Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
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Softball: Local teams battle for bragging rights /B1

A aa iAft. n0. W * m aim d-_._ _alIV


State lawmen to look at Adams allegations


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

INVERNESS Two high-
ranking agents with the Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment arrived Monday morning
in Inverness and left with docu-
ments provided by County Com-
missioner Scott Adams


regarding a 22-year-old county
land lease.
The agents met separately
with CountyAdministrator Brad
Thorpe and Adams regarding a
$650-a-year lease with AmeriGas
for county-owned property on
Forest Drive in Inverness that
the company has never paid a
dime on.


The FDLE is conducting an
inquiry of the documents to de-
termine whether to proceed
with an investigation, FDLE
spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger
said.
"We're just in the review
process," she said.
Adams on Thursday emailed
documents to FLDE Commis-
sioner Gerald Bailey, alleging
that unnamed current or former
officials conspired with Citrus
County resident David Langer, a
former AmeriGas employee, to
withhold the payments.


Langer said Monday he
worked as a salesman for Ameri-
Gas for three years and never
knew of any lease the company
had with the county
He said the only time he dis-
cussed AmeriGas with county of-
ficials was before he began his
employment.
Langer said a real estate agent
told him of a prospective land
buyer who complained about
nighttime noise coming from the
propane tank storage facility
Langer said he passed the com-
plaint to county officials and


then forgot about it.
He said the only time he knew
of the lease was the last few days
from Thorpe, who told him of
Adams' allegations.
"That's the only conversation
we've had about AmeriGas,"
Langer said.
Neither Thorpe nor Adams
would discuss the conversations
they had Monday with Cindy
Sans, FDLE director of execu-
tive investigations, or Rick
Ramirez, special agent in charge

See Page A8


Residents rise up for POW


Nugent commends county

for taking up cause of

-captive Idaho native


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
U.S. Rep. Richard Nugent, R-Brooksville, addresses a group of about 100 people Monday morning in Inverness
following the delivery of some 8,000 petition signatures. The signatures are on a letter addressed to
Secretary of State John Kerry encouraging the negotiation for the release of American prisoner of war Army
Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The soldier is being held captive in Afghanistan.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS The
color of the day was yel-
low as a crowd of about
100 people gathered in
the parking lot of Time
Square Plaza just out-
side Inverness on Mon-
day to send Washington,
D.C., and the nation the
message: "Bring Bowe
home."
With a backdrop of
yellow ribbons on local
storefront businesses'
doors and the song "Tie
A Yellow Ribbon
Round the 01' Oak
Tree" playing, U.S. Rep.
Richard Nugent, R-
Brooksville, was pre-
sented with nearly
8,000 petition signa-
tures on a letter ad-
dressed to Secretary of
State John Kerry, urg-
ing him to do whatever
he can to bring home
Army Sgt. Bowe
Bergdahl, the only liv-
ing American POW
Bergdahl, 27, was re-
ported missing June 30,
2009, while on duty in
Afghanistan. Since
then, the Taliban has
released videos show-
ing him in captivity
In December 2011, he
was reported to have
escaped his captors, but
was recaptured three
days later Until re-
cently, the Taliban had
shown interest in possi-
ble negotiations.
A committee of about
30 people, spearheaded
by Air Force veteran


Sgt. Bowe
Bergdahl
HOW TO HELP
For information
about the Bring
Bowe Home
project and how
you can help,
email Cynthia
Holden at
Cyn2719
@yahoo.com.

and Rolling Thunder
member Cynthia
Holden, plus many
more volunteers from
local veterans' organi-
zations, have been
working tirelessly since
last fall to collect Citrus
County residents' signa-
tures, with the goal of
delivering them to Nu-
gent, who would in turn
bring them back to
Washington.
Under rain-threaten-
ing gray skies, Holden
told the crowd, "The
mission statement of
Rolling Thunder is
'POW/MIA awareness,'
so it's fitting for us to be
involved in bringing

See Page A2


CMH Foundation


bids bye to Beaty


Interim chiefgets approval


MIKE
WRIGHT
Staff writer

INVERNESS
- The Citrus
M e m o r i a l
Health Founda-
tion on Monday
said goodbye to
Chief Executive
Officer Ryan
Beaty and pre-
pared to wel-
come his


Dr. Ca
Fairb
said b
"held a
our he;
get agree


temporary replacement
Beaty, whose 10 years
as CEO followed Chuck
Blasband's 32 years, re-
signs on March 14. His
resignation techni-
cally a termination -


arlton
anks
board
gun to
ads" to
cement.

joined
trustees
person
tee, said
tried to


was the linchpin
for a settlement
agreement be-
tween the foun-
dation and


Hagel: Time to shrink US military


Secretary

emphasizes

asymmetrical

threats
Associated Press


Citrus County WASHINGTON Look-
Hospital Board ing beyond America's post-
in resolving two 9/11 wars, Defense
lawsuits. Secretary Chuck Hagel on
Foundation Monday proposed shrink-
chairwoman ing the Army to its smallest
Sandy Chadwick size in 74 years, closing
who, along with bases and reshaping forces
board member to confront a "more
Bob Collins, volatile, more unpre-
two CCHB dictable" world with a
Sas part of a four- more nimble military
search commit- The nation can afford a
id she repeatedly smaller military so long as
steer the Beaty it retains a technological
edge and the agility to re-
See Page A8 spond on short notice to


Classifieds.
Comics ..
Crossword .


.... C12
.... C ll
.... C10l


Community . .C8, C9
Editorial ........ A10O
Entertainment ..... A4


Defense budget
Pentagon chief Chuck Hagel recommended shrinking the
Army to its smallest size in decades in an effort to balance
defense needs with budget realities.
* Army 0 Air Force Navy Marine Corps


12 million


A comparison (in thousands):


28
9 ..............
S 161- 940 323-
6 ............. 1
269
3 .............. ** *---- M ** --


40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85
WWII Korean War Vietnam
('41-'45) ('50-'53) ('65-75)


SOURCE: Department of Defense
crises anywhere on the
globe, Hagel said. He said
the priorities he outlined
reflect a consensus view
among America's military
leaders, but Republicans



Horoscope ........ A4


2013 523


194


Ni -= m -
90 95 00 05 10 13
GulfWar Afghanistan/Iraq
('90-'91) ('01-present)


in Congress were quick to
criticize some proposed
changes.
In a speech at the one-
year mark of his tenure as
Pentagon chief, Hagel re-

Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies .......... Cll


vealed many details of the
defense spending plan that
will be part of the 2015
budget that President
Barack Obama will submit
to Congress next week.
Hagel described it as the
first Pentagon budget to
fully reflect the nation's
transition from 13 years of
war
At the core of his plan is
the notion that after wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan
that proved longer and
more costly than foreseen,
the U.S. military will no
longer be sized to conduct
large and protracted
ground wars. It will put
more emphasis on versa-
tile, agile forces that can
project power over great
distances, including in
Asia.
Hagel stressed that such
changes entail risk. He

See Page A8

Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ...... ClO


Commissioner claims possible

conspiracy over unpaid lease





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
From left, Ann Panasik, Delores Resales, Rose Stephens, and Mildred Tomasheski roll yellow ribbon that will be sold for donations to the "Bring Bowe Home" campaign. The
ladies represent the West Citrus Elks Lodge.


POW
Continued from PageAl

Bowe home ... People ask,
'Do I know him?' No, but he
could be ours, and as far as
I'm concerned, he is ours....
What we're trying to do is
bring awareness that it's
not satisfactory that any-
body is left behind."
In light of the recent news
from the Taliban that they
have suspended mediation
with the U.S. to exchange
Bergdahl for five senior Tal-
iban prisoners held in cus-
tody in Guantanamo Bay,
Holden said it only embold-
ens local grassroots efforts
to keep his name in the
minds of our nation's lead-


ers and citizens.
"We need the government
to know that we care, and
we're going to keep the
awareness going until Bowe's
brought home," she said.
Nugent echoed that sen-
timent, saying it's "ab-
solutely amazing" that
people in Citrus County
are so passionate about a
soldier who isn't even from
the area. Bergdahl is from
Hailey, Idaho.
"Last year, on the fourth
anniversary of Sgt.
Bergdahl's capture, on the
floor of the House of Rep-
resentatives, I introduced a
resolution in the House
calling on the United States
to do everything possible
not to leave any members of
the armed forces behind


during the drawdown of
Iraq and Afghanistan. Be-
lieve it or not, I had mem-
bers of Congress come up to
me and say, 'I didn't know
we had a living POW in
Afghanistan.' That was
shocking to me," he said.
Nugent spoke about his
own three sons who are
serving in the military and
about the wounded war-
riors he has met in mili-
tary hospitals, noting that
their primary concern is
about their comrades and
how it's of the highest im-
portance to not leave a
buddy behind.
Regarding the nearly
8,000 signatures on stacks
of letters that were all tied
up with yellow ribbons,
Nugent said he's been


asked repeatedly if it will
make a difference.
"I have faith that it will,"
he said. "But unless the
American people continue
to put pressure on Wash-
ington, the cries of his fam-
ily will continue to go
unheard."
He added, "I would want
that if it was my son held in
captivity, and that's what
you would want, too."
Nugent said that al-
though he couldn't guaran-
tee the secretary of state
would or could do any-
thing, he could guarantee
that he would do his best to
"make your voices heard."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


INTELCENTER/Associated Press
This file image provided by IntelCenter on Dec. 8, 2010,
shows a frame grab from a video released by the Taliban
containing footage of a man believed to be Bowe
Bergdahl, left.


DANIEL'S

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING, INC.
4581 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 726-5845


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THREE LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT CITRUS COUNTY
10489 N Florida Ave., Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, FL 34434 (352) 489-2486


3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR 44), Inverness, FL 34453
7991 S Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446


(352) 341-5520
(352) 382-8282


License #
CAC042673


A2 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


LOCAL


OOOHH23







Page A3 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2014



TATE2&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Woman charged with credit-card fraud


Bond set at

$17,000
SEAN ARNOLD
For the Chronicle

A Jacksonville woman is
accused of using fake identi-
fication in an effort to pur-
chase cellphones from area
Walmarts.
Sarah Carver, 27, was ar-


rested Feb. 22 and charged
with multiple felonies, in-
cluding fraudulent use of a
credit card, scheming to de-
fraud and having a fraudu-
lent driver's license,
according to an arrest
affidavit.
According to her arrest af-
fidavit, Carver visited several
area Walmarts, including the
ones in The Villages,
Lecanto, Inverness and Ho-
mosassa. In each case she at-
tempted to purchase


cellphones, often under dif-
ferent names.
Security personnel at The
Villages Walmart first no-
ticed the crime when Carver
purchased two cellphones
with a fraudulent Capitol
One credit card, using the
name Becky Margel. She
later reportedly attempted to
purchase two iPhones at the
Inverness Walmart; however,
her credit was declined. The
Lecanto Walmart reportedly
has records of the same


woman attempting to pur-
chase two cellphones using
the false name and credit
card of Kristina Ricci, but
she was declined there as
well.
By the time she arrived at
the Walmart in Homosassa,
the loss prevention team
had been alerted, accord-
ing to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. She at-
tempted to purchase cell-
phones there under the
name of Becky Margel, but


instead was apprehended
by deputies.
Surveillance footage was
used to confirm that all three
identities were Sarah Carver
When questioned at the Ho-
mosassa Walmart, Carver
gave deputies a New York
driver's license that con-
tained her photo and the
name Becky Margel. During
questioning, Carver report-
edly gave deputies her true
name and address. Her bond
was set at $17,000.


Sarah
Carver
accused of
trying to buy
cellphones
under
different names.


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Whitelaw wants to
return to school board
Former Citrus County
School Board member Sheila
Whitelaw filed paperwork
Monday with the Supervisor
of Elections Office to seek the
seat she once held.
Whitelaw, who served one
term on the board before
being defeated by Pat
Deutschman in her re-
election attempt, is a candi-
date for District 3. School
board seats are nonpartisan.
Deutschman announced
she will retire after 16 years
on the board when her term
ends in November.
Chamber celebration
this afternoon
The public is invited to
help celebrate the opening
of the new Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce of-
fice on Courthouse Square
today in Inverness.
There will be a ribbon cut-
ting ceremony at 4:30 p.m.
at the new chamber office
- which it shares with the
Citrus County Chronicle -
at 106 Main St.
Chamber members are
then invited to a reception
across the street at the Fox
Den Winery.
Crystal River
featured on TV show
The NBC Sports Network
will air "Extreme Fishing Ad-
ventures Crystal River
Extravaganza" at 1 p.m.
Wednesday. Cable compa-
nies' programming varies,
so check your provider's
listings.
The segment features
the city of Crystal River as
well as the Plantation on
Crystal River resort, the lo-
cation from which the tour is
based.

Tallahassee
Senate proposes
new casinos
The Florida Senate is
rolling out a sweeping gam-
bling proposal that would
allow the creation of two new
casinos in South Florida and
expand the use of slot ma-
chines across the state.
A Senate committee re-
leased the proposal on
Monday.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

Due to erroneous in-
formation, an item on Page
C4 of Sunday's edition,
"Donate cars to help Boys
& Girls Clubs" stands cor-
recting. The organization
does not accept used cars
and does not have an 800
number to call for those
wishing to do so.
A photo caption on
Page A4 of the Feb. 19
issue of the Current, ac-
companying the story
"Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum," contained an error.
Art Jones is the present
owner of the Seminole Club
in Crystal River. An incor-
rect name was given.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Reading for literacy


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Fourth-grade student Timmy Barker reads with his parents, Melissa and Robert Barker, at Crystal River
Primary School's recent Literacy Dinner Night presented by the Rotary Club of Crystal River. Each student
in teacher Erin Boyd's fourth-grade class received three books to share with family members during quiet
reading time. The evening was topped off with a pizza dinner, also provided by the Rotary Club of Crystal
River. Volunteers from the Interact and Rotaract clubs assisted in the evening's activities.





Local leaders preparing for


annual Legislative Days


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Citrus County business, govern-
ment and civic leaders, along with
concerned residents, hit the road
next month for the annual Legisla-
tive Days in Tallahassee.
It's a long-running local tradition
that gets county concerns and pri-
orities directly in front of state
leaders.
Nearly 100 people went up for the
event last year, which is coordi-
nated by the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce. It's a two-day
event, March 19 to 20, but activities
are scheduled to maximize the time
of those who can only make the sec-
ond day
"It's been going on 20-plus years,
maybe longer," said Josh Wooten,
chamber CEO. "We've already noti-
fied our delegation on the priori-
ties." The legislative priorities are
a combined focus by the chamber
and Economic Development
Council.
Ardath Prendergast, EDC man-
ager, said the lunchtime keynote
speaker will be Hershel Vinyard,
secretary of the Department of En-
vironmental Protection. He will
focus on issues critical to Citrus
County including King's Bay, rivers
and springs. The lunch will be at
the Governor's Club.
Other confirmed speakers in-
clude Adam Putnam, secretary of
the Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Affairs; Ananth
Prasad, secretary of the Depart-
ment of Transportation; Jeff At-
water, Florida chief financial


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and the Economic
Development Council have the following 10 legislative priorities
for 2014.
* Continued support of the clean up of King's Bay and springs
restoration.
* Storm water runoff and control U.S. 19, support DOT funding.
* Support extension of the Suncoast Parkway.
* Support widening of U.S. 41 from Inverness to Hernando.
* Extend the expiration of Enterprise Zones beyond 2015.
* Oppose repeal of state laws that allow local governments to levy local
business taxes.
* Repeal state regulations concerning the ability of local governments
to regulate short-term rentals.
* Support for the development of Port Citrus.
* Support "e-fairness" and end special tax treatment for Internet-only
retailers in Florida.
* Support the restoration of $15 million to the CareerSource portion of
the TANF budget.


officer; Pam Steward, commis-
sioner of education; and state
Rep. Jimmie T Smith.
Lisa Miller, insurance consultant,
will discuss flood insurance and
Citrus County lobbyist Mike Harrell
will provide a legislative update.
Other speakers expected include
state Sen. Charlie Dean; Sen. Andy
Gardiner, Senate president-elect
2015; and Rep. Steve Crisafulli,
House speaker-designate 2015. New
Lt. Gov Carlos Lopez-Cantera and
Gov Rick Scott have also been in-
vited to speak, but have not
confirmed.
The chamber has three options
available for participation. Reser-
vations can be made to include bus


service for one or both days and for
individuals providing their own
transportation. Those going
Wednesday are also invited to par-
ticipate in an optional Dutch-treat
dinner
Prendergast said there are still
nearby rooms available for Wednes-
day night and space available on
the buses for both days. For more
information and to make reserva-
tions, visit the chamber website at
citruscountychamber.com, then
click on news and events.
Wooten said there has been a lot
of interest this year, including some
young people from the Citrus
CountyAnti-Drug Coalition who are
planning on making the trip.


Florida

considers

in-state

tuition for

illegal

immigrants

Associated Press

MIAMI State lawmak-
ers could approve a bill
this session allowing qual-
ified Florida students to
pay in-state college tuition
even if they are in the
country illegally
The tuition debate is a
perennial one in Tallahas-
see. Similar bills passed
the House and Senate but
never in the same year But
this year the measure ap-
pears to be gaining
broader support. House
Speaker Will Weatherford
has staunchly backed the
proposal, even penning a
newspaper column in its
favor. He
reiterated
his sup-
port re- .
cently
after the
House bill
passed its
first sub-
commit- Will
tee. The Weatherford
State's House speaker
Hispanic backs proposal.
Caucus also has made it a
priority
At least 15 other states
have passed such laws,
with another seven con-
sidering them this year.
The trend reflects immi-
grant advocates' increas-
ing focus on state
legislatures as Congress
fails to make any headway
on national immigration
reform. It also highlights
lawmakers' growing
recognition of the influ-
ence of Latino voters.
The bill would cover all
Florida youth who at-
tended at least three years
of high school in the state
and apply for college
within two years of gradu-
ation- regardless of their
immigration status. It also
would provide in-state tu-
ition to veterans and
would require students to
be U.S. citizens to receive
state financial aid.
Currently, those stu-
dents pay out-of-state fees
that can run as much as
$17,000 more per year
more than those charged
Florida residents.
"Instead of waiting on
Washington to fix our bro-
ken immigration system, we
have an opportunity this
session to allow these indi-
viduals to fulfill the promise
of earning a college de-
gree," Weatherford said. He
lauded House Education
Committee Chair and
Miami GOP Rep. Jeanette
Nunez, who sponsored the
primary bill (HB 851).
Gov Rick Scott, who
faces a tough re-election
campaign in which His-
panic voters could play a
pivotal role, says he's open
to the idea. That marks a
reversal from past com-
ments in which Scott
blamed such immigrants
for costing the state
"countless billions" and
taking jobs from U.S.
residents.
Sen. Dwight Bullard, a
South Florida Democrat,
has proposed a similar
measure (SB 428), but it
faces an uphill battle.


*






A4 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday This is a great year for
self-improvement. Your energy and in-
tensity will surprise everyone. You will
be able to summon the diligence and
concentration required to manage any
contractual dealings or legal issues.
Taking the initiative will result in a new
partnership.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You
should use discretion when dealing
with others today Many people respect
your opinions and will look to you for
guidance and advice.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Keep
your opinions and ideas to yourself. It
is not necessary to reveal your secrets
to others.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Informa-
tion you have recently received may
have had a negative effect on your life.
Dwelling on the issue is not productive.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- You may
be tempted by an appealing invest-
ment offer. Do your research thor-
oughly before you commit to anything
in writing.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Have a
heart-to-heart discussion with some-
one who concerns you.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Prepare to
focus on business matters today There
is opportunity for advancement if you ex-
ceed your employer's expectations.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) Be as-
sertive, and direct your efforts into social-
izing and networking. Your personal and
business relationships will improve if you
make new acquaintances that could have
a positive influence on your future.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Family and
friends may not be totally honest with
you. Find someone impartial to provide
the answers to your questions. A self-
improvement project will turn out better
than you expected.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your
commitment and determination will
provide you the necessary ingredients
to get ahead.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You
should consider previous outcomes
before taking action.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) For-
mulate a concrete plan for an impor-
tant discussion. Have a clear idea of
your own responsibilities, and consider
the expectations of others.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your
compassion and understanding will
help others accomplish worthwhile
goals. Favorable changes to your per-
sonal life will occur.


MON TUE
H L Pep. H LFcst City


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Aflantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham I
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock


24 12 f(
68 37 pc
56 27 pc
58 34 cd
34 20 sn
73 40 ts
.01 36 22 fl
33 15 3 sn
58 31 cd
60 35 Cd
30 18 pc
.03 20 9 fl
22 10 pc
70 41 pc
.11 36 16 sn
58 38 cd
20 -1 pc
35 11 cd
25 7 fl
34 8 pc
31 9 pc
22 7 pc
53 32 ts
30 15 sn
.02 18 -4 pc
25 6 fl
77 52 pc
40 14 pc
33 16 sn
28 15 pc
73 47 ts
29 4 pc
76 51 pc
52 29 r
69 55 f


T FOR 3:00 RM.
TUESDAY

MON TUE
H L Pep. H L Fcst


New Orleans 69 59 73 47 ts
New York City 44 33 31 20 pc
Norfolk 57 42 47 29 pc
Oklahoma City 49 30 43 18 pc
Omaha 25 21 02 19 0 pc
Palm Springs 82 53 81 57 pc
Philadelphia 40 33 32 20 sn
Phoenix 83 53 83 54 pc
Pittsburgh 33 22 27 9 sn
Portland, ME 38 29 23 10 pc
Portland, OR 45 42 .11 51 38 pc
Providence, RI 42 33 30 18 pc
Raleigh 60 41 54 31 pc
Rapid City 18 6 .03 16 -4 pc
Reno 69 31 65 38 pc
Rochester, NY 27 21 .02 20 9 fl
Sacramento 75 41 72 50 pc
Salt Lake City 62 41 58 35 pc
San Antonio 79 61 78 43 ts
San Diego 69 54 60 55 f
San Francisco 71 45 58 52 pc
Savannah 77 59 72 43 pc
Seattle 44 38 .55 52 40 f
Spokane 25 23 10 33 19 pc
St. Louis 38 23 37 10 pc
St.Ste.Mane 13 2 .02 11 -8 fl
Syracuse 27 22 .04 22 12 fl
Topeka 41 27 28 8 pc
Washington 48 39 38 25 fl
YESTERDArS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 7, Kendall, Fla.
LOW -19. Willow City, N.D,
WORLD CmES


Lisbon 57/50/pc
London 57/46/cd
Madrid 5135/r
Mexico City 78/51/s
Montreal 19/10/pc
Moscow 35/28/cd
Paris 5950/cd
Rio 89/73As
Rome 60/37/s
Sydney 80/66/s
Tokyo 53/&33/s
Toronto 26/13/pc
Warsaw 44/28/s


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


Graceland exhibit
gives glimpse into
young Elvis
MEMPHIS, Tenn. The
telegram sent by Elvis Presley
to his parents in November 1954
gives a glimpse into the young
singer's sense of responsibility
and his optimism, as he begins
what will become an influential
career as a rock 'n' roll icon and
cultural phenomenon.
The note, which is being dis-
played in an exhibit at Grace-
land, was sent from Houston by
Presley to his parents, Vernon
and Gladys, in Memphis. It in-
forms them that he sent money
to pay the bills, and more will be
coming.
The exhibit, which opened
Monday, commemorates the 60
years since Presley cut his first
record, "That's All Right," at Sun
Studio in July 1954. It was
played on the radio days later,
and some believe its release
marked the birth of rock 'n' roll.
One-day tickets at
Disney World now
more expensive
LAKE BUENA VISTA-The
cost of going to the Magic King-
dom at Walt Disney World just
got more expensive.
Disney World has raised the
one-day ticket price to the Magic
Kingdom by $4 so that it now
costs $99 before taxes for visi-
tors over age 9.
Single-day tickets for the re-
sort's other parks Epcot, Dis-
ney's Hollywood Studios and
Animal Kingdom also went up
by $4. It now costs $94 to get
into those parks for visitors over
age 9.
For children younger than 10
years old, the cost is $93 to get
into the Magic Kingdom and $88
to enter the other parks.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HiILO P NL PRP NI LO PR
71/61 B '.73/5 0 trace 71/60 trace


City


Associated Press
Priscilla Presley stands in the "60 years of Elvis" exhibit inside
an annex at Graceland in Memphis, Tenn. The exhibit, which
opened Monday, features jump suits worn by Presley, an organ
played in his California home, a copy of the original "That's All
Right" record and other miscellaneous Elvis items.


Actor Alec Baldwin
contemplates
leaving NYC
NEW YORK -Alec Baldwin
said he misses the days when
New Yorkers signaled their ap-
preciation of celebrities briefly
and politely while taking care to
maintain privacy.
The 55-year-old actor writes in
New York magazine that he
"probably" needs to move out of
the nation's largest city.
Baldwin said he has a happy
home for the first time in his
adult life. He said he's consider-
ing Los Angeles, living insulated
behind a gate with his wife and
their child.
A lot of the article deals with
comments that Baldwin said
were misquoted or misinter-
preted. Among other things, he
details strongly worded evidence
that he's not homophobic.
Baldwin said he realizes he
"could have done things differently."
He apologizes if he's "of-
fended anyone along the way."


H L Fecast City


Daytona Bch. 77
Fort Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 82
Gainesville 77
Homestead 83
Jacksonville 76
Key West 81
Lakeland 81
Melbourne 78


Seth Meyers hosts
'Late Night' Monday
NEW YORK- The last piece
of NBC's big talk-show turnover
fell into place Monday when
Seth Meyers debuted as host of
"Late Night."
Until early this month, Meyers
was a "Saturday Night Live" vet-
eran and co-anchor of its "Week-
end Update" newscast. Now
he's filling the vacancy left by
Jimmy Fallon after five years
hosting "Late Night."
Fallon moved up last week to
be host of "The Tonight Show,"
replacing Jay Leno.
Scheduled guests for "Late
Night with Seth Meyers" in-
cluded Vice President Joe
Biden and Meyers' former
"Weekend Update" co-anchor,
Amy Poehler, as well as the
band A Great Big World.
Another "SNL" alum, Fred
Armisen, is Meyers' resident
bandleader.
"Late Night" airs at 12:35 a.m.
-From wire reports


H L F'cast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI I LO PRaNIL PR
72/60 trace NA/tA NA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK sExl" da" i
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 770 Low: 58
Mostly cloudy with a 20% chance of
showers.

pr WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
60 I.A High:67 Lowv47
Cloudy with a 60% chance of rain. Turning
Much cooler.
m THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 63' Low: 430
Rain exits early, the mostly cloudy and
cool.
ALNMIAc


TEMPERATURE* DEW I
Monday 78/68 Monda
Record /32
Normal 74/56 HUMI
Mean temp. 73 Mond
Departure from mean 9 POLLI
PRECIPITATION* Predomi
Monday 0.00 Tue
Total for the month 1.59"
Total for the year 4.73" T O
Normal for the year 4.67"
*As of 7 p,m. at Inverness s To
UV INDEX: 7 T
0-2minimal,3-4low,5-6moderate, We
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE I Th
29.96 Polluta

DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
02/25 TUESDAY 02:39 07:40
02/26 WEDNESDAY 03:33 08:39


POINT
ay at 3 p.m. 64.9
DITY
ay at 3 p.m. 87%
EN COUNT**
infant Juniper, Oak Nettle
-I
'day's active pollen:
Juniper, oak, nettle
day's count: 8.7/12
dnesday's count: 8.6
iursday's count: 8.3
ant: Particulate matter


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
13:43 20:12
14:49 21:10


SUNST pIOT 6 m
SUlRST TE OMOI T ............................6:26 p.m.

y eC 1 01y I I OH11E TODAY ......................... 3:38 a.m.
Mar 1 Mar 8 Mar 16 Mar 23 MOONISET TODAY........................ 2:42 p.m.
uflRN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
htlptflame.fI-dof com/lire wealhiet(bdl
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal
River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-766.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At Kings Bay ..At Mason's Creek
TUESDAY
City High Low
Chassahtowitzka 3:20 am. 0.7ft, 3:54 p.m, 0.2 ft. 11:24 a-m. 0.1 ft. 9:39p.m0.1 ft,
Crystal Rver- 1:11 a.m. 2.2ft. 2:39p.m. 1.5ft. 8:41 a.m. 0.1ft. 8:27p.nmD.7ft.
Withlaoxochee* 12:07p.m. 2. ft, 11:37p.m. 3.2ft. 6:23 a.m. -0.7 ft. 6:24 p.mf.9 ft.
Homosassa- 1:36a.m. 1.3ft, 4:01 p.m. 0.6ft. 11:17a.m. -0.0ft- 8:45p.m0.3ft.


Today: Northeast winds around 5
knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and
inland waters a light chop. Tonight:
West winds around 5 knots. Seas 2
feet or less. Bay and inland waters
smooth.


Gulf water
temperature


69
Ttorn


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 25, the
56th day of 2014. There are 309
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Feb. 25,1964, Muhammad Ali
(then known as Cassius Clay) be-
came the world heavyweight boxing
champion as he defeated Sonny Lis-
ton in Miami Beach. (The victory was
scored as a technical knockout when
an injured Liston failed to answer the
bell for the seventh round.)
On this date:
In 1836, inventor Samuel Colt
patented his revolver.
In 1954, Gamal Abdel Nasser be-
came Egypt's prime minister after
the country's president, Mohammed
Naguib, was effectively ousted in a
coup.
In 1986, President Ferdinand
Marcos fled the Philippines after 20
years of rule in the wake of a
tainted election; Corazon Aquino
assumed the presidency.
In 1991, during the Persian Gulf
War, 28 Americans were killed
when an Iraqi Scud missile hit a
U.S. barracks in Dhahran, Saudi
Arabia.
Ten years ago: The U.S.
Supreme Court, in Locke v. Davey,
ruled states didn't have to under-
write the religious training of stu-
dents planning careers in the
ministry.
Five years ago: President Barack
Obama introduced former Washing-
ton Gov. Gary Locke as his nominee
for commerce secretary after two ear-
lier choices dropped out.
One year ago: Former U.S. Sur-
geon General C. Everett Koop, 96,
died in Hanover, N.H.
Today's Birthdays: Country
singer Ralph Stanley is 87. Actress
Diane Baker is 76. Latin singer Julio
Iglesias Jr. is 41. Comedian-actress
Chelsea Handler is 39.
Thought for Today: "Open-
mindedness is not the same as
empty-mindedness. To hang out a
sign saying, 'Come right in; there is
no one at home' is not the equiva-
lent of hospitality." John Dewey,
American philosopher and educator
(1859-1952).



LEGAL NOTICES


r'in ody' itrsCut hoicl l


Bid Notices...................................C15

Lien Notices................................. C15

Notice to Creditors/

Administration..............................C15

Surplus Property..........................C15


41- CITRUS COUNTY



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community% Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
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Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3 -32 2 2
Tnrina Murphy............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429


PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


LAKE LEVELS
Location MON SUN Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.91 28.97 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.45 38.45 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.54 39.55 40.60
Tsala Apopka-RFloral City 40.21 40.22 42.20
Levels reported In leet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 233-year flood,
the mean-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In
any one year. Trhis data Is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District
and Is subject to revision. In no event will the Dlstct or t me United States Geological Survey
be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you
should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211 .
THE NATION


Louisville 42 22 .04 40 15 cd CT KY
Memphis 51 32 54 29 cd CITY HdLSKY
Milwaukee 23 10 18 -3 pc Acapulo 84V73/s
Minneapolis 14 -3 7 -9 pc Amsterdam 53/42/cd
Mobile 73 53 72 38 sh Athens 57142/cd
Montgomery 71 50 69 38 cd Beiing 48/30/s
Nashville 49 27 49 22 pc Berlin 53/3/s
Bermuda 71/60/ts
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c cloudy; rdrdizzk Cairo 69/53/s
fUfain h~has, pcpnftl cloudy, rmin; Calgary 171-111s
n=vrawk/w mixee ssiusunry h=showes; Havana 86/62/pc
sn=anow; t--thunmletmtnns w=windy. Hong Kong 69164/pc
WSl s2014 Jerusalem 71/55/s


IFLOPADA TEOPMATUMS,


wi


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1 FATHER & SONS
HEARING AID CENTERS


3 Generations of
Board Certified
Hearing Aid Specialists


IWvr
Full time
offices staffed
5 days a week
with more
combined
experience
than any other
dealer in
Citrus County.


SecureTec


Complete


protection


II "J :


reports, were 5 times more likely to develop dementia than those with normal hearing.
IHave you noticed a change in
your ability to remember?
"The more hearing loss you have, the greater the likelihood of developing dementia or Alzheimer's
disease. Hearing aids could delay or prevent dementia by improving the patient's hearing."
2011 Study byjohn Hopkins University School of
Medicine and the National Institute on Aging


ATTENTION:
All Federal Workers & Retirees


If your BC/BS card looks like this...

YOU'RE COVERED!
We're a BlueCross BlueShield Provider
Hurry Before Obamacare Starts! 4


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105 or 104 R
Enrollment code R


111 or112
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F -CUSTOM FULL SHELL
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iSS $6900
L Fixed Chip Digital Retail Price $1,390 40 DB loss
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L Fixed Chip Digital Retail Price $1,800 50 DB loss _

FREE HEARING EVALUATION
PROVIDED AS A -NO COST
COMPLIMENTARY SERVICE -NO PRESSURE
.TO OUR COMMUNITY -NO OBLIGATION


FREE Hearing Tests*
Reveals if and when you need
hearing assistance and is
recommended for everyone over 50
years old.

FREE Ear Canal Inspections*
Sometimes it's nothing more than
excessive earwax. WE use our
state-of-the-art Video Otoscope to
look inside your ear canal. You can
watch on a video monitor as
it happens.


352-860-1100
2240 W. Hwy. 44 Inverness
...... (Across from Outback)


352-564-8000
Crystal River Mall Crystal River


352-628-9909
4155 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa
(Across from The Wildlife Park)


FindA UsOnlne At wwwSfatheransonshear-ingScom


from


the inside out.


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 A5


Am-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Ghostbusters' writer,


actor Ramis dies


Associated Press

CHICAGO Comedy
actor, director and writer
Harold Ramis, best
known for his roles in
movies such as "Ghost-
busters" and "Stripes,"
died Monday at his subur-
ban Chicago home after a
four-year battle with an
autoimmune disease, his
talent agency said.
Ramis, 69, died early
Monday morning of com-
plications from vasculitis,
which causes inflamma-
tion and damage to blood
vessels, said Chris Day, a
spokesman at United Tal-
ent Agency Ramis was
surrounded by family and
friends.
Ramis was a key factor
in some of the biggest
blockbuster comedies in
the 1970s and 1980s.
He co-wrote 'Animal
House," which starred fel-
low Second City alum
John Belushi. He teamed
with Second City alums
Bill Murray and Dan
Aykroyd on "Ghost-
busters," in which Ramis
co-starred and helped
write.
He also co-wrote and di-
rected "Groundhog Day"
and "Caddyshack," and co-
wrote "Meatballs" all of
which starred Murray
"The best comedy


Associated Press
Actor and director Harold Ramis laughs Dec 12, 2009,
as he walks the Red Carpet to celebrate The Second
City's 50th anniversary in Chicago. An attorney for Ramis
said the actor died Monday morning from complications
of autoimmune inflammatory disease. He was 69.


touches something that's
timeless and universal in
people," Ramis told The
Associated Press in a 2009
story about the 50th an-
niversary of Second City
"When you hit it right,
those things last."
More recently, he di-
rected 'Analyze This,"
starring Billy Crystal and
Robert DeNiro.
Aykroyd issued a state-


ment Monday, saying he
was "deeply saddened to
hear of the passing of my
brilliant, gifted, funny
friend ... May he now get
the answers he was al-
ways seeking."
Ramis was born Nov 21,
1944, in Chicago. He is
survived by his wife, Erica
Ramis; sons Julian and
Daniel; daughter, Violet,
and two grandchildren.


