Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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XLVIII: Opposites collide in superstar QB showdown

AY Li.CI^ C CITRUS COUNT YIll %.


Partly cloudy
with coastal fog.
PAGE A4


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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 119 ISSUE 179


2014 FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE SESSION


EXCURSIONS:


SyLORIDA,.Co


Cozumel
Chronicle correspondent
Amanda Mims writes
about her trip to the
island of Cozumel in
Mexico./Page A13
HOMEFRONT:


LEON

Chronicle photo illustration
State legislative leaders rolled out the centerpiece of their 2014 agenda before a gaggle of reporters Wednesday in Tallahassee at
a legislative preview session hosted by the Associated Press. Tax cuts and economic opportunity dominated the conversation, with
one focal point being a $400 million reduction in motor vehicle fees expected to save Floridians about $25 apiece.


2014 designs
Felt is trending hot in
designer fashions for
the home./HomeFront
BUSINESS:


Super boom?
Sports economists say
the financial impact of
the Super Bowl could
fall far below New York
City's $600 million
expectations./Page Dl
COMMENTARY:
The state of
Inverness
City
manager
Frank Di-
SGiovanni
shares
Shis report
for the
city of
Inverness./Page Cl


HOMEFRONT:


Azaleas
Gardener Jane Weber
writes about hybrid
azaleas./Page E9


USA WEEKEND:


Olympics
Olympic figure skating
gold medalist Kristi
Yamaguchi joins USA
WEEKEND to celebrate
Olympic spirit./Inside
II 111] =11,111
Annie's Mailbox ........A4
Classifieds ................D6
Crossword ............... A14
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B4
M ovies ..................... A14
Obituaries ................A6
Together................... A20
Veterans ........ A16

6 I118 1111 I 0o


State GOP's



road map:



$5o00M in



lower tolls

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer


Representatives are committed to following
through on Gov. Rick Scott's promise of
$500 million in tax cuts. Senate President
Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, voiced agreement to
reduce vehicle registration fees for all Florida drivers.
They support Scott's concept of eliminating the 2009 annual motor vehicle
tax increases, which statewide represents about $400 million. It could save
Florida drivers an estimated $25 per vehicle.
The $500 million tax cut is part of what Gaetz and Weatherford called their
joint 2014 Work Plan Florida Agenda.
"We have chosen five initiatives we plan to work on together," Gaetz said.
"These are the issues we plan to have an influence on."
Other categories are: Economic Opportunity
Editor's note: On Jan. Through Education, the Florida GI Bill, Protect Vul-
29, state leaders and nerable Floridians, and Improve Government Ac-
candidates for state countability and Efficiency
office addressed the Weatherford said it's the second year of a reform
2014 Associated Press agenda that will leave more money for Florida
legislative planning families.
session in Tallahassee.
Gov. Rick Scott's While they emphasized agreement with Scott on
proposed tax cuts and the total tax cut, they were only specific on cutting
Republican legislative motor vehicle fees.
leadership support for "We will be asking our colleagues to consider a
the concept were among $500 million tax cut," Gaetz said. "There are a number
the topics discussed, of areas we can look at. The governor has mentioned
several. Every one of those will be considered."
Scott's tax cut is the promotional centerpiece of his proposed 2014-15,
$74.2 billion budget.
In addition to vehicle fees, cuts include a sales tax rate reduction for com-
mercial rent, lower filing fees for businesses and increasing the level of in-
come exempt from the business tax.
Gaetz labeled motor vehicle taxes as confiscatory fees that are wrong.
"We intend to roll those fees back as much as we can and consider other
forms of tax relief to hit the governor's goal," he said.
"We're with him on tax cuts," Weatherford said. '"And he has a commitment
from the House and from the Senate that we're going to cut $500 million in
taxes.
"It probably will be one of the larger tax cuts the state of Florida has had in
a very long time and it's long needed and overdue."
In response, state Senate Democratic leader Chris Smith, D-Fort Laud-
erdale, did not address specifics of the proposed tax cuts.
"With an election year upon us, we're expecting lots of 'feel-good' proposals
from the governor, and the budget he released on Wednesday was no excep-
tion," Smith said. "Four years ago, Rick Scott spent $70 million of his own
money to win the election.
"This year, he's preparing to spend $500 million of Floridians' tax dollars to
do the same thing."
Nan Rich, seeking the Democratic nomination for governor, was critical of
Scott's record.
However, she agreed there is a good case for rolling back some of the fees in-
creased in 2009.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


LOCAL
LEGISLATORS

DEAN,

SMITH

AIM FOR

FAMILIAR

FOES
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The start of the state legislative
session is a month away, so any-
thing is still on the table when it
comes to lawmakers' bills.
Lawmakers sometimes wait until
after the session has begun to file
spending bills. Because House mem-
bers may only file six bills per ses-
sion, it isn't unusual to see them hold
spaces open for bills.
As of Friday, though, here's the
rundown of bills filed so far by Cit-
rus County's legislators, Rep. Jim-
mie T Smith and Sen. Charlie Dean,
both Inverness Republicans.
SMITH: CUT DOWN
ON WELFARE CHEATS
HB 155: Provides a new eco-
nomic incentive tax break for com-
panies that hire Florida-based
subcontractors on national security-
related federal project contracts.
The tax incentive would equal up to
4 percent of the company's state cor-
porate income tax.
HB 515: Provides higher crimi-
nal penalties for welfare-fraud
crimes, depending on the amount in-
volved. For instance, if the value of
See Page A9


OTHER
PRIORITIES

'SCORCHED

EARTH' FOR

SEX CRIMES,

MORE PERKS

FORVETS
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Strengthening links between edu-
cation and jobs and expanding
school choice are parts of the state
Legislature's agenda for increasing
economic opportunity
There will also be a push to make
Florida the most welcoming state in
the nation for veterans and military
and the most unwelcoming state for
sexual predators.
"Nearly one in five Floridians
today are living in poverty that is
See Page A5


Tnn f


I JElAI
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
57


1144





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Traveling?


Need a U.S.


passport?


ANGELA VICK
Special to the Chronicle
Are you taking a vaca-
tion this year? Will you
need a U.S. passport for
your travels? The Citrus
County Clerk of the Circuit
Court and Comptroller's
Office can help you cross
that item off the list. As a
U.S. Passport Acceptance
Facility, the office accepts
applications for new pass-
ports and can also take the
required photo.
All citizens of the United
States applying for a U.S.
passport must apply in
person at the clerk's office
or a passport agency For
new passports, Applica-
tion DS-11 should be com-
pleted in its entirety using
black ink. This form is
available at the clerk's of-
fice or can be accessed on
the clerk's website at
www. clerk.citrus.fl.us.
Please note: Do not sign
the application until asked
to do so at the Acceptance
Facility
In addition to the appli-
cation, it is essential to
bring a certified copy of
your birth certificate or
naturalization papers and
valid photo identification,
such as a driver's license.
Minors younger than 16
years must apply in person
with both parents. If both
parents are not able to be
present please refer to the
special circumstances on
Page 1 of the DS-11 form,
or contact our office for as-
sistance. Children are not
subject to renewal pass-
ports; a new application
must be completed using
form DS-11.
Payment for passport
photos and applications
may be made in cash,
checks and credit cards. A


ON THE NET
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us

separate check or money
order is also required for
each application, payable
to the U.S. Department of
State.
Passport renewals may
be submitted by mail if the
following four statements
are true:
Your most recent U.S.
passport is undamaged
and can be submitted with
your application.
It was issued when
you were age 16 or older
It was issued within
the past 15 years.
It was issued in your
current name, or you can
legally document your
name change.
Form DS-82 should be
used for all mail passport
renewals and are mailed
directly to the National
Passport Processing
Center
The National Passport
Processing Center cur-
rently takes four to six
weeks to process routine
service applications while
requests for expedited
service are processed in
about half of that time
frame.
The status of your appli-
cation may be tracked on-
line at the U.S.
Department of State's
website travel.state.gov
Citizens are encouraged
to contact the clerk's office
at 352-341-6424 or visit its
website at www clerk.
citrus.fl.us to obtain com-
plete information regard-
ing the required
documents for passports.
Angela Vick is Citrus
County clerk of the circuit
court and comptroller


Center teaches art to disabled


ZACK MCDONALD
The News Herald
PANAMA CITY The
paintbrush sets Amy Petty
free.
Her disabilities aside,
when the paintbrush is in
her hand, it might as well
be the world.
"I can do anything I
want," Petty, a student at
Pyramid's adult day train-
ing facilities, said. "I like
being able to paint any-
thing I want."
That day, she had cho-
sen thick-stemmed iris
flowers. The violet and
yellow of the petals were
standing distinctly out
from the greens of the
grass background. Petty's
works, along with that of
her classmates, are not
only "inspired," as an art
critic would say, they're
downright impressive.
The gallery of Pyramid,
a school for mentally and
physically disabled
adults, consists of various
styles of art. From paint-
ings to jewelry to sculp-
tures and found art, most
media are represented.
And on the walls of the
tiny front room facing
Harrison Avenue, styles of
artists throughout history
are mimicked with adept
accuracy
"I have a lot of talent in
here," said Amanda Rein-
feld, visual arts coordina-
tor "Some take three to


Comprehensive foot
care for the entire


Associated Press
Student aide Jonathan Jones helps Matt Haley with a
painting Jan. 22 during class at Pyramid Adult Day
Training in Panama City.


four months, and others
they can put in half a year
of work into.
"That one took a little
less than a year," she said,
pointing out a 4-by-6-foot
found-art project designed
and painted with methodi-
cal precision. "Just work-
ing a few hours every day"
In other classes taught
at Pyramid, students
learn daily living skills
like personal hygiene,
how to balance a check-
book or how to set a table;
and also general educa-
tion curriculum of basic
math skills, reading, cur-
rent events and history
The visual and
performance-arts classes,
though, teach lessons the
students otherwise would
not encounter in the real


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world.
"It's creative problem-
solving," Reinfeld said.
"They're learning to bal-
ance colors and things like
that, which makes them
access parts of their brain
they wouldn't usually"
The time and concen-
tration creative work re-
quires acts as a


therapeutic tool, Reinfeld
said, for most students.
Jonathan Crowley was
painting a snow-caked
mountain side, glowing or-
ange in an early morning
light with deep-green
conifer trees scattered
and jutting out from the
white palette. Crowley had
an inclination toward the
stark contrast of dark sil-
houettes in the foreground
with sweeping, hazy land-
scapes in the back.
"It's just fun," Crowley
said. "It doesn't calm me
down; I get excited when I
paint."
All the students' pieces
in Pyramid are com-
pletely their own, so a
great deal of pride and
hard work goes into each,
Reinfeld said.
"I'll teach them blend-
ing techniques on a sepa-
rate sheet of paper, but
I'm completely hands-off,"
she said. "All the paintings
were done by the students
alone."


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LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Purple Heart event
scheduled Feb. 15
The Combat Wounded
Patriots of Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
invites all veterans and the
public, especially families, to
attend the ninth annual Pur-
ple Heart Ceremony at
11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15,
at the Florida National
Guard Armory, 8551 W.
Venable St., Crystal River.
Dedicated to the memory
of departed Chapter 776
Patriot Donald Guard, the
patriotic ceremony will com-
memorate the proud legacy
of the Purple Heart and pay
tribute to Florida's fallen he-
roes of the Global War on
Terror and America's
wounded warriors with spe-
cial recognition of World
War II recipients.
The MOPH Department
of Florida Afghanistan/Iraq
War Memorial Portrait
Mural, which honors those
Floridians who fell during
the Afghanistan/Iraq cam-
paigns, will be on display.
The mural is the first memo-
rial to bear both the en-
graved names and color
portraits of those who fell.
For information, visit the
Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org
or call 352-382-3847.
Free gardening
workshops offered
Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping will
offer two free Florida-
friendly gardening work-
shops in February at the
Citrus County Extension
Service building, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
"Right Plant, Right
Place" is set from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4.
This workshop will discuss
plant materials that are
used successfully in this
hardiness zone, their grow-
ing characteristics and qual-
ities, including large trees,
ornamental trees, buffer
shrubs, large shrubs, low
shrubs, groundcover,
perennials and annuals.
Landscaping 201 is set
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Feb. 18. This work-
shop will offer gardening
suggestions including gar-
den theme, composition,
vertical layering of materi-
als, garden preparation and
establishment.
Contact Steven Davis at
352-527-5708 to confirm
your participation.

Orange City
Meth lab catches fire
while girl home alone
Authorities said a meth
lab caught fire while a 9-
year-old girl was left home
alone.
The Volusia County
Sheriff's Office charged
Melissa Berry and Jonathan
Coburn with child neglect,
manufacturing meth, arson
and cultivation of cannabis.
Deputies were called to
the home near Orange City
at about 3:45 p.m. Friday.
A fire marshal detective
determined meth lab equip-
ment in the garage had
caused the fire.
The child was turned
over to relatives.

Miami
Cycling event for
rare cancer research
Nearly 300 cancer sur-
vivors, patients, their fami-
lies and others gathered
Saturday in Miami for a
team cycling event to raise
money for the research of
rare cancers.
The Cycle for Survival
took place at Equinox Coral


Gables.
All money raised will go
to Memorial Sloan Kettering
Cancer Center to fund clini-
cal trials and research stud-
ies within six months of the
event.
-From staff and wire reports


FDOT to talk future of roads


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
How do you get there from
here?
If that question frustrates a
driver, then some answers may be
revealed at the next meeting of
the Citrus County Council, when
it focuses on the state's Future
Corridors Initiative, a look ahead
at the best routes for moving peo-
ple and freight.
Ananth Prasad, secretary of the
Florida Department of Trans-
portation (FDOT), introduced the
initiative two years ago.
'As we emerge from the reces-
sion, Florida is expected to regain


its position as one of the nation's
fastest-growing states," Prasad
said. "Population, visitors and
freight tonnage are projected to
grow 35 percent or more between
2010 and 2040. This means our
transportation system will need to
move more people and freight over
the next several decades to support
our economic growth and quality of
life. Clearly, our existing highway
system will not be able to keep up
with this increase in demand."
FDOT representatives will be
the guest speakers at the CCC's
meeting to discuss how Citrus
County fits into the plan. Discus-
sion will specifically focus on the
Tampa Bay-to-Northeast Florida


Study Area. This study will assess
the need for better connectivity
between Tampa Bay and Jack-
sonville, two large regions that
are not well connected today
An early focus of the study will
evaluate operational improve-
ments to Interstate 75 as well as
potential extensions of the Sun-
coast Parkway or Florida's Turn-
pike to improve connectivity in
the southern portion of the study
area. The full study will explore a
possible new connection between
the Suncoast Parkway and 1-75 in
the Gainesville/Ocala area, as
well as enhanced connectivity be-
tween Gainesville-Ocala and the
Jacksonville area.


* WHAT: Citrus County Council
meeting.
WHEN: 9 a.m. Feb. 12.
Coffee and networking at
8:30 a.m.
WHERE: Beverly Hills Lions
Club, 72 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills.

The CCC is a nonprofit consor-
tium of homeowner associations,
civic clubs and environmental
groups. Monthly meetings are
open to the public.
For information, call John Wade,
president, at 352-341-1937, or visit
www.citruscountycouncil.org.


J.A&RyrA(C come roue


Promgoers

become princesses

for the day
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

W INVERNESS
however you
are, you are
loved.
That was
the theme of
this year's annual Cinderella's
Closet, which transformed
more than 120 Citrus County
high school girls Saturday into
princesses for the day at Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church in
Inverness.
Cinderella's Closet a free
prom dress giveaway is a
project of the Working Chris-
tian Women group, under the
umbrella of Cornerstone Bap-
tist Church.
"In 2008, our minister chal-
lenged us to have an outreach
ministry," said co-coordinator
Dana Davis. "I already had
one in mind. My daughter was
going to college and we were
cleaning out her closets. She
had two prom dresses and I
didn't want to trash them.
"We talked about how nice it
would be if there was a place
where girls could go and get
dresses for their daughters, es-
pecially for people who were
struggling."
Like many girls who have
benefited from this ministry,
Anna Venero and Sarah Welch
have found their prom dresses
at Cinderella's Closet for the
past several years.
"My freshman year, I was in-
vited to go to prom and I didn't
have a dress," Venero said. "I
came to Cinderella's Closet
and found the perfect, brand-
new dress."
However, their experience
does not stop there. Venero
and Welch both donate their
time to Cinderella's Closet
after they find their own
dresses.
"It was such a good experi-
ence and connection that I was
able to make with my god-
mothers," Venero said. "I
wanted to give back and let
other girls experience the
same thing."
"When we see the smiles on
the faces of the girls, it makes


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Anna Venero, left, and Sarah Welch, right, both found dresses Saturday at the annual Cinderella's
Closet high school prom dress giveaway. Venero was pleased with what she saw when she looked
into the mirror and saw her "dream" purple dress.


it worth what we do," Welch
added.
Coordinator Melinda Fergu-
son explained that each
princess team has three volun-
teers who act as a girl's fairy
godmothers. They take a girl,
love and dote on her and wait
hand and foot on her as she
chooses an outfit.
Girls are offered a variety of
colors, styles and lengths.
Shoes, purses, jewelry, acces-
sories and onsite alterations


are also available. Girls this
year had more than 1,300
dresses to choose from.
"Time and time again, it just
gives you chills when you see
the girls try on the dresses,"
Davis said. "Over and over
again, we are seeing girls that
are discovering that beauty
and confidence inside
themselves."
Now, Davis is coordinating
with high schools for profes-
sionals and volunteers to as-


Associated Press
LAKE WALES Bok
Tower Gardens, a central
Florida landmark, is aiming
for a $12 million renovation.
The cost will pay for the
creation of new gardens and
restoration of existing ones,
all tethered by a new, hard-
surface path, giving full ac-
cess to the disabled and
parents with strollers. An-
nual members have raised


sist with the girls' hairdos,
makeup and photographer for
the day of the Citrus County
proms.
Cinderella's Closet was
sponsored this year by Paul &
Jerry's Self Storage, Pronto
Dry Cleaners, Windmill Stor-
age, Venero and Sons and
many more.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext 1334, or eworthington
(@chronicleonline. corn.


all but $4.3 million of the
needed funds.
Other projects include a
children's discovery garden,
an outdoor kitchen for pri-
vate parties, a new Florida
wild garden, an enhanced
shuttle route and new ex-
hibits detailing park history
The gardens were de-
signed by noted landscape
architect Frederick Law
Olmsted Jr and opened
85 years ago.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS From the warm,
buttery yellow walls to the metal tree
sculpture and inviting reception area,
the newly remodeled Chronicle office
in downtown Inverness is back open
for business with a new roommate.
The office is now co-occupied with
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce.
"We had space available in our Main
Street branch office, and the chamber
of commerce needed a stronger down-
town location," said Chronicle Pub-
lisher Gerry Mulligan. "By subleasing
space to the chamber, we help this im-
portant business organization get a
stronger location and at the same time
reduce costs to the newspaper by shar-


ing expenses. It's a win-win situation."
Josh Wooten, chamber chief execu-
tive officer, said being downtown
means greater visibility
"The square is very vibrant, and we
feel that to benefit the city of Inver-
ness, our members and visitors, being
located right there in the hub is going
to be a great enhancement for every-
body"
In addition, Chronicle staff re-
porters will be working out of the In-
verness office regularly on a rotating
basis. Stop by and say hello, ask a
question or share a story idea.
The address is 106 Main St., Inver-
ness. For the Chronicle, call 352-726-
0902. For the chamber, call
352-726-2801.
Office hours are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday


Chamber to share Chronicle's

office space in Inverness


Bok Tower


Gardens to


get $12 million


makeover






A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Your sensitive approach
will gain you admiration, but will also
cause some people to feel that they
can take advantage of you. You must
not leave yourself vulnerable to abuse.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
stand to make some extra money if
you can focus on work today
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Try not
to employ emotional blackmail to get
your way with your partner. Chances
are good that it will backfire, leaving
you exasperated and with only yourself
to blame.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You may
fall for the hyperbole of unreliable indi-
viduals. Don't make any promises, and
don't expect others to keep theirs.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You must
make good use of your energy today If
you expect help, you will end up feel-
ing angry. Plan your day carefully
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Headaches or problems with skin,
bones or teeth may occur. Do not
overdo it today. Allow yourself to rest.
Don't impulsively overspend.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Notori-
ety may not turn out to benefit you
today. Be cautious about sharing your
grievances. A colleague's agenda may
set you back.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Make sure
you have all the facts before weighing
in, or you may say things you will later
regret. Minor accidents will irritate. Be
careful to avoid any such problem.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) It's a
good day to use your hands and get
crafty You will enjoy seeing some tan-
gible results. Children may seek out
your counsel today. Make a plan to get
active.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Complete
domestic tasks first thing. Plan to in-
clude your family in today's activities.
Unexpected guests may turn up.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you've
been avoiding solving domestic prob-
lems, you will meet with difficulties.
Your partner is unlikely to want to help
you now.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If
you've been negligent with your do-
mestic responsibilities, tension will
mount. You may want to consider mak-
ing a residential move.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
Friends or relatives may want to med-
dle in your personal affairs, but if you
care about your partner, you must
keep them at bay.


ENTERTAINMENT


Dylan Farrow
resurrects Allen
molestation claim
NEW YORK- Dylan Farrow
renewed molestation allegations
against Woody Allen, claiming
the movie director sexually as-
saulted her when she was 7
after he and actress Mia Farrow
adopted her.
In an open-letter to The New
York Times posted online Satur-
day, Dylan Farrow made her first
public comments about the 1992
incident. In a letter to op-ed
columnist Nicholas Kristof, she
said she was moved to speak
out because of Hollywood's con-
tinued embrace of Allen.
"That he got away with what he
did to me haunted me as I grew
up," wrote Farrow. "I was stricken
with guilt that I had allowed him
to be near other little girls."
The New York Times reported
that Allen declined comment.
Also, representatives for Allen
and for former wife Mia Farrow
also did not immediately return
requests for comment Saturday
from The Associated Press. Allen
has long maintained his innocence.
Allen was investigated on
child molestation claims for the
alleged 1992 incident in Con-
necticut. It was investigated the
next year, but prosecutors
elected not to charge him.
The handling of the investiga-
tion was criticized after Litchfield
County state attorney Frank S.
Maco said in a news conference
there was "probable cause" to
charge Allen, although he
elected not to.
The 1992 allegation came
shortly after Allen became involved
with Mia Farrow's adopted
daughter, Soon-Yi Previn. Allen
was not the adoptive father of
Previn, who was about 19 at the
time. Allen was in his mid-50s.
The two married in 1997 and
have two adopted daughters.


Associated Press
A car drives by the empty lot of Woody Guthrie's childhood
home on Aug. 22, 2013, in Okemah, Okla. Architects planning
the rebuild of folk legend Guthrie's boyhood home hope to
begin construction at the site in mid-March and want to
complete the project before the town's annual festival in July
that celebrates the singer's life.


Build schedule set for
Guthrie home in Okla.
TULSA, Okla. -Work on the
rebuild of folk legend Woody
Guthrie's boyhood home is
scheduled to begin in mid-March
so it can be finished before an
annual summer festival that cel-
ebrates the singer's life, a proj-
ect manager said Friday.
Dan Riedemann, who is in
charge of the rebuild, also said
the project in the town of
Okemah has generated around
$450,000 in pledges from the
public for the reconstruction of
the 1860s-era property, which
he's budgeted at $600,000.
Best known for the song "This
Land is Your Land," Guthrie came
of age during the Great Depres-
sion and later embraced left-wing
politics, including for a time some
tenets of communism.
The rebuild will use original
planks salvaged from the run-
down property called London
House, which was eventually
torn down because it was in
such a state of disrepair.


The local businessman who
bought the property saved the
lumber for the day when others
would recognize Guthrie's im-
portance to the town and the
country. The bundle of preserved
wood eventually ended up at the
Okfuskee County History Center.
Track team uses 'The
Biebs' to recruit girls
ANKENY, Iowa -A central
Iowa high school is trying to con-
vince girls to go out for track and
field by touting the sport as a
way to avoid turning out like
troubled pop star Justin Bieber.
The Des Moines Register says
Ankeny Centennial High School
has posted a tongue-in-cheek flyer
sporting one of Bieber's latest
mug shots. It reads: "Justin Bieber
never ran track. Now he's in jail.
Coindcidence? Don't Beliebe it. Don't
end up like Bieber. Run track."
The 19-year-old Bieber was
arrested Jan. 23 during what po-
lice describe as an illegal street
drag race.
-From wire reports


CIOus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 2, the 33rd
day of 2014. There are 332 days left
in the year. This is Groundhog Day.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Feb. 2,1914, Charles Chaplin
made his movie debut as the com-
edy short "Making a Living" was re-
leased by Keystone Film Co.
On this date:
In 1536, present-day Buenos
Aires, Argentina, was founded by
Pedro de Mendoza of Spain.
In 1653, New Amsterdam -now
New York City was incorporated.
In 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe
Hidalgo, ending the Mexican-
American War, was signed.
In 1887, Punxsutawney, Pa., held
its first Groundhog Day festival.
In 1943, the remainder of Nazi
forces from the Battle of Stalingrad
surrendered in a major victory for
the Soviets in World War II.
In 1971, Idi Amin, having seized
power in Uganda, proclaimed him-
self president.
In 1990, in a dramatic conces-
sion to South Africa's black majority,
President F.W. de Klerk lifted a ban
on the African National Congress and
promised to free Nelson Mandela.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush unveiled a $2.4
trillion budget featuring a record
deficit, as well as big increases for
defense and homeland security.
Five years ago: Hillary Rodham
Clinton was sworn in as U.S. secre-
tary of state.
Today's Birthdays: Former French
President Valery Giscard d'Estaing
is 88. Comedian Tom Smothers is 77.
Rock singer-guitarist Graham Nash
is 72. Country singer Howard Bellamy
(The Bellamy Brothers) is 68. TV chef
Ina Garten is 66. Model Christie
Brinkley is 60. Singer Shakira is 37.
Thought for Today: "It was naive
of the 19th-century optimists to expect
paradise from technology and it
is equally naive of the 20th-century
pessimists to make technology the
scapegoat for such old shortcomings
as man's blindness, cruelty, imma-
turity, greed and sinful pride." Peter
F. Drucker, Austrian-born American
business management consultant
(1909-2005).


178/55 O.03or UU/5 U0
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exduse dai
Wi i TODAY & TOMOIIOW MORNING
J^'-" '" High: 78' Low: 57'
: ., Partly cloudy, coastal fog

=Mw MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
-.High: 79- Low:58
"o Partly cloudy, coastal fog

9W^- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low:62
." Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 77/59
Record /27
Normal 71/53
Mean temp- 55
Departure from mean -7
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday Trace
Total for the month T"
Total for the year 3.14"
Normal for the year 2.33"
'As oi 7 p-m at Ittmrnes
UV INDEX: 6
O-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.07


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 62.6
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 100%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, oak
Today's count: 8.6/12
Monday's count: 11.1
Tuesday's count: 11.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed:
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES M.W -=S,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
02/02 SUNDAY 08:03 02:12 20:31 13:44
02/03 MONDAY 08:44 03:03 21:33 14:36
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
s e T I T ........... .......-..6:09 p-m .
C L~O ........~tim~m ........... j:i'a'm
C411 1MOON 8RISTODT y........ .... 9:01 a.m.
Feb6 Feb14 Feb22 Mar1 M00 TOET ............._ 9:29 p.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For mote Infornmaton cl Florida Diis.n of Fofesirv al t352i 75A-6,777 Fii rne
information on drought .'-,oniin pIase vI Is1b Dvis,3n o Fr e'ls We bsre
hlt p: /famne-ftl-dl.comire weaneftbcflx
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walii on Wedriesday arnnor Sahrc-dy
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro inigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens. flowers and shlubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus Counly Ulities' aistomers shouh CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Scrme re% planlojg- rn;my jaity. lor atddle'n 1
walering allowances.
To report violations, please call: Cily of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Cstal
River 0 3,52 7%A421. elI 313 unircorporated Clnrus County 0 35-527-76689.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay "At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
Coy High Low
Chaaowtzka" 8:27am, 0.5it, 8:47 p,m. 0.s5ft, 2;44am, 0.1 i" 3:38p.mO) $,
Crystal RiveB 6:37 a,m, 2.2 7;03p,m. 2.1 t. 12:56 a.m 0,2 2f 1,21 pmO.ff,
Wilacoochee* 3:44 am, 2-9fl, 3:59p.mt. 3.1 ft. 10:39 a.m -0.0tt t 15pr-O.O.
Homosassa- 7:27 a.m. 12f, 7:49 p.m 1.2 ft. 2:06 a.m. 0.0.fl 2:42p.mO It,


H L Feast
80 71 pc
81 58 pc
83 64 pc
65 58 ts
79 60 f
75 56 pc
78 64 f
82 67 f
80 70 pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Today: South-southeast winds
around 10 knots then. Seas 2 feet or
less. Bay and inland waters a light
chop. Tonight: Souih winds around 5
knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and
inland waters smooth


Gulf water
tem erature



Taken. at Arlpki


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Witnlacoochee al Holder 28.78 2877 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.41 38.40 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.47 39.47 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.16 40.16 42.20
Levels reported in feet above sea eive Flood stage lo lakes are based on 233-year flood,
the reamannual flood which has a 43-.precent cwmc of being equaled of exceeded n
any one year This dat is oblained from the SOuttiwest FrWIJda Water Maragement Distrtct
and is suiec to revmson In no event wil the District or the Unrled Stales Geological Survey
be Ime to any damages auisng l outof ihe use ol this data I you have any questions you
should contact tme Hydrological Data Section al (352) 796-7211


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Atl1anta
Atlantic City
Austin
Balhmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boslon
Buffalo
Buftlngton, VT
Charteston, S.C.
Charteston. W.V.
Chartlotte
Chicago
CIncinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concofd. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Delroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartlon!
Houslon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock


SAT
H L Pip. H
41 20 41
50 39 46
58 20 60
58 32 65
46 23 50
76 67 39
48 25 53
16 0 34 24
66 37 66
40 28 .01 40
42 34 47
36 26 09 33
38 14 .03 39
52 41 -28 69
66 31 45
59 21 62
31 22 42 16
58 36 34
43 30 .17 28
32 25 .53 21
51 34 33
40 19 43
66 45 38
24 16 .01 29
26 14 A10 18
34 27 .55 29
66 55 59
60 37 .02 34
84 30 45
47 26 47
73 62 63
40 31 .46 27
54 43 52
64 53 38
66 50 63


SUN
L Fcst
23 I
29 pc
41 r
49 sh
29 Cd
31 r
27 r
5 pc
43 ts
26 pc
29 pc
16 11
18 ft
55 pc
27 r
49 pc
-5 pc
20 sn
15 sn
6 pc
20 sn
2O pc
27 1
7 pc
5 s
3 pc
38 pc
21 sn
27 sh
27 sh
41 Sh
12 cd
37 pc
24 r
At 47


SAT SUN
City H L Pep. H L Fcst
NewOileans 73 51 73 53 ts
NowYorkCity 44 36 48 32 r
Nodrfolk 47 23 57 40 pc
Oklahoma City 39 28 31 17 sn
Omaha 25 18 06 22 8 s
Palm Spngs 66 49 61 41 pc
PttadelpNa 48 30 49 29 cd
Phoenix 66 54 65 40 pc
Ptlsbutgh 52 31 38 21 sn
Portland, ME 38 23 42 22 pc
Portland. OR 50 39 47 31 pc
Pmvidance, RI 43 31 48 29 pc
Raleigh 59 24 64 38 t
Rapid City 20 8 29 3 pc
Reno 41 20 40 21 pc
Rocheslter.NY 40 22 .07 35 19 fl
Sacramenlo 60 35 58 32 pc
Sal Lake City 36 28 33 21 pc
San Antono 80 66 47 31 r
San Diego 64 51 61 52 pc
San Francisco 59 42 52 47 sh
Savannah 54 46, .14 71 57 1
Seallle 46 40 08 44 29 pc
Spokane 25 1 30 18 sn
SI. Louis 37 31 ,47 23 10 pc
St Ste Mane 19 TO .01 15 -3 "
Syracuse 42 20 .11 39 17 fl
Topeka 29 20 20 22 4 pc
Washinglton 53 28 54 31 r
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
NIGH 86. Kijrgt Texas
LOW -25. Doe Lake. Mich
WORLD CITIES


-~ SUN
Louisville 63 40 34 24 sn CITY HLJSKYUN
Memphis 70 52 38 28 r C HXK
Miwaukee 23 15 18 14 -1 pc AcPulc 84r3s
Minneapolis 22 1 10 -2 pc Amsterdam 4637t/r
Mobile 66 39 71 50 ts Athens 51/42/cd
Montgomery 65 31 72 53 ts Beij ng 44r30pc
Nashvlle 62 44 43 30 r Berltn 3932/cd
Bermuda 71/6/&cd
KEY TO CONDITIONS: cicoudy; drcldrhl e, Cairo 71/59/cd
frair, h-hary pc.padly cloudy: r-nin; Calgary 26/1s
rln.flmnow mix; umr, stushowerw ; Havana ftr s
U-s'iow tbssuindemntfos; w.wldd Hong Kong 71/62/pc
WSi 214 Jerusalem 71/55/cd


Lisbon 57/44/pc
London 46/411
Madrid 53/33/Pc
Mexico City774M6pc
Montreal 32/32/pc
Moscow 12W3
Paris 48/33k
Rio 89f75/s
Rome 6W44/pc
Sydney 80/69ic
Tokyo 62/46/r
Toronio 39W28sn
Warsaw 33/22/pc


U LEGAL NOTICES




Fictitious Name Notices................D8

Bid Notices.....................................D8

Meeting Notices.............................D8

Miscellaneous Notices..................D8

Surplus Property ...........................D8


1-- C I T R U S r nC O U N T Y -o"



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Who's in charge:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L Fcast City


Daytona Bch. 80
Fort Lauderdale 79
Fort Myers 82
Gainesville 80
Homestead 78
Jacksonville 76
Key West 80
Lakeland 82
Melbourne 82


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OTHER
Continued from PageAl

unacceptable," House
Speaker Will Weather-
ford, R-Wesley Chapel,
said Wednesday at a leg-
islative session preview
meeting hosted by the
Associated Press in Tal-
lahassee. "Education al-
ways should be and will be
at the top of our agenda."
He said there will be a
massive expansion of
school choice for fami-
lies and an expansion of
the tax credit scholar-
ship plan.
"We're going to allow
more parents and stu-
dents the opportunity to
go to the school of their
choice," he said. "We
cannot allow ZIP codes
to define our opportu-
nity in life.
"We plan to make
Florida first in the nation
in preparing students for
real jobs in the real
economy and we plan to
measure that by having
more students in our state
earn national and global
industry certifications in
high-demand careerfields,"
said Senate President
Don Gaetz, R-Niceville.
He added they will
link higher-education
funding to performance
relating to graduation
and finding jobs.
Their combined
agenda includes the
Florida GI Bill, which
waives out-of-state tu-
ition for veterans, funds
scholarships for mem-
bers of the Florida Na-
tional Guard and waives
business licensing fees
for returning veterans.
"Our goal is to make
Florida children a lot
safer," said Gaetz, ex-
plaining provisions for
protecting vulnerable
Floridians. "We intend
to make Florida scorched
earth, the most unwel-
comed place in America
for sexual predators."
He estimated their
overall agenda will re-
quire about 20 pieces of
legislation.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


FDLE chemist may have stolen evidence


Agency: Prescription painkillers were swapped with OTCpills dozens of times


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-The Florida
Department of Law Enforcement
announced Saturday it is investi-
gating 2,600 cases handled by a
Pensacola-based agency chemist
after discovering dozens of instances
where prescription pain pills that
were seized by police and tested
as evidence were swapped with
over-the-counter pills.
FDLE Commissioner Gerald
Bailey said the chemist handled
cases involving 80 law enforce-
ment agencies from 35 counties
since he was hired in 2006. Most,
but not all, of the cases involved
testing drug evidence, though it
was not immediately clearhow many
cases might be compromised.
The situation was discovered
after Escambia County investiga-
tors realized evidence was miss-
ing and later found other
evidence packages where pre-
scription pills had been substi-
tuted with non-prescription pills.


It potentially means drug
charges will have to be dropped
and prisoners released if it's de-
termined the chemist tampered
with evidence, Bailey said.
"This has the potential of im-
pacting hundreds of drug cases
across our state," Bailey told re-
porters. "This is a total shock and
a disappointment."
The department is using agents
from each of its offices to review
all the cases handled by the
chemist, who is on paid leave
while under criminal investiga-
tion. He is not being identified
while under investigation, but
Bailey said he hopes charges are
brought quickly, at which point
the chemist will be fired.
The department is contacting
state attorneys and law enforce-
ment agencies across the state
that have pending cases that
could be compromised.
"We are going back and looking
at each case that was worked and
we are going to the evidence


The quantities
are large. It's early
in the investigation.
We don't know if the
individual is a user
or a trafficker.

Gerald Bailey
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement commissioner.

rooms of sheriff's departments
and police departments around
the state and actually physically
looking especially at the pre-
scription meds- to see if what is
in that particular package is in
fact a prescription medication and
not in fact an over-the-counter
calcium tablet," Bailey said.
Bailey said the agency doesn't
yet know the motive. The chemist


isn't cooperating with the
investigation.
"The quantities are large,"
Bailey said. "It's early in the
investigation. We don't know if
the individual is a user or a
trafficker"
The department is reviewing its
drug testing program to try to pre-
vent similar incidents. One idea
may be to increase employee drug
testing, Bailey said. Right now,
employees are drug tested when
they are hired, but not again un-
less they have reason to suspect
they are abusing drugs.
Attorney General Pam Bondi has
offered to assist in the investigation.
"The Florida Department of
Law Enforcement is a top notch
law enforcement agency I con-
tinue to have complete confi-
dence in them and their work.
This situation simply underlines
the extent of the problem our
country faces with prescription
drug abuse," Bondi said in an
emailed statement


State BRIEFS


Philanthropist dies Judge ruled against More than a dozen Winter storm blamed
after fall from horse in Facebook case displaced by fire for sea turtle deaths


WELLINGTON -Aformer
New York City assistant dis-
trict attorney and philanthro-
pist died after falling in a
horse jumping competition.
Anne Heyman, 52, died in
Wellington, Fla., on Friday after
a fall at the Palm Beach Inter-
national Equestrian Center at
about 10:30 a.m. She was flown
to Delray Medical Center, where
she died three hours later, the
Palm Beach Post reported.
Heyman was born in South
Africa and attended the George
Washington School of Law.
She went on to work for the
Manhattan district attorney's
office and later led the cre-
ation of the Agahozo-Shalom
Youth Village, a community
for children orphaned during
the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
She died after a fall during
a master's jumper competition,
FTI Consulting Winter Eques-
trian Festival spokeswoman
Jennifer Wood told the Post.
Funeral details are ex-
pected to be shared in the
coming days.


DAYTONA BEACH -An
appellate court has ruled that
a judge was wrong to "friend"
on Facebook a woman whose
divorce case the judge
presided over.
The 5th District Court of Ap-
peal in Daytona Beach last
week ruled that Judge Linda
Schoonover should not have
sent a Facebook friend re-
quest to Sandra Chace when
the judge was still presiding
over Chace's divorce case.
Chace didn't respond to
the request on the advice of
her attorney. Chace claims
the judge retaliated against
her by ordering her to pay
her ex-husband a high
amount of alimony and
assume most of the marital
debt.
Chace had requested that
Schoonover disqualify herself
from the case, and the appel-
late court agreed.
The appellate court said
such actions by a judge can
undermine the judge's ap-
pearance of impartiality.


TAMPA- More than a
dozen people have been dis-
placed after a fire at a Tampa
apartment complex.
Hillsborough County Fire
Rescue was alerted to the blaze
at the Hidden River Grande
Apartments in Temple Terrace
on Saturday at about 3 a.m.
Investigators determined the
fire started in an attic space. The
cause is under investigation.
Atlantic recreational
snook season opens
MIAMI Snook season is
back in Florida's Atlantic
coastal and inland waters.
The recreational harvest
season reopened Saturday
from the Miami-Dade and
Monroe county line north. The
season runs through May 31.
Anglers can keep one snook
per day. The fish can't be fewer
than 28 or more than 32 inches
in length. A snook permit is re-
quired to keep snook, along
with a saltwater fishing license.
Only hook-and-line gear is
allowed.


PENSACOLA-The win-
ter storm that struck the
Florida Panhandle is being
blamed for the deaths of peli-
cans, sea turtles and other
wildlife.
More than 130 cold-
stunned endangered and
threatened sea turtles were
rescued Thursday and Friday,
The Pensacola News Journal
reported. About a dozen more
were found dead, including
some from the Gulf Islands
National Seashore.
"With all the bridges being
closed, we were not able to
do what we really needed to
do," Seashore biologist Mark
Nicholas said. "Time is of the
essence."
Most of the turtles being
found are green sea turtles,
Robbin Trindell, a biological
administrator with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission told the
newspaper. They will be taken
to the Gulf World Marine Park
in Panama City Beach to re-
cover and be released some-


time next week.
The storm covered much of
the western Florida Panhan-
dle with ice and snow. Water
temperatures dropped quickly
from about 58 degrees to 37
degrees, FWC wildlife biolo-
gist Allen Foley said.
Sea turtles go into a cata-
tonic state when they suffer
from the reptile version of hy-
pothermia. Unlike marine
mammals such as dolphins
and manatees, they cannot
keep themselves warm. Once
temperatures dip below 50
degrees, sea turtles have diffi-
culty moving through the
water.
"When it comes to wildlife,
it seems the turtles had the
most trouble," Foley said.
He also saw dead lady fish,
sea urchins and horseshoe
crabs while searching for sea
turtles.
Five pelicans suffering from
hypothermia were also res-
cued. Wildlife workers encour-
age anyone who sees a sick
or injured bird to bring them to
the Wildlife Sanctuary of
Northwest Florida.
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Mary Bronne Ronald Egli, 58
HOMOSASSA HOMOSASSA


Mary Madeleine
Bronne, 86, Homosassa,
Fla., died Nov 28, 2013.
Graveside services will be
at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7,
2014, at Florida National
Cemetery Bushnell.





Robert
Chappell, 69
HERNANDO
Robert S. Chappell, 69,
of Hernando, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Jan. 30,
2014, at
Citrus Me-
m o r i a1
hospital in
Inverness,
Fla. He
was born in
July 7,
1944, in
Arlington, Robert
Va.; was a Cha ppell
U.S. Army
veteran;
and arrived in this area in
1946, coming from Vir-
ginia. Robert was owner of
Bob's Office Supply in
Crystal River, and at-
tended the Church of God
in Inverness. He enjoyed
hunting, gardening, the
outdoors and fishing, and
was also owner of Gulf
Coast Charters on Crystal
River for 20 years.
Survivors include his
longtime companion, Car-
oline Lupo of Hernando;
his mother, Chrystine
Chappell of Hernando;
brothers Carlton (Ginger)
Chappell Jr of Tallahas-
see, Fla., and Brad (Vim)
Chappell of Hernando,
Fla.; and one sister, Joy
Wilson of Hernando.
The family will receive
friends in visitation from 1
to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4,
2014, with a funeral serv-
ice at 3 p.m. at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.


6L.a SWaV
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation ^ ]i.;" r: .. In-l%
.Mtne)r, A lc r,-
For Information and costs,s
call 726-8323

r In Memory of


Douglas Patton
who passed away Jan. 26, 2011
We honor you for whom you were
And the special things you've done
That made your life so ,. 1 i ....
And made you a special one
Your memories are ours to cherish
As we fondly remember your ways
Lovingly' .. I ;,,-- ,;, our hearts
Is wh.. II ,I ys stay
Always in our hearts,
" Love your family t


Ronald Henry Egli, 58,
passed away unexpectedly
on Jan. 2, 2014. He was
born Jan. 22, 1955, in Sid-
ney, N.Y.,
to Henry
and Ellen
(Hurlburt)
Egli. Ron
was a
graduate
of Sidney
High




area before relocating to
Homosassa, Fla.
Ron is survived by the
love of his life and best
friend, Lisa Calbi, and son
Michael Calbi, both of Ho-
mosassa; parents Henry
and Ellen Egli, Sidney,
N.Y; brother and sister-in-
law Denis and Sandra Egli,
Sidney, N.Y; brother and
sister-in-law Gary and
Kate Egli, Connecticut; sis-
ter and brother-in-law, Drs.
Janis and Albert Bravo,
Massachusetts; nephews
Jerry and Michael Egli;
nieces Sara, Emma and
Anna Egli; and five great-
nieces and -nephews.
A celebration of Ron's
life was held Saturday,
Feb. 1, 2014, at Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa,
with Fr Gregory Andrews
officiating, wwwwilder
funeral. com

Reinaldo 'Ray'
Elias, 70
Reinaldo M. "Ray"
Elias, age 70, died Wednes-
day, Jan. 29, 2014.
A celebration of life
service will be at 3 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory

Dwayne
Ventura, 51
INVERNESS
Dwayne Burton Ventura,
51, of Inverness, Fla., died
Friday, Jan. 31, 2014.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.


In Homosassa & Crystal River
352-564-1040

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Frederick
Layman Jr., 88
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Frederick
B. Layman, Jr, age 88, of
Homosassa, Florida, will
be held 2:00 pm, Monday,
February 3,2014 at the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Interment
will take place at Crown
Hill Cemetery of Albany,
Albany, Georgia. The fam-
ily will receive friends
from 1:00 pm until the time
of service, Monday at the
chapel. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Layman was born
February 9, 1925 in
Louisville, KY, son of Fred-
erick and Lucille
(Woosley) Layman. He
died January 25, 2014 in
Homosassa. Mr Layman
was a Navy veteran serv-
ing during World War II.
He worked as a Salesman
for a fish and tackle com-
pany Mr Layman was a
member of Dougherty Ma-
sonic Lodge #591.
Mr Layman was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents and his wife, Mary
Layman. Survivors in-
clude son, Frederick B.
Layman III and 2 sisters,
Bernice Hall of Louisville,
KY, and Merna L. Bruing-
ton of Falls Of Rough, KY

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.


Virginia 'Ginny'
McDonald, 83
INVERNESS
Virginia "Ginny" Ruth
(Pundy) McDonald, 83, of
Inverness, Fla., formerly of
Baldwin, Wis., passed
away peacefully Jan. 25,
2014, at the Hospice House
of Citrus County of the Na-
ture Coast Lecanto.
Ginny was preceded in
death by parents, Ira (Ike)
and Gladys (Christenson)
Pundy; and brothers-in-
law, Roy Nadeau and Eu-
gene Suter She will be
dearly missed by her hus-
band of 56 years, Burt;
daughters, Amy McDonald
of Tampa, Pam O'Keefe of
Baldwin, Wis., and Polly
(Randy) Blom of Oakdale,
Minn.; granddaughters,
Emily (Curt) Fristed,
Amanda Blom and
Stephanie Hughes; great-
granddaughter, Josephine
Fristed; sister, Iris
Nadeau; sister-in-law, De-
lores Suter; three nieces;
three nephews; and many
cousins and friends.
Virginia was born in
Baldwin, Wis., March 9,
1930. She graduated from
Baldwin High School in
1944. She attended Central
College in Pella, Iowa, and
the University of Wiscon-
sin River Falls and trained
at Michael Reese Hospital
in Chicago, Ill., for medical
technology She worked as
medical technologist from
1952-1959 atAncker Hospi-
tal in St. Paul, Minn. Ginny
married BurtApril 4,1957,
and they resided in North
St. Paul for a while until
returning to Baldwin. She
worked as a medical tech-
nologist at the Baldwin
Hospital and Clinic until
1974; and taught medical
assistant labs at WITC in
New Richmond, Wis., from
1978-1990.
After retirement they re-
located to Inverness in
1992. She was a member of
the Ladies Auxiliary, Eu-
gene Quinn VFW Post 4337
in Inverness. Ginny en-
joyed traveling, knitting,
crocheting, gardening, golf-
ing reading and crossword
puzzles; the Green Bay
Packers; and playing bingo.
Per her wishes, arrange-
ments were handled by


The National Cremation &
Burial Society, 13011 U.S.
19, Hudson, FL 34667. In
lieu of flowers, memorials
preferred to Hospice
House of Citrus County of
the Nature Coast, 3350 W
Audubon Park Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461, or
donor's choice.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

Mildred
O'Halloran, 80
LECANTO
Mildred L. O'Halloran,
age 80, of Lecanto, Fla.,
passed away Jan. 31, 2014,
at Superior Residences of
Lecanto.
She was
born
Sept. 24,
1933, in
Leech-
burg, Pa.,
t o
Nicholas
and Verna Mildred
Mae (Hub- O'Halloran
b a r d )
Cherry Mildred moved to
Citrus County in 1995 from
Diners Grove, Ill. She was
a member of Crystal River
United Methodist Church,
the Christian Women's
group, she loved singing in
the choir, and she loved to
bowl.
In addition to her par-
ents, Mildred was pre-
ceded in death by her
brother, Leonard Cherry
Mildred married her
loving husband, Patrick M.
O'Halloran, on Feb. 9,
1963. In addition to her
husband, she is survived
by two sisters, Delores
(Harry) Bostley and
Lawanda Wells; and sister-
in-law, Anne Cherry
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. A memorial
service will be at 1 p.m.
Wednesday Feb. 5,2014, at
Crystal River United
Methodist Church in the
Bethel Chapel. Burial will
be at the Florida National
Cemetery at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to the
Crystal River United
Methodist Church or to
Hospice of Citrus County


Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.
See Page A7

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and
paid obituaries.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Area funeral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chron-
icle are charged a $25
base fee and $8.75
per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
charged a base fee of
$25 plus $10 per
column inch, payable
in advance.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an ad-
ditional charge.
Larger photos, span-
ning the entire col-
umn, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in sub-
mitted material are
charged at the same
rates.
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's obitu-
aries and guest
books. Per Legacy pol-
icy, all guest book
comments are
screened by its staff
for appropriate con-
tent before being
placed online. Allow
24 hours for review of
guest book entries.


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Meeting Your Needs!


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Licensed Funeral Director
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A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6




Jack Stiles, 85
INVERNESS
Jack Stiles, 85, of Inver-
ness, died Monday, Jan. 27,
2014.
Jack was born in South
Haven, Mich., to Oliver and
Georgia
Stiles. He ( -
was raised
in Kalama-
zoo, where -
he at-
tended
University
High
School. Jack
S o m e Stiles
schoolboy
pranks determined that St
John's Military Academy of
Delafield, Wis., would be a
better place for him to fin-
ish his education. Jack
served in the U.S. Army
from 1946-48 as a para-
trooper After being honor-
ably discharged, he
attended Western Michi-
gan University and joined
his father in owning and
running Stiles Paint Com-
pany Jack ran the business
until the mid '70s. Although
Jack moved to Florida, his
heart remained in Michi-
gan and he remained a
Broncos and Wolverines
fan. He especially loved the
Upper Peninsula, where
he worked, traveled and
fished for decades. Jack
was an avid golfer, bird
watcher and fisherman. He
loved nature and wildlife.
His many car journeys took
him to sites of rugged natu-
ral beauty He especially
loved Idaho, where he trav-
eled often. His knowledge
of nature and wildlife was
abundant He could iden-
tify any bird he saw and
loved to tell about the
chickadees that would
alight on his shoulder as he
walked out to feed them
during a frigid Michigan
winter Jack lived his life as
simply as nature going
about her business. What
you saw is what you got -
no pretense. Jack was a
member of the Elks for 63


years. At the Inverness
lodge, he would bring elk
ivory and elk jerky to share
with his fellow Elks. Jack
was a voracious reader his
entire life, and the knowl-
edge he gained was evident
in every conversation with
him. His lasting gifts are a
deep love and respect for
nature and for knowledge.
Jack was married to Joanie
for 22 years. She is the love
of his life and brought out
his sweet side. The two of
them could often be seen
holding hands as they sat in
their recliners watching
TV
Joanie survives Jack. He
is also survived by his chil-
dren, Kathleen Griffin,
Melinda Stiles-Conrad
(Tom), John Stiles (Judy);
stepchildren, Caryl Dean,
Jim and Jon Witucki;
seven grandchildren; four
great-grandchildren; and a
sister


Mass mobs fill pews


A Celebration of Life
will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 4, at the Inverness
Elks Lodge, 3580 E. Lemon
Drive, Hernando, FL
34442. Donations in Jack's
name may be made to
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness, FL 34452 or National
Audubon Society, Attn:
Audubon Angel, 225 Varick
St 7th floor, New York, NY
10014. Please specify that
a notification be sent to:
Stiles Family, 9970 E. Mary
Dr, Tucson, AZ 85730.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.


iSmf I Lt


Associated Press

BUFFALO, N.Y. You've heard of
flash mobs? Behold the Mass mob.
Playing off the idea of using social
media to summon crowds for parties or
mischief, mobs of Buffalo-area Roman
Catholics have been filling pews and lift-
ing spirits at some of the city's original,
now often sparsely attended, churches.
It works this way: On a given Sunday,
participants attend Mass en masse at a
church they've picked in an online vote
and promoted through Facebook and
Twitter Visitors experience the architec-
ture, heritage and spirit of the aging
houses of worship and the churches once
again see the numbers they were built for,
along with a helpful bump in donations
when the collection baskets are passed.
"I call these churches faith enhancers.
You can't help but walk in and feel closer
to a higher power," said Christopher
Byrd, who hatched the idea in Buffalo


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last fall and has organized two Mass
mobs so far, both of which drew hun-
dreds. He's heard from other cities
about starting their own.
The aim, he said, is to reignite inter-
est, support and perhaps even member-
ship in older churches that "kind of fall
off the radar screen of people."
One such church is Our Lady of Per-
petual Help in a neighborhood settled
by Irish immigrants along the Buffalo
River The church once brimmed with
800 families when it was dedicated in
1900. Today, fewer than 50 worshippers
typically amble into the Gothic-style
sanctuary for Sunday Mass.
It's a familiar story among city
churches that were built for waves of
Polish, German, Irish and Italian immi-
grants but whose congregations have
dwindled with the city's population de-
cline and suburban sprawl. Buffalo's
population is less than half what it was
in 1950, when it peaked at 580,000.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IIIrl ,


Highlights


SSmall, Community Feel
Among Students and Faculty
Student/Teacher Mentor Groups
Over 90% of Our Students
Play Sports
Thriving Fine Arts Department
Including Band, Drama and AP/
Honors Art
Dual Enrollment Offered
Right On Our Campus
Variety of AP/Honors
Class Offerings
Weekly Chapel Worship

Socially and culturally diverse
student body


Small Class Size


Our students have been
admitted to every single public
college/university in the state of
Florida as well as out-of-state
colleges including:


SAmerican University, DC
SAuburn University, AL
SBerry College, GA
SCollege of Charleston, SC
Covenant College, GA
SEmory University, GA
SErskine College, SC
Kent State, OH
New York University, NY
North Carolina
State University


P Our Curriculum Does Not Bind Us To State
Mandated Testing Such As The FCAT, End-of-
course, Or Common Core Testing. Yet We
Produce AP Scholars, Dual-enrollment And
Honor Graduates Who Get Admitted To Many
Colleges, Universities And Military Academies

Seven Rivers Christian School is accredited by
the following agencies:
The Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools/AdvanceEd
Christian Schools of Florida
The National Council for Private School
Accreditation

The faculty of Seven Rivers loves who they
teach and what they teach. All are degree
with 40% having a master's degree or higher.


Accepting Applications NOW
for the 2014-15 school year.
Stop by the school for
enrollment application or visit
our website.


www.sevenriverscs.org


Come to an Open House and
hear all about our school,
financial assistance
opportunities, curriculum,
and take a tour.


SRutgers University, NJ
SSt. John's University, NY
SUniversity of Alabama
SUniversity of Georgia
SUniversity of Kentucky
SUniversity of Tennessee
U.S. Air Force
Academy, CO
U.S. Coast Guard
Academy, CT
SWheaton College, IL


OPEN HOUSES


February 18 at 6:30pm
February 22 at 11am
February 24 at 10am
Pre-K only OPEN HOUSE March 11, 10AM
On-site VPK sign up April 1 at 9AM
(For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current proof
of address, birth certificate or shot record for child. If parent is missing
any of these documents, she will not be able to sign them up.)


Call to sign up: 746-5696


LMAissi[nStatement[11


A Provider for
Florida's Voluntary
Pre kindergarten
Program (VPK).


for students


Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12
scholarships and related support, giving economically
disadvantaged families the freedom to choose the best learning
options for their children. Almost 30% of our students receive the
Step Up scholarship.


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts
and minds of children
with a distinctly biblical
program of academic rigor,
artistic beauty, and athletic
competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


Notable


AS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL
Continued from PageAl

the fraud is between $20,000 and $100,000
in a 12-month period, the person would
be guilty of a second-degree felony, pun-
ishable by up to 15 years in prison. Cur-
rently all welfare-fraud cases are
third-degree felonies, carrying a maxi-
mum penalty of five years in prison.
HB 763: Allows fee waivers for state
parks and toll roads for Purple Heart
recipients.
HB 7015: Revises and creates ways to
benefit military service members and vet-
erans in several areas, including educa-
tion, employment preference, admittance
to state veterans nursing homes and ex-
tensions or creations ofprivileges relating
to driver's license fees and requirements.

DEAN: EXEMPT
RESEARCHERS
FROM RECORDS
SB 106: Allows county governing
body the authority to determine benefits
available to different types of personnel.
Benefits include insurance coverage
and paid leave.
SB 116: Allows for owners of mobile-
home parks to increase the lot rent on a
mobile-home owner only under specific
circumstances; also requires disclosure
of the lot rental policy at the time of mo-
bile-home purchase.
SR 382: Resolution recognizing
April as "Springs Protection Awareness
Month" in Florida.
SB 414: Extends exemption of public
records act to information identifying
current or former researchers whose
duties include or included performing
"life-sustaining" medical research on
animals at a certified medical-research
facility, including a university.
The exemption is proposed to not sun-
set in order to protect current or former
researchers from "zealous animal-rights
activists" who oppose medical research on
animals, according to the proposed law
"University of Florida employees
have reported being harassed or threat-
ened as a result of posting of their home
addresses and other contact information
on a popular animal rights website," the
proposed law reads.
SB 600: Requires that a final order
in an administrative proceeding awards
all costs and attorney's fees to the pre-
vailing party under certain circum-
stances; revises the criteria used by the
administrative judge to determine if a
party participated in the proceedings
for an improper purpose.
SB 724: Revises state references of
"Korean Conflict" and "Vietnam era" to
Korean War and Vietnam War Also au-
thorizes issuance of a Combat Medical
Badge license plate.


ALONG

LAYOVER

BETWEEN

IDEA AND

LAW
* About 2,000 to 3,000 bills are
filed in the Florida Legislature each
year. As of Friday, 1,218 bills were
filed so far this year- 815 in the
House and 403 in the Senate.
Generally, about one-sixth go on to
become laws.
* Because of the number of rep-
resentatives (160), House mem-
bers are limited to six bills each
session. Senators, 40 in all, have
no limit on the number of bills
they introduce.
* House bills are odd-numbered;
Senate bills are even-numbered.
* A lawmaker's bill must survive each
committee it is assigned to before
reaching the chamber's floor for a final
vote. Sometimes the bill is amended
in a committee, and the citation
changes to reflect that. For example,
SB 99 would become CS/SB 99.
* To pass the Legislature, the
same bill with identical language
requires approval from both cham-
bers. For example, a House bill de-
claring that the sun shines bright
would need approval from an iden-
tical bill in the Senate. If the Senate
bill says the sun shines bright only
on Thursday, then the leaders of
both chambers would name mem-
bers of a conference committee to
work out the differences. That re-
structured bill then goes to the
House and Senate for final votes.
* Oftentimes, weighty or controver-
sial bills, such as the state budget,
end up in a conference committee.
And that often happens in the final
days or hours of the session.
* The governor doesn't have to sign
a bill for it to become law. It can
become law without his signature.
* If the governor vetoes a bill, it's
sent back to the chamber of origin.
The Legislature may override a
veto with two-thirds majority votes
in both the House and Senate.
Follow the progress of bills on each
chamber's website: www.flsenate.gov
or www.myfloridahouse.gov.
Source: Florida Senate and
House of Representatives


Gas continues to escape


from rig off Gulf coast


Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS -
Crews worked Friday to
stop natural gas from es-
caping an underwater well
where a rig was drilling off
the Louisiana coast. The
Coast Guard said workers
had cut the flow in half
since losing control of the
well a day earlier
No injuries or pollution
have been reported. The
Bureau of Safety and Envi-
ronmental Enforcement
said most crew members
had been evacuated from
the rig, which was drilling
in 262 feet of water about
108 miles southwest of
Lafayette.
The rig operator is
EnVen Energy Ventures of
Metairie, La. Company
spokesman David Black-
mon said the flow from the
well has "significantly di-
minished" and consists al-
most entirely of water and
sand, with "just a trace" of
natural gas. No sheen has
been spotted in the area,
Blackmon added.
Work is under way to se-
cure the well, said Deanna
Castillo, a spokeswoman
for rig owner Rowan
Companies.
'All personnel currently
aboard the rig are safe and
non-essential personnel


Gull
Crews
the Gul
natural


H
SOURC
have
well c
functi
(and)
envirc
she sa
Bla
plann
water
"Th
every
said.'
while
of ope
A s]
envirc
ment,
said
in the
Friday
send
inspe


agency spokeswoman also
F gas well said a platform that was
lost control on a rig in producing oil and gas near
ilf of Mexico and the EnVen rig was shut
I gas is escaping, down as a precaution.
Wild gas wells tend to be
less of an environmental
threat than blowouts from
Soil wells.
A natural gas blowout off
Louisiana's coast in July
2013 ended one day later
CLdld--I, eAuthorities believed the
well had been clogged by
sand and sediment. The
-rig, operated by Hercules
m l.. .... Offshore Inc., blew out and
-..... later caught fire. Part of
- "E: ESRIAPthe rig collapsed before
the well apparently
been evacuated, all plugged itself.
controll equipment is The BP PLC blowout in
oning as designed April 2010 off the south-
there has been no east Louisiana coast killed
onmental impact," 11 workers and spewed a
aid Thursday mixture of natural gas and
ckmon said workers oil from a busted well
ed to pump mud and nearly a mile under the
Sto kill the well. Gulf's surface. The worst
ey're just getting environmental damage ap-
thing lined up," he peared to be caused by the
'Sometimes it takes a hundreds of millions of
to stage these kinds gallons of crude oil that es-
mrations." caped and fouled marshes
spokeswoman for the and seafood grounds.
onmental depart- The EnVen rig was oper-
Eileen Angelico, ating in relatively shallow
water temperatures waters, where measures to
SGulf were too cold control a leak or blowout
y for the agency to are easier to manage than
ts own officials out to in the deep waters of the
ct the scene. The Gulf.


Arizona shelter has
Associated Press
PHOENIX An Arizona animal shelter has
a rather large cat on its hands.
The Maricopa County Animal Care and Con-
trol recently received a 36-pound cat at one of
its shelters in the Phoenix area. I
The cat named "Meatball" is temporarily stay-
ing in an office at the shelter because he's too
large to fit into a standard kennel.
The cat is not available for adoption.
Instead, the shelter is trying to place him with
a rescue organization that helps overweight cats.
The shelter says Meatball is extremely
friendly and that he can comfortably walk
despite his weight.


36-pound cat
Meatball,
a 36-pound
cat, is
pictured
recently
at the
Maricopa
County
Animal
Care &
Control
shelter in
Phoenix.


Associated
Press


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In inequality, many opinions, but few answers


Associated Press

ASHBURN, Va. The
wealthiest county in Amer-
ica is settled deep in 4 a.m.
slumber when Neal Breen
threads the mini-mansion
subdivisions and snow-
blanketed fairways on his
way to open shop.
There's two hours yet
before the business day
begins, but Breen, who is
21, has plenty to do after
flipping on the lights. Don-
ning a green apron without
taking off his tweed cap, he
boils the first of more than
500 bagels, then shovels
them into a waiting oven.
When the early risers step
from their cars at a few
minutes past 6, a chalkboard
meets them at the door:
"Breakfast of Champions."
Breen, who quit college
a year ago with hopes of
saving money to start his
own business, is keenly
aware that the wealth in
the neighborhoods where
he delivers breakfast sand-
wiches is, for now, beyond
reach. He's long known
what it means to have less;
he recalls growing up as
the son of a pastor whose
earnings sometimes made
it tough to feed five children.
But he does not decry the
gap between the Vienna
sausage dinners of child-
hood and the $168,000 me-
dian income of the
households surrounding
this shopping center, about
35 miles from Capitol Hill.
It just confirms that the
free-market economy is
working, Breen says, by re-
warding those who do for
themselves.
"Capitalism is about
seizing opportunity A lot
of people get more oppor-
tunities than others, but a
lot of people aren't com-
fortable seizing it," he says.
When President Barack
Obama promised to do
something about growing
economic inequality in his
State of the Union address,
he spoke to a public whose
own experiences have, like
Breen's, shaped very per-
sonalviews aboutwho makes
it in today's economy and
who gets left behind.
"Those at the top have
never done better But av-
erage wages have barely
budged. Inequality has
deepened. ... Our job is to
reverse these trends,"
Obama said.
The speech addressed
deeply held convictions:
Americans know firsthand
the challenges of trying to
get ahead, and sometimes
just getting by, and speak
reverently about making
sure the country fulfills its
promise as a land of eco-
nomic opportunity
But in a reporter's con-
versations along a drive of
more than 400 miles, from
communities of wealth to
those of poverty, from areas
where politics increasingly
lean Democratic to those
fast tilting Republican,
there was little agreement
on how to realize that ideal
or on what role govern-
ment should play
"It's a conundrum," says
Chris Meyer, the owner of
a landscaping business,


leaving Ashburn Bagel &
Sandwich Shop, breakfast
in hand. "How do you
make a workable system
out of being a compassion-
ate people?"

About 15 minutes away,
past the office park
housing AOL Corp.,
Tanveer Mirza sees things
very differently
The thrift shop run by
Mirza's FAITH Social
Services is closed today
But the cramped quarters
buzz with activity as work-
ers sort and mend donated
ladies' tops that will sell
for $2 to $6 downstairs, while
those in the upstairs office
attend to requests for do-
mestic violence counseling
and temporary housing.
Mirza emigrated from
Pakistan 37 years ago. In
1999, her mosque started this
effort to assist refugees from
the war in Bosnia who were
being resettled in Northern
Virginia. Organizers soon
realized that, even amid
relative wealth, there were
many who needed assis-
tance, including many non-
Muslims. Last July, she
said, more than 800 people
waited in line for four to
five hours to receive food
packages at the group's an-
nual Herndon Without
Hunger program, timed to
coincide with Ramadan.
"You don't think there
are people in need, butthere
are a lot of them," says Mirza,
the organization's presi-
dent. "You don't see them."
Mirza says her group
emphasizes self-sufficiency,
but finds people who are
struggling frequently can't
get there without a hand.
Government plays a critical
role. She and other FAITH
administrators decry re-
cent cuts in food stamp
benefits and long-term un-
employment assistance.
She recalls the struggles
of families the group has
helped: The two girls they
assisted with college tu-
ition after their father
died. The Iraqi refugee
family who relied on tem-
porary housing and phar-
macy training before
eventually finding work.
The U.S. "is not a place
where people can pick gold
leaves off of the tree," she
says. "In the long run,
America is going to be the
one which benefits from
spending. It's like an in-
vestment- in people."
Back on the road, subdi-
visions and corporate
headquarters give way to
more open spaces. Inside
the wood-paneled dining
room at the Stonewall Golf
Club, friends Diane Wagner,
Shari Viellieu and Francie
Meade share a lunch table
overlooking greens that
curl around Lake Manas-
sas. But they have differ-
ing views of the economic
landscape.
"I believe the minimum
wage should be raised, I
can you tell you that," says
Wagner, a retired corpo-
rate office manager Too
many people are strug-
gling to get by, working in
fast-food restaurants or
others place for wages that
can't possibly support fam-


Associated Press
Neal Breen, 21, works Monday at the Ashburn Bagel & Sandwich Shop in Ashburn, Va.
Breen, who quit college a year earlier with hopes of saving money to start his own
business, is keenly aware that the wealth in the neighborhoods where he delivers
breakfast sandwiches is, for now, beyond reach. But he does not decry the gap
between the Vienna sausage dinners of childhood and the $168,000 median income
of the households surrounding this shopping center: It just confirms that the free-
market economy is working, he says, by rewarding those who do for themselves.


lilies, she says. She notes
that just as she's counting
on Social Security and
Medicare, it's reasonable
for others less fortunate to
look to the government for
help. "I'm willing to pay
more taxes if I have to,"
she says.
But Meade, an interior
designer, has her doubts.
"I lean toward less govern-
ment involvement," she
says. "I think a lot of things
have been fixed. I think
with education, people do
have a possibility of up-
ward mobility"
Down Lee Highway, in
Culpeper, Va., her views are
echoed by Rick Sarmiento,
a former Army officer, mil-
itary contractor and retail
manager sharing barbecue
with son, Ricky, 22.
Sarmiento says his view
is shaped by his own expe-
riences and those of his
parents, medical workers
who moved to Chicago
from the Philippines and
made their own way
Sarmiento knows what re-
tail workers make and
some of his son's friends
from high school are work-
ing two or three such part-
time jobs to get by But
Ricky's new job in finan-
cial services proves it's
possible to do better if you
pursue an education, the
elder Sarmiento says. He
acknowledges, too, that in
a country of more than 300
million, there's no univer-
sal solution for leveling
the economic turf.
"You ask any 10 people,
you're going to get 10 dif-
ferent responses," he says.
It's fitting then that an-
other hour on the road
leads to Charlottesville,
the hometown of Thomas
Jefferson, whose sometimes
conflicting views on human
striving and equality are a
reminder that the country
has struggled with ques-
tions of economic opportu-
nity since its earliest days.
A few minutes' drive from
Jefferson's Monticello puts
you at the door of Mount
Zion First African Baptist
Church, where Gerald Ter-


rell, Me congregation s sen-
ior trustee, is getting ready
to lock up for the night.
Terrell, 65, was raised in
segregated central Florida
by a father who only finished
third grade and a mother
who took night classes so
she could graduate from
high school the day before
her son received his diploma
Terrell says he knew at 13
that he wanted to be a
school principal, so he asked
his father for old keys and
started walking around
with them swinging from
his belt convinced that
they were the symbol of
someone in charge. Cer-
tain he did not want to stay
in the citrus groves that
employed his father, he
left for college, became a
teacher and eventually a
principal for 24 years.
Terrell acknowledges
much has changed since
the Jim Crow laws of his
youth, but says creating
economic opportunity re-
quires doing more. He
points out that his church
sits just across the street
from a public housing
project where children of
families often don't have
the advantages wealthier
families consider basic. At
least when he was a boy,
those with limited educa-
tion knew they could find
a job in agriculture or a
factory
Today, "it's harder be-
cause we've moved from
an industrial society to a
technological society And
who has the computer at
home? The haves," says
Terrell, who volunteers as
a mentor to young black men
"They don't need a hand-
out. ... They need support
in terms of people helping
them to achieve their goals.
Now, that may be finan-
cially But they need to be
put in a position where they
can help somebody else."


West about 45 miles, at
the foot of the Blue
Ridge in Staunton, retiree
Bob Clatterbaugh glances
up from his solitaire hand
at the bar of the Fraternal
Order of Eagles Post 680.
The television screen dis-
plays a report on Obama's
minimum wage proposal;
Clatterbaugh is skeptical.
Bar manager Hope
Fitzgerald and Chuck Gal-
lagher, a beverage distrib-
utor, join the conversation.
Fitzgerald, 55, recalls
earning $15 an hour in the
mid-1990s when she
worked the line at a now-
shuttered men's suit fac-
tory, a job that came with
health insurance. Jobs like
that have disappeared, she
says, noting that her adult
son is working temporary
positions and lives at
home. The rich are getting
richer and the poor are
getting poorer, she says,
but public assistance too
often seems to go to those
who aren't really trying to
get ahead.
"The social issues need
to take a back seat," Gal-
lagher says, criticizing De-
mocrats in Washington
who focus on increasing
aid programs. "They need
to figure out a way to get
people working."
Into the mountains and
across the state line to
West Virginia, highway
signs tout one county after
another as "A Certified
Business Location." Ten
miles off the interstate,
down a twisting two-lane
road, haircutter Brian
Cooper settles into his own
red leatherette barber
chair in downtown Hinton.
Cooper, 33, has a unique
perspective on the econ-
omy of this faded railroad
stop in one of the state's
poorest counties, which
hugs a steep hillside along
the New River He left


town for college, taught
school for 10 years before
deciding it wasn't the right
fit, and decided to retool
with a trade. The switch
might not have been possi-
ble without government
assistance. He took out a
$10,000 federal student
loan to pay for barber
school and while he was
out of work, applied for
government assistance to
help cover food costs. He's
self-supporting now, run-
ning his own business
thanks to a chair offered
by a senior barber But that
doesn't mean it's easy
"Can you imagine pay-
ing $8 for a haircut? That's
telling you the kind of econ-
omy that's here," he says.
But Cooper, whose shop
sits across the street from
the local office of the
Women, Infants and Chil-
dren food assistance pro-
gram, says that while he
sees the economic divide
widening, he's doubtful
about government programs
that try to remedy it. Often
it seems there's more in-
centive for the unem-
ployed to work the system,
rather than go to work for
minimum wage, he says.
"It's harder for the mid-
dle class to get ahead," he
says. "I just don't feel like
the opportunities are out
there for people. There are
lot of ideals and theories,
but I don't think they're
put into practice very well."
Ninety miles north in
Charleston, upriver from
the state Capitol, The Cold
Spot serves hot garlic
wings in multiples of six,
tempered by pitchers of
beer There's a president
out there tonight delivering
a State of the Union speech,
but inside the bar, the sets
are tuned to West Virginia
University basketball. Cheers
go up when the Moun-
taineers triumph, 66-64.
With the game over,
Brian Snyder, who runs a
one-man glass business,
takes a moment to con-
sider economic inequities.
Increasing assistance to
the poor isn't fair because
it will raise taxes on every-
one else, he says. "The gap
keeps on growing and it's
not right at all," says Sny-
der, who is 43 and used to
employ others in his busi-
ness until times got tighter
But he's certain most
politicians are so discon-
nected from the lives of or-
dinary Americans, they
aren't capable of fixing it.
"What would I do if I were
president?" Snyder says.
He looks around the bar
filled with chemical plant
workers, a septic truck
driver, and an ultrasound
technician who moon-
lighted as a waitress to pay
down student loans.
"I'd fire everyone in the
House and the Senate," Sny-
der says, "and put working-
class people in who
actually know what it's like
to be out here."


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A10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


































NEW YORK -Delivery
workers at a Domino's
pizza shop in New York
City have accepted nearly
$1.3 million to settle a law-
suit in which they claimed
they were routinely stiffed
out of overtime pay.
The lawsuit is one in a
string filed by restaurant de-
livery workers over alleged
labor law violations.
The New York Times
reported that the settle-
ment will cover claims
by 61 workers who
claimed managers at a
Manhattan Domino's
told them they wouldn't
get paid for overtime
hours, forcing them to rely
entirely on tips.
State law requires
restaurant workers to be
paid a minimum wage,
even when they are also re-
ceiving tips.
But at many New
York City restaurants,
those provisions are still
ignored.
Franchise owner David
Melton told the Times that
the company "made some
mistakes."

i-%,\


'444w


NATION/WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fish flinger
Associated Press
LECLAIRE, Iowa The
photographers who line up at a
Mississippi River lock to snap
images of eagles are getting
help from a man with a giant
slingshot that flings dead fish
into the open water
Ken Kester, who built the
contraption, calls it a "fish
launcher"
Kester sets up the slingshot
at Lock and Dam 14, in Le
Claire, Iowa. He told the Quad-
City Times it can toss fish far
out into the channel where the
water is calmer
"You have to get the fish out
there a couple hundred feet,
into that comfort zone for the
eagles," Kester said.
Jeff Harrison, a conserva-
tion officer with the Iowa De-


WASHINGTON United
Airlines said Saturday it will
drop its money-losing hub in
Cleveland, slashing its daily
flights and eliminating 470 jobs.
Company CEO Jeff Smisek
announced in a letter to
employees that the airline
will no longer use Cleveland
to connect fliers coming
from other airports around
the country. As a result,
United's daily departures
from the city will fall from
199 currently to 72 by June.
"Our hub in Cleveland
hasn't been profitable for over
a decade, and has generated
tens of millions of dollars of
annual losses in recent
years," Smisek states. "We
simply cannot continue to
bear these losses."
United said in November
that it aims to cut $2 billion
in annual costs in the com-
ing year by shifting flights,
making workers more pro-
ductive, and improving its
maintenance procedures.
Similar cutbacks have af-
fected many other small hubs
in cities such as Memphis,
Cincinnati and Salt Lake City
amid a wave of airline merg-
ers over the past five years.


BAGHDAD The
United Nations said Satur-
day at least 733 Iraqis were
killed during violence in
January, even when leaving
out casualties from an em-
battled western province.
The figures issued Satur-
day by the U.N.'s mission to
Iraq show 618 civilians and
115 members of the security
forces were killed in Janu-
ary. But the UNAMI state-
ment excluded deaths from
ongoing fighting in Anbar,
due to problems in verifying
the "status of those killed."
The figures also leave out
insurgent deaths.
Also, the U.N. said at
least 1,229 Iraqis were
wounded in attacks across
the country last month.
Baghdad was the worst
affected province, with 297
killed and 585 wounded.
AI-Qaida-linked fighters
and their allies seized control
of the city of Fallujah and
parts of the Anbar provincial
capital Ramadi last month
after authorities dismantled
a protest camp by Sunnis
angry at what they consider
second-class treatment by
the Shiite-led government.


YOLA, Nigeria Before
the usher could finish warning
worshippers of the gunmen
approaching, the attackers
were storming into the church,
locking the main door, explod-
ing homemade bombs and
firing into the congregation.
The shooting continued
as some people scrambled
to escape out of windows
and through the back door
of the sacristy.
Some had their throats slit
in last Sunday's attack on
St. Paul's Roman Catholic
Church in Wada Chakawa
village in northeast Nigeria.
Many villagers have fled,
vowing not to return until
their lives can be assured in
a 4-year-old Islamic upris-
ing by extremists who want
to impose Shariah law
across Africa's biggest oil
producer, which is divided
about equally between
Christians and Muslims.
Some villages in northeast
Adamawa state have turned
into ghost towns with thou-
sands of Christians fleeing
attacks by suspected militants
who have killed more than
50 people in the area this
week, church leaders said.


SANAA, Yei
Security and ti
say a battle be
Shiite and Sur
over land in nc
Yemen has lef
65 dead.
The officials
tie, which rage
and into Satur
tween Shiite K
members of th
Hashid tribe, a
mutually desire
the province o
north of Sanaa
The officials
on the conditic
anonymity bec
were not auth(
speak to medi
lence escalate
Hashid tribes
reinforcements
ultraconservat
sent over 700
Land dispute
mon between
group and the
Tensions have
between Salal
who are Sunni
and former Ha
who are Shiite


men -
ribal officials
3tween
nni tribesman
)rthwest
t more than
Essay the bat-


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 All


a win-win for eagles, photographers
Illinois border.
s fee Photographers line the river-
bank elbow-to-elbow on nice
S o N l R- i l days to make images of the ea-
S li in gles, and the slingshot ensures
S more dramatic pictures.
thEven though it doesn't hurt
the eagles to serve up fish, Har-
rison wonders about the ethics
for the photographers.
"I don't know if I agree with
it,"he said. "Some of these pho-
tographs show up in some
pretty big magazines, and they
are more or less staged."
AoaPe And Kester, who works in the
Associated Press railroad industry but consid-
Ken Kester of Clinton, Iowa, uses an oversized homemade sling- ers photography a serious
shot to fling dead fish into the open water for bald eagles to to feed hobby, said there are limits to
on Wednesday at Lock and Dam 14 on the Mississippi River near his invention. Recently, after a
Le Claire, Iowa. couple hours of flinging fish,
apartment of Natural Re- fish come from the local pool the eagles stopped grabbing
sources, said flinging fish into of water. Le Claire is 15 miles them.
the river is fine as long as the northeast of Davenport, on the "I think they got full," he said.


a all i-riaay MONROE, Mich. -Workers going
day, was be- through donated clothing at a thrift
lawthis and store turned up more than $43,000
ie Sunni in the pockets of suits and a robe.
3nd was over Goodwill manager Tyler Gedelian
ed territory in told The Monroe Evening News
)f Amran, that he sometimes finds loose change
a. in clothing, but nothing like what
3, who spoke happened Wednesday at the Monroe
:)n of store. Stuffed in envelopes in the
cause they pockets were tidy stacks of $100 bills.
prized to The 29-year-old called police,
a, said vio- who tracked down the man who
d after donated the clothes. That person
nan asked for had been cleaning out an elderly
s fromSunni relative's closet and took the
srom clothes to Goodwill; he didn't know
tives, who . ~~
es, there might be money hidden in
men. them, the newspaper reported.
es are com- When an officer arrived, he brought
the Hawthi a small zippered bag to transport
tribesman, the cash. When Gedelian saw the
long existed officer, he said had one thought:
fi Islamists, "You're gonna need a bigger bag."
i Muslims, At the police station, Sgt. Chris
iwthi rebels, Miller sorted the cash. The money
Muslims. was in $100 bills banded together
in packs of 10, and some of the bills
-From wire reports dated to the 1930s.


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Associated Press
Money that was found by workers at
the Monroe Goodwill donated cloth-
ing store is pictured Wednesday in
Monroe, Mich.

Workers find

$43,000 in

donated

clothing
Associated Press


Nation/World BRIEFS
NYC Domino's United Airlines UN says more Christians flee Officials: Sunni-
settles wages suit drops Cleveland as than 733 Iraqis attacks in Nigeria's Shiite fighting kills
for $1.3 million hub airport killed in January northeast 65 in Yemen


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Nation BRIEFS

Christened


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Christie going on offensive


World BRIEFS


Associated Press
This Jan. 9 photo shows
the USNS John Glenn off
the coast of San Diego.
On Saturday, the military
christened the Navy
logistics ship in honor of
the first American to orbit
Earth. The 785-foot ship
is a Mobile Landing
Platform ship a new
type of amphibious
staging and assault
vessel.


Manslaughter in
injection trial
JACKSON, Miss. -To
hear Natasha Stewart tell it,
she was just trying to help
an insecure woman when
she helped arrange for her
to get silicone injections in
her buttocks, shots that
prosecutors say were
deadly. Ajury disagreed,
convicting Stewart on Fri-
day of culpable negligence
manslaughter.
Stewart, of suburban
Memphis, Tenn., was found
guilty Friday in Jackson,
Miss., in the death of 37-
year-old Karima Gordon of
Atlanta.
Authorities say Stewart,
an adult entertainer also
known as Pebbelz Da
Model, took $200 for a re-
ferral to the alleged injector
and falsely represented that
the injector was a nurse.
Jurors also found her
guilty of conspiracy to com-
mit culpable negligence
manslaughter. She faces up
to 20 years in prison for
each charge. A sentencing
date has not yet been set.
Police: Man stole
cars left in storm
ATLANTA-A 34-year-
old man is accused of using
a tow truck to take cars that
were abandoned in Atlanta
during the winter storm and
traffic jam.
Police said Louis Mitchell
Jr. was arrested Thursday
and charged with auto theft,
forgery and other offenses.
It's not clear whether he
has an attorney.
Atlanta Police Sgt. Greg
Lyon told The Atlanta Jour-
nal-Constitution a police of-
ficer saw an unmarked tow
truck pulling a car. The truck
fled when the officer tried
stopping it. The driver and
passenger fled the truck
during a chase, sending it
crashing.
Investigators said the two
truck was stolen this month.
It was pulling a Toyota that
was stranded on Interstate
85. The investigation led
police to three other cars
taken from highways.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
TRENTON, N.J. New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
is going on the offensive
after a former loyalist said
he has evidence the Re-
publican governor knew
more than he has admitted
about an apparently polit-
ically motivated traffic jam
ordered by one of his
staffers last year
The governor's political
team sent an email Satur-
day to donors, along with
columnists and pundits
who might be in a position
to defend Christie, bashing
the man Christie put in a
top post at the Port Au-
thority of New York and


New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks Satur
ceremony to pass official hosting duties of
Super Bowl to representatives from Arizona.


New Jersey and the accu-
sations the man's lawyer
made in a letter Friday
The email says the for-


mer Port Authc
David Wildste
and say anyth
David Wildstei


The action from
Christie's supporters
comes as Republicans are
debating the implications
of the scandal that this
year has surrounded the
administration of the pos-
sible 2016 presidential
contender It was sent at a
moment when Christie is
in the spotlight with his
state hosting Sunday's
Super Bowl.
Associated Press The email, headlined "5
day during a Things You Should Know
next year's about the Bombshell
That's Not a Bombshell"
was obtained by The Asso-
mrity official, ciated Press and con-
in, "will do firmed by Christie's office.
ing to save It was first reported by
n." Politico.


Murder mystery


Associated Press
Amanda Knox waits on a television set for an interview Friday in New York. Knox said she will fight the
reinstated guilty verdict against her and an ex-boyfriend in the 2007 slaying of a British roommate in Italy
and vowed to "never go willingly" to face her fate in that country's judicial system.

Differingperspectives fuel debate over Amanda Knox case


Associated Press

SEATTLE To some Ameri-
cans, especially those in her
hometown of Seattle, Amanda
Knox seems a victim, unfairly
hounded by a capricious legal
system in Italy that convicted her
this week in the death of a 21-
year-old British woman.
But in Europe, some see her as
a privileged American who is get-
ting away with murder, embroiled
in a case that continues to make
global headlines and reinforces a
negative image of U.S. citizens be-
having badly even criminally -
abroad without any punishment
As she remains free in the U.S.,
the perceptions will likely fuel
not only the debate about who
killed Meredith Kercher in 2007
and what role, if any, Knox played
in her death, but complicate how
the U.S. and Italian governments
resolve whether she should be
sent to Italy to face prison.
"It's been a polarizing case, and
that polarization will remain,"
said Anne Bremner, a Seattle at-
torney and Knox supporter
The divergent views on who
killed Kercher are rooted not just


in the typical dynamics of a legal
case in which the two sides hold
opposing narratives, but also in
the differences between the jus-
tice systems in the U.S. and Italy,
and examples of Americans
avoiding Italian justice.
After being first convicted and
then acquitted, Knox and her one-
time boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito,
were convicted again Thursday,
following their third trial. Knox
was sentenced to 28 1/2 years, Sol-
lecito to 25 years. The court's rea-
soning isn't expected to be
released for three months.
The tone of some British news-
paper coverage reflected skepti-
cism about Knox's protestations of
innocence. "Shameless in Seattle"
was the front-page headline on
Saturday's Daily Mail, which re-
ferred to Knox's "brazen TV charm
offensive to escape extradition."
Any decision on whether to re-
turn Knox to Italy will ultimately
be made by the U.S. State
Department.
There have been other high-
profile cases in which Italians
hoped in vain to have Americans
face justice there, notably the
case of a U.S. Marine jet that


sliced a gondola cable in the Ital-
ian Alps in 1998, killing 20 people.
Under NATO rules, the U.S.
military retained jurisdiction,
and the pilot was acquitted of
manslaughter
More recently, in 2009 Italian
courts convicted in absentia -
26 CIA and U.S. government em-
ployees in the kidnapping of an
Egyptian cleric suspected of re-
cruiting terrorists in Milan.
Some lawyers familiar with the
process say Knox has little hope
of avoiding extradition under the
terms of the U.S.-Italy treaty, but
that won't stop her supporters
from mounting a campaign to
keep her in the U.S.
They're appealing to American
principles about trying someone
multiple times for the same
crime, even though under Italian
law her earlier conviction and
subsequent acquittal were never
finalized, and even her third trial
was considered part of the first
prosecution against her
They're also asking how one ap-
pellate court could find her actu-
ally innocent, while another court
convicts her beyond a reasonable
doubt.


Keystone XL foes undaunted by State Dept. report


Associated Press

LINCOLN, Neb. With yet an-
other obstacle removed for the
Keystone XL pipeline, opponents
were pressing forward with a law-
suit to challenge the project, pub-
lic protests and an effort to inject
the issue into the November
elections.
Supporters and opponents both
were quick to claim victories with
the U.S. State Department report
released Friday, which raised no
major objections to the pipeline.
The oil industry, some union
groups and congressional Repub-
licans called on the Obama ad-


ministration to move forward
with the project, while a coalition
of landowners and environmen-
talists say there is still cause for
denying a federal permit. The
project would ship 830,000 barrels
of oil a day from Canada to Texas
Gulf Coast refineries.
Meanwhile, farmers and ranch-
ers in Nebraska who oppose the
pipeline are planning to run for
seats on a state board that regu-
lates power stations that are
needed along the project route.
And national activists say they
have recruited more than 75,000
volunteers willing to participate
in civil disobedience, should


President Barack Obama approve
the Keystone project.
The project now goes to a 30-
day comment period and a review
by U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry and other agencies.
Obama has 90 days to make the
decision on the pipeline, but the
White House on Friday disputed
the notion that the report is
headed to a fast approval.
Oil began flowing last week
through an Oklahoma-to-Texas
section already approved by
Obama.
"There's no question, if the
president approves this permit,
that there will be civil disobedi-


ence," said Jane Kleeb, executive
director of the group Bold Ne-
braska, which has helped organ-
ize opposition in the state. "We've
said from the beginning that we
will support the landowners and
what they want to do and what
they think is best for their prop-
erty I think you'll see some
landowners driving really slow on
their county roads to block the
(pipeline) trucks."
Project backers said the report
- the latest in a five-year review
by state and federal agencies -
bolsters their case for the
pipeline and eliminates the need
for further delays.


AP
Thai polls open in
tense election
BANGKOK Thailand's
tense national election got
underway Sunday amid
signs of disruptions at sev-
eral polling stations and
fears of violence, a day
after gun battles between
protesters and would-be
voters broke out at a busy
Bangkok intersection.
The extent of disruptions
was not immediately clear
when polls opened nation-
wide, but there were early
indications that dozens of
polling stations in Bangkok
would not open because
protesters blocked delivery
of ballots or stopped voters
from entering.
At least seven people
were wounded in Satur-
day's clashes, including an
American photojournalist,
when gun battles broke out
at a busy Bangkok intersec-
tion between government
supporters and protesters
intent on derailing the polls.
Indonesian
volcano erupts
MOUNT SINABUNG, In-
donesia -An Indonesian
volcano that has been rum-
bling for months unleashed
a major eruption Saturday,
killing 14 people just a day
after authorities allowed
thousands of villagers who
had been evacuated to re-
turn to its slopes, saying
that activity was decreas-
ing, officials said.
Among the dead on
Mount Sinabung were a
local television journalist
and four high-school stu-
dents and their teacher who
were visiting the mountain
to see the eruptions up
close, said National Disas-
ter Mitigation Agency
spokesman Sutopo Purwo
Nugroho. At least three
other people were injured,
and authorities feared the
death toll would rise.
Toronto mayor
ticketed
VANCOUVER, British
Columbia It seems that
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford
can't cross the street these
days without getting into
trouble.
The mayor's spokesman,
Amin Massoudi, confirmed
Saturday that Ford received
a jaywalking ticket Friday
night.
Ford was in Vancouver,
British Columbia, where
he's attending the funeral of
a friend's mother.
Toronto's embattled
mayor last year made inter-
national headlines when he
admitted to having smoked
crack cocaine while in a
drunken stupor.
Syrian forces
launch strikes
BEIRUT-- Syrian mili-
tary helicopters dropped
barrels packed with explo-
sives in the government's
latest air raids on rebel-held
areas of the northern city of
Aleppo on Saturday, killing
at least 23 people including
a family trapped in a burn-
ing car, activists said.
In neighboring Lebanon,
a car bomb blew up near a
gas station in a Shiite town,
killing at least three people,
in the latest attack linked to
the war in neighboring
Syria.
-From wire reports











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If you take a Caribbean cruise
from Florida, there's a good
chance you'll end up in
Cozumel at some point. This
island, which is Mexico's largest
in the Caribbean, is about
30 miles long. It hosts millions
of visitors every year, and many
of them arrive by cruise ship.


Now, I've heard people criticize Cozumel, saying it's nothing
but shopping, hotels and tourists. True, it's an island whose
main focus is serving tourists. You can get by just fine speaking
English and your American dollars probably won't need to be
exchanged for pesos, so you might not feel like you've gone ter-
ribly far from home. But if you can look beyond that, there are
a whole lot of worthwhile things to see and do here.
Visiting historic sites
The modem name Cozumel, which originated from the Mayan-
language, means "Island of Swallows." Mayan history on the is-
land dates back to the first millennium A.D., and there are several
places where visitors to Cozumel can see Mayan ruins. Cruise
ships offer tours of these sites, but you might want to take a taxi
there or walk instead, depending on how much time you have and
where you start your visit The largest of the ruins on Cozumel is
San Gervasio, which is near the center of the island.
See Page A18

Feature and photos by AMANDA MIMS / For the Chronicle


TOP: Snorkelers look at tropical fish during an excursion near Paradise Reef in Cozumel. ABOVE: Mayan ruins can be found in
several locationson the island of Cozumel.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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S48 33 48 31 34 (2008) Kathy Bales.'PG-13' c Tyler Perry, Janet Jackson. 'PG-13' (DVS) Married Too?" 2010)
TOON 38 58 38 33 ***"Scooby-Doo!The MysteryBegins" NinjaGo INinjaGo King/Hill King/Hill Burgers Burgers Fam.Guy IFam.Guy
TRA 9 106 9 44 Food Paradise 'G' Food Paradise 'G' Food Paradise 'PG' Food Paradise 'PG' Food Paradise 'G' Sturgis's Most Tasty
ruTV 25 55 25 98 55 World Records World Records Word Records World Records World Records Word Records
CTVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Hot in Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls
SLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Psych "Someone's Got
04) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 a Woody"'PG'
Law & Order "Turnstile Law & Order Law & Order "Standoff" Law & Order "Return" Law & Order "Burn Law & Order "Amends"
WJ 117 69 117 Justice"'14' "Dissonance"'14'c '14'Bc '14'mc Baby Burn"'14' '14'c
1WG 81A18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny HomeVideos *** "Red Dragon" (2002) Anthony Hopkins. 'R' ]*** "The Pledge"(2001)'R'


DearAnnie: I am
beyond speech-
less at some of the
things my husband's par-
ents say and do, and yet
he lets all of this roll off
his back.
My in-laws often treat
my husband's brother
and kids to vacations to
which we and our kids
are not invited. Then
they show us the photos
and brag
about all the
fun they had.
I can hardly
stand to be in
the same
room while
this is going
on, but my
husband
smiles and
asks ques- .
tions about
the trip. ANN
My own MAIL
parents M__ lL
would never
dream of doing some-
thing for one child that
they would not offer to
the other They always
have been very fair To
see such lopsided treat-
ment is foreign to me.
The truly confounding
thing is that my husband
is the responsible son.
He lives to provide for
his family His brother is
irresponsible and a
spendthrift and yet
seems to be rewarded by
his parents.
Outwardly, my hus-
band acts like this
doesn't bother him, but I
know deep down the
slights have to hurt. Our
children are also old


enough and smart
enough to see the differ-
ence in treatment be-
tween them and their
cousins.
My New Year's resolu-
tion is to enjoy the peo-
ple who truly want to
spend time with our fam-
ily and not permit the
others to steal my joy
Am I right? -Missouri
Mom
Dear
Missouri: Of
course you
should not
allow others to
"steal your joy"
But please
keep your hus-
band's feelings
foremost when
dealing with
his family
members. We
E'S don't deny that
this behavior is
3OX hurtful, but he
has chosen to
deal with it by turning
the other cheek and not
allowing jealousy or
anger to guide his ap-
proach. This is a forgiv-
ing attitude, and it
allows him to have a re-
lationship with his fam-
ily, which he obviously
wants. If you turn this
into your crusade, criti-
cizing his family and
pushing him to be more
upset by it, you are not
helping. Instead, shower
him with the praise and
gratitude his parents
deny him so he knows he
is appreciated.
Email questions to
anniesmailbox
@comcastnet.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"12YearsASlave" (R) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7p.m.
"August: Osage County" (R)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
4:15 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13) In
3D. 2 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Labor Day" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1:40
p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"That Awkward Moment" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D.
5 p.m. No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)


1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
In 3D. 3:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"That Awkward Moment" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D.
4:40 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Acute
6 Pulsates
11 Kind of engine
16 Made tractable
21 Basilsauce
22 Irk
23 Gras
24 Texas landmark
25 Appraised
26 Small seabirds
(2 wds.)
28 Lawful
29 Rd.
30 Kind of British gun
31 Chum
32 Afalling down
34 Pub drink
35 Word
37 That girl
38 Set of steps
40 and sympathy
41 Get hitched
42 Spouted vessel
44 Altar boy
46 Part of the eye
49 Holy
52 Quahog
53 Possesses
55 Brusque
59 Characteristic
60 Whistle sound
61 Sherlock Holmes, e.g.
64 -of the ball
65 Touch on
66 Links cry
67 Wild swine
68 Rend
70 Check
71 Mil. rank
72 Endorse
73 Young deer
74 Egyptian president
Anwar -
76 Knock
77 Incarnation of Vishnu
79 Apple PC,
for short
80 Manner of walking
82 Harangue
84 Trick
85 Soft mineral
86 West coast
campus (Abbr.)
87 Particular
88 Old Spanish
explorer
90 podrida
91 Clumsy boat


92 Roars
95 The "I"
96 Low hill
98 Fury
100 Woody stem
101 Round mark
102 Formal garment
104 Old bug killer
105 Female horse
106 -Knox
107 Nothing but
108 Fields
110 Formal discussion
112 Shapeless mass
113 Code name
114 Cramped
116 Gear tooth
117 River duck
118 Doghouse
119 Twofold
121 Got too big for
124 Fender mishap
125 Drink
128 Old soldier,
for short
130 Bundle of papers
131 Color
132 Injure
136 Literary collection
137 Corpsman
139 Tried for office
140 Poetic time of day
141 Extinct bird
142 Extent
144 Harmless reptile (2 wds.)
147 Circa
149 Chile's range
150 Efface
151 Bone of the ear
152 Door hardware
153 Moor
154 Inclined ways
155 Abounds
156 Kind of
management

DOWN
1 Jack in a rhyme
2 Pitch
3 Daisylike flower
4 Itinerary (Abbr.)
5 Two peas in a-
6 Kitchen gadget
7 Inscribe
8 Before long
9 Rocky hill
10 Indication
11 Fetid
12 Make lace


13 Goes wrong
14 Highly skilled
15 Surroundings
16 Lofty
17 -Pasha
18 Colorful bird
19 Writer-Zola
20 Was too fond
27 Bucket
30 Molt
33 Molten rock
36 Worth
38 Begone!
39 Old anesthetic
43 Rainy
44 Succulent plant
45 de vie
47 Flow back
48 God of war
49 Pile
50 Shelter in a
garden
51 Avegetable
52 Maize
54 Rock layers
56 Completely
up-to-date
57 Entreat
58 Arizona city
60 Ancient garment
61 Pig
62 Tongue
63 Went
underground
66 Where Helsinki is
67 Casino game
69 Long-suffering
72 Trembled
73 Time of year
74 Parachute
material
75 Call
78 Weep
79 Shoppers' haven
81 "God's Little -"
83 Kinsman (Abbr.)
85 Indian of Mexico
88 Commenced
89 Ancient
marketplace
92 Sharp projection
93 Sicker
94 Tough alloy
97 Peculiar
99 Exist
100 Not warm
103 Old aromatic
ointment
105 Sorcerer


Imperfection
- of Sundays
French coin
Scary yell
Complaint
Chess pieces
Tsunami
Sic gloria mundi
Enthusiastic
Accounts book
...-a crowd


Equipment
Coercion
- Jessica Parker
Silly
Black-and-white animal
Jeweled
headband
Bunk
With
A cosmetic
Alma -


Interlock
Study in haste
Aromatic spice
Fetch
Recipe meas.
Opp. of SSW
Cry of discovery
Hopper


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.1


A14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Purple Heart
Ceremony slated
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart (MOPH)
invites all veterans and
the public to attend the
ninth annual Purple
Heart Ceremony at
11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15,
at the Florida National
Guard Armory, 8551 W
Venable St., Crystal River
Dedicated to the mem-
ory of Chapter 776 mem-
ber Donald Guard, the
patriotic ceremony will
commemorate the legacy
of the Purple Heart and
pay tribute to Florida's
fallen heroes and
wounded warriors, with
special recognition of
World War II recipients.
The MOPH Department
of Florida
Afghanistan/Iraq War Me-
morial Portrait Mural,
which honors those
Floridians who fell dur-
ing the Afghanistan/Iraq
campaigns, will be on dis-
play The mural is the first
memorial to bear both the
engraved names and
color portraits of those
who fell.
Vocalists Paul and
Jackie Stevio and 9-year-
old Marleigh Miller will
provide patriotic music.
For more information,
visit wwwcitruspurple
heart. org or call 352-
382-3847.

'Real'military
card party on tap
Unit 776, Ladies Auxil-
iary Military Order of the
Purple Heart will host a
real Military Card Party
at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
22, at the Point 0'Woods
Clubhouse, 9228 E. Gospel
Island Road, Inverness.
Lunch will be served at
noon and cards will
follow
Men are also invited to
join in for the fun and
prizes. "Elvis" will be on
hand, straight from his
duty station in Friedberg,
Germany
If you were in the mili-
tary, wear your uniform or
military service organiza-
tion uniform. Those who
weren't in the military are
asked to wear red, white
and blue in honor of our
military personnel and
veterans.
Cost is $12, which in-
cludes lunch, coffee and
dessert, plus door prizes.
Make your own table of
four or the ladies will pair
you. For reservations, call
Tee at 352-345-1438 or
email ridertee3@
yahoo.com, or Linda at
352-344-8196 or
pooh2102@icloud.com.
Reservations must be re-
ceived by 5 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 16.
A portion of the pro-
ceeds will help support
the Honor Flight Net-
work, a nonprofit organi-
zation to honor America's
veterans. They transport
veterans to Washington,
D.C., at no cost to visit and
reflect at their memorials.
Top priority is given to
World War II and termi-
nally ill veterans from all
wars. Honor Flight Net-
work has expanded to in-
clude Korean War and
Vietnam War veterans.

Post plans
Chinese auction
The Ladies Auxiliary of
the Harry E Nesbitt Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars
Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills will host a Chinese
auction fundraiser on Sat-
urday, March 8, at the Post
located at 2170 Vet Lane,
behind Cadence Bank, on
County Road 491.
Doors open at 10 a.m.
and drawings will begin
at noon.
Admission is a $2.50 do-
nation to benefit the VFW
Veterans Village in Fort
McCoy -the only facility
of its kind. The VFW


home provides afford-
able, independent living
accommodations in a
homelike atmosphere to
those in VFW, Men's Aux-
iliaries, Ladies Auxil-
iaries and their spouses.
The facility is not subsi-
dized by any governmen-
tal agency, so the cost of
operation is met by rent
income, donations and
fundraisers such as this.
There will be hot dogs
available for $1, along


with free dessert and
coffee.
For more information,
call Bettie at 352-746-1989
or Donna at 352-746-5215.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5. The post is at 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills, 2170 Vet
Lane (County Road 491
behind Cadence Bank),
offers several events that
are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sun-
days in the smoke-free
hall. Card bingo and grill
night is at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m.
Monday and Fridays in
the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

VFW Post 4252
invites public
VFW Post 4252, State
Road 200 in Hernando
(with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the
public at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch
every day and breakfast
on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include
bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show
Me the Hand at 2 p.m.
Thursday Dance music is
on tap every Friday and
bingo is played in the hall
Saturday
Beginning Feb. 7,
Friday will feature all-
you-can-eat fish or New
England boiled dinner
For more information
and menus, call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabayrrcom and
Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received


Chili champs


Special to the Chronicle
Winners of the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Crystal River Chapter 158 chili
cook-off are Mike and Lisa Curry of Curry's Rooftop Bar-B-Que. The cook-off was at
Crystal River Mall on Jan. 25.


great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

DAV program
needs van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-


buttons from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has
more than 270,000 miles
on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not


accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.


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Prizes include

* Accommodations & Dinner for Two

at Plantation on Crystal River

* Jewelry from Specialty Gems

& Jim Green Jewelers

* $100 for Ike's/Neon Leon's

C IiON i C+
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 A15



Reserve for Trip
to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, will lead the 2014
trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and
friends from March 11 to
March 28. Signups are
being taken for the an-
nual trek, which includes
visits to several islands,
some golfing and a spe-
cial visit to the USS Ari-
zona Memorial and The
National Cemetery of the
Pacific.
For more information,
call McLean at 352-637-
5131 or email dmclean8
@tampabayrrcom.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com.

Air Force invites
prior enlisted
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select ca-
reer fields.
Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other
specialties.
Assignment locations
are based on Air Force
needs.
Call 352-476-4915.











ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post 166 organizing auxiliary
American Legion Post 166 is in the
process of organizing an auxiliary unit.
All women in the Chassahowitzka,
Homosassa Springs and Sugarmill Woods
areas interested in joining the American
Legion Auxiliary Unit are welcome to call
352-860-2090 or 928-848-8359. Or, write to:
American Legion Post 166, PO. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL 34447-0767.
Furnish your name, address, city and
state.
The information is needed by Feb. 22 to
set up an organizational meeting.

40&8 to have breakfast today
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
today at American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

VFW post to serve chicken
The VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864,
10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, will have a chicken dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7.
The public is invited. Donation is $8;
children younger than 6 eat for $4.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Italian dinner on menu
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for Italian garlic sauce
chicken at 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 7, 906
State Road 44 East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7 and includes sides, salad,
bread and dessert. Call 352-344-3495, or
visit wwwvfw4337.org, for information
about all post activities.

CCVC yard sale set for Feb. 8
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call 352-400-8952.

Spaces available for craft fair
The American Legion Allen Rawls
Auxiliary Unit 77 will sponsor a craft fair
on Feb. 8.
Outdoor spaces and indoor spaces are
available. To rent a space to sell hand-
made crafts, call Alice at 352-476-7001 or
Charlotte at 352-341-1803 or Linda at 352-
201-0015 for more information.

Four Chaplains service set
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will have a Four
Chaplains Memorial Service at
4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9. The service will be
followed by the post's birthday
celebration.
Refreshments will be served. The public
is welcome.

Post to have flea market
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will have its
outdoor flea market and pancake break-
fast beginning at 7:30 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 15.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausages, orange
juice and coffee for a $5 donation. Every-
one is welcome.

Memorial honors veterans
Purple Heart recipients are sought to be
honored with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092 for
more information.


Vietnam experience


Jungle rot,


snakes,


raw sewage,


protests

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Dennis Gibson's
timing, which
he had no
control over,
could be described as
both unfortunate and
fortunate. But then
again, such a dichotomy
is something easily
attached to the Vietnam
War.

Gibson, who now lives south of Ho-
mosassa, grew up in Chicago, gradu-
ating from Lane Tech High School in
1959. With work hard to come by, he
joined the U.S. Marines in 1967, going
through basic training in Camp
Pendleton, outside San Diego -
"They called us Hollywood Marines,"
he said.
From there he shipped out to Oki-
nawa before landing in South Viet-
nam -just in time for the Tet
Offensive, until then the biggest mili-
tary action launched by either side.
Before it was over, more than 80,000
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong
troops would attack a number of
South Vietnamese towns and cities in
three phases that would extend for
nine months.
"Everything hit the fan then,
Gibson said. He had been in Vietnam
less than a month when Tet started on
Jan. 30, 1968, and, unlike many of his
comrades, he was fortunate enough to
survive.
"I was on a hill overlooking Happy
Valley, outside Da Nang (Air Base),"
he said. '"About 500 hit us, and there
were about 50 of us."
Gibson was a lance corporal; the
group he was part of that guarded the
hill had a pair of.50-caliber machine
guns at their disposal, and the hill
was lined with 50-gallon drums filled
with diesel fuel and gasoline and
wired with C4 explosives. When
enemy troops attacked, the drums
were set off.
"They killed 17 of us and wounded
about a dozen," he said.
Gibson said a couple of fixed-wing
prop planes armed with mini-guns ca-
pable of firing up to 6,000 rounds per
minute were called in and, together
with helicopter gunships, "That's
what saved us. They saved our butts."
'"About two days later, we found
about 260 bodies (of the enemy). We
threw them in a big hole with lime. I
always wondered about their fami-
lies, and if anyone ever wondered
about them," Gib-on -said
Unlike regi ilir Ii S iiI.\ troop, .
the Marines l' -\'eek I-.il triniil'
included extensil\e Ilrl\ I\.i l trii -
tion, "How t. Ii\e ff lthe Ilnd." lihe
said. "... thin-, thit \ illI
keep you ali\ e e" e


IVIMATI I nwVV B rECu nronicle
Dennis Gibson grew up in Chicago and graduated from Lane Tech High School in
1959. With work hard to come by, he joined the U.S. Marines in 1967, going
through basic training in Camp Pendleton, outside San Diego "They called us
Hollywood Marines," he said.


would take part in approximately
eight patrols.
These were not short strolls in
areas around the base. According to
Gibson, they would last "three to five
weeks," some taking them into the
hills where they would find tribes of
natives living in a near pre-historic
state. He would be carrying about 70
pounds of equipment, including his
M16 and an AK47, both automatic ri-
fles, and a .45-caliber pistol.
The memory of his first such mis-
sion still resonates. "We went into a
village, and that's when the reality of
it all sunk in," he said.
"We were just outside Da Nang and
we caught some small-arms fire, so
we went to investigate. This guy lead-
ing us, he was an old salt, and we
went into this building, like a tem-
ple, and this woman was
there, niid lie asked
her where
the


.1'


During his four years in the service
Gibson, who was designated a truck
driver and spent a large part of his
time on convoy duty carrying supplies
to various bases in South Vietnam,


knom "
A %e rI h \v- f: lo dlu ted. rex eA 111i
i "tililnel iinder thle lt r Tlit oIld
.jit, he jlst sh t this \v ii,%.%
"I got sick. But he had to do it.
Otherwise, we'd be coming home in a
body bag."
Gibson would be exposed to all
sorts of similar tragedies. During the
Tet Offensive, the North Vietnamese


overran the city of Hue, executing
thousands of its residents. U.S. forces
would eventually recapture the city
in a battle that lasted a month;
Gibson took part in that reclamation
effort.
"One thing that will never leave me
is the smell of Vietnam," he said. "It
was like mold and raw sewage."
There were other lessons. "I
learned you couldn't make friends
over there," he said, simply because
they could be dead the next day "You
didn't sleep because it was always
wet.
"You'd get jungle rot (a fungal in-
fection of the foot caused by constant
exposure to wet, unsanitary condi-
tions). And you had to deal with the
elements, the monsoons, the snakes
and then the rats; they were
overrunning us."
He .sn't unhappy to return to the
st.tes.in 1 9170, but he was unpre-
plired f:r what happened next-
\ i: r, ,ds ,f war protesters greeting
\ hiii ith insults.
\ "Here I thought I was a hero,"
\ he siid "They didn't tell us
\ jl).iiit that. I have to say, I was
\ re.ll, disappointed."
\i Gibson said it wasn't until
S ter 9/11 that anyone actu-
Sjll.\ gave him a positive ac-
kn owledgment for the
.!icrifices he made.
A ot \ "Never did I have any-
e ._ ,one come up and say
'a ,- \thank you for your serv-
\\ \ ice," he said.
\ Nightmares he
Suffered about his
Vietnam experiences
Li nded him a two-week stay in
Glenil.ile Hospital in 1987, 16 years
.jtter hi, distharge.
I \%. s Ili.ning myself for a lot of
lih.t hiMppened," he said.
He \ v. .lsko diagnosed with Type 2
di .ibetes. believed to be caused by his
e \ p,:,'iire to Agent Orange, commonly
iie(ed in1 Vietuam as a herbicide and
det,:liint
Other memories still persist as
well. Asked how many friends he lost
during the war, he replied, '"About a
dozen. I blamed myself for a couple of
them. I always felt I could have done
something differently"


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


...........................................................................................................................................

...............................................................EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 A17










Five free things to do in St. Louis as




Gateway to the West marks 250 years


Associated Press

ST LOUIS -St Louis is
turning 250 this year, and visi-
tors who want to join in the cel-
ebration can find plenty to do
without spending a dime.
The Gateway City was
founded by Pierre Laclede
and Auguste Chouteau on Feb.
15, 1764. A series of anniver-
sary events are planned
throughout the year Some are
serious, including a reenact-
ment of the founding on Feb.
15 at the Laclede's Landing
area on the Mississippi River-
front downtown. Others are
more whimsical, like a
"Burnin' Love" festival in
which 250 couples are ex-
pected to become engaged on
Valentine's Day
Amid the hoopla, there's
plenty to do for free, including
visits to one of the world's
biggest breweries, two popular
animal attractions, a science
center and a towering monu-
ment that has come to define
St. Louis.

Gateway Arch
The iconic Arch, built as a
monument to westward expan-
sion, stands 630 feet tall along
the banks of the Mississippi
River For a fee, visitors can
ride a tram to the top of the
Arch and gaze over downtown
St. Louis to the west or the
cornfields of Illinois to the
east.
But many attractions at and
around the Arch are free. That
includes the Museum of West-
ward Expansion in the base-
ment of the Arch, focusing on
life in the West in the 1800s.
Visitors can also wander the
expansive Arch grounds,
where a multi-million dollar
upgrade project is under way
and expected to be completed
by 2016.
Also free are visits to the Old
Courthouse in downtown St.
Louis, also operated by the Na-
tional Park Service. The court-
house was the site of the
famous Dred Scott case that
played a role in eventually free-
ing the slaves.
Construction of the Arch, de-
signed Eero Saarinen, began in
1963. The final piece connect-
ing the two legs was installed in
1965, and the Arch opened to
visitors on May 25, 1968.


Associated Press
A visitor to the Saint Louis Zoo points as a sea lions frolic Sept. 5, 2013, in an exhibit in St. Louis. The zoo is considered one of the best
in the nation, and one of the few that with no admission fee.


Anheuser-Busch
Brewery tour
The Busch family sold An-
heuser-Busch to the Belgian
brewer InBev in 2008, but the
massive brewery remains an in-
tegral part of St. Louis, making
some of the nation's best-selling
brews, including Budweiser
and Bud Light.
The complimentary tours are
open to visitors of all ages -
but only those 21 and older can
taste the finished product after
the tour Younger visitors get
soft drinks.
Visitors not only get a
glimpse of how the beer is
made but see the Budweiser
Clydesdales, kept at stables on
the brewery site.
Reservations are required.
Anheuser-Busch also offers a
more comprehensive "Beer-
master Tour" and "Beer
School," though neither is free.


The brewery itself is in the
eclectic Soulard area near
downtown. Soulard Market
nearby offers a variety of fresh
produce, meats and other goods.

Grant's Farm
The 281-acre Grant's Farm is
owned by the Busch family It
got its name because the prop-
erty was founded as a farm by
Ulysses S. Grant, the Civil War
general who later became the
nation's 18th president.
The farm, in St. Louis County
just south of the city, is home to
more than 900 animals. Among
them: Another group of Bud-
weiser Clydesdales.
More than 24 million people
have visited Grant's Farm since
it opened in 1954. Reservations
are required.

St. Louis Zoo
The St. Louis Zoo in sprawl-


ing Forest Park is considered
one of the best in the nation,
and one of the few that with no
admission fee. Funding comes
from a cultural tax district, the
Metropolitan Zoological Park
and Museum District, though
fees are charged for some spe-
cial attractions.
The zoo is home to more than
18,000 animals, including some
rare and endangered species. A
"Zooline Railroad" takes visitors
to various locations and is pop-
ular, especially among children.
The zoo's origins date to the
1904 St Louis World's Fair, when
the city purchased the Flight
Cage from the Smithsonian In-
stitution. Over the years, new
exhibits and animals were added.
The zoo is open 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. most days; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
on Thanksgiving, Christmas
Eve and New Year's Eve; and
closed on Christmas and New
Year's Day


St. Louis
Science Center
The Science Center, also part
of Forest Park and funded
through the same cultural sub-
sidy as the zoo, is among the
few free science centers in the
U.S. It was founded as a plane-
tarium in 1963. Today, the cen-
ter includes more than 750
exhibits in 300,000-plus square
feet of space, making it one of
the nation's largest science cen-
ters. About 1.2 million people
visit it each year
The center itself is free, but
fees are charged for admission
to some special exhibits and
planetarium shows. An Omni-
max Theater also charges for
admission.
The center features an en-
closed walkway over Interstate
64 in which visitors can monitor
the speeds of cars traveling
below


COZUMEL
Continued from Page A13

If you are mostly inter-
ested in history and Mayan
culture, a boat ride to the
mainland might be in order
There you can visit the
Mayan ruins at Tulum and
see what remains of the
walled, Pre-Columbian city
set against a backdrop of
blue-green Caribbean Sea.
If you have a lot of time
to spend while your ship
is docked at Cozumel, you
can travel further into the
mainland and visit
Chichen Itza, one of the
largest Mayan cities.

Snorkeling
and diving
Cozumel is known for
its ample diving and snor-
keling opportunities.
There are several coral
reefs around the island to
keep you occupied,


whether you want to
scuba dive or snorkel.
You can save money by
skipping the group snor-
keling excursions the
cruise lines offer and
bringing your own snorkel
gear Many popular shore
snorkeling spots are ac-
cessible to the public.
However, it's very impor-
tant to be familiar with
the currents around the
island and make sure you
choose a safe place to
swim.
One snorkeling spot,
Chankanaab Lagoon at
Chankanaab National
Park, is popular for
families. There is an
admission fee to get into
the park, but there is
plenty to see and do
there on land as well
as in the water
If you want to scuba
dive or to snorkel farther
offshore, you won't have a
problem finding someone
to take you out. Dive
shops dot the island, and


cruise ships offer diving
and snorkeling excursion
packages. A major benefit
ofreservingspace on an
excursion with the cruise
line is that you won't have
to worry if the ship is late
arriving in port, which
sometimes happens.

Other things to do
There are hundreds of
restaurants on the island.
Here are 250 of them
listed on Trip Advisor:
http://tinyurl.com/
cozumelrestaurants
And of course, there are
othershore-excursion ac-
tivities that are typically
offered to cruise line


guests: ATV rentals,
buggy tours, shopping
tours, zip-lining, charter-
boat fishing and
eco-tours.
Want to learn more
about Cozumel? Check


Massage


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In H omosassa & Crystal River
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.travel
http://www.fodors.com/
world/mexico-and-


central-america/mexico/
cozumel
Ready to learn
more about cruising?
Start at http://www.
cruisecritic.com.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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A18 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


EXCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only basic
information regarding each group.
For more information about sched-
uled activities, meetings, meals and
more for a specific post or group,
call or email the contact listed. Posts
and groups may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call
352-795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost1l55@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544,
or email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Legion
Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77,
4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street
in Inverness. Call Commander Norm
Brumettat 352-476-2134 or Auxiliary
president Alice Brummett at
352-476-7001.
American Legion Post 166
has a new schedule. Meetings are
the first Monday at 7 p.m. at the
Springs Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. To
accommodate members who cannot
drive at night, executive board
breakfast meetings are held at Olive
Tree at 9 a.m. Wednesday. Call
Commander Robert Scott at 352-
860-2090 for other information.
Herbert Surber American


Legion Post 225, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. Call
352-860-1629.

VETERANS
OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087,
County Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N.
Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-726-3339,
email vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com
and Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west of
U.S. 19 between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW
Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call
352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post
447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis,
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter No. 70,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at
the intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-
419-0207.


Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call
Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-
794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans
Chapter No. 158, Crystal River,
meets at the Crystal River Mall. For
more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies
Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498 meets at
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in
Hernando. Call Susan McQuiston at
352-666-0084, or Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30
a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Coun-
try Club, Hernando. Call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets atAmerican
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De
Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776


Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of
Military Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at
the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or Secre-
tary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252
in Hernando. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank.
Call Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Saturdays at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.
Remaining meetings in 2014 are:
Feb. 8, March 8, April 12 and
May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country


Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at
West Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or email
seacapt34447@yahoo.com or
Robert Currie at 352-799-5250 or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport
Administration Building, 750 S.W.
60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV property in
Inverness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is
to meet the needs of wounded
veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


VETERANS NOTES


Citrus Kia supports veterans


Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-


quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat. For more informa-
tion about the Citrus
County Veterans Office,
log onto wwwbocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-


Christina A. Austin
Air Force Airman Christina
A. Austin graduated from
basic mili-
tary training
at Joint
Base San
Antonio-
Lackland,
San Anto-
nio, Texas.
The air-
man com- Christina
pleted an A. Austin
intensive, U.S.
eight-week Air Force


form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
back-ground check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
com, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice tailors
program to vets
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
352-527-4600.


program that included training
in military discipline and stud-
ies, Air Force core values,
physical fitness and basic
warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force.
Austin is the daughter of
Penny and Alan Sowerby of
Hernando. She is a 2010
graduate of Citrus High
School, Inverness.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Kia General Manager Paul Arduser, right, presents a donation to American
Legion Riders Chapter 237 Director John Roby to benefit local veterans. The
donation was for the fourth annual American Legion Post 237 Poker Run held
Saturday, Jan. 25. The event was to benefit Moffitt Cancer Center ovarian cancer
research and veterans served by Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast.



U.S. Coast Guard Flotilla 15-01 to do GPS training


Special to the Chronicle

Interested in learning
how to use that GPS you
have for your boat?
U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary 15-01 of Crystal
River will offer a two-


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Class size is limited to


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Call Linda at 352-503-
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES


Plant clinics
focus on weeds
Are you someone who
hates weeds and spends
a lot of time and money
to get rid of them? Do
you know there are dif-
ferent types of weeds?
Each weed type re-
sponds to different types
of control.
The free February
Master Gardener Plant
Clinics will address the
types of weeds, ways to
control them, and de-
scriptions of some of the
most common weeds
found in Citrus County
The schedule is:
Feb. 5 -Floral City
Library 2 p.m.
Feb. 11 -Lakes
Region Library, Inver-
ness, 1 p.m.
Feb. 12 Central
Ridge Library, Beverly
Hills, 1:30 p.m.
Feb. 14 Coastal
Region Library, Crystal
River, 1:30 p.m.
Feb. 19 -Citrus
Springs Library, Citrus
Springs, 1 p.m.
Feb. 25-
Homosassa Library,
Homosassa, 2 p.m.
Bring samples, ques-
tions or problems and
master gardeners will
address them.
For information, call
352-527-5700.

County seeks
volunteer help
There is a special op-
portunity waiting for
folks who want to make a
difference and are will-
ing to get involved as a
volunteer
Citrus County is
rolling out a new County
Volunteer Program and
is looking for people
who are interested in as-
sisting in various depart-
ments throughout the
county. Being sought are
bright, enthusiastic and
energetic adults who
would like to assist pro-
fessional staff enhance
services.


Some examples of vol-
unteer opportunities in-
clude: event workers,
clerk typists, filing or an-
swering the phone.
For more information,
log onto wwwbocc.cit-
rus.fl.us/volunteering.
htm or contact Deb Bloss
at 352-341-6429 or
deborah.bloss@bocc.
citrus.fl.us for details.

Valentine's Day
with IR-RU
The IR-RU Family So-
cial Club has announced
plans for Valentine's
Day On Friday, Feb. 14,
Chef Gina will offer a
dinner consisting of
honey-glazed Cornish
hen with herbed stuff-
ing, mashed potato, cau-
liflower, homemade
cranberry sauce, fresh
veggie and roll. Also, a
red velvet cake for two
will be available.
Dinner prices are $10
per person or $18 per
couple. A discount of $1
is offered on all advance
sales. There is a limit of
60 dinners to be served
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
The bartenders have the
tickets for sale at the
clubhouse at 922 U.S. 41
in Inverness. Call 352-
637-5118.
Entertainment will be
provided by Steve
Champagne from 8 to
midnight.
Guests are always
welcome at The IR-RU
Family Social Club.

Learn social
ballroom dance
Social ballroom dance
classes with June
Queripel are offered
Wednesday at the
Central Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 2804 Marc
Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Basics are taught at
1:30 p.m., Plus classes
are at 2:45 p.m. The one-
hour lessons are $5 each.
Proceeds help support
In-Home Senior
Services.


69th ANNIVERSARY

The Cammaratas


Special to the Chronicle
Giuseppe and Mary Cammarata celebrated their 69th
wedding anniversary Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at
Angelo's Restaurant in Hernando. Celebrating with
them were their daughter and son-in-law, Vinnie and
George Breniak, and their son and daughter-in-law,
Frank and Rita Cammarata.


FOR THE RECORD


Jan. 13-19, 2014
Divorces
Bradley R. Conley,
Inverness vs. Julie A. Conley,
Inverness
Stephen Newberry, Floral
City vs. Dawn Newberry,
Brooksville
Kevin George Zicheck,
Floral City vs. Elizabeth A.
Zicheck, Inverness
Marriages
Anthony James Agostini,
Crystal River/Heather Jolyne
Kroczewski, Crystal River
James Robert Brooks,
Inverness/Trista Nicole
Vick-Campbell, Inverness


Edward Samuel Gruman,
Inverness/Brooke Anne
Fisher, Inverness
Michael Scott Kirkeby,
Ocala/Margaret Iranette
Rutsch, Hernando
Alfred Michael Passarella,
Hernando/Carmenza Borrero,
Hernando
TylerAdam Quinn, Floral
City/Morgan Elizabeth
Knoebl, Floral City
Johnathan Robert Schlick,
Dunnellon/Morgan Laurel
Kirschner, Citrus Springs
Walter Emory Smith,
Inverness/Linda Ann
Barnebee, Inverness


Come for tea at Hospice House


Special to the Chronicle
The community is in-
vited to Afternoon Tea at
Hospice House at 2 p.m.
every Friday Afternoon
Tea offers an ideal way to
greet neighbors and
friends and meet Hospice
of Citrus County staff who
will provide information
and tours of the facility
When a patient is ap-
propriate for hospice care


and has symptoms that
can be addressed in an
acute care setting, inpa-
tient hospice care may be
appropriate.
The Hospice House is a
place of comfort and
peace which emphasizes
privacy, dignity and the
inclusion of family mem-
bers for the provision of
end-of-life care.
For more information,
call 352-527-2020.


WEDDING


Kylene Laura
Colasanti and Curtis
David Laytart ex-
changed wedding vows
on Saturday, Nov 9,
2013, at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church in
Lecanto. The Rev Adam
Jones officiated the
ceremony
The bride is the
daughter of John and
Susan Colasanti of
Lecanto. The groom is
the son of Beth Klein of
Homosassa and David
Laytart of Lady Lake.
John Colasanti gave
his daughter in mar-
riage. Amy Moore of
Orlando, the bride's sis-
ter, served as matron of
honor Rachael Adams
of Groveland, also a sis-
ter of the bride, along
with friends of the bride
Alyssa Visalli (Odessa)
Andrea Holcomb (Olate,
Kan.), Emily Thompson
(Oviedo) Kristine Witt
(Windermere) and
Alecha Worley (Orlando)
were bridesmaids.
Troy Laytart of Tampa
was best man for his
brother Brother of the
bride, J.A. Colasanti of
Fort Myers, served as a
groomsman, as did
friends of the groom
Joey Capparelli
(Orlando), Eric Champ
(Austin, Texas) Alton
Smith (Tampa) and
Bryan von Dohlen
(Columbus, Ga.).
Following the cere-
mony, a reception was
held at Citrus Hills Golf
& County Club in
Hernando. The Hamp-
ton Room was brimming
with pink and black, and
the wedding party, fam-
ily and friends cele-


brated with dinner and
dancing to the music of
Al Dee Productions,
Orlando, with photogra-
pher Cassie Peech & Co.
of Orlando capturing the
memories of the day
Guests also had fun with
a photo booth provided
by Curtiss Bryant
Photography (Lecanto).
Many out-of-state
guests traveled from
Massachusetts, Rhode
Island, New Hampshire,
Virginia, Louisiana and
North Carolina, along
with dear friends from
The Netherlands.
The bride is a 2002
graduate of Lecanto
High School and the
University of Central
Florida. She is a third-
grade teacher in Ocoee.
The groom also gradu-
ated from Lecanto High
School in 2002 and has
worked as a chef and
manager in several
restaurants in the
Orlando area.
Following a 10-day
honeymoon cruise to the
south Caribbean, the
couple now reside in
Orlando.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Oak Hill Hospital &


Ir^TFRegional Medical Center Bayonet Point




For Your Health


Community Education Series


Atrial fibrillation (A-Fib) is the most common heart rhythm
problem. Yet most treatments have been ineffective and
long-term medications often have side effects. Raul Jimenez,
MD and N.S. Rattehalli, MD will discuss the minimally invasive
treatment options available followed by a question and
answer session.


N.S. Rattehalli, MD
Board Certified Cardiovascular Surgery
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Brought to You by:


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5:30 pm 7:00 pm

"Atrial Fibrillation:
Treatment Irregular
Heart'Sythm"
Plantation On Crystal River

Presented By:
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SPORTS


Gators get
21 points from
Michael Frazier
in win over
TAMU./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 NBA, NHL, golf/B2
1 College football/B3
r Local sports/B2, B3
- Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 College basketball/B5
0 NFL/B6


'Canes earn runnerup trophy behind 12 places


JOE DiCRISTOFALO/For the Chronicle
Citrus senior Casey Bearden used this takedown to best
Springstead's Bill Swift in overtime for the 170-pound title Saturday
in the District 2A-5 tournament at Springstead High School.


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
SPRING HILL There was
plenty to celebrate albeit for
only one weekend for the 24-
member Citrus County wrestling
contingency representing Citrus
and Lecanto high schools at Sat-
urday's six-team, District 2A-5
wrestling tournament at Spring-
stead.
Nearly 88 percent or 21
mat men placed fourth or
better along the contested 14
weight divisions in the six-hour
meet in the Eagles' gym.


More district
wrestling
The Crystal River wrestling
team had two individual district
winners en route to finishing as
runner-up at the District 1A-5
tournament. For the story, see
Page B2.

The host and three-time de-
fending Class 2A state cham-
pion Eagles opened up on a 16-3
tear going into the consolation
finals.
SHS totaled 241 points to


outdistance Citrus (163.5) by
77.5 points.
The district title was the Ea-
gles' 10th straight, tying the
Hernando County record set
previously by Bob Levija's 1992-
93 through 2001-02 teams.
Third-place Belleview (139),
Springstead and Citrus will all
be advancing 12 grapplers to
Feb. 7-8's dreaded Region 2A-2
meet at Brandon.
LHS: Fourth
Lecanto placed fourth overall
with 78 points and advanced
See Page B5


Lending a hand


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Todd Mys, a 1990 Citrus High School graduate, is still heavily involved with the Hurricanes boys basketball team today after
first joining as a team manager in 1987 as a sophomore despite suffering from cerebral palsy.

Mys doesn't let disabilityprevent him from helping CHS boys hoops


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
hen Todd Mys tried out for the
Citrus High School boys bas-
ketball team as a sophomore in
1987, his dream to represent the Hurri-
canes on the court came to an end.
"I was the last one (then Citrus head
coach Chuck Gannon) called into his of-
fice," Mys recalled. "He didn't want to of-
fend me, but he knew I had a disability.
He told me I was the hardest-working
kid on the floor, but, unfortunately I did-
n't have the skills. And I accepted that"
At that moment of closure, an oppor-
tunity opened, one that would lead Mys,
who suffers from cerebral palsy and
didn't walk until the age of 5, to becom-
ing an integral part of Citrus basketball
in the 27 years since.
"(Gannon) asked me if I wanted to be
a student manager," Mys said, "so I be-


came varsity manager my sophomore
year Gannon left the next year and (JV)
Coach Glen Sykes was promoted, and
Sykes kept me on for
my junior and senior
years. Whe
"From there, my
love for basketball (before
evolved."
To call Mys a volun- everything'i
teer doesn't begin to
describe his work for To
the program. Whether Citrus High School b
it's setting up conces- said of program
sions and water cool-
ers, handling uniforms and equipment,
checking the lineup in the scorebook, giv-
ing the managers a hand, or even greet-
ing opposing teams as they get off the bus,
Mys is often the busiest person in the gym.
A better title for him, one given to
him a couple years ago by assistant
coach Mike McDowell, is director of


n
j
S
or
bo
i N


game day operations.
"We always joke with him because
he's always here and he does every-
thing," McDowell
said. "So I told him I
SI get here was going to give him
a title, and it's stuck
lames), ever since.
"The only thing I
done. don't like about him,"
McDowell jokingly
m Densmore added, "is he's a
.ys basketball coach Michigan fan. They
volunteer Todd Mys. beat my Syracuse last
year"
'Canes head coach Tom Densmore
said Mys, who's also donated items -
and arranged donations to the pro-
gram, can't be appreciated enough.
"When I get here (before games),"
Densmore said, "everything's done. As


PageB4


Broncos,


'Hawks


ready for


Super Bowl

Different QB styles

clash today for title
Associated Press
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. This
Super Bowl has just about everything a
fan, a player, a coach and certainly a
league could ask for
Denver's record-setting offense versus
Seattle's re-
lentlessly
stingy de- Super Bowl XLVIII
f e n s e Seattle Seahawks
Coaches
who actu- (15-3) vS. Denver
ally smile Broncos (15-3)
and think Time: 6:30 p.m.
football tonight.
should be
fun. A win- 0 TV: FOX
try setting,
and the best two teams in the NFL.
"It's very special to be here," Seattle
coach Pete Carroll said of today's big
game. "Look at this event that our play-
ers are having to take part of The game,
the matchup, the culmination of the sea-
son, all of this is just extraordinary"
This Super Bowl could also have a
profound effect on the immediate future
of pro football.
See Page B6


Associated Press
Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson leads
his Seahawks into Super Bowl XLVIII
today to take on the Denver Broncos at
MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.


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Two Pirates crowned district champions


Allen, Sanabria

lead CR wrestlers

to 2nd in district
RICHARD BURTON
Correspondent

THE VILLAGES Crystal
River did what it needed to in
the District 1A-5 wrestling meet
at The Villages on
Saturday night.
Sparked by individual cham-
pions Michael Allen and Carlos
Sanabria, the Pirates finished


second to state power Green
Cove Springs Clay in the nine-
team event.
"Our objective was to make it
to the finals," Crystal River
coach Craig Frederick said. "We
knew it was going to be tough
against Clay and we lost some
matches early in the day that
took us out of contention (for the
team title).
"But I really want to congratu-
late Michael and Carlos. They
did a great job."
Allen (38-5) defeated Clay's Ju-
lian Summa (31-14) by a 10-6
score in the finals at 126 pounds.
After seeing Summa battle to
a 5-all tie following an escape,


Allen scored a takedown with
five seconds left in the second
period and clinched the bout
with a takedown with just three
seconds remaining the bout.
Sanabria (38-10) took the
championship at 220 pounds
with a pin at the 2:35 mark of the
match over North Marion's Alex
Williams, who suffered his first
defeat via fall of the season.
Following a scoreless first pe-
riod, Sanabria flipped Williams
(25-4) to the mat early in the sec-
ond and took the title.
Led by Allen and Sanabria,
Crystal River finished with 173.5
points, which was off the pace set
by Clay (257), a program that has


finished as state runner-up in
each of the past three seasons
under longtime coach Jim Reape.
Michael Ciccone (18-8 at 132),
Joel Pelton (38-12 at 138), Nick
Hooper (40-8 at 145), Justin Bur-
croff (25-13 at 160), Eddie Ben-
nis (37-13 at 182), and Andrew
Bilby (27-8 at 195) finished as
district runner-ups for the Pi-
rates.
In the finals, Ciccone suffered
a loss by pin at the 1:07 mark of
his bout against Clay's Dylan
Martin, while Pelton was on the
wrong side of a 9-2 finals bout
against Martin's teammates
Austin Luke.
Adam Briendel of Clay scored


a first-period pin of Hooper and
Burcroff was defeated 17-1 by
Zachary Logan of The Villages.
Bennis held a 4-2 edge on Tris-
tan Sichmeller of Clay, before
falling in the final period by a
7-4 score and Bilby was pinned
by Dunnellon's Cole Fagan (41-1)
in 1:34.
David Dalton (31-18 at 106),
C.J. Lawson (32-14 at 152) wound
up third for Crystal River and
advanced to the regional round,
as did fourth-place finishers
Chase Bunts (17-18 at 113) and
Jesse Stills (9-12 at 120).
The Region 1A-2 meet
begins Friday at Clay High
School.


Keeping pace


Indy now

22-2 at home

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Paul George and Roy Hib-
bert both had 20 points,
and the Indiana Pacers
overcame an early deficit
to beat the Brooklyn Nets
97-96 on Saturday
Lance Stephenson, left
out of the All-Star game
despite leading the NBA
in triple-doubles, added
14 points for the Pacers
(36-10), who improved the
league's best home record
to 22-2. David West had 17
points and George Hill
scored 10.
Shaun Livingston had a
season-high 24 points for
the Nets, who couldn't
hold an early seven-point
lead against the Eastern
Conference leaders.
Joe Johnson, an All-Star
selection, spent much of
the night dueling with
Stephenson and scored 16
for Brooklyn.
Pelicans 88,
Bulls 79
NEW ORLEANS -An-
thony Davis scored 24 points
and grabbed eight rebounds
to lead the New Orleans Peli-
cans to an 88-79 victory over
the Chicago Bulls.
Tyreke Evans added 11
points for the Pelicans, who
have won four of their past
five games.
D.J. Augustin scored 23
points, Taj Gibson added 17
and Joakim Noah had 14 for
Chicago.
Davis also blocked six
shots and the Pelicans domi-
nated in the paint, outscoring
the Bulls 50-34.
Rockets 106,
Cavaliers 92
HOUSTON James
Harden returned from injury
to score 28 points and Je-
remy Lin had his first career
triple-double to lead the
Houston Rockets to their third
straight win, 106-92 over the
Cleveland Cavaliers.
Dwight Howard added 26
points and Lin came off the
bench to tally 15 points, 11
rebounds and 10 assists.
Harden sat out the last two
games with a bruised left
thumb. It showed no signs of
bothering him Saturday,
when he also had four as-
sists and three rebounds.
Luol Deng had 24 points
and Kyrie Irving added 21
points and seven assists for
Cleveland, which lost its
fourth straight game.
Wizards 96,
Thunder 81
WASHINGTON John


Associated Press
Indiana Pacers center Roy Hibbert gets a dunk over Brooklyn Nets guard Joe Johnson in
the second half Saturday in Indianapolis. The Pacers defeated the Nets 97-96.


Wall scored 15 of his 17
points in the second half and
the Washington Wizards took
advantage of a rare off-game
from hometown star Kevin
Durant in a 96-81 win over
the Thunder that stopped
Oklahoma City's 10-game
winning streak.
Two days after being se-
lected to the All-Star game for
the first time, Wall also had
15 assists and six steals and
went 7 for 11 from the field
after halftime, more than
making up for an 0-for-7 first
half. Trevor Ariza added 18
points and did a solid job de-
fending Durant, whose 26
points came on 8-for-21
shooting, including 0 for 6
from 3-point range, along
with five turnovers.
The victory moved the
Wizards to .500 for the sev-
enth time this season. Awin
Monday against Portland
would give Washington a
winning record for the first
time since October 2009.
Pistons 113,
76ers 96
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Andre Drummond had 22
points and 14 rebounds, and


Bubba Watson
leads Phoenix Open
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -A desert crit-
ter saved leader Bubba Watson at least
a stroke Saturday in the Phoenix Open.
Some pigskin play cost Phil Mickelson
to the chagrin of the rowdiest fans in the
largest crowd in golf history.
The estimated 189,722 fans had a
lot to see on a sunny, cool day at TPC
Scottsdale.
Watson's drive on the par-5 13th
went into a desert bush and settled
next to a burrowing animal hole that
would have interfered with his swing.
He got a free drop, ended up saving
par on the way to a 3-under 68 and a
two-stroke lead at 15 under.
Mickelson made a double bogey on
the par-3 16th hole, the 20,000-seat sta-
dium hole where he "lost focus" thinking


the Detroit Pistons' talented
frontcourt overwhelmed the
short-handed Philadelphia
76ers for a 113-96 victory.
Greg Monroe added 21
points and 12 rebounds. He
and Drummond combined to
go 18 of 21 from the field.
Brandon Jennings and Kyle
Singler added 20 points
apiece for Detroit.
Philadelphia was without
rookie of the year candidate
Michael Carter-Williams, who
sat out with a sore right
shoulder. Tony Wroten led
the 76ers with 18 points.
Detroit owner Tom Gores
was seated courtside. The
Pistons have won back-to-
back games at The Palace for
the first time since their first
two home games of the sea-
son. Detroit is 9-15 at home.
Hawks 120,
Timberwolves 113
ATLANTA- Kyle Korver
scored 24 points, including a
trio of 3-pointers in a third-
quarter stretch that gave At-
lanta the lead, and the
Hawks overcame Kevin
Love's 43 points to beat the
Minnesota Timberwolves
120-113.


about throwing footballs into the crowd.
He had a 72 to drop to 3 under.
Gallacher opens up
2-shot margin over Mcllroy
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates De-
fending champion Stephen Gallacher
had seven birdies and an eagle on the
back nine Saturday to surge past Rory
Mcllroy and take a two-shot lead into
the final round of the Dubai Desert
Classic.
Gallacher equaled the European Tour
record for the lowest nine-hole score
with an inward 28 for a 9-under 63. That
gave him a 16-under total of 200, with
Mcllroy in second after 69.
Tiger Woods is 11 shots back after a 70.
Gallacher started with seven straight
pars before a bogey on the eighth. But
he birdied the next four holes before an
eagle on the par-5 13th. After another


Paul Millsap, guarded by
Love much of the night in a
matchup of All-Stars, had 20
points and 13 rebounds be-
fore fouling out late in the
game.
Ajam by Minnesota's
Corey Brewer with 2:55 re-
maining cut Atlanta's lead to
107-104. Jeff Teague, who
had 19 points, drove for a
layup and DeMarre Carroll's
free throws pushed the lead
to seven points.
Love's 3-pointer again
trimmed the margin to three
before Atlanta's Gustavo
Ayon banked in an unlikely
scoop shot to thwart the
comeback attempt.
Grizzlies 99,
Bucks 90
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Nick
Calathes, subbing for an in-
jured Mike Conley, scored a
career-high 22 points and the
surging Grizzlies defeated
the Bucks.
Zach Randolph had 23
points and 10 rebounds for
Memphis, which won its sea-
son-best sixth straight and 11
of 12 overall. Marc Gasol had
19 points and James John-
son scored 14.


par, he finished with four straight birdies.
American Anya Alvarez
leads NZ Women's Open
CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand -
American Anya Alvarez had six birdies in
an unblemished 66 to take a two-stroke
lead after Saturday's second round of the
New Zealand Women's Open, resisting a
late charge from world No. 4 Lydia Ko.
Alvarez, who started the day two
shots from the lead, had two birdies on
her outward nine and four more on the
way home to move to 8-under 136 in
the Ladies European Tour event at
Clearwater Golf Club.
New Zealand's Ko shot her second-
straight 69 and was within a stroke of
the lead before finishing with a bogey
on the 18th.
Beth Allen of the United States was
tied for third place at 5-under.


Thompson



scores twice in



Lightning win


Associated Press

MONTREAL Nate
Thompson scored twice,
including the winner at
4:36 of overtime, to give
the Tampa Bay Lightning a
2-1 victory over the Mon-
treal Canadiens on Satur-
day afternoon.
Ben Bishop stopped 28
shots for Tampa Bay,
which snapped a two-
game losing streak.
Daniel Briere scored for
Montreal. Carey Price
made 34 saves.
Thompson scored the
clincher when Alex Kil-
lorn found him all alone in
from of Price.
The Lightning have a
five-point advantage over
the Canadiens in the At-
lantic Division.
Bruins 4, Oilers 0
BOSTON David Krejci
scored a second-period
power-play goal and Chad
Johnson made 22 saves for
his second career shutout and
the Boston Bruins earned a 4-
0 victory over the last-place
Edmonton Oilers.
Krejci's 12th goal of the sea-
son at 2:06 of the second pe-
riod was enough for the Bruins
to win for the sixth time in their
past eight games and maintain
the second-best record in the
Eastern Conference.
Dougie Hamilton, Carl
Soderberg and Torey Krug
scored in the third for Boston.
Johnson started in place of
Tuukka Rask, who was pulled
during Thursday's loss to the
Montreal Canadiens.
Avalanche 7,
Sabres 1
DENVER Jamie McGinn
had two goals and an assist,
Gabriel Landeskog also had
two goals and the Colorado
Avalanche beat the Buffalo
Sabres 7-1.
Nathan MacKinnon had a
goal and two assists and Se-
myon Varlamov had 27 saves
for the Avalanche, who have
won three straight.
Varlamov also had his sec-
ond assist of the season.
Marc-Andre Cliche scored
his first NHL goal and Tyson
Barrie also scored for the Ava-
lanche.
Colorado continued its
mastery over the Sabres. The
Avalanche have won seven
straight against Buffalo.
Flyers 2, Kings 0
LOS ANGELES Steve
Mason posted his second
shutout in three games with
35 saves and Wayne Sim-
monds scored his 100th NHL
goal, leading the Philadelphia
Flyers to a 2-0 victory over the
Los Angeles Kings.
It was the 22nd career
shutout and third this season for


Mason, who stopped 33 shots
in a 5-0 win against Detroit last
Tuesday after getting pulled by
coach Craig Berube in two of
his previous three starts. Mason
got a break with less than 3 1/2
minutes left, when Justin
Williams tried a wraparound
and hit the left post.
Claude Giroux added his
17th goal on a power play
with 1:58 left.
Maple Leafs 6,
Senators 3
TORONTO Phil Kessel
scored three goals, and the
Toronto Maple Leafs beat the
Ottawa Senators 6-3 for their
sixth straight win at home.
With 5:59 left, Tyler Bozak
fed a pass to Kessel, who
scored his 30th goal of the sea-
son to complete his hat trick
and give Toronto a 4-3 lead.
Kessel is second in the
NHL in goals this season.
Toronto's (30-21-6) streak is
its longest since the Maple
Leafs concluded the 2006-07
season with 10 straight home
victories. They have won five
straight over Ottawa.
Chris Neil scored two
goals, and Colin Greening
added one for Ottawa (24-21-
10).
Blue Jackets 4,
Panthers 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio Line-
mates Ryan Johansen and
Boone Jenner each had a
goal and an assist in the first
period, and Sergei Bobrovsky
made 36 saves to lead the
Columbus Blue Jackets past
the Florida Panthers 4-1.
After Brad Boyes cut
Florida's deficit to 2-1 early in
the second period, Nick
Foligno and Mark Letestu
scored for the Blue Jackets.
Nathan Horton had two assists
in the opening 20 minutes.
Coyotes 3,
Penguins 1
GLENDALE, Ariz. -
Zbynek Michalek scored
against his former team, his
first goal in 83 games, and the
Phoenix Coyotes became the
first Pacific Division team to
beat the Eastern Conference-
leading Pittsburgh Penguins
in regulation this season with
a 3-1 victory.
Mike Ribeiro had a goal and
an assist for Phoenix. Radim
Vrbata scored the third goal for
the Coyotes, who were coming
off perhaps their worst loss of
the season, 3-2 at home to the
East's worst team, the Buffalo
Sabres, on Thursday night.
Evgeni Malkin scored for the
Penguins, who entered 8-0-1
against Pacific Division foes.
Michalek's previous goal
was scored on March 5,
2012, for Pittsburgh against
Phoenix.


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Lightning's Nate Thompson, second from
left, celebrates his overtime goal Saturday against the
Montreal Canadiens in Montreal. The Lightning won 2-1
in overtime.


GofBBRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bronze medal vs. star


hat is the differ-
ence between an
Olympic athlete
and a Navy SEAL? This
is a favorite subject in
our family of five with
three sons, a Marine in-
telligence officer (re-
tired) and two Navy
SEALS. This is espe-
cially pertinent in light
of the start of the
Olympic Winter Games
this week in Sochi, Rus-
sia, with the threat of an


Dr. Ron
DOCT'
ORDI


Olympic terrorist attack being
higher now than at any time in the
post 9/11 era.
What hit me this week and adding
fuel to our family debate was a call
last week from one of our SEAL sons.
This was one of those "Oh! By the
way I was just awarded the Bronze
star with Valor" This involved mer-
itorious or heroic action in combat
and aiding several comrades.
So after my shock wore off, I told
him to not do it again. However, I
started to ponder the childhood of
an Olympic athlete and a future
Navy SEAL.
We have another friend in the
neighborhood also with a SEAL son
and have compared his upbringing
with our sons' childhoods.
Alden Mills, retired Navy SEAL
and CEO of a fitness company, notes


that "the Olympics are a
celebration of individual
perseverance .. .of child-
hood dreams finally real-
ized over countless years
of hard work and undy-
ing determination." Just
o like a SEAL.
One theme in common
Swas they are all athletes
Joseph and at some time in their
OR'S lives connected with the
E Olympic Dream. They
ERS trained for their sport
daily Woke up early,
worked out in extreme weather, ate
and slept with regularity, sacrificed
not going to the Friday night party,
Saturday football tailgater or the
prom.
Both the Olympic athlete and
SEAL are in top physical condition,
both represent our country, both
want to be the best and both are
willing to work to exhaustion to
achieve their goals while paying a
great personal price for doing so.
The difference comes in the train-
ing and, most importantly, in the at-
titude and risk.
The SEALS have learned that,
"the human body can always
achieve more than we believe and
controlled purely by our minds,"
states Olympic Gold medalist Gar-
rett Weber-Gale, who went through
a SEAL training program specifi-


cally for Olympic athletes in the
training center in Colorado Springs.
From an athlete's perspective,
going to the physical and mental
breaking point and frequently be-
yond helps forge competitive tough-
ness like no other experience. The
athletes quickly learn their mind
can and will control the body's ef-
fort, endurance and performance
by knowing they can push farther by
having already done it
For the last nine years, the SEALS
have helped train U.S. Olympic ath-
letes. The U.S. field hockey team re-
lated that the SEAL training
program was the ultimate boot camp,
even though they did it only for a few
hours to a few days. It was tougher
psychologically and physically than
any other training they had done.
The U.S. water polo team won its
first Olympic medal in 20 years in
2008 after training with the SEALS.
When you watch and read about
these great U.S. Olympians and the
Navy SEALS, remember the sacri-
fice they have made and are making
to represent us and protect us.
So in comparing the Bronze Star
with Valor with an Olympic Bronze
medal ...you give your life for both
and you do it for your country
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at
SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute may
be reached atrbjhand@cox.net.


Young runners excel in Hemrnando race



I.s
b-j


Special to the Chronicle
On Saturday, Jan. 25, the Hernando Runners Club held its fifth race of the season. This 2.2 mile race is open to
any Citrus County schools students in grades 2-8. Winning the girls grades 2-3 race was Bella Arnold (standing,
second from left) followed by Blakely Messer and Kylie King (standing, far left). In the boys 2-3 race, Cade Arnold
(seated, left) won the boys division with Hunter Harper (seated, middle) and Aidan Gonzalez (seated, right) in sec-
ond and third place, respectively. In the girls grades 4-5 division, Mackenzie Scordato (standing, third from left)
was victorious with Lauren Wood and Riley Messer (standing, far right) finishing right behind her. Thomas Tyler of
IPS set a new course record of 13:41 to win the boys 4-5 division. Brock Weed and Isaih Ross finished in second
and third place. The final race is the Citrus County Elementary Cross Country Championships on Feb. 15.


Reaching out by


playing tennis


he 10th annual Crys-
tal River Open Ten-
nis Tournament is
about reaching out to peo-
ple that have fallen on
hard times. Helping the
less fortunate is a very
gratifying thing
to do, but to do
it through play-
ing tennis
makes it even o
more worth- J .
while. Luck is a A-
big part of life. .
Being able to
donate your
time and some
goods and/or Eric v
money makes Hoo
us the fortunate ON TI
ones. The pro-
ceeds of this
tournament will go to the
Citrus County Foodbank,
that distributes food and
goods to all charities in
Citrus County Apart of the
proceeds will be used to
purchase a ball machine
for the Crystal River High
School tennis teams.
The event is Feb. 8-9, at
Crystal River High School.
This tournament will offer
Men's, Women's, and Mixed
doubles divisions, each di-
vided in Open, B and C.
The entry fee can be
canned and non-perish-
able food or a suggested
cash donation of $20 per
person for a single event,
and just an extra $10 do-
nation for a second event.
It also includes a fast
serve contest, a chance to
find out if the speed of
your serve comes close to
the one of your favorite
player If you can't play in
the tournament, you can
still participate in this
contest for a small dona-
tion. The fast serve contest
will be held on both days
around noon, depending
on the progress of the
scheduled matches.
Each participant will be
guaranteed two matches.

Low impact
aerobics
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is proud to an-
nounce a great new low-im-
pact aerobics class with
certified instructor, Roger
(Roc) O'Connor.
This ongoing class will
be held from 9:30 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. at the Citrus
Springs Community Center,
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
The cost is $5 per class. Talk
to the instructor about special
pricing deals.
No registration is needed,
just sign up when you come
to your first class.
For additional information


USTA rules and "the code"
will govern play Matches
will be best 2 of 3 sets for
men's and women's dou-
bles, and the pro set format
will be used for mixed dou-
bles. Balls will be pro-
vided. The
tournament di-
Srectors will
evaluate all en-
*tries. Partici-
pants will be
Called on Fri-
day, Feb. 7 with
their start times.
~Our USTA co-
ordinator, Leigh
an den Chack, has
gen scheduled byes
ENNIS for all the local
USTA teams so
you can partici-
pate in this worthy event.
The organizers would like
to stress the point that they
will adjust the schedule
any way possible to allow
you to participate if you
have other commitments,
tennis or otherwise. If you
do not have a doubles part-
ner, please go ahead and
sign up. Every effort will
be made to find you a suit-
able partner If on the day
of the tournament your
regular partner drops out
for whatever reason,
please still come to the
tournament. There are al-
ways players available to
step in, to keep the flow of
the tournament going.
New players to the area:
remember, a social tourna-
ment is one of the best
ways to meet new tennis
friends.
Come and join us; to sign
up, e-mail or call one of the
following volunteers:
Tournament Directors:
Sally deMontort at 352-
795-9693 or demont@
embarqmail.com
Cindy Reynolds at 352-
697-3222 or reynolds@
citrus.kl2.fl.us
Eric van den Hoogen at
hoera@juno.com

please call 352-465-7007.
Play golf, help
Relay For ULife
Team Hope's fourth annual
Relay For Life Golf Tourna-
ment will be Feb. 8 at Juliette
Falls, Dunnellon.
The tournament will be a
four-man scramble. Entry
fee is $75 per person or
$300 for a team and in-
cludes lunch, beverages and
range balls.
Eagle Buick GMC will offer a
2014 Verano for a hole-in-one
contest, along with a $500
Travis Matthews shopping
spree and Maui Jim sunglasses.
For more information, call
Michele Snellings at 352-697-
2220 or Nick Maltese at 352-
464-7511.
From staff reports


Fans give FSU football champs warm welcome


Seminoles

celebrate third

national title

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE An
estimated 30,000 people
descended on the Florida
State campus to celebrate
the program's third na-
tional championship in
school history
Fans were welcomed
onto the field after the
hour-long program at the
football stadium and hun-


dreds surrounded coach
Jimbo Fisher begging for
pictures and autographs.
"We love you, Jimbo!" was
shouted from the crowd.
"Jimbo, you're a genius!"
followed moments later
The crowd filled nearly
the entire home side of the
stands and hung on every
word spoken as Fisher,
Heisman winner Jameis
Winston, athletic director
Stan Wilcox and receiver
Rashad Greene all took
turns speaking on a stage
constructed at midfield.
"We didn't just develop a
team, folks," Fisher said.
"We developed a program.
We plan on being here for


a long time.
"To me, this team domi-
nated maybe like no other
team in college football
history We're one of the
great teams in Florida
State history, but I think
they've become one of the
great teams overall be-
cause they dominated like
no other team. They took
no prisoners, felt sorry for
no one. We're here to
stay"
Florida State passed
out shirts that read "Crys-
tal Ballin"' and hats with
a miniature trophy on
them. Confetti was
sprayed into the crowd
and over the players and


coaches on stage. Early
NFL entrees Devonta
Freeman, James Wilder
Jr., Kelvin Benjamin and
Timmy Jernigan all re-
turned to take part in the
celebration.
Heisman Trophy winner and
FSU quarterback Jameis
Winston smiles as football
highlights are shown on the
jumbo screen Saturday in
Tallahassee. Thousands of
Seminole fans turned out
to finally welcome their
beloved football team back
home, nearly a month after
their dramatic victory over
Auburn for the national
championship.
Associated Press


4th Player I


FREE! I
Until February 28

pay regular price
for 3 players &
get the 4th free


I IWa
Valid any day, not valid for twilight rate or for 9 hole rate.
Make tee times no more than 3 days in advance.
Must present coupon at time of check-in. Expires February 28, 2014.
b S 930"'1^ W. Fr
-B SgT 7 9301W., Fort 1Island Trail,
ULANTATION ++ / Crystal River
Ci^ .^Er www.plantationoncrystalriver.com
1 __________352-795-7211


Recreation BRIEFS


10th annual
Kids Fishing Clinic
Don't miss out on this fun free event!
Teaching children a lifelong hobby, ap-
preciation for our marine environment and
a fun family outing are the objectives for
the Kids' Fishing Clinic. The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) and Citrus County Parks and
Recreation (CCPR) present the free Kids'
Fishing Clinic for pre-registered children
between the ages of 5 and 15 on Satur-
day, Feb, 22, at9 a.m., 10a.m., 11 a.m.,
12p.m. and 1 p.m.
The clinic will be held at the Fort Island
Trail Park (12073 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River). Each participant will receive
a rod/reel combo, T-shirt and goodie bag.
Because space is limited, pre-registration
is required and can be completed by visit-
ing www.citruscountyparks.com. If you do


not have internet access or have trouble
while registering please contact Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540
This clinic enables young people to
learn the basics of environmental stew-
ardship, fishing ethics, angling skills and
safety. In addition, environmental dis-
plays will provide participants with a
unique chance to experience Florida's
marine life firsthand. The main objective
is to create responsible marine resource
stewards by teaching children about the
vulnerability of Florida's marine ecosys-
tems. This event is a catch-and-release
activity, and all participants must be ac-
companied by an adult.
Individuals or companies interested
in helping to sponsor this event or
volunteer at the clinic should call
352-527-7543.


Davis Golf Tourney
coming Feb. 15
VFW Post 8189 Men's Auxiliary will
present the second annual Ted Davis
Golf Tournament on Saturday, Feb. 15,
at Twisted Oaks Golf Course. Shotgun
tee-off is at 8 a.m.
The $55 per-person entry fee includes
greens fee, golf cart, goody bag and
dinner to follow at VFW Post 8189 at
4:30 p.m.
Prizes will be awarded for best team
score, closest to the hole, longest drive
and worst team score.
There will be raffles, a 50/50 drawing,
giveaways and a putting contest.
For more information, call Bill Peter-
son at 856-364-7233 or Jerry Webb at
352-220-4807.
From staff reports


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 B3


a
E


kna






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


SCOREBOARD


Waste Management For ffi r^ cor1
Phoenix Open


Saturday
At TPC Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Ariz.
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,152, Par: 71
Third Round
Bubba Watson 64-66-68 -198 -1
Kevin Stadler 65-68-67 -200 -1
Ryan Moore 66-71-64 -201 -1
Harris English 65-67-69 -201 -1
Hideki Matsuyama 66-67-68 -201 -1
Brendan Steele 66-74-62 202 -1
Hunter Mahan 66-71-65 -202 -1
Matt Jones 65-65-72 -202 -1
Jason Kokrak 66-69-68 -203 -1
Pat Perez 65-68-70 -203 -1
Greg Chalmers 65-67-71 -203 -1
Graham DeLaet 67-72-65 -204 -
Matt Every 72-66-67 -205 -
Ricky Barnes 71-67-67 -205 -
Chris Stroud 70-67-68 -205 -
NickWatney 69-68-68 -205 -
Patrick Reed 67-67-71 -205 -
Morgan Hoffmann 69-66-70 -205 -
John Rollins 72-67-67 -206 -
John Mallinger 67-72-67 -206 -
Charles Howell III 70-69-67 -206 -
Martin Laird 67-68-71 -206 -
Spencer Levin 67-69-70 -206 -
BrandtSnedeker 70-64-72 -206 -
Ben Crane 69-69-69 207 -
Cameron Tringale 71-67-69-207 -
Webb Simpson 68-72-67 -207 -
William McGirt 65-69-73 -207 -
Bryce Molder 67-71-70 -208 -
David Lynn 72-66-70 -208 -
Kevin Na 70-70-68 -208 -
Bill Haas 69-68-71 -208 -
David Lingmerth 72-68-68 -208 -
Brendon de Jonge 66-73-70 -209 -
John Merrick 75-65-69 -209 -
Ken Duke 70-67-72 -209 -
Geoff Ogilvy 71-70-68-209 -
Scott Piercy 67-67-75 -209 -
CamiloVillegas 70-71-68 -209 -
Chris Smith 70-69-71 -210 -
Phil Mickelson 71-67-72 -210 -
ErikCompton 67-72-71 -210 -
Robert Garrigus 70-70-70-210 -
James Driscoll 67-70-73 -210 -
Michael Thompson 72-68-70-210 -
Ryan Palmer 76-64-70 -210 -
Kiradech Aphibarnrat 66-71-73-210 -
Jason Bohn 70-70-70 -210 -
K.J. Choi 71-70-69 -210 -
Brian Stuard 73-68-69 -210 -
Charley Hoffman 70-71-69 -210 -
Justin Hicks 71-70-69 -210 -
Jonathan Byrd 68-73-69 -210 -
Aaron Baddeley 68-70-73-211 -
Gary Woodland 67-72-72-211 -
Jonas Blixt 68-71-72 -211 -
David Hearn 68-70-73-211 -
Brian Gay 69-71-71 -211 -
Martin Kaymer 69-71-71 -211 -
Nicolas Colsaerts 69-68-74 -211 -
Sang-Moon Bae 67-73-71 -211 -
Roberto Castro 72-69-70 211 -
Brian Davis 72-69-70-211 -
J.B. Holmes 73-68-70-211 -
John Peterson 68-70-74 -212 -
YE.Yang 64-73-75-212 -
JhonattanVegas 71-66-75-212 -
Mark Calcavecchia 70-71-71 -212 -
Scott Langley 71-70-71 -212 -
Kevin Streelman 71-68-74 -213
Chris Kirk 65-73-75- 213
Ben Curtis 68-72-73 -213
Derek Ernst 72-69-72 -213
Steven Bowditch 71-69-75 -215 +
Fred Funk 69-71-76 -216 +
Vijay Singh 69-72-75 -216 +
Joe Ogilvie 71-70-77 -218 +
Omega Dubai

Desert Classic
Saturday
At Emirates Golf Club (Majlis Course),
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 7,316, Par: 72
Third Round


Stephen Gallacher, Scotland
Rory Mcllroy, Northern Ireland
Brooks Koepka, United States
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark
Robert Rock, England
Edoardo Molinari, Italy
Steve Webster, England
Roope Kakko, Finland
Damien McGrane, Ireland
Emiliano Grillo, Argentina
Jamie Donaldson, Wales
Dawie Van derWalt, S. Africa
Darren Fichardt, South Africa
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand
Richard Sterne, South Africa
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria
Paul Waring, England
RomainWattel, France
Also
Francesco Molinari, Italy
Joost Luiten, Netherlands
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland
Paul Casey, England
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark
Paul Lawrie, Scotland
Tiger Woods, United States
Henrik Stenson, Sweden
Fred Couples, United States


66-71-63
63-70-69
69-65-70
71-68-65
67-70-68
65-72-68
71-70-64
69-69-68
66-70-71
71-67-69
69-68-70
72-70-65
69-72-66
68-69-71
66-73-69
70-70-68
70-70-68
68-73-67

69-69-71
70-69-70
70-70-69
70-72-67
72-70-68
68-71-72
68-73-70
70-67-75
70-71-73


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Toronto 25 21 .543
Brooklyn 20 25 .444
NewYork 19 27 .413
Philadelphia 15 33 .313
Boston 15 33 .313
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 32 13 .711
Atlanta 25 21 .543
Washington 23 23 .500
Charlotte 21 27 .438 1
Orlando 13 35 .271 2
Central Division
W L Pct
Indiana 36 10 .783
Chicago 23 23 .500
Detroit 19 27 .413
Cleveland 16 31 .340 2
Milwaukee 8 39 .170 Z
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 33 13 .717
Houston 32 17 .653
Memphis 26 20 .565
Dallas 27 21 .563
New Orleans 20 26 .435
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 38 11 .776
Portland 33 13 .717
Minnesota 23 24 .489
Denver 22 23 .489
Utah 16 30 .348 2
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 33 16 .673
Phoenix 28 18 .609
Golden State 29 19 .604
L.A. Lakers 16 31 .340
Sacramento 15 31 .326 1
Friday's Games
Orlando 113, Milwaukee 102
Atlanta 125, Philadelphia 99
Memphis 94, Minnesota 90


SFlorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
~6-5-0
CASH 3 (late)
7-2-9
PLAY 4 (early)

9-1-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 9-9-3-1

Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 4 8 14 -34
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $550,000
4-of-4 2 winners $3,046.50
3-of-4 MB 39 $342.00
3-of-4 952 $41.50
2-of-4 MB 1,162 $23.50
1-of-4 MB 10,134 $2.50
2-of-4 27,049 $2.00


Fantasy 5:4 5 9
5-of-5 9 winners
4-of-5 489
3-of-5 12,681


-18-21
$26,397.87
$78.00
$8.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
FOOTBALL
6:30 p.m. (FOX) Super Bowl XLVIII: Denver Broncos vs. Seattle
Seahawks
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) Duke at Syracuse (Same-day Tape)
12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia at Pittsburgh
1 p.m. (CBS) Michigan at Indiana
2:30 p.m. (ESPNU) UCLA at Oregon State
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) William & Mary at James Madison
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) LSU at Kentucky
2 p.m. (MNT) Florida at Mississippi
2 p.m. (ESPN) Notre Dame at Duke
2 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Vanderbilt
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Stanford at California
4:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Tennessee at Alabama
2 a.m. (ESPNU) Notre Dame at Duke (Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (ESPNU) Stanford at California (Same-day Tape)
NBA
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Boston Celtics
BOWLING
4 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Super Clash (Taped)
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Cp3 Remix (Taped)
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (SUN) Golden Boy: Jermell Charlo vs. Jose Angel
Rodriguez (Taped)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Waste Management Phoenix Open, Final
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix Open, Final
Round
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Detroit Red Wings at Washington Capitals
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: West Bromwich
Albion vs. Liverpool
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Crystal Palace
TENNIS
5:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Davis Cup First Round: Great Britain vs. USA-
Rubber 5
8 p.m. (TENNIS) Davis Cup First Round: France vs. Australia -
Rubber 4 (Taped)
11 p.m. (TENNIS) Davis Cup First Round: Great Britain vs. USA-
Rubber 4 (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing Nordic Combined/Ski Jumping (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Oklahoma City 120, Brooklyn 95
Dallas 107, Sacramento 103
Toronto 100, Denver 90
Charlotte 110, L.A. Lakers 100
Golden State 95, Utah 90
Saturday's Games
Indiana 97, Brooklyn 96
Washington 96, Oklahoma City 81
Detroit 113, Philadelphia 96
Atlanta 120, Minnesota 113
Houston 106, Cleveland 92
Memphis 99, Milwaukee 90
New Orleans 88, Chicago 79
Sacramento at San Antonio, late
Miami at NewYork, late
Charlotte at Phoenix, late
Toronto at Portland, late
Utah at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Orlando at Boston, 1 p.m.
Monday's Games
Orlando at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Portland at Washington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
NewYork at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Sacramento, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 54 3516 3 73164 119
TampaBay 55 3218 5 69162 137
Toronto 57 3021 6 66170 176
Montreal 55 2920 6 64136 137
Detroit 54 2419 11 59139 152
Ottawa 55 2421 10 58158 176
Florida 55 21 27 7 49133 174
Buffalo 54 1531 8 38105 161
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 55 38 15 2 78176 132
N.Y Rangers 56 3023 3 63145 140
Columbus 55 2823 4 60163 154
Philadelphia 56 2723 6 60152 163
Carolina 54 2520 9 59137 151
New Jersey 56 2321 12 58132 140
Washington 55 2422 9 57158 167
N.Y Islanders 57 2128 8 50159 191


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 56 3310 13 79199 156
St. Louis 53 3612 5 77181 122
Colorado 54 3514 5 75165 142
Minnesota 56 2921 6 64137 140
Nashville 56 2523 8 58139 168
Dallas 54 2421 9 57156 160
Winnipeg 56 2625 5 57159 165
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 56 4011 5 85189 137
San Jose 55 3415 6 74166 133
LosAngeles 57 3021 6 66134 122
Vancouver 56 2720 9 63142 147
Phoenix 55 2619 10 62159 164
Calgary 54 2027 7 47128 170
Edmonton 57 1833 6 42147 194
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Detroit 4, Washington 3, SO
N.Y Rangers 4, N.Y Islanders 1
Carolina 3, St. Louis 1
Nashville 3, New Jersey 2, OT
Winnipeg 4, Vancouver 3
Saturday's Games
Boston 4, Edmonton 0
Tampa Bay 2, Montreal 1, OT
Colorado 7, Buffalo 1
Philadelphia 2, Los Angeles 0
Toronto 6, Ottawa 3
Columbus 4, Florida 1
Phoenix 3, Pittsburgh 1
Nashville at St. Louis, late
Minnesota at Calgary, late
Dallas at Anaheim, late
Chicago at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Detroit atWashington, 12:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Montreal, 1 p.m.
Monday's Games
Edmonton at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.




Super Bowl MVPs
2013-Joe Flacco, QB, Baltimore
2012-Eli Manning, QB, N.Y Giants
2011-Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay


ATLANTA HAWKS Signed F Cartier Martin to
a 10-day contract.
INDIANA PACERS Signed C Andrew Bynum
for the remainder of the season.
NEWYORK KNICKS Recalled G Toure' Murry
from Erie (NBADL).
SAN ANTONIO SPURS Signed G Shannon
Brown to a 10-day contract. Released G Othyus Jef-
fers from his 10-day contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS Recalled C David Steckel
from Norfolk (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Recalled F Simon
Moser from Milwaukee (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Reassigned G Kris-
ters Gudlevskis to Syracuse (AHL).
ECHL
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Loaned F
Jack Downing to Iowa (AHL). Signed F Dale Mitchell.
COLLEGE
ARKANSAS Suspended men's basketball F
Alandise Harris and G Michael Quails indefinitely.


2010-Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans
2009-Santonio Holmes, WR, Pittsburgh
2008-Eli Manning, QB, N.Y Giants
2007-Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis
2006-HinesWard,WR, Pittsburgh
2005-Deion Branch, WR, New England
2004 Tom Brady, QB, New England
2003-Dexter Jackson, FS, Tampa Bay
2002 Tom Brady, QB, New England
2001-Ray Lewis, LB, Baltimore
2000-Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis
1999-John Elway, QB, Denver
1998 Terrell Davis, RB, Denver
1997-Desmond Howard, KR, Green Bay
1996-Larry Brown, CB, Dallas
1995-Steve Young, QB, San Francisco
1994-Emmitt Smith, RB, Dallas
1993 TroyAikman, QB, Dallas
1992-Mark Rypien, QB, Washington
1991-OttisAnderson, RB, N.Y Giants
1990-Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco
1989-Jerry Rice, WR, San Francisco
1988-Doug Williams, QB, Washington
1987-Phil Simms, QB, N.Y Giants
1986-Richard Dent, DE, Chicago
1985-Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco
1984-Marcus Allen, RB, L.A. Raiders
1983-John Riggins, RB, Washington
1982-Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco
1981-Jim Plunkett, QB, Oakland
1980 Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh
1979 Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh
1978-Randy White, DT and Harvey Martin, DE,
Dallas
1977-Fred Biletnikoff, WR, Oakland
1976-Lynn Swann,WR, Pittsburgh
1975-Franco Harris, RB, Pittsburgh
1974-Larry Csonka, RB, Miami
1973-Jake Scott, S, Miami
1972-Roger Staubach, QB, Dallas
1971-Chuck Howley, LB, Dallas
1970-Len Dawson, QB, Kansas City
1969-Joe Namath, QB, N.Y Jets
1968- Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay
1967- Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay
NFL MVPs
The NFL Most Valuable Players named by The
Associated Press in balloting by a nationwide panel
of the media:
2013 Peyton Manning, Denver, QB
2012 -Adrian Peterson, Minnesota, RB
2011 -Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay, QB
2010-Tom Brady, New England, QB
2009 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, QB
2008 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, QB
2007 -Tom Brady, New England, QB
2006 LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego, RB
2005 Shaun Alexander, Seattle, RB
2004 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, QB
2003 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, and Steve
McNair, Tennessee, QBs
2002 Rich Gannon, Oakland, QB
2001 Kurt Warner, St. Louis, QB
2000 Marshall Faulk, St. Louis, RB
1999 Kurt Warner, St. Louis, QB
1998 -Terrell Davis, Denver, RB
1997 Brett Favre, Green Bay, QB, and Barry
Sanders, Detroit, RB
1996 Brett Favre, Green Bay, QB
1995 Brett Favre, Green Bay, QB
1994- Steve Young, San Francisco, QB
1993 -Emmitt Smith, Dallas, RB
1992- Steve Young, San Francisco, QB
1991 -ThurmanThomas, Buffalo, RB
1990- Joe Montana, San Francisco, QB
1989- Joe Montana, San Francisco, QB
1988 Boomer Esiason, Cincinnati, QB
1987- John Elway, Denver, QB
1986 Lawrence Taylor, NewYork Giants, LB
1985 Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders, RB
1984 -Dan Marino, Miami, QB
1983 Joe Theismann, Washington, QB
1982 Mark Moseley, Washington, PK
1981 Ken Anderson, Cincinnati, QB
1980 Brian Sipe, Cleveland, QB
1979 Earl Campbell, Houston, RB
1978 -Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh, QB
1977 -Walter Payton, Chicago, RB
1976 Bert Jones, Baltimore, QB
1975 -Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota, QB
1974 Ken Stabler, Oakland, QB
1973- O.J. Simpson, Buffalo, RB
1972 Larry Brown, Washington, RB
1971 -Alan Page, Minnesota, DT
1970- John Brodie, San Francisco, QB
1969 Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles Rams, QB
1968 Earl Morrall, Baltimore, QB
1967-John Unitas, Baltimore, QB
1966 Bart Starr, Green Bay, QB
1965 Jim Brown, Cleveland, RB
1964-John Unitas, Baltimore, QB
1963 -YA. Tittle, NewYork Giants, QB
1962- Jim Taylor, Green Bay RB
1961 Paul Hornung, Green Bay RB
NFL playoff glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44
New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24
Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10
San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan.11
Seattle 23, New Orleans 15
New England 43, Indianapolis 22
Sunday, Jan. 12
San Francisco 23, Carolina 10
Denver 24, San Diego 17
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
Denver 26, New England 16
Seattle 23, San Francisco 17
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
Team Rice 22, Team Sanders 21
Super Bowl
Today, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
Denver vs. Seattle, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)



BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS -Agreed to terms with
LHP Bruce Chen on a one-year contract. Designated
INF Emilio Bonifacio for assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-- Agreed to terms with
CYorvitTorrealba on a minor league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS Assigned RHP Chaz Roe
outright to Round Rock (PCL).
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Agreed to terms
with C A.J. Ellis on a one-year contract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Agreed to terms
with RHP Doug Fister.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association


school, at home and in the
community" That same year,
with Mys as a team manager,
the 'Canes won their first boys
basketball district title since
the state finalist team of 1961.
Mys said Sykes kicked a cou-
ple players off the team for
making fun of the managers.
"He told the team that we
managers worked harder than
the players even though we don't
put the uniform on," Mys said.
All these years later, one of
his favorite perks of the work
is getting invited to every grad-
uation by each crop of seniors
that passes through.
"Those are my boys out
there," he said. "I like to see
them come in here as freshmen
and leave four years later after
maturing into young men."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








Forward leads US
past S. Korea
CARSON, California -
Chris Wondolowski scored
both goals in the United
States' 2-0 victory over South
Korea in an international
friendly Saturday.
The Americans won their
13th straight home match,
thrilling a flag-waving sellout
crowd at StubHub Center.
From wire reports




MYS
Continued from Page BI


far as setting up the gym and
getting ready for a game, I
don't have to do a thing. We've
been blessed to have Todd
around for a long time. He's
pretty much been here since
he graduated. He just loves the
game and he would do any-
thing for Citrus High School
basketball, and most of the
time he does."
When Citrus won the dis-
trict championship at
Brooksville Central last Feb-
ruary, Densmore gave Mys a
call later that night.
"I was on the way home with
my girlfriend and Tom called
to thank me for everything I
did for the program," Mys said.
"I knew Tom before he became
a part of the basketball pro-
gram. His wife Sheila used to
bowl with my mom."
It turns out Mys is an avid
bowler himself, and the im-
pressive ring on his finger is a
"300 ring," earned for bowling
a perfect game, another ac-
complishment his disability
couldn't suppress.
Mys' appreciation for Dens-
more is mutual.
"I really can't thank Tom
Densmore, the coaches and
the administration enough,"
Mys said,"because this is what
I love to do.I like to be able to
help the community and my
alma mater"
Growing up, Mys says he was
all about "trucks and Lincoln
Logs." By middle school, his
love of sports was taking off,
which led him to try out for the
Inverness Middle School team.
"Of course, I didn't make it,"
he said. "With the cerebral
palsy, I couldn't dribble behind
my back, and couldn't typically
do the things a normal basket-
ball player would be able to do.
But I didn't know any better"
Mys loves talking about the
friends he's made over the
years during his enduring stint
with the program. His friend
and classmate Luke Simmons
is now an assistant coach in
the program and father to CHS
junior forward Desmond Sim-
mons. Mys looks forward to vis-
iting with coaches from other
schools, including former
Lecanto coach Frank Vilardi,
Crystal River head coach
Steve Feldman and Wildwood
head coach Von Moreland.
As a fan and alumni, Mys is
passionate about Citrus High
School sports, like a combina-
tion of a proud father and a
sports agent boasting of his
clients. But his advocacy and
love for the game are sincere.
He said he's attended 20 of the
past 25 state championships,
only missing when he's out of
state or when other duties get
in the way He's worked as a
Wal Mart associate for 18
years, and is thankful that the
company allows him a flexible
schedule to be with the team
as often as possible.
Mys doesn't know where he
gets his resolve from, but he
actually credits his father for
motivating him into greater
things, albeit through negative
reinforcement.
"I credit my dad," he said,
"because he was always
telling I wouldn't be able to do
this or that. I've done every-
thing he said I couldn't do and
a lot more."
When Mys was a senior in
high school, in 1990, he was se-
lected, based on a nomination
by Sykes, as a Disney Dream-
ers and Doers Shining Star,
which is awarded to those who
"serve as role models at





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 3 Gators crush Texas A&M 69-36


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Michael
Frazier II scored 21 points, Do-
rian Finney-Smith added 11 and
No. 3 Florida overwhelmed
Texas A&M 69-36 on Saturday
The Gators (19-2, 8-0 South-
eastern Conference) pushed
their winning streak to 13 games
and extended a school record
for consecutive home wins to 27.
The latest one was another de-
fensive gem. It tied the fewest
points Florida has allowed in
SEC play since 1950, matching
last year's defensive effort
against South Carolina.
Florida held the Aggies (12-9,
3-5) to 26 percent shooting and
20 percent from 3-point range.
The Gators also outrebounded
Texas A&M 57-27.
No. 2 Syracuse 91,
No. 17 Duke 89, OT
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Jerami
Grant scored eight points in over-
time to finish with a career-high 24
and Jim Boeheim's No. 2 Syracuse
stayed unbeaten, topping Mike
Krzyzewski's No. 17 Duke 91-89 in a
matchup of the two winningest
coaches in Division I history.
C.J. Fair scored a career-best 28
points as Syracuse (21-0, 8-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) set a school
record for consecutive wins to start a
season before a Carrier Dome-
record crowd of 35,446. The Orange
remained one of three undefeated
teams in the nation, along with No. 1
Arizona and No. 4 Wichita State.
Duke's Rasheed Sulaimon beat
the buzzer in regulation with an off-
balance 3-pointer that tied it at 78.
The Blue Devils led 87-84 with 80
seconds left in overtime before Syra-
cuse rallied.
Jabari Parker had 15 points and
nine rebounds for Duke (17-5, 6-3)
before fouling out in regulation.
No. 4 Wichita St. 81,
Evansville 67
WICHITA, Kan. Fred VanVleet
and Ron Baker had 14 points
apiece, and Wichita State withstood
an early barrage by Evansville.
Cleanthony Early scored 13 and
Tekele Cotton added 12 points for the
Shockers (23-0, 10-0 Missouri Valley),
who haven't lost since last year's sur-
prising run to the Final Four.
Wichita State spotted Evansville a
15-point lead before using a mas-
sive run to carry the advantage into
halftime.
D.J. Balentine scored 26 points
for the Purple Aces (10-13, 3-7).
No. 5 San Diego St. 65,
Colorado St. 56
SAN DIEGO Coach Steve
Fisher earned his 300th win at San
Diego State behind 24 points from
Xavier Thames and 17 for Winston
Shepard.
The Aztecs (19-1, 8-0 Mountain
West) won their 18th straight
game and are 8-0 in conference
play for the first time in the pro-
gram's 93-year history.
Jon Octeus scored 24 for the
Rams (12-10, 3-6), who lost their


Associated Press
Florida guard Michael Frazier II shoots as Texas A&M forward Antwan Space defends during the second
half Saturday in Gainesville. No. 3 Florida won 69-36.


third in a row.
No. 25 Texas 81,
No. 6 Kansas 69
AUSTIN, Texas Isaiah Taylor
scored 23 points, Jonathan Holmes
had 22 and Texas to its sixth con-
secutive victory.
Texas, which lost its top four scor-
ers from last year's 16-18 squad,
has been the surprise of the Big 12.
The Longhorns have four consecu-
tive wins over Top 25 opponents and
now sit in second place after domi-
nating a team that had been playing
as well as anyone in the country in
recent weeks.
The Longhorns (17-4, 6-2)
thumped the Jayhawks (16-5, 7-1)
with suffocating defense that held
the Big 12's best shooting team to
39 percent from the floor. Kansas
freshman Andrew Wiggins, who av-
eraged 24 points over the previous
three games, scored seven before
fouling out late.
Wayne Selden Jr., scored 21 for
the Jayhawks.
Georgetown 64,
No. 7 Michigan St. 60
NEW YORK Markel Starks
scored 16 points and Georgetown
ended a five-game losing streak.
Jabril Trawick came up with two
big plays down the stretch as the
Hoyas (12-9) won the late-season
nonconference game that was part
of the New York area's celebration of
Sunday's Super Bowl.
Michigan State (19-3) played with-
out injured frontcourt players
Adreian Payne and Branden Daw-
son, and the Spartans had a tough
time shooting the ball.
Gary Harris led the Spartans with
20 points, including going 4 of 10
from 3-point range.
D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera added 12
points for the Hoyas.


Baylor 76,
No. 8 Oklahoma St. 70
STILLWATER, Okla. Brady
Heslip scored a season-high 20
points to help Baylor end a five-
game losing streak.
Rico Gathers had 14 points, Gary
Franklin scored all 11 of his points
in the second half and Cory Jeffer-
son had 11 points and 13 rebounds
for Baylor (14-7, 2-6 Big 12), which
greatly improved its fading NCAA
tournament hopes. The Bears had
scored fewer than 70 points in four
straight games, but shot 52 percent
from the field and outrebounded the
Cowboys 32-26.
Markel Brown scored 24 points and
Le'Bryan Nash had 19 points for Okla-
homa State (16-5, 4-4), which lost to
rival Oklahoma 88-76 on Monday
night. Marcus Smart added 15 points,
seven assists and six rebounds.
No. 9 Villanova 90,
Temple 74
PHILADELPHIA- James Bell
scored 19 points to lead Villanova to
the win.
Villanova (19-2) improved to a
perfect 4-0 record in Big 5 play and
earned its 22nd Big 5 championship
in program history.
Temple (6-14), meanwhile, missed
out on a share of the city title and an
opportunity to upset a top-10 team
for the sixth consecutive season.
The Wildcats took a five-point lead
at the half and stretched it to as much
as 24, at 64-40, with 10:17 to play.
Will Cummings had 24 points for
the Owls.
No. 11 Kentucky 84,
Missouri 79
COLUMBIA, Mo. -Aaron Harri-
son scored 21 points and James
Young added 20 to power Kentucky
to the victory.


The Wildcats (16-5, 6-2 South-
eastern Conference) kept their poise
one game after calling a players-
only meeting to discuss the team's
issues away from home.
Jabari Brown finished with a career-
high 33 points and Jordan Clarkson
scored 28 to keep Missouri (16-5,4-4)
in the game. Clarkson's layup with
51.9 seconds remaining narrowed the
Tigers' deficit to 80-77, butAaron Har-
rison answered with a layup 30 sec-
onds later to end the threat.
No. 24 Ohio St. 59,
No. 14 Wisconsin 58
MADISON, Wis. -Aaron Craft
scored all seven of his points in the
final 4 minutes, LaQuinton Ross fin-
ished with 13 points, and Ohio State
got a confidence-boosting road win.
Amadeo Della Valle added 11
points for the Buckeyes (17-5, 4-5
Big Ten) in a bruising back-and-forth
affair with the Badgers (17-5, 4-5).
Sam Dekker missed a 3 at the
buzzer for Wisconsin.
No. 15 Iowa 81,
Illinois 74
CHAMPAIGN, III. Gabriel
Olaseni had 15 points and 12 re-
bounds, helping Iowa to the win.
The Hawkeyes (17-5, 6-3 Big Ten)
led by 21 points just over 12 minutes
into the game. Illinois (13-9, 2-7)
fought its way back and took a 62-61
lead on a 3-pointer by TracyAbrams
with 10:18 left in the game.
But Iowa took the lead for good at
72-70 on a bucket by Mike Gesell
with 3:50 to play.
Joseph Bertrand scored 20 points
for Illinois, which lost its seventh
straight game.
Roy Devyn Marble led the
Hawkeyes with 17 points.
No. 16 Iowa State 81,
No. 23 Oklahoma 75
AMES, Iowa Sophomore


Georges Niang scored a career-high
27 points and Iowa State held on for
its second win in six games.
Melvin Ejim had 22 points and 16
rebounds for his 28th double-double
as the Cyclones (16-4, 4-4) moved
back to .500 in the Big 12.
Niang buried a 3 to put Iowa Stata
ahead 76-70 with 55.5 second left.
Buddy Hield scored a career-
high 30 points for Oklahoma (17-5,
6-3), which outrebounded Iowa
State 46-33.
No. 19 Saint Louis 87,
George Mason 81, OT
ST. LOUIS Rob Loe scored 10
of his career-high 23 points in over-
time, leading Saint Louis to the win.
Loe hit a tying 3-pointer with 44
seconds left in regulation and then hit
another 3-pointer to start overtime,
giving the Billikens the lead for good.
Saint Louis (20-2, 7-0 Atlantic 10)
has reeled off 14 victories in a row,
the sixth-longest active winning
streak in the country. The winning
streak ties the school record.
Bryon Allen scored 30 points and
Patrick Holloway added 15 for
George Mason (7-14, 0-7).
Saint Joseph's 73,
No. 21 UMass 68
PHILADELPHIA- Halil Kanace-
vic scored 18 points and Saint
Joseph's broke away from a late tie
to get the win.
UMass rallied from a 16-point
deficit in the second half and made it
68-all in the final minute. Saint
Joseph's hit five foul shots to win.
Kanacevic added six rebounds
and five assists. Ronald Roberts
scored 17 for the Hawks (15-6, 5-2
Atlantic 10).
Derrick Gordon scored 21 and
Chaz Williams finished with 16 points
and 10 assists for the Minutemen.
SMU 87,
No. 22 Memphis 72
DALLAS Nic Moore had 14
points and 10 assists, and SMU
stayed undefeated at home.
The Tigers (16-5, 6-3 American
Athletic) lost a conference road
game for the first time in two years.
Moore had an assist on Markus
Kennedy's tiebreaking layup right
after halftime. Moore then added
3-pointers in the 10-2 spurt in just
over 2 minutes that put SMU (17-5,
6-3) ahead to stay and in control.
Clemson 53,
Florida State 49
TALLAHASEE K.J. McDaniels
scored 26 points as Clemson de-
feated Florida State 53-49 on the road
in ACC action.
The Tigers (14-6, 5-3) survived a
slow-moving defensive battle in which
both teams failed to shoot 40 percent
from the floor most of the game.
Jeron Blossomgame scored 10
points and Jordan Roper added
eight for Clemson.
Florida State (13-8, 4-5) dropped
its third consecutive game as
Okaro White was held to nine
points, lan Miller, who entered the
game as the Seminoles' leading
scorer, suffered an injury in the first
half and did not return.


No. 1 UConn 86,
Cincinnati 29
CINCINNATI- Bria Hart-
ley and Kaleena Mosqueda-
Lewis each scored 17 points
to help No. 1 Connecticut rout
Cincinnati 86-29 on Saturday.
Hartley added a career-
high six steals for the Huskies
(23-0, 10 American Athletic
Conference), who jumped out
to a 41-11 halftime lead and
never looked back.
Cincinnati, missing leading
scorer Dayeesha Hollins for
the remainder of the season
due to a knee injury, took a
5-3 lead two minutes into the
game before Connecticut took
over for good.
UConn held Cincinnati (9-
12, 2-8) scoreless for 11 min-
utes and 22 seconds in which
the Bearcats missed 11 shots
and turned the ball over nine
times.
No. 9 Baylor 87,
Texas 73
WACO, Texas Odyssey
Sims scored 44 points, fresh-
man Nina Davis had a dou-
ble-double and No. 9 Baylor
beat Texas 87-73.
Sims had another rough
shooting night but made up
for it with seven rebounds and
seven assists to help the Lady
Bears (18-3, 8-1 Big 12) hold
on after she put them ahead
for good on the first basket of
the second half.
Baylor, which has had the
nation's longest home and
conference winning streak
snapped this season, ex-
tended its conference home


winning streak to 32 games.
The last loss was to the Long-
horns on March 7, 2010.
Nneka Enemkpali had 19
points and 15 rebounds to
lead Texas (14-7, 5-4).
Oklahoma 81, No.
11 Oklahoma St. 74
NORMAN, Okla. Sha-
rane Campbell scored a ca-
reer-high 28 points as
Oklahoma pounded 11th-
ranked Oklahoma State in
front of a raucous home
crowd at the annual Bedlam
Series game.
Nicole Griffin added 14
points with 10 rebounds and
six blocked shots as the
Sooners (14-8, 5-4 Big 12)
handed Oklahoma State (18-
3, 7-3) its first road loss in
conference this season. The
Cowgirls, harried into 17
turnovers with eight Sooner
steals and 7 blocked shots,
haven't won at Norman since
Feb.7,1998.
Tiffany Bias led the Cow-
girls with 18 points. Liz Dono-
hoe (11 points) was scoreless
after halftime.
No. 22 Gonzaga
101, San Fran. 66
SPOKANE, Wash. Lind-
say Sherbert scored 18 of her
career-high 23 points in the
second half and No. 22 Gon-
zaga used a huge final 20
minutes to beat San Fran-
cisco.
Sunny Greinacher added
17 points for Gonzaga (20-3,
10-1 WCC), which has won
11 straight to reach 20 wins
for the eight-straight year.


Shaniqua Nilles scored a ca-
reer-high 11 points and Kiara
Kudron added 10, joining
Sherbert to give the Bulldogs
a 56-12 advantage in bench
points.
No team had scores more
than 50 at McCarthey Athletic
Center this year but the Dons
(8-14, 3-8) almost reached
that by halftime, when they
trailed 50-46. Gonzaga had
won the first meeting 68-40.
San Francisco shot 70.8
percent in the first half but,
was just 4 of 17 in the sec-
ond. The Dons had 13 of their
23 turnovers in the second
half and was out-rebounded
37-17, including 184 on the
offensive end.
No. 25 Middle
Tenn. 67, Tulsa 57
TULSA, Okla. Ebony
Rowe scored 18 points and
grabbed 15 rebounds as No.
25 Middle Tennessee held off
a determined Tulsa squad,
pushing its winning streak to
17 games.
The Blue Raiders (18-3, 7-
0 Conference USA), ranked in
the national polls for the first
time since Nov. 16, 2009, had
a battle with the Golden Hurri-
canes (10-8, 4-3), who held
Middle Tennessee to just nine
field goal attempts in the first
12 minutes of the second half.
Rowe scored 10 points
after halftime to notch her
70th career double-double,
17th this season. KeKe Stew-
art added 12 points and China
Dow 10.
Tulsa's Kelsee Grovey
scored a career-high 23


PLACERS mentor Jeff Wood was
PLAC ER P'pleased after advancing
12-of-13 grapplers.
Continued from Page B1 Though SHS pushed 11
into the finals, CHS
nine to 2A-2. pushed eight, but only two
Lecanto senior Chris senior hammers Bran-
Ewing (29-4), the top seed don Taylor and Casey
at 182 pounds, was one of Bearden earned top-of-
three Citrus County grap- the-podium efforts.
plers to return home with Overall, CHS captured
his first-place blue ribbon. 15-of-29 bouts (52 percent)
The top-seeded Ewing, behind seven pins.
the only Panther to reach Six Hurricanes settled
the tourney finals, opened for second including:
with a bye before pinning freshman James Wright at
Vanguard's Cameron Life 113, sophomore Justin
(1:59) and then second- Allan at 152, junior
seeded Citrus seniorAustin Johnathan Loggins at 285,
Renaud in the finals (1:03). and seniors Tarique Ca-
"That first district title banas at 145, Austin Re-
tastes great," the 18-year- naud at 182 and Bradley
old Ewing beamed. "I feel Wiesenauer at 195.
like I'm getting what I de- In the consolation fi-
serve. I had a tough run last nals, sophomores Willie
year Today was the biggest Wallen at 138 and Christo-
accomplishment of my pher Keene at 106 placed
wrestling career It's such a third while sophomore
big win, I need to dedicate Stephen Mackey at 220
this to my mom she's and junior Victor Segarra
watched all my matches, at 126 placed fourth.
"I've already starting "I'm good with second,"
preparing for next week," Wood said. "We're send-
Ewing noted. "I've been ing 12 to regionals and we
training for regionals saw lots of kids stepping
every day in practice." up. Some kids just did
The other Panthers to their jobs."
advance from the consola- On the match ofthe night
tion finals included sen- featured second-seeded
iors Cody Simmons at 220 Bearden notching a siz-
and Bryce Hickey at 145 zling two-point takedown
(both third) along with with 29 seconds remaining
sophomore Austin Hart- in overtime to edge Spring-
man at 120, junior Timo- stead's top-seeded Billy
thy Cyr at 138, and seniors Swift, 10-8. That match had
Nicolai Kortendick at 152, the gym rocking for both
Matt Wheat at 160, Nick competitors.
Slusser at 170 and Charley "The Bearden/Swift
Vale at 285 (all fourth), match was a barn-
Hurricanes burner," Wood said. "We
knew coming in that it
advance nine would be. We have to
Second-year Citrus savor today and get back


to work on Monday"
Bearden (45-2 overall)
reached the finals by post-
ing a 15-0 technical fall
against Belleview sopho-
more Malachi Ortiz.
The decision over Swift
helped ease the sting of the
OT nod earlier this season
against the 2013 state
placer at Ocala-Forest.
"He beat me last time,"
the 17-year-old Bearden
said. "I was looking for re-
demption. I got a little
tired there at the end. The
difference this time was
takedowns. I felt I beat
him on his feet."
On the significance of
his first district title, "It's
so big," he replied, "Be-
cause it's my last year. I'm
not celebrating this. I'll
start training in the morn-
ing for regionals. This is
just a small step toward a
state title."
Taylor (county-best 51-3
overall) wrestled once en
route to his initial blue
ribbon.
The top-seeded Taylor
earned a bye and re-
ceived an injury default
victory over Lecanto sen-
ior Matt Wheat to advance
to the finals.
Taylor never trailed
solving second-seeded
Vincent Buonanno of
Springstead via a major
decision, 9-1.
"Winning districts feels
good after finishing as a
runner-up last year,"
pointed out the 17-year-old
Taylor "Today was a good
start to my state series, but
I'm really looking forward
to next week. I can't really
dwell on what happened
today too much."


Women's college basketball BRIEFS


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 B5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Awards galore


Manning wins

record5th

MVP award

Associated Press

NEW YORK Peyton
Manning's record-setting
season earned him his
fifth Associated Press
NFL MVP award Saturday
night in a landslide.
No other player has won
more than three.
Denver's record-setting
quarterback, who threw for
55 touchdowns and 5,477
yards in leading the Bron-
cos to the AFC's best record,
earned 49 votes from a na-
tionwide panel of 50 media
members who regularly
cover the league. New Eng-
land quarterback Tom
Brady got the other vote.
Manning won his other
MVPs with Indianapolis in
2003, '04, '08 and '09. He
also was the runner-up last
season to Adrian Peterson.
"I am humbled by this
recognition and grateful to
my family, (Broncos
owner) Pat Bowlen, John
Elway, John Fox and the
entire Denver Broncos or-
ganization, and of course,
my coaches and my team-
mates," Manning said in a
prepared video accept-
ance speech. He was not
on hand as he gets ready
for Sunday's Super Bowl
against Seattle.
"Now, I sent a couple of
guys over there tonight to
pick up the trophy on my
behalf: my father Archie
and my son Marshall.
Thank you very much and
God bless you."
Archie Manning, hold-
ing his grandson Marshall
in his arms, accepted the
award from two more
MVPs, Joe Montana and
Aaron Rodgers.
Manning still trails sev-
eral Hall of Famers for
total MVPs in their sport.
Wayne Gretzky won nine
NHL MVPs, Barry Bonds
owns seven in baseball,
and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
won six in the NBA.
Manning also took the
AP's Offensive Player of
the Year award for the sec-
ond time. Elway accepted
the Offensive Player award
on Manning's behalf
"I can say I have never
seen a better year played
by a quarterback than Pey-
ton Manning," Elway said.
"To see what he did this
year, it was truly amazing."
Manning received 33
votes for that honor He
also was runner-up last
year to Peterson for Offen-
sive Player
This time, running back
LeSean McCoy of
Philadelphia was second
with 10 votes, followed by
Kansas City running back
Jamaal Charles with four
Carolina grabbed two
major awards, with Ron
Rivera winning AP NFL
Coach of the Year and line-
backer Luke Kuechly
voted top defensive player
Rivera engineered the
Panthers' turnaround from
a 7-9 record to 12-4, the
NFC South title and a first-
round playoffbye. Kuechly


Associated Press
Green Bay Packers running back Eddie Lacy poses with his AP Offensive Rookie of the Year
award at the third annual NFL Honors at Radio City Music Hall on Saturday in New York.


keyed a defense that al-
lowed 241 points, less than
every team except NFC
champion Seattle.
"I had no idea," he said
of adding the award to the
top defensive rookie hon-
ors he got last season. "You
look at the list of guys:
Robert Mathis, a sack mas-
ter, a guy that forced a lot
of fumbles. And obviously,
everybody knows about
Richard Sherman and
Earl Thomas. Those guys
are both studs."
Green Bay running back
Eddie Lacy and Jets de-
fensive tackle Sheldon
Richardson were the top
rookies for 2013.
San Diego quarterback
Philip Rivers took the
Comeback Player of the
Year award at the NFL
Honors show
Rivera's fine work in his
third season in charge in
Carolina brought him 21
1/2 votes. That outdis-
tanced Kansas City's Andy
Reid, who got 13 1/2 votes.
In his first year with the
Chiefs, Reid took them
from 2-14 to 11-5 and an
AFC wild-card berth.
"I do feel a lot of pride
because it has been a long
journey, but it also was a
part of the process," Rivera
said. "Just like us getting to
where we are winning 12
games was part of the
process. We started, the
team was 2-14 before I got
there and we went to 6-10
and then 7-9, and this year
we broke through at 12-4. It
was part of the process of
growing and developing."


Rivera is the second
Panthers coach to win the
award. Dom Capers was
AP Coach of the Year in
1996, Carolina's second
season in the NFL.
All-Pro Kuechly re-
ceived 19 votes, ahead of
Indianapolis All-Pro line-
backer Mathis, who
earned 111/2.
Kuechly was credited
with 96 tackles, four inter-
ceptions, two sacks, eight
passes defensed, and was
a presence from sideline
to sideline on the NFL's
No. 2 unit.
A second-round pick
(61st overall) from Ala-
bama, Lacy was a key per-
former in the Packers'
offense, particularly when
star quarterback Aaron
Rodgers was sidelined for
seven games. He rushed
for 1,178 yards on 284 car-
ries (4.1 average), with 11
touchdowns. He also had
35 receptions.
That was good enough
for 35 votes.
"I'm comfortable where
I am, and my teammates
believe in me, and they
make me feel comfortable,
so I'm able to play the way
I'm capable of playing,"
said Lacy, who beat out
San Diego wide receiver
Keenan Allen, who re-
ceived 12 votes.
Richardson, the 13th
overall pick in April's
draft on a selection ac-
quired when New York
traded star cornerback
Darrelle Revis to Tampa
Bay, won a close race over
Buffalo linebacker Kiko


Alonso. Richardson re-
ceived 23 votes; Alonso, a
second-round choice (46th
overall), got 19.
Often double-teamed as
the season wore on,
Richardson made 42 tack-
les and had 3 1/2 sacks. He
clogged the running lanes
so effectively that the Jets
ranked third against the
run this season.
"I'm surprised," Richard-
son said of beating Alonso
and Arizona safety Tyrann
Mathieu, who got two votes.
"Kiko and Tyrann most def-
initely had outstanding
rookie years and it was a
toss-up to me. Kiko made a
lot of tackles and Tyrann
made a lot of plays down the
field. Unfortunately he got
hurt, but it was a tight race."
Richardson joked about
the possibility of winning
both awards he scored
two touchdowns as a full-
back in goal-line situations.
"Eddie Lacy beat me out
there," Richardson said.
"He had a few more touch-
downs than I did."
Rivers led the Chargers
to a wild-card playoff spot
with four straight victories
to close out the schedule,
giving them a 9-7 record.
He led the league with a
69.5 completion rate and
threw for 32 TDs against 11
interceptions.
Chicago cornerback
Charles Tillman won the
Walter Payton Man of the
Year award, and accepted
the honor with tears in his
eyes.
'As a Chicago Bear, this
award has a special mean-
ing to me," Tillman said.


Brooks among


7 heading into


Hall of Fame


Former Bucs

LB gets in

on first try

Associated Press

NEW YORK The
hang time is over for Ray
Guy The longtime punter
for the Oakland Raiders
is all by himself once
again.
After waiting 23 years,
Guy is the first punter
elected to the Pro Foot-
ball Hall of Fame.
"Good things are worth
waiting for," Guy said Sat-
urday night after being
elected along with six
other players. "It's just a
matter of time when it
will show up. And I knew
it would, sooner or later
It had to, whether it was
me or somebody down
the road. But sooner or
later, it had to show up,
because that is a part of a
football game."
The class of 2014 also
included defensive end
Michael Strahan, re-
ceiver Andre Reed, de-
fensive back Aeneas
Williams and defensive
end Claude Humphrey,
who like Guy was a senior
selection. Two first-time
eligible players, line-
backer Derrick Brooks
and offensive tackle Wal-
ter Jones, were selected.
The announcement
was made at the NFL
Honors award show, less
than 24 hours before the
Denver Broncos meet the
Seattle Seahawks in the
first Super Bowl in a non-
domed stadium in a cold-
weather city
Among the finalists
who didn't get in were
two with ties to the Indi-
anapolis Colts and cur-
rent Broncos quarterback
Peyton Manning coach
Tony Dungy and receiver
Marvin Harrison.
Each of the incoming
Hall of Famers walked to


the stage and was an-
nounced individually
Strahan, who helped the
Giants make two Super
Bowls, got a huge cheer
from the home crowd.
Induction will be on
Aug. 1 in Canton, Ohio.
Guy turned the punting
job into a defensive
weapon after he became
the first player at his po-
sition to be selected in
the first round of the
draft in 1973. He made
"hang time" part of the
football vernacular while
playing all of his 207
games in 14 seasons with
the Raiders.
The Southern Missis-
sippi product averaged
42.4 yards, falling under
the 40-yard bar only dur-
ing the strike-shortened
1982 season. Only three of
his 1,049 punts were
blocked, and he set an
NFL record with 619 in a
row without a block. He
had 209 punts downed in-
side the 20-yard line, in-
cluding 77 in his final
three seasons.
"It's gratifying to now
see a punter go into the
Hall of Fame," Guy said.
"Whether it was me or
somebody else, they
needed representation in
that position."
Brooks was the corner-
stone of a Bucs defense
that led the league in
2002 and'05, and the NFC
five times. He was The
Associated Press Defen-
sive Player of the Year
when Tampa Bay won its
only Super Bowl after the
2002 season.
The linebacker never
missed a game in his 14
seasons and averaged a
remarkable 146 tackles.
Six of his 25 interceptions
were returned for touch-
downs, including a
league-record three in
'02. He holds Tampa Bay
records for tackles in a
game (23), defensive TDs
in a season (four), career
starts and games, and
tackles (2,196).


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers linebacker Derrick Brooks was
elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday.


Associated P
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning drops back to pa
during practice Friday in Florham Park, N.J. The Broncos
scheduled to play the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLVIII tod
in East Rutherford, N.J.


SUPER
Continued from Page B1

It may be a referendum on
whether the NFEs showpiece
event should ever again be held
outdoors in a cold-weather city.
But more likely is it being a
strong indicator about the future
of the quarterback position.
The game will feature the clas-
sic pocket passer emblematic of
the old guard Denver's veteran
Peyton Manning, who has had an
extraordinarily prolific season.
Against him is Seattle's quick-
footed, quick-witted scrambler
Russell Wilson, who represents
the new guard along with the
likes of Robert Griffin III, Colin
Kaepernick, Cam Newton, even
Andrew Luck.
Seattle's miserly defense
wants to force Manning into un-
comfortable territory, which
means anywhere outside the
passing pocket Denver's defense
will be intent on giving Wilson a
taste of claustrophobia by keep-
ing him hemmed in the pocket.
ress Both QB approaches work for
ass their offenses, or else these two
are teams wouldn't each be 15-3, top
lay seeds in their conferences and
facing off for the championship.


The quarterback differences -
aside from age, time of service in
the pros, or even their height -
Manning is about 6 inches taller
than Wilson make this Super
Bowl even more intriguing.
There will always be a place in
anyone's starting lineup for a Pey-
ton Manning, who deserves strong
consideration in the debate about
the greatest quarterback in his-
tory, regardless of whether he
adds a second Super Bowl ring
today Teams construct their of-
fense around a talent like that
Whether most teams will stick
with convention or choose mo-
bile, creative and elusive
passers such as Wilson won't be
decided by who wins at the
Meadowlands. But it could play
a significant role.
'As a talent evaluator for col-
lege and even free agency, the
toughest thing to evaluate is
process," Broncos quarterbacks
coach Greg Knapp said. "Can
the guy process in the pocket
during the heat of battle?"
Everyone knows Manning has
had that skill throughout his ca-
reer, and Wilson has provided
strong evidence in his two NFL
seasons that he's got it, too.
"Peyton might be one of the best
I've ever been around that can
process, 'Ok, I've got these tools to


use, and in 10 seconds I've got to
make a decision, and execute in
less than four,"' Knapp added.
Wilson's multi-faceted abili-
ties on the field might differ in
method to Manning's, but Car-
roll sees many similarities off
the playing field.
"He's an incredible competi-
tor in every way," Carroll said of
his quarterback, who at 25 is 12
years younger than Manning.
"In preparation, in game day,
he's the epitome of what you
want in your competitor. He's
got tremendous work habits.
He's got extraordinary athleti-
cism. He's got a general all-
around savvy that allows him to
make great decisions under
pressure.
"He's extremely confident, too,
so no matter what is going on, he's
not going to waver in his focus
and ability to handle things."
Manning believes elements of
all styles will always be in
demand.
"I could describe the perfect
quarterback. Take a little piece of
everybody," he said. "Take John
Elway's arm, Dan Marino's re-
lease, maybe Troy Aikman's
dropback, Brett Favre's scram-
bling ability, Joe Montana's two-
minute poise and, naturally, my
speed."


B6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


NFL


.M.










COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Mr. Larson was not coming home


hen I started in the
newspaper busi-
ness, no one was
really interested in my
opinion on too much.
They just wanted to be
sure that I delivered the
newspaper to my 44 cus-
tomers before 4:30 p.m. and
that I placed each copy of
Newsday as close to the
front door as possible.
I was not a great delivery
boy, but the job experience


was my first in this busi-
ness, and I consider myself
fortunate to still have in-
credible passion for it today
My experience as a news-
paper boy came roaring
back to me last week when
I read the Chronicle story of
79-year-old Cecylia Ziobro
Thibault.
Cecylia survived a Nazi
forced labor camp and re-
cently contributed to a
book, written by her son


Robert, about her experi-
ences as a slave laborer
She was compelled to tell
her story at this late date
because the president of
Iran has repeatedly pro-
claimed that the Holocaust
is a hoax.
Mrs. Thibault knew it was
not a hoax; she lived
through the horrors.
When I delivered News-
day to those 44 customers
on Cedar Road in East


Northport, N.Y, I learned
that the world was made up
of very different people.
Some people were nice;
others weren't
Some were grateful for
your hard work; others
were always quick to point
out that your efforts needed
improvement.
"Why don't you put the
paper inside the screen
door?" one would say
"Why don't you get here


earlier?" another would
ask. To an 11-year-old kid,
the complaints turned to
cynicism when you discov-
ered the only time the com-
plaining customers were
not around was when you
needed to do your weekly
collection.
We had to go door to door
on Friday and get 25 cents
from each customer


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file photo
The Puddle in the Pines splash park at Whispering Pines Park was one of the many city facilities that saw upgrades over the course of 2013, says Inverness City
Manager Frank DiGiovanni.


We are pleased to deliver the 15th
State of the City Address. Hope
it's fulfilling and entertaining.
The first was provided 1999. In
one way or another, every project and initiative
from then to now has been accomplished.
A list of 2013 accomplishments:
Under citywide operations and services of a general
nature, production of city newsletter takes place three
times annually and is delivered
Sto every resident and business.
-Beyond a newsletter, two web-
sites are managed, and Face-
book pages for Sunny Cooter
and Whispering Pines Park are
continually updated to share in-
4 formation. On a daily basis, the
S critically acclaimed iNews is
| '" ^ published; we issue tweets,
handle reader board manage-
ment, manage media interac-
Frank DiGiovanni tion and handle marketing to
GUEST keep the community engaged.
COLUMN
___________ See Page C3


ONCE




AGAIN,




WE MADE




A SPLASH


Taxpayer advocate: Avoid health care tax surprises


CAROLE FELDMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON It's not too
early to start thinking about the
tax implications of health care
reform.
Did you buy health insurance
through one of the exchanges?
You might be eligible for a re-
fundable tax credit. Taxpayers
had the option of estimating
their 2014 income to see if they


qualified for the credit and then
having it applied in advance to
the cost of the premiums.
"We have an opportunity in
the 2014 filing season to educate
taxpayers about what they need
to do during the year to avoid
problems during the 2015 filing
season," National Taxpayer Ad-
vocate Nina Olson said.
Her advice to those taxpayers:
keep the exchanges advised ifthere
are changes in your circumstances


that could affect the subsidy
"It could increase if you have
another child and you want to
be able to get the benefit of
that," she said in a wide-ranging
interview with The Associated
Press. "It could decrease if you
have a significant pay increase,
if your spouse gets a job, if a
child is no longer covered on
your plan."
As a result, some taxpayers
could end up owing the U.S.


Treasury money when they file
their 2014 taxes next year
But what about those taxpay-
ers who don't get refunds be-
tween 75 percent and 85 percent
do, she said or those whose
refunds aren't big enough to
cover what is owed if the sub-
sidy is reduced?
In that case, "the easiest thing
is you'll have a refund the next


Editor's note: This is the
second entry in a six-part
series on tax changes.
Next week: Paying taxes is
hard enough. Don't let the
total payment due rise
because of penalties and
interest. There are penalties
if you fail to file your tax return,
or if you file it late.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Page C4


Online: http://www.taxpayer
See Page 03 advocate.irs.gov/Home







OPage C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"If there are obstacles, the shortest line between
two points may be the crooked line."

Bertolt Brecht, "Life of Galileo," 1947


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................ citizen member
I Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DO THE RIGHT THING




Blasband could



steady rocky



ship of Citrus



Memorial


Adam was not alone in the
Garden of Eden, however,
and does not deserve all the
credit; much is due to Eve,
the first woman, and Satan,
the first consultant.
-Mark Twain,
Notebook, 1867
harles Blasband of In-
verness ran Citrus Me-
morial hospital for 32
years. He took the
health care insti- THE I,
tution from a
small-town hospi- Interir
tal to a major at ho,
health care
provider. OUR OF
Ten years ago,
before any of the mSele
current contro- man wt
versy erupted, did tl
Blasband volun-
tarily retired and handed off
the leadership of the facility
to the next generation.
Now the institution that he
loved and developed could
use his temporary assistance.
But members of the hospital
governing board have re-
jected his willingness to help
stabilize the hospital during
this transition period be-
cause they believe an outside
consultant will have all the
answers they need.
Citrus Memorial hospital is
in the process of being leased
to HCA, the nation's largest
for-profit health care
provider. The lease is neces-
sary because the two hospital
boards in Inverness have bat-
tled for four years and driven
themselves to financial ruin.
Current CEO Ryan Beaty
recently resigned his position
(as of March 15) as part of a
deal with the governing board
and its attorney Bill Grant to
drop personal lawsuits against
foundation board members.
Both the governing board
and foundation board believe
an interim CEO is needed to
lead the hospital over the next
six months while the facility
transitions from a public hos-
pital to a for-profit facility.
Chuck Blasband would be
the ideal candidate to lead


S
is



C.
h
h(


Pony up, Mr. Grant
This is Jan. 28 and I'm looking
at the paper right now, the
Chronicle (page A10), and it says:
"Look for a cheaper option, guys."
"Cut it out with the gravy train
already." Well, all I have to say
on that issue is, you need to tell
that attorney, Grant, let him pay
for the $30,000 or $40,000 that
they want a month for that new
CEO for the hospital. I think it's
ridiculous.
Beaty is flying high
This Sound Off is in relation to
the hospital activities. The CEO of
American Airlines is just reported
to make an annual salary of
$700,000 for next year and Citrus
County Board and Foundation is
giving Mr. Beaty a severance package
of $670,000 a year. Something
is atilt in the hospital system.


Get HCA involved
To the board of directors of
Citrus Memorial hospital: Why
not hire or appoint an executive
from HCA to act as an interim
CEO? It would get a head start
on the proposed takeover and
perhaps in taxpayers funds.
Hold them accountable
The editorial today on, let's see,
Jan. 28, is the best the Chronicle
has ever written. It's perfect.
Enough is enough of all this spend-
ing money and waste in the hos-
pital battle. Every one of those
board members should be fined
$1 million each and see how they
like it. Just because we're taxpay-
ers and we have to pay our fine, they
should have to pay their fines, too,
for a stupid job and erratic behavior.
They should be held accountable
for the money they spent.


CMH through the transition.
He knows the lay of the land
and the operational needs of
our county hospital. But Bias-
band has been blocked from
returning because the gov-
erning board insists that no
one who has ever had any-
thing to do with CMH should
be considered for the tempo-
rary post.
Instead, the governing board
wants to hire a
$SUE: temporary CEO-
at a reported cost
n CEO of $30,000 to
;pital. $40,000 a month
to transition
'INION: the hospital.
While we are
t tne sure a competent
io once interim CEO
e job. could be found at
that price range,
it is absurd for the governing
board to continue to spend
the tax dollars of Citrus
County residents in this way.
This four-year confrontation
has cost the taxpayers of Citrus
County more than $11 million
in legal and consultant fees.
Could you imagine the pub-
lic outrage if the county com-
mission or one of our city
councils wasted $11 million
on an internal dispute?
We don't need an interim
CEO to create grand strate-
gies or make big capital pur-
chases. We need an interim
CEO to steady the rocky ship
at our county hospital. We
need someone who can help
the employees and physi-
cians get refocused on pro-
viding quality health care.
We urge the two groups to
show some good faith to the
taxpayers and pull Chuck
Blasband in as the interim
CEO. He has the skills and ex-
perience demonstrated in
Citrus County that he can lead
the hospital through these
final months of transition.
He is extremely competent
and has the respect of the
employees, the physicians
and the community
It's time to do the right
thing. And it's time to stop
wasting money.


Bringing b

Editor's note: This is the sec-
ond in a series on new perspec-
tives to changing standards in
public education.


he new mayor of New
York, Bill de Blasio, is
seen as a prototypical
liberal by fans and foes alike,
but his most important appoint-
ment- making Carmen Farina
chancellor of the
city's school system
- is beyond such
general categories.
The 70-year-old
Farina, who'd been
retired before
agreeing to take the
job, focuses on indi-
vidual students,
scorning collective Nat I
standardized tests. OTI
She also insists that
parents, largely VOI
overlooked by previ-
ous chancellors and mayors, be
active partners with her
As The New York Times'
Ginia Bellafante noted:
"Farina is a progressive edu-
cator who speaks movingly
about returning joy to the proj-
ect of teaching children"
("Schools Chancellor Brings
Joyful and Fierce Style," Ginia
Bellafante, The New York
Times, Jan. 3).
Farina is against "myopic sys-
tems of learning in which real
knowledge becomes a casualty
of test knowledge, and what
she calls 'the gotcha mentality'
of the (Michael) Bloomberg
years, when teachers and prin-
cipals were often abandoned
instead of being given whatever
support they might need to
improve."
"Even the worst principals
work hard," Farina told Bel-
lafante. "When we support
them, then we can hold them
accountable."
Remarkably, before the new
chancellor had retired, she was
a 40-year member of the largest
school system in the United
States. Farina had been a teacher,
principal, superintendent and
even deputy chancellor in the
Bloomberg administration.
However, she resigned from
that position because her prin-
ciples were being increasingly
disrespected by those on top.
As a principal, when those
beneath her did not become ac-
countable, Farina could be
tough, as Bellafante noted:
"Serving as the principal of
Public School 6 on the Upper
East Side during the 1990s, she
overturned 80 percent of the
staff, greatly improving the
school's standing."
Farina told Bellafante about
a teacher whose work was so
bad that she would "wake up
during the night thinking about
the children who had to deal
with this teacher"
Where did Farina come from,


I
H
(


ack the 'joy
this singular prober of chil-
dren's learning capabilities?
According to The Huffington
Post's Joy Resmovits, she "grew
up in Brooklyn, the daughter of
two Spanish immigrants who
spoke that language at home"
("NYC Schools Chancellor Pick
Carmen Farina Leaves More
Questions Than Answers," Joy
Resmovits, huffingtonpost.com,
Dec. 30,2013).
At the mayor's
press conference
announcing Farina's
appointment, "she
told a story of a post-
card that her father,
who she said had a
third-grade educa-
tion and taught her
entoff about the impor-
IER tance of education,
received in the mail
DES from her school.
The postcard asked
why Farina never attended class,
though she hadn't been absent
"When her father asked about
the postcard, he was told that
Farina's teacher couldn't prop-
erly pronounce her last name,
and Farina didn't respond to the
name the teacher made up for
her- so she was labeled absent"
At the press conference, Fa-
rina said, "She absolutely made
me feel invisible."
But years later, as she ascended
the New York City school system,
Farina became ever more visi-
ble. As Resmovits wrote, "In 2001,
she was elected to lead Brook-
lyn's school District 15 that's
where she met de Blasio, who
held his first elected office there
as a school board member...
"Since then, she has been his
informal education adviser -
always taking his calls when he
needed something, de Blasio
said..."
De Blasio said "he was confi-
dent she could help alleviate
some of the city's major prob-
lems not the least of which is
that only 22 percent of high
school graduates were found to
be college-ready"
With regard to that 22 per-
cent, former Mayor Bloomberg,
who had anointed himself as
"the education mayor" while in
office, praised himself lavishly
for what he had accomplished
for the city's students.
Worth keeping in mind as Fa-
rina takes charge is that, as the
Times' Bellafante pointed out,
she "is a fan of 'balanced liter-
acy,' designed chiefly by profes-
sor Lucy Calkins of Columbia,
an approach rooted in the idea
that children build reading skill
by reading books that they love
and that engage them."
Yes indeed! Much of my life-
long deep pleasure in reading
came from books I'd discovered
on my own.
But Farina has to deal with
more than reading. She's dis-
cussed ways "to teach funda-


LETTERS to the


Assault on broken
system not finished
When Jimmie T Smith an-
nounced that he was running
for a seat in the Florida House,
I invited him to breakfast. Over
coffee, he told me that one of
his goals was reforming
Florida's welfare system.
True to his word, he spon-
sored a bill that would ask ap-
plicants for Temporary
Assistance for the Needy
(TANF) to take a voluntary
drug test, denying benefits to
those who refused.
Florida TANF provides 60
months (maximum) cash assis-
tance for Floridians who are
working, job hunting or going
to school and need daycare for
their children.
There is always a danger
that welfare dollars will be
spent on drugs. Smith rea-
soned that since TANF recipi-
ents have children and drug
abuse is connected to child
abuse, those children required
special protection.
Gov Scott agreed and signed
the bill into law on July 1,2011.
Last December the Orlando
District Court ruled the law
unconstitutional.
The ruling prompted the
Chronicle to publish an unusu-
ally acerbic and uncharacteris-
tically shrill editorial exalting
in the law's demise.
Omitted was sound research.
The Supreme Court has al-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle
editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address
the editorial board should call
352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

tered Fourth Amendment ju-
risprudence substantially In
the recent past, they have al-
lowed random or "suspicion-
less drug tests" as long as they
advance important govern-
ment objectives.
For example, the Supreme
Court has deemed constitu-
tional an Oklahoma school dis-
trict's random drug testing of
students engaged in extracur-
ricular school activities.
Recently a Michigan law
mandating non-voluntary drug
testing of all welfare recipients
deadlocked the Seventh Cir-
cuit Court 6-6. The addition of


of learning
mental in a more traditional
way until fourth grade or so, to
lay the groundwork for more
expansive learning, and then
take things in more experimen-
tal directions.
"The Ascend network of char-
ter schools, educating some of
the poorest children in the city
in central Brooklyn, has had
great success with that model,
borrowing the humanities-driven
approach of progressive private
schools once children are beyond
the earliest elementary grades.
By sixth grade, Ascend students
are reading 'The Iliad."'
And dig Farina's classroom
keys to guiding students' dis-
coveries while learning, ac-
cording to the Times:
"Dialogue, debate and excite-
ment in the classroom should
obviously be the goals of all
educators."
How I wish that were true!
A recent Associated Press re-
port covered Farina's first day
as chancellor, following her
around a New York middle
school. Her down-to-Earth per-
sonality came across in this
exchange:
"The word 'chancellor' kind
of gives me the shivers," she
said, according to the AP "So
just call me Carmen. 'Cause
everybody does" ("New schools
chancellor Carmen Farina
starts job," The Associated
Press, Jan. 2).
The report went on: 'As she
visited students working on
writing in a small group in one
classroom, their peers in
another group at the other end
of the room burst out with
answers to their teacher's
question."
"You hear the noise in the
room?" Farina said to those ac-
companying her on her visit.
"That's good. I only like schools
where kids are talking and
buzzing only they're actually
learning."
Whatever controversies
Mayor de Blasio gets into and
there will be many, because
New York can be the most con-
tentious city on the planet-he
has committed a public service
by appointing Farina.
When I taught at New York
University, I asked members of
every class to name a teacher
they'd had, from kindergarten
on, who had changed their
lives. Very few hands went up.
In the future, many hands
will wave when that question
is asked amid hosannas to
Carmen Farina.
--in--
Nat Hentoffis a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


e Editor
the voluntary aspect included
in Smith's bill could have
changed at least one vote.
In any event, the state will
probably appeal and has a rea-
sonable expectation of success.
Whatever the outcome, if you
think that Jimmie T Smith's as-
sault on our broken welfare
system has ended, you haven't
had breakfast with him.
John McFadden
Inverness

Pro-choice a misnomer
The Creator of all things is,
was and always will be pro-
life. Pro-choice is a misnomer;
the choice has already been
made. Pro-creation should be
a choice for husband and wife.
But today lies are finessed,
and truth is just a charade.
While abortion may be legal, it
steals a human life.
Since 1973, 55 million babies
have died under Roe v. Wade.
Teenage and "unwanted" preg-
nancies cause too much strife?
We must advocate for life; rec-
ommend adoptions be made.
God's greatest gift to mankind
is life don't throw it away!
Every human is valuable don't
condemn or upbraid. Help the
victims of the evil of abortion


find their way We are all sin-
ners; God is loving and forgiv-
ing- be not afraid.
John J. Greifenkamp
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: HOSPITAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Forgiving is one thing, forgetting is something else


Columnist's note: I've no
doubt written a version of
this story before, but every
once in a while, new
thoughts seem fleeting, so
today, I will rewrite it; not
copy it from a previous
publication, but reuse the
incident and rewrite it in
its entirety Thank you for
your indulgence.

I suspect some of you
might be as certain as
I was that there is a
scripture which says
something about God cast-
ing our sins into the sea of
forgetfulness; even so,
after a reasonable amount
of research, I couldn't find
it. The concept is there,
but so far as I can deter-


INVERNESS
Continued from Page Cl

In 2013, we completed our 18th
year as a Tree City USA.
A grant application was com-
pleted and submitted to the
Florida Cultural Facilities Pro-
gram for $500,000 toward work
on the Valerie Theatre.
Shuffleboard courts at Wallace
Brooks Park were resurfaced
and enhanced for tournament
play and to improve my game.
In 2013, the city became debt-
free (in the general fund).
The year also brought in-
creased investment and building
activity Permits issued, plan re-
view, inspections, code cases and
code enforcement inspections
saw an increase of between 15
percent to 30 percent.
Along these lines, community
business development involved
completion of Publix Shopping
Center; a new O'ReillyAuto Parts
store; and a demo and rebuild of
Wendy's on the same spot.
In the area of operations and
revenue enhancements, a dy-
namic reorganization was done
to merge maintenance functions,
equipment and staff of Whisper-
ing Pines Park with Public Works
to improve internal efficiencies,
equipment sharing, labor pool-
ing and savings.
We improved sanitation com-
mercial billing, collection and
account management.
We completed a full audit of
commercial sanitation accounts
and modified ordinance language
and transferred account billing,
collection and account monitor-
ing to the city for handling. (Rev-
enues were improved.)
We successfully implemented
a highly acclaimed residential
recycling program at no direct
cost to people.
We rolled out a residential cart
program.
We created a commercial
dumpster-sharing program to re-
duce rates and provide high-
quality service.
We researched, bid, analyzed
and entered into a new landfill
agreement, with potential an-
nual savings of $75,000 to
$100,000 annually
Commenced introduction of
Leachate at the WWTP as a new
revenue source and to further
offset the cost of bio-solid
disposal.
In parks, recreation and
events, we evaluated and reas-
signed internal functions of
Whispering Pines Park created
consolidation of personnel, clo-
sure of the Park Office Building
and built a nucleus of activity
and operations of park user in-
teraction and customer service.
A new user-group fee struc-
ture was added to bring equity
and revenue to facility utiliza-
tion. We streamlined the permit-
ting process and event
management in all aspects of
park facilities. We painted the
exterior of the administrative of-
fice building, recreation build-
ing, large picnic pavilion, ball
field score booths, dugouts, con-
cession stand and four restroom
comfort station buildings. The
pool complex building was
painted and interior compo-
nents of climate control, storage


TAXES
Continued from Page C1

year, and we'll take it out
of the refund the next
year," Olson said. "It's a
debt on the books. It's an
assessed tax, and we can
collect it for 10 years and
it's just a computer offset"
To qualify for taxpayer
advocate assistance, you must
show that you face a signif-
icant hardship that the
IRS is causing you economic
harm, that its systems are
not working or that your
rights have been violated.
"That gets you through


mine, the quotation is not.
Be that as it may, this writ-
ing isn't about His forgive-
ness, it's about the human
kind, the kind which for-
gives but doesn't necessar-
ily forget.
Cheryl loves me unre-
servedly I know this for a
fact, but I also know there
is a certain offense I com-
mitted many years ago that
she has not forgotten, and
most likely, she never will.
It has nothing to do with
running after wild women,
drinking booze or gam-
bling away the mortgage
payments. No, I never did
those things it's about a
candy bar
The circumstances?
Long ago, on a lovely mid-


summer's evening, during sofa to purchase one,
the time my Cheryl was very getting dressed, driving to
pregnant with our first- a store and buying it. Being
born, little Bethy-Pooh, the uninitiated and woefully
she pleaded, unwise young
"Sweetheart, man thatlI was,
will you please.I said, "No. It's
go get a candy too late and I'm
bar for me?" not dressed. I'll
It was not as get one for you
though we had tomorrow"
candy bars Wronganswer
stashed in the I had ignored
cupboard or two most im-
the refrigerator, Fred Brannen portant P's-
nor did we have S she was preg-
an unlimited A SLICE nant and she
supply of funds OF LIFE had said
with which to please. When I
buy one. Getting a candy realized how badly I'd hurt
barrequired searching until her feelings, I apologized,
I found enough coins but by then it was too late
perhaps by digging in the to get that particular candy


space, lifeguard room and pub-
lic meeting area were all built
and/or enhanced. We removed
and replaced roofing on many
buildings in Whispering Pines
and have several that remain.
The Whispering Pines mainte-
nance complex scrap yard was
completely cleaned out and the
fence surrounding the com-
pound has been removed. The
Pines administrative office is
being renovated. Improvements
include drywall repair, trim re-
placement, exterior door re-
placement and painting of the
interior. Pool operations have
been revamped to improve man-
agement and function of the pool
and Splash Park. We com-
menced a total overhaul of me-
chanical aspects of the pool
complex and Splash Park. We
improved drainage at WPP to
protect roads. We added "traffic
calming" features at park road-
ways. A new wood fence and gate
were added to the Boy Scout en-
trance. We erected "space net"
apparatus at WPP playground,
which has been hugely popular
We commenced a partnership
with Inverness Rotary for land-
scape improvements at the
Pines. We entered an agreement
with Inverness Little League to
boost tournament play (tourism).
Feral cats were relocated to bal-
ance and protect the natural
ecosystem at the Pines.
Technology achievements in-
volved an online payment proj-
ect, which has been completed
and allows customers to view
their utility account detail and
make payments. Credit cards are
now accepted by the city Inter-
nal efficiency software was in-
stalled to increase productivity
in cross-sectional applications.
Generalized Public Works ac-
tivity throughout Inverness: We
rehabbed the Public Works main
facility, painted exterior, re-
stored worker locker and rest-
rooms, finished new flooring in
office area; we added decorative
(protective) chains and posts
around the 9/11 memorial; we
demolished the former funeral
home off Dampier Street and
graded and cleaned the entire
property to create a new, park-
like area. We added eight cathe-
dral oaks to Cooter Pond Park,
installed new fencing at Cooter
Pond Park, installed additional
bike racks at downtown parks
and in the business district to ac-
commodate increased cycling
traffic. A fishing pier at Wallace
Brooks Park was painted. We
completed Phase I of the
Wayfind directional sign pro-
gram, added electric service
around downtown to power the
city stage with greater mobility to
support special events and
added 11 new solar-powered "Big
Belly" trash units at city parks.
The North Apopka trailhead
and streetscape project was com-
pleted. We completed the build
out in the Inverness Government
Center to house satellite office
for Congressman Rich Nugent.
Seven lift stations had decora-
tive security fencing installed.
We bid and purchased an addi-
tional backup generator for the
utility system. Engineering de-
sign is under way to apply for a
Community Development Grant
to improve Dampier Street from
North Apopka Avenue to Semi-


the door," Olson said.
Ask her what challenges
taxpayers face and she an-
swers emphatically, "Get-
ting assistance from the
IRS, getting service from
the IRS."
In fiscal year 2013, she
said, nearly four out of 10
calls to the IRS did not get
through to a live person
who could help. The aver-
age wait time was 17.5
minutes.
Getting IRS assistance is
particularly an issue, she
said, when it comes to
identity theft, which re-
mains a major issue, al-
though the number of
cases has declined since


nole Avenue and a portion of
Martin Luther King Jr Avenue
Online surplus sales adminis-
tration was launched to improve
return. We prepared 24 city
council agendas, presented two
ordinances for adoption, 25 res-
olutions, 15 proclamations and
conducted four budget work-
shops sessions and one joint pub-
lic workshop with the city of
Crystal River
Under the heading of events,
major and more major, we launched
a comprehensive marketing/pro-
motional plan to include year-
long radio and social media
advertising, YouTube videos and
more and focused on building
stronger relationships with the
Inverness business community.
We raised thousands from a
major event sponsor program:
Citrus County Speedway, Duke
Energy, Great Bay Distributors,
Insight Credit Union, Nick
Nicholas Ford & Lincoln, O'Reilly
Auto Parts, Tobacco Free Florida
and Waste Management; plus
media sponsors: (in-kind dona-
tions): Citrus County Chronicle,
Citrus 95.3 and The Fox 96.7.
We created a yearlong calen-
dar of events that "kicked it up."
We added the Pine Street Jam
and Culinary Crawl events. We
enhanced the Thunder Car Show,
Farmers' Market, St Patrick's
Day, Rock the Block and, of
course, the Cooter Festival.
Other events included Clean
Up Day/Flag Day Ceremony,
three adult softball leagues, the
United Way Triathlon, the CHS
Cross Country Race, the Inver-
ness Little League's spring sea-
son and full spring, summer and
fall seasons, the Nature Coast
EMS Obstacle Course Challenge
and the first Bass Blasters Fish-
ing Tournament, to be bigger and
better in 2014.
What will 2014 look like? The
city Web pages (city government
Cooter Festival, Art Festival) will
be redesigned with greater func-
tionality and a better user inter-
face and social network
operability A new city event Web
portal will be created to provide
a unified location for all city
events. This new site will provide
visitors a single source for infor-
mation on what they need to know
Additional security cameras
for the Inverness Government
Center perimeter and counter
areas in Finance and Develop-
ment Services will be installed.
INews will move to a Web-based
service that will allow a larger
viewing audience and advanced
functionality that will ultimately
drive traffic and business. We will
find a solution and fix the half-in,
half-out lot parcels. We will initi-
ate Phase II of the Wayfind sign
project. We will complete the
boat/kayak launch project at Wal-
lace Brooks Park. We will intro-
duce a new permit fee schedule
for building and permit review
We will commence project por-
tions of the CDBG IV Program,
prepare a new code enforcement
ordinance, conduct the 2014
early voting and elections,
achieve a public-oriented inter-
action with the Department of
Children and Families, relocate
city event operations to the first
floor of the Inverness Govern-
ment Center and relocate the
sheriff's community resources to
Whispering Pines Park.


the IRS put "significant
screens" in place. When
identify theft occurs, Olson
said, the IRS needs to act
more quickly and consis-
tently to help victims.
"The taxpayer has already
gone through an enormous
amount of angst and huge
inconvenience ... and we
do not recognize that in
our customer service to
them," Olson said. Victims
of identity theft typically
speak to a different person
each time they call the
IRS, she complained, and
"have to explain their situ-
ation over again."
She said the agency
should assign each case to


bar I learned from my mis-
take and never made a
similar one again; even so,
in my mind, there was the
continuing question as to
whether or not she had
ever fully forgiven me for
this most grievous faux pas
and whether she had, at
least figuratively, forgotten
the incident.
Many years later, during
a visit with daughter No. 2,
Becky, in Houston, she, her
mother and I were having
a leisurely breakfast, dis-
cussing, among other
things, forgiving those we
believe have wronged us. I
looked at Becky and teas-
ingly made the comment,
"I don't think your mother
forgave me for the candy


Electronic agenda develop-
ment is nearing completion.
Total implementation of a paper-
less agenda will occur Council
member training is being
planned and coming soon.
A full-system automatic utility
meter reads system project will
commence in January The
boardwalk lighting project at
Cooter Pond Linear Park will be
complete. The fully rebuilt en-
trance to Whispering Pines will
be finished. The adult softball
area parking lot will be resur-
faced and striped. Baseball/soft-
ball fields will be renovated and
ready to accommodate activity
that starts in February 2014. The
joint venture with Inverness Ro-
tary to landscape the pool com-
plex (and park entrance) will be
complete. Upgrades to the chem-
ical controller system at the pool
will achieve full automation. We
will flex aquatic scheduling for
patrons, schools, competitive
programs and adult lessons to in-
crease participation and rev-
enue picture. The city will have
a newly created swim team -
the Hilltoppers to improve
swimmer opportunity and
competitiveness.
Expanded family activities at
both the pool complex and all
city parks will include movie
night, a kickball association, a
volleyball league and several
seasonal events (scavenger hunt,
Easter egg hunt, athletic boot
camp, to name a few). We will
work with the Rowing Organiza-
tion of Citrus County Students to
host a rowing event at Wallace
Brooks Park and Liberty Park
and host the first Ultra 12-
Hour/Run Walk at Whispering
Pines Park.
In one way or another, in 2014,
the city will finalize its position
with Fire Service cost, MSBU
and tax. We did not forget that we
provide all Park and Recre-
ational Services to everyone
through Whispering Pines Park
and a county reimbursement is
warranted. Woodard and Curran
contract renewal with the city
will be finalized in March. The
City Clerk will work with the
County Elections Supervisor to
Conduct 2014 Early Voting and
Elections. We will totally handle
the final plan, development, con-
struction, programming and
opening of the new Valerie The-
atre and Plaza in 2014. Creation
of at least two historic plaques
will take place. Establishment of
the Inverness Visitors and
Events Bureau in the Inverness
Government Center will occur. A
property swap for intermodal
connectivity and setting the envi-
ronment for the development of
the Inverness business park for
the continued development of
the North U.S. 41 corridor should
take place early in the new year
Acquisition of Rosemont/Rolling
Green Utility is being pursued to
expand revenue base and bring
high-quality water to people. A
new "controlling" sidewalk ordi-
nance is on its way
New businesses are opening
and succeeding. People are ex-
cited. Inverness has a buzz and
an eventful New Year is coming.
Thank you it's been fun.
--*--a
Frank DiGiovanni is the
Inverness city manager


one person who can see it
all the way through.
As for electronic filing,
Olson suggested that tax-
payers look into the IRS'
Free File program, which
allows people whose ad-
justed gross income is
under $58,000 to file their
taxes for free through the
IRS site. For people whose
income is higher, the IRS
has Free Fillable Forms,
which do the basic math
but don't walk you through
filling out your returns.
"I don't think I should
have to pay to file elec-
tronically with the IRS,"
said Olson, who uses the
Free Fillable Forms.


"That's my duty as a tax-
payer, and the IRS in the
21st century should make
it available to me for free.
It's crazy"
She urged taxpayers to
check out tax preparers
carefully before hiring
one, and not to fall for
promises of huge refunds.
"It really becomes a 'con-
sumer, beware' world," she
said.
In dealing with tax pre-
parers, she offered these
tips:
U Get a copy of your re-
turn. "If the preparer then
alters the return after
you've signed off on it,
that's proof that it was a


bar incident until I took
her to Paris."
Cheryl looked at me the
way that only she can, ex-
pressing her love without
saying words, but then she
spoke. "I forgave you for
that long before we went to
Paris, but I still haven't for-
gotten it."
Forgiving is one thing,
forgetting is something else.
A trip to Paris is one
thing, but refusing to go get
a candy bar for my then-
ever-so-pregnant 18-year-
old wife was, and remains,
something else.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


Sound OFF

Doesn't make sense
Why did CEO Beaty have
to resign and now the
Foundation has to pay for
it? And for the few months
a new CEO will be in there,
it doesn't pay. And we're
going to pay $30,000 to
$40,000 a month, the
hospital is.
Thanks for
returning birdcage
Thank you for returning
(my) birdcage. The Quaker
parrot lady.
Lethal combination
It seems to me that the
proposal before the Legis-
lature up in Tallahassee
with regard to medical
marijuana, coupled with a
not-too-distant proposal to
raise the speed limit on
Florida highways, is headed
for a disaster physically with
those taking, imbibing in
medical marijuana coupled
with an increased speed
limit. Already now people
are doing 5 to 10 mph
over the maximum speed
limit. It would be a deba-
cle. If one wishes to re-
duce the population of
Florida, this would be a
great way to do it.
Not his good side
I do like Gov. Scott. I
sometimes get a kick out
of him. I can go both ways
with some of his princi-
ples and ideals, but the
picture in Wednesday's
paper (Jan. 22) of the guy
didn't do him any justice.
This wasn't a good shot of
him. They should do a bet-
ter job of producing better
pictures of him. It kind of
caught my attention. But
he is helping out the springs
and, I guess, thank God for
help like that. This county
can use a lot of help.
Sheriff's cars
everywhere
I drive for a living and I
go to various counties
within the state of Florida.
I see in today's Chronicle
(Jan. 22): "County worker
fired for gas-card use,"
"Sheriff's office reviewing
incident for possible crimi-
nal charges." I've never
read, seen or heard any-
thing about Citrus County
sheriff's deputies that use
their car for personal use.
I've seen them in Her-
nando County. I've seen
them in Marion County
outside of Walmart and
various other stores out-
side this county. That is an
abuse.
Listen to Wayne
I just wanted to say kudos
to Wayne Sawyer of Floral
City for his Jan. 23 letter.
Keep it up, Wayne. Maybe
somebody in the powers
that be will listen to us be-
fore it's too late. Thank
you and have a good day.


false return that was
filed."
Make sure the pre-
parer's name, registration
number and address are
on the return.
Check with the Better
Business Bureau or state


consumer affairs agency to
see if there are any com-
plaints against the prepa-
ration firm or preparer
"Even though that
seems like some work up-
front, if you get sucked into
one of these preparer is-
sues it can take over a year
to get it resolved, and
that's just pain that nobody
needs to go through," she
said.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 C3





C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

It was brutal. I could
often hear the television
inside the house, but the
people wouldn't answer
the door
They didn't want to turn
25 cents over to the 11-
year-old kid who had very
little experience as a bill
collector and some weeks
seemed to be working
hard just to break even.
But when you're 11 years
old, you remember the good
people. The ones who
treated you with respect.
And that brings me to
Mrs. Larson, the second to
last house on my route.
Mrs. Larson was my best
tipper She gave me 50
cents a week and was al-
ways so grateful to see me.
Each Friday I would
stop at her house and she
would invite me inside for
some home-made cookies.
She was an elderly woman
and she spoke with a thick
accent I was not familiar
with.
She lived alone and
never had company
There was a photo of a
young Mrs. Larson with
her husband that sat on
the fireplace. He was
dressed in a funny-looking
suit and had a big
mustache.
I would always ask Mrs.
Larson when her husband
was coming home. She
would just tell me "Soon.
He's coming home soon."
I never met Mrs. Lar-
son's husband, and as an
11-year-old, I thought he
must have had an awful
job, because he was never
around.
"He's cominghome soon,"
Mrs. Larson would tell me.
One summer day I came
to the house and she in-
vited me inside for my reg-
ular cookies and 50 cents.
It was hot and she was
wearing a short-sleeved
blouse.
That's when I noticed
the funny numbers on the
inside of her wrist


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I was a dopey 11-year-
old kid and did not under-
stand. I asked her why she
had the numbers on her
wrist, and she got embar-
rassed and tried to hide
them.
I didn't understand.
That's when she told me
that she once lived in a
very bad place where they
did not like people like
her She was Jewish.
I didn't know what that
meant. I thought everyone
was a Catholic.
She told me she lived in
a camp with thousands of
other people just like her
In the camp, she said,
everyone had their own
number put on their
wrists.
At the camp, she got sep-
arated from her husband.
She loved Americans,
Mrs. Larson told me, be-
cause they freed her from
the camp and let her come
to this country She had
searched and searched for
her husband, but never
found him.
But she was sure he was
still looking for her As she
said it, she looked out the
curtains of her living room
to see if anyone was com-
ing. To see if her husband
had come home.
This was in 1964. The
war had ended in 1945.
Mr Larson was not com-
ing home.
I was a stupid 11-year-old
kid and did not understand.
But today I do under-
stand. And when I hear the
president of Iran mouth
off that the Holocaust was
a myth, I want him to have
to sit in Mrs. Larson's liv-
ing room, eat her cookies
and explain why Mr Lar-
son never came home.
Cecylia Ziobro Thiabault
and her son have written
"Trapped in a Nightmare,"
a book I will read.
And none of us should
ever forget how evil peo-
ple can become.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him at gmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


GS Wtt ittsS $ I uQSSBn G9Ef ^^^^
77 b huO 11 1ff 95
SaI am% Am*wka sif
Sallq's Valentine Tribute Show
Sunday, ebruarj, O2M-
Doors open: 2 0pm
Ctelrit Impression S ow O0-5tOOpm
wit intrmi.ion for corf mc, cake, aknd
demonstration 6 the everl'q HilLs iJne Dancers.
rbr tickets and more inFormation, c.il 5Z-746-+ -2
Ticket Price: Mcmbrs 10, Non Membr6s: IZ
Sponsored 6 9,Citrus Count. Park 6 Recreation


Originally published in the Citrus County Chronicle.

In 1938 ...
L yla Carlson, 16-year-old Citrus High school
junior, was awarded the first prize of $15 for
submitting the best essay in an essay contest
sponsored by the Peninsular Abstract company
here. Faye Davis, 16-year-old senior in Citrus
High school, was awarded second prize of $10
and LaVerne Love, 17-year-old senior in the
same school, won third prize of $5.
The packing house of Gulf Coast Sea Food,
Inc., at Crystal River is the only oyster packing
house in Citrus County licensed by the Florida
State Board of Health, the board announced this
week. Six months ago Florida's health depart-
ment began enforcing regulations governing the
gathering, packing and shipping of oysters that
have resulted in this industry's elevation to a po-

,\ il/i An nal
Purple Heart Ceremony
Florida A-aional Guard A rnioy. Cr' tal River
Sa.urda,. %February 15. 2014.,11:00 a.m.
CG i .!h!h ii.h li 1: il I....l Ic-'.I ',, ,[ ili= Piiip$: Heart
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All Gave Some, Some Gave All
Hoie I\M the .'h111" \ % Ouilndcd. l tiotli s of
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N iliti,\ ()iidcr of Ithe Pu plc Hc.it
Fc.t inin tic A. ,_h.,nit.in Ihi.iq cmorial
Pol .it lu '.it \\ itl | itii ti muNic: by
P.dil .i d .IL.kic Stc% it Niid ll.lci,-hi Miller
VETER 1I\.S I\D P RLI( IRE ( ORDI ILL\ INVITED
CiI KONaJjE


A. uoung Elvis in-concert brings uOU

%^ woveig~different. performances~


us Rocks Florirda 21

SFebruar 22nd & 23d
i'Old Courthouse Heritage Muse


j Cote Deonath Concert
|Februarg 22'" 7:30pm
y ,| with the Suspicious Minds Musicians
,^c |Reserved seats $35 House tickets -
f, CASH BAR!


lfratlonal Gospel Music

irg 23rd Doors open (a 11:30am
ore Deonath
ast Buffet $25


HERITAGE MUSEUM
. Inverness. Florida

CHRONICLED


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Swww.chronicieonlinecom


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sition of first-rank in the entire nation in point of
cleanliness and freshness.
In 1953...
A State Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion ruling which forbade use of airboats in
the Second and Fifth Districts during the duck
hunting season was knocked out last week by Cir-
cuit Judge T. G. Futch.
Tune Payne has been chosen by the Junior
Woman's Club as their candidate in the con-
test sponsored by the Stephen Foster Memorial
Association to choose Florida's new "Jeanie with
the Light Brown Hair" An accomplished pianist,
June is the daughter of Mr and Mrs. Yale Payne
of Wildwood Road.
Information for Back in Time is supplied by the Citrus
County Historical Society.

Feb3 Mach16














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Special to the Chronicle
George Oscar Barnes of Lecanto, pictured here with his dog and a deer he bagged.


COMMENTARY


B:;?a










BUSINESS OUNTC2,H.N.
BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SUPER BOOM?




Will the snowy New York City area really reap an estimated
$600 million economic boost from the Super Bowl?


Probably not. Despite such lofty predictions, sports economists
say the financial impact of the Super Bowl could fall far below
expectations, in part because visitors often spend their cash at
NFL-sponsored or corporate events rather than at tourist
attractions.


NEW YORK

Some hotels say Super Bowl
bookings are running be-
hind what they hoped for,
prompting them to ease de-
mands for minimum stays
and room deposits. And ac-
ademic studies show that at best,
past Super Bowls generated tens of
millions, not hundreds of millions.
"Move the decimal point one
place to the left," said Robert
Baade, a professor at Lake Forest
College in Illinois, who has studied
the Super Bowl's impact on local
economies. "The NFL says $500 or
$600 million? I think $50 to $60 mil-
lion would be a generous appraisal
of what the Super Bowl generates."
The NY/NJ Super Bowl Host
Committee, which has worked
closely with the NFL to prepare for
the Feb. 2 game, has claimed in the
yearslong run-up that it would gen-
erate $500 to $600 million for the re-
gion, but it refused to provide any
information on how it tabulated that
estimate. An NFL spokesman said


Meghan Banrr
Associated Pre

A pedestrian passes a soi
under construction in Nev
Times Square. A dozen blc
Broadway, in the heart of
will close to traffic for fou
the NFL can host a Super
festival. The championship
game between the Denve
and Seattle Seahawks is
East Rutherford, N.J.


the league does not cond
nomic impact studies on
Bowl.
A study Baade conduct
showed that the average
Bowl from the 1970s thro
late '90s only accounted f
$32 million each in incre
nomic activity at the mos
study, which examined ta
and other economic factor
and after the Super Bowl


cluded that the 1999 Super Bowl in
,ss Miami, for example, only con-
tributed about $37 million to the
Associated Press South Florida economy
undstage The NFL, by comparison, claimed
N York's that 1999 game between the Denver
ocks of Broncos and Atlanta Falcons gener-
Manhattan, ated $396 million, the study said.
r days so County sales tax data in Jack-
Bowl sonville showed hardly any increase
p football in 2005 when it hosted the Super
r Broncos Bowl compared to non-Super Bowl
Sunday in years, according to a study con-
ducted by Philip Porter, an econom-
ics professor at the University of
South Florida.
"No one's ever been able to find a
uct eco- footprint that an event occurred,"
the Super he said.
Porter found that visitors spend
;ed in 2000 money at NFL-funded events and
Super buy NFL-branded memorabilia dur-
ugh the ing Super Bowl week instead of fre-
bfor about quenting local establishments.
ased eco- Die-hard Denver or Seattle fans
t. The won't necessarily attend a Broadway
ax revenue show or visit the Statue of Liberty


Drs before
1, con-


See Page D4


House passes farm bill, crop subsidies preserved


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -After more than
two years of partisan squabbles over
food and farm policy, the House
passed and sent to the Senate Wednes-
day an almost $100 billion-a-year, com-
promise farm bill containing a small
cut in food stamps and preserving
most crop subsidies.
White House spokesman Jay Carney
said shortly after the vote that Presi-
dent Barack Obama would sign the bill
if it reaches his desk.
The measure, which the House ap-
proved 251-166, had solid backing from
the Republican leadership team, even
though it makes smaller cuts to food
stamps than they would have liked.
The bill would cut about $800 million a
year from the $80 billion-a-year pro-
gram, or around 1 percent. The House
had sought a 5 percent cut.
The legislation also would continue


to heavily subsidize major crops for
the nation's farmers while eliminating
some subsidies and shifting them to-
ward more politically defensible insur-
ance programs.
House Agriculture Chairman Frank
Lucas, R-Okla., who has been working
on the bill since 2011, called the com-
promise a "miracle" after years of set-
backs. An early version of the
legislation was defeated on the House
floor last June after conservatives said
the food stamp cuts were too modest
and liberal Democrats said they were
too steep.
The House later passed a bill with a
higher, $4 billion cut, arguing at the
time that the program had spiraled out
of control after costs doubled in the
last five years. But cuts that high were
ultimately not possible after the Sen-
ate balked and the White House


Page D5


THE WEEK AHEAD
*MONDAY
Institute for Supply Management
releases its manufacturing index
for January, 10 a.m. Commerce De-
partment releases construction
spending for December, 10 a.m.
Automakers release vehicle
sales for January
*TUESDAY
Commerce Department releases
factory orders for December, 10 a.m.
Oil giant BP release annual re-
sults and holds news conference.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless claims
and fourth-quarter productivity
data, 8:30 a.m.; Commerce Depart-
ment releases international trade
data for December, 8:30 a.m.; Fred-
die Mac releases weekly mortgage
rates, 10 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Walmart lowers Q4,
full-year expectations
BENTONVILLE, Ark. Walmart
said Friday that key earnings fig-
ures may come in at the low end or
below its prior forecasts for its fourth
quarter and full fiscal year It also
said a widely-watched sales metric
for the fourth quarter, which in-
cludes the holiday season, will be
lower than its previous forecast
The news initially sent Walmart
shares lower Friday, but they were
up by early afternoon.
The world's biggest retailer said
the lower earnings outlook reflect
accounting for some Brazil-related
charges and other items. Chief Fi-
nancial Officer Charles Holley said
in a statement that these items were
not anticipated when Walmart pre-
viously provided its forecasts.
It previously projected fourth-
quarter adjusted earnings from
continuing operations between
$1.60 and $1.70 per share.
Its 2014 guidance was for $5.11
to $5.21 per share.

MasterCard's Q4
profit up 3 percent
PURCHASE, N.Y -MasterCard
Inc.'s fourth-quarter earnings
climbed 3 percent as rising pay-
ment volume countered a jump in
expenses, but the results fell short
of financial analysts' expectations.
That sent shares in the Purchase,
N.Y, payment networks company
down 5 percent in morning trading
Friday
MasterCard said net income grew
to $623 million, or 52 cents per
share, in the three months that
ended Dec. 31. That compares with
$605 million, or 49 cents per share,
a year earlier
Earnings in the most recent quar-
ter totaled 57 cents per share, not
counting a litigation-related charge.
Revenue climbed 12 percent to
$2.13 billion.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


My money,


your money,


our money
EAR BRUCE: Before I get
married, I am wondering
whether we should have
joint or separate checking ac-
counts. We have been together for
three years and I don't have any
reason not to trust her, but you
hear stories of how things can end
up.
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: You ask a valid
question. The fact that you have
been together and you don't have
any reason not to trust her is a con-
sideration. If you are both em-
ployed, consider figuring out how
much money you should each drop
into a joint account to be used to
pay the bills; the balance would go
into your separate checking ac-
counts, savings accounts, invest-
ments, etc.
There is no serious disadvan-
tage. You will still file a joint tax
return, but this way you will both
have an interest in how you spend
your money It may well be that she
will spend money on things that
you don't agree with, and she may
have the same problem with you.
But you both can contribute to the
joint expenses, and the remainder
of the money can be spent at your
sole discretion.
DEAR BRUCE: This is not my
problem, but it's one that really
irks me. I have a granddaughter
who is married, working and still
going to school to earn a degree.
She is always complaining about
how the two of them are going to
pay her student loans.
What really bothers me is their
style of living. They have two new
See Page D5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Amber Proctor

promoted to

manager by

Village Services
Villages Services would like to an-
nounce that it has promoted Amber
Proctor to community association
manager Amber joined Villages
Services in January 2013 as a recep-
tionist. In August
2013 she completed
and passed the state
of Florida's required
Community Associa-
tion Certification
Program.
She is a graduate
of Crystal River
Amber High School and the
Proctor International Acad-
emy of Design in Tampa. She has ex-
tensive experience in retail sales
office management and marketing.
She is active in the Reflections
Church in Citrus Springs.
Her recreational interests in-
cludes fishing, skating and riding
bikes on the Nature Coast Trail with
her son. Amber looks forward to a
rewarding career with Villages
Services as well as working and
building relationships with local
communities.




Local

pharmacist


gets national

recognition

Hernando pharmacist Richard P
Hoffmann has received honorable
mention in the 2014 Pharmacy Today
One-To-One Patient
Counseling Recogni-
tion Program. The
award recognizes an
S outstanding pharma-
cist who has per-
formed exceptional
one-to-one patient
counseling, resulting
Richard in better health, su-
Hoffmann perior communica-
tions, and improved outcomes for
patients. He will be honored at the
annual meeting of the American
Pharmacists Association on March
29, in Orlando, Fla. Dr Hoffmann re-
ceived this award for his weekly 'Ask
The Pharmacist" column, published
in the Citrus County Chronicle dur-
ing the past 17 years.


SCORE seeking volunteer


business education chair


CORE is searching for someone
with practical business experi-
ence interested in organizing and
directing seminar/conference pro-
grams. In past years SCORE annually
staged two separate events: The "R U
Ready" seminar, a two-hour overview
on business startup considerations,
and the 11-week Small Business Insti-
tute (SBI). Each of these educational
events was designed and lead by certi-
fied business mentors and/or practic-
ing professionals in Citrus County

What will this
chairperson do?
The SCORE Education Committee
Chair will have the following responsi-
bilities:
Form and chair the Education
Committee
Select seminar topics and set the
format
Implement and present programs
at the College of Central Florida
The chair will have full access to
SCORE national programs via the in-
ternet on contemporary business disci-
plines.
The chair will access mentor members
and practicing professionals in Citrus
County to facilitate the presentations.

The changing economic scene
The national and local economy dur-
ing this previous period was character-
ized by a severe slowdown. Many


Fi
I



EX
ri


attendees of the programs
formation and support rele
ing a business. Others cam
how to prepare and offset t
effects of the downward preE
businesses. The potential 1
in many cases, was a strong
that increased audience p;
From an economic persp
things have changed; howe
Practical business educati
focus equally on growth op
and small-business startup
is crucial programs be led
enced businesspeople. Thi
SCORE does best. We bring
ence that matters for the li
business in Citrus County
SCORE certified mentor
lifetime of experience to cl
request counseling service
proach is coupled with allc
to discover they have the s.
turity to go forward with th


plans. The mentors monitor the startup
phase to reinforce the client's capacity
Dr. for good decision-making. Included in
rederick the counseling sessions is the personal
rede CK experience of the mentors on various
H-Ierzog, business disciplines.
SCORE mentors come from many
Ph.D. business backgrounds: banking, mar-
keting, accounting/tax, human resources,
management, advertising, real estate,
manufacturing, engineering, project
[PERIENCE management, information technology,
lATTERS restaurant and food management and
a myriad of service businesses.
In many cases, co-counseling by mul-
came for in- tiple counselors is offered to refine and
native to start- better help clients. Client decision-
e to explore making is encouraged. SCORE's ethical
the negative standards are well-defined and strongly
assure on their adhered to. All conversations, interac-
loss of jobs, tions with SCORE mentors and business
g motivator plans are held in the strictest confidence.
participation. Prospective business owners are thereby
)ective protected on their journey to success.


ever, slowly
on now must
opportunities
) planning. It
by experi-
is is what
g the experi-
fe of your
rs bring a
clients who
*s. This ap-
owing clients
kills and ma-
teir business


How to respond
Interested individuals should call
the SCORE office at 352-249-1236 be-
tween the hours of 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday If you call
during non-office hours, please leave a
phone number or email address so we
can contact you and set up a meeting.
Dr Frederick J. Herzog, PhD is the
Immediate Past Chairman of Citrus
County SCORE. He can be reached via
email: Therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Make positivity a priority in the workplace


o you and your asso-
ciates dress appropri-
ately for your work
environment? A written dress
code should be in place for
employees to follow It should
include grooming, jewelry,
tattoos and body piercing.
Then the trick is making sure
everyone abides by the code.
Are phones being answered
with a friendly greeting? For
example, "Thank you for call-
ingABC Inc., Rhonda speak-
ing, how may I help?" This is
a must, not a sometimes-it-is-
done-and-sometimes-it-is-
not. Employees who do not
answer the phone with a
pleasant greeting should be
counseled. And at least a
first name should be used, so
the caller knows who they are
speaking with; plus, it makes
the caller feel welcomed.


Rhonda Lestinsky
GUEST COLUMN


Are customers/clients
greeted the minute they
walk in the door, or do they
stand looking around for
someone to assist them?
Have you ever entered a
business and had to look
around for someone to help
you? I have, and honestly I
feel like turning around and
walking out the door Tip:
Put a ringer on your door, if
necessary, to alert employ-
ees when someone has en-
tered the building. Within
seconds of entering, a cus-
tomer/client should be
greeted, even if just to say
"Someone will be with you
shortly"


Do employees talk up or
criticize the business? Fire
the ones who criticize! Seri-
ously, employees who do not
proactively support the mis-
sion of the business do dam-
age they should either
have an attitude adjustment
or find employment else-
where. I was recently talking
to an employee of a local
business and he was slam-
ming the company he works
for computers stink, man-
agement stinks, etc. I finally
said, "So why do you work
there?" He said, "For the
paycheck." Do you really
want someone working for
you just for the paycheck?


Is there respect among
employees and does everyone
work as a team? Send out a
survey once or twice a year
asking employees for feed-
back on how to improve the
work environment and build
the business. You will get some
pretty constructive suggestions
and some really stupid stuff.
But look at the stupid stuff
really carefully to make sure
it truly is stupid. Once all
employees respond, prepare
a response for to the entire
staff listing all the suggestions
and highlighting the ones man-
agement plans to implement
Rhonda Lestinskyis chair-
person of the Citrus County
Business Women's Alliance.
She can be contacted at
rlestinsky@na turecoast
bank com.


For more information
on advertising call
Anne Farrior at
352-564-2931 or
Darrell Watson at
1 352-564-2917 1


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LINCOE AX DIRE-i.G^i


D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


BUSINESS










D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber.com/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
Feb. 4 Ribbon-cutting for Joyful
Housekeeping, at 8:30 a.m., Crystal
River Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S.
19, Crystal River.
Feb. 5 Ribbon-cutting for Duds-n-
Suds Laundromat, at 4:30 p.m., 423
S.E. King's Bay Drive, Crystal River.


& VAS TUL&RCULNTTE

aumlu rMle I
Hossedby CIwhse M amoi Heath" Ssm
M1 Celebratin of the
Heart & ViSC lr C01te|
10 Ye r Anniesawy
Thursday. February 6. 2014
5100 p.m.-700 p.m.
CMHSShav ClfubAudltori um-402Grace St.. Inverness
Business Casual Hors d'oeuvres Beer & Wine
The Hnat & Vascular Centers
YEA RS He.rt Halth Fair Calaboalon
Saturday. FMmijarv 22.2014
10,00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Fun Food Screenings -Tours
Hstodc Scthoo Budq HoHsp"ial Canmpus

Feb. 6 Business After Hours
hosted by Citrus Memorial, 5 p.m. to
7 p.m., Share Club Auditorium, 402
Grace Street, Inverness.
Cmm&hw Lumchmmo*
Filoidda PubUic Re lastions Association (FPRA)
Nataueu CoI ChAplez
Ouet fp.aker
ceaft s.reoE, vi Pmftee nl
of Cxpnkirft Caolunkadnass
rieshcuoMAw.ri- LLC nt C


Feb. 7 -F Chamber LuncwltMnheon


sponsored by the Florida Public
Relations Association, 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club, 505 E. Hartford
Street, Hernando.
Feb. 10 Ribbon-cutting for




Workforce Connection (Career
NWHItWMOMS"








Source) at 4:30 p.m., 683
SS. Adolph PointdL, Lecanto.





Feb. 13 -P Ribbon-cutting for
Precious Paws Rescue Inc. at
4:30 p~m,Crystal River Mall,
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
Feb. 20 Business After Hours
sponsored by the Florida Public
Relations Association, 11:30 a.m.




hosted by Unp.m. at City Church of Citrusnd
County, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 2628W.Hartford
StrWoodview LHernandoe, Lecanto.





March 1 and 2 -- Floral City Straw-
berry Festival
FebMarch 13 0 Ribbon-cutt Business After Hours
Workforce Connection (Career











hosted by the Mullet Hole Tavern, 5
Source) at 4:30 p.m., 6837 p.m.
S. March Po19 and 20 -t, Leangislativeo.
Feb. 13 Ribbon-cutting for





PreDays: Citrus Paws County is headed to Tal-





lahassee to talk with state leaders
4:30about key commerce issues.r Mall,







Community
evenU.S. 19, Crystal River.
Feb. 1520 Music and Movie in theours
hosted by Unity Church of Citrus







CounPark, at 4 p.m., will feature Phantas-7 p.m., 2628 W.
tic Sounds aned movie is TBD, King'so.
Bay Parknd 268 NW 3rdal C Street, Crys-
talberry Festivaler.
March 13 Business After Hours
hosted by the Mullet Hole Tavern, 5
to 7 p.m.
March 19 and 20 Legislative
Days: Citrus County is headed to Tal-
lahassee to talk with state leaders
about key commerce issues.


Community
events
Feb. 15 Music and Movie in the
Park, at 4 p.m., will feature Phantas-
tic Sounds and movie is TBD, King's
Bay Park, 268 NW 3rd Street, Crys-
tal River.


Feb. 15 Faith Haven Christian Re-
treat Center to celebrate the legacy
of Eloise "Grandmother" Van Ness
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. This event
will introduce the public to Grand-
mother VanNess' horse, Lady, who
was donated last year to Soquili Sta-
bles. In keeping with their tradition
of giving the horses of Soquili Sta-
bles a Cherokee name, Lady is now
known as Elisi. More information So-
quili Stables 352-206-2990 or Faith
Haven 352-795-7387.


Strawberry Festival


has deep roots with


Floral City businesses


Aunt Martha's Produce
7751 S. Florida Ave., Floral City FL 34436 o 352-344-5574
M artha Burns and Shannon Burns love Floral City. This mother-and-daughter
team has long worked to promote the city and preserve its charming character.
Shannon Burns, president of the Floral City Merchants Association, is proud
to share that her mother Martha was instrumental in starting the Floral City
Strawberry Festival 27 years ago. Martha Burns operates Aunt Martha's
Produce at 7751 South U.S. 41, just a short ride from the site of the Floral City Strawberry
Festival, Floral Park. This event brings thousands of visitors to Floral City and encourages
them to stop by local shops like Aunt Martha's Produce.


Ferris Groves
7607 S. Florida Ave., Floral City FL 34436 352-860-0366 ferrisgroves.com
F erris Groves was established in the 193os as a citrus grove
in Floral City and has evolved into an innovative and award-
winning grower of citrus, blueberries and strawberries.
Ferris Groves is led by General Manager Dudley Calfee, who
has been a driving force in promoting Ferris Groves, its K
produce and its hometown Floral City. Dudley has been active in L i
the planning of the Floral City Strawberry Festival with Martha and
Shannon Burns, particularly the kickoffbash Berries, Brew & BBQ.

Berries, Brew & BBQ
Berries, Brew & BBQ will kick off the Floral City Strawberry Festival on Feb. 28
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Floral City Library Complex. There will be live
entertainment from PD Smith, Magic Bus and the Florida Cracker Boys.
The public is invited to come down and enjoy all the fresh strawberries and
delicious barbecue.


Lynn's Ice Cream & Belgian
2028 State Road 44 West, Inverness FL 34452 o 352-201-5615




I-. G1
^^ '*T 'il


Waffles
lynnsicecream.com


From left: Janet Mayo, associate member; Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Jennifer Duca,
Comfort Keepers; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Josh Wooten, Chamber
CEO/president; Rudi and Lynn Weber, owners; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Nancy
Hautop, Top Time Travel; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Mary Pericht, Cadence Bank;
Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal.


Join the

Chamber

in the

Capitol
The 2014 Florida
Legislative session
is only 60 days and will
convene March 4,
running through May 2.
Given this limited frame
for citizens to communi-
cate with legislators about
proposed bills and budget
requests, the Chamber
and the Economic Devel-
opment Council (EDC)
extend this Legislative
Days opportunity each
year to our local business
leaders and concerned
citizens. This year's visit
will include a full agenda
with speakers on topics
such as transportation
and commerce.
You are invited to join
the Chamber and Economic
Development Council (EDC)
in traveling to Tallahassee
on March 19 and 20 for
Legislative Days 2014!
There are three levels of
participation available, but
remember: Space is limited.

Summary
of options
Option 1
Legislative Day,
Pre-evening Reception
and Optional Dinner
Wednesday and Thursday,
March 19 and 20
This includes round-
trip bus transportation
to Tallahassee, including
an evening reception on
Wednesday, and Legisla-
tive Day sessions on
Thursday with lunch at
the Governor's Club.
Option 2
Legislative Day and
Transportation
Thursday, March 20
This includes round-trip
bus transportation to
Tallahassee, Legislative
Day sessions and lunch
at the Governor's Club.
Option 3
Legislative Day
Thursday, March 20
You provide your own
transportation. This in-
cludes Legislative Day
sessions and lunch at the
Governor's Club.
Space is limited, so visit
citruscountychamber
.com/events and select
Legislative Days 2014 to
review pricing options.
The Chamber has secured
two hotels at a special rate;
the deadline to make your
reservation is Feb. 19.
There is still an opportu-
nity to sponsor this event,
and you can secure this by
contacting Ardath Pren-
dergast at 352-726-2801.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.





D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


BOOM
Continued from Page Dl

during their stay, as
tourist attractions often
report lower attendance
than usual during major
sporting events. They're
more likely to visit Super
Bowl Boulevard in Times
Square, which is filled
with NFL-sponsored ac-
tivities that funnel money
directly back to the league.
Economic impact stud-
ies commissioned by past
Super Bowl host commit-
tees based largely on
spending surveys distrib-
uted among fans at the
game claimed that the
2008 Super Bowl in Glen-
dale, Ariz., generated a
record $500 million and
the 2006 game in Detroit
brought in about $274
million. But those stud-
ies, which aren't made
publicly available, are
widely disputed by econ-
omists.
"Here's how the NFL
gets the huge numbers
that they get. They ask
the people, 'How much
are you spending while
you're here?"' Porter
said. "They ought to be
asking: 'How much did
we sell you while you
were here?"'
The Super Bowl is a
weeklong business bo-
nanza for people who
work in marketing, adver-
tising, product develop-
ment and sales, said
Robert Boland, a profes-
sor of sports management
at New York University
"The Super Bowl has a
life of its own as a trade
show apart from a foot-
ball game," Boland said.
"It's about 10 days of cele-
bration, trade show and
tourist event, and then
it's a game. And not nec-
essarily the same people
attend both."
Experts note that the
pre-game madness may
also deter tourists or
business travelers who
might ordinarily plan a
visit to the host city.
In New York some hotels
realized by mid-autumn
that the expected surge
in bookings had not mate-
rialized, so they began to
scale back in some cases
reducing required mini-
mum stays from four nights
to two and ending demands
for non-refundable room
deposits. Rates for the week
leading up to the game,
which had been at a pre-
mium, were dropped


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


back to normal pricing.
Kate Martin, general
manager of the Hotel
Chandler in midtown
Manhattan, said the hotel
was only 50 percent
booked during Super Bowl
weekend, with fewer
than usual bookings lined
up for the week preced-
ing the game.
Part of the problem lies
in the tri-state area's
large hotel room inven-
tory, which at 150,000
rooms is at least triple
the inventory seen in the
past 10 Super Bowl host
cities, said Adam Jones, a
director at consulting
firm PricewaterhouseC-
oopers. That leaves more
lodging options for visi-
tors and makes it harder
for hotels to jack up rates.
Still, some hoteliers
are more sanguine about
the prospect of a football-
fueled revenue jump.
Langham Place Hotel, a
luxury hotel on Fifth Av-
enue, is approaching the
Super Bowl like another
holiday with prices on par
with New Year's Eve at
about 20 percent higher
than normal. As of two
weeks before the big game,
the hotel was not yet sold
out, with 70 percent occu-
pancy for the days lead-
ing up to the game.
"For us, it's a bit like
another holiday," general
manager Francois-Olivier
Luiggi said. "Suddenly
you throw another
Thanksgiving in the mid-
dle of a cold winter"
Economists say that's
the one bright spot for
New York City: The
months of January and
February are usually the
most sluggish tourism
months of the year, so it's
possible the game might
provide a boost
Another potential ben-
efit exposure could
also be muted. While
prior host cities in less
populated cities, such
Indianapolis and Jack-
sonville, have been en-
ticed by the chance to
showcase themselves on
a worldwide stage,
there's no evidence that
the game has any lasting
brand impact for any
city, said Smith College
sports economist An-
drew Zimbalist.
And in any case, more
exposure isn't exactly
something New York City
needs.
"You can't say that a
Super Bowl is going to
put New York on the
map," he said.


Women of Sugarmill Woods, Inc Presents -"
18th Annual "School-astic"

Classic Golf Tournament


ies f E cgistration 7:30am
Shotgun 9:00am
Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Cypress Blvd.W.& Douglas St.
S(2nd Douglas St.) Homosassa
S Co EntryFee $60
Registration Deadline: Monday, February 17, 2014
Contact Donna Rayne (352) 382-2999
or Stephanie St. Clair (352) 503-3023
Cuq -d-~--


NFGKT

Fundraiser Sponsored by Hoops-Link-Inc
Saturday, February 22, 2014
6:30PM 10:30PM
Chet Cole Enrichment Center
Key Training Center Campus, Lecanto
$50 pp. Admission fee includes food, drinks, bar, prizes and more! Texas
Hold'em, Black Jack (standup), Roulette, Craps, Skill Stop (slot style) ma,,,,-:
4ii for the great cause of supporting Hoops-Link travel basketball team,
For tickets go online to www.Hoops-Link-inc.org
or contact Kurt 422-4884 or kurt@hoopslink-inc.org
Cw-N~O


BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CaIa couTY
Charitable Partner


Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing


Inverness Golf & Country Club
February 22, 2014
Registration 7 a.m. Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.
$60 per player or
$220 for a team of four.
Includes: Greens fees, cart, lunch, door prizes and one
Mulligan ticket. Additional Mulligan tickets will be available.
For online registration, forms and information
visit www.CitrusBuilders.com or call 746-9028.
-A SPONSORS
iii<()NiT m Sll
B^ ^H=^ C "=-


Brands vie to stand out



amid Super Bowl chatter


Associated Press

NEW YORK If it's on TV, it's
on Twitter, at least when it comes
to blockbuster events such as the
Super Bowl.
Advertisers, in particular, are
ready to capitalize.
"What advertisers have realized
is that Super Bowl advertising
doesn't just take place on TV, with
your 30-second or 60-second spot
that you paid millions of dollars for,"
said Debra Aho Williamson, an
analyst for research firm eMarketer
Last year's Super Bowl was in-
terrupted by a 34-minute power
outage luckily for one advertiser
Oreo seized on the opportunity and
tweeted "you can still dunk in the
dark" It was retweeted and mentioned
on Facebook thousands of times.
Every brand wants to be this
year's Oreo. Brands are setting up
social media "war rooms" so they
can respond to memorable events
as they happen be it another
blackout, a snow storm or a
wardrobe malfunction with
clever, retweetable quips.
Volkswagen has set up a studio in
Los Angeles to create quick, catchy
video responses, said Jennifer
Clayton, media manager at the au-
tomaker There will be about a dozen
people in the room, from creative
and production folks to community
managers in charge of monitoring
chatter on social media Once a video
is shot, it'll be sent to Volkswagen's
lawyers for approval and, within
20 minutes, posted on Twitter
The game is a big day for Twitter,
too. The company will have its own
employees in the "war rooms" of
some advertisers, helping them
identify what people are tweeting
about and helping them develop
quick, clever reactions.


Associated Press
New York Giants fan Brian Poarch, of Greenville, S.C., watches the
2012 Super Bowl between the Giants and the New England Patriots on
Feb. 5 in midtown Manhattan. The number of those tweeting during the
Super Bowl grows each year, and the blackout in 2013's game had a lot
of fans and advertisers chirping on social media.


But for every Oreo, there are
dozens, perhaps hundreds of tweets
that fall flat, even if they were
conjured in a room full of social
media experts and marketers.
During last Sunday's Grammys, "a
lot of brands tried to do it, but only
one stood out," Williamson said.
That one was Arby's. Singer
Pharrell Williams showed up at the
awards show wearing an oversized,
puffy brown fedora. It quickly got
its own parody Twitter account, not
to mention all the Twitter men-
tions. The fast-food chain known
for its big cowboy hat logo quickly
tweeted "Hey @Pharrell, can we
have our hat back? #GRAMMYs."
It went over well. Arby's tweet
got more than 83,000 retweets and
a response from Williams himself:
"Y'all tryna start a roast beef?"


ITAA 1 M0oPe
lW RELAY

"^ imir FOR LIFE
4th Annual Relay "FORE" Life

American Cancer Society

GOLF TOURNAMENT
Saturday, February 8, 2014
Juliette Falls Golf Course PRICE: $75/person
Range Balls AND Lunch Included!
9:00am Tee Time, 4-Person Scramble
For more information, contact
Michelle Snellings 352-697-2220 or Nick Maltese 464-7511
Raffles & Door Prizes & 50/50
SPONSORS:
Eagle Buick, Citrus County Chronicle, Sodium Fishing Gear, Fox 96.7, Citrus 95.3

TAKE STOCK in CHILDREN of CITRUS COUNTY

"DOLLARS for ^
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GOLF TOURNAMENT d
18 HOLE -4 PERSON SCRAMBLE
J Includes golf, cart, breakfast, lunch, snacks & beverages
SFeb. 17,2014-10 a.m. Shotgun Start
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1600 Foursome 150 Individual
r' m dTeam Prizes For 1st, 2nd & 3rd Place
i* Auction Raffle Long Drive Contest Closest to the Pin
FOR ENTRY FORMS call Liz Blick at 352-249-9276
o or EMAIL at eblickbdt@gmail.com
AL


Ci Ii~pNiu.E


Admitting that the right moment
may never come up, some brands
are taking a different approach.
M&M's marketers plan to use
Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and
the video-sharing app Vine to dis-
tribute short animated videos made
from peanut M&M's.
Even without a blackout, Sun-
day's game is likely to be the most
tweeted, Facebooked and Insta-
grammed-about Super Bowl.
There were 2.8 million tweets
about the 2011 Super Bowl. That
grew to nearly 14 million in 2012
and more than 24 million in 2013.
Still, Williamson said it's still
unproven how effective all this
real-time marketing is. People might
be tweeting about Oreo and Arby's,
but are they eating their cookies
and roast beef sandwiches?


1I SENIORS ON THE MOVE
_ Are holding a IES (

TRASHH TO TIEASURESSL


I SALE
^ Friday, February 7,2014.
^5 From 10:00am till 1:00pm
in the cafeteria at
Central Citrus Resource Center
S 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto 1
Light refreshments will also be available :0,
For more information, please call Sue (352) 527-5959. 3
Proceeds benefitting the
WSENIOTR Senior CHFi o Ni-dE
6 .. FOUNDATr. Ctrus Count, nc' -




VzM&s;HFWr U(PCQi6nJ CmRr

8th Annual
CHILI COOK-OFF
& CRAFT SHOW
Saturday, February 15, 2014
`-- 9:00am 4:00pm '/
-N F For information 352-464-4070 *"


Ozello Civic Association 14095 West Ozello Trail
S(Approx. 6.5 miles down Ozello Trail) Crystal River, FL

XoDSsO CIIK(NII.IE NODOGS pAFe
11 ~ J>' P LE^ASE "*IIVG
www.ozello.net --PLEASE ___

i-- Faith Hai en (hitiliin Rlti'rta ( vnlkr v A_
/ !(,,, ,, ... i .... ,! i

"Grandmother" Van Ness
BBQ And Equine Demos
Saturday. February 15. 2014
1Oan in p41)
s(,q iili M jl)li r%
ja Failll H lj(-ii ChriqiM m Rellrfal (C-i'll"
EIili i'e a[111 911 %% \\. BfIIII)(, Pja h. C 'i\ ll Rif |'
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it-
CHkpNILLE


# ONLINE


AUCTION
Amazing Items Bid Now!
www.rotaryinverness.com
Watch final bidding live
q Sat., Feb. 8, 2014 Noon 5 p.m.
WYKE Channel 47 or 16
4!qfA! Gift Cards Kayak Dining Electronics
Golf Jewelry Day Spa Auto Service
sponsored in part by:
Rotary Club of ...... T7AU
Inverness HURPNIUL rTJ jLd
Charitable Foundaton, Inc. '- A
ww .roariven ss~o 0HC


BI.e.ssln'


Saturday, February 8, 2014


7:00am Registration & Packet Pick-Up
8:00am 10k Race Start
8:05 am 1 Mile Walk 8:15am 5k Race Start


Start & Finish: Nature Coast Bank Citrus Hills
2455 North Citrus Hills Blvd., Hernando 34442
Register Online at: www.drcsports.com
Charity and Contact Info:
Citrus County Blessings (352) 341-7707
Email: info@citruscountyblessings.com
....CJNI E C, H31055... presented by: TLC Rehab & Suncoast Schools FCU


(, .For more information
S 206-2990 or 795-7387


Event Sponso. Per Person ..H and Rall i
CRYSTAL Tickets may be purchased at
AUTOMOTIVE ,,, Crystal Chevrolet Homosassa,
A U T ..gM, T iu'-i'0" Hagar Insurance Inverness,
-";'' -"l" '--. -.. "(('C- Brashear's Pharmacy Lecanto,
of Ki ' -w- t E Fancy's Pets Crystal River,
Law Office r 5 Gulf to Lake Sales Lecanto,
of Keith Taylor Capital City Bank Crystal River
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: www.rotarybeastfeast.com


L A re-regis ere n r es
11 PreReceive a Free T-shirt


BUSINESS


1 1.1 1 L nini. 1 it I In ,i. I. .,, ,,,, I "I m ,
J -11 J I -y PL I .l 1,II. 11l I,.,.I- 1 q ,


IF.-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FARM
Continued from Page Dl

threatened a veto. The
Senate had sought a cut
of $400 million annually
The savings in the
cost of the food stamp
program would be gen-
erated by cracking
down on some states
that seek to boost indi-
vidual food stamp bene-
fits by giving people
small amounts of fed-
eral heating assistance
that they don't need.
That heating assistance,
sometimes as low as $1
per person, triggers
higher benefits, and
some critics see that
practice as circumvent-
ing the law. The bill
that was passed
Wednesday would re-
quire states to give indi-
vidual recipients at
least $20 in heating as-
sistance before a higher
food stamp benefit
could be authorized.
Some Democrats said
the food stamp cut still
is too high.
Rep. Jim McGovern of
Massachusetts, one of
the states that has
boosted benefits
through heating assis-
tance, said the cut will
be harmful on top of au-
tomatic food stamp cuts
that already went into
place in November.
"I don't know where
they are going to make
that up," McGovern said.
And some conservatives
continued to argue that
the food stamp cuts are
too low and the overall
bill spent too much
money In the end, 63
Republicans voted
against the legislation.
"This is exactly the
kind of logrolling that
we fought to prevent
this summer," Indiana
Rep. Marlin Stutzman
said of the House's re-
jection of the bill in
June. "It spends money
we simply don't have."
To pass the bill,
Lucas and his Senate
counterpart, Demo-
cratic Sen. Debbie
Stabenow of Michigan,
found ways to entice
many potential naysay-


ers. They spent more
than two years crafting
the bill to appeal to
members from all re-
gions of the country, in-
cluding a boost in
money for crop insur-
ance popular in the
Midwest; higher rice
and peanut subsidies
for Southern farmers;
and renewal of federal
land payments for West-
ern states. The food
stamp cut was low
enough that 89 Democ-
rats voted for the bill.
They also backed
away from repealing a
catfish program a
move that would have
angered Mississippi
lawmakers and
dropped language that
would have thwarted a
California law requir-
ing all eggs sold in the
state to come from hens
living in larger cages.
Striking out that provi-
sion was a priority for
California lawmakers
who did not want to see
the state law changed.
For those seeking re-
form of farm programs,
the legislation would
eliminate a $4.5 billion-
a-year farm subsidy
called direct payments,
which are paid to farm-
ers whether they farm
or not. But the bill
nonetheless would con-
tinue to heavily subsi-
dize major crops -
corn, soybeans, wheat,
rice and cotton while
shifting many of those
subsidies toward more
politically defensible
insurance programs.
That means farmers
would have to incur
losses before they could
get a payout.
The bill would save
around $1.65 billion an-
nually overall, accord-
ing to the Congressional
Budget Office. The
amount was less than
the $2.3 billion annual
savings the agriculture
committees originally
projected for the bill.
An aide to Lucas said
the difference was due
to how the CBO calcu-
lated budget savings
from recent automatic
across-the-board spend-
ing cuts, known as
sequestration.


SMART
Continued from Page Dl

vehicles, a new motorcycle, a
pool and constantly go out to eat.
I know they both work hard, but
they don't see their obligations as
a priority or even put anything
aside to repay the loans. They
are waiting for the time when it
will be dismissed.
It has been hard for me to not
say anything, but I don't want to
cause any family discord. N.C.,
via email
DEAR N.C.: You said it all in
the last line about not saying any-
thing because it will only cause
family discord. I agree.
These people are being very
irresponsible. However, it's not
your obligation. If they come to
you in the future, wanting help
because of the burden of their
obligations, then it becomes an
issue where you can legiti-
mately say, "Well, you guys
squandered a great deal of
money, but now it's up to you to
pay the piper"
DEAR BRUCE: I'm an avid
reader of your syndicated col-
umn that appears in my local
paper I'm currently the execu-
tor/administrator of my dad's es-
tate, and I have a few questions


S1 m mO


Music for a
Valentine Eve
Featuring
Southern
Exposure
With Vocals
by Kim Evans
Thursday, Feb. 13
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


I'd like to pose to see if you can
point me in the right direction.
Once I probate the will and pay
out what is listed in it, both
money and possessions, can I
begin to disperse any funds to
myself, being the direct descen-
dent/inheritor of all that's left,
before the estate closes? If I can
disperse funds before the estate
is closed, do I claim them in the
year I disperse them or the year
the estate closes?
Also, do I file taxes for the es-
tate this year, even though it may
close next year? Can I defer es-
tate taxes until the year it closes?
-C.J., via email
DEAR C.J.: You mentioned you
are the direct descendent and in-
heritor; that's two different
items. If you were named as the
sole beneficiary of the will, you
may or may not be able to dis-
burse something to yourself
Whether that's a smart thing to
do is another question. You will
be required to satisfy all of your
father's bills and any other obli-
gations before you can make dis-
bursements. That should not be a
major problem.
If you can disburse the funds
before the estate is closed, you
claim in that year The only real
thing to claim that I can see is in-
come from the monies that are
left in the estate, which will have


Doors open at 6:00p.m.
Music starts., qih at 7p.m.

I I I'f
Ci ii Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CTRus CouwYfHisrTOicAL SOCIETY


to be taxed.
As to filing taxes, there will be
no estate taxes, unless the estate
is extremely large only the
taxes on the monies the estate
is holding until they have been
disbursed.
DEAR BRUCE: I have been
married for two years. We both
have fair incomes. She makes
$35,000 a year as a nurse, and I
make $33,000 as a mechanic. We
are both 35 years old. My ques-
tion is, how much of our pay-
checks should go into my 401(k)?
- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: There is no
magic percentage, but a mini-
mum of 10 percent would make a
great deal of sense. It will leave
you with about $60,000 before
taxes.
The next question is, how is
the 401(k) doing? If it's doing OK,
in other words getting a good re-
turn, you'll want to contribute the
maximum. Failing that, it may be
to your advantage, because you
are in a low tax bracket, to con-
sider an investment in a medium-
risk stock.
Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


community history literacy

OUT LOUD!


7th Annual

(African

Smerican

Read-In


Sunday, Feb. 9, 2014
2:30-4:30 PM
Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature.
Enjoy musical entertainment & refreshments
during this celebration of history & literacy at
CF Citrus Campus. Join us out loud!
Learn More: http://facebook.com/citrusaari

Ciii(WKNIJN


SC I T R U Sw C O UNT

HRNJICLE
V www.chronicleonline.com


U U W U W-W


r g \ ^


I a Ap--


ServiceMA STER Our Services: Carpet Protector
Ser eMASTR Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24'7 365 RestoV Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

3 ROOMS & $1 95 UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
:1~~CHI HALA mOR
1 HALLWAY RECLINER CLEANED
i i F E (with purchase of a
. . Expires 3/2/14 oI Expires3/2/14 couch & oveseat)

352-794-0270
CR-C057844 www.smctlorida.com ?



0 0 "



INC.-
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
Q A~i hli" Visit MON-FR 830-5
S 341O o -0813 mSAT94
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
INSURED www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMEN



When mopping isn't enough call...

2 Mr. Tile Cleaner
/,, [ Showers Floors Lanais
1-. ~ Pools & Pavers
Jl^ t "Clean, Seal & Repair
.( ., p ~*Shower Maintenance & Grout Repair
I, Grout Colorant
586-1816 746-9868


WIsO CLA IN

Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!


35.03.8


352.503.8465


CJ7
WINDOWt
GENIE.,.
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED
www.windowgenie.com


I


|B l *ipi^^ ^^^^II


call


I-i*.Loo d Insre
i
f^ J i *U1 T


DON WALL YOUR BUSINESS


OFF FROM YOUR CUSTOMERS

For more information on how to keep your cI ,T- I _T o u IsTc
business in front of your customers, 1 IIt
call 352-563-5592. l -nr niNEoli


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 D5













To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax (52.53-66 1Tol Fee .(88 82-34 1Emal:clssfidschonclon ie om0 w-0 0 *chonclonlin 0


YOU'LL THIS! YU ou vTHIS!I


Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.

v


Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.








L V NIPf Nr VNf




Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$


*



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



YOU'LL t THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.




v
Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.


' 11 11 "1 f '









Youlr\\nrld first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!




U 1,.,
GflHB^k


Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.




Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifleds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.

Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.
E I













VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397





* .f ^ 4 -*



TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696


V THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/ screened
patio on over / acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512







ACCOUNT-

ING
ANALYST

The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
is now accepting
applications. For
more information
and to apply visit
our website
www.sheriffcitrus.
org/career.aspx
Equal Opportunity
Employer MFDV


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245

CHEVY
'09, Malibu,
4DR, LS, 35K miles,
$12,900.
726-2494, 201-7014


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


CRYSLER
'12, 200S,4 Dr 13k mi.
$18,000 Trade for
Class C Motor Home
No Junk or pull behind
726-2494, 201-7014

RENT TO OWN
lnv 3 bd/No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178





BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$


FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Collection of Lecanto
High Prom Glasses.
1988 to 2006
(352) 560-6108
Free Flea Market Items
books, dishes, silver-
ware & household
items. 10 items a time
(315) 466-2268
Free oak firewood,
352-344-2321
Tennessee Walker
Hound, Male,
Neutered, 1 yr old
(352) 586-7581




FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
*GIFT SHIPPING
8:30a-5p Closed Sun
352-726-6378




Large Female
tortoise shell cat
in vicinity of 488
Dunnellon Rd 1/24
(352) 563-2987
Lost Black Cat
Name "Mamba"
Last seen Paradise Pt.
Road. by Ale House
REWARD
(727) 481-3010


YORKIE Male, 5 Ibs,
Blue & Gold w/ long
legs. Lost on Duval
Island 11/23.
$300 Reward
for safe return,
pictures avail, on
facebook
@helpfindjack-jack
(352) 398-6774



CHIHUAHUA MIX
bown, white & black
found 1/27 at Royal
Oaks Dog Park
please call
(352) 341-0611
RECEIVE BOOK
Left in a shopping cart
at the Crystal River
Publixs'. Call to identify
(352) 563-0756


Bring Bowe Home!
Afahanistan POW
for over 4 years
Army Sgt Bowe
Bergdahl has been
a POW in Afghani-
stan for over 4-1/2
years. Bowe is an
Idaho resident but
Citrus County con-
siders him one of
ours and is doing it's
best to show our
support and bring
the awareness to
everyone that we
need to Bring Bowe
Home. If you are an
individual or a busi-
ness that would like
to be involved with
this project by dis-
playing the Bowe
decal/ getting
petitions signed/
fundraising for a
billboard/ donating,
etc. please contact
Susan at:
352-637-6206
or cvn2719@vahoo.
corn More details
as well as the peti-
tion can be found at
advocate4victims.
ora /wb


Padala Medical
Center
Located in Lecanto
near new Walmart
Accepting new
Patients all ages.
Open M-F until 8 pm
Call for appt
352-436-4428
Walk-ins Welcome/
Urgent Care


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


Cemetery

4 Choice Cemetery
Lots at Fero Memorial
Selling Separately or
together 352-746-5019




Hair Stylist
Clientele preferred,
not necessary. Salon
Bev Hills 352-527-9933


Domestic

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smnk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off.
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
Blind Box 1853
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
FL 34429
or EMail to
jeffwroth@aol.com




I I IIII



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





EXP MEDICAL
CODING/BILLING
F/T Wanted
for office based
medical practice in
Inverness.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 726-5818


REHAB AIDE
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
in Lecanto
PRN position avail-
able for weekday
and weekend
coverage. Must be
a Florida-Certified
Nursing Assistant
with a high school
diploma or equiva-
lent. Rehabilitation
experience pre-
ferred. We offer
competitive pay in
a team-oriented
environment.
Melanie Reyna
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
MelanieReyna@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
45868







RN WEEKEND
SUPERVISOR
Seeking a dynamic
exp RN Leader.
Candidate will have
a stable work his-
tory, management
abilities, organiza-
tional skills and ef-
fective delegation
and monitoring of
clinical systems.
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL or
Resume to: atdon
@southernltc.com
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D


I Valentine


I ^^HapNo


HBy


F/T, HYGIENTIST
For Busy Dunnellon
Dental Practice
Email Resume to:
jandj95@aol.com


RCA AID FT & P/T
exp. in ALF
call 352-726-2555


RUN'S & LPN'S
Needed ASAP
Hospitals in Citrus &
Hernando Counties
Med Surg and ICU
Units.
Please call Staff
America -
352-432-0080







Ci"KINR \1.
FLORIDA
an equal opportunity
college-

College of
Central Florida
Faculty -
Health Information
Technology
(Pending Budget
Approval)
Master's degree
required in HIT or a
related field. Three
years of teaching
or work experience
or a combination
thereof required.
Commitment to the
state college objec-
tive of providing in-
struction for diverse
student populations.
Close date is
2/24/2014.
Faculty RN to BSN
Program
168 Workdays
(Anticipated va-
cancy for fall 2014)
Master's degree in
Nursing required or
Master's degree
with a concentra-
tion in the Nursing
discipline (a mini-
mum of 18 gradu-
ate semester hours
in Nursing) required.
Doctoral degree in
Nursing preferred.
Florida registered
nurse licensure re-
quired (or is eligible).
Requires a minimum
of two years of nurs-
ing practice. Prefer
two years of recent
bedside clinical ex-
perience or teach-
ing or a combina-
tion of work and
teaching experi-
ence. Commitment
to the state college
objective of pro-
viding instruction for
diverse student pop-
ulations. Application
review date is
2/26/2014.
Faculty RN to BSN
Program
220 Workdays
(Anticipated va-
cancy for fall 2014)
Doctoral degree in
Nursing required.
May consider can-
didates with
Master's degree in
Nursing and a mini-
mum of 18 gradu-
ate semester hours
in Nursing toward
doctoral degree.
Florida registered
nurse licensure re-
quired (or is eligible).
Requires a minimum
of two years of nurs-
ing practice. Prefer
two years of recent
bedside clinical ex-
perience or teach-
ing or a combina-
tion of work and
teaching experi-
ence. Commitment
to the state college
objective of provid-
ing instruction for di-
verse student popu-
lations. Application
review date is
2/26/2014.
Part-time Assess-
ment Specialist -
Levy Campus
Open until filled.
Part-time Financial
Aid Technician -
Ocala Campus
Open until filled.
A copy of transcripts
from an accredited
institution must be
submitted with the
electronic applica-
tion for each posi-
tion that requires a
degree. Email to
hr@cf.edu or fax to
352-873-5885 when
not uploaded
electronically.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of tran-
scripts to hr@CF.edu
or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


.NET Developer
With C # and .NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
components and
features for our
Industrial SCADA
and HMI software
products.
Other desirable
experience -
Web Services,
ASP.NET, HTML5,
Javascript, XMLSVG
Other domain
expertise -
SCADA, HMI, MES
EAM OR CMMS
3 yrs exp. preferred.
Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
kokeefe@
b-scada.com








ACCOUNT-

ING
ANALYST

The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
is now accepting
applications. For
more information
and to apply visit
our website
www.sheriffcitrus.
org/career.aspx
Equal Opportunity
Employer MFDV



Principal Planner
Announcement
#14-14
Oversee the devel-
opment of the
comprehensive
plans and programs
for utilization of land
and physical facili-
ties regarding
County projects,
planning docu-
ments and local
land development
regulations.
Requires Master's
degree or educa-
tion and training
equivalent to four
years of college.
Requires over seven
years of related ex-
perience. Starting
pay $1,870.22 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 14,
2014 EOE/ADA


COOK/PREP/
PIZZA MAKER
Call (352) 628-7827


I EXP. LINE COOK I


Po s io

Program
Assistant
Announcement
#14-11
Performs routine
office tasks such
as answering tele-
phone, data entry,
compiling, analyz-
ing, and reporting
data, filling out
forms, filing and
processing mail. In-
teracts with citizens
in person and by tel-
ephone, answering
questions and
directing inquiries
to appropriate
personnel. Some
public speaking is
required. Managing
of RSVP/NCVC
volunteers and
coordinating sched-
ules and work to be
performed. Starting
pay $11.09 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 7,
2014 EOE/ADA

UTILITIES
COMPLIANCE
MANAGER
Announcement
#14-12
Involves professional
administrative and
technical work in
maintaining Citrus
County Department
of Water Resources
compliance with
state and federal
regulations for water
and wastewater in
support of the Utili-
ties Division. The po-
sition is directly re-
sponsible for com-
plying with regula-
tory reporting and
record keeping re-
quirements, provid-
ing technical input
on
water/wastewater
compliance issues.
Performs related du-
ties as required. Pay
range $1,292.98 to
$1,991.14.16 B/W
DOQ. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 7,
2014 EOE/ADA


HELP WANTED
Sales/Management
[ ,, H, [,, ,I I , I I I ii,,[, [ I Ih d [
352-628-2555

To Schedule Your Interview
Full Company Benefits:
Medical, Dental, 401K, Bonuses & More
Previous Sales Experience Helpful


Central Florida Health Alliance

Leesburg Regional Medical Center The Villages Regional Hospital


Th ii I llages Re ionlHsita 1 ,l o









$42/hour plus applicable shift differential.

$2,000 completion bonus

SWill be scheduled to work three (3), twelve (12) hour
shifts each week, as determined by the facility. Schedule may
require every other weekend, holiday and alternate
shift schedules.

To qualify, you must have:
Current Florida RN licensure
SMinimum 2 years current RN experience in an acute care hospital




/r ~To learn more and apply visit
TOP 100 www.CFHACareers.com/seasonal
CT:O U. EEO/AA/H/V. Drug-free Workplace / Tobacco-free Workplace


CSR's
SProducers
Insurance profession-
als wanted to join a
large growing
agency. Please send
resume to:
CC Chronicle
Blind Box 1852
106 W Main St.
Inverness, Fl 34450




Lic. Massage
Therapist

in Neuromuscular,
and Sports Massage
therapy. Kinesiology
background helpful
but not mandatory.
Perfect room in
downtown Inverness
studio. Rental rate
negotiable, call for
interview
352-476-4352











itRestedrintsup
potnLounachev
TooJay's Gourmet
Del is currently
hiring year round
positions in both of
our restaurants
located in
The Villages. We are
interested in sup-
porting you achieve
your New Year plans
by encouraging you
to bring your talents
to us for a new
career.
We are currently
hiring high-powered
back-of-the-house
people who desire
to produce our
high-quality food in
a casual environ-
ment surrounded by
dedicated team
members and a
supportive and
hands on manage-
ment team. These
are year round, not
seasonal positions.
Starting wages
range from $10.00 to
$13.00. We are also
looking for BOH
leads or shift super-
visors starting at
$15.00.
We offer great
benefits including
meal benefits.
If this sounds like to
perfect way to start
your new career,
send your resume
today or apply in
person at TooJay's in
LakeSumter, 1129
Canal Street or
TooJay's in Spanish
Springs, 990 Del Mar
Drive. Email to
LKS@toojays.com or
VIL@toojays.com.


Full Time
Advertising Sales
Representative
For the
South Marion
Citizen
Must have minimum
of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
Must be able to
maintain current
account base as
well as prospecting
for new clients. Fast
paced environment
that requires ability
to multi task with
ease. Computer
proficiency a must.
Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.
Base Salary plus
commission, full
benefits package
Email Resume to:
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com
or Apply in Person
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River Fl.
Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE


Pest Control
Inspectors/Sales
Wanted for Citrus/
Sumter Co. Salary,
Plus Commissions.
Company vehicle.
APPLY IN PERSON
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy.






Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net


#Empsloymensourceis



www.chronicleonline.comr


D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


OTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONiCLE


CLASSIFIED








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAINTERS, Exp.

352-400-0501

Utilities
Operator I
Announcement
#14-13
Skilled technical
work related to
water/wastewater
treatment plant op-
erations. Must have
experience in a re-
lated field or an
equivalent combi-
nation of training
and experience.
Certification as a
Florida Water
and/or Wastewater
Class "C" Operator.
Dual certification
preferred. Starting
pay is $12.67 hourly.
Excellent Benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, February 7,
2014 EOE/ADA





CITRUS MAIDS

CLEANING PERSON
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

CUSTODIAN

Needed- Honest,
dependable male
with custodial
experience and
references. Full time,
competitive salary,
and some benefits.
Reply to: Citrus
County Chronicle,
Blind Box 1855
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd
Crystal Riv. Fl 34429

DRIVERS

For Floral Holiday de-
liveries must have Van
or SUV (352) 726-9666


Housekeeping
/Locker Room
Attendant
Part-time or Full-time

Fitness Desk/
Personal Trainer
Part-Time

For Upscale Golf
& Country Club,
Male or Female
Aoolv in Person
@2125W. Skyview
Crossing, Hernando

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT

LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off.
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
Blind Box 1853
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
FL 34429
or EMail to
jeffwroth@aol.com

ReStore Manaaer
Truck Driver

Habitat for Humanity
is filling 2 positions
in Citrus County
E-mail request for
detailed job descrip-
tion & instructions for
submitting resume to:
H4Hrestore@
yahoo.com
No calls or walk-ins

Retail Manager

wanted for resale
clothing store for
teens & young
adults. Experience
working in junior
brand stores a plus.

Apply in Person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL.
Key Training Center
*EOE*

Security for a
Shelter

Parttime Evenings
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sipperd@
bellsouth.net


NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone?

Appt. Setters
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
352-628-0254




AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547









MASSAGE
THERAPY
Classes Start,
April 28, 2014
Spring Hill
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE*
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


KETTLE CORN BUSINESS
FOR SALE $5,900.
Money Maker See ad
& pics. / Ocala Craigs
List (352) 344-0025
You can become an
expert in HVAC
installation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute Online
HVAC education in as
little as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961 or go
online:
www.HVAC-Online-
Education.com




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


CLASSIFIED




WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**





16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316







DUDLEY'S
"A'UCTI'On

w Thursday 1-30-14
Walk About
Auction.. 3:00 pm
full sale outside w/
furniture and quality
lined inside Treasures
to tools
mSunday 2-2-14
Antique & Collecti-
ble Auction 1:00 pm
Primitives to Country
French- Henredon to
Oriental, Bronzes,
Art, Coins, Jewelry,
Trains, Clocks,
Hummels, Lladro
500 +lots

call for info 637-9588
Dudleysauction
.corn 4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.





AMANA UPRIGHT
Deep Freeze, 15.2
cu.ft. 60.5x30x28.3 adj.
temp control, free
frost, 3 shelf, high effi-
ciency compressor,
$275. (352) 400-8746

APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


www.chronicleonline.corn


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 D7


FRIGIDAIRE UPRIGHT
FREEZER 20.3 CU.FT
Frost Free Excellent
condition
$100. 352-564-0788
GE Range, white
self-cleaning electric
exc. cond. $150.
GE Microwave, white
over the range $75.
(570) 240-1707
GE Refrigerator, white
side by side, water,
ice on the door $400.
GE Dishwasher, white
$100. (570) 240-1707
GE WASHER
king size cap, Whirl-
pool Dryer, Lg Cap.
White, Both like new.
$300 for both
(352) 613-0823
Kenmore Dishwasher
white, works great
$100.
(352) 637-2188
Magic Chef
Chest Freezer
7.2 cubic ft.
$150. obo
(352) 464-0100
REFRIGERATOR
1.7 cu. ft. dorm size
excellent condition
$45.00 352 746-9250
Refrigerator Freezer
GE, gd Cond $100
Oak Table $65
(352) 226-3883
REFRIGERATOR
LG, 28 CF, S.S.,
side by side,
ice/water in door, $600
(352) 527-8663
SAMSUNG 3.7 2011
WASHING MACHINE
call for details.
$75 352-344-2321
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE, 20"
electric, white
clean, works good.
$125. Homosassa
(678) 617-5560 or
352-513-5580
VAC. ACCESSORIES
Filter Queen hose
excellent condition.
$50 call 527-6425
VACUUM Accessories
Filter Queen Power
head & wand
Excellent condition
$50 each. 527-6425
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
Washer and Dryer
Fridgidaire Heavy
Duty, white, exc. cond
$125. ea.
(570) 240-1707


WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398




DESK
SOLID DARK WOOD
w/ hutch and 7 drawers.
Great for home
office. Exc Cond
$265.00 352-249-7212









DUDLEY'S

w-Thursday 1-30-14
Walk About
Auction.. 3:00 pm
full sale outside w/
furniture and quality
lined inside Treasures
to tools
a Sunday 2-2-14
Antique & Collecti-
ble Auction 1:00 pm
Primitives to Country
French- Henredon to
Oriental, Bronzes,
Art, Coins, Jewelry,
Trains, Clocks,
Hummels, Lladro
500 + lots
......................
call for info 637-9588
Dudleysauction
.corn 4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




BRAKE
12 ft 6 inches
$850
(352) 795-6160
Walk Boards
2 @ 16 ft each
$650 ea; 12 ft Walk
Board $500
(352) 795-6160




4 Speakers
2soundtech 12"
speakers, 520 peak
watts, 2 Samson 15"
225 RMS Watts, 8 ohms
2 poles & hook up
cables, included. &
808S Stereo Mackie,
1200 Watt
All for $1,300 Cash
352 503-2472


CD COLLECTION 25
CD's for $25 Call
726-0040
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS $100
352-341-6920
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS $25
352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
216" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS 1 5" 80
WATTS 352-613-0529



SANDED GROUT (15)
light gray 251b mapel
brand new 5.00 ea
352 302 7451
SHUTTERS
2 Pair of Indoor & Out-
door Wooden Shutters
$80.00 352-746-5421



COMPUTER GAMES 7
games, most multi-pack,
1 with 500,000 games,
great- shape, ($25)
352-613-7493
COMPUTER Gateway
835GM Desktop Win-
dows XP with computer
desk. $100.
352-344-1503



PATIO SET 5 PIECE
48" OCTAGON TABLE
& 4 CHAIRS WITH
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529

Furniture

2 MATCHING BROWN
big overstuffed chairs,
microfiber suede v/good
cond.(nonsmokers).
$100 ea.,$190 both.
860-2701.
3 PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET 3 PIECE LIV-
INGROOM SET Dual
reclining fabric sofa,
loveseat and rocker re-
cliner. Very good condi-
tion. No kids, pets or
smokers in house.
$500.00. 352-400-4924.
4POSTER FULLSZ
BEDROOM SET 7PC
light pine, no mattress,
boxspringgreat cond.
$700. (352)301-1219
BAR STOOLS 3 uphol-
stered bar stools 32"
high with armrests and
backs. Wood Construc-
tion Like new 300.00
phone 352-382-3933


Bedroom Set
Qn white wicker head
board w/ mattress.
Beautiful wicker & rat-
tan entertainment ctr
Room for 28" TV $225
(352) 249-7168
Bedroom Set
solid wood, twin size
bed w/ box spring,
headboard, 5 dresser
drawer, 2 end table
w/ 2 drawers, 2 yrs. old
Asking $350.
(352) 746-9539
China Cabinet
44Lx 78h, blond
washed wood w/ 2
drawers & 2 doors
$150; 222S Monroe BH
802-782-7185
COUCH
Lazy boy sofa, 81 in.
exc cond. Banana
color. Non-smoking
environment. $250
(352) 586-6377
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com
352-795-0121
Desk Chair & Ottoman
both brown leather
and in excel, condi-
tion. Desk chair is high
back w/ arms & ad-
justable height.
Ottoman measures
40Wx24Dx18H and has
hinged top for stor-
age. $50 for chair and
$40 for ottoman.
Will email photos.
352-746-1644.
Dining Room Table
Glass Top, Med.
brown rattan. 4 cush-
ioned chairs with cas-
tors. PalmTree Design
$200 352-249-7168
Dining table. Oblong
56x38 w/4 brown,
caned back, cush
chairs. $150
222 S Monroe/ BH
802-782-7185
Dresser & Night Stand
Antique, Pine, $100
obo, China Cabinet,
GI doors, w/ cabinets
$75 (352) 226-3883
LEATHER SOFA,
brown, exc. cond.,
$200. Brown leather
recliner, fair cond.,
$75. (740) 339-3433
Queen Sz. Bed
w/Headboard has
mirror & shelves, 3
drawers on each side
at bottom. $75 obo
(352) 621-5265
RECLINER
Recliner,Swivel Rocker,
Dark Blue
Looks Good,$40.
352-746-6813


y.____


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



-Affordable Mobile-
all type marine repairs
711 NE6th Av. Cry Riv
352-398-5903
All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialize in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770




PERSONAL CARE
Light house work
Respite Care. Male
CNA (352) 875-9793
Take Care of Loved
Ones in My Home
Clean, caring, exp.,
exc. ref. 352-476-7159
Transportation and/or
Asst. with shopping,
errands, appt., & air-
port runs. Lic/Ins. w/
refs. (352) 613-0078




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020




TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


I-.kLSADI.IAES


WATKIINS & SONS
PAVING, INC.
* DrivewaysAT
* Parking Lots
*Seal Coating
* Maintenance
* Overlay Asphalt

R. Watkins
Owner/Operator
PH-352-247-0284
Email-ronniewatkins.rw@gmail.com
Licensed and Insured Lic #Sp13889


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
**ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
* AFFORDABLE
V 'RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Wor ks, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service, Res/
Coin (352) 400 8361
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773


*'START A FIRE!
DRYER REPAIR













Ted s Painting

P AI nmT NG&unOER Pn


All Types of Home Repairs

746-5190
LIC/INS Lic #240270


D& S Cleaning
Let us make your life
easy. We do it all.
(352) 445-9523
HOUSEKEEPING, relia
ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable ref.
Maggie(352) 503-9621
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning





mi



(352) 270-4672
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



Exp Tutor/Certified FL
Teacher offering priv
tutoring all subjects
K-6, lang. arts K-12 &
college lev. & French
call/text 352-287-2756



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755


Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




GOT LEAVES
DR POWER VAC
Call John 607-760-3919
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
I- *All Home Repairs
0 Small Carpentry
Fencing
0 5creeflifg
lean Dryer Vents
ilfforodble & Dependable
4. E. Epiernce lifelong

S 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


4h



POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636

[HS^^"T21
Pressure
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Any Surface,
roof cleaning, int/ext
painting, gutter cleaning,
Absolute Exterior
Restoration
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower cony. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Insalla euir Now's the
HPumspnMirS lime for pool
Healers remodeling
.a San Systems
`Po Pf;n;,h;nq

.1 I'1,,i

Sugarmill ,,,1, 1 .,,,,,
Woods
Wod rvIng All Oi cdlIS co nrl
Pool.& Spa ,,,, ,,,,,,
sMwPoNs.coOM .382-4421






SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
R 352-364-4610
,MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated
Lc#1EC13003381 insured & bonded
I 24Hours ayDA 7DaYsaWeek


Stylists wanted! MVP
Clips is hiring lic. stylists
for a sports theme bar-
bershop. Manager and
Asst Manager positions
avail. 302-9779 or
mvp clips@yahoo.com





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins



Your World






CHR pONiIE


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians 3
ER0015377

-52621124


DETECTION
Licensed


Electronic
Leak
Detection
for all pools
and spas
We'll find your leak
or there's
no charge!


352-433-6070

S30 day guarantee on all work
BayLeakDetective@gmail.com


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


NINs

%M E)IRN
GENIE.:;
W.0 W"_ hi-M I Wtel L. lkl>
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill




3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

4 THUIA CLEAN he
Carpet Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091






AAA ROOFING

Call the %" 74ak6ust&5"
Free Written Estimate


$1OO OFF:
AnOy Re-Roof
i Must present coupon at time contract is signed i
[ic/ins.cCC075 7~ ~~ zo


I


Pressure Washing
Interior & Exterior
Drivewavs/Decks
Ormall/Tenture









D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014



_ flROF114HEAIEH ConcealedWeapons
Plus Mattress $75. small tent heater, Amen- Permit Course
(352) 527-7919 can Camper, ($5) DAN'S GUN ROOM
SOFA 352-212-1596 (352) 726-5238
Brown & Green Plaid RAMP 4'x 8' Presure i m U
$100. treated wood, (2x12) for J4W
(352) 513-4621 sheds, or platform. 1Ir11
SOFA $75.00 obo
SOFA 352-249 7212 MASTER TOW
brown neutral color, 2012 Tow Dolly
excellent condition Rocking Chair, 3500 GVW, serge hyd.
$90. Ask for Mimi Couch Bench & brakes, new spare
(352) 795-7285 Entrance Table $100 tire, $975. Inverness
TABLES Home made Quilt (352) 860-1106
Coffee table & 2 Tops 5 for $100
matching end tables. (352) 795-7254
Heavy glass w/ beau- SCHWINN CRUISER S lrw
tiful stucco like bases. SS WOMEN'S BIKE-
$75 (352) 249-7168 26" x 2-1/8" tires & alloy
TWIN MATTRESS SET wheels, single speed,
BEAUTYRES T $65. 628-0033
SIMMONS SOLACE SHUTTERS
CLASSIC FIRM $100 Indoor & Outdoor
634-2004 Wooden Shutters
$95.00 352-746-5421
Garden/La m SPEAKERS Pair of 5" -
Suppies 2 Way 70 Watt
Speakers $35.00
AFFORDABLE 352-746-5421
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Ten Gallons
Hauling & Tractor Work Concrete Silicone | | | |
(352) 341-2019 Acrylic Sealer
Chain Saw -Smokey Topaz Tell that special
14" electric with 2 new org. $30 a gallon person
chains $50; Sell for $150. "Happy Birthday"
Heavy duty electric (352) 746-6072 with a classified
edger $45 Utility Trailer. 4X8, 2' ad under Happy
(352) 794-6761 Sides. Special Built. Notes.
CRAFTSMAN Good Cond. Good Tires Only $28.50
EDGER/TRIMMER Well Built. $450. includes a photo
Gas/4HP $100 Call (678)617-5560 ll ir I.lscifiorI


/ zo-uuRtu
Riding Mower
2012 Troy Bilt, Auto,
42", 20 HP, $825
Gas Weed eater
Troy Bilt $65
(352) 794-6761




BEVERLY HILLS
Estate/Garage Sale
Sat. 1st & Sun. 2nd
8:30am-4:00pm
377 W. Sugarmaple Ln.
r DONATIONS
NEEDED!
FOR CHARITY
YARD SALE
Sale Date of
Feb.I5 & 8
Pick-up
Available
Call
352-201-4369




MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS LARGE $20
352-613-0529
MENS JACKET London
Fog Size 40/42 Excel-
lent Condition $25 Call
726-0040



BROTHER FAX COP-
IER SCANNER WITH
MANUAL ONLY 35.00
4640316



2 DAHON FOLDING BI-
CYCLES Like new con-
dition. Great for RV or
car trunk. $50 each
352-564-0788
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, $45. 628-0033
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
Antique Cast Iron
Wood Stove w/screen
good working stove
good cond. $375.
(352) 246-3500
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGE LG 32 W X
40 L
$60 OBO
Linda 423-4163
BUTTERFLY LAMP
multicolor glass,
Tiffany-like, 2 light
levels, BEUTIFALL,
($30) 352-613-7493
CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with case Excellent
Condition $95.00
352-746-5421
CORNING WARE
ELECTRIC COFFEE
POT- 6 cups, cornflower
pattern, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
Exercise Bike
Life Style D1000 Arm &
Leg with Monitor $60
King Size memory
foam 2" mattress pad
w/cover. Exc cond. Pd
$135 asking $70
(352) 794-3907
GENERATOR
B&S, 5550 Watts, Port. ,
test started only $425;
DOG CRATE 48x30x32,
like new, $65
(352) 628-6001
Glass Top for Desk
72" x 42"
believed edges,
$75.,
352-503-7930
GRAY TILE, 10 boxes
+ 1 broken box,
13"x13", 14.3sq. ft.
must take all $100.
(352) 527-7919
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES NEW
FITS 1350-1450 SLIDE
ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464 0316
Home De-humidifier
$50. obo
Grain Mill $50.
(352) 726-7367
MICHELIN TIRE
205/65R15 very good
condition
$15 352-344-2321
Mini Bike
With 196CC, 6.5HP
New Motor,
New Chain $335.
(352) 726-0839
Multiple AQUARIUM
RELATED ITEMS 4
saleMoving-need to sell
coolstuff4salenow2013@
yahoo.com
PINFISH HOLDING
CAGE- 24" dia. x 24"
tall, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
Play Station 2,
game cube, Wii con-
trols, 39 games $250
Weight Distribution
Hitch, 2 5/16, torsion
bars, sway control
$100 (352) 613-0823


BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Power Lift
Chair Recliner
$275.
(352) 513-4621
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANEUVERABILITY.
ONLY 60.00 464 0316



"BORN HIPPIE" BY
BEDELL TRAVEL/
STUDENT GUITAR
W/GIGBAG NEW! $75
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC G35FX
LEAD SERIES AMP
OVERDRIVE,DELAY&
REVERB NEW! $100
352-601-6625
DIGITECH VOCAL
HARMONIZER, EASY
TO USE NO GUITAR
NEEDED! $75
352-601-6625
GRETSCH 125 ANNI-
VERSARY ELECTRO-
MATIC VINTAGE SUN-
BURST NICE! $100
352-601-6625
POWERED MONITORS
WORK GREAT NADY
PM200A&80WATT
STAGEWORKS $95
352-601-6625
TOCA PLAYERS
SERIES CONGAS 10"
& 11" red fiberglass w/
stand. Like new. $199.
352-860-2701



2 TWIN SHEET SETS
ROBIN EGG BLUE
SPRING MAID
QUALITY USED $25
634-2004
GAS LOG FIREPLACE
Set, Complete with eve-
rything needed, to be
used with propane gas,
Cash + Carry.
$200 352-586-7820
MARY JANE'S HOME
COLLECTION
CHENILLE TWIN
BEDSPREAD ECRU
$40 634-2004
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
TWIN BED SKIRT
EYELET TRIM
100% COTTON
ECRU, USED $15
634-2004
UMBRELLA STAND
BLACK AND GOLD
METAL ORNATE
$40 634-2004
VACUUM CLEANER
LG upright, compres-
sor compact, pet
care, like newbagless
$150
(352) 465-9395



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
NordicTrack EXP10iOOX
TREADMILL
Works/Great Condition.
Asking $400. OBO. Call
352-257-3547 Can
Email Pictures
Proform Treadmill
cooling fan, electron-
ics, heart rate control,
certified training pro-
gram $360. Almost
New (352) 795-3086
Schwinn Airdyne
Stationary Bike,
electronic computer,
excel, cond. Pd. $600.
Asking $175.
(352) 584-5976
Wesco Electric Tread-
mill and Cardio Glide
Stationary Excercise
Bike, and Manual
Walker.$200 for all
(352) 344-0424



1990 CLUB CAR, top
& windshield, new
batteries, $1195.
1995 Yamaha 36volt
$295. (315) 466-2268
1993 Yamaha Golf
Cart, blue, full side &
rear curtains, comes
with battery charger
& 2 extra tires, new
batteries 2 months
old. exc. condition
$1500. (352) 513-4287
Club Car Golf Cart
1991, Family owned
Excellent condition.
Lights, Battery 1 yr.
old, Must Sell, $1,500.
(352) 527-3125
Golf Clubs & Bag,
Wilson Pro Full Set,
excel, cond. $75
Ping Pong Table,
brand new, paddle
balls instruction book
pd. $250. asking $125
(352) 584-5976
Men's 26" 3spd
Free Spirit Bicycle
exc. cond. $60.
Golf Bag Rack, holds 2
bags, has 3 shelves
$100. (352) 527-7919


Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




Model Rail Road
N Scale
(352) 564-8605
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369













Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Regina
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820




3 Dapple Dachshund
Puppies, all female
w/papers, pis call
Sylvia (727) 235-2265










ASHER
Asher, 6-y.o. Border
Collie mix, neutered,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, wt. 59
Ibs. Gentle, very
friendly, gets along
w/other dogs. Plays
fetch w/tennis balls,
doesn't care about
cats. Fee $30, found
as stray. Beautiful
markings.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682.









BO
Bo is a 2 1/2 y.o.
hsbrkn, friendly lab
mix, who loves peo-
ple & other dogs.
He's a happy dog,
leash trained & fam-
ily friendly. He is neu-
tered and UTD on
vaccinations. His $30
adoption fee in-
cludes microchip
& HW test.
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821.










HUNTER
Hunter, handsome
1-year-old Black-
mouth Cur mix.
He sits & lies down
especially for treats,
eager to please &
will be easy to train.
Appears housebrkn.
Very loveable &
likes to snuggle.
Energetic boy best
w/fenced yard.
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821.
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827
YOUNG SPAYED FE-
MALE TORTOISE
SHELL CAT Loving, sit
in your lap and cuddle
kind of cat. One eye,
but she doesn't know
that. I can't keep her.
352-419-7730
YOUNG SPAYED FE-
MALE TORTOISE
SHELL CAT Loving, sit
in your lap and cuddle
kind of cat. One eye,
but she doesn't know
that. I can't keep her.
352-419-7730




SATURN
2013 14' KBoat inflata-
ble, 55 Ib e-motor &
batt, bimini, auto-inflator,
dolly $500. 860-2701


** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"

All Rivers Trailers
Repacks per axel $50
Specialized in brakes,
cross-members, bunks
Call 352-464-2770
KAYAK
Hobie Mirage
Outback, like new.
Peddles, sail, & pad-
dle. Depth finder.
4 rod holders & 3
storage comp. $800
(352) 228-4018
OUTBOARD MOTOR
EVENRUDE 4.5 HP
15 in .shaft, fresh
water motor
$475 call
(352) 613-8453
POLAR
2005, 19 Ft., center
console, 115 HP,
Yamaha, excel, cond.
Everything for fishing.
$12,900 352-270-2015
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation
Vehicles
ALLEGRO BUS
2011, 36ft, inches
8,900 mi, loaded w/ 4
slides exel. cond. ext.
warr. Asking $205,000
Retail $237,900
(828) 553-0134
CRYSLER
'12, 200S,4 Dr 13k mi.
$18,000 Trade for
Class C Motor Home
No Junk or pull behind
726-2494, 201-7014
Keystone Everest
'03 5th wheel. 3 sliders,
xtra storage under
goose nk, New: gen,
septic/ H20 hoses,
deck. Must Sell, $15k
obo 352-795-1272
Sport Coach IV
Motor home, 38"diesel
pusher, coming allison
trans,1989, 63,670 mi,
Possible trade $22,000.
812-360-3834, 327-2814
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., 1
slide $7000 obo
(352) 628-1126
CASITA
2003 17' Freedom De-
luxe Aerodynamic, fi-
berglass travel trailer.
Loaded.
Easy to tow with small
vehicle.
Microwave, 3 way
fridge-freezer,
under-shelf
TV,CD,DVD,radio.
RoofAC Gas heater
etc.etc.
$11,000 OBO Tele-
phone 352 527-1022
e-mail
mmlesser@tampabay.rr.
com
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
MONTANA
2003, 32 FT. 5th wheel,
2 slides, non smoking,
excel, cond., In park
on Hwy 19$16,000 obo
(989) 560-8900
or (989) 775-6011
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




GM AIR HOSE
2007 Aux Inflator Kit for
air-suspension truck
models, new. $23
860-2701.




"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267"
Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-


CLASSIFIED






Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ




Buy Here/Pay Here

'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa Fl

CHEVY
'09, Malibu,
4DR, LS, 35K miles,
$12,900.
726-2494, 201-7014
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


CHRYSLER
1999 Concorde LX, V6
2.7 LTR, Automatic, It
has all the Extras,
123,000 miles, Runs
great, Very Good Condi-
tion, $2,500
352-586-7820
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2001 Sebring LX Cony.
Leather Interior, Full
power, Exc cond.
$3200
(352) 795-8986
DODGE
2001 Intrepid Very
good condition;
85,300 miles
Dark green with
charcoal interior.
$3,400 or Best offer;
call 352-249-4491
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

Hyundai
Azera 2007-
loaded-power
windows,heated
power seats-rear
sun screen -
6 cyl. Very low
mileage. Asking
$10,000. Available
after Jan. 22nd.
Call 860-716-3128

LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,000.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440









III II III

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru


Classic
aeice
AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN.FEB.2ND.
1-800-438-8559




CHEVROLET
'03 S10 Extended Cab,
Short bed. 3 Door,
V6, 5 spd, Exc Cond
$3700 352-201-0877

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
05 Escape, XLT Non-
smoker, low mi. Mint
Cond, All pwr, serv
recs avail $6800.
352-563-5217
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306










2005 HD 1200C
EZ Finance $3,900.

2004 YAMAHA
VSTAR 1100
BUY HERE PAY HERE
$2,900.

2009 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC LOW MILES
$14,500.

2003 HONDA
GOLD WING $7,500.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047







01 HD ROAD KING
Loaded $7,800.

'13 HD STREET GLIDE
Low Miles $18,500.

'06 HD ULTRA
CLASSIC TRIKE Full
Conversion $21,000.

'08 HONDA GOLD
WING TRIKE
Loaded $24,900.

LUCKY YOU CYCLES
9803 N HWY 301
Wildwood FL 34785
(352) 330-0047

BMW 1200 C
1998, Corbin teardrop
molded rear bags,
low miles, 12K mi tune
up, new rear tire
$4900 907-942-2283
TRIUMPH
2007 Bonneville 900
blk, low miles, exc
cond, one owner
$4600 907-942-2283
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
ong doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4,500. 352-513-4257




ary 28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


327-0202 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

All interested parties within Citrus County are hereby advised that the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners, acting as Citrus County Transit, is applying to the
Florida Department of Transportation for a capital grant under Section 5310 and/or
5311 of the Federal Transit Act of 1991, as amended, for the purchase of 8 passenger
wheelchair and stretcher accessible buses and/or 16 passenger wheelchair accessi-
ble buses to be used for the provision of public transit services within Citrus County.
A Public Hearing has been scheduled on February 13 2014 9:00AM at 1300 S.
Lecanto Highway Lecanto Florida 34461 for the purpose of advising all interested
parties of service being contemplated if grant funds are awarded, and to insure that
contemplated services would not represent a duplication of current proposed ser-
vices provided by existing transit or Para transit operators in the area.
This hearing will be conducted if, and only if, a written request for the hearing is re-
ceived by February 11, 2014 by 5:00 p.m. (two business days prior to the scheduled
hearing).
Requests for a hearing must be addressed to Citrus County Transit, attention Lon Frye
at PC Box 1930, Lecanto Fl. 34460. A copy of the request should be sent to the Flor-
ida Department of Transportation, District Seven, Attn: Tracy Dean at 11201 N. McKn-
ley Drive, MS-7330, Tampa, FL 33612.
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 2 & 9, 2013.


322-0202 SUCRN
2/8 CMHS MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE

There will be joint meeting by and between the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees
Debbie Ressler and Mark Fallows and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc Directors
Sandy Chadwick and Robert Collins or other designee in the Board Room, located on the
second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 Highland
Blvd, Inverness, Florida on Saturday, February 08, 2014 at 2:00pm.


COnTRUS COUNTY (FL)D CHRONICLE




This notice informs and notifies the public that all members of the Citrus County Hospital
Board and members of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Inc may also be in attend-
ance The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will not vote or conduct business but
will possibly recommend to CMHF Board of Directors an Interim Transaction Executive
{ITE)/CEO However, the meeting will occur by and between each Board's respective repre-
sentatives only
The Citrus Memorial Directors may be active participants) This notice informs the public
that two members of the Citrus County Hospital Board shall participate with two Directors of
the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc to discuss
* Transition Process
* ITE/CEO Recommendation
* Other
Copies of the Agenda will be available in the Administration office Any person wishing to
appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such
meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must
include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based

Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 22, 2014


325-0202 SUCRN
02/13/2014 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, February 13, 2014 at 8:00 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 2, 2013.


326-0202 SUCRN
02/13/2014 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, February 13, 2014 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, February 2, 2013.


328-0202 SUCRN
2/12/14 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, February 12th at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN "JJ" KENNEY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, February 2, 2014.


320-0202 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID-4350
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Bldgs. 1 & 2 Pleasant Grove Elementary School Cit-
rus County School Board Bid No. 4530 will be received by the Citrus County School
Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time February 18, 2014, in the Purchasing Department
Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida,
34450-4625. Immediately following all bids received will be opened and read aloud
in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional
for sub-contractors, will be held at Pleasant Grove Elementary School,
630 Pleasant Grove Road in the Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur February 5, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc. upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County
School Board in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made
upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days af-
ter the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 19, 26 & February 2, 2014.


323-0202 SUCRN
BOCC Bid Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
RFQ No. 013-14
SUGARMILL WOODS ADVANCED WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND RECLAIMED WATER
PRODUCTION PROJECT

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners is requesting interested firms to
submit statements of qualifications to provide professional engineering and consult-
ing services for the proposed Sugarmill Woods 2.0 MGD advanced wastewater treat-
ment (AWT) and water reclamation facility project. The Professional Design Engineer
(Consultant) selection process will include this request for qualifications (RFQ and oral
presentations of the top ranked Consultants shortlisted).
Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Proposal
Responder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a
responsive and responsible at the time of Response Submittal:
1. Attend Mandatory Pre-Response Conference
2. Attend Mandatory Site-Visit Immediately following the Pre-Response
Conference
3. The Respondent, the project manager, lead engineer, and geotechnical engi-
neer, shall have a minimum of five years' experience providing the similar services
within the last 5 years and be certified, registered and/or licensed as appropriate in
their area of expertise.
A Mandatory Pre-Response Conference will be held on February 10, 2014 at 10:00
AM, with a mandatory site-visit to follow immediately after the meeting. The Confer-
ence will be held at the Lecanto Government Building, Room 280, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
SEALED Responses are to be submitted on or before March 19, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Responses is scheduled for March 19, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Responses.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Qualifications Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on
the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle February 2, 2014.


324-0202 SUCRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-


ness under the fictitious
name of
Turff Masters Inc.
located at 5280 S. Charlie
Pt, Lecanto, FL., 34461, in
the County of CITRUS,
intends to register said
name with Florida
Department of State,
Division of Corporations,


Tallahassee, Florida.
DATED at Crystal River,
this 28th day of January,
2014.
/s/ Donald 0. Gainey,
Owner
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
FEBRUARY 2, 2014.


I i oie


I Bi


I Bim


Meeting
I ~ Notce


Meeting
I Notices ^I


Meeting
I NoicespI





Section E SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2013


OME


RONT


* Sikorski's
S7Attic
PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


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A FeltWall created by
designer Brian Patrick Flynn
puts a fresh twist on felt by
Using it to create an
interactive wall in a boy's play
room. Flynn suggests that
felt is becoming increasingly
popular for upholstery and
' crafting and will eventually
be used in unexpected ways.
Associated Press


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14 WEEPING WILLOW CT.
'DREAM COME TRUE! 'NEXT TO NEW Villa
'3/2/2/Screened Lanai Wood Cabinets
' Solid Surface Counters Lots of Tile
SFormal Dining Plus Nook Reasonable Fees
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
**iin miri. 1ru j 1-Ml


SPOOL W/PAVERS *DIAMONDBRITE
3/2.5/2 Split BR Plan Leaded Glass Entry
SOver 2,220 Sq. Ft. living 1 Acre Treed Lot
SDR Plus Nook& FR MOVE-IN READY!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1
Elnimo elliesullon i leltnix nei
www.Flo iduL isl inglnlo.comin


3 GRAYTWIG CT. W.
SUGARMILL WOODS
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Great Location
* Living RM & Fam RM Bonus RM in Back
* Formal Dining Room Eat-In Kitchen Area
*Nearly 2,300 SF living Fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL I
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875
10 LINE
'* ^52)63728287
Enter house AJ200





4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
BEVERLY HILLS
*4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
* New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM
* Beautifully Maintained .Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [-S
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


* WHISPERING PINES : WOOD CABINETS
* 2BR/2 Bath Villa Florida Room with H/AC 2002 built 3/2/4 ON 3/4 ACRE FENCED
*Nook Plus Dining Area MOVE-IN READY! PROPERTY....Granite countertops, dock,
* Community POOL Low Monthly Fees
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 Fe boat lift, 11' ceiling in garage for RV.
o o.l .I. LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Einnil elliesullon F emnrix ner I Email: lucyblarnes remax.net l
www.Floidlulislnglinlo.comln Visual Tours: www.crystalriveril.com L

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12-2PM OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-2PM

W^^W^.. SU


9 BALSAM CT. S., HOMOSASSA
Wonderful 3/2/2 pool home located in the
beautiful community of Sugarmill Woods.
Come and take a look today!
Directions: Hwy. 19 S to Cypress Blvd. W. Right on Pine St-
left on Balsam Dr.- Left on Balsam Ct. S.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com KU
Certified Distressed Property Expertl


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-3PM






4864 N. CHEYENNE DR.
BEVERLY HILLS
*PINE RIDGE ESTATES -POOLHome
* Recently Updated 1.5 ACRE Comer Lot
*GRANITE Counters FIREPLACE in Family RM
*STAINLESSAppliances Porcelain Tile
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 1
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com





WM*
'W



REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S12 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

H 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


6 FREESIA CT., SUGARMILL WOODS
* Quality Built 3/2/3 Heated Pool, Spa, Lg /Lanai
SGas Range and Fireplace 3-Zone HVAC and CENTRAL VAC
* So Many Special Features Beautful Landscaping, Privacy
* Metculously Maintained Light, Open & Inviting Split Plan
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961 F 1
Email: g.english@remax.net ]..
www.sellngcitruscountyhomes.com


CITRUS HILLS!!
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR GARAGE HOME,
LOCATED ON 15TH FAIRWAY, INGROUND
SCREEN POOL, FORMAL DINING AREA,
BREAKFAST NOOK, INSIDE UTILITY ROOM,
LOCATED ON CUL-DE-SAC. -
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com ___


PRICE REDUCED: on lovely 2/25/2 on
large beautifully landscaped lot 4737 Sawmill Way,
Riverhaven Fireplace in Ig great room with vaulted ceiling,
glassed-in Fla rm., eating area views private patio and
screen porch open to tropical & lush fenced backyard.
EO,:1 ,l,,:d 1:,1,, ,: B 1: ,:, 211, :l:,hl 34 ,::, i:,1 ,2 1
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Fiiiuil rFitiniflii?? ,ih&-,Fn ^a3


2 OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY 11-2PM
TIMBERLANE

1709 N. Lombardo Avenue
3BR/2BA/2CG w/POOL
QUAIL RUN

1292 E. Bluebird Ct.
3BR/2BA/2CG on 1.14 ACRES
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 M
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


:4/4/3 Pool Home + Guest Quarter 1/1
SOn the Horse Trail with 5.5 Acres
13 Foot Ceilings in the Study, Dining and Living Rooms
SGranite Counters, All Wood Cabinets, Beautiful Flooring
SMaster Has Garden Tub, Walk-in Shower & Closet
Which is Also a Safe Room
* Much, Much More
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM


MAKE YOUR OFFER on this nice 3/2/2 in
Inverness Highlands Great family neighborhood,
close to everything Inverness has to offer Split
bedroom plan, tiled throughout, updated guest
bathroom, shady lot.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net








CHARMING VILLA RETREAT
2 Bedroom + Den Exterior Maintenance
* Peaceful 55+ Setting Close to Recreation Center
* Large Front & Rear Porches Kitchen Dome Lighting
* Hard Surface Floors Attractive Backyard
GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812 "
Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleeman.com 1


2421 N. Leana Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


* 3 Bedrooms/3 En Suite Baths Smart Home Installed
* 31/2-Car Garage Salt Water Pool
*Hardwood and Tile Fireplace
* 3-Zone HVAC Jacuzzi in Master
Call for complete list of upgrades!
ASTEAL at $220,00 0
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolts@ aol.com
Websilte: www.CryslalRiver Living.com


WINTER VISITORS!
This 2/2/1 Sugarmill end unit condo is PRICED
RIGHT for your home away from those northern
winters. Newer black appliances & 18" tiles in kitchen,
laminate in living/dining. Garage door replaced in
2013. Near the golf course. Take a look and make an
offer. Don't miss out on this.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


Jet +., t&






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eclectic selection at outdoor gear expo


Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY-
Wilderness gear is going
soft, and not just for peo-
ple. Dogs are getting their
own luxury outdoor items.
A trend at the world's
largest outdoor-gear trade
show is equipment and ap-
parel that's also fashion-
able, easy to use or
comfortable from roomy
spoon-shaped sleeping
bags and pillow-top air
mattresses to espresso
makers and camp stoves
that do double duty boiling
water and charging elec-
tronic devices. Other ven-
dors offer rugged leashes,
life vests and even energy
bars just for dogs.
Barebones Inc., maker
of a $2,000 safari-style tent,
held a 'glamping' festival
at last summer's Outdoor
Retailer expo, which fea-
tured a wider assortment
of luxury gear than the
winter show. Glamping
stands for glamorous
camping, and the Utah
company says the 160-
pound tent lets people
enjoy the outdoors without
having to rough it.
With network and cable
news anchors sporting
jackets by The North Face
on camera in the field,
manufacturers don't have
to be reminded that back-
woods fashion has hit the


mainstream.
"We don't pay for any-
thing like that, but we like
it when anyone wears our
high-quality products,"
said Todd Spaletto, presi-
dent of The North Face.
Peter Metcalf, CEO of
Salt Lake City-based Black
Diamond Inc., introduced
U.S. Interior Secretary
Sally Jewell to his com-
pany's "soft" and "sensual"
line of jackets and stretch-


r.r. Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney ^]
AHSReallor, A USE Realtor @IM
302.3179 SOLD Nae! 287.-9022 L
746-6700
4k6 PAl 70 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
The; olden ri WEEKS REALTY, s BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


3944 HUCKLEBERRY m
Larger than normal 1/1/1 villa overlooking 3057 N. DELEON
beautiful scenery. Enclosed back porch/den Come enjoy this lovely Kingsley
under air plus addtl scrn porch with vinyl model 2/2/1. Relax on the large front
windows. Enjoy coffee in frt den/breakfast rm screened porch or enclosed lanai
off the kit. A/C 3 yrs old & newer barber cr
carpet. Lovely comm, closetoCtyActivity/ Eat in kitchen, partially fenced yard.
Comm Ctr & pool. Call for private viewing. Call for private viewing. I


woven pants as the Out-
door Retailer Winter Mar-
ket opened Wednesday
Jewell was CEO of
Recreational Equipment
Inc., or REI, for more than
a decade before joining
President Barack Obama's
cabinet last year She was
wearing a fleecy white
REI jacket


The merchandise
bazaar for a lifestyle of
outdoor adventure brings
together 1,000 of the
world's manufacturers
and distributors.
Shoppers weren't al-
lowed inside and no cash
sales were conducted.

See SHOW/Page E5


B H Gail Hargreaves ...
Broker/Realtor I* U )
P(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com
\~~~~ ~ *"*E^ gay-0 1 A^^ ^^ 9


INCOME
PRODUCER!
Check out this
duplex. Great
location, close to
water amenities, .
shopping, and .._.-
medical. Both units "
currently rented. r
Unit A has been
remodeled and is rented fully furnished. Unit B unfurnished
with long term annual tenant. Great CAP rate!
MLSt# 340239 $129,900


1*'W
Associated Press
Mike Newlands wears the Backcountry Bed in the Sierra Designs booth at the Outdoor
Retailer Winter Market show in Salt Lake City. One trend at the world's largest outdoor-
gear trade show in Salt Lake City is equipment that makes outdoor living fashionable,
easy or comfortable.


www^xitraltyeades^cm


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 E3











Products aim to help kids sleep

KIM COOK
Associated Press

Do your young ones balk at bed-
time? Get gnarly at naptime?
There are plenty of products
aimed at parents looking to create
the right mood in the nursery to
send little ones off to sleep.
Parents of wakeful or colicky ba-
bies should talk with their pediatri-
cian. And the first rule is not to put
anything in the crib of a baby under
a year old, says Deborah Pedrick,
founder of the Family Sleep Insti-
.tute in Stamford, Conn. (www.
familysleep.com) She notes that the
American Academy of Pediatrics ad-
vises that any loose articles, such as
blankets, bumpers or stuffed ani-
", 'mals, be removed from a crib, al-
,though a pacifier is OK.
After a year, however, many par-
r,," ents do like to give babies comfort
.objects. Retailers and manufactur-
.;''"7,',4t'. Kers are happy to oblige.
Land of Nod has super-soft plush
blankets that have animal head
shapes, so children can cuddle


See SLEEP/Page E15


Associated Press
ABOVE: The Twilight Turtle pillow, available on Cloudb.com, which lights up
the ceiling with a starry pattern. Parents can download lullabies and stream
them through the turtle via Bluetooth technology. BELOW: This sleep mat
available on Safetosleep.com is integrated with a fiber optic system that
monitors a baby's breathing and movement. It can also record your voice
and/or lullabies.


E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHOW
Continued from Page E3

Instead, storekeepers and big retail-
ers were placing orders for next
year's inventory Suppliers ranged
from industry giants Patagonia Inc.
and Mountain Hardwear to tiny
Ruffwear, which makes perform-
ance dog gear in Bend, Ore.
The expo has taken place in Utah
since 1996 and pours $40 million
into the local economy annually
A year ago, organizers signed a
contract to keep the expo in Salt
Lake City through August 2016. The
decision suspended a political
standoff that had the 4,000-member
Outdoor Industry Association
threatening to leave over Gov Gary
Herbert's land use policies.
Herbert, a Republican, responded
by pledging to actively support the
$5.8 billion economic sector in Utah
with the appointment of an industry
executive, Brad Petersen, as his
outdoor-recreation chief.
Attendance is up 40 percent since
2006, according to the show's organ-
izer, Nielsen Expo Outdoor Group.
The twin show in August brings out a
larger crowd and is dominated by
water sports.
Registered dogs are welcome
even if the public is not. Nearly a
dozen vendors at this week's show
are hawking specialized pooch gear,
and dog parties are part of the activ-
ity on the show floor
The dog outfitters say they're
going after a $53 billion pet industry
and taking spoils from the big chains
like PetSmart Inc. and Petco.
Kurgo Dog Products, from Salis-
bury, Mass., makes a jump seat that
can restrain a dog inside a moving car
Also on display are rugged leashes,
collars, harnesses and booties.
Competitors bow to Ruffwear Inc.,
the leader of the pack. Soon after he
started making collapsible water
and food bowls in 1994, the com-
pany's founder, Patrick Kruse, was
selling 8,000 a month to retailer L.L.
Bean. Now he sells 47 different dog
products, including a life jacket.
"We were the first to give dog
products an outdoor perspective,"
Kruse said. "We've had a lot of offers
of investment, but we want to grow
organically We never had to borrow
money"
TurboPUP, run by a former U.S.
Air Force C-130 pilot, says it can't
make enough of its doggy energy


TurboPUP, run by a
former U.S. Air Force
C-130 pilot, says it
can't make enough
of its doggy energy
bars that can stand
in for a full meal and
come in a foil
package that's
easy to carry.

bars that can stand in for a full meal
and come in a foil package that's
easy to carry
"We started in a kitchen making
3,000 bars a month," said Kristina
Guerrer, TurboPUP's CEO. "It's
been crazy"
The main ingredients include
olive oil, egg yolk, juice concentrate
and chia seeds, and company bakers
from La Pine, Ore., swear they're
good enough for people.
The jam-packed expo under-
scores a thriving corner of the econ-
omy Outdoor-gear sales grew 5 per-
cent annually throughout recent
years of recession, analysts said.
The show favors Utah, a place of
rugged mountains and canyons and
a cottage industry for innovators like
Voile Manufacturing, which makes
lightweight backcountry skis for
$600 a pair Voile laminates 3,000
skis and snowboards a year at a fac-
tory in a Salt Lake City suburb.
The winter show highlights such
leaps in technology as the ski bind-
ings made by Dynafit The company's
most popular model weighs just 530
grams, or less than 19 ounces.
Dynafit is out with a new $1,000
pair of bindings, the Beast, that per-
forms as well as a heavier alpine
binding in absorbing jolts that could
knock a skier's boot loose from a ski.
The company also makes exception-
ally lightweight skis and boots.
"We're finally a noun in ski lan-
guage," says Eric Henderson, a mar-
keting representative for the
company's North American opera-
tions, based in Boulder, Colo. "It's
taken some time 30 years."
Dynafit, headquartered in Mu-
nich, Germany, was bought by one of
Europe's largest outdoor brands,
Bolzano, Italy-based Salewa Inter-
national, in 2003.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
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Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 ES


r .


VVHO, SAID THREI A CROWD7

"A






E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014



HOMEFRONT
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Average on 30-year



loan at 4.32 percent


Data shows signs of weakening demand


Associated Press
WASHINGTON- Average U.S. rates
for fixed mortgages slipped this week as
new data showed a decline in home
prices in November and a drop in new
homes sales last month.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday the average for the 30-year loan
fell to 4.32 percent from 4.39 percent last
week. The average for the 15-year loan
eased to 3.40 percent from 3.44 percent.
Mortgage rates have risen about a full
percentage point since hitting record
lows roughly a year ago. The increase was
driven by speculation that the Federal
Reserve would reduce its $85 billion a
month in bond purchases. Deeming the
economy to be gaining in strength, the
Fed pushed ahead Wednesday with a
plan to reduce the bond purchases, which
have kept long-term interest rates low
Data issued this week suggested a


pause in the housing market's recovery
Home prices fell slightly in November as
colder weather slowed buying, ending
nine straight months of price gains, the
Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city
home price index released Tuesday
showed.
The Commerce Department reported
Monday that sales of new homes fell in
December for a second straight month.
Even with the end-year decline, though,
home sales for 2013 climbed to the high-
est level in five years as they benefited
from historically low mortgage rates.
Most economists expect home sales
and prices to keep rising this year, but at
a slower pace. They forecast sales and
prices will likely rise around 5 percent,
down from double-digit gains in 2013.
The National Association of Realtors
said Thursday that fewer Americans
See RATES/Page EO10


Inside...


2014 trends
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E9
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Nautical artifacts should be examined by a specialist


ear John:
Can we
please get
an estimate on .
these items? We
bought them at an
antiques store in
Pennsylvania
about 10 or 15
years ago. The
RNLI on the flag John S
is for Royal Na- SIKOI
tional Life Boat AT
Institution. The
bronze bell has a
brass plate stating how it was
used to call out volunteers
for rescue duty The picture
does have some cracks in it.
-J.B., Beverly Hills
Dear J.B.: Martifacts is a
company located in Jack-
sonville that specializes in
marine and nautical arti-
facts. I suggest you contact


L

1


Them about your
bell and flag. The
website is www
martifacts.com.
rThe phone num-
ber is 904-
645-0150.
Dear John: The
photographs did
not come out that
korski good with my little
SKI'S camera, but I hope
rc they are good
enough. I hoped
you might have an
idea who the artist of these
drawings might be. My wife
said we got these when we
were stationed in New Jersey
back in 1978 to '80. While I was
moving some old boxes, I came
back across them. They are
about 8 by 11 inches. I think
they are very nice and would
like to know more about them.


Thanks again for any help you
can give. C.P, Internet
Dear C.P: It appears the
signature is Mazzoha or Maz-
zona. I was not able to find
any listings or biographical
information about either I
suggest you examine the
backs of the pictures for no-
tations about the artist. Let
us know if you find anything.
Otherwise, potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
See ATTIC/Page E7
This bell and flag were found
in an antiques store, and ap-
pear to have some sort of
nautical connection. A mar-
itime and nautical artifacts
company would best be able
to identify where they came
from and what, if any value
they might have.
Special to the Chronicle


- .-..: t


B : .









S..A

5: SS "







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

DearJohn: I found these
at an antiques store, but do
not know what they are.
They were tarnished and
cleaned up with a copper
cleaner, and also do not
react to a magnet. You can
see the hole that might in-
dicate they could be at-
tached. Any ideas? -K.S.,
Internet
Dear KS.: I think the
items are used for furni-
ture drawer pulls.
Dear John: A member of
our church has a German
Bible, copyrighted in 1784.
It has a velvet-like cover
with a cross on the front
cover She wants to have it


appraised and valued. Can
you suggest anyone that can
do this? -R.M., Internet
Dear RM.: Late 18th
century German Bibles
were produced in massive
quantities. They typically
sell for less than $100.
Even those with fancy
leather bindings do not go
much higher than the
$100-plus range.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


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laundry room, currently rented on month-
to-month basis Makes a nice investment
#700696 $50,000


What are these
intriguing little
items? John
Sikorski thinks
they're pull
handles for
drawers. Do any
readers have
other ideas?
Special to the Chronicle


D] 746-9000.


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty Yvonne Jenkins|
BROKERPASSOC.' REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR REALTOR
CIRU RIG REALT


CITRSSPINGS


BEVERLY HILLS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 E7






ES SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


WHAT'S IN STORE FOR
















Designers give sneak peek at

this year's burgeoning trends


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

With a new year come
new trends in home de-
sign and decorating.
Among them: paler walls
contrasted with colorful
furniture, and plenty of
personal expression, de-
sign experts say
Coolest colors
Whisper-soft, ultra-pale
shades of pink -de-
scribed by designers as
"blush tones" are back.
But the '80s haven't re-
turned, says designer
Brian Patrick Flynn says,
at least not entirely
"What's different about
blush this time around is
what it's paired with. In
1985, you'd find it paired
with mauve and black
with tons of shiny brass
accents. Flash forward to
today and blush is likely
to be paired with preppy,
masculine tones," says
Flynn.
His favorite blush paint
is Barely Blush from Glid-
den, which he contrasts
with navy blue: "The
deep, rich personality of
the navy actually washes
out the blush, almost
causing it to look white,
and the overall effect is
fresh and gorgeous."


Speaking of white
walls, Los Angeles-based
designer Betsy Burnham
sees those coming back in
a big way
"I used to think white
walls looked unfinished,"
she says. "But I've com-
pletely come around on
this one, because white is
the ultimate palette
cleanser It gives every
space even the most
traditional a modern
edge, and sets the stage
wonderfully for layers of
color in upholstery, acces-
sories, area rugs and art."
But while wall colors
are getting softer and
paler, the opposite seems
to be happening with
furniture.
"Strong colors on up-
holstery are becoming
more of the norm," says
Kyle Schuneman, founder
of Live Well Designs, who
spent a chunk of 2013 de-
signing his first line of
furniture, in collaboration
with retailer Apt2B.
He opted to create sofas
in bright blues and
shades of orange because
"a bright sofa is no longer
just for a creative office
waiting room," he says.
"People are bringing
them into their homes."
See Page EO10


)


beds by interior
designer Brian Patrick
Flynn. who says that
bunk rooms are -
Sbecoming more and
more popular with
.------ ma owners who
have awkward bonus
rooms which are
otherwise hard to
furnish. Flynn sug-
gests investing in
custom built-in bunks
to maximize a home's
sleeping space while
also adding a stylish
architectural focal
-point.


Associated Press


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-1, ..






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Azaleas



in Central



Florida


Indica Azalea, Rhodo-
dendron indica, origi-
nally from Japan, was
imported to Holland and
Belgium about
1680. Southern
indicas were de-
veloped and hy-
bridized in the
United States
and promptly
became a staple
feature in gar-
dens of the
Southeast In
Central Florida, Jane'
heat zone 10, the JAN
summer sun is GAR
strong and more
directly over-
head than further north, as
in the Carolinas and Cali-
fornia. Thus, azaleas need
part shade protection in
Florida's hot wet summers.
Indicas grow well be-
neath deciduous trees
such as Red Maple, Aces
rubrum; Flowering Dog-


wood, Cornmus florida; Red-
bud, Cersis canadensis;
River Birch, Betula nigra;
Turkey Oak, Quercus lae-
vi is; and other
canopy trees.
The soil must
be rich in or-
ganic content to
hold moisture
and provide nu-
trients. Azalea
roots are gener-
ally shallow and
spread well be-
Veber yond the leafy
E'S shrub.
DEN Gardeners
grow azaleas for
their spectacu-
lar flowers. Colors range
from white, cream, yellow,
orange, red, pink and
lavender through to bur-
gundy Blooms may be sin-
gle, semi-double, double,
hose-in-hose or ruffled.


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Gardeners grow azaleas for their spectacular flowers.
Colors range from white, cream, yellow, orange, red, pink
and lavender all the way to burgundy. These lovely pink
specimens are from the 'Autumn Royalty' variety.



Jackie Davis

B. American Realty & Investments
I*** 117S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERX (352) 634-2371 Cell
EAL ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bidavis.com


See Page Ell


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 E9


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014
Continued from Page E8

One bold color to approach care-
fully this year: red-violet. "Red-
violet is the Pantone color of the
year for 2014," Flynn says. 'As a de-
signer whose specialty is using color,
let me tell you something: Red-vio-
let is about as complex as it gets."
"My trick for using it right is pair-
ing it with black, white and brass,"
he says. "It's not all that overwhelm-
ing, since it's balanced by the neu-
trality of the black and white, and
made a bit more chic and regal with
the brass."
Top textures
"For accessories, the trend seems
to be getting away from color and
going more into rich textures like
horn, aged metallics and linens,"
Schuneman says. "The absence of
color is becoming chic for smaller
items."
One texture Flynn says will have
a big moment in 2014: felt.
"Have you looked at Pinterest
lately? It's like every fifth photo you
see involves felt! Ever since the
handmade movement kicked in
back in 2010, felt has been used in
unexpected ways and in a modern
fashion," Flynn says. "What makes it
such a favorite for designers is how
easy it is to work with. It's amazing
for door upholstery due to its stiff-
ness. It makes for awesome craft
material, since it's easy to cut and
stitch, and it's awesome for kids."
An easy project for even the DIY-
challenged: "I modernized the clas-
sic kindergarten felt wall in a boy's
room by covering a wall with batting,
then literally upholstering it with
white and blue felt, then cutting tons
of felt into random objects and char-
acters to give the kids something in-
teractive and stylish."
Fresh inspirations
"The idea of personalization is be-
coming stronger and stronger,"
Schuneman says. "People are want-
ing their homes to reflect a more
unique perspective."
So rather than assuming that
everyone will be buying the same
popular items, "stores are doing lim-
ited runs on items more often, like
art in series or a special brand col-
laboration for just a season," he
says.
Burnham agrees. Homeowners
are increasingly looking to "large-


scale wall hangings" and other
pieces of art to express themselves,
she says, rather than doing it with
bold wall color
"Boy, am I sick of accent walls. I
really believe that trend is out! I vote
for art every time," Burnham
says. "If you're looking for some-
thing to cover big, blank areas, shop
on Etsy for macrame pieces. They
add such wonderful texture to your
walls, and artists like Sally England
have brought them back into
vogue."
She also recommends hunting for
vintage posters that speak to you.
Find them through online dealers
and auction houses, and then frame
them in a group.
"While the vintage ones are a bit
of an investment," Burnham says,
"they can be a lot more reasonably
priced than large-scale paintings
and photographs."
Another way Americans are in-
creasingly customizing their space,
according to Flynn: Western-in-
spired d6cor
"For years I've seen taxidermy
make its way into mainstream de-
sign, yet reinvented in new ways.
Lately, I've been looking to Ralph
Lauren-like cabins of the Western
United States for inspiration in my
own home. I think a lot of cabin-
inspired colors such as pea greens,
hunter greens and camouflage-in-
spired prints will become super
popular"
Flynn's cabin in the north Georgia
mountains is currently decorated in
pea green and accented with heavy,
masculine fabrics, Western hats and
antlers.
Tackling awkward spaces
"Tons of new-construction homes
have awkward bonus rooms" that
homeowners aren't sure how to fur-
nish, Flynn says.
One suggestion: "Why not turn
that space into an extra sleeping
area that can accommodate multi-
ple guests, but in a super-stylish, ar-
chitectural manner? That's where
the art of built-in bunks comes in,"
Flynn says.
"I turned a dated attic into a bunk
room and play space for two young
brothers by using one wall as floor-
to-ceiling, mid-century-style bunks.
This isn't exactly cheap to do, but it's
well worth the investment since it
maximizes space and adds an archi-
tectural focal point, albeit one that's
functional, to otherwise dead
space."


RATE
Continued from Page E6

signed contracts to buy previously
occupied homes last month. Cold
weather stalled home purchases.
To calculate average mortgage
rates, Freddie Mac surveys
lenders across the country be-
tween Monday and Wednesday
each week. The average doesn't
include extra fees, known as
points, which most borrowers
must pay to get the lowest rates.
One point equals 1 percent of the
loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-year
mortgage was unchanged at 0.7
point. The fee for a 15-year loan
declined to 0.6 point from 0.7 point.
The average rate on a one-year
adjustable-rate mortgage edged up
to 2.55 percent from 2.54 percent.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely
publication of submitted material. The earlier
Chronicle editors receive submissions, the better
chance of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance
of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication
Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication
Tuesday.
* Religious events: 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication
Saturday.


- DUNNELLON 2006 BUILT
3BR, 2.5BA, two story country home
with new hardwood, kitchen cabinets,
Corian and remodeled baths. Beautiful.
MLS 707164 $129,900


E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page A9

Solid colors prevail, but
many have a different col-
ored throat, splotches,
speckles and stripes.
Knowing which named
hybrid you have is impor-
tant, so you will know its
growing characteristics.
Pruning is unnecessary if
the right plant is put in
the right place with suffi-
cient space to grow to ma-
turity I will write about
pruning azaleas later in
spring.
Indicas come in tall,
medium and low growing
varieties. The old-
fashioned purple 'For-


mosa' has 3-inch diameter
single flowers once a year
for about three to four
weeks starting in January
and lasting into February
'Formosa' grows to 15 feet
tall and develops a thick,
woody trunk.
Obviously, this variety
should not be planted
near a home or under a
window Many older
homes had this variety
planted too close, and con-
sequently had to chop
them down. Pruning after
June will remove the flow-
ering for the next Febru-
ary There is also a 'Red
Formosa' with similar
characteristics and bur-
gundy flowers.
Medium Indicas grow to
8 feet tall by about 6 feet in


diameter The flowers are
borne in trusses or clus-
ters at the tips of new
stems once a year from
January to February They
are useful in a back border
or property line wildlife
buffer zone.
'Southern Charm' has
single-flowered, 3-inch tu-
bular five-petaled flowers
in a deep rose pink. 'Mrs.
G.G. Gerbing' has 3.5 inch
pure white flowers.
'George Tabor' has 3.5-
inch single flowers in
pale pink with darker
blotches and whitish
petal edges.
Low-growing Southern
Indica Azaleas readily
available in Central
Florida include 'Red Ruf-
fle,' which grows 2 to 3 feet


tall with a 2 to 4-foot
spread. Flowers are red,
ruffled and semi-double, 2
to 2.5 inches in diameter It
prefers afternoon shade in
summer It is suitable near
a home and under low
windows. 'Red Ruffle'
flowers in late fall through
winter It can have a sec-
ond flush of flowers in May
to June.
'Vivid' grows 1.5 to 3 feet
tall and as wide, while
'Dwarf White' grows 2 to 4
feet tall and wide. The
most popular low-growing
variety is 'Fashion,' with
salmon-orange flowers. It
reaches about 3 to 4 feet in
diameter, width and height
without pruning.
Florist Azaleas are less
hardy and are best kept as


house plants. They do not
thrive in Central Florida
gardens. Some named va-
rieties include salmon
pink and/or white 'Duc De
Rohn' and the pale pink
'Duchess of Cypress.' 'Lit-
tle John' is grown more for
the foliage, which turns
burgundy in cool fall
weather It has few and
sparse red flowers in
winter
Modern 'Encore' azaleas
are wonderful. I have
planted several dozen that
bloom from fall through-
out the winter until late
March about seven
months.
Each of the 27 named
varieties has a particular
height and diameter at
maturity They are initially


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 Ell

pruned by the grower and
rarely by gardeners and
are reliable plants in
amended flower beds. All
azaleas need regular wa-
tering and humus-rich,
well-drained soil. Summer
shade is important in Cen-
tral Florida.


Jane Weberisa
professional gardener
and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows
thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are
welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For an
appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@
maill, com.


SpcaiigiTerVit
&BenwoResaes


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 9 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
CARI MANL[Ii .10? n2.97R7 SLJ.qAN Miii FN .s-.42.2 VICTRIA FRANKI IN .10.427.777


SINGLE FAMILY HOME,3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE
Luxury and storage! Wth ove 3600 square eet f gorgeous appointed giving space this
home has all the optons. The tall cherry cabinets, Conan countertops, SS appliances and DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
walk-in butler pnty make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook. The massive formal ExqUste vlla 3 bedroom,2.5 baths plus a denand pool n prestigious Terra Vista. T home
vi ng area s perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring w ich has many beautul upgrades nclud a ng porcelain tle floors throughout, formal dintang room
carres through to the spacous family room. Large master sue w/sttng area & TWO walk-n w t cm har heght moldng, professonal wandowtreatments throughout, custom maple
closets, pt floor plan, guest bedrooms w/drect bath access& huge walk in closets. A cabnetry in the great room, den and ktchen have under cabinet ghtng & pullouts, gas
beautiful terrace garden and an oversized 2-car garage wth a separate golf cart entrance fireplace, aquarum-wtndowed breakfast nook gtves you an tncredvble vew overlooking the
com lete t s fabulous home. MLS 7 59 ............................................................. 4 22.900 th fa wav of the o la rSkw ew Golf Course. MLS 7 750 ................................. 324 .900


Stunningly beautiful 4/3/2.5 Michael Angelo model with custom changes allowing for a more
open feel. Situated on a private, amazingly landscaped lot at the end of a cul-de-sac in
Bellamy Ridge. Heated pool with waterfall feature. Custom designed fish pond complete with
water fountain. Exterior stone. Brick paver drive way, entrance and pool deck. Golf cart
garage. Private well for irrigation. This home is immaculate inside and out. Granite
countertops. 42" staggered wood kitchen cabinets. Sliding doors throughout the home
allowing for maximum light. Custom Armstrong flooring. MLS706244...................$679,000


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
- '-,--__- -DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS Professionally decorated Lantana maintenance-free home. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, plus den/ DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
S- MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING IN GATED GOLF COMMUNITY! Meticulously maintained office with French-door entry. Open floor plan design with ambient fighting throughout the Enter the foyer and be instantly captivated by the charm and tasteful refinements of this
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 4 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage detached villa on beautifully landscaped cul-de-sac lot home. Kitchen has Menllat cabinets with soft close feature & crown molding. Conan counter gracious home. Beautiful 2 bedrooms, plus den, 2 bath, 2-car garage Hllsde vlla. Many
AS GOOD AS IT GETS! One-of-a-kind immaculate 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 2-car garage, in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Screened entry to this villa with a spacious open floor plan, tops & gourmet stainless steel kitchen sink. Butler's pantry, eat-in kitchen & formal dining desirable upgrades such as huge mirror in formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, butler pantry,
plus golf cart garage. Custom pool/spa home with guest suite, situated on the best kitchen has eat-in dining area and breakfast bar. Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are room. Greatroom has specialty built in with custom arches & remote control fireplace. Minka ceramic tle and carpet throughout and so much more. Pristine condition, only lived in
homeste in Foxhfire on Skyview Golf Course. Professionally decorated, to many handicap equipped. The sliders to the large rear lanai offer a view of a green expansive '' '''' .... r--'--.-. r- '- -- seasonally. This home has arguably one of the best views in Terra Vista overlooking
upgrades to mention, enjoy exclusive living in this premier court yard home. A must lawn. Plenty of room for a pool. Home is ready for you to move right in. Enjoy the Citrus p u.................. .... ..... prestigious Skyview Golf Course. Come and sit on the extended lanai and watch a II the golf
see inTerra Vista. M LS 704934..........................................................................$589,000 Hills Country Club Membership Lifestyle with this home. M LS 705084.........$ 120,000 ... ... .. i S 269.000 action unfold before you. MLS 706279 ........................................................................ $259,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH I
Beautiful 3 bedroom, plus den, 2.5 bath, 2-car enlarged garage with magnificent pool with
waterfalls. Located on a prem ere residential Skyview Golf Course homesite. The picturesque :IAII IDETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH view with preferred exposure gives this customized expanded Windward great room floor DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Beautiful immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage villa in Brentwood. The 3rd
Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom, plus den, 2.5 baths, great room floor plan, plan with voluminous ceiling a radiant perfect setting. Extensive upgrades throughout, Maintenance-free vlla with an open floor plan design with great use of the space. 3 bedroom, bedroom is currently set up as a den. Open great room, a sunny atmosphere. Master
expanded and loaded with upgrades. Situated on Sky View Golf Course with breathe including tle flooring, kitchen cabinet, lighting, exterior lanai pavers, plantation shutters, 2 bath villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, living room, family room, formal di inning room, bedroom with window seat. Handicapped tub in guest bath. Guest bathroom is
taking views. Oversized lanai with lush landscape. Located in the premiere upgraded energy efficient features and anymore. Recently painted exterior. This stunning ceramic tle, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2-car oversized garage, all situated in accessible to both guest bedrooms. Minutes to golf course, pool, sauna, hot tub,
community of Terra Vista. MLS 702685 ............................................... .334.900 home has a trul s eal feein in restiaious move in condition. MLSS76562..369.000 beautiful Terra Vista. MLS703250 ................................................................. 179.OOO exercise room at Brentwood recreation center. MLS 707172 ...................... $129.900


I ......


I T TI


I T I








E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014




Real Estate
Classifieds


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

p.


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
mincl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $560 mo. Near
Walmart & 2/1 $515.
mo. 352-464-3159




1999 Mobile Home
28x60, bank owned,
Repo, Great Shape
Financing Available.
Call 352-795-1272
MUST SEE*
Crystal River 2 bed 1
bath singlewide Mobile
Home in 55+ park, Flor-
ida room, car port, sep-
arate laundry, furnished
$9000. 607-591-0273
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Fleetwood
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at$499/month
John Lyons (a)
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065

Owner Financing
Available for Mobile
Homes!
Call for Details
352-795-2377


/ THIS OUT!
2Br/2Ba w/screened
patio on over % acre
land. $22,500. Owner
Finance possible.
6851 Vanaman Ct.,
Cry Riv. 727-480-5512
DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER
3BR, 3Bath, includes
mother-in-law apt.
roof over, sheet rock,
on 3 lots, 2 sheds,
waterfront $38,000
(217) 474-7727
FLORAL CITY
2BR/1/2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4
acres, must see inside,
nice & Clean $42,000
(will consider reasona-
ble cash offers)
352-465-7606
Homosassa 2br/2ba
on approx 1 acre.
New bathrooms Ig
screened porch
dead end rd.
$45,900. 352-302-1383
HOMOSASSA
Large 3BR/2BA DW,on
large lot. New carpet,
Freshly painted inside
$3500 to move in
RENT To OWN
3402 S Aberdeen Ter
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330
LECANTO $42,500
3bd/2ba, i acre,
new c/h/a & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond.
(352) 621-3929
Mobile Home on
Large Lot Fixer Upper 2
BR, 1BA, Carport,
Laun. Rm. Fl. Rm.
Asking $15,000
Drive by then call
115 N. West Ave.
Inverness 352-621-0559
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-2377
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 1/4 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Ready To Move In
3/2 with large back
deck on 1.5 acres.
Close to town
call 352-795-2377


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984

1989 Palm Harbor DW
in 55+ Park, 60 units in
park, incl. most furn.
Rent $408/mo incl
water, sewer, trash,
pool and clubhouse
$18,500 (352) 344-5172

55+ MH Gated Com-
munity. Large 3/2,
2000 Jacobson Triple
Wide. 2000+ sq. ft.
Ready to move in.
$68K. Serious inquir-
ies only. Owner will fi-
nance with $20K
down.
727-967-4230

Floral City, DW,
2bd/lba, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726


For Salek -

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Nice 2br/1.5 ba dw
in exceptional 55+ park
$10,700 cash or lease
to own for $700. down
$179.mo- w/12yr payoff
+lot rent 352- 628-5977


Stonebrook 2Br/2Ba
1400 sq ft. Enclosed
screened room with
A/C, overlooks pond.
Pantry, full equipped
Kitchen, wood burn-
ing FP in living room.
Den & DR furniture.
Laundry room & W/D;
Shed with sink &
freezer. Partially fur-
nished. Too many
extra's to list. $25,000
8323W Charmaine Dr.
Homasassa, Fl
must see to
appreciate
615-692- 4045


WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090






MOBILE HOME LOTS.
Owner Financina. Has
Well, Septic, Impact
Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 746-7990








AfflON
RENTALMANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S875 & UNDER
8410 N. Elkcam Blvd.
3/2/1,1250 sq. ft.
272 N. Big Oaks Pt.
2/2/2,1510 sq ft
6441 W. Rosedale Dr.
2/2/1,1140sq. ft
S600 & UNDER
8 S. Fillmore St.
2/1,875 sq. ft.
1872 Freeman Pl.
2/1,902 sq. ft.
2332 W. Silver Hill Ln.
2/1, ground floor anpt
2334 W. Silver Hill Ln.
2/1, upstairs apt
For More Listings Go To
www.CitrusCountyHoimeRentals.womn


















Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. month
Agent (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?



Triplex 2/1 .......................$500
Heron Creek 2/2/1 ........... $700

Penrose 2/2/1 ...................$675
Hamnpton3/2/2..................$875
Marathon 3/211 Pool ..........$900

Lincoln 211,5/1 ...................$650
Daniel Ct, 2/2/1 ................. $650

Doublewide 2/2................$575
Jennifer Fudqe Cheryl Scruggqqs
Property Managqer/
SRealtor-Associates
352-726-9010






(352D 637-38O




RENTALS

COUNTYWIDE!

Starting at

$450

Call Today!







FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025







CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath du-
plex Large yard, garage,
washer/dryer hook up,&
private patio. $600 mo.
$1,200 move in Stewart
813-927-4647 or Kelly
813-927-0525


INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393


INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio in
quiet area. $525/mo +
$525 Sec; 2/2 large
screened patio. Beauti-
ful Ig apt completely tiled
on cul-de-sac. $600/mo
+ sec. 352-344-0238


CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFI
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD










CRYSTAL RIVER
NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incl Water lawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514





CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Carport, Fur-
nished & Unfurn. Extra
Clean. (352) 613-4459


CITRUS HILLS
End Unit, unfurn., 2/2
with carport. Mem-
bership
included $650 mo.
352-302-3705




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, Duplex water, trash
lawn, $475. mo.+ $300
sec. 352-212-9205, or
(352) 212-7922
INVERNESS
clean, attractive 2/2/1
3619 Theresa Lane,
Terry Houston, Foxfire
Realty (352)359-1442




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANADO
Terra Vista 3BR Villa,
furn. seasonal/ longer
Incd's ext. Maint. &
club memb. 302-7559
LECANTO
Cottage 1/1 $525
incls. pwer /water, Dirt
Road (352) 220-2958




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new
appliances Move in
$1350, 442-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm. Scrn por.
$600. 352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, EZ Terms,
$575 mo. 697-1457
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2/1 Cornor lotnice
back porch $675/mo
1 st& last 352-220-2958
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 Spacious,
open concept.
$800/mo, 1st + dep
(352) 302-0229
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1 /2, Screen Room
$750.mo. Fist/last/Sec.
(352) 302-6025
Homosassa
2bd/1 2ba, nice yard
no gar, $700. mo. +
$700. dep + credit ck
(513) 349-1675
INV. S. Highlands
2/2/2, Pool, $850. mo.
(267) 250-4499
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411
INVERNESS
3/ 2 Ig LR,DR
FRQDW,W/D,shed
$650.mo. 410-829-9976
INVERNESS
Highlands, 3/2/2
$700 mo + dep.
(352) 422-6978


Ea

INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850.
352-726-7212


RENT TO OWN
lnv 3 bd/No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM






HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


OLD HOMOSASSA
Very Nice 1/1 unfurn,
no pets/smoking
$550/mo, LT lease
water/garbage incld.
941-730-2359






CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms in house, Full
kitchen, Near Publix,
furn., one price pays
allI,+WIFI $120wk./440.
mo. sm. $140wk/$490
mo. Irg. 352-563-6428







AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFIMR(
REALTY ONE













DEB
THOMPSON

f One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
Service with a smile
seven days
a week.

Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(avahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickgbf@agmail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514



2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
REMODELED
MOVE-IN READY
$59k.
352-527-1239





Newly Updated 2/2/2
w/family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
3229 N Juniperus Way
$114,900352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased











SEmployment

sourcee ish.









Fw.ch ron iceonline .cm


Real Estate is MY
Business!!
15+ Years Exp

Teri Paduano
Broker/Owner


Realty
Connect
Masonic Business Ctr
111WMainSt, #311
Inverness, FL
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com




4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009



3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3/2
1/4 Acre MOL
on River Oak Lane
Inverness
Glamour bath
Eat-in Kitchen
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Nice Double Lot
3A Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


400 Properties in
251 Offerings
JOHN DIXON



[A, --- Online Bidding Available
ALNA i 4 1Self wit Rese~


Hoe


For Sale II, A
Point of Woods,
Inverness 3/2,
new roof, encl. porch,
(352) 726-7367
RENT TO OWN
Inv 3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
back yard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 14 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
For Sale By Owner
55+ Gated Comm.
2/2/2 w/den. Many
upgrades. $92,000
Must call for appt.
859-274-5242




2Br/2Ba/1CG home
on approx 1 ac. land
Owner Financed
$80,000 w/$5,000
down. No qualifying
(305) 891-2323

AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R 4MC
REALTY ONE





3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFMR(
REALTY ONE


Hoe

Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!





For Sale ,,A
HOMOSASSA
4/2, BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell




4BR/2BA, 2400 Sq ft.
pool home, add'l heat
pump. Well maintained
Pine St. Fully Furnished
$225,000
(352) 382-5298


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Sil great values
out
there for buy-
ers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BEMIY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments










Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Six dedicated
Professionals led by
Bruce R Brunk,
assisting clients in
making their Real
Estate dreams
a reality.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"


Citrus County
Dream Team
At Keller
Williams Realty
Uncompromising
Service with
honesty, integrity
and expertise.
Why settle for less?
Call today at
352-637-2777
Se habla Espanol
www.CitrusSold.com
"Our Team Serves
Your Dream"





I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt&
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515













SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855















Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Citrus Cour
BHomes^-


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

HOMOSASSA-Halls
River Rd, Deep Canal
to Gulf. 3BR/2BA mo-
bile w/ add on + roof
over room with pool
table, boat lift+ boat
sheds & more. Asking
$145,000 352-422-1311


LAKE ROUSSEAU
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642


Hoe


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


Citr sCo n y
IHomesJ-


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 E13


CitrusCount
IHomesJ-


'Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms ,Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002





For Sale ,

Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some turn, new Lanai
& Lam, ceramic floors.
$48,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100

Inverness Village Condo
2/2 ground floor over
looks pool mature trees
55 plus community
1035 living area
634-3976

Whispering Pines Villa
INVERNESS
2/2/1, NEW Carpet, Tile,
Paint, All appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900. 352-726-8712





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFu-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"






WE BUY HOMES
Any Condition
Quick Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271






FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre.land survey &
clear title.assessed at
$23,800.power and
homes in area. ASKING
$8,500. 813-792-1355






GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
Call 352-527-2711




MUST SELL


HERNANDO
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
Lot for sale $15,000
OBO. 781-864-1906
352- 726-2821






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The bib necklace: You can make your own


JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press

Who knew that a bib
would get so much adult
wear?
The bib necklace -
often giant, sometimes
sparkly started hanging
around a lot of necks a few
years ago, and it's still
here.
Of course, some women
would rather craft than
buy theirs. From buttons to
lace, here are a few
examples:
Jenny Chapman of
Chowchilla, Calif, has
turned her love of buttons
into expressive necklaces.
"Buttons are so fun,"
says Chapman, who scours
thrift stores and eBay for
them. "When you get them
and there's a big jar and
you have no idea what
you're going to find ... it's
like a treasure hunt."
She sews each button to
a slightly larger disk of
black felt and then glues
them to a sheet of felt with


felt glue, available at craft
stores. She allows the en-
semble to dry and then
cuts around the buttons to
create the bib. After that,
it's just attaching bails -
necklace hardware at
the bib's top two corners to
connect an organza chain.
"You really don't need to
know anything to make it
yourself," says Chapman.
"The most time-consuming
part is figuring out the but-
tons, but that's fun."
Find Chapman's Bubble
Button Bib necklaces at
her Etsycom shop, Jenny's
Trinket Shoppe.
Carly J. Cais of Portland
Ore., makes clever enamel
jewelry using craft store
supplies and something
new: Martha Stewart
Crafts Jewelry Enamel
and Enamel Activator The
enamel paint lets you
color metal jewelry pieces
in two steps, far easier
than traditional enamel-
ing, which involves kiln-
drying the pieces.
"You get the glossy


sheen of enamel without
all the hassle," says Cais.
"It looks like stuff you
could buy in the store, but
still I made it myself."
First, clean the metal
charms with alcohol. Then
mix the paint (there are 10
colors) with the enamel ac-
tivator and let it sit 2 to 3
minutes to thicken before
applying it with a toothpick


to the charm. Allow the
pieces to dry 24 hours to
harden, and then assemble
charms and filler pieces
onto larger filigree squares
for support. Attach two
jewelry toggles and a chain
to the upper corners of the
piece for wearing.
Detailed instructions
with photos for the DIY
Enamel Spring Flower Bib


lI ,. JOANN MARTIN [] i]
PPreferred
REAL ESTATE I%!-

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net







2599 W Apricot Pine Ridge
4390 W Pine Ridge Blvd. Beautiful 2002 Rusaw pool home. 3
Pine Ridge bedrooms plus office/den upgraded
Beautiful 4/4/3 with office. Caged in ground salt HVAC 2008, master suite with sitting
water pool with spa 3981 sq. ft. of living area, area, dual pane windows, bright
stainless steel appliances Wet bar, Tray ceilings, kitchen w/skylight. A must see, call
plantation shutters, Intercom, and summer kitchen. today. Priced at $209,900
Come see it today! Priced at $465 OO, Directions: Rte. 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to left on Apple
Directions: Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd. to home on left. Valley to right on Apricot.


Necklace are at Cais' blog,
Chic Steals.
More bib-crafting ideas
pour out of Marianne
Canada, host of
HGTVcom's Web series
Weekday Crafternoon:
Spray paint a large,
graphic piece of lace, let it
dry, and then attach jump
rings and a chain for
hanging.


Using an X-acto knife,
cut out a graphic shape
from leather or a light-
weight sheet of balsam
wood, then attach jump
rings and a chain.
Roll fabric rosettes
and attach them with
beads, lace, buttons or
whatever suits your fancy

See DIY/Rage E15


KEY "Always There For You"
E Ln GAIL COOPER

I ', F (352) 634-4346
i L Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4ui. mindspnng.com


HEATED SALT SYSTEM POOL WITH SPA POPULAR CUSTOM ARUBAVILLA
4/3/3 Westind V with 2564 sq ft of living 3/2/2 Hammocks villa 2060 sq ft living
SHardwood flooring Plantation shutters Dual pane windows include FL room
SGas fireplace in the Great Room 10' flat ceilings throughout
SSecurity system well for the yard Glassed Florida room under air
SQuartz -SS appliances staggered maple cabinetry Oversized custom Master walk-in closet
SLarge lanai with entertainment counter Paneled cabinetry under counter lighting
S3-zone heating and cooling Side entry garage gives extra storage
S8' leaded beveled front doors Furnishings available separately
#702152 $299,900 #706332 $137,900
See .JVirtual IIIours i @ ww Jresal .I..Ies IB.I..I


PBB^iuwwuiauaiiiv^
- iB Fj


I enlarged screened room. Solar tubes, .. : :.- r :. .-.r, .- -.-
great view, oversized great room & any many amenities. Yard completely fenced, updated
more extras. $109,000 1583130/705997 kitchen & bath $229,900 1583131/706848





1W.AbnHampton Hills.Priocvrciclrrvet
Scores & the sparkling waters of Floral City Lake Hampton His. Portico covers circular drive to
off the backyard w/a deep water dock. this brick-faced home. Storm shutters, pavers on
Home has huge rustic back porch w/separate pool deck, double pane windows. Extras galore.
workshop & 2 car gar. $234,900 1583132/706959 Social membership. $479,000 1583133/708156

CridindInvrnes, FL 3
Real^^ivg ^^BU Iatp 352-344-5535^^
Fax:352344-256


E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


COLDMILLm
BANKOR






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SLEEP
Continued from Page E4

elephants, rabbits and lambs.
(www.landofnod.com)
Pillow Pets, those soft plush toys
that double as pillows, include un-
usual animals like koalas, buffalo
and elephants, as well as dolphins
and dinosaurs. A lighted version,
Dream Lites, projects a starry night
sky on the wall for 20 minutes.
(www.mypillowpets.com)
Projectors that display starry
skies and frolicking sheep, and pil-
lows that glow in the dark, have
caught on in recent years.
Elizabeth Pantley, author of "The
No Cry Sleep Solution" (McGraw-
Hill, 2002), says darkness is nature's
way of signaling that it's time to
sleep. The projectors or glowing pil-
lows can be part of the bedtime rit-
ual, she says, but then turn them off.
Or put them behind furniture so the
glow isn't as strong.
(www.pantley com)
Many of the projectors do come with
a 20-minute programmable shut-off
White noise can be relaxing for
many babies and children, Pantley
says, especially a steady, unobtru-
sive, relaxing sound, such as rain-
fall, ocean waves or, for newborns, a
heartbeat.
Homedics' SoundSpa collection
includes machines that play sounds
of nature, including moving water,
crickets and heartbeats. There's a
portable clip-on model for traveling.



DIY


The Graco Baby Sweet Slumber
Sound Machine is a veritable sleep
disco with 12 different sound options,
MP3 port for customizable plug in
music and a night light. Duux makes
a cool-mist humidifier shaped like a
mushroom, with an aromatherapy
option (wwwhomedics.com;
www.toysrus.com; www.duux.com)
You can personalize your child's
bedtime routine by downloading
songs or stories to Cloud B's
menagerie of soft sleep critters. The
company also offers the Lullabag, a
soft, baby-size zippered sleeping
bag. (wwwcloudb.com)
If high-tech peace of mind is im-
portant, check out wwwsafe
tosleep.com: They offer a sleep mat
integrated with a fiber-optic system
that monitors baby's breathing and
movement. You can also record your
voice or lullabies.
For troublesome sleepers,
Pedrick likes the Sleep Buddy sys-
tem, which consists of a blue light
projector, a storybook and a reward
chart. Stickers are awarded for
nights when kids don't get out of bed;
after consecutive successes, small
prizes can be offered. (www sleep
buddycom)
Brooklyn, N.Y, mom Betsy
Bradley dealt with her daughter
Phoebe's colicky early months by
using a Metropolitan Museum of Art
lullaby CD and one of Miracle
Baby's swaddling blankets. The one-
size-fits-all shaped cotton blankets
wrap baby snugly so she can't twitch
and startle herself. (www miracle
babycom )


ON THE WEB


Continued from Page E14 U www.chic-steals.com.


- onto sturdy backing, such as
heavy felt or leather Finish with
jump rings and a chain.
Some of these ideas are pictured
at Pinterest.
While the bib and its relative -
the collar necklace have been
trendy for years, they have staying
power, says Canada. She looks at the
fashion world, where necklines
often incorporate rhinestones or
other "blingy" accents.


www.JennysTrinketShoppe.
etsy.com.
www.hgtv.com/weekday-
crafternoon/show/index.html.

"It's such a nice way to update the
more basic items in your wardrobe,"
says Canada.
Making it yourself lowers the cost
and carries bragging rights, too -
"being able to say, 'Ohhhh, you like
that? I made it,"' she says.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engagement
announcements, anniversaries, birth announcements and first
birthdays.


311 W. Main St., Inverness
352-726-5263
LA N K www.landmarkinverness.com BEST



LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


SOMETIMES YOU DIG TO THE BOTTOM of the
barrel for ideas... & houses. Got one for ya! 1911 IT'S NIFTY & THRIFTY! 2/2/2 Beverly
3/2, carport. $32,900. 707964. 819 Cedar. Hills Buy, 1526 living, $58,000. #708032.
fomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. 95 S. Columbus. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014 E15








E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014


lN =11.116 iliiFslil FslinLoI

lA.I.-a l Fall 1, 1 1 .l :.lli '.illi -lla'r
ddh.l,lah:l '''a 1,:1',al,:.al.all
Mi_ = /:1:lI"I' $52,000
Call Buddi Giibson at i3521 3914385
lot an appointment


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I" 11h 1"1,, 1 1,, ,, 1i" ,,' h,, ..I, ,1 I ,,1
'". I A 6.,I- -,, I h I, l I.h, I' I I .I i
III I i, ,i l Ii i I I 11: 1 I' 11 F,111,,,,I I
I, I I hI'i l'l ,n l I' ii II
r i : av f ASKING $68.900
Pit D,> ,352' 212 7280
oo.i'an. ca, a 2Infid,,a.m


I-- ... .. ... rnlEu mn i
:. il. .. H _FH F-o I 1%' I. _.1., .
ll. h...., h I...... a I I ......1 I. I..
h ..l.l..... ..ai.H :h. al a..o .. 1\ I 1 .). 1

rFiF = -.-,:- $49.000
Cill Doaa Illh.- 352 422 4627 1q mr.t al,


OLD HOMOSASSA
. i1:11:1 I'1 II l l l.ll i. :,:,.' ,d II. M Ih.
p.. ll ..I .: 'J I pllf I,. .d .,] ...

Ml = 1ii:' -1:i.: ASKING $250.000
Call Jim Motion 352 4222173


* I: i l .:.ll I. II I1. _I1:11:16.
* 3 a L PlI3 :. .aI
* I: i.j l I i.:..:. I ,V ..i.l
U lI_,: ;hj. 1l.. f.l I. -..: ld,,J .
* H i .11 .lir.q c li.:ih l hi.| .i ci:.
* Hi,|l. li,:i, ..dHllll, I. .:l.I,:J(.
Ml _; = 1 :i,:: ili $219,000
Jeanne 0O Blillaid Pickiel 3522123410
1111 C/liusCounli Sold con,


* I ,- I. ll. I. II .. I
* i .h IA ,' a I. Il : IJI.1

* -a I-I i i,. a 'l, I ,II 1,1 .:. I
* Nl VV lii..]la-
MG5 =h:w .' ,x $205,000
Jeanne ot W/llaid Pickiel 212 3410
iw'i:'i'. Ci, usCounie'Sold. corn


CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT
BLOW OUT SALE!

'-. 11 '.- i I. ....,l 11111 ..i I .-
H ir.il ,J ,illvihjll I,,,iI .iiJ b, l hll i' l".IJJ J
Mi.: =i :;l:; GREAT BUY S399.000
and looking lor ollis.
Call Onade 352 302 7699








WELL MAINTAINED
I. .Il....l I I I..l6, Vh v l,l Hill hI...III
I I ,,, B -d v-~I, 1-1 .1 1
I l.. 1'|,. .a ,ll I a.a l-' ,3 '-VV-

K ....I IF .I. l l. l I_ I I ,I4 .'. 1 ,'If 1 I. 'I 1:.


Mi il: i,: :-. ASKING $48,000
Call Nlancy Jenks 352.400 8072


* 1. ll llll7.a ll. 1 ll l
* Na-,,,ai l,:,,:,1 A l: a l, llli,: i
* Ilh Idh .h h hl.. I.,: h.:1,11,

Mi_ _/ii:_'/ ASKING $85,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


RIVER LAKES MANOR BEAUTY!

, H III'Il ; ,llnl 11 I 1 nI ,:li nl ih, l
.ai,-.a' II ,nn-.nI ,:ni,:'' allll la-h.lin Ia bla .lhl~il~ll


Mi =/l:h.:,. ASKING $176,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352.4008072


TWO BEDROOMITWO BATH
MAINTENANCE-FREE VILLA IN WINDERMERE
lIl'ilal...i ,j .. .-:.n.l' ..''''''''''' I..L'''''I ,n.I 1,1i.
.:.i, 1 i ml, na.l 1 1 .:.l .. i ni ,.: f M l = /1:1':,111 :,
Call Isaac Bay Ion lot a Peisonal Tou
3526972493


ROOMS WITH A VIEW
. ... ... i h i.. h ,' f r I... n I i'i l I "..I ,, h, 1
i, h .. I ,,, I' ,,I h l,, 1, i ,
h l hl, I, 1 '. 'i, h l. I ',,, ,,i I m i.
i h, I'i i'i I i l h' I
r 1 : = -1".l_'4 ASKING $158,900
Pit Di,- ,3522 2127280
OPENl llHOiUSE SN Fl Fl M2inrid .jm


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4PM


STONE RIDGE LANDING
I_ .:..I na- |i.l

$24,500
Willaid Pickiel 352 2019871


* _'II I, 6 I h.,lh

* Ii,.:..i l.d I.,Jhi J. I 4 l.6 l.
* B'- ,a:lillhil la'',l ,,l.,p',,I
MI =/11111 1' $145,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
iivit'i. CililusCounl'So/d. con


UHMUII'UL arUILlzb ULIMN

11 ,, 6 .'1 61, ..i d, ii 11 'II ,, I Ii ,, ii
I '11 i,,,I 6.i11h", 6.i11bI, h l, ,h. 1 1 I
.i i iii i 1. 6 I. I.1 I ,i ,,,I I I'I h i d ,i ,, Ii6 .i1
i,- .1,-, -,I m-, ASKING 89.900
C hll I Sr'll Fl,'lld.I lH ?J'6S'?' F,' a'"l ei"
Fl''ii 1 all ,Ia'l Fl 'lA 1,y lala -'l 'tfJS


.1,, , ,1,,I h ,hh,,,,I I, ,I ..... ..II I 1 I, I ,, I
i ,.,,,,,. i,,,I ,, ..i..,i.. ,, li,,,i ....i ,hi ,,, ,,iI ,, ,,,I


PRICED FAR BELOW REPLACEMENT AT S218.900
P.aL ,,,, ,J" .' .I' 'pp
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S C uII' '2 a '266668 .
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Ca.aalaaa 21 1288888


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$75,000 EACH
Call Jim Motion 352-422-2173


LARGE INVERNESS
4 BED, 3 BATH POOL HOME
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$250,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


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1, I .. ... I $139. 800. r11.: = -l:i i :
Pi Dil,i ,352 212 7280
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