Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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County clash: CR, Citrus meet on diamond/]B1


I --UNLAJII


30 percent
chance of rain.
Mostly cloudy.
PAGE A4


C I T R USC 0 U N T Y







www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


2014 PRIUS
SEE PAGE D6


VOL. 119 ISSUE 200


Barge canal at 50

...PAT FAHERTY
~ I Staff writer


Coal ash spill
Contaminated ground-
water from a pair of
huge coal ash dumps is
headed toward the wells
of a small town in North
Carolina./Page A15


It's technicial
What did Del Turner do
in the U.S. Air Force? He
was into computers -
in the 1960s./Page A21


Not so fast
Think state water policy
is improving? Think again,
writes guest columnist
Gary Kuhl./Page Cl



USA WEEKEND


o '--


Decor
Create a home you love
with simple design tips
from the pros./Inside


Ag census
The number of U.S.
farms is declining,
according to a
government census of
American agriculture.
/Page D1


Sainted Eire
St. Patrick is not
Ireland's only saint
go find out./Page A17


Annie's Mailbox ...... A18
Classifieds ........... D5
Crossword .............. A18
Editorial ............... C2
Entertainment .......... A4
Horoscope........A4
Lottery Numbers ...... B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies .................... A 18
Obituaries.........A6
Together .................. A26
Veterans ........ A21


6 I8411111 I07 I o


This historical photo shows the section of the Cross Florida Barge Canal along U.S. 19.
For more photos, see
Q Page A8 and see this
story at www.chronicle
online.com.


LBJfoiowed

FDR in canal

ceremony

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

On Feb. 26, 1964, an assis-
tant to President Lyndon B.
Johnson sent a telegram to
Palatka accepting the invita-
tion to attend groundbreaking
ceremonies for the "Florida
Cross State Barge Canal."
The next day, Feb. 27, John-
son, with his wife and daugh-
ters, showed up in a cold,
pouring rain to do the honors.
Following a speech in which
he recognized the various
politicians present, Johnson
threw a switch, setting off a dy-
namite explosion symbolizing
the start of the project.
It was similar to an event
two decades earlier, when
President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt, sitting in Washington,
D.C., triggered a symbolic ex-
plosion by telegraph during a
groundbreaking ceremony
south of Ocala for the pro-
posed Florida Ship Canal.
According to University of
Florida history professor and
author Steven Noll, Johnson
pulled a red switch and set off
150 pounds of dynamite. To en-
hance the blast, the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers had added
peat moss, powered charcoal
and black oil to the mix.
Construction followed, Noll
reported, with work beginning
just west of the St. Johns River
as well as the straight-line cut
from the Gulf of Mexico to the

See CEREMONY/Page A9


Movement against canal


sets a new standard


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

The effort to cleave a canal
across the Florida peninsula
began decades before the
Franklin Roosevelt administra-
tion in 1935 OK'd a plan to begin
construction of a waterway- big
enough for ocean-
going vessels be-
ginning in Bi
Yankeetown and
emptying in the At- by God
lantic at piece ol
Jacksonville.
That plan, the A lovel)
Florida Ship Canal,
failed because cash area, rig
for the project ran
out and environ- back yC
mentalists who op- was
posed it proffered a
simple argument: threats
The scale of the
project was too big no go'
- it was going to be
four times the size reaso
of Suez Canal and
crews would have Marjc
to dig 30 feet down.
Digging that biologist, sp
deep, environmen- C
talists contended,
would commingle the surface
water (salt water) with the fresh
water underground, which could
cause a lot of damage.
Farmers concerned about
fresh water and other business
interests joined the environmen-
talists to oppose the effort
Supporters of the project let it
lay dormant for nearly three
decades before it was resur-
rected. This time, the project
was called the Cross Florida


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en


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Barge Canal and it was scaled
back the depth of the canal
was only going to be 12 feet
However, the route of the proj-
ect remained the same: Dredge
the St. Johns River going south,
cut through land near Palatka to
the Ocklawaha River, which was
to be expanded and dredged,
then clear cut
through the river's
t here, basin to Silver
Springs and again
was a cut through to the
Florida. Withlacoochee
River and follow
natural that to the Gulf of
Mexico.
ht in my In 1964, work
t began on the proj-
",, that ect despite what
)eing seemed like token
opposition from a
ied for intrepid pioneer bi-
ologist Marjorie
d Harris Carr and her
friends from the
Gainesville Garden
Club and the
rie Harris Audubon Society
Carr Carr would go on
king about the to help found a
klawaha River. group called
Florida Defenders
of the Environment (FDE) and
stop the construction of the canal
seven years later Carr and the
group also registered a legacy as
the only environmental group
and person to stop the largest
public works project in the world
after construction was almost
third done.
The project included the con-
struction of the Rodman earthen


T/Page A9


The western remnant
of the Cross Florida
Barge Canal defines
northern Citrus County
with a direct connection
to the Gulf of Mexico and
an enduring link to
Florida's divisive past.
While the canal is a
local landmark, it is also
a historic milepost sepa-
rating the mores of post-
World War II America
from the social, eco-
nomic and technological
changes that would re-
shape the remainder of
the 20th century
It is credited with in-
spiring Florida's envi-
ronmental movement
and fueling the state's
contentious eco-
political landscape.
Part of the canal's
legacy is the Majorie
Harris Carr Cross
Florida Greenway and
Rodman Reservoir
The remainder of
its legacy is yet unde-
fined, but almost in-
cluded a nuclear
mo power plant and
could include Port
Citrus.
Thursday, Feb. 27,
marks the 50th anniver-
sary of the groundbreak-
ing for construction of
the second attempt to
cross Florida with a
canal. The first attempt
was planned on a larger
scale by the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers. It
was called the Florida
Ship Canal, the product
of centuries of dreams
and surveys.
According to a study by
Corps, the concept of a
water route across
Florida dates back to
1567. Spanish explorers
were under instruction
from King Philip II to
find a route crossing the
Florida peninsula.
Ditch of Dreams
"There's something
about a peninsula that
makes people want to cut
across it," said David
Tegeder, co-author of
"Ditch of Dreams, The
Cross Florida Barge
Canal and the Struggle
for Florida's Future."
"The idea was to basi-
cally cut down the jour-
ney it takes around the
peninsula.
"It's a story about
progress and economic
growth, about the vision
of putting Florida as the
center of a new South, a
commercial South, about
trade and the political
power used to get that.
"But it's also a story
about the emerging envi-
ronmental movement,"
he said, speaking last
week at a University of
Florida event marking
the anniversary "It's a
story about the changing
nature of politics."
The ship canal concept
would have a short life
(1935-36) as a Depression
relief public-works proj-
ect. The plans were the
See A L/Page A9


USFWS open to limited access to Three Sisters


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER-
Federal officials are
amenable to limited pub-
lic access to Three Sisters
Springs starting as early
as September of this year
if agreement can be
reached on the details of a
plan unveiled at a work-
shop.
At the workshop Friday
evening community ac-


tivist Bob Mercer pre-
sented a plan he and oth-
ers developed to the city
council which would
allow "limited and tempo-
rary" public access to the
57-acre property commu-
nity. There has been a
chorus of voices recently
asking U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service (the man-
agers of the property) to
allow public access. Pro-
ponents claim the board-
walk is the most ideal spot


MORE INSIDE
0 Crystal River is
moving ahead with
plans to prohibit
open containers of
alcohol near the
water entrance to
Three Sisters
Springs./Page A3

for tourists to watch man-
atees.
Mercer's plan calls for,
among other things:


0 Daily public access
between 10 a.m. to noon
and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
0 Temporarily use the
King's Bay Drive entrance
to allow shuttles to drive
into the property until a
permanent entrance is
constructed on Cutler
Spur Boulevard.
0 Sell tickets at tour of-
fices and dive shops with
Special Unit Permits to do
business in Three Sisters
Springs. The cost of tick-


ets is undetermined (he
believes anywhere be-
tween $5 to $15).
0 Since there are no toi-
let facilities at the prop-
erty, Mercer said tourists
will be told to use facili-
ties where they buy their
tickets and he said there
is a possibility of in-
stalling portable toilets
until a permanent struc-
ture can be built.

See S '/Page A10


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
79
LOW
61


I INSI IDE]I





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Arts in the Park continues today


State BRIEFS


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Joyce Cusick paints a portrait of her favorite cougar at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park in
Homosassa. She said she had been sketching and painting the cougar for years; however, the cougar died Monday.
Her painting Saturday was a part of the annual Arts in the Park exhibit and sale in the visitor center of the park. Hosted
by the Citrus Watercolor Club, the exhibit features artwork of local watercolorists. The exhibit and sale continues
today, and 20 percent of sales from the show are donated to the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park.



Baby in stable condition after CPR rescue


Associated Press

MIAMI An infant whose aunt
used CPR to help save him on a busy
highway is in stable condition and
smiling.
The 5-month-old baby was fighting
a chest infection and crying in the


back of his aunt's car Thursday on
the Dolphin Expressway in Miami,
when he lost consciousness.
Pamela Rauseo halted her SUV,
called for help and performed CPR
on her nephew. A Miami Herald
photographer who happened on the
scene captured her efforts and those


of other rescuers.
The baby was whisked to Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Jackson doctor
Juan Solano said Friday the infant
remained in critical care.
The boy was born prematurely
and already suffered respiratory
issues.


Students cook
with blender bikes
MIAMI -A group of high
school students whipped up
a healthy snack in a most
unusual way this weekend.
Miami Northwestern Sen-
ior High School students
rode stationary bicycles fitted
with blenders during an
event Saturday at the South
Beach Wine and Food Festi-
val. Roughly two dozen stu-
dents will whip up their
frozen raspberry lemonade
using ingredients grown in
their school garden.
Celebrity chef Robert
Irvine was also slated to
make an appearance at the
event.
The event is part of a pro-
gram that combines hands-
on learning about
sustainable food practices
from field to table. The pro-
gram was created through a
partnership between Florida
International University and
Chase to help promote a cul-
ture of students aiming for
college who also have work-
force-ready skills.
Jury awards
company in case
FORT MYERS -A fed-
eral jury has awarded a
Naples company $226,000
in royalties they should have
received after an "as-seen-
on-TV" marketing company
allegedly stole a cleavage
cover idea.


IT'S ALL ABOUT WATERFRONT DINING


The Naples Daily News
reported Michelle and J.D.
De Sousa and their Naples
company, Branovations,
sued Ontel Products Corp,
alleging it stole their
patented idea for a snap-on
cleavage cover and made
millions selling Cami Secret.
The couple, who began
selling Cleava on Aug. 4,
2009, provided bills that an
Ontel employee bought
three Cleavas in 2010.
Four months later, after
shipping the three items, the
couple discovered a knockoff
camisole for sale in a Wal-
mart in New Orleans on
Nov. 2, 2010. It was called
Cami-Secret.
Cuban windsurfer
found adrift
KEY WEST The third
and last Cuban migrant who
disappeared while trying to
windsurf across the Florida
Straits has been found adrift.
Coast Guard officials
found the man late Friday af-
ternoon. He was barely able
to speak. Coast Guardsman
Petty Officer Third Class
Alex Davis told The Key
West Citizen the man would
probably not have made it
one more day. U.S. Citizen-
ship and Immigration Serv-
ices is investigating and will
determine whether the men
will be taken back to Cuba.
The three migrants left
Jibacoa, Cuba, on Tuesday.
-From wire reports


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Rescreen,- Seamless Gutters, Garage Screens
New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions
HWY. 44 J Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER 1 I." ] RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
Fre stmaes wvm lakser. 6


A2 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


LOCAL/STATE







Page A3- SUNDAY, FEBRUAY2,01



TATE & 3 21


CI-


LOCAL


[TRUS COUNTY CHRO


NICLE


Campaign

TRAIL


Alcohol ban at springs on tap at meeting


The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, ap-
pearances and the like for
the 2014 political campaign.
Send information to mwright
@chronicleonline.com.
0 Ron Kitchen, candidate
for county commission Dis-
trict 2, will meet with the public
from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Satur-
day, March 1, and Sunday,
March 2, at Howard's Flea
Market, 6373 Suncoast
Blvd, Homosassa. Kitchen
will be at booth 72.

Around the

STATE

Citrus County

Democrats to host
school officials
Superintendent of Schools
Sandra "Sam" Himmel and
Patrick Simon, director of
research and accountability
with the school system, will
be the speakers at the
Crystal River Democratic
Club meeting, 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Feb. 25, Oysters
Restaurant, Crystal River.
Their topic will be Com-
mon Core standards and
other related issues.
All wishing to eat at the
restaurant before the meet-
ing, please arrive by 6 p.m.
All Democrats are wel-
come. For more informa-
tion, call 352-795-5384.
Appraiser to address
Republicans
The Nature Coast Repub-
lican Club will meet at 9 a.m.
March 8 at the Hampton
Inn, Crystal River. Buffet
breakfast for $5 is available
at 8:30 a.m. The guest
speaker is Les Cook, Citrus
County property appraiser.
For more information email
NCRC2014@aol.com or call
Connie at 352-634-2503.
Candidate workshop
slated March 4
The Citrus County Super-
visor of Elections Office will
be offering an informational
candidate workshop at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, March 4, at the
Board of County Commis-
sioners meeting room at the
courthouse in Inverness. At-
tendees will learn how to file
for office, qualifying costs, the
petition process, campaign
reporting, state election
laws and new legislation.
Potential candidates, in-
cumbents, campaign treas-
urers and others interested
in the process are invited to
attend. For more informa-
tion, call 352-341-6751.

Tampa

Woman sues employer
over gun rules
A woman is suing Wells
Fargo after she was fired
for bringing a gun to work.
Ivette Ros, 37, has a
concealed weapons permit,
and the single mother says
she feels safer having the
weapon with her. She told
the Tampa Tribune in a story
published Saturday that she
brought the gun to her job at
an Oldsmar branch so she
could protect other employ-
ees from potential robbers.
"1 feel naked when Idon't
have my gun," she told the
paper.
Ros has filed a federal law-
suit, alleging she lost her job
last year for exercising her
institutional fight to bear arms.
Wells Fargo spokeswoman
Kathy Harrison declined to
talk about the case. She said
the company has clear rules
prohibiting employees from
bringing weapons onto its
premises. The company does
offer an exception when a
state allows individuals to
keep permitted weapons in
their locked vehicles in a
company parking lot.
Ros said sometimes she
left the weapon in her locked
car in the parking lot, but
she also brought it inside.


Ros said she never openly
displayed it, but someone
reported her to the bank.
-From staff and wire reports


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The city is moving ahead
with plans to implement
one of the recommenda-
tions from the Three Sis-
ters Springs Working
Group an ordinance to
prohibit open containers
of alcohol in the waters
near the water entrance to
the springs.
The ordinance defines
the area's boundaries as
Cutler Spur Boulevard to
the east, King's Bay Drive
to the north and the west,
and Paradise Point Road
to the south.
At Monday's regular
meeting, council members
will hear, on first reading,
that an "open container"
means any receptacle or


container immediately ca-
pable of being consumed
from by a person, or which
has been opened, or a seal
broken, or the contents of
which have been partially
removed.
And "alcoholic bever-
ages" include distilled
spirits and all beverages
containing 0.5 percent or
more alcohol by volume.
The law, if passed after
second reading, will fine
first-time violators up to
$50. Subsequent violations
could cost an individual
up to $300.
Overcrowding at the
water entrance of the man-
atee-watching area has be-
come problematic, and the
working group was formed
last year to come up with
some solutions.
The group's suggestions


also included:
0 Work with enforce-
ment agencies to provide a
presence to promote de-
sired behaviors.
0 Establish a mooring
system that could help free
up the channel near the
entrance and provide
safety for swimmers.
0 Create a kayak moor-
ing area east of the water
entrance.
A workshop on the issue
was held Feb. 7 to discuss
the congestion and safety
issues and the council is
also expected to discuss
some of the ideas that
came out of the workshop.
Officials want to have
more discussion before
further action is taken.
The city is also poised to
file a declaratory and in-
junctive relief motion in


" WHEN: Monday, CRA
meeting 6:00 p.m.;
council meeting 7 p.m.
WHERE: Council
chambers, City Hall,
123 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
CONTACT: 352-795-
4216 or visit crystal
riverfl.org

circuit court to move a
boat officials contend has
been illegally moored in a
cove in King's Bay since
2009.
Officials say Premier
Construction LLC, owner
of the boat, has created a
dangerous condition by
mooring the vessel at its
current location.
A hearing officer or-
dered the vessel moved


within five days or the city
could go ahead with plans
to have it towed and
stored. A couple of weeks
ago, the city council au-
thorized funds for the ef-
fort and, according to
officials, the owner has not
heeded the hearing offi-
cer's order
Council members also
will discuss alternative
provisions to be included
in the floodplain ordi-
nance they are working on.
At the Community Rede-
velopment Agency (CRA)
meeting, the council -
which serves as the CRA
board will be accepting
public input on proposed
changes to the CRA plan.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle



Bluegrass on the backroads

R ather like a big family reunion, the eighth annual Arrowhead community's Stompin' in the Swamp bluegrass
festival and longtime organizers Carl and Fern Held brought in seven bands to entertain the crowd. "The
clouds we had earlier are breaking up and we expect to have quite a crowd this afternoon," said Arrowhead
Citizens Association President David Rann. According to Rann, the event drew about 500 people last year
and he hoped to see more this year. Bands and staff are all volunteers. "Our goal is for everyone to come and enjoy a day
of fun, food and music," he said. The bluegrass festival, along with other fundraising events, helps to maintain the roads
in the Arrowhead community, which, according to Mrs. Held, are so bad "even the Chronicle won't deliver here any-
more." Rann says that they will be considering a two-day event next year.


Cheryl McElwain, left, and Jean Grady
from the audience pitch in with the The Sugar Hill Gang from left, Maxine Connor, Terri Melton, Sammye Johnson
Sugar Hill Gang. and Carol Pawell play dulcimers to the tune of "Oh! Susanna" Saturday.




Qualifying dates for March 3 the deadline for 2014


elections announced exemptions and classifications


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections Susan Gill has
announced the following
schedule for potential can-
didates interested in run-
ning for election in 2014.
Candidates may prequal-
ify at any time prior to the
final qualification period.
Federal, judicial, state
attorney and public de-
fender candidates qualify
from noon April 28 through
noon May 2. Petitions for
judicial, state attorney and
public defender candidates
are due by noon March 31.
Statewide, multicounty,
county and district candi-
dates qualify from noon
June 16 to noon June 20.
Petitions for statewide,
multicounty, county and
district candidates must
be submitted prior to noon
on May 19.


Candidates for federal
office qualify with the Fed-
eral Elections Commission.
Statewide and multicounty
candidates qualify with
the Division of Elections.
Citrus County candidates
qualify at the Citrus County
Supervisor of Elections Office.
County offices up for
election are property ap-
praiser, Board of County
Commissioners Districts 2
and 4, school board Dis-
tricts 1, 3, 4 and 5, Ho-
mosassa Special Water
District Seats 2 and 4 and
Mosquito Control Board
seats 1, 2 and 3.
For information con-
cerning the elections for
the cities of Crystal River
and Inverness, call the re-
spective city clerk for can-
didate information.
Call 352-341-6751 or visit
votecitrus.com for further
information.


Special to the Chronicle

The 2014 deadline for
the filing of homestead
and other exemptions
and classifications is
Monday, March 3, accord-
ing to the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Of-
fice. Applications may ei-
ther be hand-delivered or
mailed and postmarked
no later than Monday,
March 3.
For eligibility, a com-
plete application with all
supporting documenta-
tion is required. This
deadline applies to:
0 Homestead exemption.
0 Widow/Widower ex-
emption.
0 All veterans disability
exemptions.
0 Deployed military ex-
emption for duty in speci-
fied active war zones
during 2013.


0 Other eligible physi-
cal disability exemption.
0 Portability applica-
tions.
0 Agricultural or con-
servation classification.
0 Conservation in per-
petuity exemption.
0 Institutional, educa-
tion, religious or charita-
ble exemptions.
Property owners with
an existing exemption or
classification should have
received their annual re-
newal postcard during
January Assuming there
are no changes in owner-
ship or other status affect-
ing the exemption or
classification, renewal is
automatic. Anew applica-
tion is required if you
have bought a new home
and/or moved, or made
any changes in the title to
your home. Contact the
Property Appraiser's Of-


fice if unsure.
Filings after March 3,
2014, are considered
late and will be consid-
ered for the 2015 tax roll.
However, the property
appraiser may, at his dis-
cretion, approve late filed
applications for good
cause and upon request.
The property appraiser's
website, citruspa.org, pro-
vides explanations of eli-
gibility and what
documentation is re-
quired to file the
application.
The customer service
staff is available to an-
swer questions in both of-
fices. In Inverness, call
352-341-6600 (Courthouse
Annex Building). In Crys-
tal River, call 352-564-7130
(West Citrus Government
Center). Applications may
be mailed to either
location.






A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday -Your intuition and imagination
will help you reach the goals you desire.
Be assertive and make your ideas known.
Don't wait for others to sing your
praises. If you take the initiative and
express your plans with confidence,
you will have a very successful year.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Travel and
education should take top priority today.
Delve into difficult cultures or attend a
conference or trade show.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your
confident and easygoing nature will at-
tract an interesting friendship. Consider
teaching or lecturing about something
at which you have excelled.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)- This is not
a good time to travel or deal with au-
thority figures. Focus on reuniting with
relatives or friends whom you haven't
seen for some time.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Someone
close to you will be demanding. Take
precautions to ensure that you aren't
taken for granted.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't
punish yourself by obsessing about the
past. There is nothing you can do to
change what has already happened.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't get
stuck in a routine. Fend off boredom by
trying something new. Share your ad-
venture with someone you love.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Someone
close to you is facing a difficult situation.
Take care to be especially tactful and
sensitive.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Prepare
for the unexpected. Don't get drawn
into a power struggle. Visit a friend or
take a day trip.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -An un-
usual request may catch you off guard.
Perform your duties as instructed and
without argument. Maintain a close
watch over your financial situation.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)- Refrain
from hiding your feelings. Expressing
your thoughts clearly will help you
avoid a situation that has the potential
to escalate, costing you emotionally or
financially.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)- Don't
be too hasty choosing a new investment.
Remain professional in your financial
dealings. Good results will be achieved
if you resist acting impulsively.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Com-
mittees are always searching for cre-
ative fund-raising ideas and would be
very interested to hear your innovative
thoughts.


ENTERTAINMENT


Tax break helps NYC
lure 'The Tonight Show'
NEW YORK "The Tonight
Show" made its return to New
York City with a splashy opening
sequence showcasing Grand
Central Terminal, the Chrysler
Building, Lincoln Center and
Jimmy Fallon's glamorous new
studio at Rockefeller Center a
fitting tribute to the place that
helped foot the bill.
An unconventional 30 percent
tax credit aimed at luring "Tonight"
away from California after four
decades is reportedly saving NBC
more than $20 million a year.
The network said that while
the show relocated to New York
for creative reasons, the move
wouldn't have been possible
without the tax credit.
New York's mayor believes the
show's relocation was a triumph
with wide-ranging benefits.
"Bringing 'The Tonight Show'
back to our city means we're
bringing more than a hundred
jobs to hard-working New York-
ers, and giving travelers another
great reason to visit," said Mayor
Bill de Blasio.
Others are less certain of the
show's benefit- or the need to
use a tax incentive to lure it back.
"We're going to change our tax
policy -in the heaviest-taxed
city and state in the country to
get another late-night show in
Manhattan?" asked E.J. McMa-
hon, head of The Empire Center
for Public Policy, a nonpartisan
think tank. "Even the money that
they bring is a rounding error in
the New York City economy."
"Other industries don't get 30
percent credit," he continued. "It's
because it's a glamorous industry."
The tax incentives were in-
serted into the state budget by
Gov. Andrew Cuomo's adminis-
tration in early 2013 as NBC was
debating dropping the show's
then-host, Jay Leno, for Fallon


Associated Press
Models parade down the runway Friday at the end of
the Aquilano and Rimondi women's Fall-Winter 2014-15
collection, part of Milan Fashion Week in Italy.


and potentially leaving Los An-
geles to return to New York,
where the show started in 1954.
The language of the 30 percent
annual tax credit was remarkably
specific: It would only benefit a
show that had filmed at least five
years in another state before
moving to New York (check),
spends at least $30 million in
production costs (check) and
films in front of a studio audience
of at least 200 people (check). In
other words: "The Tonight Show."
Aussie TV star Charlotte
Dawson found dead
SYDNEY -Australian TV
star and former model Charlotte
Dawson has been found dead
at age 47.
Famed for TV shows such as
"Australia's Next Top Model,"
Dawson had also been an anti-
bullying activist and was tar-
geted by cyber-trolls for personal
attacks online.
The New Zealand-born star,
who had a history of depression,
was found dead in her Sydney
apartment on Saturday morning.
Police said there were no suspi-
cious circumstances.


The Sun-Herald newspaper in
Sydney reported on Sunday that
her body was found only minutes
before her luxury apartment was
due to be sold at auction.
Maria von Trapp, 99,
dies in Vermont
STOWE, Vt. The last surviv-
ing member of the famous Trapp
Family Singers made famous in
"The Sound of Music" died this
week at her
/home in Vem-ont
Maria von
Trapp was 99.
Von Trapp's
brother, Jo-
hannes von
Trapp, says
Maria that she died
von Trapp on Tuesday.
He called her a "lovely woman
who was one of the few truly
good people."
The family won acclaim through-
out Europe for their singing and
escaped from Nazi-occupied
Austria in 1938. Their story was
turned into the film and Broadway
musical. Maria von Trapp was
portrayed as Louisa in the story.
-From wire reports


CIOus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 23, the
54th day of 2014. There are 311
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Feb. 23, 1954, the first mass
inoculation of schoolchildren
against polio using the Salk vaccine
began in Pittsburgh as some 5,000
students were vaccinated.
On this date:
In 1633, English diarist Samuel
Pepys was born in London.
In 1836, the siege of the Alamo
began in San Antonio, Texas.
In 1863, British explorers John H.
Speke and James A. Grant an-
nounced they had found the source
of the Nile River to be Lake Victoria.
In 1870, Mississippi was readmit-
ted to the Union.
In 1903, President Theodore
Roosevelt signed an agreement
with Cuba to lease the area around
Guantanamo Bay to the United States.
In 1927, President Calvin
Coolidge signed a bill creating the
Federal Radio Commission, fore-
runner of the Federal Communica-
tions Commission.
In 1944, U.S. forces secured Eni-
wetok Atoll from the Japanese dur-
ing World War II.
In 1945, U.S. Marines on Iwo
Jima captured Mount Suribachi.
Ten years ago: The Army can-
celed its Comanche helicopter pro-
gram after sinking $6.9 billion into it
over 21 years.
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama pledged to dramati-
cally slash the skyrocketing annual
budget deficit as he started to dole
out the record $787 billion eco-
nomic stimulus package he'd
signed the previous week.
Today's birthdays: Actor Peter
Fonda is 74. Pro and College Foot-
ball Hall of Famer Fred Biletnikoff is
71. Actress Kristin Davis is 49. Ac-
tress Niecy Nash is 44. Actress
Emily Blunt is 31. Actor Aziz Ansari
is 31. Actress Dakota Fanning is 20.
Thought for Today: "If you wish
to avoid seeing a fool you must first
break your mirror." Francois
Rabelais, French satirist (1494-
1553).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI/LO PR HIlLO PR ,HILO PR

80/64 0O00 78 .00 1 7/63 O.O0
'A- -9 1810.0 Nt


1PR11LOILO PR
80164 trace 82167 0.01r
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exduswe daily
TODAY & TOMORFIROW MORNIW
High: 78' Low: 60
Few showers, rain chance 30%

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 741 Low: 59-
Scattered mainly PM showers, rain chance
40%
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 74' Low: 591
1011Few showers, rain chance 30%

ALANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 78/69
Record /32
Normal 73/55
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean 9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0191
Total for the month 1.59"
Total for the year 4.73'
Normal fo rtVhe er A "


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 70.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 100%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, oak, nettle
Today's count: 8.6/12


'I l y- Monday's count: 10.4
As ol7 po rnes
UV INDEX: 5 Tuesday's count: 9.8
0-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate. AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 25
30.06 PoIlutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES HV 6=0Z
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
02/23 SUNDAY 00:44 05:43 11:41 18:14
02f24 MONDAY 0!V43 06:41 1240 19:12
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 624 p.m.
C 40H ISE .._,W6:59 a m
MOONIS TODAY 1:43 a.m,
Mar 1 Mar8 MarI16 Mar 23 MOONIETTOOAY.. .2:40p a
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
Fr moro Irformlailn Call Florida Dtson o For(esry at (352) 754-6777 For more
InnmaLron on droughil condin, p4ease v rvs te Division ol Forestrys Web st e
hltp il/lamo 1dotc m/ire weather Ibi
WATERING RULES
Lawn waterirgIihtriedIo twdays per week, before 10 a m oraferi4 pmmas
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday ardor Sunday.
OD addresses may water on Wednesday andorSaturday
Hand watering with a shut-of rbzzle or m r imgaton of non-grass areas, sud
as vegetable gard. flRowers and shrjbs. can be dorie on any day and at any
Citrus Countly Uihes customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
planl rmtna 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for addional
watering allowances,
To report violations, please call Cityof Ofremess @ 352-726-2321. City of Crystal
River @ 352-795-4216 ext 313, uninorporated Cus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'Frm mouths of rivers "At Kings Bay ...At Mason s Creek
SUNDAY
COY High Low
Chassahowitzka l:Oam 06ft 137p,m 02t1 94am 0It 5:26pm02fl
CrystaRiver" 1210pm t3ftt 1t56pm 22fh 644am 0211 6:1lpmOi9fl
Wthlacoochee* 10:2a.m 24t 905p.m. 26ft 4:6am-0,3 1,3:52pml41f
Homosassa*" 1A40p.m..5ft 934am 021 5:42pmO.3ft


city


H L F'cast City


Daytona Bch. 78 63 Is Miam
Fort Lauderdale 84 70 pc Ocala
Fort Myers 84 66 pc Orlan,
Gainesville 76 59 ts Pensi
Homestead 83 68 pc Saras
Jacksonville 71 57 ts Talla
Key West 84 71 pc Tamp
Lakeland 84 63 ts Vero
Melbourne 81 65 Is W. Pa

EARINSGull
Today: South then west winds
around 5 knots. Seas 2 feet or less.
Bay and inland waters smooth.
Tonight: Southwest winds around 5
knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and
inland waters smooth.


ni
la
ndo
acola
isota
hassee
pa
Beach
aim Bch.


H L F'cast
84 71 pc
78 59 ts
82 65 ts
64 59 ts
79 64 pc
70 59 ts
78 65 pc
82 63 ts
84 69 ts


LOOK
Gulf water
temperature
670


Taken at Arlpoke


LAKE LVELS
Location SAT FRi Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.06 29.03 3552
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 3845 3846 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39,55 3956 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Roral City 40.22 40.22 42.20
Leels eobrtied in ree above sea F' Rood stage tat lakes are based on 233-year flood
trlafean-alnm al O(d hatch t 4 43pnecen chve ol eofg euale r exceeded in
awW one year. This dat i s ob4uned Irm e Soutirmest FIorda Water Mangement Dstn
as su bj ct t o I c D f no eve will i Dih t I or !hiI Urdia Stdites Geoogacal Suiey
b hN e for any damages nsign out 011 use of1 thi data ff yai hav arty quesins You
$houlaO hi1 Ihe Hym l( G. D $1 st t(35) 797g1II

THE NATION
p


FORECAST FOR 3-00 P.M.
SUNDAY


city
Albany
Albuque"
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlanic Cy
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Blrmnghaim
Boston
Burlingo, VT
Charlestn, SC.
Charleston, W.V.
Charlotte
Chcago
Cincinnat
Clevelaric
Columbia, SC
Columbus. OH
Concord, NH
Denver
Des Moines
Oetroit
E Paso
Evansville, IN
Har*rg
Hartford
Houston
Indanapols
Las Vegas
Ulfle Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Mlwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Monlgomaiy
Nashville


SAT SUN
H L Pep. H LFcst


51 27
64 27
62 38
65 39
59 28
77 48
61 27
24 13
66 35
40 31
50 34
39 35
48 34
71 43
61 29
64 33
35 21
60 36
45 37
55 29
55 34
48 19
75 47
52 20
34 25
37 30
74 47
63 31
54 37
51 25
69 45
55 30
73 46
72 33
76 51
64 37
67 35
31 IS
14 4
68 41
67 40
68 31


06 43
65
67
69
.01 57
80
60
08 14
70
52
.15 49
31
.23 38
73
55
71
25
44
32
37
40
.23 44
71
50
25
29
75
44
47
.16 47
77
33
73
64
70
47
63
21
14
68
68
59


SAT SUN
City H L Pep. H LFcst
New Orieans 69 46 74 59 ts
Now York Cily 54 40 01 52 30 Cd
Norlolk 59 39 .01 67 41PC
OkahomaCity 72 38 49 32 pc
Omaha 39 26 28B17 pc
Palm Spings 80 53 80 56 pc
Phladelphia 59 31 53 31 sib
Phoenix 79 50 81 53 pc
Pitburgh 53 36 40 21 fl
Porland,ME 46 26 34 44 20 Pc
PorlandOR 47 30 50 41 Pc
Providence, RI 48 30 .21 51 25 Pc
RaIgh 63 36 70 42 pc
RKW City 26 19 D02 23 8pc
Reno 60 29 59 28 s
Rochester.NY 44 36 36 17 pc
Sacramento 73 40 69 44 s
Sail Lake City 54 33 55 37 pc
San Antonio 74 47 84 63 f
San Diego 69 54 62 63 1
San Francisco 66 46 61 49 f
Savannah 72 48 72 51 cd
Seatle 41 37 0541 33 sn
Spokane 32 26 30 20 sn
SI Louis 62 31 38 20 PC
S Sle Mane 21 13 13 3 fl
Syracuse 46 35 37 16fl
Topeka 58 24 37 21 pc
Washington 64 34 62 35 sh
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH& LOW
HIGH 8 Oa Lda. Fa
W19AuyyN-D,
WOR~LDCITIES


SUN
CITY H/I SKY
Acapulco 86171s
Amsterdam 4W37(pc
Athens 64/5Ws
Beijing 46S3apc
Berlin 51/33ts
Bermuda 73f68&cd


KEY TO COIDTN & ecDM dy;d 4 je Cairo 77/55/s
fai hha/ I p=laztycloudy; _-r& Calgary 15.-2sn
nn-=rubsmow mlx- .su s.wy .ih ww Havana 876Ys
InnWw lts-ftwdetomsi; w.skwv. Hong Kong 62/57/1pc
WSI C214 Jerusalem 8057/s


Lsbon 59W411pc
London 53/441pc
Madrid 53/33s
Mexico City 78/50pc
Montreal 41/21/s
Moscow 230pc
Paris 48/411r
Rio 89/73pc
Rome S3MOs
Sydney 731644
Tokyo 44/=3pc
Toronlo 39S2pc
Warsaw 48r32/pc


LEGAL NOTICES




Bid Notices................ DIO

Lien Notices................ D10

Miscellaneous Notices......... D10

Surplus Property............. D10

jr- C I T R LI S_ c O U NTY-



CHi[\NICLE
Florida's Best Commun N wspaper Seing Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P ublisher, 5 6 3-3222
Trina Murphy.........Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 564 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney ...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Trista Stokes....................Online Manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes..................Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.............Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories............Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content.................Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content.................Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage..........Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
I" Phone 352-563-6363
~POSTMASTER. Send address changes to.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES





CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Not Just a School.

A family.


Because we are a small school with
small class sizes and many shared
experiences, students at Seven Rivers
know each other. Students and faculty
interact with each other, and there are
several all-school events throughout
each school year. Students become a
family because their interactions go
beyond the superficial.


Junior Julia -ckart helps out with elementary chapel.

Seven Rivers Christian School is not bound to state mandates
such as FCAT, Common Core, or end-of-course tests, yet we
produce AP scholars, dual enrollment and honor graduates who get
accepted every year to many colleges, universities, and military
academies including every public university in Florida.
Seven Rivers Christian School is accredited by the following agencies:
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools/AdvanceEd
Christian Schools of Florida
The National Council for Private School Accreditation
The faculty of Seven Rivers loves who they teach and what they
teach. All are degreed with 40% having a master's degree or higher.


Upper school students read to class pals during scheduled gathering times.

From chapels and community outreach
opportunities, to small group mentoring
with faculty, to pep rallies and class pals,
our campus naturally lends itself to real
friendships and real relationships.
Happy children are successful learners.
This is how it should be.

Find a community of friends and learners
at Seven Rivers Christian School.


High school principal Scott Jackson and seniors building a
Habitat for Humanity House.
Our students have been admitted to every single
public college/university in the state of Florida
as well as out-of-state colleges including:


Senior Kimberly Strong acts in "Beauty and the Beast"
with elementary students.
Accepting Applications NOW for
the 2014-15 school year. Stop by
the school for enrollment
application or visit our web site.

www.sevenriverscs.org


American University, DC
Auburn University, AL
P Berry College, GA
P College of Charleston, SC
m Covenant College, GA
P Emory University, GA
P Erskine College, SC
Kent State, OH
o New York University, NY
o North Carolina
State University


o Rutgers University, NJ
o St. John's University, NY
o University of Alabama
o University of Georgia
P University of Kentucky
o University of Tennessee
P U.S. Air Force
Academy, CO
m U.S. Coast Guard
Academy, CT
P Wheaton College, IL


OPEN HOUSES
February 24 at lOam
Seven Rivers Christian School admits students of any race, color and
national or ethnic origin.
Pr_-K nnIvlOPEN HOUSE Marrh 11. flAM


Come to an Open House and hear OnI .- VPK sgn up....pril 1.at .,I.9AM..
all about our school, financial On-site VPK sign up April 1 at 9AM
(For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current proof of
assistance opportunities, curriculum, address, birth certificate or shot record for child. If parent is missing any of
and take a tour. these documents, she will not be able to sign them up.)
Some classes are already filling to capacity. Enroll now to ensure your child's seat in
the coming school year.




A Provider for
Florida's Voluntary / Seven Rivers Christian School
Pre kindergarten exists in partnership with
Program (VPK). 1) SIJ r i ri d t s families to shape the hearts and

Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12 minds of children
scholarships and related support, giving economically disadvantaged with a distinctly biblical program
families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their of academic rigor, artistic
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship. beauty, and athletic competition.
Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 AS





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Estelle
Brown, 79
FORMERLY OF
INVERNESS
Estelle H. Brown, 79, of
New Jersey, formerly of In-
verness, Fla., died Feb. 18,
2014, at Bergen County
Healthcare Center Estelle
was born June 3, 1934, in
Brooklyn, N.Y, the daugh-
ter of Frederick and Es-
telle Strubel. She moved to
Inverness in 1978 from
Hillside, Md. Estelle
worked for various banks
over the years. She retired
in 1999 from Brannen
Banks, where she spent
more than 20 years in the
bookkeeping department.
Estelle was a veteran of
the U.S. Army and mem-
ber of the Women's Army
Corp Veterans Association
Chapter 78 in Crystal
River. She was an active
parishioner and volunteer
at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, Inver-
ness. Estelle moved to
New Jersey in 2008 to be
closer to her son.
Ms. Brown was pre-
ceded in death by her
brother, Gustav. Survivors
include her son, Steven
Brown of Ogdensburg,
N.J.; sister, Doris and her
husband Mark Edgar of
Edgewater Md.; niece,
Kellie Feck of Sykesville,
Md.; and nephews, Chris
Edgar of Edgewater, Md.,
and Michael Amrhein of
Las Vegas, Nev.
The family will receive
friends from 9 to 10 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, at
the Heinz Funeral Home.
The funeral Mass will
begin at 10:30 a.m., at Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, Inverness. Inter-
ment will follow at Florida
National Cemetery, Bush-
nell. In lieu of flowers, the
family would appreciate
donations to the New York
City Chapter of the
Alzheimer's Association,
360 Lexington Ave., 4th
Floor, New York, NY
10017. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197



II


Alice Heim, 90
HOMOSASSA
Alice Evelyn Heim, 90,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Jan. 27,2014, in Palm
Coast, Fla. A native of New
York, N.Y,
born
Aug. 28,
1923, to
Robert
Prescott
Hausrath
a n d
Gladys
Cook Bass, Alice
she came Heim
to the area
in 1986 from Port Washing-
ton, Wis. Alice graduated
from Ponce De Leon High
School in Coral Gables and
she was a Christian Scien-
tist. Her memberships in-
clude PEO International,
Daughters of The Ameri-
can Revolution, Past Wor-
thy Matron of The Eastern
Star, Social Order of the
Beauceant, and a
Leader/Trainer for The
Girl Scouts of America.
She began her working life
during World War II as a
clerk/typist for the Depart-
ment of War in Miami. She
also worked as an office
assistant, a bookkeeper,
and a continuity writer for
a local radio station before
finding her passion as a
designer of crochet and
tatting patterns. Her de-
signs were published in
many craft magazines and
created a booklet of 20
projects published as
"Crochet for Wedding and
Home." She taught adult
education classes in cro-
chet and in tatting in Wis-
consin and Florida.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 59
years, Dallas W Heim Jr.;
five sisters, Dorothy
Schwartz, Eleanor Young,
Lois McCloud, Jeanne
Thomson, and Beatrice
Esty Hogberg. Survivors
include two daughters,
Leslie Herkamp and hus-
band Nathan of Palm
Coast and Lauren Pelc and
husband Richard of
Schaumburg, Ill.; four
grandchildren, Sarah
Herkamp of Gainesville,
Nathan Herkamp and wife
Leigh of Rochester, N.Y,
Rachael Edison and hus-
band William of Buffalo
Grove, Ill., and Christo-


Carrie Ruth
Thomas
Born Feb. 25, 1966
Died Jan. 2, 2014
at home under
Hospice care.
Daughter of Saundra
& Ralph Thomas


KNEE PAIN 2
............L


pher Pelc and wife Noe-
lany of Denton, Texas;
great-granddaughter Eve-
lyn Luise Herkamp of
Rochester, N.Y; and sister
in-law Florence Custer of
Davidsville, Pa.
A celebration of her life
will be at 11 a.m. Friday,
Feb. 28,2014, at Wilder Fu-
neral Home, 4890 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa,
with a reception to follow
Interment services will
take place at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery at 2 p.m.
on the same day In lieu of
flowers, donations may be
made to Continuing Edu-
cation, through PEO Chap-
ter HL. Send checks made
out to PEO Chapter HL to
President Sally Moore, 24
Woodfield Circle, Ho-
mosassa, FL 34446. Or you
may choose to contribute
to PEO International
Scholar Awards, 3700
Grand Ave., Des Moines, IA
50312 or https://donations
.peointernational. org/
peo-donation-psa in mem-
ory of Alice.
To express condolences
to Alice's family, please
visit www.wilderfuneral.
com.

Dawn
Conley, 51
LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Dawn A. Conley, 51, of
Lake Panasoffkee, Fla.,
died Friday, Feb. 20, 2014,
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus County in Inver-
ness, Fla. Arrangements are
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando, Fla.

OBITUARIES
0 Phone 352-563-5660
for details.




Massage




details onine



In H omosassa & Crystal River
352-564-1040


Michael
Estel, 54
INVERNESS
Michael J. Estel, 54, of
Inverness, Fla., died Fri-
day, Feb. 21, 2014, under
the care of Hospice of Cit-
rus County in Inverness,
Fla. Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando, Fla.

Janet
Polliard, 82
HERNANDO
Janet E. Polliard, age 82,
of Hernando, Fla., passed
away Feb. 20, 2014, at her
home. Born Nov. 11, 1931,
in Trafford, Pa., to Jesse T
and Eleanor C. (Speelman)
Elliott, Janet moved to Cit-
rus County in 1996 from
Duncansville, Pa. She was
a retired Home Economics
Teacher at Altoona High
School in Altoona, Pa., and
Hyndman Junior-Senior
High School in Bedford,
Pa., and she was a member
of First United Methodist
Church in Inverness, Fla.
She is survived by her
children, Nancy Wilson,
Lynda Chuddy, Deborah
Morehouse and Judith
Rhoades; four grandchil-
dren; and one great grand-
daughter
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. A memorial
service will be at 10 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 25, at First
United Methodist Church
in Inverness, Fla.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Fla., www brownfuneral
home.com, www.facebook.
com/brownfuneralhome
andcrematory






352.795.1424
800.771.0057
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Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

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Military Service Walk

being built in Georgia


MIKE OWEN
The Columbus
Ledger-Enquirer

COLUMBUS, Ga. -
Work is under way on a
Military Service Walk in
Woodruff Park, between
Columbus State Univer-
sity's Corn Center for the
Visual Arts and the Chat-
tahoochee Riverwalk.
The walk is designed to
honor those who have
served in the military
throughout history by
spotlighting the sacrifice
they and their loved ones
bear for their service, ac-
cording to Stuart Ray-
field, director of
Columbus State Univer-
sity's Servant Leadership
Program.
The project was con-
ceived and launched by
students in the program.
Organizers are collect-
ing correspondence be-
tween soldiers and their
loved ones, from the
American Revolution to
Afghanistan, Rayfield
said. They can be letters,
post cards, love notes,
emails, even Tweets and
Facebook posts.
Excerpts from the cor-
respondences will be em-
blazoned on permanent
granite markers along the
walk. In addition to the
excerpts, the monuments
will have the service
member's name and
where and when he or
she served.


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So far, the project has
raised about $250,000 in
private donations, which
is enough to construct the
walk and put up eight
monuments, Rayfield
said.
More monuments are
planned as more funding
is raised.
Uptown Columbus is
holding the donations, so
anyone wanting to donate
to make more memorials
possible can contact Up-
town Columbus at 706-
596-0111 or Rayfield at
CSU at 706-507-8773. In
addition to monetary do-
nations, submissions of
correspondence are
being sought from the
loved ones.
Donations can also be
dropped off at any CB&T
branch, Rayfield said.
Landscape architect
Gary Gullatte, who de-
signed the walk and is
overseeing construction,
said the area will be sep-
arated from the rest of
Woodruff Park by earthen
berms to provide a de-
gree of separation and
will feature low walls for
seating and a flag plaza.
"It will be an area for
reflection and for people
to remember and appre-
ciate," Gullatte said.
Construction is under
way and is expected to be
complete in late spring of
this year, weather permit-
ting, Gullatte said.



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Good News About Reducing Your Risk of Stroke
In most every case, the faster you can get treatment for stroke, the better
the outcome will be. Knowing the signs of a stroke and knowing where to
go for the best local treatment can save your life. Attend this workshop to
learn about emergency stroke care-including warning signs, our stroke
alliance with the premier stroke specialists at UF Health and much more.

Stroke Alert Workshop
Wednesday, February 26, 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Nature Coast EMS Educalion Center # 3876 W. Country Hill Drive, Lecanto
The Future of Stroke in the United States
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911 and Emergency Medical Services (transport)
Advanced Stroke Care in the Emergency Room/
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Program is free. Refreshments served.


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Obituaries


A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014


FEATURING:
(in order of program)
Anna Khanna, M.D.
Guest Speaker, Ass stant
Professoi of Neurology at
UF College of Medime
Patricia Dourm, RN
Stroke Team Champion
Mike Hall, CEO
Guest Speaker, Nature
Coast EMS
Kevin Morgan, RN
Lmergency Seroces
Clinical) Coordinator




CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Black-and-white images courtesy of Florida Memory
ABOVE: Construction of the U.S. 19 bridge
over the barge canal. T: Excavation work
in the late 1960 for the Cross Florida Barge
Canal near U.S. 19. B---. A map of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal route.


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SBAG CANAL


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www.florida
stateparks.org/
crossflorida/


Marjorie Harris Carr led the effort to stop
construction of the barge canal. BELOW:
Construction of the Inglis Lock, circa 1966-67.
Black-and-white images courtesy of Florida Memory


'1


--I

9


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A lone sailboat rests in the barge canal at the north-
west corner of Citrus County. The 50th anniversary
of the ground breaking for the Cross Florida Barge
Canal, a project designed and constructed by the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will be Thursday.


A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014





CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CEREMONY
Continued from Page Al

Inglis Lock.
In addition to the canal, contractors
began work on the overpass to carry U.S.
19 over the Barge Canal.
According to "Ditch of Dreams," by
Noll and David Tegeder, the overpass, 65
feet high and 150 feet long, was reported
to be 4 percent complete by the end of
1965. It would serve the area until 2010.
In late October 1963, President John F
Kennedy had included $1 million for
canal construction in a joint appropria-
tions bill, which Johnson followed after
succeeding Kennedy in office.
Tegeder said it was likely the result of
some trading with the Southern lawmak-
ers, since Kennedy and Johnson were
easing toward civil rights legislation and
needed their support.
The other theory is the canal funding
came because the Democrats wanted to
be sure to carry Florida in 1964 presi-
dential election.



CANAL
Continued from Page Al

result of at least two dozen different sur-
veys leading to numerous proposed
routes. They called for a ship canal with
locks, 250 feet wide and 30 feet deep, ca-
pable of handling oceangoing vessels.
"It's extraordinary in scale," Tegeder
said, reflecting that era. "It's an ambi-
tious project."
But after an energetic start, congres-
sional support waned as the Great De-
pression passed and the nation faced
World War II. Growers questioned its po-
tential effect on the water table, and
there were concerns it would physically
split the state.
By then, canal advocates had refo-
cused. The ship canal concept was aban-
doned in favor of a smaller canal as


supporters came up with a
way to get the project back
on track, according to co-
author Steven Noll.
'Along the same route,
instead of making it a ship
canal that's 30 feet deep,"
he said, "we'll make it a
barge canal that's nar-
rower, 150 feet wide and
only 12 feet deep and
doesn't cut into aquifer"
He said they also played
it up as a national defense
initiative, bolstered by the
torpedo sinking of an oil
tanker off the coast of


The
only con
about g
the dar
done.

Ste
co-author of "Di
The Cross
Canal and
Flo


Jacksonville that was visible from the
beach.
Congress was back on board. It author-
ized the building of the Cross Florida
Barge Canal, but no funding was ap-
proved.
Canal supporters were persistent,
eventually finding support in the White
House, with President John F Kennedy
being a close friend of
Florida Sen. George
Smathers. Finally, Ari
Kennedy put $1 million for
canal construction in a comes
public works budget.
(Harris
Construction started at
a furious pace. 'Our Lad
"They were only con-
cerned about getting the River.'
darn thing done," said
Noll. the va
"And then comes Ma- nobody c
jorie (Harris) Carr, 'Our
Lady of the River,"' said upon,
Tegeder "This is the vari-
able nobody counted David
upon." co-author of "Di
Work started near the The Cross
St. Johns River and in Canal and
northwestern Citrus Flo
County. In her book "Back


Roads," local author and historian Betty
Berger describes the enthusiastic wel-
come the project received. Political lead-
ers saw it as the means of cheap bulk
transportation to bring industry to a de-
pressed part of the state.
But according to Noll and Tegeder, de-
struction of the Oklawaha River cast a
pall over what should have been a cele-
bratory stage of canal construction, the
completion of the Inglis Lock on the
Withlacoochee River in January 1970.
It was marked by a huge celebration,
including Gov. Haydon Burns, boosters
and politicians from Cit-
rus, Levy and Marion
counties. Up on U.
At the time, Florida
Power had two new plants the norti


The overpass to carry
U.S. 19 over the Barge
Canal, 65 feet high and
150 feet long, was re-
ported to be 4 percent
complete by the end of
1965. It would serve the
area until 2010.

Once the project started, U.S. Rep. Syd
Herlong from Marion County introduced
an unsuccessful resolution in the House
to designate the Cross Florida Barge
Canal as the John F Kennedy Canal.
This year also marks the 81st anniver-
sary of the creation of the Florida Canal
Authority; the agency was formed in 1933
to oversee construction of a canal across
the state.
Contact Chronicle reporterPatFaherty
at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chroni-
cleonline. com.


assumed control of the barge canal right
of way for conservation and recreation
use.
The project would take on new life as
the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida
Greenway, the state's first greenway
The 110-mile corridor now includes
the Withlacoochee Bay Trail, a 5-mile
paved trail running along the south side
of the barge canal from U.S. 19 to the gulf.
It uses part of the dirt berm created by
the canal excavation.
"You have to see it," said Noll, "It's a
must-hike."
Nuclear plant location
While abandoned as a route across
Florida, the local segment of the canal
has been considered for other uses.
According to documents from Progress
Energy, Levy County was selected for its
proposed two-reactor nuclear plant be-
cause of the canal. The project would
have required between 100 million and
130 million gallons of salt
water per day, and the
ey were canal would have sup-
plied more than 99 per-
ncerned cent of that.
Plus, the existing canal
getting and a proposed landing
n thing would have enabled the
company to bring in heavy
pieces of equipment by
barge. That project was of-
even Noll ficially terminated early
itch of Dreams, this year
Florida Barge Port Citrus
the Struggle for
orida's Future." The first Citrus County
Port Authority was created
in 1967, along with three others in Levy,
Marion and Putnam counties. Lawmak-
ers at the time considered the ports nec-
essary to service the
soon-to-be-completed Interest ended
when the project stopped.
The current Citrus County Port Au-
thority was formed in 2011 with the
Board of County Commissioners sup-
porting the idea as an op-
portunity for economic
id then development. And the
canal is used for limited
Majorie barge traffic.
Late last year, a consult-
) Carr, ant study reported the
barge canal is limited to a
ly of the barge port because of its
This is 13-foot depth. The report
said the best uses for a
riable Port Citrus are materials
manufactured on site and
counted then shipped out. It also
recommended industrial
uses be combined with a
commercial marina.
I Tegeder Canal at 50
itch of Dreams,
s Florida Barge As the Cross Florida
the Struggle for Barge Canal project turns
orida's Future." 50, water transportation
continues to dominate
geopolitics.
The Panama Canal is marking its cen-
tennial and undergoing expansion, and
some Florida ports are gearing up to han-
dle more and larger vessels.
At least one "wet canal" in Nicaragua
and several dry freight corridors are
planned to move freight across
Central America, in and out of U.S. ports
more quickly
While the Cross Florida Barge Canal
has an uncertain commercial future, it is
an important place in Florida's history
According to Noll and Tegeder, "the
story is so compelling, be-
cause Florida's past is at
S. 19 on once its future."


h edge of


New uses


High-wire walker sets


sights on Georgia gorge


Associated Press terview hoi
crossed a
ATLANTA- Daredevil tightrope ins
tightrope walker Nik Wal- gia Dome ir
lenda is setting his sights Feb. 8.
on a new goal: the nearly Karl Wal
1,000-foot-deep Tallulah plunged to
Gorge in the northeast while trying
Georgia mountains, cable betwe,
The Georgia gorge ings in San
holds special meaning for Rico, in 1978
Wallenda, since his great- Nik Waller
grandfather Karl Wal- already visil
lenda crossed it on a high near the Gec
wire on July 18,1970. Tallulah Fa
"To be able to walk lit- considering
erally in his footsteps is the feat wit
what my life's about," said three years.
Nik Wallenda, who dis- "Hopefull
cussed the idea in an in- make it ha



MOVEMENT
Continued from Page Al

dam and reservoir in 1968. The dam's
name was later changed to Kirkpatrick
Dam for a politician who fought to keep
the dam despite a halt to the project.
Carr, who became known as "Our
Lady of the River," loved the Ocklawaha
River basin and campaigned for its
preservation decades before the barge
canal work began.
Carr said this about the Ocklawaha:
"The first time I went up the Ock-
lawaha, I thought it was dreamlike. It
was a canopy river It was spring-fed and
swift. I was concerned about the envi-
ronment worldwide. What could I do
about the African plains? What could I
do about India? How could I affect
things in Alaska or the Grand
Canyon? But here, by God, was a piece
of Florida. A lovely natural area, right in
my back yard, that was being threatened
for no good reason."
In their book the about canal, "Ditch
of Dreams: The Cross Florida Barge
Canal and the Struggle for Florida's Fu-
ture," University of Florida professors
Steven Noll and David Tegeder said
Carr changed tactics against the project
and began emphasizing the threat the it
posed to one of the state's ecologically
diverse areas.
Noll and Tegeder, who recently had a
presentation at the UF campus about
their 2009 book, told the audience Carr
began garnering national attention.
In the late 1960s, Carr's campaign was
featured in The New York Times,
Reader's Digest, and other publications.
Noll said after Carr reading about the


urs after he
100-foot-high
side the Geor-
n Atlanta on

llenda later
his death
g to walk a
en two build-
Juan, Puerto
8.
rnda said he's
ted the gorge
orgia town of
lls, and he's
attempting
thin the next

y we can
happen Wal-


lenda told the AP
The Georgia gorge walk
would add to accomplish-
ments that include his tel-
evised crossing of
Niagara Falls in June
2012 that gained interna-
tional attention. Last year,
he crossed the Little Col-
orado River Gorge in the
Grand Canyon area of
Arizona.
In northeast Georgia,
local leaders say a high-
wire walk across the Tal-
lulah Gorge has the
potential of drawing thou-
sands of tourists to the
area and increasing its
visibility globally


courtroom success of a new legal organi-
zation named the Environmental Defense
Fund in Sports Illustrated, Carr report-
edly met with them to seek counsel.
A leader of the group reportedly told
Carr and her friends to "sue the bas-
tards, sue the bastards," Noll said.
Carr's group fashioned an environ-
mental impact study outlining the per-
ils of the canal, especially to the
Floridan Aquifer, one of the state's main
sources of potable water The aquifer
had just been mapped and documented
in 1955.
The Army Corps of Engineers, the
builders of the canal, denied claims, but
the intellectual opinions offered on be-
half of Carr's group convinced a judge
to halt construction of the canal in 1971.
President Richard Nixon soon issued
an order stopping it, citing environmen-
tal impact.
Carr's environmental impact work
also became the precursor to the Na-
tional Environmental Policy Act in the
early 1970s, which requires all federal
projects to assess environmental im-
pacts before work begins.
This marked the beginning of FDE's
continuing efforts to restore the Ock-
lawaha River
The Cross Florida Barge Canal was
not deauthorized until 1990, but FDE's
effort to remove the Kirkpatrick Dam
continues. The goal, they say, is to let the
Ocklawaha run free and allow marine
life to move unimpeded.
Carr died in 1997. A year later, the
path of the incomplete canal was named
the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida
Greenway
Contact Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


online in Crystal River, During the past two
Citrus Springs opened for Citrus County, a years, several ideas have
sales as a planned com- large road sign come up on potential uses
munity and the county for the county's segment
was expected to top 20,000 once depicted of the barge canal.
residents. Plus the "high It has been suggested as
bridge" carrying U.S. 19 plans for Barge a location for dragon boat
over t lwasraces, crewing team races
o the canal under Canal But and even a powerboat re-
construction.
But the canal project currently, there gatta. But it remains an
was running out of friends isolated resource for hik-
in Washington, D.C., and are no signs, no ers, bicyclists, birdwatch-
an attempt to demonstrate ers and anglers with a
its commercial potential markers and no boat ramp.
went badly when a par- A plan supported by the
tially loaded barge got information Southwest Florida Water
stuck at the mouth of the about this Management District calls
Withlacoochee River for a multilane boat ramp.
A year after the Inglis Florida landmark. Up on U.S. 19 on the
Lock was dedicated, with north edge of Citrus
the barge canal one-third completed, County, a large road sign
President Richard Nixon ordered the once depicted plans for the barge canal.
project stopped. Now, there are no signs, no markers and no
information about this Florida landmark
Greenway established Contact Chronicle reporterPat Faherty
It took more than 20 years, but the De- at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
partment of Environmental Protection online.com.