Centralizing donors may aid transplants


MARILYNN
MARCHIONE
AP chief medical writer

For decades, surgeons
have traveled to far-off
hospitals to remove or-
gans from brain-dead
donors and then rushed
back to transplant them.
Now an experiment in the
Midwest suggests there
may be a better way:
Bring the donors to the
doctors instead.
A study out Tuesday re-
ports on liver transplants
from the nation's first
free-standing organ re-
trieval center Nearly all
organ donors now are
transported to Mid-Amer-
ica Transplant Services in
St. Louis from a region in-
cluding parts of Missouri,
Illinois and Arkansas.
Removing organs at this
central location near the
four hospitals that do
transplants saves money,
the study found. The liv-
ers spent less time out-
side the donor's body,
which at least in theory
improves the odds of suc-
cess. Doctors also think
they are getting more us-
able organs from each
donor, though this study
only looked at livers.
Transplant experts say
this could become a new
standard, and groups in
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh,
Denver, Chicago and Ann
Arbor, Mich., have started


Gdkas. og. 2avl
Funeral Home With Crematory
JAN KING
Service: Graveside Friday 2:00 PM
Florida National Cemetery
MARGARET LANKSTON
Mass: Thursday 10:00 AM
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church
Florida National Cemetery
STEPHEN E. GOULD
Memorial Service to be Announced
TERRY PEELMAN
Arrangements Pending
726-8323


or are exploring similar
ventures.
"It's kind of a foreign
concept so it's taken some
time for this to catch on,
but I think it will. It makes
so much sense," said Dr.
William Chapman, a
transplant surgeon at
Washington University in
St. Louis, which uses the
Mid-America center
"There's no question in
my mind" this should be
done everywhere, said Dr
Majella Doyle, also of
Washington University "It
will increase the number
of organs that are used
and it will increase effi-
ciency and decrease
costs." She led the
study, published in the
American Journal of
Transplantation.
About 28,000 trans-
plants were done in the
United States in 2012;
more than 121,000 people
are on the waiting list
now
Organs have a finite
shelf life livers, 6 to 10
hours after removal;
hearts and lungs, even
less. Kidneys last about a
day
Transplants are not
done at every hospital -
only a few in any major
city have that capability
Surgeons usually travel to
wherever the donor is to
retrieve organs, perform-
ing these hurried, com-
plex operations in


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800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

^ Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!



I B t> '. '
Brown



5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
SLecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
rbif 0 e l 352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
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unfamiliar settings, often
assisted by staffs at hospi-
tals that don't have trans-
plant expertise.
Donors provide three
organs on average, but
can give six or more. Each
specialist lung, heart,
kidney wants to test
and inspect an organ to
ensure viability before
committing to the trans-
plant. Sometimes multi-
ple doctors make the trip
to retrieve organs, or
there is redundant testing
and inspection when an
organ that's been re-
moved by one doctor gets
to another hospital where
it will be transplanted.
Mid-America, the re-
gion's organ procurement
organization, thought that
having a retrieval center
- a commercial building
with two operating rooms
and testing equipment -
near the four St. Louis
hospitals that do trans-
plants would improve co-
ordination. In 2001, the
first year it was open, it
handled 36 percent of
liver donations in the re-
gion. By 2011, it was up to
93 percent.
Donor families have not
balked at sending their
loved ones' bodies out of
town.


Obituaries


Nancy
Clark, 76
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nancy J. Clarke, 76, of
Crystal River, Fla., died
Feb. 23, 2014, under the
care of Hospice of Citrus
County in Lecanto.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service LLC,
Hernando.




Stephen
Gould, 61
INVERNESS
Stephen E. Gould, 61, In-
verness, Fla., died Feb. 22,
2014, under the loving care
of his significant other,
Janet, her
family,
fri ends
and Hos-
pice of
Citrus
County.
Stephen
was born
Dec. 18, Stephen
1952, in Gould
New York
City to the late Thomas
and Magdalene Gould.
Stephen served our coun-
try in the U.S. Navy during
the Vietnam War He was a
certified nurse's aide,
working in various nursing
homes. Stephen enjoyed
gardening, photography
and reading.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his significant other
of 14 years, Janet Gra-
mann; his brothers,
Thomas (Eleanor) Gould,
New York, and Dennis
(Doreen) Gould, Maryland;
nieces and nephews, Ellie
(Terry), Tom (Barbara),
Tim (Elizabeth), Michael
(Laurie), Matthew, Evelyn,
Elissa, Melissa; great-
nieces and nephews,
Joshua, Julia, Rebecca,
Thomas, Teagon, Lana and
Donald; and Janet's family,
Dot, Dick, Chris, Shellie
and Emily Cornell, all of
Florida. He was preceded
in death by one brother,
Michael.
A Mass of Christian Bur-
ial will be celebrated at
10 a.m. Saturday, March 29,
2014, at Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church. Me-
morial donations may be
made to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in
lieu of flowers. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with arrangements.
There will be no calling
hours at the funeral home.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

0 Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Lorraine 'Ina'
Wood, 74
HOMOSASSA
Mrs. Lorraine "Ina" L.
(Lasher-McMickle) Wood,
age 74 of Homosassa,
Florida, died Monday,
February 24, 2014 in
Lecanto, FL. She was born
March 14, 1939 in New
Paltz, NY, daughter of the
late Evelyn (Ayers) and
Charles H. Ellis, Jr. She
was a registered nurse and
was employed by Kingston
Hospital, Kingston, NY
While working there she
was employed as staff
nurse, head nurse and su-
pervisor during her 17
year career She then
worked with the Ulster
County Health Depart-
ment until moving to
Florida in 1990. She began
working in the home
health field and retired
from Leesburg Regional
Medical Center in 2000.
She cared for relatives and
friends, always ready to
offer a helping hand to a
friend in need. Mrs. Wood
was a member of Moose
Lodge #1434, Crystal
River, West Citrus Elks
Lodge #2693, Fraternal
Order of Eagles, Ladies
Auxiliary #4272, lifetime
member of Ladies Auxil-
iary to the Veterans of For-
eign Wars #8189, Crystal
River, American Legion
#0155, Crystal River and
the First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa.
Mrs. Wood was preceded
in death by husband,
Robert "Louis" Wood
(2004), son, Robert "Rob-
bie" Alan Lasher Jr (1982)
and a brother, Irving A.
Ellis. Survivors include a
son, Michael Scott Lasher
of Homosassa, 3 grand-
daughters, Sharon Lee (Ar-
naldo) Bermudez of
Saugerties, NY, Kristin Lee
Wilhelm of Hurley, NY and
Jessica Lasher of Pough-
keepsie, NY, 2 great grand-
children, Robert "Robbie"
Auchmoody and Macken-
zie Dockery, 3 sisters, Joyce
(John) May of Wallkill, NY,
Marilyn (Donald) Birch of
Lyman, WY and Beverly
Jan Ellis of Crystal River,
loving companion, John
McMickle and many nieces
and nephews.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
are by the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory


Armida
Cohen, 83
BEVERLY HILLS
Armida M. Cohen, 83 of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, at
Citrus Memorial hospital.
Private arrangements pro-
vided by Cremation Center
of the Nature Coast, Crys-
tal River




George
Rowlinson, 80
CORRYTON, TENN.
George David Rowlin-
son, 80, of Corryton, Tenn.,
passed away Sunday,
Feb. 16, 2014, at Beverly
Park Nursing Home. He
was born in Monnette,
Ohio, and graduated from
Bucyrus High School. He
was a Navy veteran of the
Korean War and a member
of Central Baptist Church
of Fountain City
He was preceded in
death by parents, Oscar
and Ferryl Howard Rowl-
inson; stepson, Ray John-
son, and stepdaughter,
Erin Castillo. He is sur-
vived by his wife of 30
years, Sally Rowlinson;
sister, Loree Levitz of Or-
ange Park; sons, David
Rowlinson of Orange Park,
and Steve Rowlinson of
Jacksonville; daughter,
Debra Fisher of Freder-
icktown, Ohio; stepchil-
dren, Pam Burnham and
Richard Johnson both of
Tampa, and Cheryl Sheri-
dan of Powell, Tenn.; also
two aunts in Ohio; 19
grand- and step-grandchil-
dren; 13 great- and step-
great-grandchildren.
Inurnment will be at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday at
East Tennessee Veterans
Cemetery, Knoxville,
Tenn., with Pastors Mike
Smith and Jeff Cocherham
officiating. Military honors
by Volunteer State Honor
Guard. In lieu of flowers,
memorials may be made to
Central Baptist Church of
Fountain City, Ministry
Center Arrangements by
Mynatt Funeral Home,
Knoxville, Tenn., Fountain
City Chapel. wwwmynatt
fh.com.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197

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A6 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


DUI arrests
Luis Reyes, 23, of Tuttle
Street, Inverness, at 2:46 a.m.
Feb. 22 on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under the in-
fluence. According to his arrest
affidavit, Reyes reportedly
drove his vehicle into a ditch in
the McDonalds parking lot in
Inverness. Deputies observed
a partially opened 12 pack of
Budweiser beer on the pas-
senger side floorboard. He was
asked to perform field sobriety
tests and refused. Reyes also
refused Breathalyzer testing.
Bond $500.
Donald Marshall, 52, of
South Lincoln Avenue, Beverly
Hills, at 2:13 p.m. Feb. 21 on a
misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, Marshall
was stopped for failing maintain
a single lane of traffic then run-
ning the light at the intersection
of Meadowcrest Boulevard and
State Road 44. He was asked
to perform field sobriety tests
and did poorly. Tests of his
breath showed his blood alco-
hol concentration was 0.0 per-
cent and 0.0 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. He refused
to provide a requested urine
sample. Bond $500.
Paul Rode, 62, of West
Bromin Court, Dunnellon, at
6:07 p.m. Feb. 22 on misde-
meanor charges of driving
under the influence with dam-
age to property, and DUI. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
Rode was involved in a traffic
accident where he struck a
2009 Kia SUV at the intersec-
tion of West Charlynn Lane and
North Citrus Avenue in Crystal
River. He was asked to perform
field sobriety tests and did
poorly. Tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.171 percent
and 0.168 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. Bond
$1,000.
Larry Swingle, 61, of
North McGee Drive, Hemrnando,
at 10:33 p.m. Feb. 22 on a mis-
demeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, Swingle re-
portedly crossed the center line
while driving on State Road
200, causing a deputy to have
to turn onto to the shoulder of
the road to avoid being hit by his
vehicle. He was asked to per-
form field sobriety tests and did


poorly. Swingle refused Breath-
alyzer testing. Bond $500.
John Croote, 72, of East
Forest Trail Drive, Hemrnando, at
3:29 p.m. Feb. 23 on a misde-
meanor charge of driving under
the influence. According to his
arrest affidavit, Croote was
stopped by the Florida High-
way Patrol for failing to main-
tain a single lane of traffic near
Stokes Ferry Road. According
to the report, the Citrus County
sheriff's officials were on
scene and had received nu-
merous reports of Croote's er-
ratic driving while he was
traveling through Marion
County on State Road 200. He
was asked to perform field so-
briety tests and did poorly.
Tests of his breath showed his
blood alcohol concentration
was 0.194 percent and
0.188 percent. Bond $500.
Domestic battery
arrests
James Nadeau, 45, of In-
verness, at 12:15 p.m. Feb. 21
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery.
Kevin Coyle, 24, of Inver-
ness, at 4:09 p.m. Feb. 21 on a
misdemeanor charge of do-
mestic battery.
Austin Vanfleet, 36, of
Brandon at 7:15 a.m. Feb. 22
on an active warrant for violat-
ing an injunction for protection
against domestic violence.
Richard Fortune, 43, of
Hernando, at 6:03 p.m. Feb. 22
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery and a misde-
meanor charge of resisting an
officer without violence.
Melvin Mathers, 44, of In-
verness, at 10:34 p.m. Feb. 22
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery.
Jade Nelson, 20, of In-
verness, at 11:42 p.m. Feb. 22


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on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery.
Daniel Lynds, 27, of St.
Petersburg, at 1:55 a.m.
Feb. 23 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. He
was also charged with know-
ingly driving while his license
was suspended or revoked.
William Wolfe, 50, of
Beverly Hills, at 3:10 a.m.
Feb. 22 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery.
Other arrests
Birdie O'Brien, 37, of
North Bloom Point, Crystal
River, at 12:54 p.m. Feb. 21 on
a misdemeanor charge of drug
paraphernalia. According to her
arrest affidavit, deputies were
responding to a home sus-
pected of illegally diverting
power. Upon arrival O'Brien
was reportedly seen running
into the woods where she was
later found by deputies. Three
methamphetamine pipes, two
plastic baggies, a small plastic
baggie containing two blue pills
(later identified as morphine
sulfate), two straws and a digi-
tal scale were found in her pos-
session. Bond $500.
Lloyd Slaughter, 40, of
West Cinnamon Drive,
Lecanto, at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 21
on an active Sumter County
warrant for felony violation of
probation as a sex offender.
Jamie Steffon, 22, of


North Andri Drive, Crystal
River, at 6:40 p.m. Feb. 21 on a
misdemeanor charge of pos-
session of cannabis. According
to his arrest affidavit, Steffon
was stopped for failing to come
to a complete stop at a stop
sign in Crystal River. He report-
edly consented to a search of
his vehicle and a small amount
of marijuana was found on his
person and in his vehicle. He
was released on his own
recognizance.
Kristine Weinel, 49, of
South Wadsworth Avenue,
Beverly Hills, at 9:40 p.m.
Feb. 21 on an active warrant
for sale of a controlled sub-
stance and conspiracy to com-
mit sale of a controlled
substance. Bond $15,000.
Ashley Smith, 24, of Tut-
tle Street, Inverness, at
10:29 p.m. Feb. 21 on an active
warrant for felony charges of
trafficking in stolen property
and grand theft, along with
felony violation of probation.
According to her arrest affidavit,
Smith called deputies to come
to her home so that she could
turn herself in.
Gregory Bassett, 28, of
South Live Oak Drive, Floral
City, at 11:32 a.m. Feb. 22 on a
felony charge of criminal mis-
chief. According to his arrest af-
fidavit, Bassett is accused of
removing a family member's
lawnmower from a shed, jump-


OOOH2PY


starting it and later abandoning
it in the woods about a half mile
away. The mower, valued at
$1,154, was found the follow-
ing morning burned and to-
taled. Bond $1,000.
Joseph Ferguson, 27, of
West Abers Court, Crystal
River, at 4:47 a.m. Feb. 22 on a
felony charge of knowingly driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked with prior convictions.
He was stopped when a
deputy recognized him behind
the wheel and was aware that
he did not have a current dri-
ver's license. According to his
arrest affidavit, Ferguson had
two prior convictions for driving
with a suspended license, one
in January of 2011, and the
other in July of 2013. Bond
$2,000.
Brandon Maner, 32, of
Tampa, at 12:56 a.m. Feb. 23
on a felony charge of battery
Bond $500.
Theresa Hanson, 56, of
Homosassa, at 1:35 p.m.
Feb. 23 on a misdemeanor
charge of trespassing after
warning. According to her ar-
rest affidavit, Hanson had been
previously trespassed from the
Homosassa Winn-Dixie on
Feb. 17, and re-entered the
store on Feb 23. Bond $500.
Jack Purcell, 37, at
2:43 p.m. Feb. 23 on an active
warrant for violation of parole


ON THE NET
For the Record reports
are archived at www.
chronicleonline.com.

stemming from an original
charge of sex with a minor over
the age of 16. According to his
arrest affidavit, Purcell cut off
his court-ordered ankle GPS
monitoring device on U.S. 19 in
Hudson on Feb. 20. Deputies
from the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office received a tip on his
whereabouts and saw Purcell
enter a white van parked at a
Dunnellon residence on River-
bend Road. He was then
stopped and taken into custody
at gunpoint. Bond was denied.
Joseph Seaman, 40, of
East Gobbler Court, Floral City,
at 4:02 p.m. Feb. 23 on an ac-
tive warrant for felony violation
of probation stemming from the
original charge of two counts of
possession of a controlled
substance.
Angela Kipper, 39, of
South FaradayAvenue, Peoria,
IIl., at 11:10 p.m. Feb. 23 on an
active warrant for felony viola-
tion of probation stemming
from the original charge of writ-
ing a worthless check. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit, Kipper
turned herself in to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. Bond
$750.


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Lecanto
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Crystal River
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Homosassa
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Hooper Funeral Homes
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Citrus County
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3700 W Sovereign Path
Lecanto

Medical Appointments
352-527-0247

Dental Appointments
352-249-9258

HEARING EXAMS/AIDS
Beltone Hearing
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Inverness
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Lecanto
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Crystal River
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HOME HEALTH SERVICES
Comfort Keepers
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HOSPICE
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Inverness
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INDEPENDENT LIVING
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Inverness
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MEDICAL ALERTS
Nature Coast EMS
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Lecanto
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MEDICAL RESEARCH
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: Ak m


LOCAL


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 A7


I^TT:mz





A8 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


HAGEL
Continued from PageAl

said, "We are entering an
era where American domi-
nance on the seas, in the
skies and in space can no
longer be taken for granted."
However, budget con-
straints demand that
spending be managed dif-
ferently from the past,
with an eye to cutting costs
across a wide front, in-
cluding in areas certain to
draw opposition in the
Congress, he said.
He proposed, for exam-
ple, a variety of changes in
military compensation, in-
cluding smaller pay raises,
a slowdown in the growth of
tax-free housing allowances
and a requirement that re-
tirees and some families of
active-duty service mem-
bers pay a little more in
health insurance de-
ductibles and co-pays.
"Although these recom-
mendations do not cut any-
one's pay, I realize they
will be controversial,"
Hagel said, adding that the
nation cannot afford the
escalating cost of military
pay and benefit packages
that were enacted during
the war years.
"If we continue on the
current course without
making these modest ad-
justments now, the choices
will only grow more diffi-
cult and painful down the
road," he said.
Although Congress has
agreed on an overall num-
ber for the military budget
in fiscal 2015 just under
$500 billion there are
still major decisions to be
made on how that money
should be spent to best
protect the nation.
Early reaction from Re-
publicans in Congress was
negative.
"I am concerned that we
are on a path to repeat the
mistakes we've made dur-
ing past attempts to cash in
on expected peace divi-
dends that never material-
ized," said Sen. Marco
Rubio of Florida.
"What we're trying to do
is solve our financial prob-
lems on the backs of our
military, and that can't be
done," said Rep. Howard
"Buck" McKeon of Califor-
nia, chairman of the
House Armed Services


CMH
Continued from PageAl

the Beaty replacement to
Blasband or hospital Chief
Operating Officer Mark
Williams but was rebuffed.
She said trustees were
quick to say the settlement
agreement, which both
sides signed, stated the
new CEO would have no
ties to Citrus Memorial.
That's still a sore point
to foundation members.
"We signed the agree-
ment because we didn't
have any choice," Chad-
wick said.
The board voted 7-1 to
hire Ralph Aleman of
Miami Beach, the former
CEO of Hialeah Hospital,
who will take over for


FDLE
Continued from Page Al

of the Tampa Bay regional
office.
"They just wanted to sit
down and talk," county
spokeswoman Tobey
Phillips said of the agents'
meeting with Thorpe.
Adams has regularly ex-
changed emails with Sans,
who told him in a Feb.14
email that his allegations
in the AmeriGas case did
not rise to a criminal
investigation.
Adams' responded by
asking Sans to come to Cit-
rus County to retrieve the
documents.


"I don't know how there
is no evidence on the
Amerigas issue sense (sic)
you have not lifted one fin-
ger to review county files,"
he wrote.
The AmeriGas issue is
on today's county commis-
sion agenda but for a dif-
ferent reason. The county
plans to swap the Ameri-
Gas property with the city
of Inverness for property
near the Inverness
Airport.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
(@chronicleonline. corn.


CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Committee.
Another proposal likely
to draw fire on Capitol Hill
is Hagel's call for a new
round of domestic military
base closings in 2017. In
the years following the last
round, in 2005, members of
Congress fought to protect
bases in their home dis-
tricts and states, arguing
that the process does not
yield as much savings as
advertised.
Among other changes
Hagel proposed:
The active-duty Army
would shrink from today's
522,000 soldiers to be-
tween 440,000 and 450,000
- the smallest number
since 1940 when the nation
was gearing up to enter
World War II. The Army
currently is scheduled to
be reduced to 490,000.
The Army's post-World
War II low was 480,000 in
2001, according to figures
provided by the service. In
1940 the Army had just
267,000 active-duty mem-
bers, but that number
surged to 1.46 million the
following year as America
prepared for war in Eu-
rope and the Pacific.
The Army National
Guard would drop from
355,000 soldiers to 335,000
by 2017, and the Army Re-
serve would drop by
10,000, to 195,000. The Na-
tional Guard also would
send its Apache attack hel-
icopters to the active-duty
Army in exchange for
Black Hawk helicopters
more suitable for domestic
disaster relief missions.
The Marine Corps
would shrink from 190,000
to 182,000.
The Navy would keep
its 11 aircraft carriers but
"lay up," or temporarily
remove from active serv-
ice, 11 of its 22 cruisers
while they are modern-
ized. The Navy would re-
duce from 52 to 32 its
purchase of littoral com-
bat ships, which are
smaller vessels designed
to operate closer to shore.
The Air Force would
retire its fleet of A-10
"Warthog" tank-killer
planes for an estimated
savings of $3.5 billion over
five years. It also would re-
tire the venerable U-2 spy
plane, which debuted early
in the Cold War as a stal-
wart of U.S. intelligence.
Hagel built his case on

Beaty on
March 18.




B' o agee rto
Board
member
Dr Carlton
Fairbanks
voted e
against hir-
ing Ale- Ryan Beaty
man, only t ea
on his be- agreed to
lef ta $2 leave CEO
lief that position to
the hospi- settle lawsuits.
tal board
forced the Beaty resigna-
tion. The agreement led to
the CCHB paying the hos-
pital $2 million at signing of
a letter of intent with HCA.
"The CCHB has held a
financial gun to our heads
to do this," Fairbanks said.
The foundation will pay
Aleman $20,000 a month
until Hospital Corporation
of America starts its lease


what he called a founda-
tion of realism. He quoted
one of his predecessors,
the World War II-era sec-
retary of war, Henry Stim-
son, as saying Americans
must "act in the world as it
is, and not in the world as
we wish it were."
"This is a time for real-
ity," Hagel said. He em-
phasized that the period of
explosive growth in de-
fense budgets was over,
making it more important
to preserve a technologi-
cal edge as other nations
modernize their mili-
taries. He made no direct
mention of China or Rus-
sia, but both are investing
heavily in their military
capabilities.
"Budget reductions in-
evitably reduce the mili-
tary's margin of error in
dealing with these risks,"
Hagel said, adding that a
smaller U.S. force "strains
our ability to simultane-
ously respond" to multiple
global crises.
He and Gen. Martin
Dempsey, the Joint Chiefs
chairman who appeared
with him, both argued
strongly against a return to
the across-the-board con-
gressional budget cuts
known as sequestration
that were partially sus-
pended for the 2014 and
2015 budgets. Hagel
likened a return to such
cuts to "gambling with our
military" Dempsey, too,
said those deeper reduc-
tions would have exceed-
ingly harmful effects on
the entire military
"We're all willing to take
risks," Dempsey said.
"None of us are willing to
gamble."
Under a congressional
deal passed two months
ago, the Pentagon's 2015
budget would be set at
$496 billion -the same as
in 2014. But Hagel said
Obama's overall budget
proposal also will include
a government-wide "Op-
portunity, Growth and Se-
curity Initiative" that
would provide the Penta-
gon with an additional and
separate $26 billion as-
suming there will be no re-
turn to sequestration. He
said the new money would
be used for increased
training and other par-
tially neglected activities
central to making the mili-
tary ready for combat.

with the
hospital,
which is
expected
to occur no
later than
Sept. 30.
By con-
Ralph t r a c t,
Aleman Beaty will
will serve as receive
CEO until two years'
lease signed, severance
of $711,984,
plus a $37,500 bonus for
meeting specific financial
goals for the current year
Board attorney Clark Still-
well said the hospital has a
bonus plan for all mem-
bers of the senior manage-
ment team.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. corn.


Associated Press
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel briefs reporters Monday at the Pentagon, where he
recommended shrinking the Army to its smallest size since the buildup to U.S.
involvement in World War II.


'"CITRUS COUNTY
) Chamber of Commerce


.. Inverness


- Tuesday, February 25

Chamber Grand

SOpening Celebration



4:30 Chamber Ribbon Cutting
106 West Main Street


5:00 Fox Den Winery Ribbon Cutting
109 West Main Street
S& stick around for the toast


FIer
First House Wine or Beer I
FREE for Chamber Members


Retirement Living


.You deserve a break without giving
I l up your independence.



e\\ * FullKitchens
..,xs Washer & Dryer in Each Apartment
,.- Unique All Day Dining in our
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Offering an unparalleled array of amenities. ,

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NATION/LOCAL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,880 .............................- S& P 500
.-, Close: 1,847.61
#- rChange: 11.36 (0.6%)
1,760 10 DAYS .........


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com

......Dow Jones industrials
-,:* .^Close: 16,207.14
15 70 D Change: 103.84 (0.6%)
15,720" 10 DAYS ****


1,8 50 ......................................... 17 0 0 0 ....................................... .........................
1,800 ............ 1 6 50........ 16,.....................................
1,750 16000 ..............
1,700 ................... .. 15500......
1,650...... .. 15000... ..................
1S60 0 "AXN";. .... .. .. D0... . N.. . .. .. ... .. D S.. ... 1 4 5 0 0 . . ....N0J... ... 1N... .. "D ... .. F.. ..


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,648
3,333
1911
1201
254
16


NASD
2,101
2,077
1677
918
228
9


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16300.04
7414.53
528.03
10426.94
4311.12
1858.71
1371.76
19924.40
1180.29


LOW
16102.27
7309.42
521.94
10321.58
4272.11
1836.78
1357.20
19689.26
1166.74


CLOSE
16207.14
7340.57
522.05
10369.52
4292.97
1847.61
1363.29
19812.58
1174.55


CHG.
+103.84
+31.97
-1.42
+62.62
+29.56
+11.36
+6.73
+123.32
+9.92


%CHG.
+0.64%
+0.44%
-0.27%
+0.61%
+0.69%
+0.62%
+0.50%
+0.63%
+0.85%


YTD
-2.23%
-0.81%
+6.42%
-0.30%
+2.79%
-0.04%
+1.55%
+0.54%
+0.94%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 --- 8.47 6.33 -.03 -0.5 V A V -22.8 +63.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 -0-- 39.00 32.47 -.33 -1.0 V V V -7.7 -2.3 10 1.84f
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -0- 62.05 52.86 +.51 +1.0 A A A +0.4 +26.8 25 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 106.83 103.15 +1.67 +1.6 A A V -3.1 +13.0 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 10.98 17.42 16.53 +.24 +1.5 A A A +6.2 +42.9 16 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 13.90 13.25 +.32 +2.5 A A A +12.6 +14.8 38
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 -0-- 38.40 31.19 +.10 +0.3 A A V -2.1 -3.0 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 40.28 -0- 55.28 48.98 +.72 +1.5 A A 7 -6.0 +14.0 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.78 0 27.57 26.59 -.37 -1.4 V A A +14.1 +58.2 28 1.00
Disney DIS 53.59 0 80.45 80.73 +.60 +0.7 A A A +5.7 +49.5 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 --- 75.46 71.11 -.38 -0.5 V A A +3.0 +8.4 19 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.67 -0-- 61.18 51.42 +.10 +0.2 A A A +4.6 +16.0 21 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 --- 101.74 96.44 +1.41 +1.5 A A 7 -4.7 +10.1 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.10 -0- 18.02 15.18 +.02 +0.1 A 7 7 -1.6 +25.8 12 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 21.11 -0- 28.09 25.29 +.35 +1.4 A A 7 -9.8 +10.7 17 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 34.90 0 51.76 50.37 +.36 +0.7 A A A +5.6 +39.7 15
Home Depot HD 63.82 -- 82.57 77.87 +.13 +0.2 A 7 7 -5.4 +23.2 21 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 20.23 --- 27.12 24.63 +.21 +0.9 A 7 7 -5.1 +25.0 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0-- 215.90 183.45 +.66 +0.4 A A 7 -2.2 -5.9 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 --- 34.32 29.51 -.01 ... A V -10.3 +34.2 30
Lowes Cos LOW 35.86 -- 52.08 47.22 +.16 +0.3 A 7 7 -4.7 +26.8 22 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 -0-- 103.70 96.50 +.05 +0.1 A A 7 -0.5 +5.8 17 3.24
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 27.33 38.98 37.69 -.29 -0.8 V A A +0.7 +41.9 14 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 67.69 64.96 -.06 -0.1 7 A 7 -3.8 +8.7 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 71.42 0 94.04 91.78 -.78 -0.8 V A A +7.2 +31.3 22 2.90f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 0- 22.98 5.23 -.41 -7.3 V 7 7 -42.8 -73.8 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 --- 21.09 17.03 -.22 -1.3 V A A +3.1 -7.5 31 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 7.42 11.08 10.44 +.20 +2.0 A A A +5.6 +36.2 13 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 32.85 --- 67.50 38.05 -2.88 -7.0 V 7 7 -22.4 -13.6 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -- 114.72 98.70 +.76 +0.8 A A 7 -4.7 +9.0 18 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 33.56 0 44.82 44.45 +.30 +0.7 A A A +1.2 +39.5 25 1.20
Time Warner TWX 51.62 --0- 70.77 65.01 +.28 +0.4 A A 7 -6.8 +25.2 17 1.27f
UniFirst Corp UNF 82.53 -- 117.91 108.10 -7.90 -6.8 V 7 A +1.0 +38.3 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 -0-- 54.31 46.23 -1.04 -2.2 V 7 7 -5.9 +9.4 12 2.12
WalMartStrs WMT 70.44 --- 81.37 73.35 +.23 +0.3 A 7 7 -6.8 +6.7 15 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 39.74 0 67.24 66.52 +.20 +0.3 A A A +15.8 +62.3 23 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a -Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates

if'



The yield on the
10-year
Treasury was
2.74 percent
Monday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.

PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MOAGO 3.25 .13
1YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
Crude oil rose for
the first time in
three days, and
gold reached its
highest settle-
ment price since
October. Natural
gas tumbled as
traders recali-
brated their ex-
pectations for
demand.




QD
CE-i


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .04 0.04 ... .12
6-month T-bill .07 0.08 -0.01 .13
52-wk T-bill .10 0.10 ... .15
2-year T-note .32 0.32 ... .25
5-year T-note 1.55 1.54 +0.01 .83
10-year T-note 2.74 2.73 +0.01 1.96
30-year T-bond 3.70 3.69 +0.01 3.15


NET 1YR
YEST PVS CHG AGO


BONDS


Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.51 3.49 +0.02 2.87
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.86 4.86 ... 4.06
Barclays USAggregate 2.33 2.36 -0.03 1.91
Barclays US High Yield 5.32 5.37 -0.05 5.91
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.44 4.52 -0.08 3.91
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.78 1.77 +0.01 1.11
Barclays US Corp 3.07 3.09 -0.02 2.80


FUELS CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD
Crude Oil (bbl) 102.82 102.20 +0.61 +4.5
Ethanol (gal) 2.14 2.07 ... +12.0
Heating Oil (gal) 3.09 3.10 -0.39 +0.3
Natural Gas (mm btu) 5.45 6.14 -11.25 +28.7
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.83 2.83 +0.01 +1.7
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD
Gold (oz) 1338.30 1323.90 +1.09 +11.4
Silver (oz) 22.05 21.78 +1.24 +14.0
Platinum (oz) 1441.40 1427.90 +0.95 +5.1
Copper (Ib) 3.36 3.34 +0.69 -2.4
Palladium (oz) 742.90 739.80 +0.42 +3.6


AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.45
Coffee (Ib) 1.76
Corn (bu) 4.51
Cotton (Ib) 0.88
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 365.30
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.46
Soybeans (bu) 13.87
Wheat (bu) 6.18


PVS. %CHG %YTD
1.45 +0.42 +7.9
1.69 +4.18 +58.6
4.53 -0.33 +7.0
0.87 +0.95 +3.9
363.60 +0.47 +1.4
1.47 -0.14 +7.3
13.71 +1.15 +5.6
6.10 +1.31 +2.1


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.41 +.10 0.0 +16.8 +11.8 +17.0
CaplncBuA m 58.84 +.18 +0.5 +12.1 +9.6 +14.1
CpWldGrlA m 45.88 +.17 +1.2 +21.5 +11.1 +18.3
EurPacGrA m 49.27 +.18 +0.4 +17.6 +7.2 +16.7
FnlnvA m 51.84 +32 -0.3 +24.4 +13.1 +20.9
GrthAmA m 44.10 +35 +2.6 +30.7 +15.0 +21.1
IncAmerA m 20.92 +.07 +1.3 +15.6 +11.2 +17.3
InvCoAmA m 37.08 +.22 +1.0 +27.1 +13.8 +19.5
NewPerspA m 37.85 +.22 +0.8 +22.5 +11.8 +20.1
WAMutlnvA m 39.40 +.24 -0.1 +25.1 +15.3 +20.4
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 43.48 +.27 +1.0 +23.6 +8.6 +22.0
Stock 169.13 +1.41 +0.2 +30.8+16.2 +24.0
Fidelity Contra 97.55 +.77 +2.5 +30.9 +15.8 +21.6
LowPriStk d 49.36 +.37 -0.2 +27.1 +15.5 +24.5
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 65.66 +.40 +0.3 +24.4 +14.7 +21.6
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.49 +.01 +2.4 +13.7 +9.0 +17.5
IncomeA m 2.47 +.01 +2.9 +14.4 +9.6 +18.1
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 12.94 +.06 -0.9 +0.1 +4.6 +10.2
Harbor Intllnstl 71.33 +.55 +0.5 +14.3 +7.4 +19.3
Oakmark Intl 1 26.72 +.13 +1.5 +23.5 +11.8 +26.2
T Rowe Price Egtylnc 32.61 +.17 -0.7 +20.5 +12.9 +21.8
GrowStk 54.02 +.41 +2.8 +37.1 +17.6 +23.9
Vanguard 500Adml 170.82 +1.05 +0.3 +24.4+14.7 +21.6
5001lnv 170.80 +1.05 +0.3 +24.3+14.5 +21.5
MulntAdml 13.95 ... +2.2 +0.2 +5.1 +4.9
PrmcpAdml 100.03 +.44 +4.5 +35.4 +17.0 +22.7
STGradeAd 10.74 ... +0.7 +1.5 +2.6 +5.1
Tgtet2025 15.89 +.07 +0.9 +14.9 +9.5 +16.6
TotBdAdml 10.68 -.01 +1.5 -0.1 +3.7 +4.8
Totlntl 16.76 +.11 +0.1 +12.4 +4.7 +16.6
TotStlAdm 47.06 +30 +0.8 +25.9 +15.0 +22.6
TotStldx 47.04 +30 +0.8 +25.8 +14.9 +22.5
Welltn 38.21 +.12 +0.7 +15.5 +11.0 +16.0
WelltnAdm 66.00 +.20 +0.7 +15.6 +11.1 +16.1
WndsllAdm 65.37 +.48 +0.2 +23.6 +14.6 +21.4
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Standard & Poor's 500 in-
dex rose Monday to within a
point of its record high, which
was set nearly six weeks ago.
Stocks in the energy and finan-
cial sectors led the way, and
three out of every four compa-
nies in the index rose.


