Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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PAGE A4


HIGH 68


LOW 52


C ITR U


COUNTY


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
For the breadth of his charitable work in the county, Inverness Walmart store manager Larry Gamble has been named the Chronicle's Citizen of the Year.




Larry Gamble,


bow


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS
Larry Gamble is a big guy with an even bigger heart.
As store manager of the Inverness Walmart Supercenter,
he goes above and beyond company directives for community
participation and involvement. From the homeless to
veterans, from animals to kids, from the annual Thanksgiving
Feeding Alliance to regular donations of bicycles and tents to the
Family Resource Center and other organizations that serve people in
need, if it matters to the community, it matters to him.


"I've known Larry for a great number of
years, and I haven't met anybody more mag-
nanimous than him," said Inverness Mayor
Bob Plaisted. "He's always there, whether
it's personally or through Walmart, doing so
many things for the community Wherever
you turn, Larry's there helping however he
can. I have to tell you, the guy should be
citizen of the year"
This year, he is.
Because of his willingness to not only write
checks and provide food and merchandise
to local charitable organizations but be
involved with hands-on help, Larry Gamble
is the 2013 Citrus County Chronicle Citizen
of the Year
See Page A8


Commission

chair, CCC

prez hit the

books before

meetings
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
When the county commission's
meeting agenda posts on its website
the second and fourth Fridays, some
residents read it in depth, undaunted
by as many as 800 pages.
One such avid reader, Inverness
resident John Wade, pores over it to
prepare for a study session he will
have with Commission Chairman
John "JJ" Kenney before the meeting
the following Tuesday of the Citrus
County Board of County Commis-
sioners (BOCC).
Recently, Kenney described to the
Chronicle's editorial board his rou-
tine for addressing the county's cur-
rent issues since the BOCC's Public
See Page A5


I 511 21111 II


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
At 79, Cecylia Ziobro Thibault still vividly remembers the
years of horror she spent as an American girl in Poland
captured by Nazis during World War II and living as a slave
in labor camps. Her life is the subject of the book "Trapped
in a Nightmare," written by her son Robert Thibault.


SUNDAY


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Horror in portrait:

Some of World War II's

worst was her childhood


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HERNANDO When
you're 5 years old, you're sup-
posed to ride your bike, play
dress-up with friends and
dream about being a ballerina
or a veterinarian when you
grow up.
You're not supposed to
watch bombs fall on your
church and your school.
You're not supposed to be
shoved into a cattle car by
men in uniforms shouting or-
ders and pointing their guns.
You're not supposed to be
taken to a forced labor camp,
be fed food barely fit for con-
sumption, witness your
mother get beaten.
Cecylia Ziobro Thibault was
5 years old when all this and
more happened to her
The years of horror she
spent as an American girl in
Poland captured by Nazi Ger-
mans during World War II and
living as a slave in labor


.~14
I:' 4
.~14
.4


INDEX
HI_ :. I ': ,, -
I., ii rill l:-


camps is the subject of the
award-winning book
"Trapped in a Nightmare,"
written by her son Robert
Thibault.
She was also featured on
CNN International.
"I was born in Poland to an
American-born mother," Ce-
cylia Thibault said. "When
she was 12, her mother my
grandmother brought four
or five of her kids back to
Poland because she didn't like
it here in America."
When Thibault's mother
was 17, she entered into an
arranged marriage with a 30-
year-old Polish soldier A year
later, Thibault was born;
when she was age 3 her father
died from kidney disease.
"Sept. 1, 1939, Hitler in-
vaded Poland," she said. "I
was 5 years and 3 months old,
and my life was changed
forever"
See Page A2


I:.i I:.
[.1.- .~14
I,-.


TODAY
and Monday
morning


take


a





A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


HORROR
Continued from Page Al

People who were young and
healthy were ordered into slave
labor in Germany Thibault's
mother packed a suitcase and
left their home. First stop was a
school where Thibault saw people
crying because they were being
separated from their families.
She was not however, separated
from her mother Instead, they
were ordered to take a shower
and someone cut off her long
hair Next, they were stuffed into
a railroad cattle car After sev-
eral hours, they arrived in East
Germany to the sound of sol-
diers screaming at the long lines
of people getting off the train.
"In front of us German farm-
ers were looking us over," she
said. "One man pointed a stick at
my mother to get in his buggy."
The man took Thibault and
her mother to his farm and
showed them their room no
heat, no water
"I still remember everything
because it was so traumatic,"
she said. "When I remember
Poland, it was so nice and quiet,
and then all of a sudden German
soldiers and their guns."

Thibault's mother was or-
dered to work in the fields from
6 a.m. until sometimes 8 at night.
At 5 years old, young Cecylia was
left alone, day after day, year
after year
"You're not in prison, but yet
you are," she said.
At one time, the farm foreman
complained about the poor work
of the Polish and Russian labor-
ers, and Thibault's mother spoke
up, saying, "If you feed your peo-
ple better, they'll be stronger and
produce better"
For that, she was beaten.
"When I heard her scream, I
ran downstairs and tried to com-
fort her," she said. "Her face was
full of blood."
By the time Thibault was 10,
her mother had given birth to a
baby boy, whom Thibault took
care of while her mother
worked. By then, she was old
enough to work and cleaned the
stables, fed and cared for the an-
imals and picked fruit in the
summer
"I got very sick with a kidney
ailment" she said. "The German
farmer took pity on me and took
me to the doctor in his horse and
wagon. I screamed in pain the
whole way There were German


kids standing in line to see the
doctor, and I couldn't stand up.
They taunted, 'The Polish swine
can't even stand up,' but I could-
n't talk back to them. The doctor
gave me medicine, but it took a
long time to recuperate."
0 0
After years on the farm,
Thibault's mother requested to
be transferred to a different job,
so they were sent to a sawmill
factory where wooden rifle butts
were made. While her mother
worked, Thibault was allowed to
recuperate and take care of her
brother
All along, she and her mother
were treated like animals, but
still not as badly as some of the
others. At the time, Thibault did-
n't notice. She just lived day to
day
"The only thing we had was
hope and our faith in God," she
said.
The sawmill was located near
a train station, which was a tar-
get for American bombs.
"There we felt what war was
really like," she said.
At the beginning of spring
1945, the bombing stopped.
Thibault recalled peeking out
through a peephole and a man
saying, "I see an American sol-
dier coming and he's armed!"
Not knowing what would hap-
pen, whether the soldier would
kill them with his machine gun
or take them as prisoners, they
raised their arms in surrender
He asked about German sol-
diers, and someone told him
they had left that morning.
"He said, 'Everybody come
out' There were about 10 of us,
and then we see American sol-
diers giving candy to the chil-
dren," she said. "The adults
knelt down and kissed the Amer-
icans' boots for liberating us."
Cecylia Thibault was 11 years
old.

The war hadn't officially
ended, but the end was near The
American soldier instructed
them to find their way to DP
camps "displaced persons"
camps where they would be
safe.
"He told us we don't have to
work for free any more," she
said. "We told him we were hun-
gry and hadn't eaten for days,
and he said the Germans had to
feed us for free. So we went to
the restaurants and they did
feed us for free, and they were
so accommodating and friendly
They didn't want any trouble."
They walked to Saalfeld


LOCAL


Thibault's mother was ordered

to work in the fields from

6 a.m. until sometimes 8 at

night. At 5 years old, young

Cecylia was left alone, day

after day, year after year.

"You're not in prison, but yet

you are," she said.

At one time, the farm foreman

complained about the poor

work of the Polish and Russian

laborers, and Thibault's

mother spoke up, saying,

"If you feed your people

better, they'll be stronger

and produce better."

For that, she was beaten.


Saale, a town in Germany, where
they found people celebrating.
"Everyone was drunk- they
were robbing the wine cellars,"
Thibault said. "I was sipping on
empty bottles trying to find out
what it tasted like, and I got
drunk, too."
After that, Thibault, her mother
and brother traveled from DP
camp to DP camp, 70 in all, from
1945 to 1948, heading for Amer-
ica. By this time, her mother had
married a Polish officer who had
escaped a Gestapo firing squad.
"My mother didn't want to go
back to Poland," she said. "She
said, 'I want to go back to Amer-
ica where I was born."'
While at the camps, Thibault
went to school to learn English.
"I had never been to school
before," she said. "The first time
I went to school was in 1946; I
was 12. I loved it so much. I went
during the day, then again at
night with the adults."
Eventually, the family arrived
in America and settled in New
York. Thibault finished school
and worked for a Polish-language
newspaper as a receptionist and
bookkeeper for nine years.


She met her husband, Robert,
at a Polish Immigration Com-
mittee Ball. He was the
evening's entertainer
0 0
Fast-forward to 2008 or 2009.
For more than 60 years, Ce-
cylia Thibault had kept most of
her memories to herself Her
son Robert Thibault, who lives
in Atlanta, said he and his sister
had only known that their
mother had lived in a labor
camp in Germany when she was
a child, but they didn't know ex-
actly what that meant.
"We didn't know enough to ask
questions when we were little,
and as we got older and did ask,
her answers were vague, and
that conditioned us not to ask, so
we let it go," he said. "About five
years ago she said, 'I have to
start writing down my story"'
Mrs. Thibault said when she
heard former Iranian president
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad say the
Holocaust was a myth, she knew
she had to tell her story of the
things she experienced and saw.
She enlisted her son to write it
for her


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

"When she began telling me,
there were many times my jaw
was on the floor," Robert Thibault
said. "So many times I had to
stop the conversation because
she'd remember things that she
really didn't want to talk about. It
was emotionally draining forher"
He said that his mother's rec-
ollections were detailed and
vivid, and when he would re-
search to fact check her state-
ments, he would discover that
she was correct every time,
down to the colors of the stripes
on the soldiers' uniforms.
"I spoke with a psychology
professor and asked how it
could be that her memory is that
good," he said.
The professor told him the
mind never forgets life-chang-
ing, life-threatening moments,
and from age 5 to 12 that was his
mother's constant daily life. She
lived in terror for seven years.
0 0
Of Thibault's experiences in
slave labor camps, one thing had
always been a mystery: Although
she and her mother had been
treated poorly, even inhumanely,
they had been treated slightly
better than the other captives.
It wasn't until Robert Thibault
was talking to the head librarian
at the Holocaust Museum in At-
lanta that the mystery was
solved. The librarian told him
that per American law at that
time, a child born to an Ameri-
can parent was automatically a
naturalized American.
She told him the Germans
were afraid of both his mother
and grandmother because they
were documented Americans
and that after the war they
would have to account for every
American life. They could treat
Thibault and her mother poorly;
they just couldn't kill them.
0 0
Cecylia Thibault is a shy
woman, but has gained boldness
in telling her story
"The first time I heard Alh-
madinejad say the Holocaust
was a myth, I ignored it," she
said. "But when I started hear-
ing people in America say it, that
hurt and I could not keep quiet.
Innocent people died, and they
did not deserve it I have to speak
up for them, because they can't."
The book, "Trapped in a
Nightmare," is available at
Barnes & Noble, Amazon.com
and all major booksellers.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicle
online. com.







Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26,2014



TATE &


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around theCity to take another look at Three Sisters


Citrus County

Cutler Spur project
nears completion
Sections of Cutler Spur
Boulevard within the city of
Crystal River will be closed
for final paving and striping
from Jan. 27 to 31.
The project limits are from
Fort Island Trail to U.S. 19.
The road is expected to be
permanently reopened by
Saturday, Feb. 1.
Detour routes will be posted.
Access to businesses and
residences will be maintained.
For more information, call
352-795-4216, ext. 314.
Homebuyer class
offered Saturday
Citrus County Housing
Services is offering First-time
Homebuyers classes to in-
terested individuals from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on
Saturday Feb. 8, at the Citrus
County Resource Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. There is no charge
to attend these sessions, but
you must reserve a seat.
Participants who attend
the entire session will receive
a certificate of completion
required for the Neighborhood
Stabilization Program and
other first-time homebuyer
assistance programs. The
class will encompass the
entire homebuying process,
from preparing credit and
finances to shopping for a
home to home inspection,
fair housing, available loan
products, loan approval and
closing. A variety of industry
professionals will present
and answer questions.
This session is sponsored
by Citrus County Housing
Services and Community
Housing Partners.
No child care is available.
Lunch will be provided by
TD Bank. Please call Jen
Pollard at 352-527-7522 or
Pat Wilkerson at 352-527-
7526, or email Jennifer.
Pollard@bocc.citrus.fl.us
to register.
Any persons who require
a special accommodation
for accessibility must let the
organizers know at least 72
hours in advance. TTY is
available by calling 352-
527-5901.
Refuge friends host
photographer today
The Friends of Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge Complex Inc. will
have its annual meeting at
2 p.m. today in the Fellow-
ship Hall of the First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
For more information, visit
www.friendsofchazz.org.
This event is free and open
to the public.
Featured speaker will be
John Moran, a Florida nature
photographer. Moran has
been a resident of Florida
since age 2 and is a Univer-
sity of Florida graduate. His
photography has appeared
in numerous books and
magazines, including Na-
tional Geographic, Time
and many others.
Moran's presentation will
be on "Our Water, Our Future."
For more information, visit
www.friendsofchazz.org.

St. Johns County
Alleged victim's note
prompts capture
Officials said they were
able to track down a woman
allegedly kidnapped by her
boyfriend, thanks to a note
she passed to a stranger at
a gas station.
Investigators said the note
asked the recipient to call
the woman's father and not
the police, but the stranger
did contact St. Johns County
Sheriff's deputies Friday af-
ternoon. They spotted the car
in which the woman had been
taken about two hours later.
The woman's boyfriend is
facing kidnapping, domestic


violence and drug charges.
He was released on $15,000
bail Saturday.
-From staff and wire reports


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER-
Three Sisters Springs is
topping the agenda again
for city officials.
At issue is setting a date
for a proposed workshop
to deal with overcrowding
at the water entrance to
the springs and schedule a
date for a town hall meet-
ing to come up with ways
to allow regular public ac-
cess to the 57-acre prop-
erty and soon.
The proposed time and


date to discuss congestion
is 12:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7,
in the council chambers.
Discussion will focus
primarily on the recom-
mendations of a working
group comprised of mem-
bers of the city's Water-
fronts Advisory Board,
state officials, the sheriff's
office and citizen stake-
holders. One of the recom-
mendations calls for an
ordinance to ban alcohol
use in the congested area.
Also, council members
will schedule a town hall
meeting to discuss access


to Three Sisters Springs
and possible city council
action. That meeting is set
for 6 p.m. Feb. 21.
Council members came
to a consensus at a recent
meeting to have a town hall
meeting to discuss possi-
bilities of obtaining public
access to the property
Several proposals being
floated for access are ex-
pected to be discussed.
The city council also will:
Hear the sheriff's of-
fice's quarterly crime re-
port, to be presented by
Capt. Danny Linhart.


* WHEN: City of Crystal
River CRA meeting
6 p.m.; council
meeting 7 p.m.
WHERE: Council
Chamber, City Hall,
123 Northwest
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
CONTACT:
352-795-4216 or
visit crystalriverfl.org

Approve the reap-
pointment of Signe Voelz
and Thomas McCarty to
the Tree Board for terms
expiring Feb. 14, 2017.


Consider approval of a
resolution asking that
county government con-
sider options within the
city limits for the potential
purchase of a permanent
location for office space
for the west side of the
county
And, in its capacity as
the Community Redevel-
opment Agency (CRA)
board, officials will discuss
the CRA plan for the city
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Laura Schwanger, track & field gold medalist in the Paralympics Games of 1988, is all smiles as she competes in the kayak rowing portion
of the first annual Citrus Sprints Regatta. She took up rowing in 2006 and was awarded the Paralympics bronze medal for rowing in 2008.
Schwanger was stricken with multiple sclerosis in 1982 while on active duty in the U.S. Army.





Merrily, merrily


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

INVERNESS
student athletes from
schools throughout the
region traveled to Lake
Henderson on Saturday for a
day of competition.
Two hundred rowers competed
in 25 races at the inaugural Cit-
rus Sprints Scholastic Regatta.
"Citrus Sprints is a regatta
that our ROCCS (Rowing Or-
ganization of Citrus County
Students) group wanted to put
together and hold for Inverness
and Citrus County," said Jodi
Zakaria, one of the organizers.
"It is the first ever regatta held
here in Inverness. Our rowing
club consists of middle and high
school students. We travel all
over the state of Florida and up
to Tennessee to attend regat-
tas. We have never had one in
Inverness, and we thought this
is a prime location for holding
regattas because of the van-
tage points for the viewers."
Grace Wiegman from Tampa
agreed with Zakaria that Wal-
lace Brooks Park was an ideal
location for spectators.


Local rowing team ROCCS competes in the first annual Citrus
Sprints Scholastic Regatta. Pictured from right are Jacob Fuffman,
Tyler Finley, Yaroslav Denisoe and Lance Miller.


"Our son is rowing today,"
Wiegman said. "We like being
able to see the whole race
course."
Zakaria said spectators sit in
Wallace Brooks Park while
rowers are loaded into the
boats at Liberty Park.
"They get to see a race from
a side view, which is important
because you get to see who
crosses the lane," she said.
'Also, we have Liberty Park,
which holds all of the boats. It
is a great area, as the lakes are
beautiful and we have down-


town Inverness with all of the
great restaurants."
Zakaria described the diffi-
culty of rowing: rowers must
maintain their balance in the
boat and act together
"If they are out of sync, the
boat just won't go," she said.
"The kids have to know how to
put the oars in the water and
how to pull through the water
They are rowing backwards, so
they can't see anything. And the
boats are tiny They are just wide
enough for the kids to sit in
them. They have to stay in sync


or the boat will start wobbling."
The diverse boats raced with
one, two, four or eight rowers
to a boat. In addition to
ROCCS, teams included
Gainesville Area Rowing, the
Lake County Rowing Associa-
tion, Steward's Foundation
(Tampa), the South Orlando
Rowing Association and
Berkeley Prep (Tampa).
Zakaria thought the inaugu-
ral regatta was a success, and
has a promising future.
"It has run fantastically
smooth," she said. "This is a
very small regatta, as it is our
first one with six teams. We
kept it small on purpose. Nor-
mal regattas are 20 to 30 teams.
It has been amazingly calm
and relaxed. We have had a lot
of feedback from other teams.
What we are hearing is that is
a fantastic rowing venue and
one of the best that people
have ever been to."
The regatta was presented
by the law firm of Deutschman
& Zakaria, with the Chronicle,
Gardner's Concrete Inc., Crystal
Chrysler Dodge & Jeep, Pos-
piech family and Zakaria fam-
ily as sponsors.


County debuts new, friendlier budget format


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

Residents who find the
county's budget to be a baf-
fling array of numbers
should be heartened to
learn that the document has
been worked into a more
reader-friendly format
The new version at
373 pages contains more
accounting documentation
and reflects the organiza-
tional structure of the
county It can be opened in
sections.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe and Manage-
ment and Budget Director
Cathy Taylor announced


Tuesday they have re-
leased the 2013-14 Citrus
County Budget in response
to residents' comments
and commissioners' re-
quests. Staff has worked to
make it easier to find
information within the
document and to format
it to post online for
convenience.
Taylor described the
new format as capable of
paving the way to add per-
formance measures into
the budget process.
"Key performance indi-
cators provide trans-
parency to the use of
public resources and com-
municate the county's op-


rational performance
and program accountabil-
ity," Taylor said.
The new document in-
cludes economic data, de-
mographics, personnel
listing, a glossary and a di-
rectory of acronyms.
Several new features
allow better understand-
ing of the document:
Account numbers have
been removed and the doc-
ument is divided by cate-
gories, such as General Fund,
Enterprise Funds, etc.
Revenues are grouped
by type and expenditures
are grouped by function.
Staffing information is
provided for each depart-


ment for the present year
and the previous two
years.
The budget summary
includes graphics to illus-
trate concepts.
To view the budget online,
visit: www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us/managebudget/
managementbudget.htm.
Hard copies can be re-
quested at the Lecanto
Government Building at
3600 W Sovereign Path in
Lecanto.
The Comprehensive An-
nual Financial Reports
(CAFR) presents the year-
end financial statements
for the county, including
statistical data, and can be


found listed by the year on
the Financial Services De-
partment, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court's website at http://
tinyurl.com/citruscafr
The Board of County
Commissioners scheduled
six presentations in Janu-
ary through March 2013 to
review details of the
county budget by func-
tional categories and rev-
enue sources. These
presentations may be re-
viewed at www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us/managebudget/
management_budget.htm.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormerat
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn.






A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday This is a year to listen
carefully, not to preach. Don't take on
too much, and avoid overindulgence in
any aspect of your life. Simplicity will
be the key to progress. Go after only
what's actually important to you.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be
careful not to allow others to spend
your money. Use your intellect to daz-
zle anyone of interest.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Now is
not the time to have a personal con-
frontation. Focus on your own prob-
lems not someone else's.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Travel
will result in a better understanding of
yourself and others.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) This is a
perfect day to open your home to
friends and family Talking to all parties
involved in this person's issues will
lead to a solution.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- You can
make or break a relationship based on
how you handle yourself today. Think
about the larger picture, and be honest
and direct at all times.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Overly
indulgent choices will be a problem for
you today Adjust your diet and exer-
cise regimens to improve your future.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Now is not
the time to allow yourself to lie idle. Ac-
cept an invitation to get out and do
something unusual, and you will dis-
cover some new possibilities.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't
make changes that make you feel un-
easy Confusion will lead to making re-
grettable choices today Get your
personal space organized to better
meet your needs.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You have
a special ability to strike a balance, and
today that trait will help you mediate for
someone who is not clear-headed.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Involvement
in a risky venture will not be to your
benefit. Consider how to adjust your plans
in order to meet your goals. Don't allow
others to mislead you in any way
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You
are likely to overreact if you don't make
plans to keep yourself on the move.
Pushiness will lead to problems with
your partner or other family members.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you
maintain openness in your approach,
you will get a much better response.
Now is not the time to keep secrets. In-
teractions with authority figures will
cause stress.


ENTERTAINMENT


'Turtleman' facing
animal welfare scrutiny
LEXINGTON, Ky. Ken-
tucky's "Turtleman" is facing fed-
eral scrutiny after a magazine
report claimed animals were
harmed while filming his reality
TV show on Animal Planet.
"Call of the Wildman" features
Ernie "Turtleman" Brown
removing nuisance animals with
his bare hands.
An article published Tuesday
at Motherjones.com claims the
show stages fake rescue situa-
tions that sometimes harm ani-
mals. It also claims a baby
raccoon and several bats died
after being used on the show.
The Lexington Herald-Leader
reported the U.S. Agriculture De-
partment, which enforces the
Animal Welfare Act, is reviewing
the situation.
Animal Planet spokeswoman
Patricia Kollappallil told the
paper the safety of the animals
is the channel's top priority. She
also said the show's producers
have hired a federally licensed
wildlife handler to be on the set at
all times since the allegations first
came to light several months ago.
USDA spokeswoman Tanya
Espinosa said the agency is
looking into whether those involved
in the show need a federal license
to exhibit the animals. A license is
required under the Animal Welfare
Act to exhibit certain animals to
the public whether on TV or in
person, such as at a zoo or circus.
Animal Planet spokesman
Jared Albert told the paper
Brown was unavailable to com-
ment. But Brown's cohort on the
show, Neal "Banjo Man"
James, did talk with the paper.
"If I saw any of that kind of
stuff going on, I would have
stopped it," he said, calling the
Mother Jones article "some kind
of doctored up story."


Associated Press
Models wait in the backstage of Sarli Couture's spring-
summer 2014 high fashion collection, unveiled in Rome, on
Saturday.


Brown got in trouble with the
state last year when Kentucky
Fish and Wildlife issued a warn-
ing after an August incident in-
volving a deer filmed in a store in
Brownsville. A warning letter ad-
vised that Brown's Nuisance
Wildlife Control Operator permit
does not allow him to handle deer.
The letter warned Brown that he
could have his permit revoked or
receive a criminal citation if there
were further violations.
Two months earlier, a poison-
ous non-native snake was re-
leased into Danville city
swimming pool without proper
authorization for an episode that
made it appear cottonmouths
had invaded a park. A Danville
city investigation found the inci-
dent was completely staged,
something that Animal Planet
spokeswoman Kollappallil said
should not be news to anyone.
"We're clear we do dramatiza-
tions," she said.
Boston event to choose
Lego Master Builder
SOMERVILLE, Mass. -
LEGOLAND Discovery Center
Boston is hosting a two-day
building competition to make


one fan's dream of getting paid
to work with Legos come true.
The event hosted at the
Boston Public Library starting
Saturday is free and open to the
public. The winner will be re-
warded with a full-time salaried
job with the title of LEGOLAND
Discovery Center Boston's Mas-
ter Model Builder. This position
is in charge of building new fea-
tures, exhibitions and models at
the center.
Suspected intruder
arrested at Selena
Gomez's home
LOS ANGELES Los Angeles
police have arrested a 19-year-old
man on suspicion of trespassing
at the home of singer-actress
Selena Gomez.
Officer Rosario Herrera says
a family member called 911 Sat-
urday morning after seeing an
intruder on the property in the San
Fernando Valley's Tarzana area.
She says Juan Daniel Garcia,
of El Mirage, Ariz., was booked
on suspicion of trespassing. Po-
lice don't know if he has a lawyer
yet and a telephone number for
him couldn't be located.
-From wire reports


COIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 26, the
26th day of 2014. There are 339
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 26,1784, in a letter to his
daughter Sarah (also called "Sally"),
Benjamin Franklin expressed un-
happiness over the choice of the
bald eagle as the symbol of Amer-
ica, and stated his own preference:
the turkey, calling it "a much more
respectable Bird, and withal a true
original Native of America."
On this date:
In 1788, the first European settlers
in Australia, led by Capt. Arthur Phillip,
landed in present-day Sydney.
In 1837, Michigan became the
26th state.
In 1870, Virginia rejoined the Union.
In 1934, the 125th Street Apollo
Theater opened in New York City's
Harlem district.
In 1939, during the Spanish Civil
War, rebel forces led by Gen. Fran-
cisco Franco captured Barcelona.
In 1950, India officially proclaimed
itself a republic as Rajendra Prasad
took the oath of office as president.
In 1962, the United States
launched Ranger 3 to land scientific
instruments on the moon but the
probe ended up missing its target
by more than 22,000 miles.
Ten years ago: The Bush ad-
ministration retreated from its once-
confident claims that Iraq had
weapons of mass destruction.
Five years ago: Nadya Suleman
gave birth at Kaiser Permanente
Bellflower Medical Center in California
to six boys and two girls, the world's
longest-surviving set of octuplets.
Today's Birthdays: Sportscaster-
actor Bob Uecker is 79. Alt-country
singer-songwriter Lucinda Williams is
61. Rock singer-musician Eddie Van
Halen is 59. Actress-comedian
Ellen DeGeneres is 56. Hockey
Hall-of-Famer Wayne Gretzky is 53.
NBA player Vince Carter is 37.
Thought for Today: "As long as
men are free to ask what they must,
free to say what they think, free to think
what they will, freedom can never be
lost, and science can never regress."
- J. Robert Oppenheimer, American
physicist (1904-1967).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L FPcast City


Daytona Bch. 69
Fort Lauderdale 77
Fort Myers 76
Gainesville 65
Homestead 77
Jacksonville 61
Key West 75
Lakeland 73
Melbourne 73


164/40 o.or0 1 0/41 0.o0r
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusiveday
i TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
!-" High- 68* Low: 52
r Mostly cloudy.

-r MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
t. High: 69 Law:49
v"!11 .,' Mostly cloudy, 40% chance of rain.
W TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
.J) I High: 62 Low: 34o
*' i1Mostly cloudy, 10% chance of rain

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 64/45
Record /29
Normal 70/52
Mean temp. 51
Departure from mean -10
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00
Total for the month 1.51"
Total for the year 1.51"
Normal for the year t .74
'As t 7 pm a I ternew
UV INDEX: 5
0-2minimal, 3-4 low,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.23


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 37.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, oak
Today's count: 8.6/12
Monday's count: 9.4
Tuesday's count: 10.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 54
Pollutant: Particutate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING, (AFTERNOON)
01/26 SUNDAY 01:55 06:55 12:54 19:27
01/27 MONDAY 02:57 07:54 13:52 20:27
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
nW I ... ...- ..... ...,6 03 p.m .
j7 ()l saii=aP i -....=..7:19 am
( ISEB T 2 5......................... 2:55 a.m.
Jan30 FebB Feb 14 Febb22 0W41 TWJIA080 153 Pm.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today't Fire Dangar Rating Is LOW. There is no bum ban.
For more Infonnrmation call Florida Dvsion of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
nrj'maliononn drought condition s please vtSit Ih e Dvison of Foreskry's Web site:
"llp Itarr II.n 1 ce 'Tiieir ll
WATERING RULES
Lawn watedrng liirrted to two days per week. before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.. as
Iblows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday arior Sunday
ODD addresses rrmay water on Wednesday and/or SabuKlday,
Harnd watertig withashiut-off nozzle or m T IOfl a no.n-grass areas, such
as vegetae gardens, flowers and shubs. can be dore on any day and at any
irme.
Cities County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant nmaiedail 352-527-7669. Son-e rew planlhg' may quality lot 3rd Mcn 11
waiting allowances.
To repon violations, please call City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, COty of Crystal
Rwer @ 352-795-4216 eid 313. urnm orawmedCAlrus County 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay "'At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
Cty Mgh Low
Chassahowftzka* 2:35am. 0.7t, 3:12pm. 0. 2ft. tO:68a.m 0.1 f 7:43p.mO.2 ft,
Crysl flivr" 1221 am, 22.12h, 2l pm. 1.4 ft. 8:07a.m, 0.1 tl 7:41p.m0.9B.
Wilthlaoochee' 1142am. 2.6 Ht. 10:37 p.m. 3.0ft, 5:46 a.m. -0,7ft, 5:29p,m.1,2f,
Homosass"' 12.40a.m, 1.4 It., 3:23p.m. 0.5ft. 1O55a.m. 0.0 i 7;11 p.mO.3B.


H L Feast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasotla
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: NE then S winds around 5 Gulf water
10 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters light chop. Tonight: South 5
winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet. 0
Bay and inland waters a light chop. 5 6
Talen at Aripoks
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.56 28.62 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.38 38.39 39.52
Tsala Apopka-Invemrness 39.42 37,44 40.60
Tsala Apopka-RForal City 40.12 40.14 42.20
Levts reported in leet above sea eve RFood stage ur takes are based on 2.33-year 0ood.
ihe rnean-annua fl ood whic has a 43peent chance o f being equalled o exceeedd ki
any one year. This data is o otaneOd fr m e Southwest Fkrida Water Managemnent Dislrct
and Is subject to revision In n even wl the DIOrict or the Untld Staites Geological Survey
be le any damages miing oul of he use of this daa. It you have any quflons you
should contact he HydmroIoglca Data Sectn al (352) 796-72 1
THE NATION














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30 18 .-5 24 23 pc Omaha 44 27 42 -4 pc
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44 36 52 4 pc SanDiego 72 62 64 56 pc
31 20 .18 32 -4 sn SanFrancisco 65 48 59 49 pc
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68 26 74 31 pc Sealtle 54 34 49 38 1
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46 27 .01 47 4 pc Topeka 50 40 56 7 pc
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67 48 67 42 pc
6230 6422 pc WORLD CITIES
77 57 70 51 pc ion 9/5pc
40 24 .12 44 9 pc SUNY I/KY Loisdon w53/37pc
5329 5820 pc C K London 57pc
30 10 08 20 -10 sn Acapuo 87/75/s Madrid 6W3Bs
24 2 02 17 -17 sn Amsterdam41r/39pc MexicoCity 71/44/s
59 31 61 43 Athens 64/46/pc Montreal 24/-1 I/sn
56 19 56 34 pc Bellng 44/t9/pc Moscow 6-2f
48 25 01 56 13 pc Berlin 1718/s Paris 4635/cd
48 ~ ~ ~ P A 25 0M5613 M P6..%. Q .., .. ....


ourmudlla 6 eDWQq
KEY TO oWNMToM M coudodif dze Catro 77/80/s
Malinrh-hriiuy pcPttlyeI.loud ra-min; Calgary 5 Z11S
mrN-lu vuw min; ,aumry; Ishiowers; Havana 80/55/pc
utIw tsillundutoms; w~wndy. Hong Kong 69t/4k
WSl 02014 Jerusalem 71S13fs


nio 91/75/pc
Rome 51/32/pc
Sydney 71t62pc
Tokyo 59/S32pc
Toronwio 2/4/sn
Warsaw 0lows


: LEGAL NOTICES




B id Notices ...................... D8

Lien Notices .................... D8

Self Storage Notices.......D8

Surplus Property.............D8


4--) CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"I'm probably my own worst enemy,"

Kenney said. "But if the Realtors Association

wants to sit down, I'll talk to anybody

anywhere over a cup of coffee."


BOCC
Continued from PageAl

Participation Ordinance went into ef-
fect in October The ordinance restricts
members of the public to speaking only
at the start of the meeting for up to three
minutes, or at public hearings or on items
introduced too late to be published on
the meeting agenda. Before the ordi-
nance was passed, public comment was
invited during most busi-
ness discussions before the WHAT: Ci
BOCC. Board of
"Since we implemented Commiss
this new open-to-the- meeting.
public (session), on Mon- 0 WHEN: 1
days, at 10:30, I sit down Tuesday;
with Brad," Kenney said, comment
referring to CountyAdmin- questions
istrator Brad Thorpe. "We taken at 1
go over the whole agenda. U WHERE: I
Then, at 1:30 in the after- Citrus COL
noon, I meet with the pres- thous e,11
ident of the Citrus County Ave., Inve
Council (CCC) and we go
over the whole agenda. I AGENDA:
ask him if there is anything www.bocc
he would like to be pulled at the Lec
for discussion and that has ment Buil
been pretty open." the comrr
The CCC is a not-for- suite on t
profit, nonpartisan consor- floor of t
tium of homeowner housein I
associations, civic groups 0 WATCH: -
and environmental groups. will be tel
Wade, the CCC president, on cable I
told the Chronicle how his nel 622 o
pre-meeting discussions House an
came about. 71 on Cor
"I didn't ask him," Wade meeting
said. "He brought up the viewed liv
issue and made the com- small digi
mitment."
Preparing for a meeting with Kenney
takes commitment from Wade, too.
"What I do is I read the agenda and all
the backup documentation, which takes
hours," Wade said. "If I find anything that
is controversial or of a great deal of in-
terest to the CCC members, then I print a
copy of that section and we go over those
issues."
The meetings last about an hour and
are friendly and nonconfrontational.
"JJ listens very intently and I have
learned that he has thoroughly gone over
his book," Wade said. "Every issue I have
brought up he has been familiar with, so
I know he is doing research on the
documents."


The meetings have shown results.
"So far, everything that I've talked
about he's taken some action on," Wade
said. "I've been happy with all of them."
In preparing, Wade discusses the
agenda with other CCC members before-
hand. Wade said they don't expect Ken-
ney to agree with all their views.
"In my opinion, he has been pleased
with these meetings because another set
of eyes is looking at all these items to see
if there isn't something that could be very
good or could be very bad," Wade said.


trus County
County
ioners

p.m.
public
s and
Swill be
1:05 p.m.
Room 100,
unty Court-
10 N. Apopka
mess.
Available at
:.citrus.fl.us,
canto Govern-
Iding or in
-lissioners'
he second
ie court-
nverness.
The meeting
evised live
TV on Chan-
n Bright
d Channel
Tmcast. The
also can be
e online in a
ital format.

be control."


Kenney was aware that
other groups' representa-
tives may ask for the same
type of meeting.
"I'm probably my own
worst enemy," Kenney
said. "But if the Realtors
Association wants to sit
down, I'll talk to anybody
anywhere over a cup of
coffee."
These meeting sessions,
however, are not seen as
replacing open public
comment during the regu-
lar commission meetings.
Wade said he thinks Ken-
ney will attempt to lift the
current limits on public
comments to return the
practice of allowing mem-
bers of the public to ad-
dress commissioners
before they vote on an
issue.
"He's not sure that there
will be as much as before,
but he certainly wanted to
make it better," Wade said.
Kenney concurred.
"There will be a change
coming," Kenney said.
"The big thing is going to


Keeping to the topic would be one re-
quirement. Questions would be ad-
dressed to Kenney
"I'll turn to the administrator and ask
him: Do we have that information avail-
able? If not, Ms. Pearson, can you please
get that gentleman's name and address so
we can give him his information?" Ken-
ney said, referring to Assistant County
Administrator Cathy Pearson. "They are
not taking over the meetings. That's our
business meeting. We welcome public
input"
Contact Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com.


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 A5





A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014

Norma
Bradley, 88
DUNNELLON
Norma J. Bradley, 88, of
Dunnellon, died Friday,
Jan. 24, 2014, at home
under the care of her lov-
ing family and Hospice of
County.
-^^^BMarion

Norma
was born
B l on July 22,
1925, in
Bristol, Pa.,
to Herman
and Clara
Norma Alexander.
Bradley She mar-
ried the love of her life,
Clarence T Carver Jr., on
July 13, 1944. They resided
in Yardley, Pa., where they
were blessed with five
children. Norma was a
wonderful mother; grand-
mother, friend and en-
joyed many years as a
homemaker and a floral
designer Norma and
Clarence relocated to
Florida in 1973.
Norma is survived by
her children Clarence T
Carver III and his wife
Mary, Kenneth E. Carver,
Vaughn F Carver and his
wife Ruth, BarbaraA Carver,
and Nancy L. Courtney
and her husband A.D.; her
surviving grandchildren
Nathan Carver, Jason
Carver, Meredith Carver,
Kacey Carver, Jared
Carver, Mariah McSweeney
and husband Ralph, Brid-
get Carver, Scotty Williams
and wife Darbi, Kristi
Coulter and husband
David, Tina Roberts and
husband Brian, Sydne
Bradley and Danielle Cash
and husband Greg. She is
also survived by eight
great-grandchildren; her
dear friends Alma Manns
and Betty Bradley; and by
her church family at St.
Margaret's Episcopal
Church of Inverness,
where she was a member
of the Daughters of the
King.
She was predeceased by
her husband Clarence T
Carver Jr and her two sis-
ters and brother The fam-
ily is planning a
celebration of Norma's life
at St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church of Inverness at a
later date. The family
wishes to thank Hospice of
Marion County for its kind
and compassionate care.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
George
Jobe, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
George Guy Jobe, 81, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Jan. 22, 2014. He was
born on July 13, 1932, to
Marvin and Alverta Jobe
in Mount Vernon, Ill.
George was preceded in
death by his parents;
brothers Marvin Wood
Jobe and Robert Donald
Jobe; sister Wanda Lee
Roberts; and children Al-
bert Edward Jobe and
James Jobe. He is survived
by his loving wife Jean
Jobe; children Virginia
Pauline Wassernam, Eu-
gene Guy Jobe, Patricia
Ann Pinder, Robert Don-
ald Jobe, Adena May Jobe,
Johnny Gerald Jobe, Jerry
James Roberts and Guy
Anthony Jobe; sister Mary
Lou Duhame; brother
Noble Jobe Jr; and many
grandchildren. Private
cremation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.
Duane
Mensch, 70
HOMOSASSA
Mr. Duane Herman
Mensch, age 70, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., died Friday,
Jan. 24, 2014 in
Brooksville, Fla. Services
and burial to be held in
Michigan. Arrangements
are under the direction of


the Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory A memorial
Service will be held in
Florida at a later date.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Joyce Caul, 86
DAVENPORT
Joyce A. Caul, age 86, of
Davenport, Fla., and Crys-
tal River, formerly of Buf-
falo, N.Y, passed away
Jan. 23 at her home under
the loving care of her fam-
ily and Cornerstone Hos-
pice. Born on Aug. 3,1927,
in Buffalo, N.Y, to William
E and Cecelia (LoTempio)
Savarino. Joyce moved to
Florida four years ago
from Buffalo, N.Y She was
a member of St. Benedicts
Catholic Church in Crystal
River, the Crystal River
Village HOA, Ladies of
Charity, a volunteer at the
Roswell Park Hospital, an
avid Bridge player and she
loved to travel.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 52
years Lawrence D. Caul on
July 4, 2003.
She is survived by three
children, Geraldine Caul,
Joy Marie and her hus-
band Henry Suraci and
Lawrence Caul and his
partner Brian Carboy; four
grandchildren, Christen
and her husband John
Wolferd, Charles Suraci,
Amanda Suraci and
Hunter Carboy; and two
great granddaughters, Lil-
lie and Fiona Wolferd.
Family will receive
friends on Sunday, Jan. 26,
2014, from 3 p.m. until 5
p.m. at the Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. Mass will be
offered at 9:30 a.m. on
Monday, Jan. 27, at St.
Benedicts Catholic Church
in Crystal River, Fla. Pri-
vate cremation will follow
the Mass. Burial will be in
Buffalo, N.Y, at a later
date to be announced.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.



