Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03371

Full Text


Positive early results: Freshman McColley excels 1


Partly cloudy,
windy and cold.
PAGE A4


CITRON CIUNT Y





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www.chronicleonline.com'
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOL. 119 ISSUE 170


Woman who
died in fire
identified
CITRUS SPRINGS -
The Medical Examiner's
Office has identified the
woman killed in a week-
end fire.
The deceased is
Melody Nugent, 63.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Division of Fire
Rescue was dispatched
to Nugent's rental home
at 8595 N. Golfview Drive
at about 11:47 p.m. Sat-
urday and arrived to find
the home fully involved.
Nugent's neighbors ad-
vised firefighters that the
home possibly was occu-
pied by an elderly woman
who had been seen there
the previous day and that
Nugent was unable to
move around very well.
A search after the fire
was brought under con-
trol confirmed the pres-
ence of an occupant and
the release of her identity
was withheld pending the
notification of next of kin.
The origin and the
cause of the fire are
under investigation by the
State Fire Marshal's
Office.
-From staff reports


STATE & LOCAL:


Leaders
Members of the Youth
Leadership Citrus tour
criminal justice sites in
the county./Page A3
ON THE SCENE:


Nutty
The animated film "The
Nut Job" features a host
of celebrity voices.
/Page Cl


Classifieds ....... C10
Comics .......... C9
Community ... .C6, C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C9
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C8


6 II JI 1212U!1151 I1 5


Teaching excellence


2__" It.i .i 1111 1
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Alex Stubenbort, seen here with his wife Lindsey, was named Teacher of the Year Thursday at the Galaxy of Stars banquet at the College
of Central Florida in Lecanto. Stubenbort is a Language Arts teacher at Lecanto Middle School.


School district recognizes Teacher,

Support Person of the Year


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
LECANTO A galaxy of stars
were in the eyes of 48 Citrus
County School District employees
who awaited the calling of their
names Thursday night.
One by one they each proudly
stood on stage as their profiles
were read aloud at the annual
Galaxy of Stars event honoring the
2015 Teacher of the Year and 2014
School-Related Employee of the
Year at the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.


After all nominees were recog-
nized, the moment that they had all
waited for arrived announce-
ment of the Teacher and School-
Related Employee of the Year
"Citrus County School District
proudly recognizes Citrus County's
Schools 2015 Teacher of the Year
Alex Stubenbort," said Superin-
tendent Sandra "Sam" Himmel.
Sounds of gasps and cheers were
heard from the audience as
Stubenbort, language arts teacher
at Lecanto Middle School,
See Page A2


Colleen Fuller, from Central Ridge Elementary School, was
named the 2014 School-Related Employee of the Year at
the Galaxy of Stars banquet Thursday night at the College
of Central Florida in Lecanto.


CCHB settles Nemzoff suit


Taxpayers out

nearly $500,000
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The Citrus County Hospital
Board's hiring and subse-
quent firing of transaction
consultant Joshua Nemzoff
will cost county taxpayers
close to $500,000 following
final approval of a lawsuit set-
tlement Wednesday night.
The hospital board will pay
Nemzoff $700,000 to settle a


federal law-
suit that Nem-
zoff filed in
response to
his July firing.
In return,
Nemzoff's at-
torney deliv-
ered more
Nemzoff than 2,000
emails that
consultant. CCHB officials
said triggered
Nemzoff's dismissal.
CCHB trustees had ap-
proved the settlement two
weeks ago contingent on ap-
proval from Citrus Memorial


hospital's insurer, which also
covers the CCHB. At the time,
hospital board attorney Bill
Grant said he was confident
the insurer, AIG, would pick up
not only the settlement amount
but also an estimated $108,000
in attorney's fees.
Instead, AIG informed the
CCHB Thursday that it would
pay $325,000, Grant told
trustees.


The insu
vided the C
cial docui
payout inte
that, the h(


Report: Police pursuit ends in


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
What started out as a DUI in-
vestigation Wednesday night
turned into a wild chase on the
east side of the county and
ended in a lake.
Stephen Michael Cabral, 63,
of Jacksonville, was arrested


and charged with resisting an
officer without violence, ag-
gravated battery on a law en-
forcement officer, DUI and
fleeing and eluding. His bond
is $7,500.
Deputy Todd Holloway was
investigating a possible DUI
after someone called and said
they saw a man walking in the


middle of th
peared into
the man the
vehicle and
Moments
spotted a v
witness' des
The car was


Gov't panel

urges end

to phone

data spying

Associated Press


rer has not pro- WASHINGTON-A government re-
'CHB with an offi- view panel warned Thursday that the
mnent stating its National Security
nt. When it does Agency's daily collec-
ospital board may tion of Americans'
See Page A2 phone records is ille-
gal and recommended
that President Barack
Obama abandon the
at er program and destroy
i w ate the hundreds of mil-
lions of phone records Barack
it has already col- Obama
ie road and he ap- elected. president said
xicated. They said The recommenda- bulk phone
en got back into a tions by the Privacy collection
drove off. and Civil Liberties program would
later, Holloway Oversight Board go
vehicle that fit the further than Obama is willing to accept
scription of the car and increase pressure on Congress to
parked on the side make changes.


See Page A7


See Page A2


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A2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


NSA
Continued from PageAl

The panel's 234-page re-
port included dissents
from two of the board's
five members former
Bush administration na-
tional security lawyers
who recommended that
the government keep col-
lecting the phone records.
The board described key
parts of its report to
Obama this month before
he announced his
plans last week to
change the govern-
ment's surveil- ,-
lance activities.
In that speech,
Obama said the
bulk phone collec-
tion program
would continue for Edw
the time being. He Sno
directed the Jus- lea
docume
tice Department brought
and intelligence data r
officials to find opera
ways to end the
government's control over
the phone data. He also in-
sisting on close supervi-
sion by a secretive federal
intelligence court and re-
ducing the breadth of
phone records the NSA
can investigate. Phone
companies have said they



AWARDS
Continued from PageAl

collected his poise and
walked to the stage to re-
ceive his award.
"What am I doing up
here?" Stubenbort asked
in disbelief as he was lost
for words. "I'm not going to
name any names but the
love of my life my wife.
It is incredible that years
ago I didn't know neces-
sarily what I wanted to do.
I just knew that I loved
working alongside kids.
Now, I am standing in front
of the classroom every day
and am taught by them. We
learn so many things from
the children on a daily
basis and it is a pleasure.
And now to get an award is
just icing on the cake. I am


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


We have to be careful that
secret law does not creep
into our jurisprudence.
Patricia Wald
board member and former chief federal appeals court judge.


do not want to take re-
sponsibility for overseeing
the data under standards
set by the NSA.
In addition to conclud-
ing that the daily collec-
tion of phone records was
illegal, the board
also determined
that the practice
was ineffective.
"We have not
Identified a single
instance involving
a threat to the
United States in
'ard which the program
vden made a concrete
ked difference in the
nts that outcome of a coun-
to light
dining terterrorism inves-
tions, tigation," it said,
and added, "We
are aware of no instance in
which the program di-
rectly contributed to the
discovery of a previously
unknown terrorist plot or
the disruption of a terror-
ist attack."
It said the NSA should
instead seek individual


lost for words. Thank you
so much."
The 2014 School-Re-
lated Employee of the
Year Colleen Fuller, para-
professional from Central
Ridge Elementary School,
was overtaken by emotions
as her name was
announced.
"I don't know what to
say," Fuller said as emo-
tion showed on her face.



www .1 Larn
Vin,


www.cashcarpi


records relevant to terror
cases directly from phone
service providers under
existing laws.
"Given the limited re-
sults, we concluded the pro-
gram should be ended,"
said board member James
Dempsey of the Center for
Democracy and Technology,
a civil liberties group.
Dempsey and another
board member, former
chief federal appeals court
judge Patricia Wald, also
said the phone sweeps did
not appear to have clear or
strong legal grounding in
the USA Patriot Act the
statute overseeing the gov-
ernment's surveillance
activities.
"We have to be careful
that secret law does not
creep into our jurispru-
dence," Wald said.
The board wrote that the
phone surveillance did not
have a "viable legal foun-
dation" under the Patriot
Act, which was used to
provide legal backing for


"I love my job, my school
and my students. It has
been the best experience
of my life and I have had
many jobs. I am one of
those people that moves
on if I am not happy
Also, not to be conceited,
I am very talented. I have
wiped my hand in just
about everything. This
has been the most fun I
have ever had. To this





ietandte.com
irpetA

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letandtile.com


the operation after it was
secretly authorized by
President George W Bush.
The board also said the
surveillance raised consti-
tutional concerns about
unreasonable searches,
free speech and freedom
of the press. Two federal
judges have split in recent
rulings over the constitu-
tionality of the government
collecting Americans'
phone records in such a
wholesale way
The White House dis-
agreed with the oversight
board. "The administration
believes the program is
lawful," said national secu-
rity spokeswoman Caitlin
Hayden. She added that
Obama "believes we can
and should make changes
in the program that will
give the American people
greater confidence in it"
The board's recommen-
dation to delete its copies
of everyone's phone
records is one area that
Obama sidestepped in his
speech what to do with
the mountainous elec-
tronic database amassed
by the NSA since shortly
after the 9/11 attacks. Na-
tional security officials
have a legal review to be
finished by March should
decide how long to keep
the phone records.


day I say, 'Oh my gosh
they pay me to do this.' I
sat there praying for
whoever got it and I can-
not believe it was me.
Thank you so very
much."
Stubenbort and Fuller
each received a plaque
from the district and
$500 from the Citrus
County Education
Foundation.


SETTLE
Continued from Page Al

either accept the pay-
ment or reject it in hopes
of receiving a higher
figure.
That leaves the hospi-
tal board on the hook for
$484,000 in the
Nemzoff The (
settlement.
The CCHB fir
hired Nemzoff Nern
in April as its
consultant for Sayir
the Citrus Me-
morial hospital violate
transaction.
The contract sta
was to pay him Sunm
$775,000 in
$20,000 monthly La
increments and
all remaining Nen
money due at
contract signing sue
with the sue- CCH
cessful bidder
In July, after fed(
Nemzoff had
secured four COI
bidders, the
CCHB fired him in a pub-
lic records dispute.
Inverness resident
Robert Schweickert Jr
requested emails be-
tween Nemzoff and all
potential bidders, plus
between Nemzoff and the
Citrus County Chronicle.
Grant made the re-
quest of Nemzoff. At first
Nemzoff refused, and
then offered to provide
the records to Grant for
$12,000. Nemzoff's attor-


Wa


ney said the amount cov-
ered the cost of research-
ing Nemzoff's database
to find thousands of
emails.
The CCHB fired Nem-
zoff, saying he violated
the state's Sunshine Law
Nemzoff sued the CCHB
in federal court
Schweickert, backed by
an attorney
CCHB with the
Florida First
ed Amendment
nzoff Foundation,
sued both the
ig he CCHB and
Nemzoff for the
ed the documents.
Grant said
te's the hospital
shine board is in the
process of set-
|W. tling the
Schweickert
izoff case by provid-
ing the emails
Sthe to him. Grant
lB in said two weeks
ago the CCHB
eral would be pay-
ing Schweick-
urt. ert's attorney's
fees, which he
estimated at $31,000.
The Nemzoff settle-
ment states neither party
will speak ill of the other
It includes a prepared
statement, with both
Nemzoff and CCHB
Chairwoman Debbie
Ressler stating they are
pleased to see the case
settled.
Contact Chronicle re-
porterMike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Hospital chain merger moves forward


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

The pending merger of Health
Management Associates, parent
company of Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center, with Com-
munity Health Systems cleared
another hurdle this week.
Wednesday the Federal Trade
Commission announced condi-
tions for accepting the settle-
ment and set a 30-day period for
public comment.
The merger would create the
nation's largest chain of hospitals


by number The estimated $7.6 bil-
lion deal will expand CHS's pres-
ence in Florida, affecting about
two dozen medical facilities in ad-
dition to Seven Rivers, located
just north of Crystal River
Merger plans were announced
last July At the time, HMA was
one of the bidders for Citrus
County Memorial Health System
in Inverness.
Under the conditions, CHS is
required to divest two acute-care
facilities and related outpatient
businesses currently owned by
subsidiaries of HMA in Alabama


and South Carolina to avoid elim-
inating local competition in those
markets.
Tennessee-based CHS is a for-
profit health system that owns
135 hospitals in 29 states. It is the
second-largest hospital chain in
the United States and generated
about $13 billion in revenue in
2012.
HMA is a for-profit health sys-
tem headquartered in Naples
that owns 71 hospitals in 15
states. In 2012, HMA generated
$5.9 billion in revenue.
HMA stockholders voted to


approve the merger earlier this
month.
"The most important thing to
know about this transaction is
that it will not impact our day-to-
day business," Joyce Brancato,
Seven Rivers chief executive of-
ficer, said at the time. "We are
dedicated to delivering the high-
est quality of care with a focus on
continuing improvement. Our
patients remain our number one
priority"
HMA has owned Seven Rivers
since 2003. It currently owns or
leases 23 hospitals in Florida, 71


nationwide, including Brooksville
Regional Hospital and Spring Hill
Regional Hospital.
CHS is now set to sign a 40-
year lease with Munroe Re-
gional Medical Center in Ocala,
a transaction negotiated earlier
with HMA.
According to the CHS website,
it encourages hospitals to main-
tain their local identity and does
not brand hospitals as being af-
filiated with CHS.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


Around the

COUNTY

Republicans to host
Schweickert
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will meet at
9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, at
the Hampton Inn, Crystal
River. Coffee social, with
breakfast available for $5,
will be at 8 a.m.
Guest speaker will be
Bob Schweickert. He will
present "groundhog
research."
For more information, call
Connie at 352-746-7249.
POW events
scheduled
From 4 p.m. to closing
Wednesday, Feb. 5, those
who bring in announce-
ments related to Army Sgt.
Bowe Bergdahl to the Crys-
tal River Beef 0' Brady's
will have 15 percent of their
meal expense donated to
the Bring Bowe Home initia-
tive and receive a decal
supporting the cause.
Bergdahl has been a
POW in Afghanistan for
more than 4 1/2 years. The
donations support the pro-
duction and distribution of
decals calling for Bergdahl's
return and are provided in
conjunction with petition
signatures to call on to U.S.
officials to take a stand for
the return of Bergdahl.
Other events/activities
scheduled where petition
signatures will be gathered
and decals made available
include:
From 9a.m. to4 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 25, at the
DA.V. chili cook-off at the
Crystal River Mall.
From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 8, at the
Wellness Fair at the Crystal
River Mall.
From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb, 15, at the
Purple Heart ceremony at
the National Guard Armory
in Crystal River.
Individual or businesses
that would I ike to be in-
volved with this project
should contact Susan
at 352-637-6206 or email
cyn2719@yahoo.com.
From staff reports

Correction
The date and time of the
Hats Off To Spring Fashion
Show is 2 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 9, at the Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center. A
different date was published
in this week's Current, Pio-
neer and Beacon.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


On the leadership path


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Eleventh-graders from three area high schools and one home-school student listen to Citrus County Sheriff's Rre Rescue Batallion Chief
L.J. White on Tuesday at the Citrus County Public Safety Training Center during the new Youth Leadership Citrus program. The program
is sponsored by the YMCA of the Suncoast, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and Leadership Citrus.


Program aims to sow seeds ofpublic service among county's high schoolers


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

They are encouraged to be
outstanding citizens, active in
their community and career-
minded people who return to
Citrus County after graduation.
These future leaders are
members of the Youth Leader-
ship Citrus (YLC) program and
toured criminal justice sites
throughout Citrus County on
Tuesday to gain a better under-
standing of county logistics.
"This is a great program that
shows them the behind-the-
scenes of the county," said Sara
Williamson, YLC program di-
rector. "We want to show kids
that there is a lot going on in
Citrus County Many of the stu-
dents who graduate from our
schools are ready to leave be-
cause they feel that there are
no career opportunities here
for them. They learn they can
go to college and come back for
a career and give back to the
community"
A partnership between


YMCA of the Suncoast, Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
and Leadership Citrus, Youth
Leadership Citrus a youth
version of the Leadership Cit-
rus program is designed to
engage and educate high school
juniors in Citrus County about
community resources and is-
sues, develop excellence in
leadership, build teamwork
skills and foster involvement in
community services. Students
receive five days out of school
and must attend the day activ-
ity from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
"This is a program where
they are learning a lot about
governance, education and
their rights as citizens,"
Williamson said. "They have
taken time out of their day and
school year to complete this
program."
During their visit of the crim-
inal justice sites in Citrus
County, Fire Rescue Battalion
Chief L.J. White led the 15 stu-
dents around the fire training
center in Lecanto for a demon-
stration of the schooling that


firefighters endure.
From using their axes to
break wood to finding a replica
baby in a burning apartment,
firefighters are put to the test at
the fire training center to en-
sure that they are physically
prepared for the call, White
said.
He escorted the students
through the training center and
encouraged them to remain fo-
cused on their futures.
"This has been the only pro-
fession that I have been in
where I want to go to work,"
White said. "That is something
for you to think about. Career-
wise, you have to point yourself
in the right direction."
Citrus High School student
Maria Aguilera said YLC has
opened her eyes to the possibil-
ities in the community
"I have lived in Citrus County
my whole life so I knew about
some of the programs in Citrus
County," she said. "I have par-
ticipated in some of them but I
didn't know there were so many
programs and people just vol-


unteer their time. It has been
motivational to me, as I want to
be a part of these things."
After leaving the fire training
center, YLC members toured
the Citrus County Detention
Facility and had lunch there
before heading to the Citrus
County Courthouse for a mock
trial.
Applications are being ac-
cepted for the next YLC group.
Participation is $90 and schol-
arships are available. Visit
leadershipcitrus.org for more
information.
"We are looking for students
who are involved in the com-
munity already," Williamson
said. "Sports and grades don't
matter We want students who
are currently volunteering. We
want to know what you have
done to give back to your com-
munity Grades and sports are
for you; what are you doing for
others?"
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. corn.


Slain woman found in Wildwood finally identified


BOB REICHMAN
Sumter County Times

Exactly nine months
since her decomposed
body was discovered,
Sumter County sheriff's
investigators Wednesday
morning announced the
identity of the unidentified
woman whose body was
discovered in a Wildwood
woods on April 22, 2013.
They also identified the
man suspected in her slaying
Referred to for months


as Jane Doe by investiga-
tors, the victim's name is
Martha "Jane" Wever She
was living in Kentucky but
traveling through Sumter
County when she was al-
leged to have been mur-
dered by long-time friend
Ralph Harold Penrod, 62,
of Tavares, officials an-
nounced at a Wednesday
morning press conference.
Wever was apparently
killed for financial gain,
said sheriff's Capt. Kevin
Hofecker Penrod was re-


ceiving Wever's pension
checks after her death,
Hofecker said.
Wever and Penrod were
friends since high school
and were living together in
Kentucky, he said. Their
relationship is believed to
have been platonic.
Penrod was arrested
Tuesday at his Lake
County home. He is
charged with murder and
is being held without bond.
Sumter investigators
have been working on the


case ever since Wever's
body was discovered in
woods near State Road 44
and Interstate 75 in
Wildwood.
While an autopsy re-
vealed that the victim had
been shot, her identity re-
mained unknown, even
with a detailed facial com-
posite prepared by Dr
Erin Kimmerle of the Uni-
versity of South Florida
Anthropology Department
Kimmerle said during
the press conference that


the remarkable similarity
between the drawing and
an actual photo of Wever
even surprised her
Local investigators got a
break in the case last No-
vember when Kentucky
State Police contacted
them suspecting that the
victim they were trying to
identify might be Wever
"It was later confirmed
through fingerprint analy-
sis by the FBI that Wever
was in fact our homicide
victim," Sheriff Bill


Farmer said Wednesday
"Once the victim was iden-
tified, detectives were able
to identify a suspect.
Through a variety of inves-
tigative techniques, some
high-tech, some old-fash-
ioned police work, proba-
ble cause was established
for the arrest of Ralph
Harold Penrod."
Additional information
about the case is not being
released because of the
ongoing investigation,
Hofecker said.






A4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday-As long as you are confi-
dent in your abilities, nothing and no
one will be able to hold you back this
year. Others may not be able to keep
up with you, but your resolve will allow
you to prosper in many areas of your
life. Positive relationships will enable
you to outmaneuver the competition.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
may not feel like working, but doing so
will keep you out of trouble on a per-
sonal level, and you will manage to
make progress professionally as well.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It's a good
idea to be as active as possible today
Travel will lead to a creative opportunity.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You will
likely have to face an older relative's
difficulties. It's an opportune time to
check out real estate or other long-
term investments.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -A part-
nership can improve your life, but don't
let your fears or your stubbornness get
in the way Love should be your focus.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Find an
opportunity to get closer to a colleague
or superior. You can gain ground if you
form alliances, but be careful whom
you choose.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) This is a
great day for love and romance. Do
something thoughtful for your special
someone.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't take any
personal or professional chances today
Changes are inevitable, so prepare to ac-
cept them and move on with grace.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your
pragmatic but tactful approach will help
you get along with everyone, and that
will make it easy to ask for assistance.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Life can
change in an instant, and sometimes
all you can do is just try your best. Pro-
fessional and financial gains are likely,
so if you have a chance to apply for a
better position, seize it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You will
be emotional, and self-control will be
an issue. Less talk and more positive
action are what is needed.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You
may find yourself stressed by a dead-
line if you are trying to complete paper-
work before the weekend officially
begins.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Your
confident approach to finding solutions
will be irresistible today. You can form
alliances and persuade others to sup-
port your plans.


ENTERTAINMENT


Justin Bieber
arrested for DUI
MIAMI BEACH -A sober-
looking Justin Bieber was re-
leased from jail Thursday
following his arrest on charges of
driving under the influence, driv-
ing with an expired license and
resisting arrest. Police said they
stopped the 19-year-old pop star
while he was drag-racing down a
Miami Beach street before
dawn.
Bieber was arrested after po-
lice said they saw him heading
down a residential street in
Miami Beach in a yellow Lam-
borghini at twice the speed limit.
Officers said he had an expired
license, was initially not coopera-
tive when he was pulled over
and smelled of alcohol.
Police said Bieber later admit-
ted that he had been drinking,
smoking marijuana and taking
prescription medication. R&B
singer Khalil Amir Sharieff was
arrested in the same incident.
He is charged with driving under
the influence. Police said Khalil
was driving a Ferrari.
Bieber and Khalil, wearing
bright red jail fatigues, made
their initial court appearance via
a video link from jail. They re-
mained silent while defense at-
torney Roy Black negotiated
bond. Bieber's bond was set at
$2,500. Khalil's bond was set at
$1,000.
Black, a high-profile lawyer
whose clients have included
Rush Limbaugh and William
Kennedy Smith, said he
thought the case would proceed
"hopefully as any other case
would" in light of Bieber's
celebrity status.
Authorities said Bieber was
arrested after police saw him
and Khalil racing two luxury vehi-
cles down the street at 4:09
a.m., with two other vehicles ap-


Associated Press
Singer Justin Bieber leaves the Turner Guilford Knight
Correctional Center on Thursday in Miami. Bieber was
released from jail Thursday following his arrest on charges of
driving under the influence, driving with an expired license and
resisting arrest.


parently being used to block off
the area. Police say Bieber was
clocked at 55 mph to 60 mph in
a 30 mph zone.
For a first DUI offense, there
is no minimum sentence and a
maximum of six months, a fine
of $250 to $500, and 50 hours of
community service. For anyone
under 21, there is an automatic
six-month license suspension.
A first conviction for drag rac-
ing carries a sentence of up to
six months, a fine of $500 to
$1,000 and a one-year license
suspension.
Fox's O'Reilly to
interview Obama
NEW YORK-- President
Barack Obama will be inter-
viewed live at the White House
by Fox News' Bill O'Reilly during
the Super Bowl pregame show.
Fox said Thursday the interview
will air at 4:30 p.m., less than two
hours before the game, which is
being televised on Feb. 2 by the
Fox broadcast network.
Following the live interview,
O'Reilly will ask the president a


few more questions that will be
aired on "The O'Reilly Factor"
the next night on Fox News
Channel. The entire interview
will be posted on the website
foxnews.com.
Captain and Tennille
headed for divorce
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. The
Captain and Tennille are headed
down the path to divorce.
Court documents filed by Toni
Tennille in Arizona say that her
marriage to Daryl Dragon is ir-
retrievably broken and cannot be
reconciled. The two have been
married for more than 38 years.
The popular 1970s pop duo's
hits include "Love Will Keep Us To-
gether," which earned a Grammy
for record of the year in 1975.
Tennille and Dragon retired to
Prescott in 2008. Their website
hints at divorce, saying people
evolve over time and hidden
feelings are uncovered.
The two have no children to-
gether. Tennille is 73. Dragon
is 71.
-From wire reports


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Jan. 24, the 24th
day of 2014. There are 341 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 24,1942, the Roberts
Commission placed much of the
blame for America's lack of pre-
paredness for Imperial Japan's at-
tack on Pearl Harbor on RearAdm.
Husband E. Kimmel and Lt. Gen.
Walter C. Short, the Navy and Army
commanders.
On this date:
In 1848, James W. Marshall dis-
covered a gold nugget at Sutter's
Mill in northern California, a discov-
ery that led to the gold rush of '49.
In 1908, the Boy Scouts move-
ment began in England under the
aegis of Robert Baden-Powell.
In 1965, Winston Churchill died
in London at age 90.
In 1984, Apple Computer began
selling its first Macintosh model,
which boasted a built-in 9-inch
monochrome display, a clock rate of
8 megahertz and 128k of RAM.
In 1989, confessed serial killer
Theodore Bundy was executed in
Florida's electric chair.
Ten years ago: Howard Dean
sharply questioned John Kerry's
judgment on Iraq as Democratic
presidential rivals raced through a
final weekend of campaigning be-
fore the New Hampshire primary.
Five years ago: Pilot Chesley
"Sully" Sullenberger, who'd safely
landed a crippled US Airways jetliner
in the Hudson River, received a
hero's homecoming in Danville, Calif.
One year ago: Defense Secre-
tary Leon Panetta announced the
lifting of a ban on women serving in
combat.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Jerry
Maren ("The Wizard of Oz") is 95.
Singer-songwriter Neil Diamond is
73. Bandleader-musician Jools Hol-
land is 56. Actress Nastassja Kinski
is 55. Olympic gold medal gymnast
Mary Lou Retton is 46.
Thought for Today: "God gives
us relatives; thank God, we can
choose our friends." -Addison
Mizner, American architect (1872-
1933).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


N L Fcast City


Daytona Bch. 52
Fort Lauderdale 70
Fort Myers 65
Gainesville 46
Homestead 70
Jacksonville 42
Key West 68
Lakeland 56
Melbourne 59


158/27 0.01 |bU/31l U.ur]
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exduse dai
T ~TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
) High: 52 Low: 29'
j ;-,- Parlly cloudy, windy and cold.

^ SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
J0 High:65" Low:45-
"o i. Partly cloudy. A little milder.

y SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
p"" High: 67 Low: 52
T-*Y Mostly cloudy. Milder. 20% chance of rain.
LM .i AC
ALMANkAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 63/39
Record /31
Normal 70/52
Mean temp- 49
Departure from mean -12
PRECIPITATION* .
Thursday 0.00
Total for the month 1.51,
Total for the year 1.51,
Normal for the year 1 .58"
'As of 7 p-m- at Itmrnews
UV INDEX: 6
0-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.30


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 32.0
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 76%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, elm, maple
Today's count: 9.5/12
Saturday's count: 8.5
Sunday's count: 10.2
AIR QUALITY
Thursday observed: 52
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES MW S,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
01/24 FRIDAY 23:55 05:07 11:15 17:35
01/25 SATURDAY 00:54 05:59 12:02 18:29
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S e TMM T ... ................. i pm.
MW T!"M-------------7:20a&m.
W0K T)110 1 ..1..............D2:A1253 a.m'
Jan30 Feb6 Feb 14 Feb22 MO TODY ............ 1214 pm.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is LOW. There is no bum ban.
For mote Informnaton cull Florida D;0ij of Fofesir'v al t352i 75A-6777 FRwf moje
Information on drought 'n-,hon-i i 1n pIa e vI I1 Dvisn o.i Fre'sl s We sre
hltp: f1amne-ftl-dol comnire wealheftxbcf
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD address may waii on. Werdnesday arnl-,r Sah, rday
Hand watenng with a shut-off nozzle or micro inigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegetale gardens. flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus Counly Ulities' aistomers shouh CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Somwe re%% planlo'j- rmay jait y lor addil'.n 3
walenng alowances
To report violations, please call: Gily of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, Cty of Cjstal
River 0 3,52 79%421. eI 313 unrircorporated COIrus County 0 35-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay "At Mason's Creek
FRIDAY
Cty High Low
Chasahowitzka" 12:31 am, 06 It 12:51 p.m. 0.3 ft, 8:52sam, 0.1 i 5:35p.moC2 f,
Cryslal Rive" 1 .8am.tW, 11:16pm, 22t,. 6:00a.m. 0A4fm. 4f 5:27 pmO.9 ,
Whllacoochee* 9:20 am, 2-1 f, 8'03p.m. 2.7ft. 3:26a.m. -0,1 ft 2:47 pm.12f,
Homnosassa" 12:22p.m. 0.5 t. 11:38pm t ft. 8:26 a.m. 0.3fl 5.:2Op.mO.2t,


H L Feast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: North winds around 20 knots Gulf water
then. Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters choppy. Tonight: Northeast 5
winds 10 to 15 knots diminishing to 5 0
to 10 knots after midnight Seas 2 to 5 8
3 feet. Bay and inland waters a t
moderate chop. Take nat lp"a
LAKE LEVELS
Location THU WED Full
Witnlacoochee al Holder 28.67 2874 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.40 38.41 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.45 39.46 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.14 40.15 42.20
Levels reported in feet above sea vW Flood stage lor akes are Basedl on 233-year food.
tihe rn -annual food which has a 43-precant cce o being equaled o exceeded n
any one year, This dat is olained rorn the Souttiwest FrFiJa Water Management Distrtct
and is suiecl to revision In 9o event wl the Distric or the Unted States Geological Survey
be Iabe fotany damages ainig out Of [he use of this data II you have any questions you
should contact tme Hydrological ata Secon al (352) 796-7211


FRIDAY


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Balthmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boslon
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, S.C.
Chareston. W.V.
Chartotte
Chicago
Clncnnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Delroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harmsburg
Hartlond
HousIon
Indianapois
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Lo A.nr..trn


THU
H L Pep. H
16 -1 14
38 25 48
31 17 25
40 23 34
22 6 18
56 34 .02 38
24 3 19
27 16 54
39 23 32
30 26 30
22 6 14
12 5 15
9 -15 10
47 29 38
19 11 21
41 17 30
10 -2 25
17 1 .03 1B
12 9 .09 19
15 1 39
15 5 .02 16
16 -1 11
45 28 42
19 4 10 52
8 -6 34
16 4 .05 14
51 39 45
21 5 24
19 5 19
20 2 15
56 40 ,11 38
9 -3 01 19
60 42 65
34 27 37
72 61 A


FRI
L Fcst
9 PC
25 pc
20 s
14 pc
32 pc
13 pc
33pc
23 s
23 1
13 pc
9 pc
8 pc
20 pc
1I pc
19 s
7 sn
I14 pc
5 od
30 pc
tl PC
t1 pc
3 pc
3O pc
12 pc
23 pc
9 fl
30 pc
22 pc
2 pc
10 pc
32 I
13 pc
44 pc
27 s
50 Dc^


THU FRI
City H L Pep. H L Fcst
NewOireans 55 39 40 31 I
NowYorkCity 19 9 18 17 pc
Nodrfolk 35 13 23 14 pc
Oklahoma City 36 17 45 30 s
Omaha 16 -5 49 30 pc
Palm Springs 79 48 74 53 pc
PtiadelpNa 22 8 .01 18 15 pc
Phoenx 76 47 72 50 cd
Ptsbutgh 13 8 .01 15 14 pc
Portlanld, ME 19 -3 12 6 pc
Portland. OR 48 31 49 33 s
Pmvidence, lRI 20 2 04 15 12 pc
Raleigh 38 16 27 16 s
Rapid Cily 30 -8 52 34 pc
Reno 50 24 50 22 pc
Rochestler.NY 13 2 .03 20 9 pc
Sacramenlo 69 34 68 35 pc
Sal LakeCity 38 22 36 19 f
San Antonio 56 38 40 32 pc
San Diego 65o 50 B7 54 f
San Francisco 69 44 59 49 pc
Savannah 48 28 39 24 pc
Seatle 50 40 52 37 f
Spokane 29 27 32 24 t
Slt Louis 14 2 37 28 pc
St Ste Mane 5 6 .04 16 -4 N1
Syracuse 14 -3 16 12 fM
Topeka 19 2 49 32 pc
Washinglton 28 12 21 18 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
NIGH 81 ,McAIsn Texas
LOW -36X Inelmeinat Falls, Min
WORLD CITIES


.... .. ... ... FRI
Louisville 22 5 .01 21 20 pc r Fy H RISKY
Memphis 33 21 32 26 s C
Miwaukee 11 -1 22 4 Sn Acapuo 8471S
Minneapolis .5 .17 33 4 sn Amsterdam 445/f5
Mobile 54 28 43 29 pc Athens 6,2J48s
Montgomery 45 24 38 24 Beijing 44a24/pc
NashvUe 22 15 25 24 pc Berlin 24*9/pc
Bermuda 6a62/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: cckudy; drl.lrhe Cairo 68/5S3/pc
ffaI.r, h-hzy; pcipalcly cloud: rrmin; Calgary 5137/pc
r ln.Vmnow mix; Suumy; shshowerW; Havana 75155/s
aU-sirw. t sstu ndentions w.wldd Hong Kong 62/57/s
WSi 0014 Jerusalem 64/46&c


Lisbon 59/461s
London 46/33r
Madrid 53/35/s
MexircoCity 71/48/s
Montreal 1/-16/fpc
Moscow &'-9R
Paris 4&6t3pc
Rio 89/75/pc
Rome 53/46/pc
Sydney 82164/cd
Tokyo 55!39/s
Toronio 12ivpc
Warsaw 2110/Is


LEGAL NOTICES




Fictitious Name Notices........................................C14
M meeting Notices......................................................C14
Lien Notices............................................................. C 14
Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.................C13, C14
Notice to Creditors/Administration......................C13
Self Storage Notices.............................................C13
Forfeitures ..............................................................C13
Surplus Property ....................................................C13


yj C ITRU S COUNTY U



CHRpNICLEI
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonllne.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -32 22
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E d itor, 5 64 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4M Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 A5

e 014
rivals
Are
Here!





A6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

Obituaries





Judson Leonard
Lincoln Sr., 93 'Lenny' Days, 74
INVERNESS HOMOSASSA


Maj. Judson D. Lincoln
Sr, 93, of Inverness, Fla.,
died Jan. 21, 2014. He was
born in Takoma Park, Md.,
Sept. 15, 1920, the oldest
son of Leonard and Anna
Marie Lincoln. He gradu-
ated from St. John's High
School and received his
bachelor's
degree in
teaching
from the
Univer-
sity of
Maryland
in Janu-
ary 1943.
Judson He joined
Lincoln Sr. the U.S.
Army in 1943. It became
the Army Air Corps and
later changed to the Air
Force. He married Cora
Lou in 1944. He received
his commission in 1945
and stayed in the Air Force
Reserve in 1947. He re-
ceived his master's degree
in 1948 from G.W Univer-
sity in Washington, D.C. He
served in World War II,
France and Germany dur-
ing the Korean War as a
major in the Air Force OSI
(Office of Special Investi-
gation). He retired from
the Air Force after 24
years. He taught social
studies at Great Neck
North High School for 23
years and was adjunct pro-
fessor at C.W Post College
for 10 years on Long Is-
land, N.Y
He married Barbara
Pantke in November 1967.
They retired to Inverness
in 1979. He was Past Mas-
ter of Smithtown Masonic
Lodge 1127 F&AM in
Smithtown N.Y He was
Most Wise Master of the
Rose Croix, Scottish Rite
in Rockville Centre, N.Y
He was a member of
Kismet Shrine Temple on
Long Island, N.Y, Egypt
Temple in Tampa and Cit-
rus Shrine Club. He was
past president of MOAA
(Military Officers Associa-
tion of America). He was
past president of SAR
(Sons of the American
Revolution). He was a life
member of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars. He was dea-
con of First Christian
Church of Inverness for six
years.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 46 years, Bar-
bara; his children, Judson
Jr, Cynthia Lincoln and
Sally Yoshioka; stepchil-
dren Karen Herman,
Wayne and James Pantke;
14 grandchildren; and 12
great-grandchildren. He
was predeceased by his
loving daughter AnnaSue
in 2012; his parents; his
two brothers, Bridwell and
Byron; and his sister
Joyce.
In lieu of flowers, me-
morial donations may be
made to The First Chris-
tian Church of Inverness,
2018 Colonade St., Inver-
ness, FL 34453. The fu-
neral service will be at
noon Monday, Jan. 27,
2014, at the First Christian
Church, 2018 Colonade
Street, Inverness, FL
34453, with Pastor Roy
Kelley officiating. The
family will receive friends
at the church from 9:30 a.m.
until service time. Full
military honors will take
place by the United States
Air Force Funeral and
Honors Team from Mac
Dill Air Force Base at
2:30 p.m. Jan. 27, 2014, at
the Florida National
Cemetery, 6502 S.W 102nd
Ave., Bushnell, FL 33513.
Visit www.veteranfuneral
care.com to sign the guest
book. Veterans Funeral
Care, 800-467-7850.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Leonard "Lenny" Allan
Days, 74, of Homosassa,
Fla., passed away Jan. 18,
2014, at home. Born Oct.
12, 1939, in Seville, Ohio, to
Robert and Lillian Days,
Lenny graduated from
Largo High School and
shortly thereafter joined
the U.S.
Navy He
married
Donna
Stelts on
June 24,
1975. He
was a
wonderful,
Leonard g i v i n g
Days husband,
father and grandfather He
will be missed by all who
had the pleasure of know-
ing him.
Lenny is survived by his
two sons, Randy and Allan;
and two grandchildren,
Aiden and Jesi.
Military honors will be
presented at 2 p.m. Mon-
day, Jan. 27, 2014, at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, and laid to
rest with his wife. Please
sign the guestbook at www.
VeteransFuneralCare.com.
Veterans Funeral Care,
Clearwater

Paul
Kaufmann, 53
HOMOSASSA
Paul Lawrence Kauf-
mann, 53, died in his sleep
Friday morning, Jan. 17,
2014. Paul was born Oct. 7,
1960, in Detroit, Mich.
Upon graduation from
North Olmsted High
School in Ohio, he moved
to Tampa, Fla. Paul Kauf-
mann owned and operated
Precision Grading & Land
Development for more
than 25 years, serving the
Tampa Bay area. Paul also
owned and operated
PGLD Materials, located
in Citrus County He was
especially proud of the
work and time that went
into the permitting and es-
tablishment of the sand
mine in Lecanto, and
dreamed of its possibili-
ties. Paul was respected
among his peers and in the
community, for his busi-
ness expertise and his ac-
complishments. He was
also known for his gen-
erosity He enjoyed many
long-time business associ-
ates and employees. Paul
was proud of his business
successes and his ability to
help employees, friends
and family
Paul is survived by his
two loving children, Chad
Wendell Kaufmann and
Chloe Leigh Kaufmann.
Paul is also survived by his
immediate family mem-
bers mother Margaret
Kaufmann; sister Jean
Kaufmann; brother David
Kaufmann; sister Patricia
(Kaufmann) Williams; and
sister Toni (Kaufmann)
Hunter
Memorial arrangements
are being made by Brewer
& Sons Funeral Home, and
will be announced at a later
date. Visit www.brewer
funeral.com to leave your
condolences. Brewer &
Sons, 352-796-4991.

* Email obits@chronicle
online.com or call
352-563-5660 to
speak with someone
about submitting an
obituary.






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800.771.0057 -
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Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

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Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
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Service: Sat. 3:00 PM
First Presbyterian Church
Inverness
GEORGE HAYDEN
Pending
JUDE WEYRAUCH
Private Arrangements
726-8323


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Rover tracks disappear toward the horizon in a sea of sand between the craters Endurance and Victoria on the
Meridiani Plains of Mars. Mars rover Opportunity took the image while stuck in the sand ripple dubbed Purgatory
for more than a month. Ten years after NASA landed two rovers on Mars on a 90-day mission, one of them is still
exploring, and the project has generated hundreds of thousands of images from the Martian surface. Now the
Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum is presenting more than 50 of the best photographs from the two
Mars rovers in an art exhibit curated by the scientists who have led the ongoing mission.



Opportunity still scanning the


Red Planet a decade after landing


Robot and twin Spirit originally slatedfor 90-day


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES The rover Op-
portunity may not be sleek like a
brand new car, but it shows no signs of
braking even after a decade on Mars.
Scientists and engineers gath-
ered at the NASA Jet Propulsion
Laboratory Thursday to celebrate


the plucky rover, which has logged
24 miles since landing.
Opportunity has been exploring
the rim of Endeavour Crater, its
fifth crater destination. A new study
of rocks examined by Opportunity
and published in the journal Sci-
ence found they're the oldest yet -
about 4 billion years old. The rocks


Associated Press
The nutrition facts label on the side of a cereal box is
pictured Thursday in Washington, D.C. Nutrition labels
on the back of food packages may soon become easier
to read. The Food and Drug Administration says
knowledge about nutrition has evolved over the last
20 years, and the labels need to reflect that.



FDA to revise


nutrition labels


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Those nutrition labels
on the back of food pack-
ages may soon become
easier to read.
The Food and Drug
Administration says
knowledge about nutri-
tion has evolved over the
past 20 years, and the la-
bels need to reflect that.
As the agency considers
revisions, nutritionists
and other health experts
have their own wish list
of desired changes.
The number of calories
should be more prominent,
they say, and the amount
of added sugar and per-
centage of whole wheat
in the food should be in-
cluded. They also want
more clarity on how serv-
ing sizes are defined.
"There's a feeling that
nutrition labels haven't
been as effective as they


should be," said Michael
Jacobson of the Center
for Science in the Public
Interest.
Other suggestions
from health advocates:
Clearer measure-
ments. Jacobson and oth-
ers have suggested the
FDA use teaspoons instead
of grams on the label.
Serving sizes that
make sense. There's no
easy answer, but health
experts say single-size
servings that are clearly
meant to be eaten in one
sitting will often list two
or three servings on the
label, making the calorie
and other nutrient infor-
mation deceptive.
Package-front label-
ing. Beyond the panel on
the back, nutrition ex-
perts have pushed for la-
bels on the package front
for certain nutrients so
consumers can see them
more easily


missions


interacted with water during a time
when environmental conditions
were favorable for microbes.
The solar-powered rover is in a good
spot to ride out the Martian winter
Opportunity outlasted its twin
Spirit, which stopped communicat-
ing in 2010 after getting stuck in
sand.


Judge favors refunds in

$1.8M traffic ticket blitz


Associated Press

CINCINNATI Drivers
who got speeding camera
tickets in a Cincinnati-
area village are entitled to
nearly $1.8 million in re-
funds, pending the village's
appeal of class action sta-
tus, a southwest Ohio
judge ruled Thursday
Hamilton County Com-
mon Pleas Judge Robert
Ruehlman, who last March
ordered Elmwood Place to
stop using the cameras
and called them "a scam,"
repeated that the village's
camera system violated
Ohio's constitution and
rules on judicial process
and public notice.
He said besides refunds
of the $105 citations and
other motorists' costs,
which total at least $1.76
million, the village is li-
able for the plaintiffs' at-
torneys' fees, because
"Elmwood Place acted in
bad faith in implementing
the ordinance." He said he
wouldn't make his order
final until the class action
appeal is resolved.
Attorney Mike Allen,
who filed the lawsuit in
late 2012, said there was
no estimate yet on what at-
torneys' fees might total.
He added that the plain-
tiffs would be willing to
discuss a "very reason-
able" settlement to expe-
dite the case rather than
see appeals go on for
months more.
"I think Elmwood Place
should stop spending
money on attorneys," Allen
said. "We'd like to put
some money back in these
people's pockets."
However, attorney Judd
Uhl said the village plans


to keep appealing
Ruehlman's decisions, in-
cluding Thursday's ruling,
because it believes Ohio
law is on its side.
"We feel pretty strongly
about it," Uhl said. "We
don't really intend to pay
anything in this case."
Officials in the mostly
blue-collar village with
2,200 residents have said it
has set aside money col-
lected from the speeding
cameras. A company that
owned and operated the
cameras received 40 per-
cent of revenues.
Uhl last month said in
court that the cameras al-
lowed police to focus on vi-
olent crimes and drugs
and to have more presence
on the streets. The village
also has said the camera
enforcement resulted in a
sharp decline in speeding.
Village business owners
and a church pastor have
said the resulting ticket
blitz drove people away
Motorists' attorneys said
drivers had little chance to
challenge the citations.
They also said the village
didn't give proper notice
camera enforcement was
starting, resulting in thou-
sands of speeding citations
within the first month.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Domestic
battery arrests
Bruce Blanford, 38, of Lecanto,
at 1:45 a.m. Jan. 23 on a felony
charge of domestic battery by stran-
gulation. No bond.
Other arrests
Ashleigh Johnston, 26, of
North Lennox Terrace, Citrus
Springs, at 11:20 a.m. Jan. 22 on an
active warrant for felony violation of
probation stemming from an original
charge of possession of a controlled
substance. Bond was denied.
Owen Hines, 44, of South Ann
Point, Homosassa, at 11:20 a.m. Jan.
22 on a felony charge of grand theft
and a misdemeanor charge of tres-
passing after warning. According to
his arrest affidavit, Hines is accused
of stealing a trailer and a Yamoto 110
four-wheeler from a fenced-in yard in
Homosassa. Bond $4,500.
Jose Diaz, 27, of Southwest
19th Avenue Road, Ocala, at
11:32 a.m. Jan. 22 on felony charges
of retail theft and trafficking in stolen
property. According to his arrest affi-
davit, Diaz is accused of stealing a
Shark vacuum, space heater, flat
screen televisions, flat screen televi-
sion mounts, air hockey table, cellular
telephone, comforter set, a second
vacuum, and an orange pot set from
the Inverness Walmart. He reportedly
had his girlfriend help shoplift the
items for him. Bond $7,000.
Nicole Walker, 33, of Southeast
Eighth Avenue, Crystal River, at
5:25 p.m. Jan. 22 on an active Des-
oto County warrant for felony violation
of probation stemming from an origi-
nal charge of burglary and grand
theft. Bond was denied.
Larry Paulison Jr., 25, of Mag-
nolia Street, Dunnellon, at 5:59 p.m.
Jan. 22 on a felony charge of traffick-
ing in stolen property and a misde-
meanor charge of resisting an officer
without violence. According to his ar-
rest affidavit Paulison is accused of
pawning an air compressor, an im-
pact wrench and a nail gun, all of
which were stolen from a Dunnellon
barn. He was reportedly uncoopera-
tive during the arrest and was
tasered. Bond $500.
Nicole Smith, 28, of West Madi-
son Street, Inverness, at 7:21 p.m.
Jan. 22 on a felony charge of an in-
mate being in possession of contra-
band in a state correctional facility.
According to her arrest affidavit,
Smith is accused of having one oxy-
codone hydrochloride 15 milligram
tablet and three clonazepam 0.5 mil-
ligram tablets in her possession while
incarcerated at the Citrus County De-
tention Facility. Bond $2,000.
Gerald Deam Jr., 35, of Crys-


tal River, at 7:39 p.m. Jan. 22 on a
misdemeanor charge of battery. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, Deam
is accused of striking a victim mul-
tiple times in the face with his fist at
the Crystal Acres RV Park. Bond
$500.
Kaileen Behrens-Hoskins, 27,
of South Bablan Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 9:04 p.m. Jan. 22 on a
charge of felony retail theft. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit, she is ac-
cused of shoplifting approximately 40
items, with a total value of $303.06,
from the Inverness Walmart. Bond
$2,000.
Kristal Ness, 24, of Northeast
Ninth Avenue, Crystal River, at 9:02
p.m. Jan. 22 on a misdemeanor
charge of criminal mischief. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit, Ness is ac-
cused of damaging a Dell computer
monitor during a verbal dispute. Bond
$500.
Steven Morales, 20, of Her-
nando, at 11:30 p.m. Jan. 22 on an
active warrant for felony violation of
probation stemming from an original
charge of grand theft. According to his
arrest affidavit, Morales was trans-
ported to the Citrus County Detention
Facility from the Leon County Jail.
Bond was denied.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
A vehicle burglary was reported
at 11:02 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22, in
the 6300 block of W. Holiday St.,
Homosassa.
Thefts
An auto theft was reported at
1:46 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22, in the
7600 block of W. Chassahowitzka
St., Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported at
10:20 a.m. Jan. 22 in the 10 block of
S. Lincoln Ave., Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported at
2:22 p.m. Jan. 22 in the 5100 block
of Aurora Drive.
A petit theft was reported at
2:39 p.m. Jan. 22 in the 1900 block of
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
A grand theft was reported at
2:46 p.m. Jan. 22 in the 8300 block of
W. Scotch Pine Lane, Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported at
8:09 p.m. Jan. 22 in the 2400 block of
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported at 7:52
p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22, in the 2800
block of N. CredeAve., Crystal River.
A vandalism was reported at
7:55 p.m. Jan. 22 in the 100 block of
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.


Latino groups to launch


massive voter registration


Associated Press

MIAMI Fewer than half of
adult Latino citizens voted in
the 2012 presidential elections,
according to the U.S. Census,
and that has prompted two na-
tional Latino organizations to
step up voter registration efforts
this year, months ahead of the
2014 elections.
National Council of La Raza
and Mi Familia Vota Education
Fund on Thursday launched a
new campaign to register more
than 250,000 vot-
ers. Tradition-
ally voter
registration
drives get going
i in the spring
and summer be-
fore the elec-
S tion. By starting
Clarissa in January, the
Martinez groups hope to
De Castro ^
De Castro top their 2012
leads NCLR campaign of
immigration mpag o
and civic more than
engagement 180,000 regis-
campaigns. tered voters.
"You have
parties and campaigns that are
trying to get their specific can-
didates elected. We look at voter
registration and engagement
another way We look at it as a
way for Latinos to have their
voices heard on issues they care
about," said Clarissa Martinez
De Castro, who heads up
NCLR's immigration and civic
engagement campaigns. "Voter



PURSUIT
Continued from PageAl

of Old Floral City Road near
Stowe Street.
As Holloway approached
the vehicle, Cabral reportedly
sped off, sparking a circuitous
and involved chase that ended
with him driving off a boat
ramp at the end of East Broy-
hill Place.
According to his arrest report,
Cabral was pursued by several
deputies and a Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission (FWC) of-


Voter registration is not the end
game. It's one piece of the puzzle.

Clarissa Martinez De Castro
National Council of La Raza.


registration is not the end game.
It's one piece of the puzzle."
Americans tend to register to
vote and to turn out in higher
numbers during presidential
elections, but Martinez De Cas-
tro said the potential for Con-
gress to take up immigration
reform combined with Lati-
nos' frustration over the current
gridlock creates an addi-
tional emotional, as well as
practical, incentive to vote.
"In 2012 they went to the polls
with the economy in their minds
and immigration in their
hearts," she said.
About 13.7 million, or just
under 60 percent, of the na-
tion's 23.3 million adult Latino
citizens were registered in
2012, but at least 2 million
those didn't vote, according to
the U.S. Census. Advocates say
the number is much higher, as
people often report voting
even if they didn't.
De Castro said the campaign
will focus on those adults who
have yet to register, as well as
the estimated 50,000 Latino citi-
zens who turn 18 each month.
NCLR and the union-backed Mi
Familia plan to start their cam-
paign with millions of mailers in


ficer, but kept moving. Deputies
even deployed stop sticks twice,
during which they got one front
and back tire on Cabral's
vehicle.
Cabral reportedly was still
undaunted and kept driving
through traffic signs and at
one time appeared to stop but
as officers converged he
struck the FWC officer's truck
and went around it. Cabral
eventually burst through a
cable barricade at a boat ramp
and drove into the water at
Broyhill Place.
He reportedly remained in
his vehicle with his windows


Colorado, Nevada, Arizona and
Texas, adding in in Florida and
California in the spring.
She noted therole Latino
support played in Nevada
Senator Harry Reid's re-
election, during his tough 2010
race.
The early efforts of the two or-
ganizations are part of a
broader strategy to increase the
political engagement of the na-
tion's fast-growing and diverse
Hispanic communities. Groups
like the League of United Latin
American Citizens (LULAC), the
National Association of Latino
Elected and Appointed Officials
and Voto Latino also play key
roles in registering Latinos, as
do the country's Hispanic
media.
Mi Familia Executive Direc-
tor Ben Monterroso said he and
other Latino advocates are try-
ing to get away from the "Roman
candle" approach to Latino
voter outreach, where candi-
dates and parties make dazzling
but brief overtures only during
the final months of the cam-
paign. Monterroso said he's
looking long-term, not just at the
2014 elections or even the next
presidential race.


rolled up.
After repeated calls for
Cabral to exit the vehicle, he
rolled down the window and
cranked up the radio. According
to the report, Cabral appeared
to be mocking deputies while
dancing and repeating the com-
mands of the officers.
Deputies finally moved in on
Cabral and forcibly removed
him from the car He was ar-
rested and transported to the
Citrus County Detention
Facility
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


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Love Honda and Love Chevrolet, two of
the area's largest new and used car dealers,
have just announced plans to start the New
Year off right and repeat the largest sales
event in their history. This event will take
place Saturday, January 25th through
the end of the month.

For example, BUY not lease, a new
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In addition, BUY, not lease a brand new
2014 Accord or 2014 CR-V with ZERO
down and payments from $92*! With over
40 to choose from!

According to Chad Halleen, owner, record
new vehicle sales in December have resulted
in an extraordinary number of used vehicle
trade-ins. "We have more used vehicles in
stock now than we've had in November and
December. We have program cars, trucks,
vans, inexpensive cars, Hondas, Chevys,
Toyotas you name it. We are going to have
to move a lot of these vehicles fast....or
else they will go to the (wholesale) auction.
Rather than lose money wholesaling
these vehicles, plus carrying cost, Love
Honda and Love Chevrolet have decided
to slash prices on their entire used vehicle
inventories in an attempt to sell at least 50
vehicles before the end of the month. "I've
been given orders to sell cars at wholesale
prices to lower inventory levels" said Mike
Marvel, Love Honda General Manager.
Brenden Prue, General Manager at Love


Chevrolet went on to say
vehicles will be priced
and displayed by 9 A.M.
Friday morning. Cars,
trucks, vans, SUVs and
motorcycles will be sold.
First come first served.
Most vehicles will have
a warranty. "If you think
you can't afford a new or
pre-loved car or truck,
you should come check
us out before you decide"
said Mike Marvel. "This
sale is three days only,
and vehicles are estimated to fly off the lot,
so you may want to come early".

Love Honda and Love Chevrolet will have
all these used vehicles on display in the sales
area by 9:00 am Saturday, to give people
time to look at all of the vehicles before
all the best deals are gone. All the vehicles
will be unlocked at 9:00 am so come here
early for the best selection. Chad Halleen
also said, "This innovative approach to
selling used vehicles should make it easy
and quick for anybody in the market for a
used vehicle to get a great vehicle at a very
low price and with no hassle. Pick it out,
drive it if you like. You already know the
price. What could be easier?" "No prices
will need to be negotiated and I can help
you arrange financing if needed ", added
Brenden Prue.

All used vehicles for sale at Love Honda
and Love Chevrolet have been inspected
and most carry the balance of their warranty.
Most vehicles also qualify for extended
service contracts. "Word of mouth is the
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The used cars and trucks will be located
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reputed mobster arrested,


charged in 1978 airport heist


Associated Press
NEW YORK More than 30
years after hooded gunmen pulled
a $6 million airport heist drama-
tized in the hit Martin Scorsese
movie "Goodfellas," an elderly re-
puted mobster was arrested at his
New York City home on Thursday
and charged in the robbery and a
1969 murder
Vincent Asaro, 78, was named
along with his son, Jerome, and
three other defendants in a wide-
ranging indictment alleging mur-
der, robbery, extortion, arson and
other crimes from the late 1960s
through last year The Asaros, both
identified as captains in the Bo-
nanno organized crime family,
pleaded not guilty through their at-
torneys and were ordered held
without bail at a brief appearance
in federal court in Brooklyn.
The elder Asaro's attorney, Ger-
ald McMahon, told reporters out-
side court that his client was
framed by shady turncoat gangsters,
including former Bonanno boss
Joseph Massino the highest-rank-
ing member of the city's five organ-
ized crime families to break the
mob's vow of silence.
Massino "is one of the worst wit-
nesses I've ever seen," McMahon
said. He added that Asaro had given
him "marching orders" that "there
will be no plea and he will walk out
the door a free man."
A lawyer for Jerome Asaro de-
clined comment.
The indictment accused Vincent
Asaro of helping to direct the
Dec. 11, 1978, Lufthansa Airlines
heist at Kennedy airport one of
the largest cash thefts in American
history
The gunmen looted a vault in the
airline's cargo terminal and stole
about $5 million in untraceable U.S.


Associated Press
In this artist's rendering, Vincent Asaro, center,stands alongside his lawyer
Gerald McMahon, right, Thursday at Brooklyn Federal Court.


currency that was being returned to
the United States from Germany,
along with about $1 million in jew-
elry The cash was never found.
According to court papers, an
unidentified mob associate who
pleaded guilty and became a coop-
erating witness told investigators
that he participated in the robbery
at the direction of Asaro. The theft
was hatched by James "Jimmy the
Gent" Burke, a late Lucchese crime
family associate who was close to
Asaro, who told the bandits that he
had a "score" that would make
them rich, the papers said.
Each robber was supposed to be
paid $750,000, but the cooperating
witness said "most did not receive
their share, either because they were
killed first or it was never given to
them," according to the court papers.
The papers say the cooperator
wore a wire and recorded a conver-
sation he had with Asaro in 2011 in
which the pair discussed being
slighted.


"We never got our right money,
what we were supposed to get,"
Asaro said, according to the court
papers. "Jimmy Burke kept
everything."
In addition to the heist, the elder
Asaro was charged in the 1969 mur-
der of Paul Katz, whose remains
were found last year during an FBI
dig at a house once occupied by
Burke. According to the cooperat-
ing witness, Asaro and Burke were
business partners in Robert's
Lounge, the papers say The saloon
was described by a fellow Lucchese
associate of Burke, the late Henry
Hill, as Burke's private cemetery
"Jimmy buried over a dozen bod-
ies ... under the bocce courts," Hill
wrote in his book, "A Goodfella's
Guide to New York."
Katz once owned a warehouse
where mobsters stored stolen goods,
according to the court papers. After
a raid at the warehouse, Asaro and
Burke began to suspect Katz was a
law enforcement informant


Scott proposes

$30M for science,

technology training


The News Service
of Florida
TALLAHASSEE -
Workforce training in sci-
ence and technology
fields would get $30 mil-
lion from Gov. Rick Scott
in the latest snapshot of
his upcoming legislative
budget request.
Scott, who is to
roll out his entire
2014-15 "It's Your
Money Tax Cut"
budget proposal -
next week, was at
convenience food
maker Greencore
USA, a growing Gov.
company in Jack- Sc
sonville, on Thurs- rolls ou
day to tout the new next
training initiative, fo-
cused on science, technol-
ogy, engineering and math
(STEM) occupations.
"With these dollars, we
will provide access to
training resources for
both job seekers and em-
ployers, while also pro-
viding scholarships to
Floridians wishing to pur-
sue STEM and other great
careers at Florida's state
colleges and vocational
centers," Scott said in a
release.
The money would be in
addition to the $12 million
expected to again be
sought for the Quick Re-
sponse Training Program
that helps with training
for new or expanding
businesses, according to
the governor's office.
In November, the De-


apartment of Economic
Opportunity included
$12 million for the Quick
Response Training Pro-
gram as part of its budget
request.
During the budget year
that ended June 30, the
Quick Response Training
Program handed out
$8.5 million in
grants that were
: intended to be
S used to train 6,522
employees, in-
cluding 4,518 an-
ticipated to be
new jobs, accord-
ing to Workforce
Rick Florida.
ott Scott will out-
budget line his entire
veek. budget proposal
Wednesday, during the an-
nual Associated Press
meeting at the Capitol in
advance of the legislative
session.
Already, Scott has laid
out almost $12 billion
from the pending spend-
ing plan, including
$493.2 million in funding
for new endeavors. His
proposed budget should
be around $70 billion. He
has also pitched approxi-
mately $461 million in
cuts to taxes and fees.
Scott has challenged
lawmakers to approve $500
million in tax and fee cuts.
It will be up to state leg-
islators to craft the final
budget package, and a
number of counter-pro-
posals have already been
made to some of Scott's
water-related requests.


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Money&Markets
1,880 ................................. S& P 500
_ -4,,, i. Close: 1,828.46
v, Change:-16.40 (-0.9%)
1,800 ........ 10 DAYS .........


A click of the wrist K
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
- .. ..................... ......... Dow Jones industrials
Dow Jones industrials
S. Close: 16,197.35
Change: -175.99 (-1.1%)
16,120 10 DAYS .


China worries prompt



stock market stumble


1 ,8 5 0 .... .............:............ ............. ............ ........" ...a. r. 17 ,0 0 0 ............... ........................... ..................................
1,8 00 6 ,500 .....i ..... .. ..........


7 0 0 ... ................ ........ .......... .. .... ...... ... ,5 0 0 .. ...
..... 0..........N ..........14,5000...........
1,600 1"4500.......
1 J6 0 A S'," 0"S N...... .......N.......D"" "J.. 4' 0 J A S ...... .......0 .......NN ......iD...... J..


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16372.96
7591.43
498.02
10331.75
4224.44
1842.29
1356.46
19756.40
1177.57


LOW
16140.58
7508.36
493.88
10228.79
4192.28
1820.06
1342.62
19500.88
1166.67


CLOSE
16197.35
7569.89
496.88
10269.39
4218.87
1828.46
1347.87
19590.32
1172.40


CHG.
-175.99
+21.33
-0.84
-99.50
-24.13
-16.40
-11.53
-166.08
-8.89


%CHG.
-1.07%
+0.28%
-0.17%
-0.96%
-0.57%
-0.89%
-0.85%
-0.84%
-0.75%


YTD
-2.29%
+2.29%
+1.29%
-1.26%
+1.01%
-1.08%
+0.40%
-0.59%
+0.75%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 --0- 8.47 6.69 -.01 -0.1 V V V -18.4 +43.5 dd
AT&T Inc T 33.09 -0-- 39.00 33.80 +.46 +1.4 A V -3.9 +4.6 25 1.84f
Ametek Inc AME 39.33 -0- 62.05 51.37 -.72 -1.4 V V 7 -2.5 +31.4 26 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 -- 106.83 102.42 -1.14 -1.1 A 7 7 -3.8 +16.8 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 10.98 0 17.42 16.86 -.29 -1.7 V A A +8.3 +51.4 17 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 --0- 13.08 12.58 -.04 -0.3 V A A +6.9 +12.0 42
CenturyLink Inc CTL 29.49 0- 42.01 29.45 -.05 -0.2 V 7 7 -7.5 -21.6 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 40.28 --0- 55.28 50.72 -1.18 -2.3 7 7 -2.7 +24.3 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.78 -- 26.38 23.81 +.46 +2.0 A A A +2.1 +46.4 25 1.00
Disney DIS 52.18 0 76.84 74.79 -.52 -0.7 A A -2.1 +44.5 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -0-- 75.46 68.53 -.12 -0.2 A 7 7 -0.7 +6.6 20 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.36 ---- 61.18 51.23 -.04 -0.1 A A A +4.2 +14.1 20 3.42f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 -- 101.74 96.97 -.91 -0.9 V 7 7 -4.2 +10.4 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.10 -- 18.02 16.43 -.12 -0.7 V A A +6.5 +19.6 12 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 21.11 --- 28.09 25.82 -.17 -0.7 V 7 7 -7.9 +21.7 18 0.88f
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 34.90 --0- 51.76 49.79 -.03 -0.1 V A A +4.4 +31.1 16
HIth MgmtAsc HMA 9.79 -0- 17.28 13.27 +.02 +0.2 V A A +1.3 +29.5 cc
Home Depot HD 63.82 --0- 82.57 80.24 +.04 ... V 7 -2.6 +24.3 22 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 20.10 -- 27.12 25.13 -.18 -0.7 7 7 -3.2 +23.8 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 --- 215.90 182.73 +.48 +0.3 7 7 -2.6 -5.2 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 -- 34.32 26.55 -.16 -0.6 V 7 7 -19.3 +18.3 27
Lowes Cos LOW 35.86 -- 52.08 48.15 +.40 +0.8 A 7 -2.8 +29.4 23 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 91.81 --- 103.70 95.32 +.44 +0.5 A 7 7 -1.8 +5.4 17 3.24f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 27.00 -- 38.98 36.06 +.13 +0.3 V 7 7 -3.6 +35.9 13 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 --0- 67.69 65.34 +.83 +1.3 V 7 7 -3.2 +12.6 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 71.35 0 89.75 88.80 -.06 -0.1 A A A +3.7 +27.1 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 0- 23.10 6.84 +.09 +1.3 A 7 7 -25.2 -64.0 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0-- 21.09 16.81 +.05 +0.3 A A A +1.8 -8.7 31 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 7.42 0 11.08 10.92 -.10 -0.9 A A A +10.4 +43.3 14 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 34.21 0- 67.50 37.36 -.23 -0.6 V 7 7 -23.8 -17.9 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 88.21 -0-- 114.72 98.08 -.37 -0.4 A 7 7 -5.3 +12.0 19 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 32.19 0 44.82 44.09 -.52 -1.2 A A A +0.4 +36.5 25 1.20
Time Warner TWX 49.50 --- 70.77 64.64 -1.12 -1.7 A 7 7 -7.3 +32.9 16 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 79.32 0 113.06 111.47 -1.24 -1.1 V A A +4.2 +37.2 19 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 42.34 -0- 54.31 47.86 +.53 +1.1 V 7 7 -2.6 +15.1 12 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 39.44 39.09 -.10 -0.3 7 A 7 -0.6 +57.3 1.61e
WalMart Strs WMT 68.13 -0- 81.37 74.96 -.39 -0.5 V 7 7 -4.7 +11.0 14 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 39.13 --0- 62.24 58.35 -.56 -1.0 V A A +1.6 +52.2 20 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate Ij -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd -Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates



Elm

The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.78
percent
Thursday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.

PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MOAGO 3.25 .13
1YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
Gold surged
nearly 2 per-
cent Thursday
as worried in-
vestors poured
money into pre-
cious metals and
U.S. government
debt securi-
ties. The price of
oil inched high-
er. Crops were
mixed.

BS


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .07
6-month T-bill .05 0.06 -0.01 .10
52-wk T-bill .09 0.10 -0.01 .13
2-year T-note .36 0.40 -0.04 .24
5-year T-note 1.59 1.70 -0.11 .75
10-year T-note 2.78 2.87 -0.09 1.83
30-year T-bond 3.68 3.76 -0.08 3.02

NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.49 3.57 -0.08 2.62
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.90 4.93 -0.03 3.95
Barclays USAggregate 2.44 2.40 +0.04 1.81
Barclays US High Yield 5.38 5.36 +0.02 5.68
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.48 4.46 +0.02 3.74
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.80 1.86 -0.06 1.03
Barclays US Corp 3.19 3.16 +0.03 2.73


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.32
Ethanol (gal) 1.81
Heating Oil (gal) 3.08
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.73
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.66
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1262.60
Silver (oz) 19.98
Platinum (oz) 1461.70
Copper (Ib) 3.32
Palladium (oz) 745.00
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.44
Coffee (Ib) 1.15
Corn (bu) 4.29
Cotton (Ib) 0.87
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 363.90
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.44
Soybeans (bu) 12.77
Wheat (bu) 5.70


PVS.
96.73
1.84
3.04
4.69
2.68
PVS.
1239.00
19.81
1460.90
3.38
747.95
PVS.
1.44
1.15
4.26
0.88
367.20
1.44
12.80
5.61


%CHG
+0.61
+0.11
+1.27
+0.87
-0.57
%CHG
+1.90
+0.87
+0.05
-1.56
-0.39
%CHG
+0.17
+0.30
+0.65
-0.58
-0.90
+0.17
-0.20
+1.56


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.29 -.16 -0.5 +17.0 +12.2 +15.7
CaplncBuA m 58.13 -.19 -0.7 +11.7 +9.3 +12.9
CpWIdGrIA m 45.30 -.26 0.0 +20.9 +10.6 +16.8
EurPacGrA m 48.88 -.42 -0.4 +16.7 +7.1 +15.7
FnlnvA m 51.38 -.57 -1.1 +24.3 +13.8 +19.5
GrthAmA m 43.21 -.39 +0.5 +29.0 +15.1 +19.7
IncAmerA m 20.60 -.09 -0.2 +14.7 +11.3 +15.7
InvCoAmA m 36.53 -.26 -0.5 +26.4 +13.7 +17.5
NewPerspA m 37.42 -.34 -0.4 +21.8 +12.1 +18.8
WAMutlnvA m 39.02 -.33 -1.0 +25.6 +15.6 +18.3
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.97 -.28 -0.2 +21.8 +8.2 +19.9
Stock 167.33 -1.47 -0.9 +31.8 +16.3 +21.6
Fidelity Contra 95.99 -.82 -0.2 +28.6 +15.7 +20.3
LowPriStk d 49.13 -.27 -0.7 +27.5 +16.2 +23.0
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 64.83 -.58 -1.0 +24.9 +14.9 +19.6
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.44 -.01 0.0 +10.5 +8.8 +15.5
IncomeA m 2.42 -.01 +0.4 +11.7 +9.4 +16.1
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 12.89 -.13 -1.6 -0.1 +4.7 +8.4
Harbor Intllnstl 70.60 -.35 -0.6 +14.0 +7.4 +17.9
Oakmark Intl 1 26.45 -.07 +0.5 +24.6 +12.0 +24.8
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.48 -.32 -1.1 +22.5 +13.4 +19.3
GrowStk 53.11 -.41 +1.0 +35.1 +18.0 +23.5
Vanguard 500Adml 168.66 -1.51 -1.0 +24.9 +14.9 +19.6
5001lnv 168.65 -1.51 -1.0 +24.7 +14.8 +19.5
MulntAdml 13.90 +.02 +1.5 -0.8 +5.5 +4.9
PrmcpAdml 97.15 -.58 +1.5 +34.7 +16.4 +20.9
STGradeAd 10.73 +.01 +0.4 +1.3 +2.6 +5.1
Tgtet2025 15.73 -.07 -0.1 +14.5 +9.6 +15.3
TotBdAdml 10.66 +.03 +1.1 -0.9 +3.6 +4.7
Totlntl 16.58 -.12 -1.0 +11.1 +4.5 +15.1
TotStlAdm 46.42 -.40 -0.6 +26.3 +15.4 +20.6
TotStldx 46.40 -.40 -0.6 +26.1 +15.2 +20.5
Welltn 37.95 -.16 0.0 +15.7 +11.2 +14.9
WelltnAdm 65.55 -.27 0.0 +15.8 +11.3 +15.0
WndsllAdm 64.48 -.61 -1.2 +23.9 +14.6 +18.8
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The stock market declined
broadly Thursday. Nine of the
10 sectors in the Standard &
Poor's 500 index declined. On-
ly telecommunication services
eked out a gain. The Dow fell
176 points, but had been down
as much as 232 points during
the trading day.

Union Pacific UNP
Close:S174.12A5.62 or 3.3%
The railroad saw a 13 percent jump
in quarterly profit as strong agricul-
tural and industrial shipments offset
declining coal.
$180-------------
1 -


0 N I J
52-week range
$130.50 $174.82
Vol.: 3.7m (1.9x avg.) PE:19.2
Mkt. Cap:$80.19 b Yield: 1.8%

Herbalife HLF
Close: $65.92 V-7.61 or-10.3%
Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey has
called for an investigation into the
business practices of the nutritional
supplement company.
$90
80

''" 0 II IJ u J
52-week range
$30.84 $83.51
Vol.: 15.8m (4.9x avg.) PE:13.8
Mkt. Cap: $6.66 b Yield: 1.8%

Jacobs Engineering JEC
Close: $64.60 V-2.21 or -3.3%
The $1.2 billion acquisition of Sin-
clair Knight Merz, or SKM, weighed
on the quarterly earnings of the engi-
neering company.




'O iJ D J
52-week range
$46.42 $66.88
Vol.:2.1m (2.4x avg.) PE:20.0
Mkt. Cap: $8.51 b Yield:...
Noble NE
Close: $33.13YV-3.12 or-8.6%
Fourth-quarter earnings from the off-
shore driller left investors wanting
and there may be weaker demand
for drilling rigs in 2014.




0 IJ I U J
4r




52-week range
$32.60 $42.34
Vol.: 17.2m (4.9x avg.) PE: 11.4
Mkt. Cap: $8.82 b Yield: 3.0%

Netflix NFLX
Close: $388.72A54.99 or 16.5%
Shares of the streaming video com-
pany hit an all-time high after it add-
ed 2.3 million subscribers in the
fourth quarter.

: 4(,1,

u I J

52-week range
$139.62 $395.63
Vol.: 13.Om (4.6x avg.) PE: 326.7
Mkt. Cap: $23.03 b Yield:...


Associated Press

NEW YORK- U.S.
stocks fell broadly Thurs-
day after a report from
China added to growing
signs that the world's sec-
ond-largest economy is
slowing. The selling
spared few companies,
even those reporting solid
earnings.
"It's pretty ugly," said
Randy Frederick, a man-
aging director of active
trading and derivatives at
Charles Schwab. "When
you've got a market that's
near record highs ... peo-
ple are looking for any ex-
cuse to take profits."
In the Standard and
Poor's 500 index, nine of
10 companies dropped.
Stocks fell from the start
of trading after an HSBC
survey of Chinese manu-
facturing fell to the lowest
point since July and sug-
gested that the country's
factory sector was shrink-
ing. Earlier this week,
China reported its slowest
annual economic growth
since 1999.
The Dow was down as
much as 232 points before
trimming its loss late in
the day It closed down
175.99 points, or 1.1 per-
cent, at 16,197.35. The S&P
500 lost 16.40 points, or 0.9
percent, to 1,828.46.
Fearful investors poured


Associated Press
Robert Stabile looks at his screens Thursday as he works
on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.


money into U.S. govern-
ment debt securities, push-
ing the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note down to 2.78
percent from 2.86 percent
late Wednesday That was
the lowest since Nov 29.
Yields fall on bonds when
their prices rise.
The price of gold, an-
other safe-play asset, rose
$23.70, or 1.9 percent, to
$1,262.30 an ounce.
Worries about China also
hammered emerging mar-
ket currencies. The Argen-
tine peso fell hard, and has
now lost 16 percent of its
value in two days, the fastest
drop since the country's
economic collapse in 2002.
The Turkish lira fell 1.3 per-
cent and reached a record


low against the dollar
Several U.S. companies
fell after reporting their
latest quarterly results, in-
cluding KeyCorp, Johnson
Controls and Jacobs Engi-
neering. All three either
met or exceeded analyst
expectations for earnings,
but were each down at
least 3 percent as investors
sold the broad market.
So far this reporting sea-
son, about a fifth of the
companies in the S&P 500
have reported fourth-
quarter earnings, with
about 65 percent of them
beating analyst estimates
- a solid performance,
said Christine Short, asso-
ciate director at S&P Cap-
ital IQ.


Business B R I E FS


Natural gas locomotives
may prove cheaper, cleaner
OMAHA, Neb. -The diesel-burning loco-
motive, the workhorse of American railroads
since World War II, will soon begin burning
natural gas a potentially historic shift that
could cut fuel costs, reduce pollution and
strengthen the advantage railroads hold over
trucks in long-haul shipping.
Rail companies want to take advantage of
booming natural gas production that has cut
the price of the fuel by as much as 50 percent.
So they are preparing to experiment with re-
designed engines capable of burning both
diesel and liquefied natural gas.
Natural gas "may revolutionize the industry
much like the transition from steam to diesel,"
said Jessica Taylor, a spokeswoman for Gen-
eral Electric's locomotive division, one of sev-
eral companies that will test new natural gas
equipment later this year.
Any changes are sure to happen slowly. A
full-scale shift to natural gas would require ex-
pensive new infrastructure across the nation's
140,000-mile freight-rail system, including
scores of fueling stations.

Weekly applications for
US jobless aid mostly flat
WASHINGTON The number of Ameri-
cans seeking unemployment benefits ticked
up 1,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted
326,000, a level consistent with steady job
gains.
The Labor Department said the four-week
average, a less volatile measure, fell for the
third straight week to 331,500. Both figures
are close to pre-recession levels and suggest
that companies are laying off few workers.
Still, hiring will also need to pick up to make
a dent in the still-high 6.7 percent unemploy-
ment rate. Many economists forecast that job
gains will pick up a bit this year.
One sour note in the report: Nearly 1.4 mil-
lion people who have been unemployed
longer than six months lost benefits in the
week that ended Jan. 4, the latest period for
which figures are available. That's because an
emergency program that provided extended
benefits expired Dec. 28.
The number of recipients fell to 3.7 million
from 4.7 million in the previous week. About
300,000 people began receiving unemploy-
ment benefits in the week ended Jan. 4.
FDA takes another look at
caramel coloring in soda
WASHINGTON The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration says there's no reason to believe
that the coloring added to sodas is unsafe. But
the agency is taking another look just to make
sure.
The agency's announcement comes in re-


sponse to a study by Consumer Reports that
shows 12 brands of soda have varying levels
of 4-methylimidazole an impurity found in
some caramel coloring.
Though studies have not been conclusive
about whether 4-methylimidazole is a carcino-
gen, California includes it on the state list of
carcinogens and a state law mandates a can-
cer warning label on products that have a cer-
tain level of the substance. In reaction to that
law, Coke, Pepsi and other soft drink makers
have directed their caramel-color suppliers to
reduce the levels of 4-methylimidazole. It is
not found in all caramel colorings.
The FDA said it has studied the use of
caramel as a flavor and color additive for
decades but will review new data on the
safety of 4-methylimidazole. The agency did
not provide details about the data.
There are no federal limits on the amount of
4-methylimidazole in food and drink. The sub-
stance is formed in some caramel coloring at
low levels during the manufacturing process.
The FDA says it also can occur in trace
amounts when coffee beans are roasted or
some meats are grilled.
Platinum miners
strike in South Africa
RUSTENBURG, South Africa Tens of
thousands of platinum miners in South Africa
went on strike Thursday, demanding higher
wages in a protest that is disrupting one of the
country's major industries.
Protesters from the Association of
Mineworkers and Construction Union sang
and danced outside one mine shaft in Rusten-
burg, the center of major platinum operations.
Some wore hard hats, and one donned a
zebra mask.
Union president Joseph Mathunjwa ad-
dressed thousands of cheering workers at the
Lonmin mine at Marikana, and told them the
demand for a minimum monthly wage of
$1,200, was less than what mine bosses
spend on their pets.

Carl Icahn snaps up another
$500M of Apple stock
SAN FRANCISCO Outspoken billionaire
Carl Icahn has tossed another bushel of Apple
stock into his investment portfolio as he tries
to persuade the iPhone maker to buy back
more of its own shares.
Icahn said he invested another $500 million
in Apple Inc. in a series of purchases made
Thursday. With the latest shopping spree,
Icahn has spent $1 billion on Apple stock dur-
ing the past weeks to raise his total holdings in
the Cupertino, Calif., company to $3.6 billion.
That represents a stake of less than 1 percent
in Apple, which has a market value of about
$500 billion.
From wire reports


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,907
3,297
1030
2105
94
37


NASD
2,076
1,964
800
1791
116
23


I !


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 A9







Page A10 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24,2014



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
1Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SETTING COURSE




Five-year



strategic plan



ambitious


he newly adopted five-
year strategic plan to
spur economic devel-
opment is ambitious, detailed
and long overdue.
Nevertheless, if successful,
the local Economic Develop
Council can literally change
the way we do business in Cit-
rus County
The plan sets 20
goals, complete
with strategies and THE 1
actions, spread EDC
over five cate- five-yea
gories: product
development, mar- OUR OH
keting, target
industries, work- Good e
force development to the
and economic de-
velopment pro-
gramming
While the primary aim is job
creation, the plan addresses
three chief weaknesses of the
current state of economic de-
velopment in the county.
First, Citrus County needs
more funding for economic
development. Accomplishing
the goals set out in the plan
will require investment in
property, infrastructure, mar-
keting, programs, hard work
and long man hours, which is
not cheap. Citrus County has
nearly 45 percent more pop-
ulation than Sumter County,
yet Sumter spends twice as
much on economic develop-


Homosassa TV stinks
I love your Sound Off. It's
great and it's really nice that the
people express their opinions.
And I want to say right now, tele-
vision for us here in Homosassa
stinks. It is terrible. It is very
bad. It's not nice anymore.
Where are all our good pro-
grams? And now they're taking
our Weather Channel away from
us. I loved it. It was so nice to
put it on and find out what the
weather is. Now we've got a dif-
ferent one. Why? What is wrong?
Dangerous left turn
I lived in Inverness the
past 10 years and I've c
had four situations there
at Joe's Restaurant
where you try to turn left
onto (U.S.) 41 going
north. ... These folks are
trying to make a left turn
out of an illegal situation
that's very dangerous.
And my feeling is that if CAL
they need to go to Joe's ,IQ
Restaurant, go down the 56J3
road west, make a legal
turn and come back and then go
into the restaurant. Anyway, I
agree with the guy that wrote in to
the Sound Off about that situa-
tion. I surely hope something's
done soon.
Great letter
Roslyn Smith
I wanted to thank Roslyn
Smith for her letter Wednesday
morning (Jan. 15). It was to the
point and the sad thing was that
most Americans believe as she
believes but nothing ever
changes.
Patriotic family
We all occasionally make cuts
at politicians. However, here is a


S
ad
a

P

e r
ac


I

(


ment than Citrus.
Second, the makeup of the
current EDC is mostly gov-
ernment employees. Private
industry must have a seat at
the table and be leading the
charge. Entrepreneurs who
have started businesses, cre-
ated jobs and met payrolls
are the experts in
economic devel-
opment and need
MSUE: to be partners in
dopts this endeavor and
r plan. eventually run
the show.
PINION: Finally, the
number of avail-
ements able shovel-ready
plan. sites where a
business owner
looking to set up
shop can move rapidly is min-
imal. Other cities and coun-
ties have already recognized
this need and have developed
the physical infrastructure
necessary to draw businesses
in. Roads, air and rail serv-
ice, water and sewer, elec-
tricity, telecommunications
and natural gas are all key in-
frastructure components that
must be developed if Citrus is
going to be competitive in ex-
panding its economy
The destination is far, but
the EDC has provided a road
map for Citrus County to get
there and that is the first step
to a healthier economy.


compliment for Congressman
Richard Nugent: His three sons
all served tours of duty in the
military in Afghanistan. They
were obviously raised as patri-
otic Americans.
Dogs deserve good life
This is to the person who
commented about the person
who wrote an article in on
(Dec. 31) about animals and
the Animal Control people.
They need to read the paper on
A3 today (Jan. 19) where it
says, "Some comfort for shel-
tered animals." I agree totally
with this whole article, that the
Animals need to be
JND kept out of the cold.
So whoever wrote that
Pll article that told that
other person to get a
life, they need to get a
life, a decent life, and
Become a better
human being and care
5* for these animals who
5 end up in these ken-
)579 nels and shelters and
have to sleep on the
hard, concrete floors.
The no-signal state
In Sunday's column (Jan. 19)
Gerry Mulligan again mentioned
the use or lack of use of turn
signals. Does he not realize that
when Florida plates are attached
to a car, it automatically discon-
nects the turn signals?
Fur doesn't cover cold
This is for the person who
called in to say animals have fur
and they don't get cold when it's
30 degrees out. I suggest you
put on your coat, go out in your
yard and sit out there all night
long better yet, maybe a 24-
hour period and you tell me
you don't get cold.


No texting in public
Texting at the movies is not a
good idea. There is no excuse
to take out a gun and shoot
someone. It has gone too far
I think it is rude to text in
any public place. We do not go
to the movies anymore. It
seems the whole movie theater
is all lights from people texting
or using a cellphone. I think
they should not use cellphones
in any public place. It is annoy-
ing and rude to do that. People
are not thinking of others.
Technology has gone too far
and it is causing nothing but
trouble.
Now they want to allow that
on airplanes? They must be
kidding. Wait until you see
what troubles that will bring.
Can you imagine a guy trying
to sleep while the guy next to
him is on the cellphone? You
don't want to know what will
happen. Stay tuned.
Anna DeRose
Lecanto


"All faults may be forgiven of him who
has perfect candor."
Walt Whitman, 1855


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Caregivers and the First Amendment


WASHINGTON
he Democratic party is
the party of government
because it embraces a
proposition it has done much to
refute that government is a
nimble, skillful social engineer
- and because government em-
ployees are a signifi-
cant component of
the party's base and
of its financial sup-
port through govern-
ment employees
unions. Franklin
Roosevelt, architect /
of the modern party, r
believed unioniza-
tion would be inap-
propriate in the Georg
public sector Today's OTI
party, however, ag-
gressively uses gov- VOIl
ernment coercion to
create supposed "government
employees" from whom unions
can extract money, some of it
for the party.
On Tuesday, the Supreme
Court will hear arguments
about whether the Illinois gov-
ernment's policy of herding
home-care workers into unions
violates the workers' First
Amendment rights. It does.
Because organized labor's
presence in the private sector
has shriveled from about 35
percent of the workforce in the
1950s to 6.6 percent today, pub-
lic-sector employees are labor's
oxygen. In Democratic-con-
trolled Illinois, the relationship
between the party and organ-
ized labor is, to say no more,
mutually congenial. So, the gov-
ernment declared that
providers of home care in-
cluding family members for
the elderly and others are gov-
ernment employees because
their compensation comes from
Medicaid, and because they
participate in a state govern-
ment program and are subject
to state regulation.
In 2003, Democratic Gov Rod
Blagojevich, of fragrant mem-
ory, so decreed that thousands
of home-care givers were pub-
lic employees, and ordered
recognition of whatever union


yg
H
I4


thousands of caregivers would
choose, which was the Service
Employees International Union
(SEIU). In 2009, the current
Democratic governor, Pat
Quinn, designated even more
home caregivers as public em-
ployees, making them targets
for "card check"
S unionization drives.
In this process for
Illinois government
employees, when a
majority signs
the cards, a union-
ization election has
occurred.
The state govern-
ment gave SEIU and
e Will a rival union the
|ER names and ad-
dresses of all the
DES freshly minted gov-
ernment employees.
Pam Harris, who is suing to get
Illinois' system declared un-
constitutional, gets a modest
stipend from Medicaid to sup-
port her care for her profoundly
disabled son. She remembers a
young SEIU employee coming
to her door to say just sign the
card "so my boss knows I spoke
to you." A majority of caregivers
in one Illinois program chose
the SEIU.
Illinois' scheme is a trifecta
of constitutional violations. It
violates the right of free associ-
ation of those who are coerced
into a fees-paying relationship
with unions a right that, the
Supreme Court has held,
"plainly presupposes a freedom
not to associate." Not to associ-
ate, for example, with groups
whose expressive activities are
offensive to those who are co-
erced into joining the groups.
Second, those coerced into
unions are compelled to subsi-
dize with their dues union
speech with which they may
strenuously disagree. Third,
after being transformed by gov-
ernment fiat into government
employees, they are denied the
First Amendment right to peti-
tion the government for redress
of grievances in their own
voices, having been forced to
allow a union to petition


for them.
An amicus brief supporting
Harris notes that "the state of
Illinois has no cognizable inter-
est in maintaining 'labor peace'
among household workers or
family members merely be-
cause they provide services to
individuals who participate in
a state program or because they
are subject to state regulation."
"Labor peace" is the reason
unionization is supposedly a le-
gitimate state interest suffi-
ciently compelling, in certain
circumstances, to allow states
to compromise First Amend-
ment protections.
"Labor peace" was an impor-
tant interest when it entered
labor law in 1917 in connection
with a national railroad strike
that might have seriously dis-
rupted interstate commerce in
wartime. But how could per-
sons providing home care in-
cluding parents such as Pam
Harris threaten labor
peace? Caregivers do not work
together in a factory or office.
And they certainly do not
threaten the flow of interstate
commerce.
They actually are employees
not of the government but of the
care recipients, who hire the
caregivers and determine
working hours and conditions.
So what is the point of a union
in these circumstances? En-
riching the union is the point.
Illinois' system resembles
that in some other states. Until
Republicans repealed Michi-
gan's arrangements, the SEIU
extracted more than $34 million
from tens of thousands of care-
givers. Patently, the purpose of
such systems is to enable
unions to siphon away, in dues,
a portion of caregivers' pay,
some of which becomes cam-
paign contributions for the po-
litical party that created the
system. The court is unlikely to
think the First Amendment
should be diluted to accommo-
date this.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost corn.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


Heading toward
another travesty
Ah, the power of the written
word, or in this case the Chron-
icle article of Jan. 16, "Beng-
hazi attacks preventable." the
unwritten word or name. The
article alluded to several agen-
cies or persons who may have
not done all they could have to
prevent the loss of four Ameri-
can lives in the Benghazi
disaster


Mentioned most obviously
of course was Ambassador
Susan Rice who made several
television appearances to foist
upon the American public the
fairy tale that the cause of the
Benghazi disaster was an un-
known film, which reportedly
was uncomplimentary to Mo-
hammed or Islam. Mentioned
four times in the article is the
Department of State, but not
once a name associated with
the State Department or its
secretary Who was that per-
son? Why none other than
Hillary Clinton. The very
same Hillary Clinton who,
during investigative hearings
vehemently yelled out, "What
difference does it make?" The
same Hillary Clinton who De-
mocrats want America to be-
lieve is the best candidate to
succeed Obama as president.
For this to happen, I feel,
would be another American
travesty
Charles D. Kowalski
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I'1 AkLScf WDfiM Ti Y'I erW A FB.ARS.'l"


LETTERS to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mich. governor wants 50K


immigrants for Detroit


Associated Press
DETROIT Michigan
Gov. Rick Snyder asked
the federal government
Thursday to set aside thou-
sands of work visas for
bankrupt Detroit, a bid to
revive the decaying city by
attracting talented immi-
grants who are willing to
move there and stay for
five years.
The Republican gover-
nor has routinely touted
immigration as a powerful
potential force for growing
Detroit's economy, saying
immigrant entrepreneurs
start many small busi-
nesses and file patents at
twice the rate of U.S.-born
citizens.
"Let's send a message to
the entire world: Detroit,
Michigan, is open to the
world," Snyder said at a
news conference.
The proposal involves
EB-2 visas, which are of-
fered every year to legal
immigrants who have ad-
vanced degrees or show
exceptional ability in cer-
tain fields.
But the governor's ambi-
tious plan faces significant
hurdles: The visas are not
currently allocated by re-
gion or state. And the num-
ber he is seeking 50,000
over five years would be
a quarter of the total EB-2
visas offered.
The program would re-
quire no federal financial
bailout, the governor said,
only the easing of immi-
gration rules and visa lim-
its to help fill jobs in
automotive engineering,
information technology,
health care and life
sciences.
"It's really taking up the
offer of the federal govern-
ment to say they want to
help more," Snyder said.
"Isn't this a great way that
doesn't involve large-scale
financial contributions
from the federal govern-
ment to do something dra-


matic in Detroit?"
He said the Obama ad-
ministration has "been re-
ceptive to us bringing
significant ideas to them,
and this would be near the
top of the list."
Snyder, a first-term gov-
ernor who made millions
as a computer industry ex-
ecutive and venture capi-
talist, said it's not clear
whether the White House
could act administratively
or if such a change would
require legislative action.
He said he's talking
about the proposal with
Michigan's congressional
delegation and plans pri-
vate meetings Friday with
administration officials
while in Washington for a
panel discussion about the
economic benefits of an
immigration overhaul.
The governor's proposal
seemed to take officials by
surprise at the State De-
partment, which works
with the Homeland Secu-
rity Department to decide
on visa requests.
In Washington, State De-
partment deputy spokes-
woman Marie Harf told
reporters Thursday that
she was aware of the gov-


ernor's comments but had
no immediate response.
Snyder's office has said
immigrants created nearly
one-third of the high-tech
businesses in Michigan in
the last decade, and he
cited a study that found for
every job that goes to an
immigrant, 2.5 are created
for U.S.-born citizens.
Being more welcoming
to immigrants would also
make the city more attrac-
tive to employers.
"The point isn't just to
say, 'Let's have a lot of jobs
created in Detroit for im-
migrants,"' he said. "Let's
step this up. Let's do some-
thing that could really be a
jumpstart to the continu-
ing comeback of Michigan
and Detroit."
The city, the largest in
American history to file
for bankruptcy, has been
hollowed out by a long
population decline, from
1.8 million people in its
heyday of the 1950s, to
about 713,000 today at the
time of the 2010 census.
During that time, Detroit
steadily lost many of its
manufacturing jobs, and
huge numbers of workers
fled to the suburbs.


Power company Tri-State
pitches $10M C02 X Prize
CHEYENNE, Wyo. -A power company
is raising money for a $10 million X Prize to
spur technology to capture and use carbon
dioxide emitted from coal-fired power
plants.
Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead proposed
Thursday that his state get involved in the
competition by helping build a facility where
teams could test out their technology.
The prize winner would have to be able to
show they could economically capture car-
bon emissions at a working power plant.
They also would have to be able to put the
carbon to a use that could defray the cost of
keeping the greenhouse gas out of the
atmosphere.


The Culver City, Calif.-based X Prize
Foundation was behind the $10 million
Ansari X Prize, which led to the first private
manned spaceflight in 2004. Current con-
tests include the $30 million Google Lunar
Lander X Prize for the first private company
to safely land a craft on the moon.
The Tri-State Carbon X Prize is under de-
velopment while the U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency seeks to require all new
coal-fired power plants to capture carbon
dioxide.
Westminster, Colo.-based Tri-State Gener-
ation and Transmission Association Inc. is
looking ahead to the day when existing coal-
fired power plants might also need to meet
such a standard, Vice President Jim Spiers
said.
From wire reports


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Nation BRIEF


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning January 27, 2014
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS
Waterbodv Plant Herbicide Used
Inverness Pool Nuphar/ Floating /Hydrilla/ Glyphosate/ Diquat/
Duckweed / Pondweed / 2,4D /Aquathol /
Tussocks / Pickerelweed Super K / Clipper / Quest
Hernando Pool Nuphar/ Torpedograss / Hydrilla Glyphosate /Aquathol/
/ Duckweed / Cabomba Diquat/ Super K/
Clipper/ Quest/
Clearcast / MSO
Floral City Pool Floating/ Pennywort/ Tussocks/ Diquat!/2, 4D / Clearcast
Pickerelweed / MSO
MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Hernando Pool Tussocks
Crystal River Lyngbya


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality Treated areas will be identified
with Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restnctions For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at http /www bocc citrus fl us/
pubworks/aauatics/aauaticservices htm Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 All


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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Virginia AG reverses course on gay marriage


Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. Gay
marriage moved closer to
gaining its first foothold in
the South when Virginia's
attorney general said
Thursday that the state's
ban on same-sex matri-
mony is unconstitutional
and he will join the fight to
get it struck down.
"It's time for the com-
monwealth to be on the
right side of history and
the right side of the law,"
newly elected Democrat


Nation BRIEFS

Welcome


Mark R. Herring said in a
state that fiercely resisted
school integration and in-
terracial marriage in the
1950s and '60s.
Republicans accused
Herring of shirking his duty
to defend the state's laws
after less than two weeks
on the job, while gay rights
activists exulted over the
latest in a string of victories
- this one in a conserva-
tive and usually hostile re-
gion of the country
"It's a nice day to be an
American from Virginia,"


Tom Shuttleworth, one of
the lawyers challenging
the ban, said in an email.
The move reflects the
rise of a new Democratic
leadership in Virginia and
illustrates how rapidly the
political and legal land-
scape on gay marriage in
the U.S. is shifting.
Herring, as a state senator,
supported Virginia's 2006
voter-approved constitu-
tional amendment defining
marriage as the union of a
man and woman But he said
he decided after a "thorough


legal review" that it is uncon-
stitutional, and he will join
gay couples in two federal
lawsuits challenging the ban
"I have now concluded
that Virginia's ban on mar-
riage between same sex
couples violates the Four-
teenth Amendment of the
U.S. Constitution on two
grounds: Marriage is a fun-
damental right being de-
nied to some Virginians,
and the ban unlawfully
discriminates on the basis
of both sexual orientation
and gender," he said.


The US shift toward gay marriage
Virginia attorney general, a Democrat, joins fight against his
state's gay marriage ban.
* Currently authorizes same-sex marriage
* Allows civil unions or domestic partnership.


^ *R.I.
*0Del.
*D.C.


NOTE:
As of
1/7/2014


SOURCE: National Conference of State Legislatures


Associated Press
Logan Turner, 4, of Lans-
ing, Mich., waits Thurs-
day while waving a flag
and holding a sign for his
father, Ed Turner, one of
more than 150 Michigan
Army National Guard sol-
diers of the 144th Military
Police Company returning
home from Afghanistan at
Owosso High School in
Owosso, Mich.


Wyoming group
OKs money for
Magpul
CHEYENNE, Wyo.-
The Wyoming Business
Council on Thursday unani-
mously approved $13 mil-
lion in state grants and
loans to help one of the
country's largest producers
of ammunition magazines
for guns relocate to the
state.
The council's 11-0 vote
sends the proposal involv-
ing Magpul Industries Corp.
to the State Land and In-
vestment Board, which is
scheduled to meet Feb. 6.
Erie, Colo.-based Magpul
is seeking to move its pro-
duction, distribution and
shipping operations to
Cheyenne because of gun
control laws enacted last
year in Colorado.
Autopsy: Officer
died of gunshot
wound to chest
OAKLAND, Calif. The
San Francisco BayArea
transit officer who was shot
and killed by a fellow officer
while they searched an
apartment died of a single
gunshot wound to the
chest, according to autopsy
results released Thursday.
Bay Area Rapid Transit
police Sgt. Tom Smith was
wearing a bulletproof vest
when he was shot on Tues-
day, but the bullet struck an
area that was not covered,
Alameda County sheriff's
spokesman J.D. Nelson
said. The shooting was an
accident, he added.
Suburban NY
chief arrested on
child porn charge
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -
A suburban New York po-
lice chief who taught sex-
abuse awareness classes
to children has been ac-
cused of downloading and
sharing more than 120 im-
ages of child pornography.
Mount Pleasant Chief
Brian Fanelli, 54, who has
been in office about two
months, was arrested
Thursday.
Fanelli reportedly told in-
vestigators that he first
viewed child pornography
as sex-abuse research for
the classes he was teach-
ing. But he added that he
then began viewing the im-
ages "for personal interest."
From wire reports


Associated Press

KIEV, Ukraine -A top oppo-
sition leader on Thursday urged
protesters to maintain a shaky
cease-fire with police after at
least two demonstrators were
killed in clashes this week, but
some in the crowd appeared de-
fiant, jeering and chanting "rev-
olution" and "shame."
Emerging from hours-long
talks with President Viktor
Yanukovych, opposition leader
Oleh Tyahnybok asked demon-
strators in Kiev for several
more days of a truce, saying the
president has agreed to ensure
the release of dozens of de-
tained protesters and stop fur-
ther detentions.


Argentina peso
suffers steepest
drop since 2002
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
- The peso is suffering its
fastest fall since Argentina's
2002 economic collapse as
dwindling reserves keep the
Central Bank from trying to
prop up the currency by inter-
vening in the foreign ex-
change market.
The 16 percent loss in the
peso's official value against
the dollar over Wednesday
and Thursday could worsen
the country's inflation, which
is among the worst in Latin
America, analysts said.
The peso fell from 6.88 per
dollar on Tuesday to 7.14 on
Wednesday. By Thursday's
close, it was at 8 to the dollar.
On the black market, where
Argentina's currency is even
weaker, the peso dropped 6
percent Thursday to 13 per
dollar.
The sharp depreciation is


But other opposition leaders
offered mixed reports on the
outcome of the meeting, with
Vitali Klitschko saying negotia-
tions had brought little result.
He and Tyanhnybok were
booed at the barricades by
angry demonstrators and the
atmosphere appeared tense.
"We are not going to sit and
wait for nobody-knows-what,"
said ski mask-wearing protester
Andriy Pilkevich, who was build-
ing barricades near police lines
from giant bags of ice. "Those
who want to win, must fight"
Interior Minster Vitali Za-
kharchenko issued a statement
guaranteeing that police would
not take action against the large
protest camp on Independence


Festival


Associated Press
A Hindu holy man stands at
Sangam, the confluence of
rivers Ganges and Yamuna,
Thursday during the annual
traditional fair "Magh Mela"
in Allahabad, India.

likely due to a new govern-
ment strategy of seeking a
sudden devaluation instead of
a gradual one, said Juan
Pablo Ronderos of economic


Square, known as the Maidan.
He also called on the police to
exercise calm and not react to
provocations.
The developments came as
hundreds of enraged protesters
in several regions in western
Ukraine, where Yanukvoych has
little support, seized government
offices and forced one governor
loyal to Yanukovych to resign.
At least two people were
killed by gunfire at the site of
clashes in Kiev on Wednesday
Demonstrators had pelted riot
police with barrages of stones
and set police buses on fire,
while the officers responded
with rubber bullets, tear gas
and stun grenades.
Opposition leaders had of-


Wor/d BRIEFS
consulting firm abeceb.com.
"There was a first sign of
this change on Tuesday be-
cause the Central Bank didn't
show up (to intervene) until
midday, and on Wednesday
and today it just disappeared
from the market," Ronderos
said. "The gradual devalua-
tion wasn't working because
the Central Bank kept on sac-
rificing lots of its reserves and
it kept on being reflected on
consumer prices."
Analysts expect Argentina's
inflation to reach more than
30 percent this year, the sec-
ond highest rate in Latin
America after Venezuela.
Fire at Quebec
senior home;
3 dead, 30 missing
L'ISLE-VERTE, Quebec-
Afire raged through a seniors'
home in eastern Quebec on
Thursday, trapping residents
dependent on wheelchairs
and walkers. Three died, 30
were missing and Canada's


fered a Thursday evening dead-
line for the government to
make concessions or face re-
newed clashes. Protesters had
quenched barricades that had
been set on fire, but lit them
again during the evening.
The protests began after
Yanukovych turned away from
closer ties with the European
Union in favor of getting a
bailout loan from Russia. They
turned violent this week after
he pushed through harsh anti-
protest laws, rejecting protest-
ers' demands that he resign and
call new elections.
Support for Yanukovych is
very thin in western Ukraine
and most residents want closer
ties to the 28-nation EU.


prime minister said there is lit-
tle doubt the death toll will be
high.
Officials said firefighters
saw and heard people in the
building that they were unable
to save.
Many of those unaccounted
for were confined to wheel-
chairs and walkers and only
five residents in the center
were fully autonomous, said
Ginette Caron, acting mayor
of the small town of L'lsle-
Verte, about 140 miles north-
east of Quebec City.
She said some had
Alzheimer's disease.
Jamaica police
units to get
wearable cameras
KINGSTON, Jamaica -
Some Jamaican police units
will soon be wearing video
cameras on their uniforms in
part to encourage officers to
use appropriate force and
perhaps curb high rates of
killings by law enforcers in a


country where they have long
been accused of trigger-
happy tactics.
On Thursday National Secu-
rity Minister Peter Bunting an-
nounced that "select" units of
the Jamaica Constabulary
Force will start wearing the
cameras this year. The small
cameras record anything from a
traffic stop to a car chase to an
unfolding violent crime and are
typically worn on an officer's
lapel or on a small headset.
At a press briefing, Bunting
said it will encourage profes-
sional behavior by police offi-
cers, improve transparency
and evidence collection, and
head off unfair allegations of
wrongdoing.
The security minister's
comments come as an inde-
pendent commission that in-
vestigates charges of abuses
by security forces is launching
a probe into alleged homi-
cides by policemen in Claren-
don parish.
From wire reports


State couldpotentially become first in South to OKpractice


Tensions on the rise


Associated Press
Opposition leader and former WBC heavyweight boxing champion Vitali Klitschko addresses protesters Thursday near the burning
barricades between police and protesters in central Kiev, Ukraine.

Ukraine opposition leaders pleadfor calm; at least two killed in clashes











PORTS


New Bucs
GM Jason
Licht ready
to help turn
team into
winners./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
U TV, lottery/B3
0 NBA, NHL, golf/B4
0 College basketball/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 High school sports/B6
0 Tennis/B6


Hurricanes' Jenkins relishes defense


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
Ask any Citrus girls basketball player,
past or present, why their team succeeds,
and it is more than likely that these
words will appear somewhere in their
description: teamwork and defense.
Sure, there will be other reasons
listed, but those two will resonate. Be-
cause that, as much as anything else, has
been the Hurricanes' propelling force.
Micah Jenkins, a 5-foot-8 senior
guard/forward, is a perfect example.
Jenkins isn't extraordinary in anything

Citrus senior Micah Jenkins is averaging
over three steals and three rebounds per
game for the Hurricanes, to go along
with her 12.7 points per contest.
MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle


in particular, but she's good at just
about everything. And that's what
makes her so valuable to a Citrus team
that has, for the fourth straight season,
won at least 20
games.
"Our defense has St
helped us win all the catalysvc
games," Jenkins said
after her Citrus team defense
dispatched a very
good Crystal River D
squad for the second Citrus girls basketb
time in as many meet- senior guard/fc
ings this season, win-
ning 60-37 last Friday
"I'm looking to go in the middle more,
but I don't want to force it"
Jenkins is the prototypical kind of
player every team needs if it is to suc-
ceed, someone capable of doing a bit of


everything. Jenkins is currently the
second-leading scorer for the Hurri-
canes, averaging 12.7 points a game;
she is also averaging 3.2 rebounds and


ie is the
st of our
e.


)ave Hamilton
all head coach said of
)rward Micah Jenkins.


3.2 steals per contest,
making her a valu-
able all-around
performer
"She is," Citrus
coach Dave Hamilton
said, "the catalyst of
our defense."
If that's the case
and she's getting
graded on last Fri-


day's performance, she certainly de-
serves top marks. Citrus led 15-0 to start
the game and was up 17-3 after one
quarter; it was 29-13 at the half and
See Page B3


recociousNo. 6 UF
takes care


' 4


MATT PFIFFNER/Chromnicle
Lecanto freshman guard Kaine McColley (1) has been invaluable for his 12-7 Panthers with his rebounding and defense.

Infirstyear ofhigh school freshman McColley makes Panthers tougher


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
As a freshman starter who's played
around 450 minutes and averaged
9.7 points a game, Lecanto guard
Kaine McColley is showing age is just a
number
His significant contributions are a prod-
uct of both his talent as well as the Panthers'
needs, especially of late. In the absence of
injured top scorers Darius Sawyer and
Brandon Burich, McColley scored 20 points
in helping his team to a win at Ridgewood
in New Port Richey on Wednesday
"When our top two scorers went out, I
knew I had to pick it up," McColley said.


The team's needs have forced the fresh-
man to grow up fast, but first-year LHS
head coach Jeffrey Anderson is comfort-
able relying on him. When Anderson
coached at Fort Pierce's Lincoln Park
Academy he frequently pulled up middle
school players to varsity and even started
a seventh-grader in his final year at the
magnet school.
From the first time Anderson watched
McColley play in a pickup game, he im-
mediately noticed the young player's
unique competitiveness, often lacking in
similarly talented young players. Re-
cently, McColley has been asked to cover
opponents' top scorer, including Crystal
River's Ty Reynolds and Dunnellon's


Desmond Frazier
"His defense has improved big time,"
Anderson said. "His close-out ability, his
quick feet, to be able to stay in front of
guards and be long and tall on them, has
helped us out tremendously We have
quicker guards, but they don't create the
kind of problems Kaine can.
"You see the steady growth he's made
and his confidence going up. He's learning
where he fits in the offense and how to
play off of his teammates."
McColley, who missed his eighth-grade
season over a separated shoulder after his
Lecanto Middle School team went unde-
See .Page B3


oi Dnama
Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
Michael Frazier II scored 18
points and made five 3-point-
ers to lead No. 6 Florida to a
68-62 victory over Alabama on
Thursday night.
It was the 10th consecutive
win for the Gators (16-2, 5-0
Southeastern Conference),
matching last season's longest
streak.
The Crimson Tide (8-10, 2-3)
had its league-best 14-game
SEC home winning streak
snapped.
Florida went 8 of 10 from the
free throw
line over
the final
47 sec-
onds to
halt any
Alabama4
threat.
Frazier shot 5 of 13, all from
3-point range. Casey Prather
scored 14 points despite just 6-
of-16 shooting for the Gators.
Scottie Wilbekin had 10 points
and four assists.
Trevor Releford led Alabama
with 14 points, while Nick Ja-
cobs had 12, Levi Randolph 11
and Shannon Hale 10.
The Tide was without No. 2
scorer Retin Obasohan, who
strained his left hip flexor in
Tuesday's practice.
The Gators, who earned win
No. 100 for the four-man sen-
ior class, have won the last
eight meetings and 10 of 11. Al-
abama has lost three of its last
four games, despite holding
six straight opponents below
70 points.
Randolph hit a pair of free
throws on back-to-back posses-
sions to cut Florida's lead to 62-
57 with 1:07 left.
Florida ran 20 seconds off the
clock before forcing the Tide to
foul, and then the free throw
parade began. The Gators did-
n't make a field goal over the
last 4 minutes.
Frazier hit consecutive
3-pointers to give Florida its
first double-digit lead, 53-43,
with 9:28 left.
Patric Young then made a steal
and lofted a long pass to Kasey
Hill for a layup. Alabama cut the
12-point deficit in half with a 6-0
spurt but couldn't get any closer
until Randolph's free throws.


Hard work propelled Fischer


1993 CRHS graduate is

one of county's four

two-time state champs
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
One of Citrus County's finest-ever wrestlers
took an unlikely route to stardom the gridiron.
Three of the county's multiple state champions:
Citrus' Taylor Jackson (2011-12), Lecanto's Nick
Carrier (1997-98) and Crystal River's Dana Wilkes
(1986-87) were practically raised on the mats.
Not so with former Crystal River High School
multi-sport athlete Robert "Bobby" Fischer
Fischer earned back-to-back mat state titles in
Class 2A in 1992-93.
Unlike the other former Citrus County state
champions, he was a football player first.


Fischer was born in Port Smith, New Hamp-
shire. He was one of four boys to James and Paula
Fischer
The Fischers relocated to the Jacksonville area
when Bobby was 4. The family packed for Citrus
County prior to Bobby's seventh-grade year His
parents still reside in Citrus County
During his eighth-grade season at Crystal River
Middle School, Fischer played football (wide re-
ceiver/cornerback), basketball (a reserve guard)
and competed in track and field (specializing in
800 and 1,500 meters).
Upon matriculating to Crystal River High
School, he played junior varsity football for Craig
Frederick.

See Page B3
Former two-time state wrestling champion Bobby
Fischer, a 1993 graduate of Crystal River High
School, holds his five-year-old son Reese while
being flanked by his other son Cameron, 14.
Special to the Chronicle




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I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 21 20 .512 -
Brooklyn 18 22 .450 21
NewYork 15 27 .357 61
Boston 15 29 .341 71
Philadelphia 14 28 .333 71
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 31 12 .721 -
Atlanta 22 19 .537 8
Washington 20 21 .488 10
Charlotte 19 25 .432 12/2
Orlando 11 32 .256 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 33 8 .805 -
Chicago 21 20 .512 12
Detroit 17 25 .405 16/2
Cleveland 15 27 .357 18/2
Milwaukee 8 33 .195 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 32 10 .762 -
Houston 29 15 .659 4
Dallas 25 19 .568 8
Memphis 20 20 .500 11
New Orleans 16 25 .390 15/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 10 .767 -
Portland 31 11 .738 1/2
Denver 20 20 .500 111/
Minnesota 20 21 .488 12
Utah 14 29 .326 19
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 29 15 .659 -
Golden State 26 17 .605 2/2
Phoenix 24 17 .585 3/2
L.A. Lakers 16 27 .372 12/2
Sacramento 15 26 .366 12/2
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 112, Orlando 109
Boston 113, Washington 111, OT
Chicago 98, Cleveland 87
Charlotte 95, L.A. Clippers 91
Toronto 93, Dallas 85
Philadelphia 110, NewYork 106
Houston 119, Sacramento 98
Milwaukee 104, Detroit 101
Oklahoma City 111, San Antonio 105
Phoenix 124, Indiana 100
Thursday's Games
Miami 109, L.A. Lakers 102
Denver at Portland, late
Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.
Washington at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Indiana at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Indiana at Denver, 9 p.m.
Washington at Utah, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 49 3115 3 65141 109
Tampa Bay 51 3016 5 65150 126
Montreal 50 2718 5 59127 125
Toronto 53 2721 5 59151 163
Detroit 50 2218 10 54127 138
Ottawa 51 2219 10 54144 159
Florida 50 2023 7 47120 151
Buffalo 49 1329 7 33 92 142
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 51 3613 2 74168 125
N.Y Rangers 53 2723 3 57132 135
Columbus 50 2620 4 56148 140
Philadelphia 52 2521 6 56141 152
Carolina 50 2219 9 53125 142
New Jersey 51 2119 11 53122 124
Washington 50 2220 8 52142 152
N.Y Islanders 53 2125 7 49151 175
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 53 32 9 12 76189 146
St. Louis 50 3411 5 73173 116
Colorado 49 3113 5 67144 127
Minnesota 53 2820 5 61127 130
Dallas 51 2320 8 54148 153
Nashville 51 2222 7 51125 152
Winnipeg 51 2323 5 51144 152
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 52 3710 5 79177 129
San Jose 50 3212 6 70161 123
LosAngeles 51 2916 6 64131 108
Vancouver 51 2616 9 61129 128
Phoenix 50 2318 9 55143 152
Calgary 51 1727 7 41114 161
Edmonton 52 1531 6 36132 183
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 5, Chicago 4, SO
Carolina 3, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 5, Montreal 1
Calgary 3, Phoenix 2
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 4, Ottawa 3, SO
Carolina 5, Buffalo 3
St. Louis 2, N.Y Rangers 1
Columbus 5, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 6, N.Y Islanders 4
Minnesota 2, Chicago 1
Dallas 7, Toronto 1
Nashville at Vancouver, late
Los Angeles at Anaheim, late
Winnipeg at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, ppd., schedule conflict
Saturday's Games


Ottawa at Carolina, 12 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y Islanders, 1 p.m.


SCOREBOARD


Foar th r record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
AO^ 1-0-0
SCASH 3 (late)
7-4-5

fPLAY 4 (early)
0-3-6-9
PLAY 4 (late)
r 5-4-6-0

FANTASY 5
21 23 33 35 36

Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 1 2 7 9 55
Powerball: 29
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
No Florida winners
Fantasy 5:2 7 12 -27- 35
5-of-5 3 winners $79,108.28
4-of-5 431 $88.50
3-of-5 11,473 $9.00


Lotto: 6
6-of-6
5-of-6
4-of-6
3-of-6


7- 11 -13-23-44
No winner
29 $3,658.00
2,193 $39.00
37,216 $5.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Lakers at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Clippers at Chicago Bulls
10:30 p.m. (NBA) Minnesota Timberwolves at Golden State
Warriors
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Rider at Manhattan
9 p.m. (ESPNU) Vermont at Stony Brook
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
10 p.m. (SUN) Florida at Tennessee (Taped)
BICYCLING
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Tour Down Under, Stage 4.
(Taped)
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Cornelius White vs. Thomas Williams Jr.
10 p.m. (FS1) Antonio Orozco vs. Miguel Angel Huerta
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Curtis Stevens vs. Patrick Majewski
GOLF
11:30 a.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Pure Silk Bahamas Classic,
Second Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Farmers Insurance Open,
Second Round
4:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Commercialbank
Qatar Masters, Final Round
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NHL) Los Angeles Kings at Anaheim Ducks (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Northeastern at Notre Dame
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (FS1) FACup: Arsenal vs. Coventry City
TENNIS
11 a.m. (TENNIS) 2014 Australian Open Men's Second
Semifinal (Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open Men's Second Semi
final (Taped)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity
Classic exhibition (Taped)
3 a.m. (ESPN) 2014 Australian Open Women's Final.
Dominika Cibulkova vs. Li Na

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Citrus at Wildwood
7 p.m. Chiefland at Lecanto
GIRLS BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m. Crystal River at Seven Rivers
BOYS SOCCER
District 3A-7 tournament at Weeki Wachee
7 p.m. No. 2 Citrus vs. No. 4 Nature Coast
WRESTLING
6:30 p.m. Vanguard at Citrus


Boston at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Washington at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Colorado atTampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Anaheim vs. Los Angeles at Los Angeles, CA,
9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.



PGA Tour

Farmers Insurance
Open
Thursday
s-Torrey Pines, South Course (7,698
yards, par 72), n-Torrey Pines, North
Course (7,052 yards, par 72)
San Diego
Purse: $6.1 million
First Round
Stewart Cink 33-31 -64 -8n
Gary Woodland 33-32-65 -7n
Jason Day 32-34-66 -6n
Tyrone Van Aswegen 33-33-66 -6n
Marc Leishman 32-34- 66 -6n
Jim Herman 32-34- 66 -6n


Pat Perez
D.A. Points
Sang-Moon Bae
David Lynn
Steven Bowditch
Justin Thomas
Trevor Immelman
Jhonattan Vegas
Harrison Frazar
Seung-Yul Noh
Charley Hoffman
Nicolas Colsaerts
Erik Compton
Keegan Bradley
Phil Mickelson
Brendon Todd
Bobby Gates
John Merrick
Martin Laird
Brad Fritsch
Kevin Tway
Michael Putnam
Mark Calcavecchia
Graham DeLaet
Tim Herron
Charles Howell III
Jonathan Byrd
Bubba Watson
Hudson Swafford
Michael Kim
Greg Owen
Brian Stuard


I SORT BREF


Vilardi paces Panthers to
easy rout of Weeki Wachee
Lecanto senior point guard Thomas Vilardi
poured in 22 points as the Panthers boys bas-
ketball squad posted a 73-29 win over Weeki
Wachee.
For Lecanto, Ronnie Crowe had 13 points,
Steven Elliott added 11 points and Kaine Mc-
Colley contributed 9.
Also for the Panthers, D'Andre Horton had
five points and eight rebounds.
Lecanto (12-7) hosts Chiefland ay 7 p.m.
tonight.


SRCS boys hoops ovi
Cornerstone Academ
Adam Gage had 34 points, 10 r
six assists during the Seven River
boys basketball team's 73-61 victc
Gainesville Cornerstone Academy
night.
Cory Weiand also had 27 point,
riors, and eighth-grader Curby Bo
down 13 rebounds.
Seven Rivers (6-12) play Mond
River.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 B3


National sports BRIEFS


Rays sign RHP Balfour to Browns hire Bills assistant
two-year, $12 million deal Mike Pettine as coach


TAMPA- The Tampa Bay Rays have
signed right-hander pitcher Grant Balfour
to a 2-year, $12 million deal.
Balfour, 36, was 62 for 67 in save oppor-
tunities the past two seasons with the Oak-
land Athletics.
It's Balfour's second tour with the Rays.
He played with Tampa Bay from 2007-10
and helped the Rays reach the 2008 World
Series, where they lost in five games to
the Philadelphia Phillies.



JENKINS
Continued from Page BI

49-26 by the end of the third quarter.
Crystal River, which was supposed to
challenge Citrus for dominance in 5A-
6, never got closer than six after the
game was six minutes old.
There's a reason, of course. Citrus
put 60 points on the scoreboard, using
the talents of its undersized (no
starter taller than 5-foot-8) defense -
namely, its quickness to great im-
pact. The Hurricanes forced 15 first-
quarter turnovers, and 28 for the
game. That helped create several easy
scoring opportunities for Citrus.




FROSH
Continued from Page BI

-feated his seventh-grade season, said
his improved conditioning is a big fac-
tor in his defensive play He's also be-
come a smarter and more patient
defender
"I'm staying on my feet," he said,
"not going for ball fakes."
Kaine's father, Kurt McColley, has
noticed a transformation in his son's
defensive game.
"I'm amazed at what the coaches
have done with him, defensively" Kurt
McColley said. "He's played against
kids longer in length, but not ones with
the girth and strength of some of the 17-
and 18-year-olds he faces on varsity
"He's been thrown in the fire, and
he's exceeded my expectations. I was
worried about injuries coming into this
year, because his muscles haven't
caught up with his skeletal structure.
But we threw a little mass on him this
year, and I think that's helped a lot. "
Kurt McColley describes his son as
having an "impeccable work ethic,"
and rigorous in his care for his body
According to Kurt, McColley scored 19
points and grabbed 14 rebounds in
helping his Florida Elite travel team to
a national championship.
McColley's ultimate goals, besides
staying injury-free, are helping
Lecanto win a district championship
and playing Division I college basket-




FISCHER
Continued from Page BI


F1 Frederick, then in his second year as
the wrestling team's head coach, un-
derstood Fischer had never stepped on
a mat, but liked his skill set
"Bobby didn't have the greatest tech-
nique in football," Frederick recalled.
"But what I enjoyed most was he did
everything full speed. When he played
running back, buddy he wasn't running
High Sco around you as much as he was running
High School through you.
"I remember he was tough to bring
down," Frederick said. "I knew when he
walked into the (wrestling) room that
he'd never been on a mat before. Thing
33-34-67 5s was he was a tough kid.
34-33 67 -5n "We got thrown in the corner, but we
34-33-67 -5n had some good kids that took him under
33-35-68 -4n their wing," Frederick stated. "Bobby
33-354-68 -4n wasn't like Dana (Wilkes), who had
34-34- 68 -4n
35-33-68 -4n wrestled since he was a tyke.
32-36 68 -4n "To me, that's the remarkable thing
34-34 68 -4n about Bobby" Frederick added. "For a
35-33- 68 -4n
33-36 -69 -3s guy who just picked up wrestling, inside
33-36 -69 -3n a couple years, he became a two-time
36-33-69 -3n state champ."
32-37- 69 -3n After not winning the district or ad-
34-35- 69 -3n
35-34-69 -3n dancing out of the region as a freshman
34-35-69 -3n or a sophomore, he captured the sports'
34-35-69 -3n trifecta- district, regional and state-
33-36-69 -3n
35-34- 69 -3n as junior and a senior
34-35 69 -3s "My dad raised me right," noted the
34-35-69 -3n 38-year-old Fischer, who graduated
33-37 70 -2n from CRHS in 1993. "I did lots of chores
35-35-70 -2n
36-34-70 -2n when I was young and I had three
34-36-70 -2n brothers -so I got toughened up."
34-36-70 -2n On his mat indoctrination, "I owe a
37-33 70 -2n lot to Coach Craig (Frederick), he never
34-36- 70 -2n
35-35-70 -2n forced anything on me; he's not a
36-34 -70 -2n forcible coach," recalled the current 5-
34-36-70 -2s foot-10, 182-pound Fischer "I mostly
wrestled Coach Frederick in the room.
SHe was intense and never took it easy
on me.
"To this day I respect the man and
ercomes how he treated all ofus. He was a big in-
my 73-61 fluence in my life."
Fischer recalls winning his initial
rebounds and gold medal at states at New Port
s Christian Richey's River Ridge Middle/High
oryover School at 152 pounds, decisioning
' on Thursday David Fish of Cocoa Beach, 10-4.
"We had dropped down (in classifica-
s for the War- tion) to 2A which helped me," Fischer
dden pulled admitted. "I felt like I was pretty strong,
but I wasn't a sloppy wrestler I was re-
ay at Crystal ally well-conditioned. I'd win a lot of
matches by being in better shape in the
-From staff reports third period.
"Winning the first time was definitely


CLEVELAND The Browns have hired
Buffalo defensive coordinator Mike Pettine
as their coach.
Pettine finalized a contract Thursday with
the Browns, who fired Rob Chudzinski on
Dec. 29 following one season. The 47-year-
old Pettine, the son of a legendary Pennsyl-
vania high school coach, spent one year
with the Bills after four as Rex Ryan's de-
fensive coordinator with the New York Jets.
From wire reports


Taking into consideration the lack-
luster seasons posted by both Dunnel-
lon and Lecanto those two teams
occupy the bottom two spots in the
5A-6 standings it's a good bet Crys-
tal River and Citrus will meet once
again in the district tournament final.
The outcome of the first two meet-
ings won't mean a thing if that does in-
deed happen. The winner of that third
matchup will host a first-round re-
gional game; the loser goes on the
road. It's that simple.
Citrus, winner of the last eight
meetings with Crystal River since
Jason Rodgers became the Pirates'
coach, will aim to maintain that
streak. And Jenkins would like to be
the guide.



ball. He's technically a guard, but has
had to mix it up plenty down low He's
averaging 5.2 boards a game, while
shooting 56 percent from the field (42
percent on 3s).
"We've taught him some post
moves," Anderson said, "but he's a
guard. He's going to be a guard at the
next level. He's had to get in there and
bang around and grab some rebounds
because he's all we got"
Anderson said McColley is among
the most consistent players according
to the team's NBA-style index grading
system, which tracks all of the positive
and negatives of each player's per-
formance and contrasts each group of
five's contributions with other lineup
configurations.
"In every lineup Kaine (McColley) is
a part of," Anderson said, "despite hav-
ing the ups and downs of a ninth
grader, he's always a positive for that
group. I found this to be truly astonish-
ing."
McColley's competitiveness is on
display even with family, as his older
brother Kaileb is a senior guard for the
Panthers.
"Kaileb is a lot stronger than me,
and has made me tougher," Kaine Mc-
Colley said. "I started being able to
beat him around sixth grade in one-
on-one. He's not going to beat me
anymore."
McColley and his Panthers (12-7)
face a 19-0 Chiefland squad tonight in
the LHS gym. The Indians are ranked
in the top five in Class 1A.


a surprise," Fischer continued. "After
getting beat out in regionals the previ-
ous two years, really all I wanted to do
was place at states."
Still, pulling off the feat a second time
might have been even tougher for Fis-
cher
"Sure, I felt the pressure of repeat-
ing," he said. "When I won the second
time (at 160), it was like a relief. I was
glad it was over When you're a state
champ, everyone is gunning for you, but
that made it fun."
His only loss over his final two sea-
sons was to former Springstead
wrestler Tom Dougherty, who trans-
ferred to Hudson for his senior year
"I remember losing to Dougherty in a
dual meet at Crystal River," he said.
"Other than that, I had a pretty good
run."
Fischer capped his senior campaign
with an unbelievable four pins in four
bouts at states at The Lakeland Center
For good measure he stuck Jack-
sonville-Episcopal's Alan Cleland in
3:06 for his second gold medal.
After graduation from CRHS, Fischer
earned a football scholarship to Bethel
University in McKenzie, Tennessee.
He played outside linebacker for the
Wildcats for 18 months before suffering
two ACL tears to his left knee.
After his second injury he returned
home to Florida and eventually earned
his air conditioning certification from a
local trade school.
He's been employed as an AC techni-
cian for Jefferson Mechanical for over
a year
Bobby and his wife of nearly eight
years, Aundrea, reside in Homosassa
with their two sons: 14-year-old
Cameron and 5-year Reese.
Like Fischer, his oldest son is cur-
rently an eighth-grader at Crystal River
Middle School and stands 5-foot-9 and
weighs 140 pounds.
He's expected to try out for the Pirate
wrestling team next season.
Fischer, who helps coach his boys at
the recreational level, said of wrestling,
"It's one of the most dedicated sports


you can participate in," he said. "It's
just 1-on-1 on the mat, which I like. Yes,
there's a team score and if you do your
job, you can help the team."
On what advice he'll impart to the
next generation of Citrus County mat
men, "In this sport, you have to be all
in," he said. "You've got to keep an eye
on your weight and know where it
needs to be. I did pretty well wrestling
in my four years; being a fast learner
helps."





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


One is enou h


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Nikita Kucherov prepares to score on Ottawa Senators goalie Craig Anderson
during a shootout Thursday in Tampa. The Lightning won the game 4-3.

Lightning outlast Senators with Kucherov's lone shootout goal


Associated Press

TAMPA Nikita Kucherov
scored the lone shootout goal and
the Tampa Bay Lightning beat the
Ottawa Senators 4-3 on Thursday
night.
Kucherov beat Craig Anderson on
the first shot during the shootout,
while Lightning goalie Ben Bishop
stopped all three shots he faced.
Tyler Johnson, B.J. Crombeen and
Ondrej Palat scored in regulation
for the Lightning, who had lost each
of their previous five home games
(0-3-2) by one goal. Victor Hedman,
who sat out a game with a leg injury
had three assists in his return.
Erik Karlsson, Clarke MacArthur
and Chris Neil had the Ottawa
goals.
Neil tied it at 3 from the right cir-
cle with 2:18 remaining in the third.
Stars 7, Maple Leafs 1
DALLAS Valeri Nichushkin scored
two goals to lead the Dallas Stars to a 7-
1 victory over the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Jamie Benn had his 100th career
goal and three assists for Dallas, which
broke open a 2-1 lead with four second-
period goals and ended Toronto's six-
game winning streak.
Cody Eakin added a goal and an as-
sist, and Alex Goligowski, Sergei Gon-
char and Tyler Seguin each had two
assists for the Stars, who won their sec-
ond game in a row since ending a 1-8-1
slide. Kari Lehtonen made 24 saves.
Nikolai Kulemin had the lone goal for
Toronto.
After Nichushkin's first goal, Toronto
coach Randy Carlyle replaced Jonathan
Bernier with James Reimer, who al-
lowed the final four goals, including one
on a power play by Shawn Horcoff and
one short-handed by Rich Peverley.
Wild 2, Blackhawks 1
ST. PAUL, Minn. -Jason Pominville
and Matt Cooke scored first-period
goals and Darcy Kuemper made 33
saves and the Minnesota Wild defeated
the Chicago Blackhawks 2-1.
The Wild, who lost to Chicago in five
games in the first round of the playoffs
last season, have won three of four
against the Blackhawks this season.


Chicago lost in regulation for only the
second time since Dec. 15.
Kuemper was making his sixth con-
secutive start as Minnesota's top two
goalies, Josh Harding and Niklas Back-
strom, have been sidelined with health
problems. The Wild are 5-3 with rookie
in the net this season.
Patrick Kane spoiled Kuemper's
shutout bid when he scored his 24th
goal of the season with 31.2 seconds
left to bring the Blackhawks to within
one. But Kuemper stopped one final
flurry in the last 10 seconds and Zach
Parise cleared the puck from Min-
nesota's zone to run out the clock.
Penguins 6, Islanders 4
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Rookie de-
fenseman Olli Maatta scored the go-
ahead goal early in the second period
and Evgeni Malkin added an insurance
score in the third as the Pittsburgh Pen-
guins held on for a wild 64 win over the
New York Islanders.
The Islanders had a 5-on-3 power
play for 50 seconds late in the third, but
couldn't score against backup Jeff Za-
tkoff, who made 30 saves for the East-
ern Conference-leading Penguins
(36-13-2). Pittsburgh improved to 17-5
against Metropolitan Division opponents.
Zatkoff stopped Frans Nielsen point-
blank during the power-play and denied
John Tavares with a shoulder save in
the closing seconds.
Brandon Sutter scored an empty-net
goal for the Penguins, who trailed 2-0
early and also got goals from Chris Ku-
nitz, Sidney Crosby and Kris Letang.
Michael Grabner, Brock Nelson, Josh
Bailey and Kyle Okposo had goals for
the Islanders.
Blues 2, Rangers 1
NEW YORK St. Louis defenseman
Kevin Shattenkirk scored the tiebreaking
power-play goal early in the third period,
and the Blues got the best of the New
York Rangers again in a 2-1 victory.
Alexander Steen also had a goal for
the Blues before leaving late in the sec-
ond period with a lower-body injury.
David Backes had two assists, and
Jaroslav Halak made 34 saves in beat-
ing New York's Henrik Lundqvist in a
matchup of Olympic goalies.


New York's Rick Nash scored his
sixth goal in four games netting at
least one in each but Shattenkirk
took advantage of Nash's slashing
penalty, scoring 9 seconds into the
power play at 3:09.
Lundqvist made 23 saves in his re-
turn from a one-game absence caused
by the flu.
Blue Jackets 5, Flyers 2
COLUMBUS, Ohio-- Matt Calvert
and Brandon Dubinsky each had a goal
and assist to lead the Columbus Blue
Jackets to a team-record eighth-straight
win and the longest active streak in
the league in the franchise's 1,000th
game with a 5-2 victory over the
Philadelphia Flyers.
Jack Johnson, Derek MacKenzie and
Nathan Horton also scored for Colum-
bus, which played their inaugural sea-
son in 2000 and has only made the
playoffs once.
Sergei Bobrovsky, last season's Vez-
ina Trophy winner as the league's top
goalie, made 26 saves in his first game
against his former club. He has won
seven in a row since returning from a
groin injury that sidelined him a month.
The Blue Jackets closed out the Fly-
ers with four straight goals to improve to
a league-best 9-0-1 record in January
and are currently holding an Eastern
Conference playoff spot.
Hurricanes 5, Sabres 3
BUFFALO, N.Y. -Alexander Semin
had two goals and defenseman Andrej
Sekera added a score at 9:50 of the
third to lift the Carolina Hurricanes to a
5-3 win over the Buffalo Sabres.
Jeff Skinner also scored for the Hurri-
canes, who overcame three one-goal
deficits. Jiri Tlusty sealed the win by
scoring into an empty net with one sec-
ond remaining.
Sekera also added two assists in fac-
ing his former team for the first time
since the Sabres traded him to Carolina
on June 30.
Goalie Anton Khudobin stopped 26
shots to improve to 9-3 on the season.
Cody Hodgson, Tyler Ennis and Brian
Flynn scored for Buffalo, which dropped
to 0-3-2 in its past five games.


Cink submits best


score on PGA


golfer leads

ifter 64 at

Farmers


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO -The best
score belonged to
Stewart Cink. The
best round be-
longed to Pat Perez.
Tiger Woods didn't
come close to
claiming either -
Thursday in the
Farmers Insurance
Open, where the
seven-time cham- Ti
Wo
pion failed to break shot
par in the opening San D
round for first time
in his career
Cink ran off three
straight birdies late in his
round on the easier North
Course at Torrey Pines for
an 8-under 64. That gave
him a one-shot lead over
Gary Woodland, who also
was on the North, which is
more than 600 yards
shorter
Perez was on the South
Course, host of the 2008
U.S. Open and with greens
so firm this year that it felt
like a major Perez had a
67, the best score on the
South by two shots, and
even more astounding is
that he played bogey-free.
The South played nearly
four shots harder than the
North.
Woods, making his 2014
debut, failed to birdie any
of the par 5s and had to
settle for a 72.
Even at eight shots be-
hind, he wasn't worried
about a chance to win at
Torrey for the ninth time
- including a U.S. Open.
The courses are so differ-
ent than it's difficult to
gauge where anyone
stands until everyone has


had a crack at both
courses. The weekend
rounds are on the South.
Phil Mickelson, mean-
while, felt awful.
He was coping with a
back locked up on him, un-
usual for Mickelson be-
cause he doesn't have a
history of back pain. It got
so bad at one point that
Mickelson thought
about withdrawing
from his hometown
event, especially
after his 4-iron on
the par-5 18th at the
North Course
nearly went out-of-
bounds. Mickelson
,er used his short game
ods to make birdie, and
72 i then made another
iegoi birdie on the next
iego. hole and he
scratched out a 69.
LPGA Tour
PARADISE ISLAND, Ba-
hamas Lydia Ko took a
share of the lead in her first
start as an LPGATour member,
matching Meena Lee with a 5-
under 68 in the season-open-
ing Bahamas LPGA Classic.
The 16-year-old Ko turned
pro late last year. She won
the Canadian Women's Open
the last two years as an ama-
teur and closed last season
with a victory in a non-tour
event in Taiwan in her second
pro start.
Ranked No. 4 in the world,
the South Korean-born New
Zealander had six birdies and
a bogey on Atlantis Resort's
Ocean Club course. Lee, from
South Korea, eagled the par-4
13th and had four birdies and
a bogey.
Third-ranked Stacy Lewis,
paired with Ko, was a stroke
back at 69 along with Jessica
Korda, Brittany Lang, Mirim
Lee, Austin Ernst, Danah Bor-
dner, Amelia Lewis, P.K.
Kongkraphan and Candie
Kung.
Michelle Wie shot 72.


Associated Press
Stewart Cink watches his tee shot Thursday on the 17th
hole of the North course during the first round of the
Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament in San Diego.

= NBA BRIEF


Bosh, James carry
Heat past Lakers
MIAMI Chris Bosh
scored 31 points, LeBron
James added 27 points and
13 rebounds and the Miami
Heat never trailed in a 109-
102 victory over the Los Ange-
les Lakers on Thursday night.
Mario Chalmers and Norris
Cole each finished with 11
points to help the Heat beat
the Lakers for the eighth time


in their last nine meetings. Ray
Allen added 10, and Miami
shot 58 percent and outre-
bounded the Lakers 48-35.
Jodie Meeks and Pau Gasol
each scored 22 points for the
Lakers, who lost for the 14th
time in their last 17 outings.
Nick Young added 19 points
- needing 20 shots to do it -
for Los Angeles, which nearly
came all the way back from a
16-point second-half deficit.
From wire reports


Women's college basketball BRIEFS


No. 3 Duke 85,
No. 24 FSU 77, OT
TALLAHASSEE Tricia Liston
scored 25 points and Elizabeth
Williams had 20 as No. 3 Duke
needed overtime to beat No. 24
Florida State 85-77 on Thursday
night.
The Blue Devils used an 11-0 run
to rally from a four-point deficit in
regulation and score the first seven
points in overtime.
Liston finished with 25 points, in-
cluding four 3-pointers, after scoring
just four points in the first half.
Williams added seven rebounds and
six blocks.
The Seminoles (14-5, 2-4) wasted
a career night from Natasha Howard
- 28 points and 21 rebounds with
five blocks. Morgan Jones scored 15
points and grabbed 10 rebounds
and Brittany Brown added 12 points
in the loss points.
Alexis Jones tied a Duke (19-1,
6-0) record with 15 assists in the
school's first overtime game since
2009.
No. 2 Notre Dame 79,
Miami 52
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Natalie
Achonwa had 23 points and nine re-
bounds, Lindsay Allen added a sea-
son-high 16 points and
second-ranked Notre Dame shook


off a slow start to beat Miami 79-52
for its 21st straight home victory.
The Irish (18-0, 5-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) are off to their best start
since going 23-0 en route to the na-
tional championship in 2000-01.
Jassany Williams and Adrienne
Motley led Miami (11-8, 3-3) with 10
points apiece as the Hurricanes shot
31 percent.
Virginia 86,
No. 6 Maryland 72
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -
Kelsey Wolfe scored 24 points and
Ataira Franklin and Faith Randolph
each scored 19 and Virginia ended
Maryland's 14-game winning streak.
The Cavaliers (10-9, 3-3 Atlantic
Coast Conference) ended a five-
game losing streak against the Ter-
rapins, and won their second
straight against a ranked foe. They
beat No. 24 Florida State on
Sunday.
Alyssa Thomas scored 27 points
and 10 rebounds Alicia DeVaughn
scored 14 for Maryland (16-2,4-1).
No. 7 UNC 83,
Wake Forest 65
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Dia-
mond DeShields and Allisha Gray
had 19 points each and North Car-
olina pulled away down the stretch.
North Carolina (17-3, 5-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference) won its 11th


straight in the series. Xylina Mc-
Daniel and Stephanie Mavunga
added 12 points each for UNC.
Dearica Hamby led the Demon
Deacons (10-9, 1-5) with 22 points
and Chelsea Douglas added 20.
Alabama 57,
No. 9 Kentucky 55
LEXINGTON, Ky. Daisha Sim-
mons scored 17 of her 22 points in
the second half, including a layup
with 2.3 seconds remaining that
lifted Alabama over Kentucky.
Kentucky (154, 3-3 Southeastern
Conference), tied the score at 55-all
on two free throws by Jennifer
O'Neill with 14.9 seconds to go.
However, the Crimson Tide (9-10,
2-4) had plenty of time to set up for
the last shot by Simmons.


KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Meighan
Simmons scored 21 points Thursday
as No. 11 Tennessee capitalized on
its 3-point accuracy to win on a night
dedicated to honoring former Lady
Vols coach Pat Summitt.
Bashaara Graves added 17
points and eight rebounds for Ten-
nessee (15-4, 4-2 SEC), which shot
10 of 21 from 3-point range and
handed Florida (13-6, 3-3) its third
consecutive loss.


No. 15 LSU 71,
Auburn 60
BATON ROUGE, La. -Theresa
Plaisance had 19 points and 11 re-
bounds to lead No. 15 LSU to a 71-
60 victory against Auburn.
LSU led 62-56 with 3:46 to play
and used a 9-0 run to build a 15-
point advantage before Auburn
scored two meaningless baskets in
the final 40 seconds.
After battling back-and-forth for
much of the first half, LSU (15-4, 4-2
SEC) trailed 36-35 at halftime. Raig-
yne Moncrief's layup 30 seconds
into the second sparked a six-point
LSU run for a 41-36 lead.
Auburn (11-8, 2-4) battled back to
a 41-41 tie, but LSU went on a 17-3
run to take a 58-44 lead with 7:24
left in the game.


COLUMBIA, Mo. Courtney
Walker scored 21 points as No. 17
Texas A&M won its ninth straight
game and remained undefeated in
conference play with a 62-57 win
over Missouri.
After trailing for much of the first
half and 33-31 at halftime, Texas
A&M (16-4, 6-0 SEC) took the lead
early in the second and never relin-
quished it.
The Tigers (13-6, 2-4) hung


around though and cut their deficit to
60-56 with 1:15 to play. Missouri then
got the ball back after a missed 3-
pointer by Texas A&M but the Tigers
missed 3s on their next two posses-
sions and the Aggies prevailed.
No. 22 Purdue 90,
Northwestern 65
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. Liza
Clemons scored 23 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds as Purdue
handled Northwestern.
Purdue (14-5, 4-3 Big Ten) closed
the first half on a 13-4 run to take a
45-34 lead into halftime. The Boiler-
makers continued to pull away after
the break, opening the half on an 11-
3 run, and Northwestern (12-7, 2-4)
was unable to cut the deficit to sin-
gle digits during the second half.
No. 23 N.C. State 85,
Boston College 76
RALEIGH, N.C. Markeisha
Gatling scored 27 points and Kody
Burke added 24 with 11 rebounds
for North Carolina State.
NC State (17-3, 4-2 ACC) shot
48.1 percent from the field. Len'Nique
Brown had 15 points, seven re-
bounds and four assists, and Krystal
Barrett dished out eight assists.
The Eagles (11-9, 2-4) were 23-
of-60 from the field (38.3 percent)
and hit 13 3-pointers, but also com-
mitted 28 fouls and 12 turnovers.


No. 11 Tennessee 89, No. 17 Texas A&M 62,
Florida 69 Missouri 57


B4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


SPORTS


D





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning shakes hands with his brother New York
Giants quarterback Eli Manning after an NFL football game on Sept. 15, 2013, in East
Rutherford, N.J. There is going to be a Manning in the Super Bowl, just not the one Eli
wanted.



Legacy secured


Eli: Peyton

already has

place in history

Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. They are two of the
NFL's most well-known
quarterbacks.
They telephone each
other at least once a week
to talk shop, work together
on an offseason passing
camp, and have appeared
in a number of television
commercials. Each had a
chance to host "Saturday
Night Live."
Each is a Super Bowl
MVP
There is something else
about Peyton and Eli Man-
ning. First and foremost,
they're brothers.
They know each other
inside out. They root for
each other They bleed for
each other They're family
So when little brother
Eli says Peyton doesn't
need to beat the Seattle
Seahawks and win a sec-
ond Super Bowl to secure
his legacy as one of the
NFL's greatest quarter-
backs, believe him.
"I think Peyton's already
created his own legacy," Eli
said Thursday during a
conference call 10 days be-
fore Peyton and Broncos
meet the Seahawks in the
Super Bowl at MetLife Sta-
dium. "He's played at a
very high level for a long
period of time and he's
overcome injuries and ob-
viously set numerous
records and been on a lot of
playoff teams, playing in
his third Super Bowl. I
don't think that's something


that he's worried about
"There will always be
arguments about who is
the greatest or who is the
best," Eli said. "I think if
you're in that argument, if
you're one of the names
thrown around in there, I
think you've already cre-
ated a pretty good legacy"
Peyton's resume is im-
pressive: four-time MVI,
13-time Pro Bowler, seven-
time All Pro.
Sure, there is only one
title. Two would be the
icing, and put him on par
with Eli.
For the past few days,
Eli Manning said his big
job has been to get his
brother extra tickets for
the first outdoor Super
Bowl in a cold-weather
city Barring late add-ons,
he's already hit the re-
quest number
"Obviously, I know what
it's like with the Super
Bowl and a lot of people
are trying to figure out if
they're coming to the
games, so I'm trying to take
some of that stress off of
him and help manage
some of those things," Eli
said. "That way, he can
focus on work and getting
the game plan."
While the two have ex-
changed some text mes-
sages, the brothers have
not seen each other since
Denver's win over New
England in the AFC title
game on Sunday They
hope to get together early
next week in the New York
for a few hours, when Eli
will give Peyton the se-
crets about playing in
MetLife Stadium and his
insight into playing Seat-
tle, which the Giants did
on here on Dec. 15.
The way the Seahawks'


defense dominated New
York that day in a 23-0 win,
Peyton might well ignore
the advice.
After that, Peyton will
take center stage during the
weeklong media frenzy and
Eli will get ready to watch
only his second game at the
Meadowlands. The first
was in 2003 when the Jets
crushed Peyton and the
Colts in an AFC playoff
game at Giants Stadium. Eli
was still at Ole Miss.
There is some coinci-
dence about this game.
When Eli won his second
Super Bowl in 2012, it was
in Peyton's stadium in In-
dianapolis.
"I'm rooting for him," Eli
said. "It's not like watching
any other football game. If
I'm watching two other
teams, I'm kind of casually
watching and don't really
care who wins or loses.
Here, it's a little bit more
nerve-racking. I don't get
nervous playing football
games, I get nervous watch-
ing my brother play, and I
guess because I've been
doing this for a long time
and you kind of know key
moments and key plays."
Eli does not think the
cold will be a factor in the
game. The bigger issue for
his brother would be snow
and wind. That might af-
fect the Broncos more be-
cause they are a passing
offense. The Seahawks are
more run-oriented.
Coming into the season,
Eli hoped the Giants might
become the first time to
play the Super Bowl in
their own stadium. A 0-6
start derailed that and led
to a 7-9 season that left
New York out of the play-
offs for the fourth time in
five years.


Adult sports NEWS


Beverly Hills Senior Open League
Week 18
Bowling Scores: Herb Sherrill 224-155-197-
576, Steve O'Connor 201-172-201-574, Jerry
Thompson 191-169-212-572, Rich Lievel
161-205-202-568, Dave Coburn 547, Marvin
Chapman 542, John Casdia 206-541,
Richard Jacobs 204-541, John Savarese
534, Don Levinson 201-533, Bob Griggs 211-
524, Bill Sumner 523, Mike Murray 204-519,
Tom Chees 548, Vito Porta 518, Glenda
Johnston 216-516, Craig Furrier 211-515,
Mike Laurain 515, John Schott 201-515,
Chuck Ahn 509. Doug Meiklejohn 507, Char-
lie Ahn 202-506. Ed Smith 504, Norman
Patch 504, Bill Johnston 504.
Splits Made: Fran Shidner 3-10, Jim McDo-
nough 2-7 and 2-7-10, Ed Smith 3-10, Mag-
gie Savarese 3-10, Glenda Johnston 5-7-9,
Walt Clevenger 4-5-7 and 3-10, Vito Porta 5-
10, Richard Jacobs 3-10, Lyle Ternes 5-6.
Beverly Hills Gang Senior Mix League
Week 18
Bowling Scores: Gary Brown 213-200-224-
637, Steve O'Conner 181-212-235-628,
Charlie Ahn 171-192-264-627, Larry Gray
192-181-236-609, Jim Wright 201-188-207-
596, Dick Dickerson 202-526, Morris Frank
225-524, Hannelore Herbener 513, Wally
Malphus 507.
Splits Made: Gary Brown 4-6-4-70, Lou Dick-
erson 2-7, Al berardi 5-10, Tony LaCattiva 3-
10, Kitty Gray 3-10, Jim McDonough 2-7,
Steve O'Connor 3-10, Mary Lou Halovich 6-
10 and 3-8-10, Ken Thompkins 5-7, Renee
Hurley 2-7, Hannalore Herbener 2-7 and 5-6
and 4-6-10.
Parkview Lanes Weekly News
12-WEEK LEAGUE: The league meeting for
the next session of the Holder Hotshots is
Thursday, January 30 at 7pm. The teams are
4-person, any mix, and the weekly fee is $12.
Call the Center to register, either as individu-
als or as teams.
VALENTINE'S DOUBLES TOURNEY: The
annual Valentine's Doubles Tourney will be
held Sunday, February 16. The festivities
begin with a luncheon at 1 pm, followed by the
three games of 7-9-8 NoTap, all to the music
of GrantsTunes. Reservations are required
by Friday, February 14.
League scores for the week ending January
19:
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: Handicap:
Eddie Corbitt 281; Wes Foley 177,779; Todd
Cridland 277; Joe Brooks 769; Sandy LePree
283; Cheryl Shafer 268; Linda Dudziak 746;
Judy Timmons 743. Scratch: Wes Foley
258,722; Eddie Corbitt 257; Mark Smith 706;
K C Cridland 226,592; Sandy LePree 214;
Stephanie Flory 616.
PRESERVE PINBUSTERS: Handicap:
Frank Turner 285,748; Desi Sidote 279;
Sonny Temple 719; Rita Fulford 273,770; Lor-
raine Pelkie 269; Melissa Widerman 750.
Scratch: Bob Swarm 233; Jeff Koch 225,650;
Ken Sprague 615; Betty Noland 184,497; Lor-
raine Pelkie 179; Paula Weaver 483.
SUNCOAST SENIORS 12-WEEK: Handi-


cap: George Simonson 279; Lou Hiller
268,740; Leon Tenniswood 694; Patricia
Honaker 243; Clara Nicolellis 233,681; Helen
Simonson 671. Scratch: Jerry Ness
227,628; Ken Meldrum 223,616; Carol
Roberts 145,384; Patricia Honaker 141;
Sherry Hiller 404.
SCRATCH CHALLENGE: Tim Lawrence
254,598; Brian Carney 240,654; Lori Ciquera
214,561; Dorine Fugere 213,521.
LATE STARTERS: Handicap: Victor Maldon-
ado 256; John Ortiz 248; Ted Rafanan 694;
Ernie Gonsalves 674; Marie Mooney 245; Mila
Ragsdale 234,649; Nancy Duncan 635.
Scratch: Ted Rafanan 238,685; John Ortiz
210; Skip George 573; Mila Ragsdale 185,499;
Millie George 179; Nancy Duncan 497.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Handicap: Joe
Brooks 296; Dalton Grudzas 276,776; Joe
Baierlein 777. Scratch: Sam Bass 256;
Charlie Stein 249,701; Eric Glowacki 714.
WOMEN'STRIO: Handicap: CarolynWood-
ward 252,654; Marilyn Seymour 249; Carol
McHale 644. Scratch: Maggie Savarese
192,498; Marilyn Seymour 190; Peggy Mur-


dock 458.
GOOD TIME BOWLERS: Handicap: Bill
Montross 219,654; John Bahrs 219; Mike
Bonadonna 217; Jim Harvey 603; Janet Mur-
ray 230,632; Gerry Gurnett 230; Jan Harvey
229,620. Scratch: Bill Montross 173,516;
FredYannotti 172,458; Janet Murray 203,551;
Gerry Gurnett 179,462.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS: Handicap: Jerry
Ness 294,744; Rich Williams 256; Chuck
Hindbaugh 631; Pat Combs 279; Patricia
Honaker 269,733; Lynda Morgan 741.
Scratch: Jerry Ness 268,666; Rich Williams
256; Chuck Hindbaugh 631; Kathy Calcagni
187,503; Pat Combs 181; Lynda Morgan 492.
SANDY OAKS: Handicap: Pat Kelley
269,666; Claude Como 253,698; Pam Stan-
ley 255,711; Ruth Frazier 248,680; Marlene
Hyde 680. Scratch: Bob Iverson 223,606;
Pat Kelley 198; Jim McQuillan 525; Marilyn
Ormiston 185,489; Karen Benefiel 170; Mar-
lene Hyde 440.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK: Pam Stanley,
111 pins over her average, and Brian Pois-
son, 99 pins over his average.


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Already on the job


New Bucs

GM confident

team will win

and soon

Associated Press

TAMPA Jason Licht
welcomes the challenge
of turning the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers into a cham-
pionship contender, and
the team's new general
manager doesn't believe
it'll take long to do it.
Without making any
bold predictions or offer-
ing a specific timetable
for success, Licht said
Thursday that the Bucs al-
ready have a solid foun-
dation in place and that
he's confident he and in-
coming coach Lovie
Smith will form a "part-
nership" that will help the
struggling franchise end
its cycle of losing.
The Bucs have missed
the playoff the past six
seasons. They haven't won
a postseason game since
the 2002 Super Bowl run
that produced the club's
only NFL title.
"The GM and coach
have to work together It's
a partnership," Licht said,
shrugging off a question
about who'll have final
say of draft selections and
other personnel moves -
him as a first-time GM or
Smith, who won three di-
vision title and one NFC
Championship during a
successful nine-year stint
as a first-time head coach
with the Chicago Bears.
'At the end of the day, it
doesn't matter if you're
Ron Wolf, Bill Polian or
Jason Licht. Our job is to
serve the coach," the for-
mer Arizona Cardinals
front-office executive
said. "He's got to tell us
what kind of players he
wants, and we've got to
(provide) players who are
the right fit ... It's got to be
a partnership. Otherwise,


Associated Press
New Tampa Bay Buccaneers general manager Jason
Licht gestures while speaking during a press conference
Thursday in Tampa. Licht becomes the fifth general
manager in team history and takes over a team that
hasn't made the playoffs since 2007.


it doesn't work."
Licht has worked with
five different teams over
18 seasons, including the
Cardinals, New England
Patriots, Philadelphia Ea-
gles, Carolina Panthers
and Miami Dolphins. He
spent the past two seasons
serving a second stint
with Arizona, where his
title in 2013 was vice pres-
ident of player personnel.
Working alongside GM
Steve Keim in Arizona,
Licht helped overhaul the
Cardinals' roster last off-
season, resulting in a 10-6
record in 2013 an im-
provement of five wins
over the previous year
He believes Tampa Bay,
which lost the first eight
games of 2013 and fin-
ished 4-12, can pull off a
similar turnaround.
"There are building
blocks in place here. We
have a lot of core players
on this team that I'm ex-
cited about," Licht said,
mentioning defensive
tackle Gerald McCoy, cor-


nerback Darrelle Revis,
linebacker Lavonte David,
safety Dashon Goldson
and running back Doug
Martin by name.
"Our philosophy is going
to be to build through the
draft That's where we
find our stars. That's
where we find the next
generation. But also in the
short term and long term,
we're going to supplement
our roster through free
agency," the GM added.
"But we're going to look
for value. We're going to
spend wisely"
Licht, who also inter-
viewed for Miami's GM
opening this winter, met
Smith a few years ago,
when Licht was a candi-
date to become the
Bears' GM.
He said the presence of
Smith, as well as the nu-
cleus of talent assembled
in recent years and own-
ership's commitment to
winning, were all factors
in his decision to leave
Arizona.


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SPORTS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 B5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


District wrapped up


'Canes, Tigers will

flip coin for top

seed in tourney

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Local boys teams put the finish-
ing touches on the District 5A-6 reg-
ular-season schedule this week, as
Dunnellon cruised to an 81-51 vic-
tory over Crystal River on Tuesday
to finish tied at 5-1 in district play
with Citrus.
The Tigers had a tougher time
against district foe Lecanto last Fri-
day With just under 10 seconds re-
maining and the Panthers down by
two, a 3-point attempt from senior
Thomas Vilardi, who converted a
couple of key free throws in a win
over Ridgewood on Wednesday,
swirled the inside of the rim before
falling out. Dunnellon, which had
chewed up nearly two minutes of
clock while holding a narrow lead
in the closing minutes, then con-
verted five free throws in the wan-
ing seconds for a 70-63 victory
For their part, the Hurricanes
wrapped up their district slate last
Friday by completing its sweep of
the Pirates with a 64-49 road victory
Senior point guard Devin Pryor, last
year's Chronicle Male Player of the
Year, led the game with 18 points
and eight steals.
The 'Canes and Tigers split their
season series, meaning a coin flip is
needed to decide the No. 1 seed.
The Pirates (4-14, 0-6), this year's
tourney host, are set to face the top
seed in the semifinals on Feb. 4 as
the fourth seed. Meanwhile, No. 3-
seeded Lecanto will be pitted
against the second seed.
'Canes rolling
Citrus (19-2) hasn't lost in 2014, since
junior Sam Franklin joined the starting
lineup. The team's currently enjoying a
nine-game winning streak, which began
after it suffered just its second loss of
the season, to Class 6A Poinciana
(17-5) of Kissimmee, a Class 7A re-
gional semifinalist in 2012.
Wednesday, behind 24 points from
Pryor, the 'Canes knocked off a formida-
ble Nature Coast squad (15-7) for the
second time in three weeks. The Sharks


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
A coin flip today will decide if Devin Pryor (3) and the Citrus boys basketball
team, or their Dunnellon counterparts receive the No. 1 seed in the
upcoming District 5A-6 tournament at Crystal River High School.


were ranked No. 10 in Class 5A prior to
their two defeats to CHS.
This is the best regular season for
CHS since 2002-03, when it finished
23-2.
One more
intra-county matchup
With both teams lacking some of the
firepower they possessed last season,
it's probably too much to ask for a re-
peat of last year's thrilling contest in the
SRHS gym between Crystal River and
Seven Rivers Christian on Monday.
Still, the two key players from the last
meeting seniors Adam Gage and Ty
Reynolds are back. The pair com-
bined for 66 points, as the Pirates, be-
hind a pair of buckets-off-steals by
Reynolds (35 points, 10 boards) in the
final seconds, overcame a 14-0 deficit in
prevailing 60-59.
Gage, who matched Reynolds' 10 re-
bounds while leading the Warriors with


31 points, looks forward to the stage
provided from intra-county games, and
has turned in a couple of strong show-
ings against the Pirates. On his way to
Chronicle Male Player of the Year hon-
ors his sophomore season, he netted
19 points and blocked four shots to help
his team to a 79-58 victory in the CRHS
gym.
Both teams have struggled in the of-
fensive rebounding department Gage
has 11 boards a game just to keep the
Warriors semi-competitive at the glass
- and so poor field-goal shooting or ex-
cessive turnovers could easily sink ei-
ther team. While Gage commands the
most attention, the Pirates will also be
concerned to limit the perimeter game
of Warriors junior Cory Weiand, who's
flirting with 20 points a night.
Crystal River also hopes for a better
start than its last two meetings with
SRHS. Two years ago, the Pirates fell
behind 20-3 in the opening quarter.


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River guard John Parry and the Pirates host Seven Rivers Christian on Monday at Crystal River High School
in the last regular-season meeting between two Citrus County schools in the 2013-14 campaign.


CR, Lecanto off



to The Villages


'Canes

wrestlers

entertain

Knights

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

In the final weekend of
prep wrestling's regular
season, Citrus will enter-
tain district rival Ocala-
Vanguard on Friday night
while Crystal River and
Lecanto journey Satur-
day to Sumter County for
the eight-team Talbott
American Legion Duals
Tournament.
Second-year coach Jeff
Wood's Hurricanes (23-15)
host the Knights beginning
at 6:30 p.m.
CHS is coming off last
weekend's third-place fin-
ish in its own gym during
the ninth annual 16-team
Ed Kilpatrick Classic.
The 'Canes, who fin-
ished 21-19 (.525 percent),
departed with seven plac-
ers featuring senior Bran-
don Taylor at 160 pounds
(first place), seniors Casey
Bearden at 170 and
Tarique Cabanas at 145
(second), sophomore Justin
Allan at 152 (third), along
with senior Austin Renaud
at 182, junior Johnathan
Loggins at 285 and sopho-
more Stephen Mackey at
220 (all finishing fourth).
In the final mat action
before Feb. l's District
2A-5 meet at Springstead,
the Hurricanes are led by
the 1-2 punch of Taylor
(48-3) and Bearden (42-2).
CHS senior Bradley
Wiesenauer arrives lead-
ing the county in pins (28)
over Bearden (27).
Pirates, Panthers
at The Villages
The Talbott American Le-
gion Duals event is expected
to feature eight teams in a
dual-meet format. There will
be two pools: Pool 'A with
Crystal River, Clearwater
Central Catholic, Starke-
Bradford and Kissimmee-
Poinciana; and Pool 'B' with
The Villages, Lecanto,
Ocala-Trinity Catholic and
Tampa Prep.
Each team will wrestle
everyone in their pool and
then cross-bracket with the
other pool.


Action is expected to begin
at 9 a.m.
The Pirates collected their
third second-place trophy of
the winter last weekend at Cit-
rus, only 7 1/2 points behind
1A-12's Naples-Lely.
"Lely was not a bad team,"
underscored CRHS' veteran
mentor Craig Frederick.
"Those guys will do well down
there in districts. Sure, we
were trying to win it, but we
had quite a few players (8).
Behind a 14-man lineup, the
Pirates appeared to be cruis-
ing entering into the semifinals
with eight grapplers, but only
three pushed their way
through into the finals.
Of that trio, only senior
Michael Allan went 4-0 with
three pins at 126 to garner a
gold medal.
Seniors Andrew Bilby at
195 and Carlos Sanabria at
220 settled on silver medals.
Junior Joel Pelton at 138,
senior Nick Hooper at 145
and sophomore Eddie Bennis
at 182 each placed third.
Freshmen Dalton David at
106 and CJ Lawson at 152
each placed fourth.
"I thought (Michael) Allan
looked really good," Frederick
described. "He really wasn't
challenged."
In an overall evaluation, "I'm a
little disappointed," explained
Frederick. 'We're a better dual-
meet team than an IBT (individu-
ally bracketed tournament)
team. We don't have kids that
will go to the finals."
According to coach Freder-
ick, lineup-wise, junior Dante
Ayala and senior Jeremy Bur-
croff (broken nose) both sat
out last week's event at Citrus,
but are expected back at 170
and 160 pounds, respectively.
CRHS is paced by Hooper
at 35-7. Three others, includ-
ing Allan, Bennis and Pelton,
have each notched 33 wins.
The eight-member Pan-
thers placed 13th last week-
end at Citrus capturing
6-of-21 bouts (28.6 percent).
LHS' only placer (top four
or better) was senior Chris
Ewing at 182.
Lely's top-seeded Tremaine
McClendon solved the sec-
ond-seeded Ewing in the
finals, 7-3.
Ewing enters The Villages
event behind a team-best
23-5, featuring a team-high
15 pins.
Saturday's IBT serves as
the final warm-up before join-
ing Citrus at the 2A-5 tourney
in Spring Hill.


Citrus County wrestling leaders


RK NAME S(
1. Taylor, Brandon= Cl
2. Bearden, Casey= Cl
3. Keene, Christopher Cl
4. Hooper, Nick+ Cl
5. Wiesenauer, Brad Cl
6. Allan, Michael= Cl
7. Pelton, Joel Cl
8. Bennis, Eddie Cl
9. Sanabria, Carlos Cl
10. Cabanas, Tarique Cl
* Denotes county leader
= Denotes 2013 state qualifier
+ Denotes 2012 state qualifier


Top 10 (through Jan. 23)
H YR W
S 12th 48*
S 12th 42
S 10th 36
12th 35
S 12th 35
12th 33
11th 33
10th 33
12th 31
S 12th 30


- Compiled by Tony Castro


Wawrinka into Aussie final; Nadal or Federer next


Swiss standout

reaches first

major final

Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Aus-
tralia- The usually diplo-
matic Roger Federer
didn't bother concealing
his preference for semifi-
nal winners at the Aus-
tralian Open.
He wanted an all-Swiss
final, the first ever in a
Grand Slam. Eighth-
ranked Stanislas Wawrinka
held up his end of the bar-
gain with a 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-7
(3), 7-6 (4) win over Tomas
Berdych to reach his first
major final.
Now the pressure is on
the 17-time major winner
to complete the match up.
The major obstacle in his
path: a semifinal against
Rafael Nadal.
Now it's Iron Stan's turn
to sit back and watch two
of the greatest players ever
do battle Friday for the
right to meet him in
Sunday's final.


"For sure I'm going to
really, really enjoy,"
Wawrinka said. "I'm going
to watch the match tomor-
row in front of my TV,
maybe with some popcorn.
"I always try to watch
when they play because
you can always learn. You
can always see the best
tennis ever on the tour"
The 33rd installment of
the Nadal-Federer rivalry
-the llth in Grand Slams
- should be enthralling
viewing. Wawrinka's joked
that he'd prefer a walkover
most of all, but likes the
idea of a Swiss decider
"My record against Rafa
is not really good, and nei-
ther against Roger, but for
sure to play a Swiss final
will be amazing," he said.
Federer "is the best player
ever. For me it's my first
final. To play against
Roger would be amazing."
Federer is into his llth
consecutive semifinal at
Melbourne Park he has
won five and gone on to
win four finals.
"This one feels different
because of the tougher
times I've had in Slams,"
said Federer, who lost in the
second round at Wimble-


Associated Press
Stanislas Wawrinka throws his wristband to the specta-
tors after defeating Tomas Berdych during their semifinal
at the Australian Open tennis championship Thursday in
Melbourne, Australia.


don and the fourth round at
the U.S. Open last year
when he was struggling
with muscle injuries and
getting to terms with a new,
bigger racket To get this far
he had to beat 2008 finalist
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the
fourth round and Wimble-
don champion Andy Mur-
ray in the quarterfinals.
He said he was inspired
by Wawrinka's upset quar-
terfinal win over three-
time defending champion
Novak Djokovic. Federer
watched it on TV and


caught himself fist-pump-
ing when Wawrinka won
big points.
Left-hander Nadal has a
commanding 22-10 lead in
head-to-heads against
Federer. His 8-2 lead in
Grand Slams includes the
2009 Australian final and
the semifinals here in
2012.
"We've had some epics,"
Federer said. "I hope we
can slug it out."
Wawrinka has never
beaten Nadal in a dozen
attempts and has only one


victory over Federer in 14
attempts. Then again, he'd
lost 14 straight to Djokovic
until his upset earlier this
week, and that was a con-
fidence boost. It was tight
against Berdych, with just
one service break in the
match and only one point
between them in the end.
To reach the final "it's
because I beat Berdych
tonight; I won against
Novak also. I had some
great matches," he said.
"So that mean's I have the
level to be there."
The 28-year-old
Wawrinka reached the
semifinals at the U.S.
Open last year his best
previous run at a major -
before losing to Djokovic
in five sets. He has gone a
step further this time-
reaching a Grand Slam
final at his 36th attempt.
Nadal was bothered by
blisters on his left hand
during his win over Grigor
Dimitrov, the 22-year-old
Bulgarian who took the
first set off him in their
quarterfinal and also had
set points in the third. He
had the hand heavily
taped during the match,
and admitted it affected


his serve. He practiced on
Thursday without all the
tape, avoiding a lot of at-
tention while the women's
semifinals were on.
The women's final will
feature 2011 French Open
champion Li Na in her
third Australian Open de-
cider in four years against
Dominika Cibulkova, who
had never previously gone
beyond the semifinals of a
major
No. 4-seeded Li Na won
the first five games in her
6-2, 6-4 semifinal win over
19-year-old Canadian Eu-
genie Bouchard, and No.
20-seeded Cibulkova later
trounced 2012 Wimbledon
finalist Agnieszka Rad-
wanska 6-1, 6-2.
In her loss to Victoria
Azarenka in last year's
final, Li twisted her ankle
and fell over twice, and
knocked her head hard on
the court.
"I think is the third time,
so pretty close to the tro-
phy," Li said. "Yeah, at
least I try to not fall down
this time, because last year
in the final I think I played
well but I only can say I
was unlucky At least I'll try
to enjoy and stay healthy"


B6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


SPORTS






Section C- FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

0Arts & Entertainment


NTHE


SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Inside:
Poker run raises money
for cancer research/C6


At the movies


Colorful, vibrant Nut Job






Could be


nuttier


Jocelyn Noveck
Associated Press
Not all rats look exactly alike, even
animated ones. But there's a real re-
semblance between a rat in "The Nut
Job," the new film by Peter Lepeniotis,
and Remy, the main character in "Rata-
touille," that wonderful 2007 Pixar film.
And that's not a good thing for "The
Nut Job," because anyone who makes
that connection will be likely also re-
membering how "Ratatouille" showed
so beautifully that an animated film,
done with the right skill and imagina-
tion, can be equally enchanting to kids
and adults something that "The Nut
Job," a decent but frankly forgettable
entry to the animal-centered animated
film oeuvre, does not.
The movie certainly looks nice. Colors
are vibrant, particularly the reddish au-
tumn shades of trees in Liberty Park, in
fictional Oakton City, where much of the
action takes place. There's a lovely mo-


ment where shimmering water reflects
the leaves above. And the whole thing
has a period feel mid-20th century -
which is appealing, though confusing,
too, when you see characters break into
what looks like very 21st-century danc-
ing at one point.
Like most animated films these days,
"The Nut Job," a joint Canadian-South
Korean-U.S. production, trades on its
celebrity voices, which here include
Katherine Heigl, Brendan Fraser, Will
Arnett, Maya Rudolph and, most recog-
nizably, Liam Neeson, who sometimes
sounds like he could be on a Shake-
spearean stage.
Not that you could call this dialogue
Shakespearean. Or even witty This
being a film about squirrels and their
nuts, kids will enjoy the "nut" puns, and
parents will groan. "Let's not get too
nutty about this," one character says.
"Sorry, I went a little nuts," says an-
other The movie's slogan: "No nuts, no
glory"


Well, at least there's an interesting di-
gression on the existential nature of
peanut brittle. Is it, someone asks, a nut
or a candy?
"Both," comes the considered reply
The story, based on Lepeniotis' short
film, "Surly Squirrel," is simple: The an-
imals in Liberty Park, ruled by a gruff
raccoon (Neeson, of course) ominously
just named Raccoon, are facing a severe
nut shortage just as winter is approach-
ing. Surly the squirrel (Arnett), who
thinks only of himself, has somehow set
fire to the winter stockpile. (Watch for
the nice shot of popping corn kernels
from an exploding tree it will remind
you there's a reason you're wearing
those 3-D glasses.)
But Surly doesn't seem willing to help
solve the situation, and he's banished
from the park to the city
There, he discovers a nut shop -
cashews, peanuts, hazelnuts, you name
it. If he can snag that booty, he'll be
golden for the winter, though that won't


necessarily help out his furry friends in
the park, led by the feisty Andie (Heigl).
Of course, there's a big complication.
A group of human lowlifes plotting a
bank heist have their own connections
to the nut stash, for reasons unrelated to
nutrition.
So who'll win out, the human crimi-
nals or the park animals? And will Surly
remain, er, surly and uncooperative, or
will he work with the others? And what
about Raccoon? Is there something
menacing in that deep, husky voice?
Parents may concern themselves with
these issues, while kids may simply be
focusing on the puns, and, oh yes, the
fart jokes.
And if they get tired of those, there's
always the animated PSY yes, that
PSY at the end, singing and dancing
his way through "Gangnam Style" as the
credits roll. Never mind that this movie
is supposed to take place some 50 years
before the song came out. It's all mildly
entertaining if slightly nuts.


Details:
"The Nut Job," an Open Road Films
release, is rated PG by the Motion
Picture Association of America "for mild
action and rude humor." Running time:
86 minutes. Two stars out of four.



"The Nut Job," features
(clockwise from top) Andie, voiced by
Katherine Heigl, Surly, voiced by Will Arnett,
left, and Precious the Pug, voiced
by Maya Rudolph, Andie, left, and Surly,
voiced by Will Arnett, and Buddy, voiced by
Robert Tinkler, in scenes from the movie.


Associated Press








'Ride Along' offers laughs along the way


Associated Press
Joining the ranks of odd-
couple police comedies, "Ride
Along" delivers laughs over ac-
tion, with loudmouthed funny-
man Kevin Hart driving the
hilarity.
Stepping into the role ofrap-
per-turned-actor Ice Cube's
sidekick in this buddy-cop
farce, Hart had a lot to live up
to. Cube (real name O'Shea
Jackson) and Chris Tucker
were classic quipsters in the
1995 pot-comedy "Friday" that
started it all, and when then-
newcomer Mike Epps dropped
in on the sequel, his chemistry
with Cube led to a third film.
The formula is always the
same: Cube, who is level-
headed for the most part, gets
into trouble with his ridiculous
sidekick. "Ride Along" is no dif-
ferent, and that's OK. It's a
blueprint we've come to rely on
for nearly 20 years.
With roots in stand-up, Hart
continues to make a successful
transition from stage to screen,
with three films released in the
past year and five
scheduled through 2015.
In "Ride Along," Hart's rapid
banter comes off naturally, as if
he's always improvising. Cube's
no-nonsense approach, punctu-
ated by his steady straight-face,
offers an ideal contrast.


Ice Cube, right, and Kevin Hart in a scene from "Ride Along."


Ben (Hart), who has just
been accepted into the Atlanta
police academy, is ready to ask
his girlfriend Angela (Tika
Sumpter) to marry him. But
first, he's determined to get the
approval of her older brother,
James (Cube), an Atlanta po-
lice officer But at 5 feet, 4
inches tall, Ben is far from
James' biggest fan. He'd pic-
tured his sister with a brawny
athlete, "not the mascot," he
says. In order to prove he's
worthy of asking for Angela's
hand, Ben must accompany
James on a 24-hour patrol of
Atlanta.


Unfortunately, Ben doesn't do
a great job of being tough or
discrete. He likens police work
to his "Call of Duty" video gam-
ing and calls Angela "bouncy
buttf' after telling her, "You
make me think of rainbows be-
cause we both love colors."
It's one of many absurdly
funny lines Hart delivers while
trying to prove himself to
James. And their exchange,
reminiscent of smooth-talking
Will Smith and the foolish Mar-
tin Lawrence in "Bad Boys," is
consistently amusing.
When James requests a day
of "Code 126" cases, cop lingo


Details:
"Ride Along," a Universal
release, is rated PG-13 by the
Motion Picture Association of
America for "sequences of
violence, sexual content and
brief strong language."
Running time: 100 minutes.
Two and a half stars out of four.

trust issues. "That' s why you
don't have a partner," he says,
foreshadowing a sequel.
After fellow officers (played
Associated Press by John Leguizamo and Bryan
Callen) set up James during a
supposed bust, Ben comes to
his rescue, which wins him big
for an annoying situation, Ben points with James.
is put to the test as he attempts This predictable "Training
to get a crew of loitering bikers Day"-goes-slapstick romp, di-
away from a storefront and put reacted by Tim Story ("Think
a drunken grocery store ceus- Like a Man"'), is far from inno-
tomer in custody vative and reaches an "oh,
Though primarily a flunky in lord" level when Cube says a
any physical task- he can't few of his signature lyrics, in-
even shoot a shotgun without eluding "Today was a good day"
its recoil hurling him backward from his 1992 album "The Pred-
- Ben uncovers a number of ator" But since the whole film
clues throughout the day, help- is full of camp down to
ing James with his hunt for the James' black muscle car and
ruthless and allusive Atlanta the police captain who won't
kingpin Omar get off his back- moments like
Despite failing all of James' these don't feel out of place,
tests, Ben refuses to bow down and Cube and Hart are a wel-
and accuses James of having comed new pair


rNocst q SNIN NOTIONt


MR, WANG'S


In 1986, Michael Lu
opened Mr. Wangs and
immediately provided his
patrons with the best
authentic Chinese food and
the friendliest service in Citrus H'
County.
The family-oriented restaurant offers
what Lu regards as the best Chinese cook who not only
provides a variety of Chinese dishes, but also provides
specialty orders at the request from patrons, cooked the way
they want it, and to their total satisfaction, knowing that
making their patrons happy will keep them coming back for
the best Chinese food in the area.
Keeping those patrons coming back is vital for Mr. Wangs as
Michael Lu anticipates and is focused on the future of many
more years of Chinese food offerings to the Citrus County
area.
Mr. Wangs is located at 3906 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Call 352-628-6366.


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C2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


ON THE SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Taylor Kitsch, as Michael Murphy, from left, Mark Wahlberg as Marcus Luttrell, Ben
from "Lone Survivor."


Associated Press
Foster as Matt "Axe" Axelson, and Emile Hirsch as Danny Dietz are shown in a scene


Superb action scenes anchor 'Survivor'


Associated Press
With all the talk about fact-based films and how ac-
curate they should or shouldn't be, it's worth noting
that some stories are best brought to screen as simply
and purely as possible.
This is especially true with a film like "Lone Sur-
vivor," Peter Berg's expertly rendered account of a
disastrous 2005 military operation in Afghanistan. War
is messy, and politics are messy But Berg has wisely
chosen to focus pretty squarely on the action, and to
present it as straightforwardly as possible.
And he's executed that approach with admirable
skill, down to using autopsy reports to get the number
of wounds a soldier suffered exactly right. "Lone Sur-
vivor" doesn't have nearly the sweep of a major war
film like Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan." But the
action scenes basically, one protracted, harrowing
firefight feel as realistic as any we've seen on the
screen for some time.
That firefight, for those unfamiliar with the story
(Berg also penned the screenplay, based on the mem-
oir by former Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell), took place
on June 28, 2005, in the craggy mountains of
Afghanistan's Kunar province. As part of Operation
Red Wings, Luttrell and three fellow SEALs were po-
sitioned on a hillside, tracking a Taliban commander
in the village below, when they suddenly encountered
a few local shepherds. Their agonized decision on
what to do with those shepherds, one of them a
teenager, led to a string of events that ultimately re-
sulted in 19 American deaths.
Of course, the title, "Lone Survivor," and the fact


Details:
"Lone Survivor," a Universal Studios release, is rated R by
the Motion Picture Association of America for "strong
bloody war violence and pervasive language." Running
time: 121 minutes. Three stars out of four.


that Luttrell is played by the movie's star (Mark
Wahlberg, in a strong and moving performance) tells
you much of what's going to happen from the get-go.
But that doesn't hurt the film's immediacy and power
In fact, you may have a hard time sitting still.
Berg opens with footage of real Navy SEAL training
and the extremes it reaches some might call it un-
necessary and overly worshipful, but for people who
don't know a lot about the SEALS, it's helpful and ef-
fective.
We're also given a sense of the lighthearted cama-
raderie at the military base, in between operations, as
the men joke about wives and girlfriends back home,
or compete in foot races. One of the SEALS worries
about how to afford a wedding present for his bride.
The veterans engage in a little good-natured ribbing of
a new arrival involving some silly dancing.
But all lightness disappears suddenly, and for good.
Soon, Luttrell is hunkered in the mountains with his
comrades: Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny
Dietz (Emile Hirsch), and Matt 'Axe" Axelson (Ben
Foster). All seems to be going well until the moment
they encounter the villagers; the ensuing debate is a
painful one. Do they let them go and risk certain dis-


cover? Or do they "terminate" the problem? The men
also touch on a heavier question: What connection, in
a deeper sense, do these shepherds have with the
enemy?
But a decision comes, and then the battle, with the
men literally falling down the mountainside, smashing
repeatedly into rocks, their bodies gashed and broken.
Several of them fight while shot and gravely wounded.
One virtually sacrifices himself to call for help. A res-
cue effort goes catastrophically badly
And then comes the amazing end to the story: How,
and with whose help, Luttrell manages to survive to
tell his tale. Though it's a matter of record, we'll keep
the suspense alive here.
At the end, we see photos of the actual casualties of
Operation Red Wings. It does not seem gratuitous, and
no further explanation or exposition is given, or
needed. Again, the best thing about Berg's work here
is its simplicity


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ON THE SCENE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C3





ON THE SCENE


WANT YOUR EVENT IN THE BUZZ? Email newsdesk@chronicleonline.com and include the name of the event; the time, date and place;
ticket prices; a contact person's name, phone number and email address; and any other pertinent information. In the subject line of the
email, type "Attention Buzz." I Photos needs to be high resolution. Identify the people in the photo and the event. Please include a con-
tact name, phone number and email address. Photos will run close to the date of the event. I Deadlines for Buzz submissions are 5
p.m. Friday for the following Friday's edition. I The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices. I For more information, call 352-563-
5660.


Theater
Central Florida Lyric Opera's
2013-14 series. All performances at
Paul P. Williams Fine Arts Audito-
rium, 9501 U.S. 441 and College
Drive, Leesburg. $15 and up. 352-
753-3229 or centralfloridalyricopera.
org.
"Barber of Seville," 3 p.m.
Feb. 16.

Arts & crafts
Works of Audrey
Bunchkowski on display through
January at Lakes Region Library.
Starving Artists Sale ex-
hibitors sought. Sale will be Feb. 1
at the historic Knight House, 8219
Orange Ave., Floral City. 10-by-10
space $30. No commission.
352-344-9300.
All Day Art Club, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday, Old Homosassa
Civic Center, 5530 S. Mason Creek
Drive, behind the fire station. $10.
Bring supplies. Intermediate and ad-
vanced artists welcome. 352-795-
8774.
Art Center Crafters Group,
noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Art Center
of Citrus County, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave., Hernando. 352-400-4466.
Members bring their own crafts to
work on each week.
Floral City Crafters, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Tuesday, Floral City Com-
munity Hall next to library. Come for
a few hours or for the day.
352-560-7668.
Citrus Springs Fun Arts &
Crafts Group, first and third Mon-
days each month. 352-489-2313.
Sandhill Crane Chapter of the
Embroiderers' Guild of America,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical Presbyte-
rian Church, 200 Mount FairAve.,
Brooksville. Bring lunch. 352-621-6680
(Citrus), 352-666-8350 (Hernando).
Needlework Fun Groups, 2 to
4 p.m. first and third Saturdays
monthly, Wildwood Public Library,
310 S. Palmer Drive, Wildwood.
352-748-1158. els34785@yahoo.
com.
Nature Coast Decorative
Artists Chapter of the Society of
Decorative Artists meets at 9 a.m.
first Saturday monthly at Weeki
Wachee Senior Center off U.S. 19
and Toucan Trail, Spring Hill. Short
meeting, show-and-tell and birthday
raffle. 352-688-4106 or 352-527-
2778. naturecoastdecorative
artists.com.


Citrus Watercolor Club meet-
ing, noon second Friday monthly,
United Methodist Church on County
Road 581, Inverness. Demonstra-
tions by well-know artists at each
meeting. $5. 352-382-8973 or 352-
622-9352. citruswatercolorclub.com.
Manatee Haven Decorative
Artists chapter of the National Soci-
ety of Decorative Painters, meets
second Saturday monthly at North
Oak Baptist Church, 9324 N. Elk-
cam Blvd., Citrus Springs. 352-270-
3256 or dynamite71@juno.com or
manateehavendecorativeartists.org.
Community Needleworks
Crafters meet at 10 a.m. first
Wednesday. All quilters, knitters and
crochet crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Florida Artists Gallery. open
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a
week.
Art Center of Citrus County's
regular gallery hours are 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Monday to Friday. The Art
Center of Citrus County is at 2644
N. Annapolis Ave., Hernando.
352-746-4089.
DownStairs Art Gallery and
Studio, at 611 N. Citrus Ave., is
open. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Saturday and
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. Pottery
lessons available. 352-249-6170 or
adellisster@gmail.com.

Art classes
Watercolor classes with in-
structor Pat Sistrand, 9 a.m. Tues-
days, Citrus Springs Community
Center. $10. citruscountyfl.org, click
on Parks & Recreation to register.
352-465-7007.
Pen and ink with oil rouging
and watercolor batiks. Instructor
Lois Owens. $20 plus some materi-
als. Beginners welcome; completed
piece every week. Classes every
Saturday at Scrap and Stamp Art
Studio in Crystal River Mall,
352-382-4911.
Art Quilt class, 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Tuesday at Whispering
Pines Park community building. In-
structor Karol Kusmaul. Complete
landscapes, portraits and still lifes.
$80 for eight weeks. 352-344-0779.
Lorna Jean Gallery art
classes:
Learn to Draw for ages 6 to
adult. $15 for group lessons. Ages 6
to 11,4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday
and 11 a.m. to noon Saturday. Ages
12 to 18,4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday.


Adult classes 11 a.m. to noon Tues-
day and Wednesday.
Watercolor Painting for Begin-
ners, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday. $15 per session. Four
students per session. 352-564-2781.
Art & craft classes for children
ages 6 to 10,11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Saturday and 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Ages 11 to 16, 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. $60 per
month. Materials included.
Classes limited to eight students.
352-564-2781.
Learn to design and create
sterling silver jewelry, 1:30 p.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday in four-week inter-
vals. $140 for four weeks. Materials
and use of tools included. 352-564-
2781.
Voice lessons. Ages 10 to adult,
by appointment. $15 per lesson.
352-564-2781.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at 6136 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
352-564-2781.
Jewelry making, 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. first and third Tuesdays at
Citrus Springs Community Center,
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd. In-
structor Marcia Balonis. $15. 352-
465-7007 or citruscountyparks.com.
The Florida Artists Gallery,
historic Knight House, 8219 Orange
Ave., Floral City, offers art classes.
352-344-9300. Floridaartistsgallery
.com.
January classes:
Advanced Fearless Painting
with Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with
lunch noon to 1 p.m. Monday, Jan.
27. Instructor Susi LaForsch. Limited
to four students. $55 per workshop;
bring materials. laforsch@tampa
bay.rr.com, 352-726-8710 or
352-344-9300.
Beginner Watercolor, 9 a.m. to
12 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23 and 30.
Instructor Jude Caborn. Students
will learn basic watercolor tech-
niques. $20 per session. Students
should supply materials. 352-344-
9300.
Ongoing classes:
Painting with Acrylics, 1 to 3 p.m.
every Friday. Instructor Connie
Townsend. For beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@aol.com.
Painting with Oils, 1 to 3 p.m.
every Tuesday. Instructor Connie
Townsend. For beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@aol.com.
Photography Critique Session,
1 to 3 p.m., second Thursday


monthly. Instructor Larry Jordan.
Critique of images. $10 per year.
352-344-0518.
The gallery is open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Satur-
days, and noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Sundays. 352-344-9300 or
floridaartistsgallery.com.

Museum
Olde Mill House Gallery &
Printing Museum "Pulp to Print"
workshops, 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 25
at 10466 W. Yulee Drive, Old Ho-
mosassa. Instructors are master
printer Jim Anderson. $60 per three-
hour class. Lunch available in Mu-
seum Cafe from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. 352-628-9411.
geminigraphics30@yahoo.com.
"An epic struggle: Florida's
Seminole Wars," an exhibit in the
Floral City Heritage Hall Museum,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday and
Saturday in the old fire station at the
east end of the Floral City Town
Center on Orange Avenue/County
Road 48. 352-860-0101, fchc@
hotmail.com or floralcityhc.org.
Coastal Heritage Museum
tours, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, Coastal Heritage
Museum, 532 Citrus Ave., Crystal
River. Extended hours 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. the second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
Photos from the Suncoast
Sentinel, a new exhibit at the
Coastal Heritage Museum. Photos
span period from 1961 to 1971; do-
nated by paper's former publishers.
532 N. CitrusAve., Crystal River.
352-795-1755.

Music
Music at the Museum concert
series in the Old Courthouse in
downtown Inverness. Jazz concerts
$25 each; acoustic concerts $10.
Social hour begins at 6 p.m., music
at 7 p.m. 352-341-6427 or society
@tampabay.rr.com.
Feb. 13 Norm Bernard and
Southern Exposure, "Jazzy Valen-
tines."
Music at the Mall presents The
Dueling Banjos, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Jan. 25 at the Crystal River Mall,
1801 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
Free.
Helton-Thomas Saxophone &
Cello Duo, 3 p.m. Jan. 26 at Dun-
nellon Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut Street, Dunnellon. 352-


C4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


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ITSALLABOUT WATERFRONT DINING


GRUFFS TAP & GRILLE
12084 S. Williams St., Dunnellon i011 Dii,-i E-, f1 I ,Lf11=11
lo 352-465-2881 www.gruffsgrill.com
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

489-2682.
Willie Nelson, 8 p.m. Jan. 29
at Ruth Eckerd Hall. $48.50 to $100.
727-791-7400 or rutheckerdhall.
corn.
The Dunnellon Community
Chorale performs "Broadway Mem-
ories" revue, 3 p.m. Feb. 9 at Dun-
nellon Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut Street, Dunnellon. 352-
489-2682.
University of Florida cello
students, 3 p.m. March 17 at
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut Street, Dunnellon.
352-489-2682.
The Country Sunshine Band,
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday,
East Citrus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway (State
Road 44 East), Inverness. Call
Annie at 352-465-4860.
John Thomas traditional
country music show and jam.
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday. Oxford
Community Center, 4027 C.R.106,
Oxford (west end of The Villages).
Admission $5; entertainers get in
free. Coffee, other drinks and finger
food available. 352-560-7946.
P.D. Smith, classical guitar,
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the
Museum Cafe, 10466 Yulee Ave.,
Homosassa. 352-628-1081.

Dance
Sunday Nite Dance, 6 p.m. to
10 p.m. Jan. 26 at American Legion
Post 347 at the corner of County
Road 466 and Rolling Acres Road,
Lady Lake. Music by Amy & Henry.
All welcome. Music starts at 7. $10.
352-304-8672.
Beginners' line dancing
classes. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday
at Central Citrus Community Center,
2804 W. Mark Knighton Court,
Lecanto. $3. Instructor Cher Mason.
Closed-toe shoes preferred.
socdancer.org. 352-527-5993.
Social ballroom dance
classes with June Queripel,
Wednesday at the Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto. Dance
basics at 1:30 p.m. and advanced at
2:45 p.m. $5. 352-527-5993 or
352-795-3831.
Sumter Singles and Couples
dinner dance, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
the first and third Fridays monthly at
Lake Panasoffkee Recreation Park
in blue building at 1582 County
Road 459 off County Road 470.
Dances open to married, couples,
singles and groups from churches
and RV parks. All ages welcome.
No alcohol. Finger foods or soda
welcome. 352-424-1688.
Allan O'Neal sings and dee-
jays first Saturday of the month at
Citrus County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
For information, call Linda at 352-
464-0004. Dance tickets are avail-
able for July 6. Dances are from 6 to
10 p.m. Free dance lesson at 5 p.m.
$10 at the door, includes hot and
cold hors d'oeuvres, soft drink or
coffee.
Sunday Night Dances every
See Page C5


I COUPN]M





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

week at Knights of Columbus, 2389
W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Lecanto.
Doors open at 6 p.m. Music starts at
7 p.m. Coffee, tea and soda
available.
Line dancing classes with
Kathy Reynolds, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, East Citrus Community
Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness. $3 per class.
352-344-9666.
Inverness Square Dance
Club's beginner square dance les-
sons, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday,
East Citrus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, east of In-
verness on State Road 44. 352-860-
2090 or 352-465-700.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday,
Beverly Hills Recreation Center. $3
nonmembers. 352-746-4882 or
352-527-3738.
Let's Dance! 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Thursday. Entertainment by Bill
Castner; instruction by Rita Hobbs.
Crystal River Mall, 1801 N.W. U.S.
19. Free.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m. Thurs-
days, fellowship hall of First United
Methodist Church of Dunnellon,
21501 W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.
352-489-1785 or 352-465-2142.
Spirit of Citrus Dances. All
dances 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Kellner
Auditorium Jewish Center, 92 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, unless other-
wise indicted, socdancer.org.
Social ballroom dancing held
second and fourth Saturdays
monthly. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.
Complimentary dance lesson at
7 p.m. General dancing from 7:30 to
10 p.m. Admission $6 for members
and $9 for non-members. Ice and
coffee provided. Sodas and bottled
water may be purchased. Call Barb
or Jack at 352-344-1383 or JoAnn at
352-746-4274.

Special interest
Crystal River of Life Coffee
House, Christian Fellowship, con-
versation and music from 7 to 9:30
p.m. Friday, Village Cafe, 789 N.E.
Fifth St., State Road 44. 352-817-
6879.
Crystal River Preserve State
Park boat tour, 10:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays, Crystal River Preserve
State Park Visitor Center. $12.50


ON THE SCENE


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of the event; the time, date and place; ticket prices; a contact person's name, phone number and
email address; and any other pertinent information. In the subject line of the email, type "Attention
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I The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices. I For more information, call 352-563-5660.


adults; $10 children ages 7 to 12;
free, children 6 and younger. Tickets
on sale in Preserve Visitor Center
one hour prior to departure; arrive
no less than 15 minutes prior to
departure. 352-563-0450.
crystalriverstateparks.org.
Chapter 156 of The National
Association of Watch and Clock
Collectors (NAWCC) meeting,
8 a.m. fourth Sunday at VFW Post
4781,9401 S.W. 110th St., Ocala.
352-527-2669.
The First Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Society meet-
ing, 1 p.m. first Saturday monthly.
September meeting focuses on fi-
nancial information for writers. Cen-
tral Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. 727-945-1064 or
fchns.org. December's guest will be
Beverly Gentry of the Fort Cooper
chapter of the Daughters of the
American revolution, speaking about
Christmases past.
The Sunshine State Romance
Authors Inc. meetings, 10 a.m.
fourth Saturday monthly, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.
352-726-0162.
"How to Publish Your Own
Book," and "Writing Your Mem-
oirs," both feat. author/publisher
Claudine Dervaes, 2 p.m. and
2 p.m. Jan. 18 at the Scrap and
Stamp Art Studio in the Crystal River
Mall, 1801 U.S. 19, Crystal River.
$15 each or $25 for both; registra-
tion required. 352-795-0317.
Community Conversation Se-
ries, a monthly program aimed at
encouraging civil dialogue with facili-
tator Kathy Bird. 3:30 p.m. Free, but
reservations recommended. To sign
up, call 352-344-9300. 8219 Orange
Ave., Floral City. floridaartistsgallery
.com.
Forgotten Film Festival,
hosted by Nature Coast Unitarian


Universalists fellowship. All films at
3 p.m. at 7633 U.S. 41, Citrus
Springs. naturecoastuu.org.
Jan. 30 "Ladies in Laven-
der." Two sisters' lives dramatically
change when they discover an in-
jured foreigner washed ashore near
their coastal home in pre-war
England.
Second annual Springs RV
Resort Craft Show, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Feb. 8 at the resort, 2950 N.E. 52nd
Court, Silver Springs. Homemade
foods, drinks and entertainment.
Parking and admission free. No
pets.

Farmers' markets
Inverness Farmers' Market,
about 30 vendors, fresh produce,
homemade crafts, baked goods and
more, summer hours are 9 a.m. to
1 p.m., first and third Saturdays, In-
verness Government Center parking
lot. 352-726-2611.
Herry's Market Day, 8 a.m. to
noon, last Saturday of the month at
Hospice Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W.
Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa (be-
hind Wendy's, east of U.S. 19).
Herry's Market Day is offering free
vendor space. Space is limited.
352-527-2020.
Beverly Hills Arts, Crafts and
Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Friday at Lake Beverly Park.
Vendor spaces $5. bhcivic
association.com. 352-746-2657.
Dunnellon's First Saturday
Village Market, includes a variety of
street vendors, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. first
Saturday monthly, Dunnellon's His-
toric District on West Pennsylvania
Avenue, Cedar and Walnut streets.
352-465-2225.
Market Day with Art & Treas-
ures, an outdoor event with plants,
produce, arts, crafts, collectibles and


more, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Satur-
days on the grounds of Heritage Vil-
lage, 657 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal
River. 352-564-1400.
Saturday at the Market, farm-
ers' market, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
days weekly, in front of the historic
Courthouse, downtown Brooksville.
352-428-4275.
Circle Square Commons
Farmers' Market summer hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday. Fresh
seasonal produce, flowers, plants,
fresh-baked goods, handmade
soaps, delicious pies and more. Cir-
cle Square Commons is adjacent to
On Top of the World Communities at
8405 S.W. 80th St. in Ocala. 352-
854-3670. CircleSquareCommons
FarmersMarket.com.
West End Market at the Crys-
tal River Mall, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. the
fourth Saturday of every month.
Features fresh produce, plants and
other local food-related items, as
well as handmade arts and crafts.
Air-conditioned. 352-795-2585.

Music rehearsals
IN-COUNTY
Second Sunday Sunset Drum
Circle, two hours before sunset,
Sunday, Fort Island Trail Beach
Park, Crystal River, at far end of
beach. Circle begins an hour and a
half before sunset. Bring drums and
percussion instruments. Chair nec-
essary; beverages optional.
352-344-8009 or 352-746-0655.
Chorus of The Highlands, the
Citrus County chapter of the Barber-
shop Harmony Society, rehearses at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday weekly at First
United Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness,
34452. Male singers welcome.
352-382-0336.
Citrus County chapter of


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C5


"Chorus of the Highlands" Bar-
bershop Harmony Society, 6:30
p.m. every Tuesday in Inverness.
352-382-0336.
The Nature Coast Community
Band, rehearses from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. Tuesday at First United
Methodist Church Fellowship Hall,
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road
(County Road 581). 352-746-7567.
nccommunityband@earthlink.net or
naturecoastcommunityband.com.
Citrus Community Concert
Choir Inc. rehearse at 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Faith Lutheran Church Fel-
lowship Hall, Lecanto. New
members welcome to audition be-
ginning at 6:30 p.m. 352-212-1746.
Sugarmill Chorale rehearses
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in
room 102 of the Sunday School
building at First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa. sug-
armillchoraledirector@yahoo.com.
352-634-2688.
OUT-OF-COUNTY
Hernando Harmonizers, part
of Men's Barbershop Harmony Soci-
ety, opens doors at 6:45 p.m. and
starts rehearsals at 7 p.m. Monday,
Nativity Lutheran Church fellowship
hall, 6363 Commercial Way, Spring
Hill. Written arrangements, training
techniques and professional direc-
tion provided. 352-556-3936 or 352-
666-0633. BASSharmonySingR
@aol.com.
Summer Springs Sweet Ade-
lines Chorus invites women to re-
hearse from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Monday
in Ascension Lutheran Church, 5730
28th Street at Baseline Road, Ocala.
Membership not required. Carpool
available from Inverness. 352-276-
3323 or summerspringschorus.com.
Marion Civic Chorale re-
hearses from 6:45 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days at St. George Anglican
Cathedral, 5646 S.E. 28th St.,
Ocala. 352-342-1796 or 352-537-
0207. wayne@fumcocala.org.
The Central Florida Master
Choir is auditioning for all voices, partic-
ularly tenors and basses. Rehearsals at
7 p.m. Tuesday at Countryside Pres-
byterian Church, 7768 State Road 200,
in Ocala. 352-615-7677.
The Ocala Accordion Club,
meets and performs the last
Wednesday monthly, Cherrywood
Club House, 6253 S.W. 100th Loop,
Ocala. 352-854-6236. FLACCAS-
SOC@bellsouth.net. www.
accordions.com/florida.
Music rehearsals run at least
once a month, space permitting.


Life tips for the new year


ello again, and
cheers to 2014. As
we are all making
those New Year's resolu-
tions, here are some tips
to guide you into an
amazing new year
First make a list of
things that you wish to im-
prove on and new things
you wish to accomplish.
Make sure that your goals
are achievable so that you
don't throw the towel in be-
fore you even get started.
Goals need to be set in
stages of achievement so
that you can see your
progress along the way
If your goal is the ever
popular weight loss or to
get fit, seek a professional
to create a plan for you to
follow Take baby steps to-
wards your goal and accept
that great accomplish-
ments take a little time, but
you will get there.
If your goal is a
makeover, look through
trend magazines and
choose three options. Post
them on your wall and
look at them for a few
days. One will surely
stand out eventually The
worst thing you can do is
jump to the decision of a
major image adjustment
or makeover Learn your
skin tone, shape of face,
hair texture and choose
the silhouette and tone
that compliments your
characteristics. Makeup is
a very important part of
your makeover Of course,
mineral make up is a
good option for your skin,
as it is natural and has
SPF protection.
Business and work
goals with proper organi-
zation will improve time
management and in-
crease success. A tool that
I use personally is a goal
journal, including a pyra-
mid tracking system. This
is a full-page triangle that
has horizontal lines divid-
ing it into segments. The
bottom of the triangle is
much wider than the top
point. So write your goal
on the top point. Utilize
the individual segments
as a guide for all of the
steps it will take to climb
to the top point. The


Lilllian
Knipp

LIFE
AND
STYLE


widest point on the bot-
tom of the page is the first
step, prioritizing the tasks
in order to get to the top.
This is an amazing tool
that can be used for work
and personal tasks. It
feels so amazing to cross
the segments off that you
have completed. Sud-
denly, you can see clearly
what has been completed,
what you need to do next
and the progress that you
are making. Hairdressers
really need to track their
goals as we work in a very
fast-paced environment
that requires our undi-
vided attention. If anyone
would like assistance
with creating a system of
tracking, feel free to
message me.


I am a big believer in
family planning as well.
Life is like a vapor as
daddy always taught us,
so we need to make it
count. Planning is the
best way to slow life's
pace down. Create a fam-
ily calendar planning fun
nights like kid's night,
date night for mom and
dad, creative meal plan-
ning, family movie night
or game night. Scheduling
a getaway at least once a
month and a few vaca-
tions a year will keep
your family close and cre-
ate lasting memories. Pre-
planning will also save
you money, as pre-book-
ing is usually a lot less
than last-minute booking.
Enjoy making 2014 the
best year ever Grow as a
person, enhance your
spiritual life, challenge
yourself with work goals
and create lasting family
memories that you will
cherish for a lifetime. We
only have one life to live
so we should make it a
great one!


ST.333OES335


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24,2014
7:00 PM
St. Timothy Lutheran Church
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
Tickets in advance or at the door.
Suggested donation $10
Call (352) 795-5325 or (352) 634-2388
gfor more information.
S Visit us at: www.thechurchmen.com
and
http://www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com/


Coming February 23rd




ATTENTION



Business Owners

Be sure to include your business!


profiling Citrus CountyV Businesses, thisspec
edition will tell the history, services and products
of our local businesses.
C CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


When Dan was asked what is the most valuable advice
he has for people considering a hearing aid he replied,
"Consult with an audiologist instead of a
salesman because who you see is much
more important than the products you buy."

FetrdBs inese
CofrtKepr,0neresF
Gardner Audiolog


Dan Gardner, Founder &
CEO, Gardner Audiology


Advertising Deadline: February 12, 2014
To find out how your business can be featured call
your advertising representative or (352) 563-5592 i







Page C6* FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Floral City Masons
to serve fish dinner
Floral City Masonic Lodge, on
Orange Ave. (next to the library),
will host a fish fry from 3 to 6 p.m.
Saturday
All-you-can-eat fish will be of-
fered. Sides include French fries,
coleslaw, hush puppies, beans,
dessert and beverage. The
donation is $8.

Author to talk about
Writer's Road Map'
Dylan Newton, president of the
Sunshine State Romance Au-
thors, will present an hour-long
seminar, "Writer's Road Map to
Success in 2014," at 10 a.m.
Saturday
The presentation will focus on
goal setting and creating a game
plan for achieving those goals.
Published authors and aspiring
writers, regardless of experience
level and genre, are invited to
join the professional group every
month for meetings, training ses-
sions and workshops designed to
promote excellence in all genres
and help members establish writ-
ing careers in today's fast-paced
publishing industry
SSRA meets from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. the fourth Saturday each
month at the Homosassa Public
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.
For more information, visit
www sunshinestateromance
authors. com or call Marian Fox at
352-726-0162.

BH Lions will have
breakfast Sunday
The Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will have its
pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. Sunday
Cost for adults is $4; and chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for $2.
This includes all-you-can-eat pan-
cakes, choice of bacon or sausage
or combo, orange juice and coffee
or tea.
For more information, call 352-
897-4899.

Mission in Citrus
giveaway continues
The Mission in Citrus Homeless
Shelters will have another free
giveaway event today and Satur-
day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. both
days at its Crystal River
locations, 2472 and 2488 N.
Pennsylvania Ave.
No resellers allowed. The give-
away is to help all those truly in
need. Resellers or those trying to
take large loads will be turned
away
Items include goods from Bed,
Bath & Beyond, Home Depot, Big
Lots, Walgreens and CVS, the
Community Food Bank and many
more.
The Mission relies solely on
donations and small grants.
For more information about the
Mission and its services, call 352-
794-3825 or 352-270-4357.

A Humane Society
OF CENTRAL FLA.


Ms. Spanky


Special to the Chronicle
Ms. Spanky is so named because
she has a chocolate-colored eye
patch, like Petey in "Our Gang,"
but is prettier and sweeter. She is
a 3-year-old, spayed deer-type
Chihuahua. She is submissive and
loving and will be a devoted
companion. Come meet Ms.
Spanky at the Pet Supermarket
adoption event from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday with A Humane
Society of Central Florida Pet
Rescue Inc. If you have a little dog
you must re-home, call 352-527-
9050. Visit www.petFinder.com
ZIP code 34465.


There's still time to join

Special to the Chronicle
American Legion Post 237,4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, will host a benefit
poker run Saturday with proceeds sup-
porting Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian
Cancer Research and patients and fami-
lies served by Hospice of Citrus County.
A $15 entry fee per rider will include a
poker hand, a raffle prize ticket and a
meal at the end of the run. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. at American Legion


/o


Jack Condron

tapped for top

honor at Citrus

Memorial

Special to the Chronicle
Jack Condron was recently
named the 2013 Volunteer of
the Year for Citrus Memorial
Health System.
He has volunteered at Cit-
rus Memorial for more than
eight years, serving two years
as the suxiliary president and
most recently as vice presi-
dent. He is the chairman of
more than 30 volunteers in the
Emergency Department.
'Jack is a dependable, loyal
volunteer who is admired by
others who serve at the hospi-
tal," said current auxiliary
president, Sandi Phillips.
"He has volunteered over
7,500 hours in his various posi-
tions. Sometimes he's the
voice of reason and is here to
lighten up a tense moment.
We're certainly thankful for
his service and philanthropic
spirit," Phillips said.
Citrus Memorial staff and
volunteers are responsible for
nominating the Volunteer of
the Year
In order to be nominated, an
individual must meet the fol-
lowing criteria:
Active membership in the
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem Volunteer Auxiliary
Demonstrate remarkable


Park to host bird walk
The Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection's Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, in
cooperation with Citrus County Audubon
Society, will host a monthly bird walk on
Pepper Creek Trail at 8 a.m. Saturday
An experienced birder from Citrus
County Audubon will lead the walk on
this trail one of 19 birding trails in
Citrus County that are part of the West
section of the Great Florida Birding and
Wildlife Trail.
Participants should meet at 7:45 a.m. at
the entrance to the park's Visitor Center
Binoculars and a field guide are recom-
mended. Participation in the bird walk
on Pepper Creek is free. After the walk,
participants can either walk back down
the trail or wait and take the first return-
ing boat after the park opens. There is no
charge to use the Pepper Creek trail or to
take the return boat trip.
Bird walks are planned for October,
November and monthly from January
through April. For more information and
to register, call 352-628-5343, ext. 1002.

British American Club meets
The British American Social Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday at Holiday Inn
Express, 903 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.
The new board will take office. They
are President Dave Jones, Vice President
Lynn Raville, Secretary Jean Wallace and
Treasurer Derek Johnson.
The club meets the fourth Monday of


r or research





in on fourth annual cancer fndraising event


Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Kick stands are
up at 10 a.m. and the last bike in will be
at 4:30 p.m. when food will be served.
The fourth annual American Legion
Post 237 Poker Run will encompass six
stops to include: Inglis Amvets, IRRU So-
cial Club, Giovanni's, Crystal River Ea-
gles, Mickey's Billiards and Scoreboards.
The best hand will win the poker run
and all vehicles are welcome to partici-
pate. Music will be provided by The Joes.
There will be a silent auction, door prize


raffles and a 50/50 drawing.
"We invite everyone to participate in
our event and everyone has a great time,"
Director of American Legion Riders
Chapter 237 and poker run chairperson
John Roby said. "This fourth annual run
proudly supports Moffitt Cancer Center
Ovarian Cancer Research and local pa-
tients and families served by Hospice of
Citrus County"
For more information, call 352-746-5018
or John Roby at 352-341-5856.


VoDv vntw t roo


Special to the Chronicle
Jack Condron, pictured with wife Marlene Condron, was named Volunteer of the Year for
Citrus Memorial Health System for 2013.


concern for the welfare and
happiness of hospital patients,
staff and other customers of
the hospital.
Perform extraordinary


acts of kindness, thereby
contributing to the customer
service image of the hospital.
Have a positive effect
on others.


Willingly perform duties,
as requested or identified.
Day-to-day performance is
dependable, consistent and
people-oriented.


every month; all interested persons are
invited. Refreshments are available.
For more information, call Dave Jones
at 352-382-3418.

Post to serve baked chicken
VFW Edward WPenno Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
will have a baked chicken dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. today
The public is invited. Cost is $8;
children younger than 6 eat for $4.
For more information, call 352-
465-4864.

Garden club to talk orchids
The Garden Club of Crystal River meet
at 1p.m. Monday, Feb. 10.
February's speaker is Dr Charles
Thomas, whose topic will be "How to
repot your orchid and other orchid facts."
The garden club meets the second
Monday of each month at the St. Martin
Marsh Aquatic Preserve, Crystal River
State Park. Each month there is a fea-
tured speaker The public is welcome.
For more information, call President
Jenny Wensel, 352-795-0844.

Come see 'Letters To Juliet'
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast
will present the January Monthly Movie
Matinee "Letters To Juliet" at 2 p.m. Mon-
day at the Hospice of Citrus and the Na-
ture Coast Wings Education Center, 8471
W Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
"Letters To Juliet" stars Amanda


Seyfried and Vanessa Redgrave. Travel
with them and Hospice of Citrus and the
Nature Coast to Verona, Italy, where the
heartbroken will find hope.
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature
Coast's Monthly Movie Matinees are pre-
sented to the community at no cost. They
offer an educational component that ben-
efits individuals dealing with grief and
loss in a supportive environment. Discus-
sion time will follow the movies and pop-
corn and snacks are available.
For more information, call Lynn Miller
at 352-621-1500. Visit Hospice of Citrus
and the Nature Coast on Facebook or on
the web at wwwhospiceofcitrus.org.

Rescue to sponsor pet clinic
Precious Paws Rescue Inc. will sponsor
a low-cost dog and cat vaccination clinic
from 1 to 3 p.m. the fourth Saturday of
each month at Crystal River Mall, starting
this Saturday
Pets must be restrained. All dogs must
be leashed and muzzled, if needed. Cats
must be in carriers or crated.
Dr Marilyn Tobey of Floral City Veteri-
nary Hospital will provide veterinary
services and Crystal River Mall manage-
ment will donate the space. Direct access
from the parking area will be the only
open entrance. Signs will be posted to di-
rect pet owners.
No pets will be allowed in the mall's
shopping areas. Only cash payments will
be accepted. PPR volunteers will be
available to sign in pet owners and an-
swer questions. For more information,
call 352-726-4700.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


NEWS NOTES





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES flrT^*-|--

FEoSa Ct Refuge Friends to gather
Ridge Masons sharing
Floral City buildings


Ridge Masonic Lodge No.398
has moved from Homosassa to
Floral City and shares the build-
ing with Floral City Lodge No. 133,
8350 E. Orange Ave.
Ridge Masonic Lodge No.398
meets the second Monday of the
month at 10:30 a.m.
For more information, visit
www.citrusshrineclub.com.

Chazz association
slates public meeting
A public meeting of the Chassa-
howitzka Community Association
is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday
Jan. 30, at the community center,
10300 S Riviera Drive.
Everyone is welcome to attend
and participate in the meeting.
The association will work to-
ward the betterment of the
Chassahowitzka community and
its residents.
Youth facilities and programs,
adult fitness and facilities, com-
munity social events, Chassahow-
itzka history preservation and
promotion and support of local
recreational and environmental
issues are some of the priorities
of the organization as it continues
to form.
To contact and/or get on the
email mailing list of the Chassa-
howitzka Community Association,
email: chassahowitzka@
outlook.com.

Ozello show looking for
chili, craft vendors
Ozello is getting ready for its
eighth annual Chili Cook-off &
Craft Show slated for 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15.
Anyone can enter the free chili
contest at the Ozello Civic Center,
located 6.2 miles off U.S. 19 on
Ozello Road. Chili tasting and
chili dinner will begin at 11 a.m.
Donation is $5.
Anyone interested in displaying
and needing an application for
the craft show may call show
chairwoman Jane Beller at 352-
634-0563 or visit the website at
ozello.net.
The annual event is a family
day featuring food, music and
crafts on display, and is spon-
sored by the Chronicle.

Fishing club invites
new members
The Trout and Redfish Club of
Homosassa is looking for new
members for the upcoming year
Members fish for trout and red-
fish only All tournaments are
held the second Friday of the
month with weigh-in at 3 p.m.
Live or cut bait is not allowed;
artificial only
There are no meeting or social
event requirements, only an op-
portunity to fish competitively
and meet fellow fishermen.
For more information, call Bob
at 352-382-5045 or 352-220-2199.

Reiki circle meets at
Homosassa Library
Reiki Gentle Touch Circle will
meet at the Homosassa Library
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 11 and 25.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, call Kristie at 352-
628-5537.

Elks Ladies schedule
annual flea market
The West Citrus Ladies of the
Elks will present its annual flea
market from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, at the lodge,
7890 W Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Proceeds benefit charities sup-
ported by the Elks Ladies.
To donate items, call Bonnie
Lee at 352-382-0211.

Cards, casino will help
Lion Club's causes
Everyone is invited to a Texas
Hold'em and Casino Night to
benefit the Homosassa Lions
Club at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at
the Lions Clubhouse, 3705 S.
Indiana Ave., across from Fire
Station Park in Homosassa.
The cost to enter the Texas
Hold'em Tournament is a $50
donation. Reserve seat tickets are
available. Prizes will be awarded
to the top five finishers.
The cost to enjoy Casino Night
is a $20 donation. Games will in-


clude blackjack, roulette, bingo
and others. Prizes will be
awarded and there will be a
Chinese auction.
Refreshments and beverages
will be available. All proceeds
will go to the Lions Charitable
Foundation.
For more information and to
get tickets, email the Lions at
HomosassaLions@gmail.com or
call 352-257-1388.


Meeting slated for Sunday at First United Methodist in Homosassa


Special to the Chronicle
Friends of Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge Complex Inc. will have
its annual meeting at 2 p.m. Sunday in
the Fellowship Hall of the First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.


For more information or directions,
call 352-586-7140 or visit www.friendsofc-
hazz.org. This is a free event and is open
to the public.
Featured speaker will be John Moran,
a Florida nature photographer Moran is
a resident of Florida since age 2 and a
University of Florida graduate. His pho-


tography has appeared in numerous
books and magazines, including National
Geographic, Time, Newsweek, Smithson-
ian and many others. Moran's presenta-
tion will be on "Our Water, Our Future."
For more information, visit www
friendsofchazz.org or call 352-653-2088,
ext. 215.


C news from the Homosassa area

COMMUNITY


Donation to the school


Special to the Chronicle
The Homosassa Game Fish Club recently donated $1,000 to Homosassa Elementary School. This year's donation is the 13th year in
a row the club was able to help the school. The donated funds represented proceeds from the merchandise sold at the 2013 annual
Cobia Big Fish Tournament. Making the donation to members of the school's Safety Patrol are: Gator MacRae, club vice-president;
Christopher Bosse, school principal; and Trudy Cooper, tournament committee member.


Partnership
proceeds
A partnership between
members of the Homosassa
River Alliance and Beef
'O'Brady's in Crystal River
recently netted a donation to
the River Alliance. A team of
volunteers from both places
set up a booth during the
Homosassa Arts, Crafts and
Seafood Festival, offering
seafood, chicken and other
food items. The donation from
Beef 'O'Brady's, owned by
Dan Heavrin, was from
proceeds garnered during the
two-day festival. Pictured,
from left, are: Jim Bitter, club
president; Ashlie Hodgkins,
Beef 'O'Brady's employee and
volunteer during the festival;
and Bob Jeeves, club
secretary.
ROCHELLE KAISER/Chronicle


Installation of officers


ROCHELLE KAISER/Chronicle
The United Methodist Women of First United Methodist Church of Homosassa had its installation of new officers recently.
Pictured, from left, are: Mim Currier and Joan West, circle leaders; Ann Ice, spiritual growth coordinator; Laurie Stainton, vice
president; Joanne Kemp, Thrift Shop co-chairwoman; Helen Lefave, secretary and treasurer; Alice Trusley, installing officer; and
Patricia Blake, president and Thrift Shop co-chairwoman. Not pictured are: Alice Carnahan, circle leader; Claudette Kirby,
nominations chairwoman; and Barbara Jackson, secretary of program resources.


COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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West
* 10 7 4
V K 5 :3 2
* .J 10 8 7
4 9 8


North 01-24-14
** Q ;i 2,
. J 4
* A K Q 3
* 7 5 3 2
Ieast
*4 K 8 6 5
Y Q 10 9 8 7 B
i
4-64
AP 6 4
South
4 AJ9
V A
* 6 5 4 2
b A K Q J 10


Dealer: North
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
I Pass
2 4 Pass :1 Pass
3 I Pass 4* + P'ass
4 V Pass i Pass
6 b Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: b 9

SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Here are the answers to the first two ques-
tions in my Christmas Competition.
1. How should South plan the play in six
clubs after West leads a trump and East fol-
lows suit?
South should finish drawing trumps, cash
the heart ace, play a diamond to dummy's
queen, ruff the heart jack in his hand, and lead
another diamond to the dummy
If the diamonds split 3-2, declarer is playing
for an overtrick by taking two spade finesses.
So, let's assume diamonds are 4-1.
If East has four diamonds, South cashes the
last high diamond, then gives East the lead in
diamonds. Now if East has the spade king, he
is endplayed. If he leads away from that king,
declarer runs the trick around to dummy's
queen, then plays a spade to his jack. (If East
does not have the spade king, the contract has
no chance.)
Alternatively, as in the diagram, if West
started with four diamonds, South should now
lead the spade queen from the board. If the fi-
nesse loses, again the contract was unmakable.
So let's have East cover the queen with his
king. Declarer wins with his ace and exits with
his last diamond to endplay West, who must ei-
ther lead around into South's jack-nine of
spades or concede a ruff-and-sluff.
2. Suggest an uncontested auction to six
clubs.
This is tough. It is much easier to end in six
diamonds, which makes with this distribution.
I accepted anything reasonable.
The winners will be given in the column of
March 22.

% j? THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
JJ VN by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, I'vecutout the That's not how
one letter to each square, 'middleman. That's you spell,
to form four ordinary words, why they are so "praa.
cheap. How many
F T would you like?
FUINT IE , :

@2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC I7 .
AM Rights Reserved
AGBYG __ I^ ^ I
2 ,i -- ^ "'



PANIDU 1 ^
7 77 1A7THE STREET- VEENPOR-
1 -- -- TOLP HER IT WAS AN
SAUTHENTIC HANPBAG,
COIYD II T 5HE WASN'T---


Iim- ^_--


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your "
answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: APART DODGE FONDLY CURFEW
I Answer: The animals in the forest got along so well
because they were all GOOD-NATURED


ACROSS
1 Ship's tiller
5 Whammy
8 Muscle for
pushups
11 Port near
Hong Kong
13 Ms. Lupino
14 Lumberjack
tool
15 Select from
the menu
16 Broke loose
18 Delivery
trucks
20 Vestige
21 Brother's
daughter
23 Holiday cheer
24 Down for the
count
25 Entice
27 Track postings
31 Country addr.
32 Depot info
33 Orchid-loving
Wolfe
34 401 (k)
cousins


36 Ceremony
38 KGB
counterpart
39 Hawk
40 Mideast gulf
41 It's south
of Eur,
42 Olive in the
comics
44 Bribery
46 Form
49 Culture
dish goo
50 Literary
excerpt
52 Actress
Garbo
56 -
snail's pace
57 Sun. homily
58 Lab slide dye
59 Recipe amt.
60 In addition
61 Dwindle
DOWN
1 Insurance grp.
2 Play it by -
3 Arith. term


Answer to Previous Puzzle


4 Writer Binchy
5 Scurries
along
6 Journal VIPs
7 Craft knife
(hyph.)
8 Family man


Want more puzzles?
Chock out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.eomn


*TIAIMIPIA M J I IV E|DI
E A|N S E R ENE
S T|YAA D A|G E S
_IUEKS SjL ITM
y EL K|S|
*SS|pRY|N OE R
PIIP UAT0AO0P T
mE|A 0 H iUTO|P I_
A ADi P|EISNElS'S

0 K L TA TOA D
UNWRA PA CO PiT E
HET HSION-I O
S E|DA N Ti~ r- "0 W


9 Co. honcho
10 Surrender
territory
12 Apollo's
priestess
17 Inert gas
19 Not taking
sides
21 Dame
22 Flawless
23 Emergency
reserve
(2 wds.)
24 -
Kristofferson
26 Foray
28 Kind of coffee
29 Snowbank
30 Glide like an
eagle
35 Spills
37 Provoke
43 Baker's buy
45 Traffic
indicator
46 Disagreement
47 Bowlers
48 Now!
49 Space lead-in
51 Earth, in
combos
53 NASA
counterpart
54 Light metal
55 "Wheel of
Fortune" buy
(2 wds.)


1 -P4 (9j PO014 LUFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: I was mar-
ried for 21 years, until
my wife decided to
call it quits. It's been four
years since the divorce. She
is now dating someone from
work. I suspect this co-
worker is the rea-
son she left me, but
I truly do not care
anymore and have
moved on with my
life.
For the past two
years, I have been
dating "Lois." We
don't live together
We both have
teenage children
and don't think liv-
ing together is a
good idea. But, ANI
Annie, every morn- MAIL
ing I ask myself:
Should I stay, or
should I go? I am 49 and Lois
is 42. We often argue about
stupid things. She quickly
gets over these spats, but I
don't.
So, tell me: How do I know
whether it's love or just com-
panionship? -Need Advice
Dear Need: If every morn-
ing you question whether you
should stick around, the an-
swer is no, you shouldn't. You
don't mention that you love
Lois or even enjoy her com-
pany
You seem to fight often in
ways that disturb you. Being
with someone who doesn't
make you happy is not the so-
lution to loneliness.
DearAnnie: My parents di-
vorced after 15 years of mar-
riage. My father remarried
and passed away in 2004. My
mother married a man and
divorced him after 18 years.
He, too, has passed away
My mother believes that my


I
L


aunts, uncles and cousins on
my father's side are still her
relatives because they are re-
lated to me. She says she is
still the aunt to my cousins on
that side of the family My
brother adds to this dilemma
by bringing Mom to
some of these fam-
ily gatherings
where my paternal
aunts ignore her
and my cousins ask
why she is there.
She seems hurt by
this.
So is Mom still a
part of my dad's
family? She has
nieces from her
second marriage,
IE'S but she has never
.BOX included me in
those gatherings,
and I don't even
know them. Are these un-
known cousins relatives to
me? Child in the Middle
Dear Child: Your mother is
related only insofar as the
relatives want her to be. If
she was "aunt" to your
cousins for 15 years, they may
still think of her this way
However, it sounds as if they
are not interested in being re-
lated any longer, in which
case, they don't have to be.
The same goes for your step-
cousins. Unless you are sud-
denly interested in getting to
know them better, you do not
need to consider yourself re-
lated.
DearAnnie: I'm writing in
response to "Heart Full of Joy
in Pennsylvania," who di-
vorced her cheating husband
after 35 years and finally
found happiness.
I've been married for 36
years, and my husband has
lived a secret life the entire


time. I've known about it, but
turned my head and kept up
a good front so the children
could have a happy child-
hood.
Now the kids are grown,
and I've decided I cannot live
the lie anymore. I told the
children that their dad has
been unfaithful, but I didn't
disclose the details that he
has been living "on the down
low," having casual sex with
men at public parks and
going to swingers clubs.
My kids are hurt, and feel
that their happy childhood
was a lie. I often wonder if I
am being selfish. After all, the
marriage isn't horrible, but it
isn't a true marriage.
My counselor says the kids
will come around eventually
and will realize that I am
much happier now that I'm
out of my dysfunctional mar-
riage.
I just want to say that
"Heart Full of Joy" has given
me hope. Though I'm not in-
terested in finding someone
else right now, perhaps there
is a man out there who will
cherish me, honor me and
truly love me. Tired of Liv-
ing the Lie

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www. creators. com.


C8 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


(TAKE5 OFF, T

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9TA P AFRP! WAT



Pickles


Sally Forth


WHA TO10W.II


Garfield


Dilbert


For Better or For Worse

,1 UNCU. PL D I C ND'T ErF

17 l DP PSO TIRTE 07 o


Beetle Bailey

TURN OF F THE SHOW 46
THAT TO ks5Tr'vE0 g?
'''^^^^^rAT


The Grizzwells


THIS REPORT SAYS
YOU LAPPED OUR CEO
SENSELESS AFTER HE
SAID THE KEY TO
SUCC5E IS FOLLOWING
'YOUR INSTINCT.


I LAS FOLLOWING M Y
INSTINCT. I A 5 ALSO
BEING PASSIONATE.
ENGAGED AND CREATIVE,


APPARENTLY. HOW
THE THINGS 6AS I
YOU SAY
ACTUALLY SUPPOSED
MAN STUFF. TO KNOW?


ROM Wf OW voK,t', MAWE TW f AI WHAT
7- 11ICLxA ME5


The Born Loser


Blondie


SIT RuNES'OU I TO85F Peir
T!'N VA G TkT TWS tPPOI KTANT
t .IA,.) fS CI-.&U LFOP ,Now,
NZ, CEWEVRHER,' ---l^


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I'S:S lUF-5 00 fODU W I% |C fcs ,0?, OK, LIE F- V WWR


Kit 'N' Carlyle


Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Why, yes, sir, I assure you that our
homemade potpies contain 100
percent dark meat ... only the
very freshest,"


"My nose sure is making' my
mouth ready to eat."


Doonesbury Flashback

O. O AT V THE A K,
To.V JUOW5 iij s i5 TVo ww
A5we ^fvuwig fwfsw


Big Nate
OkPY. SO T-HLSI KID'S
SETrER THANT AM'
--- WHAT,








Arlo and Janis

t1,6 Twit- A, Tut TVOICO
v b'6,E 'f mmi
ffl&TAKE6. 80fYW DOK)'
4AAVE TO MAKE THEM. TOO'






^/ J


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"12 Years ASlave" (R) 1 p.m., 7 p.m.
"August: Osage County" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Dallas Buyers Club" (R)4:15 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Devil's Due" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13) 4:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:10 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 2 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D. 4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Devil's Due" (R) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"I, Frankenstein" (PG-13) In 3D. 3:50 p.m.,
10p.m. No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D. 4:40 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A s1nba_1


"VB CNYYOSNNP, KHWXM ONE DXW K


YVWWYX REGGXRR, WCX BXAW WCVBD


ONE EREKYYO DXW VR K PVTNMGX."


PKB PKVYXO



Previous Solution: "There's nothing wrong with being a loser, it just
depends on how good you are at it." Punk rocker Billie Joe Armstrong
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-24


CONSIDER^ ^ ^
jMEUGGED-
Co~^^g


COMICS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C9











To place an ad, call 563=5966




Classifieds

In Print


I and



Online


All


The Time


. .. ** OR*SOa.% .


YOU'LL V THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.




Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.







4' v ~'w ,^





Ytitll v. ,l ld IiiSt.
Ek, ij La



CHk NiCLE
Classifieds






Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$

Single 56 yr. old
Gentlemen
Looking for Someone
55-60 No drugs,
no smoking. Like the
simple things in life?
Movies, Dinner,
and would like to
play disc golf. Call Jim
352-212-4167





5'iofrV\ orld first

Need a jil)
iir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CnJoNICfE


v


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


YOU'LL THIS!

Remember
Valentine's Day
is Friday,
February 14th.




Let your significant
other know how
much you love
them with a
special message
from you in the
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday
February 13th at
1:00pm.







N w Ads v




Bedroom Set
solid wood, twin size
bed w/ box spring,
headboard, 5 dresser
drawer, 2 end table
w/ 2 drawers, 2 yrs. old
Asking $350.
(352) 746-9539
BEVERLY HILLS
Sat 1/25 9a-4p, &
Sun 1/26 lp-5p
Furn, hsehold items,
tools & more.
222 Monroe St
BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday 25th, 7:30-2p
*MULTI FAMILY SALE*
4804 N. Pink Poppy Dr.
Dishwasher, Bike
Clothing & MORE!!
Citrus Hills
806 W. Massachusetts
St. SAT. Jan 25
9am-2pm CASH only.
Antiques, Wicker,
Aladdin Lamps, Chairs,
Pool cover w/Reel,
Power Tools, Adult
Trike, Potter's Wheel,
Collectables, Fenton,
Princess House,
Pressed sets, Beanie
Babies. Sm. appliances.


I Hapy No


Today's

6-^ffoo~r6)rder
$50.
4 x 6 Trailer
$50.
(352)400-0312
BUICK
1997 LeSabre, leather
int, 48k mi, newer tires
& brakes. Fine Cond.
$3950 (352) 726-9049
Citrus Springs
SATURDAY ONLY
8am to 1pm
turn, tools, & more
8363 N Upland Dr.

CNA
7a-3p & 3p-I Ip Shift
Citrus Health
and Rehab Center,
a five star skilled
nursing facility. We
offer a good salary
and work environ-
ment including medi-
cal/ dental/vision
insurance. A liberal
paid time off plan.
Please Appoolv in
Person for an
immediate interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit

Dunnellon
Jan 24, 25 & 26
8am to 3pm
clths all sizes, turn,
hshld, misc- signs to
SW57th PL. Lk Trop

EXP MEDICAL
CODING/BILLING
FIT Wanted
for office based
medical practice in
Inverness.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 726-5818
FLORAL CITY
1/25 & 1/26 8am
Monster Estate Sale
Antiques, tools,
Kitchen wares & More
8898 E Washington Ln
FORD
05 Escape, XLT 6 cyl
Non-smoker, Excellent
Cond all pwr, tinted win.
$6900. 352-613-8290
Freezer
$75.
Troybuilt Roto Tiller
$30.
(352) 400-0312
Hernando
BLOCK SALE
SAT URDAY ONLY
9am to 3pm
E. Flying Arrow Path
off 200, 2nd street
past Family Dollar
Lots to choose from!
HOMOSASSA
1/24 & 1/25 8am
6628 W Pelican Lane
Off Grover Cleveland
INVERNESS
1/25 & 1/26
7am- 2pm
Everything must go!
Household items
furniture, clothes &
collectibles.
501 Cabot Street


INVERNESS
Estate Sale:
January 26, 27, 28th
11:00 AM to 3:00 PM.
Household
goods and furniture
3255 E. Raccoon
Court


INVERNESS
Friday thru Sunday
Antiques, 10,000 items
tools, glassware,
marine, golf, engines,
fishing,
(315) 466-2268


Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
LOST DOG Near Vil-
lage Pines in Inglis.
Tan, sheppard mix, 60
pounds. Wearing red
harness. Named
Rebel. May not come
to you. Call Sonny Ar-
nold at 352-447-5124 if
spotted. Offering re-
ward.
Lost on Saturday, small
Samsung tablet in black
case, in Cambridge
Greens, please call
(352)422-7450 if found.

^^,


ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable ref.
Maggie(716) 378-4657
INVERNESS
MOVING SALE 1465 N
Paulette Terrace Friday
& Saturday, January
24-25; 9AM-1PMI Lots
of Household Items
Kenmore Dishwasher
white, works great
$100.
(352) 637-2188
LEATHER SOFA
brown, exc. cond.,
$200. Brown leather
recliner, fair cond.,
$75. (740) 339-3433
Leather Sofa,
love seat & chair, neu-
tral color, good cond.,
$300. obo
Sugarmill woods
(352) 382-9975
MASTER TOW
2012 Tow Dolly
3500 GVW, serge hyd.
brakes, new spare
tire, $975. Inverness
(352)860-1106
MITSUBSHI
'97, Mirage, 2 Door
New Tires, New Battery
New Radio, $1,500.
(352) 489-0117
MOBILE HOME
REPAIR/REMODOLING
SKIRTINGRELEVELS
DOORS,FLOORS,
AND MUCH MORE
352-257-9056
CC2211
Nature Coast
Ministries
Indoor Yard Sale
Stuff a bag w/clothing
Sm $3/ Lg $5,
Jeans $3 pair
(Boutq 25%off)
Furn-Sm Appl-Wall
Art 25%-50% off
Hours: Mon-Sat
(10am-4pm)
E. Hwy44
Next to Race Trac
352-563-1860
Volunteers Needed
Donations
Appreciated!
Power Lift
Chair Recliner
$275.
(352) 513-4621
SOFA
Brown & Green Plaid
$100.
(352) 513-4621
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



12 yr old Corgi mix fe-
male needs a home.
(352)464-4482
12 yr old corgi Mix Fe-
male needs a home
(352)464-4481
Beautiful, young,
healthy, orange cat. 1/2
grown, can help with
spay/neuter expenses,
Crystal River 795-8800
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch u load and
haul 352-628-9624
FREE BROKEN
FLOOR TILES great for
crafts or small construc-
tion projects
352-465-0580
Free Rhode Island
Red Hen
(352) 344-8122
Free
Shower Chair
Excellent Cond.
(352)382-4991
Fresh cut 70' oak tree
for firewood in manage-
able sections in Crystal
River city limits
795-8800
LOST DOG in Half
Moon/Rutland/Lake Pan
area; SMALL FEMALE
PIT/PIT MIX PUPPY
Last seen Jan.10th.
White with brown
patches. Patch over
right eye. Very friendly.
My son is heartbroken.
Please call with informa-
tion: 352-201-9866



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.00lb,
Grouper @ $6.001b
Stonecrab@ $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
*r GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org





RMESIM ./




PET ADOPTION
Saturday,10a-12
PET
SUPERMARKET
Inverness
(352) 527-9050 to
rehome small dogs
www.ahumanesocie
typetrescue.com


*


Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
florida.com
Crystal River Mall
Thursday-Sunday
12pm-4pm
Floral City Adoption
Center 7358 S. Flor-
idaAve Sat10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
Low Cost
spay/neuter vouch-
ers are avail.
726-4700 for Info.
Saturday Jan 25th
Howards Flea
Market is having an
antique & collectible
SWAP. Presentinga
American Tradina
Post
call 352-628-4656
for more information

CAT
ADOPTIONS


COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home style
environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.



Your World








C1I NI CLE


Adopt a
pesgcued Pet j,







4i

View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.com or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday, 10a 12p
PetSupermarket
(exceptions below)
Sat. 2/1
9am 3pm
Best Friends Fest
Citrus CntyAud.
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness





Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
w Grouper @ $6.1OOlb
0- Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001





TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444






PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


293
856
741
569
317
482
124
635
978


6'48
721
93:5
472
869
513

397


256


CA/FRONT DESK
& LMT
PT, The Villages, M-F
Fax Resume 795-8911

Certified Dietary
Manager

Join an Exciting
Team!
Certification Re-
quired w/ 2 yrs exp.
Excellent Benefits.
Apply at:
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness 34453 or
Email to: atadmin@
southernltc.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoll@
Xvahoo com


#1 mpoyent ourei





Iwwcrnceonlinecorn

EXP MEDICAL
CODING/BILLING
F/T Wanted
for office based
medical practice in
Inverness.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 726-5818

Nurse Pract. or
Physician Asst.
Needed for internal
medicine office.
Traditional inpatient
and outpatient care.
Great location within
Citrus Co. FL.
Excellent Benefits.
National Health
Service Corps
approved site. To
apply please email
resume to
sum07mer@
mall .corn or
Fax Attn Patty
352-746-3838.


1 7 5
943
862
31S
254
697
586
729
431


MEDICAL Assist.
front and back
Fax Resume to:
352-465-3733

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA

INTERIM Healthcare
Apply In Person
581 E Gulf to Lake hw
or Call 352-637-3111

SURGICAL
ASSISTANT

EFFICIENT &
DETAIL ORIENTED?
Progressive Oral
Surgery Practice
looking to add F/T
experienced Surgical
Asst. Benefits incl.
health insurance &
retirement pension
Mail resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks Dr. Crystal
River, FL. 34429





LOOKING FOR
Retired/Semi Retired
FOR APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Get Extra Cash $$$$
Daily/Wkly. Bonuses
CALL (352) 628-0254










ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough, Trim. Slab,
Lintel, Service
Employer paid
benefits, paid holi-
day & vac./EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wildwood


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Lecanto

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


CCITRUS COUNTY


CHRpNICLE
www.chmonlclonhll.com


YORKIE Male, b IPS,
Blue & Gold w/ long
legs. Lost on Duval
Island 11/23.
$300 Reward
for safe return,
pictures avail, on
facebook
@helpfindjack-jack
(352) 398-6774


C LO FRIDAYJANUARY 24,2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Marine
Mechanic
yard work, must
have own truck &
tools. (352) 398-5903





PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-sink,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351


PT Secretary/
Receptionist

Four 6 hour days,
must be computer
literate and pass
back ground chk.
Apply at: St
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Parish Office.1460 W.
St Elizabeth PI. Citrus
Spgs 352- 489-4889


RANCH &
FARM HELP
Maintenance,
Mow, Stalls, Turnout,
Exp. w/horses a plus.
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
352-400-0469


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
RA ,. ... .


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


IF, I"


130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
SA local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com
WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**




ANTIQUE STEAMER
TRUNK. 36" X 22" X 23"
Tall. Good condition.
$60. 527-1239.




16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316
BRIDE DOLLS 7 Lovely
Brides! Satin/lace
gowns. Lovely for child
or adult. $20 per or
$100 for all. 4654208
BUTTERFLY LAMP
Tiffany-like, 2 light
levels, beautiful, ($35)
352-613-7493
SPORTS CARDS for
sale,$100.00
3527464405




AMANA UPRIGHT


Uenmoreswswaser
white, works great
$100.
(352) 637-2188
Whirlpool
Self-Clean Elec Range
WHITE Exc cond. No
dents or scratches.
$100732.977.2616



OFFICE / COMPUTER
DESK SOLID Dark
WOOD Office/Computer
Desk W/Hutch VGC, 7
Drawers, $250.00
352-249-7212
Office Desk
Large, Dark wood
$150.
(352) 489-4445
Rainbow Springs
Dunnellon



Heavy Duty 10"
Craftsman Table Saw
with Stand $100. obo
(352) 287-3729
Tool Chest, 10 draw-
ers, one chest sits on
top of the other,on
wheels, good shape
$50. (352) 697-2583



JVC DVD PLAYER +
VCR COMBO UNIT
Nice, Used few hours
Mom doesn't need. In
box. $60 341-0450
RECORDS over 50
L/P's, various artists,
($20) 352-613-7493



CROWN MOULDINGS
pieces 12FT 9/16" x
2-3/4" Primed Ceiling
Pattern 52 NEW $60
341-0450



COMPUTER GAMES 7
multi-pack, 1 with 5000
games, ($25)
352-613-7493
HP DESKTOP PC
a1430n Dual core 2GHz
CPU 1GB RAM 250GB
No Ethernet Clean $65
341-0450
REAR VIEW CAMERA
SYSTEM VR3 Car,
truck, SUV, NEW, wire-
less, $50.
(352)257-4076
XBOX DEAD ISLAND
GAME For XBOX 360,
Good Condition, $20
341-0450


Medical urOice Deep Freeze, 15.2 2 PC SECTIONAL, with Boxspring, Frame
Assistant. NO cu.ff. 60.5x30x28.3 adj. 2 oftomans recliner & Mattreiss
EXPERIENCE temp control, free 2 end tables 4 wall&Mats
NEEDED! Online frost, 3 shelf, high effi- pictures. $400 for all (352) 220-3984
training gets you Job ciency compressor, (352) 628-3829 Waterbed, King Size
ready ASAP. HS $275. (352) 400-8746 VITA OFF very good condition
Diploma/GED & 2 VINTAGE COFFEE
PC/Internet needed! APPLIANCES, like new TABLES. 1 round with support mattress &
(888)528-5547 washers/dryers, stoves, lazy susan. 1 rectangu- heater $200. obo
I-_- --- fridges 30 day warranty lar. Both maple. $25 for 352-364-3601
trade-ins, 352-302-3030 both. 527-1239 ,,.l f u
SCommercial Stove 3 seat and 2 seat
Gas, Vulcan Green Cloth Couch Sp'
10 burner, double $200. obo AFFORDABLE
oven. Good working SMW(352) 476-1124 Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
condition. $500. obo BED AND MATTRESS Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 795-3964 Guest Q mattress and (352) 341-2019
boxsprg, drk headbrd,
GE Electric Stove adj metal frame, K m
White w/black door spread, sham and shirt.
coil burners, GE $350352.419.7376 Yr
MASSAGE Microwave white Bedroom Set BEVERLY HILLS
THERAPY $130. obo solid wood, twin size Sat 1/25 9a-4p &
Classes Start, (812) 701-8881 bed w/box spring, Sun 1/26 lp-5p
April 28, 2014 HOOVER CARPET headboard, 5 dresser Furn, hsehold items,
CLEANER, $40 drawer, 2 end table tools & more.
Spring Hill (352) 400-8746 w/ 2 drawers, 2 yrs. old 222 Monroe St
DAY & NIGHT Asking $350.
SCHOOL SMITTYS APPLIANCE (352) 746-9539 BEVERLY HILLS
H L REPAIR. Also Wanted BRAND NEW Saturday 25th, 7:30-2p
BENE'S Dead or Alive Washers Queen Size Pillow Top *MULTI FAMILY SALE*
BEN & Dryers. FREE PICK Mattre Set $150. 4804 N. Pink Poppy Dr.
International UP! 352-564-8179 Still in Original Plastic. Dishwasher, Bike
School of Beauty STOVE, 30" (352) 484-477t2 Clothing & MORE!
www.benes.edu electric, white DESK CHAIR AND OT- Citrus Hills

s w $125. Homosassa leather and in excel. St. SAT. Jan 25
4 (678) 617-5560 or condition. Desk chair 9am-2pm CASH only.
s 352-513-5580 is high back w/ arms Antiques, Wicker,
Washe rer & adjustable height. Aladdin Lamps, Chairs,
Washer & Dryer Ottoman measures Pool cover w/Reel,
white, Good Cond. 40Wx24Dx18H and has Power Tools, Adult
$100 ea hinged top for stor- Trike, Potter's Wheel,
f976 Call Homosassa age. $50 for chair and Collectables, Fenton,
(678) 617-5560 $40 for ottoman. Princess House,
(727) 848-8415 or 352-628-3258 Will email photos. Pressed sets, Beanie
(352) 263-2744 WASHER OR DRYER 352-746-1644. Babies. Sm. appliances.
1 (866) 724-2363 $145.00 Each. Reliable, DINETTE SET Citrus Springs
TOLL FREE Clean, Like New, Excel- Rattan 75 table, SATURDAY ONLY
STATE APPROVED lent Working Cond, 60 6 chairs with cushions 8am to 1pm
FOR VA TRAINING day Guar.Free Del/Set Excellent Cond $600 furn, tools, & more
up. 352-263-7398 (352) 382-0543 8363 N Upland Dr.



S^K~x.V


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 CIA


Dk Green Wicker TV
stand w/swivel top_
Green wicker oval
mirrorsml Green
wicker table w/lower
shelf. $95. for all
(352) 382-2939
GLIDER ROCKER
Glider rocker $65 near
LeCanto 304-679-8692
KITCHEN SET
Table ,Glass top, with 4
cushioned swivel
chairs. 3 matching
bar stools. $425
352-422-6849
LEATHER SOFA
brown, exc. cond.,
$200. Brown leather
recliner, fair cond.,
$75. (740) 339-3433
Leather Sofa,
love seat & chair, neu-
tral color, good cond.,
$300. obo
Sugarmill woods
(352) 382-9975
LOVELY LOVESEAT
Neutral beige/gold 58"
One yr old nonsmoking
$100 OBO
352-465-4208
NEWER LOVESEAT
Neutral beige/gold 58"
nonsmoking; less than 1
year old $100 OBO Pat
465-4208
OAK COFFEE TABLE.
Excellent condition.
24"x48".
$15. 527-1239
OAK DESK -KIDS
HEIGHT 2 x 4 foot Top,
Blonde Oak, 2 Drawers
plus Book Shelf $100
341-0450
Queen Sleeper Sofa
great condition, tan
$150. obo
(352) 795-0037
Queen Sleeper Sofa,
beige, microfiber,
excel cond. $350.
Black Dining Rm. Set
round glass tble, 4
chairs, matching
drapes & Serving tbl
$650. (352) 419-5363
Queen Sz all Cherry
Cannonball Bed
w/dresser & night-
stand, $600. obo
SMW(352) 476-1124
SLEEPER SOFA
Queen mattress. Off
white floral. Nice condi-
tion. 78 x 36 x 32 tall.
$95. 527-1239
SOFA
Brown & Green Plaid
$100.
(352) 513-4621
SOFA/FOYER TABLE
BEAUTIFUL DARK
CHERRY Solid Wood
table L-NEW, beveled
glass/top, B/shelf,
$185 (Cost$450)
(352)249-7212
Wanted To Buy
9 Twinpiq


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




'Affordable Mobile-
all type marine repairs
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-398-5903




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
*k 352-422-7279 -k-k



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lie.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
* FAST. 100%Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
' AFFORDABLE
e' RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
sRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
se'AFFORDABLE
*V RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447


CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 or 364-1773
HOUSEKEEPING, relia-
ble, exp. for home or
office. Affordable, ref.
Maggie(716) 378-4657
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


Mobil Hom


MOBILE HOME
REPAIR/REMODELING
SKIRTING, RELEVELS
DOORS.FLOORS,
AND MUCH MORE!
352-257-9056
CC2211


#1 Employment source is

CAhII\R',nI1AClained

wvvww.chronicleonline.com


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



bASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ilns.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


III \' ,il i IIISt.
Li-,iDa,


Classifieds


EM1


POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636


Any Surface,
roof cleaning, int/ext
painting, gutter cleaning,
Absolute Exterior
Restoration
352-382-5172
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc. comrn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

















TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


CRYSTAL RIVER MEN'S COAT Designer
1/24 & 1/25; 8am Black Size 42 Like new
*DON'T MISS THIS $25 Call 352-726-0040
3910 N Eagle Point WOMEN'S LONDON
FOG JACKET Blue
Dunnellon suede, size large, zipout
Jan 24, 25 & 26 lining, excell. cond. $15.
8am to 3pm (352)257-4076
clths all sizes, furn, WOMEN'S LONG
hshlmsc- igns to WOMEN'S LONG f)
hshld, misc-signsto RAINCOAT black, lined,
SW57th PL. Lk Trop excell. size 12, $25.
FLORAL CITY (352)257-4076 -"
1/25 & 1/26 8am WOMEN'S VINYL ...
Monster Estate Sale LEATHER LOOK
Antiques, tools, JACKET KC Collections
Kitchen wares & More Black excell. 18/20 $8.
8898 E Washington Ln (352)257-4076
Hernando
BLOCK SALE
SAT URDAY ONLY
9am to 3pm BROTHER FAX COP-
E. Flying Arrow Path IER SCANNER WITH
off 200, 2nd street MANUAL ONLY 35.00
past Family Dollar 4640316
Lots to choose from! -
HOMOSASSA
1/24& 1/25 8am
6628 W Pelican Lane 8 ft. Pool Slide
Off Grover Cleveland $50. -24
4 x 6 Trailer
Homosassa $50.
Fri, Sat, 8am to 4pm (352)400-0312 "Want n
turn, tools, antiques, 1500 Rubber Stamps,
electronics, hshold & Supplies
4100 S Alabama Av STORE CLOSED
Sell All (352) 249-7240
INVERNESS 12V TROLLING MO- T [] [ "
1/25 & 1/26 TOR40LBVERIGUIDE Y
7am-2pm MOTORMAX Thak _
Everything must go! $100 (352)249-7542 .
Household items Leave message
furniture, clothes & 225/75R -16 f-
collectibles. Goodyear light truck i
501 Cabot Street tire GREAT SHAPE I=I
__________________ ONLY $50
352-464-0316 C NI TN U
** ** ** 7- 5 GALLON METAL .
INVERNESS OLD FUEL CANS WITH
Estate Sale: SPOUTS ALL FOR a
January 26, 27, 28th $80.00464 -0316
11:00 AM to 3:00 PM. APPLIANCES, like new jl C O
Household washers/dryers, stoves,
goods and furniture fridges 30 day warranty
3255 E. Raccoon trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Court Bookcase,
$140
*** ** ~ 20 Glass Boots
Drinking glasses
INVERNESS $60.
MOVING SALE 1465 N (352) 795-7254
Paulette Terrace Friday CY ou 've G (
& Saturday, January Cage & 6 Finches8
24-2 AM-1~l ots 30x35x18
24 25,se9AM IPemIos and supplies $75.00
m 20" rectangular fish
Nature Coast tank and supplies
Ministries $50. (352) 382-3420
Indoor Yard Sale after 5pm
Sm $3/Lg $5, Cage & all $100. S o m
Jeans $3 pair 30 gal. tank w/stand
(Boutq 25%off) light, fish and all live
Furn-Sm Appl-Wall plants. $100.
Art 25%-50% off (352) 726-7106 1
Hours: Mon-Sat CREMATION NICHES
(10am-4pm) Two side-by-side niches
E. Hwy 44 w/memorials in beautiful
Next to Race Trac Fero Memorial Gardens,
352-563-1860 Beverly Hills. Price for
Volunteers Needed both from cemetery: Wa in
Donations $2,500 will sell for
Appreciated! $2,000. 352-327-2487.

PINE RIDGE DENON STEREO I
Sat 1/25 8am-? RECEIVER AM/FM
Misc hsehold items PRECISION AUDIO
2979 W Verbena PI RECEIVER. FIRST
ROYAL OAKS 100.00. 464-0316
ANNAL DIRECT SATELLITE
ANNUAL DISH Like new. I own.
YARD SALE $100 OBO.
Saturday, Jan. 25, Linda 423-4163
8am-lpm ELECTRIC GRILL
BIG SELECTION! BLUE WORKS FINE
From Inverness ONLY 20.00 464 0316
S. on 41 to Royal Oaks RANE
sign (before airport) ENTERTAINMENT
turn right, follow CENTER [LT. OAK]
signs. glass door/shelves, stor-
age. included 19 in. TV.
-$40. neg. 352-344-8212
Estat SaFlorida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
HOMOSASSA w Grouper @ $6.001lb
1/23 1/24 & 1/25 8A-4P Stonecrab @ $6.001b
Furn, antiques, elec- delivered 352-897-5001
tronics, vintage Freezer
Corelle dishes, cloth- $75.
ing, CD's, Collectibles Troybuilt Roto Tiller
& much morel 8975 $30.
W. Halls River Rd #144 (352) 400-0312
INVERNESS GAS GENERATOR
Friday thru Sunday Power stroke, 6200
Antiques, 10,000 items starting watts, 5000 run-
tools, glassware, ning watts, Never Used
marine, golf, engines, $500 623-760-7684
fishing, Crystal River
(315) 466-2268 HARLEY STOCK
^ ^k EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450 C I T R U S
Coming SLIDE ON ONLY $75
DRESS SHITr352-464-0316
DRESS SHIRT Bristol & HARMAN KARDEN
Bull New Tag says DIGITAL SYNTHE- \
79.50/selling $25 SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
Linda 423-4163 RECEIVER FIRST
MEN'S DRESS PANTS 100.004640316
Like new, 6 pair $10 Kitchen Cabinets
each OBO. Off white laminate (352)
Linda 423-4163 with oak trim. Match-
WOMEN'S LEATHER ing counter top. 10x10
COAT Black, Thinsulate L shape layout. SS sink
zipout lining. Excel & faucet. Exc Cond WWW.C C h roI
cond. $50.00 $750 352-228-4837 or
(352)2574076 352-212-6918




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C12 FRIDAY,JANUARY 24, 2014
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WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Semi's Newton cookie fruits (1) Every answer isa rhymin
pair of words (like FAT C
||and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Loathe a horse's trot or canter (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number aftkte
definition tells you how ni
3. Tarzan transport stripe (1) syllables in each word.

I I 1I I@ 2014 UFS, Dist by Univ UcickR
4. Pilfer Pat and Vanna's prop (1)


5. Artist Warhol's snifter drinks (2)


6. More sultry conspirator (2)


7. Occurring prior to leaving the Union (3)


9NIaflaS ONIaIHOHid l ALLO'Id aaLOH '9 SHIINVi SMINV
IaHAM VItS *I' 3N1I 3NIA T JLV9 ajVH '9* so I SDI "I
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Triust U ei TouIt l11We're UyLL INSIREK r
BIBo ineral i bilityND1Woiurko'CoeR _C


3EST

I 5EA,


Neutron, battery
operated $75;
PS3 Games -$10 ea
Ratings for everyone.
(352) 205-7973
OLDER HUSGVARNA
SEWING MACHINE
stitches,zigzag button-
hole & more. Asking
$50 (352)613-5240
POOL TABLE
4x8 with genuine slate
top. Cue's and balls.
$400
(352) 628-1723
SCHWINN CRUISER
SS WOMEN'S BIKE-
26" x 2-1/8" tires, com-
fort seat/bars, Ex.
$65. 628-0033
Shed, 8 x 10
New, Assembled
$350.
(352) 419-7332
WIRE SHELVING 16
INCHES WIDE-87
FEET long-brackets in-
cluded. $100 OBO
352-527-1399
WOOL RUG
Union Jack, 5x7,
$200, Matching Bedd-
ing, throws, & pillows,
2 sets $50 for all.
(352) 382-2906



4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, $45.
352-628-0033
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
MOBILITE HOSPITAL
BED. Good Cond.
Electric head & foot.
3 mattress heights
$150 315-651-7708
Homosassa
Power Lift
Chair Recliner
$275.
(352) 513-4621
Pride Heavy Duty
motorized scooter
chair, like new $500.
Power chair-lift
for car $200.
(352) 628-0824
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANUVERABILITY.
ONLY 60.00 464 0316



"NEW" BEDELL BORN
HIPPIE GUITAR
W/GIGBAG PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT!
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER NEW-
PORTER ACOUSTIC
W/GIGBAGTUNERSTRING
S&PICKS.SELLS
FOR $280+ MY PRICE
$160 352-601-6625
"NEW" SMALL BODIED
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
LOOKS,PLAYS,SOUND-
GREAT W/GIGBAG
$50 (352)601-6625
BASS EFFECTS
PEDALS ELECTROHA-
RMONIX"MOLE"&
ZOOM B1 MULTI
$25 (352)601-6625
FOLDING MUSICIANS
STOOL W/FOOT
REST&BUILT IN GUI-
TAR STAND
$25 352-601-6625
YAMAHA KEYBOARD
Model YPG235.
With stand and bench
Like New $175 OBO
(740) 505-1505



ANIMAL CAGE Big. Call
for details.
$60 423-4263 Linda
PLEATED SHADES
French Door [2] Like
New $25 Call
352-726-0040
SNACK TABLES 4
w/Stand Natural Wood
Tone. Like New $30
Call 352-726-0040



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
SPACE SAVER FOLDS
UP FOR EASY STOR-
AGE. ALL ELECTRON-
ICS ONLY 185.00
3524640316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE GET FIT!! IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 200.00
3524640316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
NordicTrack EXPIOOOX
TREADMILL
Works/Great Condition.
Asking $400. OBO. Call
352-257-3547 Can
Email Pictures


Proform Resistant Bike,
Never used, pd $350,
asking $200; Weslo
Cadence Treadmill
Asking $100. Call Eve-
nings (352) 344-3131
Treadmill Image 15.0R
Space saver, step
counter, work out fan,
10 programs, like new,
$150. (352) 400-8746



2007 CLUB CAR
Box on back, batteries
1 year old. $2,150.
Call (352) 344-0770
BICYCLE WHEELS
WTB 700cx 23mm
Front & Rear, Straight,
6061 Alloy, No Tires,
$60 341-0450
CAMPING AIR MAT-
TRESS COLEMAN
queen with coversheet,
used once, ($15)
352-212-1596
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ Go Golf Cart
Well Maintained
Newer side curtains,
seat covers, springs &
shocks. $1,000. obo
(352) 527-3517
GOLF CLUBS
X-Factor Hammer
Driver & #3 Hybrid-
$100., Adams Golf
3 & 5 Woods $40.
Call Dan 352-464-4897

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 25th 9a-5p
Sun. Jan. 26th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
Ping Golf Bag
Like New
$65.
(352) 637-5389
TENT HEATER Ameri-
can Camper, propane,
($10) 352-212-1596



CAR TRAILER
Tandem axel,
15,000 Ib capacity.
$1700 OBO
(740) 505-1505
MASTER TOW
2012 Tow Dolly
3500 GVW, serge hyd.
brakes, new spare
tire, $975. Inverness
(352) 860-1106

Sell o Svwa


JA^.



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369











Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820


3 Dapple Dachshund
Puppies, all female
w/papers, pis call
Sylvia (727) 235-2265








ASHER
Asher, 6-y.o. Border
Collie mix, neutered,
appears housebro-
ken, medium sized
@ 59 Ibs. Gentle,
friendly, gets along
w/other dogs.
Friendly & coopera-
tive. Beautiful mark-
ings. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.
BUNNIES & RABBITS
FOR SALE
All Colors $15 ea.
352-697-9187
DOG CRATE
42L x24wx28h
excellent condition
$50
352-422-6698


DOLLY
Meet Dolly, 6-y.o.
Bulldog/terrier mix,
wt 54 lbs., has had
an unfortunate life,
still one of the
sweetest dogs ever.
Shows signs of ne-
glect, but amazingly
is full of love for peo-
ple, playful & very
happy, craves af-
fection and returns
it, so deserving of a
loving home. Sweet
personality.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.







-in^


EMMA
Emma, 2-y.o.
Lab/Pointer mix,
very calm & gentle.
Weight 48 Ibs,
heartworm-negative,
vaccinated &
microchipped. ID #
12506886. Fee $60,
covers cost of spay,
available @ Citrus
County Animal
Shelter. Appears
housebrkn.
Call 352-573-7821.


GUS
Gus, 1-y.o. male
American bulldog
mix, white & red
color, weight 60 Ibs.
Very intelligent, can
lie down, roll over,
stay on command,
a lover, not a
fighter. Appears
housebrkn., would
be great compan-
ion, family dog &
cuddle buddy.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.







r

LADYBIRD
Ladybird, an adora-
ble little white terrier
mix, owner had too
many dogs. Very
easy-going, calm,
gentle, gets along
w/other dogs, ap-
pears housebroken.
Obedient & listens
carefully. In good
health. Medium size.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.
LOST DOG Near Vil-
lage Pines in Inglis.
Tan, sheppard mix, 60
pounds. Wearing red
harness. Named
Rebel. May not come
to you. Call Sonny Ar-
nold at 352-447-5124 if
spotted. Offering re-
ward.


000GWRI



ig
CAT
,E), and

erthe
many


kfor UFS


TINY Tiny is a gorgeous
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, Very
clean DW 3/2 New
carpet, shed, fenced,
$695.mo 352-419-1744
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $560 mo. Near
Walmart & 2/2, $530
mo. 352-464-3159
LECANTO
3/2, Screened porch,
carport, shed. $625
(352) 795-7813



FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272
Palm Harbor Factory
Liquidation Sale
6 models to choose
from, 1200 sq ft up to
2400 sq ft..$12K offl!
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext. 210
for details



INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, call for
details 877-499-8065


Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827

1.4o&f


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print

& Online



,. .. .. .. ,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS



DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER
3BR, 3Bath, includes
mother-in-law apt.
roof over, sheet rock,
on 3 lots, 2 sheds,
waterfront $38,000
(217) 474-7727
FLORAL CITY
2BR/1/2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
LECANTO $42,500
3bd/2ba, / acre,
new c/h/a & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond.
(352) 621-3929
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-2377
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 14 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

SOLD
HOMOSASSA
3bd mobile that needs
more work than it's
worth. Value is in the
land 1.3 acres. Septic,
well, impact fees, 2
sheds, ride by then call
SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then 1/2
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512




*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356
Floral City, DW,
2bd/lbal, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726

For SaleII

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must seel Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858






Stonebrook 2Br/2Ba
1400 sq ft. Enclosed
screened room with
A/C, overlooks pond.
Pantry, full equipped
Kitchen, wood burn-
ing FP in living room.
Den & DR furniture.
Laundry room & W/D;
Shed with sink &
freezer. Partially fur-
nished. Too many
extra's to list. $25,000
8323 W Charmaine Dr.
Homasassa, Fl
must see to
appreciate
615-692- 4045
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


1 ACRE MOBILE HOME
LOT. Owner Financing.
Has Well, Septic, Im-
pact Fees already pd.
Simply move your MH
on! $0 Down Payment
$135 per month. Call
(352) 746-7990





ACTIONO"
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. j
352-795-7368
S875 & UNDER
8410 N Elkcam Blvd.
3/2/1 New listing!
6973 N Gladstone Dr.
3/2/2 Splitfloorplan 1515 sq ft
1063 N. Commerce Terr.
2/1 Furnished Apt. Cap on Utilities.
6441 W. Rosedale Dr.
2/2/1 Available soon.
$550 & UNDER
2278 S. Sandburg Pt.
2/1 Nice, clean duplex.
7650W Homosassa Trl.
2/1 nice duplex.
6383 S. Tompaul Terr.
1/1 Cozy and Quiet.
For More Listings Go To
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.nm

Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000



FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025










Rental Assist.
Available NOW!

>Bedrooms
Call A,
Recent Foreclosures Welcome
(352) 447-0106
TDD ph # 1800-955-8771
This Institution IS an equal
L J opportunty provider & employer
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath du-
plex Large yard, garage,
washer/dryer hook up,&
private patio. $600 mo.
$1,200 move in Stewart
813-927-4647 or Kelly
813-927-0525

Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694



J '['JH-LrJiI

Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Inverness
At the
Washington
Square Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-726-4397
TTY800-233-6694


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(352) 563-59661/


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Government CRYSTAL RIVER UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Subsidized Apts Warehouse 3900 SqFt Homes, Commercial
For Rent in with 550 SqFt office. Waterfront & Land
Wildwood Gulf Storage,1424 N "Small Town
At the Gulf Ave,One mile East Country Lifestyle
Wildwood of Rt 484 & Rt 44 inter- OUR SPECIALTY
Commons Apts. section, beside Gulf to SINCE 1989"
Must meet Lake Church. $4 sqft for
year lease, shorter
eligibility available. 352o 302 1935
requirements.
Please Cal l
352-748-0047 R Et e
TTY800-233-6694 al
"LET US FIND
YOU
-,A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW,
HOMOSASSA crosslandrealty.comn
1 & 2BR, $450-$500, (352) 726-6644
inclds. garb & water, Crossland Realty Inc.
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital DEB
$475 incld water/garb THOMPSON
$950 moves you in ATTN Homebuyers
352-422-2393 O100% financing avail.
3 3One call away for Government Pro-
INVERNESS your buying and gram. You do not
1st floor 2/1 with patio in selling needs, need perfect credit.
quiet area. $525/mo + Realtor that you can Call or email to get
$525 Sec; 2/2 large refer to your qualified.
screened patio. Beauti- family and friends. Ph: (813) 470-8313
ful Ig apt completely tiled Service with a smile rickabf@amail.com
on cul-de-sac. $600/mo seven days Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
+ sec. 352-344-0238 a week. originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
Parsley Real Estate NLMS ID 76856
Deb Thompson __ ID78
352-634-2656
CRYSTAL RIVER resdeb(vahoo.com
NICE debtho snd
Secret Harbour Apts. debthomson.com
Newly remodeled 2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
2/1 $575 Unfurn. REMODELED
IncI Waterlawn, PUBLISHER'S MOVE-IN READY
garbage, W/D hook-up. NOTICE: $59k.
352-257-2276 All real estate 352-527-1239
| advertising in this
newspaper is subject Real Estate is MY
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal Business!!
CITRUS HILLS to advertise "any 15+ Years Exp
Cottage unit, unfurn., preference, limitation
2/2 with carport, or discrimination Terin Paduano
Membership based on race, color, Broker/Owner
included $650 mo. religion, sex, handi-
352-302-3705 cap, familial status or
naINVERNtional origin, or an
INVERNESS intention,
2/2, updated, immacul. to make such prefer-
$625. mo 317.442-1063 ence, limitation or
discrimination. "Fa-
Duplexes milial status includes 9=7_
F R children under the age
of 18 living with
CRYSTAL RIVER parents or legal cus-
2/1, Duplex water, trash todians, pregnant
lawn, $475. mo.+ $300 women and people
sec. 352-212-9205, or securing custody of
(352) 212-7922 children under 18. Realty
This newspaper will Connect
not knowingly accept
any advertising for Masonic Business Ctr
Il li M-real estate which is in 111W Main St, #311
CRYSTAL RIVER violation of the law. Inverness, FL
CRYSTAL RI VER Our readers are
Fully Furnished hereby informed that (352) 212-1446
Studio Efficiency all dwellings adver- TheFLDream.com
w/ equipped kit. All tised in this newspa-
util., cable, Internet, & per are available on
cleaning provided, an equal opportunity
$599.mo 352-586-1813 basis. To complain ofH a

HERNANDO discrimination call H m
Affordable Rentals HUD toll-free at
Watson's Fish Camp 1-800-669-9777. 4/2 Doublewide
(352) 726-2225 The toll-free telephone on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
____ __ number for the Fireplace Glamour
hearing impaired is Bath, large walk-in
1-800-927-9275. closets all bedrooms,
*off US 200
Beverly Hil Is in Hernando Fl.
2 Beverly Hills F ne1$89,995
2 bdrm, plus FlIRm, new O SELLER FINANCING
appliances Move in OUN Call 352-726-4009
$1350, 442-7794Call 352-726-4009
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands, Specializing in n Un
Close to Downtown Acreage,Farms H m
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723 Ranches & 3/2 Doublewide
INVERNESS Commercial on 1/3 mol acre has
Golf & Country 2/2/2 glamour bath and
$725mo & Sec walk-in closets off
(352) 895-0744 Turner Camp Rd
(32-- -07-- 7 1 Inverness, Fl.
INVERNESS $64,995.
Highlands, 3/2/2 SELLER FINANCING
$700 mo + dep. Call 352-726-4009
(352) 422-6978
INVERNESS 3/2
Lake Tsala Gardens Richard (Rick) 1/4 Acre MOL
comp. renovated 3/2/1 Couch, Broker on River Oak Lane
Inverness
scn porch, fenced yard, Couch Realty & Glamour bath
city water $850. Investments, Inc. Eat-in Kitchen
352-726-7212 (352) 212-3559 $69,995.
RENT TO OWN SELLER FINANCING
No credit check RCOUCH.com Call 352-726-4009
Inverness 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020 W _
JADEMISSION.COM O U D 1 I
W TERRA VISTA
1963 N. Ramblewood
Rentals Hei, i.-
HERNANDO .Pi Reoti, Ie.
Affordable Rentals Gloria Reagan 352-345-1192
Watson's Fish CampMaryWalls352-586-4822
(352) 726-2225 Mary Walls 352-586-4822


HOWDO







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nice Double Lot
3/4 Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inverness 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
back yard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on '4 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




2Br/2Ba/1CG home
on approx 1 ac. land
Owner Financed
$80,000, w/$5,000
down. No qualifying
(305) 891-2323




3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4BR/11 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


IAMIIi O.,UI I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY !





For Sale ",i
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell




4BR/2BA, 2400 Sq ft.
pool home, add'l heat
pump. Well maintained
Pine St. Fully Furnished
$225,000
(352) 382-5298











Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351













Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

THE MARKET
IS GOOD

Thinking of
selling?
Now Is the time
to get listed

Stil great vd-
uesWol
there for
buyers!!

Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


w- I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245*

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING!

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattig
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.












A Al & a
MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515








IoI

SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855











N

Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com



eeeeeeeeeH


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms ,Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002


Citrus County
Homes 9


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2/1 BA, Two Lots, Pool
Boatslips, Shop, $169K
contract considered
5311 W Riverbend Rd
(815) 980-8642
Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCbast
Propertiescom
"To view
my properties"




BUYING HOMES
In Need of TLC, Fair
Pricing, Fast Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271



FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre.land survey &
clear title.assessed at
$23,800.power and
homes in area. ASKING
$8,500.813-792-1355



4*** * *
GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905

2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
Call 352-527-2711




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510*
ALUMINUM BOAT
10' Long, Good Cond.
Easy to load. Light
weight. $225.
(678) 617-5560
COLEMAN
15 ft. Canoe
2 Kayaks $300 ea
All for $800.
(352) 613-8453
GANOE
15ft., w/6 HP, Tohatsu
4 stroke engine, with
boat lift, $2,500 obo
(724) 516-4123
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation

ALLEGRO BUS
2011, 36ft, inches
8,900 mi, loaded w/ 4
slides exel. cond. ext.
warr. Asking $205,000
Retail $237,900
(828) 553-0134
Keystone Everest
'03 5th wheel. 3 sliders,
xtra storage under
goose nk, New: gen,
septic/ H20 hoses,
deck. Must Sell, $15k
obo 352-795-1272
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., I1
slide $7000 obo
(352)628-1126
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
MONTANA
2003, 32 FT. 5th wheel,
2 slides, non smoking,
excel, cond., In park
on Hwy 19$ 16,000 obo
(989) 560-8900
or (989) 775-6011


PFor Sale ,,i

Inverness Village 55+
Unit 108. 1st fir, 2/2,
Some turn, new Lanai
& Lam, ceramic floors.
$48,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Whispering Pines Villa
INVERNESS
2/2/1, NEW Carpet, Tile,
Paint, All appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900. 352-726-8712




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
STARCRAFT
'07, Pop up Camper
excel, cond., $3,950.
352-795-0787
or 352-208-7651



RoadMaster
Hidden Tow Bar
brackets fits Dodge
Ram 1500. ask $225.
Iv msg (727) 251-0589



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

LQok

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



BUICK
1997 LeSabre, leather
int, 48k mi, newer tires
& brakes. Fine Cond.
$3950 (352) 726-9049
Buy Here/Pay Here

'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

Forfeitures


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 CL3


CLASSIFIED




Hyundai
Azera 2007-
loaded-power
windows,heated
power seats-rear
sun screen -
6 cyl. Very low
mileage. Asking
$10,000. Available
after Jan. 22nd.
Call 860-716-3128

LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MAZDA
2008 Miata MX5 Red
hardtop conyv 6-speed
mint condition garage
kept Boise stereo.
22.3K $18,000 OBO.
Pics avail. Bob
352-489-5443
MITSUBSHI
'97, Mirage, 2 Door
New Tires, New Battery
New Radio, $1,500.
(352)489-0117
NISSAN
2004 Altima
Great Car! 115k Miles.
$4900. 352-464-7415
PONTIAC
'04, Grand AM, GT,
4 Door, loaded, sunrf.,
V6, auto, CD, clean,
$3,650., 352-212-9383

SOLD
CADILAC
'04, DeVille, 79K mi.,
Champagne, w/ top &
gold kit, cream leather,
new tires,




DATSON 280ZX
Attention Z lovers '82
Datson, lnline6 turbo,
eng. & trans good,
$500 (352) 613-1184






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII

Mercury Cougar
1974 XR7; one owner
ExcCond; 81k miles;
Gagarge Kept $8500
(352) 726-0258




FORD
2006 F 150, like new
super cab, chrome
pck, leather, 1 owner,
non-smoker, 132k mi.
$11,900. (813) 967-5580

Forfeitures


873-0124 FCRN
FORFEITURE CCSO
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FSS 705.103, the following found items will be disposed as provided by
state statue unless claimed by the owner:
1. Under Cabinet Radio
2. Samsung Tablet in case
3. EZGO Golf Cart
To make claim for any of the items, contact Betty Rideout, Evidence Custodian, Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office at 352- 341-7425.
Sheriff Jeffrey J. Dawsy
By: Cynthia Russo, Supervisor Staff Services
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 17 & 24, 2014.


875-0124 FCRN
Kings Bay Self Storage 1/7/14 Sole
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF LIEN
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property de-
scribed below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Florida Self Stor-
age Facility Act Statutes (Section 83.80183.809). The undersigned will sell at Public
Auction by competitive bidding on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 10:30am on the
premises where said property has been stored, Kingsbay Self Storage, 7957 W. W.
Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River, FL 34429, Citrus County, State of Florida:
Sapp, Jimmy and Chelsey Unit#238 I0xi0
Melvin Andrew Unit#143 10x10O
Cloer, Alien Unit#1040 5x5
Fitzgerald, Paul Unit#237 10x10O
Registration begins at 9:30am. Purchase must be paid at the time of purchase in
cash. All items purchased are sold as is and must be removed atthe time of the sale.
Sale subject to cancellation or in the event of settlement between owner and obli-
gated party. Tenants have until the time of the Auction to pay for their units. Auction
conducted by Hammerdown Auctions.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 17 & 24, 2014.


c t it


N i i


N i t i to
44 ,stafon


867-0124 FCRN
Sawyer, Helen 2013-CP-000709 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. :2013-CP-000709
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF HELEN SAWYER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of HELEN SAWYER, deceased, whose date of death
was November 10, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, File Number 2013-CP-000709; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 17, 2014.
Personal Representative:
/s/ GARY ALLAN SAWYER
712 centennial Avenue, Media, PA 19063-2416
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas VanNess, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750
VanNess & VanNess, RP.A., 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429,
352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 17 & 24, 2014.


871-0124 FCRN
Zaldivar, Alfredo 2013-CA-398 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2013-CA-398
PASTORE CUSTOM BUILDERS, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALFREDO ZALDIVAR; and DUKE ENERGY
FLORIDA, INC., F/K/A FLORIDA POWER
CORPORATION D/B/A PROGRESS ENERGY
FLORIDA INC.,
Defendants,


I I R I


I I ''


ic t ri
Administraion


Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
05 Escape, XLT 6 cyl
Non-smoker, Excellent
Cond all pwr, tinted win.
$6900. 352-613-8290
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2000, Town & Country
72k miles, wheel chair
Van, Good Shape
$10,000. 352-270-1466
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




Harley Davidson
2004 Heritage Softail
Classic, loaded, garage
kept $10,000.
(352) 270-8488
HONDA
99 American Classic
750cc, 8k mi., wind
shield, light bar, hard
bags, $2900. Ik new
352-634-2247
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4,500. 352-5134257



947-0228 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from Jan-
uary 14, 2014 until Febru-
ary 28, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
1-23-14 THRU 2-28-14


4 Sal


4 i I


866-0124 FCRN
Cordell, Lou Ann 2013-CA-000689 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2013-CA-000689
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
LOU ANN CORDELL; ET AL.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LOU ANN CORDELL; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or
against the above named Defendant, who is not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
8529 N TITLEIST DR., CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434-5869
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 2, BLOCK 396, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGES 133 THROUGH 152, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before February 7,
2014 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and
file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 13th day of August,
2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR
(352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 1-800-955-8771.
January 17 & 24, 2014. 888122337


868-0124 FCRN
Hill, Gina 2013-CA-001140 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-CA-001140
M & T BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GINA M. HILL, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: GINA M. HILL, 8 SANDPINE CT E, HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GINA M. HILL, 8 SANDPINE CT E, HOMOSASSA, FL
34446
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 8, BLOCK B-94, CYPRESS VILLAGE SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 PAGES 86-150, PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 1-150,
AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1-16, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS
AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of you written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on McCalla Raymer, LLC, Amber B. Parker, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 225 East Robinson Street, Suite 660, Orlando, FL 32801 on or before
(30) days from the first publication of this Notice otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 19th day of December, 2013.
(SEAL)
ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of the Court
/s/BY: Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 17 & 24, 2014. 13-01106-3


869-0124 FCRN
Clark, Henry C. 09-2012-CA-001619 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY CASE NO.: 09-2012-CA-001619
REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HENRY C. CLARK, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF LAWRENCE E. CLARK, STATE OF
FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OP REVENUE E, UNITED STATES Of AMERJCA, DEPARTMENT OF THE
TREASURY INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF
THE SECRETARY Of HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, U KNOWN TENANT IN POS-
SESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HENRY C.
CLARK NIK/A JUNITA CLARK, any and all unknown parties claiming by, through, un-
der, and against Lawrence E. Clark, whether said unknown parties may claim an in-
terest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF LAWRENCE E. CLARK, any and all unknown
parties claiming by, through, under, and against Lawrence E. Clark, whether said un-
known patties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or
other claimants
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 7: THE NORTH 100 FEET OF LOT 37, HOLIDAY ACRES, UNIT 3, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 26 AND 27, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2001 WINN
DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME BEARJNG ID #8D61 01 19NA AND 8D610119N13
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of you written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on McCalla Raymer, LLC, Amber B. Parker, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 225 East Robinson Street, Suite 660, Orlando, FL 32801 on or before
February 10, 2014, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of
this Notice in the Citrus Publishing and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief demand in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 19th day of December, 2013.
(SEAL)
ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of the Court
/s/BY: Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 17 & 24, 2014. 12-03442-1


870-0124 FCRN
Peace, Hilde C. 09-2013-CA-001210 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-2013-CA-001210
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF
HILDE C. PEACE, DECEASED, ET AL..
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF
HILDE C. PEACE, DECEASED, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR
CORPORATE, AND WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH UNDER OR AGAINST HILDE C. PEACE, DECEASED, OR ANY OF THE HEREIN
NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS OR PARTIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN AND TO THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
5278 S HARDWOOD TER, LECANTO FL 34461-9253
-AND-
TO: THERESA A. SMITH; and all unknown parties claiming by, through under or against
the above named defendant, who is not known to be dead or alive, whether said
unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trus-
tees, spouses or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
5278 S HARDWOOD TER, LECANTO FL 34461-9253
6625 100th AVE, PINELLAS PARK, FL 33780;
5845 59TH ST. N., SAINT PETERSBURG, FL 33709
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida, to-wit:
LOTS 5 AND 6 OF A REPLAT OF LOTS 3 AND 4, BLOCK I, LEISURE ACRES, UNIT NO. 2, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 67
AND 68, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
LOT 5: COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF LOT 3, BLOCK I, LEISURE ACRES, UNIT 2, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 67-68,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE N 0 DEG. 19" 59" W ALONG
THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 423.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE N 0 DEG. 19"59" W ALONG SAID EAST LINE A DISTANCE OF 105.98
FEET, THENCE N 89 DEG. 25"04" W 213.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG 20" 24" EAST
106.05 FEET, THENCE S 89 DEG 26" 07" EAST 213.66 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
AND
LOT 6: COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF LOT 3, BLOCK I, LEISURE ACRES, UNIT 2, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 67-68,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE N 0 DEG. 19"59"W ALONG THE
EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 529.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE N 0 DEG. 19"59" W ALONG SAID EAST LINE A DISTANCE OF 105.98
FEET TO THE NE CORNER OF SAID LOT 3, THENCE N 89 DEG. 25"04" W ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 213.69 FEET, THENCE S 0 DEG. 20"24" E
106.05 FEET, THENCE S 89 DEG. 26"07" E 213.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH THAT 1986 DOUBLE WIDE CHAMPION 28" X 64" MOBILE HOME, TITLE
NUMBERS 43382664 AND 43417774, VIN NUMBERS 336475C5532A AND
336475C5532B.


has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before February 17,


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ALFREDO ZALDIVAR
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on a real property
has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in Citrus
County, Florida. The case is styled Pastore Custom Builders, Inc. v. Alfredo Zaldivar
Case No. 2013 CA 398 and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, on Darryl W. Johnston, Esquire, Plaintiffs' attorney, whose mailing ad-
dress is: Johnston & Sasser, P.A., P.O. Box 997, Brooksville, Florida 34605-0997, on or
before February 7. 2014, and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
DATED this 27th day of December, 2013.
(Court Seal}Angela Vick, Clerk of Circuit Court
By/s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 17 & 24, 2014.


!


F S al'J
Acton otie I!S


S e l S l r1


SefS!r


Sell Storage--I
I Notices







C14 FRIDAY,JANUARY 24, 2014




2014 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and
file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 27h day of December,
2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR
(352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 1-800-955-8771.
January 17 & 24, 2014. 888131596


885-0131 FCRN
Bello, Rafeal 2013-CA-1113 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2013-CA-1113
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAFAEL BELLO, ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
RAFAEL BELLO
90 SOUTH JEFFERSON ST BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
OR
72 BRAINARD AVE APT REAR, PORT MONMOUTH, NJ 07758
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAFAEL BELLO
90 SOUTH JEFFERSON ST BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
OR
72 BRAINARD AVE APT REAR, PORT MONMOUTH, NJ 07758
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the
following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit:
LOT 20 IN BLOCK 75, OF BEVERLY HILLS, UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 2, 3, 4 AND 5, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Sujata J. Patel, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road,
Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 30th day of December,
2013.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordi-
nator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7
days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this
notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you
are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /S/ Sonia Prylepa, Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL)
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 24 & 31,2014. B&H#337216


886-0131 FCRN
Lofton, Alice Manrie 2013-CA-001060 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2013-CA-001060
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALICE MARIE LOFTON A/K/A ALICE M. LOFTON, ET AL.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
DAVID JAMES MECHAM
6941 N DAWSON DRIVE, HERNANDO, FL 34442
OR
2600 E HAYES ST, INVERNESS, FL 34453
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the
following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit:
LOT 7, BLOCK F, HILL N' DALE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 31 AND 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2004 MERIT MANUFACTURED HOME, MODEL
#F3210G_4. SERIAL #FLHML3F996Y-27743A AND #FLHML3F996Y-27743B

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Sujata J. Patel, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road,
Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 30th day of December,
2013.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at


CLASSIFIEDS


Foeloue ae


no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordi-
nator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7
days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this
notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you
are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /S/ Sonia Prylepa, Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL)
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 24 & 31, 2014 B&H#290209


878-0124 THCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PUBLIC NOTICE
ADVANCE TOWING gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell


these vehicles) on
02/07/2014, 8:00 am at
4875 S. FLORIDA AVENUE,
INVERNESS, FL 34450,
L8YTCBPV58Y071128
2008 SHNK


pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the FL. Statutes.
ADVANCED TOWING re-
serves the right to accept
or reject any and /or all
bids.
January 24, 2014


877-0124 FRCRN
1/29 Hearings/Meeting/Workshop
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administrative Hearing, a Special Meet-
ing and Workshop beginning at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 in the
Board Room of the District Services Center located at 1007 West Main Street, Inver-
ness, Florida.

The Administrative Hearing is to act upon proposed student expulsion(s). The pur-
pose of the Special Meeting is to discuss and act upon items outlined on the
agenda. The Workshop is for a review of the following items: proposed 2014-2015
Code of Student Conduct and a School Resource Officer (SRO presentation, Student
Emergency Card Procedures, Retention of Records, Food Services Nutrislice Software
Overview, Substitute Rate of Pay, an RFP Before /After School Day Care Services, FTE
Forecast Update and a Budget Review / Staffing Plans.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.

/S/Sandra Himmel, Superintendent Citrus County School Board
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle, Friday, January 24, 2014.


882-0124 FCRN
LAND VARIANCE APPLICATION-V-14-03
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION FOR VARIANCE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on February 6. 2014 at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Flor-
ida. Please note that the PDC meeting beans at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a
particular item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDC moves through
the agenda.

V-14-03 Elizabeth H. Darr: This request is for an After-the-Fact Two-Part Variance
from the Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC) to (1) allow for the continued
placement of a screened enclosure addition with stairs and screen room on an exist-
ing deck having less than the required 50-foot minimum building setback from the
ordinary high water line (35-feet with berm and swale), pursuant to Section 3501, Sur-
face Water Protection Standards, of the LDC; and to (2) allow for the continued
placement of a screened enclosure addition with stairs and a screen room on an
existing deck having more than the maximum impervious lot coverage, pursuant to
Section 2403, Coastal And Lakes Residential District (CLR) of the LDC.
Property is located in: Section 31, Township 19, Ranae 17; more specifically Lot 18
Block 8, Riverhaven Village; Plat Book 9, Page 36, which address is known as 5135 S.
Running Brook Drive, Homosassa, FL. A complete legal description of the property is
on file with the Land Development Division.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect
to any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. Copies of the proposed application will be
available for inspection and/or purchase between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00
PM, Monday through Friday in the Department of Planning and Development, Land
Development Division, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 141, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 24, 2014.


883-0124 FCRN
LAND USE APPLICATION-SV-13-03
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on February 6. 2014 at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Flor-
ida. Please note that the PDC meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a
particular item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDC moves through
the agenda.
SV-13-03 Robert & Roberta Schaefer: To vacate an unnamed 20-foot alley lying
between Lots 2-9 & Lots 27-36, Block 204, Unit 5 of Homosassa, as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 47, public records of Citrus County. A complete legal description of
the property is on file with the Land Development Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Suite 141, Lecanto, FL, 34461, telephone (352) 527-5239.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 24, 2014.


884-0124 FCRN
LAND VARIANCE APPLICATION-V-14-02
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION FOR VARIANCE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on February 6. 2014 at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Flor-
ida. Please note that the PDC meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a
particular item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDC moves through
the agenda.
V- 14-02 Dan Wilson All Exterior Roofing, for Garnet Gregory: This request is for a Vari-
ance from the Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC) to allow for the con-
struction of an elevated screen room, stairs, and a concrete slab having less than
the required 50-foot minimum building setback from the mean high water line
(35-feet with berm and swale), pursuant to Section 3501 Surface Water Protection
Standards, of the LDC.
Property is located in: Section 10, Township 19, Range 16; more specifically Lot 8, St.
Martins Estuary Retreats Unit 3; Plat Book 4, Page 87, which address is known as 1128
South Ozello Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429. A complete legal description of the prop-
erty is on file with the Land Development Division.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect
to any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. Copies of the proposed application will be
available for inspection and/or purchase between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00
PM, Monday through Friday in the Department of Planning and Development, Land
Development Division, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 141, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 24, 2014.


879-0124 FCRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of
SUSHI-O
located at 1988 N. Future
Terrace, Lecanto, FL.,
34461, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida. DATED
at Lecanto, this 20th day
of January, 2014.
/s/ Skylar BrummOwner
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
January 24, 2014.


880-0124 FCRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of
Floral City Auction
located at 7368 S, Florida
Ave., Floral City, FL.,
34436, in the County of
CITRUS, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida. DATED
at Lecanto, this the 20th
day of January, 2014.
By: /s/ Kalon B. Jepsen,
Owner
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
January 24, 2014.


881-0124 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name Notice
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Johkitran Concrete
Design
located at 265 S. Thayer
Ave., Lecanto, FL 34461,
in the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporations of the Flor-
ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL,
this 21 day of Jan., 2014.
/s/ Catherine P. Neff
Owner
Published Jan. 24, 2014.


^f 'n866.361.1137 ..

... 1Sales: Mon-Thurs 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11am-4pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat8am-4pm


Meeting
^*I Noice


Foreclosure Sal
Action Notices
I 15je


Metn


FMetn


NEW YEAR

CELEBRATION


ONE


WEEK


ONLY!




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C15


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= = =30 -c


C16 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014