Chesapeake Energy CHK
Close:$27.29 A0.72 or 2.7%
The energy company is considering
the sale or possible spin off of its oil-
field services unit to maximize
shareholder value.



4 D d F
52-week range
$18.21 $29.06
Vol.:11.7m (1.3x avg.) PE: 14.5
Mkt. Cap:$18.15 b Yield: 1.3%
Darden Restaurants DRI
Close:$51.01 unchanged or 0%
An activist investor is pushing for a
special meeting on the restaurant
operator's plan to spin off its strug-
gling Red Lobster chain.



'-I
D J F
52-week range
$44.78 $55.25
Vol.:1.3m (0.8x avg.) PE:18.8
Mkt. Cap:$6.7 b Yield: 4.3%
Pfizer PFE
Close:$31.99A0.53 or 1.7%
The drugmaker's Prevanar 13 pneu-
monia vaccine met primary and sec-
ondary goals in a study involving
85,000 patients aged 65 and up.
$32


S D J F
52-week range
$26.82 $32.50
Vol.:38.8m (1.5x avg.) PE: 19.4
Mkt. Cap: $207.33 b Yield: 3.3%
Marriott MAR
Close:$53.47A0.96 or 1.8%
Raymond James is telling investors
not to fear the hotel's rocketing
share price, pointing to global de-
mand in the hospitality sector.



4' D J F
52-week range
$38.17 $53.97
Vol.:3.1m (1.4x avg.) PE:26.7
Mkt. Cap: $16.02 b Yield: 1.3%
Jos. A Bank Clothiers JOSB
Close:$60.04A4.99 or 9.1%
Rival Men's Wearhouse is stepping
up its pursuit of the retailer, boosting
its takeover offer by 10 percent to
$1.78 billion.




D J F
52-week range
$38.36 $60.14
Vol.: 5.4m (6.5x avg.) PE: 26.1
Mkt. Cap:$1.68 b Yield:...


StocksRecap


Stocks end higher but



fall short of record high

Associated Press Monday's focus was on an- market watchers say
other round of corporate "It shows that compa-
NEW YORK The deal making, nies still see value in this
stock market ended higher Chipmaker RF Micro market, even at these
Monday, but a late fade Devices jumped $1.22, or highs," said Quincy
kept it from closing at an 21 percent, to $7.03 after it Krosby, a market strategist
all-time high. said would buy a competi- at Prudential Financial.
The market marched tor, TriQuint Semiconduc- In the last two-and-a-
broadly higher most of the tor, in an all-stock deal half weeks, the stock mar-
day, helped by optimism valued at about $1.56 bil- ket has basically erased of
about the economy and lion. TriQuint soared the losses it experienced
more corporate mergers, $2.41, or 26 percent, to after a difficult start to the
onlyto slowly lose momen- $11.64. year
turn in the final half hour Meanwhile, men's cloth- The S&P 500 index was
of trading, ing chain Jos. A. Bank rose down as much 6 percent
The Standard & Poor's $4.99, or 9 percent, to for the year as of Feb. 3 as
500 index ended up 11.36 $60.04 after competitor investors worried about
points, or 0.6 percent, to Men's Wearhouse in- emerging markets like
1,847.61-just short of its creased its buyout offer China and Turkey The
record close of 1,848.38 set Men's Wearhouse rose U.S. economic recovery
on Jan. 15. The momentum $3.40, or 8 percent, $48.51. was also showing signs of
helped the index set a new M&A has taken off this slowing growth.
intraday high of 1,858.76 year Last week, Forest But the U.S. stock mar-
earlier in the day, however Laboratories and Actavis ket has recovered as tur-
The Dow Jones indus- announced a $25 billion bulence in overseas
trial average rose 103.84 merger and Facebook said markets calms down.
points, or 0.6 percent, to it was buying WhatsApp In the latest develop-
16,207.14 and the Nasdaq for $19 billion. That's on ment in overseas markets,
composite rose 29.56 top of deals or offers an- the chaos in Ukraine came
points, or 0.7 percent, to nounced this week. to an abrupt halt over the
4,292.97. Companies buying com- weekend following the
Investors had little in petitors, or buying up a ouster of President Viktor
the way of economic data company whose product in- Yanulovych. Investors had
or corporate earnings to terests them, should be been worried about the es-
work through, so much of seen as a positive for stocks, calating violence.


SBusiness HIGHLIGHTS

Netflix reaches Men's Wearhouse younger man but they offer
deal with Comcast lifts takeover bid similar types of clothing: suits
and sport coats. As competi-
NEW YORK Netflix has for Jos A Bank tion has increased in the sec-
reached a deal with Comcast to NEW YORK Will they or tor and shoppers cut back
ensure that its TV shows and won't they? due to the uncertain economy,
movies are streamed smoothly Shares of Men's Wear- analysts have said a merger
to households, the first deal the house and Jos. A. Bank is in the best interest of both
online video streaming service jumped on Monday after companies. But agreement on
has reached with an internet Men's Wearhouse said it was terms has proved difficult.
service provider, boosting its takeover offer yet They have been attempting a
The two companies said in again spurring hopes that combination since October.
a joint statement Sunday the months-long saga might Men's Wearhouse Inc. said
there establishing a more di- finally be coming to an end. Monday it's now offering
rect connection to provide a $63.50 per share for Jos. A.
better service to customers Men's Wearhouse raised its Bank, up from its prior bid of
that will also allow for future takeover offer for its rival by $57.50 per share. The new
growth in Netflix traffic. The 10 percent to about $1.78 bil- offer, which is set to expire on
companies said the arrange- lion. Both company's shares March 12, is conditioned on
ment is already giving cus- rose more than 8 percent in Jos. A. Bank ending an offer it
tomers a better experience, late afternoon trading, made for Eddie Bauer. Other
The statement said Netflix will The two companies cater to conditions include Jos. A.
receive no preferential network different customers Jos. A Bank's directors redeeming or
treatment under the multi-year Bank is geared to a more es- invalidating the shareholder
deal. The terms of the deal are tablished male professional, rights plan that's in place.
not being disclosed. Men's Wearhouse a slightly -From wire reports























beverly hills fl






Senior living


with comfort and style!





KINGSWAY IS AN INDEPENDENT SENIOR


LIVING RENTAL COMMUNITY FOR ADULTS

55 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER.










Our community is growing!




Space is limited.


Call us at 352-465-6006



to schedule a tour.






WWW.KINGSWAYOFBEVE R LYHILLS.COM

352-465-6006


I


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 A9







OPage A10 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2014



PINION


"We must face up to the grim fact that
the rulers we elect are losing patience
with us."
Kenneth Minogue, 1930-2013


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
i EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
M Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


EMOTIONAL IMPASSE





Time for




decision on




fire services


he rocky relationship
between Inverness and
county officials has not
smoothed as the two continue
sparring over whether Inver-
ness will join the countywide
fire MSBU.
In the last In-
verness City
Council meeting, THE I
there was a lot of Invern
emotion, name- debate
calling and even prot
macho talk about fun
"righteous indig-
nation," but no OUR OI
decision on the
key issue. Time tc
The issue is deci
whether the city
will join the
MSBU and continue receiv-
ing fire protection from the
county fire department or
whether it will secure
equipment, hire firemen,
and set up its own fire
department.
Unfortunately, this rather
straightforward question has
become intertwined with
other issues of contention be-
tween the two governments.
There is without a doubt a
history of tension between
the city and the county, and
neither of them is all right or
all wrong. Both bear some re-
sponsibility for the frayed re-
lationship, but the issue the
town must soon decide is not
about relationships. It is
about fire protection.
The fact is that there will


Is
C
e
ii
d


be fires in Inverness in the
future. Someone will have to
respond to them, and this re-
sponse will have to be paid
for.
Issues such as whether the
county has been fair regard-
ing Whispering
Pines, whether
ISUE: the city was con-
ss still sulted properly
ng fire during develop-
ction ment of the
I MSBU or


II Ig.


PINION:
o make a
sion.


whether the
county treats the
city as a full part-
ner are irrelevant
to the decision
the city must
make.


Stripped of all the emo-
tional baggage, the simple
question is how Inverness
will provide fire protection
for its residents and who pays
for it.
The longer the debate
drags on without resolution,
the more likely it is to even-
tually end up in court. If this
is the outcome, there will be
no winners.
Taxpayers will fund litiga-
tion on both sides, positions
will harden, and both the
city and the county will lose.
The better answer is for the
city to make a decision one
way or the other, and then
act on it.
The sooner this happens,
the better for everyone
involved.


-- Hot Corner: SCOTT ADAMS --


Can I not pay
my rent?
This is in regards to
your story on the front
page Feb. 21, "Unpaid
rent stalls land swap."
Could you do me a
favor and lose my tax
payments for about 20-
something years? Geez,
that would be a good
service to me.
And by the way, Mr.
Scott Adams, you go.
You go, man. You are
helping the taxpayers
of Citrus County. You kee
your work. It's about tim
got a commissioner on th
board that cares for the p
Adams is on
the right traci
Let me set the record s
Scott Adams is not haras
the other commissioners
lawyers. He's trying to ge
to put their jobs in the rig
spective, which is listening
the citizens of Citrus COL
not just the business peo
They think the business p
are the only citizens in th
county and all of us are n
sances who feed them ar
their wages.
Getting what
you voted foi
Is it me or is it every tir
see Scott Adams in the C
c/e or an article regarding
he's complaining about s


I


body else? Did his constituents
elect him as a commissioner or
did they elect him to review all
Sthe other commission-
JND ers? Did they elect him
r to be the heart and soul
of the county or com-
plain about everything?
If they elected him to


yrfa,, complain about every-
thing, the constituents
^ W S are getting what they
CAL r" want.
5630579 Rule him
UDUU/ ~out of order
I don't understand why when
*p doing Commissioner Adams starts on
e we his long, rambling speeches the
he chairman doesn't rule him out
people, of order and go on conducting
regular business. The chairman
k does have that authority.
straight Applaud Adams'
sing efforts
and I am calling in regards to
t them today's (Feb. 20) editorial on
ght per- "Misuse of forum," "Not the
ig to place for campaign speeches,"
inty, regarding Scott Adams and the
)pie. commission, the county com-
)eople missioners' meetings. I am
1is happy to see someone finally
nui- standing up for the citizens of
id pay Citrus County and trying to edu-
cate them and trying to control
expenses in this county. The
Sgood-ol'-boy network that's been
in place for so many years and
mne I the insider flimflams and the
'hroni- way it's been going sure have
g him, not worked. I applaud Mr.
ome- Adams' efforts.


Plan would repair, not repeal


here s no
doubt the vast
majority of Re-
publicans in Con-
gress would repeal
Obamacare if they
could. Most GOP "al-
ternative" bills begin
with a clause to re-
peal the Affordable
Care Act before pro-
ceeding to outline
new policies to put in
its place. Of course,
GOP lawmakers don't


Byron
OTH
VOl(


have any hope of actually re-
pealing the law as long as
Barack Obama, and his veto
pen, are in the White House.
Now some Republicans are
looking at what might be done
to undo as much as possible of
the Democrats' national health
care scheme without actually
repealing it. If Obamacare's
problems continue to mount-
and Republicans believe they
will could the GOP create
any political momentum be-
hind proposals to limit the
harm?
At the recent Senate Repub-
lican retreat at the Library of
Congress, Sen. Ron Johnson
presented an extensive Power-
Point proposal to "repair the
damage" of Obamacare. John-
son had once hoped to repeal
the law but conceded that now,
after its implementation, "you
don't just wave a wand and re-
peal it and it goes away" So he
is collecting ideas for a bill he
hopes would instead remove
some of the most problematic
parts of Obamacare. Johnson
stressed that his proposal, in
whatever final form it takes,
will not be a systematic re-
placement but rather a set of in-
dividual fixes that could offer
relief to some of the Americans
most burdened by Obamacare.
Johnson outlined to his GOP
colleagues a set of proposals
that included doing away with


all of Obamacare's
mandates em-
ployer, individual,
plus the requirement
that all insurance
S policies contain spe-
S cific government-
Sdictated features. He
also suggested what
he calls "a true
SYork grandfather clause"
|ER a provision that
D would allow anyone
ES to keep his or her
health coverage. Yet
another proposal would allow
any state to opt out of Oba-
macare. Still another would
end the "bailouts" of insurance
companies.
Johnson is also considering
some standard Republican pol-
icy suggestions, including al-
lowing the sale of insurance
across state lines and ending
the tax penalty for those who
purchase insurance on the in-
dividual market. He's also dis-
cussing the creation of high-risk
pools to insure people with pre-
existing conditions.
He stressed that a bill con-
taining some narrowed-down
combination of those proposals
- he would prefer that the final
legislation include no more
than three must first be
something the Republican-con-
trolled House would pass. Sec-
ond, it should not be considered
a substitute or GOP alternative
to Obamacare "It should be
far more modest in scope,"
Johnson told me later And fi-
nally, it should "already enjoy
supermajority public support."
"The elements should be de-
signed to highlight the major
flaws of, and damage being
done by, Obamacare," Johnson
said.
A critical point: Johnson
would not end the flow of subsi-
dies under Obamacare. "I think
you almost have to (leave subsi-
dies in place) until you start


transitioning," he told me. "Re-
alistically, could we just elimi-
nate the subsidized care?"
Johnson also plans to stay away
from Obamacare's expansion of
Medicaid. "I'm not dealing with
that right now," he said.
Nevertheless, Democrats will
see almost every one of John-
son's proposals as an attempt to
destroy Obamacare, to repeal it
without literally repealing it.
And even if the House passes
such a repair bill, Senate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid would
certainly block it.
But what is wrong with pre-
senting a set of limited plans to
address specific problems cre-
ated by Obamacare? Some De-
mocrats are already
campaigning for re-election by
promising to "fix" the health
care law Shouldn't voters know
there are Republican plans to
deal with that, too?
"It's designed to attack Oba-
macare," Johnson said of his
plan, "to keep that the issue, but
in doing so, have some policy
prescriptions that if passed
would be actually helpful."
It's not clear that Republicans
would unite behind Johnson's
specific plan when it is finished.
Perhaps some will want to stay
focused on demanding repeal.
But a senior Senate GOP aide
stressed that calls for repeal are
"not incompatible" with the goal
of repairing the damage from
Obamacare.
"There's a recognition that
repeal won't happen in the next
two years," said the aide. "I
think there's probably a pretty
strong appetite among mem-
bers, particularly those up for
re-election, for (finding) how do
you fix the problem that we face
today"

Byron York is chief
political correspondent for
The Washington Examiner


LETTERS to the Editor


Taxpayers
lose in the end
Mr Bertoch's letter hit the
nail on the head concerning all
points of the never-ending hos-
pital soap opera going on. As
he so succinctly points out, the
bottom line is that the taxpay-
ers are always the ones who
end up taking the brunt of all
the fighting and arguing be-
tween the two parties.
As Mr Bertoch pointed out,
those involved in this annoying
and seemingly eternal power
struggle really have no per-
sonal stake in the matter; they
know the continually mounting
legal fees won't be coming di-
rectly out of their own pockets.
Again, refer back to the taxpay-
ers shouldering that burden.
Lease it sell it, appoint an in-
terim CEO, a summary rejec-
tion "that is out of the
question." hospital bigwigs get-
ting huge buyout packages -
and on and on and on. It all re-
ally does make one wonder
who really is in charge and
pulling all of the strings.
So, why is there no outrage
on this subject? Oh, I believe
there is more than enough out-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

rage to go around, but where
will it get us? The foundation,
the board, the attorneys and
those who have held the power
at the hospital for so long are
making sure that this whole


debacle is a never-ending cir-
cus at the taxpayers' expense.
Most people involved in this
mess will come out of it in a
much more lucrative state than
they were at the beginning. I'm
outraged just knowing that, but
what can be done about it? The
words to the song ring true
every time: "Them that's got
shall get, them that's not shall
lose."
Whatever money this ends
up costing in the end, I know
that it could have been put to
so much better use. How about
helping the less fortunate in
our county, or considered
building a new county Animal
Shelter to replace the anti-
quated, outdated one we have
- or certainly, as Mr Bertoch
suggested, providing health
care for the needy rather than
for infighting and the resulting
attorney fees?
This fiasco has got to stop,
and it has got to stop now It's
nothing but a money pit and
only a select few who know
how to play the game will ben-
efit in the end.
Leslie Ostergard Ramalho
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to


Ashamed of
Americans
I'm deeply ashamed of
my fellow countrymen,
particularly Southerners.
I've been absent from
writing much-needed let-
ters to the editor, but
since having a brain
seizure very recently and
being hospitalized for five
days, the news of Michael
Dunn has awakened me
to the point it is impera-
tive that I speak out.
President Obama was
right in his recent national
prayer meeting: All reli-
gions have their god and
rightfully so, since they
were developed under en-
tirely different cultures
and preceded that of Chris-
tianity So why should we
denigrate their religions?
The only reason for
slavery was because of
the Spanish, English,
French and others in-
vaded countries, particu-
larly in the Caribbean, in
our hemisphere, and sub-
jected entire populations
to slavery because of their
lack of warfare technol-
ogy to offset the invasions.
We immigrants, including
you and me, unless you
are an American Indian,
have taken dire advan-
tage of their way of life.
Certainly, in my mind
and experience, most of
those who support Michael
Dunn in his recent killing
of a Jacksonville boy are
Southerners who were
born and raised in the
South, where slavery in
the early 1800s was com-
mon and fully acceptable,
because blacks were con-
sidered less intelligent
and uneducable. Now,
people are finding that
with education, we are all
equal, as is fully proven by
our educated president
and many others.
I was a racist, like many
in the South. Being from
the Midwest, living in a
small town of less than
3,000, we didn't permit
blacks to live in our town.
Happily, because of the
insistence of my wife
while working in Wash-
ington, D.C., I came to
know several blacks who
were better educated and
had great personalities.
And since then, I have
made more close friends
in Citrus County.
I ask only that Ameri-
cans open their minds to
acceptance of those with
other beliefs, regardless
whether it is another reli-
gion, being an agnostic, or
atheist who has valid rea-
sons for their beliefs.
Though their beliefs may
change because of you, you
must not continue this
racism so prevalent in our
country even though it is
denied by many! And I ask
the press to determine and
publish information about
those who support Dunn's
excuses, including their
birthplace, places of resi-
dence during their lives,
and organizations in which
they are involved.
George Harbin
Homosassa

Reflecting on
morality
The arts have always
been a most accurate re-
flection of the moral soul
of nations. Appearing in
the Feb. 7 Chronicle were
facing stories from the
world of art that made me
think about the American
soul what it once was


and what it has become.
On Page C4 was a re-
view of "Monuments
Men" which tells the story
of Americans who were
drafted into the Army and
assigned to the Army
Monuments and Fine Arts
Section of the military
government of U.S. zone
in Germany during World
War II. Their dedication
to duty became a magnifi-
cent obsession, resulting
in the recovery of more
than 5 million works of
art stolen by the Nazis.
The story on the facing
page (C5) reported "the
celebration of the remark-
able life" of actor and di-
rector Philip Seymour
Hoffman, who was found
dead in his apartment
amid packets of heroin
and bottles of prescrip-
tion drugs, a syringe dan-
gling from his arm.
The first story is a stand-
ing ovation for Tom
Brokaw's "Greatest Gener-
ation"- for the ordinary
men and women who
"dwelt with death (and be-
came) the most ardent wor-
shipers of life and beauty,"
according to Eisenhower
The second story was a
sad commentary on the
values of a generation
that has become most ar-
dent in their worship of
mind-altering drugs.
I see "Monuments Men"
as exalting the values of
the men and women of our
"Greatest Generation,"
whose commitment to
something above self has
left future generations en-
riched in many ways less
visible than artifacts of art.
I see the senseless
death of Phillip Seymour
Hoffman as exemplifying
the corrupted values of
the "me" generation,
which leaves me wonder-
ing what might have been
left to future generations
had brilliant minds like
his been left unaltered.
John McFadden
Inverness

Ongoing meat
recall nightmare
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture is still expand-
ing the list of retailers car-
rying meat unfit for human
consumption to Alabama,
Florida, Mississippi, New
Mexico, Oregon, Washing-
ton and 970 locations in
California alone. About
8.7 million pounds were
shipped through 2013 by
Rancho Feeding Corpora-
tion of Petaluma, Calif.
The recall comes in the
wake of USDAs new "in-
spection" program that al-
lows the meat industry to
increase the speed of pro-
cessing lines and replace
federal inspectors with
plant employees. Accord-
ing to the USDA inspector
general, this has resulted
in partial failure to re-
move fecal matter, undi-
gested food, and other
contaminants that may
contain deadly E. coli and
listeria bacteria.
Traditionally, the USDA
has catered more to the in-
terests and profitability of
the meat industry than the
health and safety of Amer-
ican consumers. Con-
sumer interests come into
play only when large num-
bers of us get sick. Having
the USDA protect con-
sumers is like asking the
fox to guard the henhouse.
The Obama administra-
tion should reallocate re-
sponsibility for all food
safety to the Food and


the Editor


Drug administration. In
the meantime, each of us
can assume responsibility
for our own safety by
switching to the rich vari-
ety of soy-based products
offered by our favorite
supermarket.

Cecil Casterelli
Crystal River


Legalize
pot, or not?
Monday's (Feb. 10)
Sound Off, "Potheads at
breakfast." Man, I'm
telling you, even the gov-
ernor, Gov. Scott ... he
doesn't want pot legal-
ized. Legalize drugs. I'm
onboard with Ron Paul.
That will take one of the
jobs away from these
cops, from busting in
your door, going through
in search for a little bit of
marijuana. Good God ...
Thanks for
scam tips
I just wanted to say
thank you, Chronicle and
the sheriff's department,
for the heads up regarding
scams. Yesterday a
woman called asking if
this was my given name
and I told her it was. She
said, oh, then I had won a
nice prize and a car and I
hung up on her as fast as I
could. I just wanted to
thank the paper for letting
me know about this
woman. A second later,
she called again. She
asked why did I hang up
on her, and she was very,
very angry, and I told her
because it's a scam. And
she said, "If it was a
scam, would I call you


right back?" And I hung up
again. She promptly
called me again. She said
she was going to deliver
the car to my house and I
told her, "I am calling the
police department and in-
forming the Chronicle." I
never heard from her
again. Thank you
for that wonderful
information.
Marijuana
is safer
I suggest be-
fore voting, we do
some research.
Medical mari-
juana, a plant, is CAL
much safer than 5
chemical treat- t563~
ment of depres-
sion, sleep disorder and
relief from pain.
Thanks for
honesty
I recently lost my wallet
at the Sweetbay plaza
here in Crystal River.
Someone found it and
turned it in at the cus-
tomer service desk at
Sweetbay. Whoever that
person was, I would just
like to say thank you. You
are a kind, honest and
caring person and I appre-
ciate it very much. Also, I
want to comment about
the great employees there


I

(


at Sweetbay. They are all
terrific. Special mention
to Stacy at customer serv-
ice. Thanks to all of you.
Don't gripe
volunteer
To the person who
called in reference to the
Streets and aban-
JND doned houses in
W- eCitrus Springs:
Instead of com-
plaining in the
paper, try attend-
ing an MSBU
meeting on the
*F first Wednesday
0*0 of the month at
)59 9 a.m. at the
)579 community cen-
ter in reference
to conditions of
roads or join, attend Civic
Association meetings,
which is the third Thurs-
day at the community
center (at) 7 p.m. for
other problems.
Taxes down?
On Mars maybe
There was an article in
the paper this morning
about someone wanting
to dump the gas tax on
County Road 486. I don't
know what planet this
guy's from, but no tax
ever gets repealed. All
they ever do is get raised.


II ^^^^?^IA 3^T^




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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2 5, 2014 All


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NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS Drug cartel carries on
Mardi Gras Drug cartel carries on


World BRIEFS

Belgium


Associated Press
Magi Z waits Sunday for
the start of the Beggin'
Pet Parade in St. Louis.
The pet parade kicked off
the annual Mardi Gras
celebrations in St. Louis.


Former astronaut
Gardner dies
DENVER Former as-
tronaut Dale Gardner, who
helped haul a stranded
satellite into the space shut-
tle during a 1984 space-
walk, died Wednesday at
age 65.
Gardner lived in Divide,
Colo., and died in nearby
Colorado Springs, accord-
ing to his obituary in the
Colorado Springs Gazette.
The obituary did not list the
cause of death. The NASA
website states he died
Feb. 19.
Gardner flew two shuttle
missions, in 1983 and
1984. He logged 337 hours
in space and 225 Earth or-
bits, and he went on two
spacewalks totaling 12
hours.
His funeral service is
scheduled for Tuesday in
Colorado Springs.
FDA to reboot
drug system
WASHINGTON -The
Food and Drug Administra-
tion is looking to revamp its
system for regulating hun-
dreds of over-the-counter
drugs, saying the decades-
old process is not flexible
enough to keep pace
with modern medical
developments.
In a federal posting Fri-
day, the agency announced
a two-day meeting next
month to discuss overhaul-
ing the system known as
the over-the-counter
monograph.
The system was put in
place in 1972 as a way to
set dosing, labeling and
other standards for hun-
dreds of nonprescription
drug ingredients, everything
from aspirin to anti-bacterial
hand scrubs.
But regulators acknowl-
edged that the process has
proven extremely time-
consuming, requiring multi-
ple rounds of scientific re-
view, public hearings and
comments before a final
monograph can be pub-
lished. As a result, many
common pain relievers,
cough medicines and even
sunscreen formulas are still
technically under review.
In its announcement,
FDA regulators detail the
numerous flaws of the cur-
rent cumbersome system,
including the inability to
quickly add warning labels
about emerging safety risks.
Eviction related
to missing funds
GRANTS PASS, Ore. -
The lawyer for a tiny Ameri-
can Indian tribe in northeast-
ern California said Monday
the woman accused of leav-
ing four dead and two
wounded in a gun and knife
attack last week at a meet-
ing at its headquarters had
been evicted from tribal
housing because she was
under investigation concern-
ing missing tribal funds.
Rhoades was arrested
Thursday on suspicion of
killing four people and
wounding two others at the
meeting in Alturas, Calif.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

MEXICO CITY- Like a
Fortune 500 company los-
ing an executive, the pow-
erful Sinaloa cartel is
likely to stay in business at
least in the short term,
selling billions of dollars of
illegal drugs despite the
arrest of its legendary
leader, Joaquin "El
Chapo" Guzman.
But the longer-term fate
of a criminal ring likened
to an international corpo-
ration is anything but
clear, as authorities pur-
sue other top leaders and
weaker rivals dream of
moving in.
Guzman's arrest Satur-


Seafaring drug

Associated Press

SAN DIEGO While security
has tightened at the U.S. border,
drug smugglers are increasingly
turning to the high seas.
The area where boats were
seized off California and the
northwest coast of Mexico tripled
to a size comparable to the state
of Montana during the 2013 fiscal
year, which ended in September
Off South America, traffickers
over the years have been travers-
ing territory so big the continen-
tal United States could be
dropped inside of it
Mexico's Sinaloa cartel has
been loading marijuana bales
onto 50-foot vessels as far south as
the Mexican port of Mazatlan -
where its leader, Joaquin Guzman,
was captured early Saturday -
and running them up the Pacific
coast to the U.S., deep into Cali-
fornia. It's unclear if Guzman's ar-
rest will hinder the maritime runs.


day was undoubtedly a structures remain in place,
major blow, coming on the all things being equal,
heels of more than Sinaloa will be
a dozen arrests of able to continue to
key lieutenants operate if not as
and lower-level op- normal, at least as
erators in recent the most powerful
months. Yet the criminal organiza-
cartel still has a tion in Mexico,"
worldwide distri- said David Shirk,
bution network director of the Uni-
and is the major Joaquin versity of San
supplier of cocaine "El Chapo" Diego's Justice in
to the United Guzman Mexico Project
States. The opera- Guzman, who
tion did not touch the car- made Forbes magazine's


tel's immense political
power, nurtured through
the bribery of corrupt offi-
cials, or its thriving money
laundering operations.
'As long as these other


lists of billionaires and
most powerful people, was
first among equals with
partners Ismael "El Mayo"
Zambada and Juan Jose
Esparragoza, known as "El


Meanwhile, budget cuts have hit
one of the lead U.S. law enforce-
ment agencies on international
waters -the Coast Guard, the only
U.S. military service able to make
drug arrests hundreds of miles off-
shore. To meet automatic federal
budget cuts, it reduced its operat-
ing costs by 25 percent in 2013. It
also lost help from U.S. Navy ships
on drug missions off Latin Amer-
ica that were decommissioned and
not replaced because of cutbacks,
or sent elsewhere because of
Washington's new military focus.
As such, only a third of sus-
pected drug smuggling boats or
aircraft out of South America that
were tracked by U.S. intelligence
in cocaine-trafficking corridors in
the Pacific and Caribbean were
stopped last year, the Coast
Guard's top officer, Adm. Robert
Papp, told The Associated Press.
"Our interdictions are down 30
percent from the year before,
when we had more assets out


Azul," both of whom re-
main at large.
Despite rumors to the
contrary, Guzman worked
closely with Zambada.
Guillermo Valdes, former
head of Mexico's top do-
mestic intelligence agency,
said the pair shared a
clear vision, not only with
respect to their adver-
saries but also with their
business plan for traffick-
ing cocaine, marijuana,
heroin and methampheta-
mine in some 54 countries.
On Monday, a senior
Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration official told The
Associated Press that Zam-
bada is likely to be the next
chief of the Sinaloa cartel.


there, so that's an indicator to me
that as soon as we start pulling as-
sets away, they're running more
drugs and they're getting
through," Papp said.
U.S. authorities stopped some
194,000 pounds of cocaine last fis-
cal year more than 40,000
pounds less than in 2012, accord-
ing to Coast Guard statistics. Mar-
ijuana seizures dipped between
2012 and 2013 from 124,000
pounds to 81,000 pounds.
On Monday, authorities said
they seized a 30-foot boat in the
harbor in Oceanside, north of San
Diego, with more than 500 pounds
of methamphetamine inside a
compartment. Customs and Bor-
der Protection said the twin-en-
gine boat came from Mexico.
Defense officials have warned
that the cuts would hamper ef-
forts to reach the president's goal
of intercepting 40 percent of the
illicit drug shipments flowing into
the region by 2015.


Dingell, longest-serving congressman, to retire


Associated Press

SOUTHGATE, Mich. -
Rep. John Dingell, who
played a key role in some
of the biggest liberal leg-
islative victories of the
past 60 years, said Monday
that he will not try to add
to what is already the
longest congressional ca-
reer in history
The Michigan Democ-
rat, who was elected to his
late father's seat in 1955
and has held it ever since,
announced his decision
while addressing a cham-
ber of commerce in South-
gate, near Detroit.
Afterward, he told re-
porters that he will not run
for a 30th full term be-
cause he could not have
lived up to his own
standards.
"I don't want people to
be sorry for me. ... I don't
want to be going out feet-
first and I don't want to do


Associated Press
Rep. John Dingell, D-Michigan, said Monday that he will
not run for a 30th full term.


less than an adequate job,"
said the 87-year-old Din-
gell, who cut a physically
imposing figure in his
prime but now uses a cane
or motorized cart to get
around the Capitol.
He fueled speculation
that his 60-year-old wife,
Debbie Dingell, who was
at the event, might run for


his seat, saying she would
have his vote if she does.
She repeatedly deflected
questions about whether
she would run, saying she
would only talk about her
husband.
In June, Dingell broke
the record for the longest
serving member of Con-
gress held by the late Sen.


Robert Byrd of West Vir-
ginia, but his congres-
sional experience goes
back even further than his
1955 electoral win. As a
congressional page in
1941, he watched firsthand
as President Franklin D.
Roosevelt called on Con-
gress to declare war on
Japan in his "Day of In-
famy" address.
Born in Colorado
Springs, Colo., Dingell
grew up in Michigan,
where his father was
elected to Congress as a
"New Deal" Democrat in
1932.
After a brief stint in the
Army near the end of
World War II, the younger
Dingell earned his bache-
lor's and law degrees from
Georgetown University
Following the sudden
death of his father in 1955,
Dingell, then a 29-year-old
attorney, won a special
election to succeed him.


Hunt on the high seas


Associated Press
Crocus flowers bloom in a
park Monday near the
Atomium, one of
Belgium's landmarks, in
Brussels. Temperatures
are around 59 degrees,
warm for the season in
Belgium.