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LECANTO
Gaythee A. Lumapas, 49,
of Lecanto, Fla., passed
away Jan. 24, 2014, at Hos-
pice House in Lecanto,
surrounded by her family
and friends. She was born
on Nov 15,1964, in Kanka-
kee, Ill., to Gary and Mar-
garet Young. She grew up
in Cedar Lake, Ind., and
graduated from the Uni-
versity of Illinois Circle
Campus in Chicago.
Gaythee was a registered
occupational therapist.
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She was active in the health
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dren's Hospital, where she
and her daughter Mary
helped with the planning of
the new hospital. Gaythee
participated in the Relay for
Life cancer events and was
the featured speaker for the
2013 Lecanto Relay She
enjoyed studying the Bible
and attended Bible studies
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husband Fabian; her daughter
Mary and son Rio of Lecanto;
her mother Margaret Young
of Beverly
stHills; sister
Maralee
Lockridge
of Knox,
Ind.;
a brother
Danny
(Tammi)
Gaythee Young of
Lumapas Dyer, Ind.;
sister Vykke (Michael)
Proud of Francesville, Ind.;
and brother Gordon (Jenny)
Young of Cedar Lake, Ind.
She was a favorite aunt of
numerous nephews and


nieces because of her will-
ingness to plan and have
fun. They will miss her
unique sense of humor
Funeral services for Mrs.
Lumapas will be at 5:30 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014,
at the Heinz Funeral Home.
The family will receive
friends from 4 p.m. until
the hour of services. In lieu
of flowers, donations may
be made to All Children's
Hospital, St Petersburg, Fla.
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Sign the guest book at
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Westminster change celebrates
Associated Press_ _


NEW YORK When the na-
tion's foremost dog show added an
event open to mixed breeds, own-
ers cheered that everydogs were
finally having their day
They see the Westminster Ken-
nel Club's new agility competi-
tion, which will allow mutts at the
elite event next month for the first
time since the 1800s, as a singular
chance to showcase what unpedi-
greed dogs can do.
"It's great that people see that,
'Wow, this is a really talented mixed
breed that didn't come from a fancy
breeder,"' said Stacey Campbell, a
San Francisco dog trainer head-
ing to Westminster with Roo!, a
high-energy see exclamation
point husky mix she adopted
from an animal shelter
"I see a lot of great dogs come
through shelters, and they would
be great candidates for a lot of
sports. And sometimes they get
overlooked because they're not
purebred dogs," Campbell said.
Roo! will be one of about 225
agility dogs whizzing through tun-
nels, around poles and over jumps
before the Westminster crowd.
And, if she makes it to the cham-
pionship, on national TV
Animal-rights advocates call the
development a good step, though


GREAT DANE PHOTOS/Associated Press
Roo!, a husky mix, clears a hurdle Dec. 14, 2012, during an agility com-
petition in Orlando. The husky mix will be one of about 225 agility dogs
whizzing through tunnels, around poles and over jumps as she competes
in the Westminster Dog Show's new agility competition in February.


it isn't ending their long-standing
criticism that the show champions
a myopic view of man's best friend.
Westminster's focus is still on
the nearly 190 breeds three of
them newly eligible that get to
compete toward the best-in-show
trophy; more than 90 percent of
the agility competitors are pure-
breds, too. But Westminster rep-


resentatives have made a point of
noting the new opening for mixed
breeds, or "all-American dogs," in
showspeak.
"It allows us to really stand be-
hind what we say about Westminster
being the show for all the dogs in
our lives" while enhancing the
138-year-old event with a growing,
fun-to-watch sport, said David


Le eveiydog
Frei, the show's longtime TV host.
Some dog organizations have
allowed mixes to compete in obe-
dience, agility and other sports for
years, and the prominentAmerican
Kennel Club governing body for
Westminster and many other events
followed suit in 2009. It has
since enrolled some 208,000 mixes
and dogs from non-recognized
breeds as eligible competitors.
One of the nation's oldest sport-
ing events, the Westminster show
had a few mixed breeds in its
early days but soon became pure-
bred territory This year, more
than 2,800 pedigreed, primped
dogs are set to be judged on how
well they fit breed standards that
can specify everything from tem-
perament to toe configuration.
That has long made Westmin-
ster a flashpoint for the purebred-
versus-mixed-breed debate.
Proponents say breeds preserve
historic traits and help predict
whether a puppy will make a good
police dog or hiking companion.
Animal-rights activists argue
that the desire for purebreds fuels
puppy mills, forsakes mixed-breed
dogs that need homes and some-
times propagates unhealthy traits.
The American Veterinary Medical
Association hasn't taken a position
on whether mixed breeds or pure-
breds are generally healthier


Poll: 49 percent in U.S. are pro football fans


Associated Press
NEW YORK About
half of Americans say they
are fans of pro football, ac-
cording to an Associated
Press-GfK poll, and nearly
a third of those fans say
they would not consider
attending a Super Bowl -
even though few have any
idea how much it costs.
The NFL is still the most
popular sports league in
the United States, drawing
the highest TV ratings by
far Its revenues climbed
above $9 billion last year
and the Super Bowl be-
tween Seattle and Denver
in New Jersey will be the
most watched television
program of the year
The AP-GfK poll was re-
leased Saturday
Last year, 56 percent of
people polled said they
were NFL fans, and that
number dropped slightly
to 49 percent this year
Even among those who
said they were NFL fans,
31 percent said they had
no interest in attending a
Super Bowl, even if they
could afford it.
Fans have complained
about high ticket prices,
with very few available to
the general public at face
value, and most fans hav-
ing to go through resellers
to get into the game.
Fans had a wide-range
of guesses as to what a face
value Super Bowl ticket costs,
though 41 percent chose
an amount between $251
and $500. The median esti-
mate was $500. The median
estimate from fans on what
it would cost to buy a Super
Bowl ticket on the second-
ary market rose to $1,000.
Ticket prices for the
Super Bowl range from
$500 to $2,600, though only
1,000 tickets are available
for $500. Forbes reported
Saturday that the average
price for a ticket to next
week's game from a ticket
broker or secondary seller
such as TiqIQ was $2,505,
according to SeatGeek,
which tracks prices. Prices
change daily
Nearly half of fans (48
percent) would be willing
to pay $250 or less for a
Super Bowl ticket if their
team was playing in the
game and 8 percent said
they wouldn't be willing to
pay anything to attend the
game, even if their team
was playing. Overall, the
median price fans say
they'd pay to attend the
Super Bowl to see their
team play is $200.
One percent of fans say
they'd pay $10,000 to see
their team play, the high-
est response received in
the poll.
Fans were about evenly
split on expansion of the
playoffs. Twenty-six percent
favor allowing more teams
into the playoffs, an idea
being considered by the
NFL. Twenty-eight per-
cent oppose it and 45 per-
cent are neither in favor
nor opposed.
A broad majority of
adults (83 percent) say the
Washington Redskins
should not change their
nickname. Among football


fans, 87 percent say keep
the name.
Since the last AP-GfK
poll on the topic in April
2013, several prominent
figures, notably President
Barack Obama, have said
it's time for the team to
change. But public opinion
is still about the same.
College graduates are
more likely to say Wash-
ington should change its
name now than they were
in April. Back then, 14 per-
cent of college graduates
said it was time for a change;
now 23 percent say it should
change. Men are also now
slightly more apt to say the


team should change, 16
percent say so in the new
poll, compared with 9 per-
cent in April. Among
women, opinions have
held steady with 13 per-
cent in favor of a change
The Chicago Bears,
Denver Broncos, Green
Bay Packers and New Eng-
land Patriots tied for most
responses when fans were
asked what is their fa-
vorite team. Each received
seven percent of the re-
sponses. The Dallas Cow-
boys, New York Giants and
San Francisco 49ers were
each the favorite team of 6
percent of the fans polled.


The AP-GfK Poll was
conducted Jan. 17-21 using
KnowledgePanel, GfK's
probability-based online
panel designed to be rep-
resentative of the U.S.
population. It involved on-
line interviews with 1,060
adults, and has a margin of
sampling error of plus or
minus 3.9 percentage
points for the full sample.
Respondents were first
selected randomly using
phone or mail survey
methods, and were later
interviewed online. Peo-
ple selected for Knowl-
edgePanel who didn't
otherwise have access to


the Internet were pro-
vided with the ability to ac-
cess the Internet at no cost
to them.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 A7


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6





Johnathan
Braden, 27
CRYSTAL RIVER
Johnathan Garett
Braden, 27, of Crystal
River, Fla., died Tues-
day, Jan. 21,2014. Private
funeral arrangements
are under the care of
Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory
Crystal River

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free
and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the fu-
neral home or soci-
ety in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press
style unless a re-
quest to the con-
trary is made.
Deadline is 3 p.m.
for obituaries to ap-
pear in the next
day's edition.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com,
fax 352-563-3280
or call 352-563-
5660 for details.


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For more Citizen of the Year coverage, including a complete list of past winners,
see the Commentary section.


GAMBLE
Continued from Page Al

Each year, the Chroni-
cle Editorial Board solic-
its the community for
nominees of people who
have a positive impact on
the lives of others.
To Ginger West, execu-
tive director of the Family
Resource Center, Gamble
is a lifeline, making her
job easier
"He's one of the most
kindhearted men I've ever
met," she said. "Obviously,
he's made donations; that
goes without saying. He
makes donations to a lot
of organizations that do
good throughout the
county But he and I have
a real good communica-
tion, and he's open to me
texting him and saying,
'Do you have enough
sleeping bags or tents for
me to come in?' Or he'll
let me know when he has
certain things I need on a
regular basis at a lower
price.
"He's so good at saving
me time and trips, and
that really makes a differ-
ence when you have a
small staff. That alone is a
tremendous help to me,"
she said. "He's just so gen-
erous about everything. If
you need him, all you
have to do is call, and if
there's any way possible,
he'll do it."
Gamble started with
Walmart 25 years ago as a
meat cutter in his home
state of Missouri. From
there he helped open nu-
merous new stores
throughout Florida and
Alabama. Before coming
to Inverness in 2002 and
opening the supercenter
in 2003, he worked in
Ocala.
As store manager, he
subscribes wholeheart-
edly to the Walmart phi-
losophy of being a
community partner, be-
lieving it's the right thing
to do, as he told the
Chronicle in 2011.


"Ifeel it's myjob as a parent to make sure my kids are exposed

to reality in the world," Gamble said in a recent interview.

"Several years ago, I brought my oldest daughter to where

they were feeding homeless people down by the lake and she

saw a homeless guy get afree haircut. He was smiling, and

as I looked at my daughter, I saw a tear roll down her face.

I can't pay enough for that tear."


"I don't think the county
realizes all that he does,"
said Peggy DeFrancisco,
who nominated Gamble.
"If there's a fundraiser, he
donates baked goods or
food platters. On a weekly
basis he donates food,
tents, heaters, bikes, all
kinds of stuff, and he's in-
volved in so many organi-
zations. Anywhere he
knows there's a need, he's
there. He does a lot be-
hind the scenes he
doesn't do it for the glory"
DeFrancisco added that
Gamble often brings his
family with him to com-
munity outreach events,
his wife and three teenage
daughters.
"I feel it's my job as a
parent to make sure my
kids are exposed to reality
in the world," Gamble
said in a recent interview
"Several years ago, I
brought my oldest daugh-
ter to where they were
feeding homeless people
down by the lake and she
saw a homeless guy get a
free haircut. He was smil-
ing, and as I looked at my
daughter, I saw a tear roll
down her face.
"I can't pay enough for
that tear," he said. "I want
to make sure they under-
stand homelessness."
He said the same goes
for his daughters'
boyfriends. If a boy wants
to date his daughter, he
has to be willing to get in-
volved in community
events.
"I'm fortunate to be a


store manager where I
can pick and choose or-
ganizations that I feel will
best benefit the commu-
nity," he said. "In Citrus
County, the biggest thing is
the homeless, veterans
and children. That's what
touches my heart. I don't
give grant money to every
organization that asks. I
look for the organizations
where the money goes to
help the people of Citrus
County"
Each year, Walmart
gives store managers a
budget for community out-
reach.
In the 10-plus years that
Gamble has been store
manager, he has also been
involved with low-income
housing as chairperson,
former board member of
the United Way, as well as
Big Brothers Big Sisters
and Sertoma Mentoring
Village and other organi-
zations.
"It gives me insight into
what's real, and an under-
standing into where the
money goes," he said.


"Plus, you have to know
about your community to
care about them."
The Rev. Doug Alexan-
der, pastor of the New
Church Without Walls,
said he considers Gamble
a brother, a friend and his
right-hand man.
"We were on the United
Way board together and
started talking and made
an instant connection,"
Alexander said. "We took
him out to the woods and
took his family out there
and let them see the
needs. He supports every-
thing I've been involved
in, and not just the church
but the entire Citrus
County Whatever it
needs, Larry's there.
"He's had lots of oppor-
tunities to move because
of how good he is at his
job, but he's decided to
stay in Citrus County,
which is good for Citrus
County"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


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Don Q Rum White or Gold Dewars Scotch Seagram's 7 Jim Beam Black
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks on Capitol Hill in
Washington, D.C., on Nov. 13, 2013.

Arizona GOP

censures McCain

for 'liberal' record


Associated Press

PHOENIX The Ari-
zona Republican Party for-
mally censured Sen. John
McCain on Saturday citing
a voting record they say is
insufficiently conservative.
The resolution to censure
McCain was approved by a
voice vote during a meeting
of state committee mem-
bers in Tempe, state party
spokesman Tim Sifert said.
It needed signatures from
at least 20 percent of state
committee members to
reach the floor for debate.
According to the resolu-


tion, the 2008 Republican
presidential nominee has
campaigned as a conserva-
tive but has lent support to
issues "associated with lib-
eral Democrats," such as
immigration reform and to
funding the law sometimes
known as Obamacare.
Timothy Schwartz, the
Legislative District 30
chairman who helped write
the resolution, said it showed
McCain was losing support
from his own party
"We would gladly embrace
Sen. McCain if he stood be-
hind us and represented
us," he said.


Associated Press
Campaign buttons are ready for distribution Saturday at
an Iowa kickoff event for the national Ready for Hillary
group in Des Moines. Ready for Hillary is a so-called super
PAC building a national network to benefit Clinton if she
decides to seek the presidency in 2016.

Lack of announcement

not stopping Clinton's

Iowa supporters


Associated Press
Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus listens to comments Friday at the RNC winter meeting
in Washington, D.C. The meeting came a year after Priebus published a report aimed at modernizing the party and
boosting its ranks, and as Republicans eye their best chance at taking control of both houses of Congress since 2002.


As election year starts, Republican


party still showing deep divisions


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The dueling
faces of a conflicted political party
were on display for all to see at the
just-concluded Republican National
Committee meeting.
One was younger, more diverse
and tech-savvy, part of the RNC's
carefully crafted plan to inspire
confidence that the GOP is trying to
grow beyond its shrinking, older,
largely white base. The other- one
that hasn't evolved since the GOP's
back-to-back presidential losses -
lurked in the hallways, occasionally
taking center stage at the Washing-
ton hotel where party delegates
from around the country met to dis-
cuss party business.
The reminder of the divisions
comes a year after Chairman
Reince Priebus published a report
aimed at modernizing the party and
boosting its ranks, and as Republi-
cans eye their best chance at taking
control of both houses of Congress
since 2002.
"If our party doesn't unite, we're
never going to win," said Jonelle
Fulmer, a Republican National
Committeewoman from Arkansas.
Following the recommendations
in the Priebus-commissioned autopsy
of the GOP's losing 2012 presidential
campaign, the national party


launched a multipronged strategy a
year ago to reach out to younger vot-
ers, women and racial and ethnic
minorities, groups who sided more
heavily with Democrats.
Yet, awkward comments about
contraception and women's repro-
ductive systems and chatter over
Michigan committeeman Dave
Agema's derogatory comments
about gays and Muslims obscured
the party's attempt to feature its ef-
forts at last week's meeting.
By the end of the three-day con-
ference, Priebus and Michigan Re-
publican Party Chairman Bobby
Schostak were calling on Agema to
quit, "for the good of the party"
The only otherpublic commentfrom
party officials about Agema came
later during a press conference on
the RNC's diversity outreach team.
"There's no room in the Republi-
can Party for those kinds of com-
ments," said Jennifer Korn, the
GOP's national director for His-
panic initiatives.
The episode created a sharp dis-
sonance with the meeting's official
program, which included sessions
on the party's organizational invest-
ments in digital, data-gathering
technology and personnel. That's
an area that helped Obama's cam-
paign carry traditional Republican
strongholds in 2008 and 2012.


Another sharp contrast occurred
when a panel of well-polished women
from an array of racial and socio-
economic backgrounds discussed
the party's up-and-coming leaders,
just minutes after former Arkansas
Gov Mike Huckabee's speech.
Huckabee said Democrats "insult
the women of America by making
them believe that they are helpless
without Uncle Sugar coming in and
providing for them a prescription
each month for birth control because
they cannot control their libido or
their reproductive system without
the help of the government."
The clash between the RNC lead-
ership's party-broadening goals and
the lingering image of a party argu-
ing with itself over tone and toler-
ance reflects the division playing
out in Republican congressional
primary campaigns.
Alex Smith, 24, said Republicans
can only gain back the edge they
had with young voters they nar-
rowly held in 2000 by updating the
language and the tools that they use
to reach her and her peers.
"Channels and messages matter,"
the Seton Hall University law school
student and chairwoman of the Col-
lege Republican National Committee
said. "If you're talking to younger
voters on television, radio or direct
mail, you're not reaching them."


Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa -
Hillary Rodham Clinton
hasn't announced whether
she will run for president
in 2016. But her supporters
in early voting Iowa are or-
ganizing anyway
Top Iowa Democrats
gathered Saturday in Des
Moines to build support
for a potential Clinton
White House bid. Craig
Smith, a senior adviser to
the Ready for Hillary
super PAC, says he wants
to ensure Iowa support is


in place should Clinton run.
The event's hosts in-
clude the state chairs for
Clinton's 2008 campaign
and President Barack
Obama's 2008 campaign.
Ready for Hillary is
building a national net-
work in preparation for a
Clinton candidacy Priori-
ties USA announced
Thursday it would back
Clinton if she runs, a sign
that senior members of
Obama's campaign team
are lining up behind the
former first lady and sec-
retary of state.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


String of bombings kills 15 people across Iraq


Associated Press

BAGHDAD -A series of
bombings across Iraq
killed 15 people Saturday,
including a soldier and his
entire family, authorities
said.


Karzai:

I won't be

forced to sign

deal with U.S.
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
Afghan President Hamid
Karzai said Saturday that
"no pressure, no threats
and no psychological war"
will force him to sign a U.S.
deal allowing foreign forces
to remain in the country
past a planned withdrawal
at the end of this year
The Bilateral Security
Agreement would allow
about 10,000 U.S. troops
and about 6,000 from allied
nations to remain past
2014, largely to help train
Afghanistan security
forces. But Karzai repeat-
edly has declined to sign,
saying he wants to wait until
the country elects his suc-
cessor in the comingApril 5
presidential election.
The U.S. had wanted the
deal signed by Dec. 31 be-
cause it needs time to pre-
pare to keep thousands of
U.S. troops inthe countryfor
up to a decade. NATO allies
have said they won't stay if
the Americans pull out.


Police said that the day's
deadliest attack struck
Muqdadiyah, when two ex-
plosions targeting the home
of a soldier killed him, his
wife, his two daughters and
two sons as they slept. The
blasts leveled the home.


Muqdadiyah is about 60
miles north of Baghdad.
In Baghdad, a car bomb
exploded in a commercial
street in the capital's western
neighborhood ofAmariyah,
killing four people and
wounding 12, police said.


Another bomb blast near
an outdoor market in the
Sadiyah neighborhood
killed two shoppers and
wounded six, officials said.
Saturday night, a car
bomb exploded near homes
in a Turkomen neighbor-


hood in the town of Tuz
Khormato, killing three
people and wounding five,
Mayor Shalal Abdoul said.
Tuz Khormato, an ethni-
cally mixed city of Arabs,
Kurds and ethnic
Turkomen, is 130 miles


north of Baghdad.
Hospital officials con-
firmed the casualties for all
attacks. The officials spoke
on condition of anonymity
because they were not au-
thorized to release the in-
formation to journalists.


Thousands flee Pakistani border following airstrikes


Associated Press


PESHAWAR, Pakistan-
Thousands have fled Pak-
istan's troubled northwest
region borderingAfghanistan
after airstrikes this week
targeting suspected Taliban
militant hideouts killed
dozens of people, elders


and officials said Saturday
Pakistan's air force
launched the airstrikes in
North Waziristan after the
Taliban claimed responsi-
bility for deadly attacks
against security forces.
There were conflicting
claims about who was killed
in the airstrikes, which began


late Monday and continued
into Tuesday A military
official said the strikes
killed 40 insurgents, while
residents said civilians
were among the dead.
Latifur Rehman, a
provincial disaster man-
agement spokesman, said
Saturday the strikes dis-


up to


placed 6,000 families.
Rehman said authorities
were making arrangements
to provide shelter and food.
A prominent tribal elder,
Gul Saleh Khan, said more
than 70,000 people had
left their homes. He said
people were still fleeing to
nearby villages and cities.


U1999


$- Q99g .. -.


The Pakistani Taliban
said earlier this week that
they would be interested
in peace talks but only if the
government proved it was
sincere and had enough
"power," a reference to the
perception that the army
wields the real power in
Pakistan.


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NATION


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Icy art


I .~- _I
Associated Press
A judge walks around the
sculptures Saturday at the
24th annual Breckenridge
International Snow Sculp-
ture Championships. The
event creates a tempo-
rary outdoor art gallery in
downtown Breckenridge,
Colo. Sculptures remain
on display through Feb. 2.

Maine mom gives
birth in driveway
GRAY, Maine Frigid
temperatures couldn't stop
this delivery.
Abigail Cain was in labor
and about to leave for the
hospital early Friday morn-
ing when she had no choice
but to give but to give birth
while standing in the drive-
way of her Gray home in
wind chills that reached
minus-13 degrees.
After the second contrac-
tion she felt she had to
push, her father. Steve Bro-
nish of Rumford, told the Sun
Journal. She had the car
door open and was leaning
on the seat when she gave
birth to a 7-pound, 5-ounce
healthy baby girl named
Danica AnneMarie Cain.
Her husband, who was
inside the house getting a
bag to take to the hospital,
came out to hear a baby
crying.
The couple, who has a
2-year-old son, called an
ambulance and mom and
the baby were taken to the
hospital.
"It was 10 below out, and
she had no help at all and
out she came right in the
driveway," Bronish said. "It's
quite an amazing story. I'm
pretty excited."
Driver loses hand
in Jeep explosion
SEATTLE -An explo-
sion from a firecracker in-
side a moving Jeep blew off
the driver's hand early Sat-
urday and scattered debris
over half a block in
Spokane, prompting initial
fears over the man's intent,
police and neighbors said.
Witnesses saw a flash of
light from inside the vehicle,
a red Jeep with a gray top,
as it drove down a residen-
tial street, police said.
Donald Wilkes, 61, said
the blast rattled his house and
woke up everyone inside. He
initially thought someone
had crashed into his parked
truck, and when he ran out-
side, he found the street
filled with smoke and the
Jeep stopped just against
his 6-foot-tall cedar fence.
"I looked around for
something that got hit, but
there was nothing," Wilkes
said. "My son reached in to
pull the keys out of the igni-
tion and make sure he didn't
go anywhere, and that's
when we saw his hand was
missing. It blew it right off at
his wrist they found part
of it half a block away."
Wilkes' son, 30-year-old
Nicholas, and another
neighbor applied a tourniquet
to the man's left arm. The
man was stocky, estimated
at about 28 to 30 years old,
and coherent. But he
wouldn't answer questions
about what he had been
doing, Wilkes said.
"All he did was look at my
son and say. 'Oh God, oh God.'
He looked like he was going
to pass out," Wilkes said. "My
main concern was why he was
driving around my neighbor-
hood at 1 in the morning
with an explosive device."
-From wire reports


Cl


&
:TRUS COUNTY


WORLD
CHRONICLE


Violence mars third anniversary of Egyp


Associated Press

CAIRO The anniver-
sary of Egypt's 2011 upris-
ing brought a violent
display of the country's fu-
rious divisions Saturday,
as giant crowds danced at
government-backed ral-
lies and security forces
crushed demonstrations
by rival Islamists and
some secular activists.
Clashes nationwide
killed at least 29 protest-
ers, health officials said.
The starkly contrasting
scenes reflect the three
years of turmoil Egypt has
faced since the Jan. 25,
2011, revolution began
and ultimately toppled
autocrat Hosni Mubarak,
replacing him with a tran-
sitional military council.
Last summer's millions-


strong demonstrations
against Mubarak's elected
successor, Islamist Presi-
dent Mohammed Morsi,
led to a military coup re-
moving him. And as Egypt
looks forward to presiden-
tial elections later this
year, many celebrating
Saturday in the famed
Tahrir Square demanded
army chief Abdel-Fattah
el-Sissi run for president.
"El-Sissi saved the na-
tion. It was up in the air
like this helicopter and he
carried it to safety," said
Mervat Khalifa, 62, sitting
on the sidewalk and
waving to a helicopter
overhead.
Military helicopters
showered crowds in
Tahrir with small flags
and gift coupons to buy re-
frigerators, heaters, blan-


Associated Press
Egyptian women wave nationals flag and posters of Egyptian
Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi on Saturday
during a pro-military rally marking the third anniversary of
the 2011 uprising in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.


kets and home appli-
ances. State-backed ral-
lies also showcased
prancing horses and tra-
ditional music for ecstatic


crowds.
Morsi's supporters used
Saturday's anniversary to
build new momentum in
their defiance of the mili-


Associated Press
Shoppers are evacuated by police Saturday after a shooting at a mall in Columbia, Md. Police say three people
died in the shooting, including the presumed gunman.



Three dead,



including gunman,



after mall shooting


Associated Press
COLUMBIA, Md.
A man carrying a shotgun
opened fire at a busy
shopping mall in suburban
Baltimore on Saturday, killing
two employees of a skate shop
and then himself as panicked
shoppers ran for cover, police
said. Five others were injured.
Police were still trying to de-
termine the identity and motive
of the gunman who killed a man
and a woman, both in their 20s, at
a skate shop called Zumiez on
the upper level of the Mall in
Columbia.
Witnesses described hearing
gunshots and screams as shoppers
ducked into nearby stores and
hid behind locked doors. Many
found cover in stockrooms and
barricaded themselves until the
arrival of police, who searched
store to store. By late afternoon,
the mall had been cleared of
shoppers and employees.
Howard County Police Chief
William J. McMahon said at a
news conference that authorities
had difficulty identifying the
gunman because of concerns he
might be carrying explosives and
were proceeding with an "abun-
dance of caution."
"We do not know yet what


caused the shooting incident" he
said. "We do not have a motive."
Someone called 911 at around
11:15 a.m. to report a shooting at
the mall. Police responded to the
scene within 2 minutes and found
three people dead including
the apparent gunman near a gun
and ammunition either inside
or outside the shop, which sells
skateboards, clothing and acces-
sories. McMahon said police were
confidentthere was a single gunman
Police identified the victims as
21-year-old Brianna Benlolo of
College Park, Md., and 25-year-
old TylerJohnson of Ellicott City,
Md. Both worked at Zumiez.
Benlolo's grandfather, John
Feins, said in a telephone inter-
view from Florida that his grand-
daughter had a 2-year-old son
and that the job at Zumiez was
her first since she went back to
work after her son's birth.
"She was all excited because she
was the manager there," he said.
He said he had spoken with his
daughter, Brianna's mother, earlier
in the day, but didn't know who
the gunman was or whether the
person knew his granddaughter
"It's senseless. It's totally, to-
tally senseless," he said.
He described his daughter's
family as a military family that
had moved frequently and had


been in Colorado before moving
to Maryland about two years ago.
He said his granddaughter was
on good terms with her son's fa-
ther, and they shared custody
"I mean what can you say? You
go to work and make a dollar and
you got some idiot coming in and
blowing people away" he said.
Zumiez CEO Rick Brooks re-
leased a statement that the com-
pany is making counseling available
for employees in the area.
"The Zumiez team is a tight
knit community and all of our
hearts go out to Brianna and
Tyler's families," he wrote.
Howard County General Hos-
pital said it had treated and re-
leased five patients. One patient
had a gunshot wound, while at
least three other patients sus-
tained other injuries.
The mall is at the center of the
town that's a suburb of both Bal-
timore and Washington, and it
typically opens at 10 a.m. on Sat-
urdays. It was busy with shop-
pers and employees when the
shots rang out before noon.
Joan Harding of Elkridge, Md.,
was shopping with her husband,
David, for a tiara for their grand-
daughter's 18th birthday She
said she heard something heavy
falling, followed by gunshots and
people running.


Syria antagonists in 'half-steps' of peace talks


Associated Press


GENEVA- In painstak-
ingly choreographed
encounters, Syria's gov-
ernment and opposition
faced each other for the
first time Saturday,
buffered by a U.N. media-
tor hoping to guide them to
a resolution of the coun-
try's devastating civil war


The antagonists sat at
the same table for nearly
three hours, but didn't ad-
dress each other directly
- and by design avoided
the contentious issue of
who will lead the country
They entered through sep-
arate doors and, outside
the walls of the United Na-
tions, had little but criti-
cism for each other


No tangible progress
was reported, but the
mere fact the meeting was
held represented what the
mediator called a "half-
step" toward peace. Unre-
solved was the fate of
Homs, a city at the core of
the uprising against Presi-
dent Bashar Assad that
has been under siege for
20 months.


The mediator, Lakhdar
Brahimi, said the peace
conference would continue
Sunday focusing on human-
itarian aid the one topic
the Syrian government
and the opposition could
agree to discuss. Brahimi
said if parallel negotia-
tions succeeded within
Syria, Homs could see an
aid delivery by Monday


t uprising
tary and its political tran-
sition plan, despite being
hit by a crippling police
crackdown and rising
public resentment against
his Muslim Brotherhood
group.
"Anger is bigger than
all. Repression sparks
revolutions. The burning
of Egypt won't last," a
statement issued by a
Brotherhood-led coalition
said.
The fiercest clashes
raged in an eastern Cairo
suburb, where Islamist
supporters fought with se-
curity forces for hours in
pitched street battles.
Troops fired over the
crowd to disperse protest-
ers who threw gasoline
bombs. Protesters set up a
field hospital to aid the
wounded.


World BRIEFS

Masquerade


Associated Press
Bulgarian masked dancers
known as "kukerl" per-
form Saturday during the
23rd edition of the Inter-
national Festival of Mas-
querade Games "Surva" in
the town of Pernik, Bul-
garia. Some 6,000 partic-
ipants take part in the
festival devoted to an an-
cient Bulgarian pagan rite.

281 passengers
ill aboard Royal
Caribbean ship
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
-The U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Pre-
vention said 281 passengers
have fallen ill aboard a Royal
Caribbean cruise ship.
The CDC said in a state-
ment Friday that another 22
crew members also are ill,
with people reporting vomit-
ing and diarrhea. Authorities
said it's not yet clear what is
causing the illness.
The CDC said health offi-
cials will board the ship on
Sunday while it's docked in
St. Thomas in the U.S. Vir-
gin Islands. Authorities said
specimens are being col-
lected and will be tested.
A total of 3,050 passen-
gers and 1,165 crew mem-
bers are aboard the
Explorer of the Seas.
Official: French
president splits
with first lady
PARIS French Presi-
dent Francois Hollande has
split with the country's first
lady two weeks after a
tabloid reported that the
leader was having an affair
with an actress, an official
said Saturday.
A presidential aide, who
spoke on condition of anonymity
because he wasn't author-
ized to speak publicly about
the matter, confirmed that
Hollande ended his seven-
year relationship with Va-
lerie Trierweiler.
The breakup was first re-
ported by French news
agency Agence France
Presse, which said Hollande
told it in a telephone con-
versation Saturday evening
that "I make it known that I
have put an end" to the re-
lationship with Trierweiler.
He and Trierweiler have
lived together since 2007,
and while they're unmarried,
Trierweiler occupied the so-
called madame wing of the
presidential palace, traveled
abroad with Hollande and
functioned as the first lady.
-From wire reports





























































Port of call:


Amanda Mims
For the Chronicle


Visiting Key West is a sort of rite of passage
for Florida travel. If you live in the Sunshine
State, you ought to go there at least once to
see it for yourself. It's the southernmost city in
the United States, and if you plan to take a
cruise to the Caribbean, there's a chance it will
be a port of call on your itinerary.

The first thing you should know if you arrive
at Key West by cruise ship is this: You're likely
going to be shuttled from the ship to Mallory
Square, where there is a whole lot of souvenir
shopping going on, and lots of people trying
to get you to part with your dollars. Stroll
down nearby streets and you'll find plenty of
bars and kitschy merchandise shops, but get
past that and you will see there are heaps and
heaps of culture piled on this quirky,
5-square-mile spit of land.


Photos by AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: The island's Cuban influence can be seen in artwork on the wall of the El Meson de Pepe Restaurant.
Above the doors are the words "Cayo Hueso," which mean "bone island," the original Spanish name for Key
West. TOP: A cruise ship is docked near Mallory Square.


See PageA21






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 26, 2014 C: .Cocast, Citrus B: Bright House DII Comcast.Dunnellon & Inglis FP Oak Forest H.: Holiday Heights
C B D/AI F H 16:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 I 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
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E S 3 3 1 6 NewsHour WEDU Secrets of the Tower of Masterpiece Classic (In Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Mystery! Sherlock faces his biggest
PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus London'PG, V' Stereo)'PG'" (N)'PGBNchallenge. (N) 'PG (DVS)
SWUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Irish Rovers Nature (N) 'PG' Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Mystery! (N) (In Stereo 'PG'
S C 8 8 NNews Nightly Football 2014 Pro Bowl From Aloha Stadium in Honolulu. (N) (In Stereo Live) N News WEN Hair
DcWFLADNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Special Care
SA 2 News World America's Funniest The Bachelor Sean Lowe and Catherine Giudici Castle "Need to Know" News Spo Night
SCF ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' wed. (N) (In Stereo Live) 'PG'" *PG' B on 9
CS 0 10 10 10 10 PGATour 10News 60 Minutes (N) (In The 56th Annual Grammy Awards Excellence in the recording industry. (N) (In Stereo 10 News
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55 64 55 Michael Corleone moves his father's crime family to Las Vegas.' R' patriarch tries to hold his empire together. 'R'
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96 19 96 Halle Berry. rights leader rises from criminal to crusader, rights leader rises from criminal to crusader.
[BAlD 254 51 254 Housewives/AtIl. Housewives/AtIl. Housewives/AtI. Blood, Sweat Housewives/AtIl. Happens Fashion
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l R 46 4 46 6 5 Jessie Jessie Jessie Good- Liv & I Didn't Do Austin & I Didn't Do Liv & A.N.T. Dog With a Jessie
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SNL 35 39 35 NBA Basketball: Magic at Pelicans Magic UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
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51 54 51 32 2 'P' 'P 'PG' 'PG' 'P (N)'PG'B Island (N)B
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0 1 *** "Mother and Child" (2009, Drama) Naomi "Steel Magnolias" (2012, Comedy-Drama) *2 "Georgia Rule" (2007, Drama) Jane Fonda,
i 50 119 Watts. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' B Queen Latfiah. (In Stereo) _Lindsay Lohan. (In Stereo) 'R' B
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BC 42 41 42 "Out of Bounds"
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Join salute to


veteran patients


D earAnnie: Over
the past 150
years, our nation
has worked tirelessly to
care for those who, as
President Abraham Lin-
coln so eloquently
stated, "shall have borne
the battle." Today, the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA) operates 151
hospitals, 134 commu-
nity living centers and
825 community-based
outpatient clin-
ics, as well as
many other re-
habilitation
and support
activities, to
deliver care to
more than six
million veter-
ans. Coupled
with our re-
gional benefits
offices and na-
tional cemeter-
ies,VA ANI
employees and MAI
volunteers
commit them-
selves daily across this
country and overseas to
assist and care for those
who have given of them-
selves to this great coun-
try
VA does not carry on
this important mission
on our own. We work in
hand with veterans serv-
ice organizations, civic
and community part-
ners, and caring individ-
uals from across the
country For all of us,
there is no higher
calling.
Many of your readers


N
IL


join us each February in
the "National Salute to
Veteran Patients." This
VA program encourages
Americans to visit and
volunteer at their local
VA medical centers and
to send letters of thanks
or valentines to those
who have protected our
nation. This year's Na-
tional Salute is Feb. 9-15.
Last year, more than
310,424 valentines were
received at
VA medical
centers, and
18,770 mem-
bers of the
public visited
morethan
72,000 vet-
eran patients.
Thank you
and your
readers for
your work in
bringing at-
lIE'S tention to this
LBOX worthy cause.
As the secre-
tary of veter-
ans affairs, I encourage
your thoughtful readers
again to take some time
this February to honor
our veterans. As always,
thank you for your
support.
For more information
regarding the National
Salute and volunteer op-
portunities at a local VA
medical center, please
visit VAs Voluntary Ser-
viceat wwwvolunteer.
va.gov. Sincerely-- Eric
K Shinseki, Secretary
of Veterans Affairs,
Washington, D.C.


To&day's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"12YearsASlave" (R) 1 p.m.,
7p.m.
"August: Osage County" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Dallas Buyers Club" (R)
4:15 p.m.
"Devil's Due" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
4:10 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
In 3D. 1:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D.
4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13)


1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Devil's Due" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13)
In 3D. 3:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D.
4:40 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Drink
6 Blood, and tears
11 Make points
16 Gladden
21 Loosen
22 Observe
23 Mean dwelling
24 Badgerlike animal
25 Lazybones
26 Group of islands
28 Be sparing
29 Oolong is one
30 Court divider
32 Holler
33 Slight error
35 Durocher of
baseball
36 Formerly, formerly
38 Eschew
41 Sated
43 Pasture
44 Abbr. on an
envelope
45 Time away
48 Purple color
50 Name fora
bystander
52 Roam
55 The Hawkeye State
57 Demier-
58 Basted
62 Ripen
63 Part of MIT (Abbr.)
65 Go wrong
67 Terminate
69 Shiny trim for cars
70 Cram
71 For every hundred
(Abbr.)
72 Regret
74 Apiece
76 High-fiber food
77 Affirm
79 Consume
81 Rouge
83 State of mind
85 Fleur-de- -
86 Infamous king
88 Arroyo
90 rosa
92 Cooking surface
94 Like the Sahara
96 Something sticky
97 Name
99 Raised platform
100 Vast region of Russia
103 Lad
105 De Mille or


Moorehead
107 Bloodsucker
110 -Baba
111 Merit
113 Deciduous tree
115 Downhearted
117 Test-question
answer
118 Distance measure
120 Peruse
122 Parrot of
New Zealand
123 Fish part
125 Levin or Gershwin
126 Pearl or Beetle
128 Talk
130 Timetable abbr.
132 Valley
133 Psychic's ability (Abbr.)
134 Saw
135 -Vegas
137 Very big
139 Monies forfeited
141 Tax org.
143 That 70s music
145 Red color
147 Bridge
150 Native of (Suffix)
152 -go bragh!
154 Greek portico
155 Requirement
159 Spigot
160 Elevate
162 Designer Cassini
164 Game official
166 Actress Gardner
167 "Honeymooners" role
169 Children's game
173 Black bird
175 Locale
176 "Tempest" sprite
177 Inventor Howe
178 Correct
179 Double-- sword
180 Film spools
181 Caffe-
182 Brumous

DOWN
1 Completely
2 Below
3 Book of maps
4 Old disapproving cry
5 Seedless plant
6 Long strip of land
7 "- and Peace"
8 Common abbr.
9 Sore
10 Burglar


11 Varnish
12 Mountain pass
13 Ellipse
14 Entertain
15 Run off to marry
16 Scottish Gaelic
17 Dead lang.
18 At an incline
19 Doctrine
20 Singer- John
27 Afruit
31 Fundamental nature
34 Uncle-
37 Bar bill
39 Single thing
40 Sgt. or Cpl.
42 Enticement
44 Bitter in taste
46 Radar-screen image
47 Sheep
49 Climbing plant
51 Cigar residue
52 Hindu prince
53 Century plant
54 Collectibles
56 Dress in finery
59 Sports event
(2 wds.)
60 Modem-day
message
61 Thick
64 Deer
66 Furrow
68 Water barrier
69 Combination of notes
73 Dawn goddess
75 Gear tooth
78 Sported
80 Small boat
81 Produce flowers
82 Little push
84 Watch part
87 Terrible
89 Throw in a high curve
91 Roll
93 Usual food
95 Appointment book
98 canto
100 Ballroom dance
101 Epic by Homer
102 Exist
104 Wild ox of Tibet
105 Frighten
106 Comfortable seat
108 Malediction
109 Lots and lots
112 Pester
114 Toy-gun projectile
116 Tell or Faulkner


119 Illinois city 142 Ocean
121 Far-out artist 143 Wish
124 Sign gas 144 Unctuous
127 Always, to poets 146 Hair preparation
129 Ignoble 147 Barrel part
131 Chronicle (Abbr.) 148 Grew wan
132 Flit 149 Mimicking
136 Parchment 151 Indian instrument
documents 153 Stair post
138 Petrol 156 Roof parts
140 Upperclassman (Abbr.) 157 Occurrence
Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


Fine and -
Woodwind
Adams or Falco
- monster
Baby buggy
Signal
Punta Este
Insect egg
Krazy of old comics
French friend


2014 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
comn, or visit www.fl Post
155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-
3544, or email boosc29
@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and
Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little
Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-
476-2134 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM,
5030 S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. Call
Commander Robert Scott at
352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491,
directly behind Cadence
Bank, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-
726-3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google


VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy God-
frey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.


Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30
a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando.
Call Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto


Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim
Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-
637-6206.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.


Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meetings in 2014 are: Feb. 8,
March 8, April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 meets at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 A15


email seacapt34447@
yahoo.com or Robert Currie
at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rollingth-
underfl7.com, call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.


I






Paqe Al 6-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26,2014




E TUERANS
-- f( ^CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post plans free info seminar
A free informational seminar on
veterans benefits and health care will be
presented at 2 p.m. Wednesday at VFW
Post 4337, 906 State Road 44 East,
Inverness.
Hands-on instruction in accessing web-
sites, setting up accounts and more will be
provided.
For more information, call 352-344-3495.

Free seminar focuses on aid
The Harbor House at Ocala, 12080
County Road 484 Southwest, Dunnellon,
will sponsor a free seminar for informa-
tion regarding veterans aid and atten-
dance benefits at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 30.
Learn who is eligible to receive up to
$24,648 per year in benefits. This is free
for veterans and widows of veterans and
provided by the Harbor House at Ocala
and Gary Marriage (Operation Veteran Aid
- Crystal River), who will present the
information.
Seating is limited. For more information
and to RSVP, call 352-489-9698.

Auxiliary men to serve ziti
The Men's Auxiliary of VFW Edward W
Penno Post 4864,10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs, will have a baked ziti
dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31.
The public is invited. Cost is $8;
children younger than 6 eat for $4.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Cooties to serve roast beef
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
roast beef dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31, at Leroy Rooks Jr VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road 200, where the
helicopter is). The public is invited.
Advance tickets are $7 and $7.50 at the
door Tickets can be purchased at Post
4252. Call the post at 352-726-3339 or Seam
Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.

Post invites all to come jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Cut a rug at CR Legion post
A 1950s and '60s Sock Hop will be
sponsored by 40&8 Voiture 1219 Saturday,
Feb. 1, at American Legion Post 155,
Crystal River Doors open at 3 p.m.
Advance ticket sales at the bar of Post
155 are $10. Tickets at the door are $12.50.
Seating is limited. Net proceeds of ticket
sales will be donated to American Legion
Post 155.
Dinner will be served from 5 to 6 p.m.
Menu includes Yankee pot roast, potatoes,
carrots, dessert, coffee and tea.
Entertainment from 6 to 9 p.m. will be
provided by Charlie De, who performed
with The Four Seasons, Frankie Lyman
and the Teenagers, The Duprees and per-
formed in many well-known nightclubs
from New York to Las Vegas.
There will be a Silver Dollar Table from
4 to 5 p.m., a hula hoop contest, twist con-
test, limbo contest, best-dressed '50s attire,
best decorated socks, The Stroll and more.
For more information, call Steve
Mikulas at 352-503-5325.

'Jean's Chicken' on menu
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for "Jean's Chicken" at
5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, 906 State Road 44
East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7 and includes sides, salad,
bread and dessert. Music by Nell. Call 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org, for
information about all post activities.

Yard sale set for Saturday
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
The next yard sale is scheduled for
Feb. 8.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight The spots are typically
15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.


All Navy men


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
United States Navy veteran Petty Officer 2nd Class Frank Selltitz, ret., served on a light cruiser during World War II. The
Inverness resident displays a framed picture of himself from the mid-1940s with several medals earned.



Family upholds tradition of service


C.J. RISAK
CORRESPONDENT
rank Selltitz had
only been in the
Navy a few months
and was on his first real
voyage aboard a
transport ship sailing
through the Caribbean
when they were attacked
by a German U-boat.
His ship escaped
undamaged.
Although from a family of Navy men
- "In our family, we always said if you
didn't join the Navy, you'd get kicked
out of the family," Selltitz said -that
included two uncles who served in
both World Wars and a younger
brother who joined just days after the
attack on Pearl Harbor, Selltitz wasn't
in a hurry to join.
Instead, he waited until late in 1942,
when he was drafted into the Navy. He
was 23.
By that time, his brother Robert had
already joined the service.
But Frank hesitated, in part because
he had a decent job as a manager of
an EW Woolworth's store in his home-
town of Brooklyn, N.Y, where he had
graduated from Grover Cleveland
High School in 1937.
But when his call came, he went.
After eight weeks of basic training
in Sampson, N.Y, Selltitz left for Nor-
folk, Va., where he boarded his trans-
port ship bound for Panama with
the brief U-boat encounter along the
way Once he reached the Canal Zone,
Selltitz was eventually assigned to the
U.S.S. Concord, which had been in
Balboa, Panama, to be refitted after a
fire caused by gas fumes from aviation
fuel led to the deaths of 24 seamen.
The Concord was not a new ship.
Commissioned in 1921, it was a
7,050-ton Omaha-class light cruiser
that was now outfitted with one of the
newer technologies of the day-
radar
"I put in for storekeeper when I first
went on board," Selltitz said. "But our
chief asked me, 'Frank, would you like
to be a radar man?' I said, 'Hell,
yeah,"' he recalled, adding one of the
major reasons was the increase in pay
grade. "I was making $200 a month. I
had been making $50."
The Concord, which early in the war
had been involved in convoys between
Bora Bora and the United States and
Panama, had her mission altered in


early 1944. "We went to San Francisco,
and then we went up to the Aleu-
tians," Selltitz said.
It wasn't a pleasant posting. "That's
the sorriest place in the world," Sell-
titz said. "I think every two weeks I
was there, I was putting in for a trans-
fer, and they always said, 'No, no."'
One reason they wouldn't let him go
was Selltitz's training in radar tech-
nology, a valued skill at that time. "At
first, all we had was surface gear," he
said. "Then they gave us air gear
"It seemed if you weren't on watch,
you were studying. And they didn't re-
ally have any books on that stuff, not
back then."
According to Selltitz, it was more of
a "learn-as-you-go" type of education,
except that any mistakes one made
could be fatal. As part of Task Force
94, the Concord took part in several
raids against Japanese shipping in the
Bering Sea, and also the Sea of
Okhotsk and against bases on the
Kuril Islands (both located northeast
of Japan) until the end of the war, in-
cluding one engagement during which
16 enemy ships were sunk.
According to Selltitz, the Concord
was en route to Okinawa when the
war came to an end. In mid-Septem-
ber, their ship sailed with two U.S. de-
stroyers to the northern Japanese port
of Ominato to accompany occupation
forces before finally heading home,
with stops at Pearl Harbor, the Canal
Zone, Boston and Philadelphia along
the way
He had been in the Navy for nearly
three years, and not since the since
leaving New York to be shipped out of
Norfolk, Va., had he seen home. He
would go on to a career as a plate
maker in the press room of several
newspapers, including such publica-
tions as the New YorkJournalAmeri-
can, the New York Times, the Tampa
Tribune and the Houston Chronicle.
Now 95, Selltitz who was a Floral
City homeowner for decades lives
in Inverness.
And he has two grandsons, one still
in the Navy and another who left the
Navy to work at the Pentagon.

Pictured is Robert Sellitz, Frank's
brother and another Navy man.
Special to the Chronicle


Special to10 ne nronicle
Name: Frank Selltitz
Rank: Petty officer 2nd class
Branch: U.S. Navy
Ship: USS Concord, part of Task
Force 94, Seventh Fleet
Years served: 1942-45
Stationed: In Panama Canal Zone,
1943-44; off Aleutian Islands,
1944-45; at Ominato, Japan, at war's
end in September 1945
Job: Radar operator
Awards: Two Battle Stars, one for
taking part in Battle in the Sea of
Okhotsk during which 16 Japanese
ships were sunk, another for taking
part in the bombardment of the Kuril
Islands; also received several Battle
Ribbons, including one for the
surrender of Japan.
Veterans organizations: Veterans of
Foreign Wars, American Legion


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Not Just a School.

A family.


Because we are a small school with
small class sizes and many shared
experiences, students at Seven Rivers
know each other. Students and faculty
interact with each other, and there are
several all-school events throughout
each school year. Students become a
family because their interactions go
beyond the superficial.


Upper school students read to class pals during scheduled gathering times.

From chapels and community outreach
opportunities, to small group mentoring
with faculty, to pep rallies and class pals,
our campus naturally lends itself to real
friendships and real relationships.
Happy children are successful learners.
This is how it should be.

Find a community of friends and learners
at Seven Rivers Christian School.


Junior Julia Eckart helps out with elementary chapel.


Seven Rivers Christian School is not bound to state mandates
such as FCAT, Common Core, or end-of-course tests, yet we
produce AP scholars, dual enrollment and honor graduates who get
accepted every year to many colleges, universities, and military
academies including every public university in Florida.
Seven Rivers Christian School is accredited by the following agencies:
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools/AdvanceEd
Christian Schools of Florida
The National Council for Private School Accreditation
The faculty of Seven Rivers loves who they teach and what they
teach. All are degree with 40% having a master's degree or higher.


High school principal Scott Jackson and seniors building a
Habitat for Humanity House.

Our students have been admitted to every single
public college/university in the state of Florida
as well as out-of-state colleges including:


Senior Kimberly Strong acts in "Beauty and the Beast"
with elementary students.

Accepting Applications NOW for
the 2014-15 school year. Stop by
the school for enrollment
application or visit our web site.
www. seven riverscs. org

Come to an Open House and hear
all about our school, financial
assistance opportunities, curriculum,
and take a tour.


P-American University, DC
o Auburn University, AL
P Berry College, GA
o. College of Charleston, SC
Covenant College, GA
Emory University, GA
Erskine College, SC
Kent State, OH
New York University, NY
North Carolina
State University


Rutgers University, NJ
St. John's University, NY
University of Alabama
University of Georgia
University of Kentucky
University of Tennessee
U.S. Air Force
Academy, CO
U.S. Coast Guard
Academy, CT
Wheaton College, IL


OPEN HOUSES
February 18 at 6:30pm
February 22 at 11am
February 24 at 10am
Pre-K only OPEN HOUSE March 11, 1OAM
On-site VPK sign up April 1 at 9AM
(For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current proof of
address, birth certificate or shot record for child. If parent is missing any of
these documents, she will not be able to sign them up.)


A Provider for
Florida's Voluntaryo t n Seven Rivers Christian School
Pre kindergarten exists in partnership with
Sfor students families to shape the hearts and
Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12 minds of children
scholarships and related support, giving economically disadvantaged with a distinctly biblical program
families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their of academic rigor, artistic
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship. beauty, and athletic competition.
Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 2 6, 2014 Al17





A18 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014



40&8 to
have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 welcomes the public
to breakfast from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. Feb. 2 at
American Legion Post 155
on State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for
adults; special on kids'
(8 and younger) meals.
Specialty drinks available
for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit
programs of the 40&8.

Spaces available
for craft fair
The American Legion
Allen Rawls Auxiliary
Unit 77 will sponsor a
craft fair on Feb. 8.
Outdoor spaces and in-
door spaces are available.
To rent a space to sell
handmade crafts, call
Alice at 352-476-7001 or
Charlotte at 352-341-1803
or Linda at 352-201-0015
for more information.

Four Chaplains
service slated
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58,10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon, will have a
Four Chaplains Memorial
Service at 4 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 9. The service will be
followed by the post's
birthday celebration.
Refreshments will be
served. The public is
welcome.

Legion post to
have flea market
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58,10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon, will have
its outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast be-
ginning at 7:30 a.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Saturday, Feb. 15.
On the menu are pan-
cakes, French toast,
scrambled eggs, sausages,
orange juice and coffee
for a $5 donation.
Everyone is welcome.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5.
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills, 2170 Vet
Lane (County Road 491
behind Cadence Bank),
offers several events that
are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sun-
days in the smoke-free
hall. Card bingo and grill
night is at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m.
Monday and Fridays in
the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Reserve for
trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, will lead the 2014
trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and
friends from March 11 to
March 28. Signups are
being taken for the an-
nual trek, which includes
visits to several islands,
some golfing and a spe-
cial visit to the USS Ari-
zona Memorial and The
National Cemetery of the


Pacific.
For more information,
call McLean at 352-637-
5131 or email dmclean8@
tampabayrr.com.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to
The Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need.
Veterans who need to go
to appointments in
Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call
the Veterans Service
Office in Lecanto at 352-
527-5915.
Appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.


Van needed for
transportation
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The
Villages, as well as to the
VA facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has
more than 270,000 miles
on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.


Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organizations.


To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and set up photos.

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
available to assist veter-
ans to apply for benefits
and provide information.
The schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Call 352-527-5915 to
make an appointment.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


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VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a


a


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 A19


le_9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IN SERVICE


Special to the Chronicle
First Lt. Alex McLean, U.S. Army, serving in a Special
Forces group at an FOB in Northern Afghanistan has
received the Bronze Star for service. McLean attended
John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Ark., and the
ROTC program at the University of Arkansas. He was
commissioned as a second lieutenant, being honored as
top soldier in his ROTC class during his summer
training. After his commission, he was stationed at Fort
Knox, Ky., before going to Afghanistan. McLean is the
oldest grandson of Don (U.S. Navy retired) and Alma
McLean of Citrus Hills. He and his wife, Brittany, will be
stationed next at Fort Collins, Colo.


Transitioning veterans
can get assistance
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department is looking for
veterans who have recently transi-
tioned from the military (or re-
turning reservist from tours of
active duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that
veterans and their spouses call to
be placed on a list for an upcoming
seminar, which will discuss what
benefits or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule a semi-
nar to discuss benefits and solicit
ideas. Call 352-527-5915 to reserve
a seat. For more information about
the Citrus County Veterans Office,
log onto wwwbocc.citrus.fl.
us/commserv/vets.

Office has help for
veterans with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers help
for veterans who have had their
post-traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied


VETERANS NOTES

within the past two years are
asked to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss compen-
sation/pension examination. All
veterans who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental Health
center and have been denied are
encouraged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to
discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915.
You will need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your compen-
sation examination by Gainesville.
You can get a copy of your exam ei-
ther by requesting it through the
VA medical records or from the
primary care window in Lecanto.
Visit wwbocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.

Assist Coast Guard
Auxiliary with missions
Ex-military and retired military
personnel are needed to assist the
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary to help
the Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams such as public education,
vessel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime secu-
rity and environmental protection.
Criminal background check and


membership are required. Email
Vince Maida atvsm440@aol.com,
or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice offers special
care for veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partnering
agency with the Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans and their
families.
The program is provided in pri-
vate homes, assisted living facili-
ties and nursing homes, and staff
is trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and conditions
unique to each military era or war
It also provides caregiver educa-
tion and a recognition program.
HPH Hospice care and pro-
grams do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call 352-527-4600.

Free yoga classes
available for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is
associated with the national serv-
ice organization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes to combat
veterans at several locations and
times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397.


Scott A. Patrick
Navy Petty Officer 3rd
Class Scott A. Patrick has
graduated from the U.S.
Navy's Enlisted Nuclear
Power School at Naval
Nuclear Power Training Com-
mand in Goose Creek, S.C.
Nuclear Power School is a
rigorous six-month course
that trains officer and enlisted
students in the science and
engineering fundamental to
the design, operation and


maintenance of naval nuclear
propulsion plants.
Graduates then undergo
additional instruction at a pro-
totype training unit before
serving as an electronics
technician, machinist's mate
or electrician's mate aboard a
nuclear-powered submarine
or surface warfare ship.
Patrick is the son of Sandra
and William Patrick of Floral
City.
He is a 2012 graduate of
Citrus High School.


Call about our research

study:

* Study participants may receive compensation

* All studies administered by a board certified medical doctor

* No medical insurance is necessary


I Meridienir
m v dese 352-59-STUDY
cor I|ea [ a' rch oar
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Brooksville, FL 34601

Kelli K. Maw, MD, MPH
Certified, Family Medicine I


T.PEERBUG-- AMA : ROKSILE BADNTN LKE7N


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352-465-0986


* Citrus Springs, Florida 34434

Swww.eldiablogolf.com


A20 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


VETERANS


I


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
Mallory Square, in Key West's historic Old Town, is a popular shopping destination and hard to miss if you arrive by cruise ship. The square faces the Gulf of Mexico and is
home of the nightly Sunset Celebration, during which tourists gather to watch the sun set.




& a ywen4c alC H *w


Welcome to Key West


WEST
Continued from Page A13

What makes Key West special?
Its original Spanish name, CayoHueso, means
"bone island." At one time, the island was littered
with human bones. It's believed Key West was a Na-
tive American burial ground or the site of a battle, ac-
cording to the city of Key West website.
Key West is also called the Conch Republicbe-
cause of its attempt to secede from the Union in re-
sponse to U.S. Border Patrol activities that hindered
access to the island and tourism. Conchs are natives of
Key West (and large snails with pretty shells).
Famous residents have included authors Ernest
Hemingway and Shel Silverstein. Several U.S. presi-
dents, including John E Kennedy, Harry S. Truman
and Dwight D. Eisenhower have time there. Today,
visitors continue to tour Truman's former home,
called "Harry S. Truman Little White House" in
Key West's Old Town district.
It was home to many active shipwreckers, or
wreckers, who salvaged valuables and materials from





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Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you
prefer your loved ones celebrate
your legacy rather than stress about
making arrangements? Give them
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sinking or sunken ships. The "Wreckers" sculpture in
the Key West Memorial Sculpture Garden beckons
back to those days. If this part of the island's history
interests you, check out the Key West Shipwreck Mu-
seum at Mallory Square.

Things to see
*The Hemingway House is a must-see for Ernest
Hemingway fans and those interested in Key West his-
tory and architecture. Take a tour of the Spanish Colo-
nial-style house and see some of author's belongings
as well as the descendants of his famous six-toed cats.
If you're a real Hemingway fan, spend some time on
the ship before you arrive at port reading Heming-
way's novel "To Have and Have Not," which he
penned in this house. It'll take you back to Key West's
rum-running days.








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Editor's note: This is the second article in a three-part
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Coming up next: Cozumel Island, Mexico.


The historic Key West lighthouse at Whiteheads
Point.
Hemingway and friends frequented Sloppy Joe's
Bar on Duval Street, and the pub remains a popular
place for tourists and residents to grab a drink or two.
See WEST/Page A22
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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 A21


.f=th- A (/ ,
t_/ I 1..





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A vist to Key West
wouldn't be complete
without seeing Key West
chickens real or
artificial. Chickens roam
freely throughout the
island.
AMANDA MIMS
Special to the Chronicle


WEST
Continued from Page A21

The Southernmost
Point: Get your photo
taken in front of the big,
red-and-black buoy mark-
ing the Southernmost
Point of the continental
United States at the cor-
ner of South and White-
head streets. It's
technically not the south-
ernmost point of Key
West, but it's close. A pri-
vate island south of Key
West is the real southern-
most point of the U.S., but


it's still kind of fun to
snap a photo of the buoy
The beginning of
U.S. 1, which is the
"Mile 0" sign in Key West.
Tourists love to take pho-
tos there, and, according
to the shuttle driver on
my most recent visit
there, it's the sign most
often stolen on the island.
The Audubon House,
a circa-1830 home owned
by master wrecker Cap-
tain John H. Geiger Ac-
cording to the building's
plaque, famous naturalist
John James Audubon vis-
ited Key West in 1832, and
in the 1960s, the house


was named the Audubon
House to commemorate
Audubon's visit. The
home remains a museum
where Audubon's artwork
is displayed.

A few tips to get
the most out of
your trip:
Even though Key West
isn't a large island, your
limited time at port will
pass quickly (it was about
six hours for me) and you
should research a bit be-
fore you go and decide
what you want to do -


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352-610-3018 ?

Fora RE i-h meesim te


unless what you want to
do is eat and drink (and
drink), in which case you
can just take meander
from Mallory Square to
Duval Street, home of the
infamous Duval Crawl.
If sightseeing is your
main objective, eat a big
meal on the ship before
arriving at port. That will
leave you more time for
traveling on the island. Or


do a bit of sightseeing and
eat at one of the island's
many popular restaurants
and grab a drink at
Sloppy Joe's or Irish
Kevin's Bar on Duval
Street.
Invest in a taxi ride or
trolley tour to get to im-
portant sites farther away
from Mallory Square,
such as the Hemingway
House and the Southern-


most Point. You could
walk the distance, but
that would take up a lot of
precious time.
All this is definitely
enough to keep you busy
while at port, but there is
a whole lot more to see in
Key West and much more
history to the little Conch
Republic. Learn more at
www.fla-keys.com/key
west.


0126-SA/SUCRN
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

KNOW WHAT YOU NEED BEFORE YOU BUILD...

To protect Florida's fragile waterways, the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (FDEP) requires an Environmental
Resource Permit prior to the dredging or filling in wetlands and/or
surface waters. If the project you are planning requires dredging
or filling in a wetland and/or surface waters (i.e. docks,
boatramps, seawalls, riprap revetments, single-family residences,
and other similar type activities), you may need a permit from
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Coming February 23rd



ATTENTION


Business Owners

Be sure to include your business!


neseS this special
profiling Citrus County Businesses,
edition will tell the history, services and products
of our local businesses.
CITRUS COUNTY

CHRONICLE
Vwww.chronicleonline.com


When Dan was asked what is the most valuable advice
he has for people considering a hearing aid he replied,
"Consult with an audiologist instead of a
salesman because who you see is much
more important than the products you buy."

FetrdBs inese
CofrtKepr,0neresF
Gardner Audiolog


Dan Gardner, Founder &
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Advertising Deadline: February 12, 2014
To find out how your business can be featured call
your advertising representative or (352) 563-5592 i


A22 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


EXCURSIONS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES


'Letters To Juliet'
to be matinee
Hospice of Citrus and
the Nature Coast will
present the January
Monthly Movie Matinee
"Letters to Juliet" at
2 p.m. Monday at the
Hospice of Citrus and
the Nature Coast Wings
Education Center, 8471
W Periwinkle Lane,
Suite A, Homosassa.
"Letters to Juliet"
stars Amanda Seyfried
and Vanessa Redgrave.
Hospice of Citrus and
the Nature Coast's
Monthly Movie Matinees
are presented to the
community at no cost.
They offer an educa-
tional component that
benefits individuals
dealing with grief and
loss in a supportive envi-
ronment. Discussion
time will follow the
movies and popcorn and
snacks are available.
For more information,
call Lynn Miller at 352-
621-1500. Visit Hospice
of Citrus and the Nature
Coast on Facebook or on
the web at wwwhospice
ofcitrus.org.

Writers critique
group to meet
The Yankeetown/Inglis
Fiction Writers Critique
Group meets at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the
Yankeetown/Inglis
Woman's Club.
Any writers of fiction
are invited to join. Con-
tact Lynn Sholes at
Lynnsholes@gmail.com
or call 352-447-2279.

Concert Choir is
now rehearsing
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir Inc. has
begun rehearsals for its
spring session. The choir


rehearses at 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Faith Lutheran
Church's Fellowship
Hall, 935 S. Crystal Glen
Drive in Lecanto.
The main feature for
the spring will be Schu-
bert's Mass in G, com-
plete with stringed
instruments. Several
other special songs will
round out the program.
New members will be
considered until the end
of January, to allow
enough rehearsal time.
Prospective members
should arrive at 6:30
p.m. for a short audition.
Performances are
planned for March 30
and April 6.
For more information,
call 352-212-1746.

Club to stage
Trivia Night
Join the Women of
Sugarmill Woods as they
present Trivia Night at
5:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31,
at the West Citrus Elks
Lodge.
Guests will enjoy an
evening of trivia while
helping support more
students through the
clubs scholarship and
education program. Hors
d'oeuvres, cocktails
(cash bar) and desserts
will be served.
Tickets are $14 and can
be purchased by calling
Pat O'Brien at 352-382-
5571 or Dianne Weller at
352-382-3992.

New Jerseyans
group to meet
The New Jersey and
Friends Club of Citrus
County's lunch slated for
3 p.m. Wednesday will be
at Cinnamon Sticks, 727
U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
For more information,
call MaryAnne at 352-
746-3386.


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY

ENGAGED

Christie/Grogan


Jennifer Holly
Christie of Lake County
and Paul Michael
Grogan of Citrus County
will exchange nuptial
vows Saturday, Feb. 8, at
Wesley Monumental
United Methodist
Church in Savannah, Ga.
The wedding cere-
mony will have an 1873
historical theme and the
Rev Jerry Carris will
officiate.
The prospective
groom is the son of
Stephan Grogan and
Teresa Adkins of Citrus
County He is the grand-
son of Ruth Aubin of
Spencer, Mass. The
bride-elect is the
daughter of Worlie
McCoy and Judy
Callaghan of


Lake County
The bride-to-be is a
licensed cosmetologist,
currently a stay-at-home
mother Her fiance is a
merchant mariner
presently employed
by Harvey Gulf
International Marine.
They will reside in
Citrus County


FOR THE RECORD


Jan. 6-Jan. 12, 2014
Divorces
Lynn Ann Adams, Beverly
Hills vs. Leon Adams,
Beverly Hills
Sandra Ann Bencini,
Citrus Springs vs. Antonio
Dicarlos Bencini,
Beverly Hills
Susan Kimberly Corbin,
Hernando vs. Terry Robert
Corbin, Beverly Hills
Ivan Wayne Harr, Crystal
River vs. Joyce Ann Harr,
Crystal River
Marion Warren Hill,
Inverness vs. Elizabeth
Allison Hill, Inverness,
Kit L. Humbaugh, Crystal
River vs. William R.
Humbaugh, Inverness
Erin Elizabeth Rains,
Inverness vs. Jonathan
Michael Rains, Hopkinsville,
Ky.
John Sowell, Hernando
vs. Susan Sowell, Inverness
Robert Wing, Lecanto vs.
Linda M. Wing, Otsego, N.Y.


Bryant Anthony Young,
Beverly Hills vs. Jennifer F.
Young, Beverly Hills
Marriages
Richard Alvin Bowman,
Crystal River/Lori Ann Darts,
Crystal River
Eros Louis Broussard,
Morgan City, La./Samantha
Lynn Rouse, Homosassa
Kyle Andrew Charette,
Hernando/Shelley Lynn
Charette, Hernando
Richard C. Dahlinger,
Inverness/Deborah E.
Hooper, Inverness
William Robert Ealey,
Homosassa/Nancy K.
Brown, Homosassa
James Patrick McGinn,
Inverness/Mary De Rosa,
Inverness
Derrick Deon Sparrow,
Edison, N.J./Nicolette
Laporte, Edison, N.J.
Charles Edward
Thompson, Crystal River/
Janice Ann Cook, Beaver
Dam, Ky.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record, available from each Clerk
of the Courts Office. For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 A23


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Stanabacks


Carol and Louis
Stanaback of Citrus
County will celebrate
their 50th wedding an-
niversary on Feb. 22, 2014.
The couple were wed
Feb. 22, 1964, in East
Paterson, N.J. Carol is a
retired nurse and Louis is
retired from Florida
Power Security
They have four chil-
dren: Pamela, Kim-Marie,
Alan and Brian, of


Pompton Lakes, N.J.
They have seven
grandchildren.
The Stanabacks, who
have lived in Citrus
County for 27 years, will
celebrate with a
reception.


ENGAGED

Brockett/Fletcher


Calli Brockett of
Lecanto and Benjamin
Fletcher of Gainesville
have announced their
engagement and
forthcoming marriage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Dr and Mrs.
Robert Brockett of
Lecanto. A graduate of
Lecanto High School, she
will be a graduate of the
University of Florida in
May
Her fiance is the son of
Dr and Mrs. Mike
Fletcher of Fernandina
Beach. A graduate of the
University of Florida, he
is employed by Shands


Children's Hospital.
Nuptial vows will be ex-
changed at 5 p.m. May 23,
2014, at the historic
Thomas Center in
Gainesville.


Oak Hill Hospital &

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treatment options available followed by a question and
answer session.


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SPORTS


In her third
straight Australian
Open final, Li Na
finally breaks
through at the
major event./B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
1 .1 Sports briefs/B3
0 NBA, NHL, football/B4
0 College basketball/B5
0 Tennis/B6


District basketball free-for-all starts Monday


Citrus, Crystal River, Seven Rivers

girls allfavored to advance


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
Citrus is favored. No surprise
there.
Crystal River and Seven
Rivers Christian will likely ad-
vance to the regions. Again, no
big shock there either
Lecanto looks better, but it
will still take an upset for the
Panthers to move on.
Girls basketball districts are
here, and while the cast and
even the landscape has
changed for each team, the re-
sults from this season are re-


markably similar to last year's.
Citrus, which lost several key
players to graduation and
changed coaches, has once
again posted a 20-win season.
The Hurricanes (20-3 overall)
remain the top power in the
county
Crystal River, 19-5 overall, re-
mains their top challenger, only
now more than just county
bragging rights are at stake. Un-
like last season, the Pirates
share a district 5A-6 with
Citrus and Lecanto. Also unlike
last season, Crystal River has
put together a more consistent


effort, also putting it on the |
brink of a 20-win campaign.
However, the Pirates did lose
a major weapon when the fam- ,t.
ily of promising freshman Bri- .
anna Richardson moved to
Orlando, her last game for them
Friday's against Seven Rivers t oK 1
Christian.
While those two teams
quickly emerged as the top con-
tenders in the district, Lecanto
and Dunnellon both sunk. The" : 4
Panthers had to replace four I
starters from last year's team, Sr
and it was a struggle. They won
just six of their 23 games and
went winless in district play
Still, three of those victories MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
came in their last three games. Katelyn Hannigan, left, and the Crystal River Pirates are expected to
meet Kiersten Weaver and the Citrus Hurricanes for the District
See Page B2 5A-6 championship Thursday barring any major upsets.


Champion Brooks


ROSS 0
Florida State's Terrence Brooks, center, holds up a sign along with teammates P.J. Williams, left, and Kelvin Benjamin
defeated Auburn, 34-31, in the BSC National Championship game in Pasadena, Calif. Brooks is a 2010 Dunnellon Hig

Dunnellon High Schoolgraduate wins BCS national title with.


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
lorida State University's return to
national prominence is complete,
and for one Dunnellon native he'll
forever be a part of the Seminoles' rise as
one of the elite NCAA Division I football
programs.
And now Terrence Brooks, a former two-
way standout for the Dunnellon High
School football program, can call himself a
national champion after Florida State
overcame a 21-10 halftime deficit to cap-
ture the BCS crown with a thrilling last-
seconds victory against Auburn, 34-31, on
Jan. 7 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif
"It's all surreal, I definitely feel like we


deserve it. It's a blessing," said Brooks, a
2010 Dunnellon High graduate who was the
starting strong safety for the 'Noles during
his final season.
It didn't come without challenges in his
final collegiate game with Florida State.
The second-ranked Tigers picked apart
the Seminoles' defense for 21 first-half
points as top-ranked FSU found itself trail-
ing 21-10 at the half. But as Brooks pointed
out, the Seminole defense made several
key second-half adjustments in limiting the
powerful Auburn offense to 10 points.
"In the third quarter, we really started
making some stands on defense," said
Brooks, who recorded six total tackles
against the Tigers, including a fourth-quar-
ter pass break-up. "We just kept maintaining


our play throughout th
think that was the turnir
More specifically, Bi
second-half interception
Marion County native v
at Vanguard High Schoo
fense, led by Heism;
Jameis Winston capital
"(The interception) c
get back into it," Brook
a lot of critical momen
but just the whole defe
gether was key"
Brooks, who earned 1
cial teams as a true fre
and his teammates n


UTno


trouble


for UF

No. 6 Gators

drop Vols in

67-41 rout
Associated Press


GAINESVILLE --Having
dropped three consecutive
games to Southeastern Con-
ference rival Tennessee, No.
6 Florida had been waiting
for a chance to end the los-
ing streak.
The Gators welcomed it
and wanted it and it
showed.
Michael










e second ~ ~ ~ M calf an I ny e Iattreyas
Frazier II
scored
1 7
points,
Scottie
Wilbeki nW
added 13 and
Florida handled Tennessee
67-41 on Saturday for the
team's 11th consecutive win.
The Gators (17-2, 6-0 SEC)
beat the Volunteers for the
first time in nearly two years
and extended their school
record for consecutive home
wins to 26.
"We had a little chip on
our shoulder because they
kicked our butts the last
three times," said Florida
)BLEY/FSU Sports Information center Patric Young, who
After the Seminoles added 10 points. "I can actu-
,h School graduate. ally remember each loss, and
the last one was the worst be-
locrt. cause they were on the court
celebrating. They punched
us, and we didn't respond
e second half, and I well the last three years.
gpointoofithegame." "Tonight, we were so
rooks said, was the ready for whatever they had
vho played prep ball to throw at us. We were all
1. The Seminoles' of- locked in."
an Trophy winner Especially on the defen-
zed on that turnover sive end.
definitely helped us Florida held the Volun-
cs said. "There were teers (12-7, 3-3) to a season-
ts for the most part, low in points and shooting
use coming back to- percentage (27). The Volun-
teers' backcourt really strug-
playing time on spe- gled, with leading scorer
,shman, said that he Jordan McRae, Antonio Bar-
ever hit the panic ton and Josh Richardson
combining to make 2 of
See Page B5 29 shots.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Top of the diamond


Advanced

Fitness takes

Parks title

Special to the Chronicle
On Wednesday, Citrus
County Parks & Recre-
ation's Fall/Winter Men's
Softball league came to a
close. Advanced Fitness
claimed the title with a 28-
12 championship game
victory over Lecanto Vet
Hospital.
It was a frigid night with
temperatures dropping
into the 30s; however the
competition was hot. The
first game was between
01' Guys w/ Help and Ad-
vanced Fitness. The 01'
Guys started off strong as
they led in the first inning,
but Advanced came back
for a 22-10 win.
The second game of the
night was between
McPherson's Archery and
first-place team Lecanto
Vet Hospital. After several
innings, it was clear that
Lecanto Vet would be vic-
torious. They finished the
game with a 19-3 triumph
over McPherson's.
The championship
game was set with Ad-
vanced Fitness taking on
Lecanto Vet Hospital.
Spirits for both teams
were high even as the
temperatures continued
to plunge. Lecanto Vet,
though, couldn't combat
the hitting power of Ad-
vanced Fitness. Advanced
was named the 2013-14
Men's Fall/ Winter Soft-
ball Champions by beat-
ing Lecanto Vet with a
score of 28-12.
10th annual
Kids Fishing Clinic
Don't miss out on this fun
free event!
Teaching children a lifelong
hobby, appreciation for our
marine environment and a fun
family outing are the objec-
tives for the Kids' Fishing
Clinic. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) and Citrus



DISTRICT
Continued from Page B1l

For Seven Rivers (13-9
overall), it's more of the
same in many ways as
well. The Warriors' dis-
trict, 2A-3, was in disarray
from the outset, with
Gainesville Cornerstone
dropping out before the
school year started, leav-
ing just three teams. Even
though the Warriors lost
"14 of 18 varsity and (ju-
nior varsity) players from
last season," according to
coach Gary Dreyer, they
were still favored to battle
Ocala St. John Lutheran
for the title.
There was more turmoil
when Leesburg First
Academy asked Seven
Rivers to host the district
tournament in its stead
just as the regular season
was winding down.
Here's a look at each of
the districts, each of the
matchups, each of teams
and each of their
prospects:
District 5A-6
Tournament host: Lecanto
Matchups: First round -
Citrus (6-0 in district) vs.
Lecanto (0-6 in district), 6
p.m. Tuesday; Crystal River
(4-2 in district) vs. Dunnellon
(2-4 in district), 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
Championship: 7 p.m.
Thursday.
What to expect: Citrus has
been steady and consistent
all season, getting balanced
scoring through its entire
starting lineup senior
Shenelle Toxen (13.6 points
per game), senior Micah
Jenkins (12.7), senior Tre-
leasha Simmons (8.4), sopho-
more Shally Morales (8.2) and
junior Kiersten Weaver (7.1).


Thing is, its defense that pro-
pels the Hurricanes, some-
thing coach Dave Hamilton
spends a great deal of prac-
tice time refining. Citrus had
little trouble with Lecanto this
season, but the Panthers, led
by sophomore DeeAnna
Moehring, did win their last


Special to the Chronicle
Advanced Fitness won Citrus County Parks & Recreation's Fall/Winter Men's
Softball league on Wednesday at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.


County Parks and Recreation
(CCPR) present the free Kids'
Fishing Clinic for pre-regis-
tered children between the
ages of 5 and 15 on Saturday,
Feb, 22, at9a.m., 10a.m., 11
a.m., 12p.m. and 1 p.m.
The clinic will be held at the
Fort Island Trail Park (12073
W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal
River). Each participant will re-
ceive a rod/reel combo, T-shirt
and goodie bag. Because
space is limited, pre-registra-
tion is required and can be
completed by visiting www.
citruscountyparks.com. If you
do not have internet access or
have trouble while registering
please contact Citrus County
Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540
This clinic enables young
people to learn the basics of
environmental stewardship,
fishing ethics, angling skills
and safety. In addition, envi-
ronmental displays will pro-
vide participants with a
unique chance to experience
Florida's marine life firsthand.
The main objective is to cre-
ate responsible marine re-
source stewards by teaching
children about the vulnerabil-


two regular-season games
and went 5-4 over the final
nine.
Crystal River played
against Dunnellon (7-14 over-
all, 2-4 in district) in the 5A-7
district last season, and the
Pirates -who handled the
Tigers easily this season -
should remember that regu-
lar-season loss to them a year
ago when the now-graduated
Tanika Jackson lit them up for
43 points. Sophomore Tyra
Thomas could be a Jackson
in the making: She averaged
16.2 points, 4.5 rebounds, 3.3
assists and 5.0 steals a
game. Others to watch are
junior Sierra Oliver (7.4
points, 10.4 rebounds) and
junior Kayla Dawson (5.5
points, 6.6 rebounds).
Still, the Pirates have plenty
of weapons to handle this with
junior Jasmyne Eason (12.9
points, 11.2 rebounds, 2.7
steals), senior Katelyn Hanni-
gan (9.7 points, 3.6 assists,
2.7 steals) and senior Megan
Wells (7.6 points, 2.4 assists,


ity of Florida's marine
ecosystems. This event is a
catch-and-release activity,
and all participants must be
accompanied by an adult.
Individuals or companies
interested in helping to spon-
sor this event or volunteer at
the clinic should contact
Recreation Specialist Crysta
Henry at 352-527-7543.
Black Diamond
hosts college event
Black Diamond Ranch in
Lecanto is hosting the "Florida
Challenge" on Monday. The
NCAA event will feature the
women golf teams from
Florida State, Miami, Univer-
sity of South Florida (host
team), Central Florida, Univer-
sity of Florida and Florida In-
ternational University.
This is the opening event
of the 2014 spring ladies golf
season.
The event is open to the
public. There will be an 8:15
shotgun start and the golfers
will compete in a continuous
36-hole event on The Quarry
Course, which is a par-72,
5,959-yard tract.
Last season, the Lady


2.2 steals). Getting a third
shot at Citrus is the goal;
beating the Canes after eight-
straight losses in the Jason
Rodgers-era as coach re-
mains a challenge.
District 2A-3
Tournament host: Seven
Rivers Christian.
Match-ups: Play-in round
- Seven Rivers Christian
(1-1 in district) vs. Leesburg
First Academy (0-2), 7 p.m.
Monday.
Championship: Winner
advances to play Ocala St.
John Lutheran (2-0), 7 p.m.
Friday.
What's next: District cham-
pion hosts 2A-4 runner-up,
Feb. 4; District runner-up plays
at 2A-4 champion, Feb. 4.
What to expect: Again, the
opening round shouldn't be
dramatic, which makes Seven
Rivers coach Gary Dreyer all
the more cautious after hav-
ing beaten the Eagles (2-16)
twice by an average of 38
points. First Academy is led


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Gators were ranked 10th in
the country.
For more information, call
the Black Diamond pro shop
at 746-3446.
Davis Golf Tourney
coming Feb. 15
VFW Post 8189 Men's
Auxiliary will present the
second annual Ted Davis
Golf Tournament on Satur-
day, Feb. 15, at Twisted
Oaks Golf Course. Shotgun
tee-off is at 8 a.m.
The $55 per-person entry
fee includes greens fee, golf
cart, goody bag and dinner to
follow at VFW Post 8189 at
4:30 p.m.
Prizes will be awarded for
best team score, closest to
the hole, longest drive and
worst team score.
There will be raffles, a
50/50 drawing, giveaways
and a putting contest.
All proceeds will go to a
relief fund to benefit local
veterans.
For more information, call
Bill Peterson at 856-364-
7233 or Jerry Webb at 352-
220-4807.


by freshman Peyton Marshall
(6.9 points, 4.7 rebounds) and
sophomore Victoria Gause
(6.6 points, 7.7 rebounds),
while the Warriors counter
with junior Alyssa Gage (17.0
points, 7.5 rebounds, 2.1
steals) and senior Alexis
Zachar (15.3 points, 9.6 re-
bounds, 2.6 blocks).
Should Seven Rivers ad-
vance, another showdown
with St. John Lutheran (14-7
overall) will be next. A year
ago, the Saints were the top
seed but it was Seven Rivers
that pulled the championship-
game upset.
On Dec. 5, the Warriors
lost at St. John 56-46, setting
the stage for yet another
showdown. The Saints are
led by senior Sara Poehlman
(12.0 points, 5.4 rebounds,
4.2 assists, 4.9 steals), soph-
omore Jenny Bollinger (11.8
points, 9.0 rebounds) and a
pair of seventh-graders,
Brylee Bartram (9.0 points
4.3 rebounds, 2.0 assists,
2.3 steals) and Essence Bell


Woodland is


third leader in


as many days
/- fP three rounds is 74.24, com-
j0O C assumes pared with 74.97 during
le a t PG s the U.S. Open. And the
at field for the Farmers In-
surance Open is nothing
Farm Se but PGA Tour or European
STour players.
Woodland was at
Associated Press 8-under 208.
SAN DIEGO Gary Bahamas
Woodland didn't have to LPGA Classic
overpower the par 5s to PARADISE ISLAND, Ba-
take the lead at Torrey hamas Na Yeon Choi shot
Pines. a 7-under 66 to take a one-
Woodland found his five stroke lead in the season-
birdies elsewhere Satur- opening Bahamas LPGA
day on another tough day Classic, chipping to a foot to
of scoring on the South set up a birdie on the par-5
Course for a 2-under 70, 18th hole.
giving him a one-shot lead T Co
over 20-year-old Jordan The seventh-ranked Choi,
Spieh an Mae Lesh-a seven-time winner on the
Spieth and Marc Leish- LPGA Tour, birdied three of
man ofAustralia going into the last four bhrdoles ind three of
the final round of the the last four holes in her
Farmers Insurance Open. bogey-free round to reach 15
That final round won't under on Atlantis Resort's
include a familiar figure. Ocean Club course.
Defending champion Lizette Salas was a stroke
Tiger Woods, an eight- back. She also had a bogey-
time winner at Torrey free 66.
Pines, went seven straight Jessica Korda and Paula
holes making bogey or Creamer each eagled the 18th
worse on his way to a 79. to reach 12 under. Korda, the
That not only matched his second-round leader, had a
highest score on Ameri- 72, and Creamer shot 71.
can soil, he failed to make Creamer also eagled the par-
the 54-hole cut. 5 11th, but had a triple-bogey
Woods had said at the 8 on No. 15.
start of the week that he Third-ranked Stacy Lewis
hasn't seen Torrey this was tied for fourth at 11 under
tough since the U.S. Open with Amelia Lewis and Jenny
he won in 2008. It sure Suh. Stacy Lewis had a 68,
looks that way Amelia Lewis shot 66, and
Spieth had a one-shot Suh had a 71.
lead to start the third round Michelle Wie and 16-year-
and it was gone quickly He old Lydia Ko were in the group
missed a 30-inch par putt at 10 under. Wie followed her
on the opening hole and second-round 65 with a 72.
took a double bogey on No. Ko, making her first start as an
5. His biggest putt might LPGA Tour member had a 71
have been a 6-footer for par LAour member had a
on the 14th, and Spieth Qatar Masters
looked confident the rest of DOHA, Qatar Sergio
the way to salvage a 75. Garcia won the AQatar -Mastergio
Leishman had a rela- Garawohe tar Masters
tively boring round of 72 for his 11th European Tour
on a gorgeous day along title, beating Mikko Ilonen with
the Pacific one birdie, a birdie on the third hole of a
one bogey, 16 pars. That playoff.
might be what it takes on Garcia closed with a
this monster of a course 7-under 65 to match Ilonen at
that features rough that 16-under 272. Ilonen had a
might even make the 66, making an 18-foot birdie
USGA blush. The average putt on the 18th hole to force
score on the South through the playoff.


(7.9 points, 4.6 rebounds,3.0
assists, 2.5 steals). It's a
challenge for Seven Rivers,
but if the Warriors can per-
form like they did Friday
against a very tough Crystal


River team, which they beat
52-50 a display of calm de-
termination and persever-
ance they could claim their
second-consecutive district
title.


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HEALTH EXPO-~YMCA KID ZONE


APRIL 12, 2014

CREST SCHOOL -LECANTO

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www.citruseducaton org www.facebook.comlcl truseducatilon
www.citruseducation.org www.facebook.com/citrused ucation


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ciu oosroaie
IIUSIrLE I


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


SPORTS


kold


CRYSTAL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




PGA

Farmers Insurance
Open
Saturday
s-Torrey Pines, South Course (7,698 yards,
par 72), n-Torrey Pines, North Course (7,052
yards, par 72), San Diego
Purse: $6.1 million
Third Round (On South Course)
Gary Woodland 65n-73s-70 -208 -8
Marc Leishman 66n-71s-72-209 -7
Jordan Spieth 71s-63n-75 -209 -7
Pat Perez 67s-71n-72- 210 -6
Morgan Hoffmann 72s-66n-72 -210 -6
Rory Sabbatini 74s-68n-69- 211 -5
Ryo Ishikawa 72s-70n-69-211 -5
Will MacKenzie 72s-69n-70-211 -5
Scott Stallings 72s-67n-72- 211 -5
Brad Fritsch 69n-70s-72-211 -5
Nicolas Colsaerts 69n-67s-75-211 -5
AndresRomero 72s-72n-67- 211 -5
Robert Streb 73s-69n-70 212 -4
Charles Howell III 70n-72s-70-212 -4
Brian Stuard 70s-73n-69 -212 -4
Keegan Bradley 69n-72s-71 -212 -4
Graham DeLaet 70n-73s-69-212 -4
Jason Day 66n-73s-73-212 -4
Kevin Chappell 73s-66n-73 -212 -4
Kevin Tway 69s-70n-73 212 -4
ErikCompton 69n-69s-74- 212 -4
Russell Knox 71s-67n-74 -212 -4
lan Poulter 75s-67n-71 -213 -3
JustinThomas 68n-73s-72- 213 -3
Trevor Immelman 68n-74s-71 -213 -3
Seung-Yul Noh 68n-73s-72-213 -3
Robert Garrigus 71n-71s-72- 214 -2
Brendon Todd 69n-73s-72 -214 -2
Sang-Moon Bae 67n-76s-71 -214 -2
Martin Laird 69n-71s-74-214 -2
Hideki Matsuyama 72n-72s-70-214 -2
Justin Hicks 71s-68n-75 -214 -2
Charley Hoffman 69s-70n-75 -214 -2
J.B. Holmes 71s-68n-75 -214 -2
Billy Horschel 70s-67n-77 -214 -2
K.J. Choi 74s-70n-70 -214 -2
StewartCink 64n-71s-79- 214 -2
John Merrick 69n-74s-72-215 -1
Jim Herman 66n-75s-74-215 -1
Victor Dubuisson 72n-69s-74-215 -1
StuartAppleby 74s-69n-72- 215 -1
Jamie Lovernmark 72s-67n-76 -215 -1
Chris Williams 71n-72s-72- 215 -1
Mark Calcavecchia 70n-74s-71 -215 -1
Luke Guthrie 76s-68n-71 -215 -1
Bill Haas 74s-70n-71 -215 -1
Justin Leonard 74s-69n-73 -216 E
Lee Westwood 73s-68n-75 216 E
David Lynn 68n-73s-75 -216 E
D.A. Points 67n-74s-75 -216 E
Bubba Watson 70n-73s-73 -216 E
Tag Ridings 73s-70n-73 -216 E
Blake Adams 75s-69n-72 -216 E
Michael Putnam 69n-73s-75-217 +1
David Lingmerth 72s-70n-75 -217 +1
Brendan Steele 76s-67n-74 -217 +1
JhonattanVegas 68n-75s-74 -217 +1
YE.Yang 76s-67n-74- 217 +1
Matt Jones 75s-65n-77- 217 +1
Chad Collins 78s-66n-73 -217 +1
Hunter Mahan 72n-72s-73- 217 +1
Ben Crane 77s-67n-73-217 +1
CameronTringale 71s-71n-76- 218 +2
NicholasThompson 72s-70n-76 -218 +2
TyroneVanAswegen 66n-76s-76-218 +2
Greg Owen 70n-74s-74-218 +2
Matt Bettencourt 71n-73s-74- 218 +2
Nick Watney 70n-74s-74- 218 +2
Bryce Molder 77s-65n-77 -219 +3
Jonathan Byrd 70n-72s-77-219 +3
Harrison Frazar 68n-74s-77-219 +3
Charlie Wi 72n-70s-77- 219 +3
D.H. Lee 73s-71n-75-219 +3
Made cut did not finish
Aaron Baddeley 71n-73s-76- 220 +4
CamiloVillegas 72s-71n-78- 221 +5
Brice Garnett 75n-68s-78-221 +5
Tim Herron 70n-74s-77-221 +5
Steven Bowditch 68n-76s-77-221 +5
Will Claxton 71n-73s-77- 221 +5
Bobby Gates 69n-72s-81 -222 +6
TigerWoods 72s-71n-79- 222 +6
Michael Block 74s-69n-86 229 +13
Phil Mickelson 69n-73s-WD
LPGA Pure Silk-
Bahamas Classic
Saturday
At Ocean Club Golf Course, Paradise Island,
Bahamas
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,644, Par: 73
Third Round
NaYeon Choi 70-68-66 -204 -15
Lizette Salas 72-67-66- 205 -14
Paula Creamer 71-65-71 -207 -12
Jessica Korda 69-66-72- 207 -12
Amelia Lewis 69-73-66 -208 -11
Stacy Lewis 69-71-68 -208 -11
Jenny Suh 71-66-71 -208 -11
Chella Choi 73-69-67- 209 -10
Thidapa Suwannapura 70-71-68-209 -10
Pornanong Phatlum 71-69-69- 209 -10
Lydia Ko 68-70-71 -209 -10
P.K. Kongkraphan 69-69-71 -209 -10
MichelleWie 72-65-72- 209 -10
AzaharaMunoz 70-71-69-210 -9
Sandra Changkija 71-72-68-211 -8
Sandra Gal 71-69-71 -211 -8
Christel Boeljon 71-67-73-211 -8
Morgan Pressel 70-73-69-212 -7
Brittany Lincicome 70-71-71 -212 -7
Tiffany Joh 73-74-66-213 -6
Kristy McPherson 73-71-69-213 -6
Laura Diaz 74-69-70-213 -6
Danielle Kang 73-69-71 -213 -6
Hee Young Park 69-72-72-213 -6
Karine cher 74-73-67-214 -5
Gerina Piller 71-75-68-214 -5
Sarah Jane Smith 72-73-69-214 -5
Cindy LaCrosse 70-74-70-214 -5
Alena Sharp 75-69-70-214 -5
Jodi EwartShadoff 75-68-71 -214 -5
Angela Stanford 73-73-69-215 -4
Julieta Granada 73-71-71 -215 -4
Meena Lee 68-76-71 -215 -4
MiHyang Lee 74-69-72-215 -4
Katherine Kirk 73-69-73-215 -4
Pernilla Lindberg 70-71-74-215 -4
Brittany Lang 69-78-69-216 -3
Moriya Jutanugarn 74-72-70-216 -3
Hannah Jun 73-72-71 -216 -3
Erica Popson 74-71-71 -216 -3
Kathleen Ekey 75-69-72-216 -3
Paz Echeverria 70-73-73 -216 -3
AmyYang 71-69-76-216 -3
Haru Nomura 73-74-70-217 -2
KellyTan 76-71-70-217 -2
Line Vedel 73-74-70-217 -2
Se Ri Pak 72-73-72-217 -2
Austin Ernst 69-74-74-217 -2
MiJungHur 75-68-74-217 -2
Mindy Kim 77-70-71 -218 -1
Mirim Lee 69-77-72-218 -1
Jennifer Song 70-76-72-218 -1
Ayako Uehara 72-74-72-218 -1
Danah Bordner 69-74-75-218 -1
SunYoungYoo 73-69-76-218 -1
Seon Hwa Lee 75-72-72 -219 E
Caroline Masson 75-72-72 -219 E


LexiThompson 73-73-73-219 E
Vicky Hurst 74-73-73-220 +1
Rebecca Lee-Bentham 74-70-76-220 +1
Lisa McCloskey 74-70-76-220 +1
Lisa Ferrero 73-74-74-221 +2
Ai Miyazato 75-71-75-221 +2
Dewi Claire Schreefel 74-71-76-221 +2
Megan Grehan 73-73-76-222 +3
Mo Martin 70-76-76-222 +3
Birdie Kim 73-72-77-222 +3
Candie Kung 69-72-81 -222 +3
Dori Carter 73-74-76 223 +4
Perrine Delacour 73-73-78-224 +5
Natalie Gulbis 73-70-82-225 +6



Pro Bowl rosters
Today, Jan. 26
At Aloha Stadium
Honolulu
TEAM RICE
John Abraham, Arizona Cardinals, OLB
Justin Bethel, Arizona Cardinals, ST


SCOREBOARD


For the record



Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


TM


CASH 3 (early)
9-6-8
CASH 3 (late)
6-8-1

PLAY 4 (early)
7-8-3-5
PLAY 4 (late)
9-1-0-7


Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money:1 11 -17 -20
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB 2 winners $500,000
4-of-4 9 winners $670.50
3-of-4 MB 52 $254.00
3-of-4 1,156 $34.00
2-of-4 MB 1,239 $22.00
1-of-4 MB 9,478 $2.50
2-of-4 28,463 $2.00


Fantasy 5:8 20 21 29 32


5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 265
3-of-5 9,606


$555.00
$24.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On theAIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
7 a.m. (FS1) Tudor United SportsCar Championship: Rolex 24 at
Daytona
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) Florida State at Duke (Taped)
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Fordham at Massachusetts
1 p.m. (CW) Georgia Tech at North Carolina State
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Harvard at Dartmouth
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Clemson at North Carolina
8 p.m. (ESPNU) California at UCLA
8 p.m. (FS1) Utah at Arizona
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Tennessee (Taped)
1 p.m. (CBS) Minnesota at Penn State
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Memphis at Louisville
1 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Kentucky
2 p.m. (MNT) LSU at Mississippi
2 p.m. (ESPN2) South Carolina at Vanderbilt
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Virginia at Syracuse
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Auburn at Florida
3 p.m. (SUN) Missouri at Mississippi State
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Tennessee at Texas A&M
5 p.m. (SUN) Baylor at Oklahoma State
6 p.m. (FS1) Georgetown at St. John's
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dayton at Saint Joseph's
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) San Antonio Spurs at Miami Heat
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Lakers at New York Knicks
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at New Orleans Pelicans
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Brooklyn Nets at Boston Celtics
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Lakers at New York Knicks (Taped)
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Brooklyn Nets at Boston Celtics (Taped)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) San Antonio Spurs at Miami Heat (Taped)
BOWLING
12 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Barbasol Tournament of Champions
FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. (NBC) 2014 Pro Bowl
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Farmers Insurance Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Pure Silk Bahamas Classic, Final Round
GYMNASTICS
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Auburn (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) New York Rangers vs. New Jersey Devils
5 p.m. (NHL)Anaheim Ducks vs. Los Angeles Kings (Taped)
LACROSSE
10 p.m. (ESPNU) Champion Challenge: US Men's National Team
Blue vs. Team White (Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Champion Challenge: U.S. Women's National
Team vs. North Carolina (Same-day Tape)
RODEO
12 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR 15/15 Bucking Battle (Taped)
RUGBY
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) USA Sevens
4:30 p.m. (NBC) USA Sevens
SKATING
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) ISU World Sprint Championships (Taped)
TENNIS
9 a.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open Men's Final (Taped)
5 p.m. (TENNIS) 2014 Australian Open Men's Final (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Curling Continental Cup: Men's Team Competition
(Taped)
11 p.m. (SUN) Snowboarding Burton European Open: Men's Halfpipe
Finals (Taped)
12 a.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing U.S. Freestyle Grand Prix: Halfpipe and
Slopestyle (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, QB
Vontaze Burfict, Cincinnati Bengals, ILB
Jairus Byrd, Buffalo Bills, FS
Antonio Cromartie, NewYork Jets, CB
Marcell Dareus, Buffalo Bills, DT
Jahri Evans, New Orleans Saints, G
Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals, WR
Brandon Flowers, Kansas City Chiefs, CB
Matt Forte, Chicago Bears, RB
Tony Gonzalez, Atlanta Falcons, TE
Josh Gordon, Cleveland Browns, WR
Stephen Gostkowski, New England Patriots, K
Jimmy Graham, New Orleans Saints, TE
Jordan Gross, Carolina Panthers, T
Ben Grubbs, New Orleans Saints, G
Joe Haden, Cleveland Browns, CB
Jason Hatcher, Dallas Cowboys, DT
Johnny Hekker, St. Louis Rams, P
Justin Houston, Kansas City Chiefs, OLB
Alshon Jeffery, Chicago Bears, WR
Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs, ILB
Cameron Jordan, New Orleans Saints, DE
Ryan Kalil, Carolina Panthers, C
Nick Mangold, NewYork Jets, C
Brandon Marshall, Chicago Bears, WR
Evan Mathis, Philadelphia Eagles, G
Robert Mathis, Indianapolis Colts, OLB
Dexter McCluster, Kansas City Chiefs, PR
LeSean McCoy, Philadelphia Eagles, RB
DeMarco Murray, Dallas Cowboys, RB
MattOverton, Indianapolis Colts, LS


Robert Quinn, St. Louis Rams, DE
Eric Reid, San Francisco 49ers, FS
Philip Rivers, San Diego Chargers, QB
Antrel Rolle, NewYork Giants, SS
Alex Smith, Kansas City Chiefs, QB
Tyron Smith, Dallas Cowboys, T
Joe Thomas, Cleveland Browns, T
Mike Tolbert, Carolina Panthers, FB
Alterraun Verner, Tennessee Titans, CB
Cameron Wake, Miami Dolphins, DE
Kyle Williams, Buffalo Bills, DT
TEAM SANDERS
Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, QB
Brandon Fields, Miami Dolphins, P
Nick Foles, Philadelphia Eagles, QB
Justin Tucker, Baltimore Ravens, K
DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia Eagles, WR
Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Colts, QB
A.J. Green, Cincinnati Bengals, WR
Matthew Slater, New England Patriots, ST
Brent Grimes, Miami Dolphins, CB
Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals, CB
Darrelle Revis, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, CB
Jamaal Charles, Kansas City Chiefs, RB
Tim Jennings, Chicago Bears, CB
Eddie Lacy, Green Bay Packers, RB
Eric Berry, Kansas City Chiefs, SS
Eric Weddle, San Diego Chargers, FS
TJ. Ward, Cleveland Browns, SS
J.J. Jansen, Carolina Panthers, LS
Marcel Reece, Oakland Raiders, FB


Alfred Morris, Washington Redskins, RB
Paul Posluszny, Jacksonville Jaguars, ILB
Alex Mack, Cleveland Browns, C
Terrell Suggs, Baltimore Ravens, OLB
Luke Kuechly, Carolina Panthers, ILB
Mike Pouncey, Miami Dolphins, C
Logan Mankins, New England Patriots, G
Trent Williams, Washington Redskins, T
Marshal Yanda, Baltimore Ravens, G
Kyle Long, Chicago Bears, G
Branden Albert, Kansas City Chiefs, T
Duane Brown, Houston Texans, T
Greg Hardy, Carolina Panthers, DE
Jason Witten, Dallas Cowboys, TE
Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh Steelers, WR
Jordan Cameron, Cleveland Browns, TE
Cordarrelle Patterson, Minnesota Vikings, PR
Dez Bryant, Dallas Cowboys, WR
Ndamukong Suh, Detroit Lions, DT
Tamba Hali, Kansas City Chiefs, OLB
Dontari Poe, Kansas City Chiefs, DT
Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, DT
Mario Williams, Buffalo Bills, DE
Brian Orakpo, Washington Redskins, OLB
J.J.Watt, Houston Texans, DE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 22 21 .512 -
Brooklyn 19 22 .463 2
NewYork 16 27 .372 6
Boston 15 30 .333 8
Philadelphia 14 30 .318 8/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 31 12 .721 -
Atlanta 23 20 .535 8
Washington 21 21 .500 91
Charlotte 19 27 .413 13/2
Orlando 12 32 .273 19/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 34 8 .810 -
Chicago 22 21 .512 12/2
Detroit 17 26 .395 17/2
Cleveland 16 27 .372 18/2
Milwaukee 8 35 .186 26/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 33 10 .767 -
Houston 29 17 .630 5/2
Dallas 25 20 .556 9
Memphis 22 20 .524 10/2
New Orleans 17 25 .405 15/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 35 10 .778 -
Portland 32 11 .744 2
Minnesota 21 21 .500 12/2
Denver 20 21 .488 13
Utah 14 29 .326 20
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 31 15 .674 -
Golden State 26 18 .591 4
Phoenix 24 18 .571 5
L.A. Lakers 16 28 .364 14
Sacramento 15 27 .357 14
Friday's Games
Orlando 114, L.A. Lakers 105
Toronto 104, Philadelphia 95
Brooklyn 107, Dallas 106
Oklahoma City 101, Boston 83
Cleveland 93, Milwaukee 78
New Orleans 103, Detroit 101
San Antonio 105, Atlanta 79
NewYork 125, Charlotte 96
L.A. Clippers 112, Chicago 95
Memphis 88, Houston 87
Washington 101, Phoenix 95
Indiana 116, Sacramento 111, OT
Minnesota 121, Golden State 120
Saturday's Games
Chicago 89, Charlotte 87
L.A. Clippers 126, Toronto 118
Oklahoma City 103, Philadelphia 91
Memphis 99, Houston 81
Atlanta 112, Milwaukee 87
Indiana at Denver, late
Washington at Utah, late
Minnesota at Portland, late
Today's Games
San Antonio at Miami, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at NewYork, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at New Orleans, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Brooklyn at Boston, 6:30 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 9 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Phoenix at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 50 3215 3 67147 110
Tampa Bay 52 31 16 5 67155 128
Toronto 54 2721 6 60155 168
Montreal 52 2720 5 59128 134
Detroit 51 2318 10 56131 139
Ottawa 52 2220 10 54147 165
Florida 51 2024 7 47122 154
Buffalo 50 1429 7 35 97 144
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 52 3614 2 74168 128
N.Y Rangers 53 2723 3 57132 135
Columbus 51 2621 4 56150 145
Philadelphia 53 2522 6 56142 158
Carolina 51 2319 9 55131 145
New Jersey 52 2219 11 55124 125
Washington 52 2321 8 54148 154
N.Y Islanders 54 21 25 8 50154 179
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 53 32 9 12 76189 146
St. Louis 51 3511 5 75177 119
Colorado 51 3214 5 69149 134
Minnesota 53 2820 5 61127 130
Dallas 52 2420 8 56151 153
Nashville 53 2322 8 54131 158
Winnipeg 53 2424 5 53149 157
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 53 3810 5 81179 130
San Jose 51 3312 6 72162 123
LosAngeles 52 2917 6 64132 110
Vancouver 52 2617 9 61130 130
Phoenix 51 2418 9 57147 155
Calgary 52 1827 7 43119 165
Edmonton 53 1532 6 36135 187
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Calgary 5, Nashville 4, SO
New Jersey 2, Washington 1


Detroit 4, Montreal 1
Colorado 3, Florida 2
Phoenix 4, Edmonton 3
Ottawa at Carolina, ppd., schedule conflict
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 4, N.Y Islanders 3, SO
Carolina 6, Ottawa 3
Boston 6, Philadelphia 1
Washington 5, Montreal 0
Tampa Bay 5, Colorado 2
Buffalo 5, Columbus 2
Winnipeg 5, Toronto 4, OT
Dallas 3, Pittsburgh 0
Anaheim vs. Los Angeles at Los Angeles, CA, late
Minnesota at San Jose, late
Today's Games
N.Y Rangers vs. New Jersey at Bronx, NY 12:30
p.m.
Florida at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Winnipeg at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Vancouver, 8 p.m.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 B3







Pirates win The
Villages duals
Behind four undefeated
grapplers, the Crystal River
wrestling team went 4-0 to
win The Villages Duals tour-
nament Saturday.
The four Pirates awarded
first-place finishes were Nick
Hooper (145 pounds), An-
drew Bilby (195), Carlos
Sanabria (220) and Jason
Graham (Hwt.).
Crystal River scored victo-
ries over Clearwater Central
Catholic (69-12), Poinciana
(81-0), Bradford (60-23) and
The Villages (60-20).
"It was kind of trying to get
back on track for the district
next week," Crystal River
head coach Craig Frederick
said.
Crystal River is now 34-4
in dual meets this season.
Lecanto came in fourth by
going 3-1 as a team with
wins over The Villages (48-
47), Trinity Catholic (54-12)
and Bradford (1-0). The Pan-
thers' lone loss came during
a 36-36 score which oppo-
nent Tampa Prep won on the
sixth tiebreaker.
Chris Ewing took first place
at 182 pounds by going 5-0
and Cody Simmons's 3-1
record at 220 was good
enough for second.
Nicolai Kortendick also
went 3-0 while splitting time
between 152 and 160
pounds.
"(I was) very pleased with
the effort today," Lecanto
coach Scot Roberts said. "I
can not say enough about
how much Nicolai Kortendick
has improved since the
Christmas break."

Stamkos starts
light contact drills
TAMPA-Tampa Bay
Lightning star Steven
Stamkos has done light con-
tact drills for the first time
since breaking his right shin
last November.
Stamkos practiced with his
teammates on Saturday as
they prepared for a game Sat-
urday night against Colorado.
The center had a couple ses-
sions of being pushed along
and into the boards by Light-
ning captain Martin St. Louis.
A member of Canada's
Olympic team, Stamkos
hopes that he will be able to
play with the Lightning and
then participate in the Sochi
games next month.
"Every day he's get better,"
Tampa Bay coach Jon
Cooper said. "There's still lots
of things that have to go on
still. He hasn't been cleared,
and he's still a ways away
from being cleared."
Cooper said a good test for
Stamkos will come when the
Lightning have a regular
practice on Monday.
"We'll have to see what
kind of strides he takes here,"
Cooper said.
Stamkos has been out
since he was injured Nov. 11
at Boston and needed sur-
gery. He had 14 goals and 23
points in 17 games before
the injury.

Lehtonen, Stars
shuts out Pens
DALLAS Kari Lehtonen
made 24 saves for his sec-
ond shutout in three games
to lead the Dallas Stars to a
3-0 victory over the Pitts-
burgh Penguins.
Sergei Gonchar, Jamie
Benn and Rich Peverley had
Dallas' goals, and Lehtonen
also had an assist for the
second consecutive game.
The Stars have won their last
three games by a combined
14-1 margin.
Gonchar had a power-play
goal, his second score this
season, with just under 5
minutes remaining in the first


period against his former
team. Dallas has scored with
a man advantage in seven
consecutive games.
Alex Goligoski, another for-
mer Penguins player, had an
assist when Benn scored to
make it 2-0 at 3:14 of the
second. Peverley closed the
scoring a little more than 7
minutes later.
Lehtonen faced only 12
shots during the first two peri-
ods, before the Metropolitan
Division-leading Penguins
doubled their attempts in the
third.
From staff reports





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Not caving in


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing J.T. Brown carries the puck against the Colorado Avalanche during the second
period Saturday in Tampa.

Lightning avoid loss to Avalanche in TB's 5-2 home victory


Associated Press

TAMPA Tyler Johnson scored
three goals to lead the Tampa Bay
Lightning to a 5-2 victory over the
Colorado Avalanche on Saturday
night
With the Lightning leading 3-2,
Johnson doubled the advantage
with 5:22 remaining and then com-
pleted his first career hat trick less
than 2 1/2 minutes later The rookie
center has 16 goals this season.
Mark Barberio and Valtteri Filp-
pula also scored for the Lightning.
Martin St Louis extended his point
streak to 10 games with an assist on
Johnson's second goal.
Johnson opened the scoring at
7:15 of the first period, Barberio
made it 2-0 about 11/2 minutes later
and Filppula completed Tampa
Bay's three-goal period with just
under 2 minutes to go.
Bruins 6, Flyers 1
PHILADELPHIA- Jarome Iginla and
Zdeno Chara each had two goals,
Tuukka Rask made 25 saves and the
Boston Bruins beat the Philadelphia
Flyers 6-1.
Reilly Smith and Patrice Bergeron
also had goals for the Bruins. The de-
fending Eastern Conference champions
are 3-0-1 since losing five of eight, and
trail only Pittsburgh in the conference.
Claude Giroux scored a power-play
goal for the slumping Flyers, who've lost
four in a row. They're 2-5-2 in their last
nine games, tumbling from second
place in the division to eighth in the
East. It's their worst stretch since a 1-7
start that got coach Peter Laviolette
fired three games into the season.
Capitals 5, Canadiens 0
MONTREAL -Alex Ovechkin re-
turned from an injury that sidelined him
two games to start a four-goal second
period as the Washington Capitals
ended a seven-game winless run with a


5-0 victory over the slumping Montreal
Canadiens.
John Erskine, Jay Beagle and John
Carlson also scored in the middle period
as the Capitals, who had scored only
three goals in their four previous games,
dominated the first half of the game and
then shut Montreal down. The Canadi-
ens have lost four in a row and five of six.
Casey Wellman, recalled Saturday
from AHL Hershey, got his first goal of
the season on a feed from Ovechkin on
a 2-on-1 counterattack 8:38 into the
third period.
Blues 4, Islanders 3. OT
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Kevin Shat-
tenkirk and Alexander Steen scored
shootout goals to lift the St. Louis Blues
to 4-3 win over the New York Islanders
following a puzzling goal reversal call in
overtime.
Thomas Vanek appeared to score the
winner for the Islanders on the power
play with 1:15 left in overtime but the
play was overturned on review. The
puck dribbled past Blues goaltender
Jaroslav Halak and went to Toronto for
review. The puck appeared to hit
Vanek's skate but the distinct kicking
motion that usually negates goals
wasn't apparent.
Matt Martin had put the Islanders
ahead 3-2 midway through the second
period. T.J. Oshie tied the game at
19:33 with his 12th goal.
Vanek and Kyle Okposo scored in the
first for the Islanders. Vladimir
Tarasenko scored twice for the Blues.
Hurricanes 6, Senators 3
RALEIGH, N.C. Manny Malhotra
had two goals and an assist, leading the
Carolina Hurricanes to a 6-3 win over
the Ottawa Senators.
It was the third straight win for Car-
olina, which is 11-0-1 in its last 12 home
games against Ottawa.
The result moved the Hurricanes,


who had a 4-0 lead in the second pe-
riod, a point ahead of the Senators in
the Eastern Conference standings.
Nathan Gerbe added a goal and
two assists for the Hurricanes, while
Eric Staal, Riley Nash and Tuomo
Ruutu scored.
Kyle Turris scored his 16th and 17th
goals of the season for Ottawa, which
also got a goal from Mike Zibanejad.
Clarke MacArthur and Eric Gryba each
had two assists for the Senators.
Carolina goalie Anton Khudobin had
23 saves.
Sabres 5, Blue Jackets 2
COLUMBUS, Ohio Christian
Ehrhoff and Marcus Foligno scored
short-handed goals to lead the Buffalo
Sabres to a 5-2 victory over Columbus,
ending the Blue Jackets' franchise-
record winning streak at eight.
Ryan Miller was almost flawless in
goal for the Sabres, making 38 saves -
standing particularly tall on the Blue
Jackets' four fruitless power plays.
Matt Ellis, Steve Ott and Cody Hodg-
son also scored for the Sabres, who
had lost five in a row (0-3-2). Ehrhoff
added two assists, tying a career high
with three points.
Derek MacKenzie had a goal and an
assist and Mark Letestu also scored for
the Blue Jackets.
Maple Leafs 5, Jets 4, OT
WINNIPEG, Manitoba Dustin
Byfuglien fired a low shot past goalie
Jonathan Bernier 2:44 into overtime to
give the Winnipeg Jets a 5-4 victory
over the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Toronto's Phil Kessel took a pass
from James van Riemsdyk and fired a
sharp-angled shot past Jets goalie On-
drej Pavelec with 1:33 left in the third
period to tie the score.
Mark Scheifele, Zach Bogosian,
Blake Wheeler and Bryan Little also
scored for the Jets, who outshot the
Leafs 32-28 through overtime.


OKC's Durant


has strong return


Triple double

by guard helps

defeat Philly

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Kevin Durant had 32
points, 14 rebounds and 10
assists in his return from a
shoulder injury to lead the
Oklahoma City Thunder to
their seventh straight win,
a 103-91 victory over the
Philadelphia 76ers on
Saturday night.
Durant was scratched
from the Thunder's win
over Boston on Friday with
a sprained right shoulder
Against the Sixers, Durant
was one of the first Thun-
der to hit the court for
pregame warm-ups. He
dunked several times,
even hanging on the rim
for several seconds after
one, and was fit to play
The 12-win Sixers
trimmed Oklahoma City's
lead to four in the third
quarter before Durant
keyed a 14-5 run to open
up a comfortable lead.
Durant, the NBAs lead-
ing scorer, has scored at
least 30 points in his last 10
games.
James Anderson led the
Sixers with 19 points.
Clippers 126,
Raptors 118
TORONTO Jamal Craw-
ford had a season-high 37
points and 11 assists, and the
Los Angeles Clippers over-
came Terrence Ross' 51
points to beat the Toronto
Raptors 126-118.
Ross matched Vince
Carter's franchise record set
14 years ago and nearly dou-
bled his previous career high
of 26 points against Portland
on Jan. 2,2013.
The second-year guard con-
nected on 16 of 29 field goal
attempts, made 10 of 17 from
3-point range and went 9 for


10 at the free throw line. But
he missed his final foul shot
with 4 seconds remaining, fail-
ing to top the 51 points Carter
scored in a 103-102 win over
Phoenix on Feb. 27, 2000.
Ross' big night wasn't
enough for the Raptors,
though.
Bulls 89,
Bobcats 87
CHARLOTTE, N.C. D.J.
Augustin scored 15 of his 28
points in the fourth quarter
and the Chicago Bulls held off
the Charlotte Bobcats 89-87
to get back above .500.
The former Bobcats point
guard hit 4 of 5 shots from the
field in the fourth quarter, in-
cluding three 3-pointers, to
help break open a tight game.
The Bulls (22-21) have won
10 of their last 13 games.
Joakim Noah had 11
points, 10 rebounds and eight
assists for the Bulls, who
have won 10 of their last 11
against the Bobcats.
Al Jefferson continued his
hot play for the Bobcats
(19-27) with 32 points and 13
rebounds. It was Jefferson's
ninth straight 20-point game.
Grizzlies 99,
Rockets 81
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike
Conley scored 17 points and
Zach Randolph had 15 points
and 17 rebounds as the Mem-
phis Grizzlies beat the Hous-
ton Rockets for the second
consecutive night, 99-81.
The Grizzlies won 88-87 in
Houston on Friday, then took
control of the rematch. Mem-
phis held the Rockets to 38
percent shooting and built the
lead to as many as 27 points
before both teams sent in re-
serves to finish the game.
Courtney Lee also had 15
points and Kosta Koufos
scored 14, hitting seven of
his eight shots from the field.
James Johnson added 12
points for Memphis and Nick
Calathes added a season-
high 11.


Associated Press
Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant puts up a
shot with Philadelphia 76ers center Spencer Hawes
defending during the first half Saturday in Philadelphia.


Associated Press
North quarterback Tajh Boyd, of Clemson, slides in front
South linebacker Telvin Smith, of Florida State, during the
first half of the Senior Bowl on Saturday in Mobile, Ala.


South claims


Senior Bowl 20-10


Associated Press
MOBILE, Ala. Dee
Ford prefers to keep things
simple: Play hard and fast,
and let others worry about
his NFL draft stock.
That approach certainly
worked at the Senior Bowl.
The Auburn defensive
end had two first-half
sacks, and Derek Carr and
David Fales each threw a
touchdown pass in the
South's 20-10 victory over
the North on Saturday
Ford, who earned posi-
tive reviews from ob-
servers during the week,
quickly dismissed a re-
porter's suggestion that he
made some money in the
draft with his performance.
"I don't do this for cash,"
said Ford, selected the


game's MVP "I do this for
pride. I do this because I
really, really want to be
great. The money will
come. I'm just all about
perfecting what I do."
The showcase game for
top senior NFL prospects
was mostly dominated by
the defenses. The South
racked up five sacks of Vir-
ginia Tech's Logan
Thomas and intercepted
three North passes.
Princeton's Caraun Reid
also had two sacks.
"Just talking to the line-
men, they said these guys
are kind of quick coming
off the ball," Clemson
quarterback Tajh Boyd of
the North said. "You've got
to go out there and try to
help those guys out."


Expect tricks at Pro Bowl


Pro Bowlerspull

out all the stops,

hints ofcompetition

Associated Press

HONOLULU Pro Bowlers
practicing one last time Saturday
before the schoolyard pickup all-
star game dropped hints they'll use
some trickery to get an edge today
On one play, Cleveland Browns
center Alex Mack streaked into the
end zone at Aloha Stadium, not
fast enough to catch a pass tar-
geted his way
Indianapolis long-snapper Matt
Overton later busted out a behind-
the-back snap a spiraling line
drive caught by St. Louis punter
Johnny Hekker about 10 yards away,
where a slot receiver might line up.
Mack says the potential catch was-
n't meant for him. He describes it as
a "last case scenario" for the team
picked by NFL great Deion Sanders.
"It's super top-secret I can't
talk about it," Mack said.
Jerry Rice's team later finished
practice by huddling up and shout-
ing "Get money," a reference to the
five-figure pay bonus winners get in
the game.
"The worst pressure I'm getting is
from the other team: 'Hey, let's take
it easy on each other,"' Miami defen-
sive end Cameron Wake told fans.
"But they got another thing coming."
Ray Anderson, the NFL's outgo-
ing executive vice president of foot-
ball operations, said he hopes that
up-tempo practices, talk and en-


Associated Press
Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall, of Team Rice, cradles the
football after catching a pass during Pro Bowl practice at Kapolei High
School on Friday in Kapolei, Hawaii.


couragement from Sanders, Rice
and coaches will lead to a better
game Sunday
"Certainly there's some competi-
tive talking going back and forth,"
he said.
Kansas CityJamaal Charles offered
to line up at wide receiver when he
was selected to the Pro Bowl. On Sat-
urday, Drew Brees ran one play that
looked a lot like an option, pitching
the ball to Cowboys running back De-
Marco Murray On another play, Larry
Fitzgerald ran the ball on a sweep
along the right side.
'"Anytime you play for the proba-
bly the greatest player to ever put


on cleats, it's a good thing," said
Fitzgerald, who was assigned to
Rice's team after the other seven
receivers were picked beforehand.
Anderson said he thinks the game
will be improved in part because
players suggested the change that
models the game partly after fan-
tasy football.
"There's always a certain amount
of pride that comes along with
being a captain and also picking
sides. You want to win," said Hous-
ton defensive end J.J. Watt, a cap-
tain for Sanders' team who lined up
as a wide receiver in last year's
all-star game.


B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Miami goes cold vs. 'Cuse


No. 21 Michigan

drops in-state

rivalNo. 3MSU

Associated Press

CORAL GABLES No. 2 Syra-
cuse held Miami without a basket
for 7 1/2 minutes down the stretch
Saturday and made eight consec-
utive free throws in the final
minute to remain unbeaten with a
64-52 victory over the Hurricanes.
Miami led 47-46 with less than
7 minutes to go but made only
one field goal the rest of the way
Syracuse (19-0, 6-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) needs one
more victory to tie the school
record for most wins to start a sea-
son, set two years ago. The ACC
newcomers beat defending league
champion Miami (10-9,2-5) for the
second time in three weeks.
Jerami Grant scored 16 points
to lead the Orange, who had a 39-
24 rebounding advantage.
Davon Reed scored 16 points
for the Hurricanes, who kept it
close by shooting 9 of 17 from
3-point range.
No. 21 Michigan 80,
No. 3 Michigan St. 75
EAST LANSING, Mich. Nik
Stauskas made a tiebreaking 3-
pointer with 3:12 left and finished
with 19 points and freshman Derrick
Walton Jr. scored a season-high 19,
lifting No. 21 Michigan to an 80-75
win over No. 3 Michigan State to re-
main the only Big Ten team without a
conference loss.
The Wolverines (15-4, 7-0 Big
Ten) went on a 10-0 run late in the
game to take control and held on to
win for just the second time in 15
games at the Breslin Center.
The Spartans (18-2, 7-1) had won
11 straight since losing to North Car-
olina at home.
Michigan State's Gary Harris
scored a career-high 27 points and
didn't get much help offensively from
his team that was without two of its
best players.


Associated Press
Miami players Rion Brown, left, and Donnavan Kirk, right, block Syracuse's C.J. Fair during the second
half Saturday in Coral Gables. Syracuse won 64-52.


their second straight.
Wisconsin relied on an old-school
formula to win this one committing
just nine turnovers while limiting the
Boilermakers to just 35.4 percent
shooting from the field.
No. 10 Iowa 76,
Northwestern 50
EVANSTON, III. Roy Devyn
Marble scored 14 points for Iowa,
which never trailed.
Gabriel Olaseni had 14 points and
10 rebounds and Mike Gesell added
11 points for the Hawkeyes (16-4,
5-2 Big Ten), who avoided losing con-
secutive games for the first time this
season after falling 75-67 at No. 21
Michigan on Wednesday. They shot
51.9 percent from the field (28 of 54)
and won their fourth in five games.
Iowa outrebounded Northwestern
44-20.
Drew Crawford had 20 points for
Northwestern (10-11, 3-5), which had
won three of four.


No. 4 Villanova 94, No. 11 Oklahoma St. 81,
Marquette 85, OT West Virginia 75


MILWAUKEE Ryan Arcidiacono
had 20 points and 11 assists, and
coolly guided Villanova in overtime fol-
lowing a frenzied finish to regulation.
Arcidiacono had six points and two
assists in the extra period. He hus-
tled for a loose ball with 37.7 sec-
onds left that allowed Villanova
coach Jay Wright to call a timeout
and avoid a turnover.
James Bell, who finished with 30
points, followed with two free throws
to make it a three-possession game
for the Wildcats (17-2, 6-1 Big East).
Todd Mayo had 18 points, includ-
ing the last 10 in regulation, for Mar-
quette (11-9, 3-4) to help force
overtime at 77-77.
No. 9 Wisconsin 72,
Purdue 58
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. Sam
Dekker and Traevon Jackson each
scored 15 points, helping No. 9 Wis-
consin end its three-game losing
streak with a 72-58 victory at Purdue.
The Badgers (17-3, 4-3 Big Ten)
won for the first time since starting
16-0. It was only their fourth win ever
at Mackey Arena.
Terone Johnson and Bryson Scott
each had 10 points to lead Purdue,
but the Boilermakers (13-7, 3-4) lost


STILLWATER, Okla. LeBryan
Nash scored a career-high 29 points
and had nine rebounds for Okla-
homa State.
Nash was 10 of 13 from the field
for the Cowboys (16-3, 4-2 Big 12),
who swept the season series with
the Mountaineers.
Markel Brown had 15 points and
10 rebounds and Phil Forte added
13 points for Oklahoma State.
The Cowboys won despite a sub-
par performance from star guard
Marcus Smart. The sophomore
scored a season-low five points on
1-for-7 shooting and played just 25
minutes before fouling out.
Eron Harris scored 21 points and
Juwan Staten added 19 for the
Mountaineers (11-9, 3-4).
No. 14 Kentucky 79,
Georgia 54
LEXINGTON, Ky. -Aaron Harri-
son scored 15 points as Kentucky
pulled away to its third straight win.
Julius Randle added 14 points
while James Young had 13 including
a couple of second-half 3-pointers
for Kentucky (15-4, 5-1 Southeastern
Conference).
Georgia (10-8, 4-2) had gotten
within 37-31 with 16:18 remaining


before the Wildcats steadily built a
double-digit lead that rarely got
below 20 points.
Georgia outrebounded Kentucky
35-32 but shot just 16 of 49 (33 per-
cent) and was outscored 36-24 in the
paint in the only regular season
meeting between the schools.
Brandon Morris had 15 points for
Georgia.
No. 16 Iowa St. 81,
No. 22 Kansas St. 75
AMES, Iowa Melvin Ejim
scored 20 points and Iowa State
snapped a three-game losing streak.
Georges Niang had 18 points and
freshman Matt Thomas matched a
career high with 14 for the Cyclones
(15-3, 3-3 Big 12), who blew a 12-
point halftime lead before putting the
game away late in the second half.
Ejim blocked a potential game-
tying 3 from Shane Southwell and hit
two free throws to put the Cyclones
ahead 79-73 with 23 seconds left.
Marcus Foster scored 20 points
for Kansas State (14-6, 4-3), which
lost consecutive games for the first
time since November.
No. 18 Duke 78, FSU 56
DURHAM, N.C. Rodney Hood
scored 18 points to help Duke, giving
Hall of Fame coach Mike Krzyzewski
his 900th victory at the school.
Jabari Parker added 14 points for
the Blue Devils (16-4, 5-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference), who won their
fourth straight game and extended
the nation's longest active home win-
ning streak to 28 games. Duke used
an 11-0 run late in the first half to
build a 20-point lead and never let
the Seminoles get the margin back
to single digits again.
Duke won despite shooting 31
percent, but converted 17 FSU
turnovers into 29 points and domi-
nated the offensive glass to score 29
second-chance points against the
Seminoles (13-6, 4-3).
Krzyzewski is the all-time leader in
career victories in men's Division I
with 973.
Okaro White scored 14 points for
Florida State.
No. 20 Pittsburgh 83,
Maryland 79
COLLEGE PARK, Md. Lamar
Patterson scored 28 points, and No.


20 Pittsburgh beat Maryland 83-79 to
complete its first regular-season
sweep as a member of the Atlantic
Coast Conference.
Pittsburgh (18-2, 6-1) never trailed
in the second half against the strug-
gling Terrapins, who lost by 20 to the
Panthers on Jan. 6. Although this
game was significantly closer than
the first one, Maryland (11-9, 3-4)
simply couldn't contain Patterson, a
6-foot-5 senior who fell just short of
matching his career high of 30 points.
Talib Zanna scored 16 for the Pan-
thers and James Robinson had 13.
Pittsburgh next faces Duke at home
on Monday night.
Texas 74,
No. 24 Baylor 60
WACO, Texas Texas freshman
guard Isaiah Taylor scored a career-
high 27 points and the Longhorns
stretched their winning streak to five
games.
The Longhorns (16-4, 5-2 Big 12)
have won three consecutive games
against Top 25 teams for the first
time in school history.
Gary Franklin had 14 points and
Taurean Prince added 12 for Baylor
(13-6, 1-5), which led only once be-
fore losing its fourth straight. It is the
Bears' longest losing streak since
dropping six in a row five years ago,
and they have lost consecutive
games at the Ferrell Center after a
13-game home winning streak.
When the Bears got within 46-39
midway through the second half,
Taylor scored seven points in a span
of 76 seconds.
No. 25 Oklahoma 74,
Texas Tech 65
LUBBOCK, Texas Buddy Hield
scored 18 points, 12 on 3-pointers,
to lead Oklahoma.
Cameron Clark added 17 points
and Jordan Woodard had 15 to lead
the Sooners (16-4, 5-2 Big 12).
Ryan Spangler had 10 of Okla-
homa's 28 rebounds.
Hield was 4 of 7 from beyond the arc
and Clark was 8 of 12 from the field.
The Sooners got 14 points off
Texas Tech's 11 turnovers; the Red
Raiders got just three points off Okla-
homa's seven turnovers.
Jordan Tolbert and Jaye Crockett
scored 14 points each for the Red
Raiders (10-10, 2-5).


SPORTS


BROOKS
Continued from Page B1

button when the team fell
behind 21-3 on college
football's biggest stage in
one of the most storied sta-
diums the Rose Bowl.
"We just had to keep
fighting and we did," he
explained. "I knew our
maturity level and work
ethic was going to come
out sooner or later We just
kept fighting and not get-
ting down on ourselves.
We all just really pulled it
together."
Nerves might have
played a factor for he and
his teammates, Brooks
said, admitting he was
nervous leading up to kick-
off as well as the first cou-
ple of series of the game.
"It was definitely nerve-
wracking at first, thinking
about the magnitude of the
game and just how many
people were watching," he
said. "I was just waiting to
get into the rhythm of the
game. After a couple of se-
ries, that all went away
and I felt at ease."
It certainly didn't hurt
that of the six tackles
Brooks recorded against
Auburn, four of them were


against the Tigers' Tre
Mason, a Heisman Trophy
finalist, who finished with
195 yards and one touch-
down on a 34 carries.
Mason, a junior who de-
clared for the NFL Draft
in April, broke Bo Jack-
son's single-season record
for rushing yards.
"He's a dynamic player,
he runs with so much au-
thority. There was a reason
he was up for the Heis-
man," Brooks said about
Mason, while also ap-
plauding the efforts of
Auburn signal-caller Nick
Marshall. "He's great also,
he's pretty fast. They have
a really great team. They
played very hard."
It won't likely be the last
time he competes against
either one of them, espe-
cially Mason if all goes
well in the coming months.
According to FSU's Sports
Information Department,
several pro scouts have
been in contact with the
school about Brooks this
past season.
The senior who is ma-
joring in sociology with a
minor in psychology will
get at least two, if not
three more attempts, to
make an impression on
the scouting departments
with NFL teams.


Associated Press
South safety Terrence Brooks, of Florida State competed
in the Senior Bowl on Saturday.


Brooks played in the
Senior Bowl, college foot-
ball's annual senior all-
star game, Saturday night
at Ladd-Peebles Stadium
in Mobile, Ala.
Brooks will also compete
in FSU's annual Pro Day in
March while he awaits an
invitation to the annual
NFL Scouting Combine,


which will be Feb. 19 to 25
in Indianapolis.
Brooks said with a lim-
ited class load this semes-
ter, he's planning on doing
as much as he can to pre-
pare for the last two
events.
"I pretty much will take
the standard FSU has in-
stilled in me and take that


to a whole other level," he
explained. "I pretty much
will stay focused as much
as possible. This is a big
turning point in my life. I
hope to capitalize on the
opportunities God gives
me. It's looking pretty good
so far, but if this is my des-
tiny I'm going to make the
most of it."
If drafted in April, Brooks
would become just the third
player from Dunnellon
High School to be selected
in the two-day selection
process. Ernie Mills was the
last Dunnellon alumni to be
taken in the NFL Draft; the
former Gator standout was
selected by the Pittsburgh
Steelers.
Lerentee McCray, a for-
mer high school teammate
of Brooks, signed a rookie
free agent contract with
the Denver Broncos last
season. However, an in-
jury during the preseason
derailed McCray's oppor-
tunity at making the 53-
man roster But the
Broncos instead placed
McCray on injured re-
serve (IR), which guaran-
teed his contract and
afforded him the opportu-
nity to rehabilitate his in-
jury at the Broncos'
training facility in Denver
The former Gator stand-


out will get a chance to
make Denver's regular-
season roster next sum-
mer if he makes the cut.
Brooks said he and Mc-
Cray have remained
friends since their prep
playing days and while
he's yet to reach out to
him, he noted it's likely he
will do so prior to the NFL
Scouting Combine.
"He's a very good per-
son; I'm sure he'll give me
some great advice,"
Brooks said of McCray "I'll
reach out to him at some
point."
With his future yet to
come, Brooks said he's
thankful for the support
of the community
throughout not just his ca-
reer at Florida State, but
in Pop Warner through
his prep days.
"I would like to give a
thank you to all of the peo-
ple," he said. "From the
start of little league foot-
ball, I really owe a lot of
people who got me to this
point Every day, I see new
comments from someone
wishing me support and the
best I made sure I stayed
true to my hometown and
represented it to the best of
my abilities. Hopefully, I'll
get the chance to continue
to do so."


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 B5

Women's college

basketball BRIEFS

Texas 66, No. 18
West Virginia 63
AUSTIN, Texas Nneka En-
emkpali scored 15 points and
Brady Sanders had 14 as Texas
knocked off No. 18 West Vir-
ginia 66-63 on Saturday.
Texas (13-6, 4-3 Big 12) out-
rebounded West Virginia (17-3,
6-2) 46-27, paced by Enemkpali
with 21, a career high. Nekia
Jones added 11 points on 5 of 7
shooting.
Bria Holmes led the Moun-
taineers with 18 points, while
Averee Fields chipped in with 12.
The Longhorns used an 8-0
run, highlighted by a Chassidy
Fussell 3-pointer, to go up 28-21
with 5:04 left in the first half and
led 40-33 at the break.
West Virginia opened the sec-
ond half with an 11-4 run to cap-
ture the lead at 45-44. But Texas
tied it at 61 on a pair of Sanders
free throws with 4:19 left as the
Mountaineers missed their final
six shots and made just 2 of 5
free throws down the stretch.
No. 25 Gonzaga 69,
Pepperdine 39
MALIBU, Calif. Lindsay
Sherbert came off the bench to
score 16 points and Gonzaga
held an opponent below 40
points for the third time, coast-
ing to a win over Pepperdine.
The Bulldogs (18-3, 8-1), who
won their eighth straight and
10th straight over Pepperdine,
have allowed less than 50
points nine times. They out-
scored the Waves (5-15, 1-7)
38-15 in the second half and
forced 23 turnovers.
Sunny Greinacher added 13
points and Haiden Palmer 11 for
GU, which had a 37-28 re-
bounding advantage, including
15-6 on the offensive end.
No player reached double fig-
ures for Pepperdine, which was
without leading scorer Bria
Richardson (16.9) and only had
eight players.
With Sherbert scoring 10
points, Gonzaga led 31-23 at
the half. The Bulldogs opened
the second half with a 10-2 run
and was never threatened. They
hit 10 3s while Pepperdine was
2-12.
D-ll coach Stevens
joins 900-win club
WALTHAM, Mass. Bentley
coach Barbara Stevens became
the sixth coach in women's col-
lege basketball history to reach
900 victories.
Stevens, 58, who also
coached at Clark University and
the University of Massachu-
setts, reached the milestone
when her undefeated Falcons
beat Saint Anselm 98-82 in a
Northeast-10 Conference game.
Stevens, in her 37th year,
joins Pat Summitt, Sylvia Hatch-
ell, C. Vivian Stringer, Tara Van-
Derveer and Jody Conradt as
the only coach to reach that
plateau. Stevens is the third-
fastest women's coach to 900.
Sharing the spotlight with
Stevens on Saturday was Lau-
ren Battista, the senior forward
who became the program's all-
time leading scorer.
The Falcons, No. 1 in the
country in Division II, are 18-0
with every victory coming by
double figures.
From wire reports





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Third-time charm


Li Na breaks

through to finally

claim Aussie Open

Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia -
Seven months after giving retire-
ment serious thought, Li Na made
it third time lucky in an Australian
Open final with a 7-6 (3), 6-0 win
over Dominika Cibulkova to be-
come the oldest women's champion
here in the Open era.
Li, who turns 32 next month, lost
finals to Kim Clijsters in 2011 and to
Victoria Azarenka last year In be-
tween, she won the 2011 French
Open in one of the many firsts she's
established for Chinese tennis.
Widely popular at Melbourne
Park for her funny post-match in-
terviews and wise cracks about her
husband and his snoring, Li didn't
disappoint the Rod Laver crowd in
her first victory speech.
She first thanked her agent, Max,
"for making me rich," her coach
Carlos Rodriguez and then her hus-
band, former coach and constant
traveling companion, Shan Jiang.
She told him he was "even fa-
mous in China."
"So thanks for him give up every-
thing just traveling with me to be my
hitting partner, fix the drinks, fix the
racket So thanks a lot, you are a nice
guy," she said, pausing for the laugh-
ter "Also you are so lucky, find me."
In both her previous finals at
Melbourne Park, Li won the first set
but went down in three. Against
Azarenka last year, she stumbled
and twisted her ankle, and needed
a medical timeout in the third set
after hitting her head on the court.
She had no such trouble against
No. 20-seeded Cibulkova on Satur-
day night, racing through the sec-
ond set in 27 minutes after taking
the first in a tiebreaker
Li's supporters were everywhere
in the crowd, some with Chinese
flags painted on their faces, others
holding Chinese flags or giant signs
painted with Chinese characters.
Her fans got her through the
nervous first set, chanting, "Li Na,
let's go," in Mandarin during every
changeover
Li opened the final by breaking
Cibulkova, holding, then getting a
breakpoint chance in the third


Associated Press
Li Na celebrates after defeating Dominika Cibulkova on Saturday during
their women's singles final at the Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia.


game. But Cibulkova held, and then
broke back in the sixth game thanks
to Li's consecutive double-faults. Li
broke in the llth game and had a
set point serving for the set in the
12th, but lost three straight points to
ensure it went to the tiebreaker
As Li began her roll in the second
set, someone yelled before
Cibulkova served "C'mon Li Na,
bagel her!"
She did.
A half hour later she was holding
up both thumbs to the crowd, and
holding back tears as she hugged
her Slovakian rival at the net. She
went immediately to the side of the
court to shake hands with her coach
Rodriguez.
The diminutive Cibulkova, one of
the shortest players ever to reach a
Grand Slam final at 5-foot-3, had
four wins over Top 20 players on


her way to the final, including a
fourth-round upset of third-seeded
Maria Sharapova and a straight-sets
semifinal trouncing of No. 5
Agnieszka Radwanska.
She had to pull the microphone
down closer to her before her post-
match speech.
"These were just fantastic two
weeks of my life," she said, pausing
to laugh, and then cry "Hello to
everybody in Slovakia. This means
a lot for our country and I'm happy
I can be the one here for Slovakia."
No. 4-ranked Li, who reportedly
has four-times more followers on
her Chinese social networking site
than there are people in Slovakia,
had a good run through the tourna-
ment as other star players like Ser-
ena Williams, Sharapova and
Azarenka tumbled out by the
quarterfinals.


New face in


Aussie men's final


Wawrinka

meets Nadal

for 13th time

Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Aus-
tralia At an Australian
Open marked by upsets
and new story lines,
Rafael Nadal will play
today's final against a man
often called the "other"
Swiss tennis player
Now, after a stunning
run in Melbourne, Stanis-
las Wawrinka has a new
nickname: The Stanimal
- a tribute to his gritty,
fight-until-the end style of
tennis. Fittingly, perhaps,
the name was apparently
coined by none other than
Roger Federer, in a tweet
of support for his friend
which quickly caught on
earlier in the tournament.
Now that Federer is out
of the running he lost to
Nadal in the semifinals -
the 17-time Grand Slam
winner and long-time am-
bassador for Swiss tennis
has joined those cheering
for Wawrinka to win his
first Grand Slam final. It is
a match that holds histori-
cal significance for all
three players.
If the No. 1-ranked
Nadal wins, as the odds
suggest he will, the 27-
year-old Spaniard will be-
come the first player to
win each of the majors
twice in the Open era. It
would be his 14th Grand
Slam trophy and bring him
one step closer to Fed-
erer's all-time record of 17.
If No. 8-ranked
Wawrinka beats Nadal to
win his first major title, he
catapults to a career high
of No. 3 in the rankings.
Just reaching the final as-
sures Wawrinka of the No.
5 spot, meaning for the first
time he will pass Federer,
who is now ranked sixth.
On the eve of the final,
Wawrinka said he was still


shocked by his success.
"It's insane. It's incredi-
ble," the 28-year-old
Wawrinka said Saturday,
speaking to reporters in
English and in his native
French. "I never imagined
that one day I would be
here, playing in the final."
After a breakthrough
year in 2013, Wawrinka is
playing the best tennis of
his life in Melbourne. He
knocked out four-time
Australian Open cham-
pion Novak Djokovic in
the quarterfinals and beat
No. 7 Tomas Berdych in
the semifinals. He knows
how tough it will be to beat
Nadal he's tried and
failed 12 times.
"I've played him so many
times, and lost so many
times, but I'm going to try
again," Wawrinka said. "I
know what I have to do. I
know that I have to play ag-
gressive, serve really well,
and try to always push him."
"I'm playing my best ten-
nis here," Wawrinka added.
"Physically, I'm ready"
Nadal said he's ready,
too, for a breakthrough at
what he calls his unlucki-
est Grand Slam. Nadal won
in Melbourne in 2009 but
in subsequent years strug-
gled with injuries during
or before the season's first
major He missed the 2013
Australian Open during a
seven-month layoff for ill-
ness and a knee injury He
returned to win the French
and U.S. Open last year but
reaching the final in Mel-
bourne holds special
significance.
"After missing last year
for me it's really, really
emotional to be back on
this court, Rod Laver
Arena, and to be able to
play another final," said
Nadal, who has known
Wawrinka since they were
teens, playing junior tour-
naments in Europe.
"He's a good friend, a
great guy I'm so happy for
him that he's in the final.
He deserves it," Nadal
said. "I know it will be a
very, very tough match."


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


A legacy of leadership


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


ctive and passionate
citizens are what dif-
ferentiate one com-
munity from the next.
Major shifts or improve-
ments don't just happen.
They often take place be-
cause one citizen gets sick
and tired of the status quo.
That one citizen stands
up and says he or she is going
to do something about it.
In Citrus County, we have
our own incredible bullpen
of activists who have done


just that.
Think for a moment about
Art Jones and cleaning up
the Crystal River One man
started something and now
most of Citrus County -
and Florida buys into his
idea of pulling the stinking
weeds out of our waterways.
Barbara Mills of Inver-
ness got aggravated that we
were not treating our re-
turning veterans with the
respect they deserve. She
started a movement that


makes us all proud.
Now, when a veteran re-
turns from the war to Citrus
County, they are welcomed
and appreciated.
Chet Cole of Lecanto did-
n't think we provided
proper services to citizens
with developmental dis-
abilities. He did something
about it and crusaded for
three decades to build the
Key Training Center


PageC4


There's only one

Citizen of the Year,

but many are worthy
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
While the Chronicle generally selects one person
as its annual citizen of the year, many others
are suggested by friends, associates and loved ones.
Here are other nominees for the 34th annual Cit-
izen of the Year:
Just days after Joy Wilson nominated Al Fischer,
of Beverly Hills, Mr. Fischer died at age 92. Here is
some of what Wilson wrote about Mr Fischer:
See PageC3


WA Edith Windsor is interviewed Oct. 18, 2012, at the offices of the New York
SCivil Liberties Union, in New York. When it comes to things like estate taxes,
the federal recognition of same-sex marriage will help legally married gay and
WHA' lesbian couples. That was the issue in the Supreme Court decision in the
Wy y HA S ^case of Windsor, who had to pay estate taxes after her lesbian spouse died.
Associated Press


NEW IN




TAXES?


CAROLE FELDMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Anew top tax rate, higher
Medicare taxes and the
phaseout of deductions and
exemptions could mean
higher tax bills for wealthier Ameri-
cans this year Legally wed same-sex
couples, meanwhile, may find the
true meaning of the marriage penalty
All taxpayers will have a harder
time taking medical deductions.
In other changes for the 2013 tax year,
the alternative minimum tax has been
patched permanently to prevent
more middle-income people from being
drawn in, and there's a simpler way to
compute the home office deduction.
Tax rate tables and the standard
deduction have been adjusted for in-
flation, as has the maximum contri-
bution to retirement accounts,
including 401(k) plans and individual
retirement accounts, or IRAs.
The provisions were set by Con-
gress last January as part of legisla-
tion to avert the so-called fiscal cliff


of tax increases and spending cuts.
"We finally got some certainty for
this year," said Greg Rosica, a con-
tributing author to Ernst & Young's
"EY Tax Guide 2014."
Nevertheless, the filing season is
being delayed because of the two-week
partial government shutdown last Oc-
tober The Internal Revenue Service
says it needs the extra time to ensure
that systems are in place and work-
ing. People will be able to start filing
returns Jan. 31, a week and a half
later than the original Jan. 21 date.
No change in the April 15 deadline,
however That's set by law and will re-
main in place, the IRS says.

HIGHER-INCOME
TAXPAYERS
The tax legislation passed at the
start of 2013 permanently extended
the George W Bush-era tax cuts for
most people but also added a top
marginal tax rate of 39.6 percent for
those at higher incomes $400,000
for single filers, $450,000 for married
couples filing jointly and $425,000 for


heads of household.
On top of that, higher-income tax-
payers could see their itemized deduc-
tions and personal exemptions phased
out and pay higher capital gains taxes
- 20 percent for some taxpayers. And
there are new taxes for them to help
pay for the new health care law
There are different income thresh-
olds for each of these new taxes.
An additional 0.9 percent Medicare
tax, for example, kicks in on earnings
over $250,000 for married couples filing
jointly and $200,000 for singles and
heads of household. Same for an extra
3.8 percent tax on investment income.
But the phaseout of personal ex-
emptions and deductions doesn't begin
until $300,000 for married couples fil-
ing jointly and $250,000 for singles.
EDUCATION
Many credits and deductions were
extended for 2013, including several
for education. Among them: the
American Opportunity Credit of up to
$2,500 per student for tuition and fees
and deductions for student loan in-
terest and tuition-related expenses.
Many of these are phased out at
higher income levels.
Schoolteachers will still be able to
deduct up to $250 in out-of-pocket ex-
penses for books or other supplies.

MEDICAL EXPENSES
Taxpayers will still be able to
deduct their medical expenses, but it
will be more difficult for many to
qualify The threshold for deducting
medical expenses now stands at 10
percent of adjusted gross income.


SERIES CONTINUES
Editor's note: This is the first in a
six-part series explaining changes
taxpayers will face when filing returns.
Next week: Health Overhaul- Did you
buy health insurance through one of the
exchanges? You might be eligible for a
refundable tax credit. Taxpayers had the
option of estimating their 2014 income
to see if they qualified for the credit and
then having it applied in advance to the
cost of the premiums.

HOME OFFICE DEDUCTION
Among the other changes for 2013,
taxpayers who work at home will now
have a simplified option for taking a
home office deduction.
The standard mileage rate for busi-
ness use of a car in 2013 is 56.5 cents
a mile, up from 55.5 cents.

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE
Beginning this year, same-sex cou-
ples who are legally married will for
the most part have to choose married
filing jointly or married filing sepa-
rately when doing their tax returns.
This is true even if they live in a state
that does not recognize gay marriage.
Many of these couples will now find
themselves hit by the so-called marriage
penalty, especially if both spouses work
Same-sex married couples also
have the option of filing amended re-
turns going back to 2010, using the
married-filing-jointly status.
When it comes to filing state returns,
same-sex married couples living in
states that don't recognize gay marriage
most likely will have to file as singles.







OPage C2- SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
& EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
S Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


POTENTIAL RESOLUTION




Common



ground



steps away



for both sides


n a move that is both en-
couraging and somewhat
belated, some form of
public comment could be re-
turning to com-
mission meetings. THE I<
Citrus Board of
County Commis- Public c
sioners will once could ri
again broach the meel
topic this week
following open OUR OH
discussion of the l
limited participa- Policy st
tion rule during benefit
the board's Jan. benei
14 meeting. sid
On Sept. 24, the
board adopted the Public
Participation Ordinance,
which allows for three min-
utes of public comment per
citizen five if you repre-
sent an organization at the
beginning of its meetings and
restricts comments on
agenda items addressed
throughout the meetings.
Prior to the adoption of the
new rule, Citrus County had
one of the most citizen-friendly
public participation policies,
allowing those who wished to
speak their minds on agenda
items to do so in any length or
fashion they so chose.
In an effort to quell the
voices of those who perhaps
voiced their opinions too
often and too lengthily, com-
missioners chose to adopt a
policy that took public partic-
ipation to the other end of the
spectrum entirely, making it
one of the least citizen-
friendly policies in the state.
This effort to quiet a very
vocal minority instead
breached the trust of not only


Thanks, Andy
Many thanks to Andy and his
partner on Dec. 28 for their
quick response to the diabetic's
call in Crystal River.
Drug testing OK
Why is it so wrong to test wel-
fare recipients for drugs? I think
anybody that gets help needs to
help out by showing that they
are free of drugs. And why is it
so unconstitutional for them
when we, when applying
for a new job, have to get 0X
drug tested? Can any-
body tell me this?
Birding is No. 1
I was shocked by the j
article on tourism on the
front page of the Chroni- CAL
cle (Jan. 20) by the De- 563(
velopment Council. They
need to promote Citrus
County by the number of bird-
ers that come here to watch all
the wildlife. Perhaps the lady
doesn't even know that the bird-
ers bring in more people and
money than all the other
tourism reasons combined. Per-
haps I would advise her that she
needs to read the Chronicle
more often for information and
really promote birders as our
No. 1. That is a really special
thing we could promote.


that minority, but the major-
ity of the board's constituency
whose voices, perhaps not
often heard, have now been


ISSUE:
comment
turn to
tings.

PINION:
should be
ned to
it both
Jes.


tions


stifled.
Finally ad-
dressing the pub-
lic's rightful
outcry of dismay,
Commissioners
Scott Adams and
Chairman John
'IJ" Kenney said
during the Jan. 14
meeting that they
favor bringing
back public com-
ment during mo-
at commission


meetings. The topic is set to
return to the table for discus-
sion at Tuesday's meeting.
Once the public's trust is
broken, it can be a hard thing
to repair, but certainly not
impossible. The board's will-
ingness to review the policy,
perhaps even change or fine
tune it, is an act of good faith
and could lead to the creation
of a rule that benefits both
sides.
Now it is up to the public to
respect that and adopt a
healthy dose of respect for its
fellow citizen, as well. Every-
one has a right to speak their
mind about subjects that are
important to them and to this
county. But doing so with
brevity and courtesy will ben-
efit them and their cause in
the long run.
Common ground is just
around the corner Let's all
do the right thing here and
take the final steps to-
gether and respectfully to
get there.


Speed up the process
I agree with Carl Hiaasen and
his opinion on capital punish-
ment, especially that many
years go by in the process. We
can save a lot of taxpayer
money and we will just need to
speed up the process.
Skip water plant, too
Regarding the Water Manage-
ment District wanting residents
to skip a week watering lawns: It
Should help save around
JND 1.9 billion gallons of
IW water in the district terri-
tory. I agree; great idea.
While they're at it, why
don't they tell that water
bottling company from
Ocala to skip a week?
79 Great music
)579 On Saturday, Jan. 18, 1
went to the Crystal River
Mall to hear Karaoke With Roger.
It was wonderful. Such great
songs and singers. One man
sounded like Tom Jones singing
"Delilah." Fabulous. And a little
girl named Dakota, about the
age of 4 to 5, got up all by her-
self and sang "Twinkle, Twinkle,
Little Star," about five verses.
She was absolutely adorable and
a great singer. ... Go to the Crys-
tal River Mall and enjoy some
great music and other activities.


"Insofar as it represents a genuine reconciliation
of differences, a consensus is afine thing; insofar
as it represents a concealment of differences, it is
a miscarriage ofdemocratic procedure."
J. William Fulbright, Oct. 22, 1965


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


At last, parent resistance to


collective standardized tests


Editor's note: This is the first
in a series on the growing re-
sistance to collective standard-
ized tests.
uge numbers of stu-
dents must take high-
stakes standardized
tests that may shape the rest of
their lives. These tests, how-
ever, take no account
of the differences
among the individual
students. For partic-
ular examples, the
tests don't recognize
the students' home
lives, or the visual or
hearing problems
that have impeded
their learning.
Those students Nat I
often failing these OTI
tests are lower-in- VO1
come blacks and His-____
panics, and students
with special needs such as Eng-
lish language difficulties. But
many other children fail them,
too.
Furthermore, many of these
students who keep failing learn
in school that they are dumb
and drop out to begin dead-end
lives.
But now, parents are actually
reading about these tests and
increasingly organizing against
them. For example, as Bob Pe-
terson, the President of the Mil-
waukee Teachers' Education
Association, commented on his
blog last fall, "This year both
the state and the school district
have increased testing for
four-, five-, six- and seven-year-
old students in the district"
("Parent Opposition to Early
Childhood Testing on the
Increase," Bob Peterson, "Pub-
lic Education: This is what
democracy looks like," Oct. 1,
2013).
He went on to write about
Milwaukee parent Jasmine
Alinder, whose daughter was
just starting kindergarten. Alin-
der, the president of Parents for
Public Schools of Milwaukee,
explained her frustrations in an
essay she posted to Facebook,
which Peterson quoted exten-
sively from.
Alinder wrote: "MAP (Mea-
sure of Academic Progress)
testing for five-year-olds does
not test math and reading com-
petency At best it tests patience
and computer literacy which is
more likely an indication of
computer access at home.
"At worst it creates a culture
of stress and frustration around
standardized testing that may
scar some of these children for
the rest of their school careers"
('"A Parent's View: MAP Testing
of Five-Year-Old Kindergart-
ners," Jasmine Alinder,
Sept. 25, 2013).
I've known older kids taking
such tests in higher-income
neighborhoods. They get sick to
their stomachs taking practice
tests in preparation for the ac-
tual tests that will be on their
permanent records.


Fl
HI

(


What do they really learn
from such tests?
But parents are continuing to
speak up nationally as AlterNet
reported last October on a
school in my city, New York:
"The Castle Bridge Elemen-
tary School is a progressive,
dual-language K-2 school in the
Washington Heights
section ... When par-
ents there learned of
a plan to give multi-
ple choice tests to
children as young as
kindergarten, they
decided enough was
enough. They re-
fused to let their chil-
dren be tested"
entoff ("What Happens
IER When Parents Stand
DES Up and Say No to
_____ Testing?" Elizabeth
Hines, AlterNet,
Oct. 30, 2013).
Actually, as reported in the
New York Daily News, "more
than 80 percent of parents
opted to have their kids sit out
the exam" ("Forget teaching to
the test at this Washington
Heights elementary school,
parents canceled it!" Rachel
Monahan, Oct. 21,2013).
So the principal canceled the
test.
A penetratingly clear, com-
mon sense reason for doing
away with collective standard-
ized tests is provided by Neal
McCluskey, the associate direc-
tor of the Cato Institute's Center
for Educational Freedom. (I am
a senior fellow at Cato.)
In the November/December
2013 Cato Policy Report, which
was on the emergence of the
Common Core State Standards,
McCluskey wrote: "Why is the
idea of common standards (and
tests) wrong? Simply put it's be-
cause all children are different.
They learn different things at
different rates during different
times.
"They start from different
places. They have different in-
terests. The idea that they
should all be fed into some sort
of lock-step standardized sys-
tem doesn't fit with the reality
of human beings" ("Common
Core: The Great Debate," Cato
Policy Report, November/
December 2013).
For many years, until arthri-
tis limited my traveling, I saw
these human differentiations -
from elementary school
through high school in class-
rooms around the country Get-
ting to speak to students outside
of their schools, I found some of
their homes and neighborhoods
were such that they distracted
the kids from getting an educa-
tion. Indeed, I saw individual
differences in the children's
hearing and vision capabilities
that deeply affected how and
when they learned.
In addition to McCluskey's
views on the various ways chil-
dren learn how to learn, an-
other beneficial perspective


_LETTER to the


Thank you,
Citrus County
It is January, and all the gifts
have been opened and all the
files have been moved and all
the boxes have been disman-
tled to make room for other
projects but the joy of Christ-
mas remains.
The number of children and
teens who received blankets or
jackets or school supplies and
clothing and books and some
toys to make their lives much
better totaled 1,924. This year
there were 278 requests for
blankets and all were filled.
Caseworkers expressed their
thanks that the children re-
ceived the things they needed.
Children in foster care and
children in shelters and chil-
dren living with grandparents
and others were all given gifts.
Caseworkers asked if there
was some way to replicate our
agency in the remaining four
counties of the circuit
Parents expressed their
thanks in letters about the cir-
cumstances of this year that
left the family struggling. As al-
ways happens, we had folks
who received gifts in the past
who now wanted to help some-


one else's child.
Teachers express relief to
know that the children now
have a warm coat on cold days
and blankets to keep away the
cold of poorly heated homes
and enjoy seeing the excite-
ment of the children sharing
information about what was
under their tree.
It is with a grateful heart
that I thank the many workers
who wrapped, sorted and de-
livered the gifts. It is a team ef-
fort- we accomplish this
project together However, the


comes from an article sent to
me by Nancy Carlsson-Paige,
professor emerita of early
childhood education at Lesley
University in Cambridge, Mass.
The article, on the shortcom-
ings of standardized collective
testing, was co-authored with
Randi Weingarten, president of
the American Federation of
Teachers.
I am often at odds with the
American Federation of Teach-
ers, but as I have reported else-
where, I do agree with
Weingarten's efforts to have
public schools become part of
an evolving interaction with the
surrounding community
In the article, she and Carls-
son-Paige explained: "Young
kids learn actively, through
hands-on experiences in the
real world. They develop skills
over time through a process of
building ideas. But the process
is not always linear and is not
quantifiable; expecting young
children to know specific facts
or skills at specified ages is not
compatible with how they
learn.
"It emphasizes right and
wrong answers instead of the
developmental progressions
that typify their learning...
"They need to figure out how
things work, explore, question
and have fun" ("Early Learning:
This Is Not a Test" Randi Wein-
garten and Nancy Carlsson-
Paige, aftorg, Nov 17,2013).
Instead of "having fun" as a
goal, I would emphasize en-
abling young kids to discover
the joy of learning. This leads
them to exploring the range of
their capacities as knowledge-
able individuals in our society
on how it works.
Again and again I've seen this
dramatic discovery happen
when I tell kids why we have,
for example, a First Amend-
ment and what it has taken for
that right to survive so that they
can use it.
For another example, I know
an 8-year-old who gets high on
science classes, and when I
bring her Robert Louis Steven-
son's "A Child's Garden of
Verses," she dives right in as
her imagination flares up.
What too many teachers,
principals and school boards
have yet to learn is that educa-
tion can be very exciting for stu-
dents preparing to be active
citizens.
Next week: I report on Car-
men Farina, the new chancellor
of schools of New York City- a
possible national model for
how children can and do expe-
rience the joy of learning.


Nat Hentoffis a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


Editor


biggest thanks is to a commu-
nity that really cares about the
children. All of you individ-
ual citizens; the marines from
Toys for Tots; the large corpo-
rate sponsors like Duke En-
ergy; and small businesses
with only a few employees;
churches, homeowners associ-
ations, civic clubs and business
associations; without this
"whole village;" it could not
happen.
Ginger West
Family Resource Center
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not nec-
essarily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to
the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly,
should call Charlie Brennan at 352 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown,
including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be published or given out.
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* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
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0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It will always be the Nutcracker Suite, sweethearts


ack during the days when Cheryl has a collection of nut-
I had an office, I had a crackers. She has big ones, little
collection of pigs that oc- ones and medium-sized ones. I
cupied space there. Not slop- suspect she has two score or
guzzling, swill-eating more. But she only
swine, but cute, ce- displays them during
ramic, iron, plastic, the holiday season,
rubber, wooden or and the number is al-
whatever else some ways consistent with
artisan might use to the other decora-
design a porcine-like tions, so I've never
masterpiece. had cause to object to
When the day her nutcrackers.
came that I no longer They are rather cute
actually had an of- Fred Brannen little kings, sol-
fice, most of my 200 A SLICE diers and whatnot
pigs wound up in OF LIFE that are designed to
boxes in the garage. theoretically crack
It was simply a matter of space, nuts between their jaws, notthat
and I had to limit the number of we've ever cracked a nut with
pigs to the size of my small home one.
office. I think I have 20 square No, Cheryl's nutcrackers have
feet, which means not very many never been a problem for me,
pigs. because most of the time they


NOMINEES
Continued from Page C1

"He is an outstanding man who loves
volunteering all over the county. He goes
around to nursing homes and other
places bringing a QChord.... He has done
this for a very long time. Also he brings
food and snacks for nursing homes to
share with residents. He buys gifts. He
supports, buys and goes to get shoeboxes
for Operation Christmas Child. He wraps
shoeboxes for it. He folds napkins or
whatever he can do to help in any capac-
ity. He lives with his daughter and she
can't keep track of him.
"He's a very loveable guy He checks on
people when he misses them. I lost my
job and he called me and left messages
for me twice. He's the best!"
The Chronicle Editorial Board also
considered:
Don Taylor, executive director of the
Citrus County Economic Development
Council, who is working to pull together
the county and private business to create
a plan to attract new business and jobs.
Ray Chirayath, president of United
Way, who is very active and frequently
volunteers in the community
Roger and Linda Proffer. Roger is a
former Crystal River councilman and
business owner in the city He is the cur-
rent district governor for Rotary Linda is
a former Rotary president. Both are very
active in their community
Paul Cash works behind the scenes,
but is a key player with Feed Citrus
County, Rotary, YMCA and the U.S. Fam-
ily Foundation.
Pete Peterson nominated Paul
Atherton, of Beverly Hills. "His activities
are numerous and I can't think of anyone
more qualified," Peterson wrote.
Those activities include: keeping the
Beverly Hills recycling bins clean; serv-
ing as board member of the Beverly Hills
Civic Association; driving needy people
for Skillbank; acting as driver and dis-
patcher for the Beverly Hills Surveil-
lance Unit; picking up litter along the
streets; visiting people in the hospital or
are unable to leave their home; and serv-
ing as president of the Irish American
Club.
Shirley Dube nominated her hus-
band, Joe Dube, of Sugarmill Woods.
Her husband is a major contributor to
Nature World Wildlife Rescue in many
ways. He volunteers his time at the Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park's
wildlife care area every week He has many
years as a manatee watch volunteer at
the park and is a tour guide at the Crystal
River National Wildlife Refuge Park.
He also is on the board of directors of
the Academy of Environmental Sciences,
where his fundraising efforts helped sup-
ply 13 kayaks for their students use this
year
Plus, his wife adds, "Joe Dube is the
quiet type that does not go out for the ac-
colades, but if you put him in front of a
microphone, he will steal the show"
Lois Thomas nominated Bonnie Mc-
Mullen for her work in helping to get the
Nature Coast Ministries Samaritan's free
dental and medical clinic nearly up and
running. The clinic will provide free
services to low-income residents.
Pat Wade nominated Teddi Rusnak,
president of the Citrus County Council.
"Teddi has dedicated many years to im-
prove the quality of life in Citrus County
for all of us," Wade wrote. "She speaks for
clean water, environmental preservation,
good government, small-business devel-
opment and our quality of life."
Dr Steven Roth nominated Vicky
lozzia for her involvement in many char-
itable and volunteer organizations, in-
cluding Friends of the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park, Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center, Radiant Ridge
Toastmasters Club and Guardian Ad
Litem.
Skip Brady, deacon at St. Anne's
Episcopal Church in Crystal River, nom-
inated Harold Walker of Hernando.
Brady said Walker is active in his church
and was central in resurrecting the
Booker T Washington community center
in Crystal River.
"He is an example for all of us, not only
as a Christian man, but as a person of ac-
tion, who accomplishes those things oth-
ers may only think about doing," Brady
wrote.
Joan Smith nominated Joyce Rowe
of Inverness for her tireless volunteer
work with Citrus Fruit Basket, visiting
shut-ins, nursing home residents and re-
turning snowbirds.
"I feel she is the most deserving
woman I have met in Citrus County, and


are out in the garage with my
pigs.
Moving on.
For the past few years, I have,
however, found myself with a
nutcracker situation outside of
the home, a circumstance
shared with many of the other
fathers and grandfathers in Cit-
rus County
The performance of
Tchaikovsky's ballet, "The Nut-
cracker Suite," by our county's
most adorable collection of bal-
lerinas and danseurs is, well, it
is adorable, but....
I'm taking a chance now, be-
cause I'm going to mention a
game that at one time was
played with a pigskin hope-
fully, Cheryl will think I'm still
talking about my pig collection
- anyway, both the SEC and
ACC championship games in


perhaps in my life," Smith wrote.
Elaine Diesing nominated Amy
Meek, who arranges fundraisers for
needy people, organizes read-ins for
school children, and encourages prayer
on Facebook when needed. "By her ex-
ample she's made me and others better
people," Diesing wrote.
Harvey Persyn nominated Henry D.
Bassett. a descendent of one of the early
pioneers of Citrus County Bassett is an
active member of the Floral City Church
of Christ; participates in activities such
as the Blessings program of Citrus
County Harvest which provides food for
needy children; he is an officer and ac-
tive member of the Floral City Library
Mary Whitehead nominated Tom
Chance, director of the Citrus Commu-
nity Food Bank. "Not only does he help
feed Citrus County's hungry, but at the
same time allows them to keep their dig-
nity and self-respect," Whitehead wrote.
Mary Gregory nominated Flo Jones
for her help with the homeless. Jones vis-
its the homeless at their campsites and
brings mosquito spray, food, pads for
their tents and other items.
"Flo is always helping someone," Gre-
gory wrote. "She says she feels blessed
and wants to give back. But blessed is
when money comes easily Flo works
hard for hers. The homeless are the most
needy in our county and Flo is the most
helpful."
Marsha Watson nominated
Stephanie Hopper for her work in the
community, including the Key Training
Center
Haydon Fbuke of Lecanto nominated
himself, a strong backer of the movement
to legalize marijuana for medical pur-
poses. "I'm very passionate about trying
to help others benefit from my actions,
and I'm proud that you would consider
me as Citizen of the Year," he wrote.
Charles Knecht nominated the late
GeoffGreene, Citrus County property ap-
praiser Knecht wrote: "I nominate the
honorable Geoff Greene for this award
(posthumously) for his effort in settling 53
disputes without litigation saving the cit-
izens monies, also his valiant efforts with
the Duke Energy litigation."
Eric and Cathy Hoyer nominated
Lace Blue-McLean, the 2008 Co-Chroni-
cle Citizen of the Year, for her volunteer
work on behalf of Three Sisters Springs
and her care for the community
ArtJones, the 2012 Chronicle Citizen
of the Year, received nominations from a
host of Crystal River Rotarians for his
"One Rake at a Time" work at removing
Lyngbya from King's Bay Krys Baum
wrote: "Art has selflessly worked to bring
hundreds of thousands of grant dollars in
to Citrus County and our community Art
is a strong presence in our community
and an inspiration."


this particular sport always
seem to fall on the same after-
noon and evening of the day on
which our little darlings are
cracking nuts.
Oh, well. Life is about setting
priorities and making choices.
When the choice involves chil-
dren and grandchildren on stage
versus championship games on
television, it's going to always be
"The Nutcracker Suite,"
sweethearts.

Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist

Granddaughter Ashley Evans as
a Spanish dancer during the
2013 performance of "The
Nutcracker Suite."
Special to the Chronicle


Special to the Chronicle
The good ship "John L. Inglis" served to transport oranges down the With-
lacoochee River from Inverness before the Plant System railroad had
arrived here. At Yankeetown, the oranges were transferred to ocean-going
ships, which took them to East Coast ports and to Europe. According to
Mrs. Viola Tooke of Inverness, the "Inglis" made the river trip to Inverness
weekly. This photo was made before the turn of the century.


Originally published in the Citrus
County Chronicle.

In 1938 ...
Mrs. Alma Cumbie, librarian,
said this week that the cir-
culation of the Inverness public
library had increased and many
of the winter visitors were en-
joying the use of the library.
Some of the best books have
been arranged on tables for the
convenience of the public. High
school students are invited to
use the encyclopedias for refer-
ence in their school work
S.H. Davis, Inverness agent
for the Atlantic Coast Line
railway, announced this week a
change in schedule and im-
proved passenger service effec-
tive December 16, (tomorrow).
Inauguration of the new serv-
ice, the "Gulf Coast Limited,"
will arrive in Inverness south-
bound at 1:43 p.m., northbound
at 3:13 p.m. This train will let off
and pick up passengers for
Jacksonville and beyond.


In 1953...
S am Pickard, owner of Para-
dise Point Villas, said he
plans to let a contract this week
for construction of a $15,000
swimming pool on his Crystal
River property. He also plans to
build a terrace for outside din-
ing between his present dining
room and the site of the new
pool. Pickard said work on the
pool would be started very soon
and will be completed within 30
days thereafter. Work on the ter-
race will follow immediately
The PTA voted Monday night
to buy a typewriter for the
elementary school for $135; to
buy materials for the high
school library in a similar
amount and to start a new fund
ear-marked for the purchase of
a new curtain for the high
school auditorium in an
amount of $120. Dell Walker,
chairman of the project com-
mittee, presented the above as
the committee choice of proj-
ects from the proceeds of the
PTA carnival.

Information for Back in Time is
supplied by the Citrus County
Historical Society.


R:A uoung Elvisin-conceprtbrings gojUq
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COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


CITIZENS OF
THE YEAR
Past winners of the
Chronicle's Citizen of
the Year
2012 Art Jones
2011 Jewel Lamb
2010 Paul Mellini
2009 Brown Dumas Jr.
2008 Lace Blue-McLean and
Andy Houston
2007 Barbara Mills
2006 Jean Grant
2005 Mike and Kautia Hampton
2004 Aaron Weaver
2003 Pete DeRosa
2002 Don Sutton
2001 Leroy Bellamy
2000 Ron and Beverly
Drinkhouse
1999 Stan Olsen
1998 Gary Maidhof
1997 Chet Cole
1996 Curt Ebitz
1995 Laura Lou Fitzpatnrick
and John Lettow
1994 Peggy and Dave Pattillo
1993 Ray Darling and William
Bunch
1992 Avis Craig
1991 Annie W. Johnson and
Father James C. Hoge
1990 Ginger West
1989 David Langer and Phil
Zellner
1988 Bob and Mary England
1987 Dr. Ed Dodge
1986 Wilson Burns and Steve
Lamb
1985 Comprehensive Plan
Advisory Board: Charles
Miko, David Walker,
Dixie Hollins, Tom
Franklin, Rick Rollason,
Robert Henigar and
Clark Stillwell
1984 Ruth Levins
1983 Sam Tamposi
1982 Judge William
F. Edwards
1981 Hank and Miriam
Cohen
1980 The Rev Roger Shively


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WINDOW
Continued from Page Al

What each one of
these folks has in com-
mon other than their
incredible drive and
focus is that they
were recognized as the
Chronicle's Citizen of
the Year.
For the 34th year in a
row, the Chronicle has
honored a citizen who
has made a difference
in our community
This year we recog-
nize Larry Gamble, the
manager of the Wal-
mart store in Inverness.
Larry is a quiet, be-
hind-the-scenes guy
who is always using his
leadership skills and
resources to make good
things happen. He
helps feed the hungry,
supports the schools,
advocates for the
YMCA and United Way,
and generally works
hard to help people in
need.
Walmart is the largest
retailer in Citrus
County, and Larry
never shies away from
using the resources of
the business to help
people.
When you look at the
list of people we have
recognized since 1980,
the names have stood
the test of time.
Pete DeRosa was rec-
ognized in 2003. He was
the businessman who
led the drive to build
Seven Rivers hospital
because he believed


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16* Annual Key Training Center Fashion Show and Tea

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February 9,2014
Tickets are S30.
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the west side of the
county needed stronger
health care.
Jean Grant was recog-
nized in 2006 for her
service as a county com-
missioner, but more im-
portantly, her leadership
over the county fair for
more than two decades.
Stan Olsen was recog-
nized in 1999 for chang-
ing the way development
looks in Citrus County
through his creation of
Black Diamond, Meadow-
crest and so many other
communities.
The Rev. Leroy Bel-
lamy was honored in 2001
for spending five decades
using the guidelines of
the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. to bridge the gap
of inequality between the
races.
Gary Maidhof was the
honoree back in 1998 for
his leadership in bring-
ing sanity to the develop-
ment standards of our


community
Ginger West was recog-
nized in 1990 for the cre-
ation of the Family
Resource Center, a non-
profit agency that helps
the needy She is still
leading the group today
Hank and Miriam
Cohen got the honor way
back in 1981 for their
early leadership of the
environmental move-
ment.
Sam Tamposi got the
recognition back in 1983
for being the dreamer -
along with Jerry Nash
and Stan Olsen who
turned watermelon fields
into the sprawling com-
munities of Citrus Hills.
Our list of Citizens of
the Year is filled with
people who have made
incredible things happen
and changed the face of
our community
As I get older, one of
the constant complaints I
hear from active citizens


Saturday, February 8, 2014


7:00am Registration & Packet Pick-Up
8:00am 10k Race Start
8:05 am 1 Mile Walk 8:15am 5k Race Start


Start & Finish: Nature Coast Bank Citrus Hills
2455 North Citrus Hills Blvd., Hernando 34442
Register Online at: www.drcsports.com
Charity and Contact Info:
Citrus County Blessings (352) 341-7707
Email: info@citruscountyblessings.com
S ... 'lSCHt055 Presented by: TLC Rehab & Suncoast Schools FCU


BOYS & GIRLS CLUIS
OFCharitable Partner
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Memorial Golf Outing


Inverness Golf & Country Club
February 22, 2014
Registration 7 a.m. Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.
$60 per player or
$220 for a team of four.
Includes: Greens fees, cart, lunch, door prizes and one
Mulligan ticket. Additional Mulligan tickets will be available.
For online registration, forms and information
visit www.CitrusBuilders.com or call 746-9028.
SPONSORS
a C i -N'.E


Music for a
Valentine Eve
Featuring
Southern
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With Vocals
by Kim Evans
Thursday, Feb. 13
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


Doors open at 6:00p.m.
Music starts .. .,,i,.i at 7p.m.


Ciii<()N il
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
TO BENEFIT THE CITRUS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY


,fE
-n chronlCleo Ilf ceom

_ ______ 1234
5 6 7 8 9 1011
January 12131415161718

i12 1920 2122 23 24 25
2vyFSLtEf 26 27 2829 30 31


is that there are not
enough young people in-
volved anymore.
I have faith in the next
generation of this county,
and that was reinforced
Friday when the Chroni-
cle published a story
about a new leadership
program. Youth Leader-
ship Citrus launched its
first class of students this
year, and the participa-
tion is strong.
Organized by the Citrus
County YMCA, the cham-
ber of commerce and
Leadership Citrus, the
volunteer program is in-
troducing students to the
concept of civic leader-
ship.