LOCAL/NATION


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 A9


31


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1.


d
At
Sh
10


.1





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
South Korean visitors wave farewell to their North Korean
relatives Saturday before returning to South Korea
following their brief reunion with the separated families at
Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea. About 80 South
Koreans traveled with their families and met their North
Korean relatives for the first time in three years.

Koreans part, likely for

last time, from relatives


Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea-
As his North Korean
daughter wept Saturday,
93-year-old South Korean
Park Un-hyeong tried to
console her before board-
ing a bus to take him south
across the world's most
heavily armed border
after spending three days
with her in the North. For
Park and dozens of other
Koreans at these rare re-
unions of families divided
by the Korean War, it was
likely the last time they'd
see each other
"You shouldn't cry on
this good day," he told his
daughter, Pak Myung Ok,
68, as he prepared to leave
the North Korean resort
that hosted the first re-
unions of North and South
Koreans in more than
three years, according to
South Korean media pool
reports. "We'll be able to
meet again soon. Trust
your father, stay healthy
and live well."
In another emotional
scene, an 84-year-old
South Korean woman, Lee
Oh-hwan, became short of
breath from crying too
hard and was immediately
treated by a medical team.
Her North Korean sister,
72-year-old Ri Ok Bin,
tried to calm her down,
telling her in an aching
voice not to get sick.
Again and again, similar
scenes played out as 80
elderly South Koreans
said their goodbyes to
North Korean relatives.
They wept, held hands, ca-
ressed faces, took pictures
and tried to convince
themselves that they'd
meet again.
Both democratic South
Korea and authoritarian
North Korea share the
same type of rhetoric
about eventual reunifica-


tion, and many average
Koreans say they long for
that day But after near
continual animosity and
occasional bloodshed
since the three-year war
ended in an unsteady
armistice in 1953, many
analysts see that as only a
distant possibility.
The reunions will con-
tinue when a group of
about 360 South Koreans
arrives Sunday to meet
with North Korean rela-
tives whom most haven't
seen in six decades. The
second and final round of
reunions is set to end
Tuesday
It's an unusual moment
of detente between the ri-
vals. Millions of Koreans
were separated from loved
ones by the tumult and
bloodshed of the war, and
few have been reunited.
Both governments ban
their citizens from visiting
each other or even ex-
changing letters, phone
calls and emails. During a
previous period of inter-
Korean rapprochement,
about 22,000 Koreans had
brief reunions 18,000 in
person and the others by
video. None got a second
chance to reunite, Seoul
says.
The current reunions
were arranged after im-
poverished North Korea
began calling recently for
better ties with South
Korea, in what outside an-
alysts say is an attempt to
win badly needed foreign
investment and aid. But
Pyongyang threatened to
scrap the reunions to
protest annual military
drills between Seoul and
Washington set to start
Monday
North Korea had can-
celed previously sched-
uled reunions in
September at the last
minute.


SPRINGS
Continued from Page Al

0 Transportation also is undeter-
mined, but alluded to various op-
tions including using the county bus
service.
"It is not set in stone, but at least
we have an outline," Mercer said.
Andrew Gude, the new refuge
manager at the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge Complex,
said U.S. Fish and Wildlife is com-
pletely committed to the Three Sis-
ters master plan and that the
service is open to Mercer's plan, but
other things have to be worked out.
"We have money to build a road,
with limerock. It's not going to be
perfect, but a road can be built and
we have money to build toilets,"
Gude said. He said there also are
funds for building a trail.
Gude said he spoke to officials
with Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District on Friday and they
gave the green light to public access
even though SWFWMD is about to
begin major construction work on a
third of the property. The water dis-
trict is going to build a stormwater
wetland and is expected to do


Capt. Mike Dunn, who is a tour operator
in the area, suggested ticket sales should be
done at restaurants and hotels to bring
more business to those operations.
Dunn also suggested that any public access
to the property be accompanied by
a ban on smoking.


shoreline erosion control work on
the edges of the property.
In addition to those two projects,
work is expected to begin on the
shoreline of Lake Lynda and the
new land entrance on Cutler Spur
Officials with USFWS had been
reluctant about allowing public ac-
cess during all these projects, but
Friday night suggested some flexi-
bility. One of the compromises is
construction of a new road to the
boardwalk on the west side of Lake
Lynda, since the current road on
the eastside of the lake will involve
the wetland construction project.
Gude said his agency would re-
ally like to see some semblance of
public access, but would prefer a
trial period of six to eight months.
Capt. Mike Dunn, who is a tour


operator in the area, suggested
ticket sales should be done at
restaurants and hotels to bring
more business to those operations.
Dunn also suggested that any
public access to the property be ac-
companied by a ban on smoking.
The property is mostly grassland
and could easily be subject to a
major fire, he said.
Mayor Jim Farley and other
council members said they were
encouraged by what came out of the
workshop.
Farley added he wanted to see of-
ficials from USFWS and Mercer to
sit down and flesh the details of a
plan so the city can have direction
on what to do next.
The property is owned by the city
of Crystal River and USFWMD.


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WORLD/LOCAL





CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weekly ROUNDUP



Home stretch of pre-session meetings


BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE -Be-
fore lawmakers returned
to their districts for the
last week before the 2014
legislative session begins,
they capped off a
week of discussions about
living arrangements and
homecomings.
A rule outlining how to
figure out where a legisla-
tor resides began moving
through both chambers.
The House tried to prod
the Senate into acting on a
measure giving in-state tu-
ition to students who live
in the state illegally And
Florida State University
President Eric Barron's
appointment at Penn State
University became official,
marking Barron's depar-
ture from one home only to
return to another
Meanwhile, the prospect
of overhauling the state's
retirement plan seemed to
settle into its usual Senate
neighborhood among the
bills that have longer odds
of passing. And the state
Board of Education
strayed into hostile terri-
tory in dealing with the
fiery objections of activists
angry about Florida's
plans to move forward
with education guidelines
resembling the Common
Core standards.
RELUCTANT ON
RETIREMENT
When Senate Commu-
nity Affairs Chairman
Wilton Simpson, R-Trilby,
unveiled an overhaul to
the Florida Retirement
System that would largely
exempt law enforcement
officers and emergency
workers, it was seen as a
gesture to a bloc of maver-
icks who torpedoed a more
expansive revamp of the
pension plan last year In-
stead, the first of those
mavericks to cast a vote on
the measure in a Senate
panel voted against it.
"I've got more convinc-
ing to do," Simpson said
after Sen. Jack Latvala, R-
Clearwater, opposed the
bill Tuesday
Latvala, one of the lead-
ers of last year's opposi-
tion to pension changes,
teamed up with the De-
mocrats to nearly defeat
the bill (SB 1114), which
the committee approved
with a 5-4 vote.
This year's Senate pro-
posal would close the
Florida Retirement Sys-
tem's traditional pension
plan to new employees
after July 1, 2015, though
those employees already
in the system would re-
main. New hires would be
required to choose be-
tween a 401(k)-style invest-
ment plan and a "cash


balance" plan, which in
some ways acts like a
401(k) but guarantees a
minimum benefit.
Law enforcement offi-
cers and emergency per-
sonnel who qualify for the
''special risk" category
could still sign up for the
traditional pension plan.
But Latvala suggested
that some law-enforce-
ment personnel aren't
classified as special-risk,
and he questioned moving
forward with the bill be-
fore an accounting review
of the proposal was
finished.
"I really am taken aback
by how you would want us
to start voting on a bill
where although you
may understand, and you
may believe in your heart,
and I know you believe in
your heart that this is the
right thing for our future
- when we don't have any
numbers, any actuarial
study to show us that," Lat-
vala said.
Still, House Speaker
Will Weatherford, R-Wes-
ley Chapel, is expected to
continue pushing changes
to the FRS. Supporters of
rejiggering the plan say
the state spends too much
to shore up the system's
finances.
"There's a glaring prob-
lem with $500 million a
year that we're putting to-
wards the pension fund as
opposed to education,"
Weatherford said Tuesday
"It's too soon to say what
exactly it's going to look
like."
DIVIDING LINE
Since taking over their
respective chambers in
late 2012, Weatherford and
Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, have
gone out of their way to
work together The buddy
act was one of the founda-
tions of last year's rela-
tively peaceful legislative
session, at least when
it came to House-Senate
relations.
But, Gaetz said half-jok-
ingly during an interview
with The News Service of
Florida on Friday, the two
have finally found an issue
on which they disagree:
Allowing some undocu-
mented students to avoid
paying out-of-state tuition
rates.


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The bill (HB 851),
strongly backed by Weath-
erford, won approval
Wednesday from a House
subcommittee. But
prospects for the measure
in the Senate are uncer-
tain at best though it
seemed Friday that Gaetz
was opening the door to
the idea that the bill could
pass.
"Somebody who favors
providing in-state tuition
to the children of undocu-
mented, or if you wish, il-
legals, did a vote count and
came in and talked with
me about it and they said
there's 18 votes to pass
what the speaker is pro-
posing. And that's before
the debate even starts. I
think we'll have a divided
Senate in this issue,"
Gaetz said.
Latvala is expected to
roll out a proposal that
would allow students who
have attended at least
three years of high school
in Florida to pay cheaper,
in-state tuition, similar to
the measure that received
unanimous support in a
House subcommittee this
week. Latvala said he
plans to release the details
of his plan Wednesday at a
news conference in
Clearwater
"In this particular case,
we're talking about chil-
dren who really weren't
responsible for the deci-
sion that their parents
made as to where they
lived and how they got
there," Latvala said. "I
don't think that penalizing
them by making them pay
more is a fair way to ap-
proach that."
Gaetz is still skeptical of
the idea, given that his dis-
trict includes many hard-
line conservatives who
favor a more hawkish view
of immigration. But allow-
ing a vote to happen could
send the measure to Gov.
Rick Scott with or without
the president's approval.
HOME AWAY
FROM HOME
The in-state tuition rate
might have had something
to do with one of the high-


profile departures from
Florida government this
week: FSU President Eric
Barron, whose hiring by
Penn State became official
during a meeting in State
College, Pa., on Monday
Barron, who spent 20
years as a faculty member
and administrator at Penn
State beginning in 1986, is
leaving Tallahassee four
years after becoming pres-
ident at FSU, his alma
mater
"In many ways I never
left Penn State," said Bar-
ron, wearing a light blue
shirt and dark blue tie
after being introduced at a
board meeting called to
vote on his appointment.
Pointing to his heart and
then his head, Barron
added: "Penn State lives
here, Penn State lives
here, and it's a great pleas-
ure to be about to live
here."
Florida State's board of
trustees met a couple of
days later to begin the
process of replacing its
former president, who at
times seemed frustrated
with Scott's efforts to hold
down college tuition. The
trustees want a replica of
their last president to take
over now
"When looking for a
model president, to me, I
don't think you have to
look too far further than
Eric Barron," board mem-
ber Andy Haggard said.
"That includes fundrais-
ing, his tremendous con-
cern for athletics, and for
our students."
Board member Joseph
Gruters suggested any
search tip toward people
with ties to the school.
"If I had my way I'd hire
another FSU alumni,"
Gruters said.
I'M GOING TO
MAKE THIS PLACE
YOUR HOME
One place that seems to
be headed for easy pas-
sage is a joint House-Sen-
ate rule that would set
residency standards for
lawmakers, expected to be
one of the first measures to
pass the Legislature when


the session begins
March 4.
The Senate Rules Com-
mittee unanimously
passed the bill Wednesday
after a brief discussion.
The House Rules and Cal-
endar Committee followed
up Thursday in a meeting
that lasted less than 10
minutes. Both chambers
hope to approve the pro-
posal on the first day of the
session and try to put the
smoldering issue to rest.
Latvala, whose advocacy
on the issue has prompted
suspicions that Senate pol-
itics are at play, is firmly
on board with the new
measure.
"I think that this will go
a long way in giving some
guidance to members of
the Legislature on how
they're supposed to con-
duct themselves and
where they're supposed to
live and how to determine
where their real residence
is, for anybody that has a
hard time figuring that
out," he said.
'Anybody" could very
well refer to Sen. Maria
Sachs, D-Delray Beach,
one of Latvala's top targets
in his campaign to make
sure lawmakers live in
their districts. In the 2012
elections, Sachs defeated
one of Latvala's support-
ers in his race for the Sen-
ate presidency. Latvala
has since publicly accused
Sachs of living outside her
district.
Sachs strenuously de-
nies those charges and
says her residency has
been established by state
reviews.
COMMOTION CORE
Away from the Capitol,
the normally sedate meet-
ing of the state Board of
Education turned into a
rowdy protest of the Com-
mon Core state standards
just as the panel voted to
tweak, but not trash, the
benchmarks for student
learning.
Education Commis-
sioner Pam Stewart has ar-
gued that the changes,
which include reinserting
creative writing into the


standards and explicitly
including calculus guide-
lines as well as the fact
that the state has science
and social studies stan-
dards that aren't part
of the Common Core -
justify renaming the initia-
tive as the "Florida
Standards."
But largely conservative
activists who have fought
to get the state to drop the
entire common core initia-
tive seemed unmoved.
They see the plan as a fed-
eral plot to take over edu-
cation and blame it for a
variety of ills.
"I do not want a wa-
tered-down, world-class
system; I want a school sys-
tem that promotes Ameri-
can exceptionalism," said
Chris Quackenbush, a
leader of the anti-Common
Core movement.
At one point, Quacken-
bush and board chairman
Gary Chartrand clashed
over an attempt to stop au-
dience members from
clapping during the meet-
ing. For a while, the crowd
seemed to go along, waving
their hands and at least
one American flag instead
of applauding.
Most lawmakers and
Scott seem willing to try to
leave the entire issue be-
hind for now. Whether
they can in the face of
dogged opposition during
an election year remains
to be seen.
0 STORY OF THE
WEEK: Florida State Uni-
versity President Eric Bar-
ron is hired by Penn
State University, prompt-
ing a search for his
replacement.
0 QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "There is an emer-
gent psychological pan-
demic taking place among
children in Florida. It's
called Common Core, or it
used to be until it was re-
branded. Our children are
suffering from anxiety at-
tacks, vomiting, emotional
outbursts, headaches and
even self-mutilation." -
Stacie Clark, a critic of
Common Core, at a meet-
ing of the State Board of
Education.


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Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Governors: Legalized pot buzz just smoke


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -All the buzz
at the National Governors Asso-
ciation meeting over legalizing
pot, some say, is just smoke.
Nearly three months after
Colorado began selling recre-
ational marijuana, the nation's
governors are taking a cautious
approach to loosening their drug
laws despite growing support for
legalization.
Republican and Democratic
state chief executives meeting in
Washington this weekend ex-
pressed broad concern for chil-
dren and public safety should
recreational marijuana use
spread. At the same time, Col-
orado Gov. John Hickenlooper is
warning other governors against
rushing to follow his lead.
He said he's spoken to "half a
dozen" governors with questions
about his state's experience, in-
cluding some who "felt this was
a wave" headed to their states.
"When governors have asked
me, and several have, I say that
we don't have the facts. We don't
know what the unintended con-
sequences are going to be,"
Hickenlooper said. "I urge
caution."
The Democrat continued: "I
say, if it was me, I'd wait a cou-
ple of years."
States are watching closely as
Colorado and Washington estab-
lish themselves as national pio-
neers after becoming the first
states to approve recreational
marijuana use in 2012. A group
is hoping to add Alaska as the
third state.
Colorado became the first to
allow legal retail sales of recre-
ational marijuana on Jan. 1 and
Washington is expected to
launch its marketplace soon.
Hickenlooper confirmed that
early tax revenue collections on
Colorado pot sales have ex-
ceeded projections but cau-
tioned that tax revenue "is
absolutely the wrong reason to
even think about legalizing
recreational marijuana."
Medical marijuana, mean-
while, is legal in 20 states and
the District of Columbia. Florida
voters will decide on a proposed
constitutional amendment to
allow medical marijuana in
November
President Barack Obama's ad-
ministration has given states the
green light to experiment with


Associated Press
Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, left, speaks to the news media Saturday as Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe,
right, and National Governors Association chair Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, center, listen during the
NGA's winter meeting in Washington, D.C.


I say, if it was me, I'd wait a
couple of years.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper
speaking to other governors at the National Governors Association meeting.


marijuana regulation.
Obama recently generated
headlines when he said in an in-
terview that he didn't think mar-
ijuana was more dangerous than
alcohol "in terms of its impact
on the individual consumer" He
said smoking marijuana is "not
something I encourage, and I've
told my daughters I think it's a
bad idea, a waste of time, not
very healthy"
Recent polling suggests that a
majority of Americans support
efforts to legalize the drug. The
issue cuts across party lines as
liberals and libertarian-minded
Republicans favor the shift.
But governors gathered in
Washington this weekend had a
more cautious approach.
"I just had a longstanding be-
lief that legalizing marijuana
would not be in the interest of
our youth or our people," said
Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, a Re-
publican. 'And I'll maintain my
position in opposition to legal-


ization as long as I'm governor"
New Hampshire Democratic
Gov. Maggie Hassan says she's
opposed to legalization because
her state already struggles with
high rates of youth substance
abuse. But she called for a "com-
prehensive look at our criminal
laws and sentencing practices."
"I don't think we should be
sending young people to jail or
have a criminal record for a first
offense," she said.
Maryland Gov. Martin O'Mal-
ley, a former Baltimore mayor
whose city has dealt with drug
addiction, said in a few years
other states would know
"whether Colorado was able to
reduce harm without creating
other adverse impacts unfore-
seen." But the Democrat noted
that in Maryland, many job op-
portunities for young people
come from federal agencies or
firms with federal contracts that
require employees to pass drug
tests.


"I don't believe for economic
and opportunity reasons that
this is an issue where Maryland
should serve as that laboratory
of democracy," he said.
The Justice Department said
last year that it would largely
steer clear of state-legal mari-
juana businesses as long as they
follow a series of strict guide-
lines. A department memo did
not give carte blanche to would-
be marijuana entrepreneurs,
but the legal pot market viewed
the department's position as en-
couraging.
Earlier this month, the Obama
administration provided banks
with guidance on how to do busi-
ness with marijuana firms, aim-
ing to make banks feel more
comfortable working with mari-
juana businesses that are li-
censed and regulated.
Meanwhile, Washington state
Gov Jay Inslee, a Democrat, said
implementation of his state's de-
cision to create a legal pot mar-
ketplace was succeeding. He
also offered some advice to his
fellow governors.
"I would encourage them to
follow their state's will," he said.
"Our will was to de-criminalize
this product. And so far it's
working well."


NJ's Christie

keeps lowprofile

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Moving
cautiously to repair his
image, New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie is maintaining a low
profile this weekend as the
nation's governors gather in
Washington.
Republi-
can officials
have been
eager to
change the
subject as
Democrats
l i n k
Christie's Chris
troubles to Christie
vulnerable governor of
GOP gover- New Jersey.
nors in a
challenging election season.
The usually outspoken
Christie is scheduled to at-
tend just one public event
over the three-day annual
meeting. He avoided a media-
sponsored forum on Friday,
wasn't granting interviews,
won't attend a White House
dinner and was skipping a
news conference hosted by
the Republican Governors
Association, an organization
he heads.
Christie arrived at the Na-
tional Governors Association
meeting with his wife, Mary
Pat and a group of aides, de-
clining to respond to reporters'
questions as he entered the
ballroom. Before the start of
the meeting, Christie chatted
with Gov Steve Beshear, D-Ky.,
and agreed to a few quick pho-
tographs with attendees near
the podium.
"I think he's getting a bum
rap," said Lily Kersh of
Arkansas, who took a "selfie"
photo with Christie.
Asked by reporters after-
ward whether the bridge
scandal came up in meetings
with governors, Christie said:
"No, just by you guys."
Christie is leaving Washing-
ton today to celebrate his
daughter's birthday and focus
on an upcoming budget ad-
dress, according to his office.


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CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Two popes on hand



in historic ceremony


Associated Press

VATICAN CITY In an
unprecedented blending
of papacies past, present
and future, retired Pope
Benedict XVI joined Pope
Francis at a ceremony Sat-
urday to formally install
new cardinals who will
one day elect their
successor
It was the first time
Benedict and Francis have
appeared together at a
public liturgical ceremony
since Benedict retired a
year ago, becoming the
first pope to step down in
more than 600 years. It
may signal that after a year
of staying "hidden from
the world," Benedict may
occasionally be reinte-
grated into the public life
of the church.
Benedict entered St.
Peter's Basilica discreetly
from a side entrance sur-
rounded by a small en-
tourage and was greeted
with applause and tears
from the stunned people in
the pews. He smiled, waved
and seemed genuinely
happy to be there, taking
his seat in the front row, off
to the side, alongside the
red-draped cardinals.
"We are grateful for your
presence here among us,"
newly minted Cardinal
Pietro Parolin, the Vatican
secretary of state, told
Benedict in his introduc-
tory remarks.
Francis warmly greeted
his predecessor at the start
and end of the service,
clasping him by his shoul-
ders and embracing him.
Benedict removed his
white skullcap in a show
of respect as Francis
approached.
But in a sign that Bene-
dict still commands the
honor and respect owed a
pope, each of the 19 new
cardinals after receiving
his red hat from Francis at
the altar- went directly to
Benedict's seat to greet
him before then exchang-
ing a sign of peace with the


Associated Press
Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI is greeted Saturday by Pope
Francis at the end of a consistory inside the St. Peter's
Basilica at the Vatican.


other cardinals.
They had, however, al-
ready pledged their fi-
delity to Francis in an oath
of obedience.
Saturday's surprise event
was the latest in the evolv-
ing reality for the church of
having two popes living
side-by-side in the Vatican.
Over the summer, Francis
and Benedict appeared to-
gether in the Vatican gar-
dens for a ceremony to
unveil a statue. But Satur-
day's event was something
else entirely, a liturgical
service inside St Peter's
Basilica marking one of the
most important things a
pope can do: create new
cardinals.
Benedict had no formal
role whatsoever in the cer-
emony, but his presence
could signal a new phase
in his cloistered retire-
ment that began with his
Feb. 28, 2013, resignation.
Chances are increasing
that Benedict might also
appear at the April 27 can-
onization of his predeces-
sor, John Paul II, and Pope
John XXIII.
The Rev. Robert Wister,
a professor of church his-
tory at Seton Hall Univer-
sity, stressed that while it
was a unique moment,
Benedict was certainly
present for the ceremony
at Francis' invitation and
that Francis was the only
actual pope in the basilica


elevating cardinals.
He said he didn't think
Benedict would gradually
return to any major cere-
monial role in the church,
both because his 86 years
make it increasingly diffi-
cult for him to get through
long services and because
doing so would be "highly
problematic, given that
some cardinals and Curi-
alists (Vatican bureau-
crats) yearn for a return to
the 'good old days."'
Nevertheless, Wister
said he thought it was
likely Benedict would at-
tend the April canoniza-
tions, when two living
popes would be honoring
two dead ones.
Benedict's decision to
appear at the consistory
could also be seen as a
blessing of sorts for the 19
men Francis had chosen to
join the College of Cardi-
nals, the elite group of
churchmen whose pri-
mary job is to elect a pope.


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French police clash with anarchists


Associated Press

PARIS Riot police moved into the
western French city of Nantes on Satur-
day, clashing with hundreds of anar-
chists who broke shop windows,
destroyed bus stops and pillaged the city
center
At least eight police officers were hos-
pitalized after violent confrontations
with up to 1,000 "radicals," the prefec-
ture of the Loire-Atlantique region said.
Fourteen people were detained.
The rioters had joined an estimated
20,000 people protesting plans to build
a regional airport. Officials did not say
whether protesters were injured.
Interior Minister Manuel Valls said
the delinquents were from the "radical-
ized ultra-left" and were waging an
"urban guerrilla" campaign.
"These are individuals who are very
violent." Valls said on iTele TV station.
Police used tear gas and water can-
non to disperse the attackers, some


wearing hoods and helmets. However,
after night fall, some 200 were report-
edly still roaming the Nantes city center
There have been numerous, some-
times violent, demonstrations against
the building of an airport in Notre
Dame des Landes, a pet project of So-
cialist Prime Minister Jean-Marc
Ayrault, a Nantes native. The anti-air-
port protests, mounted since 2009, have
brought together an unlikely alliance of
farmers, ecologists and anarchists -
who call themselves ZADists, based on
the French acronym for "development
zone." The farmers trying to save their
land have depended on the ZADists to
keep their protest alive.
It was unclear whether the ZADists
were joined by even more radical ele-
ments. The interior minister referred to
ultra-leftist groups also active in Ger-
many, Italy and elsewhere.
The prime minister issued a firm con-
demnation of the violence, saying "noth-
ing can justify it."


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SUNDAY FEBRUARY 2 3, 2014 Al13










Detroit police feel the pain of city's money woes


Associated Press

DETROIT- It has come
to this: Even some crimi-
nals sympathize with De-
troit's cops.
Baron Coleman thought
he'd heard it all in his 17
years patrolling the
streets. But then came the
city's bankruptcy, a 10 per-
cent cut in police salaries,
followed by support from a
most unlikely corner- the
bad guys.
"When they saw us take
a pay cut they were in shock
We were arresting guys ...
and they were like, 'I can't
believe your city would do
you like this.' ... I say,
'Thanks for caring,"' the
veteran officer says with a
smile. "It's just funny be-
cause I don't like commu-
nicating with a person who
has just committed a rob-
bery how sad my life is."
Detroit police officers
have long known adversity:
They've worked in crum-
bling station houses with
busted pipes, driven run-
down cars, tangled with
balky radios. They've navi-
gated darkened streets -
Detroit has thousands of
broken street lights- chas-
ing criminals, breaking up
fights, encountering drug
dealers who may be carry-
ing AK-47s or wearing their
own bulletproof vests.
As Detroit tries to re-
bound a plan to emerge
from bankruptcy was filed
Friday few groups, if
any, have been feeling the
pain of the city's financial
collapse more than the po-
lice. Despite some recent
positive changes a new
chief, new cruisers, new
plans there's worry,
frustration and anger among
the rank and file. Paychecks
have shrunk Morale is low
Co-workers have fled to more
lucrative jobs. And those
who remain face a formidable
task: trying to protect a
sprawling, often violent city
where hidden dangers lurk
among tens of thousands of
abandoned houses.
Baron Coleman knows
it's hard being a police of-
ficer anywhere. In these
trying times, it may be a lot
harder in Detroit
Nearly a generation ago,
when Coleman traded a
factory job for a badge and
crisp blue uniform, he had
certain expectations: a
good salary, great benefits
and a pension.
The bankruptcy erased
all that. The city's finan-


The Detroit skyline is pictured Feb. 12 from the city's midtown.


cial future is uncertain. So
is his own.
Though he still enjoys
being an officer, Coleman
he says he never dreamed
that as he approached age
50, he'd be working seven
days a week- moonlighting
in security jobs to pay
for two kids in school and
compensate for a $15,000
drop in benefits and wages.
"Right now, the dream of
what I came on for has been
destroyed," he says. "I'm
worried. Is my pension
going to be there? If I get
injured, is the city going to
cover my family? ... Before
I would tell my wife, 'If I
die, I know you'll be taken
care of.' Now, I tell her, 'If I
die, you're on your own."'
The plan by Detroit's
emergency financial man-
ager to pull the city out of
bankruptcy would give po-
lice and fire retirees at
least 90 percent of their
pensions after eliminating
cost-of-living allowances
(other city workers would
likely get at least 70 percent).
But that plan probably faces
court challenges and hinges
on proposed state funding,
among other factors.
While so many unre-
solved issues linger, the
department is under new
leadership. James Craig
knew all about the depart-
ment's troubles, but the
former Detroit police offi-
cer who spent much of his
37-year law enforcement
career in Los Angeles ea-
gerly returned home last
summer to take what he
called his "dream job" -
chief of police.
He is the fifth man to hold
the position in five years.
But he is undaunted.
In a report last month,
Craig announced a sweep-


ing reorganization and
vowed to reform a police
department he said had
been woefully misman-
aged and had "lost the con-
fidence of the public, lost
the confidence of its own
officers and lost its way..."
Or as Craig puts it more
succinctly: "The bottom
line the department,
like the city, was broken."
Some troubles have been
general: The department
has operated under a fed-
eral monitor for a decade
because of accusations of
abuse, including excessive
force. That oversight is com-
ing to an end. Other em-
barrassments have been
more specific: A member of
an elite police squad now
awaits retrial the first
jury was deadlocked- in the
2010 shooting of a 7-year-
old girl killed during a
chaotic search for a mur-
der suspect.
The city's financial
agony has only added to
the dysfunction and disre-
pair When Craig arrived,
he discovered:
0 A 50-minute response
time to 911 calls. It's been
reduced to eight minutes
for priority calls.
0 Twelve-hour shifts and
"virtual' police precincts,
stations that closed at 4 p.m.
-two unpopular cost-cutting
moves that Craig scuttled.
0 Bulletproof vests that
were no longer effective.
(They've been replaced.)
Dilapidated cars with nearly
200,000 miles on their
odometers. (Last summer,
the business community
donated about $8 million
for a new fleet of 100 po-
lice cruisers along with
ambulances.)
Add to all that the stress
of seeking justice for the


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victims of the violent inci-
dents that have come to
epitomize the Motor City:
the Good Samaritan shot
in the eye while trying to
help two women robbery
victims. The 91-year-old
man who was victim to a
carjacking. (There were
about 700 carjackings in
the city last year)
Craig says when he took
over, he had three goals:
reduce violence, improve
morale and restore credi-
bility. The department, he
says, is now on the mend
and more accountable.
"The people here deserve
better," he says, "and
they're getting better"
Among rank-and-file of-
ficers, there are deep-seated
anxieties, both about the
city's finances and their own
They fear they're too
short-staffed to adequately
protect a city spanning
about 140 square miles.
Craig has announced
plans to hire 150 new offi-
cers to shore up the 2,300-
member force.
They worry about haz-
ards posed by the thou-
sands of abandoned
homes, whether it's falling
through a rotted floor or
hunting a suspect hiding
in the inky darkness.
And they're especially
unhappy with the pay cut.
Some say they're annoyed
they have to work second
or third jobs to pay the
bills while others charged


with turning the city
around are bringing home
six-figure salaries.
"To say morale is up is a
falsehood," says Scott Bar-
rick, a second-generation
officer who spent 19 years
on the streets before re-
cently becoming a full-
time police union official.
"It seems like every time
we turn around they want
us to do more and they
want to give us less. You
can't help but think, 'Why
am I doing this every day?'
... You feel like the entire
burden of repairing the
city is falling on our shoul-
ders and quite frankly over
the last year, it has."


In January, 19 new offi-
cers graduated and joined
the force, but since the start
of 2012, 425 members of
the department nearly
20 percent have left.
The department could not
provide details, including
how many are retirements.
Barrick says he hears
from officers daily Veter-
ans ask if they should quit
now in case things getworse;
younger police wonder if
it's time to jump ship. He
expects a turnaround, but
the big question is when.
"I do believe things are
going to get better," he says,
"but do you want to stay
around and wait to see it?"


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A14 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Amid ash spills, coal-plant towns'


Associated Press

WILMINGTON, N.C. From
his modest home near the Cape
Fear River, Sam Malpass can
glimpse the tall stacks of Duke
Energy's Sutton Steam Electric
Plant, a looming reminder of the
environmental dangers threat-
ening his family
Contaminated groundwater
from a pair of huge Sutton coal-
ash dumps is headed toward the
wells that provide drinking water
for Flemington, a largely working-
class community a half mile from
the entrance to Duke's plant.
Duke says the wells are safe. But
the threat is so serious that the
company has agreed to pay to
extend pipes to connect resi-
dents to a public water system.
Despite the danger, the gov-
ernment regulators responsible
for protecting the state's natural
resources have not taken action
to force Duke to stop the spread
of the underground plume of
pollution encroaching closer to
their homes each year
According to a recent study,
toxic chemicals leaking from


Duke's coal-ash dumps at Sutton
have triggered genetic mutations
in fish living in nearby Sutton Lake.
Duke disputes that conclusion.
Meanwhile, 3 1/2 years ago,
part of a big dike at Sutton col-
lapsed, spilling toxic ash down
the embankment.
"If you want to know what it's
like living near a coal ash pond,
this is it," said Malpass, 67, a re-
tired carpenter and Vietnam vet-
eran. "We're afraid to drink the
water because we don't know what's
in it We can't eat the fish because
we don't know if it's safe anymore.
It's changed our lives out here."
In the wake of Duke Energy's
massive coal ash spill in Eden,
people in the tight-knit Fleming-
ton community are paying close
attention to the environmental
disaster unfolding 200 miles to
the northwest along the Dan River
A generation of families
raised their children in Flem-
ington, an area outside Wilming-
ton of mostly one-story homes
that hug the narrow pine-shaded
roads sprinkled with sand.
Many of the 400 people who
live here say they'd like to stay


But it's getting harder espe-
cially when they live in the shadow
of Duke's coal-ash dumps.
On Feb. 2, a pipe running
under a coal ash pond at Duke's
Dan River Steam Station col-
lapsed, coating the bottom of the
river with toxic ash up to 70
miles downstream.
Federal prosecutors have
launched a criminal investiga-
tion into the disaster, issuing at
least 22 subpoenas to Duke and
the state Department of Envi-
ronment and Natural Resources
demanding documents and or-
dering 19 agency employees to
testify before a grand jury


The firs
were issue
a story by
raised qu
posed dea
state regul
fined the
tricity pro
violations
ter contain
facilities
Charlotte.
contamina
Duke acq
mega-mer
ergy, was
the time o
North (


worries growing

A freshwater dumps at 14 coal-fired power
mussel rests plants spread across the state -
on the banks of all near public waterways. The
the Dan River environmental groups want
Feb. 5 as state Duke to remove its coal ash from
and federal the leaking, unlined pits adja-
environmental cent to rivers and lakes and
officials contin- move it to sealed landfills li-
ued their inves- censed to handle toxic waste.
tigations of a On a sun-splashed afternoon
spill of coal ash last week, about 10 people gath-
in Eden, N.C. ered in Sam and Patricia Mal-
passes' front yard to talk and
Associated Press vent their frustration with Duke
st batch of subpoenas and state regulators.
d Feb. 10, the day after "When you own a piece of
The Associated Press property, one of the most important
estions about a pro- things to have on that piece of
al between Duke and property is groundwater, drink-
lators that would have ing water," said resident Kenneth
nation's largest elec- Sandlin. "We don't have that."
vider $99,111 to settle He said residents can't get
over toxic groundwa- "straight answers" to their ques-
nination leeching from tions for either Duke or the state.
near Asheville and "They just push us to the side
A settlement for the and do what they want do to do.
ation at Sutton, which They don't come down and meet
uired during its 2012 with us. They've never come
rger with Progress En- down here for an opinion: 'How
under negotiation at do you feel about it' They look at
)f the Dan River spill. us like a thorn in their side. No
Carolina has 31 ash one told us what was going on."


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CITRUS COUNTY
LOCATIONS
Inverness
2231 Highway 44 West
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Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400

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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


World's top drug lord apprehended


Associated Press
Heavyweight boxing
champion Muhammad All
arrives at a Veterans Ad-
ministration office March
17,1966, in Louisville, Ky.,
to appeal his 1A draft
classification. "I ain't got
no quarrel with those Viet
Cong," Ali said, setting off
on a path that cost him
more than three years of his
career and nearly put him
in prison. It was 50 years
ago on Feb. 25 when the
heavyweight championship
meant something and the
world was about to be
shocked in more ways
than one by the phenom-
enon who would become
Muhammad Ali.

Girl Scouts' sale
efforts go to 'pot'
PHOENIX Customers
of some medical marijuana
dispensaries are finding
they don't have to go far if
they have a case of the
munchies.
Girl Scouts seem to be
foregoing the usual super-
market stops for selling
their beloved cookies.
A few days after a
teenager sold dozens of
cookie boxes outside a San
Francisco pot dispensary,
8-year-old Lexi Menees will
return to Trumed Dispen-
sary in Phoenix on Satur-
day for the same purpose.
The girl's mother, Heidi
Carney, got the idea after
hearing about what hap-
pened in San Francisco.
Susan de Queljoe, a
spokeswoman for the Girl
Scouts Arizona Cactus-
Pine Council, said this is
not something the organiza-
tion would encourage but
that it's up to the parents.
Man found dead in
river was in meth
documentary
BILLINGS, Mont.-A
24-year-old man whose body
was found in the Missouri
River behind Black Eagle
Dam was featured in the
2006 HBO documentary
"Montana Meth."
Toward the end of the film,
the then 16-year-old Graham
Macker is asked by his
mother, "How does it end?"
Macker says, "I don't know."
On Wednesday his body
was found as PPL Montana
workers broke up ice near
the dam. Cascade County
officials said he drowned.
Notre Dame loses
birth-control appeal
CHICAGO -A federal
appeals court on Friday
ruled against the University
of Notre Dame in a case
over parts of the federal
health care law that forces it
to provide health insurance
for students and employees
that covers contraceptives.
The U.S. 7th Circuit Court
of Appeals in Chicago upheld
a federal judge's earlier rul-
ing that denied the Roman
Catholic school's request
for a preliminary injunction
that would prevent it from
having to comply with the
birth control requirement as
the suit moves forward.
The lawsuit challenges a
compromise in the Affordable
Health Care Act offered by
the Obama administration that
attempted to create a buffer
for religiously affiliated hos-
pitals, universities and social
service groups that oppose
birth control. The law requires
insurers or the health plan's
outside administrator to pay
for birth control coverage and
creates a way to reimburse
them.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

MEXICO CITY- A
massive operation that
mushroomed through the
western Mexican state of
Sinaloa last week netted the
world's top drug lord, who
was captured overnight by
U.S. and Mexican authori-
ties at a condominium in
Mazatlan, officials from
both countries said.
A senior U.S. law en-
forcement official said
Joaquin "El Chapo" Guz-
man was taken alive by
Mexican marines in the
beach resort town. The of-
ficial was not authorized to
discuss the arrest and
spoke on condition of
anonymity. Mexican Presi-
dent Enrique Pena Nieto
confirmed the arrest on
his Twitter account Satur-
day afternoon.
Guzman, 56, was found
with an unidentified woman,
the official said, adding that
the U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration and the Mar-
shals Service were "heavily
involved" in the capture.
No shots were fired.


A legendary outlaw and
fugitive, Guzman had been
pursued for several weeks.
His arrest came on the
heels of the takedown of
several top Sinaloa opera-
tives in the last few months
and at least 10 mid-level
cartel members in the last
week. The information
leading to Guzman was
gleaned from those ar-
rested, said Michael S.
Vigil, a former senior DEA
official who was briefed on
the operation.
The Mexican navy
raided the Culiacan house
of Guzman's ex-wife,
Griselda Lopez, earlier this
week and found a cache of
weapons and a tunnel in
one of the rooms that led
to the city's drainage sys-
tem, leading authorities to
believe Guzman barely es-
caped, Vigil said.
As more people were ar-
rested, more homes were
raided.
"It became like a nu-
clear explosion where the
mushroom started to ex-
pand throughout the city
of Culiacan," Vigil said.


Associated Press
Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted to a helicopter in
handcuffs Saturday by Mexican navy marines at a navy
hanger in Mexico City. A senior U.S. law enforcement
official said Saturday that Guzman, the head of Mexico's
Sinaloa cartel, was captured alive overnight in the beach
resort town of Mazatlan.


Authorities learned that
Guzmanfled to nearbyMazat-
lan, where he was arrested
with "a few" of his body-
guards nearby, Vigil said.
"He got tired of living up in
the mountains and not being
able to enjoy the comforts
of his wealth. He became
complacent and starting
coming into the city of Cu-
liacan and Mazatlan. That
was a fatal error," he said.


Vigil said Mexico may
decide to extradite Guz-
man to the U.S. to avoid
any possibility that he es-
capes from prison again,
as he did in 2001 in a laun-
dry truck. Because insid-
ers aided his escape,
rumors circulated for
years that he was helped
and protected by former
Mexican President Felipe
Calderon's government.


Associated Press
Former Ukrainian prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko addresses the crowd Saturday in central Kiev, Ukraine.
Hours after being released from prison, former Ukrainian prime minister and opposition icon Tymoshenko
praised the demonstrators killed in violence this week as heroes.




Yanukovych flees;




Tymoshenko rises


Ukrainian president decries 'coup, 'former PM rallies crowd


Associated Press

KIEV, Ukraine
H ours after her release
from prison, former
Ukrainian prime minis-
ter and opposition icon Yulia Ty-
moshenko appeared before an
ecstatic throng at the protester
encampment in Ukraine's capi-
tal Saturday, praising the demon-
strators killed in violence this
week and urging the protesters to
keep occupying the square.
Her speech to the crowd of about
50,000, made from a wheelchair
because of the severe back prob-
lems she suffered in 2 1/2 years of
imprisonment, was the latest
stunning development in the fast-
moving Ukrainian political crisis.
Only a day earlier, her arch-
rival, President Viktor Yanukovych,
signed an agreement with protest
leaders that cut his powers and
called for early elections. Parlia-
ment once controlled by Yanukovych
supporters, quickly thereafter
voted to decriminalize the abuse-
of-office charge for which Ty-
moshenko was convicted.
Yanukovych appeared to be
losing power by the hour He de-
camped from Kiev to Kharkiv, a
city in his support base in eastern
Ukraine, while protesters took
control of the presidential admin-
istration building and thousands
of curious and contemptuous
Ukrainians roamed the suddenly
open grounds of the lavish com-
pound outside Kiev where he
was believed to live.


In Kharkiv, Yanukovych defi-
antly declared that he regarded
parliament's actions as invalid and
bitterly likened the demonstra-
tors who conducted three months
of protests against him to Nazis.
"Everything that is happening
today is, to a greater degree, van-
dalism and banditry and a coup
d'etat," he said. "I will do every-
thing to protect my country from
breakup, to stop bloodshed."
The reversal of fortune for both
Tymoshenko and Yanukovych
was an eerie echo of the Orange
Revolution of a decade ago -the
mass protests that forced a rerun
of a presidential election nomi-
nally won by Yanukovych. Ty-
moshenko attracted world
attention as the most vivid of the
protest leaders.
On Saturday, Tymoshenko ap-
peared close to exhaustion and
her voice cracked frequently, but
her flair for vivid words was
undimmed.
"You are heroes, you are the
best thing in Ukraine!" she said
of those killed in the violence.
The Health Ministry on Saturday
said the death toll in clashes be-
tween protesters and police that
included sniper attacks had
reached 82.
And she urged the demonstrators
not to yield from their encamp-
ment in the square, known in
Ukrainian as the Maidan.
"In no case do you have the
right to leave the Maidan until
you have concluded everything
that you planned to do," she said.


After the 2004 protests helped
bring Viktor Yushchenko to the
presidency, Tymoshenko became
prime minister But when Yanukovych
won the 2010 election, Tymoshenko
was arrested and put on trial for
abuse of office, an action widely
seen as political revenge.
The president's support base
crumbled further as a leading
governor and a mayor from the
eastern city of Kharkiv fled. Oleh
Slobodyan, a spokesman for the
border guard service, told The
Associated Press that Kharkiv re-
gional governor Mikhaylo Dobkin
and Mayor Hennady Kernes
crossed the border into Russia.
Yanukovych also said Saturday
that he would not sign any of the
measures passed by parliament
over the past two days. They in-
clude motions: saying that the
president removed himself from
power; setting new elections for
May 25 instead of next year; trim-
ming the president's powers;
naming a new interior minister
after firing the old one on Friday;
and releasing Tymoshenko.
The past week has seen the worst
violence in Ukraine since the fall
of the Soviet Union a quarter-
century ago. At Independence
Square Saturday, protesters heaped
flowers on the coffins of the dead.
"These are heroes of Ukraine
who gave their lives so that we
could live in a different country
without Yanukovych," said pro-
tester Viktor Fedoruk, 32. "Their
names will be written in golden
letters in the history of Ukraine."


Guzman faces multiple
federal drug trafficking in-
dictments in the U.S. and
is on the DEAs most-wanted
list His drug empire stretches
throughout North America
and reaches as far away as
Europe and Australia. His
cartel has been heavily in-
volved in the bloody drug
war that has torn through
parts of Mexico for the last
several years.
Experts predict that as
long as Guzman's partner,
Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada,
is at large, the cartel will
continue business as usual.
"The take-down of
Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guz-
man Loera is a thorn in the
side of the Sinaloa Cartel,
but not a dagger in its
heart," said College of
William and Mary govern-
ment professor George
Grayson, who studies Mex-
ico's cartels. "Zambada ...
will step into El Chapo's
boots. He is also allied
with Juan Jose 'El Azul'
Esparragoza Moreno, one
of most astute lords in
Mexico's underworld and,
by far, its best negotiator"


World BRIEFS

Caracas roiling


Associated Press
Anti-government protesters
rally Saturday in Caracas,
Venezuela. Supporters and
opponents of the govern-
ment of President Nicolas
Maduro are holding
competing rallies in the
bitterly divided country.

Syrian troops near
Golan Heights;
U.N. demands aid
BEIRUT Syrian gov-
ernment forces Saturday
captured two rebel-held areas
on the edge of the Israeli-
occupied Golan Heights
after days of intense fight-
ing, state TV said.
The violence came as
the U.N. Security Council
unanimously demanded im-
mediate access everywhere
in Syria to deliver humani-
tarian aid to millions of peo-
ple in desperate need.
The Syrian TV report, cit-
ing a military official, said
troops and pro-government
gunmen captured the areas
of Rasm al-Hour and Rasm
al-Sad, south of the town of
Quneitra.
Also Saturday, Syrian ac-
tivists said Kurdish fighters
captured the town of Tel
Braknear the Iraqi border
after days of combat with
members of an al-Qaida
breakaway group.
Taliban condemn
violence in Africa
KABUL, Afghanistan The
Afghan Taliban on Saturday
called for an end to violence
against Muslims in the Cen-
tral African Republic, making
a rare statement on conflicts
outside their region that was
soon echoed by al-Qaida's
North Africa branch.
In the statement, the Taliban
condemned the "merciless
killings" of Muslims at the
hands of "bloodthirsty militias"
as the world sits "idly by." It
warned that the situation
threatens the peaceful co-
existence of Muslims and
Christians throughout Africa
and urged the international
community -including the
pope to stop the bloodshed.
-From wire reports
















EXCURSIONS


Photos by the Associated Press
TOP: The soaring round tower on the remains of an ancient monastic settlement
in Glendalough, County Wicklow is shown. Founded by St. Kevin in the sixth
century, the site, which includes churches and gravestones was one of Ireland's
greatest centers of learning for 500 years. ABOVE: A book sits next to the altar
of St. Valentine in the Carmelite Church in Whitefriar Street, Dublin. Although
he was not Irish, remains of the third-century martyr are buried here, along with
a tincture of his blood. Visitors are invited to write to St. Valentine in the book,
which is filled with poignant requests for help finding love and marriage.


Not just St. Patrick:


Ireland home to many saints


Helen O'Neill
Associated Press

St. Patrick may have banished snakes and brought Christianity to
Ireland, but perhaps his greatest feat was one of sheer endurance.
After all, there were hundreds of other future saints roaming
Ireland at the time, but Patrick is the one who gets the party.

DUBLIN
n March 17, Guinness will flow from Malin to Moscow, the Chicago River will
run green and parades will be held worldwide to celebrate the fifth-century
preacher and patron saint of Ireland.
"St. Patrick's legacy is pretty impressive," says historian Brian Lacey, "especially
considering he wasn't even Irish."
Patrick was British, captured at the age of 16 by a band of raiders and brought as
a slave to Ireland. For six years he tended sheep on a remote mountain in County
Antrim and wrestled with visions from God. After escaping, he went on to become
a bishop who traveled throughout Ireland building churches, baptizing converts
and performing countless miracles along the way
See ISLE/Page A19


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Antarctica


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Special to the Chronicle
Fulfilling a lifelong dream, Penelope Nettles embarked on a 24-day trip to
Antarctica in November. She toured the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the
Antarctic Peninsula.






Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money can be



used for abuse


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 23, 2014 C: Coast, Citrus B: Bright House D11: .Co.a. Dunnellon&Inglis POak Forest H:Holiday Heights
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D earAnnie: When
my husband and I
married, we said
vows that included "for
richer, for poorer, in
sickness and in health,"
until death. I am now 65,
and my husband and I
are both retired. We
have money, but my hus-
band does not want to
give me any for any rea-
son, including gas and
groceries. I
receive So-
cial Security
benefits, but
my monthly
insurance
payment eats
most of it My
husband also
has accounts
at different
banks in his
name only If
something ANN
were to hap-
pen to him, I MAIL
couldn't use
these accounts for our
household bills.
My husband is facing
major surgery soon.
Here's the real problem:
He wants some distant
lady friend to be at his
surgery I've never met
her He only first con-
tacted her a couple of
months ago and refuses
to tell me her last name.
I don't want this woman
here.
She is a stranger to
me, and I would be un-
comfortable having her
around. What should I
do? -Very Upset Wife
Dear Wife: It sounds
as if your husband met
some woman online and
wants a little romance.


There is no reason for
this woman to be present
during your husband's
surgery But worse than
a fling is the fact that he
is keeping income from
you, setting up separate
accounts to which you
have no access and deny-
ing you money for gro-
ceries and gas.
Controlling the money is
a form of abuse. Please
call the Domes-
tic Violence
Hotline (the-
hotline.org) at
1-800-799-7233
for information
and resources.
DearAnnie:
I read the let-
ter from "Frus-
trated," the
president of an
organization
E'S that has a
member who
BOX disrupts every
meeting.
I'll bet a copy of that
letter appears on meet-
ing room bulletin boards
all over the country
While the women's or-
ganization I belong to
doesn't have one mem-
ber with all of those dis-
ruptive characteristics,
we certainly have mem-
bers exhibiting each of
them.
Thanks for printing
that letter I hope your
answer encourages some
meeting chairs to control
the proceedings more
firmly and some group
members to examine
their behavior more
closely I know I will. -
Small Town Club
Member


Toda MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"3 Days to Kill" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"About Last Night" (R)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Endless Love" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m. 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 2 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 7p.m. No
passes.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 4:55 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m. No
passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13)


1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Endless Love" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m. 4:10p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) 4:30 p.m.
"Pompeii" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Seat in a diner
6 Athletic activity
11 Light wood
16 Frugal one
21 Very, in music
22 Like the firstborn
23 Epic by Homer
24 Old-womanish
25 Meager
26 Soup scoop
27 ---be tied
28 Of the bishop of Rome
29 Label
30 Spicy
31 Villain in
Shakespeare
33 Therefore
35 Greek letter
36 Heretofore
39 Strategic
43 King Cole
44 Tyrannosaurus-
45 Elemental gas
47 Kind of orange
49 Unrefined
51 Disgrace
54 Related to the calla lily
57 Footman's
uniform
59 Aid and-
63 Jump
64 Modem
66 Old ointment
68 Exhibition, for short
69 Kelly or Krupa
70 Form of "John"
72 "- Rheingold"
74 -tide
76 Rustic
78 "Born Free" lioness
79 Requirement
82 Small bird
84 Harsh
86 Put into office
87 Punning poet
89 "Star--"
91 Broken-down horse
92 Tiny
93 A state (Abbr.)
95 Toothed wheel
97 Secondhand
99 Shadowy
101 Serpent
104 Not talking
106 Wild disturbance
108 Eastern European
110 Panoroma
114 Carved


117 Do nothing
119 Synthetic fabric
121 Story
122 Word in a
telegram
124 Gentle
126 Easy as-
127 Vocalized
128 War god
129 Love god
131 Den
133 Chinese "way"
135 Overly
136 New York players
137 Warbles
139 Tutor
141 From stem to-
143 Kimono sash
145 Circus performer
147 Wrinkle
149 -Palmas
152 Kind
154 Famous ballet
(2 wds.)
157 Roam
161 Lofty mountain
162 Receptions
164 Dregs
165 Truck ofa kind
167 Flightless bird
168 Fold
170 Precious one
173 Place for storage
175 Eye part
177 Burn a bit
178 Basilsauce
179 Cost
180 Soap substitute
181 Go in
182 Lopsided
183 Printer ink
184 Appraised

DOWN
1 Sew loosely
2 Movie award
3 Western Indian
4 Beige
5 Strike
6 Fly unaccompanied
7 Dish
8 Roulette bet
9 Object from
antiquity
10 Handle
11 Kind of lens
12 -Pasha
13 Kindled
14 Gratify


15 Decorate
16 Indian fruit
17 Literary collection
18 Venomous animal
19 Gladden
20 Unwind
30 Rd. cousin
32 Hard liquor
34 Town in Indiana
37 -deguerre
38 Farm animals
40 Soon
41 Eager
42 Pry
46 Round Table knight
48 Arboreal animal
50 Bet
51 Polish
52 Mean dwelling
53 Swiftly
55 Bond creator
Fleming
56 Sketched
58 Thicke or Williams
60 Underneath
61 Follow as a
consequence
62 Pester playfully
65 Norton and
Begley
67 Flit
71 Bottle part
73 For men only
75 Place near Chile
77 Mild oath
80 Philately item
81 Belgian river
83 Loch -
85 Pointed arch
88 Call for
90 Maintain
94 Loco
96 Sufficient space
98 Let fall
100 Girl
101 State in India
102 Frighten
103 Washington's
-Sound
105 Parking or
postage
107 Follow
109 Lighthearted
111 Utter
112 Male vocalist
113 Inert gas
115 Reata
116 Column order
118 London apartment


Certain vote
Where to vote
Expire
Dilatory
Oven shelf
Mountain in Greece
Flooring piece
Gulp
Crack
Decimal base
Acerbic


Dir. letters
Plant bristle
Failing
- a day's work
Exhausted
Phi Beta-
Jumped
Texas player
Station
Rousseau title
Held sway


Understands
Maple genus
Period
Make inquiry
Itinerary (Abbr.)
Container
Golf term
Thurman of films


Puzzle answer is on Page A26.


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


II
LE


A18 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ISLE
Continued from Page A17

In recent years there
have been calls to rein in
the revelry and reclaim
the religious aspects of
the national holiday
Some are even attempting
to boost the name recog-
nition of other saints
(early Irish records list as
many as 1,700) and bring
their stories to the atten-
tion of the world.
There are hundreds of
holy wells, sacred round
towers and monastic re-
mains all over Ireland
and it seems every town
and village boasts its own
special miracle maker

GLENDALOUGH,
COUNTY WICKLOW:
ST. KEVIN
At Glendalough (valley
of two lakes) in County
Wicklow, visitors can wan-
der through the remains
of a monastic settlement
that for 500 years was one
of Ireland's greatest cen-
ters of learning. Founded
by Kevin in the sixth cen-
tury, the soaring round
tower, churches and
gravestones, as well as
"St. Kevin's Bed"- a
man-made cave carved
into the rock high over
one of the lakes- creates
a strikingly evocative
scene and almost mystical
sense of the past.
Tour guides offer tales
of how Kevin cast a mon-
ster into the upper lake,
rebuked an ardent
woman suitor (one un-
likely legend has him
hurling her from his cave
into the depths below)
and once, while fasting,
allowed a blackbird to
build a nest on his out-
stretched hand. The story
goes that he kept his arm
outstretched until the
chicks hatched.
There are endless such
yarns woven around the
saints. At the time Ireland
was dubbed "the Island of
Saints and Scholars" and
monastic settlements had
to compete for pilgrims
and patrons causing in-
house scribes to pen ever
more dramatic tales of
saintly powers.

KILDARE, COUNTY
KILDARE: ST BRIGID
Brigid, for example, is
said to have turned water
into ale, diverted rivers
from their courses and
conjured up extra bacon
for unexpected guests.
When she decided to
build a monastery in Kil-
dare in the fifth century,
she needed land from a
local chieftain. He grudg-
ingly agreed to give her as
much as her cloak would
cover Miraculously, the
cloak kept spreading for
as many acres as she
wanted.
Today, a round tower
and cathedral mark the
spot in Kildare where
Brigid's abbey once stood.
On the outskirts of the
town is a tranquil park
with an ancient well, said
to have healing powers,
next to a tall bronze
statue of the saint wear-
ing a cross and holding a
flame.

CLONMACNOISE,
COUNTY OFFALY:
ST. CIARAN
In neighboring County
Offaly, visitors can ex-
plore the magnificent re-
mains of the sixth-century
monastic site founded by
Ciaran in Clonmacnoise.
It includes the ruins of a
cathedral, two round tow-
ers, three Celtic crosses
and the largest collection
of early Christian grave-
stones in Western Europe.
Ciaran's path to saint-
hood was launched as a
young man, when he sup-
posedly restored life to a
dead horse -just one ex-
ample of his way with ani-
mals. Legend has it that a
fox carried his psalter
(psalm book) and a stag


held his books on its
antlers while he studied.
After performing the
usual round of miracles,
Ciaran decided to build a
monastery at Clonmac-
noise, smitten, he said, by
the beauty of the lush
green plains and sweep-
ing views of the river
Shannon. First though, he
had to settle a boundary
dispute with a neighbor
who offered him land as
far as he could throw his
cap. After uttering a
prayer, a gust of wind
swept Ciaran's hat across


the fields. To this day, a
sudden squall in the mid-
lands is sometimes called
"Ciaran's wind." The
neighbor was eventually
made a saint as well St.
Manchan.

ARDMORE, COUNTY
WATERFORD:
ST. DECLAN
Farther south, at the
picturesque seaside vil-
lage of Ardmore, visitors
can learn about St. De-
clan and how he crossed
the sea on a huge flag-
stone which ran aground
on a local beach. High on
a hill above the village
are the spectacular re-
mains of his fifth-century
settlement, including an
ancient church decorated
with intricate stone carv-
ings, one of the tallest
round towers in Ireland,
and the remains of an ora-
tory where Declan is
buried.
The saint still has a cult
following in County Wa-
terford, which he chris-
tianized before St
Patrick. The waters of St.
Declan's well are said to
possess healing powers,
especially for aching
joints and backs. And
every year pilgrims flock
to Ardmore to celebrate
his feast day on July 24
and throw a weeklong
party in his name.

ST. PATRICK AND
MANY MORE
There are hundreds of
other saints and saintly
shrines. At Fenit harbor
in County Kerry in south-
west Ireland, a large
bronze statue depicts St.
Brendan, the sixth-cen-
tury navigator who set off
on an epic voyage across
the Atlantic in a wooden
boat covered with ox
hides. Brendan is said to
have landed in New-
foundland, and to this day
his followers claim the
saint was the first to dis-
cover America.
Relics of saints also
abound. The preserved
head of St. Oliver Plun-
kett who was hanged,
drawn and quartered in
Britain in 1681 for his
Catholic faith is housed
in an elaborate shrine at
St. Peter's Church in
Drogheda, a port town
north of Dublin.
For centuries St. Lau-
rence O'Toole's 900-year-
old heart was on display
at Christ Church Cathe-
dral in Dublin until,
shockingly, it was stolen
in 2012 and has not been
recovered.
And, though he wasn't
Irish, St. Valentine's third-
century remains also
ended up in Dublin, pre-
served in an elaborate
reliquary at the Carmelite
church on Whitefriar
Street.
Still, Patrick remains
the star This year Dublin
will host a four-day ex-
travaganza including beer
fests, ceilis (Irish folk
dancing), street perform-
ances and a lavish parade
in honor of"La Fheile
Padraig" (St. Patrick's
feast day). Downpatrick in
Northern Ireland, where
the saint is reputedly
buried (and which has a
huge visitor center dedi-
cated to all things Patrick)
is throwing a nine-day
program of events.
All this for a man who
famously described him-
self as "a sinner, the most
unlearned of men, the
lowliest of all the faithful,
utterly worthless in the
eyes of many"


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SUNDA, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 A19


If you go ...

GLENDALOUGH,
COUNTY WICKLOW (ST
KEVIN): http://www
glendalough.ie/. Visitor
center open daily Adults,
3 euros; seniors and
groups, 2 euros; chil-
dren/students, 1 euro;
families, 8 euros. Guided
tours of St. Kevin's
monastic site available.

CLONMACNOISE,
COUNTY OFFALY (ST
CIARAN): http://www.
offalytourism.com/
business directory or
http ://www heritage
ireland.ie/en/. Monastic
heritage center offers 30-
minute video and tours.
Open daily

ARDMORE, COUNTY
WATERFORD (ST DE-
CLAN): http://ireland-
sholywells.blogspot.com
/2011/08/saint-declans-
well-ardmore.html

KILDARE, COUNTY
KILDARE (ST BRIGID)
http://wwwkildare.ie/kil-
dareheritage/?pageid
=65. Check with tourist
office on walking tours to
St. Brigid's Cathedral and
directions to St Brigid's
well on town outskirts
near the Black Abbey

DOWNPATRICK,
COUNTY DOWN (ST
PATRICK):
http ://wwwsaintpatrick-
centre.com/. Saint
Patrick Centre, open
Monday-Saturday (Sun-
day afternoons in summer
only). Adults, 5.50 British
pounds; children, 3
pounds; family, 13
pounds.




Photos by the Associated Press
TOP LEFT: St. Patrick's
Cathedral in Dublin, built
in 1220 in honor of
Ireland's patron Saint.
BOTTOM LEFT: A statue of
St. Patrick stands in St.
Patrick's Cathedral,
Dublin. The stained-glass
window depicts the life of
the fifth-century saint who
brought Christianity to
Ireland.





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Come play games
with VFW Post 8189
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa
invites the public to have some
fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m.
Wednesdays and food is avail-
able. Jam sessions are from 3 to
7 p.m. Thursdays.
The Mystery Bus trip is
planned for 9 a.m. March 8 to
visit other clubs and organiza-
tions. Seats are still available.
Call Lou Whitten at 352-
212-7876.

Bingo open to public
each Thursday
The public is invited to play
bingo Thursdays at American
Legion Wall-Rives Post 58.
Doors open at 4 p.m.; games
start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Post welcomes all for
fun in Beverly Hills
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), offers several events
that are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sundays in
the smoke-free hall. Card bingo
and grill night is at 5 p.m.
Wednesdays in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m. Mondays Aa
and Fridays in the Canteen. fla,
Golf Leagues are Monday and Fo
Thursday mornings. Ve
For more information, call Be
352-746-0440.


Purple Heart flag


Special to the Chronicle
iron A. Weaver Chapter 776, Military Order of the Purple Heart, presented the Citrus County Tax Collector's Office with a Purple Heart
g in appreciation of its annual partnership with Chapter 776, which raised $7,539.17 for the benefit of the Citrus County Veterans
undation Inc. Front, from left, are: Chapter 776 Commander Bud Allen, Citrus County Tax Collector Janice Warren and Citrus County
Dterans Foundation President Rear Admiral (Ret.) Carlton McLeod. Back, from left, are: Tax Collector's Office top fundraisers Gall
Ilamy, Kathy Claffey and Lydia Dunn.


Post 4252 invites all
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road
200 in Hernando (with the heli-
copter out front), welcomes
the public at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch every
day and breakfast on Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities
include bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday
Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in
the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-
can-eat fish fry or New England
boiled dinner
For more information and
menus, call the post at 352-
726-3339, email vfw4252@
tampabayrrcom and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.

More spots open
for Hawaii trip
Due to ill health, one couple
had to cancel their participa-
tion in the upcoming annual
trip to Hawaii led by Don
McLean, U.S. Navy, retired,


leaving a few spots open for the
trip.
The March 11 to 28 jaunt is
for veterans and their families
and friends. The trip includes
visits to several islands, whale
watching, some golfing and
more, as well as a special visit
to the USS Arizona Memorial
and The National Cemetery of
the Pacific.
For more information, call
McLean at 352-637-5131 or
email dmclean8@tampabay
rr.com.

DAV helps veterans
get to VA clinics
The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a
need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office


in Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to be
placed on the van list. All
appointments must be made
before 1 p.m.

DAV transport
program needs van
The Disabled American Vet-
erans Transportation Network
requests contributions from the
public to reach a goal of $20,000
for a van.
The van program goes to the
clinic in The Villages, as well as
to the VA facility in Gainesville.
This service is available to all
veterans each weekday, for
scheduled appointments, tests
and procedures.
The program uses a loaner
van, which has more than
270,000 miles on it, to transport
to The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not ac-
cepted and it is requested that
any contributions be made by
check or money order made out
to: DAV Van Project- with
DAV van project also written in
the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible contri-
bution to: DAV Van Project, c/o


Joe Stephens, chairman, 2797
W Xenox Drive, Citrus Springs,
FL 34433, or mail it to the DAV
Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project!Treasurer, Gerald A.
Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter
70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34450.

'In Their Words'
wants your stories
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-
ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit
and veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set
up obtaining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with your
story


Case manager aids
vets with benefits
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department has a
case manager who is available
to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
0 First Wednesday Lakes
Region Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness.
0 Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.
0 Third Wednesday-
Coastal Regional Library, 8619
W Crystal St., Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
To make an appointment to
meet with the case manager,
call 352-527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers
help for veterans who have had
their post-traumatic stress

See NOTES/Page A22


SI T R US C 0 U N TY



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A20' SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


VETERANS


I


/I ."











V Page A21. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014
TERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post offers Tax-Aide service
Wall Rives Post 58 of the American
Legion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, hosts
the AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation
services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesdays
through April 9.
Call Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.

VFV ladies to serve dinner
The VFW Ladies Auxiliary of Edward
W Penno Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, will host a chicken parme-
san dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
The March 17 St. Patrick's Day dinner of
corned beef and cabbage with potatoes
and carrots will be served from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance only
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

VFW post to serve Italian
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for Max's Eggplant
Parmesan from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
March 1, at the post home; 906 State Road
44 East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7 and also includes spaghetti
and meatballs, salad, bread and dessert.
Entertainment to be announced.
Call 352-344-3495 or visit
www.vfw4337.org, for information about
all post activities.

40&8 to serve breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
today, March 2, at American Legion Post
155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 7, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

CCVC sale set for March 8
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call Dan at 352-
400-8952.

Post plans Chinese auction
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Harry F
Nesbitt Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
10087 in Beverly Hills will host a Chinese
auction fundraiser on Saturday, March 8,
at the Post located at 2170 Vet Lane, be-
hind Cadence Bank, on County Road 491.
Doors open at 10 a.m. and drawings will
begin at noon. Admission is a $2.50 dona-
tion to benefit the VFW Veterans Village
in Fort McCoy, which provides affordable,
independent living accommodations in a
homelike atmosphere to those in VFW,
Men's Auxiliaries, Ladies Auxiliaries and
their spouses.
There will be hot dogs available for $1,
along with free dessert and coffee.
For more information, call Bettie at 352-
746-1989 or Donna at 352-746-5215.

Celebrate St. Paddy at VFW

Harry F Nesbitt Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 10087 in Beverly Hills will have
a St. Patrick's Day dinner from S to 7 p.m.
Friday, March 14, at the post, 2170 Vet
Lane, behind Cadence Bank, on County
Road 491.
Donation is $7. All are welcome.
Post to stage flea market

Wall Rives Post 58 of the American Le-
gion, 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon, will have
its outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast beginning at 7:30 a.m. Saturday,
March 15. On the menu are pancakes,


French toast, scrambled eggs, sausages, or-
ange juice and coffee. Donation is $5.
The public is welcome.


Young C


man,


!ian


Floral City resident Del Turner served in the United States Air Force for more than 21 years.


MATHEW BECK/Chronicle


Floral City veteran served in U.S. Air Force


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

rouble seemed
to follow
Del Turner
during his early
years in the
U.S. Air Force, a time
during which he would
be demoted on a couple
of occasions.

But Turner, an 18-year-old kid from
Nitro, WVa., when he joined the serv-
ice in 1949, was a radio technician
who knew his job. So, even when he
did leave the Air Force after his initial
enlistment expired in 1953, he was
welcomed back when he decided to
re-enlist three months later
"I loved my job," said Turner, now a
Floral City resident. "I was 19 and in
Hawaii."
But it would be another decade be-
fore Turner was involved with some-
thing that was deemed imperative to
America's defense.
By then, the U.S. was entangled in
the Cold War with the Soviet Union,
with events like the Cuban Missile Cri-
sis in 1962 making people even more
aware of the terrible threat of nuclear
war The development and implemen-
tation of SAGE or Semi-Automatic
Ground Environment- was instru-
mental in that battle.
SAGE was powered by the largest
computer system ever built the build-
ing that housed it covering 3.5 acres.
This was before the introduction of
computer chips; the system used ap-
proximately 55,000 vacuum tubes to
operate.
Turner's job, after his graduation
from computer maintenance school,
was to keep the system going.
Constantly
"There was only about five minutes
of down time per year," he said. "This
was the computer that would fight the
air battles if we had to."
To make certain it was ready for that
task, the more than 20 SAGE defense
centers would have practice drills at
all times. It was an ongoing operation
that would verify the readiness of
America's defense system.
Information about a potential air


Name: Del Turner
Rank: Technical Sergeant
Branch: U.S. Air Force
Years: 1949-69
Stations: Honolulu, Hawaii; Sand Island,
Hawaii; Warner Robins, Georgia; Fuchu
Air Station, Japan; Duluth, Minnesota;
Port Austin Air Force Station,
Michigan; Kingston, New York;
Fort Custer, Michigan; Bedford,
Massachusetts
Jobs: Ground radio maintenance;
maintenance for Semi-Automatic Ground
Environment system, the largest computer ever built, which directed
and controlled America's air defense system through the Cold War,
from the 1950s to the 1980s


strike would be fed into the SAGE sys-
tem, which would then guide an air-
craft or missile to eliminate the threat.
The data collected by the various
SAGE systems would be sent directly
to NORAD, or North American Aero-
space Defense Command, located out-
side Colorado Springs, Colorado.
"We fought air defense battles at
least once week," Turner said.
It was Turner's job to make certain
the thousands of tubes involved in the
tape drives, disc drives, printers and
card punchers were all working prop-
erly Panels could hold several tubes;
if a tube on that panel failed, Turner
would locate the panel and replace it
The location of the SAGE defense
command where Turner was stationed
was in Fort Custer, located near Battle
Creek, Michigan. That SAGE system
was responsible for the defense of
Michigan, Ohio and Indiana.
When Turner joined the Air Force
in 1949, his recruiter "said I could be
in ground radio. I wanted to be in elec-
tronics." After his training, he was ini-
tially posted in Hawaii, where he was
demoted from private first class to
private.
"I got into a little trouble, so they


sent me to Sand Island," he said, refer-
ring to a small radio outpost on an is-
land located at the mouth of Honolulu
Harbor "There were only four others
with me, no one else. It was a good
place for me to stay out of trouble."
After additional postings in Warner
Robins, Ga., and at Fuchu Air Station
in Japan, Turner was first introduced
to the SAGE system while stationed
near Duluth, Minn.
'A guy asked me if I'd like to see
their computer system," he said.
Turner said yes and, after touring
the site, he asked, "How can I get to
school for that?
"I did everything I could to get
there. I pushed hard to get that
assignment."
After six months of computer
classes in Kingston, N.Y, Turner was
sent to his posting at Fort Custer,
where he would spend four years
working on that SAGE system, making
sure it would run its air defense drills
properly Fortunately, they were al-
ways just drills.
Turner would leave the Air Force in
1969. SAGE would remain as the guid-
ing force behind America's air defense
until the 1980s.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


Skills, seamanship

Graduates of the recent Boating Skills and
Seamanship course offered by the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-04 are, back row,
from left: Chuck Braman, John Tippery,
Charles Wright, Michael Carter, Tim Griffin,
Sue Ann McClutchey and John McClutchey;
front, from left: Mary Ann Plummer, Ray
Sherwood, Linda Garrett and Don Garrett.
Most agreed that the "Rules of The Road"
portion of the course was not only the most
difficult, but probably the most important part
of the course. The group consisted of 11 local
boaters, including novice and experienced
boaters alike. For more information, email Ned
Barry at nedbarry115@gmail.com or call him
at 352-249-1042.

WILBUR SCOTT/Special to the Chronicle


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


0 This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meetings, meals and
more for a specific post or
group, call or email the con-
tact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline com.

AMERICAN LEGION
0 Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl155@gmail.co
m, or visit www.flPostl155.org.
0 American Legion Aux-
iliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
0 American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
0 American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
0 Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-476-
7001.
N American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. To accommodate
members who cannot drive at
night, breakfast meetings are
also held at Olive Tree at 9
a.m. weekly. Call Commander




NOTES
Continued from Pap A20

disorder (PTSD) claim
denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc. citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.


Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.


Robert Scott at 352-860-2090
for days and other
information.
0 Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-
0440.
0 Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
0 Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
0 Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
0 Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
0 Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org.
0 Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
0 AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.


The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat. For more informa-
tion about the Citrus
County Veterans Office,
log onto wwwbocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
For more information,
call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Help needed for
USCG Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
back-ground check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440
@aol.com, or call 917-597
6961.

Hospice program
assists veterans
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.


0 AMVETS Harry M.
Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
0 Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
0 Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
0 Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
0 Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
0 The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
0 U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
0 Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
0 Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30


The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.

Prior enlisted
sought for service
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select ca-
reer fields.
Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other
specialties.
Enlisted career open-
ings that include the op-
portunities to retrain
consist of special opera-
tions positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes
offered for vets
Yoga teacher Ann S and-
strom is associated with
the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes
to combat veterans at sev-
eral
locations and times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-


a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
0 Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl55.org.
0 Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citruspur-
pleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
0 Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at the
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim
Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
0 Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-
637-6206.
0 Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819


meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
0 Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
0 Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
0 Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meetings in 2014 are: March
8, April 12 and May 10.
0 West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
0 U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 meets at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or
email seacapt34447
@yahoo.com or Robert Cur-
rie at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
0 VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts


throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneu-
sawo@tampabay.rr.com.
0 Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rollingth-
underfl7.com, call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
0 Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
0 Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Mem-
bers can renew by calling
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
0 Hunger and Homeless
Coalition has help available
for veterans. For more infor-
mation, call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
0 Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence
at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, or
email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org for more
information.


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Fine dining while watching Mardi Gras parades


STACEY PLAISANCE
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Visiting New Or-
leans for Mardi Gras season? You'll find
pizza, hot dog stands and rolling carts of
cotton candy galore along the parade
routes, but some of the city's finest fare
can also be consumed along St Charles
Avenue, the main drag for the biggest
and glitziest star-studded processions of
Carnival.
Some restaurants even have grand-
stands that put viewers at eye level with
floats and just above the throngs of
street revelers jockeying for beads with
outstretched arms.
Herbsaint, a French bistro-style
restaurant on St. Charles near the mid-
dle of the parade route, offers viewing
spots for diners from its grandstands for
$35 to $50, depending on the night, but
also has dining-room windows fronting
the route.
"I can't think of too many spaces
where you can actually sit in a restau-
rant and have that nice bottle of bur-
gundy, that nice meal, and then just sit
there and just watch the parades go by,"
said chef and owner Donald Link. "It's a
neat experience."
Link said this will be the restaurant's
14th Mardi Gras, and after experiment-
ing with buffets, special menus and
scaled-back menus, what works best is
regular dinner service inside with the
option of stand-viewing outside. That
means the opportunity to indulge in
Herbsaint standards like duck confit
and dirty rice, beef short ribs with po-
tato cakes and gumbo all while taking
in the Carnival revelry
"We serve our wine in the right
glasses, and nothing changes," Link
said. "It's the experience you want to
come here for any night of the year"
Like several restaurants, Herbsaint is
closed on Mardi Gras (March 4 this
year), but most downtown parades hap-
pen in the days and weeks before the
holiday Zulu, Rex and two other clubs,
known as krewes, parade on Carnival
day More than 30 others are scheduled
from Feb. 21 through Lundi Gras, the
Monday before Mardi Gras, including
the star-studded Bacchus, Endymion,
Muses and Orpheus parades.
"It's a busy time for us, but it's a fun
time," said Anthony Scanio, chef de cui-
sine at Emeril's Delmonico, which is
owned by celebrity chef Emeril
Lagasse and is also located along the St
Charles route. There, patrons can watch


Associated Press
King cake doughnuts, served with strawberry jam and toasted pecan, are seen at Emeril's Delmonico in New Orleans.
Attending a Mardi Gras parade may conjure up images of standing for hours among crowds of drunken revelry and street eats
like hot dogs and cotton candy. That is one side of one of the biggest free parties in the world. But there's another side to Mardi
Gras for those willing to pay a little extra. Fine-dining establishments along New Orleans parade routes offer a much different


kind of experience.

parades from the main dining area
while enjoying a fine meal with some
Carnival-inspired touches, like a Mardi
Gras "king's cup" cocktail and king cake
doughnuts sprinkled with Carnival col-
ors of purple, green and gold.
The menu also includes Louisiana
delicacies like spicy cream cheese
boudin (sausage) balls, chicken and an-
douille gumbo and veal braciolone with
spaghetti and New Orleans red gravy.
The Brennan family-owned Palace
Cafe, which is toward the end of the
route where St. Charles turns onto
Canal Street, offers fine dining with
three levels of parade views.
"We're known for our crabmeat
cheesecake, our andouille-crusted fish
and of course the white chocolate bread
pudding," said Wesley Janssen, spokes-
woman for the restaurant. "That's what
people come here for The views are a
bonus."


Near the start of the route is Superior
Seafood, which opened two years ago
serving Louisiana seafood favorites like
raw and charbroiled oysters, oysters
wrapped in bacon, seafood gumbo and
shrimp and oyster po'boys. It's on the
corner where floats and marching
bands turn from Napoleon Avenue onto
St. Charles, fronting the parade route on
two sides. It was designed with Mardi
Gras in mind, said Aimee Rowland, the
restaurant's event planner
"It's a crazy corner, so we tried to set
things up to accommodate as many peo-
ple as possible," she said. The restau-
rant boasts an oyster bar and two patios
with seating at ground level as well as a
large balcony that can accommodate up
to 150 patrons upstairs.
A bit farther down the St. Charles
route is Superior Seafood's sister-
restaurant Superior Grill, a Mexican-
style restaurant To accommodate more


patrons on Mardi Gras, stools are re-
moved to make room at the long bar in-
side, and a walk-up bar is set up
outside. The restaurant hires a disc
jockey to entertain between parades,
and grandstands are available for rent
outside.
But the big draw is the food. The
menu includes full meals of enchiladas
and fajitas or easy-go options like burg-
ers and nachos. A favorite is brisket,
marinated in a seasoned dry-rub for 24
hours before being cooked and served
in quesadillas, flautas and nachos. On
busy parade days, they tend to run out,
said McKinley Eastman, managing part-
ner at the restaurant since its opening
in 1997.
"We can't make our brisket as fast as
we sell it," Eastman said. "But we'd
rather run out than cut corners and
make a less quality product, even for
Mardi Gras."


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SC archeologists race to uncover Civil War prison


SUSANNE M. SCHAFER
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. Racing against time, South Car-
olina archeologists are digging to uncover the rem-
nants of a Civil War-era prisoner-of-war camp before
the site in downtown Columbia is cleared to make
room for a mixed-use development.
The researchers have been given four months to ex-
cavate a small portion of the 165-acre grounds of the
former South Carolina State Hospital to find the rem-
nants of what was once known as "Camp Asylum."
Conditions at the camp, which held 1,500 Union Army
officers during the winter of 1864-65, were so dire that
soldiers dug and lived in holes in the ground, which
provided shelter against the cold.
The site was sold to a developer for $15 million last
summer, amid hopes it becomes an urban campus of
shops and apartments and possibly a minor league
baseball field.
Chief archaeologist Chester DePratter said re-
searchers are digging through soil to locate the holes
- the largest being 7 feet long, 6 feet wide and 3 feet
deep as well as whatever possessions the officers
may have left behind.
'Almost everybody lived in holes, although the Con-
federacy did try to procure tents along the way, as they
could obtain them," said DePratter a research archae-
ologist with the University of South Carolina's Insti-
tute of Archaeology and Anthropology.
DePratter said he's been able to track down about
40 diaries written by camp survivors, telling tales of
suffering and survival, as well as dozens of letters
written by the prisoners about their experiences. He
said they came from states across the North, and from
many different military units.
"It's hard to imagine. They all talk about their cloth-
ing being threadbare, many of them had no shoes.
They shared the blankets they had, three or four to-
gether spoon fashion and put a blanket over them" to
stay warm, DePratter said. "They wrote about how
every prisoner in the camp would walk about at night
to keep from freezing to death."
Amazingly, only one officer died there.
Officers were useful for prisoner exchanges, so they
were shuttled from site to site as the war progressed.
The enlisted men were sent to the notorious prison at
Andersonville, Ga., where 12,000 Union soldiers died
of illness and privation. The officers, however, were
held in Richmond, Va., then Macon, Ga., before being
sent to Savannah and Charleston, S.C.
After a yellow fever outbreak in Charleston, they
were brought to Columbia, where they were put in an
open field dubbed "Camp Sorghum" on the western
side of the Congaree River across from Columbia. But
when hundreds started escaping into the surrounding
countryside, they were shifted to the mental hospital's
grounds, which are surrounded by a 10-foot brick wall.
As the researchers dig and sift the reddish earth,
they uncover buttons, combs, remnants of clothing and
utensils presumably used by the prisoners. One hole
contained crudely made bricks the prisoners fash-
ioned by hand, which they stacked to offer protection
from the wind and rain.
The developer has given DePratter $25,000, which
has been matched by the city, to start his dig. He's
been able to raise another $17,000.
DePratter is hoping to raise additional funds to pay
for ground-penetrating radar to avoid the utility pipes
that crisscross the site. He has until the end of April to
dig out as much as he can. Everything the crew finds
is going to be held for preservation and study through
the archaeology institute, he said.
Tours set up through the Historic Columbia Foun-
dation at $10 per person are being conducted to
help bring attention to the archaeology project.
Eric Leonard, the director of education at the An-
dersonville National Historic Site in Georgia, which
also houses a prisoner of war museum, said it is im-
portant to uncover the histories of prisoners even if it
is an unpleasant topic.
"Prisoners of war are an example of the extraordi-
nary cost of war It's not an easy story to tell, and it's
not a happy story But it delves into the consequences


Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2014
11:00 a.m. Registration
11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 28,2014
For information call Jim Green (352) 249-1236


Photos by the Associated Press
ABOVE: Crews excavate the site of "Camp Asylum,"
the Civil War-era prison that once held 1,500 Union
officers on the grounds of the state mental hospital in
Columbia, S.C., in the waning days of the Civil War.
Racing against time, South Carolina archeologists are
digging to uncover the remnants of a Civil War-era
prisoner-of-war camp before the site in downtown
Columbia is cleared to make room for a mixed-use
development. RIGHT: University of South Carolina
research archaeologist Chester DePratter shows a
button from a Civil War Union officer's uniform found on
the dig of "Camp Asylum," the Civil War-era prison that
once held 1,500 Union officers on the grounds of the
state mental hospital in Columbia, S.C.


of war," Leonard said.
Leonard added that unearthing artifacts is also im-
portant to do, since it gives people today a broader
picture of the human story that might not jump out of
the printed page.
Joe Long, the curator of education for the South
Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Mu-
seum in Columbia, said the prisoners were educated
officers, who were more hardened to the elements
than people today
"These were intelligent, skilled men, and they pro-
duced some beautiful crafts," Long said. His museum
has purchased a pipe carved by one of the prisoners
from a hardened root ball of briarwood.
Long added that the waning days of the Civil War
have gotten little historical attention, and need to be
academically documented.
Long noted that in order to keep their spirits up, the
prisoners formed a glee club, and sang for themselves
and the local populace.
"The camp commandant had a rule, he told them
they could sing all the Yankee songs as they wanted,


CZTflUS courqTrr
Saturday, March 1, 2014 9-5pm
Sunday, March 2, 2014 9-4pm
Join us for two days of family fun in Floral ParkTT PresentedSDorso
F.D.S. Disposal
Park at Citrus County Fairgrounds Citrus Buntabrmb
Ciru County Chamnbar of Commerce
& ride the shuttle into Floral Park for $1 Floral City MerchantsAssociation
- Admission $3/under 12 FREE



ART CENTER.....
OF CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center
Theatre


Presents


By
Marshall Karp

Directed b
Peter Abrams


Feb. 14-Mar. 2,2014
Friday & Saturday at 7:30 pm
Sunday Matinee at 2:00 pm
Additional Saturday Matinee
Feb. 22,2:00 pm
Tickets: $19.00
352-746-7606


The Art Center of Citrus County (Citrus County Art League, Inc.)
is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization, solicitation #CH9729


but they also had to sing a Southern song. So they'd
sing 'Battle Hymn of the Republic,' and then they'd
sing 'Dixie,"' Long said with a laugh.
Three days before Gen. William Tecumseh Sher-
man's forces entered the city, the men were moved to
Charlotte, and then to Wilmington, N.C. Shortly there-
after the war ended, and prisoners on both sides
freed.


Take Stock in Children of Citrus County presents...


'"LcIlars fur Schulars"
1194A-WIDIJ k0Rg
Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 3:00 PM [, Fun
Curtis Peterson Auditorium Doors OpenM Great Music
(sio [ooj 3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto
\.. .C / [Located in the Lecanto School Complex SilentAuction
Singing the hits of the 50's and 60's... The Fabulous "Lola & The Saints"
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stock in Children of Citrus Countyis a program sponsored by the Citrus Couny Sheriffs Office and the Citrus County Chronicle


S r a From
5r s f ln Noon FridaU,
..ar March 7 to
ESunday,
a 40r ~March 9, 2014
SERTOMA YOUTH RANCH (onsite camping)- camping info 352465-21 67
85 Myers Rd., Brooksville FL 34602
" Entertainment by Workshops: song __,
Florida's best songwriters writing, guitar,
and singers banjo, autoharp,
" Florida songwriter dulcimer,
contest harmonica
" Music- rain or shine Arts, Crafts
" Covered listening areas Delicious Food
* Bring your lawn chairs Children's activities
7 Miles West of Dade City & 11/2 miles Eas of 1-75 Exit 293
Before March 1 weekend tickets $35-under 12 free; higher after March]I
Send check payable to Will McLean Foundation and self addressed,
stamped envelope to TICKETS, 20232 Palmetto Lane, Dunnellon, FL 34432
or order online.- VISIT WEBSITE AT http://www.willmclean.com




BOYS & GIRLS CUSSrl
OF CITRUS COUNTY
13th Annual
Steak & Steak Dinner
Celebrating 22 years of dedication
to the children of Citrus County


Thursday, March 6,2014
M&B Dairy Farm, 8760 Lecanto Hwy.
kd Reception 5:45 p.m.


For tickets or
call 302-4E


$50 in advance- $60 at door
VIP Tablesstart at $500 (table of 8)
Business Casual

r more information
882 or 422-6704 CHopiCl


I 'AM


A24 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


Exc URS IONS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Golf resort is out of the ordinary for Florida


TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press

BOWLING GREEN What
do you do with 15 million cubic
yards of sand?
If you're Mosaic, one of the
world's largest phosphate com-
panies, you build two award-
winning golf courses. And a spa.
And an edgy, modem hotel.
In the middle of central
Florida, far from any theme
park or beach.
Streamsong Resort opened
its golf courses and clubhouse
in late 2012, and last month, it
unveiled its 216-room lodge. It's
located in the tiny community
of Bowling Green, which is
closer in DNA to cattle ranches
than Disney
In fact, Streamsong is diffi-
cult to find; the journey from
the Tampa Bay area included a
turn at a ramshackle BBQ
restaurant and a drive past sev-
eral cows. A medium-sized
metal sign with the resort's
name is the only thing signaling
that one has arrived on the
property.
Visitors are first greeted by
the sight of large, grass covered
dunes and blue lakes, and in-
stead of the flat landscape of
central Florida, there are hills
and dips and yes, some green of
the golf courses. A modern-
looking hotel, with its slightly
curved exterior, is nestled near
a lake.
The whole landscape is noth-
ing like anything in Florida,
possibly because it's not
groomed and plucked and pat-
terned with palm trees. The
property is oddly wild and
rough, yet zen-like and
tranquil.
The resort was built on what
was once a phosphate mine.
The mining, which was last
done on the property in the
1960s, left behind the sand and
the dunes. About seven years
ago, a Mosaic executive won-
dered what the company could
do with the property.
"We needed to do something
that was exceptional," said
Rich Mack, the general counsel
for and executive vice presi-
dent at Mosaic. "You can go to a
lot of great places in Florida.
We needed to do exceptional,
not just great."
Mack had played college golf
and some competitive golf as an
adult, so he called in three of
the world's preeminent golf
course designers to evaluate
the property (Bill Coore, Ben
Crenshaw and Tom Doak, the
people behind some of the
courses at Bandan Dunes in
Oregon, for you golfing afi-
cionados).
The golf course gurus were
initially skeptical about even
coming to look at the property,
said Mack.


Associated Press
This 2013 image provided by Streamsong shows golf courses at the new Streamsong Resort in central Rorida about 50 miles from
Tampa. The new 16,000-acre luxury property has edgy modern architecture and two award-winning public golf courses and is located on
what was once a phosphate mine.


"They expected central
Florida to be relatively flat," he
said.
But once they arrived and
saw how nature had overtaken
the dunes with natural grasses
and scrub, and saw how the
Florida sunlight shimmered off
the rugged landscape, the trio
signed on.
The rest became golfing his-
tory Coore and Crenshaw's
team built one course (the
"Red" course) and Doak built
another (the "Blue" course).
They still have the "Red" and
"Blue" names, after the pen
colors the designers used to
make initial drawings.
Both courses are considered
"minimalist" golf, where play-
ers generally walk while play-
ing (although carts are
available). Rates are $180 for
walkers and $210 for a golf cart
with a forecaddie during the
winter season. Caddies are also
available and they work for
tips; $80-$100 plus gratuity per


group is suggested. Rental carts
and clubs are extra, and the re-
sort discounts both golf and
hotel rates in the summer sea-
son.
Tom Parke, Streamsong's di-
rector of marketing, said that
the courses are not your
"stereotypical" Florida golf
course, with paved paths for
carts. The Streamsong courses
are more similar to European-
style golf, featuring many eleva-
tion changes, wild grasses and
bunkers and within months
of opening garnered several
awards.
Golfweek magazine named it
the best new golf course in 2012
and in 2013, the magazine listed
both courses on the top 40 pub-
lic courses in the world.
There are 130 caddies during
the high season, a clubhouse
that serves lunch and drinks
near the golf course, and 12
rooms for those that want to
wake up each morning on the
course.


"Those are for pure golfers
who literally want to be at the
course's edge," said Parke.
Players don't have to stay at
the resort to use the course;
Parke said that some visitors
come from the Tampa and
Sarasota areas just for the day
And while Streamsong is a
golf-heavy resort and confer-
ence center (think high-level
executives meeting in confer-
ence rooms, then hitting the
links in the afternoon) there is
more to the resort
The hotel is something out of
South Beach, with its concrete-
and-wood exterior- except
that it overlooks a beautiful and
unusual Florida landscape.
There are four restaurants on
the property (three in the main
hotel and one in the golf club-
house).
Visitors can go fishing in one
of the many lakes, shoot sport-
ing clays or lounge by the pool.
There are fire pits for the
slightly chilly winter evenings


and a rooftop bar
Eventually, some may go to
the resort just for the spa,
which has a grotto-like feel
with marble, concrete and dif-
fused natural light. It offers six
thermal pools, a steam room, a
sauna and treatment rooms,
along with a more traditional
beauty salon.
Hotel rooms are equally as
modern and interesting, and
they start at $359 a night for a
weekend stay (pricer, 2 bed-
room suites are $799 a night).
They all offer sofas, Keurig cof-
fee makers, refrigerators, large
bathrooms and two-sided TVs
- one person can watch from
the bed, while the other can
watch something different from
the sofa.
All have a view of the land,
whether it's the lakes or the
golf course and its dunes.
Looking out from a room, or
the rooftop lounge, a visitor
might just forget they are in
Florida.


Friends of the Homosassa Public Library


SPRING BOOK SALE
FEBRUARY 27 MARCH 1,2014
at the Homosassa Library
on Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa
Great bargains in recycled reading!

Sale Hours
Thurs: 10 am 6 pm FrI: 10 am -4 pm
Sat: 10 am -4pm
For book sale information
call 352-382-2440 or visit the
library website: http://citruslibraries.org




loit're initd to Our 3rdA nut1 C,,,, We'r h


11,1~rdi jors

FO'. R ACAUSE ..





S Sunday, March 9, 2014

6:00pm to 9:00pm

Crystal River Mall


Live Perfonmance
b J. mad
.Co r oll"ats.m
ildiba
$30.00 pw person
3USMat Ow T


"rop Chef "
Stytk
coloPltition!
Nemeamourpo*009~
1 rewpwakrMsIq


Cub BaraCocktail Attire IO

lw Tgamfth hM v
Pa mucds h judged



,ssie's Place (352) 27-8814

.mit m&e AwfSe am K IKy KI,
* .dI MCC"% INow" odCIh
CO Ca" ogca" Ibowstn Kftunsplus &S Pas
* CedurCm.Ik at Khtg B.1 Selaood Sullovmnd CaMt
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LU&w S w &OMtI Wdt4W 8W NO "I


Fort Cooper Days
-Sat. March 15 & Sun. March 16
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fort Cooper State Park
3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness
Experience Florida History
Adults thru 13 yrs. $6 12 yrs. & under Free
Come and Enjoy
2nd Seminole War
Reenactments
at 11 a.m. & n.
Period Arts & Crafts
Great Food & Refreshments
fasted by Living History Demonstrations
heFriends -Exhibits/Demonstrations
Fo:Cooper
i ')N ifl[ For more information,
call 726-0315


f ..Sat,, Mar, 1, 2014
Plantation on Crystal River
Shotgun Start at 9:00am. Registration 8:00am
Kick off Cocktail party on Friday, February 28, at 6:30pm
with music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
along with a live auction, raffles and meet and greet with celebrities.
Don't miss out, get your teams together for this fun event, and
help raise funds for the Tourette Syndrome Association of
Florida. All proceeds from this event will go to help adults
and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.
For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com
or email Gary D'Amico
at gary78@tampabay.rr.com Cft -(W


2nd Annual

W on .Dr$250 Prize
,Best Elvis"
$250 Prize
For "Best
Dressed Dog"


~ Corporate
Team Award
*Door Prizes
dllk~aE *& More
Register At

E'IL~UL'A~I'O1S''tII Harty's Kds Pedatrc Servces is a
*Program of Hospce of Ctrus and
the Nature Coast Licensed 1985.


Multi-Instrumentalists

Fred Gosbee

& Julia Lane
Thursday, Mar. 13
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFH THE CITRUS COUNTYHisJORCAi SOCIETY


]EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 2 3, 2014 A25


160 o 0 o OA :w





A26 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


Homemade,



homegrown



Time drawing near for entries

in 2014 Citrus County Fair


Special to the Chronicle

Do you want to enter
homemade or homegrown
items in the 2014 Citrus
County Fair? There are
many, many categories to
enter
Some categories, in ad-
dition to the regular ones,
include rubber stamping,
themed table settings, col-
lections and homemade
wine and home-brewed
beer The themed table
settings category contin-
ues to grow The rules are
simple and are available
online at www.citruscoun-
tyfaircom click on
Competitive Exhibit
Rules or at the fair of-
fice or check the Citrus
County Fair section to be
published March 16 in the
Chronicle). Bring a card
table, settings and your
imagination and show
just how great you can set
a table.
New this year is the
Shoebox Float for Youth.
Entries will be taken
from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, March 21, or from


9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 22.
Baked goods and agri-
cultural products, eggs,
etc., will be accepted only
on Monday, March 24,
from 8 to 10 am.
Youth exhibitors must
enter their own exhibit,
with the exception of the
Monday entries of baked
goods and agriculture.
These may be entered by
an adult.
New this year are cash
awards for the best Straw-
berry Dessert and Straw-
berry Preserve in youth
and adult divisions. Each
winner will be awarded
$25.
The awards are spon-
sored by the Earl Stokes
Family
Ribbons will be
awarded in all categories;
cash and ribbons will be
awarded in the youth divi-
sion. Youth entrants are
also eligible to apply for
scholarships.
For more information,
visit wwwcitruscounty
fair com or call 352-
726-2993.


Sussex County picnic set


Special to the Chronicle

The 21st annual Sussex
County picnic will be at
10 a.m. Saturday, March 1,
at Dade Battlefield Park,
Bushnell.
Admission is $3 per car
Bring your own food and
beverage. No alcohol is
allowed. Sheltered pavil-
ions and picnic tables are
available. Bring folding
chairs if you have them.
All previous and pres-


ent Sussex County resi-
dents are invited to at-
tend. Please register upon
arrival. Donations for
door prizes are appreci-
ated. Sale of raffle tickets
helps with expenses for
next year's picnic.
For more information,
call Liz and Jerry Brock
at 352-489-5530 or 973-222-
2873; Dave and Mickie
Naisby at 352-799-8701 or
973-219-8803; or John
Wadovsky at 352-317-3266.


Robert and Mary
Ellen Korinek of
Inverness and
McKenzie Bridge, Ore.,
announce the
engagement of their
daughter, Rebecca Lynn
Korinek, to Steven
Michael Kriha, both of
Huntington Beach,
Calif
The prospective
groom is the son of Greg
and Jeri Kriha of
Westminster, Calif
The couple became
engaged April 2013, at
Waterford Castle in
Ireland.
The bride-to-be is a
graduate of Seminole
High School, Seminole,
and the University of
Oregon. She is
employed as a GIS
specialist at Orange
County Fire, Irvine,
Calif


The future groom
graduated from
Westminster High
School, Westminster,
Calif, and is also em-
ployed with Orange
County Fire Authority
as a firefighter/
paramedic.
The couple will
exchange vows June 20,
2014, at Talega Country
Club in San Clemente,
Calif


FOR THE RECORD


Feb. 3-9, 2014
Divorces
Kathleen A. Garron,
Citrus Springs vs. Chester
E. Garron Jr., Citrus
Springs
Lois Margaret Truesdale,
Hernando vs. Ralph B.
Truesdale, Hernando
Barbara Ann Zonitch,
Crystal River vs. John
Donald Zonitch,
Homosassa
Marriages
Rolf Max Benkert,
Inverness/Priscilla Dale
Vega, Inverness
Nathan Wayne Boles,
Inverness/Brittney Louise
Concidine, Inverness
Taylor Hamilton Cody,
Hernando/Kristen Ellen
Jones, Inverness
Steven Andrew
Dembling, Cohoes,
N.Y/Susan Jean Cronk,
Voorheesville, N.Y.
Brent Charles Hobbs,
Brooksville/Christina Marie
Erlinger, Brooksville
Bryan Andrew Jacek,
Hernando/Tara Marie Aerts,


Hernando
Chad Robert LaBranche,
Homosassa/Sandra Elaine
Kirchaine, Homosassa
Thomas Richard Ricci,
Homosassa/Rita Jean
Walker, Homosassa
Robert Joseph Scarpello
Jr., Crystal River/Kristan
Marie Maidhof, Inverness

FOR THE
RECORD
0 Divorces and
marriages filed in
the state of Florida
are a matter of
public record,
available from each
county's Clerk of
the Courts Office.
For Citrus County,
call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or
visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.
fl.us.
0 For wedding and
engagement forms,
call 352-563-5660,
ext. 1197.


Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY

ENGAGED


Korinek/Kriha


Claire Wilker of Citrus
Springs and James
Mansfield of Reading,
England, exchanged
nuptial vows at 11:30 a.m.
Dec. 14, 2013, at The
Guildhall, Bath, England.
The bride is the
daughter of Donna Wilker
and the late Larry Wilker
of Citrus Springs. Her
husband is the son of
David and Audrey
Mansfield of Reading,
England.
The couple will reside
in Reading.
A 2000 graduate of


Lecanto High School, the
bride earned her
Bachelor of Science in
2005 at Spring Hill
College, Mobile, Ala. She
earned her Master of Arts
at the University of
Reading in England in
2013. She is global
campaign director at the
Humane Society
International.
The groom graduated
from Waingels Copse
School, Woodley, England.
He is associated with
Virgin Media as a change
analyst.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


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2-23 0D2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WEDDING


Wilker/Mansfield












.PORTS


* US
hockey
team
routed in
bronze
medal
game./B5


0 Golf/B2
0 NASCAR/B2
0 High school football/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Lottery, TV/B3
0 College basketball/B4
0 NBA/B4
0 Olympics/B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


No. 2 Florida rallies past Mississippi 75-71


Gators clamp down on

Henderson in second half

Associated Press

OXFORD, Miss. Mississippi's Marshall Hen-
derson unleashed a first-half scoring spree that put
No. 2 Florida's school-record winning streak in
danger
The Gators were impressed. And then they made
sure it didn't happen again.
Jolted awake by Henderson's 22 points in the first
half, Florida clamped down to keep him scoreless in
the second half and then fought its way to a 75-71
victory on Saturday afternoon.
Scottie Wilbekin scored 18 points and Michael
Frazier II added 17 as the Gators (25-2, 14-0 South-
eastern Conference) extended their winning streak
to 19 games.
"We had a heightened sense of urgency to start
the second half, especially on (Henderson)," Frazier


said. "We did a better job of staying locked in on him
and staying locked in as a whole."
Ole Miss (16-11, 7-7) has lost four in a row Jarvis
Summers added 20 points for the Rebels.
The game was tied at 59 with eight minutes left,
but Florida scored the next seven points to take con-
trol. Henderson missed all six ofhis shots in the sec-
ond half.
The Gators could very well be the No. 1 team in
the country when the new polls are released on
Monday. The current No. 1 Syracuse lost on Wednes-
day to Boston College.
But Frazier and Florida coach Billy Donovan said
that won't mean much.
"This team understands that the whole is greater
than its parts," Donovan said. "But we need to play
better and I'm talking about that from an effort
See AT---/Page 133

Florida's Casey Prather (24) is defended
Saturday by Mississippi's Derrick Millinghaus (3)
and Sebastian Saiz (11) in Oxford, Miss.
Associated Press


CI


tch


plays


MATT PFIFFNERChronicle
Crystal River's Jordan Humphreys slides safely into home plate under the tag of Citrus catcher Cody Bogart to tie the game
at 1-1 during the second inning Saturday night in Crystal River. Citrus won the county clash, 3-2.

Big hit, strikeout gives Citrus 3-2 district victory at Crystal River


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER Both
teams made big plays, both
teams made mistakes. But in
the final analysis, it was Citrus
that made the two pivotal
plays with the game on the
line.
Wesley Bradshaw sliced a
two-out single to right field in
the sixth inning to score the
tie-breaking run for the Hur-
ricanes, then Austin Bogart
struck out Kameron Penning-


ton on a 3-2 pitch with the
tying run at third to get the
final out in a 3-2 baseball vic-
tory over Crystal River Satur-
day at Crystal River
The win boosted Citrus to
2-3 overall but, more impor-
tant, gave the 'Canes an open-
ing win in District 5A-6 play in
a district that figures to be
tight all season. Crystal River
slipped to 3-3 overall, 0-1 in
the district.
"Our pitching won it," said
Citrus coach Brady Bogart.
'Alex (Atkinson) and Austin


are both fly ball pitchers. the runs we get we're going to
Right now, we're struggling
with our hitting. I told the kids See CWTCH/Page B2

Seven Rivers rolls to a 10-run win
Adam Gage smacked a pair of home runs and drove in seven
runs in a 17-7 Seven Rivers Christian six-inning rout of Mount
Dora Bible on Saturday at home.
Garrett Griggs had three singles and scored four runs for the
Warriors (2-0). Cory Weiand also scored four times and Josh
Iwaniec had an RBI and two runs scored.
Tyler Pillsbury picked up the victory with three solids inning of
relief work.
-From staff reports


Hamlin



goes for



Daytona



sweep

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH Denny
Hamlin almost couldn't help
himself at the start of his Daytona
500 qualifying race, when his
anxiously
tried to Daytona 500
charge to
the front 0 When: Today at
a n d 1 p.m.
shake out 0 Where: Daytona
all the International
cobwebs Speedway.
and frus- m TV: FOX
tration
from his
injury-plagued season a year ago.
The move backfired, he found
himself mired in traffic and after
a deep breath to regroup, used a
different game-plan to get to the
front
It was a valuable lesson in pa-
tience, one he'll need today when
he tries to become the first driver
at Daytona International Speed-
way to sweep Speedweeks. He
opened Daytona with a win in
the exhibition Sprint Unlimited
and in the second of two 150-mile
qualifying races, but those races
are only confidence-boosters.
The big daddy is the season-
opening Daytona 500, and no
driver has ever completed the
trifecta.
Oh, what a prize that would be
for Hamlin, who sat out five races
last season with a fractured ver-
tebra then gamely drove through
the pain for the final six months
in a failed attempt to salvage his
year
"I think the biggest challenge
for myself is keeping the reins
back for 400 miles, 450 miles," he
said. "Obviously, when you go out
here and you perform the way we
have over these last few races, it's
hard not to just want to go out
there, charge out there, show that
you're still on top and still the
best right on lap one. It's going to
be battling those inner demons of
wanting to go out there, lead laps,
putting yourself in a safe posi-
tion, but also being conservative
and making sure you're there at
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Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Photo finish


Associated Press
Jordan Spieth hits out of a bunker Saturday on the second hole in his match against
Ernie Els during the fourth round of the Match Play Championship golf tournament in
Marana, Ariz. Els won to reach the semifinals.



Final four set in


Match Pla


Els reaches semis for

1st time in 13 years

Associated Press

MAIANA, Ariz. The love-hate rela-
tionship Ernie Els has with the Match
Play Championship is taking a major turn
for the better
Els made a birdie from the desert on
the par-5 eighth hole to take the lead for
good Saturday against 20-year-old Jordan
Spieth, reaching the semifinals in this
fickle tournament for the first time in 13
years.
It was the first time all week that Els


made more birdies than
bogeys, yet he somehow
has survived.
"At times I haven't
played my best as you guys
have well-documented
and know," Els said with a
laugh. "But it's match play
I've just done enough to get
through."
Graeme McDowell was


Matcl
Champi
Today's
Ernie Els vs. V
Rickie Fowler
Follo%
champion


the only other player with greater fortune
on his side, but that ended Saturday
McDowell had reached the quarterfi-
nals even though he never led a single
hole while any of his three matches were
in progress. Just his luck, he finally took a
lead and wound up losing the match to
Victor Dubuisson of France.
Typical of his week, it went down to the
wire.
They were all square with five holes re-
maining when Dubuisson hit a beautiful
chip from the rough in front of a corporate
suite behind the 16th green and saved par,
while McDowell missed a 6-foot par putt
to fall behind.
After matching pars on the 17th,
Dubuisson's shot into the 18th rolled off
the false front He chipped perfectly and
was conceded his par, and McDowell then
missed a 25-foot putt to extend the match.
"Lucky, lucky to even be here today,"
McDowell said. "But actually played quite
nicely most of the day It all boiled down to
my putter actually let me down. I had a
chance on 14 for the hole, chance on 15 for
the hole, missed a short one on 16. My luck
is going to run out sooner than later"
Els plays Dubuisson, a rising star in the
European ranks who won the Turkish
Open when Tiger Woods finished third.
In other quarterfinal matches:
U Jason Day reached the semifinals for


iy tourney

the second straight year with a 2-and-1
win over Louis Oosthuizen, who played
with a nagging back injury
U Rickie Fowler lost a 3-up lead to Ari-
zona grad Jim Fbryk, only to win the last
two holes for a 1-up victory for a shot at
Day Furyk was in the same spot as
Dubuisson on the 18th hole, but his first
chip rolled back down the hill toward his
feet
Fbwler is the No. 53 seed, the highest to
reach the semifinals since Zach Johnson
was No. 59 in 2006 when it was held at
La Costa.
Els long held a reputation as a wizard
in match play, having captured the World
Match Play Championship seven times
when it was at Wentworth and featured
smaller fields and
36-hole matches. This
h Play version hasn't been kind
lonships to him.
He reached the semifi-
3emifinals nals in 2001 at Metropol-
ictor Dubuisson itan Golf Club in
vs. Jason Day Melbourne, only to lose
wed by to Pierre Fulke. Els did-
ship match n't imagine it would take
this long to get back,
though he understands
that anything can happen and usually
does over 18 holes of match play
"I really had a love-hate relationship
with this event as you guys well know," he
said. "I was lucky enough to get in the field
a couple of years ago and beat Luke Don-
ald in the first round. But most of the time,
I lost in the first round here either on the
18th or 19th hole. It's been a frustrating
time in this event"
The semifinals will be this morning, fol-
lowing by the championship match.
"I'm just very glad to be here on Sun-
day," Els said. "Hopefully, it goes good to-
morrow I still feel I've got a really good
one in me."
Fowler never looked like he would
need to go 18th holes the way his match
against Furyk started. And then he was
happy to get there. Fbryk was 3 down with
only six holes remaining when he made
three straight birdies and won a fourth
straight hole at No. 16 with a par when
Fowler flubbed a chip. Fbryk missed the
fairway on the 17th, however, allowing
Fowler to square the match.
On the 18th, Furyk came up just a frac-
tion short of perfect and saw the ball roll
back down the false front of the green. His
chip was heavy, and that one rolled back
toward his feet and led to bogey Fowler
navigated a quick birdie putt down the
slope to a concession range and escaped.


Smith wins

Nationwide

opener at

Daytona

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Regan Smith had the
checkered flag in sight at
Daytona a year ago and a
freight train of cars in his
rearview mirror.
He moved high to throw
a block on Brad Ke-
selowski and it backfired
badly The desperate at-
tempt to preserve the win
triggered a 12-car acci-
dent, Kyle Larson's car
sailed into the fence and
debris from the wreck in-
jured nearly 30 fans.
It was a racing accident,
nobody's fault. But Smith
was racked with guilt.
So it was sweet redemp-
tion Saturday when he
nipped Keselowski at the
finish line to win the Na-
tionwide Series opener-
finally, a year later at
Daytona International
Speedway
"I think it hurt him
deeply that the fans were
involved in the accident,"
said Dale Earnhardt Jr,
who along sister, Kelley
and Rick Hendrick owns
the JR Motorsports
Chevrolet that Smith


drove to victory
"I think that he person-
ally and privately (bore)
some responsibility for his
involvement in the crash,
just being in the crash, to
have someone in the
grandstands get hurt had
to affect him tremen-
dously That was definitely
probably one of the tough-
est things he went through
personally as a driver"
Smith said he went to
dinner with Earnhardt
after the accident and
leaned on his boss.
"I'm fortunate that I've
got a boss who has been in
a lot of different situations
in this sport and under-
stands a lot of different
things over the years in
Dale," Smith said. "He just
basically said 'You've got
to shake it off, it's racing
and no fault of anybody
Circumstances sometimes
happen. He offered up a
lot of good advice in that
situation. It did bother me.
I'd be lying if I said I
didn't."
Nothing bothered Smith
on Saturday
He beat Keselowski by
0.013 for the second-
closest finish at Daytona
International Speedway
and seventh closest in se-
ries history It was the 300th
victory for the Hendrick
Motorsports engine shop.
Keselowski said last
year's crash-marred finish
never entered his mind as
he plotted his strategy over
the closing laps. Smith and


Keselowski raced side-by-
side at the front of the
pack over the final two
overtime laps. They were
door-to-door exiting the
final turn and Smith edged
him at the line.
"I'm not that smart and
I've got a terrible mem-
ory," Keselowski said of
not worrying about a re-
peat of last year
Trevor Bayne finished
third, followed by Kyle
Busch, winner of Friday
night's Truck Series race,
and his Joe Gibbs Racing
teammate Elliott Sadler
Brendan Gaughan was
sixth and followed by Ty
Dillon.
Earnhardt Jr, who was
11th, ran into the back of
Joe Nemechek after the
finish. He said he was
being pushed by Kyle Lar-
son and traffic slowed too
quickly It caused heavy
damage to Nemechek and
Ryan Sieg's cars that Earn-
hardt said he'd pay to
repair
"We were slowing down.
I was looking all around
trying to figure out where
everybody was at" he said.
"Totally my fault. Really
wasn't paying attention. I
hate it for Joe and those
guys 'cause they don't need
to be tearing up race cars."
NASCAR issued its first
drafting penalty of the sea-
son 86 laps into race when
James Buescher was
called for push-drafting
Keselowski.


Associated Press
Regan Smith (7) crosses the finish line Saturday ahead of Brad Keselowski (22) and
Trevor Bayne (6) to win the NASCAR Nationwide Series auto race at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach.


CLUTCH
Continued from Page B1

have to manufacture."
Citrus did just that, using different
methods to produce each of its runs.
Austin Bogart started the game by hitting
a fly ball that got over the center fielder's
head, allowing Bogart to get all the way to
third. Cody Bogart's slow roller to first
base one out later produced the game's
first run.
Crystal River tied it in the second after
getting the first two runners aboard on a
single and an error Derrick Rogers' sac-
rifice fly to center delivered the run. In
the third, Citrus regained the lead with-
out the benefit of a hit. Austin Bogart got
aboard on an error and eventually scored
on another error on a pick-off attempt.
Pirates' pitcher Jordan Humphreys,
who singled and scored his team's first
run, accounted for the second run him-
self, when he pounced on an Atkinson
pitch and sent it over the left-field fence
to knot it at 2-2 after four innings.
Neither team did much in the hit col-
umn, Citrus getting five and Crystal River
three. Three of the Hurricanes' hits came
in the sixth, when Alex Barbee, Brooks


Brasher and Bradshaw each singled,
Bradshaw's hit knocking in Barbee with
what proved to be the game-winning run.
The Pirates did not go quietly, however
With Austin Bogart on the mound in relief
of Atkinson who worked the first five
innings and allowed two runs (one
earned) on three hits and one walk with
nine strikeouts Shaun Frazier opened
the Crystal River seventh with a walk.
Tyler Voland followed with a hard
grounder to shortstop, but after retiring
Frazier at second, the relay from Cy Yates
sailed well over Bradshaw's head at first
allowing Voland to take second.
A slow grounder to first allowed the
baserunner to advance to third with two
out setting the stage for Austin Bogart's
victory-clinching strikeout
"They capitalized on a few of our mis-
takes," said Crystal River coach Bobby
Stack. "We were making mental errors.
Everything they got we gave to them.
"I don't think they're a better team, but
their kids played heads-up baseball. They
took advantage of our mistakes."
Five players accounted for the five Cit-
rus hits, while Humphreys had two of
Crystal River's three. Humphreys took
the pitching loss, working six innings and
surrendering three runs (two earned)
with two walks and four strikeouts.


LHS announces Harper as next football coach


Tasked with

turning around

Pantherprogram

J.M. SORACCHI
Staff writer

LECANTO -After a close-to-
the-vest search for its next head
football coach that included 56 ap-
plicants and eight finalists,
Lecanto High School named Greg
Harper as McKinley Rolle's suc-
cessor Fiday morning on the Pan-
thers' campus.
Harper joins Lecanto after
serving as the offensive line coach
and assistant head coach at Uni-
versity High School in Orange City
during the 2013 campaign.
Prior to that Harper spent time
as an assistant football coach at
Orlando Evans, University (Or-
lando), DeLand and Orlando
Colonial.


The new leader of the Panthers'
program will be faced with the
same thing most
previous Lecanto
football coaches
faced a major
rebuilding job.
The Panthers
have had just one
winning record
in school history
(6-4 in 2001), one Greg
state playoff ap- Harper
pearance in 1999
and are 20-80 during the past 10
regular seasons.
Harper, for his part, relishes the
task
"I've always wanted to be a
head football coach and I was just
looking for the opportunity to get
the job," Harper said. "I know they
haven't had a lot of success here,
but that's also attractive because
we can turn this thing around and
get it going in the right direction."
Panthers activities director Ron
Allan who was Lecanto's head


football coach from 2007 to 2010-
was impressed with Harper's foot-
ball knowledge and expressed in-
terest in student-athletes.
"He talked about how when he
dealt with his kids at University,"
Allan said, "he spent a lot of time
away from football with them.
"He has an excitement for being
a head football coach. I think that's
going to be evident as we go for-
ward. He's very personable and
very approachable."
Lecanto also liked Harper be-
cause of his ability to fill two head
coaching vacancies: he will also
lead the Panthers' boys weightlift-
ing squad.
Arguably, the new coach's
prowess in the latter sport is more
impressive- while at DeLand, he
won the 2005 boys weightlifting
championship.
Harper is, understandably, a big
proponent of the weight room and
said his real work with his new
charges would come outside the
three-month football season.


"Seventy-five percent of what a
head football coach does is dur-
ing the offseason," Harper said.
"My perspective is we need to
change the whole culture of
what's been going on ... it's not
something that's going to change
overnight, I'm realistic about
that."
Rolle- the coach Harper is re-
placing went 10-21 in three
years at the helm of Lecanto,
which included a 5-5 regular-
season record in 2012. However,
the Panthers ended the 2013 sea-
son on an eight-game losing streak
and Rolle resigned for personal
reasons in November By January
though, he was named head coach
at King High School in Tampa.
Harper is married to wife
Karen and the couple has three
daughters: Jessica, Faith and
Clarissa. He was a part of
Gainesville Buchholz's 1990 state
championship team and later at-
tended the University of Central
Florida.


"I'm looking forward to it," said
Harper of Citrus County's smaller
environment "I know my wife
likes the smaller, more country-
type areas.
"I'm one of those guys who is
adaptable. You can put me any-
where and I'll be OK"
Lecanto High School- and its
football team will certainly
hope so. In fact, the Panthers are
betting they've found the right
guy to not just lead, but build a
program.
"The mindset is we want to win
football games on Friday night,"
Allan said, "but we also want our
coaches to worry about the whole
athlete too.
"I got a really good feeling from
talking to Greg and a couple of
other people that know him, and
that's important to him."
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the
Chronicle sports editor He can
be reached at 352-564-2928 or
emailed at jmsoracchi@
chronicleonline corn


B2 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


SPORTS





CIOus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NASCAR Nationwide
DRIVE4COPD 300
Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (19) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 121 laps, 109.7 rat-
ing, 47 points, $122,152.
2. (17) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 121, 101.3, 0,
$92,585.
3. (31)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 121, 86.1, 41, $87,066.
4. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 121, 129.5, 0, $74,785.
5. (5) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 121, 118.1, 39, $70,051.
6. (27) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 121, 87.2, 38,
$65,276.
7. (23)Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 121, 110.6, 37, $63,776.
8. (1) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet, 121,102.2, 36,
$65,601.
9. (29) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 121,73.5, 0, $60,851.
10. (2) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 121, 106.9, 0,
$61,001.
11. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 121, 90.4, 0,
$52,195.
12. (24) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 121, 73.2, 32,
$58,026.
13. (25) Mike Wallace, Dodge, 121, 70.3, 31,
$51,345.
14. (6) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 121, 82.4, 0, $51,020.
15. (26) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 121, 90.5, 29,
$57,576.
16. (14) James Buescher, Toyota, 121, 89.8, 28,
$56,826.
17. (20) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 121, 82.4, 27,
$56,376.
18. (39) Ryan Reed, Ford, 121, 65.2, 26, $56,251.
19. (3) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 121, 72.4, 0,
$50,070.
20. (12) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 121, 85.8, 24, $56,701.
21. (34) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 121, 58.9, 23,
$55,876.
22. (11) Blake Koch, Toyota, 121, 77.2, 22, $55,746.
23. (30) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 121, 55.8, 21,
$55,571.
24. (40) Chad Boat, Chevrolet, 121, 58.4, 20,
$49,240.
25. (10) David Starr, Toyota, 121, 65.4, 19, $55,796.
26. (22) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, 121, 56, 18,
$55,171.
27. (7) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 121, 84.6, 18,
$55,071.
28. (9) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 120, 79.2, 0, $48,765.
29. (33) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 120, 40.2, 15,
$54,871.
30. (37) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 120, 36.9, 14,
$55,046.
31. (28) JasonWhite, Toyota, 119, 36.6, 13, $54,571.
32. (36) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 119, 48.9, 12,
$54,476.
33. (18) Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet, 118, 36.3, 11,
$54,426.
34. (38) Mike Harmon, Dodge, 117, 31.3, 10,
$54,371.
35. (13) Eric McClure, Toyota, accident, 115, 43, 9,
$54,204.
36. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 114, 37.4, 0, $48,391.
37. (35) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 114, 30.3, 7,
$48,326.
38. (21) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, engine,
12, 35.2, 6, $42,059.
39. (15) Harrison Rhodes, Toyota, engine, 8, 29, 5,
$40,960.
40. (8) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 26.2, 4,
$40,910.
NASCAR Camping
World Truck
NextEra Energy
Resources 250
Friday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 100 laps, 119 rating, 0
points.
2. (18) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 100, 100.7, 43.
3. (9) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 100, 101.2, 41.
4. (14) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 100, 100.8, 0.
5. (2) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 100, 108.6, 39.
6. (3) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 100, 94.4, 38.
7. (11) Jeb Burton, Toyota, 100, 86.9, 37.
8. (13) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 100, 75.2, 0.
9. (30) Jimmy Weller Ill, Chevrolet, 100, 56.8, 35.
10. (23) German Quiroga, Toyota, 100, 71.7, 34.
11. (12) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 100, 72.2, 33.
12. (10) Tyler Reddick, Ford, 100, 63.2, 32.
13. (4) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 100, 71.4, 31.
14. (6) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 100, 81.4, 30.
15. (1) Ben Kennedy, Chevrolet, 100, 103.4, 31.
16. (32) Justin Jennings, Chevrolet, 100, 46.9, 28.
17. (25) Bryan Silas, Chevrolet, 100, 67.3, 27.
18. (34) Ryan Ellis, Chevrolet, 100, 55.3, 0.
19. (27) Chris Fontaine, Toyota, 100, 61.3, 25.
20. (36) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 100, 48.4, 24.
21. (35) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 98, 38.3, 23.
22. (28) Travis Kvapil, Chevrolet, 95, 46.8, 23.
23. (19) John King, Chevrolet, 87, 51.9, 21.
24. (33) Michel Disdier, Chevrolet, 83, 30.9, 20.
25. (26) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, 81,51.2, 19.
26. (16) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, accident, 76,
77.9, 18.
27.(29) Caleb Holman, Chevrolet, accident, 74, 61, 17.
28. (22) Mason Mingus, Toyota, accident, 73, 67.3, 16.
29. (15) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, accident, 73, 87, 0.
30. (8) Ross Chastain, Ford, accident, 73, 84.2, 14.
31. (20) Sean Corr, Ford, accident, 73, 61.1, 13.
32. (5) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, accident, 73, 69.9, 12.
33. (21) Brian Ickier, Toyota, accident, 73, 63.9, 11.
34. (17)TylerYoung, Chevrolet, accident, 73, 60.7, 10.
35. (24) Chris Cockrum, Chevrolet, accident, 73,
30.3, 9.
36. (31) JasonWhite, Chevrolet, engine, 45, 36.4, 0.


Toronto
Brooklyn
NewYork
Boston
Philadell

Miami
Washing
Charlotte
Atlanta
Orlando

Indiana
Chicago
Detroit
Clevelan
Milwauke


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
30 25 .545
25 27 .481
k 21 35 .375
19 37 .339 1
Thia 15 41 .268 V
Southeast Division
W L Pct
39 14 .736
gton 27 28 .491
27 30 .474
26 29 .473
17 40 .298
Central Division
W L Pct
41 13 .759
29 25 .537
23 33 .411
nd 22 34 .393
ee 10 44 .185


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 40 16 .714
Houston 37 18 .673
Dallas 34 23 .596
Memphis 31 24 .564
New Orleans 23 32 .418
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 43 13 .768
Portland 37 18 .673
Minnesota 26 28 .481
Denver 25 29 .463
Utah 19 35 .352
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 37 20 .649
Phoenix 33 21 .611
Golden State 33 22 .600
L.A. Lakers 19 36 .345
Sacramento 18 36 .333
Saturday's Games
Washington 94, New Orleans 93
Charlotte 92, Memphis 89
Dallas 113, Detroit 102
Atlanta 107, NewYork98


SCOREBOARD


Fo r the reco-.(rd


Florida LOTTERY

Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
0-1-0
CASH 3 (late)
3-0-5

PLAY 4 (early)
2-5-5-7
PLAY 4 (late)
1-1-9-1


POWERBALL
2-3-13-14-54
POWER BALL


Fantasy 5 and Lotto not
available at press time.

Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 8 19 20 22
Mega Ball: 22
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 8 winners $773
3-of-4 MB 62 $218.50
3-of-4 1,134 $35.50
2-of-4 MB 1,769 $15.50
1-of-4 MB 11,894 $2
2-of-4 27,044 $2


Fantasy 5:1 13 27 29 33
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 339 $555
3-of-5 10,532 $19.50

Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (FOX) 2014 Daytona 500
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing CARQUEST Auto Parts Nationals
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) Syracuse at Duke (Taped)
12 p.m. (CBS) Michigan State at Michigan
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Yale at Columbia
5 p.m. (SUN) Seton Hall at Creighton
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida State at Pittsburgh
6 p.m. (FS1) Providence at Butler
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Arizona State at Utah
8 p.m. (FS1) USC at California
12 a.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at Virginia Tech (taped)
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Clippers at Oklahoma City Thunder
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Toronto Raptors
9 p.m. (ESPN) Houston Rockets at Phoenix Suns
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Houston Rockets at Phoenix Suns (same-day tape)
2:30 a.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat (same-day tape)
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Clippers at Oklahoma City Thunder
(same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Duke at Notre Dame
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Saint Joseph's at Dayton
1 p.m. (FS1) Georgetown at Villanova
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Wake Forest at Miami
1 p.m. (SUN) Florida at South Carolina
2 p.m. (MNT) Tennessee at Missouri
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Kentucky at Texas A&M
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Rutgers at Louisville
3 p.m. (FSNFL, SUN) Oklahoma State at Texas Tech
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Maryland at Georgia Tech
BILLIARDS
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Trick Shot Magic (taped)
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Trick Shot Magic (taped)
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Trick Shot Magic (taped)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA USBC Masters
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour WGC Accenture Match Play Championship,
Semifinals
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) Honda LPGAThailand, Final Round (same-day tape)
2 p.m. (CBS) PGATour WGC Accenture Match Play Championship, Fi-
nals
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour WGC Accenture Match Play Championship,
Finals (same-day tape)
HOCKEY
8 p.m. (NHL) AHL Oklahoma City Barons at Toronto Marlies (same-day
tape)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 a.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross: Atlanta (taped)
WINTER OLYMPICS
7 a.m. (NBC) Hockey: men's gold medal final
2 p.m. (NBC) Cross-country skiing: men's 50km freestyle gold medal
final; bobsled: four-man (same-day tape)
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey: men's gold medal final (same-day tape)
8:30 p.m. (NBC) Closing Ceremony (same-day tape)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Liverpool FC vs
Swansea City AFC
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Norwich City FC vs
Tottenham Hotspur FC
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: Deportivo Toluca
FC vs Chivas de Guadalajara
TENNIS
9:30 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA Dubai Duty Free Championships Final (taped)
7:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Delray Beach International Championships,
Doubles Final (same-day tape)
TRACK AND FIELD
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) USA Indoor Championships

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


CORRECTION

In Saturday's edition of the Chronicle, new Lecanto football coach
Greg Harper was referred to as Greg Walker due to reporter error.
A corrected version of the article runs in today's paper.


Indiana at Milwaukee, late
Minnesota at Utah, late
Boston at Sacramento, late
Brooklyn at Golden State, late
Today's Games
L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Boston at Utah, 9 p.m.


WGC-Accenture Match
Play Championship
Saturday
At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Purse: $9 million;Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Quarterfinals
(Seedings in parentheses)
Jason Day (8), Australia, def. Louis Oosthuizen
(32), South Africa, 2 and 1.
Rickie Fowler (53), United States, def. Jim Furyk
(20), United States, 1 up.
Ernie Es (31), South Africa, def. Jordan Spieth
(10), United States, 4 and 2.
Victory Dubuisson (27), France, def. Graeme Mc-
Dowell (14), Northern Ireland, 1 up.


DAYTONA
Continued from Page B1

the end of the day"
This is a familiar act at Day-
tona, where surprise winners
often steal the win and heart-
break is the norm. The late Dale
Earnhardt won 34 races at Day-
tona but didn't win his only Day-
tona 500 until his 20th try. Trevor
Bayne? He won his Daytona 500
debut at the expense of three-
time NASCAR champion Tony
Stewart, who is 0-for-15 and has
lost the race in spectacular fash-
ion. He was passed by Ryan
Newman on the last lap in 2008,
didn't get the push he needed on
the final restart when Bayne
won in 2011 and played second-
fiddle to Dale Earnhardt Jr in
2004.
Like Hamlin, or Kevin Har-
vick last year, Stewart is among
the many drivers who had domi-
nant Speedweeks only to come
up empty bidding for the biggest
prize. Most notably was 2002
when he was the driver to beat
and his engine failed on the sec-
ond lap, leading to a devastating
last-place finish for Stewart and
Joe Gibbs Racing.
So Gibbs expects nothing
today even though both Hamlin
and Matt Kenseth, winner of the
first qualifying race, have estab-
lished themselves as two of the
favorites.
"I don't think I ever go into
something where I feel like, 'Hey,
we got this thing," Gibbs said. "So
many things have got to go your
way I think drivers and crew
chiefs, they're more optimistic
than I am because I'm always
nervous about it"
Gibbs has every reason to be
anxious: A year ago, Kenseth
dominated the race only to suf-
fer an engine failure while lead-
ing. Moments later, teammate
Kyle Busch's engine also
expired.
It's a nightmare nobody at Toy-
ota wants to relive as the manu-
facturer embarks on its 10th year
in NASCAR. Toyota didn't move
to the Cup Series until 2007, and
it was JGR that gave it legitimacy
the next season- the year Stew-
art and Busch nearly won
the 500.
But it's been a series of near-
misses in both the Daytona 500
and the race for the Sprint Cup
title for Toyota, which finally
might have the Harley J. Earl
Trophy in its reach.
"This trophy, it's hard to char-
acterize just how important it
would be for our organization,"
said David Wilson, president of
Toyota Racing Development
"Clearly, we've got some really
strong cars. We've got speed,
we've got capabilities of running
up front We haven't been able to
put it altogether in the past Cer-
tainly, winning, now four races in
a row, gives us confidence."
And confidence, patience and
being in the right place at the
end is all it takes to win
NASCAR's biggest race. It's how
Bayne got to Victory Lane in
2011, and how any one of the
seven rookies in Sunday's race
could repeat the feat
That includes pole-sitter
Austin Dillon, who will lead the
field to green in the No. 3 made
famous by the late Earnhardt
The number has not been used
at Daytona in a Cup race since
The Intimidator's fatal accident
on the final lap of the 2001 race,


GATORS
Continued from Page B1

standpoint"
Ole Miss badly needed a qual-
ity win for its mediocre NCAA
tournament resume and played
like a desperate team for much of
the afternoon.
But the Gators steadily put the
Rebels away with quality offen-
sive possessions late in the sec-
ond half.
"We gave a winning effort," Ole
Miss coach Andy Kennedy said.
"But we've got to make plays and
we didn't make plays."
Florida had to survive Hen-
derson's impressive barrage in
the first half just to have a
chance.
It's not the first time Hender-
son has had a big moments
against the Gators. He scored 21
points against Florida last season
in the SEC tournament champi-


onship adding a memorable
Gator Chomp motion as the
Rebels ended up winning 66-63.
And it was quickly apparent on
Saturday that the 6-foot-2 senior
was feeling good again. He shot 7
of 14 from the field- including 5
of 11 from 3-point range -as the
two teams fought to an entertain-
ing 42-all tie by halftime.
The Gators' vaunted defense,
which is easily the best statisti-
cally in the SEC, had few answers
for Henderson early He made
several difficult shots with a
hand in his face.
It didn't last
Henderson cooled off in the
second half- missing those


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 B3


but car owner Richard Childress
was finally ready to use it again
as his 23-year-old grandson
moved to NASCAR's top level.
Childress has no hesitation in
seeing the 3 on the track, and be-
lieves strongly that Dillon has
given Richard Childress Racing
a much-needed boost.
"I know in my heart, today, as I
sit here, Dale Earnhardt is smil-
ing down," Childress said. "He
would want to see this 3. He did-
n't want it to ever go away But I
felt it was the thing to do right
after Daytona, and I know today
that he's accepting this highly I
knew him that well."
RCR threw itself into prepara-
tions for the 500, evidenced not
only by Dillon's pole-winning run
but how Earnhardt-Childress
engines put five cars in the top 12
during qualifying and swept the
front row with Dillon and Frni-
ture Row Racing's Martin Truex
Jr
But Truex's car was wrecked
on the last lap of Thursday's
qualifying race when defending
race winnerJimmie Johnson ran
out of gas. It cost him his starting
spot
"It stinks for the guys who have
worked so hard on that car, and
have a great race car, only to
have that happen on the last cor-
ner of the last lap," Truex said.
He won't be alone in the back
of the field as many heavy-
weights will start at the rear of
the field.
Stewart, who will be in his first
points race since breaking his
leg in August, will drop to the
back because of an unapproved
engine change. So will his team-
mate Danica Patrick, last year's
pole-winner
Johnson, who has wrecked two
cars this Speedweeks, will drop
to the back, along with Clint
Bowyer, who flipped his car
when Johnson ran out of gas.
Daytona 500 lineup
AfterThursday qualifying; race today
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019 mph.
2. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 195.852.
3. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574.
4. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.477.
5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544.
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.042.
7. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894.
8. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 194.078.
9. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211.
10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.919.
11. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.061.
12. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 194.776.
13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658.
14. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.334.
15. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108.
16. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.41.
17. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 193.736.
18. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193.732.
19. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707.
20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.523.
21. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.365.
22. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.695.
23. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 192.538.
24. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 192.135.
25. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 195.818.
26. (52) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 191.493.
27. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.38.
28. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 194.582.
29. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.685.
30. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.712.
31. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.798.
32. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.637.
33. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.296.
34. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.004.
35. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582.
36. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.574.
37. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502.
38. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422.
39. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066.
40. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 193.815.
41. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.594.
42. (66) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 193.428.
43. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 192.328.
Failed to Qualify
44. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 190.347.
45. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 192.291.
46. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.48.
47. (93) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, 189.542.
48. (35) Eric McClure, Ford, 192.905.
49. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford.


tough looks that had gone in dur-
ing the first half and Florida
did enough offensively to win.
"You're not going to prevent
(Henderson) from shooting and
in the first half it was a wash -
him versus our team," Donovan
said. "In the second half, it just
didn't go in."
The Rebels stayed in the game
thanks to a big second half from
Anthony Perez and Summers.
Perez made a layup to tie it at 59.
But Florida responded quickly
Wilbekin stole the ball and
passed down the court to Patric
Young, who finished with a dunk.
Casey Prather made a 10-foot
jumper on the next possession
and the Gators never trailed
again.
Florida was relentlessly effi-
cient down the stretch, scoring on
nearly every possession in the
final minutes.
'All I can say is we're focused
more (late in the game), we're
more together and more con-


nected," Frazier said. "That's
something we pride ourselves on.
We want to become stronger
when the adversity becomes
stronger"
Young added 12 points and five
rebounds for the Gators. He
made four straight crucial free
throws in the final minutes to
help Florida keep its lead.
Henderson finished 7 of 20
from the field, including 5 of 16
from 3-point range. He tied Pat
Bradley's SEC record by hitting a
3-pointer in a 60th consecutive
game.
The Gators haven't lost since a
65-64 setback to UConn on Dec. 2.










Scott scores career high as Hawks top Knicks


Associated Press

ATLANTA Mike Scott scored a
career-high 30 points, Jeff Teague added
28 and the Atlanta Hawks snapped an
eight-game losing streak with a 107-98
victory over the New York Knicks on Sat-
urday night.
Carmelo Anthony finished with 35
points for the Knicks, who blew a double-
digit, third-quarter lead for the second
straight night
New York has lost two straight and
seven of nine to fall 5 1/2 games behind
Atlanta for the eighth and final Eastern
Conference playoff spot.
The Hawks rallied from a 17-point
deficit in the third quarter to take a 74-73
lead on Lou Williams' 3 early in the
fourth.
The Hawks never trailed again.
Wizards 94, Pelicans 93
WASHINGTON Nene made the go-ahead
dunk with 0.9 seconds left and matched a sea-
son high with 30 points to propel the Washington
Wizards past the New Orleans Pelicans, 94-93.
Washington trailed 93-92 when Anthony
Davis hit two free throws with seven seconds
left. After a timeout, the Wizards inbounded to
John Wall, who dribbled to the lane, drew the
defense, and dished to a cutting Nene, who
slammed the ball with his right hand. It was the
12th assist of the night for Wall.
The play spoiled a big performance by Davis,
who had 26 points and 11 rebounds. Anthony


Morrow added 18 points on 7-of-8 shooting.
Bobcats 92, Grizzlies 89
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Kemba Walker
scored 31 points and the Charlotte Bobcats
won for the fourth time in five nights, defeating
the Memphis Grizzlies 92-89.
Charlotte is 4-0 since the All-Star break,
marking its longest winning streak since March
2011.
The Bobcats used an 18-3 run in the fourth
quarter to break open a tight game and then
held on down the stretch with Walker making
four free throws in the final 25 seconds to snap
Memphis' four-game win streak.
The Grizzlies were led by Mike Conley, who
had 16 points but missed two 3-pointers on
Memphis' final possession that would have tied
the game.
Mavericks 113, Pistons 102
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Dirk Nowitzki
scored 24 points, Vince Carter added 18 and
the Dallas Mavericks held off the Detroit Pis-
tons for a 113-102 victory.
Detroit star Andre Drummond was in foul
trouble all night and finished with only eight
points and three rebounds in just under 20
minutes of action.
Josh Smith kept the Pistons in the game
for a while and finished with 32 points,
his most since signing with Detroit last
offseason.
Monta Ellis had 12 points and 13 assists
for the Mavericks.


Associated Press
Atlanta point guard Jeff Teague, right, drives past New York shooting guard J.R. Smith
(8) and center Tyson Chandler (6) to score Saturday in the first half in Atlanta.


Cards slip by Cats


Top-ranked
Syracuse falls

to No. 5 Duke

Associated Press

CINCINNATI -Russ
Smith's 18-foot jumper
with 2.2 seconds left gave
No. 11 Louisville a 58-57
victory win over No. 7
Cincinnati on Saturday,
the Cardinals' sixth
straight win and 10th in 11
games.
Louisville (23-4, 12-2
American Athletic Confer-
ence) started the winning
streak after a last-second
69-66 home loss to the
Bearcats (24-4, 13-2) three
weeks ago.
Cincinnati fought back
from a 10-point second-
half deficit to take a 55-52
lead with 90 seconds re-
maining in the game.
Freshman Troy Caupain
made two free throws with
12 seconds left to give the
Bearcats a 57-56 lead.
Terry Rozier passed the
ball to Smith, catching the
notoriously stingy Cincin-
nati defense off guard and
he made the jumper The
Cardinals tipped the in-
bounds pass, giving
Cincinnati no opportunity
to get off a shot before the
buzzer sounded.
Montrezl Harrell, who
was just 5 of 12 from the
free throw line, led the
Cardinals with 21 points,
Rozier had 11 and Smith
finished with 10 on 3-of-10
shooting.
Sean Kilpatrick had 28
points for the Bearcats,
who had won 19 straight at
home.
No. 5 Duke 66,
No. 1 Syracuse 60
DURHAM, N.C. Rodney
Hood scored 13 points and
drew the game-changing
charging call that helped
No. 5 Duke beat No. 1 Syra-
cuse 66-60.
Freshman Jabari Parker
had 19 points and 10 re-
bounds for the Blue Devils
(22-6, 11-4 ACC).
Jerami Grant had 17 points
and C.J. Fair finished with 13
for the Orange (25-2, 12-2).
Syracuse had the ball down
60-58 in the final seconds
when Fair drove past Tyler
Thornton along the baseline
for an apparent tying layup.
But official Tony Greene
whistled Fair for charging -
and when Syracuse coach
Jim Boeheim shot onto the
court to argue, Greene
slapped him with two techni-
cal fouls and ejected him.
Quinn Cook iced it by hit-
ting three free throws with
10.4 seconds left.
No. 3 Wichita
State 83, Drake 54
WICHITA, Kan. Tekele
Cotton had 21 points, Darius
Carter came off the bench to
score 15 and No. 3 Wichita
State pounded Drake 83-54.
Wichita State (29-0, 16-0
Missouri Valley Conference)


Associated Press
Louisville guard Russ Smith shoots over Cincinnati guard Sean Kilpatrick in the second
half Saturday in Cincinnati. Smith scored 10 points in the game won by Louisville 58-57.


is the first team to start 29-0
since Illinois in 2004-05 and is
two wins away from a perfect
regular season.
Fred VanVleet scored 15
for the Shockers, who cut
down the nets after the game
to celebrate their Missouri Val-
ley championship.
Daddy Ugbede scored 14
points, Jordan Daniels had 13
and Aaron Hawley 10 for
Drake (14-14, 5-11).
No. 8 Kansas 85,
No. 19 Texas 54
LAWRENCE, Kan.-An-
drew Wiggins scored 21
points, Joel Embiid briefly
flirted with a triple-double and
No. 8 Kansas trounced No.
19 Texas 85-54 to seize con-
trol of the Big 12.
Embiid finished with 13
points, seven rebounds and
six blocks for the Jayhawks
(21-6, 12-2), who lead the
league race by three games
with four to play. Kansas can
wrap up at least a share of its
10th straight title when Okla-
homa visits Allen Fieldhouse
on Monday night.
Kansas also exacted a little
revenge for a lopsided loss to
the Longhorns (20-7, 9-5) in
Austin.


No. 9 Villanova 57,
St. John's 54
PHILADELPHIA- Darrun
Hilliard scored 18 points, Ryan
Arcidiacono had 12 and No. 9
Villanova beat St. John's 57-54.
It was the second straight
win for Villanova (24-3, 12-2 Big
East) since its second loss of
the season to No. 11 Creighton.
D'Angelo Harrison had 15
points for St. John's (18-10, 8-7).
No. 14 Virginia 70,
Notre Dame 49
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
-Akil Mitchell and Anthony
Gill both scored 15 points and
No. 14 Virginia used a 30-2
second-half run to blow open
a close game and beat Notre
Dame 70-49, the Cavaliers'
11th consecutive victory.
The victory gave Virginia
(23-5, 14-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference) 14 conference
wins for the first time.
Pat Connaughton led the
Fighting Irish (14-14, 5-10)
with 11 points.
No. 16 Wisconsin
79, No. 15 Iowa 74
IOWA CITY, Iowa Frank
Kaminsky had 21 points and


a crucial late steal as No. 16
Wisconsin beat No. 15 Iowa
79-74 for its fifth straight win.
Sam Dekker added 15
points and 11 rebounds for
the Badgers (22-5, 9-5 Big
Ten), who swept the season
series and moved a half-
game ahead of the Hawkeyes
(19-7, 8-5) in the Big Ten
standings.
Roy Devyn Marble had 21
points and 11 assists to lead
the Hawkeyes.
No. 17 Iowa St. 71,
TCU 60
FORT WORTH, Texas -
DeAndre Kane scored 20
points, Georges Niang had 19
points and eight rebounds and
No. 17 Iowa State kept TCU
winless in the Big 12 with a
71-60 victory.
Georges had two three-
point plays in the last min-
utes to help the Cyclones
(21-5, 9-5 Big 12) build a cush-
ion after entering the game in
a three-way tie for third place
in the conference with Okla-
homa and Kansas State.
Melvin Ejim, the Big 12
leader at 19.1 points per game
coming in, scored 14 after set-
ting a Big 12 record with 48 in


Iowa State's 84-69 win over at
TCU at home.
Anderson had 18 points for
the Horned Frogs (9-17, 0-14),
who are 2-30 in their two Big
12 seasons.
No. 18 Kentucky
77, LSU 76, OT
LEXINGTON, Ky. -Julius
Randle scored in the lane with
3.9 seconds remaining in over-
time gave No. 18 Kentucky a
hard-earned 77-76 victory over
LSU.
After Andre Stringer's
jumper with 12 seconds left
gave LSU a 76-75 lead, James
Young's shot on the other end
was blocked. Randle was able
to grab the loose ball and hit
the game-winning short
jumper, sparking a delirious
celebration with his Wildcats
teammates piling on top of him
on LSU's end of the court.
Randle finished with eight
points and 15 rebounds for
Kentucky (21-6, 11-3 South-
eastern Conference), which
got 21 points from Aaron Harri-
son and 20 from James Young.
Johnny O'Bryant III and An-
thony Hickey both had 20
points for LSU (16-10, 7-7).
Stanford 83,
No. 23 UCLA 74
STANFORD, Calif. -
Chasson Randle made a ca-
reer-high seven 3-pointers
and scored 26 points to help
Stanford boost their case for
an at-large NCAA tournament
berth with an 83-74 victory
over No. 23 UCLA.
Josh Huestis tied a career
high with 22 points and An-
thony Brown had 18 for the
Cardinal (18-8, 9-5 Pac-12),
who have won five of six.
Zach LaVine and Norman
Powell scored 14 points each
for the Bruins (21-6, 104).
No. 24 Ohio St. 64,
Minnesota 46
COLUMBUS, Ohio- Sam
Thompson scored 16 of his 19
points in the second half, lead-
ing No. 24 Ohio State back
from a 12-point deficit to a
64-46 victory over Minnesota.
The Buckeyes outscored
the Golden Gophers 46-18 in
the second half.
Lenzelle Smith Jr. added 13
points and Shannon Scott 10
for the Buckeyes (22-6, 9-6
Big Ten).
Andre Hollins had 13 points
and DeAndre Mathieu added
12 for Minnesota (17-11, 6-9).
Miami 69,
Boston College 42
CORAL GABLES Rion
Brown scored 22 points to
lead Miami to a 6942 win
over Boston College.
Brown shot 8 of 14 from the
field and made four 3-pointers
for Miami (14-13, 5-9 Atlantic
Coast Conference). Erik
Swoope tied a career high
with 14 point, while Manu
Lecomte and Garrius
Adams had 11 and 10 points,
respectively.
Patrick Heckmann scored
15 points but was held to two
points in the second half for
Boston College (7-20, 3-11).


No. 1 UConn 92,
Houston 41
HOUSTON Bria Hart-
ley and Stefanie Dolson
scored 24 points apiece
and No. 1 Connecticut beat
Houston 92-41 on Saturday,
extending the Huskies' win-
ning streak to 34 games.
Dolson also had nine re-
bounds and Breanna Stew-
art added 16 points, seven
boards and five assists as
UConn (28-0, 15-0Ameri-
can Athletic Confereence)
cruised to the win in coach
Geno Auriemma's 1,000th
game at the school. Au-
riemma improved to 867-
133 with the Huskies.
Te'onna Campbell had
15 points, and Jessieka
Palmer added 12 points for
the Cougars (5-22, 1-15).
No. 6 Baylor 69,
TCU 46
FORT WORTH, Texas
- Odyssey Sims matched
her season low with 17
points, and No. 6 Baylor
overcame a sluggish
showing in a rare morning
start for its 10th straight
win, beating TCU 69-46.
The Lady Bears (24-3,
14-1 Big 12) stayed in sole
possession of first place
as they pursue a fourth
straight conference
regular-season title.
The Horned Frogs
(15-12, 6-9) went score-
less for nearly 9 minutes in
the first half.
No. 13 W. Va. 61,
Kansas State 40
MANHATTAN, Kansas
- Christal Caldwell scored
21 points as No. 13 West
Virginia throttled Kansas
State 6140, winning its
seventh straight and hold-
ing five of its last six foes to
less than 62 points.
After a mid-week drub-
bing of 12th-ranked Okla-
homa State, the
Mountaineers (24-3, 13-2
Big 12) coasted through a
disjointed game at Kansas
State (10-16, 4-11 ) that saw
long scoreless stretches.
Caldwell led the Moun-
taineers for the sixth time
this season, picking up for
Bria Holmes, who scored
just five points on 2-for-11
shooting.
Kansas State led for the
first 5 minutes, then went
more than 9 minutes be-
tween field goals. By then
the Mountaineers were up
20 just ahead of halftime.
No. 25 Gonzaga
72, Portland 61
SPOKANE, Wash. -
Haiden Palmer scored 12
points as No. 25 Gonzaga
ground out a 72-61 win over
Portland, assuring the Bull-
dogs (244, 13-2) of a share
of their 10th-straight West
Coast Conference title.
Cassandra Brown came
off the bench to lead Port-
land (14-13, 7-9) with 16
points, hitting all four of her
3-pointers.
-From wire reports


a4 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


BASKETBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Page B5 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014




2014 Winter Olympics

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Disappointing finish


Finland routs US

5-O for bronze in

Olympic hockey

Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia Teemu Se-
lanne led his team around the ice,
with a bronze medal draped
around his neck, after he finished
off his sixth Olympics with a sweet
victory.
If the Finnish Flash is retiring
and hanging up his skates after the
NHL season, he picked a pretty
good way to go out on the world's
stage.
Selanne scored two goals and
Tuukka Rask had a 27-save shutout
helping Finland rout the United
States 5-0 Saturday to win hockey
bronze at the Sochi Games.
The 43-year-old, smooth-skating
forward with a lightning-quick shot
and Jussi Jokinen scored 11 sec-
onds apart early in pivotal second
period.
Selanne and his teammates were
not finished, scoring three goals in
the third against a team that looked
like it would rather be at home.
"It was just something special,"
Selanne said. "I'm so proud."
The Americans, meanwhile,
were humiliated.
"I'm kind of embarrassed where
we're at now," U.S. defenseman
Ryan Suter said.
Selanne has helped Finland win
four medals in the last five
Olympics, more than any other na-
tion in the NHL era.
Before the match became a rout,
it was a game of missed opportuni-
ties for the Americans.
Patrick Kane couldn't convert on
a penalty shot in each of the first
two periods. He missed the net to
the right on his first one-on-one
duel and hit the right crossbar on
his second.
'Just didn't really capitalize on
anything," he acknowledged.
Kane, who also missed a break-
away in overtime against Russia,
said Saturday's setback was one of
the most frustrating games of his
career
"Whether it was confidence or
not getting enough chances, who re-
ally knows at the end of the day," he
said. "I thought I had opportunities.


Associated Press
Finland forward Tuomo Ruutu hits the ice as he challenges USA defenseman Brooks Orpik for the puck
Saturday during the second period of the men's bronze medal ice hockey game at the 2014 Winter Olympics
in Sochi, Russia. Finland claimed the bronze with a 5-0 victory.


... You think you're in three times
against the goaltender alone and
hopefully you could score a couple
of times out of that It just wasn't
meant to be."
No, it wasn't
The Americans wasted a chance
to earn medals in consecutive
Olympic hockey tournaments for
the first time since winning gold in
1960 and silver in 1956.
Finland, meanwhile, took advan-
tage of two power plays in the third
period with goals to put the U.S.
away in a game it didn't look inter-
ested in after falling behind 2-0.
If the league and players' union
do not let the world's best players
go to South Korea in four years,
Kane and Co. may never get a shot
to help the Americans win gold that
has been elusive since the 1980
"Miracle on Ice."
Jonathan Quick, starting ahead
of silver-medal winning goaltender
Ryan Miller, stopped all eight shots
that got to him in the first before
giving up five goals on just 21 shots
over the last two periods.
'Absolutely not second-guessing
the decision to go with Quick in
net" U.S. coach Dan Bylsma said.
"He was our best player in the


semifinal game.
"He was excellent again tonight
He made five, six or seven excellent
saves in the first half of this game.
And no, I did not consider pulling
him as the game went to four and
five."
Selanne, who has said he will re-
tire after playing for the Anaheim
Ducks this season, skated off the ice
in Sochi for the final time with 20
seconds to play and hugged two
teammates on the bench before
leaping back over the boards at the
final buzzer
From the ice, Selanne reached
over the boards to embrace every
assistant coach and executive on
Finland's bench. The popular
player got lifted off his skates more
than once by hugs.
"Maybe this was his last game for
national team and as a captain,"
Finland coach Erkka Westerlund.
"It was excellent game to finish."
Finland won bronze for the sec-
ond straight Olympics and third
time since 1998, the first with NHL
players. It lost to rival Sweden in
the 2006 gold-medal game and in
Friday's semifinals.
The Finns were fired up for the
consolation prize and weren't sat-


isfied with a two-goal lead after
two periods, pouring it on with
Juuso Hietanen's goal 6:10 into the
third as a penalty on Kane was
expiring and Selanne scored
for a second time less than two
minutes later
Selanne, the oldest player in the
tournament extended his Olympic
record to 43 points with another
fantastic game.
The U.S. seemed setup to end its
Olympic hockey championship
drought or at least come home with
a medal, with a group of talented
players in their prime.
It started well, routing Slovakia,
outlasting the host Russians in an
eight-round shootout and cruising
past Slovenia and the Czech Re-
public by a combined score of 20-6.
The Americans were humbled by
defending champion Canada,
which also beat them in the gold-
medal game in 2010, with a 1-0 win
that was more lopsided than the
score indicated.
Then, they got schooled by Fin-
land, a team that wanted to win
more than they did.
"They played hard and taught us
a real good lesson for 60 minutes,"
U.S. forward David Backes said.


Dutch speedskaters add more gold medals


Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia The
Norwegian women revived
their cross country skiing
dominance at the Sochi
Olympics on Saturday and
the Dutch added two more
speedskating gold medals
to their record haul.
Marit Bjoergen won her
sixth career gold medal by
leading a Norwegian sweep
in the women's 30-
kilometer cross-country
race. A week ago, Norway's
heavily favored women's
relay team finished a disap-
pointing fifth, touching off a
mini-crisis in the ski-crazed
Scandinavian country.
The Netherlands won
both men's and women's
team pursuit races in

SOCHI 2014 OLYMPICS


Medal count
COUNTRY G S B TOT
Russia 11 10 8 29
United States 9 7 11 27
Norway 11 5 10 26
Canada 9 10 5 24
Netherlands 8 7 9 24
Germany 8 6 5 19
Austria 4 8 5 17
France 4 4 7 15
Sweden 2 6 6 14
Switzerland 6 3 2 11
China 3 4 2 9
South Korea 3 3 2 8
Czech Republic 2 4 2 8
Slovenia 2 2 4 8
Japan 1 4 3 8
Italy 0 2 6 8
Belarus 5 0 1 6
Poland 4 1 1 6
Finland 1 3 1 5
Britain 1 1 2 4
Australia 0 2 1 3
Latvia 0 1 2 3
Ukraine 1 0 1 2
Slovakia 1 0 0 1
Croatia 0 1 0 1
Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
AP


speedskating, giving the
Dutch eight gold medals
out of 12 events, and 23 total
in the sport That's two
more golds than the Soviet
Union won in speedskating
in 1960, the previous
record, and 10 more than
East Germany's 1988 total
medals mark
In hockey, six-time
Olympian Teemu Selanne
scored two goals to help
Finland rout the U.S. 5-0 in
the game for bronze. Fin-
land has won four medals
in the last five Olympics,
more than any other nation
in the NHL era.
Elsewhere, Russia won
the 4x7.5-kilometer men's
biathlon relay to take its
games-leading 11th gold
medal; Mario Matt of Aus-
tria won gold in the men's
slalom; Vic Wild of Russia
captured his second gold by
winning the Olympic debut
of men's parallel slalom
snowboarding; and Julia
Dujmovits of Austria won
the women's snowboarding
race.
On Day 16, the Sochi
Olympics also was hit by
another doping case. Cross-
country skier Marina Liso-
gor of Ukraine became the
third athlete to test positive
for banned substances in
two days. The 30-year-old
Lisogor competed in two
cross-country events in
Sochi, and did not win a
medal.
Cross-country
skiiing
Bjoergen is now the most
decorated female Winter
Olympian in history with 10
total medals and six gold,
including three in Sochi
and three from Vancouver
Her career total puts her
one ahead of Russian cross-
country skier Lyubov
Egorova, who had six golds
and three silvers. Two other
women Stafania Bel-
mondo of Italy and Soviet


Associated Press
Speedskaters from the Netherlands, left to right, Sven Kramer, Jan Blokhuijsen and
Koen Verweij celebrate winning gold Saturday in the men's team pursuit at the Adler
Arena Skating Center at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.


skier Raisa Smetanina -
also have 10 medals, but
fewer golds. Therese Jo-
haug took silver in the 30K
race, while Kristin Stoer-
mer Steira completed the
Norwegian sweep by win-
ning bronze.
Speedskating
The Dutch men's team of
Sven Kramer, Jan Blokhui-
jsen and Koen Verweij set
an Olympic record of 3 min-
utes, 37.71 seconds in the
team pursuit. The Nether-
lands also held the old
record of 3:39.95, set in Van-
couver four years ago.
South Korea took the silver
and Poland the bronze. In
the women's race, the
Netherlands trio of Ireen
Wust, Marrit Leenstra and
Jorien ter Mors also set an
Olympic record of 2:58.05.
Poland took silver and Rus-
sia bronze. Wust now has
won five medals in Sochi,
more than any other athlete
- two golds and three
silvers.


Alpine skiing
Matt's victory in the
men's slalom makes him
the oldestAlpine champion
in Olympic history Matt,
who turns 35 in April, sur-
passes now-retired Norwe-
gian great KIetil Andre
Aamodt as the oldest skier
to win an Alpine race.
Biathlon
Russian anchor Anton
Shipulin beat Germany's
Simon Schempp on the
final lap to give the host na-
tion its first biathlon gold of
the Sochi Games. The
4x7.5-kilometer relay was
the last biathlon competi-
tion at the games. Defend-
ing champion Norway led
for most of the race but
dropped to fourth after an-
chor Emil Hegle Svendsen
missed three targets in his
final shooting. Germany got
the silver and Austria the
bronze.
Snowboarding
The American-born Wild,


who became a Russian citi-
zen in 2011 after marrying
Russian snowboarder
Alena Zavarzina, won gold
in parallel giant slalom ear-
lier this week. Wild and an-
other adopted Russian,
former South Korean short
track speedskater Viktor
Ahn, have won five of Rus-
sia's 11 gold medals in
Sochi. Zan Kosir of Slove-
nia took silver behind Wild,
and Benjamin Karl of Aus-
tria won bronze. In the
women's parallel slalom,
Dujmovits edged Anke
Karstens of Germany at the
finish. Amelie Kober of
Germany won bronze.
Ice hockey
The 43-year-old Selanne
and Jussi Jokinen scored 11
seconds apart early in the
second period to give Fin-
land the advantage. Then
the Finns scored three
goals in the third period
against an American team
that looked like it would
rather be at home.


Saturday's
Winter Olympic
medalists
ALPINE SKIING
Men
Slalom
GOLD-Mario Matt, Austria
SILVER-Marcel Hirscher, Austria
BRONZE-Henrik Kristoffersen,
Norway
BIATHLON
Men
4x7.5km Relay
GOLD-Russia (Alexey Volkov,
Evgeny Ustyugov, Dmitry Malyshko,
Anton Shipulin)
SILVER-Germany (Erik Lesser,
Daniel Boehm, Arnd Peiffer, Simon
Schempp)
BRONZE-Austria (Christoph
Sumann, Daniel Mesotitsch, Simon
Eder, Dominik Landertinger)
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women
30km Mass Start
GOLD-Marit Bjoergen, Norway
SILVER-Therese Johaug, Norway
BRONZE-Kristin Stoermer Steira,
Norway
ICE HOCKEY
Men
BRONZE-Finland (Olli Maatta, Ossi
Vaananen, Lasse Kukkonen, Sami Salo,
Teemu Selanne, Olli Jokinen, Tuomo
Ruutu, Aleksander Barkov, Sami Lep-
isto, Jori Lehtera, Sakari Salminen,
Jarkko Immonen, Petri Kontiola, Lauri
Korpikoski, Antti Niemi, Kari Lehtonen,
Jussi Jokinen, Juuso Hietanen, Tuukka
Rask, Antti Pihlstrom, Kimmo Timonen,
Sami Vatanen, Juhamatti Aaltonen,
Mikael Granlund, Leo Komarov)
SNOWBOARD
Men
Parallel Slalom
GOLD-Vic Wild, Russia
SILVER-Zan Kosir, Slovenia
BRONZE-Benjamin Karl, Austria
Women
Parallel Slalom
GOLD-Julia Dujmovits, Austria
SILVER-Anke Karstens, Germany
BRONZE-Amelie Kober, Germany
SPEEDSKATING
Men
Team Pursuit
GOLD-Netherlands (Jan Blokhui-
jsen, Sven Kramer, Koen Verweij)
SILVER-South Korea (Joo Hyong
Jun, Kim Cheol Min, Lee Seung Hoon)
BRONZE-Poland (Zbigniew Brodka,
Konrad Niedzwiedzki, Jan Szymanski)
Women
Team Pursuit
GOLD-Netherlands (Marrit Leen-
stra, Jorien ter Mors, Lotte van Beek,
I ree n Wust)
SILVER-Poland (Katarzyna Bach-
leda Curus, Natalia Czerwonka,
Katarzyna Wozniak, Luiza Zlotkowska)
BRONZE-Russia (Olga Graf, Yeka-
terina Lobysheva, Yekaterina Shikhova,
Yuliya Skokova)
Saturday's U.S.
Olympians fared
ALPINE SKIING
Men's Slalom
Final Ranking
(First and second runs in
parentheses)
13. Nolan Kasper, Warren, Vt., (18,
48.70; 10, 55.52) 1:44.22.
NR. Ted Ligety, Park City, Utah, (6,
47.56, DNF), DNF
NR. David Chodounsky, Crested
Butte, Colo., DNF
BIATHLON
Men's 4x7.5km Relay
16. United States (Lowell Bailey, Lake
Placid, N.Y, Russell Currier, Stockholm,
Maine, Sean Doherty, Center Conway,
N.H., Leif Nordgren, Marine on St. Croix,
Minn.), 1:17:39.1 (3+0).
BOBSLEIGH
Men's Four-Man
Through Two Runs
4. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb,
Park City, Utah, Curt Tomasevicz,
Shelby, Neb., Steve Langton, Melrose,
Mass., Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah),
1:50.36.
11. United States 2 (Nick Cunning-
ham, Monterey, Calif, Justin Olsen, San
Antonio, Johnny Quinn, McKinney,
Texas, Dallas Robinson, Georgetown,
Ky.), 1:51.09.
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women's 30km Mass Start
24. Liz Stephen, East Montpelier, Vt.,
1:14:11.8.
27. Holly Brooks, Anchorage, Alaska,
1:14:58.3.
28. Kikkan Randall, Anchorage,
Alaska, 1:15:10.7.
40. Jessie Diggins, Afton, Minn.,
1:18:13.0.
SNOWBOARD
Men's Parallel Slalom
Qualifying
(First and second runs followed by
total time)
NR. (6) Justin Reiter, Steamboat
Springs, Col., DSQ.
Women's Parallel Slalom
Qualifying
(First and second runs followed by
total time)
None competed.
S PE EDS KAT IN G
Men's Team Pursuit
Final 0
4. (W) United States (Brian Hansen,
Glenview, Ill., Jonathan Kuck, Cham-
paign, Ill., Juey Mantia, Ocala, Fla.).
4. (L) France (Alexis Contin, Ewen
Fernandez, Benjamin Mace).
Women's Team Pursuit
Final C
3. (W) Canada (Ivanie Blondin, Kali
Christ, Briftany Schussler).
3. (L) United States (Briftany Bowe,
Ocala, Fla., Heather Richardson, High
Point, N.C., Jilleanne Rookard, Wood-
haven, Mich.)
Today's Winter
Olympic schedule


Bobsleigh
Men's Four-Man (Run 3), 4:30 a.m.
Men's Four-Man (Run 4), 6 a.m.
Cross-Country Skiing
Men's 50km Mass Start Free, 2 a.m.
Ice Hockey
Men
Gold Medal
Sweden vs. Canada, 7 a.m.
Closing Ceremony
11 a.m.




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





They aren't called 'supers' for nothing


any residents who
move to Citrus
County from other
locations are amazed to dis-
cover that we ask voters to
elect the person who runs
our county school system.
The superintendent of
schools is a constitutional
officer, and every four years
the voters get to select the
person who will be in charge
of the largest employer in the
county. Our school system


has more than 2,000 employ-
ees and the largest budget of
any public or private entity
doing business in the county.
Many counties in Florida,
including Hernando to the
south, have made the tran-
sition to an appointed su-
perintendent In those cases,
the voters elect the five school
board members and those five
individuals then recruit and
appoint a superintendent
They are also the same


five individuals who routinely
fire their superintendent
when they are not happy
with one thing or another
In my book, I have more
faith that the voters will
make the right decision.
On Thursday the current
school superintendent- Sam
Himmel hosted a cere-
mony to honor the men who
had held the job before her
And yes, before Mrs. Himmel,
all previous superintendents


in Citrus County were men.
The four living previous
superintendents all attended
the ceremony and the room
at Withlacoochee Technical
Institute was packed with
educators who had spent
decades in the system.
Carl Austin, Jimmy Hughes,
Pete Kelly and Dave Hickey
were all present at the Su-
perintendent's Wall of Fame
induction ceremony Each
of the former superintend-


ents had their portraits hung
in the entryway of the school
administration building in
Inverness.
During brief remarks by
the retired superintendents,
each mentioned Roger Weaver,
the longtime superintendent
who was also honored at the
ceremony Weaver served as
the head of the county's
school system for 28 years

SeeW. ../PageC3


GARY KUHL/Special to the Chronicle


Rainbow Springs is a first-magnitude spring near Dunnellon.


NOT SO FAST,




MY FRIENDS

ust when it was starting to feel like the governor and
the Florida Legislature might be trying to head in the
right direction and "get the water right," things look
like they are headed south again.

Gov. Rick Scott recently suggested putting money in the state's budget to assist
with Everglades management and improvement in water routing to minimize the
disastrous impacts seen this past summer in the Indian River Lagoon- putridly
Gary Kuhl polluted runoff waters released into the lagoon from Lake Okeechobee appar-
GUEST ently killed hundreds of dolphins, pelicans and manatees over this past year
COLUMN Even though Scott's proposed budget amount for the Everglades is a pittance
compared to what is needed, it seemed like a positive start. See KUHL/Page C3








Boom & bust: Fifty years of growth comes to an end


MIKE ARNOLD
Chronicle
hen Duke Energy an-
nounced last February
it would shutter its nu-
clear power plant for good, it
marked the end of a 50-year pe-
riod of prosperity for Citrus
County directly tied to the ex-
pansion of the Crystal River
Energy Complex.
In January 1964, Florida
Power Corporation officials an-
nounced a quarter-billion-
dollar expansion of its facilities
throughout the state, with the


lion's share to be spent on con-
structing two 400,000-kilowatt
coal-fired power plants -
Crystal River 1 and 2. The first
would be completed in 1966
and the second in 1969. Three
more energy units would fol-
low: the nuclear reactor CR3 in
1977, and two more coal plants
(CR4 and CR5) in 1982 and 1984.
Citrus County's population
increased by more than seven-
fold in the 20 years of Florida
Power's expansion.
While the entire county ben-
efitted from the expansion,
Crystal River began seeing an


immediate impact in those first
two months of 1964 when more
than a dozen new businesses
sprang up on the west side of
the county, including:
0 General contractors
Workinger and Tolle opened their
new office buildings on Citrus
Avenue in January and five
businesses Tolle and Whet-
stone Insurance, Ed Tolle Real
Estate, Working and Tolle General
Contracting, Attorney Johnson
S. Savary and Bert's Beauty Shop
- moved into the new digs.

See BUST/Page C3


An artist's
rendering of the
glass and steel
observatory being
built in 1964 at
Homosassa
Springs. The
observatory
replaced an older
one, and was built
near the start of a
half-century period
of prosperity that
saw its end sown
in its beginnings.

Chronicle file


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW






"Behavior is a m
Page C2. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014




CNPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


irror in which every one displays his own image."
Goethe, "Elective Affinities," 1809


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................ managing editor
A Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Rebecca Martin ........................ citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista............. .......copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


POOR BEHAVIOR




Adams should



address poor



conduct at once


or as many folksy id-
ioms as Scott Adams
spins, apparently he's
never heard this one: You can
catch more flies with honey
than vinegar
For the second time in four
months, CommissionerAdams
has been told his behavior is


unacceptable and
bordering on
workplace harass-
ment. On Tuesday,
interim County
Attorney Kerry
Parsons told
Adams in an email
he has repeatedly
criticized her pro-
fessional ability to
the point that she
wants it stopped.
Whether Com-


THE IS
Scott A
behavior
rebuke
county a

OUR OP
Commit
should
where he


missioner Adams is unaware
of the phrase, or he simply
prefers vinegar to honey, be-
havior of his sort is not pro-
fessional and does not belong
in the workplace.
As one of Parsons' five bosses,
Adams has a responsibility to
refrain from actions that
could potentially be consid-
ered workplace harassment.
Adams faced a similar situ-
ation in October when County
Administrator Brad Thorpe
sent him a memo telling him
to stop contacting his staff be-
cause, he said, Adams had es-
tablished a pattern of making


unfounded accusations and
insults.
According to senior staff,
Adams' behavior has not im-
proved since the original
memo, prompting this most
recent warning.
Parsons addressed this very
issue in her email, cautioning
Adams to "monitor
your actions and
ISUE: statements to-
dams' wards employees."
r draws The proper
from forum for Adams
ttorney. to address the
performance of
'INION: Parsons and
Thorpe -both
ssioner county attorney
watch and county ad-
e steps. ministrator an-
swer to the board
of commissioners is at a
public meeting. He can list
performance deficiencies and
call for a vote to fire either
one, which he has already
done with Parsons' predeces-
sor, Richard Wesch.
Adams has no jurisdiction
over the rest of county staff
and could cause the county to
face legal action if an em-
ployee were to complain
about his actions or remarks.
It is in Adams' best interest
to rein in his hounding be-
havior before it proves costly
to the commissioner and the
taxpayers.


Hot Corner: ADAMS' ACTIONS =

Adams is out of control Thanks, Ms. Parsons


This is in regards to the arti-
cle in today's paper, Wednesday,
Feb. 19, regarding Adams being
told to back off by (the) county
attorney. It is really too bad that
we cannot take him out of the
county position because he's
done nothing but cause total
chaos for our county. I may not
agree with everything the com-
missioners do, but this guy has
an agenda to go after anybody
and everybody. And hopefully,
the citizens of Citrus County will
not look at this behavior as
being something that is
positive and get rid of 0
the other commission-
ers. Because if we got a
bunch of people like
him in our county com-
mission at election time f
this county's going to
have bigger problems
than what we have CAL
today. This guy is out of
control and he's going 563-
to cost us more money.
Only Adams cares
Your headlines today (Feb. 19)
talked about Scott Adams and
the (county) attorney. He's the
only one on the board that
seems like he really, really cares
about this area and really wants
to make something out of it,
eliminate waste. Damn right he
should go in her office and raise
holy hell.
Laughing matter
It's amazing. Every time I read
about Scott Adams, it makes
me laugh.
Adams' interests
For a county commissioner
that often talks about landfills
and it just so happens he owns
one; I think it's wrong.


I

(


This is a heads-up to Kerry
Parsons: Thank you for bringing
out our glorious Commissioner
Scott Adams and his bullying of
people.
Don't muzzle Adams
In regards (to) "County attor-
ney tells Adams to back off:" It's
a shame that when one honest
voice down there speaks out, they
seek to put a muzzle on him.
Adams doing nothing
Most of you can't complain. You
voted for him, Scott
JND Adams. Well, see what
he's doing nothing.
Looking out for us
After reading the
Wednesday morning
(Feb. 19) Chronicle
story on the front page,
attention, Kerry Parsons,
5 interim county attorney:
)579 As a citizen of Citrus
County, I like what Scott
Adams is doing. I wonder
how many ridiculous ideas like
the Ottawa fiasco would have
happened if we the citizens had
a Scott Adams looking out for us.
Stop putting him down
Well, the Chronicle has done it
once again. Your headlines for
Wednesday (Feb. 19) again, the
Chronicle is against our wonder-
ful Commissioner Adams. Scott
Adams is the voice of the peo-
ple in Citrus County. He speaks
for us and the Chronicle is con-
tinually putting him down. It is
disgusting.
Man with a back bone
Just a quick message: Good for
Scott Adams. This town finally
has somebody with a backbone.
Desperately needed around here.


When death comes too soon


Editor's note: This is the last
in a series on states abusing the
death penalty
he state of Texas should
be far from commended
for its ample dedication
to continuing the death penalty.
But at least the care Texas
courts take when listening to
death penalty ap-
peals is technically
what used to be the
American way:
'Texas, the nation's
most active death
penalty state, gener-
ally waits until all
appeals are exhausted
before carrying out
executions" ("Lawyers: Nat F
Mo. Moving Too 0TH
Quickly on Execu-
tions," The Associ- VOl1
ated Press, Jan. 31).
But, as I reported last week,
citing a New York Times edito-
rial, certain states' disregard of
death row inmates' final last-
minute appeals is becoming
more common. I wrote about
Herbert Smulls, who was exe-
cuted in Missouri on Jan. 29 for
the 1991 murder of a jewelry
storeowner. His lawyers had
made appeals to the U.S.
Supreme Court for a stay of ex-
ecution, claiming Smulls'
Eighth and 14th Amendment
rights had been denied. Their
most urgent appeal was sent
just before 10 p.m. on the night
of Smulls' planned execution.
However, as reported by nu-
merous outlets, Smulls' depar-
ture from this planet began at
10:11 p.m. He was pronounced
dead at 10:20 p.m.
But, according to the AP one
of Smulls' lawyers, Joseph
Luby, "received an email at
10:30 p.m. from the Supreme
Court, saying the stay applica-
tion was denied at 10:24 p.m. -
four minutes after Smulls was
pronounced dead."
That doubly obliterated
Smulls without a hearing.
It may interest you, the
reader, to know that "Smulls,
who was black, was convicted
by an all-white jury"
Additionally, a key element of
Smulls' appeals was the nature
of the drugs Missouri finally
used to kill him. As the AP, the
Times and other media have re-
ported, Missouri and certain
other states hide the identities
of certain execution drugs and
the compounding pharmacies
supplying them.
For example, the AP noted in
its report on Smulls' passing
that "two weeks ago, Ohio in-
mate Dennis McGuire took 26








A


(
HI
c


minutes to die by injection,
gasping repeatedly as he lay on
a gurney with his mouth open-
ing and closing. And on Jan. 9,
Oklahoma inmate Michael Lee
Wilson's final words were, 'I
feel my whole body burning."'
It also may interest official
executioners in Iran, North Korea,
China and other expeditious
nations that, accord-
ing to the AP, the at-
torneys for Smulls
expressed concern
"that it was the third
straight case in
which Missouri has
moved ahead with
an execution while
the case was still in
entoff court"
I'd appreciate
ER hearing from any-
DES one in another state
- who is keeping
count of death row inmates
being extinguished, while their
cases are still on appeal under
our once glorified system of
justice.
Some state legislators are
now working to create inves-
tigative procedures into pre-
cisely what poisons are ending
the lives of these prisoners. I
would very much like to hear
from them. I'd also like to hear
from recently awakened citizens
who can inform me whether
any candidates in local, state or
federal elections are breaking
through official silence on
these shrouded homicides.
Also, what of the ministers,
priests and rabbis living in
these states that are speeding
up executions? Are any of them
speaking up?
I also am increasingly curious
about the quality of legal repre-
sentation throughout the nation,
and how well attorneys are han-
dling the cases of their clients on
death row. How many of these
prisoners have lawyers with the
know-how and persistence of
Herbert Smulls' attorneys?
Moreover, how many inmates
now waiting on death row in
states that hide their execution
methods have lawyers with the
capacity to be of any real use to
them?
This raises a much more wide-
ranging question about the pres-
ent state of American justice.
In a recent issue of The Week,
Andrew Cohen reported on
"the one area where America
really needs more lawyers."
He began: "Mike Engle, a
public defender in Nashville,
stood up in a local courtroom
last month and raised a trou-
bling issue that has national
resonance.


'After prosecutors notified a
trial judge that they were seek-
ing the death penalty against an
indigent defendant named
Lorenzo Jenkins, who is ac-
cused of murdering three peo-
ple, Engle asked the judge to
assign a private attorney to han-
dle the case on behalf of the de-
fendant' ("This is the one area
where America really needs
more lawyers," Andrew Cohen,
The Week, Jan. 22).
According to the AP, the pub-
lic defender expressed his con-
cerns to the judge thusly: "Our
office, quite frankly, lacks the
resources to defend a death
penalty case" ("Private attorney
weighed in death penalty case,"
AP, Dec. 14, 2013).
The Week's Cohen continued:
"This surely is not what the
United States Supreme Court
had in mind in 1963 when it first
recognized a constitutional
right to counsel in Gideon v.
Wainwright.
"What the justices did not do
in Gideon, and what has haunted
the court system ever since, is to
require states to enforce the right
to counsel through policies and
programs (and most of all, fund-
ing) that ensures adequate rep-
resentation in all criminal cases."
And dig this deeply shameful
truth about our system of jus-
tice: "The result has been cata-
strophic for millions of
Americans who cannot afford
their own attorney. There are
no precise, recent figures
telling us how many indigent
defendants need lawyers each
year but in 2007 the figure
was at least six million people."
Furthermore, Cohen re-
ported in The Week, "as the
Supreme Court has gotten more
conservative since Gideon, it
has consistently refused to
force state legislators to ade-
quately fund defense work or to
overturn convictions even
where criminal defendants re-
ceived patently ineffective as-
sistance from overworked
public defenders.
'As a matter of law, this must
change."
Those of you who are inter-
ested in bringing justice to such
defendants should remember
this when you vote for presi-
dent in 2016.


Nat Hen toff is a na tionally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


o. for
;011 ...


se,1Nrs
I lottvv


LETTER to theI

Heads should roll [OPINIONS INVITED


In the Jan. 24 Chronicle we
were told the taxpayers of Citrus
County will pay Josh Nemzoff
close to $500,000 for breach of
contract by the geniuses running
Citrus Memorial hospital. Re-
viewing the tax dollars spent
by this group of elites is noth-
ing short of staggering consid-
ering we are a relatively small
area of working-class and re-
tired people. Think about this:
We have paid more than $10
million dollars for their legal
fees. In addition to Nemzoff,
we will be paying for a golden
parachute for the outgoing
CEO in the area of $670,000.
The interim CEO will cost us


Editor
$20,000 per month. You citizens
must all be millionaires, because
I don't hear any screaming.
For those of you with a short
memory or haven't lived here
long enough, about five to six
years ago another business-
man stole $678,288.69 from the
Citrus County School District.
The superintendent at that
time is still in office. Nobody
got fired!
We have lost all this money
because of ineptitude and
politicians looking the other
way Then we re-elect them.
Come on Citrus County, let's
start demanding some heads.
Doug Oxford
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
* Letters must be no longer than
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" SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.





CiTus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A woman laughing is a woman conquering


uring the 1950s, a
pretty little blond-
haired girl was
playing in the park sur-
rounding the Bunker Hill
Monument in Boston, Mass.,
while at the same time, a
cotton-topped little boy was
fishing in central Florida's
Withlacoochee River
Years later, they would
meet, share a smile and
laughter, then fireworks
would follow
Not so long ago, Cheryl
shared with me a quote at-
tributed to Napoleon
Bonaparte.
I determined that it was
a quote around which I
could, and perhaps would,
build a column. But before
using it, I felt I must do at
least a minor amount of re-


search to be sure the quote
was something this ever-
so-memorable historical
character did indeed say
As I am sure most of you
know, during the late 18th
and early 19th centuries,
Napoleon, an Italian-born
(Corsican) French military
figure, used his talents as a
soldier and as a politician
to become the emperor of
France. He had his highs and
his lows. Becoming emperor
says it all as far as the
highest of highs, and being
imprisoned on St. Helena
by the British for the final
six years of his life pretty
much paints a picture of
the lowest of lows.
Prior to finding the
quote Cheryl had related
to me, I found another one


which grabbed my atten- Southern solidarity -
tion; that is, according to sometimes with hurtful re-
Monsieur Bonaparte, sults- that existed then to
"History is no more than a much greater degree
lies agreed than it does
upon by the now
victors." My answer to
Soon after her at that time
we were mar- was: "The
ried, when we South lost. The
were first get- North wrote
ting to know the history
each other, my books and what
sweet little was written dif-
Northern-born Fred Brannen fers from what
wife asked the A SLICE was locked in
question, "Why the memories
does the South OF LIFE of those whose
continue to homes were
fight the Civil War?" burned and who suffered
After coming here from death, destruction and in-
Boston in the late 1950s, dignities atthe hands of an
even as a child, Cheryl was invading army My grand-
well aware of a lingering mother heard these stories


directly from her mother,
who had lived them. In an-
other generation, much
will be forgotten and
things should improve."
Nowadays?
Both the North and the
South keep fighting the Civil
War because re-enactments
create an excellent excuse
to have a good time!
So, what about the quote
I felt compelled to research?
Napoleon is in fact cred-
ited with also having said,
'A woman laughing is a
woman conquered."
I'm well aware he was a
military genius, but I am
not altogether sure he has
this one right. When
Cheryl and I first met and
began to date, a combina-
tion of nervousness and


excitement caused me to
put my wit into overdrive,
and, yes, she responded by
laughing. With her smile
and her laughter, she had
captured my heart in no
time at all.
Based on personal expe-
rience, I believe a more
correct evaluation might
be: 'A woman laughing is a
woman conquering!"


Fred Brannen, an Inver-
ness resident, has been a
Chronicle columnist since
1988 and is the author of
the recently published
novel, 'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay." He may be
contacted at fbrannenjr
@gmail. com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.


KUHL
Continued from Page C1

State monies were recently spent with great fanfare
to clean up some of the state's springheads, includ-
ing the Chassahowitzka spring in southwest Citrus
County. It is well known that it is going to take seri-
ous action upstream of these springheads to stop
the nutrient and water consumption problems, but
again, these springhead cleanup projects seemed to
be a good start. And Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District employees have tried hard to keep
local citizens informed of progress on these spring
projects. There seemed to be a few other good signs
of recognition by elected state officials of our water
problems and, hence, potential problems for
Florida's future.
But not so fast, my friend: Enter Pam Bondi -
Florida's attorney general, who surely receives di-
rection and supervision from our own Gov. Scott -
joining some 20 other state attorneys general with
formal letters supporting a lawsuit by the American
Farm Bureau Federation filed against the feds and
the state of Maryland for (gasp!) cleaning up Chesa-
peake Bay! She, Bondi, claims her only desire here
is to stop federal overreach, i.e., to stop a cooperative
environmental cleanup program between six states,
the District of Columbia and, yes, the federal gov-
ernment. How does her action make any sense? It's
embarrassing. When's the last time you ate an oys-
ter or crab harvested from Chesapeake Bay? That
bay is a mess -kind of like Indian River Lagoon.
Then right behind Bondi comes Florida Panhan-
dle Rep. Jimmy Patronis with proposed legislation
(HB 703) to eliminate or severely limit Florida coun-
ties and municipalities from managing and regulat-
ing their own local development and projects
impacting our environment Remember, the Florida
Legislature two years ago dismantled Florida's
growth management laws and the state department
responsible therefore. The reason given was, gosh,
the local county and city governments could handle
all that stuff. Is there a pattern here?
Is there a decided approach to dismantle the sub-
stance of 40 some years of environmental con-
sciousness promulgated by bipartisan Florida
governors and legislators? Looks like no one will be
overseeing development or long-term planning or
"you name it" in Florida, a state that has now has
almost 19 million residents and millions more an-
nual visitors.
Guess who supports this bill, HB 703? Is it the
same folks who are suing Maryland because they
are trying to clean up their own Chesapeake Bay
through planning and, yes, regulation of farming
and development practices? Over the long haul, fair
and well thought-out regulations are job savers, not
job killers.
And finally, along comes Speaker of the House
Will Weatherford, who proclaims he is "punting the
water stuff" to next year's legislative session. He ac-
knowledges that Florida's water issues are real and
have been a long time in the making and will take a
long time to solve. It is very hard to understand how
a responsible leader in our state government could
make such an ill-considered statement for non-ac-
tion. It is a problem. It will take a long time to solve
it. So ... let's put it off another year?
Kudos to State Sen. Charlie Dean, along with four
other Florida senators, who have drafted a pro-
posed bill aimed at protecting and enhancing
Florida's dying springs, and really, our fresh
groundwater resources for drinking, irrigation and
industry use. Sen. Dean, in a recent presentation at
the annual meeting of the Friends of the Crystal
River Wildlife Management Complex, explained the
bill he was instrumental in drafting. He cited the
proposed bill as long overdue and the "right thing to
do" for our state. These five state senators and their
proposed bill need our strong support through citi-
zen letters and phone calls to elected officials, such
as our governor and other state senators and repre-
sentatives. Sen. Dean, along with getting his pro-
posed bill passed, will need to fight to quash HB 703.
Patronis' bill opens the door to the old days in
Florida totally unmanaged growth along with an
apparent path to privatization of our water re-
sources. Guess who is already strongly lobbying
against Sen. Dean's bill? You got it lobbyists for
agricultural and development interests.
Don't get me wrong, I personally like agriculture,
chambers of commerce and home builder folks -
many of us have relatives and good friends in these
groups. I like Rep. Patronis; several of us met with
him this past summer to express our concerns about
his bill that passed last year, further weakening
water management districts in Florida.
I like jobs being created here in Florida and good
pay for employees. Positive cash flow into our state
is probably good. However, if we mess up what
brings people and businesses to our beautiful and
unique state, we can kiss it all goodbye. Selling or
polluting our natural resources to the highest bid-
der to get re-elected as governor or attorney general
or legislator is dead wrong.
Maybe many have never seen a Florida spring in
the wild and maybe some could care less about "the
environment," but we taxpayers will pay the bill to try
to fix the mess if our water is not properly managed.
Help Sen. Dean get his bill passed and kill
HB 703.


Gary W Kuhl is a former Citrus County administrator


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

and retired in 1984. He was mur-
dered two years after his retirement
by an intruder he found in a rental
home he had in Tampa.
Two of Weaver's children were
present at the Thursday event to ac-
cept a copy of their Dad's portrait.
It was probably the first time that
five superintendents of schools had
ever been gathered in the same
room. What was immediately evi-
dent was that Citrus County voters
had done a really good job.
Each of these five individuals had
a different style, but each played
a role in building a very strong
public school system. Weaver,
Austin, Hughes and Hickey each
came up through the system. They
first served as principals at one of
the county schools and then became
superintendent.
Austin and Hughes both ascended
to the role. Austin was Superinten-
dent Weaver's chief assistant when


the veteran leader decided to retire.
There was no challenger when
Austin began his first term.
Likewise, Jimmy Hughes was ap-
pointed superintendent after Austin
retired mid-term. Hughes was ap-
pointed to the post by then-Gov.
Lawton Chiles.
Hickey was a principal at schools
in Crystal River and a coach before
he ran for the job.
Jimmy Hughes was also a coach at
Citrus High and he remembered
having words with Hickey while he
was a coach at Crystal River
Pete Kelly became superinten-
dent after serving as an Inverness
city councilman. While Kelly
worked in the school system as an
educator, he came at the job more as
an outside leader
Mrs. Himmel, the current leader,
came to the job from the school
board. She was first elected as a pol-
icymaker and then became the pol-
icy enforcer
While our school system has cer-
tainly faced many challenges over
the past 40 years, it has withstood
the test of time.


Our standardized test scores are
some of the best in the state. We still
have strong discipline going on in
the schools and that helps main-
tain an atmosphere that supports
learning.
Our facilities are top-notch and
maintenance happens on a regular
basis.
Many of our graduates go on to
some of the best colleges in the
country and others flow through the
technical institute to find good jobs.
From a financial standpoint, up
until the current problem with Duke
and its tax bill, our schools have re-
mained one of the strongest posi-
tioned districts in all of Florida.
We elect our leader from our pop-
ulation, and we've done a pretty
darn good job.
Thursday's event was a good re-
minder about how fortunate we
have been.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


BOB TANNEHILL/Chronicle file


The Holiday Inn under construction north of Crystal River on U.S. 19.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Robert D. Conley opened the
City Barber Shop across the street
from the Crystal River Post Office.
Crystal River Title Company
(formerly Peninsular Abstract Com-
pany, with its main office in Inver-
ness) opened a new branch in
Crystal River
Fran Smith and Helen Drawdy
opened their new beauty shop in
Homosassa Springs in the Bob Trot-
ter Real Estate building.
Optometrist Dr Bernard Forrest
expanded his Ocala practice to
Bunts Point Road.
Dave's TV Sales and Service
opened its new shop in the Suncoast
City Plaza (formerly the Southland
Motel) on U.S. 19.
Realtor R.H. Teague, Ho-
mosassa Springs, announced he had
become the exclusive dealer for Bel-
laire Aluminum Homes.
Hallmark Producing Company
filed corporation papers for its real
estate and personal property firm.
Homebuilder and Realtor adver-




Originally published in the Citrus
County Chronicle. Information for
Back in Time is supplied by the
Citrus County Historical Society.

In 1954...
m he annual inspection of Citrus
County's "antique" automobiles
will be held each Wednesday after-
noon until February 20, the dead-
line for obtaining 1954 license
plates. Owners of cars 20 years old
or older will be expected to bring
them to City Hall on Wednesdays
between 1 o'clock and 4:30 p.m.

E xpress shipments of citrus fruits
from Inverness during December
amounted to well over 5,000 crates,
according to WK. Jenkins, railway
express agent. This represented an
increase of about 10 per cent over
last year, which is in keeping with
the approximate yearly increase
for the past ten years.


tisements flooded the The Suncoast
Sentinel and Citrus County Chronicle
newspapers.
Val Enterprises offered homes in
Lake Tsala Apopka Gardens, Point
0' Woods, Bel Air, East Cove and
Pine Lakes from $5,995 to $14,000.
Rolling Oaks Corporation (Beverly
Hills) offered a one-bedroom with
Florida room or two-bedroom con-
crete block home for $9,370. Trudel
Homes advertised building homes
along Port Paradise Road and Echo
Hills had just constructed three new
homes to kick start a new subdivision.
Roadwork had begun on the four-
laning of U.S. 19 in Crystal River and
to its south, and the Holiday Inn north
of town was under construction.
The Homosassa Springs wildlife
park (formerly Nature's Giant Fish-
bowl) was undergoing expansion,
building a new 315,000-pound glass
and steel observatory to replace its
old one, while adding on to its other
buildings on the property.
In a Suncoast Sentinel February
editorial, the editor wrote the fol-
lowing: "Notice how the picture is
changing in the area as a result of
rapid expansion." He went on to add
that business areas had been dor-


mant, with seemingly no future a
few years earlier, but now had new
life and a rosy future.
Today, the mood in the county is
different. CR3 has been shut down,
and two planned nuclear reactors in
south Levy County have been put on
hold. News of a potential new natu-
ral gas plant being built in the area
is good, but it will not replace the
hundreds of jobs lost.
Additionally, a tax dispute be-
tween the county and Duke Energy
has led to tax increases to cover
budget shortfalls caused by the un-
remitted tax revenues tied up in the
dispute. These latest developments
came on the heels of a devastating
economic depression that nearly
shut down home building and real
estate sales over a five- to six-year
period.
While Citrus may never again ex-
perience the kind of growth it has
maintained over the past five
decades, it is important to under-
stand these things come in cycles.


Mike Arnold is the editor of the
Citrus County Chronicle. Email him
at marnold@chronicleonline com.


Special to the Chronicle
A favorite hangout for young people in the late 1930s was Jut Williams' drive-in.
And why not, with all those pretty carhops there to serve you? That's Jut in the
photo inset. The photo was made in 1939. The girls are, from left: Eva Stanley,
Jerry Thomas, Bobbie Bell, Lois Edwards, Kathryn Hendricks and Mary Smith,
and below, Pat Vance. Liquor was sold along with food in your car by the "curb
girls," who wore bright red slacks. Cokes were five cents, hamburgers, 10 cents,
and a half of a fried chicken cost 35 cents. A popular item was Mint Springs
Whiskey known as "Citrus County Scotch" which sold for 35 cents for
a half pint. Liquor was sold 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Jut's opened
in 1932 and got the first liquor license issued in the county in 1935.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 C;3





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Children aren't necessary to qualify



for Earned Income Tax Credit


Editor's note: This is the fourth in-
stallment in a six-part series on tax
changes.
Next Legally married same-sex cou-
ples may be in for some surprises come
tax time. Filing federal taxes could be-
come more complicated for gay married
couples who live in states that don't rec-
ognize their marriage.

CAROLE FELDMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON You might want to
consider filing a tax return this year
even if you don't meet the required in-
come levels.
You could be eligible for the Earned
Income Tax Credit, a refundable tax
credit that will put money in your pocket
even if you don't owe any taxes. But to
get it, you must file a tax return.
Created by Congress in 1975 "to offset
the burden of Social Security taxes and
to provide an incentive to work," the In-
ternal Revenue Service says the prem-
ise of the EITC is simple: "to help you
keep more of what you earned."
For the 2011 tax year, the most recent
full year available, more than 27 million
tax returns claimed nearly $62 billion in
earned income tax credits. That's up
from 19.4 million returns for $30.4 billion
in credits in 1997.
The IRS says the effect has been to lift
people out of poverty- 6.6 million peo-


Income limits

range from $51,567

for a married

couple filing jointly

who have three or

more children to

$19,68o for a

married couple

with no children.

ple, half of them children, based on 2011
tax year returns.
"EITC is one of the largest anti-
poverty programs," the IRS said.
The tax legislation sets out a series of
15 rules that taxpayers have to meet to
qualify for the tax credit
"You have to work, you have to have
earnings and have your income below
set limits," said Barbara Weltman, a con-
tributing editor to 'J.K Lasser's Your In-
come Tax 2014."
Income limits range from $51,567 for a
married couple filing jointly who have
three or more children to $19,680 for a
married couple with no children.


You also have to fill out and submit a
tax return, choosing married filing
jointly, single or head of household for
the filing status. Those who are married
but file separately are not eligible.
To qualify, you also need a valid Social
Security number. Investment income
cannot be greater than $3,300, and you
had to live in the United States for more
than half of 2013.
The tax credit is geared toward families
-the more children, the greater the credit
For a family with three or more quali-
fying children, the maximum credit for
tax year 2013 is $6,044. For families with
no children, the maximum credit is $487.
Taxpayers doing their own return
have to file a one-page form, Schedule
EIC, to claim the credit. There are work-
sheets that go with the form, but those
don't have to be filed.
Tax preparation software can help
point out whether you are eligible, but
you'll still have to go through the quali-
fying questions.
Because it is a refundable credit, EITC
also is prone to fraud. In a report released
in October, the Treasury Inspector Gen-
eral for Tax Administration estimated
that $110.8 billion to $132.6 billion in
earned income tax credits was paid out
erroneously over the past decade. It said
the IRS has made little progress in re-
ducing fraud in the program.
The agency also has said that EITC
claims are twice as likely to be audited.


Take my picture
I say bring on the red-light cameras.
Bring them on. You know what? The
only ones that are complaining about
the red-light cameras are the people
that are running the red lights. That's
who is complaining about it is the peo-
ple running the red lights. Bring them
on and let's get those and put them be-
hind bars if we have to.
The business side
I have a pet peeve. I'm listening to
the radio and there's a talk show per-
son complaining about too much regu-
lation of business.
Well, I'm in a busi-
UND ness where there
W was hardly any reg-
I M P ulation when I first
started it. Every-
thing was beautiful.
However, there were
people in my business
that were crooked;
They abused people
56 0 7 and the system. And
"0 7 then the government
put the regulations
in to stop that type of abuse and then
those very same people that caused the
regulations to have to go into effect are
complaining about regulations. You know,
I mean what's wrong with this picture?
Don't bogart that toast
This is in reference to (the Feb. 10
Sound Off titled) "Potheads at break-
fast." Can you imagine you're at a
restaurant eating breakfast and some
potheads come in there with a pipe the
size of a baseball bat smoking legal
marijuana? Wow, you would hope they
would have the decency to share.


FmI. MARCH 7,2014 & SAT. MARCH 8, 2014
5 PM. TL 9 P.M.
Look for the lighted pathways Get to know your local artists Artist Demonstrations
Refreshments ree Admission & Parldng
I- Olde Mill House Gallery & Cafe Photography, Painting & Print Museum
2 River Safaris & Safari Cafe-Pottery, Wood, Glass & Metal Work
3- Glass Garage Stained & Fused Glass, Jewelry Wildlife Paintings on Wood
4- Pepper Creek Pottery Sculptral Functional Clay Works & Studio
5 5-Riverwoks & HolosassaSnokehouse, CopperSculpture &DrifwoodFurniture
A llsr ops owned and operated by local artists..t!!

For more info call
o (352) 628-5222 or (352) 212-3617


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C .* V6 C olw4 O'rk"&R y r i Ccvm @ Wo4h$ ws M=@.15Plc
0 mmv & me.grop *wo*. o S+ I W@ rces'WA


L:0 Y IAL,ickets may be purcnasea at
AUT T I V E C Crystal Chevrolet Homosassa,
AUTO O V Qil ,1 Hagar Insurance Inverness,
DA. C sI Brashear's Pharmacy Lecanto,
Law ffic Fancy's Pets Crystal River,
Lof y w Gulf to Lake Sales Lecanto,
of Keith Taylor Capital City Bank Crystal River
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: www.rotarybeastfeast.com


,. March 15, 2014
HERNANDO FLORIDA
on evon. -
F.d- & WI- .,r.
Kid. Zon SOVnd...
An Ce.ft ., Me ,
BUILD A TEAM

OXDLSUP!4


(







NO FoS~ie Signs


Citrus County Cruisers
30th Manatee

Car & Truck Show
Sunday, March 2, 2014
Registration 8 a.m. Noon
Pre-Registration $15
ONLY PRE- 1989 Registration Day of Show $20
ANTIQUES- CUSTOMS Crystal Chevrolet!
.Chrysler/Jeep/Nissan

1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19) Homosassa
Judged Show: Top 50 Plus Awards Including:
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Dash Plaque to first 200 registered. FREE 4x6 photo of


F FOR INFORMATION, CALL: John (352) 382-5501
Registration form available at ourwebsite
411 JIN1LL www.citruscountycruisers.com


FEBRUARY IS COU...
MERICAN HEART MONTH Ci.! ONI(, ,
.art disease is the leading cause www.h.. nle o
death for both men and women,
k... . ... .. .. .. .. 'J- .-l t po [


16 17118119120121122
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14TH ANNUAL '
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March 7 thru March 1 1


SHe zNE 201
Prsend B S t herd oi t Hills kpiscopaf Church

Mary L. Jackson Fears, Storyteller,
Civil War Reenactor, Geneologist, Author

Mrs. Fear% will re-enacis lonie of wha life was like
fiU "pepe r c I r" during ihe Civil War. She will
1-o diliy exihits of artifacts repraenting Ihe
Civil War pri~I.


C4 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


COMMENTARY


Starring
ANDY COONEY
"Irish America's Favorite Son" NY Times
Featuring Noel V. Ginnity, Comedian,
The Darrah Carr Dancers
Bugs Moran & The Guiness Irish Band

SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 2014 $22
2:00 PM Per Person
CURTIS PETERSON AUDITORIUM
CH [pN LE For more information, call (352) 860-1292


Feb 23 March 2:
Art Center Theatre Squabble
Location: ACT Entrance Fee: $19.00
Event Time: Friday and Saturday at 7:30,
Sunday Matinee at 2PM, Additional
Saturday Matinee Feb 22 at 2PM
Contact Email:vitografx@yahoo.com

Feb 24 8:30 am
Women of Sugarmill Woods
WSW Schoolastic Classic Golf
Tournament
Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Entrance Fee: $60
Contact Phone: 382-2999

Feb 27 Mar 1:
Friends of the Library of Homosassa
Spring Book Sale Homosassa Library
4100 Grandmarch Ave, Homosassa, FL
Contact Phone: 352-503-6385

Feb 280- 9AM-1 PM
Pope John Paul II Catholic School -
Lecanto
5th Annual Early Childhood Expo
Entrance Fee: Free
Contact Phone: 746-2020

Mar 01 02 Sat 9-5, Sun 9-4
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
Strawberry Fest Floral City
Entrance Fee: $3
Contact Phone: 352-795-3149

Mar 01 Registration 8AM
Tee off for Tourettes
2nd Annual Celebrity Golf Tournament
Plantation on Crystal River
Contact Email:
gary78@tampabay.rr.com

Mar 02 3:00 pm
Take Stock in Children
"Dollars for Scholars" Doo-Wop
Curtis Peterson Auditorium, Lecanto
Entrance Fee: $10.00
Contact Phone: 344-0855,422-2348
(CELL)

Mar 02 8AM
Citrus County Cruisers Car Club
30th Manatee Car and Truck Show
Crystal Motors Homosassa
Fee: $20 day of show for entrants
Free For Visitors
Contact Phone: 352-382-5501


("lopmuE












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press


Combines harvest the winter wheat on the Cooksey farm near Roggen, Colo.


AG CENSUS:





Number of US farms declines, farmers getting older


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil above $102 as cold

underpins demand

NEW YORK -The price of oil
fell slightly but remained above $102
on Friday, underpinned by demand
stemming from the severe winter
weather in the U.S.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for April de-
livery was down 26 cents at $102.49 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange. On
Thursday, the contract fell 9 cents to
close at $102.75.
In other markets, Brent crude,
used to set prices for international
varieties of crude, was down 3 cents
at $110.27 a barrel on the ICE Fu-
tures exchange in London.


Japanese stocks lead

world markets higher

HONG KONG -World stocks
rose on Friday, led by the Japanese
market as the central bank in Asia's
second biggest economy signaled its
lavish monetary stimulus could con-
tinue for longer than the two years
anticipated by markets.
The benchmark Nikkei 225 index
closed 2.9 percent higher at
14,865.67 after the Bank of Japan re-
leased minutes of its policy meeting.
Most major global benchmarks
notched up smaller gains. Britain's
FTSE 100 rose 0.2 percent to
6,826.14 and Germany's DAX
climbed 0.1 percent to 9,628.99.
France's CAC 40 added 0.3 percent
to 4,366.30.
South Korea's Kospi gained 1.4
percent to close at 1,957.83. Hong
Kong's Hang Seng added 0.8 percent
to 22,568.24 and Australia's
S&P/ASX 200 advanced 0.5 percent
to 5,438.70.
The Shanghai Composite Index
dropped 1.2 percent to 2,113.69.
China's tightly controlled yuan has
been steadily strengthening, but this
week is down about 0.4 percent
-From wire reports


Bruce

Williams


Mary Clare Jalonick
Associated Press


WASHINGTON


he number of U.S.
farms is declining even
as the value of their
crops and livestock has in-
creased over the past five
years, a government census
of American agriculture
released Thursday says.

The survey, taken every five
years, shows there were a total of
2.1 million farms in the United
States in 2012, down a little more
than 4 percent from 2007. That fol-
lows a long-term trend of declining
numbers of farms.
Also, farmers are getting older-
the average age was 58.3 years. But
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
points to a bright spot: a small rise


in the number of farmers between
25 and 34 years old.
Vilsack says the boost in the num-
ber of younger farmers is partly
due to increased interest and gov-
ernment support for locally grown
foods and a thriving export market.
Many younger farmers work at
smaller operations, where the
boom in the farm economy and a
rising consumer interest in where
food is grown have helped them.
That boom has been good to all of
farm country: According to the sur-
vey, the market values of crops,
livestock and total agricultural
products were all at record highs.
Farms in the United States sold al-
most $395 billion in products in
2012, 33 percent higher than in
2007.
Still, farmers are aging. Accord-
ing to the census, a third of farmers
were older than 65 in 2012.
"The reality is, over time those
folks won't be able to continue


SMART
MONEY


farming, and the question for all of
us is, if they don't, who will?" Vil-
sack said after the report was re-
leased.
Vilsack has made the revitalization
of rural America a priority at USDA.
As people have moved to suburbs
and cities, many communities have
increasing poverty and fewer young
people to take over family farms. He
has also argued that the dwindling
population has led to less political
clout- made evident by a recent
three-year congressional struggle to
enact a new farm bill. President
Barack Obama signed the bill, which
provides farm subsidies and food
stamps, this month.
"My question is not just who is
going to farm, but who is going to
defend them?" Vilsack said.
The amount of farmland in the
United States also shrank over the
time period, from 922 million to 915
million acres. At the same time,
SeeCNUPage D2


A fading passion: Debt, deficits recede from view


JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Just four years
ago, deficits and debt were an explo-
sive political combination, propelling
Republicans to control of the House
and fueling the budget fights that
would ensue over the next three years.
Today, they are an afterthought- a
dying ember in Washington's political
and policy landscape.
The nation's annual deficit, the
amount the government spends be-
yond what it receives in revenue, has
been cut by nearly two-thirds from its
2009 high, thanks to a combination of
tax increases, an improving economy
and mandatory across-the-board cuts
in programs from defense to trans-
portation to education.
And lawmakers, fatigued by their
budget battles, have called a truce and
abandoned the brinkmanship that led


to unnerving default threats and a par-
tial government shutdown.
As a result, the impulse to cut will be
decidedly weaker when President
Barack Obama's admsubmits his latest
budget plan to Congress early next
month. The White House drove home
the point Thursday when it said
Obama's budget would drop his past
offer to cut spending on federal bene-
fits with lower cost-of-living increases
for beneficiaries.
"It's hard to deny that there is less
political momentum at this moment, in
the year 2014, for the type of extensive
budget negotiations we saw in 2011
and 2012," said Gene Sperling, the di-
rector of the White House's National
Economic Council and a close Obama
adviser
That doesn't mean the problem has
been solved. Far from it. The nonparti-
san Congressional Budget Office
See DEBT/Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
BERLIN Germany's Ifo insti-
tute releases its monthly business
confidence index, a key indicator
for Europe's biggest economy
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Standard &
Poor's releases S&P/Case-Shiller
index of home prices for December
and the fourth quarter, 9 a.m. The
Conference Board releases the
Consumer Confidence Index for
February, 10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON -Labor
Department releases weekly
jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.; Com-
merce Department releases
durable goods for January,
8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the mort-
gage company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.


Don't be


generous


with the


revenue


service

EAR BRUCE: I have a stock

that I sold, but I don't have
any record of when it was
bought and for how much. What
kind of information do I need
when reporting this for my taxes?
Any help you can give me would be
appreciated.
_-Arlene, via email
DEAR ARLENE: It seems to be
the time of year for questions such
as yours. I have had several similar
inquiries in the last couple of
weeks.
We all have many responsibili-
ties, and one of those is to keep ac-
curate records. This way you know
what you paid for a particular in-
vestment, how much the profits
were, and so forth. Without this in-
formation, the government can
take a very narrow view
The first thing to do is write
down everything you can remem-
ber about the transaction, such as
when was it made and the approxi-
mate costs. If a brokerage was
used, by all means contact the bro-
ker and find out what records it
has. It should have a record of the
transaction, assuming it took place
in this century
In the absence of solid informa-
tion, you're going to have to go to
See Y/Pae D2





D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014


CENSUS per
ulal
Continued from Page D1 nor
gr(,
farms grew larger the av-
erage farm grew from 418 of.
to 434 acres. wo
Vilsack said he is most per
concerned about the sur- sm
vival of middle-sized farms,
which declined in the last 0
five years. The number of sm
larger and smaller farms sal
held mostly steady 201
He said he believes that 0
decline partly came from a far
lapse in disaster assistance 201
while Congress haggled
over the farm bill, drought 20(
in many states and rising 0
feed costs. Fh
Ideally, he said, many of th(
the younger farmers who cr&
are working on smaller far
farms will eventually grow cr&
their operations.
One area of growth for en
agriculture is farms that saA
are minority-operated. The mt
number of farms operated sta
by Hispanics, African cr&
Americans, American Indi- mc
ans and Asians all grew be- veg
tween 2007 and 2012, and cr&
the number of Hispanics con
who were principal opera- 0
tors of farms grew by 21 mc
percent so
Still, farm country re- ifo
mains overwhelmingly Illi
white 92 percent of con
farms are operated by th(




MONEY
Continued from Page D1

the government and tell it you
must estimate what you paid
and what you sold this stock for
Don't be too generous. The IRS
will chop you up if you are.
In the event that you can rea-
sonably live with whatever fig-
ures the IRS estimates, go in
peace. If not, depending upon
the amount of money involved,
you may have to seek represen-
tation. I would go to a specialist
who does nothing but negotiate
with the IRS. Generally speak-
ing, this is a former IRS em-
ployee. If the numbers are
substantial, that is the only way
to fly, but if it's a relatively mod-
est transaction, take your beat-
ing and get on with your life.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 62 years
old and looking at retiring soon.
I have had a reasonable income
and hold about $500,000 in in-
vestments and a variety of re-
tirement vehicles, but have no
company pension to rely on.
The stock market took a deep


BUSINESS


ites, while less than 64
rcent of the general pop- I
nation is white and the mi-
rity population is
owing.
Similarly, only 14 percent p:
farms are operated by ir
omen, and more than 90 b3
rcent of those were h(
caller farms. p,
The survey also found: t
m Most U.S. farms are ci
all: 75 percent had d(
des of less than $50,000 in
12. ar
.Agricultural sales per
rm averaged $187,000 in ar
12, an increase of $52,000 0
or 39 percent- over sr
)07. sv
m New England, Texas, v(
orida and many states in R
e Mountain West saw in- In
eases in the number of al
rms and some saw an in-
ease in farmland. ti
Many Midwestern, South- p(
m and Mid-Atlantic states tb
tw decreases. Vilsack said ci
uch of the growth in those ar
rates comes from an in- ti
ease in specialty crops, h(
costly fruits and
getables, that are in- st
easingly popular with w
rnsumers.cc
m The 10 states with the tb
ost farms are Texas, Mis- H
uri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Cal- a
rnia, Kentucky, Ohio, tb
inois, Minnesota and Wis- d:
rnsin. Only Ohio is new to N
e list since 2007. er



slide in 2008, and I cannot af-
ford to allow that to happen
again. CDs and money market
funds have no return. Is there a
good way to position part or all
of my funds to gain a long-term
monthly retirement income?
Annuities? How about life in-
surance products?
-Keith, via email
DEAR KEITH: Unfortu-
nately, there are no sure solu-
tions for your problem.
However, it's not unsolvable.
You said, "The stock market
took a deep slide in 2008, and I
cannot afford to allow that to
happen again." What you
should do is settle on a number
For the sake of discussion, let's
say you have an account worth
$100. You tell yourself that at no
time do you want it to go below
90 percent of its value, and
when it hits $90, you're going to
sell it. Or you may say that
when it hits $90, you'll sell half
of your holdings. You see where
I am going: If you spell out a
plan and follow it, you will not
get trapped in a huge loss.
On the other side of that, the
market is doing very well, and


)EBT
Continued from Page DI

rojects deficits will rise again t
n a couple of years, pushed up r
y an aging population, rising
ealth care costs and antici-
ated increases in interest on
he nation's debt, the amount ac-
imulated over the years by
eficit spending.
But the public has shifted its t
inger
The 2008-2009 bank bailouts
rnd the stimulus spending that
bama set in motion in 2009
parked the revolt in 2010 as
;wing voters those who might
ote for either Democratic or
republican candidates de-
aanded more fiscal account
bility.
With another midterm elec-
on this year, swing voters ap-
ear more concerned about r
heir own personal economic t
circumstances, and Republicans
re focused on making the elec-
on a referendum on Obama's
ealth care law.
A Gallup poll last week
;howed public preoccupation
vith debt and deficits falling as
concerns over jobs took over as t
he top worry for Americans.
[ealth care continued to rank
mong the top problems cited by I
hose surveyed, though it has
ropped slightly from its high in I
[ovember during the botched
enrollment rollout of the law. t



all indicators say at the present
time it should do reasonably
well for the next year Sitting
around with CDs or money mar-
ket funds with no return means
you are throwing away a lot of
money for no good reason.
There are some good annuity
products that certainly deserve
your attention, not necessarily
a purchase, in my opinion.
By and large, I continue to
think that investing in good,
solid American companies is
the way to go.
DEAR BRUCE: I clipped an
answer you gave about transfer-
ring paper bonds to Treasury Di-
rect I went to that site to try to
find out what bonds I may have
purchased, and I cannot figure
out where to go on the site. I
have some paper bonds and
know they are in a bank safe.
Wouldn't the government still
know I had purchased them and
have a record somewhere?
-Pat, via email
DEAR PAT: It seems to me if
you have the bonds in your pos-
session, it shouldn't be a real
problem. I am going to assume
you dealt with a broker If not,


"Deficits and debt remain
salient with the Republican
base, but the middle has moved
on," Republican pollster Wes
Anderson said. "They were
there in 2010, but now they are
pretty strongly focused on Oba-
macare, with the economy as an
issue picking up steam."
Indeed, Republicans are now
not only attacking the health
care law but shifting from call-
ing for cuts to complaining about
them.
House Republican leaders
drew attention to the health care
law's reductions in spending for
Medicare Advantage, an option
available to older Americans
who are eligible for Medicare. In
a letter to Obama, House
Speaker John Boehner and
other top House Republicans
complained that the cuts, which
Republicans themselves have
included in past budgets, would
result in higher health care costs
for those who enroll in the pro-
gram.
"Now is not the time to short-
change seniors' choices," the Re-
publicans wrote in a
not-so-veiled appeal for the
over-65 vote.
That fundamental shift in at-
tention may well be both a bless-
ing and a curse.
If the cease-fire over budgets
holds, the economy no longer
will be convulsed by eleventh-
hour negotiations, missed dead-
lines, threatened shutdowns and
fears of jeopardizing the nation's



go to a broker, explain your cir-
cumstance and tell him/her that
you will be agreeable to paying
a fee to sort out the matter
You were a little sloppy, and
there is a cost involved to put all
the bonds in order Make an ap-
pointment to see a broker Paper
bonds are a thing of the past
DEAR BRUCE: My husband
and I are considering a reverse
mortgage. We are both retired,
living on my husband's pension
and Social Security disability. I
am not receiving any assis-
tance. What is the interest rate
on a reverse mortgage, and
when we inquire, will they
want to know what the money is
going to be used for?
D.Y, via email
DEAR D.Y: For many folks, a
reverse mortgage is a solid way
to tap into equity they have in a
home that they wish to con-
tinue to live in, but they do not
wish to pay back the loan until
they pass on. It's not a bad idea.
One thing you will learn is
that the interest rate on a re-
verse mortgage is higher than
on a conventional mortgage. I
am not certain where you get


Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

credit The new 2014 projection
from the Congressional Budget
Office $514 billion this year
from a $1.4 trillion high 2009 -
means this year's deficit would
be about 3 percent of the na-
tion's economic output, good
news in that it would virtually
match the average percentage of
the past four decades.
But the nation's debt contin-
ues to grow, the CBO says, ever
rising as a share of the nation's
gross domestic product.
The CBO estimates that the
federal debt will equal 74 per-
cent of GDP at the end of the
year, the highest since 1946, and
it projects that based on existing
laws, it will rise to 79 percent in
2024. The main drivers of the
debt are the government's
biggest benefit programs So-
cial Security, Medicare and Med-
icaid. The government revenue
stream is simply not keeping up
with the aging population and
with the increases in the cost of
care.
The CBO also predicted that
after 2016, the health care law
also will lower total working
hours as many employees
choose to cut back on work to
qualify for federal insurance
subsidies.
Such a reduction would con-
tribute to lower tax revenues
and thus higher deficits, CBO di-
rector Doug Elmendorf said.
That conclusion has become yet
another piece of Republican am-
munition against the law



the idea that the lender will
want to know where the money
is going. But if asked, you can
be very general for example,
to pay bills, or pay off an exist-
ing mortgage, or to use for
pleasure.
Reverse mortgages are not for
everyone. You didn't indicate
how old you are. Why is that im-
portant? Both of you must be at
least 62 years old to be eligible.
The older you are, the more you
will be able to receive.
In other words, if you are
both 62, you may have 20 to 25
years left to live. As a conse-
quence, the lender will lend
you a relatively modest amount
of the equity you have. On the
other side of that, if you are
both 85 years old, your life ex-
pectancy is considerably
shorter, and you'll be able to re-
ceive a much larger loan.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
ofmail, personal replies cannot
be provided.


LINNOM A DRE40'R


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA I11" '"
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522 _- Family Owned and Operate
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs I _____ 6220 W. Corporate Oaks Dr
SCHLUMBERGERACCOUNTING SERVICES, INC. Crystal River, FL 34429
In Business For Over 34 Years
*Tax Preparation: 7 -3 91
Individual, Business or Fiduciary All States www.schlumbergeraccounting.com
Authorized e-file provider RoetShumberger E.A
In affiliation with Jennifer Schiumberger-Jones
Business accounting and payroll reporting Jennifer Schiumberger-Jones
Visit www.ChrisEck.com information station


BOB LANEAccountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
44 Years in Business 32 Years in Inverness



Tax Professional 30+ Years Experience

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Glora Can -wCertified Public Accountant
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2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
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www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants

795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services


www.pwprice.com


Fo or nfrato

on advrtiingcal
Ann Frro4a


3254231o
- IrllWtsna


ITPS TAX TIME!
here 's Still 7ime Left
,o" Place Your Ad Call
563-5592



TaxPrpaatoServic


" Accurate and affordable service year round

" Experienced, trained tax professionals

" Convenient evening and weekends hours

" Audit assistance

" Electronic filing


Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352) 795-4733/ 564-1010
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


I&R BLOCK


Werner & Company, PA ::
A Certified Public Accounting Firm .4
www.wernercpas.com


Taxes & Accounting Fraud Investigations
Financial Planning Independent Audits


1011 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442


Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352) 344-4397


(352) 794-3879
www.edserra.com
6118W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River, FL












D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


number Connection

28 N.W.U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149. 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450. 352-726-2801


Chamber

events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber.com/
events!, CitrusCounty
Chamber. com/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.


CITRUS COUNTY
Inverness
T uesday, February 25
Chamber Grand
Opening Celebration q

4: F Chib r ib nC tting

&stick around for the toast
First House Wine or Beer
FEE for Chamber Members



Feb. 25- Grand open-
ing of the Citrus County
Chamber on Court-
house Square in Inver-
ness starts with a
ribbon-cutting at 4:30
p.m. at the new Cham-
ber and Citrus County
Chronicle Office and
then a 5 p.m. ribbon-
cutting and celebration
at the Fox Den Winery.
Feb. 26- Ribbon-
cutting for Krista A
Cleaning Lady, 4:30 p.m.,
Crystal River Chamber
Office
Feb. 28 Pre-event
party Berries, Brew and
BBQ, 6 to 10 p.m., Floral
City Library Complex,
8360 E. Orange Ave.,
Floral City, FL 34436
hosted by the Floral City
Merchants Association
and the presenting
sponsor is Insurance
Resources and Risk
Management, Inc.
March 1 and 2 27th
annual Floral City
Strawberry Festival
March 5 Ribbon-
cutting for O'Reilly Auto
Parts, 4:30 p.m., 1104
N.E. Fifth Street, Crystal
River, FL 34429
March 14 Chamber
Luncheon sponsored by
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church and School
at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Citrus
County Commissioner
John "JJ" Kenney will
provide an update on
the County and his
Chairman's agenda.
March 19 and 20 -
Legislative Days: Citrus
County is headed to
Tallahassee to talk with
state leaders about key
commerce issues with
keynote speaker, Her-
schel Vinyard, secretary
of the Department of
Environmental
Protection.


Member

news

SCORE hosting
fundraising
golf tourney
Citrus County SCORE is
a resource for small-
business counseling,
mentoring and educa-
tion. A major funding
source for this organiza-
tion is its annual golf
tournament, which will
be at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club in Ho-
mosassa on April 7.
This event will have a
luncheon at 11:30 a.m.
and a flighted scramble
format with 1 p.m. shot-
gun start. Tickets and
sponsorships are avail-
able at citruscounty.
score.org or by calling
Jim Green at 352-249-
1236.


Submit completed application and picture to:
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River, FL 34428

FIRSTAND LAST NAME


BIRTH DATE


AGE


PARENT NAME


LITTLE MISS
F STRAWBERRY PRINCESS


MISS STRAWBERRY
F- PRINCESS


PARENT EMAIL


FAVORITE BOOK


FAVORITE TELEVISION SHOW


HOBBY OR SPECIAL INTEREST


FAVORITE FOOD


SCHOOL


WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE WHEN YOU GROW UP?



PET? WHAT KIND?









Calling


all


princesses


D O YOU KNOW A YOUNG LADY WH-O IS A GREAT
ROLE MODEL FOR OTHERS AND AN AMBASSADOR
FOR CITRUS COUNTY? The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce is extending the dead-
line for applications for the 2014 Little Miss Strawberry
Princess (4 to 6 years old) and Miss Strawberry Princess
(7 to 12 years old) until Thursday, Feb. 27 at 4 p.m.

The only requirement is that participants must be resi-
dents of Citrus County and submit a completed applica-
tion and picture to one of the Chamber offices: 28 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River or 1o6 W. Main Street, Inverness,
or email it to jeff@citruscountychamber.com.

The two pageants are designed to bolster self-esteem
and encourage the children to discuss their interests,
such as books and hobbies.
The Pageant is Saturday, March 1. All participants will
receive a certification of participation.

Information:
Little Miss Strawberry Princess (ages 4-6) starts at 9 a.m.
Check-in with pageant officials by 8:30 a.m.
Miss Strawberry Princess (ages 7-12) starts at 10 a.m.
Check-in with pageant officials by 9:30 a.m.
WHERE: Floral Park 9530 S. Parkside Ave., Floral City, FL
34436
PARKING: Available at Citrus County Fairgrounds, 3600 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
Pageant Registration Fee: $5 (payable at the event)


Berries, Brew & BBQ

Pre-lvent Bash
The flaill tysrawberry mFetilhi


Presented by


Friday, February 28, 2014
6- 10 p.m.

Floral City.- Library Complex
8360 E. Orange Ave.
Floral City, FL 34436

Free Admission

Delicious food prepared by the
Citrus County Ag Alliance

Strawberries from Ferris Farms

Live Music

PD SMITH
MAGIC BUS
CRACKER COWBOYS

citruscountychamber.com


Firehouse VP shares success


story at Chamber luncheon


T he February Chamber luncheon
sponsored by the Florida Public
Relations Association (FPRA) Na-
ture Coast Chapter welcomed a spe-
cial guest speaker, Cecily Sorensen,
vice president of Firehouse Subs
corporate communications. She
shared the story of Firehouse Subs
and its humble beginnings with her
family building it into an ever-grow-
ing business with more than lO,OOO
employees and 350 franchises.
Her presentation covered their
public relations strategy of building
a story with elements of belief and
commitment, which has been the
secret to her success in gaining more
than 1.6 billion impressions in 2013.
FPRA Nature Coast invited
Sorensen to speak at the luncheon
because they knew her story of a
small family business would res-
onate well with members and small
businesses looking to enhance their


From left: Elizabeth Austin, Cecily
Sorensen, Katie Mehl and Josh Wooten.
public relations.
To learn more about this
presentation or about the FPRA
Nature Coast Chapter, visit
fpranaturecoast.wordpress.com or
facebook.com/FPRANatureCoast.
The group hosts a professional de-
velopment meeting the first Friday
of each month from September to
June at Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club, Garden Room in Hernando.


5
I


CrTRUS CoUnY


Precious Paws Rescue

Mall Adoption Center
1801 U.S. 19, Crystal River
preciouspawsflorida.com o-352-726-4700
Noon to 4p.m. Thursday to Sunday


Chamber ambassadors welcome George
Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Bill Hudson, Land
Title of Citrus County; Peter Retzko, Citrus County
Chronicle; Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Crystal Ashe,
Health Center at Brentwood; and Dennis Pfeiffer,
Orkin Pest Control welcome the volunteers of Precious
Paws Rescue and Mall Manager Millie Bresnahan.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014

Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


a-m- MR. 4., "










How to approach the partnering process


he Jan. 19 Nonprofit Briefs col-
umn presented an overview of
signs that emerge when it's time
for nonprofit leadership to consider
partnering. Part 2 is its continuation, fo-
cusing on the "how" of partnering with
another organization. Here are sug-
gested steps to consider when partner-
ing becomes a possibility.

Leaders must be willing
Willingness on the part of both the
boards of volunteers is essential. Ex-
ploratory discussions are central to be-
ginning the conversation. Few people
appreciate unwelcome surprises, so full
disclosure of everyone's expectations is
key to going forward. Honest dialogue
should discuss how partnering will af-
fect both organizations, as only one will
ultimately survive.

Searching for a partner
Searching for a suitable partner can
be a challenge. This is especially true


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD


NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


when multiple nonprofits in the commu-
nity have closely related roles. Ap-
proaching one or more potential
partners is a delicate process. Remem-
ber that volunteer leaders are most
often the founders of nonprofits. Organi-
zational founders discover a need left
unfulfilled and strive to solve the prob-
lem. They start from scratch, become
deeply involved in development, growth
and survival. During this process they
take ownership of the organization, so


relinquishing control is often difficult
for them. Over time their relationship to
the organization becomes personal.

Structuring the partnership
Finding a partner may take time and
careful analysis to ensure it is a good fit.
Structuring the partnership will require
careful discussions of the principal
leaders. Planning should include mod-
eling. Others groups may have discov-
ered changes that yield the best
outcome. A complete review of the mis-
sion, purpose, original documents such
as the IRS determination letter, bylaws,
nonprofit corporation status filing, etc.,
should be the next step. It's always pos-
sible a new IRS code category might
better serve the emerging organization.

Maintenance & management
Combining two organizations and
their volunteers requires interpersonal
and communication skills. Commit to
keeping the mission and purpose of


both organizations relevant and easily
transferable to the surviving organiza-
tion.
This allows all participants to per-
ceive the partnership as working well
together for the client base. It's all about
good management and maintenance.

Credit where credit is due
The power of partnership is filled
with the principals and practices that
create strategic relationships for non-
profits and other entities. The Non
Profit Resource Center hereby acknowl-
edges the work done by the Plexus Con-
sulting Group, LLC in cooperation of
ASAE and the United States Chamber of
Commerce in publishing this work.

Dr FrederickJ Herzog, PhD is
Founder and Executive Director of the
Non Profit Resource Center in Citrus
County Florida. He can be reached via
email: herzog@tampabay.rrcom or 847-
899-9000.


Detroit's bankruptcy follows decades of decay


Associated Press

DETROIT -The city of De-
troit, which for years paid its
bills with borrowed money, is
the largest city in U.S. history
under bankruptcy protection.
Here's a look at how the city
spiraled into financial ruin and
why it's in so much trouble:

WHAT HAPPENED?
For decades, Detroit paid its
bills by borrowing money while
struggling to provide the most
basic of services for its resi-
dents. The city, which was
about to default on a good
chunk of a long-term debt ex-
ceeding $18 billion, now is get-
ting a second chance in a
federal bankruptcy court-led
restructuring. Kevyn Orr, De-
troit's state-appointed emer-
gency manager, chose
bankruptcy over diverting
money from police, fire and
other services to make debt
payments. The move conserves
cash so the city can operate, but
it will hurt Detroit's image for
years. It will also leave credi-
tors with much less than they
are owed and places in jeop-
ardy the pension benefits of
thousands of city retirees.

WHY DID IT HAPPEN?
It took decades of decay to
bring down the once-mighty in-
dustrial giant that put the world
on wheels. The city grew to 1.8
million people in the 1950s, lur-
ing them with plentiful jobs


Associated Press
A young man walks in front of a row of abandoned houses in Detroit. Detroit has thousands of decrepit
and abandoned homes and buildings. The city's proposal to emerge from bankruptcy includes a plan to
demolish them.


that paid good wages to stamp
out automobiles for sale across
the globe. But like many Ameri-
can cities, Detroit's fall began
late that decade as developers
starting building suburbs. Then
came the 1967 riots that accel-
erated the number of white res-
idents who moved to the cities
north of Eight Mile Road, con-
sidered the region's racial di-
viding line. At the same time,
auto companies began opening
plants in other cities, and the
rise of autos imported from


Japan started to cut the size of
the U.S. auto industry Detroit's
property values fell, tax rev-
enue dropped, police couldn't
control a growing murder rate
and many middle-class blacks
fled the city for safer suburbs
with better schools. By 2009, the
auto industry collapsed along
with the economy as a whole,
eventually pulling the city
down with it. Government cor-
ruption under former Mayor
Kwame Kilpatrick only made
things worse. In the 2000


census, Detroit's population fell
under 1 million as the exodus
continued. Today, it's about
700,000.

DID THE INDUSTRY'S
FALL DRAG DOWN THE
CITY?
It's a big factor The city is lit-
tered with abandoned factories
built in the postwar boom
years, most of which have mul-
tiple stories. As the Japanese
auto invasion began cutting
into Detroit's sales, General


Motors, Chrysler, Ford and hun-
dreds of auto parts companies
looked outside the city to build
one-story plants that could han-
dle modem assembly lines.
With every downturn, more
companies abandoned the city,
leaving the hulking buildings to
squatters. Detroit's tax base
continued to erode. By the time
the auto industry melted down
in 2009, only a few factories
from GM and Chrysler were
left GM is the only one with
headquarters in Detroit, though
it has huge research and testing
centers with thousands of jobs
outside the city.

WHERE ELSE HAS THIS
HAPPENED?
Before Detroit, the largest
local government bankruptcy
filing was in Jefferson County,
Ala., in November 2011. The
county cited more than $4 bil-
lion in debt, mostly from cor-
rupt deals involving sewer
financing that fell apart when
the home mortgage crisis hit in
2008. A federal judge in Novem-
ber approved a plan calling for
creditors to reduce the county's
roughly $3 billion debt from
sewer construction by about
half and for the county to issue
nearly $1.8 billion in new debt
while raising sewer rates annu-
ally The city has officially
emerged from bankruptcy Jef-
ferson County has nearly
700,000 people, which is similar
in size to Detroit, and includes
the city of Birmingham.


D4 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35)56-56 0TolFre:(88 8*230@ ma*:cas0fes hrn 0loni 0 .mIwesie0w w honc 0olie 0o


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dpt for details
P3T2-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BUICK
2002 LeSabre
38,000 mi, Exc Cond,
$6900
(352) 527-9509


Airport Transport
352-746-7595
Household Furniture
Like New, Din. Rm Set
2 bar stools, kitchen
nook dining set, chest
of drawers, bed side
tables., Makita Miter
Saw, Haywood navi-
gator pool cleaner,
Thorens belk drive turn
table, 126MKII and
various golf clubs.
352-212-0160
81 Woodfield Cir.
Homosassa
LOST CAT
Seal Point Siamese
151bs, lost in Pine
Ridge, needs
mediction, REWARD
PIs call (352) 527-1408
or 352- 400-1924
Macaw- Female
$2500; Quarter horse,
National Champion,
takes intermediate
rider $2500
352-860-2457
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $775. mo
+ util and security dep.
(352) 382-8935
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Amana Dishwasher
exc. cond. You pick up
352-637-2911
FREE WOOD
cut oak wood
352-637-2499


















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966



w-whronieeonlineorm


I Happy Not


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Deptfor details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH l5ct@ $5.001b,
0, Grouper @ $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001











Tell that special
person
",Happy Birthday
I"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only_'$28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


COLLIE MIX
(352) 293-7642
Free wood, uncut
or split, you cut and
haul away
(352) 860-1250
Iv msg w/number
Malti-poo
male, 5yrs old.
Free to go home.
No young children.
352-249-7451
Panasonic 32" TV
Works fine, 30" wide,
27' high
269-932-5150



Gold wedding band.
Lost 2/18/14. Possibly in
Homosassa Wal-Mart.
Reward.563-1265
Hearing Aid
in Inverness at Olive
Garden Restaurant
Reward
(352) 628-7159
LOST CAT
Large, black,
Burr Terrace, Anna Jo
area of Inverness
Highlands
Call (352) 726-4270
Lost Female Spayed
Gray Cat,
with orange & pink
10 yrs. old. short
haired 10 lbs. Lost in
Crystal Glen/Lecanto
(352) 746-0733
LOST KITTY
femaleCalico Manx
missing in the Burr Ter-
race, Anna Jo area of
Inverness Highlands
pls call (352) 726-4270
Lost male Siamese cat
with tan body and dark
brown face, legs and
tail, blue eyes in the vi-
cinity of Whispering
Pines Park on Forest
Dr. Please call
422-4038 with info
Lost, female black cat in
Lucille St Beverly Hills
area. Answers to Skit-
ties. She is a little leery
of Men, trusts women.
Reward: 352-364-2416
Man's gold ring
with 5 diamonds.
Lost on Fern St & Ala-
bama or at the TLC
building off of Rt 19
Reward
(352) 628-1723
Pit, Boxer, Mastive,
Shepard Mix. Med size
Brown & White. 7 mo.
old. Lost on 2/13 Inde-
pendance area of
Inverness. 3 kids and
parents really want
her home
352-422-5221
Tan and White Cat
with collar. Lost on
Plantation Lane off Ft
Island Tr. 2/18. Call
Lou (352) 794-3534




8U Sumter Shock
Baseball
is currently seeking
2 talented 8 yr olds
who would like to
join our state cham-
pionship winning
travel baseball
team. We are
based out of Sumter
county. We prac-
tice 2 times a week
and play 2 tourna-
ments a month.
If you are interested
in scheduling
a tryout Call
Wes Jennings
352-303-1190


* Medical Office

Clerical

Computer
experience a must!
email resume
to: ifamilypractice
@gmail.com.

Are YOU
a professional,
joyful, caring,
experienced
Medical
Receptionist or
Medical Assistant
Looking to work at
a successful
Physician's office?
Then send YOUR
Resume To:
resumek@
rocketmail.com

CASE MANAGER

Primary Care
Physician
Accountable Care
Organization (ACO)
seeking qualified
Care Manager.
Current Florida RN
Lic. along with 3 plus
years experience in
hospital setting or
post acute care
setting. Manage
Care experience
and Case Mgr certi-
fication preferred.
Please Fax
Resume to:
Nature Coast ACO
Aftn Patty King
352-746-3838

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo com

HIRING: PT/A,
OT/A, RN/LPN

Florida Homecare
Specialists
(352) 794-6097

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience req'd
for very busy
medical office.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

MEDICAL ASST

Needed for busy
family practice Med-
ical Office in Citrus
County. Please Fax
Resume
352-746-3838




.NET Developer

With C # and NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
components and
features for our
Industrial SCADA
and HMI software
products.
Other desirable
experience -
Web Services,
ASP.NET, HTML5,
Javascript, XMLSVG
Other domain
expertise -
SCADA, HMI, MES
EAM OR CMMS

3 yrs exp. preferred.

Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
kokeefe@
b-scada.com


EOE H FE ORKPA









BEEFT PACA-



0.GO


Community
Center
Supervisor
Announcement
# 14-19

Supervises commu-
nity center staff
including selecting,
training, scheduling
and evaluating
work, counseling,
disciplining and
terminating or rec-
ommending termi-
nation. Requires
Bachelor's degree
or education and
training equivalent
to four years of
college education
in leisure services,
recreation, market-
ing or a closely
related field. Must
be able to lift 50 lbs.
Must have prior
event coordinator
experience. Re-
quires at least two
years experience in
a related field. Start-
ing pay $1,292 B/W.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.

Experienced
Closing Agent

Busy Title Company
in Citrus County.
Fax Resume:
888-713-3272

Litigation
Asst/Paralegal

5 yr litigation exp.
mandatory Salary
negotiable/Benefits
avail. Fax resume:
352-726-3180

Sports/Event
Coordinator
Announcement
#14-23

Plans, coordinates
and directs a com-
prehensive sports
program for all age
groups on a year
round basis. Two
years' experience in
Tournament/Event
planning or specific
job related experi-
ence comparable
to minimum require-
ments. Must be
available to work
weekends Starting
pay $1,292.98 B/W.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.





PLANTATION
on Crystal River
is currently offering
opportunities for jobs
in the hospitality field

I Front Desk Clerk
I*Restaurant
Server

Bartender
Competitive benefits
in a professional
atmosphere.
Please apply
in person at the
Plantation on Crystal
River Human
Resources office.
or call "Job Hotline"
@ 352-7954211
ext. 490 DFWP
EOE M/F DNAA


Cooks/Kitchen
and Servers

Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues

Royal Oaks
Country Club
Restaurant
Attention positive,
hardworking,
self-starters looking
for a stable
environment.:
Positions available
immediately so apply
today!

FT Cooks
1+ yrs exp.
Break/lunch & some
evenings
PT Dishwasher
working Tues,
Thurs & alternate
Sundays
PT Server
AM/PM & Week-
ends

Come apply to join
our team
at Oak Run
Human Resources
SR200 & 11Oth
Street, Ocala, FL or
call 352.854.6557
EEO/DFWP





SALES POSITION

AVAILABLE
If you are looking for
a career, not just a
job with long term
employment, we
offer many benefits.
Insurance, 401 K,
paid vacations.
Draw salary vs.
commission. Perfor-
mance bonuses
paid quarterly.
We are a Drug Free
work place
ApplV in Person
1825 Hwy41 N.
Ask for Mr. Green
(352) 726-4009




CDL-A Team
Owner
Operators:

$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946 NFI
Industries
ntioartners.com

Exp. Laborer
& Plasterer

need valid DL,
Top pay for quality
applicants.
call 352-232-9524
Scott Wright Stucco


Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
ww~elnet

Survey Party
Chief
Announcement
# 14-24

This position serves
as Survey Crew
Party Chief, per-
forming topo-
graphic, hydro-
graphic, boundary,
route, geodetic sur-
veys and County/
Civil engineering
projects Performs
additional field and
office survey related
tasks as necessary.
Minimum of eight
years experience in
field of Survey Party
Chief preferred.
Starting pay $16.16
hourly. Excellent
benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at
www.bcc.cihrus.flus You
can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

Painters Wanted

must be able to
spray, work w/o
supervision & have
own transportation.
Call 352-266-4320
and leave a msg.-


ROOFING CREW
experienced only

Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
A ClvInPrson
AAROING

Crystal River
(352) 563-0411





Asphalt
Distributor
Truck Operator
Needed

CDL class B required.
Full time position w/
benefits. Drug
screening and Back-
ground conducted.
Send resume to:
jobs@paveritefloridacom
or apply at
Pave-Rite, Inc.,
3411 W Crigger Ct.
Lecanto.

Assessment
Agent
Announcement
#14-22

This position facili-
tates County land
acquisition of real
property associated
with Capital
Improvement Proj-
ects. Requires at
least one year real
estate experience
and/or at least two
years experience in
a related field.
THIS POSITION
REQUIRES AN
INACTIVE FLORIDA
REAL ESTATE LICENSE
AND/OR A FLORIDA
TITLE AGENT LICENSE.
Starting pay
$13.46 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.


Billing Specialist
Announcement
#14-21

Provides customer
service coverage
during normal busi-
ness hours to answer
questions regarding
utility accounts.
Requires at least
one year of related
work experience.
Starting pay $13.46
hourly. Excellent
benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.

COMO RV Hiring
Housekeeper/
RV Detailer
Inauire within
1601 W. Main Street
Inverness 344-1411

Exp Tire Changer
Must have valid
drivers. Lc. $10. hr.
(352) 628-3554

Meter Specialist
Announcement
#14-17

Performs routine
meter reading
audits. Requires at
least six months of
job related experi-
ence. Starting pay
$11.88 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.



Your World


HomeomFinder

www.ch roniclehomef inder.com


FYour tresu,


Search Hundreds of Local Listings


www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Gasroots Lawn

FT/PT LABORER
Exp. & Drl. lc a must.
352-795-2287


Part-Time Gate
Security
Coordinators

Neat, energetic and
outgoing persons with
good people and
telephone skills for
part-time work at the
main entrance of
Citrus Hills. You will
greet, identify and log
all visitors. Preferred
experience: customer
service, military
service or law
enforcement. Good
vision, able to stand
for prolonged periods
of time. Starting pay
is $7.93 per hour.
Must be available for
any of the three (3)
shifts of 24/7 operation
or extra daytime
coverage as needed.
Apply in person @
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL.









Seeking Two
29-hr production
collators
Work Tuesday
-Saturday Night
hours include shift
between 6pm-2am
as needed to reach
29-hour per week.
Work in our packag-
ing department
loading inserts into
the machine to pre-
pare final package
ready for delivery.
Must stand up to
6-8 hours during shift
and must be able
to push, pull, lift,
up to 70 lbs.
Reliable, strong
work ethic a must.
Will train. Join a
hardworking,
critical team in or
organization.

ADDLV in Person
to fill out application
at the Chronicle
1624 North
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River. EOE,

final applicant
required to take a
drug screen prior to
hire day.


TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only
Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
(352) 628-0254


CLASSIFIEDS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2 3, 2 014 D




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


#1for

everyone
r sales event

SAVE UP TO '4,000 _____
ON ALL 2014 -
CAMBY'S wj

-OR--OR-
LEASE$ PER MO. AP)
FORE189 36 MONTHS FOR
$2,399 DOWN 60 MO


PM


MINIMUM DISCOUNT OF 12,000
ON THE NEW
2014 PRIUS
OR LEASE FOR OR
S2 4 $2,399 DOWN O FOR 48 MOS.


MINIMUM DISCOUNT OF 12,000
ON THE NEW
2014 RAV4
OR LEASE FOR OR
239MO.36 MONTHS
232399 DOWN 0 O 6 MOS.


MINIMUM DISCOUNT OF 12500
___ ..ON THE ALL NEW REDESIGNED
.2014 TUNDRAS


-OR-
LEASE$
FOR


PER MO.
36 MONTHS
$2,399 DOWN


-OR-


APR
FOR
36 MOS.


r www l I APE9 rA &,mI


866361,1137
Sales- Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm 9 Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm *Sun 1lam-4pm 9 Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm *Sat 8am-4pm


241S Snos Bv. *ssa F 44
2014 Camry: Tier 1-2 Specidal Money Factor = 00021; Tier IllI-V SpecidaI Available, See Bulletin Example: '14 MY "2546" Offer $189 month, $2,399 Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months Through SETFrOnly" 2014 Prius: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor =.00178; Tier IllI-V Special
Available, See Bulletin Example: '14MY "1223" Offer- $249 month, $2,399 Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months -Through SETF Only 2014 RAV4: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor =.00193 Tier IllI-V Special Available, See Bulletin Example: '14MY' "4440" Offer- $239 month, $2,699
Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months -Through SETFrOnly'. 2014 Tundra: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor= .00190; Tier Ill-IV Special Available, See Bulletin Example: '14MY' "8240" Offer- $329 month, $2,999 Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months -Through SETFrOnly-.


I


D6 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014





CiTus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EVENT


DOWN


PAYMENT


DUE AT


SIGNING


1sTMONTH'S


PAYMENT


Learn Why Ford Is America's Favorite Brand
See Dealer For Complete Details. _


. masN


2014 FOCUS
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $0 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.
N


2014 FUSION
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $9 Due at Signing $01 st Months Payment
Security deposit waived.Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 ESCAPE
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
$9 Down Payment $9 Due at Signing $9 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 FIESTA
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
$9 Down Payment $9 Due at Signing $9 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.

I k%1daIYLVk


2014 EDGE 2014 EXPLORER
$329 mo. $339 mo.

36 Month Lease 36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $01st Months Payment $0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $01st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees. Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2010 FORD 2009 FORD EXPLORER 2013 FORD 2011 FORD 2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
EDGE AWD SEL XLT SPORT TRAC FUSION SE EDGE LIMITED 1500 4X4 CREW CAB
ONLY 34K MILES. NP5915 HARD T $ FIND. NP5929 ONLY 6K MILES. N3C235A ONLY 20K MILES. N3T531A 4 WHEEL FUN. N3T198A
SALE PRICE $23,500 SALE PRIC900 SALE PRICE $24,900 SALE PRICE $25,400 SALE PRICE $26,900


FORD CREDIT


SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT


BLUE OVAL CERTIFIED


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00
GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
1 -1 231
www.nicknicholasford.com oBrad Hill
www~ickncholsfor~com Salesperson of the Month


**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 03/31/14.


THE


(AND


Inglis Dunnellon
Beverly Hills
If486W1
Crystal
River 4nverness

Homosass _14, Nick Nicholas
a Springs Hwy. 98

Spring Hwy. 50
Hill 1_Brooksville


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


04-7 -,t 41
0 4Ni ,




















IIII I I II


I II





O O CRYSTAL A
AN_ M C H ENVORP0YLENTS





800-584-8755 EXT10 CRYSTALAUTOSCOM
1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:3Oam-8:OOpm, Saturday 9:OOamu-7:3Opmi Sunday-Closed


Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:3Opm 'Tuesday & Thursday :3Oan-7:OOpn Saturday 8:OOam-4:OOpn Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm n Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*No payments until 2015 offer applies to vehicles in stock as of 21/14 or before and for qualified buyers financed with specified bank at 3.99% for 72 months. Dealer retains all factory rebates and
incentives. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer and pre-sales are excluded.


D8 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRUCK DRIVER

OTR, class A, 1Oyrs
exp. You need clean
mvr, good appear-
ance and people
skills. We offer weekly
dedicated run to NY.
Home 2 days/wk.
Base $800/wk+
call 352-212-3770






Transit Driver
Part Time, 5 positions
Announcement
# 14-18

This classification is
required to operate
a Citrus County Bus
or Van. Able to load
and unload, secure
wheelchair; assist
with infant, elderly,
frail and disabled
passengers while
boarding and
parting vehicles.
Performs driver sup-
port to include dis-
patching, respond-
ing to incidents and
troubleshooting.
Positions will rotate
driving and driver
support. Starting
pay $11.09 hourly.
Monday and Satur-
day, 12:30 PM 7:00
PM, 12-15 hours
weekly.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 28,
2014 EOE/ADA.






AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com


Carol's



Airport Transport
352-746-7595




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR 461-4518




All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialize in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770



Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/ Ref. 352-875-9793


Heating And Air
Conditioning
Technician
Training!
Fast Track. Hands
On National
Certification Pro-

gram. Lifetime Job
Placement. VA
Benefits Eligible!
1-877-994-9904



MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547








BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu





SPRINGHILL
CAMPUS

Cosmetoloav
March 17th
Day & Night School
w Barber
April 28th
Night School
w Massage Ther.
April128th
Day School
w- Massage Ther.
April128th
Night School
w-NAIL TECH
or FACIAL TECH
Day School
Open Enrollment
INTRODUCING *
NEW Niaht School
MARCH 17th
Classes for Nail Tech
or Facial Tech
Mon., Tues., Wed.
5:00 PM-9:00 PM
(727) 848-8415
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
Full & Part time
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Take Care of Loved
Ones in My Home
Clean, caring, exp.,
exc. ref. 352-476-7159
Will Provide: Rides,
Cleaning, Shopping
Inverness/Floral City
$10 hr. (352) 613-3114




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAUILING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lidins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida 'Stamped"
engineered drawings
+All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor


qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!




Classifieds


A- I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
-4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


6x10 shed $550
4x7 shed $100
Crystal River Area
352-613-8453
WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**



DOME TOP STEAMER
TRUNK. Excellent con-
dition in/out. 20"H x
30"W x 18"D. $100.
527-1239



LLADRO Unexpected
Visit. Piece retired in
2004. Beautiful, no
flaws. In original box.
Will text picture if inter-
ested. $200 OBO. Tom
352-586-3380
Miniature Shoes, Tea
Sets, & Thimbles. All in
oria. boxes. For Gifts or
Collectibles 50-70% disc
Call (352) 746-1821



Your World


pv!w49ea


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DISHWASHER black
Kenmore.Top of the line
model $50
(352)795-7813
High end appliance
set,5 burner glass top
stove, 5 cycle
dishwasher,side by side
refrigerator ice/water in
door.All almond great
shape. $750 for all. call
Linda 352-564-1231
Kemore Washer &
Dryer, limited edition,
digital, $225. for both,
good cond. pls call
352-201-7048
Kitchen Appliance Set
GE, Almond, S-by-S
Refrig w/ ice/water
Range glass top, and
Diswasher. May Divide
$1,100; 352-601-3728


*ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST. *100% Guar.
seAFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST -100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
eV RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST.- 100% Guar.
seAFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
0, Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081





Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Coin (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447




Need your house
cleaned! Call Maggie.
Need your home re-
paired! Call Chris.
Married Team! Res &
Com. Lic.352-503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


CLASSIFIEDS



ELECTRIC DRYER
white Gibson.
Cleanworks great $75
(352)795-7813
REFRIGERATOR
bisque Kenmore 20 cu.
ft. top freezer.Clean.
$99(352)795-7813
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE, 20"
electric, white
clean, works good.
$125. Homosassa
(678) 617-5560 or
352-628-3258
UPRIGHT FREEZER
AMAMA
GOOD COND
WHITE $100
352-601-3728
Washer & Dryer
GE, Front load, on
pedestals, Cranberry,
good cond $650
352-601-3728
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398



COMPUTER DESK
Large desk w/shelving &
keyboard tray, corner
unit, can email photos,
$35. 352-795-8800
DESK OFFICE CHAIRS
THREE SWIVEL
CHAIRS @ $30 EACH
(352) 527-8993



Air Compressor/
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, 125 PSI
$325
(202) 425-4422 cell
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80 METAL
HAND HELD INVER-
NESS 419-5981
Table Saw, Drill Press,
Chop Saw, Vice, all
mounted on work
bench w/wheels
$150. for all
(352) 527-7919




DISH TV Retailer.
Starting $19.99/
month (for 12 mos.)
Broadband Internet
starting $14.95/
month (where avail-
able.) Ask About
SAME DAY
Installation!
CALL Now!
1-800-980-6193


Kat's Kr tter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavating &
Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 D9


BOSE
Soundlink Bluetooth
Mobile Speaker II
with power supply &
aux cable. Pd $300,
asking $250
(352) 746-7790 LM
GE VCR WITH MAN-
UAL & REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
HOLIDAY CLASSIC
CD'S Top Artists 25 for
$50 Call 726-0040




CEILING FANS WHITE
-3-52", 142" $20
EACH (352) 527-8993
TOILETS 1-powder blue
,1-tan 50.00 ca.
352 726-4135
WINDOW BLINDS 2 -
72"X54"; 3- 48" X 72" -
$15 EACH
(352) 527-8993




Acer Computer
Monitor, 19" model
S201, $50. Printer
Apollo, P2200
$10. (352) 795-9040
COPY MACHINE
CANON IMAGE CLASS
D320 $100
(352) 527-8993
FAX MACHINE SHARP
UX510 EXCELLENT
COND. $45
(352) 527-8993




LANAI 9 pc set
glass table 66 x40,
6 chrs, 2 footstools, sm
round glass coffee ta-
ble. Like New $400 obo
352- 422-2317 Cl John
Round Patio Table,
120" round with 4
chairs, good condition
$100. (352) 795-7254
Wrought Iron Bar with
5 Stool Patio Set
good condition
$100. obo
(352) 270-0763




3 New Bar Stools
with arm rest
& foot rest,
good quality
$120
(352) 795-2975
Antique Rocker,
round table & desk.DR
table, 4 chrs, 2 leafs;
dresser, overstuffed
chr, kit storage unit, &
paintings. $400 takes
it all. (352) 419-5635


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V' ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Absolute Exterior
Restoration Any
Surface roof & gutter
cleaning, int/ext painting
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Li. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


base, cherry wood,
4 leather chairs
org. cost $1,600.
Asking $800. (352)
465-5541, 464-1000
Ashley loveseat dark
sage green $100.
352-341-1086
BAR AND 3 STOOLS
Solid oak bourbon
barrel bar set
@1960's. Excellent
quality. NO particle
board.Can email pics.
$600.Pine Ridge/BH
352-270-3909
BEDROOM SET -
Mahogany, 4 poster
Full Size, w/ night
stand, dresser, mirror.
Mattress rarely used.
$400 352-346-0153
BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in Original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
Bunk Bed & Futon
Combination
heavy duty metal
construction,
excel. cond. $250.
(352) 249-7796
COFFEE TABLE round
black glass coffee table
$100. 352 795 9664
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
352-795-0121
COUCH
Beautiful, almost new,
soft, light green plush
3 cushions. No smking,
kids, pets or hubands
$150 352-341-1665


LISTINGS
COUCH Ethen Allen 72"
subtle tones of green
mauve sm print. Nor-
walk cream w/large plaid
soft colors.excellent
condition.$500
3523414586
DINING ROOM SET
Table with 6 chairs,
walnut, 4 glass inserts
in table $200
(352) 897-5278
Dresser & Night Stand
Antique, Pine, $100
obo, China Cabinet,
Glass doors, w/ cabinets
$75 obo (352) 226-3883
Household Furniture
LiKe New, Din. Rm Set
2 bar stools, kitchen
nook dining set, chest
of drawers, bed side
tables., Makita Miter
Saw, Haywood navi-
gator pool cleaner,
thorens belk drive turn
table, 126MKII and
various golf clubs.
352-212-0160
81 Woodfield Cir.
Homosassa


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE /lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


King Mattress
& 2 twin boxsprings
for King $175. obo
kids bedroom set,
3 pc. set $200. ob
(352) 226-3883
KING SIZE BED King
w/headboard excel
condition. $325
352-628-3418
Kitchen Set w/ 4 Chairs
on casters & three
matching barstools
upholstered, 32" high
with armrests and
backs, $450.00
352-382-3933
Lazy Boy Sofa, beige
tone, dual recliners,
$300. 2 Lazy Boy
Swivel Rocker Chairs,
$300. for both,
obo 352-382-2836
Lighted China Cabinet
approx 6.5' tall,
two compartment
drawers, light wood,
exc. cond. $250.
(352) 465-0339
Queen Sofa Bed
Very Good Condition
Flower Print
$150
(352) 637-2117
SLEEPER SOFA, $150.
Sleeper loveseat, $75
Good cond., Smoke
free environment
(352) 344-9391
Sofa, Love seat, Cof
fee table, matching
recliner, printed mate-
rial w/ some wicker
$600 obo excel. cond.
(352) 341-4406
SOLID OAK COM-
PUTER DESK no
hutch-top $65.00
5271399
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
Two End Tables
One Cocktail Table
Solid Oak, sold as set
for $300. obo
(352) 382-2836



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
COMPOSTER AND
RAIN BARREL compost
barrel and plastic rain
barrel both for $100.
352 795 9664
John Deere
Riding Mower
17.5 HP Kawaski
Motor, 42" deck. $500
(352) 746-7357
WEEDEATER
Bolens-BL150, 17"new
line/filter gatorblades,
runs great needs worm
gear,$20 352-212-1596





ho:, ^


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
352-201-7313


BLUEBERRY PLANTS
Mature Rabbiteye blue-
berry bushes (Blue
Gems and Woodards)
We'll dig them up and
put them in your truck
$10.00 per bush. 352
726-7907




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun 8am-3pm.
8758 W OrangeTree St



DRESS perfect for
prom, large, red &
black, spaghetti-strap
back, new, ($40)
352 -613-7493
HIGH-HEEL SHOES
perfect for prom,
6" paprika with studs,
size 8, new, ($20)
352 -613 -7493



..225/65 R17....
Great tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!! (352)
857-9232
2 LG BEVERAGE DIS-
PENSERS Clear with
spout. Like new. $12 ea
or 2/$20. Call Penny
10am-9pm 527-2598.
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALLPAPER
$25 PREPASTED VI-
NYL 165 SQ FT E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
4 WOOD BOXES $20
GOOD FOR
WORKSHOP/GARAGE
2 DIFFERENT SIZES
INVERNESS 419-5981
6 FT CHRISTMAS
TREE Green, exc. cond.
Can be taken apart to
store. Call Penny
10am-9pm $15.
23 WOOD FORMS $25
UNFINISHED
HEARTS/BUNNIES/TEDDY
BEARS TO PAINT
ARTS/CRAFT 419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BEACH CRUISER
BIKES 1 red with alumi-
num frame 1 blue with
steel frame EXCEL-
LENT condition! Paid
over $300 each. asking
$250 for both or $150
each 727-207-1447


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Instal&Re it Now's the
tiinus. time for pool
Heates remodeling
ig Sal Systems Pool Refnshing

Construction
Pavers
S a Leak Detection
Suarnill Pool1Tile & Repair
POOServii All O Citrus COUI
Poell SUB soFree Consultation

S tCPO nt382-4421
p a w Slate eriifdPol ontratorLk#1458326


WATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
" 7DrivewaysT
" Parking Lots

" Seal Coating
" Maintenance
" Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@grnail.corn
Licensed and Insured Lic. #Sp13889


GRENERAC
Stand Alone-
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Reside ntial/Com merc ialI Service

SGenerac -Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill






Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
f All Home Repairs
9 Small Carpentry
9 Fencing
9 Screening
9 Clean Dryer Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic#37761


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only'69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $3 5
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

f..., CUAN hc
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091


DETECTION
Licensed


Electronic
Leak
Detection
for all pools
and spas
We'll nd you leak
or there s
no charge!


352-433-6070

30 day guarantee on all work R
BayLeakDetective@gmail.com


"Hasta La Bye Bye."




Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured



KNOCK OUT


CLEANING SERVICE

RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RNLS& CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.

Pressure
Washing Too

352,942,8434
Call Today for a
Clean Tomorrow


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators :Lighting -Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
352-364-4610
MR.

'VELECTPIC*
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated
Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a fDay.-7Days a Week







Ted's Painting









All TYpes o fHome Repairs

746-5190
LiC/INS Lic #240270


I POOLS AND PAVERS
NMI III A 1: 111:1111 H A I I M III







D10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014

Genea Gen

Hood $35.00 POT/LID exc. cond. 10"
Double bowl composite hi X 25" circumference.
sink $35.00 $20. Call Penny
(717) 994-2362 527-2598 10am-9pm.
Chain Link Fence, TENT HEATER small
6 ft high, 176 feet, propane, American
complete setup camper, works great,
Asking $600. ($5) 352-212-1596
(352) 341-6213 WEST BEND BREAD
CHICAGO RECIPRO- MAKER Clean, exc.
CATING SAW- new in cond. $40 Call Penny
box, 6 AMP, rotating 10am-9pm 527-2598.
handle, #65570, $30,
628-0033 Medical
COMMODE WITH
ARMS Clean, like new,
height adjustable. $25. 4 INCH TOILET SEAT
Call Penny 110am-gpm RISER IT MAKES IT
527-2598 p EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
Complete Set of 352464-0316
China, 50 yrs. old,
Crown Victoria, white 4 PRONGED CANE
w/gold trim $100. DON'T WAIT TO FALL
(352) 465-4474 or AND NEED IT LATER
(517) 282-6:404 ONLY 25.00
352 464 0316
COMPUTER GAMES
6 muti-packs, 1 with BEDSIDE COMMODE
500,000 games, great &ALUMINUM WALKER
shape, ($15) both have adjustable
352613-7493 legs only 20.00 each
352464-0316
CRAFTERS 16
Crewel/Embroidery kits. **** **,*
$75. Will sell separately. CELEBRITY SCOOTER
Call 527-2598 Penny AND HARMAR LIFT
lOam-9pm. Both in good working
CRAFTERS Lg box of condition. $850. Call
var size stretcher strips 270-2319 before 8 PM
for painting, crewel, em- CHILD'S MANUAL
broidery. $15 obo WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
527-2598 10am-9pm. SHAPE, YELLOW W/
CRAFTERS Plastic FOOT RESTS. ONLY
Canvas-10 colored,16 $85 352-464-0316
clear fine mesh,60 clear Foot Massage
sheets & bag of var. Homedics, deep
sizes/shapes.$40 kneading heat $25.
527-2598 10am-9pm (352) 795-9040
CURIO CABINET, FOUR WHEELED
6' high, 18 1/2" wide, I" WALKER WITH SEAT.
deep, lighted, dark Excellent condition.
wood, 4 shelves, $75, Storage under seat.
(352) 465-1813 $70. 527-1239
DENON STEREO INVACARE POWER
RECEIVER AM/FM WHEELCHAIR Pronto
PRECISION AUDIO M14 "SureStep" Perfect
RECEIVER. FIRST shape $950
100.00. 464-0316 352-8974154
DESK SOLID DARK RECUMBENT EXER-
WOOD w/ Hutch Excel. CISE STATIONARY
Used Cond. 7 drawers. BIKE ALL ELECTRON-
Org. $1,300. ICS ONLY 100.00
Selling for $245.00 352464 -0316
352-249-7212 SHOWER BENCH
EASEL Small, SEAT ALUMINUM &
light-weight, wooden. FIBERGLASS BENCH
Good for on-site artistry. TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
$25 Call Penny 352464-0316
10am-9pm 527-2598. THREE WHEELED
ELECTRIC RIVAL WALKER LARGE
YOGURT/ICE CREAM WHEELS
MAKER clean, exc. ONLY 50.00
cond. $15. Call Penny 464-0316
527-2598 10am-9pm.
EMTEK INTERIOR musical
DOOR HANDLES
Imported-Oil-Rubbed
Bronze $20 Call Epiphone EP-800
726-0040 guitar amp $25.
EZ-UP CANOPY 3524194464
10 x 10 with remova- Kenmore Refrigerator
ble awning, sides, & Elite Side by Side
weights, $100 25.6 cu it, 2 comput-
(352) 344-4105 ers, auto defrost
HARLEY STOCK w/side mounted
EXHAUST PIPES freezer, thru-door
NEW FITS 1350-1450 ice/water $500.
SLIDE ON ONLY $75 (352) 465-0339
352-464-0316 LOWREY ORGAN
HARMAN KARDEN MX-2, With all the
DIGITAL SYNTHE- bells and whistles.
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM Exc Cond, w/ bench
RECEIVER FIRST $1400; 352-601-3728
100.00 464-0316 PIANO
Karcher Lowery piano with
Pressure Washer bench. Good Cond.
6 hp, 2300 psi, $150. $350
Queen Sofa Couch (352) 637-2117
multi color, like new
$150. obo
(352) 270-0269
Kerosene Lamps DISHES service for
set of 10, $100. 12w/addit.pcs. Serv
(352) 795-7254 bowl, platter, butter dish.
Large Shed, with PfaltzgrafAmalfi $100
windows & skylight 5134614
w/ portible air cond.
$850. obo, Pd. $2,000 Liberation by
Leave Message American Standard
(352) 637-6310 Walk-In Bath -
OTTLIGHT Floor Lamp. Dont Struggle
18 waft bulb. Grey. Getting Out Of A
Le $ Normal Bathtub.
Like New. $50.00 Stay in your home
(352) 628 3585 longer, safely,
PENN SPINNING independently.
ROD & REEL- Captiva Liberation Walk-In
CV4000 Reel, Penn Baths Commended
Slammer 7' Rod, Ex., by the Arthritis
$65. 628-0033 Foundation. Best
ROCKING DOLL Lifetime Warranty
CRADLE $60 SOLID in the industry.
OAK HANDCRAFTED Hydrotherapy,
E-MAIL PHOTO INVER- Chromatherapy,
NESS 419-5981 Aromatherapy no
SHUFFLEBOARD extra cost. Installa-
Table game, 2ftxgft, ma tion Included! Get
hogany wood, ex.cond. $1,000 Off Call
TONS OF FUN $150 Toll-Free Today
613-5240 1 1-866-583-1432.


PAMPERED CHEF
Vegetable Chopper &
Measuring Cup $25
Call 726-0040




BOWFLEX
TREADCLIMBER
Combo treadmill, ellipti-
cal, & stepper all in one
machine. Originally cost
$2000, selling for $500.
Must pick up.
Homosassa area. Call
352 382 7827 and leave
message
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
Recumbant Excercise
Bike. Edge 280,
like new. $150.
(352) 465-7269




CLUB CAR
New batteries, drop
curtains, charger
$1700 obo
(352) 489-1865
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ GO Golf Cart
Lifted, rear seat, large
tires and more, like
new $3200
(352) 697-7854
(352) 564-2756
KAYAK DIMENSION 9'
SIT INSIDE $100
(352) 527-8993
Mens Bike
$60.00
352 447 4380
after 10am
Women's Bike
$60.00
352 447 4380
after 10am


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Deptfor details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


BARRY,
a sweet, loving,
calm gentle boy,
sits, takes treats
gently, & will
speak for treats.
He should do well
with kids too. Is an
approximately 5-y.o.
pit bull mix.

Call Laci @
352-212-8936.


BENNY
Benny is a 4-y.o.
bulldog mix, Very
friendly & affection-
ate and loving.
Loves kids & gets
along w/some other
dogs. Loves to
chase the tennis
ball & go for car
rides. He appears to
be housebroken.
Call Laci @
352-212-8936.

CHAWEENIES
Health Cert, 1st set
of shots, 1 mo flea
control $350 ea
(352) 613-9736
Dachshund Mini Long
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. $300.
(352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell
LABRADOODLE PUP-
PIES 3 adorable males,
1 black, 2 apricot, par-
ents on premises, vet
checked, health certifi-
cates. Ready for new
homes! $500
352410-0080
Macaw- Female
$2500; Quarter horse,
National Champion,
takes intermediate
rider $2500
352-860-2457
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


SKINNEY
Skinney, an Ameri-
can pit bull terrier, a
great favorite
among the shelter
volunteers. Bears
the scars of a previ-
ous hard life, but is
looking for a new
wonderful life with a
loving family. Rides
well in a car, takes
treats gently, loves
to play with toys.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


Classifieds




2 Pot Belly Pigs
$50 each
Stallion pony, semi-
broke, $300
(352) 634-4237
ask for Mike




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510"


I Pets -1


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONiCLE


CLASSIFIEDS



All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50;
Elec backing plates
set:12" $90; 10" $80
Call 352-464-2770
ALUMINUM BOAT
10' Long, Good Cond.
Easy to load. Light
weight. + trolling mtr.
$300. (678) 617-5560
Boston Whaler
1979, 13', w/motor &
trailer, in good condition
$2500. (352) 302-5875
GENERATOR
Honda, Black Max
8125, 6500 wafts,
low hours, $550
Will take hunting eq.
on trade 906-285-1696
Sea Doo GTX
2005, 3 seater, 131 hrs.
2010 Continental
trailer asking $3450.
obo (352) 794-3374
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555-
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
RV & Truck for Sale
Mobile Suite 5th Wheel
Custom 3 slides, 37 '
2003 FORD F350 Lariat,
Dually Super Duty V-8
TURBO, Easy Rider
Reese, 16k Hitch
MANY EXTRA'S ON
BOTH, PACKAGE
$37K 352-897-5339
RV tow car braking
system "Brake Buddy"
With break away control
VG cond. $475
352-270-1775
Sport Coach IV
Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans, 1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




TOW BAR
Blue Ox Tow Bar
For RV
$450
(352) 344-2161




2014 KZ SONIC 18'
"Like New",
completely loaded
MUST SELL, Homosassa
$14k 315-729-2634
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




GMC
1988, 6 doors,
complete front end
$550; Small Trailer
40x85 $150
(352) 228-9058




Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Llk



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




BUICK
2002 LeSabre
38,000 mi, Exc Cond,
$6900
(352) 527-9509

Buy Here/Pay Here

'98 Ford Explorer
$825 Down

05 Saturn VUE
$995 Down

'96 Saturn
$650 Down

'96 Olds Bravada
$725 Down

'95 Toyota Camry
$2195 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
'01, Sebring, LXI, con-
vert., loaded, leather,
V6, CD, full pwr. new
tires, garaged, clean,
$2,975., 352-212-4882

IMMACUlATE
CHRYSLER
SPORTS CAR
2005 Crossfire Yellow
convertible w/black top,
auto trans, excellent
condition, 45k,built in
Germany w/Mercedes
V6 engine $14,000
OBO (352) 563-5150
DODGE
2012, Avenger RT,
Sunroof, leather, navl,
$17,995
352-341-0018
FORD
'10, Mustang Cony.
42K mi, V6, auto, pwr.
opt., alloy whls, alarm
spoiler, ext warr.
$15,500, 352- 860-1939
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
Reduced price for a
well maintained '03,
Taurus SE, Looks &
drives great $3,200
firm w/ 141khwy mi.
Shown on appointmnt.
(352) 422-1798
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

HYUNDAI
2007 Azera
loaded-p/w, heated
power seats 6 cyl
very low miles, Askg
$9800. 860-716-3128

LINCOLN
89 TOWNCAR. 75,300.
mi. very clean, exc.
condition, all original,
$3500. (304) 678-4070

Liquidation Sale
HelD Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19& US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


NISSAN
'09, Sentra, FE +
Sedan, excel. cond.
56,600 mi. $8,900
352-795-8880

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR *k 461-4518





2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dpt for details
l3T2-563-5966






CHEVROLET
2010, Silverado
Reg Cab WT
$13,495,
352-341-0018
DODGE
1995, 2500, Reg Cab
Work Box Truck
$2,888.
352-341-0018

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHRYSLER
2005, Pacifica AWD,
low miles, leather
extra clean $9,450.
352-341-0018


2003 Excursion XLT
V-10 New Michelin tires,
new master brake cylin-
der, new fuel pump, new
transmission. Great tow
vehicle, class IV heavy
duty hitch, tow package,
loaded. Regularly main-
tained and serviced.
$7,900. (352) 344-1823

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

JEEP
'0 1, Grand Cherokee,
limited, loaded, new
tires & engine. Mint
$9,500. 305-619-0282




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306

FORD
E 150 Conversion Van,
1999,180 K miles
$1,200
(352) 465-1124














BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.
2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood, FL 34785
(352) 330-0047


947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru-
ary 28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


338-0316 SUCRN
DOCTORS OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The PEDIATRIC DENTAL OFFICE of
MID FLORIDA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY OF CITRUS COUNTY
Located at 22 REGINA BLVD, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 Phone number: 352-270-8860
Is CLOSING on MARCH 28, 2014.
We thank you for your patronage. It has been our pleasure to serve your children's
dental needs.

Patients are welcome at our primary office in Lake County and all records will be
transferred there. If you wish to have records transferred to another dentist, we will
be happy to transfer them for you at no charge with your written authorization.
Please contact us at this number prior to our permanent closing day.
After March 28, 2014, records will be held at 1340 E. Orange Ave, Eustis, FL
Any inquiry about records should be directed to phone number 352-483-9183.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, March 2, 9, & 16, 2014.


341-0223 THCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Change of location for the Joint Agricultural and Green Industry Advisory Committee.
This meeting will include a FARMS Project tour. One or more Governing Board mem-
bers may attend.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, March 13, 2014 at 10:00 a.m.
PLACE: 14576 Blackjack Road, Dover FL 33527
Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinator&swfwmd.state.fl.us.
For more information, you may contact: Cindv.Tavlor&watermatters.ora
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211 ,x4150
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, 2014. #EXE0308


342-0223 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Anthony P. Haros Robert 0. Patterson
2273 N Overlook Path 3882 S Garland Ter
Hernando, FL Inverness, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, 2014.


339-0223 SUCRN
3/24 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Per FS713.585(6), Elsie Title Services of SW FL, LLC w/POA will sell listed units to highest
bidder free of any liens; Net deposited with clerk of court per 713.585;
owner/lienholders right to a hearing per FS713.585(6); to post bond per FS559.917;
owner may redeem for cash sum of lien; held w/reserve; inspect 1 wk prior @ lienor
facility; cash or cashier's check; 25% buyers prem. Sale a VICIOUS CYCLE 5164 S.
FLORIDA AVE, STE 2 INVERNESS FL 34450-8535 MV-85950 352 476-2203 03/24/2014 @
9:00am @0 Storage @ $15.90 per day inc tax VICcy M1 lien amt $889.34 2005 HD
FXDCI Dyna SG MC WHI 1HD1GVW165K322245
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, February 23, 2014.


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online


ITUO-('f


(352) 563-5966


340-0223 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
Stormwater SE 3rd Court BID #14-B-04
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for Stormwater SE 3rd Court. You are
hereby invited to submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is the
City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on March 14th, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work consists of installing a single storm drain in City Right
of Way and routing it per the drawing and specifications. This bid requires working
within an easement area where a minimum of disruption to the owners' property is
required.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
miffed. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"Stormwater SE 3rd Court, BID #14-B-04" AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR AD-
DRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
34428

All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 23, 2014.


'01 HD ROAD KING
Loaded $7,800.

'13 HD STREET GLIDE
Low Miles $18,500.

'06 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC TRIKE Full
Conversion $21,000.

'08 HONDA GOLD
WING TRIKE
Loaded $24,900.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood, FL 34785
(352) 330-0047

GOLDWING
'12, 1800 Trike,
Red, 31 k miles, Serious
inquires only $26,000.
(352) 341-5762
HONDA
'07 VTX-1300, low mi-
les, custom, worth
$6500, asking $5500
OBO 352-697-1205
KAWASAKI
2004 Vulcan Classic
800 cc lots of extras
$2500
(352) 726-1460
Open Motorcycle
Trailergreat for Harley,
Goldwing, or cruiser
type cycle. Will carry
3 dirt bikes, or 1 quad.
Good tires, $650 obo
727-744-2498


I inNtcl


I in oi


I in oi


I i Ntc


I i Ntc


Bi otc





CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE


Learn Why Ford Is
America's Favorite Brand
Call 352-795-7371 For Details.


DOWN

PAYMENT


DUE AT

SIGNING


I MONTH'S

PAYMENT


$
*


. AND


2014 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
M SRP .................................. $30,280
Customer Cash................$2,000
Ford Credit Customer Cash ..... $1,000


$27,280


BmI


2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT
39,000 Miles. G4TO01A
S17.950


2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT
23,000 miles, leather. GP1699


2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4WD
43,000 miles. GP172
S 17.Os


2011 LINCOLN MKX
Leather, 29,000 miles. GP1717
$26,950


2007 FORD FUSION SEL 2006 CHEVY MALIBU MAX LT
Leather, spoiler. 70,000 miles, Auto.
$7,950 $7,950


2011 FORD RANGER
One owner, 17,000 miles. G3T233A


2013 LINCOLN MKT
10,000 Miles. GPR1265


2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS
Leather, 50,000 miles. GP1697
$8,950


2011 LINCOLN MKZ
One owner, 33,000 miles. G42034A
S20.950


2013 LINCOLN MKZ
7,000 miles, over $48,000 new. GP1745
$37,950


2008 FORD FUSION SE
AWD, leathersunroof, 37,000 miles.
$12,950


2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE
One owner, local trade. G4TO98A
S24-450


2012 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR L
24K miles, sunroof, Nay., loaded. GP1947
$43,950


201 1 ESCAPE XLT
V6, local trade.
$13,950


2010 FORD Fl150 XLT 2009 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2013 TOYOTA COROLLA LE 2010 FORD F150 REG CAB 2011 HONDA ACCORD
One owner, V8, auto. One owner, local trade. G4CO53A Only 5,000 miles. V8, power windows/locks. G3T263A 23,000 Miles, one owner. G3TO73A
$15,950 $15,950 $15,950 $15,950 $16,950


2009 LINCOLN TOWN CAR SIG. LTD 2012 FORD FUSION SPORT 2008 JEEP WRANGLER
One owner, 40,000 miles. L3C028A 23,000 miles, leather, sunroof. One owner, lifted & loaded, 37,000 miles.
On one,4000 ils.LC08A$119_.5


U0


Nick Nicholas


Crystal River Hwy.19


SN.
&71


IL


2010 FORD TAURUS LTD
One wonder, local trade. L4CO08A
$18,450


INCOLN


Nick7 q
Nicholas
Ford
Lincoln i


w r Idk'U


Ana Cruzw


*Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer wiII qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For alI offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 3/31/14.


2014 FOCUS
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment* S Due at Signing S 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 FUSION
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
S Down Payment* $0 Due at Signing S 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & tit e fees.


2014 ESCAPE
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
S Down Payment* S Due at Signing S 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2013 EDGE
$329 mo.
36 Month Lease
S Down Payment* SD Due at Signing SD 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


EVENT


2007 MERCURY RANDMARQUIS
Leather.
$8,950


2010 FORD F1 50 XLT 2012 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 2013 TOYOTA PRERUNNER
Crew cab, chrome package. Leather, 3rd seat, 24,000 miles. GP1729 One owner V6 dbl cab, only 5,000 miles.
20O95O 26.950


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 D11


. .........




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buy or lease any
New 2014 Nissan
and pay less than
Black Book Value
for a used 2014.
You will pay less
for a Brand New
2014 Nissan than
others pay for the
Same Vehicle Used.


1(73E:=,

MOREm


New 2014 Nissan
Altima S
VIN# EC183916
MODEL # 13114


CRYSTAL.,
NISSAN D
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
800-584-8755 EXTI 0 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:3Oam-8:O0pm mSaturday 9:OOam-7:3Opm mSunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:3Oam-5:3Opm. mTuesday & Thursday 7:3Oam-7:O0pmm Saturday 8:OOam-4:00pmm Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:3Oam-5:3Opm.m Saturday & Sunday-Closed
Black Book Trade-in Value Is Based On Vehicle Being In Excellent Condition With Less Than 10,000 Miles. See Dealer For Details. **Price Includes All Rebates And Incentives, Not Everyone Will Qualify.
Excludes, Tax, Tag, Title And Dealer Fee $599.50 With Approved Credit. Pictures Are For Illustration Purposes Only, Prior Sales May Restrict Stock.


O12 SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014


















ON THE COVE


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


Section E SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013




OME RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID








NB


HOME AND


13


9'


.- f;., 0
-b-. -._ o


* 4
* -
p. 4~ -


I







E2Sunday February 23, 2014


CHmus CouNwrY (FL) CHRONICLE


[OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-3PM
82j o aN


,4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
N New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM
, Beautifully Maintained Many Extras
PETER & M,ARVIA KOROL!T-1~
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


Beautiful 3/2 oversized garge, WATERFRONT
home, granite, kitchen bar open to great room, with
fireplace, entertainment size FLA room w/wet bar &
fridge viewing canal & dock. Built in 2002.

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com



RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit

Ninli etaliscm


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11 -2PM


I:'. I
TERRA VISTA VILLA
GREAT PRICE!!
2 BR, plus DEN *2-Car Garage
2005 Built Large Great RM
* Double Closets in Master PAVERS in Lanai
* World Class Amenities
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email kellygoddardsellslorida.com







V




REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


S3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-3PM


5470 S. Cedar Mill Pulh, Homosassa
This 2 bedroom home is furnished and offers a
wonderful view of the Homosassa River. Close to
neighborhood eateries, marina, and craft shops. Stop in
and be charmed.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Emoil: Woyne@WoyneHemmerich.com


18 HACKBERRY DR., HOMOSASSA
Sugarmill Woods Pool Home
2,320 Sq. Feet Pool Pavers
Built 2006 Hot Tub
3-4 Bedrooms Hardwood Flooring
ROH MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Propery Expert


6179 W. GLEN ROBBIN
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage on almost half an
acre. Well maintained and on a cul-de-sac so minimal
traffic, but close to Hwy. 44 for shopping and medical
needs. Block home, 1.600 sq. ft. under air.
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491 I
Email: piparvi@yahoo.com


BUILT IN 2005
Open floor plan with great room, formal dining,
breakfast room, split bedrooms. 10x51' 4-season
lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 1 0x82' & 20x20
attached carports and detached carport/boat
parking. Everything your family needs is right here.

CHERYL HADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


WALK OUT BASEMENT!
*3 Bdrms/2 Bath/1-Car Garage -1.6 Acre Lot
*New Metal Roof Neutral Interior
1000 Sq. Ft. Unfinished Convenient toAll Necessities!

SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 ]
Email heryloltsXal1co1
W.el:it ww. rslaeriv in g.cr L


2421 N. LecI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRMXcmI10 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 124PM
f:35
Jja4jjFt 1g 822
Enterhousa go


I..- -~


04t4 N. I:LKUAM ILVU.
TODAY 12 4 PM
Stunning 2007 Builder's showcase
award-winning home!
Priced 45% below replacement VALUE!!
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
Ad Code #1043
Email. kim@kimdevne.com







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Nancy John
Lewis Maisel
EXIT EXIT
Realty. Realty.


Pam Mary
Shemet Gulling
EXIT EXIT
Realty. Realty.

EXIT salutes top
agents for 2013
Congratulations to the EXIT
Realty 2013 Florida produc-
tion pin winners from the EXIT
Realty Leaders Team.
We are very proud to


Steve
McClory
EXIT
Realty.


announce the
winning
agents from
the $100,000
category,
Nancy
Lewis, John
Peggy Maisel,
Price Steven Mc-
EXIT Clory, and
Realty. Rebekah
Paradiso.
Winning agents from the
$75,000 category were
Nancy Ayers, Lili Garcia and
Pam Shemet.
And winning agents from
the $50,000 category were
Gary Ayers, Mary Gulling,


Tomika Kimberly
Spires-Hanssen Fuller
Landmark Landmark
Realty. Realty.
closed more than $17.5 million
in sales for 2013. That sales
volume represents more than
200 sold properties.
Tomika and Kim specialize
in foreclosed properties and
work with many investors.
This dynamic team has also
closed $2 million in January.
Call Tomika or Kim at 352-
726-5263.


and Peggy Price.
Call these experienced
agents today.
Agents score sales
at Landmark
Landmark Realty of Citrus
County would like to an-
nounce that the team of
Tomika Spires-Hanssen and
Kimberly Fuller listed and


DIGEST DEADLINES
0 Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by
4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.


I


UPGRADES GALORE!!!
3/2/3 Gorgeous kitchen with Quartz
countertops, real wood cabinets,
huge breakfast bar & built-in desk.
Dining with tray ceiling & crown
moulding. Cherry hardwood floorng
in entry, dining & living room. Home
features split plan. Spare bath with Conan counters. Master with tray ceiling his/her closets.
Master bath with dual sinks, garden tub & sep. shower. Master, living, family have French doors
out to the amazing beck paved lanai with solar heated pool and spa. Home also features therm.
windows, air purifier and alum. solar shield insulaton just installed. Buyers you will also love the
world class amenities of Terra Vista when you purchase this home.
~ LEATY Rebekah Paradiso
vr LEADERS
5018. 'ecante Hwy52.3 "4 8
Beverly Hill, FL 3 2 6 4 4 8
711 d: ai M. 7V .1:u~[];!t 1m|kLlJ; ,


1 zILIL reaLurlng vvuuu uaDinels In IMILUIen, New VVUUU
Flooring, Carpeting & Tile. Fresh coat of Paint in and out. Vinyl
exciosed lanai 12 X 30. Double pocket door. Gated community.


4390 W Pine Ridge Blvd.
Pine Ridge
Beautiful 4/4/3 with office. Caged in ground salt
water pool with spa 3981 sq. ft. of living area,
stainless steel appliances Wet bar, Tray ceilings,
plantation shutters, Intercom, and summer kitchen.
Come see it today! Priced at $465,000.
Directions: Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd.
to home on left.


4340 Mustang Blvd.
Unique find 3 bedroom 3 baths home on
3.25 acres. 3502 sq. ft of living, large
theater room, granite counter tops,
stainless steel appliances. Solar heated
caged in-ground pool and spa. Don't
ovedook this one. Offered for $349,000.
Directions: N on 491 left on Mustang,
home on left.


SURRENCY
GREAT OPPORTU NI RREALTOR
TO LIVE YOUR
WATERFRONT DREAM! CELL
Home on deep water canal with short ride to the Crystal River
and Gulf. Four bedrooms, two baths, 2257 SF of living area, OFFICE
screened pool, 2-car garage. Elevation certificate shows l Ift. 352-795-0021
This is a "diamond in the rough" and needs some TLC to pool FAX 352-795-1323
and pool deck. New roof July 2013, A/C 2010. 85'of seawall.
Watch wonderful Mother Nature right in your backyard with pensurIF 01c1
dolphins, manatees, bald eagles and bass and mullet jumping. weu'
Home is ADA compliant also. Come and take a look. EACH OFFICE'S INPENDENTLY
NATUE CEOWNED a RATED
=72. NATURE COAST 835 NE Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34429


Rebekah Nancy Lili
Paradiso Ayers Garcia
EXIT EXIT EXIT
Realty. Realty. Realty.


American Realty For a Visual Tour of Jackie Davis
MEN & Investments my listings and all MLS:
E r n 117eS. Hwy. 41 jackie@bidavis.com (352) 634-2371 Ceil

WINDERMERE, A VILLA COMMUNITY



mL



Windermere is a superior villa community offering maintenance-free living.
Townhomes, 2 bedroom villas, single family homes. From $87,000 to $130,000


I


Care and pruning


of Indica Azaleas
zaleas come to the end
of their flowering sea-
son by mid-March. Gar-
deners prefer flowering shrubs
that need little maintenance
and no pruning. All azaleas re-
quire humus-rich, well-
drained soil that is slightly
acidic.
Homeowners can amend
sandy soils in Citrus, Marion
and Levy counties by topping
garden beds with an inch or
Jane Weber two of the finely milled
JANE'S "mulch" available free from
GARDEN
See JANE/Page E6
[! JOANN MARTIN

Preferred
REAL ESTATE

Broker Associate 352 270-3255 www.prefim.net


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 E3







E4Sunday, February 23, 2014




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information ..................... 352-563-5966
News information ............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing ........ www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
0 Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


US home sales




down in January



Data shows transactions plunged 5.1 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sales of existing U.S.
homes plummeted in January to the
worst pace in 18 months. Cold weather,
limited supplies of homes on the market
and higher buying costs held back
purchases.
The National Association of Realtors
said Friday that sales fell to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 4.62 million units
last month. That was down 5.1 percent
from the December pace. The sales rate
declined 5.1 percent over the previous
12 months.
Higher mortgage rates and higher
prices have contributed to a slowdown in
home buying in five of the past six
months. Freezing temperatures and
snowstorms have also caused most hous-
ing activity to slip this winter The flagging
sales suggest a deceleration from the mo-


mentum for much of 2013, when 5.09 mil-
lion homes were sold, the most in seven
years.
"Such a picture confirms that the U.S.
housing market reached its peak at the
end of 2013 and further reacceleration is
unlikely near term," Annalisa Piazza of
Newedge Strategy said in a research
note.
Home building dipped 16 percent in
January from December, the Commerce
Department said this week. Signed con-
tracts to buy homes plunged in December,
foreshadowing the January drop-off, the
Realtors said in a separate report.
The weather has kept would-be buyers
from venturing to open houses, while con-
struction crews have endured work stop-
pages.
But sales also declined in parts of the

See SALES/Page E5


Inside...


Orchids
PAGE ES
Jane Weber
PAGE E3
Pets and furniture
PAGE E9
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Shirley Temple memorabilia; sizing up a rolltop desk


D earJohn: Are these old Shirley where or how to sell it? Thanks for
Temple pitchers worth any- any information. I love your radio pro-
thing? The date is around the gram and articles. G. W, Internet
1930s. Please advise. -PL, Homosassa Dear G.W.: You have a good-looking
Dear PL: Shirley Temple S-rolltop desk. It was new
was born in 1928 and just when acquired by your
recently passed away at the parents and is not from the
age of 85. Shirley Temple 19th century, when rolltops
memorabilia has been a were being made in Amer-
specific category of collect- ica. Victorian-era rolltops
ing. A wide variety of items did not have the handsome
were produced: dolls, floral carvings on the sides
books, jewelry, buttons, like your desk has.
dish sets, pocket mirrors, In general, current inter-
paper cutout dolls, sheet John Sikorski est in antique rolltop desks
music, statues, and more. is very soft. Your reproduc-
Your cobalt blue pitcher SIKORSKI'S tion rolltop would be in the
was part of a child's break- AI'IC used furniture category
fast set. Current potential and better kept than sold.
dollar value is $25 to $50. Potential dollar value is
DearJohn: Can you please give me catch-as-catch-can.
a rough estimate of this desk's value? Dear John: I really enjoy listening to
It was acquired by a parent in Hawaii the radio program on WUFT-FM! My
in the 1940s. It is rosewood and quite wife and I live in Beverly Hills, but
heavy. Do you have any ideas on while visiting relatives in Mississippi


over the holidays, I was privileged to see
a manually operated "fried-pie press."
Although it has no manufacturer's in-
formation, it does have an apparent se-
rial number of 10045 stamped into the
top. Apparently, dough is placed in the
two inserts, with filling in one, and the
hand crank is turned, pressing the sides
together There is an "extra" inter-
changeable mold to provide a different
crimping pattern. What information do
you have about this device, if any?
Thanks for your help! -KD., Internet
Dear KD.: I am not familiar with
fried-pie makers, although it sounds
like a fun item. I was not able to find
any specific collector interest.
The general category where it might
be of interest is kitchen memorabilia.
A website where you might find
See A-TIC/age E1O
This 1930s Shirley Temple pitcher
was part of a child's breakfast set.
Special to the Chronicle







CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SALES
Continued from Page E4

country where weather was less of a
factor This suggested that price
pressures and tight inventories are
also weighing on the real estate
market.
Buying fell 7.3 percent in Western
states, the region less affected by
winter storms and where average
prices are the highest. That decline
was significantly larger than in the
Northeast, South and Midwest. The
median price of homes in the West is
$273,500, almost double the median
price in the Midwest.
The median price nationwide has
risen 10.7 percent to $188,900 since
January 2013. There are just 4.9
months of available inventory on the
market, a sign that would-be buyers
have relatively few homes to pick from
and may choose to delay purchases.
Just 26 percent of sales last month
were by first-time buyers. In a
healthy market, that figure is closer
to 40 percent. All cash-sales ac-
counted for 33 percent of all pur-
chases, evidence that investors


continue to make up a sizable share
of the sales.
Existing-home sales in a healthy
market would approach 5.5 million,
nearly 900,000 more than the Janu-
ary rate. Buying has slowed during
the past six months.
Over the summer of 2013, home
resales reached a pace of 5.39 mil-
lion. But they began to slow in Sep-
tember as the costs of buying a home
rose because of rising prices and
higher mortgage rates.



5693 N. NAKOMA DRIVE, BEVERLY HILLS
(PINE RIDGE ESTATES)


3 bedroom, 2 bath, office/den pool, workshop
hobby room. MLS # 706498
Directions Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd. Right on
Bedstrow. Left on Oakmont, Right on Nakoma
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582
i A M E R IC A N .HG
ERA REALTY& IWESTMENTS 2 352-746-3600


m m 7469000L

Kr..k& A ma Johnson Tom Balfour Wait Engelken ...enis Fe oePieAayi
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE FreeALTORie n ly i


15 TAFT 521 S. MONROE
2/1/1 707140 $69,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


The average rate on a 30-year
mortgage rose to 4.33 percent this
week from 4.28 percent the previous
week. Rates surged about 1.25 per-
centage points from May through
September, peaking at 4.6 percent.
The increase began after the Fed-


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


eral Reserve signaled that it would
start to slow its bond-buying pro-
gram before the end of the year
The Fed has reduced its monthly
bond purchases from $85 billion to
$65 billion in its last two policy
meetings.


WPrudential
pen 7 sFlorida Showcase
open 7 Days
A Week! Properties


160ZU W Tacoma St ,'$Uat- uri inaianriver ur
MLS 707838 $239,000 4 MLS 704824 $294,900
Super clean &well maintained 3/2.5/2. REDUCED! Exquisite custom pool home
MUST SEE! on one acre.
Dir. 486 to Ottawa Av (becoms Quart Av), L on Dir. Rt. 486 to north on Annapolis, R on N. Indianhead
Tacoma St or Hwy 44 to School Av, R on Union St, Rd., 3rd R onto F Tradvwind Dr, becomes
quick L on Nashville, L on Tacoma St. N. Indianriver Dr.
Anna Graf 352-613-0060 Jack Flemina 352-422-4086


"1."g.LL1[ MLS 705976 $128,500
Meticulously maintained 22/2w/fabulous
upgraded features.
Dir 486 south on Essex, R on Keller, L on Fr no,
R on Pearson.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


',,7)jLU w-" .Jb/4 N LaureIwoor Lp
MLS 708624 $57,200
Maintenance-free 2/2/1 in 55+ community.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261


/h'- v- 1708 W Spring Meadow Lp
'1644 W Spring Meadow Ip MLS 705820 $94,900
MLS 706531 $119,900 Move-in ready, maintenance free
Move-in-condition 3/2 corner townhome. 2/2.5/1 Townhome.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086

Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


MLS 706039 $189
REDUCED! Meadows Golf Course 3/:
with caged pool.
Dir. 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on Dakota.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


STUNNING lakefront views from this
w/boathouse, lift & dock.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


ra buy, 770t $25,500
Great buy, great opportunity, great
location! Come see the greatness!
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976






2343 N Putnam Pt
MLS 357348 $79,000
Neat & clean 2bd/2ba villa in
prime location.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774

-Repeat Home Buyer
-First Time Home Buyer
-First Time Home Seller


@2013 BRER Affiliates [C. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affliates LC. Prudential, the Prudential logo andthe Rock symbol are registered service marks (91
of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
VVW 0lr a S wcae Soper So


SlF VZ 04 9W C7-M 9O M-


J"/,,' 2772 N Crosswater Path
MLS 702222 $995,000
Custom built home with endless views of
The Ranch Course.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 ES






CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Pqs E3

Central Landfill on State Road 44
between Inverness and Lecanto. It
has almost no sand mixed in, so it
cannot be called compost, although
it is well-rotted and sufficiently de-
cayed to release nutrients necessary
for plant growth.
Azalea roots are shallow, barely
below the surface. Do not mix the
fine mulch mechanically doing so
will damage the delicate feeder
roots. Simply hose in thoroughly and
the finest organic particles will wash
down into the larger spaces between
the coarse sand grains of local soils.
This decayed material releases its
nutrients so azaleas quickly respond
with new growth. A top mulch of dec-
orative pine needles prevents weed
seeds from germinating and reaching
the soil, moderates soil temperature
and helps maintain soil moisture.
Modern azalea hybrids have a
particular mature size, as outlined
in a previous column. Under a 2-
foot-high egress window, a thought-
ful gardener could plant a "Red
Ruffle" that will only grow about 2
feet tall. A "Fashion" that only grows
3 feet tall and 3 feet in diameter
would be a good choice too, espe-
cially if there is more summer sun
and little afternoon shade.
If selecting a patented "Encore"
azalea, be sure to read the tag and
select for size before deciding on
color Further away from a building,
taller shrubs can add color when in
flower, as well as height and ever-
green density for privacy screening
and wildlife habitat particularly
bird nest sites.
If an old woody azalea has grown
more than 10 feet tall and has sev-
eral thick woody trunks, it can be re-
juvenated by removing the fattest
and tallest trunks with a cordless
electric reciprocating saw early in
March immediately after flowering
stops. Cut them off at ground level,
leaving no stumps. Many suckers will
sprout, but allow only a few to grow
The top third of all old growth can
be pruned just above a leaf node on



16CtrusCounty


00 X01


a 45-degree angle. The node will
sprout four or five new stems rather
than have one long sucker As azal-
eas have a cluster of flowers at the
tips of new branches, the group of
new shoots will have four or five
times more flowers next season.
The new growth can be tip-pruned
a second time after four to six sets of
leaves have grown on the young new
stems. Simply pinch or snip off the
terminal growth bud. Each of the new
shoots will send out four or five new
shoots, resulting in 16 to 25 times as
many flowers. This second tip-prun-
ing is usually done by the end of May
Prune after June, and the azalea will
not bloom the following winter, as all
the latent buds will be removed.
Most azaleas that fail to flower
have been butchered after June by
uninformed maintenance hirelings
who fail to learn the growth habits
and timing of azaleas. Such people
are not gardeners.
Ignorance is no excuse in the gar-
den. The Internet has many helpful
sites to learn proper gardening prac-
tices: check university sites first.
Snowbirds returning to Florida in
the fall should insist their azaleas
and camellias be left unpruned until
after the flowering season. They will
have a graceful natural shape and
bloom sometime between fall and
spring, each plant in their own time.
Cropped round balls and sheered
square shapes have had most of
their future flowers removed by
thoughtless butchers.
Azaleas are long-lived and need
only good soil, protective top mulch,
some summer shade and fore-
thought to flower well in Central
Florida gardens. Select the appro-
priate variety by mature size and
then by color Site the plants where
they can grow to maturity, then relax
and let nature take its course.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.

Serving Citrus& Levy Counties Since 1970
David G. Griffin
Real Estate
Licensed Real Estate Broker
Cell 352-228-1812
Office 352-795-0330


Auction or estate sale



- which do you need?


Steve Barnes
TIME WILL
TELL


GypQss Two Cents: The sky is
falling! I'm told it's an annual
event, but this is my first experi-
ence with flocks ofcedar waxwings
in ourpecan frees. Poo everywhi!
Dad even washes customers' cars. I
of course bark only to warn people
"Don't look up!"
etting rid of one's stuff
seems to be a common
problem. Last month's ar-
ticle discussed the many options
for solving this dilemma. Let's
now focus on two popular solu-
tions by interviewing two experi-


enced people from each field.
Chris and Robert Dudley are auc-
tion experts, while Cheryl Anne
Reed is a specialist in estate
sales.
Dudley's Auction with creates a
"full-service estate liquidator
partnership" and boasts a full
staff of auctioneers, real estate
brokers, office warehouse and
pick-up crews.
With an estate sale, Cheryl will
meet with the clients in the

See Q&A/Page Eli


Randy Morehouse 287-2934


Peg Price 302 563 3 John Maise1302-5351 Becky Paradiso 634-4581





Golf course outyour back door 3/2. 707444. $134,900 as a button country Style 3/2, 707451, $119,900 On Top OfTheWorld comm., charming 2/2.707736. $45,000
John MaiseI302-5351 Randy Moorehouse 287-2934 Steve McClory 422-3998


Sits on over an acre, 31212. /u/91. 5
Steve McClory 422-3998


13 LCTOS TO SEV YO!3279-88- 5-2-11 5-4749


E6Sunday, February 2 3, 2014








CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I,1r~


I :ir


1




IHI II~I.


Success in numbers!


TOP

COMPANY

PRODUCER

STEVE LATIFF


2013

MEGA-

MILLION

DOLLAR

PRODUCERS


2013 MULTI-MILLIOH DOLLAR PRODUCERS







MARGARET KAREN & GARY KATHY BOBBI HARRY ECK &
BAKER BAXLEY CANFIELD DILEGO KAREN STUKES


* BROAD EXPOSURE

MARKETING


AL W A1 -


JEANNE SUE JOHN ROD
GASKILL HARTMAN HOFFMEISTER KENNER


DEBRA
MCFARLAND


GREG
RODRICK


2013
MILLION DOLLAR
PRODUCERS


on


LOIS ROB
FREARS HARD




MARGE VINCENT
MASZOTA MCCRAVE


C.D.
ALDERSON




SANDI
HART




JOANNA
MORRIS


BARBARA
BANKS




DEB
INFANTINE

N


JENNIFER
MUNN


ALAN COLEEN
DEMICHAEL FATONE-ANDERSON




HOLLY YAN
JONES MAK




BETTY SARAH
POWELL SPENCER


LEDSOME


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 E7







ESSunday, February 23, 2014


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Urttz, tt""q












annual british disp


draws thous(

GREGoRy KAT2
P. Associatcd Prcss

he weather outside

frightful it has
ew eks, with parts of t
try experiencing th(
floods in decades but it's
warm inside the Princess ol
conservator It's humid
A-It ical in fact.
The heat and moi!
necessary for the te
thousands of orchii
See ORCHID













ialaenopsis hybrid
is displayed during







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FURNISHING WITH


A dog-sized sofa from Enchanted
Home Pet. The company's furniture
line features contemporary styling,
colors and patterns and is designed
to be inviting and comfortable
for pets while offering aesthetic
appeal to their human owners as
accent pieces that will look nice
in a well-appointed home.
Enchanted Home Pet/Associated Press


KEY "Always There For You"
REAL I GAIL COOPER
Multimillion Dollar Realtor
iRe
(352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3@hiindspring.com


* 3/2/2 Driftwood III on quiet street
* Convenient to shopping
* Vaulted family room with fireplace
* Open patio perfect for grilling
* Well for irrigation
* Garage bump out makes great workshop
* Spacious lanai has summer kitchen
* Deep greenbelt for privacy
#706193 $159,000


* New granite in kitchen and laundry
* Updated sink and faucets
* Exterior recently repainted
* Dual paned windows well for yard
* Security system surround sound
* Newer pool pump and cleaner
* 6'x20' garage bump-out for workshop
#707654 $185,000


SHOPPING FOR NEW DECOR
WHEN YOU'RE A PET OWNER


Associated Press

NEW YORK
ydney Masters' dog Angus has
white fur But he loves to play
and dig in the mud, so his
paws are often brown. And that was
a factor in Masters' choice of sofa.
"We didn't choose the lovely
white sofa that I wanted. No! We
chose a rich, dark brown leather
couch," said Masters, who shares a
Manhattan apartment and a home
in France with her husband, who is
French, and with Angus, a West
Highland terrier.
Finding furniture that dogs and
cats won't ruin is a challenge for
pet owners. Here are some things
to think about when you're buying
furniture, along with some ideas
for protecting it from fur, stains and
scratches.


Leather
Many dog owners report that
leather works well as a pooch-proof
alternative to fabric. "It's that kind
of glossed leather that repels water
and dirt," Masters says. Angus
tends to stay off the sofa because
the leather surface is "not as comfy
or warm as other places and it's a
little slippery" If he does occasion-
ally sit on it, Masters says the dirt is
easily wiped off
But leather might not work for
households with cats, who may
damage it with their claws, accord-
ing to the American Humane Asso-
ciation's chief veterinary adviser
Dr Patricia Olson. Owners of dog
breeds that habitually dig or
scratch might also think twice
about leather
See P /Page E1O


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 E9


I See Virtual Tours @ www.homes4u3com 111H.T






CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PETS
Continued from Page E9

Microfiber
In addition to leaving scratch marks
on leather, cat claws can destroy fab-
ric upholstery Some cat owners say
that microfiber, a synthetic, velvety
suede-like material, is a good alterna-
tive. It's smoother and less appealing
to cats than knits or woven fabric they
can sink their claws into. And fur -
from dogs or cats- is easily removed
from microfiber with a vacuum, lint
roller or cloth. Microfiber can also be
spot-cleaned.
Fabric
Texture and design matter when
choosing furniture. Some folks don't
like the feel of leather (too cold) or
microfiber (too synthetic) compared
to fabric. Fabric-covered sofas and
chairs also come in the widest range
of colors and patterns, offering more
choices for home decor
If you own pets and must have fab-
ric-covered sofas, consider this ad-
vice from Jay Jeffers of the Jeffers
Design Group in San Francisco: "I
would always suggest a fabric with a
small pattern or texture a her-
ringbone pattern or small check cre-
ates a great disguise."
And don't be afraid to camouflage
your pet's fur "In our house, the fur-


niture is in similar colors to our pets
so their fur blends in," Jeffers said.
Fabric slipcovers with zippers
that are easily removed and washed
are a plus. Some brands, like IKEA,
sell fitted slipcovers for their sofas
so they can be replaced easily
A couch of their own
One way to keep pets off your fur-
niture is to give them a couch of
their own. But where should sleep-
ing dogs lie? Choices abound, from
$30 floor pillows at discount pet
chains to $1,200-$1,400 custom
B-Home brand dog beds, sold at
Jeffers' design store, Cavalier-
named for his two cavalier King
Charles spaniels.
Enchanted Home Pet sells classy
dog-size sofas that look a lot like
sofas for humans. They have backs
and arms, in contemporary styles
and colors ranging from tasteful
grays and browns to bold, whimsical
hues and geometric patterns. "Every
bed has a different personality," said
Enchanted Home Pet president
Fred Silber, whose wife, Randi, de-
signs the furniture.
While the Enchanted Home Pet
products are inviting and comfy for
dogs, they're also attractive accent
pieces for a well-appointed home.
They run $60 to $300 depending on
size, style and place of purchase;
they're available online and in stores,
from trendy home decor websites like
Joss & Main to brick-and-mortar


chains like Marshalls. The company
will soon introduce therapeutic op-
tions like orthopedic support, cooling
gel and self-warming beds.
Finally, if you own cats, give them
something better to scratch or lie on
than your sofa: a scratching post
doused with catnip spray and a
climbing platform. (And of course,
keep their nails trimmed.)
Covering up
The simplest way to protect furni-
ture from pets is to throw a wash-
able blanket or sheet on it. Problem
is, these makeshift covers slip, come
untucked and often look a mess.
Consider a fitted slipcover or other
covering designed to stay put and
look neat. Matt Kovacs, owner of an
English bulldog, Lulu, has tried a
number of covers and recommends
the SureFit brand. "Bulldogs drool,
pant and are a general mess when it
comes to everyday living," said Ko-
vacs, of Long Beach, Calif "Without
the covers, furniture doesn't stand a
chance." SureFit covers wash easily
and when company comes over,
they're easily pulled off.
An artfully draped throw can work
too, and can even dress up an other-
wise-plain piece of furniture. Masters
doesn't mind tossing an attractive
washable blanket on her leather sofa
- even when it becomes a magnet for
her dog: "You throw that on the end
and it looks kind of chic, and he tends
to curl up in that area."


CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT
FASCINATING A taste of unspoiled nature secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, Elegant estate cn 1.85 ac, high over the Withlacocceho river, amazing views.
RIVER VIEWS ponds, mature oak trees. The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully Park like setting, pool. Dock your yacht or sailboat, deep water and no bridges to
positioned in a beautiful setting the Gulf of Mexico! This sophisticated 5,916 sq. ft. home is a true master piece
This ShangriLa can be yours for $800,000 waiting for you and your family to move right in!
the banks of the Withlacoochee Get a tae of it & visit www.mycrystalrKverfarm.com/ for an interactive tour. $549,000
across from Half Moon-Gum Slough
cherry cabinets & granite counters
areiust a few details.
521,961


GITTA "

BARTH 'Li'
REALTOR an
Cell: (352) 220.0466 [i
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
oA ywebsite at: wi.nflorida-h ou seco


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAKE"' MOVE RiGT IN BEAUTIFULCITRUS HILLS,, DESIRABLE CYPRESS
no bridges! 2 master suites, apar 2 Enoy this 3/3/2 pool home an a I act VILLAGE LOCATION!
ment an the lower level. Upper level settcng 60 x300 ft, ctresecorner lot with mature oak trees and Elegant 3/2/2 pool home quiet
accessible via elevator. Pool, hurricane i w it m ofered, some lots of privacy Very well maintained, cul-de-sac. Famly room w/wood beams
hutters, security system, updated newroofO05/.Just bring yoursuitcase & fireplace. Open kitchen w/eating;
cft of original fixtures and fireplace ti in and move right in. Community features formal dining & living room, master suite
seawall, boat lift- Everything ust La a ww golf, tennis, clubhouse w/garden tub & large shower. New roof
waiting foryou. $488,000 seawall. $159,900 MLS #358397$169,000 in 2008, A/C in 2010 $169,00


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

information about the pie
maker The Kollectors of
Old Kitchen Stuff site is
www.kooksonline. org.
Good luck.
Dear John: I have a
service for 12 of this vin-
tage china service. I
would like to sell the set
and was wondering if I
should sell it as a set or
individually I have no
idea of the value, but it is
in excellent condition,
with no chips or breaks.
Could you please advise
me? Thank you. S.S.,
Internet
Dear S.S.: There is no


specific collector interest
in your Mikasa china
service. Potential dollar
value is relative to inter-
est in the china pattern
replacement market.
I suggest you contact Re-
placements Ltd in Greens-
boro, North Carolina. The
phone number is 1-800-
REPLACE (737-5223).


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, P. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


I DREAMINGI
OF A
MANSION?
A Tudor mansion? Magni-
ficent architecture, seldom
seen in this area! Scenic
Kensington area, on cul de
sac, framed by a large wooded lot. Three bedrooms, two baths, two porches,
double garage, not to mention a stone turret and wrought iron entry gate, mul-
lioned windows and half-timbered exterior. Freshly painted interior enhances
spacious rooms, with fireplace in both living room and in the master bedroom.
Looking for something different and classy? This will not disappoint you. Used
as a winter home, widow now wishes to sell! MLS #705542 $225,000
Directions: 44W. to r. on Kensington. Follow to Reehill, to Lancaster, to
Heathrow which makes a loop, then I. on Elton Court.
396 E. ELTON COURT
Your host and hostess:
David Kurtz, 954-383-8786, and Marilyn Booth 637-4904

. .. iWaterfront 3/2 home locatedl
on beautiful Duval Island adj.
to the pastures of Ferris
Farms. The best of two worlds.
Like living on a farm w/o the
chores & the sparkling waters
of Floral City Lake off the backyard w/a deep water dock. Home has
huge rustic back porch w/separate workshop & 2 car gar. 1583132/
706959 $234,900. Call 352-344-5535 for appointment today
2 bedroom, 2 bath, all tiled,
U split floor plan home with j
cathedral ceilings.
Chain link fenced back yard.
Being sold "as is".
158D742/708346/402778
$55,000
Call Capt. Lee Harris
352-489-4949
957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452 j
o 352-344-5535
www.Cridland.com


'lop
Pon&


ElOSunday, February 23, 2014







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Q&A


Continued from Pap E6


privacy of the home to discuss the sale
and answer any questions; she can
also Skype with out-of-town clients.
Q: How much notice is needed to
arrange a sale?
Chris: Every estate and downsizing
situation is different, but offering a
variety of services offers the oppor-
tunity to design a plan that will best
fit the individual's needs. If items
need to removed and sold quickly, we
offer weekly estate adventure auc-
tions. Items can be dropped off or
scheduled for a pick up. On-site auc-
tions are also one of the options. We
bring the buyers to your location and
have an auction. We can schedule an
on-site with a couple of weeks' no-
tice, but the more advance notice, the
more opportunities to market.
Cheryl: It depends on the size of
the estate and the needs of the
client. On average, two weeks' setup
time is needed.
Q: How do you advertise and
reach customers?
Chris: We market extensively
Having the infrastructure of person-
nel, equipment and customer base,
we give the seller the greatest expo-
sure in which to market the sale.
Photos and a video walkthrough are
posted on our website, listing on sev-
eral national auction and estate
website calendars. We also have di-
rectly targeted email, a newsletter
both in print and online, and we use
newspaper advertising and signage.
A large advantage is the notification
of all our clients at the well-attended
Thursday-night estate auction for
the following day's sale.
Cheryl: We use the local newspa-
pers and we advertise on the Inter-
net through www.estatesales.net,
www.craigslist.org, Facebook and on
our website, www inverness
antiques.com. We also have an ex-
tensive email list.
Q: Whyshould Ichoose an auction?
Chris: Choosing an auction means
that items are sold in a competitive
marketplace to the highest bidder
Values are based on supply and de-
mand, with a strong dash of excite-
ment. Values will vary, the bottom
line will be satisfying.
All items can be sold, from the
pots and pans to the estate vehicles
to the real estate. One day for the on-
site: in and out, and then you are
ready to move forward with a


broom-clean home unless, of
course, we have auctioned the
house. If that' s the case, with a cash
closing on or before 30 days, the en-
tire process will be complete.
Since an auction has such a
unique perspective in terms of li-
quating an estate, the experience
and knowledge of our staff to recog-
nize value and quality through their
exposure is unparalleled.
Q: Why choose an estate sale?
Cheryl: Nothing leaves your home
until it's sold. An estate sale is held
in the home, where we can stage the
items for maximum sales appeal.
Each item is appraised we have
more than 35 years of experience in
the antiques business and tagged
with a price. With an estate sale,
people come to buy Besides, people
love estate sales.
Q: What are your commission rates?
Chris: Our rates vary depending
on the extensiveness of the project,
from a graduated commission rate
to a flat rate.
Always remember that lower rates
do not always mean higher net in
your pocket. It is always important
to keep an eye on the bottom line.
Cheryl: Rates depend on the size
and the quality of the estate. Also,
some homes are ready for a sale, while
others require extra work to prepare
the home and contents for a sale.
The commission is deducted from
the total sale, and funds are paid to
the client within the week.
Q: What if my items don't sell?
Chris: The auction method -
well, we sell it all.
Cheryl: Usually, there is not much
left. The remainder is sold to our
buyout people, or donated to a char-
ity of the client's choosing.
Q: What otherservices do you offer?
Chris: As a full-service estate liq-
uidator, we offer most everything
that you need. Personal property,
real estate auctions, court-qualified
appraisals, and private, confidential
appointments to help assist you with
your liquidation needs. We can meet
at your home or at the auction hall.
Cheryl: We offer full service and
can coordinate with Realtors, clean-
ing/lawn service, handyman repair
or most any service the client needs
for the home.
Next month's article: Something
for everybody Happy trails.


Steve Barnes owns and, along
with his shop dog Gypsy, operates
Olde Inverness Antiques.


fireplace, oversized workshop with eledic.' 1 AC. 'Well I aftached garage. Split flo r plan. Fenced yard.'
maintained. 2018 S Sunwood Pt $54,000 #708667 Convenient location. 1230 S Cornell Terr $64,500
Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 #708682 Jean Cassese 352-201-7034


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 El11







E12Sunday February 23, 2014


ORCHIDS
Continued from Page E8

orchids that are provid-
ing flower-loving Brits
with reason to believe that
this grim, soggy winter,
with its record January
rainfall, may soon be over
The annual Orchid Fes-
tival at the Royal Botanic
Gardens at Kew is a rite of
early spring as British as
breakfast tea, a chance to
celebrate the hardy flow-
ers that seem to grow like
magic on trees and rocks.
Their ornate blossoms
offer welcome reassur-
ance that better days are
near- as do the bulbs just
starting to sprout in the
beds of one of the world's
oldest and best known
botanical gardens.
"It's so brightly color-
ful," said Rich Cooper,
leaving the glasshouse
with a sweaty smile.
"You're trapped inside by
cruel weather for some
time and suddenly, even in
the rain, you can come to
an almost tropical spot
and just see lush jungle
color It's just beautiful."
The festival draws a


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


cult-like following of like-
minded enthusiasts, in-
cluding many who, like the
58-year-old Cooper, return
year after year Officials
won't release precise fig-
ures, but they say the
month-long orchid extrav-
aganza doubles atten-
dance at a normally slow
time of year
This year's display high-
lights the grit of Victorian-
era orchid hunters, who
spent months or years on
perilous expeditions de-
signed to bring exotic
plants from places like
Papua New Guinea and
the Amazon basin back to
London, where rare or-
chids could sell for tens of
thousands of pounds
(dollars).
It is a testament to the
softer side of Empire -
not the hubris of the
British expeditionary
forces, but the curiosity of
the British scientist, col-
lector and eccentric.
"It must have been hor-
rific in Victorian times,"
conservatory manager
Nick Johnson said. "It took
a few months sea voyage to
get out to these places.
They had to hire 40 or 50
people to take equipment


DEB INFANTINE-Realtor
Cell: 352-302-8046 OFFICE: 352-726-5855
S EAmerican Realty & Investments
E S117 S. Hwiy. 41 *Inverness, FIL
ONE OWNER CUSTOM
BUILT HOME on 5-pretty
acres. Three large
bedrooms (possibly five),
2.5 baths, 2002 archt.
shingle roof, large bonus
room, formal LR, den,
formal DR, new kitchen
cabinetry, tile floors,
stainless steel appliances
under i-yr old, family RM
with fireplace, loads of
closets, covered front and rear porches, manicured grounds.
Close to shopping, schools and hospital. MLS# 705434 $275,000
WELL CARED FOR
CITRUS HILLS
POOL HOME
Builder upgrades
include: 3 bed, 2 bath,
double door entry,
9' ceilings, cove
ceilings, bay windows,
rounded corners,
formal LR, formal DR,
large covered lanai,
updated kitchen, family RM and breakfast nook. Laminate floors
thru-out, large spa-like master bath with his and her walk-in
closets, 8' sliding doors, pool recently re-tiled, 15-zone sprinkler
system, security system. MLS# 707256 $224,900


into the field, through
dangerous territory, and
they lost a lot of people.
They would collect or-
chids from the Andes, and
they would get rotten be-
fore they were even
loaded onto ships. That's
weeks and weeks worth of
work lost."
The display includes let-
ters back to Kew from
hunters in the field and a
replica of a makeshift
hunters' camp as it would
have been set up in the
1880s.
"This British obsession
with orchids has lasted 150
years now," Johnson said.
"We try to do a little edu-
cation but at the same time
have a little fun and add a
bit of color to peoples'
lives this time of year"


Get acquainted with the


garden of your new home


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Americans are a rest-
less bunch. They change
locations with a frequency
that would tire a migrat-
ing songbird.
But there is more to mov-
ing day than unpacking
boxes; there's also learning
to care for that garden in-
herited with the new home.
If you were thinking
ahead, you asked for an
inventory of the plants


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
oFF: (352) 795-6633
WWWAT VYRVUOM -. AAT FQ(0 AT FYR COM


Raltor


and accessories that came
with the house.
"There's no problem
with asking owners for a
list of landscape items
and for an explanation
about the plantings," said
Shirley French, an agent
with the Woodstock, Va.,
office of Funkhouser Real
Estate Group. "Usually,
the owners are more than
happy to give you a list. In
fact, if they know the pur-
chasers are interested,
that will make for good


feelings on both sides."
Gardening priorities are
determined mostly by the
seasons. You won't be
mowing the lawn in Febru-
ary, although you might be
combing the seed catalogs.
But where to start with a
newly purchased property?
Michael Becker, presi-
dent of Estate Gardeners
Inc. in Omaha, Neb., sug-
gests that putting safety
first

See GARDEN/Page E15


1 e Im m. 1


INGLIS 2001 Skyline w3 bedrooms,
2 baths, newly remodeled, on 2 lots BEVERLY HILLS totally renovated
(2 acres), cathedral ceilings, inside 2 bedrm, I bath, family rn & laundry.
laundry, secluded &prvate. Lg. living rm, New central A/C, carpets, interior paint,
dining rm, kitchen. Easy access to Gulf of ceiling fans w/lights. Fenced yard. Neat,
Mexico. #702563 $80,000 clean, bright, airy. #700983 $89,900


CITRUS SPRINGS very nice older home
w/2 bedrooms, I bath, open living/dining
room I car carport, fenced backyard, 1Ox7
utility shed. Convenient location, close to
community amenities. #708004 $46,900




HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side by side
Well maintained; fully leased @ $600/
month; roi 10.6%; all new roofs in 2001 &
2002 and central A/C units installed in
2004. 2-wells, each bldg has own septic
system. #703762; $396,000




DUNNELLON 1998 Nobility D/W M/I
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2.5 acres.
Master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
shower. Country kitchen, vaulted ceilings,
16 x 20 workshop w/electric, inside
laundry. #703976 $55,000


HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home,
I bedroom, I bath, neat & clean w/circular
driveway half way between Crystal River
and Homosassa. 2 lots, 2 sheds, glassed in
screen porch Fully furnished. #703608


BEVERLY HILLS excellent condition,
move in condition, Pergo floors, glass
porch on back, awning to keep house
cool, decorative driveway, beautifully
landscaped, nice neighborhood of newer
homes. 705297 $150,000


LECANTO 2 separate parcels- total of
3 mobile homes buildings, center of
county, I well, 2 septics. Appointment
only. One rented for $450/mo. #703819
$106,000


IuIIKVVUUUI1-VIKnI1)), rL DARiK UWVtiIU-LKDIAL KIVtK, tL
Cozy 2BR home situated on 1.15 acres. 3BR/2BA home with office iLn Shmrock Acres.
Great location. $66,900 MLS#708261 1 25 acres. $159,900 MLS#708173
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours (352) 302-6714 Email: ro ass@tampaay.rrcom www.allcusrealty.com


WONDERING IF

YOU SHOULD

SELL YOUR

HOME?

WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$12.2 million closed in 2013

Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
To Learn More
(352) 746-9924









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

To place an ad, call 003-5966

7Rea]Esat 7Classifieds

Cisa ................ In Print

~and

Online

~All

~The Time


n Fax 1 50 11 1 11 1 ;:: ll e (01 5-34 1 Iriall : 013S[ I fi led t.h.:- i leoin.o I: wesie wwI--n eoiln


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HERNANDO
(No Pets) 2BPRI BA,
All Appi's $395.mo
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815

HERNANDO
(No Pets) 3BR/2BA,
All Appi's $495.mo
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815




1999 Mobile Home
28x60, bank owned,
Repo, Great Shape
Financing Available.
Call 352-795-1272
K MUST SEEK

ATTENTION:
Custom order a new
home and receive
20% OFF, between
now and tax day.
April 15th.
Factory direct,
Call (352) 621-3807


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2x6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C
Call (352) 621-9183

Palm Harbor Homes
2014 Models are here!
$8,500 Pre-
Construction Savings
John Lyons (
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details


SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 1,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now'
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




FLORAL CITY
3/2-1+AC, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $91,900
716-807-8847




2 Bedroom, Large La-
nai, front porch, car-
port, 2 sheds, corn
pletely turn.
Inverness, very nice
$34,000 cash
(989) 781-6066


V THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/ screened
patio on over % acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512

3/2/1 DW MH
1/ acre corner lot
exc. cond. open floor
plan, laundry room,
all appl, Ig scn porch,
fenced,3 carports,
shed, Homosassa,
$51k 352- 410-1072
4/3, 32x80, w/ 2 master
suites in Homosassa.
2006 MH, Must See!!
Owner Financing Avail
Ready to move in *
(352) 795-1272

HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4
acres, must see inside,
nice & Clean $42,000
(will consider reasona-
ble cash offers)
352-465-7606


Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre.
New bathrooms, Ig
screened porch,
dead end rd.
$45,900. 352-302-1383

Mobile Homes with
acreage. Ready to
move in.
Seller Financing
(subject to credit
approval).
Lots of room for the
price, 3Br 2Ba.
No renters.
850-308-6473
VMFhomes.com

Owner Financing
Available for Mobile
Homes!
Call for Details
352-795-2377
Ready To Move In
3/2 with large back
deck on 1.5 acres.
Close to town
call 352-795-2377

West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA Mobile
Detached Garage
Scn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most turn.
Rent $408/mo Ind
water, sewer, trash,
pool and clubhouse
$15,000 (352) 344-5172
2BD/1 BA Singlewide
with added fam. rm
rasied deck, Ig. shed,
furnished 55+ $184 mo
Reduced Price $5,500,
(352) 726-3726
2Br, IBa in 55+ Park
carport, shed, wshop,
scorned Patio In great
shape, fully turn. Ask-
ing $15k, $225/mo lot
rent. 352-419-4428
55+ MH Gated Com-
munity. Large 3/2,
2000 Jacobson Triple
Wide. 2000+ sq. ft.
Ready to move in.
$68K. Serious inquir-
ies only. Owner will fi-
nance with $20K
down.
727-967-4230

Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273


AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf, over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077


AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
2/1 carport/rf. over
Storage shed, $6,500
furn, 55+ park, clean
quiet, move in ready
780 S Suncoast Blvd
Homo.352-220-2077



For Sale

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858

Lecanto Hills
2br/lba in 55+ comm.
Must Sell $3000
(352) 302-8886

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classifiedsi






MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financing. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374


-ACflON4
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC
352-795-7368
$850 & UNDER
9218 N. Satinwood Terr.
3/2/2,1254 sq. ft.
272 N. Big Oaks Pt.
2/2/2,1510 sq ft.
7416 W. Kendale Ct.
3/2, D/W on an Acre
$650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/2, 992 sq. ft
504 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1,816 sq. ft
229 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1, Fenced, 1072 sq. ft
8469 W. Drew Ct.
2/2, M/H on Cnl w/Boat Dock
For More Listings Go To
',w.Citrus(ountyHonseRetnals.O

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!


3/2/2 ...... .... $850
3/2/2 ................... $875
2/1/1 .................... $650
2/1 ....................... $500
2/2/1 Condo $700


2/2/1 ................... $650


2/2/Carport $575
MOBILE
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010






IInc

[333 N. Crf Av e ue


(354)637-3800




END OF FEBRUARY
SPECIAL!
Inverness
1 Bedroom Apts.
$400/month. Inc Water,
trash, pest, and lawn maine
Will include washer/dryer
with new lease
Signed before Feb. 28,2014





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 furnished apt util.
incl. $550. first mo. +
Sec. (352) 795-2746

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. Sec $450
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





LECANTO
2/2, eat-in Kit.
screened porch, laundry
room, CHA, near new
Walmart $550. Ist/Sec,
352-746-4191 or
352-697-5900


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for I & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 E13


CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS


I BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Mnthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer.




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Inc Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514




CRYSTAL RIVER
Professional Office
Bldg. New construc./
Brick 1,200 sf, beauti-
fully landscaped
$1,200. mo., 794-7425




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/Carport, Furnished
& Unfurn. Extra Clean.
(352) 613-4459
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $775. mo
+ util and security dep.
(352) 382-8935




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm. Scrn por.
$600. 352-464-2514

Beverly Hills
No Pets. 2/1, all appl,
$495. (352) 860-0904
(352)212-6815

INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411

INVERNESS
3/2/2, all appliances,
$725 + 1st, last, sec.Off
Croft 352-634-1070

INVERNESS
3/212, Spacious, bright
Close to Downtown
No Pets, 352-400-5723

INVERNESS
Beautiful 2/1, gated
comm. 55+ pool, clb
hse activities. $650 +
dep. (330) 806-9213
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850.
352-726-7212

INVERNESS
Waterfront Lake Nina
4/3, beautiful yard,
huge lanai, $1200/mo
1st, last, sec
(734) 417-1737


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classifieds!





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



INVERNESS
4/2 1600sq ft House for
rent 2 carports on canal.
Large yard, boat dock.
$1000.00mo. First and
security required. Back-
ground check required
($25.00)Available March
1st. 727-871-4222




New Log Home*
on 10+ acres only
$89,900 3 Bed,
2 bath log home
with direct river
access. Convenient
to downtown Jack-
sonville. Excellent
financing. Call now
877-525-3033, x.19
*Constructed
weather-tight log
home shell. EHO


DEB
THOMPSON

One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.

Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb~vahoo.com
and
debthomonUC.cm

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


RelEstt









E14 Sunday, February 23, 2014


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
'Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
cross landrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.













40-32079
oAutonee






Shue rBShuer
RE Auc I
AB#9/AU#14/
AU 1077






ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amil.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-94961464-2514






Use Your TAX Money
For a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
HID., 2 BTH., 1,207 sf.
Located at
9203 N. Justa Dr. Cit-
rus Springs $104,900.
Visit: www.roseland

co.com\C49
Drive by then Call
1 (866) 51- 1234





Attractive 2 Bd/2BA
Home near library.
please call for d etails

DBy Owner, asking
4,900. No calls after
9pm (352) 746-3919

Laurel Ridge 3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks

house & pool.) 1754 SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kit w/ pantry &
nook. MER has 2 cos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639


Newly UpdaTed 2/2/2
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
3229 N Juniperus Way
$114,900 352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased







For Slo
Beautiful home you
are looking for! 4
bedroom. 2 bath, 2
car garage in gated
community large
14K sq. ft. lot, cus-
tom pool many up-
grades. 3300 sq.
ft.Can email info.For
Sale by Owner NO
brokers please!
352-601-6942
352-513-4463


....... "0 IN ii
MEADOWCREST
606,0 W. Cr oyden Circle in Crystal River
3/2/2 Open House!
7 Check out this ste .al. Home listed at $93,900.

Call Kristi Bortz for Details (352) 228-9505


Hoe










Great Starte Home
S. LttleJohn Ave.
Inverness
2/2 Single Fa mily
Attached Garage
Lease or Cash
Call For Deatails
877-500-9517


For Wae 1104
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, end,. porch,
(352) 726-7367





For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Apopt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.



IIsss '


TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate
I'm there for you

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!






For Sale u
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

SECLUDED
3BR/2BA, 1653sf 2 car
CP 2 story barn.
Includes /4 acre
buildable lot. $109,900
352-613-2289





Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes com.



Spacious 2/2/1 with
New roof, ACA &win-
dows, Inclds all Kit ap-
pliances. Sunroom
overlooking Green-
belt. Inside utility rm.
$85 ,000 352-422-3256


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.

Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists

Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I '11 work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


BEMIY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bioowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




Buying or Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone@tamoabav.rr
com

ERA American
Realty &
Investments


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty

Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.

Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www .Citrus~Sold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


t Zkelr'"
Williams Realty

Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.

Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol

www.CitrusSold.com

"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL..
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classifieds!


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it

352-476-9649
sandra.ha@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


CirsC u tl'


Cir s o l


I=1


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
















FulDurnisedVer
Here's Your
Chance" TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000

Ower Financina
$10,000 Down,
10 Vrs 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886





















LaeCondosel
RealU InSe

Citrus Hills Townhouse
2br/22-ba + carport
Fully Furnished Very
nice, many extra'
near pool, great view
Must See $79,000
(352) 527-4518

Inverness Village
Condo 2/2, 55+ ground
floor over looks pool,
mature trees, 1035 sq. ft
living area. $39,900
352-634-3976





HOMOSASSA- Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000 352-422-1311


INVERNESS, 2BR/1 BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$1 25.000,352-422-4749


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


528 SW 1st Court
3 bedrm., 2-1/2 bath
Exciting opportunity
to live on Paradise
Isles in the heart of
Crystal River, Flor-
ida with two sided
deep, crystal clear
water and access to
the Gulf of Mexico.
Located across from
a 57 acre wilderness
preserve and a man-
atee sanctuary.
Watch the dolphins
and manatees play
in your own back
yard. Paddle board,
kayak, See Doo,
boating and water
skiing to your hearts
content. This %Ahalf
acre property has 2
docks, one with a
10,000 pound lift and
220 foot sea wall.
This beautiful 3,2 %
home has granite
counter tops, 2 fire
places, 2 % car gar-
age, hurricane win-
dows and doors,
panoramic water
view, sunrise and
citrus fruit trees.
Enjoy low utilities
with hot water on
demand and water
to air AC. This prop-
erty won't last,
priced to sell at
$585,000. Owner
will finance part.
1(352)795-7400


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hm


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty













Teoprrisoned













myArbories"5+
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


4 ADJOINING LOTS
Total lAcre MOL
Close to Town Gospel
Island Gunn Ct.
$14,000. Make Offer
(352) 726-2038




MUST SELL


HERNANDO
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
Lot for sale $15,000
OBO. 781-864-1906
352- 726-2821

Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner





PARADISE! OZELLO!
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583


WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 10 uuft on
water. All utilities.
$165,000.352-634-1171






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GARDEN
Continued from Page E12

"Check out the dangers," said
Becker, a spokesman for Planet,
the Professional Landcare Net-
work that certifies green industry
professionals. 'Are the retaining
walls stable? Are any trees lean-
ing or diseased with dead
branches?
'Assess the hardscape," Becker
said. "Is anything heaving, creat-
ing tripping hazards? Examine
the drainage around the house.
More often than not, it isn't cor-
rect and may be damaging the
structure. Bring in some profes-
sionals to help sort things out."
As for plantings, be patient with
the perennials.
"Go through the seasonal
changes," Becker said. "Learn


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 E15


what things look like in your yard.
Determine if it's aesthetically
what you want, or if it's so high-
maintenance you won't have the
time to care for it. Most perennials
need pruning and deadheading."
Other things to consider when
dealing with an unfamiliar
landscape:
0 Make note of the average
frost dates. Do soil tests. Map the
yard for sun and shade. "If you
live in the city and all you have is
a porch or a patio to work with,
where is all that water going to go
that you'll be putting on plants?"
asked Josh Kane, president and
head designer at Kane Land-
scapes Inc. in Sterling, Va. 'Also,
where do you get the water?
You'll have to figure out how to
care for everything."
0 Water fixtures. "Look for care
instructions when dealing with
special features," Kane said. 'A


lot of people get put off or are
scared of things like koi ponds,
pools and fountains that require
startups, maintenance and atten-
tion during the seasons."
0 Don't try to do everything the
first year Mulching will keep the
weeds down. Composting will im-
prove the soil. Bringing in some
annuals for window boxes, hang-
ing baskets or containers will pro-
vide instant color "Nothing gives
you as much impact in a garden
as planting annuals," Kane said.
0 Anticipate. Avoid planting
trees or shrubs near sewer or
water lines, to prevent root dam-
age. Study the plat map for re-
strictions that could prevent
expansions or additions. 'A lot of
people might want to build a big
outdoor room or pool and find
they can't do it because of an
easement on the property,"
Kane said.


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A new home owner's prebuilt Sunshine GardenHouse made from
a kit that he added to his yard, to greatly extend the growing sea-
son in the cool coastal climate of Whidbey Island, in Langley,
Wash. It's being used for everything from seed starting and grow-
ing tomatoes and sweet corn to relaxing with a good book on
days when it's too wet to garden.


SpcaiigiTerVit
&enwReaes.


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODSIDE
4 bedroom split plan, 2 full baths and separate office/den. Custom-built shelving n the great
room and dining room, lots oftile. Home features living room and family roomwh a ge eat n
kitchen. This home has a great unobstructed view sitting on th e hill on a quiet cul-
de-sac. Come see Florida active life style living atits best. MLS 7085 .............. $379,000


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 7466121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
(Ail MANl 3.2.112.Q7R7. S[J.qAN Miiil FN 352.422.21 VlCTORIA F ANKI IN 12.427.1777


UOLIALMILU VILLA, .53 LU, Z.0 DAM, LU, LRLVILWV VILLA3
Enjoy life at Terra Vista in this popularWindward model. Home offers over 2100sf of living space,
BRENTWOOD VILLAS 3bedrooms PLUS De n-ample space for famly and friends. Abuts a Green Belt in the rear giving
Brentwood' community of Citrus your outdoor pool and entertaining activities lots of privacy. The Green Beltin the rear offers a
:he lanai. Sliding glass door to a hard to find setting in Terra Vista. Oversized home site provides lots of space between home.
a den. Home is filled with natural Rare find in a maintained home setting. Casual great room setting with a natural gas "wood'
d MLS707603 $169,000 stove and a separate formal dining room.A MUST SEE LIST.MLS 706998 .............. $289,900


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Be part of one of Florida's premier resort communities in the maintenance-free villa DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
located the Village of Brentwood at Citrus Hills. Home close to Brentwood Fitness & DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Exquisite villa 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, plus den and pool in prestigious Terra Vista. Many
Pool Facility &the Brentwood Golf Course. Open floor plan allows you a casual Florida SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD Lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is ideal place for any occasion, whether seasonal use, beautiful upgrades including porcelain tile floors throughout, formal dining room with
lifestyle. Features a Florida Room for year-round comfort. Master suite offers large Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, spit-plan home in Brentwood. Great room, dining room, retirement, or full time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large yard, custom chair-height molding, professional window treatments throughout, custom maple
walk-in closet, spacious vanity & walk-in shower in the bathroom. "Social spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar a no cozy nook, inside laund ry room and a 2-car o formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what you've been cabinetry in the great room, den and kitchen have under cabinet lighting & pullouts, gas
Membership" is required, providing you access to an array ofworld class amenities. All garage. NO monthly maintenance fee with this single family home. Access to the Citrus Hills ioolang for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoythe social life that comes fireplace. Aquarium-windowed breakfast nook gives you an incredible view overlooking
this is available in one of Brentwood's GREATESTvalue. MLS 704580 ............. $99,900 and Terra Vista amenities, too! MLS 704406 .............................................................. $123,000 withthe social membership! MLS 703807 ........................................................... $288,000 the Oth fairway of the popular Skwiw Golf Course. MLS704750 ..................... $319,000


Terms 6 Mos or More
Te rait Br nt oo R a ls Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE
BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 2 BED 2.5 BATH 1 CAR Come live the Florida lifestyle in this lovely unfurnished 3 bedroom, Custom Martinique modelwith a lovely garden view from the lanai. Thishome hasaformal Wow! Come take a look at this single family home with 4 bedrooms
Unfurnished Brentwood Townhome 2 Bedrooms and 2.5 Bathrooms 2 bath, 2-ear garage, detached villa in Brentwood Rent includes living room aowell as a separate familyroom. Cookswill ovethe large pantrywith plenty plus a den. Very spacious unfurnished home with lots to offer.Social
1 car garage Social M embership included. #6017 ..................... $1,050 Social M embership and law n maintenance. #2191 ................. $1,200 ofstorage.Lotsoftile. The home wllbe rented unfurnished. #1250 ........................ $1,450 m em dbership included #1131 ............................................................................ $1,950.


.ll


I. J


| ,I








E16Sunday, February 23, 2014


This 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home is located
adjacent to the Withlacoochee State Forest which
is filled with miles and miles of horse trails for
your trail riding pleasure. The 2.43 acres includes
a spacious 2 stall stable, a tack area, 2 large
outbuildings, and a detached carport.
MLS #708676 ASKING $72,500
Call Luke Whitehurst 476-5578


" U U III UUII[ III -U
* 3/2/2 PLUS den
* Caged pool/RV pad
* Large shed, fenced yard
* High tray ceilings, fireplace
MLS #708008 $219,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrl 352-212-3410
wwwCitrusCountvSold.com


Custom built by Sweetwater homes. 3 bedrooms
w/office or 4th bedroom, style and space
throughout this showplace. Wood cabinets, tile
floors, formal dining, elegant master suite opens to
caged swimming pool area. Fenced yard, boat dock,
3 car garage on 1 acre waterfront. MLS #706933.
PROUDLY OFFERED AT $329,900
Call Karen Morton 352-212-7595


Brand new roof and pool screening! Inverness
Golf Estates, 3 bdrm, 2 bath- custom built
home by Avanzini. Pool has been newly retiled
8 cleaned. Public water, public sewer and so
much more! Call for an appointment today!.
MLS #707083 ASKING $129,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072


iEW.

This beautiful
light and
bright home
boasting open
floor plan with pocket doors to the large lanai
and solar heated I.G. pool, gives you the
felling you are in a tropical paradise. Boasts
3 bdrms, split plan, 2 full baths, 2 car garage.
Home has many upgrades, includes, inside
laundry, extended lanai with beautiful tile
floors, new carpet, and much more.
A must see. ASKING $169,900
Call Martha Snyder 352476-8727
and ask for file MLS #708627


MOVE-IN CONDITON AND AFFORDABLE
Spacious 2/1.5/2 home with enclosed porch,
2 sheds with electric and partially fenced hack-
yard. This home has been well maintained, is super
clean and move-in ready. NO HOA. OK to park RV.
Minutes from town with low county taxes.
MLS #705204 ASKING $68,900
Pat Davis (352)212-7280
View listing: wwwc2atdavis.com


COUNTRY ACREAGE ON PAVED ROAD
10 HIGH AND DRYACRES WITH 2/2/1 HOME.
Zoned for horse with close forest access offering
many miles of trails for riding. Home features open
plan with Fla. Room and screen porch. If you're
looking for some privacy and elbow room, THIS IS IT
MLS #705375 ASKING $148,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280
View listing wwwc21atdavis.com


3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths on 7+ acres. Mature
open pasture for your horses and cross
fenced. Large screened patio overlooking
majestic oaks. Detached garage with a half
bath, also a RV hookup plus a 21x20 metal
shed. Enter your country paradise through a
key padded security gate.
MLS #708203 ASKING $189,000
Call Dan Gaddi 954-551-3215


Inverness JtH, Z Datn poor nome
* 2.8 Acres, detached workshop 24 X 28
* Open kitchen with wood cabinets
* Granite 22 X 25 great rm., 14' tray ceiling
* Wood floors, 10' ceilings, 8' doors
* Den/office, jetted tub, much, much more
MLS #708661 ONLY $317,500
Call Charles Kelly 352422-2387


AMAZING NEW PRICE!
*Citrus Hills *Pool Home *Golf Course
This one has it all! New kitchen,
granite tops, beautiful pool
overlooking the "Oaks" Golf Course.
MLS #703963
PRICED RIGHT AT $199,900
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


THIS HOME LOOKS LIKE IT
JUMPED OFF A MAGAZINE PAGE!
3BR, 2 new baths, & 2+ car garage. Totally
remodeled for your enjoyment. Laminate & tile floors.
Stainless appliances. New wood cabinets & counters.
Double panned windows. New A/C. fenced yard.
Shed. Close to boat launch & trail so much morel
MLS #708640 $110,000
Call Doris Miner for appointment
352-726-6668 or 422-4627 (cell)


COUNTRY LIVING THAT IS
NOT FAR FROM TOWN
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home,
sits on 16 acres with fenced pasture
and rolling hills.
MLS #708595 ASKING $325,000
Call Jim Morton 422-2173
to see the lovely farm


YUU UWE IT TU YUURSELF iU SEE iHIS BEAUTIFUL HUME
IN PRIME LOCATION MAKE OFFER! This beautiful,
traditional style home is ideally located on 1.41 in-town
acres. 3/2.5/2 features great room with fpl., formal din.,
sunny FIrm. Kitchen updated, granite, stainless appls.
Beautiful wood and tile flooring. Bonus rm. off kit. ROCKING
CHAIR FRONT PORCH. Five mins. to schools, hospital,
shopping. Choice home in choice location. MLS #704772
PRICED FAR BELOW REPLACEMENT AT $218,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280
View listing and visual torL: www.c21Latdavis.com


4/2 WITH DETACHED 2 CAR GARAGE. Spacious home
on .64 acre home site that offers lots of privacy.
Living room with wood-burning fireplace, formal
dining, solid surface countertops, new appliances,
screen room and patio. All this home needs is a new
owner. Everything is done here. Move right in.
MLS #708386 ASKING $138,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7280
See All Listings: www. c2latdavis.com


LAND, LOTS OF LAND!
Two of the most gorgeous building lots in
the county! Side-by-side in subdivision of
fine well kept homes, and a view of
endless rolling pastures to gladden your
eyes. $19,900 each, owner may
negotiate with sale of both lots.
MLS #704543 and MLS #704547
Ask for Marilyn Booth 637-4904


4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH ON A
VERY PRIVATE SETTING,
AND YET SO CLOSE TO TOWN
Built-in 2007, all appliances included.
MLS #708674
Call Isaac Baylon 352-697-2493
for a personal tour


Features 1680 SF living area, fireplace,
tray ceilings, and crown molding.
Just professionally painted inside.
ONLY $99,900
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


" iODyISi wanrea
" Nice 2/2 on 1/2 acre
" 2 detached garages.
" 24'x40' and 25'x4O'
" Water to air heat pump
MLS #357895 $79,900
Jeanne & Willard Pickrel 212-3410
www. CitrusCountySoldfcor


zbb b. ranKlin terrace
" Inverness Golf f Country Club
" 3BR, 2 bath, 2 car gar
* POOL, fenced, 2 lots, shed
MLS #704237 REDUCED $170,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410


CANTERBURY LAKE ESTATES
Lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath home home with
over 1700 sf of living area. Summer kitchen in
the lanai and a hot tub/spa make outdoor
entertaining easy and fun! City water & sewer.
Don't let this one pass you by call today!
MLS #708269 ASKING $125,000
Call Nancy Jenks at 352400-8072


* 3 bedroom, Z .b bath, I'UUL home
* Landscaped 1.5 acres, self-cleaning POOL
* WOOD floors, new appliances SPOTLESS
* CITRUS HILLS MEMBERSHIP
MLS #706908 $232,747
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www. CitrusCountySold. com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
































COUNTY
lol


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-AIL]






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Paid Advertisement

Over 32 Years Of Service In Citrus

Nick Nicholas came to Citrus County Nichola
32 years ago and acquired what was C-Max
Citrus Ford at the time. Having several Hybrid,
years of experience with both Ford mpg.
Motor Company and other Ford H If a
dealerships, he chose Citrus County and Heritag
Inverness to start his own path in the Mustan
automobile industry. k h The
A few years after operating in world b
Inverness, Mr. Nicholas opened a a top se
satellite dealership in Crystal River has bee
under the name Gulf Coast Ford. Expedit
Starting with a mere 30 employees, after The
expanding to the second facility in dealers
Crystal River he now employs over 100 selling
people. preown
Both dealerships have expanded Lincoln
several times in all areas of sales and vehicles
service, and there is even a large a worry
collision center at the Inverness a N N i ho asSo if
dealership for any accident or paint please v
related repair. Adding that luxury brand really brought name in the form of a Navigator, MKZ, dealers
Just a few years a go, Mr. Nicholas what the Nick Nicholas family of MKX or MKS, totally compliments the a 5-tin
added the Lincoln nameplate to the dealerships could offer the residents of fact of having the #1 selling truck for 37 Presidei
Crystal River Dealership, now operating Citrus County to a full circle. years the F-Series truck. Compar
under Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln. lfferinr the lxyur of the I inonln If fuel -ffioi-ncx is ouir need Nick exnerier


G2 Sunday, February 23, 2014


Come Test Drive America's Freshest Lineup


*1 LI NCOLN


NICK NICHOLAS

IN CRYSTAL RIVER

Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River
TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371 795-7371
Sales : Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM; Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM, Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
www.nicknicholasford.com 7
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 7


Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



County

s has that too with the the new
Hybrid, Fiesta, Focus and Fusion
all have the capability of 40

sports car is in your future, the
e and performance of the
g is unmatched.
all new Explorer has taken the
y storm and is quickly becoming
ller in the SUV market that ford
n the leader in with the Escape,
ion and of course the Explorer.
Nick Nicholas family of
lips has always prided itself on
the cleanest and best quality
ed vehicles available. Ford and
Certified Program preowned
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you have any automotive needs,
visit the Nick Nicholas family of
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ne winner of the prestigious
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iy and put their 32 plus years of
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to, .7 .7 .7 1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS Sunday, February 23, 2014 G3

Paid Advertisement



The best real estate has to offer


EXIT Realty Leaders, a franchise of
EXIT Realty International, has been owned
and operated by the Wade family since
1999. The Wade family has been selling
real estate in Citrus County for over 30
years!
Despite the tumultuous years that the
real estate industry has suffered, EXIT
Realty Leaders has not only survived but
thrived. They were able to open a third
office in Yankeetown, which was only
possible through the hard work and
dedication of their professional and diligent
realtors and their extremely loyal
customers.
The company was named Best of the
Best for the past three years-and at least
one of their agents was named Best of the
Best for each of those three years, too.
"If you are looking for a great career
opportunity, now is the time to get involved
in the real estate market. We are always
looking for new dynamic agents to bring
EXIT Realty Leaders to the next level!"
says Gene Wade.
We would like to introduce a few of
their agents.


+ MICHAEL STOKLEY is at your
service whether you're selling or buying,
from residential and commercial to condos,
mobiles, and vacant land. A member of
Kiwanis, Michael is also a member of the
Economic Development Council and is a
Key Training and Hospice volunteer.
+ NANCY LITTLE LEWIS was born
and raised on the west coast of Florida. She
specializes in the Inglis and Yankeetown
areas, acreage, and hunting land, and is
very knowledgeable about the local
waterfront and riverfront areas.
+ MARY GULLING entered the
profession in January of 2006, and even
though she started just as the real estate
bubble broke, she wonders why she didn't
get into it sooner. "I love this business,"
she says. "It's become a passion." She's
closed over $1 million each year since
2008, was a multi-million dollar producer
in 2012 and 2013, and has closed over $1
million so far in 2014.
+ JOHN MAISEL has been licensed
since 2006, and in spite of the downturn in
the housing market, has consistently grown
his business and been a multi-million dollar


producer year after year. He prides himself
on his strong negotiation skills and forward
thinking, and enjoys using these skills in
the best interests of his clients. He sits on
the Board of Directors for the REALTORS
Association of Citrus County and the MLS
Board of Managers. His 38 transactions
totaled $4.6 million in sales in 2013, and he
was voted Best of the Best Real Estate
Agent in 2011. He's been happily married
to his amazing wife for 21 years, and is the
proud father of three beautiful girls.
+ STEVE MCCLORY and ALLISON
MARIIAM are your full-time real estate
duo. Consistently multi-million dollar
producers, this team is dedicated to
providing the highest level of customer
service. They combine knowledge,
experience, and customer service expertise
to exceed your expectations.
+ TAMI SCOTT has been with EXIT
Realty in Citrus County for 12 years. When
working with Tami, you can be sure that
you are represented to the fullest. Whether
buying or selling, you can trust Tami Scott!
+ BECKY PARADISO was voted
Citrus County Chronicle Best of the Best in


2012, and has been a Realtor since 2000.
She and her husband have been Citrus
County residents since 1991, and have
raised two children here. She utilizes her
vast experience living in the county to
offer her customers exceptional and
knowledgeable service, and is consistently
a multi-million dollar producer.
THE REAL TEAM is here for you!
Sherri Orendorf, Trisha Antonetti, and
Bernadette Poorman have the experience
and proven track record in traditional sales
and the short sales process. They closed 48
transactions in 2013, 22 of which were
short sales. Together, they're simplifying
the process of buying and selling real
estate in today's market.
EXIT Realty Leaders has three
convenient locations to serve you,
730 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River, 5018
Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, and
5 63rd Street Yankeetown. Contact them
at (352) 794-0888, (352) 527-1112,
(352) 447-2595 or online at
www.exitrealtyleaders.com.


The Choice Is Clear. Choose The Best.










CHAEL NANCY LITTLE MARY JOHN STEVE MCCLORY TAMI BECKY THE REAL TEAM
OKLEY LEWIS GULLING MAISEL ALLISON MARHAM SCOTT PARADISO Sherri Orendorf,
Bernadette Poorman


W vvvvw w.exi.,trealtyleaders.,com


nk 3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!

alty Leaders 352-794-0888 352-527-1112 352-447-4594


MI
ST


Re







G4 Sunday, February 23, 2014

Paid Advertisement



When work needs


to be done, the


"YES MAN" can


Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric, Inc. is home
of the "Yes Man"
When it comes to plumbing and electrical
services you can expect the answer to be Yes!
Since 1979 Suncoast Plumbing & Electric,
Inc. has offered Citrus and surrounding
counties with the best in quality and highest
level of customer service for plumbing and
electrical work.
The company was founded in August 1979
by Rick & Sandi Workman as a small business
selling retail parts and offering many phases of
plumbing contracting and electrical services.
On Saturdays and after school, Rick &
Sandi's son, Todd Workman, worked at the
shop and in the field. In 1989, Todd became
the youngest person to get a Master
Plumber's license in the state of Florida.
Rick & Todd are licensed by exam and offer a
combined total of 70 plus years' experience
in plumbing.
In 1991, Todd's wife Jenni joined the
Suncoast family by becoming a valuable part
of the office staff. Nine years later, in early
2000, Todd and Jenni purchased the business
from Rick & Sandi.
Fourteen years have gone by since Todd &
Jenni have purchased the company, but just as
ever, they continue to still offer the best in
plumbing and electrical contracting. True to
any family business, it doesn't stop there.
Currently, their eldest son, Kyle, has been
with the company since high school, and is
currently studying for his Master Plumber's
exam. Kyle's forte is in the new construction
phase of plumbing.
Kyle's younger brother, Brady, recently
came on full time with his specialty being in
plumbing service. Brady is also studying for
his Master Plumber's exam. Todd, Kyle and
Brady are all certified in backflow preventer
installation and certification.
As truly a family business, Suncoast
Plumbing & Electric, Inc. will continue its
legacy of providing to each customer, high
quality personalized service, with this next
generation of plumbers.
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric, Inc.'s
office is located in Homosassa, but you can
find the "Yes Man" on the side of their trucks


Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AVAILABLE

24/7/365


throughout the county.
Don't be surprised to see them out and
about late into the evening, as Suncoast offers
24/7 service at NO EXTRA CHARGE! When
an emergency happens, the "Yes Man team"is
always available. You can rest assured that
when you call you are always answered by an
experienced member of the staff or the "Yes
Man" himself.
Some of the plumbing services Suncoast
Plumbing & Electric, Inc. offers are water
heater repair, water heater replacement, sewer
cleaning, drain field repair/ new installation,
video pipe inspection, slab leaks, remodeling,
backflow preventer installation and
certification, just to name a few.
For electrical services they offer main
panel change outs, electrical upgrades/repairs
and inspections among other services.
Day, night or weekends, even on holidays,
you can expect a competent, trained and
skilled service technician to provide you fast,
dependable and fair service.
At Suncoast, there is no job too small or
too big. Suncoast Plumbing works heavily
with several local builders on new homes and
remodels throughout Citrus and the entire
state of Florida. Local builders have trusted
the expertise and standards of Suncoast
Plumbing for new homes, businesses and
complete building alterations for years,
knowing that they are providing the best for
their customers. When you want it done right
from the ground up, the "Yes Man" can.
Anytime service, at no extra charge is also
offered to businesses as well.
The team at Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric, Inc. make it their business to make
sure your business is disturbed as little as
possible in the event of an emergency. They
also offer plumbing and electrical protection
plans which include inspection and
maintenance of fixtures and discounted rates
on service calls on repairs.
Scheduled service and routine inspections
reduce the number of service calls by
revealing potential problems that can be
corrected inexpensively before causing a
major repair or emergency.
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric, Inc. is
located at 6970 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446. Phone 352-628-6608.
www.yesmancan.net/


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS






CIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Our family
is here
to give comfort
to your family.
Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager,
Gailen Spinka, General Manager
and Lindsey Haller, Administrator


Gailen, Jennifer
& lindsey
discussing
quality care.
Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner,
Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison,
Lindsey Hailer, Administrator-Owner


NOW OFFERING
"Private Duty Nursing (PDN) Services."
Tube Feedings Wound Care
Ostomy Hygiene Medication Set-up
Catheter Hygiene Medication Administration





Comfort


Keepers..'.
Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888

In-Home Care Services that help people maintain
full and independent lives


Companionship
Meal Preparation
Laundry
Light Housekeeping
Medication Reminders


Escort for Shopping and
Doctor's Appointments
Bathing and
Incontinence Care
Alzheimer's/Dementia Care


2244~~~~~~~~~~ Hw.4 et nenss L(5)7644


We Are Comfort Keepers_


Comfort Keepers of Inverness
takes in-home care to a new level.
Since the business opened in 2004,
the mission has been to provide each
client the support necessary to
achieve the highest level of "Quality
of Life" that they can achieve while
remaining in their own home. Over
time we identified that some clients
needed more care than we were
licensed to provide. That is to stay in
their home they needed skilled or
medical care.
To meet that need we changed our
state licensing, employed
experienced nurses, went to classes at
CK Franchising, Inc. and now are
able to offer new services called
"Private Duty Nursing (PDN)
Services." PDN services are skilled
medical services such as tube
feedings, ostomy and catheter
hygiene, wound care, medication set-
up and administration,
For each client our goal is to
transform day-to-day caregiving into
opportunities for meaningful
conversation and activities that
engage and enrich the lives of seniors
physically, mentally, socially and
emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels
that their practice of "Interactive
Caregiving"TM contributes to
longer, healthier, more purposeful
lives for seniors.
Whether it is only a few hours a
week, or 24 hours a day, the
caregivers at Comfort Keepers make
it possible for seniors to continue to
live in their own home and enjoy a
quality of life that they thought was
going to change forever. "Interactive
Care-giving"TM reinforces seniors
self value by allowing them to
continue their daily activities with as
much independence as possible. The
focus is providing solutions for the
normal transition of aging.


In order to achieve the most
favorable outcome for each client,
Comfort Keepers carefully matches
caregivers and clients by
personalities, interests, skills and
needs. This extra consideration forms
the basis of strong, healthful
relationships. Comfort Keepers Care
Coordinators work as partners with
our client's family to provide their
loved one a complete in-home care
solution to promote independent
living.
To work with Comfort Keepers,
caregivers must pass stringent screening
and interviewing processes and must
show a strong devotion to others.
Only a few special people who
pass this process go on to complete
the training necessary to deliver this
special brand of care and become
"Comfort Keepers." All "Comfort
Keepers" pass extensive background
checks and complete continuing
education.
All "Comfort Keepers" are
employees of the company. They are:
Trained, Supervised, Insured with
Worker's Compensation and
Liability Insurance and Bonded.
Comforts Keepers is locally-
owned and family operated by
Deborah and Gailen Spinka and
daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort
Keepers is actively involved in the
community by participating and
being sponsors of local organizations
like, Chamber of Commerce,
Business Women's Alliance,
Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business
Masters and various health expos.
For in-depth information about
Comfort Keepers, visit the websites
at www.seniorservicesinvemessflorida.com
or stop by the local office at 2244
Highway 44 West. Inverness, Florida.
Phone: 352-726-4547


Sunday, February 23, 2014 G5


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS


Paid Advertisement


Comfort Keepers


Expands In-home



Care Services






G6 Sunday, February 23, 2014 PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
WELCOME to Botox Spa!
at
Richard C. Swanson, D.M.D., P.A.
"A PERSONALIZED ARTISTIC APPROACH TO BO TOX"

Lynn Swanson, MS., A.RNP.


MY PHILOSOPHY: Administering Botox is an art that requires
the discerning eye, knowledge, and skills of a experienced
practitioner who understands both the health and beauty aspects
behind the treatment. Every patient is unique. There is beauty in
every individual. I believe the purpose of Botox is to enhance the
natural beauty inherent in each individual and maximize a more
youthful appearance.

WHY BOTOX: Botox offers instant gratification to those who
undergo treatment to improve the physical attractiveness and
shapeliness of their face. Botox not only helps to diminish
wrinkles, it can be utilized to aid in wrinkle prevention as well.
Finally, Botox is a temporary cosmetic procedure (lasting 3 to 6
months), making it a great option for those not ready to commit to
more permanent solutions.

THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE: Patient comfort is of utmost
importance at Botox Spa, which meets the standards of the
International Spa Association. At Botox Spa, patients are treated in
state-of-the art treatment chairs equipped with massage and heat
controls. After discussing with the patient the goals they hope to
achieve and areas they hope to improve, I carefully evaluate and
map their unique facial structure. Subsequently, a customized
artistic treatment plan is created with recommendations that will
help give the patient the natural results they desire. It is important
to me that options are always discussed, and that treatment
proceeds at a pace the patient feels comfortable with, in a spa-like
environment that is private, comfortable and soothing. It is, in fact,
so relaxing that some patients have fallen asleep during treatment!
This may be attributed to the soothing music, green-tea scented
gloves, & aromatherapy also used to create the ultimate relaxing
Botox experience.


ABOUT LYNN SWANSON: Lynn Swanson is a licensed
Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP) with over 20
years of experience. She attained a
Master's degree with honors in 1992
from the University of South
Florida, and later received her
specialty training at the American
Academy of Facial Esthetics in
Houston, Texas. Lynn Swanson,
A.R.N.P., is also a member of the
International Spa Association
(ISPA). Lynn and her husband, Dr.
Richard Swanson, have made their
home and raised their three sons in
Citrus County since 1992. Her
interests include yoga, meditation,
nutrition, skin care, photography,
interior design, composing music,
kayaking and reading. She is also an accomplished pianist and
guitarist.

Botox Spa Services


Botox
" Crows feet
" Frown lines
" Worry lines
" TMJ
" Headaches


Juvederm
" Facial Contouring
" Adding volume to lips
* A long lasting solution to
smoothing wrinkles and
filling folds


1815 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
Please call the office at (352) 795-1223 for your personalized Botox treatment.
botoxspacrystalriver.com






CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS Sunday, February 23, 2014 G7









"A Personalized Artistic

Approach To Botox"

Enhance your natural beauty
Maximize a more youthful appearance
Improve the physical attractiveness and shapeliness of your face
Helps to diminishes wrinkles
Aids in wrinkle prevention

Your Botox & Dermal Filler options
are personalized to you.



Free Teeth Whitening!
All patients who schedule Botox Treatment will receive FREE
Comprehensive Exam, Custom Teeth Whitening Trays with 2 free Whitening
tubes (value of $390) with your completed Botox treatment.

or

Free Dental Exam & Xray!
All patients who complete Botox treatment.
Must present coupon at time of treatment.
Disclaimer Richard C. Swanson, D.M.D., P.A. and staff have the right to refuse offer if deemed necessary based on patients
health conditions, misuses, abuse, or any other factor deemed necessary to void offer. Minimum gum and teeth health are
required to receive professional whitening.

"o feeL Lour best

vvkevv Uov., LookfzUjo vv- best"

Call the office for a
NO CHARGE CONSULTATION

352) 795-1223
1815 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL

"I botoxspacrystalriver.com Lynn Swanson,
rswansondental.com M.S., A.R.N.P.







G8 Sunday, February 23, 2014 PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Paid Advertisement

If you want a financial advisor that will put you at ease,


Todd Financial Services is here for you


Located in Homosassa, J. Michael Todd
has over 25 years' experience in the business,
and has been offering his services to Citrus
County residents since 2001. He's been at the
same convenient Homosassa location since
2007.
"We try to preserve your wealth and guide
your financial future," says J. Michael Todd.
"We try to educate clients on the basic
concepts of financial management and about
steps we can take to reach their financial
goals."
The company's services are for everyone
in search of a structured way to make their
money work for them. Whether your goal is
buying a house, funding an education, or
maintaining your lifestyle after retirement,
their expertise and experience will help you
feel confident in your financial security.
Todd Financial Services develops a
customized financial program for each client,
ensuring at each step that you understandthe
process. Their experienced staff works with
clients to establish financial goals, customize
appropriate strategies, and execute a sound,
long-term financial program. They utilize


services such as investment management,
retirement strategies, and insurance and
annuity products.
They also strive to create financial
security for retired customers. Their years of
experience can work for you to ensure that
you continue to enjoy the lifestyle you're
accustomed to after retiring. You can be
secure in the knowledge that Todd Financial
Services is familiar with your financial
situation and will continue working with you
to maintain your financial stability.
The company prides itself on listening to
clients' wants and needs, as well as on
determining what is realistic. They work
personally with everyone who comes
through the door, discovering what their
short and long term financial goals are and
formulating a plan to achieve them.
Todd Financial Services will work with
you on all stages of your financial journey,
whether you are accumulating wealth or
withdrawing from your savings. Their
abilities to plan and prioritize will help you
meet both your financial and your life
goals.They are dedicated to developing


lasting relationships with their clients while
developing a roadmap to working toward a
more secure financial future.
Their Homosassa office is comfortable,
designed to put clients at ease in an
easygoing environment.
"I'm a laid-back individual," says Todd.
"It's a relaxed atmosphere in this office."
With no reason to feel tense or
intimidated, it's easy for clients to get to
know their financial advisors, and for them
to get to know and understand their client's
needs.
"Our philosophy is that there's only one
dumb question," says Todd, "and that's the
one you don't ask."
The office and staff are also dedicated to
maintaining high standards of integrity and
professionalism, thoroughly understanding
each client's circumstances, and tailoring
advice and plans of action to meet those
requirements.
Todd Financial Services believes that
clients are better able to make sound
financial decisions if they understand the
strategies and steps of the plan implemented


to meet their goals. Toward this end, they
strive to educate clients about concepts of
financial management along the way, and to
provide fast, easy access to market
performance data. They enjoy sharing their
experience and expertise with clients to help
them pursue their financial goals.
While the company provides a wide range
of financial products and services, they also
realize that they cannot offer everything a
client may need. However, Todd Financial
Services' wide network of relationships with
other financial services companies means that
if they don't have something, they know
someone who does. They are dedicated to their
client's success, and never hesitate to reach
out in order to achieve their goals.
Todd Financial Services is located at 8546
Homosassa Trail, Suite 1.
The office can be reached at (352) 621-
8013. They also maintain an informative web
site, www.toddfinservices.com, geared toward
helping potential clients find information
about their services and providing easy access
to up-to-date market information and other
resources.


TODD FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC

Preservin Your WeahI, (uIIng Your FinnI: IlI FuIur,


We provide a
* Stocks Bonds Mutual FundsR
Life Insurance & Annuities T







































255 E. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FI 34452
726-4709


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS Sunday, February 23, 2014 G9

PAID ADVERTISEMENT



I Whalen Jewelers


\ y
PANDORA"
UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS


Whalen Jewelers has been offering quality and
value to the Citrus County area since 1977.
Whalen Jewelers is the oldest operating jewelry
store in the entire Nature Coast


area, and is owned and operated by
Joyce Taylor. Specializing in fine
diamonds, they have traveled half
way around the world to hand-
select diamonds direct from the
world's leading sources at consid-
erable savings.
Whalen Jewelers is the only


Mkale


Whalen's offers the
following services:
Diamond Inspection -
I' free-of-charge. To prolong the life
BEST of your jewelry Whalen's rec-
Of T ommends a professional inspection
SI four times per year. Let the experts
*- check the condition of your set-
tings to help prevent further dam-
age or loss of gemstones. Always a
free service provided by Whalens.
Jewelry Repair Whalen
Jewelers' professional staff is ready to service your
jewelry repair needs. They can repair all types of
jewelry, from diamond settings to broken chains.
Custom Designs / Restyling
Whalen's skilled staff can perform magic with your
older jewelry, inherited items, or gift pieces you
might like better in another style. Whalen's main-
tains a large selection of the latest styles for you to
"try on" which helps in your selection of the custom
style for your personal taste.
Watch Repair Whalen's watch repairman
is certified, even on Rolex watches. Watch batteries
and bands are professionally installed. All watch
estimates are free.
Pearl and Bead Stringing Whalen's
does custom stringing for your necklaces or bracelets.
Engraving Jewelry, gifts, cuff links or
money clips purchased at Whalen Jewelers may be
engraved.
Appraisals All appraisals are performed by
a Certified Gemologist, who is trained by
Gemological Institute of America (GIA), and a
member of the National Association of Jewelry
Appraisers.
Silver Restoration Bring in your family
heirloom sterling or plated silver wares and have
them restored to their original beauty.
Wish Lists Whalen Jewelers offers a wish
list for all customers. Ask for their popular "Pssst,"
cards to pass on a subtle hint about that special gift
that caught your eye.
Layaway Whalen Jewelers offers a free
layaway program for your convenience.
Whalen Credit Plan Provided through
GE Money Luxury Card.
As a Master IJO Jeweler, Whalen Jewelers guar-
antees you the "Brilliance You Deserve" at a price
you can afford.
Whalen Jewelers is located at
225 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL.
352-726-4709 www.whalenjewelers.com


CIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Easily adjustable bracelets with charms
that let a woman show how she feels,
what she believes in, and who she is.
Over 500 bracelets to choose.
Donates $.25 of each bracelet
to Generation rescue.*
Designed and manufactured in the USA
Features unique designs
Uses only recycled metals



wktiee


jeweler in the county that is a mem-
ber of an elite group of retailers hand-selected tor
membership in the Independent Jewelers Organization
(IJO) and Retail Jewelers Organizations (RIO), which
only accepts jewelers with the highest ethical standards
and superior professional integrity.
Group purchasing power through IJO & RJO
priviledged Whalen Jewelers to bring the top fashions
and highest quality products at the best prices, which
means a significant savings for their customers.
Being affiliated with IJO and RJO, Whalen
Jewelers is allowed to buy directly from the actual dia-
mond cutters through their offices in the famous city of
Antwerp, Belgium, the diamond capital of the world -
diamonds direct at significant savings. Whalen
Jewelers attends trade shows each year, where top-
notch manufacturers exhibit the latest designs long
before other jewelers have access to them.
In addition, Whalen Jewelers attends educational
seminars to hone their skills and to keep abreast of
changes in the diamond and gemstone market.
From your first visit to the Whalen Jewelers store
in Inverness you will feel like a favorite friend.
Customers will find knowledgeable employees to
assist you whether you are shopping for a diamond
selection or just need a new watch battery installed.
Whalen Jewelers has always worked hard to keep
your total satisfaction a top priority. The owner and
employees are a part of the local community, which is
another requirement to be an IJO Jeweler, and they
strive to offer an unsurpassed level of service.
Whalen Jewelers has a large, varied inventory.
They are a full service jeweler with professional staff
who will educate and guide you through your pur-
chase.
TRUST Whalen's earns your trust based on their
commitment to a high standard of excellence deliv-
ered through their friendly hometown service.
INTEGRITY As a Master IJO Jewelers, Whalen
must follow an ethical code of conduct and best prac-
tices.
HONESTY Master IJO Jewelers are sincere and
truthful about the information and pricing of the fine
jewelry in their store.
EXPERTISE The combination of experience,
skill, and knowledge are qualities that result in con-
fident shopping and a satisfying jewelry purchase.







GIO Sunday, February 23, 2014


18 Point Visual Inspection FREE with your oil change
We also service your car with light mechanical work,
such as serpentine belts, brakes, tune-ups and much more!


Mobilil


Lube Express Mni(


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Mobil 1 Lube Express

Here for you. Here for your car. Here for good.


Same Owner e Same Service e Better Product
(352) 795-2333 1050 SE Hwy. 19- Crystal River
Email: crmobilellube@aol.com Open Mon.-Fri. 8-5 / Sat. 8-3
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We Now Do Computer Diagnostics


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Each day, many Americans take
for granted just how lucky they are to
have working vehicles to get them to
and from work, school and everything
in between. Mobil 1 Lube Express is
here to make sure your car can keep up
with your lifestyle by maintaining your
car as well you maintain yourself.
As your local Mobil 1 Lube
Center, we are dedicated to providing
high quality Auto Repair & Lube
Services at a standard of excellence on
which you can depend. We take great
pride in remaining the Mobil 1 Lube of
choice for Crystal River, Florida.
We offer a variety of car care
services, all performed by qualified
mechanics to ensure that you are
getting both professional and high
quality services.
In only 15 minutes, professional
mechanics use high quality Mobil 1
lubricants to provide your car engine
with supreme power and protection. At
the same time, every car will be
provided with 18-point Visual
Inspection to keep monitoring on its
mechanical condition and its
performance. This guarantees that the
car can always unleash its optimum
power, and you can always enjoy a
safer and more pleasure driving
experience.
To keep the interior of the car
clean is very important, Mobil 1
provides you with vacuuming service
that keeps the interior of the car
spotless and dust free.
Along with maintaining a


"healthy" car, Mobil 1 Lube believes in
keeping a healthy environment around
us and is a green leader in the service
industry.
We recycle many products we use
in our everyday business.
Cardboard/paper products
Used Batteries
Used Antifreeze and Coolant
Used Motor Oils
Used Fuel Filters
Used Transmission Fluids
Used Motor Oil Filters
Please help us keep Citrus County
a great place to live by recycling the
above products with the appropriate
facilities.
One last thing for business owners:
Mobil 1 Lube offers local fleet
programs to take care of your
preventative maintenance needs of
your company vehicles, whether you
have 3 or 300 vehicles.
Less Downtime
Convenient Locations
Consolidated Monthly Billing
No Appointment Necessary
Fleet Manager Control
Manufacturer Recommended
Services
Fast Service
Mobil 1 Lube Express is located at
1050 SE US Hwy. 19, Crystal River.
For more information, call 352-795-
2333 and ask for Brian or email
crmobill lube@aol.com.
Mobil 1 Lube Express, Here for
you. Here for your car. Here for good.


Also Available: Head & Tail Light
Bulbs & Headlight Restoration


StyCneceO ONE LO I CE


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








I PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Hassle-Freeg

Mowing Fro Your


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Citrus Equipment & Repair

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I Through good times and challenges,
Citrus Equipment & Repair has kept
their residential and commercial
customers working throughout
Citrus and the surrounding counties.
By providing the equipment people
..3 want and also offering service
beyond the box stores, Citrus
Equipment & Repair tightened their
o Z belts and weathered the economic
downturn. Their 7,000 sq. ft.
-_ o showroom in Crystal River is the
largest in West Central Florida, with
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Citrus Equipment_771F

& Repair Inc.

6659 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.

Crystal River (Hwy. 486, just east of Hwy. 44)

352-795-6635

www.outdoorpowerplace.com
See dealer or toro.com (toro.ca for Canadian residents) for warranty details. Product availability, pricing & special promotions are subject to dealer option.


Citrus Equipment & Repair is at
your service whether you stop by
their showroom or prefer a "virtual"
look first. Their extensive website
offers a peek at some of the lawn
mowers, trimmers & blowers,
garden equipment, pressure washers,
generators, pumps, and light
construction equipment that they
provide to both the commercial and
residential homeowner customer. In
addition, their construction division
offers mixers, rammers/compactors
and trowels.

At Citrus Equipment you will find a
vast selection of commercial riding
mowers and walk-behind mowers in
stock for your inspection. See the
latest models from manufacturers
such as TORO, HUSTLER,
GRAVELY, and WRIGHT. Citrus
Equipment also offers a huge
selection of residential lawn mowers
from the top manufacturers. In stock
you will find residential zero turn
radius riding mowers, lawn tractors
and power assist push. And,
remember, their service department
is ready to help, from annual tune
ups to maintenance and repairs.

With one of the largest selections of
in-stock chain saws in West Central


Soi


of
tL- 3 :


Sunday, February 23, 2014 G1'1


OnTus COUNTY (FL) CONmCLE


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS


r 17-


Florida, you can stop in for a hands
on look at the vast selection of chain
saws from the most sought after
brands like Stihl, Echo, and others.
You will find quality construction
and reliability backed by a
manufacturer's warranty and Citrus
Equipment's own professionally
trained maintenance and repair staff.

For help in your garden, Citrus
Equipment offers many cultivators,
rototillers, spreaders, sprayers and
much more from the best names in
garden equipment. Whether you are
working a small backyard garden or
running a commercial business, their
pros will help you select the right
size equipment for all of your
garden needs.

Citrus Equipment & Repair is
conveniently located in Citrus
County, Florida, and is large enough
to meet the needs of West Central
Florida and beyond. The 7,000 sq.
ft. showroom is less than an hour
from Ocala, Spring Hill,
Brooksville, and Wildwood AND no
more than an hour and a half from
Gainesville, Pasco County, Leesburg
and Tampa Bay.

Visit the website at
www.outdoorpowerplace.com
If you would like information or
have a question, just send an
email to
cerinc@tampabay.rr.com.
You'll receive a response within
24 hours.


Call or stop by today.
(352) 795-6635


Open Monday thru Friday 8am 5pm
year round and Saturday 9am 12pm
during the Summer only.







G12 Sunday, February 23, 2014 PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Paid Advertisement



Aquarium Expo coming to Crystal River Mall


Soon, Crystal River will have fish
somewhere besides in the river.
The Crystal River Mall will soon have an
"aquarium expo," says Art Jones. "An
exposition hall with a lot of different exhibits
and interactive exhibits-virtual reality exhibits,
a 3D theater, after-school programs, a manatee
education center."
Jones, a local resident active in efforts to
preserve and restore the Crystal River itself,
discovered the perfect venue for his idea when
stores in the mall began closing.
"Art Jones began talking to us about an
aquarium at the mall last summer," says Millie
Bresnahan, the mall's manager. "When Belk
announced their closing in August 2013, Art was
knocking on the door the next day."
Art's vision for the former store is of an
educational space where both locals and tourists
can learn and enjoy themselves.
Small former dressing rooms will likely be
turned into small theaters, in which locally-
produced informative and entertaining films will
be shown, such as swimming with manatees


(and how to do it safely), and the experience of
hang-gliding.
These theaters will also be an opportunity for
those who cannot participate in some activities,
such as those with physical limitations, to see
what the experiences are like.
"Shopping malls around the country are
rethinking the use of space out of necessity,"
says Millie. "We are finding that people go to
malls for social and public interaction. The
combination of education, entertainment, retail,
and restaurants is the key to surviving."
There will also be small classrooms in the
Aquarium Expo. One will contain about 150
small aquarium tanks, where kids can do
experiments. Jones hopes to work with local
schools and teachers to introduce children to the
new center.
The Aquarium Expo will also include
educational exhibits for adults, whether they're
local or tourists, such as Florida-friendly
landscaping and how to maintain a clearer river.
The first exhibit Jones has planned will be a
huge-5,400 square foot-aerial photo map of


Citrus County. It will be the largest such map in
the county and, Jones says, "people will be able
to see up close what we have and how many
different opportunities there are."
10% of the proceeds from the Aquarium
Expo will go back into the community to fund a
project to clean up the river-the One Rake At A
Time project. Jones's other brainchild, it is
dedicated to removing Lyngbya from the river.
Lyngbya is an algae that forms large mats and
can clog spring vents, crowd out native grasses,
cause ulcerative dermatitis in manatees, and
reduce oxygen in the water, harming fish, crab,
and other river life.
"That was one of my motivations for going
forward with the aquarium," says Jones. "The
long-term economic stability and survival of the
restoration."
And the Aquarium Expo is just the
beginning. Jones's long-term goal is to build a
completely new aquarium from the ground up in
another location in Crystal River. Large fish and
ocean wildlife exhibits require far more
sophisticated equipment, which must be


integrated into a structure designed to support it.
The Aquarium Expo will be "a great
community center," Jones says. "Tourism can be
such a wonderful green industry, and we want to
encourage good behavior. It's going to be so
fantastic for this community."
"The Crystal River Aquarium will be a huge
compliment to the mall and the community,"
says Millie.
"Every day we greet visitors from all over
the world. They are looking for this experience,
and want to learn much more about our county.
The Crystal River Mall is excited to be working
with Art Jones and his volunteers on this
fabulous attraction."
More information about Jones's plan for the
Aquarium Expo location can be found in a
YouTube video he had produced, which can be
found at www.youtube.com/watch?v-
r8BR3dO IU4 or by searching for "youtube
crystal river aquarium art jones."
More information about the One Rake At A
Time project and about lyngbya can be found at
www.savecrystalriver.com.


U U i NG SON.


LEASING OPPOWTUNITI

BECOME A FAN&4
WATCH THE PROGRESS


@TH ECRMALL
TH ECRYSTALRIVERMALL.COM







CIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS Sunday, February 23, 2014 G13

Paid Advertisement




Meet the New, One and Only




Doctor of Audiology in Citrus


Dr. Angela SchenkAu.D.

Doctor of Audiology

Highest Degree of Hearing Knowledge


Dr. Angela Schenk,
Citrus County's one
and only Doctor of Audiology.

Originally from Greenwood,
Indiana, Dr. Schenk graduated from
Purdue University with a B.S. in
Communication Disorders in 1996.
She continued her education at the
University of Tennessee, receiving her
M.A. in audiology in 1998, and her
doctoral degree in audiology (Au.D.)
from A. T. Still University in 2005.


Hearing Aid Experl

Dr. Schenk joined Gardner Audiology
recently, in 2013, but she's not new 1
field. She worked in Tallahassee for
years, and then in Reno, Nevada f:
before moving back to Florida in
2012.
Angela didn't always knoA
wanted to be an audiologist
0-1 started out studying to wo
speech/language pathology.
discovered audiology durin
sophomore year of college
she says she never looked ba
She finds that, while she
all aspects of audiology, she
fitting hearing aids the most.
"This is the time you
know the individual yot
working with," Dr. Angela Schenk says. '
family, activities, and so on. I get attack
my patients and look forward to hearing
they have been up to."
When she's not getting to knoM
patients, she loves to read, cook, and
time with her family. She married her hu
Steve Schenk, who teaches in the bi
department at the College of Central Flo
Citrus County campus. They have two


In the office of Gardner Audiology

700 SE 5th Terrace, Crystal River

820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness


(3521795-5700


Alex and Nick, both of whom are
hearing impaired. She attends
church in Citrus County, where
she plays in the Bell Choir. She
and her family are also avid
runners. Angela has run in the
Beat the Sheriff 5K, and her
oldest son and husband ran in the
Colors for CASA 5K. They
particularly enjoy running on the


fairly Withlacoochee Trail.
:o the Gardner Audiology is a 25 year old hearing
seven healthcare company, with locations in Crystal
)r six River and Inverness, as well as in the Tampa
July Bay area. They are as dedicated as Dr. Schenk
is to improving lives with the best possible
7 she hearing through compassion, innovation, and
; she expertise in all aspects of hearing healthcare.
rk in Their goal is to improve the quality of life
She of people with hearing loss in Citrus County
g her through investing in the best doctors, staff,
I and knowledge, and equipment. They were the first
-k. and are still the only full time audiology service
loves in Citrus County.
loves Their services include diagnostic hearing
exams, hearing aid services including fittings
yet to and repairs, consultations on tinnitus
I are treatments, and hearing aid studies. They
'Their provide diagnostic hearing exams and hearing
ied to aid services to hospitals, physicians, and their
what own patients at locations in the Tampa Bay
Area.
7 her Gardner Audiology also partners with large
spend international companies to perform field studies
sband of consumer satisfaction with hearing aids.
ology The company's founder and CEO, Dan
rida's Gardner, earned his graduate degree in
sons, audiology from the University of South








www.gardneraudiology.com


Florida, and has of 35 years' experience in
most aspects of the hearing industry.
All Gardner Audiologists have earned a
Masters or Doctoral degree in audiology, and
are certified by or are members of the
American Speech-Language Hearing
Association, Certified Industrial Trainer, the
American Academy of Audiology, Florida
Association of Speech-Language Pathologists
and Audiologists, or the Florida Academy of
Audiology.
An audiologist has received an Au.D.
(Doctorate in Audiology) or a Master's of
Doctoral degree from an accredited university
graduate program in audiology. Audiologists
are trained to diagnose, manage and treat
hearing or balance problems for individuals
from birth through adulthood.
Gardner's corporate center is located at 700
SE 5th Terrace, Suite 11 in Crystal River, about
one block east of Highway 19. They can be
reached by phone at 352-795-5700 or 800-277-
1182. They also have offices in Carillon,
Inverness, Pasadena, Tampa, and Zephyrhills.
Their website, www.gardneraudiology.com,
contains further contact information for their
locations, as well as information about hearing
aids, cochlear implants, middle ear implants,
tinnitus, and hearing research, and patient
testimonials.
If you have any concerns or questions about
your hearing or their services, please call
Gardner Audiology-let them help you hear
better.







G14 Sunday, February 23, 2014


Paid Advertisement


Hooper Funeral Homes


and Crematory


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[L Funeral Pre-Arrangements
[L Cremation Services
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Li I am interested in touring Best Time to Contact:
Florida National Cemetery Mail coupon to our Inverness Chapel, 501 W. Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450


A funeral is a ceremony for celebrating,
sanctifying, or remembering the life of a
person who has died. When a loved one dies,
grieving family members and friends often
are confronted with dozens of decisions about
the funeral all of which must be made
quickly and often under great emotional
duress.
Hooper Funeral Homes has been helping
families through this difficult process for over
40 years. This family owned business has
grown to three chapels to better provide
service for all of Citrus County as well as
neighboring counties.
When Lowell and Ruth Hooper bought
the existing business that originally started in
1946, they continued the personal
relationship with the area and remained
actively involved in the community. Dwight
Hooper is the second generation to take over
the operation of the business, and remains
sensitive to the needs of the residents.
Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory is a
full service operation, and provides additional
comfort to the families they serve by owning
their own crematory. This means your loved
one never leaves the Hooper family's care,
even if you choose cremation.
Unsure about cremation? Many
people believe that cremation limits your
service options. However, when you choose
cremation you still have as many options as
you do with a traditional funeral service. If
you would like more information on
cremation please call for answers to help you
understand the process and the options
available. At Hooper Crematory, our
crematory facilities are provided to our
clients exclusively.
What does it mean to preplan?
The loss of a loved one can take a major toll
on the people left with the challenge of
making all of the arrangements. Preplanning
allows you to make your plans before they
are needed. Your plans can include your
favorite music, a desire for special military or
religious rites, or perhaps a verse that is dear
to your heart. These are all pieces of the
service that will comfort your family and
reflect the life you have lived.
When dealing with this physical and
mental burden, it can be difficult to
remember all of the desires of the departed.
By preplanning, you remove that burden from
your family and loved ones and ensure that
your wishes will be followed. People may
think that they have the problem solved by
including their wishes in their Will. Many
times the funeral services are completed long
before the Will is even read.


Preplanning appeals to a growing number
of people for many reasons. Some of these
are:
to relieve your family from having to
make quick difficult decisions during an
emotionally stressful time
to protect your loved ones from
emotionally overspending and quick
decisions
to ensure that your wishes are followed.
to guard against inflation if you choose
to fund your plans.
You can save your information and
wishes on file by filling out an easy to follow
form that Hooper's provides. When they
receive your information, you have the choice
to discuss your options over the phone; or if
you prefer, you are can make an appointment
with one of their knowledgeable preplanning
professionals. Hooper's believes that the
more knowledge you have, the better you will
be able to decide what arrangement will be
best for you or your loved one.
Hooper Funeral Home is a family owned
and community-based funeral home offering
many choices for every stage of the process,
including:
Pre-need planning and funding options
Traditional or contemporary funeral
services
Immediate burials
Cremation services
Anatomical donation services
Out-of-town arrangement services
Bereavement information
The tradition of having a funeral service
meets many needs. Here are a few of the
reasons Hooper's believes it is important for
families to hold these services.
A funeral service...
allows family and friends to gather in one
place to share their grief and find strength
in each other.
gives mourners the opportunity to reaffirm
their faith and beliefs through clergy.
helps family and friends come to terms
with the death of their loved one.
allows mourners to remember, honor and
acknowledge their loved one's life.
initiates the grieving process.
gives everyone a chance to say goodbye.

The staff at Hooper's is ready to assist you
with all of your funeral care needs, even after
the services are performed. If you find that
you need assistance with paperwork, or
perhaps working through your grief issues,
please feel free to call.
Hooper Funeral Homes is open seven days a
week from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Sunday, February 23, 2014 G15


Paid Advertisement


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Your Carpet &

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24/7/365 EMERGENCY SERVICE


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ServiceMaster Restore of Crystal River has
been in business in Citrus County since 1989.
Owned by Benje Thomas, the company
provides a wide range of services, including
mold remediation, repairing damage from
natural disasters, regular carpet and upholstery
cleaning, and tile and grout cleaning.
"We provide everything from carpet,
flooring and upholstery cleaning to general
cleaning in homes, spring cleaning, all the way
through fire and water damage to your home,"
says Benje Thomas. "We have eight vehicles
to take care of any customer needs."
Benje started out in the construction
industry, but by 1998 he was looking for a
change.
"I knew a
friend who Service
was selling the
franchise," he
says, "and so I
bought it from him, and here we are."
In 2004, the company moved to its current
location on Highway 19 in downtown Crystal
River.
The business was active in Crystal River in
1993, when the destructive 'No-Name Storm'
caused considerable flooding and damage. By
the time the hurricanes came in 2004, Benje
owned the company, and remembers helping
local homeowners recover. The company deals
with water damage to property and structures,
as well as wind damage and fire damage.
ServiceMaster Restore prides itself on being
able to meet any customer needs.
"For us, 'no' is not an option. We're here to
serve people, to take care of them," says Benje.
"If it's something we can't do ourselves, we'll
help them find someone who can do it."
The company's range of regional
professional contacts allows them to help their
customers find the best way to solve their
problem.
ServiceMaster Restore of Crystal River also
deals with mold. Mold can be serious, and
cause severe damage to a home. It can easily
grow after a home is damaged by water. There
are different varieties as well.
"It affects people in different ways," says
Benje, "and it does affect people. You've got to
be careful with the respiratory system, open
cuts, things like that. It requires our guys to
wear a certain level of protection when


working to remove the mold."
ServiceMaster Restore is more than
capable of dealing with potentially hazardous
mold safely.
"We're a certified mold remediator," Benje
says. "If somebody sees mold in their house,
we can remediate it. Sometimes it requires
testing."
It also requires specialized equipment to
safely remove, which ServiceMaster Restore
is proud to offer its clients.
"You can't just spray it with bleach or
vacuum it away," says Benje. "It involves
equipment, sometimes removal of affected
building materials."


STL

Resto,


When he got into the
;yR business, Benje knew it
,R wasn't going to be a
typical nine-to-five job
e because, when disaster
strikes, ServiceMaster


Restore can be there whenever you need them.
"We have someone on call 24/7, 365 days
of the year," Benje says.
Their convenient downtown Crystal River
location, on Highway 19 near the intersection
of 19 and SR 44, allows them to easily travel
to any comer of Citrus, Marion, and Hernando
counties-they serve all three.
ServiceMaster Restore of Crystal River is
also a certified Florida State Contractor,
meaning they are licensed to do construction
work in the entire state of Florida. They are
qualified to perform all stages of disaster
cleanup, from initial removal of debris and
damaged materials to final reconstruction.
They have years of experience working with
insurance companies as well, which can
facilitate faster action to repair damage and get
life back to normal for their clients.
ServiceMaster Restore of Crystal River is
located at 275 NE Highway 19 (near CVS).
They can be contacted by phone in Citrus
County at (352) 794-0270; in Marion at (352)
401-1966; and in Hemando at (352) 684-0131.
Anyone with questions about their business and
services is welcome to call, or to email Benje
Thomas at benje@smcflorida.com. Their web
site, at www.smcflorida.com, also provides
information about services the company offers.
Their offices are open Monday through Friday
from 8 to 5, but ServiceMaster offers around-
the-clock customer service in case of emergency.


OnTus COUNTY (FL) CONmCLE


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS


L






CIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


G16 Sunday, February 23, 2014


Since Tobacco Free Florida launched in 2007, adult smoking prevalence
has decreased from 21.1 percent in 2006 to 17.7 percent in 2012.i
In 2012,19.7 percent of Florida adult males and 15.8 percent of Florida
adult females smoked cigarettes.i
Florida ranks 16th with a current adult smoking rate of 17.7 percent.ii
This is below the national average of 19.6 percent (2012).i


Since Tobacco Free Florida launched in 2007,youth smoking prevalence
has decreased from 10.5 percent in 2006 to 6.1 percent in 2013.iii
In 2013,8.6 percent of high school students and 2.6 percent of middle
school students in Florida reported current cigarette use.iii
In 2013,27.6 percent of high school students and 12 percent of middle
school students had tried smoking a cigarette at least once.iii


Tobacco Free Florida's free and easy 3 Ways to Quit are evidence-
based resources that help tobacco users set personalized plans and
can double tobacco users' chances of quitting for good.
From July 2007 through June 2013,289,288 Floridians have used one
of the 3 Ways to Quit and 93,406 have successfully quit tobacco.
From July 2012 through June 2013,94,100 Floridians used one of the
3 Ways to Quit: vi
Florida Quitline: 57,197 participants
(29.2 percent quit rate with a cost per quitter of $562)vii
Web Coach: 21,719 participants
(32.5 percent quit rate with a cost per quitter of $289)
In-person classes via the Florida Area Health Education
Centers (AHEC):
15,184 participants (multi-session program quit rate of
36.9 percent and single-session program quit rate of 27.4
percent with a cost per quitter of $1,253)

Tobacco Free
Florida- r
N.CCr
Citrs County


In Florida,the annual direct costs to the economy attributable to smoking in 2009
were in excess of $1 9.6 billion, including lost workplace productivity of $4.4 billion
premature death losses of $7.9 billion and direct medical costs of $7.2 billion.iv
The reduction in smokers has helped save more than $4.2 billion in personal health
care costs since the inception of the Tobacco Free Florida program in 2007.v


i Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco State Highlights 2012. n.p.Web.
ii Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco State Highlights 2012. n.p.Web.
iii Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS). Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, 2013.
iv Penn State. "Potential Costs and Benefits of Smoking Cessation for Florida." 30 April 201 O.Web. I March 2011.

v RTI International. 2010 Independent Evaluation Report. January 2011 .Web. 25 February 2011.
vi Professional Date Analysts, Inc.
viiA quitter is defined as a former tobacco user who has not used tobacco, even a pinch or a puff in the last 30 days.


PORTRAITS OF SUCCESS