Pre-inspection
begins in Canada
FORT ERIE, Ontario-
U.S. customs officers
began inspecting U.S.-
bound cargo trucks in
Canada Monday under a
pilot program intended to
relieve congestion at one of
the border's busiest com-
mercial crossings.
Authorities will watch to
see whether pre-inspecting
trucks on the roomier Cana-
dian side of the Peace
Bridge will reduce wait
times and pollution-causing
idling on the 86-year-old
span between Fort Erie,
Ontario, and Buffalo.
The bridge handled
1.2 million truck trips and
more than $40 billion in
trade last year, making it
the third-busiest truck
crossing on the U.S.-
Canada border.
The three-lane span also
saw more than 4.7 million
passenger cars, more than
any other port of entry.
Korean ship stuck
in Antarctica
SANTIAGO, Chile-A
Korean-flagged fishing ship
is stranded in Antarctica
with 90 passengers
aboard.
Chile's Navy said Mon-
day that the Kwang Ja Ho
struck the ocean floor about
1,500 feet from the coast
while cruising through
Antarctic waters.
The maritime governor
for Chile's portion of Antarc-
tica said a rescue mission
was launched. Officials
have confirmed that every-
one on board is safe and
that there currently is no
risk of a fuel spill.
The 305-foot trawler was
coming from a Peruvian
port and carried 817 tons of
krill.
Officials said the damage
to the ship is in an area that
holds a tank for drinking
water. Chile's Navy has
contacted the ship's owners
so they can figure out how
to salvage the vessel.
Uganda sets harsh
anti-gay law
ENTEBBE, Uganda-
Uganda's president on
Monday signed an anti-gay
bill that punishes gay sex
with up to life in prison, a
measure likely to send
Uganda's beleaguered gay
community further under-
ground as the police try to
implement it amid fevered
anti-gay sentiment across
the country.
Ugandan President Yow-
eri Museveni said the bill,
which goes into effect im-
mediately, was needed
because the West is pro-
moting homosexuality in
Africa.
Museveni may have de-
fied Western pressure to
shelve the bill, four years
and many versions after it
was introduced, but his
move likely to galvanize
support ahead of presiden-
tial elections pleased
many Ugandans who re-
peatedly urged him to sign
the legislation.
Homosexuality is crimi-
nalized in many African
countries.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Coast Guard officer William Pless talks on the radio Jan. 28 while steering a 45-foot Coast Guard vessel
through a dense fog during a patrol off the San Diego coast in California. With the drug war locking down
land routes across Latin America and at the U.S. border, smugglers have been increasingly using large
vessels to carry multi-ton loads of cocaine and marijuana hundreds of miles offshore, where the lead federal
agency with extensive law enforcement powers is the Coast Guard, a military service roughly the size of the
New York Police Department.


smugglers challenging Coast Guard











SPORTS


Evan Gattis will
take over behind
the plate full-time
for the Atlanta
Braves./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Basketball/B2
0 Baseball/B3, B4
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Auto racing/B4
SFootball/B4


Hise rides to big payday at Speedway


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS Gator Hise won his third
consecutive Open Wheel Modified feature
at the Citrus County Speedway, while fel-
low Citrus County drivers Tim Wilson,
Jason Waller and Johnny Siner each scored
their first wins of the season in Saturday's
racing action in Inverness.
After drawing a pill that landed him the
pole position, Hise faced a strong push
from Seffner's L.J. Grimm, who rode side
by side on the inside of the Inverness driver
for four laps in the middle of the 35-lapper


Hise reclaimed his lead on the front stretch was just peppering the throttle and trying to
of lap 18, and extended it over the ,get off the corner better I probably
final 10 laps for a comfortable finish ]Al ] could have pushed my car a little
in his blue No. 43. harder to get past him, but I wanted
Pinellas Park's Cody Stickler to let him wear his tires out.
finished third, behind Grimm. "The best of the best were here
At $1,200, it was the biggest payout tonight," Hise added of the short but
yet for Hise, a sophomore at Citrus formidable six-car field. "The Jimmy
High School. Cope-owned cars are no joke. Any
"My edge was pinning him down track you go to, they're in the front
on the bottom and making him wear Gator and you're battling it out with them.
his tires down," he said of racing Hise They're veterans of this class."
Grimm two-wide for successive laps. Waller, winner of the 2013 Pure
"He was having to pick up the gas so hard, Stock championship, started in the third
he was burning the wheels off of it, while I See Page B3


On the diamond

County softball teams ready to battle each other for local bragging rights


A- 4


I


7


Iii


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
his is going to be fun. Softball season
is here, and it promises to be full of
confrontations between local rival-
ries that will be momentous as well as hard
fought. District 5A-6 has arrived, and in it
are four very good teams: Citrus, Crystal
River, Dunnellon and Lecanto. Last year
Dunnellon had a rough go of it, winning just
five games although the Tigers did get to
the second round of the 5A-7 playoffs.
Crystal River fared a bit better, going 11-
11 overall and 4-6 in 5A-7 but losing in the
first round of the 5A-7 tournament Lecanto
figured to be very strong a season ago, but
the Panthers struggled through the 6A-6 reg-
ular season, posting just a 4-4 district mark.
But coach Robert Dupler said the regu-


lar season mattered not; those were mere
practice games, all leading to what did mat-
ter, the district and state tournaments. He
proved his approach was accurate by beat-
ing Citrus in the 6A-6 district finals and
then reaching the Final 16 before losing.
Citrus did have the best regular-season
run last season, going 5-3 in 6A-6 and then
defeating Spring Hill Springstead 8-7 in the
district semifinals. But Lecanto thumped
the Hurricanes 11-1 in the 6A-6 finals, then
in the opening round of regionals they suf-
fered another lopsided defeat, falling to
Gainesville 9-1.
Now: That was a summary, a history of
what happened a year ago in what has now
become 5A-6. What promises to make this
season so delightful is that each of the
above-named teams has a strong nucleus re-
turning, including experienced pitchers and


a majority of their 2013 lineups returning.
There's one very special exception to
that list of returnees. Although Lecanto has
lost only two players from last season, one
was its catcher, Amber Atkinson, the two-
time player of the year in the county Atkin-
son graduated and is now playing at Indian
River State College.
So what about this season in 5A-6? All
four teams have pitchers with starting ex-
perience returning, and both Dunnellon
and Lecanto have some promising new-
comers on the mound who could alter the
softball landscape.
And Crystal River has a new coach in
Cassidy Rash, who took over for Lanna
Wentworth. The Pirates have already
played Dunnellon twice and split with


SRCS baseball
holds on for victory
The Seven Rivers Christian
baseball team scored a 7-4 win
over Ocala Christian Academy
on Monday night.
Parker Pillsbury, an eighth-
grader, had two runs, two RBIs,
two stolen bases and a double
to pace the Warriors. Team-
mates Garrett Griggs (two hits,
run, stolen base), Adam Gage
(double, single, two runs) and
Josh Iwaniec (hit, run) also con-
tributed offensively.
On the mound, Coy Phillips
tossed six innings for the victory.
Phillips yielded three earned runs,
and Pillsbury tossed a scoreless
seventh inning for the save.
Seven Rivers (3-0) plays
tonight at Cornerstone Academy.
Warriors easily
handle OCA 15-0
Buoyed by a fine all-around
performance by eighth-grader
Delaney Byers, the Seven
Rivers Christian softball team
notched a 15-0 triumph against
Ocala Christian Academy in four
innings Monday night.
Byers struck out seven batters
in four frames and issued a sin-
gle walk. She also went 2 for 3
with a home run, two runs scored
and four RBIs at the plate.
Alexis King homered and drove
in four runs during a 2 for 3 per-
formance; King also scored twice.
Seven Rivers (2-0) plays
tonight at Williston.
Stamkos not ready
to return to Bolts
TAMPA- Injured Tampa Bay
Lightning star Steven Stamkos
is recovering, but not ready yet
to return to the lineup.
Stamkos is sitting out a four-
game post-Olympic trip that
starts Thursday at Nashville.
Stamkos underwent X-rays on
Monday that revealed that his
broken right shin, which has
sidelined him since November, is
improving but not enough for him
to be cleared to play in games.
The center will travel with the
team to continue practicing, and
is expected to be examined
again when the Lightning return
for a homestand that begins
March 6 against Buffalo.
Stamkos was injured on Nov.
11 at Boston and underwent sur-
gery. He has 14 goals and 23
points in 17 games this season.
The injury kept Stamkos from
playing for Canada in the Sochi
Olympics.
Cruz, Orioles finalize
$8 million contract
SARASOTA- Outfielder Nel-
son Cruz and the Baltimore Ori-
oles have finalized an $8 million,
one-year contract, a deal that
puts him on track to become the
team's regular designated hitter.
The 33-year-old, who served
a 50-game suspension last year
for violating baseball's drug
agreement, can earn an addi-
tional $750,000 in bonuses
based on days on the active 25-
man roster: $150,000 each for
60, 90, 120, 150 and 180.
He turned down a $14.1 mil-
lion qualifying offer from the
Texas Rangers in November.
Because of the qualifying offer,
Baltimore forfeits its second-
round selection in June's ama-
teur draft, the 55th pick overall.
From staff, wire reports


Page B2


UF men's hoops ascends to top spot in AP poll


Associated Press
The Florida Gators are taking
their turn as the newest No. 1 in
what coach Billy Donovan calls
a revolving door atop the AP
college basketball poll, their
first time on top of the rankings
since they repeated as national
champions in 2007.
The Gators (25-2) moved up
one place Monday, replacing
Syracuse (25-2), which lost twice
last week and dropped to fourth.
Wichita State (29-0) and Ari-
zona (25-2) both moved up one
place to second and third.
Florida, the fifth school to hold
the No. 1 spot this season, re-
ceived 47 first-place votes from


the 65-member national media
panel. The Gators were ranked
No. 1 for eight weeks in 2007.
Wichita State was No. 1 on 14
ballots with Arizona receiving
the other four first-place votes.
Donovan called the rankings
a revolving door before his
Gators took over the top spot,
and he said being No. 1 is an
honor and compliment.
"But let's be honest right now:
The only reason we have gar-
nered No. 1 and we would have
never, ever been No. 1 if it had
not been for the teams in front
of us losing," Donovan said.
To Donovan, a lot of teams
could be considered the nation's
best right now with undefeated


Wichita State having a strong ar-
gument. Donovan also said he's
impressed by Syracuse winning
25 straight games along with
what Arizona did before
Brandon Ashley's foot injury
"It's not like all of a sudden
Florida is No. 1 or you get a
See Page B3
Florida forward Dorian Finney-
Smith (10) and teammates Will
Yeguete, center, and guard
Scottie Wilbekin (5) have
propelled the Gators to the
No. I spot in both the
Associated Press and ESPN
men's college basketball
rankings.
Associated Press


Chronicle file photo
Jordan Martin is one of seven returning starters on a Lecanto
softball team that reached the Class 6A regional semifinals
in 2013. The Panthers are now in District 5A-6 with Crystal
River, Citrus and Dunnellon.










hwing ff No. 4 Syracuse

Showing ofsurvives Terps


Crawford's

output helps

LAC top NO

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Jamal Crawford hit seven
3s on his way to 24 points,
and the Los Angeles Clip-
pers beat the New Or-
leans Pelicans 123-110 on
Monday night.
Crawford picked up
where he left off in Okla-
homa City a day earlier,
when he hit five 3-point-
ers and finished with 36
points in the Clippers' vic-
tory over the Thunder
Chris Paul had 19 points
and 13 assists in his latest
return to New Orleans,
while Blake Griffin added
22 points. All five Clippers
starters and two reserves
scored in double figures.
DeAndre Jordan had 14
points to go along with 16 re-
bounds, while Matt Barnes,
Darren Collison and Hedo
Turkoglu each scored 12.
Anthony Davis had 26
points and 11 rebounds for
New Orleans. Alexis Ajinca
had 19 points and 12 re-
bounds, both career highs.
Mavericks 110,
Knicks 108
NEW YORK Dirk Now-
itzki's 19-foot jumper bounced
up and then fell in as time ex-
pired, giving the Dallas Mav-
ericks a 110-108 victory over
the New York Knicks.
The Mavericks blew an
eight-point lead in the final 90
seconds, then pulled out their
third straight victory when
Nowitzki's jumper that
seemed to have missed in-
stead fell through.
Carmelo Anthony had 44
points and nine rebounds for
the Knicks. He played strong
defense on the Mavericks'
final possession, but was left
standing in disbelief long
after the buzzer after Now-
itzki's shot appeared to hit
the backboard first, then the
front rim, then bounced up
before dropping.
Vince Carter scored 23
points and Monta Ellis had 22
for Dallas, which has won
nine of 11 and is a season-
best 12 games over .500.
Warriors 104,
Pistons 96
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -


Associated Press


COLLEGE PARK, Md. -
No. 4 Syracuse blew most of
a 12-point lead in the last 8
minutes and used one final
defensive stop to squeeze
past Maryland 57-55 on
Monday night and end a
two-game losing streak
It was another close call
for the Orange (26-2, 13-2 At-
lantic Coast Conference),
whose previous four games
were decided by a total of
12 points, including losses
to Boston College and
Maryland. Syracuse led 49-
37 with 7:54 left but allowed
Maryland to close to 56-55


with 47 seconds remaining.
After C.J. Fair missed a
jumper for the Orange,
Baye Moussa Keita blocked
a driving layup by Nick
Faust to keep Syracuse in
front. Trevor Cooney was
fouled and made one of two
free throws with 4 seconds
to go before Maryland's
Seth Allen's game-ending
jumper bounded off the
back of the rim.
Tyler Ennis scored 20
point and Fair had 17 to
help Orange coach Jim
Boeheim secure his 946th
career victory
Allen scored 22 points
for the Terps (15-13, 7-8).


Women's college

basketball BRIEFS


Associated Press
Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin shoots over New Orleans Pelicans center
Greg Stiemsma in the first half Monday in New Orleans.


Stephen Curry had 19 points,
nine assists and eight re-
bounds, and the Golden State
Warriors clamped down on
the Detroit Pistons in the sec-
ond half of a 104-96 victory.
Klay Thompson scored 19
points for Golden State, which
has won four in a row. The
Pistons have lost five of seven
since firing Maurice Cheeks
and replacing him with interim
coach John Loyer.
The Warriors were still
without David Lee, who has
been dealing with a stomach
flu. Andrew Bogut returned
from a left shoulder injury


and played 29 minutes be-
fore fouling out.
Gerg Monroe had 23
points for the Pistons, who
scored only 13 points in the
fourth quarter. The Pistons
were only down 63-62 at half-
time but couldn't replicate
that offensive success.
Bucks 130,
76ers 110
PHILADELPHIA- O.J.
Mayo made seven 3-pointers
and scored 25 points, Ersan
Ilyasova added 20, and the
Milwaukee Bucks placed
seven players in double fig-


ures in a 130-110 rout of the
Philadelphia 76ers, who lost
their 11th straight game.
Ramon Sessions had 16
points, Khris Middleton and
Brandon Knight scored 15
each, and Giannis Antetokoun-
mpo posted 13 for the Bucks
(1145), who own the NBA's
worst record. John Henson
chipped in 12 points for the
Bucks, who had their highest
scoring game of the season.
Philadelphia (15-42),
which owns the league's
second worst record, has
lost 21 of 24 and 10 straight
at home.


No. 6 Baylor 96,
Oklahoma 89
WACO, Texas Odyssey
Sims scored 38 points and
Nina Davis added 28 points
and 14 rebounds to help No.
6 Baylor beat Oklahoma 96-
89 on Monday night.
Makenzie Robertson added
11 points for the Lady Bears
(25-3, 15-1 Big 12).
Baylor led by 32 points in
the second half before Okla-
homa cut it to 93-87 with 37
seconds. The Sooners (17-
12, 8-8) could have made it
closer, butAaryn Ellenberg's
shot bounced off the rim and
Davis grabbed the rebound.
Ellenberg, who finished
with 29 points, was playing
her first game since suffering
a concussion against Okla-
homa State on Feb. 16.
Sims, the nation's leading
scorer at nearly 30 points a
game, was 12-of-27 from the
field and 10 of 15 from the
free throw line.
No. 16 Nebraska 94,
No. 8 Penn State 74
LINCOLN, Neb. Tear'a
Laudermill scored 22 of her
career-high 27 points and
made six of her seven 3-
pointers in the first half, and
Nebraska defeated Penn
State to stay alive in the Big
Ten race.
The Cornhuskers (21-5,
11-3) extended their winning
streak to a season-best eight
games and pulled within a
half-game of the two-time de-
fending champion Lady Lions
(21-6, 12-3). The Huskers
have two games remaining in
the regular season and the
Lady Lions have one.


The surprisingly easy win
came after a 3-point shooting
performance that was best in
Division I this season, accord-
ing to STATS. The Huskers
finished 16 of 22 from beyond
the arc, a 72.7-percent clip.
The school record for 3s is 17.
The Huskers made 11 of
14 3-pointers in the first half.
The 78.6-percent accuracy
was best by a major-confer-
ence team in a half this sea-
son and No. 2 in Division I
behind Alabama State's 81.8
percent (9 of 11) against
Arkansas-Pine Bluff.
No. 21 Michigan St.
75, Minnesota 61
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Tori Jankoska scored 16 of
her 21 points in the first half,
including four 3-pointers, as
Michigan State beat Min-
nesota.
Michigan State got out to a
16-point first half lead, after
making 6 of 9 3-pointers, and
led by double-digits for the first
16 minutes of the second half.
The Spartans (19-8, 11-3
Big Ten) are now tied in the
conference loss column with
No. 16 Nebraska and No. 8
Penn State.
Michigan State's leading
scorer, freshman Aerial Pow-
ers, fouled out with 8:59 left in
the second half, and finished
with seven points.
The Big Ten scoring leader,
Rachel Banham, scored 31
points, on 11-of-29 shooting,
for Minnesota (17-11,6-8).
Jankoska's first 3-pointer
gave MSU a 16-7 lead. Later,
Branndais Agee made Michi-
gan State's sixth 3-pointer to
open up a 34-18 advantage.
From wire reports


SOFTBALL
Continued from Page Bl

them, making them 1-1 in 5A-6.
They have lost five key players,
but seven others with plenty of
experience return. There will be
a sorting out process, but expect
the Pirates to be in the thick of
the district hunt.
At first glance, Citrus with
eight starters back seems to
be the early pick in 5A-6. How-
ever, that is a very tenuous posi-
tion. Still, the Hurricanes do
have the Abramowich sisters,
Kelly and Amy, returning and
several more of the county's top
players. Speculation says they'll
start the fastest in district play;
question is, can they hold onto
the top spot?
And then there's Lecanto,
which proved to be the county's
top team again last season. De-
spite its losses outfielder Lilly
Parrish joined Atkinson on the
graduated list there's plenty
of talent on this Panther team. A
key change: switching Amber
Hopkins from third base to
catcher A sophomore, Hopkins
had a superb freshman offensive
season, hitting .414 with 19 runs
batted in. Her problem was in
the field (32 errors), something
that will hopefully change be-
hind the plate.
Enough said about 5A-6. As for
Seven Rivers Christian, the War-
riors are the county's best bet to
make the regionals. That's be-
cause there's just two teams -
Palatka Peniel Baptist Academy
is the other in a shrunken 2A-
3. So both play will meet in the
district final, with the winner
hosting a first-round regional
game and the loser playing a re-
gional game on the road.
Although the Warriors lost
three key players who combined
to knock in 53 runs, they have
plenty returning (seven key play-
ers) to spark them this season, in-
cluding junior pitcher Tessa
Kacer, who was strong on the
mound (11-9, 2.71 earned run


average) and at the plate (.438,32
RBI, 31 of 32 stealing bases). What
they don't have is a single senior
Now here's a more detailed
look at each team:
Citrus
Coach: Larry Bishop.
Last year's record: 16-11 overall,
5-3 in 6A-6; made it to district cham-
pionship game, lost in first round of
regionals.
This year's record to date: 4-1
overall.
Key players lost: Aaron Mclntyre,
center field; Jessica Liptrap, third
base; Melissa Michaud, catcher.
Key players returning: Kelly
Abramowich, senior pitcher (Last
year: 12-8 record, 1.59 ERA, 123
inning pitched, 115 strikeouts); Amy
Abramowich, senior first base (Last
year: .388, six doubles, 9 RBI, 23
runs); Erica Corlew, sophomore
catcher (,Last year: .300, 15 dou-
bles, one home run, 24 RBI, 14
runs); Chelby Lawler, senior out-
fielder (Last year: .238, four doubles,
one triple, eight RBI, 13 runs);
Rachel Martin, junior outfielder/
pitcher (Last year: .209, nine RBI, 10
runs) April Desomma, junior third
base/center field (Last year: .279,
seven RBI, 24 runs, 11-of-13 stolen
bases); Emaly Ferreira, sophomore
second base (Last year: .267, nine
doubles, eight RBI, 16 runs); Kayla
Quesenberry, junior pitcher (3-3,
3.48 ERA, 32.2 innings pitched, 21
strikeouts, five walks); Jordan Josey,
junior outfielder/third base.
Prospects: With so much experi-
ence returning as well as newcom-
ers Alyssa Nathan, a sophomore
pitcher, and Cameron Trehy, a fresh-
man first baseman/third baseman,
the Hurricanes have a lot.
"Kelly had a shoulder injury that
hurt her a bit late last season,"
coach Larry Bishop said of Kelly
Abramowich. "But she came back
this year with a vengeance. She's
been in the weight room and she's
stronger now than ever.
"I've seen all of our district teams
and they all look good, it looks pretty
even. It's going to be a very good
race. But Lecanto to me is still num-


ber one, and will be until someone
knocks them off. We set goals for
ourselves last year, and we came up
one game short. This year, our goal
is to finish what we started, in every
drill, every at-bat."
Crystal River
Coach: Cassidy Rash.
Last year's record: 11-11 overall,
4-6 in 5A-7; lost in first round of dis-
trict tournament.
This year's record to date: 5-2
overall, 1-1 in 5A-6.
Key players lost: Rachel Roe,
pitcher; Chloe Lane, outfielder;
Emily Laga, outfielder; Meagan
McMichen, third base; Samantha
Jenkins, first base; Laynee Nadal,
outfielder.
Key players returning: McCale
Wilson, senior pitcher (Last year:
8-6, 2.34 ERA, 86.2 innings, 43
strikeouts, 21 walks); Tiffany Mc-
Donald, senior pitcher (Last year:
2-2, 5.53 ERA 12.2 innings, 10
strikeouts, six walks); Danielle
Gomez, junior catcher (Last year:
.315, four doubles, one home run,
10 RBI, 15 runs); Marissa Pool, sen-
ior shortstop (Last year: .371, five
doubles, one triple, 20 RBI, 17 runs);
Katherine Desomma, sophomore
second/third base (Last year: .250,
three RBI); Bridget Whitley, senior
infielder (Last year: .170, six RBI,
five runs).
Prospects: Rash, in her first year
coaching at Crystal River, a school
where she was a standout pitcher,
realizes things won't get any easier
in this new district set-up, not with
top-notch programs like Lecanto and
Citrus in the mix. However, it might
be worth noting that the Pirates
played each of them twice last sea-
son and split with both. And they've
already played the new and im-
proved Dunnellon squad twice and
split with the Tigers.
"We lost a majority of our outfield
plus a key infield player," Rash noted.
"We have a very young team that has
combined with the returning players."
Pool, Gomez and Wilson certainly
give Rash players to work with;
question is, is there enough to keep


pace in this very difficult district?
Lecanto
Coach: Robert Dupler.
Last year's record: 18-13 over-
all, 4-4 in 6A-6; won district champi-
onship, won first regional game, lost
in 6A quarterfinals.
This year's record to date: 1-0
overall.
Key players lost: Amber Atkin-
son, catcher; Lilly Parrish, outfielder.
Key players returning: Breanna
Martin, senior pitcher/outfielder (Last
year: 6-2, 2.58 ERA, 62.1 innings,
21 strikeouts, 12 walks; .260, two
doubles, one triple, 11 RBI, 22 runs);
Jordan Martin, senior second base
(Last year: .307, four doubles, nine
RBI, 22 runs, 10-of-12 stolen
bases); Kelsie Lilley, senior first
base/catcher (Last year: .306, two
doubles, 10 RBI, 11 runs); Danielle
Yant, senior pitcher (Last year: 9-10,
3.12 ERA, 114.1 innings, 26 strike-
outs, 20 walks); Amber Russo, junior
shortstop/third base (Last year: .383,
eight doubles, two triples, 18 RBI, 20
runs); Paige Richards, senior center
field/shortstop (Last year: .357, two
doubles, one triple, two home runs,
17 RBI, 26 runs, 13-of-14 stolen
bases); Amber Hopkins, sophomore
catcher (Last year: .414, three dou-
bles, two triples, 19 RBI, 21 runs);
Jessica Ray, junior shortstop; Sid-
ney Holstein, senior pitcher/out-
fielder (Last year: .197, three
doubles, five RBI, 16 runs; Amanda
Myers, junior pitcher (Last year: 2-0,
3.17 ERA, 17.2 innings, six strike-
outs, six walks).
Prospects: First, the loss of both
Atkinson and Parrish can't be dis-
counted. "Those would be two major
losses to any program, both in lead-
ership and in the way they play,"
said coach Robert Dupler. "You don't
replace Lilly Parrish and Amber
Atkinson."
Still, there's plenty to build with.
Yant is the most experienced of the
pitchers, but Dupler plans to use a
rotation that will include returnee
Myers and newcomers Madison
Kaufman and Rebecca Schuler,
both freshmen. Also, Hopkins faces
a daunting challenge in replacing


Atkinson at catcher, but offensively
at least she has the potential. In-
deed, most of the Panther infield will
be redone.
"I think any team in this district
has the potential," said Dupler. "Ba-
sically, we have a new infield. Lead-
ership is what we need to develop."
Seven Rivers Christian
Coach: Gary Dreyer.
Last year's record: 11-10 overall,
0-4 in 2A-3, lost in district tournament
final, lost in first round of regional.
This year's record to date: 1-0
overall.
Key players lost: Rebecca
Wright, first base; Allison Green,
catcher; Milena Kacer, second base.
Key players returning: Tessa
Kacer, junior pitcher (Last year: 11-9,
2.71 ERA, 118.2 innings, 80 strike-
outs, 96 walks; .438, three doubles,
three triples, four home runs, 32
RBI, 29 runs, 31-of-32 stolen bases;
Alyssa Gage, junior first base (Last
year: .288, 18 RBI); Katie Dreyer,
sophomore outfielder (Last year:
.283, one double, two triples, 10
RBI, 14 runs, 16-of-17 stolen
bases); Kim Iwaniec, junior short-
stop (Last year: .368, two doubles,
one triple, 18 RBI, 26 runs, 32-of-35
stolen bases); Alexis King, sopho-
more catcher (Last year: .299, two
doubles, five RBI, 25 runs, 35-of-37
stolen bases); Gabby Wright,
sophomore outfielder (Last year:
.340, eight RBI, seven runs);
Shannon Hoey, sophomore out-
fielder (Last year: .077, six RBI).
Prospects: How good this team
can be is hard to tell, according to
coach Gary Dreyer.
There's plenty of potential, to be
sure, with seven players returning,
including standout pitcher Tessa
Kacer. Delaney Byers and Emma
Bresson, a pair of eighth-graders,
should contribute as well.
"It's too early to know," Dreyer
said. "We've just had one practice
as a group. I do think this will be a
really good team once we get some
time together. If I've got my whole
team, I feel real good about our
chances."


B2 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Men'sAP Top 25 For the record


The top 25 teams in The Associated Press' col-
lege basketball poll, with first-place votes in paren-
theses, records through Feb. 23, total points based
on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point
for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking:
Record Pts Pry
1. Florida (47) 25-2 1,606 2
2. Wichita St. (14) 29-0 1,549 3
3. Arizona(4) 25-2 1,494 4
4. Syracuse 25-2 1,410 1
5. Kansas 21-6 1,310 8
6. Duke 22-6 1,286 5
7. Louisville 23-4 1,152 11
8.Villanova 24-3 1,113 9
9.Creighton 23-4 1,103 11
10. SaintLouis 25-2 1,047 10
11. Cincinnati 24-4 921 7
12.Virginia 23-5 909 14
13. San Diego St. 23-3 886 6
14.Wisconsin 22-5 818 16
15. Iowa St. 21-5 709 17
16. Michigan 19-7 653 20
17. Kentucky 21-6 629 18
18. Michigan St. 22-6 552 13
19. North Carolina 20-7 440 -
20. Iowa 19-7 418 15
21. Memphis 21-6 288 22
22. Ohio St. 22-6 253 24
23. SMU 22-6 155 -
24.Texas 20-7 129 19
25. New Mexico 21-5 113 -
Others receiving votes: UConn 81, UCLA 41,
Oklahoma 35, Stephen F Austin 11, UMass 9,
Gonzaga 2, Green Bay 2, NC Central 1.
USA Today
Top 25 Poll
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men's col-
lege basketball poll, with first-place votes in paren-
theses, records through Feb. 23, points based on
25 points for a first-place vote through one point
for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Florida (24) 25-2 791 2
2. Wichita State (8) 29-0 771 3
3. Arizona 25-2 727 4
4. Louisville 23-4 660 5
5. Syracuse 25-2 625 1
6. Kansas 21-6 619 8
7. Duke 22-6 594 6
8. Saint Louis 25-2 563 10
9.Villanova 24-3 538 11
10. Creighton 23-4 514 12
11. Virginia 23-5 480 13
12. Cincinnati 24-4 460 9
13. San Diego State 23-3 452 7
14.Wisconsin 22-5 358 18
15. Kentucky 21-6 343 16
16. Michigan 19-7 315 20
17. Iowa State 21-5 291 19
18. Michigan State 22-6 275 14
19. Iowa 19-7 229 15
20. Ohio State 22-6 166 23
21. North Carolina 20-7 153 -
22. Memphis 21-6 124 24
23.Texas 20-7 102 17
24. SMU 22-6 57 -
25. Oklahoma 20-7 52 -
Others receiving votes: UConn 47, New Mex-
ico 45, UCLA 15, Kansas State 9, UMass 9,
Stephen F Austin 5, Pittsburgh 4, Gonzaga 3,
Baylor 1, Middle Tennessee 1, Nebraska 1,
Green Bay 1.
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 31 25 .554 -
Brooklyn 26 28 .481 4
NewYork 21 36 .368 10%
Boston 19 39 .328 13
Philadelphia 15 42 .263 16/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 40 14 .741 -
Washington 28 28 .500 13
Charlotte 27 30 .474 14/2
Atlanta 26 29 .473 14/2
Orlando 17 41 .293 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 42 13 .764 -
Chicago 29 26 .527 13
Detroit 23 34 .404 20
Cleveland 22 35 .386 21
Milwaukee 11 45 .196 31/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 40 16 .714 -
Houston 38 18 .679 2
Dallas 35 23 .603 6
Memphis 31 24 .564 8/2
New Orleans 23 33 .411 17
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 43 14 .754 -
Portland 38 18 .679 4/2
Minnesota 27 29 .482 15/2
Denver 25 30 .455 17
Utah 20 36 .357 22/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 20 .661 -
Golden State 35 22 .614 3
Phoenix 33 22 .600 4
Sacramento 20 36 .357 17/2
L.A. Lakers 19 37 .339 18'/2
Sunday's Games
L.A. Clippers 125, Oklahoma City 117
Miami 93, Chicago 79
Washington 96, Cleveland 83
Toronto 105, Orlando 90
Sacramento 109, Denver 95
Brooklyn 108, L.A. Lakers 102
Portland 108, Minnesota 97
Houston 115, Phoenix 112
Monday's Games
Milwaukee 130, Philadelphia 110
Golden State 104, Detroit 96
Dallas 110, NewYork 108
L.A. Clippers 123, New Orleans 110
Utah 110, Boston 98
Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Portland at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Chicago, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 9 p.m.
Brooklyn at Portland, 10 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


Citrus County
Speedway

Feb. 22 results
Open Wheel Mods Feature
No. Name Hometown
43 Gator Hise Inverness
982 L. J. Grimm Seffner
99 Cody Stickler Pinellas Park
98 Robbie Cooper Bronson
19 Keith Brendel Leesburg, GA
90 Cody Johnson Ocala
Mini Stocks Feature
No. Name Hometown
73 Jason Terry Bellview


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
0> 6-5-5
CASH 3 (late)
05-8-3
4 '
fPLAY 4 (early)
6-6-4-4
PLAY 4 (late)
rJ 9-4-3-0

FANTASY 5
8-19-25-26-31


Sunday's winning numbers and payouts:


Fantasy 5: 13 -15-
5-of-5 3 winners
4-of-5 289
3-of-5 8,808


23 27 35
$69,044.85
$115.50
$10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) Florida at Vanderbilt
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Kansas State at Texas Tech
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia Tech at Duke
7 p.m. (FS1) Xavier at St. John's
7 p.m. (SUN) Clemson at Wake Forest
9 p.m. (ESPN) Indiana at Wisconsin
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Wichita State at Bradley
9 p.m. (ESPNU) Missouri at Georgia
9 p.m. (FS1) Seton Hall at DePaul
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Vanderbilt (Same-day Tape)
3 a.m. (ESPNU) Indiana at Wisconsin (Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (SUN) Charlotte at Middle Tennessee State (Taped)
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Washington Wizards
7 p.m. (NBA) Los Angeles Lakers at Indiana Pacers
7:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls atAtlanta Hawks
FOOTBALL
9 a.m. (NFL) 2014 NFL Scouting Combine
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (NHL) Carolina Hurricanes at Buffalo Sabres
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FS1) UEFA Champions League: Zenit St. Petersburg
vs. Borussia Dortmund
2:30 p.m. (FS1) UEFA Champions League: Olympiacos vs.
Manchester United
TENNIS
5 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Dubai Duty Free Championships,
Early Round
7 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Dubai Duty Free Championships,
Early Round
10 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Dubai Duty Free Championships,
Early Round
12 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Dubai Duty Free Championships,
Early Round
11 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Abierto Mexicano Telcel, Early
Rounds
1 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Abierto Mexicano Telcel, Early
Rounds (Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



== Prep CALENDAR


11 Jerry Daniels Weirsdale
33 Bill Ryan Bushnell
24 Tim Scalise Lutz
199 Chris Hennessy Beverly Hills
22 Mark Patterson Webster
Mod Mini Stocks Feature
No. Name Hometown
01 Johnny Siner Homosassa
44 Michael Lawhorn Clermont
24 Phil Edwards Crystal River
47 Richard Kuhn Ocala
711 Wayne Heater Homosassa
Street Stocks Feature
No. Name Hometown
8 Tim Wilson Floral City
3 Curtis Flanagan Inverness
48 Dora Thorne Floral City
92 Ted Head Auburndale
32 Raymond Vann Wesley Chapel
Pure Stocks Feature
No. Name Hometown
3 Jason Waller Inverness
72 Karlin Ray Floral City
17 Nicholas Malverty Spring Hill
285 Chucky Smith Inverness
32 Mike Autenrieth Inverness
185 Wes Wilson Floral City
85 LarryWelterSr. Bronson
75 Mike Gilkerson Bushnell
65 Happy Florian Lecanto
28 Lori Ickes Brooksville
44 Glen Colyer Homosassa
Pro Hornets Feature
No. Name Hometown
99 Raymond Vann Wesley Chapel
97 Alan Harmon Cheifland
98 Marvin Armstrong Wildwood
00 Willie Lacey Wesley Chapel
73 Drew Jackson Lakeland
Rookie Hornets Feature
No. Name Hometown
99 Jacob Vann Wesley Chapel
97 Tyler Harmon Chiefland
73 Stephanie Pope Lakeland



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 57 3716 4 78176 125
Tampa Bay 58 3320 5 71168 145
Montreal 59 3221 6 70148 142
Toronto 60 3222 6 70178 182


Detroit 58 2620 12 64151 163
Ottawa 59 2622 11 63169 191
Florida 58 2229 7 51139 183
Buffalo 57 1534 8 38110 172
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 58 4015 3 83186 138
N.Y Rangers 59 3224 3 67155 146
Philadelphia 59 3023 6 66162 167
Columbus 58 2924 5 63170 161
Washington 59 2723 9 63171 175
Carolina 57 2622 9 61144 158
New Jersey 59 2422 13 61135 146
N.Y Islanders 60 2230 8 52164 200
WESTERN CONFERENCE


St. Louis
Chicago
Colorado
Minnesota
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville

Anaheim
San Jose
Los Angeles
Phoenix
Vancouver
Calgary
Edmonton


Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
57 3912 6 84196 135
60 3511 14 84207 163
58 3716 5 79174 153
59 3121 7 69145 147
58 2721 10 64164 164
60 2826 6 62168 175
59 2524 10 60146 180
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
60 41 14 5 87196 147
59 3716 6 80175 142
59 3122 6 68139 128
58 2721 10 64163 169
60 2724 9 63146 160
58 2229 7 51137 179
60 2033 7 47153 199


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Today's Games
Carolina at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 10p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10:30 p.m.
NHL Scoring leaders
Through Feb. 23


Sidney Crosby, Pit
Ryan Getzlaf, Anh
John Tavares, NYI
Phil Kessel, Tor
Patrick Kane, Chi
Alex Ovechkin, Was
Corey Perry, Anh
Kyle Okposo, NYI
Patrick Sharp, Chi
Evgeni Malkin, Pit
Claude Giroux, Phi


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves catcher Evan Gattis hits during a spring training baseball
workout on Feb. 16 in Kissimmee.



Stepping up to the plate


Braves catcher

Gattis focused on

replacing McCann

Associated Press

KISSIMMEE When Evan Gattis
made Atlanta's opening-day roster
last season, the rookie slugger became
one of the biggest stories for the
Braves.
For Year 2, he wants the focus to be
on his play
Gattis is expected to serve as At-
lanta's primary catcher after Brian Mc-
Cann signed a free-agent deal with the
New York Yankees. Gattis hit .243 with
21 homers and 65 RBIs in 2013, com-
pleting a winding road to the majors.
"I want as much playing time as I
can get," he said after a full-squad
workout. "I want constant at-bats and
I want to keep going every day I want
to play every day and I loved last sea-
son, but this year I want a little more.
I am not taking everything for granted.
Last year was nice but it's a new year"
What made Gattis so compelling
last season was the journey he took to
the pros. After high school, there were
bouts with drugs and alcohol, not to
mention plenty of dark days where the
thought of killing himself seemed like
a good way out The fear of failing at
baseball proved overwhelming,
prompting him to quit when he was
only 19.
He worked a series of menial jobs
-from valet to janitor to cart boy at a
golf course and struggled to un-
cover a deeper meaning to life, hop-




POLL
Continued from Page B1l

ranking and we're the best team in
the country," Donovan said. "We've
been given a number, and that's about
the extent of it."
These Gators have won a school
record 19 straight games coming off a
75-71 win at Mississippi where they
shut down Marshall Henderson in the
second half. They can clinch at least a
share of the Southeastern Conference
title on Tuesday night with a win at
Vanderbilt before having a chance to
wrap up the championship against
LSU on Saturday
Playing at Memorial Gym means
dealing with the unique layout with
the benches on the end lines. Even
though Vanderbilt is playing short-
handed with only seven scholarship
players and even used a couple walk-
ons, the Gators with their new rank-
ing will be tested quickly
Florida senior forward Will
Yeguete thinks the Gators will handle
the challenge well.
"Our lives aren't really changing,"
Yeguete said. "We're No. 1. That's a




HISE
Continued from Page B1

Stock championship, started in the
third row of the Pure Stock feature,
before vaulting to the front of the
largest field of the night by the fifth
lap. On 17, the Inverness driver began
lapping the back of the field.
Floral City's Karlin Ray, a six-time
feature winner in 2013, overcame car-
buretor trouble to grab and main-
tain second place with an inside
move on lap 15 against Spring Hill's
Nicholas Malverty, who finished third.
"Man, this is great!" said Waller in
victory lane. "We worked on this (No.
3) for the last two nights until 11 or 12
o'clock at night, trying to get here this
week. I couldn't be more proud."
Wesley Chapel's Raymond Vann
won the night's Pro Hornets feature
with ease, but was immediately
knocked out of the Street Stocks fea-
ture after losing a tire during a three-
wide blitz to the front out of the
starting gate. Wilson had the lead
once the dust settled, and he kept Cur-
tis Flanagan (second-place finish) be-
hind him by four or five car lengths for
most of the 25 laps. Dora Thorne came


ing that would help him deal with his
demons. He became a wanderer, trav-
eling through the western United
States. He lived out of his vehicle and
listened intently to the words of vari-
ous spiritual advisers.
Finally, something clicked. The
quest was over It was time to get back
to what he knew best baseball.
His stepbrother was playing at the
University of Texas of the Permian
Basin. Gattis joined the team and be-
came one of the top players in the
Heartland Conference, showing
enough power and potential to be a
late-round pick by the Braves.
It's a story Gattis has recounted
over and over, and knows he'll have to
tell again. But he's focused on im-
proving his batting average from last
season and catching a revamped
pitching staff.
"I know there are going to be ad-
justments to make," Gattis said. "I just
hope it's an easy adjustment. Brian
was a great catcher for the Braves but
now it's up to me for as many games as
they give me and it's my job to help
this team get to the World Series."
Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez
said he was impressed by Gattis' work
with the pitchers last season while he
adjusted to the majors.
"The pitchers like working with
him," Gonzalez said. "He's adjusting
to the leadership position, but he
never had any trouble working with
the veteran pitchers last season.
Maybe they were afraid of him."
The 6-foot-4, 240-pound Gattis is
physically intimidating, but in the
locker room, he's just one of the guys
trying to blend in as the starting
catcher He'll talk about the past, but
his eyes are more on the future.


really good accomplishment, espe-
cially for us being No. 1. But I think
Coach D will use that to motivate us.
We've been No. 2 before. We know
what it is to be ranked really high. We
know you just take one game at a
time."
Wichita State coach Gregg Marshall
told The Associated Press that being
ranked No. 2 means the Shockers are
being recognized for an outstanding
season so far, and they plan to keep
pushing to see how high they can go.
"Florida is an outstanding team,"
Marshall said. "I've watched them, I
really think they're good, there's a lot
of good teams out there. But I just
think this continues to be a carrot for
our team. It continues to be a goal and
it's a very lofty goal, and it's some-
thing to strive for"
Kansas jumped three places to fifth
and was followed by Duke, Louisville,
Villanova, Creighton and Saint Louis.
Syracuse, which was No. 1 the past
three weeks, lost to Boston College
and Duke last week, the Orange's first
losses of the season.
North Carolina, SMU and New
Mexico all returned to the Top 25 this
week replacing Connecticut, UCLA
and Gonzaga.



in third.
Wilson thanked the efforts of HHH
Chassis for his car's improvement
from the first race.
"It took a lot of work," Wilson said.
"I don't care who you are, it's hard to
do anything by yourself, especially in
racing."
Homosassa's Siner had to fend off
Clermont's Michael Lawhorn both
early and late for his win in the 25-lap
Modified Mini Stock feature. Lawhorn
ended up second, while Crystal
River's Phil Edwards, facing heat
from Ocala's Richard Kuhn late in the
race, landed third place.
Belleview's Jason Terry celebrated
his 40th birthday with a feature win in
Mini Stocks, where he beat out Jerry
Daniels (second place) and division-
leader Bill Ryan (third).
First-timers Jacob Vann, of Wesley
Chapel, and Tyler Harmon, of
Chiefland, tussled for all 15 laps of the
Rookie Hornets feature, which Vann
prevailed in while riding the same
No. 99 the elder Vann won with in the
Pro division earlier in the night.
Non-winged Sprints, Champ Karts,
Street Stocks, Pure Stocks, Hornets
and Fan Participation Racing are on
the docket this Saturday at the Citrus
County Speedway


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. Lecanto at Hudson
TBD Seven Rivers at Cornerstone
SOFTBALL
6 p.m. Seven Rivers at Wildwood
7 p.m. Lecanto at Hernando
7 p.m. Citrus at West Port
BOYS TENNIS
4 p.m. Hernando at Lecanto
GIRLS TENNIS
4 p.m. Hernando at Lecanto


SCOREBOARD


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 B3








Sprint Cup

Yankees add $52 million for GardnerDSprints


x ~ ~ A fir, :l ": :E:.:... E":::E. :: :: :::E ii:E .... lll, m ::: i ":"7M '- .Ai
Associated Press
New York Yankees center fielder Brett Gardner bunts during spring
training Friday in Tampa.


Associated Press

TAMPA Outfielder Brett
Gardner and the New York Yan-
kees have agreed to a contract
that adds $52 million in guaran-
teed money from 2015-18.
The deal announced Sunday
includes a team option for for
2019 that if exercised would
make the new money $62.5 mil-
lion over five seasons.
"It shows the level of confi-
dence, belief and trust, and the
type of player and person he is,"
Yankees general manager Brian
Cashman said. "We're excited to
know that he's going to be a part
of this team going forward. We're
a better team with Gardy on it,
that's the bottom line. This is a
good day for him, and we believe


it makes the future for us better"
Gardner agreed last month to a
$5.6 million, one-year contract
and would have been eligible for
free agency after the 2014 season.
The new four-year contract in-
cludes a $2 million signing bonus
payable next Jan. 15 and salaries
of $12 million in 2015, $13 million
in 2016, $12 million in 2017 and
$11 million in 2018. The Yankees
have a $12.5 million option for
2019 with a $2 million buyout.
Gardner would receive an ad-
ditional $1 million payment if
he's traded, a provision he can
earn only once.
The Yankees are moving Gard-
ner to left field this year after
signing free agent center fielder
Jacoby Ellsbury to a $153 million,
seven-year contract in December


Heavy weight lifted


Earnhardt

gets big win at

Daytona 500

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
There was a moment late
in the Daytona 500 when
Dale Earnhardt Jr had a
moment to catch his
breath. It was clearly his
race to lose and the ten-
sion ran thick through
Junior Nation, all the way
into his car
Steve Letarte, the crew
chief and cheerleader
who had rebuilt Earn-
hardt's crumpled confi-
dence and returned him
to a championship con-
tender, used the moment
under caution to settle his
driver
"Having fun?" Letarte
asked over the radio.
"Yeah, but it's the big
prize, man. It's hard to
enjoy it," Earnhardt said,
before he paused. "I'm en-
joying particular pieces of
it, but the entire experi-
ence is driving me crazy"
That's the albatross that
was strapped to the back
of NASCAR's most popu-
lar driver as he closed in
on his second Daytona 500
victory It had been 10
years since he won his
first 500, and after three
runner-up finishes the last
four seasons in a race that
had caused his family so
much heartache and joy,
the moment was
overwhelming.
There's so much pres-
sure on Earnhardt, who
entered the season-
opening showcase mired
in a 55-race losing streak
dating to 2012. He'd won
just two races since join-
ing mighty Hendrick Mo-
torsports in 2008, and as
he closes in on his 40th
birthday, he is still search-
ing for his first Cup
championship.
It's been openly stated
by the suits at NASCAR
that when Junior wins,
NASCAR's popularity
surges. So under that the-
ory, if he could just get it
together, the days of flat
television numbers and
sagging attendance would
certainly spike.
That's a lot of pressure
to put on one guy, and it hit
him as he readied himself
for the homestretch Sun-
day night.
"It's a big race and you
want to win it so badly and
your team wants to win so
badly," he said afterward.


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. celebrates in Victory Lane after winning NASCAR's Daytona 500 on Sunday night at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach.


"You realize at that mo-
ment that there are count-
less people watching on
television and there are
countless people sitting in
the grandstands with your
shirts and hats on, and
your team is over on the
pit wall and your family
back home there are so
many people pulling for
you and want to see you
win. It's a heavy weight."
This time, he delivered.
He emerged from a rain
delay of more than six
hours with the strongest car
in the field. As other driv-
ers struggled to keep busy
during the lengthy break,
Earnhardt said his concern
was not consuming too
much of the junk food


stored in his motorhome.
He knew what he had in
the No. 88 Chevrolet.
"I knew it was some-
thing special," he said. "I
knew we had enough race
car I was a little bit nerv-
ous because the pressure
was on me because there
was plenty of car to do it."
Earnhardt handled every
challenge over the final 50
miles. He shook off Greg
Biffle, the peskiest foe, and
then Carl Edwards. Lined
up for a two-lap sprint to
the finish, he found himself
next to one-time protege
Brad Keselowski, who had
a car almost as strong as
Earnhardt's.
But Earnhardt had
teammate Jeff Gordon on


his bumper to help on the
final restart, and once he
cleared Keselowski it was
essentially over Moves
made by other drivers in
the pack ruined Ke-
selowski's pursuit and
Denny Hamlin stormed
through the field but did-
n't have the help he
needed or enough laps to
mount a proper charge.
Hamlin, who won two
races earlier in Speed-
weeks and was going for
the trifecta, was dejected
with second place. But he
noted the significance of
the victory
'"Any time an Earnhardt
wins at Daytona," he
shrugged.
The late Dale Earn-


hardt won 34 races at
Daytona International
Speedway, but his only
500 victory came in 1998
in his 20th try He was
killed in an accident on
the last lap of the 2001
race, triggered while he
tried to protect a 1-2 finish
for Michael Waltrip and
his son, who both drove
for him.
Conspiracy has followed
Earnhardt Jr since his fa-
ther's death as fans won-
dered if some of his
biggest career moments
were freebies from
NASCAR during a time of
mourning. Third-place fin-
isher Keselowski believes
Daytona 500 win No. 2 can-
not be challenged.


Dolphins' union rep: Fallout for team is overblown


Associated Press

DAVIE The players' union
representative from the Miami
Dolphins says the fallout from
their bullying scandal is
overblown because every NFL
team has a similar locker-room
culture.
Long snapper John Denney, a
nine-year veteran, said Monday
he hadn't read the investigative
report on the Dolphins case. But
any harassment among players
is nothing new, he said.
"It's overblown, because this
has been my experience with the
league my entire career from
Day One," Denney said in a tele-
phone interview "If something


needed to be done, it needed to
be done a long time ago. It has
never escalated. I never saw con-
ditions worsen. I guess we're late
in getting to the issue.
"I would be comfortable in
saying if you put an investigation
on any of the 32 teams in the
NFL, you're going to come out
with the exact same results."
In a report released Feb. 14,
investigators found guard
Richie Incognito and two other
offensive linemen engaged in
persistent harassment directed
at tackle Jonathan Martin, an-
other offensive lineman and an
assistant trainer
Denney, at 35 the Dolphins' old-
est player, said behavior among


players was no different last year
than when his NFL career began
in 2005. Bullying of rookies was
common then, too, he said.
"When I came into the league,
I assumed I was going to accept it
or find a different line of work,"
Denney said. "I don't agree with
the lifestyles of some of guys on
the team, but if I have an issue, I
can address it with individual
people. If I felt uncomfortable
with a situation, I would address
it or find something else to do."
Denney made his comments fol-
lowing a celebrity golf tournament
organized by former Dolphins star
Jason Taylor that included several
current Miami players.
Quarterback Ryan Tannehill


said he's confident the neces-
sary changes will be made to en-
sure a healthy locker-room
environment. Tannehill made
his first public comments re-
garding the 144-page report.
"I saw a few pages of it," Tan-
nehill said. "I got overwhelmed by
140-and-whatever pages and
skipped it I'm just glad it's out
The evaluations and summaries
have been made, the points have
been taken and now we can move
forward. There's no more being
anxious about it coming out We've
had the consequences and reper-
cussions, and now we can put it in
the past and move forward."
The Dolphins fired offensive
line coach Jim Turner and long-


time head athletic trainer Kevin
O'Neill for their roles in the
scandal, and coach Joe Philbin
pledged to improve the work-
place culture.
NFL punishment of players
who engaged in harassment may
be forthcoming in the form of
fines, suspensions or both. Tan-
nehill could find him playing be-
hind an entirely new line to start
the 2014 season.
Even so, he considers fallout
from the scandal in the past.
"I think it's behind us at this
point," he said. "Obviously we'll
try to learn from it and correct
things coach Philbin and the
coaching staff feel need to be
changed."


B4 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sunday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (9) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200 laps,
133.1 rating, 48 points, $1,506,363.
2. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 113.8, 43,
$1,148,451.
3. (33) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200, 117.1,42,
$847,721.
4. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 102.7, 40,
$731,399.
5. (32) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200,
101.2, 40, $589,399.
6. (3) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 98.2, 38,
$518,362.
7. (34) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 72,
37, $434,588.
8. (25) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200, 94.1, 37,
$413,838.
9. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 83.4, 36,
$424,674.
10. (28) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 200, 80.8,
34, $377,221.
11. (35) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 104.1, 34,
$376,354.
12. (18) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 200, 67.6,
0, $306,850.
13. (38) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 85.1,
31, $368,196.
14. (22) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200,
73.8, 30, $361,777.
15. (26) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 200, 46.2,
29, $325,213.
16. (39) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 200,
69.3, 28, $342,446.
17. (30) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 87, 28,
$340,638.
18. (7) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 200, 79.5, 26,
$363,458.
19. (37) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 100.5, 26,
$373,504.
20. (24) Terry Labonte, Ford, 200, 66.1, 24,
$339,996.
21. (8) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 199, 89.9, 24,
$331,763.
22. (19) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 199, 60.3,
22, $331,638.
23.(29) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 198, 43.7, 21,
$334,346.
24. (11) Josh Wise, Ford, 196, 47.5, 20,
$322,888.
25. (12) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 196, 68.2, 0,
$336,035.
26. (15) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194,
53.1, 19, $321,788.
27. (40) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident,
193, 60.8, 18, $327,513.
28. (23) Cole Whitt, Toyota, accident, 193,
62.5, 16, $315,663.
29. (41) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, accident,
193, 48.2, 15, $318,338.
30. (31) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192, 70.6, 14,
$350,388.
31. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 192, 64.1,
14, $350,413.
32. (10) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 184, 80, 13,
$550,702.
33. (14)Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 183,
59.5, 0, $316,438.
34. (43) David Ragan, Ford, 176, 32.2, 10,
$323,738.
35. (21) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 174, 36.8,
9, $349,521.
36. (17) David Gilliland, Ford, 171, 41.5, 8,
$322,968.
37. (36) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, accident,
161, 42.8, 7, $313,605.
38. (16) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, accident,
160, 32.2, 6, $310,248.
39. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 146,
59.8, 6, $317,939.
40. (27) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, accident,
145, 53.6, 5, $282,778.
41. (42) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, accident,
144, 46, 4, $278,628.
42. (20) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, engine, 127,
41, 2, $302,344.
43. (2) MartinTruex Jr., Chevrolet, engine, 30,
27.3, 1, $292,311.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 145.290
mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 26 minutes, 29
seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 7 for 39 laps.
Lead Changes: 42 among 18 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1; D.Hamlin 2-10;
Ku.Busch 11-25; P.Menard 26-30; D.Hamlin
31; Ky.Busch 32-45; K.Kahne 46; Ky.Busch
47; K.Kahne 48; Ky.Busch 49; D.Hamlin 50-
55; Ky.Busch 56; B.Keselowski 57; Ky.Busch
58-59; B.Keselowski 60-63; P.Menard 64-70;
J.Logano 71-72; B.Keselowski 73-75;
T.Bayne 76-77; A.Almirola 78-82; A.AII-
mendinger 83; J.AIIgaier 84; D.Patrick 85-86;
J.AlIIgaier 87; M.Waltrip 88-89; P.Menard 90-
106; J.Johnson 107-115; B.Keselowski 116-
120; J.Johnson 121-126; J.AlIIgaier 127-128;
M.Waltrip 129-130; D.Earnhardt Jr. 131-143;
C.Edwards 144; D.Earnhardt Jr. 145-150;
G.Biffle 151-153; D.Earnhardt Jr. 154-155;
G.Biffle 156-158; D.Earnhardt Jr. 159-172;
G.Biffle 173-174; C.Edwards 175-177;
D.Earnhardt Jr. 178; C.Edwards 179-182;
D.Earnhardt Jr. 183-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): D.Earnhardt Jr., 6 times for 54 laps;
P.Menard, 3 times for 29 laps; Ky.Busch, 5
times for 19 laps; D.Hamlin, 3 times for 16
laps; J.Johnson, 2 times for 15 laps;
Ku.Busch, 1 timefor 15 laps; B.Keselowski, 4
times for 13 laps; G.Biffle, 3 times for 8 laps;
C.Edwards, 3 times for 8 laps; A.Almirola, 1
time for 5 laps; J.AlIIgaier, 3 times for 4 laps;
M.Waltrip, 2 times for 4 laps; J.Logano, 1 time
for 2 laps; K.Kahne, 2 times for 2 laps;
T.Bayne, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Patrick, 1 time
for 2 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 1 lap; A.AII-
mendinger, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. D.Earnhardt Jr., 48; 2.
D.Hamlin, 43; 3. Bra.Keselowski, 42; 4. J.Gor-
don, 40; 5. J.Johnson, 40; 6. M.Kenseth, 38;
7. R.Stenhouse Jr., 37; 8. G.Biffle, 37; 9. A.Dil-
lon, 36; 10.C.ears, 34; 11. J.Logano, 34; 12.
K.Harvick, 31.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in
a race.
The formula combines the following cate-
gories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Av-
erage Running Position While on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap,
Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.






Section C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Inside:
Concert set for Arts Council
Series in Homosassa
/C8


y now, lio' t i-t Ii x h i\e heirdi thit
strawben-'rie 're ol- e o- tlhe
healthiest ftoodI .. peroni ':n enit
We all knowthe.\ 're hih in1 \ it.iiin C.
but what else makes them a good choice
at mealtime?
Strawberries and other berries are
touted as "superfoods" because of their
impressive nutrient profiles.
They owe their red hue to antho-
cyanins, which are color pigments and
antioxidants.
One study by the Harvard School of
Public Health showed that high intake
of anthocyanin was associated with a
reduced risk of stroke in young and
middle-aged women.
Strawberries are rich in manganese
and other minerals and vitamins.
Strawberries are good for the brain.
In a study published in Annals of
Neurology researchers found a high
intake of strawberries and other
flavonoid-rich berries can slow down
memory decline.
One cup of whole strawberries con-
tains fewer than 50 calories and about
100 percent of the recommended daily
amount of vitamin C for an adult.


Sti %henv ie-I I Ontljin hiO'ti n. iI
imllporitit in trlient tr he.li thi .kin
Here are some more things you might
not know about strawberries:
They belong to the same family -
Fragraria as roses and apples.
The Environmental Working
Group ranked conventionally grown
strawberries second-worst for pesticide
residue in its list of popular fruits and
vegetables.
If synthetic pesticides are a concern
for you, there is good news: Organically
grown strawberries aren't difficult to
find in grocery stores, and strawberries
are easy to grow at home.
Also, some growers choose not to use
synthetic pesticides, so it's worth asking
local growers about these practices if
you are concerned about pesticide
residue on your berries.
According to University of Illinois
Extension, 94 percent of American
households consume strawberries.
Although they are grown in every
U.S. state, most of the country's
strawberries are grown in California.
-photo byAmanda Mims


Amanda Mims
For the Chronicle

Strawberries aren't just
delicious they're also
nutritious. They're packed with
antioxidants, and a cup of
whole strawberries contains
fewer than 50 calories and
about 100 percent of the
recommended daily amount of
vitamin C for an adult.


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Can tomatoes reduce your breast cancer risk?


or decades, we have
known that post-
menopausal women are
at a higher risk of developing
breast cancer But now, new re-
search suggests that adopting a
diet rich in tomatoes may re-
duce this risk, according to a
study recently published in the
Journal of Clinical Endocrinol-
ogy and Metabolism. And, since
more than 200,000 cases of breast
cancer are diagnosed each and
every year, any reduction could
impact thousands of women.
Based upon statistics from
the National Cancer Institute,
women in the U.S. have a
12.4 percent risk of developing
breast cancer at some point in
their lives. And, like many dif-
ferent cancers, this risk in-
creases with age, with women
older than age of 50 having a 1
in 42 chance of developing the
disease. But why does this risk
increase with age? For years,
we have known that post-
menopausal women increase
their risk of breast cancer fur-
ther as their body mass index
(BMI) climbs. And for years, we
have encouraged post-
menopausal women to
watch their weight, eat a


Dr. C.
Joseph
Bennett

NAVIGATING
CANCER


well-balanced diet, and to exer-
cise. But this latest study sug-
gests that this risk may be
reduced simply by adopting a
different diet.
In this study, researchers
carefully followed 70 post-
menopausal women. For the
first 10 weeks, the women were
required to follow a tomato-
rich diet. This involved con-
suming a minimum of 25 mg of
lycopene each day Lycopene is
an antioxidant found in toma-
toes and other fruits and veg-
etables. A tomato-rich diet also
increases adiponectin levels, a
hormone that plays an impor-
tant part in the regulation of fat
and blood sugar levels. For the
remaining 10 weeks, the
women followed a soy-rich diet.
This required them to consume
at least 40 g of soy protein daily


Results of the study revealed
that when the women followed
the tomato-rich diet, they
showed a 9 percent increase in
their levels of adiponectin.
And, this effect was more
prominent for women who had
a lower BMI. However, when
the women followed the soy-
rich diet, this led to a reduction
in adiponectin levels, and as
one would guess, low
adiponectin levels are linked to
an increased risk of obesity and
insulin resistance, leading to
higher blood sugar levels.


Based upon this study, it ap-
pears that the apple is not the
only fruit or vegetable that
can possibly keep the doctor
away
Eating fruits and vegetables,
that are rich in essential nutri-
ents, vitamins, minerals and
phytochemicals, such as ly-
copene, appears to lead to sig-
nificant benefits. With the
recent negative data regarding
vitamins and supplements, this
data seems to support the con-
cept of a healthy diet over sup-
plements. And, based on this


data, it appears that consump-
tion of at least the daily recom-
mended servings of fruits and
vegetables would promote
breast cancer prevention in the
post-menopausal female popu-
lation. This study also seems to
highlight the importance of
obesity prevention, since a
tomato-rich diet had a bigger
impact on adiponectin levels
for women who maintained a
healthy body weight
And, this is not the first time
the mighty tomato has been
linked to health benefits. Last
year, another report suggested
that eating lots of tomatoes may
reduce the risk of stroke, while
other research has suggested
that eating a combination of
soy and tomato foods may help
prevent prostate cancer
The take home message: Eat
a healthy diet, exercise, and
maintain a good body weight
Makes sense doesn't it?

Dr Bennett is a board-certi-
fied radiation oncologist If you
have any suggestions for topics,
or have any questions, contact
him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461, or email
cjbennett@rboi. com.


Stroke: Preventable, treatable and beatable


Special to the Chronicle
Editor's note: This is
the final entry in a four-
part series for February
about heart health
awareness.
To begin to understand
the impact that stroke can
have in our lives, it is im-
portant to know the statis-
tics. The American Stroke
Association reports that
one in six people will
have a stroke in their life-
time; stroke is the fourth
leading cause of death in
the United States; and
worldwide, stroke is the
number one cause of pre-
ventable disability
As healthcare providers
we have a responsibility


to promote awareness in
the community on the
warning signs of stroke as
well as the fact that stroke
is largely preventable,
treatable and beatable.
What is a stroke? One
way to understand a
stroke is to think of it as a
"brain attack." A stroke
can occur when a vessel
in the brain either rup-
tures or develops a clot
which can block circula-
tion to an area of the
brain.
Recognizing the signs
and symptoms of a stroke
quickly is important be-
cause treatment alterna-
tives are time-sensitive. If
you or someone you know
shows any of these signs
and symptoms of a stroke,


call 911 immediately An
easy way to remember the
signs and symptoms of a
stroke is to use the letters
EA.S.T
Face Drooping -
Does one side of the face
droop or is it numb? Ask
the person to smile.
Is the person's smile
uneven?
Arm Weakness Is
one arm weak or numb?
Ask the person to raise
both arms. Does one arm
drift downward?
Speech Difficulty -
Is speech slurred? Is the
person unable to speak or
hard to understand? Ask
the person to repeat a
simple sentence, like
"The sky is blue." Is the
sentence repeated


VO T


correctly?
Time to call 911 -If
someone shows any of
these symptoms even if
the symptoms go away -
call 9-1-1 and get the per-
son to the hospital imme-
diately Check the time so
you'll know when the first
symptoms appeared.
Of course, it is best to
live a healthy lifestyle
that reduces your risk for


www.Tri-County-Hearing.com
dvdditchfield@yahoo.com


stroke. How can stroke be
prevented? Follow "Life's
Simple Seven"!
1. Eat better
2. Manage your blood
pressure
3. Get physically active
4. Lose excess weight
5. Lower cholesterol
6. Reduce blood sugar
7. Don't smoke
If you are the one in six
that experiences a stroke,


get to the nearest hospital
designated as a Stroke
Center as quickly as pos-
sible.
The more quickly you
receive evaluation and
treatment, the better your
chances for recovery
without significant loss of
function.
Remember ... stroke is
preventable, treatable
and beatable.


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Help us welcome Dr. Anastasia Solovieva, board
certified in obstetrics/gynecology. In the Seven
Rivers Regional tradition of providing exceptional
care, she can help women with normal and high-risk
pregnancies as well as conditions that involve fertility,
abnormal bleeding, pelvic pain, ovarian cysts, urinary
incontinence and more. Dr. Solovieva offers
high-tech, in-office treatments as well as traditional
and minimally invasive surgical options.


Anastasia Solovieva, M.D.
OB/GYN

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Hearing Aid Specialist, Audioprosthologist


3519 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL (Winn Dixie Plaza)


C2 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Newer test to detect internal bleeding


iss Smith was feeling
very tired, and so she
went to see her in-
ternist, who did a blood count
and found that she had anemia.
This is a very common condi-
tion. We must find out what is
the cause of her anemia. It can
be due to many different rea-
sons and finding out the exact
reason is extremely important.
Once we know the reason, we
can treat it and then correct
anemia in most cases.
She was referred to me for
further workup. She was found
to be deficient in iron. This is
very common. The most com-
mon cause of iron deficiency in
adult Americans who are post-
menopausal is bleeding in the


Dr.
Sunil
Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE


GI tract, i.e., the stomach, colon
or intestine. She did not notice
any blood in stool or black-col-
ored stool that suggests blood in
stool.
Therefore, I ordered a stool
test that can test for micro-
scopic or hidden blood in stool.
The old method of stool testing
involves checking stool


specimens daily for 3 days and
there is a strict restriction on
diet, certain medications like
iron, etc.
The test is called fecal occult
blood test (FOBT). This has
been used for many decades.
A new test is coming out
called fecal immunochemical
test or FIT
There are no drug or dietary
restrictions. Since vitamins and
foods do not affect the FIT,
sample collection may take less
preparation. Also, the patient
needs to collect stool samples
for only one day This compares
favorably to the old FOBT
system that requires stool
collection for three days.
The test method is based on


the detection of human hemo-
globin (Hgb). It indicates the
presence of blood in the stool.
The test detects the globin (pro-
tein) portion of the Hgb mole-
cule. Because globin does not
survive passage through the
upper gastrointestinal tract,
any globin in the stool indicates
that there is bleeding in the
lower colon or rectum, the re-
gion where colorectal cancers
originate.
This test has an overall diag-
nostic accuracy of 95 percent
for the detection of colorectal
cancer, according to the results
of a meta-analysis just pub-
lished in the Annals of Internal
Medicine. The study analyzed
19 different studies by a


method called meta-analysis.
In short, the test is more spe-
cific for colon-related occult
blood, and probably more sen-
sitive, than FOBT and requires
fewer stool samples.
My patient underwent the
new FIT for her stool and she
liked it a lot more than the
other FOBT, which she had to
take in past

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a hema-
tologist and oncologist. He is
the volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit ofAmerican
Cancer Society Write to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, email sgandhi@
tampabayrr.com or call
352-746-0707.


Common bone


medication can


cause jaw, throat


and esophagus


problems, issues


Slendronate is a
generic name for
u osamax, which is a
common medication that
is taken by many of my pa-
tients for bone problems.
Generally speaking, it is
tolerated very well, but it
does cause some ENT
and esophageal problems
that can be significant. Al-
endronate is a prescrip-
tion only medication that
is used to treat or prevent
osteoporosis in women
after menopause.
Osteoporosis is defined
as a reduction in the
quantity of bone that is
seen in postmenopausal
women and elderly men
that can increase risk for
fractures. Fracture sites
include the hip or spine.
Sometimes the medica-
tion is used in situations
where patients have to
take steroids for chronic
conditions that can dam-
age the bone. Then there
is a disease call Paget's
disease that manifests it-
self in causing bones to
thicken and soften.
The patients who take
alendronate can have and
develop problems in the
throat and the esophagus,
including irritation, in-
flammation, ulcers, that
could even bleed if se-
vere. Sometimes symp-
toms are very mild and
may seem innocent like
some minor heartburn,
and other times they can
be quite severe and cause
pain or trouble swallow-
ing. I have seen patients
complain of spasms,
twitching or cramping in
muscles around the
mouth, and even some-
times describe numbness
or tingling.
Besides the direct irri-
tation alendronate
causes, it can also cause
lower calcium levels and
that may account for the
muscle cramping type of
symptoms. Severe bone,
joint and muscle pain can
also develop and is com-


Dr.
Denis
Grillo
EAR,
NOSE &
THROAT


only seen in the jaw.
Generally speaking, when
the medicine is pre-
scribed, doctors advise
patients to see their den-
tist, and have a good
exam and cleaning and
then if there are any prob-
lems that develop, they
can follow up and evalu-
ate if there is any damage
to the jaw bone.
The most common thing
that is seen is a problem
called osteonecrosis. Os-
teonecrosis means that a
viable bone tissue dies off
and leaves small areas of
dead bone that can lead
to problems with the
teeth and jaw, which is
necessary for simple
things, such as eating and
chewing.
If you have been recom-
mended to begin alen-
dronate, please have a
candid discussion with
your doctor about any
teeth or jaw problems,
swallowing or digestive is-
sues. He or she may rec-
ommend premedication
consultation with a den-
tist, gastroenterologist or
may just simply recom-
mend starting you on cal-
cium supplement as that
is one of the minerals that
can be affected by the
medication.
If used properly and no
side effects or problems
occur, alendronate can be
an effective medication to
combat osteoporosis and
Paget's disease.
Denis Grillo, D. O.,
FOCOO, is an ear, nose and
throat specialist in Crystal
River Call him at 352-795-
0011 or visit Crystal
CommunityENTcom.


"Caring is my Pro ion
"Caring is my Profession"


Questionable treatment suggestions


worries patient about scam issues


Q I am a 70 year old
Woman. I have all my
teeth and have always
tak care of them. In the past
three years, I have probably spent
around $4,000 on root canals, old
fillings caps, etc. Less than a year
ago, I had major surgery and I
had too see my dentist before my
operation.
Now that I am in Florida for
the winter I made an appoint-
ment to have my teeth cleaned. I
did not want any X-rays, as I have
that done at home. The girl spent
30 minutes checking my teeth and
taking notes. After the cleaning,
the dentist came in and told me I
needed a lot of work. In fact, they
gave me a printout when I left,
saying I needed $6,500 worth of
work.
I want to know how a dentist
can look into my mouth after just
a cleaning and no X-rays and
come up with this kind of advice?
This seems to be the latest rip off
of older people. I would like your
comments on this.
A: Thank you for your question.
I am sorry you had to go through
this and feel as you do. As you
may realize, it is impossible for
me to know the condition of your
mouth without seeing you. How-
ever, this situation is part of why
you wrote to me.
It may be entirely possible that
you need the work presented to
you. However, based on you hav-
ing significant work in the recent
past and being a regular patient
to the dentist, you have a right to
be skeptical.
In order to make a thorough di-
agnosis, a dentist must perform a
complete clinical examination
and review of radiographs. I
would also be concerned if the


" "


Dr. Frank
Vascimini
SOUND
BITES


assistant or hygienist did the ex-
amination part and all the dentist
did was present the treatment.
I feel strongly that the first visit
to a dental office should be with
the dentist so he or she can per-
form a thorough examination to
include a review of radiographs.
In fact, many people choose not to
make an appointment with me
because I refuse to appoint a pa-
tient into the hygiene department
first.
When we were taught diagnosis
and treatment planning in school,
they always started us with
doing a complete set of X-rays,
followed by an examination of
the teeth, gums, supporting and
surrounding structures.
Now that you have written in
with this question, I will bring up
another issue that has surfaced in
the past few months. It happens
to parallel what your concerns
are.
I have had a number of patients
present to me for a second opin-
ion with a written treatment plan
in hand. For whatever reason,
they were just not comfortable
with their first visit to the
dentist, a situation very similar to
yours.
Each of these patients had a
different reason for feeling un-
easy about what was suggested to
them, but they all had doubts.
I am very sorry to report that,


in each of these cases, dentistry
was recommended that simply
was not necessary One patient
was recommended to have gum
surgery at the cost of $3,000 that
was totally unsupported by my
examination.
I am embarrassed by my profes-
sion when I see these things going
on.
All I can say to you, as well as
all the readers of this column, is
that there are some serious things
happening in dentistry right now
Just last week, I have had another
lab from China contact me and a
Chinese manufacturer of lasers
contact me about their new den-
tal laser When you combine this
along with the issue of unneces-
sary dentistry being diagnosed,
we have a big problem.
Please be aware of this and
share it with your friends who do
not read the Chronicle. However,
do not condemn all of the dentists
out there.
I guess you may have more of a
reason than ever to seek out a
second opinion. Just be sure you
choose the right person for the
second opinion.
I wish I could be of more help
than this, but the issue of second
opinions is always a hard one be-
cause they can often lead to third
and forth opinions. Just remem-
ber that your "gut" feeling
is seldom wrong. If you are sus-
pect, this is a great time to look
further
Dr Frank Vascimini is a dentist
practicing in Homosassa. Send
your questions to 4805 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
or email them to him at
info@MasterpieceDentalStudio.
com.


