Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
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Unknown
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
UF00028315:03359

Full Text


NFL: Seahawks advance to NFC title game /B1


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH .
68 Mostly sunny,
LOW breezy.
47 PAGE A4


)RNICL.
CITRRUS couNTUY 5






Sk- www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 158


Raid on fugitive nets huge drug cache


NEWS

Watch out for
wanted suspect
The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office is looking
for Daniel Wesley
Combs, 52, of Inverness,
who is wanted on
charges of attempted
first-
degree
murder,
kidnap-
ping
while
armed
and ag-
igra- Daniel
vated Wesley
battery Combs
causing considered
great armed and
bodily dangerous.
harm
with a weapon.
Combs is possibly
driving a gold 2000 Ford
Ranger with a silver
toolbox with Florida tag
545 2JR.
He is a white male with
gray hair and blue eyes.
He is 5 feet, 7 inches tall
and weights approxi-
mately 150 pounds.
CCSO requests the
public not attempt to make
contact with Combs, as he
is considered armed and
dangerous.
Anyone with informa-
tion about Combs or his
whereabouts should im-
mediately call 911, Crime
Stoppers of Citrus County
at 888-ANY-TIPS, visit
www.crimestoppers
citrus.com or text the
word "CITRUS" plus the
tip to 274637 (CRIMES).
Citizens providing valid
information may be eligi-
ble to receive a cash re-
ward of up to $1,000.
Nominations
open for award
The Citrus County
Chronicle is seeking 2013
nominees for the 34th an-
nual Citizen of the Year.
Winners in the past have
been honored for every-
thing from philanthropy
to volunteerism, civil
rights work to service to
country and environmen-
tal efforts to governmen-
tal initiatives.
While all nominations
are considered, prefer-
ence is usually given to
community contributions
that are above and be-
yond the role one plays in
their day-to-day job.
Email nominations to
marnold@chronicle
online.com; or, mail to
Citizen of the Year c/o
Mike Arnold, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429 by
Monday, Jan. 13.
-From staff reports


EXCURSIONS:


Four & More
Groups travels, eats,
has fun./Page A17


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ............... A18
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A18
Obituaries ..........A6, A8
Together................... A23
Veterans ........ A20


6 0184J578 L I f Uo


Suspect sought in armed burglary case


ERYN
WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS U.S. Marshals
nabbed a Marion County man in
Inverness on Friday night after an
apparent pawn shop armed
burglary
Earl Wayne Abbey was wanted
by the Marion County Sheriff's Of-
fice on an outstanding arrest war-
rant for armed burglary, grand


theft, dealing in
stolen property
and possession
of a firearm by a
convicted felon.
According to
the U.S. Mar-
shals Florida Re-
gional Fugitive
Task Force news
release, Abbey


%N^s


%a. -4 .4.


Irse


This photo from
the Citrus
County Sheriff's
Office shows
some of the
nearly 5,000
pills found in an
Inverness home
on East Ryan
Street during
the arrest of
Earl Abbey, a
fugitive suspect
wanted in
Marion County.
Special to the Chronicle


I
-V..


Se


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Driver Linda Richmond works out Spider, a 4-year-old, five-gated show pleasure horse, at the Hawkewood Farm in Floral City.

Hawkewood Farm has

nationalfollowing
PAT FAH ERTY
Staff writer
S ome of the classiest clothes and
top performers in the high-
stepping world of American
Saddlebred
Show Horses come out of
Citrus County.
Linda Weber owns
Hawkewood Farm, her
base of operations for two
related businesses built For more
on her half-century of photos, see
equine experience. Page A16 and
She has owned the click on this
property near Floral City stonr at www.
since 1996 and is joined online.com.
at the farm by legendary
horse trainer Abbott Wilson.
Weber said she has been buying, selling
and training horses most of her life. Elsa Hackett of Floral City recently won Tampa's Harvest Days Horse Show in the
She also designs and creates custom Hackney Pleasure Pony Championship competition on Match Maker, a 15-year-old horse.
Hackett followed Weber down from New England and lives near the horse farm, which is
See Page A7 on land Weber bought in 1996.


Former Israeli PM Ariel Sharon dies at 85


Associated Press
JERUSALEM It was vintage Ariel
Sharon: His hefty body bobbing behind a wall
of security men, the ex-general led a march
onto a Jerusalem holy site, staking a bold
claim to a shrine that has been in contention
from the dawn of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
What followed was a Palestinian uprising
that put Mideast peace efforts into deep-freeze.
Five years later, Sharon, who died Satur-
day at 85, was again barreling headlong into
controversy, bulldozing ahead with his plan
to pull Israel out of the Gaza Strip and uproot
all 8,500 Jewish settlers living there without
regard to threats to his life from Jewish
extremists.
The withdrawal and the barrier he was
building between Israel and the West Bank
permanently changed the face of the conflict


and marked the final legacy of a man who
shaped Israel as much as any other leader
He was a farmer-turned-soldier, a soldier-
turned-politician, a politician-turned-
statesman a hard-charging Israeli who
built Jewish settlements on war-won land,
but didn't shy away from destroying them
when he deemed them no longer useful.
Sharon died eight years after a debilitating
stroke put him into a coma. His body was to
lie in state at the parliament today before he
is laid to rest at his ranch in southern Israel
on Monday, Israeli media reported.
Vice President Joe Biden will lead the U.S.
delegation.
Sharon suffered his stroke in Janu-
ary 2006 and fell into a coma. Over
the past week and a half, doctors
reported a sharp decline in his
See PageA12


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T UNDDAY JANUARYOUG 12,DY2011410CITRU O UNY FL HRNI














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1946-1964


GRADED COINS


WASHINGTON
QUARTERS
1932-1964
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LIBERTY
HALF DOLLARS
1916-1947
UPTO$2,000*


KENNEDY FRANKLIN
HALF DOLLARS HALF DOLLARS
1964-1970 1948-1963
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1921-1935
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YOU BRING ANY ITEMS THAT YOU ARE INTERESTED IN
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A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Page A3 -SUNDAY, JANUARY 12,2014



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Campaign
TRAIL


School board to discuss epinephrine pens


Kitchen holding
public meeting
Ron Kitchen, Republican
for county commission Dis-
trict 2, will meet the public
at 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16,
at The Deco Cafe, 109
Courthouse Square, Inver-
ness. Information: Ron
Kitchen, 352-302-6313.

Around the
COUNTY

Water task force
meets Monday
The Citrus County Task
Force of the Citrus/Hernando
Waterways Restoration
Council will have its first
meeting of 2014 at 2 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 13, at the
Lecanto Government
Building, Room 166.
There will be three pre-
sentations with question-
and-answer periods:
Withlacoochee River
Watershed Initiative update.
Springs restoration
projects and funding.
Chassahowitzka
Springs restoration.
The 2013 report to the
legislature is available on
the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
website under Council Re-
ports. Questions and com-
ments are welcome.
Suggestions for projects
and ideas for consideration
during 2014 are welcome.
For information, call AI
Grubman at 352-726-2201
or Jennifer Noland at 352-
796-7211, ext. 4378.
Appraiser's office
closed Wednesday
The Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office will be
closed from noon to 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 15. This
is being done out of respect
for the passing of Geoffrey
Greene, whose memorial
service will be at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church
in Lecanto.
Normal operations will re-
sume the next day for any-
one with business with the
office. Please help us pay
respect to Mr. Greene and
his family. We appreciate
the public's indulgence and
support.
Refuge friends
hosting photographer
Friends of Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge
Complex Inc. will have its
annual meeting at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 26, in the Fel-
lowship Hall of the First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
For more information or
directions, call 352-586-7140
or visit www.friendsofchazz
.org. This is a free event
and is open to the public.
Featured speaker will be
John Moran, a Florida na-
ture photographer. Moran
has been a resident of Florida
since age 2 and is a Univer-
sity of Florida graduate. His
photography has appeared
in numerous books and
magazines, including Na-
tional Geographic, Time,
Newsweek and Smithsonian.
Moran's presentation will be
on "Our Water, Our Future."
For more information,
visit friendsofchazz.org or
call 352-653-2088, ext. 215.
Trees accepted
at county landfill
Eligible Citrus County
residents may recycle natu-
ral, live Christmas trees at
the Citrus County Central
Landfill, free of charge during
the months of December and
January only. Trees must be
cleaned of all decorations,
lights and artificial snow.
Artificial trees brought to
the landfill for disposal will
be charged standard rates.
For information about
landfill hours, call 352-527-
7670 during weekday office
hours or go to www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us. Click on "De-


apartments then "Public
Works," then "Solid Waste."
-From staff reports


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS A life-
saving device for allergic
reactions may soon appear
in the Citrus County
School District's health
clinics.
The availability of epi-
nephrine auto injectors
(EpiPens) will be a topic of
a public hearing and up
for approval at Tuesday's
monthly school board
meeting at the district ad-
ministrative offices.
EpiPens are medical de-
vices that deliver a dose of
epinephrine into a person
to treat allergic reactions
to substances, food or in-
sect bites.
"The medication would
be used in the event of an


anaphylactic reaction in a
student with an unidenti-
fied allergic condition,"
said student health spe-
cialist Jessica Hoag.
School Board Chairman
Thomas Kennedy said due
to a change in the law, the
district had to remove
EpiPens from schools.
However, during the last
legislative session "lan-
guage was introduced to
allow school districts to be
able to have them."
Legislation mandated
that requirements be out-
lined for who, what, when,
where and how an EpiPen
can be utilized. A protocol
had to be developed by a
physician and training
must be completed before
it can be administrated.
The district partnered


* WHAT: Citrus County School Board meeting.
* WHEN: 4 p.m. Tuesday.
* WHERE: District administrative offices, corner of
State Road 44 and Montgomery Avenue, Inverness.
* ON THE WEB: www.citrus.k12.fl.us.


with Care Here its well-
ness provider and its
physician Dr Anthony Dal-
las. His requirement was
that staff be trained on use
of the product and have
cardiopulmonary resusci-
tation (CPR) certification.
"I am really excited that
these lifesaving devices
are going to be back on our
campuses for our students
and staff if an incident oc-
curs," Kennedy said.
Hoag said the first ship-
ment of EpiPens will be
free from the EpiPen 4


Schools Program. When
the injectors expire -they
have a shelf life of one to
two years the district
will need to reapply for an-
other shipment through
the program. Each set of
two EpiPens would have
cost the schools $112.10.
Each of the county's 23
schools will receive a set
of EpiPens.
"The injector is in-
tended to provide relief of
symptoms for a student
until emergency medical
personnel arrive," Hoag


said. "Employees will be
trained to call 911 if they
are using an epinephrine
pen. Depending on how
severe the allergic reac-
tion is, one EpiPen may
not do it."
The projected imple-
mentation of the device
would occur before the
end of January
Other topics up for pub-
lic hearing include:
Approval for revisions
to Policy 4.72, Homeless
students.
Approval for revisions
to Policy 5.321, Bullying
and Harassment.
Approval for revisions
to Policy 6.61, HIV, AIDS
or other communicable
diseases, blood-borne
pathogens and environ-
mental hazards.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Corvettes lined up Saturday behind the Arby's in Crystal River for the Citrus County Corvette Club rally. The rally included a convoy to Pecks
in Ozello for lunch. The club has 114 members and meets once a month for a special activity. Club meetings are the second Tuesday of
each month at 7 Golf and Rivers Country Club. Anyone with an interest in Corvettes may join the club for an annual fee.





SATURDAY DRIVE

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER
More than 30 new and antique Corvettes braved the rain Saturday
for an opportunity to spin their wheels.
The Citrus County Corvette Club assembled in the parking lot
of Arby's in Crystal River before playing follow the leader for a
scenic car cruise to Peck's Old Port Cove in Ozello.
The club is a Crystal Chevro- these meetings they agree on a all the wayto the present edition." socialize with people from all
let sponsored nonprofit social car cruise for later in the month Activities committee member over the county. It's like the say-
club for corvette enthusiasts, to locations throughout Florida. Jim Cosner said the club is more ing, 'Come for the cars, but stay
The club's members meet the "We have members of all dif- about friendship than cars. for the people.'"
second Tuesday of every month ferent ages and walks of life that "We love just interacting with The club donates its profits to
at the Seven Rivers Golf and drive Corvettes," said activities other people," Cosner said. "You Daystar Life Center.
County Club, 7395 W. Pine- committee member Chuck Ya- know your neighbors; however, For more information about the
brook St., Crystal River. During vorsky. "We have cars from 1953 this gives you an opportunity to group, visit citruscorvettes.com.


Beverly Hills man


charged with sexual


battery on a minor


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Deputies arrested a 37-
year-old Beverly Hills man
Friday after a 16-
year-old girl levied
allegations of sex-
ual abuse against
him, according to ,
the Citrus County .
Sheriff's Office. .
The girl, who was 1
at Brundon's resi-
dence at the time of Jol
the alleged inci- Brun
dent, said Brundon's wife
had gone to work and she
had gone into Brundon's
bedroom to speak with him.
Reportedly, while they
were talking Brundon shut
the bedroom door, sat on
the bed next to her and


began making sexual ad-
vances toward the girl.
She told Brundon to stop;
however, he continued to
touch her inappropriately,
the report states.
The report states
at that moment
Brundon's wife
came home from
S work and he
jumped up to block
the door, but that
the girl was able to
in escape.
idon Brundon told au-
thorities he had about 10 beers
that day and said every-
thing was between him and
the girl was consensual.
Brundon was arrested and
transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility
His bond was set at $10,000.


State BRIEFS


Man being evicted
charged with arson
PORT CHARLOTTE -A
man has been arrested after
authorities said he set fire to
the house he was about to
evicted from while another
man slept inside.
Charlotte County Sheriff's
officials said Matthew Hunter
and another man were stand-
ing outside the burning home
Friday when fire officials arrived.
Florida State Fire Marshal's
investigators said they un-
covered a gas can in the dining
room, an empty can of paint
thinner and several combustibles.
Authorities said they also
found homemade explo-
sives in the house.
Hunter and two roommates
were being evicted from the
home, but authorities said the
other unidentified man was
allowed to stay longer than
Hunter. Hunter was charged
with arson of an occupied
dwelling and two counts of
possessing a destructive
device.


$100M suit refiled Police: 13-year-old
over chopper crash forced to stdrip at club


MIAMI--A$100 million
lawsuit has been refiled
against a Florida billionaire
over a 2012 helicopter crash
in the Bahamas that killed a
prominent tax attorney.
The wrongful death law-
suit filed against real estate
mogul Jeffrey Soffer by the
widow of attorney Lance
Valdez had been withdrawn
from federal court. The widow's
attorney, Gary Phillips, refiled
it in Miami-Dade Circuit
Court on Friday.
Soffer owns the
Fontainebleau Hotel in
Miami Beach and is married
to model Elle Macpherson.
The lawsuit claimed Soffer
covered up that he was piloting
the helicopter in November
2012 when it crashed on Great
Guana Cay, killing his friend
Valdez. The suit claimed
Soffer and others sought to
limit Valdez's widow and
their three children to a $2
million insurance payment.


MIAMI -A Miami Beach
strip club has temporarily
closed its doors after police
said a 13-year-old runaway
was forced to dance for money
City officials issued an
emergency order to Club
Madonna's manager Friday
night shortly before it opened.
City Manager Jimmy
Morales said he revoked
Club Madonna's certificate
of use for six months be-
cause the club was a threat
to the community.
Richard Wolfe, an attorney
for Club Madonna, said the
city had no basis for such
actions.
The Miami Herald reported
police arrested three people
earlier this week for allegedly
forcing a runaway teen to
prostitute herself and dance
at the club.
Club Madonna's owner
said he was unaware the girl
performed there.
-From wire reports


Nature Coast EMS offering pediatric care course


Special to the Chronicle
Nature Coast EMS's next
PEPP Class Pediatric
Education for Pre-hospital
Providers will be from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 16 and
17 at its education center
at 3876 W Country Hill


Drive, Lecanto.
Developed by the Amer-
ican Academy of Pediatrics,
PEPP is designed specifi-
cally to teach pre-hospital
professionals how to bet-
ter assess and manage the
emergent care of ill or in-
jured infants and children.


Registration is $185 per
person and required class
books are $55. Scholar-
ships may be available for
the cost of the class and
books. Students must
begin the course prepared
to learn and should under-
stand the need to continue


practicing the skills and
using the knowledge ac-
quired during the course.
Register online at
wwwnaturecoastems.org.
Click on the "Education"
tab at top of the page, click
on blue words "Nature
Coast EMS Training Cen-


ter," then scroll down to
"PEPP class" and click
"Enroll."
For more information or
assistance contact Jane
Bedford at janeb@nature
coastems.org, or call
Nature Coast EMS at
352-249-4700.






A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Don't be afraid to
make changes if it will help you find
happiness or broaden your interests
and friendships. New possibilities
could lead to greater prosperity.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Don't feel obliged to do things differently
or to give in to someone's demands.
Concentrate on what you can do to
improve your life and your future.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Dealing with authority figures, institu-
tions or government agencies will
pose a problem. Demands will not be
met, and your reputation must be
protected. Stick close to home.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Take part in a cause you believe in to
impress someone who has some-
thing to offer.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -
Consistency will be a deciding factor
when it comes to your future relation-
ships with friends, family and peers.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
Relax and enjoy the day. Take time
to be with the people whose com-
pany you most enjoy.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Thoughts followed by actions will
bring good results. High energy and
quality intentions will prove to be
your ticket to the winner's circle.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A
makeover will prepare you for future
endeavors. Getting involved in some-
one else's cause won't satisfy your needs.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -You won't
get all the facts, but you should still
head in the direction that beckons you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Timing
is everything. Mixing business with
pleasure will allow you to grab the
support needed to pursue future
endeavors.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't
be afraid to voice your opinion. You
may raise eyebrows, but in the end,
you will get your point across.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -An
emotional financial matter may cloud
your vision. Romance should occupy
your time, but not break your budget.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Establish how to incorporate what
you do best into a marketable serv-
ice and revenue stream.


ENTERTAINMENT


AMC announces
'Better Call Saul'
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-
Walter White's lawyer is return-
ing to Albuquerque.
AMC announced this week
that the "Breaking Bad" spinoff,
"Better Call Saul," will premiere
in November 2014, but no spe-
cific date has been released.
The series will follow sleazy
attorney Saul Goodman, played
by Bob Odenkirk, as he de-
fends drug lords, criminals and
those allegedly injured in minor
traffic accidents.
The network has already created
a website for the fictional lawyer,
with Saul Goodman's signature
videos boasting how he can get
anyone out of legal trouble. The
website includes "testimonies"
from a drug dealer and prostitute
who tell potential clients how he
got them out of jail.
AMC has given few details on
the upcoming spinoff nor have
show creators said how much of
it would be filmed in Albuquerque.
But the fictional website
shows "Breaking Bad" charac-
ters bragging in video on the
streets of Albuquerque about
how the convincing lawyer was
able to pull them out of jail
For example, one such testi-
mony comes from Badger, a
methamphetamine dealer on
"Breaking Bad" played by Matt
Jones, who tells viewers that
Goodman got him out of legal
trouble after undercover officers
arrested him for selling drugs -
a reference to an episode of
"Breaking Bad."
"And then, bam! Saul Good-
man shows up," Jones says in
the video. "He's like, get out of
here cop, because of the
Constitution."
Within two days, Jones said,
he was back on the street and
"burning one with my homess"


Associated Press
Bob Odenkirk is pictured in a scene from the final season of
"Breaking Bad." AMC and Sony Pictures Television confirmed
that Odenkirk, who played Saul Goodman in the popular se-
ries, will star in a one-hour prequel tentatively titled "Better
Call Saul."

White House: Gov't can't Weather Channel says
force Kimmel off air safety at risk in dispute


WASHINGTON -The White
House has responded to a peti-
tion calling for an apology and
the removal of Jimmy Kimmel's
television show by saying the
comedian can't be forced off
the air.
More than 105,000 people
signed the petition on the White
House website. It followed an
October broadcast of ABC's
"Jimmy Kimmel Live" featuring a
segment in which Kimmel spoke
to young children about U.S.
government debt owed to China.
One boy said "kill everyone in
China" when Kimmel asked how
the U.S. should repay China.
In its response, the White
House noted that ABC and Kim-
mel have apologized, and that
the network has removed the
segment from future broadcasts
and its online platforms.
The White House also noted
that the Constitution protects
free speech, even when it's
offensive.


PASADENA, Calif. -The
Weather Channel asked its view-
ers Saturday to urge Congress to
intervene in its business dispute
with DirecTV, arguing that it can
harm public safety if the satellite
system pulls the network off the
air for nearly 20 million viewers.
The network's contract with
DirecTV expires at the end of
Monday. If an agreement on how
much DirecTV pays The Weather
Channel is not reached by then, TWC
will likely stop airing on the system.
David Clark, president of The
Weather Channel, said Saturday
he has no problem essentially
equating his television network
to a public utility. The Weather
Channel is part of the NBC Uni-
versal stable of networks and is
owned by Comcast Corp.
'Yes, it is a privately held com-
pany and a for-profit" enterprise,
Clark said. "That's OK. What
also happens to be true is that
we have a mission to serve."
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 12, the 12th
day of 2014. There are 353 days left
in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 12, 1959, Berry Gordy Jr.
founded Motown Records (originally
Tamla Records) in Detroit.
On this date:
In 1519, Holy Roman Emperor
Maximilian I died.
In 1912, textile workers at the
Everett Mill in Lawrence, Mass., most
of them immigrant women, walked
off the job to protest wage cuts.
In 1915, the House of Representa-
tives rejected, 204-174, a constitu-
tional amendment giving women the
right to vote.
In 1948, the U.S. Supreme Court,
in Sipuel v. Board of Regents of Uni-
versity of Oklahoma, ruled that state
law schools could not discriminate
against applicants on the basis of race.
In 2010, Haiti was struck by a
magnitude-7 earthquake, killing as
many as 300,000 residents and leav-
ing over 1.5 million people homeless.
Five years ago: Acting at Presi-
dent-elect Barack Obama's behest,
President George W. Bush agreed to
ask Congress for the final $350 bil-
lion in the financial bailout fund.
One year ago: The NHL's four-
month lockout finally ended as the
league and the players' association
completed signing a required memo-
randum of understanding.
Today's Birthdays: Actress Luise
Rainer is 104. Singer Glenn Yarbrough
is 84. The Amazing Kreskin is 79.
Radio commentator Rush Limbaugh
is 63. Actress Kirstie Alley is 63. Writer
Walter Mosley is 62. Radio-TV per-
sonality Howard Stern is 60. Writer-
producer-director John Lasseter is
57. Broadcast journalist Christiane
Amanpour is 56. Entrepreneur Jeff
Bezos is 50. Rock singer Zack de la
Rocha is 44. Rapper Raekwon (Wu
Tang Clan) is 44. Singer Melanie
Chisholm (Spice Girls) is 40. Rock
singer Zayn Malik (One Direction) is 21.
Thought for Today: "Love is the
strongest force the world possesses,
and yet it is the humblest imagina-
ble." Mohandas K. Gandhi, Indian
spiritual leader (1869-1948).


H L Fcast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


180/61 1.20" ,8z/58 trace
THREE DAY OUTLOOK ,oe lEy

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
LJ|. High: 68" Low: 47' _
Mostly sunny, breezy

L_11-H 9 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
)iv Highs 74 Low: 57"
..Npr W Increasing clouds, showers by Monday
*'*_n~ght_____________
" 11 "TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
jr High: 66 Low: 45'
Scaltered showers, rain chance 50%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 76/69
Record /25
Normal 70/51
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean 14
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00"
Total for the month 0.76"
Total for the year 0.76"
Normal for the year 0.76"
*As o( 7 p m al hwness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6moderate.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.05


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 69.8
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 100%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, elm
Today's count: 9.9/12
Monday's count: 8.8
Tuesday's count: 6.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 21
Pollutant: Particulate matter


PIO4d toy
SOLUNAR TABLES fSm0.
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
IMORNINGi (AFTERNOONi
01/12 SUNDAY 0324 09:11 14:17 20:45
01113 MONDAY 04:13 09:59 15:06 21:33
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUW E TTOSH 55.. . .......... 5:51 p.m,
0 (je t) ~~SUNRISE TO -MERG W - 23 -am

MOMN ASET4W TOuDAVY 4 231 a m
Jan 15 Jan 24 Jan 30 Feb 6 MONSTU -AY 4 23 am
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There Is no bum ban.
For more InflormatiOn call Forida D ision ol Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
Irll ,llim lkllt'lr 111'1 (lrluii.-]lll :,iriitllr"ri l / Ij l'*il, 11 Iris" E lJ.,",,n ,1-r K ^'r^^rr ', \'/ t'- ,*ih;.
:il1, 7l&in, 11 i.,I c "* I .T h air'r [A.n
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited Io two days per week. before 10 a.m or afler4 p.m.. as
foflows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday arKnor Sunday.
ODD WSrews r;k moV Aailer n Woclne-i1la, nidrit Sitira-iy
H nAM t a l a- rnlg r h' : m1 u <.Jl -n. rN 3Z l ,t r n- ic ro im rp a in l .:t ri ai. lr .rd& L -iu c h
as vegetable gardens. powers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
ijrne.
Citrus Counly Utilies' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plan matenaJ 352-527-7669 S '-1 I'w [i: ms ,, mi y '.q'. oiv .r l chraI
waiening allowances.
.- rqnon rI ,iia-fw pia3 .mail City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321O Crly r1 Crvrii
River @ 352-795-4216 exa. 313, unincorporated C.trus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At m ,." ". &av 'At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassahowltzka" 3:51 a.m. 0.6ft. 3:44 ,m. 0.211 11:500.m 0.1 9:41 p.mO.1N
Crystal Rlvef" 1:37a.m. 2.1 t. 3:05p.m. 1.4 N 9:07a.m. 02f a8:39p. mO.AI
Wihlacoochee" I2:50p.m. 2.5ft. liS4p.m, 2.9 f 7;1Aa.m. -0,5!! 6:43p.m1 1 ft.I
HomoasaSSa"" 2:04 am t2t 4C32 p.m. 07 It 11:44 a.m.-0,011 B:28p.m0Af. I


Today: North then NNE winds 10 to
15 knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet subsiding
to 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
a light to moderate chop. Tonight:
Northeast winds around 10 knots
then. Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters a light chop.


Gulf water
temperature


60
Taken at Aripek"


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Wizhlacoocnee at Holder 28.57 28.51 3552
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.37 38.37 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.42 39.42 40,60
Tsala Apopka-Florai City 40.09 40.09 42.20
Levels lepoiled in feel at>" sea tvM F1oo stage k la kes are base on 2.33-year od.,
ttre reartauijal lOOd wih h1s a 43-pecent chance of btrg equaled ot exceed In
any one year, This data s obiaried Iromi Ih Softhwes Fl ornda Walter Managereni Dstct
and ks subje'-[ "^ rc~-.-: nf -..,1 `1.1 11 C'.Lr. r "'f 1P., ur' r o*r.- ui.i/ -. iiL
1be liabtef]r 5 i.- ,,v^ t.1.':,/.: -,.-_,, .,,ir ..:i inr, ..'-- -.I [n,; .lHi.- Ir *.-.. r,.,i? .--,", .-i,..;i.-,,-. i,,,
should contact Ihe Hydologtail Data Secion at (352) 796.7211

THE NATION___
L-1 ;is F-,- I


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashewlle
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
BIrmingham
Boisa
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleslon, S.C
Charleston, W.V.
Charloltte
Chicago
Cincinnali
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvlle, IN
Harmsburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
LasVegas
LIltie Rock
Los Angeles
Loulsville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
MontgomoMy
Nashville


KEY TO CONCITI
I-lair hahty: 'p
nmaliusnow mix
snm.nol ts-thm
WSiai214


SAT
H L Pcp. H
55 33 .38 40
55 27 54
56 44 1,4552
65 47 2.385B
61 47 .23 49
75 49 72
57 35 .86 47
49 30 44
65 56 .72 57
53 39 42
57 34 .14 47
50 37 .53 34
48 34 87 40
72 64 .21 64
61 48 .64 47
65 42 1.5957
40 34 68 43
53 41 .85 46
51 43 20 42
46 34 .06 59
53 42 .69 44
32 24 23 42
69 37 74
57 19 45
34 24 50
42 38 58 38
65 33 69
51 40 .60 49
48 33 .49 43
57 33 .75 44
74 57 72
42 33 .25 44
62 41 63
60 40 .10 64
73 48 74


SUN
L Fcst
31 PC
25 pc
29pc
41 s
31 PC
49 pc
3O pc
32 pc
43 8
31 "I
34 pc
30 sn
26 pc
40 s
33 pc
36 s
25 pc
37 pc
35 pc
34 pc
35 pc
2O pc
44 pc
3O pc
26 pc
29 pc
37 Pc
38 pc
28 pc
25 pc
5O pc
35 pc
39 pc
43 s
49 iw


SAT SUN
City H L Pap. H LFcst
New Orleans 73 61 52 65 53 pc
NewYorikCity 57 37 18 47 33 pc
Norfolk 73 59 81 54 35 pc
Oklahorma City 63 35 70 36 pc
Omaha 46 20 49 28 cd
Palm Springs 74 46 76 51 pc
Philadelphia 61 36 .64 47 33 pc
Phoenix 71 43 72 44 pc
Pitsburgh 54 43 .48 37 31 pc
Portland, ME 46 29 -32 44 27 pc
Portland, OR 58 43 -53 46 40 r
Providence, Rt 58 34 30 46 29 pc
Raleigh 69 45 60 58 35 s
Rapd City 53 24 46 24 pc
Reno 55 30 47 21 pc
Rocheslter.NY 53 39 .29 37 30 pc
Sacramento 58 40 61 36 pc
Sell Lake City 50 36 33 22 sn
San Antonio 78 49 73 49 pc
San Diego 70 50 65 52 1
San Francisco 58 46 56 48 pc
Savamnnah 75 81 .18 65 40 s
Seattle 57 44 .84 49 45 r
Spokane 47 39 07 40 36 pC
SI. Louis 49 37 .17 58 39 pc
Sl. Sle.Man 35 32 -36 34 18 sn
Syracuse 55 35 .20 39 28 ?1
Topeka 50 32 58 31 pc
wa.-tnlon s5 3-s 17 1 .?' 36 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
HINGH 88. Ilrnmokals Fla
LOW -4, Alraa, Cok).
WORLD CITIES
SUN Lisbon 62/50/I
CITY HWL4SKY London 44/30/s
Acapuko 86/73 s Madrid 5735tpc
Amsterdam 48/33k Mexico City 68/42,ts
Alhens 62/46/pc Montreal 39W2/sn
Beijing 37/15/s Moscow 35/24/r
Berlin 44/37tpc Parts 51t2BJcd
Bermuda 69/68/s Rio 91/77/s
Cairo 64/50/s Rome 57/39/1
Calgary 44/22/pc Sydney 80/66/pc
Havana 82/6Wpc Tokyo 48/35/s
Hong Kong 69/59V/s Toronto 41/281r
Jerusalm 60/15Wpc Warsaw 42/33/pc


1LEGALNOTICES






Bid Notices.................................. D8


Meeting Notices.......................... D8


Miscellaneous Notices...............D8


y-C IT R U S rnCOUNTY rNT



CHRO"NICLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Report a news tip:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L Pcaot City


Daytona Bch. 66
Fort Lauderdale 78
Fort Myers 76
Gainesville 66
Homestead 79
Jacksonville 65
Key West 78
Lakeland 73
Melbourne 70


54 43 .98 51 40 pc
58 47 1.4763 50 pc
38 32 .19 40 22 pc
32 25 40 18 Cd
73 63 .67 64 60 pc
69 57 1,4160 42 s
58 51 96 54 41 s
MRON ccta dr-dq rie;
pcpartly cloudy: r"rain
: Issunny; sh-showrS:
xdwmtorms wwilndy.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Scott discusses Common Core


BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service of
Florida

ORLANDO Looking
to calm a rising furor in
the grass roots of his party,
Gov. Rick Scott said Satur-
day that a state set of revi-
sions to nationwide
education standards will
be unveiled next week.
One day after a caucus of
the Republican Party of
Florida's state commit-
teemen and committee-
women backed a resolution
opposing the Common
Core standards, Scott also
said he would support leg-
islation specifying that cur-
riculum is a local
responsibility and limiting
what information can be
gathered about students.
Education Commis-
sioner Pam Stewart said
earlier this week that her
department would pro-
pose about 40 changes to
the voluminous education


benchmarks. Scott's re-
marks Saturday, to the an-
nual meeting of the state
GOP, signaled that he
hopes the changes will
soothe conservative fears
about the standards.
"Here's what we're
going to ensure: These are
Florida standards," he
said. "They're not some
national standards; they're
going to be Florida stan-
dards. This is our state.
We're not going to have the
federal government telling
us how to do our education
system."
The overwhelming ma-
jority of the changes Stew-
art is set to propose would
add material to the state's
version of the standards,
officials say
Common Core started
out as a joint project by of-
ficials in about four dozen
states, but some conserva-
tives have grown worried
that the standards will in-
stead lead to unprece-


Here's what we're I
going to ensure: These 4.
are Florida standards.
They're not some
national standards;
they're going to be Florida
standards. This is our state.
We're not going to have the
federal government telling us how
to do our education system.
Gov. Rick Scott
speaking Saturday.


dented federal intrusion
in local schools. The oppo-
sition to the guidelines has
opened a rift on the right
between those arguing
against the benchmarks
and members of the school
accountability movement,
like former Republican


Gov Jeb Bush, who backs
the standards.
On Saturday Scott spoke
about legislative proposals
only in vague terms. He
did not stop to answer
questions despite shouted
requests from reporters
who jogged toward him as


he left the Rosen Centre
Hotel.
But any measure
spelling out the role of
local school boards in cur-
riculum might affect Com-
mon Core only at the
margins, if at all. Support-
ers insist that the new
standards only outline
what students are ex-
pected to learn, while cur-
riculum is still controlled
at the local level.
The governor has tried
before to get rid of con-
cerns about Common
Core, issuing an executive
order in September that
began distancing the state
from a separate multi-
state consortium building
tests based on the stan-
dards. Scott also ordered
the review of the bench-
marks that led to Stewart's
proposed changes.
Rep. Debbie Mayfield, a
Vero Beach Republican
who has sponsored anti-
Common Core legislation,


said after Scott's remarks
Saturday that she was
"perfectly happy with the
direction the governor's
going in." But she sug-
gested that simply adding
more material to the Com-
mon Core standards might
not satisfy critics.
Mayfield has filed legis-
lation (HB 25) intended to
stop the standards from
fully taking effect in
Florida.
"If we have our own
standards and if we have
our own assessment, then
what is the purpose of
being in Common Core?"
she asked Saturday
Meanwhile, Republican
Party Chairman Lenny
Curry told the party's ex-
ecutive board Saturday
that he would refer Fri-
day's Common Core reso-
lution to the RPOF's
legislative affairs commit-
tee. The executive board is
not expected to vote on the
measure.


Crystal River City Council sets 2014 goals


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER In
the first meeting of the
new year, the city council
is opting for the big-ticket
items by setting goals for
the year and in its capacity
as the Community Rede-
velopment Agency (CRA).
At the CRA meeting set
to begin at 6:30 p.m. Mon-
day, officials plan to lay out
a blueprint for the vacant
Petrella property, at the
corner of U.S. 19 and Cit-
rus Avenue. The city re-
cently purchased the
northern/western portion
of the property and would
like to re-sell it at some
point to a private devel-
oper who shares city lead-
ers' vision for the parcel.
Officials want the property
to be the gateway to the


city's downtown core and
would like to see a struc-
ture commensurate with
those aims.
In the interim, officials
are suggesting, among
other things, the following
improvements:
Removal of a deterio-
rated oak tree and palm
trees located in the middle
of the property
Installation of a pri-
vacy fence along the east-
ern side of the property to
shield a barbed-wire fence
that is currently visible
from U.S. 19.
Installation of a con-
crete apron within the
right of way adjacent to
Citrus Avenue to eliminate
sand washout from the va-
cant property onto Citrus
Avenue, and to facilitate
the installation of parking
spaces along the south


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County issues citations that carry with them
a fine of $100 for first offenders of local watering
rules. Second violations cost $250, third or more
cost $500.
* Find watering rules in the weather map on Page A4
daily.


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COLLEGE of CENTRAL FLORIDA

EPerforming

Arts
Series


Tickets.CF.edu


352-873-5810


Cashore Marionettes, "Life in Motion"
Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala
Saturday, Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m.
Cashore Marionettes, "Simple Gifts"
Family Show FREE craft workshop
for children immediately flowing show
Sunday. Jan. 19, 3 p.m.


"The Graduate"
by L.A. Theatre Works
Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala
Monday, Feb. 10, 7:30 p.m.
JfNKINS ALUTO GROUP
Ac=ta 'I.Hyun9i M=&d
&R. 2NBOCUA


L.A."RATaff WON
ILS ANI,


Th
Graddite


Mak ou cledas


* WHAT: Crystal River government meetings.
* WHEN: Monday CRA, 6:30 p.m.; city council,
7 p.m.
* WHERE: Council Chambers, City Hall, 123 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* CONTACT: 352-795-4216 or visit crystalriverfl.org.


side of the property (be-
tween the easement and
an existing building).
Install 20 parking
spaces between the ease-
ment and the existing
building using stone and
concrete wheel stops.
These spaces would pro-
vide parking support for
the downtown area, pend-
ing what would happen
with the property
Put up a sign in the
northwest corner of the site


stating the property is avail-
able for redevelopment.
Limited landscaping
along Citrus Avenue.
At the 7 p.m. regular
council meeting, officials
are expected to lay out
goals for the upcoming
year, which include:
Extend the term of the
Community Redevelop-
ment Plan by 30 years.
Develop Commercial
Waterfront District devel-
opment guidelines that


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fLXWODKNS TO TRATMENTS**^C l
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give consideration to such
things as reducing/elimi-
nating on-site parking re-
quirements in conjunction
with a pooled parking sys-
tem that serves the overall
CRA district and modify-
ing height restrictions
within designated areas.
Complete Cutler Spur
Boulevard project
Begin work on the
wastewater line to Duke
Energy power generation
site.
Enhance city parks.


Facilitate the develop-
ment of the Three Sisters
Springs site.
Address floodplain
management concerns.
The council also will
consider a resolution
requesting the transfer of
ownership of a portion of
County Road 495 from Cit-
rus County to the city of
Crystal River
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline. corn.


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 A5


ICaslio le11





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Robert
Greenwood, 71
INVERNESS
Robert S. Greenwood,
71, of Inverness, Fla., died
Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014.
Graveside service with
military honors will be at
1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 20,
2014, at Fero Memorial
Gardens.

Mary
Leidecker, 82
HERNANDO
Mary Lucille Leidecker,
age 82, Hernando, Fla.,
formerly of Winchester,
Va., died Jan. 8,2014, at her
residence, surrounded by
her loving family and
under the



Mary
July 18,
1931, in
M a son- Mary
town, Pa., Leidecker
to the late
Caleb and Rosella (Stin-
son) Rockwell. She was a
homemaker and member
of Hernando United
Methodist Church. Mary
was the first resident of
Arbor Lakes subdivision
and was made honorary
mayor She loved antiques
and in her past operated
her own antique store. She
enjoyed shopping for
clothes and collectibles for
herself and her family A
devoted mother, grand-
mother and great-grand-
mother, she will be missed
by all who knew her
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her daughters,
Debra Goode and husband
John Goode Sr, Winches-
ter, Va., Dona Norwood
and husband Geoff Nor-
wood, Queensland, Aus-
tralia; and stepdaughters
Linda Buckle and Debra
Files and husband John;
her brother Jack Rockwell,
Calif; sisters Betty Jack-
son, Virginia, and Sandra
Franks, Pennsylvania;
nine grandchildren,
Matthew Robertson, John
T Goode Jr, Michael T
Goode, Danielle Stevens,
Olivia Norwood, Natalie
Cavanagh, Kristen Bush,
Amy Kerns and Sarah
Emerson; nine great-
grandchildren, Kailyn and
Tyson Robertson, Noah,
Asher, Ananiah, Nahum
and Tali Stevens, Blake
Daniel Bush, Sophia
Danyell Kerns; and one
baby Cavanagh on the
way; also her step-
grandchildren, Sean Buck-
ley, Jake Files, Jesse Files
and their children. She
was preceded in death by
her husband of 25 years,
Edward Leidecker, on
Aug. 28, 2002; daughter
Diane Mills Hall; son
Daniel Emerson; and sis-
ter Glenna Rockwell.
A celebration tribute of
Mary's life will be at 2 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. The family will
greet friends in visitation
from 1 p.m. until the hour
of service. Memorial dona-
tions are requested to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.






CIa. 2
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

t l tm, ^T^^l k ,-
Crmain i i-i^4Fsii~

For Information and costs
call 726-8323


Frances
Burgess, 78
FLORAL CITY
Frances M. Burgess, 78,
Floral City, died Thursday,
Jan. 9, 2014, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital. Private
arrangements are by Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory Inverness,
Fla.




William
Magito, 88
DUNNELLON
William L. Magito, 88, of
Dunnellon, Fla., died
Thursday Jan. 9,2014, with
Gulf Side Regional Hos-
pice in Zephyrhills.
A funeral Mass will be at
10 a.m. Wednesday Jan. 15,
2014, at St. John the Bap-
tist Catholic Church, 7525
S. U.S. 41 Dunnellon, with
interment to follow at
12:30 p.m., at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery The fam-
ily will receive friends at
the funeral home Tuesday
from 4 to 7 p.m. at Fero Fu-
neral Home, Beverly Hills.

Irene
Martin, 102
CITRUS SPRINGS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Irene E.
Martin, age 102, of Citrus
Springs, Florida, will be
held 11:00 AM, Tuesday,
January 14, 2014 at the
Beverly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
Interment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Florida.
The family will receive
friends from 10:00 AM
until the time of service,
Tuesday at the chapel. On-
line condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mrs. Martin was born
July 12, 1911 in Clifton
Heights, PA, daughter of
Frederick and Carolyn
(Lear) Edwards. She died
January 7, 2014 in Inver-
ness, FL. She retired from
Fidelity Bank & Trust of
Philadelphia, PA. She
moved to Citrus Springs,
Florida from Folcroft, PA
in 1983 and worked as a
correspondent for the
Ocala Star Banner She en-
joyed painting and writing,
having written numerous
plays Mrs. Martin was a
member of the Beverly
Hills Art Club, AARP a
life-member of VEW
#4864 Ladies Auxiliary,
Citrus Springs and a mem-
ber St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Catholic Church,
Citrus Springs.
Mrs. Martin was pre-
ceded in death by her par-
ents, husband, J. T Martin,
daughter, Edryth M. Pow-
ell, 2 sisters, Doris E. Titus
and Vivian Williams and a
grandson, Scott Melhuish.
Survivors include 2 daugh-
ters, Betty Irene Melhuish
of Bradenton and Virginia
Cornell of Orlando, 10
grandchildren, 12 great
grandchildren and 3 great-
great grandchildren.

Randall
McGouyrk, 59
INVERNESS
Randall S. McGouyrk,
59, of Inverness, Fla., died
Friday, Jan. 10,2014, at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.





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CRYSTAL RIVER
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Marcella
'Marcy'
McElwain, 95
LECANTO
After a long struggle,
Marcella G. McElwain, af-
fectionately known as
Marcy, age 95, peacefully
passed



of a thse Macel
away
Jan. 5,
2014, with
her family
at her side
and under
the excel-
lent care
of the Marcella
H e aldth McEIwain
Center at
Brentwood and Hospice.
She was born Nov. 8,1918,
in Chicago, Ill., to Emil and
Frieda Zuehlke.
Marcy was loved by so
many and she always had
a friendly smile, a kind
word and a helping hand
to share with those she
knew She was a practical
joker and loved to tell a
good joke or story She was
a good friend and an ex-
ceptional wife and mother
On Dec. 6, 1941, Marcy
married Lloyd Ardell
McElwain. They had two
daughters, Cheryl Ann
(Paul Black) of Inverness,
Fla., and Trudie Lee of
San Diego, Calif, who sur-
vive her She was pre-
ceded in death by her
parents, Emil and Frieda
Zuehlke; her husband,
Lloyd; her brother, Clif-
ford; and her sister,
Dorothea. In addition to
her two daughters, she
leaves behind to cherish
her memory her beloved
son-in-law, Paul Black; and
many nieces, nephews and
friends.
Arrangements are en-
trusted to Heinz Funeral
Home of Inverness, Fla. A
memorial service will take
place at a future date in
Westmont, Ill. memorial
contributions can be made
to Hospice of Citrus and
the Nature Coast.
"Come to me all ye that
labor and are heavy laden
and I will give you rest."
Matthew 11:28.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Martha
Roberts, 73
FORMERLY OF
HERNANDO
Martha R. Roberts, 73,
formerly of Hernando,
Fla., died Jan. 6, 2014, in
Fort Wayne, Ind. Graveside
service will be at 1 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at
Fero Memorial Gardens.

Theodore
Russo, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Theodore Russo, 80, of
Beverly Hills, died Jan. 10,
2014, at Citrus Memorial
hospital in Inverness.
Funeral services for Mr
Russo will be at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, at
the Heinz Funeral Home.
The family will receive
friends from 2 p.m. until
the hour of service. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, Fla.


