Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
System ID:
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Full Text


Strong finish: Citrus' Evans claims sixth in state meet /B1


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH .... ...
71
LOW Decreasing
46 clouds.PAGE A4
*w PAGE A4


CI T RRUS COUNT Y R






Sk- www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 186


EXCURSIONS:


w n


History tour
16th-century Spanish
ships on display./Page
A15
LOCAL NEWS:


Rained out
Mother nature crashes
annual event./Page A3


BUSINESS:
o_____,__


Flying high
Airline CEO changing
the way we fly./Page Dl
WEEKLY FEATURE:
Back in Time
This
dapper
young
man was a
shop clerk.
Read
snippets
from 1939
and 1953
editions of
the Citrus
County
Chronicle.
/Page A8


NATION:


Deep freeze
Winter weather leaves
thousands without
power/Page A14


Shibori
Japanese dye process
gains fans./HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ................ D5
Crossword ...............A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ..................... A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together................... A22
Veterans ........ A18


6 t I! 1 1 LIJ!I oI


Decade of



mending hearts


Panel



selects



CEO for



hospital

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS -A health care executive
with 31 years of administrative experience
is poised to become the in-
terim chief executive offi-
cer of Citrus Memorial
Health System.
Robert Davis III, of
Tampa, received unani-
mous backing Saturday
evening from a four-person
committee representing
both the Citrus County Robert
Hospital Board and Davis III
Citrus Memorial Health choice for
Foundation. interim CEO.
The committee inter-
viewed four applicants Sat-
urday afternoon. After a brief break, each
member immediately said Davis was his or


See Page A9


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle
Interventional Cardiologist Dr. Hari Kannan performs a heart catheterization Thursday
morning at the Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center in Inverness. The hospital is
celebrating the 10th anniversary of the center, where 2,000 open-heart surgeries have
been performed.


Citrus Memorial

Heart and Vascular

Center saves thousands
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
INVERNESS
patient needing open-heart
surgery had to leave the
county to get help. But during
the past decade, since Jan. 5,
2004, more than 2,000 open-heart surger-
ies have been performed at Citrus
Memorial Heart and Vascular Center
Before the center opened at Citrus Me-
morial hospital, 450 Citrus County resi-
dents had been estimated to leave the
county every year for heart surgery,
which imposed travel and overnight stays
on family members, as patients sought
life-saving treatment in Ocala,
Gainesville, Tampa and beyond.
Since 2,000 open-heart surgeries and
10,000 catheterizations have been per-
formed at the center, hospital CEO Ryan
Beaty recently reflected on how well the
center had hit its goals, with perhaps a
surprising conclusion: Success cannot be
measured through the number of
procedures, but through the number of
prevention.
"At the very beginning, we had the
expectation that we'd get up to 300
See Page A8


Open-heart surgery
patient 10years later
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
LECANTO At 89, Donald Young
doesn't remember much about his
quadruple bypass open-heart surgery
10 years ago, but he does remember
being thankful the heart unit at Citrus
Memorial Health System was there.
"It was in the afternoon, and I had
chest pains," he said. "My wife drove me
to the hospital, and the next thing I
knew the doctor was talking to me about
what he was going to do."
He said the surgeon explained to him
and his frightened wife, Helen, who
died in 2013, that "it's just like being a
plumber I can take you apart, fix what's
bad, put you back together and you'll be
OK."
Young, whose mother and father both
died from heart attacks, told the doctor
he wanted to go home and come back in
the morning.
"He told me, 'If you go home, you
won't come back tomorrow!"' he said.
"So that was that. After it was all over I
was fine all new."
Although he doesn't remember much
about that time, he does remember the
red heart pillow that every heart patient
See PATIENT/Page A8


Suncoast trail could bring water


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The proposed Suncoast
Parkway 2 project could play
a role in getting water and
sewer to the county's enter-
prise zone.
Getting adequate water
and wastewater services to
the enterprise zone has been
a challenge in positioning the


property for development
and could cost about $15 mil-
lion.
Supplying water would
cost an estimated $9.5 mil-
lion, and wastewater service
about $5.5 million.
Most of the enterprise zone
is approximately 9.26 square
miles in northwest Citrus
County around the Cross
Florida Barge Canal and the


area planned for Port Cit-
rus. It includes a second,
much smaller area, a little
more than half a square mile,
east of U.S. 19 and south of
West Longfellow Street in
Homosassa.
Designation as an enter-
prise zone required state ap-
proval and offers state tax
See Page A9


Associated Press
This image provided by the New York Public
Library shows one of the cigarette
advertisements from 1920s through the
1950s included in a 2008 exhibit at the
library. The ad featuring a baby reads, "Gee,
Dad, you always get the best of everything...
even Marlboro!"


Experts


look to end


of smoking

MIKE STOBBE
AP medical writer
ATLANTA Health officials have begun
to predict the end of cigarette smoking in
America.
They have long wished for a cigarette-
free America, but shied away from calling
for smoking rates to fall to zero or near zero
by any particular year The power of to-
bacco companies and popularity of their
products made such a goal seem like a pipe
dream.
But a confluence of changes has recently
prompted public health leaders to start
throwing around phrases like "endgame"
and "tobacco-free generation." Now, they
talk about the slowly declining adult smok-
ing rate dropping to 10 percent in the next
decade and to 5 percent or lower by 2050.
See Page AO10





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Floating classroom

Students learn about marine science, fishing


ROCHELLE KAISER
Staff writer
Fifth-grade students
at Homosassa Ele-
mentary School
took their class-
room outdoors for a day of
learning on the high seas.
With assistance of the
Homosassa Guides Asso-
ciation, several fishing
guides volunteered their
time, fuel, fishing poles
and bait on Wednesday to
take students out on the
Homosassa River for a
day of fishing and
learning.
"I've never caught a fish
before," said Heather
Osborn.
Osborn and her fellow
classmates Devon Kemp-
ton and Katie Lafritz
were excited to spend the
day on the river School
Board member Sandy
Balfour was the floating
classroom teacher for the
day She boarded the boat
armed with a lesson plan
and a test her students
would take at the end of
the trip.
There was plenty to
keep everyone busy for
several hours. Water tem-
peratures needed to be
taken and species offish,


birds and other natural
wildlife needed to be
identified.
Captain Rick Spratt, a
native of Citrus County
and graduate of Lecanto
High School, provided in-
valuable knowledge of the
river that helped students
better understand science
terms such as herbivores,
carnivores and omni-
vores, also part of the
day's lesson on the float-
ing classroom.
Spratt seemed to know
the lesson plan better
than anyone else and was
prepared to answer many
of the students' questions.
He's been taking students
on the river for the past
five years. As a biologist
and 22-year officer with
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, his knowledge
was helpful in answering
the tough questions.
Before setting off,
Spratt explained the
parts of a live shrimp that
would be used for bait,
and students recorded
their first water tempera-
ture of 60 degrees before
leaving the dock.
Balfour reviewed some
of the classwork students
had already learned as
Capt. Spratt guided the


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.


boat to a special fishing
location where he soon
prepared fishing poles
with artificial bait for
each student.
"I'm fishing for lady
fish," said Katie Lafritz.
It wasn't long before the
first lady fish was caught
and brought into the boat.
Students took turns esti-
mating the length and
weight of the fish before
officially measuring and
weighing the fish for Bal-
four to record.
Their initial estimates
may have been slightly
off, but as more and more
fish were caught, they
became very good at
estimating.
"Now my hands smell
like fish," said Devon
Kempton after releasing
the lady fish back into the
river
Kempton and Lafritz
have both been fishing
several times before, but
neither had caught a lady
fish until then.
Kempton, one of the
most experienced stu-


ROCHELLE KAISER/For the Chronicle
Heather Osborn shows off the first fish she's ever caught. The Homosassa Elementary
School student was among a group of fifth-graders from the school to be treated to a
day of fishing and learning on the Homosassa River, courtesy of the Homosassa Guides
Association.


dents, helped other stu-
dents throughout the trip,
often assisting them with
casting bait and removing
fish from hooks.
Another water tempera-
ture reading was taken,
and students were sur-
prised to learn the tem-
perature didn't change
even though they were
now out on the river
A change of fishing lo-
cations netted more fish
as Capt. Spratt guided the


students to a place where
small mangrove snapper
were plentiful. This re-
quired a change of bait,
from artificial to live
shrimp.
"I got one, I got one,"
said Osborn as she
brought in her first fish.
"This is only the second
time I've been fishing. It's
a lot of fun. This is the
first time I've caught a
fish," she said.
A line of showers


brought everyone back to
the docks earlier than
planned, but the excite-
ment of the day continued
back at school where
everyone gathered to dis-
cuss the day
"The hands-on experi-
ence the students get and
the results we as fishing
guides hear on how well
the students do on the
FCAT makes all this
worthwhile," said Capt.
Spratt.


Accomplishments fly high


Special to the Chronicle
The following Civil Air Patrol cadets recently received certificates: C/AIC Michael A.
Bush, 1st Lt. John M. Korycki, C/AIC Karlin Ray, C/SrA. Pablo Remis, C/AIC Garrett
Wyman and C/SMSgt. Jonathan Dovi.



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Dunnellon 489-7353 Inverness 860-1037
i Crystal River 795-8600 Homosassa 621-7700


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Civil Air Patrol Cadet
Squadron FL-315 recently conducted its
annual awards banquet, highlighted by
the STEM ROBOTIC program, with these
cadets receiving certificates: C/A1C
Michael A. Bush, 1st Lt. John M. Korycki,
C/A1C Karlin Ray, C/SrA. Pablo Remis,
C/A1C Garrett Wyman and C/SMSgt.
Jonathan Dovi.
At the ceremony, Cadet Commander
1st Lt John M. Korycki received the pres-
tigious AFA Award and Squadron Cadet
of the Year Also present was Korean War
Veterans 1st Vice, Col. Bob Crawford, who
made a special donation presentation to
the squadron, recognizing C/A1C Michael


A. Bush with the Korean Veterans Award.
The Civil Air Patrol an auxiliary of
the U.S. Air Force offers cadet activi-
ties which range from and encompass
orientation powered and glider flights,
aerospace education, emergency serv-
ices, and cadet special activities.
CAP embraces leadership training and
core values, which make CAP a unique
organization serving the community and
nation.
Cadet Squadron FL-315 meets from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive at Inde-
pendence Highway (off of U.S.41).
To learn more about Civil Air Patrol
and its mission, go to its website at
www.gocivilairpatrolcom.


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I


A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


LOCAL







SPage A3 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY9,2014



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the Corridors initiative program offered
COUNTY


American Cancer
Society open house
The American Cancer
Society Resource Center
will host an open house
from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 13, at 208 Grace St. in
Inverness.
The Open House will pro-
vide cancer survivors and
caregivers the opportunity
to see what resources are
available to them through-
out the community, as well
as sign up for the Relay for
Life of Inverness/Lecanto
slated for April 4.
The American Cancer So-
ciety raises funds for cancer
patients in Citrus County in
order to provide rides to treat-
ment, a local resource room,
lodging and support in addi-
tion to funding cutting-edge
research. The Relay for Life
event is the culmination of
nearly one year of fundraising
efforts by local teams consist-
ing of businesses, families
and survivors.
Young Elvis singer
to appear at benefit
On Saturday, Feb. 22,
Cote Deonath -a 16-year-
old from Dunnellon -will
perform at 7:30 p.m. in the
Old Courthouse in Inverness.
While he is still too young
to perform in the Ultimate
Elvis Tribute Artist Contests
around the country, he has
performed for audiences
since he was 5.
All proceeds to benefit
the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum. Doors open
at 7 p.m. with cash bar and
snacks available. Tickets for
up-front and personal re-
served seating are $35;
other seats are $25.
At noon Sunday, Feb.
23, there will be a Gospel
Music and Brunch event in
the upstairs at the Old
Courthouse with Deonath
singing Elvis' renditions of
inspirational music. Seating
is limited to the first 120
people; no reserved seat-
ing. Doors open at 11:30
a.m. Tickets are $25.
For all tickets, call the
Old Courthouse at 352-341-
6427 or 352-341-6436.
Pet food donations
sought from public
Citrus County Animal
Services is asking for the
public's help in meeting the
needs of financially chal-
lenged citizens who own
pets. The goal is to afford
those residents the ability to
feed their pets.
Animal Services is asking
citizens to deliver donations
of dog and cat food to their
local food bank or to the An-
imal Services shelter in In-
verness to help those
residents keep their ani-
mals rather than surrender
them to the shelter because
they don't have the money
to feed them.
Monetary donations may
be mailed to Citrus County
Animal Services, 4030 S.
Airport Road, Inverness, FL
34450. The shelter is at the
end of Airport Road, which
is off U.S. 41 between the
Inverness Airport and the
county auditorium/fair-
grounds, just south of Inver-
ness. For information, call
352-746-8400.
Scouts to honor
two Citrus leaders
The local Boy Scouts are
going to honor two local
leaders as longtime sup-
porters of the organization.
The Gulf Ridge Council's
Withlacoochee District will
host its annual Boy Scouts
of America Dinner on
Thursday, Feb. 13, at the
Citrus Hills Golf and Coun-
try Club. The honorees will
be local banker Jack
Reynolds and retired
banker Paul Perregaux.
Both have a long history of
leadership with the Scouts.
Tables and tickets are
available to the event by
contacting District Execu-
tive Jennifer Siegert at


jsiegert@boyscouting.com
or at 352-232-0379.
-From staff reports


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Council
(CCC) is hosting a Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation presenta-
tion on its "Future Corridors
Initiative" and how Citrus County
fits into the plan at the CCC's
monthly meeting at 9 a.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 12, at the Beverly
Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle.
Coffee and networking begin at
8:30 a.m.
The Future Corridors Initiative is


a statewide effort led by the Florida
Department of Transportation
(FDOT). Its mission is to plan a
transportation system that main-
tains our economic competitive-
ness by meeting today's
transportation needs for moving
people and freight, and by planning
for future major transportation cor-
ridors in the decades to come.
The focus of the Feb. 12 presen-
tation will be "Tampa Bay to
Northeast Florida Study Area."
This study will assess the need for


better connectivity between
Tampa Bay and Jacksonville, two
large regions that are not well
connected today
An early focus of the study will
evaluate operational improve-
ments to Interstate 75 as well as
potential extensions of the Sun-
coast Parkway or Florida's Turn-
pike to improve connectivity in
the southern portion of the study
area.
The full study will explore a
possible new connection between


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chroni
Hundreds of runners, walkers and volunteers braved the weather Saturday morning for an opportunity
participate in the fourth annual Citrus County Blessings walk/run. However, Mother Nature had a different pla
for the morning as she brought buckets of water and lightning to the race, which resulted in a cancelation.


It was




and it was


rnnw
C


County Blessings runf canceled

County Blessings run/ 5acled


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CITRUS HILLS The clouds
opened up Saturday morning and
Citrus County became a giant rain
puddle.
However, that did not stop ap-
proximately 350 runners, walkers
and volunteers from participating
in the fourth annual Citrus County
Blessings run/walk.
"We were shocked at the num-
ber of people who preregistered
and still came in the pouring rain,"
said Debbie Lattin, Citrus County
Blessings program director "We
still had lines at the registration
table."
Lattin explained that Citrus
County Blessings is a program that
"feeds children on Saturdays and
Sunday when they are not in


school. When the students are in
school, they participate in a feder-
ally funded meal program. On the
weekends, often times they don't
have the nutritional food balance
that they get at school. We try to
bridge that meal gap for those
900 students involved."
Even though the run had a great
attendance, Mother Nature had a
trick up her sleeve.
"Behind the pouring down rain
that we are dealing with right now,
there are more storms and light-
ning coming, which would be re-
ally dangerous," Lattin said. "For
the safety of the runners and all of
our volunteers who are here this
morning, we canceled the event."
She said this is the first time in
four years that inclement weather
affected the race and that Citrus
County Blessings program is grate-


ful for the support and donation
"People know the Citrus Coun
Blessings program and they at
happy to make donations," Latt
said. "We are grateful that no oi
was hurt this morning and v
know that we made the right dec
sion."
Lattin was not sure if the rac
would be rescheduled.
"They made a contribution for
benefit and the icing on the cake
that they get to run a race," si
said. "It's hard to find a weekei
in Citrus County when there is n
an event happening."
DRC Sports, TLC Rehab ar
Suncoast Schools Federal Crec
Union sponsored the event
Contact Chronicle report
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-566
ext 1334, or eworthington
chronicleonline. corn.


LHS yearbook earns recognition


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer


Lecanto High School is not only
proud of its A' school grade, but its
yearbook, too.
For the second consecutive year
LHS's "Legacy" yearbook has been
selected as a National Sample Book
by Balfour Publishing.
"Every year our publisher- Bal-
four Publishing selects year-
books among the middle schools,
high schools and colleges that they
publish to use as National Sample
Books," said "Legacy" advisor Bev-
erly Sylvester. '"About 2 percent of
all of the books that they publish
are selected for this."
Sylvester explained that these
books are utilized at workshops as
"good example books."


The selection is not based on a
completed package but, instead, on
the current 360-page colored book
in progress.
"Our students do every aspect of
the book," Sylvester said. "We have
a professional photographer that
takes pictures for us but the stu-
dents take the majority of the pic-
tures. They write the stories and
captions. We don't use templates so
they create their own layouts with
Photoshop and Adobe InDesign.
They do sales and advertising. I
oversee the process but they pretty
much do every aspect."
Staffers through editors-in-chief
- freshmen through seniors con-
tribute to the lengthy process.
"The students are very excited
but it also puts a lot of pressure on
them to make sure that this is the


very best book," Sylvester said.'
those kids across the country
going to be looking at their bc
Also, it kind of lights a fire un
the juniors to do the best that tI
can do so that their book, when V
are seniors, will have the sa
distinction."
Sylvester said she is proud of.
staff and the year book and ho
students are, too. For seven year
a row the purchase price has
mained the same and she ho
this can continue with increa
sales.
The "Legacy" maintains me
bership in the Florida Schola:
Press Association, Journalism E
cation Association, Ameri
Scholastic Press Associat
and the Columbia Scholastic Pr
Association.


the Suncoast Parkway and 1-75 in
the Gainesville/Ocala area, as
well as enhanced connectivity be-
tween Gainesville/Ocala and the
Jacksonville area.
The Citrus County Council is a
nonprofit consortium of home-
owner associations, civic clubs
and environmental groups.
Monthly meetings are open to the
public.
For more information, call John
Wade, president, 352-341-1937, or
visitwww citruscountycouncil.org.



Removal

of boat

onCR

agenda

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
When the meet Monday
evening, it appears city of-
ficials are set to move on
the owner of an illegally
moored boat. City council
members will consider
placing a lien on the boat
owner's property to pay for
costs associated with mov-
ing the boat and storing it
The boat was found to be
a hazard to an adjacent
property during a code en-
forcement hearing Jan. 16.
The owner of the boat
failed to show up for the
ce hearing.
S The 52-foot boat's owner
an was cited for having the
vessel improperly and un-
safely moored, including
being tethered to a tree.
Officials expect to pay
$10,000 to have the boat
S towed and stored for a pe-
riod not exceeding six
months.
The hearing officer re-
portedly determined that
the mooring of the boat did
constitute a danger to the
public and the adjacent
property owner
And, because of the
emergency nature of the vi-
olation, the boat owner was
ordered to move the boat
within five days. The order
also included a $250-a-day
fine if the owner failed to
comply with the five-day re-
moval period. Moving the
boat is expected to cost ap-
proximately $1,100 and stor-
age at a local marina will
cost $676 a month.
The council which
meets at City Hall as the
Community Redevelop-
ment Agency at 6 p.m. and
IS. as the city council at 7 p.m.
ty -also is slated to:
re Consider a motion to
in award a contract to Green-
ne man-Pedersen Inc. (GPI) in
we the amount of $352,500 for
construction management
services for the project to
install a reclaimed water
ra (effluent) line from the city's
is sprayfield to the Duke En-
e ergy power complex.
nd The project is expected to
ot ultimately reduce the nutri-
ent load into the King's Bay
id watershed and groundwa-
S ter withdrawal for use at
the power plant by more
than a million gallons per
er day
0 U Hear a proclamation
from mayor recognizing a
local group's effort to
help free an American
prisoner of war in
Afghanistan.
" Cynthia Holden will ac-
cept the award on behalf
of the Rolling Thunder
Aill Florida Chapter 7 group,
which has been active in
are the Bring Bowe Home
der Project.
[ey U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe
ihey Bergdahl has been held
captive since June 2009. He
is believed to be held by
her one of the insurgent fac-
tions of the Taliban and has
pes been shown to be alive.
The group has been on a
re- blitz, gathering petition sig-
ese natures, collecting dona-
tions, and having decals


S and wristbands made dis-
stic playing Bergdahl's infor-
du- mation. The group is
can asking the public to put
Lion pressure on government
*ess officials to help secure
Bergdahl's release.






A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Adaptability will be what
counts in the near future. Adjusting to
your surroundings will make life easier
and give you a better perspective
regarding future possibilities.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Strive
to be more active. Join a gym or sign
up for an activity that will get you
moving and motivated.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Listen
to others' suggestions and concerns.
Channel your energy into home-im-
provement projects or anything that will
raise the value of your assets or what
you have to offer others.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Take ac-
tion and do whatever you can to raise
your profile or encourage a better
lifestyle.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't
allow someone's stubborn attitude to
stand in your way Put your differences
aside and take part in an activity or
event that can help you re-establish
your reputation or position.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Keep a
level head and pursue interests that
will help you gain the most ground
personally or professionally.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Look for
ways and means to improve your life and
your looks. Take the initiative to try new
things and to make new connections.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -A change of
pace will help to establish what you can
and can't accomplish. Don't take on
something that will hinder your own
dreams.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Take your
time and go over fine details that can
give you a better view of a situation.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Listen to
suggestions and pick up information
that can help you put together a plan.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Look,
see and do your best to accommodate
those requiring your assistance. Lend-
ing a helping hand will ensure you
continue to have a say
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Step
out of the spotlight if you don't want to
be judged by what you say or do. An in-
trospective approach will help you get
more done without interference from
others.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Con-
sider all your alternatives, but rely on
your intuition when it comes to making
a choice. A personal relationship will
improve if each party maintains equal
responsibilities.


ENTERTAINMENT


Allen defends self
against claims
LOS ANGELES In a nearly
2,000-word open letter punctu-
ated with rhetorical questions
and decades-old anecdotes, no-
toriously media-shy Woody
Allen again defended himself
against renewed claims that he
molested adoptive daughter
Dylan Farrow 21 years ago.
Allen's response was pub-
lished online Friday night by The
New York Times, nearly a week
after the same publication re-
leased an open letter from Dylan
Farrow in which she claimed that
in 1992 at the family's Connecti-
cut home, Allen led her to a "dim,
closet-like attic" and "then he
sexually assaulted me." Dylan
Farrow didn't specify Allen's ac-
tions, but described other abu-
sive behavior.
"Of course, I did not molest
Dylan," Allen wrote. "I loved her
and hope one day she will grasp
how she has been cheated out
of having a loving father and ex-
ploited by a mother more inter-
ested in her own festering anger
than her daughter's well-being."
Allen was investigated for the
alleged molestation, but was
never charged. A team of child
abuse specialists from the Yale-
New Haven Hospital, brought in
to the case by prosecutors and
police, concluded that Dylan
Farrow had not been molested.
Valentino apologizes
for Adams bag-gate
NEW YORK -The fashion
house Valentino has apologized
for touting in an email blast to
journalists that one of their
pricey bags was carried by Amy
Adams as she stepped from a
car at the wake of Philip
Seymour Hoffman.
Much was made of the pro-
motional email sent Friday, com-


Associated Press
Woody Allen, director of the film, "Midnight in Paris," is
photographed during an interview in Beverly Hills, Calif. Dylan
Farrow, the adopted daughter of Allen and Mia Farrow, penned
an emotional open letter, accusing Hollywood of callously
lionizing Allen, who she claims abused her.


plete with two photos of Adams
outside the Thursday wake.
Valentino said in a statement
that quickly followed that the
company didn't realize the pho-
tos were snapped at the sad
gathering of loved ones for Hoff-
man, who was found dead
Feb. 2 of an apparent heroin
overdose in his apartment.
Hoffman, 46, co-starred with
Adams in "The Master" and both
his wake, and funeral the next
day, were attended by numerous
celebrities, Adams included.
"We sincerely regret releasing a
photo to the media ... of Amy
Adams with a Valentino Bag. We
were not aware the photograph
was taken while she was attending
the wake of Philip Seymour Hoff-
man. It was an innocent mistake
and we apologize to Ms. Adams
who was not aware, or a part of,
our PR efforts," said the regretful


statement signed by Mona
Swanson, vice president of com-
munications for Valentino USA.
Princess testifies in
historic fraud probe
PALMA DE MALLORCA,
Spain In a historic judicial
hearing that could further impact
the deteriorated image of Spain's
monarchy, Princess Cristina
testified Saturday in a fraud and
money laundering case in which
she and her husband could even-
tually be charged.
Judge Jose Castro will rule
on whether Cristina, the first
Spanish royal to be questioned
in court since the monarchy was
restored in 1975, illegally used
funds from a company she
owned with her husband for
personal expenses.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 9, the 40th
day of 2014. There are 325 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlights in History:
On Feb. 9,1964, The Beatles
made their first live American televi-
sion appearance on "The Ed
Sullivan Show," broadcast from
New York on CBS.
On this date:
In 1825, the House of Represen-
tatives elected John Quincy Adams
president after no candidate re-
ceived a majority of electoral votes.
In 1861, Jefferson Davis was
elected provisional president of the
Confederate States of America at a
congress held in Montgomery, Ala.
In 1950, in a speech in Wheeling,
W.Va., Sen. Joseph McCarthy, R-
Wis., charged the State Department
was riddled with Communists.
Ten years ago:Anti-government
rebels took control of nearly a
dozen towns in western Haiti as the
death toll in the violent uprising rose
to at least 40.
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama used his first news
conference since taking office to ur-
gently pressure lawmakers to ap-
prove a massive economic
recovery bill.
One year ago: Hundreds of
mourners and dignitaries, including
first lady Michelle Obama, packed
the funeral service for 15-year-old
Hadiya Pendleton, who was shot
and killed Jan. 29 as she stood with
friends at a neighborhood park
about a mile from President Barack
Obama's Chicago home in the Ken-
wood neighborhood.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Joe
Pesci is 71. Singer Barbara Lewis is
71. Author Alice Walker is 70. Ac-
tress Mia Farrow is 69. Former
Sen. Jim Webb, D-Va., is 68. Singer
Joe Ely is 67. Actress Judith Light is
65. Rhythm-and-blues musician
Dennis "DT" Thomas (Kool & the
Gang) is 63.
Thought for Today: "What we
call progress is the exchange of
one nuisance for another nui-
sance." Havelock Ellis, English
psychologist (1859-1939).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L Pecat City


156/51 1.2- | 1 INA NA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exduse dai
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNINGk
High: 71 Low: 46
.:;"-" Decreasing clouds

I I "fl MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
S High:72 Low:47
: Mostly sunny

W TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 74 Low: 52
.,..." Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 61/55
Record /22
Normal 72/54
Mean temp- 54
Departure from mean -8
PRECIPITATION* .
Saturday 0.09
Total for the month 0.30"
Total for the year 3.44"
Normal for the year 3.04
*As Ot 7 p.n- a- It rerne
UV INDEX: 8
O-2minimal,3-41ow, 5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.08


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 55.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 97%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, maple
Today's count: 8.7/12
Xxday's count: 10.2
Xxday's count: 10.3
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 23
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES H.W:--
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
02/09 SUNDAY 02:09 07:56 13:03 19:30
02/10 MONDAY 02:57 08:43 13:52 20.18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
Si.USET K1.T 4-...................6 4 p.m.
S% WOI S E TOM OR7Y1.................... 1a... m201 p.
\~J Feb14 Feb22 Marl Mar 8 M N TOD.AY 3:0 a.m
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is LOW. There Is no burn ban.
For more Informnaton call Floida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For mornw
Information on drought conditions, please visit the v-ision of Foresty's Web site:
htl p:/AalmeBfl-dol.comfre-westher/dlbc
WATERING RULES
Lawn wateng limited to two days per week. before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as
folows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei on Wednesday ajriof Saturday
Hand watedng with a shut-off nozzle ormicro rrgalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable garderns. Bowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime
Citrius County Uihes!' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plan material 352-527-7669. Some re% plantings may quality lor amituin i
watering allowances
To report vations please cal: Oty o invemess @ 352-726-2321, CGly dC CrysaJ
River 1 352 795-421. ex 313 urnncorporated Cilrus County 0 3W-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay "'At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
Cty High Low
Chassahowltzka 2:30a.m. 0.6it, 206p,m. 02 ft. t10:39 a.m 0.1 fl 8:38p.m0.2I,
CryslalHRWer- 1:32p.m. 12 .ft. 7:54 a.m. 0,4 7;28p.m09B.
Willaoochee 12:00 p.m. 2-3 It., 11:02 p.m. 2.6ft. 6:18 a.m. -0.2ft. 5:45p.m.3,
Homosassa' 12:22a.m. t.21. 3.11 p.m. 0.6ft. 1032a.m 0.1 ft 7:04p.mOA4 t.


H L Fcast


Daytona Bch. 72 49 pc Miami 81 67 pc
Fort Lauderdale 80 66 sh Ocata 72 44 f
Fort Myers 79 59 f Orlando 72 53 pc
Gainesville 69 43 f Pensacola 63 53 f
Homestead 81 65 pc Sarasota 73 53 f
Jacksonville 69 44 f Tallahassee 71 43 pc
Key West 78 68 pc Tampa 72 52 f
Lakeland 75 51 f Vero Beach 76 53 pc
Melbourne 74 53 pc W. Palm Bch. 79 65 sh

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: North winds around 10 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and inland temperature
waters a light chop. Tonight: North
winds around 5 knots. Seas 2 feet or
less. Bay and inland waters smooth 9 1
Taken at Arlpka
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Witniacoochee al Holder 28.77 28.87 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.40 38.41 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.48 39.48 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Roral City 40.15 40.15 42.20
Levels reported in Feet above sea lve el Flood stage lor lakes are based on 2,33year ood.
ihe rnean.annual flood whtEi has a 43-pwecent chance of being aled o ex needed in m
any one year This dalt a is ainerd or ithe Southwest Florida Water Maragemnet Distrtct
and is suject Io revision In no ,, m wi the Distric or t"e Unted States Geologpcal Survey
be IWA lo anyy droages ading ou of the use of tits dala If you have any queson s you
should contact tMe Hydroilogca Data Seciaon al (352) 796-72 1

THE NATION




N









FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuqtuerque
Ashevllle
Atlanta
Alantic City
Ausmin
Baltnmore
Billings
Sirminghuam
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burtlngton, VT
Chairtston, S.C.
Charteston. W.V.
Chawtotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus. 014OH
Concor. NH
Dalas
Denver
Des Moines
Delroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartlond
HousIon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT SUN
H L Pcp. H LFcst
24 -4 26 tS t1
56 25 60 38 pc
5332 5430 pc
59 37 62 41 pc
32 20 35 22 sn
65 37 76 38 f
32 26 35 22 fl
11 4 .13 10 6 sn
5434 58 36 pc
37 28 .35 41 32 r
29 18 2920 fl
14 6 .02 22 9 sn
23 11 22 12 fl
55 43 .07 64 44 pc
30 19 .06 38 18 sn
5737 59 36 pc
15 M .06 20 -1 pc
25 13 .03 31 9 sn
20 3 24 7 an
28 14 .02 24 2 sn
21 4 27 5 sn
27 4 27 14 fl
5532 57 30 f
47 19 19 14 sn
23 11 .06 13 -9 pc
18 1 .01 23 5 sn
67 46 71 48 pC
29 17 .03 32 11 sn
28 15 31 t3 sn
271 2916 11
5738 69 47 t
23 5 -02 26 3 sn
64 42 70 49 pc
31 22 .14 47 25 cd
66 52 65 52 f
28 18 .03 33 13 i
37 27 .04 47 25 cd
14 2 .04 18B -1 pc
15 4 7 -15 pc
64 38 .02 68 47 f
61 39 65 44 pc
4226 43 25 pc


SAT SUN
City H L Pep. H L Fect
Now Orleans 57 44 65 51 pc
New York City 29 21 32 22 sn
Nodolik 39 30 48 34 pc
Oklahoma City 33 25 35 21 cd
Omaha 29 12 12 *8 pc
PalmSpings 74 50 78 56 pc
PhtleadelpNa 30 24 33 22 sn
Phoenix 72 50 77 51 pc
Pitsburgh 23 4 27 14 1l
Pomtlmlnd, ME 29 8 26 15 1
Portland. OR 30 25 -07 35 33 I
PrwidanceRI 31 11 30 21 fl
Raleigh 50 34 57 34 pc
Rpi.jCily 18 0 03 10 -5 sn
Resro 55 44 .01 51 34 r
Rochest.etNY 19 -1 23 11 an
Sacramenlo 54 51 78 60 49 r
Sail Lake City 45 41 07 47 30 r
SanAntorio 68 39 77 43 f
SanDiego 66 53 62 56 cd
San Francisco 59 53 .46 56 52 r
Savannah 60 45 .08 66 44 1
Seatle 42 30 41 38 sn
Spokane 23 10 23 19 sn
S, Louis 30 16 .04 27 6 sn
St Ste Mane 17 -3 14 -4 cd
Syracusa 18 0 24 15 an
Topeka 30 16 21 5 sn
Washtngton 37 30 38 27 fl
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HNIN 87. We" KWKFl, Ha
LOW -32, Embarrass. M,
WORLD CITIES


SUN
CITY HMJSKY
Acapulco 86/71i/s
Amsterdam 48I39f
Athens 62/484/pc
Being 35/61s
Berlin 50/42/pc


I Bermua 7fi68atV
KEY TO ONTONf coud dry drzuzle; Cairo 66/46/s
f.ini h-hay PC-pMtty cioudry rei; Calgary 4-t3/cd
rm.kVintow mIX;: WUmy, ih.ishowrsM Havana 8B/64s
av-.ow ts-.undertom s wawlnd. Hong Kong 6410r
WMS O214 Jerusalem 62/44/s


Lisbon 57t50ht
Londo 48/42/pc
Madrid 5535/pc
Mexico Cty 7344/s
Montreal i9.3ft1
Moscow 37/28W1
Paris 48/39/r
Rio 8905s1
Rome 57/46/pc
Sydney 87i/6s
Tokyo 48/30/pc
Toronto 17/8/s
Warsaw 41/32/f


LEGAL





Bid Notices...............


Meeting Notices.......


Miscellaneous Notic


NOTICES





.......................D 7



.......................D 7


es..................D7


y1- CITRUS COUNTY N T



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community News paper Se ing Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -32 2 2
Tnrina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 64 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
I" Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 A5


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V 4


-..Nod





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Aldo Cerilli, 93
Aldo J. Cerilli, 93, died
peacefully Feb. 2, 2014, at
Hospice of the Florida
Suncoast
Care Cen-
ter in
Palm Har- .
bor, Fla.
He was d
born and
raised in
Pough-
keepsie, Aldo
N.Y, he Cerilli
retired as
a certified master watch-
maker, was a proud Army
Air Corps veteran of World
War II and of the Catholic
faith.
He is survived by his
wife of 67 years, the former
Mary Visentin of Wap-
pingers Falls, N.Y; and
their children, daughter
and son-in-law, Caroline
and Jerry Goodrich;
grandson, Tristan
Goodrich, of Tampa; and
his son and daughter-in-
law, John and Karen Cer-
illi of Scottsdale, Ariz. His
parents, brother Julius,
and sister, Lora prede-
ceased him, but his sister
and brother-in-law, Clara
and Don Osterhoudt re-
side in Beverly Hills.
Nieces and nephews in-
clude Paul Gromko, Chris
Contelmo, David Oster-
houdt, Alexandra Robin-
son, Steven Cerilli, and
Delphine Cerilli.
He retired to Florida
and spent many happy
years in Citrus County A
Mass of Christian Burial
will be at Espiritu Santo
Catholic Church followed
by interment at the Bay
Pines National Veteran's
Cemetery in Bay Pines.
Condolences may be sent
to the family at the Sylvan
Abbey guestbook online at
www sylvanabbey com and
to Cerilli Family, 45
Katherine Blvd., Apt. 319,
Palm Harbor, FL 34684.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.



CkWaoerle^


352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

^ Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com


Virginia 'Ginny'
MacKenzie, 74
CRYSTAL RIVER
Virginia "Ginny"
MacKenzie, age 74, died
Saturday,

2014, at
S e v e n a.
Rivers Re- N
g i o n a I y."
gional '
Medical -
Center in
Crystal -
River, Fla.
B o r n Virginia
Aug. 4 MacKenzie
1939, in
Dansville, N.Y, she lived
in Rochester, N.Y;
Baumholder, Germany;
Miami and New Port
Richey, Fla., before set-
tling in Crystal River She
owned two businesses and
later was a Realtor at
Alexander Real Estate Inc.
until retiring in November
2013. She was a charming,
witty woman who loved
reading, gardening and
life. Her sense of humor
was clever and un-
matched. Ginny's person-
ality simply sparkled.
Survivors include her
daughter, Charlotte Wat-
son; granddaughters, Vic-
toria Thorp and Zoe
Lamb; niece, Karin Whit-
ney; grand-nephew, Na-
tion Meyer; three
great-grandsons; and one
great-granddaughter
Ginny was preceded in
death by her parents,
Robert Earl Whitney and
Adeline Frances (Shockey)
Whitney; brother, Robert
Whitney Jr; and sister,
Barbara Aponte; her hus-
band, John MacKenzie;
and daughters, Katherine
"Kathy" Eichenberger
and Elizabeth "Betsy"
Contreras.
Celebration of Life serv-
ices will be at 6 p.m. Mon-
day, Feb. 10,2014, at Bethel
Chapel, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(across from Crystal River
United Methodist Church),
Crystal River. In lieu of
flowers, please send dona-
tions to Aaron A. Weaver,
Chapter 776, Military
Order of the Purple Heart,
PO. Box 1345, Lecanto, FL
34460-1345.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Ca. E. aii
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Crenution W 'v s -A 1 & m'F3I,
1- ,lk Aknic.;,l..(,c-

For Information and costs,_
call 726-8323


Daniel
Combs, 52
Daniel W Combs, age 52,
died Jan. 12, 2014.
A Celebration of Life
Service will be at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at
First Baptist Church of
Floral City Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is assisting the
family with arrangements.




Billy
Covington, 88
INVERNESS
Billy Raymond Coving-
ton, age 88, Inverness,
passed away Dec. 22, 2013.
Billy was born June 15,
1925, in Texas to the late
Raymond and Anna (Gar-
ner) Covington. He served
our country in the U.S.
Navy, retiring with the
rank of master chief. Billy
was a patriotic veteran
and proudly displayed his
flag daily He enjoyed am-
ateur ham radio, photogra-
phy, traveling and
exploring places and
meeting new people. He
was a very social and out-
going man who loved a
good joke.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 29 years,
Shirley Covington; daugh-
ters Susan Covington, Bal-
timore, Md., and Linda
(John) Kukar, Brooksville,
Fla.; stepdaughters Joy
(John) Ralston, John's
Creek, Ga., Gaynell (John)
O'Neil, Milton, Ga., and
stepson Michael (Kris)
Power, John's Creek, Ga.;
and eight grandchildren.
A graveside military
committal service will be
at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 14,
2014, at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. The family invites
friends to join the proces-
sion to the cemetery at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home at 9:15 a.m. Memo-
rial donations may be
made in Billy's memory to
Alzheimer's Family Organ-
ization, PO. Box 1939, New
Port Richey, FL 34656 in
lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Onlee
Davis, 84
FALMOUTH, KY.
Onlee Omega Davis was
born in Chenoa, Ky, on
May 22, 1929. She died
Feb. 6,2014, at her beloved
farm in
Falmouth,
Ky. Onlee,
also.
known by
many as
" M e g, "1
was the
third of
five chil- Onlee
dren born Davis
to Dorsey
and Jannie Partin of
Frakes, Ky She is prede-
ceased by her brothers,
Roy, John and Gib; sister,
Alta; and both her parents.
She left home at 13 to at-
tend God's Bible School in
Cincinnati, Ohio. Her ex-
perience there influenced
her throughout her life.
She was a woman of strong
faith and convictions, and
carried her faith and her
Bible with her always.
After leaving Cincinnati,
she returned to Middles-
boro, Ky., where she com-
pleted her study as a
licensed practical nurse.
She was proud of her pro-
fession, and was an incom-
parable and compas-
sionate nurse for more
than 20 years. Onlee was
known by all for her love of
God, family, all children
and nature. She was gen-
erous to family, friends
and strangers alike. No
one was a stranger for
long, as she had an amaz-
ing gift for conversation
and compassion. For her
entire 84 years, she had
the gift of seeing the world
with the excitement and
wonder of a child.
Onlee lived in Cincin-
nati, Ohio, for most of her
adult life, and lived be-
tween her farm in Fal-
mouth and her home in
Homosassa, Fla., for the
past 20 years. She had
many faithful friends in
Florida, but returned to
her farm to be close to
family during her final
months.
Onlee was married and
widowed more than once,
but she always said the


true love of her life was
Laurence L. Davis. They
were married Nov 7,1973,
and were married until Mr
Davis' death in 1995. Re-
flecting her Southern her-
itage, Onlee called her
husband "Mr Davis" to
others throughout much of
their marriage, but he was
always "Poppy" to loved
ones.
She leaves to celebrate
her memory her children,
Rick Foland, Stella Logan
and her husband Michael
Turner, Sam Logan, Greg
Logan, and Nancy
Ballinger; grandchildren
Darcey Turner, Jennifer
Logan, Reed Turner, Ellie
Logan, Ethan Ballinger
and Morgan Ballinger; for-
ever daughter-in-law,
Clare Logan; and nieces;
nephews, cousins and
friends beyond count.
Special thanks are due
to Dr Edward Jung, who
cared for her with utmost
skill and compassion for
many years, Dr. Drosick
and the team at OHC, Hos-
pice of Hope of Kentucky,
especially Diana and
Bethany Life would not
have been the same for
Onlee without her com-
panion and caregiver of
the last years, Caroline
Howard.
Arrangements are
through Vorhis & Ryan Fu-
neral Home, 5501 Mont-
gomery Road, Cincinnati,
OH 45212. Visitation will
be at Vorhis & Ryan Fu-
neral Home from 6 to
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11.
Services will be held at In-
dian Hill Church at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 12. In lieu
of flowers, donations may
be made to God's Bible
School, the American Can-
cer Society, or Sheltered
Paws Dog Rescue.


Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
All obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in sub-
mitted material are
charged at the same
rates.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


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A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The goals for the SRCS Athletic
Department are:

* To help student athletes develop athletic skills,
goal-setting abilities, and work ethic.
* To build Christ-like character traits in student
athletes and develop servant leadership skills.
* To instill in student athletes the importance of
self-sacrifice and teamwork.
* To foster school pride via the excitement of
competition.
* To encourage coaches, players, fans, and
parents at athletic events to reflect God's grace
to the watching world. 4
* To recognize that the athletic program is one of
three integral elements in the SRCS program
and to support and encourage a student athlete's
involvement in the other two academic and art-
related pursuits.
* To preserve the integrity of the covenant
community in each team by respecting and duly
enforcing team rules, policies, and agreements
as specified in the Athletic Handbook.


Seven Rivers
Christian School


Rayburn Greene
head varsity
football coach


Seven Rivers Christian School: Going strong
for 25 years. Seven Rivers Athletics: Many
teams, all Warriors since 1997.
22... Athletic teams
6... Regional champion titles
2... State runner up titles
1... State champion title
32... District champion titles
4... State "sweet 16" games
2... State "elite 8" games
1... State "final 4" games
3.8...Cumulative GPA of 2013-14 Varsity
volleyball team. Winners of class 2A
Academic Team Championship
2... FHSAA Academic Team Championships
90+%... SRCS middle and high school
students who participate in athletics
11 ... Number of SRCS graduates who went on
to play for collegiate teams
6... Intramural athletics for K-8 elementary
students
2... Number of awarded participation on the
FHSAA Student Athlete Advisory
Committee
1... Student named to the FHSAA Academic
Team
1... FHSAA Rozell Award for Sportsmanship


25 Years Countless Futures
SRCS is a member of the
Florida High School Athletic
Association (FHSAA)


Accepting Applications NOW for
the 2014-15 school year. Stop by


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he
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e school for enrollment February 18 at 6:30pm
plicationn or visit our website. February 22 at 11 am
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ome to an Open House and Pre-K only OPEN HOUSE
iar all about our school, March 11,10-12PM
iancial assistance April 1 at 9:00am On-site VPK sign up
)portunities, curriculum, and (For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current
ke a tour. proof of address, birth certificate or shot record for child.)
Some classes are already filling to capacity.
Enroll now to ensure your child's seat in the upcoming school year.


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scholarships and related support, giving economically disadvantaged
families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship.


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts L_' ill
and minds of children
with a distinctly biblical
program of academic rigor,
artistic beauty, and athletic l%
competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


[ATI M*


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 A7


SI;





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECADE
Continued from PageAl vasc
va\\[
will Ih
(open-heart surgeries a body
year), maybe 325," Beaty satul
said. "But our medical rate
community got to be much co ro
better at managing pa- educ
tients and not necessarily 0 The
needing to send them for hear
open-hearts." the [
Citrus Cardiology began scree
recruiting interventional ultra
cardiologists, for example, elect
Beaty said. Refr
"Just byvirtue of doing a be of
better job of taking care of The *
our patients generally, the Feb.
number of open-hearts Men"
did not reach what we ex-
pected," Beaty said.
"Watching the national or sligh
benchmarks and keeping year'
on top of things, we know When
that's happening every- opene
where." Therwas a
There
While the center did not there w]
achieve 300 open-heart to be do:
surgeries a year, the pro- Ocala 01
gram is a success for sav- places
ing lives, weren't
"When we began the agency 1
program, there were more them tl
than 500 a year related "So we
heart deaths in Citrus picked
County," Beaty said. 'And hanging
last year was only 308. And two or t]
we've got more people That
than we had then. I'm sure son wh
that's attributable not only surgeries
to the heart center, but the explain
entire flotilla of boats got those fi
raised." were n
During the past 10 agency le
years, open-heart surger- dwindle
ies in general in the U.S. Other
have trended down, ac- fectedtl
cording to Beaty When ditiontc
the center opened, the services
surgeries went up fairly "Two
quickly to 250 a year, a after we
number consistent for hospitala
four or five years, opened
"Last year, I think we Beaty s,
ended up with 195," Beaty of our p
said. "We'll be right at that armill V



PATIENT
Continued from PageAl

receives that's used as a cushion
underneath the chest strap of a
seatbelt.
"I still have it somewhere, al-
though I
haven't seen it
I had in a while," he
I a said. "But I re-
good member it."
After 10
care, and years, he said
he feels great,
I'm glad as great as an
the 89-year-old can
tey feel, he added
were with a laugh.
He takes the
there, blood thinner
Coumadin and
has a nurse
Donald who visits him
Young once a month at
surgery patient. his home.
"That's all I
can tell you,"
he said. "I had good care, and I'm
glad they were there. It was so long
ago, 10 years, and I know it was
traumatic and I should remember
more, but it's a distant memory But
I'm alive, so that's a good thing,
right?"

Donald Young, 89, was among the
first open-heart surgery patients in
Citrus Memorial Health System's
heart unit, which is celebrating its
10th year.
NANCY KENNEDY/Chromcle


FREE HEALTH FAIR
celebrate the 10th anniversary of its heart and
ular center, Citrus Memorial Health System
host an event featuring free health screenings:
y mass index, balance screening, oxygen level
ration screening, blood pressure and heart
screening, heart health self risk assessment,
nary risk profile and smoking cessation
:ation and support materials.
event will include door prizes, giveaways,
t health talks by physicians, guided tours of
ieart center and free drawings for advanced
enings: ankle-brachial index (ABI), vascular
sound, pulmonary function testing (PFT) and
:rocardiogram (EKG).
eshments and face-painting for children will
offered.
fair is set from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
22, at the Historic Schoolhouse on Citrus
iorial's Inverness campus.


tly under that this
i the center
in 2004, "There
pent-up demand.
were people out
ho needed surgery
ne who didn't go to
r some of the other
because they
at a level of emer-
that would take
here," Beaty said.
went through and
off all the low-
g fruit in the first
three years."
was another rea-
y the number of
es declined, Beaty
ed. After treating
first patients who
)t at a high emer-
evel, the numbers
ed.
r events also af-
he numbers, in ad-
Sincreasing health
S.
or three years
Opened, Oak Hill
il in Spring Hill)
(a heart center),"
aid. "It took some
patients from Sug-
Voods."


Two years ago, Beaty
said, Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center
near Crystal River opened
its catheter lab.
"It began doing inter-
ventional catheter proce-
dures, so that ate into our
caths," Beaty said.
Cardiac catheterization
- threading a long, thin,
flexible tube through a
blood vessel to the heart
- is used to diagnose and
treat some heart condi-
tions. Citrus Memorial of-
fered catheterization
before the center was
opened, and it works con-
veniently and with added
safety with the center's
procedures of bypass sur-
gery, heart valve surgery
and chest surgery on lung
cancer patients.
According to CMH
spokeswoman Katie Mehl,
"Having a cardiac
catheterization procedure
without immediate, on-
site, open-heart surgery
backup just isn't safe. Any-
thing can and some-
times does happen
during a cath procedure
on even the most stable


patients. We're equipped
to handle emergencies
within seconds without
costly and time-
consuming ambulance
transfer"
Dr Peter Kim, with the
Ocala Heart Institute, is
the center's open-heart
surgeon.
"Peter is the primary
reason why our open-
heart program is ranked
at the top 14 percent of
open-heart programs in
the United States for cab-
bage (CABG coronary
artery bypass graft), which
is the main thing," Beaty
said, "and the top 9 per-
cent for valves."
The heart and vascular
center has offered an ex-
ceptional service to
the community, Beaty
continued.
"Just think, right here in
River City, we've got a pro-
gram that's highly tal-
ented and highly ranked,"
Beaty said.
Another program on the
horizon is for treating
retina issues, Beaty said.
Specialized medical treat-
ments can bring economic
development to a
community.
"Chuck Nutinsky, our
chief medical officer, said
- and I think this is really
interesting he said:
How many people would
have heard of Rochester
in Minnesota if it hadn't
been for the Mayo Clinic?
'How many people are
going to hear about Inver-
ness through this kind of
stuff, the heart program
and this retina program?"'
Beaty said. "It doesn't
matter that you are a little
town, if you've got a gun
that you can shoot"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormerat
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
(@chronicleonline. corn.


Special to the Chronicle
At your service at the company commissary at Hamburg


Mine was "Tip" Boswell.

Originally published in the
Citrus County Chronicle.
In 1939...
Lanier's Drug store is
more than doing its
part in the state-wide
campaign to promote
the sale of large glasses
of orange juice for five
cents.
The store, which for
several weeks sold the
large glasses of juice for
five cents, is now selling
two large glasses for only
six cents, or two for only a
cent more than the price
for one.
The Baptist Brother-
hood will meet at the
church tomorrow (Friday)
night at 7:30, the pastor,
Rev. E.C. Tyner, said yes-
terday
He explained that
Frank Morris and his
group will be in charge of
the program.
Rev Tyner urges all
men, whether or not they
are Baptists, to attend this
meeting.


In 1953...
A new simplified
method for filing pub-
lic records has been in-
stalled by Francis W
Williams, clerk of the cir-
cuit court The simplified
system saves storage space
and makes it much easier
for the public to locate
public records. Heretofore
there were separate books
for filing mortgages, satis-
factions of mortgages,
chattel mortgages, deeds,
foreign judgments,
chancery orders, leases
and various other records.
The Little Women held
their annual formal
dance last night, December
30, at the Woman's Club.
The theme of the dance
was "Stardust" and the
decorations carried out
this motif. Invited to the
dance were all girls in the
eighth grade who will be el-
igible for club membership
next year; all young people
home on vacation and from
college. There were about
100 invited guests.


Information for Back in Time is supplied by the Citrus County
Historical Society.

VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT FOR SOCIETY
Start the new year off right by volunteering for the
Citrus County Historical Society and its Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum.
The society needs volunteers with retail experience
to work in its expanding museum store. Also
needed are volunteers for a variety of computer
tasks including Photoshop.
No experience is needed to be a greeter and tour
guide. Call 352-341-6427 to volunteer or email
csociety@tampabay.rr.com.
Like the Back in Time feature above? Look for it in
its regular spot in the Sunday Commentary section
in future weeks.


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A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


r"





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRAIL
Continued from Page Al

exemptions to businesses
coming in or local busi-
nesses expanding in the
zone.
The Enterprise Zone
Development Agency on
Friday got an update on
the Utility Master Plan sta-
tus and cost estimates
from Ken Cheek, county
utilities director While
water and sewer could be
available to develop the
smaller site, he explained,
a number of issues, includ-
ing costs, affect the
county's northwest
quadrant.
"We can't move forward
until we have a partner on
the business side, so we
have a reason to be there,"
he said. "We would be
looking at some level of
grants or private funding
participation."
Funding sources could
include developer agree-
ments, utility expansion
funds part of user fees,
bonds paid off by ratepay-
ers or economic develop-
ment grants.
He explained the county
does not currently pro-
duce enough reclaimed
water to provide that serv-
ice to the enterprise zone,
but it could be considered
in the future. Currently,
the county's reclaimed
water goes to the lake at
the Black Diamond golf
course. "They're taking al-
most every drop we pro-
duce now," he said.
Cheek said that, typi-
cally, utilities are not per-
mitted in limited-access
roadway corridors. How-
ever, they could possibly
use the multi-use pathway
corridor that would ac-
company the Suncoast


Parkway extension, but
would revert to the county.
He said the problem is
there is no schedule for
the project, but they ex-
pect to know by this
summer
Cheek cited other fac-
tors in the mix for getting
service to that area. He
said Inglis is interested in
getting service, since ar-
senic is showing up in pri-
vate wells, and Seven
Rivers hospital and Duke
Energy would benefit.
As for a timeframe, he
said a waterline project
could be fast-tracked in
about two years.
Agency chairman John
Seifert cited the need for
having infrastructure in
place as one barrier to
economic development.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


CEO
Continued from Page Al

her first choice.
Foundation Chairwoman Sandy
Chadwick called Davis to give him
the news. Chadwick will negotiate a
contract with Davis, whose name
will go before the foundation
Feb. 24 for approval.
Davis' asking salary $12,500 a
month was far below his com-
petitors. That could well make his
approval probable, since the foun-
dation sought to pay $20,000 or less
per month for the interim CEO.
Davis is in line to replace Ryan
Beaty, who is resigning as part of an
agreement between the two boards
to resolve lawsuits. Beaty's last day
is March 14.
Committee members, whose
work in recent months included
breaking down the details of a let-
ter of intent with Hospital Corpora-
tion of America for a 50-year lease
of Citrus Memorial, were im-


pressed with Davis'
knowledge of the
hospital.
"I just liked his
personality," Chad-
wick said. "He had
the right combina-
tion to coming in
and helping our
employees."
Davis' last job
was senior vice
president of Acadi-
ana Management
Group in Lafayette,
La. He was laid off


Sandy
Chadwick
chairwoman of
Citrus
Memorial
Health
Foundation.


in February 2013 after three years
on the job.
Davis said he has held the in-
terim executive positions similar
to the one awaiting him at Citrus
Memorial four other times.
He said prior to his interview he
walked the Citrus Memorial
grounds, talking to employees, physi-
cians and volunteers. He requested
and received the hospital's most re-
cent financial report and also scruti-
nized patient satisfaction reporting


data online.
S -. Davis said, as in-
S.,terim CEO, he
would meet with
hospital physicians
and employees -
quickly
"It's about com-
Debbie munication," he
Ressler said. "Go to every
chairwoman of medical staff meet-
the Citrus ing with the same
County message. With the
Hospital employees, you've
Board. got to get them
involved."
CCHB Chairwoman Debbie
Ressler said Davis will be a good fit
at Citrus Memorial until HCAs
lease starts. Both boards expect to
sign a contract with HCA prior to
Sept. 30.
"I thought Mr Davis was very
genuine. I think he can relate to
people easily," Ressler said. "I
think we're in good hands."
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. corn.


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CRYSTAL RIVER




INVERNESS


Branch Manager


LOCAL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 A9





AIO SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

SMOKING
Continued from PageAl

Acting U.S. Surgeon
General Boris Lushniak
last month released a 980-
page report on smoking
that pushed for stepped-up
tobacco-control measures.
His news conference was
an unusually animated
showing of anti-smoking
bravado, with Lushniak
nearly yelling, repeatedly,
"Enough is enough!"
"I can't accept that we're
just allowing these num-
bers to trickle down," he
said, in a recent interview
with the AP "We believe
we have the public health
tools to get us to the zero
level."
This is not the first time
a federal health official
has spoken so boldly In
1984, Surgeon General C.
Everett Koop called for a
"smoke-free society" by
the year 2000. However,
Koop a bold talker on
many issues didn't offer
specifics on how to
achieve such a goal.
"What's different today
is that we have policies
and programs that have
been proven to drive down
tobacco use," said
Matthew Myers, president
of the Campaign for
Tobacco-Free Kids. "We
couldn't say that in 1984."
Among the things that
have changed:
Cigarette taxes have
increased around the
country, making smokes
more expensive. Though
prices vary from state to
state, on average a pack of
cigarettes that would have
sold for about $1.75
20 years ago would cost
more than triple that now
Laws banning smok-
ing in restaurants, bars
and workplaces have
popped up all over the
country Airline flights
have long been off-limits
for smoking.
Polls show that ciga-
rette smoking is no longer
considered normal behav-
ior, and is now less popu-
lar among teens than
marijuana.
Federal officials are
increasingly aggressive


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This image provided by the New York Public Library shows
one of the cigarette advertisements from 1920s through
the 1950s included in a 2008 exhibit at the library.


Associated Press
Olympic gold medalist Tara Lipinski, right, stands with schoolchildren May 20, 1998,
in an anti-tobacco rally on Capitol Hill in Washington. The rally was sponsored by the
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.


about anti-smoking adver-
tising. The Food and Drug
Administration launched a
new youth tobacco preven-
tion campaign last week.
At about the same time,
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
debuted a third, $60 mil-
lion round of its successful
anti-tobacco ad campaign
- this one featuring
poignant, deathbed images
of a woman featured in
earlier ads.
Tobacco companies,
once considered impervi-
ous to legal attack, have
suffered some huge de-
feats in court. Perhaps the
biggest was the 1998 settle-
ment of a case brought by
more than 40 states de-


manding compensation for
the costs of treating smok-
ing-related illnesses. Big
Tobacco agreed to pay
about $200 billion and cur-
tail marketing of cigarettes
to youths.
Retailing of cigarettes
is changing, too. CVS Care-
mark, the nation's second-
largest pharmacy chain,
announced last week it
will stop selling tobacco
products at its more than
7,600 drugstores. The com-
pany said it made the deci-
sion in a bid to focus more
on providing health care,
but medical and public
health leaders predicted
pressure will increase on
companies like Walgreen
Co. and Wal-Mart Stores


Inc. to follow suit
"I do think, in another
few years, that pharmacies
selling cigarettes will look
as anachronistic" as old
cigarette ads featuring
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This undated photo provided by RKO shows dancer-actor
Fred Astaire for the 1935 film musical "Top Hat" with a


cigarette in his mouth.

END *The
END anti
Continued from Page A10 ww
feat
201
physician endorsements 201
look today, said CDC Di- Prohib
rector Dr Tom Frieden. ohi
These developments "It's,
have made many in public cigaret
health dream bigger It's taking
caused Myers' organiza- from pe
tion and others to recently are usi
tout the goal of bringing someti]
the adult smoking rate said R
down to 10 percent by Northe
2024, from the current 18 law pr
percent. That would mean on t
dropping it at twice the Betpl
speed it declined over the people
last 10 years. produ
The bigger goal is to re- Heis i
duce U.S. smoking-related forts i
deaths to fewer than handfu
10,000, from the current to ban
level of 440,000. But even if anyone
smoking rates dropped to tainm ye
zero immediately, it would would
take decades to see that he said
benefit, since smoking- Would
triggered cancers can take itProb
decades to develop. Malon
But while some experts theMalosi
and advocates are swing- t sci
ing for the fences, others "Inbacco
are more pessimistic. They in k
say the key to reaching to thin]
such goals is not simply things
more taxes and more local ble for
smoking bans, but action Agrc
by the U.S. Food and Drug perts
Administration to regulate promise1
smoking. people
A 2009 federal law gave ily to s
the FDA the authority to electr
regulate tobacco products. Elec-
The law barred FDA from batters
outright blocking the sale that P
of cigarettes, but the aeroso
agency was free to take contain
such pivotal steps as pro-
hibiting the use of appeal-
ing menthol flavoring in
cigarettes and requiring
cigarette makers to ratchet
down the amount of addic-
tive nicotine in each
smoke.
But nearly five years
after gaining power over
cigarettes, FDA has yet to k
even propose such regula-
tions. Agency officials say
they're working on it
Many believe FDAs
delay is driven by defense
preparations for an antici-
pated battery of legal and
political challenges.
A spokesman for Altria
Group Inc., the maker of
Marlboro, said the com-
pany supports FDA exer- I
cising its regulatory
authority over tobacco
products. But as a whole,
the industry has tended to
fight regulation. Some of
the nation's largest to-
bacco companies -
though not Altria sued
to stop FDA-proposed
graphic warning labels on
cigarette packs. A federal
court blocked the ads.
"The industry makes
money as long as they can
delay regulation," said
Kenneth Warner, a Univer-
sity of Michigan public
health professor who is a
leading authority on smok-
ing and health. At
Warner and Michigan
colleague David Mendez
estimate that, barring any
major new tobacco control
victories, the adult smok-
ing rate will drop from its
current 18 percent only to
about 12 percent by 2050. If
health officials do make
huge strides, the rate
could drop as low as 6 per-
cent, they think. C
But Lushniak said zero.
Will that ever happen?
Some experts doubt it.
As long as cigarettes and
other combustible tobacco
products are legal, it's
likely some people will --
smoke them. Efforts to
prohibit them are likely to F 1.0 F
fail, they say (Remember


e new CDC
i-smoking ads:
w.cdc.gov/
:ures/SmokersTips
.4/

ition?)
hard to do a ban on
;tes because you're
something away
people they have and
ing. Once you have
ling, you hold tight,"
ichard Daynard, a
eastern University
ofessor who focuses
acco issues.
er, he said, to bar
from having a
ct in the first place.
intrigued by legal ef-
n Singapore and a
al of other countries
sales of tobacco to
e born after a cer-
ar- 2000, say That
be constitutional,
i. The question is:
our culture accept

ably not, said Ruth
e, editor-in-chief of
entific journal To-
Control.
Dur culture, we tend
k we have a right to
even if they're terri-
us," she said.
)wing number of ex-
believe the most
sing option is to get
to switch voluntar-
omething else, like
nic cigarettes.
ironic cigarettes are
g-powered devices
provide users with
1 puffs that typically
i nicotine, and


Associated Press
Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt lights the cigarette of Eleanor Young at the Oct. 16, 1937, opening of the Sert Room of
the Waldorf Astoria in New York.


sometimes flavorings like
fruit, mint or chocolate.
They've often been de-
scribed as a less danger-
ous alternative to regular
cigarettes. But there are
few studies exploring ex-
actly what chemicals are
in them, and in what con-
centrations, and whether
those levels are harmful.
They're controversial:
Some experts believe that
at a time when cigarette
smoking has finally be-
come pass in popular cul-
ture, e-cigarettes may
re-glamorize puffing away
in public places. Cigarette
sales could surge.
"It could go in either di-
rection," said John Seffrin,
the American Cancer Soci-
ety's chief executive officer
But if the FDA can
ratchet down nicotine in
conventional cigarettes to
levels below what's in e-
cigarettes, perhaps every-
one who clings to smoking
will switch to the higher-
nicotine new products.
That could achieve the
end of smoking, at least of
combustible, carcinogen-
filled cigarettes or so
the thinking goes.
In the past, "the country
really wasn't ready" to
walk away from ciga-
rettes," Daynard said. "I
think the country's ready
now"


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that one is behind the "Jet Age" and doesn't care how one looks, during a demon-
stration April 29, 1964, in New York.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 All





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Iran, UN focus on alleged nuclear arms work


Associated Press
VIENNA Iran is sig-
naling that it will cooper-
ate this weekend with U.N.
experts visiting the coun-
try to investigate alleged
nuclear weapons activity it
has steadfastly denied, a
potentially promising step
in a probe that has been
stalled for six years.
But with Iran still deny-
ing any attempt to make
such arms, the investiga-
tors must tread carefully
As the U.N.'s Interna-
tional Atomic Energy team
arrived in Tehran on Fri-
day, the state IRNA news
agency cited Iranian
atomic energy organiza-
tion spokesman Behrouz
Kamalvandi as saying his
country is ready to answer
all questions raised by the
U.N. agency
IRNA did not elaborate,
and such pledges have
been made before. How-
ever, a senior diplomat
from an IAEA member na-
tion cited a ranking Iran-
ian official as telling him
and other senior diplo-
mats that Iran was specifi-
cally ready to engage on
the weapons program sus-
picions with the U.N.
experts.
The diplomat demanded
anonymity because he
wasn't allowed to discuss
his private meeting with
the Iranian official.
Iran has denied any in-
terest in or work on -
nuclear weapons since the
IAEA started to focus on
its atomic activities. Spe-
cific attempts to probe the
alleged weapons program
first launched in 2007 have
made little progress.
Iran appears to be sug-
gesting it will go into detail
on the big topic, an issue it
has previously said was
not in the agency's
purview or was based on
doctored intelligence. If
successful, it will be the
first of what the agency
hopes will be a series of in-
creasingly deeper investi-
gations into the nuclear
weapons allegations.
The U.S. and its allies
are pushing the IAEA for
progress. At the same time,
too much pressure on Iran
at the weekend talks be-
tween the agency and
Iranian officials could
push Tehran back into its
shell of secrecy
That, in turn, may im-
pact negatively on parallel
talks between Iran and six
world powers seeking to
eliminate fears Tehran
may use its nuclear pro-
grams to make weapons. It
has agreed to curb its
atomic activities in ex-
change for sanctions re-
lief.
Those talks are off to a
promising start with both
sides planning to meet
Feb. 18 to try to translate
an interim deal into a per-
manent agreement. But
Olli Heinonen, who for-
merly headed the IAEA's
Iran probe, says that-
with distrust still high on
both sides a final deal
can be sealed "only if un-
certainties over Iran's mil-
itary nuclear capability
are properly addressed."
Another diplomat said
that the IAEA team was
carrying a list of alleged
weapons-related experi-
ments that it would pres-
ent to the Iranian
negotiating team for dis-
cussion. Among them,
were:
indications that Iran
has conducted high explo-
sives testing and detonator
development to set off a
nuclear charge, as well as
computer modeling of a
core of a nuclear warhead.
suspected preparatory
work for a nuclear
weapons test, and develop-
ment of a nuclear payload
for Iran's Shahab 3 inter-
mediate range missile a
weapon that can reach
Israel.
information that Iran
went further underground
to continue work on nu-
clear weapons develop-


ment past 2003, the year
that U.S. intelligence agen-
cies believe such activity
ceased.
Iran has up to now de-
nied the allegations, first
published in detail by the
IAEA in November 2011. It
has dismissed them as in-
accurate or outright false,
based on doctored intelli-
gence from the U.S.,


Associated Press
TOP: An aerial view of a heavy-water production plant in the central Iranian town of Arak is shown. BELOW: The reactor building of the Bushehr
nuclear power plant just outside the southern city of Bushehr, Iran. Iranian state TV announced in January the country has started implementing
a landmark deal struck between six world powers and Tehran to ease Western sanctions in exchange for Iran opening its nuclear program to
international inspection and limiting its uranium enrichment, which is a possible pathway to nuclear arms.


Israel and other Iran
adversaries.
The agency is seeking
access to individuals, doc-
uments and sites linked to
these and other alleged
nuclear weapons-related
work.
The second diplomat,
from a Western nation,
also demanded anonymity
because he wasn't author-
ized to share his informa-
tion. He said the U.S. and
its Western allies had
made clear to IAEA chief
Yukiya Amano that they
expected progress on
clearing up the weapons
allegations.
A third diplomat, also
from a Western country
said agency experts were
planning to allow Iran to
ease into cooperation on
the weapons allegations by
asking first for less sensi-
tive information. He de-
clined to give details and
demanded anonymity


because he wasn't author-
ized to discuss confiden-
tial negotiating tactics.
In Tehran, meanwhile,
Iran's Supreme Leader
urged officials Saturday
not to pin hopes for eco-
nomic recovery on the
sanctions relief from the
nuclear deal reached with
world powers.
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei
also called on critics of the
interim nuclear deal
achieved on Nov. 24 in
Geneva to be fair and give
time to President Hassan
Rouhani to pursue his pol-
icy of engagement with the
outside world.
"The only solution to the
country's economic prob-
lems is to employ (Iran's)
infinite domestic capaci-
ties, not to pin hopes on
the lifting of sanctions. No
expectations from the
enemy," Khamenei told
army officers in Tehran.
Khamenei also de-


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fended Rouhani against
hardliners in Iran who
think the deal gives away
too much for too little in
return,
"No more than a few
months have passed since
the (Rouhani) government
took office. Authorities
should be given the oppor-
tunity to push forward
strongly Critics should
show tolerance toward the
government," he said in
comments posted on his
website, leaderir.
Khamenei's support is
crucial for Rouhani's
diplomatic success in ne- B..
gotiations with the six-na- .-
tion group the United -- -
States, Russia, China,. : .. -., :, ..
Britain, France and .;--.-. ...
Germany I: ..


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A12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


WORLD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Drought-rattled Calif. welcomes weekend storm


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO-
Californians accustomed
to complaining about the
slightest change in the
weather welcomed a ro-
bust weekend storm that
soaked the northern half
of the drought-stricken
state Saturday even as rain
and snow brought the
threat of avalanches,
flooding and rock slides.
The storm that moved in
Friday, powered by a
warm, moisture-packed
system from the Pacific
Ocean known as a Pineap-
ple Express, had dropped
more than 7 inches of rain
on Marin County's Mt.
Tamalpais, an average of 4
inches in Sonoma County
and one to three inches in
San Francisco, San Jose
and other urban areas, Na-
tional Weather Service hy-
drologist Mark Strudley
said.
With areas north of San
Francisco forecast to see
another few inches by
Sunday, the downpour was
ample enough to flood
roadways and prompt
warnings that parched
streams could be deluged
to the point of overflowing,
but by itself will not solve
the state's drought wor-
ries, Strudley said.
"The yearly rainfall
around here, depending
on where you were, was
less than 10 percent of nor-
mal," he said. "The addi-
tions from this last series
of storms and the totals
are taking a dent out of it,
but it is not a significant
dent."
Still, seeing the water
levels in a local reservoir
and his backyard pond
creeping up and small
streams flowing again
cheered Willits City Coun-
cilman Bruce Barton.
Willits, a city in the heart
of redwood country
that usually sees about
50 inches of rain a year
and was expected to get
about four inches over the
weekend, is one of 17 rural
communities that Califor-
nia's Department of Public
Health recently described
as dangerously low on


Associated Press
A woman carries an umbrella Friday as she crosses the street with lanterns from Chinatown hanging behind her in
San Francisco. Dry California got a much needed taste of rain, but drought-watchers hope it was just a teaser for a
much wetter weekend.


water
"It's guarded optimism.
We are a long ways from
where we need to be, but
we have to start with some
sort of a raindrop," Barton
said.
The storm deposited a
foot of snow of on the top
of Lake Tahoe ski resorts
that have relied on
man-made snow for much
of the season, and eleva-
tions above 7,500 feet
were expected to get an-
other foot or two by
Sunday, said Holly Os-
borne, a National Weather
Service meteorologist in
Sacramento.
The additions, which
followed some brief peri-
ods of snow in the last
week, already have im-
proved the outlook for the
Sierra Nevada snowpack,
which provides about a
third of California's water
supply


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When state surveyors time of winter By Satur- something versus noth-
last checked on Jan. 30, the day, it was at 17 percent of ing," Osborne said.
snow pack was at 12 per- normal. While the fresh snow de-
cent of normal for this "At least we are getting lighted skiers and resort


operators, the Sierra Ava-
lanche Center warned Sat-
urday that the danger of
avalanches, both natural
and human-triggered, was
high in a wide swath of the
Central Sierra Nevada be-
cause wind had blown new
snow onto weak layers of
existing ice and rock.
Forecasters hope the
storm portends an end to
the persistent dry weather
that has plagued the state
for months and con-
tributed to its drought
emergency Light precipi-
tation is forecast for
Wednesday and Thursday,
and another storm is pos-
sible next weekend.
Southern California was
expected to be mostly dry
Forecasters said measure-
able rain over the week-
end likely would not fall
farther south than San
Luis Obispo and northern
Santa Barbara counties as
a ridge of high pressure
pushes up from the south.


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Must present coupon. Any make or 2 Packs Per Visit. Must present N WEEK ONLY'
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NATION


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 A13


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Good boy


Associated Press
Spring, a Shetland sheep-
dog, exits the tunnel
obstacle Saturday during
the Masters Agility
Championship the West-
minster Kennel Club
staged at Pier 94 in New
York. The competition
marks the first time
mixed-breed dogs have
appeared at Westminster
since early in the show's
138 years.
Dogs take on
agility trial
NEW YORK Top-knot-
ted Tommy the toy poodle
might look like he's more in-
terested in laps than leaps.
But the 5 -pound silver
poodle took a maze of ob-
stacles in stride Saturday
as he and about 225 other
dogs jumped, darted, clam-
bered and broke new
ground at the Westminster
Kennel Club show's first
agility competition.
The agility trial added a
dynamic, fast-growing sport
to the nation's best-known
dog show and marked the
first time mixed-breed dogs
have appeared there in 130
or more years. And for en-
thusiasts like Tommy's
owner, Barbara Hoopes, it
was a chance to showcase
what dogs of all shapes and
sizes can do.
"He's a big dog in a little
dog's body," Hoopes, a biol-
ogy professor at Colgate
College in Hamilton, said
after Tommy finished a
strong run. Dogs are judged
on accuracy and speed as
they navigate jumps, tun-
nels, ramps and other ob-
jects off-leash, with
handlers guiding them via
calls and signals.
Established decades ago,
agility is an increasingly pop-
ular canine pursuit. The
number of dogs competing
in agility trials sanctioned by
the American Kennel Club,
the governing body for many
canine events, has grown by
nearly 50 percent over the
last five years.
Court papers:
Woman stole baby
TOWN OF BELOIT, Wis.
-An hour after a woman re-
ported her newborn son
missing from a Wisconsin
home, police were question-
ing her step-sister found
with a prosthetic pregnancy
belly, baby clothes and a
stroller, but no baby, accord-
ing to court documents.
It was more than 24
hours after Kayden Powell
went missing before author-
ities discovered the infant,
less than a week old, in a
plastic storage crate outside
an Iowa gas station, mirac-
ulously alive and well de-
spite frigid temperatures.
Kristen Smith of Denver
had pretended to be preg-
nant, went to Wisconsin and
stole her step-sister's baby
from his bassinet as his par-
ents slept, court documents
say. Then, as police closed
in on her, she allegedly
abandoned the infant, who
was swaddled in blankets.
Federal prosecutors in
Madison charged Smith with
kidnapping Friday afternoon,
hours after an Iowa police
chief found Kayden.
"He's strong," the new-
bom's great-unde, Mark Ben-
nett, said of the boy. "I'm glad
that baby is still living instead
of in a ditch somewhere on a
strange highway."
The discovery of the in-
fant shortly after 10 a.m.
Friday capped a frantic
search that involved police
officers in Wisconsin, Illinois
and Iowa.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Justice Dept. applies same-sex rights to itself


Associated Press

WASHINGTON In an asser-
tion of same-sex marriage rights,
Attorney General Eric Holder is
applying a landmark Supreme
Court ruling to the Justice De-
partment, announcing Saturday
that same-sex spouses cannot be
compelled to testify against each
other, should be eligible to file for
bankruptcy jointly and are enti-
tled to the same rights and privi-
leges as federal prison inmates in
opposite-sex marriages.
The Justice Department runs a
number of benefits programs, and
Holder says same-sex couples will
qualify for them. They include the
September llth Victim Compen-
sation Fund and benefits to sur-
viving spouses of public safety


officers who suffer catastrophic or
fatal injuries in the line of duty.
"In every courthouse, in every
proceeding and in every place
where a member of the Depart-
ment of Justice stands on behalf of
the United States, they will strive
to ensure that same-sex mar-
riages receive the same privi-
leges, protections and rights as
opposite-sex marriages under
federal law," Holder said in pre-
pared remarks to the Human
Rights Campaign in New York.
The advocacy group works on be-
half of lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender equal rights.
Just as in the civil rights strug-
gles of the 1960s, the stakes in the
current generation over same-sex
marriage rights "could not be
higher," said Holder


"The Justice Department's role
in confronting discrimination
must be as aggressive today as it
was in Robert Kennedy's time,"
Holder said of the attorney gen-
eral who played a leadership role
in advancing civil rights.
On Monday, the Justice Depart-
ment will issue a policy memo to
its employees instructing them to
give lawful same-sex marriages
full and equal recognition, to the
greatest extent possible under the
law
Holder's address is the latest
application of a Supreme Court
ruling that struck down a provi-
sion in the Defense of Marriage
Act defining marriage as the
union of one man and one woman.
The decision applies to legally
married same-sex couples seek-


ing federal benefits.
After the Supreme Court deci-
sion last June, the Treasury De-
partment and the IRS said that all
legally married gay couples may
file joint federal tax returns, even
if they reside in states that do not
recognize same-sex marriages.
The Defense Department said it
would grant military spousal ben-
efits to same-sex couples. The
Health and Human Services De-
partment said the Defense of Mar-
riage Act is no longer a bar to
states recognizing same-sex mar-
riages under state Medicaid and
Children's Health Insurance Pro-
grams. The U.S. Office of Person-
nel Management said it is now
able to extend benefits to legally
married same-sex spouses of fed-
eral employees and annuitants.


I World BRIEFS

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Associated Press
An ice covered tree and utility lines block a roadway Friday in Exton, Pa. Utility crews in Pennsylvania are still
trying to restore power to more than 320,000 customers who remain without power two days after an ice storm
downed trees and power lines.





Deep freeze



Thousands of customers in Pa., Md. still withoutpower


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA About
170,000 customers remained with-
out power in Pennsylvania and
Maryland on Saturday, three days
after a winter storm coated trees
and electrical lines with ice.
The majority of those outages
are in the Philadelphia area,
where the utility PECO reported
155,000 outages.
That number includes nearly
60,000 customers in suburban
Chester County, where 80 percent
of residents lost power after
Wednesday's storm. Montgomery
County still has 45,000 customers
without electricity, while Bucks
County has 33,000.
"We're vagabonds," said Robin
Ross of King of Prussia, who has
been on the move with her hus-
band, shuffling between two hotels,
their daughter's home in Philadel-
phia and their veterinarian's office,
where they had taken their cat.
They checked on their house


Saturday, but the power was still
out Neighbors who toughed it out
for a few days with indoor temper-
atures in the 40s had finally given
up and left, Ross said.
"Obviously there's Mother Nature
to blame, but with the power lines
and the trees, they just haven't done
enough (maintenance)," Ross said. "I
would hope after this experience
that they look closely at where the
trees are with respect to the power
lines, because it wasn't a ridiculous
amount of ice."
PECO spokesman Greg Smore
said weakened trees and limbs
continue to fall, creating new ob-
stacles. The company expects to re-
store power to everyone by
Monday
"There's still a lot of extensive
damage out there," Smore said Sat-
urday "We still have roads that are
closed."
The outages that remained Sat-
urday included about 12,000 Met-
ropolitan-Edison customers in
York County and 5,000 outages in


Maryland.
More than 1 million customers
lost power at the storm's peak,
850,000 of them in Pennsylvania.
PECO alone reported 623,000 out-
ages, making it the second-worst
storm in the company's history,
topped only by Superstorm Sandy
in 2012.
The region, besieged by snow
and frigid temperatures this win-
ter, at least appears to have caught
a break this weekend, as the latest
snowstorm threat dwindled to a
forecast that called for flurries to
an inch of snow across the state.
Jennifer Kocher, a spokeswoman
with the state Public Utility Com-
mission, said the agency will re-
view the state's storm response to
see if any improvements can be
made in terms of forecasting, plan-
ning for the storm or having sup-
plies on hand to resolve outages.
"We understand people are frus-
trated. It is frustrating to have your
power out for a long time, espe-
cially when it's this cold," she said.


Future of C. African Republic Muslims imperiled


Associated Press

DAKAR, Senegal -The mob vio-
lence wracking Central African Re-
public imperils the future of the
country's Muslims, with tens of
thousands fleeing the daily violence
and untold numbers killed.
Bangui, the capital, is engulfed in
an orgy of bloodshed and looting de-
spite the presence of thousands of
French and African peacekeepers.
"We are in a moment where im-
mediate action is needed to stop the
killings," Peter Bouckaert of
Human Rights Watch told The As-
sociated Press, calling for a full-
fledged U.N. peacekeeping mission.
"Otherwise the future of the Muslim
community of this country will be
gone."
Muslims make up about 15 percent


of Central African Republic's 4.6 mil-
lion people. More than 800,000 peo-
ple have fled their homes -about
half of those from the capital, ac-
cording to the United Nations.
"There are some who don't want
Muslims in this country," Prime
Minister Andre Nzapayeke said on
local radio Saturday "But when the
Muslims have left the country, what
happens next? The Protestants will
throw out the Catholics, and then
the Baptists against the Evangelists,
and finally the animists? It is time
we regain control and stop our-
selves from plunging into an abyss."
Thousands of Muslims left Bangui
in a massive convoy Friday that was
jeered by crowds of Christians. One
Muslim who fell off a truck was
quickly killed by the mob. Muslim
women who could not get on the


trucks tried to hand their children to
strangers aboard the vehicles. Whole
neighborhoods are abandoned and
Muslims who cannot leave are hiding
inside mosques that have not already
been set ablaze or destroyed by angry
crowds.
Entire Muslim communities also
have left towns in the rural north-
west sometimes only to come under
attack from Christian militiamen
and die while trying to get out of the
anarchic country
Across a wide stretch of northwest
Central African Republic, Christian
militiamen known as the anti-Balaka
(or anti-machete) have driven tens of
thousands of Muslims out of the area.
Many are seeking refuge in Chad or
Cameroon, as there are few corners
of Central African Republic where
Muslims are an outright majority


Associated Press
An enormous boulder
hurtled off a mountain
and smashed into a
tourist train in the French
Alps on Saturday,
derailing it on the moun-
tainside and killing two
passengers, officials said.
Nine people were injured.

Boulder smashes
tourist train
PARIS -An enormous
boulder hurtled off a moun-
tain and smashed into a
tourist train in the French
Alps on Saturday, derailing
it on the mountainside and
killing two passengers, offi-
cials said. Nine people
were injured.
The force of the boulder
caved in the side of the
train, which takes a
leisurely three hours to
travel about 93 miles from
Nice to Dignes-les-Bains.
"A rock the size of an au-
tomobile came off the
mountainside and slammed
into the first car of the train,"
Jean Ballester, mayor of
nearby Annot, told BFM tel-
evision. "There are unfortu-
nately two dead."
The uninjured among the
approximately 30 passen-
gers were evacuated to
Annot, a little more than
half-way through the train
route, Ballester said. Two
rescue helicopters were
dispatched to the remote
area, he said.
France's top security offi-
cial, Manuel Vals, confirmed
two dead and nine injured.

Cease-fire in
Syrian city falters
BEIRUT Two trucks
carrying food and medical
supplies into rebel-held
neighborhoods in the cen-
tral Syrian city of Horns
turned back under heavy
fire Saturday, leaving four
paramedics wounded as a
cease-fire faltered, Syrian
officials said.
Talal Barrazi, the gover-
nor of Horns province, told
the Lebanon-based Al-
Mayadeen TV that the at-
tack occurred late in the
afternoon and that the
trucks were targeted by two
roadside bombs and a mor-
tar shell from the rebel side.
Horns activist Ahmad al-
Qusair however denied
there had been roadside
bombs and said the convoy
was attacked by mortar
shells fired by government
forces.
The state TV said four
members of the Syrian Arab
Red Crescent were
wounded by rebel fire in the
area, but gave no further
details.
-From wire reports













EXCURSIONS


Amanda Mims
For the Chronicle




For more information about the ships and tickets, visit www.tallshipevent.com. To learn more
about the foundation, visit www.fundacionnaovictoria.org.


It might cause you to do a double take.


Photos by AMANDA MIMS / For the Chronicle
TOP: The El Gale6n, left, and the Nao Victoria, replicas of 16th century Spanish
ships, at port in St. Augustine. RIGHT: A re-enactor stands aboard the El Gale6n in
St. Augustine.


imagine driving over the Bridge
of Lions in historic Saint Augus-
tine and seeing in the harbor
two ships that look like Christopher
Columbus could have sailed them
there. That's what Saint Augustine's
visitors got to see during the month
of January, when the Nao Victoria
and El Galeon, replicas of
16th-century Spanish ships, were
docked side by side in all their
tall-ship glory


Both ships are open to the public,
and visitors are allowed to do some
exploring of their own inside the
upper and lower decks. Inside,
guests can see the ships' cannons,
peer into the galley and even the
crews' no-frills, 16th-century sleep-
ing quarters.
While the 170-foo tEl Galeon is
expected to stay in Saint Augustine


See Page A17






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grandchild needs


to learn manners


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 9, 2014 C: ConastCitrus B: Bright House DII:Conw.s Dunnellon & Inglis F. Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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35 26 35 nThe World According to Dick Cheney The life of *** "Killing Them Softly" (2012) ** "Sinister" (2012 Horror) Ethan Hawke, "Perks of
350 261 350 the former vice president.'MA, L,V' Brad Pitt.'R c James Ransone. (In Stereo) R' Being"
S** "Sherlock Holmes" (2009, Action) Robert ** "The Tourist" (2010) Johnny Depp. A flirtation with a ** 'The Tourist" (2010,
MY 48 33 48 31 34 DowneyJr.'PG-13' (DVS) stranger leads to a web of intrigue. 'PG-13' Suspense) Johnny Depp. PG-13
TOON 38 58 38 33 ** "Firehouse Dog" (2007, Comedy)'PG' Steven Teen King/Hill |King/Hill Burgers Burgers Fam.Gu Fam.Gu
TRAV 9 106 9 44 Food Paradise 'PG' Food Paradise 'PG' Monumental Myster Mysteries-Museum Castle Secrets Mysteries-Museum
ruTV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Top 20 Funniest'PG' World's Dumbest...
tv) 32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gold Girls |Gold Girs Gold Girs |Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls
A 4 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Psych "Cog Blocked"
U5 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14" PGI
117 117 Law & Order (In Law & Order"Teenage Law & Order "Phobia" Law & Order"A Losing Law & Order (In Law & Order Murder
S 117 69 117 Stereo) '14' c Wasteland" '14' '14' cc Season" '14' Stereo) '14' c investigation. '14'
WNA 18 18 18 18 20 Funny HomeVideos Funny HomeVideos Funny HomeVideos Funny HomeVideos **> "Tremors" (1990) Kevin Bacon.


D earAnnie: Last
year, I was laid off
of work. Knowing
my financial burden, our
son asked whether he
and his family could
move in with us to help
out. We reluctantly
agreed.
The issue is our 7-
year-old granddaughter
"Lulu" is spoiled by her
mother There is no ac-
countability for her ac-
tions. Her
mother
makes all
kinds of ex-
cuses, and it's
almost as
though she is
rewarded for
her lack of
behavior and
respect.
Lulu dis-
likes me be-
cause I ANN
expect her to AN N
clean her MAIL
room and ad-
here to general house-
hold rules and manners.
She gives me dirty looks,
never says "good morn-
ing," talks back, defies
us, lies and blames oth-
ers, and uses inappropri-
ate language. When I
politely asked her (in
front of her mother) not
to use certain words, she
looks me straight in the
eye and says the word
again. Her mother sim-
ply says, "You were told
not to do that. Now apol-
ogize." Even Lulu can
tell that Mom is insin-
cere, so she rarely apolo-
gizes and still won't stop
using inappropriate lan-
guage. And of course,
there are no conse-
quences.


Lulu is manipulative,
deceptive and narcissis-
tic and has difficulty
being social. She shows
no affection toward us
and told her school prin-
cipal that I am her aunt.
Our son has very little
to say If he tries to disci-
pline his child, he
catches it from her
mother My daughter-in-
law gets angry with me
when I comment on
Lulu's terrible
behavior How
do I get Mom to
stop thinking
she's Lulu's
S best friend and
start being a re-
sponsible
mother? -An-
noyed
Grandma
Dear
Grandma: We
feel sorry for
E'S Lulu. Her lack
3BOX of discipline
will make her
an undesirable friend
and unwelcome every-
where. Parents some-
times don't realize that
children who have no
definite boundaries feel
insecure and act out.
Your son needs to step
up and be a father to this
girl. If his wife gives him
a hard time, they can go
for counseling and par-
enting classes. We hope
you get back on your fi-
nancial feet soon so they
can move out before
your relationship is per-
manently damaged.
Email anniesmailbox
@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


-- Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"August: Osage County" (R)
1 p.m.,4 p.m., 7p.m.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow Re-
cruit" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Labor Day" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:50 p.m.
"Lone Survivor" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
2 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"That Awkward Moment" (R)
1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Vampire Academy" (PG-13)


1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Frozen" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"LEGO" (PG) In 3D. 4:30 p.m.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 7:05 p.m.
"Monuments Men" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m.
"That Awkward Moment" (R)
7:25 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Unrefined
6 Full of flavor
11 Commerce
16 Military trainee
21 Mature
22 French river
23 Spiral
24 Express a view
25 Behaved
26 Metric measure
27 Newton orAsimov
28 Crowbar
29 Recent (Prefix)
30 Yield by treaty
31 Paul or Perlman
33 Bungling
35 Print measures
36 Sea eagle
38 United
39 "Mamma -!"
40 Upon (Prefix)
41 Whiskey
42 Grain for brewing
44 NASA vehicles
48 Agent(Hyph.)
51 Be present
54 Knock down
55 Love god
57 Of a frozen region
61 Impostor
62 Baroque
composer
63 Slays
65 Human trunk
66 Highway
67 Winter month
70 Deen orAbdul
72 Doctrine
73 CIA forerunner
74 Defunct political
acronym
75 -and haw
77 Tomb
79 Billiards stick
80 Earns as profit
82 Contend
83 Reason
85 Storage place
87 Canvas stand
89 Brooch
90 Roulette bet
91 Kind of detector
92 Luther King Jr.
94 Last
96 Child
97 Untidy state
100 In the past
101 Mother-of-pearl


104 Mil. address
105 Gun pellets
106 Punta-Este
107 Fall mo.
108 Memorize
110 Bow-and-arrow sport
112 Pueblo people
113 Peace goddess
116 Bay window
118 Healthy
119 Namely (2 wds.)
120 Pointed tooth
122 "-Karenina"
123 Fish organ
124 Summer and Karan
125 Wallop
127 Relevant
129 Walking stick
130 Golden-agers (Abbr.)
133 Eat
135 Big boat
136 Impair
137 Distance measure
141 -the hay
142 CaanorCagney
144 Johnny-
145 Bottle stopper
146 Dessert choice
147 Convex molding
149 Penniless
151 Depart
153 Praying figure
155 Of warships
156 Restrict
157 Immigrants' island
158 Analyze
grammatically
159 Choose
160 Gladden
161 Coins
162 Stage direction


DOWN
1 Hoisting device
2 Kitchen gadget
3 Writer Sinclair
4 A letter
5 Conclude
6 Not talking
7 Stage whisper
8 Fountain or
Sampras
9 Wrath
10 Oil field structure
11 Slender
12 Legal matter
13 Jai-
14 Lane or Keaton


Excluding
Young horse
Simian
Scuba-equipped swim-
mer
Foe
Not wordy
Frigid
Hard wood
Kind of cotton
Make corrections to
Coffee variety
A random one
Happen again
"-! A mouse!"
Stumble
Comforted
Skill
Mil. category
Protective
garment
The ones there
Kitchen appliance (2
wds.)
- macabre
Aspersion
Kind of economics
(Hyph.)
Publish
Rising star
Flavoring plant
Cunning
Old Roman satirist
Bates or Fleming
So far
In abundance
Reflect
Child
Perched

Hr. part
Flight formation
Rotating machine part
Transgression
Looking hard
Mary Tyler -
Crazed
Where Greeks
assembled
Kick - fuss
Rigid covering
Reddish brown
Cuts
Bus. bigwig
- avis
Sedimentary rock
Hawaiian goose
Small opening
Sweetie


Pen point
Dir. letters
Roman household god
Weight unit
"Born Free"
lioness
Confused
Gloomy
Fall
West of old
movies


Loving touch
Emitted light
Competitor
Kitchen device
Danger
Kind of star
To pieces
Wash cycle
Prevent from
acting
Shock


Body, in anatomy
Nerve network
Tranquil
Fond du -
Set of parts
Whitney the
inventor
Unclose
Operated


Puzzle answer is on Page A22.


2014 UFS. Dist_ by Universal Li:,:ck for UFS


I
.1


A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHIP
Continued from Page S15

until summer, the Nao Victoria, an 85-
foot long replica of the ship by the same
name that was the first to circumnavi-
gate the world, is scheduled to be in
Fort Myers starting Feb. 13 and in
Tampa starting March 21.
The crews of these two ships, volun-
teers with Fundacion Nao Victoria, an
Andalusian nonprofit whose mission in-
cludes educatingthe public about Span-
ish explorers, have gotten a taste of
what life at sea was like hundreds of
years ago.
For 31-year-old Guillermo Mufioz of
Barcelona, sailing on the Nao Victoria
has been a rewarding experience.
"I sailed before, but never on a ship
like this," said Mufioz, a chief mate on
the Nao Victoria who plans to become a
captain. "It's a challenge. We set the
sails as often as we can and it's all by
hand. It's a lot of work."
Although he is a sailor by trade, sail-
ing 16th-century-style is unlike anything
he has done before, especially when the
weather is bad.
He now laughs when he recalls his
first nerve-wracking shift on watch.
"On my first watch, at night, I was at
the whipstaffwith rough seas, and all
the water on the deck. I said, 'Oh my
God, we are going to die.' But then I saw
how the ship was navigating, so I said,
'OK. Maybe we will survive.'
"You have to learn a lot of new things
and this ship (rolls a lot). Sometimes
when we have rough seas we get water
in the wood. It's quite an experience."
Some crew members have been out to


sea for more than 20 days at a time, and
many will volunteer for a total of six
months before their visas expire.
The ships are scheduled to be in
Florida for much of the year For more
information about the ships and to pur-
chase tickets, visit wwwtallship
event. com. To learn more about the
foundation, visit www.fundacionnao
victoria.org.

Nao Victoria
The Nao Victoria was a Spanish car-
rack and the first ship to successfully
circumnavigate the world. The Victoria
was part of a Spanish expedition that
began in 1519 and was commanded by
the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand
Magellan. After his demise in the
Philippines, the last part of the voyage
was commanded by Juan Sebastian
Elcano. The expedition began with five
ships and 245 men but the Victoria was
the only ship to complete the voyage re-
turning in 1522, almost three years later
Only 18 men survived the 32,000-mile
trip.

El Gale6n

The galeon was an oceangoing ship
type that evolved from the carrack in
the second half of 16th century Galeons
were constructed from oak, pine and
various hardwoods for hull and decking.
Hulls were usually carvel-built. Hun-
dreds of expert tradesmen, including
carpenters, blacksmiths, shipwrights
and pitch-melters worked day and night
for months to make a galeon seaworthy

Information from
wwwtallshipevent.com


Details:


For more information about the ships and
tickets, visit www.tallshipevent.com.

Schedule:
Feb. 13 to March 17
Fort Myers Beach Nao Victoria
Docked at Nervous Nellie's Marina
1131 First St., Fort Myers Beach, FL 33931

March 21 to March 30
Tampa Nao Victoria
Docked at the Tampa Convention Center
333 South Franklin St., Tampa, FL 33602


April 16 to May 11
Port Canaveral Nao Victoria
Docked at the Cove in Port Canaveral
Glen Cheek Drive, Cape Canaveral, FL 32920

May, June & July ports of call to be
determined

Aug. 1 to Sept. 1
Ocean City, Maryland Nao Victoria and
El Galeon
Docked at 3rd Street Park
3rd Street Bayside, Ocean City, MD 21842


AMANDA MIMS / For the Chronicle
Visitors explore the deck of the Nao Victoria and speak with crew members, who are
volunteers who live and work aboard the ship.


European sites, art tell


tales of Monuments Men


Associated Press

DALLAS From a
fairy tale-inspiring castle
in the Bavarian Alps to a
serene sculpture of Mary
and Jesus by Michelan-
gelo tucked away in a Bel-
gian church, sites and
works of art across Eu-
rope can give travelers a
glimpse of the heroic
work done by the group
depicted in the new
movie "The Monuments
Men."
The group's mission
was to save cultural treas-
ures during World War II.
And just like the group's
previously unsung accom-
plishments, many of the
places and objects they
saved have been "hidden
in plain sight" for
decades, said Robert
Edsel, the Dallas-based
author of the book "The
Monuments Men," which
inspired the movie star-
ring George Clooney, Matt
Damon and others.
Edsel talked about a
few of the many places
and artworks in Europe
tied to the work of the 350
men and women from Al-
lied countries, most of
them already established
as architects, artists, cura-
tors and museum direc-
tors when they reported
for duty.
Eventually, they re-
turned more than five
million cultural items
stolen by the Nazis as part
of a systematic looting
operation.

WORKS OF ART IN
BELGIUM AND THE
AUSTRIAN SALT MINE
WHERE THEY WERE
HIDDEN

Visitors to the canal-
lined, storybook town of
Bruges, Belgium, may
look in in awe at
Michelangelo's marble
sculpture "Madonna and
Child" in the Church of
Our Lady, but few know of
its harrowing wartime
journey Taken from the
church by German offi-
cers in 1944, the sculpture
was eventually discov-
ered by Monuments Men
on a dirty mattress in a
salt mine near Altaussee


in Austria.
In the town of Ghent,
not far from Bruges, visi-
tors at Saint Bavo Cathe-
dral can gaze at another
work that was discovered
by Monuments Men at the
Altaussee mine: the
Ghent Altarpiece. Made
of panels painted by Jan
van Eyck in 1432, the fa-
mous work of art was
taken by the Belgians to
France in 1940 for safe-
keeping. But in 1942 it
was taken by the Ger-
mans.
Tourists can also visit
the Altaussee salt mine
where those works -
along with 6,600 paint-
ings, 140 sculptures and
other pieces filled
more than 100 tunnels.
The works stored in the
Austrian mine about 45
minutes from Salzburg
housed treasures Adolf
Hitler wanted to one day
fill his planned museum
in Linz, Austria.

A PARISIAN MUSEUM
AND A FAMOUS
VERMEER

When the Nazis took
over the Jeu de Paume
museum in Paris, making
it the headquarters of
their looting operation,
French art expert Rose
Valland was allowed to
stay But Valland, who un-
beknownst to the Nazis
spoke German, managed
to keep track of where the
artworks most stolen
from Jewish families in
France were being
sent. She passed that in-
formation along to Monu-
ments Man James
Rorimer after the libera-
tion of Paris, directing
him to Germany's
Neuschwanstein Castle.
Today, a small plaque on
the southwest corner of
the Jeu de Paume, located
near the Place de la Con-
corde, recognizes her
bravery
To see a work of art
with a history that encap-
sulates the Nazi looting
machine, Edsel says, gaze
upon Jan Vermeer's
painting "The As-
tronomer" at the Louvre.
"If we could take it off the
wall it would have a Nazi


inventory code on the
back," he said.
"That one picture is
stolen from the Roth-
schilds, goes to the Jeu de
Paume. It's selected for
(Adolf) Hitler's museum.
... It ends up in the salt
mine atAltaussee, found
by the Monuments offi-
cers, returned with all
these other things to
France, returned to the
Rothschilds, donated to
the Louvre," he said.



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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 A17











ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Cook chili, auction items
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family, 906 Highway 44 East,
Inverness, for its annual Chili/Cornbread
Cook-off and Chinese Auction on Feb. 16.
All entries must be in by 1 p.m. for judg-
ing at 2 p.m., with prizes for first-, second-
and third-place winners. Auction tickets
go on sale at 1 p.m., with drawings to pick
winners at 3 p.m.
Call 352-344-3495 or visit
wwwvfw4337.org for information about all
post activities.

Post 166 organizing auxiliary
American Legion Post 166 is in the
process of organizing an auxiliary unit.
All women in the Chassahowitzka, Ho-
mosassa Springs and Sugarmill Woods
areas interested in joining the American
Legion Auxiliary Unit are welcome to call
352-860-2090 or 928-848-8359. Or, write to:
American Legion Post 166, PO. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL 34447-0767. Fur-
nish your name, address, city and state.
The information is needed by Feb. 22 to
set up an organizational meeting.

Four Chaplains service today
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will have a Four
Chaplains Memorial Service at 4 p.m.
today The service will be followed by the
post's birthday celebration.
Refreshments will be served. The public
is welcome.

Post to have flea market
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will have its out-
door flea market and pancake breakfast
beginning at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausages, orange
juice and coffee for a $5 donation. Every-
one is welcome.

Purple Heart Ceremony set
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) invites
all veterans and the public to attend the
ninth annual Purple Heart Ceremony at
11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Florida
National Guard Armory, 8551 W Venable
St., Crystal River
Dedicated to the memory of Chapter 776
member Donald Guard, the patriotic cere-
mony will commemorate the legacy of the
Purple Heart and pay tribute to Florida's
fallen heroes and wounded warriors, with
special recognition of World War II
recipients.
The MOPH Department of Florida
Afghanistan/Iraq War Memorial Portrait
Mural, which honors those Floridians who
fell during the Afghanistan/Iraq cam-
paigns, will be on display The mural is the
first memorial to bear both the engraved
names and color portraits of those who
fell.
Vocalists Paul and Jackie Stevio and
9-year-old Marleigh Miller will provide
patriotic music.
For more information, visit on www
citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.

Ladies plan card party
Unit 776, Ladies Auxiliary Military
Order of the Purple Heart will host a real
Military Card Party at 11 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 22, at the Point 0' Woods Clubhouse,
9228 E. Gospel Island Road, Inverness.
Lunch will be served at noon and cards
will follow
Men are also invited to join in for the
fun and prizes. "Elvis" will be on hand,
straight from his duty station in Friedberg,
Germany
If you were in the military, wear your
uniform or military service organization
uniform. Those who weren't in the mili-
tary are asked to wear red, white and blue
in honor of our military personnel and vet-
erans.
Cost is $12, which includes lunch, coffee
and dessert, plus door prizes. Make your
own table of four or the ladies will pair
you. For reservations, call Tee at 352-345-
1438 or email ridertee3@yahoo.com, or
Linda at 352-344-8196 or
pooh2102@icloud.com. Reservations must
be received by 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16.
A portion of the proceeds will help sup-
port the Honor Flight Network, a non-
profit organization to honor America's
veterans. They transport veterans to Wash-
ington, D.C., at no cost to visit and reflect
at their memorials. Top priority is given to
World War II and terminally ill veterans
from all wars.

Public welcome to play
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.; games start
at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.


Aboard the big ship


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Retired United States Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Charles Owen served aboard the USS New Jersey during World War II.


Citrus Hills veteran served on USS New Jersey


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


H


e wasn't just a
part of the
original crew
on one of


America's biggest ships
of World War II.
"I can almost say I
helped build it," Charles
"Jake" Owen said.
The ship in question was the USS
New Jersey one in a class of four battle-
ships that included the Iowa, Missouri
and Wisconsin. They were the last of
their kind built by the United States,
and like its fellow ships, the New Jersey
would see action although it was de-
commissioned several times in three
other conflicts after the Second World
War
The keel for the New Jersey was laid
before that fateful day in December
1941, that day at
Pearl Harbor
whenAmer-
ica's entry into '
World War II
was decided.
When the U.S. -
fleet of battle-
ships in the
Pacific were
all nearly de-
stroyed or put
out of action
for a lengthy -'B
period of time,
the need for .
ships like the a L '- '-
New Jersey
became more
imperative.
The ship
was commissioned in May 1943, and
one of its crew was Charles Owen, an
18- year-old kid from Fairdale, Ky, who
joined the Navy because he knew he
would soon be drafted. "I didn't want to
go into the Army and dig foxholes," he
said.
Following boot camp at the Great
Lakes Naval Station north of Chicago,
Owen was shipped to Philadelphia
where he assisted in the completion of


the ship that would be his home for
nearly three years.
After being commissioned, the New
Jersey trained off Trinidad in the West-
ern Atlantic for six months. Once com-
pleted, the New Jersey passed through
the Panama Canal in early January
1944, bound for action in the Pacific the-
ater of war
On Jan. 22, she joined the U.S. Fifth
Fleet and three days later became part
of Task Force 58, assisting in the assault
on the Marshall Islands.
"Our job was to bombard the islands
so the Marines could go in and invade,"
Owen said. 'And to protect the carri-
ers."
Naval warfare had been altered by
the introduction of aircraft, shifting the
necessity of what needed to be pro-
tected the most in a fleet to aircraft car-
riers. Still, there remained an urgent
need for a gun platform that could
launch a 2,500-pound shell 25 miles.
The New Jersey's nine 16-inch


Name: Charles "Jake" Owen
Rank: Third class petty officer
Branch: U.S. Navy
Years: 1943-46
Ship: U.S.S. New Jersey
ajor campaigns: Marshall Isla
Caroline Islands, Mariana Islan
Philippine Islands, Iwo Jima, 01
Jobs: Loader, 40-millimeter ant
gun; part of Ship Services Divis
Awards: Asiatic Pacific Campa
Victory Medal, Good Behavior r
-i*J .Philippines Battle Ribbons, Wo
11 service ribbon


(in diameter) cannons, divided into
three turrets, could supply that kind of
firepower
The New Jersey also had 20 five-inch
cannons on 10 turrets, 80 40-millimeter
antiaircraft guns and another 49 20-mil-
limeter antiaircraft guns.
"We had a lot of firepower," Owen
said. As for going into battle, "They
were all scary We were sitting out there
shooting at an island and they were
shooting back at you."
During battle, Owen was a loader for
one of the 40-millimeter antiaircraft sta-
tions. "Sometimes they came in so close,
you could see the pilot," he said. The
rate of fire for the guns was 120 rounds
a minute, making his job to keep feed-
ing shells an important one.
When not in battle, Owen was part of
the Ship Services Division, which in-
cluded a wide variety of services. He
spent most of his time working in the
laundry but he also spent time on
watch.

: Charles "Jake" Owen on board
the New Jersey in 1944.
Charles "Jake" Owen with
former New Jersey shipmate Frank
Webb standing in front of 16-inch gun
turret at 2006 reunion aboard New
Jersey in Camden, N.J. The ship is now
a museum in that harbor.
Special to the Chronicle


Although the New Jersey was never
significantly damaged by enemy fire
during the 11 engagements it was in-
volved in during that war, it would be-
come the most decorated ship its size.
On Feb. 4,1944, it became Admiral Ray-
mond Spruance's flagship, the first time
- but certainly not the last that it
would serve in that capacity It would
see action at Truk in the Caroline Is-
lands and at Saipan, Tinian and Guam,
all part of the Marianas, and it would
take part in the bombardment of Iwo
Jima after it had spent eight months
supporting the landings at the Philip-
pines and taking part in the Battle of
Leyte Gulf, the Japanese Navy's last
major naval battle.
But perhaps the toughest time aboard
the big ship was during the action off
Okinawa in mid-March, 1945. The island
was within range of suicide bombers, or
kamikazes, taking off from Japan, and
they proved a horrible menace.
It was during that battle that Owen
and his shipmates
watched as a Japan-
ese dive bomber
struck the USS
Franklin, the bomb
piercing the deck
and causing several
ands, fires. More than 800
Sds, sailors died.
inawa The New Jersey
tiaircraft was involved in res-
sion cue operations,
in M plucking several sea-
ign Medal, men who had been
MiWedal, blasted overboard.
rid War II The war officially
ended in September
1945, with the signing
of surrender papers
by Japanese officials in Tokyo Bay The
ceremony took place on the U.S.S. Mis-
souri; however, it was originally sup-
posed to be hosted by the New Jersey
President Harry Truman had it
switched to the ship that bore his home
state's name.
Owen left the Navy in January 1946,
and started his own produce shipping
business, retiring in 1987 when he
moved to Florida. He currently lives in
Citrus Hills.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Take precautions during winter weather


ven though Florida is
known for its sunny
beaches, warm summers,
mild winters and of course, our
hurricane season, we have had
winter Nor'easters take a swipe
at our state.
As a newspaper reporter in
Sebastian, north of Vero along
our east coast, I covered the
news about some major dam-
age one of these storms had
done to the Sebastian Inlet
Jetty The sturdy metal railing
was washed away and the steel
grating making up the center
portion of the walkway had its
bolts ripped loose from the con-
crete. I joined scientists in-
specting the damage, out onto
the now-unprotected platform,
timing our journey between
12-foot waves still crashing
across our path.
In January 1985, we had a no-


Barbara
B Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


table coating of ice as far south
as Homestead. In 1977, I re-
member the morning tempera-
ture being just 17 degrees
Fahrenheit. Even here in
Citrus County, we had a dusting
of snow in late 2009.
This year, Florida's panhan-
dle had snow, so I'll share some
things that might be helpful
in our colder-than-usual
temperatures.
Winterizing your home in-
cludes allowing outdoor spigots


dribble and pool pumps run
when freezing temperatures
are expected. For colder condi-
tions, allowing an indoor faucet
to dribble as well could help.
As a military dependent in
Alaska, I attended winter orien-
tation and still use these guide-
lines when traveling during
Florida winters, even when not
leaving the state.
Besides the first-aid/emer-
gency gear and charged cell
phone, try to have the following
with you during inclement
weather: bottled water, at least
one blanket (those old military
blankets are perfect for this),
hat, gloves, heavy socks and wa-
terproof boots.
Additionally, canned nonper-
ishable food, can opener or P-
38, mess kit with eating
utensils, sharp knife, flashlight,
a folding shovel and some kitty


litter (dirt roads can get mucky),
and anything else that might
help if you're stuck on a back
road or in a traffic jam for an
extended period of time.
This may seem a bit like
overkill, so use common sense
and adapt according to your
itinerary Nights can get chilly
when stuck in a powerless car
while you wait for help to ar-
rive. Even an extra sweater
during the summer can be
helpful.
Fog is another driving danger
we've been facing in recent
weeks. Use headlights while
driving, remembering the high
beams won't help. If you have
fog lights, use those.
Above all, slow down! If the
fog gets too dense, pull off the
roadway safely and keep those
flashers on. Don't overdrive
your own headlight beams.


Regulate your speed according
to conditions and be aware of
other drivers, both fast and
slow
Please note that our Food
Bank's new hours are 9 a.m. to
noon (instead of 1 p.m.) on
Tuesday.
Our next meeting is 10 a.m.
Feb. 27.
Call Dan at 352-400-8952 to
reserve your March 8 yard sale
spot. Next month, read about
some interesting veterans I've
met throughout the years.
Maybe you know them!
Barbara L Corcoran is the
public information officer of
the Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Inc. She maybe con-
tacted via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org.
More information about this
group maybe found at
ww.ccvcfl.org


VETERANS & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS


AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
comn, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-
3544, or email boosc29
@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.





A0_


E American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs Lodge
No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Me-
morial Drive, Homosassa. To
accommodate members who
cannot drive at night, break-
fast meetings are also held at
Olive Tree at 9 a.m. weekly.
Call Commander Robert Scott
at 352-860-2090 for days and
other information.
Herbert Surber
American Legion Post 225,
6535 S. Withlapopka Drive,
Floral City. Call 352-
860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose


Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.


OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.


AMVETS Harry M.
Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American


~I -,-..


Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. Call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.


The Korean War
Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Post plans Chinese
auction fundraiser
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Harry F Nesbitt Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills will host a Chi-
nese auction fundraiser on Sat-
urday, March 8, at the Post
located at 2170 Vet Lane, be-
hind Cadence Bank, on County
Road 491.
Doors open at 10 a.m. and
drawings will begin at noon.
Admission is a $2.50 donation
to benefit the VFW Veterans
Village in Fort McCoy -the
only facility of its kind. The
VFW home provides affordable,
independent living accommo-
dations in a homelike atmos-
phere to those in VFW, Men's
Auxiliaries, Ladies Auxiliaries
and their spouses. The facility
is not subsidized by any govern-
mental agency, so the cost of op-
eration is met by rent income,
donations and fundraisers such
as this.
There will be hot dogs avail-
able for $1, with free dessert
and coffee. For information,
call Bettie at 352-746-1989 or
Donna at 352-746-5215.


Post 77 invites all to
jam Friday nights
Everyone is welcome to join
the American Legion Allen
Rawls Post 77 at a jam from 6 to
9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21, with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who
enjoy playing instruments or
singing, and those who want to
just enjoy the music are wel-
come. Cost is $5 at the door;
food and soft drinks are avail-
able for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al
Point in Inverness. For more in-
formation, call 352-476-2134,
352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.


Celebrate St. Paddy
at VFW post
Harry E Nesbitt Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills will have a St
Patrick's Day dinner from 5 to
7 p.m. Friday, March 14, at the
post, 2170 Vet Lane, behind
Cadence Bank, on
County Road 491.
Donation is $7. Tickets are
now available and everyone is
welcome

Post welcomes public
for fun all week
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), offers several events
that are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in
the smoke-free hall. Card bingo
and grill night is at 5 p.m.
Wednesday in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m. Monday
and Fridays in the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and
Thursday mornings.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.

Post 4252 invites all
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road
200 in Hernando (with the heli-
copter out front), welcomes the
public at meals and activities.
Meals include lunch every
day and breakfast on Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities
include bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday
Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in
the hall Saturday
Beginning Feb. 7, Friday will
feature an all-you-can-eat fish
fry or New England boiled
dinner
For more information and


menus, call the post at 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.

Reserve for 2014
trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy, re-
tired, will lead the 2014 trip to
Hawaii for veterans and their
families and friends from
March 11 to March 28. Signups
are being taken for the annual
trek, which includes visits to
several islands, some golfing
and a special visit to the USS
Arizona Memorial and The Na-
tional Cemetery of the Pacific.
For more information, call
McLean at 352-637-5131 or
email dmclean8@tampa
bayrr.com.

DAV helps veterans
get to clinics
The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a
need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office
in Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to be
placed on the van list. All
appointments must be made
before 1 p.m.

DAV transport
program needs van
The Disabled American Vet-
erans Transportation Network
requests contributions from the
public to reach a goal of $20,000
for a van.


The van program goes to the
clinic in The Villages, as well as
to the VA facility in Gainesville.
This service is available to all
veterans each weekday, for
scheduled appointments, tests
and procedures.
The program uses a loaner
van, which has more than
270,000 miles on it, to transport
to The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not ac-
cepted and it is requested that
any contributions be made by
check or money order made out
to: DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also written in
the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible contri-
bution to: DAV Van Project, c/o
Joe Stephens, chairman, 2797
W Xenox Drive, Citrus Springs,
FL 34433, or mail it to the DAV
Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald A.
Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter
70,1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34450.

'In Their Words'
wants your stories
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-
ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave.
We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of
service, theater of war served,
years served, outfit and veter-
ans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo.com.
C.J. will put together your
stories and help set up obtain-
ing "then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story


Case manager aids
county's veterans
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department has a
case manager who is available
to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes
Region Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Ho-
mosassa Library, 4100 S. Grand-
march Ave., Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library, 8619
W Crystal St., Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To
make an appointment, call 352-
527-5915.


Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers
help for veterans who have had
their post-traumatic stress dis-
order (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been de-
nied within the past two years
are asked to contact the office
to review the case and discuss
compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the Lecanto
VA Mental Health center and
have been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment
to discuss a claim, call 352-527-
5915. You will need to have
your denial letter and a copy of
your compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. Get a copy
of your exam either by request-
ing it through the VA medical
records or from the primary
care window in Lecanto.
For more information, visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.


VETERANS & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS


Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at
10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Coun-
try Club, Hernando. Call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De
Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County


Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of
Military Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at
the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or Secre-
tary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252
in Hernando. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly


Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Saturdays at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meetings in 2014 are: Jan. 11, Feb.
8, March 8, April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen


at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at
West Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or email sea-
capt34447@yahoo.com or Robert
Currie at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association


meets at Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coali-
tion is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by call-
ing 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is
to meet the needs of wounded vet-
erans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES


60th ANNIVERSARY


NAMI Citrus to gather
Monday in Citrus Hills
NAMI Citrus (the National Al-
liance on Mental Illness) will
gather for its regular monthly
meeting Monday Doors open at
6 p.m. at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church on County Road 486 in
Citrus Hills.
Speaker will be Mary Lee
Cubbison, former director of The
Centers on County Road 491 and
founder of a nonprofit advocacy
group, the Anti-Drug Coalition of
Citrus County Inc. The group is
composed of community leaders
whose mission statement is "to
prevent substance abuse among
youths and adults through
community-based partnerships."
All those with an interest in
mental health issues are welcome.
Call 352-464-4495.

PFLAG meeting is
scheduled Tuesday
PFLAG Lecanto (Parents, Fam-
ily and Friends of Lesbians and
Gays) will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
at Unity Church of Citrus County,
2628 W Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
PFLAG's mission is to promote
the health and well-being of LGBT
persons, their families and
friends. Meetings are open to
everyone and provide an opportu-
nity for dialog, discussion and sup-
port, as well as education about
LGBT issues and concerns.
For information, call Linda at
352-419-2738 or email
pflag.lecanto@gmail.com.

Retired employees
group to get together
Chapter 776 of the National Ac-
tive and Retired Federal Employ-
ees Association (NARFE) invites
all retired employees, surviving
annuitants and guests to its next
meeting at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday
The program presentation this
month is by Audible Hearing Cen-
ter The chapter is collecting used
or broken hearing aids for the
Starkey Hearing Foundation.
These hearing aids will be refur-
bished and provided at no charge
to people in need of hearing aids.
NARFE's regular meetings are
held at Mama's Kuntry Kafe, 1787
W Main St., Inverness.
For more information, call 352-
522-1923.


Gallery to host
'Conversation' series
The Florida Artists Gallery will
host the third gathering in its
Community Conversation Series
Wednesday
The public is invited, admission
is free and refreshments are avail-
able. The meeting will begin at
4 p.m. in The Gallery Caf6 at his-
toric Knight House, 8219 Orange
Ave., Floral City The topic will be
"Civility in our Society and the
New Media." Community Conver-
sations last about one hour
The purpose is to bring people
together to share ideas through
stimulating and mutually respect-
ful discussion while exploring top-
ics that are critical to our nation
and our time.
For more information, call 352-
344-9300.

Citizen's Academy
discussion set Tuesday
The League of Women Voters of
Citrus County will have Deborah
Bloss, Citrus County administra-
tive assistant, speak at its next
meeting at 10:15 a.m. Tuesday at
the Coastal Region Library
Crystal River
Bloss will give a presentation on
the Citrus County Citizen's Acad-
emy, followed by discussion and
questions from those attending.
The Citizen's Academy is free and
open to all residents who wish to
experience a hands-on, inside look
at how the county's departments
work and the services provided.
In September, 12 league mem-
bers participated and graduated
Dec. 10. They agreed the class was
both enlightening and enjoyable,
and urge others to participate.
All interested men and women
are invited. The league is a non-
partisan, educational organization.
For more information, contact
lwvcc2013@gmail.com.

Women's club plans
Mardi Gras event
Citrus Hills Women's Club will
host a Mardi Gras luncheon with a
fashion show and silent auction
Wednesday, Feb. 12.
Enjoy a taste of New Orleans
lunch with a surprise Mardi Gras
dessert and see what is new for
spring as Bealls of Crystal River
presents a Jazzy Fashion Review


modeled by club members.
Arrive early (10 a.m.), to pur-
chase raffle tickets for the Fashion
Accessory Chinese Auction and
peruse and bid on the many silent
auction specialty items.
The luncheon price is $20.
The Citrus Hills Women's Club is
a social and charitable organiza-
tion for the purpose of making
friends, sharing fun events and
providing service to the commu-
nity. Membership is open to all
women residents of the areas de-
fined as the former and current
Villages of Citrus Hills.
For membership information,
call Tricia at 352-270-8909.

From Wisconsin?
Come to potluck lunch
Wisconsinites will meet at 11:30
a.m. Wednesday at the Crystal
Point Club House on Summertree
Street, off Citrus Avenue North,
Crystal River
Those attending are asked to
bring a covered dish for the lunch-
eon. Snowbirds and new residents
are welcome.
For more information, call Joyce
at 352-860-1292.

Get together with
New Jerseyans, friends
The New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County will have
lunch at Mr King's in Crystal River
on Wednesday at 3 p.m. and go to
Tampa Bay Downs on Wednesday,
Feb. 26; bus departs at 9:30 a.m.
from Winn-Dixie Plaza, Beverly
Hills.
For more information, call Mary
Anne at 352-746-3386.
The club bowls Thursdays at 10
a.m. at Sportsmen's Bowl, 100
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41) in Inverness.
All are welcome.

Lions Club will serve
breakfast this morning
Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72
Civic Circle Drive, will serve a
pancake breakfast today from
8 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Cost for adults is $4 and children
younger than 12 eat for $2. On the
menu are all the pancakes you can
eat, choice of bacon or sausage or
combo, orange juice and coffee
or tea.
For more information, call
352-897-4899.


The Hamlins


Frank and Clara
Hamlin were married in
Cincinnati, Ohio, on Feb.
13,1954.
They moved to Citrus
Hills after retiring and
have been here for more
than 20 years. They have
been active in the
community and their
church.
A Mass of Celebration
will be at St. Scholastica


Church at 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 15.
The Hamlins have six
children four boys and
two girls as well as 13
grandchildren and four
great-grandsons. Three of
the children will travel
with them to Amelia
Island to celebrate.
The other children plan
to come to Florida later in
the year


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A22 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY










SPORTS


First gold medal
awarded at Sochi
Winter Olympics
goes to American
snowboarder./B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Golf/B2
A0 NBA, NHL/B2
Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 Recreational sports/B4
0 College basketball/B5
i 0 Winter Olympics/B6


Citrus' Evans garners medal at state


'Canes senior

comes in sixth

at 154 pounds
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
KISSIMMEE Hannah
Evans found just the right sou-
venir to take home from the


ot


2014 FHSAA girls state
weightlifting meet.
The Citrus High
School senior earned a
sixth-place medal in the
154-pound class during
her final high school
meet. She had a 165-
pound bench press and Har
a 150-pound clean and Ev
jerk for a 315-pound
total.
Three other Citrus County
lifters came away with smiles


but not medals.
Sam Kanawall, who
earned a medal last year,
had a 305-pound total.
She was coming back
from an ankle injury She
had a 165-pound bench
press and a 140-pound
inah clean and jerk. She was
ans competing in the 183-
pound class.
Senior Anna Venero
had a 310-pound total in the
183-pound class. She had 155-


many


Citrus senior Brandon Taylor defeated Tampa Jesuit's Marc
Region 2A-2 tournament Saturday at Brandon High School.


pound lifts in both the bench
and clean and jerk.
Evans was all smiles regard-
ing that souvenir
"I'm surprised, thankful," she
said. "I should have done a lot
better I lost my balance on a
clean and jerk. It threw me off."
Kanawall missed most of the
season due to the ankle injury
"I feel very accomplished,"
Kanawall said. "I ended up
making a new total for this year
I have one more year I am only


left


JOE DiCRISTOFALO/For the Chronicle
lurato in the 160-pound consolation match for a third-place finish in the


Taylor, Bearden only two county grapplers to advance to state out of region


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
BRANDON -A generation of wrestling
was celebrated Saturday evening when
host Brandon High captured its
25th straight regional title at the conclu-
sion of the rugged Region 2A-2 wrestling
tournament, aka the "Region of Doom."
BHS, which hasn't dropped a regional
since 1989, crushed the other 30 teams in
the two-day, 16 1/2-hour double-elimina-
tion IBT (individually bracketed tourna-
ment) field, capturing an amazing 51-of-55
individual bouts (meet-high 93 percent)
behind a meet-best 24 pins.
The host Eagles, in Coach Russ Cozart's
34th season, walked in with 13 grapplers.


On Saturday night, BHS departed with a
tourney-high 13 advancing to the
50th FHSAA State Finals set Feb. 14-15 at
The Lakeland Center
Brandon crowned 10 of its meet-high 11
finalists, and added two third-place fin-
ishers totaling 300 points compared to run-
ner-up Tampa-Jesuit (164.5) and
third-place Spring Hill-Springstead (145).
Citrus, who qualified 12 for the region,
walked away with two state qualifiers: sen-
iors Brandon Taylor at 160 and Casey
Bearden at 170. Incidentally, both were
2013 state qualifiers.
Lecanto, which qualified nine to region-
als, captured 3-of-21 individual bouts (14
percent) and failed to advance anyone to
states. Senior Chris Ewing posted the best


record for the Panthers going 2-2 at 182.
"We knew coming in here was going to
be challenging," explained CHS' second-
year skipper Jeff Wood, after his mat men
captured 11-of-33 matches. "This was a re-
ally good tournament for our younger guys
to experience. This was a different caliber
of competition."
Bearden went 4-1 overall settling on sec-
ond place while improving to 48-3.
He opened the meet by pinning his first
two opponents Sunlake's Caleb Dixon
(3:13) and Lake Nona's Andres Sosa (3:45).
In Saturday's semifinals, Bearden edged
Tampa-Blake senior Charles Watts, 7-6.
Brandon junior Dontae McGee im-
proved to 54-0 behind an 8-1 finals
See Page B2


a junior
"I'm proud that one of our
girls was able to represent our
school and I'm happy that it's
Hannah."
Venero overcame a little trep-
idation Saturday
"I was hoping to do a little bit
better," Venero said. "I dropped
150 on my knee at sectionals.
That kind of made me hesitant
about clean and jerking again. I
See Page B3



Walker

seizes lead

at Pebble

Beach
Associated Press
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -
The wind was so strong, the
conditions so demanding, that
Jimmy Walker felt like Saturday
at the AT&T Pebble Beach Na-
tional Pro-Am was competing
against the golf course instead
of the rest of the field.
Golf's hottest player wound
beating them both.
Walker finally made his first
bogey of the
tournament,
and that was
only a nuisance.
He ran off five
birdies at Mon-
terey Peninsula
for a 4-under 67,
the best score of
a blustery day, Jimmy
giving him a six- Walker
shot lead going
into the final round.
Walker went 187 starts on the
PGA Tour without winning. He
now has a chance to win for the
third time in his last eight tour-
naments. He won the Frys.com
Open last fall about an hour
away at CordeValle. He won for
the second time this season last
month in Honolulu. In both
those tournaments, Walker was
trailing going into the last day
This time, he has the largest
54-hole lead at Pebble Beach
since Phil Mickelson led by
seven in 2005. Mickelson went
on to win by four shots.
"I've never had whatever big
lead this is going into the last
round," Walker said. 'Just go out
and hit good shots and play good
golf and see what happens."
He was at 13-under 202.
Tim Wilkinson of New Zealand
had a 69 and Hunter Mahan had
a 72, both at Monterey Peninsula.
They were at 208.
Havoc happened on Saturday
on all three courses, particu-
larly at Pebble Beach.
The third round was not com-
pleted because of a delay last-
ing 2 hours, 19 minutes due to
gusts at 30 mph that made golf
balls roll off the green, mostly at
Pebble Beach. In a three-course
rotation, play has to be stopped
at all three courses.
The average score at Pebble
Beach was just over 75.
Jordan Spieth caught the
brunt of it. Tied with Walker
going into the third round, Spi-
eth was 5-over through 15 holes
See Page B3


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Allen shoots 69, hangs onto top spot at Allianz


Associated Press

BOCA RATON Michael
Allen was prouder of the 3-under
69 he shot Saturday than his
record-tying 60 the day before.
A day after making the game
look so easy when he was the
ninth player to shoot 60 on the
Champions Tour, Allen fought
his swing from the opening drive
at Broken Sound.
He fell out of the lead after
playing his first 10 holes in 1
over, but birdied four of his last
eight holes to take a one-stroke
lead over Scott Dunlap and
Chien Soon Lu in the Allianz
Championship.


"This is one of those rounds I
really feel good about," said
Allen, who is at 15-under 129 en-
tering the final round. ""I knew
if I hung in there, eventually the
birdies would start coming."
Allen has a more difficult task
to win for the sixth time on the
50-and-over tour With calm,
warm condition on The Old
Course, the field combined for a
scoring average of 69.67, the low-
est in the eight-year history of
the event.
Allen had only one player -
Dunlap within four shots of
his lead after the first round.
Now, there are seven players
within four shots entering Sun-


day's final round.
"All I did was make it a good
tournament," Allen said, smil-
ing. "At least I know what I have
to do now be aggressive from
the start"
Lu shot his second straight 65,
and Dunlap followed his opening
63 with a 67. Neither Allen nor
Dunlap won on the PGA Tour, but
Dunlap is playing in just his sec-
ond Champions Tour event
"I didn't use up a lot of great
golf on the PGA Tour," said Dun-
lap, whose best showing in 204
career PGA Tour starts was a
third-place finish. "It would be
nice to think that door (of win-
ning) hasn't closed."


Duffy Waldorf was fourth at 13
under after a 63. He played the
front nine in 7-under 29.
Jay Haas, winless in 123 starts
in Florida, was another stroke
back along with Tom Lehman.
Haas had a 64, and Lehman shot
67. NBC announcer Gary Koch
was 11 under after a 66.
Cheyenne Woods leads
Ladies Aussie Masters
GOLD COAST, Australia -Amer-
ican Cheyenne Woods will take a
one-stroke lead into the final round
of the Australian Ladies' Masters
after shooting a 2-under 71 on Sat-
urday to stay on track for her first


professional victory.
The 23-year-old niece of Tiger
Woods had a three-round total of 12-
under 207 at the Royal Pines Resort.
Stacey Lee Bregman of South
Africa, who shared the lead with
Woods at the start of the round, had
a 72 to hold second place, a stroke
ahead of 17-year-old Minjee Lee,
the Australian amateur champion,
who shot a 69.
Woods mixed seven birdies with
five bogeys in a choppy third round,
finishing strongly with four birdies on
her last five holes.
Bregman had four birdies and
three bogeys, taking second place
with a birdie at the 18th.


Playing spoiler


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning center Tyler Johnson ties up Detroit Red Wings left wing Henrik Zetterberg during the third
period Saturday in Tampa. The Lightning won the game 4-2.

Lightning down Red Wings 4-2 in Detroit's 6,000th game


Associated Press

TAMPA- Alex Killorn scored a
tiebreaking goal late in the third
period, Ondrej Palat had two goals
and the Tampa Bay Lightning beat
the Detroit Red Wings 4-2 on Satur-
day in the Red Wings' 6,000th regu-
lar-season game.
Killorn beatJimmy Howard from
just outside the crease to give the
Lightning a 3-2 lead with 3:11 to
play Palat added an empty-net goal
with 63 seconds left.
Tampa Bay also got a goal from
Tom Pyatt. The Lightning, who had
lost four of five, are second in the
Atlantic Division, one-point ahead
of Montreal and Toronto.
Daniel Alfredsson and Tomas
Jurco scored for Detroit, which has
record of 2,761-2,320-815-104.
Blues 4, Jets 3, SO
ST. LOUIS T.J. Oshie and Vladimir
Tarasenko scored in a shootout to give
the St. Louis Blues a 4-3 victory over
the Winnipeg Jets.
The crowd chanted "USA! USA! as
Oshie skated in on Al Montoya and beat
him. Tarasenko then scored, giving the
Blues the victory in their final game be-
fore the Olympic break.
Blues goalie Brian Elliott stopped
Bryan Little and Andrew Ladd in the
tiebreaker.
Brenden Morrow, Derek Roy and
Jaden Schwartz scored in regulation for
the Blues, 15-0-1 against Central Divi-
sion rivals. They are 22-5-3 at home
and 39-12-6 overall.
Mark Scheifele scored twice, and
Dustin Byfuglien added a goal for
Winnipeg.
Bruins 7, Senators 2
BOSTON Patrice Bergeron scored
twice and added an assist as the Bruins
went into the Olympic break with a win
over the Senators.



LEFT to
Di
Continued from Page BI ja
TE
decision over Bearden.
"I thought I did alright until g1
the finals," detailed the 17-year- 0o
old Bearden. "In the finals I got m
caught in a Gramby What mat- lo
ters is states, not tonight." to
On what Bearden will empha- o
size in practice on Monday, "I got fo
to learn to get my head straight se
and mind right before matches,"
he said. "Then I've got to work m
through scrambles." "I
Taylor (55-4) also finished 4-1 av


Bergeron, who will join Team Canada
for the Olympics, was one of several
Bruins with multiple points before joining
their national teams in Sochi, Russia.
David Krejci of the Czech Republic and
Sweden's Loui Eriksson added a pair of
assists apiece.
Brad Marchand had a goal and two
assists, Jarome Iginla a goal and assist
and Reilly Smith a pair of assists for
Boston.
The Bruins outshot the Senators 42-
28 and chased Ottawa goalie Craig An-
derson after taking a 5-1 lead early in
the third on a goal by Milan Lucic.
Flyers 2, Flames 1
PHILADELPHIA- Brayden Schenn
and Scott Hartnell scored goals, Ray
Emery stopped 32 shots and the Flyers
beat the Flames for their fourth straight
win.
Making his first start since Jan. 23,
Emery had a shutout going until Matt
Stajan scored with 2:26 left.
Despite winning six of their past eight
games, the Flames are tied for the third-
fewest points in the league.
The teams resume their regular-sea-
son schedule on Feb. 27.
Canadiens 4,
Hurricanes 1
RALEIGH, N.C. David Desharnais
scored twice and the Canadiens went
into the Olympic break with a win over
the Hurricanes.
Montreal left wing Max Pacioretty
sustained a lower-body injury with 7:30
left in the first period when he was
checked into the goal by Carolina's
Brett Bellemore and did not return. The
U.S. Olympic hockey team member
said the move was precautionary.
Ryan White and Brian Gionta also
scored for the Canadiens, who won
their third in a row.
Goalkeeper Carey Price finished with
31 saves for the Canadiens.

o place third, got
Taylor opened the event pin- wee]
ing Lake Gibson freshman Or
ashua Hill (1:51) before edging thou
ampa-Jesuit's Marc lurato, 6-4. house
In the semifinals, eventual re- semi
onal champion Dakota Greene I go
f Brandon folded Taylor via a gotta
major decision, 11-2. feet i
From the loser's bracket, Tay- Re
Dr remained composed enough
o solve Hillsborough High soph- t(
nore Connor Knauer, 10-1, be-
ore topping Iruato for the 106-F
second time, 5-2. 22-6.
"Third-place is OK," re- 113-
arked the 17-year-old Taylor, 1:5.
120-
3ut I wish I could have walked 2:57.
way finishing higher At least I 126 J


Carolina's Drayson Bowman tallied
his fourth goal of the season.
Avalanche 5, Islanders 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Matt Duchene
scored a pair of goals 2:44 apart in the
second period, and the Avalanche beat
the Islanders.
Nathan MacKinnon scored, and
Gabriel Landeskog and Paul Stastny
each had empty-net goals for Colorado.
Jean-Sebastien Giguere stopped 30
shots to help the Avalanche snap a two-
game skid.
The Islanders scored two goals dur-
ing a wild sequence in the third period in
which the Avalanche committed four
penalties over a 3:34 span. Islanders
captain John Tavares got his team on
the board with 8:43 remaining. Then, 57
seconds later, Lubomir Visnovsky got
New York within one. Both goals were
scored as part of 5-on-3 advantages.
Maple Leafs 3, Canucks 1
TORONTO Phil Kessel scored the
go-ahead goal midway through the third
period and the Maple Leafs handed the
Canucks their seventh straight loss.
Mason Raymond and James van
Riemsdyk also scored in the third for
Toronto and Jonathan Bernier made 23
saves.
Toronto won for the 11th time in 14
games and seventh straight at home,
while the Canucks lost the 16th time in
20 games. They've scored just 37 goals
in that span.
Ryan Kesler scored for Vancouver
and Roberto Luongo stopped 30 shots.
Capitals 3 Devils 0
WASHINGTON -Julien Brouillette
broke a scoreless tie with his first NHL
goal midway through the third period,
Braden Holtby stopped 25 shots and
the Washington Capitals beat the New
Jersey Devils 3-0 in the teams' final
game before the Olympic break.


a good look at some of next 6-2.
k's competition." 132-Dylan
n the tourney's strength, "I (SPG) 11-2.n
138 Devan
ght I did pretty well in a tough 4 (OT).
;e," replied Taylor "In my 145-Troy J
final loss I wasn't right When 2.
back to work on Monday I've 160 Dakot
Shave more movement on my nanno (SPG
to set up my shots." 170 Dont,
gion 2A-2 wrestling (CIT)s P1
dEn2A2182-LusP
urnament results: 3-1.
ournmentresu195 Nick M
Championship matches 1.
rankie Bruno (BRA) tech. fall Jarrett Roop (TJ), 220 Rober
2-1 (OT)
Kyle Norstrem (BRA) pin Jarred Lanier (WGR), 285- Austin
2:53.
Michael McDonald (SPG) pin Ty Lucas (BRA),
106 Jona
ames Flint (BRA) dec. Sa'derrian Perry (LKG), (ARM), 9-3.


Mills' 32 points


leads Spurs


San Antonio

beats Charlotte

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Patty Mills scored 18 of his
season-high 32 points in
the fourth quarter and Tim
Duncan had a double-dou-
ble to lead the San Antonio
Spurs to a 104-100 victory
over the Charlotte Bobcats
on Saturday night for their
fourth win in five games.
Mills was 10 of 13 from
the field, including 5 of 5 in
the fourth quarter He also
connected on 8 of 9 foul
shots and had four 3-point-
ers to help the Spurs de-
feat the Bobcats for the
sixth straight time.
Duncan finished with 16
points and 13 rebounds for
his 22nd double-double of
the season.
The red hot Al Jefferson
led the way for the Bobcats
(22-29) with 26 points and
nine rebounds.
Trail Blazers 117,
Timberwolves 110
MINNEAPOLIS LaMar-
cus Aldridge scored 16 of his
26 points in the second half
and Wesley Matthews added
21 to help the Portland Trail
Blazers hold off the injury-de-
pleted Minnesota Timber-
wolves 117-110.
Aldridge had six points dur-
ing Portland's game-deciding
13-1 run in the fourth quarter.
Corey Brewer led Min-
nesota with 26 points and
Ricky Rubio scored a career-


high 25 for the Wolves, who
were without All-Star Kevin
Love, Nikola Pekovic and
Kevin Martin.
Grizzlies 79,
Hawks 76
ATLANTA-Zach Ran-
dolph scored 20 points and
the Memphis Grizzlies contin-
ued their pattern of winning
on the road with strong de-
fense, shutting down the At-
lanta Hawks 79-76.
The Hawks set a season
scoring low after leading 29-
27 following the first period.
Atlanta was held to a com-
bined 25 points in the second
and third periods.
Paul Millsap had 20 points
and 11 rebounds for Atlanta,
which has lost three straight.
The Grizzlies ended a two-
game skid.
Atlanta's Lou Williams
missed a 3-pointer with about
1 second remaining.
Pistons 126,
Nuggets 109
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Brandon Jennings had a sea-
son-high 35 points to go with
12 assists, Josh Smith had 30
points and the Detroit Pistons
rolled to a 126-109 win over
the Denver Nuggets.
The game didn't quite
match Detroit's 186-184 triple-
overtime win over Denver 30
years ago, but still saw 11
players score in double fig-
ures and the Pistons put up a
season high in points.
Rodney Stuckey added 19
points for Detroit, while Andre
Drummond had 18 points and
15 rebounds.


Associated Press
San Antonio Spurs guard Patty Mills is fouled by
Charlotte Bobcats forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist during
the first half Saturday in Charlotte, N.C. The Spurs won
104-100.


Lucas (BRA) major dec. Andrew Smith
SBerrian (BRA) dec. Adam Lewis (TJ), 6-
oyce (BRA) dec. Jordan Rivera (SPG), 3-
Ewles (WH) dec. Brian Buser (TJ), 9-8.
ta Greene (BRA) tech. fall Vincent Buo-
), 16-1.
ae McGee (BRA) dec. Casey Bearden
eguero (ROB) dec. Sawyer Root (HARM),
osco (TJ) dec. Corey Humphrey (SPG), 7-
t Enmon (BRA) dec. David Rudd (LKG),
Underwood (TJ) pin Dylan Martin (NSB),
Consolation matches
than Quinones (LKG) dec. Kyre Kelly


113 -Caleb Smith (LKG) pin Anthony Zucco (TJ), 0:28.
120 Nick Peschek (GAIT) major dec. Luis Casado
(LOL), 15-4.
126 Marcus Mosley (KING) dec. R.C. Consuguegra
(TJ), 8-2.
132 Jared Tarvin (LKG) tech. fall Jonathan Crunkilton
(NSB), 20-4.
138- Devin Glenn (AUB) pin Corey Tisdal (LKVW), 3:24.
145 Chris Moore (KING) major dec. Kionte Crocker
(ROB), 11-3.
152 Tommy Fretwell (BRA) dec. Triston Howe
(CHAM), 4-1.
160 Brandon Taylor (CIT) dec. Marc Iruato (TJ), 5-2.
170 Billy Swift (SPG) major dec. Charles Watts
(BLAK), 11-2.
182 Joe Marcano (BRA) won by injury default over
John Mooney (TJ).
195 Bailey Shepard (BRA) dec. Cole Mueller (WH),
7-2.
220 Kendonte Nichols (ROB) dec. Carlos Barbosa
(PR), 2-1.
285 Robert Mosley (CHAM) pin Colton Rausch
(AUB), 4:46.