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Providing state-of-the-art retina care to West Central Florida since 1989


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH NOTES


Diabetic series offered
Spring Hill -Access Health Care of-
fers an education series about diabetes
mellitus at Access Health Care, 4270
Lake In the Woods Drive, Spring Hill, at
1 p.m. March 10 titled "Diabetes 101."
The series is directed to anyone who
has been diagnosed with diabetes
mellitus (DM) and family
The series is conducted by Verna
Pedersen Runyan, ARNP-C, CDE.
Seating is limited and reservations
are required. For information and to
RSVP, call Jeanna or Mariah at 352-597-
7249.

Group conducts meeting
Citrus County Continuity of Care
meets at 10 a.m. the fourth Wednesday
monthly; the location varies.
This month, the group meets at
Crystal River Health & Rehab, 136 N.E.
12th Ave., Crystal River, with guest
speaker Elizabeth Dalusio discussing
elder options.
For information, call Gailen Spinka at
352-697-2288. Check out Facebook:
Citrus County Continuity of Care.

Matter of Balance class
scheduled in Homosassa
The next Matter of Balance class se-
ries is scheduled to start Friday, April 4,
at the West Central Community Center
located at 8940 W Veterans Drive in


Homosassa, next to the VA just off U.S.
19. Classes are from 9 to 11 a.m. every
Friday through May 23. There are only a
few openings available for this class, as
participant space is limited. Call Katie
Lucas, Matter of Balance county coordi-
nator, at 352-249-4730 to reserve your
placement
This program is free to all partici-
pants and is designed to reduce the fear
of falling and increase the activity levels
of older adults who have concerns about
falls. Matter of Balance utilizes volun-
teer coaches to teach the eight two-hour
sessions and is sponsored by Elder
Affairs of Florida.
Classes are being scheduled through-
out the county, so if you would like to be
put on a waiting list for a class in your
area, call Katie Lucas at Nature Coast
EMS at 352-249-4730. Once a class is
scheduled near you, you will have first
rights for enrollment in that class.

Blood donors sought

LifeSouth Community Blood Centers:
To find a donor center or a blood drive
near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must
be at least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum of 110
pounds and be in good health to be eli-
gible to donate. A photo ID is required.
The Lecanto branch office is at 1241
S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at 2629 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, open from 8 a.m.


to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m.
Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Satur-
days and closed Sundays.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, Cit-
rus County Tax Collector's Office, 210 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness.
2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, Wal-
mart Supercenter, 2461 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
Noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26,
Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday Feb. 26, VFW
Post 10087, West Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27,
Sumter Electric Cooperative, U.S. 301
and Sumter County Road 471,
Sumterville.
5 to 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28, 5 Points
of Life Kids Marathon, 3810 W Educa-
tional Path, Lecanto.

Seven Rivers Regional
offers health programs
CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center offers the fol-
lowing health education programs pre-
sented by board-certified physicians
and licensed medical professionals.
Website: SevenRiversRegional.com.
Call 352-795-1234 to register for the
programs.
Stroke Alert Workshop -Join Anna
Khanna, M.D., associate professor of
neurology at UF College of Medicine,
for an open discussion on the future of
stroke in the United States, followed by


an in-depth lesson on the signs and
symptoms of stroke. 1 to 3 p.m. Wednes-
day, Feb. 26, at Nature Coast EMS.
Registration required.
Balance Screenings Seven Rivers
Rehab & Wound Center offers free bal-
ance screenings at 11541 W Emerald
Oaks Drive, Crystal River (adjacent to
the hospital). Call 352-795-0534 to
schedule.

Oak Hill Partners Club
states upcoming events
SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital
H2U Partner's Club events. The hospital
is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9
miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50.
Visit OakHillHospital.com.
H2U Partner's Club events and activi-
ties are open to members only Member-
ship is open to Hernando, Pasco and
Citrus County residents for $20 a year,
which includes membership in the HCA
national H2U program.
March 3 -AARP tax assistance
service 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 3 -AARP driving school -
10 am to 1 pm
March 4 blood pressure test-
10 a.m.
March 5 -AARP driving school -
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 5 yoga class -10 a.m.
March 5 Suncoast Driving School
-6p.m.
March 7 smoking cessation -

See NOTES/Page C7


ort Cooper Days
Sat. March 15 & Sun. March 16
S9a.m. to4 p.m.
.', Fort Cooper State Park
\ 3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness
7. Experience Florida History
Adults thru 13 yrs. $6 12 yrs. & under Free
I ~Come and Enjoy
.,." 2nd Seminole War



-II 1 5
Y, I. ""1 h ',, I.. ,,', ''h I,',S
d s I- r,,r,i ,,,,,,, i. 1 ,,,,
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-- ,an 726-0315


LiGHT SHINE 2014
Pneir.iJ '. Slqphrn .. ir ill t'rM I E.i tq Churmh

Mar)n L. Jackson Fear. Silorleller.
Ctil ,% ar Reenactor. Gneologisl. Author

%I1f" I LJ "-'?- 1IV ,r .O O *IFIIL. *l-T -01.11 11C ..J' lIJ% 4 "
l r "people r color" during tihe Civil War, She will
also display exhibits of arnifacls representing the
^^ ^ ^K1C. pis,~ri ..l
r .... ... ... I...1,1 *, ..| .. .. I

: -i- I,; CHRpNir.E


SShcpard i If cH&E a1iion1QrdLu 254WNmlBrin-i f2i lCR4fl.L iipln
For More Informiaion. call: 352-527-W52 -im r Ipm


ART CENTER
OF CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center
Theatre


Presents


By
Marshall Karp

Directed b
Peter Abrams


Feb. 14-Mar. 2,2014
Friday & Saturday at 7:30 pm
Sunday Matinee at 2:00 pm
Additional Saturday Matinee
Feb.22,2:00 pm
Tickets: $19.00
*%Vv- 7AAC 7AC^ C


5 : -/ !:)-/!:)U!
S The Art Center of Citrus County (Citrus County Art League, Inc.)
is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization, solicitation #CH9729


'wStarring


ANDY COONEY
S"Irish America's Favorite Son" NY Times
Featuring Noel V. Ginnity, Comedian,
The Darrah Carr Dancers
Bugs Moran & The Guiness Irish Band
SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 2014 $22
2:00 PM PerPerson
CURTIS PETERSON AUDITORIUM
C11f9)NICJ.E For more information, call (352) 860-1292

Take Stock in Children of Citrus County presents...


CITRUS~ cDumT-Y--"
Saturday, March 1, 2014 *-A-tpni-
Sunday, March 2, 2014 9-4pm
Join us for two days of family fun in Floral Park!! Preseted SDonsr
Park at Citrus County Fairgrounds C tr bym
SCitrus County Chamber of Commerce
& ride the shuttle into Floral Park for $1 Floral City MerchantsAssociation
Admission $31under 12 FREE ('_.
www.floralcitystrawberryfestival.com -"-.r--,


Silent Auctions. Door Prizes,,
$25.00 per person
Tickets may be purchased at
Century 21 Nature Coast,
Connie's Boutique,
The Cotton Club, or any
Member of the
Pilot Club of Crystal River

SFresh Produce -VeroaBrodley
STommy Bahama Brighton Acessories Proceeds benefit Citrus County Charities_
For more information, call Jo (352) 208-1490 CQIINlE


March 7 thru March 11
Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds -U.S. 41 S., Inverness
Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
t Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day)
S Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3 a bag)
ICash or Checks Only
Swww.foccls.org
For book sale information call
746-1334 or 527-8405 C | .1I6NI(I


~x&3..f~ ~7
-ii
.1


iJ *~,
rLL~
S ga a


II


I


L F


Hosted b
the Frienc
of Fort Coo
OOOHAJN


S (-h 214TH ANNUAL





FRI. MARCH 7,2014 & SAT. MARCH 8,2014
5 PM. TIL 9 P.M.
Look for the lighted pathways Get to know your local artists Artist Demonstrations
Refreshments Free Admission & Parking
1- Olde Mill House Gallery & Cafe Photography, Painting & Print Museunm
2 River Safaris & Safari Cafe-Pottery, Wood, Glass & Metal Work
3- Glass Garage Stained & Fused Glass, Jewelry Wildlife Paintings on Wood
S 4 Pepper Creek Pottery Sculptural Functional Clay Works & Studio -
S5 Riverworks & Homnosassa Smokehouse, Copper Sculpture &Driflwood Furniture
All shops owned and operated by local artistsI! I
"- y For more info call .7 "
"% (352) 628-5222 or (352) 212-3617 V


lTdluf $(li(lars

^ -~ r-W(P CHupRoJJ.E
Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 3:00 PM Fun
Curtis Peterson Auditorium- Doors Open 2PM se ,.c
(sio.oo) 3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto uauu
2EACHJ Located in the Lecanto School Complex Silent Auction
Singing the hits of the 50's and 60's... The Fabulous "Lola & The Saints"
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stockin fChldren of Citrus Countyf is a program sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office and the Citrus County Chronicle


Handmade
/ Gift Drawings
All Day!

SSaturday,
Mar. 8,2014
-9am tn onm


For Information
i 503-6329 or 527-3378
P,, it ni h
LIM .1t I In ,.: "II'1l l.,w- Ihl
~ ._ D ,"., i 'ii.',- H ,:'" : E '':,l ,-' lr,"; ,.',,inil
SCrystal River National Guard Armory
Across from Home Depot
8551 West Venable Street A


Friends of the Homosassa Public Library

SPRING BOOK SALE

FEBRUARY 27 MARCH 1, 2014
at the Homosassa Library
on Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa
Great bargains in recycled reading!
Sale Hours
Thurs: 10 am 6 pm Fri: 10 am 4 pm
Sat: 10 am 4 pm
For book sale information
call 352-382-2440 or visit the
library website: hffttp://citruslibraries.org
C CH\pNICE-


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^^3^3^fijo"
25jB -*pth Annua
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Citrs Cunt Li


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C4 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


HEALTH & LIFE


ever
BeveragesFood &
A _,il 'g
vailabl','





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS


R.I. Discovery (Recov-
ery International) Abraham
Low, M.D., self-help systems
for mental health depres-
sion, obsession, stress, fears,
anger. Meetings are 2 to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Call Jackie, 352-563-5182.
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group,
6:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Room 204 in office building,
use right-side entrance across
from the Memorial Garden;
Nar-Anon is for family and
friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to
www.NARANONFL.org.
Recovery from Food
Addiction, 7 p.m. Thursday
at St. Anne's Church, 9870 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River,
in the parish hall library. Call
Peg at 410-903-7740.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a
free 12-step recovery pro-
gram for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeat-
ing, undereating or bulimia.
For details or a list of meet-
ings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit www.foodaddicts.org.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the back hall, St. Thomas


Church, off U.S. 19 south of
Cardinal Street. Group is
composed of men and
women who are experiencing
grief and are convinced "Life
can be good again." Open to
all. Come or call Anne at
352-220-1959.
AI-Anon groups meet
regularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41.
0 6 p.m. Monday at Club
Recovery, corner of County
Road 486 and Anvil Terrace,
Hernando.
Crystal RiverAFG:
8 p.m. Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S.
Suncoast Blvd.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG:
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
YANA Club, 147 Seventh St.
(off Citrus Avenue), Crystal
River.
*Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
Stepping Stones AFG:
10 a.m. Saturday atYana
Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Cit-
rusAvenue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics


Anonymous: If you drink,
and want to stop, call Alco-
holics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 352-621-
0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
10:30 a.m. Sunday,
10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chas-
sahowitzka Community Cen-
ter, 1 mile west of U.S. 19 on
Miss Maggie Drive, turn left,
two blocks.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
A 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living
Waters Ministries, 12 N. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 352-527-2443. Free
and open to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon, 20831
Powell Road. Call the church
at 352-489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
SIt Works How and Why,
7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Saturday, YANA
Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St.,
Crystal River.
Men's RAW (Recovery at
Work) meeting, 7 to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Lecanto Church of
Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Lecanto.
More Will Be Revealed,
8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday, Citrus Memorial
Health System Historic


School House: 135 S. Citrus
Ave., Inverness.
Recovery on the River,
7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to
9 p.m. Friday and Sunday;
Lecanto Church of Christ, 797
S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto.
Save Our-Selves, 9:30 to
10:30 p.m. Friday; 7:30 to
8:30 p.m. Sunday; Club Re-
covery: Anvil Terrace and
C.R. 486, Hernando, 352-
419-4836.
Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m.
Thursday, Citrus County Fam-
ily Resource Center's outreach
center: 3848 E. Parsons Point
Road, Hernando.
Women United Ladies
Meeting, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Citrus Memorial
Health System Historic
School House: 135 S. Citrus
Ave., Inverness.
*You Are Never Alone,
noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Mon-
day, Wedneday and Friday,
YANA Club: 147 N.W.
Seventh St., Crystal River.
Narcotics Anonymous is
not affiliated with any of the
meeting facilities listed. Call
the 24-hour Helpline: 352-
508-1604. Information about
NA is also available at
NatureCoastNA.org.
Overeaters Anony-
mous:
0 5 p.m. Tuesday at Club
Recovery, corner of County
Road 486 and Anvil Terrace,
Hernando.
Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the
Senior Center (V.A. building)
on County Road 491,


Lecanto. Call Dolores at
352-746-5019.
Gift of Life, 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at St. Anne's li-
brary, 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River. Call Rita
at 352-382-8503.
The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.
Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777.
The New Beginning,
7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
352-341-0777.
Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call
Charmaine at 352-422-3234.
Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 1100
Turner Camp Road, Inver-
ness, offers two free weekly
women's domestic abuse
support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday and 10:30 a.m. to
noon Wednesdays. Child care
available.
Call CASA at 352-344-8111
to sign up.
Celebrate Recovery:
support for any hurts, habits,
hang-ups or addictions.
6:30 p.m. Monday at
Oxford Assembly of God
Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in
Oxford. Call 352-748-6124.
0 7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Re-
covery Fellowship Church,
2242 W. State Road 44. Call


352-726-2800.
Gulf to Lake/Crystal
River UMC Celebrate Recov-
ery Fridays at Crystal River
United Methodist Church on
County Road 495. Dinner ($3)
at 6 p.m.; large group at
7 p.m.; small groups at 8 p.m.
Call 352-586-4709.
Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless
and hurting of Citrus County.
We offer referrals to Celebrate
Recovery, call 352-563-1860.
Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or
other out-of-control habits,
8 p.m. Monday at the Sanc-
tuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Call Paul at 352-628-
2874.
Dunnellon Life Recov-
ery group for adults where
addiction, compulsion and
codependency issues are
dealt with, at 7 p.m. Monday
at Rainbow Springs Village
Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd
St. Road, Dunnellon. Call
Char at 352-465-1644 or
Nancy at 352-794-0017.


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BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CITRUS COUNTY
13th Annual
Steak & Steak Dinner

Celebrating 22 years of dedication
to the children of Citrus County


Thursday, March 6,2014
M&B Dairy Farm, 8760 Lecanto Hwy.
ko Reception 5:45 p.m.


For tickets o0
call 302-4E


$50 in advance $60 at door
*VIP Tables start at $500 (table of 8)
Business Casual .,

r more information
882 or 422-6704 CIIRNICIF


1 [i leElvis Dog Wal


Register At
www.Elvis5KRun.com
Herty's Kids Pediatric Services is a


R-, W,.e
4 *Eary Leanw Coolfiho of 4h Ma4r. Coosi Crirs Coui4 IJhiwies
*QCriruCAn.r Pa*7r & kcre+. 0 wwafhy l-H CalrtHOA 401s&e PcT
0Moy & Me Gm*0t roop .mre Coa4EI4 w @neoos4 CA I


11111 AIr1uid]I r



Saturday, March 8
Inverness City Hall ~ 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Hosted by the Nature Coast Corvair Club
SPre-registration prior
Top 50 Awards to February 24 $15
plus Best of Show* Day of show $20
*Club PanicpaftonDaofsw$2
1987 and older


Inccorvairclub@yahoo.com


vu' iw itad to our rd.4A, Cci ebx
--c~oln6&, lebrati"O





O'*(L COOKIO[rz
iOClllAUSE- _







Sunday, March 9, 2014
_9t 6:00pm to 9:00pm
fr Crystal Rhv Mal l
Cubh Bar Cocktail Attire
by hum Sand
Cl CtpfaMt Catsn"ii i *he d


M30.00 per pM
S" st tu Ow


"rt Chef


colo wpfitill
moswatomiis w~cm


ssie's Place (352) 2708814



*od Oo* A K s
*m SW.g. lol" Cao
Slii-W.Me -A
JtI~li ldljoucill t fl .t


IN--'I Hog"( 40 la
altektmm& ps"

(Mi a"lu oil m
-bw- 0. $
wtet muaw


Tee Off for Tourette

hit



Sat, Mar. 1,2014

Plantation on Crystal River
Shotgun Start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Kick off Cocktail party on Friday, February 28, at 6:30pm
with music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
along with a live auction, raffles and meet and greet with celebrities.
Don't miss out, get your teams together for this fun event, and
help raise funds for the Tourette Syndrome Association of
Florida. All proceeds from this event will go to help adults
and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.
For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com
or email Gary D'Amico
at gary78@tampabay.rr.com CHRpNCLq E


51.u W Id 1 Noon Friday,
fr ~ March 7 fo
A gunsef
E44 _l9undag,
.7e March 9, 2014
SERTOMA YOUTH RANCH (onsite camping)- camping info 352-465-2167
85 Myers Rd., Brooksville FL 34602
* Entertainment by Workshops: song _N __ _
Florida's best songwriters writing, guitar,
and singers banjo, autoharp,
* Florida songwriter dulcimer, "
contest harmonica -
*Music- rain or shine Arts, Crafts
* Covered listening areas Delicious Food
* Bring your lawn chairs Children's activities-7 (C I( \liJ [1
7 Miles West of Dade Cily & 11/2 miles Eas$ of 1-75 Exi! 293
Before March 1, weekend tickets $35-under 12 free; higher after March 1
Send check payable to Will McLean Foundation and self addressed,
stamped envelope to TICKETS, 20232 Palmetto Lane, Dunnellon, FL 34432
or order online. VISIT WEBSITE AT http:// www.willmclean.com


St. Scholastica Council
of Catholic Women
Presents j


SiBy Bealls





March 29, 2014
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
Doors open at 11 a.m.
Delicious Entrees of Pasta, Pork or Salad
Donation: $20
Climae For Tickets call Joan at 563-2271
000HOYW____________________________________


I M


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONTHLY SUPPORT GROUPS


SPRING HILL- Leukemia
/Lymphoma Support Group, 5 to
6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly at the Florida Cancer Insti-
tute-New Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the
Medical Arts Building next to Spring
Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight,
R.N., group facilitator, at 352-688-
7744.
Caregivers' Support and In-
formation meeting, 1 p.m. the fourth
Tuesday monthly. hosted at Sun-
flower Springs Assisted Living, 8733
W. Yulee Drive in Homosassa.
Speakers from Sunflower Springs
and its sister community, Superior
Residences, will provide information
on when to consider assisted living,
what to expect from assisted living
and how to assist with dementia and
memory-impaired loved ones.
Reservations are requested; con-
tact Gail Sirak at 352-795-1618
ssirak778@tampabay.rr.com for
directions/information.
OCALA- Ocala Health
Stroke Support Group meets 9:30
to 11:30 a.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly at the Senior Wellness
Community Center (9850 S.W. 84th
Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call 800-
530-1188 to register.


Alzheimer's caregiver sup-
port group, 3 p.m. fourth Tuesday
monthly at Crystal Gem Manor,
10845 W. Gem St., Crystal River, fa-
cilitated by Debbie O'Leary, a group
leader trained by the Alzheimer's
Family Organization. Call 352-794-
7601. Respite care available.
Alzheimer's caregiver sup-
port group, 2 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly at Highland Terrace
ALF, 700 Medical Court E., Inver-
ness, facilitated by Debbie O'Leary,
a group leader trained by the
Alzheimer's Family Organization.
Call 352-860-2525. Respite care
available.
The Citrus Memorial Diabetes
Support Group, 10:30 a.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly on the
campus of Citrus Memorial Health
System in the auditorium.
Call Amy Freeman at 352-341-
6110. No reservation is required.
The Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society Suncoast Chapter, Cancer
Support Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the Moose
Lodge, 5214 Mariner Blvd., in Spring
Hill. There is no charge and light re-
freshments are provided. Contact:
Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient


services manager, at 813-963-6461
ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or
visit The Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society website at www.lls.org.
Alzheimer's caregiver sup-
port group byAlzheimer's Family
Organization, 2 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at Sugarmill
Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd., Ho-
mosassa. Call Bevin Brayton at
352-302-9066.
Look Good ... Feel Better, a
free two-hour session for women un-
dergoing radiation or chemotherapy,
at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at the Cancer & Blood Dis-
ease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m.
the fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown
at 352-341-7741 or the American
Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to
register.
Emotions Anonymous 12-
step support group, noon the sec-
ond and fourth Thursdays monthly at
Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge
Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly
Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443.
SPRING HILL Stroke Sup-
port Group, noon the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at HealthSouth
Rehabilitation Hospital in the private


dining room. Call Pam McDonald at
352-346-6359.
PINELLAS PARK "Connec-
tions" fireside-discussion-style sup-
port group for cancer patients,
7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly,
WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St.
N., Pinellas Park, 727-343-0600;
www.wellspringoncology.org.
Families Against Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m.
the first Saturday monthly at First
Baptist Church of Hernando, 3790
E. Parsons Point Road, for families,
friends and anyone affected by MS.
Call Shana at 352-637-2030 or
352-422-2123.
BROOKSVILLE "Man to
Man" prostate cancer support
group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at the Florida Cancer Insti-
tute-New Hope's Brooksville Center,
7154 Medical Center Drive. Call
Mary Capo at 352-596-1926.
Grandparents Raising Grand-
children Support Group, 10 a.m.
to noon the first Monday monthly at
the Citrus County Resource Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central
Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call
Pam at 352-387-3540.
OCALA- The Alzheimer's


and Memory Disorders support
group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Medical Of-
fice Building at West Marion Com-
munity Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th
Court, second-floor Community
Room. Call 352-401-1453.
RBOI has begun a monthly
survivor group with inspirational
guests and strength based topics.
Any cancer survivors and family are
welcome to attend. There is no cost
to attend. For information, email
Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tam-
pabay.rr.com or call Wendy Hall,
LCSW, at 352-527-0106.
Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support
groups are attended by caregivers of
loved ones with dementia or
Alzheimer's disease. All support
groups are free of charge to care-
givers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness,
11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call
Anne Black at 352-527-4600.
BROOKSVILLE Women's
breast cancer support group, 6 to
7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly
at Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope Center at 7154 Medical Cen-
ter Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo, R.T, at 352-592-8128.


* So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic
reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician.


*S~- 352.400.0960 I


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Proceeds Benefit
Citrus County Blessings
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of Citrus County



March 13, 2014


5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

Rock Crusher Pavilion


0 CapIal City
.Ban~k
More than your bank. Your banker.


rC4Wmp ir
..,0


Tickets may be purchased at
Crystal Chevrolet Homosassa,
Hagar Insurance Inverness,
Brashear's Pharmacy Lecanto,
Fancy's Pets Crystal River,
Gulf to Lake Sales Lecanto,
Capital City Bank Crystal River


NMATION VISIT: www.rotarybeastfeast.com


C6 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


HEALTH & LIFE


O





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS


Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated
support groups are for family mem-
bers, caregivers and others inter-
ested in learning more about
Alzheimer's disease. Meetings are
open to everyone and free of
charge. To arrange free respite care
so you can attend a group, call the
Hernando office at 352-688-4537 or
800-772-8672.
Website: www.alzsupport.com
- Live chat every Wednesday at
noon. Message boards open at all
times to post questions and leave
replies. Join the Alzheimer's Associ-
ation online community at
www.alz.org/living withalzheimers_
messageboardslwa.asp.
Crystal River Health & Rehabili-
tation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave.,
Crystal River; 2 p.m. third Saturday
monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at
352-795-5044.
First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our
Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, In-
verness.
Second Monday, 1 p.m.,
First United Methodist Church of


Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. Free respite care
available.
Last Wednesday, 11:30 a.m.,
Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church,
6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Free respite care available.
Brooksville: Lykes Memorial
County Library, 238 Howell Ave.;
2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call
Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital
Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.;
2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Spring Hill: The Residence at
Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road;
2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call
Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or
The Residence at 352-683-9009.
Free respite care provided, call to
reserve.
First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has several
support groups that run on a
monthly basis. All groups are open
to the public and free of charge, and
meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the
Administration Building:


First Monday: diabetic support
group.
Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia caregivers
support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke sur-
vivors support group.
Memory Lane Respite offered
weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia.
Anyone bringing a loved one for the
first time is encouraged to come
early to fill out information forms.
Call 352-628-4083 for meeting
dates.
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is a 198-bed, not-for-profit com-
munity hospital that provides health
care services to residents of Citrus
County and surrounding communi-
ties. Support group meetings are in
the CMHS Administration Building
unless indicated.
RBOI Prostate Cancer Support
Group: 11:30 a.m. the first Wednes-
day monthly at Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute, 522 N. Lecanto
Highway. Call 352-527-0106.
AHEC Quit Smoking: 3 p.m.


Tuesday at Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Med-
ical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000,
ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support:
11:30 a.m. the second Friday,
Robert Boissoneault Cancer Insti-
tute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-
4389.
Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafete-
ria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-
726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329.
Cancer Support: at Cancer
Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at
352-746-1100 for date and time.
Diabetes Support: Call Carol
McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for
details.
Head and Neck Cancer Sup-
port: Robert Boissoneault Cancer In-
stitute. Contact Wendy Hall at
352-527-0106.
Heart-Healthy Eating Work-
shop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second
Wednesday every other month,
CMHS Medical Office Building. Call
352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to


register.
Look Good Feel Better: monthly
at Robert Boissoneault Oncology In-
stitute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall,
522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
sponsored by the American Cancer
Society, the Cosmetology Associa-
tion and the Personal Care Products
Council. A licensed cosmetologist is
present to advise women about
many issues. For dates, times, more
information or to register, call the
American Cancer Society at 800-
395-5665.
Mended Hearts Support:
10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at
CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardio-
vascular Services at 352-344-6416.
Ostomy Support Group: 2 p.m.
third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the
CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Cit-
rus Ave., Inverness. Call Ted at 352-
489-7888 or Sue at 352-560-7918.
Stroke Support Group of Citrus
County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday
monthly, CMHS Annex Building con-
ference room, State Road 44 across
from Walgreens. Call 352-344-6596
or 352-344-1646.


FITNESS PROGRAMS


20140


1V |I A V 0/ \ \ f \ w r

JIfffl


Exercise class set

Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation its "Fit Forever" exercise
class with certified instructor
Roger "Roc" O'Connor
This ongoing class is from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. at the Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center, 1570 W Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, Tues-
days and Thursdays.
The cost is $5 per class. Partici-
pants will move at their pace with
this cardio, stretch and exercise
class. No registration is needed,
just sign up at a class.
Call 352-465-7007.


appropriate for exercising.
Regular park admission will
apply for entrance into the Wildlife
Park. For information on this and
other fitness-related programs, call
the park office at 352-628-5343, ext.
1002, Mondays through Fridays.
Visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.

All welcome at yoga

Free yoga and reiki sessions are
offered weekly
For schedules and information,
call Aviva (for yoga) at 352-419-7800
or Connie (for reiki) at 352-560-
7686.


Classes offered at park Special chair yoga


The Florida's Department of En-
vironmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park will host exer-
cise classes in the Florida Room in
the park's Visitor Center on U.S. 19
in Homosassa Springs: 9:30 to
10 a.m. Monday, March 10,
March 24 and April 7.
The public is invited to join in
any of the exercise classes. While
you are encouraged to attend all
four classes, it is not mandatory
Consult your medical professional
before beginning an exercise rou-
tine. A donation of $2 per class is
suggested and will benefit the
Friends of Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park.
Presented by Steve and Patti
Griffith, all of the exercises in this
program are focused on improving
balance, range of motion and
strength. Participants should wear
lose clothing and "gym shoes"




NOTES
Continued from Page C4


11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 10 -AARP tax assis-
tance service 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 11 blood pressure test
-10 a.m.
March 12 yoga class -
10 a.m.
March 17 -AARP tax assis-


Chair yoga classes are offered
free at 10 a.m. Monday atAlesci's
Corner Plaza, 1015 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando, across
from Dollar General.
This is an opportunity for people
who are not able to practice regu-
lar yoga on mats. Classes are given
by experienced, certified yoga
teachers. Call 352-419-7800.

Join Y for exercise

The YMCA offers group exercise
classes from cardio circuit to yoga,
and everything in between. Classes
are conducted at four locations:
Cornerstone Baptist Church and
First Presbyterian Church in Inver-
ness, First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa and Hope
Evangelic Lutheran Church in
Citrus Springs.
Classes are available to anyone


tance service 9 a.m. to 1
March 18 blood pres
-10 a.m.
March 18 Suncoast T
School 6 p.m.
March 19 yoga class
10 a.m.
March 24 -AARP tax
tance service 9 a.m. to 1
March 25 blood pres
-10 a.m.
March 26 yoga class
10 a.m.
March 26 -Meet N' E


p.m.
ssure test

traffic


assis-
p.m.
ssure test


at-


18 and older, and are offered in the
mornings and afternoons. Try the
first class out at a YMCA location of
choice for free.
Call the YMCA 352-637-0132, or
visit wwwymcasuncoast.org.

Join Les Mills for class

After numerous requests, the Y
has answered the demand of
adding Les Mills classes to the
Group Exercise schedule.
The Citrus County YMCA will
offer Les Mills Body Pump at the
new Crystal River Fitness Loca-
tion, 780 S.E. Fifth Terrace. The
class is taught by Cheryl Steffer,
certified and trained Less Mills in-
structor
Les Mills Body Pump will sculpt,
strengthen and tone the entire
body Through choreography and
lively music Body Pump can help
participants burn fat quickly and
focus on the major muscle groups.
Body Pump will get hearts racing
with "The Rep Effect," paired with
squats, presses, lifts and curls.
Call 352-637-0132. To download
the Y's complete group exercise
schedule, visit wwwymcasuncoast
.org.

Free zumba offered

Zumba classes for beginners are
offered at 11:30 a.m. Monday,
Thursday and Saturday at the
Unity Church, 2628 W Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Lose weight while having fun.
For more information, email miss-
donna@tampabayrr.com or call
352-628-3253.



Cici's Pizza -12:30 p.m.

Health center board

to meet monthly

The George A. Dame Community
Health Center Board meetings are
at 3 p.m. the first Wednesday
monthly at the Citrus County
Health Department, 3700 W Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto, in the first-floor
conference room.


Positively educational.

Positively life-saving.


Good News About Reducing Your Risk of Stroke
In most every case, the faster you can get treatment for stroke, the better
the outcome will be. Knowing the signs of a stroke and knowing where to
go for the best local treatment can save your life. Attend this workshop to
learn about emergency stroke care-including warning signs, our stroke
alliance with the premier stroke specialists at UF Health and much more.

Stroke Alert Workshop
Wednesday, February 26, 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Nature Coast EMS Education Center 3876 W. Country Hill Drive, Lecanto
The Future of Stroke in the United States
Stroke Signs & Symptoms
911 and Emergency Medical Services (transport)
Advanced Stroke Care in the Emergency Room/
Emergency Stroke Specialists Alliance with UF Health
Program is free, Refreshments served.


Registration is required.
352.795.1234


Positively SEVEN RIVERS
Pstively REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

SvcenRiversRcgional.comn Your I if Our Story-


Community-Wide

Fitness Challenge
TEAM POINTS RECORD
February 3- March 16
Week 2


STEPS CHALLENGE


TOTAL


JUST GETTING STARTED
Citrus Centurions 90,334
CRPS Bear Cub Steps 63,000
DoubleD 110,250
Hot to Trot 28,500
Moving Along 75,500
1 GETTING THERE
Beauties and the Beast 240,000
Book Smart 143,626
CRPS Steppin' Tweeners 89,000
Fitness Warriors 106,424
JAM 136,000
Movin' On Up 105,473
Pets 'n Steps 120,000
Pines Pedometer Packers 140,500
Salad Sisters 75,500
We Are Family 136,000
1 JOCKS
Walkin' the Boss 45,000

MINUTES CHALLENGE TOTAL
JUST GETTING STARTED
BFF 580
Bikini Bound 474
CRPS Cubs in Minute Training 268
Government Gals & A Guy 654
Homosassa Lassies 1,020
In Tune But Out of Shape 665
Just Us 715
Paper Dolls 354
Pine Nuts 505
Preschoolers 615
Sole Trainers 526
Skyhawkers 840
Team Wellness 631

1 GETTING THERE
2 Carrs 153
2 Plus 1 735
Ambulators 640
But, I'm Not Dead Yet 1,298
CPR Exercise Warriors 432
CRPS Minute Tracking Tweeners 416
Happy Hearts 393
Health Nuts 390
HPH-Citrus Rocksters 376
HPH-Hip for Fitness 492
JCM Motivators 584
Jigglers 530
Lake Front Losers 1,361
Little Rascals 470
Ramblers 884
Sunflower Springs Seedlings 289
Team K-9 239
The Heat is On 499
Unleashed 438
Windermere Wonders Plus 1,750
"Y"ld for Citrus YMCA 665

1 JOCKS


CRPS Minute Tracking Pros
Jazzercise Junkies

Jrm- b -


946
1,676


Ana Khanna, M.D.







Mike Hall, Cl [:EO


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 C7


)DHHRQ







Page C8- TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Amateur radio group
meets Wednesdays
The Citrus County Amateur
Radio Emergency Service meets
at 7 p.m. Wednesday on the
146.775 mhz repeater with a PL
tone of 146.2 hz.
Meetings are once a month at
the Citrus County Emergency Op-
erations Center in Lecanto. For
more information and meeting
dates, contact Jerry Dixon,
WA6QFC at WA6QFC@ARRL.net
or on the Citrus County ARES
website at www.CitrusCounty
ARES.com.

Sugar Babes Doll Club
to talk about birthday
The Central Florida Sugar
Babes Doll Club will meet at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday in room 115
at the Central Citrus Community
Center, off County Road 491 be-
hind Diamond Ridge Convales-
cent Facility
The meeting is followed by
lunch at the Main Street
Restaurant in Beverly Hills.
In lieu of a program, members
will complete all arrangements
for the celebration of the club's
25th birthday in March.
The club welcomes visitors.
For information, call Laurie at
352-382-2299 or Barbara at 352-
344-1423. The club is a member of
the United Federation of Doll
Clubs.

Poet, gardener to read
Wednesday at library
Citrus Springs Library will host
a poetry reading by Robert Ward
at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the
library
Everyone is welcome to enjoy
an hour of "Poetry, Prose and
Attempted Humor by the Non-
award-winning Author Robert
Ward." His sense of humor is re-
flected in some of his work.
Ward is a native of Wisconsin,
but spends some of the colder
months in Florida. He is an ac-
complished gardener and has cre-
ated a Japanese garden at his
home.
The library is at 1826 W
Country Club Blvd. in Citrus
Springs. For more information,
call 352-489-2313.

Sell treasures, crafts
Saturday in Floral City
Floral City Garden Club will
have a Sewing Room Treasures
and Crafts Sale from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, March 1, at the
Community Building on Orange
Avenue next to the library
The club is reserving 6-foot
tables at $10 each. You can share
with friends. Vendors set up at
8 a.m. Bring your finished crafts
and excess craft supplies and sell
them.
To reserve a table, call Carole
at 352-341-7745 or Sandy at 352-
726-4766.


Precious Paws
ADOPTABLES


Blending of heritage


Castlebay to perform Si

Special to the Chronicle
Castlebay will perform a concert of
music from the New England coastline,
Ireland and Scotland at 3 p.m. Sunday on
the stage of the fellowship hall at First
United Methodist Church, 8831 W
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
The concert is the third in the
Winter/Spring Concert Series sponsored
by the Arts Council of the First United
Methodist Church, Homosassa.
Castlebay has been musically weaving
together the heritage of New England
and the Celtic lands since 1987. Members
Julia Lane and Fred Gosbee have loved
and researched traditional music for
most of their lives and blend history, leg-
end and experience into their personable


Yndayfor Arts Council Series in Homosassa


performance style. Their concerts feature
poignant ballads sung in Lane's ethereal
soprano and Gosbee's rich baritone inter-
spersed with joyous dance tunes played
on Celtic harp, guitar, fiddle, and tin
whistle. Castlebay treats the audience to
a musical journey through time and
across the Atlantic.
What captivates audiences are Julia
and Fred's musicianship, the apparent
casualness with which they weave their
listeners into magical worlds of story-
telling, song and harp, and their down-to-
earth (and sea) Maine coast and Celtic
tunes, tales and humor
Castlebay has toured the eastern U.S.,
Ireland, England and Scotland, playing at
festivals and art centers, as well as on
radio and television. The duo maintains a


commitment to cultural education, ex-
changing music and lore with colleagues.
They provide folklore and music pro-
grams for schools, museums, libraries
and elder hostels, exploring Celtic lore
and tradition throughout the eastern U.S.
and the British Isles. The duo has re-
leased 27 recordings, including both orig-
inal and traditional songs, Christmas
harp recordings and the "Tapestry" col-
lection, a six-part instrumental series.
This is an encore performance by
Castlebay Their concert in February last
year was so well received, they are back
by popular demand.
For tickets or more information, call
the church office at 352-628-4083, Jim
Love at 352-746-3674, Jim Potts at 352-
382-1842, or Karen Kline at 352-382-7263.


Making a Difference


CHRIS GANGLER/Special to the Chronicle
During a recent Citrus County School Board meeting, Superintendent Sandra "Sam" Himmel recognized two students by awarding
them the "Making a Difference Award." Inverness Middle School eighth-grader Madison Cassidy, center left, and seventh-grader
Madison Smith, center right, were congratulated by Himmel, Principal Trish Douglas and School Board chairman Thomas Kennedy.


Classy serenades


Puppies


Special to the Chronicle
Chihuahua-mix puppies, both male
and female, approximately 4
months old, are ready for homes of
their own. They are all in the puppy
mode of playing and learning and
will need families ready and willing
to spend some time helping them
learn proper dog behavior. Kittens
and cats are also available for
adoption at the Pet Supermarket
on State Road 44 in Inverness
during regular store hours. The
Crystal River Mall adoption center
is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday,
Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The
Floral City Adoption Center at
7360 S. Florida Ave. is open
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. For
more information, call 352-
726-4700 or go to www.precious
pawsflorida.com.


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the Chorus of the Highlands, the Citrus County chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, again serenaded
sweethearts for Valentine's Day across the county. The chorus has been doing "Singing Valentines" for more than 30 years here. The
group's style of music, known as barbershop harmony, is a style of acappella, or vocal music unaccompanied by instruments. The
quartets were singing to raise money for their nonprofit group. Recipients were serenaded with two love songs and received a rose, a
box of candy and a personalized valentine. The chorus rehearses at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday evenings in Inverness and men of all ages,
who love to sing, are invited to visit with them. Call 352-382-0336 for more information.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NEWS NOTES

Retired officers to
meet in Crystal River
NARLEO (the National Associ-
ation of Retired Law Enforce-
ment Officers) will meet at
7:30 p.m. Thursday at American
Legion Post 155, 6585 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River
The organization is open to ac-
tive and retired law enforcement
officers, including federal and
state agents, as well as probation,
corrections and parole officers.
Visitors are welcome; bring a law
enforcement ID.
Refreshments are served after
the meeting. For more informa-
tion, call Andrew J. Tarpey,
president, at 352-344-9313.

Garage sale to benefit
Precious Paws Rescue
Precious Paws Rescue group
will have a garage sale from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Friday
and Saturday at the Floral City
Adoption Site, 7360 S. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41).
There will be a variety of
household goods, pet supplies,
some furniture and clothing
available.
Precious Paws is an all-
volunteer charity organization
and all proceeds will go to help
needy pets in our community
Stop by, say hello and help fund
pet rescue and low-cost spay and
neuter programs.

Gospel Fest benefits
Relay For Life team
The Relay For Life team of
Citrus Springs Elementary
School, with assistance from the
Rev David Houston of Mount
Olive Baptist Church in Dunnel-
lon and New Salem Baptist
Church in Holder, will stage a
Relay For Life fundraiser the
third annual Gospel Fest at
7 p.m. Friday at the North Oak
Baptist Church in Citrus Springs
at the corner of Elkcam and
Citrus Springs boulevards.
Anyone who would like to sing,
read a poem or give testimony is
invited to participate. This year's
goal is to raise more than $2,000
for the Relay effort, which bene-
fits the American Cancer Society
Checks can be made payable to
the American Cancer Society
For more information, call the
Rev Houston at 352-637-0385 or
352-364-6586, or the school at 352-
344-4079.

Motions to be topic for
parliamentarians
Several people at a recent
meeting indicated interest in the
Citrus County Unit of Parliamen-
tarians' advanced workshop
slated for Friday, March 7, where
the topic of motions will be
discussed.
The workshop will cover the
proper way to introduce a motion
and being recognized by the chair
of the meeting. After the motion
is introduced, there is proper
protocol for debating the motion,
amending the motion and voting
on the motion.
The workshop will be from
9:30 a.m. to noon Friday March 7,
at the Whispering Pines Recre-
ation Building, Inverness.
The registration fee is $10 and
is due by Friday Make checks
payable to CCUP and mail to
Patricia Cowen 421 N. Turkey
Pine Loop, Lecanto, FL
34461-8434.
For more information, call Pat
at 352-746-9003, Connie at 352-527-
2599 or Bob at 352-382-2631.

Crystal Oaks to have
Tricky Tray fundraiser
For a fun afternoon, join the
Crystal Oaks Civic Association as
it hosts a Tricky Tray fundraiser
at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the club-
house, 4858 Crystal Oaks Drive.
The raffles and drawings will
be held at 1 p.m. and will feature
a good selection of different bas-
kets with contents valued at $25
or more.
Ticket donations of $4 purchase
a sheet of 20 tickets. Place your
tickets as you wish into the bas-
kets of your choice to win. A box
lunch is available for $4.
For more information, call


Hedda at 352-527-8144.

Moose Tricky Tray to
help Relay For Life
The Inverness Moose Relay For
Life team will be having a Tricky
Tray luncheon on Saturday from
1 to 3 p.m. at Moose Lodge 2112, at
221 S. Haid Terrace, Lecanto.
Cost is $10 a ticket and includes
a hot lunch with coffee and
dessert and 10 free tickets for a
selection of baskets.
Additional tickets for prizes
will be available. All proceeds go
to Relay For Life.
For more information, call
Martha at 352-476-8727 or JoAnn
at 352-560-0352.


COMMUNITY


5 symphonic years



Nature Coast Community Band to celebrate anniversary with concert


Special to the Chronicle

Five years ago the Nature Coast
Community Band was established to pro-
vide symphonic music for the community.
Under the direction of Cindy Hazzard,
the band has played to packed audiences,
has garnered community support and has
given more than 50 free concerts.
The band has grown from 40 to 75 mem-
bers of all ages. All the musicians are vol-
unteers, many are professional musicians
and members hail from many states.
Hazzard, the conductor/music director,
recently counted 20 active or retired con-
ductors within the band. Many members
travel long distances to rehearse and per-


form with our Citrus County community
band. Financial support comes from
donations by concert attendees.
To celebrate its fifth anniversary,
Hazzard turned over programming to the
members of the band, who have put to-
gether an eclectic program of their most
loved music.
The program, narrated by Doreen Mor-
gan, includes Gustav Holst's "Second
Suite in F," "Pineapple Poll" by Sir
Arthur Sullivan and Charles Mackerras,
Ralph Vaughan Williams' "English Folk
Song Suite," and Percy Grainger's "Chil-
dren's March."
Trombone soloist Paul Furman will
perform the jazz ballad "Reflective


Mood" by Sammy Nestico and the band
will have some fun with dogs, trapeze
acts, elephants and clowns in Thomas
Kahelin's "Clown Act" The band has per-
formed more than 20 patriotic or veter-
ans' related concerts and this concert will
be no exception, with James
Christensen's "The Homefront: Musical
Memories From WWII" and "Missing
Mafn" byJerkerJohansson, complete with
a jet flyover
The free anniversary concert will be
performed twice at 2:30 p.m. Saturday
at Citrus Springs Community Center, 1570
W Citrus Springs Blvd., and at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday at the Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W Highland Ave., Inverness.


Helping CASA


Special to the Chronicle
The local Mu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma International Society of Key Woman Educators recently presented a check of $500 to
CASA, the Citrus Abuse Shelter Association. Shown at the presentation are Bonnie Rybak, DKG President Bonnie Ignico, Louise
Martin, CASA Executive Director Diana Finegan, Wilma Smith and Nancy Reynolds. Mu Chapter raised much of this donation with a
yard sale held in November. DKG is an organization made up of key women educators, both working and retired. For more information
about the organization, call Ignico at 352-726-4236 or go online to www.dkg.org.


Snowbirds
Celebrate
,The American-Canadian
Snowbirds Club had its 20th
ftpI 0 anniversary Valentine's
Dinner/Dance on Feb. 12 at
the VFW Post in Hernando.
More than 100 members
and guests attended and
enjoyed the prime rib steak
dinner and the music of
Katie Lynn, and some won
door prizes to take home.
The season will wrap up with
the annual picnic at
Whispering Pines Park on
March 12. Everyone is
invited to join the group for a
good time playing golf,
euchre or shuffleboard next
season, beginning in
November. Call Tony or
Sharon at 352-341-4407
for details before the end of
April.

Special to the Chronicle



Special speakers inspire luncheon guests


or many years, the Christian
Women's Club has invited the pub-
lic to their monthly luncheons. The
group does not require dues and those
who attend are placed on a telephone list
and are called each month for their
reservation.
Each month the luncheon meeting be-
gins with a special feature. Sometimes it
is local artisan displaying their art form
(stained glass work, brush stroke paint-
ing, floral design, instrumental or solo
music.)
Following the luncheon, an inspira-
tional message is given by a speaker,
approved by Stonecroft Ministries, the
parent organization.
Recently, Barbara Mills of Operation
Welcome Home was the group's special
speaker Founded in 2007, more than 300
Citrus County servicemen and service-
women have been welcomed home by the
group. The Welcome Home parties for
them include a dinner for them and their
family A huge laundry basket of gifts is
presented, including gift certificates for
dinners, tool kits, car wash certificates,
and movie tickets. They are presented a
plaque of appreciation and a host of
thank-you cards.
Mills spoke passionately about the
Honor Flights to Washington, D.C., for
veterans. Volunteers are always needed
and deeply appreciated. To help, call 352-
422-6236.
Gaye Martin was a recent inspirational
speaker She spoke on "Magic: Some have
it, some don't" As she took us on an imag-


Ruth
Levins

AROUND THE
COMMUNITY


inary journey through her life from child-
hood, through the teen years, marriage
and retirement, we gained powerful in-
sights to apply in our day-to-day encoun-
ters with family and friends.
She spoke of a beloved aunt who left
her footprints upon her life with her spe-
cial magic as a listener, an encourager
and one who profoundly molded her
character
Along the way, she learned that rejec-
tion is a powerful teacher, for it forces us
to question and evaluate our values and
their impact upon our lives.
Just as that aunt prominently displayed
a framed loving note she had written for
her in her home through the years, we
can make room in our hearts for others
by appreciating and affirming them lov-
ingly (Is there someone you could frame
in your heart with kindness today?)
The greatest of healers is acceptance,
approval and validation. Martin com-
pared a sense of humanf" as the magic
that we can experience as we are able to
laugh about a difficult situation. It is then
that we find ourselves on the road to re-


cover and no longer a victim of the cir-
cumstances that are challenging us.
She said that trust has magic implica-
tions, as well. It helps us call forth poten-
tial long dormant. When we trust others
with things that are important like hon-
esty, kindness and integrity, the miracle
of a changed life occurs.
Just as her childhood note took up resi-
dence in her aunt's house, with kindness,
compassion, forgiveness and loving con-
cern, we can come to know when a gift
can be given freely to another in need.
For reservations for the March 11 lunch-
eon, call Ginny at 352-746-7616.
Here is a great need I'd like to share
with you for your thoughtful considera-
tion: The Crystal River Kings Bay Lions
Club is struggling to remain an active
club whose mission, "We Serve," is be-
coming increasingly difficult to fulfill due
to a loss of memberships due to the down-
turn in the economy making it difficult to
recruit members.
Its mission is to provide eyeglasses for
needy, deserving individuals, to help
screen people for diabetes, to offer guide
dogs for the blind and provide local char-
ity items like food for food pantries.
Monthly dinner meetings are at 6 p.m. the
first Monday at Oysters Restaurant. Call
352-795-4467 for information.

Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community Let her
know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 C9






C10 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


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S 4 4 4 6 5 essie Austin & A.N.T Austin & Dog With a Jessie Good Luck Charlie (In Austin & Jessie A.N.T Good-
'46 40 46 6 5 'G's Ally'G' Farm 'G' Ally 'G' Blog'G' 'G' Stereo) 'G' Ally'G' 'G' Farm'G' Charlie
(jESP14 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) College Basketball Florida at Vanderbilt. (N) College Basketball Indiana at Wisconsin. SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2 34 28 34 43 49 Around Pardon College Basketball College Basketball Wichita State at Bradley. Olbermann (N) N
WTN 95 70 95 48 At Last Love Daily Mass'G'c Mother Angelica Live Religious IRosary Threshold of Hope Thought |Women
mnii 29 52 29 20 28 o The Middle The Middle Pretty Little Liars "Free Pretty Little Liars (N) Twisted (N) (In Stereo) Pretty Little Liars (In The 700 Club (In
29 52 29 20 28 'PG' 'PG' Fall"'14' (In Stereo)'14' '14'1 Stereo)' 14' Stereo)'G'C
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(TNC1 44 37 44 32 Special Report Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O'Reilly Factor
TD 26 56 26 Chopped'G' Chopped'G' Chopped'G' Chopped'G' Chopped (N)'G' Diners IDiners
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Ti J 35 39 35 -UFC Magic NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Washington Wizards. IMagic Sports Unlimited World PokerTour
3 60 3 How I Met Two and Two and *** "Thor" (2011, Action) Chris Hemsworth. Cast out of Justified "Raw Deal" Justified "Raw Deal"
FX 30 60 30 51 Half Men Half Men Asgard, the Norse god lands on Earth. 'PG-13' (N) 'MA' 'MA'
OLF 727 67 727 Central PGATour Golf Learning PGATourGolf Central PGATour
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iS 51 54 51 32 42 Cars'PG' Cars PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars PG'
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24 38 24 31 Roachford"'PG' isolates herself.'PG' 'PG' Trade-Off"'PG'
UI ** "Family Sins" (2004) Kirstie Alley. A model *)Y "Plain Dirty" (2003, Drama) Dominique "Widow on the Hill" (2005, Drama) Natasha
50 119 citznisacseifterrible crimes. Swain. (n Stereo)'R [ Henstridge. (In Stereo) N]
** "A Good Day to Die Hard" ** "Battleship"(2012) Taylor Kitsch. Earth comes under Banshee "Ways to Bury ***Y, "Fight Club"
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42 41 42 Matthews (N) N (N) Show (N) Lawrence O'Donnell
M109 65 109 44 53 Mennonite Made'PG' Building Wild "Log Building Wild Building Wild'Tuff Diggers Digers Building Wild Tuff
109 65 109 44 53 Jam" 'PG' "Backwoods Bus"'PG' Enough"'PG' PG PG9 Enough"'PG'
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36 31 36 Bensinger Bask. (N) (Live) Destination Coaching Luis obllazo. From Brooklyn, N.Y.
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TM 19 5 1 0 *** "1776" (1972, Musical Comedy) William ***", "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir" (1947) Gene **** "Great Expectations" (1946, Drama)
169 53 169 30 35 Daniels, Howard da Silva.'G'c Tierney Premiere.'NR'c John Mills, Bernard Miles.'NR' c
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U 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit '14' Victims Unit'14 Family Family Family Family Family Family
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West
* A K 9 8 6 5
Y2
* Q J5
SK 10 6


South
i 4Y
4 V


North
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02-25-14


East
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*- J 9 8 7 3 2


South
10 7 2
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Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
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1 2 Pass
Pass Pass Pass


[ Opening lead: A

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Stonewall Jackson, the Confederate general
who died of pneumonia at only 39, said, 'Al-
ways mystify, mislead and surprise the enemy
if possible."
That certainly applies to bridge players, es-
pecially when the declarer (It is usually dan-
gerous for a defender to mislead his partner)
In this deal, South is in four hearts. Which
card should declarer play at trick one after
West leads the spade ace and East drops the
four?
South knows that East has just played a sin-
gleton (unless West made an unusual overcall
in a four-card suit). But West does not know
that.
Suppose South plays his spade seven. Then
West will know it is safe to cash his spade king,
because East would not have dropped the four
from 10-4-2. And the same applies if South fol-
lows suit with his 10.
Instead, South must play his two. Then West
will wonder if East started with 10-7-4. Yes,
West might still get it right, thinking that East
would have raised to two spades with three
trumps and forgetting that the auction suggests
East has a very weak hand. But West will be
nervous about leading the spade king at trick
two, lest South ruff it and later get a critical
discard on dummy's spade queen.
As you can see, if West continues spades, the
defenders take two spades, one spade ruff and
the club king to defeat the contract. If West
does anything else, the contract makes.
If declarer is trying to disrupt the opponents'
signals, he should copy their methods. He
should play low to try to discourage a continu-
ation, or vice versa.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
| GIRNB o

2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC -
All Rghts Reserved
| NIBOS



NOCMUL |
[I _[; 1




URUYXL __

171 1


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Now, let's convert these
temperatures from
F ,r,rleit to Celsius.

3.2=
I .102=
.. ai I
.,. send us



t_ -
*;fi home.







AFTER THE HEAT WENT OUT
IN THE SCHOOL, THE MATH
CLA55 FEATUREV --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answerhee [ y y "
here: I IT
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: RIGID HOIST COMMON GAZEBO
Answer: For the rookie poker player, winning the game
wasn't -IN THE CARDS


ACROSS
1 Sine non
4 Garden
hopper
8 Scheme
12 Explosive Itrs.
13 Twisted
14 Chalet feature
15 Rink surface
16 Artery
complement
17 Wheels for
nanny
18 Situated
20 No sweat!
22 Bahrain VIP
23 Imply
25 Munchies
29 Ovid's 12
31 Face powder
base
34 Mauna -
35 Tall stalk
36 Wave away
37 D.C. zone
38 Farmer's grp.
39 Maize unit
40 Canyon


42 Trolley
44 Country
addrs.
47 Thin Man's
terrier
49 Left in the
dust
51 Mr, Bunuel
53 The one here
55 Edmund
Hillary's title
56 Handel
contemporary
57 Pull the lever
58 Santa -
winds
59 Sugar source
60 Injury
memento
61 Still


DOWN
1 Ear swab
(hyph.)
2 Family
member
3 Varsity
(hyph.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle


4 Alehouse
5 Got in debt
6 Jackie's
second
7 Unit of force
8 Soft drink
brand


2-P25 (1 2014 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


DearAnnie: My wife of
nearly 30 years and I
are having some diffi-
culties. Recently, she asked
whether I wanted to go to
Rome for a business confer-
ence. She thought we could
see the sights after-
ward. I said yes, as
I'm recently retired
and have plenty of
time.
However, a few
weeks later, I was
uninvited. She said
I wouldn't enjoy
the weather Last
week, I discovered
that she is staying
an extra day with
someone else. She
made these plans AN I
long before she dis- MAIL
invited me. Yester-
day, she told me
that a woman from work is
staying with her for an extra
day I've never heard this
woman's name before. These
meetings are held once a
year in different locations,
but this is the first time she
has stayed any extra time.
Additionally over the past
year, her behavior at work has
changed. She has started wear-
ing makeup and nicer clothes.
She mentions taking walks
with some guy or another and
having coffee or lunch with
some other guy I'm sure taking
a walk with Peter or having
coffee with Paul and casual
conversations with Larry are
innocent enough. But I've no-
ticed that these same guys only
interact with attractive women
like my wife.
My wife doesn't see a prob-
lem, but I know how guys
think. I worry that my wife is
looking beyond me. Am I wor-
rying about nothing? -


L


Anxious in Davis, Calif
DearAnxious: The fact that
your wife wants to be more
attractive at work is not nec-
essarily a problem. A lot of
married people enjoy flirting
for the attention and have no
interest in pursu-
ing things further
However, when
your wife disin-
vites you to a trip
to Europe and then
stays an extra day,
we would be con-
cerned that she in-
tends to party.
Things can get out
of hand when you
are far away from
your spouse and
lIE'S want to impress
LBOX your work friends
with how wild and
crazy (and young)
you are. It's time to have an
honest conversation with
your wife about your con-
cerns. If she refuses to ex-
plain herself, counseling is
the next step.
Dear Annie: I have a big
problem. I am only 49 and
have been married twice. My
first wife passed away 10
years ago in May and I am
still mourning her death.
My new wife of seven years
doesn't think it's normal that
I still think about my first
wife all the time. Can you
help me deal with her death
so I can move on and live a
better life? Still Grieving
Dear Still: There is no
timetable for grief, but if you
haven't moved much beyond
your initial stages of mourn-
ing after 10 years, it's time to
seek professional guidance. It
is normal to think about your
first wife on occasion, but it is
not normal to obsess over her,


cry daily, turn her closet into
a shrine or constantly com-
pare her to your current wife.
If you are doing any of these
things, please ask your doctor
to refer you to a grief coun-
selor
DearAnnie: The letter
from "Two Scared Parents"
motivated me to speak up.
People don't seem to under-
stand that alcoholism is an
illness. I am an alcoholic with
many years of sobriety I at-
tend AA meetings and have
been to Al-Anon meetings.
People whose loved ones
have other serious diseases
research to find out all they
can about the disease. They
are usually eager to learn in
order to help. So why is it
that when it comes to the
deadly disease of alcoholism,
the family complains, makes
excuses and takes no action?
They expect the sick person,
the one who cannot think
clearly due to alcohol in the
brain cells, to be logical.
When I ask, "Why don't you
go to Al-Anon?" they tell me
it's not their problem.
I realize it's hard to under-
stand that it is a disease.
Please, dear friends, go find
out all you can about alco-
holism. Take action to help
yourself -Anonymous

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
a t www. creators. com.


KN I IT O5 5PI|A RHl
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IS.L E Q S|SBE|A RIM


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OuillDriverBooks.com


9 Voice boxes
10 Eggs
11 Speaker
pro -
19 The Kid
21 Happy sighs
24 Made a knot
26 Guinness or
Baldwin
27 Blunt weapon
28 Green
Hornet's valet
30 Potato st,
31 Halt a
dangerous fly
32 At the drop
of -
33 Quiche -
35 Oxidizes, as
iron
40 911 responder
41 Blackboard
need
43 Investment
45 Term paper
46 Fishing net
48 Off-road
vehicles
49 Gyro pocket
50 Heck!
51 Research site
52 Suffix for
forfeit
54 Ad -
committee


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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"MRIAILSON NEEPSTO'WLIeN UP'
IN MORE WNYS TIAN ONe."

Betty


"How was I supposed to know I'm
old enough to know better!"


Frank & Ernest


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"About Last Night" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Endless Love" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m. 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 2 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,4 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 4:55 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Endless Love" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m. 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:40 p.m. No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 4:30 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: >t synb V


"K ENS'R ZNJL CGRKSX ... K'P BOMR


ENKSX KR YLGCOML KR ALLTM PL NDD


RVL MRHLLRM CSE NOR ND BCKZ."


BNSCRVCS HVFM PLFLHM

Previous Solution: "I'm really a standard brand like Campbell's tomato soup
or Baker's chocolate." Katharine Hepburn
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-25


Garfield


Dilbert


COMICS


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2 5, 2014 Cll














i To place an ad, call 563=5966


~Classifieds



In Print


and



Online


All

!The Time


AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAR. 2ND.
1-800-438-8559


For Sale19.
Crystal Glen 4/2/2 on
corner landscaped
lot. Salt pool w/heater
and lanai, under roof
with kit area. $159,900
410-804-1454
no brokers please
Electric
Wheelchair
With lift, Like New,
$800.
352-897-4154

FORD
'09, Edge, 57K miles
all pwr loaded,
2 tone interior $15,000
firm. (352) 201-1866
Serious Inquiries Only
Selling/Health reasons

Ford
2010 Fusion SEL,
8k miles, loaded,
(352) 344-5307
GAS STOVE
Black w/Stainless Steel
top and doors, Fnrigidaire
like new, $150.
(352) 419-4733
HOMOSASSA
2/2 like new, $500 mo.
NO SMOKING
814-566-8708



LISTINGS
LECANTO
2 bedroom. 1 bath. m.h
for rent/w option to buy
owner financing availa-
ble next to walmart club-
house for your enjoy-
ment 352-476-6144 or
240-310-8122
Philips, "Hard Start"
Brand New
Home Defibrillator,
for sudden cardiac
arrest, Internet, price
$1,199, Sell for $500
(352) 382-1088
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings
THOMPSON CON-
TENDER MUZZLE
LOADER Hawken 45
caliber, like new with
complete set of
'possibles' $350 firm.
352-212-8624.
White PVC Table w/
chairs $150. obo
2 Seater lawn Chairs
still in the case $50.
(352) 209-4311- Iv msg.




$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389


Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



FREE
Cut Oak Fire Wood
U hual
(352) 860-1250
FREE
Top half wood hutch,
mirrored back
glass shelves
(352) 615-7666
Malti-poo
male, 5yrs old.
Free to go home.
No vouna children.


LOST CAT
Large, black,
Burr Terrace, Anna Jo
area of Inverness
Highlands
Call (352) 726-4270
Lost Female Spayed
Gray Cat,
with orange & pink
10 yrs. old. short
haired 10 Ibs. Lost in
Crystal Glen/Lecanto
(352) 746-0733
Lost, female black cat in
Lucille St Beverly Hills
area. Answers to Skit-
ties. She is a little leery
of Men, trusts women.
Reward: 352-364-2416
Man's gold ring
with 5 diamonds.
Lost on Fern St & Ala-
bama or at the TLC
building off of Rt 19
Reward
(352) 628-1723




8U Sumter Shock
Baseball
is currently seeking
2 talented 8 yr olds
who would like to
join our state cham-
pionship winning
travel baseball
team. We are
based out of Sumter
county. We prac-
tice 2 times a week
and play 2 tourna-
ments a month.
If you are interested
in scheduling
a tryout Call
Wes Jennings
352-303-1190

BiB


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Sudoku ***


8 7 4


46 5


1


759


1


486


9


32 8

5 9
_5 __ 9 3^
Fill in the squares so that each row
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 It


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
u Grouper @ $6.OOlb
delivered 352-897-5001








RANCH TYPE
CAREGIVER

Lifting, Cleaning. ETC.
inside/out. Call 11am
leave message 352-
795-0088, 220-0452


Crystal River Dental
Practice seeking a
motivated
Dental Assist/
Sterilization Tech

to add to our team.
Candidate should
be enthusiastic,
energetic, and
willing to be a team
player. Part-time
position, average
18-20 hours weekly.
Experience a must
and Dentrix dental
software preferred.
Email Resume To:
info@kgsdds.com

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo.corn

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience req'd
for very busy
medical office.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

MEDICAL ASST

Needed for busy
family practice Med-
ical Office in Citrus
County. Please Fax
Resume
352-746-3838


^^^^^^^B ---RN--
Citrus County
Detention Facility
Medical Office 8 hour shift 11:45pm
-8:15am. Apply at
Cral ccajob.com
Clerical M/F/D/V/EOE/DFWP

Computer
experience a must! Poe il
email resume
to: ifamilypractice
@gmail.com. NET Developer

With C # and .NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
Are YOU components and
a professional, features for our
joyful, caring, Industrial SCADA
experienced and HMI software
Medical products.
Receptionist or Other desirable
Medical Assistant experience -
Looking to work at Web Services
a successful ASP.NET, HTML5,
Physician's office? Javascript, XMLSVG
Then send YOUR Other domain
Resume To: expertise -
resumek@ SCADA, HMI, MES
rocketmail.com EAM OR CMMS

3 yrs exp. preferred.

Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
CASE MANAGER kokeefe@
b-scada.com
Primary Care ___________
Physician ititin
Accountable Care Litigation
Organization (ACO) Asst/Paralegal
seeking qualified
Care Manager. 5 yr litigation exp.
Current Florida RN mandatory Salary
Lic. along with 3 plus negotiable/Benefits
years experience in avail. Fax resume:
hospital setting or 352-726-3180
post acute care _____ J
setting. Manage
Care experience
and Case Mgr certi-
fication preferred.
Please Fax Cooks/Kitchen
Resume to: a Sre
Nature Coast ACO and Servers
Attn Patty King
352-746-3838 Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
HA6- 1 (352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues
4puz.com



S Exp. Laborer
3 & Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
- Scott Wright Stucco

8 4 3 EXP. MECHANIC
Must have own tools.
6Aoolv in Person
6 American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd.
No Phone Calls Please


11







column, andw forea
Itrough e9.itv out


#4 #44m4%am All of our
structures
withstanid

Installations bBrianCBC1253853 1winms

'e.-4 4352628-97519


FREE' BEST
Permit And bL'T
Engineering Fees
SUp to $200 value

SSiding Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms *Decks Windows Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Blvd, i I R M I I ver




Icam -lp
NewspaperFiT*^^
ca~rrir I arje^^ iw







|Cndependent


Traes/^


ROOFING CREW
experienced only

Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
A&%lv In Person
AAA ROOFING

Crystal River
(352) 563-0411





Asphalt
Distributor
Truck Operator
Needed

CDL class B required.
Full time position w/
benefits. Drug
screening and Back-
ground conducted.
Send resume to:
jobs@paveritefloridacom
or apply at
Pave-Rite, Inc.,
3411 W Crigger Ct.
Lecanto.

CARE GIVER

Seeking a priv. duty
care giver, with exp.
inside a facility sett-
ing in Lecanto, com-
passionate & experi-
enced working with
Alzheimer patients.
Must pass
a level 2 BG check.
(352) 748-0057

COMO RV Hiring
Housekeeper/
RV Detailer
Inquire within
1601 W. Main Street
Inverness 344-1411

IExp Tire Changer
Must have valid
drivers. Lic. $10. hr.
(352) 628-3554

Grass roots Lawn

FT/PT LABORER
Exp. & Dri. lic a must.
352-795-2287




CiiMdlE


Seeking Two
29-hr production
collators
Work Tuesday
-Saturday Night
hours include shift
between 6pm-2am
as needed to reach
29-hour per week.
Work in our packag-
ing department
loading inserts into
the machine to pre-
pare final package
ready for delivery.
Must stand up to
6-8 hours during shift
and must be able
to push, pull, lift ,
up to 70 Ibs.
Reliable, strong
work ethic a must.
Will train. Join a
hardworking,
critical team in or
organization.

Aoolv in Person
to fill out application
at the Chronicle
1624 North
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River. EOE,

final applicant
required to take a
drug screen prior to
hire day.

TRUCK DRIVER

OTR, class A, 10yrs
exp. You need clean
mvr, good appear-
ance and people
skills. We offer weekly
dedicated run to NY.
Home 2 days/wk.
Base $800/wk+
call 352-212-3770





P/T Line Cooks

Must be available to
work week-ends.
Skyview Restaurant
at Citrus Hills
Aoolv in Person
2100 N. Terra Vista
Blvd Mon.-Sun.
8a-1Oa Or 3p-5p





Heating And Air
Conditioning
Technician
Training!
Fast Track, Hands
On, National
Certification Pro-
gram. Lifetime Job
Placement. VA
Benefits Eligible!
1-877-994-9904

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu





SPRINGHILL
CAMPUS

w, Cosmetoloav
March 17th
Day & Night School
w Barber
April 28th
Night School
Massage Ther.
April 28th
Day School
o Massage Ther.
April 28th
Night School
w- NAIL TECH
or FACIAL TECH
Day School
Open Enrollment
INTRODUCING *
NEW Niaht School
MARCH 17th
Classes for Nail Tech
or Facial Tech
Mon., Tues., Wed.
5:00 PM-9:00 PM
(727) 848-8415
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
Full & Part time
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**



DOME TOP STEAMER
TRUNK. Excellent con-
dition in/out. 20"H x
30"W x 18"D. $100.
527-1239



LLADRO Unexpected
Visit. Piece retired in
2004. Beautiful, no
flaws. In original box.
Will text picture if inter-
ested. $200 OBO. Tom
352-586-3380
Miniature Shoes, Tea
Sets, & Thimbles. All in
orng. boxes. For Gifts or
Collectibles 50-70% disc
Call (352) 746-1821



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GAS STOVE
Black w/ Stainless Steel
top and doors, Frigidaire
like new, $150.
(352) 419-4733
High end appliance
set,5 burner glass top
stove, 5 cycle
dishwasher,side by side
refrigerator ice/water in
door.AII almond great
shape. $750 for all. call
Linda 352-564-1231
Kitchen Aooliance Set
GE, Almond, S-by-S
Refrig w/ ice/water
Range glass top, and
Diswasher. May Divide
$1,000; 352-601-3728
SANYO TV. 27
in.Works.call for info..
Linda 423-4163
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE, 20"
electric, white
clean, works good.
$125. Homosassa
(678) 617-5560 or
352-628-3258
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398
WHITE MAGIC CHEF
ELECTRIC STOVE
Slide In, Glass Top,Self
Cleaning, Timers,$200
3525134084



DESK OFFICE CHAIRS
THREE SWIVEL
CHAIRS @ $30 EACH
(352) 527-8993











n-Thur 2-27 Walk
About Estate Auction
3pm Complete con-
tents of several
homes, furniture,
tools, boxes of
treasures
Sun 3/2 Antique
Auction I pm Kawai
Baby Grand,
Victorian-Primitive-
Marble Top Furniture,
Signed memorabilia,
Jewelry,
Coins, Rugs, Porc,
Sterling. 500 + lots

call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.


Air Compressor/
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, 125 PSI
$325
(202) 425-4422 cell




42a?D Panasonic
Plasma TV. Input from
DVR or cable box. Re-
mote control. Stereo
speakers built in. $150.
(352) 527-6527

BOSE
Soundlink Bluetooth
Mobile Speaker II
with power supply &
aux cable. Pd $300,
asking $250
(352) 746-7790 LM




CEILING FANS WHITE
3 52"; 1-42" $20
EACH (352) 527-8993

TOILETS 1-powder blue
,1-tan 50.00 ea.
352 726-4135

WINDOW BLINDS 2 -
72"X54"; 3 48" X 72" -
$15 EACH
(352) 527-8993




Acer Computer
Monitor, 19" model
S201, $50. Printer
Apollo, P2200
$10. (352) 795-9040

COPY MACHINE
CANON IMAGE CLASS
D320 -$100
(352) 527-8993

DVD RESCUE ME
SERIES Seasons 1 3
total of 11 DVDs $25
OBO 352-446-9620

FAMILY GUY DVD
SERIES total of 75
DVDs -Retails $170
asking $70 OBO
352-446-9620

FAX MACHINE SHARP
UX510- EXCELLENT
COND. $45
(352) 527-8993

HP LAPTOP CARRY-
ING CASE w/Shoulder
Strap New $25 Call
726-0040

MARRIED WITH CHIL-
DREN Series 7 DVDS
asking $15 OBO [retails
$36] 352-446-9620

ROSEANNE DVD
SERIES 20 DVDS
asking $60 OBO [retails
$140] 352-446-9620




DOUBLE ROUND PA-
TIO LOUNGE frame
w/cushions & pillows.
good cond. 95.00 obo
352-560-7857

LANAI 9 pc set
glass table 66 x40,
6 chrs, 2 footstools, sm
round glass coffee ta-
ble. Like New $400 obo
352-422-2317 Cl John

Round Patio Table,
120" round with 4
chairs, good condition
$100. (352) 795-7254

White PVC Table w/
chairs $150. obo
2 Seater lawn Chairs
still in the case $50.
(352) 209-4311- Iv msg.