FREE OBITUARIES

Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


George
Melonson, 83
OCALA
U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr
George G. Melonson, 83,
died Thursday, Jan. 9,
2014, in Ocala, Fla. He was
born April 30, 1930, to the
late George and Caroline
(Legro) Melonson in North
Reading, Mass.
George moved to
Florida in 1997 from Vir-
ginia. He proudly served
our country in the U.S.
Navy for 23 years, obtain-
ing the rank of lieutenant
commander George had a
passion for golf and played
locally achieving a hole in
one many times. He was a
handyman who could fix
just about everything. A
very simple, quiet man
who truly enjoyed his fam-
ily and will be missed by
all who knew him.
George is preceded in
death by his first wife, Au-
drey; and his sister, Mil-
dred Higbee.
He is survived by his
wife, Lorna Melonson,
Dunnellon, Fla.; his son,
David Melonson and his
wife Teresa of Lancaster,
N.Y; his daughters, Dar-
lene Rudolph, Wood-
bridge, Va., Debbie Baird
and her husband, Elray, of
Provo, Utah, and Diane
Saucier and her husband,
Val, of Albion, Maine; his
stepdaughter, Karen Car-
rico, Ashburn, Va.; his sis-
ter, Jeanette Hall,
Jacksonville, Fla.; nine
grandchildren; 14 great-
grandchildren; and his two
kitty cats, Lily and Sandee.
We love you and we will
miss you until we meet
again.
There will be a public
visitation from 2 to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, at
the Roberts Funeral Home
in Dunnellon, with a wake
service starting at
3:30 p.m. Burial with full
military honors will be
held at Quantico National
Cemetery in Quantico, Va.
Expressions of sympa-
thy can be made online at
robertsofdunnellon.com.
Arrangements are under
the careful direction of
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free obit-
uary.)
Additionally, all
obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.


Serving Our Community-

Meeting Your Needs! &-



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5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694 |
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhome.com


William 'Bill'
Wilson Jr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
William J. "Bill" Wilson
Jr, passed away Jan. 3,
2014, after a full life of
service to his country, en-
trepre-
neurship F -
and ad-
venture.
Bill was
born in
Vinita,
Okla., and
raised in
Paris, Ky., William
and King Wilson
Ferry, N.Y
He was a graduate of the
University of Kentucky
and an Army veteran of
the Korean War At his
death, Bill was a resident
of Crystal River, Fla.
A self-made man, Bill
had a long and successful
business career He was a
former partner with the
Louisville accounting firm
of Yeager, Ford and War-
ren (now Price Water-
house Coopers) and the
founder and former owner
of Wilson & Company,
PS.C. He was proud of his
long association with Citi-
zens National Bank, Som-
erset, Ky. In recent years,
Bill obtained his commer-
cial captain's license and
enjoyed the title "Captain
Bill." He loved to spend
time aboard his favorite
boat, "Bill's Reef."
Bill is survived byhis lov-
ing and devoted wife, Jean-
nie Tankersley Wilson ;and
children with his former
wife, Linda L. Wilson, John
(Mickey), Cindy Kopelke
(Paul), Dr Susan Mills
(Dennis), Laura Wilson and
Wayne (Christie); eight
grandchildren; two sisters,
Lucinda Hill and Nancy
Clark (another sister, Ann
Averitt, predeceased him);
many nieces and nephews;
and his beloved dog, Ellie.
Also cherishing Bill's mem-
ory is his stepdaughter,
Robin Ross, and her three
children.
A lifelong Christian, Bill
belonged to Second Pres-
byterian Church, Louis-
ville, Ky., attended First
Baptist Church, Somerset,
Ky., and was a member of
First Presbyterian
Churches in Lexington,
Ky., and Crystal River
It should have been too
hard to resist boasting of
all his accomplishments
(he had been SCUBA div-
ing all over the world), but
that wasn't Capt. Bill's
style. He was a model of
humility, generous to a
fault and an advocate for
the underdog. Capt. Bill al-
ways kept his sense of
humor, even through re-
cent health challenges.
A celebration of Bill's
life will be at First Presby-
terian Church, Lexington,
Ky, at 2 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 16, 2014. In lieu of
flowers, the family has re-
quested that expressions
of celebration take the
form of memorial gifts to
the University of Kentucky
Gatton College of Business
& Economics. Gifts should
be made in memory of
William J. Wilson Jr. and
be sent to the UK Gifts Re-
ceiving Office, 343 Waller
Ave., Suite 303, Lexington,
KY 40504-2912.


Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.




James 'Ben'
Wall, 73
James B. "Ben" Wall,
master chief machinist
mate, U.S. Navy (retired),
passed from this world to
the next,
Jan. 10,
2014.
A native
of Pierson,
Fla., he
was born
Oct. 2,
1940, to the
late Frank James
and Nellie Wall
(Scoggan)
Wall. He served our coun-
try in the U.S. Navy for 20
years and after retirement,
he joined the postal serv-
ice. Ben has enjoyed many
trike travels, remaining ac-
tive with the Nature Coast
GWRRA; bowled with var-
ious local leagues; avidly
followed the Florida
Gators football team;
fished when possible; and
held the "patriarchal" re-
spect of surviving family
members. His family has
the deep roots of Florida
Crackers, with kin spread
throughout the region.
He was preceded in
death by his beloved wife
of 30 years, Joy (Elder)
Wall; and his brother, Roy
M. Wall. He is survived by
his three children, John
Rode, Warwick, R.I.,
Michael Wall, Salisbury,
Md., and Jennifer Hurst,
Freistatt, Mo., and their
families; two sisters, Vir-
ginia Victoria Jenkins-
Hesse, Brooksville, Fla.,
and Anna King, Omaha,
Neb.; three nieces; two
nephews; five grandchil-
dren; two great-great-
grandchildren; and
long-time friend ofJoy and
Ben, Pat Watson.
A funeral tribute for
James will be at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Burial with military hon-
ors will follow at the
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. The fam-
ily will greet friends in
visitation from noon until
the hour of service.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

See DEATHS/Page A8


SO YOU KNOW
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
charged a base fee of
$25 plus $10 per
column inch, payable
in advance.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an
additional charge.


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FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
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A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Plenty of equipment, such as hundreds of bits at the Hawkewood Farm, is a must to
keep the animals in top form.


SENSE
Continued from PageAl

riding clothes. And Weber maintains a
skill almost unique to the industry: braid-
ing and fitting artificial tails to give
horses a perfect look in competition.
"It has to look natural, it can't look
fake," she said. "I think I'm good at it be-
cause I've been on that end of the horse
most of my life."
That aspect of the business keeps her
on the road quite a bit, visiting various
horse events or being flown to locations
for special fittings.
"That's gotten bigger than I ever
thought it should," Weber said about the
clothing business. "I sell mostly to riders,
and their clothes over the years have be-
come more interesting.
"There are certain rules and parame-
ters that you've got to follow and every-
one wants their look. It's gotten
extremely expensive, $2,500 to $3,000 for
a coat."
Weber does individual fittings, selects
fabrics and works with what she de-
scribes as "old European-styled tailors"
and assembles complete riding outfits,
down to jewelry
She does some dressage and hunter-seat
outfits, but mostly sticks to saddle-seat
clothes because of her time limitations.
"All my business is by word of mouth,"
she said. "We try hard; we dress a lot of
the best stables in the country"
When she first bought the land and put
up the barn with an apartment, Weber
thought she would be partially retiring
and initially kept her place in New
Hampshire, which carried the Hawke-
wood name. She no longer has a farm
there, but still has a shop.


Wilson came on board about 10 years
ago.
"People find out we're here, we just
keep getting more customers and keep
adding on," she said. "Very few of our
customers live locally"
Elsa Hackett, who currently drives a
champion Hackney pony out of Hawke-
wood, is an exception, living nearby, hav-
ing followed Weber down from New
England. She also has a couple from
Tampa.
"The rest of them are from all over the
country," Weber said. "They fly in from
Texas, Oregon, New York, Wisconsin -
everywhere."
"I enjoy it," said Hackett, who recently
took first place in a show at the Florida
State Fairgrounds.
Some have their horses shipped in for
training, some buy their horses at the
farm and some start from scratch, even
learning to ride there.
"Most of our people are fairly serious
show horse people," Weber said. They
work with riders as young as 4 and as old
as they can still keep on doing it.
The walls of her office are covered
with photos of champion horses and rid-
ers with a Hawkewood connection, in-
cluding her and Wilson.
And after all the years and all the
horses, Weber admits she still gets
excited.
"I can't wait for the season," she said.
"You have to be passionate about it seven
days a week; there's no days off."
When the March-to-November season
starts, it means double duty She sets up a
clothing booth at the various events and
runs back and forth when they have
horses in the ring.
Contact Chronicle reporterPat Faherty
at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gun rights group sues UF


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -A gun rights group
is suing the University of Florida for ban-
ning guns in campus housing. The law-
suit comes on the heels of a similar suit
against the University of North Florida's
ban on guns in cars.
In early December, the 1st District
Court of Appeal sided with a UNF stu-
dent and gun rights group Florida Carry
that challenged a rule banning students
from storing guns in their cars.
The Daytona Beach News-Journal re-
ported UF officials said in a written
statement they had been in talks with
Florida Carry this week and were
stunned by the lawsuit.
UF got rid of its ban on guns in cars to
comply with the ruling, but had left in
place a strict ban on firearms elsewhere
on campus. Campus residents can store
their guns, unloaded, at the university's
police station if they have permission.
Anyone bringing a gun to the station is re-


DEATHS
Continued from PagsA6



Kenneth
Wise, 88
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kenneth V Wise, 88, of
Crystal River, died Friday,
Jan. 10,2014, under the lov-
ing care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County.
He was born Nov 7,
1925, to Louis H. and
Ramie B. Rowlett in Bed-
ford, Ky., and came here 25
years ago from Louisville,


SUSPECT
Continued from PageAl
burglarized Everyday
Pawn Shop in Marion
County in November and
stole multiple firearms.
Through investigation,
task force members in-
cluding investigators from
the U.S. Marshals Service,
Marion County Sheriff's
Office and Alachua County
Sheriff's Office deter-
mined Abbey had fled to


quired to follow a specific street route to
get there.
More than 75 people have stored guns
at the station, according to media reports.
"They didn't object to the steps we have
taken to comply with the court's decision,
and they never raised the issue of guns in
the home, which was not the subject of
the court's decision," UF spokeswoman
Janine Sikes said in a statement.
After last month's ruling, Florida Carry
sent a notice to all Florida universities
and colleges that it will sue any school
that does not repeal similar rules by the
start of the spring semester
"We take no joy in filing lawsuits,"
founder Sean Caranna said. "I wish it was
not a necessary part of what our organi-
zation does. But it is a stark reality in the
fight to protect the right to bear arms."
After the ruling, UNF President John
Delaney told students and faculty the
university would not appeal the ruling;
and stated that, effective immediately,
students could store guns in their cars.


Ohio. Mr. Wise was a re-
tired millwright and a
World War II U.S. Navy
veteran. He was of the
Baptist faith.
He was preceded in
death by his beloved wife,
Juanita Wise; daughter
Rose Marie Wise; brothers
Richard, Wilson and Lee-
bert Wise; and sisters
Pauline Cutshaw and
Thelma Wood. He is sur-
vived by daughters Linda
M. Wise of Crystal River,
Debra L. Foy of Canal Ful-
ton, Ohio, and Judy De-
Poister of Crystal River;
sons Kenneth Lee Wise of
Canton, Ohio, and Douglas
V Wise (Lois) of Texas; a
brother, Edward Wise of
Bedford, Ky; 12 grandchil-

Inverness, where he was
hiding with friends in an
attempt to avoid arrest the
news release stated.
Reportedly, at 7:30 p.m.
task force members and
the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office approached the
house where they believed
Abbey to be hiding in the
4000 block of East Ryan
Street.
Abbey was ordered to
exit the residence at gun-
point and placed under ar-
rest on his Marion County
warrant.


dren; and 11 great-
grandchildren.
The funeral service will
be conducted at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 15, at the
Strickland Funeral Home
chapel in Crystal River
Friends are invited to visi-
tation there from 6 p.m.
until service time. Burial
with military honors will be
at 10:30 a.m. Thursday,
Jan. 16, in the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery The family
requests in lieu of flowers,
please consider a memorial
contribution to Hospice of
Citrus County PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 or www.hospiceof
citruscountyorg.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Inside the house, task
force members located ap-
proximately 4,950 pills, as
well as other drugs and
drug paraphernalia. The
pills were located in ap-
proximately 25 sandwich
bags, as well as two larger
plastic bags. Officials also
located a homemade ski
mask with eye holes.
Abbey was transported
to the Citrus County De-
tention Facility His bond
was set at $25,000. Addi-
tional charges are
pending.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


U.S. Army Sgt. Wade Mitcheltree is towed by a dolphin
Saturday at Dolphin Research Center in Marathon.

Wounded vets

swim with dolphins


Soldier Ride
ends today
Associated Press
MARATHON Dozens
of wounded military veter-
ans got some dolphin ther-
apy in the Florida Keys
this week when they got to
swim with the mammals.
At the Dolphin Research
Center, retired Army Sgt.
1st Class Robert Rivera
held onto a dolphin's dor-
sal fin and was towed for a
Friday Rivera sustained a


spinal injury in Iraq in
2010.
Rivera said he was most
excited to see the reactions
of his comrades, many who
lost limbs in Iraq or
Afghanistan or are suffer-
ing from injuries that are
not visually apparent.
The dolphin visit was
part of Soldier Ride, or-
ganized by the nonprofit
Wounded Warrior Project.
About 50 wounded mili-
tary veterans and their
supporters are participat-
ing in the combination bus
and bicycle trip through
the Florida Keys.
Soldier Ride ends today
in Key West.


-/


Associated Press
Wounded veterans of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan pedal their way across the Seven Mile Bridge in the Florida Keys
on Friday near Marathon. About 50 injured vets and their supporters joined in the trip down segments of the Florida
Keys Overseas Highway during Soldier Ride. The event is staged by the Wounded Warrior Project to help restore
injured soldiers' physical and emotional well-being. It concludes today in Key West.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vets face disability benefit backlog
Hoping to speed claim processing, the Obama administration
wants to tighten rules for veterans seeking disability benefits.
Disability claims backlog at the end of each quarter since 2010
I Total claims pending 0 Claims pending more than 125 days
1 .0 m illio n ....................................................................................................

0.8


n.AlliiII


SOURCE: Department of Veterans Affairs Al



VA under fire


for proposed


filing rule


Associated Press
WASHINGTON For
veterans seeking disability
compensation, the appli-
cation process is supposed
to be so easy that a hand-
written note on a napkin
will initiate a claim or an
appeal.
An Obama administra-
tion proposal would
change that, and veterans
groups are sounding the
alarm.
The Department of Vet-
erans Affairs says the
many ways that requests
for disability compensa-
tion arrive actually ham-
per its ability to administer
benefits, and contribute to
a claims backlog that has
about 400,000 veterans
waiting more than 125 days
for a decision.
At times, workers spend
so much time trying to fig-
ure out what's being
claimed and trading let-
ters with applicants that
it's slowing down deci-
sions for everyone.
The VAs solution would
require veterans to use a
standard form when they
file for disability compensa-
tion or appeal a decision,
and the agency would throw
in some incentives for those
who use a computer
The response to the pro-
posed rule from the na-
tion's major veterans
groups?
"Draconiafn" and
"heavy-handed," said the
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
'"A seismic change" that
will "poison" the disability
claims process, according
to the American Legion.
"The most serious, egre-
gious attack on a veteran-
friendly disability claim
system in VA history," con-
tended the law firm of
Bergmann & Moore, which
specializes in pursuing
disability claims.
The critiques recently
submitted in response to


the proposed regulation
point to one of the sharpest
policy disagreements that
veteran groups have had
with the administration.
Both camps generally
have agreed on the need to
transform how disability
claims are managed;
namely the need to move to
a computer system instead
of relying on paper records
to track a veteran's injuries,
illnesses and service.
So far, the burden has
been on the VA to trans-
form. The proposal would
place more of the burden
on the veteran.
"VA believes that using a
standard form is a mini-
mal burden to place on
claimants," the proposed
rule states.
But for veterans, a major
advantage of the current
system is that once the VA
makes its decision, bene-
fits generally accrue back
to when a veteran first ini-
tiated his or her claim,
usually months and some-
times years earlier
Submitting what are re-
ferred to as "informal
claims" has become a stan-
dard practice for veterans
because it locks in the ef-
fective date of their claim
even as they gather sup-
porting evidence such as
military records and doc-
tor's exams for the more
formal application. Then,
if the application is ap-
proved, the veteran often
ends up getting a sizable
lump-sum payment in ad-
dition to a monthly award.
Under the proposal, the
first communication from
a veteran may not trigger
anything. Those veterans
who put their claims in
writing would have to com-
pletely fill out a standard
form, and the clock that
determines how far back
the government will pay,
won't begin ticking until
the VA receives the suc-
cessfully completed form.


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Tweets and threats


Gangs find new

home on the Net

Associated Press
CHICAGO The video is riddled
with menace and swagger: Reputed
gang members in Chicago point
their guns directly at the camera. A
bare-chested young man bran-
dishes an assault weapon. They
flash hand signals, dance and, led
by a rapper, taunt their rivals as he
chants:
"Toe tag DOA. That's for being in
my way ... Killing til my heart swell
... Guaranteed there's going to be all
hell."
Thousands watch on YouTube.
Among them: the Chicago police,
who quickly identify two of those in
the video as felons who are prohib-
ited from being around guns. Both
are later taken into custody
As social media has increasingly
become part of daily life, both gangs
and law enforcement are trying to
capitalize on the reach of this new
digital world and both, in their
own ways, are succeeding.
Social media has exploded
among street gangs who exploit it-
often brazenly to brag, conspire
and incite violence. They're turning
to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and
Instagram to flaunt guns and wads
of cash, threaten rivals, intimidate
informants and in a small number
of cases, sell weapons, drugs -
even plot murder
"What's taking place online is
what's taking place in the streets,"
said David Pyrooz, an assistant pro-
fessor at Sam Houston State Uni-
versity who has studied gangs and
social media in five big cities. "The
Internet does more for a gang's
brand or a gang member's identity
than word-of-mouth could ever do.
It really gives the gang a wide plat-
form to promote their reputations.
They can brag about women, drugs,
fighting... and instead of boasting to
five gang members on a street cor-
ner, they can go online and it essen-
tially goes viral. It's like this
electronic graffiti wall that never
gets deleted."
On the crime-fighting side, "cy-
berbanging" or "Internet banging,"
as this activity is sometimes called,
is transforming how police and
prosecutors pursue gangs. Along
with traditional investigative tech-
niques, police monitor gangs online
- sometimes communicating with
them using aliases and track
their activities and rivalries, look-


Associated Press
This image made from the YouTube website shows a still frame of the music
video "Die L'z" by Bang Da Hitta posted on Aug. 8, 2013, with a man
pointing a weapon at the camera. Police in Chicago identified two of those
in the video as felons who are prohibited from being around guns. Both were
later taken into custody.


ing for ways to short-circuit poten-
tial flare-ups.
It's a formidable task: There are
millions of images and words, idle
boasts mixed in with real threats
and an ever-changing social media
landscape. Myspace has given way
to Facebook and Twitter, but gangs
also are using Instagram, Snapchat,
Kik and Chirp different ways of
sharing photos, video, audio and
words, sometimes through smart-
phones or pagers.
"It's kind of like clothing-this is
the style today but in two months, it
won't be," said Alex Del Toro, pro-
gram director at one of the
branches of the YMCA of Metropol-
itan Chicago's Youth Safety and Vi-
olence Prevention program.
It's not just changing styles, but the
language itself that can pose obsta-
cles. Police often have to decipher
street talk, which varies according to
gang and city. In Chicago, for in-
stance, a gun may be a thumper or a
cannon. In Houston, a burner, chop-
per, pump or gat. In New York, a
flamingo, drum set, clickety, biscuit,
shotty, rachet or ratty.
That slang played a significant
role last year for New York police
and prosecutors. They pursued a
digital trail of messages on Face-
book and Twitter, along with jail-
house phone calls, to crack down on
three notorious East Harlem gangs
tied to gun trafficking, more than 30


shootings and at least three
murders.
After 63 reputed gang members
were indicted, authorities revealed
they'd collected hundreds of social
media postings to help build their
case. Some messages, according to
the indictment, were vengeful:
"God forgives, I don't ... somebodie
gotta die," one posted on his Face-
book page. "I don't wanna talk. I
want action n real guns," another
said on Twitter Others were boast-
ful: "My team not top 2 most wanted
youth gangs in Manhatten for
nothing we got guns for dayss," a
third posted on Facebook.
"These Facebook and Instagram
postings are sometimes our most
reliable evidence and they become
our most reliable informants in
identifying who's in the gang," said
Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus
Vance Jr "Gang members are Insta-
gramming pictures of themselves
with guns and cash. They are com-
municating about where to meet
before they do something related to
gang activities. They brag about
what they've done after the fact. We
see that again and again and again
in these cases."
And yet, Vance also said social
media should be viewed skeptically
- some kids brag about things that
aren't true or just want to look
tough and a Facebook post would
not be reason alone to file charges.


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Palestinian children hold weapons and chant slogans against Israel on Saturday after
hearing of the death of Ariel Sharon, the hard-charging Israeli general and prime
minister, as they celebrate in the Ein el-Hilweh camp near the southern city of Sidon,
Lebanon. Sharon was loathed by many Palestinians as a bitter enemy who did his
utmost to sabotage their independence hopes by leading military offensives against
them in Lebanon, the West Bank and Gaza and a settlement drive on the lands they
want for a state.


SHARON
Continued from PageAl

condition as various bodily
organs, including his kid-
neys, failed. On Saturday,
Dr Shlomo Noy of the
Sheba Medical Center
near Tel Aviv said "his
heart weakened and he
peacefully departed" with
relatives by his bedside.
His death was greeted
with the same strong feel-
ings he evoked in life. Is-
raelis called him a war
hero. His enemies called
him a war criminal.
President Barack
Obama remembered Shar-
on as "a leader who dedi-
cated his life to the state of
Israel." Former President
George W Bush, who was
in the White House during
Sharon's tenure, called
him a "warrior for the ages
and a partner in seeking
security for the Holy Land
and a better, peaceful Mid-
dle East."
Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu, a
rival and harsh critic of
Sharon, said: "His mem-
ory will be enshrined for-
ever in the heart of the
nation." President Shimon
Peres, a longtime friend
and rival, said "he was an
outstanding man and an
exceptional commander
who moved his people and
loved them and the people
loved him."
The Palestinians, who
loathed Sharon as their
most bitter enemy, distrib-
uted candy, prayed for di-
vine punishment and said
they regretted he was
never held accountable for
his actions, including a
massacre in the Lebanese
refugee camps of Sabra
and Chatilla by Christian
militiamen allied with Is-
rael during the 1982 inva-
sion that was largely his
brainchild.
"He wanted to erase the
Palestinian people from
the map. ... He wanted to
kill us, but at the end of the
day, Sharon is dead and
the Palestinian people are
alive," said Tawfik
Tirawi, who served as
Palestinian intelligence
chief when Sharon was
prime minister
The man Israel knew
simply by his nickname
"Arik" fought in most of Is-
rael's wars. He detested
Yasser Arafat, his lifelong
adversary, as an "obstacle
to peace" and was in turn
detested in the Arab
world.
Sharon had a life of sur-
prises, none bigger than
his election as prime min-
ister in his twilight years,
when he spent his first
term crushing a Palestin-
ian uprising and his sec-
ond withdrawing from
Gaza. The pullout in 2005
freed 1.3 million Palestini-
ans from Israeli military
rule and left his succes-
sors the vague outline of


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Associated Press
Maj. Gen. Ariel Sharon, right, views a map Oct. 10, 1973, with Maj. Gen. Haim Bar-Lev
in the Sinai desert, during the 1973 Middle East War. Sharon, the hard-charging Israeli
general and prime minister who was admired and hated for his battlefield exploits and
ambitions to reshape the Middle East, died Saturday.


Israeli President Shimon Peres delivers a statement
Saturday at the president's residence in Jerusalem
following the death of late Israeli Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon.


his proposal for a final
peace settlement with Is-
rael's Arab foes.
Sharon opted for sepa-
rating Israel from the
Palestinians, whose
birthrate was outpacing
that of his own country He
gave up Gaza, with its 21
Jewish settlements, and
four West Bank settle-
ments, the first such Is-
raeli pullback since it
captured the territories in
the 1967 Mideast war
He also began building a
snaking barrier of fences,
walls, razor wire and
trenches to separate Israel
from the West Bank. The
withdrawal and the bar-
rier, which left large West
Bank settlement blocs on
Israel's side, led many to
suspect his real intention
was to sidestep negotia-
tions with the Palestinians
and make it easier to hold
onto what really mattered
to him chunks of the
West Bank, with its biblical
Jewish resonance and
value as a buffer against
attack from the east.
Sharon was born to
Russian immigrant par-
ents on Feb. 26, 1928, in the
farming community of
Kfar Malal, 10 miles north
of Tel Aviv He com-
manded an infantry pla-
toon during the 1948
Mideast war over Israel's
creation.
Leading a ragtag band of
soldiers, some Holocaust
survivors, Sharon stormed
the Jordanian Arab Legion
stronghold at Latroun, a
key spot on the road to
Jerusalem, during the 1948
war that followed Israel's
creation. He was badly
wounded in the leg and
belly, and bled for hours
while surrounded by
enemy soldiers.
In 1953, he commanded
Unit 101, a force formed to
carry out reprisals for
Arab attacks. After the
slaying of an Israeli
woman and her two chil-
dren, his troops blew up
more than 40 houses in
Qibya, a West Bank village
then ruled by Jordan,
killing 69 Arabs. Sharon
later said he thought the
houses were empty
After Israel's 1956 inva-
sion of Egypt's Sinai
Peninsula, Sharon was re-


buked for engaging in
what commanders re-
garded as an unnecessary
battle. Some 30 Israeli sol-
diers died.
The accolades mounted
as well. Sharon received
praise for his command of
an armored division dur-
ing the 1967 Mideast War,
in which Israel captured
the West Bank, Gaza Strip
and Sinai Peninsula.
His finest hour in uni-
form, as he described it,
came in the 1973 Mideast
war Yanked out of retire-
ment by an army desper-
ate for leadership, he
commanded 27,000 Is-
raelis in a daring drive
across Egypt's Suez Canal
that helped turn the tide of
the war A picture of a boy-
ish-faced, 45-year-old
Sharon, bloody bandage
wrapped around his head,
remains one of the most
enduring images of the
war
In 1982 he engineered
the invasion of Lebanon. It
was portrayed as a quick,
limited strike to drive
Palestinian fighters from
Israel's northern border
Later it emerged that
Sharon had a larger plan:
to install a pro-Israel
regime in Lebanon a de-
sign that typified boldness
to his friends and danger-
ous megalomania to his
critics. The conflict
quickly escalated, and Is-
rael remained in Lebanon
for the next 18 years.
That September, the Is-
raeli military, controlling
parts of Beirut, allowed
members of the Phalanges,
a Lebanese Christian mili-
tia allied with Israel, to
enter the Palestinian
refugee camps of Sabra
and Chatilla in Beirut to
root out "terrorists." The
militiamen systematically
slaughtered hundreds of
civilians, including women
and children. The mas-
sacres sparked mass
protests in Israel and
abroad. An Israeli com-
mission rejected Sharon's
contention that he didn't
know what was coming,
saying: "It is impossible to
justify the minister of de-
fense's disregard of the
danger of a massacre."
He was fired as defense
minister


In his autobiography,
Sharon said he was out-
raged by the findings. "It
was a stigmatization I re-
jected utterly," he wrote.
Sharon gradually reha-
bilitated himself, serving
in parliament and using
various Cabinet posts to
build dozens of settle-
ments in the West Bank
and Gaza despite interna-
tional protests.
As foreign minister in
1998, Sharon called on
Jewish settlers to grab as
much land as possible.
Sharon's demonstrative
visit to the Temple Mount,
or Haram as-Sharif, soon
followed. Palestinian riots
escalated into a full-
fledged uprising that
would claim more than
3,000 Palestinian and 1,000
Israeli lives.


In February 2001, with
the fighting continuing
and peace talks collapsing,
Israelis grew deeply disil-
lusioned and inclined to
lay all the blame on
Arafat. They elected
Sharon prime minister in
a landslide.
Fighting continued
throughout Sharon's first
term and he was re-
elected in 2003 to a second
term.
In late 2003, he unveiled
his "unilateral disengage-
ment" plan withdrawing
from territory he no longer
deemed essential to Is-
rael's security without
an agreement with the
Palestinians.
He also confined Arafat
to his West Bank head-
quarters in his final years
before allowing the long-


time Palestinian leader to
fly to France in late 2004
shortly before his death.
Speaking Saturday,
Olmert said Sharon's
legacy was far more com-
plicated than critics say
"Arik was not a warmon-
ger When it was necessary
to fight, he stood at the
forefront of the divisions
in the most sensitive and
painful places, but he was
a smart and realistic per-
son and understood well
that there is a limit in our
ability to conduct wars,"
he said.
Sharon was widowed
twice he married the
sister of his first wife after
she died in an auto acci-
dent and had two sons,
Gilad and Omri. A third
son died in 1967 in a
firearms accident.


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A12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


WORLD


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 A13


i







?Page A14-SUNDAY, JANUARY 12,2014



NATION


Cl


&
:TRUS COUNTY


WORLD
CHRONICLE


ion BRIEFS


Nat Economy drying up as chemical
Semicentennial


Associated Press


Associated Press
A monument that marks
the site of a crashed Air
Force B-52 bomber is pic-
tured Jan. 7 in Barton, Md.
On Jan. 13, 1964, a B-52
bomber carrying two
unarmed nuclear bombs
crashed near Barton,
killing three of five crew
members. Fifty years later,
residents of far western
Maryland are recalling the
anniversary of the crash.
Local volunteers helped
government workers re-
cover the bodies and two
unarmed nuclear bombs
from the snow-covered
scene.

Dallas group set
to auction permit
to hunt rhino
DALLAS Hunt the black
rhino to save the black rhino.
That's the Dallas Safari
Club's approach to a fundraiser
for efforts to protect the en-
dangered species. The
group hopes to raise more
than $200,000 Saturday by
auctioning off the right to
shoot and kill a black rhi-
noceros in the African na-
tion of Namibia.
But the auction has drawn
howls from environmental
protection groups and pro-
testers, and the FBI earlier
this week said it was inves-
tigating death threats against
members of the club.
Ben Carter, executive di-
rector of the Safari Club,
defended the auction. He
said all money raised will go
toward rhino conservation
efforts. He also said the
rhino that the winner will
hunt is old, male and non-
breeding and that the
animal was likely to be tar-
geted for removal anyway
because it was becoming
aggressive and threatening
other wildlife.
An estimated 4,000 black
rhinos remain in the wild,
down from 70,000 in the
1960s. Nearly 1,800 are in
Namibia, according to the
safari club.
Neiman Marcus
is latest victim of
security breach
NEW YORK-- Luxury
merchant Neiman Marcus
confirmed Saturday that
thieves stole some of its
customers' payment card
information and made
unauthorized charges over
the holiday season.
Neiman Marcus didn't
say whether the breach
was related to the massive
data theft at Target, but
some security experts be-
lieve they could be part of
the same scam.
Ginger Reeder, spokes-
woman for Dallas-based
Neiman Marcus Group Ltd.,
said in an email Saturday that
the retailer had been notified
in mid-December by its credit
card processor about po-
tentially unauthorized pay-
ment actMty following customer
purchases at stores. On
Jan. 1, a forensics firm con-
firmed evidence that the up-
scale retailer was a victim
of a criminal cyber-security
intrusion and that some
customers' credit and debit
cards were possibly com-
promised as a result.
Reeder wouldn't estimate
how many customers may be
affected, but said the mer-
chant is notifying customers
whose cards it has now de-
termined were used fraudu-
lently. Neiman Marcus, which
operates more than 40 up-
scale stores and clearance
stores, is working with the
Secret Service on the
breach, she said.
-From wire reports


CHARLESTON, WVa. -
On the third day without
clean tap water, business
owners with empty dining
rooms and quiet aisles of
merchandise around West
Virginia's capital were left
to wonder how much of an
economic hit they'll take
from a chemical spill.
Most visitors have cleared
out of Charleston while lo-
cals are either staying
home or driving out of the
area to find somewhere
they can get a hot meal or
take a hot shower Orders
not to use tap water for
much other than flushing
toilets mean that the spill
is an emergency not just
for the environment but
also for local businesses.
A water company execu-
tive said Saturday that it
could be days before un-
contaminated water is flow-
ing again for about 300,000
people in nine West Vir-
ginia counties. The uncer-


tainty means it's impossible
to estimate the economic
impact of the spill yet, said
the leader of the local
chamber of commerce.
Virtually every restaurant
was dark Saturday unable
to use water to prepare
food, wash dishes or clean
employees' hands. Mean-
while, hotels had emptied
and foot traffic was down
at many retail stores.
"I haven't been able to
cook anything at home and
was hoping they were open,"
Bill Rogers, 52, said out-
side a closed Tudor's Biscuit
World in Marmet, just east
of Charleston. "It seems like
every place is closed. It's
frustrating Really frustrating"
In downtown Charleston,
the Capitol Street row of
restaurants and bars were
locked up. Amid them, The
Consignment Shop was
open, but business was
miserable. The second-hand
shop's owner said she re-
lies on customers who come
downtown to eat and drink


Associated Press
Adelphia Sports Bar owner Deno Stanley talks Saturday
about how his restaurant will suffer because businesses
were forced to stop serving food and drink by the Kanawha
County (W.Va.) Health Department following a chemical
spill on Thursday.


"It's like a ghost town,"
Tammy Krepshaw said. "I
feel really bad for all my
neighbors. It's sad."
The person she doesn't
feel bad for is Freedom In-
dustries President Gary
Southern, who told re-
porters the day before that
he was having a long day
and quickly wrapped up a


news conference on the
chemical spill so he could
fly out of the area.
"People want answers.
They deserve answers,"
Krepshaw said.
The emergency began
Thursday when complaints
came in to West Virginia
American Water about a
licorice-type odor in the


Associated Press

BEIJING
fire that raged for nearly
10 hours Saturday razed
an ancient Tibetan town
in southwest China that's popu-
lar with tourists, burning down
hundreds of buildings as fire en-
gines were unable to get onto the
narrow streets, state media and
witnesses said.
There was no immediate re-
port of any casualties, and the cause
of the fire was not known. State
media, citing local authorities,
said the blaze started in a guest-
house and was ruled accidental.
The fire broke out at about
1:30 a.m. in the ancient Tibetan
quarter of Dukezong, which dates
back more than 1,000 years and is
known for its preserved cobbled
streets, ancient structures and
Tibetan culture. Dukezong is part
of scenic Shangri-La county in
Deqen prefecture.




In Calif., call


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES De-
mocrats across the nation
are eager to make increas-
ing the minimum wage a
defining campaign issue in
2014, but in California a
proposal to boost the pay
rate to $12 an hour is com-
ing from a different point
on the political compass.
Ron Unz, a Silicon Valley
multimillionaire and reg-
istered Republican who
once ran for governor and,
briefly, U.S. Senate, wants
state voters to endorse the
wage jump that he pre-
dicts would nourish the


economy;
workers
on food
assistant
taxpayer:
A pus
checks 1
lower r
nomic 1
associate
-Presid
is suppo
gress th
the $7.25
to over $
But e
52, is a fc
The Air
tive mag
tory of


Once called Gyaitang Zong, the
county renamed itself Shangri-
La in 2001, hoping to draw
tourists by the reference to the
mythical Himalayan land de-
scribed in James Hilton's 1933
novel. Like hundreds of Chinese
cities and counties, Shangri-La
renovated its old neighborhood,
Dukezong, turning it into a
tourist attraction filled with
shops and guesthouses.
Photos and video footage
showed Dukezong and its
labyrinth of houses engulfed in
flames that turned the night sky
red.
The fire destroyed about 242
houses and shops in Dukezong,
dislocated more than 2,600 peo-
ple, and torched many historic
artifacts, the official Xinhua
News Agency said.
He Yu, a resident, said she
woke to loud, explosion-like
sounds to find the old town on
fire.


"The fire was huge," she said.
"The wind was blowing hard, and
the air was dry I was scared be-
cause my home is a little distance
away from the ancient town. It
kept burning, and the firefighters
were there, but there was little
they could do because they could
not get the fire engines onto the
old town's narrow streets."
With fire engines kept out,
local residents lined up to pass
buckets of water to combat the
fire, the Deqen prefecture gov-
ernment said.
Most of Dukezong's buildings
are made of wood and the fire
spread easily because of dry
weather, state-run China Central
Television said.
More than 2,000 firefighters,
soldiers, police, local officials
and volunteers responded to the
blaze and brought it under con-
trol at around 11 a.m., the
Shangri-La county government
said.


for $12/hr. minimum wage
y and lift low-paid political activism that in- Unz says taxpayers for
from dependency cludes pushing a 1998 bal- too long have been subsi-
stamps and other lot proposal that dizing low-wage paying
ce bankrolled by dismantled California's businesses, since the gov-
rs. bilingual education sys- ernment pays for food
3h for bigger pay- tern, an idea he later stamps and other pro-
for workers at the championed in Colorado grams those workers often
ungs of the eco- and other states, need to get by
adder is typically To Unz, who's spoken He dismisses the notion
ed with Democrats out over the years on is- that countless jobs would
dentBarackObama sues as varied as campaign evaporate, noting that
)rting a bill in Con- finance to IQ and race, the most of the state's lower-
iat would elevate proposal simply makes wage jobs are in agricul-
Sfederal minimum sense. As drafted, it would ture and the service sector,
;i an hour increase the minimum which can't be easily auto-
ntrepreneur Unz, wage in two steps to $10 mated or transported else-
brmer publisher of an hour in 2015, and $12 where. He believes higher
ierican Conserva- the following year, which wages would make the
gazine with a his- would be the highest among jobs more attractive to U.S.
against-the-grain states at current levels, residents.


.s linger

tap water The source: the
chemical 4-methylcyclo-
hexane methanol that
leaked out of a 40,000 gal-
lon tank at a Freedom In-
dustries facility along the
Elk River State officials
believe about 7,500 gallons
leaked from the tank.
It could take days for
clean tap water to flow
again. First, water sample
test results must consistently
show the chemical's pres-
ence in the public water
system is at or below 1 part
per million, the level rec-
ommended by federal
agencies, West Virginia
American Water President
Jeff Mclntyre said Satur-
day at a news conference.
Federal authorities, in-
cluding the U.S. Chemical
Safety Board, opened an
investigation into Thurs-
day's spill.
By Saturday morning,
FEMA said it had delivered
about 50 truckloads of water,
or a million liters, to West
Virginia for distribution.


World BRIEFS

Pro scarecrow


Associated Press
A female aplomado falcon
named Baraka perches
on the hand of her trainer
Raul Palacios as he gives
an interview and demon-
stration of his training
techniques Saturday
alongside the bay of
Asuncion in Paraguay.
Baraka and other falcons
trained by Palacios, a vet-
erinarian, are being used
to chase migratory birds
away from airplanes that
service the capital's airport,
in an effort to reduce the
risk of birds getting
sucked into plane turbines
and causing aviation
accidents.

Iraq: At least 60
killed in two weeks
BAGHDAD Fighting
between security forces
and al-Qaida-linked mili-
tants in Iraq's Sunni-domi-
nated Anbar province has
killed at least 60 people
over the past two weeks, an
official said Saturday.
The head of Anbar's
Health Directorate, Khudeir
Shalal, said that 43 people
were killed in the city of Ra-
madi and other 17 were
killed in Fallujah since vio-
lence erupted in the western
province after the Dec. 28
arrest of a Sunni lawmaker
sought on terrorism charges
and the dismantling of an
anti-government Sunni
protest camp in Ramadi.
Shalal said a total of 297
people were wounded in both
cities. He said Iraqi military
casualties were not included.
FBI: Kenya mall
attackers believed
to be dead
NAIROBI, Kenya -The
gunmen who attacked an
upscale mall in Kenya's
capital, killing at least 67
people, likely died in the at-
tack, an FBI official has said.
AI-Qaida-linked al-Shabab
militants claimed responsi-
bility for the Sept. 21 attack
on Nairobi's Westgate Mall.
Dennis Brady, the FBI legal
attache in Nairobi, said in an
interview posted Friday on
the bureau's website: "Our
ERT (Evidence Response
Team) made significant finds,
and there is no evidence
that any of the attackers es-
caped from the area where
they made their last stand."
-From wire reports


Associated Press
A firefighter works on a roof of a wooden building Saturday while a fire ravages ancient Dukezong town in
Shangri-la county in southwestern China's Yunnan province. The 10-hour inferno razed the ancient Tibetan town.



Fire razes ancient




Tibetan town





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The goals for the SRCS Athletic
Department are:

* To help student athletes develop athletic skills,
goal-setting abilities, and work ethic.
* To build Christ-like character traits in student
athletes and develop servant leadership skills.
* To instill in student athletes the importance of
self-sacrifice and teamwork.
* To foster school pride via the excitement of
competition.
* To encourage coaches, players, fans, and
parents at athletic events to reflect God's grace
to the watching world.
* To recognize that the athletic program is one of
three integral elements in the SRCS program
and to support and encourage a student athlete's
involvement in the other two academic and art-
related pursuits.
* To preserve the integrity of the covenant
community in each team by respecting and duly
enforcing team rules, policies, and agreements
as specified in the Athletic Handbook.


Seven Rivers
Christian School


Rayburn Greene
head varsity
football coach


Seven Rivers
for 25 years.
teams,


[ATHI OMP


Christian School: Going strong
Seven Rivers Athletics: Many
all Warriors since 1997.


22... Athletic teams
6... Regional champion titles
2... State runner up titles
1... State champion title
32... District champion titles
4... State "sweet 16" games
2... State "elite 8" games
1... State "final 4" games
3.8... Cumulative GPA of 2013-14 Varsity
volleyball team. Winners of class 2A
Academic Team Championship
2... FHSAA Academic Team Championships
90+%... SRCS middle and high school
students who participate in athletics
11... Number of SRCS graduates who went on
to play for collegiate teams
6... Intramural athletics for K-8 elementary
students
2... Number of awarded participation on the
FHSAA Student Athlete Advisory
Committee
1... Student named to the FHSAA Academic
Team
1... FHSAA Rozell Award for Sportsmanship

iL f-4


25 Years Countless Futures
SRCS is a member of the
Florida High School Athletic
Association (FHSAA)


Accepting Applications NOW for
the 2014-15 school year. Stop by
the school for enrollment
application or visit our website.
www.sevenriverscs.org
Come to an Open House and
hear all about our school,
financial assistance
opportunities, curriculum, and
take a tour.


OPEN HOUSES
February 18 at 6:30pm
February 22 at 11am
February 24 at 10Oam
Pre-K only OPEN HOUSE
March 11, 10-12PM
April 1 at 9:00am On-site VPK sign up
(For VPK sign-up Parent must have driver's license or ID. Current
proof of address, birth certificate or shot record for child. If parent is
missing any of these documents, she will not be able to sign them up.


A Provider for
Florida's Voluntary
Pre kindergarten
Program (VPK).


for students


Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12
scholarships and related support, giving economically disadvantaged
families the freedom to choose the best learning options for their
children. Almost 30% of our students receive the Step Up scholarship.


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts E.'!iJ
and minds of children
with a distinctly biblical
program of academic rigor,
artistic beauty, and athletic
competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 A15


I;







HAWKEWOOD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


FARM


Rider Ann Fisher works with this 3-year-old horse in the Hawkewood corral.


Photos by Matthew


.' V, ..,
& d


Linda Richmond cruises through an open field on Spider during a recent workout. The
walls of farm owner Linda Weber's office are covered with photos of champion horses
and riders with a Hawkewood connection, including her and trainer Abbott Wilson.


Beck/Chronicle


Hawkewood offers a serene setting for the animals living there, as well as the riders
who work out their horses.


Ann Fisher walks a horse from one side of the barn to the other as the workout for the horse comes to an end.


Hawkewood trains elite horses for competition.










E Travel & Leisure

XCURSIONS


ur


an


mor


Whether it's lunch bunch, kayaking or an afternoon of mah jongg,

Citrus Four and More ladies know how to have a good time.


And that's their goal.


Eryn Worthington
Staff writer
"It's a fun and intimate time,"
said co-president Ellen Saun-
ders. "I love Four and More be-
cause we are a smaller group
and, we can remember each oth-
ers names. It's a fun group -
why keep it to ourselves?"
Citrus Four and More is a nonprofit
social organization that strives to en-
hance friendships through luncheons
and activities in a group environment.
"The group wants it to be simply a so-
cial club with no agenda or speakers,"
Saunders said. "It's an opportunity for
women to get together and develop new
friendship while being active."


In 2005, Citrus Four and More spun off
from another nonprofit social organiza-
tion Citrus Newcomers Club. Saunders
said the group became so large and popu-
lar that membership had to be limited to
people with four years residency to en-
sure newcomers were truly members.
Because of this, members who en-
joyed the activities and social time so
much of Citrus Newcomers Club de-
cided to make a sister organization
for Citrus residents with more than four
years of residency
"It's a matter of the continuity of the
people," said Citrus Four and More par-
liamentarian Shirley Johnson. "Most of
the people that I know I met in Citrus
County It's a longevity sort of friend-
ship. It's very easy to drop that if you
don't have that continuation of atten-
dance."
The ladies-only group meets a mini-


mum of six times a month through vari-
ous activities monthly luncheons,
bunco, mah jongg, kayaking, lunch
bunches, movies, discussion groups and
more. However, men are not forgotten
as they are often welcomed to join so-
cial activities with their spouse or sig-
nificant other
Qualifications of membership require
that a woman has had to live in Citrus
County for four or more years and pays
a yearly membership due of $15.
"We would love to have new people
and make new friends," Saunders said.
"Some of the activities are to other
towns like a trip to St. Augustine or
somewhere else."
Corresponding secretary Sunny
Wiard said she not only takes a smile
home after the luncheons, but new
friendships.
For more information, visit www.


citrusfourandmore.homestead.com or
email Ellen Saunders at esaunders
@tampabayrr.com or Marilyn Campbell
at mrcdjo@tampabayrr.com.