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 26 24 .520 -
Brooklyn 22 26 .458 3
NewYork 20 30 .400 6
Boston 18 33 .353 8/2
Philadelphia 15 36 .294 11/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 35 13 .729 -
Atlanta 25 24 .510 10/2
Washington 24 25 .490 111
Charlotte 22 29 .431 14
Orlando 15 37 .288 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 39 10 .796 -
Chicago 24 25 .490 15
Detroit 21 29 .420 18/2
Cleveland 17 33 .340 22/2
Milwaukee 9 41 .180 30/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 37 14 .725 -
Houston 34 17 .667 3
Dallas 30 21 .588 7
Memphis 27 22 .551 9
New Orleans 22 27 .449 14
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 40 12 .769 -
Portland 36 15 .706 3/2
Denver 24 25 .490 14/2
Minnesota 24 27 .471 15/2
Utah 16 33 .327 22/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 35 18 .660 -
Golden State 30 20 .600 3/2
Phoenix 29 20 .592 4
L.A. Lakers 18 32 .360 15/2
Sacramento 17 33 .340 16/2
Friday's Games
Orlando 103, Oklahoma City 102
Indiana 118, Portland 113, OT
L.A. Lakers 112, Philadelphia 98
Cleveland 115, Washington 113
Boston 99, Sacramento 89
Detroit 111, Brooklyn 95
NewYork 117, Denver 90
Dallas 103, Utah 81
New Orleans 98, Minnesota 91
L.A. Clippers 118, Toronto 105
Saturday's Games
San Antonio 104, Charlotte 100
Detroit 126, Denver 109
Memphis 79, Atlanta 76
Portland 117, Minnesota 110
Houston 101, Milwaukee 95
Golden State at Phoenix, late
Miami at Utah, late
Today's Games
NewYork at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Boston, 6 p.m.
Sacramento atWashington, 6 p.m.
Memphis at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Denver at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Toronto, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Boston at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.




NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 57 3716 4 78176 125
TampaBay 58 3320 5 71168 145
Montreal 59 3221 6 70148 142
Toronto 60 3222 6 70178 182
Detroit 58 2620 12 64151 163
Ottawa 59 2622 11 63169 191
Florida 58 2229 7 51139 183
Buffalo 57 1534 8 38110 172
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 58 4015 3 83186 138
N.Y Rangers 59 3224 3 67155 146
Philadelphia 59 3023 6 66162 167
Columbus 58 2924 5 63170 161
Washington 59 2723 9 63171 175
Carolina 57 2622 9 61144 158
New Jersey 59 2422 13 61135 146
N.Y Islanders 60 2230 8 52164 200
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 57 3912 6 84196 135
Chicago 60 3511 14 84207 163
Colorado 58 3716 5 79174 153
Minnesota 59 3121 7 69145 147
Dallas 58 2721 10 64164 164
Winnipeg 60 2826 6 62168 175
Nashville 59 2524 10 60146 180
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87196 147
San Jose 59 3716 6 80175 142
Los Angeles 59 3122 6 68139 128
Phoenix 58 2721 10 64163 169
Vancouver 60 2724 9 63146 160
Calgary 58 2229 7 51137 179
Edmonton 60 2033 7 47153 199
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 3, SO
New Jersey 2, Edmonton 1, OT
Carolina 5, Florida 1
Phoenix 2, Chicago 0
San Jose 3, Columbus 2
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 4, Winnipeg 3, SO
Philadelphia 2, Calgary 1
Boston 7, Ottawa 2
Toronto 3, Vancouver 1
Montreal 4, Carolina 1
Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 2
Colorado 5, N.Y Islanders 2
Washington 3, New Jersey 0
Anaheim 5, Nashville 2
Dallas 2, Phoenix 1
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Monday's Games
No games scheduled




AT&T Pebble Beach


National Pro-Am
Saturday
At Pebble Beach, Calif., p-Pebble Beach:
6,816 yards, par-72, s-Spyglass Hill GC: 6,953
yards, par-72, m-Monterey Peninsula: 6,867
yards, par-71
Purse: $6.6 million
Partial Third Round
Jimmy Walker 66p-69s-67m 202 -13
TimWilkinson 67p-72s-69m 208 -7
Hunter Mahan 68p-68s-72m 208 -7
Richard H. Lee 65m-72p-72s -209 -6
Phil Mickelson 66m-73p-71s- 210 -5
Blake Adams 69s-69m-72p- 210 -5
Kevin Na 72p-68s-70m 10 -5
Ryan Palmer 72s-66m-72p- 210 -5
Pat Perez 69m-70p-71s- 210 -5
Jim Renner 65m-73p-72s- 210 -5
Michael Thompson 71s-68m-72p2- 11 -4
Brendon Todd 70s-68m-73p- 211 -4
Dustin Johnson 68s-73m-70p- 211 -4
Brice Garnett 75p-68s-68m- 211 -4
Robert Garrigus 67m-71p-73s- 211 -4
Jim Herman 70m-70p-71s- 211 -4


SCOREBOARD


For Lthe record



Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


TM


CASH 3 (early)
3-7-7
CASH 3 (late)
6-7-4

PLAY 4 (early)
4-7-3-9
PLAY 4 (late)
5-4-5-2


Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:
Mega Money: 1 -10 -34 -42 Fantasy 5: 8 11 12 20 32
Mega Ball:12 5-of-5 1 winner $238,706.51
4-of-4 MB No winners 4-of-5 337 $114.00
4-of-4 3 winners $2,049.50 3-of-5 11,109 $9.50
3-of-4 MB 30 $449.00
3-of-4 685 $58.50
2-of-4 MB 1,106 $25.00 Players should verify
1-of-4 MB 9,551 $2.50 winning numbers by
2-of-4 22,353 $2.00 calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 p.m. (ESPN) NHRA Circle K Winternationals (taped)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) Duke at Boston College (taped)
1 p.m. (CBS) Michigan State at Wisconsin
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Connecticut at Central Florida
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Clemson at Syracuse
7 p.m. (FS1) Creighton at St. John's
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Washington at Colorado
9:30 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at Miami (taped)
2 a.m. (ESPNU) Connecticut at UCF (taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Louisville at Connecticut
1 p.m. (FS1) Creighton at DePaul
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Florida State
1:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Memphis at Temple
2 p.m. (MNT) Arkansas at South Carolina
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Penn State at Ohio State
2:30 p.m. (SUN) LSU at Texas A&M
3 p.m. (FS1) Iowa State at Texas
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Syracuse at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Stanford at Washington
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Oklahoma State at Baylor
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Oklahoma City Thunder
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Los Angeles Lakers
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Indiana Pacers at Orlando Magic
6 p.m. (NBA) Dallas Mavericks at Boston Celtics
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Knicks at Oklahoma City Thunder (taped)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Los Angeles Lakers (taped)
4 a.m. (ESPNU) Louisville at Connecticut (taped)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA League quarterfinals: L.A. X vs. Brooklyn Styles
(taped)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m. (FS1) Gulfstream Park
GOLF
5:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Joburg Open, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am,
Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, Final
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Allianz Championship, Final Round
GYMNASTICS
10:30 a.m. (SUN) Oklahoma at Florida (taped)
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia at Alabama (taped)
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL) ECHL: Stockton Thunder atAlaska Aces (taped)
3 p.m. (NHL) AHL: Hamilton Bulldogs at Toronto Marlies
6 p.m. (NHL) NHL: Vancouver Canucks at Toronto Maple Leafs (taped)
LACROSSE
11:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Ohio State at Johns Hopkins
WINTER OLYMPICS
5:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cross-country skiing: men's skiathlon gold
medal final; speed skating
8 a.m. (MSNBC) Hockey, women's: Russia vs. Germany
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Luge: men's singles competition
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Figure skating: team event
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Ski jumping: men's K-95
2 p.m. (NBC) Figure skating; biathlon; speed skating; cross-country
skiing (taped)
7 p.m. (NBC) Figure skating team event finals; alpine skiing;
snowboarding; ski jumping (taped)
11:35 p.m. (NBC) Figure skating team event: postgame; luge: men's
singles (taped)
3 a.m. (NBCSPT) Men's curling: Germany vs. Canada (taped)
RODEO
12 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR 15/15 Bucking Battle Liftmaster
Chute Out (taped)
SOCCER
8 a.m. (USA) English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs. Everton
11 a.m. (USA) English Premier League: Manchester United vs. Fulham
TENNIS
6:30 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Open Sud de France final (taped)
8:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup First Round: Italy vs. USA-
Rubber 5 (taped)
10:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup First Round: Slovakia vs.
Germany Rubber 5 (taped)
12:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP PBZ Zagreb Indoors final (taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Woody Austin
Brian Davis
Bryce Molder
Jason Kokrak
Dicky Pride
Russell Knox
Dudley Hart
D. Summerhays
Matt Jones
Andrew Loupe
Aaron Baddeley
Kevin Stadler
Steven Bowditch
Wes Roach
Jim Furyk
James Driscoll
Padraig Harrington
J.B. Holmes
Will MacKenzie
Cameron Tringale


73p-70s-69m -
68p-74s-70m-
72m-71p-69s-
74s-68m-70p-
66m-72p-74s-
70p-72s-70m-
71 p-68s-73m-
69m-69p-74s-
68m-74p-70s -
63m-73p-76s-
69m-70p-73s -
67m-73p-73s-
68m-70p-75s -
67m-74p-72s-
70s-70m-73p-
69s-71m-73p-
72p-69s-72m-
68p-75s-70m-
69m-74p-70s -
70p-73s-71m-


Patrick Reed
Ben Kohles
Graeme McDowell
Seung-Yul Noh
David Duval
Bronson La'Cassie
Robert Streb
Victor Dubuisson
Doug LaBelle II
George McNeill
Roberto Castro
Alex Cejka
Sean O'Hair
Greg Owen
Stuart Appleby
Andres Romero
Michael Putnam
Kyle Stanley
Russell Henley
Chris Kirk


69s-70m-75p-
72p-73s-69m -
71s-71m-72p-
72m-71p-71s-
72p-68s-74m -
70p-72s-72m -
67p-75s-72m -
73m-67p-74s -
70m-74p-70s -
67m-74p-73s -
70s-73m-71p-
69s-71 m-75p-
70p-71s-74m-
67m-74p-74s -
65m-74p-76s -
71s-70m-74p-
69s-71 m-75p-
74s-69m-72p-
73s-70m-72p-
71s-68m-76p-


Kevin Foley
Rory Sabbatini
Lee Janzen
Scott Langley
K. Aphibarnrat
Will Wilcox
Jamie Lovemark
Retief Goosen
Jason Day
Kevin Kisner
John Mallinger
R. Cabrera Bello
Lee Williams
Brian Harman
Troy Merritt
Justin Thomas
Jason Bohn
Freddie Jacobson
Will Claxton
Chad Campbell
D.H. Lee
Scott Brown
Jeff Maggert
Danny Lee
Paul Goydos
Nick Watney
Martin Flores
Ben Martin
Brendan Steele
Ken Duke
Alex Prugh
Matt Every
K.J. Choi
William McGirt
Vijay Singh
Mike Weir
MarkWilson
Trevor Immelman
Bo Van Pelt
Kevin Tway
Joe Durant
Sang-Moon Bae
Lucas Glover
John Senden
Paul McGinley
Tag Ridings
Spencer Levin
Matt Bettencourt
John Huh
M. Angel Carballo
Geoff Ogilvy
Rod Pampling
Brandt Snedeker
Hudson Swafford
Justin Hicks
Bobby Gates
James Hahn
Nicholas Thompson
Ted Potter, Jr.
T. Van Aswegen
Charlie Wi
Steven Fox
Jerry Kelly
Rod Perry
J.J. Henry
Ricky Barnes
Daniel Chopra
Tommy Gainey
MaxHoma
Charlie Beljan
Chad Collins
Troy Matteson
Davis Love III
Edward Loar
Kris Blanks
John Daly
Joe Ogilvie
Andrew Svoboda
JoshTeater
Mark Anderson
Greg Chalmers
Charley Hoffman
Scott McCarron
Heath Slocum
Justin Bolli
David Carr


1. J
2.T
2. H
4. F
5. F
5. F
5. K,
5. F
5. J
5. BE
A


Mic
Sco
Chi
Duf
Jay
Ton
Gar
We
Bra
Jeff
Ker
Olir
Gen
Roc
Joh
Mik
Da\
Rog
Fre
Col
Ton
Ber
Dou
Joh
Bill
Ton
Rod
Jeff
Rus
Mar
Koh
Mar
Est
Bob
Mar
D.A
Gar
Mik
Hal
Ste
Mar
Bria
Fuz
Ste
Pet
Bru
Will
Lar
Bob
Dar
Ber
Mar
Anc
Way
Bob
Lore
Ste
Joe
Billy
Sco
Jim
Cur
Ton
Joh
Mor
Jay
Hal
Bra
Dar
Lee
Ton
Ste
Bob
Ton
Bar
Rick
Pet
Jim
Anc
Joh


68m-76p-71s-
67s-72m-77p-
68m-73p-75s -
69m-75p-72s-
69s-74m-73p-
72p-69s-75m-
73m-69p-74s -
71 p-73s-72m-
68m-77p-71s-
72s-69m-75p-
71s-71m-74p-
74p-71s-71m -
76p-73s-68m -
66m-76p-75s -
74p-69s-74m -
70s-72m-75p-
69s-71m-77p-
68m-73p-76s -
68s-74m-75p-
73s-70m-74p-
69p-73s-75m -
70m-76p-71s-
71 m-74p-72s-
68m-74p-75s -
72s-70m-76p-
72s-74m-72p-
69m-76p-73s -
71 p-73s-74m-
70s-72m-76p-
72p-72s-74m-
74p-75s-69m -
71 m-75p-73s-
69p-75s-75m -
70s-73m-76p-
78p-71s-70m-
70m-73p-76s -
71s-73m-75p-
70s-72m-77p-
72p-75s-73m-
70m-76p-74s -
74p-72s-74m-
69p-74s-77m -
68m-78p-74s-
69m-74p-77s -
67p-76s-78m -
73s-73m-75p-
76p-74s-71m -
75s-71m-75p-
67m-77p-77s-
72m-77p-72s-
71s-69m-81p-
73p-73s-75m-
72s-72m-77p-
71 p-75s-75m-
74p-75s-73m -
71 p-79s-72m-
69p-72s-81m -
72s-78m-72p-
69m-75p-79s-
73p-74s-76m -
71s-73m-80p-
72p-78s-74m
74s-74m-77p-
69p-77s-79m -
72m-79p-74s-
75s-71m-79p-
70m-79p-76s -
78s-70m-77p-
73p-76s-76m-
73s-76m-77p-
71 m-77p-78s-
70m-81p-75s-
75s-71m-81p-
70p-79s-78m -
72s-78m-78p-
73s-79m-76p-
73m-76p-79s-
71s-73m-84p-
69p-81s-78m-
75m-77p-77s-
77p-77s-75m -
73m-78p-78s-
71 p-76s-83m-
74p-78s-78m -
71m-81p-79s-
78p-80s-78m -


Leaderboard at time of suspended play
SCORETHRU
immy Walker -13 F
im Wilkinson -7 F
Hunter Mahan -7 F
Richard H. Lee -6 F
'hil Mickelson -5 F
'at Perez -5 F
Kevin Na -5 F
Ryan Palmer -5 F
im Renner -5 F
Blake Adams -5 F
kllianz Championship
Saturday
At The Old Course at Broken Sound, Boca
Raton
Purse: $1.6 million
Yardage: 6,807, Par: 72
Second Round
hael Allen 60-69-129 -15
ott Dunlap 63-67- 130 -14
en Soon Lu 65-65- 130 -14
fyWaldorf 68-63-131 -13
Haas 68-64-132 -12
n Lehman 65-67-132 -12
ry Koch 67-66- 133 -11
s Short, Jr. 65-68- 133 -11
dBryant 66-67- 133 -11
f Hart 68-66- 134 -10
mnny Perry 68-67- 135 -9
n Browne 68-67-135 -9
ne Sauers 67-68- 135 -9
;co Mediate 69-67- 136 -8
n Riegger 69-67- 136 -8
e Reid 68-68-136 -8
'id Frost 68-68- 136 -8
gerChapman 69-68-137 -7
dFunk 71-66- 137 -7
in Montgomerie 67-70- 137 -7
n Kite 70-68- 138 -6
hard Langer 70-68- 138 -6
ug Garwood 70-68-138 -6
n Inman 70-68- 138 -6
Glasson 69-69-138 -6
nmy Armour lll 72-66-138 -6
d Spittle 69-69- 138 -6
f Sluman 68-70-138 -6
ssCochran 70-69- 139 -5
rkO'Meara 70-69- 139 -5
hkil Idoki 69-70- 139 -5
rkMcNulty 74-65- 139 -5
eban Toledo 69-71 -140 -4
)Tway 71-69-140 -4
rk Brooks 72-68- 140 -4
.Weibring 73-67-140 -4
ry Hallberg 74-66- 140 -4
e Goodes 68-72-140 -4
e Irwin 67-73-140 -4
vePate 71-70- 141 -3
rkWiebe 70-71 -141 -3
an Henninger 71-70-141 -3
zzyZoeller 70-71 -141 -3
ve Elkington 67-74- 141 -3
erSenior 71-71 -142 -2
ce Fleisher 70-72- 142 -2
lieWood 69-73-142 -2
ryMize 72-70- 142 -2
b Friend 72-70- 142 -2
na Quigley 69-73- 142 -2
n Crenshaw 72-70-142 -2
rk Calcavecchia 75-67- 142 -2
ders Forsbrand 70-73- 143 -1
yne Levi 72-71 143 -1
bbyWadkins 69-74-143 -1
en Roberts 72-71 143 -1
ve Schneiter 74-69- 143 -1
y Sindelar 71-73- 144 E
y Andrade 71-73- 144 E
itt Simpson 73-71 -144 E
Rutledge 73-71 -144 E
rtis Strange 74-70- 144 E
n Pernice Jr. 74-70- 144 E
hn Harris 75-69- 144 E
rris Hatalsky 75-69- 144 E
Don Blake 72-73-145 +1
Sutton 75-70- 145 +1
dFaxon 77-68-145 +1
n Forsman 72-74- 146 +2
SRinker 74-72- 146 +2
n Purtzer 75-71 146 +2
ve Lowery 76-70- 146 +2
b Gilder 77-69-146 +2
n Byrum 76-71 147 +3
rt Bryant 76-71 -147 +3
kFehr 74-75- 149 +5
erJacobsen 78-71 -149 +5
Thorpe 71-79- 150 +6
drewMagee 78-81 -159 +15
hn Cook 66-WD


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 B3


MEET
Continued from Page B1


got a PR today in clean and
jerk with 155. I wish we had
one or two more lifts. I might
have had a chance at placing.
I'm happy with it. Everything
happens for a reason."
"We're proud of them," Cit-
rus assistant coach Dana Rise
said. "All three increased their
totals. Hannah ended the year
with a medal.'
Lecanto senior Breanna
Johnson enjoyed her one trip
to the state meet.
The Panther had a bench
press of 135 pounds and a
clean and jerk of 130 pounds
for a total of 265 pounds.
"I feel I could have done bet-
ter," she said. "I'm proud of
myself for getting to states. It's
really exciting to be here. It's a
show I was nervous to get my
opener After my opener, I was
better"
"Breanna epitomizes the
student-athlete," Lecanto
coach Bob LeCours said. "I
had the most fun year ever All
the girls were great I'm happy
to see her here."





WALKER
Continued from Page B1l


when the round was halted by
darkness. That included a pair
of three-putts on the front nine
when he went out in 40, and an-
other three-putt from 18 feet.
Spieth missed an 8-foot birdie
putt on the 16th hole, and then
chose to mark the 5-foot par
putt he had coming back.
Walker opened with a 66 at
Pebble Beach when it was
calm, the best time to play it.
That doesn't mean he was off
the hook on the Shore Course
at Monterey Peninsula. He just
had to play his best, and he did.
On the par-3 ninth, typically
a 6-iron, Walker smashed a
5-wood into the wind and
couldn't reach the green. He
made one birdie with an 8-iron
from 140 yards, and was hitting
4-iron that went only about 165
yards.
"It just feels like a battle,"
Walker said. "You're not bat-
tling really anybody else.
You're not battling the field or a
tournament. You're just out
there trying. The golf course is
trying to beat you up."
Richard Lee had a 72 at Spy-
glass Hill and was alone in
fourth at 209. Phil Mickelson
had a 71 at Spyglass and was
among those eight shots be-
hind. Only three players broke
par at Pebble none better
than Dustin Johnson's 70. Bren-
don Todd looked as if he might
have one of those rounds until
bogeys on the last two holes.
"Nine and 10 are par 5s
today I couldn't reach either
one," Todd said. "There were
no birdie holes out there."
Play was stopped about an
hour after the last group teed
off. It was a peculiar sight to see
clouds gathering on the Pacific
horizon, and officials trying to
spray water on the greens to
help balls stay on the putting
surface.
It didn't work
And when play resumed,
Brian Gay was given relief on
the fourth green at Pebble
Beach because of standing
water left from hosing down
the greens. He was able to
move his ball some 15 feet to
the other side of the green.
But the big trouble was the
wind.
Kevin Chappell's approach
to the par-3 fifth sailed over the
cliff, and he ambled down to-
ward the beach to play the shot
The par-5 sixth at Pebble, usu-
ally reachable with a long iron,
was a true three-shot hole. On
the 109-yard, downhill seventh
hole into the wind, the club of
choice was a chip 8-iron.
It was most difficult with the
putting being able to stand
over the ball, trying to hit it as it
wobbled and judging the
speed. Geoff Ogilvy three-
putted from 3 feet twice in a
three-hole stretch on his way to
an 81. Spieth had a pair of
three-putts that sent him tum-
bling out of contention. The


worst was on the ninth, when
he gunned his 12-footer for par
about 4 feet by the hole, sent
the next one 5 feet by on the
other side and raised his arms
in mock triumph when he
made the third one.
D.A. Points might have had
the best time. His score didn't
count
Points was disqualified Fri-
day for using a sponge ball as a
training device while waiting
on the 18th tee. He returned
Saturday to contribute to the
pro-am side of the competition
with former Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice. The team
shot 77 and missed the cut.











Offense leads UF by 'Bama


No. 7Cincy

knocked off

by SMU

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Scot-
tie Wilbekin scored 16
points, leading all five
starters in double figures,
and No. 3 Florida beat Al-
abama 78-69 on Saturday
for its 15th straight victory
The Gators handled the
Tide for the second time in
16 days and extended a
school record for consecu-
tive home wins to 29.
Florida (21-2, 10-0
Southeastern Conference)
shot 62 percent from the
field and finished with a
season-high 22 assists.
Wilbekin was 3-for-5
shooting from behind the
arc, making all three in the
second half Michael Fra-
zier II was 3 for 8 from the
3-point range.
Frazier finished with 14
points, joining Wilbekin,
Casey Prather (15), Will
Yeguete (12) and Patric
Young (11) in double fig-
ures. It was the first time
all five of Florida's starters
topped 10 points since
Nov 21, 2013 against Mid-
dle Tennessee.
Trevor Releford led the
Tide (9-14, 3-7) with 25
points on 7-for-10 shooting.
SMU 76, No. 7
Cincinnati 55
DALLAS Nick Russell
had 15 points to go with several
big steals, and coach Larry
Brown's SMU Mustangs stayed
undefeated at home with a
76-55 victory over No. 7 Cincin-
nati, ending the Bearcats'
15-game winning streak.
SMU (19-5, 8-3 American
Athletic Conference) has al-
ready beaten three Top 25 op-
ponents in seven games
since moving into the reno-
vated Moody Coliseum on
campus five weeks ago.
Before that, the Mustangs
hadn't defeated a ranked op-
ponent anywhere since De-
cember 2003, and hadn't had
multiple wins against Top 25
teams in the same season
since 1984-85, the last time
SMU appeared in the poll.
Russell had two steals in
less than a minute that led to
breakaway baskets, with a 3-
pointer by Nic Moore in be-
tween, to cap an 11-0 run by
the Mustangs after Cincinnati
(22-3, 11-1) cut the gap to 48-
41 midway through the sec-
ond half.
No. 8 Kansas 83,
West Virginia 69
LAWRENCE, Kan.--An-
drew Wiggins scored 19 points
and Wayne Selden had 17 for
Kansas, which padded its lead
in the Big 12 standings.
Reserve Tarik Black added
11 points for the Jayhawks
(18-5, 9-1 Big 12), who hon-
ored the 40th anniversary of
their 1974 Final Four team by
fending off the Mountaineers
(14-10, 6-5) to take a two-
game lead over surprising
Texas in the conference race.
The 15th-ranked Long-
horns on Saturday lost to
Kansas State, which will host
the Jayhawks on Monday
night.
Juwan Staten scored 22
points and Eron Harris had 17
for West Virginia, which dealt
with foul trouble nearly the en-
tire game. At one point, the


Associated Press
Florida forward Dorian Finney-Smith drives towards the lane as Alabama guard Levi Randolph chases during the
second half Saturday in Gainesville. The No. 3 Gators won the game 78-69.


Mountaineers had five players
with four fouls apiece, and
Brandon Watkins and Devin
Williams eventually fouled out.
No. 17 Iowa 85,
No. 10 Michigan 67
IOWA CITY, Iowa-Roy
Devyn Marble scored 22 of
his 26 points in the first half
for Iowa.
Aaron White added 11 points
and eight rebounds for the
Hawkeyes (18-6, 7-4 Big Ten),
who have beaten twoAP Top
10 teams in the regular season
for the first time since 1990-91,
avoided a third straight loss at
home and split the season se-
ries with Michigan.
Caris LeVert scored 22
points for the Wolverines
(17-6, 9-2), who have lost two
of three after starting 8-0 in
the Big Ten.
Marble was 6 of 9 from 3-
point range in the first half -
more than the Hawkeyes
made as a team the last five
games. He finished 8 of 17
from the field and made all
four of his free throws.
Mike Gesell had 10 points
and matched a career high
with eight assists for the
Hawkeyes, who rank next to
last in the Big Ten in 3-point
field goals, but finished 10 of
17 from behind the arc. Mel-
sahn Basabe added eight
points and 10 rebounds.
Nik Stauskas, Michigan's
top scorer, finished with 10
points.
No. 11 Duke 89,
Boston College 68
BOSTON Jabari Parker
set career highs with 29
points and 16 rebounds, and
Quinn Cook hit five 3-point-
ers and scored 21 points as
Duke coasted to a win over
Boston College.
Rasheed Sulaimon added
10 points for the Blue Devils
(19-5, 8-3 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference). Parker extended his
Duke freshman record to 14
games with 20 points or more.
Olivier Hanlan led Boston
College (6-17, 2-8) with 25


points. The Eagles have
dropped 10 of 12, with their
only conference wins coming
against last-place Virginia Tech.
The Blue Devils put it away
with an 18-0 run midway
through the second half, im-
proving to 18-2 against un-
ranked teams this season.
No. 13 St. Louis
65, La Salle 63
PHILADELPHIA- Jordair
Jett scored 19 of his 25 points
in the second half, including
the game-winning basket with
4 seconds left, and Saint Louis
extended its school-record
winning streak to 16 games
with a victory over La Salle.
Dwayne Evans added 14
points to help the Billikens
(22-2, 9-0 Atlantic 10) improve
to 9-0 on the road the best
undefeated road record in the
country.
Jerrell Wright matched his
career high with 21 points for
La Salle (12-11,4-5), which
has lost five of six. Steve Zack
finished with 15 points and 13
rebounds.
Kansas St. 74,
No. 15 Texas 57
MANHATTAN, Kan. -
Marcus Foster scored a ca-
reer-high 34 points on 13-of-
16 shooting as Kansas State
ended Texas' seven-game
winning streak.
Foster's points were the
most for Kansas State fresh-
man since Michael Beasley
had 39 against Kansas on
March 1,2008. Foster's previ-
ous high was 25 points against
Oral Roberts on Nov. 13.
Will Spradling added nine
points for the Wildcats (16-7,
6-4 Big 12) who extended
their home winning streak to
12 games. The win improved
coach Bruce Weber's record
at Bramlage Coliseum to 292,
13-1 in conference games.
Isaiah Taylor had 17 points
for the Longhorns (18-5, 7-3)
while Connor Lammert added
eight points. Texas entered
the game with four players av-
eraging in double figures.


No. 16 Iowa St. 84,
TCU 69
AMES, Iowa Melvin Ejim
hit 20 of 24 shots in scoring a
Big 12-record 48 points and
grabbed a career-high 18 re-
bounds to lead Iowa State.
Ejim had two 3-pointers
and six dunks during his big
game, one on a spectacular
fast-break lob from DeAndre
Kane that gave the Cyclones
(18-4, 6-4 Big 12) a 67-52
lead and effectively put the
game out of reach.
A 6-foot-6 senior, Ejim
scored 20 straight Iowa State
points during one stretch in
the second half. It was his
30th career double-double.
Georges Niang added 11
points and Kane finished with
10 assists for the Cyclones.
Kyan Anderson led the
Horned Frogs (9-13, 0-10)
with 27 points and eight as-
sists. Amric Fields scored 18
points and Karviar Shepherd
had 11 for TCU.
Ejim padded his Big 12
scoring lead with a perform-
ance that topped the previous
conference record of 44
points by Kansas State's
Denis Clemente in 2009 and
the Wildcats' Michael Beasley
in 2008. His previous high
had been 23 points against
Oklahoma last season.
Iowa State's school record
is 54 by Lafester Rhodes in
an overtime victory over Iowa
in 1987.
No. 18 Kentucky
69, Miss. St. 59
STARKVILLE, Miss. -
Julius Randle scored 16
points and fellow freshman
James Young added 11 for
Kentucky.
Kentucky (18-5, 8-2 South-
eastern Conference) has won
three straight overall and
seven in a row over Missis-
sippi State. The Wildcats had
an uneven game on offense
but forced the Bulldogs into
just 38.3 percent shooting (18
of 47) from the field.
Kentucky coach John Cali-
pari used an unorthodox


lineup for much of the game
because of ineffective play
and foul trouble. Jarrod Pol-
son (30) and Jon Hood (13)
both had season highs in min-
utes played.
The 6-foot-9 Randle was
8 of 13 from the field and
grabbed seven rebounds.
Dakari Johnson started for the
third time this season and
added nine points and eight
rebounds.
Craig Sword had 12 points
for Mississippi State (13-10,
3-7), which has lost five
straight.
No. 20 Virginia 64,
Georgia Tech 45
ATLANTA- Sophomore
guard Malcolm Brogdon
scored 14 points and tied his
career high with 11 rebounds
as Virginia closed the game
on a 22-1 run.
Joe Harris and Anthony Gill
added 11 points each for the
Cavaliers (19-5, 10-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference).
Georgia Tech (12-12, 3-8)
led 30-29 at halftime, but the
injury-ravaged Yellow Jackets
ran out of gas down the
stretch.
Sophomore guard Chris
Bolden scored 11 of his 13
points in the first half to lead
the Yellow Jackets. He was 1
for 8 from the field in the sec-
ond half when Georgia Tech
shot 6 for 23.
No. 21 Oklahoma
88, Baylor 72
NORMAN, Okla. Isaiah
Cousins scored 15 of his ca-
reer-high 21 points in the sec-
ond half to help No. 21
Oklahoma beat Baylor 88-72.
Buddy Hield had 19 points
and Cameron Clark added 16
for the Sooners (18-6, 7-4 Big
12), who made a season-high
14 3-pointers and snapped a
two-game skid.
Isaiah Austin scored a sea-
son-high 21 points for Baylor
(14-9, 2-8), which once again
was competitive in a losing ef-
fort. The Bears, who spent the
first three months of the sea-


son ranked in the Top 25 and
cracked the Top 10, lost for the
seventh time in eight games.
Baylor shot 46 percent in
the first half but just 39 per-
cent in the second.
The teams combined to
make 23 3-pointers. Okla-
homa took 29 shots from 3-
point range and 27 inside the
arc, while Baylor took 23 of its
59 shots from 3-point territory.
No. 25 Pitt. 62,
Va. Tech 57, 2 OTs
PITTSBURGH Cameron
Wright scored four of his 18
points in the second overtime
to help Pittsburgh snap a two-
game home losing streak.
Pitt guard James Robinson
converted a four-point play with
33 seconds remaining in regu-
lation to tie the score at 48.
In the second overtime, Pitt
forward Lamar Patterson,
who was held scoreless dur-
ing regulation, made his first
field goal of the game for a
54-52 lead. Wright added four
consecutive free throws.
Pitt (20-4, 8-3 Atlantic
Coast Conference) reached
20 wins for the 13th consecu-
tive season.
Jarrell Eddie had 15 points
for Virginia Tech (8-15, 1-10),
which lost its 10th straight. The
Hokies have not won since
New Year's Eve when they
beat Maryland Eastern Shore.
Maryland 83,
Florida St 71
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -
Seth Allen scored 21 of his
career-high 32 points in the
decisive first half, and Mary-
land beat Florida State 83-71
to climb over .500 in the At-
lantic Coast Conference.
Playing in his 12th game of
the season after being side-
lined with a fractured left foot,
Allen went 11 for 15 from the
floor and 7 for 10 beyond the
arc in topping his previous ca-
reer best of 21 points. The
6-foot-1 sophomore guard
also had four rebounds and
two assists.
Dez Wells scored 15 and
Jake Layman added 12 for
Maryland (14-10, 6-5), which
avenged a 24-point defeat at
Florida State last month. The
victory enabled the Terrapins
to gain sole possession of
seventh place in the ACC,
one game ahead of the skid-
ding Seminoles (14-9, 5-6).
Maryland led by 17 at half-
time and coasted to the finish.
NC State 56,
Miami 55
CORAL GABLES ACC
leading scorer T.J. Warren
scored 19 of his 27 points in
the second half to help lead
NC State to a 56-55 win
over Miami.
Ralston Turner scored 16
of his 17 points in the first half
for NC State (15-8, 5-5),
which was won four of five.
Rion Brown's 20 points led
Miami (11-12, 2-8), which
dropped to 0-6 in conference
home games.
Miami's Raphael Akpejiori
had a chance to tie the game
at the free-throw line with 3.5
seconds left. He had grabbed
an offensive rebound follow-
ing a miss by Manu Lecomte,
who scored 13 points.
Akpejiori, who was 4 for 4
from the line this season,
made the first and missed
the second.
The rebound was corralled
by Kyle Washington, who
missed both free throws and
Brown's three-quarter heave
was well short.


No. 17 West Virginia women rout Kansas 84-44


Associated Press

MORGANTOWN, WVa. -
Bria Holmes had a career-high
31 points and Taylor Palmer sur-
passed the 1,000 point-mark on
Saturday as No. 17 West Virginia
defeated Kansas 84-44.
Holmes reached the 30-point
mark on a pair of free throws
with 3:34 left and Palmer
achieved her career milestone
on a 3-pointer with 2:52 left in
the first half. Palmer was also
the last Mountaineer to score 30
or more when she had 30 against
Oklahoma on Jan. 3, 2013.
The Mountaineers ended the
first half on a 26-5 run to lead 43-
24 at halftime. Holmes made 5 of
8 3-pointers and had 19 points
before the break.
Christal Caldwell added 17
points and Palmer finished with
13 for WVU (20-3, 9-2 Big 12)


which finished 11 of 19 from 3-
point range.
Leticia Romero scored 12
points for Kansas State (9-13, 3-
8) which shot just 26.7 percent
from the field.
No. 20 Gonzaga 88,
Loyola Marymount 51
SPOKANE, Wash. Haiden
Palmer hit 10 of 15 shots and scored
27 points as Gonzaga won its 12th
straight routing Loyola Marymount.
Since beating the Lions 91-82 in
overtime on Jan. 23, the Bulldogs
(22-3, 12-1 West Coast) have won
by 30, 52, 35, 35 and 37 points.
The Bulldogs used a 12-0 run to
take a 25-5 lead at the 11:25 mark. It
was 46-20 at halftime when the Bull-
dogs shot 53.3 percent, including 5
of 10 3-pointers. The Lions were at
22.7 percent.
TaylorAnderson led the Lions


(7-16, 4-8) with 11 points. LMU
made 14 of 28 shots in the second
half and still fell further behind.
Gonzaga now has a three-game
lead over Saint Mary's and Brigham
Young with five games to play to win
their 10th straight WCC title.
No. 22 Nebraska 76,
No. 24 Michigan St. 56
LINCOLN, Neb. -Jordan
Hooper scored 18 points and Rachel
Theriot had nine with 12 assists as
Nebraska rolled past Michigan
State.
The Cornhuskers (17-5, 7-3 Big
Ten) shot 46.8 percent from the field
and outrebounded Michigan State
38-31. Tear'a Laudermill scored 15
points and Emily Cady had 13 with
nine boards and five assists.
Michigan State (16-8, 8-3) was
held to 22-of-56 shooting (39.3


percent). Aerial Powers paced the
Spartans with 17 points and seven
rebounds.
The Spartans jumped out to a 14-
6 lead six minutes in, but Nebraska
stormed ahead with a 22-0 surge
sparked by a layup, three-point play
and a jumper by Cady. Branndais
Agee ended the Spartans' nearly 10-
minute scoring drought with two
straight jumpers, but the Corn-
huskers rolled to a 40-20 halftime
advantage.
Nebraska coasted in the second
half, as Michigan State couldn't pull
closer than 17.
No. 21 Middle
Tennessee 65, Rice 54
MURFREESBORO, Tenn. -
Ebony Rowe scored 12 points and
added 12 rebounds as Middle Ten-
nessee defeated Rice.


Rowe recorded her 19th double-
double of the season and 72nd of
her career. Laken Leonard came off
the bench to add 13 points. The
Blue Raiders were coming off their
first conference loss, 68-56 against
Southern Miss on Wednesday.
Middle Tennessee (19-4, 8-1 Con-
ference USA) led by 10 at the break
and held the Owls to their lowest-
scoring first half of the season. The
Blue Raiders shot 46 percent from
the floor in the first half, compared to
Rice's 23 percent.
Middle Tennessee led by 21
points midway through the second
half, but the Owls responded with an
18-6 run to cut the lead to single dig-
its with 3:58 remaining.
Jessica Kuster scored 15 points
to lead Rice (10-12, 3-6), Maya
Hawkins finished with 13 and Megan
Palmer added 11.


B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Seven years and running in Chronicle


As of this writing, I have been
preparing articles for the Chron-
icle re-
garding
the Withla-
coochee
State Trail
for the past
seven
years. I am
a member
Sof the
-- _Rails to
Al Harnage Trails of
RAILS TO the Withla-
coochee,
TRAILS which is a
volunteer
organization that supports the


trail. We have about 300 members
and are always looking for more
to make the trail even better
Please note that my monthly ar-
ticle will now be printed in the
sports section of the Chronicle and
my article will appear on Sundays.
In the past, the article appeared in
the multiple neighborhood papers
around the county I hope you will
continue to read my articles and
send me your comments.
Potato vines
Do you know what this vine
looks like? It is a fast-growing vine
with large, green leaves and it
produces light brown fruit This is
the time of year that the fruit falls


from the vine. There are many
pieces of fruit on each vine and
when they fall and sit on the
ground, they grow into another
vine for the following year The
only way to stop the vine is to
make sure all of the fruit is picked
up and properly discarded. On my
adopted portion of the trail, I pick
up dozens of potatoes each week
The vine grows wild up and down
the trail in certain sections. If you
should run across them, please
pick them up and discard prop-
erly We need everyone's help to
control this pesky vine.
Starting 2014
Now that the holidays are over


and most of our snowbirds are
local to enjoy the great weather
that we have in Citrus County,
the volunteers are getting down
to some serious work on the trail.
One thing that we've gotten
behind on is trimming all up and
down the trail. We try to go to the
areas that are most in need of
trimming and work there first.
We have been lucky lately and
have not had too many trees
down blocking the trail. We have
a cutting crew, stackers and then
there those that put the
branches into the chipper As
long as the equipment is work-
ing and not breaking down, we
can move right along and get


some work done.
We are also working on the
west end of the parking lot at the
Inverness trailhead that runs
alongside of the trail. We are cut-
ting down those old paper trees
and chipping them up. We are
expanding the parking area so
that we will have more parking
spaces which are needed for the
bike ride and special events. We
can always use volunteers -
please call if you might be inter-
ested in any of our projects.
Thanks again for your phone
calls. Comments are always wel-
come good or not so good.
Ride and enjoy your trail! I can
be reached at 352-527-3263.


Crack of the bat


A 's leftfielder

Cespedes ready

for new season

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. -
With a shortened swing
and newfound swagger
following his most rigor-
ous offseason of training
yet that helped him pack
on 15 pounds of muscle,
Yoenis Cespedes wants to
forget all the frustrations
of last year
While the slugging left
fielder has turned his at-
tention to making better,
more consistent contact,
he still plans to regularly
clear the fences for the
Oakland Athletics and
the reigning Home Run
Derby champion hopes
that means hitting more
than the 26 long balls he
had last season.
"Possibly, I'll have a little
less power If a home run
went 430 feet, it will go 410
feet," Cespedes said with a
chuckle. "But maybe I can
do it more often."
As Cespedes looks back
now on what he consid-
ered a subpar second sea-
son in the majors, he
points to not being "strong
in mind" dealing with the
ups and downs.
He became an unlikely
Home Run Derby winner
at the All-Star game while
celebrating his family's
long-awaited arrival to the
Bay Area, but dealt with
injuries and a notable de-
cline in batting average.
"I think I should have
been stronger mentally,"
Cespedes said leading
into Saturday's FanFest.
"As an athlete, when
things aren't going your
way, you have to be strong-


Associated Press
With a shortened swing and newfound swagger following his most rigorous offseason
of training yet that helped him pack on 15 pounds of muscle, Oakland Athletics left
fielder Yoenis Cespedes wants to forget all the frustrations of last year.


minded. Maybe that was
one of the reasons I didn't
so well last year"
So motivated was Ces-
pedes, he took his offsea-
son training up a notch.
Not in volume, but
rather the intensity in
which he worked out this
winter in South Florida.


While the 28-year-old
Cuban defector has two
seasons remaining on the
$36 million, four-year con-
tract he signed in Febru-
ary 2012, Cespedes
indicated Friday he is
eager to lock up a long-
term deal and even con-
sider spending his career


with a club he helped win
improbable back-to-back
AL West crowns.
"You're always going to
have highs and lows. Last
year I got into this low and
just couldn't recover the
whole season. In 2012, I
had highs and lows,"
Cespedes said.


Honoring one of a kind


Baseball greats

toast Hank Aaron

for 80th birthday

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -At a hotel over-
looking the White House, Attorney
General Eric Holder motioned to-
ward a window and paid Hank
Aaron a huge compliment.
"The young man who lives right
over there," Holder said Friday
night, speaking of President Barack
Obama, "his path was made easier
by this man."
Forty years ago, Aaron broke the
hallowed record of Babe Ruth on
his way to 755 career home runs, all
while combating racism with quiet
dignity
On Friday evening at a private
party celebrating his 80th birthday,
friends, former teammates, and
baseball luminaries paid tribute to
"Hammerin' Hank."
Slugger Reggie Jackson com-
pared Aaron to Jackie Robinson,
who broke baseball's color barrier
in 1947. Frank Robinson spoke of
the thrill of entering the Hall of
Fame with Aaron in 1982.
Former teammate Robin Yount
said he was his mother's second-fa-
vorite player right behind Aaron.
Aaron was last to speak and grew
emotional as he talked of his parents,
recalling an afternoon when he and
his brother were called into the house
and ordered to hide under beds. Min-
utes later, members of the Ku Klux
Klan marched up their street
"I don't know what that could
have done to me growing up,"
Aaron said. "But my mother she


Associated Press
Baseball Hall of Famer Hank Aaron speaks at a reception in his honor
Friday in Washington. Aaron is turning 80 and is being celebrated with a
series of events in Washington.
was uneducated and father, too fielder who played for the Milwau-
but they always taught me and all of kee and Atlanta Braves and Mil-
my siblings that the thing I want you waukee Brewers.
to remember is, 'Do unto others as "He showed me the way a person
you would have them do unto you.' should be," Smith said. "He in-
That's been my philosophy" spired me and thousands of others."
As the ceremony came to a close Bud Selig, commissioner of Major
at the Hay-Adams hotel, Aaron and League Baseball, spoke of his
his wife of 40 years, Billie, beamed friendship with Aaron, which dated
as the crowd sang "Happy Birthday" to 1958.
Aaron turned 80 on Wednesday Selig also talked of the overdue
His tribute will continue on Satur- acceptance of Aaron in a career in
day when he speaks as part of the which he was often overshadowed
Living Portrait Series at the Smith- by Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays.
sonian American Art Museum. "I'm not so sure people under-
In addition, a painting of Aaron, stand what a great all-around
done by Ross Rossin of Atlanta, will player he was," Selig said. "He
be unveiled at the National Portrait played in Milwaukee. He played in
Gallery Atlanta. I think it was only maybe
Other speakers on Friday night after he broke Babe Ruth's record
included Hall of Famers Jim Rice, and in the last 20 years that
Rickey Henderson and Ozzie Smith, he's got the wonderful recognition
who grew up in Aaron's hometown that he so extraordinarily de-
of Mobile, Ala., idolizing the out- served."


LHS hosts track
meet open to public
The second annual Leg-
ends of the Spring Track and
Field Meet takes place at
Lecanto High School on Sat-
urday, Feb. 15.
There will be meets for two
different age groups: pre-K
through 8th grade go from
10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. and
cost $15 to enter.
High School graduates (18
and older) starts at 1 p.m. and
costs $20 to enter.
To register online, go to
www.active.com.
10th annual Kids
Fishing Clinic on
tap for Feb. 22
Teaching children a lifelong
hobby, appreciation for our
marine environment and a fun
family outing are the objec-
tives for the Kids' Fishing
Clinic. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) and Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
(CCPR) present a free Kids'
Fishing Clinic for pre-regis-
tered children between the
ages of 5 and 15 on Saturday,
Feb. 22, at 9 a.m., 10a.m., 11
a.m., 12 p.m. and 1 p.m.
The clinic will be held at
the Fort Island Trail Park
(12073 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River). Each partici-
pant will receive a rod and
reel combo, T-shirt and
goodie bag. Because space
is limited, pre-registration is
required and can be com-
pleted by visiting www.
citruscountyparks.com. If you
do not have internet access
or have trouble while regis-
tering please contact
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540.
This free clinic enables
young people to learn the ba-
sics of environmental stew-
ardship, fishing ethics,
angling skills and safety. In
addition, environmental dis-
plays will provide participants
with a unique chance to ex-
perience Florida's marine life
firsthand. The main objective
is to create responsible ma-
rine resource stewards by
teaching children about the
vulnerability of Florida's ma-
rine ecosystems. This event
is a catch-and-release activ-
ity, and all participants must
be accompanied by an adult.
Individuals or companies
interested in helping to spon-
sor this event or volunteer at
the clinic should contact
Recreation Specialist Crysta
Henry at 352-527-7543.
Ted Davis Golf
Tourney coming
Feb. 15
VFW Post 8189 Men's Aux-
iliary will present the second
annual Ted Davis Golf Tour-
nament on Saturday, Feb. 15,
at Twisted Oaks Golf Course.
Shotgun tee-off is at 8 a.m.
The $55 per-person entry
fee includes greens fee, golf
cart, goody bag and dinner to
follow at VFW Post 8189 at
4:30 p.m.
Prizes will be awarded for
best team score, closest to
the hole, longest drive and
worst team score.
There will be raffles, a
50/50 drawing, giveaways
and a putting contest.
All proceeds will go to a relief
fund to benefit local veterans.
For more information, call
Bill Peterson at 856-364-7233
or Jerry Webb at 352-220-
4807.
Benefitting Take
Stock in Children
of Citrus County
Take Stock in Children of


Citrus County, a non-profit or-
ganization dedicated to provid-
ing scholarships, mentors,
educational support and col-
lege/career counseling to low-
income youth, is hosting a
"Dollar$ for Scholar$" Golf
Tournament. Take Stock in
Children of Citrus County cur-
rently has 39 students enrolled
in their program, and will have
an additional three new stu-
dents enter in January of 2014.
They also anticipate adding
new students in the spring.
Partnering with Take Stock
in Children of Citrus County
for this event is Black Dia-
mond Ranch, Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, The Citrus
County Chronicle and Harley-
Davidson of Crystal River, the
hole-in-one sponsor.
The tournament will be held
on Monday, February 17,
2014, on the premier Black
Diamond Ranch Quarry
Course. The format for the
tournament is a four person
scramble with a 10 a.m. shot-
gun start. Cost to enter the
tournament is $600 for a four-
person team or $150 for indi-
viduals. The tournament is
open to everyone.
All of the proceeds from
this event will be used to pur-
chase scholarships for de-
serving students in Citrus
County. All scholarship contri-
butions are matched dollar for
dollar through the Florida Pre-
paid College Foundation.
For information on becom-
ing a tournament sponsor or
to participant, email Liz Blick
at eblickbdr@gmail.com or
phone her at 352-249-9276.
You can also download a
golfer's entry form by visiting
www.takestockcitrus.org.
Click on Upcoming Events
and then click on the golfer's
icon.
Blue Suede Shoe
run, walk scheduled
The second annual Stump-
knockers on the Square Elvis
Blue Suede Shoes Run will
be Saturday, March 8, in
downtown Inverness.
In addition to a 5K run, par-
ticipants can enjoy a one-mile
Elvis Walk and a one-mile
Elvis Dog Walk.
Stumpknockers Restaurant
is the title sponsor. The pre-
senting sponsor is Top Per-
formance Real Estate
Consultants.
The day will begin with reg-
istration and check-in at 7 a.m.
at Stumpknockers On The
Square, 110W. Main St., In-
verness. Runners and walkers
start at 8 a.m. Enrolled dog
walkers begin at 8:15 a.m.
Entry fee for pre-registrants
is $25. Pre-registration can be
done on line at
www.Elvis5Krun.com or
mailed to DRC Sports, PO
Box 70, Inverness FL 34451
(make checks payable to DRC
Sports). For information call
352-637-2475 or www.drc
sports.com. Entry fee on the
day of event will be $30.
You'll see runners and dogs
dressed up in their Elvis best.
A $250 cash prize will be
awarded to the Best Elvis.
Winners must be registered in
the run or walk. A $250 cash
prize will be awarded to the
Best Dressed Dog registered
in Dog Walk.
Additional Awards go to
Overall Individual Male/ Fe-
male, Overall Masters (40 and
up) Male/Female and five dif-
ferent age groups 9 and
under through 85 and up.
At check-in, pre-registered
participants receive an official
commemorative Stumpknock-
ersOn The Square Elvis Blue
Suede Shoes Run shirt.


-- Recreation BRIEFS


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 B5












2014 Winter Olympics

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


First gold of Games


Kotsenburg

of US wins

slopestyle

Associated Press

KRASNAYA POLYANA,
Russia -The kid they call
"second-run Sage" didn't
waste time putting down
the run of his life.
Sage Kotsenburg tamed
the treacherous slopestyle
course at the Extreme
Park on Saturday, grab-
bing the first gold medal
of the Sochi Olympics.
And he did it with a run
that left the 20-year-old
American who talks like a
surfer and rides like a
purist momentarily
stunned in disbelief
Kotsenburg's soulful
first run in the finals
ended with a score of
93.50 that held up over the
next 30 minutes as the rest
of the field's dozen riders
failed to catch the laid-
back Couer d'Alene,
Idaho, native, who pep-
pers his interviews with
"whoas" and "gnarly" and
often refers to himself as
"your boy"
One that's now an
Olympic champion.
Staale Sandbech of
Norway grabbed silver
while Canadian Mark Mc-
Morris, who nearly missed
the finals because of a
broken rib, surged to
bronze as slopestyle pro-
vided an electric Olympic
debut.
While the course that
chased teammate Shaun
White to the apparent
safety of the halfpipe took
out its fair share of riders,
Kotsenburg kept his cool


rsi


Associated Press
United States snowboarder Sage Kotsenburg takes a jump during the men's
slopestyle final Saturday at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park at the 2014 Winter
Olympics in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.


in the finals.
Then again, that's just
his way
His blonde hair flapping
from under his helmet as
he soared through the sun-
splashed Caucasus Moun-
tains, Kotsenburg looked
as if he were cruising
down the hill with his bud-
dies even as he soared off
ramps that are the equiva-
lent of leaping out of three
three-story buildings in
the span of 15 seconds.
In a sport built on signa-


ture moments as much as
it is built on triumphs,
Kotsenburg provided both
when he leapt off the sec-
ond ramp, unveiling a new
trick that impressed the
judges and drew oohs
from the packed stands.
He calls it the "Holy
Crail," a move that makes
it appear as if he's spin-
ning like a top as he ro-
tates 4 1/2 times, grabbing
the board behind his back
in the process.
"I'd never even tried it


before, literally," Kotsen-
burg said. "Never ever
tried it before in my life."
Not that it stopped him
as he put to bed the notion
of being everybody's fa-
vorite runner-up by taking
the biggest event of his life.
Kotsenburg has spent
most of his career on the
sport's second tier When
he captured the final
Olympic qualifying event
in California last month, it
was his first win since he
was 11.


Grim talk turns to gold for now


Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia All the gloom
and grim talk leading to the Sochi
Olympics at last gave way to more
uplifting things.
IOC President Thomas Bach had
said it's "time that it finally starts."
And so it did Saturday the first
competition since the cauldron
was lit.
In all, 98 gold medals will be
awarded over the next 16 days, and
five were settled on Day 2.
Norwegian biathlete Ole Einar
Bjoerndalen became the oldest in-
dividual gold medalist at the Winter
Olympics, winning the 10-kilometer
sprint his seventh career gold.
Cross-country skier Marit Bjoergen,
also from Norway, captured the
women's 15-kilometer skiathlon for
her fourth Olympic title. And Amer-
ican snowboarder Sage Kotsenburg,
his blonde hair flapping from his
helmet, won the first gold medal of
the games by taking men's
slopestyle.
Biathlon
At age 40, Bjoerndalen became the
oldest Winter Olympic gold medalist
in an individual sport, bringing him
within one gold of the all-time mark
of eight held by Norwegian cross-
country skiing great Bjorn Daehlie.
He was followed by Dominik Lan-
dertinger of Austria and Jaroslav
Soukup of Czech Republic.
"I am in super form," Bjoern-
dalen said. "I prepared well for this
and I am feeling strong."
Cross-county skiing
Bjoergen's gold was tempered by
grief The brother of teammate
Astrid Uhrenholdt Jacobsen died
"suddenly and unexpectedly" a day
earlier, according to Norwegian
Olympic officials. Bjoergen, joined
by teammates, sobbed in an em-
brace after the race.
"We really did a good race for him
today," Bjoergen said.
Bjoergen held off silver medalist
Charlotte Kalla in the final straight-
away to win in 38 minutes, 33.6 sec-
onds, successfully defending her
title from Vancouver Norway's
Heidi Weng won the bronze.
"One gold was my goal, so now I
can relax a little bit," Bjoergen said.
Speedskating
Sven Kramer of the Netherlands
set an Olympic record and de-
fended his speedskating title in the
men's 5,000 before his country's
king, queen and prime minister


Associated Press
Gold medalist Canada's Justine Dufour-Lapointe, right, celebrates with her
sister and silver medalist Chloe Dufour-Lapointe on Saturday after the
women's moguls freestyle skiing event at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park,
at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.


Kramer has been bedeviled at
the Olympics, notably in Vancou-
ver when his coach pointed him to
the wrong lane in the 10,000. But
on this day he surged around the
oval, winning in 6 minutes, 10.76
seconds and leading a Dutch
sweep in which he was followed by
Jan Blokhuijsen and Jorrit
Bergsma.
"That Sven was able to deliver
despite such pressure, it leaves me
speechless," King Willem-
Alexander said.
Alpine
Bode Miller of the U.S. and Aksel
Lund Svindal of Norway emerged
as favorites on a treacherous down-
hill course. Miller and Svindal fin-
ished 1-2 in the final downhill
training run. Asked of his objectives
Saturday, Miller said: "Um, not kill
myself was primary"
Hockey
The U.S. won the opener of the
Olympic women's hockey tourna-
ment, defeating Finland 3-1 behind
Hilary Knight's goal 53 seconds into
the game and Jesse Vetter's 14 saves.
The Americans can reach the semifi-
nals by beating Switzerland on Mon-
day Canada beat Switzerland 5-0.
Figure skating
If the Russians keep performing
as they have in the new team figure
skating competition, they're sure to
dominate throughout these Sochi
Games. Julia Lipnitskaia at 15 had
the look of an Olympic champion on


Saturday night, dazzling the home
crowd with a near-perfect routine
in the women's short program. Kse-
nia Stolbova and Fedor Klimov
earned cheers as they routed the
field in the free skate.
With only the men's and women's
free skate and the free dance left to
contest in Sunday's finale, Russia
has 47 points and a six point lead
over Canada. World champions
Meryl Davis and Charlie White
quick-stepped their way to victory
in the team short dance, lifting the
U.S. into the medals chase. The
Americans are third with 34 points.
Moguls
Justine and Chloe Dufour-
Lapointe joined a few other sis-
ters to win gold and silver in the
same Olympic event. They did it
in women's moguls, where their
oldest sister Maxime made it into
the finals and finished 12th.
French skiers Marieele and Chris-
tine Goitschel and Austrian lugers
Doris and Angelika Neuner are
on the short list of sisters to also
go 1-2 in an Olympic event.
"A dream. A long time, we've
dreamed this," said their father,
Yves. "It doesn't get any better than
this. It doesn't."
Bobsled
Sprint star Lauryn Williams was
selected to push the U.S. sled
driven by Elana Meyers. She has a
chance at becoming only the second
person to win gold at the Summer
and Winter Games.


Saturday's Winter
Olympic medalists
BIATHLON
Men
10km Sprint
GOLD-Ole Einar Bjoerndalen, Norway
SILVER-Dominik Landertinger, Austria
BRONZE- Jaroslav Soukup, Czech
Republic
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women
Skiathlon
GOLD-Marit Bjoergen, Norway
SILVER-Charlotte Kalla, Sweden
BRONZE-HeidiWeng, Norway
FREESTYLE SKIING
Women
Moguls
GOLD-Justine Dufour-Lapointe, Canada
SILVER-Chloe Dufour-Lapointe, Canada
BRONZE-Hannah Kearney, Norwich, Vt.
SNOWBOARD
Men
Slopestyle
GOLD-Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah
SILVER-Staale Sandbech, Norway
BRONZE-Mark McMorris, Canada
SPEEDSKATING
Men
5000
GOLD-Sven Kramer, Netherlands
SILVER-Jan Blokhuijsen, Netherlands
BRONZE-Jorrit Bergsma, Netherlands
Saturday's U.S.
Olympians fared
BIATHLON
Men's 10km Sprint
(Penalties in parentheses)
19. Tim Burke, Paul Smiths, N.Y,
25:23.3 (1).
35. Lowell Bailey, Lake Placid, N.Y,
26:04.1 (2).
45. Leif Nordgren, Marine on St. Croix,
Minn., 26:17.4(0).
61. Russell Currier, Stockholm, Maine,
26:58.5 (4).
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Women's Skiathlon
8. Jessie Diggins, Afton, Minn., 40:05.5.
12. Liz Stephen, East Montpelier, Vt.,
40:09.6.
31. Sadie Bjornsen, Winthrop, Wash.,
41:09.7.
47. Holly Brooks, Anchorage, Alaska,
42:34.0.
FIGURE SKATING
Team Event
Ice Dance Short Program
1. Meryl Davis, West Bloomfield, Mich.,
and Charlie White, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.,
75.98.
Women's Short Program
4. Ashley Wagner, Alexandria, Va.,
63.10(0).
Standings
3. United States, 27 (0).
Final Round
Pairs Free Program
4. Marissa Castelli, Cranston, R.I., and
Simon Shnapir, Sudbury, Mass., 117.94.
Standings
3. United States, 34.
FREESTYLE SKIING
Women's Moguls
Qualifying Run 2
6. Heather McPhie, Bozeman, Mont,
(14, 19.92; 6, 18.85)18.85 (q).
NR. Heidi Kloser, Vail, Coblo., DNS.
Ranking
1. Hannah Kearney, Norwich, Vt.,
23.05 (0).
4. Eliza Outtrim, Hamden, Conn.,
21.51 (0).
16. Heather McPhie, Bozeman, Mont,
(14, 19.92; 6, 18.85)18.85 (q).
NR. Heidi Kloser, Vail, Coblo., DNS.
Finals
Run 1
2. Eliza Outtrim, Hamden, Conn.,
21.81 (Q).
7. Hannah Kearney, Norwich, Vt.,
20.95 (Q).
13. Heather McPhie, Bozeman, Mont,
20.05.
Run 2
1. Hannah Kearney, Norwich, Vt.,
21.93(0).
5. Eliza Outtrim, Hamden, Conn.,
21.53(0).
Medal Run
3. Hannah Kearney, Norwich, Vt, 21.49.-
BRONZE
6. Eliza Outtrim, Hamden, Conn., 19.37.
LUGE
Men's Singles
After Two Runs
13. Chris Mazdzer, Saranac Lake, N.Y,
1:45.387.
23. Tucker West, Ridgefield, Conn.,
1:46.108.
26. Aidan Kelly, West Islip, N.Y, 1:46.467.
SKI JUMPING
Men's Individual
K90 Qualification (normal hill)
26. Anders Johnson, Park City, Utah
(92.5, 55.0, 51.5) 107.9.
35. Peter Frenette, Saranac Lake, N.Y
(93.0, 56.0, 52.0) 105.3.
40. Nick Alexander, Lebanon, N.H.
(90.0, 50.0, 49.0) 100.7.
Did not qualify
50. Nick Fairall, Andover, N.H. (80.5, 31.0,
44.5) 77.3.
SNOWBOARD
Men's Slopestyle
(Start position in parentheses)
Semifinals
Run 1
2. (14) Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah,
89.00.
4. (12) Ryan Stassel, Anchorage, Alaska,
83.25.
20. (21) Chas Guldemond, Laconia, N.H.,
13.25.
Run 2
1. (14) Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah,
(89.00; 90.50) 90.50.
4. (12) Ryan Stassel, Anchorage, Alaska,
(83.25; 81.75) 81.75.
6. (21) Chas Guldemond, Laconia, N.H.,
(13.25; 79.75) 79.75.
Ranking
2. Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah,
(89.00; 90.50) 90.50 (Q).
6. Ryan Stassel, Anchorage, Alaska,
(83.25; 81.75) 83.25.
7. Chas Guldemond, Laconia, N.H.,
(13.25; 79.75) 79.75.
Finals
Run 1
1. (3) Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah,


93.50.
Run 2
5. (3) Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah,
(93.50; 83.25) 83.25.
Final Ranking
1. Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah,
(93.50; 83.25) 93.50.- GOLD
SPEEDSKATING
Men's 5000
16. Emery Lehman, Oak Park, III., 6:29.94.
19. Jonathan Kuck, Champaign, Ill.,
6:31.53.


20. Patrick Meek, Northbrook, III., 6:32.94.
2014 Winter
Olympic schedule
Today, Feb. 9
Alpine Skiing
Men's downhill, 2a.m.
Biathlon
Women's 7.5km Sprint, 9:30 a.m.
Cross-Country Skiing
Men's 15km/15km Skiathlon, 5 a.m.
Figure Skating
Men'sTeam free program, 10a.m.
Women's Team free program, 11:05 a.m.
Ice Dance Team free dance, 1:10 p.m.
Ice Hockey
Women
Group B: Sweden vs. Japan, 3a.m.
Group B: Russia vs. Germany, 8 a.m.
Luge
Men's Singles (Run 3), 9:30 a.m.
Men's Singles (Run 4), 11:40 a.m.
Ski Jumping
Men's Individual (normal hill) First Round,
12:30 p.m.
Men's Individual (normal hill) Final,
1:30 p.m.
Snowboard
Women's Slopestyle Semifinals, 1:30 a.m.
Women's Slopestyle Finals, 4:15 a.m.
Speedskating
Women's 3000, 6:30 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 10
Alpine Skiing
Women's Super Combined (downhill),
2a.m.
Women's Super Combined (slalom), 6 a.m.
Biathlon
Men's 12.5km Pursuit, 10 a.m.
Curling
Men
Russia vs. Britain, Mid.
Switzerland vs. Sweden, Mid.
Denmark vs. China, Mid.
Germany vs. Canada, Mid.
Women
China vs. Canada, 5a.m.
Switzerland vs. United States, 5 a.m.
Sweden vs. Britain, 5a.m.
Russia vs. Denmark, 5 a.m.
Men
United States vs. Norway, 10 a.m.
Denmark vs. Russia, 10 a.m.
Canada vs. Switzerland, 10 a.m.
Sweden vs Britain, 10a.m.
Freestyle Skiing
Men's Moguls, 9a.m.
Men's Moguls, 1 p.m.
Ice Hockey
Women
Group A: United States vs. Switzerland,
5a.m.
GroupA: Finland vs. Canada, 10 a.m.
Luge
Women's Singles (Run 1), 9:45 a.m.
Women's Singles (Run 2), 11:35 a.m.
Short Track Speedskating
Men's 1500 Heats, 4:45 a.m.
Women's 500 Heats, 5:30 a.m.
Men's 1500 Semifinals, 6:10 a.m.
Women's 3000 Relay Semifinals, 6:40 a.m.
Men's 1500 Final, 7:05 a.m.
Speedskating
Men's 500 (Race 1), 8a.m.
Men's 500 (Race 2), 9:55 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 11
Biathlon
Women's 10km Pursuit, 10 a.m.
Cross-Country Skiing
Men's and Women's Individual Sprint Free,
5a.m.
Men's and Women's Individual Sprint Free
Finals, 7a.m.
Curling
Women
Switzerland vs. Denmark, Mid.
Sweden vs. Canada, Mid.
Russia vs. United States, Mid.
South Korea vs. Japan, Mid.
Men
Canada vs. Sweden, 5 a.m.
United States vs. China, 5 a.m.
Britain vs. Germany, 5 a.m.
Norway vs. Russia, 5a.m.
Women
Britain vs. United States, 10 a.m.
South Korea vs Switzerland, 10 a.m.
Denmark vs Japan, 10 a.m.
China vs. Russia, 10a.m.
Figure Skating
Pairs short program, 10a.m.
Freestyle Skiing
Women's Slopestyle Qualification, 1 a.m.
Women's Slopestyle Final, 4 a.m.
Ice Hockey
Women
Group B: Germany vs. Sweden, 5 a.m.
Group B: Russia vs. Japan, 10 a.m.
Luge
Women's Singles (Run 3), 9:30 a.m.
Women's Singles (Run 4), 11:20 a.m.
Ski Jumping
Women's Individual (normal hill) First
Round, 12:30 p.m.
Women's Individual (normal hill) Final,
1:20 p.m.
Snowboard
Men's Halfpipe Quarterfinals, 5 a.m.
Men's Halfpipe Semifinals, 10 a.m.
Men's Halfpipe Final, 12:30 p.m.
Speedskating
Women's 500 (Race 1), 7:45 a.m.
Women's 500 (Race 2), 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 12
Alpine Skiing
Women's downhill, 2a.m.
Curling
Men
Denmark vs. United States, Mid.
Norway vs. Germany, Mid.
China vs. Switzerland, Mid.
Women
Japan vs. Russia, 5a.m.
United States vs. China, 5 a.m.
South Korea vs. Sweden, 5 a.m.
Canada vs. Britain, 5a.m.
Men
Germany vs. China, 10 a.m.
Switzerland vs. Britain, 10 a.m.
Russia vs. Canada, 10 a.m.
Denmark vs. Sweden, 10 a.m.
Figure Skating
Pairs free program, 10:45 a.m.
Ice Hockey
Men
Group C: Czech Republic vs. Sweden,
Noon
Group C: Latvia vs. Switzerland, Noon
Women
GroupA: Switzerland vs. Finland, 3a.m.
Group A: Canada vs. United States,
7:30 a.m.
Luge


Men's Doubles (Run 1), 9:15 a.m.
Men's Doubles (Run 2), 10:45 a.m.
Nordic Combined
Men's Individual Jump (normal hill),
4:30 a.m.
Men's Individual 10km, 7:30 a.m.
Snowboard
Women's Halfpipe Quarterfinals, 5 a.m.
Women's Halfpipe Semifinals, 10 a.m.
Women's Halfpipe Final, 12:30 p.m.
Speedskating
Men's 1000, 9a.m.











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Nacho sandwiches, or the perils of


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


atrick Mulligan is 4
years old and he
loves to make sand-
wiches out of nacho chips
and pretzels.
His special sandwich has
a couple of nacho chips on
the outside and the pretzel
on the inside. You will not
find this special item in any
culinary magazine or top-
selling cookbook.
Patrick is my grandson,
and he was visiting recently


while his mom was in Cali-
fornia helping her sister
deal with a medical crisis.
That's important, because if
his mom was visiting Crys-
tal River with Patrick, there
is no way he would have
been permitted to eat 20
nacho/pretzel sandwiches.
We may or may not have
been paying close attention.
The truth is that we did
not see Patrick until he was
about to place sandwich


No. 21 in his mouth and his
big sister knocked it out of
his hand.
He just sat back and
smiled. And then he
burped.
You forgive a 4-year-old
for burping. But you don't
forgive them for everything.
I am a notorious early
riser, and at 5:30 a.m. the
next day I was up and
dressed and sitting in the
kitchen drinking coffee.


Morn
ing t
most
day
Mo
It
whei
quidc
ral s
ond-1
He
extre
"Gra
mak(


culinary capers
aing coffee while read- make."
;he newspaper is the There is no bathroom on
relaxing time of the the second floor of our
home.
ist of the time. Apparently consuming 20
was about 5:35 a.m. nacho/pretzel sandwiches
n Patrick began his creates a gastronomical im-
k descent down the spi- balance that involves ur-
taircase from his sec- agency and a similar degree
floor bedroom, of helplessness.
Swas holding his rear Patrick was urgent
emities and yelling I was helpless.


ndpa, I'm not going to
e. I'm not going to


CHRONICLE BOOK REVIEW


Associated Press
Wearing a neck brace after a fall a few weeks ago, former defense secretary Robert Gates, second from left, signs copies of his new
book Jan. 21 after speaking at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.





IN GATES' 'DUTY,



INSIGHT FOR THE AGES


"DUTY: MEMOIRS OF A SECRETARY AT WAR"
BY ROBERT GATES,ALFRED A. KNOPF PUBLISHERS 2014
618 PAGES, $35.


MICHAEL FRANCIS For the Chronicle

-F memoirs of influential public

\l /| figures provide insights into


recent


international events.


JL. V L This book by Robert Gates

contributes substantially to our knowledge

of Washington's controversial foreign and

defense policy during the past 10 years.


Gates was a career CIA man who even-
tually rose to be director of the agency,
after which he became president of
Texas A&M University A few days after
the 2006 re-election of George H.W
Bush, the president surprisingly asked
Gates to replace the controversial Don-
ald Rumsfeld as secretary of defense. At
the time, Bush gave no explanation for
Rumsfeld's sacking, though Rumsfeld
had become particularly controversial
for his handling of the war in Iraq and its
aftermath. Bush's only comment to
Gates on this came when, reaching the
end of his second term in office, he men-
tioned to Gates that he wished he had
appointed him two years earlier
The Bush management style was
hands-off. He accepted Gates' advice
and seldom made suggestions. When
Barack Obama entered the White House
in 2008, the president-elect surprisingly
asked Gates to remain in office during
his first administration. Gates' strong
sense of public service compelled him to
agree. The secretary found Obama much


more involved in policymaking than the
hands-off Bush.
Gates was often irritated by the group
of advisers around the new president be-
cause they continually ridiculed what
they saw as the Bush team's unenlight-
ened policies. He felt some members of
the inner circle were irresponsibly leak-
ing private White House conversations.
Vice President Joe Biden in particular
receives scorn from Gates, who claims
that he liked Biden personally, but that
Biden was "wrong historically on the is-
sues." Gates has a number of positive
things to say about Obama's intelligence
and thoughtfulness. However, as the
book makes clear, he was disappointed
that the "surge" in Afghanistan champi-
oned by Gates and the generals failed to
be strongly supported by the White
House during the final months of Gates'
tenure. Where the Secretary of Defense
saw progress, the White House saw a
stalemate. However, on numerous issues
the two agreed. Gates strongly supported
the president's attempt to close Guan-


tanamo, a policy initiative thwarted by
House Republicans. Hillary Clinton
proved to be a supporter of Gates in nu-
merous White House discussions, and he
praises the secretary of state for her man-
agement of America's foreign policy
During his time in office, Gates devel-
oped a disdain for Congress. He describes
members as "rude, insulting, belittling,
bullying ... too often personal attacks by
members of Congress violated every norm
of civil behavior and acted as judge, jury
and executioner" This situation was com-
plicated by the increasingly partisan
struggle between the two parties.
Heading the Department of Defense was
complex because each service had its own
weaponry development plans and budgets,
yet completely ignored what was going on
in the other services. Furthermore, it's a
Herculean task because, in Gates' words,
it is "the most complex organization on
the planet." Add to that a Congress whose
members want to maintain defense


See Page C4


Associated Press
Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton speaks to the National Automobile
Dealers Association meeting Jan. 27 in
New Orleans. Clinton gets high marks from
former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates
in his memoir "Duty."


Page C3


Don't let

penalties

or interest

add to your

tax bill
CAROLE FELDMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Paying taxes is hard
enough. Don't let the
total payment due rise
because of penalties and
interest.
"To me, one dollar out
of my pocket is signifi-
cant," said Dave Duval,
TaxAudit.com's vice
president of consumer
advocacy "It's another
tax, it's another percent.
It adds up."
There are penalties if
you fail to file your tax
return, or if you file it
late. There are late pay-
ment penalties if you
didn't have enough with-
held or didn't pay
enough in estimated
taxes.
"You may also have to
pay a penalty if you sub-
stantially understate
your tax, understate a
reportable transaction,
file an erroneous claim
for refund or credit, file
a frivolous tax submis-
sion, or fail to supply
your SSN or individual
taxpayer identification
number," the Internal
Revenue Service says.
"If you provide fraudu-
lent information on your
return, you may have to
pay a civil fraud
penalty"
On top of that, there's
interest assessed on
money that's past due.
"The United States in-
come tax is a pay-as-you-
go tax, which means that
tax must be paid as you
earn or receive your in-
come during the year,"
the IRS says. "You can
either do this through
withholding or by
making estimated tax
payments."
For many, "the chal-
lenge is not figuring out
how much to pay but
coming up with the cash
to do it," said Barbara
Weltman, a contributing
editor to "J.K. Lasser's
Your Taxes 2014."
"The money comes in
the door and they use it
to pay bills," she said.
"That's where the chal-
lenge comes in."
The IRS has made it
easy to get an extension
to file taxes beyond the
April 15 deadline. But
that doesn't mean you
can delay paying what-
ever you may owe the
U.S. Treasury
"You have to pay what
you owe by April 15,"
Weltman said.
"You do want to pay as
much of the tax as you
can so you won't be
See Page C3
...........................................................................................................
Editor's note: This is the
third installment in a six-
part series on tax changes.
Next week: You might
want to consider filing a
tax return this year even if
you don't meet the required
income levels. You could
be eligible for the Earned
Income Tax Credit, a refund-
able tax credit that will put
money in your pocket even
if you don't owe any taxes.







OPage C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"Litigant, n. A person about to give up his skin
for the hope of retaining his bones."
Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary," 1911


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
& EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ........... ..............copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CHA-CHING!




Nemzoff's



firing comes



at great cost



to taxpayers


ith the four-year
governance dispute
between the Citrus
County Hospital Board
(CCHB) and Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation (CMHF)
eroding the fiscal soundness
of Citrus Memorial Health
System (CMHS), the decision
was made to sell
or lease the non-
profit hospital. THE I1
To broker the
sale or lease, the Nemzof
hospital board settle
signed a $775,000
contract with OUR OF
transaction con- Patier
sultant Joshua is the c
Nemzoff last
April. Possessing
a professional track record of
extensive expertise and ex-
perience in joining struggling
nonprofit hospitals with large
for-profit health care compa-
nies, Nemzoff was also
known for his no-nonsense
and acerbic style.
Nemzoff's style soon
earned him the disfavor of
hospital board attorney Bill
Grant and some of the
board's trustees, which
prompted a failed vote to fire
him on July 10 following
brash emails from the con-
sultant that took Grant and
the trustees to task for med-
dling in his role.
A week later trustees voted
3-2 to terminate Nemzoff, cit-
ing his intransigence in com-
plying with a public records
request by Inverness resident
Robert Schweickert Jr. for
emails between Nemzoff and
interested CMHS bidders. The
vote carried despite Nemzoff
being on vacation and his at-
torney's belief that compli-
ance was not required of him
as an independent contractor
Following his abrupt firing,
Nemzoff filed a federal lawsuit
alleging the public records


Critters have it rough
There has been a lot of misin-
formation out there about "JJ"
Kenney's work to build a new an-
imal shelter. To my knowledge,
this would not be paid for by
taxpayers' money. I suggest before
passing judgment, people go visit
the animal shelter and
see the antiquated con- c
editions these poor ani
mals live in: cold
concrete floors in win-
ter, overcrowding, no
air-conditioning in the
summer and no outside
runs. They only get out-
side to go to the bath-
room, at most once a CAL
day for a few minutes, 563-(
and only if there is a
volunteer there.
Don't forget the bottler
When the politicians, which I
don't have much use for, sit down
to talk about the springs ... I hope
they speak of the 176,000 gallons
a day that we're giving away out
of our aquifer to a bottling com-
pany in Ocala.


s
f
i

P
1
8


I
r


request and the trustees' de-
nial of due process was or-
chestrated by Grant to
circumvent paying his full
contract amount after bring-
ing four bidders to the table.
Although Grant initially
contended the allegations
were "baseless and without
merit," the hospi-
tal board last
$SUE: month agreed to
settle Nemzoff's
lawsuit lawsuit for
ment. $700,000. At the
time of the settle-
'INION: ment, Grant
t care stated he believed
casualty. the hospital
board's insurer
would pick up the
total settlement amount. With
the insurer signaling it would
only pay $325,000, that reim-
bursement is now in dispute.
The CCHB's $375,000 settle-
ment share, however, is only
the tip of the iceberg. The
hospital board's outside legal
counsel necessitated by Nem-
zoff's lawsuit chalked up an-
other $108,000. The hospital
board has also agreed to pay
$31,000 for Schweicker's at-
torney fees. Additionally,
Nemzoff's abrupt firing re-
quired the hiring of another
consultant to complete the
transaction process at a cost
of $550,000.
In directing hundreds of
thousands of taxpayer dollars
collected for patient care to-
ward the costs triggered by
Nemzoff's questionable firing,
the CCHB lost sight of its charge
to operate a public hospital
system on behalf of its patients
and Citrus County residents.
The two hospital boards fi-
nally appear to be coming to-
gether on the transaction to
HCA, but the road to success
has been littered with unnec-
essary breakdowns that have
cost taxpayers deeply.


Bowe Project growing
The Citrus County Bring Bowe
Home Project would like to thank
Keith and Colleen at Mac 1 Signs
on Grover Cleveland Boulevard
... for their generous donation of
28 decals with Bowe's picture to
be put on all 25 Citrus County
Transit buses. A special
JND thank you to two won-
Sderful people who really
F care about this project.
Please help bring Bowe
home now.
Observe leash law
I would like to leave a
Sound Off to the people
who let their dogs run
)579 loose about daylight off
) Watson Road. I almost
fell this morning trying
to get away from two large dogs
in my yard about daylight when
I went out for the paper. They're
fancy-looking dogs with their
tails curled over their backs.
Now if they come back in my
yard, I'll call you to come get
them. Don't let them loose. We
have a leash law here. Please.


Take time to share your love


s Valentine's Day ap-
proaches, I'm pleased
to share this heartfelt
message with you.
As busy as we are, let's never
be too busy to take time to enjoy
the connection with
those we love.
While there is
great evidence of
hate and animosity,
anger and negativity
in this world, I sub-
scribe to the emotional
antidote prescribed
by John Lennon and
Paul McCartney in Jack]
the classic Beatles G
song "All You Need GUI
Is Love." Here are COL
their simple yet pro-
found lyrics: http://allspirit.
co.uk/allyouneed.html.
And despite being our seri-
ous selves most of the time,
sometimes it helps to get just a
bit silly! Victor Borge, the
famed comedic piano virtuoso,
said "Laughter is the closest
distance between two people."
A group of 4- to 10-year-olds
was asked, "What does love
mean?" Here's a selection of
their replies wonderful wis-
dom from the mouths of babes!
"When my grandma got
arthritis, she couldn't bend over
and paint her toenails anymore.
So my grandpa does it for her
all the time, even when his
hands got arthritis too. That's
love." (Rebecca, age 8)
"When someone loves you,
the way they say your name is
different. You just know that
your name is safe in their
mouth." (Billy, age 7)
"Love is sharing even if you


L
L
E
I


think you don't have enough."
(Chrissie, age 6)
"Love is what makes you
smile when you're too tired to
think." (Terri, age 9)
"Love is the quiet sound in
the room when the
people you care
about are all to-
gether" (Luis, age
10)
"When you love
Somebody, it doesn't
matter if they're
gone for a little
while or forever You
,evine still find a way to
ES love them." (Karen,
ST age 7)
JMN 0 "My mommy
---- said they adopted
me because they wanted one
more way to grow love in our
family She said I grew in her
heart, not in her belly" (Hector,
age 9)
"Love is like a little old
woman and a little old man who
are still friends even after they
know each other much too
well." (Tommy, age 8)
"During my piano recital, I
was on a stage and I was scared.
I looked at all the people watch-
ing me and I saw my daddy wav-
ing and smiling. I wasn't scared
anymore. Love does that."
(Cindy age 8)
"Love is when Mommy sees
a picture of my family on the
wall and stops to look a little
extra long look at it" (Chris, age
7)
"Love is when your puppy
licks your face even after you
left him alone all day" (Mary
Ann, age 6)
To love and be loved is our


most treasured emotional bond.
And while love lost is also a re-
ality of life, there is much reward
in appreciating the connection
we have with others.
Please take every opportunity
to tell others that they are loved,
and make every effort to ex-
press yourself in positive words
and deeds that uplift, edify and
energize relationships.
And when we are faced with
circumstances that challenge
us, it's so important to take a
breath, pause for a moment to
think of the bigger picture, and
find opportunities to balance
life's ups and downs with a
fresh and positive perspective.
Resolve to be the most posi-
tive person in the room and see
if someone dares to compete
with you! Now that's a game I
think is worth playing!
One of the greatest expres-
sions of love is compassionate
advocacy: To use our voices to
speak on behalf of another a
person who needs us or an en-
tire group of people who are in
need based on their economic,
emotional, health, safety or ed-
ucational challenges is an ex-
ample of sharing your love with
others.
I've composed a one-pager
featuring Ten Advocacy Attrib-
utes which I think you'll enjoy
If you'd like me to send it your
way, just contact me with "Ten
Advocacy Attributes" in the
subject line.

Jack Levine is the founder
of4Generations Institute.
Email him atJack@4Gen. org
or visit http://4Gen. org.


Health care reform
by the numbers
I have read a lot of opinions
about the new health care leg-
islation in the paper, but no re-
ports of actual costs. There is
no end of horror stories on the
Internet about the costs and peo-
ple saying they just can't afford
it, but you can't believe every-
thing you read on the Internet.
I've been exploring
healthcare.gov since it launched,
and I've compiled some data for
Citrus County, which I'll offer
here. I also compared Florida to
other states, and there are some
differences. We only have one
provider, Blue Cross, while some
other states have five or six
providers. We appear to be
slightly more expensive than the
other states, but only slightly
One fact that jumps out at you
is you can pay them now or pay
them later If you opt for low
monthly premiums, you are going
to have a high deductible and
high out-of-pocket cost limits.
If you try to minimize the de-
ductible and out-of-pocket costs,
the premium goes up steeply
Regardless of your age and in-
come status, you should try to
make an honest assessment of
your health and your chances
of becoming really sick. If you
are in excellent health, the
lower premiums make a lot of
sense, and if your health is not
so good, the higher premiums
and lower deductible and out-
of-pocket costs might be the
way to go. The only way to beat
the system is to not get sick. That
eliminates the deductible and
out-of-pocket costs for that year


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

There are four or five levels
of coverage available, depend-
ing on circumstances. The so-
called "metal plans" are:
"bronze," offering 60 percent
coverage of your health care costs;
"silver," offering 70 percent;
"gold," offering 80 percent; and
"platinum," offering 90 percent
coverage. In some cases, a cat-
astrophic plan is available of-
fering fewer than 60 percent
coverage.
I started off looking at the costs
for a 64-year-old couple with a
family income of $64,000. That
would probably describe a lot
of small-business owners in
Citrus County, and that is the


income level at which you are
not eligible for any assistance
paying the premium. Depending
on the plan, the monthly premium
ranged from $1,000 a month to
more than $1,500. The deductible
and out-of-pocket costs had the
inverse relationship discussed
above and ranged from $6,250
per person down to $2,000 per
person per year
Next I looked at what demo-
graphics say is the average family
in Citrus. That would be a 54-
year-old couple with a family
income of $38,000 and no children
in the house. They are eligible
for $572 a month in assistance
in paying their premiums, which
is reflected in these numbers.
Depending on the plan, their
premium ranges from $144 a
month to $573. The deductible
and out-of-pocket costs ranged
from $6,250 per person down to
$2,000 per person per year
I looked at a family of four with
the parents age 34 making $36,000
a year in family income, and
the website attempts to put
them in Medicaid.
At that point, I gave up fol-
lowing that demographic.
Lastly I looked at a family of two,
age 21, making $30,000 a year
in family income. They were
eligible for $234 a month in as-
sistance and their premium
ranged from $102 a month to
$303. The deductible ranged
from $6,250 per person to
$2,000 per person per year
It's my opinion that this is
expensive. At all ages and in-
come levels, it's going to hurt,
more so if you get sick.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


IF WEO LEALIZE 4 REGULATE
TE I1LL6AL DRVS, WE'D
SOLVE THE PROBLEM ,

NED


LETTER to the Editor


wIs ai.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A story of the South, and it is n


On a recent morning,
Cheryl and I
watched a program
on PBS regarding the in-
comparable Harper Lee
and her novel "To Kill a
Mockingbird."
It was inspiring to see
just how much her words
helped to change the world.
Those who produced the
telecast seemed to under-
stand that from the recon-
struction era right on up
through the 1960s, the
overwhelming majority of
folks in the South did not
purposefully practice rad-
ical racism, most did not
plant bombs and they did
not beat, maim or kill peo-


ple because of color
Unfortunately, some did
in fact do such things, while
the same overwhelming
majority did nothing to
stop them.
It was simply seen as the
world in which we lived.
Any of us raised in the
South during those turbu-
lent times knew from the
title alone that "To Kill a
Mockingbird" was some-
thing special.
Ironically, we were all
taught that to kill a mock-
ingbird, an innocent crea-
ture whose most obvious
purpose was to provide us
with its beautiful songs,
was a sin, but we had not


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

By the time I realized what was hap-
pening, the eruption was flowing with
full force. I grabbed Patrick from the
last steps of the staircase and launched
toward the bathroom.
But the cat was out of the bag.
The horse had left the barn.
The ship had sailed.
Take your pick.
It had been more than three decades
since I had been called upon to rescue
a 4-year-old from such mayhem, and I
have no memories of the prior genera-
tion being able to produce the level of
product I was called upon to deal with.
It was everywhere.
It was on his legs. It was in his hair It
ran up his back all the way to his neck.
It had gotten between his toes. Be-
tween his toes!
"We didn't make it," Patrick said to
me with his most innocent look.
"What's this 'we' stuff?" I thought but
did not say
There was a trail of work product on
the floor from the stairs to the
bathroom.
No one else in the house was awake,


been taught that to do harm
to others based solely on
the pigmentation of their
skin was wrong.
I cannot
imagine anyone
being unfamil-
iarwiththe story
Ms. Lee told so
eloquently in
1960, but, just
in case, it is a
treatise of how,
despite the Fred B
best efforts of a
white lawyer, a
black man was OF I
wrongly con-
victed of the rape of a
white girl.
What did this tale do for


so Patrick and I were on our own. I took
him to a big bathtub and filled it with
hot water
I scrubbed and shampooed and
washed him until his skin was red and
his hair squeaky clean.
I inspected my clothes and was
amazed to find that I was not covered.
He was actually enjoying himself by
this time, playing with some balls and
toys that the last grandkid in the bath-
tub had left behind.
It was a moment of bonding between
grandson and grandfather
A very brief moment.
It was about that time that Patrick
picked up a ball floating in the water
He looked me in the eye and said:
"Grandpa fire in the hole!"
I looked at him in bewilderment until
he squeezed the ball and shot me in the
face with a stream of hot bath water
Four years old.
Patrick did not need a towel to dry
off, because he managed to drip dry as
I chased him through the house.
The moral of the story: Ten nacho
sandwiches are enough.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


I


I


me as a 15-year-old?
It made me begin to
question if my attitude -
moreover, the
attitude of the
S South in gen-
S eral --was
wrong.
cYes, itwas an
attitude fos-
tered by being
defeated in
war, suffering
rannen the indignities
E and physical
lCE abuses that
LIFE come with an
invading army,
then seeing the homeland
overrun politically during
the aftermath, but was


TAXES
Continued from Page C1

penalized for a late pay-
ment penalty."
The late payment
penalty is one-half of
1 percent of the unpaid tax
per month. However, if the
total of all your tax pay-
ments withholding and
any estimated tax pay-
ments, plus any other pay-
ments made before April 15
is at least 90 percent of
the total tax due, you gen-
erally won't be assessed the
penalty during the period
of the extension.
For future tax years, the
IRS has a withholding cal-
culator to help you figure
out if you are having enough
taken out of each paycheck
to avoid penalties.
It's important to file
your return even if you
don't have the money to
pay the taxes due. The fail-
ure-to-file penalty is nor-
mally 5 percent for each


.ot insignificant

striking out at those who replied, "Harper Lee
were blameless right? wrote her book for the
No, it was a sin. The readers God gave her Your
same as killing a mocking- work is for your readers,
bird was a sin, but many the ones He has and will
times more diabolical, continue to give to you,
I believe the story had to and it is not insignificant."
be told by a Southerner, a
girl from Alabama, for
those of us in the South to Fred Brannen, an
listen. Inverness resident,
At the program's conclu- has been a Chronicle
sion, I gave consideration columnist since 1988
to the novel I have recently and is the author of the
completed and said to recently published novel,
Cheryl, "Watching this 'At the Bottom of
makes me realize just how Biscayne Bay." Fred
insignificant my writing maybe contacted at
is." fbrannenjr@gmail.com
After a moment's or via wwwbrannen
thought, my sweetheart booksllc.com.


month that a return is late,
up to a maximum 25 per-
cent "The penalty is based
on the tax not paid by the
due date (without regard
to extensions)," according
to the IRS.
For those who file on
time but didn't have
enough withheld or didn't
pay sufficient estimated
taxes, they may be charged
interest on the underpay-
ment. The rate is variable,
equal to the federal short-
term rate plus 3 percent.
For all of 2013 and the first
quarter of 2014, the inter-
est rate is 3 percent
However, you might be
able to avoid the interest
charges if your total pay-
ments for the year equal at
least 90 percent of what
your final payment will be,
if you owe less than $1,000
or if the taxes you paid at
least equaled your 2012
tax bill.
Tax software programs
generally will figure out
whether you have to pay


any penalties, and include
that in whatever money
might be due. As a result,
many people might not
even be aware they're pay-
ing penalties.
If you find that you are
unable to pay whatever tax
is due, you might be able to
work out a payment plan
with the IRS. To be eligi-
ble, you must have filed
your tax returns, and your
tax bill including inter-
est and penalties has to
be $50,000 or less. You can
apply online at wwwirs.
gov/Individuals/Online-
Payment-Agreement-
Application, or through
one of the IRS' Taxpayer
Assistance Centers.
If you receive a notifica-
tion from the IRS, TaxAu-
ditcom has the following
advice:
"Don't bury your head in
the sand," they say "Of all
the tax mistakes you could
make, not dealing with an
IRS letter is one of the
worst."


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Registration Deadline: Monday, February 17,2014
Contact Donna Rayne (352) 382-2999
or Stephanie St. Clair (352) 503-3023


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I La3 nOB:


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 C3


4;1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hot Corner:
MONEY FOR NOTHING

Something wrong here
In today's Chronicle, Wednesday, Feb. 5, was two
articles: "Money for nothing," about Josh Nemzoff
being hired and paid $500,000 for nothing, and an
article about the Three Sisters Springs federal grant
to build a bridge so that we citizens can get over to
the park and see it. In one case, we're begging the
federal government to allow us to access a beautiful
park and preserve and something we paid for, and
the other we're giving away more money than the cost
to build the bridge and probably the parking lot and
other things. There's something wrong here, really
wrong. And I think the people at the board, that is
the hospital board, should actually be held liable for
this and should pay for this out of their own pock-
ets. They made a terrible mistake. They did a stupid
thing and they should not have taken a single cent.


563-0579


No business? No wonder
If anyone has a doubt why
business will not come to Citrus
County, tell them to please read
the Chronicle on Wednesday,
Feb. 5. The wasteful money spent
by this hospital board, by our
county commissioners, by the
people running our government
-that's explaining itself why
business will not come to Citrus
County.


Sue the hospital board
Why doesn't the taxpayers of Citrus County sue
the hospital board for hiring the consultant who took
us for $500,000 and we got nothing? I'd appreciate
more information about the hospital board.
Editor's note: Citrus County Hospital Board members
are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the state
Senate. The members are Chairwoman Debbie Ressler,
Krista Joseph and Dr. Mark Fallows. There are two vacancies.
Gravy for me too, please
Please, oh please, tell me how I can get on the
taxpayers' gravy train like Attorney Nemzoff. I'm an
82-year-old disabled widow and I only need $10,000
to be totally out of debt. Well, I'll tell you, that hospital
board and board of trustees has been nothing but a joke.



t~CA N 0'T...



Fundraiser Sponsored by Hoops-Link-inc
Saturday, February 22, 2014
6:30PM 10:30PM
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Music starts ...,q i at 7p.m.


Cti <(Nio
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRus COUTYHfisTOicAL SOCIE!


.L. H1-;.,


ii


GATES
Continued from Page Cl

spending levels (or in-
crease them) in their dis-
tricts. Meanwhile, Gates
observed a military that
tended to emphasize
preparing for war instead
of figuring out how to actu-
ally fight a war As for his
dealings with the defense
contractors in Iraq and
Afghanistan, Gates had
grave reservations about
many of the projects de-
signed to modernize the
infrastructure in those two
countries. Cost overruns,
corruption, bribery and
weak oversight, he says,
plagued America's efforts.
Gates criticizes the set-
tlement between Washing-
ton and Iraq that led to the
hasty withdrawal of U.S.
forces, but realized that
the government of Nouri
al-Maliki (perhaps influ-
enced by Iran) was unwill-
ing to sign a status-of-
forces agreement which
protected our troops.
In Afghanistan, Gates
observes that the United
States learned nothing
during the 20 years following
the Russian withdrawal.
There are eerie similari-
ties between the programs
Russia instituted when it
took over the country and
those Washington pushed
when the United States be-
came involved: building
highways, constructing and
opening schools for girls and
boys, improving agricultural
methods, stopping political
corruption, etc. Both the
Russians and the Ameri-


ChYS &t GIRLS CPaB
Charitable Partner


When Gates realized the shabby
level of medical care the troops were
getting, heads rolled and funding
for hospitals and medical personnel
greatly increased. He expedited the
development of military equipment
that was needed in Afghanistan.
Incidentally, he has harsh words for
the Department of Veterans Affairs.


cans failed in their efforts
to modernize the society
The local culture was sim-
ply too deeply entrenched
to be easily brought into
the 21st century
But Gates' fundamental
focus was on the fighting
forces. He showed great
compassion toward the men
and women in uniform and
was deeply aware that they
were far from their friends
and families in a country
whose language and culture
were incomprehensible. The
soldiers faced their own
fates, hardship, the death
of comrades and serious
injury He personally wrote
letters of condolence to the
families of those who died
and often attended memo-
rial services and funerals in
the United States. When he
made his numerous trips
to Afghanistan and Iraq,
he insisted on going to the
front lines to meet the sol-
diers and get a better idea
of their needs. When he re-
alized the shabby level of
medical care the troops
were getting, heads rolled
and funding for hospitals
and medical personnel
greatly increased. He ex-
pedited the development
of military equipment that


Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing


Inverness Golf & Country Club
February 22, 2014
Registration 7 a.m. Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.
$60 per player or
$220 for a team of four.
Includes: Greens fees, cart, lunch, door prizes and one
Mulligan ticket. Additional Mulligan tickets will be available.
For online registration, forms and information
visit www.CitrusBuilders.com or call 746-9028.
SPONSORS
& C iiO ji, 7 6 -
?acc C SUH=KM -IC


SCORE 16th
ANNUAL U
Monday, April 7,2014
JG^,,IlLL yj'/j L '" uiii, f C L'J C SSIC
-',_,l'h i, l .'... .* i. ,'<- Ill.- ;.1-, ;.I t':. I


Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2014
11:00 a.m. Registration
11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 28,2014
For information call Jim Green (352) 249-1236

I^^B~~f,, BB C^^ iWO'pp~^ N ^Hj^^iX iEnjji^


c i....O.NI.C.LE
i| www.chronicleonline.com


liibmr~airy I II II II
23 45678

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j ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 9 1 7 I R I Q 7f f 4 ^ i A 7 1l 7 7


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23 24 25 26 27 28


was needed in Afgthanistan.
Incidentally, he has harsh
words for the Department
of Veterans Affairs.
The book has some in-
teresting portraits of lead-
ers he met. He had known
Benjamin Netanyahu for
some years and mistrusted
him. When he met with
Hamid Karzai, he found
him extremely concerned
with Karzai's international
reputation as a corrupt
leader When President
Bush met with Russia's
Vladimir Putin, Bush said


he saw into his soul and saw
a good man When Gates met
Putin he saw a hardened,
ruthless KGB agent of the
type he confronted during
the Cold War Reading Gates'
views on foreign policy
makes one think that that
the Cold War lives on, at
least in the hearts of some.
This is a great book giving
us a view of important global
issues that, unfortunately,
continue to be in the head-
lines. For decades, this vol-
ume will be required reading
for anyone studying for-
eign and defense policy

Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
relations at the University
ofNotre Dame for 39years.
He also was the chair of the
Political Science Depart-
ment and associate provost
in charge of the university's
study abroad programs
for a number of years.


.".- Tee off for Tourette
Come join us for our
2nd Annual 11011419w"

Tee Off for Tourette





Sat., Mar. 1,2014

Plantation on Crystal River
Shotgun Start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Kick off Cocktail party on Friday, February 28, at 6:30pm
with music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
along with a live auction, raffles and meet and greet with celebrities.
Don't miss out, get your teams together for this fun event, and
help raise funds for the Tourette Syndrome Association of
Florida. All proceeds from this event will go to help adults
and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.
For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com
or email Gary D'Amico
at gary78@tampabay.rr.com CmpN]ciE


Feb9 Mach16






Feb 9- 200- 4:00 p

Che CleLi e Erih en ene















Feb 9 230 p
















Feb 9 oor5opn a 2:0 p
Cirs ont OC0-. s& ereto
Saly' Vletin Tibte Sho


I


C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
^CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


the strategy of


Airline CEO changing how we pay to fly


SCOTT MAYEROWITZ
Associated Press
FORT LAUDERDALE-
en Baldanza, the CEO of
Spirit Airlines, leans over his
kitchen table, takes another
look at the board and plots out his
strategy
He's not thinking about new
routes, extra fees or how to pare
back service on his famously no-
frills airline. He's indulging his
true passion: board games. At one
point in his life he owned nearly
4,000. Today he's whittled the col-
lection down to 1,500 still enough
to fill one of the four bedrooms in
his house.
These aren't kids' games, I
learned on a recent Thursday night
when I was Baldanza's guest, along
with Ted Christie, the airline's
chief financial officer and DeAnne
Gabel, director of investor rela-
tions. They are elaborate affairs
that take enormous concentration,
careful planning, cunning and ruth-
lessness. Luck has very little to do
with the outcome.
We play Power Grid, a game Bal-
danza, 52, selected. Players build a
network of cities, buy power plants
and purchase the oil, coal, garbage
or uranium necessary to electrify
the cities. The more you power, the
more money you get. The best play-
ers, Baldanza notes, "connect the
cities in the most efficient way"
The similarities to running an
airline aren't lost on me.
Spirit carries only 1 percent of
U.S. fliers, yet has significant name
recognition thanks to provocative
advertising. Baldanza has in-
creased the number of lines on
Spirit's route map by 73 since 2010,
while doubling the size of Spirit's
fleet He undercuts other airlines


"We're not adding more fees
anymore. We're selling people
more things that they never
would have considered part of the
base ticket."

Ben Baldanza
CEO of Spirit Airlines


on base ticket prices, but turns a
profit by packing more passengers
into planes and then charging them
extra for almost everything, except
the cabin air It's a strategy that
consistently produces one of the
best profit margins in the industry
Each player starts our game with
$50, which Baldanza doled out be-
fore we arrived. I grab my stack.
"Do you mind if I count my
money? It's not that I don't trust
you..." Before I can finish, Gabel
chimes in: "We all did too."
Passengers don't necessarily
trust Spirit either They are at-
tracted by low fares but then com-
pelled to play a game of dodging
fees. Some drive to the airport to
avoid paying up to $16.99 extra
each way to book online. Customer
service is notoriously lacking,
something Baldanza attributes to
keeping costs low so tickets are af-
fordable. Each boarding pass
printed by an agent at the ticket
counter costs $10. A bottle of water,
free on most airlines, costs $3.
Spirit has 24 different types of bag-
gage fees, including ones for plac-
ing a carry-on bag in the overhead
bin.
So, it's not surprising that Bal-
danza sees revenue opportunity


where others see controversy
Would he allow in-flight cell-
phone conversations if the govern-
ment lifts its prohibition?
"Sure," he says without hesita-
tion. "If we can make money at it."
He notes that those fees would
allow for lower ticket prices. He
knows and doesn't care that
most Americans oppose such calls.
"People are only annoyed for a
while," Baldanza counters. "They
were annoyed that (Spirit's) seats
didn't recline."
I soon learn that Baldanza ran a
mini-training camp at lunch the
prior day, teaching his executives
how to play Power Grid. They even
discussed letting me win but
then decided not to be that gener-
ous. I was at a major disadvantage.
"I feel like the guy who shows up
at the airport not realizing that
Spirit charges for carry-on bags," I
mutter
"You shouldn't have bought your
ticket on Orbitz," Baldanza shoots
back.
Transparency remains one of
Spirit's biggest challenges. Passen-
gers booking through the airline's
website typically understand
See Page D2


US employers add 113Kjobs; rate dips to 6.6 pet.


CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -A surprisingly
weak jobs report for a second straight
month has renewed concern that the
U.S. economy might be slowing after a
strong finish last year
Employers added 113,000 jobs in
January, far fewer than the average
monthly gain of 194,000 last year Job
gains have averaged just 154,000 the
past three months, down from 201,000
in the preceding three.
The sluggish job growth could under-
mine hopes that economic growth will
accelerate this year But economists also
say they expect hiring to return to
healthier levels in coming months. They
note that solid job gains in January in
areas like manufacturing and construc-
tion point to underlying strength.
The government said Friday that
manufacturers, construction firms and


mining and drilling companies added
a strong 76,000 jobs combined.
"You rarely see expansions in these
industries without the economy being
in fairly healthy shape," said Gary
Burtless, an economist at Brookings
Institution.
And more people began looking for
work in January, a sign that they were
optimistic about finding jobs. Many of
these people found work, thereby re-
ducing the unemployment rate to 6.6
percent from 6.7 percent in December
That's the lowest rate since October
2008.
"The underlying trend in employ-
ment growth is still decidedly positive,
despite the slowdown we experienced
in December and January," Diane
Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Fi-
nancial, wrote in a research note.
Investors seemed generally pleased
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
SINGAPORE -Airbus puts on
first full display of its advanced
wide-body A350 airliner a day be-
fore major int'l airshow in bid to
woo Asian buyers. The A350 is a
high-tech jet that will compete
against Boeing's 777 and 787 air-
planes. First deliveries are ex-
pected at end of this year
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases wholesale
trade inventories for December,
10 a.m. Eastern; Labor Department
releases job openings and labor
turnover survey for December,
10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Crude oil up despite
unconvincing report

The price of oil edged to above
$98 a barrel Friday after the U.S.
unemployment rate fell to 6.6.per-
cent even as U.S. payrolls rose less
than expected.
By mid-afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for March
delivery was up 41 cents at $98.25 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
On Thursday, the contract rose 46
cents, boosted by a positive report
on the U.S. labor market and
colder temperatures.
The unemployment rate fell to
its lowest point since October 2008
despite a second straight month of
weak hiring.
The Labor Department said em-
ployers added 113,000 jobs, after
adding just 75,000 in December
Job gains averaged 154,000 the
past three months, down from
201,000 in the preceding three
months.


World stocks hold
gains after jobs data

LONDON Global stock mar-
kets held onto their gains Friday
after a mixed U.S. jobs report that
raised the possibility the Federal
Reserve might delay another cut to
its stimulus program.
In Europe, Germany's DAX stock
rose 0.5 percent to close at 9,301.92
while the CAC 40 in France rose 1
percent to 4,228.18. Britain's FTSE
100 gained 0.2 percent to 6,571.68.
Earlier in Asia, Japan's bench-
mark Nikkei 225 index surged 2.2
percent to 14,462.41 and Hong
Kong's Hang Seng added 1 percent
to 21,636.85. South Korea's Kospi
climbed 0.8 percent to 1,922.50 and
Australia's S&P/ASX 200 rose
0.7 percent to 5,166.50.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


There is a


heavy cost


to keeping


poor records

EAR BRUCE: I have bought
and sold stocks since 1981.
Unfortunately, I have been
negligent in recording the number
of shares bought, dates purchased
and the price of shares. Are there
sources available to get this infor-
mation? I have sold quite a num-
ber of shares this year and will
need this information for my in-
come tax preparation.
-Jack, via email
DEAR JACK You are talking
about going back more than 30
years, and that could be a problem.
The fact that you have been negli-
gent is no excuse.
If you were buying and selling
through a broker, it's possible he
would still have this information
available. In the event that's not
the case, you know what stocks you
sold this year and you should be
able to come up with something in
your records as to what you paid
for them.
This underscores the necessity
for keeping records in today's
world. With almost everyone own-
ing a computer, there is just no ex-
cuse for not having that
information. With that having been
said, if you can't put the matter to-
gether, you or someone represent-
ing you should to go to the IRS.
Contacting the IRS and working
out some type of settlement may
not be in your favor, but that's the
penalty for your negligence.
See Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion to debut


tomorrow at precisely
10:30 a.m., Workforce
Connection will be no
more.
Long live CareerSource Cit-
rus Levy Marion, our new name
under the new, statewide uni-
fied CareerSource Florida
brand.
Let me state at the outset:
there are clear benefits and ef-
ficiencies in this.But the pass-
ing of an era does not come
without mixed feelings. After all,
we have been around as an en-
tity doing what we do -
connecting talent and employers
to develop a strong workforce -
for nearly 20 years and we have
been known locally as Workforce
Connection for more than a
decade. So for us, and for those
we serve in Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties, the Workforce
Connection name worked.
But so did FloridaWorks for
the folks in Alachua and Brad-
ford counties, and WorkSource





SPIRIT
Continued from Pi

Spirit's business model. Those bo
through third-party sites often do:
learn of the extra charges until th
arrive at the airport. For instance
sengers who fail to pay in advance
large carry-on bags are dinged $1
the gate.
Baldanza recognizes that Spirit
needs to be "a little friendlier, me
ing that more and more of our cus
tomers actually understand the
model." He's making a big push ti
year to better align expectations
reality
As he buys up cities on the boai
game, Baldanza's reasoning becoi
clearer: If passengers see the fees
potential enhancements rather th
punitive charges, they might be w
to buy more.
Earlier in the day, I visited Spir
headquarters which incidental
sits next to a collection agency in
ramar, Fla. office park. While the:
spied a framed copy of a profile I
of Baldanza three years ago with
headline: "Meet America's king o
line fees." The word "fees" is cov
up with a piece of paper saying "o
tions." During a pause in the gam
ask him about the change.
"We're not adding more fees an
more," Baldanza says. "We're sell
people more things that they newv
would have considered part ofthe
base ticket."
That means hotels and car rent
for now and maybe scuba diving t


over in Jacksonville
for Business Excell
tona Beach, Workfo
Tallahassee and Wo
liance in Palm Beac
You get the idea. Th
clature for each of]
different workforce
ment regions was a:
and diverse as the i
serve. On the one h
made perfect sense
boards are led by lo
men and women an
ficials who underst,


responsive to,the needs specific
to our own communities.
On the other hand, well, it
Laura can seem a bit fragmented
when the system is viewed as a
Byrnies whole. Consider that Workforce
Connection is one of nearly
600 workforce investment
WORKFORCE boards throughout all 50 states,
CONNECTION Puerto Rico and U.S. Territo-
ries, and in Florida, workforce
policy is vested with Workforce
Florida, Inc., then factor in the
e and Center 24 regions and our 100-plus
ence in Day- one-stop career centers.
rce Plus in Yet at heart, we are all driven
)rkforce Al- to connect employers with qual-
ch County ified, skilled talent from
.e nomen- entry-level to professional -
Florida's 24 and Floridians with employ-
* develop- ment and career development
s unique opportunities in order to help
regions we bring about economic prosper-
and, this ity
, our And that's what the new uni-
)cal business fied brand is all about. It is de-
id elected of- signed to improve customer
and, and are awareness and use of the


Cirque du Soleil tickets or ski pack-
ages in the future.
Baldanza also plans to change the
structure of some existing fees, in-
creasing or decreasing the price of
checking a bag or picking a seat based
on demand.
"The idea that a bag is more expen-
sive at Christmas than it is in Septem-
ber hasn't really been broached yet,"
Baldanza says.
Baldanza's ultimate dream- if the
government would let him would be
to create two components of a ticket:
the price of fuel and everything else.
Passengers would pay more or less,
depending on the cost of fuel the day
they fly
"It just takes out a huge risk," he
says. "I don't know that we'll ever get
there, but the idea of being able to
make fuel a true pass-through would
be revolutionary for the industry"
We take a break from the game for
dinner Baldanza has set out barbeque
beef and chicken, corn muffins, potato
salad, baked beans and mac and
cheese the type of food fliers can
only dream of.
Other airlines are trying to win over
passengers by adding individual TVs,
power outlets, larger overhead bins
and Wi-Fi. The battle is even fiercer in
the premium cabins of flights between
New York and Los Angeles and San
Francisco. There, airlines are adding
lie-flat beds previously only seen on
international routes.
Baldanza thinks it's all foolhardy
'At the end, when everybody has the
lie-flat seats, all they did was raise
their costs for the same traffic base,"
he says. "The allure of a temporary


system's services and re-
sources, regardless of where
that customer may be. We think
that's a good thing. At the same
time, we will remain nimble in
order to meet local needs as ef-
fectively as possible, whether
those are needs for specific
training, financial incentives to
offset the costs of hiring, candi-
date assessments, support for
economic development and ed-
ucation partners, investment in
students pursuing STEM and
high-demand careers, help
finding jobs for college gradu-
ates who want to return to
Citrus County and help for
employers who want to find
college-degreed candidates.
We're launching the new
brand tomorrow not with any
ticker tape parade or major
hoopla, but by doing our jobs.
The "open house" at our new
career center in Lecanto is an
opportunity for you to find out
what we're all about and to let


share gain ends up costing the indus-
try"
This from a guy who sells ads for
timeshares and casinos on overhead
bins.
Baldanza refilled our iced tea and
diet sodas and noted nobody had
touched the wine in a box I brought. It
seemed like the perfect gift for a CEO
who sells wine in a can on flights;
though he apparently doesn't like the
taste.
"It's too sweet," Baldanza says. But
there is a market for it: "People who
buy wine spritzers."
More than two hours into the game, I
start to get the hang of it. Unfortu-
nately, Baldanza snags a few more
cities and wins. Nobody is surprised.
As I help him clean up, we discuss
the future of his airline. Spirit cur-
rently has 54 planes and plans to ex-
pand to 143 within seven years. Latin
America helped drive Spirit's growth
but Baldanza sees its importance de-
creasing.
"The domestic market has more
fruit on the tree right now," he says.
For Baldanza, staying one step
ahead of his passengers is also a game.
The airline is always trying to squeeze
extra cash out of fliers, but Baldanza
knows passengers have their own
tricks to hold onto their cash.
He's been watching passengers
avoid paying pet carrying fees by
claiming under the Americans with
Disabilities Act that they are comfort
animals.
"We're waiting for someone to claim
another human being as a comfort ani-
mal," Baldanza half jokes. "Someone's
going to do it at some point."


us help meet your employment
needs.
In the afternoon, we're ex-
cited that the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will per-
form a formal ribbon-cutting
ceremony at our Lecanto office
because that underscores the
partnership we continue to
have with the business commu-
nity The bottom line is,
whether we're known as Work-
force Connection or Career-
Source Citrus Levy Marion, our
focus is on providing employ-
ment solutions that work for you.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a
Florida Certified Workforce
Professional and communica-
tions manager for Career-
Source Citrus Levy Marion
which is part of the Career-
Source Florida workforce sys-
tem. You may reach her at
lbyrnes@careersourceclm. com
or by calling 352-291-9559 or
352-873-7839, ext. 1234.


RATE
Continued from Page Dl

by the figures. The Dow Jones indus-
trial average rose 78 points early in the
day, before paring its gains by late
morning.
Cold weather likely held back hiring
in December, economists said, but the
impact faded in January Construction
firms, which sometimes stop work in
bad weather, added 48,000 jobs last
month.
Over the past month, signs of eco-
nomic weakness in the United States
and overseas have sent stock prices
sinking. Upheaval in developing coun-
tries has further spooked investors.
The anxiety marks a reversal from
just a few weeks ago, when most ana-
lysts were increasingly hopeful about
the global economy
The U.S. economy grew at a sturdy
3.7 percent annual pace in the second
half of last year The Dow finished 2013
at a record high.
Europe's economy was slowly emerg-
ing from a long recession. Japan was fi-
nally perking up after two decades of
stagnation.
But then the government reported a
dismal hiring report for December:
Employers added just 75,000 jobs. And
on Monday an industry survey found
that manufacturing grew far more
slowly in January than in December. A
measure of new orders in the report
reached its lowest level in a year That
report contributed to a dizzying 326-
point plunge in the Dow


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I


I


INNCOME AXDIE-E..^OR


D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


BUSINESS










D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information
on events, visit Citrus
CountyChamber. corn/
events/, CitrusCounty
Chamber.corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
Feb. 10 Ribbon-cutting
for Workforce Connec-
tion (Career Source), at
4:30 p.m., 683
S. Adolph Point,
Lecanto.
Feb. 13 Ribbon-cutting
for Precious Paws Res-
cue, Inc., at 4:30 p.m.,
Crystal River Mall,
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
Feb. 20 Business
After Hours hosted by
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 5 p.m. to
7 p.m., 2628 W. Wood-
view Lane, Lecanto.
Feb. 25 Ribbon-cutting
for new Chamber Office,
4:30 p.m. and a Cham-
ber Night in Inverness.
More details to come.
Feb. 26 Ribbon-cutting
for Krista A Cleaning
Lady, 4:30 p.m., Crystal
River Chamber Office.
Feb. 28 Pre-Event
Party Berries, Brew and
BBQ, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.,
Floral City Library Com-
plex, 8360 E. Orange
Ave., Floral City, FL
34436 hosted by the
Floral City Merchants
Association. Presenting
sponsor is Insurance
Resources and Risk
Management, Inc.
March 1 and 2 27th
annual Floral City
Strawberry Festival.
March 5 Ribbon-cutting
for O'Reilly Auto Parts,
4:30 p.m., 1104 N.E.
Fifth Street, Crystal
River, FL 34429.
March 13 Business
After Hours hosted by
the Mullet Hole Tavern,
5 to 7 p.m.
March 14-Chamber
Luncheon sponsored by
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church and School
at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Citrus
County Commissioner
John "JJ" Kenney will
provide an update on
the County and his
Chairman's agenda.
March 19 and 20 -
Legislative Days: Citrus
County is headed to Tal-
lahassee to talk with
state leaders about key
commerce issues.


Member
events
Feb. 14 In honor of
the role cardiac rehabili-
tation plays in reducing
the potentially devastat-
ing effects of heart dis-
ease, the hospital is
hosting a Valentine's
Day Open House & So-
cial for program gradu-
ates and their families,
health care profession-
als, and individuals in-
terested in learning
more about the benefits
of cardiac rehabilita-
tion. The event takes
place Friday, February
14, 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.
in the Cardiac Rehabili-
tation center, 11541 W.
Emerald Oaks Dr., Crys-
tal River. Call
352.228.4940 if you
would like to attend.
March 26 Crystal
River Sail & Power
Squadron Fundraiser to
benefit boating educa-
tion and safety, 11:30
a.m. doors open and
play begins at 1 p.m.
Tickets $12 and call
Jennie 352-382-0808 to
purchase, for informa-
tion call Linda at 352-
382-1758.


Berry special


Floral City Strawberry festival builds

youth confidence with pageant

F or more than 14 years, Mary-Ann Virgilio has volunteered at the Floral City
Strawberry Festival to host and help organize the Strawberry Princess Pageani
The two pageants Little Miss Strawberry (ages 4-6) and Miss Strawberry
(ages 7-12) are designed to bolster self-esteem and encourage children to di"
cuss their interests, such as books and hobbies. Mary-Ann is a local business leader amn
worked for 20 years in the fashion industry in New York City before coming to Citrus
County. Mary-Ann says, "There may only be one Miss Strawberry Princess and one Lit-
tle Miss Strawberry Princess selected, but in my opinion, all young girls who participate
in this event are considered princesses and winners."


Pageant details
Little Miss Strawberry Princess
(ages 4-6) starts at 9 a.m.
Check-in with pageant officials
by 8:30 a.m.
Miss Strawberry Princess (ages
7-12) starts at 10 a.m. Check-in
with pageant officials by 9:30 a.m.
Where: Floral Park, 9530 S. Park-
side Ave., Floral City, FL 34436
Parking: Available at Citrus
County Fairgrounds, 3600 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
Pageant Registration Fee: $5
(payable at the event)


The pageant is Saturday, March 1. Applications will be ac-
cepted until Feb. 21, 2014. All participants will receive
certificate of participation.
Important information
Admission to the Floral City Strawberry Festival: $3 for
all adults; children 12 and under are free. Pageant Par-
ticipants must be residents of Citrus County and submi
the application and picture by the deadline to partici-
pate. Participants will be judged on poise, responses an
overall appearance. Participants should dress in their
"Sunday best," in age-appropriate attire. Participants ai
strongly encouraged to wear clothing with a strawberry
theme or color.


PAGEANT APPLICATION


FIRSTAND LAST NAME


BIRTH DATE

PARENT NAME


Submit completed application and picture to:
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River, FL 34428


LITTLE MISS
El STRAWBERRY PRINCESS

PARENT EMAIL


MISS STRAWBERRY
F- PRINCESS


FAVORITE BOOK

FAVORITE TELEVISION SHOW

HOBBY OR SPECIAL INTEREST

FAVORITE FOOD

SCHOOL

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE WHEN YOU GROW UP?

PET? WHAT KIND?


Citrus County Joyful Housekeeping
Speedway by Cheryl Howard
36oo00 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL 34450 healthyfitnessjourney@gmail.com
citruscountyspeedway.com o 352-726-9339 352-256-0430


: Chamber ambassadors Bill
Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Dennis
Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Jennifer Duca,
Comfort Keepers; Janet Mayo, associate
member; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union;
Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; and Mary Pericht,
Cadence Bank, along with Chamber CEO/
President Josh Wooten and Chamber Board
Immediate Past Chair John Murphy, welcome
Gary Laplant, the promoter of the Citrus
County Speedway.


f^li mm Ft j^



: Chamber ambassadors Betty
Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers; Nicholle
Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Kelley Paul, Wollinka
Wikle Title Insurance; Bill Hudson, Land Title
of Citrus County; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay
Cosmetics; Janet Mayo, associate member;
Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; and Dennis
Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control, welcome Cheryl
Howard and Tom Davis.


Rocky Hensley
named VP of
Brannen Bank
Matt Brannen, president of Bran-
WA nen Bank, announced that Rocky
Hensley will join Brannen Bank
as vice president. Hensley brings
39 years of experience, all here in
the Citrus County market.
Henlsey will be located at the In-
verness branch, located at 320 S.
U.S. 41, Inverness.

Plantation now
home to IGFA
weigh station
The Plantation on Crystal River is
now home to the only official In-
ternational Game Fish Associa-
tion (IGFA) weigh station for
more than 400 miles to the north
or south on Florida's West Coast.
Good for far more than bragging
rights, the weigh station gives
local anglers and guests a chance
to have their catch considered for
one of IGFA's nearly 7,000 world
records. Located at the resort's
Plantation Adventure Center, the
weigh station has made arrange-
ments to weigh fish up to 2,000
pounds. The Adventure Center
s- will also have all the documents
necessary to submit a catch for a
world record, and with the knowl-
edge of all the rules and regula-
e tions, will assist in completing
them so that they have the best
chance of being considered. For
S more information about Planta-
tion on Crystal River or the Ad-
venture Center, visit
PlantationonCrystalRiver.com or
call 800-632-6262. To locate
other official IGFA weigh stations
S around the world, visit the inter-
active map on IGFA.org.
d

re Help Meals
on Wheels by
playing a round
Are you aware that there are sen-
iors living alone and going hungry
right here in our community?
That's right, in your neighbor-
hood. During the month of
March, your local Meals On
Wheels is going the extra mile to
raise money and awareness to
fight senior hunger. We hope
you'll help support our cause by
sponsoring or participating in our
"Golf for Meals" Tournament on
Saturday, March 29 at Seven
Rivers Golf & Country Club. Even
if you don't golf, you can show
your support by sponsoring a
hole, providing items for gift bags
or by donating prizes that can be
given away or raffled off for addi-
tional funds. To become a corpo-
rate sponsor, please call
352-527-5980.




LifeSouth Community
Blood Center
2629 E. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Ste.A7, Inverness,
FL 34453 lifesouth.org o 352-344-5332


I P LEAS E
LOOD
: Chamber ambassadors Mary
Pericht, Cadence Bank; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin
Pest Control; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union;
Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; and Sarah Fitts,
First International Title, welcome LifeSouth
District Community Development Coordiantor
Tom Davis.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.









Race to enroll young and healthy for new insurance

JULIE PACE "
Associated PressS---


WASHINGTON "Do you guys have
health insurance?" David Bransfield
asks each time a group of college stu-
dents passes by
Some nod yes. A few promise to stop
back after class. Others don't bother re-
moving their headphones.
Nearly every day Bransfield comes to a
satellite campus of the University of the
District of Columbia in the shadow of the
Capitol, sitting for hours behind a table in
the lobby of a classroom building.
With an Apple laptop and lots of
fliers, he's part of the army of workers
and volunteers trying to enroll young,
and probably healthy, people in health
insurance available through President
Barack Obama's law
Run largely by groups with close ties
to the White House, the recruiting effort
is based in part on lessons learned from
Obama's presidential races, which revo-
lutionized the way campaigns tracked
and targeted voters.
"On the campaign, you want to be able
to find an Obama voter and you want to
get them to vote," said Matt Saniie, who
worked on the 2012 campaign's data
team and is now analytics director at
the organization Enroll America. "In the
enrollment world, you want to find
someone who is uninsured and you
want to get them to enroll."
More than any other group, participa-
tion from among the "young invincibles"
- those ages 18 to 34 will be crucial
to the law's success.
The Kaiser Family Foundation esti-
mates that about 40 percent of those
who enroll need to be young and
healthy, to balance out the higher costs
of insuring older, sicker people.
But less than two months before the
March 31 sign-up deadline, the adminis-
tration is lagging behind its goal.
Young adults made up about one-
fourth of the 2.2 million people who en-
rolled in the exchanges through
December, the last time the administra-
tion released demographic data.
Officials announced in mid-January
that 3 million people had enrolled in in-
surance plans, but officials didn't up-
date the demographic details.
Critics of the law say young people
were most likely to be turned off by the
technical problems that marred the first
two months of online sign-ups.
They also say some young people will
opt to pay the penalty for not enrolling
- $95, or 1 percent of income,
whichever is higher rather than pay
more for coverage.
A December Gallup poll found that 26
percent of uninsured people under the
age of 30 intended to pay the fine rather
than enroll.
White House officials have minimized
the slow enrollment by young people,
saying they always expected those in
their 20s and 30s to enroll toward the
end of the six-month sign-up period.






MONEY
hav
Continued from Page Dl tr
For
DEAR BRUCE: My husband and bat
I are 72 and 74 years old, with all If y
assets in both of our names. This tha
includes property, vehicles and bat
bank accounts. Each of our wills in r
leaves everything to the remaining to bs
spouse. None of these assets whE
amounts to a large amount of E
money out
Upon the death of one of us, does anc
that individual will need to be pro- con
bated, or can a will just be filed to
be on record and the remaining E
spouse will then have the deceased hav
person's name removed from the tak
assets? We live in Florida. This ass
seems like a simple question to me, prize
but nothing I read addresses it tim
Shirley, via email thil
DEAR SHIRLEY: If everything for
comes down as described, there is IIR
very likely no reason to probate the you
will. You will file it to be on record, tha
Everything else you mentioned can suc
have the deceased person's name to t
removed or the account can be the
closed altogether and distributed to E
the survivor wit
In the event that you accumu- cen
lated some other assets after the 199
will was drafted that are not ad- cei'
dressed, it may very well be that sun
the will must be probated. That is a a rn
relatively simple process, enc


Associated Press
David Bransfield, a state outreach coordinator for Young Invincibles, a group which supports President Barack Obama's health
care law, talks with student Philippe Komongnan, 27, who is in the process of signing up for health care, at the University of
the District of Columbia in Washington. An army of workers and volunteers has fanned out around the country trying to enroll
young and healthy people in health insurance now available through Obama's signature law.


Spokesman Jay Carney said young
people are more likely to be deadline-
driven and "late to the party when it
comes to signing up."
Megan Chapman is among the hold-
outs.
The 23-year-old college student from
High Point, N.C., has been without
health insurance for several years.
She's been thinking about signing up
through the new federal marketplace
but said she's heard conflicting informa-
tion about the costs, prompting her to do
more research.
"It just depends on the price and how
much financial aid I can get," said
Chapman, her laptop and spiral note-
book spread out before her as she
worked in the Guilford Technical Com-
munity College cafeteria in Jamestown,
N.C. "I'm unemployed. I can't pay a
whole lot of money So that will defi-
nitely be a major factor"
As Chapman studied, a volunteer
from Enroll America was going from
table to table in the cafeteria, encourag-
ing uninsured students to sign up.
The volunteer, retired dentist Ben-
jamin Williams, 75, didn't persuade
Chapman to enroll, but he did get her to
sign a card setting her up for a follow-up
phone call to answer her health care





lany scare tactics have been amount
d to discourage people from me dete
ring a will rather than using a these re
st. I don't agree, in most cases, vestor, r
* most of us, having a will pro- achieve
ed is a relatively simple process.
ou own real property, it may be DEAt
t the will would have to be pro- stand y(
ed, and if you won real property suggest
nore than one state, it will have percent
be probated in each of the states the pen;
ere you own real estate, n't detei
DEAR BRUCE: Can I take money results.
of a Roth account to pay bills you are
d still get a tax deduction for percent
tributions to a traditional IRA? reasons
B.A., via email a modes
DEAR BA The fact that you ketplac
'e a Roth account and want to Will y
e money out, which you can do, Most lik
uming that you are at the appro- last yea:
ate age and meet investment most 13
e constraints, doesn't have any- year
ng to do with the tax deduction One tl
contributions to the traditional you pas
. They are totally separate. But pension
Must meet all requirements gone. If
t the Roth account imposes, vest it y
h as time opened, etc., in order princip;
ake money out of it, otherwise This ma
re will be some penalties, one, bul
DEAR BRUCE: I do not agree some cc
th your representation of a 6 per-
it to 8 percent return. I retired in Send
2 and was given an option to re- @bruce
ve a pension monthly or a lump- general
a payment. It was suggested that in future
turn of 7 percent would be volume
)ugh to equal the pension cannot


questions.
With Chapman's personal information
now in Enroll America's system, volun-
teers will almost certainly keep tabs on
her enrollment status through March 31,
mirroring the way the Obama campaign
tracked likely Democratic voters.
Unlike the political campaign, in
which staffers relied on voting records
to track possible supporters, there's no
ready-made list of the uninsured. So
outside groups are compiling their own
databases through contacts their volun-
teers make while they're promoting the
health law at colleges, bars, church
youth group events, and even laundro-
mats.
Marlon Marshall, another veteran of
Obama's presidential campaigns, now
oversees health care outreach efforts
for the White House. He said the strat-
egy for signing up young people it to
"meet them where they're at"
The approach worked for Philippe
Komongnan, 27, a student at the Univer-
sity of the District of Columbia.
Komongnan thought he had health in-
surance, but when a bad ear infection
brought him to the emergency room last
year, he was told he no longer had cov-
erage. Because his school requires stu-
dents to have insurance, he had to sign


. I could not for the life of
ermine how I could attain
*sults. I am not a trained in-
ior could I hire someone to
these results.
Reader, via email
I READER: I can under-
our concern. You say it was
ed that earning a return of 7
. would be enough to equal
sion amount, but you could-
rmine how to attain these
Even though, as you say,
not a trained investor, 6
. to 8 percent is not an un-
ible return if you are taking
st amount of risk in the mar-
e.
ou make that every year?
:ely not. On the other hand,
r my broker returned al-
percent It was a very good

thing to consider is that if
s away, the money left in a
n fund is in all likelihood
you take the money and in-
ourself, when you pass, the
al could be left to an heir
ay not be important to every-
t I think it's certainly worth
)nsideration.

questions to bruce
'williams.com. Questions of
Interest will be answered
re columns. Owing to the
of mail, personal replies
be provided.


Cargill adds 'textured beef wording to labels


Associated Press

LINCOLN, Neb. -Cargill, one
of the nation's largest meatpack-
ers, has added wording to its labels
on ground beef packages that indi-
cates whether the meat inside in-
cludes a product that's been called
"pink slime."
Since Jan. 20, all of Cargill's
U.S.-produced, fresh, 100 percent
ground-beef products that contain
what it calls "finely textured beef"
will say so on a label, whether sold
in bulk or in chubs directly to con-
sumers, the company announced
this week. Cargill had said in No-


vember that it would add the label-
ing, the Lincoln Journal Star said.
Cargill also said it has developed
a website to answer questions
about finely textured beef
Another company that makes the
textured beef product Dakota
Dunes, S.D.-based Beef Products
Inc., sued ABC News in September
2012 after the organization aired a
story that used the phrase "pink
slime." The company said the story
mentioned only Beef Products Inc.
and its product and misled con-
sumers into believing the product
is unhealthy and unsafe.
The company said it had to close


plants in Texas, Kansas and Iowa.
It kept open a Nebraska plant that
is still running at reduced capacity,
but Beef Products spokesman Je-
remy Jacobsen told The Associated
Press on Friday that the other
plants remained closed.
An ABC attorney has said the net-
work in each of its broadcasts stated
that the U.S. Food and DrugAdmin-
istration deemed the product safe to
eat and that the coverage never sug-
gested the product was unsafe.
Beef Products is seeking $1.2 bil-
lion in damages from ABC, ABC
staffers, and scientists who criti-
cized the product


up for coverage through the college that
costs nearly $700 per semester
Then Komongnan started noticing a
health care display in the lobby of his
classroom building, the one where
Bransfield works most days. After a cou-
ple of conversations, Bransfield plugged
Komongnan's information into Washing-
ton's health care website and discov-
ered that he qualified for Medicaid,
which has been expanded under the
new law
While Komongnan's costs will drop
dramatically, he doesn't count toward
the pool of young and healthy people
the White House is courting because
he's getting coverage through Medicaid,
not the new private marketplace.
Bransfield, who works for the aptly
named organization Young Invincibles,
said signing up young people takes pa-
tience, given that most are buying insur-
ance on their own for the first time. The
process can sometimes take weeks, he
said, as people collect the information
they need to enroll or weigh the options
available to them.
But the deadline has increased the
pressure on Bransfield to get the stu-
dents through the system faster
"We're trying to make sure it feels
urgent," he said.


BUSINESS DIGEST


Rocky Hensley named vice

president at Brannen Bank

Rocky Hensley has been named vice president
of Brannen Bank. A fourth-generation Floridian
and lifelong resident of Inverness, Hensley brings
39 years of experience of working in Citrus
County to the position. He has served as past
president and current board member of the Ro-
tary Club of Inverness, as well as a Paul Harris
Fellow Additionally, Hensley is past president
and current member of the Kiwanis Club of In-
verness, past president of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce and is treasurer of United
Way of Citrus County
Hensley can be contacted at 726-1221 or
hhensley@brannenbanks. com.
Brannen Bank has remained a family-owned
and family-operated bank since 1926.
For the Chronicle





Pa. vendor was possible

backdoor to Target data

Associated Press

NEW YORK-The hackers who stole millions
of debit and credit card numbers from Target's
computer systems may have gained access by first
infiltrating the network of a western Pennsylva-
nia heating and refrigeration contractor
Fazio Mechanical Services Inc., of Sharpsburg,
Pa., issued the statement late Thursday saying it
was the victim of a "sophisticated cyberattack op-
eration."
The statement came days after Internet secu-
rity bloggers identified it as the third-party ven-
dor through which hackers accessed Target's
computer systems.
Target has said it believes hackers initially
gained access to its vast computer network
through one of its vendors. Once inside, the hack-
ers moved through the retailer's network and
eventually installed malicious software into the
company's point-of-sale system.
The series of hacks, experts believe, gave
thieves access about 40 million debit and credit
card numbers and the personal information, in-
cluding names, email addresses, phone numbers
and home addresses of as many as 70 million cus-
tomers. Target has said the data was pilfered dur-
ing the busy holiday shopping season.


D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE DECLASSIFIED


I Chronicle I


To place an ad, call 563-5966


IT-


Classifieds .....gc


I.a: 32)53-65 ol.re:(88 82230 1 m il*lasfid *crnil* nie Iw bst: w*crnilonie0o


Valentines


YOU'LL THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.



e
Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.





f /i 'W
)rv jei jeN.


Yowir\ world first

Need aj.ih
ir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


S, IO


Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111

YOU'LL THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.



v
Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.






e Ne v v


Buy Here/Pay Here
'98 Ford Explorer
$825 Down
'96 Ford Taurus
$675 Down
'96 Saturn
$650 Down
'03 Dodge Neon
$895 Down
'98 Chevy 1500 P/U
$2500 CASH
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
Cabinet Service
Person
Full time position.
Must be dependa-
ble, punctual, with
strong customer
relations. Duties to
include: door and
drawer adjustments,
touch-ups, replace
ments, hardware in-
stallation, some
molding work, and
cabinet installation
help. Vehicle and
tool allowance pro-
vided. Send
resume to:
nancy@cltrushIllls.
com or complete an
application @
Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando.
a, Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(352) 949-2292
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500


*_ Running or Not *
^*^^^^^^^^^^^**^W BUYING JUNK CARS
Need J? CASHPAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
#1 Employment source Is I Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
www.chronicleonline.com ike 386-266-7748
j $$WE PAY CASH$$




You've Got It!






Somebody






Wants





It!


U


FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



10 Cylinder Water
Bed, Mattress
and cover,
no box spring
Excel. condition
(352) 489-8612
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or mulch. U load and
haul 352-628-9624
Found in Citrus springs
Area, Young Male,
Bullseye Tabby Cat
very friendly, will give
free to good home
(352) 489-9640



Very sm female kitten
about 12 weeks old
Tiger striped blk/grey.
Black lips. Lost 2/6 in
Pendent Pt/Floral City.
(352) 419-7050
352-410-1779


-Ei


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.OOlb,
0, Grouper @ $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001



4 Choice Cemetery
Lots at Fero Memorial
Selling Separately or
together 352-746-5019


P/T Office Help
SSMW (352) 322-8867



Exp. Hair Stylist
Apply within:
Nu-Yu Beauty Salon
Beverly Hills Plaza
Hair Stylist
Clientele preferred,
not necessary. Salon
Bev Hills 352-527-9933









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




Are YOU:
A LPN or RN
Exp Med Assist.
Or Exp Med Biller
MGMT exp? GREAT!
Send resume to
resumek
@rocketmail.com

C.N.A's
Crystal River Health
& Rehab is seeking
C.N.A's with active
licenses in good
standing to host
activities in our
secured dementia
unit. Duties to
include leading
activities and devel-
oping and planning
activities calendar
for our dementia
unit. 2 Positions
available. If you
think you have what
it takes contact
Julie Schneider RN,
D.O.N. 352-795-5044

CNAs
Expanding our Nsg.
Services 7am-3 pm
Excellent Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer, M/F/V/D


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com

F/T, HYGIENTIST
For Busy Dunnellon
Dental Practice
Email Resume to:
jandJ95@aol.com

*SEVEN Rj%'LRS
Join Our Team
SRN Med/Surg-Tele
SRN Cath Lab Mngr.
SRN Women & Fam.
SRN Resource Mgnt.
SRN Surgery
SRN Cath Lab.
SLic. Social Worker
SLab Supervisor
SMed Tech II
SPhlebotomist
SPCA
APPLY at Our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River Fl.
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace

Medical Office:
StateCertified/
Licensed individual
for busy practice.
Professional &
computer proficient.
Fax resume to:
352-746-5605

Physician,
Family Practice,
Inverness, FL:
Provide/Manage
direct patient care
including, physical
exams, evaluations,
test results, assess-
ments, diagnoses,
treatment for speci-
fied patient popula-
tion (including, but
not limited to pedi-
atric and geriatric
care). Order diag-
nostic testing, pre-
scribe pharmaceuti-
cals, medications,
treatment regimens
as appropriate.
Refer patients to
specialists; Direct/
coordinate patient
care, nursing,
support as required.
Reply to: Bikkasani,
Ram, Hellstern,
Chandrupatia MD,
PA, 105 N Osceola
Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450


HIRING: PT/A,
OT/A, RN/LPN
Florida Homecare
Specialists
(352) 794-6097

Nurses, RNs/LPNs
Crystal River Health
and Rehab
is seeking part time
Nurses, RNs/LPNs
to join our team.
Hours could turn into
a full time slot.
If interested in what
a home like, team
approach to nursing
looks like. Contact
Julie Schneider RN,
D.O.N. for a tour and
information of what
we have to offer.
352-795-5044

RN'S & LPN'S
Needed ASAP
Hospitals in Citrus &
Hernando Counties
Med Surg and ICU
Units.
Please call Staff
America -
352-432-0080

SURGICAL
ASSISTANT
EFFICIENT &
DETAIL ORIENTED?
Progressive Oral
Surgery Practice
looking to add F/T
experienced Surgical
Asst. Benefits incl.
health insurance &
retirement pension
Mail resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks Dr. Crystal
River, FL. 34429

THE CENTERS
(Citrus Ofc)
Residential Sub-
stance Abuse Tech
(Full-time & Pool)
Assists in providing
quality client care in
reducing the effects
of substance abuse.
Residential
Substance
Abuse/Assisted
Dally Living Educator
(Full-time)
Provides educa-
tional activities on
daily living skills
focusing on meal
planning, purchas-
ing & preparation
where recovery
aspects are incor-
porated in all
aspects of the
process.
EOE/DFWP;
Full benefits pkg;
Tel 352-291-5555;
Send resume to:
Lobs@thecenters.us
or walk In
Visit
www.thecenters.us
for more Info.


WE ARE
GROWING
COME JOIN OUR
TEAM!
Home Health
Positions Available
-* Clinical
Manager

QI Nurse

Weekend
On-Call RN

-* Nursing-RN,
Psych

MSW
SCONPIEiSIVE
V NoH. Cu(
For more
information contact
Mikesha at:
352-861-8806 or
352-688-4020 or
email resume to:
mbeam@cwshome
health.com




NET Developer
With C # and .NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
components and
features for our
Industrial SCADA
and HMI software
products.
Other desirable
experience -
Web Services,
ASP.NET, HTML5,
Javascript, XMLSVG
Other domain
expertise -
SCADA, HMI, MES
EAM OR CMMS
3 yrs exp. preferred.
Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

ACCOUNTING
ANALYST
The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Is now accepting
applications. For
more Information
and to apply visit our
webslte
www.sherlffcltrus.
org/career.aspx
Equal Opportunity
Employer MFDV



EXP. GRAPHIC &
MULTI-MEDIA
20 hours per week
for Local Church
Send Resume listing
familiar software to:
janmetcalf
@embarqmail.com


Survey Party
Chief
Announcement
# 14-15
This position serves
as Survey Crew
Party Chief,
performing topo-
graphic, hydro-
graphic, boundary,
route, geodetic
surveys and County/
Civil engineering
projects Performs
additional field and
office survey related
tasks as necessary.
Minimum of eight
years experience in
field of Survey Party
Chief preferred.
Starting pay
$16.16 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 14,
2014 EOE/ADA.




Utility Billing
Supervisor
Announcement
#14-16
Oversee daily tasks
performed by the
Billing Specialist and
the Meter Manage-
ment Specialist in
order to determine
monthly usage, bill
utility customers
and collect utility
revenue, including
daily read routes.
Requires Associates
degree, vocational
technical degree or
specialized training
equivalent to com-
pletion of 2 years of
college. Requires at
least 4 years of
related experience.
Starting pay
$1,292.98 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 14,
2014 EOE/ADA


.- wr


1~~.
/


HowDo






Your cy























Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print

& Online


C I T Rt U 0 U N T Y


CHRpNICLE



(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com


640980B


C//
^/- ,:"


il ()NIL(;I.E 'CHkNECLO




(352) 563-5966 1 -.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 D5


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


FreeSeri c


, -/ "" .." ;


I







D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


LEGAL ASSISTANT
Busy Law Firm.
Probate experience
preferred.
Send Resume to:
Citrus County
Chronicle
Blind Box 1856P
106W. Main Street
Inverness Fl. 34450











Full Time
Advertising Sales
Representative
For the
South Marion
Citizen
Must have minimum
of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
Must be able to
maintain current
account base as
well as prospecting
for new clients. Fast
paced environment
that requires ability
to multi task with
ease. Computer
proficiency a must.
Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.
Base Salary plus
commission, full
benefits package
Email Resume to:
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
or Apply in Person
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River Fl.
Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE



Seeking Professional
Sales Person
for counter and
outside sales for
auto body paint
supply store. Exp.
Req'd. Pay based
on Exp. Email
resume to: paint.
n.etc@gmail.com


Trades/
ByoB

Exp. Dispatcher
For AC Co. Must
have knowledge of
multi county area.
Computer exp., be
reliable & depend-
able. Experience
only need apply
or Email: aairinc
@centurylink.net

Experienced
Stucco Laborers
& Plasterers
352-621-1283

Heavy Mach.
Mechanic
DAB Constructors
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
(352) 447-5488

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

Plumber
& Plumbers
Helper
Very busy plumbing
company searching
for plumbers that are
hard working, reliable
and motivated.Valid
drivers license. Serv-
ing all of Central Flor-
ida. 352-341-4243

ROOFING CREW
experienced only
Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
APVPly In Person
AAA ROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411

Tanker Drivers:

Up to $5,000 Sign-On
Bonus! Upto51cpm
plus additional pay
for HazMat loads,
pump offs, mileage
bonuses!
1-year OTR. Call
877.882.6537
www.oaklev
transport.com


Cabinet Service
Person
Full time position.
Must be dependa-
ble, punctual, with
strong customer
relations. Duties to
include: door and
drawer adjustments,
touch-ups, re-
placements, hard-
ware installation,
some molding work,
and cabinet instal-
lation help. Vehicle
and tool allowance
provided. Send
resume to:
nancy@citrushills.
corn or complete an
application @
Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando.

CUSTODIAN
Needed, Honest,
dependable person
with custodial
experience and
references. Full time,
competitive salary,
and some benefits.
Reply to: Citrus
County Chronicle,
Blind Box 1855
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd
Crystal Riv. Fl 34429

Maintenance
Assistant
Must have exp.
In plant & Equip.
Apply @ 611 Turner
Camp Rd, Inverness
Email Resume:
ATHRC@
SouthernLTC.com
Fax Resume:
352-637-1921
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

P/T Classroom
Facilitator
For Sexual Risk
Avoidance Program
experience with
youth & excellent
public speaking skills
required.
Email Resume to:
kari@
riverproject.info

P/T MECHANIC
Exp in light duty auto
rprs. Must have Dr.
Lic & tools.. Call
Barb or John
352-563-2003


BI
PT Sales/Setup
Person
weekends, set/up
breakdown/driver
sales experience
(352) 228-3258

Retail Manager
wanted for resale
clothing store for
teens & young
adults. Experience
working in junior
brand stores a plus.
Applyv in Person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL.
Key Training Center
*EOE*

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only
Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
(352) 628-0254


Pail-time


Looking for
a mature, well
groomed individual
needing part time
work. After training,
will have a two day
work week with
some after hours
work. Interview by
appointment.
Chas E. Davis
Funeral Home
(352) 726-8323

P/T Secretary
Experience required
Email Resume and
3 References to:
theresa@lumc.org





AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
877-741-9260
www.FixJets.com


CLASSIFIED




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
877-741-9260
www.FixJets.com



MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547












MASSAGE
THERAPY
Classes Start,
April 28, 2014
Spring Hill
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY
Lg well maint.& profit-
able coined laundry
for sale. Qualifed buy
eran-ly-352-270-0943






ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


1 1J."I1


130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
SWe custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com





Your World








CHRONICLE


StMoraeSHDI Rf*eao~*I

we accept Visa/MC white, double door
**352-634-3935"* with ice/water in
door, 4 mo. old with
4 yr. warr. $800 obo
Coll ectible Cell (541) 973-5030
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
70 Bradford REPAIR. Also Wanted
Collectible Plates Dead or Alive Washers
Norman Rockwell, & Dryers. FREE PICK
Sandra Kuck, etc. UP! 352-564-8179
$1000. obo
(352) 746-7129 Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
PORCELAIN BRIDE $100 ea
DOLLS Danbury Mint Call Homosassa
Brides ofAmerica -12 78 -
doll collection. $20 each (678) 617-5560
or $200 for all Call or 352-628-3258
(352)302-1084 WASHER OR DRYER
S$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
RjaloJ u bs lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
4 Person Hot Tub up. 352-263-7398


Like New
$1,000.
(352) 795-9651
HYDRO HOT TUB
5 per,15jets, padded
cover, Ex Cond. No
chemicals require
$1200 obo
(352) 726-2038


L I _I
V.u ", ihl lust.


CHK RpNICII
Classifieds



AMANA UPRIGHT
Deep Freeze, 15.2
cu.ft. 60.5x30x28.3 adj.
temp control, free
frost, 3 shelf, high effi-
ciency compressor,
$275. (352) 400-8746
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE Dishwasher
pot scrubber
white, exc cond
$100
734-355-2325
352-503-9825
GE Electric Range
Self Cleaning, $150
GE Over Range Micro-
wave $75 Both White
(734) 355-2325,
352-503-9825
GE RANGE,
Self Cleaning
almond, coil burners,
excel, cond. $125.
352-228-4837; or
352-212-6918
Magic Chef
Chest Freezer
7.2 cubic ft.
$150. obo
(352) 464-0100


4 WOOD BOXES $25
GOOD FOR
WORKSHOP/TOOLS 2
SIZES INVERNESS
419-5981
BRAKE
12 ft 6 inches
$850
(352) 795-6160
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER, HAND HELD
HEAVY DUTY METAL
$90 INVERNESS
419-5981
Walk Boards
2@ (16fteach
$650 ea; 12 ft Walk
Board $500
(352) 795-6160



2 SANSUI SP5500X
Speakers, 120 watts,
15" woofers, 1-1/4 horn
tweeters, 8 ohms, 25
mid range, freq. re-
sponse, 10 dB, 29Hz
Orig. owner, $100 ea.
(352) 400-8746
DISH TV Retailer.
Starting $19.99/
month (for 12 mos.)
Broadband Internet
starting $14.95/
month (where avail-
able.) Ask About
SAME DAY
Installation!
CALL Now!
1-800-980-6193
DVD PLAYER
Yamaha DV-C-6660, 5
DVD changer, high-end,
($15) 352-212-1596
VCR WORKS GREAT
Never use want gone
$5.00 Pine Ridge
352-270-3909


WINDOWS
NEW Double hung,
Double Pane. 2 sets of
30 by 62 french cut tem-
pered glass ; $225 ea
352-503-6537

ComIuters/i

20" HP Monitor
w/keybard, like new
$50. Kurio 10S, android
tablet, never used,
$175. (352) 513-4317
COMPUTER GAMES
most multi-pack, 1 with
500,000 games, good
shape,($20)
352-613-7493
EPSON NX330
PRINTER wifi connect.
hardly used. $25.
352-344-8212



John Deer Tractor
Loader, model #3320
Like New, 280 hrs.
4 WD, HST, Canopy
$16,000. 352-795-9339



Aluminum PATIO
TABLES & CHAIRS. 4
chairs w/cushions &
table w/umbrella. $60.
352/628-0698.
PATIO TABLE Large
oval glass top with
aluminum frame Ex-
cellent condition $45.
352-270-3909



2 MATCHING BROWN
big overstuffed chairs,
microfiber suede v/good
cond.(nonsmokers).
$100 ea.,$190 both.
860-2701.
3 PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET 3 PIECE LIV-
INGROOM SET Dual
reclining fabric sofa,
loveseat and rocker re-
cliner. Very good condi-
tion. No kids, pets or
smokers in house.
$500.00. 352-400-4924.
20x20 storage unit
filled with beautiful
wood furniture. Made
for displays in retail
setting. Eleven 8-10 ft
units; like new. If inter-
ested call Daystar Life
Ctr (352) 795-8668
4POSTER FULL SZ
BEDROOM SET 7PC
light pine, no mattress,
boxspringgreat cond.
$700. (352) 201-1219


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179

Automotive

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR 461-4518




'Affordable Mobile-
all type marine repairs
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-398-5903
All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialize in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770



PERSONAL CARE
Light house work
Respite Care. Male
CNA (352) 875-9793
Take Care of Loved
Ones in My Home
Clean, caring, exp.,
exc. ref. 352-476-7159




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **k-k
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912


Inslall a Nenfr Now's the
pnIIus.i iets. time for pool
Healers remodeling
a Sail Systeinms
I- ,, I ,I I,, h
j ~ n ,in linnn I ,in
I,h,-i
I,-u hh, ,, H
Snugarmill I .I,-.
Woods
Woods Serving All Di Cilruii Coeinl
Pool & Spa f, ,,,,, ,,i,,,,,,,,
sMWPN"osM .382-4421







IWATKINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
7Driveways
* Parking Lots
* Seal Coating

* Maintenance
* Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmail.com
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
eP RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
w Remodeling
Additions, new homes
Free est. crc1330081
(3521 949-2292
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Corn (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County
Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured





Ted's Painting

a ome Services Co.







All Types of Home Repairs

746-5190
LIC/INS Lic #240270


CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
HOUSEKEEPING, relia-
ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable, ref.
Maggie(352) 503-9621
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557

Home
Services^^


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavating &
Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442

W7


IPOLSALEAKI


DETECTION
Licensed


Electronic
Leak
Detection
for all pools
and spas
We'll find your leak
or there's
no charge!


352-433-6070

30 day guarantee on all work
BayLeakDetective@gmail.com


POOL
hi

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Any Surface,
roof cleaning, int/ext
painting, gutter cleaning,
Absolute Exterior
Restoration
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377







SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting -Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
S352-364-4610
(#MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL

24 Hours a Day -7 Days a Week


Stylists wanted! MVP
Clips is hiring lic. stylists
for a sports theme bar-
bershop. Manager and
Asst Manager positions
avail. 302-9779 or
mvp clips@yahoo.com






Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill






AAA ROOFING
Call tie "A/eakhuste."
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
IMust present coupon at time contract is signed i
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000HaZO
* S l | I | 1 1


Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Lic/Ins. Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


q I IL IIL
3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallway is Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $3 5
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon,

0 THuRA GLEAN hC
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
eveningng
I lean Dryer Vents
ffl V/dobfol & Dependable
E.,'P., since lifelong
S' 352-344-0905
S cell: 400-1722
i Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


Call Jim
(352) 382-2368
Please Leave Messge.

Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


I r e e vi:







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Antique Couch
2 seater, with 6 legs,
recently reupholstered
in neutral colors $150
352-634-4329
BAR STOOLS (2) Oak
Beige Fabric Seats
$50. Oak bar with 3
stools Very Nice older
set 352-270-3909
BR & LR Furn, Kit setTV,
Hsehold items & much
more!! (352) 522-0107
* Movina Sale**
CHAIR DARK BROWN
old wooden, great for
desk. Good condition.
$10. 352-270-3909
CHAIRS SOLID WOOD
(2)nice older dark for
home/office $10. ea
Good Condition
352-270-3909
CHEST SOLID WOOD
old 5 drawers medium
brown some scratches
good shape $50.
352-270-3909
COFFEE TABLE
WOOD DETAILED
Medium reddish brown
color ONLY $10. Info
352-270-3909
COFFEE TABLE wood
nice medium brown
color/condition $15.
obo 352-270-3909
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
352-795-0121
Complete 8pc. Rattan
Dining Room Set
excellent condition
$1200. obo
(352) 897-4681
Dining Room Table
w/ 6 chairs and
Buffet, light oak,
Exc cond$500
(352) 746-4448
END TABLE ROUND
Black wood CUTE
Good Condition
$15.00 352-270-3909
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER & DESK
Wood TV Centerpocket
doors, holds 32-36
TV.55 in. high x44 in.
wide. Beautiful cond.
$250. Desk, 3 drawers
& door,60 wide x 22
deep. exc. cond. $45.
352-489-1239
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER [BLONDE]
includes 19 in. TV.
$25 must see!
352-344-8212
Fold Away Bed
Plus Mattress $75.
(352) 527-7919
Household Items
for Sale, some Ethan
Allen pieces, lounge
chair, 3 bd. rm. side
tables, animal print
bench, chest of draw-
ers, leather chair,
teak 10 drawer cab.
2 rattan bar stools,
5 pc. rattan din. set,
3pc. fabric sofa & rug
never used 382-3346
HUTCH
Solid Oak,
$300. obo
(440) 773-1480 cell
King Sz Oak Bedroom
Set complete 7 PC. set
excellent condition
$1200.
obo (352) 897-4681
Oak Entertainment
Center,
fits up to 80 inch. TV
$300
Cell (541) 973-5030
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
Ashley Millennium Tan
leather Recliners
Excellent condition
Asking $500 for both.
352 726 7745
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Traditional, overstuffed
look. Olive green with
wood trim. Large deco-
rative pillows with both.
Excellent condition.
$450 for both. Pine
Ridge 352-746-1661
SOFA
brown neutral color,
excellent condition
$90. Ask for Mimi
(352) 795-7285

1-OQ4&
TABLE AND CHAIRS
(54") Glass top dining
table with 4 cushion
chairs 352-503-9013.
Great condition. Asking
$300. Call for photos.



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Rock, Mulch
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Chain Saw
14" electric with 2 new
chains $50;
Heavy duty electric
edger $45
(352) 794-6761
Riding Mower
2012 Troy Bilt, Auto,
42", 20 HP, $825
Gas Weed eater
Troy Bilt $65
(352) 794-6761



BLUEBERRY PLANTS
Mature Rabbiteye blue-
berry bushes (Blue
Gems and Woodards)
We'll dig them up and
put into your truck
$10.00 per bush.
(352)726-7907




CITRUS HILLS
Sat, Sun 2/8 & 2/9
9am to 3pm
Hernando
364 E. Dakota Court
CRYSTAL RIVER
Daystar Life Center
9-2 M-F
6751 W Gulf to Lake
Good used furniture
Gently used clothing


INVERNESS
ALL ITEMS MUST GO!
2/7, 2/8, 2/9 8am-4pm
Elec lift chair, green
leather couch &
loveseat, Girl Scout
items from '80's & '90's
Ping Pong Table, lots
of household goods.
6431 E Glover St



MEN'S TUXEDO
Burberry with shirt,
vest, 2 cumber bands,
studs. Size 40. $40.00
(352) 382-5883



BROTHER FAX
COPIER SCANNER
WITH MANUAL ONLY
$35.00 464 0316


3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALLPAPER
$25 PREPASTED VI-
NYL 165 SQ FT E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
15 WOOD HEART
FORMS $20 UNFIN-
ISHED READY TO
PAINT/DECORATE VA-
RIETY SIZES 419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
Antique Cast Iron
Wood Stove w/screen
good working stove
good cond. $375.
(352) 246-3500
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BABY DRESSER
white 4 drawers on one
side & little closet on left
$69.00 obo
3524226310
BIRD CAGE ON
STAND 20x20x60H. For
medium bird. $35 Lo-
cated in Floral City.
(239)404 8589
BOOKS Hard Backs -
fifty cents
Paper Backs -
twenty-five cents
(352)419-2004
BUTTERFLY LAMP
Tiffany-like, stained
glass, 2 light levels,
NICE, ($25)
352-613-7493
CHARCOAL GRILL
Perfect Flame,
large cook top,
only used once, $150
(352) 860-2956
CLOTHING RACK
Chrome on casters 4
adjustable arms Gar-
age sale/retail use $20.
352-270-3909
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DESK
SOLID DARK WOOD
w/ hutch and 7 drawers.
Great for home
office. Exc Cond
$245.00 352-249-7212
DOG SWEATER
FLA Gators blue/orange
medium, Used once
Clean/warm $8.
352-270-3909
Electric Lift Chair,
Pride L3-105,
color sandal,
3 mo. old $500.
Black Mesh Office
chair, adjustable $50.
(352) 628-4540
Free standing storage
cabinet white double
door & 2 drawers in
bottom $89.00 obo
3524226310
Guardian Walker
used one time $100.
Singer Sewing
Machine, used very
little $75.
(352) 726-6238
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464 0316
KITCHEN TABLE AND
4 CHAIRS Honey col-
ored wood, 30x60, good
condition. $50 In Floral
City. 239 404 8589
Older Shop smith
5 tools in 1, $400 obo
Craftsman 42"
Lawn Mower, Kohler
Eng. $450. obo
(352) 344-2932
PET WATER FOUN-
TAIN electric aerates
water small dogs/cats
Works Great $10.
352-270-3909
PLANTS ARTIFICIAL
Small potted tropical $2.
Potted Fern $5.
Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
Play Station 2
Lots of extras
2 controllers,
lots of games
$100.
(352) 382-4085
Rocking Chair,
Couch Bench &
Entrance Table $100
Home made Quilt
Tops 5 for $100
(352) 795-7254
ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE SOLID OAK
E-MAIL PHOTOS
$65 INVERNESS
419-5981
SUNBEAM
MIXMASTER 12 speed
w/two sets of beaters
Works Great $25.00
OBO 352.249.9164
TENT HEATER pro-
pane, American
Camper,($5)
352-212-1596
Utility Trailer.
5X14, 2' Sides. Special
Built. Good Cond. Good
Tires Well Built. $550.
(678)617-5560 or
352-513-5580



4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY 25.00 352 464
0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY 25.00
352 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316


Go Go
3 Wheel Scooter
extra basket,
fairly new battery
$700.
(352) 419-6016
Harmor
Wheelchair Lift
with swing away,
good condition
$500 obo
(352) 637-3793
POOL LIFT
Horcher, Brand new,
never used. $2500
(352) 628-0824
SHOWER BENCH
SEAT ALUMINUM &
FIBERGLASS BENCH
TO PUT IN TUB 20.00
3524640316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANEUVERABILITY.
ONLY 60.00 464 0316


Manual, with leg &
foot rest, good cond.
$100. (352) 344-4105



"NEW" FENDER
NEWTPORTERWITH
GIGBAG PERFECT
STUDENT/TRAVEL
$100 352-601-6625
GUITAR STANDS
Axeman, folding, porta-
ble, 2- ($5-each)
352-212-1596
LES PAUL COPY
FLAME TOPSET
NECK,CHERRYBURST
PLAYS GREAT! $100
352-601-6625
LES PAUL COPY
GOLDTOP,BLACK
BACK SET NECK
PLAYS GREAT! $100
352-601-6625
MICROPHONE Phonic,
low-impedance, new
never used, ($10)
352-212-1596
PIANO & SEAT
Marantz,
needs tuning,
$300 OBO
(352) 465-0339
TROMBONE, BUNDY
USA. $100 OBO.
352/628-0698
YAMAHA PSR70 ELEC-
TRONIC KEYBOARD
W/STAND. Only $100.
352/628-0698.



CURTAINS
Various sizes and
colors $15. all or
separate info call
352-270-3909
DUVET COVERS
Dark Solid Green $8.
Multi color $8. Call for
more info
352-270-3909
Liberation by
American Standard
Walk-In Bath -
Don't Struggle
Getting Out Of A
Normal Bathtub.
Stay in your home
longer, safely,
independently.
Liberation Walk-In
Baths Commended
by the Arthritis
Foundation. Best
Lifetime Warranty
in the industry.
Hydrotherapy,
Chromatherapy,
Aromatherapy no
extra cost. Installa-
tion Included! Get
$1,000 Off -Call
Toll-Free Today
1-866-583-1432.
PIE MAKER Wolfgang
Puck electric BRAND
NEW unused $35.
352-621-0175
QUEEN COMFORTER
Green, tan, cream com-
forter, pillow
shams,throw pillows.
$20 (352)419-2004
SINGER PORTABLE
Free Arm,ZigZag &
more. Just serviced.
Runs Ex. $95
Brian 352-270 9254
TABLE LAMP Large
off white base and
shade 3 way light
NICE $10.
352-270-3909



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
NordicTrack EXP1000X
TREADMILL
Works/Great Condition.
Asking $400. OBO. Call
352-257-3547 Can
Email Pictures

S orting

1990 CLUB CAR, top
& windshield, new
batteries, $1195.
1995 Yamaha 36volt
$295. (315) 466-2268
CLUB CAR
Golf cart & charger.
Windshield lights, cur-
tains good batteries
$1,400 obo
(352) 564-2756
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Golf Club bag & carts,
mens full set Wilson,
$50. Ladies custom fit,
Megaforce, $150
Golf balls too.
(352) 344-4374
LADIES TAYLORMADE
R11 IRONS
5-PW,AW,SW graphite
excellent condition
$250.00
249-7345
Men's 26" 3spd
Free Spirit Bicycle
exc. cond. $60.
Golf Bag Rack, holds 2
bags, has 3 shelves
$100. (352) 527-7919
Range Finder
Hunting/golf, LRF 400
Simmons-Bushnel
$100; Telescope w/
tripod, Bushnell
700mm never used
$50 (352) 527-4518
RECUMBENT BIKE
Sun bicycle- EZ Sport
$350.; Kayak Carriers
Thule, 2 prs $50 total
(352) 860-2956
Ted Williams Signed
Louisville Slugger Bat,
comes with certificate
of authenticity from
Ted williams Museum
$1,400. (352) 527-4146




13 ft Utility Trailer
Tandem Axle
$600.
(352) 795-9651


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


Need whole body
vibrator. For poor
Circulation
(352) 249-1190
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




HARLEY DAVIDSON
AMF GOLF CART
1970's Era, three
wheel electric, bright
blue, goes forward
and backward,
two-speed, new bat-
teries last year. $500
Call 414-550-2464




3 Dapple Dachshund
Puppies, all female
w/papers, pis call
Sylvia (727) 235-2265


ASHER
Asher, 6-y.o. Border
Collie mix, neutered,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, wt. 59
Ibs. Gentle, very
friendly, gets along
w/other dogs. Plays
fetch w/tennis balls,
doesn't care about
cats. Fee $30, found
as stray. Beautiful
markings.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682.


14-M
GEORGIA LEE
Georgia Lee, 4-y.o.
spayed Brindle/
white Bulldog/
possible hound mix,
weight 66 Ibs.
Gentle, calm, great
on leash, appears
housebrkn. Has
some hip dysplasia
which she doesn't
seem to notice.
Good family/ com-
panion dog. Adop-
tion fee $30.00.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682.


PAYTON
Payton, young
white/tan terrier mix,
weight 45 Ibs. Sits on
command, eager to
please, energetic &
friendly. Appears
housebroken. Loves
to play & loves his
human friends Best
as only dog, fenced
yard preferred.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.
PUPPY LOVE
2 Little Chihuahua's
10 weeks, male,
1 white, 1 blue, HC,
puppy pac, $200 ea.
Baby Yorkies, ready
end of February
Janet (352) 628-7852
(352) 220-4231
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827
YOUNG SPAYED FE-
MALE TORTOISE
SHELL CAT Loving, sit
in your lap and cuddle
kind of cat. One eye,
but she doesn't know
that. I can't keep her.
352-419-7730



Davit Boat Lift
up to 1200 Ibs easy
you remove, motor
listed 2 yrs. old.
pictures avail. $500.
(352) 422-6649




SATURN
2013 14' KBoat inflata-
ble, 55 Ib e-motor &
batt, bimini, auto-inflator,
dolly $500. 860-2701




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*
All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialized in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770
Bass Tracker
18', 70hp Evanrude
Motor w/trim, $2500.
(352) 795-9651
Carolina skiff
1998 boat,
motor 30hp evanrude.
trailer, lots of extras
2500.OR BEST
OFFER
352-228-1256
FISHING BOAT
2002 Lowe,1995:50 HP
Johnson Motor & trlr,
new cvr, extra's VGC
$3000 obo 527-2566
Porta-Boat 12'
w/trailer & cover $900.
Johnson Outboard
Motor 5/2hp, model
cd-20c, overhauled
$450. (419) 944-8777
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com


CLASSIFIED

Recreation
Vehicles
ALLEGRO BAY
'07, 37 DB, 25K miles
Freight Liner, Loaded
$69,995. obo
352-795-7820
ALLEGRO BUS
2011, 36ft, inches
8,900 mi, loaded w/4
slides exel. cond. ext.
warr. Asking $205,000
Retail $237,900
(828) 553-0134
CRYSLER
'12, 200S, 4 Dr 13k mi.
$18,000 Trade for
Class C Motor Home
or pull behind No Junk
726-2494, 201-7014
Sport Coach IV
Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans,1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
WINNEBAGO
'07, Journey, 36 SG,
excel, cond 300 Cum.,
Non smoke, no pets
22K mi, tow veh. incld
$ 102K, 352-598-5616



CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., 1
slide $7000 obo
(352) 628-1126
CASITA
2003 17' Freedom De-
luxe Aerodynamic, fi-
berglass travel trailer.
Loaded.
Easy to tow with small
vehicle.
Microwave, 3 way
fridge-freezer,
under-shelf
TV,CD,DVD,radio.
Roof AC Gas heater
etc.etc.
$11,000 OBO Tele-
phone 352 527-1022
e-mail
mmlesser@tampabay.rr.
com
Holiday Rambler
2008, SAVOY, 26 ft.
Travel trlr. New awning,
1 slide out, central vac.
ducted air. Emmucalate
inside & out $12,500.
352-586-1694
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, p arts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WILDERNESS
1995, 24 ft Camper
$2900.
(772) 260-4363 cell



BRIDGESTONE
LT245/75R16 M/S-E Dot
11/12 10-32nd rubber
left, V-steel rib 265,
$150 firm
(903) 487-9272
CHEVROLET
1953 Parts Car, Belair,
4 dr, No trans, no eng,
no windows $600. obo
(352) 257-3542, Cell
Transmission for Sale
out of a 2000
Silverado, V8 or V6 En-
gine, rebuilt by coast
to coast, $1,300
Sell for $850. 465-0989

Vehicles
Wanted
-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-426-4267**
Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




Buy Here/Pay Here

'98 Ford Explorer
$825 Down

'96 Ford Taurus
$675 Down

'96 Saturn
$650 Down

'03 Dodge Neon
$895 Down

'98 Chevy 1500 P/U
$2500 CASH

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


CHRYSLER
'04, Sebring, GTC,
convert., loaded only
70K, econ. V6, CD, full
pwr.garaged, perfect,
$5.650.. 352-212-4882


CHRYSLER
1999 Concorde LX, V6
2.7 LTR, Automatic, It
has all the Extras,
123,000 miles, Runs
great, Very Good Condi-
tion, $2,500
352-586-7820
CHRYSLER
2001 Sebring LX Cony.
Leather Interior, Full
power, Exc cond.
$3200
(352) 795-8986


%,, V T
09, Malibu,
4DR, LS, 35K miles,
$12,900.
726-2494, 201-7014
DODGE
2001 Intrepid Very
good condition;
85,300 miles
Dark green with
charcoal interior.
$3,400 or Best offer;
call 352-249-4491
DODGE
2012, Avenger RT,
Sunroof, leather, navl,
$17,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,000.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
SUBARU
'09, Legacy, has only
66k miles, new brakes
& tires, 4 DR, Auto,
$10,900. 352-586-3072

Transmission
Repair & Finance
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR *461-4518




AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
21TH ANNUAL
WINTER
SWAP MEET
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bushnell
Feb. 14, 15, 16th
1-800-438-8559

CHRYSLER
1990 CONV, 1 owner,
exc cond Dk Cherry,
white topall org. eq.
$4900,352-527-4518
ELCAMINO
Conquista, 1983
Good condition
Nice Driver $3,950
(352) 564-9336





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2010, Silverado
Reg Cab WT
$13,495,
352-341-0018
CHEVY
'04, Silverado
103K miles, w/ topper
$9,500 (352) 628-7765
Cell (352) 228-0984
DODGE
1995, 2500, Reg Cab
Work Box Truck
$2,888.
352-341-0018
FORD
1993 F250 Diesel Ex-
tended cab, extended
bed, bed liner, camper
shell, excellent condi-
tion. 86,000 mi
$5000.00 352-564-0788
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
Toyota
1992 ext. cab, pick-up
5 spd, $80k mi. one
owner, good cond.
$3700.(352) 382-4511



CHRYSLER
2005, Pacifica AWD,
low miles, leather
extra clean $9,450.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
Wrangler 1989 auto-
matic 71,408 miles
$1895 8632742373
MERCURY
'99 Mountaineer 162k
mi, leather, sunroof,
cold AC $3500 OBO
(352) 726-4881 Iv msg



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306


2005 HD 1200C
EZ Finance $3,900.

2004 YAMAHA
VSTAR 1100
BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.

2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14,500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood, FL 34785
(352) 330-0047


Motomycles






'01 HD ROAD KING
Loaded $7,800.

'13 HD STREET GLIDE
Low Miles $18,500.

'06 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC TRIKE Full
Conversion $21,000.

'08 HONDA GOLD
WING TRIKE
Loaded $24,900.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood, FL 34785
(352) 330-0047


I


199
61
Cond
(35




Fv,,


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 D7




?5 Goldwing 750 Bonnieville. 10K
K miles, Exc orig doc mi. True clas-
. Asking $4500 sic. Like new cond.First
2)212-8696 $4,500.352-513-4257

#1 Employment source is

ii T- 1.3 nfwww.chronicleonline.com


1Uu11 VVU11U









CI-RjDNJCLE
Your wori
..... eat:-i" :1-1115 ":11


947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru-
ary 28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


Misc. Notice


327-0202 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
All interested parties within Citrus County are hereby advised that the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners, acting as Citrus County Transit, is applying to the
Florida Department of Transportation for a capital grant under Section 5310 and/or
5311 of the Federal Transit Act of 1991, as amended, for the purchase of 8 passenger
wheelchair and stretcher accessible buses and/or 16 passenger wheelchair accessi-
ble buses to be used for the provision of public transit services within Citrus County.
A Public Hearing has been scheduled on February 13 2014 9:00AM at 1300 S.
Lecanto Highway. Lecanto Florida 34461 for the purpose of advising all interested
parties of service being contemplated if grant funds are awarded, and to insure that
contemplated services would not represent a duplication of current proposed ser-
vices provided by existing transit or Para transit operators in the area.
This hearing will be conducted if, and only if, a written request for the hearing is re-
ceived by February 11, 2014 by 5:00 p.m. (two business days prior to the scheduled
hearing).
Requests for a hearing must be addressed to Citrus County Transit, attention Lon Frye
at PC Box 1930, Lecanto Fl. 34460. A copy of the request should be sent to the Flor-
ida Department of Transportation, District Seven, Attn: Tracy Dean at 11201 N. McKin-
ley Drive, MS-7330, Tampa, FL 33612.
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 2 & 9, 2013.


329-0209 SUCRN
2/13 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 13, 2014 in Room 280 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, February 9, 2014.


330-0209 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
LS#19 Upgrades
Bid #14-B-01
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for upgrades to submersible Lift Sta-
tion (LS) #19, located on SE Cutler Spur Blvd, approximately 250 LF north of SR44. You
are hereby invited to submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is
City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on March 4, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on February 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM
in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally consists of upgrades to LS#19. Upgrades
include, but are not limited to:

1. three (3) new submersible pumps
2. one (1) odor control system
3. one (1) generator
4. electrical appurtenances
5. paving
6. security fencing
7. site clearing / grading
8. maintenance of traffic
9. one (1) pre-fabricated building
10. variable frequency drives
ALL BIDDERS must demonstrate they are qualified for the type of work for which the
BID is submitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:

"LS #19 UPGRADES", BID #14-B-01, AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY
CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, and a copy of
the Bid Documents may be obtained from Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc., 95 East
Mitchell Hammock Road, Oviedo, FL 32765. The cost of the Bid Documents is $100.00
(inclusive of sales taxes). A non-refundable $20.00 fee for postage and handling will
be assessed if plans are mailed, unless a UPS or FedEx Shipping number is provided.
Return of the document is not required, and the amount paid for the documents is
non-refundable. Bidders must put their official bid set number on the bid form to be
considered for award.
Bidder shall submit all questions about the meaning or intent of the Bid Documents to
Stefano Ceriana (sceriana@hoyletanner.com), Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc., in
written format only, preferably by way of e-mail. Interpretations or clarifications nec-
essary in response to such questions will be issued by a written Addendum. Only
questions answered by formal Addendum will be binding. Oral and other interpreta-
tons or clarifications will be without legal effect. Questions submitted shall not consti-
tute formal protest of the specifications or of this Invitation to Bid. The deadline for
questions is February 27, 2014.

No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within one hundred and eighty
(180) days from receipt of the notice to proceed by the owner.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 9, 2014.


331-0209 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
2014 ROAD PAVING BID #14-B-02
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for 2014 Road Paving. You are
hereby invited to submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is the
City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on March 7, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally consists of reclaiming and resurfacing a
portion of Kings Bay Drive, from Cutler Spur Boulevard west to the bridge past SW 1st
Place. The approximate major item quantities are as follows; 7,000 square yards full
depth reclamation, 7,000 square yards asphalt super-pave 9.5, 1-1/2" thick, 30 tons
limerock, tack coating, leveling course, traffic striping and maintenance of traffic.
This project also includes spot repairs on other streets if/as needed. Quantities may
be increased or decreased at the discretion of the Owner.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:

"2014 ROAD PAVING, BID #14-B-02", AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR AD-
DRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY
CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.org), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised to
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner. The paving contract may be ex-
tended to 2015 and 2016 by mutual agreement between the City and Contractor at
the unit prices in the bid.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 9, 2014.


Metn


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014






" Section E SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2013



I OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUlD


* Sikorski's
S Attic
PAGE E4


It

i Pillows from
B OriShibori.com. Oriana
Ii.H DiNella recently launched
y i her own Web-based
., : ~ shibori line, OriShibori.com,
including linen tableware, pillows
and throws, and large leather wall
hangings, all made to order and
hand-dyed in organic indigo. From S
tablecloths to duvet covers. iPhone
cases to wallpaper and startling 1
calf-skin wall hangings, the /
ancient Japanese technique
of shibori has gone ,.-\
t,.L ~mainstream. S .
Hlfl~u' -:::':ili>-1i'-::,-^ ^ ^^ K


.Fj

.1.
.


ON THE COVER:

FILM


HOWE AND GARDEN:



REAL ESTATE

SE cU!mIE IS= S






E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


637-'282J,_
"1 ~ ~ ~"'" IV, r1 qZo
-" -
^E*l 1_ 5i1011


4750 EL CAMINO
*3BR/3BATH/HUGE GAR GREAT RM. & FAM RM.
* Lanai w/Pavers Wood Cabinets/Lg. Laundry
*Split Guest Wing .Rusaw Built
* Low Annual Fees Comm. Pool/Near GOLF
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
EinalE elliesullon *einiia n.e|
wwww.lotiaudlislinglnlo.coin


I dZ 3. UhUUUrItLU UK.
LECANTO
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot
* Nearly 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained
* Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows
SAttractive Yard
PETER & MARVIA KOROL !fl
(352) 527-7842 i
(352) 422-3875


0d,10 W. ULInIDUNI1IE LI.
FOX HOLLOW CRYSTAL RIVER
2BD/2BA/2CG Detached Villa
Maintenance-Free Community of Fox Hollow
Lots of Wonderful Upgrades
Part of Meadowcrest with 2 Community Pools
PETER & MARVIA KOROL r
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875






- L~ ,. i, 4 '- Wil I'1
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
IN CITRUS HILLS ON ONE ACRE WITH CAGED
POOL. BUILT IN 2004 WITH A TOTAL OF 3,803
SQ FT MOVE-IN READY TILE FLOORING AND
CARPET GREAT ROOM PLUS FORMAL LIVING
RM. SPLIT PLAN. -S
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I I
Email: bbarbrajmills@earthlink.inet I


ONE OWNER HOME WITH FIREPLACE
*2 BR, 2 BATH 1-Car Garage
1,136 Sq. Ft Living Oversized Master BR
* Master Bath Enclosed Porch
* All Appliances Included Skylight
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 f
Email: kellygoddardsellsllorida.com ..l





WM*
W '


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REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
J 1 Buyer calls exclusive
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637-2828
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prompted

F IJ 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


i* I II I
861 N. SPEND-A-BUCK DR.
Well-Maintained 3BR/3BA/2CG
Living & Family Room
Lg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
Pool & Lanai Area
Beautiful Landscaped Setting
Lots of Living Space & Storage
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 M
Email: lenpalmer@remax.netl









# irQM
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#1 in Citrus County


CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunninigham@remax.net


ILOUI N. LIlHLt 6in., L13IIAL HlVtH
You won't find a better priced 6/3/2 with open water
view anywhere. Located in front of the head spring in
King's Bay. Two stories, two kitchens, den, office, loft,
screened lanai, wood-burning fireplace and so much
more. Exterior boasts fenced yard, seawall, dock and
pool overlooking Kings Bay. [-
DAVID IVORY 352-613-44600
Email: duvidsivory@hotemuil.con


911 1I1
DEEP WATER...TREETOP LIVING
This 4 bedroom, 2 bath home puts you above the flood plain
where you live among the birds and enjoy the cool breezes.
Large rooms and lots of windows make and covered decks in
the front and the back make this a very inviting home.
Handicap access. Large kitchen with 2 pantries, a large
storage closet, and new flooring in most of the house. 13.3ft.
elevation for reduced flood insurance rates. Call to take a
look... | |
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 fl
Email: Wayne@WayneHommerich.com


UPDATES GALORE!! NOT A DRIVE-BY!!
*3 BR, 3 BATH *2-Car Garage
*1,802 Sq. Ft. Living Updated Kitchen
* HVAC 2009 .-i,,- :iiii,- :
* Extended Screened Lanai -1 ACRE Lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 f
Email: kellygoddardsellsllorida.com _


2421:1 N. Leana Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SReal Estate DIGEST


Barth hits high
mark in 2013
Coldwell Banker In-
vestors
Realty of
Citrus
County is
proud to T%
announce
that Realtor '--
Gitta Barth
closed
more than Gitta Barth
$4 million Coldwell
Banker
in sales Investors
volume in Realty.
2013.
Gitta, a German transplant
and Citrus County resident
since 1994, is dedicated to
increasing her sales volume
in 2014.
She can be reached at
352-220-0466 or by email at
gbarth@myflorida-house.
com.


New blood at
Plantation Realty
Plantation Realty Inc.
would like to welcome
Jayson Bortz to our real es-
tate team. He has recently
passed his state exam and is
a currently an active member
of the Citrus County Realtors
Association. Call him at 352-
795-0784.
Saxer tops
January totals


Wayne
Saxer has
been
named the
top sales
agent for
January at
the Vil-
lages of
Citrus
Hills.
Wayne had


rU


Wayne
Saxer
Villages of
Citrus Hills.


four new home sales during
the month.
The Welcome Center for
the Villages of Citrus Hills is
located at 2400 N. Terra
Vista Boulevard in Citrus
Hills. Visit www.CitrusHills.
com.
EXIT agent warms
up January
Congrat-
ulations to .
Mary .
Gulling
with EXIT J* J
Realty -
Leaders in =
Crystal
River, who M
won the top Gulling
sales agent EXIT Realty
award for Leaders.
January.
Mary surpassed $1 million
in sales for January. Call
Mary at 352-422-2994.


Average rate on 30-year


loan at 4.23 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Aver-
age U.S. rates for fixed
mortgages fell this week as
the latest data continued
to indicate a pause in the
housing market's recovery
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday the av-
erage rate for the 30-year
loan declined to 4.23 per-
cent from 4.32 percent last
week. The average for the
15-year loan dipped to 3.33
percent from 3.40 percent.
Mortgage rates have
risen about a full percent-
age point since hitting
record lows roughly a year
ago. The increase was
driven by speculation that


the Federal Reserve would
reduce its $85 billion a
month in bond purchases.
Saying the economy was
gaining strength, the Fed
pushed ahead last week
with a plan to reduce the
bond purchases, which
have kept long-term inter-
est rates low
Data released Tuesday
by real estate specialist
CoreLogic showed that
U.S. home prices slipped
from November to Decem-
ber, and the year-over-year
increase slowed..
The December decline
was the third straight


month-to-month drop.
Home prices had risen for
eight straight months
through September For all
of 2013, prices rose a
healthy 11 percent.
The Commerce Depart-
ment reported Monday that
U.S. construction spending
rose modestly in Decem-
ber, slowing from healthy
gains a month earlier
Most economists expect
home sales and prices to
keep rising this year, but at
a slower pace. They forecast
that both will rise around
5 percent, down from
double-digit gains in 2013.


r .Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
r Realtor.- A HOUSE Realtor J
302-3179 SOLD Nanie! 287-9022
S I746 l6700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!|
The olden ir WEEKS REALTY, BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


.I OPN I I,1g rW InY11], I


I I, ,, ,, :, I! ,[.; l :I 1 , r,r, I11. J I ,,, r ,, I "
705705. $144,900 707224. $76,500
John Maisel 302-5351 Yolanda Canchola 219-2196


1. coiyiiyeircial^ REAjDrYTO GOH

,, ^) "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods'"
NANCY Direct: 352-634.4225
KEY 1 REALTY INC.
P0 NTICOS Nancy@Nancyknows.com
w ~j^B Multi-Million $$$ Producer "*
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S 44 KINDER DR. 22 CACTUS ST.
Sweetwater Ridgewood Sweetwater Tradewinds
Over 2,660 living area Oversized garage
SGorgeous dated decor Light neutral decor,
1 r Wood and tile floors Dual pane windows
Open family room Lived in only part time!
Heated POOL Move-in new condition.
MLS#705418 $234,500 MLS#708265 $173,200
lle my ,ltultOm l l| ll,7


MfB~


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 E3






E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
'I



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cool weather means



gardening chores


February is halfway through winter
Central Florida can expect several
more frosty mornings until about
March 15. Days are getting
longer and soil temperatures
should warm up to 60 degrees
by next Saturday
Now is the time to apply pre-
emergent 0-0-8 Pre-M to kill
emerging weed seedlings as
they sprout. It is effective for
about six weeks and usually
applied before Valentine's Day
It will prevent the majority of
spring-germinating weeds in a Jane
lawn. A 50-pound yellow bag JAN
costs about $35 at a landscape
supply place like John Deere GARI
Landscapes on the north side
of State Road 44 west of Lecanto. Sterling,
the manager, can give homeowners and
DIY gardeners a printout of which chem-
icals to apply and when for your particu-
lar species of grass.
Frost will kill many species of tender
weed seedlings such as red Salvia, Salvia
coccinea, a native wildflower Those lawn


weeds that are actively growing by mid-
March can be killed in a Bahia lawn by
broadcasting Momentum. The 30-pound
blue bag covers about 5,000
f square feet and retails for
around $40. Always read and
follow the directions on the
label. Staff at landscape supply
warehouses are well-trained
professionals who have the ac-
curate knowledge to advise
homeowners.
February is the time to
prune certain plants. The
Weber maple, river birch, redbud,
E'S flowering dogwood, fringe tree
and red buckeye are all native
DEN deciduous trees that bud in
winter and flower in spring.
After they finish flowering is a good time
to prune off lower and interfering
branches.
Be sure to have only one main trunk
and never cut its leader tip. Leave no
stubs. Make clean cuts at the fattened


See JANE/Page E7


Inside...


Shibori
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Readers solve mystery: Sticks are curtain stretchers


ow, great
response.
There is
no doubt these
sticks were used to
dry lace curtains.
We printed as
many responses
the column could
hold to show the
solid agreement
among our read-
ers, leaving no
doubt what the
sticks were used


John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
AT'IC


for. The number of letters
sent were far too many to be
used, so thank you to all those
who took the time to respond.
Dear John: Most people
who lived in the 1920s, 1930s
or even the 1940s should know
the answer to this one. You are
just too young, John. These
wooden sticks with their rows


of nails were used
as curtain stretch-
ers. Every house-
wife had one
tucked away in
some comer of her
basement, and
when spring clean-
ing time came
around, all of her
lace or cotton cur-
tains were washed
and then attached
to the stretchers to
dry


This contraption was set
up in a fashion similar to an
artist's easel. Four of the
boards had rows of short thin
nails set in about every quar-
ter of an inch so that the
points came through and the
four edges of the curtains
could be caught on them
without damaging the curtain


materials. In those days, cur-
tains were made of materials
that did not always keep their
shape or their proper size as
they dried. Our modern
Nylon and other wash-and-
wear fabrics were not
invented yet
In order to ensure that the
curtains would be the right
size and shape when they
were re-hung, the housewife
could adjust the four wooden
stretchers to the size she
wanted and then catch all
four edges of the wet curtains
to the rows of nail points;
thus, the curtains were
forced to dry to the proper
size and shape. I spent a lot of
time helping my mom stretch
her curtain, and I believe
that the stretchers folded up
for storage. If you had a big
basement, you could just


hide it away behind the fur-
nace or some other out-of-
the-way spot and drag it out
whenever you needed it.
Thanks for your weekly
column. I really enjoy read-
ing it because I am 83 years
old, so I am probably consid-
ered an antique myself. I
seem to have accumulated a
lot of old family heirlooms
over the years, but the cur-
tain stretchers never made it
out of my Mom's basement! -
LS., Inverness
See AlTTIC/Page E6
What are these things?
According to readers of
Sikorski's column, they're
curtain stretchers, used
to keep curtains from
shrinking in the era before
modern fabrics.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Plants offer



next-best thing



to real chocolate


LEE REICH
Associated Press
With Valentine's Day coming up,
thoughts naturally turn to chocolate.
How nice it would be for gardeners
to give their beloved a living, grow-
ing, chocolate expression of
affection.
Alas, chocolate, native to steamy
equatorial lowlands, is not usually
productive when grown as a house-
plant. Even if you could get the foot-
ball-sized pods dangling from the
trunk of a chocolate tree, fairly in-
tricate processing is needed before
you'd have something worth sinking
your teeth into.
But there are some chocolate-y
alternatives:
A number of plants Chocolate
Ruffles coral bells, Chocolate Cake
gladiola and Sweet Chocolate pep-
per, for example have chocolate-y
looking leaves or fruits. Let's shy
away from them, though, because
their chocolate is only skin deep.
Plants with chocolate-y aromas
offer instant gratification more akin
to Hershey's Kisses. For an affair on
shaky ground and needing a quick
horticultural chocolate fix, I suggest
a peppermint geranium plant. Pep-
permint geranium makes a nice
houseplant for a sunny windowsill,
and, in spring, feathery white blos-
soms add to the sensual pleasure.
OK, it's not chocolate, but there is
that common association of pepper-
mint and chocolate.
The Chocolate Mint variety of
peppermint is another plant that
shares its aroma as soon as it is in
hand. Close your eyes and this one's
a stand-in for a Peppermint Patty
I'm not sure there's really any
chocolate in that peppermint-y
aroma; perhaps it's the chocolate-y
hue of the leaves and the power of
suggestion. Chocolate Mint, like
other mints, is easy to grow and mul-
tiply Mints do become scraggly in-
doors, so plan on eventually planting


chocolate mint outdoors in a sunny
garden bed.
Wax plant (Hoya carnosa) is an
easy-to-grow houseplant with a gen-
uine, sweet, chocolate-y aroma,
though it might require some pa-
tience. The aroma comes from the
flowers, which are not borne contin-
uously Still, if you and that special
person can stand the wait, just hold
hands and admire the way the fleshy
leaves twist around in their waxy
smoothness. The pure chocolate
aroma is worth waiting for
Other plants could cement a ro-
mance with the smell of chocolate in
the months and years ahead. De-
spite its name, summer snowflake
offers up its fragrance admittedly
slight and, to some noses, just sweet
rather than chocolate-y- in spring.
The "snowflake" part of the name is
apt, however, for this bulb's nodding
blooms are indeed snowflake white,
much like those of another bulb,
snowdrops, except larger
Chocolate daisy (Berlandiera
lyrata) is a perennial flower that is
strong in scent and tough in dispo-
sition. And the plant's also pretty,
displaying characteristic daisy
heads of yellow petals around green
eyes for weeks and weeks through
summer Cut some blossoms, plunk
them into a vase of water, and I
guarantee your lover will be looking
for hidden chocolate bars or
"Kisses."
Chocolate also wafts from a
perennial vine. Crossvine (Akebia
quinata), also known as five-leaf
akebia, is native south of Virginia
but root-hardy much further north.
Grown in full sun, this vine covers it-
self with brown or reddish-brown
trumpet-shaped blooms that blare
out a mocha scent for a few weeks
each spring. The flowers are fol-
lowed by sausage-shaped, violet
fruits that split lengthwise when
ripe to reveal a jellied pulp inter-
esting and edible, but not even a hint
of chocolate.


Chocolate mint peppermint
growing in a pot in New Paltz, N.Y.
With Valentine's Day coming up,
thoughts naturally turn to
chocolate. Chocolate mint
peppermint is a chocolate-y
alternative.
LEE REICH/Associated Press


7 `111 4746.9000
Amandaf &ifJohnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Pa- y Yvonne Jenkins
BROKERIASSOC ,REAtLTORGRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR REALTOR________________________


10683 W. DUBLIN I 5518 N. ELKCAM
S 3/2/2 708170 $99,900 3/2/2 706451 $159,900


IT
15 TAFT 48 S. HARRISON 521 S. MONROE
2/1 707828 $29,000 2/1 707029 $49,000 2/1/1 707140 $69,9(
I 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


I


- lI


CRYSTAL MANOR


I


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 ES


PIN RI'DG






E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Dear John: I know exactly
what these sticks are, because as
a child trying to handle this
item, I pricked my fingers many
a time, causing them to bleed.
My mother stored these sticks in
a hall closet and used them
about once or twice a year to dry
her linen curtains after washing.
When you stand up the sticks
and unfold them at the hinges,
they form a tall, approximated 5-
foot-square box tripod that
would look like a very large
artist's easel. There were hun-
dreds of very sharp needles
along the outside edges of the
square frame. Wet, washed cur-
tains would be spread out on the
easel like a canvas, gently poking


the sharp needles through the
outer edges of curtains. Curtains
stretched snug and tight would
then dry without wrinkles and
would be easily hung again with-
out ironing. Without this needle
frame, the curtains would dry all
wrinkled and be too ugly to hang
again. -J.C., Internet
Dear John: The frames had
short pins all around, and we
would stretch and pin the items
on the frame. This was accom-
panied by stuck fingers when I
was not careful. As often hap-
pens when reading your articles,
fond memories come back. -
A.C., Dunnellon
Dear John: Before the 1950s,
fabric for curtains would lose its
shape when washed. These
sticks were put together, forming
a frame, and the edges of the
curtains were hooked on by
using the nails so the curtain


The numbers were there so the stretching
would be equal. The stretcher came apart
for storage. My mother had one when
I was a little child and I am 81 years old
now. When the curtains were dry, they
were ready to be rehung on the windows
without having to iron them!


would dry and reinstate its orig-
inal form. My grandmother
would have these stretchers set
up in the yard for curtains to dry
and get the benefit of the sun
whitening. Most of the curtains
at that time were lace. R.AB.,
Internet
Dear John: I remember as a
kid helping my mother take off
the curtains and, if you did it fast
enough, you could make them


"sing" as you pulled them off the
stretcher I have not seen one in
years and it brought back sweet
memories. -E., Internet
Dear John: Love the articles
in the paper. Besides curtain
stretching, my mother also used
these sticks to attach a quilt back
to the quilt in order to hold it to-
gether, again using the brackets
and numbers for squareness. We
had to have a big room to set this


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

up cause it took up quite a bit of
area. I remember this set up in
our house often. Keep up the
good work! -M., Homosassa
DearJohn: The numbers were
there so the stretching would be
equal. The stretcher came apart
for storage. My mother had one
when I was a little child and I
am 81 years old now. When the
curtains were dry, they were
ready to be rehung on the win-
dows without having to iron
them! -A.E., Internet


John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


RerraLT G

REALTY GROUP


Speilzn inTra it

~EE Sor
(x Brnwo.eae


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
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ome take a look at this beautiful home that is situated on an upstairs. Half bath downstairs. Inside laundry, tile & carpet. Glass
oversized home site. Very well maintained. 2 bedrooms plus a den, doors open to screen tiled lanai off of living room. Look outthe lanai to
Mhich can be used as a third bedroom. Some of the features this private community pool. Leave the yard and exterior maintenance to
iome has to offer are extended lanai, summer kitchen, extra storage others while you enjoy the fitness center & spa, golf, swimming,
:loset,surround sound and many more. MLS 704582 ...... $199,000 restaurants, social activities and much more! MLS 708272 $89,900


-DETACHED VILLAS
.... 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR
HILLSIDE VILLAS
Located in Terra Vista of Citrus
Hills one of Floridas Premier
Lifestyle Communities this
popular Antigua model with its
customize features is looking for
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 4 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2 CAR a new owner having only known
Beautiful custom home located on Fenway Drive in the center of Terra 1 owner! The plan proves to be lust the right size for today active
Vista. Exclusively designed pool and spa home with 4 bedrooms, 3.5 lifestyle. This thoughtfully planned home features an expanded garage
baths plus den, and oversized garage with attached 18 X 45 RV with a roll-up screened door, tile flooring in the main living area,
garage. Upgrades throughout home, including marble fireplace, security system, surround sound, double paned windows and doors,
summer kitchen, solid surface countertops, tile floors, window custom window treatments, tall upper kitchen cabinets and a
treatments and many more to mention. Amazing panoramic viewfrom spacious master bath. The home also offers a private rear setting and
spacious lanai on over an acre of land. MLS 708318 ........$595,000 is located nearthe top of the HILL! MLS 708315 ................$224,900


Ters 6 Mots or More
Ter Vit &Betwo enas Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


.UdU U. I iO me space. Dearoom, z Dain vie Teauring ea.-in Kiacnen, pantry,
anai with I Iliving room, family room, formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed
rra Vista. I lanai, screened courtyard, 2 car oversized qaraqe, all situated in







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

branch collar, which will
heal over quickly with the
rising sap. This prevents
disease from entering the
wound. Old-fashioned
paints interfere with the
healing process.
Pruning short, young
trees of unwanted lower
branches will also remove
any seeds that are forming.
Seeds are important food
for north-migrating birds.
Pruning stimulates growth
and directs it upward in
natural tree form. As a tree
grows, it would shade out
lower leaves and the tree
would eventually drop its
lower branches. Pruning
smaller young branches
sooner rather than later is
beneficial, produces faster
vertical growth and en-
courages strong single
leaders. Once the tree is
too tall to prune, it should
be left to mature naturally
After flowering stops, it
is time to prune evergreen
hybrid exotic azaleas,
loropetalum and camellias.
Native, evergreen Walter's
Viburnum 'Densa' and


'Schellings' Yaupon Holly
have a natural dense ball
shape. They need no prun-
ing, but can have errant
growth removed in spring.
'Schellings' is a male
plant that flowers in May or
June, so prune in February
to allow time for flower
buds to form. No flowers
means no pollen to fertilize
the female Weeping
Yaupon. No pollination will
mean no holly berries next
winter Gardeners may
want to prune 'Schellings'
holly after flowering fin-
ishes late in June.
Pruning stimulates ten-
der new growth, which is
sensitive to late frosts. I
like to prune 'Knock-Out'
roses by Valentine's Day I
first cut all flowers and
buds for the vase and give
away posies to friends and
neighbors. Then I prune
off any dead, diseased,
crossing and touching
branches.
You could prune back
hard and leave only foot-
tall stubs that will produce
lots of new shoots fed by
the large healthy root sys-
tem, or the rose can be
given a clipping all over to
produce a rounded ball
shape. Interior twigs


would get no sunlight, so
they would produce few
leaves or flowers. They can
be removed down to the
main branch.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


GET THE
WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organiza-
tions are invited to
submit news re-
leases about up-
coming community
events.
* News releases are
subject to editing.
* Call 352-563-5660
for details.


KEY1 "Always There For You"
RL GAIL COOPER
U. Multimillion Dollar Realtor
^ ^(352) 634-4346
LOffice: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3@nindspring.com


SELLER WILL INSTALL
RARE AND VERY PRIVATE! NEW ROOF!
2/2 end unit 1-story condo 2/2/2 home with 1824 sq ft of living
SViews of #3 green on Cypress Open floor plan with 2 Master suites
Updated tiled kitchen has pass thru Florida room expands living area
SStainless steel appliances Tiled family room for entertaining
SRaised panel cabinetry Large backyard with room to add a pool
SAll appliances will convey Convenient to Country Club
| Home warranty for the buyer All appliances will convey
#707553 $66,000 #705485 $84,500
See irtu Tori s U.i I w.rsle o s umi. i-- 11 .


000HCOM y f
;XOE 2_
---- -V-REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
EaS ~CRYSTAL RIV ERFL 34429
ocE: (352) 795-6633
WWW AIT jPYT O mIU1M lw. AT P AT I rY'VQNY CYiM


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#700766 nri-a r-dued t. U3 ffeift


CTRI UPRIj *, i ,;.i.,
3 .. i ,., ,, 12x16
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IHERNANDO Waterfront home
, . I ,, I, h ,, ,I I ,,
S' i Tsala Apopka Lake
n, ; the Potts Wildlife Perserve
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I -:.-. I


HOMOSASSA-1988 3bdrm, 2 bath on
1/2 acre, with '; ;. familyy rooms &
wood burning i. I, roof over in
2000; both baths renovate dbl
paned windows, new A/C, dead
end paved road #707609 $54,900


CRYSTAL RIVER Ready to move in
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is in cul-de-sac Has pool &
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back yard 14 3 I 11 maintained
#359466 $104,900
k-I7- 'N


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INVERNESS Neat as a pin 1985 single 3 bedroom, 3 bath 2007 Nobility
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2 baths. 2 lots, concrete drive, corner lot i ..... . i .., .11. .1
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air Newer refrigerator #704966 $35,000 ... ... ",\ || l'r'r


WONDERING IF

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SELL YOUR

HOME?

WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$12.2 million closed in 2013

Call Debbie Rector's Team --- ----
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
Il To Learn More
S(352) 746-9924 9


RIVER VIEWS ponds, mature oak trees The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully ,, ii , .. 1 ,1 ..... ,,. ,. ,, ,, ,
3/2ho re bylt27on13acresn posltloned in a beautlfulsettngl i .... n l .... ,, 14,, ,.4 .m '1 ......iful setting .. ...... .....
3/2hor i e s ,,,,,, .t . .. ,, $800.000 waitingfor youand yourfamily to move right no
the banks of the Withlacoochee ractivetour $549,000


$521,961

GITTA THE GLEN HIGHVIEW ESTATES
|A 55t community Enjoy maintenancefree INCREDIBLEVISTAS-HAMPTON LAKE PINE RIDGE ESTATES Citrus Hills
G T ated in The Glen This 3/2/1 situated on 12 acre elevated Beautiful 2004 Avanzlm Model nicely
B A R T H ..... *^^ ide laundry, with lots of fruit trees Recently treed 1 ac lot High ceilings, flreplace,
carpet and paint, great room boasts large picture w/jetted tub
it is in perfect condtionl Just unpack the windows f .. private lanai
B A T an suitcase and relax Close to shopptrg, dining metal roof justthe right size w/tons of upgrades
REALTOR@ and medcalfaciites $65,000 SSappl $274,000 $469,000 $189,900

Cell: (352) 220-0466 L-a Hiw
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SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAKE,, MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! uuTSTANDaC WATERFRONT RESIDENCE
0J -0 no 331 2 matrsutsaat
ment 2 master suites, apart 12 an (10 x 300+ ft), picturesque Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home an a 1 acre Tastefully ren
^J meant lower level Upper level 1 corner lot with mature oak trees and & dry(never , .
^ accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane oak trees Charming lots of prvacyl Very well maintained, ac) for boatV
Investors Realty i shIters, security system, updated tie offered some docks, 240 ft seawall, workshop, shed
k Hutcer & bathrooms 190 ft of ringmal fixtures and fireplace still in ,Updated roof, A/C, kit, windows, every-
of Citrus County, Inc. seawall, boat liftt Everything just place Large det gar w/workshop, thing meticulous maintained Priced
ofCywebiteat wI s c waatngforyou $488,000 seawall $159,900 11 $169,000 oo ght at $399,000!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 E7


FEATURED.HOMEI





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All
*I lI~H IPIf5r::II'iI*


An OriShibori tablecloth.
runner and napkin on
a table.
1 I i-,1- ,'l


1!', ,1I'
Il,, . '..


UP


KATHERINE
ROTH
Aiijtiit'/d lJ)',


SF WNE\V YORK
H ri:, t .jleclths t: dl et ,:,\-
ers. iPhtne ,es to -s.ll|.i -
per iLnd stm-tlinL. :all- skin
w.Ill ti. Ll ', tle nM lent
J~i).nese resist-d. inL. te :h-
ni'|lie o s' lll i' ,.i L.', e iia-ln-
strej. i \erj \\WnL. R l)ph Liiiren.
Eileen Fisler.: Le i'$ mjnd inniiiiler-
hlIle filler jrtist$ ire Irejthiln- new\


lire int-- the
a'jft r il tl'
"iThe stillneI jnd e
he itA It it rejll.\ tl el-
tel's I ." said Or ijnjl^I
DiNell.. \% ho re,:entl.\
lllll liedd hero,\ml \\elh-lIsed
hllh:,ri line. iiil, idllldl lillen
tjlilem re. )illl,: s mnd tlhr,:,\s -
mid Ir.-..e le.tlher w\.ll hij .i.in.'s-
ll i de to, ordere r mnd [1mld-d.\ed ii
"It teeln i ke iL' rebel t
"It reels like i rehiell i' n j- iui nst


-- SHIBORI Page EO10


JAPANS-STiYLE TIE DYE GAINS

L NEW FANS IN THE WEST .


.1,1


ES SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


I)







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hiroyuki Murase's
family has produced shibori
fabrics for generations in
Japan. He has founded the
Germany-based Suzusan firm,
which produces shibori
shawls, award-winning
lighting called Luminaires,
and custom fabrics for
high-end fashion designers
such as Christian Dior
and Lacoste.
Suzusan/Associated Press


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 E9


SCOMMERCIAL SITE on US 41 N, currently used
726 5 6 l for mobile home sales; Includes 4,000 sq. ft.
l 2U6 J-U5 6 warehouse. $349,000 #357257.
SDebbie Tannery 352-613-3983.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHIBORI
Continued from Page E8

the fashion movement, where every-
thing seems so fast and disposable,"
the New York-based designer
explained.
Shibori is slow It takes time, and
has been around since about the 8th
century The word comes from the
Japanese shiboru, meaning "to
wring, squeeze or press."
The technique involves twisting,
tying, crumpling, stitching or folding
fabric usually silk or cotton in
various ways, transforming the two-
dimensional material into a sculp-
tural, three-dimensional form. This
sculptural shape is then tradition-
ally dyed, originally using indigo, al-
though a huge variety of colors and
dyes are now used. Sometimes, the
same fabric is then twisted in some
other way and then dyed again.
When the wrappings are removed,
the folds and creases where the fab-
ric resisted the dye form distinctive
crinkled textures and patterns.
A sort of "memory on cloth," Shi-
bori also encompasses Issey
Miyake's revolutionary pleated
clothing, fulling and felting, and
other methods of transforming nat-
ural fabrics into 3-D shapes.
The work of Hiroyuki Murase ex-
emplifies both the 3-D possibilities
of shibori and the bridge between
traditional and new Murase grew up
in Arimatsu, Japan, where shibori
has been done using traditional
techniques for 400 years. Today, his
array of Luminaires lampshades
and haute couture fabrics, designed
for the likes of Christian Dior, are
the cutting edge of modern shibori.
Murase's family company, Suzu-
san, was founded there a century ago
and has designed shibori fabrics for
Miyake and other designers. Murase
founded and is creative director at a
separate company by the same name,
Suzusan, in Dusseldorf, Germany
But shibori is still most widely
thought of as a sort of tie-dyeing.
Today's incarnations are as differ-
ent from their early Japanese pred-
ecessors as they are from the wild,
tie-dyed pieces that became em-
blematic of the '60s and '70s.
There's a sense of timelessness
and calm to the modern shibori
pieces, and also a renewed focus on
workmanship and functionality
"I love the bleeds, the fluidity of it.
I love how the light shades of indigo


ON THE NET
Suzusan: www.suzusan.com.
Rebecca Atwood: www.
rebeccaatwood.com.
Eskayel: www.eskayel.com.
OriShibori: www.
orishibori.com.
World Shibori Network:
www.shibori.org.
Slow Fiber Studios: www.
slowfiberstudios.com.
Urban Outfitters: www.
urbanoutfitters.com.
Martha Stewart Living:
www.marthastewart.com.

can be so pale and watery and the
navies can be such a deep, deep
blue," DiNella said.
Brooklyn designer Rebecca At-
wood uses modern fiber-reactive dyes
for her Blauvelt Collection, which in-
cludes pillows and pouches. And
home-design purveyor Eskayel is cre-
ating the look of shibori patterns
using ink water and watercolors, fol-
lowed by digital printing techniques.
"We have wallpaper, rugs, fabric,
pillows, baskets, iPhone cases, sta-
tionery, prints and wall hangings.
Oh, and poufs," said founder and
creative director Shanan Cam-
panero, when asked about the com-
pany's shibori-inspired offerings.
Compared to the tie-dyes of a gen-
eration ago, today's shibori-inspired
works feature patterns that are more
careful, deliberate and traditional.
Vera Wang's collection is centered
on bedding, while Ralph Lauren's
features swim trunks and clothing.
Levi's has even come out with shi-
bori-inspired jeans. But while mass-
produced items lack the nuanced
appeal of handcrafted works, they
bring a surprising touch of texture
and pizazz to the familiar
For those inclined to take on do-it-
yourself projects, shibori has never
been more accessible. It can be done
easily at home using minimal
equipment.
Urban Outfitters sells its own shi-
bori kits, and lessons are widely avail-
able online, from basic for beginners
to truly advanced. Martha Stewart
Living features a project on its web-
site using a standard pressure cooker
to make elegant shibori at home.
Serious shibori artists and work-
shops across the country and inter-
nationally can be found through the
Berkeley-based World Shibori Net-


work. With a membership of dedi-
cated artisans in Japan and around
the globe, it was founded in the
1990s because of fears that the tra-
ditional craft would disappear
Despite widespread interest in shi-
bori in the West "we are still concerned
with its survival in Japan," explained
Yoshiko Iwamoto Wada, the organiza-
tion's president and co-founder
Wada, author of "Shibori" and
"Memory on Cloth" (both published
by Kodansha), has taught and written
about shibori for more than 30 years,
co-founded Berkeley's Kasuri Dye-
works in 1975, and helped introduce
shibori to the United States. Now, her
focus is ensuring its survival in Japan.
"There used to be thousands and
thousands of artists working on this.
Now there are not so many people
doing it using traditional tech-
niques," said Wada. 'Adapting shi-
bori to something contemporary is
the key to its survival. When the big
designers come out with it and
young artists take it in new direc-
tions, then more people here and in
Japan start to pay attention."

f Se' LiqlaCit s& Levy Counties Since 1970
rZZZJ David G. Griffin
ii R Real Estate
I F Licensed Real Estate Broker
ICell 352-228-1812
h44iUUT Office 352-795-0330


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers
about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your
name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.


_aM American
MEE Realty &
E R A Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855


BARBARA
BANKS
Fy roa Realtor
cell: 352-476-3232


Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
WATERFRONT 3/2 with carport on Hemrnando Chain of Lakes, offers
. partially-fenced yard in a lovely
H setting with 2 docks, updated kitchen
& baths, tile flooring, inside laundry.
Lower level 24x24 enclosed family
room (lanai) with air unit, sliding
windows & screens. Upper lever has
its own screen porch with beautiful
views. New roof in 06. Dock has hose
bib for cleaning. Don't miss out on
tswaterfront bargain! MLS705088
.,l .!. . ASKING $110,500
GREAT HOME GREAT PRICE
LOVELY INVERNESS POOL HOME
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
Fthoru to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool,
covered lanai... all this & more
sitting on .73acre. Room for the
whole family here. MLS 705163
.-'. ASKING $185,000
Zechariah 4:6


IT..


E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Furry felines get their



own place to relax


4 E VZ 0 L 9W C7-M 9O M-


Associated Press
Carrie Fagerstrom's "catio," which cost $5,000 to build, allows her eight
cats to enjoy the outdoors, but not the harmful elements that come along
with it. The playground for the cats has an 11 foot by 14 foot base and is 11
feet high, with mesh wiring on the sides and a clear roof. The room includes
scratching posts, a small water fountain and plenty of toys.


'Catios'let housecats enjoy the outdoors


Associated Press

When Carrie Fagerstrom was
looking for a new home in Portland,
Ore., her must-have list didn't in-
clude a spacious yard, plenty of clos-
ets or even a large kitchen.
Her highest priority: the comfort
of her cats.


"I really wanted a house that
would allow me to build a place for
them," said Fagerstrom, who had vi-
sions of a catio out back.
A catio is essentially a cat's play-
ground. It's an enclosed, covered
area, much like a patio, that allows


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820
NEW LISTING


(w0 Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
A Week! Properties
NEW LISTING
RIF I


:1s5LA 2701 W Doerr Path MLS 708329 $194,500
MLS 708247 $229,000 Maintenance Free, move in ready, 3/2/2
Private backyard; 3/2/2 + den/bonus room. w/private backyard.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
__ NEW LISTING III L_ '- /


ouI L -l1iuuluuill bl
MLS 708333 $79,900
Freshly painted throughout, 2/2/1 villa in
Citrus Hills area.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


141 E Liberty St
T'--' MLS 707281 $294,900
Oaks Golf Course 18th fairway view-
3/2/3 pool home.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
BACK ON MARKET


,Z j41- 3542 N Palomino Ter
MLS 706410 $429,900
Expansive 5/4/3 pool home; acreage on
horse trail.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700
REDUCED


LSt, $ 4161 N Longvalley Rd
MLS 707428 $289,900
REDUCED by $10,000. Bring all offers!
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


MLS 706039 8589W Sasso Ln
BACK ON MARKET $209,900 MLS 706812 $164,900
Meadows Golf Course 3/3/2 with caged Park-like setting, 3/2/2 + enclosed lanai on
pool. 1+ acres.
DickHildebrandt 352-586-0478 Brian Murray 352-212-5913


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
NEW LISTING


MLS 708184 $1
Woodview Villas maintenance free:
den/3rd bdrm pool home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


"ti,$L 479W Mickey Mantle Path
MLS 703997 $385,000
Value, elegance & a golf view you've
dreamed of in this home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947



IPQx


460 W Doerr Path
MLS 356086 $288,000
Stunning Villa overlooking 6th Fairway of
Skyview Golf Course.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


. 1,gTIu"H'f644 W Sprinc Meadow Lp
SMLS 706531 $119,900
Move-in-condition 3/2 corner
townhome.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


I 1 I .Oh In .. , i ,, I I , I I . .. i


See CATIOS/Page E12


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 Ell


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROWD7







E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


CATIOS
Continued from Page Ell

feline friends to be ex-
posed to the outdoors, get-
ting fresh air and scenery,
while keeping them safe
from predators.
"I thought it would be as
simple as running wire on
three sides and putting
tarp overhead, but it
wasn't that easy," Fager-
strom said. "It ended up
being a much bigger proj-
ect, but I love it"
Roughly $5,000 later, her
eight cats have room to
roam in a catio filled with
scratching posts, climbing
apparatuses and even a
drinking fountain. The
space also contains human
seating so that Fagerstrom
and her friends can enjoy
it as well.
"It's a very calm and
serene place," she said.
Catios got their start
with cat breeders and at
animal sanctuaries, but
more and more cat owners
have begun building them
at home, according to Kate
Benjamin, founder of
Hauspanthercom, an on-
line magazine for design-
conscious cat people.
"I've been seeing a lot
more people catifying
their homes," Benjamin
said. "If your cats are truly
beloved members of your
family, you won't let them


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


live outside. There are just
too many threats."
There are benefits to
cats both ways: being in-
doors-only and being al-
lowed access to the
outdoors, says Sarah Ellis
of the University of Lin-
coln, in England, who co-
chaired a group of
experts that issued cat-
care guidelines last year
for the American Associa-
tion of Feline Practition-
ers and the International
Society of Feline
Medicine.
"An indoor cat is more
likely to be protected from
injury, such as that from
road traffic accidents and
neighborhood cats, as well
as less likely to contract in-
fectious diseases that are
passed from cat to cat,"
Ellis said. "However, an in-
door-only cat may be more
likely to experience bore-
dom and frustration from
the inability to exhibit
hunting behaviors, run-
ning and exploring."
That's why catios are
great, said Fresno, Calif.
resident Harvie Schreiber
The two catios she and her
husband built onto their
home give their four cats
the best of both worlds, she
said.
"We have indoor cats
only and we believe they
live longer, healthier, safer
lives, but we wanted to
give them a chance to
enjoy the outdoors in a


I -,. JOANN MARTIN I' [3
Preferred

SJI.REAL ESTATE mf r

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefmn.net


3605 N. Honeylocust Drive
Beverly Hills FL
Beautiful 2/2/2 home with caged, heated
in-ground pool. Roof replaced 2005, new
heating & air Dec 2011. Some new
carpeting 2012. Home is well maintained
and a must see. Offered for $112,500.
Dir: Rte 486 to north on Forest Ridge
Blvd. to right on Honeylocust Drive.


3826 N Parkside Village Terrace
Spacious 1 bedroom 1 bath villa with
Florida room. New carpeting, new tile in
kitchen. Interior recently painted, new
washer& dryer, inside laundry, large
bedroom. Offered at $39,900.
Dir: 491 To Forest Ridge to right on Lake
Beverly to right on Parks de Village entrance.
Villa is the second villa in on the left.


Catios got their start with
cat breeders and at animal
sanctuaries, but more and more
cat owners have begun building
them at home.


safe way," she said.
The Schreibers started
by turning the small patio
off their bedroom into a
catio. Heavy-duty wiring
was used to enclose the
space, which already had a
roof They added some cat
favorites like trees and
cardboard boxes, and the
area became a favorite
spot for their feline family
members.
That's when the


Schreibers knew they
wanted to build a larger
catio, off the main living
area in their home and
overlooking the backyard
pool.
Since it was so visible
and centrally located, they
wanted the catio to be at-
tractive, as well as
functional.
Harvie Schreiber had
the entire thing, including
the ceiling, painted Tree


KENSINGTON ESTATES
Desirable Pool Home in a Lovely Neighborhood
S 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, plus a den. 2 car garage
Plus a detached 3 car with a workshop! One acre, for your RV,
SBoat and other Big Toys. Home and yard are upgraded nicely.
At $239,900 this is a must see. MLS 708197 ...
i' I :).J:>IJ:.IJ:.IJ>.I :>.J:).J:>IJ:.IJ).IJ>.I :).J:>IJ:>IJ:.IJCT


CAROLE LISTER |
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: 422-4620 ...
ERIA Office: 382-1700


CHARMING VILLA
near CC
* 2/2/2 all new Fam. room
* Eat-in kitchen Berber & tile
* Huge master bath Updated kitchen
* Scr. Atrium Move-in ready
#701368
Reduced to $114,900


FABULOUS
CUL-DE-SAC HOME
* 3/2/2 + Fam. rm. Pool
* Wood,tile & carpet Walk-in wet bar
* Cath. ceilings Breakfast cove
* Master tub & shower 2 walk-in closets
#707215
Reduced to $158,500


Frog Green. She hung dec-
orative artwork and in-
cluded a couch for
humans. The catio also in-
cludes 7-foot-tall cat con-
dos and tons of toys.
The cats "love being out
there and getting the fresh
air," Schreiber said.
"Even when it's horribly
hot in the summer and
freezing cold in the win-
ter, they still want to be
out there."
Some tips from Ben-
jamin on building a catio:
A catio can be built in
any home, no matter the
size. While some people
build large, elaborate
ones, a small window en-
closure also will work if
you're short on space.
Make sure the catio is


fully enclosed, so cats can-
not get out and predators
cannot get in.
Provide cats a view of
the outdoors, and make
sure there's ventilation so
that fresh air comes in. Be
aware of the weather: You
might need a fan in the
summer or a heater in the
winter
Include plenty of toys
and features your cats
enjoy, such as climbing
shelves, scratching posts,
cat condos, trees or a
water fountain.
Keep their litter box in
the catio.
Make the space pleasant
for humans too. Include
comfortable seating so you
and your cats can enjoy
the catio together


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
Executive Office Suites
New Constr auction Class "A" Office
Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 1q
S After Hours 352302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom nwww.allcitrusrealty.corn


wvvw.listerlistings.com I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 E13



To place an ad, call 563-5966

... "-- Classifieds

In Print




and


............ O nline


All


The Time


Fa-X 132) W-565 Tol Fill(US 85-234 1 mai: cassf ld s..-h rniceonine~om wesit: ww~cronr.,eo-iin~co


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $475. + Dep
(352) 628-0170
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $560 mo. Near
Walmart & 2/1 $515.
mo. 352-464-3159




1999 Mobile Home
28x60, bank owned,
Repo, Great Shape
Financing Available.
Call 352-795-1272
MUST SEE*

ATTENTION:
Custom order a new
home and receive
20% OFF, between
now and tax day.
April 15th.
Factory direct,
Call (352) 621-3807
Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273

Palm Harbor Homes
55+ Community
Special!
$5K for your old home!
Many models to
choose from
Call John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on 1/2 AC
fenced yard, 1500sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2x6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C
Call (352) 621-9183

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details





7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065


V' THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/screened
patio on over 1% acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512

DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER
3BR, 3Bath, includes
mother-in-law apt.
roof over, sheet rock,
on 3 lots, 2 sheds,
waterfront $38,000
(217) 474-7727


FLORAL CITY
2BR/1 /2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4
acres, must see inside,
nice & Clean $42,000
(will consider reasona-
ble cash offers)
352-465-7606
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre.
New bathrooms Ig
screened porch,
dead end rd.
$45,900. 352-302-1383
HOMOSASSA
Large 3BR/2BA DW,on
large lot. New carpet,
Freshly painted inside
$3500 to move in
RENT To OWN
3402 S Aberdeen Ter
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330
LECANTO $42,500
3bd/2ba, 12 acre,
new c/h/a & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond.
(352) 621-3929
Mobile Home on
Large Lot Fixer Upper 2
BR, 1BA, Carport,
Laun. Rm. Fl. Rm.
$12,500.
Drive by then call
115 N. West Ave.
Inverness 352-621 -0559
Mobile Homes with
acreage. Ready to
move in.
Seller Financing
(subject to credit
approval).
Lots of room for the
price, 3Br 2Ba.
No renters.
850-308-6473
VMFhomes.com
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-2377
Owner Financing
Available for Mobile
Homes!
Call for Details
352-795-2377


Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 14 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Ready To Move In
3/2 with large back
deck on 1.5 acres.
Close to town
call 352-795-2377




1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
pool and clubhouse
$18,500 (352) 344-5172
2BD/1BA Singlewide
with added tam. rm
rasied deck, Ig. shed,
furnished 55+ $184 mo
Reduced Price $5,500,
(352) 726-3726
55+ MH Gated Com-
munity. Large 3/2,
2000 Jacobson Triple
Wide. 2000+ sq. ft.
Ready to move in.
$68K. Serious inquir-
ies only. Owner will fi-
nance with $20K
down.
727-967-4230
Floral City, DW,
2bd/lba, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726


For Sle ,,r

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858


HOMOSASSA'S
Estate liquidation Sale
Buy 1000's of $$$
below market. 1983
Fleetwood 14x66, 3bd
2ba, good cond. fully
furnIn Nice 55+ park
with reasonable lot
rent ($259/mo). Only
$6500. (352) 628-5977


Stonebrook 2Br/2Ba
1400 sq ft. Enclosed
screened room with
A/C, overlooks pond.
Pantry, full equipped
Kitchen, wood burn-
ing FP in living room.
Den & DR furniture.
Laundry room & W/D;
Shed with sink &
freezer. Partially fur-
nished. Too many
extra's to list. $29.900
8323 W Charmaine Dr.
Homasassa, Fl
must see to
appreciate
352-257-9293

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!





MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financina. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 746-7990


IACTIONI
RENTAL MANAGEMENT 1
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S875 & UNDER
8410 N.Elkcam Blvd.
3/2/1,1250 sq. ft
272 N. Big Oaks Pt.
2/2/2,1510 sq ft
6441 W. Rosedale Dr.
2/2/1,1140sq ft
S600 & UNDER
8S. Fillmore St.
2/1,875 sq. ft.
1872 Freeman PI.
2/1,902 sq. ft
2278 S. Sandburg Pt.
2/1, duplex, great Iocaton
229 S. Monroe
2/1/1,1,072 sq. ft
For More Listings Go To
www.(trusuintyHomieRentals.omn

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

3/2/2..................$850
3/2/2...................$875
2/1/1 .................... $650
2/1 ....................... $500
2/2/1 Condo.......$700

2/2/1 ...................$650

2/2/Carport.......$575
MOBILE
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
S Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




HOMOSASSA
1/1, Clean, Quiet, CHA
$375. Incl. Water. 352-
563-2114, 257-6461
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Large 2/2, ceramic tile
throughout, eat-in Kit.
screened porch, laundry
room, CHA, near new
Walmart $550. lst/Sec,
352-746-4191
352-697-5900


CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD



& Iy Et R_ r


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incl Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furn. Long or Shrt
Term 352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



HERNANADO
Terra Vista 3BR Villa,
furn. seasonal/ longer
Incd's ext. Maint. &
club memb. 302-7559
LECANTO
Cottage 1/1 $525
incls. pwer /water, Dirt
Road (352) 220-2958



Beverly Hills
1 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, 1st
month free Move in
$1150, 442-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm. Scrn por.
$600. 352-464-2514








E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299,
352-364-2073
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411
INVERNESS
31212, Clean & Open
Close to Downtown
No Pets, 352-400-5723
INVERNESS
3/2/carport, Ig fenced
yard, sun room appv'd
pet with add'l fee.
$775/mo sec& 1st.
352-697-2195
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850.
352-726-7212

Pine Ridge
3bd,2ba,2cg, avail.
March 1st, beautiful
home backed up to
wooded area for
privacy, bkfst nook
off galley kitchen,
dining, Ig Ivng room,
lanai, screened in
patio, w/d,$1000.
+ $1000. sec.
(603) 860-3501
RENT TO OWN
Inv 3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
Nice, quite/secluded
1/1 porch, deck, boat
sliip. H20/garb incd
$525 + sec. No Pets
941-730-2359 (cell)




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Blue Ridge Mountain
Getaway!
4.64 acres, only
$44,800. Beautifully
wooded 4.64 acre
estate with pictur-
esque rolling
mountain views.
Ideally located at
end of quiet country
road with no traffic.
Enjoy privacy along
with peace & quiet.
Build when you are
ready. All under-
ground utilities:
water, electric, fiber
optic cable.
Excellent financing.
Perfect for weekend
mtn cabin or
year-round
residence. Call now
866-952-5303, x 146


AFe


DEB
THOMPSON
r One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
r Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
r Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb vahoo.com
and
debthomDson.com





Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


S


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.








:I














I "RUARY I I
.10AM


Pat Plaz








726 BRADI ST'I"]1..'


Open House

OPEN HOUSE
Sun. Feb. 14, 11a- I
Start the New Year
With A
Home Sweet Home
2 HOUSES*
1105 Knob Hill St.
806 Shelly Terr.
Inverness, 34450
Call Patty Sargent
For More Details
352-613-6500




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514




2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
REMODELED
MOVE-IN READY
$59k.
352-527-1239



IF3

Newly Updated 2/2/2
w/family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
3229 N Juniperus Way
$114,900 352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased





For Sale 0
Beautiful home you
are looking for! 4
bedroom. 2 bath, 2
car garage in gated
community large
14K sq. ft. lot, cus-
tom pool many up-
grades. 3300 sq.
ft.Can email info.For
Sale by Owner NO
brokers please!
352-601-6942
352-513-4463




4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


Hoe

3/2
1/4 Acre MOL
on River Oak Lane
Inverness
Glamour bath
Eat-in Kitchen
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Nice Double Lot
3/ Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

OPEN HOUSE
Sun. Feb. 14,11a-1
Start the New Year
With A
Home Sweet Home
2 HOUSES*
1105 Knob Hill St.
806 Shelly Terr.
Inverness, 34450
Call Patty Sargent
For More Details
352-613-6500


For Sale S,
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367
RENT TO OWN
Inv 3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
back yard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on /4 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




2Br/2Ba/1CG home
on approx 1 ac. land
Owner Financed
$80,000, w/$5,000
down. No qualifying
(305) 891-2323

AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RrMRC
REALTY ONE


For Sale By Owner 3/2
w/ Pool, Crystal River
Near Plantation Golf
Course Call for Appt.
(954) 547-5722 Cell
$89,900.


Hoe

3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


For Sale %
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


4BR/2BA, 2400 Sq ft.
pool home, add'l heat
pump. Well maintained
Pine St. Fully Furnished
$225,000
(352) 382-5298


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.



Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq.ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351















Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

S I great values
out
there for buy-
ers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office

-w111111116 J


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bLDowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

Buying or Selling,
it's time to make
your move!








I
Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
e-mail:
Cfatone@tampabav.rr.
corn
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"










Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


714 Offerings





Awr'o s Online Bidding Available
AN A1418 GAL R2034; 45 Sell with Reserve
-~ -
FL-AB ~ b 18,1 418 2037;^ ^ ^^ ^









#1 Employment source is







www.ch ronicleonline.com
ww~crniloniX ~ o


E "ell
Citrus Count







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATERFRONT, Inverness
Own your own
canal peninsula
just off the
Withlacoochie!
2/2 Inverness Waterfront.
MLS# 357281
Oakwood Village,
Beverly Hills
Relax and enjoy
the picturesque
nature views!
2/2/2 Beverly Hills
Oakwood Village
MLS# 701630
Beverly Hills
Beautiful 2/2/2,
New Roof, NewA/C,
New Appliances!
MLS#707667

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL





Il
DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com






A
LaWanda Watt
THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com
ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


1 1Employmntisource is


rwww.chronicleonline.com


Citrus Coun"I
Homes


Hoe

"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financina
$10.000 Down.
10 vrs @ 6 percent
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002



Citrus Hills Townhouse
2br/2/2ba + carport
Fully FurnishedVery
nice, many extra's
near pool, great view
Must See $79,000
(352) 527-4518
For -uke^
Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some turn, new Lanai
& Lam, ceramic floors.
$48,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Inverness Village Condo
2/2 ground floor over
looks pool mature trees
55 plus community
1035 living area
634-3976


HOMOSASSA-Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000 352-422-1311
INVERNESS, 2BR/1BA
Carport. Fl. Rm., Open
Lake Completely
Remodeled Inside &
Out, 1 mile from town
$125.000,352-422-4749
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop,$169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To Vpiews
my properties"


Homosassa/Crystal
River area, 2-3 BR
Need Owner Finance
option. Please Call
218-290-1869 (cell)


FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre.land survey &
clear title.assessed at
$23,800.power and
homes in area. ASKING
$8,500.813-792-1355



GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905
2.75 Acre Pine Ridge
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
Call 352-527-2711

MuST SELL

HERNANDO
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
Lot for sale $15,000
OBO. 781-864-1906
352- 726-2821
Inverness 80 x 100
private lot, High, Dry
convenient location
quiet residential area
$5,000. obo
(352) 476-8310, Owner
Watrfon


PARADISE! OZELLO! f
Ideal for Fisher
persons -seafood
lovers Middle of Fl.
State Preserve.
Minutes for Gulf.
$39,000, 727-733-0583 I


Your World





CHRpNICLE
.,.. ........ .., .IF


Home o Finder

www.chronicleh.., '-n-finder.com


~Fnaar I

I

I


HOW..


AGENTS -


'WANTED i ui Yor rMwHom,
ImB- Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com
Um


Desperately
Need Rentals
Office Open
7 Days a Week
LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014 E15


IF A111111111








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NORTHERNERS AND LOCALS ALIKE
WILL LOVE THIS HOME
IN OAKWOOD VILLAGE

Mi __:,= if,:- :-:1 $87,800
Call Teil/ Steail 220 1008
Email temlann steiatt,'contu'21 comn


YOU'LL BE IMPRESSED
.1' ... I ... h I. h l l', ,'.,,,, 1 h l.6 'l.. '.. h, I ,I a ,
I11,,'1 I ,h I, ,I, ,1 ,', ',1,1 I' ',h Ia,,I a I l a,1,111 ,"", '
I,.1 ,-6 1.11 h :.6 h I. II6'i. h1ll 1., '. F ..1 1h i, I jh
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ri.: =i:i 4: ASKING $114.900
Pit D> ,352' 212 7280
I'",i h-lanw a,1,,1 2Iraldid, aJm


fE.'l.-1i'-;-'~ -
I',,,,, .... *"*..*-,, . ..

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Mi 3 = hil"O REDUCED $170,000
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


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Mi = 1ii:.iiifi:x $219,000
Jeanne o0 il'illaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
iait, CilitusCountl'Sold con


CELINA HILLS
I 'a''I '"'a I a'''- IlIi,.-,, h,, I' pi aaa ,,'lla
,I |Nl ii' il. l' h l-ln :l,,,1,1 ,,,,,,,, .... n i. l I' ,N'F
,,,'-al.' h,'a'a a'll,,,,' .,i,.a'',,.''

Nl. ivN $160,000
Call Jim Moilon 422-2173
Io see this lovel' home


INVERNESS HOME
aIJlh1 Ija, Ja I a a.. .a l-ai aI'...vi.j' *. 'J I'..l ..j .l l

MI', =Ii/,:.',". ASKING $95,200
Call laizanda W'all 212 1989
io come see ihis izell kepi home!


PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB
M ,:,,' a. a In '.i, I,:, Il 1 l, f ,:,,fll I ll,,'
I'll Ian' nn' aa :.aii, 'a l'- llaall I l npnl a'.l m.n,:n

-I tl:ll- la Iii -1l ll lllllllI 1A h. l ,ll:llI Iiii .l l hl
i'ii,:,i, ,I a I: i a''l a, l '' I' m l' l lia ..,I

Mi /i3 = i:.' ASKING $110,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072


CITRUS SPRINGS HOME SITS
ELEGANTLY ON 1/2 ACRE CORNER LOT
_. _" _" Vzlh Ia'''',I l i.l'' I ,, l'j'aaa ,6,,61 h,
laal i aa. h: la I,'II la, Im~~~ 'lla''
I,:l,:, ,l ,,i. i, i M I_ = R1:1: ._ 6 I :1
lon aine 0 Regan 586 0075


FOR YOU TO CHOOSE FROM


i': '"iHl I' lh '''I''hl l' h .:.. -.. I l a:: Id

r li.: = 4 $6.500 PER ACRE
Cm" Jm AIl.il.}" 422 2173


LOVELY 3 BEDROOM. 2 BATH HOME
IN CANTERBURY LAKES EST.
H.,,,,- I- ,la,,, I.'...'''.' I.I i II. 1. 1 a''.1 .

11,, h ,, l, ,,,,,,, I h I I, ,, ,, I,,, h: ,
'aI a''''il I,, .m ',aHIHI Il ''l aa' i ll~ il
rii :=-::- v ASKING $125.000
Ckll Nmai Jana. 11 352 4008072


* '-i1 -all i i i lii ll l I l. ....|



W wI:I' A I -_ i aal I I a-alll'll m 'a il 1ih
* l..i. | I.A ll, I a lill ll. ., h. ll
Mi 3 = /i:.l:. ASKING $69,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


INVERNESS 3/2/1
ON ALMOST 1/2 ACRE
ONLY $62,900
I 1.i. ,'llj : I .a l ll ,lali lll mh.iilia hi- l,1 I lil


Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


la.a _.rIIa 1 I..1 rI I: I I a -a' '.I... ''
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'''I 1 q11 I.. 1' H1l .
lad 'i "-'l i l,H~ ,ll a''' I- .''"-a. i :I.Il
rii: = -.. ASKING $194.900
Pit D,- ,352' 212 7280
1' .l .1.1. llal e2Iat ld?,a.a jnai


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r1,,lh,, h~l. I ,I.. I III, II.,,hlll, ll 11....
O iNiS.. i O,,

l H H-l ...... h,, h l, h l, 1

ONLYS$254,000


I I ..a,,,,l ,,, I,,,l,- )




..... .:.& $139.800. r 1 ..: = .......
P139. Boo. il ii2 a
Pit DB>-,352' 212 7280
|a1ivil 'a .1.1.1 621pi dao Co'gr~ n. ;


Illa I L.- .l........ l r.a,' I. fi.aj i.' a

I..I a,, l \t,- ,,,, ,,, I i'\- H ,,- l- .. i..

l; 1..:-. $95,000
C.ill Slel.n Sluit 352 2/2 02/11


TRULY MOVE-IN READY HOME




rJ.:. HIN U.I.I.I..., l1 1.1.hh ,I a hal' 1, 1
rl: i -.I. :: ASKING $119.800
Pit Do,- 352 212 7280
l'ail lh~lna lil LiL 21iprldflaa .,ai


E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014