch & trail so much more!
MLS #708640 $110,000
Call Doris Miner for appointment
352-726-6668 or 422-4627 (cell)


= im LS/ S;l:


FOR. MO TO YOROM



COUNTY PROY ,. -N
YER.* SNA


INVERNESS
3/2/1 ON ALMOST 1/2
ONLY $62,900
Features a large lot with huge backyard,
updated kitchen, screen porch, and lots
of privacy. Call before its gone.
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


* inverness )even LaKes Iome
* Waterfront f Pool f Cul De Sac
* 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage
* Updated Kitchen and Master Bath
* Open Floor Plan, Great Room w/FP
* Short Golf Cart ride to IG f CC
MLS #706678 ASKING $174,900
Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


* i-airview ts.
* 3 Bedroom, 2 .5 Bath, POOL home
* Landscaped 1.5 acre, self-cleaning POOL
* WOOD floors, new appliances, SPOTLESS
* CITRUS HILLS MEMBERSHIP
MLS #706908 $229,727
Jeanne or Willard Pickrl 352-212-3410
www.CitrusCountySold.com


Croft area, just remodeled, 2/2.
Also a mobile attached to home.
Detach garage with workshop.
MLS #706965 $34,500
Call Nilda Cano 352-270-0202


" On the Oaks Golf Course
" 3BR, 2 bath pool home
" Fireplace, open living
" Split plan, 1/2 half acre
" A block from the clubhouse
MLS #706097 $194,600
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www. CitrusCountySold. com


VICTORIAN STYLE HOME
Located Sumter County.
MLS #708847 $119,900
Call Buddy Gibson at (352) 391-4385
for an appointment


* 3 Bedroom, 2 bath home, 3.6 acres
* 36 X 60 Metal building
* 18 X 30 Workshop
* 24X 32 Detached garage
* LR fi FR with fireplace
MLS #707801 ASKING $220,000
Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


BEAUTIFUL HOME
3/3/2 WITH FAMILY ROOM & OFFICE. Caged pool
& lanai overlooks nicely landscaped backyard.
Bedroom suite features bath with spa tub, separate
shower. Stainless steel appliances. Kitchen area
adjoins nook & family room overlooking pool area.
Newly painted, inside & out, A/C under warranty.
New roof 2012. Centrally located.
MLS #706958 ASKING $199,800
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280
View listing. www.c21atdavis.com









2 Bedroom, 2 bath, Florida room
1/3 acre fenced, private backyard
All appliances, NEW ROOF
PLEASANT GROVE School District
MLS #705067 $110,000
Jeanne Or Willard Pickrel 212-2410
www.CitrusCountySold.con


THE EXTERIOR OF THIS LOVELY HOME
Boasting 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. All
this on 2 cleared and landscaped lots. Everything
has been updated from the roof, A/C, new water
pump, new driveway. Lania enclosed with
windows and tile floor. $89,900
Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727
ask for file #707648.


* 6USTOm uiIt in LUUt3
* 3/2/2 PLUS Den
* Caged Pool/RV Pad
* Large Shed, Fenced Yd.
* High Tray Ceilings, Fireplace
MLS #708008 $219,000
Jeanne Or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
CitrusCountySold. com


WOODSY PRIVACY
You will love calling this 3/2 with family room,
two-story country home your own. Situated on 5
acres, this is perfect for retirement or family living.
Detached carport and utility building. Conveniently
located between Inverness and Brooksville. This
immaculate home is move in ready. 1001
PRICED TO SELL AT $151,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280


Gorgeous, quality, custom-built pool home
in Pine Ridge Estates. Over 2800 sf of living
area. Very energy efficient. 3 bdrm/4.5 baths
PLUS den & media room. 2 car attached & 1 car
detached garage. A must see! MLS #706420
NEW ASKING PRICE: $264,900
Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072


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With pool on 2 lots. Over 3700 sq. ft. of
living area! Beautiful home on a cul-de-sac
with an additional available lot on the other
side of home. Call for your personal tour
today! MLS #708830
LaWanda Watt 352-212- 1989


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Spacious 4bed/2.5bath/6 car garage!
5,500 sq. ft. total, 3,700 sq. ft. living.
Heated saltwater pool and boat lift included.
GREAT BUY $399,000
and looking for offers. MLS #703130
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


WANTED CASH BUYER!
2 bedroom/2 bath home in Crystal River.
1/3+ acre lot. Good location. Needs some
TLC and updates. Need a cash offer quickly
to beat public sale by bank. Call today.
MLS #708826 ASKING $32,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072


This home is in move-in condition. Large great room
with wood burning fireplace, 3 bedrooms, all with
walk-in closets, two baths (Master has separate tub
& shower). 2 screen porches w/insulated roof.
LARGE 2.5 CAR DETACHED GARAGE/WORKSHOR
Fenced backyard. This home has it all.
MLS #706368 ASKING $68,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280
View listings: www.c21atdavis.com


Surprising 2/2/1 has large tiled family
room and adjoining large screen room
and touches, such as decorative patio at
entrance and attractive rear patio. Great
city limits neighborhood.
MLS #703336 $50,700
SHORT SALE, BUT LENDER READY TO MOVE!
Ask for Marilyn Booth 637-4904


S/S/z Iownhouse with pool. Living room with
fireplace, formal & casual dining areas. Private
patio area and full two car garage. Minues to
downtown, bike trail, park. Perfect location for
busy professional or retiree/snowbird.
MLS #707407 ASKING $124,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280
View listing: wwwvc21oatdavis.com


$119,900
WATERFRONT HOME IN INVERNESS
Enjoy beautiful Lake Pocono from your screen
porch. This three bedroom, two bath home with
two car garage has fenced yard and dock.
Wood-burning fireplace, open floor plan, eat-in
kitchen, natural wood trim throughout, many
extras. Easy to see- call today! MLS #707245
Mary Parsons 634-1273


E20 SUNDA, MARCH 2, 2014