Photos by MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Clockwise from top: Citrus Four and
More members Cathy Knight, Bill
VanVliet, Barbara Karow, Judie Small and
Jarme Wenner are lead by Aardvark's
Florida Kayak Company owner Matt
Clemons along the Chassahowitzka River
For many kayakers, quietly paddling a
kayak gives ample opportunity to view
wildlife like this great white egret.
on one of the club's many social outings.
Kayaks await paddlers from the Citrus
Four and More group on the banks of the
Chassahowitzka River.


DREAM
VCATIONS
r oto Con(^e^

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Ill ~
1's~
J


Cozumel
For the Chronicle
During a family vacation to Mexico, Gene Fox took a daylong tour of Cozumel,
which included a visit to the Discover Mexico Museum and Archaeological theme
park. The family watched a performance of Los Voladores, or the "flying Indians."
Five men dressed in native costumes performed at the top of a 40-foot pole, doing
a variety of tricks and stunts.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cheating husband


puts wife at risk


SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 12, 2014 C: .Cocast, Citrus B: Bright House DII:Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis FP Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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SP 3 1 NewsHour WEDU Masterpiece Classic Mary and Isobel fall into Masterpiece Classic Unlocking Sherlock (N) As Time Keeping
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S2 2 News World America's Funniest The Bachelor (N) (In Revenge "Endurance" Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) News Spo Night
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S M N Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee Carl and Emma Glee "A Very Glee The Office The Office We There We There
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ED UWT MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *2 "Lucky Numbers" (2000) 'R' BmSeinfeld Seinfeld Republic of Doyle Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
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Dear Annie: I have
been married for
three years. Two
months after the wed-
ding, I discovered that
my husband was cheat-
ing with several women.
Worse, he confessed that
he wasn't using con-
doms, and by that time, I
was four months preg-
nant. I was crushed to
learn that he was putting
our unborn baby's life at
risk.
After that
horrible or-
deal, we tried
to work on
our marriage,
but I never
regained
trust in him,
and the love I
had felt dissi-
pated. Now
I've discov-
ered that he A NM
is cheating AN
again. I can't MAIL
even stand to
be intimate with him. To
kiss him is torture.
I no longer love him
and am contemplating
leaving. Can you give me
some guidance? -My
Trust Went Out the Win-
dow
Dear Trust Speak to a
lawyer You need to pro-
tect yourself financially
You also need to work
out custody, support and
visitation arrangements
that are in your child's
best interests. Then we
hope you will seek coun-
seling to help you under-


stand that your hus-
band's serial cheating
and risky sexual behav-
ior are not your fault and
that you deserve better
A good counselor will
guide you to move for-
ward with your life.
DearAnnie: This is a
response to "BH," who
was irked that her
boyfriend's unpleasant
ex-wife invites herself to
family events. Many
years ago, a
dear friend
taught me that
we can achieve
peace by
changing our
own attitude
when we find
ourselves deal-
ing with an un-
pleasant
person.
I was be-
E moaning the
nE'S latest outra-
3OX geous behavior
by an uncle I
couldn't avoid when
"Lenora" interjected,
"How sad you must be
for him! He must be a
deeply unhappy person
and have many struggles
in life." Rather than be
annoyed, I should feel
sorry for him. It com-
pletely reoriented my
outlook. This mindset
does not require that we
like the person, but it
does enable us to main-
tain our own calm polite-
ness and avoid the
pitfalls of trying to force
others to make changes.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"American Hustle" (R)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:45 p.m. No passes.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13)
8p.m.
"Her" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
7:25 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D,
high frame rate. 4 p.m.
No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity: The
Marked Ones" (R) 1:05 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Secret Life of Walter
Mitty" (PG) 1:50p.m., 5p.m.


No passes.
"The Wolf of Wall Street" (R)
1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7p.m.
No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"American Hustle" (R) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D.
3:45 p.m. No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity: The
Marked Ones" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Explosion
6 Oak-to-be
11 Passion
16 Of hearing
21 Half diameters
22 Dugout
23 Della or Pee Wee
24 "- and Prejudice"
25 Battery terminal
26 Commerce
27 Sober and serious
28 Place in
southern Asia
29 Grab
30 Foray
32 Brink
34 Tall grasses
36 Pol. acronym
37 Follow a food
regimen
39 Army group
41 Yin and-
43 Cereal plant
44 Quiz
45 Place visited often
48 Effrontery
50 Punta del -
52 Oppose
55 Troublesome
insect
57 Neeson or
Hemsworth
59 The Parthenon, e.g.
63 Oh, woe!
64 Icy
66 Writer of a kind
68 Lecture
69 Bric-a- -
70 Hope or Marley
72 Hue
73 Ab (from the begin-
ning)
74 WWII abbr.
75 Abound
76 Greek letters
78 Sunbeam
79 Dollar bills
80 ADA member
82 Drunkard
83 Bare
85 Fashion
86 Tiny farm denizen
87 Dove's soft cry
88 Disobedient
89 Sold-out show
90 Bonds or Manilow
93 Stir to action
95 Delight


96 Eau de -
100 Touch on
101 Low
102 Special pleasure
104 Footballer's kick
105 Attila the -
106 Rocky hill
107 Onetime Alaskan capi-
tal
109 Butt
110 Pure
111 Rope
112 Fading away quickly
115 TV accessory
117 Old-fashioned
118 Flood
119 -avis
121 Indian garment
122 Liquefied
123 Nobleman
125 Croon
127 Breakfast fare
129 Wickedness
132 Ship's record
134 Debatable
136 Tells a tale
137 Raced
141 Actor-Chaney
142 Go by bike
144 Additional
146 General Bradley
148 Roman
household god
149 Clergyman
151 City in Florida
153 Town in Maine
155 Saying
157 Get away from
158 Bay window
159 Beneath
160 Large and
extra-large
161 Goat antelope
162 Attempt anew
163 Kind of bear
164 Perceives


DOWN
1 Trade name
2 Hawaiian porch
3 Sun-dried brick
4 Caesar of early TV
5 Row
6 Thespian's specialty
7 Diagnostic aid
8 Puppet--- string
9 Went on
10 Poor


Weapons cache
On a pension (Abbr.)
Cherished
Willow rod
Overnight flight (hyph.)
Bee genus
Samovar
Blue Mountains
So long, amigo!
Jumped
A relative
Joke
Ruin
Dense
Old garment
Smooth-tongued
Office worker,
for short
Invite
Kind of sale
Secular
Salty drop
Appraised
Fill with happiness
Elegant room
Neighbor of
28-Across
Anchored
Impostor
Raze
Notched, as
leaf edges
Worry
Speck
A flower, for short
Finest
Prohibition
Wee
Raise
Wooden shoe
Sgt. Snorkel's dog
Sour
Old French coin
A letter
Sediment
Stove, British style
Sharpen
With breath
Higher up
Countrified
Campus military grp.
Goof
Brown or Bond
Remedy
Disembodied spirit
Care for, medically
Concluded
Cheap
Cup handle


Made a formal request
- lily
Genus of ducks
Ethical
Phones
- and void
Decorate
Late Chinese chairman
Legume
Something
unusual


Tableland
Sawbones
Sticky material
Part of RAM or ROM
Sprites
Sheer fabric
Bring on oneself
Angry look
Food fish
Public square
Avid


Gown
Ship's company
Exude
River in Ireland
Too hasty
Fuss
- contra
Unmatched
Expire


Puzzle answer is on Page A21.


2014 UFS, Dist. bv Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.1


AlS SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
The Great Falls in Paterson, N.J., a waterfall and national park, is one of a number of attractions in Northern New Jersey that may be of interest to Super Bowl visitors looking
for things to see and do in the days before the big game.



NJ offers Super Bowl visitors a diverse palette


Generations of punch lines notwithstanding, northern New Jersey is more than just shopping malls, refineries and turnpike traffic -
though you can certainly find those without looking too hard.


DAVID PORTER
Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. The truth
is that the counties that lie
within 15 miles of downtown
Manhattan are home to a richly
diverse population and contain
something for everyone, from
high art to ignominious history
and everything in between. Of
particular interest to visitors
for next month's Super Bowl,
many attractions are within
walking distance of public
transportation and are, thank-
fully, indoors.

LIBERTY SCIENCE
CENTER/ELLIS
ISLAND/SEPT 11 MEMORIAL

The Liberty Science Center's
(http://lsc.org) 88-foot IMAX
movie screen, considered the
largest in the country will
dwarf any puny 50-inch flat
screen your buddies will be
watching at home in their man
caves. You won't be able to
watch the game on it, but who
needs football when you can
watch penguins, dinosaurs and
great white sharks in such de-
tail that you can critique their
dental work? The science cen-
ter, along the Hudson River in
Jersey City, also features loads
of exhibits on inventions,
health and the environment,
with many interactive compo-
nents. There's also a pristine
view of the Statue of Liberty
For the Super Bowl, Liberty
Science Center is presenting
"Gridiron Glory," an exhibit
featuring memorabilia such as
the Vince Lombardi trophy and


a 1917 game ball used by Jim
Thorpe, as well as interactive
displays and appearances by
former New York Giants and
New York Jets players.
Nearby in Liberty State Park
are ferries to Ellis Island
(http://wwwnps.gov/elis/index.
htm), the gateway to America
for millions of immigrants in
the 19th and 20th centuries.
Some areas of the complex are
closed or restricted due to con-
tinuing rehabilitation from Su-
perstorm Sandy, but main areas
such as the baggage room and
Great Hall are open. Liberty
State Park also features "Empty
Sky," a striking memorial to vic-
tims of the Sept. 11 terror at-
tacks composed of 30-foot-high
towers stretching 208 feet, 10
inches long, the width of the
original Trade Center towers.

HOBOKEN

Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zim-
mer takes it in stride when peo-
ple joke that she is the
second-most important person
in the city of 50,000 across the
Hudson River from Manhattan.
After all, who could compete
with the addictive confections
of "Cake Boss" Buddy Valastro?
His bakery Carlo's, sits across
the street from city hall at 95
Washington St (hint: it's the
one with the line stretching
around the block).
Another favorite son grew up
a half-mile away and went on to
become a pretty fair singer The
house at 415 Monroe St. where
Frank Sinatra was born is gone,
but the spot is marked by a
bronze plaque on the sidewalk


and a brick arch. (Try humming
"Summer Wind" to take your
mind off the biting cold.)
01' Blue Eyes probably never
performed at Maxwell's (llth
and Washington streets) but
many other big names did, in-
cluding REM, Sonic Youth, Nir-
vana, Blue Oyster Cult and Red
Hot Chili Peppers, and part of
Bruce Springsteen's "Glory
Days" video was shot there.
Maxwell's closed as a music
venue earlier this year but re-
mains open as a restaurant
Blink and you'll miss the
plaque standing in a traffic is-
land catty-corner from
Maxwell's. It marks the spot
where, according to some, the
first baseball game was played
in the 1840s at Hoboken's
Elysian Fields.

GREAT FALLS

Yes, natural beauty exists
even amid the rust and grime of
northern New Jersey's once-
thriving industrial areas. In the
case of Paterson's Great Falls, it
is beauty with a purpose: the
majestic, 77-foot waterfall in
the heart of the working-class
city generated power to a net-
work of mills and factories that
fueled the Industrial Revolu-
tion, from textiles to the Rogers
Locomotive Works and the loca-
tion where the first Colt .45 re-
volvers were manufactured.
The Great Falls (http://www
nps.gov/grfa/index.htm), which
are second in water volume
only to Niagara Falls east of the
Mississippi, were designated a
national park in 2011. Nearby is
Hinchliffe Stadium, a national


landmark and once-grand Art
Deco stadium that in its heyday
was filled to capacity for Negro
League baseball games featur-
ing future Hall of Famers Larry
Doby and Monte Irvin and
teams like the New York Black
Yankees, the New York Cubans
and Newark Eagles.

MAYHEM, REAL AND
IMAGINARY

"The Sopranos" ended its six-
season run in 2007, but the lo-
cations that gave the HBO
series its gritty backdrop still
fascinate, judging by the two
dozen people taking a tour re-
cently past the former site of
Satriale's Pork Store in Kearny,
the fictional clubhouse of Tony
and the gang.
Satriale's is now a parking
lot, but you can stand on the
sidewalk at Kearny Avenue and
Dukes Street where Paulie, Sil-
vio and the rest sipped
espresso and pondered life's
riddles. Other popular loca-
tions include Satin Dolls (230
Route 17, Lodi), the real-life
Bada Bing strip joint; the So-
prano house (14 Aspen Drive,
North Caldwell) and Holsten's
(1063 Broad St, Bloomfield),
the diner where the last scene
of the final episode was shot.
If actual bloodshed is your
thing, there's the monument
that commemorates the famous
1804 duel between Vice Presi-
dent Aaron Burr and former
Treasury Secretary Alexander
Hamilton. Along the Palisades
in Weehawken (Hamilton Av-
enue and Boulevard East), a
bust of Hamilton stands next to


a boulder where he allegedly
rested his head as he lay mor-
tally wounded. The site offers a
spectacular, unimpeded view of
the Manhattan skyline.
Three blocks from Newark's
Prudential Center, site of Super
Bowl Media day, a sidewalk
plaque in front of 12 East Park
St. marks the spot where Arthur
Flegenheimer, better known as
the Prohibition-era gangster
Dutch Schultz, was gunned
down in 1935 by rival mobsters.

MUSEUMS
The 104-year-old Newark Mu-
seum (49 Washington St,
Newark) is home to 80 galleries
of world-class art and artifacts
with a particular emphasis on
Asian and African art. During
Super Bowl week it will have
on display the original Lom-
bardi Trophy that was hand-
crafted in Tiffany's Newark in
1967. It's part of an exhibition
celebrating Newark's place as
the former hub of the country's
precious metals industry
The Montclair Art Museum (3
South Mountain Ave., Montclair),
celebrating its centennial this
year, specializes in American and
Native American artworks from
the 18th century to the present
For a change of pace, the
Yogi Berra Museum (http://www
.yogiberramuseum.org), on the
campus of Montclair State Uni-
versity, offers a collection of
mementos from the Hall of
Fame catcher's career during
the New York Yankees' heyday
in the 1940s and '50s, and also
provides sports-based educa-
tional programs for kids.


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 A19











ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post to serve fried fish
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 will
have a fried fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 17. The public is invited.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.
The post is at 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs.

Everyone welcome at jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Legion to serve ham dinner
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a ham and scalloped potatoes din-
ner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, at
the post home, 6585 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Everyone is welcome. Donation is $7.
Profits support the many programs of
the American Legion Auxiliary For more
information, call unit President Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.

Join post for cheesy ziti
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for three-cheese baked
ziti with meat sauce at 5 p.m. Saturday
Jan. 18, at the post home; 906 State Road
44 East, Inverness.
Dinner is $7 and includes salad, bread
and dessert Music will be by Karen and
Danny, from 6 to 9 p.m.
Call 352-344-3495, or visit
wwwvfw4337.org, for information about
all post activities.

Post to do market, breakfast
Wall-Rives Post 58 of the American
Legion, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will
have an outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 18.
Pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs,
sausage, orange juice and coffee are on
the menu for $5.
The public is welcome.

Purple Heart group to meet
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 21, at the Cit-
rus County Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto, about a half mile south of State
Road 44 on the west side of C.R. 491.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member
To learn more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit www. citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.

Post to host poker run
American Legion Post 237,4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 25, with proceeds
supporting Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian
Cancer Research and patients and fami-
lies served by Hospice of Citrus County.
A $15 entry fee per rider will include a
poker hand, a raffle prize ticket and a
meal at the end of the run. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Kick stands are
up at 10 a.m. and the last bike in will be at
4:30 p.m. when food will be served.
The fourth annual American Legion
Post 237 Poker Run will encompass six
stops to include: Inglis Amvets, IRRU So-
cial Club, Giovanni's, Crystal River Ea-
gles, Mickey's Billiards and Scoreboards.
The best hand will win the poker run
and all vehicles are welcome to partici-
pate. Music will be provided by The Joes.
There will be a silent auction, door prize
raffles and a 50/50 drawing.
For more information, call 352-746-5018
or John Roby at 352-341-5856.

Cooties to serve roast beef
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
roast beef dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Fri-
day, Jan. 31, at Leroy Rooks Jr VFW Post
4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, where the heli-
copter is). The public is invited.
Advance tickets are $7 and $7.50 at the
door. Tickets can be purchased at Post
4252.
Call the post at 352-726-3339 or Seam
Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.


'I did what I was told'


France honors

American

World War II

veteran

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

On the Saturday just prior to
Thanksgiving, Robert "Bob"
Kline, a longtime Floral City
resident, and Eugene Wright
made the trip to the Safety Harbor Re-
sort and Spa in Safety Harbor to re-
ceive the Legion of Honor, the highest
distinction awarded by France.


Finally.

Kline, 88, was honored for some-
thing he did 69 years earlier, when he
was 18.
"I was drafted on May 11, 1944, and I
went to France in December," he re-
called. "I was with Gen. (Alexander)
Patch's Seventh Army, the 100th In-
fantry Division, the 397th Infantry
Regiment.
"I did what I was told to do. Back in
those days, you didn't question
anybody"
Kline still feels humbled to receive
the award.
"I'm glad to get it," he said. "But I
don't know why I did; there's so many
of them that deserve it. I didn't do any-
thing in particular I was shocked."
The reason, according to the expla-
nation the French provided, was to
honor "all the U.S. veterans who
fought on French soil, many of (whom)
gave their lives in the name of free-
dom and were therefore unable to re-
ceive this award."
In 1944, on the 60th anniversary of
the Normandy Invasion, the French
decided to present the Legion of
Honor to all surviving U.S. veterans
who fought in France.
The only requirements were that
they served in France during World
War II and that they were still alive.
Kline said he had just filled out a form
that had been sent to him and re-
turned it, not realizing what he would
be receiving in return.
Kline served in the U.S. Army until
1971, minus a couple of tries at making
it in the world outside the service. And
he served with distinction, earning
battle stars for taking part in military
action in the Ardennes-Alsace, in the
Rhineland and in Central Europe. It
was his fighting in the Ardennes and
the Rhineland that got him the Legion
of Honor
The award was presented by
Philippe Letrilliart, the consul
general of France, and Jean-Charles
Faust, the honorary consul of France,
both from the consulate general of
France in Miami.
Kline still insisted he did nothing
noteworthy, just did the job he was
told to do. And during that period he
was afraid asked what worried him
most when he was in action in World
War II, he answered, "I guess, death."
Kline, who had wanted to enlist in
the U.S. Marines after graduating from
high school in 1943 (his parents would-
n't allow it), was contemplating being.
discharged after the end of the war,
but instead he re-enlisted in Novem -
ber 1945, in part to get the 60-day lex\ ee
which would get him back home for
Christmas.
He was dis-
charged in March, g
1947 -he got mar- ne
ried three months eRa g
later and he went 13atte". ,
back to work in the 1*ea9s
pressroom of the Wa- Starion '
tertown Daily Times. oivisioI'
But, as Kline described QU3^er
it, "Times were rough," GeIa11
so he decided to re-enlist oteat Va
again in September 1948. odrig'e
He would leave again case
in June 1952, and would \etI1n
re-enlist in July 1954, Gerl';a
spending the next three ar'6 F1
years in Germany and an- Fo't C
other in Italy It was during lobS:
this time Kline found what oper
he liked doing the most in the -ite
service: intelligence. i;
"I enjoyed working in intel- Ie|
ligence," he said. "That was my ps
primary love."
Kline was in the service dur-
ing two other conflicts, the Ko-
rean War and Vietnam War, but


Special 10 t e Cnronicle
Maj. Gen. Michael Garrett, right, stands with Robert Kline following the
presentation of France's Legion of Honor to Kline.


One of the places Robert Kline, right, served was in Stuttgart, Germany, where he
is pictured here with a fellow soldier.


he did not see combat action in either
In the early years of the Vietnam War
he was stationed at recruiting offices
in Great Falls, Mont, and Provo, Utah,
and by regulation since his brother
was in action in Vietnam, he couldn't
go. So he served for 13 months in an
intelligence bunker 10 miles south of
the 38th parallel at Camp Casey in
South Korea.
After leaving in 1968, Kline was
called back into service at the age of
44 in 1970, and by April of that year he
was in Vietnam (the sibling regulation
had been rescinded) working in intel-
ligence just outside of Saigon.
"I enjoyed it," he said of his respon-
sibilities he was a sergeant first
Li. 1 I. then -whi hli:l% ilIitided
coIe tllrctnL lll01iijtl011 jlld pIlttlll
t tether Illip) folr
o"liiierI


that included enemy dispositions and
supply depots.
"If you've got the experience, it
comes naturally"
He finally left the service for good in
1971, moving to Floral City and buying
the house he and his wife, Marian, still
live in. In his 24 years in the service he
had a multitude of experiences, and
Marian was there for most of them.
"You can't say we led a dull life," she
said. "I was with him the whole time
except when he was in Korea and Viet-
nam."
She would have gone there, too, if
she could have, "just to experience it."


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


American soldiers: Superheroes in our hearts


I read a story in the newslet-
ter of a group of American
veterans called the VA-
106/VF-62 Gladiators. The arti-
cle was so moving that,
withstanding some editing for
space and privacy purposes, I'll
share it with you. The original
version named a specific man,
but it's a beautiful tribute to
our fallen military members;
past, present and future.
"Superman ... Some say he
was courageous and fearless.
Some say he was generous and
kind-hearted. In the field, many
of our soldiers are superheroes.
They cannot bend steel with
their bare hands, nor can they
change the course of mighty
rivers, but they're still our
America soldiers.
"As we look upon the lives of
these brave men and women,
we sometimes feel as if we're
looking through a window in
time. The stories are familiar
Boys and girls growing up,
doing what children do, like
fishing and swimming and play-


Barbara
4V Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


ing ball and dancing. They
learned the lessons that made
them young adults who stepped
up to the plate when duty and
honor called their names while
more volunteered to serve their
country in the bravest way they
knew how
"In the Gettysburg Address,
Abraham Lincoln said, 'It is
rather for us to be here dedi-
cated to the great task remain-
ing before us. That from these
honored dead we take in-
creased devotion to that cause
for which they gave the last full
measure of devotion. That we
here highly resolve that
these dead shall not have died


in vain.'
"The value of devotion, brav-
ery, courage and honor cannot
be given a dollar amount.
"The measure of an Ameri-
can soldier is in the swell of
pride in a parent's chest, and in
the sorrow of saying good-bye.
"It's been said that the meas-
ure of freedom is in the blood
and sacrifice, tears and
heartache. Yet, amidst the grief,
there is hope. The liberation of
humanity, mankind and thought
is the American Dream that we
fight for so diligently
"The parent of a fallen sol-
dier once said, 'Our soldiers
are a special breed. Being a sol-
dier is about duty, honor, self-
lessness, bravery, heart,
compassion. (It is) about want-
ing to be part of something
greater than yourself. Soldiers
face the bullets other men are
afraid to face for freedom.'
"This soldier gave his all, the
man spoke on, 'Even in the face
of adversity. Even in his final
moments, he did his duty and


he did it well. He made the ulti-
mate sacrifice. He gave all that
he had to give.'
"From the moment our young
men and women swear their
oaths and don their uniforms,
they become heroes, larger
than life, with powers seem-
ingly far beyond those of mortal
men. They are our sons and
daughters, fathers, mothers, sis-
ters and brothers, husbands
and wives. They leap over those
tall buildings and are stronger
than a locomotive.
"Folks, these are our Ameri-
can soldiers. They are our su-
perheroes, and they fight the
never-ending battle for truth,
justice and the American way"
I know a lot of you will also
be moved by this piece as I was.
I know you are out there thank-
ing our active-duty and veteran
servicemembers when you see
them in the store, on the side-
walk and in the parking lot. I
know because I see and hear
you. I want to thank you for
your show of support, and let


you know how proud I am of
you all. Thank you on behalf of
myself, my veteran family and
all the other American warriors
out there.
Show your support for the
Citrus County Veterans Coali-
tion by visiting our yard sale
held in Inverness on the second
Saturday of each month.
Whether you're shopping or
selling, call Dan at 352-400-
8952. The next one is Saturday,
Feb. 8.
For inquiries concerning our
website (wwwccvcfl.org), this
column or my monthly televi-
sion appearances as Anne
Black's guest on HPH Hospice's
"Every Day is a Gift" show,
aired on WYKE47, use the con-
tact information below

Barbara L Corcoran is the
public information officer of
the Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Inc. She maybe
contacted via Barbiel@
ccvcfl.org. Visit the website at
ww.ccvcfl.org.


VETERANS GROUPS


This listing contains
basic information for each
group. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meetings, meals and more for
a specific post or group, call
or email the contact listed.
Email changes or corrections
to community@chronicle
online.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
com, or visit www.fl Post
155.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155. Call Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Norm Brumett
at 352-476-2134 or Alice
Brummett at 352-476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive,


Homosassa. Call Robert
Scott at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

Veterans of Foreign Wars
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call
352-447-3495.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


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THE
MAST BROTHERS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 2014
3:00 PM
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I^A


VETERANS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 A21





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


40&8 to have
breakfast Feb. 2
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 welcomes the public
to breakfast from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. today, Feb. 2, at
American Legion Post 155
on State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for
adults; special on kids' (8
and younger) meals. Spe-
cialty drinks available for
$1. The hall is smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit pro-
grams of the 40&8.

Spaces available
for craft fair
The American Legion
Allen Rawls Auxiliary
Unit 77 will sponsor a
craft fair on Feb. 8.
Outdoor spaces and in-
door spaces are available.
To rent a space to sell
handmade crafts, call
Alice at 352-476-7001 or
Charlotte at 352-341-1803
or Linda at 352-201-0015
for more information.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6 p.m. Dinner is available
for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), offers
several events that are
open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sun-
days in the smoke-free
hall. Card bingo and grill
night is at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Canteen.
Darts are at 7 p.m. Mon-
days and Fridays in the
Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Reserve now for
trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, will lead the 2014
trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and
friends from March 11 to
March 28. Signups are
being taken for the an-
nual trek, which includes
visits to several islands,
some golfing and a spe-
cial visit to the USS Ari-
zona Memorial and The
National Cemetery of the
Pacific.
For more information,
call McLean at 352-637-
5131 or email dmclean8@
tampabayrr.com.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The Vil-
lages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

DAV transport
needs new van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation


Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has


more than 270,000 miles
on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Florida
Chapter 70,1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL
34450.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss


compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get assistance
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be


placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat. For more informa-
tion about the Citrus
County Veterans Office,
log onto wwwbocc. citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Memorial honors
Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard
with non-military and
non-law enforcement
programs such as public
education, vessel safety
checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, mar-
itime security and envi-


ronmental protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons.
Criminal background
check and membership
are required.
Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.

Free yoga classes
offered to vets
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated
with the national service
organization, Yoga for
Vets.
Sandstrom teaches
free classes to combat
veterans at several loca-
tions and times.
For more information
about the Yoga for Vets
program, call her at 352-
382-7397.

Air Force wants
prior entlisted
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-
ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or
retraining into select ca-
reer fields.
Some of the careers
include aircraft electron-


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Hospice offers
services to vets
HPH Hospice, as a
partnering agency with
the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs (VA), provides
tailored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war
It also provides care-
giver education and a
recognition program to
honor veterans' services
and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
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A22 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


VETERANS


7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


50th ANNIVERSARY


CLAIRE PHILLIPS LAXTON/Chronicle
Bill and Mary Lyons celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on Dec. 28, 2013
with 100 friends and family at Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club in Crystal River.
Mary retired twice from Crystal River High School- first as curriculum specialist and
later as certification trainer. Front, from left, are: Bill Lyons, Mary Lyons, daughter
Laura Lyons and grandson William Carolan. Back row are: nephew Paul Lyons, niece
Teresa Lyons and grandson Michael Carolan.


FOR THE RECORD


Dec. 23-29, 2013
Divorces
John W. McKeown, Lecanto vs. Carinne
Ann McKeown, Bethpage, N.Y.
Deana Marie Miley, Dunnellon vs.
John Patrick Miley, Dunnellon
Marriages
Lester Darrell Andrews, Crystal River/
Patricia Brown, Crystal River
Mark Allen Ash, Inverness/Dorothy Eleanor
Shands, St. Cloud
Peter Eric Atkinson, Alexandria, Va./
Anna Malgorzata Cygan, Alexandria, Va.
Robert Eugene Bergeron Jr.,
Inverness/Stephanie Lynn Erhardt, Inverness
Peter Stanley Bevington, Citrus
Springs/Teresa Lynn Geer, Citrus Springs
Alfredo Cerda II, Killeen, Texas/
Kristina Marie Perez, Inverness
Nathan Troy Chesmore,
Hernando/Christina Marie Adams,
Homosassa
James Lloyd Creel, Crystal River/
Amy Lynn Stonestreet, Dunnellon


William North Easterly, Hernando/
ShelbyYandle Bray, Hernando
Brian Michael Herrin, Homosassa/
Leslie Ann Fowler, Homosassa
Christopher Clayton Humphries,
Port Orange/Amy Joy Green, Inverness
Christopher Bryan Larkins, Citrus
Springs/Leandra Lei Victoria Lapps,
Citrus Springs
Joseph Peter Palagonia, Citrus Springs/
Andrea Elizabeth Galindo Guevara, Citrus
Springs
Nathan Anthony Parent, Homosassa/
Kristie Marie Mendes, Old Lyme, Conn.
Viraj Dilip Patel, Washington, D.C./
Ami Ashwinkumar Shah, Clearwater
Antonius Maria Pauelsen, Inverness/
Carolyn Jacqueline Keizer, Inverness
Richard Nathan Robbin, APO
09128/Amanda Leigh Volk, APO 09128,
John Wayne Roxey, Dunnellon/Amanda
Nicole Doherty, Beverly Hills
Michael Angelo Sanchez, Citrus
Springs/Kristin Nichole Kessell, Citrus Springs


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record,
available from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County, call
the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


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TOGETHER


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 A23




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A24 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


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SPORTS


Penn State
introduces James
Franklin as its new
head football coach
Saturday./B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


" NBA, NHL, golf/B2
" Scoreboard/B3
" Sports briefs/B3
" TV, lottery/B3
" College basketball/B4
" MLB, recreational sports/B5
" College football/B5
0 NFL/B6


No. 10 UF needs OT to best Arkansas


Associated Press
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Do-
rian Finney-Smith and Scottie
Wilbekin weren't about to let a
little thing like injuries get in
the way for Florida.
The banged-up Gators, play-
ing without leading scorer
Casey Prather, overcame a host
of ailments and earned an 84-82
overtime win at Arkansas on
Saturday
They did so behind a career-
high 22 points from Finney-
Smith, starting in the place of
Prather, as well as a timely
jumper near the end of regula-
tion from Wilbekin who
scored nine points in overtime
as Florida (13-2, 2-0 Southeast-
ern Conference) completed its
comeback.


Prather, averaging 17 points,
missed the game because of a
bone bruise in his right knee,
but he was hardly the only
Gator affected by injuries.
Wilbekin missed two days of
practice this week with a
sprained ankle, and center
Patric Young also missed time
with a sore knee.
Wilbekin finished with 18
points for Florida, and Michael
Frazier had 15 and Young 10.
Finney-Smith, starting for
just the second time this sea-
son, added 15 rebounds in-
cluding nine offensive while
also connecting on three
3-pointers.
"You're going into this game
not really knowing what you're
going to get," Florida coach
Billy Donovan said. "... I think
the one guy we, at least I tried


to instill just a belief and confi-
dence was in (Finney-Smith).
Just to go, be aggressive, play
through mistakes."
The Razorbacks (11-4, 0-2)
had a chance to all but seal the
win with 17.1 seconds remain-
ing in regulation, but Alandise
Harris missed the front end of a
1-and-1 to give Florida the ball
back down 66-64.
Wilbekin answered with the
game-tying bank shot with 2 sec-
onds left for the Gators, who
then took control quickly in
overtime while snapping
Arkansas' 23-game home win-
ning streak.
"It means a lot to us," Finney-
Smith said. "It tells you about
our team. We play for each
other Any given night, it can be
someone's night and tonight it
was just me."


Associated Press
Florida guard DeVon Walker drives to the basket while being guarded
by Arkansas forward Jacorey Williams and forward Coty Clarke, right,
Saturday in Fayetteville, Ark. Florida won 84-82 in overtime.


Hard'nosed triumph


Associated Press
Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin catches a pass against New Orleans Saints cornerback Corey White during the fourth
quarter of an NFC divisional playoff game Saturday in Seattle. The Seahawks won 23-15.

Seahawks dominateproceedings in 23-15 homeplayoff win over Saints


Associated Press
SEATTLE Marshawn Lynch over-
powered the New Orleans Saints in the
postseason again.
Lynch ran for 140 yards and two touch-
downs, Steven Hauschka kicked three
field goals in blustery conditions and Seat-
tle's defense flustered Drew Brees and
New Orleans in a 23-15 victory Saturday in
the NFC divisional playoff game.
The top-seeded Seahawks advanced to
the NFC championship game for the sec-
ond time in franchise history and will host
San Francisco or Carolina next Sunday
Seattle last reached the conference title
game in the 2005 playoffs.
Seattle shut out the Saints in the first


half, got Lynch's first 100-yard game since
Week 10 of the regular season and re-
ceived a spark from the brief return of
Percy Harvin before he left with a concus-
sion. Lynch scored on a 15-yard run in the
first half and capped the victory with a 31-
yard scoring run with 2:40 left that coach
Pete Carroll celebrated by jumping into of-
fensive line coach Tom Cable's arms.
Lynch stiff-armed Keenan Lewis on his
way to the end zone for the clinching score
that left CenturyLink Field swaying.
While the clinching score lacked the
stunning explosiveness of Lynch's "Beast
Quake" touchdown run against the Saints
in the 2010 playoffs, this one was more im-
portant. It ensured Seattle would not be
the latest No. 1 seed to get upset by a No. 6


seed in the divisional round.
Lynch finished with 28 carries and made
up for another shaky day passing by Rus-
sell Wilson. Seattle's offense was a concern
heading into the postseason and, outside of
Lynch, did little to quell those worries.
Wilson missed on five of his first six pass
attempts to start the second half but came
through with a vital 31-yard completion to
Doug Baldwin with 2:57 remaining. On the
next play, Lynch got a key seal block on the
edge from Jermaine Kearse and raced
down the sideline for his second TD.
Wilson finished 9 of 18 for a career-low
103 yards. His leading receiver was
Harvin, making his second appearance of
See Page B3


A-Rod's


ban


reduced

Arbitrator still

rules Yankee out

for all of2014

Associated Press
NEW YORK Alex Ro-
driguez was dealt the most se-
vere punishment in the history
of baseball's drug agreement
when an arbitrator ruled the
New York Yankees third base-
man is suspended for the entire
2014 season as a result of a drug
investigation by Major League
Baseball.
The decision by arbitrator
F r e d r i c
Horowitz, an-
nounced Satur-
day, cut the
suspension is-
sued Aug. 5 by
baseball Com-
missioner Bud
Selig from 211
games to this Alex
year's entire Rodriguez
1 62-gam e banned for all of
regular-season 2014 season.
schedule plus
any postseason games. The
three-time American League
Most Valuable Player will lose
just over $22 million of his $25
million salary
Rodriguez vowed to continue
his fight in federal court to re-
verse the decision.
"It's virtually impossible. The
arbitration will stand. I think it's
almost inconceivable that a fed-
eral court would overturn it,"
said former baseball Commis-
sioner Fay Vincent, a graduate
of Yale Law School. "The arbi-
tration is itself an appeal from
the commissioner's judgment.
How many appeals do you go?"
Rodriguez is the most high-
profile player ensnared by
baseball's drug rules, which
were first agreed to in 2002 as
management and union at-
tempted to combat the use of
steroids and other perform-
ance-enhancing drugs. In sus-
taining more than
three-quarters of Selig's initial
See Page B4


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Kirk moves atop Sony Open leaderboard


Associated Press

HONOLULU Will Wilcox fi-
nally got around to making his
debut as a PGA Tour rookie and
was surprised as anyone to be in
the final group at the Sony Open.
As for Chris Kirk and Harris
English, it's no surprise at all.
Kirk got up-and-down from a
bunker on the par-5 18th by mak-
ing a 10-foot birdie putt for a
5-under 65, giving him a one-shot
lead going into the final round of
a Sony Open that remains up for
grabs among at least a dozen
players.
Cloudy conditions and only a
gentle, Pacific breeze kept
everyone in the mix Saturday at
Waialae, even John Daly
And even Wilcox.
The 27-year-old from Ala-
bama made birdie on his last
two holes for a 64 and was one
shot behind. Wilcox once quali-
fied for the Canadian Open in
2010, and for the U.S. Open in
2011 at Congressional. He fi-
nally made it to the big leagues
by finishing 10th on the
Web.com Tour money list, al-
though he didn't play in the
Web.com Tour Finals or in the
fall for what he only said were
"unfortunate, personal things."


And here he is.
"I didn't know what was going
to happen this week," Wilcox
said. "Making the cut was a
dream come true. Playing good
on Saturday was a dream come
true. Getting to have a decent shot
tomorrow is ridiculous. We'll
see."
Kirk, who was at 12-under 198,
won the McGladrey Classic in
November, his final tournament
of 2013 before taking time off for
the birth of his second child. He
returned at Kapalua and shook
off some rust. And while he
closed with a 73 at Kapalua, it
was a good day of scrambling
and gave him a small measure of
momentum on Oahu.
English, who had a 67, won the
final event of 2013 in the OHL
Classic at Mayakoba. He goes for
his third win in his last 16 starts
on the PGA Tour
"It was just kind of'Grind it til
you find it.' This course is
tough," English said. "It's hard to
hit the fairways, and you've just
got to be a wizard around the
greens, and that's kind of how I
approached today I didn't have
my best golf, but I scraped it
around at 3-under par and I'm
still in this golf tournament."
So is everyone else it would


Associated Press
Chris Kirk watches his drive off the 12th tee during the third round
of the Sony Open golf tournament Saturday at Waialae Country Club
in Honolulu. Kirk shot 5-under on the day to move into first place.


seem.
At one point there was a six-
way tie for the lead. An hour
later, 14 players were separated
by a single shot.
Daly matched the low score of
the third round with a 64 and was
five shots behind. Masters cham-
pion Adam Scott wasn't making
up any ground, dropped two
shots late in his round and fin-


ished with a two-putt birdie for a
71 and was two shots behind.
A dozen players were sepa-
rated by three shots going into
Sunday, a group that includes
Kapalua winner Zach Johnson
as he tries to become the first
player since Ernie Els in 2003 to
sweep the Hawaii swing.
The plan for all the contenders
is to not worry about anyone else


because there would be too
many players to worry about.
"When it's so close like that,
everybody is going to be making
some birdies here and there,"
Kirk said. "So I probably won't
look at leaderboards as much as
I normally would. A lot of
courses I think lend themselves
to you need to know what your
position is going into any given
hole, but out here, I don't think
that's really the case. They're
just so volatile with guys making
birdies and bogeys.
"I'll just probably try to keep
my head down and make as
many birdies as I can."
Former Sony Open champion
Jerry Kelly (66) and Jimmy
Walker (67) were at 10-under 200,
while the group at 201 included
Robert Allenby (65), Pat Perez
(66), Retief Goosen (66) and
Johnson, who had a 66. Brian
Stuard, who had a one-shot lead
going into the third round, had a
71 and also was still only three
shots behind.
Perez was among those tied for
the lead until he four-putted the
14th, the final three putts from 3
feet. PGA champion Jason
Dufner three-putted from 3 feet
on the 18th hole for a bogey and
was four shots behind.


Scorin outburst


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Lightning's Nate Thompson carries the puck against the Philadelphia Flyers' Andrej Meszaros
during the first period Saturday in Philadelphia. The Lightning win 6-3.

Lightning net six goals in doubling up East foe Flyers in Philly


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA- Valtteri Filp-
pula scored the go-ahead goal dur-
ing a wild second period and the
Tampa Bay Lightning beat the Fly-
ers 6-3 Saturday to snap Philadel-
phia's 10-game home winning
streak.
Ryan Malone had two goals, Alex
Killorn, Teddy Purcell, and Martin
St. Louis also scored goals for the
Lightning, who moved into a tie
with Boston for first place in the At-
lantic Division.
Jakub Voracek had two goals and
Wayne Simmonds also scored for
the Flyers, who were 7-1 in their
previous eight games. The Flyers
hadn't lost at home since Nov. 5
against Carolina.
Goaltender Steve Mason had his
worst game for Philadelphia, allow-
ing five goals for the first time in 41
games with the team since being ac-
quired last April. He was pulled for
Ray Emery after the second period.
Devils 2, Panthers 1, OT
NEWARK, N.J. Marek Zidlicky
scored with 2.1 seconds showing on the
overtime clock to lift the New Jersey
Devils to a stirring 2-1 win over the
Florida Panthers 2-1 on Saturday night.
With just over 3 seconds to go, the
Devils called a timeout before the final
faceoff. Travis Zajac beat Marcel Goc
on the draw, and Jaromir Jagr nudged
the puck back to the top of the right cir-
cle to Zidlicky, who ripped a shot that
beat screened goalie Tim Thomas.
Michael Ryder extended his goal
streak to four games, and Cory Schnei-
der made 29 saves in giving New Jer-
sey its second straight win.
Nick Bjugstad had the lone goal for
the Panthers. The frustrated Thomas
stormed off the ice at the end of his
34-save performance.
Senators 2,
Predators 1, SO
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Mika Zibane-
jad and Jason Spezza scored in the
shootout to lead the Ottawa Senators
to a 2-1 victory over the Nashville


Predators.
Kyle Turris scored in regulation for
Ottawa, which has won five of its last
six. Craig Anderson had 31 saves
through overtime, and then stopped
Craig Smith and David Legwand in the
shootout.
Mike Fisher had the lone goal for
Nashville, which has lost three of four.
Marek Mazanec finished with 20 saves.
Turris scored the game's first goal at
6:23 of the second period. It was Turris'
12th goal of the season and gave him a
point in four of his last five games.
Fisher tied it with 3:01 left in the sec-
ond period.
Anderson stopped Viktor Stalberg on
a penalty shot with 8:17 left in the first
period.
Blue Jackets 6, Jets 3
WINNIPEG, Manitoba Boone Jen-
ner and Mark Letestu each scored twice
to lift the Columbus Blue Jackets to a 6-
3 victory and extended the Winnipeg
Jets' losing streak to a season-high five
games.
The Blue Jackets scored four straight
goals in the second period and Curtis
McElhinney made 28 saves and Colum-
bus won its third straight game.
Ondrej Pavelec made 20 saves for
Winnipeg, which was booed at the end
of the game.
James Wisniewski and Derek
MacKenzie each had a pair of assists
for Columbus.
The Blue Jackets' second-period run
included four goals in the first 9:07,
starting with Letestu's short-handed
goal 36 seconds into the period.
Canadiens 2,
Blackhawks 1, OT
MONTREAL-Andrei Markov
scored two goals, including at 1:28 of
overtime, to lead the Montreal Canadi-
ens to a 2-1 victory over the Chicago
Blackhawks.
Markov took a deflected pass from
Max Pacioretty and found the roof of
the net.
Carey Price finished with 19 saves for
Montreal.
Marian Hossa scored for the Black-


hawks. Corey Crawford made 36 saves
for Chicago.
Chicago has lost three games in a
row, including two in overtime, for only
the second time this season.
The Canadiens couldn't capitalize on
back-to-back tripping penalties by the
Blackhawks midway through the first
period as Crawford made two quality
saves to preserve the scoreless draw.
Avalanche 4, Wild 2
ST. PAUL, Minn. Ryan O'Reilly
scored twice, including the game-winner
with 7:16 to play, and the Colorado Ava-
lanche beat the Minnesota Wild 4-2.
Gabriel Landeskog and Maxime Tal-
bot also scored for the Avalanche, win-
ners in five of seven. O'Reilly had his
first two-goal game of the season
Charlie Coyle had his first career two-
goal game for Minnesota, which lost for
the first time in five games.
Tied 2-2, and after Ryan Suter's
turnover in the Wild end, O'Reilly sent a
pass to Matt Duchene in the right cor-
ner. Duchene sent the puck back to
O'Reilly who lifted a backhand over the
left shoulder of Niklas Backstrom from
below the right circle. O'Reilly was back
in the lineup after missing two games
with a bruised shoulder.
Talbot added an empty-netter with
1:10 to play.
Ducks 5, Coyotes 3
GLENDALE, Ariz. Hampus Lind-
holm scored two goals, and the steam-
rolling Anaheim Ducks won for the 16th
time in 17 games with a 5-3 victory over
the Phoenix Coyotes.
Ryan Getzlaf scored his 23rd goal of
the season in the Ducks' sixth straight
win. Sami Vatanen and Dustin Penner
also scored as the Ducks swept the
season series with the Coyotes 5-0.
Jonas Hiller made 28 saves in his
13th straight win for Anaheim, the
longest streak since Detroit's Chris Os-
good did it in 1996.
Thomas Greiss started in goal for
Phoenix but was lifted for Mike Smith
after the Ducks scored three times in a
span of 5:11 in the second period.
Lauri Korpikoski, Martin Hanzal and
Mike Ribeiro scored for the Coyotes.


Knicks claim


fourth straight

Associated Press ing up and hitting 63 after the
break.


PHILADELPHIA -
Amare Stoudemire scored
21 points and Carmelo An-
thony added 18 to lead the
New York Knicks to a 102-
92 victory over the
Philadelphia 76ers on Sat-
urday night.
J.R. Smith returned
from a one-game benching
for unsportsmanlike con-
duct and contributed 11
points for the Knicks
(14-22), who have won four
straight. Anthony added
nine rebounds and seven
assists. Stoudemire went 8
for 10 from the field.
Spencer Hawes and
James Anderson each had
17 points to lead the Sixers
(12-25).
Rockets 114,
Wizards 107
WASHINGTON There
was a pair of rain delays at an
NBA game, a curious happen-
ing followed by another
strange turn of events: The
Houston Rockets built a
25-point lead, lost all of it and
then some, then rallied from
five down late in the fourth
quarter for a 114-107 win over
the Washington Wizards.
Long after the stoppages of
35 and 22 minutes because of
a leak in the roof, James
Hardin tied the game with a
driving layup with 2:33 to play,
then gave the Rockets the
lead again this time for
good with a three-point play
with 1:54 remaining. He fin-
ished with 25 points to lead the
Rockets, who made only four
field goals in the final period
yet closed with a 17-5 run.
John Wall led Washington's
comeback and finished with
23 points and 10 assists.
Thunder 101,
Bucks 85
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Kevin
Durant scored 33 points and
Serge Ibaka had 17 points
and 17 rebounds, and the
Oklahoma City Thunder
snapped a two-game skid by
defeating the Milwaukee
Bucks 101-85.
Durant missed his first eight
shots but made 8 of 10 the
rest of the way. Jeremy Lamb
added 17 points for the Thun-
der, who had lost four of six.
Oklahoma City scored just 14
points in the first quarter and
38 in the first half before heat-


O.J. Mayo and Luke Rid-
nour scored 16 points apiece
and GiannisAntetokounmpo
had 13 points and 11 re-
bounds for the Bucks (7-29).
Raptors 96,
Nets 80
TORONTO DeMar
DeRozan scored 26 points,
Patrick Patterson had 14
points and 12 rebounds and
the Toronto Raptors beat
Brooklyn 96-80, snapping the
Nets' five-game winning streak.
Terrence Ross scored 14
points, John Salmons had 13
and Kyle Lowry finished with
12 as Toronto won for the
seventh time in nine games.
Paul Pierce scored 15
points and Alan Anderson had
13 for the Nets.
Joe Johnson scored 11 for
the Nets, who fell to 1-6 this
season in the second game of
a back-to-back.
Pistons 110,
Suns 108
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Josh Smith's driving, left-
handed bank shot with 1.2
seconds left gave the Detroit
Pistons a 110-108 win over
the Phoenix Suns.
Smith finished with 25
points, and Brandon Jennings
had eight points, 18 assists
and eight rebounds for De-
troit. Greg Monroe added
20 points and 12 rebounds.
Frye led Phoenix with 21
points.
Bulls 103,
Bobcats 97
CHICAGO D.J. Augustin
had 20 points and 12 assists
and Joakim Noah added 19
points and 14 rebounds, help-
ing the streaking Chicago
Bulls beat the Charlotte Bob-
cats 103-97.
Chicago had seven players
score in double figures in its
fifth consecutive victory. The
Bulls (17-18) also improved to
3-0 since they traded All-Star
Luol Deng to Cleveland late
Monday night.
Mike Dunleavy had 17
points for Chicago, which re-
covered after blowing a 15-
point lead in the second half.
The Bobcats (15-23) have
dropped three straight. Gerald
Henderson had 30 points, and
Kemba Walker scored 29.


Associated Press
New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony signals to his
teammates as he controls the ball while being defended
by the Philadelphia 76ers' Hollis Thompson during the sec-
ond half Saturday in Philadelphia. The Knicks win 102-92.


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




PGA

Sony Open
Saturday
AtWaialae Country Club, Honolulu
Purse: $5.6 million
Yardage: 7,044, Par: 70
Third Round
Chris Kirk 64-69-65 -198 -12
WillWilcox 69-66-64 -199 -11
Harris English 66-66-67 -199 -11
Jerry Kelly 67-67-66- 200 -10
Jimmy Walker 66-67-67 -200 -10
JeffOverton 68-68-65-201 -9
Robert Allenby 68-68-65-201 -9
RetiefGoosen 66-69-66-201 -9
Pat Perez 68-67-66-201 -9
Zach Johnson 68-67-66-201 -9
Brian Stuard 65-65-71 -201 -9
HidetoTanihara 66-65-70-201 -9
John Peterson 68-69-65-202 -8
BrendonTodd 70-66-66-202 -8
Jason Dufner 67-68-67-202 -8
Ryan Palmer 65-70-67-202 -8
Marc Leishman 67-64-71 -202 -8
Heath Slocum 69-69-65 203 -7
Justin Leonard 68-66-69-203 -7
Hudson Swafford 70-64-69-203 -7
Greg Chalmers 68-66-69-203 -7
Matt Every 69-65-69-203 -7
Chris Stroud 68-65-70-203 -7
Sang-Moon Bae 63-70-70-203 -7
John Daly 66-73-64-203 -7
Jason Kokrak 66-67-70-203 -7
Kevin Na 70-67-67-204 -6
Spencer Levin 69-69-66 204 -6
StewartCink 69-69-66-204 -6
TyroneVan Aswegen 69-69-66-204 -6
Matt Kuchar 68-68-68-204 -6
Hyung-Sung Kim 70-68-66-204 -6
Ben Martin 67-69-68-204 -6
Ryujil Imada 67-69-68-204 -6
Tim Herron 68-70-66-204 -6
Charles Howell III 71-67-66-204 -6
Brian Harman 69-66-69-204 -6
BooWeekley 67-67-70-204 -6
Adam Scott 67-66-71 -204 -6
David Hearn 68-70-67-205 -5
Ricky Barnes 68-69-68-205 -5
Billy Hurley III 67-69-69-205 -5
Seung-Yul Noh 70-66-69-205 -5
Brice Garnett 67-71-67-205 -5
TimWilkinson 71-67-67-205 -5
K.J. Choi 67-69-69-205 -5
YE.Yang 73-66-66-205 -5
Michael Putnam 70-68-68-206 -4
DerekTolan 70-66-70-206 -4
James Hahn 67-68-71 -206 -4
Chad Collins 71-67-68-206 -4
Brian Gay 71-68-67-206 -4
Robert Streb 70-69-67 206 -4
D.A. Points 70-69-67-206 -4
John Rollins 69-68-70-207 -3
Russell Henley 73-65-69-207 -3
Daniel Summerhays 66-71-70-207 -3
Steven Bowditch 72-66-69 207 -3
MarkWilson 68-68-71 -207 -3
Charlie Beljan 68-70-69-207 -3
John Senden 72-67-68-207 -3
William McGirt 67-72-68-207 -3
Charlie Wi 69-70-68-207 -3
Morgan Hoffmann 68-69-71 -208 -2
Peter Malnati 69-69-70-208 -2
Paul Goydos 74-64-70-208 -2
Justin Hicks 69-69-70-208 -2
Scott Brown 71-67-70-208 -2
Brendon de Jonge 68-71-69-208 -2
StuartAppleby 70-68-71 -209 -1
Tommy Gainey 72-67-70-209 -1
Missed Final Cut
Scott Verplank 71-67-72-210 E
John Huh 71-67-72 -210 E
Miguel Angel Carballo 68-70-72-210 E
Toshinori Muto 70-69-71 -210 E
Ken Duke 68-71-71 -210 E
Kevin Foley 67-72-71 -210 E
EricDugas 70-68-73-211 +1
Joe Durant 68-71-73-212 +2

Volvo Champions
Saturday
At Durban Country Club, Durban, South
Africa
Purse: $4 million
Yardage: 6,686, Par: 72
Third Round
Tommy Fleetwood, England 70-67-69 206
Victor Dubuisson, France 69-69-69 207
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-67-70 207
Louis Oosthuizen, S. Africa 68-69-71 208
Branden Grace, South Africa 74-67-68 209
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 71-71-68 210
Raphael Jacquelin, France 67-73-70 210
Brett Rumford, Australia 73-70-68 211
Charl Schwartzel, S. Africa 74-69-68 211
Paul Casey, England 72-75-65 212
Padraig Harrington, Ireland 71-71-70 212
Chris Wood, England 70-71-71 -212
Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 69-71-72 212
Matteo Manassero, Italy 72-67-73 213
Julien Quesne, France 74-73-66 213
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 76-70-67 213
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 70-74-69- 213
Marcel Siem, Germany 70-71-72 -213
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 79-68-67 214
M. Orum Madsen, Denmark 71-74-69 214
Thomas Aitken, South Africa 72-72-70 214
Also
Peter Uihlein, United States 70-78-70 218
G. Fernandez-Castano, Spain 74-73-71 -218
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 73-77-77-- 227



BASEBALL
MLB ARBITRATION PANEL Reduced the sus-
pension of N.YYankees 3B Alex Rodriguez from 211
games to 162.
National League
WASHINGTON NATIONALS -Agreed to terms
with RHP Stephen Strasburg on a one-year contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTA HAWKS Signed F James Nunnally
to a 10-day contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ATLANTA FALCONS Named Bryan Cox de-
fensive line coach.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed RB Joe McK-
night, LB Jordan Campbell, CB DeMarcus Van Dyke,
DT Dominique Hamilton, OT R.J. Dill, DB Jerron
McMillian and DE Brandon Moore.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES --Activated F Cody Hodg-
son from injured reserve. Recalled D Brayden McN-
abb from Rochester (AHL). Sent D Rasmus
Ristolainen and LW Johan Larsson to Rochester.
Loaned C Mikhail Grigorenko to Quebec (QMJHL).
NEWYORK RANGERS -Assigned F J.T. Miller
to Hartford (AHL). Reassigned G Scott Stajcer from


Greenville (ECHL) to Hartford.
ST. LOUIS BLUES-Signed F Ryan Reaves to a
four-year contract.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS Reassigned C
Michael Latta to Hershey (AHL).
American Hockey League
HARTFORDWOLF PACK-Claimed FT.J. Hen-
sick off waivers from Abbotsford.
ECHL
ECHL -Suspended Idaho F Brett Robinson one
game and fined him an undisclosed amount.
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Loaned D
Ryan Grimshawto Rochester (AHL).
COLLEGE
PENN STATE Named James Franklin football
coach.



NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44
New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24


SCOREBOARD


For Lthe record



Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


TM


CASH 3 (early)
1-6-8
CASH 3 (late)
6-2-8

PLAY 4 (early)
7-4-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)
2-0-7-5


Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:
Mega Money: 2 6 14 -22 Fantasy 5:6 12 18 19 33
Mega Ball: 17 5-of-5 1 winner $238,631.18
4-of-4 MB No winner 4-of-5 338 $113.50
4-of-4 5 winners 1,457.50 3-of-5 10,759 $10.00
3-of-4 MB 75 $212.50
3-of-4 1,360 $35.00
2-of-4 MB 1,578 $21.00 Players should verify
1-of-4 MB 11,949 $2.50 winning numbers by
2-of-4 33,112 $2.00 calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 a.m. (ESPNU) Kansas State at Kansas (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (FS1) Southern Mississippi at Tulsa
1:30 p.m. (CBS) Iowa at Ohio State
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) La Salle at Duquesne
3 p.m. (FS1) Colorado at Washington
5 p.m. (FS1) Stanford at Oregon
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Maryland at Florida State
10 p.m. (ESPNU) Arizona State at UCLA
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida at LSU
1 p.m. (FSNFL) North Carolina at Florida State
2:30 p.m. (SUN) South Carolina at Auburn
3 p.m. (ESPN) Purdue at Penn State
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Louisville at South Florida
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Duke
5 p.m. (ESPN) Tennessee at Vanderbilt
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Missouri at Kentucky
9:30 p.m. (SUN) Texas at West Virginia (Same-day Tape)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Round 1 Japan Cup (Taped)
FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (FOX) NFC Divisional Playoff- San Francisco 49ers at
Carolina Panthers
4:30 p.m. (CBS) AFC Divisional Playoff San Diego Chargers at
Denver Broncos
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Volvo Golf Champions, Final
Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Sony Open in Hawaii, Final Round
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL) 2014 Winter Classic: Detroit Red Wings vs. Toronto
Maple Leafs (Taped)
3 p.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at Montreal Canadiens (Taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Philadelphia Flyers at New York Rangers
SKATING
3 p.m. (NBC) Figure Skating U.S. Championships
SOCCER
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Newcastle United vs.
Manchester City
11:15 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Stoke City vs.
Liverpool
TENNIS
7 p.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open First Round
3 a.m. (ESPN2) 2014 Australian Open First Round
WINTER SPORTS
1 p.m. (NBC) Snowboarding U.S. Grand Prix (Taped)
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing Visa Freestyle International: Freestyle &
Aerials (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10
San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 11
Seattle 23, New Orleans 15
Indianpolis at New England, late
Today, Jan. 12
San Francisco at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
San Diego at Denver, 4:40 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS)
San Francisco-Carolina winner at Seattle, 6:30
p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)
Seahawks 23,
Saints 15
NewOrleans 0 0 0 15- 15
Seattle 6 10 0 7- 23
First Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 38, 10:19.
Sea-FG Hauschka 49, :37.
Second Quarter
Sea-Lynch 15 run (Hauschka kick), 14:17.
Sea-FG Hauschka 26, 1:18.
Fourth Quarter
NO-K.Robinson 1 run (Ingram run), 13:11.
Sea-Lynch 31 run (Hauschka kick), 2:40.
NO-Colston 9 pass from Brees (S.Graham kick),
:26.
A-68,388.
NO Sea
First downs 25 13
Total NetYards 409 277
Rushes-yards 26-108 35-174
Passing 301 103
Punt Returns 0-0 1-5
Kickoff Returns 2-43 1-21
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 24-43-0 9-18-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 3-0
Punts 4-38.8 6-36.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-74 6-52


Time of Possession 30:30 29:30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-New Orleans, K.Robinson 13-57, In-
gram 10-49, Sproles 3-2. Seattle, Lynch 28-140, Wil-
son 3-16, Turbin 3-9, Harvin 1-9.
PASSING-New Orleans, Brees 24-43-0-309. Seat-
tle, Wilson 9-18-0-103.
RECEIVING-New Orleans, Colston 11-144, Spro-
les 5-32, Meachem 2-69, Moore 2-20, Hill 1-23,
K.Robinson 1-13, J.Graham 1-8, Watson 1-0. Seat-
tle, Harvin 3-21, Baldwin 2-30, Kearse 1-25, Tate 1-
13, Miller 1-11, Lynch 1-3.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-New Orleans, S.Graham
45 (WL), 48 (WL).

NFL Injury Report
NEW YORK- The updated National Football
League injury report, as provided by the league:
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at DENVER BRON-
COS CHARGERS: QUESTIONABLE: G Jeromey
Clary (shoulder), T D.J. Fluker (ankle), C Nick Hard-
wick (neck, concussion), DE Sean Lissemore (shoul-
der), RB Ryan Mathews (ankle), WR Eddie Royal
(toe). PROBABLE: T King Dunlap (ankle), DE
Kendall Reyes (ankle), S Eric Weddle (hamstring).
BRONCOS: OUT: DE Derek Wolfe (illness). PROB-
ABLE: CB Champ Bailey (shoulder), TE Joel
Dreessen (knee), S Duke Ihenacho (concussion), T
Winston Justice (finger), G Chris Kuper (ankle), QB
Peyton Manning (ankle), C Steve Vallos (concus-
sion), CB Kayvon Webster (thumb), WR Wes Welker
(concussion).
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at CAROLINA PAN-
THERS 49ERS: QUESTIONABLE: CB Carlos
Rogers (hamstring), LB Dan Skuta (foot). PROBA-
BLE: LB NaVorro Bowman (wrist), WR Michael
Crabtree (wrist), DT Demarcus Dobbs (knee, shoul-
der), C Jonathan Goodwin (not injury related), RB
Frank Gore (knee), DT Justin Smith (shoulder). PAN-
THERS: QUESTIONABLE: DT Colin Cole (calf), WR
Steve Smith (knee), RB Jonathan Stewart (knee).
PROBABLE: TE Ben Hartsock (knee), S Quintin
Mikell (thumb).



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 18 17 .514 -
Brooklyn 15 22 .405 4
NewYork 14 22 .389 4%


Boston 13 24 .351 6
Philadelphia 12 25 .324 7
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 10 .730 -
Atlanta 20 17 .541 7
Washington 16 19 .457 10
Charlotte 15 23 .395 12/2
Orlando 10 26 .278 16/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 29 7 .806 -
Chicago 17 18 .486 11/2
Detroit 16 22 .421 14
Cleveland 13 23 .361 16
Milwaukee 7 29 .194 22
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 28 8 .778 -
Houston 24 14 .632 5
Dallas 21 16 .568 7/2
Memphis 16 19 .457 11/2
New Orleans 15 20 .429 12/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 28 9 .757 -
Portland 27 9 .750 1
Denver 18 17 .514 9
Minnesota 18 18 .500 9/2
Utah 12 26 .316 16/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 -
Golden State 25 14 .641 1
Phoenix 21 15 .583 3/2
L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 11
Sacramento 12 22 .353 11/2
Friday's Games
Indiana 93, Washington 66
Detroit 114, Philadelphia 104
Atlanta 83, Houston 80
Minnesota 119, Charlotte 92
Memphis 104, Phoenix 99
Dallas 107, New Orleans 90
Brooklyn 104, Miami 95,20T
Chicago 81, Milwaukee 72
Cleveland 113, Utah 102
Sacramento 103, Orlando 83
Golden State 99, Boston 97
L.A. Clippers 123, L.A. Lakers 87
Saturday's Games
Houston 114, Washington 107
Toronto 96, Brooklyn 80
NewYork 102, Philadelphia 92
Detroit 110, Phoenix 108
Chicago 103, Charlotte 97
Oklahoma City 101, Milwaukee 85
New Orleans at Dallas, late
Orlando at Denver, late
Boston at Portland, late
Today's Games
Cleveland at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 9 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 44 2814 2 58128 98
Tampa Bay 45 2714 4 58132 109
Montreal 46 2615 5 57117 107
Detroit 44 1915 10 48115 125
Ottawa 46 2018 8 48131 146
Toronto 46 2120 5 47125 141
Florida 45 1721 7 41105 139
Buffalo 43 1226 5 29 75 120
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 46 3212 2 66150 111
Washington 44 2216 6 50135 133
Philadelphia 45 2318 4 50120 125
N.Y Rangers 46 2320 3 49114 123
Carolina 45 1917 9 47111 128
New Jersey 46 1918 9 47106 114
Columbus 45 2120 4 46126 129
N.Y Islanders 46 1722 7 41126 150
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 47 29 8 10 68170 129
St. Louis 44 31 8 5 67161 99
Colorado 45 2812 5 61132 115
Minnesota 47 2418 5 53114 119
Dallas 44 2017 7 47125 135
Nashville 46 1920 7 45109 137
Winnipeg 47 1923 5 43128 145
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 46 33 8 5 71155 116
San Jose 45 2811 6 62148 115
LosAngeles 45 2713 5 59118 93
Vancouver 46 2413 9 57123 114
Phoenix 43 21 13 9 51130 131
Calgary 44 1523 6 36100 142
Edmonton 47 1527 5 35123 164
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Rangers 3, Dallas 2
Washington 3, Toronto 2
Columbus 3, Carolina 0
N.Y Islanders 2, Colorado 1, OT
Edmonton 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT
Vancouver 2, St. Louis 1
Saturday's Games
Ottawa 2, Nashville 1, SO
Tampa Bay 6, Philadelphia 3
Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT
New Jersey 2, Florida 1, OT
Columbus 6, Winnipeg 3
Colorado 4, Minnesota 2
Anaheim at Phoenix, late
Pittsburgh at Calgary, late
Detroit at Los Angeles, late
Boston at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Dallas, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Calgary at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.



Baseball Calendar
Jan. 14 Salary arbitration filing.
Jan. 15-16-Owners' meetings, Paradise Valley,
Ariz.
Jan. 17 Salary arbitration figures exchanged.
Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings, St. Pe-


tersburg, Fla.
Feb. 6 -Voluntary reporting date for Arizona and
Los Angeles Dodgers pitchers, catchers and injured
players.
Feb. 11 -Voluntary reporting date for Arizona
and Los Angeles Dodgers other players.
Feb. 13 Voluntary reporting date for other
team's pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 18 Voluntary reporting date for other
team's other players.
Feb. 25 Mandatory reporting date.
March 12 -Last day to place a player on uncon-
ditional release waivers and pay 30 days termina-
tion pay instead of 45 days.
March 22-23 Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona,
Sydney.
March 26 -Last day to request unconditional re-
lease waivers on a player without having to pay his
full 2014 salary.
March 30 Opening day in North America, Los
Angeles Dodgers at San Diego. Active rosters re-
duced to 25 players.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 B3


BRIF



Pirates wrestlers
finish 2nd at NCT
dual-meet event
The Crystal River
wrestling team went 9-1 at
the Nature Coast Technical
Duals over the two-day
event on Friday and Satur-
day.
Nick Hooper was the only
Pirate wrestler to finish 9-1
individually. Michael Allen,
Michael Ciccone and
Eddie Bennis each went 8-2.
For Crystal River, Carlos
Sanabria and Joel Felton
sported 7-3 marks.
The Pirates, now 29-4 in
dual meets, host Lecanto on
Wednesday.

Blount has four
TD runs, Patriots
lead Colts 43-22
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -
LeGarrette Blount had three
2-yard touchdown runs in
the first half (four total), and
Stevan Ridley rushed for a
TD and a 2-point conversion
to help the New England Pa-
triots take a 43-22 lead over
the Indianapolis Colts late in
the fourth quarter in a rainy
AFC divisional round playoff
game Saturday night.
For the final score, go to
www.chronicleonline.com.
Adam Vinatieri kicked a
21-yard field goal on Indi-
anapolis' first possession of
the second half to make it
21-15, but the Colts could
have had more.
Andrew Luck completed
consecutive passes of 40
yards to T.Y. Hilton and 16 to
Coby Fleener to get the ball
to the 4, but New England
(12-4) made a nice defen-
sive stand to keep Indi-
anapolis out of the end zone.
From staff, wire reports





TRIUMPH
Continued from Page BI


the season after nearly getting
put on injured reserve less
than two weeks ago. Harvin
had three receptions for 21
yards in the first half and one
rush for 9 yards, but left the
game late in the first half with
a concussion.
Hauschka hit field goals of
38 and 49 yards with the windy,
rainy conditions at his back
and hit a 26-yarder into the
wind late in the third quarter.
Brees finished 24 of 43 for
309 yards and put a scare into
Seattle in the closing seconds.
After Lynch's touchdown,
Brees took the Saints 80 yards
in nine plays, capped with a 9-
yard TD pass to Marques Col-
ston with 26 seconds left that
made it 23-15.
Colston then recovered the
onside kick when it caromed
off the chest of Golden Tate and
directly to the Saints' receiver
Brees took over at his 41
with 24 seconds left and
Jimmy Graham caught his first
pass of the game on an 8-yard
completion. Brees spiked the
ball to stop the clock, then
found Colston near the side-
line. Instead of stepping out of
bounds to have one more play,
Colston tried to throw across
the field to Darren Sproles.
The pass was forward and the
penalty for an illegal forward
pass ran off the final 10 sec-
onds of the clock giving Seat-
tle the victory
Khiry Robinson rushed for
a career-high 57 yards and had
a 1-yard touchdown run early
in the fourth quarter as the
Saints continued to stress the
running game. New Orleans
finished with 108 yards rush-
ing on 26 attempts. The 2-point
conversion by Mark Ingram
pulled the Saints to 16-8.
But New Orleans could
never overcome Ingram's fum-
ble in the first half that led to
Lynch's first touchdown run
and a 13-0 lead, and a pair of
missed field goals by Shayne
Graham. Both times Graham


was wide left kicking into the
wind after not missing after he
was re-signed by the Saints
late in the season.
New Orleans was shut out in
the first half for the third time
in Sean Payton's tenure as
head coach and first since
2011. Brees was held to 34
yards passing in the half
Jimmy Graham was not tar-
geted until the very end of the
half and the pass was batted
away by Earl Thomas.
Colston finished with 11
receptions for 144 yards, but
Graham was held to one catch
for 8 yards.










No. 2 'Cuse scoots by North Carolina


No. 5MSU

downs Minnesota

in overtime

Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. C.J. Fair
scored 20 points, Jerami Grant
had 12 points and a career-high
12 rebounds, and No. 2 Syracuse
beat North Carolina 57-45 Satur-
day in an Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence marquee matchup.
Syracuse (16-0, 3-0) evened its
all-time record against the
North Carolina (10-6, 0-3) to 4-4.
UNC started 0-2 in ACC play
three times in the past five years
and five times overall, and the
loss to Syracuse equaled the
worst conference start in school
history in 1996-97, Dean Smith's
final year as head coach.
It was the fewest points scored
by North Carolina since posting
44 in a loss to Duke in 1979.
No. 5 Michigan St. 87,
Minnesota 75, OT
EAST LANSING, Mich. Keith
Appling scored 24 points to help No.
5 Michigan State beat Minnesota
after overcoming a double-digit
deficit in the second half and blow-
ing a lead late in regulation.
The Spartans (15-1,4-0 Big Ten)
scored 15 straight points while hold-
ing the Golden Gophers (13-4, 2-2)
scoreless for nearly 8 minutes after
trailing 53-43 with 15:57 left.
Michigan State missed an oppor-
tunity to win in regulation for the sec-
ond straight game, losing a five-point
lead in the last 13 seconds.
No. 7 Baylor 88, TCU 62
WACO, Texas Taurean Prince
scored 15 of his career-high 23
points off the bench when Baylor
took control before halftime and
went on to a victory over instate
rival TCU.
The Bears (13-2, 1-1 Big 12) won
their 13th consecutive home game,
the latest in the streak coming four
days after they lost their conference
opener 87-72 at No. 9 Iowa State.
Baylor went ahead to stay against
TCU (9-6, 0-3) with a 16-3 run mid-
way through the first half. Prince had
a pair of layups in the 5-minute spurt
that Brady Heslip capped with a
3-pointer that made it 25-14.
Brady Heslip had 15 points on five
3-pointers for Baylor.


Associated Press
North Carolina's Nate Britt guards Syracuse's Tyler Ennis in the second half Saturday in Syracuse, N.Y.
The No. 2 Orange won the ACC game 57-45 over the Tar Heels.


No. 8 Villanova 74,
St. John's 67
NEW YORK JayVaughn
Pinkston had 15 points and 10 re-
bounds and Villanova overcame
some early shooting woes to beat
St. John's.
The Wildcats (15-1,4-0 Big East)
came into the game having shot bet-
ter than 50 percent from the field
and 3-point range in their last three
games. Against St. John's (9-6, 0-3)
they struggled from both in the first
half shooting 25.9 percent from the
field (7 of 27) and 22.2 percent from
3 (2 of 9).
Oklahoma 87,
No. 9 Iowa State 82
NORMAN, Okla. Buddy Hield
scored 22 points and Ryan Spangler
added 16 points and a career-high 15
rebounds to help Oklahoma knock off
previously unbeaten Iowa State.
Isaiah Cousins added 17 points
for the Sooners (13-3, 2-1 Big 12),
who ended No. 9 Iowa State's
school-best winning streak at 14
games.
DeAndre Kane had 23 points and
nine rebounds and Melvin Ejim
added 21 points and six rebounds
for Iowa State (14-1,2-1).
No. 11 Oklahoma St. 73,
West Virginia 72
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. -


Markel Brown hit a 3-pointer with 12
seconds to lift Oklahoma State to a
win over West Virginia.
The Cowboys (14-2, 2-1 Big 12)
trailed for most of the game, but got
solid efforts from their top two scor-
ers in the final minutes.
Marcus Smart had 22 points and
13 rebounds. Le'Bryan Nash added
18 points and Brown finished with 12.
Terry Henderson scored a sea-
son-high 21 points for West Virginia
(10-6,2-1).
No. 14 Kentucky 71,
Vanderbilt 62
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -Willie
Cauley-Stein scored 15 points, and
Kentucky beat Vanderbilt for the
Wildcats' fourth straight victory.
Aaron Harrison added 14 points
and Andrew Harrison 10 and Ken-
tucky (12-3, 2-0) started off a two-
game road swing through the
Southeastern Conference with a
win. Julius Randle had 10 of his
11 rebounds in the first half.
Damian Jones had a game-high
18 points for Vanderbilt. Kyle Fuller
had 17 points and 10 assists, and
Dai-Jon Parker added 17.
Clemson 72,
No. 16 Duke 59
CLEMSON, S.C. K.J. Mc-
Daniels scored 24 points and Jaron
Blossomgame had career highs with
14 points and 14 rebounds as Clem-


son defeated Duke, the Blue Devils
second straight Atlantic Coast Con-
ference road loss.
Duke (12-4, 1-2 ACC) led 36-26
late in the first half before the Tigers
(11-4, 2-1) put together a 37-18 run
over the next 14 minutes to take
control. Blossomgame's second
3-pointer of the half put Clemson
ahead for good, 57-54, and Adonis
Filer followed moments later with a
driving layup to increase the lead.
Rodney Hood led the Blue Devils
with 20 points. Jabari Parker scored
15, only five after halftime.
No. 18 Kansas 86,
No. 25 Kansas State 60
LAWRENCE, Kan. -Andrew Wig-
gins scored 22 points, fellow fresh-
man Wayne Selden added 20 and
Kansas beat Kansas State in its latest
Sunflower Showdown beatdown.
Another of the Jayhawks' bally-
hooed freshmen, Joel Embiid, con-
tributed 11 points and nine
rebounds, and Perry Ellis scored 12
in their sixth straight win over their
1-70 rivals.
Kansas (11-4, 2-0 Big 12) shot 56
percent from the field and committed
just seven turnovers while beating
the Wildcats (12-4, 2-1) for the 48th
time in the last 51 meetings.
No. 19 UMass 73,
St. Bonaventure 68
AMHERST, Mass. Trey Davis


missed nine of his first 10 shots from
the floor before scoring a pair of
baskets in the closing two minutes to
help Massachusetts rally for a win
over St. Bonaventure.
Raphiael Putney led the Minute-
men (14-1 overall, 2-0 Atlantic-10)
with 17 points and eight rebounds.
Cady Lalanne scored 16 and Davis
finished with eight.
No. 21 Missouri 70,
Auburn 68
AUBURN, Ala. Earnest Ross
hit four free throws down the stretch
and Jordan Clarkson scored 20
points to lead Missouri to a victory
over Auburn on Saturday.
Ross, who spent two seasons at
Auburn before transferring in 2011,
scored 16 points for Missouri (13-2,
1-1 Southeastern Conference).
Unable to get off a tying 3-pointer,
Chris Denson missed a layup with
5 seconds left but drew the foul for
Auburn (8-5, 0-2). He made one free
throw then Torren Jones stepped on
the baseline after rebounding the
missed second attempt.
KT Harrell led Auburn with 27
points.
No. 24 Memphis 79,
Temple 69
PHILADELPHIA- Shaq Goodwin
had 23 points and 11 rebounds to
lead Memphis to a win over Temple.
Down four early in the second
half, Memphis (12-3, 3-1 American)
used a 17-6 run lasting nearly seven
minutes to finally pull away and suc-
cessfully follow up its win at No. 12
Louisville on Thursday. Memphis is
only the second ranked team to win
at Temple in the past six seasons.
Then No. 1 Kansas topped the Owls
in the 2009-10 season.
Dalton Pepper scored 24 to lead
Temple.
UConn 84, UCF 61
STORRS, Conn. Freshman
centerAmida Brimah scored 20
points and grabbed eight rebounds,
both career highs, as UConn
recorded its first-ever American Ath-
letic Conference victory with an
84-61 victory over Central Florida.
Shabazz Napier scored 14 points,
and DeAndre Daniels (13) and Ryan
Boatright (11) joined them in double
figures as UConn (13-3, 1-2) won its
second consecutive game. The
Huskies shot 47 percent and outre-
bounded UCF 50-34 before 9,561 at
Gampel Pavilion.
Isaiah Sykes led UCF (9-5, 1-2)
with 17 points.


No. 1 UConn drubs Temple


Associated Press

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. Bria
Hartley scored 19 points and Kiah
Stokes had 18 rebounds to lead top-
ranked UConn to an 80-36 rout of
Temple on Saturday
Moriah Jefferson added 13 points
and Breanna Stewart scored 12 for
the Huskies (17-0, 5-0 American),
who extended their winning streak
to 23 games in a home game played
80 miles from campus in
Bridgeport.
Erica Covile had 13 points and
seven rebounds to lead Temple
(8-7, 2-3), which has lost three of its
last four games.
No. 7 Baylor 80, TCU 46
WACO, Texas Odyssey Sims
scored 28 points and Baylor led
throughout its victory over TCU that ex-
tended the Lady Bears' national-best
home-court winning streak to 69 games.
After being recognized during
pregame for breaking the school's ca-
reer record for 3-pointers in the previous
game, national scoring leader Sims
made six more shots from long-range.
She had two from beyond the arc when
the Lady Bears (14-1,4-0 Big 12)
scored the game's first 14 points in just
over 3 minutes.
Sims has never lost at home, but a
big test comes Monday night when Bay-
lor hosts top-ranked Connecticut (17-0).
TCU coach Jeff Mittie called his sec-
ond timeout already after Sims' second
3-pointer, when the Horned Frogs (11-5,
2-2) had taken only two shots.
No. 15 Oklahoma St. 69,
No. 11 Iowa St 62
AMES, Iowa Tiffany Bias scored
22 points and 15th-ranked Oklahoma
State beat No. 11 Iowa State 69-62,
knocking the Cyclones from the ranks of
the unbeaten.
Brittney Martin had 14 for the Cowgirls
(14-1,3-1 Big 12), who used a 12-0 run
to take control of the first matchup be-
tween top-15 teams in Ames in 12 years.
Iowa State (14-1, 3-1) had pulled
within 63-60 before Bias hit a floater in
traffic and a pair of free throws with 14
seconds left.
Ohio State 70,
No. 22 Indiana 51
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -AmerystAI-


'.,..=g "- -7 m" -:
---
-. I

Associated Press
Connecticut's Moriah Jefferson drives past Temple's Natasha Thames
during the first half Saturday in Bridgeport, Conn.


ston tied a career-high with 29 points
Saturday and Ohio State upset a cold-
shooting Indiana, snapping a program-
best 14-0 start to the season for the
Hoosiers.
The Hoosiers (14-1, 1-1 Big 10
Conference) shot just 28.8 percent
(17 of 59) compared with 53.4 percent
(31 of 58) for the Buckeyes.
Raven Ferguson came off the bench
to score a career-high 18 for Ohio State,
and Martina Ellerbe added 10.
Ohio State (12-7, 2-1) led 39-29 at half-
time, with the Buckeyes shooting 62.1
percent to 40.7 percent for the Hoosiers.
Gonzaga 79,
No. 24 San Diego 50
SPOKANE, Wash. Gonzaga
raced out to an initial lead of 16-2,


scored 50 in the first half and pounded
San Diego.
The loss was the second straight for
the Toreros (15-2, 4-2 West Coast Con-
ference), who began the week unde-
feated and nationally ranked for the first
time in program history. San Diego lost
at Portland on Wednesday.
Haiden Palmer scored 19 for the Zags
(14-3, 4-1), who are nine-time defending
WCC champs and who were ranked as
high as 23rd earlier in the season.
Palmer and Keani Albanez each had
four of GU's 12 steals as the Bulldogs
forced 18 turnovers and held San Diego
to less than 37 percent shooting, includ-
ing 0-7 from 3-point range.
Malina Hood scored 13 for the
Toreros. Sonja Greinacher added 14 for
Gonzaga, Kiara Kudron 10.


A-ROD
Continued from Page BI

penalty, Horowitz's deci-
sion will be widely viewed
as a victory for the 79-year-
old Selig, who has ruled
baseball since 1992 and
says he intends to retire in
January 2015.
A 14-time All-Star, Ro-
driguez has been base-
ball's highest-paid player
under a $275 million, 10-
year contract. He has
spent parts of the last six
seasons on the disabled
list and will be 39 years old
when he is eligible to re-
turn to the field in 2015. He
is signed with the Yankees
through the 2017 season.
Rodriguez admitted five
years ago he used per-
formance-enhancing
drugs while with Texas
from 2001-03 but has de-
nied using them since. He
already sued MLB and
Selig in October, claiming
they are engaged in a
"witch hunt" against him.
"The number of games
sadly comes as no sur-
prise, as the deck has been
stacked against me from
day one," Rodriguez said
in a statement. "This is
one man's decision, that
was not put before a fair
and impartial jury, does
not involve me having
failed a single drug test, is
at odds with the facts and
is inconsistent with the
terms of the Joint Drug
Agreement and the Basic
Agreement, and relies on
testimony and documents
that would never have
been allowed in any court
in the United States be-
cause they are false and
wholly unreliable."
The Major League Base-
ball Players Association
had filed a grievance last
summer saying the disci-
pline was without
"just cause."
The 65-year-old
Horowitz, a California-
based lawyer who became
the sport's independent


arbitrator in 2012, heard
the case over 12 sessions
from Sept. 30 until Nov. 21.
Technically, he chaired a
three-man arbitration
panel that included MLB
Chief Operating Officer
Rob Manfred and union
General Counsel Dave
Prouty. The written opin-
ion was not made public.
In Rodriguez's only par-
tial victory, Horowitz ruled
he is entitled to 21-183rds,
or about 11.5 percent, of
his salary this year, a per-
son familiar with the deci-
sion said, speaking on
condition of anonymity be-
cause the decision was not
made public. That comes
to $2,868,852.46.
Baseball's drug agree-
ment says the amount of
lost pay shall match the
number of regular-season
games suspended, regard-
less of days over the sea-
son, which is 183 days this
year
Despite the ban, base-
ball's drug rules allow Ro-
driguez to participate in
spring training and play in
exhibition games, al-
though the Yankees may
try to tell him not to report.
New York figures to be
happy with the decision,
which eliminates uncer-
tainty and gives the Yan-
kees additional money to
sign Japanese pitcher
Masahiro Tanaka or other
free agents while remain-
ing under the $189 million
luxury tax threshold.
MLB was largely
pleased.
"While we believe the
original 211-game suspen-
sion was appropriate, we
respect the decision ren-
dered by the panel and
will focus on our continu-
ing efforts on eliminating
performance-enhancing
substances from our
game," MLB said in a
statement.
The union said it
"strongly disagrees" with
the ruling but added "we
recognize that a final and
binding decision has been
reached."


B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vote changes for Hall up to writers


Associated Press
Former Atlanta Braves pitcher Tom
Glavine speaks during a press
conference announcing his election
into the 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame
class Thursday in New York.


Associated Press

NEW YORK The Hall of Fame
says it's up to baseball writers to
propose any changes in the selec-
tion process.
The Baseball Writers' Association
ofAmerica has voted on Hall of Fame
candidates since 1936, and elections
have become more controversial in
recent years as stars tainted by accu-
sations of steroids use have fallen
well short of the 75 percent needed
for entry to Cooperstown.
Writers are limited to a maximum
10 votes, and some say there's a log-
jam as Barry Bonds, Rogers
Clemens and Mark McGwire re-
main on the ballot at a time new
players are added.
The Hall electorate includes any-
one who has been a BBWAA mem-
ber for 10 consecutive years at any
point. Some say the voting group
should be expanded beyond writers.
"We're happy," Hall chairman


Jane Forbes Clark said Thursday
after a news conference to intro-
duce 2014 electees Greg Maddux,
Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas.
"We're in an age where everyone
does want to be heard, but we really
see this as an issue that needs to be
dealt with by the BBWAA."
Dan Le Batard was kicked out of
the BBWAA for one year and barred
from future Hall votes on Thursday
after he turned over his 2014 ballot
to the website Deadspin, which al-
lowed readers to choose the selec-
tions. Le Batard, an ESPN host and
longtime Miami Herald columnist,
said Wednesday he gave his ballot
to the website because he detests
the "hypocrisy" in the voting
process and it "needs remodeling in
a new media world."
"The BBWAA regards Hall of
Fame voting as the ultimate privi-
lege, and any abuse of that privilege
is unacceptable," the organization
said in a statement.


PSU's new coach


Associated Press
James Franklin answers questions from reporters after he was introduced as Penn State's new football coach
during a news conference on Saturday in State College, Pa.

Nittany Lions tap Vanderbilt's Franklin to leadfootball team


Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Penn
State has hired James Franklin as
its next head coach.
Franklin, 41, who led Vanderbilt
to bowls in all three of his seasons
there, replaces Bill O'Brien, who
left the Nittany Lions after two
years to coach the NFLs Houston
Texans. Penn State made the an-
nouncement Saturday, after the
school's compensation committee
met to finalize the contract.
That committee approved the hir-
ing by a 6-0 vote Saturday morning,
and Franklin was introduced later
in the day
"Our program requires a very
special kind of leader," Penn State
President Rodney Erickson said,
calling Franklin a "special talent."
"We ran a careful and deliberate
search process and I believe we've
found the right person to lead our
program."
Franklin won 24 games with the
Commodores and is a Pennsylvania
native with strong ties in-state. Penn
State officials met with him this
week in Florida. He will be asked to
build off a foundation that O'Brien
set amid scandal. Despite a lack of
scholarships, a bowl ban and player
defections from the late Joe Pa-


terno's roster, O'Brien led the Nit-
tany Lions to two winning seasons
(8-4, 7-5) while restoring some tem-
pered enthusiasm in Happy Valley
"I'm a Pennsylvania boy" Franklin
said during his opening statement,
"with a Penn State heart."
Franklin, who attended football
camp at Penn State as a youth and
played at Division II East Strouds-
burg (Pa.), set seven school records
as a senior, and also has coached at
Washington State, Idaho State,
Kansas State and Maryland. With
the Terrapins, he was offensive co-
ordinator and assistant head coach.
"I thought I was good enough to
play at Penn State," he said, sternly
"I was not. So, I am so very proud to
be able to be the head coach at this
university"
Members of Penn State's trustee
committee met with Athletic Director
Dave Joyner and others Saturday
morning to discuss the contract,
which the group called "excellent" for
both Franklin and the Nittany Lions.
"Dr Joyner and I have stressed
that our No. 1 priority in hiring a
new coach was to hire an outstand-
ing leader for our football program,
one who will continue our long tra-
dition of student-athlete success on
the field and in the classroom," Er-
ickson said. "We have achieved that


goal."
Much of Saturday's meeting, at
which specific terms of the contract
were laid out for trustees, was done
privately The actual vote was pub-
lic, lasting roughly a minute, and
Penn State made the formal an-
nouncement of the hiring moments
later Trustees said Franklin's con-
tract terms would be revealed Sat-
urday afternoon.
"The contract is in line with other
recent coaching contracts," com-
mittee chairwoman Linda Strumpf
said.
Franklin took over a Vanderbilt
program that went 2-10 each of the
two seasons before he was hired
Dec. 17, 2010. He went 24-15 in his
first three seasons as a head coach,
matching Dan McGugin for the most
wins in school history over a
coach's first three seasons. But the
allure of Penn State, and the oppor-
tunity for a homecoming of sorts
was too good to pass up.
"This is my dream job," he said.
"This is where I want to be."
The Commodores are 16-4 over
the past 20 games, which is second
in the SEC only to Alabama. Van-
derbilt won the final seven games of
2012 and the final five of 2013 in a
stretch that also includes back-to-
back bowl wins.


Kids' Fishing



Clinic in Feb.


Special to the Chronicle

Teaching children a life-
long hobby, appreciation
for our marine environ-
ment and a fun family out-
ing are the objectives for
the Kids' Fishing Clinic.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) and
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation (CCPR) pres-
ent a free event for pre-
registered children
between the ages of 5 and
15 on Saturday, Feb. 22 at 9
a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12
p.m. and 1 p.m. The clinic
will be held at the Fort Is-
land Trail Park. Because
space is limited, preregis-
tration is required and can
be completed by visiting
www. citruscountyparks.
com.
This free clinic enables
young people to learn the
basics of environmental
stewardship, fishing ethics,
angling skills and safety In
addition, environmental
displays will provide par-
ticipants with a unique
chance to experience
Florida's marine life first-
hand. The main objective
is to create responsible
marine resource stewards
by teaching children about
the vulnerability of
Florida's marine ecosys-
tems. This event is a catch-
and-release activity, and
all participants must be ac-
companied by an adult
Individuals or compa-
nies interested in helping
to sponsor this event or
volunteer at the clinic
should contact Citrus
County Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-527-7543.
Register now for
YMCA basketball
The Citrus County YMCA
has extended the deadline to
register for the Winter Basket-
ball League until Wednesday.
Registrations are available
online and at the Ys adminis-
trative office at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
For more information or to
register, call the Beverly Hills
administrative office at
352-637-0132 or visit www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
Register now for
Kids Marathon
The 2014 Citrus Five
Points of Life Kids Marathon
is coming Feb. 28 in Lecanto,
and by registering before
Jan. 17, there is no charge
for participants.
The annual event is equal
parts fun and fitness, and par-
ticipants can start logging


miles immediately.
Five Points of Life is a foun-
dation started by LifeSouth
Community Blood Centers to
raise awareness of the five
ways to share life with others
through the donation of blood,
apheresis, marrow, cord blood
and organs and tissue. It also
offers classroom programs to
students in the Citrus County
area that teach the science
and social responsibility of do-
nating. The kids' marathon
promotes fitness and offers
lessons in goal setting.
Participants in kindergarten
through eighth grade will run
or walk the full 26.2-mile
marathon a little bit at a time,
logging their distance as they
go. Then, on Feb. 28 at 6 p.m.
at the Lecanto High School
track, 3810 W. Educational
Path, they'll have the opportu-
nity to celebrate their accom-
plishment and earn a medal at
the finish line. All participants
also receive a T-shirt.
Registration is free through
Jan. 17, and entry forms and
running logs are available
online at www.fivepointsoflife.
org, or at LifeSouth's Lecanto
headquarters, 1241 S.
Lecanto Highway. Call 352-
527-3061 for information.
Davis Golf Tourney
coming Feb. 15
VFW Post 8189 Men's Aux-
iliary will present the second
annual Ted Davis Golf Tour-
nament on Saturday, Feb. 15,
at Twisted Oaks Golf Course.
Shotgun tee-off is at 8 a.m.
The $55 per-person entry
fee includes greens fee, golf
cart, goody bag and dinner to
follow at VFW Post 8189 at
4:30 p.m.
Prizes will be awarded for
best team score, closest to
the hole, longest drive and
worst team score.
There will be raffles, a
50/50 drawing, giveaways
and a putting contest.
All proceeds will go to a relief
fund to benefit local veterans.
For more information, call Bill
Peterson at 856-364-7233 or
Jerry Webb at 352-220-4807.
Citrus Fishing Club
angles for members
If you like to fish with people
who like to fish, and maybe
learn to fish better, come see
what the Citrus Fishing Club is
all about. Men and women alike
meet at 7 p.m. the first Monday
monthly atAmerican Legion
Post No. 155 at 6585W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
For more information, call
Steve Tresnak at 352-445-
6743 or visit www.citrusfishing
club.org.


Special to the Chronicle
The Kids' Fishing Clinic is a free event for children
between the ages of 5 to 15.


P.L.A.Y. starts soon

Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks and Recreation is
offering a great sports opportunity for
your little one, who may be too young to
join the organized sports leagues within
the county. The PL.A.Y Program, which
is an acronym for Preparing Little Ath-
letes Youth Program, was created for
those children who are ready to play
sports, but just aren't old enough.
The PL.A.Y programs offered include:
soccer, which will be held at Central
Ridge District Park on Mondays or at Ho-
mosassa Area Recreational Park on
Wednesday, and T-ball, will be held at
Central Ridge District Park on Tuesdays
or at Bicentennial Park on Thursdays.
The next session will begin the week
of Jan. 20. Boys and girls, ages 3-5, are en-
couraged to join the six-week program.
After enrollment, each child receives
age-appropriate sports equipment and a
team T-shirt.
Registration is open now and space is
limited. Please contact Citrus County
Parks & Recreation at 352-527-7540 or Special to the Chronicle
visit www.citruscountyparks.com, for T-ball is one of two sports offered by this
more information, session of the P.L.A.Y. Program.


it's 0oI S j -,







Community-Wide Fitness Challenge

February 3 through March 16, 2014

No excuses this year Join the 10th Annual Fitness Challenge
* You get points for a variety of types of exercise
* Teams select the fitness level category to compete in:
"Jocks", "Getting There", or "Just Getting Started"
* Report points weekly and get helpful tips along the way

* Team registration deadline is January 24, 2014 5 p.m.

Act NOW-
email fitnesschallenge@tampabay.r com r
and ask for details. -I K nil n.cj.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 B5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No one like him


NoQB has

Manning's playoff

experience, letdowns

Associated Press
DENVER No quarterback has
been to the playoffs more than Pey-
ton Manning or experienced more
heartache there, either
Only once in his previous dozen
trips to the postseason party has
Manning put his fingerprints on the
Lombardi Trophy
His 9-11 postseason record stands
in stark contrast to his 167-73
regular-season mark and includes
eight first-round exits, none more
scarring than last year's AFC Divi-
sional home loss to Baltimore as the
AFC's top seed.
He also lost his first playoff game
in Indianapolis as the No. 1 seed
after the 2005 season, then bounced
back to win it all the next year Since
then, he's won just two of seven
playoff games and lost his last three.
The meticulous quarterback
renowned for his unrivaled work
ethic and painstaking preparation
doesn't believe that's because he
grinds too much in January
"I really don't believe so," Man-
ning said as he prepared for today's
showdown between his Denver
Broncos (13-3) and the San Diego
Chargers (10-7). "I know people -
it's easy to summarize, to take a
whole bunch of football seasons and
lump them together I personally
don't believe in that theory
"I think each season takes on its
own identity and different things
occurred along the way at different
points of my career This is the 2013
season, 2014 postseason, and it's its
own chapter We're looking forward
to hopefully writing it for a number
of more weeks."
Manning set a slew of records this
season, including 55 TD passes and
5,447 yards through the air as the
Broncos became the highest-scor-
ing team of the Super Bowl era.
Five players scored 10 or more
touchdowns. No team in history
had ever had more than three play-
ers accomplish that feat.
Yet for all his records and all his
greatness, Manning's fault-finders
point to his cold-weather record -
it's 4-7 in sub-freezing temperatures
at kickoff- and his playoff pratfalls
- his 11 losses are tied with Brett
Favre for most in NFL history to
suggest he won't cap it all off with a
championship in the first outdoor
Super Bowl in a cold-weather city


Associated Press
Denver quarterback Peyton Manning tosses a football Thursday during
practice ahead of the Broncos' NFL playoff game today against the San
Diego Chargers.
next month, times this season seemed in a hurry
Here's the thing about the cold: just to get back here. The regular
In many of those games, Manning season took on an air of being 20
had the lesser team. That's why he preseason games with the real
was on the road. And sometimes, he opener coming Sunday afternoon.
only played a series or two because Yet all week, he was relaxed, em-
his team had already bracing the pressure
clinched its playoff of this time of year
slot, but the loss AFC divisional game "If it's just miser-
went next to his No. 6 San Diego able this whole time,
name nonetheless then why are you re-
And in the play- Chargers (10-7) ally doing it? I mean,
offs, you could point at No. 1 Denver there are other things
the finger at his sup- Broncos (13-3) you can do that might
porting cast as much make you feel less
as you could at him, Time: 4:30 p.m. today, miserable than if it's
if not more. 0 TV: CBS just an absolute
If Rahim Moore grind," Manning said.
doesn't make one of 'And maybe. as you


the biggest blunders in playoff his-
tory last year, Manning would be
hailed for his fourth-quarter touch-
down toss to beat the Ravens and
not lambasted for his interception
in overtime. And maybe now he'd
be trying to defend a Super Bowl
title instead of seeking atonement
That scarring defeat has driven
Manning for 365 days.
So doggedly determined to rectify
that disappointment, Manning at


get older, you think more in those
lines, that, 'Hey this is a pretty unique
opportunity to be in this position, to
be one of just a few teams playing."'
Manning is coming off his best
statistical season at age 37, just two
years removed from the neck sur-
geries that weakened his throwing
arm but strengthened his resolve.
Yet, no matter how many more
years he has left, he knows he won't
get many more chances.


Panthers home


underdogs to 49ers


Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. It
doesn't surprise safety
Mike Mitchell that the Car-
olina Panthers are only
the third home underdog
in the NFL divisional play-
offs in the past 20 years.
"We haven't gotten much
respect all year," he said.
"It looks like we still have
people to prove wrong."
The Panthers (12-4) are
playing the no-respect
card after opening the
week as a 1-point under-
dog against
San Fran- NFC divisi
cisco (13-4),
despite de- No. 5 San
fearing the 49ers
49ers 10-9 at No. 2
at Candle- ath
stick Park Panthe
on Nov. 10. Time: 1 p
Panthers _
wide re-
ceiver Steve
Smith said the 49ers are
likely favored because of
their playoff experience.
This is the third straight
season San Francisco has
been to the playoffs under
coach Jim Harbaugh, and
most of the players have re-
turned from last year's NFC
championship team. The
Panthers will make their
first playoff appearance
since 2008 under third-year
coach Ron Rivera.
That doesn't seem to
bother Rivera.
"No, because two years
ago (the 49ers) didn't have
any playoff experience
and they did pretty well,"
Rivera said.
Harbaugh, who was
teammates with Rivera


with the Chicago Bears,
also downplayed the expe-
rience factor
"I've always really felt
that where you're going is a
heck of a lot more impor-
tant than where you've
come from," Harbaugh said.
Rivera said the Pan-
thers got some playoff-type
experience by winning a
number of big games dur-
ing the season they beat
New England and New Or-
leans along with San Fran-
cisco to battle back from
a 1-3 start to win the NFC
South and


onal game
Francisco
(134)
Carolina
rs (124)
.m. today.


secure a
first-round
bye.
The Pan-
t h e r s
sacked
C o lin
Kaepernick
six times


and limited
him to 91
yards passing and 16 yards
rushing in the first meeting
in a win that defensive end
Greg Hardy said "proved
we were a contender"
But Rivera said Kaeper-
nick's play has vastly im-
proved since.
"He is playing with a lot
of confidence right now,"
Rivera said. "Maybe we'll
get lucky and catch him on
a bad day"
Kaepernick said he's
eager to bounce back from
perhaps the most disap-
pointing game of his career
against Carolina. When
asked what the Panthers
did that was so effective,
he said, "I think it was
more of what we did to our-
selves. I didn't play well."


Associated Press
Carolina Panthers wide receiver Steve Smith is listed as
questionable for today's NFC divisional round game
against the San Francisco 49ers.


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Together we mourn the loss of a kind man


here was a collective
sadness that came
over the community
last week with the passing
of Citrus County Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene.
Greene, 64, took his own
life last Sunday in the back-
yard of his Lecanto home.
He had been the county
property appraiser for five
years, having won re-elec-
tion without opposition in
2012.


It is difficult to try to
make any sense of the
tragedy, and our hearts go
out to the family and
coworkers of Geoff.
Geoffhad volunteered on
the Citrus County YMCA
board, and we worked
closely together to plan the
future of that organization.
He served on our interview
committee that selected
Joanna Castle as the Y ex-
ecutive, and he helped drum


up financial support to build
the new Y facility planned
for County Road 486.
He was always energetic
and positive about making
good things happen in Cit-
rus County
As a public figure, he in-
evitably faced criticism for
things he did in his official
capacity as property appraiser
But it always appeared he
could handle the positive
and negative feedback.


I have told more than one
candidate for public office
that when you get involved
in the political process in
Citrus County, you had bet-
ter have very thick skin. Not
everyone will agree with
the decisions you make, and
some of the criticism that
will come your way will be
personal and mean.
You just can't let it get to
you in a personal way But
that's easier said than done.


I am not making any as-
sumptions about what drove
Geoff to make the decision
he did. Health concerns,
stress and depression all
play into why people see
this ultimate escape as a
logical conclusion.
If we as a community can
take one thing from this tragedy,
it should be that we need to
dial back the emotion and


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file photo
The Chassahowitzka River is pictured in August 2013. The Southwest Florida Water Management District recently cleaned up the springs that feed the river, but
columnist Dan Hilliard argues that unless broader changes to water policy are enacted, those efforts will be for naught.


OUR


LONG



FOOL'S



ERRAND

BY DAN HILLIARD GUEST COLUMN

A great dialogue is under way in
Florida these days involving the
media, political servants and the
citizens of this state. The topic is the
health of our water resources and, locally, the
health of our coastal spring systems, which are
vital to Citrus County's long-term prosperity.
The discussion illustrates the conflict between
the government's obligation to protect the
health, safety and welfare of the people versus
what has actually occurred.


We have accepted the adminis-
tration of water policy by the state
in good faith since the 1960s. The
lead agencies are the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection (FDEP) and our five water
management districts. This bu-
reaucratic maze has failed us, and
done so in spectacular fashion.
This is illustrated by the very long
list of Florida's pollution-impaired
Editor's note: This is the first of a
two-part series about the health of
local and state water resources.


waters. The 2013 FDEP Integrated
Water Quality Assessment 303(d)
List contains more than 2,700
water bodies or segments of water
bodies (80-plus percent) that are
impaired, mostly for pollution. All
of Citrus County's rivers are on
this list for multiple pollutants, in-
cluding mercury and nutrients.
Not long ago, Art Jones began
the "One Rake at a Time" project
with the intent of cleaning up
King's Bay Kudos to Mr Jones for
See Page C3


OOPSS,


A POOR



DEFENSE

BY JOHN MORAN GUEST COLUMN

T his year just might go down as the
year in which rising public
concern over the declining health
of our springs finally reaches critical mass.
The Gainesville Sun's recent "Fragile
Springs" series has certainly helped to
elevate the conversation about water and
Florida's future to its rightful place at
center stage. Day after day, the stories
drove home two points: Our fabulous
springs are in a world of hurt and we are
failing the test to preserve and protect our
priceless blue-water gems.


Language structures any de-
bate, so let's be clear: It's sim-
ply inaccurate to say that our
springs are dying. Dying is
what happens when old trees
fall down in the forest. That's
the cycle of nature.
But "dying" is too soft a word
to describe what's happening
to our springs. The reality is
that we are killing our springs.
The fact that none of us
wanted this to happen doesn't
excuse our responsibility for the
consequences of our actions.
Editor's note: This column was
originally published Dec. 29 in the
Gainesville Sun and is being reprinted
with permission of the author.


The desecration of our
springs is no accident; this is
negligent homicide. As with
the drunken driver who meant
to cause no harm, crying
"Oops!" is no defense to this
crime against nature.
Massive groundwater over-
pumping and nutrient pollu-
tion are the culprits,
compounded by gross regula-
tory neglect. For more than 20
years, a growing chorus of sci-
entists and journalists and
artists and springs-loving
Floridians of every stripe has
sounded the alarm that our
springs are imperiled and in


See Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Page C3







OPage C2- SUNDAY, JANUARY 12,2014



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"Pleasant words are the food of love."
Ovid, "The Art of Love," circa 8 A.D.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


&I


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. edito r
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member


M Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TIME OF SORROW




Geoff Greene's



death leaves



void in county


he untimely death of
Property Appraiser
GeoffGreene has left a
cloud of sorrow over Citrus
County
His magnanimous charac-
ter was contagious and his
willingness to serve the


community ever
present.
To his family
and loved ones:
You are in the
thoughts and
prayers of people
far and wide.
Mr. Greene, 64,
had an uncanny
ability to share
his enthusiasm,


THE IS
The de
Property !
Geoff G

OUR OP
A sad Ic
the corn


inspire people and give back
to the community he loved.
Despite the often-unenviable
challenges of his job, the
twice-elected property ap-
praiser had a special talent
for connecting with cowork-
ers, fellow officials and con-
stituents at a very human
level.
As a public official, he was
easily accessible, affable and
down to Earth. Those charac-
teristic rang through on and
off the job.


Great column
Hey, Gerry, thanks for running
that commentary in Sunday's
paper (Dec. 29) about "How
America manufactures mass
shootings." I hope everybody in
the paper reads that. Everybody
in America ought to read that. I
just, it would be wonderful if
you could run that every Sunday
until people get it through their
head what's going on in this
country. Great column. Thanks
for running it.
Adams protects us
We are very fortunate to have
a commissioner like Scott
Adams. He is being criticized
simply because he's opposed to
continuing "business as
usual." Mr. Adams'
main interest is to pro- O
tect and help the Citrus L
County taxpayer. -M
Sports complex?
Ask Adams


You know, they're J /
talking about a sports
complex, to build one. CALI
What are you kidding 5
me or what? I would 563
just like to say, what
happened to Mike Hampton, the
baseball player? He wanted to
build one and our great county
commissioners said no, they
didn't want one and they could-
n't agree to terms, as usual,
which is our commissioners. So
now they want to spend the tax-
payers' money to build a sports
complex. Come on. Give us all a
break and start listening to Mr.
Adams. He's the only one that's
got sense up there.
Don't blame Kenney
I would like to say that I have
nothing but the utmost respect
for our veterans, past and pres-
ent, but it's not "JJ" Kenney's
fault that the veterans' benefits
are being cut. You know, don't
blame "JJ" Kenney because he
wants to do something for the
animals who are helpless and
can't help themselves.


The considerable grief ex-
perienced by his staff is evi-
dence of the care and
concern he brought to his po-
sition, as well as other en-
deavors. As a board member
of the fledgling YMCA, for ex-
ample, Mr. Greene brought
drive, determina-
>|E:P tion and an inno-
SUE: vative approach
ath of to helping foster
\ppraiser an organization
ireene. that is on the
move.
'INION: As the YMCA
was close to his
oss for heart, the Greene
munity. family asks that
the public not
send flowers but, if wishing to
make a contribution in his
memory, to instead donate to
the Citrus County YMCA,
3909 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
The service for Geoff
Greene will be at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 15, at Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church,
4221 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(State Road 44), Lecanto.
Geoff Greene touched the
lives of many in Citrus
County. He will be missed.


Playing for handouts
Saturday, Dec. 28, another
couple joined us for lunch. As
we were about to enter the
restaurant, a young man was
sitting playing his guitar while a
couple of young kids were run-
ning about. There was a large
jar placed in front of him as he
performed. I was aghast and
ashamed to have our guests see
this. When I was young in the
1930s, street performers with
tin cups were a common sight.
Please tell me, people, is this
our return to hard times?
Since you asked...
It would have been good if that
story on the sandhill crane that


0579
-0579


you had on the front
page of today's Chroni-
cle (Dec. 30), if you
could have included the
number for the wildlife,
where people could re-
port an injured animal.
Anyway, that would be
good if you could put
that in the newspaper.
Editor's note: Call
Nature World Wildlife
Refuge at 352-621-5575
to report injured wildlife.


Funnier all the time
I think the Sound Off ought to
be part of the comedy strip in
the newspaper because the
more I read some of them, the
harder I laugh. And it's amazing
how people can make some of
the comments they make, obvi-
ously because it is anonymous. I
tell you, these Sound Offs are
getting funnier and funnier by
the day.
Get a job
I don't feel sorry at all for this
unemployment since it is ceas-
ing. In the apartment complex I
live in, all the young ones sit
around and drink beer and
smoke cigarettes all day and
(they are) on unemployment,
welfare and you name it. Let
them get out and get a job.
There's jobs out there.


On the phone, there's no privacy


On Dec. 16, a federal
judge's ruling may have
marked a historic turn-
ing point in the civil war be-
tween President Barack Obama
and those Americans intent on
preventing the executive branch
from being the sole rule of law
while We The People are no
longer a self-governing republic.
The next day, the lead editorial
in The New York Times con-
cerning Klayman v Obama cited
Judge Richard Leon's
ruling in favor of
plaintiffs that in-
eluded conservative
legal activist Larry
Klayman. Judge
Leon, who sits on the
bench of the Federal
District Court for the
District of Columbia,
argued that the Na- Nat H
tional Security 0TH
Agency's continuous
collection of all our VOl
phone records "'al-
most certainly' violates the
Fourth Amendment's prohibi-
tion against unreasonable
searches" ("A Powerful Rebuke
of Mass Surveillance," The
New York Times, Dec. 17).
Who nominated this patriotic
judge to the influential court?
It was George W Bush, back
in 2001. But Bush, along with
Vice President Dick Cheney,
began to toss aside the Consti-
tution's mandatory separation
of powers after Sept. 11.
Judge Leon, while sometimes
leaning conservative, can also
be an insistent libertarian. For
example, consider this illustra-
tion from November 2008, cov-
ered by The Wall StreetJournal:
The judge "ordered the re-
lease of five men U.S. forces
took from Bosnia to Guan-
tanamo Bay in 2002, ruling that
the Bush administration relied
on insufficient evidence to im-
prison them indefinitely as
'enemy combatants"' ("Judge
Orders 5 Gitmo Inmates Re-
leased," Jess Bravin, The Wall
Street Journal, Nov 21,2008).
That may have made Dick
Cheney growl.
And in his recent NSA deci-
sion, Judge Leon alerted future
U.S. historians and students to
this: The Bush and Obama ad-
ministrations, along with com-
pliant Congresses, had not been
able to show a "single instance
in which analysis of the NSAs
bulk metadata collection actu-
ally stopped an imminent at-
tack, or otherwise aided the
government in achieving any
objective that was time-
sensitive in nature."
Meanwhile, all of us lost our
Fourth Amendment rights to
personal privacy


"The judge," according to The
New York Times, "wrote that
James Madison 'would be aghast'
at the degree of privacy invasion
the data sweep represents."
That's a quotation I treasure.
It should be noted that Judge
Leon's decision is not final; it
will no doubt be appealed all
the way up to the Supreme
Court And I'm skeptical that a
John Roberts-led court would
forthrightly embrace the Con-
stitution, even
though The New
York Times cheered
in its editorial that
Judge Leon's ruling
"is an enormous
symbolic victory for
opponents of the
(warrantless) bulk-
collection program
entoff ... for seven years,
IE these constitutional
ER issues have been ad-
DES judicated under a
---- 'cloak of secrecy' as
Judge Leon put it. Now that
cloak has finally been lifted in
a true court of law"
Whether or not you agree
with this judge, whom I regard
as a hero of the Constitution, it's
clear that there would not have
been a case to judge had it not
been for the "leaks" the dis-
closure of so many other gov-
ernment acts of contempt for
our personal privacy by Ed-
ward Snowden, the former con-
tractor for the NSA.
I've already noted that, de-
pending on the candidates for
the presidency in 2016, I may
write in Snowden for the Oval
Office.
This is hardly a unanimous
feeling in our nation. Former
U.S. Ambassador to the United
Nations John Bolton is not alone
in believing, as reported by the
American Civil Liberties Union,
that Snowden "ought to swing
from a tall oak tree" for reveal-
ing so much of the government's
unconstitutional programs.
The ACLU disagrees, and so
would James Madison.
What is Snowden's reaction
to Judge Leon's resurrection of
the Fourth Amendment? From
Moscow, where he has tempo-
rary asylum, he issued a state-
ment, which was released to the
public by another one of my he-
roes, Glenn Greenwald. Green-
wald first began the distribution
of Snowden's salutary leaks
through The Guardian.
Said Snowden: "I acted on
my belief that the NSAs mass
surveillance programs would
not withstand a constitutional
challenge, and that the Ameri-
can public deserved a chance to
see these issues determined by
open courts. Today, a secret


program authorized by a secret
court was, when exposed to the
light of day, found to violate
Americans' rights. It is the first
of many"
We'll see if this "first of many"
rulings will eventually rescue
the Fourth Amendment. It's not
going to be easy or quick.
On Dec. 27, for example, a
federal judge in New York,
William H. Pauley III, ruled in
a case brought by the ACLU
(ACLU v Clapper) that, as The
New York Times reported in a
front-page story, "a National Se-
curity Agency program that col-
lects enormous troves of phone
records is legal" ("A Judge Up-
holds N.S.A. Collection of Data
on Calls," Adam Liptak and
Michael S. Schmidt, The New
York Times, Dec. 28).
Naturally, Obama's alleged
Justice Department expressed
its pleasure.
Dig this section of Judge
Pauley's conclusion: "No doubt,
the bulk telephony metadata
collection program vacuums up
information about virtually
every telephone call to, from, or
within the United States. That
is by design, as it allows the
NSA to detect relationships so
attenuated and ephemeral they
would otherwise escape notice"
("NSAs Phone Data Collection
Program Lawful, Federal Judge
Rules," Jacob Gershman, The
Wall Street Journal, Dec. 27).
Therefore, he added,
nonetheless justifying his con-
trary ruling to Judge Leon's, 'As
the Sept. 11 attacks demon-
strate, the cost of missing such
a thread can be horrific."
What's the cost to our Consti-
tution regardingJudge Pauley's
verdict? An aghast James Madi-
son might have had a stroke.
What's your bet on the ulti-
mate Supreme Court ruling?
And, furthermore, as future
vacancies occur on the high
court, who will be controlling the
Congress and the presidency?
Edward Snowden told Barton
Gellman of The Washington
Post "For me, in terms of per-
sonal satisfaction, the mission's
already accomplished" ("Ed-
ward Snowden, after months of
NSA revelations, says his mis-
sion's accomplished," Gellman,
The Washington Post, Dec. 23).
Snowden celebrated our Con-
stitution too soon.

Nat Hentoffis a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the
Bill ofRights. He is a member
of the Reporters Committee
for Freedom of the Press, and
the Cato Institute, where he
is a senior fellow


(oitit v h; fh a 1,I hI, l


A recent front-page article
indicated Commissioner Scott
Adams would like the two com-
missioners up for re-election
in 2014 to be replaced. I totally
agree. The two incumbents have
a record of tax and spend, again
and again, and that is not the
Republican way Republicans
are supposed to cut taxes and
reduce the size of government,
but these two commissioners
have not followed this line, so
it is time for them to go. There
are good Republican candi-
dates running for these offices
who will follow the Republican
line of cutting taxes and reduc-
ing the size of government


As a former officer of the Re-
publican Executive Committee,
I know both incumbents and they
are decent people. However,
their actions on the BOCC have
not been in keeping with low-
ering taxes and/or reducing the
size of our county government.
We have seen the tax-and-
spend actions of this BOCC time
and again and in my opinion,
far too much. Therefore, as a
lifelong Republican who wants
to see more efficient and smaller
government with less taxes, I
personally will not be voting
for either of these incumbents
in the primaries -will you?
Harry Cooper
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I LETTER to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
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letters@chronicleonline.com.


H
(


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


There were never more devoted sisters


"Sisters, sisters ... there
were never such devoted
sisters...."
-"Sisters,"
Irving Berlin, 1953.

I never had a sister, and
I hope it is obvious
that I never was a sis-
ter, but Cheryl and I had
the dubious distinction of
raising a pair of sisters.
Did they love each
other? Of course. Did they
detest each other? Ab-
solutely
Did they fight? At times,
almost to the death, but
neither of them would
ever allow anyone else to
take a potshot at the other
And they sang together


Their voices were very dif-
ferent, but they blended
magnificently They were,
after all, sisters.
Leaving childhood be-
hind, passing through
youth, getting on with
young adulthood, becom-
ing wives and mothers and
now quickly approaching
middle age, though con-
flicts still occur and prob-
ably will until death does
them part, I have never
seen more devoted sisters
than our Beth and Becky
Even so, I believe I've
seen sisters who just might
be their equals, two who
are also Brannens son
Fred and his lovely wife
Gayla's daughters, Ariana


and Kaylee. I have never She protested, "I don't
personally seen the two of mean Kaylee! I want an-
them at each other the way other sister"
their aunts It was un-
were, but I clear whether
can't imagine she wanted a
that disagree- different baby
ments do not sister or an ad-
occur ditional baby
There are sister What she
only 15 months did make crys-
between them, tal was that she
and I remem- did not want a
ber clearly Fred Brannen baby brother!
when 3-year- A SLICE But that's a
old Ariana con- story for an-
fided in me, OF LIFE other day No,
"Granddaddy, I the point today
want a baby sister" is what I consider to be
I replied, "You have a deep, considerate and
baby sister; you have imaginative devotion of
Kaylee." one sister to the other


Ariana is now 16 and
Kaylee is 14. They attend
one of Orange County's
larger high schools, where
Ariana is a junior and
Kaylee is a freshman. An
upperclassman sister with
a freshman sister is a cir-
cumstance begging for irri-
tation, especially when they
are both in the school's
very respectable and quite
competitive chorus.
Recently, for an inter-
scholastic competition, an
elite choir was chosen.
After auditions, Ariana
was selected to compete,
but Kaylee was not. Recog-
nizing not only her sister's
disappointment but also
her talent, Ariana sug-


gested, "Kaylee, the com-
petition also includes duets.
Let's try out together"
They were allowed to
audition as a duet, were
selected to compete and,
after what was an awe-
some performance with
their voices blending per-
fectly, they placed higher
than did the group com-
peting as an elite choir
Sisters.
Beth and Becky
Ariana and Kaylee.
There were never more
devoted sisters.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


No quick



fixes for



ADHD

MARTHA SEIJAS
Guest column
oday we live in a fast-paced soci-
ety and most of us want a life of
convenience. If something
makes our life difficult, we want a
quick, easy fix. Unfortunately, some-
times this carries over to how we raise
our children. ADHD (attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder) is a condition
in which a child may have one or more
of the following: trouble paying atten-
tion, a seeming inability to follow di-
rections, a tendency to blurt out
inappropriate comments at inappro-
priate times and an inability to sit still.
A child who exhibits these behaviors
all the time may have ADHD.
Having a child with ADHD can be
very challenging for parents. Managing
this type of behavior can take a lot of en-
ergy and time. Parents tend to want to
medicate the child to make life easier
The problem with this is that sometimes
we are doing more harm to the child.
Medication must be closely monitored
because there can be adverse effects on
the child's physical and mental health
over a period of time.
There is no conclusive evidence that
can tell us why a child may have this
disorder, but there are ways that a fam-
ily can work to help structure the envi-
ronment for the child without using
medication. (This does not mean that all
children with ADHD should never be on
medication.)
Some experts agree that by changing
the child's environment you may be
able to help them live with their disor-
der without the use of medications.
A few ways to do this are:
Familiarize yourself with the signs
of ADHD and with normal early child-
hood development so that you will know
the difference.
Once your child is of school age,
work with the teacher to ensure your
child has a structured routine. Some-
times children with ADHD need extra
time to grasp lessons or learn via differ-
ent methods than their peers.
Use a routine at home that every-
one can follow but is consistent and
workable. Meals, homework, bedtime,
etc. should be followed the same every
day
Praise and reward good behavior
Get your child involved in physical
activity on a daily basis. This is some-
thing you can either do as a family or by
getting involved in an organized sport in
your community.
Try to avoid changes in the sched-
ule, they can have adverse affects.
There is evidence that some diets
can actually intensify the behavioral
traits associated with ADHD. Talk to a
doctor or nutritionist about food addi-
tives to avoid. Giving your child more
fresh fruits, vegetables, grains, healthy
fats and carbohydrates can help. Try to
stay away from fast-food restaurants
and highly processed foods.
There are many resources available
to parents that will help them under-
stand ADHD. With the use of profes-
sionals and support groups, you and
your child can learn to live a productive
life with this disorder


Martha Seijas is director of the
Playcare Early Learning Center


Special to the Chronicle
Beloved citizen Mrs. Hattie Louisa (Gale) Sanders lived in Inverness for 18
years before her death in 1955. She was the wife of W.H. (Cap) Sanders and
was active in the Presbyterian Church, Eastern Star and Woman's Club. In
her younger days, she was the first schoolteacher in Dade County at 15
years old. This photo was taken in the summer of 1940 near the R.W.
Stewart home in Inverness.


Originally published in the Citrus
County Chronicle.
In 1938 ...
One of Inverness' oldest and
most popular institutions
changed hands this week when J.E.
Johnston sold his department store
to George Adams Rogers of
Brooksville. Mr Johnston had op-
erated the department store here
for more than 18 years and had
built up a large customer following
all over this section. Mr Rogers, al-
though comparatively young, is an
experienced merchandiser, having
been associated with his father,
J.M. Rogers of Brooksville, for sev-
eral years in the management of
the Rogers' Department store of
that town.
The feature picture at the Va-
lerie theatre for tonight will be
"Cowboy From Brooklyn," starring
Dick Powell and Pat O'Brien. For
tomorrow and Saturday, the fa-
mous Maunch twins will be seen in
Booth Tarkington's "Penrod's Dou-
ble Trouble." A cartoon and an-
other chapter of the current serial
are also on the bill.


In 1953...
Multi-colored Christmas lights
have been strung across the
two main streets in downtown Crys-
tal River and have been turned on
to burn through the Christmas hol-
idays. The lights, which give a fes-
tive appearance to Crystal River
after dark, were financed through
contributions from business men,
The Town of Crystal River and sev-
eral individuals. The total of the
contributions came to $184.20.
The Inverness Senior Woman's
Club met Monday afternoon,
Nov 23. Seven new members were
welcomed. They are Mrs. E.L. An-
derson, Mrs. H.F Bonifield, Mrs.
WH. Goulder Mrs. Ernest W Lee-
son, Mrs. R.E Porter, Mrs. J.A. Ram-
sey and Mrs. E.J. Whitacre, who is a
transfer from the Floral City Club.
The club voted to buy a $5.00 Tu-
berculosis bond. Mrs. Russell Strat-
ton was appointed finance chairman,
to replace Mrs. J.G. Segar

Information for Back in Time is
supplied by the Citrus County
Historical Society.


ERRAND
Continued from Page C1

that, for it surely needs to be cleaned up!
He has energized the public, but perhaps
his most spectacular success is bringing
the fresh focus of state politicians and
business leaders to our local waters.
After all, they are the people with the
money and power to implement change.
Concurrent with the "One Rake" proj-
ect the Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District cleaned up Weeki
Wachee and Chassahowitzka Springs.
The district will soon begin a project to
restore native vegetation and otherwise
improve the quality of King's Bay The
need for such actions is real, but these
programs and projects are frequently
heralded by the state and media as
restoration, which they surely are not.

Charade, n: Something that is done in order
to pretend something is true when it is not
really true- Merriam -Webster Dictionary

Our springs and rivers are beset by
two fundamental problems. One is re-
duced flow volume and the second is
pollution. Spring vents rely on approxi-
mations of historic flow rate to expel
sediments that will otherwise slowly ob-
struct outflow If we do not sharply re-
duce nutrient pollution in our aquifers,
there will be no end to the scourge of
Lyngbya in our rivers and springs. We
can repetitiously scrub and clean for-
ever or we can begin to undo the dam-
age we have done and let the springs
take care of the housecleaning.
Florida is in the midst of developing a
program intended to reduce pollution
under the auspices of the Total Maximum
Daily Load program. While it sounds good,
it will do nothing other than put gauze on
a festering wound. The program relies
on best management practices for im-
plementation and, as such, is a toothless
tiger It sets goals and objectives, but little
else. Compliance is largely voluntary
The apparent rationale is that what is
good for agriculture and industry is
good for us. It is not to say that we don't
need these activities, for we surely do,
but we also have great need for firm reg-
ulatory support and protection of our
most powerful economic resource and
fundamental need, water By allowing
these and other activities to destroy our
waters, we are simply subsidizing one
interest at the expense of another It is
not a cheap subsidy, nor is it sound eco-
nomic policy by any stretch of the imag-
ination. A regional restoration plan like
that being implemented in the Ever-
glades costs billions of dollars.
We have watched the accelerated deaths
of the Indian River Lagoon and the
Caloosahatchee River estuary due to the
discharge of severely polluted waters from
Lake Okeechobee. These discharges were
prescribed by the Army Corps of Engi-
neers due to safety concerns about the
aged levy system around the lake. If this
water was allowed to filter through the
prairies of the Everglades, as in the
past, the lagoon, Florida Bay and the
Caloosahatchee estuary would be in a
far better state of health today
Florida's waters have specific prob-
lems and require specific solutions. Our
legislators must realize that killing our
largest economic contributor to benefit
other endeavors is a fool's errand. Until
the state admits that it has a problem so
significant that charades will not mask
it, we will watch the continued spiral of
degradation of our springs, lakes, rivers
and estuaries.
It isn't that complicated and there are
reasonable paths to a solution.


Dan Hilliard is a director of Withlacoochee
Area Residents Inc., which was organized
in 1984 in response to quality of life
threats posed by activities that have a
high potential to degrade water quality


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

personal bitterness that often
accompanies our public debates.
It only takes looking at the mess
at Citrus Memorial hospital to
see how a spoiled and bitter de-
bate can position people to make
awful decisions. Millions of dol-
lars of public funds have been
wasted because public officials
have such a deep hatred and total
lack of trust of their adversaries.


Very bad decisions have been
made that cost every taxpayer
because some officials make
their decisions out of anger and
personal vindictiveness.
In Citrus County we have a
multiplying impact from groups
of angry citizens who take to the
"hate" blogs and the Chronicle's
own online Sound Off and go postal
about those they disagree with.
Chronicle editor Mike Arnold
has been spending a lot of time
during the past few months trying
to sanitize the online Sound Off
forum as it relates to the elec-


tions of 2014. The elections are
eight months away, and people
are already attacking the sanity
and genetic heritage of people
they disagree with.
Mike is going to do his best to
stop the nonsense, or we will
just shut the whole darn thing
down.
The collective negative dia-
logue does have an effect on
those who serve in public office
and those who are thinking
about becoming involved. I have
had numerous good citizens of
our community tell me they


would never run for office here
because they wouldn't put them-
selves and their families up for
the public criticism and ridicule
that often accompanies the
experience.
Let's try to dial back the nasti-
ness. We can disagree with each
other on the issues and still have
relationships and conversations
that are cordial and professional.
I am not saying that any of this
had anything to do with Geoff
Greene's decision to take his
own life. But I do know we place
each of our public officials


under a special kind of burden
to withstand a constant barrage
of personal insults.
It wears people down and can
force even the most optimistic
individual to have doubts.
Geoff Greene was a nice man
who tried to do what he thought
was best for this community To-
gether, let's mourn his passing
and remember his smile.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Purse protectors Help little humans


I left my bag or my
purse on the bench in
front of Bealls and some-
one took it inside and give
it to one of the girls inside.
They put it inside one of
the safes. It would be safe
until my husband come
and picked it up. I wanted
to tell them that they went
out of their way to be very
giving at this time of the
year and I thank them very
much. Everything was in
my billfold that was sup-
posed to be there and I
thank them very much.
Beautiful sight
I know it might sound
strange to have me de-
scribe the military ceme-
tery down at Bushnell as
being beautiful,
but if you want to C M
see something
that really reflects
the concern and
support for our
veterans, you can
see what they've 1
done with the
wounded veterans CAL
that are buried
down there. Every 563'-(
one of them in
that front section,
there must be thousands
of wreaths have been
placed against every
stone. It's the most beau-
tiful sight I've ever seen.
It's just unbelievable. It's
worth the drive down
there if you've never been
there.
Packed pews
I just want to tell the
Cornerstone Baptist
Church that on Sundays
when I go by there, I have
never, ever seen so many
cars in a parking lot. They
don't have room for one
more car and they have a
huge parking lot. Corner-
stone, you must be doing
something right. God
bless you.
Little light of yours
A message to the
neighbors: Come on,
neighbors. Fix your pole
lights. Put new bulbs in
them. The streets are get-
ting very dark. Let's be
safe in our neighborhoods.
Please replace your bulbs
and your yard lights. You
owe it to yourself and your
neighbors.


I


I


(


This call is in regards to
the Chronicle this morning
(Dec. 29) in regards to
"JJ" Kenney wanting to
build the new dog shelter.
I think it's a very, very
good idea. I thought about
it myself a year and a half
ago, to let these prisoners
take care of these dogs
that need help. They can't
speak; they're little hu-
mans. And if you people
can't see that, you proba-
bly don't have dogs. You're
probably the ones that
leave your dogs chained
up outside in the cold and
in the heat.
Let manatees be
This is in concern of the
Three Sisters, in the back
where the nice
J ND springs are. If you
Seen it during the
Oll open house and
during this week-
end, Christmas
holiday weekend,
the amount of
*40 kayaks, paddle-
Sboards and swim-
5 mers back there
0579 disturbing the
water, not only
disturbing the
manatees that are asleep.
If we're wondering where all
our ground's going, it's been
washed up by all the peo-
ple walking on the bottom,
stirring the bottom up. Not
only that, they showed less
respect of the manatees,
chasing them off to the
colder waters. So we need
to do something about
monitoring how many peo-
ple go through the back.
Take responsibility
Once again the Citrus
County ... mentality has
spoken. Instead of taking
care of those who can't take
care of themselves, we have
residents who want govern-
ment to take care of every-
body That is not government's
job. Lazy people should
get off their duff, accept
responsibilities for animals
and children ... and let's get
on with doing the right things
instead of the "me, me, me."
Art's got heart
Today, Monday, Dec. 30,
what a great story on Art
Jones. That man has done
more than most people
can imagine.


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At the following outlets...
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Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 795-3149
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Inverness Chamber of Commerce 726-2801
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Food & Camping Available Jr Tractor Race Every Day
3 Sleds Pulling in Covered Arena


Citrus County Fair
Truck & Tractor Pull
Jai. 24- 25, 2014
Advance Registration Forms Online at
www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html
Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2993
citruscountyfair@embarqmail.com


OOPS
Continued from Page Cl

danger of collapse.
The message is finally
getting through. A bipar-
tisan band of concerned
senators has drafted a
bill that begins to correct
the neglect that has mas-
queraded as legislative
oversight in recent
years. The bill is a fluid
work in progress, but
this much is clear: What
ails our springs cannot
be corrected by throwing
a few million dollars at
the problem. We must
stop overpumping the
aquifer And we must
stop pollution at its
source.
But as surely as the
sun comes rising in the
east, the pushback is in
full swing. A wide-
ranging consortium of
business leaders -
including developers,
farmers and fertilizer
suppliers has pre-
dictably responded with
"Not so fast."
Many are the same
folks who once insisted
that "we don't have a
problem," before switch-
ing gears to "we can't af-
ford to fix this." Now
they claim "we need
more studies so that
sound science" can point
the way, a tired argu-
ment which echoes the
tobacco industry's deny-
and-delay response to
the surgeon general's
1964 report linking
smoking to cancer
Come on, Florida. If


Puirp,
Floiida, \d-a i
Sa.1Hdai |
G '!llill !l, !
,!.\ I, H ,,n .1 ,,r
Glch,.! \V.|,,!l,, T ll.


that's the best we can do,
why don't we just be hon-
est with ourselves and
each other and admit that
we're really only inter-
ested in fixing our springs
if it's convenient and pain-
less to do so?
And while we're at it,
why don't we gather our
children and grandchil-
dren and confess this dirty
little secret: They deserve
no better than to inherit a
state in which our pristine
springs, running clear and
blue, can be found only in
old pictures and fading
memories for that is
surely the message we've
conveyed in deed, if not in
word.
In the absence of evi-
dence to the contrary,
Floridians increasingly
have concluded that our
state agencies formerly
national models of wise
water governance are
now engaged in an elabo-
rate charade to create the
illusion of environmental
protection.
Think about it. "Protec-
tion" means to safeguard
from injury or harm. If the
springs were our children,
the Department of Chil-
dren and Families would
long ago have acted to
place them in the care of
responsible adults.
If you find these words
extreme, you'd do well to
visit springseternalproject
.org. Spend some time
watching stunning decline
of our springs over the past
30 years. Listen to the pic-
tures. And then listen to
your heart.
What we have here in
Florida is a failure of


Fg'.' sa I River
_:O a.m.
3 P5Pirnl Heart
w it rrle
' . uiii iH!!d~ warriors


All Gave Sonw0omne Gave All
Ho,,tcd h\ the bL1 t'/Imh.td P.iliotrs of
A.II o paki -6
Niliti.,lo w'(, lpIc H,nt
FeItintiln!, t1q i 'u11N l Memorial
Poit-.u it Nip J LIt' :ij.jl Ic m!lii. hy
P iul .1 J l ,1d .I.1 1i. 1 L i .W1l Ici_'ih N tiller
VErER\I.SI \L%\D '0, RD!I LL) INVITED
Ci il)NuiiE


LieGrr SHINE 2014.
JR SA.j n |rIi


Blues From TheInside Out:
An Intmspection Of Blues

H Randall "Big Daddy" Webster's "Blues From The
Inside Out: An Introspection of Blues" is a
participatory lecture-performance program that will
take you deep into Blues music, and how performing
Blues can empower people through expressing
themselves. Blues From The Inside Out will teach you
that delicate "dance" and give you an opportunity to
,,* j- express yourself through Blues performance.

".- ..".":....:.. "C -NIE

Shepherd of the H1la EpIncopal Church.
1540W. Norvmal Brymi Highwuy (CR 486). Lcainlo
Far. M.,e l c-nai. mlk 33.-SZ7-dMS2 1p .Ip


S community history o literacy

, OUT LOUD!


7th Annual

African

American

Read-In



Sunday, Feb. 9, 2014

2:30-4:30 PM

Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature.
Enjoy musical entertainment & refreshments
during this celebration of history & literacy at
CF Citrus Campus. Join us out loud!
Learn More: http://facebook.com/citrusaari

Ci [ON KXE |


Our springs
are world-class
treasures, and
they deserve
world-class
protection.

imagination and a poverty
of spirit that has enabled a
system of governance that
seemingly knows the cost
of everything but the value
of nothing. We've done
nothing to deserve the gift
of these pools of stunning
blue wonder the finest
springs the world has ever
known. And our only
charge was to find a way to
not screw it up.
Here's a New Year's res-
olution we can all get behind:
Our springs are world-
class treasures, and they
deserve world-class pro-
tection. If you believe this
to be true, then Tallahas-







Central FloridaLJ Io
ReistefpWrToday^tn

795-5483~ijn^
I S!iM lTponsord By


see needs to hear from you,
because you can be sure
our legislators are getting
an earful from powerful
polluters who value their
private profits more than
our public waters.
The future of our
springs depends on public
advocacy We can no longer
afford to buy the false di-
chotomy that would have
us choose between a
healthy economy and a
healthy environment, for
the former will surely
wither and die without the
latter. Nothing less than
the soul of Florida hangs
in the balance. And that is
a message we can take to
heart as we resolve to
make tomorrow a better
day in Florida.

John Moran and Lesley
Gamble are the creators
of the Springs Eternal
Project. Learn more at
SpringsEtemrnalProject org.


Make plans to attend this unique event brought to
you in partnership with CF,Workforce Connection,
EDC,and Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.

ATTEND THIS UNIQUE WORKSHOP
Each registered participant will attend a workshop in the following:
Do's and Don'ts of the Interview
Navigating the workplace
Resume writing '101'
Social Media for Job Seekers
Participate in a 'mock' interview with a professional
in their chosen field
Register today at www.citrusunitedway.org
or call 352-795-5483
Each registered attendee will receive a ticket for breakfast and lunch.
Doors open at 8 am. This FREE workshop is brought to you in partnership
with Workforce Connection and College of CF Citrus Campus.
We thank our United Way partners: CenterState Bank,
Publix Supermarket Charities, The Citrus County Chronicle,
Cypress Cove Care Center, Sheldon Palmes Insurance, Sibex, LIVE UNIIFE
and State Farm agent Michael Bays and our event partners 'j-{D.o~ P flf
CF and Workforce Connection. CHJ4NU A Mi L__-

Jan 16
Citrus County Historical Society
MUSIC AT THE MUSEUM: SINGING TREE -
HAMMERED DULCIMER & BASS VIOLIN
Old Courthouse Museum Inverness
Doors open at 6:15 PM
Contact Phone: 341-6427 or 341-6436

Jan 18 9AM-5PM 19 9 AM 4 PM
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
MANATEE FEST CRYSTAL RIVER
Contact Phone: 726-9814 or 201-2656

Jan 19-4 PM
Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church
LIGHT SHINE: BLUES FROM THE INSIDE OUT
Contact Phone: 527-0052

Jan 20 10 AM
George Washington Carver Community Ctr.
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. PARADE
Crystal River Parade begins at
7th Ave between 3rd & 4th St leading to Gulf
To Lake Hwy to 12th Ave, to
3rd Street and ending at Copeland Park.
Contact Phone: 777-1214

Jan 24 -8:30AM-2:00 PM
United Way of Citrus County
LAND THAT JOB CF, Lecanto
Contact Phone: 795-5483

Jan 24 11:00 AM
West Citrus Ladies of the Elks
FASHION SHOW BURST OF COLOR
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Elks Lodge $20.00
Contact Phone: 352-382-4748

Jan 24- 4PM-6PM Jan 25- 1 OAM-1 PM
Citrus County Fair
15TH ANNUAL TRUCK AND TRACTOR PULL
Citrus County Fair Grounds
Entrance: $8 adults, $4 children 4-11
Contact Phone: 726-2993

Jan 25 7 AM
ROCCS*
CITRUS SPRINTS SCHOLASTIC REGATTA
Lake Henderson, Inverness Free
Contact Phone: 352-601-6195

Jan 25 9:30 AM
Citrus County Senior Foundation
A Day at The Races
Tampa Bay Downs $48
Contact Phone: 527-5959


2r&7'Proceeds Benefit---a-w-
'-.2-_Ybuth Scholarships -1


C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS CONTY CHRONICLE
^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ -^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


As demand for senior services provided by nurses' aides,

home health aides and other such workers grows with the

aging of baby boomers, so are those professions' employment

of other seniors. The new face of America's network of

caregivers is increasingly wrinkled.


































Aging in America



Seniors caring for seniors


6NOBLESVILLE, Ind.


aul Gregoline lies in bed,
awaiting the helper who will
get him up, bathed and
groomed. He is 92 years old,
has Alzheimer's disease and
needs a hand with nearly every task
the day brings. When the aide ar-
rives, though, he doesn't look so dif-
ferent from the client himself-
bald and bespectacled.
"Just a couple of old geezers,"
jokes Warren Manchess, the 74-year-
old caregiver
Among the overall population of
direct-care workers, 29 percent are
projected to be 55 or older by 2018,
up from 22 percent a decade earlier,
according to an analysis by the
Paraprofessional Healthcare Insti-
tute, or PHI, a New York-based non-
profit advocating for workers caring
for the country's elderly and dis-
abled. In some segments of the
workforce, including personal and
home care aides, those 55 and older
are the largest single age demo-
graphic.
"I think people are surprised that
this workforce is as old as it is," said
Abby Marquand, a researcher at
PHI. "There's often people who
have chronic disease themselves
who have to muster up the energy to
perform these really physically tax-
ing caregiving needs."
Manchess came out of retirement
to work for Home Instead Senior
Care after caring for his mother-in-
law, who, too, had Alzheimer's and
whom he regarded as his hero. The


Did you know?

AGING WORKFORCE: Growing
demand for senior services provided
by nurses' aides, home health aides
and other such workers along with
aging baby boomers has led to more
employment for senior caregivers.
FILLING A NEED: Some of the
change is driven by the overall
aging of the population and the
trend of people working later in life.
But with high turnover and a constant


need for more workers, home care
agencies are willing to hire older
people new to the field who have
found a tough job market as they try
to supplement their retirement
income.
THE BAD NEWS: The jobs are
among the fastest-growing positions
in the U.S., but are also notoriously
physically demanding, with low pay
and high rates of injury.


Caregiver Warren Manchess, 74, left, shaves Paul Gregoline, in
Noblesville, Ind. Gregoline is 92 years old and battling Alzheimer's and
needs a hand with nearly every task the day brings. Burgeoning
demand for senior services like home health aides is being met by a
surprising segment of the workforce: Other seniors. Twenty-nine
percent of so-called direct-care workers are projected to be 55 or older
by 2018 and in some segments of that population older workers are the
single largest age demographic. With high rates of turnover, home care
agencies have shown a willingness to hire older people new to the
field who have found a tough job market as they try to supplement their
retirement income.


experience, though taxing, inspired
his new career
Three days a week, he arrives at
Gregoline's house, giving the retired
electrician's wife a needed break.
He carefully shaves and dresses his
client, prepares breakfast and
lunch, cleans the house and quickly
remedies any accidents. He does


the laundry and swaddles Gregoline
in a warm towel from the dryer,
reads him the sports page to keep
him updated on his beloved Bears
and sometimes pulls out dominoes
or puzzles to pass the time.
Gregoline is rather sedate this af-


Page D3


Getting ahead in business with a short r6sum6


Associated Press
NEW YORK -Hey twentysome-
things, dreaming of trading in the
safety of a regular paycheck to start
your own business? There's no secret
sauce. Instead, founders of three com-
panies have obvious tips: Work hard,
network and ask for help.
Chicago venture capitalist Bruce
Barron, who has invested in compa-
nies including food ordering service
GrubHub and pet products website
doggyloot seconds that. He counsels
young entrepreneurs to be open to ad-
vice. Some young company owners
"wanted us to write a check and just
get out of the way Those qualities
don't bode well for us. We want to see
people who are collaborative," he says.
Three entrepreneurs who success-
fully raised money for their companies
underscore the importance of hard
work, of course and making friends


and playing nice.
HOMEJOY
FOUNDERS: Adora Cheung, 30, and
her brother Aaron Cheung, 25
STARTED IN: Mountain View, Calif,
July 2012
THE BUSINESS: Now based in San
Francisco, Homejoy's website con-
nects more than 100,000 house clean-
ers with customers in about 30 cities in
the U.S. and Canada
MONEY RAISED: $40 million
BIG BACKER: Max Levchin, co-
founder of PayPal
Coming out of the University of
Rochester, which had no entrepre-
neurial community that she was aware
of, Adora Cheung wanted to learn how
startups work. She joined a Bay Area
See Page D3


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON- Treasury
releases federal budget for
December, 2 p.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON- Commerce
Department releases retail sales
data for December, 8:30 a.m.; Com-
merce Department releases busi-
ness inventories for November,
10 a.m.
MUMBAI, India India's closely
watched statistics are released.
*FRIDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Labor Depart-
ment releases Consumer Price
Index for December, 8:30 a.m.;
Freddie Mac, the mortgage
company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises above $93
after US jobs data

NEW YORK -The price of oil
jumped to above $93 a barrel Fri-
day, recouping some recent losses
as the U.S. economy added fewer
jobs than expected, fueling specu-
lation that the Federal Reserve
will reconsider its plans to slow
economic stimulus.
By mid-afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. oil for February
delivery was up $1.41 to $93.07 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
On Thursday, the contract fell 67
cents to $91.66, its lowest close in
eight months.
Although the unusually cold win-
ter in the U.S. is expected to fuel
demand for refined oil products,
global supplies of crude oil are
ample despite some persisting con-
cerns about political instability in
the Middle East.

Markets brush off
weak US jobs report

LONDON -Weak U.S. jobs fig-
ures weighed only slightly on
global stocks Friday, with the disap-
pointment largely assuaged by
hopes the Federal Reserve won't
reduce its monetary stimulus again
in the near future. The dollar, how-
ever, suffered a big reverse.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index
of leading British shares was up
0.7 percent at 6,739.94 while Ger-
many's DAX rose 0.6 percent to
9,473.24. The CAC-40 in France was
0.6 percent higher at 4,250.60.
In the U.S., the Dow Jones indus-
trial average was down 0.3 percent
at 16,393 while the broader S&P
500 index fell 0.2 percent to 1,834.
Japan's Nikkei closed with a
slight gain of 0.2 percent to
15,912.06 while Hong Kong's Hang
Seng rose by 0.3 percent to
22,846.25.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SSMART
MONEY


Properly


given gifts


are no IRS


concern

EAR BRUCE: A lawyer told
me the IRS no longer looks
back on gifts to children. Is
this true? I value your opinion.
-Jim, via email
DEAR JIM: I am not sure why
you are asking me about the IRS.
Once a gift has been made appro-
priately, the IRS is out of it.
Look-backs are important when
money is given to children and
then some type of aid is collected,
usually from Medicaid. When pub-
lic benefits are paid to a person
who has given money away, upon
that person's demise, the state may
look to the receivers of the money
and ask that the money be re-
turned, at least as far as the re-
ceivers are able to return what was
advanced during the individual's
lifetime.
In other words, if the money was
clearly given to avoid paying the
person's bills, and it was given
within the statutory look-back pe-
riod, the state may come after the
person's estate.
There may be some reason the
IRS at one time would be inter-
ested, but I can see no legitimate
reason. If the money is given up to
the limits allowed, that's the end of
the story, assuming the look-back
requirement is satisfied.
DEAR BRUCE: I have an ac-
count with Edward Jones worth al-
most $136,000. I take out $400 a
See Page D3










I


2


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber.com/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
Jan. 18 and 19 Florida Manatee
Festival




ai a ME ip ulier
Wlnmb el tvlS
JO 'mAaE~AuWY
Thursdav. Febaru 6. 2014
5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
CMUS ihm i bCA AtnrwiV ~ A-4WGrgce St. knl
Wls CasCA Hotoeuero l.er & Wiw
SHALIA 9Te Keana v amur ceipfs 10 YeA' ) rY
CeIkbuld l Hjat, Hett Fillr
Saturday. Fobraey 22. M214
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Fun Food Scrme"f !4Tours
imcmk Sdaol Buliid IIHplul Campia

Feb. 6 Business After Hours
hosted by Citrus Memorial, 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
Feb. 7 Chamber Luncheon with
the Florida Public Relations Associa-
tion, 11:30 a.m. to 1p.m.
Feb. 20 Business After Hours
hosted by Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
March 1 and 2 Floral City
Strawberry Festival
March 13 Business After Hours
hosted by the Mullet Hole Tavern,
5 to 7 p.m.

Community
events
Jan. 16 and 17 Nature Coast EMS
announces the next PEPP Class, (Pe-
diatric Education for pre-hospital
providers, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
our education center located at
3876 W Country Hill Drive, Lecanto,
Florida 34461. Contact Jane Bedford
at janeb@naturecoastems.org, or
call 352-249-4700.
Jan. 16-Tobacco Free Partnership
of Citrus County meeting, 3:30 to
4:30 at the Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Rd., Inverness. Call 352-
527-0068 ext. 342.
Jan. 18- Inverness Famer Market,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Inverness Govern-
ment Center Plaza, 212 W. Main
Street. Call 352-726-2611.
Jan. 20 Martin Luther King, Jr. Pa-
rade, 10 a.m., along State Road 44 to
NE 9th Avenue ending at Copeland
Park.
Jan. 20- MLK Jr. Unity Walk, 8:30
a.m. begins at Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, One MLK Jr. Drive to Lib-
erty Park, Inverness, short
ceremony with recitation of Rev.
King's I Have Dream speech.
Jan. 22 and 23 Nature Coast EMS
PALS Class, (Pediatric Advanced Life
Support), from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
our education center located at
3876 W Country Hill Drive, Lecanto,
Florida 34461. Nature Coast EMS of-
fers this course as part of our com-
mitment to the mission of the
American Heart Association. Contact
Jane Bedford at janeb@naturecoast-
ems.org, or call 352-249-4700.
Jan. 24 and 25 15th Annual Cit-
rus County Fair Truck and Tractor
Pull, 3600 S. Florida Avenue, Inver-
ness. Visit citruscountyfair.com/trac-
tor.html or call 352-726-2993.





brttuflht ( y.u n ptnW*(ip- rih cy,
ATTEND THIS UNIQUE WORKSHOPa-,

Wi~eqa,4 ees
Ihdi~cmmimvq nin
llKCehillfeCI- n lllt e SkI
*m4 dbhlr bS..t.p



Jan. 24 Land that Job event pre-
sented by the United Way of Citrus
County, 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at
the College of Central Florida Cam-
pus. Learn the dos and don't of a
job interview and how to navigate the
workplace. Register at CitrusUnited
Way.org or call 352-795-5483.


Citrus County is headed to Tallahassee!


F--
cnMus COUNTY
Cabmnbw of.G.m


'IL


alGvwnorsDlu
~d~dWmuCmft
I hbvNmw


Legislative Day + Pre-Evening Reception and Optional Dinner:
Wednesday and Thursday, March 19-20, 2014
* Includes round trip bus transportation to Tallahassee, including evening
reception on Wednesday and lunch on Thursday
* Optional: Join the Chamber for Dutch Treat dinner at Andrews 228
downtown (Private Dining Room; limited to 1st 50 to sign up)
* Cost: $65/person


Legislative Day (only):
Thursday, March 20,2014
* Includes round trip bus transportation to
Tallahassee and lunch @ Governor's Club
* Cost: $65/person


Reserve online at www.citruscountychamber.com and click on News & Events tab;
or call Ardath Prendergast or Heather Gibson at 352-726-2801.


HOTEL INFORMATION: [Hotel deadline: February 19!]
You are responsible for making your hotel reservation and costs. We have room blocks under the Chamber of Commerce at
both the Homewood Suites Tallahassee (our "headquarters" hotel) and the Hampton Inn Central (next door to the
Homewood) on Apalachee Parkway. The bus will take you to the Tallahassee Center in the morning.
* Homewood Suites ($189/night + tax) or Hampton Inn ($139/night + tax): Call 850-402-9400 and request to reserve


under the group name of "Citrus County Chamber".
Pk- qjb
Presented by C CSuMty 1!"2
c a.M~~


Become a sponsor for Legislative Day events!
For information, call Ardath at 352-726-2801.


SupportingCt ^ lI:
Partners .
!2,1111


Gold
Sponsors


A *-.-
<6s1ws>


F'LVD',,IO, A



h$sk61 P"'1 Satuday, Jan. 18 2014 starts at L9am. until 5 m 41ro.,
0 them SundaV, Jan. 19,2014 starts atla.mL. unt 4 p.m. u
In downtown Crystal Fivtler, FL
Waterside- Manatee Boat Tours, Civil War Era Scow
Three Siters Springs Open Both Days
Entertatmnient -LesterFreeman A"D"Band
1Tho BiluandesRa d Mel& CGiLikum
Down sitn- AM& ( 9Ift
FluinAl on D150ay
Merne Ri[KIV'Tlne
Akulsinn54 per per ffldon, 121 ud&r trio
FwkridMurPJIMFesIWLCT o 352-79S-1 T49 110L


ifB fjCfyw abw
Irmui Nu m n oWity Club


ii\hI.L


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


FLORAL CITY STRAOM .RRT FSTTIVAL


SAVE THE DATE


Saturday, March 1,2014 starts at 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Sunday, March Z 2014 starts at 9 am. until 4 p.m.
Floral City Park

n', l.'2v Entrtrasnent
AM & L~Crfts
^S ^ II&Wt DP


Prnesented by CRYTA --vIIf$ ,i
CRYSTAL -u


Sho TDbacio Free Rrlda with t Irofld*a Depajrtm of HNmtt ERlum County
.WsMt ,s McCrarnt. Wardtow Cash, PA Mawr Caan IMS Homarmn Vzuk
CitruI ,5PTrueIOdies1Ol.. .T3-heFoX .7


!j c' 1 F. a i -




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Odds of finding job are in your favor this year


I read recently that the aver-
age person falls off the
New Year's resolution
wagon by Jan. 10. Happily, if
you've set your sights on a new
or better job in 2014, the odds
of success are in your favor
Consider that unemploy-
ment is trending in the right
direction. Citrus County's job-
less rate is 7.1 percent, down
2.1 percent over the year Over-
all, Citrus County is at its low-
est unemployment rate since
May 2008.
During a post-holiday party, I
caught up with a friend who,
shortly before Christmas 2010,
had been downsized from a
company where he'd worked
for 20 years. At the time, our re-
gional unemployment rate was
14.4 percent and 29,365 people
were out of work.
My friend called for advice
and we talked about the need to


Laura
Byrnies

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


develop a strategic job search
campaign. He lost no time tak-
ing full advantage of our avail-
able services. He participated
in the Refueling and Retooling
for Professionals workshop;
learned new skills through a
paid internship program; and
attended an intensive alterna-
tive work strategies class all
while working contract and
freelance jobs, maintaining his
professional network and


sharpening employability skills.
At the party, he was down-
right ebullient about his new
full-time position that marries
his experience with some of the
new skills he'd developed, in
part thanks to training and help
from Workforce Connection.
Best of all, the company is
growing.
"I can't tell you how good
that feels," he told me. And I
can't tell you how good that
makes me feel.
Did this happen overnight?
Of course not. Even while the
economy continues to improve,
there are no short cuts to re-
employment And it still takes
determination defined as
"firmness of mind or purpose"
- which is just another word
for "resolve."
If you can commit to hard
work and persistence, we'll
commit the tools, services, and


support to help make your New
Year's Resolution a reality
Here's what I recommend:
Visit our One-Stop Career
Center, currently located in In-
verness and opening Jan. 27 at
683 S. Adolph Point in Lecanto.
Tell the folks at the Welcome
Desk that you want our staff-as-
sisted "Roadmap to Employ-
ment" services. Remember,
there is no charge.
Check Events Calendar at
workforceconnectionfl.com for
a listing of free workshops and
services offered at our one-
stops, community locations and
via our mobile resource units.
Visit the Job Seeker Re-
source Center on our website
for tips, strategies and re-
sources available 24/7. You'll
also find no-cost Short-Term
Training you can do from the
comfort of your home or at one
of our computer labs. Offerings


include customer service rep-
resentative training, keyboard-
ing, Microsoft basic and
advanced, online languages, so-
cial media and marketing and
more. You can even have your
training validated for prospec-
tive employers.
Follow us on Twitter to get
the latest on job alerts, training
opportunities and more -just
use the link on our website to
sign up.
So, let 2014 be your year to
achieve your re-employment
resolution. We resolve to help.
Laura Byrnes, APR, is a
Florida Certified Workforce
Professional and communica-
tions manager at Workforce
Connection, soon to become Ca-
reerSource Citrus Levy Marion.
Please contact her at 352-291-
9559 or 800-434-5627, ext. 1234
or lbyrnes@clm workforce, com.


SENIORS
Continued from Page Dl

afternoon, relaxing in his favorite chair
while occasionally offering glimpses of
his trademark wit. Asked if he remem-
bered anything about the Army, he says:
"It was a bitch!" Offered the chance to
go outside, he responds: "No! I'll freeze
my ass off out there!" Describing an
abrasive personality of long ago, he of-
fers: "He followed me around like a bad
conscience."
Manchess has worked for Gregoline
for about a year, and the men are at ease
around each other Past aides to Grego-
line have been in their 20s, but
Manchess says he thinks his age is an
asset.
"Age can be an advantage," he said,
pointing to the common conversation
points and life experience, including
his own health troubles and aches and
pains that can come with age. "We hit it
off pretty well. Maybe I didn't seem to
be too much out of the ordinary"
Around the country, senior service
agencies are seeing a burgeoning share
of older workers. About one-third of
Home Instead's 65,000 caregivers are
over 60. Visiting Angels, another in-
home care provider, says about 30 per-
cent of its workers are over 50. And at
least one network, Seniors Helping Sen-
iors, is built entirely on the model of hir-
ing older caregivers.
Like most occupations, some of the
growth in older caregivers is driven by


"I think this is about as rewarding,
if not more rewarding, than any of
them (previous careers)."
Warren Manchess
senior caregiver


the overall aging of the population and
the trend of people working later in life.
But with incredibly high rates of
turnover and a constant need for more
workers, home care agencies have also
shown a willingness to hire older peo-
ple new to the field who have found a
tough job market as they try to supple-
ment their retirement income.
The jobs are among the fastest-grow-
ing positions in the U.S., but are also no-
toriously physically demanding, with
low pay and high rates of injury
Manchess has had spinal surgery and
says he's especially careful when vacu-
uming. He's not sure how many years
he'll be able to continue this work, and
he acknowledges it can be tough.
"Halfway through my shift, I'm a little
weary myself," he said. "It takes its toll."
Manchess had worked as an Air Force
pilot, then in real estate, then as a
school bus driver, before becoming a
professional caregiver As Gregoline
contentedly nibbles on his ham sand-
wich, Manchess wraps up his shift, turn-
ing reflective when considering his
life's careers.
"I think this is about as rewarding, if
not more rewarding, than any of them,"
he said.


SMALL
Continued from Page Dl

company, Slide, which was started by
PayPal co-founder Max Levchin.
IMPRESS THEM: Slide didn't
have many employees when Cheung
came on board. "I got to work closely
with Max, and he came to know a lot
of how I work. He and I work on a
very similar sleep schedule," she
says. They would find themselves
talking shop at 4 a.m.
FOLLOWING FRIENDS: After
Cheung left Slide, she and her
brother spent three-and-a-half years
trying to come up with a business.
They participated in the Y Combina-
tor accelerator program, which helps
startups launch. Friends who had
been through the program recom-
mended it.
KEEP IN TOUCH: The Cheungs
were in debt and needed money for
Homejoy Levchin was the first in-
vestor "It was very helpful that Max
knows me and I think he trusts me.
He saw numbers that were going up
and to the right. He gave us a bit of
money," Cheung says. After that,
other investors wanted in.
SWEETGREEN
FOUNDERS: Former Georgetown


University schoolmates Nicolas Jam-
met, 28; Jonathan Neman, 29; and
Nathaniel Ru, 28
STARTED IN: Washington, D.C., Au-
gust 2007
THE BUSINESS: Twenty-two shops
and 600 employees selling salads,
wraps, soups and juices, in Boston,
New York, Philadelphia, Washington,
D.C. and Maryland and Virginia
MONEY RAISED: $40 million
BIG BACKER: Steve Case,
co-founder of AOL
The trio launched Sweetgreen the
summer after their senior year of col-
lege. Over the years, they raised $17
million from about 100 people before
landing their first investment from a
financial institution in December: $22
million from AOL co-founder Steve
Case's Revolution fund.
m OLD FRIENDS: When the three
had nothing but a business plan and a
possible location, they raised their
first chunk of money $375,000 -
from 25 friends, friends of families,
former bosses and classmates.
ASK NICELY: When approaching
potential advisers and funders, "meet
on their terms" and make it "pain-
less," Neman says. Give the restau-
rant where you are meeting your
credit card before the potential in-
vestor arrives so that the person's
meal or drink is taken care of, and he
or she cannot fight to pay


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

month. They charge me a fee of $31 to
$145 a month. My account representative
keeps telling me I am making 6 percent
annually Is this a smart investment?
-John, via email
DEAR JOHN: It would seem to me
that $31 a month is not unreasonable,
but $145 seems a bit high. You say you
are being told that you are making 6
percent annually Is that net after ex-
penses? If you are actually walking
away with $8,000, it's not bad in today's


world. On the other side of that, if it's 6
percent less somewhere between $400
and $1,600 a year, that's not so good.
There is certainly no reason you
shouldn't be shopping around to see if
you can do better Always take into ac-
count the fees. It is oftentimes a won-
derful thing to be told you are earning a
healthy percentage, but if you don't take
into account the cost of this earning, it is
at best misleading.
Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be provided.


GET
















TODAY

on a reloadable
JH Preferred Prepaid Visa Card





VISA

or $50 discount off tax prep


"New Location" in the Sweetbay Shopping Center
1619 SE Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Time Square Shopping Center
3810 Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR 44)
Inverness, FL 34458
Also Located Inside All Citrus County Walmart Stores

(352) 726-8820 or (888) 282-1040

SiJACKSON HEWIT
-_TAK SERVICE
800-234-1040 JacksonHewitt.com YOuGl


FBI ~ ~ ~ -N I IB B^^~eB
V3











Think


About


Taxes...

Don't be left out of our weekly
tax directory!
Publishes weekly, every Sunday
starting Jan. 19 April 13.
Great rates to advertise your tax preparation
services.
Call to reserves your space;
Anne 564-2931 or Darrell 564-2917
C C I T R U C 0 U N T Y'

CHkoNIMCLE
j ^^ www.chronicleonline.com iwiw,


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 D3











I To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(32 535651TolFee 88)82-30 mal l*sfid *rnclol. ecm ebie w wchoilenin0o


I'm a Lady, 79 yrs
Young, looking for a
gentlman in the
same age group for
friendship. If you'd
like to talk pleas e
call (352) 503-2338


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111

Today's

CA/FRONT DESK
& LMT
PT Villages, M-F 2-8pm
Fax Resume 795-8911
CAR TIRES Firestone
Tires P215/55R/17 Ap-
proximate 20,000 miles
on each
$15 each firm. Call
352-564-1771






I&I









How To
Make Your
Dining Room Set
Disappear..
Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966


Ci i ipNi( E

www.chronicleonline.com i


Dependable, honest,
care giving. Medical
experience w/ ref.
(352) 220-6303
DINING ROOM FURNI-
TURE Small Hutch and
Corner Cabinet.
$150.00 for both.
352-344-5334

must sell!
MASTER TOW
DOLLY
2012 Master Tow Dolly
with spare tire and
wheel. Brakes and light
kit. $900.00 OBO.
352-344-5334
Maytag white
FRIG/FREEZER
-STOVE AND MICRO-
WAVE $350 for all
PH# 352-410-6969
Part-Time Front
Desk Reception
Busy sales office
needs receptionist,
schedule to include
weekends. Must be
friendly, professional
have excellent
phone skills and be
customer service
oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL
Pool Table
Good Shape, $45.
Hot Tub,
like new 4 person
$500
(352) 628-1646
REGISTERING NOW
CNA'S, HHA'S
Companions
new Home Health
Business
FL Caregivers
352-795-7800
Res House Clean
15-20 hrs. Must past BK
GD ck, have valid DL,
dress code req. LM
w/name and reach #.
(352) 422-5535
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


2 young cats came to
us; very friendly but
scared, 1 black, 1
cream, need good
homes, can help with
spay / neuter expenses
352-795-8800
Chest Freezer
14 CF, works
10823 Yulee Dr
Homosassa
Free
Catahula/American
Bull Dog Mix, male,
8 months old
all shots, neutered
(352) 410-8128



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
- Grouper @ $6.001lb
w Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
Black Short Hair Male,
very slim, needs
medicine.BIk & org
collar. Lost 1/9 on
West Cove Harbor Dr/
Pelican Cove, CR
(352) 794-3687
Lost 2 Pairs of
Children's glasses. For
girl. One is red, one is
purple.
(352)419-7378
Male Yorkie, 6 Ibs,
brown & tan, Bubba,
last see on Alamo &
Flagstaff in Pine Ridge
1/5 Had on an army


pitbull. Lost in high-
lands area, near
Apopka and Malverne.
Her name is Babi and
she is 1 1/2 years old.
She belongs to my 7
year old daughter.
Went missing this
morning 1/9/2014
around 7:30am. Please
call 352-601-8344 if
you find her!
Silver colored money
clip. White with green
lettering. Lost in area
of Wells Fargo Bank,
CR (352) 382-7656


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


Denture Partial,
Found in Inverness
Parking Lot near Big
Lots/Anytime Fitness
(352) 220-4931
Prescription Glasses
found 3 weeks ago
at Hunter Springs,
Crystal River, call
to identify
(352) 795-3701



Wanted young/active
female cat, good with
other cats & people.
Updated on shots,
indoor only, spayed,
declawed 341-4103
WE HAVE
The-Ofice of
Dr. Blessilda Liu
942 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy,
Hernando
352-419-8924

B ap


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.OOlb,
- Grouper @ $6.00lb
w Stonecrab@ $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001




TEACHER

Fulltime position. 40
hr certification
needed
LITTLE DISCIPLE
PRESCHOOL
352-302-2383

TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




AVANTE
At Inverness
LPN and CNA
Full time
Evenings and Nights
Excellent pay
and benefits. Please
Apply Online at
Avantecenters.com

CA/FRONT DESK
& LMT
PT, Villages, M-F 2-8pm
Fax Resume 795-8911

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
For Overnight Shifts
Apply Online: home
Instead.com/671

CNAs
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
All Shifts
EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D





ner
k h I I1

Medical Billing/
A/R Specialist:
Seeking FT Medical
Biller with A/R expe-
rience. Minimum 5
years. E-Clinical EMR
software knowledge
helpful. Charge,
payment posting
and Insurance
follow-up required.
Detail oriented and
serious Inquires only
please.
Email resume to
hr@ cmc-fi.com


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Lecanto


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


C~ CITRUS COUNTY


CH-ONICLE
R wmw.chrolclJolln.com


Medical Assist-
ants Needed
With Phlebotomy
and Front Office
Skills for offices in
Dunnellon and
Inglis locations.
Fax Resume to:
352-465-7576 or
Email to: srideven@
yahoo.com

"aEGISTE1hRINGN

Companions
new Home Health
Business
FL Caregivers
352-795-7800

RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF





City of Bushnell
Lift Station
Maintenance
Mechanic -
Water/Wastewater
Department
The City of Bushnell
is currently accept-
ing applications for
the position of Lift
Station Maintenance
Mechanic. Salary
is based on experi-
ence and includes
an excellent
benefits package.
Applicants must
meet the following
requirements:
Ability to trouble-
shoot and repair 3
phase electrical
service and controls,
maintain pumps,
blowers, valves,
meters, control
systems, piping, and
other equipment
related to water/
/wastewater plant
and distribution/
collection systems.
A high school
diploma or GED
required, with a DEP
collection system
certification pre-
ferred or ability to
become certified
within two years.
Applicants must
possess a valid
Florida Class A or B
CDL driver's license
or become certified
in three months.
Applications are
available at Bushnell
City Hall located at
117 E Joe P Strick-
land, JR Ave.
Bushnell, Florida or
on-line at http:www.
cityofbushnellfl.com.
Applications ac-
cepted until position
filled. Questions
concerning this
position may be
directed to Kelly
Marcoux,
352-793-2591 x 114.
This position is open
until filled. The City
of Bushnell is a drug
free workplace
EOE/ADA

Community
Center
Supervisor
Announcement
# 14-05
Supervises commu-
nity center staff
including selecting,
training, scheduling
and evaluating
work, counseling,
disciplining and
terminating or rec-
ommending termi-
nation. Requires
Bachelor's degree
or education and
training equivalent
to four years of col-
lege education in
leisure services, rec-
reation, marketing
or a closely related
field. Must be able
to lift 50-75 Ibs.
Must have prior
event coordinator
experience. Re-
quires at least two
years experience in
a related field.
Starting pay
$1,472.15 B/W.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, Jan. 17, 2014
EOE/ADA.


GIS Specialist
Announcement
# 14-06
Create or prepare
graphic representa-
tions of Geographic
Information Systems
(GIS) data. Requires
Associate's degree,
vocational techni-
cal degree or
specialized training
that is equivalent to
satisfactory comple-
tion of two years of
college education
in GIS, Computer
Science or closely
related field.
Starting pay
$13.46 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, Jan. 17, 2014

INTERNET
MARKETING
Wanted motived
person with Photo-
shop, social media
and html skills as well
as a knowledge of
email marketing and
online marketing.
Great opportunity
with a growing com-
pany with clients
worldwide.
Check us out here
http://Imqmc.com/
company/careers/
To apply email
resume to:
Andrew@ legendary
marketing.com

Library Systems
Support
Technician
Announcement
#14-04
Responsible for pro-
viding information
systems support to a
five branch public
library system. Per-
forms daily server
administration and
maintenance tasks.
Troubleshoots and
solves network
issues, computer
hardware and
software problems,
monitors overall sys-
tem performance,
implements im-
provements and
works with the man-
agement team to
prioritize library
needs. Regularly
performs mainte-
nance and
upgrades on PCs,
mobile devices,
laptops, operating
systems, and print-
ers. Trains staff on
new and current
software and tech-
nologies. Performs
related work as re-
quired .Beginning
rate of pay $15.00.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 17,
2014 EOE/ADA

NEW YEAR
NEW CAREER!

Tired of dead end
jobs?
Sick of workplace
uncertainty?
New opportunities
with established 35+
year local company
* Looking for goal
oriented individuals
* Training provided
* Average com-
pensation $50k+ yr.
* Company spon-
sored trips and
incentives
2 Positions Open
For immediate hire
Fax Resume to
Karen 352-726-6813
or Call 352-726-7722


User Support
Analyst
Announcement
#14-07
Complex and re-
sponsible technical
work in planning,
designing, imple-
menting, coordi-
nating, evaluating
and enhancing
the Fifth Judicial
Circuit's distributed
computer system
network. Beginning
rate of pay
$1,292.98 B/W.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
for more information
and to apply for this
position. You can
also visit one of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 17,
2014 EOE/ADA







Country Club
Restaurant
FT Night Cook
Must be exp:
Apply at Oak Run
SR200& 110th
Street
Ocala, FL 34481
or Call:
352-854-6557 X13
EEOC/DFWP







A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic
Must have valid
driver's license.
Min. 3 yrs. Exp.
Applyv in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto, DFWP



DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624



Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net







Maintenance
Worker
Announcement
# 14-03
This position is
unskilled and semi-
skilled work assisting
in the road mainte-
nance operations
and use of construc-
tion and mainte-
nance equipment.
Duties include
patching potholes,
clearing ditches
and swales, vegeta-
tion control, sign
repair/replacement,
and heavy manual
labor tasks. This
position requires the
ability to work out-
doors in hot/cold
weather conditions
and requires pro-
longed standing,
heavy lifting, push-
ing, bending, climb-
ing, reaching and
pulling. May oper-
ate light equipment
in an occasional or
temporary basis.
Performs related
work as required.
Starting pay
$11.88 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 17,
2014 EOE/ADA.


Case Manager/
Farm Manager

Fax or Email
Resume to:
352-489-8505
sipperd@
bellsouth.net

Part-Time Front
Desk Reception
Busy sales office
needs receptionist,
schedule to include
weekends. Must be
friendly, professional
have excellent
phone skills and be
customer service
oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351

Security for a
Shelter

Evenings
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sipperd@
bellsouth.net

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only
Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
Gerry (352) 628-0254

Transit Diver
Announcement
# 14-08
This classification is
required to operate
a Bus or Van. Able
to load and unload,
move and secure
stretchers, secure
wheelchair; assist
with infant, elderly,
frail and disabled
passengers while
boarding and de-
parting vehicles.
Completes pre and
post trip inspections.
Checking and filling
fluids, lights, mirrors,
tires, wheelchair lift,
radio, body dam-
age and more.
Maintain check list;
cleaning and in-
specting vehicle be-
fore and after run.
Reports accidents,
keeps records and
reports. Performs
other tasks as as-
signed. Starting pay
$11.09 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 17,
2014 EOE/ADA.




Local smoke-free
Tennis Club
Looking for
part-time help with
computer skills
(Word, Excel) and
great customer
service skills. Week-
end shifts available,
flexibility a plus.
Pays $7.93 hr. E-mail
resume to: tennis@
citrushills.com
Res House Clean
15-20 hrs. Must past BK
GD ck, have valid DL,
dress code req. LM
w/name and reach #.
(352) 422-5535





Lir\\ orid firsi

Need a ji-l


qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


D4 SUNDAYJANUARY12,.2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


Financial

Tax Accountant
2 5 yrs. Business Tax
Exp. ,CPA preferred
Qualified Persons
Send Resume to
Cpa.resume.search
@gmail.com








ALL CLASSES
FOR 2014
Spring Hill &
New Port Richey

* COSMETOLOGY
* BARBERING
* NAILS SKIN
* MASSAGE Therapy
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty &
Instructor Training
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.
CAFE FOR LEASE
400 SF Located in
Busy waterfront boat
tour, rental company
and artist community
RIVER SAFARIS
10823 Yulee Drive
352-628-5222



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
527.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Yom \ orld first

Need a jih
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classified


ANTIQUE STEAMER
TRUNK. 36" X 22" X
23" Tall. Good condition.
$100. 527-1239.




16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316
Contents of 12 x 24
Storage Unit, Displays,
Cases, cabinets, glass,
toys, primitives, over
2,000 items, 1 price,
all or nothing, Call
489-8323 for Appt.




6 CU. FT. CHEST
FREEZER Kenmore
white 6 cu. ft. chest
freezer with basket and
owners manual 'only
used for a month$85.00
352-4194767
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
FREEZER small chest
freezer $40.00 works
good 352-302-3771
Maytag white
FRIG/FREEZER
-STOVE AND MICRO-
WAVE $350 for all
PH# 352-410-6969
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398




Schmann Casters &
Equipment
Company Inc.
LIVE & ONLINE
Tuesday, January
28th at 10am
1299 W Beaver
Street, Jacksonville,
Fl32204
Tremendous amount
of New Material
Handling Equipment,
Forklift, Boat Trailers,
Racking, Scrap
Metal, Steel Casters,
Dollies, Conveyor &
much more.
ABC Case
No.:16-2013-CA-010616.
Details at
www.moecker
auctions.corn
(800) 840-BIDS.
15%-18%BP, $100
ref. cash dep. Subj
to confirm.


AIR COMPRESSOR
30 gal, 5hp, 150 psi,
Craftsman $125;
ROTOTILLER, Honda, 4
cycle, Model #FG-110
$175(352) 794-0296
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$50 OBO
352-464-0316
MITER SAW
Sears, 12" compound
$100; Leaf Blower,
mulcher and vacuum
Ryoby ,like new $100
OBO (352) 794-0296
OLDER STYLE
CRAFTMAN WORK-
BENCH $40.00
352-527-1399
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $90 HAND
HELD HEAVY DUTY
OLDER MODEL
419-5981
SCAFFOLD 4ft. and 5ft.
scaffold and braces
$20.00 set
352-302-3771



150 WATT JVC THEA-
TER SURROUND
SOUND SYSTEM JVC
DVD Digital Home thea-
ter system,5disc
CD,four tower
speakers,subwoofer
and midrange speakers,
remote $100.00
352-419-4767

Building

STAINLESS SINK Dbl
basin. 33"x22"x6"
w/atchs.Ex cond.
$75 OBO.
352-637-5969
STEEL BUILDING
CLEARANCE: Five
Only 25x32, 30x40,
40x60,60x100,
100x240.Straight
walls! Choose Color!
FREE Freight! Local
Office: Punta Gorda!
Call Now For
Quote! 1-800-237-962
0, ext. 941



65" HDTV
$100
503-3467
Spotless King Size
Simmons Beauty Rest
Mattress, box spring,
aprox. 7 or 8 yrs. old
$395. Call Ken
(352) 382-5149


I Tools -1^


SUNDAY,JANUARY 12,2014 D5


CLASSIFIED



FLAT SCREEN MONI-
TOR 19" viewsonic flat
screen computer moni-
tor
$35.00 352-302-3771



5 pc. Dining Set
w/swivel chairs, wicker
backs, square table &
sage/brown $225.
(352) 897-4154



2 VINTAGE CHAIRS.
Gold swivel rocker and
brown/rust fixed chair.
Nice condition. $25 for
both. 527-1239


2 VINTAGE COFFEE
TABLES. 1 round with
lazy susan. 1 rectangu-
lar. Both maple. $25 for
both. 527-1239

Antique Couch & two
swivel rockers
$200. for all 3
Good condition
352-6344329

BOOK CASE large oak
bookcase
18x30x72 $95.00
352-621-3360

DINING ROOM BUFFET
light gray wood, 4
drawers, cupboard,
cut. board. 4'7"' L, 19"
W $65. (352) 465-1262


S/ ,v ,. ...'. ..





Chronicle ::./ '.

Classifieds / ''H

In Print '.


DINING ROOM FURNI-
TURE Small Hutch and
Corner Cabinet.
$150.00 for both.
352-344-5334

DINING TABLE AND 4
CHAIRS Solid wood
Canadel Brand. Table
30X48 with white legs.
Chairs with white legs
and backs. Great for
small dining area or
kitchen. $200 or best
offer. Phone:
352-270-3685

DOUBLE BOXSPRING
@ MATTRESS guest
room box spring used
very little, clean. $85
352-613-5240


*4

I1


I:?
Ii
I,


wmEna3 D kn .ry


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Dependable, honest,
care giving. Medical
experience w/ ref.
(352) 220-6303
Exo. Help for Elderly
Care. Lgt Housekping,
dr's appt's, shopping
etc.. (352) 422-3837
LICENSED CNA,
For Errands, Shopping
Dr. Appt.'s, References
352-362-2665



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

,;ii* I"L
ttll 'v, l ud I 'St.
Lk) D,) II

C % lspNifE
Class fieds


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912
OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352) 637-6641


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
VFAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

r NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR &
MAINT. INC
Offering a FullI
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homerepair. om
Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover
LiiiiMi


Wandyman
* FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
S352-257-9508 *
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334


Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447

Home/Offic
Cleaning


Hme

Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


F- i--jl1-


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Landscaping


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


b ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




.4.


POOL.

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


Riemodelin
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower cony. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofino- Inc.corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service, p arts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452






Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


1.1t ',, ,i I I l1 st.



Classifieds


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
K, *9 Small Carpentry
P, eFencing
A ., x reening
1 :. Clean Dryer Vents
AIoolt "itt' & Dependable
r E.%pterience lifelong
[ 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


GENERAL r- 'j
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators|
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377








W4(. fth W&.dec tMm
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


S"- i -Exposed
Aggregate
V-.Shotcrete $451yd.
FE Decks, Tile
FREE Pavers
ESTIMATES >rr
0 HEUG COMPLETE
Until 0 REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
,,ESE ED352-746-5200





Ted's Painting
s &me Services Co.






All Types of Home Repairs

746-51901
LIC/INS Lic #240270


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





Install a eir ow's the
Pinnps.Fiteis.l time for pool
Healers" remodeling
a Salt Systems
& *Pool Refinishing
Construction
Remodel
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
WOOdS Sening AilOi CIris COlnhl
POOl'& Spa ..,, ,,,,,:,,,
wwwsmwrols.cm 302-4421
I.-i, ., --. I.. .. . .


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START
A FIRE!
Flat Rate No
Hidden Co ti












SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting -Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair *New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
M 352-364-4610
MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL

24 Hours a Day -7 Days a Week


66 I jii
YOUR INTERLOCKING
BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST _


a7







E- POOL AND PAVERl LC
352-400-3188






AAA ROOFING
Call the Aeak6u tse"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
,Any Re-Roof:,
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic/Ins. CCC057537 00H05K


AAA Miller Auto
& Tire Service
Interior/Exterior Detail & Window Tint
Oil Filter Lube
Car Oil Changes $1A99
up to 5 Qts. starting from &O

Diesel Oil & Filter Change
Special $9999 upto1 s.
r plus tax
Open 7am-7pm
(352) 527-4111
Across from Wal-Mart, Lecanto


& Online / / /
C ,I' N /" -,1, Ik"NI *I / h.,I



CI) I



(352)563-5966 -^' /


For Sale Adjustable
Electric Bed,
Like New
$250.
(352) 344-1960
New Sofa,
excellent condition
tweed, neutral $250.
2 matching Leather
recliner chairs, brand
new, black & medium
brown $200ea. or $350
for both non smoking
home. (352) 527-1963
New Twin Bed
Frame, boxspring &
Mattress $100. firm
(352) 795-0783
OAK COFFEE TABLE.
Excellent condition.
24"x48".
$45. 527-1239


.................... .............. ...........
.........................................................................................................
................................................ .. ....... ...................... ..................
...... ..................
....................... ..................
...................... ..................
..... .. .. ...
.......... ...
........................................


I I


OAK ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER.
18"X54"X45" TALL.
Glass door/shelves.$75.
527-1239

ROCKER RECLINER
Off white fabric/oak.
Nice condition. $65.
527-1239

SLEEPER SOFA
Queen mattress. Off
white fabric. Nice condi-
tion. 78 x 36 x 32 tall.
$145. 527-1239

SOFA
brown neutral color,
excellent condition
$150. ask for Mimi
(352) 795-7285




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


T H E Find out for yourself n
why so many people
TE have switched from
the imports to Ford.
See what Ford has to
offer at Nick Nicholas
Ford. And make the
switch to Ford.
e sh is n to A' fr i b "When I sat in the Fusion for the first
The switch is on to America's favorite brandanw time, it was like, wow!"
-Brandon switched frommeHondaWAaccordtokeordWFusion'.
-- 2013 F1 50 SUPER CAB STX
fMSRP $31,760
S-1500 Customer Retail Cash
Irm** tU -1000 STX Bonus Cash
AH* W PR r :1500 Ford Motor Credit Customer Cash
i W months Sale Price $27,760
S %22014 FORD EXPLORER

APR Or 02 00
For 48 20
lopIMonths* Customer Cash
i __ 2014 FORD FUSION

APR Pu
For 60 Ford Motor Cred it
Months* Customer Bonus Cash
S 2014 FORD ESCAPE
S- 2OO0

APR Or 2
Months* Customer Cash
!File: CPO LOGO VEF
0Type:.'??-. ERTIFIED PRE-OWNED Call For Savings!
O QO/,^Bt"- ----____' Call For Savings!
0. Relax, It's Covered. :,'g 352 795 7371
0 9 172-po,1 in 5pe[ition t., Ford far lor, -trained le, .hiicianl 1--
APR for 36 months -ar 1 100 00-li i Ford Pover1rain arranl, C.e rag2 7 5 7 7
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
I :, ll l:Wj E ,ju I',",:l F,:l l' .i I T i ', j .- T .-lI: i rA 1 : 1 i: -iTiil, rd i l j ] -l:. ,1,: I,,I, I T Jl ] -1'i : i W -1 Aif jI l, ,-1 i,, W .i CC 1,, ll l: ll :,jl *]. ClC l', ,:,: 1C 1 ^ .] 11: Jl',l.l, .- j II ,I ] l l-.I:,



2012 FORD FUSION SE 2011 FORD RANGER XLT 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID 2010 FORD FUSION SEL 2009 LINCOLN MKS
iji.,,, 'l'jBr i n1(1i 1i inil ,E-1 '15. E*I-i -i,[ d CdL; t 17 1 00 ,'-F'l ,' ","lh:'i'i ; 1 ii- le ll,-r c r ,,,,l I, -I:_1 Leal er, Stil rooi f GP17i j. aowr er 1- I 1m i hle. GP .- P I
$17,950 $19,950 $20,950 $20,450 $20,950




2011 LINCOLN MKX 2013 FORD F 150 CREW XLT 2012 FORD EDGE LTD 2011 LINCOLN MKX 2013 LINCOLN MKT
Like New GP .i 1 I 3,05 V8 GPR1 251 Na', in. ',' lu. 1 .1.'i 1.'i'1 m l" GPF 12,. L.lri.r ":}..9 nlI I, i 10,000 r.lies G. PR.1i
$25,950 $27,950 $27,950 $28,950 $30,950
I =q
-_


2002 HONDA ACCORD 2007 FORD FUSION SEL 2004 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 2009 MERCURY MILAN 2009 MERCURY MILAN 2007 FORD EXPLORER
Leather, Sunroof Leather, spoiler. 6 Leather Leather, Premium package. Sunroof, Navigation, leather Eddie Bauer leather.
$6,950 $7,950 $7,950 $9,950 $9,950 $ 1 3l950


2011 HUNDAI SONATA 2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 2013 TOYOTA COROLLA LE 2012 CHEVY MLIBU LT 2010 FORD MUSTANG CONV. 2012 FORD MUSTANG
One owner, GLS trim. Leather. Only 5,000 miles. Sunroof, leather. Leather, Auto 24,000 miles, automatic.
$13,950 $14,950 $15,950 $16,950 $17,950 $17,950



2009 FORD FLEX LIMITED 2010 FORD Fl 50 XLT 2012 FORD FUSION SPORT 2012 TOYOTA TACOMA 2011 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 2008 CHEVY CORVETTE


Leather, sunroof, navigation. Crew cab, chrome package. 23,000 miles, leather, sunroof. 28,000 miles, 1 owner. 5.8L V8, leather. One owner 21,000 miles
$17,950 $20,950 | $20,950 $22,950 $26,950 $30,950

Nick N icholas LINCOLN
Nick
Nicholas
Crystal River H79.i, Lic i__
J ww.nick n h asfrdlincOln.cOm Salesperson of the Monthr
Sales numbers as of 9/30/13. **Plustax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible fortypographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyerwill qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 60 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 01/18/14.


D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mocha faux suede. $45.
527-1239
Sofa Sleeper
3 cushion, 2 throw
pillows beige print
$100
(352) 601-7380
Two Tan Leather
Couches
little wear, $150. ea.
$250. for 2, Dunnellon
(352) 465-9114
Wooden Hutch
filled with china
and old silverware,
asking $400. obo
(352) 419-6865



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
ChipperlShredder
Craftsman 3", 7.5 HP,
OHV, Model #
247.776350. Strong
machine, little use.
$250 OBRO
(352) 489-2011
Troy bilt Chipper/
Shredder,
6/2HP Motor,
good condition
Asking $225.
(352) 527-1963



HYACINTHS 30
PLANTS FOR WATER
GARDEN BLUE FLOW-
ERS 10 FOR $15
464-0316



CRYSTAL RIVER
1/ 10, 1/11, 1/128a-4p
Hundreds of items
Under roof, rain or sun
9639 N Misty Janell Ter
Off Dunnellon Rd



MENS DRESS PANTS
Like new.
$10 OBO Linda
423-4163



3 DOUBLE ROLLS VI-
NYL WALL COVERING
$25 FLORAL DESIGN
165 SQ FT E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &
ACCESSORIES $30.
464-0316
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $25
HANDCRAFTED
HEARTS/BUNNIES/TED
DY BEARS 419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $60
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$100 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGES. 3 bird
cages $15 for all.
352-465-0580
CAL-HAWKADJUSTA-
BLE CHROME
TRAILER RECEIVER-
10" drop, 2" ball, 50001lb,
Ex. $60, 628-0033
CAR TIRES Firestone
Tires P215/55R/17 Ap-
proximate 20,000 miles
on each
$15 each firm. Call
352-564-1771
COLUMBIA D44
BENCH VICE- 4-1/2"
Jaw, swivel base, 25lbs,
made in USA, EX., $30.
352-628-0033
EAZ-LIFT TRAILER
HITCH RECEIVER-
2-5/8" 60001b ball,
1000# MUHC, 10,000
MGTWR, $75 628-0033
FISHING TACKLE
WANTED- vintage, new
and used, cash.
352-628-0033
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
0" Grouper @ $6.001lb
Stonecrab @ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FOUR DRAWER FILE
CABINET, METAL.
Good condition. $50.
527-1239
Full Size Traffic Light
$250.
Golf Cart Top w/
brackets and folding
windshield fits all
brands $150
(315) 466-2268 cell
GAS FURNACE
Coleman, Propane
gas. 66.000 BTU very
little use $100
(608) 732-4049 cell
Hand Made Hats
Beautiful, Yarn all
colors, 90 total, buy
& sell on ebay,
make good profit,
It's cold up North
Cash Only $180.
(352) 746-9573
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
LIQUOR BAR
W/STOOLS
dk wood w/black marble
top w/brass footrail
2 upholstered bar stools
exc. cond $650.obo
(352) 419-6016
MIRROR 48"x68" Mirror.
$75.00 OBO
352-212-2051
OUTBOARD MOTOR
SKAG/PROP GUARD-
stainless steel, fits 30 to
70 HP motor, $30,
352-628-0033
Pool Table
Good Shape, $45.
Hot Tub,
like new 4 person
$500
(352) 628-1646
SEARS MANUAL


BATTERY CHARGER-
6/2AMPs, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
SONY STEREO
EQUIPMENT $50
AM/FM, AMPLIFIER,
DUAL CASSETTE,
CABLES 419-5981
STAINLESS SINK Dbl
basin,33"x22"x6"
watch. Ex cond.
$75 OBO 352-637-5969
VINTAGE REED MFG.
HVY. DUTY BENCH
VICE- 4-1/2" jaws,
80lbs, USA, Date- 1914,
$80. 352-628-0033
WIRE SHELVING 16 IN
WIDE 87 FT LONG all
brackets included
$100.00 352-527-1399
WOMEN'S BLACK
RUBBER RIDING
BOOTS $15 KNEE
HIGH LIKE NEW
LARGE 419-5981


CHROME CLOTHES
RACK FOR STORE
DISPLAY, 4 arms, ex-
cellent condition, $35,
(352) 465-1813




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS,
1 Lazy Boy $295;
1 Golden $375.
Both Excellent Cond,
352-270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
UP.RONLY $20
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316


Cloth lift & recliner
chair.Pd $1,500 Sell
$750.00 firm.
carol.hudson@oumookcom35
2-344-3947
(leave message).
Manual Wheelchair
W/ Footrests, Great
Shape, Only $100
352-464-0316



EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL SIZE
(DRED)FLAT TOP
W/GIGBAG&TUNER
$85 352-601-6625
MINI ELECTRIC GUI-
TAR "LAP STEEL"
HUMBUCKIN
PICKUP,GIGBAG &
BAR $75 352-601-6625
New Acoustic Guitar
Dark MahogonyY
W/Gigbag, Tuner,
Strings & Picks $70
352-601-6625
OSCAR SCHMIDT
DELTA KING "335"
STYLE ARCHTOP
ELECTRIC SEMI
HOLLOW,BLACK $165
352-601-6625
Scandalli Accordian
120 full base, exc.
condition, $600.
(352) 341-0299



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
RECUMBENT BIKE
Sears Preform 990,
wide seat, dig. display
w/ arm exercise $125;
Marcy multi-position
exercise gym, assem-
bled, 140 Ib selective
wts, lists at $495, ask-
ing $215. Exc Cond
(352) 382-7074
Stationary Bike
ProForm XP 185
IFIT Multi, never used
$100. firm cash
(352) 527-6779



12 GAUGE SHELLS
10-Boxes, #4 shot.
$90 352-502-0722
Brushed Suede Chaps
sml upper thigh 22",
never worn $100.
(352) 637-3673
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
POOL TABLE
Oak with slate top,
leather pockets, queen
ann legs, W/ all access.
Exc Cond. $350
(352) 464-2687


Sell or Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




Children Toys,
strollers, car seats
& cribs 352-563-5437
or 352-795-0161
Used Jazzy Power
Chairs, running or not
(352) 628-4712
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED- HARLEY
Cycles, Golf Carts or
Parts, Cash on Spot
(315) 466-2268 Cell












Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820


JO JO
Jo Jo, a loving,
affectionate 4-y.o.
bulldog/hound mix,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, spayed.
Special needs dog
D/T hip dysplasia for
which needs
Rimadyl or Gluco-
samine. She doesn't
know she has a
problem, however;
runs & plays like any
other dog. Is there a
compassionate
family or individual
who could give this
girl a good home,
with limitless devo-
tion from her?
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-795-1288.


li'IYT imy is a gorgeous
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936

"1, .1 ". 'I, 1 I CL.
>>1 ;1t I <>id IJ l st.
L IL- j ^Ll, I

ClasNi fiE
Ciassifieds


#1 Employment source is

CA hronI cClassifined

Iwww.chronicleonline.com


Iet


SUNDAY,JANUARY 12,2014 D7

VehilesCar


I Pets :1


CLASSIFIED



AKC YORKSHIRE
MALE PUP very small,
health cert., shots,
(352) 489-0960

Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510-

CANOE W/ PADDLES
Water Quest by KL
Industries. Seats 3,
center cooler, sturdy,
stable, great shape
$350 (352) 897-4154

Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




01 Prevost Vogue 45ff
Featherlite Motorhome
NICEST ONE in Central
FL, 81k mi, 500hp/
CAT Diesel Engine.
Divorced/ Must Sell!
1 (352) 795-1272
FLEETWOOD
1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
may trade, very good
tires, lots of storage
I11k obo352-263-4339
MOBILE SUITES
5th WHEEL, custom
built 2004, 3 slides,
Easy Rider 16K hitch,
Many Xtra's. Must See
$22,000 352-897-5339
SOUTHWIND
98'V-10 eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


must sell!
MASTER TOW
DOLLY
2012 Master Tow Dolly
with spare tire and
wheel. Brakes and light
kit. $900.00 OBO.
352-344-5334
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WILDERNESS
2004 Advantage 28.5
Ft. 5th Wheel. Sleeps
six, one slide, upgraded
interior, self contained, 2
TVs, AM-FM Disc
player, new electric
brakes, good tires.
$7,500 w/reese re-
ceiver. Must see.
352-527-4968
WILDERNESS
24 ft, Camper
Call
(772) 260-4363 cell
to see and appreciate



-BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-426-4267**

Liquidation Sale
Held Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Get the Facts: Gators;


Seminoles; Hurricanes;


Bulls; Knights


College teams from coast to coast have a large Florida fan

base. 6.5 million Floridians consider themselves Florida

college football fans. Over 9.5 million Floridians

consider themselves Florida newspaper readers.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... GET THE FACTS

AND GET IN THE GAME.


OOB8XGY


C I T R U S COUNTY

For more information on how to reach II--1 L

Citrus County readers call CHK\ NJICLYE

352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191




Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100

WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
- ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939





Buy Here/Pay Here

'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl


2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600

CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018

FORD
2000 Taurus, great
shape, 121k miles,
$2500 Firm. (352)
795-5784 or 212-3720

FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600

FORD CROWN VIC
LX
1994 Crown Victoria Ix
119,000 micold ac,new
tires runs good
$1900.See pictures on
Ocala craigslist
3525273498 after 3pm













2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

New Year Specials

02 Nissan Sentra
4 dr, 63k mi, $5900
'02 Olds Silhouette
AWD, Premier Pack.
Leather, Loaded
65k miles, $6995
'03 Honda Element
4 Cyl, Auto, Good
Gas Mileage $6500
'04 Chevy Extra Cab
4.8 Engine, Auto,
Runs Great! $5900
'06 Dodge Ram1500
4 Dr, Auto, 6 cyl,
x-tra Clean $6500
Gulf Breeze Auto
352-257-3894
352794-6069

TOYOTA
'05, Avalon XLS,
blue, sunroof, loaded,
23k miles, $15,000
(352) 527-7980









IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


M isc.INoiII


DODGE
'95, Ram 1500, good
work truck, w tool box
126k mi.V8, needs
paint & TLC, $2,000
obo, 305-393-1404

DODGE
'96, Dakota, club cab,
w/shell cap, 209,188
miles. Runs good.
Many new parts.
$2,300 (352) 341-8415

DODGE RAM
2002 1500 Quad cab,
short bed, 53,850 mi,
Many Extra's! $8,950
(352) 795-1499

FORD
1994 F 150
300 in-line, 6 cyl
$750. obo
(352) 422-1681

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018

FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018



Your World









CHrONICLE






Misc.. Not ,i-c


D0 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Rav, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C, runs
great. Low miles
$2,800. 352-628-1646



CHEVY
VENTURA 2005 Van
74K ml. exc cond
extras included
$5,500 obo
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
'06 Town & Country, LX
Loaded, 6 DR, dual AC
V6, stow seats, CD,
maintained, garaged
clean $5,500,212-9383
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




HONDA
1992, Helix Scooter
25k miles, good cond.
new tires, $1,500
(352) 746-7378
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4950. 352-513-4257

Misc. NG^i^e


316-0112 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Joan E. Blaney Louise Kite
2659 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 2659 E Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness, FL Inverness, FL

Ronald Kite Ashley N. Smith Josephine L. Lucas
2659 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 1706 Tuttle St 1689 E Ray St
Inverness, FL Inverness, FL Hernando, FL
Schi Lee Bair Brian M. Meadows
5236 N Florida Ave 3897 W Wilburton Dr
Hernando, FL Citrus Springs, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 12, 2014.


314-0112 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING
on January 22, 2014 at 9:00 A.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING, ROOM
166, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461.

THE PURPOSE OF THIS MEETING IS TO CONDUCT THE FIRST QUARTERLY REQUIRED MEET-
ING OF
2014 FOR THE CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD.

AGENDA ITEMS:

S Approval of last CRAB meeting's minutes
S Swearing in newly appointed alternate CRAB member,
Kathie Atkinson
S Powers and duties of CRAB
S Fee Schedule
S 2014 chairman and vice-chairman elections
S Any other business that may come before the Board
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CODE REVIEW AND
APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUBLIC MEET-
ING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)

ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560
AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IM-
PAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING
(352-527-5310).
GASTON HALL, CHAIRMAN
CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD OF CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA

APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY:
COUNTY ATTORNEY

PUBLISHED ONE (1) TIME IN THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, JANUARY 12, 2014.


317-0112 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance vAwill conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, January 15,2014 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.

Baylon, Roger S. & Idaisa S. **REPEAT VIOLATION- .GREGG BRENNAN**
7 N Washington St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, furniture, buckets, bedding, and other miscella-
neous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Canary, Amy Nicholle Anderson & Thomas R.
2785 N Page Ave, Hernando, Fl 34442

Failure to comply with condition of permit number 200412007. To Wit: The removal
of the 2nd mobile home.

Collins, Jerry R. & Rhoda C.
905 N Equal Pt, Lecanto, Fl 34461

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Garbage, mattresses, cardboard, tree debris, and
other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Davis, Thomas M.
7780 W Grove St, Homosassa, Fl 34446

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31 (a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Intenor household furniture all around the yard, several
bags of household trash, propane tanks, piles of clothes, some in bags, some in
boxes, some on the ground, a lot of broken toys, buckets, tvs, coolers, and miscella-
neous junk and debris throughout the yard.

DeMott, Florence Joan
3255 E George St, Inverness, Fl 34453

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material


Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Permit
#200703925 for a remodel & repair of existing mobile home expired on 11/24/10
leaving no valid permit.

Rutledge, Cheryl J.
6373 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken furniture, broken
electronics, coolers, buckets, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash
and debris.

Sellers, Justin Nieves
8138 W Fairoak Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428

It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-


CLASSIFIEDS




stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage and miscellaneous junk.

Demars, Tracy Lee
6381 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, mattresses, broken
metal fencing, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Fernandes, Anthony J.*REPEAT VIOLATION-
115 N West Ave, Inverness, Fl 34453

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, household garbage, mattresses, buckets,
plastics, paper, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed
area.

Gionti, Nancy & Julio
911 N Rhyme Pt, Crystal River, Fl 34429

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Construction materials, buckets, coolers, household
garbage, household furniture, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous
trash and debris.

Gordon, Hercilia A.
17 S Fillmore St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465

It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Kleyn, Ethel
6476 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, metal and plastic debris,
and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Knowles, Susan G.
1231 N Sidiki Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453

Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: The two decks
(one having a second story).

Larimer, David
349 S Thayer Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461

Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve,
convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a float-
ing residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without
first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A porch with a ramp and screen en-
closure, an addition to the left
side of trailer, an addition to the back of trailer, a deck with a spa on it, a pool with a
deck attached, and a shed in
the rear portion of the property.

Larimer, David
349 S Thayer Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Construction materials, paper, plastics, bottles, tarps,
household garbage, metals, aluminum, styrofoam, wood, a tub, window screens,
buckets, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Mathews, S W & Lisa D.
502 S Harrison St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal siteor sani-
tary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, plastic, metal, and other miscellaneous materi-
als being stored in an unenclosed area.
Medich, Anton
3530 E Brave Ln, Hernando, Fl 34442

Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: No permits ob-
tained for an enclosed screen porch and one 10x24 utility building.
Menezes, April
986 N Lyle Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34429

Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: No permits ob-
tained for a complete garage enclosure to include two windows and a door.

Neida Inc.
10200 W Halls River Rd, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Neida Inc.
10200 W Halls River Rd, Homosassa, Fl 34448

It shall be unlawful for any owner, agent, contractor, or other person in charge of a
construction, demolition, or development site to cause or permit the accumulation
of junk or construction and demolition debris thereon, except in enclosed litter re-
ceptacles; to fail to furnish on site litter receptacles; or to leave unused construction
materials on the site for more than seven days after the completion of the develop-
ment, demolition, or construction, or the expiration of the permit therefore, pursuant
to Article III, Section 20 31(b) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Con-
crete block and pipe, concrete bags, iron and steel pieces, pallets, concrete rubble
and miscellaneous junk.
Petersen, Jodi L.
5 S Adams St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465

It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Quick, Jacquelyn & Bernard, Patricia
2836 N Kent Pt, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Roberts, Mark W. & Ashley B.
2441 S Stanley Ter, Homosassa, Fl 34448


313-0105 SUCRN
City of Inverness-ITB
PUBLIC NOTICE
Project Number: #ADM 1014-01

The City of Inverness will be accepting sealed bids until 4:00pm, Monday, January 27, 2014,
and then opened and read aloud Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 10:00am, at a public meeting
in the New City Hall Government Complex, located at 212 West Main Street., Inverness,
Florida for:
CUSTODIAL SERVICES

Custodial Services are required to clean and maintain the following City Government build-
ings: Administration, Finance, Development Services, Council Chambers, and State Offices
located in the New City Hall Government Center at 212 W. Main Street. as noted in Specs.

In your bid response, indicate the total charges (monthly and annual) during the contract pe-
riod (two year time frame). Be advised billing will be on a monthly basis and submitted to
the City of Inverness, Administration Office, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450.

Specifications for bids may be obtained at the City of Inverness, Administration Office, lo-
cated at 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida. A walk through will be scheduled for
January 16th at 10:00am. For questions and additional information, please contact Sheila
Densmore 726-2611 x 1001.

The City of Inverness reserves the right to reject any and all bids, all formalities or irregulari-
ties, and to accept any combinations of alternates as may be in the best interest of the City.

By order of the City of Inverness, Florida.
Is/ Frank DiGiovanni, City Manager
City of Inverness
Published two (2) times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 5 & 12, 2014.


315-0112 SUCRN
REVISED INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE

Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Crystal River High School Gym Electric Service Relocation/New
Gym Floor and Miscellaneous Improvements will be received by the Citrus County
School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time January 23, 2014 in the Purchasing Depart-
ment, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness,
Florida, 34450-4625. Immediately following, all Bids will be opened to verify if the Bid-
der included all the required components and attachments, and the name of the
Bidder will be read aloud.

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.

No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at (352) 726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Crystal River High School 3195 Crystal River High
Drive, Crystal River, FL 34428.
B. Conference will occur 2:00 P.M., January 3, 2014.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from John-
son, Smith Architects, P.A., 316 S.E. 8th Street, Ocala, Florida 34471, (352) 351-1963,
upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board in the
amount of $75.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the return of
these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the opening of
Bids.
Bidders may also obtain one (1) copy of the Contract Documents on compact disc
for ten dollars and no cents ($10.00) made payable to Johnson, Smith Architects,
P.A., 316 S.E. 8th Street, Ocala, FL 34471, (352) 351-1963.

Bidders may also view and/or download the Contract Documents as Adobe.pdf files
through the internet for free by contacting Johnson, Smith Architects, P.A., 316 S.E.
8th Street, Ocala, FL 34471, (352) 351-1963.

The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 12, 2014


way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One inoperable four door sedan car covered with a tarp and deflated tires.

Sellers, Justin Nieves
8138 W Fairoak Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, household furniture, appliances,
metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Smith, Kenneth D.
22 N Davis St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Appliance, multiple buckets, garbage, tarp covering
something, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Smith, Laura Louise
3655 E Yandle PI, Inverness, Fl 34453

It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Starkey, Duane
9909 N Cherry Lake Dr, Citrus Springs, Fl 34433

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Construction materials, loose plastic, buckets, coolers,
household garbage, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and
debris.

Ware, Angela R.
8210 W Alton Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448

It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Ware, Angela R.
8210 W Alton Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448

It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: An untagged white RV trailer is parked in the left side yard behind the drain-
field mounds.

Ware, Angela R.
8210 W Alton Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448

It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Interior household furniture all around the yard, broken
blinds, several bags of household trash, a pile of carpet and padding, piles of
clothes (some in bags some in boxes, some on the ground), mattress and
boxsprings, and miscellaneous junk and debris throughout the yard.
Whaley, Renika
6864 W Grant St, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Interior household furniture all around the yard, broken
lumber and construction debris, 15 to 20 bags of household trash, several tires,
children's furniture, broken toys, coolers, boxes of books and yard sale stuff, and mis-
cellaneous junk and debris
throughout the yard.

NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE

Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 12, 2014.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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D10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014







HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULID


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INSIDE
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PAGE E6


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E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


CIRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4750 N. EL CAMINO DRIVE
*STUNNING HOME! PAVERS-HUGE LANAI
*3/3/Huge Garage Lots of Tile
. Wood Cabinets Office/Formal Dining
*2007 Rusaw Built Community Pool
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 I '
r. lh '.lll~ .I. I IJ
Einal elilesullon* lernax neB
www.FloidaLimiinginlo.cou








3691 SQUAW VALLEY DRIVE
*WATERFRONT -MOVE-INREADY
*2/2/Carport Dock in Place
Fantasbc View Huge Glassed FL Rm.
Paved Street Great Price for WATERFRONT
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
" I "lhH. II II.T.I "'^~
EinuilE elliesullon, lelniax nel
www.F lon idLislnglnlo.con


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352 t372-820
Ente house #955
'AM~~e0


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1332 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
LECANTO
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot
* Nearly 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained
* Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows
* Attractive Yard
PETER & MARVIA KOROL f. i
(352) 527-7842 L ii
(352) 422-3875









3 GRAYTWIG CT. W.
SUGARMILL WOODS
* 3BD/2BAJ2CG Great Location
* Living RM & Fam RM Bonus RM in Back
* Formal Dining Room Eat-In Kitchen Area
*Nearly 2,300 SF living Fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL n
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


LAUREL RIDGE SPACIOUS HOME!!!
S2 BR, 2 BATH W/OFFICE 2-Car Garage w/Screen
SLiving & Family RM. HVAC Updated 2012
S1999 Sq. Ft. Living '8 Person SPA
SUpdated Appliances Community POOL

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 f
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com Fl






WM*
W '






REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

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6223 W. WESTON DR.
MEADOWCREST
3/2/2 with open floor plan, eat-in kitchen,
screen lanai, A/C & roof approximately
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2 pools, clubhouse and ready for move-in.

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxga122@yahoo.am cr


GREAT HOME...
GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD
This 2 bedroom 2 bath home has a spacious kitchen
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WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 .J
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com

I MILLION


IZ/D N. I;lHi;Lt in., NiJ3IAL HlIVtH
You won't find a better priced 6/3/2 with open water
view anywhere. Located in front of the head spring in
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screened lanai, wood-burning fireplace and so much
more. Exterior boasts fenced yard, seawall, dock and
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DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 J
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com I


SPACIOUS 312/2 POOL HOME
This "Victoria" Brentwood Home Features Cathedral
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Breakfast ook w/Oak Hardwood Floors & Gas Stove,
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Email: martha.sather@remax.net


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Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
Websilte: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


^^ 1'Ftt? ii Tir
8139 W. NECTAR LANE
Charming Get-A-Way or Downsize. 3BR/2BA with
Living Rm, Dining Rm, Den/Office. Block/Stucco,
Offered w/2nd Lot & Furnishings. 10x20 Fl Rm,
10x20 Carport, 9x1 5 Strg BIdg, Re-roof 06', A/C
03'. Minutes from boat ramp, kayak/canoe rentals,
scenic river.
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: lounalleoy@tampabay.rr.com I


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


6 LONGLEAF CT.
HOMOSASSA
4/3/2 POOL HOME IN EXCELLENT CONDITION WITH
2,588 SQUARE FEET OF LIVING SPACE
DIRECTIONS: U.S. Hwy. 19 (Suncoast Blvd.) to Cypress
Blvd. W, to right on Pine Street, to right on Longleaf Ct.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert l


* 2/2/2 Car Garage SPLIT BR/BATH PLAN
Large Dining Rm. Appliances Included
Nice Elevation Concrete Drive
* Florida Room Central Heat/Air
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-39970907n
Eilnii elliesullon* leReiman neD
www.HoBidanLislinginlo.coiu


4838 N. MOJAVE TERRACE
PINE RIDGE
*Private Wooded 1.8 ACRES
* 4BR/3BA/2CG Home
* Large In-Law Suite
* Beautiful Pool & Heated Spa
Well-Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
E-mail: lenpalmeroremax.nel







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sen. Warren hails



new mortgage rules

Associated Press

BOSTON- U.S. Sen. Eliza-
beth Warren is hailing new
mortgage rules set to go into ef-
fect this week.
Warren said that under the
new Consumer Financial Pro-
tection Bureau rules, lenders
must determine that a bor-
rower has the ability to repay a
mortgage before issuing the
loan.
The Massachusetts Democrat
said the rules will prohibit bro-
kers from being paid by lenders
to steer customers into higher-
cost loans and strengthen the
mortgage market by improving
mortgage servicing practices.
In remarks on the Senate
floor Tuesday, Warren said the
rules which take effect Fri-
day will give consumers a
better chance to buy and keep
homes, and will force mortgage
lenders and services to com-
pete by offering better rates
and customer service, not by
"tricking and trapping people."
Warren championed the cre- Associated Press
ation of the bureau after the na- Sen. Elizabeth Warren applauds Monday,
tion's mortgage-led financial Jan. 6, during Boston Mayor Marty
meltdown. Walsh's inaugural address at Boston Col-



Real Estate DIGEST


Top Performance
Real Estate Consult-
ants is proud to an-
nounce that Realtor
Tony Pauelsen
passed the broker li-
censing test.
The real estate bro-
kerage license test is
very difficult, and many
do not pass it the first
time but Tony did
just that.


Tony
Pauelsen
Top Performance
Real Estate.


Tony is now a broker/associate at Top
Performance. His dedication to his
clients and the industry has allowed him


to close more than $1.2 million in busi-
ness during his first year with the group.
Reach him at 352-303-0619
Mastrangelo tops
charts at Citrus Hills


Susan Mastrangelo
has been named the
top sales agent for De-
cember at the Villages
of Citrus Hills. Susan
finished the year with
16 new home sales.
The Welcome Center
for Citrus Hills is located
at 2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd. More information
is available online at
www.CitrusHills.com.


Susan
Mastrangelo
Villages of
Citrus Hills.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


4ti Y 9r A1 FA


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


4141 W Hacienda Dr
MLS 705887 $359,900
Nearly 6 acre equestrian estate.
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home.
Dir
L
Bonanza, L on Banjo, R on Hacienda, home on left
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


-"" f 858 N Bennincilon Ter
v MLS IU6262 $234,900
3 bdrm, 2.5 bath pool home has all the
desirable features.
Dir 486 to So on Annapolois, Eon Hartford, So on
JoAnn Condll 352.212.9774


f *'3 '1 I1 aauuie ur
S MLS 707511 $199,500
ONE-OF-A-KIND 3/3.5/2, pool home
w/tons of space-needs some lovin'!
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


711CW 77 W Forest Oa
MLS 706602 $16!
Large, open, bright 3/2/2 in nice
subdivision.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


(wN Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
A Week! Properties

1-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


II|l .1 rLh :.1 J4.j $359.000
Exquisite 3/2.5/3 in gated community.

Liberty, Ron SpendA Buck, L onAllegrie, Ron
Shenandoah Lp, R on Braddock Pt
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4PM




Ssiftaf" 1115 N CarnevaleTer
L iii nU S224.500
3 bdrm, 2 bath, UPDATED home w/pool -
a great opportunity!
Dir Hwy 486 (Norvell Bryant Hwy), to ProspectAve, go
to the end, R on Sunrise St, R on Carnevale Ter
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


8101 N Verdino Ter
MLS 706315 $229,500
Crystal River 4/3/2 pool home. Must see!
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


MLS 706642 $165,000
Plenty of room to roam in this
3/2/2 home.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4PM




'7jS 1048 W Lake Valley Ct
MLS 705655 $340,000
REDUCED & ready to sell! 3/2/2 enhanced
with upgrades.

Landing, L on Wisper, L on Lake Valleyto home on right
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


,jil.1 3234 N Tallow P1
'h_ :i: .,, s.,. $78.500
Neat& clean 2/2/2 w/fenced yard on
cul-de-sac.
Dir Forest Ridge Blvd to Roosevelt Blvd, L on Tallow
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


'rLOWl, ,IOu vv tatI I UaKS ur
i- J MLS 706190 $224,900
Custom Built 3/2.5/2 pool home on
1.12 acres. New roof in 2012.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


2669 N Brentwood Cir
MLS 706700 $142,900
3/2/2/pool home, comfortable &
well-kept.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


I .F lt i, a , t ,,. t iie
[E )[ 1, ,I .. .. .I I.. I I I0,h i I I.. .. i,, h .I I I ,, I .. Ih ,, Ih ,1,, I-,I , ,,Sl l IH .. ii h ,,


Top Performance agent
tackles license test


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 E3


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROWD7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


House movers still going strong after four generations


North Dakota firm's experience in


moving large structures brings numerous unusualjobs


JILL SCHRAMM
Minot Daily News

MINOT, N.D. Kevin Huwe
was tagging along with his father
and grandfather in the house-
moving business long before he
was big enough to see over the
steering wheel of the company
semi-trucks that he now drives.
As fourth-generation owner of
Huwe the House Mover in
Minot, he carries on a family
business that has roots going
back about a century The com-
pany remains as busy as ever in
an industry that sees fewer mov-


ing companies but just as much
demand for moving as in the
past.
"It seems like we are a month
out most of the time," Huwe said
of job scheduling. Winter slows
the activity but doesn't stop it.
"There some things we can do
in the winter if it's closer to
Minot," he told the Minot Daily
News.
Although the majority of the
moving jobs are in western
North Dakota, the company has
moved buildings and other
structures over a region that in-
cludes Manitoba, Saskatchewan,


Montana, South Dakota and
Minnesota.
Huwe's great-grandfather,
Richard Huwe, was a house-
mover in the Noonan area,
where he worked with as many
as 32 horses to move buildings.
Richard Huwe also worked for a
time with his son, Roy, who
started his own house-moving
company in Minot in the early
1930s.
Roy Huwe had five sons who
helped in the business. Kenneth
Huwe took over the company
from his father in 1960, moving
the business from its location on


Maple Street to its present loca-
tion on 13th Street Southeast,
south of U.S. Highway 2. Kevin
Huwe, 55, assumed the business
about 10 years ago.
Large moving projects have a
tendency to capture the public's
attention, and House the House
Mover has turned heads at times.
Some of the more unusual
jobs have included moving a
large tank in 1975 that originally
was used to store by-products
from a lignite processing plant
in Minot. In 1984, Huwe the
House Mover moved two 30-ton
water tanks, 60 feet in diameter,


from Burlington Northern prop-
erty in Minot. The company
hauled the former Minot State
College president's house from
the college to north of the city in
1985.
In addition to having moved a
number of grain elevators,
Huwe the House Mover has re-
located 45-ton boilers, a 110-ton
dragline bucket, electrical trans-
formers and a Viking ship
replica on loan to Norsk Host-
fest from a Moorhead, Minn.,
museum.


See MOVERS/Page E15


REALTY GROUP


Speilzn inTra it

~EE Sor
(x Brnwo.eae


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Centei
Ri i iFPcKFR 3.2.464.(1647 SIIAN Milli I FN 3.2.49922.21 VirTnRIA FRANiKI IN .2.427.1777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Elegance, simplcity and breathtaking describes this3/2.V2 with den. One of the bestviews in Large roomy 3/2/2 home in a well-respected gated community offering privacy and SPACIOUS & OPEN 3/2/2 Golf Course Homne In The Gated "Brentwood" One of the few Paloma Model homes available! Great open floor plan, hard wood floors,
Ferra Vista overlooking 8th green of prestigious Skyview golf course. Professionally security. Upgrades include an open floor design, decorator fans and lighting, neutral Community of Citrus Hills comfortable Open Floor Plan with a nice view from Oversized pool handicapped accessible. Situated on a cul-de-sac, tranquil oak tree setting
lecorated throughout, completely upgraded kitchen featuring stately cabinets and Conan colors, formal dining room. French doors with glassthat leadstothe den. Plantation the lanai. Sliding glass door to a screened porch. The 3rd bedroom is offers an abundance of privacy. Guest bedrooms have direct bath access. Loaded with
counters. Stone accented frontwith brick pavers on drivewayand anai setthis home apart shutters adornthe windows forthat crisp classylook.The screenedlanai overlooks a currently being used as a den. Home is filled with natural sunlight .Come upgrades, central vac, surround sound, designer double entry door, oversized garage with golf
rom all others. Ma intenance-free iving atits best. MLS 707623...........................$349,000 private sttingarea for enjoying the true outdoor lifestyle. MLS 707614....$229,000 seethis beautiful home and make it yourown!L MLS 707603. $169,000 cart garage door. Must comesee ths spectcular home! MLS707587 ................ $399,000


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
immaculate Bristol model, spit plan home in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Great room, dining Beautiful immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage villa in Brentwood. The
room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar andcozy nook, inside laundryroom. Neutral 3rd bedroom is currently set up as a den. Open great room, a sunny
le throughout the home, bedrooms are carpeted. Gated community, access to the world- atmosphere. Master bedroom with window seat. Guest bathroom is
lass amenities of Citrus Hills Country Club. Just minutes to golf courses, pools, sauna, hot accessible to both guest bedrooms. Minutes to golf course, pool, sauna, hot
ub,Bella Vita Fitness Center and Brentwood recreation center. MLS 707514....$249,000 tub, exercise room at Brentwood recreation center. MLS 707172...$129,900


Move right into this immaculate villa and start enjoying the Florida lifestyle. Open and nto a 4/2. Pocketdoorsopento bedroom 24x11 room wh 2huge customized closets. Bedroom 3
spacious, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, plus a den and a 2-car garage, large great room, dining was extended 5 feet and features Bahamian shutters & tray ceings. Master bath features shower
area & fully applianced kitchen. Light and bright and all rooms are spacious. Top it off with and arge soaking tub.Bahamian shutters grace the lving area and gas fireplace warms it during the
an enclosed Florida room all nicely situated on a fully landscaped cul-de-sac homesite. cooler nights. Bath 2 features a custonnmized glass-enclosed shower. Tie throughout the giving area
Fantastic gated communy with great amentiesto enoy MLS 707146............$148,900 and upgraded cabinets and granite counter tops in kitchen.MLS 707132 ........................$249,500


Term 6 Moth or More


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS .
his spacious unfurnished 3 bedroom 2 bath home with open floor -
lan, large eat in kitchen and formal dining area is perfect for BRENTWOODTOWNHOME, 3BD. 2.5 BATH. 1-CAR
ntertaining. Located on a corner lot and close to the Bella Vita Unfurnished end unit. Soacious living, areat location. Enmov Terra


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HomeFront BRIEFS


Master gardener
plant clinics for
January
We are fortunate in Citrus
County to be able to veg-
etable garden year-round -
as long as you know what
and when to plant.
The January free Master
Gardener Plant Clinics will
focus on vegetable gardening
and will answer questions not
only about what and when to
plant, but also how and
where. The schedule is:
1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14,
at Lakes Region Library,
Inverness.
1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.


15, at Citrus Springs Library.
1:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24,
at Coastal Region Library,
Crystal River.
2 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28,
at Homosassa Library.
There will be no plant clinic
in Floral City in January.
Bring samples and ques-
tions to the free clinics. Mas-
ter gardener volunteers will be
happy to answer your garden-
ing questions.
The master gardener
phone numbers at the exten-
sion office are 352-527-5709
or 352-527-5711.


Mail Iviaster I .
citrus.fl.us or Master(
bocc.citrus.fl.us.


OOOH3W5 y f

REAL ESTATE, INC.
r 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
IMS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
o.: (352) 795-6633
ww'uw ATT~ii rq'mvr r.Tqi Cfl -&1AT ir<;/ff)AT !qrvi ir r'lmr


1-1 I. -


I-4LO^^^^^^^
HOMOSASSA-1988 3bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2
acre, with living & family rooms & wood
... . ,, , , ,, . both
i .. , i i loaned
.... .1 end
paved road #707609 $54,900




SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H
handyman/woman special, needs lots of
work, roof does not leak, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, private well & septic, no
appliances or outside A/C unit On 0 40
i 7(11QI~ oQ10inn


INGLIS great fixer upper, bring your
tools & imagination 1 bedroom, 1 bath
w/detached garage workshop Comer lot,
convenient location on 0 76 acres fenced
#706379 $22,900


HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
garage home on 0 46 acres w/additional
2 waterfront lots go with this house Has
extra carport, screen porch & shed Has
well and central water #706017
$99,900


LKYiiAL I iVEK really to move min
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is in cul-de-sac Has pool &
spa, patio fo, 1 .1 ', '
backyard 14 "'
#359466 $104,900





BEVERLY HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage w/opener, w/rear wooden
deck, rear fenced, on comer lot, cathedral
& standard ceilings, well maintained
Newer tile, carpet & vinyl flooring


CRYSTAL RIVER 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home or 1 .
Open & .... . ...
window i, .
T ;i w/breakfast
i i i.1 ,, ,inter space
#7O165R2 S2.500N


INGLIS 2001 Skyline w/3 bedrooms,
2 baths, newly remodeled, on 2 lots (2
acres), cathedral ceilings, inside laundry,
secluded & private Lg living rm, dining
rm, kitchen Easy access to Gulf of
Mexico #702563 $80,000


Free gardening
workshops slated
for January
Citrus County Florida-
friendly Landscaping will offer
a free gardening workshop
from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Jan. 14.
Irrigation scheduling and
management are essential to
successful and sustainable
gardening. Providing plants
with the water they require and


efficient application of this re-
source is the topic of the day.
Landscaping 101 will be of-
fered free from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 21. Landscap-
ing 101 is the first in a series
of educational workshops pro-
viding guidelines for success-
ful landscape design and
planning.
This first workshop de-
scribes the site evaluation
phase of landscape planning.
Bring a site plan or aerial pho-


tograph of the property to
begin the process. A series of
five workshops are scheduled
providing participants the land-
scape design skills needed to
create attractive and sustain-
able garden improvements.
Classes are held at the Cit-
rus County Extension Service
building, 3650 W. Sovereign
Path in Lecanto. Call Steven
Davis at 352-527-5708 to
confirm participation.
From wire reports


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 ES



SO YOU KNOW
* News notes tend to
run one week prior
to the date of an
event.
* Submit information
at least two weeks
before the event.
* Early submission of
timely material is
appreciated, but
multiple publica-
tions cannot be
guaranteed.


DO CC . ...........
32@


BR~746-9OOO0
S- Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner ArtPaty -69
BEST BROKERASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


Realtor __ _D_ P RID F RID FAM


.MUSTANG 5518 N. ELKCAM
$3693/2/2 706451 $163,000






15W.LNARK 2239 W. SNOWY EGRET
322 0549 $124,M 900 3/2/2 707289 $179,900





137 N. FRESNO 1974 W. ALHAMBRA
3/2/2 705787 $108,000


3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


rRI t1DGF. RE N


l






E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiiHrONICLE
lc -- ~~knEl-n cr


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Primer on Florida's



forest industry


Timberplays major role in state's economy
hen visitors to Florida and even played both full and part-time in the
many residents think of major in- state's forest industry- a 17 percent in-
dustries in Florida, crease since 2008. These jobs
most respond by saying come from the pulp and paper
tourism and/or citrus. industry, sawmills and other
Both answers are right- mills, logging, federal, state,
these are generally the top two K '1, A if and other government employ-
industries in Florida, although ment, and miscellaneous jobs
the citrus industry has been in 1 such as forestry consulting.
decline in recent years. How- --' Florida exported more than
ever, what most people do not $5 billion worth of forest prod-
realize is the importance of the ucts to out-of-state destinations
forest or timber industry to the in 2011. And the forest industry
state's economy The Florida I generated more than $400 mil-
forest industry has been con- Eric Hoyer lion in tax revenue for the state
sistently one of the top three ARBOR treasury in 2011.
industries in Florida for many C TU Total forest land in Florida
years. CULTURE is approximately 17.4 million
In 2011, Florida's timber in- acres, which represents 50 per-
dustry generated $13.95 billion in total cent of Florida's total land area. Of this
economic output. This was 8 percent less acreage, 15.9 million is considered
than in 2010, but 3 percent more than in
2008. In 2011, 76,000 people were em- See TREES/Rage E14


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside...


Crafty books
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E9
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Careful examination will yield info about Audubon print


DearJohn: I have an have not tried to remove it
Audubon print of a from its frame for further
pair of examination. I
Curlew Sand- will leave that
pipers. The to an expert.
image meas- HCan you direct
ures approxi- me to an expert
mately 6 1/2 Ip, in or near my
inches by 10 1/2 area?
inches and has The other
the numbering item is a print
and text on it by Charles Bur-
for an Octavo ton Barber, ti-
Edition print, John Sikorski tled "A Special
no. 67, plate 333, SIKORSKI'S Pleader" It is
J.T Bowen Co. ATTIC matted and
From the re- ___________ framed, with
search I have the visible


done, it seems to meet the
criteria for an authentic
print, but I need an expert
to examine it and confirm
this or gently inform me
that it is yet another mass-
produced reproduction. I


image measuring 16
inches by 11 1/2 inches. I
know there are a lot of
reprints of Barber's works;
I do not see a signature on
this one, but I have read
that not all of his work was


signed. How can I deter-
mine if this is an authentic
print or not?
I hope you do not mind
me inquiring about the
above works of art. I am re-
cently semi-retired and
have picked up the hobby
of art rescue to try to ferret
out works of art from dusty
deaths in unappreciated
See ATTIC/Page E10
Octavo prints are 1/8 size
reproductions of originals.
Original-edition Audubon
octavo prints were done
with stone lithograph and
were hand-colored. While
an original octavo print
would be a collector's
item, most are 20th cen-
tury reproductions and
have little collector value.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Help plants make it through dark days of winter


w I

^ ** 0


t^1^ 1
V Ibi 9'


'IC



C^


Ak


*


V4 F


A prayer plant, which tolerates low light levels, "prays" by folding up its leaves each evening.


LEE REICH
Associated Press
Plants and people can't
help but feel a bit wan this
time of year, but things are
brightening up already.
Every day the sun is grad-
ually moving higher in the
sky, burning with increas-
ing intensity and duration.
Light is measured in
foot-candles -the amount
of light cast on a square
foot area by a candle at 1
foot distance and the
sun on a clear summer day
can bathe us in 10,000 foot-
candles. Contrast that with
the paltry 500 foot-candles


dribbling down on an over-
cast winter day
Houseplants' problems
are further compounded
by windows, which cut
sunlight by another 10 per-
cent. No wonder these
plants, if they are growing
at all, stretch for light this
time of year
There are ways you can
help them.
One is to clean your win-
dows. Any dirt on the glass
cuts down light. While
you're at it, dust or spritz
off your plants' leaves;
dust has the same ill effect.
See Page Ell


BANK OWNED-BUSHNELL, FL IMMACULATE CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
Two-story 3BR/3.5 BA situated on fenced 5 Move in today. 2BR/2BA condo in Regency
gorgeous acres. $160,000 MLS#705895 Park $53,500 MLS#705999
Associated Press CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 A
After Hours 3302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com


"Always There For You"
GAIL COOPER
Multimillion Dollar Realtor
a o (352) 634-4346
ER Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


* 4 bedrooms 2 baths Stunning golf course views
* 3-car garage with circular drive Floor to ceiling brick fireplace
* Third bay could be "Man Cave" Breeze Thru" pool cage
* 2007 salt system heated pool LOCATION! PRICE! CONDITION!
DIRECTIONS: Cypress Blvd W; first left on Douglas Street to # 133 on light
i',.'J 1i [.IIId3 L,,M,,t [=,A -"JIJ'^II1J a.I l[.I..I ^IIBJ..I..Jin


2013 Sales Associate of the Year!

Changing lives by helping people find their
place in the sun. Karis, I


thank you for all
you do here at the
Villages of Citrus Hills


HI "*-


" OPEN HOUSE "
Sunday* 1 lpm to 4 pm


Newly updated 2/2/2 pool home.
Newer roof & AC. Lawn Sprinkler.
3229 N Juniperus Way $114,900
Near the Central Ridge Library.
S 352-249-7892 *!


uploj


V j 1- I A l ` ` 1 f-7
it r us Q/W II S9M'


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 E7


6 T I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


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[T./-i:", ,'a: v'.,' .[ (,. L,--, -"


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Also on my list: "Crochet
at Home," edited by Brett
Bara (Interweave), with 25
projects, including four
small nesting dolls and a
copper wire-crocheted
bowl. Although I'll need to
start with something sim-
pler, I can aspire to these.
"Resin Alchemy," by
Susan Lenart Kazmer (In-
terweave), is aimed at
mixed-media and jewelry
artists and bursts with fan-
tastic ideas. Learn the ba-
sics for using resin, and
then let your imagination
take flight in jewelry-
making and other projects.
Handmade soap pops up
at farmers and crafts mar-
kets with increasing regu-
larity In "Soap Crafting"
by Anne-Marie Faiola
(Storey), the entire
process, including molds
and additives, is explained
in a simple format and
See Page EO10


JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press
As we ring in a new
year, let's not forget
the crafting books
that came before. A look at
some of the best of 2013:
Traditional crafts
As a longtime knitter,
tny New Year's resolution
is to learn how to crochet.
: Storey Publishing has
obliged with the fifth in
its One-Skein Wonders
^ series, an enticing grab
bag of a book called "Cro-
chet One-Skein Won-
ders," edited by Judith
Durant. The idea is
clever: Provide an eclec-
., iiii tic mix of projects, in-
. .... i i .cluding purses, toys,
| hats and shrugs, that re-
I quire only one skein (or
ball) of yarn, proving
there's more to crochet
,, .-.... than you can shake a
S1 hook at.


Al


ES SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


.&M M`300%.
-^;fl,.W


the






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cooler weather means it's time for Camellias


ainbow Springs from fall to spring, a gar-
State Park is one of dener must carefully se-
the few Florida lect three or more
State Parks to be allowed varieties of each species
to continue to grow exotic, that will flower at different
non-native species of times.
plants due to its past her- I planted three different
itage as a commercial small-leaved sasanquas
tourist attraction. Former alongside a shaded sandy
owners planted path through
old-fashioned I my back yard.
tall azaleas in 111 The well-
the Rhododen- drained soil
dron genus and was first
species of amended with
Camellia to ample decayed
flower in the organic fine
winter and mulch from
draw sightseers. Central Landfill
The height of on State Road
m i d s e a s o n Jane Weber 44 west of
Camelliajapon- JANE'S Inverness.
ica flowers oc- '0 c t o b e r
curs in January, GARDEN Magic' is a
just as the old patented selec-
azaleas start to flower tion grown by Flowerwood
Camellias are evergreen in Bushnell, Florida. It
shrubs which can reach flowers during October
tree-size if left to grow nat- 'Cotton Candy' and 'Polar
urally without pruning. Ice' are December
There are several species bloomers, with colors be-
and many hybrids readily fitting their names. In No-
available in Florida. vember, the older hybrids,
C. sasanqua flowers in called 'Shishigashira,' a
the fall from October to deep pink, and white 'Mi-
December locally Various No-Yoki' put on a lovely
varieties of C. japonica display I have not yet in-
have a month-long flower- stalled irrigation, so I hand
ing time from December to water until the plants are
March. C. reticulata established and during dry
blooms later, also for about months from April to June,
4 weeks per variety, some- when the summer rains
time from January to start in.
April. To have one Camel-
lia or another in flower See Page E14

- Jlackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney |
S Realtor, A HOUSE Realtor .
o302-3179 SOLDNanlef 287-9022
[ 746-6700
'ka P GlfaRfig THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
I -rWEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


26 W COLBERT
3/2/2 Brittney I am Beautiful. I
Gourment Kitchen/Island/New I
appl., Roof 5/12, HA/C 09. I
Impressive tiled entry.


2/2/1 Come enjoy this lovely I
Kingsley. Newer roof &A/C.
New kitchen appl., living room
+ family room. Fenced for pets.


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Camellias are evergreen shrubs that can reach tree-size if left to grow naturally without pruning. There are several
species and many hybrids readily available in Florida. This is a 'Mi-No-Yoki' hybrid.


c "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" )
NANCY Direct: 352-634.4225
KEY 1 REALTY INC.
PONTICOS Nancy@Nancyknows.com 0
Multi-Million $$$ Producer !f L/2
0 15 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, FL 382-1700 ,
717171 Z 1 I C'-


I *) -. ic-a ---
87 PINE STREET
S*Updated Granite Kitchen *Wood Cabinets
*New Appliances -Tile Floors *Open Floor Plan
*Tile Floor in Lanai *Separate Living Room *Split
7 Bedrooms *POOL *Well Maintained
' i $162,500 MLS#705604
Eltmo. u1f11


9 DAHOON COURT N '
*Beautiful 2005 Artistic Open Great Room
*i, ,,i,,, Screened &Glass FlaRm
S. ... I' *Dual Walk-in Closets!
*Large 3 Car Garage *Comer Cul-de-Sac o
$189,900 MLS#701124
I S S^^^ '**


Gail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com
---mgr/ iti :

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 WATERFRONT
HOME
No bridges to
Gulf and river.
Just 11/2 lots off
main river on ,. _
deep water canal!I
3221 NW 20tl- A, -
Crystal River FL
MLSft7016cr,
REDUCED TO $280,000!


O00OH3RO





I





I


RLOTTE G.
ALTY

WEEK!
IVER


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 E9







EIO SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


BOOKS
Continued from Page E8

with lots of photos. If
you've wanted to try
"saponification" (the
chemical reaction that
occurs in soap-making)
but shied away from the
caustic materials, partic-
ularly lye, this book might
entice you to explore the
basics.
For the young and
the young at heart
"Martha Stewart's Fa-
vorite Crafts for Kids"
(Potter Craft) surveys
years of the magazine's
projects and packs the best
for kids into one handy
tome. There are friend-
ship bracelets, sewing
projects and tie-dye. Some
of the best are scientific
experiments, such as
growing salt crystals and
making a giant bubble
wand.
"Photo Doodles" (Quirk
Books), by ViiZ the cre-
ative team of Vahram Mu-
ratyan and Elodie
Chaillous of Paris pro-
vides pages of black-and-
white photographic
images for kick-starting
creativity, from blank post-
cards to a garden gnome
who needs a home.
"Fabric Paper Thread,"
by Kristen Sutcliffe (C&T


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Publishing), offers simple
crafts primarily for teens
and anyone new to em-
broidery Basic stitches
are explained, and the co-
pious photos help. My two
teenage girls liked the no-
sew leather bracelet and
the beaded tassel
necklace.
"Pom-Poms!" by Sarah
Goldschadt and Lexi Wal-
ters Wright (Quirk Books)
puts the easy-to-make,
soft-and-squishy pom-pom
to new use: in bouquets, on
pillows and curtains, and
made into rings and
brooches.
Three methods for mak-
ing pom-poms are ex-
plained, and suggested
materials include recy-
cled T-shirts and plastic
bags.
"Beastly Crochet," by
Brenda K.B. Anderson (In-
terweave), includes 23
scary-cute critters for play
and wear The sugar skull
shoulder bag may appeal
to the teen crowd, while
younger kids might enjoy
wearing the fanged bunny
slippers.
Inspirational
Two books from Am-
photo Books help parents,
bloggers and others take
better photographs. "Your
Child In Pictures," by Me
Ra Koh, shares tips for
catching toddlers and
young children at their


I *.1


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
Executive Office Suites
New Const auction Class "A" Office
Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
Call (352) 795-7007


best. For photographing
older kids, her tips include
inviting creative collabo-
ration, asking permission
and allowing for prep
time.
She offers guidance on
which everyday moments
deserve capturing, and
her technical advice
shines. Meanwhile, 'A
Beautiful Mess," by Elsie
Larson and Emma Chap-
man, covers portraiture,
lighting, backdrops and
other tricks for getting a
professional look. The
book stems from the sis-
ters' blog of the same
name.
"Tie-Dye: Dye It, Wear
It, Share It" by Shabd
Simon-Alexander (Potter
Craft) comprehensively
covers the history, dyes,
fabrics and methods of
tie-dye.
Nearly two dozen pat-
terns are shown in proj-
ects that give tie-dye an
upscale appeal.
"Fabric Surface Design"
by Cheryl Rezendes
(Storey) describes tech-
niques such as stamping,
silk-screening and image
transfers for designing
one's own fabric. It's
thought-provoking, and


the section on traditional
marbling techniques is in-
triguing (there are even in-
structions for marbleizing
with shaving cream, which
might be fun to do with
kids).
"Creating Art at the
Speed of Life" by Pam Car-
riker (Interweave) encour-
ages artists to take risks,
stretch skills and explore
new media. It begins with
advice on handcrafting an
art journal for exploring
color, texture, light and
more during Carriker's 30-
day plan.
There are few crafting
books as gorgeous as
"Lena Corwin's Made by
Hand" (STC Craft/A
Melanie Falick Book), a
hefty hardcover teeming
with projects from this tex-
tile designer and illustra-
tor and her creative
friends (including the au-
thor of the tie-dye book
above). From weaving and
knitting to printing and
beading, the projects are
fitting for solo work or a
crafting party Crochet's
five basic stitches are il-
lustrated, so I may be
learning crochet sooner -
and faster than I'd
planned.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

places, while educating
myself about the art and
the artists. If I earn a few
dollars in the process, all
the better, but I am enjoying
the search and rescue and
research and education
anyway -N.B.H, Internet
Dear N.B.H.: The
Audubon Octavo Edition
prints were 1/8 the size of
the large prints. They
were stone lithograph
hand-colored prints. Take
a hand magnifier and
look closely at the detail.
If you see a tiny uniform
dot pattern, they are 20th
century reproductions
and of little dollar value.
Charles Burton Barber
1845-99, was a British
artist. He painted a wide
range of subjects, includ-
ing portraits, landscapes
and genre depictions of
everyday life circum-
stances. He did not pro-
duce original prints. The
picture you have is a com-
mercial-grade print. Po-
tential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
DearJohn: Attached is a


picture of one of two
matching tables that I
have. They have a ma-
hogany finish and have the
following information on
the bottom of each table:
Both show that they were
manufactured by Lane in
AltaVista, Va., Style No. 27,
and have the same serial
number of 40154201.
Please advise of the value
and thank you for your
time. -L.C., Internet
Dear L.C.: Your end ta-
bles were made in the
20th century but are not in
a modem style. They are a
quasi-Hepplewhite style,
originally popular in the
early 19th century You
would be better off to keep
them as long as they are of
use to you or your family
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
--
John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski&aol. com.


THE GLEN SOUTHERN STYLE GOSPEL ISLAND HIGHVIEW ESTATES
IA 55+ community Enjoy maintenance-free PLANTATION HOME Nicely kept 3/2/2 home, spacious Citrus Hills
T ated in The Glen Custom built 4/3/2 on approx 10 ac fenced yard, shed & carport for the Beautiful 2004 Avanzin Model, nicely
insHe n. r Ca aora wood .. ...... .....t ..... ..
*& *^^^ 1 lnslde lalnd Catherlwo d m'^ '" *. 1." -i.. n cabinets & treed 1 as lot High ceilings, fireplace,
carpet and paint, fireplace Recently i ,, i, ,,I om has vaulted eatin kitchen, large master w/jetted tub
t is in perfect condItioni Just unpack the impeccably maintained Horse barn, 4 ,i,, ,i .1.... Roomy covered & huge walk-in shower, nice private lanai
B A R T H suitcase and relax Close to shopping, dining screened porch -just the right size w/tons of upgrades
REALTOR and medical facilities $65,00 $379,000 $86,000 $189,900
Cell: (352) 220.0466
gbarth@rnyflorida-house corn
SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OWR FLORAL CITY LAKE,,, MOVE RIGHT IN-BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! OuTSTANDNC WATERFRONT RESIDENCE
Jno 2 master suites, apart Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on acre I
meant lower level Upper level corner lot with mature oak trees and
accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane setting with major oak trees Charming, lots of prlvacyl Very well maintained,
Investors se rity system, updated brick home, first time offered, some d. , cks, 240 ft seawall, workshop, shed
Inchen & ahom 9 to original fixtures and fireplace still in ,Updated roof, A/C, kit, windows, every-
of Citrus County, Inc. eawa, p Lg e orhop, thg metulous taed Pred
Lywebsite at: ww.nyflorida-house.com waiting for, o',0 seawall $179,000 $ *169,000 seooo right at $399,000!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PLANTS
Continued from Page E7

Fortunately, many house-
plants hail from the shade
of tropical jungles. Still,
flowering and fruiting take
energy, which comes ulti-
mately from the sun, so if
you want flowers or fruits
from such plants as
Jerusalem cherry, flowering
maple, citrus and miniature
roses, you have to arrange
for abundant light Other-
wise these plants will just
stay alive, might even grow,
but will not flower and fruit
How bright is
your window?
How much light is
enough? Most flowering
and fruiting plants need
1,000 or more foot-candles,
although some, such as
African violet, rex begonia,
flowering maple, zebra
plant and crown-of-thorns,
will provide colorful dis-


plays even at about 500
foot-candles. Below that
level, stick strictly to fo-
liage plants such as cast
iron plant, Swiss cheese
plant, baby's-tears, parlor
palm, pothos and ferns.
You can translate those
needed foot-candles into
light measured by a digital
SLR camera. Set it on
aperture priority with the
aperture at f/8 and the ISO
at 100. Hold a white sheet
of paper so that whatever
light you're measuring falls
directly on it, and measure
the shutter speed reading
that the camera gives you
(without a flash) for a good
picture from about a foot
away Multiply the shutter
speed times 4 for the ap-
proximate foot-candles.
(Shutter speed is usually
expressed as a fraction of a
second, so a speed of "500"
is really 1/500th of a sec-
ond; for foot-candles, you'd
multiply 500 times 4 for
2,000 foot-candles. If light
is very dim, the shutter


Jackie Davis
WM American Realty & Investments
MEN 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL I
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell
.E.L ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.corn


.I
SPACE, SPACE AND MORE SPACE AND ALL IN TIP TOP CONDITION. 4 Bedrooms,
3.5 baths, office, formal dining room, family room off open kitchen, 2.5-car garage, heated pool
with spa, 14'x 14' detached workshop with power/water and a sidewalk to the house. Just
replaced: all 3 C/H/A systems, roof. Appliances were new in 2011. The 3-way split plan allows for I
bedroom #4 and bath #3 to be separate from the guest wing. Center island in kitchen, wood
cabinets, corian counters, pull-out spice pantry. Security system, intercom, 2 skylights, white tile
and carpet, all neutral and inviting and on an acre. $335,000 MLS 707544


Natural light can be augmented
with artificial light. Don't expect
too much from artificial light,
though, especially for large
plants, the bulk of whose leaves
cannot get close to the light
source.


speed might be more than
a second; no need to meas-
ure, in that case, because
in such light any plant will
barely stay alive.)
Take measurements at
various locations and
times of day; you'll proba-
bly be surprised at how lit-
tle light falls near even a
bright window
If such exactitude is not
your style, just gauge light
by window direction. A
south-facing window is


brightest, followed by east
and west-facing windows,
with north windows being
the darkest. Any obstruc-
tion will reduce light levels.
Artificial light
can help maybe
Natural light can be aug-
mented with artificial
light. Don't expect too
much from artificial light,
though, especially for
large plants, the bulk of
whose leaves cannot get


sizedxkitchenywithersIcom
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY JANUARY 12 1PM TO 3PM
105 W. FOREST OAK PL BEVERLY HILLS
Great amount of space for the.
price. Very spacious ; i" i ,:_..,
BA, over 2400 sf .:k h
space, high ceilings, F P .:.-,.
sized kitchen with :s' '-: 1_t
nook, wet bar, large t.
with sitting room ard 1'I1U.-I
more to see in this home.
Come and be surprised! DIRECTIONS: From CR 491 right onto
$144,900 Whispering Oak Loop (1st entrance) Left on N.
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 Misty Oak, Right on Forest Oak to home on left.
***Foreclosure List***
2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods
706156 REDUCED $57,500 705705 REDUCED $144,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939
4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests Deep Waterfront Canal Home
705702 REDUCED $157,900 705665 REDUCED $219,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Tami Scott 352-257-2276
Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs
705223 REDUCED $71,000 705093 REDUCED $74,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196
3/2/3 in Crystal Glen 3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon
704264 REDUCED $94,900 705142 REDUCED $94,900
Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939 John Maisel 352-302-5351
LIKE NEW! 3/2/2 on one acre in 3/2 Country Home on 4.5 Acres!
Dunnellon 705087 $109,900 707451 $119,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329


close to the light source. A
fluorescent light, for ex-
ample, casts as much as
900 foot-candles of light,
but that's only within 6
inches of the light bulb.
Light levels drop dramati-
cally as you retreat from
the bulb with the square
of the distance, so double
the distance and you have
only one-fourth of the
light, triple it and you have
only one-ninth, etc.
In addition to intensity,
the spectral distribution of
the light can impact plant
growth. Flowering requires
more light at the red end of
the spectrum; fluorescent
light tends toward the blue
end of the spectrum.
Bulbs other than fluores-
cents have their own advan-
tages and disadvantages.


SE American BARBARA
Realty & ie
E investments 1Y" BANKS
117 S. Hwy. 41 Realtor
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855 cell: 352-476-3232 [ j
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
_31212 POOL Seller's Pride
shows in this updated home. Split
floor plan, light & bright! Large
master, lovely new kitchen with all
appliances (Bosch range &
dishwasher), wood cabinets.
Features porcelain tile & hardwood
flooring, double-pane windows all
with plantation shutters, utility room with storage, workbench in garage,
sprinklers, inground pool with child guard, newer A/C. Move in and enjoy this
like-new home. MLS702982 ASKING $154,500
LOVELY
INVERNESS POOL
HOME
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thin to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool, covered lanai.. all this & more sitting on .73acre.
Room for the whole family here. MLS 705163 ASKING $195,000
fF WATERFRONT 3/2 with carport
P rm 1 on Hernando Chain of Lakes, offers
partially-fenced yard in a lovely setting
with 2 docks, updated kitchen & baths, tile
flooring, inside laundry. Lower lev el
24x24 enclosed family room (lanai) with
air unit, sliding windows & screens.
Upper lever has its own screen porch with
beautiful views. New roof in 06. Dock has
hose bib for cleaning. Don't miss out on
this waterfront bargain! MLS705088 ASKING $124,900
NEED ROOM TO ROAM AT
A MODEST PRICE?
Here is a well-cared for home that offers
2/2/carport, plus additional large room
w/bath that could be 3rd bedroom,
family room or in-law arrangement.
Large living area, eat-in kitchen, newer water system, large screen porch,
shed, decorator block in extra large under roof carport area. All sitting on
a lovely double lot. MLS 705774 ASKING $84,900
Zechariah 4:6 00H3B2


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 Ell

Incandescent lights convert
much of their energy into
heat, so you can't put a plant
close enough for a dramatic
effect on growth without
scorching leaves. Special
high intensity lights, such as
mercury vapor and sodium
lights, can dramatically in-
crease growth, but the in-
tensity and spectrum of the
light will make your living
room look more like a hos-
pital operating room. LED
(light-emitting diode) bulbs
also have potential for in-
door plant growing. They
are efficient, and the spec-
tral output can be tailored
to plant needs.
My own plan is to wait
out the sun. It's reassuring
to watch plants naturally
gather steam as the days
grow longer








E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


L ___ To place an ad, call 5_635966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS. FL


55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
*k 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, Very
clean DW 3/2 New
carpet, shed, fenced,
$695.mo 352-419-1744

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $560 mo. Near
Walmart & 2/2, $530
mo. 352-464-3159

LECANTO/C.R.
2/2/1, D/W com-
pletely remodeled,
Central Air/Heat,
W/D Hookup. New
Carpet/Vinyl, and
Paint, 2 screened
patio's, store room.
$650. mo. $650. dep
No Pets/Smoking
Very Nice Home
Hurrry 352-464-0999


-I..

FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272

FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272


Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985
Palm Harbor Homes
55+ Community
Special!
$5K for your old home!
Many models to
choose from
Call John Lyons (a)
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 1/4 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




FLORAL CITY
2BR/1 /2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then z
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512


Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, IBA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356
Floral City, DW,
2bd/1ba, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726


FPor Sle %i

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858


S7iLii


Homosassa Adult Park
2BR/1BA. Newly
remodeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$4,800 (608) 921-5564

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


'ACnTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www [iitrusiouyHoieintalslicorn

CITRUS SPRINGS
9869 N Angela Dr.............. $800
3/2/2 Nice locaton 1254 sq ft.
8410 N ElkcamBlvd............ .$800
3/2/1 New listing!
6913 N Gldstone Dr .......... $815
3/2/2 Split floor plan 1515sq ft.
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt ............ $500
2/1 Nice, clean duplex
1650 W Homosassa Tri .......$500
2/1 nice duplex
7396 W Green Acres............ $650
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
5164 N Dewey Way (Her).....$700
3/2 Nice DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
FLORAL CITY
6383 S. lompaul Ter.............$550
1/1 Home











INVERNESS
3 Bedroom Homes
$800-$875
BEVERLY HILLS
Beautiful Oakwood
Village
Large- $500
HOMOSASSA
2/1 -$900
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1/1 Pool w/Pool Care
$1,000
with Move-in Special
- __ 000H3AL

Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
)
ME 77 77M
3/2/2 pool .................$1000
3/2/2............................ $750
3/2/2new paint/newflooring,.$875
2/1,5 townhouse .........$550


2/1.5/1 .........................$650
2/2/1 ............................$700
2/2/1 ............................$650
3/2................................ $700
Jennifer Fudge
CherylScruggs
RProperty Manager/
.Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550.3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC Ocean No Pets
(352) 344-1025





HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds, garb & water,
-1-Senior Discount. 352-


628-7300 or 697-0310
FurHnisedflu^




CRYSTAL RIVER
2,13R $550. 313R $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Becirm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inelds. garb & water:
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310


INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


INVERNESS
Nice 2 bed. 1 bath with
refridg and stove in In-
verness. Does have
w/d hookup. $500 a
month. First and Last
months rent plus $300
security before move in.
352-201-4363 phone


RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

1 BR Apts. Avail.
Immediately
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S469.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

Outside storage
Front / back
porches
Onsite laundry cntr
Resident Commu-
nity Room
Monthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD









CRYSTAL RIVER
NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276
LECANTO
1/1 Apt. W/D, Util. incl
Non Sink, $550/mo.
352-628-3501




INVERNESS
2/2, updated, immacul.
$625. mo 317-442-1063




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, Duplex water, trash
lawn, $475. mo.+ $300
sec. 352-212-9205, or
(352) 212-7922
HOMOSASSA
1/1, $435. mo. 1st.
& Sec. 352-212-4981

INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
**RENT REDUCED-
3/1 Country Home on
stilts, w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




Beverly Hills
2bd +den, 1.5ba
family room, exc.
cond. no pets or
smokers, $700. mo.
6 Pennsylvania St
(586) 419-2041
INV. S. Highlands
2/2/2, Pool, $850. mo.
(267) 250-4499

INVERNESS
2/2, modern, $600m
dishwasher, W/D,
screened back porch.
F/L/S.close to Publix,
P.O. 352-634-1141

INVERNESS
2413 Jungle Camp Rd.
Sm. 2/1, Cottage,
New roof/septic,
fenced in yard, handy
cap. Access, River Ac-
cess No electric dep.
1 Small Pet Ok
$450. mo. $450. dep
Hurry! 352-464-0999
Inverness
2bd/1 ba/1 cg
$550. mo. first, last &
damage, immediate
occup.(352) 341-2838
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2 &
3/2/2 $795/mo &Sec
(352) 895-0744

INVERNESS
Highlands, 3/2/2
$700 mo + dep.
(352) 422-6978


INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057




LECANTO
Crystal Oaks
Lg BR w/priv bath.
TV w/cable, internet
access, swimming
pool, laun & kitchen
access. All utilities.
$450/mo 352-464-1928




HERNANDO
Terra Vista, Furn. 3BD,
spacious Villa, w/ext.
maint. & club memb.
$1,800. 352-302-7559





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-eljsa


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator. NLMS
#267854,FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
Nice condition!
MOVE-IN READY
$46k. 527-1239

Real Estate is MY
Business!
Buying or Selling?
CONTACT
Teri Paduano
Broker/Owner
Realty Connect!


15+ Years Exp.
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com


4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3/2
1/4 Acre MOL
on River Oak Lane
Inverness
Glamour bath
Eat-in Kitchen
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Nice Double Lot
3A Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
back yard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 1/4acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R5/W(
REALTY ONE




3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4BR /1/% BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816


4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RMw"
REALTY ONE
Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!




For Sale .id
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell




Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Sil great values
out
there for buy-
ers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office

o CHEAP
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash**
352-503-3245

I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245*


#1 Employment source is









www.ch rncenline.com


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


Citrus County'
Homes


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Citnis County'
Homes


J S= 11Bl
Jd^-1


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




BUSHNELL
Estate Sale
Custom Built 3/2/2 w/
40X60 2 story garage.
See What $9k Can Buy
8471 County Rd 614A
To view & more info
(352) 569-1252




Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Whispering Pines Villa
212/21, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




Mountain Stream
Bargain!
Beautifully wooded
acreage 390'
crystal clear stream,
natural yr-round
spring, prime Blue
Ridge Mountain
location.
Paved roads, utilities
municipal water,
more. Only $27,900.
Excellent financing,
little down. Call now
866-952-5303, ext
1.1 Alabama Ext:
110 Florida Ext: 111
Georgia Ext: 112




..;;
YVur"Q\orld fint

Need a jiih
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHfpmE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 E13


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNa-ureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"







BUYING HOMES
In Need of TLC, Fair
Pricing, Fast Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271








Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bkyard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRE S ernmenl
TREES 62,000 a
owned.
Continued from Page E6 Sumte
similar t
capable of producing com- mately
mercial timber Sixty-five Sumter
percent is in private own- which a]
ership, 6 percent is owned are state
by the forest industry, and acres ar
the remaining 29 percent Mario
is owned by various fed- northea.
eral, state, and local gov- acres of
ernmental entities, percent
How do the local coun- The fed
ties fare with timberland owns m
and ownership? Citrus acres (n
County has a total of Ocala N
158,671 acres of timber- state of
land, or 40 percent of its proxima
total land area. Of this and 219,
total, more than 88,000 vately o
acres are owned by the This i,
state of Florida, while to Levy C
more than 1,900 acres are Of its 44
owned by the federal gov- berland


JANE
Continued from Page E9

All gardens are works in progress.
'Yuletide,' once thought to be a
sasanqua, is now considered a hybrid
of C. sasanqua and C. japonica. It is a
plant made in America. It is a bushy
evergreen plant with abundant scar-
let flowers in time for the winter hol-
idays. It has single flowers with a
prominent center or yellow, pollen-
covered stamens. It prospers in
Zones 8-10 in part shade. 'Professor
Sargent' has bright red pompom-like
flowers from December to January
The larger-leafed japonicas are
mid- to late-winter bloomers. There
are hundreds of named varieties.
'Rosa Plena' has many bright pink
flowers in February It thrives be-
side my path.
Choose several that bloom at dif-
ferent times to have a succession of
plants in flower throughout the
winter
The Ocala Camellia Society has its
annual show and competition Satur-
day, Jan. 25 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the
Ocala Golf Club, 3130 Silver Springs
Blvd. Affiliated with the American
Camellia Society, local societies
throughout the nation host festivals,
shows and plant sales from fall to
spring. Tallahassee's was yesterday;
Lakeland/Orlando's is Saturday,
Jan. 25.
The reticulata species bloom later


t. Fewer than
cres are privately

er County is very
;o Citrus. Approxi-
47 percent of
is timberland, of
[most 92,000 acres
-owned and 78,000
e in private hands.
n County to the
st has 530,558
timberland 50
of its total acreage.
leral government
ore than 244,000
nost of this is the
national Forest), the
Florida owns ap-
tely 54,000 acres,
000 acres are pri-
Yned.
s in sharp contrast
county to the north.
5,609 acres of tim-
(61.5 percent of the


total land area), private
ownership accounts for
more than 353,000 acres,
while governmental enti-
ties own approximately
88,000 acres. Counties to
the north of Levy through
both northeast and north-
west Florida reflect similar
acreage and ownership
trends; most of these coun-
ties are heavily wooded
and, with the exception of a
National Forest, a vast ma-
jority of this timberland is
privately owned.
Florida is, like most of
the lower Southeast, pri-
marily a pine-producing
state. Various pine species
account for more than 88
percent of the growing
stock (trees at least 5
inches in diameter and
larger) for the entire state
of Florida. Most of the 58


'Yuletide,' once
thought to be a
sasanqua, is now
considered a hybrid
of C. sasanqua and
C. japonica. It is
a plant made in
America.
from January until March or April.
Camellia flowers may take one of
several forms: single, semi-double,
double or peony The deep green
leaves are narrower, with toothed
margins.
Last year I found an interesting
Camellia at a small grower near
Bushnell. Called 'Spring Festival,' it
a turned out to be a C. cuspidata na-
tive to Western and Central China in
zones 7-10.
Rainbow Springs State Park has
many camellias in flower during
winter


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands ofna-
tive plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County, gar-
den. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


wood-using mills in
Florida process pine tim-
ber for mulch, pulpwood,
lumber, fence posts and
poles. Most of Florida's
timberland acreage is
north of the
Ocala/Gainesville area,
and the location of these
various mills reflects this
timberland concentration.
A wood-using industries
map of Florida shows a
concentration of mills in
northeast Florida from
Gainesville to Jacksonville
with another, but smaller,
concentration of mills in
the central Panhandle
north ofApalachicola. The
remainder of the state has
a smattering of smaller
mills, primarily mulch
mills and small sawmills.
No mills of any kind are
located within Citrus


FORMS
AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms avail-
able for wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth announce-
ments and first birthdays.


County Surrounding and
nearby counties have sev-
eral mills, including ani-
mal bedding mills in
Marion and Pasco;
sawmills in Pasco, Marion
and Lake; a fuel wood mill
in Hernando; mulch mills
in Pasco and Sumter; and
a post mill in Sumter
I have burdened the
reader with enough facts
and statistics for one read-
ing. I will continue a dis-
cussion of the forest


industry in a future article,
with an emphasis on the
various types of forest
products and markets.


Eric H. Hoyeris a certi-
fied arborist, a certified
forester, a registered con-
sulting arborist and a
qualified tree risk asses-
sor with Natural Resource
Planning Services Inc. He
can be contacted at
erich@nrpsforesters.corn.


l 'JOANN MARTIN [
re Pvia efe5wecd n
REAL ESTATE T

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net


228 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness
Great Investment opportunity. Nice
4 family with 2 bedrooms in each
unit. Close to Hospitals and
shopping. Coin-op Laundry on site.
Off street parking. Can be purchased
with 224 Pleasant Grove
Priced at $149,900.


oil

224 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness
Nice 4 family with 2 bedrooms in
each unit. Close to Hospitals and
shopping. Coin-op Laundry on site.
Off street parking. Can be purchased
with 228 Pleasant Grove.
Priced at $170,000


E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOVERS
Continued from Page E4

Huwe said his company can move
nearly anything. It's cost that usually
determines what can't be moved.
He said one of his most challeng-
ing jobs was moving a cabin with a
loft that sat in about a foot of very
cold water about 25 feet into an ex-
panded Devils Lake.
"We actually had to float wood
beams out and put them on," he said.
Huwe said the moves that he would
call routine are often the ones that
fascinate the public, such as moving
houses up or down Broadway A re-
cent attention-getter was the moving
of an F-15 jet fighter from Minot Air
Force Base to Dakota Territory Air
Museum in Minot in October
"That was easy It was fairly un-
eventful for us," Huwe said.
A bigger deal this year was moving
a 60-foot by 100-foot building near
Devils Lake for the North Dakota
Game & Fish Department. The
building was carried in an atypical
manner, surrounding three sides of
the truck, cab and all, as it moved
down the road. That's an experience
they don't get often in the moving
business, Huwe said.
Every job is unique, though, he
added. Each requires a specific plan
to determine the blocks and beams
and other equipment that will be nec-
essary, and a route must be identified
and contact made with utility compa-
nies and permitting agencies. A utility
representative often comes along
during the move to help ensure that
power lines are avoided or lifted.
Power lines are the major con-
cern, but there also can be mail-
boxes, signs or other structures that
need to come down and then be
re-installed.
Huwe remembers when a lead ve-
hicle and a follow-up vehicle were all
that would be necessary to escort the
moving equipment Now two to three
vehicles often run ahead to keep the
road clear and alert motorists.
"You have to be watching for
everything all the time. Just from
years of doing it, you kind of know
what cars aren't paying attention.
You have to be ready for that," Huwe
said.
He recalls one oblivious driver,
engaged in texting, who passed the
two pilot cars and looked up only as
Huwe, driving the moving truck, was
getting ready to take evasive action.
"If there's anything that's changed


down through the years, itfs cell-
phones. Half the people will pull out
their phone and they are taking pic-
tures, especially if you have something
that's a little unique," Huwe said.
A year ago, HGTV's "Massive
Moves" filmed Huwe the House
Mover moving a large house from
Douglas to the radar base south of
Minot. The show segment has yet to
air, Huwe said.
The company also moved two
homes for ABC's "Extreme Home
Makeover." One house was moved
from Minot to Surrey in 2006 to
make room for construction of a new
house, and the other project was in
Moorhead, Minn., in 2010. Huwe
said the move in Moorhead tied up
traffic at an intersection for about a
half hour while the show filmed a
segment with its cast.
A typical job without all the show
biz might take a day and half Larger
moving projects have taken as long
as three days, Huwe said.
The company saw demand for
services increase due to the Souris
River flood in 2011. Huwe was in the
process of moving a mobile home
when Minot sounded its evacuation
sirens. The company also jacked up
equipment at Lowe's Printing, later
moving the equipment to its shop for
storage until the flood passed and
the equipment could be moved
back in.
After the flood, a number of
homes in the buyout zone were
moved, and Huwe expects those
moves to continue as more buyouts
take place.
The demand for housing in the re-
gion has increased the interest in
modular homes, which, again, re-
quire movers. Huwe does that work
for some of the local suppliers. Mov-
ing homes into western North
Dakota has become more challeng-
ing because of the oil-related traffic.
Huwe said their moving permits
sometimes have required moving
houses on Sundays when fewer ve-
hicles are on the roads.
As equipment has become bigger,
the number of workers needed to
move a house has declined, Huwe
said. The company currently em-
ploys about 10 people.
Huwe said the work is easier
today than in his grandfather's day
because of the improved equipment,
including hydraulic jacks that began
replacing manual jacks in the 1970s.
"Now we can get a lot more work
done," he said, although he added,
"You just hustle all the time in other
ways because your production


is so much higher" truck as he tows houses down
While the next generation re- the road.
mains in training, Huwe continues "I do the pulling myself," he said.
to run the company from the cab of a "It's the part I still enjoy the most."


*BRINGYOUR SKILLS & YOUR DRILLS...
LIVING SPACE & LAND! II, l, 11,,11 I. REDUCED TO 529 900
LIV IN G .. ..... .. 1....,.....1,...1 1..,......k -l. I.I.. ,l...I,,., I,, ,,,,........ .... .,.,,,,,,,10,,,,,,. E D.-., TO .SRD U2D9O 90090
"d, . NLY 5139,900 .. .. . ,,I,, ,l,,i.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


* :. e^.hJ.....n.n _' Bih FIJIJ. H..m..
* l_-.i ..ia|v hJ I c'. ... : '-. II Pl-.11'.. 11Nl_
* WVIINNJ I ,,,,,,. rj .,u U|,l,li| .,N ,:F'1:.III_:_ ,:,
* ilm I-. Hill '.. Ml- M F '-.HIP
Mli.c = I:II.'nI,.1 $232.747
Jeanne ot I,'illaid Pickiel 3522123410
iz'irziz, CitiusCounti Sold corn


POOL HOME!
lI..,. i rrr i.. I.in, i~I'nnn'nlnn in.rrnn ,I-,J' u .ln..


MiL. : iin.'],' PRICED TO SELL S146,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352302 7699


UN MLIVIUbI A MiEb
vvrrr .... I rrr I b.- .ja 1a I 7 1,11
1 l, 1 illi, H ,mi,: i,.:i:, ; TI.i
T ilnl i ; 3, i .i l ,:
Mi1I3_=1- .i $60,000
lottaine 0 Regan 352 586 0075


MOVE-IN READY!
SnI" i ,* "-' M ,,,,r Ir ,nI, irrr..... ,,rin ...... 1-00


i i,q 11 1,1
jI I,..1 I I ji ll .li l l n m i n

1 1.7I .'i ) ASKING $69,900
Coa.ic.l N.ncl Jenks 352 400 80?2
o0 352 /26 6668


Ihn, nnn,rlnlnn nnr .-n.,il rrrrrnnn irnnnr.- ni-.lnrnr.- Ir..-lrli..r
,i [.,i I.... n ni. ..... j I [ .. l .. I L,,i ,.
n.-rrr. .-r h) i ) i.ar..j I"",iln i.-'.,il ,i.ar... ,,I.
I~il.. .,in) ll, 'r. l J .,:, i lll ..lir r .hr ) ,in)
, ai, ,i ,i[.I. I rr rrr. -r... a],l' .. rrrrr in.ar inh, AJ/,il-
ri H-lA I"
Mln.- =m u'"ii, ASKING $52,700
Pal Datis i3521 212.7280
Iiew listing ii'i'i c21paldai's corn


I1 I.. i dn~ n, I h , ,l n h i, ,, . .1. 11, h ,n ,

1 ... ,i I. .. ... , ,,. . ,1 S1 .9 0
h ,, ,I ,,, 6 m,, I ,, I , , Ih , ....... i I ,1. h ,
,, ,, ,1 ,I 6 . 1 i. .. .1 6,.1 ,i ih , If h .,,,,,I
6 1 1.h I1,, ,, i If, .. ... .. I I I, 1 ,1. , h 6 ,1 6 U '
,1 ,I I,, i ,I ,,I I h, I..,,,,, I...

r i/ i ,' . tt
S l hl!l, l,,!, S218.900l ll lll Iii .


CRYSTAL RIVER 12.65 ACRES
l:.:l, il'l,, .n int:.lll'llnn )n I.., l .innnn, .inn h l .in'nn)



.illi.:I.A r1 ir.'|,r'l,:,|,. r .r' .i l.i, '- i ad,.i,
Mlv_.- =i iiri'l4 $99,000
David KuInt Cell 9543535/56
OFF 352/26B6668


CELINA HILLS
tr...lr........ b t inr rrr... rji. ,ri,rj n, m
I''''' 1I' .1.ii rr ,rr i~i..r irl. i II.... i .I i rr ,l
S l. -i Iih ri.-ir ini n ,,'r lr..i.'' i... .i I-n j i l 'i-
1 |i||,, ,, i. i ,lu i- ..),, ,l;,;,r. I l ,,

MC. ; = .";')i. $160,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173
to see this lovelt' home


INVhKNfca UUL" h I AIh
POOL HOME
h.J....... _h air' a_' .n ..ij
bhjill b, i .nanrnrn 1ublh a.'uiih ruhbln.. "la'
,in\ .'n.J *. nn i. n .nn ij .. 0 i l h. Ii ln. -

Ml.1-. ='iinii ASKING $110,000
Call Vancj Jenks 3524008072


GOLF COURSE
IIni ,n, l..Irk a l iall' rj i, I ilr irh l, ,in.,nla

Ij.il 1 ,unl I i : M I. _l =I / 1 i'I:,I1
PRICED RIGHT AT $224,900
Call Ouade Feese, 352 302 7699


_,in.. .. "rrr I,,],, "r n. Ir lr ,r.r.j), .nh-r lrr .n.
Il )..l ~.rrr..l ~ .1 r......rr hI.,, jI.r r)'" ,..rrr.r:1
I1. r I ... ......


ASKING $89.900
Cl 7 lh mi Snidi, 352 476 8727
,aad .hl, ltio Ii 1707648


l.,,','urihr,,i ,,lh~ I""'.. I' 'irrr..r,' l'"'""i, ,l
l,1, ,I,. ,,,i _1" 1,11 nlnn',nrrl~rr Pn.***~nn Il..
,I,., ,n'nhl i,,'n [,I .. h il l'i l l.j l.r I I,,, I,,n h,

In =iii.ii' ASKING $124,900
Pat Anl is 35212/2 /280
I'lie li sting l Ill c21pildi is corn


'.. .- I 1 l H ri IIII. HIIl1 II I,, ..
. j ji-.i. l ........ .,l r. .I .I ..., i... I.
I~ h I H I' H ... .)II H] I' .)..)...il I..)... ., ..

I1i...1 i.,) 1..II ,i. I ...... ,, : I.I.
r l ii -" ASKING $194.900
Pit Di ,352'212 7280
.'iI ht,no I i!llll g2londi4 c.jm


i In ,rrzI l _al In

MiI =- :,"- $99,500
Call laWanda Walit ., 212 1989


.-- -I
STATELY CRYSTAL OAKS HOME
Ij J....... i Iitl i r ... il l ,ij i i hr i.l ...


Mln.. =iniirrri'' ASKING $90,300
I/I J, H 't'1 I, J222 1it' nr r ih, lli r I hi,,ir


* BR P BP.i i, P,:,:I H..ni,:
* I A ,i:| Pi.I i, : ,,i.' ,
* _HHi:lI I- ,h l ','i1]1 11, ,,,,
* F.iiIl Fr .:. i, e i .,.i l Ni ....I
* NMW _i,,,,lii...
Mi 6=1- ., -. $205,000
Jeanne 01 Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
I:'I:'I'. Cioi usCounti'Sold. corn


WHISPERING PINES VILLAS
irj inl T ,' irjit rrj, i !: 1: :1.!! i.t irji irj i HTi I Ii.irj
I 1:t1lr I 1l l . I d. l l .I I,, lll. I,, I
I: 111, l: ,I I r r i I IT i 1: 11 1 :,rJ i I i' IIrJ i ll TII1
'HTTII !if f 'T I! IIlHllHl: HI lllI iNr ll
ln -1 ASKING $55,900
PAl D.Ais 35212/2 280
I',eli l hs/ing l 1111 c2 t.ild.it is corn


kl1f.r .r f. r.. l I- rl..,i.j Ili. ill Ii h, .I _'_'
1..I.r h1.l|.l.r r .r ..J l.,:, ..rhI. Ih'. 1:: I.,. .J. I,...
II,: i,. i. J.. ...r.:.l.r.. All ,il.l.hli r..iN A h... l
n.f A I: HA:I l ll L .,:i, hi.. 'hij' ..... l
$29,000
Call Dotis Mine, at 352 7266668


* :F uC e.II,
* 2 lols and Shed
* I I:.l l:..:il .:i i.]
* IVIr.ilh, II'ru ...I..I
Mln =iu. ':'w $87,900
Jeanne o0 i',lla/d Pickel 352 212 3410
imiil CitiusCount 'Sold corn


t, A.i in; i H .. ...I
I P eI. e.il. MH
* .i.,r.. i ,i : .i. I il.i
Mi_ =/ 11'11i' $67,000
Jeanne 01 Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i:'i,'i:. CliusCounin'Sold. corn


. il r... r h .. ....r ... .. 1 .. .. '. i'"rrl.

i ,11 '" i:' .-- ONLY $69.900
Rut, ft.dt,:, 1352 563 6866