I look forward to
the day when one of the
graduates of Youth
Leadership Citrus will
be recognized as the
Chronicle's Citizen of the
Year.
Students today who
take the time to get in-
volved in the effort are
the ones who will use the
passion and leadership
skills they develop to
shape our community in
the future.
The cycle will continue.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


Cinderella's Ci.', t is a ministry of C... i,. ..,I, %&A .
Baptist ( I,,. i Our mission is toproi. .,/'i
& accessories for young ladies in our, .. hitl / I,, !^L
Our services are completely Jr.
CURRENT High School Student ID i i .. ,...
For more information, call 726-7335. inail iiu, at
cbcwcw@yahoo.com or visit us at CitrusCinderella's
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Cornerstone Baptist Church i I
I I1 10 \\. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL




I^H f^ VIWRELAY
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GOLF TOURNAMENT
Saturday, February 8, 2014
Juliette Falls Golf Course PRICE: $75/person
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9:00am Tee Time, 4-Person Scramble
For more information, contact
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SESPONSORS:
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Jan 26 0 2:00 pm
Friends of the Crystal River Nat'l.
Wildlife Complex Annual Meeting
First United Methodist Church
Fellowship Hall
Contact Phone: 352-201-0149

Feb 1 10:00 am
Cinderella's Closet
Cornerstone Baptist Church
1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
Contact Phone: 352-726-7335

Feb 1 9:00 am
Citrus County Animal Services
2014 Best Friends Fest
Citrus County Auditorium
Entrance Fee: Silent Auction Item
to benefit Animal Services' Special Needs Fund
Contact Phone: 746-8401 or 746-8408

Feb 3-March 16:
Citrus County Community Challenge
2014 Fitness in Citrus
Contact Phone: 726-7517

Feb 5 -11:00 am
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
9th Annual Purple Heart Ceremony
National Guard Armory, Crystal River
Open to the public free of charge
Contact Phone: 352-382-3847

Feb 8 9:00 am
Team HOPE- Relay 4 Life
American Cancer Society
4th Annual Golf Tournament
Juliette Falls Golf Course, Dunnellon
4 Man Scramble $75 per person
Contact Phone: 352-697-2220

Feb 8
Citrus County Harvest Organization
Citrus County Blessings
5K/1 OK & 1M walk/run
Nature Coast Bank, Hernando
Contact Phone: 352-341-7707 or
best # 352-400-0362

Feb 9 2PM-4PM
Key Training Center
Hats Off to Spring Fashion
Contact Phone: 795-5541 Ext 313


,in;hl A nnual
Purple Heart Ceremony
Florida Aiional Guard .Arnmor. Crystal River
Saturday, Februarr 15, 2014, 11:00 a.m.
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COMMENTARY


l-AOR











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


into the new year with new image, new ships


Associated Press

NEW YORK

ping new ships, the
ever-growing popu-
larity of river cruis-
ing, and efforts to
restore consumer confi-
dence, are among the head-
lines in cruise news as 2014
unfolds.
But don't expect ships to
keep getting bigger Instead,
look for theme park-style at-
tractions and new offerings
in dining and entertainment.
Here are some details.

THE BIG PICTURE
Cruise Lines International
Association (CLIA), which
represents 95 percent of
cruise capacity worldwide
with 63 member cruise lines,
forecasts 21.7 million guests
will cruise this year, up from
21.3 million in 2013.
The Caribbean remains
the world's most popular
cruise destination, included
on 37 percent of global
cruise itineraries, followed
by a 19 percent share for the
Mediterranean.

BETTER NOT BIGGER
More than two dozen
cruise ships will launch in
2014 and 2015, but the race
to make every vessel bigger
than the last is subsiding
from several years ago, when
Royal Caribbean's Allure
and Oasis set records with
capacities of more than 6,000
passengers apiece.
"I think the size of the
ships -Allure and Oasis-
is as big as it gets," said CLIA
president Christine Duffy in


Photos by the Associated Press
ABOVE: The Norwegian Getaway debuts this month. It will
homeport in Miami and its colorful exterior was designed by
Miami-based Cuban-American artist David Le Batard, also
known as "LEBO." TOP: A computer-generated image pro-
vided by the Royal Caribbean International cruise line shows
its forthcoming ship, Quantum of the Seas. Quantum is ex-
pected to launch in November and is one of the cruise indus-
try's most highly anticipated ships of 2014.


an interview Instead,
Duffy says, the new empha-
sis is "on more bells and
whistles."
Two of 2014's new ships
are sure to turn heads. The
colorful exterior of Norwe-
gian Cruise Line's ship Get-
away, which debuts this
winter and will homeport in
Miami, features a mermaid
cavorting amid turquoise
and yellow swirls. It was
designed by Miami-based


Cuban-American artist
David Le Batard, also known
as "LEBO."
Getaway will homeport in
Miami and is a sister ship to
Norwegian Breakaway, a
New York-themed ship that
debuted in 2013. Getaway
carries 3,969 passengers, has
18 decks and two unique of-
ferings: the Illusionarium,
part restaurant, part magic
show, and the "Grammy
Experience at Sea," with


performances by Grammy
winners and nominees, plus
exhibits of Grammy-related
artifacts.
The most-anticipated new
ship of 2014 is Royal
Caribbean's Quantum of the
Seas, with dazzling first-at-
sea attractions: simulated
skydiving, bumper cars and
an observation capsule
called The North Star The
capsule, modeled on the
London Eye, offers a bird's-
eye view 300 feet above the
water The ship debuts in
November
Meanwhile, the Mediter-
ranean-based MSC Cruises
company is hoping to win
over Americans with its first
U.S.-based ship, MSC Divina,
which recently started sail-
ing year-round from Miami
to the Caribbean.

IMAGE REHAB

The cruise industry has
had a rough few years, begin-
ning with the January 2012
shipwreck of the Costa Con-
cordia, which killed 32 peo-
ple. In September 2013, the
Concordia was finally pulled
upright in a complicated en-
gineering feat, but the vessel
is still in the waters off the
coast of Italy and its captain
remains on trial.
The bad news continued
last year when Carnival had
several mishaps, with passen-
gers stranded at sea, ships
towed back to port and can-
celled trips. The negative pub-
licity depressed prices and
revenue for the company
The incidents even
changed the way travelers
book cruises. The percent-
age of cruises booked online

See Page D2


Smart spending: Electronics a good buy in winter


Associated Press

NEW YORK The winter doldrums
strike in January and February, but
there is one silver lining: it's a great
time to buy electronics. As stores clear
out older merchandise and new mod-
els get introduced, good deals abound.
Here's a look at what to buy and what
to hold off on in January and February
TELEVISIONS: Large-screen TVs
are always a hot item on Black Friday,
the busy shopping day after Thanksgiv-
ing. But those are usually store brands
or lesser-known brand names. In Janu-
ary and February, higher-end brand-
name TVs like Panasonic and
Samsung start being discounted, says
Louis Ramirez, senior editor at Deal-
News, a Web site that monitors pricing.
The reason? The Consumer
Electronics Show, a yearly electronics
trade show in Las Vegas, happens
in January, and that's when


manufacturers unveil new models. So
older models are discounted to make
way for new TVs.
"A lot of times the differences be-
tween 2013 and 2014 are very small up-
grades, so the average person who just
wants a new TV is just as well buying a
2013 model," he said.
The price to look for? For a 55-inch
3D TV, you should look for $700 and
below, Ramirez says. And most retail-
ers offer free shipping on TVs at that
price, so make sure to ask about ship-
ping deals, wherever you're shopping.
LAPTOPS: The buzz is all about
tablets, so it is actually a great time to
buy laptops if a touch-screen tablet is
not what you're after There are also
hybrid laptops/tablets that aren't too
expensive as well.
"Retailers are slashing some prices
right now to move laptops and PCs,"
Ramirez says. A 15-inch screen laptop
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD

* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases new home
sales for December, 10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Commerce De-
partment releases fourth-quarter
gross domestic product, 8:30 a.m.;
National Association of Realtors
releases pending home sales index
for December, 10 a.m.; Freddie
Mac, the mortgage company, re-
leases weekly mortgage rates, 10
a.m.; Hearing on lifting the ban on
U.S. crude oil exports.
*FRIDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases personal in-
come and spending for December,
8:30 a.m.;


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil slips to near $97
a barrel after rally

NEW YORK The price of oil
slipped back to near $97 a barrel
Friday, interrupting a sustained
rally on expectations for increased
demand.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for March de-
livery was down 30 cents to $97.02 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange. On
Thursday, the Nymex contract rose
to $97.32 a barrel.
The deep chill blanketing much
of the central and eastern U.S. has
reduced stocks of heating oil as
homeowners crank up the thermo-
stat and electric utilities burn it to
avoid paying for natural gas.
Brent crude, a benchmark for in-
ternational oil, was down 83 cents
to $106.75 a barrel on the ICE Fu-
tures exchange in London.

Markets roiled by
emerging woes
AMSTERDAM -Global stock
markets sold off Friday as in-
vestors were spooked by a possible
slowdown in emerging economies,
the main engine of growth since
the 2008 financial crisis, and the
prospect of tighter monetary policy
in developed countries.
Germany's DAX plunged 2.5 per-
cent to close at 9,392.02 while
Britain's FTSE 100 fell 1.6 percent
to 6,663.74. France's CAC 40
dropped 2.8 percent to 4,161.47.
In Asia, the pain was keenest in
Japan, as demand for a safe-haven
currency the yen surged,
dampening prospects for its ex-
port-driven economy The Nikkei
225 slipped 1.9 percent to close at
15,391.56
Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed
1.3 percent to 22,450.06 and Seoul's
Kospi dropped 0.4 percent to
1,940.56.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SSMART
MONEY


Investment


might do


better in


the market

EAR BRUCE: My wife and I
just retired. We have no
debts other than a small
charge card we put monthly pur-
chases on (for reward points), but
it is paid in full every month. Our
house is paid off, and we have rea-
sonable income that meets all of
our expenses, allows us to go on
vacation and still save money We
also have current medical cover-
age that covers us until Medicare
takes over Our children are grown
and are self-sufficient.
My wife has a whole life insur-
ance policy with a face value of
$100,000. It currently has a cash
value of about half that. The agent
would like us to convert it into an-
other whole life policy that has a
long-term-care rider that allows
you to take out several thousand
dollars per month up to about 90
percent of the policy value.
My wife thinks it might be bene-
ficial to have this, although an-
other possibility is to cash in the
policy We don't need the life insur-
ance anymore as it was especially
needed when the house was not
paid and the kids were young. I
could do fine without having the
money if she dies. I figure that the
life insurance policy is not for in-
vestment, and we could do much
better properly investing the
money What is your thought?
C.K., via email
DEAR C.K: It appears that you
See Page D2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Television sets are picutred on sale in November in the Pembroke Pines Best Buy store. As stores clear out older
merchandise and new models get introduced, good deals abound if you want a big new TV for the Super Bowl or
video games.


WINTER
Continued from Page Dl

should run about $400, he said.
FITNESS DEVICES: Competi-
tion is high in the fitness device
arena, with Fitbit, Jawbone, MIO,
Nike and others all coming out
with new versions of the workout-
tracking gizmos recently That
might mean price cuts in coming
weeks.
If you want to try out the devices
first, Fitbit and Nike have free
apps that you can use on your
phone as a trial.
"You can try an app, and if you
like it, you can commit to that and
later on upgrade and actually buy
the device," Ramirez said.
GAMING CONSOLES: One
thing you won't find a good deal


on, Ramirez says, is gaming
consoles.
Because the new Xbox One and
Sony Playstation 4 were just re-
leased late last year, the pricing
hasn't gone down yet. The only deal
you might find is if the consoles are
bundled with games.
"You might see a PS4 bundled
with two games or an Xbox that
comes with a free year of
Xbox Live (Xbox's multiplayer
gaming and digital streaming
media system), but demand is so
high there is no incentive to dis-
count," he said.
Ramirez said he expects modest
deals on the Xbox One, about $50
off its $449 price, beginning in
April. Meanwhile, PS4 deals could
begin in March and the price could
drop to $364 from $400. Those esti-
mates and timing are based on
what happened with earlier


models.
One exception is the Nintendo
Wii U, which has been a slower
seller
"If you want a next-generation
console on the cheap, look out for
deals on the Wii U," he said. He
predicts a price cut in coming
weeks as Nintendo tries to move
the systems.
You'll also get good deals on
older models such as the PS3 and
Xbox360, both of which have sold
for as low as $149, he said.
"What's particularly great is that
both Sony and Microsoft said they
would support their older consoles
throughout the year," Ramirez said.
"So not only will you have new
games to look forward to, but you
can continue buying older (and
now cheaper) games that perhaps
before you didn't get a chance to
play/buy"


CRUISE
Continued from Page Dl

had been increasing fast until last year,
according to a study released in December by
PhoCusWright. After the Carnival mishaps,
"both cruise lines and agents spent more time
on the phone winning over tentative travelers
and upselling all they could," according to
PhoCusWright. Online cruise bookings
jumped 28 percent in 2011 and 26 percent in
2012, but were expected to increase just
6 percent in 2013.
To restore consumer confidence, the cruise in-
dustry in 2013 took a number of steps, including
publishing statistics for crimes that take
place on ships and issuing a passenger bill of
rights guaranteeing sanitary conditions, medical
care and refunds in the event of a major power
failure.

RIVER CRUISING

Carolyn Spencer Brown, editor-in-chief of
CruiseCritic.com, says river cruises are "just ex-
ploding with new ship launches by Viking, Uni-
world, Avalon, AmaWaterways and others."
Viking Cruises christened 10 new river ships
last year and launches a dozen more this year.
American Cruise Lines has commissioned four
new riverboats. And the newly refurbished Amer-
ican Empress makes its maiden voyage in April
on the Pacific Northwest's Columbia and Snake
rivers.
River cruises are offered around the world,
from the Danube to the Mississippi to the
Yangtze, but Spencer Brown says this year's "hot
places to watch" include Myanmar and France's
Bordeaux region.

NO SMOKING

More cruise lines are banning smoking on bal-
conies in addition to cabins. After all, if you're a
nonsmoker, you don't want smoke from the neigh-
boring verandah blowing back into your room.
Disney, Celebrity Princess, Royal Caribbean and
Crystal are among the lines that no longer permit
balcony smoking; Cunard will join them later this
year
But most ships still offer some designated
smoking areas onboard, which may include
decks, casinos and select clubs.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

have a reasonable monthly in-
come that takes care of all your
expenses, so I would certainly
consider investing the money
with your broker in a modestly
aggressive fashion.
You mentioned you don't
need the life insurance; you
can get along well if your wife
passed away Other things being
equal, it looks to me like a no-
brainer.
The question is what would
you invest the money in? If you
are going to invest it in some
very conservative fashion, it
may do better in the insurance
policy You are relatively young,
since you are not eligible for
Medicare yet. If you are willing
to take a certain degree of risk
in the marketplace, in my opin-


ion, that would be the way to go.
DEAR BRUCE: I noticed in
your newspaper column this
morning that someone asked
about their credit score. It was
750, and you said that was a
good score, but 800 was golden.
According to my insurance
company, my score is 770.
I have never in my life been
late on any debt payment. I use
a credit card to pay everything
and pay it off every month. I do
have several cards, but use only
one. I own my home, plus a lake
house and rental duplex, all
paid off on time.
Why isn't my credit score
800? I am a senior citizen.
Maria, via email
DEAR MARIA: There can be
any number of reasons. From
your prospective and mine, you
should be absolutely top-of-the-
scale.
Have you financed a car in
the last six years? If not, that is


going to lower your credit
score. Why? I really don't know,
but I do know that people like
me who haven't financed a car
in many years are going to have
a lower credit score. I don't un-
derstand all of the nuances.
I do know that my wife, who
has no income other than mine,
has a higher credit score than I
do.
We are both flirting with 800,
but nonetheless, why she has a
better score than I do, I simply
don't know I am not going to
lose a lot of sleep over it, and
neither should you.
DEAR BRUCE: My husband
is 76 years old, and I am 73. We
currently live in our own home.
He thinks it is time to sell and
move to a rental apartment
closer to our children and to
our physicians. I would sell (al-
beit reluctantly) if we pur-
chased a condominium. I am
reluctant to be at the mercy of


landlords and neighbors; he
wants freedom from the re-
sponsibility of a house and
wants to use more of this
money to enjoy life.
The area we would move to is
more expensive than where we
live now If we rent, we would
also lose the tax benefits of the
interest on our mortgage of ap-
proximately $375,000. Selling
the house would net us
$200,000, which we could in-
vest.
We are living within our
budget, but do not have much
left for travel or gifting our chil-
dren. At our age and in our cir-
cumstances, is it better to rent
or buy?
-M.E, via email
DEAR M.E: I can appreciate
your husband's desire to be re-
lieved of ownership responsi-
bilities, and your desire to have
some control. But I am on your
husband's side on this. You can


likely rent a lot cheaper than it
will cost you to own the same
type of condominium. The tax
benefits are not even a factor,
in my opinion.
The one line in your letter
that troubles me is "gifting your
children." Why in the world are
you worried about "gifting the
children"? When you pass
away, which in both of your
cases should be several years
from now, if there is money left,
you can leave it to them. If
there is no money left, so what?
The idea of giving up a better
lifestyle so you can give money
to your kids, in my opinion, is
insanity.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
of mail, personal replies cannot
be provided.


INN[OME TAX .1:41R C^r(R


For more information

on advertising call

Anne Farrior at

352-564-2931 or

Darrell Watson at

1 352-564-2917 1


WILLIAMS,
McCRANIE
Q WARDLOW
'A & CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


S Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs



I ,l lh,,l ':I.l I-l .. I
''II'h '' I,, ,ll h h ., 'hI I ,: ',,h ,
\^v ^ i\ il " .< l I'l~lr '.tl t lll ll h~llhll l lli ,,ll ,l~llli ,,ll




BOB LANE, Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities

(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
44 Years in Business 32 Years in Inverness


TaxPrpaatonServic


* Accurate and affordable service year round

* Experienced, trained tax professionals

* Convenient evening and weekends hours

* Audit assistance

* Electronic filing


Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352) 795-4733 / 564-1010
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


H&R BLOCK


PRICE & COMPANY, RP.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA
Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
i Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services


www.pwprice.com


Werner & Company, PA .
A Certified Public Accounting Firm *
www.wernercpas.com

Taxes & Accounting Fraud Investigations
Financial Planning Independent Audits

1011 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Phone: (352) 344.4390
Hernando, FL 34442 Fax: (352) 344-4397


D2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


BUSINESS











D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connectionn

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber.com/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
Feb. 4 Ribbon-cutting for Joyful
Housekeeping, at 8:30 a.m., Crystal
River Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S.
19, Crystal River.
Feb. 5 Ribbon-cutting for Duds-n-
Suds Laundromat, at 4:30 p.m., 423
S.E. King's Bay Drive, Crystal River.
Feb. 6 Business After Hours
hosted by Citrus Memorial, 5 p.m. to
7 p.m., Share Club Auditorium, 402
Grace Street, Inverness.
-~ .... ....................................




chamber Mixer
Hosted by d ims Mmorial Health System
in Celebratna of uthe
Hear 8 aiVasculr Center
10 YeorAnnnlvemry
Thursday. February 6 2014
S:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
CMHS Share OubAudnorium 402 Grace St, Invermess
Business Casua Hors d'roeuvres Beer & Wne
&,,fit_ &&.E" ,
i/. l 'The me Ha4n 9 Vi scI CenlPes 10 Yeir Annverury
Ceebratih Hearts Healh Fair
Saturday. February 22. 2014
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Fun- Food $Screenin gp Tours
__Hkstorfc 5ool Buiirin(H08pIII Carnp|>u _

Feb. 7 Chamber Luncheon spon-
sored by the Florida Public Relations
Association, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club,
505 E. Hartford Street, Hernando.
Chamber Luncheon ^
Y-.od by
Florida Public Relatioms Anzo.ation (FPRA)
Nature Coaut Chapter
Guest Speaker
CAc"ly so>To, Vko Prnmide
of CorIpofat CazuennIimnaij
rFrah..a.Ial c,L L r .


A berry good time in Floral City


WHAT: Floral City
Strawberry Festival
WHEN: Saturday, March 1
and Sunday, March 2
WHERE: Floral Park,
9530 S. Parkside Ave.,
Floral City
TICKETS: Adults $3;
children 12 and under free
ON THE WEB:
flora Icitystrawberry
festival.com


he Citrus County Chamber of Festival planners anticipate
Commerce and the Floral City live entertainment from the


Merchants Association are hard
at work at putting the final details
in place for the 27th Floral City
Strawberry Festival. In addition to
thousands of flats of beautiful red
strawberries provided by Ferris
Groves, festival planners are ex-
cited to announce the addition of
a strawberry pie-eating contest.


Amazzing Steel Drum Ensemble,
Dave Shepard and the Blues Rid-
ers, the Dan Story Band, the Sug-
arbear Band and the Magic Bus.
New this year is the addition of
a strawberry pie-eating contest. If
you are interested in entering the
pie eating contest, email
Jeff@CitrusCountyChamber.com.


Member spotlight:



Point 0' Woods


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Friday Feb. 7,2014 notee -la Fr y of the onth)
BogCIiaTm1130 a.ni.
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Pmesm RSVP no la" M"ar Fte, I


Feb. 10 Ribbon-cutting for Work-
force Connection (Career Source) at
4:30 p.m., 683 S. Adolph Point,
Lecanto.
Feb. 13 Ribbon-cutting for Pre-
cious Paws Rescue Inc. at 4:30
p.m.,Crystal River Mall, U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
Feb. 20 Business After Hours
hosted by Unity Church of Citrus
County, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.


Community

events
Feb. 1 Best Friends Fest is a pet
adoption extravaganza from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. The event will include pet
rescues, groomers, veterinarians,
food and a silent auction to benefit
Animal Services' Special Needs
Fund. Bring in pet food for the needy
and you'll be entered into a drawing
for a prize. Citrus County Audito-
rium, 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
(U.S. 41 and Airport Road).
Feb. 4- Life by Chocolate. Atten-
dees will enjoy chocolate fountain,
desserts and drinks. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Crystal
River branch of Raymond James or
you may purchase tickets at Cattle
Dog Coffee Roasters on the night of
the event. All money raised goes to
the American Cancer Society, fund-
ing research, advocacy, education
and patient services. Event is 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. at 2416 N. Heritage Oak
Path, Hernando. More information,
call 352-795-6155.
Feb. 5 Nature Coast Emergency
Medical Institute begins its next
Paramedic class. The program
course is 10 months long and shift-
friendly and is held at Nature Coast
EMS Administration building at
3876 W. Country Hill Drive in
Lecanto. It includes off-site clinical
work. Contact lead instructor Ron
Bray, CCP, at ronaldb@naturecoast
ems.org or call 352-400-1191.
Feb. 15 Music and Movie in the
Park, at 4 p.m., will feature Phantas-
tic Sounds. Movie TBD. King's Bay
Park, 268 N.W. Third Street, Crystal
River.


The Point 0' Woods Clubhouse on Gospel Island Road has been a center of activity in the
community for 40 years. Originally built for an activity center for those living in the
Point 0' Woods subdivision, membership is now open to anyone in Citrus County who
enjoys playing bridge, 500 or other card and board games. While memberships are
available, anyone who is interested may come and play for a $2 fee per day. The club-
house, which includes seating for more than 100oo as well as a dance floor, is available for rental. Of-
ficers include Sandra Koonce, president; Jean Cunningham, vice president; Betty Kolczynski,
secretary; Sally Metzger, treasurer; Marilyn Pruter, membership; Charlotte Ziebarth, social; John
Liken, maintenance; and Pat Liken, publicity.


Address:
9228 E. Gospel
Island Road,
Inverness FL 34450
Phone:
352-634-4216


Accu-Pro Painting / Daystar Life Center
Sealing / Pressure 6751 w. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River FL 34429
Was n, L C 352-795-8668 o daystarcitruscounty.org
Washing, LLC 31-51-1
Jeff Brown o 314-561-o182 ---


From left: Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Bill Hudson, Land '
Title of Citrus County; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at From left: Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Jennifer Duca, Comfort
Brentwood; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Jeff Keepers; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Sarah Fitts, First
Brown and family; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; International Title; Jeanne Green, associate member; Betty Murphy,
Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; and Jeanne Green, Citrus Archives & Computers join Daystar Life Center staff and
associate member, volunteers for a morning ribbon-cutting.

Patty's Barber Cuts
2167 W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto FL 34461 o 352-364-1793


From left: Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Bill
Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; owner Patty Lewis, joined by friends and family; Janet Mayo, associate member; Jennifer
Duca, Comfort Keepers; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; and Sarah Fitts, First International Title.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.










D4 SUNDAYJANIJARY 26,2014 DECLASSIFIED Crnus Couixrry (FL) CHRONICLE


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tim e


Fax (52.53-66 1Tol Fee .(88 82-34 1Emal:clssfidschonclon ie om0 w-0 0 *chonclonlin 0


YOU'LL P THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.



v
Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.


Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Single 56 yr. old
Gentlemen
Looking for Someone
55-60 No drugs,
no smoking. Like the
simple things in life?
Movies, Dinner,
and would like to
play disc golf. Call Jim
352-212-4167


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



YOU'LL w THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.

v


Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.



-y -


(\ 'I W V


57 YO Male Caregiver
Available for Cooking,
Cleaning, Errands and
Hands on. 8 yrs. exp.
Resume & Ref. Call
Edward 352-419-8387



18'x16' Storage Build-
ing, metal roof, fully
floored, roll-up door
$900. bo. 352-726-7106



AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN.FEB.2ND.
1-800-438-8559




CNA
7a-3p&3p-11p Shift
Citrus Health
and Rehab Center,
a five star skilled
nursing facility. We
offer a good salary
and work environ-
ment including medi-
cal/ dental/vision
insurance. A liberal
paid time off plan.
Please Apply in
Person for an
immediate interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit



COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
352-795-0121



ESTIMATOR
For repair/ remodel-
ing Projects prior
experience/
construction back-
ground. Perm/ FT
position. Competi-
tive salary/ incen-
tives/ Ins/401 k/vac/
sick/ holidays/ cell/
advancement/more!
Send resume or
apply in person:
Restoration
Specialists, 36 W
Gulf-To-Lake Hwy,
Lecanto, 34461
Fax 352-732-8950
ATTN: Eric Ehrlund
352-425-2901 cell.
EEhrlund@Restor
ationSoecialists.com
EOE/DFWP


COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
professional
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
position
including weekends
shuttling potential
homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL
Exp Tutor/Certified FL
Teacher offering priv
tutoring all subjects
K-6, lang. artsK-12&
college lev. & French
call/text 352-287-2756
FUND RAISERS
NEEDED
Veterans' Outreach
needs reps for
GREETER Position.
Help in our Donation
efforts that aid our
"Program Services".
Grocery /Dept
Stores, Gun Shows
etc are where our
venues are assigned
and the "Outreach"
display is set up.
Must have car and
be willing to travel.
Comp/Exp pd for
P/T position. Seniors
Welcomed!
Call 866-212-5592 or
email resume & let-
ter of interest to:
ielv@veteransout
reach.com
PARK MANAGER
Hosts to manage 26
lot RV Park on Stein-
hatchee River. Free RV
site, utilities & modest
salary in exchange for
grounds upkeep & mi-
nor maint. Also house-
keeping for two rental
cottages.To Apply:
(229)263-8364 or
email: dfletch(csvic.net
Preform Treadmill
cooling fan, electron-
ics, heart rate control,
certified training pro-
gram $360. Almost
New (352) 795-3086
SECRETARY
For a fast paced office!
MUST have the ability to
multi task, communicate
professionally and have
excellent Microsoft
Office skills. To Apply:
construction resume
wci(camail.com
DFWP/EOE
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings


StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



12 Ft Above Ground
Pool with newer
pump. Good Cond.
Take down & take
awa. (352) 503-7508
200 yd. Sand fill.
U load, u haul.
Inverness area
(352) 419-6000
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch u load and
haul 352-628-9624
FREE BROKEN
FLOOR TILES great for
crafts or small construc-
tion projects
352-465-0580
Free English Bulldog
8 years old
Male, good with other
pets & kids
(352) 212-0136
FREE
Mother Cat orange &
white & 2 Kittens
calico, short tail
born last August
To good home
(352)476-1132
Free Rhode Island
Red Hen
(352) 344-8122
Free to good Homes
Adult recue cats
Male & female
all fixed, 1 yr. old to
seniors. Must be in-
door only, Moving
cant take
(352) 422-6310
Free to good Homes
Older adult
Chihuahuas, 4 to 81bs
male & female all
spayed and neutered
and shots
Moving cant take
(352) 422-6310


Home e Finder


www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


Yoer Dreiz.4m Howme

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Free
Shower Chair
Excellent Cond.
(352)382-4991



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
- Grouper @ $6.1OOlb
- Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
*GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
LOST DOG Near Vil-
lage Pines in Inglis.
Tan, sheppard mix, 60
pounds. Wearing red
harness. Named
Rebel. May not come
to you. Call Sonny Ar-
nold at 352-447-5124 if
spotted. Offering re-
ward.
Lost
Unique Gold Bracelet
Crystal River Area
Will Identify
(352) 563-2203
Rat Terrier, female, 15
yrs, 15 Ibs, has collar
and leash lost on 1/18
Wallis Pt, Ozello
(352) 228-4359 or
732- 814-9627
Small Long-Haired
light brown dog,
malevery friendly,
,area of Quarterhose
& Oakland, Crystal
River. pls call
(352) 257-1308



"


YORKIE, Male, 5 Ibs,
Blue & Gold w/ long
legs. Lost on Duval
Island 11/23.
300 Reward
for safe return,
pictures avail, on
facebook
@helpfindjack-jack
(352) 398-6774

HV^E^B


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
0- Grouper @ $6.001lb
0 Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001



TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444




SECRETARY
Announceme
nt
#14-10


This position is a
pr-
mary adminis-
trative
support posi-
tion for
answering
phones,
directing
calls,
provides information
and receives citizen
requests and com-
plaints. Maintains
the work order
request tracking
and billing system.
Assists with customer
service, inquiries
and problem resolu-
tion. Performs filing
and other general
clerical duties. Per-
forms related duties
as required. Works
four-10 hour days
Monday-Thursday,
6:30 AM -5:00 PM.
Working knowledge
of the Microsoft
Office Suite of
Products. Starting
pay $10.29 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 31,
2014 EOE/ADA






Your World




CI--- J(L





CHRpNidE



I 6 I r M
'., .,, ,. hh ,i-i i, IT ,l'nli i ,, 'm


For a fast paced office!
MUST have the ability to
multi task, communicate
professionally and have
excellent Microsoft
Office skills. To Apply:
construction resume
wcileamail.com
DFWP/EOE



PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351


YOU'LL V THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.

W


Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.







f V W4 V ^











chronideonlhne corn


Our enhanced starting pay rates are effective immediately.
There's never been a better time for RNs to embark on a career
with Central Florida Health Alliance.

Call 352-751-8816 to speak with one of our recruiters today.

To learn more about the facilities or to apply online, visit us at
http://www.cfhacareers.com.
EEO/AA/H/V. Drug-free Workplace/Tobacco-free Workplace.


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




CA/FRONT DESK
& LMT
PT, The Villages, M-F
Fax Resume 795-8911

Certified Dietary
Manager

Join an Exciting
Team!
Certification Re-
quired w/ 2 yrs exp.
Excellent Benefits.
Apply at:
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness 34453 or
Email to: atadmin@
southernltc.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamnoli@
yahoo com

EXP MEDICAL
CODING/BILLING
F/T Wanted
for office based
medical practice in
Inverness.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 726-5818

MEDICAL Assist.
front and back
Fax Resume to:
352-465-3733

Nurse Pract. or
Physician Asst.
Needed for internal
medicine office.
Traditional inpatient
and outpatient care.
Great location within
Citrus Co. FL.
Excellent Benefits.
National Health
Service Corps
approved site. To
apply please email
resume to
sum07me
mail .com or
Fax Attn Patty
352-746-3838.


OP' 100


S Central Florida Health Alliance
Leesburg Regional Medical Center The ViUllages Regional Hospital


HELP WANTED
Sales/Management
If you are looking for a career, not just a job.
Full company benefits:
Medical, Dental, 401K, Paid Vacation.
Previous Experience Necessary
Cemetery/Funeral Home Experience Helpful
Please Fax Resume to 352-628-4867


D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


OnTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Part-time
Licensed Basic
X-Ray Tech:
32 Hours/wk, com-
petitive salary, par-
tial benefits. Two of-
fice locations in Cit-
rus County. Mini-
mum of 2 years exp.
in a medical office
within the state of
Florida. Must pass
national back-
ground check. Dig-
ital x-ray exp prerrd.
Mail Resume,
No Faxes Accepted:
Citrus Podiatry
Center, PA, P.O. Box
1120, Lecanto, FL
34460-1120

REHAB AIDE
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
in Lecanto
PRN position avail-
able for weekday
and weekend
coverage. Must be
a Florida-Certified
Nursing Assistant
with a high school
diploma or equiva-
lent. Rehabilitation
experience pre-
ferred. We offer
competitive pay in
a team-oriented
environment.
Melanie Reyna
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
MelanieReyna@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
45868






RN/LPN
CNA/HHA

INTERIM Healthcare
ADDIVpply in Person
581 E Gulf to Lake hw
or Call 352-637-3111

SURGICAL
ASSISTANT

EFFICIENT &
DETAIL ORIENTED?
Progressive Oral
Surgery Practice
looking to add F/T
experienced Surgical
Asst. Benefits incl.
health insurance &
retirement pension
Mail resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks Dr. Crystal
River, FL. 34429



CLOSING AGENT

Express Title Services
Needs, experienced
closing agent ASAP
Send Resume to H.R.
Dept, 730 N. Suncoast
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl
34429 All inquires kept
confidential


Parttime Servers,
Bartenders and
Dishwashers.

Skyview Restaurant
at Citrus Hills
Aoolv In Person
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd., Mon-Sun
8:00-10:00am
or 3:00-5:00pm






TooJay's Gourmet
Deli is currently
hiring year round
positions in both of
our restaurants
located in
The Villages. We are
interested in sup-
porting you achieve
your New Year plans
by encouraging you
to bring your talents
to us for a new
career.
We are currently
hiring high-powered
back-of-the-house
people who desire
to produce our
high-quality food in
a casual environ-
ment surrounded by
dedicated team
members and a
supportive and
hands on manage-
ment team. These
are year round, not
seasonal positions.
Starting wages
range from $10.00 to
$13.00. We are also
looking for BOH
leads or shift super-
visors starting at
$15.00.
We offer great
benefits including
meal benefits.
If this sounds like to
perfect way to start
your new career,
send your resume
today or apply in
person at TooJay's in
LakeSumter, 1129
Canal Street or
TooJay's in Spanish
Springs, 990 Del Mar
Drive. Email to
LKS@toojays.com or
VIL@toojays.com.




FUND RAISERS
NEEDED
Veterans' Outreach
needs reps for
GREETER Position.
Help in our Donation
efforts that aid our
"Program Services".
Grocery /Dept
Stores, Gun Shows
etc are where our
venues are assigned
and the "Outreach"
display is set up.
Must have car and
be willing to travel.
Comp/Exp pd for
P/T position. Seniors
Welcomed!
Call 866-212-5592 or
email resume & let-
ter of interest to:
ielvveteransout
reach.comn


BATTERIES ETC.
Inverness, F/T Sales
Positions. Electronic
background, DC
skills & mechanically
inclined. E-mail
resume to: resume
@batteriesetc.net
LOOKING FOR
Retired/Semi Retired
FOR APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Get Extra Cash $$$$
Daily/Wkly. Bonuses
CALL (352) 628-0254
Transportation Co.
iso of qualified
logistic people with
previous experience
Send resumes only to:
transportationresumes
@outlook.com



Assistant
Veterans Service
Officer
Announcement
#14-09
Specialized work
assisting in the
administering of
veterans services
programs. Advises
and assists veterans
and their depend-
ents regarding their
rights and benefits
under federal and
state statutes and
regulations. Pre-
pares forms, assem-
bles information,
keeps records and
makes referrals.
Makes presentations
to civic organiza-
tions and veterans
groups. Must have
an honorable
discharge from the
military, be a vet-
eran of a wartime
era, pass the FDVA
certification course.
Beginning rate of
pay $14.26 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us for
more information
and to apply for this
position. You can
also visit one of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 31,
2014 EOE/ADA


ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough, Trim. Slab,
Lintel, Service
Employer paid
benefits, paid holi-
day & vac. /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wildwood



ESTIMATOR
For repair/ remodel-
ing Projects prior
experience/
construction back-
ground. Perm/ FT
position. Competi-
tive salary/ incen-
tives/ Ins/401 k/vac/
sick/ holidays/ cell/
advancement/more!
Send resume or
apply in person:
Restoration
Specialists, 36 W
Gulf-To-Lake Hwy,
Lecanto, 34461
Fax 352-732-8950
ATTN: Eric Ehrlund
352-425-2901 cell.
EEhrlund@Restor
ationSoecialists.com
EOE/DFWP



Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full benefits,
achievable
bonuses. Call for de-
tails 1-888-378-9691
or www.hevl.net



Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net


www.chronicleonline.com


CLASSIFIED
Skills


Marine
Mechanic
yard work, must
have own truck &
tools. (352) 398-5903




COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking hgh-energy
professional
hostesses fo
seasonal part-time
position
including weekends
shuttling potential
homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

PARK MANAGER
Hosts to manage 26
lot RV Park on Stein-
hatchee River. Free RV
site, utilities & modest
salary in exchange for
grounds upkeep & mi-
nor maint. Also house-
keeping for two rental
cottages.To Apply:
(229)263-8364 or
email: dfletch(csvic.net

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351

PT Secretary/
Receptionist

Four 6 hour days,
must be computer
literate and pass
back ground chk.
Apply at: St
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Parish Office. 1460 W.
St Elizabeth PI. Citrus
Spgs 352- 489-4889

ReStore Manaaer
Truck Driver
Habitat for Humanity
is filling 2 positions
in Citrus County
E-mail request for
detailed job descrip-
tion & instructions for
submitting resume to:
H4Hrestore@
vahoo.com
No calls or walk-ins


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26,2014 D5


Si
Security for a
Shelter
Parttime Evenings
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sipped@
bellsouth.net

Part-time


FUND RAISERS
NEEDED
Veterans' Outreach
needs reps for
GREETER Position.
Help in our Donation
efforts that aid our
"Program Services".
Grocery /Dept
Stores, Gun Shows
etc are where our
venues are assigned
and the "Outreach"
display is set up.
Must have car and
be willing to travel.
Comp/Exp pd for
P/T position. Seniors
Welcomed!
Call 866-212-5592 or
email resume & let-
ter of interest to:
ielv@veteransout
reach.comn


AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


MASSAGE
THERAPY
Classes Start,
April 28, 2014
Spring Hill
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu
S







(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


NOW HIRING!
Truck Driving
School
Instructors
Join CRST's brand
new training school
in Cedar Rapids,
Iowa! Relocation
assistance provided.
Call: 866-756-3407;
email:
mknoot(&crst.com


Home Finder

www.chronicleh r--i finder.com


Fid Your Vreumn HoIte-

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


- Tn f866-361-1137 .
>a~i VT L Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11am-4pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat 8am-4pm


CELEBRATION

ONE







( NE YEAR
WEEK


ONLY

io




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOYOTA

Let's Go Places


2013 Blowout Savings.


New 2013 Toyota Sienna Limited mode l 5356. with aulomalic rans-
mission and select eauipmenl. Adding options increases payment. MSRP
ol $49,581. Village Toyota discount ol $6.282 and $3,499 cash or trade
equity due at signing. Excludes tax. tag. registration, title and dealer lees.
Dealer lees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all manufacturer rebates and
incentives. Cannot be combined with any otner offers. Must complete
retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


NEW 2014TOYOTA

Corolla
LE
.............................................................
BUY FOR

$13,999
LEASE FOR

$129 MONTH
AUTO







New 2014 Toyota Corolla LE model #1852, with automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP of $19,160, Village Toyota
discount of $1,661 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes tax,
tag, registration, tide and dealer fees. Dealer fees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
of 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile thereafter. Disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


New 2013 Toyota Rav4 XLE model u4440,w. wit aulomadc btransmission ann select
equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP ol $25 904, Village Toyota
discount 01 $2,905 and $3.499 casn or trade equity due at signing Excludes tax,
tag registration. tille and dealer lees. Dealer lees vary oy dealer. Dealer retains all
manulacturer rebates and incentives. Lease lor 36 montn with approved credit score
ol 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and lear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile inereahier. Disposilion fee ol $350 due al lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. MUST complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


New 2014 Toyota Camry SE model #2546, with automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP of $25,040, Village Toyota
discount of $3,641 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes tax,
tag, registration, title and dealer fees. Dealer fees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
of 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile thereafter. Disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


New 2013 Toyota Prius C model "1201 witn automalic transmission ana select
equipment. Aading options increases paymneni MSRP ol $19,940, Village Toyola
discount ol $1.441 and $3,499 cash or orae equity due at signing. Excludes tax
lag. registration tiue and dealer lees. Dealer lees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
ol 680 or nhigner through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposh required
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year. 18 cents
per mile Inereafter. Disposilion tee or $350 due ai lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14


New 2014 Toyota Prius II model #1223, with automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP of $25,060, Village Toyota
discount of $2,310 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes tax,
tag, registration, title and dealer fees. Dealer fees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
of 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile thereafter. Disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


NEW 2013 TOYOTA

Sienna
Limited
Advanced Tech
BUY FOR

$39,800


NEW 2013 TOYOTA

RAV4
XLE
BUY FOR

$19,500
LEASE FOR
$199
$ 9 I MONTH
'- __ -


NEW 2013 TOYOTA

Prius C
ONE


BUY FOR

$15,000
LEASE FOR

$139MONTH


NEW 2014 TOYOTA

Camry
SE


BUY FOR

$17,900
LEASE FOR

$159MONTH


NEW 2014 TOYOTA

Prius
TWO


BUY FOR

$19,251
LEASE FOR

$239MONTH


D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


You can become an
expert in HVAC instal-
lation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute Online
HVAC education in as
little as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961 or go
online:
www.HVAC-Online-Edu
cation.com


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


II I g


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
# A local Fl. Manufact.
# We custom build-
We are the factory
# Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
# Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**


ANTIQUE STEAMER
TRUNK. 36" X 22" X 23"
Tall. Good condition.
$60. 527-1239.



16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316
BRIDE DOLLS 7 Lovely
Brides! Satin/lace
gowns. Lovely for child
or adult. $20 per or
$100 for all. 465-4208
BUTTERFLY LAMP
Tiffany-like, 2 light
levels, beautiful, ($35)
352-613-7493
SPORTS CARDS for
sale,$100.00
3527464405
VARIETY OF INTER-
ESTING FRAMED ART-
WORK all oils, watercol-
ors or numbered prints
$25-$75 352-897-4154



AMANA UPRIGHT
Deep Freeze, 15.2
cu.ft. 60.5x30x28.3 adj.
temp control, free
frost, 3 shelf, high effi-
ciency compressor,
$275. (352) 400-8746
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE Electric Stove
white w/black door
coil burners, GE
Microwave, white
$130. obo
(812) 701-8881
GE WASHER
king size cap, Whirl-
pool Dryer, Lg Cap.
White, Both like new.
$300 for both
(352) 613-0823
HOOVER CARPET
CLEANER, $40
(352) 400-8746
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE, 30"
electric, white
clean, works good.
$125. Homosassa
(678) 617-5560 or
352-513-5580
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258


Kenmore Dishwasher
white, works great
$100.
(352) 637-2188
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398
We are remodeling
our Kitchen 28 cu. ft.
Maytag Bisque french
door Refrigerator w/
ice & water in door
3 yrs. old, perfect
cond. Matching
Range, Microwave
& Dishwasher $600.
(352) 527-3429
Whirlpool
Self-Clean Elec Range
WHITE Exc cond. No
dents or scratches.
$100 732.977.2616



4 Draw file cabinet, by
HON, Metal W/Keys.
Good Condition. $25.00
352-249-7212
COMPUTER DESK
Corner unit, new, can
email photo, must move
now, need room, $35
795-8800
OFFICE / COMPUTER
DESK SOLID Dark
WOOD Office/Computer
Desk W/Hutch VGC, 7
Drawers, $250.00
352-249-7212
Office Desk
Large, Dark wood
$150.
(352) 489-4445
Rainbow Springs
Dunnellon




BANKRUPTCY
AUCTION
5,700 +/- Acres North
Port, Florida Febru-
ary 13 World Class
Hunting Develop-
ment Potential.
800-504-3010 Na-
tional Auction
Group, Inc. Thomas
J. Bone, FL#
AU3422




Heavy Duty 10"
Craftsman Table Saw
with Stand $100. obo
(352) 287-3729
MIKITA POLISHER
Mikita Polisher with
pads, like new $95.00
352-795-2657


Tool Chest, 10 draw-
ers, one chest sits on
top of the other,on
wheels, good shape
$50. (352) 697-2583




DISH TV Retailer.
Starting $19.99/
month (for 12 mos.)
Broadband Internet
starting $14.95/
month (where avail-
able.) Ask About
SAME DAY
Installation!
CALL Now!
1-800-980-6193
JVC DVD PLAYER +
VCR COMBO UNIT
Nice, Used few hours
Mom doesn't need. In
box. $60 341-0450
RECORDS over 50
L/P's, various artists,
($20) 352-613-7493



CROWN MOULDINGS
pieces 12FT9/16" x
2-3/4" Primed Ceiling
Pattern 52 NEW $60
341-0450



COMPUTER GAMES 7
multi-pack, 1 with 5000
games, ($25)
352-613-7493
DESKTOP COMPUTER
Compaq w 19" flat mon-
itor. Vista OS.$75.00.
352-560-0046
HP DESKTOP PC
a1430n Dual core 2GHz
CPU 1GB RAM 250GB
No Ethernet Clean $65
341-0450
REAR VIEW CAMERA
SYSTEM VR3 Car,
truck, SUV, NEW, wire-
less, $50.
(352)257-4076
XBOX DEAD ISLAND
GAME For XBOX 360,
Good Condition, $20
341-0450

Furniture

2 VINTAGE COFFEE
TABLES. 1 round with
lazy susan. 1 rectangu-
lar. Both maple. $25 for
both. 527-1239
BED AND MATTRESS
Guest Q mattress and
boxsprg, drk headbrd,
adj metal frame, K
spread, sham and shirt.
$350 352.419.7376


CLASSIFIED



4 AMERICAN COLO
NIAL ARMCHAIRS dark
pine, very high quality &
comfy
$65/all 352-897-4154
Bedroom Set
solid wood, twin size
bed w/ box spring,
headboard, 5 dresser
drawer, 2 end table
w/ 2 drawers, 2 yrs. old
Asking $350.
(352) 746-9539
BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in Original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
352-795-0121
Desk Chair & Ottoman
both brown leather
and in excel, condi-
tion. Desk chair is high
back w/ arms & ad-
justable height.
Ottoman measures
40Wx24Dx18H and has
hinged top for stor-
age. $50 for chair and
$40 for ottoman.
Will email photos.
352-746-1644.
DINETTE SET
Rattan 75 table,
6 chairs with cushions
Excellent Cond $600
(352) 382-0543
Dk Green Wicker TV
stand w/swivel top,,
Green wicker oval
mirrorsml Green
wicker table w/lower
shelf. $95. for all
(352) 382-2939
ELEGANT CHAISE
LOUNGE Solid wine
color, very comfy, very
good shape $65
352-897-4154
GLIDER ROCKER
Glider rocker $65 near
LeCanto 304-679-8692
KITCHEN SET
TableGlass top, with 4
cushioned swivel
chairs. 3 matching
bar stools. $425
352-422-6849
Leather Couch
dual recliner sofa by
Flexsteel, exc. cond.
$295.(352) 746-5789
LEATHER SOFA
brown, exc. cond.,
$200. Brown leather
recliner, fair cond.,
$75. (740) 339-3433
Leather Sofa,
love seat & chair, neu-
tral color, good cond.,
$300. obo
Sugarmill woods
(352) 382-9975


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26,2014 D7


LOVELY LOVESEAT
Neutral beige/gold 58"
One yr old nonsmoking
$100 OBO
352-465-4208
NEWER LOVESEAT
Neutral beige/gold 58"
nonsmoking; less than 1
year old $100 OBO Pat
465-4208
OAK COFFEE TABLE.
Excellent condition.
24"x48".
$15. 527-1239
OAK DESK KIDS
HEIGHT 2 x 4 foot Top,
Blonde Oak, 2 Drawers
plus Book Shelf $100
341-0450
Queen Sleeper Sofa,
beige, microfiber,
excel cond. $350.
Black Dining Rm. Set
round glass tble, 4
chairs, matching
drapes & Serving tbl
$650. (352) 419-5363
SLEEPER SOFA
Queen mattress. Off
white floral. Nice condi-
tion. 78 x 36 x 32 tall.
$95. 527-1239
SOFA
Brown & Green Plaid
$100.
(352) 513-4621
SOFA/FOYER TABLE
BEAUTIFUL DARK
CHERRY Solid Wood
table L-NEW, beveled
glass/top, B/shelf,
$185 (Cost$450)
(352)249-7212
Wanted To Buy
2 Twin Beds,
with Boxspring, Frame
& Mattress
(352) 220-3984
Waterbed, King Size
very good condition
w/support mattress &
heater $200. obo
352-364-3601




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
RETAINING BLOCKS
concrete (126) for
landscaping..$95
352-249-7212




FLORAL CITY
1/25 & 1/26 8am
Monster Estate Sale
Antiques, tools,
Kitchen wares & More
8898 E Washington Ln


***,*******k

INVERNESS
Estate Sale:
January 26, 27, 28th
11:00 AM to 3:00 PM.
Household
goods and furniture
3255 E. Raccoon
Court






INVERNESS
Friday thru Sunday
Antiques, 10,000 items
tools, glassware,
marine, golf, engines,
fishing,
(315) 466-2268




DRESS SHIRT Bristol &
Bull New Tag says
79.50/sellng $25
Linda 423-4163
MEN'S COAT Designer
Black Size 42 Like new
$25 Call 352-726-0040
MEN'S DRESS PANTS
Like new, 6 pair $10
each OBO.
Linda 423-4163
WOMEN'S LEATHER
COAT Black, Thinsulate
zipout lining. Excel
cond. $50.00
(352)257-4076
WOMEN'S LONDON
FOG JACKET Blue
suede, size large, zipout
lining, excell. cond. $15.
(352)257-4076
WOMEN'S LONG
RAINCOAT black, lined,
excell. size 12, $25.
(352)257-4076
WOMEN'S VINYL
LEATHER LOOK
JACKET KC Collections
Black excell. 18/20 $8.
(352)257-4076




BROTHER FAX COP-
IER SCANNER WITH
MANUAL ONLY 35.00
4640316




8 ft. Pool Slide
$50.
4x6 Trailer
$50.
(352)400-0312


1500 Rubber Stamps,
& Supplies
STORE CLOSED
Sell All (352) 249-7240
12V TROLLING MO-
TOR 4OLB VERIGUIDE
MOTORMAX
$100 (352)249-7542
Leave message
18'x16' Storage Build-
ing, metal roof, fully
floored, roll-up door
$900. bo. 352-726-7106
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80.00 464-0316
ANIMAL CAGE Big. Call
for details.
$60 423-4263 Linda
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Bookcase,
$140
20 Glass Boots
Drinking glasses
$60.
(352) 795-7254
Conure Parrot
Cage & all $100.
30 gal. tank w/stand
light, fish and all live
plants. $100.
(352) 726-7106
CREMATION NICHES
Two side-by-side niches
w/memorials in beautiful
Fero Memorial Gardens,
Beverly Hills. Price for
both from cemetery:
$2,500 will sell for
$2,000. 352-327-2487.
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER. FIRST
100.00. 464-0316
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new. I own.
$100 OBO.
Linda 423-4163
DOG CRATE
Folding, 60w, 22L,17h
$25; Kennel Cab 13w,
21L, 14H $15
(352) 465-9395
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER [LT. OAK]
glass door/shelves, stor-
age. included 19 in. TV.
$40. neg. 352-344-8212
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.OOlb,
w- Grouper @ $6.OOlb
Stonecrab @ $6.OOlb
delivered 352-897-5001


Freezer
$75.
Troybuilt Roto Tiller
$30.
(352) 400-0312
GAS GENERATOR
Power stroke, 6200
starting watts, 5000 run-
ning watts, Never Used
$500 623-760-7684
Crystal River
GENERATOR
B&S, 5550 Watts, Port. ,
test started only $425;
DOG CRATE 48x30x32,
like new, $65
(352) 628-6001
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464 0316
Kitchen Cabinets
Off white laminate
with oak trim. Match-
ing counter top. 10x10
L shape layout. SS sink
& faucet. Exc Cond
$750 352-228-4837 or
352-212-6918
Lawn Mower,
Neutron, battery
operated $75;
PS3 Games $10 ea
Ratings for everyone.
(352) 205-7973
OLDER HUSGVARNA
SEWING MACHINE
stitches,zigzag button-
hole & more. Asking
$50 (352)613-5240
Play Station 2,
game cube, Wii con-
trols, 39 games $250
Weight Distribution
Hitch, 2 5/16, torsion
bars, sway control
$100 (352) 613-0823
POOL TABLE
4x8 with genuine slate
top. Cue's and balls.
$400
(352) 628-1723
RAMP 4'x 8' PT wood,
(2x12) for sheds, or
platform. $85.00
352-249-7212
SCHWINN CRUISER
SS WOMEN'S BIKE-
26" x 2-1/8" tires, com-
fort seat/bars, Ex.
$65. 628-0033
Shed, 8 x 10
New, Assembled
$350.
(352) 419-7332
WIRE SHELVING 16
INCHES WIDE-87
FEET long-brackets in-
cluded. $100 OBO
352-527-1399


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




-Affordable Mobile-
all type marine repairs
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-398-5903




57 YO Male Caregiver
Available for Cooking,
Cleaning, Errands and
Hands on. 8 yrs. exp.
Resume & Ref. Call
Edward 352-419-8387
PERSONAL CARE
Light house work
Respite Care. Male
CNA (352) 875-9793




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
lic/ins (352) 563-8020



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
**ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
PeAFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
VeAFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
&AFFORDABLE
sRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773


HOUSEKEEPING, relia-
ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable ref.
Maggie(716) 378-4657
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672
Residential Cleaning
wkly/biwkly/monthly
references available
Kristin (352) 400-1978
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




Exp Tutor/Certified FL
Teacher offering priv
tutoring all subjects
K-6, lang. arts K-12 &
college lev. & French
call/text 352-287-2756




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lie. (352) 364-2120
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




MOBILE HOME
REPAIR/REMODELING
SKIRTING, RELEVELS
DOORS,FLOORS,
AND MUCH MORE!
352-257-9056
CC2211




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




60ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




4.



POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636




Any Surface,
roof cleaning, int/ext
painting, gutter cleaning,
Absolute Exterior
Restoration
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557









Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


Remodeling

All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoorina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
***352-639-1024***




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


I-.kLSADI.IAES


Ted's Painting
a & Home Services Co.







All Types of Home Repairs

746-51902
ilC/INS ii #240270


AM ROOFING

Call th "%eak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF;

Any Re-Roof
| Mus present coupon attm contract is signed 1
|Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 00OH05K









Insal N ir Now's the
HPumps nneri time for pool
Healers remodeing
a Sail Ssiems n
sl sm Pool Refinishing
Sn* Construction
S* Remodel
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
WOOdS Seriing All OiCirsColnrl
Pool&Spa .... I,,,,
wwwNYpii,,- 382-4421
, IA W 'a .... .............'... ......


+ Electronic
ALeak
Detection
for all pools
and spas
We'iifimdyour leak
DETECTION oTW eem',
Licensed no charge!


352-433-6070

S30 day guarantee on all work
BayLeakDetective@gmail.com


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only $69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt. With copon.

I THURA CLEAN hC
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091


WIN -
GEN ,lE."C
ft 0.- llhli; -M lbA L. A.-9

Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
o Small Carpentry
,9' Fencing
AME N* 5ueening
[ (Clean Dryer Vents
i lff doble & Dependable
4 E.%perience lifelong
li 352-344-0905
Sell: 400-1722
f Licensed & Insured Lic.#3 7761


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Doay,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
5E R 352-364-4610
1MR.
ELECTRICC
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated
Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
I 24HoursaDa 7 DaYsaWeek


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians 3
ER0015377

352-621-124


n


I trg


.4


Call

1-352-566-6615
Dr. Vent
1-855-4DR-VENT'-
cally Owned 15+ Yrs.
Liz Lic./ins.. Bonded Wi









D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26,2014


EL RIII RL
BLUE WORKS FINE
ONLY 20.00 464 0316
WOOL RUG
Union Jack, 5x7,
$200, Matching Bedd-
ing, throws, & pillows,
2 sets $50 for all.
(352) 382-2906



4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, $45.
352-628-0033
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
MOBILITE HOSPITAL
BED. Good Cond.
Electric head & foot.
3 mattress heights
$150 315-651-7708
Homosassa
Power Lift
Chair Recliner
$275.
(352) 513-4621
Pride Heavy Duty
motorized scooter
chair, like new $500.
Power chair-lift
for car $200.
(352) 628-0824
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANUVERABILITY.
ONLY 60.00 464 0316



"NEW" BEDELL BORN
HIPPIE GUITAR
W/GIGBAG PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT!
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER NEW-
PORTER ACOUSTIC
W/GIGBAGTUNER,STRING
S&PICKS.SELLS
FOR $280+ MY PRICE
$160 352-601-6625
"NEW" SMALL BODIED
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
LOOKS,PLAYS,SOUND-
GREAT W/GIGBAG
$50 (352)601-6625
BASS EFFECTS
PEDALS ELECTROHA-
RMONIX"MOLE"&
ZOOM B1 MULTI
$25 (352)601-6625
Casio CTK-811ex music
keyboard $50.
352-419-4464
FOLDING MUSICIANS
STOOL W/FOOT
REST&BUILT IN GUI-
TAR STAND
$25 352-601-6625
YAMAHA KEYBOARD
Model YPG235.
With stand and bench
Like New $175 OBO
(740) 505-1505



PLEATED SHADES
French Door [2] Like
New $25 Call
352-726-0040
SINGER SEWING
MACHINE Singer Sim-
ple Sewing Machine.
Like new. $60.00.
352-560-0046
SNACK TABLES 4
w/Stand Natural Wood
Tone. Like New $30
Call 352-726-0040
VACUUM CLEANER
LG upright, compres-
sor compact, pet
care, like new bagless
$150
(352) 465-9395


ELECTRIC TREADMILL
SPACE SAVER FOLDS
UP FOR EASY STOR-
AGE. ALL ELECTRON-
ICS ONLY 185.00
3524640316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE GET FIT!! IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 200.00
3524640316
EXERCISE BIKE UP-
RIGHT (FAN)TYPE.
WORKS GREATVERY
CLEAN ONLY 85.00
4640316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
NordicTrack EXP1000X
TREADMILL
Works/Great Condition.
Asking $400. OBO. Call
352-257-3547 Can
Email Pictures
Proform Treadmill
cooling fan, electron-
ics, heart rate control,
certified training pro-
gram $360. Almost
New (352) 795-3086
Treadmill Image 15.OR
Space saver, step
counter, work out fan,
10 programs, like new,
$150. (352) 400-8746



2007 CLUB CAR
Box on back, batteries
1 year old. $2,150.
Call (352) 344-0770
BICYCLE WHEELS
WTB 700c x 23mm
Front & Rear, Straight,
6061 Alloy, No Tires,
$60 341-0450
CAMPING AIR MAT
TRESS COLEMAN
queen with coversheet,
used once, ($15)
352-212-1596
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ Go Golf Cart
Well Maintained
Newer side curtains,
seat covers, springs &
shocks. $1,000. obo
(352) 527-3517
GOLF CLUBS
X-Factor Hammer
Driver & #3 Hybrid-
$100., Adams Golf
3 & 5 Woods $40.
Call Dan 352-464-4897

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 25th 9a-5p
Sun. Jan. 26th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
Ping Golf Bag
Like New
$65.
(352) 637-5389
TENT HEATER Ameri-
can Camper, propane,
($10) 352-212-1596



CAR TRAILER
Tandem axel,
15,000 Ib capacity.
$1700 OBO
(740) 505-1505
MASTER TOW
2012 Tow Dolly
3500 GVW, serge hyd.
brakes, new spare
tire, $975. Inverness
(352) 860-1106


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Regina
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221,ma60820




3 Dapple Dachshund
Puppies, all female
w/papers, pls call
Sylvia (727) 235-2265
BUNNIES & RABBITS
FOR SALE
All Colors $15 ea.
352-697-9187


DOLLY
Meet Dolly, 6-y.o.
Bulldog/terrier mix,
wt 54 Ibs., has had
an unfortunate life,
still one of the
sweetest dogs ever.
Shows signs of ne-
glect, but amazingly
is full of love for peo-
ple, playful & very
happy, craves af-
fection and returns
it, so deserving of a
loving home. Sweet
personality.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Earn extra income


delivering The Citrus


County Chronicle. We are


looking for dependable


people to deliver the news


on routes that are already


established. Potential


carriers must be 18 years


old, have reliable


transportation, a valid


drivers license and


automobile insurance.







Paid Weekly






OOOGUX2


DOG CRATE
42L x24wx28h
excellent condition
$50
352-422-6698


EMMA
Emma, 2-y.o.
Lab/Pointer mix,
very calm & gentle.
Weight 48 Ibs,
heartworm-negative,
vaccinated &
microchipped. ID #
12506886. Fee $60,
covers cost of spay,
available @ Citrus
County Animal
Shelter Appears
housebrkn.
Call 352-573-7821.
LOST DOG Near Vil-
lage Pines in Inglis.
Tan, sheppard mix, 60
pounds. Wearing red
harness. Named
Rebel. May not come
to you. Call SonnyAr-
nold at 352-447-5124 if
spotted. Offering re-
ward.
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 females
Schnauzer Pups 8 wks
Shih-TZu Pups Born
Jan. 21, 352-795-5896
628-6188 Evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827

Leeok


illll i inis IOa gogeuIsU
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936




** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"

ALUMINUM BOAT
10' Long, Good Cond.
Easy to load. Light
weight. + trolling mtr.
$225. (678) 617-5560
COLEMAN
15 ft. Canoe
2 Kayaks $300 ea
All for $800.
(352) 613-8453


ISelrSM


CLASSIFIED



GANOE
15ft., w/6 HP, Tohatsu
4 stroke engine with
boat lift $2,500 obo
(724) 516-4123
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BUS
2011, 36ft, inches
8,900 mi, loaded w/ 4
slides exel. cond. ext.
warr. Asking $205,000
Retail $237,900
(828) 553-0134
Keystone Everest
'03 5th wheel. 3 sliders,
xtra storage under
goose nk, New: gen,
septic/ H20 hoses,
deck. Must Sell, $15k
obo 352-795-1272
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., 1
slide $7000 obo
(352)628-1126
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
MONTANA
2003, 32 FT. 5th wheel,
2 slides, non smoking,
excel, cond., In park
on Hwy 19$16,000 obo
(989) 560-8900
or (989) 775-6011
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
STARCRAFT
'07, Pop up Camper
excel, cond., $3,950.
352-795-0787
or 352-208-7651




Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


1LQilk

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




BUICK
1997 LeSabre, leather
int. 48k mi. newer tires
& brakes. Fine Cond.
$3950 (352) 726-9049


If interested in any of

the following areas





Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Lecanto


Homosassa


Beverly Hills




Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River, FL 34429


C CITRUS .COUNTYin



CHKONICLE
www. chroielsonllnm.com


Buy Here/ray Here
'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

Hyundai
Azera 2007-
loaded-power
windows,heated
power seats-rear
sun screen -
6 cyl. Very low
mileage. Asking
$10,000. Available
after Jan. 22nd.
Call 860-716-3128

LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Hel Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MAZDA
2008 Miata MX5 Red
hardtop conyv 6-speed
mint condition garage
kept Boise stereo.
22.3K $18,000 OBO.
Pics avail. Bob
352-489-5443
MITSUBSHI
'97, Mirage, 2 Door
New Tires, New Battery
New Radio, $1,500.
(352) 489-0117
NISSAN
2004 Altima
Great Car! 115k Miles.
$4900. 352-464-7415
PONTIAC
'04, Grand AM, GT,
4 Door, loaded, sunrf.,
V6, auto, CD, clean,
$3,650., 352-212-9383




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN.FEB.2ND.
1-800-438-8559


1 111111111
im







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Mercury Cougar
1974 XR7; one owner
Exc Cond; 81k miles;
Gagarge Kept $8500
(352) 726-0258








FORD
2006 F150, like new
super cab, chrome
pck, leather, 1 owner,
non-smoker, 132k mi.
$11,900. (813) 967-5580



947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-


Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19Q& US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018

FORD
05 Escape, XLT 6 cyl
Non-smoker, Excellent
Cond all pwr, tinted win.
$6900. 352-613-8290

FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru


319-0126 SUCRN
2/5 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY
RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
#4 Kenneth Scott Guinn;#105 Dwight Tawan Edwards;#156 Lester Joshua Bass 111;#157
Richard Wayne Mills;#170 Troy E. Suarez;#183 Wayne Edward Penninger;#221 Hope
Lynn McBride;#223 Allison Nicole Ford;#261 Patricia Ann Seymour;#300 Debra A.
Picucci
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY, 2014.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PUBLISHED IN THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, JANUARY 19 & 26, 2014.


322-0126 SUCRN
2/6 LIEN SALE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
gives Notice of Foreclosure
of Lien and intent to sell this
vehicle on 2/6/2014



Bid N tice


10:00:00 AM at 1635 NE
32nd Ave, Ocala, FL 34470
pursuant to subsection
71378 of the Florida Stat-
utes
1FBJS31Y2RHA82644


1994 FORD CLUB
WAGON
SUPER E350
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
reserves the right to accept
January 26, 2014



Bid N tice


320-0202 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID-4350
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Bldgs. 1 & 2 Pleasant Grove Elementary School Cit-
rus County School Board Bid No. 4530 will be received by the Citrus County School
Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time February 18, 2014, in the Purchasing Department,
Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida,
34450-4625. Immediately following all bids received will be opened and read aloud
in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional
for sub-contractors, will be held at Pleasant Grove Elementary School,
630 Pleasant Grove Road in the Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur February 5, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc. upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County
School Board in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made
upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days af-
ter the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 19, 26 & February 2, 2014.

321-0126 SUCRN
REVISED INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Crystal River High School Gym Electric Service Relocation/New
Gym Floor and Miscellaneous Improvements will be received by the Citrus County
School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time February 6,2014 in the Purchasing Depart-
ment, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness,
Florida, 34450-4625. Immediately following, all Bids will be opened to verify if the Bid-
der included all the required components and attachments, and the name of the
Bidder will be read aloud.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at (352) 726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Crystal River High School 3195 Crystal River High
Drive, Crystal River, FL 34428.
B. Conference will occur 2:00 P.M., January 3, 2014.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from John-
son, Smith Architects, P.A., 316 S.E. 8th Street, Ocala, Florida 34471, (352) 351-1963,
upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board in the
amount of $75.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the return of
these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the opening of
Bids.
Bidders may also obtain one (1) copy of the Contract Documents on compact disc
for ten dollars and no cents ($10.00) made payable to Johnson, Smith Architects,
P.A., 316 S.E. 8th Street, Ocala, FL 34471, (352) 351-1963.
Bidders may also view and/or download the Contract Documents as Adobe.pdf files
through the internet for free by contacting Johnson, Smith Architects, P.A., 316 S.E.
8th Street, Ocala, FL 34471, (352) 351-1963.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 26, 2014


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHRYSLER
2000, Town & Country
72k miles, wheel chair
Van, Good Shape
$10,000. 352-270-1466

CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




Harley Davidson
2004 Heritage Softail
Classic, loaded, garage
kept $10,000.
(352) 270-8488

HONDA
99 American Classic
750cc, 8k mi., wind
shield, light bar, hard
bags, $2900. Ik new
352-634-2247

Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
ong doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4,500. 352-513-4257




ary 28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


OTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Push, Pull, Drag, even caloil us and we will tow it for you!


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D10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014





Section E.-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26,2013


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUlD


* Sikorski's
g ,Attic
PAGE E6


ON liE COVER:
aErYOeU OWa miA E


HOE AND GImD:
|Lu


m


mi 5TATE


*.... I

, ..r /. ..


Tea is strained as hot water
is poured from a kettle.
Tea gardens are becoming
a popular way for brew lovers
to bypass the store and
enjoy tea's benefits without
additives or preservatives.


I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^







E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


MEADOWCREST
* 2BD/2BD/2CG Villa Maintenance Free
* Large Eat-In Kitchen Plus Formal Dining
* Split Bedroom Plan Large Master BDRM
* Great Community 2 Swimming Pools
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842 Ll i
(352) 422-3875


SAILB MAT IFTRONT-

Sailboat waterfront, double lot has 160 ft. of
prime waterfront with seawall with wooden dock
(replaced in 2005), clear sailing with no
bridges to Crystal River to Gulf of Mexico. 3
Bedroom, 2 bath split plan with attached 2-car
garage and a detached 2-car garage, large
windowed family room overlooks water.
JEFF BURKE 352-201-6094 !, 1
Email: lelburke@remax.net L J


1.69 ACRES
GREAT COUNTRY LOCATION
* 2 BR, 2 BATH & OFFICE Frame/Stucco Home
* Updated Wood Cabinets Stone Fireplace
* Wood Flooring Updated Baths
Large Wood Deck *.i, ,- h ,-,i
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsnlonda coin m






WM*i
'MW'



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
i1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


H 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


6179 W. GLEN ROBIN
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nicely Maintained 3 Bed, 2 Bath Home
Large Lot with Citrus Trees, 2-car Garage
On A Cul-de-sac Close to Hwy. 44
Excellent Home for the Parents
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-349 I
Email: plparvi@yahoo.rom








MINT CONDITION
Located in Citrus Hills. 3BR/2BA home with
a total of 2,790 sq. ft. Family room with
Pergo flooring. Formal dining and living rm.
Master suite with dual sinks, garden tub and
walk-in closets. Price right.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I?
Email: borbaroimills@eoarthfink.net 1


JZl IH. UlbEUULA AVENUE
SOpen Waterfront
S3BR/2BA/2.5CG
SDouble-Sided Fireplace
SNew Dock
SLg. Screened Lanai
SBeautiful Private .63 Acres
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


S OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY -4PM


FABULOUS COUNTRY HOME
This 3 Bedroom 2 Bath In Popular Pine Ridge Has All The
Bells & Whistles. Features Include Oak Kitdhen Cabinets,
Anderson Oak Plank Roors, Solid Surface Counters, Gas
Cooking, FR Stone Gas Fireplace Deluxe Master & En Suite
Bath Oual Trane A/C Units, Dual Fuel Tankless Water, Heater,
Whole House Gas Generator 8x10 Steel Safe Room. Too
Many To Mention. Call For Complete List Of Upgrades. A
Mus See To Appreciate! I
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 VI 9
Email: martha.sather@remax.net


WWI 11 ii-NI rMf ftwwW won.
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
Well-Maintained 3BR/3BA/2CG
Living & Family Room
Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
Lg. Lanai & Pool Area
Citrus Hills Social Membership
Beautiful Landscaped Setting
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpaliner@reinax.net


3/2/2 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS
BUILT IN 2005
Open floor plan with great room, formal dining,
breakfast room, split bedrooms. 10x51' 4-season
lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 10x82' & 20x20
attached carports and detached carport/boat
parking E -.,il,;,, ,. r.,,,;I, ,,--J ; ,; 1...
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 F I
Email: enadal. remax .nel i








CHARMING VILLA RETREAT
2 Bedroom + Den Exterior Maintenance
* Peaceful 55+ Setting Close to Recreation Center
* Large Front & Rear Porches Kitchen Dome Lighting
* Hard Surface Floors Attractive Backyard

GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812
Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleeman.com 3 .


24211 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


3621 N. TAMARISK AVE.
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2BA/1CG 1,923 SF Under Roof
* Living RM & Fam. RM All New Windows
* Beautifully Updated and Maintained
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [-E
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


to .A^ 01, J.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






'.. ','- :"i.: .- "
iih61i' ilw_ J M a


CUSTOM SWEETWATER!
* 3 Bedrooms/3 En Suite Baths Smart Home Installed
*31/2-Car Garage Salt Water Pool
*Hardwood and ile Fireplace
* 3-Zone HVAC Jacuzzi in Master
Call for complete list of upgrades!
A STEAL at $249,900 [- ~
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolas@aol.coin
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.comi






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Home sales up 1 percent in December


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sales of exist-
ing U.S. homes edged up slightly in
December, helping to lift sales for
the year to the highest level in seven
years.
Sales increased to an annual rate
of 4.87 million units last month, up 1
percent from the November sales
pace, the National Association of
Realtors reported Thursday Both
months represented a slower pace
of sales than earlier in 2013, reflect-
ing the drag from higher mortgage
rates and higher home prices.
For all of 2013, sales totaled 5.09
million, the best performance since
2006, when sales climbed to 6.48 mil-
lion. However, the sales gains in
both 2005 and 2006 represented an
unsustainable housing bubble. Ana-
lysts say a more normal sales pace
currently would be around 5.5 mil-
lion units.
The median price of an existing
home rose 11.5 percent last year to
$197,100, the highest in eight years.
Sales of previously owned homes
are up 19.5 percent since 2011 but
sales fell from September through
November and the December level
is still 9.6 percent below the summer
peak.
"We lost some momentum toward
the end of 2013 from disappointing
job growth and limited inventory,
but we ended with a year that was
close to normal given the size of our
population," said Lawrence Yun,
chief economist for the Realtors.
Yun expects sales will remain
around the 2013 level of 5.09 million
in 2014 as such factors as tighter
mortgage lending standards and
limited inventories impede further
progress in the housing market.
But other forecasters are more op-
timistic. Patrick Newport, an econo-
mist at Global Insight, predicted that
sales growth would slow a bit from
last year's 8.8 percent rise. He pre-
dicted a 5.1 percent increase this
year to 5.33 million. He said that
would represent a "return to nor-
malcy for this portion of the housing
market."
Joel Naroff, chief economist at
Naroff Economic Advisors, agreed.
"The decade of boom, bust and boom
in the housing market is nearing an
end," he said. "We should be getting
back to a more normal market"


U.wara


Associated Press
A "for sale" sign hangs in front of a house in Mount Lebanon, Pa.


Total housing inventory at the end
of December was down 9.3 percent
to 1.86 million existing homes avail-
able for sale. That represents a 4.6
month supply at the December sales
pace.
By region of the country, sales fell
4.3 percent in the Midwest and were


down 1.3 percent in the Northeast.
Sales were up 3 percent in the South
and rose 4.8 percent in the West.
Over the summer, re-sales
reached a pace of 5.39 million, the
fastest in four years. But sales began
to slow in September as the costs of
buying a home rose.


Combs Team
joins RE/MAX
Patricia
and
Murphy
Combs
have made
the move
to
RE/MAX
Realty Patricia
One in and Murphy
its Crystal Combs
River RE/MAX
location. Realty One.
They
join the No. 1 company in
real estate sales in Citrus
County and bring nearly 10
years of experience to the
organization.
The associates of
RE/MAX are pleased to wel-
come Patricia and Murphy to
their team and look forward
to sharing in their success.
New blood joins
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker In-
vestors Realty of Citrus


County is pleased to an-
nounce that Carol Burns
has joined the sales associ-
ate team.
She can be reached di-
rectly at 813-352-3957, at
the office at 352-726-9533,
or by email at caroljburns
@hotmail.com.
Rector shines at
Top Performance
Top
Perform-
ance Real
Estate
Consult-
ants wants
to congrat- wt7
ulate their
very own 69
broker/ Debbie
Rector
owner,To
Debbie Top
Performance
Rector, for Real Estate.
being cho-
sen as 2014 president-elect
for the Realtor Association of
Citrus County.
Debbie also won the pres-
tigious award of "Broker of
the Year" for 2013.


SReal Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 E3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Help, I've got too much stuff


Ifyou're cleaning out clutter from your home, options abound


Gypsy's Two
Cents: I am
working so hard
to comply with
requests. So in
my efforts to
control my emo-
tions, I decided
to serve notice
to all other ca-
nines on this
planet: You're
in my space (ex-
cept for Shelby
and Lola). I


Steve Barnes
TIME WILL
TELL


know I am pushing, as my
Dad threatened to take
away my two cents.
D o you need to
downsize? Are you
moving? Is your
spare room stuffed with
stuff? How about the
garage or attic? Do you
have a storage unit?
Many of us have ac-
quired things that really
serve no purpose except to
take up space. Some have
value, either sentimental
or monetary, and tough
choices sometimes must
be made. What can I do
with all this stuff? Follow-
ing are some options:
Dump: When evaluat-
ing an entire house, we tell


our customers
"don't throw
anything away"
It never hurts
for experienced
eyes to take a
peek. But some-
times it's obvi-
ous it's dump
material.
Donations:
Whether it's the
Key Training
Center, hospice,
The Path or


your favorite charity, this
is a valued and feel-good
option. Most charities offer
free pickup of items. They
will take your items, resell
them for a worthy cause
and give you a receipt for
the donation.
Garage sale: If you like
negotiating and interacting
for one or two days and
price things to move, you
can rid yourself of a lot and
make some money Be ready
to go at your published start
time, as many early birds
are looking for that deal.
With the right attitude, this
can be fun unless it rains.
Some communities restrict
these kinds of sales, so be
sure and check


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

PONTICOS Nancy@Nancyknows.com 6

Multi-Million $$$ Producer Ift
15S SunIoastBld Homosassa, FL 382-1700 :'
W i'i-7-1 -n 1'. .I1- -4 1r 1.1 .1.l.rAM


'. 145 DOUGLAS STREET
Sweetwater "Tradewinds" On Golf Course
Open Great Room Wood Burning Fireplace
SScreened Lanai Kitchen Pass-Thru
j Brand New Carpet, Paint & Flooring!
S $157,000 MLS#703105
pyfte myitu


15HEUCHERACTE
*Sweetwater Driftwood w/HEATED Pool & Spa
Large Lot Quiet Cul-de-Sac Corian Kitchen
* 3 CAR Garage Separate Living & Family Rooms
* Stainless Appliances Lots of Cabinets & Closets
$237,000 MLS#706997


AanI WS nS


Flea market: You can
rent a space at any of the
local flea markets -
Howard's, Stokes, Webster,
Fatima, WTI or the fair-
grounds, just to name a
few An interesting experi-
ence, but beware you
might buy more than you
sell.
Auctions: Several
local auction houses will
buy your items outright or
for a commission put it in
an appropriate auction,
and offer pickup service.
Example: Dudley's has an
auction every Thursday
for household items and
the first Sunday of every
month is an antiques auc-
tion which simultaneously
provides live bidding on
the Internet. If there are
massive amounts of stuff,
most auction houses will
perform an on-site
auction.
Estate sales: If you
need to get rid of every-


thing in a house, this is a
good option. Individuals or
companies that provide
this service can organize
and price the entire con-
tents of a house. They will
advertise and promote the
sale locally or regionally
on the Internet, with pic-
tures and descriptions.
This is done on a commis-
sion basis and their por-
tion comes out after the
estate sale.
Consignment shop:
From quality furniture to
small items, these shops
take your items (with a
contract) and display them
in a showroom for cus-
tomers. The contract
should state an agreed
selling price, duration,
markdowns and a commis-
sion rate. Be realistic -
the agreed-upon price
should sell the item, not
keep it. So often people

See STUFF/Page E15


Looking for Horse Properties?|





ITHE LARGEST AVAILABLE LOT IN
PSherri Parker is the Pine Ridge Equestrian Real Estate Expert








YOUR HORSES DESERVE THE Center entry w/6 stalls, tack room, feed
BEST! See this completely turn key horse room and sitting porch located in the center
farm w/the elegant comforts you deserve of 6 pastures, fence and cross fenced.
on 5.5 ac in the best section of Pine Ridge Swim in the oversized diamond bright pool
and adjoining horse trails. Recent upgrades w/newer cage. Enjoy your privacy here as
include remodeled chefs kitchen w/new the home is situated back off the road but
appliances, new barn, round pen, irrigated close to the Community Equestrian Center.
pastures and well. Relax by the pool or the Competitively priced at only $299,000.
fireplace. You deserve the good life. MLS 703623



THE HORSES CALLED. They want to
directly behind the equestrian center. This amazing pool home on 2.75 ac has lenient
4 BR, 3 Bath pool home on 2 ac with a split location. 5 BR, 4 B and is located on the
floor plan has amazing amenities and is riding trails. The in-law apt has its own wing
exquisitely decorated. Enjoy sitting in your inc sitting area and pool bath. Notice the
pool at the picnic table and watching your special details such as electric gate, barrel
horses graze. Wonderfully designed horse tied roof, privacy and convenient location.
barn and grassy pastures. Priced right at Seller wants this gone so it's only
$329,000. MLS 706173 $319,900. MLS 706472


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name,
phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call
352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again,
be prepared to leave a detailed message.


fGail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
S (352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com


This home has _
something for the entire
family! Comfortable,
spacious 3 bedroom, 2
bath pool home on 4.9 __
beautiful acres. Updated
kitchen w/newer
appliances, new A/C and
ductwork, security
system, wood burning fii eplde, hiuye Ldyed
pool and lanai. The Mr will love the detached i
garage/workshop with 3 roll up doors and car
hoist. Plenty of room for the kids to roam so
bring the horses and enjoy! MLS #703985
Priced at $299,900.


~.0
LO

WE/


aI
//n


Jackie Davis
American Realty & Investments
IME 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL O
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell i L
.E.L ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bidaviscom
VIBRANT VILLA
'3 BRs, 2.5 BAs, Office
Lots of built-ins
I ^ *Hardwood floors
Extended Lanai
Gated community
State-of-the-art gym
S$349,000 MLS 707372
3 BEDROOMS, 3 BATHS
BR #2 w/sitting rm/office
r KeyMaple cabinets, granite counters
Inground pool, central vac
Newer roof, new C/H/A
..1414' Utility bldg
: On an acre.
$185,000 MLS 706770
EVERY DREAM, EVERY WHIM!
*3 BR, 2.5 BA, 2.5 car gar
,-tf M--. -. Granite counters,

""-- r. upgraded appliances
T ri Keyless entries,
stunning lighting systems
.Summer kitchen on Lanai
has tile, vented gas grill
etached 3-car garage
w/power, water, AC
..."" ' "I ,:',:,
$272,000 [.11-c 7iir:..


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


I 3 II f J I I /IiI I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LEE REICH/Associated Press
A pencil cactus, the common name for Euphorbia tirucalli, is an easy-to-care-
for and interesting-looking houseplant.



Pencil cactus is good



choice indoors and out


LEE REICH
Associated Press

Pencil cactus is a fitting common
name for Euphorbia tirucalli, even
though the plant would be useless
for writing and is not really a cactus.
A single plant looks like many
slender, green pencils, each stuck on
the end or growing off the side of the
one before it. A couple of small,
elongated leaves perch inconspicu-
ously and briefly at the end of the
"pencils," relegating photosynthesis
to the succulent, green stems.
Lack of thorns is one indication
that this plant is no cactus. Even
more telling is the milky sap that
oozes from broken or cut stems. That
sap and the plant's flowers not
very showy and rarely appearing in-
doors put pencil cactus in the
spurge family, along with more fa-
miliar houseplants such as poinset-
tia and crown-of-thorns.


On the positive side, the sap has
been used in its native Africa as folk
medicine, and to repel mosquitoes
and kill rats. It's also a potential
source of latex rubber and oil 10
to 50 barrels of oil per acre by one
reckoning. On the negative side, the

See CACTUS/Page E14



\603 W. SUNBIRD PATH, HERNANDO
(FOREST RIDGE VILLAGE)


Fully Furnished 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage Villa
A Citrus Hills Golf & Country Social Membership is
required, so if you enjoy world class amenities this one is
for you. SEE IT TODAY! MLS #705374
DIRECTIONS: Hwy. 486 to Forest Ridge Blvd. to left into
Forest Ridge Village (Sunbird path) to #603 on right.
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582


SO YOU KNOW
* News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Submit information at
least two weeks before the event.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-
563-3280; or by e-mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


*4 9 f -i 11/I9FA


PINE RIDGE Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. W
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 A week. Properties

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM
-. lqW A- -, ,:... .


MLS 707931 $649,900
Distinctive 4/2.5/3.5 pool home
w/luxurious attention to detail.
Dir Go thru main Gate of Terra Vista, L at the
roundabout, follow Fenway Dr to 1430
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING



h~mi

002599W Mesa Verde Dr
IMLS 708039 $339,000
No expense spared in this 3/2/3
pool home.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


IT.W 60 W Mickey Mantle Path
MLS 707861 $249,900
Top quality 2/2.5/2 w/den, fireplace & pool.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING


G1868 WAngelica Loop
MLS 707926 $149,900
Move right into this immaculate, well
maintained 3/2/2.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


J lbk 1b L1 Uakota Ut
S MLS 707876 $334,000
Stunning 4/2/3, saltwater pool/waterfall on
10th fairway of Meadows GC.
Dir Hwy 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, L on Dakota
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


7f ijD" 31 VV banle ui
C'VJ MLS 707913 $305,800
Pride of ownership SHINES thru-out,
3/3/3 pool home.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952
NEW LISTING


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM
%.%" MAA4L1r A tJ


.j, iL3 JZJ3l N allow PI
1.11 :: 5: $78.500
Neat, clean, 2/2/2 w/fenced yard on
cul-de-sac.
Dir Forest Ridge Blvd to Roosevelt Blvd, L on Tallow
DickHildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING


--- i-t,,.. y,_ .. . -
.75 . 185 E Keller CI
SMLS 707988 $285,000
Custom built 3/3/2 + golf cart parking &
pool on Oaks Golf Course.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


I, # 153 Under Dr '' l$aWs 1246 E Liberty St
I MLS 708003 $225,000 C1.*" MLS 707935 $175,000
Beautiful upgraded 3/3/3-two master Very spacious pool home, 3/2.5/2, many
suites & pool. items replaced w/in last 3 yrs.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


, L$.r't^ 1876 W Shanelle Path
MLS 707901 $123,000
Detached Villa featuring 2/2/2 + den/3rd
bdrm &open floor plan.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


itf 656 W Wild Pine Cir
MLS U094u $39,900
Super clean 1/1 villa in 55+ community.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


S .hh, I.. I ,, 1,oI, ,, ,I 11 I I.Ihh, e III I,,,I ,,III I, ,,I,,h, I 1 ,,, h I I ,.I
[E, {{ I " ~ l.. .. t. .. ,I I ,hh i I .. .. i,, .. It SI IO,,, I. .I Ih-l~ I ,, I ,S,~ l i, l . Ii h ,, |


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 ES


VI SAID THI A CROWD7
;7






E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Average on 30-year



loan at 4.39 percent


Experts sayprices should rise through 2014


Associated Press
WASHINGTON- Average U.S. rates
for fixed mortgages changed little this
week.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday the average for the 30-year loan
declined to 4.39 percent from 4.41 percent
last week. The average for the 15-year
loan slipped to 3.44 percent from
3.45 percent
Mortgage rates have risen about a full
percentage point since hitting record
lows roughly a year ago. The increase was
driven by speculation that the Federal
Reserve would reduce its $85 billion a
month in bond purchases. The Fed deter-
mined last month that the economy was
strong enough to start trimming the pur-
chases, which have kept long-term inter-
est rates low
The rise in mortgage rates and higher
home prices slowed sales of existing


homes, which have fallen for three
straight months.
But overall, 2013 was the best year for
housing in seven years. The National As-
sociation of Realtors reported Thursday
that sales of existing homes edged up
slightly in December, helping lift sales for
the year to the highest level since 2006.
Most economists expect home sales
and prices to keep rising this year, but at
a slower pace. They forecast sales and
prices will likely rise around 5 percent,
down from double-digit gains in 2013.
To calculate average mortgage rates,
Freddie Mac surveys lenders across the
country between Monday and Wednesday
each week. The average doesn't include
extra fees, known as points, which most
borrowers must pay to get the lowest
rates. One point equals 1 percent of the
loan amount.
See RATES/Page E7


Inside...


Tea time
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE Ell
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sikorski tackles questions on faience, china and milk glass


ear John: I
bought this por-
trait plate from a
Midwest estate sale. It is
10 inches in diameter
with a 6-inch portrait
area. It is a heavy plate
with thick edge. It
stands an inch tall and
has no markings on the
back and appears to be John S
roughly thrown and SIKOF
fired.
I have no idea who AT
the picture is of- per-
haps Christopher Columbus. It
looks Italian and may have been
picked up on a European trip in
the 1950s. Help! There were many
things in the house and this was
but one. -J.P, Internet
DearJ.P: You have an attractive
faience portrait plate. Faience is
earthenware with opaque tin-oxide
glazes, usually highly colored.


k


I
;i


The neoclassical fig-
ures around the outer
edge are wonderfully
done. I do not recognize
;P. the fellow depicted in
the center
'The plate was likely
S manufactured during
the late Victorian era,
circa 1880-90, in Europe.
korski Potential dollar value is
SKI'S $100 to $200.
C Dear John: I was in
C the army in Germany in
1955. While I was there,
I bought my wife a set of china. It is
a 12-place setting. It was so beauti-
ful in the cabinet she seldom ever
used it.
Every piece is like new. It was
made in Selb, Germany, by Rosen-
thal; on the bottom is Winifred.
That must be the pattern name. I
was hoping you could give me a
wild guess of what it would be


worth today -JR.F, Internet
DearJ.RE: Collector interest in
Rosenthal china is for the decora-
tive porcelain figurines. There is
no specific collector interest in the
fine-quality tableware.
Potential dollar value for your
set is relative to the pattern re-
placement marketplace. I suggest
you contact Replacements Ltd. in
Greensboro, North Carolina at
wwwreplacements.com or
call them at 1-800-REPLACE
(737-5223).
Dear John: I was just reading
your column of Jan. 5, as I do
every week after church. I do not

See ATTIC/Page E7
This typed of earthenware is
referred to as faience. It uses
colorful tin-oxide glazes. It likely
dates from the late 19th century.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

know how old your reader
is who wrote about Coke
for 10 cents.
I am 75 and I remember
the 6-ounce bottles for 5
cents, as confirmed by
Pepsi's advertising ditty:
"Pepsi-Cola hits the spot!
Twelve full ounces, that's a
lot! Twice as much for a
nickel, too, Pepsi-Cola is



RATES
Continued from Page E6

The average fee for a 30-
year mortgage was un-
changed at 0.7 point. The
fee for a 15-year loan also
remained at 0.7 point.
The average rate on a


the drink for you." I even
remember the melody, not
just the words! A.B.,
Internet
DearA.B.: I am glad you
shared your soda-pop Re-
member When. I was not a
Pepsi-Cola drinker; Coke
was my favorite. However,
none of the Coke or Pepsi
jingles stuck in my mem-
ory, though the one you
mention seems vaguely fa-
miliar Thanks for the
letter
Dear John: I have a col-


one-year adjustable-rate
mortgage declined to 2.54
percent from 2.56 percent.
The fee was unchanged at
0.5 point.
The average rate on a
five-year adjustable mort-
gage increased to 3.15 per-
cent from 3.10 percent.
The fee was steady at
0.5 point.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely
publication of submitted material. The earlier
Chronicle editors receive submissions, the better
chance of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of
the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL BANK OWNED- INVERNESS, FL
4BR/3BA over 3000 sq ft of living 3BR/2BA/2 car garage Inverness Highlands.
Sugarmll Woods. $145,900 MLS#702836 $62,900 MLS#704181




BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON FL IMMACULATE CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
1998 4BR/2BA doublewide on 5 acres. Over Move in today. 2BR/2BA condo in Regency
1900 sq. ft. $95,000 MLS#707619 Park. $50,900 MLS#705999
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 #-
After Hours 12302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay rrcom www.allcitrusrealty.comrn


election of Fenton milk
glass that I have had for
about 50 years. I want to
know how I can deter-
mine if it is true Fenton
milk glass. There are no
manufactured markings
on them except for one
piece. Also, I would like to
know the value of each
piece. Could you put me
in touch with someone
who could guide me
in this process? H.,
Internet
Dear H.: Until 1967, the


Fenton Glass Company
used paper labels to
mark its products, so
typically the labels were
removed. The company
no longer produces art
glass.
Milk glass is near the
bottom of the totem pole
of collector interest.
There are numerous In-
ternet sites that can be of
help on Fenton Glass, just
follow the yellow-brick
road and Google "Fenton
glass."


-- -. HOME ON POND A
SHORT DISTANCE
IE Nl l I FROM SEVEN RIVERS
GOLF COURSE
Fish from your own
backyard! Close to local
shopping. 3/2 split floor plan home is in move-in
condition. Large separate garage with walks and
driveway done in beautiful pavers. Home is
unfurnished. $120,000. MLS#702011
LOVELY,
SPLIT PLAN HOME
Backs up to Plantation
Golf Course. Large,
S glassed porch with bar,
sink, cabinets, CharGlow grill with hood. Only needs
refrigerator. Master bath has "garden shower".
Master bedroom has access to private porch. Tile
throughout home other than bedrooms which are
carpeted. $131,500 MLS#704398


JANICE W.
HOLMES-RAY
REALTOR
CELL
352-634-2398
OFFICE
352-795-0021
FAX 352-795-1323
ance holmes-rai entur21 co
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY
OWNEDAND OPEFAED


L NATURE COAST 835 NE Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34429


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the
antiques business for
30years. He hosts a
call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 E7

WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon
to 1 p.m. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL
34478 or asksikorski
@aol.com.


R7, .._JI =!atP,.0 I O SE Rator. -1. ,Iii
r^-Jackie Caffney Jason Gaffney IF
SRealtor.- A HOUSE Realtor
S 302-.3179 SLD Nane., 287-9022
S'746- 6700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


I s61 W WILD PINE CIR 2392 N LOMA PT I
Tucked away under the shaded oak trees is Beautiful 55 plus community with Rec Center
this 55 plus community which is offering a and pool This 2 bd, 2 bath mobile home is
beautiful 1 bed, 1 bath unit in a park like located on two combined lots (lots 15 & 16)
setting Beautiful Turn Key, Loads of Tile With in a few minute drive to local shopping and
Living/dining combo plus den or office restaurants A/C was replaced in 2010


I-.,
$446-,
$42-r,
F


IIuu
i^I.II hi.1
l tl.- ,,


I'n .1. F ,l .\llz-.ilr !l l r '- 1 -1

, F I,,, I- i.r i l r i
Beautiful spring-fed
swimming hole 1
iumder Oaks ? Cvypiress
sld 40 1 ghth
07-M


HOIE #1
. I-. ,, 4 ,I I ..
I- , : . i l ,,
6 x i ' i i. 1 r .

HON I#2, I
II1 1 I 'd I.-


Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
WATERFRONT 3/2 with carport on Hemrnando Chain of Lakes, offers
partially-fenced yard in a lovely
setting with 2 docks, updated kitchen
& baths, tile flooring, inside laundry.
Lower level 24x24 enclosed family
room (lanai) with air unit, sliding
windows & screens. Upper lever has
its own screen porch with beautiful
views. New roof in 06. Dock has hose
bib for cleaning. Don't miss out on
this waterfront bargain! MLS705088
1. ASKING $110,500
GREAT HOME GREAT PRICE
LOVELY INVERNESS POOL HOME
0 4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thru to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool,
covered lanai.., all this & more
sitting on .73acre. Room for the
whole family here. MLS 705163
ASKING $185,000
Zechariah 4:6


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ar*


SARAH WOLFE
Associated Press


J


aR hen temperatures
fall, there's nothing
better than a piping-
W hot cup of tea.
And as craft and or-
ganic tea seeps into the
mainstream, tea gardens are becom-
ing a popular way for brew lovers to
bypass the store and enjoy the benefits
of herbal tea without additives or
preservatives.
"It just tastes and smells better," says
chef Kimmy Tang, who snips mint, laven-
der and lemongrass from her garden for
herbal teas at her 9021PHO restaurants in
Los Angeles.


t


C


e^re3


' A cup of
Hibiscus tea.
This time of
year. there's
nothing better
than curling up
with a hot cup
of tea.
ANestforAII : : :-:
Associated Pr-:


See Page EO10


ES SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LEFT: Oat tops, rose hips, hibiscus
and red raspberry leaf steeping in
the sunlight. As craft tea seeps into
the mainstream, tea gardens are
becoming a popular way for brew
lovers to bypass the store and
enjoy tea's benefits without
additives or preservatives.

RIGHT: Dandelion, rose hips
and other dried plants
that line the cupboards of
authors Dede Cummings and
Alyssa Holmes, who use
them for homemade
teas and salves.
ABIGAIL GEARING/
Skyhorse Publishing/
Associated Press


OOOH7S8 y f

REAL ESTATE, INC.
- 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OcE: (352) 795-6633
WWWAIIYATFOM ri L QAT Ii(SATPYUC CM


IA em ON iT SV DAYS A 1i -: I


CITRUS SPRINGS very nice older home
w/2 bedrooms, 1 bath, c, i' .
room, 1 car carport, : i
10x7 utility shed Convenient location,
close to community amenities #708004
$46,900






HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side by side
Well maintain ,n i
month; ROI 1 .,
& 2002 and central A/C units installed in
2004 2-wells, eacl. 11 '. ]as own septic
system #703762 t' ""





DUNNELLON 1998 Nobility D/W M/H
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres
Master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
shower Country kitchen, vaulted ceilings,
16 x 20 workshop w/electric, inside
laundry #703976 $55,000
53a


bedrooms, 2 baths, 9ft ceilings w/crown
molding, on 10 fenced & cross fenced
acres, asphalt driveway Tile & wood
floors, dbl paned windows, custom built
in wood entertainment center $310,000


HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home,
1 bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean
w/circular driveway half way between
Crystal River and Homosassa 2 lots,
2 sheds, glassed in screen porch Fully


BEVERLY HILLS excellent condition,

landscaped, nice neighborhood of newer


LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of
3 mobile homes/buildings, center of
county, 1 well, 2 septics appointment
only One rented for $450/mo #703819


CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2 5 bath
D/W M/H by Skyline on 4 5 acres of land
Country kitchen, dining rm, family rmi,

P i' i l 1. 1 1 1 1. . ... .


I746.9OOO0

I Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty Yvonne Jenkins
BEST7 BROKERASSO.. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR REALTOR

- Sat % S 6 1 S
Realtor 611 __N RDG FRM


5518 N. ELKCAM
3/2/2 706451 $159,900


15 TAFT 8308 EROSKO S22S JACKSON 48 S. HARRISON 521S MONROE
2707828 $29000085 $39 900 22065950 21 707029 $49,000 2 0 40$9O0
3 51 4o N. L2/1/1 707140 $69,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


nIk


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 E9


CITRUS SPINGS


I c SRGS







E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


TEA
Continued from Pago ES

"I also know that it's 100
percent organic. I don't
use any chemicals to help
them grow, and I can taste
the difference."
It may sound daunting,
but British gardener and
author Cassie Liversidge
says many tea garden sta-
ples may already be at
your fingertips.
"Honeysuckle, mint,
rosemary They're all quite
common plants, but can be
turned into tea," says Liv-
ersidge, author of the
forthcoming book "Home-
grown Tea: An Illustrated
Guide to Planting, Har-
vesting and Blending Teas


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and Tisanes" (St. Martin's
Griffin, March 2014).
She and other tea gar-
deners offer the following
tips to get your feet wet:
First and foremost, no
sprawling English estate is
required here.
Tea gardens come in
many forms, and don't
even need to be in the
ground. Tang grows her
herbs in a vertical garden
hanging on a wall behind
her restaurants, while
other city dwellers
cramped for space use
pots and other containers.
All you need is dirt,
water and some seeds.
'A great way to get
started is to buy a plastic
indoor sun garden at
Lowe's or Home Depot,
along with the seeds and


pieces of dirt that expand
with water," says McCollo-
nough Ceili, a 26-year-old
author who grows laven-
der, sage, mint and other
herbs outside her kitchen
window in Tennessee.
Liversidge recommends
easy-to-grow plants like
mint, lavender or
chamomile for beginners.
If you've already got
those growing, take a stab
at other popular tea ingre-
dients like coriander,
lemon balm, rose hips, hi-
biscus and jasmine.
Keep the plants in an
area that gets at least six
hours of sunlight each day,
rotate them often and
monitor moisture per di-
rections on the seed
packet.
Each plant is unique


when it comes to harvesting.
The flower tops are the
most medicinal part of the
rosemary plant, for exam-
ple, so be sure to clip those
off along with the leaves
for tea, Liversidge says.
Fennel is valued for its
seeds, and those must be
shaken out from the flowers
once they turn brown. Snip
flowers like chamomile at
the base of their stems, not
the top, so you can use the
stems, leaves and petals in
your brew, according to Liv-
ersidge.
Many herbs can be used
fresh, but drying them is a
good way to keep your tea
cupboard stocked through
the winter
Tie them up and hang
them in bundles to dry, or
spread them out on a flat


surface in the sun. A dehy-
drator or an oven at a tem-
perature of 212 degrees
Fahrenheit or lower can
also be used.
"With my lemongrass, I
cut it and freeze it to keep
the nutrients locked in,"
says Tang.
No matter the method,
be sure to store your tea
ingredients in airtight
containers.
There are a few ways to
brew your homemade tea,
depending on the ingredi-
ents and personal
preference.
Hershey, Pa.-based
writer and photographer
Amy Renea prefers to
"chop off big hunks" of
fresh mint, lemon balm,
chamomile and sometimes
stevia from her tea garden


and put them right in the
tea kettle.
Once it's reached boil-
ing, pull the kettle off the
heat and let it sit for a few
minutes before pouring
into your favorite tea cup.
"I strain the tea through
a small tea mesh strainer,
but any strainer will do,"
Renea says.
Liversidge prefers fill-
ing empty tea bags with
homemade ingredients -
"then you're not tempted
to put too much water with
it" and letting them
steep about three minutes
before enjoying.
For the freshest tea pos-
sible, she advises pouring
fresh water into your tea
kettle every time. It has
more oxygen, which will
bring out the tea's flavor


TCe rra

REALTY GROUP


X Brnwo.eae


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Centet
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d of C DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
..i ,-at room with Maintenance free villa with an open floor plan design with great use
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR LAKEVIEWVILLAS ,',1 dining combo, DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS of the space. 3 bedroom, 2 bath villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry,
Nicely maintained Malibu model with great open floor plan on Golf A ", ,, ,tihen. Spacious Expanded Lantana model perfectly located on 1st tee of the Skyview living room, family room, formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed
Course homesite. This home has 2 bedrooms plus a den, which can bedrooms upstairs, master suite with walk-in closet. Nice open floor Golf Course. Professionally decorated, built-ins in living room, lanai, screened courtyard, 2 car oversized garage, all situated in
be used as a third bedroom. An outstanding home for year round or plan, screened lanai, professionally decorated, furniture negotiable surround sound, Cherry cabinets with roll-outs and so much more. beautiful Terra Vista
a vacation getaw ay. M LS 706854 ......................................$ 2 14 ,90 0 M LS 359587 ...........................................................................$ 1 19 ,0 0 0 M ove in ready! M LS 701779 .............................................. $ 2 59$ 259 ,00 0 M LS 703250............................................................ $ 17 9 ,0 0 0
Tem 6 Mots or More
Terr Vita rn wo dR nas Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


EXCEPTIONAL AND FABULOUS describe this 3 bedroom,
BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR (plus a den), 3 bath, 2 car, 5375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive
Brentwood Townhome. Beautifully furnished with everything you upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island
need including new carpet. Townhome features 2 bed/2.5 baths and kitchen great space for entertaining. Enloy a relaxing retreat on the
a 1 car oaraoe. The Terra Vista social club membership is Included, extended screened lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SLANDG


i LARGEST SELECTION OF I


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Carolina jessamine grows well in cultivated gardens with well-drained, sandy
soil that is acidic. The best feature is the masses of yellow, trumpet-shaped
flowers that are lightly fragrant.


A vine for winter:


Carolina jessamine


ne of the prettiest
vines that bloom
in winter is the na-
tive, evergreen yellow or
Carolina jessamine,
Gelsemium semper-
virens. It starts flowering
early in January and con-
tinues through to Febru-
ary locally It is the state
flower of South Carolina,
where it blooms later in
March or April.
There are only three


species in the
Gelsemium genus: one in
Asia and the other two in
the Southern states and
further south. They are
unique from a DNA
standpoint, so they have
recently been reclassi-
fied into their own fam-
ily, Gelseminacea.
Yellow jessamine
ranges from Virginia
See JANE/Page E14


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


WATERFRONT BANK OWNED WINNER!I '"
Remodeled 3/2/2 Pool home, almost 1/2 AC, BANK OWNED INVERNESS LAKEFRONT
$339,900. NEW roof, paint, flooring... dock, POOL HOME! 3/2/2, 1779 living, $125,990!
seawall, fencing, fireplace. 1005 N. Stoney. 9002 Gospel Island Rd. 705666. Tomika Spires-
#707116. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Hanssen tel: 352-586-6598


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 Ell








E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014





Real Estate

Classified


I


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966

'ClassiJieds

In Print

anid

Online

All

The Tinie


* ax(32) g. . . ..1Tll Free:( 2 : claE!.'IcIB ^hrm ilJM.I. e .c m j.w[Je w^ hoitoln^o


--I.

BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
V I


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, Very
clean DW3/2 New
carpet, shed, fenced,
$695.mo 352-419-1744
HOLDER
2bd/1 ba SW,
renovated, furnished,
call(352) 489-7061
LECANTO
3/2, Screened porch,
carport, shed. $625
(352) 795-7813




FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
2014 Models are here!
$8,500 Pre-
Construction Savings
John Lyons (a)
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale call for
details 877-499-8065
2br/2ba on approx 1
acre. New bath-
rooms, Ig screened
porch, dead end rd.
Minutes from Walmart
$49,900. 352-302-1383
DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER
3BR, 3Bath, includes
mother-in-law apt.
roof over, sheet rock,
on 3 lots, 2 sheds,
waterfront $38,000
(217) 474-7727
FLORAL CITY
2BR/1 /2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
HOMOSASSA
Large 3BR/2BA DW,on
large lot. New carpet,
Freshly painted inside
$3500 to move in
RENT To OWN
3402 S Aberdeen Ter
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330
LECANTO $42,500
3bd/2ba, %/ acre,
new c/h/a & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond.
(352) 621-3929
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-2377
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 114 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then %
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512




*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984


FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356
Floral City, DW,
2bd/lba, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726

For Sale .

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858


Stonebrook 2Br/2Ba
1400 sq ft. Enclosed
screened room with
A/C, overlooks pond.
Pantry, full equipped
Kitchen, wood burn-
ing FP in living room.
Den & DR furniture.
Laundry room & W/D;
Shed with sink &
freezer. Partially fur-
nished. Too many
extra's to list. $25,000
8323 W Charmaine Dr.
Homasassa, Fl
must see to
appreciate
615-692- 4045
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




1 ACRE MOBILE HOME
LOT. Owner Financina.
Has Well, Septic, Im-
pact Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 746-7990


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?


1032 Bucknell 3/2/2.v..$850
3359 Glen3/2/2................$875
6677 Hampton 3/2/2.V .$875
VILLA
68 Heron Creek 2/2....$700
454 Landing Blvd 2/21h,$650

3726 Honeylocust 2/2/1. $650
216 S Lincoln 2/1,5/1,.,,$650

70 Lynnhaven 3/2/2.v..$900
518 Glenhaven4/2/2....$800
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
SRealtor-Associates
352 -726-9010


-AfION0
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
S875 & UNDER
8410 N Elkcam Blvd.
3/2/1 New listing!
6973 N Gladstone Dr.
3/2/2 Sphlit floor plan 1515 sq ft.
1063 N. Commerce Terr.
2/1 Furnished Apt. Cop on Uhites.
6441 W. Rosedale Dr.
2/2/1 Available soon.
S550 & UNDER
2278 S. Sandburg Pt.
2/1 Nice, clean duplex.
7650W Homosassa Trl.
2/1 nice duplex.
6383 S. Tompaul Terr.
1/1 Cozy ond Quiet
For More Listings Go To
www.OtrusountyHomieRentals.mnm









.Inc

1 4 BE DROOMfS1 f
ALLAiREAS
Call Fo D ['B etalsJ Il


Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."

HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds. garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393

INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio in
quiet area. $525/mo +
$525 Sec; 2/2 large
screened patio. Beauti-
ful Ig apt completely tiled
on cul-de-sac. $600/mo
+ sec. 352-344-0238


Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694


Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Inverness
At the
Washington
Square Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-726-4397
TTY800-233-6694


6,rA
1-11- Ldfl I


Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Wildwood
At the
Wildwood
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-748-0047
TTY800-233-6694



[,,,g ; i..


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD



^^ OPPOT Ir t





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incd Water lawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276




CITRUS HILLS
Cottage unit, unfurn.,
2/2 with carport.
Membership
included $650 mo.
352-302-3705




CRYSTAL RIVER








Fully Furnished
lawn, $475. mo.+ $300
sec. 352-212-9205, or
(352) 212-7922

Eff~ficiScl


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new
appliances Move in
$1350, 442-7794
INV. S. Highlands
2/2/2, Pool, $850. mo.
(267) 250-4499
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2
$725mo & Sec
(352) 895-0744

INVERNESS
Highlands, 3/2/2
$700 mo + dep.
(352) 422-6978


INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850.
352-726-7212
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inverness 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
OLD HOMOSASSA
Very Nice 1/1 unfurn,
no pets/smoking
$550/mo, LT lease
water/garbage incld.
941-730-2359




CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse 3900 SqFt
with 550 SqFt office.
Gulf Storage,1424 N
GulfAve,One mile East
of Rt 484 & Rt 44 inter-
section, beside Gulf to
Lake Church. $4 sqft for
2 year lease, shorter
available. 352 302 1935




1.84 Acres with 3
State Views!
Prime, wooded,
mountaintop acre-
age with majestic
three state views.
EZ access to US
National Forest.
Incredible 4 season
recreation.
Paved roads, under-
ground power, fiber
optic cable, munici-
pal water. Perfect for
primary/ vacation/
retirement home.
Just $24,900! Only
one, won't last.
Call now
866-952-5303, x120

3 STATE VIEWS!
Nat'l Forest Access.
1.84 AC-$24,900
Prime, wooded,
mountaintop acre-
age with majestic
three state views. EZ
access US National
Forest. Incredible 4
season recreation.
Paved roads, under-
ground power, fiber
optic cable & munici-
pal water. Perfect for
primary/,acador~reJrement
home Excellent
financing. Only one
available, won't last.
Call owner now
866-952-5303, x120.


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE
REALTY ONE


DEB
THOMPSON

w One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebS)vahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


`0T


RelEtt








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





BEVERLY HILLS, 12p-3p
Sun. 58S .OsceolaSt
REMODELED Imperial.
2/2/1. $59K 527-1239

INVERNESS
10506 E. Joy Lane
Sun. Jan. 26, 12-3pm
2/2/2 new flooring,
cabinets, granite,
windows, $77,500
Ron Mayer, Realtor
352-634-1337
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty





ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


Beverfly Hgi



2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
REMODELED
MOVE-IN READY
$59k.
352-527-1239


Real Estate is MY
Business!!
15+ Years Exp

Teri Paduano
Broker/Owner


Realty
Connect
Masonic Business Ctr
111W Main St, #311
Inverness, FL
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com





4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

3/2
1/4 Acre MOL
on River Oak Lane
Inverness
Glamour bath
Eat-in Kitchen
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Nice Double Lot
3A Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inverness 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM





4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
back yard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 14 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009






2Br/2Ba/1CG home
on approx 1 ac. land
Owner Financed
$80,000, w/$5,000
down. No qualifying
(305) 891-2323


AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFWMI
REALTY ONE






3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


4BR/1% BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


IAIVII V lu I I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY !






For Sale6 ,
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell





4BR/2BA, 2400 Sq ft.
pool home, add'l heat
pump. Well maintained
Pine St. Fully Furnished
$225,000
(352) 382-5298


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351






r- I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245*


Hme


Hoe




I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

SRI great values
out
there for buy-
ers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office



Anu^1w





INVERNESS
Spectacular
Country Charmer!
4/2.5/2 home on lovely
acre with absolutely
every extra added inc.
whole house generator
MLS 705002 $299,900

BEVERLY HILLS
Lovely 2/2/2 in newer
area of Beverly Hills
Newer roof, brand new
A/C system, upgraded
kitchen with new SS
appliances. MUST SEE!
MLS 707667 $88,900
000_______ OH75Z












BETMY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt(
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


CitrusjCount


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855












Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com







"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002






For Sale ,

Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some furn, new Lanai
& Lam, ceramic floors.
$48,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCboast
Proqerties.com
"To view
my properties"





A Guaranteed Offer
in 48 Hours! We Buy
Homes!
www.dbuvshomes.com
800-741-6876


Whispering Pines Villa
INVERNESS
2/2/1, NEW Carpet, Tile,
Paint, All appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900. 352-726-8712




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


BUYING HOMES
In Need of TLC, Fair
Pricing, Fast Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271





FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre.land survey &
clear title.assessed at
$23,800.power and
homes in area. ASKING
$8,500. 813-792-1355






GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-S30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
Call 352-527-2711




to
w

In ~S














How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise

in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!







(352) 563-5966


CI IIN) (IClI.

www.chronicleonline.com


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 E13







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ANE leaf no
JANE roots ar
the mail
Continued from Page Ell ered fro
sulting i
south to Florida, west to plant. T
Texas and Oklahoma, and will be
wanders south as far as parent.
Guatemala in Central in pots
America. It grows in cold where
hardiness zones 6 to 11. Its Extra i
natural habitat is in wood- needed
lands, flatwoods and on establish]
hammocks. The b
Jessamine grows well in masses (
cultivated gardens with shaped
well-drained, sandy soil lightly fi
that is acidic. It grows in ers are
full sun to part shade. It is twining
a twining vine that will at the 1
climb 20 feet up a tree or long-live
over a fence, trellis or do not pi
arbor ers. You
It naturally spreads prolific
over the ground and will samine
send down roots at the without



CACTUS
Continued from Page E5

sap has been implicated as a poten-
tial carcinogen and, if it gets in the
eyes, is said to cause temporary
blindness. At the very least, it is
somewhat toxic and irritates skin, as
does the sap of many spurge family
plants.
Making new plants
All that is necessary to get a pencil
cactus started is to snap a few stems,
each 2 or 3 inches long, from an ex-
isting plant (again, avoiding touch-
ing the sap). My pencil cactus
cuttings came from a living fence I
happened upon during a recent visit
to Florida.
There was no need to keep those
cuttings moist until I returned
home because this plant, like all
succulents, roots best if its cut ends
are allowed to callous over in dry
air before being put in soil. So it
wasn't until I brought my cuttings
home that I stuck them into pots of
soil, watered them, and then
waited each time until the soil was
thoroughly dry before watering
again.
Growing this pencil
Where winter temperatures don't
drop below freezing, pencil cactus
can grow outdoors as high as 30 feet.
There, the dense tangle of stems and


des. Once these
e well established,
i stem can be sev-
im the parent, re-
n an independent
hese small plants
identical to the
[hey can be grown
or relocated else-
in the garden.
irrigation is not
once the plant is
hed.
est feature is the
)f yellow, trumpet-
flowers that are
'agrant. The flow-
borne along the
reddish stems and
tips. The vine is
d, and older stems
produce many flow-
nger stems flower
illy. While Jes-
would be happy
pruning, it can be


pruned annually immedi-
ately after flowering stops
in February or March lo-
cally in north central
Florida.
Leaves are shiny, dark
green on top, opposite in
pairs along the stems, 1 to
4 inches long, narrow,
lance-shaped and pointed
at the tips. As the plant
grows, it sheds its lower,
older leaves. These leaves
are usually shed so the old
woody plant stem becomes
leafless below, with a ram-
pant mass of dense green
growth above climbing
over the support structure
or tree.
It looks quite spectacu-
lar on a mature longleaf
pine, where the reddish
stems twine up the sturdy
trunk between the large
plates of pine bark. Once


a sap that virtually every animal
avoids make the plant an ideal liv-
ing fence.
Where winters are too cold to
grow pencil cactus outdoors, it
makes a nice houseplant (keeping in
mind the cautions about the sap). As
a succulent, the plant loves light but
otherwise tolerates the threats fac-
ing most houseplants: dry air and
forgetful watering. If in doubt about
whether or not to water this plant,
don't. It won't die from under-water-
ing. Taper off or completely avoid
watering in winter Extra perlite
added to any potting mix further en-
sures that the mix drains well and
stays on the dry side.
One variety that's particularly at-
tractive indoors or out is "Sticks on
Fire." Its "pencils" are reddish yel-
low, the red becoming more promi-
nent in cooler weather
Once my pencil cactus plants take
root and begin to grow, I may leave
them to grow freely like a jumble of
branching "pencils" in their pots.
Or perhaps I'll coax them with
pruning and bending into a living
sculpture. Perhaps I'll pot them up
with a candelabra cactus, another
sculptural spurge (Euphorbia
lactea, also erroneously called a
cactus), which has fat, three-sided,
dark green stems with thorns along
the ridges.
No matter how I grow my new
pencil cactus, I'll be careful to avoid
the sap.


the jessamine reaches 10
feet high or more, the
twisted stems cascade
downward like lush green
garlands spangled with
yellow flowers in season.
A well-appointed natural
garden has room for sev-
eral different species of
vines that flower at differ-
ent times and seasons.
Companion vines include
evergreen native coral
honeysuckle, Lonicera
sempervirens, that flowers
all spring and summer;
perennial but frost-tender
(therefore deciduous) pas-
sionvines, Passiflora
species, including hybrids
that flower in late spring
through to fall and are host
to several butterfly catter-
pillars; the woody decidu-
ous Virginia creeper, also
called woodbine, Partheno-


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Citrus County Chronicle
has forms available for
wedding and engagement
announcements, anniver-
saries, birth announcements
and first birthdays.


sisus cinquefolia, that turns
brilliant scarlet red in the
fall; and the exotic, Decem-
ber-flowering orange or yel-
low Cape honeysuckle,
Tecomaria capensis, native
to South Africa.
Several named
Jelsemium varieties have
been developed which are
readily available in pri-
vate nurseries and big box
stores. The flowering sea-
son lasts about a month.
After that, Gelsemium will


be hard to find at all ex-
cept at smaller nurseries
and native plant outlets.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


KEY "Always There For You"
REY GAIL COOPER
Multimillion Dollar Realtor
( (352) 634-4346
R ~ Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


CABANA COURTYARD POOL HOME! ENJOY POOL WITH TOTAL PRIVACY!
S3+office/3 solar heated pool home 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 3-car side entry garage
S2-car side entry garage with 11 'x1 2' bump out Over 2900 square feet of living
SCorian island kitchen has nook Heated pool extended lanai with speakers
SWell for irrigation security system Corian and upgraded cabinetry in all baths
SAC/heat new in 2011 Zodiac with maple cabinetry in kitchen
SHome set on 2 landscaped lots Two AC/heat systems for efficiency
| Third bay area has air conditioned office Master has 2 walk-in closets
| Extra large glassed Florida room 2 pull down stairs in garage for added storage
#706972 $289,900 #701153 $308,900
See .Virtual Tour @ [ .II[.res .alIeho e,.-m.. B.I.I


E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


L==::






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STUFF
Continued from Page E4

want top dollar and then
the item sits for months
until it hits the half-price
table. There are several
consignment shops in Cit-
rus County
Retail shops: End of the
line. Quality comes first
here, as these shops will buy
your items outright How-
ever, if glassware is chipped
or cracked, don't bother If
furniture needs refinishing
or, for example, has a bro-
ken leg, don't bother As a re-
sult of their "quality-first"
approach, they can pay
more for your items.
Having been a dealer in


antiques for 35 years, you
can imagine how much stuff
has passed through my
hands and how much has
been accumulated! But the
best things are the many
wonderful people I have
met and still have as
friends, from fellow dealers
to the owners of the objects
that I have bought and sold.
It has been a pleasure to
help people figure out how
to let their treasures go
and to then pass them into
the hands of others who
will hold and love them
too. Life is good indeed!


Steve Barnes owns and,
along with his shop dog
Gypsy, operates Olde
Inverness Antiques.


SCAROLE LISTER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: 422-4620 ...
ER.A Office: 382-1700

OPE HOUSES-9
JANUARY 26, 2041:03:0


*.-. ,- ;,.)M, ,..;":*"' ", :,.
46 BEECH STREET
*3/2/2+ 1 AcGClot
SSolar heated pool Eat-in kitchen
* Cathedral ceilings Corian
* Well for yard Oversized garage
#704737 $239,900


SY HAW I hIUKNrE I.
S3/2/2 Pool
* Family room Walk-in wet bar
* Morning room Hardwood floors
* 2 Walk-in closets Garden tub + shower
#707215 $164,900


Ready for winter veggies?


Last January Master Gardener Plant Clinic this week


Special to the Chronicle

We are fortunate in Citrus County
to be able to vegetable garden year-
round as long as you know what
and when to plant.
The January free Master Gar-
dener Plant Clinics will focus on
vegetable gardening and will an-


swer questions not only about what
and when to plant, but also how and
where.
The remaining class for January
is 2 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the
Homosassa Library
There will be no plant clinic in
Floral City in January
Bring samples and questions to


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
ExecLutive Office Suites
New ConstrIuction Class "A" Office
Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
Call (352) 795-7007


_ _.ir..!.j i -,


PINE RIDGE I
ESTATES
Elegant custom built 3/4/3 Pool

sophisticated Ilfestyle
$469,000


GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220.0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com



Investors Realty B
of Citrus County, Inc.
jkF ywebsite at: w w.mnyflorida-house.con


the free clinics.
Master gardener volunteers will
be happy to answer your gardening
questions. The master gardener
phone numbers at the extension of-
fice are 352-527-5709 or 352-527-
5711. Email MasterGl@bocc.citrus.
flus or MasterG2@bocc.citrus.
flus.


ffATTENTION
il ;'" ; ':2 INVESTORS!
l Perfect location close
to all Crystal River
schools and area
amenities Good
rental history Needs some TLC 3/2 with eat in kitchen, laun-
dry room, patio and one car carport City limits, with central EVELYN
water and sewer $45,000. MLS#705012
GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE YOUR CURRENCY
WATERFRONT DREAM! REALTOR
Home on deep water
canal with shor ride CELL
to the Crystal River 352-634-1861
and Gulf Four bed
rooms, two baths, OFFICE
22' :, 11... 352-795-0021
screenedpc i :,i,., Elevation builtto i i, 3 52 ,9-2
diamond ii .. i o ii id needs some TLC to pool and pool FAX 352-795-1323
deck New i i "i:.A/C2010 85'of seawall Watchwon- evelnsrencentu21 cnm
derful Mother Nature right in your backyard with dolphins, mana- Aweel|nur|[omn
tees, bald eagles and bass and mullet jumping Home is ADA
compliant also Come and take a look $299,500 MLS#704254 EACH OFFICEISINDEPENDENTLY
A R OWNED AND OPERATED
__1 a., NATURE COAST 835 NE Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34429


'IIVMII VILW UVILU LII LII Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home n a acr(
1 2 ac (160 x 300+ f ), picturesque corner lot with mature oak trees an
setting with major oak trees Charming lots of privacy Very well maintained
bric home, first time offered, some,, ,
original fixtures and fireplace still in
place Large det gar w/workshop,
seawall $159,900 $169,000


I www.listerlistings.com


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014 E15








E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* ON THE OAKS GOLF COURSE
* .,. .ilr. POO L r....-..


* Ijh... I h.I' I.IN ..hr.ll'jl..ll.I-
Mil'.- = iii.i,') $194,600
Jeanne ot Ii'llaid Pickiel 3522123410
izi'iz'iz CiliusCounti Sold corn


YOU'LL BE IMPRESSED
i ,,,.,,,,,, ,,,,,l I .
II I i ,,,- II' ,, "

I" I ,,ii h ,,I,,hll ,ll 1 ,111 1 l l i- i ,, I II I I,
1111 ,, Iiii ,, i h ,,, ,I,,,l ii, i,-,,, I i, ,- hI ',

ri: =I:i44: ASKING $114.900
Pt Di, 4,352' 212 7280
rI'l h.- t .n 1. t inn l v2 d?,4 1om


MOBILES IN PARKS!
THIS MAY BE THE WAY TO GO!
S8.000 TO S29.000
HiiF.Nlhll hIIhl.- l fl.Nii H Fl _H I_ l WITH
F1.ijiM hIf F. All ''jl) IF. fAV lF. ITf TI 0'i _
_ WM fl.II ,I H l._I-I h II)W Il_)T IhfNTi
Call Dos Minet lot mote into.
352 726 6668 o1 352422.4627


mi n i'rmiMIiImn nunam IHHIL
ii1,111 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ,, ,, I g.. . I i ,h I I ........1111
h ..l~ l .... .. ~ l l.. .... i l, i ~ l h I ,


Il: =-ii'.':'. $255,000
Cil Jm Hgloilon 422 2173
t.J toJut /h'" pt?/"/'r"*? ,;.niluntl








MOVE-IN READY!
Bn ; 1 1(:11d I l _" blh 111h 1. 1 m llh
i~ ~~ c/ 1 i 1 l ii 1 ,ii i .v, II pil 7 Altlii

iqp.l.i ,, 11I11/ A 11.ii ,i, .ipp.l hiH iii hm i
I.. l1 61 h ji, l ,:jp i[ ll l ll l
Ml h) =/11i,. 1,ASKING $69.900
Contact IVanc' Jenks
352 400 8072 ai 352 7266668


" lI, ll. j, .)), 1H. H 1.1 1~I, ,, I, ll I I
HI .. H .-... ......


l1. :-l:- : $63,000
C1 lhI 1 Sni dti 352 476 8727


NICE 2/2/2 IN
CANTERBURY LAKES ESTATES

I& ~bl jm" i"v ..J .. Iau h.m .i"JI,


HI-iiiii.iiiui IH. i lljlbh..u.
ML-. = J4. REDUCED TO S87.900
Call Slelan SluaiI at 3522120211


WITH PUBLIC WATER!
, 1 h:4, 1 l- l ,:ilV ,:i l .-i li.ai
h ii,:ii ]: ill i f ,lil iii.: i.:., .i i .. l..:.hh ..


ONLY $107K
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


INVERNESS
3/2/1 ON ALMOST 1/2 ACRE
ONLY $62.900

uadl Fi sei 32 l 302i 699j
.: I iI ,. b p311 1..)I i n.] b.0 1 ;

Ouade Foesei 352.302.7699


i . l i l ....ip ,l 1, _, -, . . b . .


hv. ,, a. v. b l .- mJiI .h. ,all.iJ

ML'. = '1/.. ASKING $79,500
Call Tem SlelvaaI 220 1008


- I-/11 l ll 1-11111 I-MI I 11,- IIh .
ji : . . : i ..... .... 1 i .I ......I I..

j,1 ., il ..l WI v -.1. 1... J Iv. v ..I d v. l iil
I 1. 1,., 1|,1 f. 1 ,|,, i ,t :H I. .

rl: =,"... ASKING $194.900
Pat Da, ,352 212 7280
P HO L .t .. 21p-da,,r4 6.Om


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4PM


WELCOME HOME!!
I l I,. i ,. .i ,1,1 P.

.. i d h , d h d l.... ... ..... .. .. ,. .....
h ,,1 iIi I, 11 ,,


rli: 1 :, 1 ASKING $88,900
Pit O l ,362' 212 7280
I.i 51--.y i! i L liaIM sci


1i 6 .1..1. 11.. 1..

I , hh I..... mi, I. I I, I, .. I,. 1, ,

PRICED FAR BELOW REPLACEMENT AT S218.900
PI' Il, ,,N 'I' '2Sil, h
I, l l h h r,,,', l i ,,',,h ii, I h, ,i, "''1'


SPACIOUS HOME

i ,,,t HI. 1- l ,: a 1. 1 lj, ,: I. . I" ,
..., HI.._ :, i: I',:.a...1l.... ,:i l .- l,: ,l H
I-.iH..11: lii ld i I. al. V :l HIh.- Ii..-:ai
$169,900
Call me Ruth Fiedeick I 3525636866


wow 1.1 "-I- itln~

Iu ii.:. I ,, i .I Il IIh. l 1:i 11:11:1 ai.: l .
VV Hil.a, ii.:.:..:-.- 'Hl.-l IiiH.- H aiil lii a HIl
llH, /l ,il'HH~ll,: "llI l I H,: ,HHH l Hll'll l h uh HpII ..H.Ii.
ML = 'Ax:l ASKING $850,000
Call Jim Motion to lout 422 2173


V I II .I i.J.d .1 1 . lh6 1 i. l .6 f l .i. b, I. .
]A.:..:i) _i lil ll..I, lIIII.|IJ|M.I|I h ,ilO) ,,Ill % Ii:
l, . I,,,l . I.l :.,, I. .., ,.:i- ll l,:,- i.l .i
|,^, il'i| i'i-h:l ni-i M:. i-ini
Mvl.-. ^.:. ASKING $158,000
C ,IIl ,jI Ji t., 362 JitS ql;2t', 162 26 666S q


12250 E. WILDBOAR TRAIL F.C.
I All I-iJ IIIF.h l I IJ|N _

Milid =1i1ie"l $39,500
Willaid Pickiel 3522019871


SUGARMILL WOODS GOLF COURSE!
I ;1- ,,,,, ,r i ,, 6 C- ,u,'
I V iii l 1" 1.. iq 111I I hi I. 1ll,,,,I
* II,', I I,1 1...
I I ,,, I
rl JUST REDUCED TO S50u.uuu00
f.-, ,i.,',i,,w ,,h ..l. it t ,s C At,, m u 6,'-ie,
4s._$i.... ne 'i lf 00 M ;"


I I-