Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
UF00028315:03393

Full Text



Strong showing: Citrus' Taylor earns state runner-up /Bl

ON% L 1A -aftaImm lNM .1M -VA


Bill would create trust board


Post-Citrus Memorial legislation to be 'simple and clean'


1 111 ,]I=I
STATE NEWS:









Jury mistrial
The jury at the trial of
Michael Dunn deadlocks
on one charge./Page A3

USA WEEKEND:
USA WEEKEND







Heart health
"The Doctors" offer six
simple strategies to
safeguard your heart by
lowering your blood
pressure, cutting your
cholesterol and more.
/Inside
MILITARY MATTERS:



a. ,1




Close call
U.S. Navy submariner
Ken Erdner served
aboard the USS
Snook./Page A22


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
The ninth annual Purple Heart Ceremony gets under way Saturday morning at the National Guard
Armory in Crystal River. Hosted by the combat-wounded patriots of Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart, patriot Richard Hunt honored the living, departed patriots and the
fallen.

Purple Heart Ceremony recognizes veterans, fallen


Bastion
Travel back in time
when visiting Fort Clinch
in Fernandina Beach.
/Page A17

HOMEFRONT:
Think
pink
What's
the hot
new color
in home
decor for
spring?
Pink, in
all its
rosy hues
and
shades.
/inside


BUSINESS:


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
All gave some, some
gave all, some still
give.
That was the mes-
sage heard Saturday as heads
hung mournfully, tears
streamed and gratitude filled
the Florida National Guard
Armory in Crystal River for
the ninth annual Purple
Heart Ceremony
Hundreds of veterans from
organizations around the
county and elsewhere joined
collectively with the combat-
wounded Patriots of Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart to
the honor living, departed
and fallen heroes.
The Purple Heart is
awarded to members of the
U.S. military who are wounded
by an instrument of war in the
hands of an enemy or to the
next of kin in the name of
those who are killed or die of
wounds received in action.
Recognition was given for
sacrifices of the Purple Heart
recipients and veterans
everywhere, including nine
Citrus County soldiers. Their
family members were hon-


The ceremony comes to a close Saturday with the traditional
laying of the wreath, 21-gun salute and the playing of taps. The
ceremony was held at the Florida National Guard Armory in
Crystal River and was well attended by local dignitaries as well as
the Rolling Thunder motorcycle club.


ored guests at the ceremony
The ceremony was dedi-
cated to retired Patriot Ma-
rine 1st Sgt. Don Guard, who
died in September 2013.
"Patriot Guard is the father
of this program," the program
read. "He was a founding
member of Chapter 776 and
our first Patriot of the Year A
true American hero, he was
awarded the Silver Star,


Bronze Star with V, Navy/Ma-
rine Corps Commendation
Medal for Valor and Two Pur-
ple Hearts, along with other
medals and awards. He
served in three wars: World
War II, Korea and Vietnam."
Instead of the usual presen-
tation of the history of the Pur-
ple Heart, Chapter 776 patriot
See Page A13


that's going to be here for genera- I t
tions to come."
The CCHB and Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation have a signed, .
$140 million letter of intent with
Hospital Corporation of America Bill
to lease Citrus Memorial for Grant
50 years. While the final price attorney for the
Citrus County
See Page A12 Hospital Board.


Jimmie T.
Smith
state
representative,
R-Inverness.


Standoff


ends in


murder


suspect's


suicide
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
DUNNELLON -A 43-year-old
New Hampshire man sought in
connection with a North Carolina
homicide was found dead in An-
gler's Resort
early Saturday
morning, accord-
ing to the Marion
County Sheriff's
Office.
The agency re-
portedly received a
a be-on-the-
lookout order for Eric Engle
Eric Engle of wanted in
Mast Road, connection
Durham, N.H., with a death
from the Cary Po- in North
lice Department Carolina.
in North Carolina.
According to the MCSO, Engle
contacted a family member and
confessed to the murder of an
elderly man in Cary
The order advised that a war-
rant had been issued for Engle in
North Carolina and stated he was
presumed to be at a Marion County
Dunkin' Donuts store. North Car-
olina authorities also advised that
Engle was suicidal and considered
to be armed and dangerous.
Several MCSO units reportedly
checked the area around Dunkin'
Donuts, but were unable to locate
Engle.
That's when the Cary Police
Department advised the MCSO
that Engle had been in contact
with a family member in North
Carolina from the Angler's Re-
sort motel in Dunnellon.
At approximately midnight on
Saturday, Marion County author-
ities made contact with the owner
of the motel, who confirmed
Engle was a guest there. The
owner further advised that a
black Jeep Wrangler bearing a li-
cense plate associated with Engle
was driving in his parking lot.
A perimeter was established
around the motel by Dunnellon Po-
lice Department patrol units and
the MCSO SWAT team. Contact was
made with Engle by phone and he
was encouraged to leave his room
and surrender peacefully; how-
ever, Engle reportedly refused and,
shortly thereafter, took his own life
with a handgun.
The gun was recovered from
the scene.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The last time a Citrus County
hospital-related bill made it
through the Legislature, a lawsuit
was filed, millions of dollars were
spent in legal fees and the case
still hasn't been decided by the
Florida Supreme Court.


That isn't expected this time, as
the latest legislation being drafted
sets up a mechanism to oversee
millions of dollars expected from
the Citrus Memorial hospital
lease.
"I really am pumped about it,"
said Bill Grant, attorney for the
Citrus County Hospital Board.
"It's exciting to set up this trust


Tweet this
Olympians turn medals
into buzz, money.
/Page Dl


Annie's Mailbox ......A24
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ...............A24
Editorial ....................C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies .....................A24
Obituaries ........A6, A14
Together...................A27
Veterans ........ A22


6 184578 2007511o


Bed tax hike considered by tourism council


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The Tourism Develop-
ment Council will con-
sider supporting a
1 percent increase in the
tourism tax, commonly
called the bed tax.
The bed tax is charged
to visitors using hotel
rooms, campsites and
other forms of short-term
lodging, defined as six
months or less.
The tax is currently at
3 percent, but the TDC
learned last month Citrus


County has the potential
to levy up to 5 percent.
Adding an additional per-
cent could bring in an es-
timated $200,000 a year,
possibly more with full
compliance by property
owners and managers.
Discussion at the Feb. 8
TDC meeting on a sports
complex feasibility study
emphasized the need for
action on establishing a
visitor center for Three
Sisters Springs. The ra-
tionale was it will provide
another activity for sports
tourism-related visitors.


Council member Gene
McGee suggested levying
the extra percent and ap-
plying it toward building
the visitor center Devel-
oping an offsite visitor
center and parking lot has
been one of the options
for getting the Three Sis-
ters Springs property
open to the public.
Kerry Parsons, acting
county attorney, advised
the council that an ordi-
nance for levying the
fourth penny would have
to be specific.
McGee said it would


have to be embraced by the
community to be success-
ful. Andy Houston, Crystal
River city manager, em-
phasized that point, as well.
"We need to do a better
job telling the community
about it," he said. "It is
going to take everybody
working together"
Houston favors having
the visitor center close
enough so people can
walk to and from the site.
He also favors future bike
trail access,
Josh Wooten, chamber
of commerce president,


agreed the tourist tax con-
cept is a good approach
and the TDC should take a
leadership role. "We
would get behind any-
thing to move that for-
ward," he said. "It's time
for this community to
come together and work
together to facilitate this."
Parsons will research
the legal aspects of the
idea and report back to
the council next month.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. corn.


Heroes honored





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


National child passenger

safety technician training set
Special to the Chronicle where parents and caregivers receive ed-
ucation and hands-on assistance.
Do you regularly transport children for The Early Learning Coalition of the
an agency, childcare facility or school, or Nature Coast is hosting this class March 4
do you work with families that have ba- to 7 at the Crystal River office, 1564 N.
bies and young children? Meadowcrest Blvd. The
Are the children prop- SAFETY SEAT class is taught by two cer-
erly restrained in car CHECKS tified CPS technician in-
seats or booster seats ap- structors. It will run from
propriate for their age, 0 Free 20-minute child 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the
height and weight, and safety seat inspections first three days, and
are the safety seats used available by appointment 9a.m. to 2p.m. on the last
correctly and installed at the Early Learning day To become a certi-
securely? Coalition of the Nature fled technician, you must
The National Child Coast, 1564 N. Meadow- attend all classes, pass
Passenger Safety Techni- crest Blvd., Crystal River, three open-book quizzes
cian Course will give you to be sure a seat is not and hands-on assess-
the training to ensure recalled, damaged or ments and participate in
that children are trans- expired; is appropriate for a community car seat
ported safely This class the child's age, height and check-up event on the
deals with the basics of weight; is used correctly; last day of the class. Reg-
all types of child re- and installed securely. istration is limited to 15
straints and proper in- Contact Sue Littnan at participants. There is a
stallation in a variety of 352-563-9939, ext. 235. course fee of $85, and
vehicles. Child Passen- registration is through


ger Safety (CPS) technicians use their
knowledge and expertise at their work-
place and at community-based activities,
such as child safety seat check-up events,


the National Safe Kids Organization.
For more information or to register,
contact Sue Littnan at 352-563-9939, ext
235, or slittnan@elc-naturecoast.org.


Ozello Chili Cook-Off


a
- I ~


wow
..-' -- ; .


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Gene Sanborn serves chili No. 29 to participants at the ninth annual Chili Cook-Off
& Craft Show on Saturday in Ozello, hosted by the Ozello Civic Association. More
than 25 diverse slow cookers bubbled away for a chance to win the hearts of those
who were voting. Sweet, spicy, meaty and meatless variations were among the se-
lections for connoisseurs who sampled chilis for $5. After tasting each of the chilis,
connoisseurs voted. Chili entries competed for a first-place prize, second-place prize
and a special prize for third place. As of Saturday evening, the Chronicle was still
awaiting the official announcement of winners.


Owner of SUV in wrong-way

crash receives death threats


CLICK & SAVE
* Check out local deals offered at www.chronicleonline.com.
* A new Click & Save deal will be offered every week.


Associated Press
TAMPA The owner of
a sport utility vehicle
driven the wrong way
down a Florida interstate
says there was nothing he
could have done to stop a
fiery crash that killed five
people.
Scott Enfinger of Tampa
told reporters Friday that
he has received threats on
social media since the
crash early Sunday that
killed Enfinger's friend
Daniel Lee Morris and four
University of South Florida
fraternity brothers.
Authorities said Morris
was observed just after 2
a.m. Sunday speeding the
wrong way down Inter-
state 275. A few minutes
later, Morris crashed
head-on into a car carry-
ing the four fraternity
brothers.
The fire was so intense
that it took Florida High-
way Patrol days to identify
Morris' body
Hours earlier, Morris
had been at a barbecue at
Enfinger's home. Enfinger
said that as the party con-
tinued into early Sunday,
Morris went inside the
home and then drove out of
the driveway in Enfinger's
Ford Expedition, which he
took without asking.
Enfinger said he ran
barefoot after Morris
when he saw his SUV
speeding away, then
turned around and urged
the other partygoers to call
the police.
Morris had had a few
mixed drinks, but he had
not been acting strangely
until he suddenly left, En-
finger said.
"There is nothing I could
do to stop this," Enfinger
said. "If I could, I would
have moved heaven and
Earth. Unfortunately, I had


Woman faces

life sentence

for robberies
Associated Press
OCALA A Florida
woman is facing a poten-
tial life prison sentence
after admitting to robbing
three banks in which she
threatened tellers with a
gun.
The FBI said 53-year-old
Renita Mount Rayner of
St. Petersburg pleaded
guilty this week in Ocala
federal court to bank rob-
bery and firearms charges.
A sentencing date has not
been set
Investigators said a
friend of Rayner's recog-
nized her from photos
made public of an August
robbery in St. Petersburg.
The FBI said Rayner also
robbed banks in Dunedin
and Ocala last fall, usually
handing tellers a note
claiming she had a gun
and would use it.
In one robbery, the FBI
said Rayner wore a wig
that was recovered and
provided DNA. In another,
a fingerprint of hers was
found on a note left
behind.


no way of seeing this one."
Morris had recently re-
turned to Florida from
Michigan, and he had
planned to join Enfinger
in looking for work at Port
Manatee.
Enfinger said the
threats he's received on
social media prompted
him to leave his home with
his fiancee and their chil-
dren for several days.
"There's just a wide va-


riety of threats, as far as
college students wanting
to retaliate. Somebody
even mentioned firebomb-
ing houses and things,"
Enfinger said.
The fraternity brothers
killed in the crash were
Jobin Kuriakose, Ankeet
Patel, Dammie Yesudhas
and Imtiyaz "Jim" Ilias.
Enfinger offered his
"deepest, heart-felt condo-
lences" to their families.


President


smart i
Family owned and operated since 1988
www.smartinteriorsfurn.com

Spring Hill
5141 Mariner Blvd., Spring Hill, FL 34609
Phone: 352-688-4633
S Mon.- Fri. 9:30 AM-5 PM
Sat. 10AM-4PM


Massage
hoGO


details online


In H omosassa & Crystal River
352-564-1040


S


Ddy Event


nteriors




Lecanto
97 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461
Phone: 352-527-4406
Mon. Fri. 9:30 AM 5 PM
Sat. 10AM-4 PM


Our Story + Your Story =
Sunshine For Your Loved One
Our compassionate staff is ready to help.
Assisted Living just got a whole lot better.
Call us today! We want to share our story,
More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY.
Memory care Short term and long term stays
A s

Jt> J1$( SI COMMUNITIES
(352) 563-0235 SANI LIv y FO 1223
311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River www.sgwseniors.com 12230
311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River www.sgwseniors.com


Historic Savings for a Limited Timne


One year same as cash financing for approve applicants.


LEXINGT' N'---- -O "
h O~% ) .i E m R NDN


A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


STATE/LOCAL







Page A3 -SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16,2014



TATE1&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Campaign
TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, ap-
pearances and the like for
the 2014 political campaign.
Send information to mwright
@chronicleonline. com.
Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 2, will meet the
public from 7:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22,
and Sunday, Feb. 23, at
Howard's Flea Market on U.S.
19, Homosassa, Booth 72.
For more information, call
Kitchen at 352-302-6313.

Around the
COUNTY

WPNCC to host
Kathy Thrumston
The Women's Political
Network of Citrus County
will meet at noon Tuesday,
Feb. 18, at Joe's Family
Restaurant in Inverness.
The speaker will be Inver-
ness businesswoman
Kathy Thrumston, who is an
activist on children's legisla-
tive issues in Florida. She
will speak on child advo-
cacy and report what is
happening in Tallahassee.
All interested women and
men are welcome. In addi-
tion to the meeting, those
who wish may clip coupons
as part of the group's ongo-
ing outreach project to help
U.S. troops overseas. In
addition, household and hy-
giene products are col-
lected for the Citrus Abuse
Shelter Association.
Learning to navigate
SSA topic of talk
Cindy Drew, from the
Agency for Persons with
Disabilities (APD), will give
a presentation on Social
Security benefits and work
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 19, at the Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center,
5521 Buster Whitton Way,
on the Lecanto campus of
the Key Center.
The presentation will be
of particular interest to
those who are the parent or
guardian of a person with a
developmental disability, as
they are likely to have to
navigate through the Social
Security bureaucracy.
For more information, call
Stephanie Hopper at 352-
344-0288.
Donations of pet
food sought
Citrus County Animal
Services is asking for the
public's help in meeting the
needs of financially challenged
citizens who own pets.
Animal Services is asking
citizens to deliver donations
of dog and cat food to their
local food bank or to the An-
imal Services shelter in In-
verness to help those residents
keep their animals rather
than surrender them to the
shelter because they don't
have the money to feed them.
Food donations are not
for shelter animals, but for
pet owners who need food
assistance for themselves
and their pets.
Monetary donations may
be mailed to Citrus County
Animal Services, 4030 S.
Airport Road, Inverness, FL
34450. The shelter is at the
end of Airport Road, which
is off U.S. 41 between the
Inverness Airport and the
county auditorium/fair-
grounds, just south of Inver-
ness. For information, call
352-746-8400.
-From staff reports

Correction
Due to reporter error, the
subject of a photograph
was misidentified on Page
A3 of Saturday's edition.
The person in the photo-
graph, which accompanied


a story headlined "Surpass-
ing the goal," is Duane
Dueker, president of the
Community Food Bank
of Citrus County board of
directors.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.


Volunteers buoy aquarium project

Organizers seeking donations of nautical relics, fish tanks


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The fledgling aquarium space at
the Crystal River Mall is coming along
with some elbow grease from vol-
unteers, according to ownerArtJones.
In recent days volunteer Keith
Raym and others were busy clean-
ing carpets and buffing the floors.
Raym also helped put detailed
maps of the county on walls of the
cavernous 63,000-square-foot de-
partment store space formerly oc-
cupied by Belk.
"We have been working on it
since the beginning of January,"
Jones said. "We are going to trans-
form it into an exposition hall and
big education center where visitors
and school children can come to
learn about all kinds of exciting
things from fish to algae."
Jones said the display signature
for Phase 1 of the project will in-
clude fish tanks small and large,
tanks of Lyngbya algae and even


I


A.B. SIDIBE/Chronicle
Keith Raym points to display maps
he and other volunteers recently put
up at the planned Crystal River
Aquarium at the Crystal River Mall.
experiments about the growth pat-
terns of algae.
Jones and Raym, who is a mem-
ber of the Crystal River Aquarium
task force, said they are seeking do-
nations from the public for such
items as tanks, discarded nautical
items and old photographs of the
springs before they became polluted.
"One person is going to bring in
old underwater diving equipment
Yes, we want those artifacts so peo-


ple can see how things used to be,"
Jones said.
The task force is also asking artists
throughout the Nature Coast area
to submit a design to be considered
as the new aquarium logo.
Artists age 15 and older are en-
couraged to use their talents to cre-
ate an informative and easily
identified logo that includes aquatic
representation of the area, both
coastal and inland. The deadline
for submissions is Saturday, Feb. 22.
The winning artist will receive
an annual family pass to the new
Crystal River Aquarium.
"(The aquarium is) a tremendous
opportunity to make that mall a
community center and help the
economy," Jones said.
For more information or to do-
nate artifacts or tanks, email
CrystalRiverAquarium@gmail.com
or call Jones at 727-642-7659.
Contact Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe&)chronicleonline. comn.


,_Iiri,
1.L 5 l ,.'.! --.I


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
An estimated 100 volunteers fill bags and boxes comprising approximately 35,000 meals as the annual
Feed the Hungry program gets under way Saturday morning at the Crystal River High School cafeteria.







Food fight


crystal River school

7- Eleven-year-old
volunteer Tristen
,, King from Lecanto
6 Middle School
S* holds a bag under
a hopper to catch
Srice and grain.
SWhen full, the
bags went to
the scales for
weighing and
sealing. After
being packaged,
the food was sent
to Orlando for
processing and
shipping. It will
end up in countries
such as Haiti and
the Philippines.
able to find something to eat,"
Waggoner said. "But that is the
reality of the situation that they
are faced with."
Waggoner told volunteers that
their participation is having an
effect.
"As you pack the meals today, I
don't want you to think of it as
one meal for one person," she
said. "It is actually much greater
than that, because a whole com-
munity is literally changed
when a school feeding program
is implemented."
And that's what Rotary Club is
about, said Cash.
"Rotary is not about just mak-
ing the community better, but how
can we help the world as well,"
Cash said. "We love things like
this because all of the local clubs
can impact in parts of the world
that we have never been to."


they want to renew that service.
This community will be trans-
formed by this experience today"
Boxes full of vitamins, rice,
dehydrated vegetables and soy
meals lined the tables as an as-
sembly line formed for volun-
teers to fill plastic bags with
nutritious meals.
Accompanying them was a bit
of up-tempo music, encouraging
volunteers to plug away toward
Citrus County's goal of 35,000
packaged meals. They hit it, and
after the food was assembled,
sealed and packaged, it was taken
to Orlando for processing through
customs and will be sent to dif-
ferent countries, such as Haiti.
"We never want to be faced
with the dilemma of whether
our children are going to go to
school and receive an education
or are they going to work to be


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
ith hair nets and plastic
gloves on, more than
125 volunteers dug in to
stop hunger around the world.
Members of the local Rotary
Clubs, Interact and Rotaract
participated in the fifth annual
partnership with Stop Hunger
Now on Saturday at Crystal
River High School.
Stop Hunger Now is a non-
profit organization that provides
meals to those in need in more
than 20 countries worldwide.
"It is an international feed or-
ganization that sends food to
Third World countries in the
world," said Crystal River Ro-
tary Club member Paul Cash.
"There is an education compo-
nent to this, because they are
putting the food in the schools so
that the children will actually go
to school to eat Otherwise they
would not be able to eat. Their
parents are sending them to
school to eat while they are get-
ting an education. Hopefully
that will help them get out of
their current circumstances."
The packaging program began
in 2006, and this weekend in
Florida alone more than 100,000
meals will be packaged, said
Stop Hunger Now Florida pro-
gram director Rebecca Waggoner
"It is an awesome opportunity
for people who want to get involved
but doriftknow how," Waggoner said.
"When someone does a service
project and gets excited about it,


After 30 hours, mistrial on murder charge


Jury: Dunn guilty

on lesser counts
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -A 47-year-old
software developer was convicted
Saturday of attempted murder for
shooting into a carful of teenagers
after an argument about their loud


music, but jurors couldn't agree on
the most serious charge of first-
degree murder
After more than 30 hours of jury
deliberations over four days, a mis-
trial was declared on the murder
charge that Michael Dunn faced in
the fatal shooting of one of the black
teens. The 12 jurors found him
guilty of three counts of attempted
second-degree murder and a count
of firing into an occupied car


Dunn was charged with fatally
shooting 17-year-old Jordan Davis in
2012 after they got into an argument
over music coming from a parked SUV
occupied by Davis and three friends.
Earlier in the day, jurors said in
a note to Judge Russell L. Healey that
they were having trouble reaching
agreement on the murder charge.
He asked them to continue their
work, and they went back to the de-
liberation room for two more hours.


Need a


fire fee


waiver?


File now
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
For residents who own a
mobile home park or who can
show a financial hardship,
it's time to fill out the paper-
work for payment of the fire
protection assessment.
The assessment, a municipal
services benefit unit (MSBU),
is a flat fee charged to each
property parcel. A resolu-
tion to set the fire protection
MSBU at $54 per residence
was approved on July 23,
2013.
Under the resolution,
owners of mobile home and
recreational vehicle (RV) parks
can receive credit for vacant
lots, rather than pay the fee.
The resolution also provides
for a hardship assistance
program to assist residential
property owners who meet
eligibility criteria. The county
will pay the fee for residents
who can prove hardship.
Applications for both ex-
emptions will be taken until
May 1 and are available at
Citrus County Housing Serv-
ices, the Lecanto Government
Building, the Citrus County
Courthouse Administration
Office's second floor, the
Property Appraiser's Office,
the Tax Collector's Office
and on the following web-
sites: www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
and www.sheriffcitrus.org.
Mobile home parks
A determination will be
based on evidence of a vacancy
rate provided by the prop-
erty owner The vacancy rate
shall be defined as the per-
centage of available spaces
within a mobile home park
or RV park that were vacant
between Jan. 1,2013, through
and including Dec. 21,2013.
The following information
is required for a vacancy
adjustment:
Applicant must be the
owner of the property
Applicant shall com-
plete the application in full,
including the vacancy rate
calculation (formula pro-
vided on application).
Applications and sup-
porting documentation must
be submitted in person or by
mail. No applications sub-
mitted by email will be con-
sidered. The property owner
must be able to provide the
Tax Parcel ID number when
completing the application
and a signature is required.
Copies of originals are en-
couraged and accepted. No
documents will be returned.
Send completed applica-
tion, together with support-
ing documentation, to Citrus
County Land Section, attn.
Citrus County Fire Protection
Assessment, 3600 W Sover-
eign Path, Suite 205, Lecanto,
FL 34461. For questions, call
the Citrus County Land Sec-
tion at 352-527-5458.
Hardship assessment
The following qualifica-
tions must be met:
Applicant must own the
residential property and be
granted homestead exemption.
The total household in-
come of all lawful occupants
of the property shall be less
than or equal to 30 percent
of the current income limits
established by the U.S. De-
partment of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD), as ad-
justed for family size (income
limits listed on application).
The applicant shall have
the present intent to main-
tain the residential property
as their permanent resi-
dence through the remain-
der of the fiscal year.
Applications submitted
without complete and
proper documentation will
be disqualified and denied.
Applications and sup-
porting documentation must
be submitted in person or by


mail No applications submitted
by email will be considered.
Send completed application
with supporting documenta-
tion to Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners, attn.
Housing Services, 2804 W
Marc Knighton Court No. 12,
Lecanto, FL 34461.


Volunteers combat world hunger at






A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday You will be concerned
with helping those in need this year.
Your dedication will be respected and
admired by the people you encounter
along the way. You have a great sense
of what will work.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Some-
one you have a deal with may not fulfill
a promise. Be ready to take over.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Uncer-
tainty regarding an important relation-
ship will make you feel upset. React
mindfully to help you find a solution
that will suit everyone involved.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You
should consider combining business
with pleasure if you want to get ahead.
You could encounter serious difficulties
while traveling, so be extra cautious.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You'll be
able to work with fine detail. Pursue a
creative project while getting together
with friends and socializing.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't let
depression get you down. Stop doing
so much for everyone around you and
start doing things for yourself.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Do
something to stimulate your mind and
get you moving in a positive direction.
Make plans to take a short trip or catch
up on correspondence.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Consider
making a career move. Look at how
you could use your skills more di-
versely You have more to offer than
you realize. Redo your resume.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You'll be
caught between wanting to say some-
thing and not feeling confident enough
to do so. Don't back down.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Choose
your words carefully. You may be taken
the wrong way. Get involved in some
sort of creative endeavor.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You'll be
attracted to someone or something
mysterious or unusual. Ask for a favor
or advice from a close friend. Don't
consider contributing cash to a joint fi-
nancial venture.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't
overdo it or let anyone take advantage
of your good nature. Take care of per-
sonal business and remember that
charity begins at home. Emotional ma-
nipulation must be counteracted.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Stop
thinking about the things you would
like to do and start putting your plans
into motion. You can make things hap-
pen if you take the initiative.


ENTERTAINMENT


De La Soul giveaway
piques industry interest
NASHVILLE, Tenn. De La
Soul made it feel like 1989 all
over again for 25 hours.
The influential hip-hop group
released seven albums worth of
material for free on its website for
25 hours starting Friday morning
to celebrate the impending 25th
anniversary of its classic debut
album, "3 Feet High and Rising."
The group's music, available
through 11 a.m. Saturday, had
become frustratingly hard to pur-
chase through legal means. De-
mand appeared to be heavy
enough midday Friday to over-
whelm the group's chosen down-
load provider temporarily.
And it wasn't just listeners ex-
cited about the move. Folks in
the music business were watch-
ing with fascination, as well.
"From a creative standpoint
and a marketing standpoint, I
think it's terrific," said Sophia
Chang, a manager for GZA, Q-
Tip and A Tribe Called Quest
and former record label execu-
tive. "I think everybody's talking
about them. I think they're all
over social media. I think they
remind people of how incredibly,
incredibly influential and innova-
tive that album was."
The group and its management
did not respond to messages
from The Associated Press. In
an interview with Rolling Stone,
De La Soul MC Posdnuos said
it's been a "trying journey" to get
the music cleared for release on
iTunes and other similar services.
"It's been too long where our
fans haven't had access to
everything," he said. "This is our
way of showing them how much
we love them."
The group, consisting of Long
Island, N.Y., high school friends
Posdnuos, Trugoy the Dove
and Pasemaster Mase, made
their debut with "3 Feet High and


Associated Press
Britain's Prince Harry gives a thumbs-up sign from the cock-
pit of a Spitfire aircraft Saturday during a visit to the Boultbee
Flight Academy in Goodwood, southern England. Battle of
Britain veterans were transported back to their days as pilots
when Harry climbed into the cockpit of the Spitfire and started
the engine during the launch of a flight scholarship for injured
ex-servicemen. The war veterans attended the to give their
support to the Spitfire Flight Scholarship.


Rising" with the help of producer
Prince Paul in 1989. Known for
hits like "Me, Myself and I,"
"Buddy" and "Potholes in My
Lawn," they were heralded for
their eclecticism.
Unlike many of their contem-
poraries, not all their music was
available for digital download or
on streaming services. Al
Branch, the general manager of
The Blueprint Group, which over-
sees the careers of Lil Wayne
and Drake among others, says
he saw a day when a major act
might attempt to reach a fan base
in such a way out of frustration.
"I always knew as the world
becomes more and more digital
and smartphones come into play
that this day was coming. It
makes you think from the per-
spective, if you're an artist,
what's more important?" he said.
"Is it more important for you to sell
albums or is it more important for
you to keep your brand afloat
and tour and keep going hard?"


Actress Ellen Page
comes out as gay
LOS ANGELES Ellen Page,
who won the hearts of moviegoers
as a pregnant teenager in the 2007
film "Juno,"
has come out
as gay.
The 26-
year-old told
a Las Vegas
au d ience Fri-
day, "I'm here
en Pa L today because
Ellen Page Isam gay." She
was speaking to a conference of
counselors who work with
teenagers who identify as lesbian,
gay, transgender, bisexual or queer.
Video of her speech was posted
on the Los Angeles Times website.
Page says she suffered for years
because she was afraid to come
out. She told the audience, "I'm
standing here today, with all of you,
on the other side of all that pain."
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 16, the
47th day of 2014. There are 318
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Feb. 16,1804, Lt. Stephen
Decatur led a successful raid into
Tripoli Harbor to burn the U.S. Navy
frigate Philadelphia, which had
fallen into the hands of pirates dur-
ing the First Barbary War.
On this date:
In 1868, the Benevolent and Pro-
tective Order of Elks was organized
in New York City.
In 1923, the burial chamber of
King Tutankhamen's recently un-
earthed tomb was unsealed in
Egypt by English archaeologist
Howard Carter.
In 1945, American troops landed
on the island of Corregidor in the
Philippines during World War II.
In 1959, Fidel Castro became
premier of Cuba a month and a-half
after the overthrow of Fulgencio
Batista.
In 1961, the United States
launched the Explorer 9 satellite.
Ten years ago: The Walt Disney
Co. rejected a takeover bid by
Comcast Corp.
Five years ago: The govern-
ment of Pakistan agreed to imple-
ment Islamic law in the north-
western region of Malakand in an
attempt to pacify a spreading Tal-
iban insurgency.
One year ago: Billy Hunter was
ousted as executive director of the
National Basketball Players Associ-
ation by NBA players.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Je-
remy Bulloch is 69. Actor William
Katt is 63. Rhythm-and-blues singer
James Ingram is 62. Actor LeVar
Burton is 57. Actor-rapper Ice-T is
56. International Tennis Hall of
Famer John McEnroe is 55. Singer
Sam Salter is 39. Rapper Lupe Fi-
asco is 32. Actress Elizabeth Olsen
is 25. Actor Mike Weinberg is 21.
Thought for Today: "There are
two ways to slice easily through life;
to believe everything or to doubt
everything. Both ways save us from
thinking."--Alfred Korzybski, Pol-
ish-American linguist (1879-1950).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


162/45 O.O0" 166/46 O.O00
THREE DAY OUTLOOK aily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 65' Low: 38"
Sunny. light winds

>l 11 1 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
f High: 74' Low45
0 '1'1.0 Mostly sunny

W TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
.rf t' High: 77 Low: 51'
....- Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 65156
Record /31
Normal 73/55
Mean temp. 54
Departure from mean -9
PRECIPITATION* .
Saturday 0.01"
Total for the month 1.37"
Total for the year 4.51"
Normal for the year 3,78'
"As of 7 p m at ltwernss
UV INDEX: 8
0-2minimal,3-4 low, 5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
29.98


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 579
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 86%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, oak, grasses
Today's count: 9.4/12
Monday's count: 10.2
Tuesday's count: 10.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 31
Pollutant: Particulale matter


From mouths of rivers
Cty
Chassahowtzka' 7:35 am
Crystal Rem" 5:42 arn.m
Wilthlacoochaee" 236 a.m.
Homosassa." 6.40 a.m


TIDES
"At King's Bay 'At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
High Low
0.Sflt. 7:41 p,,Q 04t t;32am, 0,11 2;44p.m0l ht
2.3 t. 6:05 p.m 2.1 12:01 a.mr. 0.3 h 12:31 p.4.2ft,
3-ft. 3:03p.m., 3.2 f 9,34 a.m. -0.2 i. 10O4p.0Aftt
t12ft, 6:52 p.m, 1.2f t'22a-m. o. 1I 1:42p.m0.1 If.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L Fecast City


H L Feast


Daytona Bch. 69 45 s Miami 77 62 s
Fort Lauderdale 77 60 s Ocala 68 40 s
Fort Myers 76 52 s Orlando 70 50 s
Gainesville 67 39 s Pensacola 65 55 S
Homestead 76 59 s Sarasota 69 49 s
Jacksonville 65 39 s Tallahassee 69 38 pc
Key West 73 65 s Tampa 67 48 pc
Lakeland 72 48 pc Vero Beach 71 49 s
Melbourne 69 51 s W. Palm Bch. 76 57 s

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: North winds around 10 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters temperature
smooth. Tonight: Northwest winds 0
around 5 knots. Seas 2 feet or less.
Bay and inland waters a lignt chop. 2
Ti*n at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Wizhlacoocnee at Holder 2927 29.29 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.51 38.52 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.60 39.61 40,60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.27 40.28 42.20
Levels ieporledl in fee a sobe sea tev. FRood stage f lakes are based on 2 33-year Ikod.
the mnean-aMal flood wtch h a 43-paecent chance of being equald exceeed in
any one year, This data is obtained Ironrt the Southwest Floeda Water Managemrent Ostrit
and Is subject to rvso kin no event will thea Dislric or the United Slates Geological Survey
be litable for a damages arising out f li use of this data. It you have any questns you
should contact Ihe HyitoloqcaI Data Secton a t (352) 796.7211

THE NATION ____
F 40, FF I .


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
AsheilIle
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlngton. VT
CharlBston, S.C
Charleslon, W.V.
Chadotte
Chicago
Cincinnatl
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvllle. IN
Hamsbrg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
LasVegas
IUfle Rock
I o Anuales


SAT
H L Pep. H
32 22 .05 23
70 37 71
41 30 .01 51
48 34 .23 59
45 25 .06 30
76 42 76
36 33 .06 33
48 33 48
47 31 .44 61
52 40 .34 49
35 27 .08 30
27 20 .01 17
33 21 19
59 49 .07 61
36 23 .26 38
47 37 15 52
24 3 25
28 14 .28 32
24 17 25
30 8 38
25 21 .16 30
30 12 04 26
70 37 72
54 36 63
31 6 15 28
23 7 24
83 46 83
28 12 01 36
35 30 18 28
31 19 .06 28
68 41 75
22 3 .01 30
69 50 78
50 27 61
78 51 73


SUN
L Fcst
3 pc
40 pc
27 pc
39 pc
14 pc
60 I
18 pc
30 n
40 pc
32 f
14 pc
1 II
2pc
37 pc
21 ( I
3O pc
16 pc
2O pc
6 sn
130 PC
3O pc
14 sn
2 pc
57 pc
34 pc
24 pc
8 an
53 pc
27 pc
9 cd
7 pc
62 I
19 pc
48 pc
47 pc
1l 5 D


SAT SUN
City N L Pep. H LFcst
New Orleans 60 46 69 54 pc
New York City 37 33 29 14 pc
Nodolk 46 37 .21 42 30 pc
Oklahoma City 67 28 64 48 pc
Omaha 5sO 18 38 30 pc
Palm Springs 6 55 82 57 pc
Philadelphia 37 32 .08 28 16 pc
Phoenix 86 53 85 54 pc
Pittsburgh 28 22 12 27 9 sn
Potland,ME 32 16 .04 28 7 pc
Portland, OR 46 42 .66 48 42 r
ProvIdence, Rt 35 23 .14 30 9 pc
Raleigh 45 38 27 50 26 pc
Rapid Cty 50 32 59 26 pc
Reno 71 54 58 29 sh
Rochaster.NY 29 25 .01 18 2 it
Sacramento 62 52 63 42 pc
Salt Lake Ci y 61 42 52 34 fl
San Antonio 79 50 80 57 f
San Diego 75 52 67 54 1
San Francisco 62 52 56 48 pc
Savannah 61 50 .02 62 38 s
Seattle 46 41 .27 46 40 r
Spokane 43 32 .12 39 32 sn
St. Louis 29 13 35 26 pc
St. Ste. Mane 11 -2 .03 13 -5 pc
Syracuse 29 25 .01 20 6 fl
Topeka 48 16 44 35 pc
_hfbj..ngl.:r, :, ."46 ',l 7 7 6 19 pc
YESTERDAY S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
14IH 91, Sarse. CaM
LOW .23. Land 0 k, .WM
WORLD CITIES


Los Anaiss ,u 01, "e w r' U
Louisville 31 19 .26 40 29 pc CIrv UNKY
Memphis 45 25 .14 56 47 pc CITY H 8"1K
Milwaukee 22 5 22 15 p Acapulco 8W7pc
Minneapolis 18 0 .12 22 20 pc Amsterdam51f14Dpc
Mobde 60 38 70 46 s Alhans 6w44/s
Monlgomory 53 36 64 41 s Beijing 44/26ft
Nashville 38 21 .08 50 33 pc Berlin 53/44/
Bermuda 7316 KEY TO COMOMTWON S c-co d-drp l-d Cairo 60W51/r
Mrair hhary, pcIpwti cloudy; fr-rai Calgary 30/15/pc
rs-raliniiWnow mix; aIsunny; hshowan; Havana 78/57/s
i=ninow; ts.Ihndeitarm w=wlndy. Hong Kong 57/57/pC
WSIO 14 Jerusalem 62/48Wr


Lijbn 55/39/pC
London 53/35fr
Madrid 53G5ft
Mexico Clly 75/4&s
Montreal 28W8pcx
Moscow 3524/pc
Paris W3/41/pc
Rio 87/73pc
Rome 64/48apc
Sydney 78at
Tokyo SW33c
Toronlo 2&8/pc
Warsaw 46d32pc


0 LEGAL NOTICES



City of Inverness.....................All

Bid Notices................................D8

Meeting Notices........................D8

Lien Notices...............................D8

Surplus Property ........................D7


CCIeT RUOS C O U N T Y



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community News paper Se ing Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -32 2 2
Tnrina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 64 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
I" Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


SOLUNAR TABLES SlO0"
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING ,AFTERNOON)
02/16 SUNDAY 06:48 00:02 19:04 12:26
02/17 MONDAY 07:22 00:45 19:57 13:10
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
Su"ITMI _-_-----619 m
'~'~' SUNRIE TOURO7 5O a M:
O N TO AY ............. .O. m,
M 101111! TODAY ... ....... 7:46 a.m.
Feb22 Marl Mar 8 Mar16 M ro .746a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no bum ban.
For mroe Inlonnaltmn call Florida Dtveon ol Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more


WATERING RULES
Lam 1iv.'erir( Inmleo to h'w a3yS pcr ,-Lk icl "rel 0 a.m. or after p.m. as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Tnuiav aredaor Sur'1a&
ODD 3 k'lrFE mr. 1 ,3r, WO ride i3ti inrl, rliun3,y
MeirO rtsitnnijwnna iiJKr riO.!- %Vxrelz r-rjIrndai-' f &1Lrviiarj4 s Sc
as vegetable gardens. lowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
time.
C qr, ,,jnlv Uliit,' cuastomeis should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
ptant material 352-527-7669. &wn -v plinci.gs iii q iiy Ic.r Idii
walenring allowances.
-, ripfrcon a Kr.ns ple a' call Cayi ycl inerre, @ 352-726-2321. Cty of CCystal
River @ 352-7954216 exl. 313 uincGrlwralei Ciirjs CCounr r4 3252.27.7'9?




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4


BEVERLY HILLS LIQUORS
3898 N. Lecanto Hwy. (Hwy. 491), Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-7723


p


LOWEST PRICES!
Prices Good Through February 22,


2014


p.^3 0


I Popovx ,,__,,
LO By2btls 7rm~eoo


adgtti0s price!! I


and get'r .ith[4is price!!i~n


Skyy Vodka

$ 999
*0tax


Buy 2 b StTHomore
adget t'hispice!!Ti I^^^


and gi s price!!


Kahlua
$28997
^f_ ^^^R + tax K~d
.^Bu y 21.75Le or orj
an getthi prce!


L CBuy2bote sor more
aI IS getithis p Iice


VN M IIRR W II II III . . . ..I
3 AYSPCAL3 AYSECAL3 A SECAL3DA SECA


Grey Goose 80 , Absolut 800
$4 799 9 ",,
7tax L ii


Jack Daniels
$ 99
I+ tax
3 2^^^^ 1.75 L


~uI~


$Is 99
+tax'm
i~i~wiMiTB^ i'B1.75 L ^


^1199
*L!--[a.
izii~rn~I LBij^j
Buy 2 bot3tlesorm' ore^^^^^


u~L Bu 2bottiles or-mor
an'gt tispra ice!!'M^BI^Bf


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 AS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Angelo
Bianco, 87
INVERNESS
Angelo John Bianco, age
87, Inverness, died Feb. 13,
2014, surrounded by his
loving
family and
under
Hospice of
Citrus
County.
Angelo
was born
in Queens,
N.Y.,tothe Angelo
late Mario Bianco
and Mary
Bianco. He was a sanita-
tion worker for the town of
Oyster Bay, N.Y, for more
than 32 years. He joined
the Knights of Columbus
in Bethpage, L.I., N.Y, be-
coming a fourth-degree
Knight. Upon retirement
and relocation to Florida,
he became active in the
Knights Council of Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. He also volun-
teered at Fort Cooper
State Park, with more than
3,000 hours of service.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 53 years,
Adele Bianco; siblings
Mario Bianco Jr, Eugene
Bianco, Raymond Bianco,
Madeline DeLouisa and
Louise Tucciarone; and
many extended family
members. He was pre-
ceded in death by his
brother, Steve.
A Mass of Christian Bur-
ial will be offered at
11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 20,
2014, from Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church. The
family will receive friends
in visitation from 10 a.m. at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home until the procession
leaves for the church. In-
urnment will be at a later
date at St John's Cemetery
in Queens, N.Y Please
consider memorial dona-
tions in Angelo's memory
to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Anthony
Monaco, 85
LECANTO
Anthony J. Monaco, age
85, of Lecanto, Fla., passed
away Feb. 13, 2014, at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center Born April
16,1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y,
to Vincenzo and Conietta
(Mazza) Monaco, Anthony
moved to Citrus County 21
years ago from
Ronkonkoma, N.Y He was
a retired parts manager
for heavy equipment. An-
thony was a member of St.
Scholastica Catholic
Church in Lecanto, Fla.,
the Crystal Oaks Civic As-
sociation and West Citrus
Elks Lodge No. 2693 of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.
He is survived by his
wife, Katherine P Monaco;
two sons, Vincent Monaco
and Steve and his wife An-
nette Monaco; and three
grandchildren, Nicolas,
Cristina and Stephen
Monaco.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. Mass will be
offered at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 18, at St. Scholastica
Catholic Church in
Lecanto.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.







CILc. . 2vi~
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremadion ].'-4rul

For Information and costs
call 726-8323


Aquilina
Ward-Roberts,
73
CRYSTAL RIVER
Aquilina Demaris Flo-
res Martinez Ward-
Roberts, 73 of Citrus
County,
Fla., died
Sunday,
Feb. 9,
2014. She -
was born
Jan. 22,
1941, to
Silvestre
Flores and Aquilina
A n g e la Ward-
Martinez Roberts
in Penono-
me, Panama. She relo-
cated to the United States
in 1966. After traveling for
her husband's military ca-
reer, her family settled in
Crystal River in 1970.
Known as Nina to her
friends and family she was
baptized as one of Jeho-
vah's Witnesses and joy-
fully served in nine
congregations in three
states. She was instrumen-
tal in the establishment
and development of the
Spanish congregations in
Citrus County
Nina will be remem-
bered as a loving mother
and homemaker by her
five children and their
spouses, Donna Ward
Frink and Ron Frink of
Beverly Hills, Billy Ward,
actively serving in the U.S.
Army, Keith Ward and
Donna Ward of Crystal
River, Keeli Ward Hamil-
ton and Rick Hamilton of
Inverness and Regina
Roberts Graham and Alan
Graham ofAthens, Ga. She
will be greatly missed by
her 14 grandchildren,
John Hodgkins and his
wife Lindsey, Steven
Hodgkins and Joshua
Barker, Will Ward and
Nicholas Ward, Hannah
Ward, Logan Ward and
Emma Ward, Austin
Hamilton, Mia Hamilton,
Malena Hamilton, Jessy
Lagarino Graham and
Clay Graham; and two
great-grandchildren, Noah
Hodgkins and Elijah
Hodgkins; and many
nieces and nephews. Her
parents preceded her in
death along with her
brother, Arselio Sabedra of
Sonadora, Panama. She is
survived by siblings,
Bernarda Seyersdahl of
Tampa, Julio Flores and
Natia MacKay of Son-
adora, Panama.
In lieu of flowers, please
send donations in memory
of Nina Ward to Hospice of
Citrus County Addition-
ally, donations may be
made in her memory to La
Casa De Campesino of
Penonome, Panama, via
her children. A memorial
service will be at 3 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at
Fero Funeral Home in
Beverly Hills.
Arrangements are en-
trusted to Fero Funeral
Home, wwwferofuneral
home.com.


Peter
Bilello, 96
INVERNESS
PeterJ. Bilello, 96, of In-
verness, died Thursday,
Feb. 6, 2014, at Citrus
Health & Rehabilitation
Center
A native of Brooklyn and
Jamaica, N.Y, he was born
April 20, 1917, to Mary Lo-
Castro and Charles Bilello
and moved to Inverness in
1971 from North Merrick,
Long Island, N.Y
Mr Bilello was retired
from the LIRR in New
York and was a member of
Our Lady of Fatima Parish.
He was preceded in
death by his wife, Mary G.
Bilello; by two brothers,
Ignacio and Salvatore; and
his great-grandson An-
thony German.
Survivors include two
daughters, Pat German of
Patchogue, N.Y, and
Diana Smith of Tampa.
Peter had five grandchil-
dren, Keith, Brett,
Danielle, Wesley and
Derek; and 10 great-grand-
children, Sami, Darla,
April, Nathan, Katherine,
Skyler, Chandler, Sawyer,
Chloe and Jack. He also is
survived by his loving com-
panion, Jean Feit.
The Mass of Christian
Burial for Peter and Mary
Bilello will be offered at
10 a.m. Saturday, March 1,
2014, from Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church.
Their urns will be laid to
rest in Oak Ridge Ceme-
tery Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home With
Crematory is assisting the
family
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Wanda
O'Steen, 90
INVERNESS
Wanda L. O'Steen, 90, In-
verness, died Friday,
Feb. 14, 2014, at Citrus
Health & Rehab. Private
arrangements are by Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory Inverness.





John'Doug'
Williams, 73
INVERNESS
John D. "Doug"
Williams, age 73, Inver-
ness, died Friday, Feb. 14,
2014. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of private
arrangements.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


.;, In Loving Memory of

J, % Scott Key Sandifer
'i 10-18-62 7-4-12


Ou ,son, b.othe,,

soul mate &Lfiteend.
000H7UI



Serving all your cremation needs.





FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Serving all of Citrus County
(352) 726&2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!



i-ID


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lf
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralheomm


Rudolph
Curcio, 79
HOMOSASSA
Rudolph Curcio, 79, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away peacefully after a
long, hard-
fought bat-
tle with f.
cancer He
was born
in Detroit,
Mich., and
graduated
fr o m
D e n b y Rudolph
H i g h Curcio
School in
Detroit.
Rudolph was the son of
John and Rose Frontiera
Curcio of Michigan.
He is survived by his
wife, Carole Pallante Cur-
cio; brother Joe and sister
Teresa, both from Michi-
gan; a brother Rudy who
passed away at birth; three
children, Sam Curcio of
Aurora, Ill., Sam's wife Jill
and grandchildren Carley
and Kyle Curcio, Rose
Marsala and husband
Randy of Clearwater, Fla.,
and John Curcio, who
resided with him and his
wife. He also had nine
grandchildren from his
marriage to Carole.
He was an Army vet-
eran, a member of the
Moose Club, American Le-
gion and Homosassa Lions
Club. He was an active
member of St. Benedict
Catholic Church. He loved
the Lord so much. He
loved old cars and col-
lected and restored autos
as a hobby after he retired
from the automobile busi-
ness. He was full of life
and loved to dance. He
loved his children and
grandchildren to the
fullest. He will be deeply
missed by everyone.
Funeral services will be
held at Bay Pines VA in St
Petersburg at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, please
send any gift to Suncoast
Hospice Foundation
NPCC or the American
Cancer Society
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries are online
at www.chronicle
online.com.



To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Julia
Bromell, 93
MARIETTA, GA.
Julia Houser Bromell, 93,
of Marietta, Ga., died Fri-
day, Jan. 31, 2014, at the
Tranquility Hospice Center
in Austell, Ga. She was born
in Philadelphia, Pa., and
lived in Bristol, Pa., when
she met and married Allen
Bromell. They lived in New
Jersey where she was a
bookkeeper at jobs like
Garden State Fruit Grow-
ers, Central Jersey Bank,
Manalapan School System,
and Freehold Township
School System. At one time,
they owned and operated a
carwash on Throckmorton
Street in Freehold. She
loved her family and
friends very much and had
a musical laugh we will
never forget They lived
many years in Manalapan
Twsp., then in Floral City,
Fla., and moved to Georgia
to be near their children in
their later years.
Julie was predeceased
by Allen (2004); a sister,
Amy Houser; a brother,
Roy; and her sister-in-law,
Mildred. Surviving are her
children, Donna Fox,
Bruce Bromell, both of
Marietta, and Beth, son-in-
law Jim, Salkowitz of
Farmingdale, N.J.; her sis-
ter-in-law, Lee Houser
(Livonia, Mich.); brothers,
Paul Houser (Phil, Pa.),
Phil and sister-in-law Mar-
garet Houser (Newton,
Pa.), Noel Houser (Ingle-
wood, Calif); and sisters,
Vivie Bennet (Jack-
sonville) and Leah and
brother-in-law Joe Ciarka
(Robbinsville, N.J.); and
many wonderful nieces
and nephews.
In the spring, a memo-
rial service will be held for
Julie at the Brig. Gen. Wm.
C. Doyle Memorial Ceme-
tery in Wrightstown, N.J.,
with a luncheon to follow.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be sent to Well-
star Hospice, 4040
Hospital West Drive,
Austell, GA 30106.


Meridien

Qecsearch
www.NewStudylnfo.com 352-59-STUDY


Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Dwight
Ferrell, 70
CRYSTAL RIVER
Dwight David Ferrell,
age 70, of Crystal River,
Fla., passed away Feb. 11,
2014, at his home under
the care of
his family.
He was
born
Dec. 24,
1943, in
Bailey,
N.C., to
Claudy
a n d Dwight
Catherine Ferrell
(Lamm)
Ferrell. Dwight moved to
Citrus County eight years
ago from Waldorf, Md. He
was a self-employed auto
mechanic and a Baptist.
In addition to his par-
ents, Dwight was preceded
in death by two brothers,
Kenny and Carroll.
He is survived by his
wife, Janice M. Ferrell;
three children, Sherri,
Staci and her husband
Johnny, and Shelli and her
husband Jimmy; three sib-
lings, John, Janet and
Keith; one grandson, Jack,
and his fiancee Haleigh;
and one great-grandson,
Justin David.
Family will receive
friends Tuesday, Feb. 18,
from 11 a.m. until service
time at 1 p.m. at the Brown
Funeral Home in Lecanto,
Fla. Pastor Lloyd Bertine
of Gulf to Lake Church in
Crystal River officiating.
Burial will follow at the
Memorial Gardens Ceme-
tery in Beverly Hills, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.
See DEATHS/Page A14

VERIFICATION
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.


Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you
prefer your loved ones celebrate
your legacy rather than stress about g
making arrangements? Give them
the relief they'll need during a
tough time.
We'll discuss:
*Affordable options
and savings
SVeterans benefits
*Worldwide Away-
From-Home II
Protection
SAnd much more...
RESERVATION REQUIRED
Limited seating available.
CALL NOW!

1-352-319-6816 *
FirN link aillmint1 only please. i
*Free crenation does not cl ude Travel Protection Plan


11
16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601

Kelli K. Maw,MD,MPH
Board Certified, Family Medicine


I ST. J:E :R:B::= cB*IJ.*:t :*]..! II :L:B .lJDENT l eLAHIKE IA D


A CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDY
bor people experiencing




CONSTIPATION
-3- due to prescription --
PAIN MEDICATIONS



TO LEARN MORE. SPEAK WITH A MEMBER
OF OUR STUDY TEAM







OMVisit us POnline at SeekingRelie.com
Visit us online at Seekinggemief cog *


ihiftnaivif


A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


gap




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMessage

from

Sheriff

-SHERIFF e Dw
-s""'-S Jeff uawsy
JEffE J. DAWSY


THE STRATEGY FOR SUCCESS
As many of you know, I like football... a lot. Specifically, I'm a huge
Tampa Bay Buccaneers fan and am very committed to watching every
single (albeit painful) game. One thing that always strikes me about
football is the myriad of playing strategies the head coach uses. To me,
it's the single-biggest factor in winning -or losing a game. You can
have the best talent, the most money, the biggest and most beautiful
venue, but it doesn't matter a bit if your coach doesn't have a good
strategy. The strategy used must be evaluated, tweaked and enhanced
continually. It must not be stagnant. It must change to fit the situation.
The same can be said for any law enforcement agency.
Now in my 18th year as your Sheriff, I can honestly say we have a
superb strategy in place that effectively helps prevent crime. I've been
"preaching"this strategy called Intelligence Led Policing for over
three years now, and we are reaping the benefits of using this crime
fighting method since it was introduced to us in 2010.
As I've stated before, ILP is a new way of doing business. It is a
strategy that is proactive instead of reactive. Instead of just trying to
catch those who are committing crimes, we're attempting to stop
crimes before they occur. Since 2010, our crimes against persons and
property crimes are significantly lower now than ever before. As with
any strategy, we will see ebbs and flows, but this is undeniable proof
that ILP works.
In order to tweak our ILP strategy, I meet with the agency leadership
every January to evaluate our successes and identify our top priorities
for the year. We then meet continually throughout the year to massage
our approach. This ensures that we "up" our game -- that we not
remain static- for whatever new challenges await us.


This year, our top ILP objec-
tives are: reducing property
crimes (thefts of items from citi-
zens); finding and stopping the
production, and use of meth-
amphetamines; finding and stop-
ping those who sell, and use ille-
gal prescription drugs; and,
focusing on those committing
retail thefts.
There are many strategies we
use to combat these issues and
they are all centered around the
ILP concept. I want you to know
that the men and women of this
agency are committed to your
safety. It is important to all of us
that we stay focused on our
objectives to keep this
community safe.
You can help keep us ahead of
the game by sharing information
with us. Simply call 911 when
you see something suspicious. Or
report crimes anonymously, and
be eligible to receive a cash
reward, by contacting Crime
Stoppers of Citrus County. Visit
the crimestopperscitrus.com
website for more information.
Working as a team, we can all
help Citrus County stay one of the saf
successful 2014.


Incidentally,
a large number
of property
crimes and
retail thefts are
committed by
drug users;
hence, we
know that
attacking
meth and
illegal
prescription
drug use will
automatically
decrease
property
crimes and
shoplifting.

est in the state. Here's to a very


Not Topl'ics


TweIhe B a / ea ............................I



Fo t e Re o d..................................."


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Follow Us on Twitter!


Tweet

the Beat
A virtual ride along with CCSO personnel.
Follow us on Twitter @SheriffCitrus.


Tweet

the Heat


Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue
2013 Incident Statistics


Incident
Type


Number of
Incidents


Structure Fires 116 120
Vehicle Fires 70 70
Brush Fires 168 224
Miscellaneous Fires 37 42
Unauthorized Burns 351 426
False Alarms 391 345
HazMat Calls 77 70
(Confirmed)
Motor Vehicle Accidents 406 438
with injuries
Motor Vehicle Accidents 359 325
without injuries
EMS Assists 2,138 2,487
Provide Basic Life Support 586 624
Prior to EMS Arrival
Canceled
Prior to Arrival 676 969
Other 945 1,105
Miscellaneous Calls


2012
Comparison


A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


TOTAL


6,320


7,245




CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEHIN THE ADGE
rljw
Am

BEOWFO TE ECR


The Risks

of Being

a Deputy

Sheriff


Over the last ten
years, an average of
more than 160
officers each year
were killed in the line
of duty. Most of them
died from gun fire or
vehicle crashes.
Last year, law
enf o rc e m e nt
agencies across the
country united to
support an initiative
known as Below 100
to reduce the number
of deaths to less than
one-hundred per year.


By Captain
Phil Royal
PROFESSIONAL
STANDARDS AND
TRAINING DIVISION
The focus is awareness


and training for agents within an organization
who make change the trainers and decision
makers of every police organization.
Although any number of police deaths is too
many, the US lost 105 officers in the line of
duty last year which is the lowest number since
1944.
In its first year, Below 100 was an
overwhelming success and has inspired
agencies to refocus attention to improving the
safety of law enforcement officers.
The CCSO has not lost an officer on duty
since the death of Aubrey "Fred" Johnson on
February 11, 1997 when he suffered a heart
attack and died in a vehicle crash.
With the excessive number of officers killed
nationally, the CCSO reevaluated the policies
and practices to assure everything is done to
send the deputies home safe and without injury.
To improve safety, CCSO has purchased
innovative patrol vehicles. Deputies spend the
majority of their shift in a vehicle or working
traffic related incidents. Crashes are one of the
most dangerous aspects of the job.
The newly designed Ford Taurus has
improved handling which decreases the
chances of losing control of the vehicle during
police pursuits and emergency response driving.
The vehicles have added air bag protection
so deputies are less likely to suffer serious
injury in most crashes.
Since gun fire is among the leading cause of
police deaths, enhanced training is the key to
CCSO's firearms regimen.
Each year, deputies attend extensive training
in the proficiency of firearms. More
importantly, firearms and other use of force
training, focuses on the cognitive aspect of the
skill not just proficiency. Knowing when to use
force, especially deadly force, is the greatest
responsibility an officer has.
Deputies are put in real-life scenarios during
training sessions requiring them to make split-
second, critical decisions. When those
scenarios become real, deputies have the
experience to fall back on because of their
training.
The CCSO's physical fitness program is
second to none. With the risks of obesity, high
blood pressure, heart attack and stroke being
very high among police officers, Sheriff Dawsy
has high expectations for his deputies.
Each quarter every deputy (including the
Sheriff) must pass a physical agility test. This
consists of a one-half mile of obstacles such as
walls, ladders, stairs, hurdles and a heavy sled
drag. There are similar requirements for every
firefighter.
Fitness is a serious matter for this agency.
Healthy employees reduce the risk of illness &
injury, minimize insurance costs and help
assure personnel are ready and able when you
need them.
With initiatives like Below 100, the CCSO
strives to improve the safety of employees,
making the financial and personal losses to our
community minimal.
Our agency's primary training focus is to
develop professionalism and reduce risk. Every
deputy should expect to end their shift injury
free while making our community a safer place
to live.
For questions or inquiries about training for
deputies and firefighters or to learn how to
become one, contact Captain Phil Royal at
proyal@sheriffcitrus.org.


A


I


f ll iIw ui.iis troiii any r callerr
Lieutenant Ricky Grant
IImI, I .I I ," . . iJ'I Ii)


ie:
11 r


MISCONCEPTION:
Some people think that there is
a quota for writing tickets.
1 lAI ITV-


' MISCONCEPTION
When a DL is seized from a person
it is submitted to Evidence.
REALITY:


L IS tiumred in to HIr I,[If e:r I rcis [ Iepartment wlIo irI tI.rrI
'rd it to [DHS'MV iuniless it is ac tual evidence in the :case
fingerprints/DNA then it is submitted to Evidence.
Elizabeth Rideout
idence Tech


r'.
Y


MISCONCEPTION:


I


,,L-LI 11 Law enforcement onicers are never
deputy has the clis,:retion whether to write a til et written fearful and never show emotion.
wariiiiii or iust ,i' e \.erli..l :iiselii It often depends REA IT
1 111 thie seerity ad oIr freiiueeilv REALITY.
iof \'i. l.tii ns ,: ri,,t:erriiir l the i.ol..tor Fear is not the I:onriseqiueri:e of a susle t s qijii or I rife
Corey Da vidso n. Fear is nrit rer:veririrl the ne.issiri, pIers'it no it .rlvi the ,r nie
CLory Uaviudu,, ^^ \ .. 11": ..
^ ,flrl-,rlr 1 ,rl ,,i ,i,, n r ot ,iettii, there on tiie A I noii:l on soi m eoni e s door at
Sa,' 2 i ani to sAiv 1Iii so rry there was a n iaiciderit will surely test
ite / e the en 'itions itf ,illlVi lile iII uIitrfo l' (sometimes t for years)
SN Corey Davidson


^1^ ~MISCONCEPTION: "S /
^r When a dog bites someone, it will be taken away^V
from the owner and euthanized regardless
of the circumstances.
REALITY:
State law requires that any time a person reports an animal bite or scratch where the


nj ry IIIUIUUUa s UIUI tII ;U II I[JUIIULUI U U UIdLUII) LIIUt dlllllldl IU[JUIImIUIU IIIU L UUt
quarantined for 10 days. In most cases, the quarantine is done at the owner's home, I
S rather than the shelter. If circumstances are such that the quarantine must be done at
the County Shelter, the animal may be claimed by the owner and taken home at
the end of the 10 day quarantine. In circumstances where the bite is a vicious or
repeat offense, further action may be taken, but these cases are rare.
SLaura Peckham

MISCONCEPTION:
MIS N EP ION fi Some citizens may think that
MISCONCEPTION: first responders exceed the speed limit
Deputies are all the same and with lights and sirens just because we
only like to put people in jail. can or because it is perceived as fun.
REALITY: REALITY:
Under e.ervy riifirm there is a manI, or womari wii Wiith a heart moist E oeediriri the sp:,eed limit i, I, irder to pi:reser.e life
with a family and childlrenri the mialority of whom woui.ld m,.i:h 1 anhdIr I:rlertv an ileret .rid rie:essry risI to
rather see the smile or n a ,il fae .as oppose to heri everq the i, I ,r i ,litfessior Is This tasl is nie\er
hid teli s,1n( of h.cr heiffs th un .arid is onl(y done Whlenari appro private
SCorey Davidson Sergeant Ryan T. Glaze
Lid 't2' ,ri I ,r* 1 ,l"^ ,, n ^ ^ ^ ^ IItZ,r. i',,',i.l,,-Z :*,r



MISCONCEPTION:
When items are found and turned over to the Sheriff's office,
they can just be claimed in 90 days by the person that found it.
REALITY:
The finder would have to submit a $50 deposit to our Finance Department for the cost of storage and
advertising. If after 90 days the item is not claimed by the owner the property would be released to the
Sfinder. If the owner claims the property they would need to pay $50 to receive their property
Sand the finder would be reimbursed their $50 deposit.
IElizabeth Rideout


We thought it would be interesting MISCONCEPTION:
to hear from our employees about
things they hear people say that may Many people think that when someone is arrested,
not be true about the Sheriff's Office. the arresting officer must read the arrested person
Here are some examples of common
misconceptions as well as the reality their rights- also known as "Miranda Rights."
of the perception. REALITY:
[V Miranda Rights" are to inform an arrested or detained person of their
MISCONCEPTION: : oistitutional rights, namely the right to legal representation and to
If a criminal flees (by any a.,.oid self incrimination. The requirement that the rights be read only
means) out of the boundaries applies when police intend to detain you to question the individual
of the pursuing agency then the regarding a criminal investigation. If no questioning occurs,
officer must stop the pursuit. no readingof Miranda is required.
Dwane Gannon "-
REALITY: Communications/91/Oispatch
AII officer Iay ni tiri ue to purii e isie fleellltJ
i.iliipecit as s i[ i choinSri alr borders ",- i
Corey Davidson MISCONCEPTION:
,ir I ,,,, -- i. A law enforcement officer must be
on duty (working) to enforce the law

MISCONCEPTION:including writing a ticket.
Citizens think they can call in and at A sw rr, I iti:er nia e, \REALITY:
to ther same ~eriiayefnri~e all IJIWs Witiiii jiirischoiitil (arici Srffl-ie
any time speak to the same deputy outside of iI.risditiflin iiI e f-inor:ile felflories) illidini traff i:
that originally handled their call. I olatiIIIs 21 hIlljrs a dilayv eery c ayv ft thie year
REALITY: Corey Davidson
Deputies worl shiit worl on l.arylni, days
In moiSt situatiiis ii iy deiuty I uld handle ieut l


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A9


00


\







1I BEHINDFBRAR 1,T01HCEu CUNYDGE CROICL


1 1 i I II' i

Sheriff's Office

Implements New

Speaker's Bureau
Need someone to speak at your next
home owners association, club or business
meeting?
The Sheriff's Office now has a Speaker's
Bureau full of knowledgeable professionals
who can help. Choose from topics like:
How to become a law enforcement
officer, firefighter or communications
dispatcher
How to become a CCSO volunteer
An inside look at crime scene
investigations
Fire prevention
Crime prevention
Motorcycle safety
Self protection
And many more! For a complete list of
topics, visit the Sheriff's Office website and
click on the Public Information tab. We
would be happy to provide a speaker, or a
demonstration, to accommodate just about
any need.
To arrange someone to speak for your
organization, contact the Media Relations
office at 341-7486.


ASK



SHERIFF


7:00am-8:00am


CLASSIC HITS
746-9696


4:00pm-5:00pm




746-0953





We encourage people to call in
or leave questions for the Sheriff
on our Facebook page.


On October 1, 2013 the Fire Rescue MSBU
assessment was implemented. This MSBU is a dedi-
cated cost-effective and financially stable means of
funding fire services and facilities. This MSBU pro-
vides fire rescue an additional revenue source nec-
essary to deliver the excellent service that our citi-
zens have come to expect.
In developing our department's five year strategic
plan, we have identified areas within the depart-
ment that need to be addressed in order to enhance
the level of service provided to our citizens. Those
priorities include staffing, equipment replacement,
and fire station renovations and replacements.
I would like to take this opportunity to let our citi-
zens know how their money is being spent.
Within the last three months we have made
some significant improvements to our department
which has directly
enhanced the safety of
the firefighters and the .....
service we provide to
the citizens and visitors
of Citrus County ......

STAFFING
With a population of
over 140,000 citizens,
we must be able to
keep up with the
demands for service
placed upon us.
Staffing is vital in Having standardiz
ensuring that we pro- our apparatus dinr
vide enough first safety. This stall
responders to effec- valuable time fo
tively and safely handle having to enter a b
any situation that we a life rescue.
may be faced with.
We have hired 3 additional full time fire-
fighters who will be staffed at the Inverness fire
station.
We are preparing to staff Citrus Springs fire
station with career personnel on 12 hour
shifts. This station will be staffed from 8:00 a.m. -
8:00 p.m. This is necessary due to the limited num-
ber of available volunteer firefighters during day-
time hours.
This additional staffing will increase our on-duty
daily firefighters from 18/per shift to 22/per shift.

EQUIPMENT
Due to the declining revenues we have been
faced with over the past several years, Fire Rescue


has held back on any major capital purchases and
tried to extend the life of our apparatus in order to
maintain essential operations. This has resulted in
higher maintenance costs associated with maintain-
ing older equipment, and an aging fleet, of which
some of our fire engines are over 20 years old.
Two new engines have been ordered with an
anticipated delivery date of August 2014. These two
engines will replace two of our 1994 engines.
Another significant safety enhancement is the
replacement of our fire nozzles.
Prior to these replacements, we carried several
different types of nozzles on each engine. These
nozzles were old with many becoming obsolete and
unable to repair.
We now have one standardized nozzle that is
multi-functional and supplied on each of our fire
apparatus. Having stan-
dardized equipment on
each of our apparatus
directly improves fire-
*fighter safety. This stan-
f dardized nozzle saves
valuable time for the
firefighter when having
to enter a burning build-
ing to perform a life res-
cue.
iWe have recently
I purchased two sets of
7 "Jaws of Life" to be
m. on replaced on our front line
pment on each of engines.
proves firefighter Tenes
These tools are
,d nozzle saves
firefighter when essential when extricat-
uilding to perform ing trapped victims in
automobile accidents.
The new jaws of life are
lighter weight and much easier for the firefighter to
operate. This is essential when seconds make a dif-
ference.
STATION UPGRADES
Most of our fire stations were built in the 1970's.
Some of these stations were not built to accom-
modate 24 hour staffing.
A renovation project has just been completed on
our Citrus Springs fire station in anticipation of
career staffing.
We are currently in the process of renovating our
Highlands fire station. These two stations were in
dire need of renovations and upgrades which has
been made possible by the implementation of the
Fire MSBU.


In closing, the Fire MSBU allows this department
to move forward and take advantage

of today's technology-based world and ensures

that your firefighters are properly trained

to handle the challenges they will face.


Jim Goodworth


Fire Chief
Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue




MSBU at Work


ed equip
ectly im
idardize
ir the
turning hb


A10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state gov't: Pension, red-light, marijuana proposals fly


BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service
of Florida

TALLAHASSEE Law-
makers seemed to be
drawing closer this week
to giving a green light to a
limited form of medical
marijuana, while some of
them complained that red-
light cameras were
spreading across the state
like weeds.
With the Legislature
going through its next-to-
last week of committee
meetings before the an-
nual session opens
March 4, time is running
short for lawmakers to
float trial balloons or
major legislation, whether
on red lights or a mari-
juana extract that doesn't
get users high. At the same
time, a bill emerged in the
Senate that could drive the
likely fiery debate over
public employee pensions.
Divisions exist on all
those issues, of course.
Lawmakers are trying to
separate the medical
cannabis bill they're push-
ing from a broader meas-
ure being sought by
Orlando attorney John
Morgan and his "army of
angels." Efforts to slam the
brakes on the proliferation
of red-light cameras have
long been contentious. And
public employees' unions
can still be expected to fight
the pension changes, even
if a strategic difference
from last year's bill will
make the measure more
palatable in the Senate.
The legislative session


has essentially begun, but
the end on some of the
high-profile issues of the
session is still unclear
A 'balance' plan
for pensions
Overhauling the pension
plan for future public em-
ployees might have been
one of House Speaker Will
Weatherford's top priori-
ties last year, but it was the
Senate that moved first on
the issue this year, now
that the revamp is part of
the joint House-Senate
agenda.
Senate Community Af-
fairs Chairman Wilton
Simpson, R-Trilby, this
week introduced a bill
(SPB 7046) that would
close the Florida Retire-
ment System to most new
public employees, instead
shifting them either to the
state's existing 401(k)-style
investment plan or a new
"cash balance plan." Law-
enforcement officers and
firefighters would still be
allowed to join the tradi-
tional pension plan.
The exclusion of those
"special risk" employees
appeared to be an effort to
defuse the most controver-
sial part of changes to the
pension plan after an ef-
fort to force all new em-
ployees into the
investment plans was tor-
pedoed last year by rene-
gade Senate Republicans.
"The proposed commit-
tee bills relating to
Florida's retirement sys-
tem are a common-sense
approach to ensure that we
are able to fully deliver on


the benefits that we've
promised our hard-working
state employees for years to
come," Simpson said.
Under Simpson's bill,
employees would have de
facto accounts set up and
would be guaranteed a re-
turn of at least 2 percent a
year on the money in their
accounts. If the plan's in-
vestments made more than
2 percent, then three-quar-
ters of the extra money
would go to employees.
House leaders said they
were still trying to decide
between the cash balance
idea and a hybrid plan that
would essentially split an
employee's account into
two, with part of it being
invested in the traditional
pension system and the
other portion going into
the investment plan.
Some critics zeroed in
on the difference between
special-risk employees
and the rest of the state,
questioning why only po-
lice officers and firefight-
ers should get to stay in the
traditional pension plan.
"If it's good for one set of
employees, it should be
good for all sets of employ-
ees," said Florida Educa-
tion Association Vice
President Joanne McCall.
In an interview with The
News Service of Florida,
Weatherford had a ready
answer
"I would say there's a
reason we call them 'spe-
cial risk,"' he said. "They
have a special job. They
put their lives in danger"


Red light for
red-light cameras?
Almost since they were
approved by the Legisla-
ture with the Mark Wan-
dall Traffic Safety Act of
2010, red-light cameras
have faced a vocal group of
critics looking to roll back
or get rid of the robotic in-
tersection overlords. And a
report out this week from
the Legislature's Office of
Program PolicyAnalysis &
Government Accountabil-
ity is fueling the drive to
scrap the cameras.
According to the OP-
PAGA report, there were
fewer fatalities but more
crashes at electronically
monitored intersections,
and fines issued due to the
technology cost motorists
nearly $119 million last
year
The study recommends
that local governments
demonstrate a safety need
at each intersection where
cameras may be installed,
that local communities
should be required to fol-
low standards on the length
of yellow lights, and that
revenue local governments
generate from the cameras
be restricted to public and
traffic safety uses. But foes
of the cameras want to go
even further
"I think we should go all
in for full repeal," Senate
Transportation Chairman
Jeff Brandes, R-St. Peters-
burg, said during a press
conference at the Capitol
to highlight the study "I


Weekly ROUNDUP


think this data clearly
shows that this program is
not working as the Legisla-
ture intended, that we're
not seeing a reduction in
accidents, (and) that we're
seeing a clear, dramatic in-
crease in revenues that are
being generated from this."
But camera opponents
have some other ideas-
just in case a repeal doesn't
happen. Rep. FrankArtiles,
R-Miami, who has filed a
measure (HB 4009) to re-
peal the 2010 law, said if
legislators are unwilling to
support repeal, they should
enact the series of recom-
mendations included in the
legislative study
"I still firmly believe
that this program should
be repealed, but if we can-
not repeal it I'm willing to
modify it significantly," Ar-
tiles said.
Artiles also proposes
that the amount local gov-
ernments can fine be re-
duced from $158 to $83.
Unsurprisingly perhaps,
local governments were
not at all convinced by the
report The Florida League
of Cities quickly ques-
tioned whether the study
was fair Lobbyist Casey
Cook maintained that the
cameras do improve safety
and called the study "bi-
ased and inconsistent."
"The report's conclusion
is not surprising, given
that it was requested by a
legislator who sponsored a
bill to repeal Florida's red-
light safety camera law,"
the release said.
Those opposed to the


F~1
Liii


Public Auction Fri., Feb. 21, & Sat., Feb. 22
9am Both Days In Clewiston, Fl ,
US Sugar Corporation Surplus. Over 2000 ,, __
Items Will Cross The Block In Clewiston,
FL. 300+ Farm Tractors, Heavy
Equipment, Farm Implements, Dump
Trucks, Excavators, Dozers, Sugar Cane -
Equip, Planting & Harvesting Equip, Cars, REMEMBER OUR
CONSIGNMENT
Pickups, Heavy Trucks. AUCTION
Live Internet Bidding at www.proxibid.com/weeks 2/14 -9 AM
IN OCALA!
10% Buyers Premium CappedAt $500.00 On All Items IN/' r





333-09216 SUCRN

NOTICE OF

BUDGET HEARING

The City Council of the City of Inverness
will hold a public hearing on Tuesday,
February 18th at 5:30 p.m. at the
Inverness Government Center, 212 W.
Main Street, Inverness, FL to consider
and finalize a resolution amending the
adopted budget for the General and
Capital Projects Funds for the fiscal year
commencing October 1, 2013 and
ending September 30, 2014HEC
O00HEIC


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE REFERENCED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


red-light cameras have
one powerful ally: Weath-
erford, who made clear
Wednesday he wants to
overhaul the state's red-
light camera law Weather-
ford described the report
as "scathing."
Weatherford said he
would support passing a
bill to repeal the cameras,
though he acknowledged
that likely will not happen.
'Some pot'
When E.B. White wrote
the book "Charlotte's Web,"
which was published in
1952, he probably didn't
think a work about a spider
putting messages like
"Some Pig" in her web to
save a porky friend would
later be applied to a form
of medicinal marijuana.
But "Charlotte's Web" is
more than a book and ani-
mated movie; it's now a
marijuana extract that
supporters say can help
children with a form of
epilepsy And three Re-
publican senators filed a
bill Wednesday that would
allow the product to be
used.
Filed by Sens. Rob
Bradley of Fleming Island,
Aaron Bean of Fernandina
Beach and Brandes, the
measure (SB 1030) centers
on the extract, which has a
relatively small amount of
tetrahydrocannabinol-
the psychoactive compo-
nent in marijuana.
Supporters say the low
level of THC in Charlotte's
Web means users do not
See ROUNDUP/Page A12


WEEKSTfllt


Whnyurdnit [eo mndr s Fimlns.





Missing Teeth? Unstable Dentures?



-' ; FREE SEMINAR
o Wed., February 19, Starting at 4:30 PM

S Location: 591 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
S: ^Lecanto, FL 34461
--,^ ~Refreshments Served -
*^ LIMITED SEATING

FREE Implate CALL FOR RESERVATIONS NOW!
FREE Implant exam *
voucher ($155.00)for 352-527-8000
every seminar participant. 0 ************
THE



N lichael N1. Hashiemian, O/
DNID, ND
-I;,: d t 0 0t11,d "II:.l J ~ .1 .,-_,-I .. .n
& COSMETIC SURGERY INSTITUTE
www.dentofacialinstitute.com


332-0216 SUCRN
BUDGET SUMMARY
CITY OF INVERNESS
2013/2014 FISCAL YEAR
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF INVERNESS ARE 15.265% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES

ROAD CAPITAL TOTAL BEFORE I.C.R.A.
GENERAL WHISPERING IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS WATER & IMPACT PENSION COMPONENT TRUST TOTAL ALL
ESTIMATED REVENUES FUND PINES PARK FUND FUND SEWER CEMETERY FEE FUND FUNDS UNIT FUND FUNDS

TAXES:
AD-VALOREM MILLAGE PER $1000 6.4955 2,164,571 2,164,571 2,164,571
AD-VALOREM Delinquent Taxes 100,000 100,000 100,000
SALES AND USE TAXES 295,000 295,000 295,000
FRANCHISE FEES 742,100 742,100 742,100
UTILITY SERVICE TAXES 670,000 670,000 670,000
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE TAX 360,000 360,000 360,000
LICENSES AND PERMITS 110,550 110,550 110,550
GRANTS AND LOCAL SHARED REVENUES 50,000 7,500 1,207,000 500,000 1,764,500 65,000 1,829,500
STATE SHARED REVENUES 679,000 679,000 679,000
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 886,570 128,450 3,056,530 4,071,550 4,071,550
FINES AND FORFEITURES 19,500 19,500 19,500
INTEREST EARNINGS 65,250 800 20,000 69,700 44,450 6,500 206,700 1,500 208,200
RENTS & ROYALTIES 107,163 250 107,413 107,413
SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS/IMPACT FEES 600 262,500 25,000 288,100 288,100
CONTRIBUTIONS/DONATIONS 2,390 300 300,000 302,690 302,690
SALE OF FIXED ASSETS 12,400 12,400 12,400
PENSION CONTRIBUTIONS 4,500 4,500 4,500
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 22,700 3,200 20,000 19,800 500 66,200 66,200
DEBT PROCEEDS 221,899 1,913,876 2,135,775 2,135,775
TOTAL SOURCES 6,275,394 140,250 2,031,399 5,560,156 57,350 25,000 11,000 14,100,548 66,500 14,167,049
TRANSFERS IN 415,000 555,869 918,570 3,376,170 51,978 5,317,587 60,000 5,377,587
FUND BALANCES/RESERVES/NET ASSETS 5,653,258 372,412 154,695 6,383,767 5,382,478 708,529 362,083 380,242 19,397,464 29,328 19,426,792
TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS & BALANCES 12,343,652 1,068,531 154,695 9,333,736 14,318,804 817,857 387,083 391,242 38,815,600 155,828 38,971,428
EXPENDITURES
GENERAL GOVERNMENTAL 2,129,716 1,739,633 5,500 3,874,849 3,874,849
PUBLIC SAFETY 762,808 30,000 792,808 792,808
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 1,021,700 73,500 4,933,850 54,828 6,083,878 6,083,878
TRANSPORTATION 663,667 1,646,618 2,310,285 2,310,285
ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT 212,946 1,409,300 1,622,246 38,495 1,660,741
CULTURE & RECREATION 495,222 654,119 2,598,869 3,748,210 3,748,210
DEBT SERVICES -708,248 708,248 708,248
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 5,286,059 654,119 7,497,920 5,642,098 54,828 5,500 19,140,524 38,495 19,179,019
TRANSFERS OUT 1,273,369 42,000 154,070 3,776,170 55,478 5,301,087 76,500 5,377,587
FUND BALANCES/RESERVES/NET ASSETS 5,784,224 372,412 625 1,835,816 4,900,536 707,551 387,083 385,742 14,373,989 40,833 14,414,822
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES, TRANSFERS,
RESERVES & BALANCES 12,343,652 1,068,531 154,695 9,333,736 14,318,804 817,857 387,083 391,242 38,815,600 155,828 38,971,428


STATE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 All


OHEHW





A12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014

TRUST
Continued from PageAl
won't be known for about two
months, the windfall is expected
to provide millions of dollars
that will be overseen by a not-
for-profit charity trust board
consisting of community
leaders.
State Rep. Jimmie T Smith, R-
Inverness, said both he and state
Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness,
have met with Grant and foun-
dation attorney Clark Stillwell to
draft the legislation.
"I think it's going to be a very
simple and clean item," Smith
said. "It's going to do what every-
one wants."
While the bill is still being
written, proposals include:
The CCHB will create the
community trust, in which pro-
ceeds from the lease payment,


LOCAL/STATE


minus the amount necessary to
pay off the hospital's debt and
pension and other costs, will be
placed.
Membership will include
two people elected by voters in a
nonpartisan election. They will
serve two, four-year, staggered
terms.
The trust board will be sub-
ject to the state Government in
the Sunshine law, and will un-
dergo annual audits by the Cit-
rus County Clerk of Court
The proposal also includes
language regarding the Citrus
County Hospital Board's taxing
authority
Currently the CCHB may tax
up to 3 mills. It dropped under
1 mill three years ago and hasn't
come close to its capacity; the
current rate is .245 mills.
The proposal would cap the
tax rate at 0.25 mills. Dean said
in the October legislative dele-
gation meeting that he sup-


Attorney Bill Grant
also said the
amount expected
for the trust is
far less than the
$90 million number
that had been
discussed in
the fall.
ported some type of tax poten-
tial in case the CCHB should
ever need it for community care.
The cap would revert back to
3 mills if either HCA or the
CCHB defaults on the lease, or if
either side decides not to renew
the lease.
Grant also said the amount ex-
pected for the trust is far less


than the $90 million number that
had been discussed in the fall. In
reality, he said, it should be
closer to $10 million to $15 mil-
lion initially
He came up with that figure
this way:
An HCA lease payment of
$140 million, minus $65 million
to cover the hospital debt and
pension, leaves $75 million.
The foundation will require
an unknown amount in escrow
to handle pending and poten-
tially future malpractice claims.
Grant estimated that amount at
around $10 million, but what-
ever isn't spent goes into the
community trust.
HCA is requiring that
$50 million be set aside to cover
the company should representa-
tions made by hospital founda-
tion not be true or accurate. If
necessary, HCA could
petition the CCHB for use of
those funds.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
That leaves about $15 million
for the trust. CCHB trustee
Krista Joseph said she doesn't
think the money should be
touched for two years, and then
no spending other than interest
on the principal for another
10 years.
After two years, $36 million of
that set-aside money is freed up
to the community trust. After an-
other seven years, the account is
closed and whatever remains
goes to the community trust.
Grant said both the CCHB and
hospital foundation are in the
early stages of negotiating an
agreement that sets up parame-
ters of the community trust, its
membership, and spending
limits.
Smith said he would expect to
file the bill in the next few
weeks.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. corn.


ROUNDUP
Continued from Page All

get high.
"Charlotte's Web helps
patients improve their
quality of life and offers
hope to parents desperate
to provide relief to their
children," Bradley said in
a prepared statement.
"While many Floridians
have significant concerns
about medical marijuana
being misused, SB 1030 of-
fers a new opportunity for
Floridians who have not


found relief with current
medications."
Also apparently on
board with the new push:
Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, whose
son is behind a similar
House bill (HB 843).
Gaetz's son, Rep. Matt
Gaetz, R-Fort Walton
Beach, is one of the lead-
ing supporters of legaliz-
ing Charlotte's Web.
"As a father myself, I am
unwilling to require these
parents to be criminals in
order to get treatment for
their children," the elder
Gaetz wrote in a release


jj 2- Tee off for Tourette
Come join us for our
2nd Annual


V -Sat,, Mar. 1, 2014
Plantation on Crystal River
Shotgun Start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Kick off Cocktail party on Friday, February 28, at 6:30pm
with music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
along with a live auction, raffles and meet and greet with celebrities.
Don't miss out, get your teams together for this fun event, and
help raise funds for the Tourette Syndrome Association of
Florida. All proceeds from this event will go to help adults
and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.
For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com
or email Gary D'Amico
at gary78@tampabay.rr.com CHkpNi1ER

1Uiver Rot







CIig






.//li'






vs:






Event Sponsor


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE
/
f.L'. Congtructorg, Int.

Heavy Civil Construction Solutions

Law Office "
of Keith Taylor CLp]

FOR MORE INFOR


posted on the Senate web-
site and addressed "Dear
Neighbor" to people in his
Panhandle district. 'As the
father of Representative
Matt Gaetz, I am proud of
my son for his political
courage in fighting for
these families as they fight
for their children's lives."
Legislative leaders,
though, have taken pains
to separate the issue of
Charlotte's Web from a
wider constitutional
amendment that would le-
galize prescription pot.
That measure, backed by
People United for Medical


Marijuana, is set to go be-
fore voters in November
Reports filed Monday
showed that the group had
burned through about $4.6
million by the end of Janu-
ary, with Morgan footing
most of the bill.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Legislative wran-
gling began over the pen-
sion overhaul that could
be one of the more hotly-
contested bills of the ses-
sion. Senate leaders put
forward a "cash balance
plan," while House lead-
ers said they were still de-
ciding which way to go


Mom's Wearing
Braces, too!
Can You Tell?








Do you want to have gorgeous, straight teeth in just 6 months?
There is an ALTERNATIVE to long term metal braces.

SIX MONTH SMILES"
C smetin, Bra es System
"We Cater to Cowards!"
I Ledger Dentistry
JexiemyA. Ledger, D.M-D.. P.A.
3640 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448
I | (352) 628-3443
Ledgerdentistry.com Se Habla Espahol


with their bill.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "Ninety percent of
the time it feels like our
agenda is your agenda,


maybe more than that" -
House Speaker Will Weath-
erford, R-Wesley Chapel, to
members of the Florida
Chamber of Commerce.


KNEE PAIN?


Attend a FREE Seminar:




Brooksville
Holiday Inn Express
14112 Cortez Blvd.

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


5 Largo Medical Center
I a ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


) Proceeds Benefit ORB
Citrus County Blessings ,
The Path
Community Food Bank "? f
of Citrus County



March 13, 2014

5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.


Rock Crusher Pavilion

$5 Hog, Buffalo, Gator,
Ribs, Brisket, Chicken

5O 0 and More, plus Open Bar
Donation & Craft Beer, Music, Door
Per Person Prizes and Raffles!


0 Capital City
Bank

More tan your bank. Your banker.


^sEA4MPIK
CUS-M


Tickets may be purchased at
Crystal Chevrolet Homosassa,
Hagar Insurance Inverness,
Brashear's Pharmacy Lecanto,
Fancy's Pets Crystal River,
Gulf to Lake Sales Lecanto,
Capital City Bank Crystal River


MATION VISIT: www.rotarybeastfeast.com


ILI ,


^,a a u N v YT^^
NICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL FALLEN HEROES
Chief Warrant Officer Aaron A. Weaver, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Dennis J. Boles, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Dennis J. Flanagan, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Robert A. Surber, U.S. Army.


HONORED
Continued from Page Al

Richard Hunt decided to
speak of Guard's dedica-
tion to the Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter and his
country
Then Chapter 776 gave a
special presentation to Cit- .
rus County Tax Collector J,,
Janice Warren for her of-
fice's fundraising efforts '
for the benefit of the Citrus
County Veterans Founda-
tion Inc.'s mission of pro-
viding immediate
financial assistance to -
needy honorably dis-
charged veterans and their
surviving spouses.
The audience wept as
the ceremony concluded
with prayers, a rifle salute
and taps playing. Then
they joined hands to sing,"
"God Bless ,,
MOPH the USA."
Aaron A. A patri-
eAaron A. otic medley
weaver and combi-
776ha nation of
Military service
Order songs were
of the under the
ofrhe direction of
Purple
Heart Paul and
H-eart:
(MOPH) Jacie Ste-
meets vio. Mar-
at Citrus leigh Miller
County sang the na-
Builders tional an-
Assn., them and
1196 S. "Wind Be-
Lecanto neath My Jeuell "Jack" Ness, 91,
Highway, Wings." standing and saluting t
Lecanto. Other or- Heart Ceremony at the
Call ganizations who were officially aware
352- that partici-
382- pated and
3847. supported
the event in-
cluded[J f rTlfra
Florida Army National
Guard, Citrus Detachment
819 Marine Corps League,
Korean War Veterans Asso-
ciation Chapter 192, Nature
Coast Young Marines, The i
Patriot Guard Riders, bag-
piper Kevin Kelly, elected
officials, veterans and the
Citrus County Chronicle.


* Cpl. Stanley J. Lapinski, U.S. Army.
* Sgt. Jonathan K. Peney, U.S. Army.
* Cpl. Johnathan W. Taylor, U.S. Marine Corps.
* Private First Class Michael C. Mahr, U.S. Army.
* Chief Warrant Officer Randy L. Billings, U.S. Army.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
a survivor of the Battle of the Bulge, is assisted Saturday in
he colors by his son, Larry Ness, at the ninth annual Purple
National Guard Armory in Crystal River. Ness was one of four
rded the Bronze Star at the ceremony.


ICOPTTRS PIC


'S


Massage


130GO
details online


In Homosassa & Crystal [ ic r
352-564-1040


Thousands at
deputy's funeral
ORLANDO Thousands
of mourners gathered Satur-
day in Orlando for the fu-
neral of a sheriff's deputy
Fatally shot
While re-
Bsponding
Ito a car
burglary
S" call.
~Law en-
A|- j forcement
agencies
Jonathan fo
Scott Pine from
across
Orange County Fcr.id
Sheriff's Office. nForda
came to
the First Baptist Church of
Orlando for the funeral of Or-
ange County Deputy
Jonathan Scott Pine.
Authorities said Pine was
responding to reports of car
break-ins late Monday when
he encountered Benjamin
Holtermann. According to of-
ficials, Pine chased Holter-
mann through nearby
backyards but Holtermann
opened fire, shooting and
killing Pine.
Holtermann was later
found dead of an apparent
self-inflicted gunshot wound
in a nearby neighborhood.
2013 a record
year for tourism
ST. PETERSBURG For
tourism in Florida, 2013 was
a record year.
Tourism in the Sunshine
State increased by 3.5 per-
cent in 2013 compared with
the prior year, with about
94.7 million people visiting
Florida in 2013.
Gov. Rick Scott an-
nounced last year's numbers
Friday at Universal Orlando


Resort, where nearly 3,500
new jobs are expected to be
created this year.
Universal Orlando is build-
ing the Wizarding World of
Harry Potter Diagon Alley,
adding a new hotel and ex-
panding the CityWalk enter-
tainment complex.
Visit Florida, the state's
tourism arm, said the num-
ber of direct, travel-related
jobs also was at a record
high: 1,088,200 Floridians
employed in the industry, a
2.9 percent increase from
2012.
Scott said he is proposing
that the Florida Legislature
boost Visit Florida's budget
by 57 percent to $100 million.
Forecasters add to
2013 storm tally
MIAMI The National
Hurricane Center has added
one subtropical storm to last
year's tally of tropical
weather.
Forecasters said this week
that as part of a routine re-
view of data from the 2013
Atlantic hurricane season, a
short-lived low that devel-
oped south of the Azores in
early December was deter-
mined to be a subtropical
storm. The December storm
was not given a name.
That brings the tally for
last year's six-month hurri-
cane season to 14 tropical
and subtropical storms. Two
of those storms, Humberto
and Ingrid, became hurri-
canes. Just one storm -
Tropical Storm Andrea -
made landfall in the United
States.
June 1 marks the begin-
ning of the next Atlantic hur-
ricane season.
-From wire reports


BUICK G3M


Welcomes Shields D. Gay IV


Homosassa, FL -As a local
resident of Citrus County
since 1985, Shields D. Gay IV
has been helping his
friends and neighbors find
great deals on cars since
1992. Please join us in
welcoming this automotive
expert to Eagle Buick GMC
in Homosassa! Specializing
in new car leases, Shields
will find the perfect ride to fit
your lifestyle. He also enjoys
searching through Eagle's
$4 million worth of pre-owned
inventory to find excellent
deals for customers who
prefer to buy.
How do you know if buying
or leasing is right for you?
Just call Shields and he will
help you make the right
decision. If you need financ-
ing, it's no problem at Eagle
Buick GMC. If we don't have
the model you're looking for,
we'll get it! We can find any
model for you, not just Buicks
and GMCs.


Shields D. Gay IV
352-302-9681
Our professional sales team
is committed to a no-pressure,
high integrity approach, and
with the addition of Shields to
our staff, we aim to exceed your
expectations from test drive to
delivery. Call Shields today at
352-302-9681, email him at
shields@eaglebuickgmc.com, or
experience his auto expertise in
person by visiting our showroom.
Refer Shields to your friends or
neighbors and he'll pay you a
$100 referral fee!*


Eagle Buick GMC
1275 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa 352-795-6800

SALES HOURS:
Monday Friday: 8:00 8:00
Saturday: 8:30 6:00 9 Sunday: 11:00 3:00
SPayble upon referral purchase ofa vehicle from Eagle Butk GMC. OHDP


EAGLBIKM.


SState BRIEFS


LOCAL/STATE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A13





A14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Marcella
Nigro, 89
The service of remem-
brance and celebration for
Marcella Nigro will be at
11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 22,
2014, at Our Lady of Grace
Church, Beverly Hills.
Marcella died Jan. 5, 2014
at home under the loving
care of her family and
Hospice of Citrus County
Marcella was born Feb. 19,
1924, in Brooklyn, N.Y, to
the late Joseph and Mar-
cella DeFiore. She was a
real people person, a very
colorful character, a won-
derful homemaker, cook
and entertainer who was
devoted to her family and
the Lord.
She enjoyed shopping,
music, dancing and spend-
ing quality time with her
daughter, Patricia Gero-
giannis, who was her care-
giver for the past two
years; her grandchildren,
Nicholas, Alfred and
Tamara, Michael, Peter,
Louis; and her great-
grandson, Urias; as well as
nieces; nephews; and a
good friend, Tanina
Ancona.
Marcella was employed
at the New York City
Board of Education for 21
years where she enjoyed
going to work every day
Shortly after retiring, she
moved to the Sunshine
State 25 years ago where
she made many wonderful
friends who were with her
till the end.
She was a delightful
hostess and cashier at the
family-owned Patnick's
Restaurant in Hernando
for seven years. Always
caring and conscientious,
a great asset to any busi-
ness and a pleasure to
have around. She will be
greatly missed by every-
one who knew her even it
if was just a brief chat at
the supermarket.
Marcella was put to eter-
nal rest at Fero Memorial
Gardens on Jan. 11,2014. A
special thank you to all the
staff of Citrus County Hos-
pice. Fero Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and
paid obituaries.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or call 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In Vietnam's capital, old town braces for makeover


MIKE IVES
Associated Press

HANOI, Vietniam
Tourists, hawkers
and motorcy-
clists rub shoul-
ders every
morning in the congested
alleyways of Hanoi's low-
rise Old Quarter, which
seems generations away
from the office towers
and electronics megas-
tores springing up in
other parts of the capital.
The quarter's street
grid, laid out in the 15th
century, is still domi-
nated by dilapidated
shops selling everything
from brass gongs to bam-
boo scaffolding.
It is now among Asia's
best-preserved urban
hubs of traditional com-
merce thanks largely
to decades of inattention.
The 203-acre downtown
area is crammed with
Buddhist temples, pago-
das and French colonial
shophouses, whose origi-
nal tiles and peeling yel-
low paint have become a
draw for foreign visitors.
But with property val-
ues high, this neighbor-
hood could change
dramatically in the com-
ing years as similar ones
already have in Singa-
pore, Shanghai and many
other cities. Authorities
want to begin gentrifying
the Old Quarter by relo-
cating 6,200 households
between this year and
2020. New construction
is likely a few years
away, but some residents
already have been
relocated.
Some of them are nerv-
ous, though not necessar-
ily over lost history They
worry about being exiled
to the city's dusty mar-
gins, and of being forced
to accept a bad deal from
a Communist government
that has generated public
discontent across Viet-
nam by forcing people off
their land with compen-
sation far below market
rates.
Pham Dinh Tranh, a re-
tired jeweler in the Old
Quarter, has watched
many of the traditional
jewelry workshops of Sil-
ver Street slowly morph
into cafes and souvenir
shops. The 82-year-old
wouldn't mind a change
of scene: The Silver
Street home he shares
with his extended family
is cramped and the roof
leaks. But he said Hanoi
officials will need to
make a convincing case
for relocation.
"We're willing to go, but
not if they take this prop-


Associated Press
Cars and motorcycles pass Friday in Hanoi's Old Quarter, a grouping of 36 streets that were laid out in the
15th century. Tourists, hawkers and motorcyclists rub shoulders here every morning. It seems generations away
from the office towers and electronics megastores springing up in other parts of the capital.


erty and resell it for
profit," Tranh said.
Vu Thi Hong, an official
with the Hanoi govern-
ment's Old Quarter Hous-
ing Relocation Project,
said the main goal of the
planned relocations is to
reduce population den-
sity while preserving cul-
tural heritage. With about
66,000 people, the quar-
ter has a population den-
sity of 823 people per
hectare (2.5 acres) -
nearly eight times New
York City's.
One Silver Street tem-
ple formerly occupied
by long-term squatters -
has been refurbished and
opened to the public,
with assistance from ar-
chitectural consultants
from the French city of
Toulouse.
During an interview at
the temple, Hong said
compensation for reloca-
tions is paid at market
rates determined by the
government.
City planners have not
yet decided what will be
constructed once cur-
rent residents are relo-
cated, she added, but
new buildings won't ex-
ceed three stories.
She said a few hun-
dred Old Quarter resi-
dents have been moved
in the last decade from
weathered temples and
pagodas, and authorities
plan to build an apart-
ment complex on Hanoi's
outskirts to house thou-
sands of others.


"Most of those who
have already been moved
say they have a better life
now," Hong said, adding
that the government pays
up to $4,000 per square
meter at streetfront
properties.
In Hanoi's real-estate
market, the average
transaction price at Old
Quarter properties is cur-
rently between $12,500
and $15,000 per square
meter, according to
Nguyen Son, a property
agent in Hanoi. That ex-
ceeds the average price
of $9,337 per square
meter paid at luxury resi-
dential properties across
Shanghai, as calculated
last year by the London-
based consultancy Knight
Frank.
Pham Ba Bao, who was
relocated from Silver
Street in 2010, is not en-
tirely satisfied with his
new situation.
The retired bicycle
maker used to live in the
temple that has since


been refurbished.
He said he received
$42,300 and later pur-
chased an apartment
about seven miles away
for $22,278.
"We're happy with this
apartment, but we can't
make a living," Bao said
recently at his new place,
down the street from
some gasoline storage
tanks.
He said he used to earn
$9.50 to $14 per day sell-
ing tea outside the tem-
ple, but foot traffic in his
new location is minimal.
He now survives mainly
on the $141 per month his
daughter-in-law earns as
a hairdresser
Scholars say vendors
and artisans were among
the first residents of the
Old Quarter's 36 streets.
When some traders fled
to the former U.S.-backed
South Vietnam in the
1950s, the north's Com-
munist government
seized their shophouses
and divided them into


apartments.
Romain Orfeuvre, an
architect from Toulouse
who works in Hanoi, said
the Old Quarter resisted
change decades ago be-
cause of stunted eco-
nomic development
during Vietnam's wars
against France and the
United States, and more
recently because authori-
ties have been reluctant
to evict squatters.
Hoang Thi Tao, who
runs a newspaper stand
near the Old Quarter, is
cautiously optimistic
about the impending
changes.
"The project will help
to make the Old Quarter
prettier, improve its resi-
dents' living standards
and lure more foreign
tourists," Tao said. "But
it'll also require a lot of
resources and determina-
tion on the government's
part. They'll need to give
big compensation offers
to persuade those people
to leave."


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County issues citations that carry with them
a fine of $100 for first offenders of local
watering rules. Second violations cost $250, third
or more cost $500.


QOFF

^W
ANY DENTAL TREATMENT'
with FREE CONSULTATION
.-. ioi. Mt:lk~~rl .,lla , .1. ,. '1 *.
- - - - n. -- - - - -
-------------------------------------------- -------
1991



I HEALTHY SMILE. HEAIL
ORAL EXAM &
------ ......
d . . . . . . . .... ....



.FREE, 1
SECOND
OPINION .t




6e9M ENNIFER LEE, ODMD ,
DENTISTRY YOUR SMI
-, DESERVE
SPEClP
CALL US TODAY' TREATME
352-795-1881

ONLY THE BEST FOR OUR PATIENT!
v Best Treatment Plans Best Technology & Equipment
v Best Dental Materials '- Best Complimentary Spa AmenlI
V/ Best Trained Staff / Best Patient Rewards
SMILES ON CITRUS DENTISTRY I 535 N. CITRUS AVE I CRYSTAL RIVER


IEW PATIENT

SPECIAL

THY LIFETr DENTAL PLAN
DIGITAL X-RAYS














LE
ES
AL 7





Ues

R I SMILESONCITRUS.COM 1 I,


I P T





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nuclear repository
being monitored
CARLSBAD, N.M. Offi-
cials are monitoring the pres-
ence of airborne radiation at
southeastern New Mexico's
nuclear waste repository.
The U.S. Department of
Energy says personnel are on
site Saturday to assess what
officials were calling a
"possible radiological event"
at the Waste Isolation Pilot
Plant.
According to the DOE, an
air monitor detected radiation
on the plant's underground
levels around 11:30 p.m.
Friday.
Officials said no employees
were working underground at
the time, and workers on the
surface have been sheltered
in place as a precaution.
They said nobody has been
found to be contaminated.
WIPP is the nation's first
and only deep geological nu-
clear waste repository.
It takes plutonium-contami-
nated waste from Los Alamos
National Laboratory and other
federal nuclear projects.
The incident comes 10
days after an underground
truck fire at the plant
prompted an evacuation.
Body found in
plane's wheel well
CHANTILLY, Va. -Airport
officials said the body of a
man has been found in the
wheel well of a South African
Airways plane parked at
Washington Dulles Interna-
tional Airport.
The Metropolitan Washing-
ton Airports Authority said the
body was found around
1:30 p.m. Saturday by ground
crew members assigned to
the aircraft.
The Airbus A340 was sitting
in a remote parking area at
the time.
Airport officials said the cir-
cumstances of the man's
death are under investigation.
The body will be turned over
to the Fairfax County Medical
Examiner's Office for an
autopsy.
Officials said operations at
the airport were unaffected by
the discovery.


Out for a drive


Associated Press
Scott Wood, from Valparaiso, Ind., leads a group of
snowmobilers Saturday as they approach Sink Road, west
of Dowagiac, Mich., during a ride.


Man sentenced in
negligent homicide
KETCHIKAN, Alaska -A
man who accidentally killed
his friend when he put him in


a chokehold has been sen-
tenced to three years in
prison, with two years
suspended.
The Ketchikan Daily News
reported 35-year-old Steven


Delicious Greek Dinners
Greek Music &
Daily Door Prizes
Specialty
Merchandise Vendors
Greek Pastries, Desserts
& Coffee Shoppe
Greek Gyros & Grilled
Specialties
Now Accepting Debit & Credit Cards

Feb. 21, 22 & 23
Indoor Dinners
& Outside Grille


Friday & Saturday
11a.m. 8p.m.
Sunday 11a.m. 5p.m.
ADMISSION $1.00 DONATION
Co-Sponsored by:
CiiiKp.JciiE


S. Cook put Thomas Guthrie
IV in a chokehold on May 28,
2012.
The two men, both of
whom were intoxicated, grew
up together in the southeast
Alaska town. Guthrie was 32
when he died.
Guthrie's death was initially
ruled a heart attack before an
autopsy.
Ketchikan Superior Court
Judge William Carey called
the case "emotionally wrench-
ing" before handing down the
sentence for criminally negli-
gent homicide and second-
degree assault.
Cook is legally forbidden
from drinking alcohol during
his sentence.
Guthrie's parents said they
have been sober for 20 years
and hope that Cook is also
able to maintain his sobriety.
-From wire reports


I--(






Presented by:
Archangel Michael Greek
Orthodox Church
4705 W. Gulf to Lake Blvd.
(State Rd. 44), Lecanto, FL
www.stmichaelgoc.org
(352) 527-0766
FREE PARKING
RAIN OR SHINE


-sA F-ov
^'F--,


Ell


Father of man who died

at sea still seeks answers


Associated Press
CIUDAD JUAREZ,
Mexico The father of a
man who died on a fish-
ing boat still has unan-
swered questions about
his son's death after
speaking on the phone
with an El Salvadoran
castaway who apparently
survived the 13-month ac-
cidental journey across
the Pacific Ocean.
Nicolas Cordoba Cruz,
the father of 23-year-old
Ezequiel Cordoba Rios,
said he spoke to Jose Sal-


vadorAlvarenga, but now
wants to meet him in per-
son, the ElPaso Times re-
ported Saturday
Alvarenga's small fish-
ing boat made landfall on
the Marshall Islands ear-
lier this month, where he
described a 6,500-mile
journey from Mexico
across the Pacific that
began when the vessel
was thrown off course by
bad weather
Alvarenga has said he
survived by eating raw
fish, turtles and bird
blood.


SPINE CARE

YOU CAN TRUST

Learn about
the Florida
r Spine &

Neuro Center
and the
innovative
treatment
options
available.


Attend a FREE Spine Seminar:




Ocala
Quality Inn
3434 SW College Rd.

call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.
Blue
Distin lion,
Largo Medical Center B1,,
ATeaching Hospital .

FLORIDA SPINE & NEURO CENTER =


While They're



Going...



We're



Growing!

Make the switch to

Insight Credit Union

and find out what you'll

do with more money!


INSIGHT


A lifelong resident of
Citrus County, Diana is
here to tell you how Better
Banking is Insight. She
welcomes her friends
and family to visit our
Inverness Office to find out
more about ourI
APR* Credit Card Balance
Transfer offer today!


211 E. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452


9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Monday Thursday
9 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday

Opening February 2014
6826 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy. (SR 44)
Crystal River, FL 34429


Balance transfers are allowed up to your available limit on your Insight VISA Platinum or Insight VISA Platinum + Rewards credit card. This offer is not good for transferring balances from existing Insight VISA Platinum or Insight
VISA Platinum + Rewards credit cards or loans. For interest purposes, balance transfers will accumulate finance charges from the date of posting. Charges and cash advances made on your Insight VISA Platinum or Insight
VISA Platinum + Rewards credit card will be made at the regular interest rate. The balance transfers made to a new Insight VISA Platinum or Insight VISA Platinum + Rewards credit card are subject to application and approval.
1.99% APR applies only to balances transferred on or before March 31, 2014. At the end of the 16-month promotional period, all balances transferred under this promotion will revert to the standard Balance Transfer APRs.
No balance transfer fee will be charged on balances transferred January 1,2014 through March 31,2014. Other restrictions may apply. Offer begins January 1,2014 and ends March 31, 2014. Federally insured by NCUA.


Nation BRIEFS


N


J-r- l- -J-F~--------------------- ----------------------3

20143



9 O EXP
I VENIQQR EXRQ


CRYSTAL RIVER



INVERNESS


Branch Manager


I


NATION/WORLD


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A15











NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

The plunge


Associated Press
Newlyweds Nate and
Holly Kroeze, both 24,
prepare to jump into the
icy water of Reeds Lake
on Saturday for the 2014
Polar Plunge event in
East Grand Rapids, Mich.


SCOTUS gets its
own fantasy league
HOUSTON In many
ways, it's a fantasy league
like any other, with players
obsessing over mounds of
data and minutia, teams
sporting a variety of colorful
names like "RISK It for the
Biscuit" and projections that
are bound to be way off.
But in this fantasy league,
it's not the NFL's Calvin
Johnson or Peyton Manning
who are the stars but a group
known for its skills not on
the playing field but in the
courtroom: the nine justices
on the U.S. Supreme Court.
In FantasySCOTUS, par-
ticipants try to predict how
the justices will vote in each
of the cases that come be-
fore the high court during its
term, which runs from Octo-
ber to late June or early July.
While most players tend
to be lawyers or law students,
the site also has political
scientists and engineers as
well as other professions.
Josh Blackman, a Houston
law professor who started
the online game more than
four years ago, said the
site's best players are 75 to
80 percent accurate.
A correct guess on a jus-
tice's vote to either affirm or
reverse a case earns 10
points. Correctly guessing
how all nine justices vote
earns a 100 point bonus.
The high court votes on
about 80 cases per year.
Duke: Leaking pipe
at dump no danger
EDEN, N.C. Duke
Energy says a second pipe
under a coal ash dump in
North Carolina is not in im-
mediate danger of collapse,
despite concerns from state
regulators that the pipe could
fail and trigger another toxic
spill into the Dan River.
The state Department of
Environment and Natural
Resources said Friday that
video taken inside the pipe
shows potentially contaminated
water leaking in through gaps
and then out into the river.
Duke spokeswoman
Paige Sheehan said the
company's assessment is
that "no immediate action"
is necessary. The state has
given Duke 10 days to come
up with a plan to fix the leaks.
The third largest coal ash
spill in U.S. history was trig-
gered Feb. 2 when a similar
pipe at Duke's dump
collapsed.


Crews a
concrete
LOS ANGEL
are set to pour
lay the foundal
tallest building
west of the Mis
and they're hop
for the history I
The marath(
pour began Sa
evening and wa
last 20 hours v
ruption. The at
verified by an
Guinness Worl
About 2,000
concrete will be
throughout the
the construction
downtown LA%
scraper called
Wilshire Granc


Research:
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
number of U.S. soldiers
forced out of the Army be-
cause of crimes or miscon-
duct has soared in the past
several years as the military
emerges from a decade of
war that put a greater
focus on battle compe-
tence than on character.
Data obtained by The
Associated Press shows
that the number of officers
who left the Army due to
misconductmore than tripled
in the past three years.
The number of enlisted
soldiers forced out for
drugs, alcohol, crimes and
other misconduct shot up
from about 5,600 in 2007,
as the Iraq war peaked, to


r

r
di
1
r

2
s

A
rl
2

ai

f

o
di
w
SE


Cl


&
TRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


CHRONICLE


Military misconduct dismissals soaring
nore than 11,000 last year troops on the battlefields For enlisted soldiers, the 370,000-strong naval force
The data reveals stark compared with the other numbers have seesawed, in 2004, the number of
differences between the services, hovering near 9,000 at the sailors who left due to mis-
nilitary services and un- "I wouldn't say lack of start of the decade and conduct and other behav-
lerscores the strains that character was tolerated in falling to 5,706 in 2007. ior issues grew. In 2006,
ong, repeated deploy- (war) theater, but the fact Since then, the number more than 8,400 sailors left
nents to the front lines of the last 10 or 12 years of has climbed again, due to conduct issues.
lave had on the Army's repeated deployments, of As the Army began to re- As the size of the Navy
soldiers and their leaders, the high op-tempo we duce its ranks in recent began to stabilize it's
It also reflects the might have lost focus on years toward a goal of now at about 323,000 -the
rmy's rapid growth in the this issue," Gen. Ray 490,000 in 2015, leaders number of problem sailors
middle part of the decade, Odierno, the Army's top of- have been more willing leaving also began to de-
and the decisions to relax ficer, told the AP last week and able to get rid of prob- dcline steadily, dropping
standards a bit to bring in "Sometimes in the pastwe've lem soldiers. That is likely each successive year to a
mndretaintensofthousands overlooked character is- to escalate because the new low of about 3,700 in
if soldiers to fill the ranks sues because of compe- latest plan would reduce 2013.
s the Pentagon added troops tence and commitment." the Army to 420,000 later In nearly one-third of
n Iraq and continued the In 2010, 119 Army offi- in the decade if deep, the cases each year over
eight in Afghanistan. cers were forced to leave automatic budget cuts that time period, the prob-
The Army grew to a peak the service because of mis- continue, lems involved drug and al-
if about 570,000 soldiers conduct; that number was The Navy went through cohol use. More than 1,400
luring the height of the fairly consistent with the a similar process, cases each year involved a
vars, and soldiers repre- annual totals since 2000. Last When the decision was "serious offense" or civil
ented the bulk of the vear the number was 387 made to cut the size of the or criminal court case.


Associated Press
Mexican lawmaker Fernando Belaunzaran takes a photo with his phone while touring a legal marijuana grow
room on Oct. 23, 2013, at River Rock dispensary in Denver, Colo. From the Americas to Europe to North
Africa and beyond, the marijuana legalization movement has unprecedented traction, a nod to successful
efforts in Colorado, Washington and the small South American nation of Uruguay, which in December became
the first country to approve nationwide pot legalization.




World seeing green


US drug policy

fuels worldwide

push for legalpot

Associated Press

In a former colonial mansion
in Jamaica, politicians hud-
dle to discuss trying to ease
marijuana laws in the land of the
late reggae musician and
cannabis evangelist Bob Marley
In Morocco, one of the world's
top producers of the concen-
trated pot known as hashish, two
leading political parties want to
legalize its cultivation, at least for
medical and industrial use.
And in Mexico City, the vast
metropolis of a country ravaged
by horrific cartel bloodshed, law-
makers have proposed a brand
new plan to let stores sell the
drug.


From the Americas to Europe
to North Africa and beyond, the
marijuana legalization move-
ment is gaining unprecedented
traction a nod to successful ef-
forts in Colorado, Washington state
and the small South American
nation of Uruguay, which in Decem-
ber became the first country to
approve nationwide pot legalization.
Leaders long weary of the drug
war's violence and futility have
been emboldened by changes in
U.S. policy, even in the face of op-
position from their own conser-
vative populations. Some are
eager to try an approach that fo-
cuses on public health instead of
prohibition, and some see a po-
tentially lucrative industry
"A number of countries are
saying, 'We've been curious about
this, but we didn't think we could
go this route,"' said Sam Kamin,
a University of Denver law pro-
fessor who helped write Colorado's
marijuana regulations. "It's
harder for the U.S. to look at


other countries and say, 'You can't
legalize, you can't decriminalize,'
because it's going on here."
Anxiety over U.S. reprisals has
previously doused reform efforts
in Jamaica, including a 2001 at-
tempt to approve private use of
marijuana by adults. Given
America's evolution, "the discus-
sion has changed," said Delano
Seiveright, director of Ganja Law
Reform Coalition-Jamaica.
In October, lawmakers from
Uruguay, Mexico and Canada
converged on Colorado for a first-
hand look at how that state's law
is being implemented.
There's no general push to le-
galize marijuana in Mexico,
where tens of thousands have
died in cartel violence in recent
years. But in liberal Mexico City,
legislators on Thursday intro-
duced a measure to let stores sell
up to 5 grams of pot. It's sup-
ported by the mayor, but could
set up a fight with the conserva-
tive federal government.


UK taxi driver crushed in windstorm


Associated Press


ui-JliNL Wl^ --3LuIrln VWV1U;a
aim for that pummeled Britain
D record killed a taxi driver, whose
car was crushed by falling
LES Crews chunks of masonry from a
r concrete to building, and an elderly
tion for the man who died after a "freak
to be built wave" struck a cruise ship
ssissippi in the English Channel, of-
ping it's one ficials said Saturday An-
books, other 15 cruise ship
on concrete passengers were injured.
3turday The taxi driver was killed
as expected to late Friday in central Lon-
Nithout inter- don when part of a build-
tempt will be ing collapsed during a
official from windstorm, police said.
Id Rord She was identified as Julie
IdrRecords. Sillitoe, a 49-year-old with
i truckloads of three sons.
e driven Her passengers, a man
)weekend to and woman, were hospital-
wn site in ized with injuries not be-
where a sky- lived to be life-threatening,
the New police said. The car wasn't
I will be built, moving at the time of the
-From wire reports building collapse and the


Associated Press
A smashed-up car is seen in Kingsway opposite Holborn
Tube station in central London on Saturday after a woman
was killed when large chunks of masonry fell onto the
Skoda Octavia vehicle she was in.


female passenger man-
aged to free herself from
the rear of the vehicle.
A fourth person, be-
lieved to be a male pedes-
trian, also was injured and
taken to a hospital, ambu-
lance officials said. About
10 people were evacuated


from nearby buildings as a
precaution.
The 85-year-old cruise
ship passenger died after
80 mph wind gusts kicked
up giant waves in the Eng-
lish Channel on Friday af-
ternoon. Cruise and
Maritime Voyages said a


"freak wave" broke five
windows on its Marco Polo
cruise ship, inundating the
ship's Waldorf Restaurant.
Spokesman Paul Foster
said the man died before
he could be airlifted for
emergency treatment. The
cause of death hasn't been
determined, he said.
The army rescued 30
people from a seafront
restaurant in Hampshire,
southwest of London, after
high winds blew a shingle
through its windows, al-
lowing floodwaters in.
Officials said 22 severe
flood warnings are in
place, meaning lives are in
danger in those areas.
More heavy rain and winds
were expected Saturday
In Hertfordshire, north
of London, residents of 17
homes were evacuated Sat-
urday after a 65-foot deep
sinkhole developed overnight
on a residential street.


World BRIEFS

Mr. Mirth


Associated Press
A man dressed as the
Carnival character Pepino
poses for photos late Friday
while waiting to compete
in the election of Carnival
characters known as
Chuta, Pepino and Chola in
La Paz, Bolivia. Bolivians
compete in their local
communities to be cho-
sen as one of the three
beloved Carnival charac-
ters who represent gai-
ety. Those chosen attend
all official Carnival events
starting March 1.

Opposition ready
to vacate city hall
KIEV, Ukraine-Atop
Ukrainian opposition leader
said Saturday that protest-
ers are ready to vacate the
Kiev City Hall they have oc-
cupied for nearly three
months if the govern-
ment drops all charges
against the demonstrators.
This week, the last of the
234 protesters were re-
leased from jail as part of
an amnesty. The amnesty
law also calls for the oppo-
sition to vacate seized gov-
ernment buildings in Kiev
and elsewhere in Ukraine.
Syrian peace
talks in doubt
GENEVA- U.N.-Arab
League mediator Lakhdar
Brahimi ended direct talks
between the Syrian govern-
ment and opposition Satur-
day without finding a way of
breaking the impasse in
peace talks.
Saturday's talks, which
lasted less than half an
hour, left the future of the
negotiating process in
doubt and no date was set
for a third session.
"I am very, very sorry,
and I apologize to the Syr-
ian people that their hopes
which were very, very high
that something will happen
here," Brahimi said.
Thousands protest
gov't in Bahrain
MANAMA, Bahrain -
Bahraini anti-government
activists clashed with secu-
rity forces as thousands of
demonstrators took to the
streets on Saturday, sending
tear gas into a major shop-
ping mall and bringing the
capital's streets to a standstill
on the same day that au-
thorities said a police officer
died of injuries sustained
from an earlier bombing.
Efforts to restart on-and-
off reconciliation talks be-
tween the Shiite-dominated
opposition and the Sunni
monarchy and its allies
have so far failed to bring
an end to simmering unrest.
-From wire reports


-.1- -.- --.- -.-


j ...........................


T mvTm- r c;T n,x,,Tfinrl,









E Travel & Leisure

XCURSIONS


asti


oa


and beach
ByAmanda Mims
For the Chronicle
Take a walk on the beach and see the towering walls lined with
cannons pointed toward the St. Mary's River, and it's not difficult
to imagine Fort Clinch as it once was: a busy garrison occupied by
soldiers during the Civil War. Step inside the compound and you'll
see dozens of men dressed in Union uniforms working as
blacksmiths, officers and fife players, giving visitors a glimpse of
life there during the war.


wal


CoiP AFSeurs
Corn" OfFIcer
CEl NfNYSV Enrs


mu-

-Umm


-9l


The fort, in Fernandina Beach on the
state's east coast near the Florida-Geor-
gia border, was also used in the Span-
ish-American War and is now protected
as part of Fort Clinch State Park.
While the fort is definitely a big at-
traction and a must-see for history buffs,
there is more to this park than soldiers
and cannons. I recently spent about a
week camping at Fort Clinch State Park,
and even though the weather was blus-
tery and cold, it was still a great experi-
ence. This is one of those state parks
that is a wonderful combination of

Upcoming events:
Confederate garrisons from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. March 15 and 9 a.m. to noon March
16. Historians recreate life at Fort Clinch
during the War Between the States. Activi-
ties may include black-powder artillery
demonstrations and marching drills, as
well as soldiers and civilians taking up
duty in the laundry, infirmary and kitchen.
Park entrance fee plus $2 per person fort
admission.
Union Garrisons the first weekend of
every month, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and
9 a.m. to noon Sunday Historians recreate
life at Fort Clinch during the Civil War.
Activities may include artillery
demonstrations and marching drills, as
well as soldiers and civilians taking up
duty in the laundry, infirmary and kitchen.
Candlelight viewings on Saturday
evenings every first weekend except
December.
Information from www.florida
stateparks.org


beach and wilderness. We regularly saw
deer grazing near our campsite at dusk,
and at night we heard the ocean, wind
and rain and nothing else.
While I was there, I learned we were
close enough to paddle to Cumberland
Island, Ga., which is part of Cumberland
Island National Seashore and famous
for its wild horses. But although pad-
dling is allowed, the park discourages it
for anyone who isn't an experienced sea
kayaker because of very strong and un-
predictable currents.
See Page A20


Photos by AMANDA and KEVIN MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
TOP: A building full of uniform clothing,
dry goods and preserved foods and other
edibles gives visitors a better idea of 1800s
life at the fort.
ABOVE: A young drummer sits next to a
building inside the fort.
LEFT: Re-enactors gather inside one of the
buildings at Fort Clinch.


- 7% AW





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meetings, meals and
more for a specific post or
group, call or email the con-
tact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or correc-
tions to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost1 55@gmail.com,
or visit www.flPostl 55.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-
3544, or email boosc29
@gmail.com.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brummett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
N American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive,


Homosassa. To accommo-
date members who cannot
drive at night, breakfast meet-
ings are also held at Olive
Tree at 9 a.m. weekly. Call
Commander Robert Scott at
352-860-2090 for days and
other information.
Herbert Surber
American Legion Post 225,
6535 S. Withlapopka Drive,
Floral City. Call 352-
860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-
726-3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco
Memorial VFW Post 7122,
8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral
City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State


Post 166 organizing auxiliary
American Legion Post 166 is in the process of
organizing an auxiliary unit.
All women in the Chassahowitzka,
Homosassa Springs and Sugarmill Woods areas
interested in joining the American Legion
Auxiliary Unit are welcome to call 352-860-2090
or 928-848-8359. Or, write to: American
Legion Post 166, PO. Box 767, Homosassa
Springs, FL 34447-0767. RiFurnish your name,
address, city and state.
The information is needed by Saturday to set
up an organizational meeting.


Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M.
Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the


month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American


Vot'lr iitd to oaur 3rdAinual e'
...,.,=t~rfird &,rls




*-A-LL foR C E

cI[IS


WE Sunday, March 9, 2014
j 6:00pm to 9:00pm
^ Crystal River Mall
Cash Bar Cocktal Attire


Un fRfomam
by JanBund
*Codl Cwpcrata CaW

$30.00 per pumn
USAD A &A owr


itrop chef"
style
oflpetition!


Dro ae oaf Wonm Im
irdgawIuty!kkmm
hPl morMwlulHEu i

Tis Pladeu 2 d.s.4
Tu PvtkkW 1INcaPaidfA R Sguorw.iM
JeSSie'S Place (352)270-8814
*Ciai-IMwIglal


* C NdAt at Kbk p Sa"
* tef lidta


Huewww~io aw, *-.o a&t Darm cat
m~iirutstll~sLuke gu SW S1"'*"


* gauta Kusty Kaof
* Home' o I f a*" CukJ
Na"as Pls I& &Pai
v M &MWDaft
Th me Ule MOMe TwUf
* -ftOSfrw Smatdi1
* WtTIMwuM HGtaTj-n


Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
The Korean War
Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson
at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine
Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,


Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30
a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter

See, Page A28


Oak Hill Hospital &

Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point


For Your Health


Community Education Series


Atrial fibrillation (A-Fib) is the most common heart rhythm
problem. Yet most treatments have been ineffective and
long-term medications often have side effects. Raul Jimenez,
MD and N.S. Rattehalli, MD will discuss the minimally invasive
treatment options available followed by a question and
answer session.


N.S. Rattehalli, MD
Board Certified Cardiovascular Surgery
Board Certified Thoracic Surgery


Brought to You by:


i Oak Hill Hospital
: Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point
JOGEIHIB PERFORMING Ai A HIGH STANDARD


Hot Meal Will Be Served!

9 Reserve Your Spot Today! PLANTATION ON CRYSTAL RIVER

e Limited Seating! 9301 West Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429






C09CE5 ,o
Oakil^opitl.OMForoua1lt
00OH76T *,M Ceal.h. c.
0' S^^^^^^^^' S S^^^^^^^
^^^^>^^^^^^^^^^^^M^^^^M^^^^m^^^^^j|^j~f~j;^^a
^^*^I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S


Blackshears !


SAluminum 2T
I II fBST/

Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens
New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions
HWY. 44 7Q 1"" Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER I9 l.-1 RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
Free Estias wwwibilackshears 6m


Raul Jimenez, MD
Board Certified Cardiovascular Disease
Board Certified Electrophysiology
Board Certified Internal Medicine


Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2014
11:00 a.m. Registration
11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 28,2014
For information call Jim Green (352) 249-1236


I


A18 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F V J


rAf
- I]


|||pyWE HAVE TO GO.^
1^^After our Mar. 16 show in Ocala
rO we will not be able to have more
shows in Florida (ever again).
ft llhMar. 9 is last in Citrus Ctv. .


11


Sunday 2.23.2014. OCALA, FI.
Sunday 3.2.2014 LAKELAND
Sunday .9214I Inverness area
LAST SHO EYER IN FLORIDA, March 1, 2014
Sun 3-16-2014- OCALA. Fl,


4W.


I


IJI I


k i


'4-^


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A19









Spring break in Asia? Consider Thailand's beaches


Associated Press
KOH PHANGAN, Thailand
-A trip sampling the diversity
of Southeast Asian destinations
can take you from the sleek
modernity of Singapore to the
ancient temples of Cambodia's
Angkor Wat. And then there are
the beaches of Thailand: relax-
ing, beautiful, and for the ad-
venturous spring-breaker, a lot
more exotic than Miami. Thai
beaches offer gorgeous
stretches of sand, water sports,
nearby outdoor activities and
cheap food and drink.
Off the Andaman Sea are
famed Phuket and Koh Phi Phi,
which rose to international
prominence after being fea-
tured in the Leonardo DiCaprio
film "The Beach," but the
beaches along the Gulf of Thai-
land have an equally renowned
trio of Koh Samui, Koh
Phangan and Koh Tao. Each of
these has its own charms and
attractions, and regular boat
service makes it easy to travel
among them. All three have fan-
tastic party scenes, as well -
and while not traditional
spring-break destinations,
American college kids would
certainly feel at home there.
As for the recent political un-
rest in Thailand, tourist num-
bers at the beaches were down
midwinter as some visitors can-
celed trips, but those who went
ahead found the islands as
lovely and as much fun as ever


Thailand's beaches and islands are beautiful and relaxing, with a vibrA
exotic alternative to more traditional spring break destinations for ad


And due to cancellations, some
hotels are even willing to nego-
tiate room rates.
KOH SAMUI
This is the main transport
center for the islands, with a
fancy airport it even includes
its own Park Avenue with de-
signer shops and built-up in-
frastructure. While the island
boasts gorgeous beaches all
over its coasts, head to
Chaweng Beach for a proper
spring-break vibe. The beach is
dotted with hotels for all budg-
ets, open-air massage parlors
where you can get an hour-long
treatment for less than $10, and


vendors peddling everything
from corn on the cob and
pineapple to beachwear and
decorative wooden keepsakes.
That's by day By night, the
main drag, a block away from
the beach, buzzes with thump-
ing music and busy restaurants.
The laidback daytime schedule
means the venues don't become
crowded until about 10 p.m. or
11 p.m.; in the interim, for
penny-pinching students, head
to Walking Street for cheap pint
bottles of Chang beer, barbe-
cued crocodile or fruit shakes,
affordable swimwear and
sarongs, and people-watching.
Places like Ark Bar on the


waters lap the shore. The Full
Moon Party, especially, is noto-
rious for drugs, but you'll see
signs as soon as you disembark
at the ferry port warning that
marijuana and mushrooms are
illegal. Be aware that travelers
have ended up in Thai jails for





illgalrs awarlbe that travdeelers
violating drug laws.
Sunrise Beach is the cove
where the Full Moon event
takes place, but it is quiet and
stunning on any day you visit.
There is a rickety path of
wooden slats to a viewpoint
KO ."restaurant, and the whole area,
This .is m despite its popularity and the
lee 7 touristy, neon Full Moon
_____ ____________of_ .c f aParty tank-tops for sale
Associated Press everywhere, gives off a very
ant party scene, and make an end-of-the-world paradise
venturous travelers.impression.
thraers During the day, there are eco-
tours available that include ele-
beach keep the party going phant trekking (this is often
until the early hours, with DJs only about 10 minutes atop an
and fire displays. elephant), waterfall hiking and
visits to temples or scenic
KOH PHANGAN beaches such as Bottle Beach
This island is home to the and Koh Ma, a deserted island
legendary Full Moon Party, but connected to Koh Phangan by a
locals have realized the poten- sandbar which can be crossed
tial of such fiestas and capital- for some Robinson Crusoe-style
ize upon everything and exploring.
anything they can. Every few At night, however, Sunrise
feet there is a sign advertising a Beach cannot be beat. You'll
Black Moon Party, a Waterfall end up with a group of Israeli
Party and countless others. A soldiers, guys from County Cork
key feature of these beach in Ireland or solo travelers
raves is that participants adorn from London who are all trying
themselves with neon body their hands at "fire limbo,"
paint then dance until they shimmying underneath a rope
drop as the gentle, cerulean set alight by local workers.


Positively educational.

Positively life-saving.


AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
Re-enactors work inside a blacksmith shop at the fort.


FORT
Continued from Page A17

There is plenty of nature to explore besides what's
at the beach and in the water, as we found out. The
park, which spans 1,100 acres, has a six-mile off-road
trail that with mountain bikers and hikers. Additional
hiking areas, such as Willow Pond Hiking Trail, pro-
vide plenty of opportunities for wildlife viewing.
More to do at Fort Clinch State Park:
Swimming
Collecting shells and sharks' teeth Visitors center
with camp store
Guided Segway tours
Geocaching
Fishing along the Amelia River, Cumberland Sound
and Atlantic Ocean.

Details:

WHAT: Fort Clinch State Park
WHERE: 2601 Atlantic Ave., Femrnandina Beach,FL 32034
INFO: Visit www.floridastateparks.org/fortclinch or call 904-
277-7274.


Good News About Reducing Your Risk of Stroke
In most every case, the faster you can get treatment for stroke, the better
the outcome will be. Knowing the signs of a stroke and knowing where to
go for the best local treatment can save your life. Attend this workshop to
learn about emergency stroke care-including warning signs, our stroke
alliance with the premier stroke specialists at UF Health and much more.

Stroke Alert Workshop
Wednesday, February 26, 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Nature Coast EMS Education Center 3876 W. Country Hill Drive, Lecanto
The Future of Stroke in the United States
Stroke Signs & Symptoms
911 and Emergency Medical Services (transport)
Advanced Stroke Care in the Emergency Room/
Emergency Stroke Specialists Alliance with UF Health
Program is free. Refreshments served.


Registration is required.
352.795.1234


Positively


AnnaTT KhannaTT, IM.D.fli








Mike Hall, CEOli~llIi
G^u^est SeakrNtur
Coat MWS'w'MIl^
Kevin Morgan, R. N ii^



Clinial Cordi ^^^^^I -----------^^


FAMILY DAY- Saturday, March 1, from 10 a.m.4 p.m.
|"Bottle Cap Bonanzal"
Check out our Spring Break and Summer Camps!
QOOOHEHB I


-A % .... .......
""-ard



Eye Center


8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa


(352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123

Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


*SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
SevenRiversRegional.com Your Life. Our Story.


A20 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


EXCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Native

American site



leaves Miami


in quandary


CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press

MIAMI -As more Na-
tive American archaeo-
logical sites are being
uncovered around the na-
tion, the findings are pos-
ing difficult questions for
the cities where they are
found.
In Miami, a major pre-
historic Native American
village has been discov-
ered at a downtown site
where developers plan to
construct a movie theater,
condos and hotel building.
The discovery has pit-
ted developers against ar-
chaeologists and historic
preservationists who
want the find preserved
in its entirety Developers
say the public is better
served by removing a por-
tion and putting it on dis-
play while continuing
with construction.
Little is still known
about Native American
architecture but more
sites are being found with
advances in technology
and a better understand-
ing of the subtle markers
that remain.
In a vacant lot between
gleaming hotels in down-
town Miami are a series
of holes carved into the
bedrock that form eight
circles.
At first glance, the site
seems like an eyesore.
But it's here where ar-
chaeologists say they have
uncovered a major prehis-
toric Native American vil-
lage, one of the largest and
earliest examples of urban
planning ever uncovered
in North America.
It's also where a movie
theater, condos and 34-
story hotel are expected
to be built.
The discovery has pit-
ted developers against ar-
chaeologists and historic
preservationists. The dis-
pute comes as an increas-
ing number of Native
American sites are being
uncovered around the
country with advances in
technology and a greater
understanding of the sub-
tle markers left behind to
look for The discoveries
pose difficult questions
for cities such as Miami
that must decide whether
it is best to preserve the
remains of an ancient so-
ciety or, often times, de-
stroy it in hopes of
revitalizing a new one.
"Let's be honest with
each other," said Eugene
Stearns, the attorney rep-
resenting MDM Develop-
ment Group, which owns
the property and is eager
to move forward with con-
struction. "Every great
city is built on the shards
of a former great city"
At its height, archaeolo-
gist Bob Carr estimated as
many as 2,000 people lived
in the Tequesta village,
starting around 500 B.C. It
likely extended a quarter
mile along the Miami
River and then wrapped
around Biscayne Bay
Much of the village con-
sisted of thatched, hut-


like buildings the Teques-
tas, one of South Florida's
earliest tribes, built by
digging holes with clam
shells into the soft lime-
stone, and then inserting
pine logs to hold floors,
walls and roofs.
Because of the materi-
als used straw, wood -
the only remnants of the
buildings are the post-
holes, today still forming
18 to 40-foot circles in the
blackened bedrock.
MDM has proposed
carving out a section of
the limestone containing
the circle formations and
placing it on display in a
public plaza.
Preservationists, how-
ever, say removing a piece
of architecture isn't like
moving a painting from
one museum to another
"The idea that you
would carve out a chunk
and move it to some other
place and put it into exhi-
bition sounds strange to
me and sad," said Mark
Jarzombek, associate
dean of the Massachusetts
Institute for Technology's
School of Architecture
and Planning. "These
places are very site-spe-
cific. There's a reason
why they made this vil-
lage or town there which
has to do with orientation,
landscape, access to
rivers."
MDM has spent $3 mil-
lion conducting an ar-
chaeological review and
is now anxious to con-
tinue construction. Steam
said all of the planned
commercial space has
been leased and half of
the residential units have
been sold.
"There are enormous fi-
nancial obligations and
commitments that have to
be met," he said. 'And
they need to go forward."
Miami isn't the only city
grappling with how best
to preserve an ancient
site while allowing devel-
opment to advance. Na-
tionwide, Native
American sites are being
discovered at a quicken-
ing pace.
"Archaeology is really
going through a bit of a
golden era now with un-
covering these sights,"
Jarzombek said.
In California, where as
many as 1 million Native
Americans may have once
lived, Dave Singleton with
the Native American Her-
itage Commission said he
receives reports from
county coroner offices re-
garding Native American
remains about once every
10 days.
Construction crews
have unearthed burial
grounds, artifacts and vil-
lages in rural, desert
areas to downtown Los
Angeles. Any time re-
mains are found in Cali-
fornia, construction is
halted while an archaeo-
logical review is done and
a descendant identified.
With a few exceptions,
however, construction has
eventually resumed.
Hundreds of tools and


Photos by the Associated Press
ABOVE and BELOW: People work at a site in downtown Miami which is likely to be one of the most significant
prehistoric sites in the United States. Over the past several months, archaeologists have dug up eight large
circles consisting of uniformly carved holes in the limestone, which are believed to be the foundation holes for
Tequesta Indians dwellings as far back as 2,000 years. The MDM Development Group plans to build movie
theaters, restaurants, and a 34-story story on the site.


other artifacts, along with
possible burial sites, were
found at a planned 250-
megwatt solar energy
project east of the
Coachella Valley in 2011,
slated to be one of the
largest in the nation.
Tribal leaders said
federal officials had
deemed the findings
"unprecedented."
Construction was tem-
porarily halted, but later
allowed to continue. A
mitigation plan that in-
cluded an extensive study
and public outreach was
developed.
"We, of course, like the
other tribes of the area,
were shocked and sad-
dened," Jay Cravath, cul-
tural director of the
Chemehuevi Indian Tribe
said. "Mitigation will not
change the damage that
was done."
Singleton said the Na-
tive American groups are
not opposed to develop-
ment, but they object to


the generation of plants
and transmission lines
that go through burial
grounds and destroy
sacred sites.
Miami-Dade County ar-
chaeologist Jeff Ransom,
however, plans to recom-
mend full preservation at a
city meeting Friday and, if
the committee members
agree, MDM could be
forced to redesign the site.
Ransom would like to
see the huts and village
reconstructed, and he be-
lieves the site could be
turned into a viable her-
itage tourism destination.
Miami is a city vying to
become an international
destination not just for its
nightlife and beaches, but
also its art and culture.
Revitalizing the city's
downtown with a new mu-
seum district, shops and
restaurants has been seen
as a central part of that.
There are some Native
American sites within
urban areas that have


been successfully pre-
served. A Hohokam mound
next to a hospital near
Phoenix was purchased by
the city of Mesa in 1988
and stabilized by a team of
archaeologists. It is now a
six-acre cultural park
"What more human and
intelligent and culturally
rich way to revitalize a
place than to recognize its
antiquity and to celebrate
its earlier native occu-
pants?" said Peter
Nabokov, an anthropology
professor at the Univer-
sity of California, Los
Angeles.
Developers in Miami
contend it would be diffi-
cult to preserve the site
and promote it as an area
for tourists to visit be-
cause it is on soft lime-
stone rock, has no
drainage and is corroding
from rain and pollution.
They also note the site is
prime real estate that
would cost the city about
$100 million to purchase.


Stearns, MDM's attor-
ney, said the archaeologi-
cal value of preserving
the postholes in their cur-
rent state ultimately does-
n't outweigh what could
be gained in terms of edu-
cation and development
by carving them out and
building on top.
"Archaeologists see them
differently," Steams said.
"They can wax eloquently
about the significance of
the postholes. But I dare
say that's not a view shared
by most others."


Massage




details online



In 2n 64-1 rys0al R40Lr
352-564-1040


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


ODI UI NI A S KIEITI I RJOINIYIN 8 A S EJ
EMS P AIR I E L G EAST
A PEN DEGASV HICTOL
E HR0 F0G. Y N E
SHAEDPIARJ PR]U NES
A A S A I S JMI$E R Y AI I R E
Ac 1 G E IC DIAITA -S L K EN
I IL O IP IOI P I --
L N CARI YEM TOAP VV I A G
ML A ARDI O PEC LP iRA

AR R YOTH ICARE CR INFGE
DA Y IB-- LU E S FR NGEIN

CLOSE LY TRIACITIF 0 AM N I T

AM-ER NORA DIIMIPIU R EIAIT R I A
T-1 AR201CRS E i stARiT E D VslI S 0 R

2-16 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universa.I Uclic~k for UFS


S C-I-E TOURS
Thinking of Ireland? 7
Now is the time to book.
Rates starting as low as
$894.00 per person, land only.
Airfare additional. Rates based on availability. Passport required.
Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of travel.
Purchase your gift certificate at Accent Travel


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

M|352-795-5797
FI,, .. .,., www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS





k .~^ T, .



4 nights from$475 + taxes and fees onT.
INCLUDES 4 nights,Sheraton Puerto Rico Pink Sand Cruise to Bermuda
BONUS 1 free night &$100 food &beverage credit. 10 Nights Vision of the Seas
myTime EXCLUSIVE up to $75 resort credit, save Aug 18 2014
25$ 0 at the spa & more. Inside starting $1255.00 per person
Book by March 30,2014 Oceanview $1365.00 per person
Travel Dates 2/16-9/9/14(Land Only) Inludespongovtt esandmotocachltoFtsiuderdae
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 .
.4..
Hocte l &ex tosino. Di i nk (35Crui527-8855ud
BONUS I ,reenigh & $100,ood & bvergcei. 1.04 N~llight'-is A ion of[ t]he S'elilasl


jOctober 18
Aval 2014
Hawaii bep915
N8W8H Froms191 !iav l5abIlI
15-day with air, Round trip from Los Angeles
Maui, Kona, Honolulu, Kuaui, Hilo, Ensenada and Los Angeles
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
TALLY-HO S en 352-860-2805
F www.tallyhovacations.com
dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
A IVS IONOF_ t w EUCAMM TOM FL Seller of Travel 10131


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A21











ECRANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post 4864 to serve dinners
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs, will host a
fish fry dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. The public is welcome.
The March 17 St. Patrick's Day dinner of
corned beef and cabbage with potatoes
and carrots will be served from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Advance tickets only
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Enjoy 'real' Military Card
Party with Unit 766
Unit 776, Ladies Auxiliary Military
Order of the Purple Heart will host a real
Military Card Party at 11 a.m. Saturday at
the Point 0' Woods Clubhouse, 9228 E.
Gospel Island Road, Inverness.
Lunch will be served at noon and cards
will follow
Men are also invited to join in for the
fun and prizes. "Elvis" will be on hand,
straight from his duty station in Friedberg,
Germany
If you were in the military, wear your
uniform or military service organization
uniform. Those who weren't in the mili-
tary are asked to wear red, white and blue
in honor of our military personnel and
veterans.
Cost is $12, which includes lunch, coffee
and dessert, plus door prizes. Make your
own table of four or the ladies will pair
you. For reservations, call Tee at 352-345-
1438 or email ridertee3@yahoo.com, or
Linda at 352-344-8196 or pooh2102@
icloud.com. Reservations must be
received by 5 p.m. today
A portion of the proceeds will help sup-
port the Honor Flight Network, a non-
profit organization to honor America's
veterans. They transport veterans to Wash-
ington, D.C., at no cost to visit and reflect
at their memorials. Top priority is given to
World War II and terminally ill veterans
from all wars. Honor Flight Network has
expanded to include Korean War and Viet-
nam War veterans.

40&8 to serve breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
today, March 2,at American Legion Post
155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 7, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

CCVC sale to be March 8
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call Dan at 352-
400-8952.

Post plans Chinese auction
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Harry E
Nesbitt Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
10087 in Beverly Hills will host a Chinese
auction fundraiser on Saturday, March 8,
at the Post located at 2170 Vet Lane, be-
hind Cadence Bank, on County Road 491.
Doors open at 10 a.m. and drawings will
begin at noon.
Admission is a $2.50 donation to benefit
the VFW Veterans Village in Fort McCoy
-the only facility of its kind. The VFW
home provides affordable, independent
living accommodations in a homelike at-
mosphere to those in VFW, Men's Auxil-
iaries, Ladies Auxiliaries and their
spouses. The facility is not subsidized by
any governmental agency, so the cost of op-
eration is met by rent income, donations
and fundraisers such as this.
There will be hot dogs available for $1,
along with free dessert and coffee.
For more information, call Bettie at 352-
746-1989 or Donna at 352-746-5215.


Name: Ken Erdner
Rank: Seaman third class, machinist/
torpedo loader
Branch: U.S. Navy
Service dates: 1943-46
Ships: Primarily aboard the USS Snook, a
submarine lost at sea in April 1945. after Erdner
had been sent ashore to have an ear operation.
Also was aboard sub tender USS Proteus and
sailed on the sub USS Runner.
Jobs: Loaded torpedoes when attacking: also
served to trim manifolds, pumping water from
different battle stations to level boat: and was
trained to work on diesel engines.
Veterans organizations: American Legion


Young Seaman Ken Erdner
circa 1943. The USS Snook
embarks on a mission out of San
Francisco Harbor.


le es
llle SJ


Infection


keeps


sailor off


sub and


alive

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Call it fate or
kismet or even
God's will, if a
need arises that
must be satisfied,
something to explain why
Ken Erdner suffered an
ear infection serious
enough to send him off
his submarine and to the
hospital in the final year
of World War II.

Erdner thinks he got the infection -
it was bad enough to cost him the
hearing in that ear while swimming
in Saipan, where his ship was being
repaired. He tried to get back on the
boat before it sailed, but couldn't
"They took me right off and said 'you
can't go,"' Erdner said.
It was April 1945. His sub, the USS
Snook, sailed without him. No one
ever saw it, or the crew, again. The
Snook is believed to have been lost
while patrolling off the coast of Tai-
wan; the last contact with it was April
8.
The 89-year-old Erdner, who now
lives in Crystal River, often wonders
why he was spared.
"They never found it and they never
knew what happened to it," he said. "It
just tore me up. I knew all those guys
real well.
"Don't make me sound like a hero.
Those guys on the Snook, they were
the heroes."
Life on a diesel submarine during
World War II could be claustrophobic,
was often nerve-racking, but could
also be exhilarating. Erdner joined
the Navy in 1943 when he was 18, and
he volunteered for submarine duty be-
cause "it sounded exciting and it paid
better"
The food was pretty good, too: "We
always had good eats," Erdner said.
He had five other siblings who also
joined the service during the war, but
unlike the Sullivans five brothers
who were killed in action when the
ship they all served on, the USS
Juneau, was sunk all six survived
(the death of the Sullivans and other
brothers led to a Congressional act
that prevented this from reoccurring).
After joining the Navy, Erdner went
to Naval "boot camp" at the Great
Lakes Naval Station outside Chicago.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
United States Navy submariner Ken Erdner is a World War II veteran and served
aboard the USS Snook. While Erdner was onshore caring for an ear infection, the
vessel was sunk, killing all aboard.


After volunteering for submarine duty,
he was sent to the University of Illi-
nois for diesel school, then was sent to
New London, Conn., the main port for
U.S. subs.
The Snook had been launched in
August 1942 and had seen extensive
action when Erdner, a seaman third-
class loader/machinist mate, joined
the crew He rotated onto the ship in
time for its seventh patrol in Septem-
ber 1944, during which it sank two
Japanese freighters and badly dam-
aged another However, one of the
freighters it sank was carrying more
than 1,700 American prisoners of war
The Snook had to survive a few at-
tacks from Japanese vessels during
this mission. After rescuing a downed
airman on Nov 3, the Snook returned
to Pearl Harbor on Nov 18.
"It was scary," Erdner said of the at-
tacks. "I remember the first time a guy
dropped an aerial bomb on us. I said,
'What's he shooting at me for? I didn't
do anything to him."'
Erdner's second mission was un-
eventful, leaving Pearl Harbor on Dec.
25 to patrol off the Kuril Islands. Their
only sightings during that time were
two Soviet vessels and a small patrol


boat; they returned to port Feb. 17.
Before its final mission could really
get started, the ship's crew became
aware of a metallic rattling in the pro-
peller shaft. Unable to fix it them-
selves, they went to Saipan for repairs.
It was there that Erdner, together with
four others who were rotating off for
leave, was left to have his ear treated.
It was determined surgery would be
required.
"I can't moan about it," Erdner said
when asked about his loss of hearing.
"After all, it did save my life."
The patrols Erdner took part in
lasted nearly a month, and there's no
doubt how they affected the war
against the Japanese, virtually isolat-
ing the island from receiving any con-
voys. The cost was high: The Snook
was one of 53 subs lost during the Pa-
cific Campaign.
When the war ended in August 1945,
Erdner was aboard the USS Proteus, a
sub tender, which sailed into Japan.
He then sailed with the sub USS Run-
ner to Seattle and from there went
back to New London, where he was
discharged.
Like his five brothers, he survived.
And Erdner knows he was fortunate.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


*....................................
l ........................................................
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll........................................................................................................................................................lllllllllllllllllllll


;., ii NiNi ..'.,,'





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Celebrate St.
Pat's at VFW post
Harry E Nesbitt Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars Post
10087 in Beverly Hills will
have a St. Patrick's Day
dinner from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday, March 14, at the
post, 2170 Vet Lane, be-
hind Cadence Bank, on
County Road 491.
Donation is $7. Tickets
are now available and
everyone is welcome.

Come play
games with post
VFW Post 8189 in
Homosassa invites the
public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at
2 p.m. Wednesday and
food is available. Jam
sessions are from 3 to
7 p.m. Thursday.
The Mystery Bus trip is
planned for 9 a.m. March
8 to visit other clubs and
organizations. Seats are
still available. Call Lou
Whitten at 352-212-7876.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58. Doors
open at 4 p.m.; games
start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5.
The post is at 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills, 2170 Vet
Lane (County Road 491


behind Cadence Bank),
offers several events that
are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sun-
days in the smoke-free
hall. Card bingo and grill
night is at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m.
Monday and Fridays in
the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Post invites all
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State
Road 200 in Hernando
(with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the
public at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch
every day and breakfast
on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include
bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show
Me the Hand at 2 p.m.
Thursday Dance music is
on tap every Friday and
bingo is played in the hall
Saturday
Friday feature an all-
you-can-eat fish fry or
New England boiled
dinner
For more information
and menus, call the post
at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabayrr.
com and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.

More spots open
for Hawaii trip
Due to ill health, one
couple had to cancel their
participation in the up-
coming annual trip to
Hawaii led by Don


McLean, U.S. Navy, re-
tired, leaving a few spots
open for the trip.
The March 11 to 28
jaunt is for veterans and
their families and friends.
The trip includes visits to
several islands, whale
watching, some golfing
and more, as well as a
special visit to the USS
Arizona Memorial and
The National Cemetery of
the Pacific.
For more information,
call McLean at 352-637-
5131 or email dmclean8
@tampabayrr.com.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and


The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call
the Veterans Service Of-
fice in Lecanto at 352-527-
5915 to be placed on the
van list. All appointments
must be made before
1p.m.

DAV transport
needs new van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has
more than 270,000 miles


on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser.
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of


For tickets or
call 302-4&


event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
See NOTES/Page A25


$50 in advance $60 at door
VIP Tables start at $500 (table of 8)
Business Casual .W

more information
382 or 422-6704 CIi)(NICI.


ART CENTER...
OF CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center
Theatre


Presents


By
Marshall Karp

Directed by
Peter Abrams


Feb. 14-Mar. 2,2014
Friday & Saturday at 7:30 pm
Sunday Matinee at 2:00 pm
Additional Saturday Matinee
Feb. 22,2:00 pm
Tickets: $19.00
352-746-7606


The Art Center of Citrus County (Citrus County Art League, Inc.)
is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization, solicitation #CH9729


-t
K
I:


4.,




CHR^


--0,4o
^'Yoaly Craft
25th AinnualH

*^-wiN601
FLING^^^^
-.-UAF-P


SHandmade
../Gift Drawings
All Day!

Saturday,
Mar. 8,2014
-am to 3pm


March 7 thru March 11
Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds -U.S. 41 S., Inverness
Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (halfprice day)
fTues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3 a bag)
Cash or Checks Only
www.foccls.org
For book sale information callI II.)N I( i..E
746-1334 or 527-8405 C11< J


Women of Sugarmill Woods,fInc.Presents
18th Annual "School-astic"
Classic Golf Tournament
"Birdies feo Edction"



Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Cypress Blvd.W. & Douglas St.
Sl f (2nd Douglas St.) Homosassa
i Entry Fee: $60
Registration Deadline: Monday, February 17, 2014
SContact Donna Rayne (352) 382-2999
or Stephanie St. Clair (352) 503-3023

JCuiepN~ldi


L-ake


D- -"Lrago'n~oat .

SIe Ist v
,March 15, 2014
9am-5pm
:qz0 HERNANDO FLORIDA '"-
\ Fr..n..ly CAP
V lrlro B 0 n.. & W l. Pa. / ^^ 0
BUILDATEAM


F .akenrrawing Spo.lt -Woaaw cl 1.
IL .li. : "(-.-]1 .:,f[l..1I P 1[11 I r[ t]lI" ....l~ II~~l'Tll ...


*Earlr ieg i00n11 10"b of460M uri '1f i us Cry
*CJ4rs &ary Pbrks & Racrearfwn Neaff 9od C-alif 0.~es~s~
*M-y & Me 6-,p e0 W64are C.as4 EW 95@wa4 YC

givivbg J0tails of servics
fu'e qffesf
-frep fresh"Whts www pjp2 org
SPONSOREDOBy
Krnsu'~AL IC ~Pu~lix

Citrus County Cruisers
1301h Manatee
"' Car & Truck Show
Sunday, March 2, 2014
Registration 8 a.m. Noon
Pre-Registration $15
ONLY PRE- 1989 Registration Day of Show $20
ANTIQUES CUSTOMS
TRUCKS STREET ROD Crystal Chevrolet/
NChryslerlJeep/Nissan
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19) Homosassa
judged Show: Top 50 Plus AwardslIncluding:
BEST OF SHOW, BEST PAINT, BEST ENGNE,&MORE!
SDash Plaque to first 200 registered. FREE 4x6 phooo
each registered vehicle. Club participaontph

FOR INFORMATION, CALL: John (352) 382-5501
Registration form available at ourwebsite
www.citruscountycruisers.com .......


Funo

Saturday, Fe
6:30PM
Chet Cole Em
Key Training Cen
$50 pp Admission fee includes
Hold'em, Black Jack (standup), Rout
A f- fh. -k f -.. ......t ....


CASNO
Nf6HT .....


raiser Sponsored by Hoops-Link-Inc
bruary 22, 2014
- 10:30PM
irichment Center
nter Campus, Lecanto
food, drinks, bar, prizes and more! Texas
lette, Craps, Skill Stop (slot style) machines.
tinn Honnn-I ink travel hb kothbll toan,


For tickets go online to www.Hoops-Link-inc.org
or contact Kurt 422-4884 or kurt@hoopslink-inc.org
CUlp E


CRYSTAL Tickets may be purchased at
SA U TO M T I V E .Crystal Chevrolet Homosassa,
'"% ( CaaEK* -:, lI-,.I [ .-.l __ (# Brashear's Pharmacy Lecanto,
La ffc CJ T, Fancy's Pets Crystal River,
_Law Office _r.nNI 4F Gulf to Lake Sales- Lecanto,
of KeithTaylor Capital City Bank Crystal River
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: www.rotarybeastfeast.com


Take Stock in Children of Citrus County presents...


Taki k i.

iw*IG-Childrenrf% E- ikB
[uItlars krU .I ,dlaCr

Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 3:00 PM I Fun
Curtis Peterson Auditorium Doors Open 2PM usic ,.
( ooo 3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto '
S Located in the Lecanto School Complex SilentAuction
SSinging the hits of the 50's and 60's... The Fabulous "Lola & The Saints"
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stockin fChldren of Citrus Countyf is a program sponsored by the Citrus County Sherffs Office and the Citrus County Chronicle


BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CITRUS COUNTY
13th Annual
Steak & Steak Dinner
Celebrating 22 years of dedication
to the children of Citrus County


Thursday, March 6,2014
M&B Dairy Farm, 8760 Lecanto Hwy.
kd Reception 5:45 p.m.


Friends of the Homosassa Public Library

SPRING BOOK SALE

FEBRUARY 27 MARCH 1, 2014
at the Homosassa Library
on Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa
Great bargains in recycled reading!
Sale Hours
Thurs: 10 am 6 pm Fri: 10 am 4 pm
Sat: 10 am 4 pm
For book sale information / '-"
call 352-382-2440 or visit the
library website: http://citruslibraries.org 6 1
ci0-i0p.N IO-E


,/ ~ ~1" i n 1 1e 4 4irfn, -K I F r e e P a .1 1
For Information
w w 503-6329 or 527-3378
PS'h,,:',-,(: It.'n ihe- tf.'r ln nI |
I ,h :=l l tlit,11 : I llf1,`n1 hl(
3^a~i ^ li; :":- H,:';i .11' I" i:qn ."im-dt
Crystal River National Guard Armory
Across from Home Depot
8551 West Venable Street


I 'A


I Leam Tn


VETERANS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A23


J


Z. \


in
s
1l
tl


4:. 1 if IF II1 [IFea cause ll f lso o rl






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Look at sleeping


arrangements


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 16, 2014 c: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII:Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D_ /I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 8:00 8:30 I 9:00 I 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
SWESHNBC 19 19 News News XXII Winter Olympics News Olympics
ED 3 4 6 NewsHour WEDU The Diamond Queen Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic "Murder on the Home Front" AreYou
WkPBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus 'PG' B '14' [(DVS) (N) (In Stereo)'PG' (2013) Patrick Kennedy. 'NR' Served?
I WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Gone Gone Nature (In Stereo) 'G' Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic "Murder on the Home Front" Austin
SNews Nightly XXII Winter Olympics Figure Skating, Alpine Skiing, Snowboarding, Speed Skating, Bobsled. (N News XXII
FLANBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Same-day Tape) (In Stereo) N Olympics
I A 2 News World America's Funniest ***2 "Up"(2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed Castle "Time Will Tell" News Spo Night
SW J ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' Asner. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG' 'PG' [ on 9
B 1 1 PGA Tour 10News 60 Minutes (N) (In Elementary"The The Good Wife"The The Mentalist "Fire and 10 News Paid
EBTSPCBS 10 10 10 10 10 olf I(N) Stereo) N Marchioness"'14' Next Month"'14' Brimstone"'14' 11pm (N) Program
S1 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's American The Bob's Family Guy American FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
S TJFOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) BN Burgers Dad 14' Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad'14' (In Stereo) NNotice'14'
] WCJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos *** "Up"(2009) Voices of Ed Asner. Castle 'PG' News Inside Ed.
N I 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken CTN Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Youngren Child G' Special Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
n r ABC 11 1 1 News World America's Funniest ***2 "Up"(2009 Comedy) Voices of Ed Castle "Time Will Tell" News Castle 'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' Asner. Premiere. (in Stereo) PG ''PG' B
MO N 1 1 16 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee April comes back Glee "Prom Queen" (In The Office The Office We There We There
ED CWM IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory to Lima.'14' Stereo)'14'" PG' '*PG' Yet? Yet?
ED UWT MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "Just a Kiss"(2002) Ron Eldard.'R' Seinfeld Seinfeld Republic of Doyle Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM) WAX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanle y Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Ministries
S1 Friends Friends Two and Two and CSI: Miami "Broken CSI: Miami "Triple Criminal Minds (In Criminal Minds "About
PI' CW 4 4 4 12 12 'PG' 'PG' Half Men Half Men Home" '14' B Threat" '14' B Stereo) PG' B Face" '14'
Casita Big Rotary Family Healthy Your Citrus County Court ISpy'G' Eye for an The Comedy
I YKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living Eye Shop
IE CWOX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Burgers American Simpsons |Burgers IFam.Guy |American News TMZ'PG'B
M WEAUNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero AguifyAhora(SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina (SS) Sal y Pimienta'PG' Corned. Noticiero
SWXPX ION 17 Leverage 'Leve rage' Leverage 'PG' Leverage 'PG' B Leverage'14' Leverage 'PG' Leverage'14'Bm
Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Duck Duck Duck Dynasty 'PG' Duck Duck Duck Duck BadInk BadInk
SJ 54 48 54 25 27 PG Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty '14' '14'm
S** "Snakes on a Plane" (2006, Horror) The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Dead (N) (Live) The Walking Dead
55 64 55 Samuel L. Jackson.'R'" "After' MA' "Inmates" (N)'MA' 14'" "Inmates"'MA'
SFinding Bigfoot (In Fi ndi i nding oot '(In Findin BiFfoot(In indingBigfoot Team bets on which state is Finding Bfoot (In
( 52 35 52 19 21 Stereo'PG' Stereo G Stereo 'PG' squatchier. (N) (In Stereo)'PG' StereoP
cFJ 96 19 96 "Notorious" ** "All About the Benjamins"(2002, Action) Ice Cube, **2 "SugarHill" (1993, Drama) Wesley Snipes. One of two brothers
96 19 96 Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. R' wants out of the illegal drug business. 'R'
[AO 254 51 254 Housewives/AtI. Housewives/AtI. Housewives/AtI. Blood, Sweat Housewives/AtI. Happens Fashion
7 27 3 South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park The boys cross into a South Park Coon and friends help
27 61 27 33 14' 14' 14' 14' *MA' 'MA' new dimension. 'MA' victims. 'MA'"
8 45 98 28 37 Party Down South '14' ** "TheBeverlyHillbillies"(1993)JimVarney.Jed My Big Tattoo Titans Tattoo art- Cops Cops
m 98 45 98 28 37 __ Clampett and his clan move to California. 'PG' Redneck ists compete.'14' Reloaded Reloaded
S 43 42 43 XXII Winter Olympics Debt/Part On American Greed American Greed American Greed American Greed
CN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. *** "Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory" "Paradise Lost 3"
w 4 Good Good- Good- Good- Good Luck Charlie I Didn't Do Jessie Austin & Dog With a Shake It Jessie
46 40 46 6 5 Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie (Series Finale) (N)'G' It 'G' 'G' I Ally G Blog G' Up! 'G' *G'"
EP 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) N Shorts 30for30" 2013 World Series of Poker SportsCenter (N)
S 34 28 34 43 49 College Basketball Rut ers at Louisville. (N) '51 Dons 30 for 30 B Shorts Sport Science (N)
WT 95 70 95 __ 48 Wales Crossing World Over Live'PG' Sunday Night Prime G.K. IRosary ITheology Roundtable God |Bookmark
S5 "Hairspray' *** "Grease" (1978) John Travolta. Disparate summer lov- ***2 "The Breakfast Club" (1985, Comedy- Twisted Danny turns to
29 52 29 20 28 ers meet again as high-school seniors. 'PG' Drama) Emilio Estevez.'R' Jo for help. '14'
i 11 7 ***2 "The Motorcycle Diaries" (2004, *** "The Color of Money" (1986, Drama) **** "The Sting" (1973, Comedy-Drama)
118 170 Biography) Gael Garcia Bernal. R' Paul Newman. (In Stereo) 'R' Paul Newman, Robert Redford.'PG
S 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
FD 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Rachael v. Guy Guy's Games Chopped (N) 'G' Cutthroat Ktchen 'G' Restaurant: Im.
S 732 112 732 College Basketball College Basketball Pole Day IUFC Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
SNL 35 39 35 __ Game 365 UFC World Poker Tour World Poker Tour Word MMA World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
** "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (2011) *** "Thor" (2011, Action) Chris Hemsworth. Cast out of *** "Thor" (2011, Action) Chris
FX 1 30 60 30 51 Shia LaBeouf, Josh Duhamel. 'PG-13' Asgard, the Norse god lands on Earth. 'PG-13' Hemsworth.'PG-13'
r J 727 67 727 LPGA Tour Golf Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Northern Trust Open, Final Round.
59 "l Married Who?" (2012, Romance-Comedy) "Undercover Bridesmaid" (2012, Romance- When Calls the Heart Golden Golden
59 68 59 45 54 Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. BNComedy) Brooke Burns. NR'N *G' Girls Girls
S 32 1 3 2 2 "Supernova" (2000) ** "Gangster Squad" (2013, Crime Drama) True Detective (N) (In Girs (N) Looking True Detective (In
302J201302 2 2 James Spader. Josh Brolin. (In Stereo) 'R' Stereo)'MA' *MA' (N) 'MA' Stereo)'MA' m
**2 'The Campaign" Real Time With Bill True Detective "Who **2 "Epic" (2013) Voices of Colin / "Date Movie" (2006) Alyson
303 202 303 (2012)'R' Maher'MA'" Goes There"'MA' Farrell.'PG'" Hannigan.'PG-13'"
23 57 23 42 52 Hunters ~Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Beach Beach Hawaii |Hawaii Island Island Hunters Hunt Intl
1 5 1 3 4 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Who'll Stop Ax Men "Ax Marks the Swamp People "Aerial Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
51 54 51 32 42 Pg PG' PG' 'PG' the Reign?"'PG' Spot" (N)'PG' Assault" 'PG PG' PG'
"Hope Floats" *2 "Fool's Gold" (2008, Action) Matthew ** "Failure to Launch" (2006) Matthew *2 "Fool's Gold"
__ _24 38 24 31 (1998)______McConaughey.'PG-13'" McConaughey. Premiere. 'PG-13' B(2008)'PG-13'"
S1 "Abducted: The Carlina White Story" (2012) **2 "Betty & Coretta" (2013, Docudrama) "Steel Magnolias" (2012, Comedy-Drama)
50 119 Aunjanue Ellis. (In Stereo) N Angela Bassett. (In Stereo) B Queen Latlfah. (In Stereo) N
S 30 221 30 3 3 ** "Ted" ** "The Transporter 2"(2005) *** "Magic Mike"(2012, Comedy-Drama) *** "Trance" (2013) James Co-Ed
X 320 221 320 3 3 Jason Statham. PG-13' -ChanningTatum. (In Stereo) 'R' j McAvoy. (In Stereo) 'R' NConfid.
Caught on Camera "I'm Caught on Camera Caught on Camera "On Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Lockup Angola
S 42 41 42 Alive!" "Chaos in the Court" Patrol" "Bad Behavior' Penitentiary in Louisiana.
Wicked Tuna "Twice Wicked Tuna '14' Wicked Tuna Wicked Tuna "The Ultimate Survival Wicked Tuna "The
S 109 65 109 44 53 Bitten" 14' "Endgame"'14' Wicked Return"'14' Alaska (N)'PG' Wicked Return"'14'
NICR ~28 36 28 35 25 Haunted Thunder Sam& Sam& SeeDad Instant Full H'se FullH'se Full H'se FullH'se Friends Frends
CW) 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now?
rX 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped: Killer Snapped: Killer Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
J 340 241 340o 4 **4 "Step Up Shameless "There's the Episodes House of Shameless Fiona ends House of Episodes Shameless Fiona ends
340 241 340 4 solution' (2012) Rub"'MA'A iMA' Les MA'I up in jail.'MA' Lies'MA' (N)'MA' up in jail.'MA'
i 37 3 37 27 3 Bar Rescue "Barely Bar Rescue (In Stereo) ** "The Expendables" (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone, ** "Rambo" (2008) Sylvester
37 43 37 27 36 Above Water'PG' 'PG' Jason Statham, Jet Li. (In Stereo) 'NR' Stallone. (In Stereo) 'NR'
37 0 2 37 *** "Full Metal Jacket" (1987, War) Matthew Black Sails "IV." (iTV) Black Sails "IV." (iTV) *** "Iron Man 3" (2013 Action) Robert
IB 370 271 370 Modine. (In Stereo)'R'B 'MA'B 'MA'B Downey Jr. (In Stereo)'PG-13' "
m4 36 31 36 One Team, One Fins & Sport Sprtsman Reel Time Saltwater Tampa Bay Rays Encore Inside the
36 31 36 Heartbeat Skins Fishing Adv. Exp. Rays
S 31 59 31 26 29 *** "X-Men 2" (2003) "The Last Airbender" (2010, Fantasy) "Skyline" (2010, Science Fiction) Eric ** "Outlander"
S31 59 31 26 29 'PG-13'" Noah Ringer, Dev Patel.'PG' Balfour, Scottie Thompson.'PG-13' (2008)'R'B
TS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "You, Me and Dupree" (2006) *** "Wedding Crashers" (2005) Owen Wilson. 'R' ** "Yes Man" (2008)
19 5 16 30 35 *** "Cat on aHot Tin Roof"(1958, Drama) *** "A Place in the Sun" (1951, Drama) **** "An American in Paris" (1951, Musical)
169 53 169 30 35 Elizabeth Taylor. NR' (DVS) Montgomery Clift. NR'B Gene Kelly.'NR' (DVS)
Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying Buying
S 53 34 53 24 26 Hawaii HawaiiG' Hawaii'G' HawaiiG' HawaiiG' Hawaii G' Hawaii'G' Hawaii 'G' HawaiiG'I Hawaii G' Hawaii'G' Hawaii'G'
L1 50 46 50 29 30 Extreme Extreme Extreme Extreme Sister Wives'PG' Sister Wives (N)'PG' 90 Day Fiance'PG' Sister Wives'PG'
30 2 35 *** "Do the Right Thing" (1989 Drama) *** "Passing Strange The Movie" (2009 Musical) *** "Jungle Fe.e, (1-1
i 350 261 350 Danny Aiello. (In Stereo)'R' De'Adre Aziza, Daniel Breaker. Premiere.'NR' Drama) Wesley S, 1"- '-.
Tn 4 8 3 3 "Fast & NBAStyle: NBATip-Off (N) 2014 NBA All-Star Game (N) (Live) B 2014 NBA All-Star Game "
48 33 48 31 34 Furious" All (Live) N
OON 38 58 38 33 "Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed"'PG' Steven Teen King/Hill |King/Hill Burgers Burgers Fam.Gu Fam.Gu
TRAV 9 106 9 44 Food Paradise 'PG' Deep Fried 'G' B Monumental Myster Mysteries-Museum Castle Secrets Mysteries-Museum
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... truTV Top Funniest World's Dumbest...
(T~L 32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan's Island 'G' Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gold Girls IGold Girs Gold Girs |Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls
SLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Modern Modern
4) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Family Family
S 7 117 CSI: Miami "Wannabe" CSI: Miami "Deadline" CSI: Miami Police offi- CSI: Miami "Not CSI: Miami "Rap Sheet" CSI: Miami "Invasion"
U 117 69 117 '14'm[] '14'm cer is killed.'14' Landing"'14' '14'N '14'm
WG A 18 18 18 18 20 *** "Snow Buddies" (2008)'G'" ***, "Bolt" (2008, Comedy) 'PG' B **_ "Alien Resurrection" (1997)'R'


DearAnnie: My
grandsons are 5
and 9 and old
enough to sleep alone.
However, they sleep to-
gether in a queen-sized
bed, and their mother
regularly crawls in with
them. She has been doing
that since they were
toddlers.
The boys have told
their mother that they do
not want her
in the bed any
longer, but
she continues
to do so, say-
ing they need
her My son
and his wife
have been
separated for
more than six
months, and
the boys fre- .
quently tell
their father AN N
how upset MAIL
they are
about this, but
he doesn't know what to
do because they don't live
together
What steps can be
taken to prevent this
from occurring? Should I
contact Child Protective
Services? I feel it jeop-
ardizes the welfare of my
grandchildren. Con-
cerned Grandmother
Dear Concerned: Un-
doubtedly, your daughter-
in-law is comforted by
being physically close to
the children, but she
should not be using them
as an antidote to her
loneliness, especially
when they have asked
her not to do so. Whether
or not your son still lives
with Mom, he is still their


father If his children are
complaining to him, he
absolutely must discuss
the situation with his
wife. He also can ap-
proach their pediatrician
and, if necessary, a thera-
pist. Mom surely does not
want to hurt her chil-
dren.
Dear Annie: A friend
received a handicap
placard after surgery sev-
eral years ago.
He is com-
pletely recov-
ered, but both
he and his wife
still put it in
their wind-
shield and park
in spaces re-
served for the
handicapped.
To me, it
seems selfish,
unethical and
E'S insensitive, yet
3OX it's not for me
to correct their
behavior At
what point should I
speak up, or should I just
button my mouth? -
Doing a Slow Burn in the
Southwest
Dear Slow Burn: Most
placards have an expira-
tion date unless re-
newed, so we are
surprised they haven't
been ticketed yet.
Nonetheless, it's OK for
you to make a note of it
should they do this when
you are in the car Simply
say, "I'm surprised you
still use the handicap
placard, since you are ob-
viously well now These
spaces should be used by
those who truly need
them. I'm so glad you
don't."


To day's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"About Last Night" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"August: Osage County" (R)
1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Endless Love" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m. 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Vampire Academy" (PG-13)
2p.m., 5p.m., 8p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Endless Love" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m. 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:40 p.m.
"Philomena" (PG-13)
7:40 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Vampire Academy" (PG-13)
4p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,7 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Television hookup
6 Diner fare
10 Lady
15 Car for hire
18 Hatred
19 Woven container
21 Socrates'
specialty
22 Ignoble
23 Yearns
24 "The Strikes Back"
25 Clothe
26 Commedia dell'-
27 Assn.
28 Stood wide open
29 Jerry or Jerry Lee
31 Bank worker
33 Coral ridge
35 So be it!
36 French painter
37 Hardwood tree
38 Ardent follower
40 Hazy
41 -vitae
42 Used with others
44 Ward off
45 Where Cuzco is
47 Aerie
51 Spade
52 Pro -
53 Reflect
55 "The Murders in the -
Morgue"
56 Holiday song
57 Raised platform for a
panel
58 Woe
60 In flames
62 On--
(equivalent)
63 Meal outdoors
65 Kind of processing
66 Smooth and shiny
67 Shamus
68 First (Abbr.)
69 Frozen rain
71 Call
73 volente
75 Long fish
76 Ricochet
77 Spinning toy
78 Joker
81 -Gras
83 Oil cartel letters
84 Spongy material


85 Nest egg letters
87 Granitelike rock
90 Vetch
92 Per annum
94 Envelope part
95 Unwilling
96 Laugh loudly
98 Earl tea
99 Profits
100 Abbr. in a
timetable
101 Youngsters
103 Was concerned
105 Wince
106 Carveyor
Andrews
108 Victim
109 Rhythm and-
110 Decorative border
111 Goad
113 Stoke-on--
114 Write a certain way
115 Carefully
118 Land area
119 Froth
120 Irritated state
124 Treat with honor
125 Intone
126 Economic
downturn
127 Poem
128 The States (Abbr.)
129 Defense acronym
131 Adulterated
133 Heart chambers
135 Legal wrong
136 Wading bird
137 Hauled
138 Cap part
139 Med. specialty
140 Dwindled
141 Tinted
142 Foe


DOWN
1 Tint
2 Love
3 Overindulge
4 Big clumsy fellow
5 Letters
6 Hinder
7 Mecca for skiers
8 Slide
9 That ship
10 Fairgrounds area


Molding edge
Performs
Reply (Abbr.)
Special aura
Monte -
Daisylike flower
Smelling of lager
Smiled
Wire
European
peninsula
Mallet
Smeared with yolk
Old French coin
Taste
Campus building
Robust
Pitcher
Hershiser
Persian language
Molded
Roman writer
of odes
Aim
Bard
Deeply moved
Satie or Estrada
Certain
Adolescent
Go away!
Make easier
Sacred song
Picnic spoiler
Had a meal
Folly
Went quickly
Landing places
Sistine -
Completely wet
Exist
Christmastime decora-
tion
Leave out
Stoppers
III
Farmers'
association
Pale
Reduces
Vaulted church area
Merry
Ibsen character
Merit
Sore
Long-legged bird
Swoons


96 Indian spice mix
97 Assorted
99 and bear it
102 Wealth
104 Family member
105 Pinch together
107 State with
confidence
109 High-fiber food
110 Entrapped


- contra
Exchanged
Decanted
Jalopy
Juicy fruit
Not hidden
Feudal lord
"The Magic-"
Scandinavian
Expression


Puzzle answer is on Page A21.


Watery-eyed
Grouch
Sprightly
Sphere
In a rage
- Maria
Metallic element


2014 UFS, Dist, by Universal Ucl]ck for UFS


I
.1


A24 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page A23

Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St, Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County
Veterans Services Depart-
ment offers help for veter-
ans who have had their
post-traumatic stress dis-
order (PTSD) claim
denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination.
All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the
Lecanto VA Mental
Health Center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-


cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas.
Call 352-527-5915 to re-
serve a seat
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Hearts
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.


Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental pro-
tection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons.
Criminal background
check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@
aol.com, or call 917-
597-6961.

Free yoga classes
for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with
the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes


The Savings
S........ AreYours
rF ^ 1 P: Because
SThe Factory
I is Ours!

i* i: ^ .lr 1"111"1'""
,p 8 Fw 4 e i:il ri ri i!'i ir
_ = 1.1* Cn 1 ,
* -.... .


to combat veterans at sev-
eral locations and times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-
382-7397.

Hospice program
assists veterans
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war


It also provides care-
giver education and a
recognition program to
honor veterans' services
and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.

Prior enlisted
sought for service
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select
career fields.


VETERANS


0


*Y you're Invited to a


^tr;t^'t


0 e


* Door Prizes
* Giveaways For Everyone
* Heart Health Talks By Physicians
* Guided Tours of the Heart Center


72 HOUR "


BLIND FACTORY
1657 W GULF TO LAKE HWY* 5LECANI TO I l *
www.72-hourblinds.com 2.UUIL -


FREE Health Screenings
Body Mass Index (BMI)
Balance Screening
Oxygen level Saturation Screening
Blood Pressure & Heart Rate Screening
Heart Health Self Risk Assessment
Coronary Risk Profile
Smoking Cessation Education & Support Materials


* Refreshments
* Free drawings for advanced screenings
ABI
VascularUlbtasounid
,PFT
Prrr J
InS


Heart


YEARS & VASCULAR CENTER
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness 1352.726.15511 CitrusMH.com
00OHG6N


He^* alth UFijalth^o



woul Shol. At.F eatD.gPul n -gdeelp*cac* ret.nt sSpecs*tht.hy'e.hagig ha'-gosil
for* patOien0s. -The- 6o*nect00 0Tiohamay be invisible, but it's how we move medicine forward
0 S^^j 3ij|T]i^T~ KT Tp i=
0 6. -- - - - -0 0T'l i~ 0J 0 -ul0 -


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A25

Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other special-
ties. Enlisted career
openings that include the
opportunities to retrain
consist of special opera-
tions positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.


U Email your
Veterans Notes to
community@
chronicleonline.com
or call Sarah Gatling
at 563-5660, ext.
1197.


--...-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Il111li'r


SEVEN RIVERS FINE ARTS

The Fine Arts Department of
SRCS develops young artists'
passions, creativity, talents, and
techniques. With an appreciation


and understanding


of art history


and its cultural impact, combined
with excellent instruction in a
variety of media, our students
bring fashion, sculpture, painting,
graphic design, literature, music,
and theater to the world.


Seven Rivers offers weekly art and music
classes to K-6th grade students.
. Our upper school (7th-12th) offers:


* Band for middle and high school
* Graphic design for middle and
high school
* Drama I and II
* Art I and II
* AP Art -


Accepting Applications NOW for
the 2014-15 school year. Stop
by the school for enrollment
application or visit our web site.
www.sevenriverscs.org


Come to an Open House and
hear all about our school,
financial assistance
opportunities, curriculum, and
take a tour.


Seven Rivers Christian School is not bound to state mandates such as FCAT, Common
Core, or end-of-course tests, yet we produce AP scholars, dual enrollment and honor
graduates who get accepted every year to many colleges, universities, and military
academies including every public university in Florida.
Seven Rivers Christian School is accredited by the following agencies:
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools/AdvanceEd
Christian Schools of Florida
The National Council for Private School Accreditation
The faculty of Seven Rivers loves who they teach and what they teach. All are degree with
40% having a master's degree or higher.


OPEN HOUSES
February 18 at 6:30pm
February 22 at 11am
February 24 at 10am
Pre-K only OPEN HOUSE March 11, 10AM
On-site VPK sign up April 1 at 9AM
(For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current proof
of address, birth certificate or shot record for child. If parent is missing
any of these documents, she will not be able to sign them up.)


Some classes are already tilling to capacity.
Enroll now to ensure your child's seat in the upcoming school year.


A Provider for
Florida's Voluntary
Pre kindergarten
Program (VPK).


for students

for students


Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12
scholarships and related support, giving economically disadvantaged
families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship.


L MisionStatmen


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts
and minds of children
with a distinctly biblical
program of academic rigor,
artistic beauty, and athletic
competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


A26 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEDDING

Lindsey


Lauren and Raheem
Lindsey of Crystal River
exchanged wedding vows
in an afternoon ceremony
Jan. 4,2014, on Fort
Island Gulf Beach. The
nuptials were officiated
by Brian Kinker
The new bride is the
daughter of Steve and
Teresa Townsend of
Crystal River Her
husband is the son of Kim
Dixon of Ohio.
Given in marriage by
Abigail Riggs, the bride
wore a white gown
accented with a touch of
pink, with silver heels
adorned with diamonds.
Rachel Ivory of


Crystal River, who wore a
bridesmaid's gown of
fuschia, was honor
attendant. Mariah
Lindsey was flower girl
and Trenton Jenkins and
Kobe Lindsey shared
ring-bearer duties.
A reception followed
the nuptials at the Old
Train Depot in Crystal
River The couple reside
in Citrus County


ENGAGED

Trimarche/Bryant


Sal and Rita
Trimarche of Inverness
announce the engage-
ment of their daughter,
Stephanie Lynn
Trimarche, to Dustin
Mark Bryant, son of Jan
Bryant of Inverness.
The bride-elect is a
1996 graduate of Citrus
High School and 2005
graduate of Webster
College. She is a
medical assistant.
Her fiance is a 1993
graduate of Citrus High
School and is associated
with Inverness Golf&
Country Club.


S./


Nuptial vows will be
exchanged Dec. 20,2014,
at Cornerstone Baptist
Church in Inverness.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.

FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays. Email
requests to community@chronicleonline.com.


Jan. 20-Feb. 2, 2014
Divorces
Anna E. Pace, Crystal River vs.
Andrew T. Pace, Crystal River
Cynthia Leigh Welch, Tallahassee vs.
Ricky Dean Curry, Southport, N.C.
Jessica Kelly Barkley, Beverly Hills
vs. Gregory Alexander Barkley, Beverly
Hills
Amber R. Degutis, Floral City vs.
Richard Degutis, Dunnellon
Atressa L. Mayes, Lecanto vs. Jason
D. Mayes, Lecanto
Jerome J. Odell, Homosassa vs.
Heather R. Odell, Beverly Hills


FOR THE RECORD
Marriages
Donald Howard Bates, Floral
City/Nancy Louise Bates, Floral City
Curtis Randell Bernaldo, Floral City/
Katia Jadon Gibson, Floral City
Darren Thomas Goulet, Westfield,
Maine/Cynthia Marie Wilcox, Westfield,
Maine
Lewis Leo Short, Homosassa/
Jamie Sue Palmer, Homosassa
BretAllan Trowell, Spring Hill/
Roberta Lena Busby, Beverly Hills
Mark Allan Augustsson, Homosassa/
Michelle Victoria Gonzalez, Webster
Jeffrey Paul Barrick, Hernando/


2012 FORD FOCUS S
ONLY 19KMILES N3T440E II
SALE PRICE $13,50011

7^^


~l Nih


TOGETHER


Carolyn Imogine Paris, Hernando
Christopher Lawrence Burns,
Crystal River/Amy Michelle Stalker,
Crystal River
Robert Warren Burns, Arbor Vitae,
Wisc./Laura Lee Zupen, Homosassa
David Allen Griffin, Crystal
River/Natasha Bagwell, Crystal River
Johnny Christopher Hardin,
Hernando/Kelly Michelle Rosato,
Inverness
Cody Joseph Todd, Homosassa/
TiffanyAnn Lee, Homosassa
Arthur Lee Wright, Dunnellon/
Ethel Mae Williams, Dunnellon


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness- CR486 I
g/WWy, 44 Invj~erness
(352) 726-1231 4 Ir
nicknicholasford.com 4m Nick Nihoias |
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 _______________


OCALA PLASTIC SURGERY


BREAST AUGMENTATION

TUMMY TUCK

FACELIFT

LIPOSUCTION

EYELID SURGERY

HAIR TRANSPLANT

BOTOX & INJECTABLE FILLERS

SPIDER VEINS

CHEMICAL PEELS





James Rogers DMD MD Navinderdeep Nijher MD
Leonik Ahumada MD
C MEMBE R OF M ,ER OF
SAmerican Society / \ American Society for
of Plastic Surgeons /_...\Aeshetic Plastic Surgery


MANAGER'S SPECIALS


2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT
ONLY 22K MILES NP5923A
SALE PRICE $18,50(
.-. --L. B f .


2010 FORD EDGE AWD SEL 2009 FORD EXPLORER XLT SPORT TRAC 2013 FORD FUSION SE
ONLY34KMICESNP59,5 HARD TO FIND NP5929 ONLY 6KMICES N3C235A
SALE PRICE $23,500 SALE PRICE $22,900 SALE PRICE $24,900


19


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 A27

Woman's
Club gets
together
Sharon Maim was the
guest speaker at the
February meeting of the
GFWC Crystal River
Woman's Club. Maim
spoke to the members
about SCORE, a group that
helps local businesses.
Maim is also the owner of
New Concepts Hair Salon
in Crystal River.

CLAIRE PHILLIPS LAXTON/Chronicle


i. % d:





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Corvette club celebrates anniversary


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the Touch of Class Corvette Club recently celebrated the club's ninth anniversary at the West Citrus Elks Club in Homosassa. Each member received a goody
bag. The hall was decorated with a corvette motif. Cupcakes with the club logo and chocolate corvette-shaped lollipops graced the tables. After dinner prepared by the
Elks, members and their guests danced to the sounds of DJ Joe Dube. Those interested in becoming a member, or who want information, should visit the website at
www.tccorvettes.com.


YMCA invites all
to get involved
The Citrus County YMCA of-
fers opportunities to encourage
the community to impact their
lives.
The Y takes pride in its pro-
grams that offer resources to
commit to a healthy lifestyle for
all ages.


GROUPS
Continued from PageA18

of Military Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at
the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or
Secretary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air
Force, retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252
in Hernando. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or


This year, the Y hopes those
who are ready to embrace the
mindset of making change to
impact their own lives will real-
ize that they can impact the
lives of their community at the
same time.
This is done daily through
the services of dedicated volun-
teers.
The volunteers make such a
strong and positive impact with

Wallace Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or
Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed


NEWS NOTES
everything they do.
Volunteer opportunities in-
clude: basketball league
coaches, assistant coaches, ref-
erees, concessions, office ad-
ministrative tasks and more.
The Y offers a large range of
volunteer opportunities.
For information about how to
be involved, email cdrew@
suncoastymca.org or call
352-637-0132.

Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Saturdays at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meetings in 2014 are: March 8, April
12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at
West Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or email
seacapt34447@yahoo.com or


Help needed to feed
Citrus County pets
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices asks for the public's help in
helping financially challenged
citizens feed their pets.
Animal Services asks for
donations of dog food and cat
food to a local food bank or to
the Animal Services shelter in

Robert Currie at 352-799-5250 or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-
302-1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport
Administration Building, 750 S.W.


Inverness to help those resi-
dents keep their animals rather
than surrender them to the
shelter because they don't have
the money to feed them.
Monetary donations for that
purpose may be mailed to:
Citrus County Animal Services,
4030 S. Airport Road,
Inverness, FL 34450.
For more information, call
352-746-8400.

60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coali-
tion is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by call-
ing 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge helps meet the
needs of wounded veterans, 2071
N. Lecanto Highway. Call 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, or email charles.
lawrence@servicesource.org.


Facial






Rejuvenation.



Refreshenw Revea... TeNew ou



Our Double Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeons, Rich Castellano, M.D. and Randall Weyrich, M.D.
have helped thousands restore their youthful appearance and achieve natural, lasting results.

Our surgeons specialize in both surgical and nonsurgical facelifts, but also have fillers and other treatments available!
The work we do will focus on rejuvenating your face, eyes, and neckline to help you look and feel younger again!

Our Sevcen clde


* ImageLift
(Small, Medium, or Large)


* All Fillers (Temporary, Long-Term & Permanent)
* Botox, Dysport and Xeomin


* Neck-Firming (Surgical & Non-Surgical) Fat Grafting
* Advanced Laser Technology Medical Skin Care


LIThursday, Feb. 21t


12:00 Dm


Citrus Hills Country Club
505 E. Hartford Street
Hernando, FL 34442


Rich Caostellano MD., Founder, Medical Director
Rondoll Weyrich, M.D.


Call 888.855.3223
Sto reserve your seat
All seminars are 100% complimentary


MAGELIFT
vwww.mage Liftocor


A28 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


VETERANS & COMMUNITY











SPORTS


No. 3UF
gets a stiff test
from SEC East
rival Kentucky
on Saturday
night./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


" Golf, college basketball/B2
" Scoreboard/133
" Sports briefs/B3
" TV, lottery/B3
" Recreational sports, NBA/B4
" MLB/B4, B5
" Auto racing/B5
0 Winter Olympics/B6


Stron show


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Brandon Taylor of Citrus (top) stacks Kevin Hilton of Tallahassee Chiles onto his shoulders for a fall in
the second overtime tiebreaker of their Class 2A semifinal match at 160 pounds. Taylor placed second
in the state tournament.

Taylor's runner-up result leads county's three state players


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
LAKELAND Citrus senior
Brandon "Frodo" Taylor came
within one victory of becoming
Citrus County's llth state
champion.
Taylor, a Hurricane senior,
reached Saturday's night's finals
at 160 pounds in Class 2A un-
beaten in the pressure-packed
50th annual FHSAA wrestling
tournament in Lakeland.
Taylor, the county leader in
wins, opened the two-day IBT
(individually bracketed tourna-
ment) double-elimination event
capturing both of his matches
on Friday, downing Fivay senior
Andrew Scherer, 9-7, and
Nease's Tristen Barth, 5-4.
In Saturday's semifinals, the
three-year 'Cane starter pinned
Tallahassee-Chiles senior


Kevin Hilton in double
overtime in 7:46.
In the finals, Brandon junior
Dakota Greene (69-1) denied
Taylor via a major decision, 13-5.
"It's a tough weight class; I'm
glad I made it to the finals," said
the 17-year-old Taylor. "I
thought I wrestled as hard as I
could; I know I have nothing to
be ashamed of."
On the finals' difference,
"Brandon guys are at the top of
the list," Taylor added. "He's
(Greene) the toughest guy I
faced all year But I have no re-
grets. I'd like to dedicate my sil-
ver medal to my mom for
being so supportive."
Citrus' other placer, Bearden,
finished 4-1 over the two-day
event.
The two-time state qualifier
Bearden opened the meet by
pinning Mater Academy's Yuri


Cabrera, 2:38, and decisioning
Fort Myers sophomore Levi
McQuinn, 4-0.
On Saturday, Springstead
junior Billy Swift solved Bear-
den in the rubber match be-
tween the two this year, losing
an 8-3 decision.
Bearden bounced back in the
loser's bracket, however, trim-
ming Naples-Barron Collier
sophomore Jamel Davis in
overtime, 3-1, before downing
McQuinn for the second time in
two days, 7-5.
Bearden's best-ever
campaign concluded at 52-4
with 30 pins.
"I'm OK placing third here,"
explained the 17-year-old Bear-
den. '"After I lost my semifinal, I
realized that I put too much
pressure on myself winning


See Page B2


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Michael Allen of Crystal River (bottom) attempts to escape from Donoven Hough of Tampa Prep during their
Class 1A semifinal bout at 126 pounds Saturday at the state wrestling tournament in Lakeland. Allen
dropped a 74 decision to the two-time defending state champion and finished sixth in the tournament.


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Shally Morales of Citrus defends Makala Canada of Land 0' Lakes
on a drive to the basket during the first half of Saturday night's
Class 5A regional final contest in Inverness. The Hurricanes fell
short of the state semifinals 40-37.


'Canes stopped


short of state semis


Land O'Lakes scores finalfour

points ofgame to stun Citrus 40-37


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Citrus had
control, but just couldn't
sustain it
Going against a physical
Land 0' Lakes team in a Class
5A regional final girls basket-
ball game played at Citrus on
Saturday, a poor-shooting sec-
ond half proved costly to the
Hurricanes, as the Gators
scored the game's last four
points in the final 15 seconds
to escape with a 40-37 victory
Citrus
ends its sea-
son at 25-4. Some
L a n d
O'Lakes,234 ball bounce
with its third sometime
consecutive
road victory, doesn't
advances to
the 5A state Da
semifinals, Citrus girls bask
m e e t i n g his team's 40-3
Bradenton
Southeast on
Friday in Lakeland.
The Hurricanes led from the
start it was 21-16 in their
favor at the half and were
still up 25-18 in the third quar-
ter before a nine-point run
gave Land 0' Lakes its first
lead with two minutes left in
the third. From that point on it
was close, neither team lead-
ing by more than four
A basket by Nicole Kraning
put the Gators up 36-32 with
4:15 remaining in the game,
but the Hurricanes answered
with a five-point run that gave
them a 37-36 advantage with
27.6 seconds to go.
After a Land 0' Lakes time-
out, the Gators ran a play sug-
gested by Lela Gregory,
someone who hadn't scored in
the game and for the season av-
eraged less than a point a game.
"She actually called the
play," Land 0' Lakes coach
Phyllis Crain said. "She's my
smartest IQ player out there.


But the bottom line is, I listen
to my players."
It was an in-bounds play
from under their own basket,
and when Rams' center Taylor
McDonald set up right under
the hoop, the Citrus defense
swarmed to cover her-- allow-
ing Gregory to slip in for the
go-ahead layup.
The Hurricanes tried to get
the ball up court quickly, but
Shenelle Toxen was forced out
of bounds at mid-court, with
the turnover giving the ball
back to Land 0' Lakes. The
Gators'
Makala
Times the Canada was
fouled and
s your way, hit both free
s it throws with
3.7 seconds
t to go for the
game's final
ave Hamilton points.
ketball coach said of S o m e -
37 regional final loss. times the
ball bounces
your way,
sometimes it doesn't," Citrus
coach Dave Hamilton said.
"We had a 10-point lead on 'em
(in the first half) and let it slip
away
"We knew what they were
going to do. But that's a very
good Land 0' Lakes team. We
played their game in the sec-
ond half instead of our game. I
think that's the fewest number
of points we scored all season."
Certainly the way Crain de-
scribed the game "We
played defense, and you had
two defensive-minded coaches
here" was accurate, with
Citrus trying to exploit its
quickness and Land O'Lakes
attempting to take advantage
of its superior size. But even
though the Hurricanes more
than held their own on the
boards, they could not force
the game's tempo, which the
Rams kept at a slower pace in
See Page B3


Batteries Installed Alignment

SSS. $ ,$5', 5995
W.-T L.a '. XI'r., ,I,.. q. ..B .....L.-;.,, ', ''" ;-,', U ... ,' ,,r,, ',,, ,. .. ,,,-,
L & ,. iI .Il ,.' t. Ji.. If- r.l, ....>n r^.,,, ., d 1 , u,. ,, I,:M .- m ..c l
T ,Z,

BUY 3 TIRES 'SUVOWNERS
AND GET ONE Ube. Oil & Fil er 5
'FREE "ufp ~I~Or
FR E E Inspection'tont 5
A.i--;sL, -n----
- -.^ ll- ll.- .. 1.1.7 ,- *n - ., ".- r -1. -. -,ll l~- -,. -1, ^ ,


I
I

* Check & Top-Off All Fluids
* Check Tire Pressure on All 4 Tires
* 27-Point Inspection 6
* Battery Test 1J
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! 7
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere'
- - - - -S


2219 S. Suncoast Blhd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.46OO
3lovelicoximcL%.c4:oxm
lcvehorad,. oor-
HOURS OF OPERATION:
SlWs 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt: 9AM-6PM Sal.: 11IAM-4PM Sun.
Seru-ce 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt; 8AM-2PM Sat.


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness. FL34453
352.341.0018
loveclevmysales.comr
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-SPM Mon.-M..: 9AM-6PM Sat.
Seruice 8AM-5PM Mon.-F-L: SAM-Noon Sal.


Hoiid~.


I T ', -. i- ,..'.:77M


00QH9TO I


8


t


k
3


jSSfl)ogE"





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Cuse escapes


Associated Press
William McGirt drives on the ninth tee Saturday during
the third round of the Northern Trust Open golf
tournament at Riviera Country Club in the Pacific
Palisades area of Los Angeles.



McGirt one



round away


Golfer can

win Northern

Trust today

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
William McGirt had never
matched par in his two
previous trips to Riviera.
Now he's one round away
from his first PGA Tour
victory
McGirt opened with
eight birdies in 13 holes
on a day when everything
felt easy He wound up
with a 6-under 65 on Sat-
urday in the Northern
Trust Open, giving him a
two-shot lead going into
the final round.
At stake for the 34-year-
old McGirt is his first trip
to the Masters he has
played in only one major
- and a two-year exemp-
tion on the PGA Tour
McGirt was at 12-under
201, two shots clear of
George McNeill and
Charlie Beljan.
McNeill, whose two
wins were in the old Fall
Series and an opposite-
field event, started with
an eagle and picked up a
final birdie on the par-3
16th for a 66. Beljan, who
lost in a playoffat Riviera
last year to John Merrick,
belted a 3-wood into 8 feet
for eagle on the llth hole
and shot a 68.
Jason Allred, the feel-
good story this week
after Monday qualifying
for his first PGA Tour
event in more than three
years, had a 67 and
joined Brian Harman
(68) at 9 under The group
at 8 under had star
power Jordan Spieth
(67), Dustin Johnson (69),
Bubba Watson (64), Charl
Schwartzel (68) and
Jimmy Walker (67), who
is going for his fourth win
of the season after win-
ning last week at Pebble
Beach.
Women's
Australian Open
MELBOURNE, Australia


- South Korea's Chella
Choi broke Victoria Golf Club
record with a 10-under 62 for
a share of the third-round
lead in the Women's
Australian Open.
Choi had two eagles,
seven birdies and a bogey
to match 17-year-old Aus-
tralian amateur Minjee Lee
at 13-under 203 in the event
sacntioned by the LPGA,
European and Australian
tours.
Winless on the LPGA
Tour, Choi rebounded from a
bogey on No. 13 with four
straight birdies and an eagle
on the par-5 18th. Lee
shot 68.
Sixteen-year-old Lydia Ko
of New Zealand was third at
11 under a 69. Second
ranked Suzann Pettersen of
Norway was another stroke
back after a 72.
Ace Group Classic
NAPLES Kirk Triplett
shot a 5-under 67 in windy
conditions for a share of the
second-round lead with de-
fending champion Bernard
Langer in the ACE Group
Classic.
Triplett matched Langer at
10-under 134 on TwinEagles'
Talon Course.
Langer, also the 2011 win-
ner and 2012 runner-up, fol-
lowed his opening 64 with a
70. He won the season-
opening event in Hawaii last
month for his 19th Champi-
ons Tour title.
Triplett has two Champi-
ons Tour victories after win-
ning three times on the
PGATour.
Duffy Waldorf and Olin
Browne were 9 under. Wal-
dorf, coming off a playoff
loss to Michael Allen last
week in Boca Raton in the
Allianz Championship, shot
68. Browne had a 71.
Africa Open
EAST LONDON, South
Africa -Argentina's Emil-
iano Grillo shot a 9-under
62 to take a two-stroke lead
over England's Oliver
Fisher in the Africa Open.
Grillo, seeking his first Eu-
ropean Tour, had a 20-under
193 total. Fisher shot 66.


BYU 62,
No. 20 Gonzaga 52
PROVO, Utah -Jennifer
Hamson scored 18 of her 20
points in the second half,
Lexi Eaton had 15 points
and 10 rebounds and BYU
ended No. 20 Gonzaga's
13-game winning streak with
a 62-52 win Saturday.
Morgan Bailey added 14
points for the Cougars
(21-5,11-4 West Coast
Conference).
BYU trailed 33-27 at the
break but shot 43 percent in
the second half, compared to
15.4 percent (6 for 39) for
Gonzaga.
Jazmine Redmon had 15
points for the Bulldogs (23-4,
13-2), who could have clinched
a 10th straight league title.
Gonzaga had 23 offensive
rebounds.
No. 24 St. John's
69, Villanova 56
NEWYORK-Aliyyah
Handford scored 25 points
and Amber Thompson had a
career-high 17 rebounds to
lead St. John's to the victory.
Reserve Danaejah Grant
added 14 points and nine re-
bounds for the Red Storm


(19-5, 12-1 Big East). Eu-
geneia McPherson scored
12 points.
Katherine Coyer had a ca-
reer-high 18 points for the
Wildcats (19-6, 9-5), who
had won six in a row. Devon
Kane added 12 points and
Caroline Coyer 10.
Thompson helped St.
John's to a 54-31 rebound-
ing edge, including a 20-7
margin on the offensive end.
No. 25 Mich. St.
70, Ohio State 49
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Annalise Pickrel had 17
points, 11 rebounds and six
assists, helping Michigan
State to the easy win.
Michigan State closed the
first half with a 17-2 run and
led 42-21 at the break. The
Spartans (17-8, 9-3 Big Ten)
have won five of their last
six games.
Becca Mills scored 17
points for Michigan State.
Aerial Powers added 15
points and tied a career high
with five assists.
Ameryst Alston scored 25
points and Cait Craft added
11 for Ohio State (14-14,
4-8), which has lost four
straight.


No. 1 Orange

avoid loss with

last-second shot

Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. Rakeem
Christmas had a key steal to set up
C.J. Fair's winning layup with 6.7
seconds left, helping No. 1 Syracuse
edge North Carolina State 56-55 on
Saturday night to remain unbeaten.
Christmas had 14 points, 12 re-
bounds and seven blocks as Syra-
cuse (25-0, 12-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) earned its 10th single-
digit win despite shooting 35.2 per-
cent. Jerami Grant finished with 12
points and 14 rebounds, and Fair
scored 11 points on 5-of-16 shooting.
The start of the game was pushed
back four hours because of a snow-
storm that wreaked havoc along the
eastern seaboard. N.C. State did not
land in Syracuse until Saturday af-
ternoon. The team's Twitter account
announced the Wolfpack's arrival at
3:07 p.m., seven minutes later than
the original scheduled tip-off.
It turns out it was worth the wait,
with a tight game leading to a frantic
finish full of missed opportunities.
TJ. Warren scored 23 points for
N.C. State (16-9, 6-6). Kyle Washing-
ton had 14.
No. 7 Kansas 95, TCU 65
LAWRENCE, Kan. Perry Ellis
scored a career-high 32 points, Andrew
Wiggins added 17 and Kansas over-
came a sluggish start to get the win.
Ellis also had eight rebounds and five
assists, and Wayne Selden Jr. scored 15
points for the Jayhawks (19-6, 10-2 Big
12), who actually trailed by as many as
six in the first half.
Playing without injured center Joel
Embiid and suspended forward Brannen
Greene, Kansas still managed to build a
47-40 lead by the break. The Jayhawks
then used a 13-1 charge out of the
locker room to put away the Horned
Frogs (9-15, 0-12) for the sixth time in
seven meetings.
TCU still has not won since knocking
off Texas Southern on Dec. 29. Kyan An-
derson did all he could, scoring 21 of his
25 points in the first half. Amric Fields
added 12 points.
No. 8 Duke 69, Maryland 67
DURHAM, N.C. Jabari Parker
scored 23 points and Duke held on for
the victory.
Rodney Hood and Rasheed Sulaimon
added 11 points each for the Blue Devils
(20-5, 9-3 Atlantic Coast Conference).
They started a run of four games in eight
nights by giving the Terrapins a hard-to-
swallow loss in their last scheduled visit
to Cameron Indoor Stadium.
The ACC's top 3-point shooting team
was just 5 of 24 from long range and
shot 23 percent in the second half but
found a way to reach the 20-win mark for
the 18th straight year.
Jake Layman scored 18 points for
Maryland (14-12, 6-7) and Dez Wells had
all 17 of his points in the second half.
Charles Mitchell missed two hook
shots in the final 10 seconds that would
have given the Terrapins the lead.
No. 10 Cincinnati 73,
Houston 62
CINCINNATI Sean Kilpatrick
scored 28 points and Justin Jackson
overcame foul problems to add 13 points
and Cincinnati shook off Houston.
Shaquille Thomas added 11 for the
Bearcats (23-3, 12-1 American Athletic
Conference), who were playing their first
game since having a 15-game winning
streak snapped with a 76-55 loss at
SMU on Feb. 8.
Danrad Knowles scored 11 points to
lead Houston (12-13, 4-8), which has lost
six of its past seven and eight of its past
10 games, led Houston with 11 points.
L.J. Rose, Danuel House and TaShawn
Thomas each added 10 for the Cougars.
No. 11 Iowa State 70,
Texas Tech 64
AMES, Iowa DeAndre Kane had 17
points with nine assists and Iowa State
won after blowing an 18-point lead in the
second half.
Georges Niang also had 17 points for


STRONG
Continued from Page BI

here was everything I
wanted to do. After I lost, I
just relaxed."
On whether Bearden
had any regrets.
"Yeah, I emptied the
tank here," he said.
"Everything happens for a
reason."
Pirate placer
Crystal River senior
Michael Allen finished 2-3.
He placed sixth and was
the only one of four Pirate
entries to place.
The two-time state quali-


Associated Press
Syracuse's Jerami Grant shoots over North Carolina State's Jordan
Vandenburg, left, in the second half Saturday in Syracuse, N.Y.


the Cyclones (19-5, 7-5 Big 12), who
survived an impressive rally from the
Red Raiders to win for the fourth time in
five games.
Jaye Crockett had 19 of his 23 points
in the second half for the Red Raiders
(13-12, 5-7).
No. 12 Saint Louis 64,
VCU 62
ST. LOUIS Dwayne Evans had 21
points and 10 rebounds and Saint Louis
broke a late tie with seven straight points
for its 17th straight victory.
The Billikens (23-2, 10-0 Atlantic 10)
blew a 12-point second-lead before fi-
nally putting away VCU (20-6, 8-3) in a
matchup of the Atlantic 10's top two
teams. Jordair Jett and Rob Loe had 14
points apiece for Saint Louis, which beat
VCU for a third straight time.
Mike McCall Jr. and Jordair Jett drove
for layups and Rob Loe hit a 3-pointer
with the shot clock winding down for a
seven-point lead with 36 seconds to go.
VCU cut the deficit to three before Loe
hit the second of two free throws for a
four-point gap with 8 seconds left.
Treveon Graham had 16 points and
eight rebounds for VCU.
No. 16 Iowa 82,
Penn State 70
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Melsahn
Basabe scored 16 points and Iowa
pulled away in the second half.
Roy Devyn Marble added 15, Aaron
White 14 and Mike Gesell 13 as the
Hawkeyes (19-6, 8-4) won their fourth
Big Ten road game of the season. Iowa's
three-game road winning streak in the
Big Ten is its longest since 1998.
Penn State (13-13, 4-9) was led by
D.J. Newbill, who scored 22 points, but
Tim Frazier was held to 11.
The game was tied four times in the
second half before Iowa stretched it out
with a 14-4 run.
Marble, the team's leading scorer at
16.5 points per game coming in, pumped
in seven of those and Mike Gesell con-
verted on a 3-pointer from the corner to
help the Hawks pull away.
No. 17 Virginia 63,
Clemson 58
CLEMSON, S.C. Joe Harris scored
16 points, including a critical 3-pointer
with about three minutes left, and No. 17
Virginia won its ninth straight Atlantic
Coast Conference game for the first time
in 32 years.
The Cavaliers (21-5) moved to 12-1 in
ACC play, also for the first time since
Ralph Sampson patrolled the middle in
the 1981-82 season. Not that it came


fier Allen (43-8) opened the
meet with a pair of wins on
Friday earning a forfeit nod
over Clewiston sophomore
Azeekwuai Bryant before
twisting Plantation-Amer-
ica Heritage junior Joseph
Padron via 16-6 major
decision.
On Saturday, two-time
defending state champion
Donoven Hough of Tampa
Prep spoiled Allen's state
gold-medal dreams behind
a 7-4 setback.
In the loser's bracket,
Mariner sophomore
Keaton Koselke solved
Allan, 11-4.
In his final prep match
for fifth place, Astronaut
senior Travis Ahrens


easily as Virginia's No. 1 defense was
matched up against a team in Clemson
that ranked second nationally in fewest
points allowed.
Clemson (15-9, 6-6) closed to 59-58
on K.J. McDaniels' 3 with 20.7 seconds
left, but Malcolm Brogdon made two foul
shots as the Cavaliers held on.
McDaniels had 24 points before foul-
ing out in the final seconds for Clemson.
No. 24 UConn 86,
No. 20 Memphis 81, OT
HARTFORD, Conn. Shabazz
Napier scored a career-high 34 points
and Connecticut beat Memphis to sweep
the season series from the Tigers.
Ryan Boatright added 21 points for
UConn (20-5, 8-4 American Athletic Con-
ference), including eight in overtime. He
also had six assists.
Joe Jackson had 24 points for the
Tigers (19-6, 8-4). Geron Johnson added
15 points and eight rebounds before
fouling out.
The game was tied at 69 at the end of
regulation and UConn opened the extra
period on a 7-2 run. But Memphis cut it
to 76-74 after a Michael Dixon hit a 3-
pointer.
Napier responded with one of his five
3-pointers.
No. 22 Ohio State 48,
Illinois 39
CHAMPAIGN, III. -Aaron Craft
scored 14 points and No. 22 Ohio State
held Illinois to 28.3 percent shooting on
the way to a scrappy 48-39 win.
Craft picked up two early fouls and
spent two long stretches on the bench.
But he was still the Buckeyes' best option
on a tough offensive night for each team.
LaQuinton Ross added nine points for
Ohio State (20-6, 7-6 Big Ten), which
trailed 23-20 at halftime.
Illinois (14-12, 3-10) scored just nine
points over the first 15:35 minutes of the
second half.
TracyAbrams led Illinois with 13
points. Nnanna Egwu had a career-high
14 rebounds but fouled out late.
The Illini have lost 10 of 11.
North Carolina 75,
No. 25 Pittsburgh 71
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. James
Michael McAdoo had 24 points and 12
rebounds to help North Carolina to its
sixth straight victory.
Marcus Paige added 18 points for the
Tar Heels (17-7, 7-4 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference), who extended the season's
longest winning streak three days after
their rivalry game against Duke was
postponed due to a winter storm.


handed Allan a 5-4 deci-
sion.
Round 1 Results
126 Michael Allan (CR) won by forfeit over
Azeekwuai Bryant (CLEWISTON).
160 Brandon Taylor (CIT) dec. Andrew
Scherer (FIVAY), 9-7.
170 -Casey Bearden (CIT) pin Yuri Cabrera
(MATER ACADEMY), 2:38.
182 Raekwon Regger (SOMERSET) pin
Eddie Bennis (CR), 3:10.
195 Fouad Salem (McKEEL) dec. Andrew
Bilby (CR), 12-11.
220 Alejandro Lopez (MARINER) pin Car-
los Sanabria (CR), 4:29.
Round 2
182 Zach Fouch (MARINER) dec. Eddie
Bennis (CR), 7-0.
195 Andrew Bilby (CR) pin Garrett Fair-
banks (MENENDEZ), 2:52.
220 Max Cobb (PROVIDENCE) dec. Carlos
Sanabria (CR), 11-7.
Round 3
126 -Michael Allan (CR) major dec. Hunter
Royce (WAKULLA), 16-6.
160- BrandonTaylor(CIT) dec.Tristen Barth
(NEASE), 5-4.


170 Casey Bearden (CIT) dec. Levi Mc-
Quinn (FORT MYERS), 4-0.
Round 4s
195 Andrew Bilby (CR) pin John Pozzy
(KEY WEST), 2:22.
Round 5
195 James Douin (WAKULLA) won by for-
feit over Andrew Bilby (CR).
Round 6
126 Donoven Hough (TAMPA PREP) dec.
Michael Allan (CR), 7-4.
160 Brandon Taylor (CIT) pin Kevin Hilton
(CHILES), 7:46.
170 Billy Swift (SPG) dec. Casey Bearden
(CIT), 8-3.
Round 7
126 Keaton Koselke (MARINER) dec.
Michael Allan (CR), 11-4.
160 Brandon Taylor (CIT) pin Kevin Hilton
(CHILES), 7:46.
Round 8
126 Travis Ahrens (ASTRONAUT) dec.
Michael Allan (CR), 5-4.
170 Casey Bearden (CIT) dec. Levi Mc-
Quinn (FORT MYERS), 7-5.
Round 9 (CHAMPIONSHIP)
160 Dakota Greene (BRANDON) major
dec. Brandon Taylor (CIT), 13-5.


_ bWomen's college.
basketball BRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Men's Top 25 Fared
Saturday
1. Syracuse (25-0) beat N.C. State 56-55. Next:
vs. Boston College, Wednesday.
2. Arizona (23-2) did not play. Next: at Utah,
Wednesday.
3. Florida (22-2) beat No. 14 Kentucky 69-59. Next:
vs. Auburn, Wednesday.
4. Wichita State (26-0) did not play. Next: at Evans-
ville, Sunday.
5. San Diego State (22-2) beat Air Force 64-56.
Next: vs. Utah State, Tuesday.
6. Villanova (22-2) did not play. Next: at No. 18
Creighton, Sunday.
7. Kansas (19-6) beatTCU 95-65. Next: atTexas
Tech, Tuesday.
8. Duke (20-5) beat Maryland 69-67. Next: at
Georgia Tech, Tuesday.
9. Michigan State (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Ne-
braska, Sunday.
10. Cincinnati (23-3) beat Houston 73-62. Next: at
UCF, Wednesday.
11. Iowa State (19-5) beatTexas Tech 70-64. Next:
vs. No. 19 Texas, Tuesday.
12. Saint Louis (23-2) beat VCU 64-62. Next: vs.
George Washington, Saturday.
13. Louisville (20-4) did not play. Next: vs. Rutgers,
Sunday.
14. Kentucky (19-5) lost to No. 3 Florida 69-59.
Next: at Mississippi, Tuesday.
15. Michigan (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 21
Wisconsin, Sunday.
16. Iowa (19-6) beat Penn State 82-70. Next: at
Indiana, Tuesday.
17. Virginia (21-5) beat Clemson 63-58. Next: at
Virginia Tech, Tuesday.
18. Creighton (20-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 6
Villanova, Sunday.
19. Texas (20-5) beat West Virginia 88-71. Next:
at No. 11 Iowa State, Tuesday.
20. Memphis (19-6) lost to No. 24 UConn 86-81.
Next: at Rutgers, Thursday.
21. Wisconsin (20-5) did not play. Next: at No. 15
Michigan, Sunday.
22. Ohio State (20-6) beat Illinois 48-39. Next: vs.
Northwestern, Wednesday.
23. SMU (20-5) did not play. Next: atTemple, Sun-
day.
24. UConn (20-5) beat No. 20 Memphis 86-81, OT
Next: at Temple, Thursday.
25. Pittsburgh (20-6) lostto North Carolina 75-71.
Next: vs. Florida State, Sunday Feb. 23.



Northern Trust Open
Saturday
At Riviera Country Club, Los Angeles
Purse: $6.7 million
Yardage: 7,349, Par 71
Third Round
William McGirt 69-67-65-201 -12
George McNeill 69-68-66- 203 -10
Charlie Beljan 67-68-68- 203 -10
Jason AlIlred 73-64-67-204 -9
Brian Harman 67-69-68-204 -9
Bubba Watson 70-71-64-205 -8
CameronTringale 68-70-67-205 -8
Jimmy Walker 67-71-67-205 -8
Jordan Spieth 72-66-67-205 -8
Charl Schwartzel 69-68-68-205 -8
Dustin Johnson 66-70-69-205 -8
Sang-Moon Bae 67-66-72-205 -8
Bill Haas 72-67-67-206 -7
Charley Hoffman 67-71-68-206 -7
Brendan Steele 68-71-67-206 -7
Aaron Baddeley 69-65-72-206 -7
Luke Guthrie 71-69-67-207 -6
John Senden 71-70-66-207 -6
Lee Westwood 69-70-68 207 -6
Bryce Molder 69-69-69-207 -6
Matt Every 69-69-69-207 -6
Jim Furyk 68-68-71 -207 -6
Robert Garrigus 67-67-73 207 -6
Hideki Matsuyama 70-69-69-208 -5
K.J. Choi 69-72-67-208 -5
Harris English 70-69-69-208 -5
James Hahn 71-72-65-208 -5
Blake Adams 67-70-71 -208 -5
Ken Duke 71-69-69-209 -4
David Lingmerth 70-69-70-209 -4
Ernie Els 71-70-68-209 -4
Daniel Summerhays 71-72-66-209 -4
Matt Jones 67-73-70-210 -3
JhonattanVegas 70-69-71 -210 -3
Kevin Chappell 71-70-69-210 -3
Brendon Todd 71-70-69-210 -3
J.J. Henry 70-69-71 -210 -3
Keegan Bradley 68-70-72-210 -3
Justin Rose 70-72-68-210 -3
Victor Dubuisson 70-72-68-210 -3
StuartAppleby 72-71-67-210 -3
David Lynn 70-71-70-211 -2
Francesco Molinari 67-73-71 -211 -2
RobertAllenby 71-69-71 -211 -2
AngelCabrera 69-71-71 -211 -2
Scott Stallings 67-72-72-211 -2
Ben Crane 72-70-69- 211 -2
Geoff Ogilvy 74-68-69-211 -2
Scott Brown 70-67-74 211 -2
Fernandez-Castano 71-70-71 -212 -1
ErikCompton 74-67-71 -212 -1
Kevin Stadler 69-69-74-212 -1
Vijay Singh 75-67-70-212 -1
Justin Leonard 70-72-70-212 -1
Harold Varner III 69-72-72-213 E
J.B. Holmes 67-71-75 -213 E
lan Poulter 72-70-71 -213 E
Martin Laird 70-73-70 -213 E
Martin Flores 72-69-73-214 +1
Kevin Streelman 72-69-73-214 +1
Jason Gore 71-69-74-214 +1
Pat Perez 69-72-73-214 +1
Richard H. Lee 69-72-73-214 +1
Webb Simpson 70-72-72-214 +1
John Huh 71-71-72-214 +1
Will MacKenzie 73-69-72-214 +1
Marc Leishman 69-74-71 -214 +1
Hunter Mahan 70-73-71 -214 +1
Billy Hurley III 70-71-74-215 +2
RetiefGoosen 73-69-73-215 +2
Davis Love III 71-71-73-215 +2
Graham DeLaet 70-73-72-215 +2
Scott Piercy 71-69-76-216 +3
Tim Wilkinson 71-72-73-216 +3
Ben Curtis 70-73-74-217 +4
Jason Dufner 70-72-76-218 +5
Michael Putnam 71-72-75-218 +5



MLB's remaining
free agents
NEWYORK The 43 remaining free agents:
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BOSTON (2) Stephen Drew, ss; Joel Hanra-
han, rhp.
CLEVELAND (2) Ubaldo Jimenez, rhp; Kelly
Shoppach, c.
DETROIT (2) Jeremy Bonderman, rhp; Octavio


Dotel, rhp.
KANSAS CITY (2) Ervin Santana, rhp; Miguel
Tejada, 2b.
NEWYORK (3) -Travis Hafner, dh; Andy Pettitte,
Ihp; Mariano Rivera, rhp.
SEATTLE (3) Kendrys Morales, dh; Oliver
Perez, Ihp; Joe Saunders, Ihp.
TEXAS (2) Lance Berkman, dh; Nelson Cruz, of.
TORONTO (2) Darren Oliver, Ihp; Ramon Ortiz,
rhp.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
CHICAGO (1)-Kevin Gregg, rhp.
COLORADO (3) Rafael Betancourt, rhp; Todd
Helton, 1b; Roy Oswalt, rhp.
LOS ANGELES (3) Chris Capuano, Ihp; Jerry
Hairston Jr, 3b; Michael Young, 3b.
MIAMI (4) Matt Diaz, of; Austin Kearns, of; Juan
Pierre, of; Placido Polanco, 3b.
MILWAUKEE (1) Mike Gonzalez, Ihp.
NEWYORK (4) -Tim Byrdak, Ihp; Pedro Feli-
ciano, Ihp; Frank Francisco, rhp; Johan Santana, Ihp.
PHILADELPHIA (1) Roy Halladay, rhp.
PITTSBURGH (2) A.J. Burnett, rhp; Jeff
Karstens, rhp.
ST LOUIS (2) -Chris Carpenter, rhp; Jake West-


SCOREBOARD


For Lthe record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


TM


CASH 3 (early)
2-1-4
CASH 3 (late)
5-9-4

PLAY 4 (early)
3-1-1-1
PLAY 4 (late)
6-9-1-4

POWERBALL
2-9-14-21-23
POWER BALL


Fantasy 5 and Lotto not
available at press time.

Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:
Mega Money: 2 -20 -28 -37 Fantasy 5:10 20 29 33 34
Mega Ball: 3 5-of-5 2 winners $121,942.84
4-of-4 MB No winners 4-of-5 324 $121.00
4-of-4 5 winners $1,366.00 3-of-5 9,585 $11.00
3-of-4 MB 43 $348.00
3-of-4 855 $52.00
2-of-4 MB 1,161 $25.00 Players should verify
1-of-4 MB 9,861 $3.00 winning numbers by
2-of-4 23,813 $2.00 calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
SUNDAY
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Sportsman Series (Taped)
1 p.m. (FOX) Daytona 500 qualifying
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (MLB) College Urban Invitational New Orleans vs. Southern
5 p.m. (MLB) College Urban Invitational Grambling State at LSU
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Kentucky (Taped)
1 p.m. (CBS) Wisconsin at Michigan
3 p.m. (FS1) Oregon State at Oregon
5 p.m. (FS1) Villanova at Creighton
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Rutgers at Louisville
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Notre Dame at Boston College
7 p.m. (FS1) Georgetown at St. John's
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Colorado at USC
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Rutgers at Louisville (Taped)
12 a.m. (SUN) Miami at Virginia Tech (Taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Kentucky at Tennessee
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Regional Coverage: Oklahoma at Oklahoma State
and Wisconsin at Penn State
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Georgia
1 p.m. (FS1) Baylor at Texas
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Syracuse at Boston College
1 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Alabama
2 p.m. (MNT) Vanderbilt at Mississippi State
3 p.m. (SUN) Missouri atAuburn
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Regional Coverage: North Carolina at North
Carolina State and South Carolina at LSU
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Louisville at Memphis
2 a.m. (ESPNU) Kentucky at Tennessee (Same-day Tape)
NBA
8 p.m. (TNT) 2014 NBAAII-Star Game
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA League Quarterfinals: New York City Wtt
Kingpins vs. Detroit Motown Muscle (Taped)
GOLF
5:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Africa Open, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Northern Trust Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour Golf Northern Trust Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: ACE Group Classic, Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: ISPS Handa Australian Open, Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
8 p.m. (NHL)AHL: Utica Comets at Toronto Marlies (Taped)
LACROSSE
11 a.m. (ESPNU) Towson at Johns Hopkins (Taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Moe's Southwest Grill Classic Jacksonville vs.
Notre Dame
9:15 p.m. (NBCSPT) Moe's Southwest Grill Classic-- Massachusetts
vs. Ohio State
MOTORCYCLE RACING
11 a.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series: Worcester (Taped)
12 a.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross: Dallas (Taped)
OLYMPICS
5 a.m. (MSNBC) Curling, women's: USA vs. Canada
5 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cross-country skiing
7:15 a.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey, men's: Slovenia vs. USA
7:30 a.m. (USA) Hockey, men's: Russia vs. Slovakia
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Figure skating: ice dancing short dance
12 p.m. (USA) Hockey, men's: Finland vs. Canada
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Biathlon: men's 15km mass start (Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (NBC) Cross-country skiing: men's 4x1 Okm relay gold medal
final; snowboarding (Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (CNBC) Curling, men's: USA vs. Sweden (Same-day Tape)
7 p.m. (NBC) Figure skating: ice dancing; alpine skiing; snowboarding;
speed skating (Same-day Tape)
11:35 p.m. (NBC) Biathlon: men's 15km mass start; figure skating
(Same-day Tape)
3 a.m. (NBCSPT) Curling, women's: USA vs. Korea (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (FS1) FACup: Everton vs. Swansea City
TENNIS
2:30 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Qatar Total Open final (Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP U.S. National Indoor Championship final
6 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP ABN AMRO World Tournament final
(Same-day Tape)
10:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP 250 World Tour: Copa Claro final
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


brook, rhp.
SAN DIEGO (2) Mark Kotsay, of; Jason Mar-
quis, rhp.
SAN FRANCISCO (2)-AndresTorres, of; Barry
Zito, Ihp.


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Claimed INF/OF
Jimmy Paredes off waivers from Miami.
BOSTON RED SOX- Agreed to terms with LHP
Andrew Miller on a one-year contract.
CLEVELAND INDIANS Agreed to terms with


RHP Aaron Harang on a minor league contract.
SEATTLE MARINERS-Agreed to terms with 1B
Justin Smoak on a one-year contract.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS Agreed to terms with UT
Emilio Bonifacio on a minor league contract.
MIAMI MARLINS-Assigned RHP Chris Hatcher
outright to New Orleans (PCL).
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
AHL Suspended Syracuse D J.P Cote five
games for an illegal check to the head of an opponent.
ECHL
ECHL Suspended Idaho F Brett Robinson
two games and fined him an undisclosed amount.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 B3


Associated Press
Kentucky's Dakari Johnson shoots as Florida's Chris Walker defends
during the first half Saturday in Lexington, Ky. The No. 3 Gators
overcame a small halftime deficit to take a 69-59 win over the
No. 14 Wildcats.



No. 3 UF snags



big SEC victory


Associated Press

LEXINGTON, Ky. Scottie
Wilbekin scored 23 points in-
cluding five critical free throws
down the stretch as No. 3
Florida rallied for a tense 69-59
victory over No. 14 Kentucky on
Saturday night in a marquee
showdown of the Southeastern
Conference's top two teams.
The Gators tied a school
record with their 17th straight
win, and their first at Rupp
Arena since 2007.
Trailing 45-38 with 11:12 re-
maining, the veteran Gators (23-
2, 2-0) didn't flinch and
outscored the young Wildcats
(19-6, 9-3) 31-14 after that by put-
ting the ball in the hands of their
best players such as Wilbekin,
who got to the line and finished
11 of 12 including two technical
free throws with 8:14 left.
Casey Prather scored 24
points on 8-of-9 shooting, while
Patric Young added 10 with the
help of two 3-point plays during
a 13-3 spurt that put Florida
ahead for good.
Andrew Harrison scored 20
points for Kentucky
Florida St. rallies past
Wake Forest 67-60
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -
Ian Miller came off the bench to
score a career-high 25 points,
and Florida State overcame a
16-point first half deficit to de-
feat Wake Forest 67-60 on Sat-
urday night.
Aaron Thomas added 19


points and 14 rebounds for the
Seminoles (15-10, 6-7 ACC), who
registered their first road win
since posting a 63-53 victory at
Miami on Jan. 15.
Despite Thomas' efforts, it was
Miller who made timely plays to
lead FSU. His 3-pointer with 2:12
remaining gave Florida State a
61-55 advantage and sent the
fans toward the exits.
The Seminoles needed every
bit of Miller's heroics. Florida
State had lost five of its previ-
ous six games before today's
game and badly needed a vic-
tory to keep its fledgling NCAA
Tournament hopes alive.
In the opening stages, it ap-
peared FSU's recent struggles
were only going to continue.
Wake Forest (14-11, 4-8 ACC)
took control with a 12-0 run, as
guard Coron Williams scored
seven quick points to push the
Deacons to a 21-6 lead. The ad-
vantage grew to as many as 16
points at 24-8 on a Tyler Ca-
vanaugh 3-pointer
Florida State responded, get-
ting back to within six points at
29-23 by halftime, thanks to a 12-
2 run sandwiched around a mo-
mentum-altering technical foul
called on the Deacons' Devin
Thomas. The Seminoles took
their first lead at 39-37 on a
Devon Bookert jumper and
held on down the stretch.
Williams led Wake Forest
with 18 points and three assists.
Cavanaugh and forward Travis
McKie added 14 points each for
the Demon Deacons.


I S P R T S B RI F S


Panthers have
trouble holding lead
Despite holding an early 3-0 ad-
vantage, the Lecanto baseball team
dropped a 9-5 decision against
Springstead on Friday night.
Offensively, Kylar Speagle
(double), Zack Bonick (2 for 4,
double, run) and Jacob Schenck
(RBI, run) paced the Panthers.
Lecanto (0-2) plays at South
Sumter on Tuesday.
Braves give RHP
Teheran 6-year,
$32.4 million deal
KISSIMMEE Right-hander
Julio Teheran and the Atlanta
Braves agreed to terms on a six-
year, $32.4 million contract on Fri-
day with a club option for the




'CANES
Continued from Page BI

the second half.
Citrus' Shally Morales got
things going quickly in the first
quarter, knocking down three
three-pointers to carry the
'Canes to a 12-6 lead entering
the second period. But Citrus
had just one other triple the
rest of the game, and that al-
lowed Land O'Lakes to sit back
in its 2-3 zone defense and
thwart any Hurricane inside
scoring attempts.
That showed in the second
half. Citrus had its opportuni-
ties, but converted just 4-of-21
third-quarter shots and 1-of-14 in
the fourth. Free-throw shooting
didn't help the Hurricanes ei-
ther: They hit just 9 of 18


2020 season.
The deal with the 23-year-old
Teheran was another move by the
team to lock up a key young
player on a long-term deal. First
baseman Freddie Freeman, 24,
agreed to $135 million, eight-year
deal on Feb. 5, the same day the
team announced a two-year,
$13.3 million deal with right fielder
Jason Heyward, 24.
Braves announced the agree-
ment with Teheran on the day
pitchers and catchers had their
first workout in spring training.
Braves general manager Frank
Wren said Teheran is "one of the
best young pitchers in the Na-
tional League and one of our core
of players we expect to be to-
gether for a number of years."
From staff, wire reports



(50 percent) at the line, while the
Rams made 14 of 21 (67 percent).
Morales, who scored 10
points in the first half, finished
with 14; she also had five steals.
Next best for Citrus was Jenkins
with seven points, to go with six
rebounds and five steals, and
Toxen with four points, eight re-
bounds and four assists.
Land 0' Lakes got 15 points
from Jhade Hayes and nine
apiece from McDonald and
Canada.
"I told our girls don't hang
your head down, you gave us a
chance," Hamilton said. "We
had a lot of firsts this season, we
won our first district title in a
while and we won at Gainesville
Eastside."
But in the end, only one team
in 5A will end the season with a
victory And this year, it won't be
Citrus.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All-Star efforts


Belinelli takes

All-Star

3-point contest

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -San
Antonio's Marco Belinelli
won the 3-point contest at
NBA All-Star Saturday
night.
The Italian, who previ-
ously played for New Or-
leans, needed to win a
tiebreaker round in the
final to beat Bradley Beal.
The Washington All-
Star had made his final
six shots, including two
"money balls" worth two
points each, to tie Be-
linelli's initial final-round
score of 19.
Belinelli then racked
up an event-high score of
24 for the win.
There were four shoot-
ers from each conference.
Belinelli had a score of
19 to win the West beating
Damian Lillard's 18. Beal
had a score of 21 to win
the East, easily eclipsing
defending champ Kyrie
Irving's total of 16.
Earlier, the tandem of
Portland's Damian Lillard
and Utah's Trey Burke
won the skills challenge,
while Team Bosh, consist-
ing of Miami's Chris Bosh,
former NBA star Do-
minique Wilkins and
WNBA player Swin Cash,
won the shooting stars
event.
Lillard won the skills
challenge for the second
straight year
Lillard and Burke, rep-
resenting the Western
Conference, beat the tan-
dem of Michael Carter-
Williams and Victor
Oladipo of the East in the
final round by a tenth of a
second.


Associated Press
Marco Belinelli of the San Antonio Spurs shoots during the three-point contest
of the skills competition at the NBA All-Star weekend Saturday in New Orleans.


The skills course con-
sists of dribbling around
obstacles, passing to tar-
gets, and hitting shots
from medium and close
range. The winning time
was 45.2 seconds.
In the first round, Lil-
lard and Burke beat
Phoenix's Goran Dragic
and Oklahoma City's Reg-
gie Jackson.
Carter-Williams and
Oladipo downed Milwau-
kee's Giannis Antetokoun-
mpo and Toronto's DeMar
DeRozan to represent the


East in the final round.
Bosh hit a half-court
shot to give his team the
victory in the Shooting
Stars contest that opened
up NBAAll-Star Saturday
night
Team Bosh had a final-
round time of 31.4 seconds.
Each team had to hit
shots from 10 feet from a
right-side angle, the top of
the key 3-point range and
half court, with the victory
going to the team with the
best time.
Team Durant, consist-


ing of Kevin Durant Karl
Malone and Skylar Dig-
gins, opened the final
round with a time of 43.6.
There were two teams
from each conference.
Team Durant beat Team
Curry made up of
Stephen Curry, Dell Curry
and Becky Hammon in
the first round to repre-
sent the West. Team Bosh
edged Team Hardaway -
consisting of Tim Hard-
away Jr, Tim Hardaway
Sr and Elena Delle
Donne in the first round.


Associated Press
Denny Hamlin crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Sprint Unlimited auto race Saturday at Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona Beach.









Race of attrition


Hamlin wins Sprint Unlimited exhibition race in Daytona


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH Denny
Hamlin won a race of attrition Sat-
urday night, beating just seven
other cars to the finish of the exhi-
bition Sprint Unlimited.
Only eight cars were running at
the end of the 75-lap showcase at
Daytona International Speedway
on a bizarre night that saw Ricky
Stenhouse Jr end girlfriend Danica
Patrick's race and the Chevrolet
pace car catch fire.
It set up a final 20-lap sprint to the
finish with the second fewest num-
ber of drivers taking the checkered
flag in event history Only seven
drivers finished the 1981 race.
Hamlin charged to the front right
before he took the white flag by div-
ing to the inside and sailing past the
few cars on the track. He then drove
away in his Joe Gibbs Racing Toy-
ota for his second career win in the
Speedweeks opener He also won
the event as a rookie in 2006.
"That was survival of the fittest for
sure," Hamlin said. "With three to
go, we were at the tail end of a very
small pack. It's really hard to get
runs, but this car was phenomenal.
You saw it those last couple of laps."
A 75-lap race split over three seg-
ments, this version had a heavy fan


involvement as sponsor Sprint al-
lowed fans to vote for various as-
pects of the race. Among them was
the starting order, how the seg-
ments were split and how the cars
lined up in the final segment.
But it was mostly for naught as
half the 18-car field was knocked out
six laps into the second segment
when Matt Kenseth cut across the
front of Joey Logano. It triggered a
nine-car accident on the frontstretch
- including Stenhouse's dramatic
late hit into the side of Patrick's car.
"I got hit by my boyfriend. What a
bummer," Patrick said.
Stenhouse took blame for ending
Patrick's race. He had difficulty
seeing in front of him because his
hood was badly crumpled when he
hit the back of Kurt Busch.
"I just drilled her," Stenhouse
said. "I didn't see anything from the
time it started to the time it ended.
Talking to Danica, I drilled her
when she was pretty much sitting
still. I couldn't see, couldn't turn."
The accident left debris and man-
gled sheet metal all over the
frontstretch and brought the race to
a stop for just over 11 minutes. It
ended the night for Tony Stewart,
who was racing for the first time
since he broke his right leg in an
August sprint car crash, and team-


mates Patrick and Kurt Busch.
Kevin Harvick, driving the fourth
Stewart-Haas Racing entry in the
field, seemed to have a Chevrolet
capable of contending for the win
but suffered serious damage that
dropped him well off the pace.
Stewart said he felt physically
fine after the hard hit, which left
his car turned nose-first into the
wall. Jeff Gordon's car was stuck be-
hind Stewart's with its rear wheels
raised by the front of Busch's car
"I was a little nervous ... but it
doesn't feel bad at all," Stewart
said. "I don't have any pain. We'll
see when the adrenaline wears off.
But so far, everything feels really
good. I'm pretty happy with it."
Kenseth, whose changing of lanes
triggered the accident, said he had
no idea Logano was on his inside
when he moved.
"Honestly, I had no idea anybody
was inside of me," Kenseth said. "I
feel bad all of those cars got
wrecked."
The 75-lap race was split into three
segments in a format voted on by fans.
The opening segment was 30
mostly single-file laps and fairly un-
eventful until Jimmie Johnson spun
through the grass and hard into the
inside wall on the final lap of the
segment.


Olympic agony


of defeat


watching some of
the Winter
Olympic perform-
ances the skeleton in
particular brought back
memories and
feelings that I
would rather
forget. It also
rekindled mem- i
ories and feel-
ings that every
athlete goes
through as a
competitor
My friends
have been ask- Dr. Ror
ing me what I DOC1
thought about ORD
the Olympic fig- R
ure skating,
which is going on right
now. Most people think
that I would be really into
the details and the ath-
letes. Funny thing, it's the
last thing I want to watch.
Now back to the skele-
ton. Americans John Daly
and Mat Antoine were sit-
ting 3rd and 4th, respec-
tively, going into the final
run of the 17-turn, roller-
coaster ice track in Sochi,
flying belly down and face
forward at over 80 mph.
The first American to go
was John Daly, who had
proclaimed that this run
would give him a medal
and he was going to give his
most aggressive perform-
ance. It was like watching
the TV cooking show
Chopped. You know the
ones who proclaim their
victory are the ones who
biff it or lose it big-time.
Daly proceeded to ag-
gressively jump on his sled,
miss the groove and slide
sideways at the start He
went over the finish line
with his head in his hands.
No one knew how he felt
until the reporter's inter-
view. Daly said after his
mistake at the start that it
took every bit of his run to
get to the finish line safely
because he knew he had
lost his medal. Then over-
whelmed by the emotion of
an athlete who has strug-
gled and trained for years,
he started to cry on camera.
Overwhelming are the
sacrifices these athletes
make for four years with
wives, children and jobs for
this one Olympic opportu-
nity. Then typical for the
media with really little ap-
preciation for anything
other than their own impor-
tance, the reporter pro-
ceeded to ask how he felt
that the otherAmerican An-
toine just won the bronze


r
I
31


medal. Really we could see
with our own eyes the grief
and disappointment.
These are individual
and not team sports. An-
toine for his
own joy was
told several
years ago he
had insufficient
talent to be suc-
cessful in this
sport. He stuck
to the hard
work and is now
an Olympian
Joseph with a bronze
rOR'S medal.
ERS Bode Miller
is an aggressive
competitor I
have known and watched
since he competed against
my oldest son. His training
runs were in essence per-
fect and he skied these
with confidence and
aplomb. But the actual
downhill run was lost with
the difference between the
gold and 8th place being
about a half-second. It is
difficult for most of us to
understand how little time
this is. Miller lost by this
margin in a race that is
over 3,000 feet of vertical
drop and over a 2-mile
course with steepness,
rolls, bumps and jumps.
His race was lost at age 36,
you could see the disap-
pointment in his face and
that of his wife.
As Nicoel-Pikus Pace is
portrayed in the TV adver-
tisement, she works all
day, takes care of her kids,
takes them to their activi-
ties after school and then
dad watches them in the
evening while Mrs. Pace
practices her skelelton
runs at night on the course
in Park City. Her perform-
ance was executed well,
she won silver and the joy
and satisfaction of success
was evident
That is when it hit me
that we all have these mo-
ments to get through. As
athletes and weekend war-
riors, we all have great
downs and some wonderful
highs. The key is to take the
defeat or the victory in
stride and go forward and
remember that it just part of
life "The thrill of victory
and the agony of defeat."
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand, shoulder and upper
extremity orthopedic sur-
geon atSeaSpine Orthope-
dic Institute and Olympic
bronze medalist, at
rbjhand@cox.net.


---Adult sports NEWS


Beverly Hills Gang Senior Mix League
Week 22
Bowling Scores: Jim Wright 202-257-227-
686, Jerry Thompson 202-179-206-587,
Gary Brown 180-225-172-577, Larry Gray
182-198-190-570, Jim McDonough 188-169-
206-563, Bob Mannella 516, Al Berarsi 512,
Marion Steenstra 503, Vito Porta 500.
Splits Made: Dot Troyanos 3-10(2X), Han-
nalore Herbener 4-5, Bill Johnston 3-10,
Trudy Wittig 3-10, Tony LaCattiva 3-10 and 4-
5-7, Anna Meirer 2-7, Dick Dickerson 9-10,
Lou Dickerson 5-7, Betty Berardi 3-10,
Glenda Johnston 5-7, Ken Tompkins 4-5,
Renee Hanley 5-6, Kitty Gray 3-10 and 4-5-
7-8, Julie Nagengnast 4-5 and 3-10, Marion
Steenstra 3-10, Ethel Siegwald 5-7-8, Fran
Shidner 3-10.
Beverly Hills Senior Open League
Week 22
Bowling Scores: Rich Lieval 236-214-185-
635, Bob Griggs 194-253-181-628, Jerry
Thompson 213-211-194-618, Joe Brooks
210-201-178-589, Herb Sherrill 205-191-192-
588, Tom Chess 191-179-213-583, Chuck
Ahn 217-173-174-564, Richard Jacobs 182-
168-213-563, Vito Porta 207-192-161-560,
Craig Furrer 170-164-220-554, John Schott
201-543, Charlie Ahn 537, Lee Ball 533, Mar-
vin Chapman 531, John Hoagland 526, Bob
Ecker 202-525, Steve O'Connor 521, Lyle
Ternes 212-520, Mike Laurain 513, Doug
Meiklejohn 510.
Splits Made: Dave Coburn 6-7-10, Tom
Chees 3-10, Lee Ball 5-7, Phil Arena 3-10,
Bob Ecker 5-6-7, Frank DiCosola 3-10, Doug
Meiklejohn 5-10, Ernie Polk 2-7, Ken Tomp-
kins 3-10 and 2-7, Charli Ahn 3-10 and 5-6-
10, Mike Murray 3-10, John Casdia 2-5-7,
MaryLou Halovich 3-10, Marvin Chapman 2-
5-7, Bernadette Brooks 3-10.
Parkview Lanes Weekly News
CONGRATULATIONS: Phil Spencer rolled a
perfect game in the Spruce Creek Pinbusters
league Tuesday, February 4. The 300 was
the thirteenth for Phil, but his first in Florida.
His 300 was in the middle game, with his
other games 238 and 199 for a 737 series.
SCRATCH CHALLENGE LEAGUE: The final
12 weeks of the Scratch Challenge league
begins Tuesday, February 18, with the draft-
ing of the teams. Additional teams may be
added at that time. A different pro-type shot
is put out every two weeks, and there is no
cap-true scratch league.
VALENTINE'S DOUBLES TOURNEY: The
annual Valentine's Doubles Tourney will be
held Sunday, February 23. The festivities
begin with a luncheon at 1lpm, followed by the
three games of 7-9-8 NoTap, all to the music
of Grant's Tunes. Reservations are required
by Wednesday, February 19.
League scores for the week ending Feb. 9
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: Handicap: Todd
Cridland 302,777; Raul Rosales 289; Larry
Fritz 741; Stephanie Flory 254,739; Pam Lev-
ert 252,727. Scratch: Mark Smith 278,719;
Todd Cridland 705; Larry Fritz 246; Stephanie
Flory 218,631; Lori Ciquera 203; Pam Levert


550.
PRESERVE PINBUSTERS: Handicap: Phil
Spencer 306; John Turner 286,795; Ken
Sprague 765; PattiWiderman 289,727; Linda
Sprague 258,713. Scratch: Phil Spencer
300,737; Jeff Koch 259,694; Patti Widerman
181; Linda Sprague 178,473; Elaine Shea
448.
SUNCOAST SENIORS 12-WEEK: Handi-
cap: Leon Tenniswood 258; Carl Peterson
257; Lenny Dexter 714; Jack Connell 708;
Sherry Hiller 270,722; Patricia Honaker
264,721. Scratch: Ken Meldrum 234,620;
Carl Peterson 216; Jerry Ness 570; Sherry
Hiller 192,488; Patricia Honaker 159; Carol
Roberts 430.
SCRATCH CHALLENGE: Bobby Craft
233,611; Spencer Mullis 221;Tim Lawrence
645; Lori Ciquera 186,523; Sandy LePree
179; Dorine Fugere 510.
LATE STARTERS: Handicap: Rich Soletto
257; Frank Andrukanis 256,679; Mark Ash
719; Virginia Vineyard 254,691; Vicki Soletto
2478,689. Scratch: Rich Soletto 255; Mark
Ash 248,710; Rich Murdock 612; Peggy Mur-
dock 202,552; Millie George 190,530; Virginia
Vineyard 190.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Handicap: Joe Baier-
lein 305,837; Steve Strohschnitter 297; John
Saltmarsh 805. Scratch: John Saltmarsh
279,769; Joe Baierlein 279,759; Brent Ci-
quera 270; Charlie Stein 762; Sean Fugere
728; Steve Strohschnitter 710.
WOMEN'STRIO: Handicap: Terri Moorbeck
248; Betty Weber 242,672; Marilyn Seymour
642. Scratch: Terri Moorbeck 192; Peggy
M urdock 185,513; Maggie Savarese
185,493.
GOOD TIME BOWLERS: Handicap: Bill
Montross 249,666; Luke Bledsoe 246,672;
Mary Krueger 237,695; Nancy Deering 231;
Dorothy Larson 619. Scratch: Bill Montross
204,531; Alan Murray 193,529; Janet Murray
192,521; Barb McNally 186,506.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS: Handicap: Rich
Williams 293,815;' Gary Brown 278,755;
June Williams 271; Pat Combs 267,737; Betty
Rauch683. Scratch: Rich Williams 260,716;
Gary Brown 245,656; Ellen Bowman 180;
June Williams 178; Kathy Calcagni 477; Pat
Combs 449.
SANDY OAKS: Handicap: Bob Iverson
277,679; Homer Raush 242,659; Kathy Crip-
pen 246,677; Karen Benefiel 239,662.
Scratch: Bob Iverson 268,652; Jack Foster
202,539; Lavon Strutz 176,459; Karen Bene-
fiel 169; Marilyn Ormiston 476.
PARKVIEW OWLS: Handicap: Michael An-
driuolo 266,700; Arta Norris 252,742; Betty
Wood 269; June Williams 267,707;Toni Mills-
Smith 716. Scratch: Wes Foley 247,674;
Michael Andriuolo 247; Arta Norris 221,649;
Myla Wexler 205,549; Betty Wood 200;
Michele Shirley 524.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK: Mary Krueger,
119 pins over her average, and Joe Baierlein,
156 pins over his average.


B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Almost ready to start

A _~~a


Associated Press
Driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. stands by his car in the garage before practice Friday for the NASCAR Sprint Unlimited
auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach.


Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH Five things
to know about what's going on at
Daytona International Speedway in
advance of the season-opening
Daytona 500 on Feb. 23:
Hendrick engines
Tony Stewart, Danica Patrick and
Bobby Labonte blew engines dur-
ing pole practice for the Daytona
500 on Saturday, creating concern
about Hendrick Motorsports power
plants. Stewart and Patrick are
teammates at Stewart-Haas Rac-
ing, and Labonte is driving for
HScott Motorsports. Both teams
lease engines from Hendrick,
which also fields cars for six-time
and defending Sprint Cup cham-
pion Jimmie Johnson, four-time
champ Jeff Gordon, Dale Earn-
hardt Jr and Kasey Kahne. Hen-
drick general manager Doug
Duchardt said "we feel like we un-
derstand what is happening" and
expects to get the issue fixed before
today's qualifying runs. Though
Hendrick drivers had no engine
problems, those teams seemed to
be down on horsepower The fastest
Hendrick driver during the two
practice sessions was Johnson, who
was ninth in the second session.
"It's something that we are doing
in our family here and we need to
figure it out," Patrick said. "I was
saying I bet other Hendrick cars are


thinking, 'What's going on?' We have
got time to hopefully figure it out"
RCR strong
Richard Childress Racing looks
strong, really strong at Daytona. RCR
took the top two spots in each Day-
tona 500 pole practice session Satur-
day and had the only cars to reach
195 mph around the famed speedway
Paul Menard and Ryan Newman
were first and second, respectively in
the opening, two-hour practice. New-
man and rookie Austin Dillon topped
the speed chart in the second session.
Teammate Brian Scott also was fast
finishing fifth in the first practice and
eighth in the second one. Menard's
No. 27 Chevrolet was so stout in the
first practice that he was one of two
cars to stay in the garage during the
second session. The other one was
Furniture Row driver Martin Truex
Jr, who is using an Earnhardt-
Childress Racing engine.
Bet paid
Kyle Busch walked around the
garage area wearing a Seattle Sea-
hawks hat Saturday It clashed with
his yellow and brown fire suit, but
he had little choice since he was
paying off a Super Bowl bet with
fellow driver Kasey Kahne. Busch,
who grew up in Las Vegas rooting
for the Denver Broncos, attended
the game at MetLife Stadium. But
once the lopsided game got out of
hand, he got online and ordered a


Russell Wilson jersey and a Sea-
hawks hat. He wore them on the
plane to Daytona and completed
the bet by wearing the hat at the
track Saturday
Qualifying order
Forty-nine drivers will vie for the
Daytona 500 pole Sunday beginning
with NASCAR's most popular
driver Dale EarnhardtJr randomly
drew the first qualifying spot Dan-
ica Patrick goes off fourth. Three-
time NASCAR champion Tony
Stewart, who returned to racing this
week for the first time since break-
ing his right leg in August, will qual-
ify 32nd. Six-time and defending
series champion Jimmie Johnson
goes off 48th, one spot ahead of final
qualifier Clint Bowyer
Green team
Mark Ruffalo has a knack for
going green. Ruffalo, star of "The
Avengers," left the superhero
makeup behind for Saturday's stop
at Daytona International Speedway
Ruffalo teamed with ARCA driver
Leilani Munter to promote a part-
nership with The Solutions Project,
which is driven to accelerate renew-
able energy adoption in all 50 states.
Ruffalo was all smiles as he
posed for pictures and signed auto-
graphs for fans even ones sur-
prised to see a former Academy
Award nominee among a garage full
of drivers.


Price was right



for Rays ace

Pitcher said Tampa Bay area

makes him feel comfortable


Associated Press
PORT CHARLOTTE-
David Price didn't think he
would be in Port Charlotte
this spring.
For much of the offsea-
son, the Tampa Bay Rays'
ace expected to be traded.
Instead, the 2012 AL Cy
Young Award winner
signed a one-year contract
to remain with the only
team he's ever played for,
a huge deal for the small-
market
club.
I t I
feels
great. comfortat
Every- home for
body
knows
h o w Tampa Bay RaE
much I staying with the team
love this
organi-
zation and how much they
love me. The way the cities
of St. Petersburg and
Tampa have treated me
over the course of six or
seven years has been noth-
ing short of incredible,"
Price said Saturday "I love
it here. I'm very comfort-
able. This is home for me."
There's still a chance
that Price could get traded
before the end of the sea-
son, but he thinks each day
in Port Charlotte makes it
less likely
"Right now, I don't think
there's a very good chance
of being traded because
I'm here in spring train-
ing," he said. "I felt like if I
could make it to spring
training, that would solid-
ify my place on this team."
Price isn't the only mem-
ber of the Rays happy to
see him return. His team-


mates say his contribu-
tions to the warm club-
house atmosphere are as
important as the pitches
he throws.
"David has a great arm,"
new Rays catcher Ryan
Hanigan said. "I've
watched him pitch a lot.
His performances speak
for themselves. He's a
great clubhouse guy, too. I
got a text from him when I
signed just saying, I'll have
(the pitchers) ready for
you.'
That's
'm very a w e -
ile. This is He's a
me. leader"
m Man-
ager Joe
David Price Maddon
iys ace pitcher said ofMad
Son a 1 -year contract. s u g -
gested
the un-
certainty of where the
looming offseason would
take him weighed heavily
on Price last season. He
went 10-8 with a 3.33 ERA.
Maddon expects Price will
enjoy this season much
more and could return to
his form from 2012, when
he went 20-5 with a 2.56
ERA.
"I can definitely see him
not as edgy," Maddon said.
"He's more comfortable
here. He believes he's going
to be here. Last year was a
difficult year, coming off all
the awards and coming back
with all the uncertainty"
If Price does return to
that 2012 form, it could
lead to something very big
for the Rays.
"We have a very solid
team right now from our
outfield to our infield, which
is always packed with Gold
Gloves," Price said.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays pitcher David Price was fine with the
one-year, $12 million contract tendered by the team
because he said he loves St. Petersburg.


INC.-
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
Sai h-0l8i Vistl MON-FR 8305
t W 341~0O IE S SAT 94
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
&INSURED www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMEN

| l 0*iiq^^^^p^^II


WIsNDN 0IN

Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!


35.03.8
N^Bew utrnHeroeniaoi^^

352.503.8465


CJ7
WINDOWt
GENIE.,
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED
www.windowgenie.com


*Servi MA Our Services: Carpet Protector
SeVZ TMS E lR Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24.7'365 Rt.PStO Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE a Spot Removal

3 ROOMS & $17 95 UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
1 HALLWAY FREE RECL CLEANED
SI IF E (with purchase of a
. Expires 3/2/14 pres3//14 couch & loveseat)

352-794-0270 .
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com rn


-II we 15+ YeaI rs

I-i*.Loo d Insre
Si
^^^*^^ i^^


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 B5


e
w



3
q












2014 Winter Olympics

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Shootout with Russia goes to USA


Oshie'sfo ur

shootout goals lead

Americans to win

Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia TJ. Oshie
brainstormed while he skated to
center ice, desperately trying to
come up with one last move to
end an epic shootout. He had al-
ready taken five shots at Sergei
Bobrovsky, and the Russians
were still even.
Yet Oshie was chosen for the
U.S. men's hockey team with just
such a situation in mind, and the
shootout specialist concocted
one last clever goal to silence an
arena filled with screaming
Russian fans.
Oshie scored four times in the
shootout and put the winner be-
tween Bobrovsky's legs in the
eighth round, leading the United
States past Russia 3-2 Saturday
in the thrilling revival of a clas-
sic Olympic hockey rivalry
"I was just thinking of some-
thing else I could do, trying to
keep him guessing," said Oshie,
the St. Louis Blues forward.
"Had to go back to the same
move a couple times, but I was
glad it ended when it did. I was
running out of moves there."
International rules allow the
same player to take multiple
shots after the first three rounds
of a shootout, and U.S. coach Dan
Bylsma leaned on Oshie's array
of slick shots and change-of-pace
approaches to the net Oshie
scored on the Americans' first
shot before taking the last five in


Associated Press
USA forward T.J. Oshie scores a goal in a shootout against Russia during a men's ice hockey game at
the 2014 Winter Olympics on Saturday in Sochi, Russia.


a row, going 4 for 6 against Bo-
brovsky and disappointing a Bol-
shoy Ice Dome crowd including
Russian President Vladimir
Putin.
"I aged a couple of years in that
shootout," Bylsma said. "We had
other guys that are capable, but
TJ. was the guy who was going
well. It seemed like he was going
to score every time he went."
Oshie's final shot was a
beauty: He threaded a forehand
right through Bobrovsky's pads,
the puck punching the back of
the Russian net emphatically
enough to pop the water bottle
on top into the air


'At some point, you think,
'Does he have any more moves
left?"' U.S. captain Zach Parise
said. "But he did a good job. ...
That's hard to do, to get in a
goalie's head and throw him off
a little bit."
Oshie was among the final se-
lections for the U.S. roster, and
though the 27-year-old from War-
road, Minn., has never had a 20-
goal NHL season, he leads
American-born players with
seven shootout goals this season.
The U.S. men are only inter-
ested in the one that all but
wrapped up an automatic berth
in the quarterfinals next week.


I think you're going to see TJ.
Oshie become a household
name after that display he put
on," said David Backes, Oshie's
teammate in St. Louis. "The kids
will be out on the pond probably
in Minnesota right now, throw-
ing a 5-hole on the goalie three
or four times in a row"
Cam Fowler and Joe Pavelski
scored in regulation for the Amer-
icans in the marquee game of the
preliminary round. Jonathan
Quick made 29 saves and stopped
five attempts in the shootout as
the U.S. improved to 2-0.
Captain Pavel Datsyuk scored
two goals in regulation and an-


other in the shootout for the
Russians, who rallied from a
third-period deficit in a fast-
paced game. Russia also had an
apparent goal waved off with
4:40 left because Quick's net
came off its moorings.
"The U.S. team is a good team
and a good test for us," Datsyuk
said. "We played good, but the
result is not good."
The shootout finish was enter-
taining, but the entire game was
international hockey at its most
compelling and the third pe-
riod was a thriller
Pavelski scored the tiebreaking
goal for the Americans on a
power play with 10:33 to play, but
Datsyuk tied it with 7:16 left dur-
ing a Russian power play,
spurring Putin out of his seat to
cheer
After review, the officials
waved off Fedor Tyutin's appar-
ent go-ahead goal because the
net was loose, incensing the
crowd. Russian coach Zinetula
Bilyaletdinov and Alex
Ovechkin both felt Quick had in-
tentionally dislodged his net
earlier in the sequence.
"I don't know what happened
there, but definitely was a goal,"
Ovechkin said. "Nobody touched
the net Their goalie touched the
net and put it out. But the ref-
eree has to see it and at least give
him two minutes, you know?"
Quick claimed he didn't even
realize the net had come un-
moored.
"You need to catch some
breaks to win games," he said.
Both teams had quality
chances in overtime, but Bo-
brovsky denied Patrick Kane on
a breakaway in the most
hair-raising moment.


Old suits no helps for Americans


Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia Maybe it wasn't
the suits after all.
After shedding their new, high-
tech skinsuits for their old-fash-
ioned gear, American speedskaters
still were without a medal at the
Sochi Olympics.
Zbigniew Brodka won Poland's
first gold medal in the men's 1,500
meters, finishing 0.003 seconds
ahead of Koen Verweij of the
Netherlands. It was one of the clos-
est 1,500 finishes in Olympic history
Verweij's silver medal gave the
Dutch 13 of the 21 medals awarded
so far in the sport, including four
golds. Traditionally, the U.S. team
has been among the medal leaders
halfway through the competition.
Hoping to end the shutout, the
U.S. had gotten IOC approval just
hours before the 1,500 started to go
back to its old suits. The new ones
had been touted as the fastest the
world has ever seen.
Norway's women cross-country
skiers were another group whose
past success failed to carry over into
the games. The Norwegian women
had not lost a 4x5-kilometer relay

SOCHI 2014 OLYMPICS






Medal count


COUNTRY G
Russia 4
Netherlands 4
United States 4
Norway 4
Germany 7
Canada 4
Sweden 1
Switzerland 5
Austria 2
China 3
Japan 1
Slovenia 1
Italy 0
Poland 4
Belarus 3
France 2
South Korea 1
Czech Republic 0
Latvia 0
Britain 1
Finland 0
Australia 0
Slovakia 1
Croatia 0
Kazakhstan 0
Ukraine 0


B TOT
5 15
6 14
7 14
6 13
2 12
3 12
2 8
1 7
1 7
0 5
1 5
3 5
3 5
0 4
1 4
2 4
1 3
1 3
2 3
1 2
0 2
1 2
0 1
0 1
1 1
1 1

AP


Associated Press
U.S. speed skater Joey Mantia, right, holds his head after the men's
1500-meter race Saturday at the Adler Arena Skating Center at the 2014


Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.
since 2009 and entered Saturday's
race as huge favorites, with a team
that featured the top four skiers in
the overall World Cup standings. By
the time it was over, Sweden had the
gold, and Norway was denied a spot
on the podium, finishing 53.6 sec-
onds behind the winners.
On Day 9 of the Sochi Olympics,
the U.S. hockey team won a shootout
to defeat Russia 3-2 in the marquee
game of the preliminary round.
Medals also were being awarded
in four other sports: Alpine skiing,
ski jumping, skeleton and short
track speedskating.
Speedskating
Brodka and Verweij were initially shown
on the scoreboard to be tied for the top
spot, but when the time was broken down
to the thousandths, the victory went to
Brodka in 1 minute, 45.006 seconds. Ver-
weij was second in 1:45.009. The bronze
went to Canada's Denny Morrison, his
second medal of the Sochi Games.
Alpine skiing
Anna Fenninger became the third
straight Austrian woman to win a gold
medal in the Olympic super-G. Maria
Hoefl-Riesch of Germany won the sil-
ver and Nicole Hosp of Austria the
bronze. Skiers from Austria have domi-
nated the event since it began at the
1988 Calgary Games. Austrian skiers
have now won eight of a possible 24
medals in the super-G.
Cross-country
Charlotte Kalla erased a 25-second
deficit on the final leg to give Sweden the
gold in the relay. Finland finished second
to win silver, and Germany took bronze.
Norway was well behind in fifth. "It is tough
to see because we are so good in relay
we have always been so good, many sec-
onds before the other girls," said Heidi
Weng, who skied the first leg for Norway.
"And today others were better than us."
Short track speedskating


Zhou Yang of China won her second
- consecutive gold medal in the women's
1,500 meters a race that included a


three-skater crash involving 500-meter
gold medalist Li Jianrou of China. Viktor
Ahn of Russia won gold in the men's
1,000, with teammate Vladimir Grigorev
taking the silver. It was Ahn's second
medal of the Sochi Olympics.
Skeleton
Alexander Tretiakov won gold in
men's skeleton. Known as the "Russian
Rocket," Tretiakov finished well ahead
of Latvia's Martins Dukurs after hurtling
down a track he's trained on more than
anyone else. MattAntoine of the United
States won bronze, the first skeleton
medal for the U.S. since Jimmy Shea
won gold in 2002.
Ski jumping
Polish ski jumper Kamil Stoch com-
pleted a gold medal sweep of the nor-
mal and large hills. Noriaki Kasai of
Japan won the silver on the large hill
and Peter Prevc of Slovenia took
bronze. Stoch joins Simon Ammann and
Matti Nykanen as the only men to win
both individual events at the same Win-
ter Games.
Curling
Canada became the first team to
qualify for the semifinals in the women's
Olympic curling tournament by beating
Russia and Japan. Sweden has the
next best record, one game ahead of
China, Britain and Switzerland. In the
men's tournament, China and Sweden
earned wins to stay at the top of the
qualifying round standings. Canada and
Britain are a game behind in the race for
the four playoff spots.
Hockey
Undefeated Sweden beat Latvia 5-3
to become the first team to advance to
next week's quarterfinals. Slovenia,
playing in its first Olympic hockey tour-
nament, surprised Slovakia 3-1. In the
women's tournament, Sweden upset
Finland 4-2 and Switzerland beat Rus-
sia 2-0, setting up next week's semifinal
matchups: Sweden vs. the U.S. and
Canada vs. Switzerland.


Saturday's Winter
Olympic medalists
ALPINE SKIING
Women
Super G
GOLD-Anna Fenninger, Austria
SILVER-Maria Hoefl-Riesch, Germany
BRONZE-Nicole Hosp, Austria
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women
4x5km Relay
GOLD-Sweden (Ida Ingemarsdotter,
Emma Wiken, Anna Haag, Charlotte Kalla)
SILVER-Finland (Anne Kylloenen, Aino-
Kaisa Saarinen, Kerttu Niskanen, Krista Lah-
teenmaki)
BRONZE-Germany (Nicole Fessel, Ste-
fanie Boehler, Claudia Nystad, Denise
Herrmann)
SHORT TRACK SPEEDSKATING
Men
1000
GOLD-Victor An, Russia
SILVER-Vladimir Grigorev, Russia
BRONZE-Sjinkie Knegt, Netherlands
Women
1500
GOLD-Zhou Yang, China
SILVER-Shim Suk Hee, South Korea
BRONZE Arianna Fontana, Italy
SKELETON
Men
GOLD-AlexanderTretiakov, Russia
SILVER-Martins Dukurs, Latvia
BRONZE-Matt Antoine, Prairie du Chien,
Wis.
SKI JUMPING
Men
K120
GOLD-Kamil Stoch, Poland
SILVER- Noriaki Kasai, Japan
BRONZE-Peter Prevc, Slovenia
SPEEDSKATING
Men
1500
GOLD-Zbigniew Brodka, Poland
SILVER-KoenVerweij, Netherlands
BRONZE-Denny Morrison, Canada
Saturday's U.S.
Olympians Fared
ALPINE SKIING
Women's Super-G
(Start position in parentheses)
8. (14) Julia Mancuso, Squaw Valley, Calif.,
1:27.04.
18. (2) Leanne Smith, North Conway, N.H.,
1:28.38.
NR. (7) Laurenne Ross, Bend, Ore., DNF
NR. (29) Stacey Cook, Mammoth, Calif.,
DNF.
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women's 4x5km Relay
9. United States (Kikkan Randall, Anchor-
age, Alaska, Sadie Bjornsen, Winthrop,
Wash., Liz Stephen, East Montpelier, Vt.,
Jessie Diggins, Afton, Minn.), 55:33.4.
SHORT TRACK SPEEDSKATING
Men's 1000
Quarterfinals
Heat 1
3. Chris Creveling, Kintersville, Pa.,
1:24.691.
Heat 4
4. J.R. Celski, Federal Way, Wash., No
Time.
Women's 1500
Heat 3
4. Alyson Dudek, Hales Corners, Wis.,
2:27.899.
Heat 5
2. Jessica Smith, Melvindale, Mich.,
2:26.703 (Q).
Heat 6
1. Emily Scott, Springfield, Mo., 2:22.641
(Q).
Semifinals
Heat 1
4. Jessica Smith, Melvindale, Mich.,
2:20.259 (B).
Heat 3
5. Emily Scott, Springfield, Mo., 2:23.439
(ADVA).
Women's 1500
Final B
2. Jessica Smith, Melvindale, Mich.,
2:25.787.


Final A
5. Emily Scott, Springfield, Mo., 2:39.436.
SKELETON
Men
Final Ranking
3. Matt Antoine, Prairie du Chien, Wis.,
3:47.26.- BRONZE
15. John Daly, Smithtown, N.Y, 3:49.11.
SKI JUMPING
Men's K120
Did Not Qualify For Jump 2
35. Nick Fairall, Andover, N.H. (120.0,50.1,
50.0) 108.3.
48. Nick Alexander, Lebanon, N.H. (111.5,
35.7, 44.5) 87.0.
NR. Anders Johnson, Park City, Utah,
DSQ.
SPEEDSKATING
Men's 1500
7. Brian Hansen, Glenview, III., 1:45.59.
11. Shani Davis, Chicago, 1:45.98.
22. Joey Mantia, Ocala, Fla., 1:48.01.
37. Jonathan Kuck, Champaign, Ill.,
1:50.19.
Today's Winter
Olympic schedule
Alpine Skiing
Men's Super G, 2a.m.
Biathlon
Men's 15km Mass start, 10 a.m.
Bobsleigh
Men'sTwo-Man (Run 1), 11:15 a.m.
Men's Two-Man (Run 2), 12:50 p.m.
Cross-Country Skiing
Men's 4x10km Relay (Classic/Free), 5 a.m.
Curling
Men
United States vs. Canada, Mid.
Britain vs. Norway, Mid.
Sweden vs. Russia, Mid.
Women
Denmark vs. South Korea, 5 a.m.
Japan vs. Switzerland, 5 a.m.
Sweden vs. Russia, 5 a.m.
United States vs. Canada, 5 a.m.
Men
Norway vs. Switzerland, 10a.m.
China vs. Canada, 10a.m.
Germany vs. Denmark, 10 a.m.
United States vs. Sweden, 10 a.m.
Figure Skating
Ice Dancing short dance, 10 a.m.
Ice Hockey
Men
Group B: Austria vs. Norway, 3 a.m.
Group A: Russia vs. Slovakia, 7:30 a.m.
Group A: Slovenia vs. United States,
7:30 a.m.
Group B: Finland vs. Canada, Noon
Women
Qualifications (5-8)
Germany vs. Finland, 3 a.m.
Japan vs. Russia, Noon
Snowboard
Women's Snowboard Cross Seeding,
2a.m.
Women's Snowboard Cross Quarterfinals,
4:15 a.m.
Women's Snowboard Cross Semifinals,
4:30 a.m.
Women's Snowboard Cross Finals,
4:45 a.m.
Speedskating
Women's 1500, 9a.m.
Winter Olympic
multi-golds
At Sochi, Russia
Through Feb. 15
MEN
Two
Felix Loch, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Kamil Stoch, Poland, ski jumping, 2 gold.
Martin Fourcade, France, biathlon, 2 gold.
Maxim Trankov, Russia, figure skating,
2 gold.
Tobias Wendl, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Tobias Arlt, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Dario Cologna, Switzerland, cross-country,
2 gold.
WOMEN
Two
Darya Domracheva, Belarus, biathlon,
2 gold.
TatianaVolosozhar, Russia, figure skating,
2 gold.
Natalie Geisenberger, Germany, luge,
2 gold.











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



New hospital foundation could help generations


s the effort to lease
Citrus Memorial hos-
pital to a private
company moves toward a
conclusion, one of the most
significant results will be
the creation of a new com-
munity trust that will han-
dle the proceeds from the
transaction.
This community trust will
become the steward of up to
$80 million which is netted
from the transaction with


HCA, the new private oper-
ator of the hospital.
The concept behind the
trust is that each year it will
distribute in the community
about 80 percent of the
earnings from the trust in-
vestments to activities in
Citrus County With even
conservative investments,
the annual return to the
community could be from
$4 million to $6 million.
With all of the ugly poli-


tics and lawsuits that have
surrounded the demise of
the public hospital, it is crit-
ically important that the
creation of this trust be set
up in a way that eliminates
any potential for acrimony
or conflict.
Once established, this could
become one of the largest
public trusts in the state of
Florida. It could accomplish
a lot of good things for the
people of our community


If you think back to the
early architects of Citrus
Memorial leaders like
George Brannen this
would be the best possible
legacy to their efforts.
Much diligence is needed
right now to ensure the trust
structure is created through
community consensus and
not any individual interest
group. The proceeds of the
trust will be used to address
health care issues facing


the community
While that's a broad con-
cept, it does mean that
politicians won't be able to
use it to pave roads, expand
airports or build something
on a whim.
In creating what this trust
board will look like, it's im-
portant that all of the par-
ties involved have input on
membership. One of the


PageC3


Special to the Chronicle
This graphic published Feb. 13, 1964, in the Suncoast Sentinel shows the district map for county commission and school board seats.
The large numbers are the county commission designations and the smaller numbers are the school board designations. This graphic,
produced in 2011, shows the current boundaries for county commission and school board districts.


BOUNDARIES




& BARRIERS

MIKE ARNOLD
Chronicle

n February 1964, grief blanketed a nation still in
shock over the assassination of John F Kennedy.
Movers and shakers in Washington and Tallahassee
were putting their final touches on what they
believed would become an economic boon for Florida
and the nation the Cross Florida Barge Canal.


Editor's note: This week begins a regular
column about the history of Citrus County.
Each week, I will delve into the Chronicle
archives from 50 years ago and attempt to tie
those events to the issues we experience today.
I believe it will be entertaining and enlightening.

Most living in the idyllic, natural
beauty of Citrus County were not pre-
pared for the massive changes the area
would undergo over the next 50 years
- doubling its population four times.
Like 2014, 1964 was a midterm elec-
tion year, and changes were on the
horizon. Here is a snapshot of life in
Citrus County 50 years ago this week.
County Clerk Francis W "Cowboy"
Williams discovered this week in 1964 that
school board and county commission
district boundaries were vastly different
than what government officials believed
them to be. For example, officials


Page C3


History of the West Citrus Government Center


he main thing to re-
member about the
West Citrus Govern-
ment Center is simply this:
It is about the provision of
citizen services and the best
interest of the taxpayers.
The BOCC is statutorily
responsible to provide space
for the constitutional offi-
cers to serve our citizens.
In 2005, the BOCC voted
unanimously to study local
government space needs for


the constitutional officers
looking out 15 to 20 years.
Commissioner Dennis
Damato was given the
assignment.
All existing facilities
were visited and all of the
constitutional officers were
interviewed for their input
in the process.
A comprehensive written
report was compiled and
presented to the community
The Crystal River leased


space is also in the tax
collector's space-needs
equation. A Meadowcrest!
Central Ridge location for a
future county-owned multi-
use facility housing other
constitutional officers should
be constructed to meet our
citizens' needs. This new fa-
cility would replace the in-
adequate old Revco drug
store space in Crystal River
Nine years later, here is
what was accomplished:


A new EOC facility was
constructed in Lecanto.
Nature Coast EMS built
a new facility in the center
of the county at the junction
of State Road 44 and County
Road 490.
A new courtroom facil-
ity was constructed by the
Corrections Corporation of
America at no cost to the
taxpayers during the ex-
pansion of the jail.
The West Citrus Gov-


ernment Center was perma-
nently relocated from an
old "Revco" drug store in a
strip plaza on U.S. 19 to
Meadowcrest
The county started uti-
lizing the construction man-
agement method to
construct and deliver major
building projects on time
and within budgets.
Although not part of the


Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


llln
Dennis Damato
GUEST
COLUMN





"As a single let
Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16,2014 of the whole,


PIONT the hidden uw

CITRS

if turns not yellow but with the silent knowledge
tree, so the wrong-doer cannot do wrong without
'ill ofyou all."
Khalil Gibran, "The Prophet," 1923


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
& EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
1Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


WHERE THE HEARTH IS



Balfour steps up,



but others still



wink and nod


hen Pine Ridge resi-
dent Sandy Balfour
was appointed to the
school board seat represent-
ing the Homosassa area, it
looked at first like another
instance of "musical
domiciles."
The term refers to govern-
ment officials who live in one
district but meet the statutory
requirement of having a "res-
idence" in the district they
represent by purchasing
cheap property
or renting a T
room and de- THE I
clearing this loca- Sandy
tion their voting moves
address, school bc
However, Bal-
four did not at- OUR 01
tempt to simply
create a voting Honorable
address in the but does
district. She and answer
her husband musical c
bought property,
moved into a mobile home on
a tract of land in her district
and put their Pine Ridge
home up for sale.
This was both honorable
and unusual. Multiple county
commissioners and county
commission candidates have
established a residence of
convenience in the district
they represent or seek to rep-
resent, while maintaining
their real household in an-
other district.
This practice is so common
in the state that earlier this
year Sen. Jack Latvala and
Rep. Ray Rodrigues filed
identical bills for the upcom-
ing legislative session which
establish criteria such as the
location of homestead ex-
emption, utility usage and
family residence to help elec-
tions officials determine
where officials elected within
districts actually live.


Try these numbers
This is in regard to the Sound
Off on Feb. 1, Saturday, titled
"Hello, hello." I also recently
went through the same exact
situation with the Social Secu-
rity office. The closest one is
Ocala to us, I believe. And I
called, like, nine times in one
day and couldn't get anyone on
the phone. They tell you to go
through all the prompts
each time, then they
tell you they're busy, to co
call back. So then II
found there's an 800
number for the Social
Security Administra-
tion, which the lady
should call. Actually, it's )
an 877 number. It's two
different numbers. One CAL
is 877-626-9911 and 56 V
the other is 800-772- 0 0
1213.
Get along, little doggy
I'm calling in response to the
"Leave the dog home" (Letter to
the Editor) in the Saturday paper
(Feb. 1). I agree totally with some
of the dogs being left at home.
My daughter has a dog and she
takes it often to outside events
and her dog is very well behaved
and very docile. But some of these
dogs always don't get along as
well as the people getting along
at the events. So sometimes, for
many dogs, I agree.


S
E
t
3
P

e
i

J


L
kA


I
r


Since commissioners and
school board members are
elected at large, even though
they represent districts, some
have argued that the require-
ment to live in the district
represented is archaic. Per-
haps it is, but it is the law, and
there is merit to the idea of
people representing districts
where they actually live.
The presumption behind this
requirement is that a person
who lives in an area has some
knowledge of the
SUE:I people in the
district, and of
3alfour the issues that
to take affect them and
ard seat. are important to
them.
'INION: For that rea-
son, even though
decision, Balfour should
*n't fully be commended
ssue of for moving to the
omiciles. district she rep-
resents, it leaves
open the question of whether
a person who lives in one dis-
trict should seek office from
another district or whether
the issue matters at all.
This is a question that re-
ally needs to be answered so
there can be one set of rules
required for all elected officials.
Currently, a person either
meets the spirit of the law and
runs from the district where
they live, moves to the district
they represent to meet the
letter of the law, or creates a
residence of convenience in
the district they represent and
gives the law a wink and a nod.
Either it matters if the per-
son lives in the district, or it
doesn't. If it matters, there
should be real tests of resi-
dency and real penalties for
misstating residency to seek
public office. If it doesn't mat-
ter, then the law should be
abolished.


Your place or mine?
On Jan. 31, emergency com-
munications broadcast a tele-
phone warning. The call stated
to be on the lookout for a man,
6-foot-5-inches tall and weigh-
ing 300 pounds. He possibly
was armed and dangerous,
last seen in the vicinity of Voy-
ager in Dunnellon. Warning
people is very good. However,
Voyager is in Citrus
MND Springs, not Dunnel-
JN Ion. For persons not fa-
flCC miliar with all the
CII street names in the
area they're living, it
S would be best if the
correct location was
Given. The suspect was
4 located by the sheriff's
department at the in-
C579 tersection of Voyager
)5 and Independence in
Citrus Springs.
Sound of safety
I would like to thank the Citrus
County Sheriff's (Office) for a job
well done on Friday afternoon
(Jan. 31). I work nights and I
awoke to the sheriff's helicopter
hovering over my neighborhood
and police cars everywhere.
Within 30 minutes, I received a
phone call from the (sheriff's of-
fice) stating that the suspect was
captured for a home invasion in
my neighborhood. Thank you so
much for keeping the area safe.


Unlawful killing, with malice an afterthought


Editor's note: This is the first
in a series of columns on states
abusing the death penalty
he late Justice William
Brennan used to tell me,
"The evolving human
standards of human decency
will finally lead to the abolition
of the death penalty in this
country"
He'd hoped that a
clear understanding
of the Constitution's
due process protec-
tions for every citi-
zen would reveal how
the death penalty
practices of certain
states violate the
Constitution. Nat H
As another 0TH
Supreme Court jus-
tice, Harry Blackmun, VOI
chillingly wrote in a
dissenting opinion in Callins v
Collins, "From this day forward,
I shall no longer tinker with the
machinery of death."
Blackmun thereby decided
the death penalty was funda-
mentally unconstitutional.
While some states have
ended the death penalty, it still
persists in others, and capital
punishment remains a federal
death sentence.
Indeed, a shocking (and, to
me, sickening) lead editorial in
The New York Times recently
revealed the means that certain
states use to continue creating
death penalty corpses. These
states viciously violate not only
the Constitution, but also the
most basic American rules of
law and our most profound na-
tional values.
How many of us know what
those are?
Deserving at the very least a
Pulitzer, this editorial explained
how certain remaining death
penalty states "hide the means
by which they kill people" ("Se-
crecy Behind Executions," The
New York Times, Jan. 30).
How did this unbounded
cruel and unusual punishment
come about?
According to the editorial:
"Because many drug manufac-
turers now refuse to supply
drugs for use in executions,
states are scrambling to replen-
ish their stocks. This often
means turning to compounding
pharmacies, which exist in a
largely unregulated world...
"There have been multiple
reports of previously untested
drug combinations leading to
botched executions, which is a


H
(


polite way of saying the con-
demned person suffered greatly
while being put to death."
Do these states not remem-
ber the Eighth Amendment's
prohibition of "cruel and un-
usual punishment?"
I have no idea how many
Americans, if any, would react
by saying, "So what? They were
convictedwereri'tthey?
What's this fuss about?
We're a lot better off
without them."
But some of you
may be ashamed.
In any case, most
of the involved ju-
ries, prosecutors,
judges and mem-
entoff bers of state execu-
IE tive branches have
ER shown no public
DES concern. Nor have
investigative re-
porters located in these areas
shown enough concern. There
have been a few exceptions.
But I will continue to follow
this story closely to see if there
is any reaction to these unpun-
ished atrocities from the media,
legislatures (including Con-
gress) and political candidates
throughout this land.
Meanwhile, a few judges
have remembered the Constitu-
tion, with one in Georgia issu-
ing "a last-minute stay of
execution to one inmate, rea-
soning that the state's secrecy
law 'makes it impossible' to
show that the drug protocol vio-
lates the Eighth Amendment."
So how about ruling that
Georgia's secrecy law is uncon-
stitutional, because it extin-
guishes inmates by unknown
and possibly criminal means?
And shouldn't certain pun-
ishments apply to those high of-
ficials who authorized the state
secrecy law's use?
Let's look at the actual case of
the late Herbert Smulls, who
was executed in Bonne Terre,
Mo., on Wednesday, Jan. 29, "for
the 1991 murder of a jewelry
store owner" His attorney had
tried desperately to stay
Smulls' forthcoming execution
by unknown means, citing his
Eighth Amendment rights.
But a federal appeals court in
Missouri ruled against Smulls'
claim that he was "entitled to
basic information about the
drugs that would be used to put
him to death."
As Smulls involuntarily de-
parted, I expect he knew by then
he was being deprived of his
Fourteenth Amendment guar-


antee that no American citizen
shall be "deprived of life, liberty
or property without due process
of law," nor without "the equal
protection of the laws."
How did the Eighth Circuit
Court of Appeals in Missouri
thereby dispose of Herbert
Smulls' Fourteenth Amend-
ment rights?
The New York Times edito-
rial tells us that the court "ruled
that Mr Smulls had no constitu-
tional claim against Missouri's
practice because he had not
demonstrated that 'the risk of
severe pain' from the state's in-
tended drug protocol would be
substantially greater than a
readily available alternative."
The judges on this highest
court had seen and rejected the
dissenting opinion, which
'"places an absurd burden on
death row inmates,' who must
identify 'a readily available al-
ternative method for their own
executions,' even though the
state won't let them see the
method it plans to use."
Reading that brought me
back to my last conversation
with Justice Brennan soon after
illness led him to retire from
the Supreme Court.
"Listen, pal," he said (he
often called friends "pal"), "you
have to remember liberty is a
fragile thing."
That's why he spent his life
protecting it.
The Times'editorial climaxed,
with which Brennan would have
agreed: "In the 21st century, the
United States has no business
putting people to death by any
means. Public support for capi-
tal punishment has reached a
40-year low, and virtually all
other Western societies have re-
jected it. It will end here, too,
but not until this despicable
practice is dragged out into the
open for all to see."
But what about the Supreme
Court? Weren't there appeals to
stay Herbert Smulls' execution?
Yes, but the last appeal was not
denied by the high court until
four minutes after he had been
declared officially dead. So he
really had no hearing on this final
appeal from the Supreme Court.

Nat Hentoffis a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


Lawyers win, we lose
What am I missing here?
The CCHB hires and then fires
Joshua Nemzoff. He was hired
to bring potential bidders for
CMH to the table. This he did.
He was fired because he al-
legedly violated the state's
Sunshine Law when he first re-
fused and then offered to pro-
vide for $12,000 records that
should have been freely avail-
able to the public. Robert
Schweickert requested the
records, was refused, and sued
the CCHB and Nemzoff. The
CCHB has settled with him
and is paying his attorney's
fees. Bill Grant was "confi-
dent" that AIG would pick up
all the settlement costs, but
surprise, surprise, it hasn't. A
few comments about this latest
CCHB fiasco:


1. Why was a settlement ne-
gotiated with Nemzoff? He was
bound by and allegedly vio-
lated the Sunshine Law and
then fired. Why is he being
paid off?
2. Mr Grant is very free with
taxpayer money Who approves
such a huge settlement before
consulting with the insurer?
Now the taxpayers are on the
hook for $500,000, the portion
of the settlement AIG refuses
to pay
It appears that the lawyers,
both Schweickert's attorney
and Bill Grant, have done well
for themselves at taxpayer
expense. Another chapter in
the ongoing saga of the CMH
boondoggle.
Maria Weiser
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTER 1 to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'And they shall become one flesh'


"Therefore shall a man
leave his father and his
mother, and shall cleave
unto his wife; and they
shall become one flesh."
Genesis 2:24, KJV
s parents, it is often
our job to do things
for which we are
so very inadequately
prepared.
Sometimes I think it is
just God's way of showing
us that he has a sense of
humor
As I would think most of
you readers are aware, the
"birds and the bees" is an
expression that refers to
courtship, marriage and
the natural activity which
results in the birth of ba-


Originally published in In 195
the Citrus County T nve
Chronicle I Nei
In 1939... begin
A beauty contest, and v
junior queen pag- Satur
meant and a talent con- project
test will be staged at scored
the high school audito- Kiwar
rium Tuesday night of Junior
next week under the Commr
auspices of the Inver- Count
ness American Legion create
post and auxiliary The more
winner of the beauty tude
contest, "Miss Inver- andne
ness," will compete in ward t
the state beauty pag- tion w
meant in Miami early person
next month, at which works
time she will be given a for ou
screen test with a pos- court
sibility of being picked uous
by a Hollywood scout. menti
contact
he January home
demonstration Ane
council meeting, work- st
ing bee and home im- pump:
provement session will night,
be held at the Pleasant and c
Grove clubhouse Jan. hoped
17-18, Mrs. Elizabeth W mean
Moore, county home ruptio
demonstration agent, ice fo:
announced yesterday come.
Mrs. Moore said there was m
will be work on uphol- and H
string and refinishing Compa
of furniture and selec- at a co
tion and making of cur- $1,860
tains and draperies, edition
She added that selec- time t
tion and framing, as who v
well as hanging of pic- last ni
tures will be thor-
oughly demonstrated
and that barrel chairs
will be made along
with other pieces of Informa
furnishings for the Time is
home. the Cit
Historic



BOUNDARIES
Continued from Page Cl

thought the U.S. 19 east-west turn
in Crystal River was the dividing
line between districts; the actual
east-west line ran along State
Road 44 until it hit U.S. 19 and
then followed Cedar Street due
west out to the river and gulf.
This meant for years the wrong
commissioner represented the
business district of Crystal River
Additionally, Betty Williams, who
was gearing up to challenge Gene
Allen for his school board seat,
found she would instead be chal-
lenging for a seat vacated by
Ralph Rooks.
Those who follow local and
state politics today know that
much has been said and written
about candidates living in the
district in which they plan to run.
Some do move, while others buy
property as a pretense but never
actually live in the zone they
represent.
How did Betty Williams handle
the change? She ran for the
Rooks' seat and won.
Today, the issue has become so
divisive two lawmakers, Sen.
Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, and
Rep. Ray Rodrigues, R-Estero,
filed bills in Tallahassee to
straighten out the residency
mess.
During Cowboy Williams' re-
search, he also discovered the
school board and commission
boundaries were identical a
fact not known beforehand al-
though the numbers were differ-
ent. While today's district
boundaries look much different
than the 1964 boundaries, local
government officials have kept
two things the same: Geographi-
cally, the school board and
county commission boundaries
stay the same; and they are still
numbered differently Only Dis-
trict 5 is the same for both.


bies. The phrase is evoca-
tive of the metaphors and
euphemisms often used to
avoid speaking directly
and technically about this
matter to children as they
grow to young adulthood.
Where did the expres-
sion originate?
Credit is often given by
some to Cole Porter (1928)
and his "Let's Do It, Let's
Fall in Love" lyrics: "...
that's why birds do it, bees
do it, even educated fleas
do it. Let's do it, let's fall in
love."
Porter's words bring a
smile to my lips, but why
can't parents just speak in
a straightforward fashion
with their children about
such things?


4 ...
mess' "Hi-
ghbor" week will
Sunday, Jan. 10,
will run through
lay, Jan. 16. The
ct is jointly spon-
by the Inverness
nis Club and the
r Chamber of
nerce of Citrus
y The object is to
Sa friendlier,
courteous atti-
toward tourists
ew residents. To-
his end, recogni-
ill be given some
m who lives or
in Inverness -
tstanding acts of
esy or for contin-
courteous treat-
in daily business
ct.

ew pump was in-
alled at the city
ing station last
and city officials
consumerss alike
d that would
no further inter-
on in water serv-
r a long time to
The installation
ade by the Farm
[ome Machinery
any of Orlando,
ost to the city of
, plus a small ad-
al sum as over-
;o the workmen
vere on the job
ght.




nation for Back in
s supplied by
rus County
cal Society.


Why, indeed, loud. Being the smart-
This most natural act in mouth kid that I was, I
all of God's plan is the replied, "I'm sure I still
most awkward thing for have a few things to learn,
parents to dis- but maybe I
cuss with their can help you.
children. And, What do you
I think, bring- need to know?"
ing birds and 41 Times change,
bees into the but kids do not
picture only When it was
serves to my turn to have
confuse. that very same
When my fa- talk with my
their thought I Fred Brannen son Fred 3, I
was of an age A SLICE posed a ques-
for the talk, he tion to him sim-
matter-of-factly OF LIFE ilar to the one
asked, "Son, my father had
what do you know about asked me. Fred's response
...?" He didn'tuse a euphe- was, "I'm good, Dad, but if
mism, he said the three- you have questions, try the
letter "s" word, right out Internet."


On a more accurate and
romantic note, I offer a
short statement of my own
which I believe explains it
best:
"... the first night we
spent together as husband
and wife, Cheryl and I be-
came one flesh."
Of course, Cheryl and I
are still learning about the
birds and the bees.
We have our own tropi-
cal paradise right outside,
straight through the lanai
to the pool deck which is
surrounded by exotic
plants, including some that
Cheryl brought back from
Hawaii.
We sit there and enjoy
the water together admir-
ing God's handiwork, ob-


Reg Rutledge and Hamp Tyner.


RALPH ROOKS

CITRUS COUNTY
GROWS
Columnist Josiah Frank, in the
Suncoast Sentinel, talked about
how Citrus County residents
should have a discussion about
water conservation, as the county
experienced rapid growth during
the 13-year period from 1950 to
1963. The county, which had
more residents in 1910 (6,731)
than it did in 1950 (6,111), had
grown 78 percent from 1950 to
1963 (to a population of 10,900).
He talked about the state passing
Amendment 3, which set aside
money to purchase land and
water for conservation purposes.
Frank said Citrus County
needed to have a seat at the table
and citizen input so it could enjoy
maximum benefits from the pro-
gram. He said the project would
limit flooding, benefit wildlife,
increase property values and
raise lake levels during drought.
Here's the rub: The project in-
volved digging canals and putting
in control structures to keep the
TsalaApopka lake chain atoptimum
levels at all times. Today, TOO-
FAR, a local environmental ad-
vocacygroup, bemoans the undesired


COWBOY WILLIAMS
effects of the canals and control
structures- low lake levels, limited
navigation and a lack of a natural
flushing mechanism that has led
to higher nutrients in the water
In the column, Frank also pre-
dicted the population would ex-
plode to possibly 16,000 in Citrus
County by 1970. He was not wrong
about the explosion: The 1970
census shows 19,196 people in
Citrus County a 107 percent in-
crease over the decade.

THIS & THAT
Two people Ralph Rooks
(District 1) and Harley Levins
(District 1 incumbent and vice
chair of the board) announced
their intent to run for the Board
of County Commissioners. Rooks,
a two-time member of the school
board, would go on to defeat
Levins in one of the most hotly
contested races of the season.
Two school board seats were
vacated, causing a number of
people to announce their candi-
dacies. Gene Allen vacated his
District 4 seat after picking up
the mail delivery for Crystal River
Ralph Rooks vacated his seat to
run for county commission.


BETTY F. WILLIAMS

The Crystal River Lions were
planning a charity basketball game
with the Crystal River Civitan
Club where the men would be
wearing dresses during the game.
The Citrus Memorial Hospi-
tal Board began planning expan-
sion. It also reported admitting
122 patients and delivery 18 ba-
bies in January 1964 for $26,494
in patient charges. It collected
$19,512 on those charges.
Citrus County Sanitarian
Shelby Colson complained to county
commissioners that residents
dumping their garbage were leav-
ing trash on the rim of the dump
sites. In 1964, the county dug large
holes around the county where
citizens could dump their garbage.
Some people just backed up to the
rim, but didn't bother to toss it down
the hole, causing trash and garbage
to blow into nearby neighborhoods
at the dump site in Floral City.
The $25 tax we pay yearly for
the landfill seems like a great
deal compared to the 1964 dump-
and-go arrangement.


Mike Amrnold is the editor of the
Chronicle. Email him at mamnold
@chronicleonline. com.


serving among other
things, hummingbirds,
butterflies and honey-
bees, oft times seeing a
particular variety we have
not noticed before, but al-
ways knowing that the
love He has allowed us to
share remains one of His
best efforts.


Fred Brannen, an
Inverness resident, has
been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988
and is the author of the
recently published novel
"At the Bottom ofBiscayne
Bay." Fred may be
contacted a t fbrannenjr
@gmail.com or via
brannenbooksllc. com.



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

best suggestions I've
heard calls for the cre-
ation of a large board -
maybe 15 members -
that would include a
member from the county
commission, both cities,
the school board and the
health department. Or-
ganizations such as the
chamber of commerce,
United Way, the county
medical society, etc.,
could have their top vol-
unteer leader automati-
cally be appointed.
Hospital governing
board members have
floated the idea -
which I think is a good
one that two positions
to the trust board be
elected by the voters of
the county
One ethics rule that
should be included is that
members of this trust
should not allocate funds
to any organization they
are affiliated with.
State Sen. Charlie
Dean, who is going to in-
troduce the legislation
that eventually creates
this trust, appropriately
insists that the trust
board would operate in
the Florida Sunshine -
which means all of its
meetings and budgets
would be open to the
public.
I also think it's a good
idea that no appointment
should come from the
existing governing board
or foundation board -
the two entities that
have spent more than
$11 million in legal fees
fighting over the hospi-
tal. This new foundation
needs to be divorced
from this bitter dispute.
Another excellent sug-
gestion is that all mem-
bers of the trust board
should be limited to
four-year terms. Let's
not make these things
lifelong appointments.
As tough as it is in a
small town, this trust
board needs to be given
every opportunity to be
independent, non-politi-
cal and focused on pro-
grams and efforts that will
make life better for the
residents of Citrus County.
By mandating that the
financial principal of
the foundation can
never be accessed, pro-
tection will also be as-
sured even if a
misguided group of folks
got in control at some fu-
ture date.
In creating this frame-
work, all parties in-
volved need to have
input. The hospital gov-
erning board, the foun-
dation board, the county
commission, the schools
and the cities should all
have the right to be
heard. And so should
the citizens of Citrus
County
Out of all the ugliness
that has surrounded the
problems at Citrus Me-
morial, the irony could
be that something good
came out the back end.
This new community
trust could be that good
thing.


Let's do our best as a
community to create a
framework that guaran-
tees good work for many
generations to come.


Gerry Mulligan is
the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him
atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 C3





C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


DAMATO
Continued from Page Cl

study, two new libraries were
constructed: a long-awaited fa-
cility in Homosassa Springs, and
a modern replacement library in
Floral City
As you can clearly see, many
facilities in the study were con-
structed by the county within budg-
ets to meet our citizen needs.
As bad as the economy has
been, all debt service on those
citizen service facilities has been
paid to date.
Let us review the history of the
West Citrus Government Center
Before the BOCC considered a
permanent relocation to Mead-
owcrest, the West Citrus Govern-
ment Center was housed in an
old Revco drugstore space in a
strip plaza on U.S. 19 in the city
of Crystal River
The county had spent more
than $1 million in rent and
$500,000 in repairs on a tempo-
rary location for 18 years on a
building it did not own.
Early on in the process, Com-
missioner Damato tried to relo-
cate the service facility to the
space vacated by Publix when it
moved out of the city of Crystal
River to the Meadowcrest area.
The majority of the board at
that time did not support that
proposal because of flooding is-
sues in the city of Crystal River
When the space needs study
was conducted in 2005-06, the
city of Crystal River showed no
interest in participating or part-
nering with Citrus County
During the assembly of prop-
erty for the four-lane upgrade to
County Road 486, the county pur-
chased land for drainage reten-
tion, and the potential
permanent location of the West
Citrus Government Center build-
ing per the space needs study
Because the government cen-
ter was permanently relocated to
an existing building in Meadow-
crest, the board has directed the
administrator to sell that property
and the trailhead property be-
cause it was moved to the "Rooks"
property (Citrus Sand & Debris)
at the junction of the proposed
parkway extension with C.R. 486.
The proceeds of those sales must
be returned to the gas tax fund.


COMMENTARY


They could be utilized on the C.R.
491 roadway expansion project
The trigger for the relocation
of the West Citrus Government
Center took place in 2009-10
when the state of Florida turned
over driver licensing to the tax
collector
Brad Thorpe, Eber Brown and
Commissioner Damato discov-
ered and identified 25,000
square feet of existing vacant
space located within the Mead-
owcrest building.
The city of Crystal River at-
tempted to provide a location
within the city; in a written letter
from the city manager, they offered:
Stay where you are and
lease more space.
Build on top of the existing city
hall building constructed in 1969.
Purchase the Ferrell Gas prop-
erty on Northeast Third Street.
Thinking in a forward manner:
The plaza that formerly
housed the West Citrus Govern-
ment Center was foreclosed
upon. Physical conditions are
much worse than they were sev-
eral years ago, as no capital has
been invested to revitalize the
strip plaza to date.
The option to build on top of
the existing city hall would not
have provided the minimum
20,000 square feet of space the
county was seeking. Feasibility
of the existing building's ability
to support an additional story
and concerns about compliance
with the Americans with Disabil-
ities act were not provided. Park-
ing and stormwater retention
issues were not addressed and
still exist today
The Ferrell Gas Plant prop-
erty was discounted for similar
reasons.
The state of Florida told the
tax collector that both the exist-
ing Revco facility and the dri-
ver's license facility in the city of
Crystal River were inadequate
by state standards.
The late Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene compiled informa-
tion to consider relocation to the
Crystal River Mall. The proposal
included rent that was double to
triple what the county has paid
at Meadowcrest.
Also keep in mind any prop-
erty on the U.S. 19 corridor in the
city of Crystal River:
Is physically located in the
coastal high-hazard zone.


The county Comprehensive
Plan does not allow increase of
density and intensity of use
within that zone. Locating public
assets within the coastal high-
hazard zone might be viewed as
going against our comp plan.
The city of Crystal River
does not have a CRS (Community
Rating System) program, which
would make flood insurance pre-
miums higher than a the Central
Ridge location we now enjoy
Then-Public Works Director
Ken Frink performed a side-by-
side comparison of the keeping
county offices where they were
and moving the West Citrus Gov-
ernment Center to Meadowcrest
The proposal to move to Mead-
owcrest won hands-down. The
Crystal River Mall did not make
the short list.
The BOCC voted 5-0 to move
the West Citrus Government Cen-
ter to Meadowcrest.
The BOCC voted 4-1, a super-
majority, to fund and complete
the tenant buildout within the
25,000-square-foot leased space.
The project was delivered on
time and under budget utilizing
in-county tradesmen under the
direction of a local construction
management company
A vote to relocate, build out and
lease space included a fixed-price
option to purchase the entire
building. All parties and the public
were fully aware of that option.
The existing 18,000-square-foot
government service facility has
7,000 square feet available at the
rear of the tax collector's office
to expand services possibly
the inclusion of the collection of
Citrus County water and sewer
bill payments or other needed
citizen services.
The property owner, Gulf to
Lakes, made all of the property
improvements to the facility be-
fore the relocated government
center opened.
They include:
Installation of a new bonded
roof on the entire building at a
cost of more than $500,000.
Replacement of most of the
existing rooftop HVAC units.
Replacement of windows in
the building.
Painting of the entire build-
ing exterior
Trimming of live oak trees.
The parking lots were
repaired.


The drainage issue was cor-
rected by altering a berm so ex-
cess storm water could move to a
second drainage retention area
on site.
Enhancement of parking-lot
lighting.
Since the opening of the West
Citrus Government Center at
Meadowcrest:
The expansion of C.R. 486 to
a four-lane roadway was com-
pleted with a traffic signal in-
stalled at the intersection of
Meadowcrest Boulevard.
A traffic signal was installed
at the intersection of S.R. 44 and
Meadowcrest Boulevard.
Tens of thousands of citizen
service transactions have been
successfully conducted at the
facility
The EDC's recently completed
strategic plan has identified the
25,000 square feet of existing space
adjacent to the Government Cen-
ter as the best location for site-
ready business relocation.
The C.R. 491 corridor plan and
upgrading of the roadway to four
lanes awaits the BOCC decision
at a public hearing on Feb. 25.
As the District 1 Commissioner
since 2004, I have presented a
factual accounting of the history
of the West Citrus Government
Center because of my direct
knowledge and involvement with
this issue garnered over a long
period of time.
I anxiously await the following
information from the adminis-
trator, his staff and the constitu-
tional officers, especially the tax
collector:
The property appraisal;
Construction cost estimates;
Cost of interior furnishings
and equipment within the facility;
All financial implications;
Statistics on citizen service
usage and levels of service;
And all other pertinent
backup information before I
make an informed decision on
our option to purchase the entire
building.
My decision will be based
solely on this: "What is best for
the taxpayers and the delivery of
citizen service provided by the
constitutional officers?"
-
Dennis Damato is the
Citrus County Commissioner
for District 1.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Hot Corner:
THE HOMELESS

Don't judge others
I'm calling in regard to
the Sound Off in the paper
on Saturday (Feb. 1),
"Homeless have plenty."
This person is very correct
in the fact that some of
our homeless population
do have bicycles, they
probably have cellphones
under the state assistance
programs and some of
them do smoke cigarettes.
My objection to this person's
(Sound Off) is that not all
disabilities are physical or
visible. I for one think that
if God only helps ones
who help themselves, as
this person said, then that
person should pay more
attention to their own life
and not judge the others
in the world.
Explain that logic
I don't quite understand
the mentality of the person
who called in about "Home-
less have plenty." I guess
they said if they have a bi-
cycle, then they can find a
job. Since the unemployment
rate is so high in Citrus
County and there are peo-
ple with a lot of skills who
can't find a job, I'd like to
have this person explain
how a homeless person
with probably very few
skills is going to find a job.
Cruel comment
I'm just calling to comment
on the call you had regard-
ing the homeless in your
paper. No. 1, I don't think
for one minute that they feel
bad for these homeless
people. And let them be in
their shoes for like an hour,
never mind a lifetime. Why
would you begrudge them
of a bike or a cellphone?
That's just, you know. And
if somebody, if they have a
pack of cigarettes? Give me
a break. Get a life, whoever
that is, and find something
else to complain about be-
cause that is the cruelest thing
I've heard in a longtime.


CITRUS~ C 0U IT TY--
Saturday, March 1, 2014 *.-9spm-
Sunday, March 2, 2014 9-4,m
Join us for two days of family fun in Floral Park!! Presete DSonsor
F.D.S. Disposal
Park at Citrus County Fairgrounds mitormu b
SCitrus County Chamber of Commerce
S & ride the shuttle into Floral Park for $1 Floral CityMerchantsAssociation
S Admission $31under 12 FREE fj,-
www.floraJcitystrawberryfestival.com- ."r--.


:Agoung Elvis. nconce ,brings Ug
S-twovOeu'idifferent performanceb



i locks Floridas

t Februaru 22nd & 23rd

IfdCourthouse Heritage Musei


Cote Deonath Concerli
February 22nd 7:30pm
with the Suspicious Minds Musicians
Reserved seats $35 House tickets $2
CASH BAR!


[iIsplratlonal Gospel Music
L ary 23d Doors open ca 11:30am
S(oate Deonath
gi fast Buffet $25

KUSE HERITAGE MUSEUM
I q-ahousenSq~aj. Inverness. FloridaE
3 Jg s je 7 352) 3ai,6q36, '. .
T3 6_2o7sp r. -.
Thank you to our sponsor CHRONLE -


.7 FEBRUARY IS ..... CU _
SAMERICAN HEART MONTH Tjl RO N I(,.
iHe-a i,:l,.i-a.-,. ira, li.adiing cause ww.chonltlanllir.com
ri ,.~alr, i,r r,,ir n;r and women, _., _. _. _. __


2


3 4


71
7 8


9 10 11 12 131415
16 17 18 19 20 2122
23 24 25 26 27 28


Jim Blackshear

Memorial Golf Outing
Inverness Golf & Country Club
February 22, 2014
Registration 7 a.m. Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.
$60 per player or $220 PRESENTING SPONSOR
for a team of four. Z-- 7
Includes: Greens fees, cart, lunch, C y sT AT
door prizes and one Mulligan i RL C 1-
ticket. Additional Mulligan
tickets will be available. CHARITABLE PARTNERS
For online registration, / ,.,
forms and information ..
visit OSMS WaA
www.CitrusBuilders.com
or call 746-9028. ( ',iIii(ii:F I











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


p ^ ... .^^i a, Mw'









TWEET THIS:



Olympians turn medals into buzz, money


JOHN LEICESTER
Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia

When Jenny Jones won
Olympic bronze at the Sochi
Games, her following on
Twitter exploded. The audience
for @jennyjonessnow has
grown 10-fold, to 65,000
followers, in the three weeks
since the British snowboarder
tweeted: "Just found out I
officially made the GB winter
Olympic team. Whoop!"
Olympic success is also working
wonders for @sagekotsenburg. The
U.S. snowboarder's account had
13,645 followers when he got the
gold in slopestyle and tweeted:
"WOW!! I just won the Olympics!!"
That number grew to 14,196 in 30
minutes, 16,697 in an hour, 40,791 in
24 hours and to nearly 64,000 by
Friday
Vacuuming up followers on Twit-
ter, Facebook and other social
media platforms is the smart play
for Olympians at the Sochi Games.
Athletes who catch and ride the
once-every-four-years wave of so-
cial media interest in all things
Winter Olympics, sharing pictures,
thoughts and stories from their
privileged backstage access at the


Associated Press
TOP: Britain's Jenny Jones takes a jump during the women's snowboard
slopestyle final at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.
When Jones won the bronze medal in the event, her following on Twitter
exploded. Athletes who build their fan base on social media platforms could
come home from Russia with far stronger hands to woo and squeeze more
money from sponsors. ABOVE: Members of the United States Olympic team
- many of them holding up mobile phones to record the moment enter
Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, for the opening ceremony of the 2014 Win-
ter Olympics. Picking up new followers on Twitter, Facebook and other so-
cial media platforms is the smart play for Olympians at the Sochi Games.
Athletes who share their experiences from their privileged backstage
access at the games could come home from Russia with far stronger hands
to woo and squeeze more money from sponsors.


games, could come home from Rus-
sia with stronger hands to woo new
sponsors or squeeze more money
from existing ones.
"They only have one shot at get-
ting in the zeitgeist," says Walter
Delph, CEO of Adly, which helps


brands build buzz via social media
movers and shakers. His advice to
Olympians: "Grab the followers,
grab the volume now because that
is the best opportunity."
It used to be that Olympians had
See D2


Canceled! Airlines scrap record number of flights


Associated Press
NEW YORK -The relentless snow
and ice storms this winter have led to
the highest number of flight cancella-
tions in more than 25 years, according
to an analysis by The Associated Press.
U.S. airlines have canceled more
than 75,000 domestic flights since Dec.
1, including roughly 14,000 this week.
That's 5.5 percent of the 1.35 million
flights scheduled during that period,
according to AP calculations based on
information provided by flight tracking
site FlightAware.
It's the highest total number and
highest percent of cancellations since
at least the winter of 1987-1988, when
the Department of Transportation first
started collecting cancellation data.
Mother Nature isn't entirely to
blame. A mix of cost-cutting measures
and new government regulations has
made airlines more likely to cancel


flights and leave fliers scrambling to
get to their destination.
On Thursday, more than 70 percent
of flights were canceled in Baltimore,
Philadelphia, Washington D.C. and
Charlotte, N.C. thanks to a winter
storm that paralyzed most air traffic
along the East Coast Ice storms this
winter have caused major headaches
in typically warm cities like Atlanta,
Dallas and Houston.
"This year is off to a brutal start for
airlines and travelers," says
FlightAware CEO Daniel Baker "Not
only is each storm causing tens of
thousands of cancellations, but there's
been a lot of them."
And February still has two weeks
left
Making things worse, airlines have
been cutting unprofitable flights and
packing more passengers into planes.
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
U.S. stock and bond markets are
closed for Washington's Birthday
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON National As-
sociation of Home Builders re-
leases housing market index for
February, 10 a.m.
BERLIN Germany's ZEW in-
stitute releases its monthly index
of investor confidence in Europe's
biggest economy
TOKYO Bank of Japan mone-
tary policy meeting issues statement
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Labor Depart-
ment releases Consumer Price
Index for January, 8:30 a.m.; Fred-
die Mac, releases weekly mortgage
rates, 10 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Crude oil slips to
near $100 on doubts

NEW YORK Oil prices slipped
closer to $100 a barrel Friday as
fresh U.S. economic data and
higher-than-expected crude sup-
plies pointed to weaker demand.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for March
delivery was down 16 cents to
$100.19 a barrel in electronic trad-
ing on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. On Thursday the
Nymex contract eased 2 cents to
close at $100.35.
The Energy Department said
crude stockpiles rose 3.3 million
barrels last week, more than ana-
lysts had expected, while distillate
stocks fell far less than anticipated.
Brent crude, which is used to set
prices for international varieties of
crude, was down 5 cents to $108.47
on the ICE Futures exchange in
London.


Stocks rise on stronger
European growth
LONDON Global stock markets
pushed higher on Friday on news
that Europe's economic recovery
gathered some speed at the end of
2013.
Germany's DAX was up 0.6 per-
cent to 9,650.82 by midafternoon in
Europe. The CAC40 in France was
up 0.5 percent to 4,331.85. Britain's
FTSE 100 index was flat at 6,658.85.
The FTSE MIB in Italy, which saw
its first economic growth since 2011,
rose a stronger 1.5 percent
China's Shanghai Composite Index
rose 0.8 percent and Hong Kong's
Hang Seng added 0.6 percent
South Korea's Kospi rose 0.7 per-
cent But Japan's Nikkei 225
dropped 1.5 percent to 14,313.03 as
the yen strengthened against the
dollar, a negative for share prices of
exporters.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SSMART
MONEY


CEOs paid

more than

shareholders

EAR BRUCE: What would
you say is fair compensation
for a CEO? It seems to me
that if I own stock in a company, I
should be part of what the CEO
pay package would be. Do you feel
they are way overcompensated? I
buy stocks to make me money, and
any excess money a CEO makes
takes money out of my pocket.
Kevin, via email
DEAR KEVIN: You raise an in-
teresting, but unanswerable ques-
tion: What is fair compensation for
a CEO? If the company is really
kicking butt and making lots of
money, it would seem to me that
the CEO should be well-paid.
Whether or not he should be paid
millions of dollars a year is an-
other question.
Your point is, whatever the CEO
is paid reduces your return on
your stock, which is a valid consid-
eration. On the other hand, if your
company doesn't make money, a lot
of that can be traced back to bad
decisions on the part of the CEO.
No matter how good the man is,
whether he is worth $40 million or
$50 million, I think the board of di-
rectors is required to answer that
question.
DEAR BRUCE: My wife has ac-
cumulated over $200,000 in cash
from an inheritance from her fa-
ther. Our accountant suggested an
immediate annuity I researched
and found that at her age of 67 it
would pay less than 7 percent, and
at the end, there would be nothing
left.
My wife is paranoid about
See Page D2





D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


TWEET
Continued from Page Dl

only traditional media -
newspapers, reporters and
later radio and TV to tell
their stories and recount their
feats. Although they are still
required to brave thickets of
microphones and gauntlets of
reporters after competing,
they also are increasingly cut-
ting out the middle men and
addressing global audiences
directly in 140-characters or
less.
Savvy Olympians, their
sponsors and managers made
sure they came to Sochi pre-
pared not only to compete
with each other on snow and
ice but also in an arm-wrestle
for social media attention and
buzz. Being cool and engaging
on Twitter and posting eye-
catching photos on Instagram
are becoming the 21st century
equivalents of a 1,000-
megawatt smile -practically
a must-have. U.S. snow-
boarder Faye Gulini, for ex-
ample, opened her Twitter
account three weeks before
flying to Sochi, prompted by
the radio station she works
with in Salt Lake City, her
hometown.
"The more people that
know who I am, the better off I
am," she says. "The more peo-
ple that follow you on your so-
cial media, the more people
know of you and then that
opens up doors for sponsors




MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

investing her cash, but she did
agree to put the $200,000 into a
company that is paying 7.3 per-
cent It's a security we have held
for 40 years. This way she gets
more income than with the an-
nuity and will be able to leave
the principal to our children.
Yes, it's putting all the eggs in
one basket, but this company
has given us a steady income
stream for many years. Also, we
have significant assets in other
IRAs and trust accounts, so
even the unlikely event of a
100 percent loss would not be
devastating. Your thoughts?
L.C., via email
DEAR L.C.: I have absolutely
no quarrel with the decision
you have made. I certainly
wouldn't have put the money
into an annuity, in most cases.
You say your wife is paranoid
about investing her cash, yet
she put the entire $200,000 into


BUSINESS


and money and all that stuff." a
The three U.S. women ski o
jumpers who competed in
Sochi were all "highly" en- p
courage in an 18-month lead- o
up to the games to develop ti
their presence on Twitter, A
Facebook and Instagram. "It's "s
absolutely a must You have to a
have it," says Whitney
Childers, communications di- c.
rector for Women's Ski Jump- a
ing USA. "Our team sponsors ti
require that." ri
"We knew that as we got ii
closer to the Olympics, people sE
wanted to know more about p
them, they wanted to get to si
know them, they wanted to un- o
derstand their story and the a
best way to do that now is to
be in control of it yourself and w
that's through social media," o
she said. '"And they all did it, G
some more reluctantly than fi
others."
To avoid distractions and T
pressures from outside to per- c:
form, some Olympians un- ii
plugged for the games. The fi
defending champion in d
women's aerials skiing, Lydia T
Lassila, tweeted Jan. 31: ii
"Time to sign off until after b
#Sochi2014."
But forgoing the chance p
now to build on @LydiaLas- d
sila's 2,800 followers may pay U
off later, the Australian's man- o
ager, Bruce Kaider, argues, tl
They plan something "engag- q
ing and interesting" Kaider tl
wouldn't be specific, to pre- tl
serve the "surprise" on her (Y
platforms post-games, when n
social media channels aren't s]



one company You mentioned
that you have held this security
for 40 years and it's done very
well, and that when she passes,
your wife will be able to leave
the principal to your children.
As you say, it's putting all
your eggs in one basket, but the
company has given you a steady
income for many years and you
have other assets to protect you
in the unlikely event that the
whole company goes down.
Sounds to me like you have
thought this out very well, and I
salute your conclusions.
DEAR BRUCE: My parents
were very frugal during their
60-plus years of marriage and
saved a considerable amount of
money Mother passed away
last year, and Dad is living in an
assisted living facility He cur-
rently has just over $300,000 in
savings and $10,000 in his
checking account.
I have his power of attorney
and take care of paying his
bills. I am also listed as his ex-
ecutor in his will. He currently
has sufficient income to pay his


s saturated with Olympic
ontent as they are now
"Everyone is trying to com-
ete on who can do the
oolest tweet, who can take
he coolest photo," he says.
after the games close Feb. 23,
she will get some real clear
ir"
What Olympians can and
cannot tweet, like and share is
lso regulated by the Interna-
onal Olympic Committee. Its
rules bar them from promot-
ng "any brand, product or
service on their social media
ages, blogs or personal web-
ites" during the games with-
ut prior, written Olympic
approval.
But there does seem to be
wiggle room. In Sochi, the ac-
ount of figure skater Gracie
rold has retweeted tweets
rst posted by sponsors of the
L.S. Olympic Committee.
'hey must be thrilled, be-
ause @GraceEGold's follow-
ng has more than doubled -
tom 27,100 to 60,000 on Fri-
ay since she marched with
'eam USA in the Feb. 7 open-
ng ceremonies and won
ronze in team skating.
While noting that she isn't
rivy to the details of Gold's
eals with her sponsors, the
JSOC's chief marketing offi-
er, Lisa Baird, says by email
hat some athletes "are re-
uired to tweet on behalf of
heir sponsors" and others "do
his on their own initiative
without contractual commit-
nents) as they value their
ponsor relationships highly"



bills, and has long-term care
insurance in the event it is
needed.
Dad's desire is to leave
$100,000 to each of his three
children when he passes away
(he's 85 years old), and my sis-
ters and I are very appreciative
of his generosity. However, our
main concern is that his money
be there for Dad, to make the
remaining years of his life as
pleasurable and comfortable as
possible.
That being said, we would
like to know if there is an in-
vestment, something like a
trust, that would minimize a po-
tential inheritance tax for my
sisters and myself, but allow
Dad plenty of access to his
money while he is still living.
-E.A., via email
DEAR EA: It appears to me
that you have everything han-
dled. You have long-term care
insurance in the event it is
needed and sufficient income
to pay your dad's bills. If the
time comes when his money
will be needed to take care of


FLIGHT
Continued from Page Dl

That's been great for their
bottom line but has created a
nightmare for passengers
whose flights are canceled due
to a storm. Other planes are
too full to easily accommodate
the stranded travelers. Many
must wait days to secure a seat
on another flight.
Carol Cummings, 23, was try-
ing to fly Thursday on United
Airlines from the Washington
D.C. area to Los Angeles to visit
a high school friend for the long
Presidents Day weekend. The
flight was canceled and Cum-
mings was automatically re-
booked for a flight on Monday -
the day she was supposed to re-
turn home. After 150 minutes on
hold, United offered to move the
trip to another weekend for
an extra $150 or to refund her
ticket
"I am annoyed and surprised
at the lack of customer con-
cern I experienced," she says."
Cummings is waiting for her
refund.
This winter is even more
painful than 2000-2001, when
66,000 or 4.2 percent of De-
cember, January and February
scheduled flights were
scrapped.
(Official statistics won't be
released for another two
months but FlightAware's fig-
ures have been historically in
line with the government's
data.)



him, I have absolutely no
problem in spending your
inheritance on him.
I don't understand why you
are worrying about inheritance
tax for your sisters and your-
self. With the amount of money
that you described, there will
be no inheritance taxes. Possi-
bly, in some states, a minor in-
heritance tax may apply, but on
$300,000 with three heirs, I
doubt seriously there will be
any taxes to be considered.
DEAR BRUCE: If a tree from
a neighbor's yard falls into my
yard, who is responsible for the
cost of cleanup? If it falls in my
yard and it is my responsibility
I would like to know why I re-
side in Pennsylvania, if state
law is a factor
WG., via email
DEAR WG.: It's not quite as
simple as you are saying. If the
tree in your neighbor's yard
falls into your yard due to wind
or some other act of god and
the tree was a healthy tree,
then you are responsible for
the cost of the cleanup. The


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

'As an industry, you are pre-
pared for bad weather but I'm
not sure if you are ready for
this many events back to back,"
says Savanthi Syth, an airline
analyst with Raymond James.
Airlines are quicker to can-
cel flights these days, some-
times a day in advance of a
storm. It's rarer to see planes
parked at the edge of runways
for hours, hoping for a break in
the weather, or passengers
sleeping on airport cots and
cobbling together meals from
vending machines. The shift in
strategy came in response to
new government regulations,
improvements to overall oper-
ations and because canceling
quickly reduces expenses.
In May 2010, a new DOT rule
took effect prohibiting airlines
from keeping passengers on
the tarmac for three hours or
more. So, airlines now choose
to cancel blocks of flights to
avoid potential fines of up to
$27,500 per passenger or $4.1
million for a typical plane
holding 150 fliers.
Additionally, the government
implemented a new rule at the
start of January, increasing the
amount of rest pilots need.
That's made it harder to oper-
ate an irregular schedule, such
as those seen after a storm. In
order to have enough well-
rested pilots, airlines cancel
more flights.
"This is another behavior
being forced upon them by gov-
ernment regulations," says An-
drew Davis, an airline analyst
at T Rowe Price.



logic there is that an act of
god caused it and you're
responsible.
However, if it could be
demonstrated that the tree was
rotten and that was the reason
for the fall, and the owner of
the tree knew the tree was rot-
ten and failed to act, then he
would be responsible for the
cleanup.
The troublesome part of this
whole equation is that the cost
of the cleanup is relatively
modest, and it would cost more
to pursue it legally than it
would be worth. You should be
aware of any trees that are dis-
eased and make it clear to your
neighbor, in a friendly way, that
he should be attending to this
problem and remove the tree
before it falls.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
of mail, personal replies cannot
be provided.


For more information

on advertising call

Anne Farrior at

352-564-2931 or

Darrell Watson at

1 352-564-2917 1


0 WILLIAMS,
k McCRANIE
WARDLOW
AW^ & CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com


BOB LANE,Accountant j
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
44 Years in Business 32 Years in Inverness



TaxPrpaatonServic


Accurate and affordable service year round

Experienced, trained tax professionals

Convenient evening and weekends hours

Audit assistance

Electronic filing


Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352) 795-4733 / 564-1010
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


I&R BLOCK


S Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs
I dll. irbl 'I ) Im ..1 1. h. All
i'' I '' Pr i ;rdn



M ~~if\ Jl i~i ^ l U ~"I"



PRICE & COMPANY, RP.A.
Certified Public Accountants

795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA
Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
I Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services


www.pwprice.com


Werner & Company, PA '
A Certified Public Accounting Firm *
www.wernercpas.com


Taxes & Accounting
Financial Planning

1011 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442


Fraud Investigations
Independent Audits

Phone: (352) 344-4390
Fax: (352) 344-4397


Inverness
726-8130


IT'S TAJX TIM4E!
Th7 e re's Still Time Left
To Place Your A d Call
563-5592


LINCOE AX DIRE-i.G^i










D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber. corn/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
Feb. 20 Business
After Hours hosted by
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 5 p.m. to 7
p.m., 2628 W. Wood-
view Lane, Lecanto.
Feb. 25 Grand open-
ing of the Citrus County
Chamber on Court-
house Square in Inver-
ness starts with a
ribbon-cutting at 4:30
p.m. at the new Cham-
ber and Citrus County
Chronicle office and
then a 5 p.m. ribbon-
cutting and celebration
at the Fox Den Winery.
Feb. 26 Ribbon-cutting
for Krista A Cleaning
Lady, 4:30 p.m., Crystal
River Chamber office.
Feb. 28 Pre-event
party: Berries, Brew
and BBQ, 6 to 10 p.m.,
Floral City Library
Complex, 8360 E. Or-
ange Ave., Floral City, FL
34436 hosted by the
Floral City Merchants
Association. The pre-
senting sponsor is In-
surance Resources and
Risk Management, Inc.
March 1 and 2 27th
annual Floral City
Strawberry Festival.
March 5 Ribbon-cut-
ting for O'Reilly Auto
Parts, 4:30 p.m., 1104
N.E. Fifth Street, Crystal
River, FL 34429.
March 13 Business
After Hours hosted by
the Mullet Hole Tavern,
5 to 7 p.m.
March 14-Chamber
Luncheon sponsored by
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church and School
at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Citrus County
Commission Chairman
John "JJ" Kenney will
provide an update on
the county and his
chairman's agenda.
March 19 and 20 -
Legislative Days: Citrus
County is headed to Tal-
to talk
lahassee

with
state
leaders
about
key
com-
merce
issues
HERSCHEL with
VINYARD keynote
speaker Herschel Vin-
yard, secretary of the
Department
of Environmental
Protection.


Berries, Brew & BBQ


Pre-Event Bash
The Floral City Strawberry Festival


Presented by


INSURANCE RESOURCES
& RISK MANAGEMENT. INC


Friday, February 28, 2014
6- 10 p.m.

Floral City Library Complex
8360 E. Orange Ave.
Floral City, FL 34436

Free Admission

Delicious food prepared by the
Citrus County Ag Alliance

Strawberries from Ferris Farms

Live Music


PD SMITH
MAGIC BUS
CRACKER COWBOYS


citruscountycham ber. corn


CrTRus COUNTY


Seven Rivers gets New Image Award
T 1he New Image Award was recently
I presented to Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church and School for its beautifi-
cation to its building and grounds.
This award program is managed by the
Ambassadors, a Citrus County Chamber
committee.


ADDRESS:
4221 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461.


CONTACT:
352-746-6200,
sevenrivers.org or
sevenriverscs.org


BWA announces scholarship program


The Business Women's Al-
liance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce en-
courages eligible students to
apply for scholarship assis-
tance before the March 7
deadline. The program offers
financial assistance for fe-
male students planning fur-
ther education in health and
business occupations.
Applicants must be Citrus
County residents planning to
attend a university, college or
technical school in Florida


and who demonstrate need.
Completed application form
and personal statement, fi-
nancial resources affidavit,
transcript and letters of refer-
ence are required.
Proceeds from BWA's suc-
cessful 2013 Women's HEALTH
and FITNESS Expo and quar-
terly networking luncheons fund
the scholarships, which are
offered for students in Lecanto,
Crystal River and Citrus high
schools plus Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. The BWA


has awarded more than
$43,000 in scholarships, and
is interested in investing in
young women who will make a
difference in their communities.
Applications are available
at the school guidance offices.
The deadline date for return
of completed applications to
guidance offices is March 7.
For WTI, consult the Student
Services office. For information,
contact the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce's Crystal
River office at 352-795-3149.


CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion Duds-n-Suds
683 S. Adolph Point, Lecanto, FL 34461 423 S.E. King's Bay Drive, Crystal River FL 34429
careersourceclm.com 352-249-3278 352-436-3813


.. /;- i \t E 'R
CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion brings together citi- -
zens, employers and educational providers to develop programs to ....I(iI R
support high-quality education/training and employment services to
meet regional workforce needs. From left: Chamber ambassadors
Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Lillian Dan Pushee, associate member; Jim Ferrara, Insight
Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Mona Marshall, SPHR, HR Power, LLC; Credit Union; Bonnie Hardiman, associate member; Bill Hudson,
Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; Sarah Fitts, First International Land Title of Citrus County; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control;
Title; Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten; and Chamber Board Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal;
Member Carl Flanagan welcome CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; and George Bendtsen, Insurance by
(formerly known as Workforce Connection) to its new location. George welcome owner Theresa Lavigne.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CINDI FEIN
Cindi Fein
named executive
director of Boys
& Girls Clubs of
Citrus County
Join the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County in welcom-
ing Cindi Fein as the execu-
tive director/chief
professional officer. Anne
Pope, vice president of opera-
tions for the clubs, said "Cindi
brings excitement to the Boys
& Girls Clubs of Citrus
County. Her enthusiasm has
already been felt by our team!
We know 2014 will be a great
year for our operation!"
Since moving to the county
in 2010, Fein has demon-
strated her desire to become
immersed in the county. She
began her local career as the
public relations coordinator
for the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce and most
recently worked for the
United Way of Citrus County
in the same capacity. Fein
was a member of the Cham-
ber's Leadership Citrus 2013
class, where she developed a
strong connection to the com-
munity.
Additionally, she is a mem-
ber of Florida Public Rela-
tions Association Nature
Coast Chapter, serving Citrus
and Hernando counties, and
has been a member of the ad-
visory panel for Coastal
Healthy Living for the past 18
months. She recently taught
the Social Media and the Job
Search workshop at United
Way's Land that Job event.
Fein, who holds a bachelor's
degree in journalism and
public relations from North-
ern Illinois University, has
worked in the nonprofit sec-
tor for the past five years and
is continuing her nonprofit
education with online classes
through Withlacoochee Tech-
nical Institute.
Get Serious
Citrus to focus
on weight
management
Beginning on Monday,
March 3, the Citrus Memorial
Diabetes Center will begin a
weight management and
weight loss program called
Get Serious Citrus. The eight-
week program does not re-
quire a physician's referral.
Under the direction of Amy
Freeman, Citrus Memorial's
certified diabetes educator,
the course will cover the fol-
lowing topics:
Detecting fat and calorie
intake
How to plan a healthful
meal
Jump-starting your
metabolism
Talking back to negative
thoughts
Managing stress
Staying motivated
Classes meet from 9 to
10 a.m. in the Citrus
Memorial Auditorium at
402 W. Grace St., Inverness,
beginning on Monday,
March 3. The cost is $10 per
class. Those interested may
pre-register by calling the
Citrus Memorial Diabetes
Center at 352-341-6110.






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association


B D Builder 's Cnnnection






Golf for a good cause Feb. 22


Crystal Chevrolet to Headline Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing ,f= i


Donna Bidlack, Citrus County Builders
Association Executive Officer, an-
nounced Tuesday that Crystal Chevrolet
will be the Exclusive Presenting Sponsor
of the 2014 Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing. This is exciting news for the
CCBA, as they share 50 percent of their
proceeds with the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County for the second consecutive
year
"We are excited to have Crystal
Chevrolet on board this year to help us
with our cause, because all of these funds
stay right here in Citrus County to help
fund programs and facilities at all three
Boys & Girls Club sites" said Bidlack.
In its 25th year, the Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing is open to all amateur
golfers. It has been a favorite CCBA event
due to regularly changing golf courses
each year that keep the outing interest-
ing and challenging for returning golfers.
It was renamed in honor of Jim Blacks-
hear, a founder of the CCBA, after his
passing in 2004.
Registration for the event will begin at
7 a.m. and the shotgun start is scheduled
for 8 a.m. All teams must pre-register The


NOT TOO LATE TO REGISTER
The 2014 Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing will be Saturday, Feb. 22,
at the Inverness Golf & Country
Club, in partnership with the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Player registration and sponsorship
open online at www.CitrusBuilders.
corn or in person at the Citrus
County Builders Association, 1196
S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461.
For questions and registration form
requests, call 352-746-9028.

$60 entry fee includes greens fee, cart,
lunch, door prizes and one free Mulligan
ticket. Signing up a team for $220 saves
$5 per person.
More event information as well as on-
line registration for players and sponsors
can be found at wwwCitrusBuilders.com
or by contacting the Citrus County
Builders' Association at 352-746-9028 or
the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
office at 352-621-9225.


The CCBA and Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County would like to thank the fol-
lowing sponsors who are helping to make
this event possible:
Presenting Sponsor: Crystal
Chevrolet.
Hole In One Sponsors: Eagle Buick
GMC and Harley-Davidson of Crystal
River
Media Sponsors: Citrus County
Chronicle and Hometown Values
Magazine.
Beverage Cart Sponsors: Citrus Pest
Management, Coldwell Bankers, Eco-
nomic Recovery Group, FDS Disposal,
Lora Wilson, Attorney and Sheldon-
Palmes Insurance.
Closest to the Centerline Sponsor:
Awareness Marketing.
Closest to the Pin Sponsors: Central
Ridge Insurers, David M. Rom State
Farm and Young Boats.
Longest Drive Sponsor: Lecanto Vet-
erinary Hospital.
Green & Tee Sponsors: Deem Cabi-
nets, Gulf Coast Ready Mix, J.W Morton
Century 21, Porter's Locksmithing.
Water Sponsors: AAA Roofing.


Jim Blackshear


Prize Sponsors: Back to New Heat-
ing & Cooling, Florian Masonry,
MacRae's of Homosassa, the Mullet Hole
Tavern, Old Mill Tavern, and Wollinka
Wikle Title.
Goodie Bag Sponsors: AAA Roofing,
Awareness Marketing, Citrus Chiroprac-
tic Group, FDS Disposal, and Porter's
Locksmithing.


Renewing members


CITRUS COUNTY
BUILDERS
ASSOCIATION
www.citrusbuilders.ccnrn Ma


Renewing members were honored at the General Membership Luncheon of Jan. 23, 2014, at the CCBA. Pictured from left are John
Jobe of City Electric Supply (4 years), Mike Deem of Deem Cabinets (36 years), Gaston Hall of Hall Brothers of CC Inc. (26 years),
Lori Haussy of AAA Roofing (15 years), Susan Adams of Ro-mac Lumber & Supply (9 years) and President-Elect Wayne Bardsley of
Quality Crafted Builders. Renewing members not pictured were: Flynn Builders (19 years), Gaudette Electric (33 years), Hulbert Con-
struction (13 years), Lada Construction (8 years), Oyster's Restaurant & Catering (3 years), Richard A. Van Orden (10 years),
Schnettler Construction (6 years), Simmons Mechanical & Construction (6 years), Smart Interiors II (9 years), Suncoast Plumbing
& Electric (16 years), Surfaces Flooring (8 years), Triton Lumber & Marine Supply (13 years), Tropical Window Inc. (19 years), and
Winkel Construction (14 years).


CCBAmembership


furthers your industry


"Every man owes a part of
his time and money to business
or industry in which he is en-
gaged. No man has the moral
right to withhold support from
an organization that is striving
to improve conditions within
his sphere." Theodore
Roosevelt

Are you a member of the
CCBA? When asked this ques-
tion, often the answer is "Why
should I be?" when in fact, the
better question is ... Why
shouldn't you be? Membership
with your local Home Builders
Association is support of your
industry through and through.
Standing alone, a small busi-
ness is "a voice in the dark,"
but by joining other members
of the team, what can be ac-
complished is nothing short of
amazing.
When you join your local as-
sociation, you automatically be-
come a full member at the state
and national level. That's three
memberships for the price of
one. Your National (NAHB),
State (FHBA) and Local (CCBA)
Home Builders Associations
offer plenty of resources
to help each member make the
most of their investment and
connect with the benefits they
value most.
For more than 60 years,
NAHB has been the nation's
leading source for housing in-


dustry information. HBA mem-
bers use a variety of ways to stay
connected to industry informa-
tion, including publications, e-
newsletters, exclusive website
content, bulletins, special re-
ports, email alerts, financial
data and many other means. Up-
to-date information, when you
want it, how you want it!
Membership in your local
Home Builders Association is
more than just networking or
having a special seal on your
business door or stationary, it's
about building relationships.
You may not feel that you need
more business, but every con-
tact a businessperson makes is
a potential asset to them and
their business. That doesn't just
mean more business; it means
better information flow, more
exposure to more innovative
and/or more cost-effective ma-
terials and services, as well as
more opportunities to put your
advertising dollars to their most
effective use through local HBA
sponsorships and publications.
So what are you waiting for?
If you already know that you've
waited too long to support your
industry, then go to wwwcitrus-
builders.com, and click on the
"how to join" link for a print-
able membership application.
If you're still not convinced
that you need to make this in-
vestment, then call the CCBA at
352-746-9028.


New member


IA


CITRUS COUN

BUILDERS


ASSOCIATION


President-Elect Wayne Bardsley welcomes new member Glenda
Mitchell of BB&T Bank.



CCBA's Banquet Hall

available for rental use


The Citrus County Builders
Association has a Banquet Hall
available to rent, for weddings,
receptions, anniversary parties,
graduation celebrations, club
meetings, etc. and it's open
to the public. The building pro-
vides free Internet access.
Please feel free to come and
look at the hall during regular


Important upcoming
CCBA events
* Duke Energy and the
Citrus County Builders
Association invite you to
join us for a whole lot of
networking, nostalgia and
an old-school steak night
on Thursday, Feb. 27, at
our CCBA Legends Night.
Join us and some of the
original movers and
shakers of the CCBA in a
night of tales and
testimony the way that
only CCBA can tell it!
5:30 networking and 6:30
dinner and program. This
is a don't-miss event!
Make reservations today
by visiting the events page
of www.CitrusBuilders.
com or by calling 352-
746-9028. Presenting
Sponsor Duke Energy and
the CCBA would also like
to thank the following
Legends Night Sponsors
for helping to make this
evening possible: Colony
Stone & Plastering, Gulf
Coast Ready Mix, Ken
Lindquist Corporation,
Quality Crafted Builders,
Sheldon-Palmes
Insurance, Sweetwater
Homes of CC, Tropical
Window Inc., Village Crier
newspaper, the Ron
Kitchen Jr. Campaign and
the John "JJ" Kenney
Campaign.
* The 2014 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment sponsored by Ex-
clusive Platinum Sponsor
FDS Disposal Inc., Weigh
In Sponsor Florian
Masonry and Heart
Sponsor Sodium Fishing
Gear-will be April 26
and 27 at the Homosassa
Riverside Resort with a
portion of the proceeds
to benefit the Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Mili-
tary Order of the Purple
Heart. Sponsorships and
Angler registration are
now open. Official entry
forms can be picked up at
FDS Disposal Inc.,
Sodium Fishing Gear or
the Citrus County
Builders Association Of-
fice. For more informa-
tion, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028
* Save the Date!! CCBA is
the planning stages of a
brand new event to be
held in 2014! The inaugu-
ral Construction Industry
Building Olympics will be
Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014.
For more information and
sponsorship opportuni-
ties, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028 or email
donnab@citrusbuilders.
corn to be added to the
email list for updates on
this exciting new event.


business hours of 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monday to Thursday
The office is at1196 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, centrally located a short
drive south of State Road 44.
If you would like more infor-
mation, visit the website at
www citrusbuilders.com or call
Donna Bidlack at 352-746-9028.


s














^____[[_To place an ad, call 563-5966


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 D5


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(352)563-5665 1Toll7Fre :( 8 5:1 awo


Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672

Laurel Ridge,3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks
Golf Comm.(with club
house & pool.) 1754SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kit w/ pantry &
nook. MBR has 2 clos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639

LLADRO Unexpected
Visit. Piece retired in
2004. Beautiful, no
flaws. In original box.
Will text picture if inter-
ested. $200 OBO. Tom
352-586-3380

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178

TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500

WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 100 ft on
water All utilities.
$165,000.352-634-1171


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




Black Lab Mix
7 mo. old male,
Free to good home
(352) 476-3854
Female Black Lab& Pit
mix, free to good
home (352) 464-4001
Free to Good Home
4 yr. old Black Lab
Border Collie Mix,
Housebroken
Good with other dogs
and kids
(352) 215-3558
Full Blooded
Blue Nose Pitt Bull
1 yr old, female
Floral City area
(352) 419-2623




CAT
Male, Orange, 10 Ibs
Lost on Apopka Ave
Inverness 2/10
(910) 401-7993 (cell)
Cockatiel
blue w/orange
patches on his cheeks
pls call (352) 344-0379
FEMALE PIG
childhood pet, name
is Babe. white w/ big
black spotsapprox. 2
yrs old, weighs about
300 Ibs, lost in the
vicinity of Dunkenfield
and Arter, REWARD
pls call (352)257-0184
Gold Mother's Cross
with birth stones.
Lost between CMH
and the gas station at
Walmart.352-212-7962
LOST DOG
14 yr old Black
Shepherd mix
missing since 2/10
from Inverness area
Heart Broken, please
call if found or seen
(352) 341-4280 Iv msg
Lost Dog. Male, White
w/Tan around eyes.
Name is Gator. Lost in
Crystal River. Please
Contact Lorra @
352-634-0220 if you
have any information.


Name "Mamba"
Last seen Paradise Pt.
Road. by Ale House
REWARD
(727) 481-3010
Male White Cat
61bs, White with grey
patched behind ears.
Lost off of Birch Ave
(352) 613-6390
Pantech Cell Phone
Reward
Lost near Court House
Inverness
(786) 205-1186 Cell
Small light Brown
Min Pin/Chihuahua
mix,
lost near Inverness
Golf & Country Club
Call (352) 538-4345



Brown Eared
Papillon, sml male,
approx 2 yrs old found
in the vicinity of
Gospel Island
(352) 637-0910
Solar Salt
call to identify
(352) 634-1500




8U Sumter Shock
Baseball
is currently seeking
2 talented 8 yr olds
who would like to
join our state cham-
pionship winning
travel baseball
team. We are
based out of Sumter
county. We prac-
tice 2 times a week
and play 2 tourna-
ments a month.
If you are interested
in scheduling
a tryout Call
Wes Jennings
352-303-1190

February 15 & 16
Howards Flea
Market is having a
"RV Show and Swap"
Presenting "Arrow
RV & Sales" Have RV
Merchandise? Call
& reserve a space.
352-628-4656


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
i Grouper @ $6.OOlb
delivered 352-897-5001















Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966








Busy Optometric
Practice Seeks:

Applicants for
Various Positions

Qualities desired
are outgoing,
friendly, problem
solving, computer
savvy, and flexible
hours. Availability to
work some evening
and weekend hours
are a must.
Please
Brina Resume to
applv in person at:
Citrus Vision Clinic,
2332 Hwy 44 W,
Inverness, 34453.




C.N.A's
Join Our Team.
Now Hiring
Ask about Baylor
Prog. EXC. Benefits
Applv at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA
EmployerM/F/V/D


CASE MANAGER

Primary Care
Physician
Accountable Care
Organization (ACO)
seeking qualified
Care Manager.
Current Florida RN
Lic. along with 3 plus
years experience in
hospital setting or
post acute care
setting. Manage
Care experience
and Case Mgr certi-
fication preferred.
Please Fax
Resume to:
Nature Coast ACO
Attn Patty King
352-746-3838

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yvahoo com

Exp Only BILLING
& INSURANCE
For Front Office

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
For Back Office
Lecanto Florida
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3305

HIRING: PT/A,
OT/A, RN/LPN

Florida Homecare
Specialists
(352) 794-6097


Housekeeping
/Laundry
Supervisor

This is a hands on
position. 2 + years.
Management and
Floor Care
experience a must.
Contact: Bob Green
(352) 249-3100 or
mail resume to
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
Florida, 34442


www.chronicleonline.corn


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience req'd
for very busy
medical office.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

MEDICAL ASST
Needed for busy
family practice Med-
ical Office in Citrus
County. Please Fax
Resume
352-746-3838

Physician,
Family Practice,
Inverness, FL:

Provide/Manage
direct patient care
including, physical
exams, evaluations,
test results, assess-
ments, diagnoses,
treatment for speci-
fied patient popula-
tion (including, but
not limited to pedi-
atric and geriatric
care). Order diag-
nostic testing, pre-
scribe pharmaceuti-
cals, medications,
treatment regimens
as appropriate.
Refer patients to
specialists; Direct/
coordinate patient
care, nursing,
support as required.

Reply to: Bikkasani,
Ram, Hellstern,
Chandrupatla MD,
PA, 105lNOsceola
Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450





NET Developer
With C # and NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
components and
features for our
Industrial SCADA
and HMI software
products.
Other desirable
experience -
Web Services,
ASP.NET, HTML5,
Javascript, XMLSVG
Other domain
expertise -
SCADA, HMI, MES
EAM OR CMMS
3 yrs exp. preferred.

Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

LEGAL ASSISTANT
Busy Law Firm.
Probate experience
preferred.
Send Resume to:
Citrus County
Chronicle
Blind Box 1856P
106 W. Main Street
Inverness Fl. 34450


HowDo




YouSfGK




Your a*


I


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print


2 /." .





,//
;. ". -
,, ,,


" k ^:"--,


^ .,. ': z/" ",": '
S ..-/ "* ;*- '-" "'
__./..,./ ,.-. :l / ,-.- ^

'I 7 :, i. " .
.'/ I .. ., '

..,4 r a . I ,J

.-. .


Litigation
Asst/Paralegal

5 yr litigation exp.
mandatory Salary
negotiable/Benefits
avail. Fax resume:
352-726-3180







Combined Food
Preparation and
Serving Workers,

Including Fast Food
(MOBILE) wanted
for Rudy's, Inc.
6 temporary
positions open from
5/19/14 to 10/26/14.
Job involves:
Perform variety of
attending duties at
amusement facility
(traveling carnival
concessions). Set-up
tear-down, operate
amusement food
concessions.
Post-employment,
random drug testing
and background
checks may be
required.
Travel with Mobile
Food Concessions
is required.
No training or expe-
rience is required.
Equal Opportunity,
FLSA (13)(a)(3) ex-
empt employer not
subject to Federal
hourly wage, over-
time or recordkeep-
ing requirements.
No overtime ex-
pected. Overtime,
if any, calculated
and paid as per ap-
plicable regulations.

Work schedule var-
ies widely, typically
35 Hrs/Wk Wed-Sun,
5:00PM to 10:00PM.

Employer will pay
$400. per wk., start-
ing in Citrus County,
FL and traveling to
Virginia Beach City,
Fairfax, Suffolk Co,
VA; Suffolk, Dela-
ware, Washington,
Columbia Co, NY;
Plymouth, Bristol:
Barnstable, Franklin,
Hampden Co, MA;
New London Co, CT;
Sussex Co, NJ;
Wake Co, NC.
Employer certifies
that if there are
changes in work
locations, employer
will obtain applica-
ble prevailing wage
for work location
and pay such
wage. Merit
increases and/or
bonuses may be
awarded at em-
ployer discretion.

Employer makes
available mobile
housing valued at
$300.00 /week.

Employer makes
available transpor-
tation from venue to
venue and sched-
uled transportation
to laundry, shopping
valued at $25.00 /
week.
Send Resume to
rudyeastcoast
@aol.com or fax to
352-489-7635.
Rudy's, Inc,
5935 N. Highland
Park Dr., Hernando,
FL 34442. Please
include complete
contact information
in your submission.


CookslKitchen
and Servers

Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues







SALES POSITION

AVAILABLE
If you are looking for
a career, not just a
job with long term
employment, we
offer many benefits.
Insurance, 401 K,
paid vacations.
Draw salary vs.
commission. Perfor-
mance bonuses
paid quarterly.
We are a Drug Free
work place
Applv in Person
1825 Hwy41 N.
Ask for Mr. Green
(352) 726-4009


Seeking Professional
Sales Person
for counter and
outside sales for
auto body paint
supply store. Exp.
Req'd. Pay based
on Exp. Email
resume to: paint.
n.etc@gmail.com


CHiOpN1LE


Business services
Full Time
Accounting
Clerk

Citrus County
Chronicle
Crystal River, FL
Minimum two years
accounting
experience.
Proficient with MS
Office products.
Requires strong
working knowledge
of MS Excel.
Fast- paced
enviornment.
High level of
attention to detail.
Process reports,
billing audition
functions, excellent
customer service,
End of Month
Closeout Functions.

To Applv
Send Resume to:
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
or Apply in Person
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, Fl. 34429
Drug screen
required for final
applicant. EOE

CDL-A Team
Owner
Operators:
$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946 NFI
Industries
nfipartners.com

Granite Fabrica-
tors & Bridge
Saw Operator
Needed

Part time w/Full time
potential NO EXP.
NEC. Will train, Must
be detail oriented
and have good
hand eye coord.
drug free workplace
Applyv in Person
DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
Crystal River

Heavy Mach.
Mechanic

DAB Constructors
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
(352) 447-5488

HELP WANTED

Looking for
individuals with
heavy equipment
experience:
Specifically grader,
dozer, loader
operators with sub-
division experience.
Also looking for
people with
underground utility
experience.
Please go to www.
magnumcs.net
download the
application form
and either fax or
deliver to our office.

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

ROOFING CREW
experienced only

Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
Aoolv In Person
AAA ROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411

The City of
Crystal River
is seeking resumes
for the position of
Maintenance II.
This is a semi-skilled
and manual posi-
tion including repair
and maintenance
of City property.
Must have a high
school diploma or
equivalent certifi-
cate; hold a valid
Florida Class B
Commercial Drivers
License; and have
two years
experience.
A job description
can be obtained
from the Finance
Director or by call-
ing 352-795-4216,
ext. 309. Hourly
wage is $9.87 -
$13.98 per hr., and
includes insurance
benefits. Please
send resume to:
David Burnell, Public
Works Director
City of Crystal River,
123 NW Hwy 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428
by February 24, 2014


Trades/

HELP WANTED

Remodeling. Must
have trans. & some
tools. $13-$18 hr.
Call (352) 637-6407

Traffic Control
Technician
Announcement
#14-20

Semi skilled laboring
tasks in the installa-
tion, maintenance
and repair of traffic
control signs and in
the installation and
maintenance of
traffic roadway
markings. Starting
pay $11.88 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
for more information
please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 21,
2014 EOE/ADA.




CASUAL
LIFEGUARD
(12 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE)
Skilled duties
lifeguarding at
Bicentennial Park
Pool and Central
Ridge Pool.
MUST POSSESS AND
MAINTAIN THE
FOLLOWING CERTIFI-
CATIONS: CURRENT
RED CROSS LIFE-
GUARD, FIRST AID
AND CPR/AED FOR
THE PROFESSIONAL
RESCUER.
*WE WILL NOT TRAIN
Must possess a valid
Florida Driver
License. Must be at
least 16 years of
age. Flexible sched-
ule, 10-30 hours
weekly. Pay range:
$8.02 $8.73 hourly.
Casual labor
applications may
be completed on
line at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
and submitted in
person or mailed to
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA

EXP. PAINTER

Needed, Plenty of
Work Must have Dri.
Lic. 352-302-8265

Key Training
Center
Has positions
available in group
home setting. Assist
adults with disabili-
ties in daily living
skills. HS Diploma/
GED required
ApoPly in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

MULTI TASKER

For Fast Paced Envi-
ronment. Must Excel
in Customer Rela-
tions. Personable,
Professional and
Presentable Only
Need Apply
River Ventures
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-1:00PM

Part time Lawn
Maintenance
Call (352) 628-2555

Part-Time Front
Desk Reception

Busy sales office
needs receptionist,
schedule to include
weekends. Must be
friendly, professional
have excellent
phone skills and be
customer service
oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

Retail Manager

wanted for resale
clothing store for
teens & young
adults. Experience
working in junior
brand stores a plus.

Applv in Person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL
Key Training Center
**EOE*

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only
Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
(352) 628-0254


& Online / .


S/* . 0 U, N









(352) 563-5966 4/


................................................... ... ........ .... ........ ... . .........
................................................................ ...................... .. .............................................................
................................................................. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
............................................................... .............................................
.................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................
.................... ..........................................................................
......................................... III ........... ............................ W
. ....... .... ... ...
................................... ...................... w ... ................. ..... .... ..........................................................................
................................... W A .... .... .... ............. ... ... .......................
................................... ... .... ..... .... ... ... .......................
................................... ...
.... .... .... .... ... ... ... ... .......................
................................... ...
.... .... ... .... ... ... ... .......................
................................... ...
................................... ... .... .... ... .......................
.... ... ... ... .......................


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


II









D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


Warehouse/
Counter Pos.

FT position. Counter
sales & warehouse
stocking. Plumbing &
comp knowledge a +.
401K & Insurance
Apply in person @:
Morgan Bros. Supply
7559 W. Gulf to Lake
Crystal River/or email:
mbscr@ hotmal.com





AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547










MASSAGE
THERAPY
Classes Start,
April 28, 2014
Spring Hill
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu









(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE*
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


You can become an
expert in HVAC
installation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute Online
HVAC education in as
little as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961 or go
online:
www.HVAC-Online
Education.com




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
* A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
# Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
# Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
# All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


Storage Sheds
6x10 shed $550
4x7 shed $100
Cryrstal River Area
352-613-8453
WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**



70 Bradford
Collectible Plates,
Norman Rockwell,
Sandra Kuck, etc.
$1000. obo
(352) 746-7129
LLADRO Unexpected
Visit. Piece retired in
2004. Beautiful, no
flaws. In original box.
Will text picture if inter-
ested. $200 OBO. Tom
352-586-3380



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DISHWASHER Black
Whirlpool. Works well.
$35 or best offer.
352-212-4363
Dryer, Maytag
Washer, Whirlpool
Both in exc cond,
White, $100 each
352-513-4394
352-400-1251


ELECTRIC RANGE GE
Spectra flat top range
with self cleaning
oven. 100% like new
condition. $325 firm.
352-422-1209 or
352-344-4407.
GE Dishwasher
pot scrubber
white, exc cond
$100
734-355-2325
352-503-9825
GE Electric Range
Self Cleaning, $150
GE Over Range Micro-
wave $75 Both White
(734) 355-2325,
352-503-9825
Maytag Washer
and Dryer, excellent
condition, in SugarMill
Woods, $200. for pair
(352) 503-9886
MICROWAVE OVEN
GE black over-the-stove
with lights and fan.
Good condition. $35 or
best. 352-212-4363
REFRIGERATOR GE.
Side by side doors with
ice maker. Excellent
condition. $100 or best
offer. 352-212-4363
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also JWanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258


iVEFrigidaireelec-
tnric excellent working
condition. Asking
$100 or best offer.
352-212-4363
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398



OAK FILING CABINET
Four drawer legal size
filing cabinet. $50.00
352-462-7041




AUCTION

ONLINE AUCTION,
100+ Hobart
60 Quart Mixers.
Restaurants Nation-
wide, See website
for locations near
you. Sold to Highest
Bidder!
Bid online thru 2/17,
www.SoldTiger.com




Circle Saw $25.
6" Jointer $75.
Angle Grinder $17.
(352) 527-7919
Table Saw, Drill Press,
Chop Saw, Vice, all
mounted on work
bench w/wheels
$150. for all
(352) 527-7919




DISH TV Retailer.
Starting $19.99/
month (for 12 mos.)
Broadband Internet
starting $14.95/
month (where avail-
able.) Ask About
SAME DAY
Installation!
CALL Now!
1-800-980-6193
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $25
352-613-0529
TELEVISION SONY
50-inch rear projection
TV $60 (352)795-7813
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $75
352-341-6920



20" HP Monitor
w/keybard, like new
$50. Kurio 10S, android
tablet, never used,
$175. (352) 5134317
Dell XP Computer
w/monitor, keyboard
and mouse, $50.
(352) 382-3467


CLASSIFIED




PATIO SET 5 PIECES
48" OCTAGON TABLE
& 4 CHAIRS WITH
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529
Rust free aluminum
rectangular glass top
table w/ 6 chairs
great cond $85.
High top rectangular
bar set, w 3 chairs &
pads good cond. $60.
(231) 775-4774




20x20 storage unit
filled with beautiful
wood furniture. Made
for displays in retail
setting. Eleven 8-10 ft
units; like new. If inter-
ested call Daystar Life
Ctr (352) 795-8668
ARMOIRE
very heavy dark
wood grain, 48"t -
49"w x 20" deep
like new, $125.
Larry(352) 344-1692
BAR AND 3 STOOLS
Solid oak bourbon
barrel bar set
@1960's. Excellent
quality. NO particle
board.Can email pics.
$600.Pine Ridge/BH
352-270-3909
BEDROOM SET -
Mahogany, 4 poster
Full Size, w/ night
stand, dresser, mirror
Mattress rarely used.
$400 352-346-0153
BR & LR Furn, Kit setTV,
Hsehold items & much
morel! (352) 522-0107
** Mgvina Sale **
COFFEE TABLE Wood
coffee table 44 inches
long, 33 inches wide, 19
inches high. $75.00
362-462-7041
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.comr
352-795-0121



LISTI4GS
COUCH Ethen Allen 72"
subtle tones of green
mauve sm print. Nor-
walk cream w/large plaid
soft colors.excellent
condition.$500
3523414586
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER & DESK
Wood TV Centerpocket
doors, holds 32-36
TV.55 in. high x 44 in.
wide. Beautiful cond.
$250. Desk, 3 drawers
& door,60 wide x 22
deep. exc. cond. $45.
352-489-1239
Kitchen Set w/4 Chairs
on casters & three
matching barstools
upholstered, 32" high
with armrests and
backs, $450.00
352-382-3933


COnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COUCH
Beautiful, almost new,
soft, light green plush
3 cushions, $150
Computer table/desk
$25; 352-341-1665
Lane Rocker Recliner,
leather vinyl combo
taupe, $85.
Round 54" Glass top
table, 4 wrought iron
chairs, w/ pads, $250.
good condition.
(231) 775-4774
LIVING ROOM SET
overstuffed brown
leather sofa,love
seat,chair and ottoman.
$80(352)795-7813
NewAshley
Sofa & Loveseat
in dark brown leather
call (352) 794-3693
QUEEN SLEIGH BED &
MATTRESS SET Solid
Wood, pristine condi-
tion, 15 inch Mattress &
Box Springs $275.00
OBO 352-422-3217
Queen Sofa Bed
Very Good Condition
Flower Print
$150
(352) 637-2117
RECLINER
BROYHILL, dk blue
cloth, Brand new,
never used. $100
(740) 684-6106 (cell)
SIMPLE MODERN
LOVESEAT washable,
cream colored, like new
$85 352-897-4154
SLEEPER SOFA, $150.
Sleeper loveseat, $75
Good cond., Smoke
free environment
(352) 344-9391



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
FREE PINE STRAW
Clean Pine Straw.
Already piled, you
haul away. Call
815-600-5133
Husqvarna
Riding Lawn Mower
48" cut, good cond.
6 yrs old, asking $700.
Moving
(352) 209-4311
Riding Mower
2012 Troy Bilt, Auto,
42", 20 HP, w/attached
grass spreader $825;
Wooden Utility Trailer
4 x 10, $485
(352) 794-6761




Citrus Springs
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a to I p
misc. hshld items,
patio furniture, gar-
age items, clothing
8414 N Creek Way
CRYSTAL RIVER
Daystar Life Center
9-2 M-F
6751 W Gulf to Lake
Good used furniture
Gently used clothing


I.Fm i t r e B


DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a-?
Antiques, Furn, Misc
20929 W McKinney Av




DRESS SHIRT
Bristol & Bull New Tag
says 79.50/selling $25
Linda 4234163
MENS CLOTHING 3
SLACKS SIZE 36X30 &
2 CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $25
352-613-0529
MEN'S DRESS PANTS
Like new, 6 pair
$60 For all OBO.
Linda 4234163




4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes/wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
$50 352464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGE
LG 32 W X 40 L
$60 OBO
Linda 423-4163
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new. I own.
$100 OBO.
Linda 4234163
Electric Scooter
Active Care
Spitfire 1420
$350.
(352) 628-1723
EZ-UP CANOPY
10x 10 with remova-
ble awning, sides, &
weights, $100
(352) 344-4105
Generac Generator
12.5 KW, mobile with
cover, factory spares
used twice, $1,500
(352) 746-6962 or
Cell 239-272-8101
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
L shaped computer
desk with hutch $25.00
regular desk with 4
drawers $25.00
352-302-3771


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179






Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR 461-4518





-Affordable Mobile-
all type marine repairs
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-398-5903

All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialize in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770





Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/ Ref. 352-875-9793

Take Care of Loved
Ones in My Home
Clean, caring, exp.,
exc. ref. 352-476-7159





SHADYFVIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
Seeding,Tree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


I POOL SPALl


LEAK
DETECTION
Licensed


Electronic
Leak
Detection
for allpools
and spas
We'l find your leak
or tewes
no charge!


352-433-6070

30 day guarantee on all work
BayLeakDetective@gmail.com




GENERAC = '..


Stand Alone -
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

General Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


A-i Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352-422-7279 *kk
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002


Firewood

TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TVs Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured



BI


Ted's Painting
a Kiwi Services Co.








All Types of Home Repairs

746-5190
LIC/INS Lic #240270


-ABOVE ALL**
M &W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 5374144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
* AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
0- Remodeling
Additions. new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352Q 949-2292



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773


HOUSEKEEPING, relia-
ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable ref.
Maggie(352) 503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavating &
Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
beASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


InsTall a Reqir Now's the
HMss ein..rs time for pool
Healers remodeling
a Sanl Systems
PnnIPf~nh;nq
*i 'Ii n ll i hl [ nil

I,-u I),i,, l i ,,
Sugarmill I,,, i
Woods
Wed ervinq All H Oi CirRCinr
Pool.& Spa ,

sMwUoUSI.cM O 382-4421
a ............. ...


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallways Free) only $69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt With copon.

IZ IHURADCEANkh
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



pa

Pool Bidnl



POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Any Surface,
roof cleaning, int/ext
painting, gutter cleaning,
Absolute Exterior
Restoration
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557









Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
*9 Small Carpentry
: 2Fencing

S( alen Dryer Vents
,4ffordobe & Dependable
E'pe,"ence lifelong
S352-344-0905
I cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
?R 352-364-4610
(%MR.
ELECTRIC*
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
3 Independently owned & operated
S Lie #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day.7 DaYs a Week


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


WATKIINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
" Driveways
" Parking Lots
" Seal Coating
* Maintenance
* Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gnmail.conm
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


S
MENS WATCHES
Invicta, Croton, Swiss
Legend, six in boxes.
Excellent cond.
$50-$100 each.
352-613-5240
Older Shop smith
5 tools in 1, $400 obo
Craftsman 42"
Lawn Mower, Kohler
Eng. $450. obo
(352) 344-2932
RICH PRICE SURF
BOARD- 72" x 18",
shaped design, USA,
minor wear, $100.
352-628-0033
Sony 50" Grand WEGA
LCD Projection HDTV
plays well $125.
(352) 726-8410
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529
Utility Trailer.
5X14, 2' Sides. Special
Built. Good Cond. Good
Tires Well Built. $550.
(678)617-5560 or
352-513-5580



4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
3524640316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Go Go
3 Wheel Scooter
extra basket,
fairly new battery
$700.
(352) 419-6016
INVACARE POWER
WHEELCHAIR Pronto
M14 "SureStep" Perfect
shape $950
352-897-4154
PHOENIX SCOOTER
S35010, good shape,
asking $300.
(352) 344-9580
Pride Mobility Scooter
"Go-Go", very good
cond. long battery life
$450. (352) 423-3513
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE STATIONARY
BIKE ALL ELECTRON-
ICS ONLY 100.00
352-464 -0316
SHOWER BENCH
SEAT ALUMINUM &
FIBERGLASS BENCH
TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
352-464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANEUVERABILITY.
ONLY 60.00 464-0316


"NEW" FENDER
ACOUSTIC
GUITAR&GIGBAGSMALL,S
HALLOW BODY
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE ELECTRIC
GUITAR, SET NECK,
CHROME&IVORY $100
352-601-6625
PIANO & SEAT
Marantz,
needs tuning,
$300 OBO
(352) 465-0339
PIANO
Lowery piano with
bench. Good Cond.
$350
(352) 637-2117




Liberation by
American Standard
Walk-In Bath -
Don't Struggle
Getting Out Of A
Normal Bathtub.
Stay in your home
longer, safely,
independently.
Liberation Walk-In
Baths Commended
by the Arthritis
Foundation. Best
Lifetime Warranty
in the industry.
Hydrotherapy,
Chromatherapy,
Aromatherapy no
extra cost. Installa-
tion Included! Get
$1,000 Off -Call
Toll-Free Today
1-866-583-1432.

Liberation by
American Standard
Walk-In Bath -
Don't Struggle
Getting Out Of A
Normal Bathtub.
Stay in your home
longer, safely,
independently.
Liberation Walk-In
Baths Commended
by the Arthritis
Foundation. Best
Lifetime Warranty
in the industry.
Hydrotherapy,
Chromatherapy,
Aromatherapy no
extra cost. Installa-
tion Included! Get
$1,000 Off -Call
Toll-Free Today
1-866-583-1432.




MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95464-0316
Recumbant Excercise
Bike. Edge 280,
like new. $150.
(352) 465-7269

S lorting

2007 CLUB CAR
Like New newer bat-
teries, fully fitted out,
exc. cond. $4200.
obo (352) 527-7919









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238



Sell r Swa


-4




Tell that special
person
with a classified
"HagPY Bktha
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


TE DeMarchi Estates
Homes Sold in 20 Days
Cash for Anything
#39910, 315-466-2268
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


BENNY
Benny is a 4-y.o.
bulldog mix, Very
friendly & affection-
ate and loving.
Loves kids & gets
along w/some other
dogs. Loves to
chase the tennis
ball & go for car
rides. He appears to
be housebroken.
Call Laci @
352-212-8936.


1







GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, 4-y.o.
spayed Brindle/
white Bulldog/
possible hound mix,
weight 66 Ibs.
Gentle, calm, great
on leash, appears
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she doesn't
seem to notice.
Good family/ com-
panion dog. Adop-
tion fee $30.00.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682.


1il1f I'll 'I "

N" *ijl 1 I I li St.
L^I) DL))


CaRp.N~ia
Class fieds
E,, ,j,!d !_sy

C~k~dE


AKC BOXER PUPS
CH Bloodline, Brindle
1 Male,
1 Female
$800. ea
(352) 637-0611

Dachshund Mini Long
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. $300.
(352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell

Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827




Boat Lift up to 1200 lbs
easy you remove,
motor listed 2 yrs. old.
pictures avail.
Reduced to $400.
(352) 422-6649


CLASSIFIED




** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*

All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50;
Elec backing plates
set:12" $90; 10" $80
Call 352-464-2770
Kayak Current Design
w/rudder and paddle
Great Cond. Only in
water 6 times!
$450 (352) 344-2161
LUND
16ft, Trolling motor, live
well, aerator. Pedistal
seats, Raised deck,
Deep V. $7000
(740) 684-6106
Porta-Boat 12'
w/trailer & cover $900.
Johnson Outboard
Motor 5/2hp, model
cd-20c, overhauled
$450. (419) 944-8777
PRINCECRAFT
1998, 16/2 ft long, 90
HP Evinrude, Garage
kept, like new $6000
262-705-4926 (cell)


Sea Doo GTX
2005, 3 sweater, 131 hrs.
2010 Continental
trailer, asking $3450.
obo (352) 794-3374

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation


ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820

ALLEGRO BUS
2011, 36ft, inches
8,900 mi, loaded w/ 4
slides exel. cond. ext.
warr. Asking $205,000
Retail $237,900
(828) 553-0134

RV tow car braking
system "Brake Buddy"
With break away control
VG cond. $475
352-270-1775


Sport Coach IV
Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans,1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814

WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945

WINNEBAGO
'07, Journey, 36 SG,
excel, cond 300 Cum.
Non smoke, no pets
22K mi, tow veh. incld
$102K, 352-598-5616


TOW BAR
Blue Ox Tow Bar
For RV
$450
(352) 344-2161




CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., 1
slide $7000 obo
(352) 628-1126


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 D7



Holiday Rambler AMC
2008, SAVOY, 26 ft. 1973 HORNET, V8, 304
Travel trlr. New awning, engineauto p/s, new
1 slide out, central vac. paint, new seats
ducted air. Emmucalate $5300. (352) 794-3709
inside & out $12,500. ask for Doug
352-586-1694 CHRYSLER
MAC'S MOBILE RV 1990 CONV, 1 owner,
REPAIR & MAINT. exc cond Dk Cherry,
RVTC Certified Tech. white topall org. eq.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. $4900, 352-527-4518
NATURE COAST RV ,
RV service. parts. sales .444
Mobile Repair/Maint. R il JII
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. '""


I


5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551


GMC
1988, 4x4, 3/ Ton
Rolling Frame,
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
GMC
1988, 6 doors,
complete front end
$550; Small Trailer
40x85 $150
(352) 228-9058
Transmission for Sale
out of a 2000
Silverado, V8 or V6 En-
gine, rebuilt by coast
to coast, $1,300
Sell for $850. 465-0989



Auto's, Truck's, SUVs
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

ILQQ Ic
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ



BUICK
1985 Riviera
$1000 Complete.
will part out PARTS
(352) 228-9058
BUICK
2003 Park Avenue
Leather, Exc Cond
Only 32,000 miles
$9500 (352) 436-7740
Buy Here/Pay Here

'98 Ford Explorer
$825 Down

05 Saturn VUE
$995 Down

'96 Saturn
$650 Down

'96 Olds Bravada
$725 Down

'95 Toyota Camry
$2195 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
'04, Sebring, GTC,
convert., loaded only
70K, econ. V6, CD, full
pwr.garaged, perfect,
$5,450., 352-212-4882
DODGE
2012, Avenger RT,
Sunroof, leather, navi,
$17,995
352-341-0018
FORD
'10, Mustang Cony.
42K mi, V6, auto, pwr.
opt., alloy whls, alarm
spoiler, ext warr.
$15,500, 352- 860-1939
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
Reduced price for a
well maintained '03,
Taurus SE, Looks &
drives great $3,200
firm/ 141k hwy mi.
Shown on appointment.
(352) 422-1798
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2007 Azera
loaded-p/w, heated
power seats 6 cyl
very low miles, Askg
$9800. 860-716-3128
LINCOLN
89 TOWNCAR. 75,300.
mi. very clean, exc.
condition, all original,
$3500. (304) 678-4070
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,000.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick
Liquidation Sale
Hel Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
'09, ALTIMA
17,600 miles
(352) 746-1022
SUBARU
'09, Legacy, has only
66k miles, new brakes
& tires, 4 DR, Auto,
$10,900. 352-586-3072

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR20 461-4518



2004 SSR


aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru-
ary 28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified

ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2010, Silverado
Reg Cab WT
$13,495,
352-341-0018
DODGE
1995, 2500, Reg Cab
Work Box Truck
$2,888.
352-341-0018
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHRYSLER
2005, Pacifica AWD,
low miles, leather
extra clean $9,450.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
'01, Grand Cherokee,
limited, loaded, new
tires & engine. Mint
$9,500. 305-619-0282
MERCURY
1997 MOUNTAINEER
5.0 ItrV8 eng,160k mi
all serv records avail.
$4100 352-586-4328



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan SE
Loaded, V6, 7 pass., 6
door, CD, tilt cruise,
garaged, clean, $3,500
352-212-9383




ARCTIC CAT 300
used less than 20 hrs.
$1600. good condition
(352) 527-3277









2005 HD 1200C
EZ Finance $3,900.

2004 YAMAHA
VSTARI100
BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.

2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14,500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood, FL 34785
(352) 330-0047






'01 HD ROAD KING
Loaded $7,800.

'13 HD STREET GLIDE
Low Miles $18,500.

'06 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC TRIKE Full
Conversion $21,000.

'08 HONDA GOLD
WING TRIKE
Loaded $24,900.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood, FL 34785
(352) 330-0047

HONDA
1995 Goldwing
61K miles, Exc
Cond. Asking $4500
(352) 212-8696
HONDA
'07 VTX-1300, low mi-
les, custom, worth
$6500, asking $5500
OBO 352-697-1205
KAWSAKI
1999 VULCAN
Low miles, in storage
5 years $1500
352-228-9058
Open Motorcycle
Trailer great for Harley,
Goldwing, or cruiser
type cycle. Will carry
3 dirt bikes, or 1 quad.
Good tires, $650 obo
727-744-2498
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
ong doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4,500. 352-513-4257




947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at









D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


337-0216 SUCRN
2/27 LIEN SALE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
gives Notice of Foreclosure
of Lien and intent to sell


these vehicles on 2/27/2014
10:00:00 AM at 1635 NE
32nd Ave, Ocala, FL 34470
pursuant to subsection
71378 of the Florida Stat-
utes S M Duggan Towing


LLC. reserves the right to
accept or reject any/or all
bids
1GNCS18Z6M8126121
1991 CHEV S10 BLAZER
February 16, 2014


334-0216 SUCRN
Code Compliance 2/19 Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 @ 9:00AM in
the Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested
are invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have ques-
tions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Campbell Sr. EST, Roy F. & Campbell, Michelle L.
6272 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B): Accessory structures shall
not be occupied as a residence. To Wit: Vacate the travel trailer.
Campbell Sr. EST, Roy F. & Campbell, Michelle L. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
6272 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Televisions, sheets of metal and plastic, household
items, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Curran Jr., Thomas E. & Brown, Darlene C.
8448 N Oak River Way, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above properly, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken kitchen sink, bro-
ken golf cart, broken tools, left over yard sale items, metal and plastic debris, and
other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Holloway, Heather E. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
2069 N Shimmer Ter, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken bicycles, broken
household furniture, broken lawn equipment, metal, wood and plastic debris, and
other miscellenous trash and debris.
Petersen, Jodi L.
5 S Adams St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Pyles, Amanda S.
2386 S Hull Ter, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: There are 2
sheds in the backyard and a large extension has been built on to the back of the
mobile home and no permits were ever applied for.
Shaver, Celeste A. & Christopher, Brian
9 Michigan St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Shaver, Celeste A. & Christopher, Brian
9 Michigan St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County


Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Garbage bags, electronics, paper, plastics, card-
board, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Silverman, Arnold A. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
875 W Catbrier Ln, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 16, 2014.


336-0216 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Pleasant Grove Elementary Kitchen Renovation will be re-
ceived by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time March 11,
2014 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007
West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4625. Immediately following all bids re-
ceived will be opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Pleasant Grove Elementary Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur February 27, 2014 at 10:00 am.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Donnelly
Architecture, Inc., 1483 West Pine Ridge Blvd, Beverly Hills, Florida, 352.249.1166 upon
deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board in the amount
of (S 75.00) per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the return of these
Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the opening of Bids.
Additional drawing sets may be ordered directly from FGE Prints located at 1109
Highway 44 in Crystal River, Florida (352) 794-3880.
Bidders may also obtain one (1) set of Contract Documents as Adobe PDF files to
view and/or download as an email link by contacting Donnelly Architecture, Inc.
352.249.1166.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 16, 2014.


335-0216 SUCRN
BOCC REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
RFQ No. 010-14
Homosassa South Fork Water Quality Improvement Project
Solicitation Overview
In accordance with Section 287.055 of the Florida Statutes (known as the
Consultant's Competitive Negotiation Act), Citrus County Board of County Commis-
sioners is soliciting Statements of Qualifications from consulting firms to perform engi-
neering and environmental design, permitting, and construction support services for
the Homosassa South Fork Water Quality Improvement Project. This project includes
the design of a treatment wetand area for water quality improvements within the
Homosassa River watershed.


Scope of Services:
A conceptual plan for the treatment wetland and the site was established within the
2002 Watershed Management Plan. The scope of this project includes the following
four tasks:
Task 1: Concept Verification
Task 2: Engineering Design and Permitting
Task 3: Bidding Assistance
Task 4: Construction Support Services
Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Response
Respondents shall provide written documentation verifying that they meet the fol-
lowing minimum requirements. If any Respondent is found not to meet these re-
quirements, their Response will be rejected.
1. Respondents shall be registered with the State of Florida to conduct business in the
State in accordance with the Florida Department of State Division of Corporations.
2. "Key Personnel" within the Respondent's firm shall possess a valid and current pro-
fessional license or certification issued by the State of Florida for the professional serv-
ice disciplines) for which Respondent is applying. And have performed similar work
for a minimum of five (5) years.
3. Respondents must have been in the business of providing professional services for
similar work for which they are applying for a minimum of five (5) years. This shall not
be limited to conducting business in the State of Florida.
Term of the Services
If award is made, an Agreement shall be executed and terminate upon completion
of the project.
SEALED Responses are to be submitted on or before March 17, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Responses is scheduled for March 17, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 284, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Responses.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Qualifications Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on
the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle February 16, 2014.


338-0216 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
CONTINUING SERVICES FOR MISCELLANEOUS CONCRETE WORK
Bid #14-B-03
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for CONTINUING SERVICES FOR MIS-
CELLANEOUS CONCRETE WORK. You are hereby invited to submit a bid on the
above referenced project. The Owner is the City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on March 14th, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally consists of providing concrete services to
the City for small projects on an as-needed basis. Work vAwill involve the installation of
concrete driveway aprons, sidewalk and curbing, in varying quantities and at vari-
ous locations throughout the City. The successful bidder will be appointed for a pe-
riod of one (1) year, with the option of up to two (2) additional one (1) year exten-
sions. Work orders will be issued periodically by the City, and the successful bidder is
required to begin work no later than two (2) weeks after issuance of the work order
and work continuously to completion. The City has no immediate needs for con-
crete work at the present time.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"CONTINUING SERVICES FOR MISCELLANEOUS CONCRETE WORK, BID #14-B-03" AND
THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crystalriverfl.ora), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Kim, 352-795-4216, extension 314.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 9, 2014.


866m361*1137 ..

IV* -' Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11 am-4pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat 8am-4pm



241S ucatBv.,Hmssa l 44


m


OTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE


CLASSIFIED


Meeting
I Ntices I


I Bi


I i oie


I Bi


Meeting
I Ntices ]


I i otcs


I i oie


I Bi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-..-5
* JB^ s^ J ?


II \


CRYSTAL
FIND ROADS' C H E V R 0 L E T


S


800-584-8755 EXT.10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:30am-8:00pm. Saturday 9:00am-7:3Opm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm n Tuesday & Thursday 7:30amn-7:00pmn Saturday 8:OOam-4:OOpm. Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:3Oamn-5:3Opm n Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*No payments until 2015 offer applies to vehicles in stock as of 2/1/14 or before and for qualified buyers financed with specified bank at 3.99% for 72 months. Dealer retains all factory rebates and
incentives. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer and pre-sales are excluded.


TRUCK OF THE YEAR




MOM-




-2014015VY

SILVERADO


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buy or lease any New 2014 Nissan
New 2014 Nissan Altima S
VIM# EG1391
and pay less than 0,,.
Black Book Value
for a used 2014. .Black BooPeidn
You will pay less VluyS
for a Brand New $21,700f $ 1
2 OR[ M RE AVI LAL E A[TI S PlR\/:ll]l:i I CE[].J!
2014 Nissan than YOu 1 )OVER
others pay for the SAVE: LF l2 USED!
Same Vehicle Used. New 2014 Nissan
Frontier S
VIN# EN707698
It's a 31___
It's aMODEL # 31014
Monumental .........
Presidents Day....
a


YOU I O OVER
SAVE:-,0 I USED

CRYSTAL
N NISSAN N
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
800-584-8755 EXTI 0 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:30am-8:00pm n Saturday 9:00amn-7:30pnm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm n Tuesday & Thursday 7:30amn-7:00pmn Saturday 8:00amn-4:00pnm Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30amn-5:30pmn Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*Black Book Trade-in Value Is Based On Vehicle Being In Excellent Condition With Less Than 10,000 Miles. See Dealer For Details. **Price Includes All Rebates And Incentives, Not Everyone Will Qualify.
Excludes, Tax, Tag, Title And Dealer Fee $599.50 With Approved Credit. Pictures Are For Illustration Purposes Only, Prior Sales May Restrict Stock.


D10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014





INSIDE


OME


RONT


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


I 'I/ 1' r'- ri
/;L'.^


( r'-*/ f / I 'IJ _


LI!)J_ I I I1 If


r I ,
,J _-It


I ' b' L_;.'_,I 1
^Lii-i^L-JJ L-. i j;


r r.
1-i r r


S _J- j


This spring, pink is popping up
all over home decor the
softer versions soothing and
nurturing, the brighteT hues
bouncy and vivacious; Adding in
a few pi k accessories freshens
a great toom or living- room.
These Moroccan floor poufs. ..--
from Pottery Barn Kids. are ,o- ,
practical pieces with:a touch &' ,-hc"
of flair. Y ..
-,Q, FI7-, e 1i ;: "'i* ll; 1 it-' F
l,' i ..


/
r
a



~


V1


I


I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


i


,t''* \'


r'i








E2 SUNDA'I~ FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


AWARD-WINNING _REA I82^ I T

MLSIfc-1^."^ #7004 $1,00


5008 W. MUSTANG DRIVE
*SPLISH SPLASH LARGE LAP POOL
* Guest Suite w/Gar. Plus a 3 Car Garage
* Gourmet Kitchen -WOOD/GRANITE
*3 Baths/4 BR MOVE IN READY!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -1
Einal elliesullon *lelnkx nel
w ww.F lot iduL isinginlo.coin








3879 N. ROSE BAY PATH
:SO MUCH ROOM! .1,872 SQ FT LIVING
* Large Family room Open Floor Plan
:2/2/2 w/Lg Utility. 24 x 14 FLORIDA ROOM
* LR/DR & Nook Appliances Included
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Eungn.l el..estullon memnaxne nEl
www.F IOl udULullunglnlo.coun








325 S. JACKSON
* OWNER FINANCE SHARP DECOR
*2/2/1 with Fain Rm. *2013 Roof Shingles
* Wood Cabinets New SS Appliances
New Carpet/Tile Lovely Porch
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1
EFnli eilmestullonil elnax nel
www.omniLisinginlosoin


LAUREL RIDGE
*3BD/2BA/2CG with HEATED POOL
* Golf Community Living RM & Fam. RM
SAll newer Appliances Furnishings Available
* Double-sidedgas fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ru
(352) 527-7842 LE
352) 422-3875


10000 H. WAYLAND AVE.
CITRUS SPRINGS
,4BD/4BAL3CG FOver 3,400 SF Under AC
f3/4 Acres on El Diablo Golf Course
SLarge Heated Pool and Spa
Custom Built Home in 2003 Like a Model
PETER & MARVIA KOROL d-fl
(352 52 07-7842 l
(352) 422-3875

*^i--, 2417INFO LIN






SELLER LOOKING FOR OFFERS!
He is ready to move this 3/2/2 home with 2,700 sq.
ft. living area. Community pool close by. Biggest utility/
craft room I have ever seen! Tons of storage. Living
room, family room, eat-in kitchen, den, lanai and large
master suite.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 J
Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.nel
www.CilrusCouidyHomes.comi


HAVE TUYOU BEEN SEARCHING for that perfect home that
is move-in ready with a great floor plan? If so this home sfor you! Home
features over 2,200 square feet of living area with 3 large bedrooms,
2 bathrooms, great room overlooking pool, family room, breakfast nook
and a completely updated kitchen and bathrooms. Sellers have updated
everything inside and outside of home. New roof, new AC, new tile floors,
new windows and freshly painted interior This home is a must see! You
will not be disappointed.
ALAN IVORY 352-302-9781
Email: ThelvoryTeum@yuhoo.com J


- -'11-w I
4864 N. CHEYENNE DR.,
BEVERLY HILLS
PINE RIDGE ESTATES POOL Home
Updated Kit. & Baths 1.5 ACRE Corner Lot
GRANITE Counters FIREPLACE in Family RM.
*STAINLESS Appliances Porcelain Tile
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 f
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com f





WM*
W '


V



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

S12 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

F I 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


ON THE 9TH FAIRWAY SITS THIS BEAUTIFUL
3BR/2BA HOME WITH A TOTAL OF 2,608 SQ.
FT UNDER ROOF STONE FIREPLACE, LARGE
SCREENED ROOM, NEWER ROOF, SPLIT PLAN.
FAMILY ROOM/LIVING ROOM. MOVE-IN READY
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajrmills@earthlink.niet 1


4438 N. RATH RUE PT., OAKWOOD
* 2BD/2BA/2CG Updated Kitchen. Appliances, Baths
* Split Floor Plan Glassed/Screened Florida Room
* Lots of New Tile Beautifully Maintained Home
* New Roof 2013 Cul-De-Sac in Great Neighborhood
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: genglish@remaxnet
wwwsellingcitruscountyhomestcom


HERES A DEAL FOR YOU!
Split plan 3/2/2 home has large fenced
backyard. Almost 1/2 acre. Seller has updated
roof and just had the drainfield replaced. Big
kitchen loaded with cabinets. Waterfront
community. 12x32 lanai.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferiStollz@renmax.net
www.CilrusCounlyHomes.com i


RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit
,PMJniimmfm


3/2/2 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS
BUILT IN 2005
Open floor plan with great room, formal dining,
breakfast room, split bedrooms. 10x51' 4-season
lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 10x82' & 20x20
attached carports and detached carport/boat
parking E -_ ;ii. r .,1 r ,i, ,;I, - J ; .; l i ..-.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 fJ
Email: tnadal.- remax.nel a ,

241 INF -y N
\ ^-^^f:,:63728
LBEnterho


Stylish & spacious 2,696 SF living area in Timberlane
Estates. New dimensional shingle roof, appliances,
2 climate control systems, carpeting, master vanity,
plumbing fixtures, well & remodeled kitchen. New,
New, New! This is a pristine home worth your time!
GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812 l
Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleeman.com KM


2421~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ N. Ieaa Hw.Ieel il 2-82wwRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


OpEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-2PMJ





6296 & 6302 W. TANGERINE,
CRYSTAL RIVER
Two DW mobile homes side-by-side. One is a 3/2
(6296) and the other is 2/2 (6302) with den,
carport, Florida Room. Both homes have fenced
yard and have an open floor plan. Directions: From
Hwy. 44, Rockcrusher Rd., to W Tangerine 1
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email: aawnwright@romax.aet


E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


U.S. 30-year loan rate at 4.28 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
average U.S. rate on a 30-
year fixed mortgage edged
up this week to 4.28 per-
cent from 4.23 percent but
remains near historically
low levels after declining
during the five previous
weeks.
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday that
the average for the 15-year
loan was unchanged at
3.33 percent.
Mortgage rates have
risen about a full percent-
age point since hitting
record lows roughly a year
ago. The increase was
driven by speculation that
the Federal Reserve
would reduce its $85 bil-


lion a month in bond pur-
chases. Deeming the econ-
omy to be gaining strength,
the Fed proceeded last
month with planned re-
ductions of its bond pur-
chases, which have helped
keep long-term interest
rates low
Recent economic data
have pointed to a likely
pause in the housing mar-
ket's recovery Real estate
data provider CoreLogic
reported last week that
U.S. home prices slipped
from November to Decem-
ber And the year-over-
year increase slowed,
likely a result of weaker
sales at the end of last year
The number of Ameri-
cans who have signed con-
tracts to buy homes has


plummeted to its lowest
level in more than two
years.
Most economists expect
home sales and prices to
keep rising this year, but at
a slower pace. They fore-
cast that both will likely
rise around 5 percent,
down from double-digit
gains in 2013.
To calculate average
mortgage rates, Freddie
Mac surveys lenders
across the country be-
tween Monday and
Wednesday each week.
The average doesn't in-
clude extra fees, known as
points, which most bor-


rowers must pay to get the
lowest rates. One point
equals 1 percent of the
loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-
year mortgage was un-
changed at 0.7 point. The
fee for a 15-year loan also
remained at 0.7 point.
The average rate on a
one-year adjustable-rate
mortgage rose to 2.55 per-
cent from 2.51 percent.
The average fee declined
to 0.4 point from 0.5 point.
The average rate on a
five-year adjustable mort-
gage fell to 3.05 percent
from 3.08 percent. The fee
held at 0.5 point.


BR Gail Hargreaves ...
Broker/Realtor I
(352) 795-9123 I E
www.charlottegrealty.com


INCOMEii i M
PRODUCER!
Check out this
duplex. Great
location, close to
water amenities, -
shopping, and N I -.
medical. Both units T
currently rented.
Unit A has been
remodeled and is rented fully furnished. Unit B unfurnished
with long term annual tenant. Great CAP rate!
MLSt# 340239 $129,900


JOANN MARTIN BB
Preferred
.REAL ESTA TE L

l R-yT-iy www.nrefm.net


3459 N. Honeylocust Drive 820 E Dakota Ct
Beverly Hills Hernando FL
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, Imperial 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, with
Executive II offering 1604 sf of living area. caged in-ground pool on the 12th tee box
Granite countertops, new roof 2012, new of The Meadows Golf Course. Newer roof
flooring, new tile in kitchen and bathrooms and air conditioner, wood fireplace,
Freshly painted inside & out intercom, security system.
Priced at $86,500. Offered for $144,900.


OPEN SUNDAY
1:30 3:30 PM
6758 W Stonewall Pt, Homosassa
ODir: Hwy 19 or Hwy 44 to Homosassa Trail
to Stonewall to home on right



AFFORDABLE LUXURY
Here! Move in ready 3/2 w carport
and lanai. So many special
features here such as eat-in
kitchen. Garden tub, large private
yard. All of this and convenient to
shopping and Hwy 19. Once you
see this one, you will call it home!
Only $62,000. MLS 704883
Hosted by Betsy Wooters 352-436-5406


BY
APPOINTMENT:
106 S Harrison, Beverly Hills





SNOWBIRDS!!!
Beautifully remodeled and priced to sell
in a lovely section of Beverly Hills.
Redone from the floors to the bathroom
and appliances. Spacious and
comfortable 2/1 w screened garage/
lanai. Let the dog out in the fenced yard
while you relax on the patio.
Priced right at $44,900. MLS 704206


r.-,Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffneyr7
AHSReallor, A USE Realtor @ KE
302-3179 SOLD Name! 287.-9022
7466ka PAa 700 i THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


I 3/2/2 Featuring Wood Cabinets in Kitchen, New Wood |
Flooring, Carpeting & Tile. Fresh coat of Paint in and out. Vinyl |
exclosed lanai 12 X 30. Double pocket door. Gated community.


2 Realtors

marks
L U i ~Congratu-
Bernadette nations to The
Peerman -,-
Poorman Real Team -
EXIT Realty Bernadette
Leaders ernadette
Poorman,
Sherri Oren-
dorf and Trisha Antonetti
- with EXIT Realty Lead-
ers in Beverly Hills. They


Sherri
Orendorf
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


won the Top Listing Agent
award for January 2014.
Call The Real Team at
352-527-1112.


WONDERING IF

YOU SHOULD

SELL YOUR

HOME?
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$12.2 million closed in 2013

Call Debbie Rector's Team -----
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
To 1b Learn More
S(352) 746-9924

L uMiel j AMERICAN
SLou Mieie Realtor, EEE REALTY & INVESTMENTS
lr ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511N1N. LeantoHwy.H 3
Cell: (352) 697.1685 o=35246-36oo


................ .. ..
.... ... ....... ..... CITRU S H ILLS
Beautiful galed community
ofBelirrion Hill;, FatiuIc~u;
"2.2 pccl home vvith
spac:,uS r0n',s rand NOgh
eiliriqs A musi Bee"
ownMNLS 761


SReal Estate DIGEST


Trisha
Antonetti
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Sherri C. Pake
ENTT7TTT7~i~STiI3,


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 E3


DM.I.JI.. A rrA.f:-k4-j>






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Don't let your garden from become a slug buffet


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Slugs and snails are rav-
enous plant eaters that
leave behind slimy trails of
destruction as they glide
through nurseries and
lawns, farm fields and gar-
dens. Remedies abound,
but prevention is an effec-
tive way to start.
"Remove any debris
from the garden," said
James Dill, a pest manage-
ment specialist with Uni-
versity of Maine
Extension. "Straw, boards,
leaves and stuff like that.
They provide the perfect


hiding places for slugs in
the daytime. Then they
come out at night and do
their damaging thing."
Slugs are essentially
snails without shells, Dill
said. "Sizes and colors are
all over the map but both
can be very destructive."
Slugs and snails prefer
feeding on soft-leaved
plants, although they will
eat whatever is available.
"Three or four years ago
I would have said straw-
berries, hostas and
leaves," Dill said. "But
when you see the damage


See SLUGS/Page E5


A-% AL- I


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press


A Variegated slug on a property at a private residence in
Langley, Wash. Slugs are ravenous plant eaters that leave
behind slimy trails of destruction. Remove debris that
gives them a place to hide during the day, to prevent their
pattern of coming out to feed at night. Making your yard
less hospitable to destructive snails and slugs is generally
more effective than using chemicals.

lM American I.. BARBARA
AR Realty & le
E investments BANKS
117 S. Hwy. 41 Realtor
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855 cell: 352-476-3232
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net

EXCELLENT VALUE
FOR THIS INVERNESS HOME
S.."-. _


...* '_ r' 1 ..--;. .* .:. i ....nJ,. -
S .. ... ...' , .:. ; 4.. V;.

THERE IS ROOM FOR EVERYONE
IN THIS LOVELY HOME
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass thru to large great room with dining area and
wood-burning fireplace, family room, inside laundry, over-sized master suite,
possible in-law arrangement, inground caged pool, covered lanai.., all this &
more sitting on .73acre. Room for the whole family here. MLS 705163
ASKING $185,000
Zechariah 4:6 OOOHEX9


Jackie Davis
f American Realty & Investments
MEN 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
.E.L ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bidaviscom
ARCHITECTURALLY EXCITING
3 Bedrooms, 25 baths
*3-Car garage
*PLUS 1 bdrm, bath
guest suite
3,100 S FLA
*3-Zone C/H/A
... *- Heated pool
t'',J .,l One acre
... $249,000 MLS 708393
WIDE OPEN VIEW
OF LAKE DAVIS
gB*3 BR, 2bath, 2-cargar
Lg picture window keeps
view in sight
SC/H/A is 3yrs old
Heated pool, screened lanai
Near Inverness Golf &
Country's course
$175,000 MLS 707670
PERFECT GEM OFA HOME
3 BR, 2BA in a split plan
T ile floors
Maple cabinets
*2-Car gar has 3rd bay,
soak sink, cabinetry
Pavers, porch & extended lanai
On a private acre
SCitrus Hills optional membership
$169,000 MLS 707722


CYPRESS CROSSINGS CLASS "A" OFFICE
FOR LEASE
2500 sq ft "New Constriuction"
Located on SR 44 & CR 486
Professional Medical Office
Call (727) 515-6571---


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 1-,
S After Hours 352302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.alldctrusrealty.com n


E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SLUGS
Continued from Page E4

(done) to potatoes or tubers, you re-
alize they can rasp on anything."
Maine had a wet summer last year
and slugs hit the state's potato crop
hard. "Commercial growers re-
ported 6 to 7 percent of their crop
was damaged," Dill said.
Slugs prefer cool, rainy climates
where they won't dry out. Snails,
which can find relief from the heat
by withdrawing into their shells, are
more adapted to dry climates.
Effective snail and slug manage-
ment calls for a combination of gar-
den upkeep and trapping. As for the
most commonly used homemade
baits, however, put away the salt-
shakers and leave the beer in a
cooler, said Robin Rosetta, an ento-
mologist with the Oregon State Uni-
versity Extension Service.
"Table salt can dry up the mol-
lusks but it also can build in the soil
over time, damaging plants," she
said. "Fermented sugar water and
yeast is cheaper than beer-baited
traps and just as functional for


drowning slugs."
Commercial baits are toxic to
snails and slugs, but some varieties
- especially those containing met-
aldehyde can be harmful to chil-
dren and pets.
Be prepared to reapply the baits
since not all slug and snail species
are active at the same time. "Bait
throughout the year or you could see
damage you didn't expect because
you didn't hit a particular group,"
Rosetta said.
Making your yard less hospitable
to slugs and snails is generally more
effective than using chemicals.
Consider:
Watering plants in the morning
when snails and slugs are less ac-
tive. Using drip irrigation rather
than sprinklers also makes their
habitat less appealing.
Distancing plants that need
more water from those that are
drought-tolerant
Weeding to eliminate moist
places where slugs find cover
Handpicking slugs about two
hours after sunset.
Using copper barriers to separate
slugs and snails from planting beds.
Copper is toxic to slugs and snails.


m I 746.9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Ballour Walt Engelken Yv.... Jenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE REALTOR
^^^ www^o^ trusbastbuy ^^oom


4349W TOMAHAWK
4/32 70786 $314,900


54WPINTO RI OOP


. UNDER CONSTRUCION
5406 N. CROSSGATE
32 3 706628 $299,000


Homeowners step up making


on-time mortgage payments


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES U.S.
homeowners are doing a bet-
ter job of keeping up with
mortgage payments, a trend
that has reduced the rate of
late payment on home loans
to the lowest level in more
than five years.
The percentage of mort-
gage holders at least two
months behind on their pay-
ments fell in the October-
December quarter to
3.85 percent from 5.08 per-


cent a year earlier, credit re-
porting agency TransUnion
said Wednesday
The last time the mortgage
delinquency rate was lower
was 3.61 percent in the sec-
ond quarter of 2008. The
firm's data go back to the sec-
ond quarter of 2007.
The latest rate also de-
clined from 4.09 percent in
the third quarter, the firm
said.
Struggling homeowners
have seen their finances
shorn up by rising home val-


Spacious 3/2.708060.$112,900
Pam Shemet 422-2939




Beautifully Maintained 2/2.707224. $76,500
Yolanda Canchola 219-2196





On the golf course, 3/2/2.707444. $149,900
John Mlaisel302-5351





Country Style 3/2,707451. $119,900
PamShemet422-2939


ues, an improving job market
and efforts to restructure
home loans so they're more
affordable. That has enabled
them to make timely
payments.
Another key driver in the
improved late-payment rate:
Many of the risky home loans
made before 2008 that went
unpaid are no longer a factor,
since the homes have been
sold or foreclosed upon.
Loans issued since then,

See PAYMENTS/Page E15


Sits on 1 acre, 3/2/2.707891. $169,900
Steve McClory 422-3998


3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


_t) E Sf
JT Www.exitreal"leaders.com
Reafty Leaders


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 ES


OATHIONSI.I SRVE YOU!352-794-888 -B35l52II111 B!.352-






E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

fv* .. krnErlicm
Cii prNic.E.


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


So you have some



timber to sell ...


Tree specialist provides overview of market


n my last article I explained the im- as is the Southeast as a whole. Pine tim-
portance of the forest industry in ber is either planted in rows in a planta-
Florida. It is ranked as ei-t tion or occurs naturally from
their the second or third largest i seedfall. Many thousands of
industry in the state (it flip- acres of pine plantations are
flops with the citrus industry) ., visible along 1-10 in north
and it employs 76,000 people 1 Florida, but are prevalent in
either full time or part time. many locations throughout our
Sales from timber on public '. area as well- Withlacoochee
lands provide revenues to -' State Forest and Goethe State
many rural Florida counties Forests contain large areas of
and can generate income to pine plantations, but many
private landowners as well. landowners have smaller
In my capacity as a consult- acreages throughout Citrus,
ing forester, I often assist pri- Eric Hoyer Levy, Marion and Sumter
vate forest landowners with ARBOR counties. Naturally occurring
the sale of their forest prod- CULTURE pine timber can be clearcut or
ucts. Unless someone is a long- ___________ seed trees can remain to natu-
time landowner and has had rally regenerate the site. In a
experience selling timber, most landown- plantation situation, the timber stand is
ers are unfamiliar with both the markets generally "thinned" at age 14 to 18 and
and the process.
Florida is primarily a pine timber state, See TIMBER/Rage E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Spring blush
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


From Japanese pouch clasps to classic baseball cards


D earJohn: I need your help. I
have two collectible hand-
carved ivory miniatures.
These were purchased
in 1983 at a Madison
Square Garden show. I
believe they are called
Japanese Netsuke.
Each is about 1 1/2
inches long, 11/4 inches
high, and 1 1/4 inches
thick. One has inset
amber eyes and the
other has ruby eyes. John S
Each has a hanging Jon
price tag, one showing SIKOF
$140, the other $170. AT
The tough questions
are, what are they?
What is their value? Who values
them? Since authenticity will be
critical, how does one allow some-
one to inspect these pieces with a
degree of security? TLaP,
Hernando


L
li
T


Dear T.LaP: Yes, the two items
are Netsuke, a specific category of
collecting for decades.
Netsuke have been
made in Japan for sev-
eral hundred years,
some say as early as the
14th century A Netsuke
,' was originally a decora-
tive toggle for a man's
leather pouch used to
carry various articles for
personal use. They were
ST made of ivory, bone,
korski wood, metal and
SKI'S porcelain.
IC Netsuke always have
-- two holes used for the
cord to secure to the
pouch. The holes were placed
where the Netsuke would be best
visible to the eye.
Hand-carved reproductions are
still being made of ivory and bone,
while some are molded composite.


The two you have are reproduc-
tions and from your photos appear
to be of commercial-grade quality.
If they are ivory, potential dollar
value would be $25 to $75 each.
Dear John: I have about 100
baseball cards in mint condition
that my sons collected years ago.
The stars then were Jim Palmer,
Willie Mays, Carl Yastrzemski, etc.
Are there any collectors out there
who would be interested? -B.JD.,
Florida
Dear B.J.D.: Yes, there still is
See ATlTIC/Page E14
This little fellow is an example of
Netsuke, a type of decorative
piece for a man's leather pouch.
They can be made from a number
of different materials, including
bone, ivory, metal and porecelain.
This particular example appears to
be a recent reproduction.
Special to the Chronicle


sf/jsr^y^^^
^W<^.^^
^^^^*^ea&A'n!
^^<^'^3^4i!
tiw^^^^^w^
sw^^^'^-^^v
ws^-^^Ni







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


I Ali


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Crape Myrtles, such as this local specimen, require careful pruning to achieve
an ideal result.



Pruning tips for



Crape Myrtles


abies, kittens, pup-
pies and foals are
cute and adorable
and they grow up. We
know how big they will
grow, how long it will take
and provide guidance
during their growing
years.
Plants are living things
that need the same kind Jane
of thinking, preparation
and initial care as chil- JAIP
dren and pets. Crape GAR
Myrtles need forethought
when planting them in the home
landscape.
Gardeners like flowers. Many
flowering perennial plants bloom
naturally for about one month once
a year Examples include Dogwood
and Redbud trees, Oakleaf Hy-
drangeas, gingers and yuccas.
Breeders have created hybrids and
selected named varieties that have


I

II


extended or repeat
blooming periods. Knock-
Out Roses and Encore
azaleas are examples.
Crape Myrtles have been
developed to grow to dif-
ferent sizes, shapes and
colors.
Gardeners prune
Crape Myrtles to create a
Veber particular form or shape
and to get more flowers. I
E'S planted six small 'Tus-
DEN carora' Crape Myrtles;
they are known to mature
at 15 to 20 feet tall. I want them to be
single-trunked, specimen trees
flanking the entrances to two drive-
ways and a path. However, the
plants have other ideas. They have
put out long sucker shoots at the
base of the trunk To create the trees
I want, I must prune off the suckers


See Page E14


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(before Activity Center)
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
EN HOUSE SUN. 1-3


MLS 708329 $194,500
Beautiful maintenance free 3/2/2
w/private backyard.
Dir Go thru main gate of Terra Vista, take first Ron
Skyview Crossing Dr, L on Lakecrest Loop
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


I.~4


S307711 N Caves V
MLS 70203
Expansive views of #9 on Th
Course w/this fabulous h
Jodie Trace Holder 352-30


U ~ 782
MLS 700636
Furnished 3bd/2ba pool home o
golf course.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-


(w0 Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
A Week! Properties
1-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-3PM


p o? e M 4075 N Pony Drive
S MLS 704678 $299,900
Remodeled large family home
on acreage.
Dir 491 to W Pine Ridge Blvd to Pony
(@ equestrian center home on left
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


'[- : . .j'*1 $119.900
Lovely 3/2/2 home with wood
burning fireplace.
Dir Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on Glassboro Ct
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


alley Path \i, 1048 W Lake Valley CI
4 $350,000 MLS 705655 $340,000
Ranch Lots of natural light in this
ome. enhanced 3/2/2.
2-2036 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086

ik

|A

E Keller Ct 184 E Ireland CI
$265,000 MLS 704600 $248,000
overlooking Oaks Golf Course- 3/2/2 + office + golf
cart garage.
1926 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM




llS 785 E KellerCt
MLS 707988 $285,000
Custom built 3/3/2+ golf cart parking &
pool on the Oaks Golf Course.
Dir Hwy 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd, L on
Keller Ct
Helen Forte 352-220-4764
MCILAI I IQTIfI#f


1 t 1('23 N Barlon Creek Cir
MLS 708531 $205,000
Golf Cottage home, well maintained
& spacious.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036
iil r: i
*MB *>yA.


9LL L ,JUpiiii It
SMLS 705515 $269,900
3bd/3ba + pool w/view of 6th Fairway of
the Oaks Golf Course.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


.k -j iji I Ilea nII i nlOn rt
MLS 705904 $219,000
3/2/3 pool home w/natural light&
lots of "extras".
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


.,,,,
I I I . .. I I i, ,h I... I SOI 1 i .. i ,


I


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 E7


VVHO, SAID THREE'S A CROWD7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ES SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


Everythi gis
premier in
prettier in


Rosy colors are a hot item for spring styles


KIM COOK
Associated Press

his spring, pinks are pop-
ping up all over home
decor -the softer ver-
sions soothing and nur-
turing, the bright ones
bouncy and vivacious.
Warm pink light can be flattering,
so designers have long employed
tricks like painting lampshade inte-
riors in those hues or switching
regular bulbs for soft pink ones.
"Pink's such a fun color to play
around with. I see it two ways -
dusty, light and classic, or vibrant,
'statement' and sharp," says
Boston-based designer Taniya
Nayak. "The former adds subtle
whispers of elegance, while the lat-
ter turns up the volume in a space."
Eddie Ross, East Coast editor for
Better Homes & Gardens, is an-
other fan.
"Pink is back, and it's all grown
up. Paired with stronger hues like
navy, chocolate or gray, pink looks
sophisticated and surprising," he
says.
Ross suggests several ways to in-
corporate the color for different ef-
fects: "When you cover a sofa or
chair in a light pink, it acts like a
neutral. Swap out throw pillows for
a completely different look. Light
pink bedding looks great with just
about any skin tone.
Light pink linen mats
in simple white
frames with black and
white photos look crisp."
See '/PageE10


1IA


This ceramic vase
embossed in a pink
crocodile pattern is
an unexpected yet
attractive accessory
for spring 2014.
HomeGoods.com


Thi
g
S
I
OVO t
as bril
..........





6








This Ovo table lamp in fuchsia
lass brings a punch of pink
into
into spring decor.
LampsPlus.com







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*II :-V
Robert Abbey's ceramic
accent lamp in Schiaparelli pink is
an elegant fixture in one of spring's
freshest new shades.
LampsPlus.com


: An accent
chair in a vibrant
pink damask
pattern adds
a touch of
traditional *
style in a
contemporary
hue.
HomeGoods.com |


.011CitrusCounty
oDr, leam


i wtrusjodico
^3~ ~ 0 SBi~faiiH


HomeGoods.com
Pink-tinged picture frames in interesting textures and
patterns which add this spring's hottest color in an easy
and interesting way.


OOOHEGP y f

REAL ESTATE, INC.
il 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
S ~CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
ocE: (352) 795-6633
WWW AT PYTmT1?COmn CAiJ(AT PtSATTYR1?COmi


-3EST7I
Re- t


1 I '-llj ia X] inj nII-
AGENT OD


CITRUS SPRINGS large 3 bedroom, 2
bath, one ca, ,. .
to kitchen, : i, ... ...... i ...
Ceiling fans w/lights in bedrooms New
counters in kitchen w/newer alliances;


DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
M/H -r f--r -.-'-vorkshopon2
acres i .. ,, china cabinet,
i .I. 1 .i.. i i.bI roomaths
,, ... . .. ,,,,, room


INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage '...... vinyl lined caged
pool, , i on 3 sides, cathedral
ceiling in great room, country kitchen
w/ island and ..-ir- counter tops Tile
fr- thnl ut U. 0o Rflfl


CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2 5 bath
D/W M/H by Skyline on 4 5 acres of land
Country kitchen, dining room, family
room, wood burning fireplace, Ig master
suite w/dbl vanity, shower, garden tub
#704053 $69,900






HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H
w/3bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved road,
, , i l. ,1 1. i 1. ;1;.Ig fians,
* i. i i.. i. i .. . . .. i .1 h e, n a
b .o s p 7 ...7 .. e, near
byto shopping #706376 $48,000


HOMOSASSA 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1985
mobile on 6 06 acres 12 x 24 workshop
w/electric metal roofover, updated
appliances, fenced and x fenced, covered
rear porch, front wood decking
7fllfll7 tgflflfl


CRYSTAL RIVER Commercial I-- 1
opportunity in nursery, wholesale; LECANTO Nice half acre with well,
fencing .* 1.. 1 ... 1 .1 5 acres septic and impact fees paid Mobile not
totally : I '"' "" ripment, livable but, take it off and replace with
J.. ,nples of fence work new Center of county, Lecanto school
,. p t i i h, ,dist #703990 $18,000


Se'r ing Ciu s & Levy Counties Since 1970
23 David G. Griffin
I Real Estate
OII Licensed Real Estate Broker
SALE Cell 352-228-1812
Office 352-795-0330


RIV E R V I EW S p o n d s m a tu re o a k tre e s T h e 2 s p a c io u s & lu x u rio u s c o tta g e s a re c a re fu lly ,i i ,,.... i i ,1 . . , ,, . i., ,. . ..i i
3/2ho me bullt207on13acre n posltloned in a beautiful setting i..... n i .... n,, 14,, h, ,i 1 '1 1 i..... .... .....
,3/2hom b, ,,b,,,, ... .. ,, $800.000 waitingfor youand yourfamily to move right mi
the banks of the Withlacoonhee ractivetour $549,000
"I $59W0

$521,961

GITTA THE GLEN HIGHVIEW ESTATES
A 55+ community Enjoy maintenancefree INCREDIBLEVISTAS-HAMPTON LAKE PINE RIDGE ESTATES Citrus Hills
G T ated in The Glen This 3/2/1 situated on 12 acre elevated Beautiful 2004 Avanzim Model, nicely
e A R T H ..... *inside laundry, with lots of frutt .... Recently treed 1 ac lot High ceilings, firepla c,
carpet and paint, great room boasts large picture i w/jetted tub
it is in perfect conditions Just unpack the windows f .. private lanai
B A T 1 'suitcase and relax Close to shoppurg, dining metal roof justthe right size w/tons of upgrades
REALTOR@ I and medicalfactes $65,000 SSapp $274,0001 $469,000 $189,900
niyMil

Cell: (352) 220-0466 USS
gbarth@myflorida-house.com ..,,.,r,,n,.,,..

SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CIY LAKE, MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS. uuTATNDC WATERFRuNT RESIDENCE
CJ no 1 2 master suites, apart- 12 an (160 x 300+ ft) pictr Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home an a 1 acre Tastefully ren
ment lower level Upper level uresque corner lot with mature oak trees and & dry(never , .
accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane oak trees Charming lots of prlvacyl Very well maintained, ac) for boat;
Investors Realty -i shers, security system, updated tie offered some dol s e
itchen & bathrooms I1go ft of origial fixtures and fireplace 'still in ,Udtdroks 240 f tsewl,wodrwsho, sever
of Citrus County, Inc. seawall, boat liftl Everything just place Large det gar w/workshop, thing meticulous maitained Priced
o tywebsiteat: yflorida-house. wating foryou $488,000 seawall $159,900 i m$16u9,000 a gat$399, 000!
$19,0 soo right at h399,000


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 E9







E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014



PINK
Continued from Page E8

His favorite pink paint
shades include Devine Color's
Devine Poodle "great on din-
ing room chairs in a lustrous
high gloss"; Benjamin Moore's
subtle Affinity Proposal for
walls; Farrow & Ball's Blushes
- "a strong pink that would be
stunning on a ceiling paired
with cream and gray"
Valspar's Rosario Ridge and
Universe Quartz Pink are two
others to consider Sherwin-
Williams' Spun Sugar and
Malted Milk are as tasty-looking
as their names, as are Peach
Parfait and Fruit Shake from
Benjamin-Moore.
CB2's Vapor chair is Lucite-


tinged pink; acrylic's a strong
trend in furniture this season,
so this piece gives extra style
bang for the buck. And the re-
tailer's City Slicker table re-
sembles a big chunk of neon
pink bubblegum; a fun piece
like this is a great way to play
with the color
San Francisco designer
Tineke Triggs adds a deep pink
desk to a home office, or a
crushed berry ceiling to a bed-
room. She pairs them with
other bold colors like crisp
white and egg yolk, or soft tans
and grays.
Combine pink accessories
with contemporary pieces, or
add a hit of surprise in a room-
ful of rustic, traditional or in-
dustrial elements. Pink looks
great next to reflective and tex-
tured materials such as mirrors,


www.bhg.com.
www.devinecolor.com.
www.benjaminmoore.com.
www.valspar.com.
www.sherwinwilliams.com.
www.taniyanayak.com.
www.homegoods.com.

metallics and velvets, but also
alongside linen, burlap, weath-
ered pine, rattan.
And don't be afraid to shop
the kids' furniture stores: Pot-
tery Barn Kids has a pretty pink
Moroccan floor pouf and a
smart pink metal side table that
would add punch to a den or
master bedroom. Land of Nod's


* www.lampsplus.com.
* www.westelm.com.
* www.potterybarnkids.com.
* www.landofnod.com.
* www.cb2.com.
* www.crateandbarrel.com.

got a playful rag rug, a preppy
blush-and-cream striped
flatweave, and a sophisticated,
hand-tufted floral rug in pastel
pink.
West Elm's spring collection
includes some interesting geo-
metric-printed, crewel-stitched
or hand-blocked throw pillows
in guava and bergamot.


SOURCES


REALTY GROUP


X Brnwo.eae


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Centet
CARI MANli 0?.n927R7 SUJSAN MIil I FN .1.-422.21.1 VirCTRIA FRANKI IN .10.427.777


ULLIA1LU VILLA, Z BLU, Z BMil, &-LAK, WUUUVILW VILLAD bINULL IHMILT nUIUL, 4 BLU, 4 BISM ZANA, WIJUUIZIUL
Spacious and absolutely lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage, plus den/office. Entertaining is easy in this exclusive custom contemporary 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 2-car
Home is tastefully decorated in neutral colors with lots of ceramic tile flooring in all garage home. Split bedroom plan with an open floor design. Many features include
vet areas plus the great room! Open floor plan design with a great use of space. living room, family room, formal dining room, theatre room, breakfast nook
Great room overlooks the private screened lanai. This home is in an excellent overlooking the ingound pool, security system, summer kitchen. Relax to the
ocaton in a maintenance9free area ofTerra Vista. MLS 707735............$209.900 Deaceful ourole ofthe dolDhin fountain bv the Dool. MLS 708539............$479.000


I- U*11
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
This beautifully landscaped enhanced maintenance-free villa will draw you in from Immaculate 2 bedrooms plus den/office, 2 baths, detached villa in gated
the moment you walk through the door. Recently painted inside and out this home community of Terra Vista. Large closet in the foyer. Great room open to kitchen &
features custom surround sound, Ktchen Aid appliances, designer lighting fixtures, nice size dining area. Very sunny atmosphere. Neutral colors throughout.
and so much more all situated in a great location at Terra Vista of Citrus Hills. Enjoy Situated on a preserve home site offering privacy with a beautiful backyard view
Peaceful eveninmos on your Drivate screened in lanai. MLS 708425.........$213.000 from either inside orfrom the exDanded lanai.MLS 708400..................$224.900


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
i mBeautiful custom Martinique Model located in the plush community of Terra Vista in
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HUNT CLUB Citrus Hills. Formal living area as well as a separate family room. Great for
Absolutely gorgeous bedroom 2 bath 2 car expanded garage pool entertaining with an open floor plan and lots oftile. Cooks will lovethe large walk-in
lome with spacious kitchen, breakfast nook, formal dining, family room, pantry with plenty of storage. Enjoythe tropical garden view from your private lanai.
jreat room and lanai overlooking the lake. MLS 704798..........$379,000 Come and enjoythe Florida lifestyle at it's best. MLS 705279......................$199,900


S DETACHED VILLAS, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
This home comes with all the luxuries you'd expect from this gated community. 2
i, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2-car garage, high ceilings, enclosed lanai with hot
model with great open floor plan on Golf Course homeste. tub, plantation shutters, triple slider. Your backyard overlooking the water fountain
ms plus a den, which can be used as a third bedroom. An and it backs up to the park. This home has been built with just the right amount of
ir round or a vacation getaway. MLS 706854 $214,900 space, nottoo big and certainly, nottoo small! MLS 707118................... $304,900


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Move right into this immaculate villa and start enjoying the Florida lifestyle. Open and Beautiful, immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage villa in Brentwood. The 3rd
spacious, there are 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, plus a den and a 2-car garage, large great room, bedroom is currently set up as a den. Open great room, a sunny atmosphere.
dining area & fully appianced kitchen. Light and brightand all rooms are spacious. Top itoff Master bedroom with window seat. Handicapped tub in guest bath. Guest bathroom
with an enclosed Florida room all nicelysituated on a fully landscaped cul-de-sac homesite. is accessible to both guest bedrooms. Minutes to golf course, pool, sauna, hot tub,
Fantastic qated communitvwith great amenities to enjov. MLS707146................$148,900 exercise room at Brentwood recreation center. MLS 707172...................$129,900


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Lamps Plus stocks some
pink lighting that includes
Robert Abbey's rectangular
Schiaparelli Pink ceramic
table lamp with a Lucite base,
and OVO's glass lamp in ele-
gant fuchsia.
Crate & Barrel's Clara chair
is covered in a gentle water-
color floral that brings springy
gardens to mind.
Aaron Probyn's porcelain
dinnerware collection in a
dreamy blush, also at the re-
tailer, is pretty without being
precious.
Homegoods has well-priced
pieces like an elegant, damask-
printed accent chair with nail-
head trim, and a chic,
crocodile-embossed ceramic
vase, as well as storage boxes
and hand-carved picture
frames in shades of pink.


M







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RW-K GAIL COOPER
Mo Multimillion Dollar Realtor
F. Rt W s (352) 634-4346
F T Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3Lmindspnng.com

OPE HOSE TOAY 1200 SO 400 P

5 RYEWOOD CIRCLE
Custom pool home in
S Southern Woods
| Views of 2 fairways
R aGourmet granite
island kitchen
New roof 2012 -
new AC/heat 2011
Well for the yard -
self cleaning pool
Rte. 19 south; left on Cypress Blvd. W; left on Cypress Blvd. E; Left
on Corkwood Blvd. Right on Ryewood Circle. 000HEDC








Real Estate

Classifieds


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Ell


Al| Antoni Realtor A AMERICAN
K A REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU" 4511 N. Leado Hw.
! Cell: (352) 220"8143 =vr ZLo, HU I_ _
alantoni@era.com ....


Pine Ridge Estates -2234 W. Begonia Dr., Beverly Hills



i




3/2.5/2, 2006 Built home, nearly 2300 sq ft. living space Features 5430
include a large kitchen, family room, office/den, dining room, split P PR Blvd. to Alamandra
floor plan. Screened-in pool with spa. All on a 1 acre lot. Move-in
ready. Separate well for irrigation. Near Pine Ridge Golf Course.
Text 163091 to 35620 for electronic brochure.
MLS #707277 $239,900
Lecanto Hwy. to Pine Ridge Blvd., right onto Lena, left onto Begonia home on left.


S S S S


I


- JHUS


ROSEDALE CIRCLE
north to Rosedale. See Sandy McDermott
S957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100 S
Inverness, FL 34452 I
o 352-344-5535
www.Cridland.com
A s IF 5


To place an ad, call 563-5966


-. -


--4
r li~f I r


G^
i BP


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax: (352) 5-5,665 ,',1 Tolil' Free: (888) 852-23401Email: classifiedsTchronicleonIine'com I websitr'le.'.li


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1%2, Big Lot, Near 19
$435 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019

INVERNESS
3/1, $425. mo 1st, last
sec. No Pets
4188 S. Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385


INVERNESS
3/1, $500. mo 1st, last
sec. No Pets
4170 S. Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385



1999 Mobile Home
28x60, bank owned,
Repo, Great Shape
Financing Available.
Call 352-795-1272
MUST SEE*

ATTENTION:
Custom order a new
home and receive
20% OFF, between
now and tax day.
April 15th.
Factory direct,
Call (352) 621-3807

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2x6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C
Call (352) 621-9183


Triple Your Tax Refund
At Palm Harbor Homes
Plant City!!
www.Dlantcitv.Dalm
harbor.com
Call John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
[a&J3SSS


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065

v THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/screened
patio on over % acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512
Owner Financing
Available for Mobile
Homes!
Call for Details
352-795-2377


DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER
3BR, 3Bath, includes
mother-in-law apt.
roof over, sheet rock,
on 3 lots, 2 sheds,
waterfront $38,000
(217) 474-7727
HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4
acres, must see inside,
nice & Clean $42,000
(will consider reasona-
ble cash offers)
352-465-7606
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre.
New bathrooms, Ig
screened porch
dead end rd.
$45,900. 352-302-1383
HOMOSASSA
Large 3BR/2BA DW,on
large lot. New carpet,
Freshly painted inside
$3500 to move in
RENT To OWN
3402 S Aberdeen Ter
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330
Ready To Move In
3/2 with large back
deck on 1.5 acres.
Close to town
call 352-795-2377


Mobile Home on
Large Lot Fixer Upper 2
BR, 1BA, Carport,
Laun. Rm. Fl. Rm.
$12,500.
Drive by then call
115 N. West Ave.
Inverness 352-621-0559
Mobile Homes with
acreage. Ready to
move in.
Seller Financing
(subject to credit
approval).
Lots of room for the
price, 3Br 2Ba.
No renters.
850-308-6473
VMFhomes.com
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-2377



2BD/1 BA Singlewide
with added fam. rm
rasied deck, Ig. shed,
furnished 55+ $184 mo
Reduced Price $5,500,
(352) 726-3726


1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
pool and clubhouse
$18,500 (352) 344-5172
2Br, 1 Ba in 55+ Park
carport, shed, wshop
scrned Patio, In great
shape, fully furn. Ask-
ing $15k, $225/mo lot
rent. 352-419-4428
55+ MH Gated Com-
munity. Large 3/2,
2000 Jacobson Triple
Wide. 2000+ sq. ft.
Ready to move in.
$68K. Serious inquir-
ies only. Owner will fi-
nance with $20K
down.
727-967-4230
Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273

Lecanto Hills
2br/lba in 55+ comm.
Must Sell $3000
(352) 302-8886


For Sale I.
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090
EMoble Home

MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financina. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374


-ACTION
F RENTAL MANAGEMENT
I REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S850& UNDER
9218 N. Satinwood Terr.
3/2/2,1254 sq. ft
272 N. Big Oaks Pt.
2/2/2, 1510 sq ft.
7416W. Kendale Ct.
3/2,D/Won anAcre
S650& UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/2,992 sq. ft
504 S. Monroe St.
2/l/1,816sq.ft.
229 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1, Fenced, 1072 sq. ft.
8469 W. Drew Ct.
2/2, M/H on Canal w/Boat Dock
For More Listings Go To
www.CrusCounntyHoimeRfentals.am


I


RelEstt








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL
Ir","7 II [1M,_ I"*~ I lg

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch ous work for you'

3/2/2..................$850
3/2/2...................$875
2/1/1 .................... $650
2/1 ....................... $500
2/2/11 Condo.......$700


21211...................$650

2/2/Carport.......$575
MOBILE
Jennifer Fudqe Cheryl Scruggqqs
Property Managqer/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010










RENTALS
COUNTYWIDE!
Starting at
$450
Call// Today!





Inc












CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




HOMOSASSA
1/1, Clean, Quiet, CHA
$375. Incl. Water. 352-
563-2114, 257-6461
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incid water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393

INVERNESS
2/1 Immaculate, in town,
$650/mo, $650 Dep
(352) 895-0744


CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD









CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276


INVERNESS
RAINTREE
Apartments II
Two bedroom
Apt Availiable
62 YRS OF Age or
Older Hadicapped/
Disabled, regardless
of age with or
without children.
201 E. Hills Street
Inverness Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:00a 4:00p, M-F
This institution is an
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Employer & Provider







FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2/2/Carport, Furnished
& Unfurn. Extra Clean.
(352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
2/2 1st fir. Furn, long
term, pleasant 55+,
Pool/Club. Central
Avail April $750 + dep.
Inclds, H20, cbl, garb.
(352) 201-8735



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



HERNANADO
Terra Vista Rental,
Spacious 3BR w/maint
& club membership
352-302-7559
HOMOSASSA
1 Bd Rm, All Utilities Pd.
$700 mo. Newly Re-
modeled 352-228-1365



BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, EZ Terms,
$575 mo. 697-1457
Citrus Springs
3bd/1 ba/1 cg, Ig pool,
indcl maint, shed, $950.
f/I/s (352) 464-0004
Inverness 3/2/1
Highlands, $725.mo
+ sec. 352-634-3897


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 $600/month. Fully
renovated with stainless
steel appliances, new
cabinets, and ceramic
tile. Attached storage
shed and inside laundry.
No pets.(352)476-3570
or (352)410-8370

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1 /2, Screen Room
$750.mo. Fist/last/Sec.
(352) 302-6025

INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411

INVERNESS
3/2/2, Clean & Open
Close to Downtown
No Pets, 352-400-5723

INVERNESS
3/2/carport, Ig fenced
yard sun room appv'd
pet with add'l fee.
$775/mo sec& 1st.
352-697-2195

INVERNESS
Beautiful 2/1, gated
comm. 55+ pool, clb
hse activities. $650 +
dep. (330) 806-9213

INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850.
352-726-7212

PINE RIDGE
3/2, $1000. F/L/S
5310 Yuma Lane
(352) 302-6025





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



INVERNESS
4/2 1600sq ft House for
rent 2 carports on canal.
Large yard, boat dock.
$1000.00mo. First and
security required. Back-
ground check required
($25.00)Available March
1st. 727-871-4222






New Log Home*
on 10+ acres only
$89,900 3 Bed,
2 bath log home
with direct river
access. Convenient
to downtown Jack-
sonville. Excellent
financing. Call now
877-525-3033, x.19
*Constructed
weather-tight log
home shell. EHO


-E


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


Spectacular Blue
Ridge Mtn View.
1+ Acre only
$14,900!
Gorgeous corner
parcel in prime
No. Georgia loca-
tion w/ spectacular
Blue Ridge Mountain
view. Next to U.S.
National Forest.
Paved roads,
municipal water &
underground power.
Mild restrictions, RV
friendly. Call & ask
about our
FREE overnight stay
with tour. Excellent
low rate financing.
Call now
1-866-952-5303,
Ext. 169


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







Absolute
Auction.
Ponce de Leon, FL.
11+/- acres,
21,000+/- sq. ft. of
improvements near
US Hwy 90,
offered in 7 parcels.
February 27,
1:00pm,
gtauctions.com,
205.326.0833,
Granger,Thagard &
Associates, Inc.
G.W.
Thagard -
AU2846,AB2100,BK300
9116


Re


COMMUNITY
Open House
Event and Bake
Sale, Saturday
Feb 22nd from
10am to 2pm @
Walden Woods
55 and over
Community
Located off State
Rte19 one mile south
of State Rte 98
intersection at
7193 W. Walden
Woods Drive.Come
seeour beautiful
gated community
and homes.
Homosassa's little
hidden treasure!




L-QQkC
OPEN HOUSE
Sugarmill Woods
Fri/Sat 11am -3pm
Sun 1 4pm
31 Pine St. Homosassa
3 BR/ Den/ Gr Rm
2,207 LivSF $149K
MLS#701999
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446







FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514







Laurel Ridge,3/2/2+ in
Beautiful Twisted Oaks
Golf Comm.(with club
house & pool.) 1754 SF
of AC living area. LR,
DR & Kit w/ pantry &
nook. MBR has 2 clos-
ets(1 walk in). Entry
closet. 352-464-4639








Newly Updated 2/2/2
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
3229 N Juniperus Way
$114,900 352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!





ForSale'rA
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Hoe


For Sale Atr
Beautiful home you
are looking for! 4
bedroom. 2 bath, 2
car garage in gated
community large
14K sq. ft. lot, cus-
tom pool many up-
grades. 3300 sq.
ft.Can email info.For
Sale by Owner NO
brokers please!
352-601-6942
352-513-4463





For Sale I
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367



For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Appt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.

Homoassa^^
Homes~


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351





Buying or Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




A


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone@tampabav.rr.
corn
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


S OfferBidding Available

JOH DIXOCITSN LI. FL GA S ICk
&AsscniATo Online Bidding Available
AL #1481; GAL #2034; 45 Sell with Reserve
FLoAB 14188; NC #6397;
Joe arply, LMS L565
Broker; Thomas m g
Tarpleryn, r MS AL 5


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


SECLUDED
3BR/2BA, 1653sf, 2 car
CP, 2 story barn.
Includes 3/4 acre
buildable lot. $109,900
352-613-2289




I .s l I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
blpowell
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments












Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


9
Citrus County
Homes


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING!
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattft
centu rv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"





I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


E9
Citrus Count
Homes^^*


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

HOMOSASSA-Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000 352-422-1311

INVERNESS, 2BR/1BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749


Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financina
$10.000 Down.
10 vrs @ 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




Citrus Hills Townhouse
2br/2/2ba + carport
Fully FurnishedVery
nice, many extra's
near pool, great view
Must See $79,000
(352) 527-4518

For Salekfl
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some furn, new Lanai
& Lam, ceramic floors.
$48,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Inverness Village
Condo 2/2, 55+ ground
floor over looks pool,
mature trees, 1035 sq. ft
living area. $39,900
352-634-3976




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"




Homosassa/Crystal
River area, 2-3 BR
Need Owner Finance
option. Please Call
218-290-1869 (cell)


528 SW 1st Court
3 bedrm., 2-1/2 bath
Exciting opportunity
to live on Paradise
Isles in the heart of
Crystal River, Flor-
ida with two sided
deep, crystal clear
water and access to
the Gulf of Mexico.
Located across from
a 57 acre wilderness
preserve and a man-
atee sanctuary.
Watch the dolphins
and manatees play
in your own back
yard. Paddle board,
kayak, See Doo,
boating and water
skiing to your hearts
content. This 1/half
acre property has 2
docks, one with a
10,000 pound lift and
220 foot sea wall.
This beautiful 3,2 1
home has granite
counter tops, 2 fire
places, 2 12 car gar-
age, hurricane win-
dows and doors,
panoramic water
view, sunrise and
citrus fruit trees.
Enjoy low utilities
with hot water on
demand and water
to air AC. This prop-
erty won't last,
priced to sell at
$585,000. Owner
will finance part.
1(352)795-7400
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642
Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre.land survey &
clear title.assessed at
$23,800.power and
homes in area. ASKING
$8,500. 813-792-1355





GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


I osFrSle


Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High, Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Finsi Yozr Dreos HtoW

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

783572


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





4r,... >


MuSt SELL


HERNANDO
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
Lot for sale $15,000
OBO. 781-864-1906
352- 726-2821


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 E13


PARADISE! OZELLO!
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583


WATERFRONT LOT
Riverhaven at end of
Mystic Pt. One lot off
of main Homosassa
Riv. Approx 100 ft on
water. All utilities.
$165,000.352-634--1171






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

interest in baseball card collecting.
The market is not nearly as strong
currently as it was in the late 20th
century I think it would best to con-
tact Lelands Auction Company, an
auction company that specializes in
baseball memorabilia. The website
is wwwlelands.com and the phone
number is 631-244-0077.
DearJohn: We recently purchased
a stone carving of what appears to
be a human or monkey torso molded
from the base or emerging from the
body of a long-necked animal. The
carving appears phallic, as it has
two round spheres at its base.
The statue stands 17 inches tall and


JANE
Continued from Page E7

and competing stems before they
leaf out.
Using sharp snips for the smallest
twigs, bypass pruners for stems up to
an inch in diameter and use a recip-
rocating saw for larger trunks and
branches. Winter pruning is best
done early The wounds will quickly
heal over as the sap seeps out to
cover them. I will also rub off any
new leaves that start to emerge from
the remaining main trunk so no new
suckers will develop.
At the same time, I can tip-prune
all twigs in the canopy to promote
branching and consequently much
more flowering than on an unpruned
Crape Myrtle. Once the trunk is tall
enough and the lowest branches are
higher than 6 or 7 feet, these trees
will get no more pruning or shaping.
Older trees sprout few suckers.
I could let them become multi-
stemmed, tall shrubs that will have
flowers at the tips of every new stem
in summer 'Tuscarora' and the
other hybrids with American Indian
names grow tall, so they cannot be
kept as small shrubs for long. Newer
named varieties remain dwarf
bushy shrubs. Always read the plant
tag before buying Crape Myrtles. Get
a plant that will fit into the garden
space available. 'Dynamite' is a
newer variety that grows 8 to 10 feet
tall. Dwarf crapes require little
pruning. Young potted plants have
usually been pruned by the grower
to have 3 to 5 shoots. If a dwarf has


is quite heavy. It is carved from one
piece of stone and polished very well.
The person we bought it from said it
came from his father's estate and he
worked for Pan-Am, so it is at least 75
years old. We are interested in learn-
ing about its possible background and
worth. Thank you. We enjoy your
show and article. -J T, Internet
Dear J.T: It sounds like an inter-
esting item. In order to help you, I
need several good, clear photographs.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, P.O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.

become too bushy, tag the stems you
want to keep and snip off all others
at ground level.
The brutal practice of lopping off
the trunks and mature branches at
waist or chest height is folly The
butchered form is unsightly Rough
chainsaw cuts allow insects and dis-
eases to enter the plants. The
stumps sprout many weakly at-
tached shoots from the amputation
site. In following years, the de-
formed plant is often recut a foot or
two above the last mutilation. It is
sometimes practical to saw off an
old victim at ground level and then
let several new vigorous stems be-
come a new plant arising from the
mass of strong roots.
Seed pods develop after flower-
ing. They can be snipped off imme-
diately after that particular bunch of
flowers stops blooming. This will
often encourage further flowering
from the new stems that sprout
below the cut. The seed pods add
winter interest. Hybrids and cross-
bred seeds are usually sterile, rarely
germinate and would have different
characteristics than the parent
plant. As with children and pets, gar-
deners can guide plants to become
the way they want rather than leav-
ing them to run wild.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


BODACIOUS BUY ON BARCO! Inverness Highlands West 3/2/2 pool home built in 1989 with 1,824 of
living. Many features include a NEW roof, NEW interior paint, NEW flooring, split floor plan, breakfast nook, lanai,
rear Tencing, walk in closet & 1/2 AC lot. $126,900 #707453 Tomika Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598


E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAYMENTS
Continued from Page E5

after banks tightened lending
standards, are less likely to go
unpaid.
"We are on the downward


slope of the mortgage delin-
quency curve, so we expect to
continue seeing delinquency
rates that have not been seen for
several years," said Steve
Chaouki, head of financial serv-
ices for TransUnion.
The rate of late payments on
home loans has been steadily


declining over the past two
years. At the same time, U.S.
home sales and prices have
been rebounding over the past
two years, while foreclosures
have been declining.
Moderate but stable job gains,
still-low mortgage interest rates,
and tight supply of homes for


sale have helped fuel the hous-
ing rebound. That's also made it
easier for homeowners to refi-
nance, catch up on payments or
sell their home, avoiding
foreclosure.
Many borrowers also are mak-
ing keeping up with their mort-
gage payments a priority over


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 E15S

other financial obligations, en-
couraged by rising home values
and lower unemployment,
Chaouki said.
This is a reversal of a trend
during the last recession and
housing downturn, which left
many homeowners owing more
on their home than it was worth.


TIMBER
Continued from Page E6

the remaining trees are "released"
to receive additional sunlight, water,
and nutrients to allow them to grow
more quickly into larger and more
valuable timber products. These
trees are then clearcut in another
eight to 10 years and the stand is re-
planted. The time from planting to
harvesting is known as a rotation.
Pine is sold byproduct, depending
upon size (diameter) and quality
Smaller diameter timber in the 5- to
9-inch diameter class is marketed as
either pulpwood or mulchwood, de-
pending upon the buyer and the des-
tination. Pulpwood goes to the
Georgia-Pacific mills in Palatka or
Perry, while mulchwood may go to
mills in San Antonio or Terrytown in
Sumter County Larger timber, gen-
erally from 9 to 12 inches in diame-
ter and of good quality can be cut for
chip 'n' saw, which, as the name im-
plies, is utilized for small-dimension
lumber and the remainder chipped
for pulp wood or boiler fuel. Unfor-
tunately, the only mill which utilizes
this product is located more than
100 miles away in Maxville, north of
Starke.
Other larger-diameter trees, de-
pending upon size and length, can
be hauled to Cross City Lumber or
Suwannee Lumber (also in Cross
City) and used as sawlogs or to Ter-
rytown and used as poles. These two
products are generally the most
valuable and landowners receive
more money for sawlogs or poles
than for other products.
Cypress timber is sometimes cut
where a landowner has timber on
lower elevations. Cypress timber is
used for mulch or sawlogs. The same
mulch mills mentioned above also
take cypress. Cypress is favored for
mulch due to its longevity and re-
sistance to insects. Several sawmills
which utilize cypress are located in
central Pasco County and Largo. Cy-
press, however, is becoming increas-
ingly difficult to procure, as much of


the larger acreages of cypress have
been purchased by numerous gov-
ernmental entities.
When a landowner sells his or her
timber, a timber buyer will pay a
price for the standing timber Stand-
ing timber is known as stumpage,
and the price paid for standing tim-
ber is called the stumpage price. A
timber buyer may offer a "compos-
ite" price (an average price for all
products) or pay a separate price for
each product. All timber products
are paid by the ton. Each truck is
weighed at the mill and a scale
ticket determines the weight of each
load.
How does a timber buyer deter-
mine the stumpage price for each
product? Three factors determine
the price paid to a landowner- the
delivered price at the mill, the haul-
ing distance, and the logging cost.
Let's take these one at a time. A mill
will offer a timber buyer a price for
the wood delivered at the mill. The
buyer then must determine the
exact trucking distance from the
tract where the timber is purchased
to that particular mill as the trucker
charges so much per loaded mile.
The buyer must also pay a "pro-
ducer" to cut and load the timber
onto the trucks. The buyer, of course,
has to make a profit so he can con-
tinue to buy wood and pay
stumpage. Therefore, the delivered
price minus the hauling cost minus
production cost minus profit equals
the stumpage price, which is the
amount paid to the landowner for
that particular product.
One can see how a distance of only
10 to 20 miles can affect the
stumpage price. This is the biggest
single factor when purchasing tim-
ber and varies from site to site and
from mill to mill. Often, a buyer is
purchasing multiple forest products
from a particular woodlot and must
determine haul distances to each
separate mill destination. Other,
lesser factors that could affect
stumpage prices include volume of
the timber being cut, accessibility of
the tract, and seasonality of forest
products such as mulch.


How does a landowner know if he
or she is getting a good price for
his/her timber? A consulting
forester can "cruise" or inventory
the timber to determine the esti-
mated volume of the various forest
products on a tract of timber He or
she can then put the timber out to
bid to various reputable (very im-
portant) timber buyers to garner the
best price for the timber A consult-
ant can also assist with writing a
contract between the landowner
and buyer and monitoring the tim-
ber sale to assure contract compli-
ance, quality control and
accountability for all loads cut and
hauled.
If you need more information re-
garding selling your timber, contact
your local Florida Forest Service
Forester in your county or contact a
consulting forester
0--
Eric H. Hoyeris a certified ar-
borist, a certified forester, a


registered consulting arborist and
a qualified tree risk assessor with
Na tural Resource Planning Serv-
ices Inc. He can be contacted at
erich@nrpsforesters. corn.


AMAZING!
WONDERFUL!
OPULENT!
DELUXE!
E SPACIOUS!
Expect to see beauty m
l this free standing home in
Royal Oaks! Two bed-
rooms, two baths, and
double garage, plus




MLS#J702390. REDUCED TO $134,900
Directions: Hwy.41 to rightscreon England, by the airport, curve left onto Belgraveto address.olar


3517 S. BELORAVE
Your Hostess: Marilyn Booth 201-1121private pool.
Skyhite, marble-countered huge kitchen with planning desk and room for casual dinig.
Elegant columns leading into formal dinig room. Jetted tub in hall bathroom. Stunning
master suite opens to pool area, as does the spacious living room. Deep woods behind the
home, next to an open common area. All the delights of a private home!
M LS #702390. REDUCED TO $134,900
Directions: Hwy/. 41 S to right on England, by the airport, curve left onto Belgrave to address.
3517 S. BELGRAVE
Your Hostess: Marilyn Booth 201-1121 OOOHEQ9








E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014


a aImijauci I r-nur-.-n I mic -
ONE ON TRIBUTARY
OF FLORAL CITY LAKE
11. & 'l h hf1"ll.: I. 0 1 ;:h "J
M ~lt_ = ** /ii.')h . iWi.') i /':i. ,: ,
ONLY $105,000
Call S/elan S/uatl at 352 212 0211


OPEN PLAN & A LOT OF LIVING AREA
SQUARE FOOTAGE FOR THE SSS
1 lllH m(ul H(N I-.'h I"h I dl .... I..r.
i I ,, I 6,,, ,, ,. II,,,I h M ,,1 ,,, ., I., '

iiii ... .. ii-i i I, -, fl ll~-. ,l lI... -11h~ .

ASKING $138,900
Pit DVi, ,352' 212 17280
S.4e .t'nii. ,. 2/ izjLdi,'. m


" - I
VERY NICE 1985 MOBILE HOME
* .63 .i. i- '* _, ii.,,.!h i... .
* I_, l. I Dl i .J .^. l ullO I h .: .i l :. l

Mi =/i:iu"1/ $39,500
Wi/llaid Pickiel 201 9871


iii l. T,:]I,: 6 6, ...J I" l'll ll l l l ~ '~ l l l ll .'
Mi := /i:i: i:, $92,000
Call Buddy Gibson al i352/ 391 4385
lot a personal lout


AMAZING INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!

I il in A I ,n . ll

MCl, =1a:e:,e.::_" $179,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


riHE HIluih UUUI IHY I1YL HUMP
,_ v.h1 "l.d h :.:..d -- l.jll. I. .. ... .II..-.. :j"I:II:
I ..I I...... I.. I.. I ... l I



r1i.:= i i( ASKING $169.900
i -eim Jq.-I& 3524008072


IUIALLY HkUUNk Z/Z HUMP UN AN AUHI
l..l. Ijl ll: h :N ....N b .1 V I......r~l .-.. ll ll N1 .1: iolJ
i.....I II'. 11 4 1:1 .J : l,,,. h ...,l.J I 'l I l.,j

,vlillJ vo ll 1 .I ,. iJI h , II ,I bljV 1',
Call Mat/ha Sn det lodaj
352476/8727 ask lot /hie = 708544


MULTI FAMILY
.i ll:.... iiif I 4h i ll~ill .h .II I. I. I: iil h 'l |. :l'l, I.I

Mi3_-,=l'Q1 $349,900
Call Jim Moti on to pletiel 422.2173


...I .:I ...I .....:I.~"~.II II...... .i.I.. II. i...

... .l.:h. ..:.. .. I r..-.I i -rI JI '" lh rr h.1.

. $375,900
Cm Rutn fi-dl,,h I 352 563 6866


* l'.i l '': Pill- : .1 _'ll
* i: .,i.J,. I ,:,,:,l IV p .. l
* HIl .jh .,.i ..j i l. .I,:. ,
M1 _=/i:i: .i:i:i:. $219,000
Joanne at il'illatd Pickiel 352212-3410
n'nin. CiQiusConl'trSold. coin


* B aB l .|I| I: I "III l'.,ll' i l .lw l.i ....'
* All ,:..l.h:..: W I .I :II ij
* i _.iAI T IAVA _.:h.:..:. ll.i.I.l
Mi i = /u1,1,i/ $110,000
Joanne at ilillaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
ww'r:'r'. CiiiusCounlySo/d. cam


* I lh.. IJ.i : I i Il l:-.:. -l :
* IB . I.,iiI. pool h...'..-
* Iprillr.iIla:' raI:II IIIIl
* A[..l l .l.i h ll ,i.:i:

Mi = /iI:iIi:i/ $194,600
Jeanne at Ilillaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
iI'vi'r'. Cit usCounlrSo/d. coamn


'. Fill FII lIJ H IlIll H llI I: I I...




rl =-,,.".' -ASKING $194,900
Pit DVi, ,352 2/2 7280
r..-ii ooon ciiiiii o el~r) i -i~


i .. .. ..... .l. l ...... .. .I.... . I" l

..I. .. "' ..I.:I h"" I..:I i..I i id. &I I. h .

,i = :,, ASKING $52,700
Pal Dail ,352' 212 7280
li'ei listing i:i,:i c2lpalda,.s corn


SPACIOUS 3 BEDROOM. 2 BATH
vB' -DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
LARGE INVERNESS ON 1.67 ACRES
I. l.A i: .:lh i.:.. .. : l...:.il -, J.ill): F: .:,lll :i .h~ ] h .l.,]: ., IIH I ll: ..

.:. llh .: Ml.: .I II |. F |l. .:..:.l'll .I.lll: ,1:].1 1 .|.:.lIl .:,.:lIl ,1111.I l ,: l |..H .hl I ll M .. Ill l ^,l.ll1'I l ll1h, I IIll

I ..i. I: lii ASKING $250,000 MI_ =II:x.', ASKING $55,900
Call buade Feeset 352-302 /699 Call la'anda Wailu 212 1989


WATERFRONT NEAR 3 SISTERS SPRINGS
I'". J ..J ..ii _~' J:l~i':' i'i..i'i.il b ".' il hi' i _'': II .Iin



I' .,il ...J .il '
Mli'.-. = i,..4 ASKING $235,000
Nlancc Jenks 352 400 8072


MRS. CLEAN LIVED HERE!!!
tV...'i.l i lhil ...i'i.l... m il o In ... ill :lh.ill ,i i.l
,,|i. ONLY $49,900. ...
h.ilh l l~llllIf id ...I .~ ll: ..:il Ih.. .

Call Dois Minet 352-4224627 cell/
oat 352726-6668 lo/licel


7423 E. Applewood. Inveirness
TWO BEDROOM. TWO BATH
IN ARCHWOOD ESTATES
Cal.l Isaac. alhan lat a pianalh loIotjj
MI_ = I:I:!I6'w)
Call Isaac Baylon lot a poisonal louw


~OPEN TO
OFFERS
A I ll : i

i: i i i ll i :
,I:II. II : II.I [I I :I:I: [HI- II 111, -I.I I'.I H :I,11 i Ir I l1i,11:

!F l I l lu I II' , II I ,, I
1 1I. h l'I ,, I h, ,i,I 1 I
.I, .........."i,,I I I .' ..' ..... Ii i III

I h ....., Ih iii Iii ,~ i h l ll r 1 : =II .
PRICED FAR BELOW REPLACEMENT AT S218.900
PiOiliS ,1's .z8
l r/l Jifi.. ,/ r :.. 'M ll/ l .- ^ .J 8 .. ;*i


A 5110.MA1 LUUIIUN hUM I" .a .J'.l.".I

I i. a.I. . I
,: .'I, l ..I.l. ,:i l i .Ij l h .. l ..

Mi'. -.= :.' ASKING S188.000
Call Jim Mot/ ton 422 2173
to see ihis ollice space


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE