Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
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Full Text


NEW 2013


Blowout

Savings

See Page D1 1
for More IrWfo. '.


No. 7 Gators survive scare on road /B 1 1




ONICLE

C ITwww.chronicleonline.com

^& www.chronicleonline.com


SUNDAY, JAN. 19, 2014 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 165


TODAY & next morning
HIGH LOW
67 38

\


Partly cloudy. South-
west wind increasing
to 20 mph.
PAGE A4

COMMENTARY:
State of city
Crystal
River
Mayor
Jim
Farley
writes _
about '
the
city.
/Page
Cl
EXCURSIONS:


Globetrotter
World traveler Peter
Graulich writes about
his voyage to Easter
Island./Page A17

BUSINESS:


Sky high
The price to board an
airliner in the United
States has risen for
the fourth straight
year./Page Dl


HOMEFRONT:


Book retreat
Create a library for
books and other
media./HomeFront


USA WEEKEND:


New series
Greg Kinnear, star of
the new Fox TV series
"Rake" talks about
the real-life role he
cherishes most:
husband and dad.
/Inside


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ...............A18
Editorial ..................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A 18
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A24
Veterans ........ A20


6 IIJLIJVILLJ7I o


Bundles of fun


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Four-year-old Madeline Towne of Ocala has some fun Saturday at the 27th annual Florida
Manatee Festival as she plays with a manatee puppet being shown to her by Hannah Miller
of IBEX Puppetry at Three Sisters Springs in Crystal River. The festival continues from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. today in downtown Crystal River and at Three Sisters.


People brave

temperatures

for Manatee

Festival
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
E early hours of the
27th annual
Florida Manatee
Festival started
out slow Saturday, as
many waited for tempera-
tures to rise.
Once the sun was high
in the sky, thousands of
brave tourists and families
walked through the festi-
val gates with layers upon
layers of warm clothing on
to reduce the 50-degree


Jim and Jan Hengtgen, visiting from Hampshire, Ill., inspect
the artwork of nature artist Leland Williams of Crescent
IN+- ^n J +.A + k^ l37+. I -I l -rim RA il-


City on aturay a t me zin annual I-ioria ivManaee
See Page A8 Festival in downtown Crystal River.


Leonard Weisman: World

traveler and self-made man


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Leonard Weis-
man had been in Ecuador on business
when he grabbed a flight from Quito in
the north to Guayaquil in the south -
and the plane crashed, killing many on
board.
Except for three broken ribs, Weis-
man walked out unscathed and
tromped through the marshes, carrying
his briefcase he had places to go,
people to see.
"Another time he was in the Philip-
pines traveling on a road that was in-
fested with bandits who were robbing
and killing people," recounted son-in-
law Phil Courter "So, he stocked his car
with cigarettes and whiskey, and every
time he was stopped he'd give them
booze and cigarettes and they would let
him go. He was not afraid of danger"
At age 98, the crazy, amazing, wild,
adventurous life of Leonard Mordecai
Weisman ended on Jan. 4,2014.
"My father was born in Pittsburgh to
very poor Russian immigrants," said
Gay Courter "His father was a junk
dealer, but also a scholar who spoke
many languages. My grandmother had
been educated in Kiev, but because of
restrictions on Jews she wasn't allowed
to finish her education (in obstetrics).


bA
S" "5D /


Special to
Crystal River resident and world
Leonard Weisman died Jan. 4 a
They were actually escaping
tion when they came to the U.
They settled in Pittsburgl
Weisman's mother worked
midwife.
See


MAITHEW BECK/Chronicle
Motorists coming from and going into the
Crystal River Apartments off North Miller
Run Terrace have been affected by the new
traffic median and signal on County Road
486 near Crystal River.


Apartment


residents


say new


C.R. 486


lacks access
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The final section of County Road 486
completes an east-west parkway that pro-
vides easy and safe access for motorists.
Don't tell that to residents of Crystal
River Apartments, such as 88-year-old Ed
Jeske, who think the new design makes it
tougher than ever to get onto the roadway
"I don't know whoever designed it; he
didn't have no brains," Jeske said.
The problem is this: Crystal River Apart-
ments is on Miller Run Terrace, which sits
just east of Meadowcrest Boulevard. The
road isn't close enough for motorists to turn
left onto it through the intersection, so they
must travel close to another half mile until
the next median cut, then come back.
Getting out isn't much easier if a red light
has westbound traffic backed up to their
street. Plus, for apartment residents to
head east on C.R. 486, they must cross two
lanes and quickly get in the left turn lane
to turn around at the Meadowcrest signal.
"This little problem out here should have
See Page All


yhill Ln



t Gynb ,


West Norvell Bryant High1


Google Maps/Chronicle illustration
Miller Run Terrace has no other access but
County Road 486, Norvell Bryant Highway.
County officials said when the property is
developed directly across Meadowcrest
Boulevard, the development will likely
connect to Miller Run, allowing residents
there access to the traffic light.


MLK events on tap


Chronicle


In honor of Martin
Luther King Jr Day, on
i 7 Monday, observances and
L ,, tributes are planned
around Citrus County.
At 5 p.m. today,
Jan. 19, there will be a
church service at Mt.
Olive Missionary Baptist
Church, 2105 N. Georgia
Road, Crystal River
In Inverness, the
f MLKJr Unity Walk begins
at 8:30 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office on Martin Luther
King Jr Avenue, ending at
Liberty Park for a short
ceremony that includes
the recitation of Dr King's
"I Have a Dream" speech.
For those interested in
participating in a Day of
Service in honor of the
civil rights icon, the Nature
Sthe Chronicle Coast Volunteer Center has
d traveler several projects going on
it age 98. around the county, such as
persecu- a cleanup from 9 a.m. to
S." noon Monday at Floral
h, where Park in Floral City
d as a U Another option is cre-
ating valentines for veter-
ans from 9 a.m. to noon at
Page Al 1 Central Ridge Community


Center, 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. For infor-
mation, call the Nature
Coast Volunteer Center at
352-249-1275 or email
ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
In Crystal River, a pa-
rade will begin at 10 a.m.
at Seventh Avenue be-
tween Third and Fourth
streets, proceeding onto
Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(State Road 44) to 12th Av-
enue and to Third Street,
ending at Copeland Park.
"This year, we have
about 20 entries, including
the Crystal River Middle
School band," organizer
Charles McCray II said.
Beginning at 11 a.m., a
commemoration service
with keynote speaker
Bishop Brown will kick off
the annual Living the
Dream Festival at Cope-
land Park. Food from local
vendors Rudy's Barbecue
and Oysters will be avail-
able for purchase, along
with drinks from the
George Washington Carver
Committee.
Also, there will be activi-
ties for kids, along with op-
portunities for visiting with
neighbors and friends.


Mll
Te^^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County may tap general fund for Inverness fire fee


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

If Inverness residents and
businesses don't agree to pay
the county's fire services fee,
the county would have to dip
into its general fund for the
city's share.
Potentially, the county
could file a lawsuit, County
Administrator Brad Thorpe
explained Wednesday to the
Chronicle editorial board.
"Here's the problem,"
Thorpe said: "If they don't
pay the bill, the board has to
take it out of the general fund
and pay it. They cannot not
pay it because if they don't
pay it, it's not equitable to the
payers of the MSBU on the
system. A lot of people subsi-
dize that To make it lawfully
supportable, it's got to be
paid so the board will have to
pay it."
As part of the current
county budget, the Citrus
County Board of County Com-
missioners (BOCC) author-
ized the levy of a municipal
services benefit unit (MSBU)
for fire protection services.
The MSBU joined an existing
municipal services taxing
unit (MSTU) because the
millage rate could not be
raised high enough to meet
fire protection service needs.
The board's goal with the
MSBU was to draw more res-
idents into the funding pool
and gradually lower the mill-
age rate.
An MSBU offers a specific
benefit funded by a special
assessment that is not related
to a taxpayer's property
value. An MSTU offers a
service or improvement that
is based on taxable value.
Inverness residents, as
county residents already do,
would pay a flat fee of $54 per
residential property parcel.
Businesses, likewise, would
be charged fees based on
square footage: 5 cents per
square foot for commercial
buildings, 1 cent for indus-
trial warehouses and 8 cents
for institutional buildings,
plus a fee for the land.
As of its Jan. 7 meeting, In-
verness City Council had not
adopted the MSBU. The an-
nual proposed cost for the city
of Inverness for this year is


http://www.inverness-fl.govlDocumentCenter/HomeVNiew/386
This map on the official website of the city of Inverness shows the approximate city limits.


$599,000. Of that amount,
$250,000 is from fire service
taxes (MSTU). The remaining
$349,000 is the MSBU amount.
If the city doesn't pay, the
county would have to con-
sider pursuing a legal remedy
"We'd probably end up
suing the city of Inverness,"
Commission Chairman John
'JJ" Kenney told the editorial
board.
"Because you have a payer
suit saying I'm paying twice,"
Thorpe explained. "I'm pay-
ing mine and I'm paying the
(Inverness) residents."
Thorpe said more meetings
will take place with Inverness
City Council President Linda
Bega and Inverness City Man-
ager Frank DiGiovanni.
Thorpe said he had provided
them both with a PowerPoint
presentation of the five-year
capital plan and a copy of the
tax roll from Government
Services Group (GSG).
"They know how many res-
idential units, how the
square footage is, how they
calculate it per square foot,"
Thorpe said. "All that was
sent to them, so they have all
that information."
Thorpe said the Inverness
City Council now can decide
how to provide fire protec-
tion services.


"They can take it out of
their general fund," Thorpe
explained. "They can change
the methodology They could
say we're not doing per
square foot, we're going to do
a base rate. They can do
whatever they want to do.
They don't have to use that
methodology The one we use
is the most commonly used in
the state of Florida."
In another contentious
issue with Inverness, the
county is looking for an agree-
ment regarding the use of the
city's park and recreational
areas. A rift started more than
a year ago when the county
withheld funding for Whis-
pering Pines Park after Duke
Energy refused to pay its en-
tire tax bill and the county
took some emergency cuts.
Thorpe said he has com-
posed a memorandum of un-
derstanding for the city's
cultural and recreational
funding because county resi-
dents enjoy the use of the city's
parks and attend its events.
The MOU would not exceed
$300,000 a year in exchange for
a copy of the city's cultural and
recreational budget. The
funds could be spent on capi-
tal, sponsorships, events and
staff, Thorpe said. Kenney said
he will take the MOU to Bega


and DiGiovanni.
"What I'd love to happen is
that (they) agree to that,"
Thorpe said. "We sign that
MOU. We give them
$300 grand for cultural and
recreation and they pay (the
fire services MSBU)."
Kenney said it would be an
attempt to settle both issues.
But Thorpe said the MOU
was not linked to the MSBU.
Kenney expressed concern
about responding to fires in
Inverness if residents don't
pay the MSBU.
"I even asked the county
attorney: If they don't pay,
what's our standing if we
have a fire truck roll up in
front of a home and they put
a fire out?" Kenney said.
'And they send the home-
owner a bill for fire services?
Not the $54, but the total cost
of responding to that fire?
Legally, we can't do that."
Thorpe said the county's
fire services would respond
to fires regardless, but that a
solution needs to be found
and that he would hate to
have to take legal action.
"I would hope it wouldn't
come to that, but eventually
we will have to do some-
thing," Thorpe said. "We are
meeting. We're going to try to
work this out."


SECO warns of

winter scams

Special to the Chronicle

SECO officials are warning all electric
customers to be wary of a variety of con-
sumer scams being run in Central Florida
this winter
SECO Director of Corporate Communi-
cations Barry Bowman said, "Right now
there are a number of scams being foisted
upon the public by unscrupulous individu-
als whose sole purpose is to separate peo-
ple from their hard-earned money These
scammers like to prey on our older popula-
tion, in particular, which makes their ac-
tions even more reprehensible."
Bowman said some of SECO's customers
have received calls from people who claim
to be from some company associated with
SECO. The callers say they'll be in the area
and offer to stop by and show homeowners
how to save on their energy bill. They also
try to get through the door by saying they
are part of some federal incentive program.
"Ultimately, they want to sell you some-
thing you probably don't need. It's impor-
tant for people to know that SECO has no
third party vendors and the co-op offers its
own free in-home energy assessments to its
customers," Bowman said. "If our mem-
ber/customers have any question about a
suspicious call they should contact SECO
directly for advice."
Another scam being run in the area in-
volves an automated call, supposedly from
SECO, telling people that their bill is over-
due and demanding they make an immedi-
ate payment with a money card or the
electric service will be disconnected. If
people fall for this scam, their money sim-
ply disappears.
A third scam involves text messaging.
People may receive a text message that
states, in effect, "Your electric service ac-
count has been hacked. Text back 'send
now' to reactivate your account"
Bowman stressed that the mere function
of texting back 'send now' can completely
compromise personal identification infor-
mation. He said people should simply
delete such texts without responding.
"Utilities and other companies all across
Florida and throughout the Southeast are
seeing these same scams play out. We want
our customers and others to be aware of
these devious practices. Anyone represent-
ing themselves as being associated with a
utility should be closely scrutinized and
their credentials checked out thoroughly
before you give them any information or
admit them to your home.
"SECO sends current scam alerts out on
its Facebook page and our energy services
group has a new community presentation
on scams of all types that we'd be happy to
show any group free of charge," Bowman
said.


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A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


LOCAL







SPage A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY19,2014



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Government closed
for MLK holiday
Citrus County govern-
ment offices will be closed
Monday in observance of
Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
The county landfill will be
open from 8 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Monday and the
business office will be
closed all day. Regular
business hours will resume
Tuesday.
Libraries will be closed on
Monday.
All community buildings
and parks, including Bicen-
tennial Pool, will be open.
Animal Services will be
closed, but will resume nor-
mal business hours on
Tuesday.
Roe v. Wade service
set for Jan. 22
Citrus County Right to
Life invites the public to the
annual Roe v. Wade Memo-
rial Service at noon
Wednesday, Jan. 22, on the
lawn at the Old Courthouse
in Inverness.
This year, Southern Ex-
press Bluegrass Band will
provide music beginning at
11 a.m.
Bring a blanket or lawn
chair.
For information, call Kathy
at 352-563-7017.

Comcast to make
channel change
Comcast has announced
it is launching Xfinity for In-
verness area residents
around Tuesday, Jan. 21.
When that occurs, the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners meetings
will be aired on Channel 71
instead of Channel 9. All
Comcast customers, regard-
less of level of service, can
view programming on Chan-
nel 71.
If you have questions
about the upcoming
changes to Comcast, con-
tact a Comcast representa-
tive. If you have any
questions regarding these
changes and viewing the
BOCC meetings, call Tobey
Phillips, public information
officer, at 352-527-5484.

Refuge Friends
meeting Jan. 26
Friends of Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge
Complex Inc. will have its
annual meeting at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 26, in the Fel-
lowship Hall of the First
United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.
For more information or
directions, call 352-586-
7140 or visit www.friends
ofchazz.org. This is a free
event and is open to the
public.
Featured speaker will be
John Moran, a Florida na-
ture photographer. Moran is
a resident of Florida since
age 2 and a University of
Florida graduate. His pho-
tography has appeared in
numerous books and maga-
zines, including National Ge-
ographic, Time, Newsweek,
Smithsonian and many
others.
Moran's presentation
will be on "Our Water, Our
Future."
For more information, visit
www.friendsofchazz.org or
call 352-653-2088, Ext. 215.

Franklin County
Illegally harvested
oysters seized
APALACHICOLA- Two
tons of illegally harvested
oysters have been seized in
northwest Florida.
The Tallahassee Democ-
rat reports that Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission officers in
Carrabelle issued citations
Monday to five people for
20 misdemeanors and two
boating infractions.
The oysters were har-
vested from areas off


Apalachicola that are closed
until summer. They were re-
turned to the bay so that
they could continue to grow.
Officials say poaching is
another threat to an industry
already struggling with low
freshwater flows and other
environmental factors.
-From staff and wire reports


Free health and fitness seminar planned


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
Now that you've made
your New Year's resolution
to get fit, have you decided how to
do it?
The Citrus County Health De-
partment is offering a free semi-
nar filled with simple-to-follow
suggestions on how to eat better
and live healthier
The public is invited to "New
Year, New You: Fitness & Nutri-
tion Made Easy," from 10 to
11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22, at
the Citrus County Extension
Building, Classroom C, 3650 W
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Topics covered include: "Nutri-
tion 101," fitness, gardening/grow-


Details:
WHAT: New Year, New You:
Fitness & Nutrition Made Easy free
seminar.
WHO: Citrus County Health
Department.
WHEN: 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 22.
WHERE: Citrus County Extension
Building, Classroom C, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
INFO: Call Sabrina Yeatman
at 352-527-0068, ext. 242.



ing your own herbs and wellness
and healthy living.
Carol Burke, licensed dietician


and county WIC manager, said
some of the seminar will focus on
how to use the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's "MyPlate" model for
daily food requirements.
"We've been using 'MyPlate' in-
stead of the food pyramid," Burke
said. "That's where half your
plate should be vegetables and
fruit. As a population, we don't eat
enough vegetables, or not a good
variety of vegetables."
A common misconception is
that eating that many fruits and
vegetables is too expensive for av-
erage, struggling families.
But Burke said canned fruits
and vegetables contain the same
nutrients as fresh and are
affordable.
'Also, if you buy fresh produce


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chroni
During the 2013 little league season, Crystal Jordan helped her son Skyler Reichard swing the bat during oi
of his Challenger's Division league practices.


Changing hope





a ae ty


Many children with special needs find themselves watching baseball from the
bleachers or their couch. For some, their dream of swinging the bat and having the
crowd scream their name is just that a dream.
Central Citrus Little League is changing that vision into a reality.


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
"For children with mental
and/or physical disabilities who
have never had the opportunity to
play in a baseball league, mo-
ments like this are more than an
individual triumph," said Tony
Cairone, coordinator of the Cen-
tral Citrus Little League Chal-
lenger's Division. "I know children
who watch their brother or sister
get ready for a baseball game
three times a week, and they are
just sitting in their house with
nothing to do. With the
Challenger's League, they get to
interact with their peers."
For the second year, Cairone has
coordinated the Challenger's Divi-
sion League in Citrus County for
children with disabilities to have
a chance at their own stardom.
The non-competitive national
Challenger's Division establishes a
separate division of Little League
for boys and girls with physical and
mental challenges so they can enjoy
the game of baseball alongside the
millions of other children who par-
ticipate in Little League.
Central Citrus Little League in-
vites children between the ages of
4 to 18 to join the Challenger's Di-
vision baseball team. Children 19
to 22 who are enrolled in a devel-
opmentally sponsored school are
also encouraged to join.
"Last year we had over 40 chil-
dren who signed up to play It was
extremely successful," Cairone
said. "Hopefully, this year the
word of mouth will spread and
even more children will come out


Details:


Registration for the league has
begun and will continue through-
out the end of the month Jan. 21,
23,25,28 and 30. Weekday hours
are from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and week-
end days are from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

A $20 registration fee will be
charged.
Games will be Friday nights and on
a few Saturday mornings on the


Central Citrus Little League handi-
cap accessible fields outside of Bev-
erly Hills.
For more information, sponsorship
or to make a donation, call Tony
Cairone at 352-601-7706, email him
at ccllchallenger@aol.com, visit lit-
tleleague.org and click on
"Challenger Division" or go to
http://www.eteamz.com/
centralcitruslittleleague.


"All of these children and young adults are special in
their own way and need to be treated as individuals both
on and off the ball field These individuals should always
be treated with pride and dignity, just the way they come
to the ball field and play their hearts out every game."
Tony Cairone
Central Citrus Little League Challenger's Division


and have a good time."
Games are scheduled to be
played alongside other Little
League games to create support
for players.
'All of these children and young
adults are special in their own way
and need to be treated as individ-
uals both on and off the ball field,"
Cairone said. "These individuals
should always be treated with
pride and dignity just the way they
come to the ball field and play
their hearts out every game. The
most important thing to see is the
smile on their faces when they


leave the ball field."
Assisting each player will be
"buddy" who aids them on tl
field with running, catching an
hitting, Cairone said.
"Later on in life, these child
are going to say 'Wow, I rememb
when I was young playing Litt
League,"' he said. "'I nev
thought I could do that because
couldn't get out of my wheelchai
This will prepare these children
open doors in their adult life. I'r
true believer that every child's li
is a result of what they learn
when they are young."


that's in season, especially at pro-
duce stands and farmer's mar-
kets, you can get better prices,"
she said. "Right now, strawberries
and oranges are in season."
Another topic covered at the
seminar: how to read a nutrition
label and what constitutes a
serving.
Judy Tear, health department
spokeswoman, said representa-
tives from the YMCA will talk
about fitness and Walgreens about
flu shots.
Also, refreshments will be
served.
For information, call Sabrina
Yeatman at 352-527-0068, ext 242.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn.


Some

comfort

for shelter

animals

Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Ani-
mal Shelter has recently
taken steps to provide
warm bedding for the shel-
ter dogs. The cold weather
has been very hard on the
animals.
The county shelter, lo-
cated on Airport Road at
the far end of Inverness, is
an aging facility with some
kennels still outdoors. The
dogs in the "upper ken-
nels" lie on concrete floors
S 24/7. This is especially
hard on older dogs suffer-
ing from arthritis and the
many undernourished
S dogs that end up in the
S shelter. Many dogs are
shivering from the
bone-chilling cold in the
morning.
Even younger dogs suf-
S fer through this, not only
S physically but emotionally
and psychologically With
,le many having come from
n warm homes with comfort-
able beds, it is a shock to
find themselves without
human companionship
and a comfortable place to
cuddle.
Although the adminis-
tration, staff and volun-
teers try their best to keep
the animals healthy while
S giving extended time for
adoptions, the comfort
needs of the dogs and cats
are harder to meet.
With the help of the non-
profit group Citrus County
Foundation for Animal
Protection (CCFAP), that
hardship is about to
change.
The group has pur-
chased a high-capacity
washer and dryer and
hopes soon to purchase
another to meet the
laundry needs involved in
providing individual bed-
ding to more than 100 dogs.
CCFAP also plans to
purchase larger soft mats
with rubber backing, to
provide some insulation
from the concrete.
A Good Samaritan has
handmade more than
100 very soft beds with
donated fabric from
Winders Fabric Store in
Homosassa.
These can be placed on
top of the bathmats to keep
the moisture from
wickingg" up from the
concrete.
This past week "trial"
mats were placed in each
kennel. Within an hour the
atmosphere of the kennels
changed. The barking
stopped and big dogs cud-
dled up next to each other.
* Bedding with stuffing or
fringe can be dangerous
because of the dogs ingest-
ing the material. Those
a who would like to donate
he to this cause and to the
nd continued CCFAP mission
to increase shelter animal
en well-being can call
er Michelle at 352- 302-2664
le or send a check to CCFAP,
er PO. Box 1164, Inverness,
e I FL, 34451; or, go to
r.' www.citruscritters.com.


to Scroll to the CCFAP link
ia and click on the PayPal
fe button there. All
ed donations are greatly
appreciated.


n(






A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


Todays
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Develop contracts, sign
agreements and take care of unfin-
ished business this year. The more
time you put into enhancing your per-
sonal and professional security, the
more you will encounter people who
want to share ideas.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Live
and learn. Letting someone from your
past get away with something you
should have anticipated will be hard to
swallow.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Put your
finances in order. A chance to make
extra cash will help you make a positive
change to your current direction.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take
hold of whatever situation you en-
counter. There is money to be made,
deals to be signed and improvements
to enact.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -What
you do will make a difference to your
community, be it spiritual, moral or
physical.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Expand
your friendships today Mix the old with
the new to achieve freedom and peace
of mind.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Keep
everyone guessing. Your changing atti-
tude and innovative mind will capture
interest and result in the chance to try
your hand at something new.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Travel to
destinations that offer something differ-
ent. Romance is on the rise, and it
could turn a dull day into an exciting
encounter.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't take
anything or anyone for granted. Live
up to what's expected of you so that
you can move ahead without feeling
guilty.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You need
to socialize, offer favors and take on
tasks that will boost your reputation
and help you gain respect.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Ask ques-
tions and be prepared to protect your
personal position and your future.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Home,
family and friends should take top pri-
ority today Do something unique or dif-
ferent that you can share with the ones
you love.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A
chance to fulfill a dream may come at
a cost. Not everyone will want you to
go in the direction you choose. Weigh
the pros and cons, but do what your
heart craves.


ENTERTAINMENT


Madonna apologizes
for racial slur
Madonna apologized Satur-
day for using a racial slur on In-
stagram to refer to her white
son, seeking forgiveness a day
after calling those who criticized
her language "haters."
On Friday night, the singer
posted a picture of her 13-year-
old son, Rocco, boxing and in-
cluded the comment, "No one
messes with Dirty Soap! Mama
said knock you out!" She then
added a variation of the N-word.
She quickly deleted the com-
ment when outraged Instagram
users berated her for the use of
the word, and was initially defi-
ant. But in a statement to The
Associated Press on Saturday, a
contrite Madonna said: "Forgive
me."
"I am sorry if I offended any-
one with my use of the N word
on Instagram. It was not meant
as a racial slur. I am not a racist.
There's no way to defend the
use of the word. It was all about
intention," she said. "It was used
as a term of endearment toward
my son who is white. I appreci-
ate that it's a provocative word
and I apologize if it gave people
the wrong impression."
Besides Rocco, she has three
other children, including Lourdes,
David and Mercy. Mercy and
David are black, adopted from the
African nation of Malawi.

French first lady
leaves hospital
PARIS France's first lady
on Saturday ended a more than
weeklong stay at a hospital
where she went to rest after a
gossip magazine's report about
an alleged affair between Presi-
dent Francois Hollande and an
actress.
Hours after Valerie Trier-
weiler left a Paris hospital, she


Associated Press
Madonna's son, Rocco Ritchie, foreground, attends the world
premiere of "Madonna: The MDNA Tour" at the Paris Theatre
in New York. Madonna is apologizing for using a racial slur to
refer to her white son Instagram. On Friday night, Jan. 17,
2014, she posted a picture of her 13-year-old son boxing and
used a hashtag that contained a racial slur.


thanked her supporters.
"Thank you from the bottom of
my heart to all who sent mes-
sages of support and recovery"
by email or social media, Trier-
weiler tweeted. "Very touched."
A member of Trierweiler's en-
tourage confirmed numerous
French media reports that she
left La Pitie-Salpetriere hospital.
The official spoke on condition of
anonymity because of the sensi-
tivity of the matter.
Trierweiler's destination could-
n't immediately be confirmed,
but Paris Match magazine, for
whom she worked for years as a
journalist, reported that she was
resting at an official residence in
Versailles, west of Paris.
Trierweiler, 48, was hospital-
ized Jan. 10, adding a new di-
mension to the unpopular
president's troubles, which
erupted after Closer magazine


reported that Hollande was see-
ing actress Julie Gayet.
Playboy sues mag
over photos of Moss
NEW YORK -Lawyers for
Playboy magazine are suing
Harper's Bazaar publisher
Hearst Communications over its
online use of photos of fashion
model Kate Moss.
Court papers filed Friday in fed-
eral court in Manhattan say the
magazine violated Playboy's ex-
clusive right to publish the pictures
taken by fashion photographers
MertAlas and Marcos Piggott.
The suit alleges Harper's
posted on its website a clothed
photo of the 40-year-old super-
model from the Playboy shoot
but added a hyperlink that took
readers to another website
showing the nude photos.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 19, the
19th day of 2014. There are 346
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 19,1807, Confederate
Gen. Robert E. Lee was born in
Westmoreland County, Va.
On this date:
In 1861, Georgia became the fifth
state to secede from the Union.
In 1937, millionaire Howard
Hughes set a transcontinental air
record by flying his monoplane from
Los Angeles to Newark, N.J., in 7
hours, 28 minutes and 25 seconds.
In 1966, Indira Gandhi was
elected prime minister of India.
Ten years ago: A freighter cap-
sized near the western Norwegian
port of Bergen, killing 18.
Five years ago: Russia and
Ukraine signed a deal restoring nat-
ural gas shipments to Ukraine and
paving the way for an end to the
nearly two-week cutoff of most
Russian gas to a freezing Europe.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama said the U.S. stood ready to
provide whatever assistance Alger-
ian officials needed in the aftermath
of a deadly terrorist attack at a nat-
ural gas complex in the Sahara, a
siege which finally came to an end
with a second assault by special
forces.
Today's Birthdays: Former U.N.
Secretary-General Javier Perez de
Cuellar is 94. Actor Fritz Weaver is
88. Actress Tippi Hedren is 84. For-
mer PBS newsman Robert MacNeil
is 83. Movie director Richard Lester
is 82. Actor-singer Michael Craw-
ford is 72. Actress Shelley Fabares
is 70. Country singer Dolly Parton is
68. ABC newswoman Ann Compton
is 67. TV chef Paula Deen is 67.
Rock singer Martha Davis is 63.
Singer Dewey Bunnell (America) is
62. Actor Desi Arnaz Jr. is 61.
Actress Katey Sagal is 60.
Thought for Today: "America is
woven of many strands. I would
recognize them and let it so remain.
Our fate is to become one, and yet
many. This is not prophecy, but
description." Ralph Ellison,
American author (1913-1994).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


50/39 0.00" l__/ _
THREE DAY OUTLOOK dly
-mm TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
l- P4High: 65' Low: 34-
,0m lM Partly cloudy, isolated showers, rain chance
10%
rV 11 v MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
f High: 67' Low:43"
v. .._. Mostly sunny

i P TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 67 Low: 30
H Partly cloudy isolated showers, rain
chance 10.o

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 57/47
Record /29
Normal 70/51
Mean temp. 52
Departure from mean -8
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00"
Total for the month 1.47"
Total for the year 1.47"
Normal for the year 1.21*
'As o( 7 ; m ni Wmrnes
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal. 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.23


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 34.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Elm, Maple
Today's count: 8.0/12
Monday's count: 10.1
Tuesday's count: 10.8
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 31
Pollutant: Ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES ",,^,aa.0,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNINGi AFTERNOON
01/19 SUNDAY 08:12 01:20 20:15 13:43
01/20 MONDAY 08:46 02:03 21:08 14:27
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SU TT1Iff ...- ...-.-........5:57pm-
SUNMRIS.E PIOMOB1W_. -_ __22Va-m
( T0DA .....MOR...ISI ...TA ....... 9:13 p.m.
Jan24 Jan30 Feb6 Feb14 WNETuu -9:10am.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For mofe Intwomaton call Florida DvMsion ol Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
r o .mmiii-visii.it.r iir i'-,_ sn the Division of Forestry's Web sie,
II llt> T ,'T- 11 dl,'l.-. .,1 1,F,:. h Pa r,<-r 1'bij,
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited two wo days per week befom 10 a.m or afler4 p.m, as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday andor Sux day.
ODD r,:rrE'es may 3.-lir on wi.V-dnesre3ay dini' Snitircaiy
i-tarYJ niaI _ng iM!II a ,ILII :.,1 rioa/le ,r m ,m IrngM l O[ ni .ri 3 *rr;-13 sIJci
as vegetable gardens. Itowem and shrus. can be done on anrty day and at any
lime.
Citrus Countly UtLes' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant matena) 352-527-7669. &S'-m. n i~ irir), snimiy L.A..Hv ,or -.dvir,a1 i
walefing allowances.
o report nJa.,jii:n pcaa ,tcail City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321. City of Cryslal
River @ 352-795-4216exl 313, wn ncrporaied C.arus Counrv 0' 352-527-7669.


TFrom mouths of rivers
ct,
Chassahowtzka" 833 a.m.
Crystal Rve" 6:39 a.r>
Wifhlacoochee" 3:23 a.m
HomosaSsa"" 725 am


TIDES
"At Kings Bay "At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
High Low
0,6ft. 854R,m. 0Q4l O2:06am, 0,11 4;05p.n011 I
2.2ft. 716p.m. 1.9fl 12:S7 a.m. 0.511 1 :32p.m02 ft
2.9ft. 4:08pm. 3.0 10:31 a.m-0.2 W I 05p.t.3t.
l2tt 8: pm, 1 ll f 2:01 a-M., 0211 2:39p.0.l fl.


City


H L Fecast City


Daytona Bch. 68
Fort Lauderdale 68
Fort Myers 70
Gainesville 63
Homestead 68
Jacksonville 63
Key West 69
Lakeland 69
Melbourne 71


Today: West then NW winds around
10 -18 knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay
and inland waters moderate chop.
Tonight: Northwesi winds around 10
knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and
inland waters a light chop.


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


Gulf water
temperature


56
T"kn at ArIpdk


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Wizhacoocnee at Holder 2897 28.98 3552
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.45 38.45 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.50 39.51 40,60
Tsala Apopka-FloraI City 40.19 40.20 42,20
Levels lopomled In teea atos sea ', Fioo: stage fo lakes are based on 2.33-year food.
tte mean-ammal Iko od ich hla a 43-peeceftr of being equaled of exceeded I
anly one year This data is obtaned ItOih lhe Sa.wiest FPorda Water menagmenei Dmtit
and is subject o rt vision -. .' *- ii .111 11 D-.'A,:r 'Y .V tirri ; j'.e.
be libleforaiy damages a ,%Jl- ..,1 .,I In ,, F ",in.:; 11" r.-. r ,W ..[.-, . .
shoulki contact Ihe h 1r*rogcal Data Secion at (352) 796.721

THE NATION
F : I i '- I,


dt


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltitmoire
Billings
Birminghamn
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Buringtion, VT
Charleston, S.C
Charleston,. WV.
Charloltte
Chicago
Cincinnalti
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Oenver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvile, IN
Harrisburg
Hatiford
Houston
Indianapols
Las Vegas
Uille Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobde
Monlgomery
Nashville


SAT
H L Pep. H
34 21 .03 34
56 26 55
37 17 42
45 24 48
43 32 45
70 37 68
35 26 45
45 30 so
49 21 50
32 21 35
38 32 .78 38
30 17 .11 28
38 19 32
53 36 57
27 16 04 37
41 26 49
20 10 16 30
26 12 .04 31
20 11 ,07 31
47 15 02 55
23 11 29
32 24 .12 33
69 35 65
54 27 59
38 13 .04 43
19 6 .01 27
65 27 65
37 15 38
33 21 .02 37
34 29 .08 36
69 32 67
23 11 .10 29
69 41 68
61 29 54
83 52 79
32 17 33
55 20 49
24 8 .03 31
23 9 .17 34
55 21 60
51 25 54
44 16 41


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

SUN SAT SUN
LFcst City H L Pep. H LFcst
13 II New Orleans 57 34 59 41 s
31 s New York City 39 34 10 38 31 pc
23 pc Norfolk 48 37 .01 50 33 pc
31 s Oklahoma City 64 38 66 38 s
28 pc Omaha 43 27 53 22 s
45 s Palm Springs 81 52 79 52 pc
26 pc Philadelphia 39 32 42 30 pc
28 pc Phoenix 75 47 80 44 pc
30 pc Pittsburgh 22 11 10 30 20 11
25 f Portland, ME 33 25 .15 34 t6 sn
22 pc Portland. OR 49 29 44 33 f
9 il Providemce. RI 37 31 .53 37 25 fl
4 fl Raleigh 47 30 50 31 pc
32 pc RapidaCity 48 35 53 23 pc
27 sn Reno 56 20 56 21 pc
27 pc Rochaster.NY 30 21 .05 30 9 fl
11 pc Sacramento 69 30 69 33 s
23 pc Sall Lake City 38 18 40 21 f
11 0 San Antonio 70 34 71 46 s
29 s San Diego 77 51 72 51 pc
20 pc San Francisco 63 43 61 51 s
13 sn Savamnnah 51 34 58 33 pc
44 s Seatte 48 33 44 40 f
28a s Spokana 33 27 31 26 f
14 pc SI. Louis 43 16 02 52 27 s
7 pc St iSle, Mane 19 4 1 -.12 f
39 pc Syracuse 30 23 28 32 9 fl
27 pc Topeka 51 32 61 28 s
26 II Wai-insj.:r, 4., 31 46 31 pc
22 ii YESTERDAY S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
48 Pc HIGH am Com., Cast
24 pc LOW -22. Embmra, MM
41 S
34 s WORLD CITIES
1 PC SUN Lisbon 55/46r
27 p- CITY H/LJSKY London 5039/fr
136 s
5 PC Acapulco 6 4/7l tt Madrnd 48/37/r
0 PC Amsterdam46139pc Mexico City 66/41/pc
34 Athens 62/51/pc Montreal 32/21/pc
3 pc Beilling 44/22/s Moscow 6ftW
3 pc Berlin 44/35/s Parns 50/42/pc


I Sonnuua 7/644sii
KEY TO COmDITIONsm cclow, dr.*tuie; Cairo 68&53/s
fairl h-amzy p PCpM y cloudy; r-rah ; Calgary 48S212s
rlwia ow mix; ssumy; *ishowrs; Havana 71 6S3s
inusiwn ts-thwidltetmi wvwindy. Hong Kong 6653Ws
W 1s1im4 Jerusaiem 64V46/s


Rome 59/SSIpc
Sydney 8016&pc
Tokyo 44/32/s
Toronlo 32/17/pc
Warsaw 33/221pc


!LEGAL NOTICES






Bid Notices..................DIO



Self Storage Notices...D10O




1-j CITRUS Rn U S cICOUNTY



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community News paper Se ing Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -32 2 2
Tnrina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 64 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
I" Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I1ll i'ir


SEVEN RIVERS FINE ARTS

The Fine Arts Department of
SRCS develops young artists'
passions, creativity, talents, and
techniques. With an appreciation


of art history


and its cultural impact, combined
with excellent instruction in a
variety of media, our students
bring fashion, sculpture, painting,
graphic design, literature, music,
and theater to the world.


SSeven Rivers offers weekly art and music
classes to K-6th grade students.
Our upper school (7th-12th) offers:


* Band for middle and high school
* Graphic design for middle and
high school
* Drama I and II
* Art I and II
* AP Art I D


Seven Rivers Christian School is not bound to state mandates such as FCAT, Common
Core, or end-of-course tests, yet we produce AP scholars, dual enrollment and honor
graduates who get accepted every year to many colleges, universities, and military
academies including every public university in Florida.
Seven Rivers Christian School is accredited by the following agencies:
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools/AdvanceEd
Christian Schools of Florida
The National Council for Private School Accreditation
The faculty of Seven Rivers loves who they teach and what they teach. All are degree with
40% having a master's degree or higher.


Accepting Applications NOW for
the 2014-15 school year. Stop by
the school for enrollment
application or visit our web site.


www.sevenriverscs.org


Come to an Open House and
hear all about our school,
financial assistance
opportunities, curriculum, and
take a tour.


OPEN HOUSES
February 18 at 6:30pm
February 22 at 11am
February 24 at 10Oam
Pre-K only OPEN HOUSE March 11, 10AM
On-site VPK sign up April 1 at 9AM
(For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current proof
of address, birth certificate or shot record for child. If parent is missing
any of these documents, she will not be able to sign them up.)


A Provider for
Florida's Voluntary
Pre kindergarten
Program (VPK).


/for students
for students


Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12
scholarships and related support, giving economically disadvantaged
families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship.


L T ~ 0 M isso Statement II;i


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts
and minds of children
with a distinctly biblical
program of academic rigor,
artistic beauty, and athletic
competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


and understanding


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 AS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Veronica
'Ronny'
Carlucci, 100
CRYSTAL RIVER
A Mass of Christian Bur-
ial for Mrs. Veronica
"Ronny" M. Carlucci, age
100, of Crystal River,
Florida, will be held 9:30
AM, Tuesday, January 21,
2014 at the St. Benedicts
Catholic Church, Crystal
River with Father Ryszard
Stradomski officiating. In-
terment will follow at
Crystal River Memorial
Park, Crystal River,
Florida. The family will
receive friends from 10:00
AM until 2:00 PM, Monday
at the Beverly Hills Chapel
of Hooper Funeral Homes.
The family requests ex-
pressions of sympathy take
the form of memorial do-
nations to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Online condolences
may be sent to the family
at www.HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mrs. Carlucci was born
August 23, 1913 in Brook-
lyn, NY, daughter of the
late Otto and Veronica
(Connolly) Hildenbrand.
She died January 16, 2014
in Crystal River She
worked as a secretary and
moved to Crystal River,
Florida from Ft. Laud-
erdale. She was an avid
traveler and enjoyed play-
ing piano, cooking and
baking. Mrs. Carlucci was
a member of St. Benedicts
Catholic Church, and vol-
unteered for church and
hospitals.
Mrs. Carlucci was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, William Carlucci,
son, Charles Carlucci,
brothers, Frank and Ed-
ward Hildenbrand and sis-
ter, Ida Januzello.
Survivors include 2 daugh-
ters, Elaine Cuomo and
husband, Carmine of
Riverview and Lynne Nofi
and husband, Robert of
East Patchogue, NY, 12
grandchildren, 24 great
grandchildren and 15
great-great grandchildren.





Gary 'Gator'
Daugherty, 60
HOMOSASSA
Gary D. "Gator" Daugh-
erty, 60, of Homosassa,
died Monday Jan. 13,2014,
at the Hospice House of
Citrus County
He was born June 27,
1953, to Voncile and Julian
Daugherty in Plant City,
Fla., and came here 30
years ago from Lakeland.
He was a U.S. Army vet-
eran of the Vietnam War
He thoroughly enjoyed the
outdoors, especially hunt-
ing in the Gulf Hammock.
He is survived by his
wife, Linda Daugherty;
son Derl Flagg and daugh-
ter Yvonne Bloom; broth-
ers Troy and Jessie
Daugherty; three grand-
children; and three great-
grandchildren.
A memorial will be held
for him at 3 p.m. Jan. 28 at
the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, 1901 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


CILa. . savi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
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For Information and costs
call 726-8323

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John Hays, 82
INVERNESS
John Ivan Hays, 82, of In-
verness, passed away
peacefully on Wednesday,
Jan. 15,
2014. John
was born
Jan. 29,
1931, in
Bosworth, A
Mo., to the ,
late Hollis
a n d
Frances John
(Douglass) Hays
Hays. He
graduated with a B.S. de-
gree from Central Mis-
souri State University In
1960, he married Ann
Kathryn Solomon of Rox-
boro, N.C., to whom he was
married for 46 years. He
was preceded in death by
his beloved wife and soul
mate, Kathryn, in 2007.
John remarried in 2010 to
Joy Hall Walls and was
preceded in death by his
second loving wife in 2012.
John was a father of two
sons and worked as a secu-
rity analyst for the Depart-
ment of the Navy in the
Washington, D.C., area
until he retired and moved
to Inverness in 1998 with
his wife, Kathryn. John
was known to his family
and friends for his humor,
compassion and loyalty
He was a master gardener
and grew the tastiest fruits
and vegetables, and partic-
ipated in the UF/IFAS
Master Gardener Pro-
gram. He was an active
member of the Hospice of
Citrus and the Nature
Coast John loved listening
to jazz music, especially
Dixieland, and was an ac-
complished trumpet
player himself. John was
very active in his family's
life, most notably his
grandchildren and de-
voted much of his time to
them. He was a devoted
husband, father and
grandfather, and a loyal
friend to many
John was also preceded
in death by one son, John
Ivan Hays Jr, in 1983; and
one brother, Douglas
Richard Hays, in 1998.
Survivors include one
son, Daniel Richard Hays
and wife Rebecca of Or-
lando, Fla.; one sister,
JoAnne Lucas of St.
Charles, Mo.; one step-
daughter, Delight Harper
of Lakeland, Fla.; and
grandchildren Addison,
Aidan and Sabrina.
Family will be present to
celebrate his life from 2 to
4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 20, at
Chas E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness, Fla.
He will be greatly
missed by his family and



"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"



Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


friends. In lieu of flowers,
donate to Hospice of Cit-
rus and the Nature Coast,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Helen
Siegle, 91
SPRING HILL
Helen Siegle, 91, of The
Residence at Timber
Pines, died peacefully
Jan. 14, 2014, following a
stroke. Born Helen Joyce
Berman in Springfield,
Mass., in 1923 to Anne and
Jacob Berman, and
resided in Westwood,
Mass., 1947-2010.
Helen was known for
her kindness, her gener-
ous spirit, her positive at-
titude. She was flawlessly
attentive and caring to
Harrison, her husband of
70 years, and always sup-
portive of friends and fam-
ily She is remembered as
never having said an un-
kind word or having an un-
pleasant thought about
anybody Helen was a
woman of honor who made
the world a more loving
and gentle place. In the
end her body gave out, but
not her love or legacy
She is survived by hus-
band, Dr Harrison Siegle
of Spring Hill; and chil-
dren, Jerri (Gray) of
Nashville, John of Fal-
mouth, Maine, and Janet
(Just) and husband Paul of
Homosassa; grandchil-
dren, Jason and Harrison
Gray, David and Laura
Siegle, and Andrew Saun-
ders; and great-grand-
daughters, Zazou and
Octavia Gray and Eliana
Siegle.
Helen's favorite chari-
ties were: Make a Wish,
American Heart & Stroke.
Her life will be celebrated
Feb. 2 at The Residence.
To sign guestbook, visit:
brewerfuneral.com/352-
596-4991.


Albert
Fischer, 92
BEVERLY HILLS
Albert R. Fischer, 92,
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Jan. 12, 2014, under the
care of his
family and
Hospice of
Citrus
County. Al-
bert was T
born
April 28,
1921, in
Philadel- Albert
phia, Pa., Fischer
to the late
Joseph and Josephine
(Braun) Fischer He retired
from the Philadelphia
Naval Ship Yard with 25
years of service as a car-
penter Albert served our
country in the U.S. Army
during World War II. Albert
was a member of American
Legion Post No. 21 in
Philadelphia for 48 years.
He was well known around
Citrus County as "The
Music Man," playing his Q-
cord instrument at local
nursing homes for more
than 12 years, much to the
delight of the residents.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his daughter, Natalie
Braun of Beverly Hills. He
was preceded in death by
his wife Elaine.
A funeral service of re-
membrance will be at
12 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21,
2014, at First Church of
God, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, Inverness. Burial
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery The fam-
ily will receive friends in
visitation from 11 a.m.
until the hour of service.
Memorial donations are
requested to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 in lieu of flowers.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.


Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation


Benjamin
Robert He:
ter, Jane
vivors inci
29 years, N
Inverness;
Lee (Pam
Montgomei


The Service of Remem- Delnanmn
brance for Mr John Lee Heaton III.
"Jack" Heaton, age 80, of four dau
Inverness, Lynn Heat
Fla., will Dana Ah
be at uardo) De
b at .? '].Miami;
10 a.m. Michael)m
Monday, | j Mcal
Jan. 20, Greensbor.
2014, at Karen Le
t h e a' golani, Roy
Florida h', Fla.; 12
National John andhisfai
Cemetery, Heaton panion, Fra
Bushnell, Those, v
Fla. Friends may call from make mem
6 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the to Hospic
Inverness Chapel of County. An
Hooper Funeral Homes. underthec
Online condolences may Hverness
be sent to the family at Hooper Fu
www.HooperFuneral Crematory
Home.com.
Mr Heaton was born OBIT
July 23, 1933, in North Ar- T
lington, N.J., son of Ben- Chronict
jamin Jr and Willie Mae permits
(Worsham) Heaton. He paid obi
passed away Jan. 17, 2014, obits@
in Inverness, Fla. Mr. online.c
Heaton was an Air Force 352-56,
veteran, serving during the details
Korean War He worked as options.
a building contractor and Deadlin
moved to Inverness from obituari
Miami in 1994. Mr Heaton in the n
was a member of Ameri- edition.
can Legion and Floral City 0 All obitL
Masonic Lodge No. 133 edited t
F&AM. Associa
Mr Heaton was pre- unless a
ceded in death by his par- the coni
ents; first wife, Johnnie
Lee Marion Marsh Aflagw
Heaton; second wife, served
Christine Antoinette Tylek military.
Heaton; two brothers,


John 'Jack'
Heaton, 80
INVERNESS


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Serving all of Citrus County
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Heaton Jr. and
aton; and a sis-
Bardsley. Sur-
ude his wife of
lartha Heaton,
two sons, John
a) Heaton Jr,
ry, Ala.; and
Anton (Gina)
, Kathleen, Ga.;
ghters, Robin
on, Zephyrhills;
exandra (Ed-
LaCruz-Munoz,
Kelly Lynn
Westbrook,
o, N.C.; and
e (Paul) Cin-
'al Palm Beach,
grandchildren;
ithful dog com-
ankie.
vho wish, may
orial donations
ce of Citrus
rangements are
direction of the
Chapel of
neral Homes &


UARIES
us County
'e's policy
both free and
ituaries. Email
chronicle
om or phone
3-5660 for
and pricing

e is 3 p.m. for
es to appear
ext day's

varies will be
o conform to
ted Press style
Request to
:rary is made.
vill be included
for those who
n the U.S.


A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014






CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


We pause to remember the 57,000,000 lives


lost since Roe vs.Wade January 22, 1973.



Citrus County Right to Life Invites You to Attend Our





Roe -vs- Wade





Memorial Service




Wednesday, Jan. 22, at Noon

on the North Lawn of the Old Citrus County Courthouse -,

Inspirational music beginning at 11:00 am by Southern Bluegrass Express i


I A-
Chris Abisia
Mr &Mrs Robert Abraham
Elizabeth Adams
Fred & Patty Adams
Rich Adelberg
Maro Aguliero Family
Mike Alberts
AshlieAlia
Walter Allard
WandaL Allen
Sandra Altomare
Elenita M Anacleto
Theresa Anderson
Frank &Brigitte Androski
Barb Archutowski
Ramona Arena
ElonaArevalo
Norma Arkell
David Arnitz
David &Sharon Arnitz
Andy & Mary Arnold
Dave Ascough
Patricia Asher
Dewey Asher
James & Sandra Ashman Cop
Lee &Gunther Assenmacher
Linda Atkins
Linda Badore
Maria Baez
Dwight &Kathy Baker
Ed & Barbara Bakes
Robert &RowenaBalint
Ruth Ballard
Frank Banas
Emy Banas
Judy Banaszak
Marion Banaszak
Louis &Faye Barfield
Diane Bargy
Milicent Baron
Brian Barr
Martin &Beverly Bass

Dick &Kay Beairsto
Gary Beasley
Vivian Beasley
Bernita& Jerry Becker
Leigh Bedford
Jane Bedford
Burton&Lindy Beem
Alice Belanger
Lois Kathryn Bennin
Barbara Benoya
Joe Benton
Diane &RudyBeres
Mr &Mrs Jack Berg
Maureen Bergeron
Carnelita Bernabe
BertBiroc
Dennis Bisson
Patricia Bisson
JohannaBjerg
Don & Marilyn Blackburn
ZeniaBlanco
Barry Biasing
Angela Blasl
Margaret &Wayne Bloom
Jim &Joanne Bobay
Marcy Bobbert
Todd&Dede Boling & Family
Carl Bondorff
Huey Bonnette
Grace Bonnette
Veronica Bont
Dan J Boone
Jane Boone
Rosemane Boone

Fred& Barbara Born
Tony Bottichio
Noelle Boydstun
Natalie Braun
Marilyn Breitfeller
Joan &Bill Brewis
IB
Judy Britain
Delons Brown
Maria Brown
Thomas Brown
Mary Brown
France Bruner
Mr & Mrs Fred Bryant
Therese Burnett
Jeff Burnett
Mike Burnett
Adrienne Burnett
Wayne & Pam Burns
Pete & Sue Burrell
Joseph &Gail Buss
Keith & Jennifer Byers
Matthew & Maryanne Byrnes
Andy &Maryann Camisa
Cindy &Jack Campbell
Janet & Dave Carey
Len &Cheryl Carmon
C Carney
June Carrol
James & Joyce Cassidy
Maureen Castellano
Jacquelne Caulfeld
Cecilia Cecilia
Vc& Jenny Celano
Harry & Marilyn Chisholm
Ernie & Lisa Chrstman
Renee Christopher- Mcpheet
Judi Ciferno
Vncent Cioffi
Madge Cioffi
Layne Lowrey & Rick Clark
Donald M Clark
Ed Clark
Paul Clark


Paul& Mildred Clark
Jean Clarke
Jack& Ruth Clarkson
Barbara Clifton
Irene Cmar
Dick &GlennaCofran
Toni Colclasure
Anthony Coleman
Ronald Collns
Mary Connolly
Lewis Conrad
John Conroy
Les Cook
Thomas J Corkery
Pat Corkery
RitaCoutinho
Robert &Babette Coxe
Barbara& Ray Cranert
Richard& Opal Creech
Arlino Crews
John & Susan Cromwel
Mirtha Crook
Martin & Josephine Crowe
G &S Cugell
Monsignor George Cummn
Sandra Cummings
Bob & Rommy Cuneo
Robert Cunha
Pam Curham
RitaCurley
Brenda Cutrone
Robert &Patricia D'souza
Joan Dahl
Chere Daniels
Paul &Jeanette Daugherty
Robert Davies
Angel & Jenny Davila
Donna Davis
Jeannne Davis
Lou & Kathy Davis
Lyne Deekee
Evelyn De Falco
Michael De Fiore
Cameron De Hart
Will Dehre
Timothy, Lucy&Carl Deblit
Robert Deemer
Roxanne Dejesus
Maria Delalla
Concetta Deluca
Trudy Depew
Michael Desautel
Mel Desha
James &Jance Devine
Ed & Donna Dewbould
Bill & Bobbi Dexter
Sal &Judy Di Sivestro
Maria Diaz
Lewis Dimech
Rosemary Dingman
Nancy & Ben Divona
Mary &George Dluhy
Dorothy Dobos
Bob &Sandy Dore
Dianne Dotson
Ann Doughman
Santo & Barbara Dovi
Ann Downer
JuamtaDownum
Jean Doyle
Eva Drost
Albert Du Fresne
I . I1.1
Carol Dugar
Pat & Mike Duke
Dorothy Dunbar
Jennifer Duncan
Tacie Dunkin
Charlotte Dunn
JoanDunne
Joanne Dunton
Robert Dunton
Dr William&MaryAnne [
Ester Ebersole
Vivian Eckert
Carolyn Edge
Laverne Edwards
A J Edwards
Luella & Richard Eggenbeg
. i. :
Joanne Ehmke
Aneillo Eldridge
Carol Ellis
Harry Ellis
Joe Elmhirst
Ralph &Janne Enger
Gail Englert
Grant &VaEriksen
Madeline Erlandson
Fernando& Nancy Esclopli
Esclopis Family
Paula Esquiln
Share Evans
Greg & Becky Evans
John &Connie Evans
Ed & Julia Fahey
Harvey Fahrenthold
Paul Fain

Nina Farewell
Gail Fara
Jennie Feeney
Richard Feldman
Mark Felten
Jim & Terry Ferguson
Charles Ferraro
Randy & Nancy Fife
Greg & Christine Finer
William & Theresa Fischer
Jane Fischer
Joan Fitzgerald
Phvlls Flisiak


Jack &Cathy Foody
Lorraine Footit
Barbara Foutes
Jeff Amber Fowler
Jim & Derek Fowler
Jim Fowler
Derek Fowler
Ernie &Darla Fowler
Barbara Fox
Richard Frank
Suzanne Frank
Joseph Frank
Phillp &Ashley Frank
Debra &Phllip Frank
Paul Frank
Ron Fresland
Art & Rita Frsbie
Mark &Rachael Fulkerson
Paul &Jolinda Fulton
Gerald &Marge Gansen
Carol Garcia
Ray & Mary Ann Garrett

Lnda & Chuck Gdovicak
Jean Georgephy
Tom &Celeste Gerlng
Joan Gerts
John & Judy Gettman
Richard D Gibbs
Lance &Ashley Gibson
Evelyn Gillette
Leonard &Nicole Giordano
Dee Glade
Rose Goodenaugh
GinaGorrow
Margaret Goss
Jim & Gay Graham
Darn &Delene Graham
Bill Gramling
Bob & Gail Granger
AnnaGrasso
Joan & Lawrence Gray
Lyn & Paul Greatrex
LindaGreeley
Sarah Green
Mr & Mrs Green
Ron Greenaway
Charlotte Greenaway
Rich &Bea Griffith
Paula Grigas
Charles & Lorraine Grimes
Maureen & James Grossmar
Marie Guarente
Wayne Gudzinskas
Van & Karen Gusha
Charles Guth
Robert E Hagaman
I 1. H
Adelheid Hagge
Dorothy Hahn
Patricia Hall
Audrey Handy
Patricia Haras
Paul Ger Harnsh
I 1I 1 11
Donna Harson
Helen Harson
Sharon Hartzell
Frank, Carol &Ryan Hayes
Hal & Mary Hayes
Toni Healey

Gerald &Nora Hebson
Norma &LeroyHedin
George & Lilian Hellmer
Margaret Hellmuth
Joan Hemsworth
Clara & Skip Henderson
Zelma Hensel
John & Joan Herberger
Kathryn Herndon
Mary Hickey
I 1 H
Jimmy & Gennfer High
Ginger Hiley
Martha& Ken Hinkle
Bobbie Hobby
I I1. H
H
Gerard W, & Florence A Hod
Kathy &Hal Holanchock
Evans Holcombe
Mildred Hollday

Sandra Holman
Susan Holmes
Rosemary Holtmeyer
Barbara Homan
Sean Hopper
Earnest Hopper
Mary Horan
Kathy Horan
Jerry & Judy Horton
Leonard & Elizabeth Houle
Kenneth Howey
Barbara Howver
Cathy Hoyn
Tom Hubbell
Pat Hubbell
Bob Hudson
I H
I I H -
Tacy Humble
Bob& Nadne Humphries
Mary Ann Huntington
Barbara Hyatt
aAI I1 .H .
Alicia Indelicato
Kathleen Indelicato
Lee Inserna
Mary loss
Irzarry Family


Mr &Mrs William Isles
Bobbie Jack
Geo & Judy Janewicz
Lionel & Helen Janisse
C Jaworski
1. 1 I
Elizabeth Jerngan
MaryJoJohnson
Edgar & RubyJohnston
JamyJones
Kimberly Jones
Monica R Jones
Monica &Nathon Jones
George Jones
Kline & Peggy Jones
Ron, Krsta &Al Joseph
Don Kajenski
Roland &Nancy Kappelmann
Mike & Barb Kasica
Jim & Bobbie Karbo
Bobbi Keane
Casey &Faye Kearse
Greg &Darla Kell
Selina Keller
Dr Ray & Shirley Kelley
Jerry &Joanne Kelly
Scott &Carole Kemper

Therese Kendrck
Lisa & Steve Kennedy
Katherine Kennedy
Rosarna Kerley
Vernon Kiesler
Jack King
Maria Kirk
Dolores Kless

Terrence & Hazel Knox
1 1. 1: 1 .
Jeanne Kofsuske
Elizabeth Kolczynski
Dave &Connie Konomtz
Martin Kopnski
Shirley &John Kornfend
Mr John & Mrs Maryann Kratky
Edwin Krausa
Barbara Kronke
James &Karol Kusmaul
Anne Kuter
Mr Richard Kwiecienski
Jance Kyle
Pat & Bob La Manna
Mary LaPiana
Jack& JoAnn Labelle
Shirleye Lane
Jim & Lor Lane
Aimee Lang
David Lanzilla
Mr & Mrs Suzanne Lanzilla & Fan
Mrs Elizabeth Larkn
Mr John Larkin
Howard Lauben
James & Nancy Laughrey
Jerry &Kathy Lavoie
Joanne Le Blanc
John &Nancy Leaf
Jim & Toni Lechowicz
Scott &Ann Lee
Lois Lee
Den & Renate Leonard
John & Pauline Levesque
Alexander & BlessildaLiu
Marie &Wynn aLu
Glenn Lloyd
Charles Locasto
Lockwood Family
Belinda Logie
Margaret Lombardo
Mary Longobardi
Brad &Barbara Looper &Family
Lopez Family
Daniel &Louise Lopp
Jim & Pat Louque
Chuck &Rose Lowitzer
Danka Loyed
V David Lucas
Ann LLupo
Kent & Trudy Luther
Harold Lykns
John Lyons
Robert Maciejewski
M Malewiki
Danny Maloney
Matthew Maloney
Michael Mancuso
Dick Mann
Theresa Manning
KayMansmann
Mary Marler
Ron & Elaine Marshal
Beverly Marshall
Susan & Charles Martel
William & Anne Martell
Bev &Bob Martin
Jeannne Martnez
Nick &Maranta Maselli
Joyce Matarese
Joe & Rosalie Matt
Audrey 0 Mattox
Vckie Mauro
John & Pat Mazzone
George Mc Goigan
Susan Mc Inns
Rachelle Mcbride
Lee &Fran Mccalla
Florence Mccann
Fran Mcconkey
Marion & George Mc Connell
Marsha Mcdanel
Lucy Mcdonald
Ronne Mcgan
Chuck &Marsha Mcgee
Georqme Mcqeoch


PLEASE SUPPORT OUR LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS:
* FAMILY AND PREGNANCY LIFE CENTER
317 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 344-3030
9020 W Atlas Dr, Homosassa, FL 34448 352-228-4999
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Inverness Office: 305 S Line Ave., Inverness, FL 34452 341-5176
Crystal River Office: 9030 Ft Island Gulf Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429 228-4909
POST-ABORTIVE COUNSELING (Project Rachel) hopeafterabortion org


Don &DianeAlvarezMcgovern
Carol Mchugh
Margaret Mclaughlin
Bill Mclaughlin
Greg& Patricia Mcneese
Patricia Mc Vicar
Jeff & Kay Meahl
JackMehl
Julia Melendez
GiovannaMelvin
Joe Melvin
Ray & Pat Michael
Joyce Michaels
Cathy Miksza
Walter& Helen Miley
LeAnne Miian
Benny & Becky Miller
Dale Miller
Lor Miller
Joseph Miller
Patti Miller
George Miller
Sally Miller
David &Sally Milsop
George & Patricia Mimnaugh
Joan Minnelli
Ruth Ann Mitchell
Peggy Mitten
Richard Mommerency
Tom &Sharon Momono
Tony &Diane Montecalvo
Francis Mooney
Joseph Mooney
Marie Mooney
Jane & Chuck Mooney
Stanley Moore
Tom Mora
John &Marlene Moran
Doreen Morgan
Archie &Kim Morr son
Susan Morson
Karen Morton
Debora Mosher


Patricia M uller
Donald Murphy
Edward H Murphy
Arlene H Murphy
Janet Murphy
Mary Murray
Janet Murray
Ann "Terry" Murtha
Lorraine &Robert Myal
Jesse, Lor, David, &RyanMyrck
Rosemary Naber
Fred& Eleanor Nason
Remy Natividad
George Nault
Sonya& Christopher Neidig
Cory &Theresa Neil
Rose Ann Nestor
Karen & Michael Neufeld
Michael Neufeld
Raleigh Nevils
Chilian Nguyen
Lea Nicholls
Nancy Nissen
KathyNoll
Linda&Marty Norrk
MaryAnn Norton
Linda Novak
Deacon Nick Nowak
Mary O' Brien
Dolores O'bren
Michael O'brien
Robert J O'connel
Barbara O'donnell
Louis Oberle
Fred Oberst
Helen Occhipnti
Chuck& Deborah Odle
Rev &Mrs Frederick Ohsiek
Robert F Opperman
MaryOpsahl
Thomas Opsahl
Mr & Mrs Orford Hall
Faith &Tony Orr
Esther Ortiz
Dick & Cindy Over
Anna Palmer
AnnaPanasik
Pat & Rich Patterson
Megan Patterson
Lewis Paulley
Marie Pellot
Alberto Pellot
John Pellot
Lois Phillips
Sarah Phillips
Rosemary Pietruski
Eugenio Pinero
Walter& Alice Pittman
Veronika Pivnick
Bob & Cookie Plaisted
Cami Plaisted
Ron &Jackie Plos
Carol Poiener
Annetta Poling
AnnaPomaro
Mary Poole
Richard & Audra Poole
Mary Lee Powers
Jon& Ruth Powers'
Roger &Marjore Preble
Don &WandaPridemore
John Prokop
G Provencher
Arvin Puckett
Barbara Pukas
FrankL Pullen
Patricia A Pullen
Gene &Pattie Pullen


ii II


ii


II I-'- II


ii


Wendy Scholz
Ann Schwaed
Joy Schwindt
Mary Seader
Gerald Seguin
Carmen Seise
Nelson & Cynthia Sergent
H Kenneth Seymour
Tomas &Arlne Shanahan
KimSharpe
Mary Shaw
Neil &Pearl Sheehan
Suzanne Shelton
Lloyd & VirginiaShelton
Barbara Shibley
Jerry Shlaud
Raymond Siemer
Billy& Jean Sims
Tony & Vivian Skala
Karen Skrapits
Mrs JeanA Skeldon
Kathy &Tom Slader
Suzanne &Bob Slaton
Nancy Smallwood
Donald& June Smith
Marene Smith
Fran Smith
Lewis &Kathy Smith
Clint &Debbie Smith &Fanm
Douglas Smutko
Elizabeth &Mark Smythe
Bertha Snodgrass
Ann Soletto
Alex &Ann Sosncki
AI & Kathy Spaude
Jon &Joanne Spaulding
Arlene &JackSpeakman
Bill &Joan Spiddle
Miriam Springer
Bob & Gail Stafford
MarieStannas
Elvra Stanley
Cmdy Staten
Bob & Syria Stazko
Florence Stevens
Ray & Shirley Stevenson
Richard &Theresa Stimpfl
Tom &Jill Stine
Gaye Stokes
Donald Storm
Bob & Ann Stratton
Kenneth& Edna Strong
William Suetz
Maureen Sullivan
Sandra Sullivan
Richard Surber


-JCitrus County Right To Life
Citrus County Right To Life


Cornelius & Irene Swanton
Sandra Swisher
Juanto & ViolaTaboada
Tany &VolyTanafranco

Constance Taylor
Sue Tejchman
Jon &Katie Terry
Lawanda Thomas
Allan Thomas
Doug &Janet Thomas
Bill Thompson
Jerry Thompson
Amy Thompson
Gayle Thrower
Diane Tibbits
Ray Toms
Sharron Trecartn
EnricoTremante
Ceel Trentmann
Larochelle Treva
Chet &Ginny Ticca
Gloria Tubolino
Jim & Jan Turner
Tush Family
Jim Twitty
Romeo Uanos
Jose & Laura Ubinas
JulieUjwar
Charles Updyke
Andrew Uzar
Veronica Uzar
Christina Uzar
Amber &Joey Uzar
Andrew & Enzamare Uzar
Peter Uzar
Lance & Patricia Uzar & Fan
Richard& Liz Valero
Linda oVarone
Maurcio Velasquez

Martha Velazquez
Ed Velez
Smirna & Ed Velez
Lilian Venezio
Peggy & Dennis Verdow
Bob Verlato
Maureen & Paul Vervoort
Alfred Vgna

Mare Vlla
John Vncelli


Marianne Vncell
Steve Vncell
Rana Vincell
Matt Vncelli
Kristen Vncelli
Mike Vncelli

Nita Rae Wadley
Fran Wagner
EdythWagnon
Laura Wahba
LsaWahba
Boules Wahba
Rick &Jan Waldemar
Bob &Joyce Walker
Jackie Walton
JoAnne Walton
Walter &MarannaWalus
Don & Patti Watkins
Lucille Watkns
DorothyWaugh
Winn Webb
Suzanne Webb
Wllam &Janet Weber
Donna Webber
Brad & Dot Welch
George Welte
Ksta Welte
Nancy Wetherholt
Mildred Wheat
Catherine Whynot
Harry & lone Wickham
John Willette
Ann Marie Wllams
Cecil &SonjaW illis
Ralph Wills
James &Audrey Winfield
JoanWirthman
Sharon Wirtz
Marie Wisser
Michele Wood
Alan & Jo Woody
Barney & Theresa Woythale
BWyka
Harold Louise Yerxa
June Yohn
Karen & Bob Yurkovich
April Zay
Dan & Judy Zearley
Barbara Zelinski


SBusinesses
D Citrus Shop Easy
D Honey Do's
Just nse
E Joseph Indelicato Law Office
Just Horse'n Around Riding Stable
L Powers Protection
El Uzar Enterprise


ADOPTION: THE LOVING OPTION


Dedicated to preserving life, from conception to natural death.

A right to hope. A right to tomorrow. A right to life.



CITRUS COUNTY RIGHT TO LIFE

519 Cabot Street Inverness, FL 34452 352-563-7017

www.citruscountyrighttolife.org

email: kathy98mindspring.com. f i


Churches B Organizations
E Cornerstone Baptist Church
L Council Of Catholic Women At Our Lady Of Grace Church
L First Baptist Church Of Inverness
E First Christian Church Of Inverness
E Knights Of Columbus Council #6168
Q Knights Of Columbus Council 14485
L Our Lady Of Fatima Respect Life Committee
E Our Lady Of Fatima Teens For Life
E Our Lady Of Grace Catholic Church
L Pregnancy & Family Life Center Of Citrus County
L Suncoast Baptist Church
E St. Benedict Catholic Church
7 St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Men's Association
L St. Scholastica Catholic Church
L Our Lady Of Fatima Catholic Church
E Life Choice Pregnancy Center


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 A7


Hi





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Phyllis Rosetti Mercer hands out brochures Saturday for the Crystal River "Buy-A-Brick"
program from Homosassa sculptor Guy Zins' booth at the 27th annual Florida Manatee
Festival in downtown Crystal River. The festival continues from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today.


FUN
Continued from Page Al

chill. Vendors sat stiff in
their booths, with blan-
kets, ear muffs and hot cof-
fee in their hands.
Nonetheless, some of the
tourists were wondering
why everyone was so cold.
"I'm from Indiana, so
these temperatures really
don't bother me that much
as it is a lot warmer here
than there," said Lydia
Ulton. "We were in Tampa
on vacation when we heard
about the Manatee Festival.
I was kind of curious what
a manatee was. Therefore,
we decided to take a road
trip to Crystal River"
The Manatee Festival is
sponsored by the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, city of Crystal
River and Rotary Club of
Crystal River Residents
and out-of-town visitors
come to the festival year
after year to take part in
activities from viewing
manatees through boat
and kayak tours to sam-
pling the food and shop-
ping for arts and crafts.
"I knew not to eat before
I came to the festival," said
Mark Santiago. "Every


IF YOU GO
* The 27th annual Florida Manatee Festival runs from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today in downtown Crystal River.
* The celebration of Citrus County's celebrity
resident- the West Indian manatee- will include
everything from entertainment and educational
opportunities to food, arts, crafts and other
specialty items for sale.
* Boat tours of King's Bay will depart from the dock
at the end of King's Bay Park.
* The Three Sisters Springs property will be accessi-
ble to the public, with shuttles to the property leav-
ing from Northeast Fifth Street and Northeast First
Avenue every 10 minutes until 2:30 p.m. Parking for
the general public is not permitted at Three Sisters.
* Admission to the festival is $4 and children 12 and
younger are free.


year I make that mistake.
Then I get down here and
there is so much good-
looking food. Therefore, I
timed our visit to when it
was near lunch time.
There were even little
samples of all kinds of food
as we were trying to make
our way to the food court"
Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce CEO and
president Josh Wooten
agreed with Santiago
about the good food.
"Manatee Fest is the
premiere event for our
county," Wooten told the
Chronicle in the Jan. 17
edition. "Where else can
you see arts and crafts, eat


delicious food ... view a
manatee all while help-
ing the local economy If
you can't have fun here,
you can't have fun."
With a warmer day fore-
cast for Crystal River 68
degrees there are lots of
activities planned for
today's festival kids'
zone, car clubs, belly
dancers and live music by
Lester Freeman and "D"
Band, Cajun Dave and
Neon Leon and Dave Shep-
ard, Mel and Chris Linkous
and the Blues Riders.
Get a glimpse of the hun-
dreds of manatees snug-
gling in the 72-degree
waters at the Three Sisters


Homosassa sculptor Guy Zins, left, explains the process in creating his art to local
resident Bob Mercer on Saturday at the 27th annual Florida Manatee Festival in
downtown Crystal River.
Dustin
Hilton and
Haleigh
Smith
pose for a
photo
Saturday
with a
manatee
character
at the
At: 27th
annual
Florida
Manatee
Festival in
downtown
Crystal
River.


Springs sanctuary Begin-
ning at 9 a.m., free shuttles
will depart from the cor-
ner of Northeast Fifth
Street and Northeast First
Avenue every 10 minutes
to bring spectators to the
sanctuary The last shuttle
to the springs departs at
2:30 p.m.
The festival is on Citrus
Avenue in downtown Crys-
tal River Admission is $4
and children 12 and
younger are free.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 A9









Russia's ban on adoptions by Americans holds firm


Associated Press

NEW YORK A year after
Russia imposed a ban on adop-
tions by Americans, some af-
fected U.S. families are
reluctantly looking elsewhere to
adopt. Others refuse to abandon
flickering hopes of uniting with
the Russian children who won
their hearts.
Thirty-three of the families
have filed appeals with the Eu-
ropean Court of Human Rights,
contending that the ban violates
the rights of the orphans whose
adoptions were thwarted. But
there's no tight time frame for
the case, and even a favorable
ruling might be unenforceable if
Russia objects.
Meanwhile, Russian authori-
ties have spurned requests from
U.S. officials to reconsider the
ban, and the two governments
have other volatile issues on
their mutual agenda includ-
ing terrorism and various for-
eign policy differences as the
international community pre-
pares for the Winter Olympics in
Sochi, Russia, next month
"I don't see movement on the
Russian side, and on the U.S. side
we've heard nothing," said Diana
Gerson, a New York City rabbi
who had her heart set on adopt-
ing a Russian toddler "I feel in
many ways we were abandoned."
By the Russians' count, the
ban halted the pending adop-
tions of 259 children. Roughly
230 U.S. families, some seeking
to adopt more than one child,
were affected including
scores of Americans who had
bonded face-to-face with the
children during visits to their
orphanages.
The Americans have been
dropped from Russia's official
roster of prospective adoptive
parents, and many of the or-
phans- possibly more than half
- already have been placed
with Russian families.
At Christmas, several dozen of
the Americans signed an open
letter to the children they had
hoped to adopt. The letter, pub-
lished by some Russian media
outlets, expressed gratitude to
the Russian families who had
taken in some of the children,
while also hinting at a whirl of
other emotions.
"It has now been one year
since we've held you in our arms
and promised you we would be
back and together as a family,"


Associated Press
This December 2012 photo provided by the family shows, from left, John, Jack and Renee Thomas at their
home in Minnetrista, Minn. Jack was adopted from Russia in 2008. At the time the Russian ban on
adoptions by Americans was imposed in 2013, the family was trying to adopt Jack's brother, Nikolai.


the letter said. "We only want
you to know that we love you
today, tomorrow, and forever
even though we are miles across
the ocean."
Throughout the 12 months, the
issue has occasionally resur-
faced, then faded from the news
spotlight.
There was a flurry of activity
in May, when more than 150
members of Congress signed a
letter to President Barack
Obama, asking him to raise the
issue with Russian President
Vladimir Putin. A congressional
delegation visiting Moscow
urged Russian officials to allow
completion of the pending adop-
tions. And many of the affected
families visited Washington,
seeking support for their cause.
Hoping to ease Russia's con-
cerns about the treatment of
Russian children in the U.S., the
families proposed that any such
adoptions in the future be sub-
ject to more stringent post-
adoption scrutiny
Among those who spoke in
Washington was 8-year-old Jack
Thomas, adopted from Russia in
2008 by Renee and John Thomas
of Minnetrista, Minn. At the time
the ban was imposed, the family
was trying to adopt Jack's bio-
logical brother, Nikolai.
In the past year, the family has


Mark Braverman, his wife, Jane Waldman, and their daughter Elaina,
12, sit on the stairs of their home Jan. 8 in Levittown, N.Y. Elaina,
who was adopted from a Russian orphanage in 2004, is now in
seventh grade, thriving, with many friends and a spot on a local swim
team, her mother says.


lobbied energetically to get that
adoption approved because of
its exceptional nature; Renee
Thomas said it is apparently the
only one of the disrupted adop-
tions involving one sibling in the
U.S. and another in Russia.
Thomas said she's traveling to
Russia on Wednesday to make
the case that Jack and Nikolai,
who is now 5, should be reunited
under Russian policy of trying to
keep siblings together as they
grow up.
"We want to respect the Russ-


ian system of justice," she said.
Some of the other U.S. fami-
lies could decide to adopt from
other countries, Thomas said.
"But there is no other option for
us. It would be a travesty for the
politics between the two nations
to prevent these boys from grow-
ing up together"
The adoption ban was in-
tended in part as retaliation for
a U.S. law imposing sanctions on
Russians deemed to be human
rights violators.
However, Russian authorities


used debate on the bill to com-
plain about mistreatment and
lack of post-adoption oversight
affecting Russian children
adopted by Americans, includ-
ing the high-profile 2010 case
where an exasperated Ten-
nessee mother sent her 7-year-
old adopted son back to Moscow
on a plane alone. The bill was
named after 21-month-old Dima
Yakovlev, one of about 20 Russ-
ian adoptees who have died
from abuse, neglect or other
causes while in the care of their
American parents.
Adoption advocates in the U.S.
express regret for those deaths.
Yet they contend that the vast
majority of the 60,000 Russian
children adopted by Americans
during the past two decades -
including many with physical or
emotional disabilities have
found loving homes and a high
standard of care.
Jane Waldman and Mark
Braverman of Levittown, N.Y,
adopted a nearly 4-year-old girl
from a Russian orphanage in
2004 despite warnings that the
child, Elaina, had fetal alcohol
syndrome.
"We fell in love with her on
our first trip," Waldman said.
"Even with challenges, we
wanted her"
Over the ensuing years, tutors,
behavioral therapists and
speech therapists worked with
Elaina, helping her overcome
many of the impediments that
had delayed her development
Now in 7th grade, Elaina is
thriving, according to her
mother, with many friends and a
spot on a local swim team.
Waldman is frustrated that
stories of troubled adoptions in
the U.S. have gained promi-
nence in Russia, while less at-
tention is paid to the fact that
most adoptions of Russian
children go well.
"Yes, there are some horror
stories," she said. "But Ameri-
cans, properly screened, can
provide wonderful, loving
homes for those children who
otherwise have little hope."
Elaina, answering questions
by email, said she hopes for a ca-
reer working with animals, per-
haps as a veterinary technician.
As for the ban, Elaina wrote, "I
think it is sad because I want
other Russian kids to have the
same chance at finding a great,
forever family in America as I
did."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


POSTSCRIPT
Continued from Page Al

Weisman finished only one year of
college, having to quit to help his fa-
ther in business. When World War II
broke out, Weisman supplied scrap
metal for the military war effort.
"He bought a beer factory and
scrapped out the copper," Mrs.
Courter said.
He also bought an aircraft carrier,
to the chagrin of his wife.
"My father thought big," Mrs.
Courter said. "He was always deal-
ing in junk, but on a grand scale.
He'd buy an oil refinery in Europe
and rebuild it in China. He came up
with a better system of building un-
dercarriages of railway cars, and
had them built in South Africa and
delivered worldwide."
The Weisman family lived all over
the world the Far East, Japan,
Taiwan, Argentina and Brazil. Even
after moving to Crystal River in the
1970s where he built his waterfront
dream house down Fort Island Trail,
he kept traveling until he was well
into his 90s, often taking a grand-
child with him.
"They would have wild es-
capades," Mrs. Courter said.
When grandson Blake was a
teenager, he and "Grampy" went to
western China, far from tourist
areas to the land of yurts and
camels.
They stopped in front of a yurt and


My father thought big.
He was always dealing in junk, but on a
grand scale. He'd buy an oil refinery in Europe
and rebuild it in China. He came up with
a better system of building undercarriages
of railway cars, and had them built in
South Africa and delivered worldwide.
Gay Courter
daughter of Leonard Weisman.


POSTSCRIPT
Postscript features are selected
by Chronicle staff to honor the
lives of residents who have
recently died. To suggest a
candidate, contact Nancy
Kennedy at 352-564-2927.

Weisman went inside and somehow
arranged for Blake to ride a camel
- and the camel took off running
across the desert.
Another grandson, Josh, accompa-
nied Grampy on a business trip to
China and Weisman asked if some-
one could escort Josh around,
maybe to the zoo. His escort turned
out to be a beautiful Chinese actress
who took him skateboarding on the
Great Wall of China.
Leonard Weisman lived a large
life. He was a self-made man, spoke
at least seven languages and read


thousands of books, always learning.
His home was a destination for
friends from around the world. He
was passionate about education and
helped many, many kids go to col-
lege. He loved boats and sailing,
flowers and gardens.
He was a go-getter, a bulldozer, a
dreamer and hard worker He loved
puns and jokes and always had a
fresh one to share with one of his
grandchildren. He loved a good
steak, medium rare more rare
than medium. He was a lion as a
businessman, a pussy cat as a father,
grandfather and friend.
"He was an unstoppable charac-
ter," said Phil Courter. "If he be-
lieved he could accomplish
something, there was absolutely
nothing that could stand in the way"
Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn.


ACCESS
Continued from PageAl

been overseen," apart-
ment resident Frank
Ravese said. "They could
put a swath through the
median to our road and
we're in."
Walt Eastmond, Citrus
County's engineering
project manager, said
Miller Run is too close to
Meadowcrest Boulevard
- 120 feet for another
median cut.
"That's way too close to
have people making
turns into the median,"
he said. "Our minimum
by code is 660 feet."
Eastmond said it made
sense to place the next
median cut four-tenths of
a mile away at the Bible
Baptist Church.
The Crystal River
Apartments, built in 1988,
is set off of the C.R. 486
roadway. Mainly senior
citizens occupy its 36
units, residents say
"It's a major inconven-
ience to these people,"
Ravese said.
Eastmond said he un-


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 All

Miller Run is
too close to
Meadowcrest
Boulevard -
120 feet -
for another
median cut.

derstands and appreci-
ates those concerns, but
he asked residents to see
a bigger picture.
Eastmond said when
the property is developed
directly across Meadow-
crest Boulevard, the de-
velopment will likely
connect to Miller Run.
When that happens, resi-
dents will have the ability
to access the traffic signal.
"That's how access
management develops to
its full potential," he said.
That doesn't satisfy Ed
Jeske, who has lived in
the apartments for four
years.
"I worked in construc-
tion for 43 years," he said,
"and never seen nothing
like this."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Registered nurse Jody Buktenica, left, with her therapy dog Phoebe, a Cardigon Welsh
Corgi, visit Judi Forbess and her mother, Lillian Downs, on Jan. 10 at Samaritan
Evergreen Hospice House in Albany, Ore. Built in August 2012, the facility provides
respite care for families and symptom management for patients in a homelike setting,
usually for only a few days.



Therapy dogs


Canines help

ease final days

ofhospice

patients
JENNIFER MOODY
Albany
Democrat-Herald
ALBANY, Ore.
t can be a hard thing
coming to a hospice
house, to a center
specifically created
to care for people
nearing the end of their
lives.
Patients can be over-
whelmed by their ill-
nesses or personal
circumstances. Families
can be deep in grief- or
denial.
At Samaritan Ever-
green Hospice House,
three small staff members
work to give patients and
visitors something new to
think about, just by being
their furry, tail-wagging
selves.
"They open the door to
a connection," said Anne
Arquette, whose mixed
Lab-border collie, Marfa,
has been a therapy dog
with Samaritan Ever-
green Hospice since 2006.
"They're just a comfort.
Something to focus on
that's not your disease."
Marfa was saved from
euthanization at an Ari-
zona animal shelter when
an Oregon State Univer-
sity student working at
the shelter chose her -
the last of a group of 16
dogs to travel to Heart-
land Humane Society in
Corvallis.
Arquette, a registered
nurse and home hospice
case manager, adopted
her and began bringing
her along to hospice care
and nursing homes at the
request of the people at
those centers.
The experience led Ar-
quette to get Marfa certi-
fied as Samaritan
Evergreen Hospice's first
therapy dog. Now, at age
10, the friendly black dog
with the graying muzzle
still makes the rounds at
Timberwood Court Mem-
ory Care Center and at
homes with hospice care.
Marfa almost always
brings a smile, and some
patients will talk about
her when they've all but
stopped communicating,
Arquette said. She partic-
ularly remembers the
woman who'd been silent


Marfa, a border collie mix, Samaritan's first registered
therapy dog, is shown Jan. 10 in Albany, Ore.


for some time, then
stunned staff members at
Timberwood by asking Ar-
quette, "Did you bring
your dog today?"
Marfa's canine cowork-
ers these days are JJ, 3, a
golden retriever who be-
longs to registered nurse
Tracy Calhoun, and
Phoebe, a 7-month-old
Cardigan Welsh corgi who
is the youngest Project
Canine therapy dog in the
state.
JJ and Phoebe both
visit with patients at the
Samaritan Evergreen
Hospice House, at Ever-
green Place in southeast
Albany
Built in August 2012,
the facility provides
respite care for families
and symptom manage-
ment for patients in a
homelike setting, usually
for only a few days.
The dogs can make a
big difference in those
few days, however, and
both seem to have a knack
for it, their owners say
Phoebe, for instance,
has the advantage of
being smaller than her
doggy sisters and can
snuggle with a bedridden
patient. On Friday, she
rested with Lillian Downs
of Albany while Davis'
daughter, Judi Forbess,
stroked her fur and talked
with owner Jody Buk-
tenica about the ins and
outs of dog shows.
JJ is careful to intro-
duce herself slowly to
new people, poking her
head in a patient's room
as if to say, "Hi, it's me,"
Calhoun said.
She also takes it upon
herself to stand sentry at
the door when a patient
has passed away, and qui-
etly leads the way when
staffers travel through the
hallway with the gurney
That procedure is
called a "walkout," and
all staff members line the


hallways in silent respect
as the patient makes that
journey Calhoun said JJ's
escort duty is nothing she
taught her
"She's incredibly intu-
itive," she said. "She's
very good at knowing."
Therapy dogs aren't the
same as service dogs and
don't necessarily receive
the same privileges,
such as being able to
travel on planes or go into
businesses.
Depending on the certi-
fication program, training
for a therapy dog involves
work with both the dog
and the handler in vari-
ous situations, such as
with wheelchairs, walkers
and sudden noises.
Not everyone is an ani-
mal person, the three
owners said, so they al-
ways check first before
making introductions.
Some people are allergic,
and some just don't get on
with dogs.
But Arquette said she's
noticing care facilities in
general are becoming
more open to pets of
all kinds, because so
many people enjoy the
distraction.
Hospice, Buktenica
said, "is a reflective
time."
People who see the
therapy dogs often are re-
minded of their childhood
pets, or happy times with
their own animals. It's
nice, she said, to help
people access those
memories.
The dogs can help
grieving family members
when they're not yet
ready to talk with a per-
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particular is good at giv-
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her back legs to drape her
front paws over a person's
shoulders.
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When do nuclear missteps put security in je4

ROBERT BURNS
AP national security
writer


WASHINGTON At
what point do breakdowns
in discipline put the coun-
try's nuclear security in
jeopardy?
And when does a string
of embarrassing episodes
in arguably the military's
most sensitive mission be-
come a pattern of failure?
Defense Secretary
Chuck Hagel is now con-
cerned "there could be
something larger afoot
here," according to his
chief spokesman, and
"wants this taken very,
very seriously"
The disclosures of dis-
turbing behavior by nu-
clear missile officers are
mounting and now include
alleged drug use and exam
cheating. Yet Air Force
leaders insist the trouble
is episodic, correctible
and not cause for public
worry
The military has a well-
established set of inspec-
tions and other means of
ensuring the safety of its
nuclear weapons. But as in
any human endeavor, mili-
tary or civilian, the key to
success is the people, not
the hardware.
Until recently, Hagel
had said little in public
about the setbacks and
missteps in the nuclear
missile force reported by
The Associated Press be-
ginning last May
Last week, Hagel made
the first visit to a nuclear
missile launch control
center by a Pentagon chief
since 1982. He praised the
force's professionalism,
even though minutes be-
fore, officials had in-
formed him that a few
missile launch officers at
another base were sus-
pected of illegal drug use.
Air Force Secretary
Deborah Lee James, just
four weeks into her tenure
as the service's top civilian
official, told reporters
Wednesday that the Air
Force's chief investigative
arm is investigating 11 of-
ficers at six bases who are
suspected of illegal drug
possession.
She said that probe led
to a separate investigation
of dozens of nuclear mis-
sile launch officers for
cheating on routine tests
of their knowledge of the
tightly controlled proce-
dures required to launch
missiles under their
control.
At least 34 launch offi-
cers, all at Malmstrom Air
Force Base, Mont., have
had their security clear-
ances suspended and are
not allowed to perform
launch duties pending
the outcome of the
investigation.
They stand accused of
cheating, or tolerating
cheating by others, on a
routine test of their knowl-
edge of how to execute
"emergency war orders."
Those are the highly clas-
sified procedures the offi-
cers would use, upon
orders from the president,
to launch their nuclear-
tipped missiles.
The alleged cheaters are
said to have transmitted
test answers by text mes-
sage to colleagues. That is
a violation not only of their
own personal integrity but
also of security classifica-
tion rules.
The commander at
Malmstrom, Col. Robert W
Stanley II, said in a tele-
phone interview Friday
it's not "off base" to think
that the cheating points to
a deeper problem in the
intercontinental ballistic
missile force.
"But I do think it's far
more than just us. I think
this is a sort of cultural
thing our society is going
through" in which too
many people have grown
accustomed to "putting
blinders on and just walk-
ing past problems."
This is reflected in the
cheating scandal, he said,
where 17 of the 34 did not
cheat but knew about the
cheating and failed to re-


port it.
"In ICBMs, we can't tol-
erate that," Stanley said.
In response to the cheat-
ing, the Air Force retested
every available ICBM
launch control officer at
Malmstrom as well as the
two other bases operating
Minuteman 3 missiles: FE.


Associated Press
Capt. Lauren Choate, a Minuteman 3 missile launch officer, sits Jan. 9 at the console of a launch simulator used for
training at F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. As disclosures of disturbing behavior by nuclear missile officers mount,
to now include alleged drug use and exam cheating, Air Force leaders insist the trouble is episodic, correctable and
not cause for public worry. The question persists, nonetheless: At what point do breakdowns in discipline put
nuclear security in jeopardy?


IFZyu


Defense Secretary Chuck
Hagel takes questions
Dec. 19 as he briefs
reporters at the Pentagon
in Washington.

Warren Air Force Base,
Wyo., and Minot Air Force
Base, N.D.
The Air Force said Fri-
day that of 472 officers who
retook the "T-1" test, 21
failed and will receive new
training before they can
return to duty Twenty-
seven were not available
to be tested this past week,
according to a Pentagon
spokesman, Col. Steve
Warren.
Thus a total of 82 launch
officers, including the 34
who have been suspended,
are not available to per-
form launch control du-
ties, and Warren said that
is "having an impact" on
the ICBM force. He added,
however, that it has not in-
terrupted the 24/7 combat
readiness of all Minute-
man 3 missiles or made
them less secure.
James said she was con-
fident that the Minuteman
3 arsenal is being safely
and reliably operated and


controlled, but said she
was "profoundly disap-
pointed" in those involved
in the drug and cheating
investigations.
"This was a failure of
some of our airmen," she
said. "It was not a failure
of the nuclear mission."
James said she is reas-
sured by "checks and bal-
ances" in the system,
including periodic inspec-
tions at the ICBM bases.
She said she would travel
to each of the three ICBM
bases this coming week to
see for herself.
"In any given organiza-
tion there are issues," she
said when asked at a Pen-
tagon news conference
about the implications of
the latest investigations.
They follow a series of
AP reports on nuclear mis-
steps, including an inter-
nal Air Force complaint
that the Minot ICBM group
was infested with "rot,"
and the firing in October of
the two-star general over-
seeing the entire ICBM
force. Maj. Gen. Michael
Carey was relieved of duty
after investigators found
he had engaged in alcohol-
fueled misbehavior during
an official visit to Russia
last summer
"Just because there are
issues with individuals it
does not mean that the en-
tirety of the mission is com-
promised," James said.
The men and women
who are entrusted with the
keys to the nation's 450 in-
tercontinental ballistic
missiles, each with at
least one nuclear warhead
capable of inflicting mass


destruction halfway among the youngest offi-
around the globe, are cers in the Air Force. They


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opardy?

are mostly 20-something
lieutenants and captains, a
generation removed from
the Cold War years of a nu-
clear standoffwith a Soviet
Union that no longer exists.
Their competence is not
in question, only their mo-
tivation in a job that some
see as unrewarding and
overly stressful. Also in
question is the quality of
leadership by the generals
above them, some of whom
never did ICBM launch
duty
Loren Thompson, head
of the Lexington Institute,
a defense-oriented public
policy advocacy group,
said he thinks part of the
problem may be the "di-
minished status" of the nu-
clear mission in the
post-Cold War era.
"Although missile forces
remain crucial to deter-
ring nuclear attack, they
are no longer seen as a
prestigious assignment in
the Air Force," he said. He
noted that in 2008, then-
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates expressed worry
about stewardship of the
mission.
"This suggests these lat-
est problems are part of a
broader pattern," Thomp-
son said.
Follow Robert Burns on
Twitter at http://twitter
comnrobertburnsAP









W.Va. spill latest case of coal tainting US waters


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The chemi-
cal spill that contaminated
water for hundreds of thousands
in West Virginia was only the lat-
est and most high-profile case of
coal sullying the nation's waters.
For decades, chemicals and
waste from the coal industry
have tainted hundreds of water-
ways and groundwater supplies,
spoiling private wells, shutting
down fishing and rendering
streams virtually lifeless, ac-
cording to an Associated Press
analysis of federal environmen-
tal data.
But because these contami-
nants are released gradually
and in some cases not tracked or
regulated, they attract much less
attention than a massive spill
such as the recent one in West
Virginia.
"I've made a career of body
counts of dead fish and wildlife
made that way from coal," said
Dennis Lemly, a U.S. Forest
Service research biologist who
has spent decades chronicling
the deformities pollution from
coal mining has caused in fish.
"How many years and how
many cases does it take before
somebody will step up to the
plate and say, Wait a minute, we
need to change this'?"
The spill of a coal-cleaning
chemical into a river in
Charleston, WVa., left 300,000
people without water It exposed
a potentially new and under-reg-
ulated risk to water from the
coal industry when the federal
government is still trying to
close regulatory gaps that have
contributed to coal's legacy of
water pollution.
From coal mining to the waste
created when coal is burned for
electricity, pollutants associated
with coal have contaminated
waterways, wells and lakes with
far more insidious and longer-
lasting contaminants than the
chemical that spilled out of a
tank farm on the banks of the
Elk River
Chief among them are dis-
charges from coal-fired power
plants that alone are responsi-
ble for 50 percent to 60 percent
of all toxic pollution entering the
nation's water, according to the
Environmental Protection
Agency
Thanks to even tougher air
pollution regulations underway,
more pollution from coal-fired
power plants is expected to
enter the nation's waterways, ac-
cording to a recent EPA assess-
ment.
"Clean coal means perhaps
cleaner atmosphere, but dirtier
water," said Avner Vengosh, a
Duke University researcher who


Associated Press
Al Jones of the West Virginia department of General Services tests the water as he flushes the faucet
and opens a rest room on the first floor of the State Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., The chemical spill
that contaminated water for hundreds of thousands of West Virginians is just the latest and most
high-profile case of coal polluting the nation's waters.


has monitored discharges from
power plant waste ponds and
landfills in North Carolina.
In that state, Vengosh and
other researchers found con-
taminants from coal ash dis-
posal sites threatening the
drinking water for Charlotte, the
nation's 17th-largest city, with
cancer-causing arsenic.
"It is kind of a time bomb that
can erupt in some kind of spe-
cific condition," Vengosh said.
The water shows no signs of ar-
senic contamination now
In southeastern Ohio, tainted
water draining from abandoned
coal mines shuttered a century
ago still turns portions of the
Raccoon Creek orange with iron
and coats the half-submerged
rocks along its path white with
aluminum.
Public drinking water systems
in 14 West Virginia counties
where mining companies are
blasting off mountaintops to get
to coal seams exceeded state
safe drinking water standards
seven times more than in non-
mining counties, according to a
study published in a water qual-
ity journal in 2012. The systems
provided water for more than a
million people.
The water quality monitoring
in mining areas is so inadequate
that most health violations likely
were not caught, said Michael
Hendryx, the study's author and
a professor of applied health at


Indiana University
The EPA, in an environmental
assessment last year, identified
132 cases where coal-fired
power plant waste has damaged
rivers, streams and lakes, and
123 where it has tainted under-
ground water sources, in many
cases legally, officials said.
Among them is the massive
failure of a waste pond at a Ten-
nessee Valley Authority power
plant in 2008. More than 5 mil-
lion cubic yards of ash poured
into a river and spoiled hun-
dreds of acres in a community 35
miles west of Knoxville.
Overall, power plants con-
tributed to the degradation of
399 bodies of water that are
drinking water sources, accord-
ing to the EPA.
There are no federal limits on
the vast majority of chemicals
that power plants pipe directly
into rivers, streams and reser-
voirs. The EPA just last year pro-
posed setting limits on a few of
the compounds, the first update
since 1982. More than five years
after the Tennessee spill, the
EPA has yet to issue federal reg-
ulations governing the disposal
of coal ash.
Experts say the agency is play-
ing catch-up to solve a problem
that began when it required
power plants in the 1990s to
scrub their air pollution to re-
move sulfur dioxide. An unin-
tended consequence was that


the pollutants captured were
dumped into landfills and
ponds, many unlined, where
they seeped into underground
aquifers or were piped into ad-
jacent rivers, reservoirs and
lakes.
As you are pushing air rules
that are definitely needed, you
need to think of the water And
they didn't," said Eric Schaeffer,
a former EPA enforcement offi-
cial. "Now they are running after
the problem."
He now heads the Environ-
mental Integrity Project, a group
whose research has uncovered
previously unknown sites of con-
tamination from power plant
waste pits.
The federal government has
in recent years issued the first-
ever regulations for mercury re-
leased from power plant
smokestacks, the largest source
of mercury entering waterways.
The EPA has stepped up its re-
view of mountaintop mining per-
mits, to reduce pollution.
"Coal-related pollution re-
mains a significant contributor
to water quality pollution across
the United States," said Alisha
Johnson, an EPA spokeswoman.
"The EPA's efforts have yielded
significant improvements, but
significant work still remains."
On the mining side, a review
of federal environmental en-
forcement records shows that
nearly three-quarters of the


1,727 coal mines listed haven't
been inspected in the past five
years to see if they are obeying
water pollution laws. Also, 13
percent of the fossil-fuel fired
power plants are not complying
with the Clean Water Act.
Many mines don't even report
their discharges of selenium, al-
though researchers have found
the chemical near mines at lev-
els where it can cause deformi-
ties and reproductive failure in
fish.
A study in the journal Science
in 2010 found that 73 of 78 West
Virginia streams in mountaintop
mine removal areas had sele-
nium levels higher than the offi-
cial threshold for fish life.
Higher levels of selenium a
natural component of coal that
seeps from rock when water
runs through it often means
fish don't reproduce or have de-
formed, even two-headed, off-
spring, Lemly said.
University of Maryland envi-
ronmental sciences professor
Margaret Palmer spent much of
the weekend that Charleston
was without water testing the
Stillhouse Branch stream near
Clay, WVa., just below a moun-
taintop removal coal mine. She
said her tests showed the water
was too salty from the rocks from
the mine.
"It's like a desert with a few
water rats in it," Palmer said.
"The organisms that do live in
(these streams), you think of
them like water rats. Only the re-
ally hearty ones survive."
Efforts by the EPA to ease the
problem, by requiring mine per-
mits to be judged by a measure
of the saltiness in downstream
water, have been vacated by a
federal court. That decision is
under appeal.
A spokesman for the National
Mining Association said the in-
dustry operates in accord with
extensive and rigorous permit-
ting guidelines.
Pollution still enters the envi-
ronment from coal mined
decades ago.
The EPA estimates 12,000
river miles are tainted by acid
mine drainage from long-shut-
tered coal mines. One of them is
Raccoon Creek in southeastern
Ohio.
"These mines have been aban-
doned for a hundred years," said
Amy Mackey, Raccoon Creek's
watershed coordinator There is
no one to fall back on."
States take the lead on the
water pollution front. But advo-
cacy groups from at least three
states in coal country- Ken-
tucky, West Virginia and Indiana
-have asked the EPA to step in,
arguing that state officials aren't
doing enough.


Many remain wary of W.Va. water as smell still lingers


Associated Press

CHARLESTON, WVa.
- The smell lingers the
slightly sweet, slightly bit-
ter odor of a chemical that
contaminated the water
supply of West Virginia's
capital more than a week
ago. It creeps out of
faucets and shower heads.
It wafts from the Elk River,
the site of the spill. Some-
times it hangs in the cold
nighttime air
For several days, a ma-
jority of Charleston-area
residents have been told
their water is safe to drink,
that the concentration of a
chemical used to wash
coal is so low that it won't
be harmful. Restaurants
have reopened using
tap water to wash dishes
and produce, clean out
their soda fountains and
make ice.


But as long as people
can still smell it, they're
wary and given the lack
of knowledge about the
chemical known as
MCHM, some experts say
their caution is justified.
"I would certainly be
waiting until I couldn't
smell it anymore, certainly
to be drinking it," said
Richard Denison, a scien-
tist with the Environmen-
tal Defense Fund who has
followed the spill closely
"I don't blame people at all
for raising questions and
wondering whether they
can trust what's being told
to them."
The Jan. 9 spill from a
Freedom Industries facil-
ity on the banks of the Elk
River, less than 2 miles up-
stream from Charleston's
water treatment plant, led
to a ban on water use that
affected 300,000 people.


Four days later, officials
started to lift the ban in
one area after another,
saying tap water was safe
for drinking because the
concentration of the chem-
ical dipped below one part
per million, even though
the smell was still strong at
that level. By Friday after-
noon, nearly all of the
300,000 people impacted
had been told the water
was safe.
Late Wednesday, how-
ever, health officials is-
sued different guidance
for pregnant women, urg-
ing them not to drink tap
water until the chemical is
entirely undetectable. The
Centers for Disease Con-
trol said it made that rec-
ommendation out of an
abundance of caution be-
cause existing studies
don't provide a complete
picture of how the chemi-


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cal affects humans.
For Sarah Bergstrom, a
29-year-old nurse who is
four months pregnant with
her second child, the news
was devastating. She has-
n't drunk the water since
the spill, but she has taken
showers.
"I cried myself to sleep
(Wednesday) night. I was
both angry and scared,"
she said. "This baby that
we've wanted for so long,
I'm now questioning-
have I done something
that could have harmed
her?"
Bergstrom said she's for-
tunate that she can afford
bottled water, which she
intends to use for the fore-


IF


seeable future.
"My biggest fear is for
those mothers, those preg-
nant women out there who
aren't able to go get
enough bottled water for
their family, who don't
have the resources and
don't have the knowledge
base to know that this is
not safe," she said.
Karen Bowling, West
Virginia's secretary of
Health and Human Re-
sources, said pregnant
women who drank the
water before being told to
avoid it should contact
their doctors. For the rest
of the population, Bowling
said she is confident the
tap water is not harmful.


a AM a -AML aMLAML AMLa


"Its understandable that
people are concerned. I
don't want to minimize any-
body's feelings about an
issue as sensitive as this,"
said Bowling, who said she
drank the tap water after it
was declared safe. "Its hard
to instill confidence when
there's little known about
the chemical, but at the
same time we have to
trust in the science of what
happening."
According to the health
department, 411 patients
have been treated at hos-
pitals for symptoms that
patients said came from
exposure to the chemical,
and 20 people have been
admitted.
I. al a ai a


SAttention Residents

of Citrus County


Join Secretary Liz Dudek to discuss Agency
priorities and programs including the upcoming
transition to the Statewide Medicaid Managed
Care program.


Tuesday, January 21st

at 1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court
in Lecanto


A14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Calif. nut farmers band together to fight theft


Associated Press

ESCALON, Calif. -The
soaring value of Califor-
nia's nut crops is attracting
a new breed of thieves
who have been making off
with the pricey commodi-
ties by the truckload, re-
calling images of cattle
rustlers of bygone days.
This harvest season in
the Central Valley, thieves
cut through a fence and
hauled off $400,000 in wal-
nuts. Another $100,000 in
almonds was stolen by a
driver with a fake license.
And $100,000 in pistachios
was taken by a big rig
driver who left a farm
without filling out any
paperwork.
Investigators suspect
low-level organized crime
may have a hand in cases,
while some pilfered nuts
are ending up in Los Ange-
les for resale at farmers
markets or disappear into
the black market.
Domestic demand for
specialty foods and an ex-
panding Asian market for
them have prompted a nut
orchard boom in the
state's agricultural heart-
land. Such heists have be-
come so common that an
industry taskforce recently
formed to devise ways to
thwart thieves.
"The Wild West is alive
and well in certain as-
pects," said Danielle
Oliver of the California
Farm Bureau. "There's al-
ways someone out there
trying to make a quick dol-
lar on somebody else's
hard work."
Amid the nut boom,
farmers have torn out
vineyards and other crops
to plant nut trees to keep
up with demand. Real es-
tate firms, retirement
funds and insurance com-
panies have taken note by
adding almonds, walnut
and pistachio land to
diversify their portfolios.
As the nation's top nut
producer, the state grows
more almonds and pista-
chios than any other coun-
try Only China produces


more walnuts, which have
nearly tripled in price in
the last five years to about
$2 a pound, according to
the California Walnut
Board.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture reported that
through 2012 the state's al-
mond crop was valued at
$5 billion per year, pista-
chios were more than
$1 billion and walnuts were
more than $1.5 billion.
"Right now, everybody
wants to be a nut grower
because it's kind of like
the gold rush of the 1850s,"
said Ripon almond farmer
Kevin Fondse of Fondse
Brothers Inc. "Everybody
wants the gold."
That frenzy has
spawned crime. In a
brazen heist in October,
thieves made off with


140,000 pounds of
processed walnuts from
GoldRiver Orchards. The
thief cut through wooden
fence posts in the dead of
night, hooked up a truck to
three gondola trailers
brimming with nuts and
drove off.
In another incident, un-
employed trucker Fran-
cisco Javier Lopez
Martinez told investigators
he couldn't pass up a job
paying $180, despite his
suspicions. He was hired
in October by a man who
gave him a fraudulent dri-
ver's license and told him
to pick up 43,000 pounds of
almonds at Sunnygem, a
processing plant.
A transportation broker
tipped sheriff's deputies
that something seemed
amiss. They arrested Mar-


Michael Fondse, a 27-year-
old almond grower of
Fondse Brothers Inc.,
inspects early blossom
buds at his family orchard
in Ripon, Calif. A fourth-
generation almond grower,
Fondse's business has had
to take safeguards from
theft in recent years by
building fences around
pump stations, installing
lights and cameras.

Associated Press


tinez, who told them he
was supposed to drive the
load to a specified address
in Los Angeles, park it and
walk away
The trucking firm that
hired him turned out to be
a fake. The company's logo
was merely taped onto the
side of the truck, and it
had stolen license plates.
Martinez pleaded guilty in


December to commercial
burglary and possession of
fake identification. He was
sentenced to
350 days in jail and three
years of probation.
Authorities say this type
of industrial identity theft,
known as a "fictitious
pickup," is becoming more
sophisticated. It often in-
volves con artists
providing fabricated in-
surance documents and
U.S. Department of Trans-
portation numbers for
trucks.
The driver presents the
paperwork to the unsus-
pecting nut processor
A walnut farmer sus-
pected he had fallen vic-
tim to such a crime in
March after a $250,000
load left his yard, so he
called Detectives Pat Mc-
Nelis and Matt Calkins at
the Butte County sheriff's
department. The detec-
tives traced phone records
to Los Angeles, where po-
lice there served search


warrants and seized
evidence.
The investigation con-
tinues, detectives said.
"In our case, there's
multiple levels of people
that were involved in a
complex crime," Calkins
said. "This is an organized
criminal enterprise.
It's not one or two people
acting on their own."
The California Highway
Patrol investigates cargo
thefts, but doesn't tally nut
thefts separately The CHP
hasn't established a link
between such thefts and
any specific criminal or-
ganization, spokeswoman
Erin Komatsubara said.
Growers and nut proces-
sors say they have been so
hard hit in the past year
that a coalition of nut asso-
ciations formed a task-
force in October to seek
the advice of law enforce-
ment and to create
an eight-step checklist
for growers and nut
processors.


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Voters back new Egypt constitution


Associated Press
A man puts his fingers in
his ears in New York's
Times Square. Noise is
New York City's biggest
quality of life complaint.
In 2013, the city's
311 hotline got more
than 260,000 calls about
excessive noise, up
30 percent in two years.

Noise is No. 1
quality-of-life
complaint in NYC
NEWYORK -No won-
der they call New York the
city that never sleeps. Who
can get any shuteye with all
the noise?!
Screeching subway
trains, honking cars, roaring
planes, barking dogs and
boisterous people make
noise the Big Apple's No. 1
quality-of-life complaint. A
city hotline got more than
260,000 noise complaints
last year.
Silence, it seems, is the
one thing in this city of more
than 8 million that's almost
impossible to find, despite a
crackdown on noise.
One of the lesser-known
legacies of the recently
ended 12-year tenure of
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
was one of the nation's
toughest noise codes.
Under it, every construction
site must post a noise miti-
gation plan, while excessive
noise from restaurants,
sidewalks, even garbage
trucks is illegal.
Tickets range from $70
for a barking dog to $350
for honking your horn to as
much as $8,000 for a night-
club playing loud music.
But despite thousands of
violation notices filed with
the city last year, health offi-
cials warn there are still
plenty of places where deci-
bels top 85, a level that can
cause hearing damage with
prolonged exposure. Some
parts of the city frequently
exceed 100 decibels es-
pecially where planes
swoop a few hundred feet
over rooftops.
Feds seek option
for dredge sand
along NC beaches
RALEIGH, N.C.-
Beach communities and en-
vironmentalists are pushing
back against a proposal to
give the National Park Serv-
ice the option of using
dredging material to fight
erosion on North Carolina's
pristine Shackleford Banks,
where wild horses roam
and no humans live.
The proposal, part what's
called a 20-year Dredge
Material Management Plan,
has created an odd coali-
tion of towns that want the
material from Beaufort Inlet
to go to their beaches, not
the Shackleford Banks, and
environmentalists, including
the well-known Orrin Pilkey,
who want to protect Shack-
leford Banks from more
human interference.
The park service man-
ages Shackleford Banks,
the southern-most barrier
island in Cape Lookout Na-
tional Seashore, as a
wilderness area, although it
doesn't have the designa-
tion from Congress.
The erosion at Shackle-
ford Banks is both a part of
the natural expansion and
contraction of inlets and a
natural reaction to sea level
rise, said Pilkey, a geology
professor emeritus at Duke
University. And in the past,
the park service has stuck to
its guns about letting nature
take its course, he said.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

CAIRO -Almost everyone who
cast ballots supported Egypt's
new constitution in this week's
referendum, results announced
Saturday show, but a boycott by Is-
lamists and low youth turnout
suggest the country is still dan-
gerously divided.
Nearly 20 million voters backed
the new constitution, almost dou-
ble the number of those who voted
for one drafted in 2012 under the
government of toppled Islamist
President Mohammed Morsi.
Only a narrow sliver of voters -
1.9 percent voted against the
charter, after a massive govern-
ment-sponsored campaign sup-
porting it and the arrest of
activists campaigning against it.
"Despite a milieu of intense so-


cial upheaval and acts of terror-
ism and sabotage that sought to
derail the process, Egyptians have
now marked yet another defining
moment in our roadmap to
democracy," presidential
spokesman Ehab Badawy said.
"The outcome represents nothing
less than the dawning of a new
Egypt."
The expected overwhelming
support for the charter is seen as
key to legitimizing Egypt's mili-
tary-backed interim government,
and the political plan put in place
since Morsi's ouster in July Ana-
lysts say it also suggests military
chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi,
who led the coup against Morsi,
has enough popular support to
make a rumored run for the pres-
idency himself.
It was the first vote since the


military removed Morsi following
massive protests in July Hun-
dreds celebrated in the streets
after officials announced the re-
sults, including Hoda Hamza, a
housewife who waved an Egypt-
ian flag in Cairo's Tahrir Square
and carried a picture of el-Sissi
with an inscription reading: "By
the order of the people, el-Sissi is
president"
Hamza called the passage of
the constitution a foregone
conclusion.
Now, "I wish el-Sissi will be
president," Hamza said. "We have
no better man. ... If it weren't for
the army, we wouldn't have food
on the table."
Morsi supporters, who boy-
cotted the vote, immediately chal-
lenged the results. Despite being
outlawed and labeled a terrorist


group, Morsi's Muslim Brother-
hood and its allies continue to
hold near-daily protests that often
devolve into clashes with police.
"Even if 38 percent of the voters
took part, that still means that 62
percent of the public rejects" the
interim government, said Imam
Youssef, a member of the Broth-
erhood's coalition against the July
coup and an ultraconservative Is-
lamist party "They are trying to
legitimize their coup."
Egypt's High Election Commis-
sion said 38.6 percent of the coun-
try's more than 53 million eligible
voters took part in the two-day
poll Tuesday and Wednesday
Judge Nabil Salib, who heads the
commission, called the participa-
tion of 20.6 million voters an "un-
rivalled success" and "an
unprecedented turnout"


World BRIEFS

US victim


Associated Press
President Barack Obama talks Friday about National Security Agency surveillance at the Justice Department in
Washington. Obama's orders to change some U.S. surveillance practices put the burden on Congress to deal
with a national security controversy that has alarmed Americans and outraged foreign allies.



Obama fuels reform


Presidentputs the burden on Congress to deal with scandal


Associated Press

WASHINGTON- President
Barack Obama's orders to change
some U.S. surveillance practices
put the burden on Congress to deal
with a national security contro-
versy that has alarmed Americans
and outraged foreign allies. Yet he
avoided major action on the prac-
tice of sweeping up billions of
phone, email and text messages
from across the globe.
In a speech at the Justice De-
partment on Friday, Obama said he
was placing new limits on the way
intelligence officials access phone
records from hundreds of millions
of Americans and was moving
toward eventually stripping the
massive data collection from the
government's hands.
His promises to end government
storage of its collection of data on
Americans' telephone calls and
require judicial review to examine
the data were met with skepti-
cism from privacy advocates and
some lawmakers.
But Obama has made it nearly
impossible for reluctant leaders in
Congress to avoid making some
changes in the U.S. phone surveil-
lance they have supported for
years.
Obama admitted that he has
been torn between how to protect


privacy rights and how to protect
the U.S. from terror attacks -what
officials have called the main pur-
pose of the spy programs.
"The challenge is getting the de-
tails right, and that is not simple,"
he said.
His speech had been anticipated
since former National Security
Agency analyst Edward Snowden
made off with an estimated 1.7 mil-
lion documents related to surveil-
lance and other NSA operations
and gave them to several journal-
ists around the world.
The revelations in the docu-
ments touched off a public debate
about whether Americans wanted
to give up some privacy in ex-
change for intelligence-gathering
on terror suspects.
The president said his proposals
"should give the American people
greater confidence that their rights
are being protected, even as our in-
telligence and law enforcement
agencies maintain the tools they
need to keep us safe."
Obama acknowledged more
needs to be done, but he largely
left it to Congress to work out the
details.
The NSA says it does not listen in
on the phone calls or read the Inter-
net messages without specific court
orders on a case-by-case basis. But
intelligence officials do collect spe-


cific information about the calls and
messages, such as how long they
lasted, to try to track communica-
tions of suspected terrorists.
Plans to end the sweep of phone
records have been building mo-
mentum in Congress among both
liberal Democrats and conserva-
tive Republicans. Congressional
leadership and the chairmen of
the intelligence committees who
for years have signed off on the
programs have opposed dramatic
changes.
Obama's order signals that the
phone program must be over-
hauled, and lawmakers called his
speech a welcome first step.
"It is now time for Congress to
take the next step by enacting leg-
islation to appropriately limit
these programs," said Rep. Bobby
Scott, D-Va., a member of the
House Judiciary Committee.
The leaders of the Senate and
House intelligence committees,
which have proposed far less
sweeping legislation, threw the re-
sponsibility back to Obama.
"We encourage the White House
to send legislation with the presi-
dent's proposed changes to
Congress so they can be fully de-
bated," Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-
Calif, and Rep. Mike Rogers,
R-Mich., said in a coolly worded
statement.


Associated Press
Afghan security forces
leave the site of a suicide
attack Friday in Kabul,
Afghanistan. A Taliban
suicide bomber and
two gunmen on Friday
attacked a Lebanese
restaurant that is popular
with foreigners, leaving
more than a dozen dead.

Chicagoan among
victims of Kabul
restaurant attack
CHICAGO Family
members say a 27-year-old
Chicago woman is among
those killed in a Taliban at-
tack against a popular
restaurant in Kabul,
Afghanistan.
The Chicago Sun-Times
reports Lexie Kamerman
was working as a student
development specialist at
American University in
Kabul.
A statement from her
family released to the
newspaper called Kamer-
man "an amazing young
woman smart, strong,
beautiful, funny, stubborn
and kind. And fearless."
Officials: Iranian
diplomat killed
in Yemen
SANAA, Yemen Gun-
men killed an Iranian diplo-
mat in a drive-by shooting
in Yemen's capital Satur-
day, security and medical
officials said, the latest at-
tack on Iran's diplomatic
corps in the Middle East in
recent months.
Iranian state television
announced that Ali Asghar
Asadi, Iran's economic at-
tache in Sanaa, was "mar-
tyred." The broadcast said
Asadi was attacked while
driving and suffered four
gunshot wounds to the
chest and stomach. It did
not elaborate.
-From wire reports


Syrian opposition to attend peace conference


Associated Press

ISTANBUL -The main, West-
ern-backed Syrian opposition
group voted Saturday in favor of
attending a coming peace confer-
ence aimed at ending the coun-
try's bloody civil war, paving the
way for the first direct talks be-
tween the rival sides in the nearly
three-year conflict.
The vote in Istanbul came as
food supplies began entering a be-
sieged rebel-held Palestinian
refugee camp in Syria's capital for
the first time in months, an ap-
parent goodwill gesture by Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's government


ahead of the peace conference,
Palestinian and United Nations
officials said.
The Syrian National Coalition
was under huge pressure from its
Western and Arab sponsors to at-
tend the peace talks, scheduled to
open Wednesday in the Swiss city
of Montreux. The Syrian govern-
ment has already said it will at-
tend the U.N.-sponsored talks.
The Coalition's leader, Ahmad
al-Jarba, said in a speech late Sat-
urday that they are heading to the
conference "without any bargain
regarding the principles of the
revolution and we will not be
cheated by Assad's regime."


"The negotiating table for us is
a track toward achieving the de-
mands of the revolution at the
top of them removing the butcher
from power," Jarba said.
But many Coalition members
are hesitant to attend a confer-
ence that has little chance of suc-
cess and will burn the last shred
of credibility the group has with
powerful rebels on the ground,
who reject the talks.
Many members boycotted the
Istanbul meetings that began on
Friday, forcing the Coalition's
legal committee to approve
the decision in a simple majority
vote.


Although Islamic rebel groups
reject any talks with the govern-
ment, the head of the Western-
backed Supreme Military
Council, Gen. Salim Idris, said in
a statement that he backs "a solu-
tion that guarantees a political
transition of power"
He called upon Coalition offi-
cials heading to Geneva to de-
mand that Assad and his top
officials leave power, have no role
in Syria's future and set up a tran-
sitional government "with full
powers" that include control of
security agencies and open corri-
dors to allow food into besieged
areas.















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For the Chronicle


During his trip around the world, Peter Graulich stopped at Easter Island.


Peter Graulich
For the Chronicle

Day 11 begins in Callao, Peru with a quick trip
ashore for some last-minute items and a stop at an
Internet cafe for a quick check of email. The ship gets
under way about 1 p.m. in route to Easter Island,
about 2,200 miles distant.
We have no plans for the day and wander about the
ship exploring the facilities and meeting our fellow
passengers. This activity is interspersed with numer-
ous food and drink breaks, and before you know it, it
is dinner time. At the end of the day, we have traveled
2,994 miles.
On Day 12, we enjoy an afternoon of scholarship
with sea speakers, new ones having boarded in Callao.
We meet Chris Contito, a classic pianist, and Alfredo
Marzi, our head chef, and Dr Norman Caisse, an as-
tronomer who specializes in the solar system and
deep space. He promises us stargazing on the upper
decks late at night.
I attend another lecture with John Maxton Graham,
as he covers great ships of the past. He is always the
perfect English gentleman. Soon you will see why I
keep reminding you of this.
In mid-afternoon, after a quick snack at the buffet
and while Leslye is playing bingo, I attend a gathering
of passengers interested in participating in a ship-
building contest.
Teams are given a role of duct tape, a small bottle of
Elmer's glue and a black magic marker With these
three tools, and anything you can beg, borrow or steal,
you must create a boat that is capable of carrying a six
pack of soda or beer from one end of the swimming
pool to the other, using a rope without any human in-
tervention.
At 6:30 p.m., our dining-room tablemates assemble


Editor's note: This is the second installment in a series
highlighting Peter Graulich's 107-day trip around the world.

Next up: Crossing the seemingly endless Pacific Ocean.


on the aft deck for cocktails. In the few days that our
group has been together, we have begun to bond. I dis-
cuss the shipbuilding contest with the group and it is
agreed that we will submit an entry Our table, No. 49,
second seating, will henceforth be known as The New
49ers and our ship will be known as The Ghetto
Princess.
Our group of eight consists of Barbara, a retired col-
lege professor; Chris, a former Air Force pilot and a
retired medical equipment salesman; Elaine, a re-
tired personal assistant to a well-known author; Jim, a
retired banker; my wife Leslye, a retired medical of-
fice manager; Marian, a retired nurse; myself, a re-
tired police detective and electronics technician; and
Vicky, a retired successful entrepreneur
After another excellent dinner, I am a little worn out
from all of the day's activities and I elect to skip the
disco, movie, karaoke and dance lessons and head to
bed.
We have now traveled 3,381 miles and have 1,400
miles to go to Easter Island.
Day 13 is another day at sea. If you're thinking we
are spending a lot of time at sea, just wait until after
we leave Easter Island.
We begin with an astronomy lecture, and then go
our separate ways, finding various activities for the
rest of the day
On day 14, our routines are beginning to form and
our table mates have all migrated to the aft deck for
breakfast. Afterwards, it is time to get busy
Leslye and I have signed up for a series of 10 Italian


cooking classes taught by Alfredo Marzi, the executive
chef. Princess is proud of its cuisine, and rightly so -
it is the best food that I have eaten on any cruise line.
Next up is another lecture by Graham, covering the
S.S. United States, a ship which still holds the title of
fastest ocean liner to cross the Atlantic. In 1961, on my
first cruise, my family and I returned from South
Hampton to New York City on the S.S. United States.
Later in the afternoon, we take a tour of the ship's
bridge, and then once again it is time to eat. We have
dinner and then to the movies. We have now traveled
4,290 miles.
Day 15 is another at-sea day The ship encourages
group meetings. Today's meeting is police officers and
firemen. I am not a joiner, but I find a break in my
hectic schedule and decide to attend the meeting. As
luck would have it, this turns out to be a really good
move.
I head to the bar, where I meet the only other per-
son that came to the meeting, John Barber, of London,
a retired police inspector
We arrive at Easter Island (a territory of Chile) on
Day 16, with 4,787 miles traveled. We took the first ten-
der ashore and promptly hired a taxi to show us
around the island, which was settled in the first mil-
lennium and is famous for its statues, known as moai.
Carved from 1100 to 1680 and numbering 887, they are
everywhere. We spent most of the day touring the is-
land. We met some of the locals and saw many of the
statues. We returned to the ship having completed
4,787 miles of our journey

Peter Graulich loves to travel. He first left the coun-
try in 1961 for six weeks travellingEurope and the
United Kingdom with family. Since then he has visited
97 countries, every state in the United States and
every national park He has spent about 300 days on
Princess Cruise Line ships.


DREAM
VCATIONS
r oto Con(^e^

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


I Barcelona, Spain

For the Chronicle
Al and Gloria Schroedel recently visited Barcelona, Spain, including Park Guell,
which was originally planned as a residential park for 60 family residences. It
" became city property in 1923. Its attractions include gingerbread gatehouses and
E dragon stairs that lead up a hillside.


4114


' '* o






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Take care when


checking birth


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_______ 98 45 98 28 37 "RepoMan"'G' 'G' 'G' 'G' "Black Out"'14' Reloaded Reloaded
S 43 42 43 1 1 Paid Paid Debt/Part On 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed
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E 24 38 24 31 (2014) 'NR' B Zuniga, Gage Golightly 'NR' B Heather Graham, Ellen Burstyn. N (2013)'NR'B
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D ear Annie: More
than 30 years ago,
my brother
"Zach" was married for
several years to "Ruth,"
who had an affair with
an older man and left
him to marry the new
guy She became preg-
nant during their last
year of marriage, but
when she left, she told
Zach that she'd had a
miscarriage.
After a very
bitter di-
vorce, there
was no com-
munication
between
them, and the
rest of us fol-
lowed suit.
Zach died
in an acci-
dent 23 years
ago, leaving a AN N
young widow MAIL
and a 6- MAlL
month-old
son. I recently ran into
an old acquaintance who
lives in the same city as
Ruth and is now wid-
owed. He told me he'd
recently met Ruth's son
and said the young man
looked exactly like Zach.
He is totally convinced
that this is my brother's
child whom Ruth
claimed to have miscar-
ried.
To complicate matters,
Ruth's mother attends
my church. We are cor-
dial but not close, and of
course, she has never


said anything about this
to me. I just heard she is
moving to an assisted-
living facility in the city
where Ruth lives.
There are a lot of peo-
ple who would be af-
fected by finding out that
Zach had another son,
not least my mother. I
discussed the matter
with my sisters, and we
decided to just let it go.
Mom was dev-
astated when
Zach died so
many years
ago, and we
don't think she
could handle
this type of
news. However,
I wonder if we
should get the
facts from
Ruth's mother
E'S before she
leaves town.
BOX Surely she
would know
whether the young man
is our nephew. -Trou-
bled but Want To Do the
Right Thing
Dear Troubled: The
person most affected by
this news would be
Zach's son by his second
wife. He could have a
half-brother You might
want to do a little addi-
tional investigating, al-
though we urge you to be
cautious. It's possible
that Ruth's mother does-
n't know any more than
you do, and it would be
cruel to harass her


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Devil's Due" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Her" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D,
high frame rate. 3:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow Re-
cruit" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 4:45 p.m.,
7:55 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D.
1:05 p.m. No passes.
"Ride Along" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
5p.m., 8p.m.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.


"The Wolf of Wall Street" (R)
9:40 p.m. No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Devil's Due" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D.
3:30 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Ryan: Shadow Re-
cruit" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) 2:45 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Nut Job" (PG) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 5 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Speedy
6 Like Batman
and Robin
11 New Hampshire neigh-
bor
16 Footnote abbr.
20 City in Japan
21 Nymph
22 Mother- -
23 Observed
25 Something
valuable
26 Scandinavian
27 Folklore creature
28 Motored
29 Perched
30 Fine-tune
32 Go across
34 Spy novel writer -
Deighton
35 Rank
37 Ancient letter
38 Layered rock
39 Brunch fare
41 Prize
43 Blueprints
44 Attach
46 Faux pas
49 Wild goose
50 Seating for
sports fans
54 Penny -
55 Timepiece
56 Lugosi or Bartok
57 Neglect
58 So-so grade
59 Practical joke
60 Pistol
61 "Lord of the Rings"
hero
62 "- Karenina"
64 Rate
65 Wading bird
66 Fastening device
67 Cry
68 "Drop me a -"
69 Move effortlessly
70 B'way sign of yore
71 "Able was I-..."
72 Deceive
74 Nobleman
75 Bonnie's partner in
crime
77 Hem and-
80 Poem
81 Brag
82 Catch unawares


83 Model T maker
87 Fit for farming
89 Cease-fire
90 Grain to grind
91 Threesome
92 Variety show
93 Kind of ball
or buggy
94 Thicket
95 Make a choice
96 Stalk
97 Theater section (Abbr.)
98 Hold
99 Upright piano
102 Plant-eating
animal
105 Aim
106 Concord
107 Andes animal
108 Sausage
109 City in Vietnam
110 Rolls with holes
113 Fields
114 Engrossed
115 Girl in a Hardy title
119 Pub order
120 New dad's
declaration
(3 wds.)
123 Song
125 Once around
a track
126 Bar mixer
128 Violin name
129 Osmond or Curie
130 Island near
Bonaire
132 Inn for caravans
133 Take delight
134 Furthers
135 Dimmed
136 Transported
137 River in France
138 Goods
139 That spot


DOWN
1 Dinner item
2 Very, in music
3 Stickum
4 10O-Down, familiarly
5 Numerical
information
6 Produce with magic
7 Approximately
8 Intrinsically (2 wds.)
9 "- of Eden"


JFK predecessor
Itinerant worker
Records
"-- Lucy"
Christen
Pitcher
Native to a region
Rocky hill
Ring-shaped isle
Water barrier
Depression
Sir Francis -
Express
gratitude to
Davenport
Pro-
Not tense
Urge
Pile of bills
Liable
Woody or Gracie
Phobia
Colorful bird
Goodnight girl
in song
Site
Sword
Brought forth
Act like a ham
Horseman
Supply
Ill-tempered one
Explode
"The is Right"
Inclined,
British style
Victuals
Fitting
Move smoothly
Kind of party
Burial place
Bus
Reduce sharply
Function
Upholstered item
Brittle
Newt
Severe
Ridge among moun-
tains
Vacillate
Supporting object
Faith
Town in Maine
Get more mellow
Daft
Make a mess of
- firma


Allow
Explosive sound
Great happiness
Pink color
- Ana
Paid player
False (Abbr.)
Unlawful
Boundless
Childishly foolish


Unfortunate
Essayist
Rock salt
Winged creatures
Medicinal plants
Literary category
Maguey
Thinner
Escape
Cavalry weapon


118 Shovel
121 Wraparound
garment
122 City in Iowa
123 Ali-
124 Crazy
127 007 creator
Fleming
129 Gaping mouth
131 Go team!


Puzzle answer is on Page A24.


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.1


AlS SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cuban travel in record numbers a year into reform


Associated Press
HAVANA Last February, Amalia Reigosa Blanco
experienced for the first time the rush of an airplane
taking off. She browsed the clothing shops of Italy's
fashion capital, and strolled cobblestone streets echo-
ing with an unfamiliar tongue. She learned what snow
feels like.
And then she came home.
"I hope I can go on vacation again," said the 19-year-
old language student, breaking into a broad smile as
she recalled her first trip overseas, to visit family in
Milan. "I'd love to see Paris."
Reigosa was one of the first Cubans to take advan-
tage of a travel reform that went into effect a year ago
this week, when the government scrapped an exit visa
requirement that for five decades had made it diffi-
cult for most islanders to go abroad. The much-hated
measure was long justified as necessary to prevent
brain drain as scientists, doctors, athletes and other
skilled citizens were lured away from the Communist-
run nation by the promise of capitalist riches.
A year into the new law, Cubans are traveling in
record numbers. Some have not returned, but there's
no sign of the mass exodus that some feared. Dissi-
dents are coming and going and raising their interna-
tional profiles and money but there has been
little impact on their limited ability to effect political
change back home.
"I'm sure there was internal resistance to the migra-
tory reform. I know that in some cases there were
ministries that said 'all our doctors are going to leave,'
and I can imagine some people in the ideological ap-
paratus saying 'if we let the dissidents travel, this is
going to be terrible,"' said Carlos Alzugaray, a long-
time Cuban diplomat and prominent intellectual.
"What has life shown?" he asked. "They did the re-
form, and nothing happened."
Through the end of November, 185,000 Cubans trav-
eled abroad on 258,000 separate trips, a migration offi-
cial said last month. That represents a 35 percent
increase on the previous year
About 66,000 Cubans traveled to the U.S. during the
period, a figure that apparently includes everyone
from tourists to islanders with immigrant visas, from
researchers on academic exchanges to dual Spanish-
Cuban citizens who can enter the U.S. without a visa.
Ania Roman, a 46-year-old cosmetics shop worker,
went to Miami in March, but even the clean, quiet
streets of the neighborhood where her brother lives
weren't temptation enough to remain.
"Why didn't I stay?" Roman shrugged. "Well, simply
because I have my 68-year-old mother here and my
children ... and I'm not going to leave them."
Only about 40 percent, or 26,000, have returned to
the island so far That means about 40,000 Cubans are
still abroad comparable to the total number of
Cuban immigrants to the United States in 2012.
There is no way of knowing their plans, but many
are likely to return to the island eventually, after fin-
ishing up the academic year, for example, or taking
advantage of a new provision in the travel reform that
lets islanders stay overseas for two years without los-
ing residency rights back home.
Cubans who remain in the U.S. for at least a year
qualify for residency there, meaning for the first time
some will be able to live binational lives, shuttling
back and forth and enjoying the best of both countries.
There are still barriers to travel, such as affording
the cost of airfare and the difficulty of obtaining visas
from countries that view Cubans as possible immi-
grants.
But it seems inevitable that the law will lead to
some increased emigration, at least as long as Cuba's
economy remains so weak. Others will leave to escape
Communism, though more recent emigrants have
tended to leave more often for financial opportunity
than for political freedom.
It would be a continuation of an upward trend in re-
cent years that in 2012, before the reform took place,
saw 46,662 islanders leave legally and permanently,
according to Cuban government statistics. That was
the largest outflow since 1994, but far less than past
migratory crises such as the 1980 Mariel Boatlift,
when some 125,000 left in a span of six months.
There have also been anecdotal reports of doctors
defecting, and more Cubans showing up at the U.S.-
Mexico border and claiming entry under a law that
lets Cubans who arrive on U.S. soil stay Visa requests
are up at the Mexican Embassy in Havana, which re-
cently had no visa appointments available until 2016.
Last week six Cubans were temporarily in limbo at




KNEE PAIN?

01I


Associated Press
Amalia Reigosa, center, accompanied by her sisters, Jaynet, left, and Anabel, right, travel to the Jose Marti
International Airport in Havana, Cuba, to begin her trip to Milan, Italy. Reigosa was one of the first Cubans to
take advantage of a travel reform that went into effect a year ago, when the government scrapped an exit-visa
requirement that for five decades had made it difficult for most islanders to go abroad.


the transit area of the international airport in Bogota,
Colombia, after they were kicked out of Ecuador and
refused to board their connecting flight back to Havana.
Ecuador is one of the few nations that don't require
a visa of Cubans, but after the January law it began
making them secure letters of invitation to enter
The U.S., meanwhile, has publicly welcomed the
travel reform and issued around 32,000 tourist and
professional visas to Cubans in the most recent fiscal
year ending Sept. 30 a 100 percent increase over the
previous period according to the U.S. Interests Sec-
tion in Havana. The mission, which Washington main-
tains instead of an embassy, also handed out roughly
24,000 immigration visas.
Havana is betting that those who leave will send
even more money back home than they do now Remit-
tances rose slowly during the George W Bush adminis-
tration and skyrocketed after President Barack
Obama lifted limits on how much Cubans in the
United States can send home each year Overall, they
are up more than 160 percent since 2000, according to
a study by economist Emilio Morales of the U.S.-based
Havana Consulting Group.
Morales estimates that remittances were $5.1 billion
in 2012, about half of that in cash and half "in kind" -
goods sent or brought to the island. Only Cuba's oil-


and-services commercial deals with Venezuela repre-
sent a bigger source of foreign income.
As for the dissidents, many have gone overseas to
claim international human rights prizes and publicly
bash President Raul Castro's government. Only those
with pending legal cases have been denied a passport.
"We have been able to go to places where there is
freedom, where there is democracy," said Berta Soler,
a leader of the Ladies in White protest group who
shook Obama's hand in Florida in November "We
have been able to talk to the international community
about the reality of the Cuban people."
Yet they face an uphill climb to raise their profile
back home, where they are largely unknown and ig-
nored by state-run media. Some have stayed overseas,
eliminating a headache for a government that offi-
cially considers the opposition mercenaries out to un-
dermine its sovereignty
Travel can help the dissidents "in terms of a
boomerang, them having international exposure and
that getting back to Cuba," said Ted Henken, a profes-
sor at Baruch College who studies the dissidents and
has ties to some. "But to the extent that they need to
engage the public in Cuba ... there's still a brick wall
in terms of control of the mass media and public
spaces."


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ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Purple Heart group to meet
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday at the Citrus
County Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto, about a half mile south of State
Road 44 on the west side of CR 491.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member
To learn more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit www. citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.

Post to serve baked chicken
VFW Edward WPenno Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
will have a baked chicken dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24.
The public is invited. Cost is $8;
children younger than 6 eat for $4.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

DAV plans chili cook-off
Crystal River DAV 158 will have an inau-
gural chili cook-off from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 25, at Crystal River Mall.
For more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.

Post to host poker run
American Legion Post 237,4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, will host a benefit poker
run Saturday, Jan. 25, with proceeds sup-
porting Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian
Cancer Research and patients and fami-
lies served by Hospice of Citrus County.
A $15 entry fee per rider will include a
poker hand, a raffle prize ticket and a
meal at the end of the run. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Kick stands are
up at 10 a.m. and the last bike in will be at
4:30 p.m. when food will be served.
The fourth annual American Legion
Post 237 Poker Run will encompass six
stops to include: Inglis Amvets, IRRU So-
cial Club, Giovanni's, Crystal River Eagles,
Mickey's Billiards and Scoreboards.
The best hand will win the poker run
and all vehicles are welcome to
participate.
Music will be provided by The Joes.
There will be a silent auction, door prize
raffles and a 50/50 drawing.
For more information, call 352-746-5018
or John Roby at 352-341-5856.

Seminar focuses on vets' aid
The Harbor House at Ocala, 12080
County Road 484 S.W, Dunnellon, will
sponsor a free seminar for information re-
garding Veteran Aid and Attendance
Benefits at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 30.
Learn who is eligible to receive up to
$24,648 per year in benefits.
This is free for veterans and widows of
veterans provided by the Harbor House at
Ocala and Gary Marriage (Operation Vet-
eran Aid Crystal River), who will pres-
ent the information.
Seating is limited. For more information
and to RSVIP, call 352-489-9698.

Cooties to serve roast beef
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
roast beef dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31, at Leroy Rooks Jr VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway State Road 200, where the
helicopter is). The public is invited.
Advance tickets are $7 and $7.50 at the
door
Tickets can be purchased at Post 4252.
Call the post at 352-726-3339 or Seam
Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.

Post invites all to come jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness.
For more information, call 352-476-2134,
352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
today, Feb. 2, at American Legion Post 155
on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is smoke-
free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.


Chili, cornbread champs


v Special to the Chronicle
Among the winners of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, Chili and Cornbread Cook-off are, from left:
Donna McCullough, first-place chili; Barb Logan, third-place chili; Marie Pink, first-place cornbread; Jacque Gore, third-place
cornbread and Bill Shreve, second-place cornbread. Not pictured is John Kunzer, who took second place for his chili.


Judges for the American
Legion Auxiliary Unit 155,
Crystal River, Chili and
Cornbread Cook-off were,
from left: Mike Klyap Jr.,
past post commander;
Barb Logan, Auxiliary 155;
and Janet Clymer, Citrus
County Chronicle staff. Not
pictured is Crystal River
Mayor Jim Farley, who also
judged.


New DAV chapter chartered


Special to the Chronicle
The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 158, Crystal River, recently received its charter at the DAV's state winter
conference in Lake Mary. M. Duane Godfrey, left, the new chapter's adjutant, receives the charter from Guy Diffenbaugh,
DAV state commander. This is the first chapter to be chartered in the state in 15 years. The chapter is located in the
Crystal River Mall.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spaces available
for craft fair
The American Legion
Allen Rawls Auxiliary
Unit 77 will sponsor a
craft fair on Feb. 8.
Outdoor spaces and in-
door spaces are available.
To rent a space to sell
handmade crafts, call
Alice at 352-476-7001 or
Charlotte at 352-341-1803
or Linda at 352-201-0015
for more information.
Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5. The post is at 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), offers
several events that are
open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m.
Sunday in the smoke-
free hall. Card bingo and
grill night is at 5 p.m.
Wednesday in the
Canteen. Darts are at
7 p.m. Monday and Fri-
days in the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Reserve for Trip
to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, will lead the 2014
trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and
friends from March 11 to
March 28.
Signups are being taken
for the annual trek, which
includes visits to several
islands, golfing and a visit
to the USS Arizona Me-
morial and The National
Cemetery of the Pacific.
Call 352-637-5131 or
email dmclean8@
tampabayrr.com.


Pearl Harbor Remembrance Luncheon


Special to the Chronicle
The Fleet Reserve Association Branch 186 hosted its 22nd annual Pearl Harbor Remembrance Luncheon in 2013.
Those honored during the 72nd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor were, from left: Arthur Fusco, Army -
Wheeler Field; Bob Bewly, Navy Ford Island; Donald Dertien, Navy USS Farragut; Jack Cissel, Army Air Corps
- Fort Shafter; and Ted Archambault, Marines 1st Marine Division. Unable to attend were Albert DeMarch,
Army Schofield Barracks, and Donald Bloomfield, Army Air Corps Hickam Field.


DAV helps veterans get to clinics
The DAV transportation Lecanto to Gainesville
network has received and the other travels from
great response for volun- Lecanto to the clinic in
teer drivers for the two TheVillages.
vans assigned to the The Gainesville van
Lecanto clinic, goes each weekday and
One route goes from The Villages run is made


when there is a need.
Veterans who need to
go to appointments in
Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call
the Veterans Service
Office in Lecanto at 352-
527-5915 to be placed on
the van list


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DAV program
needs new van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has
more than 270,000 miles
on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser.
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project -with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-
586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your
stories and help set up
obtaining "then" and
"now" photos to publish
with your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.


Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension
examination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical


0 FTR I ..WRD

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APOITM NT RCO MEDE


records or from the
primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Hearts
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County
Veterans Services
Department is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.


The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-
law enforcement pro-
grams such as public edu-
cation, vessel safety
checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, mar-
itime security and envi-
ronmental protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
back-ground check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@
aol.com, or call 917-597-
6961.

Hospice assists
sick veterans
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the


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Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides
tailored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.

Air Force wants
prior enlisteds
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-


trained career fields or re-
training into select
career fields.
Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other special-
ties. Enlisted career
openings that include the
opportunities to retrain
consist of special opera-
tions positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes
available for vets
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated
with the national service
organization, Yoga For
Vets.
She teaches free
classes to combat veter-
ans at several locations
and times.
Call her at 352-382-7397
for more information.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.
* Call 352-563-5660, ext. 1197, for copies.


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VETERANS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only basic information regarding each
group. For more information about scheduled activities, meet-
ings, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email
the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or
corrections to community@chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352-795-6526,
email blantonthompsonPost1l55@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit
www.Post237.org or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at 352-476-2134 orAuxiliary
presidentAlice Brummett at 352-476-7001.
American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Lodge
No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call
Commander Robert Scott at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087, County Road 491, directly
behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864,10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando.
Call 352-726-3339, email vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call
352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906
State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston
at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post 447,405 E. State Road 40,
Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
No. 70,1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of
Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter No. 158, Crystal
River, meets at the Crystal River Mall. For more information,
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498


meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler
at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or
Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets
at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND
X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy Staples at
352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at
American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River.
Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA) meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly at the Olive Garden. Call President Norm
Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army, retired, at 352-746-1768, or
Secretary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force, retired, at
352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-637-6206.
Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at
VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind
Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the
DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North,
Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Denny's in Crystal
River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.

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Remaining meetings in 2014 are: Feb. 8, March 8, April 12
and May 10.
West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd.
(State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Homosassa Flotilla 15-4
meets at West Citrus Community Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive. Call Wilbur B. Scott at 352-628-0639 or email
seacapt34447@yahoo.com, or Robert Currie at 352-799-5250
or email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or email GatorDad0527
@tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. Members can renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Warrior Bridge, developed by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the needs of wounded veterans.
2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, or
email charles.lawrence@servicesource.org.





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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 A23


I





CITmUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Happy birthday,


SnippetCitrus


Volunteer organization

celebrates with 'Hip to Snip'


Special to the Chronicle
SnippetCitrus is a vol-
unteer organization that
raises funds to assist Cit-
rus County residents who
need financial help to
spay and neuter their cats
and dogs.
Thanks to community
support, the group was
able to spay and/or neuter
395 cats and 206 dogs dur-
ing its first year As a
thank-you, SnippetCitrus
is working with Citrus
County Animal Services
and Humanitarians of
Florida to offer a special
spay and neuter promo-
tion during February,
National Spay and
Neuter Month.
The three groups will
take part in the "It's Hip
to Snip" promotion. For a
$5 fee during February,
Citrus County residents
can purchase a package
that includes spay or
neuter for a dog or cat, ra-
bies vaccine, county li-
cense and a microchip.
The pet owner partici-
pating in the promotion
will automatically be en-


tered to win one of many
prizes, such as gift cards
for restaurants, groceries,
gas and more.
Call 352-503-3237or 352-
621-1249 for details after
Jan. 28.
The package will be
available during Febru-
ary as long as funding is
available.
SnippetCitrus will sup-
plement the additional
funding needed to pro-
vide the spay/neuter serv-
ice, Citrus County Animal
Services will provide the
rabies vaccine, microchip
and county license and
the Humanitarians of
Florida will perform the
services.
Sponsors are also
sought. Make a financial
donation, or one of time,
services or gift cards for
prizes. Sponsors will be
included in promotional
listings.
Donations can be ad-
dressed to SnippetCitrus
and mailed to: Snippet
Citrus, PO. Box 4533,
Homosassa, FL 34447.
For more information,
call 352-503-3237.


Special to the Chronicle
Back in Citrus County
by popular demand, the
American Irish Club will
present Andy Cooney in
Cooney's Irish Cabaret at
2 p.m. Saturday, March 8,
at the Curtis Peterson Au-
ditorium in Lecanto.
Andy Cooney has taken
the Irish-American music
scene by storm. He was
christened by the New
York Times as "Irish
America's Favorite Son."
Cooney is also one of
"The New York Tenors."
His voice and stage pres-
ence make him a favorite
with audiences as he ren-
ders songs ranging from
all-time favorites like
"Galway Bay" and "Danny
Boy," to his hit records
"The Irish Wedding
Song," "Boston Rose" and
"Daughter of Mine."
Rounding out the after-
noon of cabaret entertain-
ment will be Irish
comedian Noel Ginnity,
the Darrah Carr Dancers
and Bugs Moran and the
Guinness Irish Band.
Doors open at 1:30 p.m.
All seats are reserved and
admission is $22.



NEWS
NOTE

Lady Elks to have
fashion show
The West Citrus Ladies
of the Elks will present its
annual fashion Show
Friday, Jan. 24.
Doors open at 11 a.m.
and a luncheon will be
prepared by Chef Ken.
Many door prizes and
raffles will be offered.
The cost is $20.
Proceeds go to local
children's charities.
Tickets are available by
calling Anne at 352-
382-1848.


Tickets will go on sale
starting Jan. 28 and can
be purchased at the
American Irish club from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday
through Saturday, and on
the second and fourth
Sunday of the month
from 9 to 11 a.m. Or, call
Joyce at 352-860-1292. The
club is on County Road
490 (Homosassa Trail), op-
posite St. Scholastica
Church.


102nd BIRTHDAY

Ethel Winn


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Russes


LUCY ANN WINES/Special to the Chronicle
Ethel Winn, pictured with Holly Oder, president of the
GFWC Crystal River Woman's Club, celebrated her
102nd birthday on Jan. 7, 2014. She has never
missed a meeting of the club.


FOR THE RECORD


Dec. 30, 2013-Jan.5, 2014
Divorces
Kelly M. Rawlins,
Homosassa vs. Freddie L.
Rawlins, Homosassa
Ralph M. Weathington,
Dunnellon vs. Jewell E.
Weathington, Dunnellon

Marriages
Dennis Neal Ackerman,
Crystal River/Debbie Leanne
Pruitt, Crystal River
Roy Miles Bass,
Inverness/Peggy Lynn
Moore, Floral City
John Joseph Crank,
Homosassa/Kristen Ann
Kearney, Homosassa
Damon Daniel Diroma,
New Albany, Ohio/Theresa
Marie Baxter, NewAlbany,
Ohio
William George Doel IV,
Dunnellon/Debra Ann Buja,
Crystal River
Keith Daniel Erickson,
Homosassa/Jessica Lynn
Breese, Homosassa
Kenneth Eugene Evinger,
Inverness/Mary Christine
Lamkin, Inverness
Justin Tyler Gibson,
Beverly Hills/April Renee
Cottrell, Beverly Hills
Carmelo Junior Gonzalez,
Crystal River/Roxana
Rodriguez, Crystal River
Harold Blane Hix,
Homosassa/Juanita Lee
Hooper, Homosassa
Raheem Lamarr Lindsey,
Crystal River/Mary Lauren
Thomas, Crystal River


Lecanto
Holiday Inn Express
903 E.Gulfto Lake Hwy.

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Jason Scott Marcelino,
Crystal River/Terayhsa
Jocelyn Renee Smith,
Crystal River
Jason Miceli, Floral
City/Yanira Colon, Floral City
Frank Alan Nusso,
Inverness/Leslie Ann Young,
Beverly Hills
Christian Alexander Reed,
Holder/Rochelle Vicktoria
Connolly, Holder
Eugene Garron Ross,
Hernado/Dianne Marie Erb,
Hernando
Theodore John Smith,
Inverness/Carol Ann
Howard, Inverness
Jean Robert Vieux,
Inverness/Regina Frederica
Rowe, Brooksville
James Andrew Whittaker,
Grand Cayman/Kirsten
Louise Stephenson, Grand
Cayman
Ryan Joseph Willis,
Lecanto/Lindsay Jane
Robichaux, Citrus Springs

FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and
marriages filed in the
Florida are a matter
of public record at
the Clerk of the
Courts Office. Call
352-341-6400 or
visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


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Coming February 23rd




ATTENTION


Business Owners

Be sure to include your business!


Profiling Citrus County Businesses, thispecil
edition will tell the history, services and products

of our local businesses.
CITRUS COUNTY ee

CHRONICLE
V www.chronicleonline.com


When Dan was asked what is the most valuable advice
he has for people considering a hearing aid he replied,
"Consult with an audiologist instead of a
salesman because who you see is much
more important than the products you buy."

FetrdBs inese
CofrtKepr,0neresF
Gardner Audiolog


Dan Gardner, Founder &
CEO, Gardner Audiology


Advertising Deadline: February 12, 2014
To find out how your business can be featured call
your advertising representative or (352) 563-5592 i


Come to cabaret

American Irish Club to stage

Andy Cooney show March 8


A24 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


TOGETHER


EN 11 AM -MIDNIGHT TUESDAY -SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3 AM FRIDAY SATURDAY Call or Text in yo


g Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373










SPORTS


The winner of today's
AFC championship
game between the
Denver Broncos and the
New England Patriots
will earn a berth in the
Super Bowl./B6
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Golf/B2
U Dr. Ron Joseph/B2
r0 Scoreboard/B3
0 NBA, NHL, tennis/B4
0 College football/B5
a0 College basketball/65
0 NFL/B16


No. 7 UF staves off upset bid by Auburn


Gators' Prather scores

21 points in return

from knee injury
Associated Press
AUBURN, Ala. Billy Donovan cau-
tioned his Florida Gators before the
game not to assume Casey Prather
would instantly return to form after a
two-game layoff.
Prather scored 16 of his 21 points in
the first half in his comeback from a
badly bruised right knee and helped No.
7 Florida survive a scare from Auburn in
a 68-61 victory on Saturday Donovan's
warning proved unnecessary
"That rule went out the window after
the first half, when he had 16," the coach
said. "He was clearly going to play a lot
more since he played so well.
"I'm not so sure if he's hurt again
this game, that this is a game we could


pull out."
Prather made eight of 10 shots for the
Gators (15-2, 4-0 Southeastern Confer-
ence), who have won nine straight games
and eight in a row at Auburn (8-7, 0-4).
Donovan said Prather looked just OK
in practice Thursday with no contact,
but fared better the day before the game.
"He was like, 'When you come back to
practice, are you going to baby it or are
you going to play?"' Prather said. "I said
I was going to play"
Tahj Shamsid-Deen hit a jump shot
with 1:59 left to cut Florida's lead to 62-
61, but Scottie Wilbekin answered with
a fadeaway jumper
"We didn't really have anything going
on that possession," Wilbeken said. "My
first drive, I didn't have anything so I tried
to give it to Casey Prather coming around
behind me. His man denied him, so I had
to make another move and I just made it"
Wilbekin, who scored 16 points, made
two of four free throws over the final 48
seconds.
See .Page B4


Associated Press
Florida forward Casey Prather drives past Auburn forward Alex Thompson on Saturday
in Auburn, Ala. The No. 7 Gators escaped with a 68-61 victory over the Tigers.


Pitch perfect?


District playoff
upon local boys

soccer teams
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
district playoffs for high
school boys soccer
begin starting Monday,
so records, streaks and other
stats go out the window as the
three county teams get one
shot at a title. Here's a look at
the matchups:
Crystal River vs. Central,
District 3A-7
6 p.m. Monday at Weeki
Wachee High School
The ninth-seeded Crystal
River Pirates enter the play-
offs an inexperienced team,
with just three of its 11 players
playing significant minutes
last season. Its youth became
apparent during the regular
season with the Pirates (3-14
overall, 3-13 district) strug-
gling to net goals; the team
was outscored 23-1 in its final
four games.
For things to change against
Central (5-15 overall, 4-12 dis-
trict), Pirates head coach
Bobby Verlato is looking for
shots on frame.
"They just have to shoot it
and not be afraid (of missing),"
he said.
The Pirates were shut out 2-
0 their first match versus Cen-
tral in November, and lost 3-1
their second meeting in a
game Verlato felt his team out-
played its opponent most the
night. With the team healthy
and building chemistry, he
feels the pressure's on Central.
"The record might not show
it," Verlato said of the Pirates,
"but now they're seasoned."
Citrus vs. Hudson,
District 3A-7
2 p.m. Tuesday,
Weeki Wachee
The No. 2-seed Citrus Hur-
ricanes look to repeat as dis-
trict champions and though
Erick Vestervall a Swedish
See Page B3


-, J* -'
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Chronicle file photo
Both Citrus' Mauro Mondragon (1) and Crystal River's Gunnar Consol (6) have visions of leading the
Hurricanes and Pirates through the District 3A-7 tournament, which starts Monday with Crystal
River's contest against Central. The Hurricanes get Hudson on Tuesday.


CR comes


in 2nd at


Kilpatrick

Host Citrus takes

third at annual

wrestling tourney
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS Lely of Naples
edged out Crystal River 163.5-156
to claim the Ninth annual Ed Kil-
patrick Class IBT (individually
bracketed tournament) in Satur-
day's wrestling action in the Citrus
High School gym.
Citrus beat out 13 schools to fin-
ish third, six points ahead of
fourth-place West Port, while
Lecanto placed 13th and Dunnel-
lon came in 10th.
Pirate Michael Allan, a No. 1
seed, dominated his 126-pound
class with three pins and a 16-2
major decision en route to his
team's sole championship.
Citrus' Brandon Taylor (160) was
one of three non-No. 1 seeds to win
a championship, and was also the
only first-place finishing 'Cane. He
outlasted his Chiles opponent for
a 4-2 decision.
"Today was a pretty good day be-
cause I knew I wasn't seeded first"
Taylor said. "I knew the last match
was going to be tough."
The Pirates and Hurricanes
each sent three wrestlers to a
championship match. CRHS had
eight wrestlers place in the top
four, while Citrus had seven.
"We lost it in the semis," CRHS
head coach Craig Frederick said.
"We had eight in the semis and
only three of them won, so we went
from contender to Cinderella.
"Mike (Allan) took care of busi-
ness," he added.
Chris Ewing, at 182, was the only
Panther to crack the top three in
his class. He lost a closely-fought
match to Lely's Termaine McClen-
don in the finals to come in second.
Eight Lely wrestlers finished in
the top three, including three
champions, of their respective
bracket.
Citrus' Casey Bearden (170) and
See Page B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bad drop in UAE


Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy tees off on the 11th hole Saturday during the third round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship in
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

PhilMickelson surges in Abu Dhabi, while Mcllroy penalized
Associated Press I T-' - _: % ]


ABU DHABI, United Arab Emi-
rates Phil Mickelson surged up
the leaderboard with a 9-under 63 to
put himself in second place after the
third round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC
Golf Championship, while Rory
Mcllroy was hit with a two-shot
penalty for a rules infraction that
dropped him into a tie for fourth.
Mickelson barely made the cut
but had the best round of the day
with nine birdies and an eagle cou-
pled with two bogeys to sit two shots
behind leader Craig Lee of Scot-
land. Lee shot a 69 for a 12-under
204 total.
"I just love the fact I am in con-
tention and have an opportunity in
my first tournament of the year here
inAbu Dhabi," Mickelson said. "The Patrick Re
biggest thing for me is that each day Humana C
as the tournament has progressed I PGA West
have felt a lot sharper and sharper" To make
Mcllroy thought he was alone in said his dr
second place a stroke behind Lee a bad lie
after finishing his round, but tour- benefited
nament officials then ruled that he "If anyt
had taken a drop incorrectly on the stage McI
second hole and adjusted his score Mcllroy
to a double-bogey 7. That gave him a without a
70 for the round to sit one stroke be- birdie oft]
hind Mickelson and Gaganjeet "To a sr
Bhullar of India (66). have beei
Mcllroy had to take relief on the that's wha
second hole when his ball ended a rule of 1
up on a gallery crosswalk and went have been
on to par the hole, but was later ing that a
told by the caddy of playing part- fix."
ner Ricardo Gonzalez that he had Mickels
his left foot on the white line mark- since a 63
ing the drop area, meaning he had Deutsche
not taken "full relief" according to Septembe
the rules, the Abu D
Tournament officials reviewed The Am
the situation after Mcllroy com- opening si
pleted his round, with the golfer and then
going back to the spot to show where ward hole
he stood when he took the shot. foot birdie
"I didn't even know my foot was on Anoth(
the line," Mcllroy said. "We went for I
back to see it again there and see
where my divot was, and it was clear LAQUIN
that I couldn't have played the shot has been as
with my feet anywhere else. I guess course conc
I was so much into the shot I didn't lenge an
even realize. ... There's a lot of stu- Another
pid rules and this is one of them." 9-under 63.


Associated Press
eed hits from the 10th tee Saturday during the third round of the
challenge PGA golf tournament on the Nicklaus Private course at
in La Quinta, Calif.


e matters worse, Mcllroy
*op had actually given him
and that he would have
from dropping again.
hing, it was a disadvan-
lroy said.
had finished the round
bogey, making his fourth
[he day on the 18th.
)ectator it may feel like I
n unduly punished, and
t it feels like to me, but it's
the game. I do feel like I
hard done by but it's noth-
fast start tomorrow can't

on shot his lowest score
on the opening day of the
Bank Championship in
r, falling one shot short of
habi course record.
erican birdied four of his
ix holes, eagled the eighth
also birdied five of his in-
*s, including sinking a 50-
Sputt at the par-5 last.
er day, another 63
teed in Humana
TA, Calif. Patrick Reed
s good as the weather and
editions at the Humana Chal-
d just as predictable.
sunny, calm day. Another


Reed broke the PGA Tour record for
relation to par for the first 54 holes, fin-
ishing at 27 under Saturday to take a
seven-stroke lead into the final round.
Playing over a pond as still as the
plastic swans PGA West uses to scare
away geese, Reed birdied his final hole
on the Nicklaus Private Course, hitting
a wedge to 2 feet on the par-4 ninth. He
also had an eagle, eight birdies and a
bogey.
"Any time you set a record on the PGA
Tour it means you're doing something
right," Reed said. "Well, a lot of things right.
But at the same time it doesn't matter if
you have the 54-hole lead. All that matters
at the end is at the end of Sunday."
The 23-year-old Reed broke the mark
of 25 under set by Gay Brewer in the
1967 Pensacola Open and matched by
Ernie Els in the 2003 Tournament of
Champions, Steve Stricker in the 2010
John Deere Classic and Pat Perez in the
2009 La Quinta event. Reed was one off
Stricker's stroke record of 188 set on a
par-71 course.
"Almost seems like I'm in a putting
coma," said Reed, the first player in tour
history to open an event with three
rounds of 63 or better. "The hole seems
huge. It almost feels like I can't miss. It's
interesting because when I do miss a
putt, I get really frustrated because I al-
most feel like I should make it."


Chasib


Olymppi(

A s the XXII Winter
Olympic Games
pen in Sochi,
Russia on Feb. 6 to the
spectacle and pomp of
marching athletes, a
blaze of fire-
works and
dramatized M


personal vi-
gnettes, I am
amazed at
what is
missed. The
Olympic
dream starts
out for most as
kids and be-
comes a life-
long struggle
of persistent


Dr. Ron
DOCTC
ORDI


training, indi-
vidual and family sacri-
fice with the dedication
to the goal of being the
best in a given sport. So
when you watch TV or
read about the Olympic
competitors, keep the
following comments in
mind.
Experienced by only a
few thousand Americans
in the last 136 years,
there are tens of thou-
sands more who en-
dured the journey but
did not reach the goal of
Olympic competitor-
let alone Olympic medal-
ist. The meaning of the
Olympic motto "Citius,
Atius, Fortius" is swifter,
higher, stronger. These
are the exact goals of
those athletes, trying to
make the Olympic team
but very few do, based on
the standards alone. To
even be competitive in
the journey requires
great fortitude and work
ethic, serious ability, ex-
perienced coaching, fi-
nancial support and
above all being fortunate
and remaining injury-
free.
In less than three
weeks, as you watch the
Olympic effort of the
competitors, remember
those who did not make
the team and those that
finished outside the
medals. They all have
sacrificed most of their
lives and trained their
hearts out, but did not
achieve an Olympic
team berth or a shiny
Olympic medal. These
athletes struggled to
compete, fought to tri-
umph and dreamed the
dream. They will watch
the Sochi Olympics on
television with you and
me.
As the dramatic per-
sonal vignettes and life
stories of these current
Olympians are superfi-
cially touted, we the
viewers will not have a
good appreciation or un-
derstanding of the train-
ing these athletes have
endured. Training is not
glamorous and fre-
quently not fun. There
are hours on end of lone-
liness, sweat, pain, depri-
vation and several


agthe


: dream

thousand other adjec-
tives and adverbs that de-
scribe the feelings while
training.
These Olympic athletes
portraits often are edited
by the media
for interest, at-
tention span of
the viewer or
other factors.
For the most
h part, rarely do
they convey
the years or the
Stars it takes to
Joseph become a
Joseph world-class
OR'S competitor.
ERS The difficulty
-- to sustain this
training effort
over years is
unimaginable.
It's hard to know how
the Olympic dream starts.
Personally at age 7, I
wanted to beat the
schoolyard bully on the
speed skating oval on the
frozen pond behind my
elementary school. For-
tune paired me with my
sister in an amateur ice
show and at that time, I
will never forget watch-
ing the Olympics on TV
knowing I was going to be
there thus the start of
an Olympic dream.
Achieving a spot on the
Olympic team years later
took perseverance,
parental support and the
need to reassure myself
several million times in
the subsequent years
over the steep hills and
valleys of a athlete's
training and competitive
life.
All the athletes from
gold medalist to last place
in Sochi have to over-
come adversity and have
struggled and suffered in
training. Most have lost
vital competitions over
the years, but have perse-
vered to perform at the
critical time and tri-
umphed to become
Olympic team competi-
tors, Olympians.
In the Olympics all
competitors have main-
tained the Olympic
Creed, contrary to my
Navy SEAL son's favorite
expression that "second
place is the first loser"
The Olympic Creed states
"the most significant
thing in the Olympic
Games is not to win but to
take part, just as the most
important thing in life is
not the triumph, but the
struggle. The essential
thing is not to have con-
quered, but to have
fought well."
As I finished reading
this to my wife, my daugh-
ter stated, "Daddy you
need to write about
rainbows!"
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand, shoulder and
upper extremity orthope-
dic surgeon at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute, may
be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


Recreational BRIEFS


10th annual Kids
Fishing Clinic
Parents, mark your calen-
dar for the 10th annual Kids
Fishing Clinic. Registration is
currently open.
Teaching children a lifelong
hobby, appreciation for our
marine environment and a fun
family outing are the objec-
tives for the Kids' Fishing
Clinic. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) and Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
(CCPR) present a free event
for pre-registered children be-
tween the ages of 5 and 15
on Saturday, Feb. 22, at 9
a.m., 10a.m., 11 a.m., 12
p.m. and 1 p.m.
The clinic will be held at the
Fort Island Trail Park. Be-
cause space is limited, pre-
registration is required by
calling Citrus County Parks
and Recreation at 352-527-
7540 or visiting our website at
www.citruscountyparks.com.
This free clinic enables
young people to learn the ba-
sics of environmental stew-
ardship, fishing ethics, angling
skills and safety. In addition,
environmental displays will
provide participants with a
unique chance to experience


Florida's marine life firsthand.
The main objective is to cre-
ate responsible marine re-
source stewards by teaching
children about the vulnerabil-
ity of Florida's marine ecosys-
tems. This event is a
catch-and-release activity,
and all participants must be
accompanied by an adult.
Individuals or companies
interested in helping to spon-
sor this event or volunteer at
the clinic should contact Cit-
rus County Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540.
Track safety
training available
Filter Youth Development
invites the public to attend
track safety supervision train-
ing from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, Jan. 25, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, Inverness.
Those who complete this
training will be certified to as-
sist instructors in facilitating
the 21-lesson dirt bike rider
safety course for children.
Certified trainers are also
eligible to participate in trail
rides with the kids. Lunch will
be provided.
To attend training, contact
info@filteryouth.org or call
352-228-0914.


Register now for
Five Points of Life
Kids Marathon
The 2014 Citrus Five
Points of Life Kids Marathon
is coming Feb. 28 in Lecanto.
The annual event is equal
parts fun and fitness, and par-
ticipants can start logging
miles immediately.
Five Points of Life is a foun-
dation started by LifeSouth
Community Blood Centers to
raise awareness of the five
ways to share life with others
through the donation of blood,
apheresis, marrow, cord blood
and organs and tissue. It also
offers classroom programs to
students in the Citrus County
area that teach the science
and social responsibility of do-
nating. The kids' marathon
promotes fitness and offers
lessons in goal setting.
Participants in kindergarten
through eighth grade will run
or walk the full 26.2-mile
marathon a little bit at a time,
logging their distance as they
go. Then, on Feb. 28 at 6 p.m.
at the Lecanto High School
track, 3810 W. Educational
Path, they'll have the opportu-
nity to celebrate their accom-
plishment and earn a medal at


the finish line. All participants
also receive a T-shirt.
Registration is free through
Jan. 17, and entry forms and
running logs are available on-
line at www.fivepointsoflife.
org, or at LifeSouth's Lecanto
headquarters, 1241 S.
Lecanto Highway. Call 352-
527-3061 for information.
Winter Golf Classic
for Special Olympics
The second annual Winter
Golf Classic for Special
Olympics Florida will be Satur-
day, March 8, at Seven Rivers
Golf & Country Club, 7395 W.
Pinebrook St., Crystal River.
Registration begins at 7 a.m.
Shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m.
Cost is $65 per person or
$260 per four-person team.
Mulligans: three for $15; max-
imum of 12 per team. 50/50
tickets will be sold: one for $1
or six for $5.
Snacks will be available
throughout the event. Lunch
will be provided at the end of
the tournament. Coffee, juice,
doughnuts and bagels will be
provided before the outing.
For information, call
352-746-3262, ext. 231, or
352-422-0819 or email
duane.dustin@gmail.com.


Davis Golf Tourney
coming Feb. 15
VFW Post 8189 Men's Aux-
iliary will present the second
annual Ted Davis Golf Tour-
nament on Saturday, Feb. 15,
at Twisted Oaks Golf Course.
The $55 per-person entry
fee includes greens fee, golf
cart, goody bag and dinner to
follow at VFW Post 8189 at
4:30 p.m.


Prizes will be awarded for
best team score, closest to
the hole, longest drive and
worst team score.
There will be raffles, a
50/50 drawing, giveaways
and a putting contest.
All proceeds will go to a
relief fund to benefit local
veterans.
For more info, call Bill
Peterson at 856-364-7233 or
Jerry Webb at 352-220-4807.


4th Player,


FREE!
Until January 31

pay regular price
for 3 players &
get the 4th free


Valid any day, not valid for twilight rate or for 9 hole rate.
Make tee times no more than 3 days in advance.
Must present coupon at time of check-in. Expires January 31, 2014.

S-1B-EST T 9301W. Fort Island Trail,
p LfANTA 0N Tk.f Crystal River
A N AST..I N www.plantationoncrystalriver.com
11 jQI. R 352-795-7211


kowd


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




PGA Tour

Humana Challenge
Saturday
p-PGAWest, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par
72, n-PGAWest, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards,
par 72, q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards,
par 72, La Quinta, Calif.,
Purse: $5.7 million
Third Round
Patrick Reed 63p-63q-63n -189 -27
Charley Hoffman 64q-66n-66p -196 -20
Brendon Todd 65n-63p-68q -196 -20
James Driscoll 68p-63q-66n -197 -19
Bill Haas 65q-66n-67p- 198 -18
Justin Leonard 66n-67p-65q -198 -18
Ryan Palmer 64p-65q-70n -199 -17
MattJones 66n-67p-66q -199 -17
Brian Stuard 67q-66n-66p -199 -17
Will MacKenzie 67n-66p-66q -199 -17
Ben Crane 70q-64n-65p- 199 -17
Keegan Bradley 69q-66n-65p- 200 -16
Charlie Beljan 68q-64n-68p- 200 -16
Seung-Yul Noh 68p-66q-66n -200 -16
Jason Bohn 70q-65n-66p- 201 -15
Zach Johnson 65q-68n-68p- 201 -15
Chad Collins 68n-68p-65q -201 -15
Jerry Kelly 69q-65n-68p -202 -14
Jonathan Byrd 68p-69q-65n -202 -14
Stuart Appleby 66p-69q-67n -202 -14
Matt Every 65n-68p-69q -202 -14
Rory Sabbatini 68p-67q-67n -202 -14
Scott Langley 69q-68n-65p -202 -14
Russell Knox 65p-70q-67n -202 -14
Spencer Levin 69p-68q-66n -203 -13
Luke Guthrie 69p-67q-67n -203 -13
Martin Laird 69n-66p-68q -203 -13
Kevin Chappell 70q-70n-63p -203 -13
Charlie Wi 65p-69q-69n -203 -13
Martin Flores 69p-65q-69n -203 -13
Jim Herman 67n-68p-68q -203 -13
Brendon de Jonge 69q-68n-66p 203 -13
Tyrone Van Aswegen 69n-67p-67q -203 -13
Ryo Ishikawa 66p-69q-69n -204 -12
CamiloVillegas 70n-66p-68q -204 -12
Harris English 67q-66n-71p- 204 -12
Jeff Overton 70q-67n-67p- 204 -12
Kevin Na 68n-68p-68q -204 -12
Brice Garnett 67p-69q-68n -204 -12
Andrew Svoboda 69n-69p-66q -204 -12
CameronTringale 68q-66n-70p- 204 -12
Brad Fritsch 67p-70q-67n -204 -12
Bryce Molder 69p-72q-63n -204 -12
William McGirt 70n-70p-64q -204 -12
Justin Hicks 64n-71 p-70q -205 -11
John Merrick 66q-70n-69p -205 -11
Gary Woodland 69p-71q-65n -205 -11
Kevin Kisner 66n-70p-69q -205 -11
Scott Brown 67p-68q-70n -205 -11
Harrison Frazar 69n-68p-68q -205 -11
Bo Van Pelt 70q-68n-67p -205 -11
Pat Perez 69q-70n-66p -205 -11
Brandt Snedeker 72q-64n-69p -205 -11
Webb Simpson 69p-70q-67n- 206 -10
Davis Love IIlI 69p-68q-69n -206 -10
ErikCompton 70q-66n-70p- 206 -10
David Lingmerth 69q-68n-69p- 206 -10
Blake Adams 70p-70q-66n -206 -10
Steven Bowditch 71n-67p-68q -206 -10
Daniel Summerhays 64n-69p-73q -206 -10
Brian Davis 69p-71q-66n -206 -10
Johnson Wagner 72p-66q-68n -206 -10
Charles Howell III 73n-68p-65q -206 -10
JoshTeater 68n-68p-70q -206 -10
Ken Duke 71p-70q-65n -206 -10
Scott Stallings 68n-69p-69q -206 -10
Rickie Fowler 68q-71n-67p- 206 -10
J.J. Henry 71n-70p-65q -206 -10
Hudson Swafford 65n-71p-70q -206 -10
Brett Quigley 66q-73n-68p -207 -9
Kevin Stadler 69n-66p-72q -207 -9
Nicholas Thompson 71p-69q-67n -207 -9
Chad Campbell 71p-68q-68n -207 -9
Brian Harman 69n-66p-72q -207 -9
Stewart Cink 73q-63n-71p -207 -9
Billy Horschel 72p-65q-70n -207 -9
JhonattanVegas 69n-71p-67q -207 -9
Scott McCarron 72q-69n-66p -207 -9
James Hahn 70p-68q-69n -207 -9
Lee Williams 70n-68p-69q -207 -9
John Senden 71n-70p-66q -207 -9
Michael Putnam 68q-69n-70p -207 -9
Roberto Castro 68p-73q-66n -207 -9
Freddie Jacobson 71p-68q-68n -207 -9
Failed to qualify
David Toms 69q-71n-68p -208 -8
Scott Piercy 71n-66p-71q- 208 -8
Daniel Chopra 70q-68n-70p -208 -8
Joe Durant 68p-71q-69n -208 -8
Justin Thomas 74q-64n-70p- 208 -8
Sean O'Hair 70n-69p-69q -208 -8
Sang-Moon Bae 72q-67n-69p -208 -8
John Peterson 68q-69n-71p -208 -8
Jeff Maggert 69p-69q-70n- 208 -8
Brian Gay 69q-71 n-69p -209 -7
Bronson La'Cassie 69n-70p-70q-209 -7
Aaron Baddeley 67q-73n-69p -209 -7
Jason Kokrak 67n-69p-73q -209 -7
Lucas Glover 72n-67p-70q -209 -7
Ricky Barnes 74q-69n-66p- 209 -7
Robert Garrigus 70q-70n-69p- 209 -7
Will Claxton 71p-70q-68n -209 -7
Nicolas Colsaerts 72q-67n-70p -209 -7
Brendan Steele 70q-70n-69p -209 -7
Chris Stroud 73q-69n-67p -209 -7
John Daly 72q-68n-70p- 210 -6
Ted Potter, Jr. 69n-69p-72q- 210 -6
Morgan Hoffmann 72n-71p-67q-210 -6
Danny Lee 73q-66n-71p -210 -6
Peter Malnati 69p-75q-66n -210 -6
Jamie Lovemark 69q-70n-71p- 210 -6
Jesper Parnevik 73q-64n-74p -211 -5
John Rollins 72p-71q-68n -211 -5
Scott Verplank 73p-70q-68n -211 -5
Ben Martin 75q-71 n-65p -211 -5
Stephen Ames 73p-73q-65n -211 -5
Troy Merritt 75p-70q-66n -211 -5
Carl Pettersson 71n-73p-68q -212 -4
John Mallinger 75q-67n-70p- 212 -4
Lee Janzen 75n-67p-70q -212 -4
Chris DiMarco 71p-71q-70n -212 -4
GeoffOgivy 74n-70p-68q -212 -4
Billy Hurley III 72q-71n-69p- 212 -4
Mike Weir 73p-69q-70n -212 -4
Andrew Loupe 67p-73q-72n -212 -4
Wes Roach 72n-70p-70q -212 -4
Briny Baird 72p-71q-70n -213 -3
Jonas Blixt 70q-69n-74p -213 -3
David Hearn 68p-70q-75n -213 -3
YE.Yang 72n-70p-71q- 213 -3
TimWilkinson 69p-74q-70n -213 -3
ScottGardiner 71n-68p-74q- 213 -3
Troy Matteson 75p-67q-71n -213 -3
Heath Slocum 67n-72p-74q -213 -3
MarkWilson 74n-66p-73q -213 -3
Edward Loar 71n-73p-69q -213 -3


Richard H. Lee 73q-72n-69p- 214 -2
RetiefGoosen 73n-69p-72q -214 -2
Bud Cauley 71q-74n-69p- 214 -2
Kevin Tway 69q-75n-70p- 214 -2
Greg Chalmers 68n-72p-75q -215 -1
Robert Allenby 70n-73p-72q -215 -1
AlexAragon 70n-74p-71q- 215 -1
Dudley Hart 72p-69q-75n -216 E
Paul Goydos 72p-70q-74n -216 E
Ben Curtis 69p-73q-75n -217 +1
Mark Brooks 73n-73p-71q- 217 +1
Peter Jacobsen 73q-74n-71p -218 +2
Will Wilcox 75q-73n-71p- 219 +3
Chesson Hadley 71p-75q-74n -220 +4
Tommy Gainey 74p-74q-74n -222 +6
Derek Ernst 69n-77p-76q -222 +6
Bobby Gates 73p-73q-76n -222 +6
Alan Scheer 79p-73q-70n -222 +6
D.J.Trahan 75n-68p-80q -223 +7
Trevor Immelman 79q-69n-75p -223 +7
Abu Dhabi Champ.
Saturday
At Abu Dhabi Golf Club, Abu Dhabi, United


SCOREBOARD


For Lthe record



Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


TM


CASH 3 (early)
1-3-1
CASH 3 (late)
3-2-7

PLAY 4 (early)
0-7-3-1
PLAY 4 (late)
3-4-6-9


Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 3 -15 -28 -32
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 winners $2,826.50
3-of-4 MB 47 $789.00
3-of-4 1,032 $107.00
2-of-4 MB 1,525 $51.00
1-of-4 MB 13,171 $6.00
2-of-4 30,422 $4.00


Fantasy 5:2-4- 11 -17- 24
5-of-5 5 winners $47,327.94
4-of-5 545 $70.00
3-of-5 13,715 $7.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Michigan at Wisconsin (Taped)
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Savannah State at Florida (Taped)
1 p.m. (FS1) Louisiana Tech at Southern Mississippi
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Towson at College of Charleston
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia Tech at Notre Dame
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Oregon at Oregon State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Duke at Virginia Tech
1:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Louisville at Southern Methodist
2 p.m. (38 MNT) Kentucky atAuburn
2 p.m. (FSNFL) LSU at Vanderbilt
2 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at Miami
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Connecticut at Rutgers
3 p.m. (FS1) Villanova at DePaul
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Fordham at Dayton
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Penn State at Michigan State
NBA
12 p.m. (NBA) Los Angeles Clippers at Indiana Pacers (Taped)
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA PBA50 Tour Finals & RPI Finals (Taped)
5 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Teen Masters Grand Championship (Taped)
NFL
3 p.m. (CBS) AFC Championship New England Patriots at
Denver Broncos
6:30 p.m. (FOX) NFC Championship San Francisco 49ers at
Seattle Seahawks
GOLF
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Humana Challenge, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mitsubishi Electric Championship,
Final Round
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Boston Bruins at Chicago Blackhawks
5 p.m. (NHL)Anaheim Ducks at St. Louis Blues (Taped)
5 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Carolina Hurricanes
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Washington Capitals at New York Rangers
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m. (NBC) European Championships (Taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Swansea City vs.
Tottenham Hotspur
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Manchester
United
TENNIS
11 a.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open Round of 16 (Taped)
7 p.m. (TENNIS) 2014 Australian Open Round of 16
9 p.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open Round of 16
11 p.m. (TENNIS) Kooyong Classic final (Same-day Tape)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity Classic
exhibition (Taped)
3 a.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open Round of 16
WINTER SPORTS
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Curling Continental Cup: Women's Team
Competition (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) Snowboarding U.S. Grand Prix
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix: Halfpipe
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.7 million
Yardage: 7,583, Par: 72
Third Round
Craig Lee, Scotland 68-67-69
Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 72-68-66
Phil Mickelson, United States 73-70-63
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-70-68
Rory Mcllroy, Northern Ireland 70-67-70
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-70-68
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-68-67
Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-71-68
Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 67-68-73
Matthew Baldwin, England 67-72-69
Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-70-69
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 70-67-72
Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-71-69
Hennie Otto, South Africa 70-71-69
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-72
George Coetzee, South Africa 68-70-72
Tommy Fleetwood, England 73-65-72
Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-70
Jose-Filipe Lima, Portugal 68-75-67
Also
Luke Donald, England 70-73-71
Sergio Garcia, Spain 76-68-70
Darren Clarke, Northern Ireland 74-69-72
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-70-73
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 74-70-73



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Toronto 20 18 .526
Brooklyn 16 22 .421
NewYork 15 25 .375
Boston 14 27 .341
Philadelphia 13 27 .325


Miami
Atlanta
Washingto
Charlotte
Orlando


Indiana
Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
Milwaukee


San Anton
Houston
Dallas
Memphis
New Orlea


Portland
Oklahoma
Denver
Minnesota
Utah


L.A. Clippe
Golden Sta
Phoenix
L.A. Lakers
Sacrament


Southeast Division
W L Pct
29 11 .725
20 19 .513
n 19 20 .487
17 25 .405
10 30 .250
Central Division
W L Pct
32 7 .821
19 20 .487
17 23 .425
15 25 .375
7 32 .179
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
io 31 9 .775
27 15 .643
24 17 .585
20 19 .513
ns 15 24 .385
Northwest Division
W L Pct
30 9 .769
City 30 10 .750
20 19 .513
19 21 .475
14 28 .333
Pacific Division
W L Pct
rs 28 14 .667
ate 26 16 .619
22 17 .564
S 15 25 .375
:to 14 24 .368
Friday's Games


Charlotte 111, Orlando 101
Miami 101, Philadelphia 86
Washington 96, Chicago 93
L.A. Clippers 109, NewYork 95
Toronto 94, Minnesota 89
L.A. Lakers 107, Boston 104


Utah 110, Detroit 89
Memphis 91, Sacramento 90
Portland 109, San Antonio 100
Dallas 110, Phoenix 107
Cleveland 117, Denver 109
Oklahoma City 127, Golden State 121
Saturday's Games
Indiana 106, L.A. Clippers 92
Detroit 104, Washington 98
Miami 104, Charlotte 96, OT
Chicago 103, Philadelphia 78
Minnesota 98, Utah 72
Houston 114, Milwaukee 104
Golden State 97, New Orleans 87
Portland at Dallas, late
Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Antonio, 7p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Dallas at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia atWashington, 2 p.m.
Toronto at Charlotte, 2 p.m.
Brooklyn at NewYork, 2:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 47 3015 2 62136 104
Tampa Bay 49 2816 5 61141 120
Montreal 49 2717 5 59126 120
Toronto 50 2520 5 55141 152
Detroit 48 21 17 10 52121 130
Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51139 155
Florida 48 1823 7 43111 147
Buffalo 47 1327 7 33 86 133
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 48 3412 2 70156 115
Philadelphia 49 2519 5 55134 140
N.Y Rangers 50 2621 3 55124 127
Columbus 48 2420 4 52138 135
Washington 48 2218 8 52141 146
New Jersey 50 2019 11 51115 123
Carolina 47 2018 9 49114 132
N.Y Islanders 50 1924 7 45138 163
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 50 31 8 11 73181 137
St. Louis 47 3210 5 69166 107
Colorado 48 31 12 5 67142 122
Minnesota 50 2619 5 57122 123
Dallas 47 21 19 7 49134 145
Nashville 50 2122 7 49121 151
Winnipeg 50 2223 5 49141 150
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79175 126
San Jose 49 31 12 6 68158 121
LosAngeles 49 2914 6 64126 100
Vancouver 49 2416 9 57124 125
Phoenix 48 2316 9 55139 145
Calgary 48 1626 6 38107 153
Edmonton 51 1530 6 36131 181
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Columbus 5, Washington 1
Chicago 4, Anaheim 2
Saturday's Games
Columbus 4, Buffalo 3, SO
Detroit 3, Los Angeles 2, SO
N.Y Rangers 4, Ottawa 1
San Jose 5, Tampa Bay 4
Winnipeg 3, Edmonton 2, OT
Toronto 5, Montreal 3
Philadelphia 6, N.Y Islanders 4
Carolina 3, Florida 2
Anaheim 3, St. Louis 2
Colorado 5, Nashville 4
Phoenix 3, New Jersey 2
Dallas at Minnesota, late
Calgary at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Boston at Chicago, 12:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 5 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at N.Y Islanders, 1 p.m.
Los Angeles at Boston, 3 p.m.
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.



Australian Open
Sunday
At Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $29.72 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Fourth Round
Flavia Pennetta (28), Italy, def. Angelique Kerber
(9), Germany, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5.
Li Na (4), China, def. Ekaterina Makarova (22),
Russia, 6-2, 6-0.
Doubles
Men
Third Round
Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (5),
Czech Republic, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, and
Michael Venus, New Zealand, 6-3, 6-2.
Women
Third Round
Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Ajla Toml-
janovic, Croatia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, and
Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-2, 7-5.
Shahar Peer, Israel, and Silvia Soler-Espinosa,
Spain, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and
Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
Legends Doubles
Round Robin
Men
Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Cedric Pioline,
France, def. Pat Cash, Australia, and MatsWilander,
Sweden, 6-7 (2), 6-1, 10-8.
Junior Singles
Boys
First Round
JumpeiYamasaki (14), Japan, def. Gabriel Vel-
linho Hocevar, Brazil, 6-1, 6-3.
Lucas Miedler (13), Austria, def. Makoto Ochi,
Japan, 6-2, 6-2.
Lee Duckhee (12), South Korea, def. Mitchell
Harper, Australia, 6-3, 6-2.
Simon Friis Soendergaard, Denmark, def. Alexan-
der Klintcharov, New Zealand, 6-4, 6-3.
Oliver Anderson, Australia, def. Rafael Matos,
Brazil, 6-4, 6-3.
Petros Chrysochos, Cyprus, def. Oh Chan-yeong,
South Korea, 7-5, 7-6 (3).


Andrea Pellegrino, Italy, def. Sora Fukuda, Japan,
5-7, 6-1, 6-3.
llyaVasilyev, Russia, def. Brian Tran, Australia, 6-
7 (2), 6-2, 6-4.
MarceloZormanndaSilva(15), Brazil, def. Chung
Yunseong, South Korea, 6-3, 6-3.
Omar Jasika, Australia, def. Zheng Wei Qiang,
China, 6-3, 6-2.
Stefan Kozlov (2), United States, def. Blake Mott,
Australia, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-5, retired.
Quentin Halys (7), France, def. Johannes
Haerteis, Germany, 6-4, 6-2.
Girls
First Round
Emilie Francati, Denmark, def. Sasha Bollweg,
Australia, 6-1, 6-2.
Fiona Ferro (15), France, def. Georgia Brescia,
Italy, 7-5, 0-6, 6-2.
Naiktha Bains, Australia, def. Shiori Fukuda,
Japan, 6-2, 6-1.
Natalie Novotna, Czech Republic, def. Beatrice
Lombardo, Italy, 6-4, 6-3.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 B3


BRIF



Panthers take
fourth at Keystone
Heights Invite
The Lecanto girls
weightlifters went 10-3 on
Saturday at the Keystone
Heights Invitational to claim
fourth place.
Andreanna Van Quelef
was the lone first-place fin-
isher for Lecanto after total-
ing 230 pounds in the
110-pound division.
Cheyenne Atkins and Bre-
anna Johnson also came in
fourth for the Panthers.
Lecanto lifts Tuesday in
the sectional qualifier at
River Ridge.
Report: NASCAR
considering radical
Chase changes
CHARLOTTE, N.C.--A
16-driver championship field
that would be whittled down
to create a winner-take-all
season finale is among radi-
cal changes reportedly being
considered by NASCAR.
NASCAR chairman Brian
France has repeatedly said
he's never ruled out tinkering
with the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship format in
an effort to create the "Game
7 moments" he covets.






KILPATRICK
Continued from Page BI


Tarque Cabanas (145) and
Crystal River's Carlos
Sanabria (220) and Andrew
Bilby joined Ewing in each
collecting second-place
medals.
Pirates Eddie Bennis, Nick
Hooper and Joey Pelton as
well as CHS' Justin Allan each
prevailed in consolation
championships to get third.
"We placed seven, and this
was definitely one of our best
tournaments," CHS head
coach Jeff Wood said. "We had
some young kids step up to the
plate.
"It would be nice to beat our
crosstown rival, but it's Crystal
River's year," he added.
"We've got work to do, but I
saw great things out of this
young team today We'll take
third place."
Dunnellon's Cole Fagan
scored two wins by fall and a
9-1 major decision to win the
195 bracket and earn the Out-
standing Heavyweight
Wrestler award.




PITCH
Continued from Page BI


exchange student was not
on the team last year, the sen-
ior defender knows the history
very well.
"I feel like I'd be letting
them down if we didn't win the
district," he said. "Honestly,
I'd feel I'd want to take them
to regionals."
For the 'Canes (14-3-1 over-
all, 12-3-1 district) to do that,
they must first beat a tough
Hudson team. Though Citrus
easily handled the Cobras 4-0
in their first regular season
game, the two played to a 1-1
draw in the second game last
month.
Head coach Steve Ekeli re-
spects seventh-seed Hudson's
speed and ball handling-- es-
pecially toward the center of
the pitch adding, "We have
to pressure everything."
Though the season ulti-
mately became a 1-2 race be-
tween the 'Canes and
Springstead, Ekeli is making
sure his players aren't looking
past the first round.
"We don't talk about Spring-
stead right now," he finished.
Lecanto vs. Vanguard,
District 4A-4
5 p.m. Wednesday, East Ridge
The Lecanto Panthers (7-6-2
overall, 6-4-2 district) enter the
playoffs recovering from in-
juries and a season marked by
low goal production. Coach
Doug Warren isn't worried.


"The only concern we have
right now is that we're going to
come out and play well and
advance," Warren said.
On paper, the Panthers and
Vanguard Knights are evenly
matched; the two played to a
1-1 draw the first matchup,
with the Panthers edging by 3-
2 the second time around. The
Knights are a quick, agile
team that for Lecanto to beat
Warren said, "We need to com-
municate, we need to have
good touches, spread the field
out and work the ball around
and then capitalize on our
opportunities."





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Record set in loss


St. Louis nets four

goals, but Lightning

lose to Sharks 5-4

Associated Press

TAMPA Martin St Louis tied a
Tampa Bay Lightning record with
four goals, but Joe Pavelski re-
sponded scored three of his own in
the second period to help the San
Jose Sharks rally for a 5-4 victory on
Saturday
Pavelski beat goalie Ben Bishop
twice in a span of 21 seconds mid-
way through the period, and then
added the winner a minute before
the intermission.
St. Louis scored three times in a
span of 7:34 in the first period for his
eighth NHL hat trick. The Lightning
captain's fourth goal early in the sec-
ond tied the team mark set by Chris
Kontos against Hockey Hall of Fame
goalie Ed Belfour and the Chicago
Blackhawks in Tampa Bay's inaugu-
ral game on Oct 7,1992.
Matt Nieto and Patrick Marleau
put San Jose ahead 2-1 with goals
three minutes apart midway
through the first period. St. Louis
scored his first goal in between,
then struck twice more against Antti
Niemi before the intermission.
Rangers 4, Senators 1
OTTAWA, Ontario Derek Stepan
broke a 13-game goal drought and
added two assists in the New York
Rangers' win over Ottawa.
After falling behind 1-0 in the first pe-
riod, the Rangers (26-21-3) got goals
from Brad Richards, Rick Nash, Stepan
and Mats Zuccarello, and won for the
fifth time in six games.
Richards has nine points in his past
eight games.
Cam Talbot gave Henrik Lundqvist a
rest and made 27 saves for his 10th win
of the season. Talbot improved to 6-0 in
Saturday games.
Marc Methot scored the lone goal for
the Senators (21-19-9).
Jets 3, Oilers 2
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -Winnipeg
defenseman Jacob Trouba scored his
second goal of the game 1:10 into over-
time to lift the Jets over Edmonton.
Fellow rookie Mark Scheifele also
scored for the Jets.
Jordan Eberle and David Perron had
the goals for the Oilers, who went 0-4
on a Central Division road trip and were
outscored 17-8.
Edmonton lost this one when Jets for-
ward Blake Wheeler found Trouba alone
in front of the net for the winning goal
after he nearly scored himself.
Ondrej Pavelec stopped 20 shots for
Winnipeg (22-23-5), and Ilya Bryzgalov
made 36 saves for Edmonton.
Flyers 6, Islanders 4
PHILADELPHIA- Michael RaffI
scored the go-ahead goal with 4:15 left
and the Philadelphia Flyers rallied to
beat the New York Islanders 6-4.
Andrej Meszaros scored twice, Andy


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis celebrates after scoring
against the San Jose Sharks during the first period Saturday in Tampa. St. Louis
had a hat trick in the period and finished with a Lightning-record four goals.


Hall, Jakub Voracek, and Matt Read
also had goals, and Claude Giroux had
two clutch assists for the Flyers.
Brock Nelson, Brian Strait, John
Tavares and Cal Clutterbuck scored for
New York, which had won eight of nine
on the road and five of six overall.
Hurricanes 3, Panthers 2
RALEIGH, N.C. -Alexander Semin
scored two goals in the third period to lift
the Carolina Hurricanes to a 3-2 victory
over the Florida Panthers.
The teams were tied at one until
Semin took control of a faceoff win by
Eric Staal and shot past Tim Thomas at
2:31 of the third. He then scored Car-
olina's league-leading ninth short-
handed goal on a breakaway at 8:57,
also on an assist from Staal.
The Hurricanes ended a two-game skid
and improved to 6-2 in their last eight.
The Panthers got a goal from Dmitry
Kulikov with 5:39 remaining butAnton
Khudobin held on from there, finishing
with 37 saves in the win.
Blue Jackets 4,
Sabres 3, SO
BUFFALO, N.Y. Ryan Johansen
scored the only goal in the shootout and
the Columbus Blue Jackets extended
their winning streak to six games with a
4-3 victory over the Buffalo Sabres.
The winning streak matches the
longest in franchise history set on April
3,2006.
Brandon Dubinsky, David Savard and
Matt Calvert scored in regulation for


Columbus. Sergei Bobrovsky made 26
saves.
Tyler Myers had two goals, including
a power-play goal with 24.9 seconds re-
maining in regulation to send the game
to overtime. Drew Stafford also scored
for Buffalo, which has lost three straight.
Red Wings 3, Kings 2, SO
DETROIT Tomas Tatar scored and
Jimmy Howard stopped all three shots
he faced in a shootout, lifting the Detroit
Red Wings to a 3-2 win over the Los
Angeles Kings.
The Red Wings, who lost their two
previous games 1-0, received a big
break late in regulation.
Detroit defenseman Niklas Kronwall's
shot was deflected and bounced off the
net out of play, came back and struck
goalie Jonathan Quick's back, and went
in to tie the game with 26.1 seconds left.
Maple Leafs 5,
Canadiens 3
TORONTO James van Riemsdyk
scored with 5:33 left in the third period
and the Toronto Maple Leafs extended
their winning streak to four games with a
5-3 victory over the Montreal Canadiens.
Cody Franson, Phil Kessel and
Mason Raymond also scored for the
Leafs and Joffrey Lupul added an
empty-netter. Jonathan Bernier made
30 saves for Toronto.
Brendan Gallagher, Brian Gionta and
David Desharnais had the Canadiens'
goals. Carey Price stopped 25 shots for
Montreal.


NBA BRIEFS


Pacers 106,
Clippers 92
INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George scored 36 points and
Lance Stephenson added 22
points and 12 rebounds, lead-
ing the Indiana Pacers past
the Los Angeles Clippers,
106-92 on Saturday night.
Indiana (32-7) has won four
straight, all by double digits,
though missed a chance to
win four in a row by 20 or
more points for the first time in
franchise history. The Pacers
retained the league's top
record and improved to 21-1
at home before heading West
for a five-game road trip.
Jamal Crawford scored 22
points for the Clippers, who
had their five-game winning
streak snapped. Blake Griffin
had 19 points and DeAndre
Jordan added 12 points and
17rebounds.
Pistons 104,
Wizards 98
WASHINGTON Josh
Smith overcame a slow start
to score 22 points and Rod-
ney Stuckey added 20 as the
Detroit Pistons beat the
Washington Wizards 104-98.
Rodney Monroe had 12
points and 10 rebounds and
Andre Drummond added 10
points and a game-high 13
boards as the Pistons outre-
bounded the Wizards 44-35.
John Wall scored 34 points,
including Washington's last
10, as the Wizards snapped a
three-game winning streak
and failed to move past .500
for the first time in more than
four years. It was the third
time this year they lost at
home with a chance to get
over the .500 mark.
Heat 104,
Bobcats 96, OT
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Le-
Bron James had 34 points
and eight rebounds, and the
Miami Heat beat the Charlotte
Bobcats for the 15th straight
time, 104-96 in overtime.
James scored six points in
the extra period, including two
driving layups to lift the Heat
to their second win in two
nights.
Chris Bosh added 25 points
and seven rebounds for
Miami.
Al Jefferson had 22 points
to lead the Bobcats, who were
playing their fourth game in
five nights.
The Bobcats lost point
guard Kemba Walker in the
third quarter with an ankle
injury.
The crowd of 19,631 was
the largest ever to see a Bob-
cats game at Time Warner
Cable Arena on a night in
which the team began selling
its Hornets gear for the first
time. The Bobcats will be-
come the Hornets after this
season.


Timberwolves 98,
Jazz 72
MINNEAPOLIS Nikola
Pekovic had 27 points and 14
rebounds in three quarters,
and the reeling Minnesota
Timberwolves blasted the
Utah Jazz, 98-72.
Kevin Love had 18 points,
13 rebounds and five assists,
and Kevin Martin scored 20
points to help the Wolves
snap a three-game losing
streak that included losses to
Sacramento and Toronto. The
Wolves scored 28 points off
16 Utah turnovers and
outscored the Jazz 50-18 in
the paint for a much-needed
blowout.
Alec Burks scored 18
points for the Jazz, who
trailed by as many as 36
points and shot 28.8 percent,
the worst shooting night in
franchise history. Derrick Fa-
vors had eight points and 10
boards, but was just 3 for 10
from the field.
Bulls 103, 76ers 78
CHICAGO Joakim Noah
had 21 points and 16 re-
bounds, Carlos Boozer added
15 points and 13 boards, and
the Chicago Bulls beat the
Philadelphia 76ers 103-78.
Noah extended his streak
of double-digit rebound
games to 12, the longest
stretch of his career.
Chicago (19-20) has won
seven of nine games in 2014.
D.J. Augustin scored nine
points and dished out seven
assists in the pivotal second
quarter, in which Chicago ex-
tended its lead from five to 20.
He finished with 19 points and
eight assists.
Only three 76ers scored in
double digits, Thaddeus
Young leading the way with
12 points.
James Anderson had 11
points and seven rebounds
for Philadelphia (13-27),
which has dropped six of
seven.
Rockets 114,
Bucks 104
HOUSTON -Terrence
Jones had a career-high 36
points and 11 rebounds, and
the Houston Rockets led from
the start in a 114-104 win over
the Milwaukee Bucks.
Jones had 25 points by
halftime, matching his previ-
ous career-best set on
Wednesday, and James
Harden added 22 points.
Houston led by 17 points
before the Bucks got within
six points in the third quarter.
The Rockets responded with
a big run to extend the lead
and hold on for the victory.
Brandon Knight scored 26
points with seven assists for
the NBA-worst Bucks, who
have dropped eight in a row.
From wire reports


UF
Continued from Page B1

Patric Young blocked KT
Harrell's attempt to bring
Auburn to within two
points in between those
trips to the line.
Kasey Hill made two
late free throws for the
final margin.
Young scored 13 for
Florida, which outre-
bounded Auburn 31-23.
Chris Denson, the SEC's
leading scorer, had 15 of
his 21 points in the second
half to help keep the Tigers
close. Harrell added 18
points and made 4 of 7 3-
pointers. Allen Payne fin-
ished with 11 points.
"They made the plays
down the stretch and we
didn't," Auburn coach
Tony Barbee said.
Auburn has lost its first
four SEC games by a com-
bined 23 points. The
Tigers have dropped their
last 14 against league
teams overall.
The Gators, who lost a
13-point lead in the first
half, made 21 of 39 shots
(53.8 percent).
Florida made 23 of 33
free throws while Auburn
was 14 of 22. The Tigers'
point guards, Shamsid-
Deen and Malcolm
Canada, both fouled out.
Prather got right into his
offensive rhythm after the
layoff. He came in with
16:58 remaining, hit two
quick jump shots and
made his first five at-
tempts, including a fast-
break dunk off a nice
bounce pass from Hill.


Pennetta, Li through to quarters


Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia -
Flavia Pennetta's late-career re-
vival continued as she reached
her first Australian Open quar-
terfinal on Sunday with a 6-1,4-6,
7-5 win over ninth-seeded An-
gelique Kerber of Germany
The 28th-seeded Pennetta, who
turns 32 next month, has played
some of her best tennis since re-
turning last February from a
wrist injury that caused her rank-
ing to drop as low as No. 166.
The Italian veteran reached
her first Grand Slam semifinal at
the U.S. Open last year and has
followed that by reaching her
first quarterfinal at Melbourne
Park in 11 appearances.
"I'm a little old so I'm starting
to enjoy (tennis) more," she said.
"When you are young you want to
win so much."
Pennetta broke Kerber to take
a 5-3 lead in the third set but
tightened up as she was serving
for the match, giving the break
right back. She recovered, how-
ever, to take a 6-5 lead and then
broke Kerber to close out the
match.
Li Na through to
Australian Open
quarterfinals
MELBOURNE, Australia Two-
time finalist Li Na has advanced to
the Australian Open quarterfinals for
the third time in four years with a 6-2,
6-0 win in just 59 minutes over Ekate-
rina Makarova on Sunday.
No. 4 Li, who broke No. 22-seeded
Marakova's serve five times, lost to
Victoria Azarenka in the 2013 final at


Associated Press
Li Na follows through on a shot to Ekaterina Makarova during their fourth
round match at the Australian Open Sunday in Melbourne, Australia.


Melbourne Park.
Li started this year by successfully
defending her title at Shenzen and
on Sunday improved her record at
the Australian Open to 31 wins from
39 matches.
Li will play the Flavia Pennetta in
the quarterfinals on Tuesday. Pennetta
earlier beat No. 9 Angelique Kerber.
Nadal puts on a grand
show in Australia
MELBOURNE, Australia Rafael
Nadal made it abundantly clear how
much he missed the last Australian
Open with the manner of his third-
round demolition of Gael Monfils.
Top-seeded Nadal trounced No.
25-seeded Monfils 6-1,6-2, 6-3 in two
hours to finish off Saturday's program
on the Rod Laver Arena, then told the
crowd it was "very emotional to have
the chance to play that well here in
Australia after missing last year."
He skipped it in 2013 during a


seven-month layoff for illness and in-
juries, depriving him a chance to pick
up two full sets of the Grand Slam titles.
Nadal returned to win the French
and U.S. Open crowns among his 10
titles last season and regained the
year-end No. 1-ranking. The Australian
Open is the only major Nadal has not
won at least twice, with his sole tri-
umph at Melbourne Park in 2009. The
Spaniard lost an epic five-set final to
Novak Djokovic two years ago.
The 27-year-old broke Monfils'
serve in the first game and then
fended off three break points before
holding in the next. He conceded just
one point on serve in the second set
and, apart from a slight stumble that
caused him to hobble around mo-
mentarily, he didn't have any trouble
advancing. Nadal next plays No. 16
Kei Nishikori of Japan, who ended
the U.S. run in the men's draw with a
comfortable win over Donald Young.
'Very happy the way that I played


against a very tough opponent like
Gael," Nadal said, giving himself high
marks for the performance. "So that
makes the level that I played tonight
better because it was against a tough
opponent.
"That makes me feel confident, but
I am in fourth round. That's all."
There were other lopsided
matches on the Rod Laver Arena,
with two-time women's defending
champion Victoria Azarenka routing
Yvonne Muesburger 6-1,6-1 to set
up an Australian Open rematch with
Sloane Stephens.
Third-seeded Maria Sharapova
opened the day session with a
straight-sets win over No. 25 Alize
Cornet and Roger Federer dispatched
Teymuraz Gabashvili of Russia 6-2, 6-
2, 6-3 in his return to the center court
after a one-match hiatus on the sec-
ondary court at Melbourne Park.
Federer is one of two four-time
Australian Open champions in the
men's draw. The other, three-time de-
fending champion Novak Djokovic
will play his fourth-round match on
Sunday, against No. 15 Fabio
Fognini. That match follows five-time
Australian champion Serena
Williams' match against Ana Ivanovic
in the women's fourth round.
Federer and Nadal are in the tough
half of the draw along with Wimble-
don champion Andy Murray, who is
two tournaments into a return from
minor back surgery in September.
Murray, a three-time finalist in Mel-
bourne, clutched at his back as he
hurdled an advertising board after
chasing a drop shot early in his 7-6
(2), 6-4, 6-2 win over Feliciano
Lopez. But he said it was no problem.


B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Michigan knocks off No. 3 Wisconsin
Mischisgan knocks of No. 3 Wisconsin


No. 2 Syracuse

narrowly downs

No. 22 Pittsburgh

Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. Nik
Stauskus scored 23 points and
hit a key 3 with 48 seconds left,
and Michigan fended off a late
surge for a 77-70 win over No. 3
Wisconsin.
Caris LeVert added 20 for the
Wolverines (13-4, 5-0 Big Ten),
who held on for their first road
win at Wisconsin since 1999
after nearly squandering a
15-point lead.
The Badgers (16-2, 3-2) went
on a 14-2 run late, and Ben
Brust's putback got them within
68-67 with about 2 minutes left.
But after whiffing on a 3 from
the right wing, Stauskus hit a
step-back from 3 from the left
side to give Michigan a 71-67 lead.
Josh Gasser had 16 points for
the Badgers, which lost their
second straight after a school-
best 16-0 start.
No. 2 Syracuse 59,
No. 22 Pittsburgh 54
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Freshman
point guard Tyler Ennis scored 16
points, including two driving layups
and two free throws in the final 2 min-
utes, and No. 2 Syracuse beat No.
22 Pittsburgh 59-54 on Saturday in a
battle for first place in the ACC be-
tween the two former Big East rivals.
Syracuse (18-0, 5-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) entered the game 2-0
against former Big East rivals, with
victories over St. John's and Vil-
lanova. The Orange made it three
straight and remained one of only
three unbeatens in Division I.
In four of the past five seasons,
Syracuse has started with at least
13 consecutive wins, and twice in
the last four years Pitt (16-2, 4-1)
had stopped those streaks.
No. 4 Michigan St. 78,
Illinois 62
CHAMAPIGN, III. Gary Harris
scored 23 points and Denzel Valen-
tine pulled down 11 rebounds to
lead No. 4 Michigan State past Illi-
nois 78-62.
The Spartans (17-1,6-0 Big Ten)
stayed on top of the Big Ten with
their 10th straight win. After opening
conference play 2-0, Illinois has now
lost four in a row.
Michigan State owned the boards
early against the Illini (13-6, 2-4).
Valentine and Keith Appling each
added 15 points for the Spartans.
TracyAbrams led Illinois with 15
points.
No. 5 Wichita St. 68,
Indiana St. 48
WICHITA, Kan. Ron Baker
scored 16 points and Fred VanVleet
added 15 as Wichita State remained
unbeaten.
Darius Carter and Chadrack Lufile
both scored 10 points for the Shock-
ers (19-0, 6-0 Missouri Valley), which
extended school records for winning
streak and best start to a season.
Dawon Cummings scored 19
points for Indiana State (14-4, 5-1).
He was 7 of 14 from the field while
the rest of the team was 9 of 37
(24.3 percent).
No. 6 Villanova 88,
DePaul 62
VILLANOVA, Pa. James Bell
had 17 points and eight rebounds and
Ryan Arcidiacono scored 14 points as


Associated Press
Michigan's Nik Stauskas drives past Wisconsin's Traevon Jackson during the second half Saturday in
Madison, Wis. Stauskas had a game-high 23 points in Michigan's 77-70 win.


Villanova won its fifth straight.
The Wildcats (16-1,5-0 Big East)
made 19 of 26 shots (73 percent) in
the second half and tied a season
low with five turnovers.
Daniel Ochefu had 14 points and
six rebounds, and Josh Hart hit
three 3-pointers and scored 13
points for the Wildcats.
Brandon Young had 13 points for
the Blue Demons (10-9, 2-4).
Texas 86,
No. 8 Iowa St. 76
AUSTIN, Texas Jonathan
Holmes scored 23 points and Cam
Ridley had 16 points and 11 re-
bounds as Texas handed Iowa State
its third straight loss.
Javan Felix scored 17 points for
the Longhorns (14-4, 3-2 Big 12) in-
cluding a 3-pointer in the momen-
tum-changing run in the second half
and a layup in the final minute that
helped protect the lead.
Georges Niang scored 18 points
to lead Iowa State, which started the
season 14-0. The Cyclones (14-3,
2-3) hadn't lost three straight since
the 2010-11 and haven't won in
Austin since 2005.
Melvin Ejim scored 17 for the
Cyclones, who went 11 of 32 on
3-pointers.
No. 15 Kansas 80,
No. 9 Oklahoma St. 78
LAWRENCE, Kan. Naadir
Tharpe scored 21 points for Kansas,
and Frank Mason stripped Oklahoma
State's Le'Bryan Nash as the final
buzzer sounded to preserve the win.
Joel Embiid added 13 points, 11
rebounds and eight blocks for the
Jayhawks (13-4, 4-0 Big 12), who
blew most of a 47-30 halftime lead
before holding on at the finish.
Phil Forte hit seven 3-pointers and
had 21 points for Oklahoma State
(15-3, 3-2). Marcus Smart added 16
points, but he was just 3 of 14 from


the field and 0 for 6 from behind the
3-point arc.
No. 10 San Diego St. 63,
UNLV 52
SAN DIEGO Xavier Thames
scored 18 points for No. 10 San
Diego State, which used a 19-2 first-
half run to beat UNLV 63-52 for its
15th straight victory.
Josh Davis added 14 points and
14 rebounds for SDSU (16-1,5-0
Mountain West), which hasn't lost
since its second game, a 69-60
home defeat against Arizona, which
is now ranked No. 1.
Bryce Dejean-Jones scored 15
points, Deville Smith had 13 and
Roscoe Smith 11 for UNLV (11-7,
2-3) which had won eight of its previ-
ous 10 games.
No. 25 Oklahoma 66,
No. 12 Baylor 64
WACO, Texas Buddy Hield
scored all 19 of his points after half-
time and Oklahoma stormed from
behind with a big run.
The Sooners (14-4, 3-2 Big 12)
were down by eight right after half-
time before reeling off 16 consecutive
points. Baylor regained the lead on a
putback by Cory Jefferson with 9:13
left, and the lead changed hands
three more times and there were
three ties before Heild's 3-pointer
with 4 minutes left made it 58-57.
That put the Sooners ahead to stay.
Kenny Chery had 16 points and
five assists for Baylor (13-4, 1-3).
No. 13 Kentucky 74,
Tennessee 66
LEXINGTON, Ky. Freshman
Andrew Harrison scored a season-
high 26 points and Kentucky used
near-perfect free throw shooting to
pull away.
The Wildcats (13-4, 3-1 South-
eastern Conference) made 23 of 24
from the line including their first 17


before Aaron Harrison, Andrew's
twin, missed the front end of a 1-
and-1 with 32 seconds remaining.
The Wildcats had entered the
game making 66 percent of their free
throws, 63 percent in SEC games.
Andrew Harrison made all 10 of
his free throw attempts along with a
couple of 3-pointers and freshman
Julius Randle was 5 of 5 from the
free throw line and 6 of 9 from the
field for 18 points.
Kentucky overcame a nine-point
first-half deficit to beat the
Volunteers (11-6, 2-2).
No. 16 UMass 84,
Elon 74
ELON, N.C. Cady Lalanne
scored 16 of his 23 points in the first
half and Chaz Williams scored all 20
of his points in the second half as
No. 16 Massachusetts held off sev-
eral Elon rallies to win 84-74.
The Minutemen (16-1) won their
sixth game in a row.
Maxie Esho finished with 17
points for the Minutemen.
Lucas Troutman scored 19 points
and Sebastian Koch had 18 points
for Elon (10-9).
No. 17 Memphis 101,
Lemoyne-Owen 78
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Nick King
scored 18 points as Memphis beat
Division II LeMoyne-Owen.
The win was a needed relief for
the Tigers (13-4), who had dropped
two consecutive home games.
No. 19 Cincinnati 61,
South Florida 54
TAMPA-- Sean Kilpatrick scored
18 points to lead Cincinnati to its
10th straight win.
Shaquille Thomas added 10 points
for the Bearcats (17-2, 6-0 AAC).
South Florida (10-8, 1-4) got 15
points from Javontae Hawkins.


No. 21 Colorado 83,
Southern Cal 62
BOULDER, Colo. Josh Scott
scored 20 points and Askia Booker
had 13 as Colorado, shaken by the
loss of star guard Spencer Dinwiddie
to a season-ending knee injury, re-
bounded from its first home defeat.
Xavier Johnson and Jaron Hop-
kins had 10 points each for Colorado
(15-4, 4-2 Pac-12), which sent
Southern Cal (9-9, 0-5) to its sea-
son-high fifth consecutive loss.
Omar Oraby and J.T Terrell both
had 16 points to lead the Trojans.
No. 23 Duke 95,
N.C. State 60
DURHAM, N.C. Jabari Parker
scored 23 points and Duke scored
33 points off turnovers.
Rasheed Sulaimon added 13
points for the Blue Devils (14-4, 3-2
Atlantic Coast Conference).
Duke shot 50 percent and went 11
for 24 from 3-point range.
T.J. Warren scored 23 points to
lead N.C. State (11-7, 1-4), which
shot 48 percent but committed 21
turnovers.
No. 24 Saint Louis 70,
Fordham 48
ST. LOUIS Dwayne Evans had
21 points and 10 rebounds and Jor-
dair Jett lacked a rebound for his first
career double-double for Saint Louis.
Saint Louis (17-2, 4-0 Atlantic 10)
has won 11 straight games. The Bil-
likens held Fordham (7-10, 0-4) to
season lows for first half and game
scoring on 29 percent shooting.
Jett had 18 points, nine rebounds
and six assists.
Jon Severe had 22 points for
Fordham.
Utah 74,
No. 25 UCLA 69
SALT LAKE CITY-- Jordan
Loveridge had 17 points and nine
rebounds to lead Utah.
Delon Wright, Brandon Taylor and
Kenneth Ogbe each scored 12
points to help the Utes (14-4, 3-3
Pac-12) earn their first victory over
the Bruins since the 1983 NCAA
tournament.
Kyle Anderson had 28 points,
seven rebounds and seven assists
for UCLA, and Zach LaVine added
15 points for the Bruins (14-4, 3-2).
Virginia 78, FSU 66
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Joe
Harris scored 18 points and Virginia
used an early 22-5 run to take com-
mand on its way to a 78-66 victory
against Florida State and a sweep of
its season series against the 'Noles.
Malcolm Brogdon added 16
points for the Cavaliers (13-5, 4-1
Atlantic Coast Conference), who
won 62-50 at Florida State on Jan.
4. The sweep is the first for the Cav-
aliers since the 2000-01 season.
Okaro White and Aaron Thomas
scored 15 each for Florida State
(12-5, 3-2).
SMU 58, UCF 46
ORLANDO Markus Kennedy
had 15 points and eight rebounds
and Southern Methodist used a sec-
ond-half run to defeat Central
Florida 58-46.
Southern Methodist (13-4, 3-2
American Athletic Conference) used
a 19-5 run in the second half that
produced a 54-39 lead with just
under 2 minutes left in the game.
The SMU defense held UCF (9-7,
1-4) without a field goal for more
than 10 minutes.
Tristan Spurlock was the only
UCF player to reach double figures,
scoring 11 points.


Garoppolo's TD pass helps East beat West 23-13


Associated Press
East quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo, of East-
ern Illinois, sets up to throw a pass during the
second half of the East-West Shrine Classic
game Saturday in St. Petersburg. The East
won 23-13 and Garoppolo was named the
offensive MVP.


Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG -
Jimmy Garoppolo threw a
short second-quarter touch-
down pass and Nevin Lawson
returned a fourth-quarter
fumble 5 yards for another
TD to lead the East to a 23-13
victory in the 89th East-West
Shrine game on Saturday
Coastal Carolina's Matt
Hazel scored on the 1-yard
scoring pass from Garoppolo,
the Eastern Illinois standout
who completed nine of 14
passes for 100 yards and no in-
terceptions. Arkansas' Zach
Hocker kicked three field
goals for the East, including a
56-yarder that snapped a 13-13
tie early in the fourth quarter
Nevin, a cornerback from
Utah State, scooped up a fum-
ble forced by Western Ken-
tucky's Andrew Jackson to
put the East up 23-13 with
9:38 to go.
Heisman Trophy finalist
Jordan Lynch of Northern Illi-
nois started at quarterback for
the East and threw a pair of
first-quarter interceptions


while also failing to get his
team into the end zone after
Ball State's Keith Wenning lost
a fumble for the West on the
second play of the game.
Hoping to capitalize on the
quick turnover, Lynch over-
threw potential scoring
passes to Michigan's Jeremy
Gallon and Miami's Allen
Hums before the East settled
for a 31-yard field goal. Two of
his next three passes were in-
tercepted by Arizona State's
Alden Darby and Arizona's
Shaquille Richardson.
More than 100 players from
last winter's East-West game
wound up in NFL camps, and
this year's participants were
hoping to make the most of an
opportunity to showcase their
skills for pro scouts.
Lynch, who finished 2 of 7
passing for 3 yards, was a
Heisman Trophy finalist in
2013 and led Northern Illinois
to a BCS bowl berth as a jun-
ior and a 24-4 record in two
years as a starter
Despite throwing for over
6,000 yards, 49 touchdowns
and just 14 interceptions as a


junior and senior, the 6-foot,
216-pound Lynch, who was an
even more effective runner in
college, entered practice for
Saturday's game feeling he
had to demonstrate he can
throw the ball well enough to
have a chance to be successful
as a pro.
Garoppolo's TD pass to
Hazel gave the East a 13-6 lead
that the West erased when
Washington's Keith Price
threw a 20-yard scoring pass to
Toledo's Bernard Reedy early
in the third quarter Reedy fin-
ished with four receptions for
46 yards, and San Jose State's
Chandler Jones also had a big
game for the West with seven
catches for 73 yards.
Wenning was 12 of 19 for 82
yards and one interception.
Notre Dame's Tommy Rees
followed him for the West,
going 5 of 11 for 69 yards and
an interception.
Copeland's two
TDs leads Team
National to win
CARSON, Calif. LSU full-


back J.C. Copeland ran for a
pair of 1-yard touchdowns,
Stanford's Anthony Wilkerson
ran for 67 yards and a touch-
down and Team National used
a second half surge to beat
Team American 31-17 in the
third annual NFLPA Collegiate
Bowl.
Copeland, who never had a
multi-touchdown game in 42 ca-
reer games at LSU, was named
MVP.
Hawaii quarterback Sean
Schroeder completed 13 of 17
passes for 138 yards and a
touchdown to lead the American.
The game was tied at 14 at
halftime, but the National scored
on its first three possessions of
the second half to cruise to
victory.
Former Chiefs, Eagles and
Rams coach Dick Vermeil
coached the National side while
former Vikings and Cardinals
coach Dennis Green coached the
American squad. Vermeil has
guided the National to victory in
all three installments of the
game.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 B5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Legacy builder


Associated Press
Tom Brady, right, and the New England Patriots are scheduled to play Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos
in the AFC championship game today in Denver.

Quarterback Brady faces Manning once more with SB on line


Associated Press

DENVER Only one of them
can be the greatest
Peyton Manning could be the one
- owner of a record four, working
on five, Most Valuable Player
awards, current holder of NFL sin-
gle-season records for passing
yardage and touchdowns and ar-
chitect of a career-reviving second
act, the likes of which has rarely
been seen in any sport.
Tom Brady could also be that
man leader of five Super Bowl
teams and winner of three titles,
one-time holder of some of the
records Manning holds now and au-
thor of an undefeated regular sea-
son. He also has that 10-4 record
against Manning despite constant
turnover on his roster and a lack of
a star-studded receiving corps.
Manning and Brady will meet
today for the 15th time, and the
fourth time in the postseason, when
the Broncos (14-3) face the Patriots
(13-4) in the AFC title game.
The winner between the top two
quarterbacks over an era in which
quarterbacks have never been so
good will get what could be the last
say in the debate over who goes
down as the greatest not so much
because of what the win-loss num-
bers will say but because this could
be the last time they meet with the
stakes so high.
"I don't know that there will ever
be another rivalry like it, or has
been a rivalry like it," said John
Elway, whose own rivalry with Dan
Marino was held to only three meet-
ings because of scheduling quirks
over their decade-plus careers.
The game will either give Brady
a chance to match Joe Montana and
Terry Bradshaw for a fourth title or
afford Manning the opportunity to
win a second ring, which would put
him one behind Brady, and in the
same company with his brother, Eli,
Roger Staubach and Elway, among
others. It would also make Manning
the first QB to win championships
with two different teams.
While paying ultimate respect to
each other- "I feel like he's been a
better player each year than he was
the year before," Manning said -
neither quarterback professes to
care much about how their own
head-to-head showdowns will de-
fine their legacy
Don't believe it, said Phil Simms,
who admits in retirement that the
smile was a little wider after he
walked off the field with a win over


Denver Broncos fans cheer at a pep rally Friday in downtown Denver.


a Staubach or Joe Theismann.
"It's always personal, no matter
what," Simms said. "It's part of
being a competitor and doing what
you do."
One reason Brady has a .714 win
percentage in the head-to-head
meetings and also holds a 2-1 ad-
vantage in the playoffs is because,
more often than not,
he's been sur- AFC char
rounded by the more
complete team. No. 2 Nem
He has been any- Patriot
thing but a one-man at No. 1
show in New Eng- Bronco
land this season, il-
lustrated best by the 0 Time: 3 p.
fact that the Patriots U TV: CBS.
are in the AFC title
game even though
Brady threw for 25 touchdowns -
less than half of Manning's record-
setting 55.
Without Rob Gronkowski, Aaron
Hernandez or Wes Welker to throw
to, Brady made it work, with a big
assist from head coach Bill Be-
lichick and offensive coordinator
Josh McDaniels, who used to coach
the Broncos.
New England's running game,
led by LeGarrette Blount and
Shane Vereen, has averaged 214
yards the last three games. Brady's
75 passes over the last three games
are the fewest of any three-game
stretch in his career
Welker, who played with Brady for
six years before coming to Denver
this season, says ift's not so much stats
or physical attributes that defines
these two Hall-of-Fame quarterbacks.
"They do a great job of keeping
guys accountable, and their leader-
ship skills and everything else," he


said. "They are two guys you want
quarterbacking your team. It's a
toss-up between those two."
Manning has thrown for 92 touch-
downs since arriving in Denver at
the start of the 2012 season, his neck
rebuilt from multiple surgeries, his
future uncertain because of his
weakened throwing arm.
He'd be the first to
ipionship admit he's not the
same as he once was,
v England physically But no-
S(13-4) body prepares better
Denver His record-setting
s (14-3) 5,477 yards and all
those touchdown
m. today, throws came with a
gifted group of offen-
sive stars surround-
ing him Welker,
Eric Decker, Demaryius Thomas
and this season's difference maker,
6-foot-5 tight end Julius Thomas.
But Manning had great players
around him in Indianapolis, as
well, and never put up these sort of
numbers.
"Honestly, no one will probably
ever break that, not in this day and
age," former Broncos receiver Rod
Smith said.
Today, Brady, who missed parts of
practice early in the week with the
flu, will be going against a depleted
secondary that just lost cornerback
Chris Harris Jr., which will make
Champ Bailey injured most of
the season a bigger cog for the
Denver 'D.'
And the Patriots will likely invite
the Broncos to run- much the way
they did in their 34-31 overtime loss
in Week 12 knowing the best
chance of beating them is by taking
the ball out of Manning's hands.


L
r
I


Two best teams



in NFC remain


Seahawks,

49ersjust

belong in game

Associated Press

SEATTLE From the
first kickoff back in Sep-
tember, the 49ers and Sea-
hawks seemed destined to
meet for the NFC title.
Time to get it on.
With the conference's
most physical, relentless
defenses, adept at forcing
turnovers and making op-
ponents think twice about,
well, just about anything,
Seattle (now 14-3) won the
NFC West by one game
over San Francisco (now
14-4). The offenses, while
not nearly as imposing,
have the right elements
for a champion: strong
running games, efficient
and sometimes dynamic
quarterbacks, and staunch
lines.
Their coaches have the
proper pedigree, as well.
Jim Harbaugh has led the
49ers to the NFC champi-
onship game in all three
seasons in charge, making
the Super Bowl last year.
Pete Carroll had a 28-23
record in three seasons as
Patriots coach, then went
to the college ranks and
built a powerhouse at
Southern
California, NFC chan
with two na-
tional titles. No. (
T h a t Francis
there's no ( a
love lost be- (144)
tween Har- Seattle S
baugh and (14
Carroll dat-
ing back to
when they U TV: FOX.
both were
working in college Har-
baugh at Stanford, where
he ran up the score on Car-
roll's Trojans adds
plenty of spice.
The sum total on both
sides should be a worthy
conference champion to
meet either Denver or
New England in two weeks
in the New Jersey Mead-
owlands for the NFL
crown.
Even if both teams are
playing down the drama
they figure to provide be-
fore an ear-shattering wall
of noise at CenturyLink
Field today
"I think ift's pretty much,
the game's a bigger stage
and gets you to the Super
Bowl obviously" said 49ers
defensive lineman Justin
Smith. "But I think for the


r
I




I


most part how we've gone
into every game in the
year's past is we try to be
as regimented as possible
in how we do things. We're
not going to get all caught
up in 'This game gets us to
the Super Bowl or this and
that' We all know. There's
nothing that needs to be
said or a special meeting
or anything."
Just football.
"It's like every game,"
Seahawks quarterback
Russell Wilson confirmed.
"Every game is no differ-
ent even though it's a
championship game and
all of that. We talk about
playing 1-0 every week,
and the game doesn't
change.
"It comes down to not
turning over the football,
being in the plus in that
situation, having a limited
amount of penalties;
you're going to get some
penalties, especially in a
game like this, but not hav-
ing too many of them.
"The biggest thing is just
staying on schedule."
The schedule brought
these teams together in
September and December
Seattle won 29-3 at home
in Week 2, then lost 19-17
at San Francisco on Dec. 8.
CenturyLink Field
might be the toughest
venue in the NFL for visi-
tors, with architecture that
not only keeps the noise
inside the
ipionship stadium, but
funnels it to-
SSan ward the
S49ers field itself
it No. 1 Wilson be-
came a
eahawks starter as a
3) rookie in
Sp.m. today. 2012 and
went unde-
feated. He
won his first
six home starts this season
before a stumble against
Arizona, but then Seattle
defeated St. Louis to finish
off the regular season, and
New Orleans in a divi-
sional-round playoff last
weekend.
"That's pretty spectacu-
lar and it just shows how
amazing our fans are, how
much energy the city has
for our football team," Wil-
son said of the supersonic
sound levels the 49ers can
expect to deal with when
they have the ball. "That's
what we're looking for-
ward to, and we want to
bring something special to
this city, and to do it we
have to play one play at a
time and see what hap-
pens at the end of the
game."


Associated Press
Russell Wilson, right, and the Seattle Seahawks host
Colin Kaepernick and the San Franciso 49ers in the NFC
championship today.


NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44
New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24
Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10
San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 11
Seattle 23, New Orleans 15
New England 43, Indianpolis 22
Sunday, Jan.12
San Francisco 23, Carolina 10
Denver 24, San Diego 17
Conference Championships
Today, Jan. 19
New England at Denver, 3 p.m. (CBS)
San Francisco at Seattle, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
NFL Injury Report
NEW YORK- The updated National Football
League injury report, as provided by the league:
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at DENVER BRON-
COS PATRIOTS: OUT: LB Steve Beauharnais (ill-
ness). QUESTIONABLE: P Ryan Allen (shoulder), WR
Aaron Dobson (foot), WR Kenbrell Thompkins (hip,
concussion). PROBABLE: WR Danny Amendola
(groin), CB Alfonzo Dennard (knee, shoulder), LB Dane
Fletcher (groin), LB Donfa Hightower (ankle), G Logan


Mankins (ankle), RB Shane Vereen (groin). BRON-
COS: PROBABLE: S Mike Adams (thigh), TE Joel
Dreessen (knee), S Duke Ihenacho (knee), TWinston
Justice (finger), G Chris Kuper (ankle), QB Peyton
Manning (ankle), WR Demaryius Thomas (calf), CB
Kayvon Webster (thumb).
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at SEATTLE SEA-
HAWKS 49ERS: QUESTIONABLE: CB Carlos
Rogers (hamstring), RB Will Tukuafu (knee). PROBA-
BLE: LB NaVorro Bowman (wrist), LB Ahmad Brooks
(illness), WR Michael Crabtree (wrist), DT Demarcus
Dobbs (knee, shoulder), C Jonathan Goodwin (foot),
RB Frank Gore (knee), LB Dan Skuta (foot), DT Justin
Smith (shoulder). SEAHAWKS: OUT:WR Percy Harvin
(concussion). QUESTIONABLE: DT Jordan Hill (groin).
PROBABLE: RB Marshawn Lynch (not injury related),
LB K.J. Wright (foot).
AFC champions
2012-Baltimore 28, New England 13
2011-New England 23, Baltimore 20
2010-Pittsburgh 24, N.Y Jets 19
2009-Indianapolis 30, NewYork 17
2008-Pittsburgh 23, Baltimore 14
2007-New England 21, San Diego 12
2006-Indianapolis 38, New England 34
2005-Pittsburgh 34, Denver 17
2004-New England 41, Pittsburgh 27
2003-New England 24, Indianapolis 14
2002-Oakland 41, Tennessee 24
2001-New England 24, Pittsburgh 17
2000-Baltimore 16, Oakland 3
1999 Tennessee 33, Jacksonville 14
1998-Denver 23, NewYork 10
1997-Denver 24, Pittsburgh 21
1996-New England 20, Jacksonville 6
1995-Pittsburgh 20, Indianapolis 16
1994-San Diego 17, Pittsburgh 13
1993-Buffalo 30, Kansas City 13


NFL STATISTICS
1992-Buffalo 29, Miami 10
1991-Buffalo 10, Denver 7
1990-Buffalo 51, L.A. Raiders 3
1989-Denver 37, Cleveland 21
1988-Cincinnati 21, Buffalo 10
1987-Denver 38, Cleveland 33
1986-Denver 23, Cleveland 20, OT
1985-New England 31, Miami 14
1984-Miami 45, Pittsburgh 28
1983-L.A. Raiders 30, Seattle 14
1982-Miami 14, NewYorkO
1981-Cincinnati 27, San Diego 7
1980-Oakland 34, San Diego 27
1979-Pittsburgh 27, Houston 13
1978-Pittsburgh 34, Houston 5
1977-Denver 20, Oakland 17
1976-Oakland 24, Pittsburgh 7
1975-Pittsburgh 16, Oakland 10
1974-Pittsburgh 24, Oakland 13
1973-Miami 27, Oakland 10
1972-Miami 21, Pittsburgh 17
1971-Miami 21, Baltimore 0
1970-Baltimore 27, Oakland 17
1969-Kansas City 17, Oakland 7
1968-New York 27, Oakland 23
1967-Oakland 40, Houston 7
1966-Kansas City 31, Buffalo 7
1965-Buffalo 23, San Diego 0
1964-Buffalo 20, San Diego 7
1963-San Diego 51, Boston 10
1962-Dallas 20, Houston 17, OT
1961-Houston 10, San Diego 3
1960-Houston 24, L.A. Chargers 16
NOTE: List includes AFL Championship Games from
1960 to 1969.
NFC champions
2012-San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24
2011-N.Y Giants 20, San Francisco 17, OT


-Green Bay 21, Chicago 14
-New Orleans 31, Minnesota 28, OT
-Arizona 32, Philadelphia 25
-NewYork 23, Green Bay 20, OT
-Chicago 39, New Orleans 14
-Seattle 34, Carolina 14
-Philadelphia 27, Atlanta 10
-Carolina 14, Philadelphia 3
-Tampa Bay 27, Philadelphia 10
-St. Louis 29, Philadelphia 24
-NewYork 41, Minnesota 0
-St. Louis 11,Tampa Bay 6
-Atlanta 30, Minnesota 27, OT
-Green Bay 23, San Francisco 10
-Green Bay 30, Carolina 13
-Dallas 38, Green Bay 27
-San Francisco 38, Dallas 28
-Dallas 38, San Francisco 21
-Dallas 30, San Francisco 20
-Washington 41, Detroit 10
-NewYork 15, San Francisco 13
-San Francisco 30, L.A. Rams 3
-San Francisco 28, Chicago 3
-Washington 17, Minnesota 10
-NewYork 17, Washington 0
-Chicago 24, L.A. Rams 0
-San Francisco 23, Chicago 0
-Washington 24, San Francisco 21
-Washington 31, Dallas 17
-San Francisco 28, Dallas 27
-Philadelphia 20, Dallas 7
-L.A. Rams 9, Tampa Bay 0
-Dallas 28, L.A. Rams 0
-Dallas 23, Minnesota 6
-Minnesota 24, L.A. Rams 13
-Dallas 37, L.A. Rams 7
-Minnesota 14, L.A. Rams 10
-Minnesota 27, Dallas 10
-Washington 26, Dallas 3


1971-Dallas 14, San Francisco 3
1970-Dallas 17, San Francisco 10
1969-Minnesota 27, Cleveland Browns 7
1968-Baltimore 34, Cleveland Browns 0
1967-Green Bay 21, Dallas 17
1966-Green Bay 34, Dallas 27
1965-Green Bay 23, Cleveland Browns 12
1964-Cleveland Browns 27, Baltimore 0
1963-Chicago Bears 14, NewYork 10
1962-Green Bay 16, NewYork7
1961-Green Bay 37, NewYork 0
1960-Philadelphia 17, Green Bay 13
1959-Baltimore 31, NewYork 16
1958-Baltimore 23, NewYork 17, OT
1957-Detroit 59, Cleveland Browns 14
1956-NewYork 47, Chicago Bears 7
1955-Cleveland Browns 38, Los Angeles 14
1954-Cleveland Browns 56, Detroit 10
1953-Detroit 17, Cleveland Browns 16
1952-Detroit 17, Cleveland Browns 7
1951-Los Angeles 24, Cleveland Browns 17
1950-Cleveland Browns 30, Los Angeles 28
1949-Philadelphia 14, Los Angeles 0
1948-Philadelphia 7, Chicago Cardinals 0
1947-Chicago Cardinals 28, Philadelphia 21
1946-Chicago Bears 24, NewYork 14
1945-Cleveland Rams 15, Washington 14
1944-Green Bay 14, NewYork7
1943-Chicago 41, Washington 21
1942 Washington 14, Chicago Bears 6
1941-Chicago Bears 37, NewYork 9
1940-Chicago Bears 73, Washington 0
1939-Green Bay 27, NewYork 0
1938-NewYork 23, Green Bay 17
1937 Washington 28, Chicago Bears 21
1936-Green Bay 21, Boston 6
1935-Detroit 26, NewYork7
1934-NewYork 30, Chicago Bears 13
1933-Chicago Bears 23, NewYork 21


B6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


NFL










COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



My New Year's resolution is to eat more jelly donuts


s some of you know,
one of the projects I
am working on in the
community is to raise
$8 million to build Citrus
County's first YMCA.
While I am a proponent
of taking care of yourself
and being physically fit,
there are times I am not so
sure that exercise is good for
your health or your wallet.
Jewel Lamb and I are the
co-chairs of the Y capital


campaign, and we already
have more than $5 million
in pledges to make the Cit-
rus facility happen. Our
goal is to raise the rest of
the money in 2014 and get
construction started.
I like to think I am physi-
cally fit because I play a lot
of tennis and regularly ride
my bike through the neigh-
borhoods. It would be a lit-
tle hypocritical for me to
urge people to use the


YMCA if I didn't practice
what I preached.
But over the holidays I
went to the Publix near
Meadowcrest and got a sur-
prise. They have a new
blood pressure machine
right by the front door, and
it looked pretty cool.
I tried it out and it gave
me some startling news. My
blood pressure was fine, but
the machine informed me I
was fat. "Overweight" was


the official word, but "fat"
was the clear implication.
I couldn't believe it. I re-
acted just like every other
normal American would
and I smacked the machine
with the palm of my hand
and tried it again.
This time the official re-
port from the blood pres-
sure gizmo was: "Fat and
angry"
(I might have made that
up.)


Anyway, I wasn't going to
be discouraged, so the next
day I got up early and rode
my bicycle around Crystal
River The weather was
cold and my glasses fogged
up. I took them off and
stored them in my pocket.
When I got back to the
house and reached for my
glasses, I was dismayed to
find that my prescription


PageC3


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Workers construct the "Gary Maidhoff Walk to Nature" trail in August, where it was subsequently dedicated at the Academy for Environmental Sciences off County
Road 44.



FOR CRYSTAL RIVER,


THIS WILL BE A


YEAR


OF OPPORTUNITY


SL AST YEAR BROUGHT UNEXPECTED CHALLENGES
to our community, but also accomplishments
.. ato be proud of. Among the challenges was the
Announcement by Duke Energy that the nu-
a clear plants would not be rebuilt. The plant employed
A about 600 people, and that number will decline through-
out the decommissioning process until there is a staff of
only 80 to 85 workers. The city didn't lose any direct tax
Jim Farley revenue since the facility is outside the city, but the number
GUEST of homes going on the market as a result of the closing
COLUMN has contributed to depressing the real estate market.




To prepare for the future, We c

we must learn from the past our w


n a recent and widely circulated management legislation adopted in
opinion piece, Wendell Cox, a St. 1972, the act's four primary objectives
Louis-based demographer, blamed were to protect environmentally sensi-
Florida's growth-management laws en- tive areas from overdevelopment; en-
acted in the 1970s and '80s sure that the roads, schools
for the devastating effects of ".-- and other infrastructure to
the 2007 Great Recession.. 4 support new development
Cox contends these laws re- .i were properly funded and in
stricted the supply of hous- I place concurrent with the
ing in Florida, contributing .- new growth; manage water
to the housing bubble and resources for the public's
subsequent financial crisis benefit; and acquire conser-
and Great Recession. vation lands that contribute
He further asserts that the E to the protection of Florida's
repeal of those growth- Bob Graham natural resources, economy
management laws in 2011 CU T and quality of life. In the
was a key factor in the state's GUEST 1980s, Florida was growing
recovery COLUMN at the rate of almost 1,000
As governor when people a day, roughly the
Florida's 1985 Growth Management Act equivalent of adding a new city of
was passed, I'd like to share some ob- Tampa every year It was in this climate
servations regarding Cox's analysis.
In conjunction with land- and water- See Page C3


A law went into effect that would sharply raise
flood insurance rates on many residents, possibly
causing some to lose their homes (or at the least not
be able to sell them) and businesses. While there are
efforts under way to change the law, or at least delay
it until an economic-impact study can be done, we
held a workshop Jan. 10 to discuss what, if anything,
we can do to help protect our residents. The issue is
extremely complex and it will take further discus-
sions and study to get a clear picture on all that is
involved. What we know for sure now is we must sub-
mit a Community Rating Service (CRS) application
to FEMA to support reduced flood insurance costs.
The Crystal River Mall has struggled due to the
nationwide recession and the ever-evolving mar-
ketplace. More and more people choose online
See Page C3



an and must repair

iters, and here's how


Editor's note: This is the final part of are today and where we wind up in the
a two-part series on the health of local future. There can be no single individ-
and state water resources. The first in- ual or endeavor that is superior to an-
stallment was published on Jan. 12. other as we face this challenge. Flawed
laws and administrative
W e need a philosoph- policies have led us to the
ical shift in how we unfortunate circumstance
manage our waters we find ourselves in today A
in Florida. Our waters are fleeting glance at Florida's
substantially impaired Impaired Waters List should
across the state, and the time be sufficient to understand
for remedial action is past that what we are doing is
due. U ineffective.
This is not an us-vs.-them While this thought may
debate. It should be under- Dan Hilliard grate on the concept of lais-
stood that regardless of what GUEST sez-faire politics, it seems
one does in day-to-day life UE peculiar that a conservative-
here in Florida, we are all in COLUMN controlled political system in
this together Whether we as Tallahassee would slight the
individuals are involved in agriculture, intrinsic worth of our most valuable and
industry or are simply residents, every dynamic state resource. If the thought
one of us is a participant in this affair
We all bear responsibility for where we See Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW







Page C2- SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CI


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
& EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby ............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ON THE MEND





CEO Beaty




steps down




to secure




CMH deal


he legal marathon to
end the turmoil at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital
is one very large step closer
to realization.
Both of the battling govern-
ing boards agreed to sign a
letter of intent to lease the
hospital to the Hospital Cor-
poration of America, the
largest hospital corporation
in the country.
The deal was reached only
after hospital CEO Ryan Beaty
agreed to fall on
his sword and re-
sign his position THE
as the hospital's Citrus M\
executive, hospital
Once that was
done, the Citrus OUR 01
Memorial hospi-
tal governing Finally
board agreed to seems
drop two of its


S
11


P
J
P


lawsuits against the CMH
Foundation board and to
eliminate the personal liabil-
ity of board members in a
third. A state Supreme Court
case is still awaiting the final
decision of the justices.
Beaty will receive a gener-
ous severance deal when he
officially resigns on March 15.
An interim administrator will
then be selected to run the
hospital in the transition pe-
riod from March until about
September, when HCA would
be expected to take over.
The good news here is that
like a sick patient enduring
an extended stay in the hos-
pital, the fever has finally
broken and the possibility of
a healthy future is right
around the corner.
The jewel of our county health
system has been tarnished
during the past four years be-
cause these two boards could


120's a big buzz
I read Mr. William Parker's letter
and some (ideas) do make sense
to me and I agree with him. How-
ever, I was in the electrical busi-
ness in Wisconsin for 43 years, and
messing around with 120 volts,
as he described it, could kill the
squirrels, birds and
anything else that ot
touched the wire. It's
not safe at all. A better
bet would be to use a
product designed for
cattle and horses
around their corral in
the field, which operates
at a safer voltage but CAL
still packs a wallop and
will still scare the squir- 563-
rels away. But somebody
could really get hurt bad by doing
that the way he's doing it, OK?
Thumbs up, Mark
Thank you, Mr. Mark Stoltz,
for your beautiful letter (to the
editor on Jan. 14). It was most
factual and pleasant to read for
both Democrats and Republi-
cans. Thank you again.


not come to terms. By collect-
ing, yet holding back tax dol-
lars, the governing board
in fact financially starved
the foundation board into
submission.
Lawyers got rich and tax-
payers paid the bill as more
than $11 million in legal fees
were wasted.
The end result is that our
once independent hospital
can no longer afford to stand
alone, and a relationship with
a national health
ME care company be-
came inevitable.
memorial The good news
boards, is that HCA has a
solid reputation
'INION: in Florida and it
does a very good
a deal job running Oak
possible. Hill Hospital in
Spring Hill. Life
will change dramatically at the
Inverness hospital, and after
four years of stress and legal
confrontation, that's not a
bad thing.
The practices and
processes of a national health
care provider will be much
more rigid and organized
going forward.
The sad truth is that the fi-
nancial value of the hospital
has continued to be diluted by
the legal wrangling from these
two boards. When HCA does
complete its due diligence
analysis of CMH, we will not be
surprised to see them come
back with a lower lease rate.
But for now let's celebrate
the positive news it ap-
pears that CMH is finally
headed toward a new owner
and a new era. That will be
good news for the employees,
physicians, taxpayers and
health care consumers.


Thanks, John and Dan
In the Jan. 12 Chronicle, Dan
Hilliard and John Moran, guest
columnists, publicized the long-
festering problems of our polluted
springs and waterways. Their co-
gent statements said more than
the Chronicle has chosen to convey


Sto the public previously.
ND Thanks, Don
OFF We always knew that
Hospice was a tremen-
dous care organization,
but the other night one
particular nurse, a Mr.
Don O'Shall, deserves
special recognition. My
5 wife, in a care center,
0579 needed a change of
medicine. He came,
prescribed the medicine, called
the doctor, got the authorization
to get it. He himself took it up to
the pharmacy, got it taken care of
and then gave it to the driver to
bring back to the care center. So
thank you, Nature Coast Lodge,
thank you, Hospice, and a special
thank-you to Don O'Shall. That's
going the extra mile. Thank you.


"Men's men: gentle or simple, they're much of a muchness."
George Eliot, "Daniel Deronda," 1876


SLETTERS to the Editor


Don't be surprised
by your choices
Each election cycle, Citrus
County votes in all Republicans
to the county commission. I ask
these voters, "How would you
expect Republican commissioners
to run the county government?"
The logical answer would be
"Like any Republican." Again I
ask these voters, "Do they know
the philosophy of the Republican
Party?" I reply, "Obviously not!"
The Republican Party in-
cludes ideas such as:
1. Trickle-down economy
2. Wages set by the free market
3. Limiting the help of people
by government intervention.
4. Government should help
stimulate a business environ-
ment.
5. Cutting taxes for higher
income and keeping loopholes
and subsidies for companies
like big oil, sugar, mega farms,
etc.
6. They believe in cuts in
Medicare, Social Security, food
stamps, Medicaid and jobless
benefits.
Republicans believe if they
do all of the above, people will
eventually reap the benefits.
But this is not happening. Cor-
porations are making big prof-
its and CEOs are getting big
raises and bonuses. But they
are not hiring and not increas-
ing wages and the middle class
is being squeezed into poverty
The reason I say that the vot-
ers of this county must not know
or understand the philosophy
of the Republican Party is be-
cause of what I read in a lot of


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

the letters and call-ins to the
editor They don't seem to like
what their commissioners are
doing. They want them to put
people first and not spend our
taxes on things like a port. So
every election, they vote in Re-
publicans and then miraculously
they expect them to run our
county like Democrats, who do
put people first. So vote smart
if you want the people put first
Cheryl Seronick
Homosassa


Please observe
proper flag etiquette
Are you really patriotic? Faded
and tattered flags are not patriotic.
I see individuals, businesses,
schools, county, state and federal
offices with worn and tattered
flags. If you fly a flag 24/7 dur-
ing all kinds of weather, please
spend a little more money and
buy one that is durable.
I am a disabled veteran and
nothing upsets me more than
seeing someone think they are
being patriotic by flying a flag
that is tattered, faded and worn.
That is not being patriotic at all.
This is a big problem all over
Citrus County Please, I am
begging you to buy a new flag.
Ask any veteran and they
will tell you the same thing.
You are disrespecting a vet-
eran when you fly a worn and
tattered flag and when you
dispose of your worn-out flag,
please dispose of it properly If
you don't know how to dispose
of it properly, take it to any Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars or Amer-
ican Legion post and they can
dispose of it properly
My post is Crystal River
VFW Post 8189, or take it to any
veteran-affiliated organization
and it will be taken care of.
By the way, I wrote a letter
approximately one year ago to
the Chronicle concerning Vet-
erans Affairs disability not being
done right. I am still waiting on
an appeal. So as of now, I have
been fighting VA for 27 years.
James Tuck
Crystal River


Special to the Chronicle
This mechanical harvester is one of the tools being used to remove Lyngbya from King's Bay.


Everyone has a hand in saving


Citrus County's waterways


On Jan. 3, board members
of Save Crystal River Inc.
(SCR) were joined by
representatives from the envi-
ronmental permit division of the
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection (DEP) and
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District (SWFWMD) to
observe a "real time" demon-
stration of a mechanical har-
vester used to remove the
invasive algae, Lyng-
bya, devastating the The I[
waters in King's Bay of Dir
The demonstration
was done as part of of Kin
the approval process Rot
for the DEP Environ-
mental Restoration Char
Permit (ERP), part of Founi
the long-term strat-
egy and focus of One and
Rake at a Time, a Cry
partnership of Kings Ri
Bay Rotary Charita- Rve
ble Foundation and
SCR. The permit will GUI
provide the continued
restoration of the bay COLI
by removing Lyngbya
with mechanical harvesting
methods.
The harvesters, originally de-
signed to gather rice and later
to remove and control floating
invasive plants in waterways,
have been modified to mini-
mize the removal of the natural
substrate while gathering the
Lyngbya off the bottom. Most re-
cently, the bubblerr bar," an in-
novation by Mark Edwards,
director of Aquatic Services for
Citrus County, suspends matted
Lyngbya in various stages of de-
composition, allowing the con-
veyor to pick it up and place it
in the bed of the harvester


i
d
k

r

E
I


During the demonstration,
the harvester was operated by
Jerry Muetzel, owner of Florida
Aquatics, with 27 years experi-
ence removing invasive plants
in King's Bay Muetzel gave the
DEP representatives a ride on
the machine to provide them a
before-and-after impression of
the harvesting. Michael Czer-
winski, Environmental Consult-
ant, provided the DEP with
other important data
boards required to receive
actors the ERE
Lyngbya is a symp-
3S Bay tom of a much wider
ary contributing factor of
S King's Bay's degrada-
table tion. Water flows,
nation drainage issues, and
fertilizers affect the
Save water clarity and con-
stal edition. Dr Paresh
nc Desai, a local sup-
Inc. porter and advocate,
shared insight re-
EST garding the Bay
cleanup effort: "Just
JIVMN like a disease, we will
often treat and con-
tain the disease while working
on the solution to eradicating
the disease with the treatments
we currently have." In this con-
text, the partnership's only tools
at this time are hand-raking
and mechanical harvesting.
State Sen. Charlie Dean cre-
ated greater momentum in stat-
ing: "We have had enough
studies; it is time for action."
The senator has facilitated leg-
islative actions that have re-
sulted in funding the cleanup of
King's Bay These funds are
currently being used for hand-
raking efforts, but will be ap-
plied to enhance the removal


by mechanical means when the
permitting is complete. Save
Crystal River's next step is to
develop and gain backing for a
self-contained vacuum system.
Saving your waterways has
been a tremendous collabora-
tion resulting from the ongoing
grassroots effort One Rake at a
Time, founded byArt Jones and
supported by Kings Bay Rotary
Charitable Foundation and
Save Crystal River Inc., the cit-
izens of Crystal River and Cit-
rus County, the support of the
Crystal River City Council, the
Citrus County Board of Com-
missioners, Rep. Jimmy T
Smith, and Sen. Dean. Addi-
tionally, technical as well as fi-
nancial support by DEP
Secretary Herschel Vinyard
and the rest of the DEP staff
will continue to be a large com-
ponent in the success of our
program.
Most of all, the local busi-
nesses and citizens deserve
great credit! The Crazy on
Country Fall Festival not only
raised awareness, but also
$98,000 to support this impor-
tant project benefitting Save
Crystal River and its efforts to
study, plan and facilitate im-
provement for future improve-
ments and restoration needs in
King's Bay
We are looking forward to an-
other year of cooperation and
continued positive action in the
challenge to improve the water
quality in King's Bay

The Boards of Directors of
Save Crystal River Inc. and the
Kings Bay Rotary Charitable
Foundation.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Some doofus put my 20-foot ladder in the garage
nce upon a time I doing it myself three times added air conditioning, tool shed cum shedio. If house, you should take 20-foot extension ladder
had a few tools: before I got it right. I organized my oils, you own such a ladder, you something out." was consistently in my way
Hammers, saws, Soon after I retired, brushes and other paint- know what a pain it can be She was right of course, I grabbed the ladder
wrenches, screwdrivers some five years ago, I ing supplies. I to find a place so I began to look for a and, while grumbling very
and such as well as rakes, started dabbling in oil placed easels to put it I'd in- place to hang my surplus loudly about the doofus
hoes and ladders- stuff painting once more not and stools r stalled suffi- masterpieces. No prob- who had put it in the
that makes a fellow feel that my attempts were ac- around to ciently sturdy lem. I would put them on garage, I stomped out to
handy whether he is or tually art, but smearing make it look I a pegs along the the walls in my shedio! No put it in the shed. That is,
not. As time passed, I ac- paint on canvasses is fun. very artsy Not inside eave, problem, that is, except until I got there and saw
cumulated a collection so Cheryl was nice enough to only that; had hung the there was a 20-foot ladder paintings hanging on the
big that it would no longer give me a wall in the house though I never 20-footer there in precisely the best possi- pegs that were specifically
fit neatly in the garage, so I on which I was allowed to found a French and decided to ble location. Not to be out- installed for the ladder
bought a shed. display my work. beret to wear leave well done, I moved the ladder I smiled, doffed my
That worked fine for Even so, I knew she while playing Fred Brannen enough alone, into the garage, imaginary beret and said
several years, then age wouldn't be all that happy artist, I settled A SLICE Things were All went well until im- to myself, "Bonjour, Mon-
began to creep up on me. with my pursuing painting for having an LC going fine, but I mediately after Christmas, sieur Doofus."
Using such instruments in her kitchen. So, I sorted imaginary one. OF LIFE ran out of room when I was trying to put Would anyone like to be-
became less and less en- through my tools, brought You think that's for any more of the decorations back in come the proud owner of a
ticing. Eventually, I came some of them back into the strange? When I was a little my paintings on the desig- the garage. I'm sure the 20-foot extension ladder?
to realize that in most in- garage, and put some of fellow, I had an imaginary nated wall. I asked for rest of you always know I'll even throw in a free
stances, I could get what I them on storage shelves at baby sister Believe me, more space on an adjacent where these things were make-believe beret.
wanted to have done, done the very back of the shed. I creating a make-believe wall, which Cheryl gra- previously and put them
by someone who knew then turned what had once beret was a piece of cake. ciously granted, but when back in the same place.
what they were doing, and been a tool shed into a Back on point, I left one that was used up, she Good for you. I can't al- Fred Brannen is an
in the end, I would spend painting studio a she- obnoxious tool a 20-foot sweetly said, "If you bring ways remember, and dur- Inverness resident and
less money than I would by dio, if you will. I even extension ladder -in my something new into the ing the ordeal, a certain a Chronicle columnist


OPPORTUNITY
Continued from Page Cl

shopping rather than visiting brick-and-
mortar stores. Sears and Belk, two mall
anchor stores, have closed.
Still, many good things have happened,
are in progress, and are scheduled. In the
area of economic development/redevel-
opment, rumors that the mall is dead are
greatly exaggerated. It is simply rein-
venting itself A visit this past Saturday
showed that hundreds of people were
there, shopping, dining, going to the
movies, playing miniature golf and lis-
tening to a live bluegrass band. The West
End Market has opened, as well as Cuzin
Vinnie's Play-Putt Golf Other newer
businesses include Get Memorable Of-
fice Products, Seafood Seller and Cafe,
Ed's Watch and Jewelry Repair, Family
Massage and Therapy, Citrus Sports Ap-
parel, Heavenly Treasures, Eclectic Gift
and Thrift, Precious Paws Rescue and
Adoption Center, and Now and Then Col-
lectibles and Antiques. A serious attempt
is under way to make a world-class
aquarium based at the mall a reality
Great credit for what will hopefully be a
mall renaissance in Crystal River is due
to Millie Bresnahan, the current mall
manager who is truly making things hap-
pen. Throughout the city, in 2013, there
were a total of 30 new business starts in
Crystal River
The city has received a $50,000 grant
from Duke Energy for economic devel-
opment. Discussion is ongoing regarding
how to best invest it. The city was also in-
volved in securing $152,000 for the One
Rake at a Time project.
The Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Tourist Development Council,
and the Economic Development Council
will relocate to a joint facility this summer
The North Citrus streetscape project
has been completed.
The city purchased the Petrella prop-
erty at the corner of U.S. 19 and South
Citrus for future development.
In the area of infrastructure, recon-
struction of Cutler Spur Boulevard is
complete. Areas 112, 113, and the Harbor
Isle section of the sewer expansion proj-
ect have been completed, with more than
220 properties near King's Bay off septic
tanks and connected to the centralized
sewer system. Water plant upgrades have
begun, with completion expected this
summer
The Waterfront District Master Con-
cept Plan has been completed.
The performance stage in King's Bay
Park is ready to go for the first Music in
the Park on Jan. 31. There will be a ribbon-
cutting to dedicate the stage on Jan. 29.
The design for the effluent water line
to Duke Energy is complete, with con-
struction planned to begin early this year
When complete, it will reduce Duke's use
of ground water by 17 percent
The Gary Maidhoff Walk to Nature trail
was constructed and subsequently dedi-
cated at the Academy for Environmental
Sciences.
In the financial arena, the city ended
fiscal year 2013 with a general fund bal-
ance of nearly $4 million, of which $2 mil-
lion is designated for emergencies and
contingencies. Because the city has such
substantial reserves, council decided to
draw down on them for a two-year period


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

glasses were gone. I rode
back along the route and
looked for the missing
spectacles to no avail.
Then I was fat and blind.
I called the doctor and
ordered another pair of
glasses.
Then I was fat, blind and
poor They cost a fortune to
replace.
So for Christmas my
wife purchased a nifty new
device that permitted me
to place the back tire of my
bike on a mechanism that
remained stationary
I put it together myself
I could exercise as hard
as I wanted, but wouldn't
travel around and stand the
chance of losing my glasses.
It was extremely helpful
because when I get home
from work in the winter


to maintain the millage rate at 3.8 rather
than raise taxes in a challenging eco-
nomic climate.
In 2013, the city manager hired a new
finance director, Michelle Russell, and a
new special events coordinator, Leslie
Bollin. Michelle hit the ground running
by coordinating the grant reimburse-
ments for the Cutler Spur project, ap-
proximately $1.2 million, and the DSC
sewer extension, approximately $6.5 mil-
lion. The annual Christmas tree lighting
has, in the past, been a relatively low-key
ceremony that would attract about 30 to
40 people. This past December, under
Leslie's guidance, an estimated 300 peo-
ple attendanded, mostly families, with
many activities available for children in-
cluding horseback riding, bounce houses,
face painting and artificial snow Thanks
to Ms. Bollin, this celebration has been
taken to a new level, and should continue
to grow in years to come. At the request of
council she is also currently putting to-
gether a monthly Movie in the Park, and
a Sunset at the Pier event.
Also, in 2013 the city was recertified as
a Tree City USA.
Moving forward in 2014, the city has a
number of goals. A few highlights are:
Extend the term of the Community
Redevelopment Agency to 30 years.
Develop Commercial Waterfront Dis-
trict development guidelines.
Permit and develop a pedestrian "is-
land" for the Crosstown Trail connection
across U.S. 19.
Design and permit a plan for installing
landscaped medians on U.S. 19 north and
south of the Citrus Avenue intersection.
Start construction of the effluent line
to the Duke Energy plant.
Permit and construct intersection
improvements for the intersection of U.S.
19 and Citrus Avenue.
Determine future plans for the water
tower
Enhance our city parks. Included in
this goal is to evaluate the cost and oper-
ational requirements for installing a
recreational water feature in one or
more city parks.
Develop an action plan to facilitate
the location of the Three Sisters Visitor
Center on U.S. 19 rather than the Three
Sisters site.
Develop an implementation plan for
the extension of Riverwalk.
The City of Crystal River has come a long
way in the last few years in enhancing
our parks and infrastructure, developing
and improving amenities and moving
ever closer to achieving our vision of a
walkable community with a vibrant, es-
thetically pleasing downtown city center
Our professional city manager and staff
work toward those goals every day, while
still providing a helpful and welcoming
atmosphere to residents and visitors
alike. The city council is united in achiev-
ing its goals, working together in mutual
respect and harmony Our volunteer
boards give of their time and talents to
advise and support council and staff.
Last year was indeed a good year for
Crystal River, and one more building
block towards achieving our goals as we
continue to look to the future in 2014. For
residents, businesses and visitors, I wish
us all a very Happy New Year!


Jim Farleyis the mayor
of Crystal River


months, it's already dark,
and that's not too safe be-
cause no one in Citrus County
uses their turn signals.
Do remember that I put
this stationary bike gizmo
together myself
It was about my third
time on the stationary bike
and I was peddling away
listening to the new Doris
Kearns Goodwin book on
Teddy Roosevelt on my
headphones.
That's an important fact
because I was distracted
and did not hear the sound
of my bike working its way
loose from the stand. I was
working the machine at about
18 mph when the bike sud-
denly freed itself from the
stand and took off
I do the workout down-
stairs under my house, and
there is a five-foot high group
of old lockers about eight feet
away from where I peddle.
Once the bike was offi-
cially free from the stand,


it took me about two sec-
onds, at 18 miles per hour,
to cross those eight feet and
smash into the lockers.
I tumbled to the ground
and, miraculously the lock-
ers did not crash on top ofme.
At that point I was fat,
blind, poor and injured.
So the moral of the story
is that when you visit Pub-
lix and see the blood pres-
sure machine, just keep
walking. Forget about the
New Year's resolutions -
they're dangerous.
If you just make a right-
hand turn after you enter
the front of Publix, you
will see the bakery, where
you can get some really
good jelly donuts.
It's hard to injure your-
self eating jelly donuts.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


Special to mte unronicie
The Victor Mathieu family were French immigrants. The baby is Alin "Al"
Gougon Mathieu.


Originally published in the
Citrus County Chronicle.

In 1938 ...
rs. Alma Cumbie,
librarian, said
this week that the cir-
culation of the Inver-
ness public library had
increased and many of
the winter visitors
were enjoying the use
of the library Some of
the best books have
been arranged on tables
for the convenience of
the public. High school
students are invited to
use the encyclopedias
for reference in their
school work.
S.H. Davis, Inver-
ness agent for the
Atlantic Coast Line
railway, announced
this week a change in


schedule and improved
passenger service ef-
fective December 16,
(tomorrow). Inaugura-
tion of the new service,
the "Gulf Coast Lim-
ited," will arrive in In-
verness southbound at
1:43 p.m., northbound
at 3:13 p.m. This train
will let off and pick up
passengers for Jack-
sonville and beyond.

In 1953...
S am Pickard, owner
Sof Paradise Point
Villas, said he plans to
let a contract this week
for construction of a
$15,000 swimming pool
on his Crystal River
property He also plans
to build a terrace for
outside dining between
his present dining room
and the site of the new


GRAHAM
Continued from Page Cl

that the Legislature overwhelmingly
supported and I signed into law Florida's
1985 Growth Management Act.
From 1985 until 2007, Florida's econ-
omy flourished. Our population contin-
ued to grow, from 11.3 million in 1985 to
18.7 million in 2007. During the 1980s
alone, Florida added 1.5 million new
jobs and, for the first time in the state's
history, Floridians' per-capita income
exceeded that of the average American.
The Financial Crisis Inquiry Com-
mission, which investigated the Great
Recession, did not find that growth-
management policies such as Florida's
were the cause of the collapse. Rather,
the collapse of Florida's housing mar-
ket- like those in other Sun Belt states
such as Arizona, California and Nevada
- was driven by a variety of factors, in-
cluding rampant speculation, lax regu-
latory policies, weak underwriting
standards and old-fashioned greed and
fraud. These were the same causes of
Florida's crashes in the 20th century,
before the state's growth-management
laws were enacted.
From 1990 to 2000, Florida added, on
average, more than 100,000 housing
units per year But in the years leading
up to 2007, housing starts exceeded
200,000 units per year On top of this,
between 2007 and 2010, 660,000 more
residences of all types were authorized
to be constructed, as well as more than
6 billion square feet of commercial and
institutional space, most of which has
not been built.
Florida's new anti-government polit-
ical order "seized the moment" in 2011,
securing draconian cuts to Florida's
conservation lands acquisition pro-
gram and growth-management laws
and sharp reductions in the budgets


pool. Pickard said work
on the pool would be
started very soon and
will be completed within
30 days thereafter Work
on the terrace will fol-
low immediately
The PTA voted
Monday night to
buy a typewriter for the
elementary school for
$135; to buy materials
for the high school li-
brary in a similar
amount and to start a
new fund ear-marked
for the purchase of a
new curtain for the
high school auditorium
in an amount of $120.
Dell Walker, chairman
of the project commit-
tee, presented the
above as the commit-
tee choice of projects
from the proceeds of
the PTA carnival.


and staff of the agencies responsible
for enforcing them. Like Mr Cox as-
serts, the blame for Florida's economic
woes was pinned on these laws, saying
they created an unfavorable climate for
business.
Florida's growth rate, which slowed
dramatically during the Great Reces-
sion, is now well on track to return to
the rate of 1,000 new residents a day
Florida's population grew by about
232,000 between 2011 and 2012. During
the 21st century Florida's population is
projected to conservatively double and
could triple to more than 50 million.
But due to the 2011 changes, Florida
is less prepared to deal with the im-
pacts of growth. Sound planning re-
mains essential to protect Florida's
economic health, abundant natural re-
sources and quality of life, which attract
new residents and visitors to our state.
Throughout much of its history,
Florida has been treated as nothing
more than a commodity, to be bought and
sold regardless of the consequences.
Florida's laws calling for smarter, more
compact development patterns brought
more stability and predictability through
the wise use of land and water resources.
Instead of being distracted by false
diagnoses of the causes of the Great
Recession and thus repeating those
mistakes, it is time for Florida to learn
from the past and prepare for the future.
Florida is a treasure. The Sunshine
State will continue to attract more res-
idents. Our generation of Floridians lives
on one of the planet's most congenial
peninsulas. We have an obligation to
ensure that our children, grandchildren
and beyond can live in an even more
prosperous and attractive Florida.


Bob Graham was Florida's governor
from 1979-86 and a US. senator from
1987-2005. He was a member of the
Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


HILLIARD
Continued from Page Cl

stands that what is
good for business is good
for the people, then let
us at least be consistent
across the board and rec-
ognize the opposite is
also true.
So, what can be done to
begin a comprehensive
and effective restoration
process for our waters?
We must recognize that
the era of cheap water is
behind us. In some re-
gions of the state, aquifer
levels have been drawn
down so far that once-
vibrant springs are dry
and many lake water ele-
vations have been sub-
stantially lowered. We
need to restructure our
regulation of water use
in recognition of this fact.
We must also promote ac-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tivities which contribute
to cleaner waters while
restricting those which
pollute. We know the
ways of the past have
failed. Let us challenge
ourselves to find innova-
tive solutions which can
assure our future.
There is at present no
incentive to promote
day-to-day water conser-
vation in Florida. Large-
scale users are regulated
by permits issued by the
water management dis-
tricts and, with issuance
of a permit, may use
water freely Most per-
mitted wells are not me-
tered, and in such
circumstances there is
no effective means to
regulate their use.
As an example, recall
that during the January
2010 freeze in the Plant
City area, approximately
750 residential wells
were affected and more

nIA i iA lWVFMTI
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Q. .. If ... .......

S I~if ra ^


Saturday, February 8, 2014


7:00am Registration & Packet Pick-Up
8:00am 10k Race Start
8:05 am 1 Mile Walk- 8:15am 5k Race Start
Start & Finish: Nature Coast Bank Citrus Hills
2455 North Citrus Hills Blvd., Hernando 34442


Register Online at: www.drcsports.com
Charity and Contact Info:
Citrus County Blessings (352) 341-7707
Email: info@citruscountyblessings.com
tiH)NICLI ~ Presented by: TLC Rehab & Suncoast Schools FCU


i pnua| Lake
-; rHenderson,











-y ^ ^r i/ Sup port Ci us County's ROCCS Rowing Team
Snve nessfirst ever Scholastic Regatass






IFar mare information, call (352) 354-3769





7Pron ^Dress em-L5V^Wy
Saturday, February 1,2014 Saturday, P
Jan, 25, 2014
~7AM-1IPM


















Cnderellas(. i story ofC
Baptist (. ii* Ourmission isto provi/ 'ii^ S f<
Saccessoresfor young ladies nrus County's ROCCS Rowing Team
Satrnvemess'first ever Scholastic Regatta!













CURRENT High bcool Student ID Ji...-. ^^ :
For more information, call (352) 354-3769 iai ii a






cbcwcw9 yahoo.com or visit us at titrustinderellays
SaturaFeray 1, 2014,@ IIJA.II 3P.M




on Facebook & www.ci., triuscinofCderellas.blogspI .
Cornerstone Baptist Churis to provc.h ,
& accessoriesforyoung ladies in our,......... ,,,
Our services are completelyfr'
CURRENT High School Student 1D i., I I,, .....
For more information, call 726-7335. rinail t, at ,
cbcwcw~kyahoo.com or visit us at Ci trus Cinderella'si
on Facebook & www.citruseinderellas.blogspot.ComI
Cornerstone Baptist Church ..." (2
1i1 I1 1001 \\. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL -
f lnni IA

Lan a Jo Job




College of LIZIlll



Make plans to attend this unique event brought to
you in partnership with CF, Workforce Connection,
EDC, and Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.

ATTEND THIS UNIQUE WORKSHOP
Each registered participant will attend a workshop in the following:
Do's and Don'ts of the Interview
Navigating the workplace
Resume writing '101'
Social Media for Job Seekers
Participate in a 'mock' interview with a professional
in their chosen field
Register today at www.citrusunitedway.org
or call 352-795-5483
Each registered attendee will receive a ticket for breakfast and lunch.
Doors open at 8 am. This FREE workshop is brought to you in partnership
with Workforce Connection and College of CF Citrus Campus.
We thank our United Way partners: CenterState Bank,
Publix Supermarket Charities, The Citrus County Chronicle,
Cypress Cove Care Center, Sheldon Palmes Insurance, Sibex, LIVE UINITED
and State Farm agent Michael Bays and our eventpartners fCuH I F UII.
CF and Workforce Connection. Onll j LL.f.


than 140 sinkholes were
reported due to agricul-
tural overpumping. Some
of those sinkholes shut
down highways and local
residents were without
water until the aquifer
levels recovered. It was
not a unique event, and it
would seem reasonable
that an ounce of preven-
tion would best a pound
of cure.
We must do better.
Here are a few sugges-
tions to that end:

Protection of
springsheds
1. Protect spring basin
water quality from nutri-
ent pollution with a fee


applied to
($/pound of
The proceeds
then be used i
purchase con
easements in
basins that rest


requiring fertilizer from
60 percent to 90 percent
of such lands.
2. Apply an aquifer
protection fee on septic
systems, the funds of
which will be used to
connect the highest den-
sity developments in
high vulnerability
aquifer regions to
central wastewater
treatment.
3. Allocate the remain-
ing revenues from Items
1 and 2 to be used to up-
grade public wastewater
treatment facilities and
enable substantial reduc-
tions of nutrient content
prior to the discharge of
treated water.


trict-issued water-use
permits of $1 per 1,000
gallons, with funds to be
utilized for resource pro-
tection, development of
alternative water sources
and subsidy support for
water meter installation.
2. Develop a regional
Floridan Aquifer water
budget that reserves 90
percent to 95 percent of
aquifer recharge for nat-
ural systems and requires
water districts to achieve
this goal within 10 years.
Such ideas are not orig-
inal, nor will they be
adopted without broad
public support. You may
have better ideas, but
keeping them to yourself


is not part of the solution.
Voice your concerns and
ideas to local and state
governing officials and
regulators.
The time to be an active
participant in protecting
the most valuable re-
source in our state has
arrived!

Dan Hilliard a director
with Withlacoochee
Area Residents Inc.,
which was organized in
1984 in response to qual-
ity of life threats posed
by activities that have a
high potential to de-
grade groundwater and
surface water quality


fertilizer Regional __________________
nitrogen) reduction of
should
n part to groundwater use 1% i B
servation 1. Levy a groundwater ) A, 1 I[
i spring use fee on all holders of A I I
rict crops water management dis- -,_ ... I i'ii
All 1 l-AAlB'M BA IA ?143


Fi-ff


One day forAdult
Two day forAdult
One day for Child (4-11)
Two day for Child (4-11)
Gate Ticket Pricing
Adults
Child (4-11)


$10.00 www.eaglebuickgmc.com
$500 352-795-6800


Garden Tractors Pulling
Food & Camping Available Jr Tractor Race Every Day
3 Sleds Pulling in Covered Arena

Ci r AoNrLE

Citrus County Fair
Truck & Tractor Pull
Jai. 24- 25, 2014
Advance Registration Forms Online at
www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html
Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2993
citruscountyfair@embarqmail.com


I JANI.IA! i. 1.17


I


W I U ; l 'L j Z 1 t.U ,, a1 ,, ,-,,,IT ll; ,: I ,[, I =,-h ,,,,- 5,,[,,., ;.:. u : |p


I


COMMENTARY


Proceeds Benefit
Youth Scholarships


I


N ONLINE

AUCTION
Amazing Items Bid Now!
www.rotaryinverness.com
Watch final bidding live
Sat., Feb. 8, 2014 Noon 5 p.m.
WYKE Channel 47 or 16
sl ,i Gift Cards Kayak Dining Electronics
Golf. Jewelry Day Spa Auto Service
sponsored in part by:
Inverness C pNi E
Charitable Foundaton, Inc. E



Xinih .1 nmal
Purple Heart Ceremony
Florida A-aional Guard A rmory. Crystal River
Saturday. February 15, 2014, 11:00 a.m.
C,,!ii!hi !h,,hriiil..; il r|iiiJ Ice..,, ,,t Ihlr- Pui I r'. Heart
,iih. I H,1-1Ii iII rII, ,ii .,i -. tid \ Iw ', I 1 i t 1r e
G lch.,! \\.,ii Ti, { i,,,, I|.II .ii. I C1- .h1 l'., nik l,,,1.1 I w arriors
All Gave Some, Some Gave All
Hosted by the c mih \\ ounided Patriots of
Aaron A. \V\e el Ch.lptel --
Militai\ (-)idcr oft he Purlple Heart
Featuring the Atijhniq,,n h.iq N cmorial
Portrait Nhir.iI i1th p.iiotic minuic by
Paul and J.jkiCe Ste\ it .ind N i Ici,'h Miller
VETERANS AM) P1RLIB( .IRE ( ORDI ILLYINVITED
CiOIN(JLE



RELAY
IG9 aFOR LIFE
4th Annual Relay "FORE" Life
American Cancer Society

GOLF TOURNAMENT
Saturday, February 8, 2014
Juliette Falls Golf Course PRICE: $75/person
Range Balls AND Lunch Included!
9:00am Tee Time, 4-Person Scramble
For more information, contact
Michelle Snellings 352-697-2220 or Nick Maltese 464-7511
Raffles & Door Prizes & 50/50
SESPONSORS:
Eagle Buick, Citrus County Chronicle, Sodium Fishing Gear, Fox 96.7, Citrus 95.3



IM110 U1 13i

iRicklaimaerrull
|t~nk & TluIsv ii!

Tickets available after December 16, 2013
At the following outlets... ,
Citrus County Fair Office-Inverness 726-2993
Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 795-3149 -
Eagle Buick Homosassa 795-6800
Inverness Chamber of Commerce 726-2801
Advance Ticket Pricing
Cash only


Jan 19-9AM-4PM
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
MANATEE FEST- CRYSTAL RIVER
Contact Phone: 726-9814 or 201-2656

Jan 19-*4PM
Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church
LIGHT SHINE: BLUES FROM THE INSIDE OUT
Contact Phone: 527-0052

Jan 20 10 AM
George Washington Carver Community Ctr.
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. PARADE
Crystal River Parade begins at
7th Ave between 3rd & 4th St leading to Gulf
To Lake Hwy to 12th Ave, to
3rd Street and ending at Copeland Park.
Contact Phone: 777-1214

Jan 24 -8:30AM-2:00 PM
United Way of Citrus County
LAND THAT JOB CF, Lecanto
Contact Phone: 795-5483

Jan 24 11:00 AM
West Citrus Ladies of the Elks
FASHION SHOW BURST OF COLOR
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Elks Lodge $20.00
Contact Phone: 352-382-4748

Jan 24- 4PM-6PM Jan 25- 1 OAM-1 PM
Citrus County Fair
15TH ANNUAL TRUCK AND TRACTOR PULL
Citrus County Fair Grounds
Entrance: $8 adults, $4 children 4-11
Contact Phone: 726-2993

Jan 25 -7 AM
ROCCS*
CITRUS SPRINTS SCHOLASTIC REGATTA
Lake Henderson, Inverness Free
Contact Phone: 352-601-6195

Jan 25 9:30 AM
Citrus County Senior Foundation
A Day at The Races
Tampa Bay Downs $48
Contact Phone: 527-5959

Jan 26 2:00 pm
Friends of the Crystal River Nat'l.Wildlife Complex
Friends Annual Meeting
First United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall
Contact Phone: 352-201-0149











B BUSINESS COUNTY CHRONICLE
^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ -^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
An American Airlines jet takes off from Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport early in the morning. The price of flying
continues to climb, with the average domestic roundtrip ticket, including tax, reaching $363.42 last year, up more than
$7 from the prior year.



Airline prices soar















The price to board an airliner in the United States has risen for the fourth straight
year, making it increasingly expensive to fly almost anywhere.


Associated Press

NEW YORK
The average domestic roundtrip
ticket, including tax, reached $363.42
last year, up more than $7 from the
prior year, according to an Associated
Press analysis of travel data collected
from millions of flights throughout the
country
The 2 percent increase outpaced in-
flation, which stood at 1.5 percent.
Airfares have risen nearly 12 percent
since their low in the depths of the
Great Recession in 2009, when ad-
justed for inflation, the analysis
showed.
Ticket prices have increased as air-
lines eliminated unprofitable routes,
packed more passengers into planes
and merged with one another, provid-
ing travelers with fewer options.
Today, 84 percent of seats are filled
with paying passengers, up from 82
percent in 2009.
'"Anyone traveling today will know
that those flights are full," said Chuck
Thackston, managing director of data
and analytics for the Airlines Report-
ing Corp, which processes ticket trans-


actions for airlines and more than
9,400 travel agencies, including web-
sites such as Expedia and Orbitz. "Just
through supply and demand, those
fares will go up."
And none of this factors in the bevy
of extra fees travelers now face for
checking bags, getting extra legroom or
even purchasing a blanket, meal or
pair of headphones.
The typical traveler pays an addi-
tional $50 roundtrip to check a single
suitcase.
Those fees, introduced in 2008 to off-
set losses from rising fuel prices, now
bring in $3.4 billion a year for U.S. air-
lines and have helped them return con-
sistent annual profits for the last four
years.
Airlines pay just over $3 a gallon for
jet fuel, up from $1.89 in 2009.
Another $2.7 billion a year is col-
lected in reservation-change fees, with
airlines charging up to $200 to revise
an itinerary
"I love to travel, but they're making it
more difficult," said Brian Kalish, a
frequent flier from Arlington, Va.
"Maybe I've been spoiled that it used to
be so cheap to fly It just feels like they
are charging more and giving less."


The AP reviewed data from 6 million
annual flights taken in the U.S., analyz-
ing fees and government on-time
records along with fare data from the
Airlines Reporting Corp.
Jean Medina, spokeswoman for Air-
lines for America, the airlines' trade
and lobbying group, said over the long-
term fares have not climbed as fast as
inflation and that flying "remains a
great bargain."
"Carriers continue to invest in their
products with new planes, new serv-
ices and new destinations," Medina
said. "It's a great time to fly"
Airlines are able to push fare and fee
hikes because there is less competi-
tion.
"You get some pricing power as a re-
sult," said airline consultant Robert
Mann.
A wave of consolidation that started
in 2008 has left four U.S. airlines -
American Airlines, Delta Air Lines,
Southwest Airlines and United Airlines
- controlling more than 80 percent of
the domestic air-travel market. Dis-
count airlines such as Allegiant Air and
Spirit Airlines have grown at break-
neck speed but still carry a tiny frac-
tion of overall passengers.


State surpluses spark debate on tax cuts, spending


Associated Press
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -As legis-
latures return to action and governors
outline their budget plans, politicians
in many states are facing a pleasant
election-year challenge: What to do
with all the extra money?
A slow but steady economic recovery
is generating more tax revenue than
many states had anticipated, offering
elected officials tantalizing choices
about whether to ply voters with tax
breaks, boost spending for favorite
programs or sock away cash for an-
other rainy day
It's a tricky question because of the
economic experiments begun almost
nationwide since the recession. A cou-
ple of dozen states controlled by Re-
publicans have been seeking
prosperity with tax cuts and less gov-
ernment. Their Democratic counter-
parts have sought to fortify their


economies by investing more in educa-
tion and other social services.
The clamor for new spending is al-
ready revealing fissures among some
governors and lawmakers. And clashes
have arisen even within the same
party, suggesting that the debate in
some places could widen beyond typi-
cal partisan disputes.
Democratic New York Gov Andrew
Cuomo, for example, wants to tap a
surplus to roll back recent tax hikes,
despite other Democrats' ideas for
new spending. In Louisiana, Republi-
can Gov Bobby Jindal wants to steer
the surplus to education and health
care.
The National Association of State
Budget Officers projects that almost
all states will see "fairly decent sur-
pluses" in their 2014 budgets. For
some, it may be the first extra cash
since before the recession began in
See Page D2


THE WEEKAHEAD
* MONDAY
U.S. stock and bond markets are
closed for Martin Luther King Jr
Day
WEDNESDAY
DAVOS, Switzerland First day
of World Economic Forum in
Davos.
FRANKFURT, Germany Eu-
rope's financial stability watchdog,
the European Systemic Risk
Board, holds a meeting.
LONDON Bank of England
policymakers releases minutes of
their January meeting as econo-
mists seek clues as to whether
there's discussion of changing their
guidance on interest rates.
*FRIDAY
WASHINGTON Labor
Department releases weekly
jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil price steady
near $94 per barrel
SEOUL, South Korea -The
price of oil was steady Friday after
an OPEC report forecast higher
global demand for oil this year
Benchmark U.S. crude oil for
February delivery inched up 3
cents to $93.99 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
Brent crude, used to set prices
for international varieties of
crude, dropped 31 cents to $105.44.
On Thursday, OPEC slightly re-
vised up its estimates for oil sup-
plies from non-OPEC countries,
such as the United States and
Canada, for both 2013 and 2014. It
also estimated that demand would
go up in 2014 compared with a
year earlier
Earlier this week, the price of oil
climbed above $94 per barrel for
the first time in two weeks after a
big drop in U.S. supplies spurred
concerns that supply would be out-
stripped by demand.

Markets capped
by disappointment
LONDON World markets
struggled to rise on Friday as weak
corporate earnings results made
investors cautious of chasing
stocks to new highs.
Britain's FTSE 100 rose 0.2 per-
cent to close at 6,829.30. Germany's
DAX gained 0.3 percent to 9,742.96,
while France's CAC-40 edged up
0.2 percent to 4,327.50.
Earlier, Japan's Nikkei 225
closed 0.1 percent lower at
15,734.46. China's Shanghai Com-
posite index sank 0.9 percent to
2,004.95, while Hong Kong's Hang
Seng rose 0.6 percent to 23,133.35
after slipping in early trading.
Australia's S&PASX 200 fell 0.6
percent, South Korea's Kospi was
down 0.7 percent, while most
Southeast Asian markets finished
higher
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SSMART
MONEY


Selling


business


can be a


big deal

EAR BRUCE: After a long
struggle to make a decision,
I have decided to sell my
business. Not because it's doing
badly, but because my health is de-
clining quickly
My question is, where do you
think I should advertise my busi-
ness for sale? Should I have my
son post it online for me? I don't
know where to begin. Thanks for
your advice.
Sam, via email
DEAR SAM: Selling a business
can be a complicated proposition.
There is no one-size-fits-all ap-
proach. You didn't tell me what
kind of business it is, and without
that kind of information, I can only
speak in general terms.
Putting the listing on the Inter-
net certainly can help. Also, re-
phrasing the listing on a weekly
basis can be helpful. Since there is
no cost involved, this is a good way
to begin. You also may wish to deal
with a broker who specializes not
only in businesses, but in busi-
nesses like your own.
Selling a business is not easy
One thing you will have to deter-
mine is whether you are willing to
carry some paper Depending on
the nature of the business, and of-
tentimes with a smaller business, it
is almost a requisite that you carry
some paper In other words, you
See Page D2


lop*









For nonprofits, partnership a powerful tool


here is power in nonprofit part-
nerships. When 501(c) nonprofit
organizations discover mutually
agreeable reasons to work together, the
benefits can mean greater success for
both of the partners. The time to begin
searching for a partner is when certain
signs of trouble become evident. Watch
for them.
Watch for trouble and ask questions
Nonprofits begin to lose effectiveness
when volunteer participation wanes
and grants and community support for
the mission diminishes. When this hap-
pens, it's time to search for answers.
The hunt for solutions should start with
questions like:
Is the organization serving the same
purpose for which it was established?
Has the direction or mission crept
slowly away?
Is there competition from another
nonprofit with similar services?
Has the market or need served
changed?
Why are volunteers, grants or com-
munity support going away?
These are hard questions with no
easy answers. Maybe it's time to investi-


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


gate a partnership arrangement and its
potential benefits.

Partnership benefits and trade-offs
Partnership arrangements between
nonprofits require trade-offs. One office
location may survive, while the other
may no longer be needed. Saving rent
expense is the benefit. Staff size might
need to change, but could result in in-
creased efficiency Cost savings in the
operating expense categories such as
supplies and utilities can preserve rev-
enue to carry on the work.
When two or more organizations work
in tandem, they can pool their talents,


knowledge base and experience. Herein
lay the potential for serving more in the
community Finding new and better ways
to spend human capital can gain an or-
ganization access to more resources.
When partnerships experience success,
opportunities present themselves be-
cause the combined strength enhances
the ability to realize the mission.

Are you ready, willing and able?
Every nonprofit has its own internal
culture/mentality with respect to its op-
eration. Personalities can play a large
part; however, its the principals that re-
ally matter The board and staff have to
be mentally ready to partner for suc-
cess, or maybe just survival! A review of
the financial condition is crucial rela-
tive to the consideration to partner

Steps to partnerships
If, during the investigative phase of
partnering, facts indicate there is the
potential for success, the next step is
finding a partner A measured approach
of actionable items should follow The
best way to go forward will be discussed
in the next Nonprofit Briefs column on


Feb. 16.
Forming the appropriate partner
arrangement may require legal and
management planning. The aftermath
of partnering is always about how best
to manage the combined operation. A
positive relationship between the part-
ners is critical. An absence of demon-
strated willingness of both partners to
work together for mutual success will
spell failure.

Putting principals before personalities
The guiding force of partnering in the
nonprofit business is to put the princi-
pals of good management before the
personalities of those involved. Much is
written about this process, and its the
experience that matters. The next col-
umn in this series will discuss in detail
actions to be taken to accomplish the
goal of a successful partnering arrange-
ment.
Dr. FrederickJ. Herzog, PhD is
Founder and Executive Director of the
Non Profit Resource in Citrus County
He can be reached via email: fherzog
(@tampabayrrcom or 848-899-9000.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

agree to allow the buyer to pay
you in installments. The larger
the business, the less likely this
accommodation is, but there are
no absolutes.
DEAR BRUCE: My
girlfriend's daughter is divorced
from a deadbeat father They
were married five years, and
two kids later they divorced be-
cause he refused to work or
spend time with the kids.
She is trying to collect child
support from him, but he keeps
working under the table to avoid
having his salary garnished. Is
there anything I can do?
H.N., via email
DEAR H.N.: From your de-
scription, "deadbeat" is a very
accurate word for this guy The
only way to get after him is to re-
port him to the appropriate au-
thorities whenever he takes an
under-the-table job. That way he
will have to quit and he might
find it easier to pay, but I would-
n't count on it Men like this are
absolutely no good for them-
selves and their families.
DEAR BRUCE: I signed a
lease about a year ago for a car
valued at $32,000. It's time to
buy it or turn it in. The car
salesman said its value now is
$24,000.
What should I do buy it or
lease another car? Is it smart to
lease? I can afford the $299 car
payments monthly with no prob-
lem.
Paul, via email
DEAR PAUL: First, if the
numbers you quote are accu-
rate, 25 percent of the original
price is a big hit to take the first
year But it would seem to me
that if the car is in decent condi-
tion, you should purchase it and
keep it for a couple of years


when the annual depreciation
will be substantially less.
Is it smart to lease? I am not
certain there is an absolute an-
swer for that. You can generally
get a better deal when you pur-
chase an automobile as opposed
to a lease.
If it is a business automobile,
the lease option may be appro-
priate for tax reasons.
DEAR BRUCE: After speak-
ing to a lot of people and weigh-
ing the pros and cons, I have
decided to put my home up for
rent. I will be living in my other
home and using the rent to pay
for that mortgage.
I am not sure what kind of in-
surance I should have on the
house in case one of the tenants
sues me for an injury to them or
any children in the home.
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: This is not a
difficult question. You will obvi-
ously need liability insurance
that will cover not only the
renter and his family and
guests, but even a casual person
who is walking down the street.
Oftentimes the renter is re-
quired to carry a liability policy
naming the landlord as a co-in-
sured.
You may wish to purchase
extra insurance on top of this
amount or it could be you will
just purchase the insurance out-
right and include the cost of that
in the rental. You can also insist
that the renter carry tenant's in-
surance on his own property
You will also have to carry
fire and theft insurance that
will cover you in the event of a
loss.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies cannot be
provided.


BUDGET
Continued from Page Dl

late 2007. In many states,
the surpluses coincide with
elections that mark the first
opportunity for officials to be
judged on the results of their
economic policies.
Voters in November will
choose 36 governors and
more than 6,000 state legisla-
tors in what amounts to a ref-
erendum on whether they
want to continue the single-
party dominance that cur-
rently exists in three-fourths
of state capitols.
"I think this election cycle
will tell us a lot about
whether or not we're going to
have better fiscal-manage-
ment officials in charge, or
whether we're going to go
back to business as usual,
which is if the revenue comes
in, let's figure out a way to
spend it," said Ross DeVol,
chief researcher at the
Milken Institute, an eco-
nomic think tank in Santa
Monica, Calif.
In California, once the epit-
ome of busted budgets, a
resurgent technology sector
and recent temporary tax in-
creases have generated fore-
casts of a $3.2 billion budget
surplus. Democratic Gov
Jerry Brown wants some in-
creased spending but also to
pay down debts and rebuild a
rainy day fund.
"It isn't time to just embark
on a raft of new initiatives,"
Brown warned.
Yet the pressure for more
spending already is building
among Democrats who con-
trol the Legislature. Some
want to reverse cuts for wel-
fare programs or launch a
new preschool initiative.


Some states with surpluses
are not necessarily in
great fiscal shape.
They still have
underfunded pension
systems, shortfalls in
school funding formulas
and infrastructure needs
that far exceed their
available dollars for roads
and bridges.



In Republican-led
Louisiana, Jindal's desire to
use the surplus for education
and health care will be com-
peting with other GOP calls
for highway construction and
restocking a state reserve
fund.
Some states with surpluses
are not necessarily in great
fiscal shape. They still have
underfunded pension sys-
tems, shortfalls in school
funding formulas and infra-
structure needs that far ex-
ceed their available dollars
for roads and bridges.
Yet numerous governors
and lawmakers are citing the
surpluses as a reason to cut
taxes, including some in GOP
states that already have shaved
hundreds of millions of dol-
lars off taxes in recent years.
The budget director for Re-
publican Michigan Gov Rick
Snyder has predicted that an
additional tax cut is "in-
evitable" in light of a roughly
$1 billion surplus. Yet Snyder
first wants to put more
money into early childhood
education.
"Then to the degree that
there are some resources
left, it's a fair question: What
can go in the rainy day fund
or what can be given back to


taxpayers?" Snyder said in
an interview with The Asso-
ciated Press.
Wisconsin Gov Scott
Walker's fiscal record will be
put to the test this year The
Republican pledged while
campaigning in 2010 to cre-
ate 250,000 jobs, but he is less
than halfway to that mark.
Tax cuts could help his re-
election appeal. Walker
signed about $750 million of
tax reductions last year and
could seek more.
Big tax cuts also are on the
agenda in Florida and Mis-
souri, where budget sur-
pluses are expected.
"If we put a tax-reduction
package in place, I believe
long-term we're going to grow
our budget and grow our
economy," Missouri Republi-
can House Speaker Tim
Jones said.
Some Democratic gover-
nors facing re-election also
are proposing to roll back re-
cent tax hikes.
Democratic Minnesota Gov
Mark Dayton wants to devote
half of an $825 million sur-
plus toward cutting taxes for
the middle class and repeal-
ing new taxes on business
transactions. But he's already
facing resistance from the
Senate Democratic leader,
who's not up for re-election.
Some budget analysts are
urging caution. The revenue
surge, they note, is driven
partly by stock-market gains
and other one-time factors.
"It will be quite naive to
hope that the surpluses will
be sustainable in the coming
years," said Lucy Dadayan,
senior policy analyst at the
Rockefeller Institute of Gov-
ernment. '"And it will be quite
naive as a result to cut taxes
or to introduce new spending
programs."


For more information
on advertising call

Anne Farrior at
352-564-2931 or

Darrell Watson at

1 352-564-2917 1


BOB LANE, Accountant j.
Accounting & Income Tax Returns -" ^
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities /
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
44 Years in Business 32 Years in Inverness






IT'S TAX TIME!



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PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA
P Federal & Out-of-State
Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
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QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services


www.pwprice.com


LINCOE AX DIREir.RY


D2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association


We


Builder's lonnetion SUNDAY


Generosity/







provides bounty


Building a

Better Christmas
The Citrus County
Builders Association
conducted its annual
Building a Better
Christmas toy drive
in conjunction with the U.S.
Marine Corps Reserve Toys
for Tots. Spearheaded by
Chairwoman Melissa Suther-
land from Air Care Heating &
Cooling, Building a Better
Christmas was able to help
115 children from 47 families
in Citrus County with gifts
and toys for Christmas, as
well as small gift cards for a
local supermarket, courtesy
of Christmas Dinner Sponsor
Air Care Heating & Cooling.
Some would say that mira-
cles were made on Dec. 13,
2013, when the toys were dis-
tributed to parents, but the
real miracles were made on
Dec. 12, 2013, when numerous
volunteers from the CCBA
and the Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart material-
ized to help sort and bag all of
the toys to get them ready for
distribution. What is nor-
mally an enormous task, was
made quick and easy by many
helping hands.
The Citrus County Builders
Association is grateful to
everyone who donated and or
helped to pack toys for this
event. Each and every year,
we are more humbled by the
generosity of others.
Thank you volunteers:
Melissa Sutherland, Air
Care Heating & Cooling
Denise Claypool, Air
Care Heating & Cooling
Lloyd and Charlotte
Myer, Lifetime Honorary
CCBA Members
John and Dusty Porter,
Porter's Locksmithing
Gary Darden, Crystal
Automotive


Chairwoman Melissa Sutherland of Air Care Heating & Cooling oversees volunteers packing
bags for Building a Better Christmas.


Volunteers from the Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart, from left,
are: Commander Richard "Bud" Allen, JoAnn Allen, Curt Ebitz, Alan Bell, Larry Troph, Sory Troph
and Lee Helscel.


Cmdr. Richard "Bud"
Allen & JoAnn Allen, Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Lee Helscel, Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Curt Ebitz, Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Alan and Dolores Bell,
Military Order of the Purple
Heart


Larry and Sory Troph,
Military Order of the Purple
Heart
Dawn Peters
Brenna Bidlack
Special thanks to:
Paul Pilny, U.S. Marine
Corps Reserve Toys for Tots
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the


Purple Heart
All About Kids
Blackshears II Aluminum
Lloyd and Charlotte Myer
StoreRight Self Storage
Walden Woods Red
Hatters
and all Citrus County res-
idents who donated to this
great cause!


* CCBA will hold its first
General Membership
Meeting of 2014 from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 23. GMMs
are open to all. $10 per
person includes
networking and lunch. For
more information, contact
the CCBA office at 352-
746-9028 or register to
attend at www.Citrus
Builders.com.
* The 2014 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing will
be Saturday, Feb. 22, at
the Inverness Golf &
Country Club, in partner-
ship with the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
Player registration and
sponsorship is now open
online at www.Citrus
Builders.corn or in person
at the Citrus County
Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Thanks to our Hole In One
Sponsors Eagle Buick
GMC & Harley-Davidson
of Crystal River! For ques-
tions and registration
form requests, please call
352-746-9028.
* The 2014 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment sponsored by Ex-
clusive Platinum Sponsor
FDS Disposal Inc., Weigh
In Sponsor Florian Ma-
sonry and Heart Sponsor
Sodium Fishing Gear-
will be April 26 and 27 at
the Homosassa Riverside
Resort with a portion of
the proceeds to benefit
the Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple
Heart. Sponsorships and
Angler registration are
now open. Official entry
forms can be picked up at
FDS Disposal Inc.,
Sodium Fishing Gear or
the Citrus County
Builders Association Of-
fice. For more informa-
tion, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028
*Save the Date!! CCBA is
the planning stages of a
brand new event to be
held in 2014! The inaugu-
ral Construction Industry
Building Olympics will be
Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014.
For more information and
sponsorship opportuni-
ties, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028 or email
donnab@citrusbuilders.c
om to be added to the
email list for updates on
this exciting new event.


Golf outing to aid Boys & Girls Clubs


Dan Kern, chairman of the Citrus County
Builders Association's Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing, recently announced
that the annual golf tournament, to be held
Feb. 22 at the Inverness Golf and Country
Club, will benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County for the second consecutive
year The Golf Outing, in its 25th year, is
open to all amateur golfers and is a favorite
CCBA event due to regularly changing golf
courses each year that aid in keeping the
outing interesting and challenging for re-


turning golfers. It was renamed in honor of
Jim Blackshear, a founder of the CCBA,
after his passing in 2004
Proceeds from the golf tournament will
help fund Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County programs and facilities at the 3
club sites. "This is money that will stay in
Citrus County to help our own children,"
said Kern.
Registration for the event will begin at
7 a.m. and the shotgun start is scheduled
for 8 a.m. All teams must pre-register The


$60 entry fee includes greens fee, cart,
lunch, door prizes and one free Mulligan
ticket. Signing up a team for $220 saves $5
per person. Eagle Buick and Harley-David-
son, both of Crystal River, are the event's
hole-in-one sponsors. More event informa-
tion as well as online registration for play-
ers and sponsors can be found at
www.CitrusBuilders.com or by contacting
the Citrus County Builders' Association at
352-746-9028 or the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County office at 352-621-9225.


SMember SPOTLIGHT


Sheldon-Palmes Insurance
of Hernando Inc.
352-341-4661
* Description of Business: Independ-
ent Insurance Company
* Employee Name & Title: Melissa
Olbek
* Number of Years in Business: Shel-
don-Palmes Insurance has been in Cit-
rus County since 1997, but we opened
the Hernando office (own corporation
in 2007)
* Community/Organizational Involve-
ment: Rotary Club of Inverness (mem-
ber, Membership Committee Chair,
Event Coordinator), Board Member for
the Boys & Girls Club, CCBA, Realtor's
Association, Pumped for Success
* What do you love about your work? I
love the opportunity to help my clients
manage their risk, get to know my
clients, and be there to help them
when devastation strikes. And know
that they are taken care of financial in
those times. People hate insurance, but
it mostly because they do not under-
stand it. I love that when people leave
my office they feel comfortable that
they are being treated fairly and that
they will be OK, in the case of some-


Melissa Obek


thing horrible happening.
* What do you love about this county? I
love everything about this county I
have been in Citrus since I was 6 years
old. I love the natural beauty of the
county, the amazing people and the
way our community is so giving and
helping to so many organizations. I love
how everyone seems to know each
other, and it is like a family; a small-
town feel that makes you feel safe.


Be a strong member to keep CCBA strong


Since joining the ,
CCBA, I feel that I have
grown in many ways:
1. The networking that
I have experienced is j
without a doubt the most
valuable benefit to my "
company It has led to
several jobs, with vari-
ous members, and has
allowed my company to
gain more work and %
grow
2. The committee ex-
periences have broad-
ened my knowledge of
Citrus County opera-
tions and created con-
tact with high level officials and
political figures, which I would not have
had without my CCBA interaction.
3. Friendships: Another perk I have
gained is many new friends and co-
workers. All of us are pretty much in the
same boat, that being business own-
ers/workers who are just trying to sur-
vive the present economy
4. There are benefits that are far too
many to list and are diverse in nature;
from the $500.00 discount on new GM
vehicle purchases to continuing educa-


tion courses at low or no
cost to members, there
is something that the
CCBA to benefit every-


I I could go on and on
about the CCBA, but this
is supposed to be a short
testimonial, so I will
close with the following:
Membership at the
CCBA is what you put
into it. To join and do
,, nothing leads not only to
S' a weak organization, but
to lack of personal gain
for you. A strong organi-
zation that works for you
requires some of your participation. At-
tend GMMs and join a committee if you
can, and get some return on your mem-
bership investment.
Ken Lindquist
Ken Lindquist Corp.
third-year member
current 2nd Associate Vice President
Membership Committee Vice Chairman
Governmental Affairs Committee Member
Spike


Jim Blackshear










D4


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Stop resting


The Florida Manatee Festival is open all day Sunday until 4 p.m., and
new this year, Three Sisters Springs will be open for viewing manatees.


ENTERTAINMENT
SCHEDULE

Waterside
9 a.m. to noon
Mel and Chris Linkous
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Cajun Dave and Neon Leon

Heritage Village
Sun. o10 a.m. to l p.m.
Craig Jaworski
Sun. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Jackie Stevio and Phantastic
Sounds



Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber.com/mobile/
orcall 352-795-3149.

3PHe AR

to.
aambr Fixer
Uosted by Cfius M wmrial Health System
Inatbtimv of the
HeWat & Vbulr Center
10 YerAnhWveyor
Thursday. February 6. 2014
5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
CMHS Shre OubAuditorium 402 Grcxe St., Inverness
Busness Casua l Hos d'oeuvres -Beer &Wine
1 Il.J I The Helln VJi Ur Cenle'r In Yt Jr Annvrreary
Celebratin Hearts Heallh fair
Saturday. February 22. 2014
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Fun. Food Screenings. Tours
__ Hlitork Sbhoo Buildkn Ho$(>taI Camnpii

Feb. 6 Business After Hours
hosted by Citrus Memorial, 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
Feb. 7 Chamber Luncheon with
the Florida Public Relations Associa-
tion, 11:30 a.m. to 1p.m.
Feb. 20 Business After Hours
hosted by Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.


Community
events
Feb. 1 Best Friends Fest is pet
adoption extravaganza at 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Event will include pet rescues,
groomers, veterinarians, food and a
silent auction to benefit Animal Serv-
ices' Special Needs Fund. Bring in
pet food for the needy and you'll be
entered into a drawing for a prize.
Citrus County Auditorium 3610 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness (41 and Air-
port Road).
Feb. 4- Life by Chocolate. Atten-
dees will enjoy chocolate fountain,
desserts and drinks. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Crystal
River branch of Raymond James or
you may purchase at Cattle Dog on
the night of the event. All dollars
raised go to the American Cancer
Society, funding research, advocacy,
education and patient services.
Event is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 2416 N.
Heritage Oak Path, Hernando. More
information call 352-795-6155.
Feb. 5 Nature Coast Emergency
Medical Institute begins the next
paramedic class. The program
course is 10 months long and shift-
friendly and is held at the Nature
Coast EMS administration building
at 3876 W. Country Hill Drive in
Lecanto. The program also includes
off-site clinical work. Contact lead in-
structor Ron Bray, CCR at ronaldb@
naturecoastems.org or call 352-400-
1191.
Feb. 15 Faith Haven Christian Re-
treat Center celebrates the legacy of
Eloise "Grandmother" Van Ness from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. This event will in-
troduce the public to Grandmother
VanNess' horse, Lady, who was do-
nated last year to Soquili Stables. In
keeping with Soquili Stables' tradi-
tion of giving its horses a Cherokee
name, Lady is now known as Elisi.
For more information on Soquili Sta-
bles call 352-206-2990 or Faith
Haven at 352-795-7387.


We thank our
generous sponsors:
Presenting
Crystal Automotive
Sustaining partners
The Citrus County Chronicle, The Tampa Bay
Times
Gold
Citrus 95, The Fox 96.7, True Oldies 106.3,
Nature Coast EMS, Sibex
Bronze
Citrus County Sheriffs Office, FDS Disposal,
Hometown Value, Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric, Tobacco Free Florida with the
Florida Department of Health, Citrus County,
Williams, McCranie, Wardlow & Cash, PA
Friend of the Festival
WXJB 99.9 WWJB AM 1450


Chamber installs executive board


STEPHEN E. LASKO/Forthe Chronicle
New Citrus County Chamber of Commerce officers are sworn in by Judge Patricia Thomas
at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. New members are, from left, Secretary Bill Winkel,
Treasurer Gerry Mulligan, Chairman-elect Rebecca Bays, outgoing Chairman John Murphy
and new Chairman Rob Wardlow.


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce installed
its new executive board members and awarded the
Chamber's New Image Award at the Jan. 10 luncheon
sponsored by Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Facility.
The Chamber Luncheon also honored Gulf to Lake Marine
and Trailer with the New Image Award for January. This
award is given to businesses that have made beautification
efforts to their building or grounds that have helped spruce
up the community as a whole. Gulf to Lake Marine and
Trailer is located at 700 S. Thompson Ave., Lecanto.
For more, call 352-527-0555 or visit gulftolakesales.com.


Strawberry

Festival

returns to

Floral City

in February
Save the date! March 1
and 2 is the 27th annual
Floral City Strawberry
Festival. This family-friendly
event actually kicks of Friday
evening, Feb. 28, with a
get-together called Berries,
Brew and Barbecue presented
by the Floral City Merchants
Association. The festival is
being chaired by Chamber
Board Member and Insight
Credit Union Branch Man-
ager Jim Ferrara, who shares:
"Being a resident of Citrus
County now for 20 years, the
Floral City Strawberry has
been a tradition now mostly
because it falls on my birth-
day. Insight Credit Union has
allowed me to work with the
Citrus County Chamber this
year in planning the 2014
Floral City Strawberry
Festival, which has been
very exciting; I truly believe
everyone from the volunteers
to the patrons will enjoy
the updated layout and
activities."
This charming festival will
have live entertainment, nu-
merous arts and crafts and a
Little Miss Strawberry
Princess Pageant for resi-
dents of Citrus County. For
more information, visit
floralcitystrawberryfestival
.corn or call 352-795-3149.


Point O'Woods Club
9228 E. Gospel Island Road, Inverness, FL 34450 352-634-4216


POINT 0 WOODS COUNTRY CLUB
922.


From left: Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Janet Mayo, associate member; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; and
Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers, join Point O'Woods member Sandra Koonce and friends.


Patty's Barber Cuts
2167 W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto FL 34461 o 352-364-1793


-- Aaw -
Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Bill Hudson, Land Title
of Citrus County, owner, Patty Lewis joined by friends and family; Janet Mayo, associate member; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers;
Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; and Sarah Fitts, First International Title.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


- startfesting!


I -iEPHEN E. LASKOi/Chnronicle Tile
The 2014 Florida Manatee Festival began Saturday
morning in downtown Crystal River and will continue
until 4 p.m. today.











To place an ad, call 563=5966




Classified Classifieds

In Print


and


Online


All


.. .The.Time


SUNDAY,JANUARY 19,2014 D5


Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$

Hyundai Azera
2007-loaded-power
windows,heated
power seats-rear
sun screen 6 cyl.
Very low mileage.
Asking $10,000.
Available
after Jan. 22nd. Call
860-716-3128

Single 56 yr. old
Gentlemen
Looking for Someone
55-60 No drugs,
no smoking. Like the
simple things in life?
Movies, Dinner,
and would like to
play disc golf. Call Jim
352-212-4167


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




1500 Rubber Stamps,
& Supplies
STORE CLOSED
Sell All (352) 249-7640

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 25th 9a-5p
Sun. Jan. 26th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Diabetic Test Strips
a diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes, we pick-up, call
Mike 386-266-7748
$$WE PAY CASH$$
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-it
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




12 yr old Female
Spayed Husky
needs a new home
call Sue
(352) 795-6795
Free Boxer/Mix,
Male, neutered,
2 Years old,
house trained
good temperament
(352) 422-7663


rKEE
Fancy Tail Guppies
(352) 560-3019
HORSE MANURE
mixed with plenty of
dark rich top soil
Lecanto area near
landfill. Bring Shovel,
Truck load avail., Help
Yourself. 352-697-5252
Two Kittens
9 week old females
Free to good home
(352) 513-4653



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
- Grouper @$6.001lb
w Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
*GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Lost Blue Folder
At Walmart/lnv
12/28. Contained
drivers Lic & Visa
Card. REWARD.
PIs Return, no ques-
tions asked. Return to
address on Lic.
Lost Cat
2/2 years old, female
Gray w/ brown nose,
white on chest,
collar with bell
Area, Western Drive,
Hernando
(352) 897-5333
Lost Dog
Maltese/Yorkie Mix
Female, small 8-10lIbs
Long blond Hair
Dunnellon
Raibowsprings Area
REWARD
(352) 465-1423
cell (352) 895.1333
Lost Grandmothers
Necklace &
birthstone pendant
In Homasassa or
Seven. Riv. Hosp.
REWARD
(641) 295-3151
Mini Australian Shep-
ard mix. Black with
white blaze, white
front feet. Lost in
Homosassa Dans
Clam Stand. REWARD
(352) 302-2255
Set of keys on blue
holder btwn Citrus
Sprgs and Dunnellon b4
Xmas 352-897-4154



Found Black & White
Tuxedo Cat,
older cat
Rainbow Springs CC
Estates
(352) 489-5085



Bring Bowe Home!
Afahanistan POW
for over 4 years
Army Sgt Bowe
Bergdahl has been
a POW in Afghani-
stan for over 4-1/2
years. Bowe is an
Idaho resident but
Citrus County con-
siders him one of
ours and is doing it's
best to show our
support and bring
the awareness to
everyone that we
need to Bring Bowe
Home. If you are an
individual or a busi-
ness that would like
to be involved with
this project by dis-
playing the Bowe
decal/ getting
petitions signed/
fundraising for a
billboard/ donating,
etc. please contact
Susan at:
352-637-6206
or cvn2719@vahoo.
com. More details
as well as the peti-
tion can be found at
advocate4victims.
orq/wo.

WE HAVE
MOVED
The Office of
Dr. Blessilda Liu
942 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy,
Hernando
352-419-8924


Fine Your Drw Hofme.
Search Hundreds o( Local Limtngs
www.chroniciehomefinder.com


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
0, Grouper @ $6.001lb
d Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001



Responsible working
adult looking to rent
a room in the Beverly
Hills Area. Reasonably
priced, call
1-231-878-4128


ChidCr
TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444




PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




NURSE
PRACT. OR
PHYSICIAN ASST
Needed for internal
medicine office.
Traditional inpatient
and outpatient
care. Great loca-
tion within Citrus Co.
FL. Excellent
Benefits. National
Health Service
Corps approved
site. To apply
please email re-
sume to
sum07mer@
mail .corn or Fax
Attn Patty
352-746-3838.


CA/FRONT DESK
& LMT
PT, Villages, M-F 2-8pm
Fax Resume 795-8911
CNAs
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
All Shifts
EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoll@
vahoo~comn

LPN
The Dermatology
Center in Inverness
is looking for an
LPN Mon-Fri 8-5
we offer competi-
tive benefits with
paid holidays. Der-
matology Experi-
ence a plus but not
req. We will train the
right candidate.
This position is avail-
able immediately.
Fax Resume to:
352-637-0788 or Mail
931S. US Hwy. 41
Inverness,FL 34450
REGISTERING NOW
CNA'S, HHA'S
Companions
new Home Health
Business
FL Caregivers
352-795-7800

RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF


I r S




" Det ile





BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


APPLYIN PE SO

LOECEVOE
229HGWA.4WS


COLLEGE ,
E 'LL1 \L
FLORIDA
an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
COORDINATOR -
Career Pathways
(Grant Funded)
Bachelor's degree
required. Three years
of experience in
education or busi-
ness required.
Part-time Custodian
-Appleton Museum
of Art
A copy of transcripts
from an accredited
institution must be
submitted with the
application for each
position. Alterna-
tively, send via
e-mail to hr@cf.edu
or fax to
352-873-5885.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of tran-
scripts to hr@CF.edu
or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF Is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


INTERNET
MARKETING
Wanted motived
person with Photo-
shop, social media
and html skills as well
as a knowledge of
email marketing and
online marketing.
Great opportunity
with a growing com-
pany with clients
worldwide.
Check us out here
http://Imamc.com/
company/careers/
To apply email
resume to:
Andrew@ legendary
marketlng.com


Exp. PT Bartend-
ers & Servers
ApplyV In Person
INVERNESS
Golf & Country Club
3150 S. Country Club
Drive




Sales
Professionals
Wanted, salary,
plus commissions.
Company vehicle.
APPLY IN PERSON
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy
NO PHONE CALLS
OR EMAILS PLEASE




Construction
Laborer
Sinkhole remedia-
tion. FT position.
Must be 18 or older.
To Apply: Call Glen
(352) 843-1717
,.,:"y';I,,,t


L. L'D

CH"" I...LE
Cl-,fied,






ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough, Trim. Slab,
Lintel, Service
Employer paid
benefits, paid holi-
day & vac. /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wlldwood

ENGINE TECH.
Certified, Marine
Merc Cruiser
& Mercury
CALL MALOY
(352) 795-9630


#1 Employment source is






Clsified


PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-sink,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351

RANCH &
FARM HELP
Maintenance,
Mow, Stalls, Turnout,
Exp. w/horses a plus.
Inglis Area, F/T, EOE
352-400-0469


C*pNidE

Seeking
Customer
Service Rep
Temporary,
Up to 29 Hrs./week
Strong Customer
Service
Solid Computer Skills
Early Morning and
Weekend Hours
Required
Email resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or
Apply in person:
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River, FL
Drug Screen
required for Final
Applicant.
EOE




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!


delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


Our family of newspaper

reaches more than

170,000 readers in Citrus,

Marion, Sumter, Levy,

Dixie, Gilchrest, Gadsden

& Wakulla Counties.

e Citrus County Chronicle Central Ridge Visitor
e Homosassa Beacon Inverness Pioneer
e Crystal River Current 9 Sumter County Times
s Williston Pioneer 9 South Marion Citizen
9 Riverdand News 9 Riverland Shopper
* Chiefland Citizen Tri-County Bulletin
* Gadsden County Times Wakulla News
0 Nature Coast Visitors Guide0 Real Estate News

The best way to reach the
growing Nature Coast market is
through our award-winning,
growing newspapers.

^C9 I T R U 9 ,_-"*-%C 0 U Is T 1Y""

CHlRONICLE


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Lecanto

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

C CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
www.chronflclwiib.cof


I PUP I I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*******wPLUS********







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vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. Used as a down payment or capcost reduction toward the purchase or lease of
any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda APR, Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program
through HFS (excludes Zero Due at Signing Lease Program). Must meet certain credit criteria established by HFS, and vehicle must
be eligible for new-vehicle rates. See dealer for complete details. * Plus $790 destination charge and options. 1.36 month closed end
lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2995 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment,
tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost. 2.36 month closed end lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles
per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $999 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost.
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D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


v2014"Chev

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 D7







D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19,2014


MASSAGE
THERAPY
Classes Start,
April 28, 2014
Spring Hill
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-1 0Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com

WE MOVE SHEDS!
we accept Visa/MC
**352-634-3935**




60'S DON QUIXOTE
WOODEN WALL
PLAQUE 6 ft very cool
$50 352-897-4154


ANTIQUE STEAMER
TRUNK. 36" X 22" X 23"
Tall. Good condition.
$75. 527-1239.
ATTRACTIVE AN-
TIQUE WOOD TRUNK
High gloss finish nice
shape $75
352-897-4154
MELMAC "ROSE BOU-
QUET" DINNERWARE
6 pl setting 38 pieces
$60/all 352-897-4154



16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316
MELMAC "ROSE BOU-
QUET" DINNERWARE
38 piece 6 pl setting
$60/all 352-897-4154



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Commercial Stove
Gas, Vulcan
10 burner, double
oven. Good working
condition. $500. obo
(352) 795-3964
FRIGIDAIRE upright
freezer, 14 cu.ft., $100
Frigidaire, refrigerator,
16.5 cu.ft. $100.
(813) 716-5140
GE Electric Stove
white w/black door
coil burners, GE
Microwave, white
$130. obo
(812) 701-8881
Maytag white
FRIG/FREEZER
-STOVE AND MICRO-
WAVE $350 for all
PH# 352-410-6969
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE, 30"
electric, white
clean, works good.
$125. Homosassa
(678) 617-5560 or
352-513-5580
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398



POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell 1/4
hose,gunlance and bot-
tle $25. Dunnellon
465-8495
WIRE SHELVING 16
inches wide 87 feet
long. All brackets
included.
$100 527-1399



J B L CENTER
SPEAKER -100 watts 6
1/2"H 18 1/2"W 5 5/8"D
$25.00 more info. call
352-527-9982


KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
5.5" SCREEN WITH
GRAPHICS
$100 352-341-6920
SHARP SPEAKERS 2
10" 150 WATTS
$30 352-613-0529
TV SONY 27" TRINI-
TRON WITH REMOTE
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
$75 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16"140 WATTS 29"
60 WATTS 1 5" 80
WATTS
$75 352-613-0529

Computers,"

PRINTER & SCANNER
Epson Workforce 1100
Printer with extra ink
and Canon 8400f scan-
ner.
VG condition, both for
$75. Call 352 382-2591



PATIO SET 5 PIECES
48" OCTAGON TABLE
& 4 CHAIRS WITH
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529



2 PC SECTIONAL,
2 ottoman's, recliner,
2 end tables, 4 wall
pictures. $400 for all
(352) 628-3829
2 VINTAGE COFFEE
TABLES. 1 round with
lazy susan. 1 rectangu-
lar. Both maple. $25 for
both. 527-1239
3 seat and 2 seat
Green Cloth Couch
$200. obo
SMW(352) 476-1124
4 RUSTIC DK PINE
ARMCHAIRS Comforta-
ble sturdy nice shape
$60/all 352-897-4154
CHINA CABINET
Broyhill, white w/light.
older in good cond. $75.
bev. hills 352-513-5108
Coffee Table and
2 end tables. Metal,
Brass colored, Stone
look top. Neutral
colors $150
(352) 382-1802
DINETTE SET
Rattan 75" table,
6 chairs with cushions
Excellent Cond $600
(352) 382-0543
DINING ROOM BUFFET
light gray wood, 4
drawers, cupboard,
cut. board. 4'7"' L, 19"
W $65. (352) 465-1262
DINING ROOM FURNI-
TURE Small Hutch and
Corner Cabinet.
$150.00 for both.
352-344-5334
DINING ROOM TABLE
3x5 wrought iron with
glass top, 4 matching
padded chairs.
Verdi gris finish.
(352) 341-1803 9-12p
Display Case
glass doors & shelves.
Lighted, cherry finish.
18"d,30"w, 76"h.
Good cond. $75
352-228-4837;
352-212-6918


Dk Green Wicker TV
stand w/swivel top_
Green wicker oval
mirrorsml Green
wicker table w/lower
shelf. $95. for all
(352) 382-2939
FURNITURE 3'x5'x12"
Book Case $30. Glider
rocker $65 304-679-
8692
KITCHEN SET
Table ,Glass top, with 4
cushioned swivel
chairs. 3 matching
bar stools. $425
352-422-6849
New Twin Bed
Frame, boxspring &
Mattress $100. firm
(352) 795-0783
OAK COFFEE TABLE.
Excellent condition.
24"x48".
$25. 527-1239
Queen Sleeper Sofa
great condition, tan
$150. obo
(352) 795-0037
Queen Sleeper Sofa,
beige, microfiber,
excel cond. $350.
Black Dining Rm. Set
round glass tble, 4
chairs, matching
drapes & Serving tbl
$650. (352) 419-5363
Queen Sz all Cherry
Cannonball Bed
w/dresser & night-
stand, $600. obo
SMW(352) 476-1124
Sealy Posturepedic full
set, w/hbd
&frm.(guestroom.) $85
352-613-5240
SLEEPER SOFA
Queen mattress. Off
white fabric. Nice condi-
tion. 78 x 36 x 32 tall.
$145. 527-1239
Sofa Sleeper
3 cushion, 2 throw
pillows beige print
$100
(352) 601-7380
VINTAGE CHAISE
LOUNGE burgundy em-
bossed cotton comfy
good shape $65
352-897-4154



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019




CRYSTAL RIVER
Selling connects
of home. Furniture &
Colletibles. Call
George for appoint.
(352) 795-7614


Clothing

2 GIRLS WINTER
JACKETS LARGE $25
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 3 SETS SIZE 6
& 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 &
5/6 $45 352-613-0529
GIRLS WINTER cloth-
ing 4 jeans 1 pants 5
shirts 2 pajama sets &
2 hoodies sizes vary
$50 352-613-0529


CLASSIFIED



MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS SIZE
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS LARGE $20
352-613-0529
PGH STEELER
JACKET NFL Winter re-
movable hood med like
new condition $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
WEDDING GOWN Ivory
sz 14 Kathryn La Croix
fitted bodice with bead
work.Full skirt with train.
$100.00 352-586-7359



BROTHER FAX COP-
IER SCANNER WITH
MANUAL ONLY 35.00
4640316



!!!!! 30X9.50 R15 !!!!!
Really nice tread. Only
asking $70 for the pair!!
(352) 857-9232
-.225/60 R16 I...
Beautiful tread. Only
asking $70 for the pair!!
(352) 857-9232
---235\60 R18~---
Great tread. Only asking
$70 for the pair!! (352)
857-9232
4 WOOD STORAGE
BOXES $30 CAN
E-MAIL
PHOTO/DIMENSIONS
INVERNESS 419-5981
15 HEARTS/WOOD
FORMS FOR VALEN-
TINES DECORATING
$20 MULTIPLE SIZES
419-5981
90 Gal. Tank W/all wood
stand & storage.
Marineland Magnum
Pump 350. Fish &
Scenery Inc. $125
(352) 621-0888
1500 Rubber Stamps,
& Supplies
STORE CLOSED
Sell All (352) 249-7240
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $60
352464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$100 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOFLEX EXTREME 2
New. Retail $1600,
asking$400; Table Saw
Craftsman 10" on
stand.Exc Cond $100
352-445-1074
Bookcase,
$140
20 Glass Boots
Drinking glasses
$60.
(352) 795-7254
Cage & 6 Finches
30x35x18
and supplies $75.00
20" rectangular fish
tank and supplies
$50. (352) 382-3420
after 5pm
DENON STEREO
RECEIVER AM/FM
PRECISION AUDIO
RECEIVER.FIRST
100.00 464 0316
ELECTRIC GRILL
BLUE WORKS FINE
ONLY 20.00 464 0316


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i-
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
w Grouper @ $6.001lb
Stonecrab @ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRAMED DISNEY
PRINT "FLATTERY"
-cert.#838 of 2000 size
18" by 24" $99.00-more
info.call 352-527-9982
GAS GENERATOR
Power stroke, 6200
starting watts, 5000 run-
ning watts, Never Used
$500 623-760-7684
Crystal River
Hand Made Hats
Beautiful, Yarn all
colors, 90 total, buy
& sell on ebay,
make good profit,
It's cold up North
Cash Only $180.
(352) 746-9573
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316


HARMAN KARDEN
DIGITAL SYNTHE-
SIZED QUARTZ AM/FM
RECEIVER FIRST
100.00 464 0316

Kitchen Cabinets
Off white laminate
with oak trim. Match-
ing counter top. O1xl0
L shape layout. SS sink
& faucet. Exc Cond
$750 352-228-4837 or
352-212-6918
LARGE MIRROR 48" x
68" Large Mirror
352-212-2051- $20.00
OBO.

POOL TABLE
4x8 with genuine slate
top. Cue's and balls.
$400
(352) 628-1723

Pool Table
Good Shape, $45.
Hot Tub,
like new 4 person
$500
(352)628-1646


e_
ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING "1979" -50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $99.00
352-527-9982
SEWING MACHINE Vi-
king model 100. Great
as a beginner machine
or general sewing.
$50 352-613-5240
WOOL RUG
Union Jack, 5x7,
$200, Matching Bedd-
ing, throws, & pillows,
2 sets $50 for all.
(352) 382-2906




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS,
1 Lazy Boy $295;
1 Golden $375.
Both Excellent Cond,
352-270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316


4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
URONLY $20
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316

'.A ;;da
Cloth lift & recliner
chair.Pd $1,500 Sell
$750.00 firm.
carol.hudson@outookconrV35
2-344-3947
(leave message).
MOBILITE HOSPITAL
BED. Good Cond.
Electric head & foot.
3 mattress heights
$150 315-651-7708
Homosassa


TT T 866m361*1137 ...

"iT 01" J.l Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11am-4pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat8am-4pm


Home o Finder

www.chroniclohomfinder.com


Fint Yozr trwu* Honw

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


NEW YEAR

CELEBRATION


ONE


WEEK


ONLY!






SUNDAY, JANUARY 19,2014 D9


WALKER LARGE
WHEELS FOR MORE
MANUVERABILITYONLY
60.004640316



"NEW" FENDER NEW-
PORTER ACOUSTIC
W/GIGBAGTUNERSTRING
S&PICKS.SELLS
FOR $280+ MY PRICE
$160 352-601-6625
KIMBALL ORGAN
Performer-Entertainer
Two tier. exc. cond.
w/bench books & light.
$125 352-634-2247
NEW ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR DARK
MAHOGANY, PERFECT
FOR LEARNING ONLY
$50 352-601-6625
Scandalli Accordian
120 full base, exc.
condition, $600.
(352) 341-0299
YAMAHA KEYBOARD
Model YPG235.
With stand and bench
Like New $175 OBO
(740) 505-1505

Household
FILTER QUEEN
VAC POWER WAND &
ELECT. HOSE
$25 EA. CALL
527-6425
SEWING MACHINE
Singer Heavy Duty Zig
Zag With carrying case.
Ex Cond,Just Serviced
$75 Brian 352-270-9254
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER&
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
VACUUM CLEANER
Filter Queen Power
head.
Excell. cond. Was $250.
$75 CALL 527-6425



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
NordicTrack EXP1000X
TREADMILL
Works/Great Condition.
Asking $400. OBO. Call
352-257-3547 Can
Email Pictures
Proform Resistant Bike,
Never used, pd $350,
asking $200; Weslo
Cadence Treadmill
Asking $100. Call Eve-
nings (352) 344-3131
RECUMBENT BIKE
Sears Proform 990,
wide seat, dig. display
w/ arm exercise $125;
Marcy multi-position
exercise gym, assem-
bled, 140 Ib selective
wts, lists at $495, ask-
ing $215. Exc Cond
(352) 382-7074
RECUMRENT EXER-
CISE BIKE marcy exer-
cise bike. brand new.
$100 firm 352-382-5275


Stationary Bike
ProForm XP 185
IFIT Multi, never used
$100. firm cash
(352) 527-6779
TREADMILL
Proform XP
Trainer 580, Like new
$100.
352-382-3990, 634-0318



8' POOL TABLE
by Brunswick
incl. accessories
exc. cond. $500.
(352) 344-8446
BB PISTOL Umarex
airgun uses bbs &
powerletts. Excellent
condition.
$40 352-382-5275
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
X-Factor Hammer
Driver & #3 Hybrid-
$100., Adams Golf
3 & 5 Woods $40.
Call Dan 352-464-4897
GOLF PULL CARTS
Excellent condition
2@ $25 each.
Call 527-6425

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 25th 9a-5p
Sun. Jan. 26th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605



CAR TRAILER
Tandem axel.
15,000 Ib capacity.
$1700 0BO
(740) 505-1505

Sel orSwa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Classifieds


C I Rk> N I .....
() 563NI596CIE 6





(352) 563-5966


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Dump truck loads
(approx 8 yds), dirt &
rock hauling. Tractor
Work. 352-302-5794



Every Day

CH.KO*NId
Cl-sified,



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


#1 Employment source is








www.ch ronicleonline.com


Electrical
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
PeFAST. 100%Guar.
veAFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


Fo anyman
SFAST 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570

PolB ildg
Riemodlin


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc. comrn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024-


.MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
p RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

GREG'S MARCITE NATURE COAST RV
Florida Gem, Diamond RV service, parts, sales
Brite Marcite, FREE EST. Mobile Repair/Maint.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


Wracoreeor
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955






Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


GCqENERAC
Stand Alone-
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


Ted's Painting








All Types of Home Repairs
746-5190
LIC/INS Lic #240270 I


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
flo All Home Repairs
9 Small Carpentry
9 Fencing
9 Screening
Clean Dryer Vents
A affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic#37761


nstallR r Now's the
Pnniits.filmes. e for pool
H.aters remodeling
B .Salt r Systemns inr
s Pool Refinishing
Construction
Remodel
Leak Detection
SSugarmill *Pool Tile & Repair
S Oo d ServingMll rl t Citrus County
POol'& S0 8 Free Consultation
I-s -LO 382-4421
fStote edied Pool (ontmdo Uc #1458326


SI
BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting -Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
R 352-364-4610
(MR.
ELECTRIC*
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated.
S Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day-7 Days a Week


W. ubr W~dw aod Wt he EM H
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $3 5
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

S THuRA CLEAN hC
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091





DON'T LET YOUR
, DRYER START
A I
& FlatRate-No


AAA ROOFING
Call te" ."eak6use.n"J
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO 37 000H05K


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


v 1 '







DIO SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


Do you have clutter?
Looking for boxes of
old papers, records,
comics, odds & ends
We haul away & pay.
352-625-7371
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



CAMPER
2003 Starcraft Aruba
pull behind. 28 ft., 1
slide $7000 obo
(352) 628-1126


Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820


U








ASHER
Asher, 6-y.o. Border
Collie mix, neutered,
appears housebro-
ken, medium sized
@ 59 Ibs. Gentle,
friendly, gets along
w/other dogs.
Friendly & coopera-
tive. Beautiful mark-
ings. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


DOLLY
Meet Dolly, 6-y.o.
Bulldog/terrier mix,
wt 54 Ibs., has had
an unfortunate life,
still one of the
sweetest dogs ever.
Shows signs of ne-
glect, but amazingly
is full of love for peo-
ple, playful & very
happy, craves af-
fection and returns
it, so deserving of a
loving home. Sweet
personality.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


1#1 EmploymnsoreI



www.chronicleonline.com


GUS
Gus, 1-y.o. male
American bulldog
mix, white & red
color, weight 60 Ibs.
Very intelligent, can
lie down, roll over,
stay on command,
a lover, not a
fighter. Appears
housebrkn., would
be great compan-
ion, family dog &
cuddle buddy.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


LADYBIRD
Ladybird, an adora-
ble little white terrier
mix, owner had too
many dogs. Very
easy-going, calm,
gentle, gets along
w/other dogs, ap-
pears housebroken.
Obedient & listens
carefully. In good
health. Medium size.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


Iet


IINY in my is a gorgeous
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510-


3 Dapple Dachshund
Puppies, all female
w/papers, pis call
Sylvia (727) 235-2265
DOG CRATE
42L x24wx28h
excellent condition
$50
352-422-6698
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


L.Qlk


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



GANOE
15ft., w/ 6 HP, Tohatsu
4 stroke engine, with
boat lift, $2,500 obo
(724) 516-4123
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




FLEETWOOD
1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
may trade, very good
tires, lots of storage
11 k obo352-263-4339
Keystone Everest
'03 5th wheel. Incls 3
sliders, xtra storage un-
der goose nk, new: gen,
septic/H20 hoses, deck.
Must Sell 352-795-1272




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SHADOW CRUISER
28ft, 1 slide, sleeps 8
only used twice! with
auto. satellite $12,000.
352-634-4113
STARCRAFT
'07, Pop up Camper
excel, cond., $3,950.
352-795-0787
or 352-208-7651




RoadMaster
Hidden Tow Bar
brackets fits Dodge
Ram 1500. ask $225.
Iv msg (727) 251-0589


C I TRUST COUNTY

For more information on how to reach H R OI iC

Citrus County readers call .. H 1 iCLLinco
352-563-5592.eonline.com
Scartorough 2010


I-.-XH2


-jE


Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100

WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
w- ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939





Buy Here/Pay Here

'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl


'00, LaSaber, Limited
Edition, good cond.
91,889 miles, $4,000
352-382-3990,634-0318
CADILAC
'04, DeVille, 79K mi.,
Champagne, w/ top &
gold kit, cream leather,
new tires, $6,950.
(352) 341-4949


CHEVROLET
2008 Corvette Coupe,
Red, 7,900 Miles, Show
Room Condition,
Extra's.
$33,000
352-212-9556
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
2004 Altima
Great Car! 115k Miles.
$4900. 352464-7415
SATURN
2000, Loaded,
Very Good Cond
$1600
(352) 746-1953
Ii

i-ii I -11 I list.
tLll, il, D ',
L I) I


CHfN ICLE
ClUfieds

Self ffiBage
Notices


DATSON 280ZX
Attention Z lovers '82
Datson, lnline6 turbo,
eng. & trans good,
$500 (352) 613-1184






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




DODGE
'96, Dakota, club cab,
w/shell cap, 209,188
miles. Runs good.
Many new parts.
$2,300 (352) 341-8415
DODGE RAM
2002 1500 Quad cab,
short bed, 53,850 mi,
Many Extra's! $8,950
(352) 795-1499
FORD
2006 F150, like new
super cab, chrome
pck, leather, 1 owner,
non-smoker, 132k mi.
$11,900. (813) 967-5580
FORD
2010 F150 Platinum
Supercrew, 4x4, 40900
miles, black, leather,
navigation, rear view
camera, tow package,
excellent condition,
$14900,
trde@netscape.com

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018


319-0126 SUCRN
2/5 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY
RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
#4 Kenneth Scott Guinn;#105 Dwight Tawan Edwards;#156 Lester Joshua Bass 111;#157
Richard Wayne Mills;#170 Troy E. Suarez;#183 Wayne Edward Penninger;#221 Hope
Lynn McBride;#223 Allison Nicole Ford;#261 Patricia Ann Seymour;#300 Debra A.
Picucci
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2014.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PUBLISHED IN THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, JANUARY 19 & 26, 2014.


320-0119 SUCRN
BOCC Bid Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB #008-14
Generators/Above-Ground Diesel Fuel Tanks for the
Charles A Black WTP #1, Charles A Black WTP #2 and
Sugarmill Woods WTP #3
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide labor, materials, equipment, and incidentals for emergency genera-
tors at three separate facilities including Charles A. Black WTP #1, Charles A Black
WTP #2 and Sugarmill Woods WTP #3. Scope of services also includes providing
above ground double wall above ground fuel tanks for the Charles A Black WTP #1
and Charles A Black WTP #2.
Minimum Reauirements for Submitting a Bid
Bidder or subcontractor shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be
determined a responsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. The dealer shall have a minimum of ten (10) years of experience in the field of
power generation.
2. The deder must have a parts and service facility within a two hundred fifty (250)
mile radius of Citrus County.
3. The deder must have one hundred percent (100%) of all engine replacement
parts locally available within a 48 hour period.
Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on January
31, 2014 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located at
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before February 19, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
L. Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for February 19, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on the left hand side of
the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352)
527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 19, 2014.


320-0202 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID-4350
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Bldgs. 1 & 2 Pleasant Grove Elementary School Cit-
rus County School Board Bid No. 4530 will be received by the Citrus County School
Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time February 18, 2014, in the Purchasing Department,
Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida,
34450-4625. Immediately following all bids received will be opened and read aloud
in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional
for sub-contractors, will be held at Pleasant Grove
Elementary School, 630 Pleasant Grove Road in the Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur February 5, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc. upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County
School Board in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made
upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days af-
ter the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 19, 26 & February 2, 2014.


^ FORD^
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C, runs
great. Low miles
$2,800. 352-628-1646


CHEVY
VENTURA 2005 Van
74K ml. exc cond
extras included
$5,500 obo
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
'01, Caravan LX Sport.
Loaded, V6. CD, AC.6
dr,7 Pass. Grg Clean
$2775. (631) 589-9410



HONDA
1992, Helix Scooter
25k miles, good cond.
new tires, $1,500
(352) 746-7378
HONDA
99 American Classic
750cc, 8k mi., wind
shield, light bar, hard
bags, $2900. Ik new
352-634-2247
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4,500. 352-513-4257


I Bid Notic


mB


mB




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C7~j~


TOYOTA

Let's Go Places


2013 Blowout Savings.


NEW 2013 TOYOTA

Sienna
Limited
Advanced Tech
BUY FOR
$39,800


AUTO OZ







New 2013 Toyota Sienna Limited model 95356. with automatic trans-
mission and select equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP
ol $49,581. Village Toyota discount o l $6.282 and $3,499 cash or trade
equity due at signing. Excludes Lax. ltag. registration, title and dealer lees.
Dealer lees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all manufacturer rebates and
incentives. Cannot be combined with any olner offers. Must complete
retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


NEW 2014 TOYOTA

Corolla
LE
BUY FOR

$13,999
LEASE FOR

$129MONTH
AUTO







New 2014 Toyota Corolla LE model #1852, with automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP of $19,160, Village Toyota
discount of $1,661 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes tax,
tag, registration, title and dealer fees. Dealer fees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
of 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile thereafter. Disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


New 2013 Toyota Rav4 XLE model P4-UO witt automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases paynrem. MSRP of $25 904. Village Toyota
aiscounl 01 $2,905 ana S3.499 casnr or trade equity due at signing Excludes tax.
tag registration, tilie ana dealer lees. Dealer lees vary ty dealer Dealer retains all
manulacturer rebates an a incentives. Lease Ior 36 monln wtiln approved credit score
ol 680 or higner [nrougn Souiheast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and lear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile inereaher. Disposilion lee o0 $350 due ai lease end. Cannot ne combined
with any orner offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


New 2014 Toyota Camry SE model #2546, with automatic transmission and select
equipment Adding options increases payment. MSRP of $25,040, Village Toyota
discount of $3,641 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes tax,
tag, registration, title and dealer fees. Dealer fees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
of 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile thereafter. Disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


New 2013 royota Prius C model n1201 witn automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases payment MSRP ol $19 940. Village Toyota
discount ol $1.441 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes Ltax
lag. registration IUlle and dealer lees. Dealer lees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer renates and incentives. Lease for 36 month withn approved credit score
ol 680 or nigner tnmrougn Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and lear. 12,000 miles per year. .18 cents
per mile nthereafter. Disposition lee or $350 due ai lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14


New 2014 Toyota Prius II model #1223, with automatic transmission and select
equipment. Adding options increases payment. MSRP of $25,060, Village Toyota
discount of $2,310 and $3,499 cash or trade equity due at signing. Excludes tax,
tag, registration, title and dealer fees. Dealer fees vary by dealer. Dealer retains all
manufacturer rebates and incentives. Lease for 36 month with approved credit score
of 680 or higher through Southeast Toyota Finance. No security deposit required.
Lessee pays maintenance, excess wear and tear. 12,000 miles per year, .18 cents
per mile thereafter. Disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. Cannot be combined
with any other offers. Must complete retail sale and take delivery by 1-31-14.


NEW 2013 TOYOTA

RAV4
XLE
BUY FOR

$19,500
LEASE FOR

$199MONTH


NEW 2013 TOYOTA

Prius C
ONE


BUY FOR

$15,000
LEASE FOR

$139MONTH


NEW 2014 TOYOTA

Camry
SE


BUY FOR

$17,900
LEASE FOR
$159MONTH


NEW 2014 TOYOTA

Prius
TWO


BUY FOR

$19,251
LEASE FOR

$239MONTH


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 Dll




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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^s^__N I SSAN


800-584-8755 EXT 16 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA, FL
Monday Saturday: 9:00am 5:00pm Sunday: Closed
VALID DRIVER LICENSE AND PROOF OF INSURANCE INCLUDING DRIVE ANOTHER VEHICLE ENDORSEMENT REQUIRED.
5o


D12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014










HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY ('III<4)NI I I 1 1 I I \ iI :UII ( >1 --


ON THE COVER:

kmT TO YoUm uMEV, 8
REAL ESTATE


, ane's
MML,Garden


PAGE EO10


This Modloft Pearl Bookcase is an
open-backed modern bookcase
that can be used to divide rooms
or set the perimeter of a library-
j _, focused space. Contemporary
home libraries utilize room for
AL books or artwork that speak to the
aesthetic and spirit of the space.
Digital readers can be enjoyed in a
library-appointed room equally with
book lovers.
Associated Press







E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


5989 H. ORCHIS TER.
PINE RIDGE
4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 1.3
(352) 527-7842 L
(352) 422-3875


-" 1FU II. LL 6WHIIIIE1 UI*.
LAUREL RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG with HEATED POOL
*Golf Community Living RM & Fam. RM
SAll newer Appliances Furnishings Available
SDouble-sided gas fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [-
(352) 527-7842 U
352) 422-3875


HELP!
I NEED LISTINGS!!
All my listings have sold and
I need to fill my inventory.
It's a great market, and if you
are considering selling please
call me for a market analysis
on your home's value. It's FREE.

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Fl
Email: cnadal@remax.net I








CHARMING FAMILY HOME
PRICED RIGHT
Adorable 3 bedroom 2 bath home with family room
and fenced back yard. Freshly painted home with many
recent upgrades Split bedroom plan close to local
schools and shopping. Storage building, deck, and nice
neighborhood too.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 IJI
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r52)637.282
Enter house #4720



W' I I

LAUREL RIDGE SPACIOUS HOME!!!
S2 BR, 2 BATH W/OFFICE 2-Car Garage w/Screen
' Living & Family RM. HVAC Updated 2012
S1999 Sq. Ft. Living '8 Person SPA
SUpdated Appliances Community POOL

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 fl
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com f










REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


LNlIaAL KIVtH, rL 444Z!
Two DW Mobile homes side by side, one is a 3/2 and the other
is 2/2 with Den, carport, Florida Room. Both homes have
fenced yard and have an Open Floor Plan. DIRECTIONS:
From Hwy 44, Rockcrusher Rd, to W Tangerine.
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email: TheWrighlBessTeanm@gmail.com i
Website: www.dawnwrighl.remaxagent.com



U-,:v t. I




SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 home with heated pool in nice
condition. Home features 1758 square
feet of living space.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Dislressed Property Expert








COME TAKE A LOOK at this nice 3/2/2 in
Inverness Highlands. Great family neighborhood,
close to everything Inverness has to offer Split
bedroom plan, tiled throughout, updated guest
bathroom, shady lot. ___
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 F l
Email: cnadalc4remax.net pM


* 3 Bedrooms/3 En Suite Baths Smart Home Installed
*31/2-Car Garage ,Salt Water Pool
Hardwood and Tile Fireplace
* 3-Zone HVAC Jacuzzi in Master
Call for complete list of upgrades!
ASTEAL at $249,900
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpottls@aol.com
Websilte: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com



dgt -.T' F 7 5. .. -7 1 F




HOMOSASSA
SRemodeled Real Beauty
2/2/1 on 2.6 acres Pdvate pond & greenhouse
SCast Iron Stove in living area Massive back deck
2 Large master suites 24x14 Screened Patio
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


,. Ai


UWhiFE4 g t ., Vgr&V""
Waterfront 2/2 home comes furnished. Fish off
your dock. Enjoy the private backyard. Fresh
oranges and tangerines. Affordable home for
weekend or winters or full time. Call for
appointment to see!
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 A
Email: JenniferSlollz@remax.net
www.CitrusCounidyHomes.com i


LIKI: Nt:W UN I AI;Hk:
* Spacious 3 Bd-2.5 Bath *2696 Sq. Ft. Living Area
* Remodeled Kitchen & Baths New Dual HVAC Systems
*New Well System New Shingle Roof
* New Interior Paint New Quality Carpeting

GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812
Email: RealEstate@Georgeoleeman.aom H


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


861 N SPEND-A-BUCKDR
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
SBeautiful 3BR/3BA/2CG
SLiving & Family Rm
SKitchen w/Breakfast Nook
SLg Lanai & Pool Area
SWell Maintained
SCitrus Hills Social Membership I
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net i U






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Johnsons close
millions in sales
Citrus Ridge Realty is
proud to announce that Kirk
and Amanda Johnson have
closed more than $12.5 mil-
lion in sales for 2013. With
buyer specialist Tom Balfour
and assistant Realtor Yvonne
Jenkins, the Johnson team is
looking forward to a great
year in 2014. Contact the
Johnson team at 352-746-


Broom is year's first
million-dollar producer


Amanda and Kirk
Johnson
Citrus Ridge Realty.
9000, or by email at citrus
ridgerealty@centurylink.net.


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.


The associates and
staff of RE/MAX Re-
alty One are pleased
to announce that Jody
Broom was the first
local agent to earn the
title of 2014 Million-
Dollar Producer.
Broom is an agent in
the Crystal River
RE/MAX and has been
with the firm for more


/W., .-


JL. 'U



Jody Broom
RE/MAX
Realty One.


than 17 years. She is a consistent multi-


million-dollar producer who specializes in
the community of Riverhaven Village and
the surrounding area.
Rutkowski joins ERA
American
ERAAmerican Realty and Invest-
ments is pleased to announce that
Michael Rutkowski has recently joined
ERAAmerican Realty and Investments.
Rutkowski will work in the company's In-
verness office, specializing in residential
sales. Rutkowski and wife Delma have
resided in Citrus County since November
2013. Prior to his real estate career, he
worked as a senior software developer


with The Washington \l
Post. Rutkowski is re-
tired from the U.S.
Army and the White -
House Communica-
tions Agency. -
Rutkowski is also in-
volved in the Loyal
Order of Moose and Michael
the American Legion. Rutkowski
ERAAmerican Re- ERAAmerican
alty, a Top 50 ERA Realty.
company nationally,
has served the real estate needs of Cit-
rus County since 1980. Call Rutkowski at
352-726-5855.


A&SR746-9000.
Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty Yvonne Jenkins
BRCIERA REATR GR REALOR REALOR BROKER REACTOR REAL OR


4669 N PINK POPPY 5 S MELBOURNE
4/3/2 Large Pine Ridge home. Original Get Excited!! New Completely remodeled ready
owner, roof and H/A replaced aprnnrx tomoveyour Businessin. Roof4/13, A/C6/13,
i n r" ana e lPaint in and out 13', flooring 13', Circuit Breaker,
4 years ago. 12x30 pool, fireplace, cabinets, appliances all 2013. Handicap
18x20 additional carport.ing is ready to go!!

-- Gail Hargreaves ...
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com
FEATRE O THEWEEK
HMS AS S


3050 W. MUSTANG
3/3/3 702967 $369,900


5518 N. ELKCAM
3/2/2 706451 $159,900


5406 N. CROSSGATE
3/2/3 706628 $299,000


BR3// 70" '694
5049 W. PI
3/2/2 706941


20 AENIA DR. 87 LUCILLE -ALHAB ERIC 2225NAUTILUS
32/ 7 73 59,900 05/2 705787 $ 108,000 [1 256 $49,900 3 7





15 TAFT 8308 EROSKO 5 JACKSON 48 S. HARRISON MONROE
3/2 707857 $39,90 $56900 /1 7074$490 $69,900
35 7721 N, LAN HWY. BEVERLYHILL 71465
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


Ir^^Jackie Caffney Jason Gaffney ^--|
11"' _,jJRealor-.- -USE Realtor ^^lj I
|o=302-3179 SOLDne! 287-9022
lPka AlfI46-6700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
Ihe Golden G\ WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 E3


CITRUS SPINGS


I crrusSPIGS3






E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Inside...


Retreat to your own
Jane's Garden
Real Estate Digest


library PAGE E8
PAGE E10
PAGE E3


SIKORSKI'S ATTIC
* Look for the column by antiques
expert John Sikorski to return in a
future HomeFront.
* Listen to Sikorski's Attic on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m.


For current property transactions, use the search features on the
website for the Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wild weather feeds homeowners'


anxiety about the safety of trees

Associated Press
Nancy Owens takes no chances
with trees since a windstorm pro-
pelled a large one through the roof
of her Long Island, N.Y, home 15
or so years ago.
So when a neighbor whose prop-
erty abuts Owens' Maine summer
home said he believed two of her
tall pines looked suspiciously
askew and leaning toward his
house Owens wasted no time
having them removed.
"They didn't look dead to us. But
what do I
k n o w ?
They Owens says. "I
was born and
didn't raised in Man-
hattan. I know
look dead nothing about
to us. trees except
they can come
But what through your '
roof"
do I Owens, who
"cries every
know? time I have to
take down a
tree," is one of
Nacya number of L
Nancy ~monr
Owens homeowners
homeowner in who reluc-
Maine who tantly opt to
removed trees. be safe rather
than sorry by
removing trees even when it
may not be necessary
Arborist Dane Buell, who over-
sees tree care for the company Sa-
vATree, says that in the last few
years people call him "all the time"
asking to remove healthy trees.
Most, he said, are afraid of the
uptick in wild weather that has sent
trees crashing down on homes, cars Associated Press
and power lines around the country. This undated publicity photo provided by SavATree shows tree pruning, which
"People see bad things that hap- improves trees' overall health and structure. Pruning, along with an arborist
pen with trees, and the natural re- using a resistograph to check for tree decay, is used to determine
sponse is we should cut them all a tree's stability.
down," says Buell.


Joe Lamb, a Berkeley, Calif., ar-
borist sees the phenomenon too. He
cautions that there's no connection
between a tree's size and the haz-
ard it poses.
"It is very common for people to
be afraid of trees simply because
they are large," Lamb says.


The health of the tree is more im-
portant than its size, Buell says, and
he recommends that property own-
ers focus on managing their trees.
That includes annual health
checks, pruning, and precautionary
steps such as adding support and
even lightning protection when


necessary
Certified arborists can identify
problems insect infestation, nu-
tritional deficiencies and disease -
in the early stages "90-some percent
of the time," he says. Remediation
See ANXIETY/Page E5









* Find a list of upcoming
blood drives, or learn what
groups offer food or free
meals./Mondays
* Nearly a dozen
medical professionals
share their expertise with


WEEKLY LINEUP

columns in Health & Life./
Tuesday
* Plan menus for the week
from the recipes in the
Food section./Thursdays


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 ,fVJ0 L 9W C7-M CO


Associated Press
This undated publicity photo provided by SavATree shows an arborist using
a resistograph to detect tree decay, which can help determine stability.


ANXIETY
Continued from Page E4

often fairly simple, too, he says.
"Trees fail often because these
conditions are not identified early
They don't fail because they are
tall," Buell says.
And while no one can prevent an
extreme storm from toppling even
the healthiest of trees, he says, the
benefits of having trees usually far


LOCAL EXPERT
* Read Eric E
H.
Hoyer's
column AN &,
monthly H -
in Home- I
Front.
* He is a
certified
arborist,
a certified forester, a registered
consulting arborist and a


outweigh the risks they pose. qualified tree risk assessor.
For example, trees
around a home can in- of thankfulness or scorn,
crease its value up to 15 If depending on whether
percent, according to the there's been a recent
Arbor Day Foundation. someone storm," McGee says. "We
Properly placed trees says that know that taking this action
around buildings can also helps keep service reli-
reduce air conditioning a tree able. But if nothing is going
needs by up to 30 percent, on and we trim the trees,
and save 20 percent to doesn't people will hit the roof."
50 percent in energy used l Lamb who says he
for heating, according to look gets a rush of tree-removal
the USDA Forest Service, right, I requests from homeown-
Homeowners aren't the ers after storms says he
only ones who have don't finds many people are
stepped up precautions in willing to try remedial
recent years. Bob McGee, argue measures like thinning
a spokesman for Con Edi- with that. out a tree and removing
son, which provides dead branches once they
power to New York City learn more about them.
and neighboring Westch- For many others, how-
ester County, says the util- Nancy ever, it's better to err on
ity company has improved Owens the side of caution.
its year-round tree-trim- homeowner in "If someone says that a
ming since the recent rash Maine who tree doesn't look right, I
of harsh storms, removed trees, don't argue with that,"
"This typically engen- Owens says. "If they say it,
ders either a community outpouring I pay whatever it is."


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


- < ct,/l.^ 4364 N Foresi Lake Dr
M' vLS 1u!31 S219,9u0
Split plan, 3 bdrms, 2.5 baths pool home
& a bonus room.
Dir Rte 486, to north on Annapolis, Ron Indianhead,
R on Ridgefild, R on N Forest Lakes Dr
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


/c ju juu I n Ianern ur
S MLS 707786 $410,000
Lovely pool home with attached
apartment-great feature for in-laws.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


(wy Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
A Week! Properties

1-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


-i$j k,5f 56U6 W Dayllower Palh
a MLS 707211 $199,900
Impeccable, flawless, 4/3/3; solar heated
pool. Xeriscaped yards.
Dir West on Rte 44, (Gulf to Lake Hwy), L on
Crystal Oaks Blvd(Entry to Crystal Oaks), L on
W Dayflower Path
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


/CWU" 4962W Custer Dr
MLS 707737 $225,000
Comfortable & efficient 3/2/2 pool home.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


1390 W Double Eagle Ct ,\t$ 936 W Sun Vista Ct
MLS 702524 $595,000 MLS 703389 $349,000
Beautiful, stunning 3bd/3ba home on True luxury found in this spacious
golf course. 3bd/2ba home.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


i((5 404 E Dakola Cl
4 A: l $209.400
Spacious 3/2.5/2 pool home; an
incredible value in The Meadows.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


MLS 703938 $120,000
Beautiful, bright & cozy 3bd/2ba w/many
attractive features.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


CSr'- C LhIIUIIIUIIIUllUiiiuilt
:.LI 11-4 SI39.500
Impeccably clean 3bd/2ba energy
efficient home on an acre lot.
Dir Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on F Reehill St!
Soton Ave, L on Lancaster St, R on Knightsbridge PI
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086







;C 2723 N Crosswater Path
MLS 706407 $675,000
Absolutely stunning, neat & clean
3/3.5/3 golf course home.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


t~ l w - li t- lll I II Lp
ta" MLS 706932 $249,000
Large family home -4 bdrms, 3 full baths,
inground pool.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


J_. 101 N a



1674 W Spring Meadow Loop
MLS 706743 $114,500
Rare find 3 bdrm, 2 bath corner unit
townhome beautiful views.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


-Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


n . , , , .
[ V V VVI,,I"hI ... .. I. .. II I,,h ,i, I... i,,h oI.. II II I,,I I. . h h,,hhh I,, ,h, sl, IH....iii ,llm I


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 ES

* Plan for weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses
of worship plan to do in
the Religion section./
Saturday


I


WHO SAID THREE's A CROWD7







E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014



Gardening small


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Many fruits

can grow in

containers

DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Many fruit growers are
going to pots, and small
wonder Containers are
great for tight spaces, easy
to manage, convenient for
harvesting, and provide
better soil than is found in
most gardens.
"They also allow grow-
ing more experimental
fruits, such as warm-
climate or tropical ones, if
pots can be moved inside
in winter,"' said Leonard
Perry, an extension profes-
sor with the University of
Vermont
Everything from blue-
berries to persimmons, cit-
rus to currants can be
grown in containers. And
don't forget that old
standby, the clay straw-
berry pot.


ON THE NET
U Stark Bro's: www.starkbros.com/blog/fruit-trees-
in-containers-ptl/


Some potted fruits,
though, may surprise.
"Pineapples are one of
the easiest warm-climates
fruits to grow in pots,"
Perry said. "There are
even some grapes suited
for containers."
Potting fruit does pose
challenges different from
those encountered when
growing fruit in the
ground. Some things to
consider:
Pot size: You can get
by with smaller containers
and less re-potting if you
choose wisely It all de-
pends on the plant. "You
may need to re-pot every
three to five years, trim-
ming off some of the older
roots, to keep plants vigor-
ous," Perry said.
"Blueberries are one of
the best choices for con-
tainers. Look for one of the
newer cultivars bred for
containers a half-high


lME a i "i AMERICAN
W Lo U I I Realtor RAITY INVSTM
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU" 4511 N.LIInto Hwy.
SeBl:edy Hills, FL 344M5
Cel: (352) 697.1685 o. 352-76 oo

FATURE ISIG


or low bush. These can be
grown in pots a foot or so
wide. For dwarf fruit trees,
use plastic containers or a
whiskey barrel half, 18 to
24 inches wide," he said.
"Casters on the bottom
make containers easier to
move about a patio, or in-
side in winter in colder
climates."
Watering: Plants in
containers dry out more
quickly than those in the
ground, and need more
frequent watering.
Fertilizing: It's safe to
wait a few weeks before
fertilizing since most
container soils include
See SMALL/Page E12


Associated Press


Raspberries grow June 19
on the patio of a home near
Langley, Wash. Raspberries
are an easy-to-grow choice
for containers. They can be
placed near high-traffic
areas around the property,
a convenient snack.


Jackie Davis
I American Realty & Investments
MINE 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
...ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bidavis.com
A I Ah


WAKE UP EACH MORNING AND be I
greeted to a wide open view of Lake Davis with its
S pristine, sparkling water Lake Davis is part of the
Inverness lake chain offering endless hours of
boating and fishing The view comes with a most
comfortable 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage home
A screened lanai and heated pool Inverness Golf &
Country course is but a short golfcart ride away The
C/H/Ais 3 years old $175,000 MLS 707670


IIIII*ilWds PAVERS ON THE FRONT PORCH AND
de THE LANAI LEND A TOUCH OF CLASS
to this perfect gem of a home 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths
in a split plan The 2-car garage has a third bay
serviced by a portable heater/cooler Used as a
hobby room it has a soak sink, built-in cabinetry, and
4 windows for great light Built in 2003 with 1,804
SFLA, its C/H/A is 2 years old All floors are tile except bedroom#3 and master suite Maple cabinets in the kitchen, an
extended lana a a security system and sitting on an acre Citrus Hills optional membership $169,000 MLS 707722
fAN AFFORDABLE SINGLE FAMILY
HOME IN WINDERMERE! Here's a 3
bedroom, 2 bath home with a 2-car garage and a
d sized lanai The range, microwave,
dishwasher, refrigerator AND C/H/A have been
Replaced, along with the carpet Enjoy a huge
great room and master bedroom HOA offers
exterior paint roof (tile) care, shrub/lawn care,
cable, clubhouse with heated pool $130,000
MLS707819
A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN while sitting on the
a l~anai and feeling like you're up in the trees So
^ peaceful T-his 2 bedroom, 2 bath, maintenance-free
condo has a new disposal carpet, interior paint,
washer, dryer, AND C/H/A The refrigerator and
IMM II range were replaced in '07 Add a skylight in the
.. master walk-in doset AND a carport and you'll feel
H ^ 'blessed So well cared for and in move-in condition
Citrus Hills' social membership is optional and
.available $59,900 MLS 707817


CYPRESS CROSSINGS CLASS "A" OFFICE
FOR LEASE
2500 sq ft "New Constiiruction"
Located on SR 44 & CR 486
Professional Medical Office
Call (727)515-6571


FAMILY FUN OR ROOMY RETIREMENT
CYPRESS VILLAGE is the site of this gleaming 4/2/2 with rear porch and screened
low maintenance pool. With 2,343 sq. ft. of living area, there's generous space
for casual dining in the kitchen, plus a formal dining room, quiet living room area,
then all those beautiful bedrooms! Retirees, use one for an office and one for craft
room: Families will have no problem finding uses for all this lovely space! You'll
enjoy the serene cul-de-sac location! $225,000 MLS 706844
Call Marilyn Booth Today 201 -1121 or 637-4904


m






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Species mix to make 'Fashion'


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 E7


here are more than 800 species of Rho-
dodendron. Most originated in China,
the Himalayas, southeast
Asia and temperate northern cli-
mates. A few are tropical, while
others thrive even in Alaska.
Florida has two native azaleas:
both wetland, deciduous, twiggy
shrubs that flower once a year for
two to three weeks in late January .
to early February
Rainbow Springs State Park has
healthy specimens of both. Pinxter
azalea, Rhododendron canescens
Zone 5-9, is pink; and Florida Jane
azalea, R. austrinum, Zone 8, has JAIh
orange to yellow flowers. Both ma- GAR
ture more than 10 feet tall and re-
quire humus-rich, moist soil and a
shady site.
Modern azaleas are manmade hybrids. In-


dica azaleas were developed in Belgium in
the 1850 as frost-tender house plants. Belgian
azaleas were bred into southern In-
F dica types for the southeastern
United States. Most azaleas sold lo-
cally for garden planting need part
shade in summer Soil must be
moist and humus-rich. Weekly irri-
gation is essential while the plants
become established. Thousands of
plants die because they are not
given the proper site conditions
and initial care.
One of the most popular hybrids
Weber is Fashion, developed by the USDA
E'S Plant Introduction Station in Glen
DEN Dale, Md.
Its director, Ben Morrison, began
developing hybrids in 1935. By


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Most azaleas seen today are Fashion hybrids desgined to flower longer and
withstand cold. Fashion is a slow-growing, compact shrub that matures
3 feet tall and as wide with a natural round shape. This species of


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I
!







Book lovers aren't the only ones


1


---1


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fINj! ^^________


.......


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Associated Press
An open-backed TFG Connections Bookcase can be used to divide rooms or set the perimeter of a library-focused space. Contemporary home libraries utilize room for books
or artwork that speak to the aesthetic and spirit of the space. Digital readers can be enjoyed in a library-appointed room equally with book lovers.


ES SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


--^










who can enjoy the retreat of a library


KIM COOK
Associated Press
With the advent of tablets,
cellphones and e-read-
ers, could the book-
lined home library go
the way of the formal dining room?
Not a chance, designers and re-
tailers say
Digital and print books can co-
exist, says House Beautiful's editor
in chief Newell Turner.
"When there's an endless river of
(digital) content, the words, text
and images we choose to print and
bind into a physical book will make
(it) even more special," he says.
And books, in their variety of
shapes and sizes, can be art in their
own right, he says. Certainly, many
people display richly illustrated
coffee table books. And at Hearst's
October 2013 Designer Visions
show house in New York, Jamie
Drake took the books-as-art notion
literally: For his House Beautiful
apartment, he turned large books
spine sides in and stacked them
geometrically in wall recesses to
flank a fireplace as sculptural art.
See Page EO10


-4
II-f


A dining room by Designer Jamie
Drake is shown for the House
Beautiful apartment in the Hearst
Designer Visions show house at
Walker Tower in the Chelsea
neighborhood of New York City.
Drake took the books-as-art notion
literally: For his House Beautiful
apartment, he turned large books
spine sides in and stacked them
geometrically in wall recesses to
flank a fireplace as sculptural art.


Designer Alessandra Branca created a library for the Elle Decor apartment in
the Hearst Designer Visions show house at Walker Tower in the Chelsea
neighborhood of New York City. Branca created a warm, intimate library with
just two bookshelves and a chrome easel for a flat-screen television. A large
Candida Hofer photograph of Dublin's Trinity College Library provided a
trompe I'oeil effect, as if the library extended into the image.


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







EIO SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014

LIBRARY
Continued from Page E9

"Books are precious and beautiful,
both their contents and materials. I
was inspired to provoke thoughts,
placing the bulk of the spines away
from the viewer, thus highlighting
the thousands of paper pages and
creating a sense of desire to discover
what lies within," he says.
For Elle Decor at the show house,
Alessandra Branca created a warm,
intimate library with just two book-
shelves and a chrome easel for a flat-
screen television. A large Candida
Hofer photograph of Dublin's Trinity
College Library provided a trompe
l'oeil effect as if the library extended
into the image. Branca imagined the
space, which included walls covered
in chocolate faux bois (wood-grain
appearance) sateen and a plump sofa
blanketed in tartan, as a room where
you could store favorite vintage
books but also use a digital reader
"Nothing can replace the wonder-
ful feel of sitting curled up with a
book, or the happenstance of discov-
ering a book on the shelf that you
haven't seen for a while, particularly
books on art, architecture or de-
sign," she says. "I think we'll always
love the physical aspect of a book in
hand, but I've found I buy more and
more of my new fiction online."
New York interior designer
Elaine Griffin sees the role of home


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


libraries changing.
"We've come a long way from the
English country home-inspired li-
braries of the '80s those spaces
that looked like Carson (the butler
on "Downton Abbey") might come in
at any moment to do a little dusting,"
Griffin says. "Today's home libraries
are retreats, actually places to re-
treat as an individual from the more
chaotic, group-themed spaces of the
rest of the house."
Home libraries are reading sanc-
tuaries, she says, but clients often
want a TV included. "The space is
an alternative to the Great Room,
used for solo viewing, for snuggling,
for seclusion."
Many modern bookshelves are
multi-purpose, with space to display
objects as well as reading matter All
Modem stocks TFG Connections'
black powder-coated steel frame
with java oak shelves; the compo-
nents can be configured a number of
ways. Modloft's Pearl bookcase has
open shelves in a contemporary
zigzag design; finishes include
white, wenge (a dark wood) and wal-
nut with chrome supports.
Create an enveloped space by
running shelves up to the ceiling;
wood tones keep the ambience
warm, but consider white or even an
interesting color creamy yellow or
rich carmine (deep red), for exam-
ple so books, accessories and art
will pop. Add a rolling library lad-
der; Home Depot offers several in
maple, cherry or oak finishes.


GARDEN
Continued from Page E7

1952, there were more than
400 releases. Fashion is a
slow-growing, compact shrub
that matures 3 feet tall and as
wide with a natural round
shape. It flourishes from
Zones 6 to 9. As with most
azaleas, the roots are shallow
and extend well beyond the
diameter of the plant A deep
layer of organic mulch will
protect the delicate roots
from heat, freezing and from
drying out. Inorganic rock
should not be used, as it re-
flects scorching sunlight and
heat.
Fashion bears masses of
salmon-orange flowers for
about three months. Those in


Frost will freeze petals, but unopened
'Fashion' buds will open naturally
about a week later.


my front garden beds have
been flowering since October
right through the fall to win-
ter Frost will freeze petals,
but unopened Fashion buds
will open naturally about a
week later
As Fashion is naturally
dense and has a fixed mature
size and shape, it needs no
pruning to look its best. It
could be fertilized after flow-
ering stops in March if the
soil has not been adequately
amended with humus. A
monthlong second flush of
flowers usually occurs in
May/June.


Seven scrawny Fashion
plants were rescued from
contractor John Wheeler's
Inverness home in the sum-
mer of 2010. My grandson El-
liot and his friends dug them
out, squashed the roots into
large pots, covered them with
garden soil made of half fine
mulch and half backyard
sand, flooded them with
water and left them to re-
cover under nursery irriga-
tion for a year
After amending the soil for
planting beds at my new

See Page Ell


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County issuesfines for
breaking local watering rules.
Find watering rules in the
weather map on Page A4 daily


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OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY- JAN 19-1-3:30 PM










Mass. man breaks bird-watching record


BRYAN MARQUARD
The Boston Globe

BOSTON As a year's final
hours slip away, many measure
its success in paychecks, vaca-
tions, or the simple pleasures of
everyday life. But for Neil Hay-
ward of Cambridge, 2013 ticked
down to a single bird.
He was among the select bird-
watchers who had attempted
what's known as a "big year" -
seeing as many different kinds
of birds as possible, traversing
the continent to do so. With just
days left in 2013, he was tied
with the longstanding record of
748 sightings. He kept going.
And then it happened. During
the final Saturday of the year,
from a boat along the North Car-
olina coast, he spotted a Great
Skua, the winter light catching
the gold specks on its back. That
made bird 749 and made Hay-
ward the North American bird-
spotting champion.
"Compared to your average
bird walk in a local park, this is
like climbing Everest," said Jef-
frey Gordon of Colorado Springs,
Colo., president of the American


GARDEN
Continued from Page E10

home in the sandhills in Zone 8b, I
replanted Wheeler's Fashion azal-
eas in July 2011. There was no irri-
gation, just the summer rains and
hand-watering when I visited
weekly
Now I have retired and sold the
farm,and I am still too disorganized
or busy to spend time tending the
garden. The Fashion azaleas have
never been fertilized. I clipped off
bunches of flower heads for table
decorations at Thanksgiving and
winter holiday parties. The lopsided
pruned places will fill in with the
flush of new growth in spring. With
little maintenance except refreshing
the pine needle mulch once a year, I
expect these pretty shrubs to flour-
ish for many years with no care.
Fashion azalea has tiny leaves
that stay evergreen in Central
Florida. Further north, it becomes


Birding Association.
Having a "big year" is not as
simple as some might imagine.
And it is certainly not just a mat-
ter of luck.
'A lot of people think, 'Oh,
gosh, if you've got the money and
the time, you just do it,"' said
Greg Neise of Chicago, listing
moderator for the American
Birding Association. "Being able
to figure out the logistics is a
huge part of it It's a lot of flying,
it's a lot of driving, it's a lot of
days away from home. It's a lot of
figuring out your next step, but
also being able, at a drop of a
hat, to change everything and go
someplace else."
On his 'Accidental Big Year
2013" blog, Hayward kept updat-
ing statistics that would give an
ardent traveler pause. He spent
195 nights away from Cam-
bridge, drove 51,758 miles, was
at sea for 147 hours over 15 days,
and flew 193,758 miles on 177
flights through 56 airports.
A biotech consultant who
could leave home and fly cross-
country at a moment's notice,
See RECORD/Page E13


I expect these pretty
shrubs to flourish
for many years
with no care.


deciduous and flowers in early
spring. Because the leaves are
small, 'Fashion' can tolerate more
direct sun than most azaleas. Fine
examples can be seen in Terra Vista,
along Carl G. Rose Highway, and on
County Road 491 at Pine Ridge
Boulevard north of Beverly Hills.

Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. corn.


#1


Associated Press
Birdwatcher Neil Hayward, right, of Cambridge, Mass., looks for birds Jan. 1 alongside girlfriend Gerri
Buck at the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge on Plum Island, Mass. Hayward possibly set an Amer-
ican Birding Association record by observing 749 different birds in 2013.


lIJ J lN lHOSIILI EJI T, CITRU HILL ll S!lD JAIINAYsIJ, 1B4i


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 Ell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[,],?;I:WKI' .li, n i Kll l Kfl ,:l'JllU, K Y] 'HILLS #SUN, 1. 115l7M







E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014


SMALL
Continued from Page E6

fertilizers. Water-soluble,
slow-release fertilizers
generally work best. Their
small capsules gradually
dissolve when watered,
adding nutrients to the
plant mix.
Soil types: "Pots create
different drainage and air
properties than soils, so
don't use straight garden
soil for fruit in pots," Perry
said. "Use half-bagged top-
soil or potting soil, with half
organic matter such as peat
moss or compost. Leave a
couple of inches free on the
top for adding fresh com-
post each spring."
Longevity and yields:
You naturally sacrifice
yields by growing in small
pots, said Elmer Kidd,
chief production officer for
Stark Bro's Nurseries &
Orchards Co. in Louisiana,
Mo. Nutrition and water-
ing are far more important
with containerized plants.
"For those who want to
participate in the garden-
ing realm by growing in
pots, their efforts can be
respectable if their level of
care is good," Kidd said.
For those who can't de-
cide which fruit to grow,
grafting can offer more
choices. Consider taking
what John Duarte, presi-
dent of Duarte Nursery


A cocktail tree
can be a peach
tree that has
an early-, mid-
or late-season
peach variety,
or it can be a
combination of
peach, plum,
apricot or
nectarine -
all on the
same tree.

Inc. in Hughson, Calif,
calls the "Cocktail Tree"
route. Duarte Nursery cre-
ates trees with different
varieties of the same fruit
or different fruit species. A
cocktail tree can be a
peach tree that has an
early-, mid- or late-season
peach variety or it can be a
combination of peach,
plum, apricot or nectarine
- all on the same tree.
"I like the fruit combina-
tions best, but I've had bet-
ter customer feedback
about trees with a single
fruit but producing at dif-
ferent times," Duarte said.
Contact Dean Fosdick at
deanfosdick@netscape.
net.


CITus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
Potted blue-
berries grow
the grounds
of a home
near Lang-
ley, Wash.
Blueberries
are easy to
grow and
convenient
to harvest
when placed
in contain-
ers. The
pots can be
moved to
follow the
sun or taken
indoors to
help the
fruit survive
extreme
cold.
Associated Press


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RECORD
Continued from Page Ell

Hayward intentionally
avoided keeping tabs on
the cost.
"I didn't want to know
myself, and I didn't want
other people to know, but
it's not cheap," said Hay-
ward, who conserved
funds by dozing in airports
and figuring out which
rental cars were the best
for sleeping.
At home in Cambridge
on New Year's Day, a few
hours after going with his
girlfriend, Gerri Buck, on
the year's inaugural bird-
ing expedition to see a
snowy owl in Parker River
National Wildlife Refuge


on Plum Island, Hayward
discussed the challenges a
big year imposes on life's
small details.
"We could be sitting in a
coffee shop and I'd get an
email about a sighting and
I'm off to the airport," he
said. "It's been impossible
to plan really much of any-
thing but the same day"
Still, he didn't begin
2013 thinking it would be
his big year But by the end
of March, after logging
some 375 species during
trips to Arizona, Canada,
and Washington state,
Hayward decided to get
serious.
He said he came up with
the name for his blog "be-
cause it was an accidental
big year I never set out to
do this. I certainly never


set out to set a record. This
wasn't something that was
planned. It was something
that fell together and felt
right."
Hayward added that
"it's really been an epic
personal journey, as well
as a geographic journey It
would have been a success
no matter what number I
got."
His total, meanwhile, re-
mains slightly in flux.
Though his blog brought
readers up to his Dec. 28
sighting of a Great Skua
from a boat off the coast of
North Carolina, he said
earlier this month that
after lengthy considera-
tion, he'll probably add
one more species he saw
in Texas earlier in the year
to make the total 750.


Three names on his list
are what birders consider
species provisional to the
areas where they were
spotted, so they'll be re-
viewed by state and na-
tional birding panels. But
Sandy Komito, who set the
1998 record of 748, also
had three provisional
species, which means Hay-
ward's record should
stand in birdwatching's
time-tested honor system.
"Birders are like
golfers," Gordon said. "You
could shave strokes off
your score, but few do."
Hayward, who is 40, was
born in Oxford, England,
and did doctoral work in
Cambridge, England, be-
fore moving nine years ago
to Cambridge, Mass.,
where he was managing


director of the life sci-
ences company Abeam. He
left that job last year to be-
come a consultant.
Like many, he began
watching birds in his yard,
keeping track of visitors to
his family's feeders when
he was a boy
While pursuing his big
year, Hayward made use of
the Internet, his blog, and
sites such as wwwebird.
org, where birders post
sightings and tips for see-
ing rare species.
In a post on the Ameri-
can Birding Association


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 E13

website, Neise examined
the logistical approaches
Hayward and Komito took
during their record big
years.
The Internet and cell-
phones brought about the
biggest changes between
1998 and 2013. Birders
who formerly brought
sacks of quarters along for
payphones in distant loca-
tions can now book flights
from cellphones and check
websites for the next rare
bird sighting, rather than
relying on word-of-mouth
reports.


It!W


Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
,.. '.ii -I 3/2/2 POOL Seller's Pride
""/i shows in this updated home. Split
t^ ', floor plan, light & bright! Large
-- master, lovely new kitchen with all
L L appliances (Bosch range &
dishwasher), wood cabinets.
Features porcelain tile & hardwood
flooring, double-pane windows all
with plantation shutters, utility room with storage, workbench in garage,
sprinklers, inground pool with child guard, newer A/C. Move in and enjoy this
like-new home. MLS702982 ASKING $154,500
~NEW HOME FOR
THE NEW YEAR
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thin to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool,
covered lanai.. all this & more sitting on .73acre. Room for the whole family here.
MLS 705163 ASKING $185,000
S_ ^ WATERFRONT 3/2 with carport
on Hernando Chain of Lakes, offers
partially-fenced yard in a lovely setting
with 2 docks, updated kitchen & baths, tile
flooring, inside laundry. Lower level
j l- 24x24 enclosed family room (lanai) with
air unit, sliding windows & screens.
Upper lever has its own screen porch with
beautiful views. New roof in 06. Dock has
l " : hos e bib for cleaning. Don't miss out on
this waterfront bargain! MLS705088 ASKING $124,900
S- NEED ROOM TO ROAM AT
S A MODEST PRICE?
Here is a well-cared for home that offers
2/2/carport, plus additional large room
w/bath that could be 3rd bedroom,
family room or in-law arrangement.
Large living area, eat-in kitchen, newer water system, large screen porch,
shed, decorator block in extra large under roof carport area. All sitting on
a lovely double lot. MLS 705774 ASKING $84,900
Zechariah 4:6 00HSGT


OH500 lte cu de

REAL ESTATE, INC.
m L5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW ATPYTFCM rMTn qAT Fq(& ATTY FF CM


I i/',
' BEST7


Realtor


IAGENTONDUT em VEN DAY AW


DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath, E
M/T t-'".r. f-r cars/workshop on HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H w/3
2 ... cabinets, china bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved road,
cabinet, carpet throughout except for screen porch, workshop, shed, ceiling fans,
kitchen, baths and laundry rm Large formal dining rm & eat-in kitchen
family rm cathedral ceilings, gourmet w/breakfast bar Immaculate inside, near
kitchenw/island #703567 $105,000 by to shopping #706376 $48,000


INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
in great room, country kitchen '
and .".it" -ounter tops Tile floors thlaru
out "-i. $93,800




DUNNELLON big & beautifuid
3 bedroom, 3 bath 2007 Nobility
manufactured home on 2 3 acres Fully
fenced, kitchen w/skylight,
cathedral thru-out, wood1 ... ; .
fireplace in living rm "lJ"
tl18 .000


HOMOSASSA 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1985
mobile on 6 06 acres 12 x 24 workshop
w/eletric Metal roof over, updated
appliances, fenced and x fenced, covered
rear porch, front wood decking #701071


CRYSTAL RIVER commercial
I I lll l ...... l resale; fencing
I .. 1 '' *I *I 5 acres totally
I I' f' equipment
nples of fence work
.... ......h,, ,,,


TLECANTO nice half ac t well, i HERNANDO waterfront home w/3 bedrooms,
LECANTO nd ice f e with well 2 baths gourmet kitchen w/ grate counter
septic and impact fees paid mobi n tops electric fireplace m living m, fountain &
livable but, take it off and replace with hot tub i famdy rm Canal flows nt Ts ala
new center of county, lecanto school Annka Lake chain in the Potts Wildlife
district #703990 $18000#707145 $175,000Apopk Lke cin m e rs W e
distictff70990*Hiiooo _______ Preserve #707145 $175,000 _____


1087 E.Allegrie
Inverness. FL 34453



I Immaculately maintained

3/2/2 with open floor plan
in Citrus Springs
707101 $104,900


The Wade Team
T$ 352-"4-0888 "Y -T .
A,
352-527-1112
352-447-2 9


OPEjNHOUSEaa
JANUARY2-26 10AM-PQM3








E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014






Real Estate

Classifieds

ka TR. lilikay im- - 1:.L 1. A


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
V I


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, Very
clean DW3/2 New
carpet, shed, fenced,
$695.mo 352-419-1744

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $560 mo. Near
Walmart & 2/2, $530
mo. 352-464-3159

HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/2, AC, appls, 1
acre fenced, 2 decks,
Ig shed, priv. paved
road. $800/mo 1st &
Sec (352) 628-5178




FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272

FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272

Palm Harbor Factory
Liquidation Sale
6 models to choose
from,1200 sq ft up to
2400 sq ft..$12K offl!
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext. 210
for details


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent
car port water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




2BR 1-1/2BADW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre, scr. rm.,
carport, garage, 4 mi
from town, $31,700.
(352) 419-5013
FLORAL CITY
2BR/1 /2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
HOMOSASSA
3bd mobile that needs
more work than it's
worth. Value is in the
land 1.3 acres. Septic,
well, impact fees, 2
sheds, ride by -then call
2128 S Colonial Ave,
34448. ask. $23,900.
(603) 860-6660
LECANTO $42,500
3bd/2ba, %/ acre,
new c/h/a & carpet
handi-cap ramp, nicely
furn, move -in cond.
(352) 621-3929
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985
MUST SEE!
Homosassa/Ready To
Move In! 2006, 32x80,
4/2, Owner Financing.
$86,900 obo
352-795-3277
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 1/4 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then z
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512




*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, IBA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356
Floral City, DW,
2bd/lba, Ig deck Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726

For Sale s

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858






Homosassa Adult Park
2BR/1BA. Newly
remodeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$4,800 (608) 921-5564


Stone Brook 2Br/2Ba
1468 sq ft. Enclosed
screened room with
A/C, overlooks pond.
Pantry, full equipped
Ktchen, wood burn-
ing FP, Den, & DRoom.
Laundry room & W/D,
Shed w/ sink & freezer.
Partially furn. Too
many extra's to list.
Handicap Accessible
with vertical platform
lift, lift chair, and new
battery operated
scooter. $35,500 for all
8323 W Charmaine Dr.
Homasassa, Fl
(352) 628-5311

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090







AffON7
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S875 & UNDER
8410 N Elkcam Blvd.
3/2/1 New listing!
6973 N Gladstone Dr.
3/2/2 Split floor plan 1515 sqft
1063 N. Commerce Terr.
2/1 Furnished Apt Cap on Ultihes.
6441 W. Rosedale Dr.
2/2/1 Available soon.
S550 & UNDER
2278 S. Sandburg Pt.
2/1 Nice, clean duplex.
7650 W Homosassa TrI.
2/1 nice duplex.
6383 S. Tompaul Terr.
1/1 Cozy and Quiet
For More Listings Go To
www.CrunsCountyHonellRentals.uon


Mobile Homes
In Park


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?


2/2/2............................ $700
3/2/2............................ $875
3/2/2............................ $850
2/2 Condo...................$650
2/1 Apt......................... $525
I:1=14t F:T 9lr*]
2/2 Mobile ................... $575

3/2................................ $700
2/2/1............................. $650
2/1.5/1.......................... $650

2/2.5/1 Villa................$850
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruyys
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010





his finicncanr^
UCl,nck0unrt.;1.bC
0S521 637.AO




INVERNESS
3 Bedroom Homes
$800- $875
BEVERLY HILLS
Large, beautiful
Oakwood Village
$875
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Mobiles w/trash, lawn
maintenance & water
$500
CITRUS SPRINGS
Gorgeous 3 bedroom
pool home,
pool maintenance inc.
$995
000H532



Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
HOMIOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath du-
plex Large yard, garage,
washer/dryer hook up,&
private patio. $600 mo.
$1,200 move in Stewart
813-9274647 or Kelly
813-927-0525
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Apt., $500. & 2/1
Dplx. $600., 1st. & last,
Move In 352-382-4053
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kitchen AppI, furn,
1137 N.Er. 3rd.Ave. Apt
3, Near CR Primary,
Middle, High School
352-795-3006

Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Homosassa
At the
Homosassa
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-628-6073
TTY800-233-6694
Goenmn


CRYSTAL RIVER
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR. APTS. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."



.J -'JH I LrJ
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


FLORAL OAKS
APARTMENTS
NOW RENTING *
352-860-0829
62+ Elderly/Disabled
With or Without
Children.
Central AC Heat
Water & Sewer
Included
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Managemnt
1 & 2 BD. APTS
8092 S. Floral Oaks
CIR., Floral City,
FI 34436, TDD #771




EOE/Provider

HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds. garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD









INVERNESS
2/2, updated, immacul.
$625. mo 317-442-1063




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BEVERLY HILLS
2-3 BR, 2BA, 2CG
Nice Area, full appl's.
w/freezer, 2 fam. rms.,
newer paint/AC, car-
pets, 3-6-12 mos. $900-
$825-$750., furnishings
or w/out 352-249-5100




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new
appliances Move in
$1350, 442-7794
Beverly Hills
2bd/2ba/1 cg
scn porch, inside utility
with w/d, $625. avail.
2/1 (352) 249-7670
INV. S. Highlands
2/2/2, Pool, $850. mo.
(267) 250-4499
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 3/2 &2/2
$750 $795/mo & Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Highlands, 3/2/2
$700 mo + dep.
(352) 422-6978
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212
INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/2, fen'd back
yrd. $875, 352-220-0633
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inverness 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Inverness
At the
Washington
Square Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-726-4397
TTY800-233-6694








Government
Subsidized Apts
For Rent in
Wildwood
At the
Wildwood
Commons Apts.
Must meet
eligibility
requirements.
Please Call
352-748-0047
TTY800-233-6694







INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393


INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2/2 and 2/1
W/D $575 TO $675
352-422-7021


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
apple. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057

Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802





CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse 3900 SqFt
with 550 SqFt office.
Gulf Storage,1424 N
GulfAveOne mile East
of Rt 484 & Rt 44 inter-
section, beside Gulf to
Lake Church. $4 sqft for
2 year lease, shorter
available. 352 302 1935





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

WVMll
REALTY ONE
REALTY ONE


DEB
THOMPSON
SOne call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(Svahoo.com
and
debthomeson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Open House

Sun Jan. 19th 1-4 pm
261 E. Hartford St,
Building 5, unit 6B
Turn Key condo in
Citrus Hills. Fully
furnished. 2,149 sq.ft,
3 bed, 3.5 bath.
Carport. From Norvell
Bryant Hwy to left on
Citrus Hills Blvd, right
on Hartford, see sign.
Reduced to $117,500
Terra Vista Member-
ship Escrow Deposit
will be paid by Buyer
at acceptable offer.
Call Myriam Reulen,
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties LLC
Homesinflorida
usa.corn




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856



2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
Nice condition!
MOVE-IN READY
$43k. 527-1239

Real Estate is MY
Business!I
15+ Years Exp

Teri Paduano
Broker/Owner


Realty
Connect
Masonic Business Ctr
111WMainSt, #311
Inverness, FL
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com




4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009



RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inverness 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


Hoe

3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3/2
1/4 Acre MOL
on River Oak Lane
Inverness
Glamour bath
Eat-in Kitchen
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Nice Double Lot
3/ Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009



4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
back yard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on /4 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009



2Br/2Ba/1CG home
on approx 1 ac. land
Owner Financed
$80,000, w/$5,000
down. No qualifying
(305) 891-2323

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFOMC
REALTY ONE




3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4BR /1/ %BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816


Hoe

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R5AIRC
REALTY ONE

Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009






For Sae %fl
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell





4BR/2BA, 2400 Sq ft.
pool home, add'l heat
pump. Well maintained
Pine St. Fully Furnished
$225,000
(352) 382-5298


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351





o I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245*


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Sil great values
out
there for buy-
ers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Citrus Coull
Homes I


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


Citrus County]
Hom es


#1 Employment source is










www.ch ronicenie.com


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Whispering Pines Villa
INVERNESS
2/2/1, NEW Carpet, Tile,
Paint, All appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900. 352-726-8712


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified! I




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists










Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 E15


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFure-oast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"





BUYING HOMES
In Need of TLC, Fair
Pricing, Fast Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271




Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810





GOLF COURSE LOT in
Terra Vista on Red
Sox Path. $47,500. Call
Ray 352-638-0905


2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
Call 352-527-2711








E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014





OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-4


3255 S. FRANKLIN TERRACE
.'. H -' B ,:l. -' ( :. ii -. hi l
P I , F l. n I :. .,j
Mi'. =11:1',1 $170,000
Jeanne ot ,l'illaid Pickiel 2019871


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROOMY INVERNESS HOME
: o ....il i .l'l . I: t,] l lh . ] l..] ,]j i.lu h M:
.il.h l l Hl'i l.jiu n l h,.v I,, l'll''ul
.,:i j nrn.' l If ; 111I
Ml1. 'I/I1.: .1. ASKING $85.000
Call Sle/an Sluai! 352 2120211


Al..i., Hd h) ,_l

_H i~j.: ( l. .i.i i i1 ,: l.,n I I.i : l i ,:n 1 1,- l .nn in l '"
Ihlll liI l\ i l. ilhh l hI |il lli| ill nl
l1 11; l li v:l, 1 .h;:H : bf.i. .ll .l ii

$149,900
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


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* .:',b ;51:1 M i.il P,111.I11'.,
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* q :' *;_ I,:l, :*l:l,,: Ii ,i: l. l ,:..i ,iy:
* I_ ,h I-- h o Inn ll ii: l.I,:],:
Mi i: I:,ilI ONLY $225,000
Call Chatles Kellf 352 422 2387


M1 1 .ii,.i.i ASKING $148,700
Pat D.A is 3521 212 /280
I',eil listing Ln n n 21n.id, is corn


* I iF.1 C..n.i]
S l.).i ,.l II..;.I.
* lV.. up I.,],..,.
* Mu. lly h .ili'iih.li^
Mi = i: 'iv. $87,900
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


YOU'LL BE IMPRESSED

I 'h I: .,, ., ,, ,,,d I ,, h .... I 1 ,,', I.I h l, h. .' .. I
I,,, I ,Il I? I: ", l ,ll'l llll 1 ,1 1 ,'. q lll
11 d I i, rl 1,, I:iiii 16 1, r .6.i, ir 6i ,I ii,
I',,,,], I ,, : ., jH~ I


rII =-.-4 ASKING $114.900
Pit Dil,- ,352' 2/2 17280


M lIUM/.Mi LUS/.II NUN 1 .1 J..... I


,. ..f'il,, : Iv d, lh. ,:.' l. ilh. ..Ill. J
MiL'.-.=,.:1. ASKINGS188.000
Call Jim Mot Ion 422 2173
to see this o/hice space


l ..i 'H .I l, : l h l ,. I .1 :.ll I. ...I IIv.. . .'
VM. t MI'.H.I lh.. .M.l :.l,,lllll 4 :. b,,:dl,. mI:'__I

d. l,: I. Hj. g: '6.1 A .i I.-I
Mi = fiv.l_"'I ASKING $274,900
Call Nancj Jenks 3524008072


* Vq V 1 ":' 1, I'): X -.& ...h I..:...,
* .63 acres. i,:i," .. ,i,:l,,:ir
W I /./Ii Pichi.21 1
.1 i- l l . . W ilu l :.H ...l lhm
M1 _3 =1I:i_"11 $39,500
Willa/id Pickiel 2019871


TRULY MOVE-IN READY HOME



i U.I. ..*... I ...I..... h.1 ... l.. ... h
Ij.. Ij ). ... l 1. 1.1 1 .. iII iI 1-1 I


r 1i: =-i" : ASKING $119.800
Pit Dil,- 3522 2127280
Iel t I. i IP iltltl L ;21p t31


h,. 11,,h ,, ,, ll .... .IIII ...... i ,, ,,, I ,, n, h, ,I
I ..... 1 ........1.. hi ,1 1 rhI ,I ,,I,',l ,,i hh ,. I
..... .h ... I, ,r., ,, 1 ,,, ,,',,I ,,., ,. ..... .IIIh I
.I .. 1,r, h , I .. I I. 1 ,',,1 11 ....

r ASKING S158.900
/ l 'll h~hl# Ip 11111 Ii,11 -tl l o


MEDITERRANEAN STYLE HOME
IN TRADEWINDS
4I Ho.t-.' r t $ t/1 eilc'i im f-'ilt b l 'twlll '
IIl' N 1 fll ..lr. tl H,,, ,,, ,,, il,,..,l., i,,,n


I. ',u




.-,, H,',, h',. h ,, 1. 1 .' ....,',h .I .....,I

1 OFRD.,AT.S,996. V.-u
r ii'" ," OFFERED AT S 199,900
s ,tlt'ell' "tt 11i i/#;[ #,ll tis" Iati ..ill
itnS C Ai,,illII II l!' li MYe


* _" E,:. .l .. _i l K ill. M .l.l,. H.II.,
** H' .,lh i1"i ;.. i. .l.hhl i.I

* I.i.l.i H.,I` .h Al II l..iI.I I I,:l.I.| .
* _" l-,lu :l., 1 ., e.iil.lin..r
Ml_ /i3/::: ', ASKING $49,500
Call Chatles Kelly 352 422 2387


lbh 'BA inill. 11. li.:^ UW i.:v .^

N .Im _"m.l i ol l '...:.l .ill I- ....I.q '
MI_._;=II:I..I:II $174,900
laWanda Wall 352212,1989


II/N'ER ORfULL TIME RESIDENTS'
I h h I II. I ..... l . r1 I:h I 1 : I?". I ,1 .
: .1.1. :1.11: rjl I: 1 : 1 ii 1 1 1. I I l...I ,
..... ,. ,1 h ,,d L' i2.1 ql h ,'., I6 1 '1.

h ,.. h, .,I, I-., i,,i 1 1 ... .. I ,, , '
r 11.: =-.:- : ONLY $49.000
Ci" OD.', All.'._~ 3527266668


PINE RIDGE ESTATES



,,..hh,., II I ., ,1 1,I h. .... ,,,., J
Mt- =* i ASKING $158,000
CtI N.icl Jenks 352 4110 80712
or 352 126 6668


ELBOW ROOM FOR ZESTY LIVING CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT

.. ,,.: 1 If ..,. .I... .... "v I L I o U'' =. ri 'i, A' I
I. i.. .. .l l i I 1. h Im L, I. ..) i., h, q 1
i... I.. H i 1.. I. .I ...... i I. h V, i. I K 6. . ..
h..ly.l..'. im.'.] .r... ... m...m'.. I H I - = 1/l1l-,1 uII
M.1i = i;'.;ili $89,000 GREAT BUY S399,0OO... .). i..-.i..ii.
4sh lot ilirili n Booth 201 1121 Call Onade Feeset 352-302-17699


MULTI FAMILY

Ill lll, 4 I Illll I..h I HHIII lI |, .Ijll .
Mi1 ._ = ` '1. $349,900
Call Jim Motion to pteien 422.2173


* _' -I.:.IV, _' Bh _' B,:llh
* hfl.i:.il:,:l~ U,:llhr ,:1i.1 l',ll.:h.:l.
* :..: l I-,: I VV.:.i I .:.1 .

Mi, =ui:ui' $145,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
it':'irv. Citi usCounlt'Sold. corn