Wrought Iron Bar with
5 Stool Patio Set
good condition
$100. obo
(352) 270-0763


Furniture

3 New Bar Stools
with arm rest
& foot rest,
good quality
$120
(352) 795-2975

54" Kitchen Table &
base, cherry wood,
4 leather chairs
org. cost $1,600.
Reduced $500. (352)
465-5541, 464-1000

Antique Rocker,
round table & desk.DR
table, 4 chrs, 2 leafs;
dresser, overstuffed
chr, kit storage unit, &
paintings. $350 obo
(352) 419-5635

Ashley loveseat dark
sage green $100.
352-341-1086

BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in Original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772

Brown Leather Couch
from Rooms to Go
good condition
$100. (352) 270-0763

Bunk Bed & Futon
Combination
heavy duty metal
construction,
excel, cond. $250.
(352) 249-7796

COFFEE TABLE round
black glass coffee table
$100. 352 795 9664


DINING ROOM SET
Table with 6 chairs,
walnut, 4 glass inserts
in table $200
(352) 897-5278
Dresser & Night Stand
Antique, Pine, $100
obo, China Cabinet,
Glass doors, w/ cabinets
$75 obo (352) 226-3883
Dual Recliner/Love
Seat. New Cond.Sea
Foam Green. No
Smoker, No Pets. $250
obo. (352)344-8277
Glass Covered Raton
coffee table. Excellent
Condition! asking $50
OBO 352-446-9620
King Mattress
& 2 twin boxsprings
for King $175. obo
kids bedroom set,
3 pc. set $200. ob
(352) 226-3883
KING SIZE BED King
w/headboard excel
condition. $325
352-628-3418
Lighted China Cabinet
approx 6.5' tall,
two compartment
drawers, light wood,
exc. cond. $250.
(352) 465-0339
Sofa, Love seat, Cof
fee table, matching
recliner, printed mate-
rial w/ some wicker
$600 obo excel, cond.
(352) 341-4406
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
COMPOSTERAND
RAIN BARREL compost
barrel and plastic rain
barrel both for $100.
352 795 9664
John Deere
Riding Mower
17.5 HP Kawaski
Motor, 42" deck. $500
(352) 746-7357

Look
RIDING LAWN
MOWER John Deer 42"
riding lawn mower.17hp
$500 352 613 5522

1.Q40k
RIDING LAWN
MOWER John Deer 42"
riding lawn mower.17hp
$500 352 613 5522
WEEDEATER
Bolens-BL150, 17"new
line/filter gatorblades,
runs great needs worm
gear,$20 352-212-1596



MEN'S DRESS PANTS
Like new, 6 pair 5.00
each 36X29 Linda
423-4163



**225/65 R17*****
Great tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!! (352)
857-9232
2 BOAT OARS(gray)-
for small boat, 60" long
with oar locks, $40.
52-628-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex+.,
$50. 628-0033
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
AMERICAN DJ
MIRROR BALL WITH
MOTOR AND 2 PIN-
SPOTS. $25.00
352-601-1851
AMERICAN TOUR-
ISTER Travel Duffle
Bag hand/shoulder
strap $25 Call 726-0040
AMERICAN TOUR-
ISTER Travel Duffle
Bag w/shoulder strap
$25 Call 726-0040
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BEACH CRUISER
BIKES 1 red with alumi-
num frame 1 blue with
steel frame EXCEL-
LENT condition! Paid
over $300 each. asking
$250 for both or $150
each 727-207-1447
BIRD CAGE 32W X 40
L $45.00 OBO e-mail
picture Linda 423-4163
BIRD CAGE ON
STAND For medium
bird. 20x20x35H.$35
Located in Floral
City.Call 239 404 8589


Bonhit.eRan..
Hood $35.00
Double bowl composite
sink $35.00
(717) 994-2362
Chain Link Fence,
6 ft high, 176 feet,
complete setup
Asking $600.
(352) 341-6213
CHICAGO RECIPRO
CATING SAW- new in
box, 6 AMP, rotating
handle, #65570, $30,
628-0033
Complete Set of
China, 50 yrs. old,
Crown Victoria, white
w/gold trim $100.
(352) 465-4474 or
(517) 282-6404
CURIO CABINET,
6' high, 18 1/2" wide, II"
deep, lighted, dark
wood, 4 shelves, $75,
(352) 465-1813
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DESK SOLID DARK
WOOD w/ Hutch Excel.
Used Cond. 7 drawers.
Org. $1,300.
Selling for $245.00
352-249-7212
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new.l own
75.00 obo Linda
413-4163
ELVIS RECORDS Elvis
LP's 6 for $25 from 50s
and 60s 860-1039
860-1039
FOG MACHINE WITH
CONTROLLER AND
FOG FLUID $25.00
352-601-1851
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
HOLIDAY CLASSIC
CD'S Top artists 25 for
$50 Call 726-0040
Karcher
Pressure Washer
6 hp, 2300 psi, $150.
Queen Sofa Couch
multi color, like new
$150.obo
(352) 270-0269
Kerosene Lamps
set of 10, $100.
(352) 795-7254
Large Shed, with
windows & skylight
w/ portible air cond.
$850. obo, Pd. $2,000
Leave Message
(352) 637-6310
PENN SPINNING
ROD & REEL- Captiva
CV4000 Reel, Penn
Slammer 7' Rod, Ex.,
$65. 628-0033
REALISTIC MICRO-
PHONE with cord.
$25.00 352-601-1851
SINGER TREADLE
SEWING MACHINE
$60.00 Located in Floral
City. Call 239 404 8589
SPINNING RED LIGHT
$5.00 352-601-1851
SPINNING RED LIGHT
Used by DJ, $5.00
351-601-1851
STAINLESS STEEL
POT/LID exc. cond. 10"
hi X 25" circumference.
$20. Call Penny
527-2598 10am-9pm.
STROBE LIGHT Great
for dances. $10.00
352-601-1851
SYLVANIA TV Very
good condition, $25
(352)465-1616
WIRELESS REMOTE
CONTROL FOG MA-
CHINE with fog fluid
$30.00 352-601-1851

Medical
Equipment
4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
3524640316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
**********
CELEBRITY SCOOTER
AND HARMAR LIFT
Both in good working
condition. $850. Call
270-2319 before 8 PM
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Electric
Wheelchair
With lift, Like New,
$800.
352-897-4154
Foot Massage
Homedics, deep
kneading heat $25.
(352) 795-9040


8 3 51711 4C9 2 6r
2 9 4Jb6 85 3 7 1.
1 67j3;9 2 4 5 8
7 5'911 2 6 8 4 3
3 1 218 4 7 5 6 9

.4 8i615 3 9 7 1 2
9 2 8'4171 6 3 5
67 312!5S 1 94
5 4 1j96 3 2 8 7


Fax: (352) 563-5665 1 Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 1 Email: classifieds@chronicleonIine.com I website:


h


C12 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WALKER WITH SEAT.
Excellent condition.
Storage under seat.
$70. 527-1239
Philips, "Hard Start"
Brand New
Home Defibrillator,
for sudden cardiac
arrest, Internet, price
$1,199, Sell for $500
(352) 382-1088
RAISED TOILET SEAT
Add 5" to toilet .Brand
new,stillin box.Paid
$25,sell for $15.00
352-746-4160
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE STATIONARY
BIKE ALL ELECTRON-
ICS ONLY 100.00
352-464 -0316
SHOWER BENCH
SEAT ALUMINUM &
FIBERGLASS BENCH
TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
352-464-0316
SILENT AIR PURIFIER
New $249 used 1 week
$50. Pay NO MORE!
352-613-4279
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS
ONLY 50.00
464-0316



Crate 15 watt acoustic
guitar amp $80.
352-419-4464






DUDLEY'S
AUCTrO'W
w- Thur 2-27 Walk
About Estate Auction
3pm Complete con-
tents of several
homes, furniture,
tools, boxes of
treasures
w, Sun 3/2 Antique
Auction lpm Kawai
Baby Grand,
Victorian-Primitive-
Marble Top Furniture,
Signed memorabilia,
Jewelry,
Coins, Rugs, Porc,
Sterling, 500 + lots

call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.
Fender Rumble
15 watt bass amp $45.
352-419-4464
First act
acoustic guitar $20.
352-419-4464
First Act
MA-215 bass amp $45.
352-419-4464


Kenmore Refrigerator
Elite Side by Side
25.6 cu ft, 2 comput-
ers, auto defrost
w/side mounted
freezer, thru-door
ice/water $500.
(352) 465-0339
LOWREY ORGAN
MX-2, With all the
bells and whistles.
Exc Cond, w/ bench
$1400; 352-601-3728
Peavey Max 112
Bass amp $85.
352-419-4464
Peavey VYPYR 30 watt
guitar amp $85.
352-419-4464
Vox DA-10
guitar amp $65.
352-419-4464



DISHES service for
12w/addit.pcs. Serv
bowl, platter, butter dish.
PfaltzgrafAmalfi $100
513-4614



BOWFLEX
TREADCLIMBER
Combo treadmill, ellipti-
cal, & stepper all in one
machine. Originally cost
$2000, selling for $500.
Must pick up.
Homosassa area. Call
352 382 7827 and leave
message
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316

Sigorting

14' x 10' Screen Room
still in the case $100.
Coleman Weekender
Hammock,
still in case $100.
(352) 209-4311 -lv msg
CLUB CAR
New batteries, drop
curtains, charger
$1700 obo
(352) 489-1865
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dirt Bike Brand-new bat-
tery. Paid $499, asking
$75 OBO Pics avail.
352-446-9620
EZ GO Golf Cart
Lifted, rear seat, large
tires and more, like
new $3200
(352) 697-7854
(352) 564-2756
Mens Bike
$60.00
352 447 4380
after 10am


'IMNSION-9'
SIT INSIDE -$100
(352) 527-8993
THOMPSON CON-
TENDER MUZZLE
LOADER Hawken 45
caliber, like new with
complete set of
possibles' $350 firm.
352-212-8624.
Women's Bike
$60.00
352 447 4380
after 10am


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


BARRY,
a sweet, loving,
calm gentle boy,
sits, takes treats
gently, & will
speak for treats.
He should do well
with kids too. Is an
approximately 5-y.o.
pit bull mix.

Call Laci @
352-212-8936.


;HAWEELLNIL5
Health Cert, 1st set
of shots, 1 mo flea
control $350 ea
(352) 613-9736
LABRADOODLE PUP-
PIES 3 adorable males,
1 black, 2 apricot, par-
ents on premises, vet
checked, health certifi-
cates. Ready for new
homes! $500
352-410-0080
Macaw- Female
$2500; Quarter horse,
National Champion,
takes intermediate
rider $2500
352-860-2457
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


SKINNY
Skinney, an Ameri-
can pit bull terrier, a
great favorite
among the shelter
volunteers. Bears
the scars of a previ-
ous hard life, but is
looking for a new
wonderful life with a
loving family. Rides
well in a car, takes
treats gently, loves
to play with toys.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.



2 Pot Belly Pigs
$50 each
Stallion pony, semi-
broke, $300
(352) 634-4237
ask for Mike


Pet


1999 Mobile Home
28x60, bank owned,
Repo, Great Shape
Financing Available.
Call 352-795-1272
K MUST SEEK


ATTENTION:
Custom order a new
home and receive
20% OFF, between
now and tax day.
April 15th.
Factory direct,
Call (352) 621-3807


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2x6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C
Call (352) 621-9183


Palm Harbor Homes
2014 Models are here!
$8,500 Pre-
Construction Savings
John Lyons (@
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 C13


11


CLASSIFIED




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
SI bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!




LSTINiGS
LECANTO
2 bedroom. 1 bath. m.h
for rent/w option to buy
owner financing availa-
ble next to walmart club-
house for your enjoy-
ment 352-476-6144 or
240-310-8122


SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$4 1,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.





INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




FLORAL CITY
3/2-1+AC, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $91,900
716-807-8847


N. ez- .
HERMAN"
LaughnSock Ite aoal n Ds by Universal UCIICk or US 2014

"Hold it! They're out of season."


A- c Ihens Bat


Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre. New
bathrooms, Ig screened
porch, dead end rd.
$45,900. 352-302-1383


Owner Financing
Available for Mobile
Homes!
Call for Details
352-795-2377


West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065


Ready To Move In
3/2 with large back
deck on 1.5 acres.
Close to town
call 352-795-2377




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
pool and clubhouse
$15,000 (352)344-5172

2BD/1BA Singlewide
with added fam. rm
rasied deck, Ig. shed,
furnished 55+ $184 mo
Reduced Price $5,500,
(352) 726-3726


55+ MH Gated Com-
munity. Large 3/2,
2000 Jacobson Triple
Wide. 2000+ sq. ft.
Ready to move in.
$68K. Serious inquir-
ies only. Owner will fi-
nance with $20K
down.
727-967-4230



AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf. over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077


DfrMI I I",


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR *"461-4518



All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialize in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770



Take Care of Loved
Ones in My Home
Clean, caring, exp.,
exc. ref. 352-476-7159
Will Provide: Rides,
Cleaning, Shopping
Inverness/Floral City
$10 hr. (352) 613-3114



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Your World





. 9 mI& rl


C*MUNtL


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
Seeding,Tree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**352-422-7279**


OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
s/FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
w Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352 ) 949-2292




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Comn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447




Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Comn. Lic.352-503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755


Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


Painting
U SPPAINTIN
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-1 Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Absolute Exterior
Restoration Any
Surface roof& gutter
cleaning, int/ext painting
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
352-201-7313


POOL- RE:M.LIN
#I ig Smice + Uttaftt


1 Inslall a Relir Now's the
Pumps Filles time for pool
Healers remodeling
Floors/walls. Tubs to & Salt Systems
shower cony. No job I-,I I, h. ,
too big or small. Ph: h, i,
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441 ., ,-,
I,-,n.1 Ii,- ,, ,,
Sugarnmill .*l ill,,,,
Woods
MAC'S MOBILE RV POOl'e&Spa aa ........nr
REPAIR & MAINT. P lap
RVTC Certified Tech SMBFO01S.COBM 382-4421
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. L BbI B ,..,i., ,,, ,, ..


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!

^Windowyi^

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


GENERAL
Stand Alone ....
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac CenturionI
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
S ER001 5377






WI ATINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
7 Driveways
* Parking Lots
* Seal Coating

" Maintenance
" Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmrnail.comr
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County
Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured




SRVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE RST,
CONSISTENT VO VED BEST OF THE BST




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install



746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Licensed Insured Bonded


WINDO -
GENE."
.4O M l I MW h A t o m "
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


-I'.IM i!1


LEAT
DETECTION
Licensed


Electronic
Leak
Detection
for all pools
and spas
We'll find your leak
or there's
no charge!


352-433-6070

30 day guarantee on all work I
BayLeakDetective@gmail.com


Ted's Painting
g Hom Services Co.







All Types of Home Repairs

746-51901
LIC/INS Lic #240270




I_ KNmOCK OUT-_-)


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallway is Free) only $69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

O THURA CLEAN LC
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091




YOUR INTERLOCKING
BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST



POOL







POOL AND PAVER LLC
"-Ll 352-400-3188


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
MR 352-364-4610
(MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated
Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
S 24Hoursa Day -7Days aWeek


I I

Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
o Smnatt Carpentry
o Fencing
o S.:reening
o (lean Dryer Vents
AIffo'o b & Dependable
nr iW Egperientce lifelong
li l 352-344-0905 I
cell: 400-1722 8
Licensed & Insured Lic.#3 7761


2-25


2 Bedroom, Large La-
nai, front porch, car-
port, 2 sheds, com-
pletely furnished.
Inverness, very nice
$34,000 cash
(989) 781-6066
2 Bedroom, Large La-
nai, front porch, car-
port, 2 sheds, com-
pletely furnished.
Inverness, very nice
$34,000 cash
(989) 781-6066

*THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/ screened
patio on over % acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512
3/2/1 DW MH
1/ acre corner lot
exc. cond. open floor
plan, laundry room,
all apple, Ig scn porch,
fenced,3 carports,
shed, Homosassa,
$51k 352-410-1072
4/3, 32x80, w/ 2 master
suites in Homosassa.
2006 MH, Must See!!
Owner Financing Avail
Ready to move in *
(352) 795-1272
HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4
acres, must see inside,
nice & Clean $42,000
(will consider reasona-
ble cash offers)
352-465-7606


I








CL4 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014


2Br, IBa in 55+ Park
carport, shed, wshop,
scrned Patio, In great
shape, fully turn. Ask-
ing $15k, $225/mo lot
rent. 352-419-4428

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf. over
Storage shed, $6,500
turn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077

Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273

For Sale 19,m

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858
Lecanto Hills
2br/lba in 55+ comm.
Must Sell $3000
(352) 302-8886
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financing. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




"I NVERNETsTS
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOUSES
TAKING
APPLICATIONS
I BR, I BATH
2 BR, 1 /2 BATH
*Rental Assistance
Available
CALL 252-344-1010
M/W/TH.,8-12& 1-5
307 Washington Av.
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity





L
.
J


16BB<


2/2, eat-in Kit.
screened porch, laundry
room, CHA, near new
Walmart $550. 1st/Sec,
352-746-4191 or
352-697-5900

Business

FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514



CRYSTAL RIVER
Professional Office
Bldg. New construct /
Brick 1,200 sf, beauti-
fully landscaped
$1,200. mo., 794-7425



Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $775. mo
+ util and security dep.
(352) 382-8935












h#1 Employment source is
.chronicleonlhne.com


HOMOSASSA
2/2 like new, $500 mo.
NO SMOKING
814-566-8708




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm. Scrn por.
$600. 352-464-2514
INV. HIGHLANDS
3/2/2, Clean, Irg. scrn.
Patio $800., 302-0431
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Spacious, bright
Close to Downtown
No Pets, 352-400-5723
INVERNESS
Beautiful 2/1, gated
comm. 55+ pool, clb
hse activities. $650 +
dep. (330) 806-9213
INVERNESS
Waterfront Lake Nina
4/3, beautiful yard,
huge lanai, $1200/mo
1st, last, sec
(734) 417-1737


CLASSIFIED



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



INVERNESS
4/2 1600sq ft House for
rent 2 carports on canal.
Large yard, boat dock.
$1000.00mo. First and
security required. Back-
ground check required
($25.00)Available March
1st. 727-871-4222


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
w Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebivahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


f;'-,.r'?


4



-~ ~


0008XHD


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers calF

352-563-5592.


S CITRUSON COUNTY
www.chronicleonline.com

Flodda Fish and Wildlife Coservatin Commission;
http://nyurl.can/htp-my-fwcusthelp-=ca -app


CITRUS COUNTY (FD CHRONICLE



WORDY GURDy BY TRCKY RICKY ANE


1. Owned an Alfred E. Neuman magazine (1) Every answer is a rhymingke FAT CAT
I-|--_ --- | pair of words (like FAT CAT
| |_and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Orange tree area zigzagged (1) theywill fit in the letter
________ ---- squares. The number after the
|77 | 1111|| definition tells you how many
3. "Clue" game Professor's muffin scraps (1) syllables in each word.
I 11 1@2014J FS, Dist. byUniv. Ucick for UJFS
4. Insane love of Jay Gatsby (2)


5. Italian gondola city net game (2)


6. Student's ethical considerations (2)


7. Losing spirit while suffering awfully (3)


DNIHSI 19iNVVNUISI1f19VI'L SHa'IIHOS SIdld *9 SINN3 iaINHA'
ASIV AZVHJ SflIUaJ sIMflld T aOAi AOAH9' GIVMOVHt'
2-25-144 Sm[ sw










oi General UailityNDWorers'Con! .


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514




Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
3BD., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Just Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $104,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
(866) 351-1234




Attractive 2 Bd/2BA
Home near library.
please call for details
By Owner, asking
$84,900. No calls after
9pm (352) 746-3919
Laurel Ridge,3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks
Golf Comm.(with club
house & pool.) 1754SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kit w/ pantry &
nook. MBR has 2 clos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639





1_F3
Newly Updated 2/2/2
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
3229 N Juniperus Way
$114,900352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased





ForWue%9
Beautiful home you
are looking for! 4
bedroom. 2 bath, 2
car garage in gated
community large
14K sq. ft. lot, cus-
tom pool many up-
grades. 3300 sq.
ft.Can email info.For
Sale by Owner NO
brokers please!
352-601-6942
352-513-4463


For SaleIf
Crystal Glen 4/2/2 on
corner landscaped
lot. Salt pool w/heater
and lanai, under roof
with kit area. $159,900
410-804-1454
no brokers please





oK-

FOR


SAlE

Great Starter Home
S. Little John Ave.
Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
Lease or Cash
Call For Deatails
877-500-9517


For Sale '.
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367




For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Appt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.

Homosassa^^
Homesjl


IAIVII LU i l
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exifttami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!





ForSale9,1,
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

SECLUDED
3BR/2BA, 1653sf, 2car
CP 2 story barn.
Includes 3/ acre
buildable lot. $109,900
352-613-2289


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351



Spacious 2/2/1 with
New roof, ACA& win-
dows, Inclds all Kit ap-
pliances. Sunroom
overlooking Green-
belt. Inside utility rm.
$85,000 352-422-3256


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880-Office


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bioowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

Buying or Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




e


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone@tampabav.r
r.com
ERA American
Realty &
Investments










Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


Chrus C
Hom:s"n









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt(l
centurv21.com
Century 21

J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


WA4'NiL aL~
MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515














SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Here's Your
Chance" TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000

Owner Financing
$ 10,000 Down,
10 vrs @ 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5000






Citrus Hills Townhouse
2br/2/2ba + carport
Fully FurnishedVery
nice, many extra's
near pool, great view
Must See $79,000
(352) 527-4518

Inverness Village
Condo 2/2, 55+ ground
floor over looks pool,
mature trees, 1035 sq. ft
living area. $39,900
352-634-3976






"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


528 SW 1st Court
3 bedrm., 2-1/2 bath
Exciting opportunity
to live on Paradise
Isles in the heart of
Crystal River, Flor-
ida with two sided
deep, crystal clear
water and access to
the Gulf of Mexico.
Located across from
a 57 acre wilderness
preserve and a man-
atee sanctuary.
Watch the dolphins
and manatees play
in your own back
yard. Paddle board,
kayak, See Doo,
boating and water
skiing to your hearts
content. This %half
acre property has 2
docks, one with a
10,000 pound lift and
220 foot sea wall.
This beautiful 3,2 %
home has granite
counter tops, 2 fire
places, 2 1/% car gar-
age, hurricane win-
dows and doors,
panoramic water
view, sunrise and
citrus fruit trees.
Enjoy low utilities
with hot water on
demand and water
to air AC. This prop-
erty won't last,
priced to sell at
$585,000. Owner
will finance part.
1(352)795-7400


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFure-Coast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"


HOMOSASSA-Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000 352-422-1311
INVERNESS, 2BR/1 BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749




ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
2.5 ACRES,
MARCH 20TH, 10am
messersales.com
Ed Messer, Broker




** *** ***
GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905
** *** *
4 ADJOINING LOTS
1 Acre MOL,Close to
Town Gospel Island
Gunn Ct.$14,000. Make
Offer(352) 726-2038
or (352) 613-4958



MUST SELL


HERNANDO
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
Lot for sale $15,000
OBO. 781-864-1906
352- 726-2821
Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High, Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner



PARADISE! OZELLO!
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583
WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 100 ft on
water. All utilities.
$165,000.352-634-1171




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*
All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50;
Elec backing plates
set:12" $90; 10" $80
Call 352-464-2770
ALUMINUM BOAT
10' Long, Good Cond.
Easy to load. Light
weight. + trolling mtr.
$300. (678) 617-5560
Boston Whaler
1979, 13', w/motor&
trailer, in good condition
$2500. (352) 302-5875
GENERATOR
Honda, Black Max
8125, 6500 watts,
low hours, $550
Will take hunting eq.
on trade 906-285-1696
Sea Doo GTX
2005, 3 seater, 131 hrs.
2010 Continental
trailer, asking $3450.
obo (352) 794-3374
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555"
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
RV & Truck for Sale
Mobile Suite 5th Wheel
Custom 3 slides, 37 '
2003 FORD F350 Lariat,
Dually Super Duty V-8
TURBO, Easy Rider
Reese, 16k Hitch
MANY EXTRA'S ON
BOTH, PACKAGE
S37K 352-897-5339


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


SHome o Finder
WWW -111 LhrIinii [ -finder corn


Fitd Yoar trwwcHowm
Search Hundreds of Local UListings
www.chroniclehcrnefinder.com


Recreation


Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans,1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




2014 KZ SONIC 18'
"Like New",
completely loaded
MUST SELL, Homosassa
$14k 315-729-2634
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
MINI LITE
2011 By Forest River
20ft, w/ slide out,
Excellent cond.
$11,000, 352-795-3434
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, Darts, sales
Mobile Repair Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




BUICK
2002 LeSabre
38,000 mi, Exc Cond,
$6900
(352) 527-9509
Buy Here/Pay Here

'98 Ford Explorer
$825 Down

05 Saturn VUE
$995 Down

'96 Saturn
$650 Down

'96 Olds Bravada
$725 Down

'95 Toyota Camry
$2195 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
'01, Sebring, LXI, con-
vert., loaded, leather,
V6, CD, full pwr. new
tires, garaged, clean,
$2,975., 352-212-4882

IMMACULATE

CHRYSLER
SPORTS CAR
2005 Crossfire Yellow
convertible w/black top,
auto trans, excellent
condition, 45k,built in
Germany w/Mercedes
V6 engine $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150




947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-


CLASSIFIED




DODGE
2012, Avenger RT,
Sunroof, leather, navi,
$17,995
352-341-0018
FORD
'10, Mustang Cony.
42K mi, V6, auto, pwr.
opt., alloy whls, alarm
spoiler, ext warr.
$15,500, 352- 860-1939
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
Ford
2010 Fusion SEL,
8k miles, loaded,
(352) 344-5307
FORD
Reduced price for a
well maintained '03,
Taurus SE, Looks &
drives great $3,200
firm/ 141k hwy mi.
Shown on appointment.
(352) 422-1798
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

HYUNDAI
2007 Azera
loaded-p/w, heated
power seats 6 cyl
very low miles, Askg
$9800. 860-716-3128

LINCOLN
89 TOWNCAR. 75,300.
mi. very clean, exc.
condition, all original,
$3500. (304) 678-4070

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
'09, Sentra, FE +
Sedan, excel, cond.
56,600 mi. $8,900
352-795-8880

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR *461-4518




2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551

AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAR. 2ND.
1-800-438-8559






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2010, Silverado
Reg Cab WT
$13,495,
352-341-0018

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru-


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 C15


DODGE
1995, 2500, Reg Cab
Work Box Truck
$2,888.
352-341-0018




CHRYSLER
2005, Pacifica AWD,
low miles, leather
extra clean $9,450.
352-341-0018
FORD
'09, Edge, 57K miles
all pwr. loaded,
2 tone interior $15,000
firm. (352) 201-1866
Serious Inquiries Only
Selling/Health reasons
FORD
2003 Excursion XLT
V-10 New Michelin tires,
new master brake cylin-
der, new fuel pump, new
transmission. Great tow
vehicle, class IV heavy
duty hitch, tow package,
loaded. Regularly main-
tamined and serviced.
$7,900. (352) 344-1823
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
'01, Grand Cherokee,
limited, loaded, new
tires & engine. Mint
$9,500. 305-619-0282




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchairvan with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306










2005 HD 1200C
EZ Finance $3,900.

2004 YAMAHA
VSTAR 1100
BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.

2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14,500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047






'01 HD ROAD KING
Loaded $7,800.

'13 HD STREET GLIDE
Low Miles $18,500.

'06 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC TRIKE Full
Conversion $21,000.

'08 HONDA GOLD
WING TRIKE
Loaded $24,900.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047

GOLDWING
'12, 1800 Trike,
Red, 31k miles, Serious
inquires only $26,000.
(352) 341-5762
HONDA
'07 VTX-1300, low mi-
les, custom, worth
$6500, asking $5500
OBO 352-697-1205
KAWASAKI
2004 Vulcan Classic
800 cc lots of extras
$2500
(352) 726-1460





ary28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


588-0225 TUCRN
Theroux, Paul J 2014-CP-38 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 2014-CP-38
Probate Division
In Re: Estate of PAUL J. THEROUX,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Paul J. Theroux deceased, Case Number
2014-CP-38, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 110 N Apopka Ave, Inverness, Florida 34450 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below

All interested persons are required to file with this court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, any claims against the estate Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or attorney, and the amount claimed If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be stated If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated If the claim is secured, the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver a copy of the claim to the clerk who shall serve a copy on the per-
sonal representative All claims not so filed will be forever barred
Publication of this Notice has begun on February 18, 2014
Personal Representative
/s/ J Patrick McElroy
P 0 Box 1511, Hernando, FL 34441
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ J. Patrick McElroy, Florida Bar No 052712
PO Box 1511, Hernando, FL 34441, (352)637-2303, ipmcelrov61ahotmail com
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: February 18 & 25, 2014


590-0225 TUCRN
Parrott, Opal 2013-CP-754 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013 CP 754
IN RE: ESTATE OF OPAL LILLIAN PARROTT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of OPAL LILLIAN PARROTT, deceased, whose date
of death was September 3, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is 110 N Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is February 18, 2014.
Personal Representative:
/S/ Robert Thomas Parrott
5185 S Thrasher, Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/S/John S. Clardy III, Florida Bar No. 123129
Clardy Law Firm PA, PC Box 2410, Crystal River, FL 34423-2410
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 7 & 14, 2014.


AdminstratiI


593-0304 TUCRN
Pelletier, Francis W. 2014-CP-9 NTC-SA
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-CP-9

IN RE: ESTATE OF FRANCIS WILFRED PELLETIER AKA
FRANCIS W. PELLETIER AKA FRANCIS PELLETIER
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:

You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of Francis Wilfred Pelletier aka Francis W. Pelletier aka Francis
Pelletier, deceased, File Number 2014-CP-9, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450; that the decedent's date of death was November 18, 2013; that the total
value of the estate is $152,310.94 (including the exempt-protected homestead) and
that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order
are: Michelle Taboada, 120 McPartand Way, East Greenwich, RI 02818.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 25, 2014.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/Michelle Taboada
120 McPartland Way, East Greenwich, RI 02818

Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/H. Michael Evans, Esquire, Attorney, FL Bar #: 251674,
20702 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34431, Telephone: (352) 489-2889
Fax: (352) 489-0852, E-Mail: hmichaelevanspa@yahoo.com
Published two times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 25 & March 4,2014.


594-0304 TUCRN
Kroeger, Otto J 2013-CP-000736 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. :2013-CP-000736
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF OTTO KROEGER, also known as
OTTO J. KROEGER
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of OTTO KROEGER, a/k/a OTTO J KROEGERe, de-
ceased, whose date of death was October 7, 2013 and whose social security number is
xxx-xx-8520, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Department,
the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450 The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 25, 2014
Personal Representative
/s/ STEPHEN OTTO KROEGER
5810 Linden Square Court, North Bethesda, MD 20852
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ROBERT W GROTH, Esq Florida Bar No 879551
5425 Park Central Court, Naples, FL 34109, (239) 593-1444, Email rob@grothlaw net
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle February 25 & March 4, 2014


595-0304 TUCRN
VanBuskirk, Bernard 2013-CP-000710 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE
CASE NO. :2013-CP-000710
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BERNARD VANBUSKIRK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Bernard VanBuskirk, deceased, whose date of death
was November 4, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, File Number 2013 CP000710; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 25, 2014
Personal Representative
Charlotte A VanBuskirk
2286 N Andrea Point, Lecanto, FL 34461
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/Thomas VanNess, Jr, Esq Florida Bar No 0857750
VanNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd Crystal River, FL 34429,
352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle February 25 & March 4, 2014


596-0304 TUCRN
Champlin, John W 2013-CP-000721 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE
CASE NO. :2013-CP-000721
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. CHAMPLIN,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of John W Champlin, deceased, whose date of death
was October 12, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, File Number 2013-CP-000721; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FL 34450 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 25, 2014
Personal Representative
John P Champlin
241 Scribner Hill Road, Otisfield, ME 04270-6212

Rosemary Watt Champlin,
10237 Pamodeho Circle, Crystal River, FL 34428
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/Thomas VanNess, Jr, Esq Florida Bar No 0857750
VanNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd Crystal River, FL 34429,
352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle Febnruary 25 & March 4, 2014


591-0225 TUCRN
2/28 LIEN FORECLOSURE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of public sale
RAG Automotive Enter-
prises gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell this vehicle
on 2/28/2014, 08:00Oam
at 2604 Hwy 44 W. Inver-
ness, FL 34453.
VIN# 5TBDT44195488526
2005 Toyota Tundra
pursuant to subsection


713.78 of the FL Statutes.
RAG Automotive Enter-
prises reserves the right to
accept or reject any and
/or all bids.
February 25, 2014.

592-0225 TUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PUBLIC NOTICE
ADVANCE TOWING gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell


these vehicles) on
03/09/2014, 08:00 am at
4875 S. FLORIDA AVENUE,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the FL. Statutes.
ADVANCED TOWING
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or
all bids.
00000000000000000 BOAT
TRAILER DMRRB217E888
1988 DONZI
February 25, 2014


597-0304 TUCRN
City of Inverness-RFQ
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
# CDD-2014-01
BOAT LAUNCH DOCK INSTALLATION

The City of Inverness, Citrus County, Florida will received sealed proposals from Qualified
Contractors for the complete installation of two (2) separate floating boat launch docks to be
placed in Wallace Brooks Park on Lake Henderson The project is for the furnishing and de-
livery of the floating docks to a destination within the City of Inverness, Florida The docks
shall be delivered in sections to the City and a separate installation entity or the City or both
shall be responsible for the assembly and installation of the docks in the water Installation
of the docks is not part of this bid Bids are to be delivered to the City Clerk 212 W Main
Street, Inverness, Florida 34450 Bids will be received until 4'00 pm on March 10, 2014 and
will be opened at 4'15 am on March 10, 2014 in a public meeting at the Inverness Govern-
ment Center at 212 W Main Street, Inverness, Florida
The project consists of, but is not limited to The furnishing and delivery of the appropriate
dock pieces, materials, supplies, hardware, cables, and other materials necessary for the
complete assembly and installation of the two docks as per the specifications

The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formalities and reject any and all bids, to
waive any technical defects and to accept any bid which represents the best offer to the City
of Inverness, all as may be in the best interest of the City

A complete set of specification documents including proposal forms are available through
the Community Development Department at the City of Inverness, 212 West Main Street, In-
verness, Florida 34450 between the hours of 9'00 am and 4'00 pm Monday through Friday,
holidays excluded

Is/ Frank DiGiovanni, City Manager
City of Inverness
Published two times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 25 & March 4, 2014


Noie oCeios


Noie o rdt




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE