Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
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Full Text



'Canes hoops still alive in playoffs /B1


2014 CAMRY
LEASE $189PER MO
OR MON
FOR 9$2 E 99 DOWN


MEE PAGE C1S


COUNTY


CITRUS


FEBRUARY 14, 2014


I -1; II '


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
64
LOW
47


Mostly sunny.
PAGE A4


Purple Heart
ceremony set for
Saturday
The Combat Wounded
Patriots of Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Mili-
tary Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) is hosting
the Ninth Annual Purple
Heart Ceremony at
11 a.m., Saturday at the
Florida National Guard Ar-
mory, 8551 W. Venable
St., Crystal River. The
event is open to the public.
Dedicated to the mem-
ory of departed Chapter
776 patriot Donald Guard,
the ceremony will com-
memorate the legacy of
the Purple Heart and pay
tribute to Florida's fallen
heroes of the global war
on terror and America's
wounded warriors, with
special recognition of
World War II recipients.
The MOPH Department
of Florida Afghanistan/Iraq
War Memorial Portrait
Mural, which honors those
Floridians who died during
the Afghanistan/Iraq cam-
paigns, will be on display.
Vocalists Paul and
Jackie Stevio and 9-year-
old singer Marleigh Miller
will provide patriotic music.
For more information, visit
the Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Three Sisters
Springs hosts
last open house
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District and
the Friends of Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge are having the last
public open house at
Three Sisters Springs from
8 a.m. to noon Saturday.
Because an improved
road and parking lot on the
property have not yet been
constructed, free shuttles
to the property will be pro-
vided. Shuttles will depart
from the southeast corner
of the King's Bay Shop-
ping Plaza parking lot on
U.S. 19, just north of the
Sonic diner, beginning at
8 a.m., and will run every
5 to 10 minutes, with the
last shuttle returning at
noon. Pedestrian access
and the last shuttle to
Three Sisters Springs will
stop at 11:30 a.m.
Only mobility impaired
individuals will be allowed
to drive to the property. All
other visitors must use the
shuttle or walk/bicycle to
the property. Fishing,
swimming or other access
to the springs from the
property will not be
permitted.
For more information,
contact Ivan Vicente, U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service,
at 352-563-2088, ext. 211.
-From staff reports


Deutschman won't run again


Sixteen-year school board veteran says her focus has always been children


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

INVERNESS To Pat
Deutschman, the job was never about
playing politics or getting ahead.
It was about the kids.
During her 16 years on the Citrus
County School Board, Deutschman
championed programs that benefit


kids. She has also opposed powerful
state office-holders on standardized-
testing laws that she says damage
students.
And now this kids' advocate says it's
time to hang it up.
Deutschman said Thursday she will
not seek re-election this year, choos-
ing to retire when her term ends in
November


There are no doubts.
"It hasn't woken me up one night,"
she said. "I've been thinking about it
since last year I'm at peace."
Deutschman and her husband,
Fred, have a second home in Col- -
orado. Their two sons, who were stu-
dents in Citrus County schools when
Pat
See Page A5 Deutschman


With adversity comes strength


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Walt Pulcini and wife Karen Dixon-Pulcini, pictured in a reflection of a mirror at their
Inverness glass studio, have been through a lot in recent years, with Dixon-Pulcini
undergoing a kidney and pancreas transplant. While her life-threatening illness
created unforeseen challenges, the couple's relationship endured and flourished.


EDC discusses need to

evolve, long-term goals


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The future Economic De-
velopment Council could
have a different cast, lean-
ing more toward business
leaders than bureaucrats.
As the EDC moves
ahead on its five-year
plan, it will also be re-
viewing the makeup of its
own board and its mes-
sage to the community
It is expected to confront
the realistic development
potential of the designated
enterprise zone, the near-
term likelihood of Sun-


Couple's love grows

in face of hardship
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS
alt Pulcini sheepishly admits
he's gotten quite good at
pedicures.
Three years ago, when his wife Karen
Dixon-Pulcini's kidneys failed and she
started to go blind, he had to do just about
everything for her put her makeup on
her, cook for her, do the grocery shop-
ping, clean the house, even polish her
toenails.
"She was on dialysis and couldn't have
salt or potassium, so I even had to soak
raw potatoes to get the potassium out, but
I didn't care about it one bit," Pulcini
said. "It's what every husband should
do."
The couple, married seven years, said
they had thought their love was strong be-
fore, but nothing like it is now after going
through three years of life-threatening
illness.
On Feb. 24 it will be one year since
Dixon-Pulcini underwent a kidney and
pancreas transplant, necessary after kid-
ney failure the result of 27 years of
Type 1 diabetes.
"I still have some blindness, so I can't
drive, but no more diabetes," she said.
"I'm finally normal I can eat whatever
I want and I don't have to be hooked up to
a machine while I sleep."
The couple met 12 years ago at Pul-
cini's installation as a Realtor A mutual
friend had suggested that Dixon-Pulcini,
a former banker, go to meet him. She did-
n't want to, but did anyway
"We met; he got installed, and we've
been together ever since," she said.
They married in Key West while on va-
cation. They were having a drink and
Dixon-Pulcini said, "Hey, why don't we
get married?"
Pulcini told her, "We can't-we need a
license," which Dixon-Pulcini happened

See Page A5


First lady promotes literacy


0 The EDC received
good news Thursday.
/Page A2.

coast Parkway 2 and prior-
itizing action steps in its
recently adopted strategic
plan.
At Thursday's meeting,
County Commissioner Joe
Meek, the EDC president,
reported that EDC Execu-
tive Director Don Taylor
has broken the strategic
plan down into short-term
and long-term objectives. MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
He said short-term items Florida's first lady Ann Scott reads
to students Thursday afternoon at
See Page A2 Crystal River Primary School.


Ann Scott visits

Crystal River school
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Supporting
her husband, Gov Rick Scott,
through campaigns was a breeze
compared to answering questions
from first-, second- and third-graders
at Crystal River Primary School.
Questions like, "How old are you?"
and, "What do you do as first lady?"
were among the dozens of inquiries
that Florida's first lady Ann Scott en-
countered as she visited with stu-
dents Thursday
"My first job is to support my
See Page A2


Classifieds ....... C10
Comics .......... C9
Community . .C6, C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C9
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C8


Flower madness: Snow, sleet and ice: Valentines Day:


Local florists are prepared for the annual
Valentines Day onslaught./A3


You can't escape the day that is dedicated to
love./Cl1


I I N S I D E I


Another storm paralyzed the Northeast with
heavy snow and sleet./A12





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County shows


increase in permits


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Jenette Collins, county
director of planning and
development, has some
positive news for the
Economic Development
Council.
"We are starting to see a
slight increase in the num-
ber of permits," she said at
Thursday's meeting of the
Economic Development
Council.
Collins reported that
single family home per-
mits were up from 165 in
2012 to 220 in 2013, a
33 percent increase.
"We're starting to see
great numbers in nonresi-
dential permits," she said.



EDC
Continued from Page Al

will need to be done over
this quarter and the next
two, listing website devel-
opment as an example.
"We are going to be very
involved in implementing
that plan," Meek said.
"That will be our focus
this year"
A discussion followed
on the county's enterprise
zones. Ardath Prender-
gast, EDC manager, said
the county got its zone in
2012 and it is scheduled to
sunset in 2015.
The county's enterprise
zone covers 9.26 square
miles around the Cross
Florida Barge Canal and
.56 square miles east of
U.S. 19 and south of West
Longfellow Street in Ho-
mosassa. The state-sanc-
tioned zone offers tax
incentives to attract new
development.
She recalled at the time
the designation process
was limited by the rules in
place, with other counties
experiencing similar con-
cerns. The EDC had
wanted to designate the
Inverness Airport Indus-


"It will never be the same
as 2007, but it's starting to
go up."
Collins cited a 35 per-
cent increase from 2012
to 2013, with the num-
bers growing from 366 to
494.
She explained that it is
not all new development,
but could be any kind of
improvement to a nonres-
idential structure. "We're
seeing a lot of creative
things going on," she said,
pointing out some restau-
rants are adding outdoor
seating.
As for new projects, she
noted Dollar General is
looking at a new location
near Inverness, and a
GNC Nutrition store is

trial Park, but it did not
meet the criteria, which
included resident poverty
rates in the immediate
area.
She said the number
one thing site selectors
are looking for is access to
transportation.
There was discussion
on the lack of water and
sewer to the enterprise
zone and a lack of connec-
tivity with the uncertainty
of Suncoast 2. "We need a
uniform voice as an EDC,"
said board member Mike
Bays. "We need to be plain
spoken as a board: we
need to have a message."
He suggested inviting
legislators to discuss the
board's priorities.
Andy Houston, Crystal


coming to the Publix
shopping center at U.S. 19
and U.S. 98. There has
also been a planned unit
development proposed
for a 76-lot residential
subdivision and assisted-
living park in Homosassa.
She said the County
Road 491 corridor overlay
plan, which encourages
the growth of the medical
corridor, will be going to
the Board of County Com-
missioners on Feb. 25. It
involves rezoning about
325 acres and was set in
motion by plans for
Suncoast 2.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. corn.

River city manager, asked
how they can get to a point
of proceeding differently
"We are going to need to
look at our board
makeup," said Meek. "We
need to look at getting ad-
ditional people with re-
gard to industry leaders.
It needs to be pushed by
the private sector"
"We have to face some
realities," said Frank Di-
Giovanni, Inverness city
manager "We really need
to have people who meet
payrolls on this board, as
opposed to bureaucrats,
for a more positive eco-
nomic result."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


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SCOTT
Continued from PageAl

husband. He needs a lot of
support," Scott said. 'Also,
I see myself as a goodwill
ambassador for Florida.
Do you know why I am
called the first lady?"
"No," the class replied.
"Is it because you are
the first lady on earth?"
one student asked.
"No, it is a title bestowed
to the governor's wife and
the first lady of the United
States," she explained.
"The first lady is a volun-
teer for the state. The things
I selected to do as first lady
were to focus on reading
and literacy, adoption offos-
ter children, healthy
lifestyles for children and
support our military"
For the record: The
question of her age was
never answered.
Scott visited Crystal
River Primary School as
part of her campaign for
reading and literacy She
tours schools and libraries
throughout Florida, en-
couraging children to read
and write.
"I have been visiting
schools all around the
state since the governor
came into office," Scott
said. "It typically was
where ever we were trav-
eling. I would find schools
in that area to read to the
kids. Sometimes it was ele-
mentary schools and
sometimes middle schools,
but mostly elementary
schools. Typically, middle
and high school students
don't need people reading
to them. We expanded the
tours at the mansion. We
sent a letter out to all
schools inviting them to


Massage



details online


In Homosassa & Crystal River
352-564-1040


come to the mansion to see
the history This year we
sent out a letter stating
that the first lady would
read to students in the
schools. In the first day, we
had over 200 schools re-
questing me to visit. I'm
trying to get to all of them."
Scott has visited more
than 100 Florida schools.
At CRPS, she read
"Slugs in Love" by Susan
Pearson to Tesa McClure's
first- and second-grade
classes and Niky Ward-
low's third-grade class.
Also, she spent time with
third-graders as they ex-
plained the mathematical
lessons that they were
completing on their iPads.
"We are honored that the
first lady is here and the
kids have really enjoyed
her reading to them," said
Superintendent of Schools


IA

U


Ann Scott
wife of Gov. Rick Scott.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel. "It
was exciting to watch how
engaged she gets with the
kids and their questions. It
was a great day for our
kids."
Before saying goodbye
to the students, they had
special gifts for her a
signed "Slugs in Love"
book, manatee Christmas
ornament, reusable water
bottle filled with mints and
samples of their writings.
And Scott left the school
a token of her visit a col-
lection of children's books
for the school library
"Thank you so much for
having me," she told the
students as she waved
goodbye.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


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LOCAL


TRUS COUNTY CHRO


)NICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Republicans to
meet Saturday
Staff Sgt. Ken Patterson,
U.S. Army-retired, will be the
guest speaker at the North
Suncoast Republican Club
meeting from 9 to 11 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 15, at the
Sugarmill Country Club,
Homosassa.
During his service, Patter-
son was stationed three
times in Iraq, once in
Afghanistan and twice in
Korea. While on tour in
Afghanistan his helicopter
was shot down.
Complimentary coffee and
doughnuts are available at
8:30 a.m.
For further info go to
www.NSRC-gop.com or call
Bill Connery, president, at
352-382-0811, or Bruce
Bryn, director, 352-503-7375.
Young Elvis singer
to perform
On Saturday, Feb. 22,
Cote Deonath a 16-year-
old from Dunnellon will
perform at 7:30 p.m. in the
Old Courthouse in Inverness.
While he is still too young
to perform in the Ultimate
Elvis Tribute Artist Contests
around the country, he has
performed for audiences
since he was 5.
All proceeds to benefit the
Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum. Doors open at
7 p.m. with cash bar and
snacks available. Tickets for
up-front and personal re-
served seating are $35; other
seats are $25.
SAt noon Sunday, Feb.
23, there will be a Gospel
Music and Brunch event in
the upstairs at the Old Court-
house with Deonath singing
Elvis' renditions of inspira-
tional music. Seating is lim-
ited to the first 120 people;
no reserved seating. Doors
open at 11:30 a.m. Tickets
are $25.
For all tickets, call the Old
Courthouse at 352-341-6427
or 352-341-6436.
Logo contest for
aquarium opens
Artists throughout the Na-
ture Coast are invited to de-
sign the artwork to represent
the logo for the new Crystal
RiverAquarium, located on
at the Crystal River Mall on
U.S. 19. (in the former Belk
department store).
Artists age 15 and older
are encouraged to use their
talents to create an informa-
tive and easily identified logo
that includes aquatic repre-
sentation of our area both
coastal and inland.
Deadline for submission
is Feb. 22.
The winning artist will re-
ceive an annual family
pass to the Crystal River
Aquarium.
For information or sub-
missions, email Crystal
RiverAquarium@gmail.com

Ocala
Woman accused of
swindling $60,000
An Ocala woman is ac-
cused of swindling an
89-year-old woman out
of $60,000.
Officials arrested 28-year-
old Tamarah S. Dalton on
Tuesday and she remained
in the Marion County Jail on
Thursday.
The Ocala Star-Banner re-
ported that an attorney repre-
senting the victim said she
was visited often by a man
and a woman. He said it was
discovered that checks were
written, forged and cashed
against her bank account be-
ginning in late 2011. He said
the victim wasn't aware the
theft had taken place.
Madon County Sheriffs
detective Adrian Lewis found


53 checks made payable to
Dalton. Lewis met with Dal-
ton, who denied at first that
she'd received money from
the woman. Later Dalton ad-
mitted writing the checks.
Jail records did not list an
attorney for Dalton.
-From staff and wire reports


Mother, daughter charged in shoplifting


SEAN ARNOLD
For the Chronicle

An Inverness
mother and
daughter face
multiple charges
in an alleged
shoplifting
scheme.
On Wednesday,
Danielle Horst,
26, and her Danielle
mother Tracy Horst
Horst, 52, were
both arrested on charges center-


ing on a shoplifting plot to get
cash. Danielle Horst was charged
with felony grand
theft and misde-
meanor retail
theft, while her
mother, Tracy,
was charged with
trafficking in ,/4
stolen property
According to
her arrest affi-
davit, Danielle Tracy Horst
Horst is accused
of shoplifting a blender, valued
at $199, from the Inverness Wal-


mart on Jan. 27. On Feb. 1, she re-
portedly shoplifted another
blender valued at $199, along
with a soda valued at $1.58 from
the same Walmart. On Feb. 11,
Danielle returned to the store
and reportedly shoplifted a set of
pots and pans valued at $199 and
a floral arrangement valued at
$15.98.
After the shoplifting incidents,
Tracy Horst allegedly returned
the items for a Walmart gift card.
On Feb. 1 Tracy received $210.94
for the stolen items. She returned
a second time on Feb. 11 and re-


ceived an additional $398 in store
credit According to reports, Tracy
Horst turned both gift cards over
to authorities. According to the ar-
rest affidavit, Tracy claimed to
have no prior knowledge that the
items were stolen, however ad-
mitted that she should have
known because her daughter
didn't work and she had returned
$617.94 worth of merchandise in
two days.
Tracy Horst was released on
her own recognizance, while
Danielle Horst's bond was set at
$2,500.


Flower madness


Wendy Mann of Waverley Florist in Crystal River arranges some of the
Valentine's Day.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
scores of long-stem roses the florist will deliver for


Local floristsprepared for annual Valentine's Day onslaught


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

Roses are red and local
florists have been up to their
eyebrows in them, preparing
all week for the annual on-
slaught of people buying flow-
ers for Valentine's Day
"We are crazy busy," Jill
Agnew, owner of the Flower
Basket in Inverness, said
Wednesday "We'll have eight
drivers on Friday"
Likewise, Cheryl Gaouette,
owner of Waverly Florist in
Crystal River, said they too
had been working non-stop all
week and will have 10 drivers
making deliveries today
"We ordered more than
2,000 red roses, and our sup-
pliers said they'd have more if
we run out," she said.


Countywide, flower shops
and roadside vendors are
geared up for last-minute sales.
According to information
from the Society of American
Florists, 233 million roses
were produced to fill the de-
mand for Valentine's Day Red
roses account for 63 percent of
floral orders for the holiday,
followed by mixed floral
arrangements and roses other
than red.
Men buy 64 percent of flow-
ers sold for Valentine's Day,
with most for "romantic rea-
sons." Women, however, tend
to buy flowers to show appre-
ciation for mothers, daughters,
friends and sweethearts; they
also buy Valentine's flowers
for themselves. Only 6 percent
of men buy for themselves.
But the actual flowers are


just part of the experience.
The other part is the card that
is sent with them.
Today, someone in Citrus
County is getting flowers from
"Your Big Sexy" according to
Jill Agnew
Gaouette said last Saturday
a little boy and his dad came
in and spent more than an
hour choosing flowers for
Mom. They chose a mixed
Valentine floral bouquet and
the boy drew a picture for his
mom on the card.
As of Wednesday, no mar-
riage proposal cards were re-
quested at either Waverly or
the Flower Basket, although a
few years ago a young guy
came into Waverly Florist with
a necklace in an envelope to
go with a bouquet of flowers
and a card that said, "Will you


State mulling curve on toll road


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Whether Suncoast Parkway 2 is still headed
toward Red Level was the question on the
minds of dozens of people who attended a
presentation Wednesday in Beverly Hills.
John Kaliski of Cambridge Systematics, a
transportation planning consultant for the
Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT),
outlined some concepts of the Florida's Future
Corridors Initiative at a meeting of the Citrus
County Council, a nonprofit consortium of
homeowners associations, civic clubs and en-
vironmental groups acting as a local govern-
ment watchdog.
When Kaliski took questions, David Kurtz of
Inverness was quick to ask: "At what point
are you in the process for the Suncoast
Parkway 2?"
Kaliski's answer was followed with rapt
attention.
"The Suncoast 2, the extension of the Sun-
coast Parkway, has received the environmen-
tal approval to begin the design process,"
Kaliski said. "One of the questions that has
come up here is, you see where the existing
alignment has been identified. We're thinking
about going to 1-75, so there would be some ad-
justments to the alignment that would curve a
little bit to the east instead."
Since 2006, Florida's Turnpike Enterprise
(FTE) has planned to develop Suncoast 2 from
the northern terminus of the Suncoast Park-


way at the southern boundary of Citrus County
for about 27 miles through the length of the
county to U.S. 19 at Red Level near the
county's northwestern boundary For the past
five years, however, the project has been sus-
pended until sufficient funding can be
collected.
Herbert Adams of Dunnellon pointed out
how the Future Corridors concept seemed to
sweep traffic from Tampa toward Northeast
Florida.
"I'm a little discouraged at the map that I'm
seeing here," Adams said. "What we're seeing
here is a funneling into the Jacksonville corri-
dor, which cannot be handled."
Adams advocated the current alignment of
Suncoast 2.
"If we look up through (U.S.) 19 to (U.S.) 27
right up into Georgia to 1-85, we would relieve
and move a lot of the stuff from the east to the
west," Adams said. "I think we are being just a
little bit too narrow-minded to move to
Jacksonville."
Kaliski said studies are trying to determine
destinations for traffic from Tampa. Some of it
is going to Jacksonville, some to Atlanta and
some to the west.
More information about the Florida's Future
Corridors Initiative is available at www.
flfuturecorridors.org.
Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer
at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer@chronicle
online, corn.


marry me?"
"We never did find out what
the answer was," said Waverly
floral designer Amy Freed.
Mike Gaouette both said one
of his favorite things is deliver-
ing flowers.
"When you ring the bell and
people see the flowers, their
faces light up," he said. "Peo-
ple love getting flowers; it's
the romance of it."
Agnew said every year she
gets roses from her husband.
"He comes in, goes to the
cooler, gets a dozen and says,
'Here Honey' and I put them
right back," she said, laughing.
"Diamonds, dear I want
diamonds."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-
2927 ornkennedy@
chronicleonline. corn



State BRIEFS

Man gets life for killing,
burying body in cement
PENSACOLA-A fantasy game enthu-
siast was sentenced to life in prison without
parole for beating a former Pensacola
newspaper reporter to death with a ham-
mer and burying his body in a concrete-
covered pit in Georgia.
Prosecutors said William Cormier III was
so desperate for money that he killed Sean
Dugas in the fall of 2012 so he could steal
his $100,000 collection of fantasy role-
playing cards.
Jurors convicted Cormier of first-degree
murder after a little more than an hour of
deliberations.
Zimmerman responds to
wife in divorce case
ORLANDO George Zimmerman is ask-
ing a judge to set aside a default judgment
for his wife in their on-going divorce proceed-
ing, and has filed a countersuit against her.
Zimmerman made the requests in a re-
sponse filed late last week.
Shellie Zimmerman filed for divorce in
September and served him with a divorce
papers while he was in jail on a since-
dropped domestic violence case involving a
former girlfriend. He says they became lost in
jail and he was unable to respond until now.
-From wire reports






A4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday It's time to put your ideas
and tried-and-true methods to work.
Rely on experience and mix lessons
from the past and present in order to
come up with solid plans for the future.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You'll
risk your reputation if you rely on sec-
ondhand information. Someone may
pass off fabrication as fact just to put
you in an awkward position.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Commu-
nity get-togethers and special-interest
gatherings are great places to meet
new friends.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't let
others do the talking for you. A col-
league may try to present your ideas
as his own.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't let
stress get you down. Make your home
your refuge. Surround yourself with the
people and comforts that make you
happy. Take time to relax and reflect.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Strate-
gize how you can make personal im-
provements. Proper nutrition, regular
exercise and plenty of enjoyable activi-
ties are all vital to your success and
physical and mental health.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You'll be ex-
tremely convincing today. Make sure
you don't harbor any ulterior motives
and that you have thought matters
through.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You may
be a little short- tempered. Just be-
cause someone has a different view, it
doesn't mean you can't get along.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Take a
moment to do something you enjoy
Perhaps there is a hobby or new
friendship you'd like to pursue.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be con-
siderate of others today Avoid criticiz-
ing others and focus on the positive
message you want to convey
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Travel delays and other unforeseen
problems will plague you. Don't get
frustrated over circumstances you can-
not control.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -A
partnership will face pressure if you en-
counter a stalemate. If you're willing to
compromise, you will find it easier to
reach an agreement.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
won't feel too sociable today. Take a
closer look at your current situation
and establish the steps you need to
take to advance. Backtracking may be
necessary


ENTERTAINMENT


Drake: I'm done
with interviews
NEW YORK Drake says
he won't do interviews with mag-
azines following a recent story in
Rolling Stone magazine.
The rapper was supposed to
be on the cover of the maga-
zine's new issue, but was re-
placed with the late Philip
Seymour Hoffman. Drake
tweeted Thursday that he's
"done doing interviews with
magazines."
"I just want to give my music
to the people," he wrote. "That's
the only way my message gets
across accurately."
Other Thursday tweets from
the 27-year-old were deleted, in-
cluding one about his discomfort
with Hoffman gracing the cover
of Rolling Stone.
"I'm disgusted with that. RIP to
Phillip Seymour Hoffman. All re-
spect due. But the press is evil,"
he tweeted.
The new issue of Rolling
Stone hits newsstands Friday.


OSAGECL-'


ETE A
-. -C.E COUNTYY


UN
OSAGE



A


UN

0AGE


ETEA
COUN


Associated Press
Associated Press


American director John Wells, left, and American actress
Meryl Streep pose Thursday in Paris as they arrive at the
French premiere of the film "August: Osage County."


multiday event that draws about
10,000 fans.
Psychopathic Records says it
does have a "Plan B," but it isn't
saying what that is.


had been through "a year-and-a-
half of hell."
"I had two trials," he said. "I
had one trial by media and one
trial by crown court. And I have
to say in all honesty that I prefer
trial by the crown court."
Travis said during the trial that
he was not a sexual predator, as
prosecutors claimed.
Travis, a longtime radio DJ
and former host of TV music
show "Top of the Pops," was one
of several veteran U.K. show
business figures arrested after
revelations that the late BBC en-
tertainer Jimmy Savile was a
serial sexual predator who
abused scores of young people.
The allegations in the cases
stretch back decades, and secur-
ing convictions has been difficult.
Last week the 81-year-old
"Coronation Street" star William
Roache was acquitted of multi-
ple sexual assault charges in a
separate trial.

From wire reports


ST. LOUIS A yearly festival
headlined by the rap-metal
group Insane Clown Posse won't
be staged this summer at a cen-
tral Missouri town's campground
after all.
Some two weeks after an-
nouncing the Gathering of the
Juggalos was bound for Cry-
Baby Campground in tiny Kaiser,
Mo., organizers of the event held
the past seven years in southern
Illinois say the campground has
backed out.
Suburban Detroit-based Psy-
chopathic Records says in an
online posting that the Miller
County campground's operators
had second thoughts after resi-
dents of that area complained
about the prospect of hosting the


Vl IIu Ivw'1t uult
LONDON -A British jury on
Thursday cleared veteran radio
and television DJ Dave Lee
Travis of 12 counts of indecent
assault.
It was the second high-profile
acquittal this month of a veteran
British entertainer on sex charges.
Jurors at London's Southwark
Crown Court failed to reach a
verdict on two more charges
against Travis. He had been ac-
cused of assaulting young
women at concerts, in radio
studios and elsewhere over a
period of three decades.
The 68-year-old had denied
13 counts of indecent assault
and one of sexual assault.
Outside court, Travis said he


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Feb. 14, the 45th
day of 2014. There are 320 days left
in the year. This is Valentine's Day.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Feb. 14,1924, the Comput-
ing-Tabulating-Recording Co. of
New York was formally renamed In-
ternational Business Machines
Corp., or IBM.
On this date:
In 1912, Arizona became the
48th state of the Union as President
William Howard Taft signed a
proclamation.
In 1929, the "St. Valentine's Day
Massacre" took place in a Chicago
garage as seven rivals of Al
Capone's gang were gunned down.
In 1949, Israel's Knesset con-
vened for the first time.
In 1989, Iran's Ayatollah Khome-
ini called on Muslims to kill Salman
Rushdie, author of "The Satanic
Verses," a novel condemned as
blasphemous.
Ten years ago: Guerrillas over-
whelmed a police station west of
Baghdad, killing 23 people and
freeing dozens of prisoners.
Five years ago: Savoring his first
big victory in Congress, President
Barack Obama used his weekly
radio and Internet address to cele-
brate the just-passed $787 billion
economic stimulus bill as a "major
milestone on our road to recovery."
One year ago: Paralympic su-
perstar Oscar Pistorius was
charged with murdering his girl-
friend at his home in South Africa, a
stunning development in the life of
a national hero known as the
"Blade Runner" for his high-tech
artificial legs.
Today's Birthdays: TV person-
ality Hugh Downs is 93. Actress-
singer Florence Henderson is 80.
Former New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg is 72. Journalist
Carl Bernstein is 70. Pro Football
Hall of Famer Jim Kelly is 54. Actor
Simon Pegg is 44.
Thought for Today: "Age is
strictly a case of mind over matter.
If you don't mind, it doesn't matter."
- Jack Benny (born this date in
1894, died in 1974).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L Peast City


Daytona Bch. 66
Fort Lauderdale 71
Fort Myers 70
Gainesville 66
Homestead 71
Jacksonville 64
Key West 70
Lakeland 69
Melbourne 67


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


155/46 Tr | n/a n/a
THREE DAY OUTLOOKExuse daiy
r TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
-. High: 64" Low: 47'
.M Mostly sunny

W q SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High:65 Low:4.0
m',,, Partly sunny, possible brief shower, rain
S .. ...... chance 20%
lV SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
..'. ,High: 68 Low'. 45
p -,! Mostly sunny.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 66/55
Record /26
Normal 72/54
Mean temp- 66
Departure from mean 3
PRECIPITATION* .0
Thursday 0.01
Total for the month 1.36'
Total for the year 4.50'
Normal for the year 3.56"
'As o 7 p-m- at Im trwss
UV INDEX: 9
O-2minimal,3-41ow, 5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
29.76


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 57.9
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 84%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, maple
Today's count: 9.3/12
Saturday's count: 11.0
Sunday's count: 10.1
AIR QUALITY
Thursday observed: 28
Pollutant: Ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES .=S
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
02/14 FRIDAY 05:39 22:34 17:18 22:58
02/15 SATURDAY 06:14 23:18 18:11 11:42
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SW T T iT ............ ..... 6:18 p.m .
Mj!Mgf sa MaMa -----------------,7:07 am
0 3 MOONRISE TOYDM 616pm
0 wOA .._.............. 6:37 am,
Feb 14 Feb 22 Marl Mar 8 TW-----------37m
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no bumrn ban.
,y m:.rii amallr.i il F.i.rva Dio'E n ol RFresvrv i51 352| 7 F.237-. moe
;nOim3lrin oir. droujghi conc-iions riara w*ill itbA Dms~on ul F-.esuy s lv~eD jB
htp://flamn e.l-dol.comtire weatherfboxi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m. as
follows:
EVEN addresse a n iy aet on Thursday andor Sunday.
ODD addre.sses rnay walei on Wednesday aior Sahlrday
Hand watering with a sixu-off nozzle or micro ilgalon o( non-grass areas such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus Courty Uilities' customers shuUd CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Scme nere planlrngs maf qaitly lor adil|onai
walerng allowances.
To report vilatons. please ct1: Oily of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City ol C rsial
River 0 352-795-4216 ext. 313 urncorporared Citrus Couri"y d 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "A[ Kings Bay "'At Mason's Creek
FRIDAY
City High Low
Chasahowttzka* 6:21 am, OSIt, 6:19p,m 0.41 1"47pmD. f.,
Crystalivw" 4:23 am, 2.3t, 456pm 1.9ft ,11 :26a.m- 0,1 t l1:22p,r4ft4.
Withlacoochee 1:30a,m, 3.1 it, 2:17p.m. 3.1 ft, 847 a.m. -0.4ft. 857 pmO2 ,
Homosassa" 5:31 am. 1.21t. 618p.m, ,0ft. 12;00 m. 0,2t 1. 2Op.mD.Ot.


Today: North, then SW winds around
5-10 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and
inland waters a moderate chop.
Tonight: Southwest winds 10 to 15
knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and
inland waters a moderate chop.


Gulf water
temperature


62
Taken at AripMa


LAKE LEVELS
Location THU WED Full
Whnlacoochee at Holder 29.30 29.17 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 3852 38.48 39.52
Tsala Apopka-tnvemess 39.62 3957 40.60
Tsala Apopka-RFloral City 40.29 40.24 42.20
Levels reported m feet above s ea Wev, Flood stage lor t akes are bas on 233.year flood.
mep fnwal arirmjfl nJK4 rn.-h M-|M a 43 pmcert cnxs.'TCe i- 01 mulp' wl wj -* e- :eTdeo .1
eiry .jna year MTldis ld 15 Qbfa'riM- 'l tr- e Sc ltr--m~ Firiddd Vialatf MflriagT-erm ^'.
and is sut ct to rWsion In no event w the Distirct or Ite Un4led Staleis Geologcal Survey
Em .Tw N ATlaiiai 0.i !. 04 u irOi 0 ir l have any queslons you
i1.-:arl.-t Te H .I I -3 ro o l-I"K 96 7_"1

THE NATION

01~


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
Allanlic City
Aussln
Balltmore
Billings
Birmingham
Soise
Boslon
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston. S.C
Charleston. W.V.
Chartlole
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbta. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
Doetrot
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Hamsburg
Hartlofd
Houslon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
I Aiaennles,


THU
H L Pep. H
27 13 .36 35
67 40 68
36 27 ,65 45
45 29 .04 53
39 32 1-6240
69 32 78
37 24 1,2336
47 36 44
49 31 .26 58
52 39 01 49
36 21 .74 38
26 12 27
29 17 .02 30
41 34 12 59
33 28 .74 38
46 26 13043
31 10 24
42 14 33
31 8 28
42 15 34
40 17 31
26 2 .30 32
67 30 67
59 34 55
46 19 20
29 8 27
76 41 78
41 17 35
35 19 .72 37
29 l18 37
62 29 73
37 7 27
74 49 79
59 21 56
so $1


FRI
L Fcst
16 en
40 pc
24 r
32 pc
25 pc
45 1
23 pc
31 pc
3D ssi
38r
28 f6
13 l
17 sn
4O pc
22 sn
31 pc
3~ PC
3 pc
12 sn
12 sn
14 Sn
12 sn
13 sn
38 pc
31 pc
7 sn
10 pc
47 pc
11 1
16 pc
22 pc
51 pc
7 sn
53 pc
29 f
531 Dc


THU FRI
City H L PC. H L Fert
NewOrleans 55 36 67 48 pc
NewYorkCity 36 24 1.1541 25 pc
Norfdolk 44 39 1.2050 35 pc
Oklahoma City 64 22 58 35 pc
Omaha 51 22 26 15 pc
PalmSpnngs 86 56 89 61 pc
Phladelphia 36 24 .90 37 23 pc
Phoenix 82 52 86 55 pc
Pllsburgh 30 22 .05 32 16 sn
Portland ME 26 9 16 34 19 n
Porland. OR 56 43 -03 52 38 r
Providence. RI 35 22 91 39 26 pc
Riealgh 33 30 80 43 33 pc
Rapid City 50 30 .01 47 29 pc
Reno 64 40 68 39 pc
Rochesler,.NY 26 8 32 14 11
Sararmenlo 70 53 68 50 cd
SaflLakeCity 61 43 17 58 43 sh
SanAntonio 70 33 81 44 1
San Diego 76 53 70 54 pc
San Francisco 67 50 57 51 cd
Savannah 48 34 .05 60 40 pc
Sealtl e 55 47 25 52 38 r
Spokane 46 37 42 32 sn
Stl Louis 49 11 31 12 sn
St Ste. Mane 22 9 .03 22 -2 sn
Syracuse 26 12 .04 32 16 sn
Topeka 48 22 40 21 pc
Washington 38 27 1.4038 25 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH ca.lo m.C
LOW 14, Oak.NDn
WORLD CITIES


1-05Will s V 04 *1 0 PCFRI
Louisville 43 19 34 13 i CIT HNXSKY
Memphis 51 23 52 30 r C
Milwaukee 29 21 .09 21 pc Acapuco 8"69"
Minneapolis 30 14 15 0 pc Amsterdam46137/pc
Mobile 54 36 64 43 pc Athens 6034WpC
Montgomery 54 34 64 36 pc Bejin 37 C
Nashville 53 26 48 23 r erl in /71c
Bemiuda 73(68.ts
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c.cloudy ddrizzle; Cairo 75/53/s
falm;ei h.they, pc patlty cloudy; r-rin; Calgary 33112/cd
rs-ralinfnow mil: I-rmumW. showrs; Havana 8OS5/ts
im-sow tsli=llundenrtoHm W= wbdn Hong Kong 53/44r
WS1 ZOa4 Jerusalem 75)51/s


Lisbon 62/55&r
London 48/35/1pc
Madrid 62/5/pc
Mexico Ciy 75/4B/s
Montlreal 2821/pc
Moscow 35/32/sn
Paris 48/35/r
Rio 9175/pc
Rome 6O/4 s
Sydney 82/a69pc
Tokyo 44/32pc
Toronto 30/22/pc
Warsaw 46'0/pc


Sl LEGAL NOTICES




Fictitious Name Notices.............................................C14
Bid Notices...................................................................C14
Meeting Notices...........................................................C14
Lien Notices.................................................................C 14
Miscellaneous Notices...............................................C13
Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices...............................C13
Self Storage Notices...................................................C13
Surplus Property .........................................................C13


S CI T RULIS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
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To start your subscription:
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Report a news tip:
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


Insane Clown Posse
seeks new site British DJ acquitted
fvf inlAcAnt aee-ault


--, .I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Loud music killing jury ends LOVE

dav two of deliberations Continuedf


w


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
defense attorney for a
Florida man accused of fa-
tally shooting a teen after
an argument about
loud music said
Thursday that his
client is in good
spirits as he waits 4
for jurors to come /
back with a verdict
in his trial.
Michael Dunn's
attorney, Cory Micz
Strolla, said that Du
waiting for a ver- charge
dict is the hard flrst-d
part of the trial. ur
"From day one, his atti-
tude has been we have the
truth. We will prevail,"
Strolla said.
Dunn is charged with
first-degree murder,
though jurors could also
consider second-degree
murder and manslaughter
as options for a conviction.
The 12 sequestered ju-
rors went home Thursday
evening without reaching a
verdict after deliberating
for almost 12 hours over two



RETIRE
Continued from Page Al

Deutschman first ran for
office, are now grown liv-
ing out west as well.
"It's time for someone
else to come in and try
their new ideas," she said
in an interview at her hus-
band's law office, which
she manages.
Deutschman was an ac-
tive parent at a time when
the schools were thirsty for
parental involvement. She
served on advisory coun-
cils at Inverness Primary,
Inverness Middle and Cit-
rus High schools.
She ran for office in 1998
after watching the school
board and superintendent
bicker constantly over de-
tails that had little to do
with the classroom.


days. They will resume de-
liberations Friday morning.
On Thursday, the jurors
asked to see a mannequin
and sticks that had been
used by prosecutors in the
courtroom to recon-
struct the angle of
the shots that hit
the victim. Circuit
Judge Russell
Healey denied the
request saying the
props were only
used for demon-
ahel strative purposes
n"" and weren't en-
d with tered into evidence.
degree A short time
der. later, jurors asked
for an easel and paper, and
an hour after that they
asked when Dunn had
written a jailhouse letter
in which he recounted his
version of events. The an-
swer was July of 2013.
Dunn claims he shot 17-
year-old Jordan Davis, of
Marietta, Ga., in self-de-
fense outside a Jacksonville
convenience store in 2012.
But prosecutors told jurors
Dunn shot the teen because
he felt disrespected by


"I thought I could do a
better job," she said.
Deutschman brought
with her a strong belief in
data-driven decisions.
That belief has spread
throughout in a district
now known for educators
who track progress for
each student, and make
decisions or not de-
pending on what the data
shows.
She said the Florida
Comprehensive Assess-
ment Test, or FCAT, was
once used with a combina-
tion of other tests to indi-
cate student achievement.
Now it's the sole indicator
and some school board
members statewide, in-
cluding Deutschman, have
fought to change that.
"It hurts kids," she said.
"One-size-fits-all does not
apply to children, and it
shouldn't apply to children


Davis. Davis had the music
in his SUV turned back up
after a friend complied with
Dunn's request to turn the
volume down.
The trial was the latest
Florida case to raise ques-
tions about self-defense
and race; Dunn is white
and the teens were black.
It came six months after
George Zimmerman was
acquitted of any crime for
fatally shooting 17-year-old
Trayvon Martin in San-
ford, Fla., about 125 miles
south of Jacksonville. The
Dunn trial was prosecuted
by the same State Attor-
ney's Office that handled
the Zimmerman case. Zim-
merman identifies himself
as Hispanic, while Martin
was black.
The Dunn trial wouldn't
have as much attention if not
for the Zimmerman acquit-
tal last summer, Strolla said.
"I believe there is a lot
vested in this case, politi-
cally," Strolla said. "The
case, on the heels of not
guilty in George Zimmer-
man, just escalated that
political pressure."


or their future."
It hasn't all been a bat-
tle. Six years ago,
Deutschman, along with
Inverness parent Tim
Hess and community lead-
ers, started the Teen
Driver Challenge, a pro-
gram that's a must for any
high school student want-
ing a parking permit at
their school.
"We used to lose one or
two a year," she said. "We
haven't had a single fatal
accident involving a stu-
dent since then."
Deutschman said she
has always kept her focus
where it belongs kids.
"I love them," she said.
"It's very gratifying to
know I've helped a lot of
kids through the years."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn.


rom Page Al


to have in her purse.
So, after a mojito, the
justice of the peace, who
was also the bartender,
married them in the court-
yard of the restaurant
"It was so touching,"
Dixon-Pulcini said. "Peo-
ple came out of the restau-
rant and they threw rice,
and some actually bought
us presents from the gift
shop, and people took pic-
tures on their phones."
She said for their first
nine years together, life
was nonstop. They trav-
eled; she worked and sat
on numerous boards
around the county; he
sold real estate and ran
Cubby's, his art glass
shop. Except for daily in-
sulin shots and testing her
blood sugar, life was easy
"Then everything
stopped," Pulcini said.
"Karen started losing her
eyesight and then we
found out her kidneys
were failing."
One of their biggest
hurdles, waiting for a kid-


I don't feel I did any more
than a husband should do. Karen
is the real hero. She endured so
much being on dialysis ...

Walt Pulcini
took care of his wife Karen during her illness.


ney transplant notwith-
standing, was Pulcini's at-
titude about sickness.
"I was raised never to
be sick," he said. "I never
had a high tolerance for
sickness or sick people,
but then Karen got sick
and she couldn't do any-
thing by herself. It's funny
that the universe would
throw this at me. She had
to have me take care of
her, so that's what I did,
and I was happy to do it."
Some days he would just
sit with her all day and
he's not a man who just sits.
"I don't feel I did any
more than a husband
should do," he said.
"Karen is the real hero.
She endured so much,
being on dialysis every
night and losing her sight.
She has made me a better


man, just being with her"
This past December the
couple took a cruise, their
first in three years.
"We did absolutely noth-
ing, and it was wonderful,"
Dixon-Pulcini said. "I still
can't drive, and now I
come to the shop with him
every single day we're
together 24/7, and we're
very happy"
"It sounds like a cliche,
but we're still very much
in love," Pulcini added.
"Even through all of this
- especially through all
of this. It was a very trying
time for us, but we're so
much stronger"
PS. He still does her
toenails.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Emi.


4:
a


s-b-- ~


- Jim.


- J~I A~


Associated Press
A group of U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials check imported flowers
Jan. 9 at Miami International Airport. In the weeks leading up to Valentine's Day,
about 738 million flowers come through the airport.



Hey Romeo, thank these


guys for bringing the roses


Associated Press

MIAMI If Cupid were
to have a home, it would be
Miami International
Airport
Before millions ofAmer-
icans can present their
loved ones with a bouquet
of Valentine's Day roses,
most of the flowers are
flown from Colombia and
Ecuador to Miami, many in
the bellies of passenger
planes. There, cargo han-
dlers and customs agents
- call them Cupid's
helpers ensure that the
deep-red petals stay per-
fect until they reach their
final destination.
In the weeks leading up
to Valentine's Day about
738 million flowers 85
percent of imported flow-
ers come through the
Florida airport Los Ange-
les is a distant second, with
44 million. The roses, car-
nations, hydrangeas, sun-
flowers and other varieties
are rushed by forklift from
planes to chilled ware-
houses and then onto re-
frigerated trucks or other
planes and eventually de-
livered to florists, gas sta-
tions and grocery stores
across the country
"We always joke that a
passenger gets themselves
to the next flight while a bit
of cargo does not," says Jim
Butler, president of cargo
operations at American
Airlines.
The biggest problem this
Valentine's Day might be
the final few miles of the
journey A massive snow-
storm that blanketed the
east coast has made some
suburban roads difficult
for local delivery drivers.
For U.S. passenger air-
lines such as American,
cargo is a small, but in-
creasingly important part
of their business. New jets
are built with more freight
space and the airlines are
adding new nonstop inter-
national routes popular

6aL. e. !Zav
Funeral Home With Crematory
STEPHEN CHITTY
Private Arrangements
BILLY COVINGTON
Graveside Fri. Feb 14 10:00AM
Florida National Cemetery
HELEN SHARF
Mass: Mon. 11:00 AM
Our Lady of Fatima
LISAWHEELER
Private Arrangements
726-8323


with shippers.
Most airline passengers
focus on what's visible to
them, like the amount of
legroom and the space in
the overhead bins. Few
think about what's beneath
the cabin floor
There's fresh Alaskan
salmon, this season's latest
luxury clothing from Milan
and plenty of Peruvian as-
paragus heading to Lon-
don. Then there are the
more unusual items like
human corneas, the occa-
sional live cheetah or lion
and large shipments of
gold and diamonds.
And there are the
flowers.
Valentine's Day is a big
day for flowers, topped
only by Mother's Day, and
cargo teams work extra
hours ahead of both to en-
sure on-time deliveries.
"There's a spark in the
air while loading these,"
says Andy Kirschner, di-
rector of cargo sales for
Delta Air Lines. "You
know this is going to loved
ones."
The cargo business isn't
just about the space in a
plane's belly There needs
to also be precision han-
dling on the ground, espe-
cially with a product that
can spoil.
With flowers, as soon as
they're cut a clock starts
ticking. And nobody wants
to give wilted roses on
Valentine's Day
Heat is the enemy
When a plane touches
down in Miami, the flow-
ers are rushed to a nearby
warehouse where a pa-
rade of forklifts carry
them into giant coolers -
really rooms set at 35
degrees. Every time the
giant cooler doors open

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Contact
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Darrell Watson 564-2197



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up, fog rolls out as the
frigid air hits the Florida
humidity.
Inside, big vacuums suck
the hot air out of flower
boxes and bring in the sur-
rounding cold air In one
hour, the core temperature
of flowers, vegetables or
other perishables drops 46
degrees.
"It's like it cryogenically
extends the life," says
Nathaniel R. Miller, a su-
pervisor with Perishable
Handling Specialists,
which operates Ameri-
can's Miami coolers.
Before the flowers can
be sent to stores across the
country U.S. Customs and
Border Protection must
sign off. Agents check tax
documentation, ensure
that drugs aren't being
smuggled and inspect
petals and stems for pests
like moths, leaf-miner
flies and spider mites,
which can ruin crops in
American fields.
The job has hazards:
roses come with plenty of
thorns and some officers
wear masks to protect
against the pollen. Their
uniforms include hats and
gloves.
"It's like working in a
meat locker," says Michael
DiBlasi, a Customs and
Border Protection agri-
culture specialist. "We
love our job. You have to,
to work in a cooler"


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with Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restnctions For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at http /vww bocc citrus fl us/
pubworks/aauatics/aauaticservices htm Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services


Diana
Griffith, 75
HERNANDO
Diana Lee Griffith, 75,
of Hernando, Fla., died
Wednesday, Feb. 12,
2014, in Lecanto. Private
interment will be under
the direction of the In-
verness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory.

Helen
Sharf, 89
INVERNESS
Helen T Sharf, 89, In-
verness,
Fla.,
passed
away Feb.
11, 2014, at
Villas at
Sunset
Bay in
New Port
Richey. HelenSharf
Helen was
b o r n
March 28, 1924, in Brook-
lyn, N.Y, to the late Julius
and Frances (Golecki)
Klosenski. After her birth,
her family moved to
Greenwich, Conn., where
she was raised. Helen was
employed by Elizabeth
Arden for 25 years as a
beautician, a position she
very much enjoyed. A de-
vout Catholic, she sup-
ported The Carmelite
Order of Nuns throughout
her life. She was a great
cook.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are nieces, Patricia,
Lydia, Gail, Eve, Jill; and
nephews, Walt and
Thomas; and sister-in-law,
Marguerite Collins. One of
16 siblings, she was pre-
ceded in death by her twin
sister, Irene M. Corvin;
brother, Walter Collins; all
of her other siblings; and
her husband of 33 years,
John Sharf.
A Mass of Christian Bur-
ial will be offered at 11
a.m. Monday Feb. 17,2014,
at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church. Burial
will follow in Oak Ridge
Cemetery The family in-
vites friends to join them
in visitation from 10 a.m.,
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home until the pro-
cession leaves for the
church. Memorial dona-
tions may be made in
Helen's memory to Gulf-
side Hospice, 6117 Trouble
Creek Road, New Port
Richey, FL 34653 or the
Multiple Sclerosis Associ-
ation of America.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


Aquilina Ward-
Roberts, 73
CRYSTAL RIVER
Aquilina Demaris Flo-
res Martinez Ward-
Roberts,
73, of Cit-
r u s
County,
Fla., died
Sunday,
Feb. 9,
2014. She
was born
to Sil- Aquilina
vestre Flo- Ward-
res and Roberts
Angela
Martinez Jan. 22, 1941, in
Penonome, Panama. She
relocated to the United
States in 1966. After travel-
ing for her husband's mili-
tary career, her family
settled in Crystal River in
1970.
Known as Nina to her
friends and family she was
baptized as one of Jeho-
vah's Witnesses and joy-
fully served in nine
congregations in three
states. She was instrumen-
tal in the establishment
and development of the
Spanish congregations in
Citrus County
Nina will be remem-
bered as a loving mother
and homemaker by her
five children and their
spouses, Donna Ward
Frink and Ron Frink of
Beverly Hills, Billy Ward,
actively serving in the U.S.
Army, Keith Ward and
Donna Ward of Crystal
River, Keeli Ward Hamil-
ton and Rick Hamilton of
Inverness and Regina
Roberts Graham and Alan
Graham of Athens, Ga. She
will be greatly missed by
her 14 grandchildren,
John Hodgkins and his
wife Lindsey, Steven
Hodgkins and Joshua
Barker, Will Ward and
Nicholas Ward, Hannah
Ward, Logan Ward and
Emma Ward, Austin
Hamilton, Mia Hamilton,
Malena Hamilton, Jessy
Lagarino Graham and
Clay Graham; and two
great-grandchildren, Noah
Hodgkins and Elijah
Hodgkins; and many
nieces and nephews. Her
parents preceded her in
death along with her
brother, Arselio Sabedra of
Sonadora, Panama. She is
survived by siblings,
Bernarda Seyersdahl of
Tampa, Julio Flores and


1


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WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning February 17, 2014
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. iA
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.co


,Wft --- --- -- or


A6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


Natia MacKay of Son-
adora, Panama.
In lieu of flowers, please
send donations in memory
of Nina Ward to Hospice of
Citrus County Addition-
ally, donations may be
made in her memory to La
Casa De Campesino of
Penonome, Panama, via
her children. A memorial
service will be 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 22, 2014, at
Fero Funeral Home in
Beverly Hills.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home,
www.ferofuneralhome.com






Robert Hurd, 65
INVERNESS
Robert A. Hurd, 65, of
Inverness, Fla., died Feb.
11, 2014, at Citrus Memo-
rial hospital in Inverness,
Fla. Arrangements by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.





Clarence
Lovelady, 78
CRYSTAL RIVER
Clarence David Love-
lady, 78, of Crystal River,
Fla., died Feb. 12,2014. In-
terment will be private at
Florida National Ceme-
tery Arrangements en-
trusted to Fero Funeral
Home.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Parasailing safety bill

passes Senate committee


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A
Senate committee unani-
mously approved a bill
that would provide safety
guidelines for parasailing
companies after hearing
tearful testimonies from a
17-year-old who suffered a
brain injury and broken
bones in her spine and
from a mother whose
daughter died
while doing the
recreational sport. .
The legislation
approved Thurs-
day details specific
insurance, equip-
ment and license
requirements,
along with Sen. I
weather condi- Sac
tions that dictate a spons
halt in operation safety
in Florida.
Sen. Maria Sachs spon-
sored the bill. The Delray
Beach Democrat said it's
her No. 1 priority for this
year's session.
"If I fail, then people can
be injured or killed,"
Sachs said. "We're tired of
these types of injuries that
could have been pre-
vented if, in fact, those op-
erators had followed the
minimum requirements of
not going out when there's
a lightning storm or if
there are wind gusts over
20 mph."
The parasailing indus-
try received national at-
tention in recent years
with several deaths and
accidents involving the un-
regulated activity in
Florida.
In parasailing, people
wear parachutes and are


lifted into the air when a
motor boat pulls on the
tow rope they are attached
to.
The bill proposes that
operators carry $1 million
in insurance, have a li-
cense issued by the U.S.
Coast Guard and have cer-
tain equipment on the
boat
Alexis Fairchild, who
suffered the brain injury,
and the mother of
Amber White, who
died in the 2007,
made pleas
J through tears to
the committee.
White's sister Crys-
V tal, who was also
injured in the acci-
Maria dent, was sched-
;hs uled to speak, but
sored became too emo-
y bill. tional to address
committee members.
Fairchild and a friend
slammed into a condo-
minium, hit a power line
and struck a parked car in
2013. She had to relearn
basic motor skills and was
forced to drop out of her
normal Indiana high
school. Fairchild had to
wear a helmet and back
brace at her new school.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
John Padilla, 49, of West
Otter Street, Homosassa, at
11:25 a.m. Feb. 12 on an ac-
tive warrant for felony petit
theft with two or more convic-
tions. Bond $2,000.
Robert Reagle, 48, of
North Trucks Avenue, Her-
nando, at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 12 on
an active warrant for felony vio-
lation of probation stemming
from an original charge of pos-
session of methamphetamine.
Dorrian Jackson, 18, of
South Swan Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at noon. Feb. 12 on
an active warrant for felony
burglary with battery. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, Jack-
son was already incarcerated
at the Citrus County Detention
Facility at the time of his arrest.
Bond $25,000.
Dennis Wilhelmina, 58,
of Wabash Avenue, Lakeland,
at noon Feb. 12 on an active
warrant for felony violation of
probation stemming from an
original charge of possession
of methamphetamine.
Brianna Lynch, 22, of
West La Prima Court, Crystal
River, at 3;33 p.m. Feb. 12 on
a felony charge of grand theft.
According to her arrest affi-
davit, Lynch is accused of
stealing cash on multiple oc-
casions during the month of


January from the Pet Super-
market in Inverness, where
she was employed. She re-
portedly stole a total of ap-
proximately $480 from the safe
and cash register drawer.
Bond $2,000.
Sean Michaud, 31, of
North Sandree Drive, Citrus
Springs, at 9:31 a.m. Feb. 13
on felony charges of grand theft
and burglary to an unoccupied
conveyance. According to his
arrest report, Michaud is ac-
cused of breaking into a 2011
Volkswagen vehicle and steal-
ing a black Coach purse, which
contained $200 in cash, along
with identification and other
miscellaneous items. He also
allegedly took grocery bags
containing several bottles of al-
cohol and soda. According to
the victim, she and her hus-
band had returned from shop-
ping and brought their children
into the house, then later re-
turned to the car to get the gro-
ceries and her purse and
noticed the missing items. Both
the groceries and the purse
were located in the woods be-
hind the suspect's home, but
the money was missing.
Michaud was arrested during a
bond hearing for unrelated
charges of vehicle burglaries.
Bond was denied.
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was
reported at 6:51 a.m.


SMassage


BO(o

details online



In Homosassa& Crystal River
352-564-1040


Wednesday, Feb. 12, in the
9000 block of N. Cortlandt
Drive, Dunnellon.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 1:04 p.m. Feb. 12
in the 6400 block of E. Wemrner
Court, Hemrnando.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 9:54 p.m. Feb. 12
in the 20 block of Golfview
Drive, Homosassa.
Thefts
An auto theft was re-
ported at 1:13 a.m. Wednes-
day, Feb. 12, in the 2900 block
of Reagan St. W., Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 7:32 a.m. Feb. 12 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 8:45 a.m. Feb. 12 in the
4100 block of N. Bluewater
Drive, Hemrnando.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 2:37 p.m. Feb. 12 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

Lake Highway, Inverness.
An auto theft was re-
ported at 9:43 p.m. Feb. 12 in
the 900 block of N. Savary
Ave., Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 9:59 a.m. Wednesday, Feb.
12, in the 40 block of S. Jeffery
St., Beverly Hills.
A vandalism was reported
at4 p.m. Feb. 12 in the 11000
block of N. Farmwood Ave.,
Dunnellon.


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Dow Jones industrials
Close: 16,027.59
Change: 63.65 (0.4%)


1 ,8 5 0 ........ ............. ......................... ..... 17 ,0 0 0 ............ ....................... ........................ ...........
, 8 o o0 . . . . .. .. . . ... .. . . . .. 1 6 ,5 0 0o . . ... . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . .
1,800 16,500
1,750.......... ..........16,000 ....

1,700 ............. .. .......... ...................- 0 ........15,5


1,600 " '" S.....X ..... O........... "N ............ r4 ...... 6 ..... i ......;..VI' 14,500-""-,k--;"' S " ...... 0 ..... N .......... "D..... D ...... i ........F '"


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,183
3,244
2283
794
148
21


NASD
2,176
1,986
1880
704
134
19


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16039.37
7292.35
516.80
10232.12
4240.67
1830.25
1343.17
19589.21
1147.80


LOW
15863.25
7201.47
509.31
10111.02
4170.47
1809.22
1323.75
19340.93
1124.40


CLOSE
16027.59
7281.98
516.25
10228.58
4240.67
1829.83
1341.67
19585.69
1147.79


CHG.
+63.65
+18.05
+5.63
+54.81
+39.38
+10.57
+9.86
+133.98
+15.25


%CHG.
+0.40%
+0.25%
+1.10%
+0.54%
+0.94%
+0.58%
+0.74%
+0.69%
+1.35%


YTD
-3.31%
-1.60%
+5.23%
-1.65%
+1.53%
-1.00%
-0.06%
-0.61%
-1.36%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 8.47 6.85 +.09 +1.3 A V V -16.5 +60.2 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 -0-- 39.00 33.49 +.55 +1.7 A V -4.7 -2.4 10 1.84f
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -0- 62.05 51.22 +.50 +1.0 A V -2.8 +21.9 24 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 -- 106.83 100.25 +.57 +0.6 A V 7 -5.8 +16.8 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 10.98 17.42 16.75 ... ... A +7.6 +37.0 17 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 13.90 13.18 +.12 +0.9 A A A +12.0 +10.9 38
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 -0-- 42.01 30.77 +.58 +1.9 A A 7 -3.4 -22.5 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 40.28 --- 55.28 49.86 -.10 -0.2 A 7 -4.3 +12.7 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.78 0 27.28 27.00 +.17 +0.6 A A A +15.8 +60.5 29 1.00
Disney DIS 53.59 0 78.01 77.90 -.01 A... A A +2.0 +43.3 21 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 --- 75.46 71.43 +.56 +0.8 A A A +3.5 +7.5 21 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.67 -0-- 61.18 51.23 +.30 +0.6 A A A +4.2 +15.1 20 3.42f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 -0-- 101.74 91.43 +.35 +0.4 A 7 7 -9.7 +5.8 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.10 18.02 15.08 +.08 +0.5 A 7 -2.3 +17.9 11 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 21.11 --- 28.09 25.44 +.05 +0.2 A 7 7 -9.2 +15.9 17 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 34.90 51.76 50.00 +.93 +1.9 A 7 A +4.8 +34.6 15
Home Depot HD 63.82 -- 82.57 77.59 +.31 +0.4 A 7 7 -5.8 +17.1 21 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 20.10 --- 27.12 24.70 +.15 +0.6 A 7 -4.8 +20.1 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0-- 215.90 181.84 +1.60 +0.9 A 7 -3.1 -8.0 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 -0- 34.32 28.50 +.87 +3.1 A 7 7 -13.4 +19.1 29
Lowes Cos LOW 35.86 --- 52.08 46.64 -.04 -0.1 A 7 -5.9 +19.1 22 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 -0-- 103.70 95.46 +.57 +0.6 V 7 7 -1.6 +3.1 17 3.24
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 27.23 38.98 37.61 +.14 +0.4 A A A +0.5 +37.9 14 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 67.69 65.67 -.11 -0.2 A 7 7 -2.7 +10.0 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 71.42 0 92.75 92.85 +.65 +0.7 A A A +8.4 +30.8 22 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 0-- 23.10 5.99 +.03 +0.5 A 7 7 -34.5 -69.1 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 -0-- 21.09 16.71 ... ... A A A +1.2 -8.8 30 0.80
Regions Fncil RF 7.42 -- 11.08 10.30 +.05 +0.5 A 7 A +4.1 +30.5 13 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 32.85 -0-- 67.50 43.42 +3.03 +7.5 A A 7 -11.5 -15.4 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 88.45 -0-- 114.72 95.14 +1.43 +1.5 A 7 7 -8.2 +6.1 18 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 32.19 0 44.82 43.74 +.44 +1.0 A A -0.4 +32.5 25 1.20
Time Warner TWX 51.62 --- 70.77 64.60 -.46 -0.7 A 7 7 -7.3 +26.1 17 1.27f
UniFirst Corp UNF 82.53 113.06 105.85 +.78 +0.7 A 7 7 -1.1 +24.9 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 44.11 -0--- 54.31 47.31 -.06 -0.1 A 7 7 -3.7 +11.3 12 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 39.44 36.81 +.17 +0.5 A 7 7 -6.4 +40.4 1.61e
WalMart Strs WMT 68.13 -0- 81.37 75.36 +.40 +0.5 A 7 7 -4.2 +7.6 14 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 39.74 0 67.00 66.39 +1.29 +2.0 A A A +15.6 +58.8 23 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a -Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates






The yield on the
10-year Treasury
fell to 2.73 per-
cent Thursday.
Yields affect
rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
natural gas
jumped, the lat-
est rise in its
see-saw ride
so far this year.
Gas rose for
the second time
in three days
and reached its
highest settle-
ment price since
Feb. 4.



DO


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.04 -0.01 .09
6-month T-bill .07 0.08 -0.01 .12
52-wk T-bill .11 0.11 ... .15
2-year T-note .31 0.34 -0.03 .28
5-year T-note 1.50 1.57 -0.07 .91
10-year T-note 2.73 2.76 -0.03 2.02
30-year T-bond 3.68 3.72 -0.04 3.23


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.47 3.51 -0.04 2.81
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.89 4.89 ... 4.04
Barclays USAggregate 2.37 2.34 +0.03 1.93
Barclays US High Yield 5.47 5.50 -0.03 5.98
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.54 4.48 +0.06 3.91
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.76 1.80 -0.04 1.16
Barclays US Corp 3.12 3.10 +0.02 2.83


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 100.35
Ethanol (gal) 2.02
Heating Oil (gal) 3.03
Natural Gas (mm btu) 5.22
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.78
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1300.40
Silver (oz) 20.39
Platinum (oz) 1416.60
Copper (Ib) 3.31
Palladium (oz) 730.90
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.43
Coffee (Ib) 1.40
Corn (bu) 4.41
Cotton (Ib) 0.88
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 360.80
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.46
Soybeans (bu) 13.44
Wheat (bu) 5.96


PVS.
100.37
1.98
3.01
4.82
2.76
PVS.
1295.30
20.33
1407.30
3.32
728.85
PVS.
1.42
1.41
4.40
0.88
354.20
1.46
13.23
5.87


%CHG
-0.02
+0.10
+0.60
+8.32
+0.51
%CHG
+0.39
+0.27
+0.66
-0.26
+0.28
%CHG
+0.74
-0.96
+0.11
-0.87
+1.86
+0.14
+1.61
+1.45


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.28 +.09 -0.6 +16.0 +11.3 +15.7
CaplncBuA m 58.05 +30 -0.9 +10.4 +9.1 +12.9
CpWIdGrIA m 45.19 +.24 -0.3 +19.1 +10.3 +16.6
EurPacGrA m 48.52 +.14 -1.1 +14.9 +6.5 +15.0
FnlnvA m 51.37 +.22 -1.2 +22.7 +12.4 +19.2
GrthAmA m 43.44 +.26 +1.0 +27.7 +14.0 +19.3
IncAmerA m 20.73 +.09 +0.4 +14.7 +10.8 +16.1
InvCoAmA m 36.54 +.22 -0.4 +24.9 +12.8 +17.7
NewPerspA m 37.35 +.21 -0.6 +20.4 +10.9 +18.2
WAMutlnvA m 39.05 +.16 -1.0 +24.3 +14.6 +18.5
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.58 +.13 -1.1 +19.0 +7.4 +19.3
Stock 167.27 +.83 -0.9 +28.9 +14.9 +21.9
Fidelity Contra 96.25 +.88 +1.1 +28.7 +14.4 +20.2
LowPriStk d 48.52 +.25 -1.9 +24.1 +14.4 +22.4
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 64.99 +38 -0.8 +22.9 +13.6 +19.7
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.46 +.01 +1.2 +11.8 +8.6 +15.7
IncomeA m 2.43 +.01 +1.3 +12.1 +9.0 +16.2
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 12.89 -.02 -1.6 -0.8 +4.4 +9.1
Harbor Intllnstl 70.20 +.17 -1.1 +12.0 +6.6 +16.9
Oakmark Intl 1 26.21 +.01 -0.4 +19.9 +10.8 +23.1
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.29 +.11 -1.7 +18.8 +11.9 +19.8
GrowStk 53.33 +.45 +1.4 +34.6 +15.8 +22.5
Vanguard 500Adml 169.08 +.99 -0.8 +22.9 +13.7 +19.8
5001lnv 169.05 +.99 -0.8 +22.7 +13.5 +19.6
MulntAdml 13.93 +.01 +1.9 +0.1 +5.5 +4.7
PrmcpAdml 97.98 +.74 +2.4 +32.2 +15.5 +20.6
STGradeAd 10.74 +.01 +0.6 +1.6 +2.7 +5.0
Tgtet2025 15.74 +.07 -0.1 +13.5 +8.9 +15.2
TotBdAdml 10.69 +.02 +1.5 +0.2 +4.0 +4.8
Totlntl 16.47 +.03 -1.7 +9.5 +3.9 +14.4
TotStlAdm 46.47 +31 -0.5 +23.9 +13.8 +20.7
TotStldx 46.45 +32 -0.5 +23.7 +13.7 +20.5
Welltn 37.91 +.11 -0.1 +14.6 +10.5 +14.8
WelltnAdm 65.48 +.19 -0.1 +14.7 +10.6 +14.9
WndsllAdm 64.49 +33 -1.1 +21.2 +13.4 +19.2
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The S&P 500 index rose Thurs-
day for the fifth time in the last
six days, led by utility and tele-
communications stocks. The in-
dex is on track for its best
weekly performance in the last
eight, and it has erased most of
its loss from early this year.


Time Warner Cable TWC
Close: $144.81 A9.50 or 7.0%
Comcast, the cable and media com-
pany, said it agreed to buy rival Time
Warner Cable for about $45.2 billion
in stock.
*' il.-0-



I I J, J F
52-week range
$84.57 $146.19
Vol.:26.7m (8.1x avg.) PE:21.6
Mkt. Cap: $40.82 b Yield: 2.1%

CBS CBS
Close:$64.61 A2.76 or 4.5%
The media company's shares hit an
all-time high Thursday after reporting
fourth-quarter earnings and revenue
growth that beat expectations.




I i I J J F
52-week range
$42.05 $64.90
Vol.:12.8m (2.6x avg.) PE:21.9
Mkt. Cap: $36.24 b Yield: 0.7%

Skechers USA SKX
Close:$35.76A5.78 or 19.3%
Thanks to higher demand for its
shoes, the footwear maker reported
fourth-quarter earnings that beat
Wall Street expectations.
$40
35

' N D J F
52-week range
$19.97 $36.10
Vol.: 3.4m (6.9x avg.) PE: 37.3
Mkt. Cap:$1.42 b Yield:...

Orbitz Worldwide OWW
Close:$8.90A1.99 or 28.8%
The online travel company reported
a fourth-quarter profit, following a
loss a year ago, as customers
booked more hotel rooms.

8
7
6N D J F
52-week range
$2.68 $13.26
Vol.:8.0m (9.0x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $964.54 m Yield:...

Cabela's CAB
Close:$64.26V-5.55 or -8.0%
The outdoor sporting goods compa-
ny posted fourth-quarter results that
missed Wall Street expectations as
ammunition sales weakened.




I I U J F
52-week range
$47.65 $72.54
Vol.:9.7m (10.5x avg.) PE:21.7
Mkt. Cap: $4.54 b Yield:...


Stocks rise as investors



assess company earnings


Associated Press

NEW YORK The stock market rose
for the fifth time in six days Thursday as
higher earnings from several big U.S.
companies helped investors shrug off
discouraging news about jobs and retail
spending.
Goodyear Tire & Rubber surged to its
highest level in almost six years after the
company's earnings beat analysts' fore-
casts. CBS also jumped after the broad-
caster beat Wall Street's profit
expectations and speed up its stock buy-
back program.
Investors' focus has returned to com-
pany earnings after concerns about
growth in emerging markets and the
health of the U.S. economy pushed the
Standard & Poor's 500 index to its lowest
level in more than three months at the
start of February Analysts at S&P Capital
IQ expect that earnings at companies in
the index increased last quarter at the
fastest pace in a year
"The momentum from earnings con-
tinues," said Andres Garcia-Amaya, a
global market strategist at JPMorgan
Funds.
The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose
10.47 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,829.83.
The Dow Jones industrial average
climbed 63.65 points, or 0.4 percent, to
16,027.59. The Nasdaq composite rose
39.38 points, or 0.9 percent, to 4,240.67.
Stocks also got a lift from deal news.


Time Warner Cable surged $9.50, or 7
percent, to $144.81 after the company
agreed to be acquired by rival Comcast
for $45.2 billion in stock. The deal would
combine the top two cable TV companies
in the United States. Comcast fell $2.27,
or 4.1 percent, to $52.97.
The biggest gains in the S&P 500 were
posted by utility companies. Gains in
these stocks suggest investors are looking
to play it safe. Utilities don't have the best
growth prospects, but they pay steady
dividends and operate in stable
industries.
Stocks opened lower Thursday follow-
ing lackluster reports on the U.S. job
market and retail sales.
The number of people seeking unem-
ployment benefits rose 8,000 last week to
339,000, the Labor Department said.
Economist had forecast claims of just
330,000.
A separate report showed that cold
weather caused U.S. retail sales to drop
in January as Americans spent less on
autos and clothing and at restaurants
during a brutally cold month. The Com-
merce Department says retail sales fell
0.4 percent last month, the second
straight decline after a 0.1 percent drop
in December
The stock market inched higher
throughout the morning. Major indexes
turned positive by late morning as in-
vestors assessed a handful of encourage
corporate earnings reports.


Valentine's dollars


Love it or hate it, Valentines
Day is a holiday that
investors should keep an
eye on.
Although it's not
universally celebrated -
the National Retail
Federation estimates
that 54 percent of
Americans will partici-
pate this year total
spending is expected to
reach $17.3 billion. That s
an average of almost $134
per person on flowers, candy,
cards, jewelry, dinner, and more.


The biggest gift categories
are candy and flowers, but
S other types of companies
may enjoy a bit of a
benefit as well.
Particularly if you think
broadly and include
companies like Pfizer,
the maker of Viagra,
k and Church & Dwight,
the consumer products
S company whose brand
portfolio includes Trojan
condoms, among others
including, Arm & Hammer, Nair
and Oxi Clean.


Sweetheart spending Here's a look at a few of the companies that should benefit, to varying
degrees, from spending for Valentine s Day.


COMPANY


THURSDAYS PRICE CHANGE
CLOSE 1-YR


Zale (ZLC)
Tiffany s (TIF)
Open Table (OPEN)


$14.66 192.6%
88.53 39.5
73.59 34.2


1-800-Flowers.com (FLWS) 5.50


Hershey (HSY)
Pfizer (PFE)


Church & Dwight (CHD) 64.38


S&P 500


104.01 27.9
31.70 17.4


1829.83 20.4


Source. FactSet


* projected earnings next 12 months


P/E
RATIO*


AVG. BROKER
RATING


21 1-
39 i i
18 i
25
14
21
15 SELL HOLD BUY

Trevor Delaney, Jenni Sohn AP


Business HIGHLIGHTS


ce




wl

in


Comcast strikes but also consolidates unprece-
deal to buy Time dented control of what viewers
watch and download?
Warner Cable Comcast said the deal will
LOS ANGELES Comn- provide faster, more reliable
ast Corp. is buying Time service to more customers
Varner Cable Inc. for about and save money on TV pro-
45.2 billion in a deal that gramming costs.
combines the nation's top two GM recalling nearly
able TV companies and 780,000 older
iould create a dominant force
i both creating and delivering compact cars


entertainment.
The company is also pre-
senting federal regulators with
an equally outsized quandary:
How should they handle a
conglomerate that promises to
improve cable TV and Internet
service to millions of homes


DETROIT- General Mo-
tors is recalling almost
780,000 older-model compact
cars in North America be-
cause a faulty ignition switch
can shut off the engines with-
out warning and cause
crashes.


We'll make sure your vehicle is ready
for any road.
SS 39?"- slO'



FL ER PCAE or less


Ui b" S 04 old ffitChaWW


p|aoftspkciifacisya ,f


T *,UbtOO tanlhfl


U, ToooffalllluriS


The company said six peo-
ple have died in 22 crashes
linked to the problem in
Chevrolet Cobalts from the
2005 through 2007 model
years, and Pontiac G5s from
2007.
A heavy key ring or jarring
from rough roads can move
the ignition switch out of the
run position, cutting off the en-
gine and electrical power, GM
said in statements and docu-
ments released Thursday by
the U.S. National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration.
If that happens, the front air
bags may not work if there's a
crash.
-From wire reports


Buy 4 select tires.
Get up to a
3O rman.M
$130 reba
when you use your Ford
Service Credit Card
orn thee name branfts




Buy 4 Michelin tires,
Get a A7mOii mail-in
-170 rebate"



Motorcraft Tested Tough
MAX and PLUS batteries
Get a a%- malt-In
42 rebate


Get a 25 l-m
$2 n i rbate' ^^
when you use your Ford Service
Credit Card on a qualifying
purchase of $250 or more.


To awtl a AN I 'fOli ^*nutk go IQ ~lto ihriovo rbot" Md. rp~ i W <,? r/
TCIII I JI tl,dS ,,IGi,flI)o I' npl ll~l.q' ll '1III lllll5 I ld v i ro. rjl~p.f l .1 JA ,11.0.. t,,Ml.U

S ,- - ,-, ,.,- artss of Motorcral oil and oil filter Taxes, diesel vehicles and disposal fees extra Hybnd battery test excluded
~-n I 1- 1 ,, 1 ,', i 14 Submit rebate by 4/30/14 Rebate by prepaid debit card or apply to an active OwnerAdvantage Rewards
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I


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 A9







OPage A10 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2014



PINION


"No man is an island, entire of itself;
every man is apiece of the continent."
Jonh Donne, 1624


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
i EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
M Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SHAPING THE FUTURE




Libraries offer


lasting service



to communities


libraries have long been
an integral part of the
community they serve,
hubs of information,
But with the advent of the
digital age, many have strug-
gled to keep up with the chang-
ing times and technologies.
Tablets, cellphones, iPads and


Kindles have revo-
lutionized the lit-
erary landscape
for readers and li-
braries alike, leav-
ing patrons hungry
for digital content
and library lead-
ers clamoring to
provide a steady
supply


THE IS
Love
Library E

OUR OF
Comrr
should s
local li
QXIC,^4


The Citrus -y-
County Library
System is working hard to
meet the demands of a trans-
forming digital culture, but it
needs the community to pitch
in and lend a helping hand.
The community will have
the opportunity to show its
support during the fourth an-
nual Love Your Library
Evening on Feb. 21. The
event's proceeds will help the
library system pay for needs
that cannot be met by its
property tax revenue. These
costs will include retooling
for the next generation of in-
formation technologies, de-
veloping informational and
cultural programming as well
as providing early childhood
and adult literacy programs.


Li


According to Eric C. Head,
director of the Citrus County
Library System, the primary
focus of the event is to start
building the fund up so they
could create an endowment
for the library And the foun-
dation is now close to achiev-
ing its first major goal of
solidifying an an-
FSUE: nual endowment
,SUE of $100,000.
Your Libraries pro-
Evening. vide an invalu-
able service to
'INION: communities -
from providing
unity free computer ac-
support cess to serving as
library a steadfast ballast
em. of knowledge and
readily accessible
information.
The community should not
only applaud library leaders
for their efforts to secure fi-
nancial security and inde-
pendence, but should open
up their hearts and their
wallets to help keep our
local libraries healthy and
thriving.
Love Your Library Evening
will be from 7 to 9 p.m. at the
Central Ridge Library on
Forest Ridge Boulevard in
Beverly Hills. Tickets are $25
per person and available at
all libraries. This year's
theme is Mardi Gras and the
evening will include live Dix-
ieland jazz, refreshments and
a silent auction.


Come into the times
I'm calling in regards to mari-
juana. Marijuana is a govern-
ment-made-up word. Look at
LaGuardia back when he was
mayor of New York City. Anyway,
the person who says (it's) the
gateway to LSD, PCR I mean
come on, it's the '90s. Those
drugs aren't even used anymore.
It's cannabis. Cannabis sounds
like canvas. Been used since the
beginning of time ...
A contradiction
I try to understand how those
people who have their cocktails
and glasses of wine (in the) af-
ternoon, but more than anything
go to the doctor for opiates for


Watch for A.C. scams
I'm calling to prevent future
scams and I hope this will be
published in your Sound Off.
Please, senior citizens, beware
when a serviceman comes to
service your air-conditioning
unit, to be very aware
that they may want to c 0
sell you a new thermo-
stat costing a lot of
money when indeed you
really do not need it.
I went through this
experience and I lis-
tened to the guy be-
cause I figured he was CAL
an expert. And I had all rQ
kinds of problems hap- 063
opening because the
thermostat did not work and it
kept steady on heat. I had a lot
of house damage. So, seniors,
beware. And Chronicle, I hope
that you will take this into con-
sideration and publish this be-


c
Ik
h.


I

(


pain of many different kinds.
How these same people can try
to prevent people from smoking
pot. I do not smoke pot. I'm
against drugs. But when some-
body has glaucoma or cancer,
they should have the ability to
go to their doctor and get mari-
juana for relief. That is my opin-
ion. And how those people that
drink beer and wine and cock-
tails and all of this can make
such a stink, I do not under-
stand. Please, somebody, help
me understand.
Brews are worse
To the man that said he
knows, but he evidently doesn't:
(beer) is highly addictive; mari-
juana is not. I know.


cause we have to protect our
senior citizens.
Not made in the USA
We people who were born in the
United States of America are find-
ing out that a lot of these prod-
ucts say "Made in the
JND USA," and they are not.
J They're made in Mexico
flE or wherever else. We in
FFrr the United States of
y America don't seem to
care anymore about our
food. The products say
"Made in the USA," but
they are not. They're
(made in) foreign
)579 countries.
i Bond disparity
Friday's paper, Jan. 31: Again,
why such a disparity on the
bond for a DUI and license sus-
pended five times and an ex-
pired tag only $500? Why such a
disparity in bond?


YMCA worth investing in


he YMCA recently com- closing this gap, survey respon-
missioned a consumer sur- dents held themselves account-
vey to measure how able. Survey respondents feel it's
Americans view quality of life in important now more than
their communities na- ever to contribute
tionwide. The survey their time and money
was based on several to community causes.
factors, such as com- They expect more
munity member in- from their commu-
volvement and the nity and each
quality of a commu- other
nity's services, ranging i _, r I agree, and that's
from education to why I believe the Y
public safety Interest- is a cause worth in-
ingly, the survey re- vesting in. The Y
vealed a 30 percent needs help from the
gap between what Robert Savard community to con-
people say is most im- OTHER tinue its vital work.
portant in creating a VOICES It's a global cause
strong community and ----- that has nearly 170
how satisfied they are years of history
with their own communities in Throughout the Tampa Bay re-
those areas, gion countless people know the
For example, Americans re- YMCA of the Suncoast. But
port that a safe environment for there's so much more to our Y
children and assistance for than one might think.
struggling community members The YMCA of the Suncoast
(job training, food pantry, etc.) Citrus County Program Branch
were important for building a is launching its annual cam-
strong community; however, paign to ensure that everyone
they rate their own community from Homosassa to Floral City
low in these same areas, has the opportunity to learn,
When asked for the solution to grow and thrive. Every day the


YMCA of the Suncoast works to
support the people and neigh-
borhoods that need it most by
addressing community issues
like youth development.
For example, this year we
partnered with Homosassa El-
ementary School, where the Y
began a before-and-after-school
child care program. The YMCA
School Age Program is licensed
through the State of Florida De-
partment of Children and Fam-
ilies and provides affordable
child care for children kinder-
garten through fifth grade. This
is just one of the many pro-
grams that the YMCA of the
Suncoast operates locally to
help improve quality of life and
strengthen Citrus County
Visit ymcasuncoastorg/
annualcampaign or contact
Joanna Castle, branch executive,
Citrus County program branch,
at 352-637-0132 to learn how you
can support the Y's cause.

Robert Savard is the volunteer
campaign chairman of the
YMCA of the Suncoast, Citrus
County program branch.


"WH IN WlR RIT'iMA MiD WAS lTb sa SJ WPM RUN FoR
FRes ttET?"


LLETTERS to the Edito r_


Obligation to form
a better union
For many years we have
been told we are turning into a
socialist state. For clarifica-
tion, it is claimed government
is growing too powerful in re-
gard to taxation and spending.
The government supposedly
can't be trusted to regulate and
spend. The free market is ex-
pected to provide for the lazy
and poor The wealthy and the
middle class retirees are going
to "foot the bill" for these
vagabonds.
Here is the real truth. We as
a nation have never had less in
federal taxation or federal reg-
ulation. The ACA is supposedly
a tax. In reality, it's supposed
to force people to take respon-
sibility for their health care.
There isn't any alternative out
there to the old health system,
with the exception of the ACA
and European-style socialism.
The public was the bearer of
burden to the old extortion
(employer-provided) system. It
is still the bearer, but cannot
be defrauded with these laws.
Yet, the Pentagon can't even
begin to tell if fraud has been
committed inside of its gigan-
tic, over bloated budget. In-
stead of finding real fraud, we
cut food stamps and Pell
grants. We chase foes we cre-
ated at the Department of De-
fense. We as a nation watched
as Wall Street used the less-
ened power of government reg-
ulation to wreck our economy
Wall Street defrauded Ameri-
can homeowners without any
meaningful repercussion.
Freedom Industries just poi-
soned West Virginia water
aquifers before it filed for
bankruptcy protection. The
last time that tank had been in-
spected was 2001. Progress En-
ergy unilaterally and
recklessly cracked the contain-
ment dome on the power plant
without any laws regulating


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

that type of procedure. It has
cost us jobs and a massive
chunk of our local economy
There are no laws in this coun-
try when you have wealth.
We're supposed to be angry
about the ACA instead.
There is a distinct moral and
ethical obligation of the people
of this nation to form a better
union. Sacrificing the only av-
enue of recourse through the
federal government on the altar
of liberty is itself the death of
liberty. Individual states will
never uphold the rule of law in
regard to civil and human
rights. We cannot allow the laws
of this land to levy such a heavy
hand on the poor while the few
wealthiest of this nation reap
the benefits of that tyranny
How can anyone in this country
ask to take the food out of peo-
ple's mouths when so many
people can't find work? Even
when they can, it's not enough
pay to feed themselves and
their family Yet they are to
blame, while some obscenely
wealthy individual pulls the
carpet out from under them and
then robs them blind.
Eighty-five people have more
wealth than 3.5 billion people.
That is half of the world's popu-
lation. When some ask for laws
to regulate the fleecing of peo-
ple and we are called socialists.
When some ask for laws that de-
stroy democracy and rob every-
day people they are called
patriots. When did we lose the
national pride in having the
smartest generation of children
in our schools? What about the
next generation being better off


than the last? This is the first
time in American history that
has happened. Most of the let-
ters here scapegoat everything.
This is what fear does. We have
been driven into the clutches of
terror We are so afraid of losing
it all, staring wild eyed at the
horizon, screaming at nothing,
we stopped looking over our
shoulders to the thieves actu-
ally stealing it We all are
responsible.
Ryan Gill
Pine Ridge

Hiaasen misses point
on death penalty
In arguing so eloquently for
the repeal of Florida's death
penalty, Carl Hiaasen quotes
cost and lengthy delays from
appeals as reasons for scrap-
ping this law
However, I think Mr Hiaasen
misses a very important fact -
the death penalty conviction is
a very valuable bargaining
"chip" for police and district
attorneys when they have a
suspect in custody Quite often
a suspect will plead to a lesser
charge, rather than facing
death with a jury trial. It would
be a shame to take that "chip"
away from law enforcement of-
ficials, not to mention the costs
saved by the taxpayers by hav-
ing the suspect plead guilty
I believe the answer to this
problem is in shortening the
convicted killer's ability to have
endless appeals they should
be allowed two, and only two. If
both are denied, the sentence
should then be carried out, and
in no case should justice be de-
nied for a longer time than five
years. With DNA and the fabu-
lous forensics available today,
there is virtually no chance that
an innocent person would be
executed.
Lorraine Ruble
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


= Hot Corner: MEDICAL POT


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


'V1


PIZZA CAFE
PI//A- SUJBS-WIN(S
637-1920
2780 N. Florida Ave.
Hernando


a taste of


ir Lrr BmI Buwjen ^J
746-3351
2147 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Lecanto


AMERICANA



Two local eateries providing


America's most popular cuisine


owners Kevin &

O Teresa Paige said
when they opened
the caf6 nearly 12
years ago, the
goal was to provide the
community good service and
great food. Proud to be
known as "The place where
the locals go".
Pizza Cafe specializes in
Pizza and is best known for
its Garlic Knots & Calzones.
The Paige's are not Italian
but you would never know it
when you taste Teresa
homemade lasagna and the
freshly made marinara
sauce. Kevin considers
himself all American and the
food reflects it. One of the
best steak hoagies in-town
or the chicken bacon ranch
wrap continue to be a lunch
favorite. Pizza Caf6 boast
some of the best original
salads and Kevin's Award
winning chili.
Cold beer, decent wine,


Chef Anthony's Special Pizza Freshly made Chicago style dough topped
with homemade pizza sauce, Grande Cheese and local produce.


good conversation and a
great time. Open 7 days a
week 11am to 8pm / 9pm
Friday and Saturday.


Located at 2780 N Florida
Ave. In the Hernando Plaza
Across from Lake Hernando
(352)637-1920


Best big I
batch chili
in the South _
For a limited time only. Come try
Kevin's homemade chili. Not so hot
and spicy that you can't eat it. Just
the right blend to enjoy all the distinct
flavors of the seasonings that tickle
your taste buds Then about the third
spoonful slowly starts to warm your
pallet. Stop by and try a bowl or
make a batch for yourself at home.
Chili Recipe
10 lb. ground beef in large pan
I oz. salt
]oz. chili powder
1oz. cayenne pepper
Sprinkle evenly across meat. Cook
meat in oven at 500o for 15 minutes
mix up and cookjfor 15 more minutes.
Split meat between two big pots.
(Drain oil). Add 3 cans of diced
tomato with chilies per pot. Add 8 oz.
diced onion per pot. Add 1 oz. of
sugar per pot. Add 1/2 oz. of black
pepper per pot. Add ]oz. of garlic salt
per pot. Add 1 can of tomato sauce
per pot. Add 1/2 large can of pinto
beans per pot. Cook for 12 minutes on
med '";.. .,'., ."" every 3 minutes.


Iconic Taste Of Old

Fashioned Goodness

Paige's Root Beer
"Home of the Little Big Burger"


The Little W
burger with the
big taste is 100%
grade A marinated
beef. Fried hard
smashed flat
served on a Butter
toasted bun. Best
customer quote
"My burger gets
better with every
bite and I just
don't want it to
end"
Burgers, Fries,
milkshakes and
homemade Root
beer it just doesn't get more
American. In less than 2 years
Paige's has established itself as


Ithe best burger in the
county and looks
forward to defending
the title again in April.
The burgers are all
made the same way.
When you have
something this good,
why would you mess
i with it? The Root beer
is made on sight from
an old family recipe
that has been in the
family for years.
Making a batch of
S home brew is still a
Christmas tradition in
the Paige family and great uncle
James still makes the best. The
original has a little kick to it.


-dm A -- .,b. "
Double Bacon Cheeseburger with Fries and a refreshing Cheerwine.

Paige's Root Beer
"Home of the Little Big Burger"
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


LUNCH & DINNER


* 10:30AM 7:00PM


2147 W Norvell Bryant Hwy. Lecanto
(352)746-3351


Homemade Root Beer
L i 13/4 tsp Yeast
2oz+ 3tsp Root beer extract
t51b granulated sugar
5 gal Water (not distilled)
Place yeast in ,/1l..ld, '.i.u., !h,,,,, luke warm water fbr 15 minutes undisturbed.
I" i Mix root beer extract i i, 5 I/. of sugar ,aiI sugar is completely brown. Add 1
gallon of hot water to sugar/root beer mixture and stir iil mixture is completely
dissolved G lj i *i, yeast ,ii1 completely dissolved then add to batch in step 3
(Isti '.,,. hl,for at least ] minute). Add four ^11//*n ** luke warm water to batch
(,.tir' ', continuously tal1 ll 4 o1' are added to batch. B. and cap do not
dtll more h,,,, 1.5 inches from top of" .ul. Store ..,1u., on side in dark ,1 ,iiee
area Jbr 10 to 15 days. Stand .'ul..' upright and store in refrigeratorJbr 12 hours
then ready to serve.


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 All












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Not just 'his' and 'hers'


Facebook will now allow users to choose from dozens ofdifferent genders


World BRIEFS


Associated Press

MENLO PARK, Calif. You
don't have to be just male or fe-
male on Facebook anymore. The
social media giant has added a
customizable option with about 50
different terms people can use to
identify their gender, as well as
three preferred pronoun choices:
him, her or them.
Facebook said the changes,
shared with The Associated Press
before the launch on Thursday,
initially cover the company's
159 million monthly users in the
U.S. and are aimed at giving peo-
ple more choices in how they de-
scribe themselves, such as
androgynous, bi-gender, intersex,
gender fluid or transsexual.
"There's going to be a lot of peo-
ple for whom this is going to mean
nothing, but for the few it does im-
pact, it means the world," said
Facebook software engineer
Brielle Harrison, who worked on
the project and is himself under-
going gender transformation,


from male to female. On Thurs-
day, while watchdogging the soft-
ware for any problems, he said he
was also changing his Facebook
identity from Female to
TransWoman.
'All too often transgender peo-
ple like myself and other gender
nonconforming people are given
this binary option, do you want to
be male or female? What is your
gender? And it's kind of disheart-
ening because none of those let
us tell others who we really are,"
he said. "This really changes
that, and for the first time I get to
go to the site and specify to all the
people I know what my
gender is."
Facebook, which has 1.23 bil-
lion active monthly users around
the world, also allows them to
keep their gender identity private
and will continue to do so.
The Williams Institute, a think
tank based at the University of
California, Los Angeles, esti-
mates there are at least 700,000
individuals in the U.S. who iden-


tify as transgender, an umbrella
term that includes people who
live as a gender different from
the one assigned to them at
birth.
The move by Facebook rep-
resents a basic and a .\et s ,.nmt-
icant form of recognition ,of the
nation's growing trans -en-
der rights movement.
which has been
spurred by veteran
activists and young people ho
identify as transgender it ., 0\.-iImer
ages. The Human Ri.-h-k C.im-
paign last year found thjt 10
percent of the 10,000 les-
bian, gay, bisexual trani.en-
der youths it surveyed
used "other" or wrote
in their own gender terni,
The change to the gender
selection option is seen as a
major step toward accept-
ance for people who don't self-iden-
tify as male or female, but the
high-profile development seemed
senseless to those who believe in
two genders, no more.


"Of course Facebook is entitled
to manage its wildly popular site
as it sees fit, but here is the bot-
tom line: It's impossible to deny
the biological reality that
hliumanity is divided into
two halves male and
female," said Jeff
Johnston, an issues
analyst for Focus on
the Family, an influential na-
tio:nal religious organiza-
tio:n based in Colorado
Springs, Colo. "Those peti-
tioning for the change insist
thj.t there are an infinite
nmimber of genders, but just
i.\ inL it doesn't make it so."
In the past decade, the trans-
.einder movement has become
111111: h mire organized and out-
spoken, demanding the kind of
civil rights and respect already
sought by gay activists. During
this time, the transgender um-
brella has been growing well be-
yond transsexuals to encompass
a wide variety of gender
identities.


East coast buried under snow


Associated Press
Hanover, Pa. resident Richard Gallant bikes to work Thursday.


Giant winter storm slams Northeast; at least 20 deaths blamed on weather


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Yet an-
other storm paralyzed the
Northeast with heavy snow and
sleet Thursday, giving the win-
ter-weary that oh-no-not-again
feeling, while hundreds of
thousands across the ice-en-
crusted South waited in the
cold for the electricity to come
back on.
At least 20 deaths were
blamed on the treacherous
weather, including that of a
pregnant woman who was
struck and killed by a mini-
snowplow in a New York City
parking lot as she loaded gro-
ceries into her car
The sloppy mix of snow and
face-stinging sleet grounded
more than 6,500 flights Thurs-
day and closed schools and
businesses as it made its way
up the heavily populated Inter-
state 95 corridor, where shovel-
ing out has become a weekly -
sometimes twice-weekly -
chore.
"Snow has become a four-
letter word," lamented Tom Mc-
Garrigle, a politician in subur-
ban Philadelphia.
In its icy wake, utility crews
in the South toiled to restore
electricity to more than 800,000
homes and businesses, mostly
in the Carolinas and Georgia.
Temperatures in the hard-hit
Atlanta area, with more than
200,000 outages, were expected
to drop below freezing again
overnight
Baltimore awoke to 15 inches
of snow Washington, D.C., had


Storm socks East Coast
Heavy snow, sleet and freezing rain hit the East Coast, a day
after the storm encrusted the Southeast with ice.

Expected snowfall accumulation.
through Ftida. Febt? 14 -

84 inches
:8 inches
M>2 inchesi... ...




.............o..o


"::!P Balliimoie





SOURCE: NOAA AP


at least 8, and federal offices
and the city's two main airports
were closed. The Virginia-West
Virginia state line got more
than a foot.
Philadelphia had nearly
9 inches, its fourth 6-inch snow-
storm of the season the first
time that has happened in the
city since record-keeping began
in the late 1800s. New York City
received nearly 10 inches, and
parts of New Jersey had
more than 11 inches.
The Boston area was expect-


ing 4 to 6 inches, while inland
Connecticut and Massachusetts
were looking at a foot or more.
In some places, the snow and
freezing rain eased up during
the day, but a second wave was
expected overnight into Friday
"It's like a dog chasing its tail
all day," said Pat O'Pake, a plow
operator in Pennsylvania.
In New Cumberland, Pa.,
which had about 10 inches of
snow by midafternoon, Randal
Delvernois had to shovel after
his snow blower conked out.


"Every time it snows, it's like,
oh, not again," he said. "I didn't
get this much snow when I lived
in Colorado. It's warmer at the
Olympics than it is here. That's
ridiculous."
In New York, Min Lin, 36,
died after she was struck by a
utility vehicle with a snow-
plow attached to it as it backed
up outside a shopping center
in Brooklyn. Her nearly full-
term baby was delivered in
critical condition via cesarean
section.
No immediate charges were
brought against the snowplow
operator
Around the country, this is
shaping up as one of the
snowiest winters on record. As
of early this month, Washing-
ton, Detroit, Boston, Chicago,
New York and St. Louis had
gotten roughly two or three
times as much snow as they
normally receive at this point
in the season.
The procession of storms and
cold blasts blamed in part on
a kink in the jet stream, the
high-altitude air currents that
dictate weather has cut into
retail sales across the U.S., the
Commerce Department re-
ported Thursday Sales dipped
0.4 percent in January
This latest round of bad
weather threatens to disrupt
deliveries of flowers for Valen-
tine's Day on Friday
"It's a godawful thing," said
Mike Flood, owner of Falls
Church Florist in Virginia.
"We're going to lose money
There's no doubt about it."


Associated Press
A woman holds up a sign
that reads in Spanish "And
who has the weapons?"
as she shouts slogans
against Venezuela's Presi-
dent Nicolas Maduro while
protesting yesterday's
killing of student Bassil Da
Costa in Caracas,
Venezuela.

Venezuela
protest leader
disappears
CARACAS, Venezuela
-A hard-line leader of
Venezuela's opposition
dropped out of sight amid
media reports Thursday
that an arrest order had
been issued charging he in-
cited violence at anti-gov-
ernment protests that
resulted in three deaths.
Leopoldo Lopez was last
heard from Wednesday
night at a news conference
where he vowed that
demonstrations against
President Nicolas Maduro's
government would continue.
Cabinet officials accused
Lopez and a "fascist" con-
spiracy with links to right-
wing elements in the U.S.
with trying to destabilize the
country and oust Maduro
from power.
Mexico City mulls
legalizing sale of
marijuana
MEXICO CITY-- Leftist
lawmakers in Mexico City
have introduced a bill to le-
galize the sale of marijuana
in the nation's capital.
The initiative proposed
by members of the Demo-
cratic Revolution Party
seeks to supply marijuana
to users and regulate the
amount they can buy. It
would create a health pro-
gram to monitor consump-
tion and sale.
Lawmaker Vidal Llere-
nas, who proposed the bill,
said the objective is to allow
authorities to focus on more
serious crimes.
Volcanic eruption
in Indonesia
closes 3 airports
SURABYA, Indonesia -
Volcanic ash from a major
eruption has led to the clo-
sure of three international
airports and darkened skies
on Indonesia's densely
populated Java Island and
darkened skies.
First light Friday brought
clear the extent of the
overnight explosive erup-
tion at Mount Kelud.
The country's transport
ministry said Jogyakarta,
Solo and Surabaya aiports
were closed due to reduced
visibility and dangers posed
to aircraft engines by ash.
US rappers
banned from
New Zealand
WELLINGTON, New
Zealand The manager
for banned U.S. rap group
Odd Future said Tyler, The
Creator, and his fellow
members in the collective
have changed over time
and aren't being given
credit for growing up.
New Zealand immigra-
tion authorities Thursday
banned the Los Angeles
rappers from entering the
country after deciding they
pose a threat to public
order. The group was due
to play an open-air concert
with headline act Eminem
on Saturday in Auckland.
The hip-hop group, which
is also known as Odd Future
Wolf Gang Kill Them All,
was initially known for its an-
archic style and lyrics about
drugs, killing and rape.
From wire reports











SPORTS


* Daytona 500
media day brings
some interesting
stories./B2


0 Auto racing/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Baseball, golf/B3
0 NCAA, wrestling/B4
0 Basketball, golf/B5
0 Winter Olympics/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The resilient life of former Pirate Wilkes


1988 Crystal River High School grad

feels he's 'the luckiest guy around"


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
The game of life is a fickle
beast.
Life is filled with thrilling
highs and torturing lows, just
ask Homosassa's Dana Wilkes.
You see, Wilkes is synony-
mous with Citrus County mat


royalty On the short list of the
county's finest-ever grapplers
- he's at the head of the class.
Despite the trappings of his
unbridled success in the
wrestling room, the 1988 Crystal
River High School graduate has
finally achieved an inner peace
for what has shaped his life
since he was 18.


Wilkes 101 Bradenton in Manatee County.
As a tyke, he and his brothers
Though his family was living had a fascination with bicycle
at the time in Phenix City, riding. So much so, Wilkes
Ala., Dana was born as toured on the BMX -
the youngest of three A p or bicycle moto-
boys to Jerry and ., cross all over the
Kay Wilkes at the country starting
closest hospital at when he was 10.
the time in Colum- Dana rose
bus, Ga., through the ranks,
Wilkes doesn't re- reaching as high as
call much of his ado--"- c' -'- the No. 2 ranking in the
lescence in the "Heart of countryfor his age division.
Dixie." But he admitted he wasn't even
His early memories begin in the best in his family


"My older brother Darren
was the best," he said.
As an avid athlete, Wilkes also
loved the gridiron and the mats.
He quarterbacked his local
Pop Warner football team and
then he'd dash to wrestling
practice.
It was common at 10 to see
him at football and wrestling
practice during the week, and
participate in football games on
Saturday.
When football season ended,
SeeI Page B3


shed to the limit


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Zach Saxer of Citrus drives to the basket past Lake Weir's Ariel Medina during the first half of Thursday night's Class 5A regional
quarterfinal game in Inverness. Citrus advanced to the regional semifinals with a 64-55 victory.


Citrus boys hoops closes out Lake Weir to move


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS Thursday's regional
quarterfinal between Citrus and Ocala
Lake Weir wasn't the prettiest display, for
either team. The two mustered just three
3-pointers on 24 tries while going 20 for 43
at the foul line and committing 19
turnovers in the first nine minutes.
But for a CHS program with just two
prior playoff wins since 1961, the result
was a masterpiece, as the black and gold
Hurricanes survived nine first-quarter
turnovers and a goose egg on 3s in secur-
ing its first playoff win since 2005 with a
64-55 victory over the District 5A-5 runner-
up 'Canes in the Citrus High School gym.
The Inverness 'Canes travel to
Gainesville Eastside on Tuesday for the
Class 5A, Region 2 semifinals. The 5A-5


champion Rams defeated Dunnellon 69-57
on Thursday
LWHS led at least once every quarter,
and held a 49-47 advantage with 6:15 re-
maining, after junior guard Jerry Steele,
who had a team-high 18 points, scored a
bucket offa Jiar Watson steal. A field goal
by senior Devin Pryor with 4:35 left gave
Citrus back the lead for good, but not with-
out some late suspense.
A wide-open Desmond Franklin dunk,
followed seconds later by a monster block
by Sam Franklin (nine boards, four
blocks), made it 59-51 with 2:30 left and ap-
peared to shift momentum in Citrus' favor
for good.
The Inverness squad made five free
throws in the final 35 seconds to help over-
come a late 3 by LWHS junior Ja'Real
Hamilton and a failed CHS alley-oop at-
tempt that showed questionable clock


on in regionalplayoffi
management by the 'Canes in the game's
waning moments.
"If you looked at the line score," CHS
head coach Tom Densmore said, "you
wouldn't think we were the winning team.
Our free throws weren't very good, and it's
usually an L for us if we don't hit a 3."
Ben Janicki, much like his effort in the
district tournament, proved a mismatch in
the low post while racking up a game-high
23 points. The CHS senior forward also
grabbed 10 boards for a double-double,
and added a pair of steals.
"I was able to find some little openings
down there, and our team was making
good passes," said Janicki, who stole the
ball out of a shooter's hand in midair in
the first quarter and had four put-backs in
the game. "It just came down to finishing
See Page B3


Rays deal


Lobaton


to Nats

Associated Press
VIERA The Washington
Nationals filled the last clear-
cut need on their roster on the
opening day of spring training,
acquiring catcher Jose Lobaton
and two prospects from the
Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday
for pitcher Nathan Karns.
Lobaton gives the Nationals
insurance behind fellow
Venezuelan Wilson Ramos, who
has never played in more than
108 games in a season because
of various injuries.
"He's a capable backup," gen-
eral manager Mike Rizzo said,
"in case something does hap-
pen with Wilson."
Lobaton, 29, started 76 games
for the Rays last
season and
batted .249
with seven
home runs
and 32
RBIs. He '
was expend-
able because
the Rays re-signed catcher Jose
Molina and traded for Ryan
Hanigan.
Rizzo said Lobaton has above
average metrics on defense. A
notable exception is a 16 per-
cent success rate throwing out
would-be base-stealers.
"We feel that he throws well
enough that he should be better
than 16 percent," Rizzo said.
It speaks volumes about the
Nationals' confidence in their
talent-laden roster that a move
for a backup can fill the last sig-
nificant hole on the day that
pitchers and catchers reported.
Barring injury, Rizzo won't be
shopping during spring
training.
"There's not an obvious spot
that we need to address," Rizzo
said. "But, as we say, if an op-
portunity arises, we'll be aggres-
sive and open-minded about it"
The Nationals are giving up a
top prospect in the 26-year-old
right-hander Karns, who three
made starts in his first taste of
the major leagues last season,
but they're adding a pair of 22-
year-olds from the Jays' pool of
talent: outfielder Drew Vettle-
son and left-handed pitcher
Felipe Rivero.
Karns would have been in a
crowded race for the No. 5 spot
in the rotation. The trade for a
younger pitcher alleviates part
of that logjam and helps the
Nationals stagger their pitch-
ing prospects.


Allen, Pirates tennis easily dispatches Hurricanes


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Matt Allen
shook off the cold to take the
No. 1 singles, and he and Ryan
Johnson combined to win the
No. 1 doubles 8-3 Thursday at
the Citrus High School tennis
courts.
The Crystal River boys tennis
team beat Citrus 5-2 in a non-
district match. Crystal River is
now 1-2 for the season and Cit-
rus is 1-1.
The temperature was in the
upper 40s and low 50s with a
chilly wind.
Allen beat Brady Hayes 6-4,
6-2 for the No. 1 singles.
Allen is hoping to improve on
his 4-5 record last year His


coach, Bill Reyes, said that
Allen, a junior, is maturing on
the court.
"With this cold, I'm not playing
my best," Allen said. "I pretty
much play it safe. Everyone
wants to get it done and go home.
"My forehand is pretty consis-
tent. I like that tennis is some-
thing you can pick it up and play
for the rest of your life."
Citrus' Noah Maginnis beat
Johnson 6-4, 4-6 (10-6) in the
No. 2 singles match, while Crys-
tal River's Ben Epstein beat the
'Canes' Joe Kelly 6-0, 6-2 in
three singles.
Citrus' Eric Vestervall, a
Swedish exchange student,
downed Matt White 6-1, 6-1,
(10-6) at No. 4 singles.
At No. 5 singles, Crystal


River's Devon Reed beat
Dakota Grudos 6-0,6-2.
The No. 2 Crystal River dou-
bles team of Epstein and White
beat Vestervall and Grudos 12-10.
Reyes was happy with his
team's efforts.
"This is the first match with a
full team," he said. "The guys
played strong tonight. We were
inexperienced and took our
lumps last year (Now) we have
experience."
Citrus was missing its No. 5
singles, Sean Flaherty
"We played real well today,"
Citrus coach James Martone
said. "I'm just glad the kids
were out and were able to put a
racket in their hands and play
I'm proud of their efforts. Every
match was close."


Dodd, Hurricanes roll over Pirate counterparts


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER The
Citrus girls tennis team domi-
nated a young Crystal River
squad 7-0 Thursday evening at
Crystal River High School.
The Hurricanes improved
to 3-1 with the shutout.
"We're doing okay," Citrus
head coach Scott Waters said
of his team. "We've had a
pretty good season so far"
Citrus' No. 1 singles player,
Melanie Dodd, improved her
own record of undefeated reg-
ular season singles matches to
53-0.


Dodd defeated Crystal
River's Veronica Williams 6-0,
6-3 on Thursday
"She's just an amazing kid,"
Waters said of Dodd. "She
never gets flat. Always poised;
never flustered."
Paige Jordan continued the
Hurricane dominance of the
day in No. 2 singles, beating
Crystal River's Anna Lane in
straight sets 7-5, 6-1.
Crystal River's Shannon
Hancock battled against Cit-
rus'Julianna Johnson in No. 3
singles but ultimately Johnson
pulled away for the 6-4, 6-2


PageB3





B2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


AUTO RACING


Stewart anxious for return to track


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH The
countdown clock for Tony Stew-
art's return to racing is no longer
at months, weeks or even days.
The three-time NASCAR cham-
pion was scheduled to be back in
a race car today for the first time
since he broke his right leg in Au-
gust. Six months and three sur-
geries after that sprint car crash,
Stewart felt a little bit like a kid
getting ready for his first race.
"I'm thinking in hours. It's been
a long time since August 5th,"
Stewart said Thursday at Day-
tona 500 media day "Normally,
we're talking about the offseason,
it seems like it flies by But this
has been the slowest offseason
I've ever had. I'm ready to get
doing something again."
He gets his chance today with
two practice sessions totaling 105
minutes at Daytona International
Speedway His first race is Satur-
day night in the exhibition Sprint
Unlimited.
If he was worried about his re-
turn, Stewart didn't let on. Al-
though he said his leg, which
required an aluminum rod to be
inserted for stability, is only 65
percent healed, Stewart believes
his race team had thought of
everything to ensure he'll be com-
fortable in the No. 14 Chevrolet
Stewart-Haas Racing ad-
dressed the cockpit of the car,
and new teammate Kevin Har-
vick ordered Stewart a special
pad that hangs off the steering
wheel and prevents his knees
from banging into the steering


Associated Press
Tony Stewart jokes with members of the media during the Daytona 500
media day Thursday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona


Beach.
column.
"We've tried to think of ab-
solutely anything that could be a
problem," Stewart said. "Our
therapy has been going really
well, and in the last few weeks,
we've made huge gains. I don't
know how we could be more pre-
pared than what we are right now
"The perfect scenario: every-
thing would be healed 100 per-
cent and we wouldn't be talking
about it. But the bone is still
about 65-percent healed right
now But as far as muscles and
everything, the strength is com-
ing much quicker than I thought
it was going to be."
Few competitors thought Stew-
art would have any difficulty in
his return.
Winner of three championships
and 48 races at NASCAR's highest


level, Stewart has proven his en-
tire career to be competitive in
any vehicle he drives.
"I think Tony has less chal-
lenges because he's more tal-
ented," said Denny Hamlin, who
struggled all last season with
back pain after missing almost
five full races with a fractured
vertebra. "He's shown he wins in
everything he gets in, so I think
not being in the car for him, al-
though it's been for a longer pe-
riod of time that I was out it will
come relatively easy"
Four-time series champion Jeff
Gordon wondered if Stewart's
biggest hurdle would not be phys-
ical but rather overcoming any
engineering advancements that
have been made since he was in-
jured. But judging by Stewart's
appearances he's lost roughly


20 pounds since the accident-
Gordon wondered if Stewart
might be feeling pretty good these
days.
"He might be in better shape
now than he's ever been because
of the physical therapy," Gordon
said. "I haven't asked him what it's
like to push on the gas pedal and if
there's pain involved, and there
are certainly going to be some
challenges. But it's Tony Stewart
I'm not overly concerned with the
challenges that he's going to have
from being able to either with-
stand some pain or get up to speed
and be a fierce competitor"
Brad Keselowski broke his left
ankle in a crash during testing in
2011. He was injured on a
Wednesday, refused to not race
that weekend, and won that Sun-
day at Pocono. He admitted
Thursday it was difficult to stay in
the car for an entire race and
credits Stewart for coming back
before he's fully healed.
"I know it won't be easy at all.
His injury is certainly a lot more
significant than mine," Ke-
selowski said. "I don't know how
he's going to do it, but he's done a
lot of other great things in his ca-
reer and if he's able to come back
out and run full races and be
competitive, I think that would
probably go right up there with
his greatest accomplishments."
Clint Bowyer was one of the
few drivers who took a humorous
approach to Stewart's return.
"He was pretty damn good be-
fore. I hope it slowed him down
- just a couple tenths, you
know?" Bowyer joked. "Give us a
couple tenths."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SPRINT CUP
SPRINT UNLIMITED
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports
1, 5-6 p.m., 6:30-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
race, 8:15 p.m. (Fox Sports 1, 8-10 p.m.)
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 187.5 miles, 75 laps.
Last year: Kevin Harvick won the exhi-
bition race, his third victory in five years
in Speedweeks' kickoff event. Greg Bif-
fle was second.
Fast facts: The race for 2013 pole win-
ners and past event winners will be run
in three segments. Online fan voting will
determine the format, starting order and
restart order for the final segment....
Three-time winner Tony Stewart is re-
turning to action after breaking his right
leg in August in a sprint car crash....
Danica Patrick is in the 18-driver field....
Daytona 500 practice is Saturday (Fox
Sports 1, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 1:30-
3:30 p.m.) and front-row qualifying
Sunday (Fox, 1-4 p.m.).
Next race: Daytona 500, Feb. 23,
Daytona International Speedway,
Daytona Beach.

NHRA DRAG
RACING
Next event: Carquest Auto Parts NHRA
Nationals, Feb. 21-23, Wild Horse Pass
Motorsports Park, Chandler, Ariz.
Last week: John Force won the sea-
son-opening Winternationals in
Pomona, Calif., beating Matt Hagan in
the Funny Car final with a record time of
3.965 seconds at 323.58 mph. Khalid al-
Balooshi won in Top Fuel, and Jason
Line topped the Pro Stock field.

OTHER RACES
ARCA RACING SERIES: Lucas Oil
200, Saturday (Fox Sports 1, 4:15-6:30
p.m.), Daytona International Speedway,
Daytona Beach.
WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car:
DIRTcar Nationals, Friday-Sunday, Vo-
lusia Speedway Park, Volusia, Fla. Late
Model: Late Model Winter Nationals,
Friday-Sunday, Bubba Raceway Park,
Ocala.


Gordon could
walk away
with 5th title
DAYTONA BEACH -
Jeff Gordon is prepared to
retire if he can win a fifth
NASCAR championship.
The 42-year-old Gordon
won championships in
1995, 1997, 1998 and
2001. He won all of them
when NASCAR's top se-
ries ran under the Winston
Cup banner.
He wants to win a Sprint
Cup championship. With a
family at home, a fifth title
could convince him to call
it quits.
"If that happened, that
would be all the reasons I
need to say, this is it. I'm
done," Gordon says. "Go
out on a high note."
Gordon said recently he
was "jokingly serious"
about retiring after another
championship.
At Daytona, he insisted
he was serious.
"I go home and I look at
my trophy room. I see four
trophies, championship
trophies," he said Thurs-
day at Daytona 500 media
day. "But they say Winston
Cup on them. You can
name me a four-time
Sprint Cup champion for
technical reasons all you
want, but to me, I'm still
not. I want that before my
career's over."
He would love to make


a push in the
revamped Ch
Sprint Cup ch
Gordon wa
season in the
his best finish
was third in 2
He has 88
third on the ca
and has had o
less seasons
Snow(
Newmal
DAYTONA
Snow made N
drivers Ryan
Martin Truex
at Daytona 50
Newman a
missed the ki
Speedweeks
because a wi
and icy condi
fected travel
and East.
Newman p
sage on his T
that included
snow-coverec
several buffalo
NC. Headed
on Farm. Buff
happy this an
The weath<
several other
drivers to alte
to Daytona In
Speedway.


Can't be ignored


Associated Press
Nearly 15 months after his surprising decision to leave Childress to drive for good friend Tony Stewart, NASCAR driver Kevin Harvick will finally
make his SHR debut this weekend at Daytona International Speedway.


Harvick

revved up at

Stewart-Haas

Associated Press


No 24 in the DAYTONA BEACH -
No. 24 in the Kevin Harvick took his
ase for the first spin in his new
championship. Stewart-Haas Racing ride
s sixth last and immediately felt at
standings, ease.
i since he It was three days after
009. Harvick had wrapped up
Cup victories, his stint with Richard Chil-
areer Cup list, dress Racing and he was
only two win- turning laps around Char-
since 1993. lotte Motor Speedway with
day for his new team in a rare De-
ay fo cember test. Any anxiety
n, Truex he had over leaving RCR
SBEACH after 13 years vanished.
ASCAR "I told them on Lap 2 at
Newman and Charlotte,'Thank you guys
Newman and very much. You have just
Jr. no-shows confirmed every reason
00 media day. that I came here to drive
nd Truex this car,"' Harvick said.
ckoff to Nearly 15 months after
on Thursday his surprising decision to
nter storm leave Childress to drive for
tions af- good friend Tony Stewart,
in the South Harvick will finally make
his SHR debut this week-
osted ames- end at Daytona Interna-
witter page tional Speedway His first
a photo of his race will be Saturday
d farm and night's exhibition Sprint
o: "Stuck in Unlimited, the first of two
o tuck in Speedweeks races Harvick
out to check won a year ago in his so-
*alo are called "lame duck" season.
1. He felt all season that
er caused nobody had high expecta-
NASCAR tions for him back then
r travel plans and proved everyone
ternational wrong with four wins.
Now, with the slate wiped
From wire reports clean, he has made clear
what he's chasing at SHR.


"I expect to win and
race for a championship,"
Harvick said. "That's why
I came here."
Very few will make the
mistake of overlooking
Harvick this season, for
two very different reasons.
He has established him-
self as one of the top closer
in the business, and many
of his wins have come from
being in the right place to
capitalize in the waning
laps. That will come into
play in this year's over-
hauled NASCAR scoring
system, which will reward
winning over consistency-
all the way to the dramatic
winner-take-all season
finale.
NASCAR Chairman
Brian France has re-
vamped the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship
into a 16-driver elimina-
tion system that will be
whittled down to four eli-
gible drivers racing for the
title in the finale. The first
one across the finish line
takes the grand prize.
A driver can make the
Chase by winning a race,
and can advance in the
Chase by winning during
the elimination rounds.
It's a system that could
- albeit temporarily -
stall Jimmie Johnson's
quest for a record-tying
seventh Cup title.
It also may suit Harvick
perfectly
"He shows up for the big
games," said Greg Zi-
padelli, vice president of
competition at SHR. "He
can rise up at the end of
the race, he can rise up for
the big races. I think that'll
help drive our company,
our group to a better prod-


uct week in, week out."
And all eyes will be on
SHR this year as the team,
which struggled last year
after expanding to three
cars with the addition of
Danica Patrick, swells to
four full-time teams with
four high-profile drivers.
Stewart, who missed the
final 15 races of last sea-
son with a broken leg suf-
fered in a sprint car crash,
has been cleared to race
again and will be back in
his car today for the first
time since the August ac-
cident. He will race in Sat-
urday night's exhibition
with many wondering if
the three-time champion
will return as the same
fearless driver
Stewart also has his
third crew chief since he
won the 2011 champi-
onship and an entirely dif-
ferent race organization
than the one he had before
his injury
Gone from the roster is
Ryan Newman, the driver
Stewart personally lured
to the team when he
joined Gene Haas as co-
owner in 2009. Newman is
now driving for Childress
and, while Stewart was re-
covering from his injuries,
Haas added Kurt Busch to
the roster in a new fourth
car that Haas will pay for
Yup, the driver Stewart
once punched in the head
on the opening day of
Speedweeks is now his
teammate and employee.
And things weren't al-
ways rosy between Harvick
and Busch. That relation-
ship was mended last year
as the two worked together
through an RCR partner-
ship, and they developed


such a respect for one an-
other that Harvick vouched
for Busch to Stewart
They've also got Patrick in
the fold, and while the three
heavyweights will be vying
for the championship, it will
be an organizational goal to
help Patrick improve on last
year's 27th-place finish in
the final Cup standings.
Stewart believes any
worries about SHR turn-
ing into a circus act are
misguided.
"We are putting a collec-
tion of talent together
There are flaws in all of
us," he said. 'As much as
people are making it out to
be a recipe for disaster, I
think it's the opposite. I
think it's a huge support
system for each other"
That similar system has
worked at Hendrick Mo-
torsports, where Johnson
has won six of the last
eight championships. A
seventh title would tie him
with Richard Petty and
the late Dale Earnhardt.
He doesn't believe the
change to the Chase for-
mat is designed to stop
him, nor does he believe it
will hinder his record-
setting opportunity
"When I look at the years
we've won championships,
we've won a lot of races.
We've won a lot of races in
the Chase," Johnson said.
"And the way this format
plays out, we would have
that opportunity come
Homestead. So this could
be something very good for
us. If we can keep our stats
like they've been, and the
process we've used, it
could be very good for us."
It could also be good for
Dale Earnhardt Jr, his


teammate who turns 40
this October still seeking
his first Sprint Cup title. If
the new Chase format had
been applied last season,
Earnhardt would have
been the champion.
"I feel like I am on the
verge of breaking through
and having possibly one of
my best seasons," Earn-
hardt said. "Maybe it's just
the stars aligning or fate
that they're making these
changes and maybe we
just have the type of sea-
son we need to have to be
the guy at Homestead
holding the trophy"
This year also marks the
return of the No. 3 to the
track in the Sprint Cup Se-
ries. The number has not
been used at NASCAR's
highest level since Earn-
hardt's fatal accident on
the last lap of the 2001
Daytona 500, but it is back
with Austin Dillon and the
Childress organization.
Childress is adamant
that Earnhardt had a suc-
cession plan for his famed
number, and that Chil-
dress' grandson is the per-
fect driver to use the No. 3.
Dillon has used it through-
out his career and won the
Nationwide Series title last
season with the number
Fan responses can be
mixed to the use of the
No. 3, but Dillon is certain
he's doing the right thing.
"Everybody has the
right to their own opinion
and I've had enough good
responses for me to be
confident in what I'm
doing and going after," Dil-
lon said. "I'm happy at this
point and excited to see
what happens at Daytona.
I feel like I'm ready"






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 28 24 .538 -
Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3/2
NewYork 20 32 .385 8
Boston 19 35 .352 10
Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 37 14 .725 -
Atlanta 25 26 .490 12
Washington 25 27 .481 12/2
Charlotte 23 30 .434 15
Orlando 16 38 .296 22/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 40 12 .769 -
Chicago 27 25 .519 13
Detroit 22 30 .423 18
Cleveland 20 33 .377 20/2
Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 38 15 .717 -
Houston 36 17 .679 2
Dallas 32 22 .593 6/2
Memphis 29 23 .558 8/2
New Orleans 23 29 .442 14/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 42 12 .778 -
Portland 36 17 .679 5/2
Minnesota 25 28 .472 16/2
Denver 24 27 .471 16/2
Utah 19 33 .365 22
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 -
Phoenix 30 21 .588 5
Golden State 31 22 .585 5
L.A. Lakers 18 34 .346 17/2
Sacramento 18 35 .340 18
Wednesday's Games
Memphis 86, Orlando 81
Dallas 81, Indiana 73
Toronto 104, Atlanta 83
Brooklyn 105, Charlotte 89
San Antonio 104, Boston 92
Cleveland 93, Detroit 89
Sacramento 106, NewYork 101, OT
Minnesota 117, Denver 90
Houston 113, Washington 112
New Orleans 102, Milwaukee 98
Utah 105, Philadelphia 100
Miami 111, Golden State 110
L.A. Clippers 122, Portland 117
Thursday's Games
Chicago 92, Brooklyn 76
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, late
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
NBA leaders


Durant, OKC
Anthony, NYK
James, MIA
Love, MIN
Curry, GOL
Griffin, LAC
Aldridge, POF
Harden, HOU
Cousins, SAC
DeRozan, TO
George, IND
Nowitzki, DAL
Irving, CLE
Lillard, POR
Davis, NOR
Dragic, PHX
Thomas, SAC
Jefferson, CH
Gay, SAC
Wall, WAS

Jordan, LAC
Drummond, D
Howard, HOL
James, MIA
Horford, ATL
Diaw, SAN
Wade, MIA
Faried, DEN
Ibaka, OKC
Johnson, TOF

Jordan, LAC
Love, MIN
Drummond, D
Howard, HOL
Cousins, SAC
Noah, CHI
Aldridge, POF
Bogut, GOL
Jefferson, CH
Randolph, ME

Curry, GOL
Lawson, DEN
Wall, WAS
Rubio, MIN
Jennings, DET
Lowry, TOR
Teague, ATL
James, MIA
Nelson, ORL
Carter-Willian


Through Feb. 12
Scoring
G FG FT
53 544 451
S 49 472 293
50 484 287
50 418 342
50 425 211
55 495 330
S 53 518 229
45 322 339
46 369 299
R 50 390 292
52 395 243
S 52 406 232
50 388 207
53 355 237
44 343 215
48 342 218
53 362 249
A 44 385 111
47 348 189
52 366 235
FG Percentage
FG
222
DET 298
S 359
484
238
206
276
216
351
S 218
Rebounds
G OFF DEF
55 230 539
50 163 498
DET 52 283 393
S 53 173 489
46 147 393
49 187 375
S 53 125 477
48 141 373
A 44 92 370
EM 50 162 356
Assists
G
50
45
52
53
T 50
52
49
50
49
ms, PHL 42


Men's Top 25 fared
Thursday
1. Syracuse (24-0) did not play. Next: vs. N.C.
State, Saturday.
2. Arizona (23-1) did not play. Next: atArizona
State, Friday.
3. Florida (22-2) did not play. Next: at No. 14
Kentucky, Saturday.
4. Wichita State (26-0) did not play. Next: at
Evansville, Sunday.
5. San Diego State (21-2) did not play. Next:
vs. Air Force, Saturday.
6. Villanova (22-2) did not play. Next: at No.
18 Creighton, Sunday.
7. Kansas (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. TCU,
Saturday.
8. Duke (19-5) did not play. Next: vs. Mary-
land, Saturday.
9. Michigan State (21-4) beat Northwestern
85-70. Next: vs. Nebraska, Sunday.
10. Cincinnati (22-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Houston, Saturday.
11. Iowa State (18-5) did not play. Next: vs.
Texas Tech, Saturday.
12. Saint Louis (22-2) did not play. Next: vs.
VCU, Saturday.
13. Louisville (19-4) did not play. Next: atTem-
ple, Friday.
14. Kentucky (19-5) did not play. Next: vs. No.
3 Florida, Saturday.
15. Michigan (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. No.
21 Wisconsin, Sunday.
16. Iowa (18-6) did not play. Next: at Penn
State, Saturday.
17. Virginia (20-5) did not play. Next: at Clem-
son, Saturday.
18. Creighton (20-4) beat Butler 68-63. Next:
vs. No. 6 Villanova, Sunday.
19. Texas (19-5) did not play. Next: vs. West
Virginia, Saturday.
20. Memphis (19-5) did not play. Next: at No.
24 UConn, Saturday.
21. Wisconsin (20-5) beat Minnesota 78-70.
Next: at No. 15 Wisconsin, Sunday.
22. Ohio State (19-6) did not play. Next: at Illi-
nois, Saturday.
23. SMU (19-5) at Rutgers, ppd. Next: at Rut-
gers, Friday.
24. UConn (19-5) did not play. Next: vs. No.
20 Memphis, Saturday.
25. Pittsburgh (20-5) did not play. Next: at
North Carolina, Saturday.


BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Named
Justin Klemm director of instant replay.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Agreed to terms
with OF Michael Brantley on a four-year contract.
SEATTLE MARINERS Agreed to terms
with RHP Fernando Rodney on a two-year con-
tract and LHP Randy Wolf and RHP Zach Miner
on minor league contracts. Placed OF Franklin
Gutierrez on the restricted list.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS Agreed to terms with
RHPs Jason Hammel and James McDonald on
one-year contracts.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Named Jack
McDowell manager of Ogden (Pioneer). Agreed
to terms with OF Carlos Mosquera.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS -Assigned RHP
Donovan Hand outright to Nashville (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Released RHP
Chad Gaudin.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES -Agreed to terms
with LHP Yao-Hsun Yang on a minor league
contract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Traded RHP
Nathan Karns to Tampa Bay for C Jose Loba-
ton, OF DrewVettleson and LHP Felipe Rivero.


Placed RHP Erik Davis on the 60-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS Reassigned F
Robert Covington to Rio Grande Valley
(NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DETROIT LIONS Released WR Nate
Burleson and S Louis Delmas.
GREEN BAY PACKERS Signed TE Ray-
mond Webber.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
CHIVAS USA Named Paul Grafer goal-
keeper coach.
SPORTING KANSAS CITY- Acquired MF
Jimmy Medranda from Deportivo Pereira (Colom-
bia) and signed him to a multiyear contract.
North American Soccer League
NEWYORK COSMOS Signed M Marcos
Senna to a contract extension.
COLLEGE
MEMPHIS- Suspended men's basketball F
Dominic Woodson indefinitely.
OHIO Named Scott Isphording offensive
coordinator/quarterbacks coach, Dave Johnson
offensive line coach and elevated Chris
Rodgers from operations assistant to director of
football operations.


SCOREBOARD


For Uthev record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^O^ ~9-7-8
CASH 3 (late)
0" 1-7-2

PLAY 4 (early)
0-7-8-8
PLAY 4 (late)
J- ,-M ^7-6-5-3

FANTASY 5
2-7-11-13-34


Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 36 44 49 52 57
Powerball: 1
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 8 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
Fantasy 5:4 6 15 -21 -26
5-of-5 2 winners $119,470.74
4-of-5 338 $114
3-of-5 10,913 $9.50


Lotto: 5-8- 19-34-41 -49
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 24 $5,366.50
4-of-6 1,315 $72.50
3-of-6 27,808 $5


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Daytona 500, Practice
6:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Daytona 500, Final
Practice
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Maryland at Florida
12:30 a.m. (SUN) Maryland at Florida (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 a.m. (ESPNU) Minnesota at Wisconsin (taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Detroit Mercy at Oakland
9 p.m. (ESPN) Arizona at Arizona State
9 p.m. (ESPNU) Canisius at Niagara
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint All-Star Celebrity Game
9 p.m. (TNT) 2014 Rising Stars Challenge
1 a.m. (NBA) 2014 Rising Stars Challenge (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Quinnipiac at Marist
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Chris Algieri vs. Emmanuel Taylor
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Africa Open, Second
Round (same-day tape)
12 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour ISPS Handa Australian Open,
Second Round (same-day tape)
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: ACE Group Classic,
First Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Northern Trust Open, Second Round
COLLEGE HOCKEY
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston University at New Hampshire
MARTIAL ARTS
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Karate U.S. Open: ISKAWorld Championships
(taped)
WINTER OLYMPICS
5 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cross-country skiing
5 a.m. (USA) Curling, women's: USA vs. Denmark
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey, men's: Sweden vs. Switzerland
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Figure skating: men's gold medal final
12 p.m. (MSNBC) Hockey, men's: Norway vs. Finland
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Figure skating: men's gold medal final
12 p.m. (USA) Hockey, men's: Canada vs. Austria
2:15 p.m. (NBCSPT) Ski jumping: men's individual K-125
(same-day tape)
3 p.m. (NBC) Biathlon: women's 15km individual gold medal
final; freestyle skiing (same-day tape)
5 p.m. (CNBC) Curling, men's: USA vs. Russia (same-day tape)
8 p.m. (NBC) Figure skating: men's gold medal final; alpine
skiing; freestyle skiing (same-day tape)
12:05 a.m. (NBC) Ski jumping: men's individual K-125 large
hill competition; skeleton (same-day tape)
3 a.m. (MSNBC) Hockey, women's quarterfinal
3 a.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey, men's: Slovakia vs. Slovenia
TENNIS
6:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATPABN AMRO World Tournament
8:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATPABN AMRO World Tournament
8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP U.S. National Indoor Championship,
Third Quarterfinal
10 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP U.S. National Indoor Championship,
Fourth Quarterfinal
12 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA Qatar Total Open (taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Continued from Page B1

down at the basket."
Desmond Franklin poured in 17
points and registered three of his
team's 11 steals.
At 12 points, Pryor finished below
his scoring average, but was invalu-
able, particularly in the second half,
as a defender and rebounder He
made a team-high six steals, and his
four boards in the fourth lifted him to
a double-double with 10 rebounds.
"Usually, hitting a 3 starts up a run
for us," Pryor said, "but we just didn't
make one tonight. (Lake Weir) was
kind of stopping Sam Franklin on the
boards, so I had to step up and re-
bound more."
"Pryor's a gamer," Densmore said.
"It's like having a coach out there on
the floor Teams are making a real ef-
fort to get the ball out of Devin's
hands. To have Ben (Janicki) come
through with 23 points is huge. Our
team is a hard team to focus in on one
guy, because it has so many scorers."
Lake Weir guard Eric Williams (12
rebounds) was his usual dominant self
in the first half, as he totaled 12 points
and seven steals. But the senior added
just one more point in the second half.
"(Janicki) and (Sam Franklin)
played their rears off on the boards


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 B3


Things to look at



going into Rays camp


Associated Press

TAMPA Five things to know
about the Tampa Bay Rays as they
start spring training camp:
Getting their
money's worth
The focus this winter was on keeping
together last year's team, which won 92
games and lost to Boston in the ALDS.
That included a decision, at least for now,
to not trade ace David Price, who was
given a $14 million, one-year salary that's
a big chunk of a projected opening-day
payroll of nearly $80 million a fran-
chise high. The budget-conscious Rays
not only expect to contend for the AL
East title, but feel they have what it takes
to win it all.
"This is clearly as good of a team as we
could ask for, given our (financial) con-
straints," principal owner Stuart Sternberg
said after signing free agent closer Grant
Balfour.
The team's other offseason moves in-
cluded re-signing first baseman James
Loney and trading for catcher Ryan Hani-
gan, reliever Heath Bell and infielder
Logan Forsythe. No club's done more with
limited financial resources the past six
years. Tampa Bay's 550 wins since 2008
are the second-most in the majors behind
the Yankees' 564.
Mound driven
The Rays thrive on pitching and de-
fense, boasting one of baseball's top rota-
tions and a deep, versatile bullpen. Tampa
Bay posted a franchise-record 17 shutouts
in 2013, and the club's 32 shutouts over
the past two seasons match the Dodgers
for the most in the majors. The Rays al-
lowed one run or less in 39 games last
season, most in the AL since the 2005 An-
gels. Defensively, they committed 59


errors, second fewest in the majors behind
Baltimore's 54.
Score some more
While the Rays have never had an over-
powering lineup, they've still found ways to
win 90-plus games the past four seasons,
five of six overall. They were ninth in the
AL in runs scored a year ago, however,
there's potential to be more potent in 2014
with Hanigan added to the mix and reign-
ing rookie of the year Wil Myers and late
2013 addition David DeJesus in the lineup
for full seasons.
Shut the door
Closer Fernando Rodney is gone after
two successful seasons in Tampa Bay, but
manager Joe Maddon feels good about re-
placing him with Balfour, who signed a $12
million, two-year deal after converting 62 of
67 save opportunities for Oakland over the
past two seasons. Bell and Juan Carlos
Oviedo also are options for closing games
and helping Balfour remain fresh. That's a
luxury for a team that customarily enters
spring training without a specific reliever
designated for the closer's role.
"We're actually going to use the C-word
this year, which is unique for me and for
us," Maddon said. "To have all these differ-
ent tools in the toolbox, all of a sudden, it's
kind of neat."
Keeping it interesting
Maddon is known for creating a relaxed
clubhouse atmosphere. Outside of de-
manding players play hard every day, the
manager has few team rules. He keeps
things light and fun, and it's difficult to
argue with the results. During a tough
stretch last season, among the things
Maddon did to liven up the routine was
bring a music DJ, merengue band and
even a cockatoo into the clubhouse to pro-
vide pregame entertainment.


Johnson takes early



lead in Northern Trust


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Dustin Johnson
moved down the coast of California
and brought his game with him Thurs-
day in the Northern Trust Open.
So did Jimmy Walker
Johnson made six birdies on a
warm, sunny day at Riviera for a 5-
under 66, giving him a one-shot lead
when the opening round was sus-
pended by darkness. Walker birdied
his last three holes and was in the
large group at 67 that included
Francesco Molinari of Italy and Tor-
rey Pines winner Scott Stallings.
Four days ago, Johnson closed with
a 66 in the gray, cold weather of Peb-
ble Beach to finish one shot behind
Walker In conditions that could not
have been any different- and could
not have been any better he made
birdie on all of the par 5s at Riviera
and only had one bogey on his card, at




'CANES
Continued from Page B1

win.
Leah Stanley nearly routed the Pi-
rates' No. 4 singles player Alanna
Fields, but Fields grabbed a game in
the second set. Stanley went on to
earn another point for the 'Canes re-
gardless, winning 6-0, 6-1.
In No. 5 singles, Natalie Dodd -
Melaine's younger sister weathered
a similar second set comeback from
Serena Pohl, but Dodd, after winning
the first set 6-0, maintained her com-
posure in the second, and ultimately


the long par-3 fourth.
Walker, whose victory in the AT&T
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am was
his third of the season. He drove his
RV down from the Monterey Penin-
sula, got up at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday to
appear on Golf Channel, and then
went right back to work. Walker was in
the middle of the pack until his tee
shot on the par-3 16th settled just over
a foot from the cup. He nearly reached
the par-5 17th in two to set up a simple
birdie, and finished with one of his
best shots an 8-iron from 184 yards
out of a flyer lie in the rough to the
back of the green and a 30-foot putt
Johnson isn't playing a lot this sea-
son, but when he does, he plays well.
He already has a win at the HSBC
Champions in Shanghai. He shared
the 54-hole lead at Kapalua and tied
for sixth, and then took off four weeks
before returning at Pebble Beach.
That was a good sign for Johnson.


the point, winning the match for Cit-
rus with a decisive 6-3 final set
The two doubles matches, played as
pro-sets, went in favor of the visiting
Hurricanes, and were finished in
rather quick order
The No.1 duo ofMelanie Dodd and
Paige Jordan blew past Crystal
River's top-two pair of Williams and
Hancock, winning in an 8-0 shutout.
In No. 2 doubles, Citrus' Johnson
and Stanley almost made similar
work of Crystal River's Lane and
Fields. Despite the Pirates rallying to
win a single game, Citrus held a hard-
line, took the match, and clenched
the meet shutout, with an 8-1 pro-set
victory


and hurt us," LWHS head coach
Bobby Tingle said. "(Citrus') bigs are
so active, it makes it tough to block
out.
"We've got a lot of young men that
can shoot the basketball," he added,
"but we didn't shoot the ball well from
the floor, beyond the arc or at the free
throw line. When you couple that with
giving up 15 points on offensive re-
bounds and committing 20-plus
turnovers, you're not going to be very
successful against a good team like
Citrus."
The visiting 'Canes led 31-29 at the
break, on the heels of a last-second
Steele layup, and were ahead for most
of the first five minutes of the game,
as the uptempo squads wobbled out of
the gate offensively
"Nerves," said Densmore of those
early minutes. "During that stretch we
had multiple turnovers and we also
missed four or five shots we normally
make. I called a timeout, and Sam
Franklin told the team that as soon as
we score, we'll be all right.
"I told the team a little while back
something I got from (Florida State
football coach) Jimbo Fisher, that
great teams don't play great all the
time, but they play great when it
counts. And I think that's been us the
last three games. All of them came
down to the last two minutes of the
game, where anyone could have won,
and we did it."


= Prep CALENDAR LIMIT


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. Lecanto at Springstead
7 p.m. IMG Academy at Crystal River
SOFTBALL
7 p.m. Vanguard at Citrus
WRESTLING
10 a.m. Citrus, Crystal River at FHSAA state meet in Lakeland





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Six grapplers



set for state


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

Six grapplers will be rep-
resenting Crystal River and
Citrus high schools in this
weekend's two-day litmus
test labeled the 50th an-
nual FHSAA State Finals
at the Jenkins Arena.
The half-dozen grap-
plers enter the Polk
County venue with a simi-
lar focus: they're all trans-
fixed at becoming the
county's llth state cham-
pion atop the podium Sat-
urday night.
The grueling, double-
elimination IBT (individu-
ally bracketed
tournament) format begins
at 10 a.m. today for the
state's top 672 grapplers in
classifications 1A, 2A and
3A at The Lakeland Center
in Lakeland.
Competition will run si-
multaneously across 10
mats. There will be two
winner's and loser's rounds
on Friday Action runs until
approximately 10 p.m.
Saturday begins with a
wrestleback round at 9:30
a.m. followed by the semi-
finals and wrestlebacks.
Finals are slated to begin
at 5:30 p.m. on three mats.
The top six finalists in
each of the 14 weight divi-
sions will earn a medal in
each of the three classes.
Trophies will be awarded
to team state champion
and team runner-up.
Pirates: Four
gunning for gold
Crystal River has en-
joyed a tremendous
season.
Coach Craig Frederick's
mat men reeled off a
school-record 34-4 dual
meet campaign and went
unbeaten among the Cit-
rus County ranks.
The Pirates' trophy case
added five second-place
trophies this winter, plus
the championship trophy
from American Legion
Post Duals at The Villages.
Yet, in Frederick's
world, all that success is in
the rearview mirror
What matters is pushing
the remaining four Pirates
to Saturday night's
podium.
CRHS will be repre-
sented in the Class 1A
tournament by seniors
Michael Allan at 126, An-
drew Bilby at 195 and Car-
los Sanabria at 220, along
with sophomore Eddie
Bennis at 182.
The Pirates don't have
enough firepower to im-
pact the hierarchy in the
team scores.
The Class 1A team
standings are expected to
boil down to Region IV
champion Cardinal Gib-
bons, Region II champ Or-
lando-Lake Highland Prep
and Region II runner-up
Green Cove Springs-Clay
Cardinal Gibbons ar-
rives towing in a state-best
13 grapplers, including
eight regional champs.
The Broward County grap-
plers are seeking their
fifth state title and first
since 2011.
On the Pirates focus,
"We're not worried about
the team score," Frederick
shrugged. "We're trying to
get as many individual
wins as we can."
Allan, the only Pirate to
capture a regional crown
last weekend at Clay, has
the best chance to
advance.
Last winter, Allan fin-
ished 0-2 in his first-ever
trip to states.
This time, Allan (41-5)
opens against Clewiston
sophomore Azeekwuai
Bryant (35-16). With a win,
he'll most likely face
Wakulla sophomore
Hunter Royce.
Looming in the semifi-
nals is two-time defending
state champion and
Tampa Prep junior
Donoven Hough (39-3).
"To me, every match at


states is tough," Frederick
detailed. "The key for
Michael is to stay focused
in the atmosphere at states.
He's put in so much extra
time, I think he's ready He
beat some quality kids at
the Super 32 and he had a
great match last week
against (Wesley Chapel's
talented Jon) Galvan.
"Michael's goal is to be
on the podium Saturday
night."
Like Allan, Bilby is a re-
turning state qualifier He
finished 1-2 in his first visit
last winter
Bilby (32-9) will open the
competition against
Lakeland-McKeel Acad-
emy senior Fouad Salem
(31-10).
With a win, he'll mostly
likely cross paths with Car-
dinal Gibbons sophomore
Ryan Thomas (38-1).
"It's real simple for An-
drew. If he shows up and
battles, he can be in the
thick of this," Frederick
said. "The key is he's going
to have to battle his way
through two days of com-
petition. He doesn't handle
aggressive kids real well."
Unlike Bilby, who
placed third in the region
last weekend at Clay, both
Bennis and Sanabria fin-
ished fourth meaning
they'll both open against
regional champs.
Sanabria (40-12) begins
against Cape Coral-
Mariner senior Alejandro
Lopez (37-1).
"Carlos' shoulder has
been bothering him, but
he's got to suck it up and
go," insisted Frederick.
"He knows he's an under-
dog, but our region's 220-
pounders were pretty
good. We'll see."
Bennis is the lone un-
derclassman in the six-
member Citrus County
contingency
Bennis (41-15, county-
leading 30 pins) drew the
state's No. 1 ranked grap-
pler out of the gates -
Somerset Academy junior
Raekwon Reggler (50-1).
"I just want Bennis to
battle," Frederick empha-
sized. "I don't want him to
play dead. I don't care who
he faces, I realize he's only
a sophomore, but to be the
best you have to tangle
with the best."
CHS: 2 returnees
All year long, Citrus has
been led by the solid 1-2
punch of seniors Brandon
Taylor at 160 and Casey
Bearden at 170.
Taylor enters states with
a county-best 55-4 slate
while Bearden ranks sec-
ond at 48-3.
Though both partici-
pated in states last winter,
both were sent pacing fol-
lowing 1-2 runs.
Unfortunately for Taylor,
the 160-pound weight class
might be one of the most
loaded divisions.
Taylor will open the
tourney facing Fivay's
three-time state qualifier,
senior Andrew Scherer
(49-2).
Taylor is fortunate in
that two of the weight
classes' toughest grap-
plers, Palmetto Ridge's
Chase Singletary (45-1)
and Brandon's Dakota
Greene (65-1) are on the
opposite bracket.
Bearden's bracket is no
picnic either
Bearden will open
against Mater Academy
senior Yuri Cabrera (25-7).
With a win, Bearden will
most likely tangle with
Fort Myers junior Levi
McQuinn (41-2).
Should Bearden and
Springstead junior Billy
Swift both win their first
two matches, they'll col-
lide Saturday morning in
the semifinals for the third
time this winter
The duo split the first
two meetings both
thrilling overtime
decisions.


2014 Citrus County state qualifers (6)
WGT NAME SCH YR. W L PINS
120 Allan, Michael CR 12 41 5 18
160 Taylor, Brandon CIT 12 55* 4 26
170 Bearden, Casey CIT 12 48 3* 29
182 Bennis, Eddie CR 10 41 15 30*
195 Bilby, Andrew CR 12 32 9 25
220 Sanabria, Carlos CR 12 40 12 28
* Denotes county leader.
Denotes 2013 state placer.
-Compiled by TONY CASTRO


NCAA proposes rule change


Associated Press

Not so fast, college football
offenses.
A proposed change by the NCAA
rules committee would prohibit of-
fenses from snapping the ball until
at least 10 seconds had run off the
40-second play clock, slowing down
the up-tempo, no-huddle attacks
that have been making defenses
dizzy
The rule allows defenses time to
make a substitution without the of-
fense changing players as is cur-
rently required and with no fear
the ball will be snapped before 29



WILKES
Continued from Page B1

he was typically traveling with his
parents on the BMX tour When that
ended, he'd spend his Saturdays in
youth wrestling tournaments.
"I liked watching baseball," re-
marked the current 43-year-old Cit-
rus County resident "But there was
no time to play"
That hectic schedule went on for
four years.
His BMX touring enabled him to
make a smooth transition to life on
the mats.
Wilkes readily admits that bicycle
racing built up his stamina and his
leg strength.
Within a week of enrolling at
Bradenton Southeast High School
and joining life-long buddy Mike
Gorris (an eventual three-time state
champ) on the mats, life tossed the
Wilkes family a fastball that they
hit out of the park.
Dana's mom, Kay, a senior vice
president with Barnett Bank, was
offered a position in the North Sun-
coast to open up new branches in
Hernando and Citrus counties. She
jumped at the opportunity
Within 48 hours, the Wilkes fam-
ily sold its Manatee County home
and purchased a new home in Crys-
tal River
The new job eased the burden of
responsibility of Dana's father
"My dad worked construction all
his life, and looked the part,"
Wilkes explained. "If he was 40, he
looked like he was 60-65 years-old.
He worked his tail off to provide for
his family Mom's promotion really
helped dad ease off.
"I owe so much to my parents,"
pointed out Wilkes, currently 5-foot-
7 and 175 pounds. "Whatever us
kids needed, my parents would pro-
vide. I remember when I was 10; I
saw a new BMX bike that cost $500
in a shop. Dad ended up buying it
because he thought it would help
me compete better- that's the kind
of provider and facilitator he was."
Within three days of school open-
ing at CRHS, Wilkes met his JV foot-
ball coach and varsity wrestling
coach Rocky Cottrell.
When the white-haired Cottrell
introduced himself to Dana's father,
it wasn't smooth.
Cottrell, a book-smart wrestling
coach, told Wilkes' father that "all
his freshmen would wrestle
jayvee."
That annoyed Wilkes' dad, until
the JV football season ended and
Cottrell got a first-hand look at his
prized pupil.
The Pirate varsity football coach
at the time, Earl Bramlett, asked to
promote Wilkes to the varsity team
with one condition -'That he stop
this Saturday wrestling business.'
Instead of splitting time with dif-
ferent sports, Wilkes opted to con-
centrate on one venue wrestling.
The rest, as they say, is history
Over the next four winters, Wilkes
captured 122-of-127 varsity bouts
(.961 percent) in a Pirate singlet.
During the 1984-88 wrestling sea-
sons, Wilkes captured a school- and
county-record four district individ-
ual titles and four regional titles.
In succession, he reached four
straight Class 3A FHSAA state
wrestling finals.
No other Citrus County grappler
before or since has duplicated that
trifecta.
As a freshman, Wilkes became
only the second-ever Floridian to
reach a state final -joining Hall of
Famer Glenn Goodman from
Tampa Catholic.
As a frosh, he lost in the state fi-
nals at 138 pounds to Plantation's
Tim Williams, 5-1.
In 1986, he solved Live-Oak
Suwannee's John Wainwright in the
state finals at 138, 7-4.
A year later, he defended the
crown capturing the 145-pound title
by bopping Davie-Nova's Steve
Williams via a major decision (9-0).


Two days prior to entering his
fourth state tournament, Wilkes
had the misfortune of dislocating
his shoulder while wrestling with
family friend Bill Combs Sr of Her-
nando High.
The injury was so severe; Wilkes
wrestled his finals match against
Clearwater Central Catholic's Den-
nis Bonneau with his left arm taped
to his side.
With only one serviceable arm,
Wilkes still competed but lost, 7-4.
Wilkes could have opted for an


seconds are left on the play clock.
An exception will be made for the
final two minutes of each half,
when the offense can snap the ball
as quickly as it wants.
"This rules change is being made
to enhance student-athlete safety
by guaranteeing a small window for
both teams to substitute," Air Force
coach Troy Calhoun, chair of the
football rules committee, said in a
statement Wednesday 'As the aver-
age number of plays per game has
increased, this issue has been dis-
cussed with greater frequency by
the committee in recent years and
we felt like it was time to act in the


interests of protecting our student-
athletes."
The committee also proposed a
change to the targeting rule that
would eliminate the 15-yard
penalty when instant replay offi-
cials overturn an ejection. Last
year, when a targeting penalty was
called, the 15-yard penalty stood
even if the replay official deter-
mined the player should be allowed
to stay in the game.
Both proposals need approval
from the playing rules oversight
panel, which is schedule to con-
sider them on March 6.


Special to the Chronicle
Dana Wilkes poses with his girlfriend Kelli, second from left, her daughter
Hannah, far left, and his daughter Lauren, far right.


injury default, forfeiting to Bon-
neau. That option, however, wasn't
in his DNA.
A month earlier when he was
completely healthy, he twisted Bon-
neau into an 18-3 technical fall.
"I had worked too hard to get to
states again," Wilkes said.
"Wrestling has allowed me to wres-
tle in 48 states and be a part of the
Pan Am Cadet National Team that
visited Cali, Columbia.
"What I've always like about
wrestling is yes, it's a team sport,
but it's all on you when you get out
there," he stressed. "When I went
out there, I blocked everything out.
Basically, I saw the referee and the
other kids, that's it
"If I worked hard all week, I could
see the end results on weekends. If
I slacked up during the week, it
would show up on weekends."
Interestingly, Wilkes' most cher-
ished moment on the mat wasn't
when he received his two gold
medals at Fort Myers (as a sopho-
more) or Seminole-Osceola (as a
junior), it was winning his first-ever
match against Citrus High's John
Langley
"What sticks with me is my first-
ever varsity match. I was a nobody
at the time and (CHS Coach Ed) Kil-
patrick and none of their guys knew
who I was," Wilkes said. "Langley
was built like a truck. Within a cou-
ple of minutes I was ahead 10-0.
That's when I thought I had arrived.
"Winning the first time at states
was more of a relief," Wilkes said.
"What was cool was my brother had
a T-shirt made and presented it to
me afterward. It read, "The Iceman
does it! 1985 state champ!"
Life's curve balls
At the peak of his notoriety, life
dished out some curve balls.
Wilkes was days away from high
school graduation and competing
that fall for one the nation's pre-
mier collegiate programs Okla-
homa State University
On May 23,1988, he and two bud-
dies Chris and Kenny were
squeezed into a small Toyota truck
heading home from Tampa.
Unfortunately, a truck blew
through a red light and slammed
into the passenger side of the Toy-
ota truck.
Wilkes was in the middle of the
trio atop the gear box, but his arm
was outside the passenger door
According to Wilkes, Kenny, the
driver, was unscathed and caught
the red-light runner 200 yards away
as he tried to flee.
Unfortunately, both Chris and
Dana were air-lifted to Bayfront
Medical Center
As a result of the accident, Chris'
pelvis was shattered, but Wilkes'
right arm was crushed.
At the hospital, the attending
physicians contacted Mrs. Wilkes to
let her now they were going to am-
putate Dana's arm below the elbow
According to Wilkes, she pleaded
for another solution. The doctors
did amputate some fingers.
Three surgeries were needed to
reconstruct his mangled right arm.
OSU moved on, allowing Wilkes
to enroll at North Idaho College -
one of their feeder programs. It was
there, Wilkes joined four of his Cali
teammates nearly 17 months later
But after a year off, Wilkes wasn't
the same person. He competed for
the Vandals for one season before
returning home to Citrus County
From 1991-2003, Wilkes was em-
ployed in a local carrier service. It
was at that point of his life that he
was married at21 and divorced at31.
He had coached for a few seasons
at Lecanto High School before de-


veloping a severe neck injury in
2003.
An MRI test detected a deadly
staph infection meandering along
his vertebrae.
The infection had spread down
his spinal column impacting the
second, third and fourth vertebrae.
Wilkes spent three months in a
Shands Hospital bed in Gainesville
with screws in his head with his
arms and legs immobilized.
The pain was so excruciating
Wilkes was given access to as much
morphine as he wanted. He was
also given large amounts of Valium.
He was told in a best-case sce-
nario, 'that I'd never walk again.'
Wilkes learned the reason for the
staph infection was that chards of
glass hadn't been completely re-
moved from his body, causing the
infection.
Before having corrective spinal
surgery, his weight plummeted to
130 pounds or what he weighed
during middle school.
After his release from Shands, it
took Wilkes 18 months to recover
enough to resume a "normal life" at
home.
But life wasn't done with him.
In his hospital stay, he had be-
come addicted to the painkilling
morphine and needed a rehab cen-
ter to sober up.
These days, he's sober and has
been employed for over a year sell-
ing vehicles at Crystal River Toyota.
He and his girlfriend, Kelli,
bought a home in Sugarmill Woods
and live with her two children -
11-year-old Hannah and 18-year-old
Frankie.
Wilkes also shares custody of his
6-month old daughter Aubrey He
spends 15 days per month with
Aubrey besides tending to the
needs of his two daughters from his
previous marriage: 21-year-old
Kaylyn and 17-year-old Lauren.
Springstead High assistant coach
Bill Combs Sr, a member of the
Wrestling Hall of Fame, said
Wilkes' finest hours haven't been
necessarily on the mat as much as
what he's done to turn his life
around.
"If people doubt why he's the
best-ever wrestler from around
here," summed up Coach Combs.
"Dana never wrestled in a wrestle-
back round. Ever He was in finals
his entire life. Who does that?
That's hard to duplicate.
"To me, the most impressive part
of his life is what he's done since
the car wreck, the divorce, the
staph infection and the drug
rehab," he insisted. "I visited him at
Shands, it was an awful sight. No
one else could do what Dana has
done to regain his life. Honestly, I
think a lot of people in his shoes
would have checked out."
"I'm not a religious person per
se," explained Wilkes. "But I be-
lieve in God. My strong faith comes
from parents, especially my mom.
Those guys saw me every day when
I was at my worst at Shands.
"My life is in a good place right
now My wrestling background has
allowed me to survive some pretty
tough times," he said. "I'd love to re-
turn to wrestling as a coach it's
who I am. Right now, I feel like I'm
the luckiest guy around."
Wilkes did say his legacy on the
mat is important.
"Yeah, it does matter to me,"
stressed Wilkes. 'Am I the best-
ever? (Rob) Hermann did a lot, too.
I'm not sure about all the others
(from Citrus County). I was fortu-
nate to have competed with some of
the best. In my prime, I feel I could
have beaten anyone."


B4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In pursuit of perfection


Syracuse, Wichita

State undefeated

Associated Press
WICHITA, Kan. Phil Martelli
remembers the crowds that started
showing up for practices at Saint
Joseph's, bigger and bigger with
every victory the Hawks put on the
board.
Bruce Weber recalls going to a
movie before a game at North-
western, and his Illinois team was
besieged while leaving the theater
by fans seeking autographs and
photos.
"It was so crazy," Weber said this
week "It got to the point, in hotels
we had to go in kitchen elevators to
go up. We couldn't go through the
lobby People would call the room
and say they had room service, and
they'd show up with armfuls ofbas-
ketballs to sign."
Attention, scrutiny, pressure -
the price that comes with pursuing
perfection.
As the season enters the home-
stretch, Syracuse and Wichita
State -two programs with very lit-
tle in common are still un-
beaten, locked in an intriguing
race, not against each other, but
against history No team has en-
tered its conference tournament
unbeaten since Saint Joseph's a
decade ago, and no team has won a
national championship without a
loss since Indiana in 1976.
"College basketball is so deep
now, and there are so many good
teams, I think the road those teams
are on is extraordinarily challeng-
ing," Martelli said. "I don't care
what team you play on, though,
when you're undefeated, it be-
comes a different animal."
Free time becomes non-existent,
replaced by endless cycles of in-
terviews, practices and games. It
becomes a chore to walk through
campus between classes. Every-
where you go, people are whisper-
ing and pointing, and those are the
people with the decency to keep
their distance.
So far, the 'Cuse and the Shock-
ers have handled it well.
While ripping off 24 straight
wins, the latest a heart-stopping,
last-second victory over No. 25
Pittsburgh on Wednesday night,
Syracuse has managed to deflect


Associated Press
Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim talks with his players during a time out Dec. 3, 2013, against Indiana
in Syracuse, N.Y. Seven games stand between Syracuse and an unbeaten regular season.


much of the attention that comes
with the best start in school history
Longtime coach Jim Boeheim has
been a stabilizing force, but so have
veterans such as C.J. Fair, a senior
and the Orange's leading scorer
"You know you're going to get
everyone else's best game. We're
going to get challenged day-in and
day-out," Fair said. "It's not going
to be an easy game for us any day"
The Shockers know how that
goes. They became the first team
since Memphis in 2008 to start 26-0
by beating Southern Illinois on
Tuesday night, a game they pulled
out despite trailing at halftime for
the ninth time this season. That
means they're off to the best start
by a Missouri Valley team since
1979, when Larry Bird and Indiana
State won their first 33 games.
"That's been the theme, you
know, whether we're up, down,
tied. This team just somehow finds
a way," said Wichita State coach
Gregg Marshall, who returned
most of the key players from a
Final Four run a year ago. "You're
not going to play the perfect game
every time."
You just need to play well
enough to stay perfect
The question now becomes how
far each team the big-name


school in the big-time conference
or the mid-major in the Missouri
Valley can go before it finally
succumbs to the pressure, to the
weighty expectations, to something
as simple as a lousy shooting night
In the case of SaintJoseph's, that
didn't happen until the Atlantic 10
tournament, when it ran into a hot-
shooting Xavier The Hawks later
lost to Oklahoma State in the
NCAA tournament
The following year, Illinois ran
roughshod through its first 29
games, still the best start since
UNLV won its first 34 in 1990-91.
The Illini wound up losing to Ohio
State in a nail-biter, bounced back
to handily capture the Big Ten
tournament, and then lost to North
Carolina in a tense, back-and-forth
national championship game.
"It was good for us to lose," said
Weber, now the coach at Kansas
State. 'All of a sudden, it wasn't the
talk about perfection. We could
focus on what we wanted to do."
Yes, losing can be helpful for a
team with national championship
aspirations.
Folks remember the Hoosiers'
undefeated championship in 1976,
but tend to forget that Indiana also
ran through the previous season
unbeaten, losing only to Kentucky


in the NCAA tournament
That taught the Hoosiers how
fragile a season can be.
"I didn't think of any other thing
than to win the game we had to
win, which was always the next
game," said Quinn Buckner, a
member of both Indiana teams.
"So going undefeated was never
the goal. The goal was to win the
championship."
That's certainly the goal for
Syracuse and Wichita State, too.
But doing it without a defeat would
be a history-making bonus, putting
them in the rarest of company:
Only seven times has there been an
unbeaten national champion since
1939, the year of the first NCAA
tournament
Syracuse has the tougher path
with seven games still to go, in-
cluding road games against Duke
and Virginia, before the ACC tour-
nament The Shockers only have
five games left, just one against a
team with a winning record, before
starting the Missouri Valley
tournament
'At the beginning of the season,
who knew?" said Syracuse guard
Trevor Cooney "But an unde-
feated season can't be in your
mind. It's pretty cool, but it can't be
in your mind."


BASKETBALL


Associated Press
Miami's Maria Brown, left, and Jessica Thomas compete with Maryland's Brionna Jones
(42) for the ball Thursday during the first half in Coral Gables.


Terps top Hurricanes


Associated Press
CORAL GABLES -
Alyssa Thomas scored 18
points to lead No. 9 Mary-
land to a 67-52 win over
Miami on Thursday night
The Terrapins started
the game on a 10-0 run and
never trailed in their first
victory at Miami since 2009.
Adrienne Motley scored
12 points for the
Hurricanes.
No. 2 Notre Dame
82, Boston Col. 61
BOSTON Kayla McBride
scored 19 points, Jewell Loyd
18 and second-ranked Notre
Dame coasted to an 82-61 win
over Boston College, giving the
Fighting Irish their best start in
school history.
Notre Dame (24-0 11-0 At-
lantic Coast Conference) re-
mains one of just two unbeaten
teams in the country along with
top-ranked Connecticut.
No. 10 NC St. 69,
Clemson 63, OT
CLEMSON, S.C. -
Markeisha Gatling scored 20
points to help No. 10 North
Carolina State beat Clemson
69-63 in overtime.
Nikki Dixon led Clemson
with 18 points.


No. 11 Penn St. 71,
Indiana 63
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.-
Maggie Lucas scored 32 points
and No. 11 Penn State de-
feated Indiana 71-63.
Larryn Brooks led the
Hoosiers with 16 points.
No. 13 W. Virginia
76, Oklahoma 75
NORMAN, Okla. Bria
Holmes scored 19 points as
No. 13 West Virginia rallied to
defeat Oklahoma 76-75 in a
wild finish.
Aaryn Ellensburg scored 18
points to move into second on
Oklahoma's career list with
2,190 points.
No. 14 Texas A&M
78, Georgia 73
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
- Courtney Walker scored 25
points as No. 14 Texas A&M
came back to beat Georgia
78-73 in overtime.
Texas A&M (19-6, 9-2 SEC)
trailed 62-56 with just more
than a minute left in regula-
tion, but scored six straight
points to force overtime.
Auburn 68,
No. 16 Vanderbilt 62
NASHVILLE, Tenn.-
Tyrese Tanner scored on a


jumper with 24 seconds left to
give Auburn the lead, and Pey-
ton Davis and Kiani Parker
both added a pair of free
throws as Auburn won at
Nashville for the first time since
1999, upsetting No. 16 Vander-
bilt 68-62.
No.17 UNC 86,
Pittsburgh 50
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.--All-
isha Gray scored 21 points and
Diamond DeShields added 19
as No. 17 North Carolina
rolled to an 86-50 win over
Pittsburgh.
Asia Logan led Pitt with 14
points.
No. 18 Kentucky 108,
Mississippi 78
LEXINGTON, Ky. Jen-
nifer O'Neill scored 27 points
as No. 18 Kentucky trounced
Mississippi 108-78.
Tia Faleru led Ole Miss with
career highs in points (31) and
rebounds (16).
No. 21 Nebraska 76,
Michigan 68
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Jor-
dan Hooper scored 23 points
- moving into second on Ne-
braska's all-time scoring list-
and grabbed nine rebounds as
the No. 21 Comhuskers beat
Michigan 76-68.


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4


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 B5

Men's college
= basketball =
BRIEFS
No. 9 Mich. St. 85,
Northwestern 70
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Adreian Payne had 20 points
and 14 rebounds, and No. 9
Michigan State cruised past
Northwestern 85-70 on Thurs-
day night to stay tied atop the
Big Ten.
The Spartans (21-4, 10-2)
are even in the standings with
rival Michigan and those two
teams meet in Ann Arbor on
Feb. 23.
Gary Harris added 14 points
for Michigan State.
The Wildcats (12-13, 5-7)
had not allowed 80 points in a
game in over a month.
No. 18 Creighton
68, Butler 63
INDIANAPOLIS- Doug
McDermott scored 26 points
and made the go-ahead
3-pointer with 47.8 seconds left
to give No. 18 Creighton a
68-63 win over Butler.
The Bluejays (20-4, 10-2 Big
East) have won five of six and
15 of 17, and are now within a
half game of No. 6 Villanova in
the conference standings.
Kellen Dunham had 16
points and Alex Barlow added
13 for Butler (12-13,2-11),
which has lost four straight.
Creighton found itself in a
back-and-forth struggle most of
the second half.
Andrew Chrabascz had two
chances to give Butler a late
lead but twice lost the ball and a
3 from Dunham that might have
forced overtime was short.
-From wire reports

=NBA BRIEFS:
Bulls 92, Nets 76
CHICAGO Taj Gibson
scored 16 points and Carlos
Boozer returned from an injury
to add 15 in the Chicago Bulls'
92-76 victory over the Brook-
lyn Nets on Thursday night.
Joakim Noah had 14 points
and 13 rebounds for his fifth
straight double-double.
Paul Pierce led Brooklyn
with 15 points.
-From wire reports


I












2014 Winter Olympics

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE






Skating in mud in Sochi


Still no American

speedskating medals;

Ocala's Bowe is

eighth in 1,000

Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia-More than an
hour after the latest disappoint-
ment at Adler Arena, the bigwigs
of U.S. speedskating huddled
glumly in the empty stands, talk-
ing urgently among themselves,
trying to figure out what to do now
This team came to the Sochi
Olympics with such high hopes.
So far, it looks like they're skat-
ing in mud.
"I'm at a loss for words," said
Ryan Shimabukuro, head coach
of the American sprinters. "For
whatever reason right now, we are
getting skunked."
While Zhang Hong gave China
its first gold medal ever in speed-
skating Thursday, and the Dutch
added two more medals to what
will surely be a record-breaking
haul, the Americans are still seek-
ing a medal of any color
The way things are going, the
third shutout in the history of the
storied U.S. program seems very
very possible.
"We've all prepared as much as
we could," said Heather Richard-
son, who failed to make the
podium in her two top events. "We
gave it our best"
At least the Americans don't
have to worry about another
flameout today it's an off day at


the oval.
Unless things change dramati-
cally it's hard to envision anyone
making the podium over the next
week.
Sure, Shani Davis is a two-time
silver medalist in the 1,500, but he
struggled to an eighth-place show-
ing in the 1,000, an event he won
at the last two Olympics.
Brittany Bowe of Ocala had
done well on the World Cup cir-
cuit in the women's 1,500. Then
again, she's the world-record
holder in the 1,000 and finished
eighth in that event on Thursday
one spot behind teammate
Richardson.
Richardson was the top-ranked
skater in the 1,000, winning three
of four World Cup races this sea-
son (with Bowe taking the other),
but she finished more than a sec-
ond off Zhang's winning time of
1 minute, 14.02 seconds.
"You've got to just take it for
what it is," Bowe said. "Obviously
we haven't had the outcomes that
we had wanted or predicted, but
that's the games. We still have a
long way to go."
The Americans came into Sochi
with 29 speedskating golds -
more than any other country -
and 67 medals overall, the most of
any U.S. Winter Olympics
program.
The only times the U.S. failed to
win a speedskating medal were in
1984 at Sarajevo and the 1956
Games, where there were just
four men's races.
This team thought it had a
chance to do something special,
given some impressive World Cup
results this season and new high-
tech suits from Under Armour,


Associated Press
Brittany Bowe of the U.S. competes Thursday in the women's
1,000-meter speedskating race at the Adler Arena Skating Center
during the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Bowe, from Ocala,
finished eighth in 1:15.47.


which got an assist in the design
from aerospace giant Lockheed
Martin. Now, there's plenty of
grumbling that the suits are actu-
ally slowing the skaters down in
Sochi.
"I'm not going to comment on
that," Shimabukuro said. "We


have to race in the suits."
Through six of 12 events, the
Americans haven't finished better
than Richardson's seventh-place
showing in the 1,000.
"I'm obviously disappointed,"
said Bowe, a former inline skater
and college basketball player who


quickly made the adjustment to
ice. "It is my first Olympics, but I
came here wanting to get a
podium finish in that particular
race. I didn't, but all is good. I left
it all out there on the track"
Zhang, who had not done much
on the World Cup circuit this sea-
son, skated in the seventh of 18
pairs based on her middling re-
sults. Her time broke the track
record and just missed the
Olympic mark set by Chris Witty
at the 2002 Salt Lake City Games.
"She hasn't had a podium fin-
ish yet this year," Bowe said.
"That's what the Olympics are all
about."
Many fans didn't even see the
gold-medal performance, drifting
in late since the supposed big
guns were all set to go in the sec-
ond half of the session. Zhang was
merely a spectator after the ice
was resurfaced at the midway
point but her smile kept getting
bigger as no one came close to
beating her
The Netherlands took the
other two spots on the podium,
with Ireen Wust winning silver
and Margot Boer the bronze.
The Flying Dutch ran their
medal haul to 12 and are on the
cusp of breaking the previous
record for most speedskating
medals by a country at a single
Olympics East Germany's
13-medal showing at the 1988
Calgary Games.
Appropriately most of the seats
at Adler Arena are orange, the
color of the Dutch team.
That's where the American of-
ficials and coaches sat Thursday
night, trying to sort out if there's
any hope left for these games.


Plushenko retires after injury

Associated Press


SOCHI, Russia From wild
cheers to stunned silence, the Sochi
Olympics said goodbye Thursday to
one of figure skating's all-time greats.
Evgeni Plushenko, the first figure
skater in the modem era to win
medals in four Olympics, retired
from competitive figure skating
shortly after withdrawing from the
men's competition for medical rea-
sons. The Russian said he injured
himself during practice on Wednes-
day then fell on a triple axel during
warmups Thursday
When Plushenko limped out of the
arena, the cheering stopped, eventu-
ally turning into mild applause.
Six medals were awarded on Day
7 of the Olympics: in slopestyle skiing,
cross-country skiing, biathlon, speed-
skating, short track speedskating and
luge.
In the first final of the day the U.S.
freestyle skiers swept the podium in
slopestyle, with Joss Christensen lead-
ingthe way in his Olympic debut Ger-
many completed a sweep of the four
luge events by winning the team relay;
Justyna Kowalczyk of Poland, skiing
with a fractured foot won gold in the
women's cross-country 10-kilometer
classical race; and Li Jianrou of China
won gold in 500-meter short track
speedskating after all three of her op-


SOCHI 2014 OLYMPICS


Medal c
COUNTRY
Norway
Netherlands
United States
Russia
Germany
Canada
Austria
Sweden
Switzerland
France
Slovenia
China
Czech Republic
Italy
Japan
Poland
Latvia
South Korea
Belarus
Slovakia
Australia
Finland
Britain
Ukraine


mountt
G S B
4 3 6
4 3 5
4 2 6
2 5 4
7 2 1
4 4 2
1 4 0
0 4 1
3 0 1
2 0 2
1 1 2
2 1 0
0 2 1
0 2 1
0 2 1
2 0 0
0 0 2
1 0 1
1 0 0
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
0 0 1


Associated Press
Evgeni Plushenko of Russia waves to spectators Thursday after he pulled
out of the men's short program figure skating competition due to injury at
the Iceberg Skating Palace in Sochi, Russia.


ponents in the final fell.
Figure skating
The 31-year-old Plushenko is the
only modern-era figure skater to win
medals in four different Olympics.
He helped Russia win the team gold
over the weekend. He also won figure
skating gold in 2006 and silver in 2002
and 2010. Plushenko said he said it
felt "like a knife in my back" when he
fell on a triple axel during Thursday's
warmups. "I think it's God saying,
'Evgeni, enough, enough with skat-
ing,"' Plushenko said.
Slopestyle skiing
For only the third time in Winter
Games history a U.S. team swept the
podium. Christensen led the way
with a dominating performance that
featured four near-perfect runs over
the rails and jumps at the Rosa
Khutor Extreme Park Gus Kenwor-
thy and Nick Goepper captured the
silver and bronze, as the U.S. skiers
matched the country's previous
sweeps in men's figure skating in
1956 and men's halfpipe snowboard-
ing in 2002. "I am stoked to be up here
with my friends," Christensen said.
'America, we did it"
Cross-country
Kowalczyk led virtually all the way
finishing in 28 minutes, 17.8 seconds
and beating silver medalist Charlotte
Kalla of Sweden by 18.4 seconds.
Therese Johaug of Norway took
bronze, 28.3 seconds behind.
Short track


S Li's win in the 500 keeps the
Olympic title with China. Injured
1 teammate Wang Meng couldn't de-
1 fend the title she has won at every
1 Winter Games since 2002. Arianna
Fontana of Italy took the silver and
1 Park Seung-hi of South Korea earned
1 the bronze. Elise Christie of Britain
caused the first crash of the wild final
AP and was disqualified.


Biathlon
Martin Fourcade of France earned
his second gold of the Sochi Games
with a victory in the men's 20-
kilometer individual race. Fourcade,
who won the 12.5K pursuit on Mon-
day, finished 12.2 seconds ahead of
silver medalist Erik Lesser of Ger-
many Yevgeny Garanichev of Russia
won the bronze.
Luge
Germany scored a golden sweep of
all four luge events by winning the in-
augural team relay Felix Loch, Na-
talie Geisenberger and the doubles
team of Tobias Wendl and Tobias Arlt
finished their runs in 2 minutes,
45.649 seconds, beating Russia for the
title by 1.030 seconds. Latvia won the
bronze.
Ice hockey
The United States defeated Slova-
kia 7-1 and Russia topped Slovenia 5-
2 in preliminary rounds of the men's
ice hockey competition, setting the
stage for the two powers to battle on
Saturday Also, Finland beat Austria
8-4. In the women's tournament Ger-
many defeated Japan 4-0.
Curling
Gold medal favorites Canada, Swe-
den and Britain posted wins in the
men's curling tournament, keeping
the pressure on undefeated China,
which had a bye Thursday In the
women's competition, Canada swept
away its fifth straight opponent while
Sweden knocked Switzerland from
the ranks of the undefeated. Britain
revived its chances of making the
semifinals with a win over China.
Skeleton
Lizzy Yarnold of Britain and Noelle
Pinkus-Pace grabbed the top two
spots midway through the women's
skeleton competition. The final two
runs for the gold are Friday


Thursday's Winter
Olympic medalists
BIATHLON
Men
20km Individual
GOLD-Martin Fourcade, France
SILVER-Erik Lesser, Germany
BRONZE-Evgeniy Garanichev, Russia
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women
10km classic
GOLD-Justyna Kowalczyk, Poland
SILVER-Charlotte Kalla, Sweden
BRONZE-Therese Johaug, Norway
FREESTYLE SKIING
Men
Slopestyle
GOLD-Joss Christensen, Park City, Utah.
SILVER-Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif.
BRONZE-Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg,
Ind.
LUGE
Team Relay
GOLD-Germany 3 (Natalie Geisen-
berger, Felix Loch, Tobias Wendl, Tobias Arlt)
SILVER-Russia 1 (Tatyana Ivanova, Al-
bert Demchenko, Alexander Denisyev,
Vladislav Antonov)
BRONZE-Latvia 1 (ElizaTiruma, Martins
Rubenis, Andris Sics, Juris Sics)
SHORT TRACK SPEEDSKATING
Women
500
GOLD-Li Jianrou, China
SILVER-Arianna Fontana, Italy
BRONZE-Park Seung-Hi, South Korea
SPEEDSKATING
Women
1000
GOLD-Zhang Hong, China
SILVER-IreenWust, Netherlands
BRONZE-Margot Boer, Netherlands
Thursday's U.S.
Olympians fared
BIATHLON
Men's 20km Individual
8. Lowell Bailey, Lake Placid, N.Y, 50:57.4
(1).
44.Tim Burke, Paul Smiths, N.Y, 54:21.2 (4).
50. Russell Currier, Stockholm, Maine,
55:07.5 (4).
83. Leif Nordgren, Marine on St. Croix,
Minn., 58:47.6 (6).
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women's 10km classic
18. Sadie Bjornsen, Winthrop, Wash.,
29:59.7.
32. Sophie Caldwell, Peru, Vt., 31:11.4.
34. Ida Sargent, Barton, Vt., 31:15.1.
35. Holly Brooks, Anchorage, Alaska,
31:19.1.
FIGURE SKATING
Men's short program
6. Jason Brown, Highland Park, III., 86.00 (Q).
15. Jeremy Abbott, Aspen, Coblo., 72.58 (Q).
FREESTYLE SKIING
Men's Slopestyle
Qualifying
Run 1
1. Joss Christensen, ParkCity, Utah, 91.00.
4. Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif., 86.40.
26. Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg, Ind., 14.80.
31. Bobby Brown, Breckenridge, Colo., 3.40.
Run 2
1. Joss Christensen, Park City, Utah,
(91.00; 93.20) 93.20.
3. Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg, Ind.,
(14.80; 87.00) 87.00.
4. Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif., (86.40;
85.80) 85.80.
11. Bobby Brown, Breckenridge, Coblo.,
(3.40; 83.00) 83.00.
Ranking
1. Joss Christensen, Park City, Utah,
(91.00; 93.20)93.20(0).
4. Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg, Ind.,
(14.80; 87.00) 87.00(0).
5. Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif., (86.40;
85.80)86.40(0).
12. Bobby Brown, Breckenridge, Coblo.,
(3.40; 83.00) 83.00 (Q).
Finals
Run 1
1. Joss Christensen, Park City, Utah, 95.80.
2. Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg, Ind., 92.40.
10. Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif., 31.00.
11. Bobby Brown, Breckenridge, Coblo., 29.20.
Run 2
1. Joss Christensen, Park City, Utah,


(95.80; 93.80) 93.80.
2. Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif., (31.00;
93.60) 93.60.
7. Bobby Brown, Breckenridge, Coblo.,
(29.20; 78.40) 78.40.
9. Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg, Ind.,
(92.40; 61.80)61.80.
Final Ranking
1. Joss Christensen, Park City, Utah,
(95.80; 93.80) 95.80. -GOLD
2. Gus Kenworthy, Telluride, Calif., (31.00;
93.60) 93.60. -SILVER
3. Nick Goepper, Lawrenceburg, Ind.,
(92.40; 61.80) 92.40. -BRONZE
9. Bobby Brown, Breckenridge, Coblo.,
(29.20; 78.40) 78.40.
LUGE
Team Relay
6. United States 1 (Erin Hamlin, Remsen,
N.Y, Chris Mazdzer, Saranac Lake, N.Y,
Christian Niccum, Woodinville, Wash.,
JaysonTerdiman, Berwick, Pa.), 2:47.555.
SHORT TRACK SPEEDSKATING
At Sochi, Russia
Men's 1000
Heat 1 2. Chris Creveling, Kintersville,
Pa., 1:25.069(0).
Heat 5 -2. Eddy Alvarez, Miami, 1:26.070
(0).
Heat 6 1. J.R. Celski, Federal Way,
Wash., 1:25.428(0).
Men's 5000 Relay
Semifinals
Heat 1
4. United States (Eddy Alvarez, Miami, J.R.
Celski, FederalWay, Wash., Chris Creveling,
Kintersville, Pa., Jordan Malone, Denton,
Texas), 6:50.292 (ADVA).
Women's 500
Quarterfinals
Heat 2
3. Emily Scott, Springfield, Mo., 44.709. -
did not advance.
SKELETON
Women
Through Two Runs
2. Noelle Pikus-Pace, Orem, Utah,
1:57.33.
4. Katie Uhlaender, McDonald, Kan.,
1:57.58.
SPEEDSKATING
Women's 1000
7. Heather Richardson, High Point, N.C.,
1:15.23.
8. Brittany Bowe, Ocala, Fla., 1:15.47.
32. SugarTodd, Milwaukee, 1:19.13.
33. Kelly Gunther, Lorain, Ohio, 1:19.43.
Today's Winter
Olympic schedule
Alpine Skiing
Men's Super Combined (downhill), 2 a.m.
Men's Super Combined (slalom), 6 a.m.
Biathlon
Women's 15km Individual, 9 a.m.
Cross-Country Skiing
Men's 15km classic, 5a.m.
Curling
Men
Sweden vs. Canada, Mid.
United States vs. Germany, Mid.
Canada vs. Norway, Mid.
Women
South Korea vs. China, 5 a.m.
Britain vs. Japan, 5a.m.
United States vs. Denmark, 5 a.m.
Russia vs. Switzerland, 5 a.m.
Men
Britain vs. Denmark, 10 a.m.
Russia vs. United States, 10 a.m.
China vs. Norway, 10a.m.
Switzerland vs. Germany, 10a.m.
Figure Skating
Men's free program, 10a.m.
Freestyle Skiing
Women's Aerials Qualification, 8:45 a.m.
Women's Aerials Finals, 12:30 p.m.
Ice Hockey
Men
Group C: Czech Republic vs. Latvia, 3 a.m.
Group C: Sweden vs. Switzerland, 7:30 a.m.
Group B: Canada vs. Austria, Noon
Group B: Norway vs. Finland, Noon
Skeleton
Men's (Run 1), 7:30 a.m.
Men's (Run 2), 9 a.m.
Women's (Run 3), 10:40 a.m.
Women's (Run 4), 11:50 a.m.
Ski Jumping
Men's Individual Qualification (large hill),
12:30 p.m.





Section C- FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2014
OArts & Entertainment


INcCOTHE CE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NE


is in the air


Whether you're in love, have ever been in love, are
looking for love or are over the whole idea of love,
you can't escape the day that's dedicated to love
Valentine's Day.


.V~ \
- -


Valentine's Day superstitions
In some countries, if a young woman
receives a gift of clothing from a prospective
suitor and keeps it, that means she has
accepted his marriage proposal.
It's said that the first man's name a woman
reads in the paper or hears on TV or the radio
on Valentine's Day will be the name of the
man she will marry.
Other Valentine's Day superstitions in-
dclude: If you see a squirrel on Valentine's Day,
you will marry a cheapskate who will hoard
all your money. If you find a glove on the
road on Valentine's Day, your future beloved
will have the other missing glove.


And to be awakened by a kiss on
Valentine's Day is considered lucky.


- r What started out as a religious feast day to
honor the martyred death of Valentine, a Roman
t priest who was beheaded 1,744 years ago has
evolved into a day to celebrate or lament for the
cynics among us- romantic love.

So, grab yourself a box of chocolates and enjoy these
little-known fun facts about Valentine's Day.



Saint Valentine ,,V .
Besides being the patron
saint of love and marriage, -W V' o .,
St. Valentine is also the saint of "
beekeepers, the plague, epilepsy i
and fainting.
Legend has it that
while jailed before his
execution, Valentine
restored the sight of the
jailer's blind daughter. The
night before his death, he
wrote her a note and signed
it, "From your Valentine."



--Information compiled
by Nancy Kennedy


- -


The first known Valentine's
card was supposedly written
in 1415 by Charles, Duke of
Orleans, and sent to his wife
while he was imprisoned in
the Tower of London follow-
ing his capture at the Battle of
Agincourt. It's part of a manu-
script collection at the British
Library in London.


Valentine's Day cards
In order of popularity, each
year Valentine's Day cards are
given to: teachers, children,
mothers, wives, sweethearts
and pets.
Parents receive one out of
every five valentines, and
about 3 percent of pet owners
will give Valentine's Day gifts
to their pets.


Historically speaking....
In the Middle Ages, the Feast of Lupercalia, a fertility feast
on Feb 15, brought young boys and girls together. On the eve
of the feast, Feb. 14, the young men drew names of the young
girls from a bowl to see who they would be paired with
throughout the festival. Also, they would wear the names on
their sleeves for a week. Today, "wearing your heart on your
sleeve" means that it is easy for other people to
know how you are feeling.

Birds of a feather?
Women can predict what kind
of man they will marry by
what type of bird she sees on
Valentine's Day: a sparrow
indicates a poor man, a
bluebird means a happy
man, a goldfinch means a
wealthy man, a blackbird
means a clergyman, a robin
means a crime-fighter
(Batman, perhaps?), a
crossbill means an
argumentative man and an
owl means no man she
will remain unmarried.


'1


J





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Play's opening the perfect


fit for Valentine's Day


How ironic that the
Art Center The-
atre production
"Squabbles," opening on
Valentine's Day, is any-
thing but lovable and ro-
mantic in its theme. What
does the title tell you?
The definitely non-ro-
mantic duo Abe and Mil-
dred, opposite in-laws
(her father, his mother)
who thoroughly dislike
each other, represent the
squabbling duo. "Squab-
bles" was introduced to
Citrus County audiences
in 2001 by the now-retired
Gulf Islands Civic The-
atre, starring Peter
Abrams, current director
of "Squabbles," in the role
of Abe. Who better quali-
fied to direct a show than
a participant in the origi-
nal production? "Squab-
bles" runs weekends from
Feb. 14 to March 2.
At Ocala Civic Theatre,
the musical with the
longest name "Do
Black Patent Leather
Shoes Really Reflect
Up?" plays from
Thursday, Feb. 6, until
Sunday, March 2. This
lighthearted musical


Jeri
Augustine

SPOTLIGHT
ON THEATER


showcases eight class-
mates, with normal grow-
ing pains, romping
through the 1950s. The
Ocala Civic Theatre
Monthly Newsletter calls
this an "affectionate
valentine to the good
times."
On the Forum Stage at
Stage West in Spring Hill.
the classic "Harvey" runs
from Thursday, Feb. 13,
through Sunday Feb. 23.
The show became a popu-
lar movie with the late
James Stewart in the role
of Elwood P Dowd, whose
sidekick, a 6-foot-tall rab-
bit named Harvey, invisi-
ble to everyone else, is his
constant companion,
much to the embarrass-
ment of his family
When the stage play fol-
lowed his hit movie, Stew-
art himself recreated his


Details:
WHAT: "Squabbles"
WHEN: Today
WHERE: Art Center Theatre at 2644 N.
Annapolis Ave., in Citrus Hills.


role and took the play on
tour While attending a
performance of "Harvey"
in Zephyrhills many years
ago, I had the opportunity
to meet the director of the
show, a charming, very
elderly gentleman. Dur-
ing our talk, he men-
tioned that in his younger
days he had been a direc-
tor for Stewart on several
tours. Jim Parsons of TV's
"Big Bang Theory" re-
cently played the role of
Elwood P Dowd in "Har-
vey" on Broadway Over a
decade ago, local award-
winning actor Frank Han-
shaw performed this
leading role in Playhouse
19's production of"Har-
vey" A community theater
favorite, "Harvey" is a play
that theater lovers can
enjoy time and time again.
And remember: Tickets
to a community theater
production make great
Valentine's Day gifts, or
gifts for all occasions.
Jeri Augustine is a long-
time participant in the
local theater community
as actor, producer and
director


TICKETS: Tickets are $19 and are avail-
able Monday through Friday from 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Art Center box office or by
calling 352-746-7606.


Associated Press
Final Season of Star Wars: The Clone Wars to stream on Netflix starting March 7.


Final season of 'Clone Wars' set


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO Netflix's In-
ternet video service is coming to the
rescue of "Star Wars" fans left in
limbo by the abrupt cancellation of
"The Clone Wars," an animated tele-
vision series that embellishes the lore
of the Jedi Order and Sith Lords.
The sixth and final season of "Star
Wars: The Clone Wars" will be shown
exclusively to Netflix subscribers in
the U.S. and Canada beginning March
7 as part of a licensing deal an-
nounced Thursday Financial terms
weren't disclosed.
The Los Gatos, Calif, company has
already pledged to spend about $3
billion this year on licensing video as
it tries to expand its audience of 48
million worldwide subscribers.
A significant chunk of that money is
being earmarked for video that can
only be seen on Netflix. One of the
company's most popular exclusives,


the Emmy-award winning political
drama "House of Cards," returns for
its second season on Friday
The resurrection of "The Clone
Wars" will finish the story that was
still unresolved when Time Warner
Inc.'s Cartoon Network canceled the
series following the fifth season. Car-
toon Network dropped the series
after Time Warner rival Walt Disney
Co. bought the "Star Wars" franchise
as part of its 2012 acquisition of Lu-
casfilm.
Besides showing all 13 episodes of
the sixth season, Netflix's video-
streaming service gained the exclusive
rights to the director's cut of previous
seasons in "The Clone Wars."
Netflix Inc. has been cultivating
closer ties with Disney while increas-
ing its spending on licensing rights as
part of its efforts to attract more sub-
scribers to its $8 monthly service,
which delivers video to Internet-
connected TVs and other devices.


FocL rtai nfrSintnt


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Saturday 7:00 am to 8:00 pm; Sunday 7:00 am
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C2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


ON THE SCENE


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Celebrating a bittersweet Valentine's Day


"Because if she let go of her
grief even for a minute, it
would only hit her harder when
she bumped into it again."
-Alice Munro
ast year, Valentine's Day
forever changed for me
and became a holiday to
be celebrated as much for its
bitter as for its sweet
This day last year, I found my-
self in a totally unexpected
room in a small hospital in
northeast Mississippi, saying
goodbye to the finest man I've
ever known; the only man to
have ever loved me wholly and
unconditionally, without judg-
ment or prejudice the man
whose heart I held since the
day I was born and who carried
my heart with him as he bid
farewell to this world and
entered another
Today is the one-year an-
niversary of my beloved grand-
father's death, and while many
will be out celebrating Cupid's
big day with fancy dinners and
extravagant plans, many in my
family, especially us grandkids,


Logan
Mosby

PEANUT
GALLERY


will find ourselves celebrating
a bit differently as we hold near
and dear to us the memories
that are just a pale reflection of
a man who made us who we all
are for better or for worse -
and whose love and affection
can never be replaced.
A Mississippi Delta farmer
the entirety of his life, my Nan-
dad lived the kind of life many
of us today would consider
ideal, if not downright damn
lucky He met and married the
love of his life, his bride of
more than 60 years, and settled
in to raise soybeans, cotton and
three kids. By the time I came
along, Nandad had stepped
back a bit from the farm to dote
on his wife and grandchildren


- a gift he gave us without us
even knowing it at the time.
Some of my earliest memo-
ries of my Nandad involve him
creeping into my room at the
crack of dawn, standing over
my bed and letting out a
squawk loud enough to wake
the recently (and some not so
recently)_departed that were
planted in the family plot just
down the road. Each time, I'd
jump a foot off the bed, my
heart in my throat, breathing
like I'd just run a marathon.
Nandad would just kiss me on
the cheek and tell me breakfast
was ready, grinning all the way
back to the kitchen.
That's right, folks. My
grandaddy crowed you know,
like the bird. He just randomly
squawked in the car, at the
dining room table, in the mid-
dle of department stores (my
Aunt Lisa can attest to an
incident at a Memphis-area
Steinmart).
Nobody knows when or why
it started, and come to think of
it, it could explain my disincli-
nation towards feathered,


squawking critters to this
day
And that, ladies and gents, is
just the tip of the iceberg. Woe
be to anyone who would dare to
fall asleep when Nandad was
around. I can't count the times I
woke up with knots in my hair
and my shoes tied together, as-
suming of course the infernal
man hadn't hidden them. Folks,
that man could find the most
peculiar places to hide my
shoes under furniture, out-
side in the bushes, even in the
deep freezer
After a visit to the family
homestead, I never knew if I
would be going home with cold
feet or bare feet
Although he could never be
considered a normal fella, my
Nandad was most defiantly one
of the bravest. Because, you
see, my Nandad taught me how
to drive. No easy task for the
faint of heart, but Nandad sur-
vived my learning curve, which
included a close call with a
farm butane tank and the mis-
guided notion that it was
OK to drive with both feet at


the same time.
There are countless other
stories I could share with you,
and none of them would ever in
a lifetime add up the totality of
my grandfather You see, he was
so very much more than the
sum of his parts.
So today, as the world cele-
brates romantic love and its pa-
tron saint, I get to celebrate a
different kind of love a true
love of a lifetime. I will be
showered with memories,
whose tastes and smells will be
far sweeter than any chocolate
or flower, and I will soothe my
grief with the truth that if I had
to lose my Nandad on any day,
what day could be more fitting
than Valentine's Day? After all,
he will always carry a piece of
my heart, no matter where he
is.
And who knows? Maybe I will
crow a time or two, just for old
times' sake.
Logan Mosby is the
chronicle's features editor
Email her at lmosby@chronicle
online. com.


Review: 'RoboCop' remake pats down the original


Associated Press
The original 1987
"RoboCop," Dutch direc-
tor Paul Verhoeven's first
Hollywood film, isn't so
much a movie to revere as
a bit of brutalism to
behold.
It had a grim comic
vibe, satirizing the sav-
agery of both corporate
bloodthirstiness and jus-
tice-seeking rampages.
Peter Weller's RoboCop
was a techno-Franken-
stein created to tame De-
troit's rampant crime:
Dirty Harry for dystopia.
Remaking "RoboCop"
is like trying to recreate a
nightmare. That's one
reason why plans to re-
make the film were meant
with mostly dubious deri-
sion: Hollywood, particu-
larly nowadays, isn't in
the business of nihilism.
Post-apocalyptic films
may be all the rage, but a
movie about a cop's dead
body shoved into a robot
is a tad darker than Jen-
nifer Lawrence running
through the woods.
Directed by Jose
Padilha (the Brazilian
filmmaker who made the
excellent documentary
"Bus 174" before shifting
into action with "Elite
Squad"), this "RoboCop"
has updated the dystopia
with some clever ideas
and better acting, while at
the same time sanitizing
any satire with video-
game polish and sequel
baiting.
The smartest addition
comes early, shifting the
story to Tehran, where
the global company Omni-
Corp has drones stopping
and frisking in the streets.
We're introduced to this
by talk show host Pat
Novak (Sam Jackson),
who appears throughout
the film, brazenly promot-
ing Pentagon propaganda,
trying to convince what
he calls a bizarrely
"robot-phobic" American
public that OmniCorp
drones can make the U.S.
safer, too.
It's a damning starting
point that already posi-
tions America as the
propagator of emotion-
less killing machines.
When the story shifts to
Detroit, it gives the whole
film the frame of: Would
we treat ourselves how
we treat those abroad?
Opening the U.S. mar-
ket to its drones is judged
imperative by OmniCorp.
CEO Raymond Sellars
(Michael Keaton) is
flanked by executive Liz
Kline (Jennifer Ehle) and
marketing wizard Tom
Pope (Jay Baruchel, bril-
liantly smarmy). To turn
the political tide, they de-
cide they need (literally) a
more human face.
For their RoboCop pro-
totype, they find Detroit
police detective Alex
Murphy (Joel Kinnaman),
who has been badly
maimed by a car bomb
meant to derail his pur-
suit of a drug kingpin.
Gary Oldman (always
good, less frequently


I na
41, f *


tested) plays the scientist
who preserves little more
than Murphy's brain in
his new steel body, con-
trolling his emotions and
memory with lowered lev-
els of dopamine.
From here, the film
(scripted by Joshua


Zetumer from the origi-
nal by Edward Neumeier
and Michael Miner) gen-
erally follows the origi-
nal's plot, letting Murphy
clean up Detroit before
his personality begins to
break through and his at-
tentions turn to his maker


Any thought-provoking
satires slide away in a tor-
rent of bullets, which fly
in the way they only can
in video games or (ques-
tionably) PG-13 rated
movies.
Kinnaman ("The
Killing") is a Swedish


actor with an urban
American swagger
Whereas Weller had to do
most of his acting through
his chin (obscured by the
RoboCop suit), Kinnaman
is a considerably stronger
force, raging at his dehu-
manization. The fine


Joel Kinnaman, left, and
Gary Oldman are pictured
in a scene from "RoboCop."
Associated Press


Australian actress Abbie
Cornish lends the other-
wise metallic film a few
moments of fleshy warmth.
What leaves an impres-
sion in "RoboCop?" It's
Keaton's trim and affable
CEO. He and his cohorts
make for one of the most
accurate portraits of cor-
porate villainy, not be-
cause they're diabolical,
but because they don't
think they're doing any-
thing wrong. Keaton, a too
seldom seen motor-mouth
energy, plays Sellars as an
executive simply remov-
ing obstacles (ethics, sci-
entific prudence, public
safety) to accomplish
what the corporation de-
mands. The film's best
moment is Baruchel cow-
ing and explaining he's
"just in marketing."


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V LET US F
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ON THE SCENE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C3


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WEEKEND
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WRAP


Saturday

Art show at park Saturday
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park Arts &
Crafts Show will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday inside
the park's Visitor Center
The event will take place, rain or shine. Admission is
free.
Original artwork and craft items, including paintings,
prints, cards, photography, decorative items, books and
more will be offered. All participating artists will donate
items for door prizes.
For more information, call 352-628-5343, ext 1002.

Music and Movie in the park
The city of Crystal River is inviting everyone out to
King's Bay Park for music and a movie on Saturday
Phantastic Sounds will kick things off at 4 p.m. in the
city's new bandshell, followed by a showing of Disney's
"Enchanted" at 6 p.m. Bring blankets or chairs. The park
is located at 268 N.W Third Street


Event planned to honor memory
of 'Grandmother' Van Ness
In honor of Eloise "Grandmother" Van Ness, Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center will host an event to
show her community service legacy continues through
her horse, "Lady"
"Lady" was donated to Soquili Stables last year and
has the new stable name "Elisi," which is Cherokee for
grandmother Most of the horses in Soquili Stables have
Cherokee stable names to promote American Heritage
that is taught within a leadership and teamwork atmos-
phere. Elisi is currently in the Camp Soquili and Club
Soquili programs. Grandmother was known for her gen-
erosity and leadership with youths.
The event to honor Van Ness will be Saturday, Feb. 15,
at Soquili Stables, 10970 W Bentbow Path, Crystal River,
and will include barbecue prepared by M&B Dairy and
equine demonstrations from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Proceeds
from the barbecue will be used for sponsorship of youths
and Camp Soquili for 2014.
Camp Soquili, a day camp, welcomes six campers a
week during June and July to learn equine skills.
The suggested donation is $10 in advance and $15 at
the event
For more information, call 352-206-2990.


Nature Coast Friends of the Blues


Feel and hear the blues Saturday in Homosassa museum


Get the word out


Nonprofit organiza-
tions are invited to submit
news releases about up-
coming community events.
Write the name of the
event, who sponsors it,
when and where it will take


place and other
details.
Include a contact
name and phone number
to be printed in the paper
News releases are
subject to editing.


The Nature Coast Friends of
the Blues will host two guitarists
at its 2 p.m. concert Saturday,
Feb. 15.
Ben Medrano and Jeff Hess
will play Southern-influenced
rock with a dose of blues at the
Museum Cafe, on Yulee Drive,
Homosassa.


Medrano studied classical gui-
tar and had a well-known band
in California before moving
here. Hess, originally from Long
Island, has been writing songs
for four years and recently re-
leased his first CD. These two
musicians are part of the Moc-
casin Slough Band, with a wide


range of covers and
originals.
The opening act Ben Meeks
and Charles McDavid -will
play at 1 p.m.
The Museum Cafe is at 10466
W Yulee Drive. Admission is $7.
For information call 352-628-
1081.


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MAMA'S KUNTRY KAFE
S "Home of the Large Portions"
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Next to
" _nABC Liquor


I Serving the Finest

S& Freshest Seafood
All You Can Eal Catfish Shrimp
S Florida Galor Frog Legs Oyslers

SAnd Citrus County's Best Open Flame Grilled
Thick Juicy Sleaks Pork Chops
^p Tender Chicken Breasts
Come v'il ui eow cond Io(dlion on ihe
tSi jf', qudle in Hi-idik Downiown Inveiness
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FRIDAY 2 Eggs"
Prime Rib Smoked Sausage,
me Rib Hashbrowns & Toast
$' 79s5 $495
w/choice of potato & veggie With coupon. Expires 2/16/14 :
352-28-96 MON-FRI 6 AM 7 PM
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All served with coleslaw, sweet corn fritters and potato.
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STUFFED PEPPERS with French Fries, Salad & Dessert
GYRO with French Fries & Dessert
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ARCHANGEL MICHAEL
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4705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, Florida
(352) 527-0766
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One complimentary glass of wine with each eat-in meal.

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SLeave Name, Phone Number and a Brief Message
Greek astlryIte KmsHvalaleFo Sle


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Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-9pm, Fri. & Sat. 4pm-lOpm, .
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Moist yellow genoise fresh pineapple mousse, layered pineapple
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Three layers of delicious dark, milk & white chocolate. Individually
prepared and topped with chocolate curls.
Enjoy a FREE glass of wine with your choice of entree.


__ _


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Theater
Central Florida Lyric Opera's
2013-14 series. All performances at
Paul P. Williams Fine Arts Audito-
rium, 9501 U.S. 441 and College
Drive, Leesburg. $15 and up. 352-
753-3229 or centralfloridalyric
opera.org.
"Barber of Seville," 3 p.m.
Feb. 16.

Arts & Crafts
Citrus Watercolor Club an-
nual show and sale, 9 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. Feb. 22 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Feb. 23 at Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park 4150 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa. 352-628-
7760 or citruswatercolorclub.com.
Stoneridge Snowbirds exhibi-
tion, through February at Lakes Re-
gion Library, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Art Teacher Art show, on dis-
play through Feb. 28 at the Old
Courthouse museum in Inverness.
Featured artists include Jinny Brew,
Dave Brown, Jack Calbeck, Cory
Collins, D.J. Collins, Brenda Dalton,
Keith Gum, Holly Herndon, Polly
Hilgert, Bonnie Ignico, Phillip Jour-
ney, Karol Kusmaul, Joy Livingston,
Grace Kelly Maronowski, Anthony
Mason, Lee Partin, Connie Phillips,
Bill Rubar, Diana Schmidt, Michele
Wirt, Allie Wright and Jinnie Zuniga.
Art includes pottery, drawings,
quilted fabric art, paintings, mixed
media and sculpture.
All Day Art Club, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Tuesday, Old Homosassa
Civic Center, 5530 S. Mason Creek
Drive, be-hind the fire station. $10.
Bring supplies. Intermediate and ad-
vanced artists welcome. 352-795-
8774.
Art Center Crafters Group,
noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Art Center
of Citrus County, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave., Hernando. 352-400-4466.
Members bring their own crafts to
work on each week.
Floral City Crafters, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Tuesday, Floral City Com-
munity Hall next to library. Come for
a few hours or for the day. 352-560-
7668.
Citrus Springs Fun Arts &
Crafts Group, first and third Mon-
days each month. 352-489-2313.
Sandhill Crane Chapter of the
Embroiderers' Guild of America,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical Presby-
terian Church, 200 Mount Fair Ave.,
Brooksville. Bring lunch. 352-621-
6680 (Citrus), 352-666-8350
(Hernando).

Art classes
Watercolor classes with in-
structor Pat Sistrand, 9 a.m. Tues-
days, Citrus Springs Community
Center. $10. citruscountyfl.org, click
on Parks & Recreation to register.
352-465-7007.
Pen and ink with oil rouging
and watercolor batiks. Instructor
Lois Owens. $20 plus some materi-
als. Beginners welcome; completed
piece every week. Classes every
Saturday at Scrap and Stamp Art
Studio in Crystal River Mall, 352-
3824911.
Art Quilt class, 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Tuesday at Whispering Pines
Park community building. Instructor
Karol Kusmaul. Complete land-
scapes, portraits and still lifes. $80
for eight weeks. 352-344-0779.
Lorna Jean Gallery art classes:
Learn to Draw for ages 6 to
adult. $15 for group lessons. Ages 6


ON THE SCENE


to 11,4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday
and 11 a.m. to noon Saturday. Ages
12 to 18,4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday.
Adult classes 11 a.m. to noon Tues-
day and Wednesday.
Watercolor Painting for Begin-
ners, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday. $15 per session. Four
students per session. 352-564-2781.
Art & craft classes for children
ages 6 to 10, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Saturday and 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Ages 11 to 16, 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. $60 per
month. Materials included. Classes
limited to eight students. 352-564-
2781.
Learn to design and create
sterling silver jewelry, 1:30 p.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday in four-week inter-
vals. $140 for four weeks. Materials
and use of tools included. 352-564-
2781.
Voice lessons. Ages 10 to adult,
by appointment. $15 per lesson.
352-564-2781.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at 6136 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
352-564-2781.
Jewelry making, 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. first and third Tuesdays at Cit-
rus Springs Community Center,
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd. In-
structor Marcia Balonis. $15. 352-
465-7007 or citruscountyparks.com.
Silk Painting Sampler, 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Feb. 22, followed
by potluck lunch. Variety of tech-
niques with dyes on fabric. $45; ma-
terials included. Class in Beverly
Hills; Space limited. Jan Hitchcock
at ozziehitchcock@yahoo.co.uk or
352-613-6746.
The Florida Artists Gallery,
historic Knight House, 8219
Orange Ave., Floral City, offers
art classes. 352-344-9300.
Floridaartistsgallery.com.
February classes:
Advanced Fearless Painting
with Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with
lunch noon to 1 p.m. Monday, Feb.
24. Instructor Susi LaForsch. Limited
to four students. $55 per workshop;
bring materials. laforsch@
tampabay.rr.com, 352-726-8710 or
352-344-9300.
Wire-wrapped Cabochon (pen-
dant) Class, 1 p.m. Feb. 15. Instruc-
tor Lynda Ryan. Students will
produce wire-wrapped semiprecious
gemstone pendant. Bring flat-nose
and round-nose pliers and
flush/close cutters. $45 includes ma-
terials. 352-344-9300. Class size
limited.
Copper Viking knit bracelet
class, 1 p.m. Feb. 22. Instructor
Lynda Ryan. Students will learn the
fundamentals of Viking knit using
round copper wire. Bring chain-nose
pliers, wire cutters and a multi-hole
draw plate if you have them. $45 in-
cludes materials. 352-344-9300.
Class size limited to six students.
Gelatin Art Class for Beginners,
1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Feb.
17. Instructor Bonnie Peterson. Par-
ticipants will learn about gelatin as
an art form, then create gelatin flow-
ers. $45 includes materials. Bring in-
sulated lunch bag and small ice
pack. Limited to six students. 352-
344-9300.
Beginner Watercolor, 9 a.m. to
12 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20 and 27.
Instructor Jude Caborn. Students
will learn basic watercolor tech-
niques. $18 per workshop if register-
ing in advance or for all four
sessions; $20 per session other-
wise. Students should supply materi-
als. 352-344-9300.
Ongoing classes:
Painting with Acrylics, 1 to 3
p.m. every Friday. Instructor Connie


Townsend. For beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@aol.com.
Painting with Oils, 1 to 3 p.m.
every Tuesday. Instructor Connie
Townsend. For beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@aol.com.
Photography Critique Session,
1 to 3 p.m., second Thursday
monthly. Instructor Larry Jordan. Cri-
tique of images. $10 per year. 352-
344-0518.
The gallery is open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Satur-
days, and noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Sundays. 352-344-9300 or flori-
daartistsgallery.com.
Photographic vision, a pho-
tography class, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 15 and 29, April 12 and 26
and May 10 and 24 at the Franklin
Anderson Gallery of Arts, 659 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. Instructor
Rebecca Pujals-Jones. $250; $230
if registering by March 1. To register,
call 352-697-2702 or email
kmanderson04@tampabay.rr.com.

Mueums
Olde Mill House Gallery &
Printing Museum "Pulp to Print"
workshops, 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 22
at 10466 W. Yulee Drive, Old Ho-
mosassa. Instructors are master
printer Jim Anderson. $60 per three-
hour class. Lunch available in Mu-
seum Cafe from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. 352-628-9411.
geminigraphics30@yahoo.com.

Music
Jim Scott, acoustic guitar, 2
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22 at the Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalist Church,
7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Adults $10; children $5. 352-489-
3545.
Nature Coast Community
Band's Fifth Anniversary Concert,
2:30 p.m. March 1 at the Citrus
Springs Community Center, 1570 W.
Citrus Springs Blvd., and March 2 at
Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100
W. Highland Ave., Inverness. Free.

Dance
Beginners' line dancing
classes. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday
at Central Citrus Community Center,
2804 W. Mark Knighton Court,
Lecanto. $3. Instructor Cher Mason.
Closed-toe shoes preferred.
socdancer.org. 352-527-5993.
Social ballroom dance
classes with June Queripel,
Wednesday at the Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto. Dance ba-
sics at 1:30 p.m. and advanced at
2:45 p.m. $5. 352-527-5993 or 352-
795-3831.
Sumter Singles and Couples
dinner dance, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
the first and third Fridays monthly at
Allan O'Neal sings and dee-
jays first Saturday of the month at
Citrus County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
For information, call Linda at 352-
464-0004. Dance tickets are avail-
able for July 6. Dances are from 6 to
10 p.m. Free dance lesson at 5 p.m.
$10 at the door, includes hot and
cold hors d'oeuvres, soft drink or
coffee.
Sunday Night Dances every
week at Knights of Columbus, 2389
W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Lecanto.
Doors open at 6 p.m. Music starts at
7 p.m. Coffee, tea and soda avail-
able.
Line dancing classes with
Kathy Reynolds, 1 to 3:30 p.m.


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C5


Tuesday, East Citrus Community
Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness. $3 per class. 352-
344-9666.
Inverness Square Dance
Club's beginner square dance les-
sons, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday,
East Citrus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, east of In-
verness on State Road 44. 352-860-
2090 or 352-465-700.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday,
Beverly Hills Recreation Center. $3
nonmembers. 352-746-4882 or 352-
527-3738.
Let's Dance! 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Thursday. Entertainment by Bill
Castner; instruction by Rita Hobbs.
Crystal River Mall, 1801 N.W. U.S.
19. Free.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m. Thurs-
days, fellowship hall of First United
Methodist Church of Dunnellon,
21501 W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.
352-489-1785 or 352-465-2142.
Spirit of Citrus Dances. All
dances 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Kellner
Auditorium Jewish Center, 92 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, unless other-
wise indicted, socdancer.org.
Social ballroom dancing held
second and fourth Saturdays
monthly. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.
Complimentary dance lesson at 7
p.m. General dancing from 7:30 to
10 p.m. Admission $6 for members
and $9 for non-members. Ice and
coffee provided. Sodas and bottled
water may be purchased. Call Barb
or Jack at 352-344-1383 or JoAnn at
352-746-4274.
Ballroom and general danc-
ing on the second and last Satur-
days of each month at Unity Church
Lecanto, 2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Ballroom dancing begins at
6 p.m. and general dancing at 7 p.m.
352-746-1270.

Special Interest
"Creating a Novel Bootcamp"
writing workshop feat. Loretta C.
Rogers, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 22 at
the Hampton Inn, 1103 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. $35 for Sun-
shine State Romance Authors mem-
bers; $45 for non-members. Lunch,
drink and dessert included. Seating
limited. 352-726-0162.
College of Central Florida Inter-
national Film Series at Building 8,
Room 110 of the CF Ocala Campus,
3001 S.W. College Road, Ocala.
Free.
Feb. 25- "Still Walking," 7 p.m.

Farmers' markets
Inverness Farmers' Market,
about 30 vendors, fresh produce,
homemade crafts, baked goods and
more, summer hours are 9 a.m. to 1
p.m., first and third Saturdays, Inver-
ness Government Center parking
lot. 352-726-2611.
Herry's Market Day, 8 a.m. to
noon, last Saturday of the month at
Hospice Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W.
Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa (be-
hind Wendy's, east of U.S. 19).
Herry's Market Day is offering free
vendor space. Space is limited. 352-
527-2020.
Beverly Hills Arts, Crafts and
Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Friday at Lake Beverly Park.
Vendor spaces $5. bhcivicassocia-
tion.com. 352-746-2657.
West End Market at the Crys-
tal River Mall, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. the
fourth Saturday of every month.
Features fresh produce, plants and
other local food-related items, as
well as handmade arts and crafts.
Air-conditioned. 352-795-2585.


Music rehearsals
IN-COUNTY
Second Sunday Sunset Drum
Circle, two hours before sunset,
Sunday, Fort Island Trail Beach
Park, Crystal River, at far end of
beach. Circle begins an hour and a
half before sunset. Bring drums and
percussion instruments. Chair nec-
essary; beverages optional. 352-
344-8009 or 352-746-0655.
Chorus of The Highlands, the
Citrus County chapter of the Barber-
shop Harmony Society, rehearses at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday weekly at First
United Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness,
34452. Male singers welcome. 352-
382-0336.
Citrus County chapter of
"Chorus of the Highlands" Bar-
bershop Harmony Society, 6:30
p.m. every Tuesday in Inverness.
352-382-0336.
The Nature Coast Community
Band, rehearses from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. Tuesday at First United
Methodist Church Fellowship Hall,
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road
(County Road 581). 352-746-7567.
nccommunityband@earthlink.net or
naturecoastcommunityband.com.
Citrus Community
Concert Choir Inc. rehearse at
7 p.m. Tuesday at Faith Lutheran
Church Fellowship Hall, Lecanto.
New members welcome to audition
beginning at 6:30 p.m. 352-212-
1746.
Sugarmill Chorale rehearses
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in
room 102 of the Sunday School
building at First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa,
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
sugarmillchoraledirector@
yahoo.com. 352-634-2688.

OUT-OF-COUNTY
Hernando Harmonizers, part
of Men's Barbershop Harmony Soci-
ety, opens doors at 6:45 p.m. and
starts rehearsals at 7 p.m. Monday,
Nativity Lutheran Church fellowship
hall, 6363 Commercial Way, Spring
Hill. Written arrangements, training
techniques and professional
direction provided. 352-556-3936
or 352-666-0633.
BASSharmonySingR@aol.com.
Summer Springs Sweet Ade-
lines Chorus invites women to re-
hearse from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Monday
in Ascension Lutheran Church, 5730
28th Street at Baseline Road, Ocala.
Membership not required. Carpool
available from Inverness.
Nella at 352-637-5162 or
summerspringschorus.com.
Nature Coast Festival
Singers' rehearsals, 7 p.m. Mon-
days, Nativity Lutheran Church,
6363 Commercial Way (State Road
50), Weeki Wachee. 352-597-2235.
Marion Civic Chorale re-
hearses from 6:45 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days at St. George Anglican
Cathedral, 5646 S.E. 28th St.,
Ocala. 352-342-1796 or 352-537-
0207. wayne@fumcocala.org.
The Central Florida Master
Choir is auditioning for all voices,
particularly tenors and basses. Re-
hearsals at 7 p.m. Tuesday at
Countryside Presbyterian Church,
7768 State Road 200, in Ocala. 352-
615-7677.
The Ocala Accordion Club,
meets and performs the last
Wednesday monthly, Cherrywood
Club House, 6253 S.W. 100th Loop,
Ocala. 352-854-6236.
FLACCASSOC@bellsouth.net.
www.accordions.com/florida.


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-h. li- Ti] [ ] ".ilii -1. Ii
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Page C6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Music, barbecue
coming to Arrowhead
The Arrowhead community is
planning its Stomping in the
Swamp the eighth annual blue-
grass and barbecue event -
Feb. 22.
Admission is free and the event
will go on rain or shine.
The concession stand opens at
the community center at noon,
serving strawberry shortcake,
with music starting at 1 p.m. The
concert will be off State Road 200
and Stokes Ferry Road; turn at
Red's Restaurant and follow the
signs.
The bands will include Rye
Whiskey, Sugar Hill Dulcimer
Gang and Country Blend. Those
attending should bring a chair
For more information, call 352-
637-4335.

Knights Ladies plan
Bunco Bonanza
The Ladies Auxiliary Knights
of Columbus Council 6168 will
hold a Bunco Bonanza on
Tuesday at the Knights of Colum-
bus Hall, 2389 W Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto.
Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Two
levels of play will be featured -
competitive for seasoned players
and a social level for others.
The $12 ticket includes a
brunch. Door prizes, raffle prizes
and cash prizes will be awarded.
Reservations must be made in
advance by call Bernita Becker at
352-344-0235.

Mission in Citrus
giveaway this weekend
The Mission in Citrus Homeless
Shelters will have another free
giveaway event today and Satur-
day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 2472
and 2488 N. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Crystal River
No resellers allowed. The
giveaway is to help all those truly
in need. Those trying to take
large loads will be turned away
Items include goods from Bed,
Bath & Beyond, Home Depot, Big
Lots, Walgreens and CVS, the
Community Food Bank and many
more.
For more information about the
Mission and its services, call 352-
794-3825 or 352-270-4357.

Barbershoppers seek
more male singers
The Citrus County Chapter
"Chorus of the Highlands" of the
Barbershop Harmony Society
seeks men to join the group.
The chorus meets at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday in Inverness.
Call 352-382-0336 for more
information.

A Humane Society
CENTRAL FLA.


'It's Hip to Snip'



Spay, neuteringproject ongoing during February


Special to the Chronicle

The February "It's Hip to
Snip" package for Citrus
County residents is
under way
This program is provided
by SnippetCitrus, Humani-
tarians of Florida and Citrus
County Animal Services and
helps those who need finan-
cial assistance to spay/


neuter their pets.
Presently, more than 400
dogs and cats have been
scheduled.
The dog surgery dates are
filled through March, so dogs
are not presently being
scheduled. Cats will con-
tinue to be scheduled in
February until funds run out
or all the surgery times are
filled.


If enough donations come
in, the group will try to do an
event again in the spring.
Become a sponsor, make a
financial donation and be
listed on SnippetCitrus.com.
Donations can be addressed
to SnippetCitrus and mailed
to PO. Box 4533 Homosassa,
FL 34447.
For information call 352-
503-3237.


Party with Bavarian band


Special to t he Chronicle
The German American Social Club of West Central Florida invites everyone to its spring
dance from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway (Count Road 486) in Lecanto. Doors open at noon. Enjoy live music and
dancing offered by the Diepolder Brothers, Sepp and Heinz. Admission is $10 and includes
finger sandwiches, dessert and coffee. BYOB. For tickets, call Horst Spangenberg at
352-237-7016 or email lrmhorst@aol.com. No tickets will be sold at the door.


Drive well to drive free


Louie


Special to the Chronicle
Louie the cock-a-poo is a 4-year-old
special-needs dog who gets around
extremely well, even though he
has advanced cataracts. He is so
smart he moves around the house
and fenced yard with no difficulty.
He is a beautiful black-on-white-
patched young neutered male, is
house trained, sweet and loving
and is a great companion. No
children. His foster mom will show
him to interested parties; call 352-
527-9050. A Humane Society of
Central FL Pet Rescue Inc. does
home visits prior to adoptions, so
can only adopt in the Citrus
County area. The group will have
several small dogs for adoption
from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday at
the Pet Supermarket in Inverness.
If you have a little dog looking for
a good home, call 352-527-9050
and leave you name and phone
number for a return phone call.
Visit www.petfinder.com, ZIP code
34465, and www.AHumaneSociety
PetRescue.com.


Special to the Chronicle
From left: Ronnie Rozier, general sales manager at Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln, Crystal River;
Stephanie St. Clair, Women of Sugarmill Woods Schoolastic Golf Tournament chairwoman;
and Sandy Partin, Women of Sugarmill Woods fundraising director, stand in front of a 2014
Lincoln MKZ. The first woman to score a hole-in-one on a designated par 3 hole during the
Schoolastic Classic Golf Tournament can win a paid two-year lease on a new Lincoln MKZ.
The tournament, which benefits the club's scholarship fund, will be Monday, Feb. 24, at
Sugamill Woods Country Club. It is open to the public. Call Stephanie at 352-503-3023
for information.



AARP to offer Safe Driving courses


Special to the Chronicle

Florida is a mandated
state and any insurance
company doing business in
Florida must give a discount
to those completing an
AARP Safe Driving Course,
open to everyone age 50 and
older
Update yourself to earn a
discount and learn about
newly enacted motor vehicle
and traffic laws. Course fee
is $15 for AARP members;
$20 for all others. Call the
listed instructor to register:
Crystal River, Homosassa,
Homosassa Springs
Monday and Tuesday,
Feb. 17 and 18, 9 a.m. to
noon, St. Benedict Church
Parish Hall, 455 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River Call Pat
Hubbell at 352-586-2731.
Tuesday and Wednesday,


March 18 and 19, ito 4 p.m.,
Coastal Region Library, 8619
W Crystal St., Crystal River
Call Lou Harmin at 352-
564-0933.
Wednesday and Thurs-
day, March 19 and 20, 9 a.m.
to noon, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W
Bradshaw Blvd., Homosassa.
Call Frank Tobin at 352-
628-3229.
Monday and Tuesday,
March 24 and 25, 9 a.m. to
noon, St. Benedict Church
Parish Hall, 455 S Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River Call Pat
Hubbell at 352-586-2731.
Inverness, Hernando,
Floral City
Tuesday and Wednesday,
Feb. 18 and 19, 9 a.m. to
noon, Inverness Elks Lodge,
3580 Lemon St., Hernando.
Call Bob Dicker at 352-
527-2366.


Tuesday and Wednesday,
March 4 and 5, 9 a.m. to
noon, Citrus Memorial
Health System Auditorium.
Call Don Slough at 352-
344-4003.
Tuesday and Wednesday,
March 18 and 19, 9 a.m. to
noon, Inverness Elks Lodge,
3580 Lemon St., Hernando.
Call Bob Dicker at 352-
527-2366.
Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs
Wednesday and Thurs-
day, Feb. 26 and 27, 10 a.m. to
1 p.m., Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W Roosevelt Blvd,
Beverly Hills. Call Joe Turck
at 352-628-6764.
Wednesday and Thurs-
day, March 26 and 27, 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W Roosevelt Blvd,
Beverly Hills. Call Joe Turck
at 352-628-6764.


NEWS NOTES

Social Security basics
topic of program
Are you the parent or guardian
of a person with developmental
disabilities? If so, you will proba-
bly have to navigate through the
Social Security bureaucracy
Help is available. Cindy Drew,
from the Agency for Persons with
Disabilities (APD), has been in-
vited to speak about Social Secu-
rity benefits and work.
The presentation is open to the
public and will be at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at the Key Center
Foundation offices at 5399 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway (State
Road 44), Lecanto, next to the
Thrift Store.
For more information, call
Stephanie Hopper at 352-
344-0288.

Winter Golf Classic
for Special Olympics
The second annual Winter Golf
Classic for Special Olympics
Florida will be Saturday March 8,
at Seven Rivers Golf & Country
Club, 7395 W Pinebrook St., Crys-
tal River Registration begins at
7 a.m. Shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m.
Cost is $65 per person or $260
per four-person team. Mulligans:
three for $15; maximum of 12 per
team. 50/50 tickets will be sold:
one for $1 or six for $5.
For information, call 352-746-
3262, ext 231, or 352-422-0819 or
email duane.dustin@gmail.com.

Political network
schedules speaker
The Women's Political Network
of Citrus County will meet at noon
Tuesday at Joe's Family Restau-
rant in Inverness.
The speaker will be Inverness
businesswoman Kathy Thrum-
ston, who is an activist on chil-
dren's issues.
She will speak on child advo-
cacy and report what is happen-
ing in Tallahassee.
Everyone is invited men and
women. Household goods and hy-
giene products for the residents
of CASA are collected at the
meeting.
For information, call Rosalie
Matt at 352-746-7143.

Art Center Camera
Club to meet Monday
The Citrus County Art Center
Camera Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Monday at 2644 N. Annapolis Ave.
in Hernando at the intersection
of County Road 486 and
Annapolis Avenue.
The meeting will be a competi-
tion night and the theme will be
"Planes, Trains and Automo-
biles." Competitions are typically
the first Monday of the month, but
this one was moved to accommo-
date a guest speaker
Each member will be able to
submit up to three entries, only
one each of a plane, train and
automobile. Two entries in one
category are not acceptable; for
example, two photos of a plane,
train or automobile.
Each competition creates a
great deal of interest and the club
has the opportunity to see
outstanding photos from the
membership.
First-time visitors are welcome.

Artist's presentation
rescheduled to Feb. 21
Due to a death in the family, the
dinner presentation by painter
Suzette Urs scheduled for tonight
at the Florida Artists Gallery will
be postponed until Friday,
Feb. 21.
Although the presentation,
"You Radical Sweetheart," was
geared for Valentine's Day, the
Feb. 21 event will still include a
Valentine's Day treat
A few places at the by-reserva-
tion dinner are still available for
$25 per person. Dinner will begin
at 6 p.m. with Urs speaking at
7p.m.
The Florida Artists Gallery and
Cafe are in the historic Knight
House at 8219 Orange Ave, in
Floral City
The gallery and cafe are open
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a
week. For reservations for the
Feb. 21 dinner and presentation,
call 352-344-9300. For more infor-
mation, go to www.floridaartists


gallerycom.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Art show to be staged
at park Saturday
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park Arts &
Crafts Show will be from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday inside the park's
Visitor Center
The event will take place, rain
or shine. Admission is free.
Original artwork and craft
items, including paintings, prints,
cards, photography, decorative
items, books and more will be of-
fered. All participating artists will
donate items for door prizes.
For more information, call 352-
628-5343, ext. 1002.

Feel, hear the blues
at Homosassa cafe
The Nature Coast Friends of the
Blues will host two guitarists at its
2 p.m. concert Saturday
Ben Medrano and JeffHess will
play Southern-influenced rock
with a dose of blues at the Mu-
seum Cafe, on Yulee Drive, Ho-
mosassa.
Medrano studied classical gui-
tar and had a well-known band in
California before moving here.
Hess, originally from Long Island,
has been writing songs for four
years and recently released his
first CD. These two musicians are
part of the Moccasin Slough Band,
with a wide range of covers and
originals.
The opening act Ben Meeks
and Charles McDavid will play
at 1 p.m.
The Museum Cafe is at 10466 W
Yulee Drive. Admission is $7. For
information, call 352-628-1081.

Chassahowitzka
yard sale is Saturday
A yard sale will be held from
8 a.m. to 3p.m. Saturday at the
community center, 10300 S.
Riviera Drive, Chassahowitzka
(old fire house).
Contacts are Russ and Mary
Duncan, who can be reached at
352-503-9096 or via email to
rduncan34@tampabayrr.com
The association works toward
the betterment of the Chassahow-
itzka community and its residents.
Youth facilities and programs,
adult fitness and facilities, com-
munity social events, Chassahow-
itzka history preservation and
promotion and support of local
recreational and environmental
issues are some of the priorities.
To contact or get on the email
mailing list, email chassahowitzka
@outlook.com.

Ridge Masons now
meet in Floral City
Ridge Masonic Lodge No.398
has moved from Homosassa to
Floral City and shares the build-
ing with Floral City Lodge No. 133,
8350 E. Orange Ave.
Ridge Masonic Lodge No.398
meets the second Monday of the
month at 10:30 a.m. For more
information, visit www. citrus
shrineclub.com.

Make reservations now
for card party
The Women of Sugarmill Woods
will host its next military card
party on Monday at Sugarmill
Woods Country Club.
Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with
cards being dealt at 1 p.m. The
cost to play is $12 per player
Prizes will be awarded to the top
three scoring teams, and the
"lucky loser" team will also re-
ceive a special prize. Snacks and
nonalcoholic beverages will be
served. Share-the-pot raffles will
also be included in the day's
events.
Make reservations no later than
today by calling Sandie Warren at
352-382-0736 or Judi Bailey at
352-464-4380.

Elks Ladies schedule
annual flea market
The West Citrus Ladies of the
Elks will present its annual flea
market from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, at the lodge,
7890 W Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Proceeds benefit charities
supported by the Elks Ladies.
To donate items, call Bonnie
Lee at 352-382-0211.


Have dinner to help
Special Olympics
Special Olympics will host a
spaghetti dinner fundraiser from
noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at
the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408
Homosassa Trail, County Road
490 East, Homosassa.
Cost of dinner is $7 for adults
and $4 for children and includes
all-you-can-eat spaghetti, meat-
balls, chicken, salad bar and
dessert. There will be music and
prizes.
For information, call Irene at
the Pooch Parlor at 352-795-5896.


Tractor Supply award



4-H district thanks

Homosassa business
.._.. ........... .. ........- -:
for its assistance

Special to the Chronicle
The Homosassa Tractor Supply Co.
(TSC) store was recently recognized for
winning the Paper Clover District Cham-
pion award for being the store with the
highest transaction percentage in the dis-
trict during the 4-H/TSC Fall 2013 Paper
Clover Promotion.
Store employees at the Homosassa
TSC store had the highest transaction
percentage in their district to include a
4-H Paper Clover purchase and were pre-
sented with a certificate and ribbon from
4-H to recognize the achievement.
The 4-H/TSC Paper Clover Campaign is
a nationwide, in-store fundraiser that
benefits 4-H programming in the commu-
nities where a TSC store is located. The
fall campaign raised more than $600,000
to support 4-H on the local, state and
national levels.
During the 12-day promotion, which
ran Oct. 9 through 20, the Homosassa TSC
raised $519 for 4-H in Citrus County.
The effort has provided direct support
for local camps, after-school programs
and other activities and has granted
scholarships to these events, where
youths can explore their interests in
everything from animal science to Special to the Chronicle
robotics. Marnie Ward, left, UF/IFAS Extension Citrus County 4-H agent, presents Chad Eckard
For information, visit wwwtractor of Tractor Supply with a certificate of achievement for winning the Paper Clover
supplycom/4h. District Champion award.



News from the Homosassa area



COMMUNITY


Bubbles ready for Valentine visitors


Special to the Chronicle
Bubbles, the manatee welcoming visitors at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, has a new look for Valentine's Day.
Park volunteers Bob and Chris Matijas, pictured, used their creativity to fashion a cupid's bow and arrow and two Valentine hearts to
dress Bubbles up for the occasion. Bob volunteers in the wildlife care and maintenance departments, while Chris works in wildlife
care and is one of the park's diver volunteers and keeps the Fish Bowl windows squeaky clean.




Busy, bookish buddies


Homosassa Library

Friends elect officers,

get ready for spring sale

Special to the Chronicle
The Friends of the Homosassa Library
had fun, elections and planned a new
book sale at its Jan. 9 meeting.
The group's annual meeting was an en-
tertaining event with Capt. Jon Semmes
extolling in song and story the beauty of
Florida rivers and the importance of
keeping our springs in good condition.
He pointed out that the springs are "a
fountain where protection begins." Using
native plants and grasses and using less
water and nitrates on lawns is good prac-
tice, he told the group.
The newly elected board of directors
for 2014 and 2015 are: Nancy Everett,
president; Dee Koehn, vice-president;
Victoria Budd, secretary; Jean Becker,
treasurer; and Diane Gapczynski, Mark
Joyce, Carol Pellegrine, Sharon
Ringsrud, Lana Schlosser and Cathy
Trask.
The next Friends event is the Nearly
Spring Book Sale at the Homosassa Li-
brary slated Feb. 27, 28 and March 1.


Special to the Chronicle
Friends of the Homosassa Library will have its book sale Feb. 28 and 29 and March 1 at
2100 Grandmarch Ave. On Feb. 28, the sale will be from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., while the
following two days will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be gently used books,
DVDs, CDs and puzzles. Proceeds are donated to the Homosassa Library and help
provide for its collection, children's materials and supplies for the many programs and
workshops the library provides. The $5-a-bag sale will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 1.
For more information, visit citruslibraries.org.


Donations are needed.
To donate gently used books, CDs,
DVDs, puzzles or games, bring them to


the library or call Nancy Everett at 352-
382-2440 or Jean Becker at 352-503-6385
for pickup.


COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D11.: Conmcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/II F H 6:00 6:30 7:001 7:30 8:00 8:30 1 9:00 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
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] WFm ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Be My Valentine, SharkTank'PG'm' 20/20 (N) (In Stereo) Eyewit. Jimmy
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169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Alan Arkin. 'G' c Dean, Julie Harris.'PG' cBetsy Blair. 'NR'
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WO A 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother IMother Mother IMother Mother IMother Mother IMother


North 02-14-14
4 -
V Q 7
A 10 9 7 6 4 3
4 8743
West East
KJ742 Q 6 5 3
IK1094 V 8 3 2
2 J 85
4,AJ2 4 K 6 5
South
A 10 9 8
V A J 6 5
KQ
4 Q 10 9
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
3 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 4

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Mae West said, "It is better to be looked over
than overlooked."
She was no doubt talking about the female of
the species, but she could also have had in
mind cards played at the bridge table. Experi-
enced defenders transmit information with al-
most all of the cards they play, especially early
in the deal.
In this deal, South is in three no-trump. West
leads his fourth-highest spade. How should the
play proceed?
Declarer took East's spade queen with his
ace, cashed the diamond king, and continued
with the diamond queen. He was hoping the
jack would appear, allowing him to run for
home. However, when West discarded the
heart four at trick three, South had to regroup.
Declarer needed a dummy entry, so had to
find West with the heart king. At trick four,
South led a low heart
West won with his king and cashed the spade
king: club, spade three, nine. West continued
with the spade jack: club, spade five, 10. Suit-
ably deceived, West led another spade. South
won with his eight, played a heart to dummy's
queen, and ran the diamonds to collect an
overtrick.
"How could I have known?" asked West.
East pointed out that on the second round of
spades, he gave "remaining count." Here, be-
cause he had three cards left, he dropped the
lowest one. If instead he had still held 8-6-5-3,
he would have played the six under West's king
and the three under the jack.
West after cashing the spade jack, should, in
desperation, have shifted to his club two,
which would have resulted in down two.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ROSVI

2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC 5
All Rights Reserved
LURYT



LANMHYOE |



GUNHOE __


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

It was fun
reivinour What a great
first date. way to end a
S perfect day.


'.f V -





2

THE COUPLF'5
VALENTINE'5 PAY
WA5 ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here:( j I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DIVOT LOGIC FIRMLY ENGAGE
SAnswer: The start-up clock company would be suc-
cessful-ALL IN GOOD TIME


ACROSS
1 Plant kingdom
6 Range
11 Sunspot
phenomenon
13 Mr. Richie
14 Insurance
workers
15 Shining
brightly
16 Incite Rover
17 III. neighbor
18 Got the
trophy
21 Has
misgivings
23 Practical joke
26 Clean water
org,
27 Southern and
Blyth
28 Plucky
29 Sniffs out
31 Orange flower
32 Hog's sound
33 Flour infesters
35 Pitcher
handles


Advance,
as money
Before
marriage
Compass pt.
Major artery
Watchdog's
warning
Veld grazer
New Haven
student
Nasal sounds
Cabbie's fares
Zoo building
Noisy sleeper
"Back to the
Future" role
It's made from
sand
DOWN


Answer to Previous Puzzle


2Tlzl CI5&A
DOMINEERNIAN
IOU A v A IN
IMPAIR LUNGE



RE[Ts TIE
GET ASO II IE R
LIMOS IVT AN
TIA TINAMEYRE
D[IVA 0OGILEMU PIS
ZONE P A[MS
L EA F D IAWJN
IAITsED.U]IT IES
MARE 101ILEIRY
ASTIA OBOE CONN
D A H SFPITIT PTHEIE


Air safety org. 6 Roadside
Wheel nut guides
Pay dirt 7 Snowy
Guidryand 8 1300 hours
Howard 9 Potpie veggie
Archeologist's 10 Shade tree
find 12 Climb


Wildlife
refuges
Hunks of
cheese
Works by
Puccini
Kind of trail
Write back
Wide open
More plentiful
It blows off
steam
State VIP
USN officer
Biking
Registers for
Third-rate
Hot under the
collar
Pesky bug
Rock star,
maybe
Woolen cap
Charleston's
St.
Gas station
freebie
Hurler's stat
Thing, in law
Almost-grads


0 2D014 LIFS- Dil by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


ear Readers: Happy
Valentine's Day to one
and all, along with our
special good wishes to the
veterans in VA hospitals
around the country And our
particular thanks to those
readers who have taken the
time to send valen-
tines, visit the vets
and volunteer at
VA facilities. Bless
each and every one
of you.
DearAnnie:
Thirty years ago,
my husband's sis-
ter-in-law made a
pass at him. They
worked at the same
place, so when he
turned her down, ANIN
she made his life a MAIL
living hell. He
ended up quitting the job,
and we left town. She and my
brother-in-law are divorced
now, but we see her occasion-
ally at family gatherings.
This woman has been hos-
pitalized twice for break-
downs. Most of the family is
cordial to her, knowing that a
lot of what she did in the past
was due to her illness. When
her meds are working and
she is feeling stable, she
reaches out to those she has
hurt to make amends. She
reached out to my husband,
tearfully admitting that she
knows she is the reason we
left, and has asked for for-
giveness.
She now thinks everything
is just fine. The problem is,
she has never reached out to
me to apologize for the way
she upended my life. She
doesn't know my husband
told me what happened. Even
after all these years, I have a
hard time smiling and


m
I
L


pretending everything is
hunky-dory
I have forgiven her, but for-
getting is something else, and
every time I see her, the old
anger comes back. My hus-
band agrees that nothing
would be gained by bringing
these things up
again. Any sugges-
tions for moving
past this in a posi-
tive way?
Wronged
but Silent in
Wisconsin
Dear Wronged:
You haven't actu-
ally forgiven her,
because her pres-
ence still makes
IE'S you angry If you
.BOX believe an apology
from her would
make a difference, you
should calmly let her know
But if you don't think it mat-
ters one way or the other,
please consider talking this
through with a professional
who can help you let go of the
past completely
DearAnnie: We have 5-
year-old twins. We enrolled
them in a swimming class last
year Our son had a bad expe-
rience and didn't want to con-
tinue. Our daughter, however,
loved it and is doing great.
After a couple of months, our
son decided to return to
classes. (We think he was jeal-
ous of his sister's achieve-
ment.) Naturally, he is a level
behind her He now cries and
wants to be on her level.
We think it would be unfair
to hold our daughter back for
a while so her brother can
catch up. However, if we do
hold her back, we can enroll
them in semi-private lessons
together, saving money as


well as transportation time. It
also solves the problem of our
son's jealousy Should we do
it? Swimmers Parents
Dear Parents: As a general
rule, it is never a good idea to
force kids to accomplish any-
thing at the same speed, mov-
ing them forward and back so
one isn't jealous of the other
This is a recipe for a lifetime
of craziness and resentment.
If you wish to put both chil-
dren in the same class be-
cause you want to save
money and time, that is a dif-
ferent issue and certainly
justifiable. If the lessons are
semi-private, your daughter
should be able to move
ahead at her own speed,
which is not the same as
holding her back.
DearAnnie: I believe you
overlooked something in your
response to "Getting This Off
My Chest."
The writer stated that he is
positive his wife got pregnant
intentionally It takes two!
Even if she "assures" him
that it is a "safe" time of the
month, that's no guarantee.
Other precautions should be
taken. It's a shared responsi-
bility-Albany, N.Y

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www. creators. com.


2-14


C8 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


For Better or For Worse

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The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


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"Shouldn't they be givin' out
HEART-shaped medals today?"


COIRECT ME IF IM'
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Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"About Last Night" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"August: Osage County" (R) 1:05 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Endless Love" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m. 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m
"Vampire Academy" (PG-13)2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Endless Love" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m. 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:40 p.m.
"Philomena" (PG-13) 7:40 p.m.
"Robocop" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:10p.m.
"Vampire Academy" (PG-13) 4 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Winter's Tale" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10 p.m.


Visit www.chronicleonline. corn for area
movie listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S senbax


"FD PCR HFBT OC IT G WRKAMTA, F


JGKO OC HFBT OC IT G WRKAMTA


LFKRX CKT AGP XC F KTBTM WGBT OC


HFBT JFOWCRO PCR."


- G.G. LFHKT


Previous solution: "If we didn't want to upset anyone, we would make films
about sewing, but even that could be dangerous." David Lynch
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-14


Pickles


Dilbert


Doonesbury Flashback


Big Nate


COMICS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C9










CIO FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 DECLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (ED CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tinme


Choice
n


FnREE BEST7i Ci
Permit And bL, llllll

SUp to $200 value I "!!S T i I


SSiding Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms Decks Windows Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273


* FREE HOT DOGS*
SAT FEB 15th
10am to 12pm
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION DAY
Come Check Out our
SPECIALS!
Inverness Flea Mkt
At the Fairgrounds
3600 S. Florida Ave
352-697-0193



2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551


BEDROOM SET -
Mahogany, 4 poster
Full Size, w/ night
stand, dresser, mirror.
Mattress rarely used.
$400 352-346-0153


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 14 & Sat. 15, 9a-3p
Elec. Tools, Boating,
Fishing & Golfing Items
Clothing, Boat, MISC.
524 S. Adams Street


/!' C /I7t,



BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday, 9a-4 pm
3922 N. Everlasting Dr


BUICK
1985 Rev
$1000 Complete.
will part out PARTS
(352) 228-9058


Citrus Springs
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a to I p
misc. hshld items,
patio furniture, gar-
age items, clothing
8414 N Creek Way



CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat 2/15 8a-3p
985 N Pioneer PT


CITRUS SPRINGS
YARD SALE *
Fri., Sat. & Sun.
Vintage items, Baby
Items, Furniture,
clothes, kitchen stuff
and much more,
so bring lots of money
7501 N. Galena Ave.



Cooks/Kitchen
and Servers

Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues


COUCH
Beautiful, almost new,
soft, light green plush
3 cushions, $150
Computer table/desk
$25; 352-341-1665


DOG KENNEL
(Pet Safe)I10xl0x6h
$250 new, asking $75
(727) 514-4112


DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a-?
Antiques, Furn, Misc
20929 W McKinney Av


Estate Sale
Rainbow Lakes Estates.
Dunnellon. 2059 SW
Valencia Heights.
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday from 8-2.
352.267.8026.


FLORAL CITY
Fri. & Sat. 8am-4pm
BLOCK SALE *
11680 E. Laurel Ct.


INVERNESS
RAINTREE
Apartments II
Two bedroom
Apt Availiable
62 YRS OF Age or
Older Hadicapped/
Disabled, regardless
of age with or
without children.
201 E. Hills Street
Inverness, Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:00a 4:00p, M-F
This institution is an
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Em-

ployer &

provider


I Valentine


HELEN KUSNEREIT
(Ludlow)
1914-2012
Dearest Mom,
You were the Heart
of our family.
Miss you every day,
especially on
Valentines Day.

Love,
Your Family
YVIVIVIV


I Valentine


I Valentine


~~JE Sat/~









PET ADOPTION
Saturday, 10a-12

SUPERMARKET
Inverness
(352) 527-9050 to
rehome small dogs
www.ahumanesocie
typetrescue.com

Please be advised
that on 1/30/14, the
offices of Legacy
Document and
Judiciary Services
closed.
Due to the type of
medical treatment,
I neither have the
strength nor the ad-
ditional assistance
to remain open.

Thank you for 16
years of business
and for all the sup-
port and kindness
you have shown.
Sincerely,
Carmen Y.R. Durso



Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
flonrda.com
Crystal River Mall
Thursday-Sunday
12pm-4pm
Floral City Adoption
Center 7358 S. Flor-
ida Ave Sat 10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
Low Cost
spay/neuter vouch-
ers are avail.
726-4700 for Info.

Adopt a
pescued Pet 4,


GMC
1988, 3/4Ton
Rolling Frame,
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
GMC
1988, 6 doors,
complete front end
$550; Small Trailer
40x85 $150
(352) 228-9058
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
Multi Unit Sale*
Furniture, collectibles,
jewelry, clothes & more
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S. Tex Point.,
Across from How-
ards Flea Market,
Follow Pink signs
INVERNESS
Sat. 15&Sun.169a-Sp
Lots of Stuff *
3552 S. Oakdale Terr.
KAWSAKI
1999 VULCAN
Low miles, in storage
5 years $1500
352-228-9058
Kitchen Set w/ 4 Chairs
on casters & three
matching barstools
upholstered, 32" high
with armrests and
backs, $450.00
352-382-3933
LECANTO
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8a-4p
Leisure Acres, 5900 &
5909 S. Plantain Pt.
fishing poles, pwr tools
Lecanto Hills
2br/lba in 55+ comm.
Must Sell $3000
(352) 302-8886
MENS WATCHES
Invicta, Croton, Swiss
Legend, six in boxes.
Excellent cond.
$50-$100 each.
352-613-5240
Nature Coast
Ministries
Indoor Yard Sale
Stuff a bag w/clothing
Sm $3/ Lg $5,
Jeans $3 pair
(Boutq 25%off)
Furn-Sm Appl-Wall
Art 25%-50% off
Hours: Mon-Sat
(10am-4pm)
E. Hwy44
Next to Race Trac
352-563-1860
Volunteers Needed
Donations
Appreciated!
Open Motorcycle
Trailer, great for Harley,
Goldwing, or cruiser
type cycle. Will carry
3 dirt bikes, or 1 quad.
Good tires, $650 obo
727-744-2498
OZELLO
2/15 & 2/16 9a-4p
Items from $1-$4500.
Patio tbl/chrs, Bistro
Table set, 8 ft Dinghy,
tenor banjoes,
mandoline, Novelty
"musical instruments",
ship's clock & barom-
eter, Bose stereo
spkrs, Table saw,
belt/disc sander, 6'
lighthouse, pressure
washer, chain saws,
smoker, staghorn
fern, croquet set,
horseshoe set, glass
dining set, Schwinn
exerciser, battery and
air tools, Rosetta
Spanish course, and
much more! (behind
the orange fence)
14360 W Seashell Ct
1 mile past Ozello
Chili Cookoff
PIANO
Lowery piano with
bench. Good Cond.
$350
(352) 637-2117
Queen Sofa Bed
Very Good Condition
Flower Print
$150
(352) 637-2117
Sea Doo GTX
2005, 3 seater, 131 hrs.
2010 Continental
trailer, asking $3450.
obo (352) 794-3374
SLEEPER SOFA, $150.
Sleeper loveseat, $75
Good cond., Smoke
free environment
(352) 344-9391
Storage Sheds
6x10 shed $550
4x7 shed $100
Cryrstal River Area
352-613-8453
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


19 842 6 3 5 7
276583914
3247 5 93 91 48
i3'4,5i749'1 i2:6 8
4 5 316 78 192
7 6_911 5 2 48 3

8 2 119 3 4 67 5
S842169 7 3 1
6 1 7'314 5 8 2 9
9 3 28117 5 4 6


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




Black Lab Mix
7 mo. old male,
Free to good home
(352) 476-3854
Female Black Lab& Pit
mix, free to good
home (352) 464-4001
Free to Good Home
4 yr old Black Lab
Border Collie Mix,
Housebroken
Good with other dogs
and kids
(352) 215-3558
Full Blooded
Blue Nose Pitt Bull
1 yr old, female
Floral City area
(352) 419-2623
Lowrey Organ
You pick up, good for
a church, club
etc.. (352) 436-4 148




CAT
Male, Orange, 10 Ibs
Lost on Apopka Ave
Inverness 2/10
(910) 401-7993 (cell)
Cockatiel
blue w/orange
patches on his cheeks
pls call (352) 344-0379
FEMALE PIG
childhood pet, name
is Babe. white w/ big
black spotsapprox. 2
yrs old, weighs about
300 Ibs, lost in the
vicinity of Dunkenfield
and Arter, REWARD
pls call (352)257-0184
Gold Mother's Cross
with birth stones.
Lost between CMH
and the gas station at
Walmart.352-212-7962
Lost Black Cat
Name "Mamba"
Last seen Paradise Pt.
Road. by Ale House
REWARD
(727) 481-3010
LOST DOG
14 yr old Black
Shepherd mix
missing since 2/10
from Inverness area
Heart Broken please
call if found or seen
(352) 341-4280 Iv msg
Lost Dog. Male, White
w/Tan around eyes.
Name is Gator. Lost in
Crystal River. Please
Contact Lorra @
352-634-0220 if you
have any information.

LOST


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
0 Grouper @ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001




P/T Office Help
SMW (352) 322-8867




Exp. Hair Stylist

Apply within:
Nu-Yu Beauty Salon
Beverly Hills Plaza











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





C.N.A's
Join Our Team.
Now Hiring
Ask about Baylor
Prog. EXC. Benefits
Apply at,
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA
EmployerM/F/V/D

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvampoi@
yahoo.com

Exp Only BILLING
& INSURANCE
For Front Office

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
For Back Office
Lecanto Florida
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3305

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience req'd
for very busy
medical office.
includes benefits
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512




NET Developer
With C # and NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
components and
features for our
Industrial SCADA
and HMI software
products.
Other desirable
experience -
Web Services,
ASP.NET, HTML5,
Javascript, XMLSVG
Other domain
expertise -
SCADA, HMI, MES
EAM OR CMMS

3 yrs exp. preferred.
Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

EXP. GRAPHIC &
MULTI-MEDIA

20 hours per week
for Local Church
Send Resume listing
familiar software to:
janmetcalf
@embarqmail.com

Litigation
Asst/Paralegal

5 yr litigation exp.
mandatory Salary
negotiable/Benefits
avail. Fax resume:
352-726-3180


1. Chronicle 1


Fax: (352) 563-5665 1 Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 1 Email: classifieds@chronicleonIine.com I website:


f't" Wmj Ho.W'
View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.com or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
Saturday. 10AA- 12P
PetSupermarket
Every 2nd Saturday
Tractor Supply
Dunnellon
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS










COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home style
environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.

IE/ua^


Small Female
Jack Russell Terrier
white with
brown ears.
Special Diet
Rockcrusher area.
REWARD
(352) 212-9168

Male White Cat
61bs, White with grey
patched behind ears.
Lost off of Birch Ave
(352) 613-6390
Pantech Cell Phone
Reward
Lost near Court House
Inverness
(786) 205-1186 Cell
Small light Brown
Min Pin/Chihuahua
mix,
lost near Inverness
Golf & Country Club
Call (352) 538-4345
White Male
Chihuahua, approx
4 yrs. old. lost in the
vicinity of Phillips Ct,
off Venable in
Crystal River pls call
352-364-3756




Brown Eared
Papillon, sml male,
approx 2 yrs old found
in the vicinity of
Gospel Island
(352) 637-0910
Commercial
Collapsible Picnic
Table. pls call
860-912-8502
Solar Salt
call to identify
(352) 634-1500


Cooks/Kitchen
and Servers

Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. &Tues





SALES POSITION

AVAILABLE
If you are looking for
a career, not just a
job with long term
employment, we
offer many benefits.
Insurance, 401 K,
paid vacations.
Draw salary vs.
commission. Perfor-
mance bonuses
paid quarterly.
We are a Drug Free
work place
Apply in Person
1825 Hwy41 N.
Ask for Mr. Green
(352) 726-4009

Seeking Professional
Sales Person
for counter and
outside sales for
auto body paint
supply store. Exp.
Req'd. Pay based
on Exp. Email
resume to: paint.
n.etc@gmail.com









Business services
Full Time
Accounting
Clerk
Citrus County
Chronicle
Crystal River, FL
Minimum two years
accounting
experience.
Proficient with MS
Office products.
Requires strong
working knowledge
of MS Excel.
Fast- paced
enviornment.
High level of
attention to detail.
Process reports,
billing audition
functions, excellent
customer service,
End of Month
Closeout Functions.
To Applv
Send Resume to:
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
or Apply in Person
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, Fl. 34429
Drug screen
required for final
applicant. EOE

Granite Fabrica-
tors & Bridge
Saw Operator
Needed
Part time w/Full time
potential NO EXP.
NEC. Will train, Must
be detail oriented
and have good
hand eye coord.
drug free workplace
Aoolv in Person
DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
Crystal River

Heavy Mach.
Mechanic

DAB Constructors
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
(352) 447-5488

HELP WANTED

Remodeling. Must
have trans. & some
tools. $13-$18 hr
Call (352) 637-6407

Plumber
& Plumbers
Helper

Very busy plumbing
company searching
for plumbers that are
hard working, reliable
and motivated.Valid
drivers license. Serv-
ing all of Central Flor-
ida. 352-341-4243

ROOFING CREW
experienced only
Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
Aoolv In Person
AAA ROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411


I ^^HapNo


C3.0 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EXP. PAINTER

Needed, Plenty of
Work Must have Dri.
Lic. 352-302-8265

FOREMAN

Landscape Maint.
Must have clean dri.
lic. exp. a plus.
Call (352) 302-6817

MULTI TASKER

For Fast Paced Envi-
ronment. Must Excel
in Customer Rela-
tions. Personable,
Professional and
Presentable Only
Need Apply
River Ventures
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-1:00PM

Part time Lawn
Maintenance

Call (352) 628-2555

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only
Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
(352) 628-0254

Warehouse/
Counter Pos.

FT position. Counter
sales & warehouse
stocking. Plumbing &
comp knowledge a +.
401K& Insurance
Apply in person @:
Morgan Bros. Supply
7559 W. Gulf to Lake
Crystal River/or email:
mbscr@ hotmal.com

Help


Part Time Help

Maintenance, Pasture
& Yard Work. Must
live near Pine Ridge
Have References
(352) 249-7434





MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547










MASSAGE
THERAPY
Classes Start,
April 28, 2014
Spring Hill
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu









(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S 15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
SFlorida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com
Storage Sheds
6x10 shed $550
4x7 shed $100
Cryrstal River Area
352-613-8453
WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**



70 Bradford
Collectible Plates,
Norman Rockwell,
Sandra Kuck, etc.
$1000. obo
(352) 746-7129



Appliance Package
RefnaeratorSide by
side w/ water/ ice, Elec
smooth top Stove, dish-
washer, over the stove
microwave. All black. All
Exc Cond $800. OBO
(352) 533-3147
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DISHWASHER Black
Whirlpool. Works well.
$35 or best offer.
352-212-4363


ELECTRIC RANGE GE
Spectra flat top range
with self cleaning
oven. 100% like new
condition. $325 firm.
352-422-1209 or
352-344-4407.
GE Dishwasher
pot scrubber
white, exc cond
$100
734-355-2325
352-503-9825
GE Electric Range
Self Cleaning, $150
GE Over Range Micro-
wave $75 Both White
(734) 355-2325,
352-503-9825

'4

I


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Maytag Large
Capacity Dryer
9 yrs. old. great cond.
$125. (352)464-3159
MICROWAVE OVEN
GE black over-the-stove
with lights and fan.
Good condition. $35 or
best. 352-212-4363
REFRIGERATOR GE.
Side by side doors with
ice maker. Excellent
condition. $100 or best
offer. 352-212-4363
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE Frigidaire elec-
tric excellent working
condition. Asking
$100 or best offer.
352-212-4363
UPRIGHT FREEZER
Works great $100.
352228 1915
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398




OAK FILING CABINET
Four drawer legal size
filing cabinet. $50.00
352-462-7041




AUCTION

ONLINE AUCTION,
100+ Hobart
60 Quart Mixers.
Restaurants Nation-
wide, See website
for locations near
you. Sold to Highest
Bidder!
Bid online thru 2/17,
www.SoldTigercom





Ste
DUDLEY'S


sThur 2/13 Estate
Adventure Auction
out- 3pm, ijn-6pm
(Two Auctions) Bush
Hog PZ73" /com
0-turn mower,
furniture, tools,
everything from
new to collectibles
w- Sat. 2/15
MORRISTON On Site
Construction Asset
Liquidation Auction:
9am. 24030
NW 27th 32668

call for info 637-9588
Dudleysauction
.corn 4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.










DUDLEY'S

tThur 2/13 Estate
Adventure Auction
out- 3pm, in-6pm
(Two Auctions) Bush
Hog PZ73" /com
0-turn mower,
furniture, tools,
everything from
new to collectibles
Sat. 2/15
MORRISTON On Site
Construction Asset
Liquidation Auction:
9am. 24030
NW 27th 32668
......................
call for info 637-9588
Dudleysauction
.corn 4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.


ate
TELEVISION SONY
50-inch rear projection
TV $60 (352)795-7813




WINDOWS
NEW Double hung,
Double Pane. 2 sets of
30 by 62 french cut tem-
pered glass ; $225 ea
352-503-6537




20" HP Monitor
w/keybard, like new
$50. Kuno 10S, android
tablet, never used,
$175. (352) 5134317




Rust free aluminum
rectangular glass top
table w/ 6 chairs
great cond $85.
High top rectangular
bar set, w 3 chairs &
pads good cond. $60.
(231) 775-4774


Furniture

Antique Couch
2 seater, with 6 legs,
recently reupholstered
in neutral colors $150
352-6344329
ARMOIRE
very heavy dark
wood grain, 48"t -
49"w x 20" deep
like new, $125.
Larry(352) 344-1692
BEDROOM SET -
Mahogany, 4 poster
Full Size, w/ night
stand, dresser, mirror.
Mattress rarely used.
$400 352-346-0153
BR & LR Furn, Kit setTV,
Hsehold items & much
more!! (352) 522-0107
* Moving Sale **
COFFEE TABLE Wood
coffee table 44 inches
long, 33 inches wide, 19
inches high. $75.00
362-462-7041
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com
352-795-0121
Complete 8pc. Rattan
Dining Room Set
excellent condition
$1200. abo
(352) 897-4681
COUCH
Beautiful, almost new,
soft, light green plush
3 cushions, $150
Computer table/desk
$25; 352-341-1665
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER & DESK
Wood TV Centerpocket
doors, holds 32-36
TV.55 in. high x 44 in.
wide. Beautiful cond.
$250. Desk, 3 drawers
& door,60 wide x 22
deep. exc. cond. $45.
352-489-1239
King Sz Oak Bedroom
Set complete 7 pc. set
excellent condition
$1200.
obo (352) 897-4681
Kitchen Set w/ 4 Chairs
on casters & three
matching barstools
upholstered, 32" high
with armrests and
backs, $450.00
352-382-3933
Lane Rocker Recliner,
leather vinyl combo
taupe, $85.
Round 54" Glass top
table, 4 wrought iron
chairs, w/ pads, $250.
good condition.
(231) 775-4774
LIVING ROOM SET
overstuffed brown
leather sofa,love
seat,chair and ottoman.
$80(352)795-7813
QUEEN SLEIGH BED &
MATTRESS SET Solid
Wood, pristine condi-
tion, 15 inch Mattress &
Box Springs $275.00
OBO 352-422-3217
Queen Sofa Bed
Very Good Condition
Flower Print
$150
(352) 637-2117


CLASSIFIED



SLEEP SOFA,150
Sleeper loveseat, $75
Good cond., Smoke
free environment
(352) 344-9391


TABLE AND CHAIRS
(54") Glass top dining
table with 4 cushion
chairs 352-503-9013.
Great condition. Asking
$300. Call for photos.



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Husqvarna
Riding Lawn Mower
48" cut, good cond.
6 yrs old, asking $700.
Moving
(352) 209-4311
Riding Mower
2012 Troy Bilt, Auto,
42", 20 HP, w/ attached
grass spreader $825;
Wooden Utility Trailer
4 x 10, $485
(352) 794-6761




FREE HOT DOGS*
SAT FEB 15th
10am to 12pm
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION DAY
Come Check Out our
SPECIALS!
Inverness Flea Mkt
at the Fairgrounds
3600 S. Florida Ave
352-697-0193

BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 14 & Sat. 15, 9a-3p
Elec. Tools, Boating,
Fishing & Golfing Items
Clothing, Boat, MISC.
524 S. Adams Street

AI 7,


BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday, 9a-4 pm
3922 N. Everlasting Dr
BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs & Fri 9am-4pm
Sm freezer, Amish
table/chrs, antique
cedar chest, DVD's,
and lots of free stuff!
62 New Florida Av

Citrus Springs
Fri, Sat, Sun 8ato 1p
misc. hshld items,
patio furniture, gar-
age items, clothing
8414 N Creek Way

CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat 2/15 8a-3p
985 N Pioneer PT
CITRUS SPRINGS
*YARD SALE*
Fri., Sat. & Sun.
Vintage items, Baby
Items, Furniture,
clothes, kitchen stuff
and much more,
so bring lots of money
7501 N. Galena Ave.
DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat, Sun 8a-?
Antiques, Furn, Misc
20929 W McKinney Av
Estate Sale
Rainbow Lakes Estates.
Dunnellon. 2059 SW
Valencia Heights.
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday from 8-2.
352.267.8026.
FLORAL CITY
Fri. & Sat. 8am-4pm
BLOCK SALE *
11680 E. Laurel Ct.
FLORAL CITY
Moving Sale Fri. 7am-?
Garage tools, house
furn. 8687 E. Anglers
Ct., old Floral City Rd.,
to Moonrise
HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
*Multi Unit Sale*
Furniture, collectibles,
jewelry, clothes & more
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S. Tex Point.,
Across from How-
ards Flea Market,
Follow Pink signs

HOMOSASSA
RIVERHAVEN
MOVING SALE *
Everything Must Go!
4940 S Deep
Water Pt
2/14 & 2/15 8a-lp


a-.l
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 8a-5p
Furn and much more
311 Wright St
INVERNESS
MOVING SALE,
Feb. 13,14 & 15, 8am-?
4700 Bow N Arrow Lp
off C.R. 581
INVERNESS
Sat. 15 & Sun.16 9a-5p
Lots of Stuff *
3552 S. Oakdale Terr.
LECANTO
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8a-4p
Leisure Acres, 5900 &
5909 S. Plantain Pt.
fishing poles, pwr tools
Nature Coast
Ministries
Indoor Yard Sale
Stuff a bag w/clothing
Sm $3/ Lg $5,
Jeans $3 pair
(Boutq 25%off)
Furn-Sm Appl-Wall
Art 25%-50% off
Hours: Mon-Sat
(10am-4pm)
E. Hwy44
Next to Race Trac
352-563-1860
Volunteers Needed
Donations
Appreciated!

OZELLO
2/15 & 2/16 9a-4p
Items from $1 -$4500.
Patio tbl/chrs, Bistro
Table set, 8 ft Dinghy,
tenor banjoes,
mandoline, Novelty
"musical instruments",
ship's clock & barom-
eter, Bose stereo
spkrs, Table saw,
belt/disc sander, 6'
lighthouse, pressure
washer, chain saws,
smoker, staghorn
fern, croquet set,
horseshoe set, glass
dining set, Schwinn
exerciser, battery and
air tools, Rosetta
Spanish course, and
much more! (behind
the orange fence)
14360 W Seashell Ct
1 mile past Ozello
Chili Cookoff





PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 8A./3P.
hshld, antiques, new
dishes $130. firm
6080 N. Kingwood
Ter. Beverly Hills, Fl

PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 8am to ?
Women's Club Sale
*5253 W. Wichita Dr.-
Pine Ridge Blvd to
Bronco, third left




.INVERNESS**
Estate/
Moving Sale
Sat, 2/15 8am to ?
turn, wall decor and
many other items!
1087 EAllegrie Drive






DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOT-

rThur 2/13 Estate
Adventure Auction
out- 3pm, in-6pm
(Two Auctions) Bush
Hog PZ73" /com
0-turn mower,
furniture, tools,
everything from
new to collectibles
w- Sat. 2/15
MORRISTON On Site
Construction Asset
Liquidation Auction:
9am. 24030
NW 27th 32668

call for info 637-9588
Dudleysauction
.com 4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




DRESS SHIRT
Bristol & Bull New Tag
says 79.50/selling $25
Linda 423-4163


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 CI--


HERMAN'
2-14 Laughngstck Inter national Inc Dl by Unversal UCIck lr UFS 2014

"Our 'cupid computer' has come up with
two names: Genghis Khan and
Attila the Hun."


LADIES COAT XLG
White with black trim
$5.00 352-270-3909
MEN'S DRESS PANTS
Like new, 6 pair
$60 For all OBO.
Linda 423-4163
MENS SHIRTS (2) Ely
171/2 striped short
sleeve snaps $1.00 ea
Nice 352-270-3909
MENS SHIRTS (2)
Wrangler XLg long
sleeve chambray snap
$1.00ea Nice
352-270-3909



4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes/wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
$50 352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
8mm FILM TRANSFER
UNITS Transfer your
movies to dvd or vhs.
With cameras $99.00
obo 352 621 0248
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGE
LG 32 W X 40 L
$60 OBO
Linda 423-4163
CHARCOAL GRILL
Perfect Flame,
large cook top,
only used once, $150
(352) 860-2956
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new. I own.
$100 OBO.
Linda 423-4163
DOG DISH LARGE
crock ceramic Bones &
spots pattern CUTE $7.
352-270-3909
DOG KENNEL
(Pet Safe) O1xl0x6h
$250 new, asking $75
(727)514-4112


Electric Lift Chair,
Pride L3-105,
color sandal,
3 mo. old $500.
Black Mesh Office
chair, adjustable $50.
(352) 6284540
Electric Scooter
Active Care
Spitfire 1420
$350.
(352) 628-1723
Generac Generator
12.5 KW, mobile with
cover, factory spares
used twice, $1,500
(352) 746-6962 or
Cell 239-272-8101
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464-0316
L shaped computer
desk with hutch $25.00
regular desk with 4
drawers $25.00
352-302-3771
MENS WATCHES
Invicta, Croton, Swiss
Legend, six in boxes.
Excellent cond.
$50-$100 each.
352-613-5240
Older Shop smith
5 tools in 1, $400 obo
Craftsman 42"
Lawn Mower, Kohler
Eng. $450. obo
(352) 344-2932
RICH PRICE SURF
BOARD- 72" x 18",
shaped design, USA,
minor wear, $100.
352-628-0033
SHOE RACK Metal
Good condition 24"
wide X 27" high $5.
352-270-3909
Sony 50" Grand WEGA
LCD Projection HDTV
plays well $125.
(352) 726-8410
TUB SPOUT CHROME
Universal New in
package $5.
352-270-3909
Utility Trailer.
5X14, 2' Sides. Special
Built. Good Cond. Good
Tires Well Built. $550.
(678)617-5560 or
352-513-5580


VACUUM CLEANER
RICCAR commercial
upright Not bagless
Works good $20.
352-270-3909




4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00
352-464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
3524640316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Go Go
3 Wheel Scooter
extra basket,
fairly new battery
$700.
(352) 419-6016
PHOENIX SCOOTER
S35010, good shape,
asking $300.
(352) 344-9580
POOL LIFT
Horcher, Brand new,
never used.$2500
(352) 628-0824
Pride Mobility Scooter
"Go-Go", very good
cond. long battery life
$450. (352) 423-3513
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE STATIONARY
BIKE ALL ELECTRON-
ICS ONLY 100.00
352-464 -0316
SHOWER BENCH
SEAT ALUMINUM &
FIBERGLASS BENCH
TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
352-464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANEUVERABILITY.
ONLY 60.00 464-0316
WHEELCHAIR
Manual, with leg &
foot rest, good cond.
$100. (352) 344-4105


r w a n 33y?
*H~~f HF~~jf .K .*^ *U K f ~ir~ .^ .K^ .1^ .^ .& .Rm o


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drivers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179





Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19CR 461-4518




*Affordable Mobile"
all type marine repairs
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-398-5903

All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialize in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770




Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793

Take Care of Loved
Ones in My Home
Clean, caring, exp.,
exc. ref. 352-476-7159




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554






AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794


Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873






A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**rk 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




"ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
w Remodeling
Additions. new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352 ) 949-2292




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Con (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning




1 111-


CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
HOUSEKEEPING, relia-
ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable, ref.
Maggie(352) 503-9621
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) Z/U-40/Z



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavating &
Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Drywall
Pres. Wash, Renova-
tions Painting (Int/Ext)
25 yrs, 352-513-5746
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


PCad
V





Pit


GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Any Surface,
roof cleaning, int/ext
painting, gutter cleaning,
Absolute Exterior
Restoration
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Remodeling

All phases of TileI
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


*miasiu i- ^r
Floors /walls. Tubs to -
shower conv. No job .J VK .
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



TREE REMOVAL &
MAC'S MOBILE RV STUMP GRINDING
REPAIR & MAINI Trim/Tree Removal,
RVTC Certified Tech 55ft. Bucket Truck
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. 352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557








C1J2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


"NEW" FENDER
ACOUSTIC
GUITAR&GIGBAGSMALL,S
HALLOW BODY
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE ELECTRIC
GUITAR, SET NECK,
CHROME&IVORY $100
352-601-6625
PIANO & SEAT
Marantz,
needs tuning,
$300 OBO
(352) 465-0339
PIANO
Lowery piano with
bench. Good Cond.
$350
(352) 637-2117



COFFEE POT Mini
Drip Hamilton Beach
Works Great white
$5.00 352-270-3909
Liberation by
American Standard
Walk-In Bath -
Don't Struggle
Getting Out Of A
Normal Bathtub.
Stay in your home
longer, safely,
independently.
Liberation Walk-In
Baths Commended
by the Arthritis
Foundation. Best
Lifetime Warranty
in the industry.
Hydrotherapy,
Chromatherapy,
Aromatherapy no
extra cost. Installa-
tion Included! Get
$1,000 Off -Call
Toll-Free Today
1-866-583-1432.
MATTRESS COVERS
King size $8. Twin size
$2. Good condition
352-270-3909
PAMPERED CHEF
Stoneware baking dish
7" x 9.5" used little $3.
352-270-3909
PAMPERED CHEF
Stoneware baking dish
8" round 2" Deep NEW
$10. 352-270-3909



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95464-0316
PULLUP BAR &AB
ROLLER. $50 value for
only $25 OBO.
352-637-2647



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GUN SHOW
Ocala National
Guard Armory
900 SW 20TH Street
Feb. 15, Sat. 9-5
Feb. 16, Sun. 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Dail
O'Bring your GUNS
to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
LADIES TAYLORMADE
R11 IRONS
5-PW,AW,SW graphite
excellent condition
$250.00
249-7345
Range Finder
Hunting/golf, LRF 400
Simmons-Bushnel
$100; Telescope w/
tripod, Bushnell
700mm never used
$50 (352) 527-4518
RECUMBENT BIKE
Sun bicycle- EZ Sport
$350.; Kayak Carriers
Thule, 2 prs $50 total
(352) 860-2956
Ted Williams Signed
Louisville Slugger Bat,
comes with certificate
of authenticity from
Ted williams Museum
$1,400. (352) 527-4146



13 ft Utility Trailer
Tandem Axle
$600.
(352) 795-9651


Sell r Swa


*w



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



TE DeMarchi Estates
Homes Sold in 20 Days
Cash for Anything
#39910, 315-466-2268
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation


3 Dapple Dachshund
Puppies, all female
w/papers, pls call
Sylvia (727) 235-2265


BENNY
Benny is a 4-y.o.
bulldog mix, Very
friendly & affection-
ate and loving.
Loves kids & gets
along w/some other
dogs. Loves to
chase the tennis
ball & go for car
rides. He appears to
be housebroken.
Call Laci @
352-212-8936.


AKC BOXER PUPS
CH Bloodline, Brindle
1 Male,
1 Female
$800. ea
(352) 637-0611








I
GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, 4-y.o.
spayed Brindle/
white Bulldog/
possible hound mix,
weight 66 Ibs.
Gentle, calm, great
on leash, appears
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she doesn't
seem to notice.
Good family/ com-
panion dog.Adop-
tion fee $30.00.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682.
PUPPY LOVE
2 Little Chihuahua's
10 weeks, male,
1 white, 1 blue, HC,
puppy pac, $200 ea.
Baby Yorkies, ready
end of February
Janet (352) 628-7852
(352) 220-4231
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
W


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
I bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
HOMOSASSA
2/1%/, Big Lot, Near 19
$435 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
INVERNESS
3/1, $425. mo 1st, last
sec. No Pets
4188 S. Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385
INVERNESS
3/1, $500. mo 1st, last
sec. No Pets
4170S. Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385



1999 Mobile Home
28x60, bank owned,
Repo, Great Shape
Financing Available.
Call 352-795-1272
*" MUST SEE*
ATTENTION:
Custom order a new
home and receive
20% OFF, between
now and tax day.
April 15th.
Factory direct,
Call (352) 621-3807

MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2x6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C
Call (352) 621-9183
Palm Harbor Homes
55+ Community
Special!
$5K for your old home!
Many models to
choose from
Call John Lyons (a),
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065

v THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/ screened
patio on over % acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512
DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER
3BR, 3Bath, includes
mother-in-law apt.
roof over, sheet rock,
on 3 lots, 2 sheds,
waterfront $38,000
(217) 474-7727
HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4
acres, must see inside,
nice & Clean $42,000
(will consider reasona-
ble cash offers)
352-465-7606
HOMOSASSA
Large 3BR/2BA DW,on
large lot. New carpet,
Freshly painted inside
$3500 to move in
RENT To OWN
3402 S Aberdeen Ter
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330


Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre.
New bathrooms, Ig
screened porch,
dead end rd.
$45,900. 352-302-1383
LECANTO $42,500
3bd/2ba, %/ acre,
new c/h/a & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond.
(352) 621-3929
Mobile Home on
Large Lot Fixer Upper 2
BR, IBA, Carport,
Laun. Rm. Fl. Rm.
$12,500.
Drive by then call
115 N. West Ave.
Inverness 352-621-0559
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-2377
Owner Financing
Available for Mobile
Homes!
Call for Details
352-795-2377
Ready To Move In
3/2 with large back
deck on 1.5 acres.
Close to town
call 352-795-2377



1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
pool and clubhouse
$18,500 (352) 344-5172
2BD/1 BA Singlewide
with added fam. rm
rasied deck, Ig. shed,
furnished 55+ $184 mo
Reduced Price $5,500,
(352) 726-3726
2Br, IBa in 55+ Park
carport, shed, wshop,
scrned Patio, In great
shape, fully furn. Ask-
ing $15k, $225/mo lot
rent. 352-419-4428
55+ MH Gated Com-
munity. Large 3/2,
2000 Jacobson Triple
Wide. 2000+ sq. ft.
Ready to move in.
$68K. Serious inquir-
ies only. Owner will fi-
nance with $20K
down.
727-967-4230
Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273

For Sale% I

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858
HOMOSASSA'S
Estate liquidation Sale
Buy 1000's of $$$
below market. 1983
Fleetwood 14x66, 3bd
2ba, good cond. fully
furn,In Nice 55+ park
with reasonable lot
rent ($259/mo). Only
$6500. (352) 628-5977
Lecanto Hills
2br/lba in 55+ comm.
Must Sell $3000
(352) 302-8886
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090



MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financing. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 302-8374




ACTION

I RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S850 & UNDER
9218 N. Satinwood Terr.
3/2/2, 1254 sq. ft.
272 N. Big Oaks Pt.
2/2/2, 1510sq ft
7416W. Kendale Ct.
3/2, D/W on an Acre
S650 & UNDER
4 Utah St.
2/2,992 sq. ft.
504 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1,816sq.ft.
229 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1, Fenced, 1072 sq.ft.
8469 W. Drew Ct.
2/2, M/H on Cana w/Boat Dock
For More Listings Go To
www. CitrusCountyHomeRentals.wm




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025









RetlAssist.
Available NOW!


2Bedrooms .2

Recent Foreclosures Welcome
(352) 447-0106
TDD ph # 1.800.955.8771
% This Institution IS an equal
L Jopportunlty provider & employer
HOMOSASSA
1/1, Clean, Quiet, CHA
$375. Incl. Water. 352-
563-2114, 257-6461
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 Immaculate, in town,
$650/mo, $650 Dep
(352) 895-0744


Large 2/2, ceramic tile
throughout, eat-in Kit.
screened porch, laundry
room, CHA, near new
Walmart $550. Ist/Sec,
352-746-4191
352-697-5900



CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incl Waterjlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276
INVERNESS
RAINTREE
Apartments II
Two bedroom
Apt Availiable
62 YRS OF Age or
Older Hadicapped/
Disabled, regardless
of age with or
without children.
201 E. Hills Street
Inverness, Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:00a 4:00p, M-F
This institution is an
Equal Housing
Opportunity

Em-
ployer &

provider







FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2/2/Carport, Furnished
& Unfurn. Extra Clean.
(352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
2/2 1st fir Furn, long
term, pleasant 55+,
Pool/Club. Central
Avail April $750 + dep.
Inclds, H20, cbl, garb.
(352) 201-8735



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



HERNANADO
Terra Vista Rental,
Spacious 3BR w/maint
& club membership
352-302-7559
HOMOSASSA
1Bd Rm, All Utilities Pd.
$700 mo. Newly Re-
modeled 352-228-1365
LECANTO
Cottage 1/1 $525
incls. pwer/water, Dirt
Road (352) 220-2958



BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, EZ Terms,
$575 mo. 697-1457
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/11/2, Screen Room
$750.mo. Fist/last/Sec.
(352) 302-6025
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Clean & Open
Close to Downtown
No Pets, 352-400-5723
INVERNESS
3/2/carport, Ig fenced
yard, sun room appv'd
pet with add'l fee.
$775/mo sec & 1st.
352-697-2195
INVERNESS
Beautiful 2/1, gated
comm. 55+ pool, clb
hse activities. $650 +
dep. (330) 806-9213
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850.
352-726-7212
PINE RIDGE
3/2, $1000. F/L/S
5310 Yuma Lane
(352) 302-6025



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


INVERNESS
4/2 1600sq ft House for
rent 2 carports on canal.
Large yard, boat dock.
$1000.00mo. First and
security required. Back-
ground check required
($25.00)Available March
1st. 727-871-4222


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
w Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebiOvahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com


CLASSIFIED



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


-;'.-: l'H l" .S T


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPEN HOUSE
Sugarmill Woods
Fri/Sat 11 am -3pm
Sun 1 -4pm
31 Pine St. Homosassa
3 BR/ Den/ Gr Rm
2,207 LivSF $149K
MLS#701999
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514


Newly Updated 2/2/2
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
3229 N Juniperus Way
$114,900 352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased




For Sale yIJ
Beautiful home you
are looking for! 4
bedroom. 2 bath, 2
car garage in gated
community large
14K sq. ft. lot, cus-
tom pool many up-
grades. 3300 sq.
ft.Can email info.For
Sale by Owner NO
brokers please!
352-601-6942
352-513-4463




For SaleB#,,,
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367



2Br/2Ba/1CG home
on approx 1 ac. land
Owner Financed
$80,000, w/$5,000
down. No qualifying
(305) 891-2323
For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Appt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.


IAIVII ;UUI I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY !


WORDy GURD TRCKY RICKY ANE

1. Heartless heel's tartan patterns (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
| If|| I|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. "Braveheart" star Gibson's chimes (1) theywill fit in the letter
___ -_ ----- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Dandy "Cheatin' Heart" singer Patsy (1) syllables in each word.

ZIIIIIIIIIIIIII 2014JFS,DistbyUnivIUcickJforJFS
4. Beefy heartthrob's thick ice slabs (1)


5. "Crazy Heart" star Jeff's hill chains (2)


6. Queen of Hearts visitor's altar cups (3)


7. Sweetheart's Canadian Black Label beers (2)


SoNWIMV SONrIM'I L SOI31qVHD SaOiIV *9 S DofI S aI9flIl *'
SHINMH SINfH '1 NIYI 3NI1 SilasS laW SUIVId SVj *I
2-14-14 SHHASNV


For Sale%,4
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell
SECLUDED
3BR/2BA, 1653sf, 2car
CP 2 story barn.
Includes 3/14 acre
buildable lot. $109,900
352-613-2289


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
biopowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


www.chronicleonline.corn


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Sil great val-
uesout
there for
buyers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office

Buying or Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




0


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone@tamDabav.r
r.com
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


/'





I *~;'**
f,,,





J" ^,
b ~~..m



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HowDo

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YourDa


(35s) 563.5966 "7 ,



1 31 *I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty

Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.

Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty

Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.

Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol

www.CitrusSold.com

"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watth
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Chrus County
I mes


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


528 SW 1st Court
3 bedrm., 2-1/2 bath
Exciting opportunity
to live on Paradise
Isles in the heart of
Crystal River, Flor-
ida with two sided
deep, crystal clear
water and access to
the Gulf of Mexico.
Located across from
a 57 acre wilderness
preserve and a man-
atee sanctuary.
Watch the dolphins
and manatees play
in your own back
yard. Paddle board,
kayak, See Doo,
boating and water
skiing to your hearts
content. This %half
acre property has 2
docks, one with a
10,000 pound lift and
220 foot sea wall.
This beautiful 3,2 %
home has granite
counter tops, 2 fire
places, 2 12 car gar-
age, hurricane win-
dows and doors,
panoramic water
view, sunrise and
citrus fruit trees.
Enjoy low utilities
with hot water on
demand and water
to air AC. This prop-
erty won't last,
priced to sell at
$585,000. Owner
will finance part.
1(352)795-7400


HOMOSASSA-Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000352-422-1311

INVERNESS, 2BR/1IBA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749

LAKE ROUSSEAU
2/1BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFure-Coast
Progerties.com
"To view
my properties"






Homosassa/Crystal
River area, 2-3 BR
Need Owner Finance
option. Please Call
218-290-1869 (cell)


Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000

Owner Financing
$S10,000 Down,
10 vrs @ 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002






Citrus Hills Townhouse
2br/2/2ba + carport
Fully FurnishedVery
nice, many extra's
near pool, great view
Must See $79,000
(352) 527-4518


For Sale ,II
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some turn, new Lanai
& Lam, ceramic floors.
$48,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100

Inverness Village
Condo 2/2, 55+ ground
floor over looks pool,
mature trees, 1035 sq. ft
living area. $39,900
352-634-3976






"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


40x85 $150
(352) 228-9058
Transmission for Sale
out of a 2000
Silverado, V8 or V6 En-
gine, rebuilt by coast
to coast, $1,300
Sell for $850. 465-0989




**BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre.land survey &
clear title.assessed at
$23,800.power and
homes in area. ASKING
$8,500. 813-792-1355



** *** ***
GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905
** *** ***
2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
Call 352-527-2711


MUsY SELL
A ,r f if, A A A

HERNANDO
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
Lot for sale $15,000
OBO. 781-864-1906
352- 726-2821
Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High, Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner



PARADISE! OZELLO!
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583




Boat Lift up to 1200lbs
easy you remove,
motor listed 2 yrs. old.
pictures avail.
Reduced to $400.
(352) 422-6649




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*
All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50;
Elec backing plates
set:12" $90; 10" $80
Call 352-464-2770
Porta-Boat 12'
w/trailer & cover $900.
Johnson Outboard
Motor 5/2hp, model
cd-20c, overhauled
$450. (419) 944-8777
PRINCECRAFT
1998, 16/2 ft long, 90
HP Evinrude, Garage
kept, like new $6000
262-705-4926 (cell)
Sea Doo GTX
2005, 3 seater, 131 hrs.
2010 Continental
trailer, asking $3450.
obo (352) 794-3374
SKI BARGE
15'30 hsp Yamaha
center console, trailer,
$1600. (304) 677-5747
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555*"
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
ALLEGRO BUS
2011, 36ft, inches
8,900 mi, loaded w/ 4
slides exel. cond. ext.
warr Asking $205,000
Retail $237,900
(828) 553-0134
Sport Coach IV
Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans, 1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
WINNEBAGO
'07, Journey, 36 SG,
excel, cond 300 Cum.,
Non smoke, no pets
22K mi, tow veh. incld
$102K, 352-598-5616



CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., 1
slide $7000 obo
(352)628-1126
Holiday Rambler
2008, SAVOY, 26 ft.
Travel trlr. New awning,
1 slide out, central vac.
ducted air. Emmucalate
inside & out $12,500.
352-586-1694
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. arts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




CHEVROLET
1953 Parts Car, Belair,
4 dr, No trans, no eng,
no windows $600. obo
(352) 257-3542, Cell
GMC
1988, s Ton
Rolling Frame,
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
GMC
1988, 6 doors,
complete front end
$550; Small Trailer


Vehicles

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Pnrices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ



BUICK
1985 Rev
$1000 Complete.
will part out PARTS
(352) 228-9058
BUICK
2003 Park Avenue
Leather, Exc Cond
Only 32,000 miles
$9500 (352) 436-7740
Buy Here/Pay Here

'98 Ford Explorer
$825 Down

'96 Ford Taurus
$675 Down

'96 Saturn
$650 Down

'03 Dodge Neon
$895 Down

'98 Chevy 1500 P/U
$2500 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
'04, Sebring, GTC,
convert., loaded only
70K, econ. V6, CD, full
pwr.garaged, perfect,
$5,450., 352-212-4882
DODGE
2012, Avenger RT,
Sunroof, leather, navi,
$17,995
352-341-0018
FORD
'10, Mustang Cony.
42K mi, V6, auto, pwr
opt., alloy whls, alarm
spoiler, ext warr.
$15,500, 352- 860-1939
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
Reduced price for a
well maintained '03,
Taurus SE, Looks &
drives great $3,200
firm w/ 141k hwy mi.
Shown on appointment.
(352) 422-1798
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

HYUNDAI
2007 Azera
loaded-p/w, heated
power seats 6 cyl
very low miles, Askg
$9800. 860-716-3128

LINCOLN
89 TOWNCAR. 75,300.
mi. very clean, exc.
condition, all original,
$3500. (304) 678-4070
Itm



947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C13


'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,000.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
'09, ALTIMA
17,600 miles
(352) 746-1022
SUBARU
'09, Legacy, has only
66k miles, new brakes
& tires, 4 DR, Auto,
$10,900. 352-586-3072

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR,*461-4518




2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551
AMC
1973 HORNET, V8, 304
engineauto p/s, new
paint, new seats
$5300. (352) 794-3709
ask for Doug

AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
21TH ANNUAL
WINTER
SWAP MEET
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds Bushnell
Feb. 14, 15, 16th
1-800-438-8559

CHRYSLER
1990CONV, 1 owner,
exc cond Dk Cherry,
white top ,all org. eq.
$4900, 352-527-4518







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2010, Silverado
Reg Cab WT
$13,495,
352-341-0018
DODGE
1995, 2500, Reg Cab
Work Box Truck
$2,888.
352-341-0018

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHRYSLER
2005, Pacifica AWD,
low miles, leather
extra clean $9,450.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600




sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru-


801-0214 FCRN
Affordable Secure Self Storage III.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Affordable Secure Self Storage III. 7465 N Florida Ave., Citrus Springs, FL 34434, (352)
465-7500, Personal property consisting of sofas, TV's, clothes, boxes, household goods
and other personal property used in home, office or garage will be sold or otherwise
disposed of at public sales on the dates & times indicated below to satisfy Owners
Lien for rent & fees due in accordance with Florida Statutes: Self-Storage Act, Sec-
tions 83.806 & 83.807. All items or spaces may not be available for sale. Cash or
Credit cards only for all purchases & tax resale certificates required, if applicable.
All R. & A. Bumgardner B70 D. Kovell B90 D. Picucci
A48 P. Speckner B79 W. Allaire D142 C. Illiano

Affordable Secure Self Storage III 7465 N Florida Ave., Citrus Springs, FL 34434.
Saturday, February 22nd, 2014 @10:00am.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 7 & 14, 2014.


810-0221 FCRN
2/28 Lien Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FLA. STAT. 83.806 Notice is Hereby Given That on 2/28/14 at 11:00 a.m. at
PACK-N-STACK MINI STORAGE, 7208 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa, FL 34446,
The Miscellaneous Personal Property contents of your storage shall be sold for past
due rent and fees owed by tenant:
#21 ANN ELLIS, 5448 S. FROST PT LECANTO, FL 34461
#47 HEDIYE S. ORTALAN, 990 W. SILVER MEADOW LP, HERNANDO, FL 34442
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14 & 21,2014.


fmoe Sal
Mon Nofice


802-0214 FCRN
Lyons, Mary Ellen 2013-CA-000598A NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 2013 CA 000598 A
REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARY ELLEN LYONS, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: MARY ELLEN LYONS, 12411 E TRAILS END RD, FLORAL CITY, FL 34436
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage cov-
ering
the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit:
THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS EXHIBIT IS LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF CITRUS AND THE
STATE OF FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK 1361 AT PAGE 1114 AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 498.11 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF COUNTY
ROAD, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 125 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 40 MINUTES
20 SECONDS WEST 165.92 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO A POINT ON THE WATER'S EDGE OF A
CANAL, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 22 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 52.35
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 40.39 FEET TO A POINT
ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4, THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 01 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF 58.39
FEET TO A POINT ON THE WATER'S EDGE OF SAID CANAL, THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH
00 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 40 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 151.61 FEET, MORE OR LESS
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; BEING LOT 97, OF OLD OAKS, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVI-


JEEP
'01, Grand Cherokee,
limited, loaded, new
tires & engine. Mint
$9,500. 305-619-0282
JEEP
Wrangler 1989 auto-
matic 71,408 miles
$1895 8632742373
MERCURY
1997 MOUNTAINEER
5.0 ItrV8eng,160kmi
all serv records avail.
$4100 352-586-4328




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchairvan with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan SE
Loaded, V6, 7 pass., 6
door, CD, tilt cruise,
garaged, clean, $3,850
352-212-9383










2005 HD 1200C
EZ Finance $3,900.

2004 YAMAHA
VSTAR 1100
BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.

2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14,500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047






'01 HD ROAD KING
Loaded $7,800.

'13 HD STREET GLIDE
Low Miles $18,500.

'06 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC TRIKE Full
Conversion $21,000.

'08 HONDA GOLD
WING TRIKE
Loaded $24,900.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047

HONDA
1995 Goldwing
61K miles, Exc
Cond. Asking $4500
(352) 212-8696
HONDA
'07 VTX-1300, low mi-
les, custom, worth
$6500, asking $5500
OBO 352-697-1205
KAWSAKI
1999 VULCAN
Low miles, in storage
5 years $1500
352-228-9058
Open Motorcycle
Trailer, great for Harley,
Goldwing, or cruiser
type cycle. Will carry
3 dirt bikes, or 1 quad.
Good tires, $650 obo
727-744-2498
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
ong doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4,500. 352-513-4257




ary28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


804-0214 THCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meetings to which all interested persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting, Committee Meetings and Public Hearing: Consider
SWFWMD business. The Governing Board meeting will be followed by a tour of Terra
Ceia Preserve Frog Creek at 2519 85th Street East, Palmetto, FL 34221. All or part of
this meeting may be conducted by means of communications media technology in
order to permit maximum participation of Governing Board members.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Sarasota Service Office, 6750 Fruitville Road, Sarasota FL 34240
A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;l(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211
For more information, you may contact: luanne.stout@watermatters.org;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14,2014. #EXE0305


805-0214 FCRN
FDEP Notice of Intent
Public Notice
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Division of Air Resource Management, Office of Permitting and Compliance
Draft/Proposed Permit Revision No. 0170004-042-AV
Draft/Proposed Permit Revision No. 0170004-043-AV
Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Power Plant
Citrus County, Florida
Applicant: The applicant for these projects is Duke Energy Florida, Inc. The
applicant's responsible official and mailing address are: Mr. Robby Odom, Station
Manager -Crystal River Plant and Fuel Operations, Duke Energy Florida, Inc., 299 First
Avenue, North, Mail Code CN77, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701.
Facility Location: The applicant operates the existing Crystal River Power Plant,
which is located in Citrus County at 15760 West Power Line Street, Crystal River, Flor-
ida.
Facility Description: The existing facility consists of the following emissions units: four
coal-fired fossil fuel steam generating units with electrostatic precipitators; two natu-
ral draft cooling towers; two sets of mechanical draft cooling towers (one set of
"helper" cooling towers and a second set of "modular" cooling towers); coal and ash
material handling facilities; and relocatable diesel fired generators. The Crystal River
Energy Complex also includes the nuclear unit and associated facilities permitted
under the same Title V air operation permit.
Project 1 (0170004-042-AV): The applicant applied on November 14, 2013, to the
Department for a revised Title V air operation permit to incorporate certain provisions
of final air construction permit Nos. 0170004-030-AC and 0170004-037-AC. Permit No.
0170004-030-AC established the final carbon monoxide (CO) best available control
technology (BACT) emission limit and Permit No. 0170004-037-AC authorized the
construction/installation of a hydrated lime injection storage and transfer system for
Units 4 and 5 to mitigate sulfuric acid mist emissions generated across the recently
added selective catalytic reduction systems.
Project 2 (0170004-043-AV): The applicant also applied on December 31, 2013, to
the Department for a Title V air operation permit revision to incorporate the condi-
tions of air construction permit Nos. 0170004-017-AC, 0170004-036-AC and
0170004-038-AC associated with the Best Available Retrofit Technology (BART) deter-
minations for Crystal River Units 1 and 2 (Crystal River South or CRS) into the TV permit.
In addition, this application required the development of a revised particulate mat-
ter (PM) compliance assurance monitoring (CAM) Plan for Units 1 and 2 that reflects
the revised PM emission limits and associated upgrades to the electrostatic precipi-
tators.
These projects are the third and fourth revisions to Title V air operation permit No.
0170004-024-AV, which was last renewed with an effective date of January 1,2010.


SION, SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT ACROSS AN EXISTING CANAL TO BE USED IN CON-
JUNCTION WITH OTHERS.
TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME SITUATED THEREON, WHICH IS AFFIXED TO THE
AFOREDESCRIBED REAL PROPERTY AND INCORPORATED THEREIN, DESCRIBED AS A 1984
BERK DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH THE ID NOS. FLFL2AD463205165 AND
FLFL2BD463205165.
has been filed against you and you are required to file a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Amber B. Parker, MoCalla Raymer, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St. Suite
660, Orlando, FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above- styled Court
on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 15th day of January, 2014.
(SEAL)
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
/s/BY: Sonia Prylepa, Deputy Clerk
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 7 & 14, 2014. 12-02376-1


812-0221 FCRN
Corbett, SeanW. 2013-CA-001103A NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITIN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case#: 2013-CA-001103 A
Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as Successor
by Merger to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Sean W. Corbett a/k/a Sean Corbett; et al.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO: Michelle Denise Corbett a/k/a Michelle D. Corbett a/k/a Michelle Corbett;
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN:
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, 4201 South Rainbow Drive, Inverness, FL 34452
Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said
Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants
are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through,
under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named
Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such
of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents
or otherwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Citrus
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:
LOTS 61, 62, AND 63, BLOCK 309, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST, ACCORDING
TO PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 19 THROUGH 33,
INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

more commonly known as 4201 South Rainbow Drive, Inverness, FL 34452..
This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within
thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there af-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 19th day of November, 2013.
Angela Vick, Circuit and County Courts,
(COURTSEAL)
By:/s/Dawn Nampel, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Street, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
Published in the CIRTRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14 & 21,2014. 13-261658


813-0221 FCRN
Olbek-Tooker, Anita 2013-CA-000478 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITIN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case#: 2013-CA-000478
The Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of New York,
as successor-in-interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as
Trustee for Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities, Bear Stearns
ALT-A Trust, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-1
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Anita Olbek-Tooker; et al.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO: The Unknown Spouse of Anita Olbek-Tooker a/k/a Anita Tooker;
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN:
LAST KNOW ADDRESS, 11941 WTimberlane Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448 and
Anita Olbek-Tooker a/k/a Anita Tooker;
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN:
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, 11941 WTimberlane Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448
Residence unknown, If living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defend-
ants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trus-
tees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown De-
fendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Citrus
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:
LOT 43, BLOCK 442, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST FIRST ADDITION,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGES 44 THROUGH 58, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
more commonly known as 4978 East Triss Street, Inverness, FL 34452.
This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within
thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there af-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 15th day of January, 2014.
Angela Vick, Circuit and County Courts,
(COURTSEAL)
By:/s/Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Street, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
Published in the CIRTRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14 & 21,2014. 13-256042


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foreclosure Sale
Acton Nofices I


Foreclosure Sale
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C14 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


Permitting Authority: Applications for Title V air operation permits for facilities that
contain Acid Rain units are subject to review in accordance with the provisions of
Chapter 403, Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters 62-4, 62-210, 62-213 and 62-214, of
the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.). The proposed project is not exempt from
air permitting requirements and a Title V air operation permit is required to operate
the facility. The Office of Permitting and Compliance in the Division of Air Resource
Management is the Permitting Authority responsible for making a permit determina-
tion for this project. The Permitting Authority's physical address is: 2600 Blair Stone
Road, Tallahassee, Florida. The Permitting Authority's mailing address is: 2600 Blair
Stone Road, MS #5505, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. The Permitfing Authority's tel-
ephone number is 850/717-9000.
Project File: A complete project file is available for public inspection during the nor-
mal business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except legal
holidays), at the address indicated above for the Permitting Authority. The complete
project file includes the draft/proposed permits, the Statements of Basis, the applica-
tions, and the information submitted by the applicant, exclusive of confidential rec-
ords under Section 403.111, F.S. Interested persons may view the draft/proposed
permits by visiting the following website:
httb://www.deb.state.fl.us/air/emission/abds/default.asD and entering the permit
numbers shown above. Interested persons may contact the Permitting Authority's
project review engineers for additional information at the address or phone number
listed above.
Notice of Intent to Issue Permits: The Permitting Authority gives notice of its intent to
issue a revised Title V air operation permit to the applicant for the projects described
above. The applicant has provided reasonable assurance that continued operation
of the existing equipment will not adversely impact air quality and that the project
will comply with all appropriate provisions of Chapters 62-4, 62-204, 62-210, 62-212,
62-213, 62-214, 62-296 and 62-297, F.A.C. The Permitting Authority will issue a final
permit in accordance with the conditions of the draft/proposed permits unless a re-
sponse received in accordance with the following procedures results in a different
decision or a significant change of terms or conditions.
Comments: The Permitting Authority will accept written comments concerning the
draft/proposed Title V air operation permits for a period of 30 days from the date of
publication of the Public Notice. Written comments must be received by the close
of business (5:00 p.m.), on or before the end of this 30-day period by the Permitting
Authority at the above address. As part of his or her comments, any person may
also request that the Permitting Authority hold a public meeting on this permitting
action. If the Permitting Authority determines there is sufficient interest for a public
meeting, it will publish notice of the time, date, and location in the Florida Adminis-
trative Weekly (FAW). If a public meeting is requested within the 30-day comment
period and conducted by the Permitting Authority, any oral and written comments
received during the public meeting will also be considered by the Permitting Author-
ity. If timely received written comments or comments received at a public meeting
result in a significant change to the draft/proposed permits, the Permitting Authority
shall issue a revised draft/proposed permit and require, if applicable, another Public
Notice. All comments filed will be made available for public inspection. For addi-
tional information, contact the Permitting Authority at the above address or phone
number.
Petitions: A person whose substantial interests are affected by the proposed permitt-
ing decisions may petition for an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to
written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S., must be filed within 14 days of publica-
tion of the Public Notice or receipt of a written notice, whichever occurs first. Under
Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who asked the Permitting Authority for
notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of that notice,
regardless of the date of publication. A petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to
the applicant at the address indicated above, at the time of filing. A petition for ad-
ministrative hearing must contain the information set forth below and must be filed
(received) with the Agency Clerk in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Common-
wealth Boulevard, MS 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000,
Aaencv.Clerk@deb.state.fl.us, before the deadline. The failure of any person to file
a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that
person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party
to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will
be only at the approval of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compli-
ance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Permitting Authority's action
is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each
agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b) The
name, address, any email address, telephone number and any facsimile number of
the petitioner; the name, address, any email address, telephone number, and any
facsimile number of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address
for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of
how the petitioner's substantial interests will be affected by the agency determina-
tion; (c) A statement of when and how each petitioner received notice of the
agency action or proposed decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of mate-
rial fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of
the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts the petitioner contends war-
rant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) A statement of the
specific rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of
the agency's proposed action including an explanation of how the alleged facts re-
late to the specific rules or statutes; and, (g) A statement of the relief sought by the
petitioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wishes the agency to take with
respect to the agency's proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the ma-
terial facts upon which the Permitting Authority's action is based shall state that no
such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set
forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency
action, the filing of a petition means that the Permitting Authority's final action may
be different from the position taken by it in this written notice of Intent to Issue Air
Permit. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final decision
of the Permitting Authority on the application have the right to petition to become a
party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation: Mediation is not available in this proceeding.
EPA Review: EPA has agreed to treat the draft/proposed Title V air operation permit
as a proposed Title V air operation permit and to perform its 45-day review provided
by the law and regulations concurrently with the public comment period, provided
that the applicant also transmits an electronic copy of the required proof of publica-
tion directly to EPA at the following email address: oauendo.ana@epa.gov. Al-
though EPA's 45-day review period will be performed concurrently with the public
comment period, the deadline for submitting a citizen petition to object to the EPA
Administrator will be determined as if EPA's 45-day review period is performed after
the public comment period has ended. The final Title V air operation permit will be
issued after the conclusion of the 45-day EPA review period so long as no adverse
comments are received that result in a different decision or significant change of
terms or conditions. The status regarding EPA's 45-day review of this project and the
deadline for submitting a citizen petition can be found at the following website ad-
dress: http://www.epa.aov/reaion4/air/permits/florida.htm.
Objections: Finally, pursuant to 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 7661d(b)(2),
any person may petition the Administrator of the EPA within 60 days of the expiration
of the Administrator's 45-day review period as established at 42 U.S.C. Section
7661d(b)(1), to object to the issuance of any Title V air operation permit. Any peti-
tion shall be based only on objections to the permit that were raised with reasonable
specificity during the 30-day public comment period provided in the Public Notice,
unless the petitioner demonstrates to the Administrator of the EPA that it was imprac-
ticable to raise such objections within the comment period or unless the grounds for
such objection arose after the comment period. Filing of a petition with the Adminis-
trator of the EPA does not stay the effective date of any permit properly issued pur-
suant to the provisions of Chapter 62-213, F.A.C. Petitions filed with the Administrator
of EPA must meet the requirements of 42 U.S.C. Section 7661d(b)(2) and must be
filed with the Administrator of the EPA at: U.S. EPA, 401 M Street, S.W., Washington,
D.C. 20460. For more information regarding EPA review and objections, visit EPA's
Region 4 web site at http://www.epa.aov/reaion4/air/permits/florida.htm.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14, 2014.


806-0214 THCRN
2/28 Uen Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Superior Towing / C&M
Towing gives Notice of
Foreclsure eof Lien and in-


Meeting^^
Notices


tent to sell these vehicles
on 2/28/2014, 09:00 am at
2157 NE Jacksonville Rd
Ocala, FL 34470, pursuant
to subsection 713 78 of the
Florida Statutes Superior
Towing /C&M Towing re-

MeetingB
Notices


serves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids
4M2XV11TXXDJ26751
1999 Mercury
1P4GP44G1WB543942
1998 Plymouth
FEBRUARY 14, 2014


Meeting^^
Notices^^


807-0214 FCRN
02/27 Meeting Citrus County Ibrary System
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Special Ubrary Advisory Board will hold their regular Meeting at
Lakes Region Library
1511 Druid Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
ANY PERSON DESIRING FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS MEETING MAY CON-
TACT THE LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD RECORDING SECRETARY AT THE CITRUS COUNTY
LIBRARY SYSTEM, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 425 W. ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD, BEVERLY
HILLS, FLORIDA 34465. TELEPHONE (352) 746-9077
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 111 WEST MAIN STREET, THIRD FLOOR, INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450,
(352) 341-6560, AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TrY TELEPHONE (352) 249-1292.
/s/ J.J. Kenney
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION OF THE
GOVERNING BODYWITH RESPECTTO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED ATTHIS MEETING WILL
NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE MAY NEED TO PRO-
VIDE THAT VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD IN-
CLUDES TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
(SECTION 286.0101, FLORIDA STATUES)
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14, 2014.

809-0214 FCRN
02/25/14 Ordinance Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance enti-
tled:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, BY THE CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS CREATING
A CODE OF CONDUCT FOR CITRUS COUNTY OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES; PROVIDING
CERTAIN FINDINGS; CREATING SECTION 2-207 OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE OF ORDI-
NANCES ADOPTING A CIVILITY AND DECORUM CODE FOR PUBLIC MEETINGS; CREAT-
ING SECTION 2-208 OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCES TO PROHIBIT THE
BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS FROM INTERFERING WITH THE PERFORMANCE OF
THE DUTIES OF COUNTY EMPLOYEES UNDER THE DIRECT OR INDIRECT SUPERVISION OF
THE COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR; CREATING SECTION 2-209 OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE
OF ORDINANCES PROHIBITING ANY FORM OF WORKPLACE HARASSMENT; PROVIDING
FOR INCLUSION INTO THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR
MODIFICATIONS THAT MAY ARISE FROM CONSIDERATION AT PUBLIC HEARING; PRO-
VIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 25th day of February, 2014, at
2:00 PM, at which time and place any and all persons interested may present any
matter for or against the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Com-
mission. Copies of the proposed ordinance may be reviewed in the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Court-
house, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he will need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall in-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.


J.J.KENNEY
CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14, 2014.

808-0214 FCRN
02/25/14 Ordinance Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance enti-
tled:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING SECTION 2-49, CITRUS
COUNTY CODE, ENTITLED PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AT BOARD MEETINGS; PROVIDING
FOR REPEALER, SEVERABILITY, INCLUSION IN THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE, MODIFICA-
TIONS THAT MAY ARISE FROM CONSIDERATION AT PUBLIC HEARING; AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 25th day of February, 2014, at
1:45 PM, at which time and place any and all persons interested may present any
matter for or against the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Com-
mission. Copies of the proposed ordinance may be reviewed in the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Court-
house, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he will need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall in-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
J.J.KENNEY
CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 14, 2014.


a


896-0214 FCRN
Invitation to Bid 14-01
PUBLIC NOTICE
COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT
3001 SW College Road, Ocala FL. 34474
ITB 14-01 Beverage Services
ITB 14-01 Bid Documents can be obtained on January 27, 2014
College of Central Florida is seeking sealed Bids from beverage companies inter-
ested in providing beverage services at College of Central Florida, Hampton and
Levy Campuses.
For Solicitation Inquiries: Steve B. Ash, Interim Director of Purchasing
(352) 854-2322 Extension 1278
ITS 1r- 01 Mannntnr PDre-Bid Conference will be h eldon.


Date Friday February 14, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM
Location: CF Ocala Campus, Financial Operations
Founder's Hall, Building 1, Room 105

ITB 14-01 Bids will be accepted until
Date: Friday March 7, 2014
Time: 2:00 PM
Location: CF Ocala Campus, Financial Operations
Founder's Hall, Building 1, Room 112
An Equal Opportunity College
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 31,


803-0214 FCRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-


ness under the fictitious
name of
Faher & Son Lawn care &
Pressure Washing
located at 9513 E. Village
Green Cir., Inverness, FL.,
34450, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State,


February 7 & 14, 2014.


D i v i
sion of Corporations, Tal
lahassee, Florida.
DATED at Inverness,
Florida this 12th day of
February, 2014.
/s/Phillip G. Brown, Owner
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
February 14, 2014.


w239o. f OIr 2IL Io O8o

S15.880 ^23ino [j18.880l2O4moj $12.880fl Oimo I$Zi.880lS25iio.


12 B M W 3811 ........................................................................ M 2808 ,,,,$25,880
13 BUICK ENCO RE .............................................................. M 2906........19,880........$299
12 CADILLAC CTS COUPE PERFORMANCE ....................M2653,,,$23,880........$349
13 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT................................................. M2879,,,4$11,880........$179
13 CHEVROLET IMPALA LTZ.............................................. M2846,,,$13,880........$205
13 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT............................................... M2793,,,,,,$14,880........$219
13 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA SPORT F LT............................. M2909,,,,,,$14,880........$219
13 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT ...........................................M2898,,,,,,$19,880........$299
13 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN LT........................................ M2748,,,4$31,880
13 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LT.......................................... M2849,,,,,,$24,880
13 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING............................................. M2700,,,,,,$12,880, ,$189
13 DODGE AVENGER SXT.................................................. M2845,,,,,,$11,880,,,,,,,,$179
13 DODGE CHALLENGER SXT.......................................... M2692,,,,,,$19,880........$299
13 DODGE CHARGER SXT................................................. M2832,,,,,,$17,880........$269
13 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CREW............................... M2743,,,,,,$15,880........$239
13 FIAT 500 PO P ..................................................................M 2901,,,,,,$10,880........$155
13 FORD FOCUS SEL.......................................................... M2771,,,,,,$12,880........$189
14 FORD TAURUS LIMITED................................................ M2828,,,4$20,880........$309
13 FO RD EDG E SEL ............................................................M 2871,,,,,,$19,880........$299
13 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED........................................... M2855,,,,,,$27,880
13 FO RD FLEX SEL ............................................................. M 2904,,, $20,880........$309
13 GMC TERRA IN SLE ........................................................M2891,,, $19,880........$299
13 G M C Y UK O N SLT ............................................................M 2729,,,,,,$29,880
12 HONDAACCORD SDN LX........................................... M2699A,,,4$13,880........$205
12 HONDA CIVIC SDN LX....................................................M2822,,,$12,880........$189
12 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-LV6............................................M2818,,,4$23,880........$349
13 HONDA RIDGELINE........................................................M2779,,,,,,$22,880........$339






AutoMax


13 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS................................................. M2817,,,4$11,880........$179
13 HYUNDAI GENESIS V6................................................... M2886,,,4$19,880........$299
13 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS................................................. M2765,,,4$12,880........$189
13 HYUNDAI VELOSTER..................................................... M2777,,,4$13,880........$205
14 JEEP COMPASS SPORT................................................ M2896,,,4$15,888........$239
13JEEP PATRIOT SPORT................................................... M 2825,,,,,,$13,880........$205
13 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED LIFTED........................ M2751,,,4$29,880
13 KIA FO RTE SX ................................................................M 2820,,,,,,$13,880........$205
13 KIA O PTIM A LX ...............................................................M 2775,,,,,,$14,880........$219
13 LEX U S ES 350 ................................................................. M 2681 ,,, $29,880
13 LIN C O LN M KX .............................................................. ..M2672,,,,,,$26,880
13 MAZDA CX. 9 TO URING .................................................. M2740,,,,,,$21,880........$325
13 MAZ DA MAZ DA3 SPORT............................................... M2881,,,,,,$11,800,,,,,,,,$179
13 MAZ DA MAZ DA5............................................................M2752,,,,,,$12,880........$189
13 NISSAN FRONTIER SV ...................................................M2545,,,$19,880........$299
13 NISSA N MAXIMAS ......................................................... M 2878,,,$17,880........$269
13 NISSAN SENTRA SV ......................................................M2815,,,,,,$12,880........$189
13 TOYOTA AVALON XLE................................................... M2831,,,,,,$22,880,,,,,,,,$339
13 TOYOTA COROLLA S ..................................................... M 2582,,, $12,880,,,,4$189
13 TO YO TA FR SS ................................................................. M 2761 ,,,,,,$19,880,,,, ,$299
13 TO YO TA PRIUS............................................................... M 2686,,,,,,$16,880,,,,,,,,$255
13TOYO TA HIGHLANDER.................................................. M2823,,,,,,$22,880,,,,,,,,$339
13 TOYOTA SEQUOIA SR5 ................................................. M 2764,,, $21,880,,,,4$325
13 TOYOTA SIENNA LE....................................................... M 2591,,,,,,$20,880,,,,,,,,$309
13 VOLKSWAGON JETTA SEDAN SE................................ M2717,,,$12,880,,,,4$189
13VOLKSWAGON TIGUAN S .............................................M2876,,,,,,$17,880........$269
13 VOLKSWAGON TOUAREG LUXURY ............................M2791 ,,,,,,$27,880


198SI1t t


-cl'*32-0-00


*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS ARE WITH $1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS TAX,TAG, AND $495
ADMINISTRATION FEE. PAYMENTS ARE FOR 75 @ 2.9% MONTHS WITH APPROVED CREDIT.


I Misc Nt


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I idNoic s


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I Misc.Not


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I Notces


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I Noties


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buy or lease any New 2014 Nissan
New 2014 Nissan Altima S
VIM# EN333960
and pay less than
Black Book Value
for a used 2014. PresM-dn
You will pay less ,iVlu DaS
for a Brand New
2014 Nissan than you $2112 OVER
others pay for the SAVE: F, USED!
Same Vehicle Used. New 2014 Nissan
Frontier S
VIN# DN756226
It'sa_ _
ItS a MODEL#31014
Monumental I f..
Presidents Day ....



YOUS$ 2OO70VER
SAVE:"-, 6 -7USED
^{r. .^ ..........
LIG CRYSTAL,
v v---,.THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
800-584-8755 EXT10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:30am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pmn Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm n Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*Black Book Trade-in Value Is Based On Vehicle Being In Excellent Condition With Less Than 10,000 Miles. See Dealer For Details. -Price Includes All Rebates And Incentives, Not Everyone Will Qualify.
Excludes, Tax, Tag, Title And Dealer Fee $599.50 With Approved Credit. Pictures Are For Illustration Purposes Only, Prior Sales May Restrict Stock.


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAVE UP TO 14,000
ON ALL 2014
CAMRY'SW
-OR-
LEASE $ PER I
FORa I 36 MON1
$2,399 D


I 1 qBB


":::


-OR-
I10. -0
rHS U
)OWN


APR
FOR
60 MOS.


MINIMUM DISCOUNT OF 12,000
ON THE NEW
2014 PRIUS
OR LEASE FOR OR
4249 OTHS
24 9$2,399DOWN 0 / FOR 48 MOS.


MINIMUM DISCOUNT OF '2,000O
ON THE NEW
2014 RAV4
OR LEASE FOR OR
239Mo. 0%APR
36 MONTHS
23$2,399 DOWN 0 O 6 MOS.


.. MINIMUM DISCOUNT OF 12500
SON THE ALL NEW REDESIGNED
__ 2014 TUNDRAS


-OR-
LEASE$
FOR


PER MO.
36 MONTHS
$2,399 DOWN


-OR-


APR
FOR
36 MOS.


r uYf lI Eu VEqp 1 1F.L &mJ


866-361-1137
Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11lam-4pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat 8am-4pm


I


2014 Camry: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor= 00021, Tier IIll-IV Special Available, See Bulletin Example '14 MY "2546" Offer -$189 month, "$2,399 Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months- SETFOnly" 2014 Prius: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor= 00178, Tier IIll-IV Special
Available, See Bulletin Example '14MY "1223" Offer -$249 month, $2,399 Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months :ETF Only 2014 RAV4: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor= 00193,- in i special Available, See Bulletin Example '14MY' "4440" Offer -$239 month, $2,699
Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months "Through SETFOnly". 2014Tundra: Tier 1-2 Special Money Factor= 00190, Ti,, ini special Available, See Bulletin Example '14MY' "8240" Offer- $329 month, "$2,999 Down" -Tier 1-2, 36 Months "Through SETF Only-.


C16 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


iTTHOMH


ropp




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE


(AN





EVENT

DOWN

PAYMENT


DUEAT

SIGNING


IST MONTH'S

PAYMENT


Learn Why Ford Is
America's Favorite Brand
Call 352-795-7371 For Details.
2014 FOCUS
t$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 FUSION
(Z$279 mo.
f% e i A.1.., 1


- -- -


w


J3o Month Lease
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


.- \2014 ESCAPE
LA $279 mo.
W ~36 Month Lease
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2013 EDGE
$329 mo.
36 Month Lease
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.
2014 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
M SRP................................... $30,280
Customer Cash...................... $2,000
Ford Credit Customer Cash.....$1,000

S$27,280


F -1 5i0l...... ,1Iooo
C t 1 ized
Super Cr-e
XLi













Prc $59,9 [15
C sta .
.L pcalRti
Cu t m r* a h.......$ ,0

For Credit
C sto e a h........$ 5
SAL PRICE

$5666
BUILT

0@H.


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES


1QO/o ^
19 U Relax, It's Cov
9 1 72-po1uinl in pertl, o
A 7-fn s ear 101)000n11,-p.l
APR for 36 months 210"12 ( ""10
r \I, u F-JO:-, 1. 12iu-. r 1h..i',-n,


FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
ered.
b, Ford facIor-ltrained le.:hnicians
Ford Potveriraii WVarrait,[ Co.erage"
Ide Ford Limiled Varranti, Co,,erage-
r,....


. 'Call For Savings!
i 352-795-7371
II J I I .Ij" d ,l ... i..7.ii- 1,),-1. i '1 lT jI I 1.. I ; ,- fI .- I, ,Il.. 1,- ,, ; L, l I -I,- I' I |:I


2012 FORD MUSTANG 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4WD
-'4 11(1):11 ml.) ]i.i1i: il, GP171' 1. 1)(r11) l ., G4T(i,)Il -43,000 miles. GP172
$17,950 $17,950 $17,950


2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT 2011 LINCOLN MKX
One wriet'r luIo il Irde. G- TI 1i A 23,000 m les, leaitier. GP 1699 L6Cnlli.tr -..K) iile, i:.l. .I.
$24,450 $26,950 $26,950


2011 FORD RANGER
On- co '-i 17'('10 n18 l, s m i" 1 ,
$18,950


2013 LINCOLN MKT
lu0,uuu000 Miles. GPRp I
$30,950


2011 LINCOLN MKZ
CO n- c In I,, I,',1i( 1) s G -1, 4-1
$20,950


2013 LINCOLN MKZ
7 i(" 1) :.- r 1. 4: (,d4c 1 .I GPl'1745
$37,950


NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR


SUPER CENTER


2007 FORD FUSION SEL
$7,950


2006 CHEVY MALIBU MAX LT
$7,950


2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS
Le~$r, 950."- ,.
$8,950

14tY


2007 MERCURY hY GRAND MARQUI
$8,950


2008 FORD FUSION SE 2011 I
.Li ,l l' : I I'"l .- I
$12,950 $1


ESCAPE XLT
I., 1 h l, 0
3,950


2010 FORD F150 XLT
ni. ,i r ". -a .i.
$15,950
6- 4 4p r 1 .0


2009 LINCOLN TOWN CAR SIG. LTD
$19,950


2009 FORD EDGE LIMITED
$15,950


2012 FORD FUSION SPORT
$19 ,9 0. I..'1 I -'... ,
$1 9,950


2013 TOYOTA COROLLA LE 2010 FORD FISO REG CAB
$15,950 $15,950


2008 JEEP WRANGLER
$20,950


2010 FORD F!50 XLT
$2 0.', 9: 50rr:,n. iG. ..
$20,950


2011 HONDA ACCORD
$16,950
I



2012 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
I $25,950


2010 FORD TAURUS LTD
" -1 -II l I h,, 1 -I45"., -
$18,450


2013 TOYOTA PRERUNNER
$26,950


U0

Nick Nicholas

Crystal River Hwy.19
Y^ ww.nickn., ithainsflord>lintalnO.co 795r vl


LINCOLN


N.
171


Ana C rzii


Nick C: iM"=
Nicholas
Ford
Lincoln |


SM-w n-t nnt


*Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 3/31/14.


--w
aft.. I


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C17


144 F-- mw




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK#C14106 0 MSRP $25,330
unt '800 DealMer DIsont
ate sS00 ...Rebate.
ito 55M-----Loal
AA 7SATr II


New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT
STK #C14112 MSRP $35,535
'l,2OO__ Dealer Discount
1,000 Rebate
SSOOLO
....------------U5AA
$2,500--- Cash orhade Equity

^-$29.585.
Drv $ ff |Pw~t.
BFrO^'3A&7 Um"s


New 2014 Chew
SONICSEDAN
SIK #04168 MSRP $18,150
s350 D eawDsot
,O00-Rebate
S750 USAA
2500 CashorTra&ud
$13*050
i 2 ft Mm


w2014 Chev
APALA L
C14005 0 MSRP $32,5
~J
C.r sh erDd
->-- Cash oTradl


ML I


I' New 2014 Chew
CAMARO 2LS
75 STK#C14094 MSRP $26,235
iscun '700 ____ Deale Discount
la$500- Rebate
.USAA ^0 ^ ^............y.^^^
eEqulty s'750
s2,500 Cash orTrade Equty


MI DAMv $
LB~em Fwo NOWt -c VLl


New 2014 Chevy
CRUZE IS
STK#C14047 MSRP $19,255
. ... ...Dealeriscout
Rebate
50___Loyaty
w750 USAA
.2..00 CashorTtadequlty

YOUf -14,25
D" $1 IM
Drit Lou


New 2014 Chew
TAHOELS
STK #CT14041 MSRP $45,115
12,D00___Dealer Dbscot.
112500 Reb____oalte
'750 ______USAA
%2W00- Cash orTrade Equity
You3Pay 35,865
drw S&C ffLa
WtON'*^ tease


OVER 9W
Used & Certified
SPre-Loved Vehicles


Vehicles!


I q
Alt Pre-Loved Certified


2YEARSc
24,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealer for complete details.


Check Out Our REALY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


OSOMWLWRPAaNCA
12356, LEATHER, 3RD ROW SEAT



P12342, TURBO, ALLOWWHEELS
$%A"S


11FORDFESTADRHBSES
12216, ABS, DUALAIRBAGS
Sumn


09SUBURMJFOfES'ERAWT
1225, LL A lEDOI, HEA WED LEH
f1ti8


PLUS MANY
MORE TO
CHOOSE FROM!


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTYT


05WOTASUENNA
123%
$7X6


12,L WERNEVK OUNWNSTR
P12mN66 LEATHER SEAIT.SONStAR
MU.16


08CHEVHIRLT 0 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE
12157, CUAFAX OWNER, CLOTHSEATS 1227tTaEIll, NRAO(fAIMWHa1i5



2011 FORD FUSION SE 10EVY51=EUDOEGACU
12330,V6WR WINDS ,LOCKS,1MIT P12286,V6,DLIALAIRUBAGS
$12z28 $12,391


061FINITYM45 11HODAACODCOUPEX
123 0, LOADED,.NAVI.RERSEATWD 12260, SUNROOFALLOYWHEELS
SS1% % $416360
C-ni


orYoul


Et r-I
'.kIL~^^ v Gf^^LETJ BB*


BUL
MSRP $23,335
-Dealer Disc
-- -Reba
__ L-


orTradeEquity 2,500 .- Cash orTrmde uty
V355 $20,280
/SeMO. Driv&4% paft*"0
me ftr*t W IC Lame


-1 .. ... .. ... Jq~l~


i


C18 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


An




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


gible active or retired members of the US Military & their spouses towards any
v Honda vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


anywhere in the world first, but

ECKWITH

ADLAS"


A


2013 Honda
2WD2.4 L4EX


eyLast!


...for a New 2014 Honda
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2EEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


...for a New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...fora New 2014 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3EEW-
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...fora New 2014 Honda
CR-VLX2WD
Model RM3K3EEW-ComeSeeWhyThe CR-VlIsThe Best
SellingCompact SUV In America! Save WhileThey Last!


...fora New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW
AWD AUTOMATIC


Pre-Owned Vehicles!


s500 MIUTARY
APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include


Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
Spd#ealer fv4r compile detadi,


Can Do For You!


a.com


a1
II
-|


'See dealer for details. tFor eligible active or retired membersof the US Military and their spouses towards any new Honda .... I .. .... *qb
vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. Used as a down payment or capcost reduction toward the purchase or lease of -
any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda APR, Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program
through HFS (excludes Zero Due at Signing Lease Program). Must meet certain credit criteria established by HFS, and vehicle must
be eligible for new-vehicle rates. See dealer for complete details. ** Plus $790 destination charge and options. 1.36 month closed end ..
lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2995 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment,
tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost. 2.36 month closed end lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles
per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $999 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost.
3.36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,689 with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2000 cash or trade equity. Payment is plus tax, tag and lease and state fees
due at signing. Options at additional cost. tCovers internal lubricant parts. See dealer for details. All pre-owned vehicles include $2500 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.


new Honda
3Doroved credit


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014 C19


wl" r
f-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r~ii
NI


I


,L-A


s27,588*
0% AVAILABLE


2o14TOWN &
COUNTRY


$27,488
0% AVAILABLE
For up ^ t oTa(~ 36 Mo inths ^^^


$18,988
$189 PER MONTH+


2014 GRAND
CARAVAN


s18,968
0% AVAILABLE
^^^^^rwwwt iuils^^^^


s22,688*
$198 PER MONTH+


2014 GRAND
CHEROKEE


$349+
PER MONTH


39MothLe.e
$2,99 De a Sinin


ma


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA, FL


Je CRYSTAL S
IAM CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM -L
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE


2077 HIGHWAY 44 W.
INVERNESS, FL


800-584-8755 ext 10 I CrystalAutos.com
*PRICES INCLUDE ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT +LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 32,500 MILES FOR
THE LIFE OFTHE LEASE. $2,999 DUEATSIGNING. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE$599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. W)%
FINANCING AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIt. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


~A


A


C2 I 3 R S I'- E

2014 300


214 JOURNEY


Jeep

2014 CHEROKEE


14358 CORTEZ BLVD.
BROOKSVILLE, FL


C20 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014


^ ^